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Sample records for osmotic minipump studies

  1. Chronic infusion of opiate peptides to rat cerebrospinal fluid with osmotic minipumps.

    PubMed

    Saland, L C; Ortiz, E; Samora, A

    1984-09-01

    Beta-endorphin-related opiate peptides or the opiate antagonist naloxone were chronically infused for periods of 24 to 48 hours to the lateral cerebral ventricle of adult male rats using Alza osmotic minipumps. Previous studies have suggested a "chemotactic"-like effect of opiate peptides for supraependymal macrophages in the region of the third ventricle of the brain. The present study demonstrates a stimulatory effect of beta-endorphin infusion on the appearance of lymphocyte and neutrophil-like cells, in addition to macrophages, in the region of the third ventricle, suggestive of an intracerebral inflammatory response. None of the other molecules, including alpha-endorphin, methionine-enkephalin, naloxone, or sterile saline produced similar cellular responses after infusion, although some of the latter substances may have induced the appearance of supraependymal neuron-like cells in the area. Observations suggest that the chronic presence of beta-endorphin, a biologically active opiate peptide, will interact with cells of the immune system, which have the ability to gain access to the cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:6091499

  2. A comparative study of the effects of the intravenous self-administration or subcutaneous minipump infusion of nicotine on the expression of brain neuronal nicotinic receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Milena; Mugnaini, Manolo; Tessari, Michela; Zoli, Michele; Gaimarri, Annalisa; Manfredi, Irene; Pistillo, Francesco; Clementi, Francesco; Gotti, Cecilia

    2010-08-01

    Long-term nicotine exposure changes neuronal acetylcholine nicotinic receptor (nAChR) subtype expression in the brains of smokers and experimental animals. The aim of this study was to investigate nicotine-induced changes in nAChR expression in two models commonly used to describe the effects of nicotine in animals: operant (two-lever presses) intravenous self-administration (SA) and passive subcutaneous nicotine administration via an osmotic minipump (MP). In the MP group, alpha4beta2 nAChRs were up-regulated in all brain regions, alpha6beta2* nAChRs were down-regulated in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and caudate-putamen, and alpha7 nAChRs were up-regulated in the caudal cerebral cortex (CCx); the up-regulation of alpha4beta2alpha5 nAChRs in the CCx was also suggested. In the SA group, alpha4beta2 up-regulation was lower and limited to the CCx and NAc; there were no detectable changes in alpha6beta2* or alpha7 nACRs. In the CCx of the MP rats, there was a close correlation between the increase in alpha4beta2 binding and alpha4 and beta2 subunit levels measured by means of Western blotting, demonstrating that the up-regulation was due to an increase in alpha4beta2 proteins. Western blotting also showed that the increase in the beta2 subunit exceeded that of the alpha4 subunit, suggesting that a change in alpha4beta2 stoichiometry may occur in vivo as has been shown in vitro. These results show that nicotine has an area-specific effect on receptor subtypes, regardless of its administration route, but the effect is quantitatively greater in the case of MP administration. PMID:20439469

  3. Echographic studies of osmotic agents.

    PubMed

    Vucicevic, Z M; Tark, E; Ahmad, S

    1979-09-01

    The effectiveness of osmotic agents, acetazolamide (Diamox), urea, glycerol, and mannitol, and massages (5 and 10 minutes) for inducing hypotony in rabbit eyes was evaluated by ultrasonography. Mannitol was found to have the greatest hypotonic effect followed closely by urea and glycerol, then acetazolamide. The difference between the 5 and 10 minute massages was negligible. PMID:122221

  4. Studies of Protein Solution Properties Using Osmotic Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agena, S.; Bogle, David; Pusey, Marc; Agena, S.

    1998-01-01

    Examination of the protein crystallization process involves investigation of the liquid and solid state and a protein's properties in these states. Liquid state studies such as protein self association in solution by light scattering methods or other methods have been used to examine a protein Is properties and therefore its crystallization process and conditions. Likewise can osmotic pressure data be used to examine protein properties and various published osmotic pressure studies were examined by us to correlate osmotic pressure to protein solution properties. The solution behavior of serum albumin, alpha - chymotrypsin, beta - lactoglobulin and ovalbumin was examined over a range of temperatures, pH values and different salt types and concentrations. Using virial expansion and a local composition model the non ideal solution behavior in form of the activity coefficients (thermodynamic) was described for the systems. This protein activity coefficient data was related to a protein's solubility behavior and this process and the results will be presented.

  5. Evaluating the control: minipump implantation and breathing behavior in the neonatal rat.

    PubMed

    Kidder, Ian J; Mudery, Jordan A; Barreda, Santiago; Taska, David J; Bailey, E Fiona

    2016-09-01

    We evaluated genioglossus (GG) gross motoneuron morphology, electromyographic (EMG) activities, and respiratory patterning in rat pups allowed to develop without interference (unexposed) and pups born to dams subjected to osmotic minipump implantation in utero (saline-exposed). In experiment 1, 48 Sprague-Dawley rat pups (Charles-River Laboratories), ages postnatal day 7 (P7) through postnatal day 10 (P10), were drawn from two experimental groups, saline-exposed (n = 24) and unexposed (n = 24), and studied on P7, P8, P9, or P10. Pups in both groups were sedated (Inactin hydrate, 70 mg/kg), and fine-wire electrodes were inserted into the GG muscle of the tongue and intercostal muscles to record EMG activities during breathing in air and at three levels of normoxic hypercapnia [inspired CO2 fraction (FiCO2 ): 0.03, 0.06, and 0.09]. Using this approach, we assessed breathing frequency, heart rate, apnea type, respiratory event types, and respiratory stability. In experiment 2, 16 rat pups were drawn from the same experimental groups, saline-exposed (n = 9) and unexposed (n = 7), and used in motoneuron-labeling studies. In these pups a retrograde dye was injected into the GG muscle, and the brain stems were subsequently harvested and sliced. Labeled GG motoneurons were identified with microscopy, impaled, and filled with Lucifer yellow. Double-labeled motoneurons were reconstructed, and the number of primary projections and soma volumes were calculated. Whereas pups in each group exhibited the same number (P = 0.226) and duration (P = 0.093) of respiratory event types and comparable motoneuron morphologies, pups in the implant group exhibited more central apneas and respiratory instability relative to pups allowed to develop without interference. PMID:27402557

  6. [Preliminary study of colloid osmotic pressure for cardiopulmonary bypass].

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Xiang, L; Luo, J

    1996-12-01

    The ideal colloid osmotic pressure is beneficial to decrease the fluid accumulated in the pulmonary and other tissue during cardiopulmonary bypass. Schupbach reported the proper colloidosmotic pressure for cardiopulmonary bypass was 2.1 kPa (16 mmHg). Colloid osmotic pressures of blood and priming fluid during cardiopulmonary bypass were measured in 28 patients with heart disease by using colloid osmotic pressure detection apparatus. The value of colloid osmotic pressure suitable for the designed standard was apparently different among the Gelofusine group and other groups. P value was 0.005. Priming fluid for cardiopulmonary bypass needs to satisfy the quality and the quantity of colloid osmotic pressure. Using Albumin isn't economical. Whole blood and plazma are not suitable for increasing colloid osmotic pressure. Hydroxyethyl starch or Gelofusine is best choice in priming to get designed standard of colloid osmotic pressure. The ratio of hydroxyethyl starch or Gelofusine in priming fluid should beyond 1/2. PMID:9590779

  7. Filtration method for studies of the kinetics of hypo-osmotic pore closure in erythrocyte.

    PubMed

    Shurkhina, E S; Nesterenko, V M; Tsvetaeva, N V; Kolodey, S V; Nikulina, O F

    2010-11-01

    Filterability of erythrocytes through small (3 μ) pores decreases with decreasing osmolarity of suspension medium because of hypo-osmotic swelling of cells. After appearance of lytic pores, erythrocyte filterability increases for some time, while after recovery of membrane integrity it decreases again. We suggest filtration method for studies of the kinetics of hypo-osmotic lytic pores closure. The dynamics of changes in erythrocyte filterability was studied in 2 patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and 6 donors (Ht 0.01%, Na phosphate buffer 5 mM, pH 7.4, 35 mOsm, 24°C). The method can be used for studies of erythrocyte membrane characteristics in various diseases and for evaluation of the membranotropic effects of drugs, infusion media, hemolysins, ethanol, etc. PMID:21165443

  8. Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Study of Neurofilament Networks Interaction under Osmotic Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, R.; Deek, J.; Jones, J. B.; Hesse, H.; Choi, M. C.; Safinya, C. R.

    2008-03-01

    Neurofilaments (NFs) are cytoskeletal proteins, which are found abundantly in nerve cell axons and impart mechanical stability and act as structural scaffolds for microtubules. The filaments assemble from 3 different subunit proteins to form a 10 nm diameter flexible polymers with radiating unstructured sidearms. At high protein concentration, the NFs form a nematic hydrogel network with a well-defined interfilament spacing as measured by synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) [1]. Here, NFs purified from bovine spinal cord are reassembled in vitro. Using analogous SAXS-osmotic pressure techniques [2] we study forces between NFs and directly probe the polyampholyte brush interactions between NF sidearms. We measure the interfilament spacing at different osmotic pressure, salt and sidearm concentrations. The study reveals the non-trivial electrostatic nature of the interfilament interaction within the NF hydrogel. [1] J. Jones, C.R. Safinya (submitted) [2] D. J. Needleman et al., PRL 93, 198104 (2004)

  9. Fabrication and study of AC electro-osmotic micropumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xin

    In this thesis, microelectrode arrays of micropumps have been designed, fabricated and characterized for transporting microfluid by AC electro-osmosis (ACEO). In particular, the 3D stepped electrode design which shows superior performance to others in literature is adopted for making micropumps, and the performance of such devices has been studied and explored. A novel fabrication process has also been developed in the work, realizing 3D stepped electrodes on a flexible substrate, which is suitable for biomedical use, for example glaucoma implant. There are three major contributions to ACEO pumping in the work. First, a novel design of 3D "T-shaped" discrete electrode arrays was made using PolyMUMPsRTM process. The breakthrough of this work was discretizing the continuous 3D stepped electrodes which were commonly seen in the past research. The "T-shaped" electrodes did not only create ACEO flows on the top surfaces of electrodes but also along the side walls between separated electrodes. Secondly, four 3D stepped electrode arrays were designed, fabricated and tested. It was found from the experiment that PolyMUMPsRTM ACEO electrodes usually required a higher driving voltage than gold electrodes for operation. It was also noticed that a simulation based on the modified model taking into account the surface oxide of electrodes showed a better agreement with the experimental results. It thus demonstrated the possibility that the surface oxide of electrodes had impact on fluidic pumping. This methodology could also be applied to metal electrodes with a native oxide layer such as titanium and aluminum. Thirdly, a prototype of the ACEO pump with 3D stepped electrode arrays was first time realized on a flexible substrate using Kapton polyimide sheets and packaged with PDMS encapsulants. Comprehensive experimental testing was also conducted to evaluate the mechanical properties as well as the pumping performance. The experimental findings indicated that this fabrication

  10. The surface charge density effect on the electro-osmotic flow in a nanochannel: a molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, M.; Azimian, A. R.; Semiromi, D. Toghraie

    2015-05-01

    The electro-osmotic flow of an aqueous solution of NaCl between two parallel silicon walls is studied through a molecular dynamics simulation. The objective here is to examine the dependency of the electro-osmotic flow on the surface charge density by considering the changes made in the structural properties of the electric double layer (EDL). The ion concentration, velocity profiles, and electric charge density of the electrolyte solution are investigated. Due to the partially charged atoms of the water molecules, water concentration is of a layered type near the wall. The obtained profiles revealed that an increase in the surface charge density, at low surface charges where the governing electrostatic coupling regime is Debye-Hückel, increases both the electro-osmotic velocity and the EDL thickness; whereas, a decreasing trend is observed in these two parameters in the intermediate regime. For high values of surface charge density, due to the charge inversion phenomenon, the reversed electro-osmotic flow will be generated in the channel. Results indicate that the absolute value of the reversed electro-osmotic velocity rises with an increase in the surface charge density.

  11. A study of the osmotic characteristics, water permeability, and cryoprotectant permeability of human vaginal immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Zhiquan; Hughes, Sean M.; Fang, Cifeng; Huang, Jinghua; Fu, Baiwen; Zhao, Gang; Fialkow, Michael; Lentz, Gretchen; Hladik, Florian; Gao, Dayong

    2016-01-01

    Cryopreservation of specimens taken from the genital tract of women is important for studying mucosal immunity during HIV prevention trials. However, it is unclear whether the current, empirically developed cryopreservation procedures for peripheral blood cells are also ideal for genital specimens. The optimal cryopreservation protocol depends on the cryobiological features of the cells. Thus, we obtained tissue specimens from vaginal repair surgeries, isolated and flow cytometry-purified immune cells, and determined fundamental cryobiological characteristics of vaginal CD3+ T cells and CD14+ macrophages using a microfluidic device. The osmotically inactive volumes of the two cell types (Vb) were determined relative to the initial cell volume (V0) by exposing the cells to hypotonic and hypertonic saline solutions, evaluating the equilibrium volume, and applying the Boyle van't Hoff relationship. The cell membrane permeability to water (Lp) and to four different cryoprotective agent (CPA) solutions (Ps) at room temperature were also measured. Results indicated Vb values of 0.516 V0 and 0.457 V0 for mucosal T cells and macrophages, respectively. Lp values at room temperature were 0.196 and 0.295 μm/min/atm for T cells and macrophages, respectively. Both cell types had high Ps values for the three CPAs, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), propylene glycol (PG) and ethylene glycol (EG) (minimum of 0.418 × 10−3 cm/min), but transport of the fourth CPA, glycerol, occurred 50–150 times more slowly. Thus, DMSO, PG, and EG are better options than glycerol in avoiding severe cell volume excursion and osmotic injury during CPA addition and removal for cryopreservation of human vaginal immune cells. PMID:26976225

  12. A study of the osmotic characteristics, water permeability, and cryoprotectant permeability of human vaginal immune cells.

    PubMed

    Shu, Zhiquan; Hughes, Sean M; Fang, Cifeng; Huang, Jinghua; Fu, Baiwen; Zhao, Gang; Fialkow, Michael; Lentz, Gretchen; Hladik, Florian; Gao, Dayong

    2016-04-01

    Cryopreservation of specimens taken from the genital tract of women is important for studying mucosal immunity during HIV prevention trials. However, it is unclear whether the current, empirically developed cryopreservation procedures for peripheral blood cells are also ideal for genital specimens. The optimal cryopreservation protocol depends on the cryobiological features of the cells. Thus, we obtained tissue specimens from vaginal repair surgeries, isolated and flow cytometry-purified immune cells, and determined fundamental cryobiological characteristics of vaginal CD3(+) T cells and CD14(+) macrophages using a microfluidic device. The osmotically inactive volumes of the two cell types (Vb) were determined relative to the initial cell volume (V0) by exposing the cells to hypotonic and hypertonic saline solutions, evaluating the equilibrium volume, and applying the Boyle van't Hoff relationship. The cell membrane permeability to water (Lp) and to four different cryoprotective agent (CPA) solutions (Ps) at room temperature were also measured. Results indicated Vb values of 0.516 V0 and 0.457 V0 for mucosal T cells and macrophages, respectively. Lp values at room temperature were 0.196 and 0.295 μm/min/atm for T cells and macrophages, respectively. Both cell types had high Ps values for the three CPAs, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), propylene glycol (PG) and ethylene glycol (EG) (minimum of 0.418 × 10(-3) cm/min), but transport of the fourth CPA, glycerol, occurred 50-150 times more slowly. Thus, DMSO, PG, and EG are better options than glycerol in avoiding severe cell volume excursion and osmotic injury during CPA addition and removal for cryopreservation of human vaginal immune cells. PMID:26976225

  13. Role of Osmotic Adjustment in Plant Productivity

    SciTech Connect

    Gebre, G.M.

    2001-01-11

    Successful implementation of short rotation woody crops requires that the selected species and clones be productive, drought tolerant, and pest resistant. Since water is one of the major limiting factors in poplar (Populus sp.) growth, there is little debate for the need of drought tolerant clones, except on the wettest of sites (e.g., lower Columbia River delta). Whether drought tolerance is compatible with productivity remains a debatable issue. Among the many mechanisms of drought tolerance, dehydration postponement involves the maintenance of high leaf water potential due to, for example, an adequate root system. This trait is compatible with productivity, but requires available soil moisture. When the plant leaf water potential and soil water content decline, the plant must be able to survive drought through dehydration tolerance mechanisms, such as low osmotic potential or osmotic adjustment. Osmotic adjustment and low osmotic potential are considered compatible with growth and yield because they aid in the maintenance of leaf turgor. However, it has been shown that turgor alone does not regulate cell expansion or stomatal conductance and, therefore, the role of osmotic adjustment is debated. Despite this finding, osmotic adjustment has been correlated with grain yield in agronomic crop species, and gene markers responsible for osmotic adjustment are being investigated to improve drought tolerance in productive progenies. Although osmotic adjustment and low osmotic potentials have been investigated in several forest tree species, few studies have investigated the relationship between osmotic adjustment and growth. Most of these studies have been limited to greenhouse or container-grown plants. Osmotic adjustment and rapid growth have been specifically associated in Populus and black spruce (Picea mariuna (Mill.) B.S.P.) progenies. We tested whether these relationships held under field conditions using several poplar clones. In a study of two hybrid poplar

  14. Osmotic buckling of spherical capsules.

    PubMed

    Knoche, Sebastian; Kierfeld, Jan

    2014-11-01

    We study the buckling of elastic spherical shells under osmotic pressure with the osmolyte concentration of the exterior solution as a control parameter. We compare our results for the bifurcation behavior with results for buckling under mechanical pressure control, that is, with an empty capsule interior. We find striking differences for the buckling states between osmotic and mechanical buckling. Mechanical pressure control always leads to fully collapsed states with opposite sides in contact, whereas uncollapsed states with a single finite dimple are generic for osmotic pressure control. For sufficiently large interior osmolyte concentrations, osmotic pressure control is qualitatively similar to buckling under volume control with the volume prescribed by the osmolyte concentrations inside and outside the shell. We present a quantitative theory which also captures the influence of shell elasticity on the relationship between osmotic pressure and volume. These findings are relevant for the control of buckled shapes in applications. We show how the osmolyte concentration can be used to control the volume of buckled shells. An accurate analytical formula is derived for the relationship between the osmotic pressure, the elastic moduli and the volume of buckled capsules. This also allows use of elastic capsules as osmotic pressure sensors or deduction of elastic properties and the internal osmolyte concentration from shape changes in response to osmotic pressure changes. We apply our findings to published experimental data on polyelectrolyte capsules. PMID:25209240

  15. Powering an Implantable Minipump with a Multi-layered Printed Circuit Coil for Drug Infusion Applications in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Givrad, Tina K.; Maarek, Jean-Michel I.; Moore, William H.; Holschneider, Daniel P.

    2014-01-01

    We report the use of a multi-layer printed coil circuit for powering (36–94 mW) an implantable microbolus infusion pump (MIP) that can be activated remotely for use in drug infusion in nontethered, freely moving small animals. This implantable device provides a unique experimental tool with applications in the fields of animal behavior, pharmacology, physiology, and functional brain imaging. Two different designs are described: a battery-less pump usable when the animal is inside a home-cage surrounded by a primary inductive coil and a pump powered by a rechargeable battery that can be used for studies outside the homecage. The use of printed coils for powering of small devices by inductive power transfer presents significant advantages over similar approaches using hand-wound coils in terms of ease of manufacturing and uniformity of design. The high efficiency of a class-E oscillator allowed powering of the minipumps without the need for close physical contact of the primary and secondary coils, as is currently the case for most devices powered by inductive power transfer. PMID:20033778

  16. Numerical study of active control of mixing in electro-osmotic flows by temperature difference using lattice Boltzmann methods.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, A; Wang, J K; Pooyan, S; Mirbozorgi, S A; Wang, M

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, the effect of temperature difference between inlet flow and walls on the electro-osmotic flow through a two-dimensional microchannel is investigated. The main objective is to study the effect of temperature variations on the distribution of ions and consequently internal electric potential field, electric body force, and velocity fields in an electro-osmotic flow. We assume constant temperature and zeta potential on walls and use the mean temperature of each cross section to characterize the Boltzmann ion distribution across the channel. Based on these assumptions, the multiphysical transports are still able to be described by the classical Poisson-Boltzmann model. In this work, the Navier-Stokes equation for fluid flow, the Poisson-Boltzmann equation for ion distribution, and the energy equation for heat transfer are solved by a couple lattice Boltzmann method. The modeling results indicate that the temperature difference between walls and the inlet solution may lead to two symmetrical vortices at the entrance region of the microchannel which is appropriate for mixing enhancements. The advantage of this phenomenon for active control of mixing in electro-osmotic flow is the manageability of the vortex scale without extra efforts. For instance, the effective domain of this pattern could broaden by the following modulations: decreasing the external electric potential field, decreasing the electric double layer thickness, or increasing the temperature difference between inlet flow and walls. This work may provide a novel strategy for design or optimization of microsystems. PMID:23859813

  17. Osmotic stress and cryoinjury of koala sperm: an integrative study of the plasma membrane, chromatin stability and mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Johnston, S D; Satake, N; Zee, Y; López-Fernández, C; Holt, W V; Gosálvez, J

    2012-06-01

    This study investigated whether cryopreservation-induced injury to koala spermatozoa could be explained using an experimental model that mimics the structural and physiological effects of osmotic flux. DNA labelling after in situ nick translation of thawed cryopreserved spermatozoa revealed a positive correlation (r=0.573; P<0.001; n=50) between the area of relaxed chromatin in the nucleus and the degree of nucleotide labelling. While the chromatin of some spermatozoa increased more than eight times its normal size, not all sperm nuclei with relaxed chromatin showed evidence of nucleotide incorporation. Preferential staining associated with sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF) was typically located in the peri-acrosomal and peripheral regions of the sperm head and at the base of the spermatozoa where it appear to be 'hot spots' of DNA damage following cryopreservation. Results of the comparative effects of anisotonic media and cryopreservation on the integrity of koala spermatozoa revealed that injury induced by exposure to osmotic flux, essentially imitated the results found following cryopreservation. Plasma membrane integrity, chromatin relaxation and SDF appeared particularly susceptible to extreme hypotonic environments. Mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), while susceptible to extreme hypo- and hypertonic environments, showed an ability to rebound from hypertonic stress when returned to isotonic conditions. Koala spermatozoa exposed to 64 mOsm/kg media showed an equivalent, or more severe, degree of structural and physiological injury to that of frozen-thawed spermatozoa, supporting the hypothesis that cryoinjury is principally associated with a hypo-osmotic effect. A direct comparison of SDF of thawed cryopreserved spermatozoa and those exposed to a 64 mOsm/kg excursion showed a significant correlation (r=0.878; P<0.05; n=5); however, no correlation was found when the percentage of sperm with relaxed chromatin was compared. While a cryo-induced osmotic

  18. Equation of State and Structure of Electrostatic Colloidal Crystals: Osmotic Pressure and Scattering Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reus, V.; Belloni, L.; Zemb, T.; Lutterbach, N.; Versmold, H.

    1997-04-01

    Electrostatically stabilized aqueous suspensions of bromopolystyrene particles have been studied by scattering and osmotic pressure measurements. We investigated their structure and the interparticle interactions as a function of the volume fraction at very low salinity of the order of micromole/l. At slow crystallization speed we observe perfect crystals, body centrered cubic crystals by light scattering for volume fractions between 0.04 and 0.7% and face centrered cubic crystals by Ultra Small Angle X ray Scattering (USAXS) for higher volume fractions (2 12%). After shear the crystal displays other structures. At low volume fractions (0.1 0.3%), some reflexions disappear by light scattering whereas a strong diffuse “prepeak" appears before the first Bragg peak for higher concentrations (2 12%) evidenced by USAXS. This “prepeak" can be attributed to defects in the crystal. Osmotic pressures have been measured by difference between the hydrostatic pressure in the solution and in the reservoir separated by an hemipermeable membrane. The experimental data are very well reproduced by the Poisson Boltzmann Cell (PBC) theory which shows that the interaction between particles is purely repulsive. No attractive contribution has been experimentally detected. By calculating the mean square displacement of a particle inside its cage from the eccentric PBC model, we have verified that the Lindemann criterion for the existence of crystals (against melting) is satisfied. This study has allowed to determine the equation of state of an electrostatical colloidal crystal and is equivalent to an ultraprecise force/distance measurement between latex particles since the measured forces are of the order of 10^{-12} N for distances of the order of 4000 Å. Des suspensions aqueuses de particules de bromopolystyrène ont été caractérisées par diffusion de lumière, diffusion de rayons X aux petits angles et par des mesures de pression osmotique. Nous avons ainsi étudié leur

  19. A New Role for Carbonic Anhydrase 2 in the Response of Fish to Copper and Osmotic Stress: Implications for Multi-Stressor Studies

    PubMed Central

    de Polo, Anna; Margiotta-Casaluci, Luigi; Lockyer, Anne E.; Scrimshaw, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of ecotoxicological studies are performed under stable and optimal conditions, whereas in reality the complexity of the natural environment faces organisms with multiple stressors of different type and origin, which can activate pathways of response often difficult to interpret. In particular, aquatic organisms living in estuarine zones already impacted by metal contamination can be exposed to more severe salinity variations under a forecasted scenario of global change. In this context, the present study aimed to investigate the effect of copper exposure on the response of fish to osmotic stress by mimicking in laboratory conditions the salinity changes occurring in natural estuaries. We hypothesized that copper-exposed individuals are more sensitive to osmotic stresses, as copper affects their osmoregulatory system by acting on a number of osmotic effector proteins, among which the isoform two of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA2) was identified as a novel factor linking the physiological responses to both copper and osmotic stress. To test this hypothesis, two in vivo studies were performed using the euryhaline fish sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus) as test species and applying different rates of salinity transition as a controlled way of dosing osmotic stress. Measured endpoints included plasma ions concentrations and gene expression of CA2 and the α1a-subunit of the enzyme Na+/K+ ATPase. Results showed that plasma ions concentrations changed after the salinity transition, but notably the magnitude of change was greater in the copper-exposed groups, suggesting a sensitizing effect of copper on the responses to osmotic stress. Gene expression results demonstrated that CA2 is affected by copper at the transcriptional level and that this enzyme might play a role in the observed combined effects of copper and osmotic stress on ion homeostasis. PMID:25272015

  20. Study of three-dimensional electro-osmotic flow with curved boundary via lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q.; Zhang, X. B.; Li, Q.; Jiang, X. S.; Zhou, H. P.

    2016-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) lattice Boltzmann model and boundary method is developed to simulate electro-osmotic flow (EOF) with a charged spherical particle immersed in an electrolyte solution. The general governing equations for electro-osmotic transport are Navier-Stokes equations for fluid flow and the Poisson-Boltzmann equation for electric potential distribution around the particle. Two sets of D3Q19 lattice structure with curved boundary conditions are implemented. The simulation results are compared with analytical predictions and are found to be in excellent agreement. The potential distribution appears circularly symmetric and the flow velocity decreases with the cross-sectional area for flow passage increasing due to the mass conservation. The effects of the ionic concentration, the sphere radius, electric potential and external electric field on the velocity profiles are investigated. The flow velocity increases with both the electric potential and the external electric field. However, the variation in flow velocity with the ionic concentration and the sphere radius is complex due to the change in electrical double layer (EDL) thickness.

  1. The Osmotic Pump

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenspiel, Octave; de Nevers, Noel

    1974-01-01

    Describes the principle involved in an osmotic pump used to extract fresh water from the oceans and in an osmotic power plant used to generate electricity. Although shown to be thermodynamically feasible, the osmotic principle is not likely to be used commerically for these purposes in the near future. (JR)

  2. Osmotic stress signaling via protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Hiroaki; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2012-10-01

    Plants face various kinds of environmental stresses, including drought, salinity, and low temperature, which cause osmotic stress. An understanding of the plant signaling pathways that respond to osmotic stress is important for both basic biology and agriculture. In this review, we summarize recent investigations concerning the SNF1-related protein kinase (SnRK) 2 kinase family, which play central roles in osmotic stress responses. SnRK2s are activated by osmotic stress, and a mutant lacking SnRK2s is hypersensitive to osmotic stress. Many questions remain about the signaling pathway upstream and downstream of SnRK2s. Because some SnRK2s also functions in the abscisic acid (ABA) signaling pathway, which has recently been well clarified, study of SnRK2s in ABA signaling can provide clues regarding their roles in osmotic stress signaling. PMID:22828864

  3. Superselective intraarterial cerebral infusion of cetuximab after osmotic blood/brain barrier disruption for recurrent malignant glioma: phase I study.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Shamik; Filippi, Christopher G; Wong, Tamika; Ray, Ashley; Fralin, Sherese; Tsiouris, A John; Praminick, Bidyut; Demopoulos, Alexis; McCrea, Heather J; Bodhinayake, Imithri; Ortiz, Rafael; Langer, David J; Boockvar, John A

    2016-07-01

    Objective To establish a maximum tolerated dose of superselective intraarterial cerebral infusion (SIACI) of Cetuximab after osmotic disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) with mannitol, and examine safety of the procedure in patients with recurrent malignant glioma. Methods A total of 15 patients with recurrent malignant glioma were included in the current study. The starting dose of Cetuximab was 100 mg/m(2) and dose escalation was done to 250 mg/m(2). All patients were observed for 28 days post-infusion for any side effects. Results There was no dose-limiting toxicity from a single dose of SIACI of Cetuximab up to 250 mg/m(2) after osmotic BBB disruption with mannitol. A tolerable rash was seen in 2 patients, anaphylaxis in 1 patient, isolated seizure in 1 patient, and seizure and cerebral edema in 1 patient. Discussion SIACI of mannitol followed by Cetuximab (up to 250 mg/m(2)) for recurrent malignant glioma is safe and well tolerated. A Phase I/II trial is currently underway to determine the efficacy of SIACI of cetuximab in patients with high-grade glioma. PMID:26945581

  4. [Osmotic dehydration of apple (Grany Smith) with different osmotic solutions].

    PubMed

    Mercado-Silva, E; Vidal-Brotons, D

    1994-06-01

    The process of osmotic dehydration in apple rings at 40 degrees, 50 degrees and 60 degrees C in two osmotic agents were studied. The agents were similar in concentration, water activity and viscosity but differed in composition. The weight loss, water content, solids uptake and Brix showed differences in the medius studied. In syrup corn medium, the weight loss was higher and the solids uptake was lower than syrup sucrose. The polysacharides from the syrup corn lowered solutes uptake and the water out was facilited. PMID:7733790

  5. Further studies on osmotic resistance of nucleated erythrocytes: observations with pigeon, peafowl, lizard and toad erythrocytes during changes in temperature and pH.

    PubMed

    Oyewale, J O

    1994-02-01

    The osmotic resistance of pigeon, peafowl, lizard and toad erythrocytes at different temperatures and pH was studied. Erythrocytes from female pigeons showed greater osmotic resistance than those from males, but no sex difference appeared with erythrocytes from peafowls. Pigeon erythrocytes were more resistant and the red blood cell, packed cell volume and haemoglobin values were higher than those in peafowls. Although no significant differences appeared in their haematological values, erythrocytes from the lizard were more resistant than erythrocytes from the toad. At higher temperature, the osmotic resistance of pigeon, lizard and toad erythrocytes increased, while that of peafowl erythrocytes decreased. The resistance of toad erythrocytes decreased in acidic and alkaline solutions, but that of peafowl erythrocytes increased in both solutions. However, with pigeon and lizard erythrocytes, the resistance was unaltered in alkaline solution and decreased in acidic solution. PMID:8085400

  6. Osmotical liquid diffusion within sclera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkatov, Alexey N.; Genina, Elina A.; Kochubey, Vyacheslav I.; Lakodina, Nina A.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2000-06-01

    We present experimental results of investigation of the optical properties of the human eye sclera controlled by administration of osmotically active chemical, such as glucose solution with various concentrations. Administration of chemical agent induces diffusion of matter and as a result equalization of the refractive indices of collagen and ground material. Results of experimental study of influence of osmotical liquid (glucose solution) on reflectance and transmittance spectra of human sclera are presented. In vitro reflectance and transmittance spectra of the human sclera samples were investigated by commercially available spectrophotometer CARY-2415. The significant increasing of the transmittance and decreasing of the reflectance of human sclera samples under action of osmotical solutions were demonstrated. Results of our study show that the degree of the sclera samples clearing is increased with increasing of the chemical agent concentration in solution. The diffusion coefficients of glucose solution with various concentrations within scleral tissue was estimated.

  7. Monocarboxylate Transporter Inhibition with Osmotic Diuresis Increases γ-Hydroxybutyrate Renal Elimination in Humans: A Proof-of-Concept Study

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Marilyn E.; Morse, Bridget L.; Baciewicz, Gloria J.; Tessena, Matthew M.; Acquisto, Nicole M.; Hutchinson, David J.; DiCenzo, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Background and objective The purpose of the current study was to demonstrate proof-of-concept that monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) inhibition with L-lactate combined with osmotic diuresis increases renal clearance of γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) in human subjects. GHB is a substrate for human and rodent MCTs, which are responsible for GHB renal reabsorption, and this therapy increases GHB renal clearance in rats. Methods Ten healthy volunteers were administered GHB orally as sodium oxybate 50 mg/kg (4.5 gm maximum dose) on two different study days. On study day 1, GHB was administered alone. On study day 2, treatment of L-lactate 0.125 mmol/kg and mannitol 200 mg/kg followed by L-lactate 0.75 mmol/kg/hr was administered intravenously 30 minutes after GHB ingestion. Blood and urine were collected for 6 hours, analyzed for GHB, and pharmacokinetic and statistical analyses performed. Results L-lactate/mannitol administration significantly increased GHB renal clearance compared to GHB alone, 439 vs. 615 mL/hr (P=0.001), and increased the percentage of GHB dose excreted in the urine, 2.2 vs. 3.3% (P=0.021). Total clearance was unchanged. Conclusions MCT inhibition with L-lactate combined with osmotic diuresis increases GHB renal elimination in humans. No effect on total clearance was observed in this study due to the negligible contribution of renal clearance to total clearance at this low GHB dose. Considering the nonlinear renal elimination of GHB, further research in overdose cases is warranted to assess the efficacy of this treatment strategy for increasing renal and total clearance at high GHB doses. PMID:24772380

  8. Saltstone Osmotic Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, Ralph L.; Dixon, Kenneth L.

    2013-09-23

    Recent research into the moisture retention properties of saltstone suggest that osmotic pressure may play a potentially significant role in contaminant transport (Dixon et al., 2009 and Dixon, 2011). The Savannah River Remediation Closure and Disposal Assessments Group requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to conduct a literature search on osmotic potential as it relates to contaminant transport and to develop a conceptual model of saltstone that incorporates osmotic potential. This report presents the findings of the literature review and presents a conceptual model for saltstone that incorporates osmotic potential. The task was requested through Task Technical Request HLW-SSF-TTR- 2013-0004.

  9. Freeze-fracture electron microscopic and osmotic water permeability studies of epidermal lipid liposomes derived from stratum corneum lipids of porcine epidermis.

    PubMed

    Mandal, T K; Downing, D T

    1993-02-01

    Freeze-fracture electron microscopic studies revealed that the liposomal membrane morphology was intact before and after osmotic treatment. This finding suggested that water leakage from the liposomes was not due to fusion of two or more lipid vesicles, but rather to the osmotic salt effect. A stop-flow spectrophotometric study revealed that epidermal lipid liposomes derived from stratum corneum lipids of porcine skin underwent increases of the absorbances with decreases of volume of the vesicles. The initial rate at which the changes in optical density occurs is a measure of the water permeability through the liposomes. The reciprocal of the changes in the absorbance at the equilibrium at different salt osmotic shocks showed a linear dependence on the reciprocal of the osmotic pressure gradient, indicating that epidermal lipid liposomes are an ideal osmometer. The present investigation reports that lignoceric acid is a potent water barrier. Present findings suggest that the initial rate of water penetration decreased in the liposomes made from 30-45% (wt% ratio) of cholesterol and ceramides. Oleic acid as drug penetration enhancer facilitated the water diffusion of the stratum corneum lipid liposomes by a fluidizing effect on the liposomal membranes. Furthermore, ceramides are important in the water barrier properties of the skin. The permeability of water depends upon the amount (wt%) and the type of lipid of the membrane. PMID:8095743

  10. Diagonal two-dimensional electrophoresis (D-2DE): a new approach to study the effect of osmotic stress induced by polyethylene glycol in durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.).

    PubMed

    Kacem, N S; Mauro, S; Muhovski, Y; Delporte, F; Renaut, J; Djekoun, A; Watillon, B

    2016-09-01

    Acclimatization to stress is associated with profound changes in proteome composition. The use of plant cell and tissue culture offers a means to investigate the physiological and biochemical processes involved in the adaptation to osmotic stress. We employed a new proteomic approach to further understand the response of calli to dehydration induced by polyethylene glycol (PEG6000). Calli of three durum wheat genotypes Djenah Khetifa, Oued Zenati and Waha were treated with two concentrations of polyethylene glycol to mimic osmotic stress. Changes in protein relative abundance were analyzed using a new electrophoretic approach named diagonal two-dimensional electrophoresis (D-2DE), combined with mass spectrometry. Total proteins were extracted from 30-day-old calli from three durum wheat genotypes that showed contrasting levels of drought stress tolerance in the field. The combination of one-dimensional electrophoresis and D-2DE gave a specific imprint of the protein extracts under osmotic stress, as well as characterizing and identifying individual target proteins. Of the variously expressed proteins, three were selected (globulin, GAPDH and peroxidase) and further analyzed using qRT-PCR at the transcriptome level in order to compare the results with the proteomic data. Western blot analysis was used to further validate the differences in relative abundance pattern. The proteins identified through this technique provide new insights as to how calli respond to osmotic stress. Our method of study provides an original and relevant approach of analyzing the osmotic-responsive mechanisms at the cellular level of durum wheat with agronomic perspectives. PMID:27317377

  11. A systematic review of studies performing the hypo-osmotic swelling test to evaluate the quality of canine spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Karger, S; Arlt, S; Haimerl, P; Heuwieser, W

    2014-02-01

    The hypo-osmotic swelling test (HOS test) is a simple and inexpensive test to evaluate the functional integrity of sperm cell membranes. According to the existing literature, its simple applicability has turned it into a valuable additional parameter to standard canine semen analysis. In the recent years, much research has been conducted in this field. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the quality of published literature in canine reproduction concerning the HOS test. Using two distinguished databases, 38 articles were detected and analysed subsequently according to various aspects, for example study design, population, semen sampling and implementation concerning the HOS test. Although there are numerous articles available, the diagnostic value of the HOS test remains ambiguous. Until now, neither a recognized test protocol nor reliable reference values have been defined. Most of the trials evaluated show serious methodological flaws and therefore do not permit drawing reliable conclusions. According to our results, approximately half of the studies (n = 20) included a sample size of five or less animals. None of the studies examined the inter- or intraobserver agreement for the HOS test. Further research is warranted including appropriate statistical methods and a sufficient number of animals to establish a standardized test protocol as well as reliable reference values. Most importantly, it is required to clarify a correlation between the HOS test and the fertilizing capacity to determine the diagnostic value of the HOS test. PMID:23931704

  12. FOST 2 Upgrade with Hollow-Fiber CTA FO Module and Generation of Osmotic Agent for Microorganism Growth Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parodi, Jurek; Mangado, Jaione Romero; Stefanson, Ofir; Flynn, Michael; Shaw, Hali; Beeler, David

    2016-01-01

    FOST 2 is an integrated membrane system that incorporates a forward osmosis subsystem and a reverse osmosis subsystem working in series. It has been designed as a post treatment system to process the effluent from the Membrane Aerated Biological Reactor developed at NASA Johnson Space Center and Texas Tech University. Its function is to remove dissolved solids residual such as ammonia and suspended solids, as well as to provide a physical barrier to microbial and viral contamination. A tubular CTA membrane module from HTI and a flat-sheet lipid-base membrane module from Porifera were integrated and tested on FOST 2 in the past, using both a bioreactor's effluent and greywater as the feed solution. This paper documents the performance of FOST 2 after its upgrade with a hollow-fiber CTA membrane module from Toyobo, treating real black-water to generate the osmotic agent solution necessary to conduct growth studies of genetically engineered microorganism for the Synthetic Biological Membrane project.

  13. Nonlinear osmotic properties of the cell nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Finan, John D.; Chalut, Kevin J.; Wax, Adam; Guilak, Farshid

    2009-01-01

    Summary In the absence of active volume regulation processes, cell volume is inversely proportional to osmolarity, as predicted by the Boyle Van’t Hoff relation. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that nuclear volume has a similar relationship with extracellular osmolarity in articular chondrocytes, cells that are exposed to changes in the osmotic environment in vivo, and furthermore, we explored the mechanism of the relationships between osmolarity and nuclear size and shape. Nuclear size was quantified using two independent techniques, confocal laser scanning microscopy and angle-resolved low coherence interferometry. Nuclear volume was osmotically-sensitive but this relationship was not linear, showing a decline in the osmotic sensitivity in the hypo-osmotic range. Nuclear shape was also influenced by extracellular osmolarity, becoming smoother as the osmolarity decreased. The osmotically-induced changes in nuclear size paralleled the changes in nuclear shape, suggesting that shape and volume are interdependent. The osmotic sensitivity of shape and volume persisted after disruption of the actin cytoskeleton. Isolated nuclei contracted in response to physiologic changes in macromolecule concentration but not in response to physiologic changes in ion concentration, suggesting solute size has an important influence on the osmotic pressurization of the nucleus. This finding in turn implies that the diffusion barrier that causes osmotic effects is not a semi-permeable membrane, but rather due to size constraints that prevent large solute molecules from entering small spaces in the nucleus. As nuclear morphology has been associated previously with cell phenotype, these findings may provide new insight into the role of mechanical and osmotic signals in regulating cell physiology. PMID:19107599

  14. Auxin response under osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Naser, Victoria; Shani, Eilon

    2016-08-01

    The phytohormone auxin (indole-3-acetic acid, IAA) is a small organic molecule that coordinates many of the key processes in plant development and adaptive growth. Plants regulate the auxin response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, transport and perception. One of the most striking aspects of plant plasticity is the modulation of development in response to changing growth environments. In this review, we explore recent findings correlating auxin response-dependent growth and development with osmotic stresses. Studies of water deficit, dehydration, salt, and other osmotic stresses point towards direct and indirect molecular perturbations in the auxin pathway. Osmotic stress stimuli modulate auxin responses by affecting auxin biosynthesis (YUC, TAA1), transport (PIN), perception (TIR/AFB, Aux/IAA), and inactivation/conjugation (GH3, miR167, IAR3) to coordinate growth and patterning. In turn, stress-modulated auxin gradients drive physiological and developmental mechanisms such as stomata aperture, aquaporin and lateral root positioning. We conclude by arguing that auxin-mediated growth inhibition under abiotic stress conditions is one of the developmental and physiological strategies to acclimate to the changing environment. PMID:27052306

  15. Advanced Life Support Water Recycling Technologies Case Studies: Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Removal and Direct Osmotic Concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Design for microgravity has traditionally not been well integrated early on into the development of advanced life support (ALS) technologies. NASA currently has a many ALS technologies that are currently being developed to high technology readiness levels but have not been formally evaluated for microgravity compatibility. Two examples of such technologies are the Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Removal Technology and the Direct Osmotic Concentration Technology. This presentation will cover the design of theses two systems and will identify potential microgravity issues.

  16. Osmotic micropumps for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Herrlich, Simon; Spieth, Sven; Messner, Stephan; Zengerle, Roland

    2012-11-01

    This paper reviews miniaturized drug delivery systems applying osmotic principles for pumping. Osmotic micropumps require no electrical energy and consequently enable drug delivery systems of smallest size for a broad field of new applications. In contrast to common tablets, these pumps provide constant (zero-order) drug release rates. This facilitates systems for long term use not limited by gastrointestinal transit time and first-pass metabolism. The review focuses on parenteral routes of administration targeting drug delivery either in a site-specific or systemic way. Osmotic pumps consist of three building blocks: osmotic agent, solvent, and drug. This is used to categorize pumps into (i) single compartment systems using water from body fluids as solvent and the drug itself as the osmotic agent, (ii) two compartment systems employing a separate osmotic agent, and (iii) multi-compartment architectures employing solvent, drug and osmotic agent separately. In parallel to the micropumps, relevant applications and therapies are discussed. PMID:22370615

  17. In vitro--in silico--in vivo drug absorption model development based on mechanistic gastrointestinal simulation and artificial neural networks: nifedipine osmotic release tablets case study.

    PubMed

    Ilić, Marija; Ðuriš, Jelena; Kovačević, Ivan; Ibrić, Svetlana; Parojčić, Jelena

    2014-10-01

    In vitro--in vivo correlations (IVIVC) are generally accepted as a valuable tool in modified release formulation development aimed at (i) quantifying the in vivo drug delivery profile and formulation related effects on absorption; (ii) establishing clinically relevant dissolution specifications and (iii) supporting the biowaiver claims. The aim of the present study was to develop relevant IVIVC models based on mechanistic gastrointestinal simulation (GIS) and artificial neural network (ANN) analysis and to evaluate their applicability and usefulness in biopharmaceutical drug characterisation. Nifedipine osmotic release tablets were selected as model drug product on the basis of their robustness, dissolution limited drug absorption and the availability of relevant literature data. Although the osmotic release tablets have been designed to be robust against the influence of physiological conditions in the gastrointestinal tract, notable differences in nifedipine dissolution kinetics were observed depending on the in vitro experimental conditions employed. The results obtained indicate that both GIS and ANN model developed were sensitive to input kinetics represented by the in vitro profiles obtained under various experimental conditions. Different in silico approaches may be successfully employed in the in vitro--in silico--in vivo model development. However, the results obtained may differ and relevant outcomes are sensitive to the methodology employed. PMID:24911992

  18. Osmotic stress alters chromatin condensation and nucleocytoplasmic transport

    SciTech Connect

    Finan, John D.; Leddy, Holly A.; Guilak, Farshid

    2011-05-06

    Highlights: {yields} The rate of nucleocytoplasmic transport increases under hyper-osmotic stress. {yields} The mechanism is a change in nuclear geometry, not a change in permeability of the nuclear envelope. {yields} Intracytoplasmic but not intranuclear diffusion is sensitive to osmotic stress. {yields} Pores in the chromatin of the nucleus enlarge under hyper-osmotic stress. -- Abstract: Osmotic stress is a potent regulator of biological function in many cell types, but its mechanism of action is only partially understood. In this study, we examined whether changes in extracellular osmolality can alter chromatin condensation and the rate of nucleocytoplasmic transport, as potential mechanisms by which osmotic stress can act. Transport of 10 kDa dextran was measured both within and between the nucleus and the cytoplasm using two different photobleaching methods. A mathematical model was developed to describe fluorescence recovery via nucleocytoplasmic transport. As osmolality increased, the diffusion coefficient of dextran decreased in the cytoplasm, but not the nucleus. Hyper-osmotic stress decreased nuclear size and increased nuclear lacunarity, indicating that while the nucleus was getting smaller, the pores and channels interdigitating the chromatin had expanded. The rate of nucleocytoplasmic transport was increased under hyper-osmotic stress but was insensitive to hypo-osmotic stress, consistent with the nonlinear osmotic properties of the nucleus. The mechanism of this osmotic sensitivity appears to be a change in the size and geometry of the nucleus, resulting in a shorter effective diffusion distance for the nucleus. These results may explain physical mechanisms by which osmotic stress can influence intracellular signaling pathways that rely on nucleocytoplasmic transport.

  19. Relationship between Water Content and Osmotic Potential of Lentinula edodes

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sun-Young

    2008-01-01

    This study was conducted to understand how osmotic potentials in Lentinula edodes tissues are related to water contents and how they change while a mushroom matures. Water content and osmotic potential of L. edodes mushroom tissues from log cultivation and sawdust cultivation were measured and the relationships were analyzed. Osmotic potentials in the tissues were exponentially proportional to their moisture contents and there were strain differences in the potentials. Strain 290 has lower osmotic potential than strain 302, in the tissues at the same water content. As the mushrooms mature, tissue water content maintained ca 94% in head tissues and ca 90% in gills, but significantly decreased from ca 90% to 82% in the stipe tissues. Osmotic potential changes were similar to the tissue water content changes as the mushrooms mature. While osmotic potentials maintained -0.25 to -0.45 MPa in head and gill tissues, the potentials greatly decreased from -0.65 to -1.33MPa in stipe tissues. Our results show that osmotic potentials in L. edodes tissues are exponentially proportional to tissue water contents, that strains differ in osmotic potential related to water, and that stipe tissues can still have nutritional value when they mature. PMID:23997603

  20. Osmotic and motional properties of intracellular water as influenced by osmotic swelling and shrinkage of Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Cameron, I L; Merta, P; Fullerton, G D

    1990-03-01

    Experiments were done on fully grown Xenopus oocytes to determine the extent and the properties of cellular water of hydration. The studies involved the osmotic shrinking and swelling of the oocytes under known osmotic pressure as well as proton NMR spectral, titration, and free induction decay analyses. Studies were done both on whole oocytes and on subcellular fractions. The results show that little if any of the oocyte water in situ has the motional or osmotic properties expected of pure "bulk" water. Four distinct water of hydration compartments were found and defined on the basis of distinct hydrogen bounding mechanisms. Some of the water in yolk platelets was found not to be in fast exchange with other water compartments. Osmotic shrinkage of oocytes caused an adaptive decrease in the bound water of hydration compartments. This osmotically induced decrease is attributed to decreased surface area available for the hydrogen bounding of water molecules on cellular proteins. PMID:2312616

  1. Evolution of osmotic pressure in solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Voutouri, Chysovalantis; Stylianopoulos, Triantafyllos

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical microenvironment of solid tumors includes both fluid and solid stresses. These stresses play a crucial role in cancer progression and treatment and have been analyzed rigorously both mathematically and experimentally. The magnitude and spatial distribution of osmotic pressures in tumors, however, cannot be measured experimentally and to our knowledge there is no mathematical model to calculate osmotic pressures in the tumor interstitial space. In this study, we developed a triphasic biomechanical model of tumor growth taking into account not only the solid and fluid phase of a tumor, but also the transport of cations and anions, as well as the fixed charges at the surface of the glycosaminoglycan chains. Our model predicts that the osmotic pressure is negligible compared to the interstitial fluid pressure for values of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) taken from the literature for sarcomas, melanomas and adenocarcinomas. Furthermore, our results suggest that an increase in the hydraulic conductivity of the tumor, increases considerably the intratumoral concentration of free ions and thus, the osmotic pressure but it does not reach the levels of the interstitial fluid pressure. PMID:25287111

  2. Development and optimization of buspirone oral osmotic pump tablet.

    PubMed

    Derakhshandeh, K; Berenji, M Ghasemnejad

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to design a porous osmotic pump-based drug delivery system for controlling the release of buspirone from the delivery system. The osmotic pump was successfully developed using symmetric membrane coating. The core of the tablets was prepared by direct compression technique and coated using dip-coating technique. Drug release from the osmotic system was studied using USP paddle type apparatus. The effect of various processing variables such as the amount of osmotic agent, the amount of swellable polymer, concentration of the core former, concentration of the plasticizer, membrane thickness, quantum of orifice on drug release from osmotic pump were evaluated. Different kinetic models (zero order, first order and Higuchi model) were applied to drug release data in order to establish the kinetics of drug release. It was found that the drug release was mostly affected by the amount of NaCl as osmotic agent, the swellable polymer; hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose (HPMC), the amount of PEG-400 and cellulose acetate in the coating solution and thickness of the semipermeable membrane. The optimized formulation released buspirone independent of pH and orifice quantum at the osmogen amount of 42%, hydrophilic polymer of 13% and pore size of 0.8 mm on the tablet surface. The drug release of osmotic formulation during 24 h showed zero order kinetics and could be suggested that this formulation as a once-daily regimen improves pharmacokinetic parameters of the drug and enhances patient compliance. PMID:25657794

  3. Theoretical and experimental studies on freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit as methods to measure osmotic pressure of aqueous polyethylene glycol and bovine serum albumin solutions.

    PubMed

    Kiyosawa, Keitaro

    2003-05-01

    For survival in adverse environments where there is drought, high salt concentration or low temperature, some plants seem to be able to synthesize biochemical compounds, including proteins, in response to changes in water activity or osmotic pressure. Measurement of the water activity or osmotic pressure of simple aqueous solutions has been based on freezing point depression or vapor pressure deficit. Measurement of the osmotic pressure of plants under water stress has been mainly based on vapor pressure deficit. However, differences have been noted for osmotic pressure values of aqueous polyethylene glycol (PEG) solutions measured by freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit. For this paper, the physicochemical basis of freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit were first examined theoretically and then, the osmotic pressure of aqueous ethylene glycol and of PEG solutions were measured by both freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit in comparison with other aqueous solutions such as NaCl, KCl, CaCl(2), glucose, sucrose, raffinose, and bovine serum albumin (BSA) solutions. The results showed that: (1) freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit share theoretically the same physicochemical basis; (2) theoretically, they are proportional to the molal concentration of the aqueous solutions to be measured; (3) in practice, the osmotic pressure levels of aqueous NaCl, KCl, CaCl(2), glucose, sucrose, and raffinose solutions increase in proportion to their molal concentrations and there is little inconsistency between those measured by freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit; (4) the osmotic pressure levels of aqueous ethylene glycol and PEG solutions measured by freezing point depression differed from the values measured by vapor pressure deficit; (5) the osmotic pressure of aqueous BSA solution measured by freezing point depression differed slightly from that measured by vapor pressure deficit. PMID:12834836

  4. Osmotic dehydration of fruits and vegetables: a review.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Ashok Kumar; Singh, Satya Vir

    2014-09-01

    The main cause of perishability of fruits and vegetables are their high water content. To increase the shelf life of these fruits and vegetables many methods or combination of methods had been tried. Osmotic dehydration is one of the best and suitable method to increase the shelf life of fruits and vegetables. This process is preferred over others due to their vitamin and minerals, color, flavor and taste retention property. In this review different methods, treatments, optimization and effects of osmotic dehydration have been reviewed. Studied showed that combination of different osmotic agents were more effective than sucrose alone due to combination of properties of solutes. During the experiments it was found that optimum osmosis was found at approximately 40 °C, 40 °B of osmotic agent and in near about 132 min. Pretreatments also leads to increase the osmotic process in fruits and vegetables. Mass transfer kinetics study is an important parameter to study osmosis. Solids diffusivity were found in wide range (5.09-32.77 kl/mol) studied by Fick's laws of diffusion. These values vary depending upon types of fruits and vegetables and osmotic agents. PMID:25190823

  5. Protein osmotic pressure gradients and microvascular reflection coefficients.

    PubMed

    Drake, R E; Dhother, S; Teague, R A; Gabel, J C

    1997-08-01

    Microvascular membranes are heteroporous, so the mean osmotic reflection coefficient for a microvascular membrane (sigma d) is a function of the reflection coefficient for each pore. Investigators have derived equations for sigma d based on the assumption that the protein osmotic pressure gradient across the membrane (delta II) does not vary from pore to pore. However, for most microvascular membranes, delta II probably does vary from pore to pore. In this study, we derived a new equation for sigma d. According to our equation, pore-to-pore differences in delta II increase the effect of small pores and decrease the effect of large pores on the overall membrane osmotic reflection coefficient. Thus sigma d for a heteroporous membrane may be much higher than previously derived equations indicate. Furthermore, pore-to-pore delta II differences increase the effect of plasma protein osmotic pressure to oppose microvascular fluid filtration. PMID:9277520

  6. Solute concentration effect on osmotic reflection coefficient.

    PubMed Central

    Adamski, R P; Anderson, J L

    1983-01-01

    A theory for the effect of concentration on osmotic reflection coefficient, correct to first order, was developed at the molecular level by considering the effect of solute-solute interactions on solute concentration and the fluid stress tensor within a solvent-filled pore. The solvent was modeled as a continuous fluid and potential energies between solute molecules and the pore wall were assumed to be pairwise additive. Although the theory is more general, calculations are presented only for excluded volume effects (hard-sphere for solute, hard-wall for pore). The relationship between the first-order concentration effect and the infinite dilution value of reflection coefficient appears to be geometry independent. The theory is discussed in light of experimental studies of osmotic flow that have recently appeared in the literature. PMID:6626681

  7. Acetazolamide inhibits osmotic water permeability by interaction with aquaporin-1.

    PubMed

    Gao, Junwei; Wang, Xiaohua; Chang, Yongjie; Zhang, Jianzhao; Song, Qianliu; Yu, Heming; Li, Xuejun

    2006-03-15

    Water channel proteins, known as aquaporins, are transmembrane proteins that mediate osmotic water permeability. In a previous study, we found that acetazolamide could inhibit osmotic water transportation across Xenopus oocytes by blocking the function of aquaporin-1 (AQP1). The purpose of the current study was to confirm the effect of acetazolamide on water osmotic permeability using the human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells transfected with pEGFP/AQP1 and to investigate the interaction between acetazolamide and AQP1. The fluorescence intensity of HEK293 cells transfected with pEGFP/AQP1, which corresponds to the cell volume when the cells swell in a hyposmotic solution, was recorded under confocal laser fluorescence microscopy. The osmotic water permeability was assessed by the change in the ratio of cell fluorescence to certain cell area. Acetazolamide, at concentrations of 1 and 10muM, inhibited the osmotic water permeability in HEK293 cells transfected with pEGFP/AQP1. The direct binding between acetazolamide and AQP1 was detected by surface plasmon resonance. AQP1 was prepared from rat red blood cells and immobilized on a CM5 chip. The binding assay showed that acetazolamide could directly interact with AQP1. This study demonstrated that acetazolamide inhibited osmotic water permeability through interaction with AQP1. PMID:16480680

  8. Phospholipid-cholesterol bilayers under osmotic stress.

    PubMed Central

    Sparr, Emma; Hallin, Linda; Markova, Natalia; Wennerström, Håkan

    2002-01-01

    Isothermal (27 degrees C) phase behavior of dimyristoyl phosphatidyl choline-cholesterol mixtures at various osmotic pressures and cholesterol contents was investigated by means of isothermal sorption microcalorimetry and (2)H-nuclear magnetic resonance. The calorimetric method allows for simultaneous measurement of the partial molar enthalpy and the chemical potential (the osmotic pressure) of water, thus providing an almost complete thermodynamic description of the sorption process. From the experimental results, the Pi(osm) - X(chol) and the ternary composition phase diagrams are constructed. We note that there are strong similarities between the Pi(osm) - X(chol) phase diagram and the previously reported T - X(chol) phase diagram at excess water. At high cholesterol contents a single liquid ordered (L(alpha)(o)) phase is present over the whole range of water contents, implying that this phase has a remarkable stability not only at decreasing temperature but also at increasing osmotic pressure. At low cholesterol contents, the microcalorimetric experiments confirm the extraordinary property of cholesterol not to cause any substantial melting point depression. One important conclusion in the present study is that the P(beta) phase can dissolve cholesterol more readily than the L(beta) phase and that the addition of cholesterol induces the P(beta) phase. Finally, the putative P(beta) - L(alpha)(o) periodic modulated structure is discussed. PMID:12324420

  9. Mass transfer kinetics during osmotic dehydration of pomegranate arils.

    PubMed

    Mundada, Manoj; Hathan, Bahadur Singh; Maske, Swati

    2011-01-01

    The mass transfer kinetics during osmotic dehydration of pomegranate arils in osmotic solution of sucrose was studied to increase palatability and shelf life of arils. The freezing of the whole pomegranate at -18 °C was carried out prior to osmotic dehydration to increase the permeability of the outer cellular layer of the arils. The osmotic solution concentrations used were 40, 50, 60°Bx, osmotic solution temperatures were 35, 45, 55 °C. The fruit to solution ratio was kept 1:4 (w/w) during all the experiments and the process duration varied from 0 to 240 min. Azuara model and Peleg model were the best fitted as compared to other models for water loss and solute gain of pomegranate arils, respectively. Generalized Exponential Model had an excellent fit for water loss ratio and solute gain ratio of pomegranate arils. Effective moisture diffusivity of water as well as solute was estimated using the analytical solution of Fick's law of diffusion. For above conditions of osmotic dehydration, average effective diffusivity of water loss and solute gain varied from 2.718 × 10(-10) to 5.124 × 10(-10) m(2)/s and 1.471 × 10(-10) to 5.147 × 10(-10) m(2)/s, respectively. The final product was successfully utilized in some nutritional formulations such as ice cream and bakery products. PMID:21535673

  10. Osmotic therapy: fact and fiction.

    PubMed

    Diringer, Michael N; Zazulia, Allyson R

    2004-01-01

    This review examines the available data on the use of osmotic agents in patients with head injury and ischemic stroke, summarizes the physiological effects of osmotic agents, and presents the leading hypotheses regarding the mechanism by which they reduce ICP. Finally, it addresses the validity of the following commonly held beliefs: mannitol accumulates in injured brain; mannitol shrinks only normal brain and can increase midline shift; osmolality can be used to monitor mannitol administration; mannitol should be not be administered if osmolality is >320 mOsm; and hypertonic saline is equally effective as mannitol. PMID:16174920

  11. Photometric determination of phenomenological correlation between osmotic behavior and hemolysis of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, X S; Kamino, K

    1995-01-01

    The osmotic behavior of red blood cells from a human and from several other mammalian species was studied by photometric measurements. When red blood cells were suspended in sodium chloride solutions with various osmotic concentrations, the optical density at 620 nm was reciprocally related to the relative volume of the red cells. Thus, we evaluated the osmotic volume changes in the red cells from optical density measurements. The Boyle-van't Hoff relation was applicable to the osmotic behavior of red cells which responded as a complete osmometer in hypertonic and slightly hypotonic (lower than about 240 mOsm) solutions. Also, we examined the rheological correlation between osmotic volume changes and hemolysis. Osmotic hemolysis occurred corresponding to breakdown of the Boyle-van't Hoff relation in hypotonic solutions. The critical osmotic concentration for the breakdown of the Boyle-van't Hoff relation was that for osmotic hemolysis. In Na2SO4 solutions, although the critical osmotic concentration shifted towards a smaller value, the critical volume for the breakdown of the Boyle-van't Hoff relation and for osmotic hemolysis was maintained at a constant value, indicating that the onset of osmotic hemolysis depends exclusively upon the critical volume. In the samples from a human, the critical volume for the onset of hemolysis was estimated to be 1.25 +/- 0.05 in the ratio to the normal volume in iso-osmotic solution. From these obtained results, it is suggested that the red cell behaves in hypotonic solutions as a viscoelastic body of the type represented by the Voigt model, and the viscoelastic breakdown of the membrane results in osmotic hemolysis in hypotonic solution. PMID:8713172

  12. The Kinetic-Molecular and Thermodynamic Approaches to Osmotic Pressure: A Study of Dispute in Physical Chemistry and the Implications for Chemistry Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Berg, Kevin C.

    2006-01-01

    Osmotic pressure proves to be a useful topic for illustrating the disputes brought to bear on the chemistry profession when mathematics was introduced into its discipline. Some chemists of the late 19th century thought that the introduction of mathematics would destroy that "chemical feeling" or "experience" so necessary to the practice of…

  13. A comparative study of diffusive and osmotic water permeation across bilayers composed of phospholipids with different head groups and fatty acyl chains.

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, M; Blume, A

    1995-01-01

    Osmotic and diffusive water permeability coefficients Pf and Pd were measured for lipid vesicles of 100-250 nm diameter composed of a variety of phospholipids with different head groups and fatty acyl chains. Two different methods were applied: the H2O/D2O exchange technique for diffusive water flow, and the osmotic technique for water flux driven by an osmotic gradient. For phosphatidylcholines in the liquid-crystalline state at 70 degrees C, permeability constants Pd between 3.0 and 5.2.10(-4) cm/s and ratios Pf/Pd 7 and 23 were observed. The observation of a permeability maximum in the phase transition region and the fact that osmotically driven water flux is higher than diffusive water exchange suggest that water is diffusing through small transient pores arising from density fluctuations in the bilayers. The Pd values depend on the nature of the head group, on the chemical structure of the chains, and on the type of chain linkage. In the case of charged lipids, the ionic strength of the solution has a strong influence. For phosphatidylethanolamines, phosphatidic acids, and ether phosphatidylcholines, permeability constants Pd were considerably lower (2-4.10(-6) cm/s at 70 degrees C). For liquid-crystalline phosphatidylcholines, a strong reduction of Pd after addition of ethanol was observed (2-4.10(-6) cm/s at 70 degrees C). The experimental values are discussed in connection with different permeation models. PMID:7756562

  14. Titrating Optimal Dose of Osmotic-Controlled Release Oral Delivery (OROS)-Methylphenidate and Its Efficacy and Safety in Korean Children with ADHD: A Multisite Open Labeled Study

    PubMed Central

    Song, Dong-Ho; Choi, Soul; Joung, Yoo Sook; Ha, Eun Hye; Kim, Boong-Nyun; Shin, Yee-Jin; Shin, Dongwon; Yoo, Hee Jeong

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study was aimed to determine effectiveness and tolerability of Osmotic-controlled Release Oral delivery (OROS) methylphenidate (MPH) and its optimal dose administered openly over a period of up to 12 weeks in drug naïve Korean children with ADHD. Methods Subjects (n=143), ages 6 to 18-years, with a clinical diagnosis of any subtype of ADHD were recruited from 7 medical centers in Korea. An individualized dose of OROS-MPH was determined for each subject depending on the response criteria. The subjects were assessed with several symptom rating scales in week 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12. Results 77 of 116 subjects (66.4%) achieved the criteria for response and the average of optimal daily dose for response was to 30.05±12.52 mg per day (0.90±0.31 mg/kg/d) at the end of the study. Optimal dose was not significantly different between ADHD subtypes, whereas, significant higher dose was needed in older aged groups than younger groups. The average of optimal daily dose for response for the subjects aged above 12 years old was 46.38±15.52 per day (0.81±0.28 mg/kg/d) compared to younger groups (p<0.01). No serious adverse effects were reported and the dose did not have a significant effect on adverse effects. Conclusion Optimal mean dose of OROS-MPH was significantly different by age groups. Higher dose was needed in older aged groups than younger groups. Effectiveness and tolerability of OROS-MPH in symptoms of ADHD is sustained for up to 12 weeks. PMID:22993525

  15. Effects of pulling forces, osmotic pressure, condensing agents and viscosity on the thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA ejection from bacteriophages to bacterial cells: a computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Anton S.; Douglas, Scott S.; Harvey, Stephen C.

    2013-03-01

    In this work, we report on simulations of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) ejection from bacteriophage ϕ29 into a bacterial cell. The ejection was studied with a coarse-grained model, in which viral dsDNA was represented by beads on a torsion-less string. The bacteriophage’s capsid and the bacterial cell were defined by sets of spherical constraints. To account for the effects of the viscous medium inside the bacterial cell, the simulations were carried out using a Langevin dynamics protocol. Our simplest simulations (involving constant viscosity and no external biasing forces) produced results compatible with the push-pull model of DNA ejection, with an ejection rate significantly higher in the first part of ejection than in the latter parts. Additionally, we performed more complicated simulations, in which we included additional factors such as external forces, osmotic pressure, condensing agents and ejection-dependent viscosity. The effects of these factors (independently and in combination) on the thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA ejection were studied. We found that, in general, the dependence of ejection forces and ejection rates on the amount of DNA ejected becomes more complex if the ejection is modeled with a broader, more realistic set of parameters and influences (such as variation in the solvent’s viscosity and the application of an external force). However, certain combinations of factors and numerical parameters led to the opposition of some ejection-driving and ejection-inhibiting influences, ultimately causing an apparent simplification of the ejection profiles.

  16. Osmotic effects of polyethylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Schiller, L R; Emmett, M; Santa Ana, C A; Fordtran, J S

    1988-04-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) has been used to increase the osmotic pressure of fluids used to cleanse the gastrointestinal tract. However, little is known about its osmotic activity. To investigate this activity systematically, solutions of PEG of differing molecular weights were made and subjected to measurement of osmolality by both freezing point depression and vapor pressure osmometry. Measured osmolality was increasingly greater than predicted from average molecular weight as PEG concentration increased. Measurement of sodium activity in NaCl/PEG solutions by means of an ion-selective electrode suggested that the higher than expected osmolality could be due in part to interactions that, in effect, sequestered water from the solution. Osmolality was consistently greater by freezing point osmometry than by vapor pressure osmometry. To determine which osmometry method reflected biologically relevant osmolality, normal subjects underwent steady-state total gut perfusion with an electrolyte solution containing 105 g/L of PEG 3350. This produced rectal effluent that was hypertonic by freezing point osmometry but isotonic by vapor pressure osmometry. Assuming that luminal fluid reaches osmotic equilibrium with plasma during total gut perfusion, this result suggests that the vapor pressure osmometer accurately reflects the biologically relevant osmolality of intestinal contents. We conclude that PEG exerts more of an osmotic effect than would be predicted from its molecular weight. This phenomenon may reflect interactions between PEG and water molecules that alter the physical chemistry of the solution and sequester water from the solution. PMID:3345895

  17. Gene expression analysis in response to osmotic stimuli in the intervertebral disc with DNA microarray

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Intervertebral disc (IVD) cells experience a broad range of physicochemical stimuli under physiologic conditions, including alterations in their osmotic environment. At present, the molecular mechanisms underlying osmotic regulation in IVD cells are poorly understood. This study aims to screen genes affected by changes in osmotic pressure in cells of subjects aged 29 to 63 years old, with top-scoring pair (TSP) method. Methods Gene expression data set GSE1648 was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database, including four hyper-osmotic stimuli samples, four iso-osmotic stimuli samples, and three hypo-osmotic stimuli samples. A novel, simple method, referred to as the TSP, was used in this study. Through this method, there was no need to perform data normalization and transformation before data analysis. Results A total of five pairs of genes ((CYP2A6, FNTB), (PRPF8, TARDBP), (RPS5, OAZ1), (SLC25A3, NPM1) and (CBX3, SRSF9)) were selected based on the TSP method. We inferred that all these genes might play important roles in response to osmotic stimuli and age in IVD cells. Additionally, hyper-osmotic and iso-osmotic stimuli conditions were adverse factors for IVD cells. Conclusions We anticipate that our results will provide new thoughts and methods for the study of IVD disease. PMID:24369767

  18. Electro-osmotic mobility of non-Newtonian fluids

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Cunlu; Yang, Chun

    2011-01-01

    Electrokinetically driven microfluidic devices are usually used to analyze and process biofluids which can be classified as non-Newtonian fluids. Conventional electrokinetic theories resulting from Newtonian hydrodynamics then fail to describe the behaviors of these fluids. In this study, a theoretical analysis of electro-osmotic mobility of non-Newtonian fluids is reported. The general Cauchy momentum equation is simplified by incorporation of the Gouy–Chapman solution to the Poisson–Boltzmann equation and the Carreau fluid constitutive model. Then a nonlinear ordinary differential equation governing the electro-osmotic velocity of Carreau fluids is obtained and solved numerically. The effects of the Weissenberg number (Wi), the surface zeta potential (ψ¯s), the power-law exponent(n), and the transitional parameter (β) on electro-osmotic mobility are examined. It is shown that the results presented in this study for the electro-osmotic mobility of Carreau fluids are quite general so that the electro-osmotic mobility for the Newtonian fluids and the power-law fluids can be obtained as two limiting cases. PMID:21503161

  19. Efficiency of osmotic pipe flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haaning, Louise Sejling; Jensen, Kaare Hartvig; Hélix-Nielsen, Claus; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine; Bohr, Tomas

    2013-05-01

    We present experiments and theory for flows of sugar or salt solutions in cylindrical tubes with semipermeable walls (hollow fiber membranes) immersed in water, quantifying the strength of the osmotic driving force in relation to the dimensionless parameters that specify the system. The pumping efficiency of these flows is limited by the presence of “unstirred” concentration boundary layers near the tube walls, and our primary aim is to understand and quantify these layers and their effect on the flow. We measure the outlet flow rate Qout while varying the inlet flow rate Q*, concentration c*, and tube length L, and map out the dependence of the flow rate gain γ=Qout/Q*-1 on these parameters. A theoretical analysis based on (1) the known velocity field for slow flow in cylindrical porous tubes and (2) a parabolic concentration profile allows us to compute analytically how the flow gain depends on the relative magnitude of radial diffusion and advection as well as the ratio of the osmotic velocity to pumping velocity, in very good agreement with experiments and with no adjustable parameters. Our analysis provides criteria that are useful for optimizing osmotic flow processes in, e.g., water purification devices.

  20. Osmotic behavior of bacterial protoplasts: temperature effects.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, A D; Corner, T R

    1973-06-01

    Among protoplasts released from cells of Bacillus megaterium grown at 20, 30, or 37 C, osmotic swelling in NaCl solution at a given external osmotic pressure was greatest for protoplasts from cells grown at 20 C and least for protoplasts from cells grown at 37 C. Protoplasts from cells grown at lower temperaturs were also less stable to osmotic shock and lysed at higher external osmotic pressures than did protoplasts from cells grown at higher temperatures. But for cells grown at any one temperature, osmotic stabilization was itself temperature dependent so that the higher the ambient incubation temperature, the higher the osmotic pressure needed to prevent lysis of a given fraction of the input protoplast population. However, comparison of the osmotic stability of protoplasts from cells grown at different temperatures at various ambient incubation temperatures revealed that, except at 5 C where no differences were discerned, protoplasts from cells grown at lower temperatures still lysed at higher osmotic pressures than did those from cells grown at higher temperatures. The apparent internal osmolality (28 to 31 atm) did not vary significantly among whole cells from the three growth temperatures. Therefore, the observed differences in osmotic behavior could not be attributed to changes in internal osmotic pressure. Rather, it seemed likely that the differences were due to changes in membrane properties. PMID:4197267

  1. Simulation of osmotic pressure in concentrated aqueous salt solutions.

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Roux, B.; Univ. of Chicago

    2010-01-01

    Accurate force fields are critical for meaningful simulation studies of highly concentrated electrolytes. The ion models that are widely used in biomolecular simulations do not necessarily reproduce the correct behavior at finite concentrations. In principle, the osmotic pressure is a key thermodynamic property that could be used to test and refine force field parameters for concentrated solutions. Here we describe a novel, simple, and practical method to compute the osmotic pressure directly from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of concentrated aqueous solutions by introducing an idealized semipermeable membrane. Simple models for Na+, K+, and Cl- are tested and calibrated to accurately reproduce the experimental osmotic pressure at high salt concentration, up to the solubility limit of 4-5 M. The methodology is general and can be extended to any type of solute as well as nonadditive polarizable force fields.

  2. Osmotic pumped heat pipes for large space platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Tanzer, H.J.; Fleischman, G.L.

    1982-01-01

    A thermal bus will be required as a thermal control source for future space platforms. The osmotic heat pipe is one candidate device with potential significant payoff toward serving growing thermal management needs. Results of a study evaluating osmotic heat pipes for thermal bus applications are presented. Electrostatic and other techniques are proposed for flow control and solution circulation in zero-gravity. Baseline size and performance design parameters of cellulose acetate membrane/sugar-water solution and other combinations were scaled up to predict osmotic pump performance for heat loads and temperatures of 4 to 120 C. A compact hollow-fiber membrane module measuring 20 inches in diameter by 12 inches long and weighing 190 pounds is projected for 50-kW heat loads.

  3. Asymmetric criticality of the osmotic compressibility in binary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Tianxiang; Liu, Shixia; Xie, Jingjing; Shen, Weiguo

    2013-01-01

    Heat capacities in the critical and the non-critical regions for {benzonitrile + tridecane} and {benzonitrile + pentadecane}, and light scattering for {benzonitrile + undecane}, {benzonitrile + dodecane}, {benzonitrile + tridecane}, {benzonitrile + tetradecane}, {benzonitrile + pentadecane}, and {benzonitrile + hexadecane} in the critical two-phase region were measured. Light scattering measurements confirmed the existence of the asymmetry for the osmotic compressibility while no such asymmetry was observed for the correlation length. An analysis of the osmotic compressibility asymmetry suggested the dominance of the singular term | {Δ hat T} |^β, which supports the complete scaling theory. The consistency of the complete scaling theory in descriptions of different asymmetry behaviors was also discussed. Moreover, it was found that the contribution of the heat capacity-related term is also important in describing the asymmetry of the osmotic compressibility as it was observed in studies of the diameters of the coexistence curves.

  4. Hypo-osmotic test in cat spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Comercio, E A; Monachesi, N E; Loza, M E; Gambarotta, M; Wanke, M M

    2013-10-01

    The hypo-osmotic (HOS) test has been used in other species as an indicator of the fertilising capacity of spermatozoa. The aims of this study were to assess the response of domestic cat spermatozoa to the hypo-osmotic test, to determine the type of solution, concentration and time of incubation needed to obtain a maximum percentage of swelling, to correlate the selected combination with the percentages of progressive motility and to evaluate whether dilution of the ejaculate alters the results. Incubation for 30 and 45 min in solutions of fructose and of citrate of 50 and 100 mOsmol kg⁻¹ was evaluated. The highest percentage of swelling was obtained using the 50 mOsmol kg⁻¹ solution, and no significant differences were observed between the times of exposure to the solutions. A positive correlation was observed between the percentage of individual progressive motility and the percentage of sperm swelling in a 50 mOsmol kg⁻¹ fructose solution, with no significant differences being observed between raw and diluted semen samples. The results of this study suggest that the HOS test could be useful for evaluating membrane function in domestic cat spermatozoa, both in raw semen and in samples diluted in the EZ Mixin® commercial extender, and thus could be incorporated into routine semen evaluation protocols. PMID:22928866

  5. Osmotic water transport through carbon nanotube membranes

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Amrit; Garde, Shekhar; Hummer, Gerhard

    2003-01-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to study osmotically driven transport of water molecules through hexagonally packed carbon nanotube membranes. Our simulation setup comprises two such semipermeable membranes separating compartments of pure water and salt solution. The osmotic force drives water flow from the pure-water to the salt-solution compartment. Monitoring the flow at molecular resolution reveals several distinct features of nanoscale flows. In particular, thermal fluctuations become significant at the nanoscopic length scales, and as a result, the flow is stochastic in nature. Further, the flow appears frictionless and is limited primarily by the barriers at the entry and exit of the nanotube pore. The observed flow rates are high (5.8 water molecules per nanosecond and nanotube), comparable to those through the transmembrane protein aquaporin-1, and are practically independent of the length of the nanotube, in contrast to predictions of macroscopic hydrodynamics. All of these distinct characteristics of nanoscopic water flow can be modeled quantitatively by a 1D continuous-time random walk. At long times, the pure-water compartment is drained, and the net flow of water is interrupted by the formation of structured solvation layers of water sandwiched between two nanotube membranes. Structural and thermodynamic aspects of confined water monolayers are studied. PMID:12878724

  6. [Effect of osmotic pressure on nitrification].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ping; Wu, Ming-Sheng

    2006-01-01

    The effect of osmotic pressure on nitrification was investigated in the internal-loop air-lift nitrifying reactor. When influent ammonia concentration is kept at 420mg x L(-1) and influent osmotic pressure is increased from 4.3 to 18.8 x 10(5) Pa, the ammonia conversion of the nitrifying bioreactor is maintained between 93% and 100%. After influent osmotic pressure is further increased to 19.2 x 10(5)Pa, the ammonia conversion goes down to 69.2%. The influence of osmotic pressure on nitrification takes place without any alarm and the critical osmotic pressure is between 18.8 x 10(5) and 19.2 x 10(5) Pa. During osmotic stress, the nitrifying bacterial populations in the activated sludge become simplified, the cell size becomes smaller, the inner membrane becomes less and some unknown inclusion particles are formed. The cell structure is restored as soon as the osmotic pressure is removed. Addition of potassium is able to relieve the effect of osmotic pressure on nitrification. The nitrifying activity of the activated sludge is stimulated by the osmotic stress, and the specific ammonia conversion is increased from 0.083 kg x kg(-1) x d(-1) to 0.509 kg x kg(-1) x d(-1) and 2.569 kg x kg(-1) x d(-1), respectively. PMID:16572857

  7. Osmotic tolerance of human granulocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Armitage, W.J.; Mazur, P.

    1984-11-01

    Human granulocytes are injured when returned to isotonic conditions after exposure at 0/sup 0/C to hyperosmotic solutions of NaCl or sucrose with osmolalities above 0.6 osmolal. The damage was expressed as a loss of membrane integrity (fluorescein diacetate (FDA) assay) only after 60-90 min incubation at 37/sup 0/C. Survival after exposure to a 1.4-osmolal solution at 0/sup 0/C was dependent on the extent of subsequent dilution. Dilution to below 0.6 osmolal was damaging, but cells could be returned to near-osmotic conditions provided that the solute concentration was increased again to 0.64 osmolal before the cells were incubated at 37/sup 0/C. Granulocyte cell volumes were measured under various osmotic conditions by computer-assisted micrometry. The cells did not display a minimum volume but behaved as osmometers over the observed range of 0.2-1.4 osmolal. Granulocyte volume at a given osmolality was independent of whether the cells had first been exposed to a strongly hyperosmotic medium, indicating that no solute loading occurred in hyperosmotic sucrose solutions. Even though the cells did not survive sequential exposure to >0.6 osmolal solutions, subsequent return to isotonicity, and incubation at 37/sup 0/C, neither cell lysis nor loss in FDA-positive cells occurred after the first two steps. This finding is not consistent with the critical-surface area-increment theory of freezing injury. The mechanism of cell injury in hyperosmotic solutions is thus not known. However, the results show that osmotic stress is potentially a major damaging factor both in the equilibration of cells with protective additives and during freezing and thawing.

  8. The effect of osmotic stabilizers on the radiometric detection of osmotically sensitive populations of some gram-negative bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, O.V.; Malinin, T.I.

    1982-02-01

    The effect of four osmotic stabilizers on the radiometric detection of osmotically sensitive populations of E. coli, S. typhimurium, and E. cloacae was studied. The addition of sucrose, sorbitol, glycerol, or ethylene glycoll to BACTEC 6B blood culture medium failed to improve the sensitivity of the system and produced an inhibitory effect on the level of 14CO2 released by organisms previously exposed to lysozyme and ECTA or to penicillin followed by the lysozyme treatment. The same effect was observed both in blood free media and simulated blood cultures. The addition of proline to sucrose-containing hypertonic media had no effect on growth index readings.

  9. Regulation of the paracellular Na+ and Cl- conductances by the NaCl-generated osmotic gradient in a manner dependent on the direction of osmotic gradients.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Shinsaku; Niisato, Naomi; Nakajima, Ken-Ichi; Marunaka, Yoshinori

    2008-02-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of osmolality on the paracellular ion conductance (Gp) composed of the Na(+) conductance (G(Na)) and the Cl(-) conductance (G(Cl)). An osmotic gradient generated by NaCl with relatively apical hypertonicity (NaCl-absorption-direction) induced a large increase in the G(Na) associated with a small increase in the G(Cl), whereas an osmotic gradient generated by NaCl with relatively basolateral hypertonicity (NaCl-secretion-direction) induced small increases in the G(Na) and the G(Cl). These increases in the Gp caused by NaCl-generated osmotic gradients were diminished by the application of sucrose canceling the NaCl-generated osmotic gradient. The osmotic gradient generated by apical [corrected] application of sucrose without any NaCl gradients had little effects on the Gp. However, this apical [corrected] application of sucrose produced a precondition drastically quickening the time course of the action of the NaCl-generated osmotic gradient on the Gp. Further, we found that application of the basolateral hypotonicity generated by reduction of NaCl concentration shifted the localization of claudin-1 to the apical from the lateral [corrected] side. These results indicate that the osmotic gradient regulates the paracellular ion conductive pathway of tight junctions via a mechanism dependent on the direction of NaCl gradients associated with a shift of claudin-1 localization to the apical side in renal A6 epithelial cells. PMID:18068115

  10. Phosphatidic acid osmotically destabilizes lysosomes through increased permeability to K+ and H+.

    PubMed

    Yi, Y-P; Wang, X; Zhang, G; Fu, T-S; Zhang, G-J

    2006-06-01

    Lysosomal destabilization is a critical event not only for the organelle but also for living cells. However, what factors can affect lysosomal stability is not fully studied. In this work, the effects of phosphatidic acid (PA) on the lysosomal integrity were investigated. Through the measurements of lysosomal beta-hexosaminidase free activity, intralysosomal pH, leakage of lysosomal protons and lysosomal latency loss in hypotonic sucrose medium, we established that PA could increase the lysosomal permeability to K+ and H+, and enhance the lysosomal osmotic sensitivity. Treatment of lysosomes with PA promoted entry of K+ into the organelle via K+/H+ exchange, which could produce osmotic stresses and osmotically destabilize the lysosomes. In addition, PA-induced increase in the lysosomal osmotic sensitivity caused the lysosomes to become more liable to destabilization in osmotic shocks. The results suggest that PA may play a role in the lysosomal destabilization. PMID:16917129

  11. Asymmetric Membrane Osmotic Capsules for Terbutaline Sulphate

    PubMed Central

    Gobade, N. G.; Koland, Marina; Harish, K. H.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to design an asymmetric membrane capsule, an osmotic pump-based drug delivery system of ethyl cellulose for controlled release of terbutaline sulphate. asymmetric membrane capsules contains pore-forming water soluble additive, sorbitol in different concentrations in the capsule shell membrane, which after coming in contact with water, dissolves, resulting in an in situ formation of a microporous structure. The terbutaline sulphate is a β-adrenoreceptor agonist widely used in the treatment of asthma. The oral dosage regimen of terbutaline sulphate is 5 mg twice or thrice daily, the plasma half-life is approximate 3-4 h and it produces GI irritation with extensive first pass metabolism. Hence, terbutaline sulphate was chosen as a model drug with an aim to develop controlled release system. Different formulations of ethyl cellulose were prepared by phase inversion technique using different concentrations of sorbitol as pore forming agent. It was found that the thickness of the prepared asymmetric membrane capsules was increased with increase in concentration of ethyl cellulose and pore forming agent, i.e. sorbitol. The dye release study in water and 10% sodium chloride solution indicates that, the asymmetric membrane capsules follow osmotic principle to release content. The pores formed due to sorbitol were confirmed by microscopic observation of transverse section of capsule membrane. Data of in vitro release study of terbutaline sulphate from asymmetric membrane capsules indicated that, the capsules prepared with 10% and 12.5% of ethyl cellulose and 25% of sorbitol released as much as 97.44% and 76.27% in 12 h, respectively with zero order release rate. Hence asymmetric membrane capsule of 10% ethyl cellulose and 25% of sorbitol is considered as optimum for controlled oral delivery of terbutaline sulphate. PMID:23204625

  12. Asymmetric membrane osmotic capsules for terbutaline sulphate.

    PubMed

    Gobade, N G; Koland, Marina; Harish, K H

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to design an asymmetric membrane capsule, an osmotic pump-based drug delivery system of ethyl cellulose for controlled release of terbutaline sulphate. asymmetric membrane capsules contains pore-forming water soluble additive, sorbitol in different concentrations in the capsule shell membrane, which after coming in contact with water, dissolves, resulting in an in situ formation of a microporous structure. The terbutaline sulphate is a β-adrenoreceptor agonist widely used in the treatment of asthma. The oral dosage regimen of terbutaline sulphate is 5 mg twice or thrice daily, the plasma half-life is approximate 3-4 h and it produces GI irritation with extensive first pass metabolism. Hence, terbutaline sulphate was chosen as a model drug with an aim to develop controlled release system. Different formulations of ethyl cellulose were prepared by phase inversion technique using different concentrations of sorbitol as pore forming agent. It was found that the thickness of the prepared asymmetric membrane capsules was increased with increase in concentration of ethyl cellulose and pore forming agent, i.e. sorbitol. The dye release study in water and 10% sodium chloride solution indicates that, the asymmetric membrane capsules follow osmotic principle to release content. The pores formed due to sorbitol were confirmed by microscopic observation of transverse section of capsule membrane. Data of in vitro release study of terbutaline sulphate from asymmetric membrane capsules indicated that, the capsules prepared with 10% and 12.5% of ethyl cellulose and 25% of sorbitol released as much as 97.44% and 76.27% in 12 h, respectively with zero order release rate. Hence asymmetric membrane capsule of 10% ethyl cellulose and 25% of sorbitol is considered as optimum for controlled oral delivery of terbutaline sulphate. PMID:23204625

  13. Membrane trafficking and osmotically induced volume changes in guard cells.

    PubMed

    Shope, Joseph C; Mott, Keith A

    2006-01-01

    Guard cells rapidly adjust their plasma membrane surface area while responding to osmotically induced volume changes. Previous studies have shown that this process is associated with membrane internalization and remobilization. To investigate how guard cells maintain membrane integrity during rapid volume changes, the effects of two membrane trafficking inhibitors on the response of intact guard cells of Vicia faba to osmotic treatments were studied. Using confocal microscopy and epidermal peels, the relationship between the area of a medial paradermal guard-cell section and guard-cell volume was determined. This allowed estimates of guard-cell volume to be made from single paradermal confocal images, and therefore allowed rapid determination of volume as cells responded to osmotic treatments. Volume changes in control cells showed exponential kinetics, and it was possible to calculate an apparent value for guard-cell hydraulic conductivity from these kinetics. Wortmannin and cytochalasin D inhibited the rate of volume loss following a 0-1.5 MPa osmotic treatment. Cytochalasin D also inhibited volume increases following a change from 1.5 MPa to 0 MPa, but wortmannin had no effect. Previous studies showing that treatment with arabinanase inhibits changes in guard-cell volume in response to osmotic treatments were confirmed. However, pressure volume curves show that the effects of arabinanase and the cytochalasin D were not due to changes in cell wall elasticity. It is suggested that arabinanase, cytochalasin D, and wortmannin cause reductions in the hydraulic conductivity of the plasma membrane, possibly via gating of aquaporins. A possible role for aquaporins in co-ordinating volume changes with membrane trafficking is discussed. PMID:17088361

  14. Aquaporins: another piece in the osmotic puzzle.

    PubMed

    Alleva, Karina; Chara, Osvaldo; Amodeo, Gabriela

    2012-09-21

    Osmolarity not only plays a key role in cellular homeostasis but also challenges cell survival. The molecular understanding of osmosis has not yet been completely achieved, and the discovery of aquaporins as molecular entities involved in water transport has caused osmosis to again become a focus of research. The main questions that need to be answered are the mechanism underlying the osmotic permeability coefficients and the extent to which aquaporins change our understanding of osmosis. Here, attempts to answer these questions are discussed. Critical aspects of the state of the state of knowledge on osmosis, a topic that has been studied since 19th century, are reviewed and integrated with the available information provided by in vivo, in vitro and in silico approaches. PMID:22728434

  15. Toward an Injectable Continuous Osmotic Glucose Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Johannessen, Erik; Krushinitskaya, Olga; Sokolov, Andrey; Philipp, Häfliger; Hoogerwerf, Arno; Hinderling, Christian; Kautio, Kari; Lenkkeri, Jaakko; Strömmer, Esko; Kondratyev, Vasily; Tønnessen, Tor Inge; Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Jakobsen, Henrik; Zimmer, Even; Akselsen, Bengt

    2010-01-01

    Background The growing pandemic of diabetes mellitus places a stringent social and economic burden on the society. A tight glycemic control circumvents the detrimental effects, but the prerogative is the development of new more effective tools capable of longterm tracking of blood glucose (BG) in vivo. Such discontinuous sensor technologies will benefit from an unprecedented marked potential as well as reducing the current life expectancy gap of eight years as part of a therapeutic regime. Method A sensor technology based on osmotic pressure incorporates a reversible competitive affinity assay performing glucose-specific recognition. An absolute change in particles generates a pressure that is proportional to the glucose concentration. An integrated pressure transducer and components developed from the silicon micro- and nanofabrication industry translate this pressure into BG data. Results An in vitro model based on a 3.6 × 8.7 mm large pill-shaped implant is equipped with a nanoporous membrane holding 4–6 nm large pores. The affinity assay offers a dynamic range of 36–720 mg/dl with a resolution of ±16 mg/dl. An integrated 1 × 1 mm2 large control chip samples the sensor signals for data processing and transmission back to the reader at a total power consumption of 76 µW. Conclusions Current studies have demonstrated the design, layout, and performance of a prototype osmotic sensor in vitro using an affinity assay solution for up to four weeks. The small physical size conforms to an injectable device, forming the basis of a conceptual monitor that offers a tight glycemic control of BG. PMID:20663452

  16. Osmotic pressure of ionic liquids in an electric double layer: Prediction based on a continuum model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Gi Jong; Ahn, Myung Mo; Kang, In Seok

    2015-12-01

    An analysis has been performed for the osmotic pressure of ionic liquids in the electric double layer (EDL). By using the electromechanical approach, we first derive a differential equation that is valid for computing the osmotic pressure in the continuum limit of any incompressible fluid in EDL. Then a specific model for ionic liquids proposed by Bazant et al. [M. Z. Bazant, B. D. Storey, and A. A. Kornyshev, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 046102 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.046102] is adopted for more detailed computation of the osmotic pressure. Ionic liquids are characterized by the correlation and the steric effects of ions and their effects are analyzed. In the low voltage cases, the correlation effect is dominant and the problem becomes linear. For this low voltage limit, a closed form formula is derived for predicting the osmotic pressure in EDL with no overlapping. It is found that the osmotic pressure decreases as the correlation effect increases. The osmotic pressures at the nanoslit surface and nanoslit centerline are also obtained for the low voltage limit. For the cases of moderately high voltage with high correlation factor, approximate formulas are derived for estimating osmotic pressure values based on the concept of a condensed layer near the electrode. In order to corroborate the results predicted by analytical studies, the full nonlinear model has been solved numerically.

  17. Synchronous delivery of felodipine and metoprolol tartrate using monolithic osmotic pump technology.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shiqing; Yu, Fanglin; Liu, Nan; Di, Zhong; Yan, Kun; Liu, Yan; Li, Ying; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Yang; Yang, Zhenbo; Li, Zhiping; Mei, Xingguo

    2016-11-01

    The synchronous sustained-release of two drugs was desired urgently for patients needing combination therapy in long term. However, sophisticated technologies were used generally to realize the simultaneous delivery of two drugs especially those with different physico-chemical properties. The purpose of this study was to obtain the concurrent release of felodipine and metoprolol tartrate, two drugs with completely different solubilities, in a simple monolithic osmotic pump system (FMOP). Two types of blocking agents were used in monolithic osmotic pump tablets and the synchronous sustained-release of FMOP was acquired in vitro. The tablets were also administered to beagle dogs and the plasma levels of FMOP were determined by HPLC-MS/MS. The pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using a non-compartmental model. Cmax of both felodipine and metoprolol from the osmotic pump tablets were lower, tmax and mean residence time of both felodipine and metoprolol from the osmotic pump tablets were longer significantly than those from immediate release tablets. These results verified prolonged release of felodipine and metoprolol tartrate from osmotic pump formulations. The similar absorption rate between felodipine and metoprolol in beagles was also obtained by this osmotic pump formulation. Therefore, it could be supposed that the accordant release of two drugs with completely different solubilities may be realized just by using monolithic osmotic pump technology. PMID:27074758

  18. Lack of appreciation of the role of osmotically unresponsive water in cell volume regulation.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Ivan L; Fullerton, Gary D

    2014-05-01

    The osmotic responsiveness of cell water has been re-evaluated of reports on the osmotic behaviour of cells. In seven animal cell types, the osmotically unresponsive water (OUR) fraction values ranged from 0.75 to 2.41 g water/g dry mass (g/g), and from 25 to 92% of the total cell water. Protein confirmation, aggregation and crowding play a major, but under-recognised, role in determining the extent of OUR and the regulation of cell volume. Volume regulation studies that do not take into account the role of OUR must be judged incomplete. PMID:24375657

  19. Deriving Osmotic Pressures of Draw Solutes used in Osmotically Driven Membrane Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick F. Stewart

    2013-03-01

    In osmotically driven membrane processes (ODMPs), such as forward osmosis (FO), the concentration of the draw solute and the related osmotic pressure play a critical role in mass transport and overall process performance. Search of the literature reveals that the concentration units used to describe draw solutes vary and the methods of deriving osmotic pressure from those concentrations are often unclear or not discussed. This paper recommends the use of molality and identifies the benefit of experimentally determined van ‘t Hoff indices when calculating osmotic pressures.

  20. Osmotically Driven Deformation of a Stable Water Film.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sue A; Clasohm, Lucy Y; Horn, Roger G; Carnie, Steven L

    2015-09-01

    An aspect of dynamic colloidal interactions that has received little attention is the osmotic stress associated with nonequilibrium distribution of solutes. Recent experiments on a mercury drop near a mica surface show a dimple forming on the mercury/water interface when there is a sudden change in the electric potential of the mercury drop coated with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 11-mercapto-1-undecanoic acid thiol molecules. A reasonable hypothesis is that the dimple formation is due to the desorption of a fraction of the SAM from the mercury drop surface when the surface potential is changed. The osmotic pressure in the thin film region increases as a result of the presence of the thiol molecules in the region, giving rise to the observed dimple. A model including the effects of osmotic flow, disjoining pressure, interfacial tension and hydrodynamic pressure is developed to test the hypothesis. The simplest version of the model, in which desorption is uniform and instantaneous, can produce a dimple whose growth is significantly more rapid than its decay, in qualitative agreement with the data. However, quantitative agreement is lacking. Several refinements to the model, including effects such as the change in interfacial tension as thiols are desorbed, gradual thiol desorption, a change in disjoining pressure as charged thiols are desorbed and nonuniform desorption do not change the qualitative picture. The qualitative success of the model suggests the osmotic pressure mechanism is correct, but the detailed picture of the SAM desorption at positive mercury surface potentials is not sufficiently well understood. The model reveals that the osmotic dimple is not the time-reverse equivalent of the usual hydrodynamic dimple phenomenon. We suggest that transient deformation of thin films by osmotic flow is a new and little-studied mechanism influencing the structure of stable thin films and the interaction of deformable drops. This has implications for

  1. Transcript abundance profiles reveal larger and more complex responses of grapevine to chilling compared to osmotic and salinity stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, iso-osmotic salinity (120 mM NaCl, 12mM CaCl2) and osmotic (PEG) stresses, along with chilling (5oC) stress, were applied to the cold-sensitive grapevine species V. vinifera cv. Cabernet Sauvignon. Microarray analysis of transcript abundance in shoot tips revealed that 43% of gene exp...

  2. A prospective multicentre study to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of osmotic release oral system (OROS®) hydromorphone in opioid-naive cancer patients: Results of the Korean South West Oncology Group study

    PubMed Central

    Song, Eun-Kee; Shim, Hyunjeong; Han, Hye-Suk; Sun, DerSheng; Lee, Soon-Il; Kang, Myung Hee; Lee, KyuTaek; Cho, DoYeun; Cho, In Sung; Park, Suk Young; Kim, Samyong; Yim, Chang-Yeol

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Osmotic release oral system (OROS®) hydromorphone is a potent, long-acting opioid analgesic, effective and safe for controlling cancer pain in patients who have received other strong opioids. To date, few studies have examined the efficacy of hydromorphone for pain relief in opioid-naive cancer patients. OBJECTIVES: A prospective, open-label, multicentre trial was conducted to determine the efficacy and tolerability of OROS hydromorphone as a single and front-line opioid therapy for patients experiencing moderate to severe cancer pain. METHODS: OROS hydromorphone was administered to patients who had not previously received strong, long-acting opioids. The baseline evaluation (visit 1) was followed by two evaluations (visits 2 and 3) performed two and 14 weeks later, respectively. The starting dose of OROS hydromorphone was 4 mg/day and was increased every two days when pain control was insufficient. Immediate-release hydromorphone was the only accepted alternative strong opioid for relief of breakthrough pain. The efficacy, safety and tolerability of OROS hydromorphone, including the effects on quality of life, and patients’ and investigators’ global impressions on pain relief were evaluated. The primary end point was pain intensity difference (PID) at visit 2 relative to visit 1 (expressed as %PID). RESULTS: A total of 107 patients were enrolled in the present study. An improvement in pain intensity of >50% (≥50% PID) was observed in 51.0% of the full analysis set and 58.6% of the per-protocol set. The mean pain score, measured using a numerical rating scale, was significantly reduced after two weeks of treatment, and most adverse events were manageable. Quality of life also improved, and >70% of patients and investigators were satisfied with the treatment. CONCLUSIONS: OROS hydromorphone provided effective pain relief and improved quality of life in opioid-naive cancer patients. As a single and front-line treatment, OROS hydromorphone delivered

  3. Proteomic profiling analysis reveals that glutathione system plays important roles responding to osmotic stress in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) roots.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianhui; Dong, Wen; Zhang, Daijing; Gao, Xiaolong; Jiang, Lina; Shao, Yun; Tong, Doudou; Li, Chunxi

    2016-01-01

    Wheat is one of the most important crops in the world, and osmotic stress has become one of the main factors affecting wheat production. Understanding the mechanism of the response of wheat to osmotic stress would be greatly significant. In the present study, isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) was used to analyze the changes of protein expression in the wheat roots exposed to different osmotic stresses. A total of 2,228 expressed proteins, including 81 differentially expressed proteins, between osmotic stress and control, were found. The comprehensive analysis of these differentially expressed proteins revealed that osmotic stress increased the variety of expressed proteins and suppressed the quantity of expressed proteins in wheat roots. Furthermore, the proteins for detoxifying and reactive oxygen species scavenging, especially the glutathione system, played important roles in maintaining organism balance in response to osmotic stress in wheat roots. Thus, the present study comprehensively describes the protein expression changes in wheat roots in response to osmotic stress, providing firmer foundation to further study the mechanism of osmotic resistance in wheat. PMID:27602297

  4. Proteomic profiling analysis reveals that glutathione system plays important roles responding to osmotic stress in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) roots

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wen; Zhang, Daijing; Gao, Xiaolong; Shao, Yun; Tong, Doudou

    2016-01-01

    Wheat is one of the most important crops in the world, and osmotic stress has become one of the main factors affecting wheat production. Understanding the mechanism of the response of wheat to osmotic stress would be greatly significant. In the present study, isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) was used to analyze the changes of protein expression in the wheat roots exposed to different osmotic stresses. A total of 2,228 expressed proteins, including 81 differentially expressed proteins, between osmotic stress and control, were found. The comprehensive analysis of these differentially expressed proteins revealed that osmotic stress increased the variety of expressed proteins and suppressed the quantity of expressed proteins in wheat roots. Furthermore, the proteins for detoxifying and reactive oxygen species scavenging, especially the glutathione system, played important roles in maintaining organism balance in response to osmotic stress in wheat roots. Thus, the present study comprehensively describes the protein expression changes in wheat roots in response to osmotic stress, providing firmer foundation to further study the mechanism of osmotic resistance in wheat. PMID:27602297

  5. Direct measurement of osmotic pressure of glycosaminoglycan solutions by membrane osmometry at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Chahine, Nadeen O; Chen, Faye H; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2005-09-01

    Articular cartilage is a hydrated soft tissue composed of negatively charged proteoglycans fixed within a collagen matrix. This charge gradient causes the tissue to imbibe water and swell, creating a net osmotic pressure that enhances the tissue's ability to bear load. In this study we designed and utilized an apparatus for directly measuring the osmotic pressure of chondroitin sulfate, the primary glycosaminoglycan found in articular cartilage, in solution with varying bathing ionic strength (0.015 M, 0.15 M, 0.5 M, 1 M, and 2 M NaCl) at room temperature. The osmotic pressure (pi) was found to increase nonlinearly with increasing chondroitin sulfate concentration and decreasing NaCl ionic bath environment. Above 1 M NaCl, pi changes negligibly with further increases in salt concentration, suggesting that Donnan osmotic pressure is negligible above this threshold, and the resulting pressure is attributed to configurational entropy. Results of the current study were also used to estimate the contribution of osmotic pressure to the stiffness of cartilage based on theoretical and experimental considerations. Our findings indicate that the osmotic pressure resulting from configurational entropy is much smaller in cartilage (based on an earlier study on bovine articular cartilage) than in free solution. The rate of change of osmotic pressure with compressive strain is found to contribute approximately one-third of the compressive modulus (H(A)(eff)) of cartilage (Pi approximately H(A)(eff)/3), with the balance contributed by the intrinsic structural modulus of the solid matrix (i.e., H(A) approximately 2H(A)(eff)/3). A strong dependence of this intrinsic modulus on salt concentration was found; therefore, it appears that proteoglycans contribute structurally to the magnitude of H(A), in a manner independent of osmotic pressure. PMID:15980166

  6. Quorum sensing regulates the osmotic stress response in Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    van Kessel, Julia C; Rutherford, Steven T; Cong, Jian-Ping; Quinodoz, Sofia; Healy, James; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria use a chemical communication process called quorum sensing to monitor cell density and to alter behavior in response to fluctuations in population numbers. Previous studies with Vibrio harveyi have shown that LuxR, the master quorum-sensing regulator, activates and represses >600 genes. These include six genes that encode homologs of the Escherichia coli Bet and ProU systems for synthesis and transport, respectively, of glycine betaine, an osmoprotectant used during osmotic stress. Here we show that LuxR activates expression of the glycine betaine operon betIBA-proXWV, which enhances growth recovery under osmotic stress conditions. BetI, an autorepressor of the V. harveyi betIBA-proXWV operon, activates the expression of genes encoding regulatory small RNAs that control quorum-sensing transitions. Connecting quorum-sensing and glycine betaine pathways presumably enables V. harveyi to tune its execution of collective behaviors to its tolerance to stress. PMID:25313392

  7. Quorum Sensing Regulates the Osmotic Stress Response in Vibrio harveyi

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Steven T.; Cong, Jian-Ping; Quinodoz, Sofia; Healy, James

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria use a chemical communication process called quorum sensing to monitor cell density and to alter behavior in response to fluctuations in population numbers. Previous studies with Vibrio harveyi have shown that LuxR, the master quorum-sensing regulator, activates and represses >600 genes. These include six genes that encode homologs of the Escherichia coli Bet and ProU systems for synthesis and transport, respectively, of glycine betaine, an osmoprotectant used during osmotic stress. Here we show that LuxR activates expression of the glycine betaine operon betIBA-proXWV, which enhances growth recovery under osmotic stress conditions. BetI, an autorepressor of the V. harveyi betIBA-proXWV operon, activates the expression of genes encoding regulatory small RNAs that control quorum-sensing transitions. Connecting quorum-sensing and glycine betaine pathways presumably enables V. harveyi to tune its execution of collective behaviors to its tolerance to stress. PMID:25313392

  8. Role of osmotic and hydrostatic pressures in bacteriophage genome ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemay, Serge G.; Panja, Debabrata; Molineux, Ian J.

    2013-02-01

    A critical step in the bacteriophage life cycle is genome ejection into host bacteria. The ejection process for double-stranded DNA phages has been studied thoroughly in vitro, where after triggering with the cellular receptor the genome ejects into a buffer. The experimental data have been interpreted in terms of the decrease in free energy of the densely packed DNA associated with genome ejection. Here we detail a simple model of genome ejection in terms of the hydrostatic and osmotic pressures inside the phage, a bacterium, and a buffer solution or culture medium. We argue that the hydrodynamic flow associated with the water movement from the buffer solution into the phage capsid and further drainage into the bacterial cytoplasm, driven by the osmotic gradient between the bacterial cytoplasm and culture medium, provides an alternative mechanism for phage genome ejection in vivo; the mechanism is perfectly consistent with phage genome ejection in vitro.

  9. Development of an oral push–pull osmotic pump of fenofibrate-loaded mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zongzhe; Wu, Chao; Zhao, Ying; Hao, Yanna; Liu, Ying; Zhao, Wenming

    2015-01-01

    In this study, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) were used to prepare an oral push–pull osmotic pump. Fenofibrate, the selected model drug, was firstly loaded into the MSNs, followed by a suspending agent consisting of a drug layer of push–pull osmotic pump. Fenofibrate-loaded MSNs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nitrogen adsorption/desorption analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), powder X-ray diffractometry (PXRD) analysis, and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Polyethylene oxide of molecular weight (MW) 100,000 and polyethylene oxide of MW 6,000,000 were selected as the suspending agent and the expanding agent, respectively. Cellulose acetate was used as the semipermeable membrane, along with polyethylene glycol 6,000 to increase the flexibility and control the membrane permeability. The in vitro dissolution studies indicated that the osmotic pump tablet combined with MSNs was able to deliver fenofibrate in an approximately zero-order manner in 24 hours. A pharmacokinetic study showed that, although the maximum plasma concentration of the osmotic pump was lower than that of the reference formulation, the relative bioavailability was increased, indicating that the osmotic pump was more efficient than the reference tablets. Therefore, using MSNs as a carrier for poorly water-soluble drugs is an effective method for preparing osmotic pump tablets. PMID:25784799

  10. Casein Micelle Dispersions under Osmotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Bouchoux, Antoine; Cayemitte, Pierre-Emerson; Jardin, Julien; Gésan-Guiziou, Geneviève; Cabane, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Casein micelles dispersions have been concentrated and equilibrated at different osmotic pressures using equilibrium dialysis. This technique measured an equation of state of the dispersions over a wide range of pressures and concentrations and at different ionic strengths. Three regimes were found. i), A dilute regime in which the osmotic pressure is proportional to the casein concentration. In this regime, the casein micelles are well separated and rarely interact, whereas the osmotic pressure is dominated by the contribution from small residual peptides that are dissolved in the aqueous phase. ii), A transition range that starts when the casein micelles begin to interact through their κ-casein brushes and ends when the micelles are forced to get into contact with each other. At the end of this regime, the dispersions behave as coherent solids that do not fully redisperse when osmotic stress is released. iii), A concentrated regime in which compression removes water from within the micelles, and increases the fraction of micelles that are irreversibly linked to each other. In this regime the osmotic pressure profile is a power law of the residual free volume. It is well described by a simple model that considers the micelle to be made of dense regions separated by a continuous phase. The amount of water in the dense regions matches the usual hydration of proteins. PMID:19167314

  11. Physical mechanism of membrane osmotic phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Guell, D.C.; Brenner, H.

    1996-09-01

    The microscale, physicomechanical cause of osmosis and osmotic pressure in systems involving permeable and semipermeable membranes is not well understood, and no fully satisfactory mechanism has been offered to explain these phenomena. A general theory, albeit limited to dilute systems of inert, noninteracting solute particles, is presented which demonstrates that short-range forces exerted by the membrane on the dispersed solute particles constitute the origin of osmotic phenomena. At equilibrium, the greater total force exerted by the membrane on those solute particles present in the reservoir containing the more concentrated of the two solutions bathing the membrane is balanced by a macroscopically observable pressure difference between the two reservoirs. The latter constitutes the so-called osmotic pressure difference. Under nonequilibrium conditions, the membrane-solute force is transmitted to the solvent, thus driving the convective flow of solvent observed macroscopically as osmosis. While elements of these ideas have been proposed previously in various forms, the general demonstration offered here of the physicomechanical source of osmotic phenomena is novel. Beyond the purely academic interest that exists in establishing a mechanical understanding of osmotic pressure, the analysis lays the foundation underlying a quantitative theory of osmosis in dilute, nonequilibrium systems outlined in a companion paper.

  12. Osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption: CT and radionuclide imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Roman-Goldstein, S.; Clunie, D.A.; Stevens, J.; Hogan, R.; Monard, J.; Ramsey, F.; Neuwelt, E.A.

    1994-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare CT and radionuclide imaging of osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption, and to develop a quantitative method for imaging osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption and to see if iopamidol could be safety given intravenously in conjunction with blood-brain barrier disruption. Forty-five blood-brain barrier disruption procedures were imaged with CT and radionuclide scans. The scans were evaluated with visual and quantitative scales. Patients were observed for adverse effects after blood-brain barrier disruption. There was a 4% rate of seizures in this study. There was good agreement between visual CT and radionuclide grading systems. Quantitative disruption did not add useful information to visual interpretations. Nonionic iodine-based contrast medium has a lower incidence of seizures when injected intravenously in conjunction with osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption than ionic contrast material. Contrast-enhanced CT is the preferred method to image disruption because it has better spatial resolution than radionuclide techniques. 34 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Osmotically driven flows in microchannels separated by a semipermeable membrane.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kåre Hartvig; Lee, Jinkee; Bohr, Tomas; Bruus, Henrik

    2009-07-21

    We have fabricated lab-on-a-chip systems with microchannels separated by integrated membranes allowing for osmotically driven microflows. We have investigated these flows experimentally by studying the dynamics and structure of the front of a sugar solution travelling in 200 microm wide and 50-200 microm deep microchannels. We find that the sugar front travels at a constant speed, and that this speed is proportional to the concentration of the sugar solution and inversely proportional to the depth of the channel. We propose a theoretical model, which, in the limit of low axial flow resistance, predicts that the sugar front should indeed travel with a constant velocity. The model also predicts an inverse relationship between the depth of the channel and the speed, and a linear relation between the sugar concentration and the speed. We thus find good qualitative agreement between the experimental results and the predictions of the model. Our motivation for studying osmotically driven microflows is that they are believed to be responsible for the translocation of sugar in plants through the phloem sieve element cells. Also, we suggest that osmotic elements can act as on-chip integrated pumps with no movable parts in lab-on-a-chip systems. PMID:19568680

  14. Maximum efficiency of the electro-osmotic pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zuli; Miao, Jianying; Wang, Ning; Wen, Weijia; Sheng, Ping

    2011-06-01

    Electro-osmotic effect in a porous medium arises from the electrically charged double layer at the fluid-solid interface, whereby an externally applied electric field can give rise to fluid flow. The electro-osmotic pump (EOP) is potentially useful for a variety of engineering and biorelated applications, but its generally low efficiency is a negative factor in this regard. A study to determine the optimal efficiency of the EOP and the condition(s) under which it can be realized is therefore of scientific interest and practical importance. We present the results of a theoretical and experimental study on the maximum efficiency optimization of the electrokinetic effect in artificially fabricated porous media with controlled pore diameters. It is shown that whereas the EOP efficiency increases with decreasing channel diameter, from 4.5 to 2.5 μm for samples fabricated on oxidized silicon wafers as expected for the interfacial nature of the electro-osmotic effect, the opposite trend was observed for samples with much smaller channel diameters fabricated on anodized aluminum oxide films, with the pore surface coated with silica. These results are in agreement with the theoretical prediction, based on the competition between interfacial area and the no-slip flow boundary condition, that an optimal efficiency of ˜1% is attained at a microchannel diameter that is five times the Debye length, with a zeta potential of ˜100 mV.

  15. Osmotic pressure in a bacterial swarm.

    PubMed

    Ping, Liyan; Wu, Yilin; Hosu, Basarab G; Tang, Jay X; Berg, Howard C

    2014-08-19

    Using Escherichia coli as a model organism, we studied how water is recruited by a bacterial swarm. A previous analysis of trajectories of small air bubbles revealed a stream of fluid flowing in a clockwise direction ahead of the swarm. A companion study suggested that water moves out of the agar into the swarm in a narrow region centered ∼ 30 μm from the leading edge of the swarm and then back into the agar (at a smaller rate) in a region centered ∼ 120 μm back from the leading edge. Presumably, these flows are driven by changes in osmolarity. Here, we utilized green/red fluorescent liposomes as reporters of osmolarity to verify this hypothesis. The stream of fluid that flows in front of the swarm contains osmolytes. Two distinct regions are observed inside the swarm near its leading edge: an outer high-osmolarity band (∼ 30 mOsm higher than the agar baseline) and an inner low-osmolarity band (isotonic or slightly hypotonic to the agar baseline). This profile supports the fluid-flow model derived from the drift of air bubbles and provides new (to our knowledge) insights into water maintenance in bacterial swarms. High osmotic pressure at the leading edge of the swarm extracts water from the underlying agar and promotes motility. The osmolyte is of high molecular weight and probably is lipopolysaccharide. PMID:25140422

  16. Osmotic tolerance limits and properties of rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Rutllant, Josep; Pommer, Angela C; Meyers, Stuart A

    2003-01-01

    Fundamental cryobiological characteristics of rhesus spermatozoa must be determined for successful cryopreservation techniques to be established. The main objectives of the present study were to determine the osmotic behavior and osmotic tolerance limits of rhesus macaque spermatozoa. Cell volume changes over anisotonic conditions were assessed using an electronic particle counter and sperm motility was evaluated with a computer-assisted sperm analysis system. Analysis of membrane integrity and mitochondrial membrane potential was performed using flow cytometry. Rhesus monkey spermatozoa behave as linear osmometers in the osmotic range tested (75-900 mOsmol kg(-1)), as shown by the Boyle van't Hoff plot (r(2) =.99). Rhesus spermatozoa have a mean cell volume of 36.8 +/- 0.5 micro m(3) at 22 degrees C, with 77.2% of the intracellular volume being osmotically inactive. Results regarding sperm tolerance to osmotic stress showed that sperm motility was more sensitive than membrane integrity to deviations from isotonicity and, in addition, that rhesus sperm motility and membrane integrity were more sensitive to hypertonic than hypotonic conditions. Mitochondrial membrane potential did not explain the lack of sperm motility observed under anisosmolal conditions in our study. Although most spermatozoa were able to recover initial volume after osmotic stress, they were not able to recover initial motility. PMID:12826693

  17. Osmotic tolerance limits of red blood cells from umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Zhurova, Mariia; Lusianti, Ratih E; Higgins, Adam Z; Acker, Jason P

    2014-08-01

    Effective methods for long-term preservation of cord red blood cells (RBCs) are needed to ensure a readily available supply of RBCs to treat fetal and neonatal anemia. Cryopreservation is a potential long-term storage strategy for maintaining the quality of cord RBCs for the use in intrauterine and neonatal transfusion. However, during cryopreservation, cells are subjected to damaging osmotic stresses during cryoprotectant addition and removal and freezing and thawing that require knowledge of osmotic tolerance limits in order to optimize the preservation process. The objective of this study was to characterize the osmotic tolerance limits of cord RBCs in conditions relevant to cryopreservation, and compare the results to the osmotic tolerance limits of adult RBCs. Osmotic tolerance limits were determined by exposing RBCs to solutions of different concentrations to induce a range of osmotic volume changes. Three treatment groups of adult and cord RBCs were tested: (1) isotonic saline, (2) 40% w/v glycerol, and (3) frozen-thawed RBCs in 40% w/v glycerol. We show that cord RBCs are more sensitive to shrinkage and swelling than adult RBCs, indicating that osmotic tolerance limits should be considered when adding and removing cryoprotectants. In addition, freezing and thawing resulted in both cord and adult RBCs becoming more sensitive to post-thaw swelling requiring that glycerol removal procedures for both cell types ensure that cell volume excursions are maintained below 1.7 times the isotonic osmotically active volume to attain good post-wash cell recovery. Our results will help inform the development of optimized cryopreservation protocol for cord RBCs. PMID:24836371

  18. Simultaneous measurement of peritoneal glucose and free water osmotic conductances.

    PubMed

    La Milia, V; Limardo, M; Virga, G; Crepaldi, M; Locatelli, F

    2007-09-01

    Ultrafiltration (UF) failure is one of the most important causes of long-term peritoneal dialysis (PD) failure in patients. Osmotic forces acting across small and ultra-small pores generate a UF with solutes through the small pore and free water transport (FWT) through the ultra-small pore. The ability of glucose to exert an osmotic pressure sufficient to cause UF is the so-called 'osmotic conductance to glucose' (OCG) of the peritoneal membrane. Our study proposes a simple method to determine both the OCG and FWT. In 50 patients on PD, a Double Mini-Peritoneal Equilibration Test (Double Mini-PET), consisting of two Mini-PET, was performed consecutively. A solution of 1.36% glucose was used for the first test, whereas a solution of 3.86% glucose was used for the second test. The sodium removal values and the differences in UF between the two tests were used to calculate FWT and the OCG. Patients with UF failure showed significant reductions not only in the OCG and the FWT but also of UF of small pores. The Double Mini-PET is simple, fast, and could become useful to evaluate patients on PD in everyday clinical practice. PMID:17609692

  19. Collective osmotic shock in ordered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala-Rivera, Paul; Channon, Kevin; Nguyen, Vincent; Sivaniah, Easan; Kabra, Dinesh; Friend, Richard H.; Nataraj, S. K.; Al-Muhtaseb, Shaheen A.; Hexemer, Alexander; Calvo, Mauricio E.; Miguez, Hernan

    2012-01-01

    Osmotic shock in a vesicle or cell is the stress build-up and subsequent rupture of the phospholipid membrane that occurs when a relatively high concentration of salt is unable to cross the membrane and instead an inflow of water alleviates the salt concentration gradient. This is a well-known failure mechanism for cells and vesicles (for example, hypotonic shock) and metal alloys (for example, hydrogen embrittlement). We propose the concept of collective osmotic shock, whereby a coordinated explosive fracture resulting from multiplexing the singular effects of osmotic shock at discrete sites within an ordered material results in regular bicontinuous structures. The concept is demonstrated here using self-assembled block copolymer micelles, yet it is applicable to organized heterogeneous materials where a minority component can be selectively degraded and solvated whilst ensconced in a matrix capable of plastic deformation. We discuss the application of these self-supported, perforated multilayer materials in photonics, nanofiltration and optoelectronics.

  20. Graphic analysis of osmotic fragility of erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, T; Sudo, K; Nishi, N; Sarashi, A; Kimura, E

    1976-11-01

    A precise and highly reproducible method for analyzing the osmotic fragility of erythrocytes with a minute amount of blood (less than 10 mul) is described. The osmotic fragility curves are recorded with a coil planet centrifuge with accessories and a scanning photodensitometer. The recorded curves are transcribed by a DuPont Curve Resolver and their components are analyzed. Normal fragility curves obtained from healthy adults revealed slightly skewed Gaussian curves and they were resolved into several typical Gaussian components which differed according to the physical and clinical conditions of subjects. Each resolved component is supposed to correspond to the population of erythrocytes having a nearly identical osmotic fragility. The method is proved to be useful for the detection of altered membrane properties of erythrocytes in various diseases. PMID:996851

  1. Collective osmotic shock in ordered materials.

    PubMed

    Zavala-Rivera, Paul; Channon, Kevin; Nguyen, Vincent; Sivaniah, Easan; Kabra, Dinesh; Friend, Richard H; Nataraj, S K; Al-Muhtaseb, Shaheen A; Hexemer, Alexander; Calvo, Mauricio E; Miguez, Hernan

    2012-01-01

    Osmotic shock in a vesicle or cell is the stress build-up and subsequent rupture of the phospholipid membrane that occurs when a relatively high concentration of salt is unable to cross the membrane and instead an inflow of water alleviates the salt concentration gradient. This is a well-known failure mechanism for cells and vesicles (for example, hypotonic shock) and metal alloys (for example, hydrogen embrittlement). We propose the concept of collective osmotic shock, whereby a coordinated explosive fracture resulting from multiplexing the singular effects of osmotic shock at discrete sites within an ordered material results in regular bicontinuous structures. The concept is demonstrated here using self-assembled block copolymer micelles, yet it is applicable to organized heterogeneous materials where a minority component can be selectively degraded and solvated whilst ensconced in a matrix capable of plastic deformation. We discuss the application of these self-supported, perforated multilayer materials in photonics, nanofiltration and optoelectronics. PMID:22120413

  2. Osmotic flow through fully permeable nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Lee, C; Cottin-Bizonne, C; Biance, A-L; Joseph, P; Bocquet, L; Ybert, C

    2014-06-20

    Osmosis across membranes is intrinsically associated with the concept of semipermeability. Here, however, we demonstrate that osmotic flow can be generated by solute gradients across nonselective, fully permeable nanochannels. Using a fluorescence imaging technique, we are able to measure the water flow rate inside single nanochannels to an unprecedented sensitivity of femtoliters per minute flow rates. Our results indicate the onset of a convective liquid motion under salinity gradients, from the higher to lower electrolyte concentration, which is attributed to diffusio-osmotic transport. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental evidence and quantitative investigation of this subtle interfacially driven transport, which need to be accounted for in nanoscale dynamics. Finally, diffusio-osmotic transport under a neutral polymer gradient is also demonstrated. The experiments highlight the entropic depletion of polymers that occurs at the nanochannel surface, resulting in convective flow in the opposite direction to that seen for electrolytes. PMID:24996091

  3. Osmotic Flow through Fully Permeable Nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.; Cottin-Bizonne, C.; Biance, A.-L.; Joseph, P.; Bocquet, L.; Ybert, C.

    2014-06-01

    Osmosis across membranes is intrinsically associated with the concept of semipermeability. Here, however, we demonstrate that osmotic flow can be generated by solute gradients across nonselective, fully permeable nanochannels. Using a fluorescence imaging technique, we are able to measure the water flow rate inside single nanochannels to an unprecedented sensitivity of femtoliters per minute flow rates. Our results indicate the onset of a convective liquid motion under salinity gradients, from the higher to lower electrolyte concentration, which is attributed to diffusio-osmotic transport. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental evidence and quantitative investigation of this subtle interfacially driven transport, which need to be accounted for in nanoscale dynamics. Finally, diffusio-osmotic transport under a neutral polymer gradient is also demonstrated. The experiments highlight the entropic depletion of polymers that occurs at the nanochannel surface, resulting in convective flow in the opposite direction to that seen for electrolytes.

  4. Relationship between sputum inflammatory markers and osmotic airway hyperresponsiveness during induction of sputum in asthmatic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Jang, A. S.; Choi, I. S.

    2001-01-01

    Hypertonic saline aerosols are being used increasingly for bronchial provocation testing and induction of sputum. The aims of this study were to assess the response to challenge with 3% hypertonic saline administered via a ultrasonic nebulizer in patients with asthma, and to evaluate relationship between % fall of FEV1 during induction of sputum (osmotic airway hyperresponsiveness; osmotic AHR) and biochemical markers of induced sputum. We investigated changes in FEV1 in response to inhaling ultrasonically nebulized 3% saline in 25 patients with asthma and 10 control subjects. FEV1 was measured before, during, and after induction of sputum. We used fluoroimmunoassay to detect eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), immunohistochemical staining to detect EG2+ (secretory form of ECP) eosinophils, and a sandwich ELISA to detect interleukin (IL)-5. Protein concentration was determined by using bicinchoninic acid protein assay reagent. Asthmatics, compared with controls, had significantly higher osmotic AHR. Moderate to severe asthmatics had significantly higher osmotic AHR compared to mild asthmatics. Osmotic AHR was significantly correlated with the proportion of eosinophils, the levels of ECP, EG2+ eosinophils, IL-5, and proteins. These data suggest that osmotic AHR is closely related to the clinical status and biochemical markers of sputum supernatant in asthmatic patients. PMID:11511785

  5. Subcutaneous Angiotensin II Infusion using Osmotic Pumps Induces Aortic Aneurysms in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hong; Howatt, Deborah A.; Balakrishnan, Anju; Moorleghen, Jessica J.; Rateri, Debra L.; Cassis, Lisa A.; Daugherty, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Osmotic pumps continuously deliver compounds at a constant rate into small animals. This article introduces a standard protocol used to induce aortic aneurysms via subcutaneous infusion of angiotensin II (AngII) from implanted osmotic pumps. This protocol includes calculation of AngII amount and dissolution, osmotic pump filling, implantation of osmotic pumps subcutaneously, observation after pump implantation, and harvest of aortas to visualize aortic aneurysms in mice. Subcutaneous infusion of AngII through osmotic pumps following this protocol is a reliable and reproducible technique to induce both abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysms in mice. Infusion durations range from a few days to several months based on the purpose of the study. AngII 1,000 ng/kg/min is sufficient to provide maximal effects on abdominal aortic aneurysmal formation in male hypercholesterolemic mouse models such as apolipoprotein E deficient or low-density lipoprotein receptor deficient mice. Incidence of abdominal aortic aneurysms induced by AngII infusion via osmotic pumps is 5 - 10 times lower in female hypercholesterolemic mice and also lower in both genders of normocholesterolemic mice. In contrast, AngII-induced thoracic aortic aneurysms in mice are not hypercholesterolemia or gender-dependent. Importantly, multiple features of this mouse model recapitulate those of human aortic aneurysms. PMID:26436287

  6. Subcutaneous Angiotensin II Infusion using Osmotic Pumps Induces Aortic Aneurysms in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hong; Howatt, Deborah A; Balakrishnan, Anju; Moorleghen, Jessica J; Rateri, Debra L; Cassis, Lisa A; Daugherty, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Osmotic pumps continuously deliver compounds at a constant rate into small animals. This article introduces a standard protocol used to induce aortic aneurysms via subcutaneous infusion of angiotensin II (AngII) from implanted osmotic pumps. This protocol includes calculation of AngII amount and dissolution, osmotic pump filling, implantation of osmotic pumps subcutaneously, observation after pump implantation, and harvest of aortas to visualize aortic aneurysms in mice. Subcutaneous infusion of AngII through osmotic pumps following this protocol is a reliable and reproducible technique to induce both abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysms in mice. Infusion durations range from a few days to several months based on the purpose of the study. AngII 1,000 ng/kg/min is sufficient to provide maximal effects on abdominal aortic aneurysmal formation in male hypercholesterolemic mouse models such as apolipoprotein E deficient or low-density lipoprotein receptor deficient mice. Incidence of abdominal aortic aneurysms induced by AngII infusion via osmotic pumps is 5-10 times lower in female hypercholesterolemic mice and also lower in both genders of normocholesterolemic mice. In contrast, AngII-induced thoracic aortic aneurysms in mice are not hypercholesterolemia or gender-dependent. Importantly, multiple features of this mouse model recapitulate those of human aortic aneurysms. PMID:26436287

  7. Reduced Osmotic Potential Effects on Photosynthesis 1

    PubMed Central

    Berkowitz, Gerald A.; Gibbs, Martin

    1983-01-01

    Addition of sorbitol, which facilitated reductions in reaction medium osmotic potential from standard (0.33 molar sorbitol, −10 bars) isotonic conditions to a stress level of 0.67 molar sorbitol (−20 bars), inhibited the photosynthetic capacity of isolated spinach (Spinacia oleracea) chloroplasts. This inhibition, which ranged from 64 to 74% under otherwise standard reaction conditions, was dependent on reaction medium inorganic phosphate concentration, with the phosphate optimum for photosynthesis reduced to 0.05 millimolar at the low osmotic potential stress treatment from a value of 0.25 millimolar under control conditions. Stromal alkalating agents such as NH4Cl (0.75 millimolar) and KCl (35 millimolar) were also found to affect the degree of low osmotic potential inhibition of photosynthesis. Both agents doubled the rate of NaHCO3-supported O2 evolution under the stress treatment, while hardly affecting the control rate at optimal concentrations. These agents also reduced the length of the lag phase of photosynthetic O2 evolution under the stress treatment to a much greater degree. The rate-enhancement effect of these agents under the stress treatment was reversed by sodium acetate, which is known to facilitate stromal acidification. The reaction medium pH optimum for photosynthesis under the stress treatment was higher than under control conditions. In the presence of optimal NH4Cl, this shift was no longer evident. Internal pH measurements indicated that the stress treatment caused a 0.43 and 0.24 unit reduction in the stromal and intrathylakoid pH, respectively, under illumination. This osmotically induced acidification was not evident in the dark. The presence of 0.75 millimolar NH4Cl partially reversed the osmotically induced reduction in the illuminated stromal pH. It was concluded that stromal acidification is a mediating mechanism of the most severe site of low osmotic potential inhibition of the photosynthetic process. PMID:16662927

  8. A comparative prospective study using matched samples to determine the influence of subnormal hypo-osmotic test scores of spermatozoa on subsequent fertilization and pregnancy rates following in-vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Check, J H; Stumpo, L; Lurie, D; Benfer, K; Callan, C

    1995-05-01

    The achievement of pregnancies in vivo is rare in couples where the male partner has defective sperm membranes as shown by hypo-osmotic swelling (HOS) test scores of < 50%. However, there have been mixed reports on the value of the HOS test in predicting outcome following invitro fertilization; some studies suggest reduced fertilization rates and others find little, if any, predictability of decreased fertilization. The assumption has been made that fertilization rates are proportional to pregnancy rates; however, this may not necessarily be true since defective spermatozoa could lead to a less viable pre-embryo and therefore a decreased viable pregnancy rate. We performed a comparative prospective study using matched controls to evaluate fertilization rates and to determine subsequent pregnancy rates. The mean HOS scores were 70.0 and 36.7% respectively, with mean motile sperm concentrations of 35.7 and 34.0 x 10(6)/ml in 27 matched pairs. There was no difference in the mean number of oocytes retrieved, fertilization rates or number of embryos transferred between the two groups by HOS score. The clinical and viable pregnancy rates and implantation rates were 25.9, 18.5 and 9.9% for normal versus 3.7, 3.7 and 1.1% for subnormal groups. These data suggest that low HOS scores may be associated with the formation of defective embryos, leading to low pregnancy rates but normal fertilization rates. PMID:7657765

  9. Magnetically Guided Propulsion of Osmotic Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, Glenn; Rinaldi, Carlos; Córdova-Figueroa, Ubaldo

    2010-11-01

    Propulsion of artificial nano- and micro-scale objects induced by chemical reactions is one of the most exciting challenges in colloidal physics. Recent experiments have shown that directed motion of catalytic motors is hindered by their rotary Brownian motion, preventing its potential to be fully realized. The present work investigates the magnetically guided propulsion of a colloidal particle--the osmotic motor-- immersed in a dispersion of colloidal `bath' particles subject to an unidirectional magnetic field using Brownian dynamics simulation. The osmotic motor is propelled by a chemical reaction that consumes bath particles over a portion of its surface. The non-equilibrium microstructure of bath particles induced by the surface reaction creates an `osmotic pressure' imbalance on the motor's surface causing it to move to regions of lower bath particle concentration. The strength of the magnetic field is controlled by the Langevin parameter, which physically measures the relative importance of magnetic to Brownian torques, and dictates the directionality of the osmotic motor. The translational self-diffusivity is measured for different reaction speeds, particle sizes, bath particle concentrations, and magnetic dipole orientations. Finally, a theory to determine the long-time self-diffusivity and time-averaged particle velocity is developed and compared to the simulation results.

  10. Effect of the achondroplasia mutation on FGFR3 dimerization and FGFR3 structural response to fgf1 and fgf2: A quantitative FRET study in osmotically derived plasma membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Hristova, Kalina

    2016-07-01

    The G380R mutation in the transmembrane domain of FGFR3 is a germline mutation responsible for most cases of Achondroplasia, a common form of human dwarfism. Here we use quantitative Fӧster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) and osmotically derived plasma membrane vesicles to study the effect of the achondroplasia mutation on the early stages of FGFR3 signaling in response to the ligands fgf1 and fgf2. Using a methodology that allows us to capture structural changes on the cytoplasmic side of the membrane in response to ligand binding to the extracellular domain of FGFR3, we observe no measurable effects of the G380R mutation on FGFR3 ligand-bound dimer configurations. Instead, the most notable effect of the achondroplasia mutation is increased propensity for FGFR3 dimerization in the absence of ligand. This work reveals new information about the molecular events that underlie the achondroplasia phenotype, and highlights differences in FGFR3 activation due to different single amino-acid pathogenic mutations. PMID:27040652

  11. Osmotic Stress Signaling and Osmoadaptation in Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Hohmann, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    The ability to adapt to altered availability of free water is a fundamental property of living cells. The principles underlying osmoadaptation are well conserved. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an excellent model system with which to study the molecular biology and physiology of osmoadaptation. Upon a shift to high osmolarity, yeast cells rapidly stimulate a mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade, the high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway, which orchestrates part of the transcriptional response. The dynamic operation of the HOG pathway has been well studied, and similar osmosensing pathways exist in other eukaryotes. Protein kinase A, which seems to mediate a response to diverse stress conditions, is also involved in the transcriptional response program. Expression changes after a shift to high osmolarity aim at adjusting metabolism and the production of cellular protectants. Accumulation of the osmolyte glycerol, which is also controlled by altering transmembrane glycerol transport, is of central importance. Upon a shift from high to low osmolarity, yeast cells stimulate a different MAP kinase cascade, the cell integrity pathway. The transcriptional program upon hypo-osmotic shock seems to aim at adjusting cell surface properties. Rapid export of glycerol is an important event in adaptation to low osmolarity. Osmoadaptation, adjustment of cell surface properties, and the control of cell morphogenesis, growth, and proliferation are highly coordinated processes. The Skn7p response regulator may be involved in coordinating these events. An integrated understanding of osmoadaptation requires not only knowledge of the function of many uncharacterized genes but also further insight into the time line of events, their interdependence, their dynamics, and their spatial organization as well as the importance of subtle effects. PMID:12040128

  12. Effect of Osmotic Pressure on the Stability of Whole Inactivated Influenza Vaccine for Coating on Microneedles

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyo-Jick; Song, Jae-Min; Bondy, Brian J.; Compans, Richard W.; Kang, Sang-Moo; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Enveloped virus vaccines can be damaged by high osmotic strength solutions, such as those used to protect the vaccine antigen during drying, which contain high concentrations of sugars. We therefore studied shrinkage and activity loss of whole inactivated influenza virus in hyperosmotic solutions and used those findings to improve vaccine coating of microneedle patches for influenza vaccination. Using stopped-flow light scattering analysis, we found that the virus underwent an initial shrinkage on the order of 10% by volume within 5 s upon exposure to a hyperosmotic stress difference of 217 milliosmolarity. During this shrinkage, the virus envelope had very low osmotic water permeability (1 – 6×10−4 cm s–1) and high Arrhenius activation energy (Ea = 15.0 kcal mol–1), indicating that the water molecules diffused through the viral lipid membranes. After a quasi-stable state of approximately 20 s to 2 min, depending on the species and hypertonic osmotic strength difference of disaccharides, there was a second phase of viral shrinkage. At the highest osmotic strengths, this led to an undulating light scattering profile that appeared to be related to perturbation of the viral envelope resulting in loss of virus activity, as determined by in vitro hemagglutination measurements and in vivo immunogenicity studies in mice. Addition of carboxymethyl cellulose effectively prevented vaccine activity loss in vitro and in vivo, believed to be due to increasing the viscosity of concentrated sugar solution and thereby reducing osmotic stress during coating of microneedles. These results suggest that hyperosmotic solutions can cause biphasic shrinkage of whole inactivated influenza virus which can damage vaccine activity at high osmotic strength and that addition of a viscosity enhancer to the vaccine coating solution can prevent osmotically driven damage and thereby enable preparation of stable microneedle coating formulations for vaccination. PMID:26230936

  13. Swelling and electro-osmotic properties of cation-exchange membranes with different structures in methanol-water media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barragán, V. M.; Villaluenga, J. P. G.; Godino, M. P.; Izquierdo-Gil, M. A.; Ruiz-Bauzá, C.; Seoane, B.

    Electro-osmosis experiments through three cation-exchange membranes with different morphology and similar electric properties have been performed using methanol-water solutions under different experimental conditions. The influence on the electro-osmotic transport of the percentage of methanol on solvent with two different electrolytes, NaCl and LiCl, has been studied. The experimental results show that the presence of methanol in the solutions affects strongly the electro-osmotic flow, and this influence is different depending on the membrane morphology. Correlations among electro-osmotic permeability, swelling behavior, and cell resistance are studied for these membrane systems at different percentages of methanol in solvent.

  14. Osmotic actuation modelling for innovative biorobotic solutions inspired by the plant kingdom.

    PubMed

    Sinibaldi, E; Puleo, G L; Mattioli, F; Mattoli, V; Di Michele, F; Beccai, L; Tramacere, F; Mancuso, S; Mazzolai, B

    2013-06-01

    Osmotic-driven plant movements are widely recognized as impressive examples of energy efficiency and low power consumption. These aspects motivate the interest in developing an original biomimetic concept of new actuators based on the osmotic principle exploited by plants. This study takes a preliminary step in this direction, by modelling the dynamic behaviour of two exemplificative yet relevant implementations of an osmotic actuator concept. In more detail, the considered implementations differ from each other in the way actuation energy storage is achieved (through a piston displacement in the former case, through membrane bulging in the latter). The dynamic problem is analytically solved for both cases; scaling laws for the actuation figures of merit (namely characteristic time, maximum force, maximum power, power density, cumulated work and energy density) as a function of model parameters are obtained for the bulging implementation. Starting from such performance indicators, a preliminary dimensioning of the envisaged osmotic actuator is exemplified, based on design targets/constraints (such as characteristic time and/or maximum force). Moreover, model assumptions and limitations are discussed towards effective prototypical development and experimental testing. Nonetheless, this study takes the first step towards the design of new actuators based on the natural osmotic principle, which holds potential for disruptive innovation in many fields, including biorobotics and ICT solutions. PMID:23648821

  15. Thermo-Osmotic Flow in Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bregulla, Andreas P.; Würger, Alois; Günther, Katrin; Mertig, Michael; Cichos, Frank

    2016-05-01

    We report on the first microscale observation of the velocity field imposed by a nonuniform heat content along the solid-liquid boundary. We determine both radial and vertical velocity components of this thermo-osmotic flow field by tracking single tracer nanoparticles. The measured flow profiles are compared to an approximate analytical theory and to numerical calculations. From the measured slip velocity we deduce the thermo-osmotic coefficient for both bare glass and Pluronic F-127 covered surfaces. The value for Pluronic F-127 agrees well with Soret data for polyethylene glycol, whereas that for glass differs from literature values and indicates the complex boundary layer thermodynamics of glass-water interfaces.

  16. Thermo-Osmotic Flow in Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Bregulla, Andreas P; Würger, Alois; Günther, Katrin; Mertig, Michael; Cichos, Frank

    2016-05-01

    We report on the first microscale observation of the velocity field imposed by a nonuniform heat content along the solid-liquid boundary. We determine both radial and vertical velocity components of this thermo-osmotic flow field by tracking single tracer nanoparticles. The measured flow profiles are compared to an approximate analytical theory and to numerical calculations. From the measured slip velocity we deduce the thermo-osmotic coefficient for both bare glass and Pluronic F-127 covered surfaces. The value for Pluronic F-127 agrees well with Soret data for polyethylene glycol, whereas that for glass differs from literature values and indicates the complex boundary layer thermodynamics of glass-water interfaces. PMID:27203347

  17. Physics of Bacteria During Osmotic Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Jordan; Klug, William

    Bacteria combat hypoosmotic shocks by opening mechanosensitive ion channels located within the inner membrane. These channels are believed to act as ``emergency release valves,'' reducing transient pressure during the shock by regulating solute and water flux. Recent experiments have shown that cell survivability depends strongly on channel populations and the rate of osmotic shock. However, the understanding of the physical mechanisms behind osmotic protection remains unclear. We investigate how channel deletions, variations in shock rate, and cell envelope mechanics affect survivability by constructing theoretical elasticity and transport models. We find that reducing the number of channels and applying faster shocks significantly increases the time-dependent stress of the cell membrane and wall. This result provides insight into physical mechanisms that govern cell failure, including membrane rupture and wall fracture.

  18. Osmotically-assisted desalination method and system

    SciTech Connect

    Achilli, Andrea; Childress, Amy E.; Cath, Tzahi Y.

    2014-08-12

    Systems and methods for osmotically assisted desalination include using a pressurized concentrate from a pressure desalination process to pressurize a feed to the desalination process. The depressurized concentrate thereby produced is used as a draw solution for a pressure-retarded osmosis process. The pressure-retarded osmosis unit produces a pressurized draw solution stream that is used to pressurize another feed to the desalination process. In one example, the feed to the pressure-retarded osmosis process is impaired water.

  19. Osmotic Pressure in Ionic Microgel Dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, Alan R.; Tang, Qiyun

    2015-03-01

    Microgels are microscopic gel particles, typically 10-1000 nm in size, that are swollen by a solvent. Hollow microgels (microcapsules) can encapsulate cargo, such as dye molecules or drugs, in their solvent-filled cavities. Their sensitive response to environmental conditions (e.g., temperature, pH) and influence on flow properties suit microgels to widespread applications in the chemical, pharmaceutical, food, and consumer care industries. When dispersed in water, polyelectrolyte gels become charged through dissociation of counterions. The electrostatic contribution to the osmotic pressure inside and outside of ionic microgels influences particle swelling and bulk materials properties, including thermodynamic, structural, optical, and rheological properties. Within the primitive and cell models of polyelectrolyte solutions, we derive an exact statistical mechanical formula for the contribution of mobile microions to the osmotic pressure within ionic microgels. Using Poisson-Boltzmann theory, we validate this result by explicitly calculating ion distributions across the surface of an ionic microgel and the electrostatic contribution to the osmotic pressure. Within a coarse-grained one-component model, we further chart the limits of the cell model for salty dispersions. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR-1106331.

  20. Sorbitol treatment extends lifespan and induces the osmotic stress response in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chandler-Brown, Devon; Choi, Haeri; Park, Shirley; Ocampo, Billie R.; Chen, Shiwen; Le, Anna; Sutphin, George L.; Shamieh, Lara S.; Smith, Erica D.; Kaeberlein, Matt

    2015-01-01

    The response to osmotic stress is a highly conserved process for adapting to changing environmental conditions. Prior studies have shown that hyperosmolarity by addition of sorbitol to the growth medium is sufficient to increase both chronological and replicative lifespan in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here we report a similar phenomenon in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Addition of sorbitol to the nematode growth medium induces an adaptive osmotic response and increases C. elegans lifespan by about 35%. Lifespan extension from 5% sorbitol behaves similarly to dietary restriction in a variety of genetic backgrounds, increasing lifespan additively with mutation of daf-2(e1370) and independently of daf-16(mu86), sir-2.1(ok434), aak-2(ok524), and hif-1(ia04). Dietary restriction by bacterial deprivation or mutation of eat-2(ad1113) fails to further extend lifespan in the presence of 5% sorbitol. Two mutants with constitutive activation of the osmotic response, osm-5(p813) and osm-7(n1515), were found to be long-lived, and lifespan extension from sorbitol required the glycerol biosynthetic enzymes GPDH-1 and GPDH-2. Taken together, these observations demonstrate that exposure to sorbitol at levels sufficient to induce an adaptive osmotic response extends lifespan in worms and define the osmotic stress response pathway as a longevity pathway conserved between yeast and nematodes. PMID:26579191

  1. An analysis of the effects of osmotic backwashing on the seawater reverse osmosis process.

    PubMed

    Park, JunYoung; Jeong, WooWon; Nam, JongWoo; Kim, JaeHun; Kim, JiHoon; Chon, Kangmin; Lee, Euijong; Kim, HyungSoo; Jang, Am

    2014-01-01

    Fouling control is an important consideration in the design and operation of membrane-based water treatment processes. It has been generally known that chemical cleaning is still the most common method to remove foultants and maintain the performance of reverse osmosis (RO) desalination. Regardless of the chemical membrane cleaning methods applied effectively, however, frequent chemical cleaning can shorten the membrane life. In addition, it also increases operating and maintenance costs due to the waste chemical disposal. As an alternative, osmotic backwashing can be applied to RO membranes by diluting the concentration polarization (CP) layer. In this study, the effects of osmotic backwashing were analysed under different total dissolved salts (TDSs) and backwashing conditions, and the parameters of the osmotic backwashing were evaluated. The results of the analysis based on the properties of the organic matters found in raw water showed that the cleaning efficiency in respect to the fouling by hydrophilic organic matters was the greatest. Osmotic backwashing was carried out by changing the TDS of the permeate. As a result, the backwashing volume decreased with time due to the CP of the permeate and the backwashing volume. The difference in the osmotic pressure between the raw water and the permeate (Delta pi) also decreased as time passed. It was confirmed that when the temperature of the effluent was high, both the cleaning efficiency and the backwashing volume, which inpours at the same time, increased. When the circulation flow of the effluent was high, both the cleaning efficiency and the backwashing volume increased. PMID:24701943

  2. MpAsr encodes an intrinsically unstructured protein and enhances osmotic tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jin-Ran; Liu, Bing; Feng, Dong-Ru; Liu, Hai-yan; He, Yan-ming; Qi, Kang-biao; Wang, Hong-Bin; Wang, Jin-Fa

    2011-07-01

    Abscisic acid-, stress- and ripening (ASR) -induced proteins are plant-specific proteins whose expression is up-regulated under abiotic stresses or during fruit ripening. In this study, we characterized an ASR protein from plantain to explore its physiological roles under osmotic stress. The expression pattern of MpAsr gene shows that MpAsr gene changed little at the mRNA level, while the MpASR protein accumulates under osmotic treatment. Through bioinformatic-based predictions, circular dichroism spectrometry, and proteolysis and heat-stability assays, we determined that the MpASR protein is an intrinsically unstructured protein in solution. We demonstrated that the hydrophilic MpASR protein could protect L: -lactate dehydrogenase (L: -LDH) from cold-induced aggregation. Furthermore, heterologous expression of MpAsr in Escherichia coli and Arabidopsis enhanced the tolerance of transformants to osmotic stress. Transgenic 35S::MpAsr Arabidopsis seeds had a higher germination frequency than wild-type seeds under unfavorable conditions. At the physiological level, 35S::MpAsr Arabidopsis showed increased soluble sugars and decreased cell membrane damage under osmotic stress. Thus, our results suggest that the MpASR protein may act as an osmoprotectant and water-retaining molecule to help cell adjustment to water deficit caused by osmotic stress. PMID:21327389

  3. Early osmotic adjustment responses in drought-resistant and drought-sensitive oilseed rape.

    PubMed

    Hatzig, Sarah; Zaharia, L Irina; Abrams, Suzanne; Hohmann, Marie; Legoahec, Laurie; Bouchereau, Alain; Nesi, Nathalie; Snowdon, Rod J

    2014-08-01

    The impact of osmotic stress on growth, physiology, and metabolism of winter oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) was investigated by detailed analysis of biomass traits, hormone metabolites and osmolytes in two genetically unrelated drought-tolerant genotypes and two unrelated drought-sensitive genotypes. Seedlings were grown in vitro under controlled conditions and osmotic stress was simulated by applying a gradual treatment with polyethylene glycol (PEG 6000), followed by hypo-osmotic treatment of variants used for metabolite determination. The results provide a basis for the identification of reliable selection criteria for drought resistance in oilseed rape. The in vitro cultivation system established during this study enabled effective discrimination of early osmotic stress responses between drought-resistant and -susceptible oilseed rape genotypes that also show large differences in relative seed yield under drought conditions in the field. Clear physiological and metabolic differences were observed between the drought-resistant and drought-sensitive genotypes, suggesting that osmotic adjustment is a key component of drought response in oilseed rape. Unexpectedly, however, the drought-resistant genotypes did not show typical hormonal adjustment and osmolyte accumulation, suggesting that they possess alternative physiological mechanisms enabling avoidance of stress symptoms. PMID:24667002

  4. Osmotic stress, endogenous abscisic acid and the control of leaf morphology in Hippuris vulgaris L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goliber, T. E.; Feldman, L. J.

    1989-01-01

    Previous reports indicate that heterophyllous aquatic plants can be induced to form aerial-type leaves on submerged shoots when they are grown in exogenous abscisic acid (ABA). This study reports on the relationship between osmotic stress (e.g. the situation encountered by a shoot tip when it grows above the water surface), endogenous ABA (as measured by gas chromatography-electron capture detector) and leaf morphology in the heterophyllous aquatic plant, Hippuris vulgaris. Free ABA could not be detected in submerged shoots of H. vulgaris but in aerial shoots ABA occurred at ca. 40 ng (g fr wt)-1. When submerged shoots were osmotically stressed ABA appeared at levels of 26 to 40 ng (g fr wt)-1. These and other data support two main conclusions: (1) Osmotically stressing a submerged shoot causes the appearance of detectable levels of ABA. (2) The rise of ABA in osmotically stressed submerged shoots in turn induces a change in leaf morphology from the submerged to the aerial form. This corroborates the hypothesis that, in the natural environment, ABA levels rise in response to the osmotic stress encountered when a submerged shoot grows up through the water/air interface and that the increased ABA leads to the production of aerial-type leaves.

  5. Membrane fluidity of halophilic ectoine-secreting bacteria related to osmotic and thermal treatment.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Sven; David, Florian; Clark, Wiebke; Wittmann, Christoph; Krull, Rainer

    2013-12-01

    In response to sudden decrease in osmotic pressure, halophilic microorganisms secrete their accumulated osmolytes. This specific stress response, combined with physiochemical responses to the altered environment, influence the membrane properties and integrity of cells, with consequent effects on growth and yields in bioprocesses, such as bacterial milking. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in membrane fluidity and integrity induced by environmental stress in ectoine-secreting organisms. The halophilic ectoine-producing strains Alkalibacillus haloalkaliphilus and Chromohalobacter salexigens were treated hypo- and hyper-osmotically at several temperatures. The steady-state anisotropy of fluorescently labeled cells was measured, and membrane integrity assessed by flow cytometry and ectoine distribution. Strong osmotic downshocks slightly increased the fluidity of the bacterial membranes. As the temperature increased, the increasing membrane fluidity encouraged more ectoine release under the same osmotic shock conditions. On the other hand, combined shock treatments increased the number of disintegrated cells. From the ectoine release and membrane integrity measurements under coupled thermal and osmotic shock conditions, we could optimize the secretion conditions for both bacteria. PMID:23653110

  6. Osmotic stress at the barley root affects expression of circadian clock genes in the shoot.

    PubMed

    Habte, Ermias; Müller, Lukas M; Shtaya, Munqez; Davis, Seth J; von Korff, Maria

    2014-06-01

    The circadian clock is an important timing system that controls physiological responses to abiotic stresses in plants. However, there is little information on the effects of the clock on stress adaptation in important crops, like barley. In addition, we do not know how osmotic stress perceived at the roots affect the shoot circadian clock. Barley genotypes, carrying natural variation at the photoperiod response and clock genes Ppd-H1 and HvELF3, were grown under control and osmotic stress conditions to record changes in the diurnal expression of clock and stress-response genes and in physiological traits. Variation at HvELF3 affected the expression phase and shape of clock and stress-response genes, while variation at Ppd-H1 only affected the expression levels of stress genes. Osmotic stress up-regulated expression of clock and stress-response genes and advanced their expression peaks. Clock genes controlled the expression of stress-response genes, but had minor effects on gas exchange and leaf transpiration. This study demonstrated that osmotic stress at the barley root altered clock gene expression in the shoot and acted as a spatial input signal into the clock. Unlike in Arabidopsis, barley primary assimilation was less controlled by the clock and more responsive to environmental perturbations, such as osmotic stress. PMID:24895755

  7. Theoretical analysis of osmotic agents in peritoneal dialysis. What size is an ideal osmotic agent?

    PubMed

    Rippe, B; Zakaria el-R; Carlsson, O

    1996-01-01

    In this article the difference between osmotic fluid flow (ultrafiltration) as driven by osmotic pressure and diffusion through thin leaky membranes is discussed. It is pointed out that water transport induced by osmosis is fundamentally different from the process of water diffusion. Applying modern hydrodynamic pore theory, the molar solute concentration and the solute concentration in grams per 100 mL, exerting the same initial transmembrane osmotic pressure as a 1% glucose solution, was investigated as a function of solute molecular weight (MW). It was then assumed, base on experimental data, that the major pathway responsible for the peritoneal osmotic barrier characteristics is represented by pores of radius approximately 47 A. With increasing solute radius, the osmotic reflection coefficient (sigma) and, hence, the osmotic efficiency per mole of solute will increase. However, simultaneously, the molar concentration per unit solute weight will decrease. The balance point between these two events apparently occurs at a solute MW of approximately 1 kDa. An additional advantage of using solutes of high MW as osmotic agents during peritoneal dialysis (PD), rather than increased osmotic efficiency per se, lies in the fact that large solutes, due to their low peritoneal diffusion capacity, will maintain a sustained rate of ultrafiltration (osmosis) over a prolonged period. To illustrate this, we have performed computer simulations of peritoneal fluid transport according to the three-pore model of peritoneal permselectivity. According to these simulations, 4% of an 800 Da polymer solution (+50 mmol/L above isotonicity) will produce the same cumulative amount of intraperitoneal fluid volume ultrafiltered (UF) during 360-400 minutes as 4% of a 2 kDa polymer solution (+20 mmol/L) or 6.5% of a 10 kDa polymer solution (+6.5 mmol/L) having the same electrolyte concentration as dialysis solutions conventionally used for PD. Similar cumulative UF volumes (during 400 minutes

  8. Osmotic concentration of polypeptides from hemofiltrate of uremic patients.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, K; Holland, F; Turnham, T; Klein, E

    1980-07-01

    Hemofiltrate from uremic patients was concentrated 15- to 40-fold by osmotic removal of water across a reverse osmosis membrane which retains salts and proteins. Salts and low molecular weight components were removed from the concentrate by partial dialysis using a highly impermeable cellulose membrane. Following this desalting step, 100- to 500-fold concentration could be achieved by evaporation at low pressure. The concentrate was fractionated on Sephadex G15 columns. Fractions were tested for their toxicity to human cells in culture. Fractions containing components with molecular weights greater than 700 daltons inhibited 3H-thymidine incorporation into the DNA of HeLa and skin fibroblast cells more than did low molecular weight peptides and an iso-osmolar control. Components eluting in the molecular weight range of angiotensin I and vitamin B-12 were most inhibitory. These studies show that hemofiltrate from uremic patients is a readily available source of toxic polypeptides. The osmotic concentration and gel chromatographic procedures described should make available large amounts of these molecules for further studies. PMID:7408253

  9. From The Cover: Osmotic water transport through carbon nanotube membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalra, Amrit; Garde, Shekhar; Hummer, Gerhard

    2003-09-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to study osmotically driven transport of water molecules through hexagonally packed carbon nanotube membranes. Our simulation setup comprises two such semipermeable membranes separating compartments of pure water and salt solution. The osmotic force drives water flow from the pure-water to the salt-solution compartment. Monitoring the flow at molecular resolution reveals several distinct features of nanoscale flows. In particular, thermal fluctuations become significant at the nanoscopic length scales, and as a result, the flow is stochastic in nature. Further, the flow appears frictionless and is limited primarily by the barriers at the entry and exit of the nanotube pore. The observed flow rates are high (5.8 water molecules per nanosecond and nanotube), comparable to those through the transmembrane protein aquaporin-1, and are practically independent of the length of the nanotube, in contrast to predictions of macroscopic hydrodynamics. All of these distinct characteristics of nanoscopic water flow can be modeled quantitatively by a 1D continuous-time random walk. At long times, the pure-water compartment is drained, and the net flow of water is interrupted by the formation of structured solvation layers of water sandwiched between two nanotube membranes. Structural and thermodynamic aspects of confined water monolayers are studied.

  10. EFFECT OF EXOGENOUS GLUTATHIONE, GLUTATHIONE REDUCTASE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, AND CHLORITE ON OSMOTIC FRAGILITY OF RAT BLOOD IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2), chlorite (ClO2(-1)), and chlorate (ClO3(-1)) in drinking water decreased blood glutathione and RBC osmotic fragility in vivo. The osmotic fragility and glutathione content were also studied in rat blood treated with ClO2, ClO2(-1), ClO3(-1) in vitro. RBC ...

  11. Freestanding polyelectrolyte films as sensors for osmotic pressure.

    PubMed

    Nolte, Marc; Dönch, Ingo; Fery, Andreas

    2006-09-11

    Freestanding ultrathin polyelectrolyte-multilayer membranes, transferred to topographically structured polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), are used as mechanical sensors. Due to the membranes' semipermeability, high-molecular-weight molecules can be either entrapped inside them or excluded, thus generating an osmotic pressure. This leads to a deformation. We investigate the deformation as a function of the osmotic pressure and present an analytical theory that fully describes the data. Thus, osmotic pressures can be determined quantitatively. The individual osmotic-sensitive elements have only microscopic dimensions, and arrays can be easily produced. PMID:16929555

  12. An Open-label, Self-control, Prospective Study on Cognitive Function, Academic Performance, and Tolerability of Osmotic-release Oral System Methylphenidate in Children with Attention-deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yi; Liang, Jian-Min; Gao, Hong-Yun; Yang, Zhi-Wei; Jia, Fu-Jun; Liang, Yue-Zhu; Fang, Fang; Li, Rong; Xie, Sheng-Nan; Zhuo, Jian-Min

    2015-01-01

    Background: Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most common mental and behavioral disorder in school-aged children. This study evaluated the effect of osmotic-release oral system (OROS) methylphenidate (MPH) on cognitive function and academic performance of Chinese school-aged children with ADHD. Methods: This 12-week, prospective, multicenter, open-label, self-controlled study enrolled 153 Chinese school-aged children with ADHD and 41 non-ADHD children. Children with ADHD were treated with once-daily OROS-MPH (18 mg, 36 mg, or 54 mg). The primary endpoints were Inattention/Overactivity (I/O) with Aggression Conners Behavior Rating Scale (IOWA) and Digit Span Test at week 12 compared with baseline. Secondary endpoints included opposition/defiant (O/D) subscale of IOWA, Clinical Global Impression (CGI), Coding Test, Stroop Color-word Test, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), academic performance on teacher-rated school examinations, and safety at week 12 compared with baseline. Both non-ADHD and ADHD children received the same frequency of cognitive operational test to avoid the possible bias caused by training. Results: A total of 128 patients were evaluated with cognitive assessments. The OROS-MPH treatment significantly improved IOWA Conners I/O subscale scores at week 12 (3.8 ± 2.3) versus baseline (10.0 ± 2.4; P < 0.0001). Digit Span Test scores improved significantly (P < 0.0001) with a high remission rate (81.1%) at week 12 versus baseline. A significant (P < 0.0001) improvement was observed in O/D subscale of IOWA, CGI, Coding Test, Stroop Color-word Test, WCST, and academic performance at week 12 versus baseline. Very few practice-related improvements were noticed in the non-ADHD group at week 12 compared with baseline. No serious adverse events and deaths were reported during the study. Conclusions: The OROS-MPH treatment effectively controlled symptoms of ADHD and significantly improved academic performance and cognitive function of

  13. Effect of Pulsed Electric Field Pre-Treatment on Osmotic Dehydration of Strawberries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research was to study the effect of pulsed electric fields (PEF) as a pre-treatment on osmotic dehydration characteristics and quality of strawberries. The studied PDF treatment conditions included three strengths of electric field (1.0, 2.0, 3.0 Kw/cm) and three numbers of pu...

  14. The osmotic migration of cells in a solute gradient.

    PubMed Central

    Jaeger, M; Carin, M; Medale, M; Tryggvason, G

    1999-01-01

    The effect of a nonuniform solute concentration on the osmotic transport of water through the boundaries of a simple model cell is investigated. A system of two ordinary differential equations is derived for the motion of a single cell in the limit of a fast solute diffusion, and an analytic solution is obtained for one special case. A two-dimensional finite element model has been developed to simulate the more general case (finite diffusion rates, solute gradient induced by a solidification front). It is shown that the cell moves to regions of lower solute concentration due to the uneven flux of water through the cell boundaries. This mechanism has apparently not been discussed previously. The magnitude of this effect is small for red blood cells, the case in which all of the relevant parameters are known. We show, however, that it increases with cell size and membrane permeability, so this effect could be important for larger cells. The finite element model presented should also have other applications in the study of the response of cells to an osmotic stress and for the interaction of cells and solidification fronts. Such investigations are of major relevance for the optimization of cryopreservation processes. PMID:10465740

  15. Electro-osmotic flow in coated nanocapillaries: a theoretical investigation.

    PubMed

    Marini Bettolo Marconi, Umberto; Monteferrante, Michele; Melchionna, Simone

    2014-12-14

    Motivated by recent experiments, we present a theoretical investigation of how the electro-osmotic flow occurring in a capillary is modified when its charged surfaces are coated with charged polymers. The theoretical treatment is based on a three-dimensional model consisting of a ternary fluid-mixture, representing the solvent and two species for the ions, confined between two parallel charged plates decorated with a fixed array of scatterers representing the polymer coating. The electro-osmotic flow, generated by a constant electric field applied in a direction parallel to the plates, is studied numerically by means of Lattice Boltzmann simulations. In order to gain further understanding we performed a simple theoretical analysis by extending the Stokes-Smoluchowski equation to take into account the porosity induced by the polymers in the region adjacent to the walls. We discuss the nature of the velocity profiles by focusing on the competing effects of the polymer charges and the frictional forces they exert. We show evidence of the flow reduction and of the flow inversion phenomenon when the polymer charge is opposite to the surface charge. By using the density of polymers and the surface charge as control variables, we propose a phase diagram that discriminates the direct and the reversed flow regimes and determines their dependence on the ionic concentration. PMID:25343500

  16. Osmotic Water Permeability of Isolated Protoplasts. Modifications during Development1

    PubMed Central

    Ramahaleo, Tiana; Morillon, Raphaël; Alexandre, Joël; Lassalles, Jean-Paul

    1999-01-01

    A transference chamber was developed to measure the osmotic water permeability coefficient (Pos) in protoplasts 40 to 120 μm in diameter. The protoplast was held by a micropipette and submitted to a steep osmotic gradient created in the transference chamber. Pos was derived from the changes in protoplast dimensions, as measured using a light microscope. Permeabilities were in the range 1 to 1000 μm s−1 for the various types of protoplasts tested. The precision for Pos was ≤40%, and within this limit, no asymmetry in the water fluxes was observed. Measurements on protoplasts isolated from 2- to 5-d-old roots revealed a dramatic increase in Pos during root development. A shift in Pos from 10 to 500 μm s−1 occurred within less than 48 h. This phenomenon was found in maize (Zea mays), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and rape (Brassica napus) roots. These results show that early developmental processes modify water-transport properties of the plasma membrane, and that the transference chamber is adapted to the study of water-transport mechanisms in native membranes. PMID:10069827

  17. Functional Characterization of TRPV4 As an Osmotically Sensitive Ion Channel in Articular Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Mimi N.; Leddy, Holly A.; Votta, Bartholomew J.; Kumar, Sanjay; Levy, Dana S.; Lipshutz, David B.; Lee, Sukhee; Liedtke, Wolfgang; Guilak, Farshid

    2010-01-01

    Objective Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) is a Ca2+ permeable channel that can be gated by tonicity (osmolarity) and mechanical stimuli. Chondrocytes, the cells in cartilage, respond to their osmotic and mechanical environments; however, the molecular basis of this signal transduction is not fully understood. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the presence and functionality of TRPV4 in chondrocytes. Methods TRPV4 protein expression was measured by immunolabeling and Western blotting. In response to TRPV4 agonist/antagonists, osmotic stress, and interleukin-1 (IL-1), changes in Ca2+ signaling, cell volume, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production were measured in porcine chondrocytes using fluorescence microscopy, light microscopy, or immunoassay, respectively. Results TRPV4 was expressed abundantly at the RNA and protein level. Exposure to 4αPDD, a TRPV4 activator, caused Ca2+ signaling in chondrocytes, which was blocked by the selective TRPV4 antagonist, GSK205. Blocking TRPV4 diminished the chondrocytes' response to hypo-osmotic stress, reducing the fraction of Ca2+ responsive cells, regulatory volume decrease (RVD), and PGE2 production. Ca2+ signaling was inhibited by removal of extracellular Ca2+ or depletion of intracellular stores. Specific activation of TRPV4 restored defective RVD caused by IL-1. Chemical disruption of the primary cilium eliminated Ca2+ signaling in response to either 4αPDD or hypo-osmotic stress. Conclusion TRPV4 is present in articular chondrocytes, and chondrocyte response to hypo-osmotic stress is mediated by this channel, which involves both an extracellular Ca2+ and intracellular Ca2+ release. TRPV4 may also be involved in modulating the production or influence of pro-inflammatory molecules in response to osmotic stress. PMID:19790068

  18. A Simple Student Laboratory on Osmotic Flow, Osmotic Pressure, and the Reflection Coefficient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feher, Joseph J.; Ford, George D.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a laboratory exercise containing a practical series of experiments that novice students can perform within two hours. The exercise provides a confirmation of van't Hoff's law while placing more emphasis on osmotic flow than pressure. Students can determine parameters such as the reflection coefficient which stress the interaction of both…

  19. Lipid tubule growth by osmotic pressure

    PubMed Central

    Rangamani, Padmini; Zhang, Di; Oster, George; Shen, Amy Q.

    2013-01-01

    We present here a procedure for growing lipid tubules in vitro. This method allows us to grow tubules of consistent shape and structure, and thus can be a useful tool for nano-engineering applications. There are three stages during the tubule growth process: initiation, elongation and termination. Balancing the forces that act on the tubule head shows that the growth of tubules during the elongation phase depends on the balance between osmotic pressure and the viscous drag exerted on the membrane from the substrate and the external fluid. Using a combination of mathematical modelling and experiment, we identify the key forces that control tubule growth during the elongation phase. PMID:24004559

  20. Effect of Long-Term Osmotic Loading Culture on Matrix Synthesis from Intervertebral Disc Cells

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Isabella B.; Carapezza, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The intervertebral disc is a highly hydrated tissue that acts to absorb and distribute large complex loads placed on the spine. Diurnal loading and disc degeneration causes significant changes in water volume and proteoglycan content, which alters the internal osmotic environment. Short-term osmotic loading alters disc cell gene expression; however, the long-term effect of osmotic loading on disc cell matrix synthesis is not well understood. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of long-term osmotic loading on matrix turnover and proliferation by juvenile and adult cells from the nucleus pulposus (NP) and the cartilaginous endplate (EP). Matrix synthesis was evaluated using pellets and a 3D agarose system, which has been used for developing engineered tissues. Intervertebral discs were acquired from juvenile and adult cows. Cells were acquired through enzymatic digestion and expanded in culture. Pellets were formed through centrifugation, and constructs were created by encapsulating cells within 2% w/v agarose hydrogel. Pellets and constructs were cultured up to 42 days in chemically defined medium with the osmolality adjusted to 300, 400, or 500 mOsm/kg. EP cells were evaluated as a chondrocyte comparison to chondrocyte-like NP cells. Pellet and agarose cultures of juvenile NP and EP cells demonstrated similarities with respect to cell proliferation and functional mechanical properties. Cell proliferation decreased significantly with increased osmotic loading. The final compressive Young's modulus of juvenile NP cells was 10–40× greater than initial properties (i.e., day 0) and was greater than the final Young's modulus of adult NP and juvenile EP constructs. In juvenile NP constructs, there were no significant differences in GAG content with respect to osmotic loading. However, GAG synthesis and mechanical properties were greatest for the 400 mOsm/kg group in adult NP constructs. Taken together, the results presented here suggest a

  1. Osmotic therapies added to antibiotics for acute bacterial meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Emma CB; Ajdukiewicz, Katherine MB; Heyderman, Robert S; Garner, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Every day children and adults throughout the world die from acute community-acquired bacterial meningitis, particularly in low-income countries. Survivors are at risk of deafness, epilepsy and neurological disabilities. Osmotic therapies have been proposed as an adjunct to improve mortality and morbidity from bacterial meningitis. The theory is that they will attract extra-vascular fluid by osmosis and thus reduce cerebral oedema by moving excess water from the brain into the blood. The intention is to thus reduce death and improve neurological outcomes. Objectives To evaluate the effects on mortality, deafness and neurological disability of osmotic therapies added to antibiotics for acute bacterial meningitis in children and adults. Search methods We searched CENTRAL 2012, Issue 11, MEDLINE (1950 to November week 3, 2012), EMBASE (1974 to November 2012), CINAHL (1981 to November 2012), LILACS (1982 to November 2012) and registers of ongoing clinical trials (April 2012). We also searched conference abstracts and contacted researchers in the field. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials testing any osmotic therapy in adults or children with acute bacterial meningitis. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently screened the search results and selected trials for inclusion. We collected data from each study for mortality, deafness, seizures and neurological disabilities. Results are presented using risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) and grouped according to whether the participants received steroids or not. Main results Four trials were included comprising 1091 participants. All compared glycerol (a water-soluble sugar alcohol) with a control; in three trials this was a placebo, and in one a small amount of 50% dextrose. Three trials included comparators of dexamethasone alone or in combination with glycerol. As dexamethasone appeared to have no modifying effect, we aggregated results across arms where both

  2. Osmotic self-propulsion of slender particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitzer, Ory; Yariv, Ehud

    2015-03-01

    We consider self-diffusiophoresis of axisymmetric particles using the continuum description of Golestanian et al. ["Designing phoretic micro-and nano-swimmers," New J. Phys. 9, 126 (2007)], where the chemical reaction at the particle boundary is modelled by a prescribed distribution of solute absorption and the interaction of solute molecules with that boundary is represented by diffusio-osmotic slip. With a view towards modelling of needle-like particle shapes, commonly employed in experiments, the self-propulsion problem is analyzed using slender-body theory. For a particle of length 2L, whose boundary is specified by the axial distribution κ(z) of cross-sectional radius, we obtain the approximation - /μ 2 D L ∫- L L j ( z ) /d κ ( z ) d z d z for the particle velocity, wherein j(z) is the solute-flux distribution, μ the diffusio-osmotic slip coefficient, and D the solute diffusivity. This approximation can accommodate discontinuous flux distributions, which are commonly used for describing bimetallic particles; it agrees strikingly well with the numerical calculations of Popescu et al. ["Phoretic motion of spheroidal particles due to self-generated solute gradients," Eur. Phys. J. E: Soft Matter Biol. Phys. 31, 351-367 (2010)], performed for spheroidal particles.

  3. Osmotic barrier of the parietal peritoneum.

    PubMed

    Flessner, M F

    1994-11-01

    Fluid movement into the peritoneal cavity results after instillation of a hypertonic solution. Some investigators have assumed that the peritoneum is a significant barrier to small solutes and have predicted that fluid would be drawn by an osmotic gradient into the cavity from the tissue surrounding the peritoneal cavity, resulting in tissue hydrostatic pressures well below atmospheric pressure. Contrary to this, we have previously shown that protein and fluid cross the peritoneum and enter the tissue at the same rate during either isotonic or hypertonic dialysis. To investigate the nature of the osmotic barrier of the peritoneum, the hydrostatic pressure profiles were measured in the abdominal wall of the rat during conditions of either isotonicity or hypertonicity in the peritoneal cavity and constant intraperitoneal hydrostatic pressure (Pip). Measurements were made with a micropipette mounted on a micromanipulator and connected to a servo-null pressure measurement system. No interstitial pressures below atmospheric pressure were observed with either type of solution in the peritoneal cavity. For the three Pip values tested, there were few significant differences between the corresponding pressure profiles of isotonic or hypertonic solutions. It is concluded that the parietal peritoneum is not a functional barrier to small solutes, which are often used to raise the osmolality of intraperitoneal solutions. This finding also implies that the tissue interstitium underlying the parietal peritoneum is not the source of water flow into the cavity, which is observed during hypertonic dialysis. PMID:7977791

  4. Maximal Load of the Vitamin B12 Transport System: A Study on Mice Treated for Four Weeks with High-Dose Vitamin B12 or Cobinamide

    PubMed Central

    Lildballe, Dorte L.; Mutti, Elena; Birn, Henrik; Nexo, Ebba

    2012-01-01

    Several studies suggest that the vitamin B12 (B12) transport system can be used for the cellular delivery of B12-conjugated drugs, also in long-term treatment Whether this strategy will affect the endogenous metabolism of B12 is not known. To study the effect of treatment with excess B12 or an inert derivative, we established a mouse model using implanted osmotic minipumps to deliver saline, cobinamide (Cbi) (4.25 nmol/h), or B12 (1.75 nmol/h) for 27 days (n = 7 in each group). B12 content and markers of B12 metabolism were analysed in plasma, urine, kidney, liver, and salivary glands. Both Cbi and B12 treatment saturated the transcobalamin protein in mouse plasma. Cbi decreased the content of B12 in tissues to 33–50% of the level in control animals but did not influence any of the markers examined. B12 treatment increased the tissue B12 level up to 350%. In addition, the transcript levels for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase in kidneys and for transcobalamin and transcobalamin receptor in the salivary glands were reduced. Our study confirms the feasibility of delivering drugs through the B12 transport system but emphasises that B12 status should be monitored because there is a risk of decreasing the transport of endogenous B12. This risk may lead to B12 deficiency during prolonged treatment. PMID:23049711

  5. Osmotic Power: A Fresh Look at an Old Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dugdale, Pam

    2014-01-01

    Electricity from osmotic pressure might seem a far-fetched idea but this article describes a prototype in Norway where the osmotic pressure generated between salt and fresh water drives a turbine. This idea was applied in a student investigation, where they were tasked with researching which alternative materials could be used for the…

  6. 21 CFR 864.6600 - Osmotic fragility test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Osmotic fragility test. 864.6600 Section 864.6600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6600 Osmotic...

  7. 21 CFR 864.6600 - Osmotic fragility test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Osmotic fragility test. 864.6600 Section 864.6600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6600 Osmotic...

  8. 21 CFR 864.6600 - Osmotic fragility test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Osmotic fragility test. 864.6600 Section 864.6600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6600 Osmotic...

  9. 21 CFR 864.6600 - Osmotic fragility test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Osmotic fragility test. 864.6600 Section 864.6600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6600 Osmotic...

  10. 21 CFR 864.6600 - Osmotic fragility test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Osmotic fragility test. 864.6600 Section 864.6600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6600 Osmotic...

  11. Asymmetry of canine tracheal epithelium: osmotically induced changes.

    PubMed

    Man, S F; Hulbert, W; Park, D S; Thomson, A B; Hogg, J C

    1984-11-01

    The symmetry of osmotic conductivity of the canine tracheal epithelial cells was examined in vitro. When an osmotic load of 100 mosM sucrose was added to the serosal bathing solution, no change in the transepithelial potential difference was observed in 15 tissue preparations. In contrast, when the same osmotic load was added to the mucosal bathing solution, there was a rapid decrease in the transepithelial potential difference of 3.9 +/- 0.5 mV (n = 23); ouabain (10(-4) M) eliminated this change. Tissues that had been exposed to the osmotic load added to either the mucosal or serosal side were compared with the control using light and electron microscopy. When the osmotic load was added to the mucosal fluid, there was no change in the nuclear-to-cytoplasmic area ratio of the cell types examined. However, when the same osmotic load was added to the serosal fluid, a marked increase in the nuclear-to-cytoplasmic area ratio of the ciliated cells was observed. This finding indicated cell shrinkage. Dilution potentials measured by substituting NaCl with mannitol also showed asymmetry. The morphological features are probably caused by differences in the osmotic conductivity (Lp) of the basolateral and apical cell membranes, with the Lp of the apical membrane being less than that of the basolateral membrane. The basis for osmotically induced potentials remained undetermined. PMID:6440880

  12. Modeling of laboratory experiments determining the chemico-osmotic, hydraulic and diffusion properties of sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, M.; Hiratsuka, T.; Ito, K.

    2008-12-01

    properties of clay-rich materials have been demonstrated in laboratory experiments. However, it remains inconclusive whether chemical osmosis can retain the pressure disequilibrium and so influence groundwater flow in a geologic time scale. Therefore, systematic research involving field-scale investigations of pressure and salinity distributions and experimental estimations of the chemico-osmotic, hydraulic and diffusive properties of formation media is required. This study focuses on the development of a laboratory experimental system and the analytical solutions to estimate the chemico-osmotic, hydraulic and diffusive properties of formation media. The experimental system consists of a flexible-wall permeameter cell that loads confining pressures, along with a closed fluid circuit to perform osmotic, hydraulic and diffusion experiments under background fluid pressures. This experimental design enables simulating underground conditions at the depths required for safety assessments of geological waste disposal. The effectiveness of the experimental system and the analytical solutions are demonstrated with a set of osmotic, hydraulic and diffusion experiments performed using sedimentary rocks.

  13. Osmotic stress adaptation of Paracoccidioides lutzii, Pb01, monitored by proteomics.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Leandro Nascimento da Silva; Brito, Wesley de Almeida; Parente, Ana Flávia Alves; Weber, Simone Schneider; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Casaletti, Luciana; Borges, Clayton Luiz; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2016-10-01

    The ability to respond to stressful conditions is essential for most living organisms. In pathogenic organisms, this response is required for effective transition from a saprophytic lifestyle to the establishment of pathogenic interactions within a susceptible host. Hyperosmotic stress has been used as a model to study signal transduction and seems to cause many cellular adaptations, including the alteration of protein expression and cellular volume as well as size regulation. In this work, we evaluated the proteomic profile of Paracoccidioides lutzii Pb01 yeast cells during osmotic stress induced by potassium chloride. We performed a high accuracy proteomic technique (NanoUPLC-MS(E)) to identify differentially expressed proteins during osmotic shock. The data describe an osmoadaptative response of this fungus when subjected to this treatment. Proteins involved in the synthesis of cell wall components were modulated, which suggested cell wall remodeling. In addition, alterations in the energy metabolism were observed. Furthermore, proteins involved in amino acid metabolism and hydrogen peroxide detoxification were modulated during osmotic stress. Our study suggests that P. lutzii Pb01. presents a vast osmoadaptative response that is composed of different proteins that act together to minimize the effects caused by osmotic stress. PMID:27496542

  14. Phenotypic characterization of Corynebacterium glutamicum under osmotic stress conditions using elementary mode analysis.

    PubMed

    Rajvanshi, Meghna; Venkatesh, K V

    2011-09-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum, a soil bacterium, is used to produce amino acids such as lysine and glutamate. C. glutamicum is often exposed to osmolality changes in its medium, and the bacterium has therefore evolved several adaptive response mechanisms to overcome them. In this study we quantify the metabolic response of C. glutamicum under osmotic stress using elementary mode analysis (EMA). Further, we obtain the optimal phenotypic space for the synthesis of lysine and formation of biomass. The analysis demonstrated that with increasing osmotic stress, the flux towards trehalose formation and energy-generating pathways increased, while the flux of anabolic reactions diminished. Nodal analysis indicated that glucose-6-phosphate, phosphoenol pyruvate, and pyruvate nodes were capable of adapting to osmotic stress, whereas the oxaloacetic acid node was relatively unresponsive. Fewer elementary modes were active under stress indicating the rigid behavior of the metabolism in response to high osmolality. Optimal phenotypic space analysis revealed that under normal conditions the organism optimized growth during the initial log phase and lysine and trehalose formation during the stationary phase. However, under osmotic stress, the analysis demonstrated that the organism operates under suboptimal conditions for growth, and lysine and trehalose formation. PMID:21132515

  15. Osmotic Effects on the Electrical Properties of Arabidopsis Root Hair Vacuoles in Situ1

    PubMed Central

    Lew, Roger R.

    2004-01-01

    To assess the role of the vacuole in responses to hyperosmotic and hypo-osmotic stress, the electrical properties of the vacuole were measured in situ. A double-barrel micropipette was inserted into the vacuole for voltage clamping. A second double-barrel micropipette was inserted into the cytoplasm to provide a virtual ground that separated the electrical properties of the vacuole from those of the plasma membrane. Osmotic stress causes immediate electrical responses at the plasma membrane (Lew RR [1996] Plant Physiol 97: 2002-2005) and ion flux changes and turgor recovery (Shabala SN, Lew RR [2002] 129: 290-299) in Arabidopsis root cells. In situ, the vacuole also responds rapidly to changes in extracellular osmotic potential. Hyperosmotic treatment caused a very large increase in the ionic conductance of the vacuole. Hypo-osmotic treatment did not affect the vacuolar conductance. In either case, the vacuolar electrical potential was unchanged. Taken in concert with previous studies of changes at the plasma membrane, these results demonstrate a highly coordinated system in which the vacuole and plasma membrane are primed to respond immediately to hyperosmotic stress before changes in gene expression. PMID:14730070

  16. Design and evaluation of osmotic pump-based controlled release system of Ambroxol Hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiongkai; Sun, Min; Gao, Yan; Cao, Fengliang; Zhai, Guangxi

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to design and evaluate an osmotic pump-based drug delivery system for controlling the release of Ambroxol Hydrochloride (Amb). Citric acid, lactose and polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG 6000) were employed as osmotic agents. Surelease EC containing polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG 400) controlling the membrane porosity was used as semi-permeable membrane. The formulation of tablet core was optimized by orthogonal design and evaluated by weighted mark method. The influences of the amount of PEG 400 and membrane thickness on Amb release were investigated. The optimal osmotic pump tablet (OPT) was evaluated in different release media and at different stirring rates. The major release power confirmed was osmotic pressure. The release of Amb from OPT was verified at a rate of approximately zero-order, and cumulative release percentage at 12?h was 92.6%. The relative bioavailability of Amb OPT in rabbits relative to the commercial sustained capsule was 109.6%. Our results showed that Amb OPT could be a practical preparation with a good prospect. PMID:20429827

  17. Hypo-osmotic shock induces nuclear export and proteasome-dependent decrease of UBL5

    SciTech Connect

    Hatanaka, Ken; Ikegami, Koji; Takagi, Hiroshi; Setou, Mitsutoshi . E-mail: setou@nips.ac.jp

    2006-11-24

    The osmolarity of body fluid is strictly controlled through the action of diuretic hormones, which are secreted in the hypothalamus. In the mammalian brain, ubiquitin-like 5 (UBL5) is expressed in oxytocin- and vasopressin-positive neurons in the hypothalamus, and these neurons play a role in regulating osmolarity. We examined the dynamics of UBL5 levels in response to hyper- or hypo-osmotic conditions. Hypo-osmotic conditions led to significantly reduced levels of UBL5 both in brain slices from the hypothalamus and in NIH-3T3 cells. This decrease in UBL5 was transcription-independent and proteasome-dependent. Time-course immunocytochemical studies using exogenous UBL5 revealed that the protein was exported from the nucleus under hypo-osmotic conditions and decreased in a proteasome-dependent manner. This report is the first to describe changes in the intracellular and subcellular localization of UBL5 in response to hypo-osmotic conditions. Our results imply osmoregulation of UBL5.

  18. Apoplastic barrier development and water transport in Zea mays seedling roots under salt and osmotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jie; Xu, Guoxin; Zheng, Hui Qiong

    2015-01-01

    The development of apoplastic barriers was studied in Zea mays seedling roots grown in hydroculture solution supplemented with 0-200 mM NaCl or 20% polyethylene glycol (PEG). Casparian bands in the endodermis of both NaCl- and PEG-treated roots were observed closer to the root tip in comparison with those of control roots, but the cell wall modifications in the endodermis and exodermis induced by salt and osmotic stresses differed. High salinity induced the formation of a multiseriate exodermis, which ranged from several cell layers to the entire cortex tissue but did not noticeably influence cell wall suberization in the endodermis. In contrast, osmotic stress accelerated suberization in both the endodermis and exodermis, but the exodermis induced by osmotic stress was limited to several cell layers in the outer cortex adjacent to the epidermis. The hydrostatic hydraulic conductivity (Lp) had decreased significantly after 1 day of PEG treatment, whereas in NaCl-treated roots, Lp decreased to a similar level after 5 days of treatment. Peroxidase activity in the roots increased significantly in response to NaCl and PEG treatments. These data indicate that salt stress and osmotic stress have different effects on the development of apoplastic barriers and water transport in Z. mays seedling roots. PMID:24965373

  19. The Relationship of Mucus Concentration (Hydration) to Mucus Osmotic Pressure and Transport in Chronic Bronchitis

    PubMed Central

    Coakley, Raymond D.; Button, Brian; Henderson, Ashley G.; Zeman, Kirby L.; Alexis, Neil E.; Peden, David B.; Lazarowski, Eduardo R.; Davis, C. William; Bailey, Summer; Fuller, Fred; Almond, Martha; Qaqish, Bahjat; Bordonali, Elena; Rubinstein, Michael; Bennett, William D.; Kesimer, Mehmet; Boucher, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Chronic bronchitis (CB) is characterized by persistent cough and sputum production. Studies were performed to test whether mucus hyperconcentration and increased partial osmotic pressure, in part caused by abnormal purine nucleotide regulation of ion transport, contribute to the pathogenesis of CB. Objectives: We tested the hypothesis that CB is characterized by mucus hyperconcentration, increased mucus partial osmotic pressures, and reduced mucus clearance. Methods: We measured in subjects with CB as compared with normal and asymptomatic smoking control subjects indices of mucus concentration (hydration; i.e., percentage solids) and sputum adenine nucleotide/nucleoside concentrations. In addition, sputum partial osmotic pressures and mucus transport rates were measured in subjects with CB. Measurements and Results: CB secretions were hyperconcentrated as indexed by an increase in percentage solids and total mucins, in part reflecting decreased extracellular nucleotide/nucleoside concentrations. CB mucus generated concentration-dependent increases in partial osmotic pressures into ranges predicted to reduce mucus transport. Mucociliary clearance (MCC) in subjects with CB was negatively correlated with mucus concentration (percentage solids). As a test of relationships between mucus concentration and disease, mucus concentrations and MCC were compared with FEV1, and both were significantly correlated. Conclusions: Abnormal regulation of airway surface hydration may slow MCC in CB and contribute to disease pathogenesis. PMID:25909230

  20. Proteomic analysis of rice leaves shows the different regulations to osmotic stress and stress signals.

    PubMed

    Shu, Lie-Bo; Ding, Wei; Wu, Jin-Hong; Feng, Fang-Jun; Luo, Li-Jun; Mei, Han-Wei

    2010-11-01

    Following the idea of partial root-zone drying (PRD) in crop cultivation, the morphological and physiological responses to partial root osmotic stress (PROS) and whole root osmotic stress (WROS) were investigated in rice. WROS caused stress symptoms like leaf rolling and membrane leakage. PROS stimulated stress signals, but did not cause severe leaf damage. By proteomic analysis, a total of 58 proteins showed differential expression after one or both treatments, and functional classification of these proteins suggests that stress signals regulate photosynthesis, carbohydrate and energy metabolism. Two other proteins (anthranilate synthase and submergence-induced nickel-binding protein) were upregulated only in the PROS plants, indicating their important roles in stress resistance. Additionally, more enzymes were involved in stress defense, redox homeostasis, lignin and ethylene synthesis in WROS leaves, suggesting a more comprehensive regulatory mechanism induced by osmotic stress. This study provides new insights into the complex molecular networks within plant leaves involved in the adaptation to osmotic stress and stress signals. PMID:20977656

  1. Differential osmotic behavior of water components in living skeletal muscle resolved by 1H-NMR.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Masako; Takemori, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Maki; Umazume, Yoshiki

    2005-08-01

    Using frog sartorius muscle, we observed transverse relaxation processes of (1)H-NMR signals from myowater. The process could be well described by four characteristic exponentials: the extremely slow exponential of relaxation time constant T(2) > 0.4 s, the slow one of T(2) approximately 0.15 s, the intermediate one of 0.03 s < T(2) < 0.06 s, and the rapid one of T(2) < 0.03 s. Addition of isotonic extracellular solution affected only the extremely slow exponential, linearly increasing its amplitude and gradually increasing its T(2) toward that of the bulk solution (1.7 s). Therefore, this exponential should represent extracellular surplus solution independently of the other exponentials. At two thirds to three times the isotonicity, the amplitude of the intermediate exponential showed normal osmotic behavior in parallel with the volume change of the myofilament lattice measured with x-ray diffraction. In the same tonicity range, the amplitude of the rapid exponential showed converse osmotic behavior. Lower tonicities increased the amplitude of only the slow exponential. Studied tonicities did not affect the T(2) values. The distinct osmotic behavior indicated that each characteristic exponential could be viewed as a distinct water group. In addition, the converse osmotic behavior suggested that the rapid exponential would not be a static water layer on the macromolecule surface. PMID:15894647

  2. Osmotic water permeability in glycoprotein containing liposomes.

    PubMed

    Neitchev, V Z; Kostadinov, A P

    1987-01-01

    The kinetics of osmotic water permeability in proteoliposomes containing alpha 1-acid glycoprotein was investigated by means of stopped-flow spectrophotometry. A biphasic time-course of scattered light with time was registered. The rate constants calculated from fits to an exponential function in the first phase were proportional to the final medium osmolarity. The apparent second order rate constants Kapp (Osm-1 sec-1) were determined at different glycoprotein concentrations in the original mixture for preparation of proteoliposomes. The value of Kapp at lipid:glycoprotein weight ratio = 1 was plotted in Arrhenius coordinates. The calculated activation energy for water permeation through the lipid bilayer suggests that eventual channel mechanism may be involved due to the presence of glycoprotein molecule in the liposomes. PMID:3431542

  3. Solute coupled diffusion in osmotically driven membrane processes.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Nathan T; Cath, Tzahi Y

    2009-09-01

    Forward osmosis (FO) is an emerging water treatment technology with potential applications in desalination and wastewater reclamation. In FO, water is extracted from a feed solution using the high osmotic pressure of a hypertonic solution that flows on the opposite side of a semipermeable membrane; however, solutes diffuse simultaneously through the membrane in both directions and may jeopardize the process. In this study, we have comprehensively explored the effects of different operating conditions on the forward diffusion of solutes commonly found in brackish water and seawater, and reverse diffusion of common draw solution solutes. Results show that reverse transport of solutes through commercially available FO membranes range between 80 mg to nearly 3,000 mg per liter of water produced. Divalent feed solutes have low permeation rates (less than 1 mmol/m2-hr) while monovalent ions and uncharged solutes exhibit higher permeation. Findings have significant implications on the performance and sustainability of the FO process. PMID:19764248

  4. Ecophysiology of invasive plants: osmotic adjustment and antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Pintó-Marijuan, Marta; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2013-12-01

    Current research into plant invasiveness often attempts to predict the effect of invasions under future climate change, but most studies only focus on ecological aspects. Understanding ecophysiological responses by characterizing physiological markers such as osmotic adjustment or antioxidant protection indicators will help us to project future invasiveness patterns. In this opinion article, we highlight how the information from physiological measurements can be incorporated into effective management strategies. Furthermore, we propose how combining research strategies of physiologists and ecologists could speed up our understanding of the advantageous mechanisms adopted by invasive species. We suggest that a combined approach would also be of considerable benefit for the development of effective governmental biodiversity conservation policies. PMID:24001766

  5. Effect of osmotic pressure to bioimpedance indexes of erythrocyte suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, A. A.; Nikolaev, D. V.; Malahov, M. V.; Smirnov, A. V.

    2012-12-01

    In the paper we studied effects of osmotic modification of red blood cells on bioimpedance parameters of erythrocyte suspension. The Cole parameters: the extracellular (Re) and intracellular (Ri) fluid resistance, the Alpha parameter, the characteristic frequency (Fchar) and the cell membranes capacitance (Cm) of concentrated erythrocyte suspensions were measured by bioimpedance analyser in the frequency range 5 - 500 kHz. Erythrocytes were incubated in hypo-, hyper- and isoosmotic solutions to achieve changes in cell volume. It was found that Re and Alpha increased in the suspensions with low osmolarity and decreased in the hypertonic suspensions. Ri, Fchar and Cm were higher in the hyperosmotic and were lower in the hypoosmotic suspensions. Correlations of all BIS parameters with MCV were obtained, but multiple regression analysis showed that only Alpha parameter was independently related to MCV (β=0.77, p=0.01). Thus Alpha parameter may be related the mean corpuscular volume of cells.

  6. Atrial natriuretic peptide mediates oxytocin secretion induced by osmotic stimulus.

    PubMed

    Chriguer, Rosengela S; Antunes-Rodrigues, José; Franci, Celso R

    2003-02-15

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), first discovered in the heart, has been also detected in various brain regions involved in the control of cardiovascular function and water and sodium balance. The anteroventral region of the third ventricle (AV3V) and the subfornical organ (SFO) have ANP-immunoreactive projections towards the paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic (SON) nuclei of the hypothalamus. Extracellular fluid (ECF) hyperosmolality stimulates the secretion of oxytocin (OT) which induces ANP release by the atrium. On the other hand, passive immunoneutralization of ANP reduces OT secretion in response to ECF hypertonicity. Previous studies have shown the co-localization of ANP and OT in PVN and SON neurons and in the periventricular region, as well as the presence of ANPergic and oxytocinergic neurons in the median eminence. The aim of the present study was to investigate the OT and ANP content in the SON and PVN of the hypothalamus and in the posterior pituitary (PP) after an osmotic stimulus that induces OT secretion. The results showed that intracerebroventricular microinjection of normal rabbit serum (NRS) or of ANP antiserum followed or not by an intraperitoneal injection of isotonic saline did not alter OT secretion or OT content in the PVN, SON, and PP; passive ANP immunoneutralization reduced the basal content of ANP in the PVN, SON, and PP of animals in a situation of isotonicity; the ANP antiserum inhibited the increase of OT secretion and content of OT and ANP in the PVN, SON and PP induced by the osmotic stimulus. Thus, the increase in plasma OT and oxytocinergic neurons of the hypothalamus-posterior pituitary system in response to hypertonicity depends on the action of endogenous ANP, i.e., ECF hypertonicity must activate ANPergic neurons which directly or indirectly stimulate OT release. PMID:12576148

  7. OSMOTIC PROPERTIES OF THE EGG CELLS OF THE OYSTER (OSTREA VIRGINICA).

    PubMed

    Lucké, B; Ricca, R A

    1941-11-20

    INVESTIGATIONS OF THE OSMOTIC PROPERTIES OF OYSTER EGGS BY A DIFFRACTION METHOD FOR MEASURING VOLUMES HAVE LED TO THE FOLLOWING CONCLUSIONS: 1. The product of cell volume and osmotic pressure is approximately constant, if allowance is made for osmotically inactive cell contents (law of Boyle-van't Hoff). The space occupied by osmotically inactive averages 44 per cent of cell volume. 2. Volume changes over a wide range of pressures are reversible, indicating that the semipermeability of the cell during such changes remains intact. 3. The kinetics of endosmosis and of exosmosis are described by the equation, See PDF for Equation, where dV is rate of volume change; S, surface area of cell, (P-P(e)), the difference in osmotic pressure between cell interior and medium, and K, the permeability of the cell to water. 4. Permeability to water during endosmosis is 0.6micro(3) of water per minute, per square micron of cell surface, per atmosphere of pressure. The value of permeability for exosmosis is closely the same; in this respect the egg cell of the oyster appears to be a more perfect osmometer than the other marine cells which have been studied. Permeability to water computed by the equation given above is in good agreement with computations by the entirely different method devised by Jacobs. 5. Permeability to diethylene glycol averages 27.2, and to glycerol 20.7. These values express the number of mols x 10(-15) which enter per minute through each square micron of cell surface at a concentration difference of 1 mol per liter and a temperature of 22.5 degrees C. 6. Values for permeability to water and to the solutes tested are considerably higher for the oyster egg than for other forms of marine eggs previously examined. 7. The oyster egg because of its high degree of permeability is a natural osmometer particularly suitable for the study of the less readily penetrating solutes. PMID:19873267

  8. Osmotically regulated transport of proline by Lactobacillus acidophilus IFO 3532.

    PubMed

    Jewell, J B; Kashket, E R

    1991-10-01

    We reported previously that, when exposed to high osmotic pressure, Lactobacillus acidophilus IFO 3532 cells accumulated N,N,N-trimethylglycine (glycine betaine), which serves as a compatible intracellular solute. When grown in medium with high osmotic pressure, these cells also accumulated one amino acid, proline. The uptake of [3H]proline by resting, glucose-energized cells was stimulated by increasing the osmotic pressure of the assay medium with 0.5 to 1.0 M KCl, 1.0 M NaCl, or 0.5 M sucrose. The accumulated [3H]proline was not metabolized further. In contrast, there was no osmotic stimulation of [3H]leucine uptake. The uptake of proline was activated rather than induced by exposure of the cells to high osmotic pressure. Only one proline transport system could be discerned from kinetics plots. The affinity of the carrier for proline remained constant over a range of osmotic pressures from 650 to 1,910 mosM (Kt, 7.8 to 15.5 mM). The Vmax, however, increased from 15 nmol/min/mg of dry weight in 0.5 M sucrose to 27 and 40 nmol/min/mg of dry weight in 0.5 M KCl and in 1.0 M KCl or NaCl, respectively. The efflux of proline from preloaded cells occurred rapidly when the osmotic pressure of the suspending buffer was lowered. PMID:1786048

  9. Optical changes in unilamellar vesicles experiencing osmotic stress.

    PubMed Central

    White, G; Pencer, J; Nickel, B G; Wood, J M; Hallett, F R

    1996-01-01

    Membrane properties that vary as a result of isotropic and transmembrane osmolality variations (osmotic stress) are of considerable relevance to mechanisms such as osmoregulation, in which a biological system "senses" and responds to changes in the osmotic environment. In this paper the light-scattering behavior of a model system consisting of large unilamellar vesicles of dioleoyl phosphatidyl glycerol (DOPG) is examined as a function of their osmotic environment. Osmotic downshifts lead to marked reductions in the scattered intensity, whereas osmotic upshifts lead to strong intensity increases. It is shown that these changes in the scattering intensity involve changes in the refractive index of the membrane bilayer that result from an alteration in the extent of hydration and/or the phospholipid packing density. By considering the energetics of osmotically stressed vesicles, and from explicit analysis of the Rayleigh-Gans-Debye scattering factors for spherical and ellipsoidal shells, we quantitatively demonstrate that although changes in vesicle volume and shape can arise in response to the imposition of osmotic stress, these factors alone cannot account for the observed changes in scattered intensity. PMID:8913607

  10. Interstitial Fluid Colloid Osmotic Pressure in Healthy Children

    PubMed Central

    Guthe, Hans Jørgen Timm; Indrebø, Marianne; Nedrebø, Torbjørn; Norgård, Gunnar; Wiig, Helge; Berg, Ansgar

    2015-01-01

    Objective The colloid osmotic pressure (COP) of plasma and interstitial fluid play important roles in transvascular fluid exchange. COP values for monitoring fluid balance in healthy and sick children have not been established. This study set out to determine reference values of COP in healthy children. Materials and Methods COP in plasma and interstitial fluid harvested from nylon wicks was measured in 99 healthy children from 2 to 10 years of age. Nylon wicks were implanted subcutaneously in arm and leg while patients were sedated and intubated during a minor surgical procedure. COP was analyzed in a colloid osmometer designed for small fluid samples. Results The mean plasma COP in all children was 25.6 ± 3.3 mmHg. Arbitrary division of children in four different age groups, showed no significant difference in plasma or interstitial fluid COP values for patients less than 8 years, whereas patients of 8-10 years had significant higher COP both in plasma and interstitial fluid. There were no gender difference or correlation between COP in interstitial fluid sampled from arm and leg and no significant effect on interstitial COP of gravity. Prolonged implantation time did not affect interstitial COP. Conclusion Plasma and interstitial COP in healthy children are comparable to adults and COP seems to increase with age in children. Knowledge of the interaction between colloid osmotic forces can be helpful in diseases associated with fluid imbalance and may be crucial in deciding different fluid treatment options. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01044641 PMID:25853713

  11. Self-assembly of silk fibroin under osmotic stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Sungkyun

    The supramolecular self-assembly behavior of silk fibroin was investigated using osmotic stress technique. In Chapter 2, a ternary phase diagram of water-silk-LiBr was constructed based on X-ray results on the osmotically stressed regenerated silk fibroin of Bombyx mori silkworm. Microscopic data indicated that silk I is a hydrated structure and a rough estimate of the number of water molecules lost by the structure upon converting from silk I to silk II has been made, and found to be about 2.2 per [GAGAGS] hexapeptide. In Chapter 3, wet-spinning of osmotically stressed, regenerated silk fibroin was performed, based on the prediction that the enhanced control over structure and phase behavior using osmotic stress method helps improve the physical properties of wet-spun regenerated silk fibroin fibers. The osmotic stress was applied in order to pre-structure the regenerated silk fibroin molecule from its original random coil state to more oriented state, manipulating the phase of the silk solution in the phase diagram before the start of spinning. Monofilament fiber with a diameter of 20 microm was produced. In Chapter 4, we investigated if there is a noticeable synergistic osmotic pressure increase between co-existing polymeric osmolyte and salt when extremely highly concentrated salt molecules are present both at sample subphase and stressing subphase, as is the case of silk fibroin self-assembly. The equilibration method that measures osmotic pressure relative to a reference with known osmotic pressure was introduced. Osmotic pressure of aqueous LiBr solution up to 2.75M was measured and it was found that the synergistic effect was insignificant up to this salt concentration. Solution parameters of stressing solutions and Arrhenius kinetics based on time-temperature relationship for the equilibration process were derived as well. In Chapter 5, self-assembly behavior of natural silk fibroin within the gland of Bombyx mori silkworm was investigated using osmotic

  12. Effect of osmotic pressure in the solvent extraction phase on BSA release profile from PLGA microspheres.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ge; Thanoo, B C; DeLuca, Patrick P

    2002-11-01

    This study investigated the influence of osmotic pressure in the organic solvent extraction phase on release profile of bovine serum albumin (BSA) from poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microspheres. BSA-loaded PLGA microspheres with a target load of 10% were prepared by a double emulsion phase separation method. All the microsphere batches were fabricated in the same conditions except that in the organic solvent (CH2Cl2) evaporation step. Different concentrations of NaCl (0, 1.8, and 3.6%) or sucrose (20%) were used to generate a range of osmotic pressures in the extraction aqueous phase. These microspheres were characterized for incorporation efficiency, surface and internal morphology, particle size, protein stability, and in vitro release. The microspheres were spherical with particle size ranging from 16.8 to 27.8 microns. Higher osmotic pressure resulted in a denser internal structure although similar nonporous surface morphology was observed with all batches. No significant difference in encapsulation efficiency existed from batch to batch (87-94%). Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyamide gel electrophoresis showed that BSA integrity was well retained. The release profile of the batch prepared with only water as the continuous (solvent extraction) phase exhibited a 79% burst release in the first 24 hr followed by a plateau and then a little release after 21 days. In the presence of NaCl or sucrose, the burst effect significantly decreased with increase in osmotic pressure in the extraction aqueous phase, which was then followed by sustained release for 35 days. A mass balance was made when the release terminated. Therefore, in the organic solvent extraction and evaporation step, increasing the osmotic pressure in the aqueous phase both reduced the burst release from the microspheres and improved the subsequent sustained release profile. PMID:12503521

  13. PEG-induced osmotic stress in Mentha x piperita L.: Structural features and metabolic responses.

    PubMed

    Búfalo, Jennifer; Rodrigues, Tatiane Maria; de Almeida, Luiz Fernando Rolim; Tozin, Luiz Ricardo Dos Santos; Marques, Marcia Ortiz Mayo; Boaro, Carmen Silvia Fernandes

    2016-08-01

    The present study investigated whether osmotic stress induced by the exposure of peppermint (Mentha x piperita L.) to moderate and severe stress for short periods of time changes the plant's physiological parameters, leaf anatomy and ultrastructure and essential oil. Plants were exposed to two levels of polyethyleneglycol (50 g L(-1) and 100 g L(-1) of PEG) in a hydroponic experiment. The plants exposed to 50 g L(-1) maintained metabolic functions similar to those of the control group (0 g L(-1)) without changes in gas exchange or structural characteristics. The increase in antioxidant enzyme activity reduced the presence of free radicals and protected membranes, including chloroplasts and mitochondria. In contrast, the osmotic stress caused by 100 g L(-1) of PEG inhibited leaf gas exchange, reduced the essential oil content and changed the oil composition, including a decrease in menthone and an increase in menthofuran. These plants also showed an increase in peroxidase activity, but this increase was not sufficient to decrease the lipid peroxidation level responsible for damaging the membranes of organelles. Morphological changes were correlated with the evaluated physiological features: plants exposed to 100 g L(-1) of PEG showed areas with collapsed cells, increases in mesophyll thickness and the area of the intercellular space, cuticle shrinkage, morphological changes in plastids, and lysis of mitochondria. In summary, our results revealed that PEG-induced osmotic stress in M. x piperita depends on the intensity level of the osmotic stress applied; severe osmotic stress changed the structural characteristics, caused damage at the cellular level, and reduced the essential oil content and quality. PMID:27107175

  14. Membrane permeability characteristics and osmotic tolerance limits of sea urchin (Evechinus chloroticus) eggs.

    PubMed

    Adams, Serean L; Kleinhans, F W; Mladenov, Philip V; Hessian, Paul A

    2003-08-01

    Development of effective cryopreservation protocols relies on knowledge of the fundamental cryobiological characteristics for a particular cell type. These characteristics include osmotic behaviour, membrane permeability characteristics, and osmotic tolerance limits. Here, we report on measures of these characteristics for unfertilized and fertilised eggs of the sea urchin (Evechinus chloroticus). In NaCl solutions of varying osmolalities, sea urchin eggs behaved as ideal linear osmometers. The osmotically inactive volume (vb) was similar for unfertilized and fertilised eggs, 0.367+/-0.008 (mean+/-SE) and 0.303+/-0.007, respectively. Estimates of water solubility (Lp) and solute permeability (Ps) and their respective activation energies (Ea) for unfertilized and fertilised eggs were determined following exposure to cryoprotectant (CPA) solutions at different temperatures. Irrespective of treatment, fertilised eggs had higher values of Lp and Ps. The presence of a CPA decreased Lp. Among CPAs, solute permeability was highest for propylene glycol followed by dimethyl sulphoxide and then ethylene glycol. Measures of osmotic tolerance limits of the eggs revealed unfertilized eggs were able to tolerate volumetric changes of -20% and +30% of their equilibrium volume; fertilised eggs were able to tolerate changes +/-30%. Using membrane permeability data and osmotic tolerance limits, we established effective methods for loading and unloading CPAs from the eggs. The results of this study establish cryobiological characteristics for E. chloroticus eggs of use for developing an effective cryopreservation protocol. The approach we outline can be readily adapted for determining cryobiological characteristics of other species and cell types, as an aid to successful cryopreservation. PMID:12963407

  15. Osmotic characteristics and fertility of murine spermatozoa collected in different solutions.

    PubMed

    Si, Wei; Men, Hongsheng; Benson, James D; Critser, John K

    2009-02-01

    Osmotic stress is an important factor that can result in cell damage during cryopreservation. Before ejaculation or collection for cryopreservation, murine spermatozoa are stored in epididymal fluid, a physiologically hyperosmotic environment (approximately 415 mmol/kg). The objectives of this study were to determine the osmotic tolerance limits of sperm motion parameters of ICR and C57BL/6 mouse spermatozoa collected in isosmotic (290 mmol/kg) and hyperosmotic (415 mmol/kg) media, and the effect of the osmolality of sperm collection media on sperm fertility after cryopreservation. Our results indicate that murine spermatozoa collected in media with different osmolalities (290 and 415 mmol/kg Dulbecco's phosphate buffered saline (DPBS)) appeared to have different osmotic tolerances for the maintenance of sperm motility and other motion parameters in both mouse strains. The hypo- and hyperosmotic treatments decreased motility and affected other motion parameters of spermatozoa collected in 290 mmol/kg DPBS. The extent of the change of motion parameters after treatments corresponded with the levels of osmotic stress. However, for spermatozoa collected in 415 mmol/kg DPBS, exposure to 290 mmol/kg DPBS tended to increase sperm motility and the quality of their motion parameters. The osmolality of sperm collection medium can affect murine sperm fertility. Spermatozoa collected in 415 mmol/kg medium showed higher fertility compared with spermatozoa collected in 290 mmol/kg as assessed by IVF. Results characterizing murine sperm osmotic tolerance collected in media with different osmolalities from different strains and the effect of collection media osmolality on sperm fertility after cryopreservation will be useful in designing cryopreservation protocols. PMID:19028924

  16. Investigation of the Effects of Extracellular Osmotic Pressure on Morphology and Mechanical Properties of Individual Chondrocyte.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trung Dung; Oloyede, Adekunle; Singh, Sanjleena; Gu, YuanTong

    2016-06-01

    It has been demonstrated that most cells of the body respond to osmotic pressure in a systematic manner. The disruption of the collagen network in the early stages of osteoarthritis causes an increase in water content of cartilage which leads to a reduction of pericellular osmolality in chondrocytes distributed within the extracellular environment. It is therefore arguable that an insight into the mechanical properties of chondrocytes under varying osmotic pressure would provide a better understanding of chondrocyte mechanotransduction and potentially contribute to knowledge on cartilage degeneration. In this present study, the chondrocyte cells were exposed to solutions with different osmolality. Changes in their dimensions and mechanical properties were measured over time. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to apply load at various strain-rates and the force-time curves were logged. The thin-layer elastic model was used to extract the elastic stiffness of chondrocytes at different strain-rates and at different solution osmolality. In addition, the porohyperelastic (PHE) model was used to investigate the strain-rate-dependent responses under the loading and osmotic pressure conditions. The results revealed that the hypo-osmotic external environment increased chondrocyte dimensions and reduced Young's modulus of the cells at all strain-rates tested. In contrast, the hyper-osmotic external environment reduced dimensions and increased Young's modulus. Moreover, using the PHE model coupled with inverse FEA simulation, we established that the hydraulic permeability of chondrocytes increased with decreasing extracellular osmolality which is consistent with previous work in the literature. This could be due to a higher intracellular fluid volume fraction with lower osmolality. PMID:26831866

  17. Controlled release of metformin hydrochloride and repaglinide from sandwiched osmotic pump tablet.

    PubMed

    Qin, Chao; He, Wei; Zhu, Chunli; Wu, Mengmeng; Jin, Zhu; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Guangji; Yin, Lifang

    2014-05-15

    The marketed compound tablet of metformin hydrochloride (MH) and repaglinide (RG) exhibits perfect multidrug therapeutic effect of type 2 diabetes. However, due to the short half life of the drugs, the tablet has to be administered 2 to 3 times a day, causing inconvenience to patient and fluctuations of plasma concentration. Here, a sandwiched osmotic pump tablet was developed to deliver the two drugs simultaneously at zero-order rate, in which MH and RG were loaded in different layers separated by a push layer. The osmotic pump tablet was prepared by a combination of three tableting procedure and film coating method. The factors including type and amount of propellant, osmotic active agents, amount of porogenic agent, coating weight, orifice diameter were optimized. The pharmacokinetic study was performed in beagle dogs, and the drug concentration in plasma samples was assayed by HPLC-MS/MS method. Simultaneous, controlled release of MH and RG in the first 12 and 8h was achieved from the optimized formulation. A significantly decreased Cmax, prolonged Tmax and satisfactory bioavailability of the osmotic pump tablet were obtained, and a good in vivo-in vitro correlation of the two drugs was also established. In summary, the sandwiched osmotic pump tablet released the MH and RG simultaneously at zero-order rate, and exhibited significant sustained release effect in vivo and good in vivo-in vitro correlation. The designed controlled release system for MH and RG proposed a promising replacement for the marked compound product in the therapy of type 2 diabetes. PMID:24607209

  18. Osmotic adjustment and the growth response of seven vegetable crops following water-deficit stress. [Phaseolus vulgaris L. ; Beta vulgaris L. ; Abelmoschus esculentus; Pisum sativum L. ; Capsicum annuum L. ; Spinacia oleracea L. ; Lycopersicon esculentum Mill

    SciTech Connect

    Wullschleger, S.D. ); Oosterhuis, D.M. )

    1991-09-01

    Growth-chamber studies were conducted to examine the ability of seven vegetable crops- Blue Lake beam (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Detroit Dark Red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) Burgundy okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) (Moench), Little Marvel pea (Pisum sativum L), California Wonder bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L), New Zealand spinach (Spinacia oleracea L), and Beefsteak tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) - to adjust osmotically in response to water-deficit stress. Water stress was imposed by withholding water for 3 days, and the adjustment of leaf and root osmotic potentials upon relief of the stress and rehydration were monitored with thermocouple psychrometers. Despite similar reductions in leaf water potential and stomatal conductance among the species studied reductions in lead water potential an stomatal conductance among the species, crop-specific differences were observed in leak and root osmotic adjustment. Leaf osmotic adjustment was observed for bean, pepper, and tomato following water-deficit stress. Root osmotic adjustment was significant in bean, okra, pea and tomato. Furthermore, differences in leaf and root osmotic adjustment were also observed among five tomato cultivars. Leaf osmotic adjustment was not associated with the maintenance of leaf growth following water-deficit stress, since leaf expansion of water-stressed bean and pepper, two species capable of osmotic adjustment, was similar to that of spinach, which exhibited no leaf osmotic adjustment.

  19. Role of spinal V1a receptors in regulation of arterial pressure during acute and chronic osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Veitenheimer, Britta; Osborn, John W

    2011-02-01

    Vasopressinergic neurons in the paraventricular nucleus project to areas in the spinal cord from which sympathetic nerves originate. This pathway is hypothesized to be involved in the regulation of mean arterial pressure (MAP), particularly under various conditions of osmotic stress. Several studies measuring sympathetic nerve activity support this hypothesis. However, the evidence that spinal vasopressin influences MAP under physiological or pathophysiological conditions in conscious animals is limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate, in conscious rats, if the increases in MAP during acute or chronic osmotic stimuli are due to activation of spinal vasopressin (V1a) receptors. Three conditions of osmotic stress were examined: acute intravenous hypertonic saline, 24- and 48-h water deprivation, and 4 wk of DOCA-salt treatment. Rats were chronically instrumented with an indwelling catheter for intrathecal injections and a radiotelemeter to measure MAP. In normotensive rats, intrathecal vasopressin and V1a agonist increased MAP, heart rate, and motor activity; these responses were blocked by pretreatment with an intrathecal V1a receptor antagonist. However, when the intrathecal V1a antagonist was given during the three conditions of osmotic stress to investigate the role of "endogenous" vasopressin, the antagonist had no effect on MAP, heart rate, or motor activity. Contrary to the hypothesis suggested by previous studies, these findings indicate that spinal V1a receptors are not required for elevations of MAP under conditions of acute or chronic osmotic stress in conscious rats. PMID:21123759

  20. Impact of osmotic stress on volume regulation, cytoplasmic solute composition and lysine production in Corynebacterium glutamicum MH20-22B.

    PubMed

    Rönsch, Hendrik; Krämer, Reinhard; Morbach, Susanne

    2003-09-01

    The response of the L-lysine producing Corynebacterium glutamicum strain MH20-22B to osmotic stress was studied in batch cultures. To mimic the conditions during a fermentation process the long term adaptation of cells subjected to a constant osmotic stress between 1.0 and 2.5 osM was investigated. Cytoplasmic water content and volume of C. glutamicum cells were found to depend on growth phase, extent of osmotic stress and availability of betaine. The maximal cytoplasmic volumes, which were highest at maximal growth rate, were linearily related to osmotic stress, whereas in stationary cells no active volume regulation was observed. Under severe osmotic stress proline was the prominent compatible solute in growing cells. Uptake of betaine, if available in the medium, reduced the concentration of proline from 750 to 300 mM, indicating that uptake of compatible solutes is preferred to synthesis. Furthermore, betaine was shown to have a higher efficiency to counteract osmotic stress, since the overall concentration of compatible solutes was lower in the presence of betaine. Under severe osmotic stress, the addition of betaine shifted L-lysine production in MH20-22B to earlier fermentation times and increased both product concentration and yield in these phases, but did not improve the final L-lysine yield. PMID:12948632

  1. Phenotypic variation and quantitative trait locus identification for osmotic potential in an interspecific hybrid inbred F2 poplar pedigree grown in contrasting environments

    SciTech Connect

    Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Tuskan, Gerald A; Sewell, Mitchell; Gebre, G; Todd Jr, Donald E; Pendley, Carrie D

    2006-01-01

    Elucidation of the mechanisms of dehydration tolerance in popular (Populus sp.) trees will permit development of biochemical and molecular indicators to indentify dehydration-tolerant genotypes during genetic selection. The objectives of the study were to characterize the degree of phenotypic variation in osmotic potential (a determinant of dehydration tolerance), determine the relationship between osmotic potential at full turgor and relative growth rate, and identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for osmotic potential in an advanced-generation, interpsecific popular pedigree established in contrasting environments.

  2. Comparative analysis of induction of osmotic-stress-dependent genes in Vibrio vulnificus exposed to hyper- and hypo-osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Rao, Namrata V; Shashidhar, Ravindranath; Bandekar, Jayant R

    2013-05-01

    Vibrio vulnificus, a halophilic pathogenic bacterium of marine environments, encounters changes in salinity in its natural habitat and in the food-processing environment. The comparative response of V. vulnificus to hyperosmotic and hypoosmotic stress in terms of gene expression was investigated. Genes belonging to the proU operon for transport of compatible solutes and compatible solute synthesis were significantly upregulated (3- to 4.7-fold) under hyperosmotic stress. Under hypoosmotic stress, upregulation of genes coding for mechanosensitive channels of small conductance (mscS) was not observed. In hyperosmotic conditions a 2.3-fold decrease in the expression of aqpZ was observed. A 2-fold induction in gyrA was observed in V. vulnificus cells on exposure to hyperosmotic stress. groEL genes, VVA1659 (1.6-fold), and VV3106 (1-fold) were induced in hypoosmotic condition. Results of this study indicate that to manage hyperosmotic stress, V. vulnificus accumulated osmoprotectants through uptake or through endogenous synthesis of compatible solutes. Expression of mscS may not be necessary for immediate protection in cells exposed to hyper- and hypo-osmotic stress. Comparative analysis of important osmotic-stress-related genes showed up- or down-regulation of 14 genes in hyperosmotic stress as compared with up- or down-regulation of only 7 genes in hypoosmotic stress, indicating that the cells respond asymmetrically to hyper- and hypo-osmotic stress. PMID:23647346

  3. Physiological and genetic responses of bacteria to osmotic stress.

    PubMed Central

    Csonka, L N

    1989-01-01

    The capacity of organisms to respond to fluctuations in their osmotic environments is an important physiological process that determines their abilities to thrive in a variety of habitats. The primary response of bacteria to exposure to a high osmotic environment is the accumulation of certain solutes, K+, glutamate, trehalose, proline, and glycinebetaine, at concentrations that are proportional to the osmolarity of the medium. The supposed function of these solutes is to maintain the osmolarity of the cytoplasm at a value greater than the osmolarity of the medium and thus provide turgor pressure within the cells. Accumulation of these metabolites is accomplished by de novo synthesis or by uptake from the medium. Production of proteins that mediate accumulation or uptake of these metabolites is under osmotic control. This review is an account of the processes that mediate adaptation of bacteria to changes in their osmotic environment. PMID:2651863

  4. Exposure to ozone and erythrocyte osmotic resistance in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Ikemi, Y.; Ohmori, K.; Ito, T.; Osaka, F.; Matuura, Y. )

    1992-10-01

    In order to learn the biological effect of photochemical oxidants on living bodies, we exposed newborn and adult rats, of both sexes, to ozone at a concentration of 0.25 ppm, which can be encountered in an urban environment, and then measured the osmotic resistance of their erythrocytes. The results of experiments using newborn rats indicated a positive increase in the osmotic resistance of erythrocytes in whole blood following ozone exposure for 4 weeks. An increase in the osmotic resistance of erythrocytes in the top part obtained by centrifugation was observed following ozone exposure for 12 weeks. This tendency was especially evident among male rats. On the other hand, no increase in the osmotic resistance of erythrocytes was recognized in the adult animals which had been exposed to the same concentration of ozone for 18 months.

  5. Experimental Support for a Predictive Osmotic Model of Clay Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, S.J.

    2001-08-29

    Osmosis has been cited as a mechanism for explaining anomalously high fluid pressures in the subsurface. Clays and shales act as membranes, and osmotic flux across these units may result in pressures sufficiently high to explain these anomalies. The theoretical osmotic pressures as calculated solely from solution properties can be quite large; however, it is not yet resolved whether these geologic membranes are sufficiently ideal to generate such pressures.

  6. Quantitative iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis of phosphoproteins and ABA-regulated phosphoproteins in maize leaves under osmotic stress

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiuli; Li, Nana; Wu, Liuji; Li, Chunqi; Li, Chaohai; Zhang, Li; Liu, Tianxue; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) regulates various developmental processes and stress responses in plants. Protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation is a central post-translational modification (PTM) in ABA signaling. However, the phosphoproteins regulated by ABA under osmotic stress remain unknown in maize. In this study, maize mutant vp5 (deficient in ABA biosynthesis) and wild-type Vp5 were used to identify leaf phosphoproteins regulated by ABA under osmotic stress. Up to 4052 phosphopeptides, corresponding to 3017 phosphoproteins, were identified by Multiplex run iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic and LC-MS/MS methods. The 4052 phosphopeptides contained 5723 non-redundant phosphosites; 512 phosphopeptides (379 in Vp5, 133 in vp5) displayed at least a 1.5-fold change of phosphorylation level under osmotic stress, of which 40 shared common in both genotypes and were differentially regulated by ABA. Comparing the signaling pathways involved in vp5 response to osmotic stress and those that in Vp5, indicated that ABA played a vital role in regulating these pathways related to mRNA synthesis, protein synthesis and photosynthesis. Our results provide a comprehensive dataset of phosphopeptides and phosphorylation sites regulated by ABA in maize adaptation to osmotic stress. This will be helpful to elucidate the ABA-mediate mechanism of maize endurance to drought by triggering phosphorylation or dephosphorylation cascades. PMID:26503333

  7. Compression and lubrication of salt free polyelectrolyte microgel particles in highly compressed suspensions by counterion osmotic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokoloff, J. B.

    2015-06-01

    The compression of polyelectrolyte microgel particles in a salt-free highly compressed colloid due to osmotic pressure outside of the particles due to counterions located there is studied for a model based on a quasi-analytic solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation and a model for the gel elasticity based on counterion osmotic pressure inside the particles and polymer elasticity (of entropic origin). It is found that for particles of radius of the order of a tenth of a micron, the counterion osmotic pressure should play a significant role in the compression of the particles, especially particles which do not have a corona (i.e., nonlinked polymer chains attached to their surface). The presence of a corona of monomer density smaller than that of the core of the microgel reduces the contribution of the osmotic pressure due to counterions outside of the microgel. It is also demonstrated that counterion osmotic pressure outside the particles can provide a significant contribution to the lubrication of the interface between the particles and a surface along which the compressed colloid is made to slide, for sufficiently slow velocities.

  8. An experimental approach to assess Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774) resistance to osmotic stress in estuarine habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira-Rodríguez, Noé; Pardo, Isabel

    2016-07-01

    Corbicula fluminea arrived in the Miño Estuary in 1989 and, from there, colonized more than 150 km upstream. Our aim was to test the capacity of C. fluminea to cope with osmotic stress conditions previously to invade new freshwater habitats through estuaries. Based on previously collected information, the experiment aims to study the response of the species to marine osmotic stress, evaluated by survival and behaviour. Experiments determined the resistance by the species to various levels of osmotic stress, and recovery time after exposure to high salinity levels, representative of the temporal and spatial salinity variation existing in the estuary. Under osmotic stress the semi-maximum response was reached after 19 days exposure. The species tolerance range, measured by individual maintained activity, was at salinity ∼20 when exposed to winter temperatures, while when animals were exposed to summer ones its tolerance was reduced to salinity lower than 15. C. fluminea show a large physiological flexibility to cope with salinity variations in estuaries. In summer, the temperature increases the metabolic rate thus making the species more vulnerable to osmotic stress exposure. These findings are relevant to preventing new invasions through ship ballast waters ensuring complete mortality if individuals are retained for >26 days.

  9. Comparative Analysis on the Key Enzymes of the Glycerol Cycle Metabolic Pathway in Dunaliella salina under Osmotic Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui; Lu, Yan; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2012-01-01

    The glycerol metabolic pathway is a special cycle way; glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3pdh), glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatase (G3pp), dihydroxyacetone reductase (Dhar), and dihydroxyacetone kinase (Dhak) are the key enzymes around the pathway. Glycerol is an important osmolyte for Dunaliella salina to resist osmotic stress. In this study, comparative activities of the four enzymes in D. salina and their activity changes under various salt stresses were investigated, from which glycerol metabolic flow direction in the glycerol metabolic pathway was estimated. Results showed that the salinity changes had different effects on the enzymes activities. NaCl could stimulate the activities of all the four enzymes in various degrees when D. salina was grown under continuous salt stress. When treated by hyperosmotic or hypoosmotic shock, only the activity of G3pdh in D. salina was significantly stimulated. It was speculated that, under osmotic stresses, the emergency response of the cycle pathway in D. salina was driven by G3pdh via its response to the osmotic stress. Subsequently, with the changes of salinity, other three enzymes started to respond to osmotic stress. Dhar played a role of balancing the cycle metabolic pathway by its forward and backward reactions. Through synergy, the four enzymes worked together for the effective flow of the cycle metabolic pathways to maintain the glycerol requirements of cells in order to adapt to osmotic stress environments. PMID:22675484

  10. Establishment of HEK293 cell line expressing green fluorescent protein-aquaporin-1 to determine osmotic water permeability.

    PubMed

    Gao, Junwei; Yu, Heming; Song, Qianliu; Li, Xuejun

    2005-07-01

    Aquaporin (AQP) is a kind of channel-forming membrane glycoprotein that mediates osmotic water transport. The present study aimed to establish a cell line stably transfected with AQP1 to measure osmotic water permeability. The recombinant plasmid was constructed by subcloning the full-length rat AQP1 cDNA into pEGFP-C3 vector, named pEGFP/AQP1. Human embryonic kidney 293 cells were transfected with pEGFP/AQP1 and selected by G418 to obtain a cell line stably expressing AQP1 tagged with green fluorescent protein. The expression level of AQP1 in the stably transfected cell was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. The real-time change of fluorescence density, corresponding to cell swelling induced by hyposmotic solution, was recorded under confocal laser scanning microscope and used to assess osmotic water permeability. The typical AQP1 inhibitor, mercuric chloride, validated this osmotic water permeability assay. These results suggested that this transfected cell model could be conveniently used to determine osmotic water permeability. PMID:15958180

  11. Inefficacy of osmotic backwash induced by sodium chloride salt solution in controlling SWRO membrane fouling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farooque, A. Mohammed; Al-Jeshi, Subhi; Saeed, Mohamed O.; Alreweli, Ali

    2014-12-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of osmotic backwash induced by high salt (NaCl) concentration solution on feed side of seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) membranes, online and offline, in controlling membrane fouling and therefore minimizing/eliminating the need for chemical cleaning. SWRO membranes were deliberately fouled by feeding seawater from an open intake located on the Arabian Gulf Coast without dosing chemicals. The fouled membranes were subjected to offline cleaning with the salt solution of up to 25 % concentration. Despite the partial removal of foulants from the membrane surface, SWRO membrane performance could not be restored, indicating the ineffectiveness of osmotic backwash in aiding offline salt cleaning. Similarly, online osmotic backwash was found to be not only ineffective in removing foulants from membrane surfaces but actually increased the fouling rate, as indicated by faster fouling rates compared to other cases. Although the driving force required for the osmotic backwash existed, the generated back flow proved to be insufficient to detach foulants from membrane surfaces. During the study period, the average SWRO membrane flux was maintained between 19 and 23 LMH, whereas the average generated back flow flux by high salt concentration solution was only 11 LMH, which was not adequate to remove foulants from membrane surfaces. Moreover, it seems that the membrane configuration as well as inherent microstructure of SWRO membrane places certain constraints on the osmotic backwash process and renders osmotic backwash ineffective in tackling SWRO membrane fouling. Hence, chemical cleaning is essential to restore SWRO membrane performance whenever fouling occurs, and the use of highly concentrated salt solution does not have any significant benefit. Membrane autopsy revealed only an insignificant accumulation of biofouling layer despite the absence of disinfection. However, it was shown that culturable biofilm bacteria species

  12. Enteric bacteria and osmotic stress: intracellular potassium glutamate as a secondary signal of osmotic stress?

    PubMed

    Booth, I R; Higgins, C F

    1990-06-01

    Enteric bacteria have evolved an impressive array of mechanisms that allow the cell to grow at widely different external osmotic pressures. These serve two linked functions; firstly, they allow the cell to maintain a relatively constant turgor pressure which is essential for cell growth; and secondly they permit changes in cytoplasmic composition such that the accumulation of intracellular osmolytes required to restore turgor pressure does not impair enzyme function. The primary event in turgor regulation is the controlled accumulation of potassium and its counterion glutamate. At high external osmolarities the cytoplasmic levels of potassium glutamate can impair enzyme function. Rapid growth is therefore dependent upon secondary responses, principally the accumulation of compatible solutes, betaine (N-trimethylglycine), proline and trehalose. The accumulation of these solutes is achieved by the controlled activity of transport systems and enzymes in response to changes in external osmotic pressure. It has been proposed that the accumulation of potassium glutamate during turgor regulation acts as a signal for the activation of these systems [1,2]. This brief review will examine the evidence that control over the balance of cytoplasmic osmolytes is achieved by sensing of the intracellular potassium (and glutamate) concentration. PMID:1974769

  13. Effects of a High Magnetic Field at Different Osmotic Pressures and Temperatures on Multiplication of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Van Nostran, F. E.; Reynolds, R. J.; Hedrick, H. G.

    1967-01-01

    The application of a yeast as a biosystem for determining the effects of a high magnetic field and other physical phenomena was studied. Multiplication of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was observed during exposure to a magnetic field of 4,600 gauss. Cell populations were determined at 24-, 48-, and 72-hr intervals, and possible interactions between the magnetic field and other environmental parameters, such as time, temperature, and osmotic pressure, were considered statistically. The main effect of the high magnetic field was a significant reduction of cell multiplication during each time interval. Significant interactions were found to occur between temperature and the magnetic field at 24 hr, and between temperature and osmotic pressure at each sampling interval. Synergistic effects of the magnetic field and osmotic pressure at both 28 and 38 C were nonsignificant. PMID:6035047

  14. Optical control of electro-osmotic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirei, Huba; Der, Andras; Oroszi, Laszlo; Ferencz, Karpat; Rakovics, Vilmos; Ormos, Pal

    2005-08-01

    Electro-osmotic pumping is an efficient way to move fluids in microfluidic systems. It is driven by the interaction of the Debye layer formed in the vicinity of the charged channel wall with a tangential electric field. The key parameters that determine the flow properties are the zeta potential of the surface and the electric field that drives the flow. Consequently, the flow can be controlled by appropriately modifying these parameters. Controlling the charge on the channel wall makes it possible to modify fluid flow. Likewise, the electric field close to the surface can be modified by changing the conductivity of the surface. The surface charge of appropriate materials can be changed by light illumination: the application of this phenomenon offers the possibility to optically control flow parameters. We have tested this possibility with several light sensitive surfaces. In the class of materials that change their charge upon illumination TiO2, a well known photoactive material was investigated. Experiments were also performed with the protein bacteriorhodopsin, known to change its surface charge following the release of protons into the solvent upon illumination. CdS was tested as the photoconductive material to modify the electric field by light. Linear microfluidic channels were prepared by soft lithography: a PDMS mold was placed upon a planar glass surface so that a rectangular cross section channel was formed upon the glass. The photosensitive materials covered the bottom glass surface. The experiments show that the flow can be readily modulated by illumination. The results demonstrate that it is possible to dynamically control microfluidic flow, opening up the prospect to create optically controlled complex microfluidic networks.

  15. Osmotic swelling of hepatocytes increases membrane conductance but not membrane capacitance.

    PubMed Central

    Graf, J; Rupnik, M; Zupancic, G; Zorec, R

    1995-01-01

    We have used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique to study changes in membrane conductance and membrane capacitance after osmotic swelling in rat hepatocytes. Hypoosmotic solutions induced an instantaneous increase in the volume of patch-clamped cells that was followed by a slow decline reminiscent of regulatory volume decrease as seen in intact cells. These morphological changes were associated with a transient increase in membrane conductance. The rise in conductance was not correlated with changes in capacitance, neither in time after the initiation of cell swelling nor in magnitude. Therefore we conclude that an osmotically induced increase in conductance is probably a result of the activation of existent channels in the plasmalemma and not a result of the fusion of vesicle membrane containing ionic channels. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:7540428

  16. Oscillatory phase separation in giant lipid vesicles induced by transmembrane osmotic differentials.

    PubMed

    Oglęcka, Kamila; Rangamani, Padmini; Liedberg, Bo; Kraut, Rachel S; Parikh, Atul N

    2014-01-01

    Giant lipid vesicles are closed compartments consisting of semi-permeable shells, which isolate femto- to pico-liter quantities of aqueous core from the bulk. Although water permeates readily across vesicular walls, passive permeation of solutes is hindered. In this study, we show that, when subject to a hypotonic bath, giant vesicles consisting of phase separating lipid mixtures undergo osmotic relaxation exhibiting damped oscillations in phase behavior, which is synchronized with swell-burst lytic cycles: in the swelled state, osmotic pressure and elevated membrane tension due to the influx of water promote domain formation. During bursting, solute leakage through transient pores relaxes the pressure and tension, replacing the domain texture by a uniform one. This isothermal phase transition--resulting from a well-coordinated sequence of mechanochemical events--suggests a complex emergent behavior allowing synthetic vesicles produced from simple components, namely, water, osmolytes, and lipids to sense and regulate their micro-environment. PMID:25318069

  17. Functional annotation of the transcriptome of Sorghum bicolor in response to osmotic stress and abscisic acid

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Higher plants exhibit remarkable phenotypic plasticity allowing them to adapt to an extensive range of environmental conditions. Sorghum is a cereal crop that exhibits exceptional tolerance to adverse conditions, in particular, water-limiting environments. This study utilized next generation sequencing (NGS) technology to examine the transcriptome of sorghum plants challenged with osmotic stress and exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) in order to elucidate genes and gene networks that contribute to sorghum's tolerance to water-limiting environments with a long-term aim of developing strategies to improve plant productivity under drought. Results RNA-Seq results revealed transcriptional activity of 28,335 unique genes from sorghum root and shoot tissues subjected to polyethylene glycol (PEG)-induced osmotic stress or exogenous ABA. Differential gene expression analyses in response to osmotic stress and ABA revealed a strong interplay among various metabolic pathways including abscisic acid and 13-lipoxygenase, salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and plant defense pathways. Transcription factor analysis indicated that groups of genes may be co-regulated by similar regulatory sequences to which the expressed transcription factors bind. We successfully exploited the data presented here in conjunction with published transcriptome analyses for rice, maize, and Arabidopsis to discover more than 50 differentially expressed, drought-responsive gene orthologs for which no function had been previously ascribed. Conclusions The present study provides an initial assemblage of sorghum genes and gene networks regulated by osmotic stress and hormonal treatment. We are providing an RNA-Seq data set and an initial collection of transcription factors, which offer a preliminary look into the cascade of global gene expression patterns that arise in a drought tolerant crop subjected to abiotic stress. These resources will allow scientists to query gene expression and functional

  18. Osmotic adjustment and requirement for sodium in marine protist thraustochytrid.

    PubMed

    Shabala, Lana; McMeekin, Tom; Shabala, Sergey

    2009-07-01

    A non-invasive ion-selective microelectrode technique was used to elucidate the ionic mechanisms of osmotic adjustment in a marine protist thraustochytrid. Hypoosmotic stress caused significant efflux of Na(+), Cl(-) and K(+) from thraustochytrid cells. Model calculations showed that almost complete osmotic adjustment was achieved within the first 30 min after stress onset. Of these, sodium was the major contributor (more than half of the total osmotic adjustment), with chloride being the second major contributor. The role of K(+) in the process of osmotic adjustment was relatively small. Changes in Ca(2+) and H(+) flux were attributed to intracellular signalling. Ion flux data were confirmed by growth experiments. Thraustochytrium cells showed normal growth patterns even when grown in a sodium-free solution provided the medium osmolality was adjusted by mannitol to one of the seawater. That suggests that the requirement of sodium for thraustochytrid growth cycle is due to its role in cell osmotic adjustment rather than because of the direct Na(+) involvement in cell metabolism. Altogether, these data demonstrate the evidence for turgor regulation in thraustochytrids and suggest that these cells may be grown in the absence of sodium providing that cell turgor is adjusted by some other means. PMID:20849566

  19. Structure and osmotic pressure of ionic microgel dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedrick, Mary M.; Chung, Jun Kyung; Denton, Alan R.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate structural and thermodynamic properties of aqueous dispersions of ionic microgels—soft colloidal gel particles that exhibit unusual phase behavior. Starting from a coarse-grained model of microgel macroions as charged spheres that are permeable to microions, we perform simulations and theoretical calculations using two complementary implementations of Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) theory. Within a one-component model, based on a linear-screening approximation for effective electrostatic pair interactions, we perform molecular dynamics simulations to compute macroion-macroion radial distribution functions, static structure factors, and macroion contributions to the osmotic pressure. For the same model, using a variational approximation for the free energy, we compute both macroion and microion contributions to the osmotic pressure. Within a spherical cell model, which neglects macroion correlations, we solve the nonlinear PB equation to compute microion distributions and osmotic pressures. By comparing the one-component and cell model implementations of PB theory, we demonstrate that the linear-screening approximation is valid for moderately charged microgels. By further comparing cell model predictions with simulation data for osmotic pressure, we chart the cell model's limits in predicting osmotic pressures of salty dispersions.

  20. Osmotic water transport in aquaporins: evidence for a stochastic mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zeuthen, Thomas; Alsterfjord, Magnus; Beitz, Eric; MacAulay, Nanna

    2013-01-01

    We test a novel, stochastic model of osmotic water transport in aquaporins. A solute molecule present at the pore mouth can either be reflected or permeate the pore. We assume that only reflected solute molecules induce osmotic transport of water through the pore, while permeating solute molecules give rise to no water transport. Accordingly, the rate of water transport is proportional to the reflection coefficient σ, while the solute permeability, PS, is proportional to 1 –σ. The model was tested in aquaporins heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. A variety of aquaporin channel sizes and geometries were obtained with the two aquaporins AQP1 and AQP9 and mutant versions of these. Osmotic water transport was generated by adding 20 mm of a range of different-sized osmolytes to the outer solution. The osmotic water permeability and the reflection coefficient were measured optically at high resolution and compared to the solute permeability obtained from short-term uptake of radio-labelled solute under isotonic conditions. For each type of aquaporin there was a linear relationship between solute permeability and reflection coefficient, in accordance with the model. We found no evidence for coupling between water and solute fluxes in the pore. In confirmation of molecular dynamic simulations, we conclude that the magnitude of the osmotic water permeability and the reflection coefficient are determined by processes at the arginine selectivity filter located at the outward-facing end of the pore. PMID:23959676

  1. Modelling of mass transfer kinetic in osmotic dehydration of kiwifruit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabrayili, Sharokh; Farzaneh, Vahid; Zare, Zahra; Bakhshabadi, Hamid; Babazadeh, Zahra; Mokhtarian, Mohsen; Carvalho, Isabel S.

    2016-04-01

    Osmotic dehydration characteristics of kiwifruit were predicted by different activation functions of an artificial neural network. Osmotic solution concentration (y1), osmotic solution temperature (y2), and immersion time (y3) were considered as the input parameters and solid gain value (x1) and water loss value (x2) were selected as the outlet parameters of the network. The result showed that logarithm sigmoid activation function has greater performance than tangent hyperbolic activation function for the prediction of osmotic dehydration parameters of kiwifruit. The minimum mean relative error for the solid gain and water loss parameters with one hidden layer and 19 nods were 0.00574 and 0.0062% for logarithm sigmoid activation function, respectively, which introduced logarithm sigmoid function as a more appropriate tool in the prediction of the osmotic dehydration of kiwifruit slices. As a result, it is concluded that this network is capable in the prediction of solid gain and water loss parameters (responses) with the correlation coefficient values of 0.986 and 0.989, respectively.

  2. Structure and osmotic pressure of ionic microgel dispersions

    SciTech Connect

    Hedrick, Mary M.; Chung, Jun Kyung; Denton, Alan R.

    2015-01-21

    We investigate structural and thermodynamic properties of aqueous dispersions of ionic microgels—soft colloidal gel particles that exhibit unusual phase behavior. Starting from a coarse-grained model of microgel macroions as charged spheres that are permeable to microions, we perform simulations and theoretical calculations using two complementary implementations of Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) theory. Within a one-component model, based on a linear-screening approximation for effective electrostatic pair interactions, we perform molecular dynamics simulations to compute macroion-macroion radial distribution functions, static structure factors, and macroion contributions to the osmotic pressure. For the same model, using a variational approximation for the free energy, we compute both macroion and microion contributions to the osmotic pressure. Within a spherical cell model, which neglects macroion correlations, we solve the nonlinear PB equation to compute microion distributions and osmotic pressures. By comparing the one-component and cell model implementations of PB theory, we demonstrate that the linear-screening approximation is valid for moderately charged microgels. By further comparing cell model predictions with simulation data for osmotic pressure, we chart the cell model’s limits in predicting osmotic pressures of salty dispersions.

  3. Ionic Origin of Electro-osmotic Flow Hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chun Yee; Lim, An Eng; Lam, Yee Cheong

    2016-01-01

    Electro-osmotic flow, the driving of fluid at nano- or micro- scales with electric field, has found numerous applications, ranging from pumping to chemical and biomedical analyses in micro-devices. Electro-osmotic flow exhibits a puzzling hysteretic behavior when two fluids with different concentrations displace one another. The flow rate is faster when a higher concentration solution displaces a lower concentration one as compared to the flow in the reverse direction. Although electro-osmotic flow is a surface phenomenon, rather counter intuitively we demonstrate that electro-osmotic flow hysteresis originates from the accumulation or depletion of pH-governing minority ions in the bulk of the fluid, due to the imbalance of electric-field-induced ion flux. The pH and flow velocity are changed, depending on the flow direction. The understanding of electro-osmotic flow hysteresis is critical for accurate fluid flow control in microfluidic devices, and maintaining of constant pH in chemical and biological systems under an electric field. PMID:26923197

  4. Ionic Origin of Electro-osmotic Flow Hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Chun Yee; Lim, An Eng; Lam, Yee Cheong

    2016-02-01

    Electro-osmotic flow, the driving of fluid at nano- or micro- scales with electric field, has found numerous applications, ranging from pumping to chemical and biomedical analyses in micro-devices. Electro-osmotic flow exhibits a puzzling hysteretic behavior when two fluids with different concentrations displace one another. The flow rate is faster when a higher concentration solution displaces a lower concentration one as compared to the flow in the reverse direction. Although electro-osmotic flow is a surface phenomenon, rather counter intuitively we demonstrate that electro-osmotic flow hysteresis originates from the accumulation or depletion of pH-governing minority ions in the bulk of the fluid, due to the imbalance of electric-field-induced ion flux. The pH and flow velocity are changed, depending on the flow direction. The understanding of electro-osmotic flow hysteresis is critical for accurate fluid flow control in microfluidic devices, and maintaining of constant pH in chemical and biological systems under an electric field.

  5. Cell osmotic water permeability of isolated rabbit proximal convoluted tubules.

    PubMed

    Carpi-Medina, P; González, E; Whittembury, G

    1983-05-01

    Cell osmotic water permeability, Pcos, of the peritubular aspect of the proximal convoluted tubule (PCT) was measured from the time course of cell volume changes subsequent to the sudden imposition of an osmotic gradient, delta Cio, across the cell membrane of PCT that had been dissected and mounted in a chamber. The possibilities of artifact were minimized. The bath was vigorously stirred, the solutions could be 95% changed within 0.1 s, and small osmotic gradients (10-20 mosM) were used. Thus, the osmotically induced water flow was a linear function of delta Cio and the effect of the 70-microns-thick unstirred layers was negligible. In addition, data were extrapolated to delta Cio = 0. Pcos for PCT was 41.6 (+/- 3.5) X 10(-4) cm3 X s-1 X osM-1 per cm2 of peritubular basal area. The standing gradient osmotic theory for transcellular osmosis is incompatible with this value. Published values for Pcos of PST are 25.1 X 10(-4), and for the transepithelial permeability Peos values are 64 X 10(-4) for PCT and 94 X 10(-4) for PST, in the same units. These results indicate that there is room for paracellular water flow in both nephron segments and that the magnitude of the transcellular and paracellular water flows may vary from one segment of the proximal tubule to another. PMID:6846543

  6. Ionic Origin of Electro-osmotic Flow Hysteresis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chun Yee; Lim, An Eng; Lam, Yee Cheong

    2016-01-01

    Electro-osmotic flow, the driving of fluid at nano- or micro- scales with electric field, has found numerous applications, ranging from pumping to chemical and biomedical analyses in micro-devices. Electro-osmotic flow exhibits a puzzling hysteretic behavior when two fluids with different concentrations displace one another. The flow rate is faster when a higher concentration solution displaces a lower concentration one as compared to the flow in the reverse direction. Although electro-osmotic flow is a surface phenomenon, rather counter intuitively we demonstrate that electro-osmotic flow hysteresis originates from the accumulation or depletion of pH-governing minority ions in the bulk of the fluid, due to the imbalance of electric-field-induced ion flux. The pH and flow velocity are changed, depending on the flow direction. The understanding of electro-osmotic flow hysteresis is critical for accurate fluid flow control in microfluidic devices, and maintaining of constant pH in chemical and biological systems under an electric field. PMID:26923197

  7. In vitro-in vivo evaluation of nanosuspension release from subcutaneously implantable osmotic pumps.

    PubMed

    Hill, A; Geissler, S; Meyring, M; Hecht, S; Weigandt, M; Mäder, K

    2013-07-15

    Utilizing poorly soluble drug candidates in pharmacokinetic studies remains challenging in preclinical drug development. We investigated a nanosuspension-based delivery system to achieve constant drug plasma levels by applying the nanoparticles via subcutaneously implanted micro-osmotic pumps. Various nanosuspension formulations were characterized in vitro prior to Alzet® pump release by means of dynamic light scattering (DLS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and rheological measurements. In vitro formulation release was checked by HPLC/UV. The in vivo experiments compared plasma-concentration time profiles of subcutaneously injected nanosuspensions with those of formulations delivered by pumps. Two Poloxamer 338 containing nanosuspensions with different viscosities were found to be stable over observation time, physically resistant against biorelevant media and showed only a low amorphous part after preparation. The more viscous nanosuspension with 31.65 mPas revealed in vitro the expected zero-order release, while the low viscous formulation with 2.18 mPas showed first order release. In in vivo experiments, the higher viscous nanosuspension released from osmotic pumps exhibited elevated plasma levels compared to the lower viscous formulation. Compared to bolus injected nanosuspensions constant plasma levels could be maintained by adapting the viscosity of the nanosuspension. Subcutaneously implanted osmotic pumps prove to be a valuable delivery system for nanosuspensions in pharmacokinetic studies by consideration of the key parameter viscosity in release kinetics. PMID:23628403

  8. Effects of osmotic stress on predation behaviour of Asterias rubens L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agüera, Antonio; Schellekens, Tim; Jansen, Jeroen M.; Smaal, Aad C.

    2015-05-01

    Environmental stress plays an important role in determining ecosystem functioning and structure. In estuarine areas both tidal and seasonal salinity changes may cause osmotic stress on predators, affecting their behaviour and survival. The interaction between these predators and their prey may affect performance, thus influencing predator impact on prey populations. The common starfish, Asterias rubens, inhabits estuarine areas, such as the Dutch Wadden Sea, that exhibit large seasonal variation in salinity (10-32 PSU). In those areas A. rubens exerts top down control on its prey, thus representing an important shellfish predator. This predation may impact on cultured and natural shellfish populations. However, the effects of osmotic stress on A. rubens performance may influence its effect on prey. Although the effect of salinity in A. rubens survival has been extensively studied, the impact on its predation behaviour and acclimation capacity remains unclear. In this study, we analyse the performance of A. rubens preying on mussels (Mytilus edulis) after a salinity decrease and monitor its acclimation capacity over a period of 22 days. Our experiments demonstrated that salinity affected performance by reducing feeding activity and altering size prey selection. Moreover, as acclimation occurred, A. rubens predation performance improved in all sub-lethal treatments. We conclude that osmotic stress caused by decreasing salinity potentially influences A. rubens distribution, abundance, and potential impact on prey populations. However the magnitude of the change in salinity (from 31 to a minimum of 10 PSU) and its timescale (3 weeks) mediate this effect.

  9. Effects of aluminum chloride on some trace elements and erythrocyte osmotic fragility in rats.

    PubMed

    Oztürk, Bahar; Ozdemir, Semra

    2015-12-01

    Aluminum (Al) is a nonessential, toxic element to which humans are constantly exposed as a result of an increase in industrialization and improving technology practices. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of different durations and doses of Al exposure on serum and tissue element levels and erythrocyte osmotic fragility in rats. A total of 40 male Wistar Albino rats were divided into five groups: control, group I (3 weeks, 8 mg/kg), group II (6 weeks, 8 mg/kg), group III (3 weeks, 16 mg/kg), and group IV (6 weeks, 16 mg/kg). Al chloride (AlCl3) was injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) five times a week. At the end of the experimental period, levels of Al, iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn) in serum, liver, and kidney tissues were measured using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. Osmotic fragility was determined using a spectrophotometer. The results of the experiment indicate that Al induced a statistically significant increase in Al and Fe concentrations in liver and serum as well as in Cu in the kidney. The Fe concentration in serum and kidney tissues was significantly lower in all the groups. As a result of our study, it may be concluded that tissue Al accumulation may lead to an increase in osmotic fragility of erythrocytes and abnormal trace element levels. PMID:23625912

  10. Theoretical and experimental investigations of the potential of osmotic energy for power production.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Adel O; Merdaw, Ali A; Aryafar, Maryam; Nicoll, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a study on the potential of osmotic energy for power production. The study includes both pilot plant testing and theoretical modelling as well as cost estimation. A projected cost of £30/MWh of clean electricity could be achieved by using a Hydro-Osmotic Power (HOP) plant if a suitable membrane is used and the osmotic potential difference between the two solutions is greater than 25 bar; a condition that can be readily found in many sites around the world. Results have shown that the membrane system accounts for 50%-80% of the HOP plant cost depending on the salinity difference level. Thus, further development in membrane technology and identifying suitable membranes would have a significant impact on the feasibility of the process and the route to market. As the membrane permeability determines the HOP process feasibility, this paper also describes the effect of the interaction between the fluid and the membrane on the system permeability. It has been shown that both the fluid physical properties as well as the membrane micro-structural parameters need to be considered if further development of the HOP process is to be achieved. PMID:25110959

  11. Theoretical and Experimental Investigations of the Potential of Osmotic Energy for Power Production †

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Adel O.; Merdaw, Ali A.; Aryafar, Maryam; Nicoll, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a study on the potential of osmotic energy for power production. The study includes both pilot plant testing and theoretical modelling as well as cost estimation. A projected cost of £30/MWh of clean electricity could be achieved by using a Hydro-Osmotic Power (HOP) plant if a suitable membrane is used and the osmotic potential difference between the two solutions is greater than 25 bar; a condition that can be readily found in many sites around the world. Results have shown that the membrane system accounts for 50%–80% of the HOP plant cost depending on the salinity difference level. Thus, further development in membrane technology and identifying suitable membranes would have a significant impact on the feasibility of the process and the route to market. As the membrane permeability determines the HOP process feasibility, this paper also describes the effect of the interaction between the fluid and the membrane on the system permeability. It has been shown that both the fluid physical properties as well as the membrane micro-structural parameters need to be considered if further development of the HOP process is to be achieved. PMID:25110959

  12. Transition zone dynamics in combined isotachophoretic and electro-osmotic transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönfeld, Friedhelm; Goet, Gabriele; Baier, Tobias; Hardt, Steffen

    2009-09-01

    The present study focuses on the interplay of isotachophoresis (ITP) and electro-osmotic flow (EOF). While EOF is commonly suppressed in ITP applications, we investigate scenarios of the combination of both EOF and ITP. Experimental results of ITP/EOF experiments within cross-patterned polymer chips show characteristic deformations of fluorescent sample zones sandwiched between leading and trailing electrolytes. A changing curvature of the deformation is observed during ITP/EOF runs, but overall a well defined sample segment is maintained after a transport over a few centimeters. By means of numerical modeling we study the deformation attributed to the mismatch of EOF between leading and trailing electrolytes. The model results are found to qualitatively agree with our experimental findings. We introduce the ratio of the EOF velocities in the leading and trailing electrolyte, expressed via the respective mobilities, as a dimensionless parameter γ and show that in the case where electro-osmotically induced convection dominates over electromigration the deformation width scales as 1-γ. In particular, we find that the EOF-induced dispersion virtually vanishes for the case γ =1. Hence, in this particular case isotachophoretic self-sharpening and electro-osmotic pumping can be combined without any detrimental effects on sample transport even for large EOF velocities.

  13. Physcomitrella patens DNA methyltransferase 2 is required for recovery from salt and osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Arya, Deepshikha; Kapoor, Sanjay; Kapoor, Meenu

    2016-02-01

    DNA methyltransferase 2 (DNMT2) unlike other members of the cytosine DNA methyltransferase gene family has dual substrate specificity and it methylates cytosines in both the DNA and transfer RNA (tRNA). Its role in plants, however, has remained obscure to date. In this study, we demonstrate that DNMT2 from Physcomitrella patens accumulates in a temporal manner under salt and osmotic stress showing maximum accumulation during recovery, i.e. 24 h after plants are transferred to normal growth medium. Therefore, to study its role in stress tolerance, we generated PpDNMT2 targeted knockout plants (ppdnmt2ko). Mutant plants show increased sensitivity to salt and osmotic stress and are unable to recover even after 21 days of growth on optimal growth media. ppdnmt2ko, however, accumulate normal levels of dehydrin-like and small heat shock protein encoding transcripts under stress but show dramatic reduction in levels of tRNA(A) (sp-) (GUC) . The levels of tRNA(A) (sp-) (GUC) , in contrast, increase ~ 25-30-fold in ppdnmt2ko under non-stress conditions and > 1200-fold in wild-type plants under stress. The role of PpDNMT2 in modulating biogenesis/stability of tRNA(A) (sp-) (GUC) under salt and osmotic stress is discussed in the light of these observations. PMID:26639858

  14. Effect of osmotic stress on the expression of TRPV4 and BKCa channels and possible interaction with ERK1/2 and p38 in cultured equine chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hdud, Ismail M; Mobasheri, Ali; Loughna, Paul T

    2014-06-01

    The metabolic activity of articular chondrocytes is influenced by osmotic alterations that occur in articular cartilage secondary to mechanical load. The mechanisms that sense and transduce mechanical signals from cell swelling and initiate volume regulation are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate how the expression of two putative osmolyte channels [transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) and large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BKCa)] in chondrocytes is modulated in different osmotic conditions and to examine a potential role for MAPKs in this process. Isolated equine articular chondrocytes were subjected to anisosmotic conditions, and TRPV4 and BKCa channel expression and ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK protein phosphorylation were investigated using Western blotting. Results indicate that the TRPV4 channel contributes to the early stages of hypo-osmotic stress, while the BKCa channel is involved in responding to elevated intracellular Ca(2+) and mediating regulatory volume decrease. ERK1/2 is phosphorylated by hypo-osmotic stress (P < 0.001), and p38 MAPK is phosphorylated by hyperosmotic stress (P < 0.001). In addition, this study demonstrates the importance of endogenous ERK1/2 phosphorylation in TRPV4 channel expression, where blocking ERK1/2 by a specific inhibitor (PD98059) prevented increased levels of the TRPV4 channel in cells exposed to hypo-osmotic stress and decreased TRPV4 channel expression to below control levels in iso-osmotic conditions (P < 0.001). PMID:24671100

  15. Refinement of elastic, poroelastic, and osmotic tissue properties of intervertebral disks to analyze behavior in compression.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Ian A F; Laible, Jeffrey P; Gardner-Morse, Mack G; Costi, John J; Iatridis, James C

    2011-01-01

    Intervertebral disks support compressive forces because of their elastic stiffness as well as the fluid pressures resulting from poroelasticity and the osmotic (swelling) effects. Analytical methods can quantify the relative contributions, but only if correct material properties are used. To identify appropriate tissue properties, an experimental study and finite element analytical simulation of poroelastic and osmotic behavior of intervertebral disks were combined to refine published values of disk and endplate properties to optimize model fit to experimental data. Experimentally, nine human intervertebral disks with adjacent hemi-vertebrae were immersed sequentially in saline baths having concentrations of 0.015, 0.15, and 1.5 M and the loss of compressive force at constant height (force relaxation) was recorded over several hours after equilibration to a 300-N compressive force. Amplitude and time constant terms in exponential force-time curve-fits for experimental and finite element analytical simulations were compared. These experiments and finite element analyses provided data dependent on poroelastic and osmotic properties of the disk tissues. The sensitivities of the model to alterations in tissue material properties were used to obtain refined values of five key material parameters. The relaxation of the force in the three bath concentrations was exponential in form, expressed as mean compressive force loss of 48.7, 55.0, and 140 N, respectively, with time constants of 1.73, 2.78, and 3.40 h. This behavior was analytically well represented by a model having poroelastic and osmotic tissue properties with published tissue properties adjusted by multiplying factors between 0.55 and 2.6. Force relaxation and time constants from the analytical simulations were most sensitive to values of fixed charge density and endplate porosity. PMID:20711754

  16. Formulation and process optimization of multiparticulate pulsatile system delivered by osmotic pressure-activated rupturable membrane.

    PubMed

    Hung, Sheng-Feng; Hsieh, Chien-Ming; Chen, Ying-Chen; Lin, Cheng-Mao; Ho, Hsiu-O; Sheu, Ming-Thau

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a multiparticulate pulsatile drug delivery system activated by a rupturable controlled-release membrane (Eudragit(®) RS) via osmotic pressure (with NaCl as the osmogent) was developed and characterized for omeprazole, omeprazole sodium, and propranolol HCl which have different water solubilities. Multiparticulates in pellet form for incorporation with or without the osmogent were manufactured by three methods and then used to coat a polymeric membrane. Results demonstrated that drug/osmogent-containing pellets manufactured by the extrusion/spheronization method with incorporation of the osmogent were optimal. The lag time (tL) to initiate pulsatile release is regulated by tL=l(2)/(6×D), which is dependent on the coating levels (l(2)) and plasticizer content (D). The pulsatile release pattern was found to be dependent on the osmotic pressure (osmogent), drug solubility, and mechanical properties of the polymeric membrane (elasticity and toughness). Omeprazole with lower water solubility could not generate sufficient osmotic pressure to create a crack in the membrane to activate pulsatile release, whereas the two other model drugs with higher solubilities could. But adsorption of omeprazole sodium on Eudragit(®) RS via charge-charge interactions led the its incomplete release. Finally, with 4% osmogent of NaCl added, a lag time in a range from 0 to 12h proportionally regulated by varying both the membrane thickness and plasticizer level initiated the complete pulsatile release of propranolol HCl. In conclusion, a multiparticulate pulsatile drug delivery system activated by a rupturable controlled-release membrane via osmotic pressure was successfully developed, and clinical applications of chronotherapy with drugs like propranolol HCl are expected. PMID:25575473

  17. INFLUENCE OF OSMOTIC PRESSURE ON THE MORPHOLOGY OF THE REITER TREPONEME

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Paul H.; Nell, E. Ellen

    1961-01-01

    Hardy, Paul H., Jr. (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md.) and E. Ellen Nell. Influence of osmotic pressure on the morphology of the Reiter treponeme. J. Bacteriol. 82: 967–978. 1961.—Spherical bodies similar to those that develop spontaneously in cultures of treponemes, and which have been considered by many investigators to represent one stage in a complex life cycle of these organisms, can be produced rapidly with the Reiter treponeme by merely altering the medium in which the organisms are suspended. Osmotic pressure appears to be the major factor responsible for this effect, as shown by the observation that treponemes suspended in NaCl solutions of 0.15 to 0.10 m retain their spirochetal morphology, whereas organisms suspended in more dilute salt solutions rapidly become spherical. Moreover, the concentration of salt appears to influence both the rate and extent of sphere formation. Further evidence that osmotic pressure is primarily involved is demonstrated by the selectivity of the conditions under which spheres form. Treponemes suspended in various 0.3 osmolal solutions either retain their spiral shape or form spheres, depending upon the nature of the solute. Viability studies of suspensions containing predominantly spherical forms, which have developed spontaneously or have been artificially induced, have failed to produce evidence that the resulting growth of treponemes came from the spheres. It is concluded, therefore, that the naturally occurring spheres probably arise as the result of an osmotic imbalance which develops between the cells and their environment, and that the spheres represent degenerative forms rather than an intermediate stage in a life cycle. Images PMID:13904666

  18. Optical methods for measuring plasma membrane osmotic water permeability in cell layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinas, Javier Anibal

    Optical methods were developed to measure water permeability in cell layers and used to characterize water channel transfected cells and measure individual plasma membrane water permeabilities of epithelial cells. The general approach was to measure the rate of change of cell volume in response to osmotic gradients. Changes in solute concentration resulting from cell volume changes were used to generate optical signals. Because of the high data acquisition rates obtainable with optical instruments, very high water permeabilities found in cells containing water channels can be measured. Total internal reflection microfluorimetry was used to measure water permeability in cells grown on transparent, solid supports. The fluorescence measured from cells containing a cytosolic fluorophore was inversely proportional to cell volume. The method was applied to transfected cells which expressed water channels and to investigate a cell model of the vasopressin-regulated shuttling of AQP2. Interferometry was used to measure cell volume and water permeability in adherent or non-adherent epithelial cell layers. Volume changes were shown to alter the optical path length of light passing through a cell layer. An interferometer was used to convert the small changes in optical path length to measurable changes in intensity. Cell membrane osmotic water permeability was determined from the time course of interference signal in response to osmotic gradients. Individual plasma membrane water permeabilities of epithelial cells were measured. To overcome the difficulties associated with interferometry, a spatial filtering microscopy method was developed based on changes in transmitted light intensity in a phase contrast microscope occurring after volume changes induced by osmotic gradients. A theory based on the refractive index changes observed in cells by interferometry was developed to explain the dependence of transmitted light intensity on cell volume. The method was applied to

  19. Osmotic potential of several hardwood species as affected by manipulation of throughfall precipitation in an upland oak forest during a dry year.

    PubMed

    Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Gebre, G. Michael; Shirshac, Terri L.

    1998-05-01

    Components of dehydration tolerance, including osmotic potential at full turgor (Psi(pio)) and osmotic adjustment (lowering of Psi(pio)), of several deciduous species were investigated in a mature, upland oak forest in eastern Tennessee. Beginning July 1993, the trees were subjected to one of three throughfall precipitation treatments: ambient, ambient minus 33% (dry treatment), and ambient plus 33% (wet treatment). During the dry 1995 growing season, leaf water potentials of all species declined to between -2.5 and -3.1 MPa in the dry treatment. There was considerable variation in Psi(pio) among species (-1.0 to -2.0 MPa). Based on Psi(pio) values, American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.), dogwood (Cornus florida L.), and sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) were least dehydration tolerant, red maple (A. rubrum L.) was intermediate in tolerance, and white oak (Quercus alba L.) and chestnut oak (Quercus prinus L.) were most tolerant. During severe drought, overstory chestnut oak and understory dogwood, red maple and chestnut oak displayed osmotic adjustment (-0.12 to -0.20 MPa) in the dry treatment relative to the wet treatment. (No osmotic adjustment was evident in understory red maple and chestnut oak during the previous wet year.) Osmotic potential at full turgor was generally correlated with leaf water potential, with both declining over the growing season, especially in species that displayed osmotic adjustment. However, osmotic adjustment was not restricted to species considered dehydration tolerant; for example, dogwood typically maintained high Psi(pio) and displayed osmotic adjustment to drought, but had the highest mortality rates of the species studied. Understory saplings tended to have higher Psi(pio) than overstory trees when water availability was high, but Psi(pio) of understory trees declined to values observed for overstory trees during severe drought. We conclude that Psi(pio) varies among deciduous hardwood species and is dependent on canopy

  20. Osmotic control of glycine betaine biosynthesis and degradation in Rhizobium meliloti

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.T.; Pocard, J.A.; Bernard, T.; Le Rudulier, D.

    1988-07-01

    Intracellular accumulation of glycine betaine has been shown to confer an enhanced level of osmotic stress tolerance in Rhizobium meliloti. In this study, the authors used a physiological approach to investigate the mechanism by which glycine betaine is accumulated in osmotically stressed R. meliloti. Results from growth experiments, /sup 14/C labeling of intermediates, and enzyme activity assays are presented. The results provide evidence for the pathway of biosynthesis and degradation of glycine betaine and the osmotic effects on this pathway. High osmolarity in the medium decreased the activities of the enzymes involved in the degradation of glycine betaine but not those of enzymes that lead to its biosynthesis from choline. Thus, the concentration of the osmoprotectant glycine betaine is increased in stressed cells. This report demonstrates the ability of the osmolarity of the growth medium to regulate the use of glycine betaine as a carbon and nitrogen source or as an osmoprotectant. The mechanisms of osmoregulation in R. meliloti and Escherichia coli are compared.

  1. Water fluxes and encapsulation efficiency in double emulsions: impact of emulsification and osmotic pressure unbalance.

    PubMed

    Nollet, Maxime; Mercé, Manuel; Laurichesse, Eric; Pezon, Annaïck; Soubabère, Olivier; Besse, Samantha; Schmitt, Véronique

    2016-03-30

    We study the influence of the emulsification process on encapsulation efficiency of drugs in double water-in-oil-in-water emulsions. Two drugs were used, first vitamin B12 which can be considered as a model drug and secondly a suspension of Cydia pomonella Granulovirus (CpGV), a virus used in organic agriculture to protect fruits against the Carpocapse insect. Encapsulation is measured by classical UV-Vis spectroscopy method. Additionally we show that rheology is a useful tool to determine water exchanges during emulsification. In a two-step emulsification process, using rotor-stator mixers, encapsulation reaches high levels, close to 100% whatever the flowing regime. This encapsulation decreases only if two conditions are fulfilled simultaneously: (i) during the second emulsification step the flow is turbulent and (ii) it leads to excessive fragmentation inducing formation of too small drops. We also investigate the effect of a deliberate loss of osmotic pressure balance on the encapsulation and characterize the induced water fluxes. We show that encapsulation of vitamin B12 is not affected by the osmotic pressure unbalance, while water exchanges, if they exist, are very fast and aim at restoring equilibrium. As a consequence, the emulsification efficiency is not very sensitive to osmotic stresses provided that the interfaces resist mechanically. PMID:26936127

  2. Osmotolerant yeast species differ in basic physiological parameters and in tolerance of non-osmotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Bubnová, Michala; Zemančíková, Jana; Sychrová, Hana

    2014-08-01

    Osmotolerance is the ability to grow in an environment with a high osmotic pressure. In this study we compared the physiological parameters and tolerance to osmotic and non-osmotic stresses of three osmotolerant yeast species, Debaryomyces hansenii, Pichia farinosa (sorbitophila) and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, with those of wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although the osmotolerant species did not differ significantly in their basic parameters, such as cell size or growth capacity, they had different abilities to survive anhydrobiosis, potassium limitation or the presence of toxic cationic drugs. When their osmotolerance was compared, the results revealed that some of the species isolated as sugar/polyol-tolerant (e.g.  P. farinosa) are also highly tolerant to salts and, vice versa, some strains isolated from an environment with high concentration of salt (e.g. Z. rouxii ATCC 42981) tolerate high concentrations of sugars. None of the tested strains and species was osmophilic. Taken together, our results showed that P. farinosa (sorbitophila) is the most robust species when coping with various stresses, while Z. rouxii CBS 732, although osmotolerant in general, is not specifically salt-tolerant and is quite sensitive to most of the tested stress conditions. PMID:24962688

  3. Food grade duplex emulsions designed and stabilised with different osmotic pressures.

    PubMed

    Pawlik, Aleksandra; Cox, Philip W; Norton, Ian T

    2010-12-01

    In this study we have investigated the production of food grade W(1)/O/W(2) duplex emulsions with salt partitioned into one water phase but not the other. Investigations were carried out with and without balancing osmotic pressures with glucose. A stable 30% primary W(1)/O emulsions containing salt could be produced with more than or equal to 2% polyglycerol polyricinoleate (PGPR) in the oil phase. We suggest that the addition of salt strengthens the interactions between surfactant molecules in the adsorbed film. This is supported by interfacial viscosity and elasticity measurements both of which increased on addition of salt and the fact that in the presence of salt the emulsion was more stable. These simple emulsions were then processed to construct duplex emulsions. When osmotic pressures were balanced with glucose there was still a release of salt in storage. The extent and rate of release was proportional to glucose concentration. This effect was followed over a period of 60days. These data suggest that the release is driven by the chemical potential difference between the two water compartments rather than the unbalanced osmotic pressures. These observations are explained in the context of a water structuring effect from the added glucose, which lowers the interfacial tension of oil-water interface and thus facilitates micellar transport of hydrated salt ions across the oil layer. PMID:20828706

  4. Osmotically induced removal of water from fungal cells as determined by a spin probe technique.

    PubMed

    Miller, R W

    1978-11-01

    Effects of physical environment on plasma membrane semipermeability and osmotic induction of changes in aqueous cytoplasmic volume were studied in vegetative and spore cells of a plant pathogenic fungus, Fusarium sulphureum. A direct method, employing a spin probe molecule that partitioned between intracellular aqueous and hydrophobic phases, allowed measurement of reversible water movement out of macroconidial cells and chlamydospores exposed to solutions of high osmolarity. Equilibrium distribution of the spin probe between intracellular aqueous and lipid phases was more rapid than movement of water in and out of the cells. The extent of water removal was exponentially dependent on osmotic strength. Some cells became irreversibly permeable to divalent cations on treatment with sodium chloride above 1.5 osmolar but addition of sucrose to the suspension medium at equivalent osmolar concentrations caused water removal without adversely affecting the viability. Sucrose also protected the plasma membrane against damage during freeze-drying. Induction of plasma membrane damage by osmotic shock or freeze-drying permitted rapid permeation of nickel ions. Neither slow equilibration of intracellular components with divalent paramagnetic cations nor partial permeability of damaged plasma membranes to these ions was observed. PMID:16660597

  5. Osmotic control of glycine betaine biosynthesis and degradation in Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, L T; Pocard, J A; Bernard, T; Le Rudulier, D

    1988-01-01

    Intracellular accumulation of glycine betaine has been shown to confer an enhanced level of osmotic stress tolerance in Rhizobium meliloti. In this study, we used a physiological approach to investigate the mechanism by which glycine betaine is accumulated in osmotically stressed R. meliloti. Results from growth experiments, 14C labeling of intermediates, and enzyme activity assays are presented. The results provide evidence for the pathway of biosynthesis and degradation of glycine betaine and the osmotic effects on this pathway. High osmolarity in the medium decreased the activities of the enzymes involved in the degradation of glycine betaine but not those of enzymes that lead to its biosynthesis from choline. Thus, the concentration of the osmoprotectant glycine betaine is increased in stressed cells. This report demonstrates the ability of the osmolarity of the growth medium to regulate the use of glycine betaine as a carbon and nitrogen source or as an osmoprotectant. The mechanisms of osmoregulation in R. meliloti and Escherichia coli are compared. PMID:3290197

  6. Effect of osmotic pressure on ganglioside-cholesterol-DOPC lipid mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onai, Teruaki; Hirai, Mitsuhiro

    2007-10-01

    By means of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) method, we have studied the structure of the lipid mixtures of monosialoganglioside (GMI)-cholesterol-dioleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) system as a model of lipid raft. The samples were small uni-lamellar vesicle (SUV) except for GMI sample. The osmotic pressure was changed with varying the polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) concentration in the range from 0 to 25 % w/w. The increase of the PVP concentration is known to reduce the lamellar spacing due to the increase of the osmotic pressure. On the other hand the polar head region of GMI was shown to be highly hydrophilic by the presence of oligosaccharide chain containing one sialic acid residue. In the cases of the GMI micelle and GMI-cholesterol SUV the presence of PVP affects little on those aggregate structures. In the case of the SUVs of cholesterol-DOPC the stacking of the bilayers was induced with the increase of PVP concentration, especially at high cholesterol content. In the case of the SUVs of GMI-cholesterol-DOPC the multi-lamellar stacking was suppressed, but a minor change of the SUV structure was induced. The present results suggest that the coexistence of GMI and cholesterol affords the lipid bilayer a resistance to the osmotic stress and avoids a multi-layered stacking.

  7. Both water intoxication and osmotic BBB disruption increase brain water content in rats.

    PubMed

    Kozler, P; Riljak, V; Pokorný, J

    2013-01-01

    Our previous experiments revealed that water intoxication and osmotic BBB disruption in the rat allow penetration of high-molecular substances into the brain and that resulting changes in the internal environment of the CNS lead to pathological development, such as the loss of integrity of myelin. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the previously described phenomena are associated with increased water content in the brain. To answer the question following methods were used: a) water intoxication: intraperitoneal administration of distilled water, b) osmotic BBB disruption: application of mannitol (20 %) selectively into the internal carotid artery, c) brain wet weight was measured after decapitation, and subsequently (after six days in thermostat set at 86 °C) the dry weight were estimated d) in animals with 20 % and 30 % hyperhydration the degree of myelin deterioration was estimated e) animal locomotor activity was tested by continuous behavior tracking and analysis. Brain water content after water intoxication and following the administration of mannitol was higher than in the control group. Different degrees of hyperhydration led to different levels of brain water content and to different degrees of myelin impairment. Hyperhydration corresponding to 20 % of the body weight brought about lower locomotor activity. Increased water content in the brain after the BBB osmotic disruption is surprising because this method is frequently used in the clinical practice. PMID:24329706

  8. Trehalose enhances osmotic tolerance and suppresses lysophosphatidylcholine-induced acrosome reaction in ram spermatozoon.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, E; Naseer, Z; Aksoy, M; Küçük, N; Uçan, U; Serin, I; Ceylan, A

    2015-09-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the influence of trehalose on osmotic tolerance and the ability of ram spermatozoon to undergo acrosome reaction induced by lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC). In experiment 1, the diluted ejaculates were exposed to anisosmotic fructose solutions (70, 500, 750 and 1000 mOsm l(-1) ) with or without 50 mm trehalose. The presence of trehalose in hyperosmotic conditions enhanced (P < 0.05) the percentage of live, live-intact and intact spermatozoa. Similarly, trehalose enhanced (P < 0.05) the live and live-intact spermatozoa during hypo-osmotic conditions. In experiment 2, the centrifuged ejaculates were diluted with TCG only or TCG containing either 50 or 100 mm trehalose. The acrosome reaction was induced by LPC. The percentage of acrosome-reacted spermatozoon was less (P < 0.05) in trehalose-supplemented groups compared to control. In experiment 3, the ejaculates were cryopreserved in an extender containing 0 mm (control), 50 mm or 100 mm trehalose. Supplementation of extender with trehalose, either 50 mm or 100 mm, enhanced the cryosurvival rate (P < 0.05) compared to the control. In conclusion, the presence of trehalose in anisosmotic conditions enhances the osmotic tolerance, cryosurvival rate of ram spermatozoon and suppresses their ability to undergo LPC and cryo-induced acrosome reaction. PMID:25269572

  9. Effect of an osmotic stress on multicellular aggregates.

    PubMed

    Monnier, Sylvain; Delarue, Morgan; Brunel, Benjamin; Dolega, Monika E; Delon, Antoine; Cappello, Giovanni

    2016-02-01

    There is increasing evidence that multicellular structures respond to mechanical cues, such as the confinement and compression exerted by the surrounding environment. In order to understand the response of tissues to stress, we investigate the effect of an isotropic stress on different biological systems. The stress is generated using the osmotic pressure induced by a biocompatible polymer. We compare the response of multicellular spheroids, individual cells and matrigel to the same osmotic perturbation. Our findings indicate that the osmotic pressure occasioned by polymers acts on these systems like an isotropic mechanical stress. When submitted to this pressure, the volume of multicellular spheroids decreases much more than one could expect from the behavior of individual cells. PMID:26210402

  10. THE OSMOTIC PROPERTIES OF LIVING CELLS (EGGS OF ARBACIA PUNCTULATA).

    PubMed

    McCutcheon, M; Lucké, B; Hartline, H K

    1931-01-20

    WE HAVE ATTEMPTED TO ANSWER THE QUESTION: How nearly ideal, as an osmometer, is the unfertilized Arbacia egg? The following conclusion have been reached: 1. Volumes can be measured accurately over a wide range of pressures since the cell is in general spherical and does not suffer deformation from its own weight or other factors. 2. The product of volume and pressure is approximately constant, if allowance be made for osmotically inactive cell contents. It is computed that from 7 to 14 per cent of cell volume is occupied by osmotically inactive material. 3. Evidence is presented that no appreciable escape of cell contents occurs while the cell is in hypotonic sea water; that, therefore, the semipermeability of the membrane is approximately perfect, so long as injury to the cell is avoided. 4. In comparison with osmotic pressure the influence of other forces, such as elasticity or surface tension, on cell volume must in these experiments be slight. PMID:19872593

  11. Nanofluidic Osmotic Diodes: Theory and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picallo, Clara B.; Gravelle, Simon; Joly, Laurent; Charlaix, Elisabeth; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2013-12-01

    Osmosis describes the flow of water across semipermeable membranes powered by the chemical free energy extracted from salinity gradients. While osmosis can be expressed in simple terms via the van ’t Hoff ideal gas formula for the osmotic pressure, it is a complex phenomenon taking its roots in the subtle interactions occurring at the scale of the membrane nanopores. Here we use new opportunities offered by nanofluidic systems to create an osmotic diode exhibiting asymmetric water flow under reversal of osmotic driving. We show that a surface charge asymmetry built on a nanochannel surface leads to nonlinear couplings between water flow and the ion dynamics, which are capable of water flow rectification. This phenomenon opens new opportunities for water purification and complex flow control in nanochannels.

  12. Determination of colloidal osmotic equation of state by dielectrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazza, Jacob; Huang, Hao; Ou-Yang, H. Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Osmotic equation of state [P(N,T)] describes both the mechanical properties and phase behavior of a colloidal suspension. As an alternative to sedimentation, we propose a new approach to determine P(N,T) by dielectrophoresis (DEP). Using fluorescence confocal microscopy, we obtain particle density profiles in order to determine the DEP force distribution when the particle concentration is low and the inter-particle interactions are negligible. From the known force distribution and Einstein's osmotic equilibrium equation, we can calculate P(N,T) from the particle density profile of interacting, charge-stabilized polystyrene latex particles under different salt concentrations and added neutral polymers. The osmotic equation of state for colloidal suspensions can then be crosschecked by sedimentation equilibrium.

  13. Closed cycle osmotic power plants for electric power production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reali, M.

    1980-04-01

    The paper deals with closed-cycle osmotic power plants (CCOPPs), which are not meant for the exploitation of natural salinity gradients but, rather, for the exploitation of those abundant heat sources having temperatures slightly higher than ambient temperature, e.g., geothermal fields, ocean temperature gradients, waste heat from power plants, and solar energy. The paper gives a general description of the CCOPP, along with some indications of its potential for energy generation. The concept of the CCOPP lies in producing electric power by means of the osmotic flows of suitable solvents and subsequently in separating them again from their solutes by means of thermal energy obtained from any available heat source. The discussion covers osmotic phenomena and the CCOPP, as well as important features of the CCOPP.

  14. Chronic Severe Hyponatremia and Cardiopulmonary Bypass: Avoiding Osmotic Demyelination Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Canaday, Susan; Rompala, John; Rowles, John; Fisher, Josh; Holt, David

    2015-12-01

    Serum sodium concentration affects every cell in the body with respect to cellular tonicity. Hyponatremia is the most frequent electrolyte abnormality encountered, occurring at clinical admission in 22% of elderly patients. Any rapid correction of chronic severe hyponatremia can result in rapid cellular shrinking due to loss of intracellular free water. This is commonly associated with paralysis and severe brain damage due to osmotic demyelination syndrome (ODS). ODS occurs because the body has the ability to compensate for cellular fluid shifts due to chronic hyponatremia (by a decrease in brain concentration of several ions, amino acids, and organic osmolytes). Thus, the neurons are often at a functional state of fluid balance despite the sodium imbalance. The initiation of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) can introduce between 1 and 2 L of priming solution containing a normal sodium concentration creating a rapid rise in sodium concentration within the extracellular fluid. This abrupt change establishes a situation where intracellular free water can be lost resulting in cellular shrinking and ODS. In presenting this case study, we hope to add to the current literature with a specific isotonic approach to treating the chronically severe hyponatremic patient pre-CPB, during CPB, and post-CPB. PMID:26834285

  15. Electro-Osmotic Remediation of Fine-Grained Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepy, N.J.; McNab, W.W.; Wildenschild, D.; Ruiz, R.; Elsholz, A.

    1999-11-22

    The coupled-flow phenomenon, electro-osmosis, whereby water flow results from an applied electrical potential gradient, is being used at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to induce water flow through deep (25-40 meters below surface) fine-grained sediments. The scoping work described here lays the groundwork for implementation of this technology to remediate solvent-contaminated clayey zones at the LLNL site. The electro-osmotic conductivity (k{sub e}) measured in-situ between two 37 m deep wells, 3 m apart of 2.3 x 10{sup -9} m{sup 2}/s-V is in good agreement with the value determined from bench-top studies on the core extracted from one of the wells of 0.94 {+-} 0.29 x 10{sup -9} m{sup 2}/s-V. Hydraulic conductivity (k{sub h}) of the same core is measured to be 2.03 {+-} 0.36 x 10{sup -10} m/s. Thus, a voltage gradient of 1 V/cm produces an effective hydraulic conductivity of {approx}1 x 10{sup -7} m/s; an increase in conductivity of nearly three orders of magnitude.

  16. Electro-osmotic transport in wet processing of textiles

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, J.F.

    1998-09-22

    Electro-osmotic (or electrokinetic) transport is used to efficiently force a solution (or water) through the interior of the fibers or yarns of textile materials for wet processing of textiles. The textile material is passed between electrodes that apply an electric field across the fabric. Used alone or in parallel with conventional hydraulic washing (forced convection), electro-osmotic transport greatly reduces the amount of water used in wet processing. The amount of water required to achieve a fixed level of rinsing of tint can be reduced, for example, to 1--5 lbs water per pound of fabric from an industry benchmark of 20 lbs water/lb fabric. 5 figs.

  17. Electro-osmotic transport in wet processing of textiles

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.

    1998-01-01

    Electro-osmotic (or electrokinetic) transport is used to efficiently force a solution (or water) through the interior of the fibers or yarns of textile materials for wet processing of textiles. The textile material is passed between electrodes that apply an electric field across the fabric. Used alone or in parallel with conventional hydraulic washing (forced convection), electro-osmotic transport greatly reduces the amount of water used in wet processing. The amount of water required to achieve a fixed level of rinsing of tint can be reduced, for example, to 1-5 lbs water per pound of fabric from an industry benchmark of 20 lbs water/lb fabric.

  18. The Balance of Fluid and Osmotic Pressures across Active Biological Membranes with Application to the Corneal Endothelium.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xi; Pinsky, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    The movement of fluid and solutes across biological membranes facilitates the transport of nutrients for living organisms and maintains the fluid and osmotic pressures in biological systems. Understanding the pressure balances across membranes is crucial for studying fluid and electrolyte homeostasis in living systems, and is an area of active research. In this study, a set of enhanced Kedem-Katchalsky (KK) equations is proposed to describe fluxes of water and solutes across biological membranes, and is applied to analyze the relationship between fluid and osmotic pressures, accounting for active transport mechanisms that propel substances against their concentration gradients and for fixed charges that alter ionic distributions in separated environments. The equilibrium analysis demonstrates that the proposed theory recovers the Donnan osmotic pressure and can predict the correct fluid pressure difference across membranes, a result which cannot be achieved by existing KK theories due to the neglect of fixed charges. The steady-state analysis on active membranes suggests a new pressure mechanism which balances the fluid pressure together with the osmotic pressure. The source of this pressure arises from active ionic fluxes and from interactions between solvent and solutes in membrane transport. We apply the proposed theory to study the transendothelial fluid pressure in the in vivo cornea, which is a crucial factor maintaining the hydration and transparency of the tissue. The results show the importance of the proposed pressure mechanism in mediating stromal fluid pressure and provide a new interpretation of the pressure modulation mechanism in the in vivo cornea. PMID:26719894

  19. The Balance of Fluid and Osmotic Pressures across Active Biological Membranes with Application to the Corneal Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xi; Pinsky, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    The movement of fluid and solutes across biological membranes facilitates the transport of nutrients for living organisms and maintains the fluid and osmotic pressures in biological systems. Understanding the pressure balances across membranes is crucial for studying fluid and electrolyte homeostasis in living systems, and is an area of active research. In this study, a set of enhanced Kedem-Katchalsky (KK) equations is proposed to describe fluxes of water and solutes across biological membranes, and is applied to analyze the relationship between fluid and osmotic pressures, accounting for active transport mechanisms that propel substances against their concentration gradients and for fixed charges that alter ionic distributions in separated environments. The equilibrium analysis demonstrates that the proposed theory recovers the Donnan osmotic pressure and can predict the correct fluid pressure difference across membranes, a result which cannot be achieved by existing KK theories due to the neglect of fixed charges. The steady-state analysis on active membranes suggests a new pressure mechanism which balances the fluid pressure together with the osmotic pressure. The source of this pressure arises from active ionic fluxes and from interactions between solvent and solutes in membrane transport. We apply the proposed theory to study the transendothelial fluid pressure in the in vivo cornea, which is a crucial factor maintaining the hydration and transparency of the tissue. The results show the importance of the proposed pressure mechanism in mediating stromal fluid pressure and provide a new interpretation of the pressure modulation mechanism in the in vivo cornea. PMID:26719894

  20. PEG-mediated osmotic stress induces premature differentiation of the root apical meristem and outgrowth of lateral roots in wheat

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hongtao; Liu, Ling; Li, Kexue; Xie, Qingen; Wang, Zhijuan; Zhao, Xuhua; Li, Xia

    2014-01-01

    Water stress is one of the major environmental stresses causing growth retardation and yield loss of plants. In the past decades, osmotic adjustment, antioxidant protection, and stomatal movement have been extensively studied, but much less attention has been paid to the study of root system reprogramming to maximize water absorption and survival under water stress. Here, it is shown that polyethylene glycol (PEG)-simulated mild and moderate osmotic stress induced premature differentiation of the root apical meristem (RAM). It is demonstrated that RAM premature differentiation is a conserved adaptive mechanism that is widely adopted by various plants to cope with osmotic stress simulated by PEG 8000, and the occurrence of RAM premature differentiation is directly related to stress tolerance of plants. It is shown that the osmotic stress-induced premature differentiation caused growth cessation of primary roots allowing outgrowth of lateral roots. This work has uncovered a key mechanism for controlling the plastic development of the root system by which plants are capable of survival, growth, or reproduction under water stress. PMID:24935621

  1. Osmotic and Specific Ion Effects on the Germination of Prosopis strombulifera

    PubMed Central

    SOSA, LAURA; LLANES, ANALÍA; REINOSO, HERMINDA; REGINATO, MARIANA; LUNA, VIRGINIA

    2005-01-01

    • Background and Aims Salinity can affect germination of seeds either by creating osmotic potentials that prevent water uptake or by toxic effects of specific ions. Most studies have only used monosaline solutions, although these limit the extent to which one can interpret the results or relate them to field conditions. The aim of this work was to evaluate the germination of Prosopis strombulifera seeds under increasing salinity by using the most abundant salts in central Argentina in monosaline or bisaline iso-osmotic solutions, or in solutions of mannitol and polyethylene glycol. • Methods Seeds were allowed to germinate under controlled conditions in a germination chamber at 30 ± 1 °C and at 80 % r.h. Salinizing agents were KCl, NaCl, Na2SO4, K2SO4, NaCl + Na2SO4 and KCl + K2SO4 and osmotic agents were polyethylene glycol 6000 and mannitol. Treatments for all osmotica consisted of 0·0, −0·4, −0·8, −1·2, −1·5, −1·9 and −2·2 MPa solutions. • Key Results The percentage of germination decreased as salinity increased. \\batchmode \\documentclass[fleqn,10pt,legalpaper]{article} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\pagestyle{empty} \\begin{document} \\(\\mathrm{SO}_{4}^{2{-}}\\) \\end{document} in monosaline solutions, with osmotic potentials −1·2 MPa and lower, was more inhibitory than Cl− at iso-osmotic concentrations. This \\batchmode \\documentclass[fleqn,10pt,legalpaper]{article} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\pagestyle{empty} \\begin{document} \\(\\mathrm{SO}_{4}^{2{-}}\\) \\end{document} toxicity was alleviated in salt mixtures and was more noticeable in higher concentrations. K+ was more inhibitory than Na+ independently of the accompanying anion. • Conclusions Different responses to different compositions of iso-osmotic salt solutions and to both osmotic agents indicate specific ionic effects. This study demonstrates that the germination of P

  2. How small polar molecules protect membrane systems against osmotic stress: the urea-water-phospholipid system.

    PubMed

    Costa-Balogh, Fátima O; Wennerström, Håkan; Wadsö, Lars; Sparr, Emma

    2006-11-30

    We investigate how a small polar molecule, urea, can act to protect a phospholipid bilayer system against osmotic stress. Osmotic stress can be caused by a dry environment, by freezing, or by exposure to aqueous systems with high osmotic pressure due to solutes like in saline water. A large number of organisms regularly experience osmotic stress, and it is a common response to produce small polar molecules intracellularly. We have selected a ternary system of urea-water-dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) as a model to investigate the molecular mechanism behind this protective effect, in this case, of urea, and we put special emphasis on the applications of urea in skin care products. Using differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, and sorption microbalance measurements, we studied the phase behavior of lipid systems exposed to an excess of solvent of varying compositions, as well as lipid systems exposed to water at reduced relative humidities. From this, we have arrived at a rather detailed thermodynamic characterization. The basic findings are as follows: (i) In excess solvent, the thermally induced lipid phase transitions are only marginally dependent on the urea content, with the exception being that the P(beta) phase is not observed in the presence of urea. (ii) For lipid systems with limited access to solvent, the phase behavior is basically determined by the amount (volume) of solvent irrespective of the urea content. (iii) The presence of urea has the effect of retaining the liquid crystalline phase at relative humidities down to 64% (at 27 degrees C), whereas, in the absence of urea, the transition to the gel phase occurs already at a relative humidity of 94%. This demonstrates the protective effect of urea against osmotic stress. (iv) In skin care products, urea is referred to as a moisturizer, which we find slightly misleading as it replaces the water while keeping the physical properties unaltered. (v) In other systems, urea is known to

  3. Osmotic gradient dependence of osmotic water permeability in rabbit proximal convoluted tubule.

    PubMed

    Berry, C A; Verkman, A S

    1988-10-01

    To assess steady-state transepithelial osmotic water permeability (Pf), rabbit proximal convoluted tubules were perfused in vitro with the impermeant salt, sodium isethionate at 26 degrees C. Osmotic gradients (delta pi) were established by varying the bath concentration of the impermeant solute, raffinose. When lumen osmolality was 300 mOsm and bath osmolality was 320, 360 and 400 mOsm, apparent Pf decreased from 0.5 to 0.10 to 0.08 cm/sec, respectively. Similar data were obtained when lumen osmolality was 400 mOsm. Five possible causes of the delta pi dependence of apparent Pf were considered experimentally and/or theoretically: (1) external unstirred layer (USL); (2) cytoplasmic USL; (3) change in surface area; (4) saturation of water transport; (5) down-regulation of Pf. Apparent Pf was inhibited 83% by p-chloromercuribenzene sulfonate (pCMBS) at 20 mOsm, but not at 60 mOsm delta pi, suggesting presence of a serial barrier resistance to water transport. Increases in perfusate or bath solution flow rate and viscosity did not alter apparent Pf, ruling out an external USL. A simple cytoplasmic USL, described by a constant USL thickness and solute diffusion coefficient, could not account for the delta pi dependence of apparent Pf according to a mathematical model. The activation energy (Ea) for apparent Pf increased from 7.0 to 12.5 kcal/mol when delta pi was increased from 20 to 60 mOsm, not consistent with a simple USL or a change in membrane surface area with transepithelial water flow. These findings are most consistent with a complex cytoplasmic USL, where the average solute diffusion coefficient and/or the area available for osmosis decrease with increasing delta pi. These results (1) indicate that true Pf (at physiologically low delta pi) is very high (greater than 0.5 cm/sec) in the rabbit proximal tubule; (2) provide an explanation for the wide variation in Pf values reported in the literature using different delta pi, and (3) suggest the presence of a

  4. A Simple Membrane Osmometer System & Experiments that Quantitatively Measure Osmotic Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marvel, Stephen C.; Kepler, Megan V.

    2009-01-01

    It is important for students to be exposed to the concept of osmotic pressure. Understanding this concept lays the foundation for deeper discussions that lead to more theoretical aspects of water movement associated with the concepts of free energy, water potential, osmotic potential, pressure potential, and osmotic adjustment. The concept of…

  5. Osmotic Stressing, Membrane Leakage, and Fluorescence: An Introductory Biochemistry Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seu, Kalani J.

    2015-01-01

    A fluorescence demonstration is described that incorporates several fundamental aspects of an introductory biochemistry course. A variation of a known leakage assay is utilized to prepare vesicles containing a quenched fluorophore. The vesicles are exposed to several osmotic environments ranging from isotonic to hypotonic. The degree of vesicle…

  6. Osmotic generation of 'anomalous' fluid pressures in geological environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzii, C.E.

    2000-01-01

    Osmotic pressures are generated by differences in chemical potential of a solution across a membrane. But whether osmosis can have a significant effect on the pressure of fluids in geological environments has been controversial, because the membrane properties of geological media are poorly understood. 'Anomalous' pressures - large departures from hydrostatic pressure that are not explicable in terms of topographic or fluid-density effects are widely found in geological settings, and are commonly considered to result from processes that alter the pore or fluid volume, which in turn implies crustal changes happening at a rate too slow to observe directly. Yet if osmosis can explain some anomalies, there is no need to invoke such dynamic geological processes in those cases. Here I report results of a nine- year in situ measurement of fluid pressures and solute concentrations in shale that are consistent with the generation of large (up to 20 MPa) osmotic-pressure anomalies which could persist for tens of millions of years. Osmotic pressures of this magnitude and duration can explain many of the pressure anomalies observed in geological settings. The require, however, small shale porosity and large contrasts in the amount of dissolved solids in the pore waters - criteria that may help to distinguish between osmotic and crystal-dynamic origins of anomalous pressures.

  7. Controlled porosity solubility modulated osmotic pump tablets of gliclazide.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Arti; Verma, P R P; Gore, Subhash

    2015-06-01

    A system that can deliver drug at a controlled rate is very important for the treatment of various chronic diseases such as diabetes, asthma, and heart disease. Poorly water-soluble drug with pH-dependent solubility such as gliclazide (GLZ) offers challenges in the controlled-release formulation because of low dissolution rate and poor bioavailability. Solid dispersion (SD) of GLZ consisted of hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC-SSL) as a polymeric solubilizer was manufactured by hot melt extrusion (HME) technology. Then, controlled porosity osmotic pump (CPOP) tablet of gliclazide was designed to deliver drug in a controlled manner up to 16 h. The developed formulation was optimized for type and level of pore former and coating weight gain. The optimized formulation was found to exhibit zero order kinetics independent of pH and agitation speed but depends on osmotic pressure of dissolution media indicated that mechanism of drug release was osmotic pressure. The in vivo performance prediction of developed formulation using convolution approach revealed that the developed formulation was superior to the existing marketed extended-release formulation in terms of attaining steady state plasma levels and indicated adequate exposure in translating hypoglycemic response. The prototype solubilization method combined with controlled porosity osmotic pump based technique could provide a unique way to increase dissolution rate and bioavailability of many poorly water-soluble, narrow therapeutic index drugs used in diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, etc. PMID:25378281

  8. Vocal Fold Epithelial Response to Luminal Osmotic Perturbation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sivasankar, Mahalakshmi; Fisher, Kimberly V.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Dry-air challenges increase the osmolarity of fluid lining the luminal surface of the proximal airway. The homeostasis of surface fluid is thought to be essential for voice production and laryngeal defense. Therefore, the authors hypothesized that viable vocal fold epithelium would generate a water flux to reduce an osmotic challenge (150…

  9. Electro-osmotic infusion for joule heating soil remediation techniques

    DOEpatents

    Carrigan, Charles R.; Nitao, John J.

    1999-01-01

    Electro-osmotic infusion of ground water or chemically tailored electrolyte is used to enhance, maintain, or recondition electrical conductivity for the joule heating remediation technique. Induced flows can be used to infuse electrolyte with enhanced ionic conductivity into the vicinity of the electrodes, maintain the local saturation of near-electrode regions and resaturate a partially dried out zone with groundwater. Electro-osmotic infusion can also tailor the conductivity throughout the target layer by infusing chemically modified and/or heated electrolyte to improve conductivity contrast of the interior. Periodic polarity reversals will prevent large pH changes at the electrodes. Electro-osmotic infusion can be used to condition the electrical conductivity of the soil, particularly low permeability soil, before and during the heating operation. Electro-osmotic infusion is carried out by locating one or more electrodes adjacent the heating electrodes and applying a dc potential between two or more electrodes. Depending on the polarities of the electrodes, the induced flow will be toward the heating electrodes or away from the heating electrodes. In addition, electrodes carrying a dc potential may be located throughout the target area to tailor the conductivity of the target area.

  10. Electro-osmotically driven liquid delivery method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Rakestraw, David J.; Anex, Deon S.; Yan, Chao; Dadoo, Rajeev; Zare, Richard N.

    1999-01-01

    Method and apparatus for controlling precisely the composition and delivery of liquid at sub-.mu.L/min flow rate. One embodiment of such a delivery system is an electro-osmotically driven gradient flow delivery system that generates dynamic gradient flows with sub-.mu.L/min flow rates by merging a plurality of electro-osmotic flows. These flows are delivered by a plurality of delivery arms attached to a mixing connector, where they mix and then flow into a receiving means, preferably a column. Each inlet of the plurality of delivery arms is placed in a corresponding solution reservoir. A plurality of independent programmable high-voltage power supplies is used to apply a voltage program to each of the plurality of solution reservoirs to regulate the electro-osmotic flow in each delivery arm. The electro-osmotic flow rates in the delivery arms are changed with time according to each voltage program to deliver the required gradient profile to the column.

  11. Electro-osmotically driven liquid delivery method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Rakestraw, D.J.; Anex, D.S.; Yan, C.; Dadoo, R.; Zare, R.N.

    1999-08-24

    Method and apparatus are disclosed for controlling precisely the composition and delivery of liquid at sub-{micro}L/min flow rate. One embodiment of such a delivery system is an electro-osmotically driven gradient flow delivery system that generates dynamic gradient flows with sub-{micro}L/min flow rates by merging a plurality of electro-osmotic flows. These flows are delivered by a plurality of delivery arms attached to a mixing connector, where they mix and then flow into a receiving means, preferably a column. Each inlet of the plurality of delivery arms is placed in a corresponding solution reservoir. A plurality of independent programmable high-voltage power supplies is used to apply a voltage program to each of the plurality of solution reservoirs to regulate the electro-osmotic flow in each delivery arm. The electro-osmotic flow rates in the delivery arms are changed with time according to each voltage program to deliver the required gradient profile to the column. 4 figs.

  12. Density-Gradient Determination of Osmotic Potential in Plant Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nabors, Murray W.

    1973-01-01

    Describes a method for measuring osmotic potential which is suitable for high school and college biology classes. This method introduces students to the hard-to-visualize technique of using density gradients to separate cells or cell constituents of differing densities. (JR)

  13. Effect of hypo-osmotic incubation on membrane recycling.

    PubMed

    Novak, J M; Ward, D M; Buys, S S; Kaplan, J

    1988-11-01

    Incubation of alveolar macrophages in hypo-osmotic media causes a time-and temperature-dependent increase in the number of surface receptors for three different ligands. Exposure of cells to solutions of 210 mOsM or less, at 37 degrees C but not at 0 degree C, resulted in an increase in the number of surface receptors for diferric transferrin, alpha-macroglobulin-protease complexes, and mannose-terminated glycoproteins. Upon media dilution at 37 degrees C, surface receptor number reached a maximum within 5 min and returned to near-normal values by 30 min. The increase in surface receptor number was the result of a decrease in the rate of internalization of receptors, either occupied or unoccupied. The rate of receptor exteriorization was unaltered by hypo-osmotic incubation of cells. The rate of fluid-phase pinocytosis was also inhibited upon incubation in hypo-osmotic solution. In experiments in which both receptor-mediated endocytosis and fluid phase pinocytosis were measured on the same samples, inhibition of both processes occurred with the same kinetics and to a similar extent. The rate of receptor-mediated endocytosis recovered to normal rates after 60 min in hypo-osmotic solutions, whereas the rate of fluid phase pinocytosis did not recover to the same extent. PMID:2848041

  14. Spike coding during osmotic stimulation of the rat supraoptic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Bhumbra, GS; Inyushkin, AN; Syrimi, M; Dyball, REJ

    2005-01-01

    Novel measures of coding based on interspike intervals were used to characterize the responses of supraoptic cells to osmotic stimulation. Infusion of hypertonic NaCl in vivo increased the firing rate of continuous (putative oxytocin) cells (Wilcoxon z = 3.84, P = 0.001) and phasic (putative vasopressin) cells (z = 2.14, P = 0.032). The irregularity of activity, quantified by the log interval entropy, was decreased for continuous (Student's t = 3.06, P = 0.003) but not phasic cells (t = 1.34, P = 0.181). For continuous cells, the increase in frequency and decrease in entropy was significantly greater (t = 2.61, P = 0.036 and t = 3.06, P = 0.007, respectively) than for phasic cells. Spike patterning, quantified using the mutual information between intervals, was decreased for phasic (z = −2.64, P = 0.008) but not continuous cells (z = −1.14, P = 0.256). Although continuous cells showed similar osmotic responses to mannitol infusion, phasic cells showed differences: spike frequency decreased (z = −3.70, P < 0.001) and entropy increased (t = −3.41, P < 0.001). Considering both cell types together, osmotic stimulation in vitro using 40 mm NaCl had little effect on firing rate (z = −0.319, P = 0.750), but increased both entropy (t = 2.75, P = 0.010) and mutual information (z = −2.73, P = 0.006) in contrast to the decreases (t = 2.92, P = 0.004 and z = −2.40, P = 0.017) seen in vivo. Responses to less severe osmotic stimulation with NaCl or mannitol were not significant. Potassium-induced depolarization in vitro increased firing rate (r = 0.195, P = 0.034), but the correlation with decreased entropy was not significant (r = −0.097, P = 0.412). Intracellular recordings showed a small depolarization and decrease in input resistance during osmotic stimulation with NaCl or mannitol, and membrane depolarization following addition of potassium. Differences in responses of oxytocin and vasopressin cells in vivo, suggest differences in the balance between the

  15. Mutation of OsGIGANTEA Leads to Enhanced Tolerance to Polyethylene Glycol-Generated Osmotic Stress in Rice.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuai; Yue, Wenhao; Wang, Min; Qiu, Wenmin; Zhou, Lian; Shou, Huixia

    2016-01-01

    Water deficit is one of the most important environmental stresses limiting plant growth and crop yield. While the identification of many key factors involved in the plant water deficit response has greatly increased our knowledge about the regulation system, the mechanisms underlying dehydration tolerance in plants are still not well understood. In our current study, we investigated the roles of the key flowering time regulator, OsGIGANTEA (OsGI), in the osmotic stress tolerance in rice. Results showed that mutation of OsGI conferred tolerance to osmotic stress generated by polyethylene glycol (PEG), increased proline and sucrose contents, and accelerated stomata movement. In addition, qRT-PCR and microarray analysis revealed that the transcript abundance of some osmotic stress response genes, such as OsDREB1E, OsAP37, OsAP59, OsLIP9, OsLEA3, OsRAB16A, and OsSalT, was significantly higher in osgi than in WT plants, suggesting that OsGI might be a negative regulator in the osmotic stress response in rice. PMID:27148296

  16. Mutation of OsGIGANTEA Leads to Enhanced Tolerance to Polyethylene Glycol-Generated Osmotic Stress in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuai; Yue, Wenhao; Wang, Min; Qiu, Wenmin; Zhou, Lian; Shou, Huixia

    2016-01-01

    Water deficit is one of the most important environmental stresses limiting plant growth and crop yield. While the identification of many key factors involved in the plant water deficit response has greatly increased our knowledge about the regulation system, the mechanisms underlying dehydration tolerance in plants are still not well understood. In our current study, we investigated the roles of the key flowering time regulator, OsGIGANTEA (OsGI), in the osmotic stress tolerance in rice. Results showed that mutation of OsGI conferred tolerance to osmotic stress generated by polyethylene glycol (PEG), increased proline and sucrose contents, and accelerated stomata movement. In addition, qRT-PCR and microarray analysis revealed that the transcript abundance of some osmotic stress response genes, such as OsDREB1E, OsAP37, OsAP59, OsLIP9, OsLEA3, OsRAB16A, and OsSalT, was significantly higher in osgi than in WT plants, suggesting that OsGI might be a negative regulator in the osmotic stress response in rice. PMID:27148296

  17. Changes in content of free, conjugated and bound polyamines and osmotic adjustment in adaptation of vetiver grass to water deficit.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qiang; Yu, Bingjun

    2010-06-01

    Osmotic adjustment and alteration of polyamines (PAs) have been suggested to play roles in plant adaptation to water deficit/drought stress. In this study, the changes in cell intactness, photosynthesis, compatible solutes and PAs [including putrescine (Put), spermidine (Spd) and spermine (Spm) each in free, conjugated and bound forms] were investigated in leaves of vetiver grass exposed to different intensity of water deficit stress and subsequent rewatering. The results showed that, when vetiver grass was exposed to the moderate (20% and 40% PEG-6000 solutions) and severe (60% PEG solution) water deficit for 6days, the plant injury degree (expressed as the parameters of plant growth, cell membrane integrity, water relations and photosynthesis) increased and contents of free and conjugated Put decreased with the rise of PEG concentration. Under the moderate water deficit, the plants could survive by the reduced osmotic potential (psi(s)), increased free and conjugated Spd and Spm in leaves. After subsequent rewatering, the osmotic balance was re-established, most of the above investigated physiological parameters were fully or partly recovered to the control levels. However, it was not the case for the severely-stressed and rewatering plants. It indicates that, vetiver grass can cope well with the moderate water deficit/drought stress by using the strategies of osmotic adjustment and maintenance of total contents of free, conjugated and bound PAs in leaves. PMID:20363642

  18. Osmotic stress and recovery in field populations of Zygnema sp. (Zygnematophyceae, Streptophyta) on Svalbard (High Arctic) subjected to natural desiccation.

    PubMed

    Pichrtová, Martina; Hájek, Tomáš; Elster, Josef

    2014-08-01

    Zygnema is a genus of filamentous green algae belonging to the class of Zygnematophyceae (Streptophyta). In the Arctic, it typically forms extensive mats in habitats that regularly dry out during summer, and therefore, mechanisms of stress resistance are expected. We investigated its natural populations with respect to production of specialized desiccation-resistant cells and osmotic acclimation. Six populations in various stages of natural desiccation were selected, from wet biomass floating in water to dried paper-like crusts. After rewetting, plasmolysis and osmotic stress effects were studied using hypertonic sorbitol solutions, and the physiological state was estimated using chlorophyll a fluorescence parameters. All populations of Zygnema sp. formed stationary-phase cells filled with storage products. In green algal research, such cells are traditionally called akinetes. However, the populations differed in their reaction to osmotic stress. Whereas the wet-collected samples were strongly impaired, the osmotic stress resistance of the naturally dried samples was comparable to that of true aeroterrestrial algae. We showed that arctic populations of Zygnema acclimate well to natural desiccation via hardening that is mediated by slow desiccation. As no other types of specialized cells were observed, we assume that the naturally hardened akinetes also play a key role in winter survival. PMID:24476153

  19. Alternative Oxidase Pathway Optimizes Photosynthesis During Osmotic and Temperature Stress by Regulating Cellular ROS, Malate Valve and Antioxidative Systems.

    PubMed

    Dinakar, Challabathula; Vishwakarma, Abhaypratap; Raghavendra, Agepati S; Padmasree, Kollipara

    2016-01-01

    The present study reveals the importance of alternative oxidase (AOX) pathway in optimizing photosynthesis under osmotic and temperature stress conditions in the mesophyll protoplasts of Pisum sativum. The responses of photosynthesis and respiration were monitored at saturating light intensity of 1000 μmoles m(-2) s(-1) at 25°C under a range of sorbitol concentrations from 0.4 to 1.0 M to induce hyper-osmotic stress and by varying the temperature of the thermo-jacketed pre-incubation chamber from 25 to 10°C to impose sub-optimal temperature stress. Compared to controls (0.4 M sorbitol and 25°C), the mesophyll protoplasts showed remarkable decrease in NaHCO3-dependent O2 evolution (indicator of photosynthetic carbon assimilation), under both hyper-osmotic (1.0 M sorbitol) and sub-optimal temperature stress conditions (10°C), while the decrease in rates of respiratory O2 uptake were marginal. The capacity of AOX pathway increased significantly in parallel to increase in intracellular pyruvate and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels under both hyper-osmotic stress and sub-optimal temperature stress under the background of saturating light. The ratio of redox couple (Malate/OAA) related to malate valve increased in contrast to the ratio of redox couple (GSH/GSSG) related to antioxidative system during hyper-osmotic stress. Further, the ratio of GSH/GSSG decreased in the presence of sub-optimal temperature, while the ratio of Malate/OAA showed no visible changes. Also, the redox ratios of pyridine nucleotides increased under hyper-osmotic (NADH/NAD) and sub-optimal temperature (NADPH/NADP) stresses, respectively. However, upon restriction of AOX pathway by using salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM), the observed changes in NaHCO3-dependent O2 evolution, cellular ROS, redox ratios of Malate/OAA, NAD(P)H/NAD(P) and GSH/GSSG were further aggravated under stress conditions with concomitant modulations in NADP-MDH and antioxidant enzymes. Taken together, the results indicated

  20. Alternative Oxidase Pathway Optimizes Photosynthesis During Osmotic and Temperature Stress by Regulating Cellular ROS, Malate Valve and Antioxidative Systems

    PubMed Central

    Vishwakarma, Abhaypratap; Raghavendra, Agepati S.; Padmasree, Kollipara

    2016-01-01

    The present study reveals the importance of alternative oxidase (AOX) pathway in optimizing photosynthesis under osmotic and temperature stress conditions in the mesophyll protoplasts of Pisum sativum. The responses of photosynthesis and respiration were monitored at saturating light intensity of 1000 μmoles m–2 s–1 at 25°C under a range of sorbitol concentrations from 0.4 to 1.0 M to induce hyper-osmotic stress and by varying the temperature of the thermo-jacketed pre-incubation chamber from 25 to 10°C to impose sub-optimal temperature stress. Compared to controls (0.4 M sorbitol and 25°C), the mesophyll protoplasts showed remarkable decrease in NaHCO3-dependent O2 evolution (indicator of photosynthetic carbon assimilation), under both hyper-osmotic (1.0 M sorbitol) and sub-optimal temperature stress conditions (10°C), while the decrease in rates of respiratory O2 uptake were marginal. The capacity of AOX pathway increased significantly in parallel to increase in intracellular pyruvate and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels under both hyper-osmotic stress and sub-optimal temperature stress under the background of saturating light. The ratio of redox couple (Malate/OAA) related to malate valve increased in contrast to the ratio of redox couple (GSH/GSSG) related to antioxidative system during hyper-osmotic stress. Further, the ratio of GSH/GSSG decreased in the presence of sub-optimal temperature, while the ratio of Malate/OAA showed no visible changes. Also, the redox ratios of pyridine nucleotides increased under hyper-osmotic (NADH/NAD) and sub-optimal temperature (NADPH/NADP) stresses, respectively. However, upon restriction of AOX pathway by using salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM), the observed changes in NaHCO3-dependent O2 evolution, cellular ROS, redox ratios of Malate/OAA, NAD(P)H/NAD(P) and GSH/GSSG were further aggravated under stress conditions with concomitant modulations in NADP-MDH and antioxidant enzymes. Taken together, the results indicated

  1. Sixteen-Day Bedrest Significantly Increases Plasma Colloid Osmotic Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, Alan R.; Hsieh, S. T.; Murthy, G.; Ballard, R. E.; Convertino, V. A.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Upon exposure to microgravity, astronauts lose up to 10% of their total plasma volume, which may contribute to orthostatic intolerance after space flight. Because plasma colloid osmotic pressure (COP) is a primary factor maintaining plasma volume, our objective was to measure time course changes in COP during microgravity simulated by 6 deg. head-down tilt (HDT). Seven healthy male subjects (30-55 years of age) were placed in HDT for 16 days. For the purpose of another study, three of the seven subjects were chosen to exercise on a cycle ergometer on day 16. Blood samples were drawn immediately before bedrest on day 14 of bedrest, 18-24 hours following exercise while all subjects were still in HDT and 1 hour following bedrest termination. Plasma COP was measured in all 20 microliter EDTA-treated samples using an osmometer fitted with a PM 30 membrane. Data were analyzed with paired and unpaired t-tests. Plasma COP on day 14 of bedrest (29.9 +/- 0.69 mmHg) was significantly higher (p less than 0.005) than the control, pre-bedrest value (23.1 +/- 0.76 mmHg). At one hour of upright recovery after HDT, plasma COP remained significantly elevated (exercise: 26.9 +/- 0.87 mmHg; no exercise: 26.3 +/- 0.85 mmHg). Additionally, exercise had no significant effect on plasma COP 18-24 hours following exercise (exercise: 27.8 +/- 1.09 mmHg; no exercise: 27.1 +/- 0.78 mmHg). Our results demonstrate that plasma COP increases significantly with microgravity simulated by HDT. However, preliminary results indicate exercise during HDT does not significantly affect plasma COP.

  2. Swelling and osmotic flow in a potential host rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horseman, S. T.; Harrington, J. F.; Noy, D. J.

    Measurements of osmotic and hydraulic permeability are reported for a series of tests conducted on Opalinus Clay samples from the Mt. Terri underground research laboratory in the Jura Mountains of NE Switzerland. Osmotic flow was observed across discs of this clayshale separating 0.245 M NaCl solution from distilled water. Pressure transients monitored during constant flow rate testing were analysed to give permeability and specific storage values. The mean permeability normal to bedding of the two Opalinus Clay specimens was 7.9 × 10 -21 m 2. The mean specific storage based on all reliable determinations was 4.1 × 10 -4 m -1. Values calculated from the steady-state pressure gradients established during constant flow rate testing were very close to those obtained by mathematical analysis of pressure transients. The calculation of the transients was carried out using a new model of flow and solute transport which included terms for the osmotic coupling. The form of the pressure transients and the magnitude of the strain seen during the tests lead to a revision to the definition of solid phase compressibility to incorporate a term dependent upon the osmotic coupling coefficient. Steady-state osmotic flow rates were in the range 0.1-0.6 μL h -1 when the specimens were placed between a sodium chloride solution with a theoretical osmotic pressure of 1.19 MPa and distilled water. Transient flow rates were substantially larger. Membrane efficiencies were found to be relatively low, ranging from 1% to 6% (mean around 4%). The mean osmotic permeability normal to bedding was 3.5 × 10 -22 m 2. Specific storage and pore compressibility values were substantially larger than anticipated, suggesting that the volumetric strain of the clayshale under the conditions of laboratory testing must be largely determined by quasi-elastic deformation processes such as swelling and crack dilation. To test this hypothesis, a 3-D swelling test was performed on a cubic specimen of the same

  3. Aquaporin-mediated increase in root hydraulic conductance is involved in silicon-induced improved root water uptake under osmotic stress in Sorghum bicolor L.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Yin, Lina; Deng, Xiping; Wang, Shiwen; Tanaka, Kiyoshi; Zhang, Suiqi

    2014-09-01

    The fact that silicon application alleviates water deficit stress has been widely reported, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here the effects of silicon on water uptake and transport of sorghum seedlings (Sorghum bicolor L.) growing under polyethylene glycol-simulated osmotic stress in hydroponic culture and water deficit stress in sand culture were investigated. Osmotic stress dramatically decreased dry weight, photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, stomatal conductance, and leaf water content, but silicon application reduced these stress-induced decreases. Although silicon application had no effect on stem water transport capacity, whole-plant hydraulic conductance (Kplant) and root hydraulic conductance (Lp) were higher in silicon-treated seedlings than in those without silicon treatment under osmotic stress. Furthermore, the extent of changes in transpiration rate was similar to the changes in Kplant and Lp. The contribution of aquaporin to Lp was characterized using the aquaporin inhibitor mercury. Under osmotic stress, the exogenous application of HgCl2 decreased the transpiration rates of seedlings with and without silicon to the same level; after recovery induced by dithiothreitol (DTT), however, the transpiration rate was higher in silicon-treated seedlings than in untreated seedlings. In addition, transcription levels of several root aquaporin genes were increased by silicon application under osmotic stress. These results indicate that the silicon-induced up-regulation of aquaporin, which was thought to increase Lp, was involved in improving root water uptake under osmotic stress. This study also suggests that silicon plays a modulating role in improving plant resistance to osmotic stress in addition to its role as a mere physical barrier. PMID:24879770

  4. Aquaporin-mediated increase in root hydraulic conductance is involved in silicon-induced improved root water uptake under osmotic stress in Sorghum bicolor L.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng; Yin, Lina; Deng, Xiping; Wang, Shiwen; Tanaka, Kiyoshi; Zhang, Suiqi

    2014-01-01

    The fact that silicon application alleviates water deficit stress has been widely reported, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here the effects of silicon on water uptake and transport of sorghum seedlings (Sorghum bicolor L.) growing under polyethylene glycol-simulated osmotic stress in hydroponic culture and water deficit stress in sand culture were investigated. Osmotic stress dramatically decreased dry weight, photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, stomatal conductance, and leaf water content, but silicon application reduced these stress-induced decreases. Although silicon application had no effect on stem water transport capacity, whole-plant hydraulic conductance (Kplant) and root hydraulic conductance (Lp) were higher in silicon-treated seedlings than in those without silicon treatment under osmotic stress. Furthermore, the extent of changes in transpiration rate was similar to the changes in Kplant and Lp. The contribution of aquaporin to Lp was characterized using the aquaporin inhibitor mercury. Under osmotic stress, the exogenous application of HgCl2 decreased the transpiration rates of seedlings with and without silicon to the same level; after recovery induced by dithiothreitol (DTT), however, the transpiration rate was higher in silicon-treated seedlings than in untreated seedlings. In addition, transcription levels of several root aquaporin genes were increased by silicon application under osmotic stress. These results indicate that the silicon-induced up-regulation of aquaporin, which was thought to increase Lp, was involved in improving root water uptake under osmotic stress. This study also suggests that silicon plays a modulating role in improving plant resistance to osmotic stress in addition to its role as a mere physical barrier. PMID:24879770

  5. Design of an osmotic pressure sensor for sensing an osmotically active substance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ch, Nagesh; Paily, Roy P.

    2015-04-01

    A pressure sensor based on the osmosis principle has been designed and demonstrated successfully for the sensing of the concentration levels of an osmotically active substance. The device is fabricated using the bulk micro-machining technique on a silicon on insulator (SOI) substrate. The substrate has a square cavity on the bottom side to fill with the reference glucose solution and a silicon (Si) membrane on the top side for the actuation. Two sets of devices, having membrane thicknesses of 10 µm and 25 µm, but the same area of 3 mm ×3 mm, are fabricated. The cavity is filled with a glucose solution of 100 mg dL-1 and it is sealed with a semi-permeable membrane made up of cellulose acetate material. The glucose solution is employed to prove the functionality of the device and it is tested for different glucose concentration levels, ranging from 50 mg dL-1 to 450 mg dL-1. The output voltage obtained for the corresponding glucose concentration levels ranges from -6.7 mV to 22.7 mV for the 10 µm device and from -1.7 mV to 4 mV for the 25 µm device. The device operation was simulated using the finite element method (FEM) and the finite volume method (FVM), and the simulation and experimental results match closely. A response time of 40 min is obtained in the case of the 10 µm device compared to one of 30 min for the 25 µm device. The response times obtained for these devices are found to be small compared to those in similar works based on the osmosis principle. This pressure sensor has the potential to provide controlled drug delivery if it can be integrated with other microfluidic devices.

  6. Asymmetric membrane capsules of phenylephrine hydrochloride: an osmotically controlled drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Philip, Anil Kumar; Pathak, Kamla

    2011-09-01

    The aim of the current study was to develop osmotically controlled release system of freely water soluble drug phenylephrine hydrochloride by use of asymmetric membrane capsules to reduce the dosing frequency and consequently improve the patient compliance. Ethyl cellulose asymmetric membrane capsules were developed by phase inversion process and solubility modulation was accomplished by common ion effect wherein sodium chloride was included in the formulation that also served as an osmogen. The effect of formulation variables namely level of polymer (ethyl cellulose), level of pore former (glycerol) and level of osmogen (sodium chloride) on the in vitro release of the drug was evaluated by 2(3) factorial design. Effects of environmental factors on the release rate of the drug from asymmetric membrane capsules were also evaluated. Membrane characterization by scanning electron microscopy showed an outer dense region with less pores and inner porous region for the prepared asymmetric membrane. The dimensional analysis of asymmetric membrane capsule documented the capsules to be of uniform cap and body size comparable to commercial hard gelatin capsules. In vitro release studies results showed that incorporation of higher amount of osmogen not only increased the osmotic pressure but also controlled the drug release for a period of 12 hr. The drug release was inversely proportional to the level of polymer in asymmetric membrane capsule but directly related to the level of pore former in the membrane. The optimized asymmetric membrane capsule (F5) was able to provide zero order release of phenylephrine hydrochloride independent of agitation rate, intentional defect in the membrane and pH of dissolution medium but was dependent on the osmotic pressure gradient between inside and outside of the delivery system. PMID:21696358

  7. Electro-osmotically induced convection at a permselective membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, I.; Zaltzman, B.

    2000-08-01

    The paper is concerned with convection at an ion exchange electrodialysis membrane induced by nonequilibrium electro-osmosis in the course of concentration polarization under the passage of electric current through the membrane. Derivation of nonequilibrium electro-osmotic slip condition is recapitulated along with the linear stability analysis of quiescent electrodiffusion through a flat ion exchange membrane. Results of numerical calculation for nonlinear steady state convection, developing from the respective instability, are reported along with those for a slightly wavy membrane. Besides these results, we report those of time dependent calculations for periodic and chaotic oscillations, resulting from instability of the respective steady state flows, and also the results of recent experiments with modified membranes. These latter rule in favor of electro-osmotic versus bulk electroconvective origin of overlimiting conductance through ion exchange membranes.

  8. Extensional instability in electro-osmotic microflows of polymer solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryce, R. M.; Freeman, M. R.

    2010-03-01

    Fluid transport in microfluidic systems typically is laminar due to the low Reynolds number characteristic of the flow. The inclusion of suspended polymers imparts elasticity to fluids, allowing instabilities to be excited when substantial polymer stretching occurs. For high molecular weight polymer chains we find that flow velocities achievable by standard electro-osmotic pumping are sufficient to excite extensional instabilities in dilute polymer solutions. We observe a dependence in measured fluctuations on polymer concentration which plateaus at a threshold corresponding to the onset of significant molecular crowding in macromolecular solutions; plateauing occurs well below the overlap concentration. Our results show that electro-osmotic flows of complex fluids are disturbed from the steady regime, suggesting potential for enhanced mixing and requiring care in modeling the flow of complex liquids such as biopolymer suspensions.

  9. Giant Osmotic Pressure in the Forced Wetting of Hydrophobic Nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelin-Jamois, Millan; Picard, Cyril; Vigier, Gérard; Charlaix, Elisabeth

    2015-07-01

    The forced intrusion of water in hydrophobic nanoporous pulverulent material is of interest for quick storage of energy. With nanometric pores the energy storage capacity is controlled by interfacial phenomena. With subnanometric pores, we demonstrate that a breakdown occurs with the emergence of molecular exclusion as a leading contribution. This bulk exclusion effect leads to an osmotic contribution to the pressure that can reach levels never previously sustained. We illustrate, on various electrolytes and different microporous materials, that a simple osmotic pressure law accounts quantitatively for the enhancement of the intrusion and extrusion pressures governing the forced wetting and spontaneous drying of the nanopores. Using electrolyte solutions, energy storage and power capacities can be widely enhanced.

  10. Osmotic surveillance mediates rapid wound closure through nucleotide release

    PubMed Central

    Gault, William J.; Enyedi, Balázs

    2014-01-01

    Osmotic cues from the environment mediate rapid detection of epithelial breaches by leukocytes in larval zebrafish tail fins. Using intravital luminescence and fluorescence microscopy, we now show that osmolarity differences between the interstitial fluid and the external environment trigger ATP release at tail fin wounds to initiate rapid wound closure through long-range activation of basal epithelial cell motility. Extracellular nucleotide breakdown, at least in part mediated by ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 3 (Entpd3), restricts the range and duration of osmotically induced cell migration after injury. Thus, in zebrafish larvae, wound repair is driven by an autoregulatory circuit that generates pro-migratory tissue signals as a function of environmental exposure of the inside of the tissue. PMID:25533845

  11. Video analysis of osmotic cell response during cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Spindler, Ralf; Rosenhahn, Bodo; Hofmann, Nicola; Glasmacher, Birgit

    2012-06-01

    Cellular response during the freeze-thaw process strongly affects the cryopreservation outcome including cell morphology and cell viability. Cryomicroscopy was used to individually analyze the osmotic response of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMECs) during slow cooling (1 °C/min) to -60 °C and fast rewarming to 4 °C (100 °C/min). The ice nucleation temperature was controlled (T(n)=-8 °C). Different concentrations of different cryoprotectant agents, dimethyl sulfoxide, ethylene glycol, proline, ectoin, and trehalose resulted in various cell volume changes. The described methods for image processing and computer vision allows for a fully automatic and individual analysis of the osmotically driven cell response under a temporal resolution of 2 frames per second. As a result, we show that in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide or ethylene glycol cells shrink during cooling to a high degree, especially at intermediate molar concentrations in the range between 0 and 2M, while during rewarming cells swell to isotonic volumes gradually. Comparative cell vitality tests, membrane integrity, and viability tests after 24h recultivation, under these conditions show a high cell survival. In the absence of cryoprotective agents or with proline, ectoin or trehalose, osmotic shrinkage did not meet our expectations: a freeze-induced swelling was detected during cooling and an extreme swelling was observed after rewarming, which was accompanied by lower comparative cell viability. A linear correlation between the cellular membrane integrity after cryopreservation and the maximal relative cell volume was derived (R(2)=96). The results clearly show that it is crucial to analyze cells within a sample individually due to their individual different osmotic response. PMID:22342926

  12. Impact of osmotic stress on protein diffusion in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Mika, Jacek T; Schavemaker, Paul E; Krasnikov, Victor; Poolman, Bert

    2014-11-01

    We measured translational diffusion of proteins in the cytoplasm and plasma membrane of the Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis and probed the effect of osmotic upshift. For cells in standard growth medium the diffusion coefficients for cytosolic proteins (27 and 582 kDa) and 12-transmembrane helix membrane proteins are similar to those in Escherichia coli. The translational diffusion of GFP in L. lactis drops by two orders of magnitude when the medium osmolality is increased by ∼ 1.9 Osm, and the decrease in mobility is partly reversed in the presence of osmoprotectants. We find a large spread in diffusion coefficients over the full population of cells but a smaller spread if only sister cells are compared. While in general the diffusion coefficients we measure under normal osmotic conditions in L. lactis are similar to those reported in E. coli, the decrease in translational diffusion upon osmotic challenge in L. lactis is smaller than in E. coli. An even more striking difference is that in L. lactis the GFP diffusion coefficient drops much more rapidly with volume than in E. coli. We discuss these findings in the light of differences in turgor, cell volume, crowding and cytoplasmic structure of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:25244659

  13. Active osmotic exchanger for advanced filtration at the nano scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marbach, Sophie; Bocquet, Lyderic

    2015-11-01

    One of the main functions of the kidney is to remove the waste products of an organism, mostly by excreting concentrated urea while reabsorbing water and other molecules. The human kidney is capable of recycling about 200 liters of water per day, at the relatively low cost of 0.5 kJ/L (standard dialysis requiring at least 150 kJ/L). Kidneys are constituted of millions of parallel filtration networks called nephrons. The nephrons of all mammalian kidneys present a specific loop geometry, the Loop of Henle, that is believed to play a key role in the urinary concentrating mechanism. One limb of the loop is permeable to water and the other contains sodium pumps that exchange with a common interstitium. In this work, we take inspiration from this osmotic exchanger design to propose new nanofiltration principles. We first establish simple analytical results to derive general operating principles, based on coupled water permeable pores and osmotic pumps. The best filtration geometry, in terms of power required for a given water recycling ratio, is comparable in many ways to the mammalian nephron. It is not only more efficient than traditional reverse osmosis systems, but can also work at much smaller pressures (of the order of the blood pressure, 0.13 bar, as compared to more than 30 bars for pressure-retarded osmosis systems). We anticipate that our proof of principle will be a starting point for the development of new filtration systems relying on the active osmotic exchanger principle.

  14. Osmotic Pressure Can Regulate Matrix Gene Expression in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Shmuel M.; Kolodkin-Gal, Ilana; Mcloon, Anna; Chai, Liraz; Kolter, Roberto; Losick, Richard; Weitz, David A

    2012-01-01

    Many bacteria organize themselves into structurally complex communities known as biofilms in which the cells are held together by an extracellular matrix. In general, the amount of extracellular matrix is related to the robustness of the biofilm. Yet, the specific signals that regulate the synthesis of matrix remain poorly understood. Here we show that the matrix itself can be a cue that regulates the expression of the genes involved in matrix synthesis in Bacillus subtilis. The presence of the exopolysaccharide component of the matrix causes an increase in osmotic pressure that leads to an inhibition of matrix gene expression. We further show that non-specific changes in osmotic pressure also inhibit matrix gene expression and do so by activating the histidine kinase KinD. KinD, in turn, directs the phosphorylation of the master regulatory protein Spo0A, which at high levels represses matrix gene expression. Sensing a physical cue such as osmotic pressure, in addition to chemical cues, could be a strategy to non-specifically coordinate the behavior of cells in communities composed of many different species. PMID:22882172

  15. Polyamine metabolism and osmotic stress. I. Relation to protoplast viability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiburcio, A. F.; Masdeu, M. A.; Dumortier, F. M.; Galston, A. W.

    1986-01-01

    Cereal leaves subjected to the osmotica routinely used for protoplast isolation show a rapid increase in arginine decarboxylase activity, a massive accumulation of putrescine, and slow conversion of putrescine to the higher polyamines, spermidine and spermine (HE Flores, AW Galston 1984 Plant Physiol 75: 102). Mesophyll protoplasts from these leaves, which have a high putrescine:polyamine ratio, do not undergo sustained division. By contrast, in Nicotiana, Capsicum, Datura, Trigonella, and Vigna, dicot genera that readily regenerate plants from mesophyll protoplasts, the response of leaves to osmotic stress is opposite to that in cereals. Putrescine titer as well as arginine and ornithine decarboxylase activities decline in these osmotically stressed dicot leaves, while spermidine and spermine titers increase. Thus, the putrescine:polyamine ratio in Vigna protoplasts, which divide readily, is 4-fold lower than in oat protoplasts, which divide poorly. We suggest that this differing response of polyamine metabolism to osmotic stress may account in part for the failure of cereal mesophyll protoplasts to develop readily in vitro.

  16. Polyamine metabolism and osmotic stress. I. Relation to protoplast viability.

    PubMed

    Tiburcio, A F; Masdeu, M A; Dumortier, F M; Galston, A W

    1986-01-01

    Cereal leaves subjected to the osmotica routinely used for protoplast isolation show a rapid increase in arginine decarboxylase activity, a massive accumulation of putrescine, and slow conversion of putrescine to the higher polyamines, spermidine and spermine (HE Flores, AW Galston 1984 Plant Physiol 75: 102). Mesophyll protoplasts from these leaves, which have a high putrescine:polyamine ratio, do not undergo sustained division. By contrast, in Nicotiana, Capsicum, Datura, Trigonella, and Vigna, dicot genera that readily regenerate plants from mesophyll protoplasts, the response of leaves to osmotic stress is opposite to that in cereals. Putrescine titer as well as arginine and ornithine decarboxylase activities decline in these osmotically stressed dicot leaves, while spermidine and spermine titers increase. Thus, the putrescine:polyamine ratio in Vigna protoplasts, which divide readily, is 4-fold lower than in oat protoplasts, which divide poorly. We suggest that this differing response of polyamine metabolism to osmotic stress may account in part for the failure of cereal mesophyll protoplasts to develop readily in vitro. PMID:11539086

  17. Inhibition of chloroplastic respiration by osmotic dehydration. [Spinacia oleracea L

    SciTech Connect

    Willeford, K.O.; Ahluwalia, K.J.K.; Gibbs, M. )

    1989-04-01

    The respiratory capacity of isolated spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) chloroplasts, measured as the rate of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} evolved from the oxidative pentose phosphate cycle in darkened chloroplasts exogenously supplied with ({sup 14}C)glucose, was progressively diminished by escalating osmotic dehydration with betaine or sorbitol. Comparing the inhibitions of CO{sub 2} evolution generated by osmotic dehydration in chloroplasts given C-1 and C-6 labeled glucose, 54% and 84%, respectively, indicates that osmotic dehydration effects to a greater extent the recycling of the oxidative pentose phosphate intermediates, fructose-6P and glyceraldehyde-3P. Respiratory inhibition in the darkened chloroplast could be alleviated by addition of NH{sub 4}Cl (a stromal alkylating agent), iodoacetamide (an inhibitor of glyceraldehyde-3P dehydrogenase), or glycolate-2P (an inhibitor of phosphofructokinase). It is concluded that the site which primarily mediates respiratory inhibition in the darkened chloroplast occurs at the fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase/phosphofructokinase junction.

  18. GABA Not Only a Neurotransmitter: Osmotic Regulation by GABAAR Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cesetti, Tiziana; Ciccolini, Francesca; Li, Yuting

    2012-01-01

    Mature macroglia and almost all neural progenitor types express γ-aminobutyric (GABA) A receptors (GABAARs), whose activation by ambient or synaptic GABA, leads to influx or efflux of chloride (Cl−) depending on its electro-chemical gradient (ECl). Since the flux of Cl− is indissolubly associated to that of osmotically obliged water, GABAARs regulate water movements by modulating ion gradients. In addition, since water movements also occur through specialized water channels and transporters, GABAAR signaling could affect the movement of water by regulating the function of the channels and transporters involved, thereby affecting not only the direction of the water fluxes but also their dynamics. We will here review recent observations indicating that in neural cells GABAAR-mediated osmotic regulation affects the cellular volume thereby activating multiple intracellular signaling mechanisms important for cell proliferation, maturation, and survival. In addition, we will discuss evidence that the osmotic regulation exerted by GABA may contribute to brain water homeostasis in physiological and in pathological conditions causing brain edema, in which the GABAergic transmission is often altered. PMID:22319472

  19. Osmotically controlled drug delivery system with associated drugs.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Brahma Prakash; Thakur, Navneet; Jain, Nishi P; Banweer, Jitendra; Jain, Surendra

    2010-01-01

    Conventional drug delivery systems have slight control over their drug release and almost no control over the effective concentration at the target site. This kind of dosing pattern may result in constantly changing, unpredictable plasma concentrations. Drugs can be delivered in a controlled pattern over a long period of time by the controlled or modified release drug delivery systems. They include dosage forms for oral and transdermal administration as well as injectable and implantable systems. For most of drugs, oral route remains as the most acceptable route of administration. Certain molecules may have low oral bioavailability because of solubility or permeability limitations. Development of an extended release dosage form also requires reasonable absorption throughout the gastro-intestinal tract (GIT). Among the available techniques to improve the bioavailability of these drugs fabrication of osmotic drug delivery system is the most appropriate one. Osmotic drug delivery systems release the drug with the zero order kinetics which does not depend on the initial concentration and the physiological factors of GIT. This review brings out new technologies, fabrication and recent clinical research in osmotic drug delivery. PMID:21486532

  20. Cognitive Improvement of Attention and Inhibition in the Late Afternoon in Children With Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Treated With Osmotic-Release Oral System Methylphenidate.

    PubMed

    Slama, Hichem; Fery, Patrick; Verheulpen, Denis; Vanzeveren, Nathalie; Van Bogaert, Patrick

    2015-07-01

    Long-acting medications have been developed and approved for use in the treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). These compounds are intended to optimize and maintain symptoms control throughout the day. We tested prolonged effects of osmotic-release oral system methylphenidate on both attention and inhibition, in the late afternoon. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study was conducted in 36 boys (7-12 years) with ADHD and 40 typically developing children. The ADHD children received an individualized dose of placebo or osmotic-release oral system methylphenidate. They were tested about 8 hours after taking with 2 continuous performance tests (continuous performance test-X [CPT-X] and continuous performance test-AX [CPT-AX]) and a counting Stroop. A positive effect of osmotic-release oral system methylphenidate was present in CPT-AX with faster and less variable reaction times under osmotic-release oral system methylphenidate than under placebo, and no difference with typically developing children. In the counting Stroop, we found a decreased interference with osmotic-release oral system methylphenidate but no difference between children with ADHD under placebo and typically developing children. PMID:25296928

  1. An Arabidopsis Zinc Finger Protein Increases Abiotic Stress Tolerance by Regulating Sodium and Potassium Homeostasis, Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenging and Osmotic Potential.

    PubMed

    Zang, Dandan; Li, Hongyan; Xu, Hongyun; Zhang, Wenhui; Zhang, Yiming; Shi, Xinxin; Wang, Yucheng

    2016-01-01

    Plant zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) comprise a large protein family and they are mainly involved in abiotic stress tolerance. Although Arabidopsis RING/FYVE/PHD ZFP At5g62460 (AtRZFP) is found to bind to zinc, whether it is involved in abiotic stress tolerance is still unknown. In the present study, we characterized the roles of AtRZFP in response to abiotic stresses. The expression of AtRZFP was induced significantly by salt and osmotic stress. AtRZFP positively mediates tolerance to salt and osmotic stress. Additionally, compared with wild-type Arabidopsis plants, plants overexpressing AtRZFP showed reduced reactive oxygen species (ROSs) accumulation, enhanced superoxide dismutase and peroxidase activity, increased soluble sugars and proline contents, reduced K(+) loss, decreased Na(+) accumulation, stomatal aperture and the water loss rate. Conversely, AtRZFP knockout plants displayed the opposite physiological changes when exposed to salt or osmotic stress conditions. These data suggested that AtRZFP enhances salt and osmotic tolerance through a series of physiological processes, including enhanced ROSs scavenging, maintaining Na(+) and K(+) homeostasis, controlling the stomatal aperture to reduce the water loss rate, and accumulating soluble sugars and proline to adjust the osmotic potential. PMID:27605931

  2. Renal Cells Express Different Forms of Vimentin: The Independent Expression Alteration of these Forms is Important in Cell Resistance to Osmotic Stress and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Gerhard A.; Dihazi, Gry H.; Eltoweissy, Marwa; Kruegel, Jenny; Dihazi, Hassan

    2013-01-01

    Osmotic stress has been shown to regulate cytoskeletal protein expression. It is generally known that vimentin is rapidly degraded during apoptosis by multiple caspases, resulting in diverse vimentin fragments. Despite the existence of the known apoptotic vimentin fragments, we demonstrated in our study the existence of different forms of vimentin VIM I, II, III, and IV with different molecular weights in various renal cell lines. Using a proteomics approach followed by western blot analyses and immunofluorescence staining, we proved the apoptosis-independent existence and differential regulation of different vimentin forms under varying conditions of osmolarity in renal cells. Similar impacts of osmotic stress were also observed on the expression of other cytoskeleton intermediate filament proteins; e.g., cytokeratin. Interestingly, 2D western blot analysis revealed that the forms of vimentin are regulated independently of each other under glucose and NaCl osmotic stress. Renal cells, adapted to high NaCl osmotic stress, express a high level of VIM IV (the form with the highest molecular weight), besides the three other forms, and exhibit higher resistance to apoptotic induction with TNF-α or staurosporin compared to the control. In contrast, renal cells that are adapted to high glucose concentration and express only the lower-molecular-weight forms VIM I and II, were more susceptible to apoptosis. Our data proved the existence of different vimentin forms, which play an important role in cell resistance to osmotic stress and are involved in cell protection against apoptosis. PMID:23874579

  3. An Arabidopsis Zinc Finger Protein Increases Abiotic Stress Tolerance by Regulating Sodium and Potassium Homeostasis, Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenging and Osmotic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Dandan; Li, Hongyan; Xu, Hongyun; Zhang, Wenhui; Zhang, Yiming; Shi, Xinxin; Wang, Yucheng

    2016-01-01

    Plant zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) comprise a large protein family and they are mainly involved in abiotic stress tolerance. Although Arabidopsis RING/FYVE/PHD ZFP At5g62460 (AtRZFP) is found to bind to zinc, whether it is involved in abiotic stress tolerance is still unknown. In the present study, we characterized the roles of AtRZFP in response to abiotic stresses. The expression of AtRZFP was induced significantly by salt and osmotic stress. AtRZFP positively mediates tolerance to salt and osmotic stress. Additionally, compared with wild-type Arabidopsis plants, plants overexpressing AtRZFP showed reduced reactive oxygen species (ROSs) accumulation, enhanced superoxide dismutase and peroxidase activity, increased soluble sugars and proline contents, reduced K+ loss, decreased Na+ accumulation, stomatal aperture and the water loss rate. Conversely, AtRZFP knockout plants displayed the opposite physiological changes when exposed to salt or osmotic stress conditions. These data suggested that AtRZFP enhances salt and osmotic tolerance through a series of physiological processes, including enhanced ROSs scavenging, maintaining Na+ and K+ homeostasis, controlling the stomatal aperture to reduce the water loss rate, and accumulating soluble sugars and proline to adjust the osmotic potential. PMID:27605931

  4. Negatively charged hyperbranched polyglycerol grafted membranes for osmotic power generation from municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue; Cai, Tao; Chen, Chunyan; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2016-02-01

    Osmotic power holds great promise as a clean, sustainable and largely unexploited energy resource. Recent membrane development for pressure-retarded osmosis (PRO) is making the osmotic power generation more and more realistic. However, severe performance declines have been observed because the porous layer of PRO membranes is fouled by the feed stream. To overcome it, a negatively charged antifouling PRO hollow fiber membrane has been designed and studied in this work. An antifouling polymer, derived from hyperbranched polyglycerol and functionalized by α-lipoic acid and succinic anhydride, was synthesized and grafted onto the polydopamine (PDA) modified poly(ether sulfone) (PES) hollow fiber membranes. In comparison to unmodified membranes, the charged hyperbranched polyglycerol (CHPG) grafted membrane is much less affected by organic deposition, such as bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorption, and highly resistant to microbial growths, demonstrated by Escherichia coli adhesion and Staphylococcus aureus attachment. CHPG-g-TFC was also examined in PRO tests using a concentrated wastewater as the feed. Comparing to the plain PES-TFC and non-charged HPG-g-TFC, the newly developed membrane exhibits not only the smallest decline in water flux but also the highest recovery rate. When using 0.81 M NaCl and wastewater as the feed pair in PRO tests at 15 bar, the average power density remains at 5.6 W/m(2) in comparison to an average value of 3.6 W/m(2) for unmodified membranes after four PRO runs. In summary, osmotic power generation may be sustained by properly designing and anchoring the functional polymers to PRO membranes. PMID:26630043

  5. Cholesterol-loaded cyclodextrin enhances osmotic tolerance and inhibits the acrosome reaction in rabbit spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Melih; Akman, Orhan; Lehimcioğlu, Necdet Cankat; Erdem, Hüseyin

    2010-07-01

    The effects of cholesterol-loaded cyclodextrin (CLC) treatment on the osmotic tolerance and ability to undergo the acrosome reaction of rabbit spermatozoa, with an unusually high cholesterol/phospholipid ratio in plasma membranes, were examined in two successive experiments. In the first experiment, CLC-pretreated and untreated sperm cells were exposed for 15min to one of five fructose solutions, adjusted to 20, 80, 290, 500 or 1500mOsm/L. After the anisoosmotic challenge, the integrity of sperm membranes in the CLC-supplemented (at a dose level of 3mg/120x10(6)spermatozoa) and control groups was estimated by a modified hypoosmotic swelling test (HOST) associated with a supravital eosin staining test (HE-test). In the second part of the study, the influence of cholesterol supplementation on the acrosome reaction of sperm cells stimulated by either calcium ionophore A23187 (CI) or lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) was evaluated. CLC pretreatment increased viable and live-HOST-responsive sperm rates (P<0.01) after incubation in anisoosmotic solutions varying from 80 to 1500mOsm/L. However, CLC supplementation did not influence the percentage of HOST-responsive sperm cells (P>0.05). A significant interaction was determined between CLC pretreatment and the level of osmotic pressure in maintaining the functional and physical integrities of sperm membranes undergoing osmotic challenges. Both CI and LPC successfully induced the acrosome reaction in rabbit spermatozoa (P<0.001). Compared with CI, LPC was more effective (P<0.0001). CLC pretreatment resulted in a significant reduction (P<0.01) in the percentage of acrosome reacted sperm cells irrespective of the inducing agent, either CI or LPC. In conclusion, CLC treatment enhanced the anisoosmotic tolerance of rabbit spermatozoa and reduced their ability to undergo the acrosome reaction after stimulation by CI or LPC. PMID:20304567

  6. Relating reverse and forward solute diffusion to membrane fouling in osmotically driven membrane processes.

    PubMed

    She, Qianhong; Jin, Xue; Li, Qinghua; Tang, Chuyang Y

    2012-05-01

    Osmotically driven membrane processes, such as forward osmosis (FO) and pressure retarded osmosis (PRO), are attracting increasing interest in research and applications in environment and energy related fields. In this study, we systematically investigated the alginate fouling on an osmotic membrane during FO operation using four types of draw solutions (NaCl, MgCl(2), CaCl(2) and Ca(NO(3))(2)) to elucidate the relationships between reverse (from draw solution to feed solution) and forward (from feed solution to draw solution) solute diffusion, and membrane fouling. At the same water flux level (achieved by adjusting the draw solution concentration), the greatest reverse solute diffusion rate was observed for NaCl draw solution, followed by Ca(NO(3))(2) draw solution, and then CaCl(2) draw solution and MgCl(2) draw solution, the order of which was consistent with that of their solute permeability coefficients. Moreover, the reverse solute diffusion of draw solute (especially divalent cation) can change the feed solution chemistry and thus enhance membrane fouling by alginate, the extent of which is related to the rate of the reverse draw solute diffusion and its ability to interact with the foulant. The extent of fouling for the four types of draw solution followed an order of Ca(NO(3))(2) > CaCl(2) > MgCl(2) > NaCl. On the other hand, the rate of forward diffusion of feed solute (e.g., Na(+)) was in turn promoted under severe membrane fouling in active layer facing draw solution orientation, which may be attributed to the fouling enhanced concentration polarization (pore clogging enhanced ICP and cake enhanced concentration polarization). The enhanced concentration polarization can lead to additional water flux reduction and is an important mechanism governing the water flux behavior during FO membrane fouling. Findings have significant implications for the draw solution selection and membrane fouling control in osmotically driven membrane processes. PMID:22386887

  7. Recent experimental data may point to a greater role for osmotic pressures in the subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuzil, C. E.; Provost, A. M.

    2009-03-01

    Uncertainty about the origin of anomalous fluid pressures in certain geologic settings has caused researchers to take a second look at osmosis, or flow driven by chemical potential differences, as a pressure-generating process in the subsurface. Interest in geological osmosis has also increased because of an in situ experiment by Neuzil (2000) suggesting that Pierre Shale could generate large osmotic pressures when highly compacted. In the last few years, additional laboratory and in situ experiments have greatly increased the number of data on osmotic properties of argillaceous formations, but they have not been systematically examined. In this paper we compile these data and explore their implications for osmotic pressure generation in subsurface systems. Rather than base our analysis on osmotic efficiencies, which depend strongly on concentration, we calculated values of a quantity we term osmotic specific surface area (Aso) that, in principle, is a property of the porous medium only. The Aso values are consistent with a surprisingly broad spectrum of osmotic behavior in argillaceous formations, and all the formations tested exhibited at least a modest ability to generate osmotic pressure. It appears possible that under appropriate conditions some formations can be highly effective osmotic membranes able to generate osmotic pressures exceeding 30 MPa (3 km of head) at porosities as high as ˜0.1 and pressures exceeding 10 MPa at porosities as high as ˜0.2. These findings are difficult to reconcile with the lack of compelling field evidence for osmotic pressures, and we propose three explanations for the disparity: (1) Our analysis is flawed and argillaceous formations are less effective osmotic membranes than it suggests; (2) the necessary subsurface conditions, significant salinity differences within intact argillaceous formations, are rare; or (3) osmotic pressures are unlikely to be detected and are not recognized when encountered. The last possibility, that

  8. Recent experimental data may point to a greater role for osmotic pressures in the subsurface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.; Provost, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Uncertainty about the origin of anomalous fluid pressures in certain geologic settings has caused researchers to take a second look at osmosis, or flow driven by chemical potential differences, as a pressure-generating process in the subsurface. Interest in geological osmosis has also increased because of an in situ experiment by Neuzil (2000) suggesting that Pierre Shale could generate large osmotic pressures when highly compacted. In the last few years, additional laboratory and in situ experiments have greatly increased the number of data on osmotic properties of argillaceous formations, but they have not been systematically examined. In this paper we compile these data and explore their implications for osmotic pressure generation in subsurface systems. Rather than base our analysis on osmotic efficiencies, which depend strongly on concentration, we calculated values of a quantity we term osmotic specific surface area (Aso) that, in principle, is a property of the porous medium only. The Aso values are consistent with a surprisingly broad spectrum of osmotic behavior in argillaceous formations, and all the formations tested exhibited at least a modest ability to generate osmotic pressure. It appears possible that under appropriate conditions some formations can be highly effective osmotic membranes able to generate osmotic pressures exceeding 30 MPa (3 km of head) at porosities as high as ??0.1 and pressures exceeding 10 MPa at porosities as high as ??0.2. These findings are difficult to reconcile with the lack of compelling field evidence for osmotic pressures, and we propose three explanations for the disparity: (1) Our analysis is flawed and argillaceous formations are less effective osmotic membranes than it suggests; (2) the necessary subsurface conditions, significant salinity differences within intact argillaceous formations, are rare; or (3) osmotic pressures are unlikely to be detected and are not recognized when encountered. The last possibility, that

  9. Bacterial Dispersal Promotes Biodegradation in Heterogeneous Systems Exposed to Osmotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Worrich, Anja; König, Sara; Banitz, Thomas; Centler, Florian; Frank, Karin; Thullner, Martin; Harms, Hauke; Miltner, Anja; Wick, Lukas Y.; Kästner, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Contaminant biodegradation in soils is hampered by the heterogeneous distribution of degrading communities colonizing isolated microenvironments as a result of the soil architecture. Over the last years, soil salinization was recognized as an additional problem especially in arid and semiarid ecosystems as it drastically reduces the activity and motility of bacteria. Here, we studied the importance of different spatial processes for benzoate biodegradation at an environmentally relevant range of osmotic potentials (ΔΨo) using model ecosystems exhibiting a heterogeneous distribution of the soil-borne bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440. Three systematically manipulated scenarios allowed us to cover the effects of (i) substrate diffusion, (ii) substrate diffusion and autonomous bacterial dispersal, and (iii) substrate diffusion and autonomous as well as mediated bacterial dispersal along glass fiber networks mimicking fungal hyphae. To quantify the relative importance of the different spatial processes, we compared these heterogeneous scenarios to a reference value obtained for each ΔΨo by means of a quasi-optimal scenario in which degraders were ab initio homogeneously distributed. Substrate diffusion as the sole spatial process was insufficient to counteract the disadvantage due to spatial degrader heterogeneity at ΔΨo ranging from 0 to −1 MPa. In this scenario, only 13.8−21.3% of the quasi-optimal biodegradation performance could be achieved. In the same range of ΔΨo values, substrate diffusion in combination with bacterial dispersal allowed between 68.6 and 36.2% of the performance showing a clear downwards trend with decreasing ΔΨo. At −1.5 MPa, however, this scenario performed worse than the diffusion scenario, possibly as a result of energetic disadvantages associated with flagellum synthesis and emerging requirements to exceed a critical population density to resist osmotic stress. Network-mediated bacterial dispersal kept biodegradation

  10. Bacterial Dispersal Promotes Biodegradation in Heterogeneous Systems Exposed to Osmotic Stress.

    PubMed

    Worrich, Anja; König, Sara; Banitz, Thomas; Centler, Florian; Frank, Karin; Thullner, Martin; Harms, Hauke; Miltner, Anja; Wick, Lukas Y; Kästner, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Contaminant biodegradation in soils is hampered by the heterogeneous distribution of degrading communities colonizing isolated microenvironments as a result of the soil architecture. Over the last years, soil salinization was recognized as an additional problem especially in arid and semiarid ecosystems as it drastically reduces the activity and motility of bacteria. Here, we studied the importance of different spatial processes for benzoate biodegradation at an environmentally relevant range of osmotic potentials (ΔΨo) using model ecosystems exhibiting a heterogeneous distribution of the soil-borne bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440. Three systematically manipulated scenarios allowed us to cover the effects of (i) substrate diffusion, (ii) substrate diffusion and autonomous bacterial dispersal, and (iii) substrate diffusion and autonomous as well as mediated bacterial dispersal along glass fiber networks mimicking fungal hyphae. To quantify the relative importance of the different spatial processes, we compared these heterogeneous scenarios to a reference value obtained for each ΔΨo by means of a quasi-optimal scenario in which degraders were ab initio homogeneously distributed. Substrate diffusion as the sole spatial process was insufficient to counteract the disadvantage due to spatial degrader heterogeneity at ΔΨo ranging from 0 to -1 MPa. In this scenario, only 13.8-21.3% of the quasi-optimal biodegradation performance could be achieved. In the same range of ΔΨo values, substrate diffusion in combination with bacterial dispersal allowed between 68.6 and 36.2% of the performance showing a clear downwards trend with decreasing ΔΨo. At -1.5 MPa, however, this scenario performed worse than the diffusion scenario, possibly as a result of energetic disadvantages associated with flagellum synthesis and emerging requirements to exceed a critical population density to resist osmotic stress. Network-mediated bacterial dispersal kept biodegradation almost

  11. Development of a microfluidic device for determination of cell osmotic behavior and membrane transport properties.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiu-Hung; Purtteman, Jester J P; Heimfeld, Shelly; Folch, Albert; Gao, Dayong

    2007-12-01

    An understanding of cell osmotic behavior and membrane transport properties is indispensable for cryobiology research and development of cell-type-specific, optimal cryopreservation conditions. A microfluidic perfusion system is developed here to measure the kinetic changes of cell volume under various extracellular conditions, in order to determine cell osmotic behavior and membrane transport properties. The system is fabricated using soft lithography and is comprised of microfluidic channels and a perfusion chamber for trapping cells. During experiments, rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-1 line) cells were injected into the inlet of the device, allowed to flow downstream, and were trapped within a perfusion chamber. The fluid continues to flow to the outlet due to suction produced by a Hamilton Syringe. Two sets of experiments have been performed: the cells were perfused by (1) hypertonic solutions with different concentrations of non-permeating solutes and (2) solutions containing a permeating cryoprotective agent (CPA), dimethylsulfoxide (Me(2)SO), plus non-permeating solute (sodium chloride (NaCl)), respectively. From experiment (1), cell osmotically inactive volume (V(b)) and the permeability coefficient of water (L(p)) for RBL cells are determined to be 41% [n=18, correlation coefficient (r(2)) of 0.903] of original/isotonic volume, and 0.32+/-0.05 microm/min/atm (n=8, r(2)>0.963), respectively, for room temperature (22 degrees C). From experiment (2), the permeability coefficient of water (L(p)) and of Me(2)SO (P(s)) for RBL cells are 0.38+/-0.09 microm/min/atm and (0.49+/-0.13) x 10(-3)cm/min (n=5, r(2)>0.86), respectively. We conclude that this device enables us to: (1) readily monitor the changes of extracellular conditions by perfusing single or a group of cells with prepared media; (2) confine cells (or a cell) within a monolayer chamber, which prevents imaging ambiguity, such as cells overlapping or moving out of the focus plane; (3) study individual cell

  12. Osmotic Stress Confers Enhanced Cell Integrity to Hydrostatic Pressure but Impairs Growth in Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2.

    PubMed

    Scoma, Alberto; Boon, Nico

    2016-01-01

    Alcanivorax is a hydrocarbonoclastic genus dominating oil spills worldwide. While its presence has been detected in oil-polluted seawaters, marine sediment and salt marshes under ambient pressure, its presence in deep-sea oil-contaminated environments is negligible. Recent laboratory studies highlighted the piezosensitive nature of some Alcanivorax species, whose growth yields are highly impacted by mild hydrostatic pressures (HPs). In the present study, osmotic stress was used as a tool to increase HP resistance in the type strain Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2. Control cultures grown under standard conditions of salinity and osmotic pressure with respect to seawater (35.6 ppt or 1136 mOsm kg(-1), respectively) were compared with cultures subjected to hypo- and hyperosmosis (330 and 1720 mOsm kg(-1), or 18 and 62 ppt in salinity, equivalent to brackish and brine waters, respectively), under atmospheric or increased HP (0.1 and 10 MPa). Osmotic stress had a remarkably positive impact on cell metabolic activity in terms of CO2 production (thus, oil bioremediation) and O2 respiration under hyperosmosis, as acclimation to high salinity enhanced cell activity under 10 MPa by a factor of 10. Both osmotic shocks significantly enhanced cell protection by reducing membrane damage under HP, with cell integrities close to 100% under hyposmosis. The latter was likely due to intracellular water-reclamation as no trace of the piezolyte ectoine was found, contrary to hyperosmosis. Notably, ectoine production was equivalent at 0.1 MPa in hyperosmosis-acclimated cells and at 10 MPa under isosmotic conditions. While stimulating cell metabolism and enhancing cell integrity, osmotic stress had always a negative impact on culture growth and performance. No net growth was observed during 4-days incubation tests, and CO2:O2 ratios and pH values indicated that culture performance in terms of hydrocarbon degradation was lowered by the effects of osmotic stress alone or combined with

  13. Osmotic Stress Confers Enhanced Cell Integrity to Hydrostatic Pressure but Impairs Growth in Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2

    PubMed Central

    Scoma, Alberto; Boon, Nico

    2016-01-01

    Alcanivorax is a hydrocarbonoclastic genus dominating oil spills worldwide. While its presence has been detected in oil-polluted seawaters, marine sediment and salt marshes under ambient pressure, its presence in deep-sea oil-contaminated environments is negligible. Recent laboratory studies highlighted the piezosensitive nature of some Alcanivorax species, whose growth yields are highly impacted by mild hydrostatic pressures (HPs). In the present study, osmotic stress was used as a tool to increase HP resistance in the type strain Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2. Control cultures grown under standard conditions of salinity and osmotic pressure with respect to seawater (35.6 ppt or 1136 mOsm kg-1, respectively) were compared with cultures subjected to hypo- and hyperosmosis (330 and 1720 mOsm kg-1, or 18 and 62 ppt in salinity, equivalent to brackish and brine waters, respectively), under atmospheric or increased HP (0.1 and 10 MPa). Osmotic stress had a remarkably positive impact on cell metabolic activity in terms of CO2 production (thus, oil bioremediation) and O2 respiration under hyperosmosis, as acclimation to high salinity enhanced cell activity under 10 MPa by a factor of 10. Both osmotic shocks significantly enhanced cell protection by reducing membrane damage under HP, with cell integrities close to 100% under hyposmosis. The latter was likely due to intracellular water-reclamation as no trace of the piezolyte ectoine was found, contrary to hyperosmosis. Notably, ectoine production was equivalent at 0.1 MPa in hyperosmosis-acclimated cells and at 10 MPa under isosmotic conditions. While stimulating cell metabolism and enhancing cell integrity, osmotic stress had always a negative impact on culture growth and performance. No net growth was observed during 4-days incubation tests, and CO2:O2 ratios and pH values indicated that culture performance in terms of hydrocarbon degradation was lowered by the effects of osmotic stress alone or combined with increased HP

  14. Chloroplast osmotic adjustment allows for acclimation of photosynthesis to low water potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, A.S.; Berkowitz, G.

    1987-04-01

    Previously in this laboratory, studies indicated that photosynthesis (PS) of chloroplasts isolated from spinach plants which underwent osmotic adjustment during in situ water deficits was inhibited less at low osmotic potentials (Psi/sub s/) in vitro than PS of plastids isolated from well watered plants. In this study, an attempt was made to determine if chloroplast acclimation to low Psi/sub s/ was associated with in situ stromal solute accumulation. During a 14d stress cycle, in situ stromal volume was estimated by measuring (using the /sup 3/H/sub 2/O, /sup 14/C-sorbitol silicon oil centrifugation technique) the stromal space of plastids in solutions which had the Psi/sub s/ adjusted to the leaf Psi/sub s/. During the first lid of the cycle, stromal volume did not decline, despite a decrease of over 20% in the leaf RWC. After this time, stromal volume dropped rapidly. In situ stromal Psi/sub s/ was also estimated during a stress cycle. These studies indicated that stromal Psi/sub s/ was lowered by net solute accumulation. The data presented in this report suggest that chloroplast acclimation to low Psi/sub s/ may involve stromal solute accumulation and volume maintenance during cell water loss.

  15. Electro-osmotic fluxes in multi-well electro-remediation processes.

    PubMed

    López-Vizcaíno, Rubén; Sáez, Cristina; Mena, Esperanza; Villaseñor, Jose; Cañizares, Pablo; Rodrigo, Manuel A

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, electrokinetic techniques on a laboratory scale have been studied but few applications have been assessed at full-scale. In this work, a mock-up plant with two rows of three electrodes positioned in semipermeable electrolyte wells has been used to study the electro-osmotic flux distribution. Water accumulated in the cathodic wells when an electric voltage gradient was applied between the two electrode-well rows. Likewise, slight differences in the water flux were observed depending on the position and number of electrodes used and on the voltage gradient applied. Results show that the electro-osmotic flow did not increase proportionally with the number of electrodes used. During the start-up of the study, there was an abrupt change in the current density, pH and conductivity of the soil portions closest to electrodic wells due to electrokinetic processes. These differences can be explained in terms of the complex current distributions from anode and cathode rows. PMID:22029697

  16. The use of the rapid osmotic fragility test as an additional test to diagnose canine immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Diagnosing canine immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia (IMHA) is often challenging because all currently available tests have their limitations. Dogs with IMHA often have an increased erythrocyte osmotic fragility (OF), a characteristic that is sometimes used in the diagnosis of IMHA. Since the classic osmotic fragility test (COFT) is time-consuming and requires specialized equipment, an easy and less labour-intensive rapid osmotic fragility test (ROFT) has been used in some countries, but its diagnostic value has not yet been investigated. This study aimed to evaluate erythrocyte osmotic fragility in dogs with and without IMHA, to compare results of the classic (COFT) and rapid (ROFT) test and to assess the value of the ROFT as diagnostic test for canine IMHA. Nineteen dogs with IMHA (group 1a), 21 anaemic dogs without IMHA (group 1b), 8 dogs with microcytosis (group 2), 13 hyperlipemic dogs (group 3), 10 dogs with lymphoma (group 4), 8 dogs with an infection (group 5) and 13 healthy dogs (group 6) were included. In all dogs, blood smear examination, in-saline auto-agglutination test, Coombs’ test, COFT and ROFT were performed. In the COFT, OF5, OF50 and OF90 were defined as the NaCl concentrations at which respectively 5, 50 and 90% of erythrocytes were haemolysed. Results Compared with healthy dogs, OF5 and OF50 were significantly higher in group 1a (P < 0.001) and OF5 was significantly higher in group 3 (P = 0.0266). The ROFT was positive in 17 dogs with IMHA, 10 hyperlipemic dogs, one anaemic dog without IMHA and one healthy dog. Conclusions Osmotic fragility was increased in the majority of dogs with IMHA and in dogs with hyperlipidemia, but not in dogs with microcytosis, lymphoma or an infection. Although more detailed information was obtained about the osmotic fragility by using the COFT, the COFT and ROFT gave similar results. The ROFT does not require specialized equipment, is rapid and easy to perform and can be used easily in daily

  17. Cloning and Expression Analysis of cDNAs Encoding ABA 8'-Hydroxylase in Peanut Plants in Response to Osmotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Xiao-Rong; Li, Li-Mei; Hu, Bo; Li, Ling

    2014-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) catabolism is one of the determinants of endogenous ABA levels affecting numerous aspects of plant growth and abiotic-stress responses. The major ABA catabolic pathway is triggered by ABA 8'-hydroxylation catalysed by ABA 8'-hydroxylase, the cytochrome P450 CYP707A family. In this study, the full-length cDNAs of AhCYP707A1 and AhCYP707A2 were cloned and characterized from peanut. Expression analyses showed that AhCYP707A1 and AhCYP707A2 were expressed ubiquitously in peanut roots, stems, and leaves with different transcript accumulation levels, including the higher expression of AhCYP707A1 in roots. The expression of AhCYP707A2 was significantly up-regulated by 20% PEG6000 or 250 mmol/L NaCl in peanut roots, stems, and leaves, whereas the up-regulation of AhCYP707A1 transcript level by PEG6000 or NaCl was observed only in roots instead of leaves and stems. Due to the osmotic and ionic stresses of high concentration of NaCl to plants simultaneously, low concentration of LiCl (30 mmol/L, at which concentration osmotic status of cells is not seriously affected, the toxicity of Li+ being higher than that of Na+) was used to examine whether the effect of NaCl might be related to osmotic or ionic stress. The results revealed visually the susceptibility to osmotic stress and the resistance to salt ions in peanut seedlings. The significant up-regulation of AhCYP707A1, AhCYP707A2 and AhNCED1 transcripts and endogenous ABA levels by PEG6000 or NaCl instead of LiCl, showed that the osmotic stress instead of ionic stress affected the expression of those genes and the biosynthesis of ABA in peanut. The functional expression of AhCYP707A1 cDNA in yeast showed that the microsomal fractions prepared from yeast cell expressing recombinant AhCYP707A1 protein exhibited the catalytic activity of ABA 8'-hydroxylase. These results demonstrate that the expressions of AhCYP707A1 and AhCYP707A2 play an important role in ABA catabolism in peanut, particularly in response

  18. Osmotic pressure effect on membrane fouling in a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor and its experimental verification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianrong; Zhang, Meijia; Wang, Aijun; Lin, Hongjun; Hong, Huachang; Lu, Xiaofeng

    2012-12-01

    A laboratory-scale submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAnMBR) treating sewage was used to investigate the membrane fouling mechanism. Characterization of cake layer formed on membrane surface showed that cake layer was hydrated, rich of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and negative charged with the charge density of 0.21-0.46 meq/kg MLSS. Detailed analysis revealed a new membrane fouling mechanism, osmotic pressure during cake layer filtration process due to the interception of ions. An osmotic pressure model was then developed to elaborate the existence of osmotic pressure and to estimate the contribution of osmotic pressure to membrane fouling. The calculated results showed that osmotic pressure accounted for the largest fraction of total operation pressure, indicating that osmotic pressure generated by the retained ions was one of the major mechanisms responsible for membrane fouling problem in MBRs. These findings provided a new insight into membrane fouling in MBRs. PMID:23026319

  19. Osmotic regulation of seamless tube growth.

    PubMed

    Schottenfeld-Roames, Jodi; Ghabrial, Amin S

    2013-02-01

    Most organs are composed of tubes of differing cellular architectures, including intracellular 'seamless' tubes. Two studies examining the morphogenesis of the seamless tubes formed by the excretory canal cell in Caenorhabditis elegans reveal a previously unappreciated role for osmoregulation of tubulogenesis: hyperosmotic shock recruits canalicular vesicles to the lumenal membrane to promote seamless tube growth. PMID:23377027

  20. Giant osmotic energy conversion measured in a single transmembrane boron nitride nanotube.

    PubMed

    Siria, Alessandro; Poncharal, Philippe; Biance, Anne-Laure; Fulcrand, Rémy; Blase, Xavier; Purcell, Stephen T; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2013-02-28

    New models of fluid transport are expected to emerge from the confinement of liquids at the nanoscale, with potential applications in ultrafiltration, desalination and energy conversion. Nevertheless, advancing our fundamental understanding of fluid transport on the smallest scales requires mass and ion dynamics to be ultimately characterized across an individual channel to avoid averaging over many pores. A major challenge for nanofluidics thus lies in building distinct and well-controlled nanochannels, amenable to the systematic exploration of their properties. Here we describe the fabrication and use of a hierarchical nanofluidic device made of a boron nitride nanotube that pierces an ultrathin membrane and connects two fluid reservoirs. Such a transmembrane geometry allows the detailed study of fluidic transport through a single nanotube under diverse forces, including electric fields, pressure drops and chemical gradients. Using this device, we discover very large, osmotically induced electric currents generated by salinity gradients, exceeding by two orders of magnitude their pressure-driven counterpart. We show that this result originates in the anomalously high surface charge carried by the nanotube's internal surface in water at large pH, which we independently quantify in conductance measurements. The nano-assembly route using nanostructures as building blocks opens the way to studying fluid, ionic and molecule transport on the nanoscale, and may lead to biomimetic functionalities. Our results furthermore suggest that boron nitride nanotubes could be used as membranes for osmotic power harvesting under salinity gradients. PMID:23446417

  1. Species variation in osmotic, cryoprotectant, and cooling rate tolerance in poultry, eagle, and Peregrine Falcon spermatozoa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanco, J.M.; Gee, G.; Wildt, D.E.; Donoghue, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    Potential factors influencing spermatozoa survival to cryopreservation and thawing were analyzed across a range of the following avian species: domestic chicken (Gallus domesticus), domestic turkey (Meleagris gallopavo), golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos), Bonelli's eagle (Hieraaetus fasciatus), imperial eagle (Aquila adalberti), and peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus). Studies focused on spermatozoa tolerance to the following: 1) osmotic stress, 2) different extracellular concentrations of the cryoprotectant dimethylacetamide (DMA), 3) equilibration times of 1 versus 4 h, 4) equilibration temperature of 4 versus 21 degrees C, and 5) rapid versus slow cooling before cryopreservation and standard thawing. Sperm viability was assessed with the live/dead stain (SYBR14/ propidium iodine). Sperm viability at osmolalities >/=800 mOsm was higher (P: /=2.06 M), experienced decreased (P: < 0.05) spermatozoa survival in all species, except the golden eagle and peregrine falcon. Number of surviving spermatozoa diminished progressively with increasing DMA concentrations in all species. Increased equilibration temperature (from 4 to 21 degrees C) markedly reduced (P: < 0.05) spermatozoa survival in all species except the Bonelli's eagle and turkey. Rapid cooling was detrimental (P: < 0.05) to spermatozoa from all species except the imperial eagle and the chicken. These results demonstrate that avian spermatozoa differ remarkably in response to osmotic changes, DMA concentrations, equilibration time, temperature, and survival after fast or slow freezing. These differences emphasize the need for species-specific studies in the development and enhancement of assisted breeding for poultry and endangered species.

  2. Integration of Wounding and Osmotic Stress Signals Determines the Expression of the AtMYB102 Transcription Factor Gene1

    PubMed Central

    Denekamp, Marten; Smeekens, Sjef C.

    2003-01-01

    Transcript levels of the Arabidopsis R2R3-AtMYB102 transcription factor gene, previously named AtM4, are rapidly induced by osmotic stress or abscisic acid (ABA) treatment. Reporter gene expression studies revealed that in addition, wounding is required for full induction of the gene. Histochemical analysis showed a local β-glucuronidase induction around the wounding site, especially in veins. In ABA-treated plants, wounding-induced β-glucuronidase activity could be mimicked by the wound signaling compound methyl jasmonate. In silico studies of the AtMYB102 promoter sequence and its close homolog AtMYB74 demonstrated several conserved putative stress regulatory elements such as an ABA-responsive element, its coupling element 1 (CE1), and a W box. Interestingly, further studies showed that the 5′-untranslated region is essential for the osmotic stress and wounding induced expression of the AtMYB102 gene. This 5′-untranslated region contains putative conserved regulatory elements such as a second W box and an overlapping MYB-binding element. These studies suggest that AtMYB102 expression depends on and integrates signals derived from both wounding and osmotic stress. PMID:12857823

  3. Actin localisation and the effect of cytochalasin D on the osmotic tolerance of cauda epididymidal kangaroo spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    McClean, R; MacCallum, C; Blyde, D; Holt, W; Johnston, S

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the hypothesis that filamentous actin associated with the complex cytoskeleton of the kangaroo sperm head and tail may be contributing to lack of plasma membrane plasticity and a consequent loss of membrane integrity during cryopreservation. In the first study, the distribution of G and F actin within Eastern Grey Kangaroo (EGK, Macropus giganteus) cauda epididymidal spermatozoa was successfully detected using DNAse-FITC and a monoclonal F-actin antibody (ab205, Abcam), respectively. G-actin staining was most intense in the acrosome but was also observed with less intensity over the nucleus and mid-piece. F-actin was located in the sperm nucleus but was not discernable in the acrosome or sperm tail. To investigate whether cytochalasin D (a known F-actin depolymerising agent) was capable of improving the osmotic tolerance of EGK cauda epididymal spermatozoa, sperm were incubated in hypo-osmotic media (61 and 104 mOsm) containing a range of cytochalasin D concentrations (0-200 microM). Cytochalasin D had no beneficial effect on plasma membrane integrity of sperm incubated in hypo-osmotic media. However, when EGK cauda epididymidal sperm were incubated in isosmotic media, there was a progressive loss of sperm motility with increasing cytochalasin D concentration. The results of this study indicated that the F-actin distribution in cauda epididymidal spermatozoa of the EGK was surprisingly different from that of the Tammar Wallaby (M. eugenii) and that cytochalasin-D does not appear to improve the tolerance of EGK cauda epididymidal sperm to osmotically induced injury. PMID:16990953

  4. Calcium and ascorbic acid affect cellular structure and water mobility in apple tissue during osmotic dehydration in sucrose solutions.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Maria A; Dellarosa, Nicolò; Tylewicz, Urszula; Tappi, Silvia; Laghi, Luca; Rocculi, Pietro; Rosa, Marco Dalla

    2016-03-15

    The effects of the addition of calcium lactate and ascorbic acid to sucrose osmotic solutions on cell viability and microstructure of apple tissue were studied. In addition, water distribution and mobility modification of the different cellular compartments were observed. Fluorescence microscopy, light microscopy and time domain nuclear magnetic resonance (TD-NMR) were respectively used to evaluate cell viability and microstructural changes during osmotic dehydration. Tissues treated in a sucrose-calcium lactate-ascorbic acid solution did not show viability. Calcium lactate had some effects on cell walls and membranes. Sucrose solution visibly preserved the protoplast viability and slightly influenced the water distribution within the apple tissue, as highlighted by TD-NMR, which showed higher proton intensity in the vacuoles and lower intensity in cytoplasm-free spaces compared to other treatments. The presence of ascorbic acid enhanced calcium impregnation, which was associated with permeability changes of the cellular wall and membranes. PMID:26575708

  5. Influence of TRPV4 gene polymorphisms on the development of osmotic airway hyperresponsiveness in patients with bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Naumov, D E; Kolosov, V P; Perelman, J M; Prikhodko, A G

    2016-07-01

    The effect of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) of TRPV4 gene on the development of airway hyperresponsiveness (39.7% of cases) in response to the decrease in osmolarity under inspiration of distilled water aerosol was studies in 189 patients with uncontrolled bronchial asthma. rs6606743 SNP was found to significantly contribute to the development of osmotic airway hyperresponsiveness. Analysis of the dominant genetic model revealed substantial prevalence of AG + GG genotype frequency in the group of patients with asthma with osmotic hyperresponsiveness in comparison with the patients who had negative response to bronchoprovocation. In addition, carriers of GG or AG genotypes had significantly more profound decrease of lung function parameters in relation to A homozygous patients. PMID:27599507

  6. Swelling, mechanical and friction properties of PVA/PVP hydrogels after swelling in osmotic pressure solution.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yan; Xiong, Dangsheng; Liu, Yuntong; Wang, Nan; Zhao, Xiaoduo

    2016-08-01

    The potential of polyvinyl alcohol/polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVA/PVP) hydrogels as articular cartilage replacements was in vitro evaluated by using a macromolecule-based solution to mimic the osmotic environment of cartilage tissue. The effects of osmotic pressure solution on the morphology, crystallinity, swelling, mechanical and friction properties of PVA/PVP hydrogels were investigated by swelling them in non-osmotic and osmotic pressure solutions. The results demonstrated that swelling ratio and equilibrium water content were greatly reduced by swelling in osmotic solution, and the swelling process was found to present pseudo-Fickian diffusion character. The crystallization degree of hydrogels after swelling in osmotic solution increased more significantly when it compared with that in non-osmotic solution. After swelling in osmotic solution for 28days, the compressive tangent modulus and storage modulus of hydrogels were significantly increased, and the low friction coefficient was reduced. However, after swelling in the non-osmotic solution, the compressive tangent modulus and friction coefficient of hydrogels were comparable with those of as-prepared hydrogels. The better material properties of hydrogels in vivo than in vitro evaluation demonstrated their potential application in cartilage replacement. PMID:27157740

  7. Electro-osmotic flow in bicomponent fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazarenko, Andrei; Sega, Marcello

    The electroosmotic flow (EOF) is a widely used technique that uses the action of external electric fields on solvated ions to move fluids around in microfluidics devices. For homogeneous fluids, the characteristics of the flow can be well approximated by simple analytical models, but in multicomponent systems such as oil-in-water droplets one has to rely to numerical simulations. The purpose of this study is to investigate physical properties of the EOF in a bicomponent fluid by solving the coupled equations of motions of explicit ions in interaction with a continuous model of the flow. To do so we couple the hydrodynamics equations as solved by a Shan-Chen Lattice-Boltzmann method to the molecular dynamics of the ions. The presence of explicit ions allows us to go beyond the simple Poisson-Boltzmann approximations, and investigate a variety of EOF regimes. ETN-COLLDENSE (H2020-MCSA-ITN-2014, Grant No. 642774).

  8. Tissue damage detection by osmotic surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Enyedi, Balázs; Kala, Snigdha; Nikolich-Zugich, Tijana; Niethammer, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    How tissue damage is detected to induce inflammatory responses is unclear. Most studies have focused on damage signals released by cell breakage and necrosis1. Whether tissues utilize other cues besides cell lysis to detect that they are damaged is unknown. We find that osmolarity differences between interstitial fluid and the external environment mediate rapid leukocyte recruitment to sites of tissue damage in zebrafish by activating cytosolic phospholipase a2 (cPLA2) at injury sites. cPLA2 initiates the production of non-canonical arachidonate metabolites that mediate leukocyte chemotaxis via a 5-oxo-ETE receptor (OXE-R). Thus, tissues can detect damage through direct surveillance of barrier integrity. By this mechanism, cell-swelling likely functions as a pro-inflammatory intermediate. PMID:23934216

  9. Tissue damage detection by osmotic surveillance.

    PubMed

    Enyedi, Balázs; Kala, Snigdha; Nikolich-Zugich, Tijana; Niethammer, Philipp

    2013-09-01

    How tissue damage is detected to induce inflammatory responses is unclear. Most studies have focused on damage signals released by cell breakage and necrosis. Whether tissues use other cues in addition to cell lysis to detect that they are damaged is unknown. We find that osmolarity differences between interstitial fluid and the external environment mediate rapid leukocyte recruitment to sites of tissue damage in zebrafish by activating cytosolic phospholipase a2 (cPLA2) at injury sites. cPLA2 initiates the production of non-canonical arachidonate metabolites that mediate leukocyte chemotaxis through a 5-oxo-ETE receptor (OXE-R). Thus, tissues can detect damage through direct surveillance of barrier integrity, with cell swelling probably functioning as a pro-inflammatory intermediate in the process. PMID:23934216

  10. Long term study of deoxyribozyme administration to XT-1 mRNA promotes corticospinal tract regeneration and improves behavioral outcome after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Brigitte; Pape, Daniel; Chao, Owen; Bauer, Jordana; Grimpe, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) affects approximately 3 million people around the world, who are desperately awaiting treatment. The pressing need for the development of therapeutics has spurred medical research for decades. To respond to this pressing need, our group developed a potential therapeutic to reduce the presence of proteoglycans at the injury site after acutely traumatizing the spinal cord of rats. With the aid of a DNA enzyme against the mRNA of xylosyltransferase-1 (DNAXT-1as) we adjourn the glycosylation and prevent the assembly of the proteoglycan core protein into the extracellular matrix. Hence, endogenous repair is strengthened due to the allocation of a more growth permissive environment around the lesion site. Here, we present data on a long term study of animals with a dorsal hemisection treated with DNAXT-1as, DNAXT-1mb (control DNA enzyme) or PBS via osmotic minipumps. After successful digestion of the XT-1 mRNA shown by qPCR we observed an overall behavioral improvement of DNAXT-1as treated rats at 8, 10 and 14 weeks after insult to the spine compared to the control animals. This is accompanied by the growth of the cortical spinal tract (CST) in DNAXT-1as treated animals after a 19 week survival period. Furthermore, after evaluating the lesion size tissue-protective effects in the DNAXT-1as treated animals compared to DNAXT-1mb and PBS treated rats are revealed. The results yield new insights into the regeneration processes and provide confirmation to involve DNA enzyme administration in future therapeutic strategies to medicate SCI. PMID:26428904

  11. Slow and steady cell shrinkage reduces osmotic stress in bovine and murine oocyte and zygote vitrification

    PubMed Central

    Lai, D.; Ding, J.; Smith, G.W.; Smith, G.D.; Takayama, S.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Does the use of a new cryoprotectant agent (CPA) exchange protocol designed to minimize osmotic stress improve oocyte or zygote vitrification by reducing sublethal cryodamage? SUMMARY ANSWER The use of a new CPA exchange protocol made possible by automated microfluidics improved oocyte and zygote vitrification with superior morphology as indicated by a smoother cell surface, higher sphericity, higher cytoplasmic lipid retention, less cytoplasmic leakage and higher developmental competence compared with conventional methods. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY The use of more ‘steps’ of CPA exposure during the vitrification protocol increases cryosurvival and development in the bovine model. However, such an attempt to eliminate osmotic stress is limited by the practicality of performing numerous precise pipetting steps in a short amount of time. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION Murine meiotically competent germinal vesicle intact oocytes and zygotes were harvested from the antral follicles in ovaries and ampulla, respectively. Bovine ovaries were obtained from a local abattoir at random stages of the estrous cycle. A total of 110 murine oocytes, 802 murine zygotes and 52 bovine oocytes were used in this study. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Microfluidic devices were fabricated using conventional photo- and soft-lithography. CPAs used were 7.5% ethylene glycol (EG) and 7.5% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for equilibration solution and 15% EG, 15% DMSO and 0.5 M sucrose for vitrification solution. End-point analyses include mathematical modeling using Kedem–Katchalsky equations, morphometrics assessed by conventional and confocal microscopy, cytoplasmic lipid quantification by nile red staining, cytoplasmic leakage quantification by fluorescent dextran intercalation and developmental competence analysis by 96 h embryo culture and blastomere quantification. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE The automated microfluidics protocol decreased the shrinkage rate of

  12. Oscillatory phase separation in giant lipid vesicles induced by transmembrane osmotic differentials

    PubMed Central

    Oglęcka, Kamila; Rangamani, Padmini; Liedberg, Bo; Kraut, Rachel S; Parikh, Atul N

    2014-01-01

    Giant lipid vesicles are closed compartments consisting of semi-permeable shells, which isolate femto- to pico-liter quantities of aqueous core from the bulk. Although water permeates readily across vesicular walls, passive permeation of solutes is hindered. In this study, we show that, when subject to a hypotonic bath, giant vesicles consisting of phase separating lipid mixtures undergo osmotic relaxation exhibiting damped oscillations in phase behavior, which is synchronized with swell–burst lytic cycles: in the swelled state, osmotic pressure and elevated membrane tension due to the influx of water promote domain formation. During bursting, solute leakage through transient pores relaxes the pressure and tension, replacing the domain texture by a uniform one. This isothermal phase transition—resulting from a well-coordinated sequence of mechanochemical events—suggests a complex emergent behavior allowing synthetic vesicles produced from simple components, namely, water, osmolytes, and lipids to sense and regulate their micro-environment. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03695.001 PMID:25318069

  13. Proteomic analysis of cross protection provided between cold and osmotic stress in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Pittman, Joseph R; Buntyn, Joe O; Posadas, Gabriel; Nanduri, Bindu; Pendarvis, Ken; Donaldson, Janet R

    2014-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive, foodborne pathogen responsible for approximately 28% of all food-related deaths each year in the United States. L. monocytogenes infections are linked to the consumption of minimally processed ready-to-eat (RTE) products such as cheese, deli meats, and cold-smoked finfish products. L. monocytogenes is resistant to stresses commonly encountered in the food-processing environment, including low pH, high salinity, oxygen content, and various temperatures. The purpose of this study was to determine if cells habituated at low temperatures would result in cross-protective effects against osmotic stress. We found that cells exposed to refrigerated temperatures prior to a mild salt stress treatment had increased survival in NaCl concentrations of 3%. Additionally, the longer the cells were pre-exposed to cold temperatures, the greater the increase in survival in 3% NaCl. A proteomics analysis was performed in triplicate in order to elucidate mechanisms involved in cold-stress induced cross protection against osmotic stress. Proteins involved in maintenance of the cell wall and cellular processes, such as penicillin binding proteins and osmolyte transporters, and processes involving amino acid metabolism, such as osmolyte synthesis, transport, and lipid biosynthesis, had the greatest increase in expression when cells were exposed to cold temperatures prior to salt. By gaining a better understanding of how this pathogen adapts physiologically to various environmental conditions, improvements can be made in detection and mitigation strategies. PMID:24564473

  14. Preservation of Supported Lipid Membrane Integrity from Thermal Disruption: Osmotic Effect.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tao; Jiang, Zhongying; Ma, Yuqiang; Hu, Yong

    2016-03-01

    Preservation of structural integrity under various environmental conditions is one major concern in the development of the supported lipid membrane (SLM)-based devices. It is common for SLMs to experience temperature shifts from manufacture, processing, storage, and transport to operation. In this work, we studied the thermal adaption of the supported membranes on silica substrates. Homogenous SLMs with little defects were formed through the vesicle fusion method. The mass and fluidity of the bilayers were found to deteriorate from a heating process but not a cooling process. Fluorescence characterizations showed that the membranes initially budded as a result of heating-induced lipid lateral area expansion, followed by the possible fates including maintenance, retraction, and fission, among which the last contributes to the irreversible compromise of the SLM integrity and spontaneous release of the interlipid stress accumulated. Based on the mechanism, we developed a strategy to protect SLMs from thermal disruption by increasing the solute concentration in medium. An improved preservation of the membrane mass and fluidity against the heating process was observed, accompanied by a decrease in the retraction and fission of the buds. Theoretical analysis revealed a high osmotic energy penalty for the fission, which accounts for the depressed disruption. This osmotic-based protection strategy is facile, solute nonspecific, and long-term efficient and has little impact on the original SLM properties. The results may help broaden SLM applications and sustain the robustness of SLM-based devices under multiple thermal conditions. PMID:26886864

  15. Effects of Osmotic Stress on the Probability of Stretch-Induced Cardiac Arrhythmias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Kk; Taylor, Lk; Wray, Cj; Wikswo, Jp; Hansen, De

    1997-11-01

    Ion channels within the plasma membrane of ventricular myocardial cells may relieve cytoskeletal and membrane mechanical stresses. Volume control channels modulate intracellular volume. Stretch-activated channels have a critical role in the initiation of stretch-induced arrhythmias (SIA) and may provide an additional pathway for Ca++ influx that modulates contractility. We tested the hypothesis that the mechanisms by which these two types of channels sense mechanical stresses are similiar. We studied the arrhythmogenic effects of mechanical stretch in six Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts in which we altered osmotic pressure across the cell membranes. In diastole, the volume was transiently increased in a left ventricular intracavitary fluid- filled ballon, which was connected to a computer-controlled piston pump. Epicardial monophasic action potential recordings showed a marked decrease in the probability of SIA during hypotonic conditions (cells swollen) (from P=0.51 to P=0.06,p=0.009), and contractility (max systolic pressure) decreased (from 51.1 to 19.6 mmHg, p=0.007). Upon return to the isotonic condition, the probability of SIA returned to baseline condition. One explanation for these findings is that stress relaxation of the viscoelastic cytoskeleton during sustained osmotic loading reduces arrhythmogenic effects of elastic loading produced by transient diastolic stretch.

  16. Controlling the extent of viral genome release by a combination of osmotic stress and polyvalent cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yan; Knobler, Charles M.; Gelbart, William M.

    2015-08-01

    While several in vitro experiments on viral genome release have specifically studied the effects of external osmotic pressure and of the presence of polyvalent cations on the ejection of DNA from bacteriophages, few have systematically investigated how the extent of ejection is controlled by a combination of these effects. In this work we quantify the effect of osmotic pressure on the extent of DNA ejection from bacteriophage lambda as a function of polyvalent cation concentration (in particular, the tetravalent polyamine spermine). We find that the pressure required to completely inhibit ejection decreases from 38 to 17 atm as the spermine concentration is increased from 0 to 1.5 mM. Further, incubation of the phage particles in spermine concentrations as low as 0.15 mM—the threshold for DNA condensation in bulk solution—is sufficient to significantly limit the extent of ejection in the absence of osmolyte; for spermine concentrations below this threshold, the ejection is complete. In accord with recent investigations on the packaging of DNA in the presence of a condensing agent, we observe that the self-attraction induced by the polyvalent cation affects the ordering of the genome, causing it to get stuck in a broad range of nonequilibrated structures.

  17. Combined device for measuring of osmotic pressure, conductance, surface tension, and viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, M.

    2010-12-01

    Micro and multipurpose analytical tools are in high demand for procuring physicochemical data. Thereby conductance and specific conductance (κ), surface tension (γ) and viscosity (η) of 0.066 to 0.333 mol/kg urea and methylurea, the osmotic pressure (π) for 0.1 to 1.0 mol/kg sucrose with 0.01 mmol/kg aqueous KCl solutions simultaneously were studied with oscosurvismeter. The solutions of different compositions were taken in cells, partitioned by nitrocellulose semipermeable membrane (SPM) for osmotic pressure. Survismeter, osmometer, electrodes, metallic clamp, SPM and high potential metallic springs are key parts of the oscosurvismeter. The conductance data were in close agreement with those of Horiba Conductivity Meter DS-8 M, surface tension data with that of face automatic surface tensiometer, CBVP-Z, Kyowa Interface Science Co. Ltd., viscosity data with survismeter, Spectro Analytical Pvt Ltd. The conductance and viscosities for methylurea are higher than those of the urea with comparatively stronger hydrophobic interaction of the -CH3 group of the methylurea. Statistical analysis of cost involved with oscosurvismeter was 99% less as compared with individual methods.

  18. Controlling the extent of viral genome release by a combination of osmotic stress and polyvalent cations.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yan; Knobler, Charles M; Gelbart, William M

    2015-08-01

    While several in vitro experiments on viral genome release have specifically studied the effects of external osmotic pressure and of the presence of polyvalent cations on the ejection of DNA from bacteriophages, few have systematically investigated how the extent of ejection is controlled by a combination of these effects. In this work we quantify the effect of osmotic pressure on the extent of DNA ejection from bacteriophage lambda as a function of polyvalent cation concentration (in particular, the tetravalent polyamine spermine). We find that the pressure required to completely inhibit ejection decreases from 38 to 17 atm as the spermine concentration is increased from 0 to 1.5 mM. Further, incubation of the phage particles in spermine concentrations as low as 0.15 mM--the threshold for DNA condensation in bulk solution-is sufficient to significantly limit the extent of ejection in the absence of osmolyte; for spermine concentrations below this threshold, the ejection is complete. In accord with recent investigations on the packaging of DNA in the presence of a condensing agent, we observe that the self-attraction induced by the polyvalent cation affects the ordering of the genome, causing it to get stuck in a broad range of nonequilibrated structures. PMID:26382433

  19. Kinetics of apple polyphenol diffusion in solutions with different osmotic strengths.

    PubMed

    Kebe, M; Renard, C M C G; Amani, G N G; Maingonnat, J-F

    2014-10-01

    Fruits contain polyphenols, widespread antioxidants beneficial for human health. Their mass transfer was studied during the leaching of apple slices immersed in mannitol solutions with ranging concentrations (0, 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 M). The solution of Fick's law for unsteady mass transfer in planar configuration was used to calculate apparent diffusivity (De). Polyphenols were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography for each immersion time. Leaching from raw apple tissues occurred only when cell integrity was lost, here at a certain level of difference in osmotic pressure. Different diffusivity values were found in the two apple varieties. Values of De either decreased from 0.2 to 0.1 × 10(-9) and 0.2 × 10(-9) m(2) s(-1) for Golden Delicious and Granny Smith, respectively, or were not determined when the mannitol concentration increased from 0 to 0.6 M. The osmotic strength of the solution strongly impacted the leaching rate of polyphenols from apple cells. The structure of the polyphenols also affected De, with low values for procyanidins. PMID:25213754

  20. The osmotic behaviour of toad skin epithelium (Bufo viridis). an electron microprobe analysis.

    PubMed

    Rick, R; Dörge, A; Katz, U; Bauer, R; Thurau, K

    1980-05-01

    The effect of saline adaptation on the intracellular Na, K, Cl, P concentrations and dry weight content of the toad skin epithelium (Bufo viridis) was studied using the technique of electron microprobe analysis. The measurements were performed on isolated abdominal skins either directly after dissection or after additional incubation in Ussing-type chambers. Adaptations of the toads to increasing NaCl concentrations for 7 days resulted in increased blood plasma osmolarity and a parallel increase in the cellular electrolyte, P and dry weight concentrations of the epithelium, the K increase representing the most significant fraction of the intracellular osmolarity increase. No evidence was obtained to show that the nucleus and cytoplasm reacted differently from each other and all living epithelial cell types basically showed the same response. Incubation of the isolated skins under control conditions showed a drastic inhibition of the transepithelial Na transport after adaptation to high salinities. In spite of the large variations in the transport rate almost identical intracellular electrolyte concentrations were observed. In tap water adapted toads the average cellular concentrations were 8.8 mmole/kg wet weight for Na, 109.6 for K, 41.5 for Cl, and 135.3 for P, respectively. Incubation of the skin with Ringer's solution of different osmolarities demonstrated that the epithelial cells are in osmotic equilibrium with the inner bathing solution. The results are consistent with the view that the osmotic adaptation is mainly accomplished by the movement of water. PMID:7191092

  1. Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of the unstirred layer in the osmotically driven flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Keito; Itano, Tomoaki; Seki, Masako

    2015-11-01

    We studied the solvent flows driven by the osmotic pressure difference across the semi-permeable membrane. The flow penetrating from the low concentration side transports away solutes adjacent of the membrane, so that the concentration is reduced significantly only at the vicinity of the membrane. It is expected that the relatively low solute concentration develops into a thin boundary layer in the vicinity of the membrane in the case of absence of external stirring process, which is termed as un-stirred layer (USL). To investigate concentration distribution in USL, we carried out non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The flows driven by th osmotic pressure are idealized as 2 dimensional hard disk model, which is composed of solvent and solute molecules. The membrane is modeled as a medium composed of stationary parallel rods distributed by a spatial interval, which is less than the diameter of the solute molecules. The following results were obtained from the numerical simulation. First, the thickness of USL, which was estimated from the obtained concentration distribution, is on the order of a length determined by mean free path. Second, USL was semicircle the center of which is on the end of pore of membrane.

  2. Osmotically driven membrane process for the management of urban runoff in coastal regions.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenyu; Valladares Linares, Rodrigo; Abu-Ghdaib, Muhannad; Zhan, Tong; Yangali-Quintanilla, Victor; Amy, Gary

    2014-01-01

    An osmotic detention pond was proposed for the management of urban runoff in coastal regions. Forward osmosis was employed as a bridge to utilize natural osmotic energy from seawater for concentrating and reusing urban runoff water, and as a barrier to reject runoff-derived contaminants. The process was demonstrated by a lab scale testing using synthetic urban runoff (as the feed solution) and synthetic seawater (as the draw solution). The submerged forward osmosis process was conducted under neutral, acidic and natural organic matter fouling condition, respectively. Forward osmosis flux decline was mainly attributed to the dilution of seawater during a semi-batch process in lab scale testing. However, it is possible to minimize flux decrease by maintaining a constant salinity at the draw solution side. Various changes in urban runoff water quality, including acidic conditions (acid rain) and natural organic matter presence, did not show significant effects on the rejection of trace metals and phosphorus, but influenced salt leakage and the rejection of nitrate and total nitrogen. Rejection of trace metals varied from 98% to 100%, phosphorus varied from 97% to 100, nitrate varied from 52% to 94% and total nitrogen varied from 65% to 85% under different feed water conditions. The work described in this study contributes to an integrated system of urban runoff management, seawater desalination and possible power generation in coastal regions to achieve a sustainable solution to the water-energy nexus. PMID:24099852

  3. Electro-osmotic-based catholyte production by Microbial Fuel Cells for carbon capture.

    PubMed

    Gajda, Iwona; Greenman, John; Melhuish, Chris; Santoro, Carlo; Li, Baikun; Cristiani, Pierangela; Ieropoulos, Ioannis

    2015-12-01

    In Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs), the recovery of water can be achieved with the help of both active (electro-osmosis), and passive (osmosis) transport pathways of electrolyte through the semi-permeable selective separator. The electrical current-dependent transport, results in cations and electro-osmotically dragged water molecules reaching the cathode. The present study reports on the production of catholyte on the surface of the cathode, which was achieved as a direct result of electricity generation using MFCs fed with wastewater, and employing Pt-free carbon based cathode electrodes. The highest pH levels (>13) of produced liquid were achieved by the MFCs with the activated carbon cathodes producing the highest power (309 μW). Caustic catholyte formation is presented in the context of beneficial cathode flooding and transport mechanisms, in an attempt to understand the effects of active and passive diffusion. Active transport was dominant under closed circuit conditions and showed a linear correlation with power performance, whereas osmotic (passive) transport was governing the passive flux of liquid in open circuit conditions. Caustic catholyte was mineralised to a mixture of carbonate and bicarbonate salts (trona) thus demonstrating an active carbon capture mechanism as a result of the MFC energy-generating performance. Carbon capture would be valuable for establishing a carbon negative economy and environmental sustainability of the wastewater treatment process. PMID:26343045

  4. Analyzing the effects of mechanical and osmotic loading on glycosaminoglycan synthesis rate in cartilaginous tissues.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xin; Zhu, Qiaoqiao; Gu, Weiyong

    2015-02-26

    The glycosaminoglycan (GAG) plays an important role in cartilaginous tissues to support and transmit mechanical loads. Many extracellular biophysical stimuli could affect GAG synthesis by cells. It has been hypothesized that the change of cell volume is a primary mechanism for cells to perceive the stimuli. Experimental studies have shown that the maximum synthesis rate of GAG is achieved at an optimal cell volume, larger or smaller than this level the GAG synthesis rate decreases. Based on the hypothesis and experimental findings in the literature, we proposed a mathematical model to quantitatively describe the cell volume dependent GAG synthesis rate in the cartilaginous tissues. Using this model, we investigated the effects of osmotic loading and mechanical loading on GAG synthesis rate. It is found our proposed mathematical model is able to well describe the change of GAG synthesis rate in isolated cells or in cartilage with variations of the osmotic loading or mechanical loading. This model is important for evaluating the GAG synthesis activity within cartilaginous tissues as well as understanding the role of mechanical loading in tissue growth or degeneration. It is also important for designing a bioreactor system with proper extracellular environment or mechanical loading for growing tissue at the maximum synthesis rate of the extracellular matrix. PMID:25638034

  5. Distinct patterns of cell motion inside a micro-channel under different osmotic conditions.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chia-Hung Dylan; Kaneko, Makoto; Sakuma, Shinya; Arai, Fumihito

    2013-01-01

    The effect of osmotic condition on a living cell inside a micro-channel is firstly studied in this work. By utilizing a high-speed camera, we observed distinct patterns of cell motion under different osmotic conditions, which are established by saline with different concentrations of sodium chloride (NaCl). The cell motions are tracked by a computer, and are presented by the coordinates of location and time (x-t chart). The motions of cells under hypotonic condition (NaCl% < 0.9%) are convex curves on the chart while the ones under isotonic and hypertonic conditions (NaCl% ≥ 0.9%) are concave curves. Since saline is widely used in both medical practices and cell-related researches, our results point out two important facts: 1) Cells are sensitive to the percentage of NaCl. One percent difference in overall concentration makes dramatic changes in cell characteristics, such as cell stiffness. 2) The micro-channel method can clearly tell the difference between hypotonic, isotonic and hypertonic conditions according to the pattern of cell motion. Interpretations of the phenomena from different perspectives are also discussed in this paper. PMID:24110988

  6. Effect of medium osmotic potential on callus induction and shoot regeneration in flax anther culture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yurong; Dribnenki, Paul

    2004-11-01

    Development of an efficient and cost-effective doubled haploid production system in flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) is the prerequisite for the application of doubled haploid technology in a practical breeding program. Pre-culture of anthers on a medium containing 15% sucrose for 2-7 days before transfer to the same medium containing 6% sucrose for a total of 28 days culture period significantly increased shoot regeneration for all four genotypes evaluated. Moreover, pre-culture of anthers on medium containing 15% sucrose for 2-7 days was sufficient to dramatically reduce the frequency of shoot regeneration from somatic tissues and thereby to increase the frequency of microspore-derived plants in flax anther culture. Furthermore, replacing 15% sucrose with 6% sucrose and 9% polyethylene glycol (PEG), or 3% sucrose and 12% PEG, in pre-culture medium did not significantly affect callus induction and shoot regeneration. The results indicate that sucrose may act as carbon/energy source as well as an osmotic regulator in flax anther culture. Sucrose as an osmotic regulator may be replaced by a non-metabolizable osmoticum: PEG. The implication of this study in flax anther culture and breeding is discussed. PMID:15235814

  7. Effect of sulphur deprivation on osmotic potential components and nitrogen metabolism in oilseed rape leaves: identification of a new early indicator.

    PubMed

    Sorin, Elise; Etienne, Philippe; Maillard, Anne; Zamarreño, Angel-Mari; Garcia-Mina, José-Maria; Arkoun, Mustapha; Jamois, Frank; Cruz, Florence; Yvin, Jean-Claude; Ourry, Alain

    2015-10-01

    Identification of early sulphur (S) deficiency indicators is important for species such as Brassica napus, an S-demanding crop in which yield and the nutritional quality of seeds are negatively affected by S deficiency. Because S is mostly stored as SO4 (2-) in leaf cell vacuoles and can be mobilized during S deficiency, this study investigated the impact of S deprivation on leaf osmotic potential in order to identify compensation processes. Plants were exposed for 28 days to S or to chlorine deprivation in order to differentiate osmotic and metabolic responses. While chlorine deprivation had no significant effects on growth, osmotic potential and nitrogen metabolism, Brassica napus revealed two response periods to S deprivation. The first one occurred during the first 13 days during which plant growth was maintained as a result of vacuolar SO4 (2-) mobilization. In the meantime, leaf osmotic potential of S-deprived plants remained similar to control plants despite a reduction in the SO4 (2-) osmotic contribution, which was fully compensated by an increase in NO3 (-), PO4 (3-) and Cl(-) accumulation. The second response occurred after 13 days of S deprivation with a significant reduction in growth, leaf osmotic potential, NO3 (-) uptake and NO3 (-) reductase activity, whereas amino acids and NO3 (-) were accumulated. This kinetic analysis of S deprivation suggested that a ([Cl(-)]+[NO3 (-)]+[PO4 (3-)]):[SO4 (2-)] ratio could provide a relevant indicator of S deficiency, modified nearly as early as the over-expression of genes encoding SO4 (2-) tonoplastic or plasmalemmal transporters, with the added advantage that it can be easily quantified under field conditions. PMID:26139826

  8. Hydrostatic and osmotic pressure activated channel in plant vacuole

    PubMed Central

    Alexandre, Joel; Lassalles, Jean-Paul

    1991-01-01

    The vacuolar membrane of red beet vacuoles contains a channel which was not gated by voltage or Ca2+ ions. Its unit conductance was 20 pS in 200 mM symmetrical KCl solutions. It was stretch activated: the conductance remained constant but the probability of opening was increased by suction or pressure applied to a membrane patch. A 1.5-kNm-2 suction applied to isolated patches or a 0.08-kNm-2 pressure applied to a 45-μm diameter vacuole induced an e-fold change in the mean current. A 75% inhibition of the channel current was obtained with 10 μM Gd3+ on the cytoplasmic side. The channel was more permeable for K+ than for Cl- (PK/PCl ∼ 3). A possible clustering for this channel was suggested by the recordings of the patch current. The channel properties were not significantly affected by a change in sorbitol osmolality in the solutions under isoosmotic conditions, between 0.6 and 1 mol/kg sorbitol. However, the channel was very sensitive to an osmotic gradient. A 0.2-mol/kg sorbitol gradient induced a two-fold increase in unit conductance and a thirty-fold increase in the mean patch current of the channel. A current was measured, when the osmotic gradient was the only driving force applied to the vacuolar membrane. The hydrostatic and osmotic pressure (HOP) activated channel described in this paper could be gated in vivo condition by a change in osmolality, without the need of a change in the turgor pressure in the cell. The HOP channel represents a possible example of an osmoreceptor for plant cells. PMID:19431814

  9. An Osmotic Model of the Growing Pollen Tube

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Adrian E.; Shachar-Hill, Bruria; Skepper, Jeremy N.; Powell, Janet; Shachar-Hill, Yair

    2012-01-01

    Pollen tube growth is central to the sexual reproduction of plants and is a longstanding model for cellular tip growth. For rapid tip growth, cell wall deposition and hardening must balance the rate of osmotic water uptake, and this involves the control of turgor pressure. Pressure contributes directly to both the driving force for water entry and tip expansion causing thinning of wall material. Understanding tip growth requires an analysis of the coordination of these processes and their regulation. Here we develop a quantitative physiological model which includes water entry by osmosis, the incorporation of cell wall material and the spreading of that material as a film at the tip. Parameters of the model have been determined from the literature and from measurements, by light, confocal and electron microscopy, together with results from experiments made on dye entry and plasmolysis in Lilium longiflorum. The model yields values of variables such as osmotic and turgor pressure, growth rates and wall thickness. The model and its predictive capacity were tested by comparing programmed simulations with experimental observations following perturbations of the growth medium. The model explains the role of turgor pressure and its observed constancy during oscillations; the stability of wall thickness under different conditions, without which the cell would burst; and some surprising properties such as the need for restricting osmotic permeability to a constant area near the tip, which was experimentally confirmed. To achieve both constancy of pressure and wall thickness under the range of conditions observed in steady-state growth the model reveals the need for a sensor that detects the driving potential for water entry and controls the deposition rate of wall material at the tip. PMID:22615784

  10. Toxic and osmotic effects of glycerol on human granulocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Armitage, W.J.; Mazur, P.

    1984-11-01

    Human granulocytes are damaged by exposure to concentrations of glycerol as low as 0.5 M. We therefore investigated the addition of glycerol to granulocytes and its subsequent dilution under various conditions to try to distinguish between toxic and harmful osmotic effects of glycerol. The lesion caused by glycerol at 0/sup 0/C was expressed as a loss of plasma membrane integrity (as visualized by fluorescein diacetate) only after incubation (greater than or equal to1 h) at 37/sup 0/C. This damage was not ameliorated when osmotic stress was lessened by reducing the rates of addition and dilution of glycerol to keep the computed cell volume within 80-170% of isotonic cell volume. However, when osmotic stress was reduced further by increasing the temperature of addition and dilution of glycerol from 0/sup 0/ to 22/sup 0/C, the tolerance of the cells to 1 M glycerol increased somewhat. Reducing exposure to glycerol to 3 min or less at 0/sup 0/C greatly increased survival, but this time was too short to allow glycerol to equilibrate intracellularly. Finally, the presence of extra impermeant solute (NaCl or sucrose) in the medium to reduce the equilibrium cell volume to 60% of isotonic cell volume enabled granulocytes to survive 30-min exposure to 1 M glycerol at 0/sup 0/C, but cells had to remain shrunken during the 37/sup 0/C incubation to prevent the loss of membrane integrity. Suspensions that contained damaged granulocytes formed aggregates when incubated at 37/sup 0/C, and these aggregates were responsible for a major fraction of the observed loss in viability.

  11. An osmotic model of the growing pollen tube.

    PubMed

    Hill, Adrian E; Shachar-Hill, Bruria; Skepper, Jeremy N; Powell, Janet; Shachar-Hill, Yair

    2012-01-01

    Pollen tube growth is central to the sexual reproduction of plants and is a longstanding model for cellular tip growth. For rapid tip growth, cell wall deposition and hardening must balance the rate of osmotic water uptake, and this involves the control of turgor pressure. Pressure contributes directly to both the driving force for water entry and tip expansion causing thinning of wall material. Understanding tip growth requires an analysis of the coordination of these processes and their regulation. Here we develop a quantitative physiological model which includes water entry by osmosis, the incorporation of cell wall material and the spreading of that material as a film at the tip. Parameters of the model have been determined from the literature and from measurements, by light, confocal and electron microscopy, together with results from experiments made on dye entry and plasmolysis in Lilium longiflorum. The model yields values of variables such as osmotic and turgor pressure, growth rates and wall thickness. The model and its predictive capacity were tested by comparing programmed simulations with experimental observations following perturbations of the growth medium. The model explains the role of turgor pressure and its observed constancy during oscillations; the stability of wall thickness under different conditions, without which the cell would burst; and some surprising properties such as the need for restricting osmotic permeability to a constant area near the tip, which was experimentally confirmed. To achieve both constancy of pressure and wall thickness under the range of conditions observed in steady-state growth the model reveals the need for a sensor that detects the driving potential for water entry and controls the deposition rate of wall material at the tip. PMID:22615784

  12. SIRT1 contributes to aldose reductase expression through modulating NFAT5 under osmotic stress: In vitro and in silico insights.

    PubMed

    Timucin, Ahmet Can; Bodur, Cagri; Basaga, Huveyda

    2015-11-01

    So far, a myriad of molecules were characterized to modulate NFAT5 and its downstream targets. Among these NFAT5 modifiers, SIRT1 was proposed to have a promising role in NFAT5 dependent events, yet the exact underlying mechanism still remains obscure. Hence, the link between SIRT1 and NFAT5-aldose reductase (AR) axis under osmotic stress, was aimed to be delineated in this study. A unique osmotic stress model was generated and its mechanistic components were deciphered in U937 monocytes. In this model, AR expression and nuclear NFAT5 stabilization were revealed to be positively regulated by SIRT1 through utilization of pharmacological modulators. Overexpression and co-transfection studies of NFAT5 and SIRT1 further validated the contribution of SIRT1 to AR and NFAT5. The involvement of SIRT1 activity in these events was mediated via modification of DNA binding of NFAT5 to AR ORE region. Besides, NFAT5 and SIRT1 were also shown to co-immunoprecipitate under isosmotic conditions and this interaction was disrupted by osmotic stress. Further in silico experiments were conducted to investigate if SIRT1 directly targets NFAT5. In this regard, certain lysine residues of NFAT5, when kept deacetylated, were found to contribute to its DNA binding and SIRT1 was shown to directly bind K282 of NFAT5. Based on these in vitro and in silico findings, SIRT1 was identified, for the first time, as a novel positive regulator of NFAT5 dependent AR expression under osmotic stress in U937 monocytes. PMID:26297866

  13. Sensitivity of Hematocrit to Osmotic Effects Induced by Changes in Dialysate Conductivity: Implications for Relative Blood Volume Measurement and Control.

    PubMed

    Schneditz, Daniel; Schilcher, Gernot; Ribitsch, Werner; Zierler, Edda; Jantscher, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Hemodialysis is accompanied by osmotic perturbations with distinct effects on red blood cell, plasma, and blood volumes. A series of in vitro studies was done to analyze the separate effect on cell volume. Whole porcine blood was circulated through an extracorporeal circulation maintaining a constant blood volume. Hemoconcentration was continuously measured by established optical and ultrasonic online techniques. Osmotic perturbation was performed by variation of dialysate conductivity within the clinical range of 13-15 mS/cm. Blood samples were analyzed using a microcentrifuge and a standard cell counter. As dialysate conductivity increased, centrifuge hematocrit (in %) decreased with a slope of -1.91% per unit of conductivity in mS/cm (r2 = 0.98). At the same time, Coulter-Counter hematocrit slightly decreased only by -0.18% (r2 = 0.53), while optical and ultrasonic hematocrit showed a small increase by 0.44% (r2 = 0.97) and 0.69% (r2 = 0.94) per unit of conductivity in mS/cm. The sensitivity to osmotic perturbation is consistent with theory and with specific characteristics of measuring techniques used in this study. The differences, however, need to be considered when comparing measurements obtained by different techniques. Finally, devices used for relative blood volume measurement in hemodialysis should be insensitive to osmosis-induced changes in red blood cell volume. PMID:24561459

  14. Mucoadhesive elementary osmotic pump tablets of trimetazidine for controlled drug delivery and reduced variability in oral bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Alam, Naushad; Beg, Sarwar; Rizwan, Mohammad; Ahmad, Akifa; Ahmad, Farhan Jalees; Ali, Asgar; Aqil, Mohammad

    2015-04-01

    The objectives of this work was preparation and evaluation of the mucoadhesive elementary osmotic pump tablets of trimetazidine hydrochloride to achieve desired controlled release action and augmentation of oral drug absorption. The drug-loaded core tablets were prepared employing the suitable tableting excipients and coated with polymeric blend of ethyl cellulose and hydroxypropyl methylethylcellulose E5 (4:1). The prepared tablets were characterized for various quality control tests and in vitro drug release. Evaluation of drug release kinetics through model fitting suggested the Fickian mechanism of drug release, which was regulated by osmosis and diffusion as the predominant mechanism. Evaluation of mucoadhesion property using texture analyzer suggested good mucoadhesion potential of the developed osmotic systems. Solid state characterization using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and powder X-ray diffraction spectroscopy confirmed the absence of any physiochemical incompatibilities between drug and excipients. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed the smooth surface appearance of the coated tablets with intact polymeric membrane without any fracture. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies in rabbits revealed 3.01-fold enhancement in the oral bioavailability vis-à-vis the marketed formulation (Vastarel MR®). These studies successfully demonstrate the bioavailability enhancement potential of the mucoadhesive elementary osmotic pumps as novel therapeutic systems for other drugs too. PMID:24669975

  15. Functional and population genomic divergence within and between two species of killifish adapted to different osmotic niches.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Genevieve M; Brennan, Reid S; Berdan, Emma L; Fuller, Rebecca C; Whitehead, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Adaptation to salinity affects species distributions, promotes speciation, and guides many evolutionary patterns in fishes. To uncover the basis of a complex trait like osmoregulation, genome-level analyses are sensible. We combine population genomic scans with genome expression profiling to discover candidate genes and pathways associated with divergence between osmotic environments. We compared transcriptome sequence divergence between multiple freshwater and saltwater populations of the rainwater killifish, Lucania parva. We also compared sequence divergence between L. parva and its sister species, Lucania goodei, a freshwater specialist. We found highly differentiated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between freshwater and saltwater L. parva populations in cell junction and ion transport genes, including V-type H(+) ATPase. Between species, we found divergence in reproduction and osmotic stress genes. Genes that were differentially expressed between species during osmotic acclimation included genes involved in ion transport and cell volume regulation. Gene sets that were divergent in coding sequence and divergent in expression did not overlap, although they did converge in function. Like many studies using genomic scans, our approach may miss some loci that contribute to adaptation but have complicated patterns of allelic variation. Our study suggests that gene expression and coding sequence may evolve independently as populations adapt to a complex physiological challenge. PMID:24134703

  16. Plasticity of vulnerability to leaf hydraulic dysfunction during acclimation to drought in grapevines: an osmotic-mediated process.

    PubMed

    Martorell, Sebastian; Medrano, Hipolito; Tomàs, Magdalena; Escalona, José M; Flexas, Jaume; Diaz-Espejo, Antonio

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies have reported correlation of leaf hydraulic vulnerability with pressure-volume parameters related to cell turgor. This link has been explained on the basis of the effects of turgor on connectivity among cells and tissue structural integrity, which affect leaf water transport. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that osmotic adjustment to water stress would shift the leaf vulnerability curve toward more negative water potential (Ψ leaf ) by increasing turgor at low Ψ leaf . We measured leaf hydraulic conductance (K leaf ), K leaf vulnerability [50 and 80% loss of K leaf (P50 and P80 ); |Ψ leaf | at 50 and 80% loss of K leaf , respectively), bulk leaf water relations, leaf gas exchange and sap flow in two Vitis vinifera cultivars (Tempranillo and Grenache), under two water treatments. We found that P50 , P80 and maximum K leaf decreased seasonally by more than 20% in both cultivars and watering treatments. However, K leaf at 2 MPa increased threefold, while osmotic potential at full turgor and turgor loss point decreased. Our results indicate that leaf resistance to hydraulic dysfunction is seasonally plastic, and this plasticity may be mediated by osmotic adjustment. PMID:25132228

  17. The osmotic tissue expander: a three-year clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Obdeijn, Miryam C; Nicolai, Jean-Philippe A; Werker, Paul M N

    2009-09-01

    Closure of defects after trauma or excision of neoplasms is a basic skill in plastic surgery. Local, regional and distant flaps lead to additional scars. Skin recruitment by serial excision or skin expansion is a less damaging option for defects that must be closed. Advantages of tissue expansion include good colour and texture match. Disadvantages are the need for a second operation, use of an implant with the attendant risk of infection, time needed for inflation of the device, repeat visits to the clinic, and punctures to inflate the expander. To overcome the last disadvantage, an osmotic expander was developed in Germany in 1999 by OSMED GmbH (Ilmenau). PMID:18755643

  18. Sporadic hypokalemic paralysis caused by osmotic diuresis in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Vishnu, Venugopalan Y; Kattadimmal, Anoop; Rao, Suparna A; Kadhiravan, Tamilarasu

    2014-07-01

    A wide variety of neurological manifestations are known in patients with diabetes mellitus. We describe a 40-year-old man who presented with hypokalemic paralysis. On evaluation, we found that the cause of the hypokalemia was osmotic diuresis induced by marked hyperglycemia due to undiagnosed diabetes mellitus. The patient had an uneventful recovery with potassium replacement, followed by glycemic control with insulin. Barring a few instances of symptomatic hypokalemia in the setting of diabetic emergencies, to our knowledge uncomplicated hyperglycemia has not been reported to result in hypokalemic paralysis. PMID:24472241

  19. Generation of Wheat Transcription Factor FOX Rice Lines and Systematic Screening for Salt and Osmotic Stress Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Liu, Yayun; Zhu, Butuo; Cao, Jian; Li, Zhanpeng; Han, Longzhi; Jia, Jizeng; Zhao, Guangyao; Sun, Xuehui

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) play important roles in plant growth, development, and responses to environmental stress. In this study, we collected 1,455 full-length (FL) cDNAs of TFs, representing 45 families, from wheat and its relatives Triticum urartu, Aegilops speltoides, Aegilops tauschii, Triticum carthlicum, and Triticum aestivum. More than 15,000 T0 TF FOX (Full-length cDNA Over-eXpressing) rice lines were generated; of these, 10,496 lines set seeds. About 14.88% of the T0 plants showed obvious phenotypic changes. T1 lines (5,232 lines) were screened for salt and osmotic stress tolerance using 150 mM NaCl and 20% (v/v) PEG-4000, respectively. Among them, five lines (591, 746, 1647, 1812, and J4065) showed enhanced salt stress tolerance, five lines (591, 746, 898, 1078, and 1647) showed enhanced osmotic stress tolerance, and three lines (591, 746, and 1647) showed both salt and osmotic stress tolerance. Further analysis of the T-DNA flanking sequences showed that line 746 over-expressed TaEREB1, line 898 over-expressed TabZIPD, and lines 1812 and J4065 over-expressed TaOBF1a and TaOBF1b, respectively. The enhanced salt and osmotic stress tolerance of lines 898 and 1812 was confirmed by retransformation of the respective genes. Our results demonstrate that a heterologous FOX system may be used as an alternative genetic resource for the systematic functional analysis of the wheat genome. PMID:26176782

  20. Overexpression of the CaTIP1-1 Pepper Gene in Tobacco Enhances Resistance to Osmotic Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yan-Xu; Wang, Shu-Bin; Xiao, Huai-Juan; Zhang, Huai-Xia; Zhang, Zhen; Jing, Hua; Zhang, Ying-Li; Chen, Ru-Gang; Gong, Zhen-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Both the gene expression and activity of water channel protein can control transmembrane water movement. We have reported the overexpression of CaTIP1-1, which caused a decrease in chilling tolerance in transgenic plants by increasing the size of the stomatal pore. CaTIP1-1 expression was strongly induced by salt and mannitol stresses in pepper (Capsicum annuum). However, its biochemical and physiological functions are still unknown in transgenic tobacco. In this study, transient expression of CaTIP1-1-GFP in tobacco suspension cells revealed that the protein was localized in the tonoplast. CaTIP1-1 overexpressed in radicle exhibited vigorous growth under high salt and mannitol treatments more than wild-type plants. The overexpression of CaTIP1-1 pepper gene in tobacco enhanced the antioxidant enzyme activities and increased transcription levels of reactive oxygen species-related gene expression under osmotic stresses. Moreover, the viability of transgenic tobacco cells was higher than the wild-type after exposure to stress. The pepper plants with silenced CaTIP1-1 in P70 decreased tolerance to salt and osmotic stresses using the detached leaf method. We concluded that the CaTIP1-1 gene plays an important role in response to osmotic stresses in tobacco. PMID:25375192

  1. Differential effects of salinity and osmotic stress on the plant growth-promoting bacterium Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus PAL5.

    PubMed

    De Oliveira, Marcos Vinicius V; Intorne, Aline C; Vespoli, Luciano de S; Madureira, Hérika C; Leandro, Mariana R; Pereira, Telma N S; Olivares, Fábio L; Berbert-Molina, Marília A; De Souza Filho, Gonçalo A

    2016-04-01

    Plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) represent a promising alternative to the massive use of industrial fertilizers in agriculture. Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a PGPB that colonizes several plant species. Although this bacterium is able to grow at high sucrose concentrations, its response to environmental stresses is poorly understood. The present study evaluated G. diazotrophicus PAL5 response to stresses caused by sucrose, PEG 400, NaCl, KCl, Na2SO4 and K2SO4. Morphological, ultrastructural and cell growth analysis revealed that G. diazotrophicus PAL5 is more sensitive to salt than osmotic stress. Growth inhibition and strong morphological changes were caused by salinity, in consequence of Cl ion-specific toxic effect. Interestingly, low osmotic stress levels were beneficial for bacterial multiplication, which was able to tolerate high sucrose concentrations, Na2SO4 and K2SO4. Our data show that G. diazotrophicus PAL5 has differential response to osmotic and salinity stress, which may influence its use as inoculant in saline environments. PMID:26809283

  2. AtERF71/HRE2 transcription factor mediates osmotic stress response as well as hypoxia response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Park, Hee-Yeon; Seok, Hye-Yeon; Woo, Dong-Hyuk; Lee, Sun-Young; Tarte, Vaishali N; Lee, Eun-Hye; Lee, Choon-Hwan; Moon, Yong-Hwan

    2011-10-14

    Various transcription factors are involved in the response to environmental stresses in plants. In this study, we characterized AtERF71/HRE2, a member of the Arabidopsis AP2/ERF family, as an important regulator of the osmotic and hypoxic stress responses in plants. Transcript level of AtERF71/HRE2 was highly increased by anoxia, NaCl, mannitol, ABA, and MV treatments. aterf71/hre2 loss-of-function mutants displayed higher sensitivity to osmotic stress such as high salt and mannitol, accumulating higher levels of ROS under high salt treatment. In contrast, AtERF71/HRE2-overexpressing transgenic plants showed tolerance to salt and mannitol as well as flooding and MV stresses, exhibiting lower levels of ROS under high salt treatment. AtERF71/HRE2 protein was localized in the nucleus, and the C-terminal region of AtERF71/HRE2 was required for transcription activation activity. Taken together, our results suggest that AtERF71/HRE2 might function as a transcription factor involved in the response to osmotic stress as well as hypoxia. PMID:21946064

  3. Monitoring of jökulhlaups and element fluxes in proglacial Icelandic rivers using osmotic samplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Morgan T.; Gałeczka, Iwona M.; Gkritzalis-Papadopoulos, Athanasios; Palmer, Martin R.; Mowlem, Matthew C.; Vogfjörð, Kristín; Jónsson, Þorsteinn; Gislason, Sigurður R.

    2015-01-01

    The quantification of volatile emissions from volcanoes is an integral part of understanding magmatic systems, with the exsolution and extent of volcanic degassing having a large impact on the nature of an eruption. Measurements of volatiles have traditionally focused on gas emissions into the atmosphere, but volatiles can also become dissolved in proximal water bodies en route to the surface. Thus the monitoring of rivers draining active volcanic areas can provide insights to identifying changes in activity. This process is particularly important for sub-glacial volcanoes in Iceland, where much of the volatile release is transported within glacial outbreak floods, termed jökulhlaups. Monitoring and characterising these phenomena is hampered by the dependence on spot sampling of stochastic events under challenging field conditions, which often leads to bias in the collected data. A recent technological advance is the osmotic sampler, an electricity-free pump that continuously collects water that can subsequently be divided into time-averaged samples. This technique allows for continued and unsupervised deployment of a sampler for weeks to months, representing a cost-efficient form of chemical monitoring. In this study we deployed osmotic samplers in two rivers in southern Iceland. Skálm is a proglacial river from Mýrdalsjökull glacier and Katla volcano, while Skaftá is a larger drainage system from the western part of Vatnajökull glacier. Both rivers are prone to jökulhlaups from geothermal and volcanic sources, and a small jökulhlaup of geothermal origin occurred during the second deployment in Skaftá in January 2014. The two deployments show that osmotic samplers are capable of delivering accurate chemical data in turbulent conditions for several key elements. Total dissolved fluxes for the deployment at Skaftá are calculated to be Na = 9.9 tonnes/day, Mg = 10.5 t/d, Si = 34.7 t/d, Cl = 11.0 t/d, Ca = 31.6 t/d, DIC = 50.8 t/d, and SO4 = 28.3 t/d, with

  4. Osmotic stress-induced remodeling of the cortical cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Di Ciano, Caterina; Nie, Zilin; Szászi, Katalin; Lewis, Alison; Uruno, Takehito; Zhan, Xi; Rotstein, Ori D; Mak, Alan; Kapus, András

    2002-09-01

    Osmotic stress is known to affect the cytoskeleton; however, this adaptive response has remained poorly characterized, and the underlying signaling pathways are unexplored. Here we show that hypertonicity induces submembranous de novo F-actin assembly concomitant with the peripheral translocation and colocalization of cortactin and the actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2/3) complex, which are key components of the actin nucleation machinery. Additionally, hyperosmolarity promotes the association of cortactin with Arp2/3 as revealed by coimmunoprecipitation. Using various truncation or phosphorylation-incompetent mutants, we show that cortactin translocation requires the Arp2/3- or the F-actin binding domain, but the process is independent of the shrinkage-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin. Looking for an alternative signaling mechanism, we found that hypertonicity stimulates Rac and Cdc42. This appears to be a key event in the osmotically triggered cytoskeletal reorganization, because 1) constitutively active small GTPases translocate cortactin, 2) Rac and cortactin colocalize at the periphery of hypertonically challenged cells, and 3) dominant-negative Rac and Cdc42 inhibit the hypertonicity-provoked cortactin and Arp3 translocation. The Rho family-dependent cytoskeleton remodeling may be an important osmoprotective response that reinforces the cell cortex. PMID:12176742

  5. Novel Regulation of Aquaporins during Osmotic Stress1

    PubMed Central

    Vera-Estrella, Rosario; Barkla, Bronwyn J.; Bohnert, Hans J.; Pantoja, Omar

    2004-01-01

    Aquaporin protein regulation and redistribution in response to osmotic stress was investigated. Ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum) McTIP1;2 (McMIPF) mediated water flux when expressed in Xenopus leavis oocytes. Mannitol-induced water imbalance resulted in increased protein amounts in tonoplast fractions and a shift in protein distribution to other membrane fractions, suggesting aquaporin relocalization. Indirect immunofluorescence labeling also supports a change in membrane distribution for McTIP1;2 and the appearance of a unique compartment where McTIP1;2 is expressed. Mannitol-induced redistribution of McTIP1;2 was arrested by pretreatment with brefeldin A, wortmannin, and cytochalasin D, inhibitors of vesicle trafficking-related processes. Evidence suggests a role for glycosylation and involvement of a cAMP-dependent signaling pathway in McTIP1;2 redistribution. McTIP1;2 redistribution to endosomal compartments may be part of a homeostatic process to restore and maintain cellular osmolarity under osmotic-stress conditions. PMID:15299122

  6. Thermal and Osmotic Tolerance of 'Irukandji' Polyps: Cubozoa; Carukia barnesi.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Robert; Browning, Sally; Northfield, Tobin; Seymour, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    This research explores the thermal and osmotic tolerance of the polyp stage of the Irukandji jellyfish Carukia barnesi, which provides new insights into potential polyp habitat suitability. The research also targets temperature, salinity, feeding frequency, and combinations thereof, as cues for synchronous medusae production. Primary findings revealed 100% survivorship in osmotic treatments between 19 and 46‰, with the highest proliferation at 26‰. As salinity levels of 26‰ do not occur within the waters of the Great Barrier Reef or Coral Sea, we conclude that the polyp stage of C. barnesi is probably found in estuarine environments, where these lower salinity conditions commonly occur, in comparison to the medusa stage, which is oceanic. Population stability was achieved at temperatures between 18 and 31°C, with an optimum temperature of 22.9°C. We surmise that C. barnesi polyps may be restricted to warmer estuarine areas where water temperatures do not drop below 18°C. Asexual reproduction was also positively correlated with feeding frequency. Temperature, salinity, feeding frequency, and combinations thereof did not induce medusae production, suggesting that this species may use a different cue, possibly photoperiod, to initiate medusae production. PMID:27441693

  7. Osmotic membrane bioreactor for phenol biodegradation under continuous operation.

    PubMed

    Praveen, Prashant; Loh, Kai-Chee

    2016-03-15

    Continuous phenol biodegradation was accomplished in a two-phase partitioning osmotic membrane bioreactor (TPPOMBR) system, using extractant impregnated membranes (EIM) as the partitioning phase. The EIMs alleviated substrate inhibition during prolonged operation at influent phenol concentrations of 600-2000mg/L, and also at spiked concentrations of 2500mg/L phenol restricted to 2 days. Filtration of the effluent through forward osmosis maintained high biomass concentration in the bioreactor and improved effluent quality. Steady state was reached in 5-6 days at removal rates varying between 2000 and 5500mg/L-day under various conditions. Due to biofouling and salt accumulation, the permeate flux varied from 1.2-7.2 LMH during 54 days of operation, while maintaining an average hydraulic retention time of 7.4h. A washing cycle, comprising 1h osmotic backwashing using 0.5M NaCl and 2h washing with water, facilitated biofilm removal from the membranes. Characterization of the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) through FTIR showed peaks between 1700 and 1500cm(-1), 1450-1450cm(-1) and 1200-1000cm(-1), indicating the presence of proteins, phenols and polysaccharides, respectively. The carbohydrate to protein ratio in the EPS was estimated to be 0.3. These results indicate that TPPOMBR can be promising in continuous treatment of phenolic wastewater. PMID:26651068

  8. Osmotic regulation of Rab-mediated organelle docking

    PubMed Central

    Brett, Christopher L.; Merz, Alexey J.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Osmotic gradients across organelle and plasma membranes modulate the rates of membrane fission and fusion; sufficiently large gradients can cause membrane rupture [1–6]. Hypotonic gradients applied to living yeast cells trigger prompt (within seconds) swelling and fusion of Saccharomyces cerevisiae vacuoles, while hypertonic gradients cause vacuoles to fragment on a slower time scale [7–11]. Here, we analyze the influence of osmotic strength on homotypic fusion of isolated yeast vacuoles. Consistent with previously reported in vivo results, we find that decreases in osmolyte concentration increase the rate and extent of vacuole fusion in vitro, while increases in osmolyte concentration prevent fusion. Unexpectedly, our results reveal that osmolytes regulate fusion by inhibiting early, Rab-dependent docking or predocking events, not late events. Our experiments reveal an organelle-autonomous pathway that may control organelle surface to volume ratio, size and copy number: decreasing the osmolyte concentration in the cytoplasmic compartment accelerates Rab-mediated docking and fusion. Fusion, by altering the organelle surface-to-enclosed volume relationship, in turn reduces the risk of membrane rupture. PMID:18619842

  9. Electro-osmotic flow enhancement in carbon nanotube membranes.

    PubMed

    Mattia, Davide; Leese, Hannah; Calabrò, Francesco

    2016-02-13

    In this work, experimental evidence of the presence of electro-osmotic flow (EOF) in carbon nanotube membranes with diameters close to or in the region of electrical double layer overlap is presented for two different electrolytes for the first time. No EOF in this region should be present according to the simplified theoretical framework commonly used for EOF in micrometre-sized channels. The simplifying assumptions concern primarily the electrolyte charge density structure, based on the Poisson-Boltzmann (P-B) equation. Here, a numerical analysis of the solutions for the simplified case and for the nonlinear and the linearized P-B equations is compared with experimental data. Results show that the simplified solution produces a significant deviation from experimental data, whereas the linearized solution of the P-B equation can be adopted with little error compared with the full P-B case. This work opens the way to using electro-osmotic pumping in a wide range of applications, from membrane-based ultrafiltration and nanofiltration (as a more efficient alternative to mechanical pumping at the nanoscale) to further miniaturization of lab-on-a-chip devices at the nanoscale for in vivo implantation. PMID:26712647

  10. Development and evaluation of oral osmotic pump of butorphanol tartrate.

    PubMed

    Shah, Bhavik; Raichandani, Yogesh; Misra, Ambikanandan

    2014-11-01

    Butorphanol is potent analgesic useful in pain management. However, because of high first-pass metabolism butorphanol is not available in market as oral dosage form. Drugs that undergo extensive first-pass metabolism can be delivered orally if protected in the stomach, and proximal small intestine. An oral controlled porosity osmotic pump (CPOP) was designed to deliver butorphanol tartrate that can maintain therapeutic blood concentration up to 24 h. The target release profile for extended release formulation was calculated by Wagner Nelson de-convolution using published immediate release blood concentration data for oral route. Composition of the core and coating were optimized using USFDA approved ingredients by evaluation of the drug release. Drug release from the developed system was inversely proportional to the weight gain and directly related to the level of pore former. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed the formation of pores in the coating membrane on contact with water which lead to drug to release. Kinetic models were applied to drug release data to establish the drug release mechanism. The developed osmotic system effectively delivers selected drug at a predetermined rate for extended period. PMID:24079361

  11. Osmotic regulation of Rab-mediated organelle docking.

    PubMed

    Brett, Christopher L; Merz, Alexey J

    2008-07-22

    Osmotic gradients across organelle and plasma membranes modulate the rates of membrane fission and fusion; sufficiently large gradients can cause membrane rupture [1-6]. Hypotonic gradients applied to living yeast cells trigger prompt (within seconds) swelling and fusion of Saccharomyces cerevisiae vacuoles, whereas hypertonic gradients cause vacuoles to fragment on a slower time scale [7-11]. Here, we analyze the influence of osmotic strength on homotypic fusion of isolated yeast vacuoles. Consistent with previously reported in vivo results, we find that decreases in osmolyte concentration increase the rate and extent of vacuole fusion in vitro, whereas increases in osmolyte concentration prevent fusion. Unexpectedly, our results reveal that osmolytes regulate fusion by inhibiting early Rab-dependent docking or predocking events, not late events. Our experiments reveal an organelle-autonomous pathway that may control organelle surface-to-volume ratio, size, and copy number: Decreasing the osmolyte concentration in the cytoplasmic compartment accelerates Rab-mediated docking and fusion. By altering the relationship between the organelle surface and its enclosed volume, fusion in turn reduces the risk of membrane rupture. PMID:18619842

  12. Effect of Osmotic-Release Oral System Methylphenidate on Different Domains of Attention and Executive Functioning in Children with Attention-Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blum, Nathan J.; Jawad, Abbas F.; Clarke, Angela T.; Power, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: This study investigated whether components of attention and executive functioning improve when children with attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are treated with osmotic-release oral system (OROS) methylphenidate. Method: Thirty children (24 males, six females; mean age 8y 6mo, SD 1y 11mo; range 6y 5mo-12y 6mo) with ADHD combined…

  13. High osmotic pressure increases reactive oxygen species generation in rabbit corneal epithelial cells by endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Sheng, Minjie; Li, Bing; Jiang, Yaping; Chen, Yihui

    2016-01-01

    Tear high osmotic pressure (HOP) has been recognized as the core mechanism underlying ocular surface inflammation, injury and symptoms and is closely associated with many ocular surface diseases, especially dry eye. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a multi-functional organelle responsible for protein synthesis, folding and transport, biological synthesis of lipids, vesicle transport and intracellular calcium storage. Accumulation of unfolded proteins and imbalance of calcium ion in the ER would induce ER stress and protective unfolded protein response (UPR). Many studies have demonstrated that ER stress can induce cell apoptosis. However, the association between tear HOP and ER stress has not been studied systematically. In the present study, rabbit corneal epithelial cells were treated with HOP and results showed that the production of reactive oxygen species increased markedly, which further activated the ER signaling pathway and ultimately induced cell apoptosis. These findings shed new lights on the pathogenesis and clinical treatment of dry eye and other ocular surface diseases. PMID:27158374

  14. Osmotic equilibrium of colloidal nanoparticles transiently confined in an optical trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jinxin; Ou-Yang, H. Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Equilibrium number density profile of colloidal particles in a potential force field depends on the particle number density, the force field and interactions between the particles. Einstein described the particle number density profile by an osmotic equilibrium equation relating colloidal osmotic pressure and the potential force in his 1905 paper on the Brownian motion. For a dilute suspension of colloids, when particle interactions are negligible, the osmotic equilibrium equation can be used to determine unknown potential energy profiles from the Boltzmann distribution of the particle number density. Using a known potential energy profile, one can determine the colloidal osmotic pressure as a function of particle density, i.e., the osmotic equation of state, from the density profiles of interacting colloids. We use particle density profiles determined by confocal imaging of fluorescent polystyrene nanoparticles transiently confined in an optical trap to determine the colloidal osmotic equation of state for colloids in the presence of KCl and neutral polymers. The osmotic compressibility and chemical potentials of the colloids are calculated from the osmotic equation of state to predict colloidal stability and phase transitions. This project is supported in part by funds from NSF DMR 0923299, Lehigh Center for Optical Technologies and the Emulsion Polymers Institute.

  15. Changes in osmotic fragility of nucleated erythrocytes resulting from blood storage.

    PubMed

    Oyewale, J O

    1994-08-01

    The storage of blood for 24 h at 10 degrees C caused significant changes in osmotic fragility of nucleated erythrocytes of pigeons, peafowls, domestic fowls, lizards and toads. Significant decreases in fragility were seen with pigeon and peafowl erythrocytes. However, the osmotic fragility of domestic fowl, lizard and toad erythrocytes increased significantly. PMID:7863738

  16. A balanced JA/ABA status may correlate with adaptation to osmotic stress in Vitis cells.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Ahmed; Seo, Mitsunori; Takebayashi, Yumiko; Kamiya, Yuji; Nick, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Water-related stress is considered a major type of plant stress. Osmotic stress, in particular, represents the common part of all water-related stresses. Therefore, plants have evolved different adaptive mechanisms to cope with osmotic-related disturbances. In the current work, two grapevine cell lines that differ in their osmotic adaptability, Vitis rupestris and Vitis riparia, were investigated under mannitol-induced osmotic stress. To dissect signals that lead to adaptability from those related to sensitivity, osmotic-triggered responses with respect to jasmonic acid (JA) and its active form JA-Ile, abscisic acid (ABA), and stilbene compounds, as well as the expression of their related genes were observed. In addition, the transcript levels of the cellular homeostasis gene NHX1 were examined. The data are discussed with a hypothesis suggesting that a balance of JA and ABA status might correlate with cellular responses, either guiding cells to sensitivity or to progress toward adaptation. PMID:26277753

  17. Real-time characterization of the neuronal response to osmotic shock by digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomariz, Maria; Garcia, Isabel; Soto-Sánchez, Cristina; Martínez-Navarrete, Gema; Fernández, Eduardo; Fimia, Antonio

    2015-05-01

    Digital holographic microscopy has numerous applications in biology for visualizing living cells and 3D tissues. This technique allows for the direct visualization of biological structures avoiding invasive and phototoxic procedures such as fixation and dying processing. In this study we have characterized the morphometry changes of neurons subject to osmolarity changes. For this purpose, we have measured the variations of the amplitude and the oscillation frequency of the plasmatic membrane, as well as the volume changes of the cells before the osmotic shock. There was a relation between the neural culture ageing and its behavioral changes. "Long-term" cultures that had not previously been studied were used to analyze the behavioral changes in aged cells.

  18. Microbial fuel cells and osmotic membrane bioreactors have mutual benefits for wastewater treatment and energy production.

    PubMed

    Hou, Dianxun; Lu, Lu; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2016-07-01

    This study demonstrates that microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and osmotic membrane bioreactors (OMBRs) can be mutually beneficial when integrated together for wastewater treatment. When connecting MFCs with OMBRs, the solute buildup increased conductivity and buffer capacity, which greatly increased MFC power density from 3 W/m(3) up to 11.5 W/m(3). In turn, the MFCs conditioned and reduced sludge production and therefore reduced forward osmosis (FO) membrane fouling. The MFC-OMBR equipped with new thin-film composite (TFC) membrane showed excellent organic (>95%) and phosphorus removal (>99%) and therefore maintained effluent sCOD below 20 mg/L. However, the nitrogen removal was limited due to the negative surface charge of the thin-film composite membrane and solution chemistry, which led to higher flux of ammonium toward the OMBR draw solution. Further studies are needed to improve nitrogen removal, reduce fouling, and optimize system integration. PMID:27105032

  19. Effect of drought and osmotic stress on gene expression in Jack Pine. [Pinus banksiana

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, M.; Mayne, M.; Coleman, J.R.; Blumwald, E. )

    1991-05-01

    The effect of drought and osmotic stress was studied in Jack Pine (Pinus banksiana) seedlings and cultured cell suspensions, respectively. The pattern of protein syntheses during stress was studied. Seedlings and cells were in vivo labeled with ({sup 35}S)methionine and membrane-bound proteins were isolated. proteins were resolved by SDS-PAGE, and identified by staining and autoradiography. Several changes in protein profiles were induced by stress. Messenger RNAs were isolated, translated in vitro, and complementary DNA libraries from control and stressed plants and cells were constructed in E. coli strain JM109. Antibodies, raised against electroeluted membrane-bound proteins that were significantly induced and/or enhanced during stress, were used to isolate stress-related genes from cDNA libraries.

  20. Activated macrophages for treating skin ulceration: gene expression in human monocytes after hypo-osmotic shock

    PubMed Central

    FRENKEL, O; SHANI, E; BEN-BASSAT, I; BROK-SIMONI, F; ROZENFELD-GRANOT, G; KAJAKARO, G; RECHAVI, G; AMARIGLIO, N; SHINAR, E; DANON, D

    2002-01-01

    Macrophages play a major role in almost all stages of the complex process of wound healing. It has been previously shown that the incorporation of a hypo-osmotic shock step, in the process of monocyte-concentrate preparation from a blood unit, induces monocyte/macrophage activation. As the macrophages are produced using a unique, closed and sterile system, they are suitable for local application on ulcers in elderly and paraplegic patients. Enhanced phagocytosis by the activated cells, as well as increased secretion of cytokines such as IL-1, IL-6, were detected in a recent study which are in accord with the very encouraging clinical results. In the present study, we used DNA microarrays to analyse the differential gene expressions of the hypo-osmotic shock-activated monocytes/macrophages and compare them to non-treated cells. Of the genes that exhibited differences of expression in the activated cell population, 94% (68/72) displayed increased activity. The mRNA levels of 43/68 of these genes (63%) were found to be 1·5-fold or higher (1·5–7·98) in the activated macrophages cell population as compared to the non-treated cells. Only four genes were found to have lower mRNA levels in the activated cells, with ratios of expression of 0·62–0·8, which may suggest that the changes are insignificant. A significant number of the genes that showed increased levels of expression is known to be directly involved in macrophage function and wound healing. This may correlate with the increased secretion of different cytokines by the activated macrophages depicted previously. Other groups of genes expressed are known to be involved in important pathways such as neuronal growth and function, developmental defects and cancer. The hypo-osmotic shock induces a gene expression profile of cytokines and receptors in the activated cells. These may evoke potential abilities to produce a variety of protein products needed in the wound healing process and may bring to light

  1. Sorbitol required for cell growth and ethanol production by Zymomonas mobilis under heat, ethanol, and osmotic stresses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background During ethanol fermentation, the ethanologenic bacterium, Zymomonas mobilis may encounter several environmental stresses such as heat, ethanol and osmotic stresses due to high sugar concentration. Although supplementation of the compatible solute sorbitol into culture medium enhances cell growth of Z. mobilis under osmotic stress, the protective function of this compound on cell growth and ethanol production by this organism under other stresses such as heat and ethanol has not been described yet. The formation of sorbitol in Z. mobilis was carried out by the action of the glucose-fructose oxidoreductase (GFOR) enzyme which is regulated by the gfo gene. Therefore, the gfo gene in Z. mobilis was disrupted by the fusion-PCR-based construction technique in the present study, and the protective function of sorbitol on cell growth, protein synthesis and ethanol production by Z. mobilis under heat, ethanol, and osmotic stresses was investigated. Results Based on the fusion-PCR-based construction technique, the gfo gene in Z. mobilis was disrupted. Disruption of the Z. mobilis gfo gene resulted in the reduction of cell growth and ethanol production not only under osmotic stress but also under heat and ethanol stresses. Under these stress conditions, the transcription level of pdc, adhA, and adhB genes involved in the pyruvate-to-ethanol (PE) pathway as well as the synthesis of proteins particularly in Z. mobilis disruptant strain were decreased compared to those of the parent. These findings suggest that sorbitol plays a crucial role not only on cell growth and ethanol production but also on the protection of cellular proteins from stress responses. Conclusion We showed for the first time that supplementation of the compatible solute sorbitol not only promoted cell growth but also increased the ethanol fermentation capability of Z. mobilis under heat, ethanol, and osmotic stresses. Although the molecular mechanism involved in tolerance to stress conditions

  2. Azotemia protects the brain from osmotic demyelination on rapid correction of hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Dhrolia, Murtaza F; Akhtar, Syed F; Ahmed, Ejaz; Naqvi, Anwar; Rizvi, Adeeb

    2014-05-01

    Osmotic demyelination syndrome (ODS) is a dreadful, irreversible and well-recognized clinical entity that classically occurs after rapid correction of hyponatremia. However, it has been observed that when hyponatremia is rapidly corrected in azotemic patients by hemodialysis (HD), patients do not necessarily develop ODS. We studied the effect of inadvertent rapid correction of hyponatremia with HD in patients with azotemia. Fifty-two azotemic patients, who underwent HD at the Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation, having pre-HD serum sodium level <125 mEq/L and post-HD serum sodium levels that increased by ≥12 mEq/L from their pre-dialysis level, were studied. Serum sodium was analyzed before and within 24 h after a HD session. HD was performed using bicarbonate solution, with the sodium concentration being 140 meq/L. The duration of the dialysis session was based on the discretion of the treating nephrologist. Patients were examined for any neurological symptoms or signs before and after HD and for up to two weeks. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in required cases. None of the 52 patients with azotemia, despite inadvertent rapid correction of hyponatremia with HD, developed ODS. This study suggests that patients with azotemia do not develop ODS on rapid correction of hyponatremia by HD, which suggests a possible protective role of azotemia on the brain from osmotic demyelination. However, the mechanism by which azotemia protects the brain from demyelination in humans is largely hypothetical and further studies are needed to answer this question. PMID:24821152

  3. Sensitivity of Nematode Life-History Groups to Ions and Osmotic Tensions of Nitrogenous Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Tenuta, Mario; Ferris, Howard

    2004-01-01

    Guild designation of nematodes of similar trophic function and life-history strategy provides a basis for using nematode faunal analyses in an integrative assessment of soil food web condition. Omnivorous and predaceous nematodes, categorized at the upper end of a colonizer-persister (c-p) continuum of nematode functional guilds are generally not abundant in cropped soil. These nematodes are more sensitive to heavy metal concentrations than those in other c-p groups, but whether sensitivity to agrochemicals contributes to the observed low abundance of high c-p groups in cropped soils is less well understood. An exposure assay in solution was used to compare the sensitivity of nematodes representing various guilds obtained from field soils and from laboratory culture to several nitrogen sources. Nematodes in c-p groups 4 and 5 were more sensitive to nitrogen solutions than nematodes representing lower c-p groups. There were both osmotic and specific ion effects—the latter most evident in exposure of nematodes to NaNO₂ and (NH₄)₂SO₄. The RC₅₀ (concentration resulting in nematode recovery of one half of that of distilled water) for (NH₄)₂SO₄ was < 0.052 M-N for c-p groups 4 and 5 compared to much greater values (0.34 to 0.81 M-N) for c-p groups 1 to 3. In non-ionic polyethylene glycol (PEG) solutions, osmotic tensions of 0.40 to 0.43 MPa reduced the recovery of exposed nematodes by half (RT₅₀; water potential of solution resulting in nematode recovery of one half of that of distilled water) for c-p groups 4 and 5 compared to > 1.93 MPa for c-p groups 1 to 3. RT₅₀ values for urea solutions, also non-ionic, were greater than for PEG. Caenorhabditis elegans N2 (c-p 1) and Meloidogyne javanica (c-p 3) reared on solid medium and in hydroponic culture, respectively, were slightly more sensitive to specific ion and osmotic effects than nematodes of similar c-p groups obtained from soil. The greater sensitivity of c-p 4 and 5 nematodes to nitrogen

  4. The Photosynthesis, Na+/K+ Homeostasis and Osmotic Adjustment of Atriplex canescens in Response to Salinity

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Ya-Qing; Guo, Huan; Wang, Suo-Min; Zhao, Bingyu; Zhang, Jin-Lin; Ma, Qing; Yin, Hong-Ju; Bao, Ai-Ke

    2016-01-01

    Atriplex canescens (fourwing saltbush) is a C4 perennial fodder shrub with excellent resistance to salinity. However, the mechanisms underlying the salt tolerance in A. canescens are poorly understood. In this study, 5-weeks-old A. canescens seedlings were treated with various concentrations of external NaCl (0–400 mM). The results showed that the growth of A. canescens seedlings was significantly stimulated by moderate salinity (100 mM NaCl) and unaffected by high salinity (200 or 400 mM NaCl). Furthermore, A. canescens seedlings showed higher photosynthetic capacity under NaCl treatments (except for 100 mM NaCl treatment) with significant increases in net photosynthetic rate and water use efficiency. Under saline conditions, the A. canescens seedlings accumulated more Na+ in either plant tissues or salt bladders, and also retained relatively constant K+ in leaf tissues and bladders by enhancing the selective transport capacity for K+ over Na+ (ST value) from stem to leaf and from leaf to bladder. External NaCl treatments on A. canescens seedlings had no adverse impact on leaf relative water content, and this resulted from lower leaf osmotic potential under the salinity conditions. The contribution of Na+ to the leaf osmotic potential (Ψs) was sharply enhanced from 2% in control plants to 49% in plants subjected to 400 mM NaCl. However, the contribution of K+ to Ψs showed a significant decrease from 34% (control) to 9% under 400 mM NaCl. Interestingly, concentrations of betaine and free proline showed significant increase in the leaves of A. canescens seedlings, these compatible solutes presented up to 12% of contribution to Ψs under high salinity. These findings suggest that, under saline environments, A. canescens is able to enhance photosynthetic capacity, increase Na+ accumulation in tissues and salt bladders, maintain relative K+ homeostasis in leaves, and use inorganic ions and compatible solutes for osmotic adjustment which may contribute to the

  5. Extraction of mechanical properties of articular cartilage from osmotic swelling behavior monitored using high frequency ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q; Zheng, Y P; Niu, H J; Mak, A F T

    2007-06-01

    Articular cartilage is a biological weight-bearing tissue covering the bony ends of articulating joints. Negatively charged proteoglycan (PG) in articular cartilage is one of the main factors that govern its compressive mechanical behavior and swelling phenomenon. PG is nonuniformly distributed throughout the depth direction, and its amount or distribution may change in the degenerated articular cartilage such as osteoarthritis. In this paper, we used a 50 MHz ultrasound system to study the depth-dependent strain of articular cartilage under the osmotic loading induced by the decrease of the bathing saline concentration. The swelling-induced strains under the osmotic loading were used to determine the layered material properties of articular cartilage based on a triphasic model of the free-swelling. Fourteen cylindrical cartilage-bone samples prepared from fresh normal bovine patellae were tested in situ in this study. A layered triphasic model was proposed to describe the depth distribution of the swelling strain for the cartilage and to determine its aggregate modulus H(a) at two different layers, within which H(a) was assumed to be linearly dependent on the depth. The results showed that H(a) was 3.0+/-3.2, 7.0+/-7.4, 24.5+/-11.1 MPa at the cartilage surface, layer interface, and deep region, respectively. They are significantly different (p<0.01). The layer interface located at 70%+/-20% of the overall thickness from the uncalcified-calcified cartilage interface. Parametric analysis demonstrated that the depth-dependent distribution of the water fraction had a significant effect on the modeling results but not the fixed charge density. This study showed that high-frequency ultrasound measurement together with triphasic modeling is practical for quantifying the layered mechanical properties of articular cartilage nondestructively and has the potential for providing useful information for the detection of the early signs of osteoarthritis. PMID:17536909

  6. The HOG pathway controls osmotic regulation of transcription via the stress response element (STRE) of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae CTT1 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Schüller, C; Brewster, J L; Alexander, M R; Gustin, M C; Ruis, H

    1994-01-01

    The HOG signal pathway of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is defined by the PBS2 and HOG1 genes encoding members of the MAP kinase kinase and of the MAP kinase family, respectively. Mutations in this pathway (deletions of PBS2 or HOG1, or point mutations in HOG1) almost completely abolish the induction of transcription by osmotic stress that is mediated by stress response elements (STREs). We have demonstrated previously that STREs also mediate induction of transcription by heat shock, nitrogen starvation and oxidative stress. This study shows that they are also activated by low external pH, sorbate, benzoate or ethanol stress. Induction by these other stress signals appears to be HOG pathway independent. HOG1-dependent osmotic induction of transcription of the CTT1 gene encoding the cytosolic catalase T occurs in the presence of a protein synthesis inhibitor and can be detected rapidly after an increase of tyrosine phosphorylation of Hog1p triggered by high osmolarity. Consistent with a role of STREs in the induction of stress resistance, a number of other stress protein genes (e.g. HSP104) are regulated like CTT1. Furthermore, catalase T was shown to be important for viability under severe osmotic stress, and heat shock was demonstrated to provide cross-protection against osmotic stress. Images PMID:7523111

  7. Effect of salinity on hemolymph osmotic pressure, sodium concentration and Na+-K+-ATPase activity of gill of Chinese crab, Eriocheir sinensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongyu; Pan, Luqing; Fu, Lü

    2008-02-01

    The effects of salinity on hemolymph osmotic pressure, Na+ concentration and Na+-K+-ATPase activity of gill of Chinese crab Eriocheir sinensis were studied. The results showed that hemolymph osmotic pressure and Na+ concentration increased significantly ( P<0.05), and the Na+-K+-ATPase activity of gills decreased significantly ( P<0.05) when salinity increased from 0 to 16. The hemolymph osmotic pressure and Na+ concentration in each treatment group rose remarkably at 0.125 d or 0.25 d, while the Na+-K+-ATPase activity of gill reduced gradually with increased experiment time in 3 d. Then the three parameters remained at a constant level after 0.25 d, 0.125 d and 3 d, respectively, and higher hemolymph osmotic pressure, higher Na+ concentration and lower Na+-K+-ATPase activity of gill occurred at higher salinity. The effect of salinity change on protein concentration of hemolymph was indistinct ( P>0.05); However, the protein concentration decreased gradually with the increase of salinity from 0.25 d to 1 d, and then tended to be stable from day 1 to day 15.

  8. Genetic Variation of Drought Tolerance in Pinus pinaster at Three Hierarchical Levels: A Comparison of Induced Osmotic Stress and Field Testing

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, Maria João; Velasco, Tania; Feito, Isabel; Alía, Ricardo; Majada, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the survival capacity of forest trees to periods of severe water stress could improve knowledge of the adaptive potential of different species under future climatic scenarios. In long lived organisms, like forest trees, the combination of induced osmotic stress treatments and field testing can elucidate the role of drought tolerance during the early stages of establishment, the most critical in the life of the species. We performed a Polyethylene glycol-osmotic induced stress experiment and evaluated two common garden experiments (xeric and mesic sites) to test for survival and growth of a wide range clonal collection of Maritime pine. This study demonstrates the importance of additive vs non additive effects for drought tolerance traits in Pinus pinaster, and shows differences in parameters determining the adaptive trajectories of populations and family and clones within populations. The results show that osmotic adjustment plays an important role in population variation, while biomass allocation and hydric content greatly influence survival at population level. Survival in the induced osmotic stress experiment presented significant correlations with survival in the xeric site, and height growth at the mesic site, at population level, indicating constraints of adaptation for those traits, while at the within population level no significant correlation existed. These results demonstrate that population differentiation and within population genetic variation for drought tolerance follow different patterns. PMID:24223885

  9. Variation in Populus euphratica foliar carbon isotope composition and osmotic solute for different groundwater depths in an arid region of China.

    PubMed

    Si, Jianhua; Feng, Qi; Yu, Tengfei; Zhao, Chunyan; Li, Wei

    2015-11-01

    Water use efficiency (WUE) is an important trait associated with plant acclimation caused by water deficits, and δ13C is a good surrogate of WUE under conditions of water deficits. Water deficiency also enhances the accumulation of compatible solutes in the leaves. In this study, variations in foliar δ(13)C values and main osmotic solutes were investigated. Those included total soluble sugar (TSS), sucrose, free proline, glycine betaine (GB), and inorganic ionic (K+, Ca2+, and Cl-) content of Populus euphratica for different groundwater depths in a Ejina desert riparian forest, China. Results indicated that foliar δ13C values in the P. euphratica for different groundwater depths ranged from -29.14±0.06 to -25.84±0.04 ‰. Foliar δ13C signatures became richer as groundwater levels declined. TSS, sucrose, free proline, GB, and K+ were accumulated in P. euphratica foliage with developing plant growth and increasing groundwater depth. Ca2+ and Cl- content increased under stronger P. euphratica transpiration rates for shallower groundwater depths (1-2.5 m) and decreased for deeper groundwater depths (greater than 3.0 m). Moreover, correlations between δ13C, osmotic solutes, and groundwater depths showed that the primary osmotic solutes were TSS, sucrose, proline, GB, and K+. Correlations also showed that δ13C was not only a useful measure for P. euphratica-integrated WUE but also could be used as an indicator reflecting some physiological osmotic indexes. PMID:26502726

  10. Osmotic and Salted Brush Phase of Polyelectrolyte Brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helm, Christane A.; Ahrens, Heiko; Förster, Stephan

    2004-03-01

    Amphiphilic block copolymers consisting of a fluid hydrophobic Poly(ethyletylene) (PEE), and a Poly(styrenesulfonate) (PSS) part form monolayers at the air/water interface. With x-ray reflectivity it is shown that the hydrophobic blocks of PEE_114PSS_83 and PEE_144PSS_136 constitute a nm-thick melt, while the polyelectrolyte forms an osmotically swollen brush with counterion incorporation. A slight thickness increase on monolayer compression is found which can be explained by the strong stretching of the brushes. Only at high salt conditions (above 0.1 M), the brush shrinks and the thickness scales with the molecular area (exponent -1/3), and with the salt concentration (exponent ca. -1/5). With Grazing Incidence Diffraction, the lateral order of the polyelectrolyte chains can be detected.

  11. Colloid osmotic pressure: its measurement and clinical value.

    PubMed Central

    Morissette, M. P.

    1977-01-01

    Plasma colloid osmotic pressure (COP) is an important determinant in the appearance of edema. The development of a simple technique for COP measurement, based on an electronic pressure transducer and a semipermeable membrane system, has led to an appreciation of the value of COP determinations in clinical practice. In a steady state the measured COP replicates the value computed from serum proteins. In pathologic sera a derived value is unreliable. The normal human plasma COP averages 25.4 mm Hg. This value tends to decrease with age, is lower in females and is also lower in subjects at bed rest. As a clinical tool COP measurement represents an unduplicated contribution to the differential diagnosis of pulmonary edema. In critically ill patients COP measurement represents a reliable predictor of survival. PMID:851930

  12. Osmotic pressure induced tensile forces in tendon collagen

    PubMed Central

    Masic, Admir; Bertinetti, Luca; Schuetz, Roman; Chang, Shu-Wei; Metzger, Till Hartmut; Buehler, Markus J.; Fratzl, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Water is an important component of collagen in tendons, but its role for the function of this load-carrying protein structure is poorly understood. Here we use a combination of multi-scale experimentation and computation to show that water is an integral part of the collagen molecule, which changes conformation upon water removal. The consequence is a shortening of the molecule that translates into tensile stresses in the range of several to almost 100 MPa, largely surpassing those of about 0.3 MPa generated by contractile muscles. Although a complete drying of collagen would be relevant for technical applications, such as the fabrication of leather or parchment, stresses comparable to muscle contraction already occur at small osmotic pressures common in biological environments. We suggest, therefore, that water-generated tensile stresses may play a role in living collagen-based materials such as tendon or bone. PMID:25608644

  13. Osmotic pressure induced tensile forces in tendon collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masic, Admir; Bertinetti, Luca; Schuetz, Roman; Chang, Shu-Wei; Metzger, Till Hartmut; Buehler, Markus J.; Fratzl, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Water is an important component of collagen in tendons, but its role for the function of this load-carrying protein structure is poorly understood. Here we use a combination of multi-scale experimentation and computation to show that water is an integral part of the collagen molecule, which changes conformation upon water removal. The consequence is a shortening of the molecule that translates into tensile stresses in the range of several to almost 100 MPa, largely surpassing those of about 0.3 MPa generated by contractile muscles. Although a complete drying of collagen would be relevant for technical applications, such as the fabrication of leather or parchment, stresses comparable to muscle contraction already occur at small osmotic pressures common in biological environments. We suggest, therefore, that water-generated tensile stresses may play a role in living collagen-based materials such as tendon or bone.

  14. Effects of pretreatments on the diffusion kinetics and some quality parameters of osmotically dehydrated apple slices.

    PubMed

    Taiwo, K A; Angersbach, A; Ade-Omowaye, B I; Knorr, D

    2001-06-01

    This study compared mass transfer during osmotic dehydration (OD) and some quality indices of untreated apple slices to those of apple slices pretreated by either blanching, freezing, or applying high-intensity electric field pulses (HELP) or high pressure (HP). HP, HELP, and blanching increased water loss. Untreated and HELP-treated samples had comparable solids gains, which were lower (P < 0.05) than in the other samples. Apple slices turned brown after pretreatment but the L values of these samples increased with OD. The breaking force of dried samples increased with OD time, and pretreated samples had firmer dried texture than the untreated. Vitamin C content decreased with OD time, but HP- and HELP-treated apples had better retention of vitamin C. PMID:11409969

  15. Effect of periodic fluctuation in the osmotic environment on the adaptation of Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Zhou, K; George, S M; Li, P L; Baranyi, J

    2012-05-01

    The growth of Salmonella from different osmotic histories was studied in low water activity conditions. Cell cultures were successively diluted and grown in batch, in minimal medium, without and then with added NaCl, several times and from different inoculum levels. The viable count curves obtained in low water activity conditions showed an initial decline after which the culture either died out or recovered and entered the exponential phase. After the first batch with NaCl added, the subsequent curves at low water activity showed progressively smaller initial decline and shorter lag time as the number of transfers from high to low water activity conditions increased. The observed curves were analyzed by F-tests applying an extension of the model of Baranyi and Roberts (1994). The results suggest that periodic, systematic "training" can improve the adaptation capability of the organism without resulting in higher specific growth rate. PMID:22265315

  16. Interstitial Fibrosis Restricts Osmotic Water Transport in Encapsulating Peritoneal Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Morelle, Johann; Sow, Amadou; Hautem, Nicolas; Bouzin, Caroline; Crott, Ralph; Devuyst, Olivier; Goffin, Eric

    2015-10-01

    Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) is a rare but severe complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD) characterized by extensive fibrosis of the peritoneum. Changes in peritoneal water transport may precede EPS, but the mechanisms and potential predictive value of that transport defect are unknown. Among 234 patients with ESRD who initiated PD at our institution over a 20-year period, 7 subsequently developed EPS. We evaluated changes in peritoneal transport over time on PD in these 7 patients and in 28 matched controls using 3.86% glucose peritoneal equilibration tests. Compared with long-term PD controls, patients with EPS showed early loss of ultrafiltration capacity and sodium sieving before the onset of overt EPS. Multivariate analysis revealed that loss of sodium sieving was the most powerful predictor of EPS. Compared with long-term PD control and uremic peritoneum, EPS peritoneum showed thicker submesothelial fibrosis, with increased collagen density and a greater amount of thick collagen fibers. Reduced osmotic conductance strongly correlated with the degree of peritoneal fibrosis, but not with vasculopathy. Peritoneal fibrosis was paralleled by an excessive upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor and endothelial nitric oxide synthase, but the expression of endothelial aquaporin-1 water channels was unaltered. Our findings suggest that an early and disproportionate reduction in osmotic conductance during the course of PD is an independent predictor of EPS. This functional change is linked to specific alterations of the collagen matrix in the peritoneal membrane of patients with EPS, thereby validating the serial three-pore membrane/fiber matrix and distributed models of peritoneal transport. PMID:25636412

  17. Preparation and characterization of silymarin synchronized-release microporous osmotic pump tablets

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Qi-ping; Liu, Zhi-hong; Huang, Ai-wen; Zhang, Jing; Song, Hong-tao

    2016-01-01

    The pharmacological activity of herbal medicine is an overall action of each component in accordance with their original proportion. An efficient, sustained, and controlled-release drug delivery system of herbal medicine should ensure the synchronized drug release of each active component during the entire release procedure. In this study, silymarin (SM), a poorly soluble herbal medicine, was selected as a model drug to develop a synchronized-release drug delivery system: an SM microporous osmotic pump (MPOP) tablet. The SM was conjugated with phospholipid (SM phytosome complex, SM-PC) to improve the solubility, and the difference in the apparent octanol–water partition coefficient between the two components was significantly reduced. The dissolution rate of SM-PC was significantly higher than SM active pharmaceutical ingredients and was the same as that of the commercial SM capsule. The SM-PC was used to generate the MPOP tablet. SM was mixed with poly(ethylene) oxide and sodium chloride (an osmotic agent) to form the MPOP core, followed by coating with cellulose acetate and poly(ethylene) oxide to generate the SM MPOP. The results demonstrated that SM MPOP could synchronically and sustainably release the five active components within 12 hours (the similar coefficient f2 between two components was >65), and the average cumulative release rate was 85%. Fitting of the drug-release curve showed a zero-order release profile for SM MPOP. Our study showed that the phytosome complex technique combined with the MPOP system will achieve synchronized release of the various active components of herbal medicine and have potential applications in developing sustained release preparations in herbal medicine. PMID:26889080

  18. Preparation and characterization of silymarin synchronized-release microporous osmotic pump tablets.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qi-ping; Liu, Zhi-hong; Huang, Ai-wen; Zhang, Jing; Song, Hong-tao

    2016-01-01

    The pharmacological activity of herbal medicine is an overall action of each component in accordance with their original proportion. An efficient, sustained, and controlled-release drug delivery system of herbal medicine should ensure the synchronized drug release of each active component during the entire release procedure. In this study, silymarin (SM), a poorly soluble herbal medicine, was selected as a model drug to develop a synchronized-release drug delivery system: an SM microporous osmotic pump (MPOP) tablet. The SM was conjugated with phospholipid (SM phytosome complex, SM-PC) to improve the solubility, and the difference in the apparent octanol-water partition coefficient between the two components was significantly reduced. The dissolution rate of SM-PC was significantly higher than SM active pharmaceutical ingredients and was the same as that of the commercial SM capsule. The SM-PC was used to generate the MPOP tablet. SM was mixed with poly(ethylene) oxide and sodium chloride (an osmotic agent) to form the MPOP core, followed by coating with cellulose acetate and poly(ethylene) oxide to generate the SM MPOP. The results demonstrated that SM MPOP could synchronically and sustainably release the five active components within 12 hours (the similar coefficient f 2 between two components was >65), and the average cumulative release rate was 85%. Fitting of the drug-release curve showed a zero-order release profile for SM MPOP. Our study showed that the phytosome complex technique combined with the MPOP system will achieve synchronized release of the various active components of herbal medicine and have potential applications in developing sustained release preparations in herbal medicine. PMID:26889080

  19. Transport and reaction of nanoliter samples in a microfluidic reactor using electro-osmotic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arumbuliyur Comandur, Kaushik; Bhagat, Ali Asgar S.; Dasgupta, Subhashish; Papautsky, Ian; Banerjee, Rupak K.

    2010-03-01

    The primary focus of the paper is to establish both numerical and experimental methods to control the concentration of samples in a microreactor well. The concentration of the reacting samples is controlled by varying the initial sample size and electric field. Further, the paper numerically investigates the feasibility of mixing and reacting nanoliter samples with a wide variation in reaction rates in the microreactor driven by electro-osmotic pumping. Two discrete samples are measured and transported to the microreactor simultaneously by electro-osmotic pinching and switching. The transported samples are mixed in the microreactor and floated for 4.5 s for reaction to occur. It is seen that the normalized concentration of the product increases from 0.25 to 0.45 during that period. Also the effects of sample size and applied electric field on sample concentration during the switching process are studied. It is found that the normalized final sample concentration increases from 0.03 to 0.11 with an increase in sample size from 60 to 150 µm, at a constant electric field. Further, by increasing the electric field from 100 to 1000 V cm-1, at a constant sample size, there is a significant decrease in the final concentration of the sample from 0.14 to 0.04. Our studies also show that the normalized product concentration depends on the reaction rate and increases from 0.28 to 0.48 as the reaction rate increases from 10 L mol-1 s-1 to 105 L mol-1 s-1. However, the increase in the reaction rate beyond 105 L mol-1 s-1 does not influence the product concentration for the present design of the microreactor. Our microreactor with improved mixing can be used for assessing reactions of biological samples. The optimized sample size along with a controlled electric field for sample injection forms the basis for developing a prototype of a microreactor device for high throughput drug screening.

  20. Preferential Osmolyte Accumulation: a Mechanism of Osmotic Stress Adaptation in Diazotrophic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Madkour, Magdy A.; Smith, Linda Tombras; Smith, Gary M.

    1990-01-01

    A common cellular mechanism of osmotic-stress adaptation is the intracellular accumulation of organic solutes (osmolytes). We investigated the mechanism of osmotic adaptation in the diazotrophic bacteria Azotobacter chroococcum, Azospirillum brasilense, and Klebsiella pneumoniae, which are adversely affected by high osmotic strength (i.e., soil salinity and/or drought). We used natural-abundance 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to identify all the osmolytes accumulating in these strains during osmotic stress generated by 0.5 M NaCl. Evidence is presented for the accumulation of trehalose and glutamate in Azotobacter chroococcum ZSM4, proline and glutamate in Azospirillum brasilense SHS6, and trehalose and proline in K. pneumoniae. Glycine betaine was accumulated in all strains grown in culture media containing yeast extract as the sole nitrogen source. Alternative nitrogen sources (e.g., NH4Cl or casamino acids) in the culture medium did not result in measurable glycine betaine accumulation. We suggest that the mechanism of osmotic adaptation in these organisms entails the accumulation of osmolytes in hyperosmotically stressed cells resulting from either enhanced uptake from the medium (of glycine betaine, proline, and glutamate) or increased net biosynthesis (of trehalose, proline, and glutamate) or both. The preferred osmolyte in Azotobacter chroococcum ZSM4 shifted from glutamate to trehalose as a consequence of a prolonged osmotic stress. Also, the dominant osmolyte in Azospirillum brasilense SHS6 shifted from glutamate to proline accumulation as the osmotic strength of the medium increased. PMID:16348295

  1. A high pressure cell for simultaneous osmotic pressure and x-ray diffraction measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gauthe, Beatrice L. L. E.; Heron, Andrew J.; Seddon, John M.; Ces, Oscar; Templer, Richard H.

    2009-03-15

    In this paper, we report on a novel osmotic cell, developed to simultaneously subject a sample to osmotic stress and measure structural changes by small angle x-ray diffraction. The osmotic cell offers many advantages over more conventional methods of osmotically stressing soft materials to measure their structural response. In particular, a full osmotic analysis can be performed with a single small sample (25 {mu}l). This reduces sample handling and the associated systematic errors, as well as enabling tight control and monitoring of the thermodynamic environment during osmosis, thereby increasing measurement precision. The cell design enables control of osmotic pressure to {+-}0.04 bar over a pressure range of 1-100 bar, and temperature control to {+-}0.05 deg. C. Under these conditions, the lattice spacing in lyotropic structures was resolved to better than {+-}0.005 A. Using the osmotic cell, we demonstrate good agreement with previous conventional measurements on the energy of dehydrating the fluid lamellar phase of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine in water.

  2. A cellulose synthase-like protein is required for osmotic stress tolerance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianhua; Lee, Byeong-Ha; Dellinger, Mike; Cui, Xinping; Zhang, Changqing; Wu, Shang; Nothnagel, Eugene A.; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Osmotic stress imposed by soil salinity and drought stress significantly affects plant growth and development, but osmotic stress sensing and tolerance mechanisms are not well understood. Forward genetic screens using a root-bending assay have previously identified salt overly sensitive (sos) mutants of Arabidopsis that fall into five loci, SOS1 to SOS5. These loci are required for the regulation of ion homeostasis or cell expansion under salt stress, but do not play a major role in plant tolerance to the osmotic stress component of soil salinity or drought. Here we report an additional sos mutant, sos6-1, which defines a locus essential for osmotic stress tolerance. sos6-1 plants are hypersensitive to salt stress and osmotic stress imposed by mannitol or polyethylene glycol in culture media or by water deficit in the soil. SOS6 encodes a cellulose synthase-like protein, AtCSLD5. Only modest differences in cell wall chemical composition could be detected, but we found that sos6-1 mutant plants accumulate high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under osmotic stress and are hypersensitive to the oxidative stress reagent methyl viologen. The results suggest that SOS6/AtCSLD5 is not required for normal plant growth and development but has a critical role in osmotic stress tolerance and this function likely involves its regulation of ROS under stress. PMID:20409003

  3. A high pressure cell for simultaneous osmotic pressure and x-ray diffraction measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthé, Béatrice L. L. E.; Heron, Andrew J.; Seddon, John M.; Ces, Oscar; Templer, Richard H.

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, we report on a novel osmotic cell, developed to simultaneously subject a sample to osmotic stress and measure structural changes by small angle x-ray diffraction. The osmotic cell offers many advantages over more conventional methods of osmotically stressing soft materials to measure their structural response. In particular, a full osmotic analysis can be performed with a single small sample (25 μl). This reduces sample handling and the associated systematic errors, as well as enabling tight control and monitoring of the thermodynamic environment during osmosis, thereby increasing measurement precision. The cell design enables control of osmotic pressure to ±0.04 bar over a pressure range of 1-100 bar, and temperature control to ±0.05 °C. Under these conditions, the lattice spacing in lyotropic structures was resolved to better than ±0.005 Å. Using the osmotic cell, we demonstrate good agreement with previous conventional measurements on the energy of dehydrating the fluid lamellar phase of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine in water.

  4. Osmotic and diffusive properties of intracellular water in camel erythrocytes: effect of hemoglobin crowdedness.

    PubMed

    Bogner, Peter; Miseta, Attila; Berente, Zoltan; Schwarcz, Attila; Kotek, Gyula; Repa, Imre

    2005-09-01

    Camel erythrocytes have exceptional osmotic resistance and is believed to be due to augmented water-binding associated with the high hydrophilicity of camel hemoglobin. In practical terms this means that the proportion of osmotically non-removable water in camel erythrocytes is nearly 3-fold greater than that in human erythrocytes (approximately 65 vs approximately 20%). The relationship between water diffusion and the osmotic characteristics of intracellular water is the subject of this report. The amount of osmotically inactive water is 2-fold greater in camel hemoglobin solution in vitro compared to that of human, but water diffusion does not differ in camel and human hemoglobin solutions. However, the evaluation of water diffusion by magnetic resonance measurements in camel erythrocytes revealed approximately 15% lower apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) compared with human erythrocytes. When human erythrocytes were dehydrated to the level of camel erythrocytes, their osmotic and water diffusion properties were similar. These results show that a lower ADC is associated with a more pronounced increase in osmotically inactive water fraction. It is proposed that increased hemoglobin hydrophilicity allows not only augmented water-binding, but also a closer hemoglobin packaging in vivo, which in turn is associated with slower ADC and increased osmotic resistance. PMID:15951204

  5. Biochemical and ultrastructural properties of osmotically lysed rat-liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Caplan, A I; Greenawalt, J W

    1966-12-01

    Isolated rat-liver mitochondria were osmotically lysed by suspension and washing 3 times in cold, distilled water. Pellets obtained by centrifugation at 105,000 g for 30 min were resuspended, fixed with glutaraldehyde and OsO(4), and embedded in Epon 812. Thin sections show the presence of two distinct membranous populations, each of which is relatively homogeneous in size and appearance. Swollen mitochondria ( approximately 1.5 micro in diameter), which have been stripped of their outer membranes, are largely devoid of matrix and normal matrix granules and are referred to as "ghosts." The smaller (0.2 to 0.4 micro in diameter), empty appearing, vesicular elements, derived primarily from the outer mitochondrial membrane, can be differentiated from the ghosts on the basis of their smaller size and complete absence of internal structures, especially cristae. Each membranous element is enclosed by a single, continuous membrane; the "double membrane" organization typical of intact mitochondria is not observed. These findings indicate that the outer membrane of rat-liver mitochondria is spatially dissociated from the inner mitochondrial membrane by osmotic lysis of the mitochondria in distilled water. Three parameters of structural and functional significance in freshly isolated rat-liver mitochondria have been correlated with the structural alterations observed: (a) chemical composition (total protein, lipid phosphate and total phosphate), (b) specific and total activities of marker enzymes for mitochondrial matrix and membranes (malate dehydrogenase (MDH), D-beta-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (BDH) and cytochromes), and (c) integrated multienzyme functions (respiration, phosphorylation, and contraction). The data presented indicate that all mitochondrial membranes are completely conserved in the crude ghost preparation and that, in addition, about (1/3) of the matrix proteins (estimated by assays for MDH activity and protein) are retained. The study of integrated

  6. Plastid Osmotic Stress Activates Cellular Stress Responses in Arabidopsis1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Margaret E.; Basu, Meera R.; Bhaskara, Govinal Badiger; Verslues, Paul E.; Haswell, Elizabeth S.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about cytoplasmic osmoregulatory mechanisms in plants, and even less is understood about how the osmotic properties of the cytoplasm and organelles are coordinately regulated. We have previously shown that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants lacking functional versions of the plastid-localized mechanosensitive ion channels Mechanosensitive Channel of Small Conductance-Like2 (MSL2) and MSL3 contain leaf epidermal plastids under hypoosmotic stress, even during normal growth and development. Here, we use the msl2 msl3 mutant as a model to investigate the cellular response to constitutive plastid osmotic stress. Under unstressed conditions, msl2 msl3 seedlings exhibited several hallmarks of drought or environmental osmotic stress, including solute accumulation, elevated levels of the compatible osmolyte proline (Pro), and accumulation of the stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA). Furthermore, msl2 msl3 mutants expressed Pro and ABA metabolism genes in a pattern normally seen under drought or osmotic stress. Pro accumulation in the msl2 msl3 mutant was suppressed by conditions that reduce plastid osmotic stress or inhibition of ABA biosynthesis. Finally, treatment of unstressed msl2 msl3 plants with exogenous ABA elicited a much greater Pro accumulation response than in the wild type, similar to that observed in plants under drought or osmotic stress. These results suggest that osmotic imbalance across the plastid envelope can elicit a response similar to that elicited by osmotic imbalance across the plasma membrane and provide evidence for the integration of the osmotic state of an organelle into that of the cell in which it resides. PMID:24676856

  7. Osmotic activation of a Na(+)-dependent Cl-/HCO3- exchanger.

    PubMed

    Reusch, H P; Lowe, J; Ives, H E

    1995-01-01

    In many systems, osmotically induced cell shrinkage activates the Na+/H+ exchanger. To assess the role of H(+)-extruding transporters in the response to osmotic shrinkage in vascular smooth muscle (VSM) and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, intracellular pH (pHi) was measured with 2',7'-bis(carboxy-ethyl)-5(6)- carboxyfluorescein-acetoxymethyl ester (BCECF-AM) after exposing cells to hypertonic medium. In nominally HCO(3-)-free medium, addition of 200 mM sucrose caused pHi to increase 0.33 pH unit on average in VSM cells but only 0.13 pH unit in CHO cells. Permeant solutes failed to increase pHi significantly. Cytochalasin B (1-20 microM), colchicine (1-10 microM), Ca2+ removal, and downregulation of protein kinase C activity did not affect osmotic activation of H+ extrusion in either cell type. Additional work was carried out to determine why osmotic activation of H+ extrusion was less in CHO than in VSM cells. In CHO cells, the osmotically induced delta pHi was only weakly sensitive to amiloride, suggesting that osmotic forces may activate an H+ transport system other than Na+/H+ exchange. In the presence of 10 mM HCO3-, osmotically induced delta pHi decreased by 60% in VSM cells but increased by 50% in CHO cells compared with the delta pHi in HCO(3-)-free medium. Lastly, removal of extracellular Cl- did not affect osmotically induced delta pHi in VSM cells but completely abolished the response in CHO cells. We conclude that in VSM cells osmotically induced changes in pHi are mediated by Na+/H+ exchange, whereas in CHO cells they are most likely mediated by a Na(+)-dependent Cl-/HCO3- exchanger. PMID:7840143

  8. Experimental and theoretical investigations of non-Newtonian electro-osmotic driven flow in rectangular microchannels.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi; Chen, Juzheng; Wong, TeckNeng; Liow, Jong-Leng

    2016-07-20

    With the development of microfluidics, electro-osmotic (EO) driven flow has gained intense research interest as a result of its unique flow profile and the corresponding benefits in its application in the transportation of sensitive samples. Sensitive samples, such as DNA, are incapable of enduring strong flow shear induced by conventional hydrodynamic driven methods. EO driven flow is thus a niche area. However, even though there are a few research studies focusing on bio-fluidic samples related to EO driven flow, the majority of them are merely theoretical modeling without solid evidence from experiments due to the inherent complex rheological behavior of the bio-fluids. Challenges occur when the EO driven mechanism meets with complex rheology; vital questions such as can the zeta potential still be assumed to be constant when dealing with fluids with complex rheology? and "Does the shear thinning effect enhance electro-osmotic driven flow?" need to be answered. We conducted experiments using current monitoring and microscopy fluorescence methods, and developed a theoretical model by coupling a generalized Smoluchowski approach with the power-law constitutive model. We calculated the zeta potential and compared the experimental results with modeling to answer the questions. The results show a reduction of zeta potential in the presence of PEO aqueous solutions. A constant zeta potential is also indicated by varying the PEO concentration and the electric field strength.The shear thinning effect is also addressed via experimental data and theoretical calculations. The results show a promising enhancement of the EO driven velocity due to the shear thinning effect. PMID:27381295

  9. Effects of nitric oxide system and osmotic stress on Aquaporin-1 in the postnatal heart.

    PubMed

    Netti, Vanina A; Iovane, Agustina N; Vatrella, Mariana C; Zotta, Elsa; Fellet, Andrea L; Balaszczuk, Ana M

    2016-07-01

    Aquaporin-1 (AQP1) is expressed in the heart and its relationship with NO system has not been fully explored. The aims of this work were to study the effects of NO system inhibition on AQP1 abundance and localization and evaluate AQP1 S-nitrosylation in a model of water restriction during postnatal growth. Rats aged 25 and 50days (n=15) were divided in: R: water restriction; C: water ad libitum; RL: L-NAME (4mg/kgday)+water restriction; CL: L-NAME+water ad libitum. AQP1 protein levels, immunohistochemistry and S-nitrosylation (colocalization of AQP1 and S-nitrosylated cysteines by confocal microscopy) were determined in cardiac tissue. We also evaluated the effects of NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) on osmotic water permeability of cardiac membrane vesicles by stopped-flow spectrometry. AQP1 was present in cardiac vascular endothelium and endocardium in C and CL animals of both ages. Cardiac AQP1 levels were increased in R50 and RL50 and appeared in cardiomyocyte plasma membrane. No changes in AQP1 abundance or localization were observed in R25, but RL25 group showed AQP1 presence on cardiomyocyte sarcolemma. AQP1 S-nitrosylation was increased in R25 group, without changes in the 50-day-old group. Cardiac membrane vesicles expressing AQP1 presented a high water permeability coefficient and pretreatment with SNP decreased water transport. Age-related influence of NO system on AQP1 abundance and localization in the heart may affect cardiac water homeostasis during hypovolemic state. Increased AQP1 S-nitrosylation in the youngest group may decrease osmotic water permeability of cardiac membranes, having a negative impact on cardiac water balance. PMID:27261598

  10. Laboratory Investigation of Electro-Osmotic Remediation of Fine-Grained Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepy, N.; Wildenschild, D.; Elsholz, A.

    2000-02-23

    Electro-osmosis, a coupled-flow phenomenon in which an applied electrical potential gradient drives water flow, may be used to induce water flow through fine-grained sediments. We plan to use this technology to remediate chlorinated solvent-contaminated clayey zones at the LLNL site. The electro-osmotic conductivity (k{sub e}) determined from bench-top studies for a core extracted from a sediment zone 36.4-36.6 m below surface was initially 7.37 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 2}/s-V, decreasing to 3.44 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 2}/s-V, after electro-osmotically transporting 0.70 pore volumes of water through it (195 ml). Hydraulic conductivity (k{sub h}) of the same core was initially measured to be 5.00 x 10{sup -10} m/s, decreasing to 4.08 x 10{sup -10} m/s at the end of processing. This decline in permeability is likely due to formation of a chemical precipitation zone within the core. Water splitting products and ions electromigrate and precipitate within the core; H{sup +} and metal cations migrate toward the cathode, and OH{sup -} from the cathode moves toward the anode. We are now exploring how to minimize this effect using pH control. The significance of this technology is that for this core, a 3 V/cm voltage gradient produced an initial effective hydraulic conductivity of 2.21 x 10{sup -7} m/s, >400x greater than the initial hydraulic conductivity.

  11. The lateral intercellular space as osmotic coupling compartment in isotonic transport.

    PubMed

    Larsen, E H; Willumsen, N J; Møbjerg, N; Sørensen, J N

    2009-01-01

    Solute-coupled water transport and isotonic transport are basic functions of low- and high-resistance epithelia. These functions are studied with the epithelium bathed on the two sides with physiological saline of similar composition. Hence, at transepithelial equilibrium water enters the epithelial cells from both sides, and with the reflection coefficient of tight junction being larger than that of the interspace basement membrane, all of the water leaves the epithelium through the interspace basement membrane. The common design of transporting epithelia leads to the theory that an osmotic coupling of water absorption to ion flow is energized by lateral Na(+)/K(+) pumps. We show that the theory accounts quantitatively for steady- and time dependent states of solute-coupled fluid uptake by toad skin epithelium. Our experimental results exclude definitively three alternative theories of epithelial solute-water coupling: stoichiometric coupling at the molecular level by transport proteins like SGLT1, electro-osmosis and a 'junctional fluid transfer mechanism'. Convection-diffusion out of the lateral space constitutes the fundamental problem of isotonic transport by making the emerging fluid hypertonic relative to the fluid in the lateral intercellular space. In the Na(+) recirculation theory the 'surplus of solutes' is returned to the lateral space via the cells energized by the lateral Na(+)/K(+) pumps. We show that this theory accounts quantitatively for isotonic and hypotonic transport at transepithelial osmotic equilibrium as observed in toad skin epithelium in vitro. Our conclusions are further developed for discussing their application to solute-solvent coupling in other vertebrate epithelia such as small intestine, proximal tubule of glomerular kidney and gallbladder. Evidence is discussed that the Na(+) recirculation theory is not irreconcilable with the wide range of metabolic cost of Na(+) transport observed in fluid-transporting epithelia. PMID:18983444

  12. Direct relationship between osmotic and ionic conforming behavior and tissue water regulatory capacity in echinoids.

    PubMed

    Santos, Ivonete A; Castellano, Giovanna C; Freire, Carolina A

    2013-03-01

    Echinoderms are considered marine osmoconforming invertebrates. However, many are intertidal or live next to estuaries, tolerating salinity changes and showing extracellular gradients to dilute seawater. Three species of echinoids - Lytechinus variegatus, which can occur next to estuarine areas, the rocky intertidal Echinometra lucunter, and the mostly subtidal Arbacia lixula - were submitted to a protocol of stepwise (rate of 2-3 psu/h) dilution, down to 15 psu, or concentration, up to 45 psu, of control seawater (35 psu). Coelomic fluid samples were obtained every hour. The seawater dilution experiment lasted 8h, while the seawater concentration experiment lasted 6h. Significant gradients (40-90% above value in 15 psu seawater) for osmolality, sodium, magnesium, and potassium were shown by L. variegatus and E. lucunter. A. lixula showed the smallest gradients, displaying the strongest conforming behavior. The esophagus of the three species was challenged in vitro with 20 and 50% osmotic shocks (hypo- and hyperosmotic). A. lixula, the most "conforming" species, showed the highest capacity to avoid swelling of its tissues upon the -50% hyposmotic shock, and was also the species less affected by salinity changes concerning the observation of spines and ambulacral feet movement in the whole-animal experiments. Thus, the most conforming species (A. lixula) displayed the highest capacity to regulate tissue water/volume, and was also the most euryhaline among the three studied species. In addition, tissues from all three species swelled much more than they shrank under osmotic shocks of same magnitude. This distinct trend to gain water, despite the capacity to hold some gradients upon seawater dilution, helps to explain why echinoderms cannot be fully estuarine, or ever enter fresh water. PMID:23261991

  13. Salinity tolerance and osmotic response of the estuarine hermit crab Pagurus maclaughlinae in the Indian River Lagoon, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes-Ondi, Sarah E.; Turner, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    Pagurus maclaughlinae is the most common hermit in the Indian River Lagoon System. Wide variations in lagoonal salinity make it likely that P. maclaughlinae is euryhaline and that other hermit species in the area are more stenohaline, at least in some stages of their life histories. In a study of salinity tolerance, crabs were held unfed at salinities of 5-50 (25 control) for up to 30 days. Based on survivorship curves, P. maclaughlinae tolerated acute exposure to salinities of 10-45 for up to 18 days, and survivorship up to 30 days at 20-45 equaled or exceeded survivorship of the control. In a study of acclimation, the osmotic pressure of hemolymph was measured after crabs were held in the laboratory for 12, 48, and 96 h acutely exposed to salinities of 10-45. Paired t-tests revealed that the crabs weakly hyperregulated their hemolymph at 45-154 mOsmol above the external medium at all salinities and sampling times, and the osmotic differential of their hemolymph was fully acclimated by 96 h. In a third study, acclimatization of hemolymph was studied on crabs at four field sites that differed in their recent salinity histories. Field-collected crabs weakly regulated their hemolymph 72-84 mOsmol above the external medium at all sites sampled. Performance did not differ by site. The range of salinity tolerance and acclimation of hemolymph of P. maclaughlinae partly explain their wide distribution, and the consistent osmotic differential of its hemolymph indicates that the osmoregulatory ability of this small-bodied species is conserved in populations throughout the lagoon. Although some other larger-bodied hermit species in the region are euryhaline as adults, their tendency to hyperregulate strongly at low salinities possibly adds an energetic burden that, along with their less euryhaline long-lived larvae, might exclude them from the lagoon. Salinity tolerance of larval P. maclaughlinae has yet to be studied.

  14. [The standardization of colloid osmotic pressure of blood substitutes with a perfluorocarbon base].

    PubMed

    Draffehn, J; Reichelt, H; Sauer, S

    1991-07-01

    Besides a number of other characteristic features the colloidal osmotic pressure of blood substitutes is of importance, since it regulates the physiological balance between the intra- and extravascular fluid content. The colloidal osmotic pressure in blood is determined predominantly by the albumin fraction. The entropy increase on diluting albumin which, can't pass semipermeable vascular walls of the intravascular substances are used in blood substitutes to maintain the colloidal osmotic pressure. Their selection and appropriate are of great importance for the efficiency of blood substitutes. PMID:1723803

  15. Preliminary experiments with an electro-osmotic heat pipe laboratory model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenassen, D.; Bunk, P. B.

    1983-04-01

    A laboratory model of an electro-osmotic heat pipe filled with ethanol was tested. The heat transport through the pipe and the temperature distribution along the pipe wall and the temperature difference across the pipe were measured. The heat pipe performed like a CCHP under wick limited operation conditions. Superheating of the ethanol in the evaporator caused relatively large variations of the heat transport. With the electro-osmotic pump in operation, the heat pipe showed a fast gas production and corrosion of the electrodes of the electro-osmotic pump, whereas no measurable effect on the heat transport was observed.

  16. Electro-osmotic drag coefficient of water and methanol in polymer electrolytes at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, D.; Wainright, J.S.; Landau, U.; Savinell, R.F.

    1996-04-01

    The electro-osmotic drag coefficient of water in two polymer electrolytes was experimentally determined as a function of water activity and current density for temperatures up to 200 C. The results show that the electro-osmotic drag coefficient varies from 0.2 to 0.6 in Nafion{reg_sign}/H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} membrane electrolyte, but is essentially zero in phosphoric acid-doped PBI (polybenzimidazole) membrane electrolyte over the range of water activity considered. The near-zero electro-osmotic drag coefficient found in PBI indicates that this electrolyte should lessen the problems associated with water redistribution in proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

  17. OsCCD1, a novel small calcium-binding protein with one EF-hand motif, positively regulates osmotic and salt tolerance in rice.

    PubMed

    Jing, Pei; Zou, Juanzi; Kong, Lin; Hu, Shiqi; Wang, Biying; Yang, Jun; Xie, Guosheng

    2016-06-01

    Calcium-binding proteins play key roles in the signal transduction in the growth and stress response in eukaryotes. However, a subfamily of proteins with one EF-hand motif has not been fully studied in higher plants. Here, a novel small calcium-binding protein with a C-terminal centrin-like domain (CCD1) in rice, OsCCD1, was characterized to show high similarity with a TaCCD1 in wheat. As a result, OsCCD1 can bind Ca(2+) in the in vitro EMSA and the fluorescence staining calcium-binding assays. Transient expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged OsCCD1 in rice protoplasts showed that OsCCD1 was localized in the nucleus and cytosol of rice cells. OsCCD1 transcript levels were transiently induced by osmotic stress and salt stress through the calcium-mediated ABA signal. The rice seedlings of T-DNA mutant lines showed significantly less tolerance to osmotic and salt stresses than wild type plants (p<0.01). Conversely, its overexpressors can significantly enhance the tolerance to osmotic and salt stresses than wild type plants (p<0.05). Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that, OsDREB2B, OsAPX1 and OsP5CS genes are involved in the rice tolerance to osmotic and salt stresses. In sum, OsCCD1 gene probably affects the DREB2B and its downstream genes to positively regulate osmotic and salt tolerance in rice seedlings. PMID:27095404

  18. Morphology transition of raft-model membrane induced by osmotic pressure: Formation of double-layered vesicle similar to an endo- and/or exocytosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onai, Teruaki; Hirai, Mitsuhiro

    2010-10-01

    The effect of osmotic pressure on the structure of large uni-lamellar vesicle (LUV) of the lipid mixtures of monosialoganglioside (GM1)-cholesterol-dioleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) was studies by using wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) method. The molar ratios of the mixtures were 0.1/0.1/1, 0/0.1/1, and 0/0/1. The ternary lipid mixture is a model of lipid rafts. The value of osmotic pressure was varied from 0 to 4.16×105 N/m2 by adding the polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) in the range from 0 to 25 % w/v. In the case of the mixtures without GM1, the rise of the osmotic pressure just enhances the multi-lamellar stacking with deceasing the inter-lamellar spacing. On the other hand, the mixture containing GM1 shows the structural transition from a uni-lamellar vesicle to a double-layered vesicle (a liposome including a smaller one inside) by the rise of osmotic pressure. In this morphology transition the total surface area of the double-layered vesicle is mostly as same as that of the LUV at the initial state. The polar head region of GM1 is bulky and highly hydrophilic due to the oligosaccharide chain containing a sialic acid residue. Then, the present results suggest that the existence of GM1 in the outer-leaflet of the LUV is essentially important for such a double-layered vesicle formation. Alternatively, a phenomenon similar to an endo- and/or exocytosis in cells can be caused simply by a variation of osmotic pressure.

  19. Characterization of γ-aminobutyric acid metabolism and oxidative damage in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) seedlings under salt and osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Al-Quraan, Nisreen A; Sartawe, Fatima Al-Batool; Qaryouti, Muien M

    2013-07-15

    The molecular response of plants to abiotic stresses has been considered a process mainly involved in the modulation of transcriptional activity of stress-related genes. Nevertheless, recent findings have suggested new layers of regulation and complexity. Upstream molecular mechanisms are involved in the plant response to abiotic stress. Plants gain resistance to abiotic stress by reprogramming metabolism and gene expression. GABA is proposed to be a signaling molecule involved in nitrogen metabolism, regulating the cytosolic pH, and protection against oxidative damage in response to various abiotic stresses. The aim of our study was to examine the role of the GABA shunt pathway-specific response in five wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars (Hurani 75, Sham I, Acsad 65, Um Qayes and Nodsieh) to salt and osmotic stress in terms of seed germination, seedling growth, oxidative damage (malondialdehyde (MDA) accumulation), and characterization of the glutamate decarboxylse gene (GAD) m-RNA level were determined using RT-PCR techniques. Our data showed a marked increase in GABA, MDA and GAD m-RNA levels under salt and osmotic stress in the five wheat cultivars. Um Qayes cultivar showed the highest germination percentage, GABA accumulation, and MDA level under salt and osmotic stresses. The marked increase in GAD gene expression explains the high accumulation of the GABA level under both stresses. Our results indicated that the GABA shunt is a key signaling and metabolic pathway that allows wheat to adapt to salt and osmotic stress. Based on our data, the Um Qayes wheat cultivar is the cultivar most recommended to be grown in soil with high salt and osmotic contents. PMID:23602379

  20. Osmotic Stress, not Aldose Reductase Activity, Directly induces Growth Factors and MAPK Signaling changes during Sugar Cataract Formation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Xing, Kuiyi; Randazzo, James; Blessing, Karen; Lou, Marjorie F.; Kador, Peter F.

    2012-01-01

    In sugar cataract formation in rats, aldose reductase (AR) actitvity is not only linked to lenticular sorbitol (diabetic) or galactitol (galactosemic) formation but also to signal transduction changes, cytotoxic signals and activation of apoptosis. Using both in vitro and in vivo techniques, the interrelationship between AR activity, polyol (sorbitol and galactitol) formation, osmotic stress, growth factor induction, and cell signaling changes have been investigated. For in vitro studies, lenses from Sprague Dawley rats were cultured for up to 48 hrs in TC-199-bicarbonate media containing either 30 mM fructose (control), or 30 mM glucose or galctose with/without the aldose reductase inhibitors AL1576 or tolrestat, the sorbitol dehydrogenase inhibitor (SDI) CP-470,711, or 15 mM mannitol (osmotic-compensated media). For in vivo studies, lenses were obtained from streptozotocin-induced diabetic Sprague Dawley rats fed diet with/without the ARIs AL1576 or tolrestat for 10 weeks. As expected, lenses cultured in high glucose / galactose media or from untreated diabetic rats all showed a decrease in the GSH pool that was lessened by ARI treatment. Lenses either from diabetic rats or from glucose/galactose culture conditions showed increased expression of basic-FGF, TGF-β, and increased signaling through P-Akt, P-ERK1/2 and P-SAPK/JNK which were also normalized by ARIs to the expression levels observed in non-diabetic controls. Culturing rat lenses in osomotically compensated media containing 30 mM glucose or galactose did not lead to increased growth factor expression or altered signaling. These studies indicate that it is the biophysical response of the lens to osmotic stress that results in an increased intralenticular production of basic-FGF and TGF-β and the altered cytotoxic signaling that is observed during sugar cataract formation. PMID:22710095

  1. An osmotic system within the cytoplasm of cells.

    PubMed

    OPIE, E L

    1948-05-01

    The cytoplasm of cells of the liver and of the kidney is in large part occupied by bodies which respond to the water content of these cells and are modified by dissolved substances in the surrounding fluid or by physical change such as freezing. These bodies, in part mitochondria but designated more broadly cytochondria, constitute an osmotic system within the cytoplasm of cells. When the specific gravity of liver or kidney tissue is used as an index of changes in the water content of tissue, swelling of cytochondria in general follows the intake of water but this relation may be modified by a variety of conditions. When liver that has been frozen and thawed is immersed in water, cytochondria become swollen though the containing cells diminish in size. Solutions of sodium and of potassium chloride isotonic with blood plasma cause delayed swelling of cells and cytochondria, greater with the potassium salt; solutions of calcium chloride of equal molar concentration cause immediate swelling of cells and cytochondria. The basophile material of the cytoplasm (ribonucleic acid and related substances) and the material that gives to mitochondria their characteristic stain are removed by immersion in water but their disappearance is retarded by isotonic solutions of sodium or of potassium chloride and further delayed by hypertonic solutions. When the intensity of staining reactions is diminished by the partial loss of basophile substance or of the distinctive mitochondrial material, these are found at the surfaces of the cytoplasmic bodies, held perhaps by adsorption. When water, isotonic solutions of sodium chloride, or Ringer's solution comes into contact with immersed liver, they remove basophile and mitochondrial material from a superficial zone and substances with similar staining reactions appear in the cytoplasm of cells at a deeper level. Osmotic changes in the cytoplasmic bodies may be reversible. When liver tissue which has been for a short time immersed in water

  2. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Two Oysters, Crassostrea gigas and Crassostrea hongkongensis Provides Insights into Adaptation to Hypo-Osmotic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuelin; Yu, Hong; Kong, Lingfeng; Liu, Shikai; Li, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Environmental salinity creates a key barrier to limit the distribution of most aquatic organisms. Adaptation to osmotic fluctuation is believed to be a factor facilitating species diversification. Adaptive evolution often involves beneficial mutations at more than one locus. Bivalves hold great interest, with numerous species living in waters, as osmoconformers, who maintain the osmotic pressure balance mostly by free amino acids. In this study, 107,076,589 reads from two groups of Crassostrea hongkongensis were produced and the assembled into 130,629 contigs. Transcripts putatively involved in stress-response, innate immunity and cell processes were identified according to Gene ontology and KEGG pathway analyses. Comparing with the transcriptome of C. gigas to characterize the diversity of transcripts between species with osmotic divergence, we identified 182,806 high-quality single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for C. hongkongensis, and 196,779 SNPs for C. gigas. Comparison of 11,602 pairs of putative orthologs allowed for identification of 14 protein-coding genes that experienced strong positive selection (Ka/Ks>1). In addition, 45 genes that may show signs of moderate positive selection (1≥Ka/Ks>0.5) were also identified. Based on Ks ratios and divergence time between the two species published previously, we estimated a neutral transcriptome-wide substitution mutation rate of 1.39×10−9 per site per year. Several genes were differentially expressed across the control and treated groups of each species. This is the first time to sequence the transcriptome of C. hongkongensis and provide the most comprehensive transcriptomic resource available for it. The increasing amount of transcriptome data on Crassostrea provides an excellent resource for phylogenetic analysis. A large number of SNPs identified in this work are expected to provide valuable resources for future marker and genotyping assay development. The analysis of natural selection provides an

  3. Regulation of salmonid fish sperm motility by osmotic shock-induced water influx across the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Takei, Gen Leon; Mukai, Chinatsu; Okuno, Makoto

    2015-04-01

    The motility of salmonid fish sperm is initiated by a decrease in the extracellular K(+) concentration. However, our previous studies revealed that salmonid fish sperm motility could be initiated in the presence of an inhibitory concentration of K(+) by drastic osmotic shock induced by suspension in a hypertonic glycerol solution and subsequent dilution in a hypotonic solution (glycerol-treatment). In the present study, we examined if an osmotic shock-induced water influx is involved in the regulation of salmonid fish sperm motility. HgCl2, a common inhibitor of aquaporins (AQPs), decreased the duration of salmonid fish sperm motility. Dilution of sperm cells in a hypotonic solution increased the cellular volume, whereas HgCl2 inhibited such an increase in cellular volume. Furthermore, the expression of AQP 1a and 10 in rainbow trout testes was confirmed. In contrast, HgCl2 did not affect glycerol-treated sperm motility, indicating that AQPs are not involved in glycerol-treated sperm motility. We also explored the possibility of aquaporin-independent water influx in glycerol-treated sperm by assessing the sperm membrane permeability using propidium iodide. The plasma membrane of glycerol-treated sperm was considerably permeabilized. The cellular volume was decreased in a hypertonic glycerol solution and increased upon subsequent hypoosmotic shock, indicating an AQP-independent water flux across the plasma membrane upon glycerol-treatment. Taken together, these results showed that water influx across the plasma membrane via AQP is crucial for the maintenance of salmonid fish sperm motility under normal conditions, whereas water influx by osmotic shock-induced membrane permeation is critical for the initiation of glycerol-treated sperm motility. PMID:25522712

  4. Influence of the partitioning of osmolytes by the cytoplasm on the passive response of cells to osmotic loading.

    PubMed

    Albro, Michael B; Petersen, Leah E; Li, Roland; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2009-12-01

    Due to the dense organization of organelles, cytoskeletal elements, and protein complexes that make up the intracellular environment, it is likely that membrane-permeant solutes may be excluded from a fraction of the interstitial space of the cytoplasm via steric restrictions, electrostatic interactions, and other long-range intermolecular forces. This study investigates the hypothesis that the intracellular partitioning of membrane-permeant solutes manifests itself as a partial volume recovery in response to hyperosmotic loading, based on prior theoretical and biomimetic experimental studies. Osmotic loading experiments are performed on immature bovine chondrocytes using culture conditions where regulatory volume responses are shown to be insignificant. Osmotic loading with membrane-permeant glycerol (92 Da) and urea (60 Da) are observed to produce partial volume recoveries consistent with the proposed hypothesis, whereas loading with 1,2-propanediol (76 Da) produces complete volume recovery. Combining these experimental results with the previous theoretical framework produces a measure for the intracellular partition coefficient of each of these solutes. At 1000 mOsm, 1,2-propanediol is the only osmolyte to yield a partition coefficient not statistically different from unity, kappa(p)(i) = 1.00 +/- 0.02. For glycerol, the partition coefficient increases with osmolarity from kappa(p)(i) = 0.48 +/- 0.19 at 200 mOsm to kappa(p)(i) = 0.80 +/- 0.07 at 1000 mOsm; urea exhibits no such dependence, with an average value of kappa(p)(i) = 0.87 +/- 0.07 for all osmolarities from 200 to 1000 mOsm. The finding that intracellular partitioning of membrane-permeant solutes manifests itself as a partial volume recovery under osmotic loading offers a simple method for characterizing the partition coefficient. These measurements suggest that significant partitioning may occur even for small membrane-permeant osmolytes. Furthermore, a positive correlation is observed, suggesting

  5. Evaluation of oxidant/antioxidant status, trace mineral levels, and erythrocyte osmotic fragility in goats naturally infected with Anaplasma ovis.

    PubMed

    Jalali, Seyedeh Missagh; Bahrami, Somayeh; Rasooli, Aria; Hasanvand, Saman

    2016-08-01

    Anaplasma ovis, an arthropod-borne pathogen that infects erythrocytes, is the major cause of ovine and caprine anaplasmosis. This study was performed to assess in goats infected with A. ovis the osmotic fragility of erythrocytes, antioxidant status, and serum levels of microminerals. Blood samples were collected from 104 mixed breed goats in Ahvaz area, southwest Iran and subjected to parasitologic, hematologic, oxidant/antioxidant, and micromineral assessment. Anaplasma infection was detected in 30 samples (28.8 %) by microscopic examination of blood smears while PCR-RFLP analysis revealed infection with A. ovis in 68 samples (65.4 %). Studied animals were divided into three groups based on A. ovis infection: Uninfected goats as control group (group 1), PCR positive without parasitemia (group 2) and PCR positive with parasitemia (group 3). Hematological evaluation showed significantly increased lymphocyte and monocyte counts in Anaplasma-infected groups (group 2 and 3). A significantly lower MCHC and higher MCV were also observed in infected groups. In group 3 significant rises in erythrocyte's osmotic fragility in different salt concentrations and also in median corpuscular fragility (MCF) was seen. Evaluation of the antioxidant defense system of the erythrocytes revealed a decrease in total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in group 3. There was no significant difference in serum micromineral levels between infected and uninfected animals. Overall, the observed substantial decrease in the antioxidant enzyme activities with remarkable elevated levels of erythrocyte osmotic fragility indicate high exposure of erythrocytes to oxidative damage in Anaplasma-infected goats. These results also suggest that the disturbed antioxidant defense mechanisms in caprine anaplasmosis can promote the development of anemia. PMID:27142027

  6. Proteomic Analysis of Erythritol-Producing Yarrowia lipolytica from Glycerol in Response to Osmotic Pressure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Bo; Dai, Xiao-Meng; Zheng, Zhi-Yong; Zhu, Li; Zhan, Xiao-Bei; Lin, Chi-Chung

    2015-07-01

    Osmotic pressure is a critical factor for erythritol production with osmophilic yeast. Protein expression patterns of an erythritol-producing yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica, were analyzed to identify differentially-expressed proteins in response to osmotic pressure. In order to analyze intracellular protein levels quantitatively, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was performed to separate and visualize the differential expression of the intracellular proteins extracted from Y. lipolytica cultured under low (3.17 osmol/kg) and high (4.21 osmol/kg) osmotic pressures. Proteomic analyses allowed identification of 54 differentially-expressed proteins among the proteins distributed in the range of pI 3-10 and 14.4-97.4 kDa molecular mass between the osmotic stress conditions. Remarkably, the main proteins were involved in the pathway of energy, metabolism, cell rescue, and stress response. The expression of such enzymes related to protein and nucleotide biosynthesis was inhibited drastically, reflecting the growth arrest of Y. lipolytica under hyperosmotic stress. The improvement of erythritol production under high osmotic stress was due to the significant induction of a range of crucial enzymes related to polyols biosynthesis, such as transketolase and triosephosphate isomerase, and the osmotic stress responsive proteins like pyridoxine-4-dehydrogenase and the AKRs family. The polyols biosynthesis was really related to an osmotic response and a protection mechanism against hyperosmotic stress in Y. lipolytica. Additionally, the high osmotic stress could also induce other cell stress responses as with heat shock and oxidation stress responses, and these responsive proteins, such as the HSPs family, catalase T, and superoxide dismutase, also had drastically increased expression levels under hyperosmotic pressure. PMID:25737116

  7. Using miniature osmotic infusion pumps to maintain tritiated thymidine exposure to cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Neely, J.E.; Hake, D.A.

    1982-06-01

    To provide a constant level of tracer doses of tritiated thymidine to cultured cells during continuous infusion, miniature osmotic infusion pumps were used to provide replacement thymidine. By determining the loss of isotope from the media during nonreplacement, the rate of constant infusion replacement to maintain thymidine levels was calculated. The replacement rates were similar for the three cell lines examined and allowed a standard osmotic pump infusion.

  8. The effect of osmotic pressure of aqueous PEG solutions on red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, A; Arnold, K; Pratsch, L

    1985-08-01

    A drastic increase of the intracellular microviscosity of red blood cells in the presence of polyethylene glycol (PEG) was established by electron spin resonance using the small spin label molecule 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidine-N-oxyl-4-one (TEMPONE). The effective osmotic pressure of PEG solutions stressing the cells was estimated by comparison with those cytoplasmic rotational correlation times of TEMPONE measured in NaCl or sucrose containing media of known osmotic pressure. PMID:2998502

  9. Active Osmotic Exchanger for Efficient Nanofiltration Inspired by the Kidney

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marbach, Sophie; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the physical mechanisms underlying one of the most efficient filtration devices: the kidney. Building on a minimal model of the Henle loop—the central part of the kidney filtration—we investigate theoretically the detailed out-of-equilibrium fluxes in this separation process in order to obtain absolute theoretical bounds for its efficiency in terms of separation ability and energy consumption. We demonstrate that this separation process operates at a remarkably small energy cost as compared to traditional sieving processes while working at much smaller pressures. This unique energetic efficiency originates in the double-loop geometry of the nephron, which operates as an active osmotic exchanger. The principles for an artificial-kidney-inspired filtration device could be readily mimicked based on existing soft technologies to build compact and low-energy artificial dialytic devices. Such a "kidney on a chip" also points to new avenues for advanced water recycling, targeting, in particular, sea-water pretreatment for decontamination and hardness reduction.

  10. Electrolyte depletion and osmotic imbalance in amphibians with chytridiomycosis.

    PubMed

    Voyles, Jamie; Berger, Lee; Young, Sam; Speare, Rick; Webb, Rebecca; Warner, Jeffrey; Rudd, Donna; Campbell, Ruth; Skerratt, Lee F

    2007-09-14

    Mounting evidence implicates the disease chytridiomycosis, caused by the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, in global amphibian declines and extinctions. While the virulence of this disease has been clearly demonstrated, there is, as yet, no mechanistic explanation for how B. dendrobatidis kills amphibians. To investigate the pathology of chytridiomycosis, blood samples were collected from uninfected, aclinically infected and clinically diseased amphibians and analyzed for a wide range of biochemical and hematological parameters. Here, we show that green tree frogs Litoria caerulea with severe chytridiomycosis had reduced plasma osmolality, sodium, potassium, magnesium and chloride concentrations. Stable plasma albumin, hematocrit and urea levels indicated that hydration status was unaffected, signifying depletion of electrolytes from circulation rather than dilution due to increased water uptake. We suggest that B. dendrobatidis kills amphibians by disrupting normal epidermal functioning, leading to osmotic imbalance through loss of electrolytes. Determining how B. dendrobatidis kills amphibians is fundamental to understanding the host-pathogen relationship and thus the population declines attributed to B. dendrobatidis. Understanding the mechanisms of mortality may also explain interspecific variation in susceptibility to chytridiomycosis. PMID:17972752

  11. Miniature osmotic actuators for controlled maxillofacial distraction osteogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-Hsien; Su, Yu-Chuan

    2010-06-01

    We have successfully demonstrated miniature actuators that are capable of converting chemical potential directly into steady mechanical movements for maxillofacial distraction osteogenesis. Pistons and diaphragms powered by osmosis are employed to provide the desired linear and volumetric displacements for bone distraction and potentially the release of bone morphogenetic proteins, respectively. The cylindrical-shaped miniature actuators are composed of polymeric materials and fabricated by molding and assembly processes. In the prototype demonstration, vapor-permeable thermoplastic polyurethane was employed as the semi-permeable material. 3 cm long actuators with piston and diaphragm radii of 1 mm and 500 µm, respectively, were fabricated and characterized. The maximum distraction force from the piston-type actuator is found to be 6 N while the piston travels at a constant velocity of 32 µm h-1 (or 0.77 mm/day) for about 1 week. Meanwhile, the release rate from the diaphragm-type actuator is measured to be constant, 0.15 µl h-1 (or 3.6 µl/day), throughout the experiment. Moreover, the sizes and output characteristics of the self-regulating actuators could readily be tailored to realize optimal distraction rate, rhythm and osteogenic activity. As such, the demonstrated miniature osmotic actuators could potentially serve as versatile apparatuses for maxillofacial distraction osteogenesis and fulfill the needs of a variety of implantable and biomedical applications.

  12. Osmotically induced cytosolic free Ca(2+) changes in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Morris, M R; Doull, I J; Hallett, M B

    2001-02-01

    Cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration in neutrophils was measured by ratiometric fluorometry of intracellular fura2. Increasing the extracellular osmolarity, by either NaCl (300-600 mM) or sucrose (600-1200 mM), caused a rise in cytosolic free Ca(2+) (Delta(max) approximately equal to 600 nM). This was not due to cell lysis as the cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration was reversed by restoration of isotonicity and a second rise in cytosolic free Ca(2+) could be provoked by repeating the change in extracellular osmolarity. Furthermore, the rise in cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration occurred in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+), demonstrating that release of intracellular fura2 into the external medium did not occur. The osmotically-induced rise in cytosolic free Ca(2+) was not inhibited by either the phospholipase C-inhibitor U73122, or the microfilament inhibitor cytochalasin B, suggesting that neither signalling via inositol tris-phosphate or the cytoskeletal system were involved. However, the rise in cytosolic free Ca(2+) may have resulted from a reduction in neutrophil water volume in hyperosmotic conditions. As these rises in cytosolic Ca(2+) (Delta(max) approximately equal to 600 nM) were large enough to provoke changes in neutrophil activity, we propose that conditions which removes cell water may similarly elevate cytosolic free Ca(2+) to physiologically important levels. PMID:11341979

  13. The effects of osmotic stress on human platelets.

    PubMed

    Armitage, W J; Parmar, N; Hunt, C J

    1985-05-01

    The effect of osmotic stress on human platelets was investigated at 0, 25, and 37 degrees C. The osmolality of the suspending plasma was decreased by adding water or increased by adding sodium chloride or sucrose. After 5 min, isotonicity was restored by dilution with an excess of isotonic phosphate-buffered saline. After centrifugation, the platelets were resuspended in autologous plasma and then incubated for 1 hr at 37 degrees C before assaying the active transport of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and the hypotonic stress response. Anisosmotic conditions had a greater effect on the extent of volume reversal in the hypotonic stress test than on 5-HT uptake. At 25 degrees C, only moderate degrees of hypotonicity (0.25 osmol/kg) or hypertonicity (0.59 osmol/kg) were sufficient to depress the hypotonic stress response. In general, platelets tolerated departures from isotonic conditions better at 0 degree C than at the higher temperatures. Furthermore, at 0 and 25 degrees C approximately equiosmolal concentrations of sucrose and sodium chloride depressed the hypotonic stress response to similar extents, but at 37 degrees C high osmolalities (greater than 2 osmol/kg) were tolerated better when the additive was sucrose than when it was sodium chloride. Platelets shrank when subjected to hyperosmotic conditions, but their discoid shape and the peripheral band of microtubules were maintained. PMID:3980588

  14. The osmotic response of human erythrocytes and the membrane cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Heubusch, P; Jung, C Y; Green, F A

    1985-02-01

    The volumes of human erythrocytes suspended in solutions of varying concentrations of sodium chloride and sucrose were measured by a Coulter Channelyzer Model H4 with appropriate corrections. The cells showed greatly restricted volume changes at osmolarities between 200-700 mOsm. At osmolarities outside this limit, on the other hand, the cells showed nonrestricted volume changes following essentially the predictions of an ideal osmometer. This unexpected volume response was not spuriously due to changes in shape or to a changing orientation of the cells as they traversed the aperture. The restricted volume change observed was abolished when the cells had previously been treated with diamide or had been heated for 60 minutes at 50 degrees C, conditions that are known to disturb the spectrin-actin network. The possibility must be considered that the osmotic behavior of human erythrocytes may be nonideal and that this nonideal behavior is primarily due to mechanical restriction provided by the spectrin-actin network of the membrane cytoskeleton. PMID:3918046

  15. Osmotic Drug Delivery System as a Part of Modified Release Dosage Form

    PubMed Central

    Keraliya, Rajesh A.; Patel, Chirag; Patel, Pranav; Keraliya, Vipul; Soni, Tejal G.; Patel, Rajnikant C.; Patel, M. M.

    2012-01-01

    Conventional drug delivery systems are known to provide an immediate release of drug, in which one can not control the release of the drug and can not maintain effective concentration at the target site for longer time. Controlled drug delivery systems offer spatial control over the drug release. Osmotic pumps are most promising systems for controlled drug delivery. These systems are used for both oral administration and implantation. Osmotic pumps consist of an inner core containing drug and osmogens, coated with a semipermeable membrane. As the core absorbs water, it expands in volume, which pushes the drug solution out through the delivery ports. Osmotic pumps release drug at a rate that is independent of the pH and hydrodynamics of the dissolution medium. The historical development of osmotic systems includes development of the Rose-Nelson pump, the Higuchi-Leeper pumps, the Alzet and Osmet systems, the elementary osmotic pump, and the push-pull system. Recent advances include development of the controlled porosity osmotic pump, and systems based on asymmetric membranes. This paper highlights the principle of osmosis, materials used for fabrication of pumps, types of pumps, advantages, disadvantages, and marketed products of this system. PMID:22852100

  16. Adaptive responses to osmotic stress in kidney-derived cell lines from Scatophagus argus, a euryhaline fish.

    PubMed

    Gui, Lang; Zhang, Peipei; Liang, Xuemei; Su, Maoliang; Wu, Di; Zhang, Junbin

    2016-06-01

    The euryhaline fish, the spotted scat (Scatophagus argus), is exceptional for its ability to tolerate rapid fluctuations in salinity. To better understand fish osmoregulation and enable more precise analyses of specific features of adaptive responses to the osmotic stress in fish, a S. argus kidney-derived cell line (SK) was developed and subcultured for more than 70 passages. The cells were mostly fibroblast-like, with a normal diploid karyotype (2n=48). A low-osmolarity-adapted SK cell line (SK-la) was induced by growth in a hypotonic solution (150 mOsm). Effects of different osmotic stresses (150, 300 and 450 mOsm) on cell growth, cell morphology, cell volume changes and cell damage in SK, SK-la and CIK (a kidney-derived cell line from freshwater grass carp) cells were studied. These were compared by use of microscopic observation, flow cytometry and a Na-K-ATPase (NKA) assay. SK cells became smaller and grew rapidly in response to hypotonic stress (150 mOsm), and exhibited no visible morphological changes in response to hypertonic stress (450 mOsm). SK-la grew well by moderate hypertonicity (300 mOsm) but depressed in severe hypertonicity (450 mOsm), the number of unhealthy SK-la cells rose as osmolarity increased. In contrast, CIK cells became unhealthy with anisotonic challenge. The NKA activities of SK and CIK cells were assayed after exposure to anisotonic conditions, and rapid decreases were detected immediately except SK cells which were not affected in hypotonicity. Unlike in SK and CIK, an increase following a down-regulation of NKA activity was observed in SK-la cells upon moderate hypertonic stress. These results suggested that SK and SK-la cells had stronger osmoregulatory capacity than CIK cells, and provided new insights on the osmosensing and osmotic adaption in euryhaline fish kidney. PMID:26911257

  17. Changes in Osmotic Pressure and Mucilage during Low-Temperature Acclimation of Opuntia ficus-indica 1

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Guillermo; Nobel, Park S.

    1991-01-01

    Opuntia ficus-indica, a Crassulacean acid metabolism plant cultivated for its fruits and cladodes, was used to examine chemical and physiological events accompanying low-temperature acclimation. Changes in osmotic pressure, water content, low molecular weight solutes, and extracellular mucilage were monitored in the photosynthetic chlorenchyma and the water-storage parenchyma when plants maintained at day/night air temperatures of 30/20°C were shifted to 10/0°C. An increase in osmotic pressure of 0.13 megapascal occurred after 13 days at 10/0°C. Synthesis of glucose, fructose, and glycerol accounted for most of the observed increase in osmotic pressure during the low-temperature acclimation. Extracellular mucilage and the relative apoplastic water content increased by 24 and 10%, respectively, during exposure to low temperatures. These increases apparently favor the extracellular nucleation of ice closer to the equilibrium freezing temperature for plants at 10/0°C, which could make the cellular dehydration more gradual and less damaging. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies helped elucidate the cellular processes during ice formation, such as those revealed by changes in the relaxation times of two water fractions in the chlorenchyma. The latter results suggested a restricted mobility of intracellular water and an increased mobility of extracellular water for plants at 10/0°C compared with those at 30/20°C. Increased mobility of extracellular water could facilitate extracellular ice growth and thus delay the potentially lethal intracellular freezing during low-temperature acclimation. PMID:16668536

  18. Osmotically regulated floating asymmetric membrane capsule for controlled site-specific delivery of ranitidine hydrochloride: optimization by central composite design.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Manvendra S; Kumar, Anil; Pathak, Kamla

    2012-12-01

    A nondisintegrating, floating asymmetric membrane capsule (FAMC) was developed to achieve site-specific osmotic flow of a highly water-soluble drug, ranitidine hydrochloride (RHCl), in a controlled manner. Solubility suppression of RHCl was achieved by the common ion effect, using optimized coated sodium chloride as a formulation component. The capsular wall of FAMC was prepared by the phase inversion process wherein the polymeric membrane was precipitated on glass pins by dipping them in a solution of cellulose acetate followed by quenching. Central composite design was utilized to investigate the influence of independent variables, namely, level(s) of membrane former, pore former, and osmogen, on percent cumulative drug release (response). The release mechanism of RHCl through FAMC was confirmed as osmotic pumping. The asymmetry of the membrane was characterized by scanning electron microscopy that revealed a dense nonporous outer region of membrane supported by an inner porous region. Differential scanning calorimetry indicated no incompatibility between the drug and excipients. In vitro drug release in three biorelevant media, pH 2.5 (low fed), pH 4.5 (intermediate fed), and pH 6.5 (high fed), demonstrated pH-independent release of RHCl (P > 0.05). Floating ability for 12 h of the optimized FAMC9 was visually examined during the in vitro release studies that showed maximal drug release with zero-order kinetics (r (2) = 0.9991). Thus, a novel osmotically regulated floating capsular system was developed for site-specific delivery of RHCl. PMID:23104305

  19. Osmotic stress in Arctic and Antarctic strains of the green alga Zygnema (Zygnematales, Streptophyta): effects on photosynthesis and ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Franziska; Lewis, Louise A; Herburger, Klaus; Holzinger, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The osmotic potential and effects of plasmolysis on photosynthetic oxygen evolution and chlorophyll fluorescence were studied in two Arctic Zygnema sp. (strain B, strain G) and two Antarctic Zygnema sp. (strain E, strain D). Antarctic strain D was newly characterized by rbcL sequence analysis in the present study. The two Antarctic strains, D and E, are most closely related and may represent different isolates of the same species, in contrast, strain B and G are separate lineages. Incipient plasmolysis in the cells was determined by light microscopy after incubating cells in sorbitol solutions ranging between 200 mM and 1000 mM sorbitol for 3, 6 and 24h. In Zygnema strain B and G incipient plasmolysis occurred at ~600 mM sorbitol solution (720 mOsmol kg(-1), ψ=-1.67 MPa) and in strains D and E at ~300 mM (318 mOsmol kg(-1), ψ=-0.8 MPa) sorbitol solution. Hechtian strands were visualized in all plasmolysed cells, which is particularly interesting, as these cells lack pores or plasmodesmata. Ultrastructural changes upon osmotic stress were a retraction of the condensed cytoplasm from the cell walls, damages to chloroplast and mitochondrial membranes, increasing numbers of plastoglobules in the chloroplasts and membrane enclosed particles in the extraplasmatic space. Maximum photosynthetic rates (P(max)) in light saturated range were between 145.5 μmol O(2) h(-1)mg(-1)Chl a in Zygnema G and 752.9 μmol O(2) h(-1)mg(-1)Chl a in Zygnema E. After incubation in 800 mM sorbitol for 3h P(max) decreased to the following percentage of the initial values: B: 16.3%, D: 16.8%, E: 26.1% and G: 35.0%. Osmotic stress (800 mM sorbitol) decreased maximum photochemical quantum yield of photosystem II (F(v)/F(m)) when compared to controls. Maximum values of relative electron transport rates of photosystem II (rETR(max)) decreased after incubation in 400 mM sorbitol in Zygnema D and E, while they decreased in Zygnema B and G only after incubation in 800 mM sorbitol. The kinetics of

  20. The mitochondria of stallion spermatozoa are more sensitive than the plasmalemma to osmotic-induced stress: role of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway.

    PubMed

    García, Beatriz Macías; Moran, Alvaro Miró; Fernández, Lauro González; Ferrusola, Cristina Ortega; Rodriguez, Antolin Morillo; Bolaños, Juan Maria Gallardo; da Silva, Carolina Maria Balao; Martínez, Heriberto Rodríguez; Tapia, Jose A; Peña, Fernando J

    2012-01-01

    Cryopreservation introduces extreme temperature and osmolality changes that impart lethal and sublethal effects on spermatozoa. Additionally, there is evidence that the osmotic stress induced by cryopreservation causes oxidative stress to spermatozoa. The main sources of reactive oxygen species in mammalian sperm are the mitochondria. In view of this, the aim of our study was to test whether or not osmotic stress was able to induce mitochondrial damage and to explore the osmotic tolerance of the mitochondria of stallion spermatozoa. Ejaculates from 7 stallions were subjected to osmolalities ranging from 75 to 1500 mOsm/kg, and the effect on sperm membrane integrity and mitochondrial membrane potential was studied. Additionally, the effects of changes in osmolality from hyposmotic to isosmotic and from hyperosmotic to isosmotic solutions were studied (osmotic excursions). The cellular volume of stallion spermatozoa under isosmotic conditions was 20.4 ± 0.33 μm(3). When exposed to low osmolality, the stallion spermatozoa behaved like a linear osmometer, whereas exposure to high osmolalities up to 900 mOsm/kg resulted in decreased sperm volume. Although sperm membranes were relatively resistant to changes in osmolality, mitochondrial membrane potential decreased when osmolalities were low or very high (10.7 ± 1.74 and 16.5 ± 1.70 at 75 and 150 mOsm/kg, respectively, and 13.1 ± 1.83 at 1500 mOsm/kg), whereas in isosmolar controls the percentage of stallion sperm mitochondria with a high membrane potential was 41.1 ± 1.69 (P < .01). Osmotic excursions induced greater damage than exposure of spermatozoa to a given nonphysiologic osmolality, and again the mitochondria were more prone to damage induced by osmotic excursions than was the sperm plasma membrane. In search of intracellular components that could mediate these changes, we have detected for the first time the c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2 in stallion spermatozoa, which are apparently involved in the

  1. Nitric oxide is involved in light-specific responses of tomato during germination under normal and osmotic stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    Piterková, Jana; Luhová, Lenka; Hofman, Jakub; Turečková, Veronika; Novák, Ondřej; Petřivalský, Marek; Fellner, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Nitric oxide (NO) is involved in the signalling and regulation of plant growth and development and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. The photoperiod-sensitive mutant 7B-1 in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) showing abscisic acid (ABA) overproduction and blue light (BL)-specific tolerance to osmotic stress represents a valuable model to study the interaction between light, hormones and stress signalling. The role of NO as a regulator of seed germination and ABA-dependent responses to osmotic stress was explored in wild-type and 7B-1 tomato under white light (WL) and BL. Methods Germination data were obtained from the incubation of seeds on germinating media of different composition. Histochemical analysis of NO production in germinating seeds was performed by fluorescence microscopy using a cell-permeable NO probe, and endogenous ABA was analysed by mass spectrometry. Key Results The NO donor S-nitrosoglutathione stimulated seed germination, whereas the NO scavenger 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (PTIO) had an inhibitory effect. Under WL in both genotypes, PTIO strongly suppressed germination stimulated by fluridone, an ABA inhibitor. The stimulatory effect of the NO donor was also observed under osmotic stress for 7B-1 seeds under WL and BL. Seed germination inhibited by osmotic stress was restored by fluridone under WL, but less so under BL, in both genotypes. This effect of fluridone was further modulated by the NO donor and NO scavenger, but only to a minor extent. Fluorescence microscopy using the cell-permeable NO probe DAF-FM DA (4-amino-5-methylamino-2′,7′-difluorofluorescein diacetate) revealed a higher level of NO in stressed 7B-1 compared with wild-type seeds. Conclusions As well as defective BL signalling, the differential NO-dependent responses of the 7B-1 mutant are probably associated with its high endogenous ABA concentration and related impact on hormonal cross-talk in germinating seeds. These

  2. In vivo performance evaluation and establishment of IVIVC for osmotic pump based extended release formulation of milnacipran HCl.

    PubMed

    Parejiya, Punit B; Barot, Bhavesh S; Patel, Hetal K; Chorawala, Mehul R; Shelat, Pragna K; Shukla, Arunkumar

    2013-05-01

    The objective of the present study was to carry out a pharmacokinetics evaluation of an oral modified release formulation [Aquarius EKX 19102 SRX-2 based osmotic pump (OP)] containing highly soluble milnacipran HCl (MH) as a model drug. It was also aimed at developing an in vitro-in vivo correlation (IVIVC) model for a developed OP. In vivo plasma concentration data were obtained from six healthy male New Zealand albino rabbits after administration of immediate-release milnacipran HCl solution (IRMHSOL) and milnacipran HCl osmotic pump (MHOP). In vitro samples were analysed using an in house developed spectrophotometry method and in vivo samples were analysed using a RP-HPLC method developed by the author. A deconvolution based Level A model was attempted through a correlation of the percent in vivo input obtained through deconvolution and the percent in vitro dissolution obtained experimentally. A good correlation between the percentages dissolved vs absorbed (R(2) = 0.978) was obtained using level A correlation. Evaluation of the internal predictability of level A correlation was calculated in terms of the percent prediction error, which was found to be below 15%. In a nutshell, the success of the present study warrants further studies in patient volunteers to assess the ability of the MHOP to provide an effective therapy for depression. PMID:23463628

  3. Genetic similarity of the Hainan medaka populations collected from hyper- and hypo-osmotic environments in northern Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Hideki; Le, Quang Dung; Kinoshita, Masato; Takehana, Yusuke; Sakuma, Kei; Takeshima, Hirohiko; Kojima, Shigeaki; Naruse, Kiyoshi; Inoue, Koji

    2015-06-01

    Ricefishes of the genus Oryzias, including Japanese medaka ( O. latipes), are known as excellent model organisms for studies in various fields of science. Some species of the genus inhabit brackish water, and such species are recognized to be useful to investigate physiological phenomena in seawater. However, only a limited number of species have been recorded from brackish waters. In addition, there is no information about the genetic relationship among populations inhabiting sites with different salinities. Here we report the discovery of Oryzias fish in two locations near Haiphong, northern Vietnam, a brackish mangrove planting area and a freshwater pond. A phylogenetic analysis using mitochondrial 12S and 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences indicated that the fish from the two localities are the same species, Hainan medaka, O. curvinotus. Population genetic analysis using the mitochondrial 12S and 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed a close genetic relationship between the two populations. These results suggest that O. curvinotus is adaptable to both hyperosmotic and hypoosmotic environments. Due to its osmotic adaptability and ease of rearing in the laboratory, this species is expected to become a model for marine environmental and toxicological studies, as well as for studies of osmotic adaptation mechanisms.

  4. Pleiotropic effects of TaMYB3R1 on plant development and response to osmotic stress in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hongsheng; Tian, Shan; Dong, Hansong; Guo, Changhong

    2015-03-10

    In a previous study, we isolated and characterized TaMYB3R1, a MYB3R gene, from wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). In vitro assays showed that the TaMYB3R1 protein is localized to the nucleus, and functions as an MSA-binding transcriptional activator. Expression of TaMYB3R1 is induced by exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) and abiotic stress, which encouraged us to further investigate its function in planta. In the present study, we generated transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing TaMYB3R1. Compared with wild-type plants, the transgenic lines produced more rosette leaves, and thus more inflorescences, but the plants showed delayed development at the reproductive stage. The TaMYB3R1 protein also functions in the osmotic stress response. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants showed enhanced tolerance to drought and salt stresses, and the tolerance phenotype was conveyed by limiting transpiration through increasing stomatal closure as well as reducing water loss. In addition, TaMYB3R1 influenced the expression of both ABA-dependent and ABA-independent responsive genes, implicating TaMYB3R1 in diverse osmotic stress-response mechanisms in Arabidopsis. Our study sheds light on novel functions of a plant MYB3R protein. PMID:25560188

  5. A universal self-adaptive time-varying function for extracellular concentration during osmotic shift for curve-fitting permeability coefficients of cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gang

    2010-01-01

    A universal self-adaptive time-varying function of extracellular concentration history during osmotic shift for measuring cell membrane permeability was presented in this study. The feasibility and accuracy of the assumed function were verified based on the experimental data obtained from the microperfusion chamber method. It was found that the assumed function could always give out the very satisfactory coefficient of determination, and there were no significant differences between the hydraulic conductivity values fitted using the laser interferometer measured extracellular concentration profile and the predicted one by the assumed piecewise function (student's t test, p > 0.05). Due to the adaptive feature of the assumed function for the concentration of extracellular solution, the function was suggest to be used for all the similar studies for measurement of cell membrane permeability by osmotic shift. PMID:20919457

  6. Estrogen effects on osmotic regulation of AVP and fluid balance.

    PubMed

    Stachenfeld, Nina S; Keefe, David L

    2002-10-01

    To determine estrogen effects on osmotic regulation of arginine vasopressin (AVP) and body fluids, we suppressed endogenous estrogen and progesterone using the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analog leuprolide acetate (GnRHa). Subjects were assigned to one of two groups: 1) GnRHa alone, then GnRHa + estrogen (E, n = 9, 25 +/- 1 yr); 2) GnRHa alone, then GnRHa + estrogen with progesterone (E/P, n = 6, 26 +/- 3). During GnRHa alone and with hormone treatment, we compared AVP and body fluid regulatory responses to 3% NaCl infusion (HSI, 120 min, 0.1 ml. min(-1). kg body wt(-1)), drinking (30 min, 15 ml/kg body wt), and recovery (60 min of seated rest). Plasma [E(2)] increased from 23.9 to 275.3 pg/ml with hormone treatments. Plasma [P(4)] increased from 0.6 to 5.7 ng/ml during E/P and was unchanged (0.4 to 0.6 ng/ml) during E. Compared with GnRHa alone, E reduced osmotic AVP release threshold (275 +/- 4 to 271 +/- 4 mosmol/kg, P < 0.05), and E/P reduced the AVP increase in response during HSI (6.0 +/- 1.3 to 4.2 +/- 0.6 pg/ml at the end of HSI), but free water clearance was unaffected in either group. Relative to GnRHa, pre-HSI plasma renin activity (PRA) was greater during E (0.8 +/- 0.1 vs. 1.2 +/- 0.2 ng ANG I. ml(-1). h(-1)) but not after HSI or recovery. PRA was greater than GnRHa during E/P at baseline (1.1 +/- 0.2 vs. 2.5 +/- 0.6) and after HSI (0.6 +/- 0.1 vs. 1.1 +/- 1.1) and recovery (0.5 +/- 0.1 vs. 1.3 +/- 0.2 ng ANG I. ml(-1). h(-1)). Baseline fractional excretion of sodium was unaffected by E or E/P but was attenuated by the end of recovery for both E (3.3 +/- 0.6 vs. 2.4 +/- 0.4%) and E/P (2.8 +/- 0.4 vs 1.7 +/- 0.4%, GnRHa alone and with hormone treatment, respectively). Fluid retention increased with both hormone treatments. Renal sensitivity to AVP may be lower during E due to intrarenal effects on water and sodium excretion. E/P increased sodium retention and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone stimulation. PMID:12217888

  7. Response of Escherichia coli growth rate to osmotic shock.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Enrique; Theriot, Julie A; Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2014-05-27

    It has long been proposed that turgor pressure plays an essential role during bacterial growth by driving mechanical expansion of the cell wall. This hypothesis is based on analogy to plant cells, for which this mechanism has been established, and on experiments in which the growth rate of bacterial cultures was observed to decrease as the osmolarity of the growth medium was increased. To distinguish the effect of turgor pressure from pressure-independent effects that osmolarity might have on cell growth, we monitored the elongation of single Escherichia coli cells while rapidly changing the osmolarity of their media. By plasmolyzing cells, we found that cell-wall elastic strain did not scale with growth rate, suggesting that pressure does not drive cell-wall expansion. Furthermore, in response to hyper- and hypoosmotic shock, E. coli cells resumed their preshock growth rate and relaxed to their steady-state rate after several minutes, demonstrating that osmolarity modulates growth rate slowly, independently of pressure. Oscillatory hyperosmotic shock revealed that although plasmolysis slowed cell elongation, the cells nevertheless "stored" growth such that once turgor was reestablished the cells elongated to the length that they would have attained had they never been plasmolyzed. Finally, MreB dynamics were unaffected by osmotic shock. These results reveal the simple nature of E. coli cell-wall expansion: that the rate of expansion is determined by the rate of peptidoglycan insertion and insertion is not directly dependent on turgor pressure, but that pressure does play a basic role whereby it enables full extension of recently inserted peptidoglycan. PMID:24821776

  8. Response of Escherichia coli growth rate to osmotic shock

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Enrique; Theriot, Julie A.; Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2014-01-01

    It has long been proposed that turgor pressure plays an essential role during bacterial growth by driving mechanical expansion of the cell wall. This hypothesis is based on analogy to plant cells, for which this mechanism has been established, and on experiments in which the growth rate of bacterial cultures was observed to decrease as the osmolarity of the growth medium was increased. To distinguish the effect of turgor pressure from pressure-independent effects that osmolarity might have on cell growth, we monitored the elongation of single Escherichia coli cells while rapidly changing the osmolarity of their media. By plasmolyzing cells, we found that cell-wall elastic strain did not scale with growth rate, suggesting that pressure does not drive cell-wall expansion. Furthermore, in response to hyper- and hypoosmotic shock, E. coli cells resumed their preshock growth rate and relaxed to their steady-state rate after several minutes, demonstrating that osmolarity modulates growth rate slowly, independently of pressure. Oscillatory hyperosmotic shock revealed that although plasmolysis slowed cell elongation, the cells nevertheless “stored” growth such that once turgor was reestablished the cells elongated to the length that they would have attained had they never been plasmolyzed. Finally, MreB dynamics were unaffected by osmotic shock. These results reveal the simple nature of E. coli cell-wall expansion: that the rate of expansion is determined by the rate of peptidoglycan insertion and insertion is not directly dependent on turgor pressure, but that pressure does play a basic role whereby it enables full extension of recently inserted peptidoglycan. PMID:24821776

  9. A Laterally Acquired Galactose Oxidase-Like Gene Is Required for Aerial Development during Osmotic Stress in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Liman, Recep; Facey, Paul D.; van Keulen, Geertje; Dyson, Paul J.; Del Sol, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Phylogenetic reconstruction revealed that most Actinobacterial orthologs of S. coelicolor SCO2837, encoding a metal-dependent galactose oxidase-like protein, are found within Streptomyces and were probably acquired by horizontal gene transfer from fungi. Disruption of SCO2837 (glxA) caused a conditional bld phenotype that could not be reversed by extracellular complementation. Studies aimed at characterising the regulation of expression of glxA showed that it is not a target for other bld genes. We provide evidence that glxA is required for osmotic adaptation, although independently from the known osmotic stress response element SigB. glxA has been predicted to be part of an operon with the transcription unit comprising the upstream cslA gene and glxA. However, both phenotypic and expression studies indicate that it is also expressed from an independent promoter region internal to cslA. GlxA displays an in situ localisation pattern similar to that one observed for CslA at hyphal tips, but localisation of the former is independent of the latter. The functional role of GlxA in relation to CslA is discussed. PMID:23326581

  10. Calcineurin B-Like Protein-Interacting Protein Kinase CIPK21 Regulates Osmotic and Salt Stress Responses in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Girdhar K.; Kanwar, Poonam; Singh, Amarjeet; Steinhorst, Leonie; Pandey, Amita; Yadav, Akhlilesh K.; Tokas, Indu; Sanyal, Sibaji K.; Kim, Beom-Gi; Lee, Sung-Chul; Cheong, Yong-Hwa; Kudla, Jörg; Luan, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    The role of calcium-mediated signaling has been extensively studied in plant responses to abiotic stress signals. Calcineurin B-like proteins (CBLs) and CBL-interacting protein kinases (CIPKs) constitute a complex signaling network acting in diverse plant stress responses. Osmotic stress imposed by soil salinity and drought is a major abiotic stress that impedes plant growth and development and involves calcium-signaling processes. In this study, we report the functional analysis of CIPK21, an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) CBL-interacting protein kinase, ubiquitously expressed in plant tissues and up-regulated under multiple abiotic stress conditions. The growth of a loss-of-function mutant of CIPK21, cipk21, was hypersensitive to high salt and osmotic stress conditions. The calcium sensors CBL2 and CBL3 were found to physically interact with CIPK21 and target this kinase to the tonoplast. Moreover, preferential localization of CIPK21 to the tonoplast was detected under salt stress condition when coexpressed with CBL2 or CBL3. These findings suggest that CIPK21 mediates responses to salt stress condition in Arabidopsis, at least in part, by regulating ion and water homeostasis across the vacuolar membranes. PMID:26198257

  11. Calcineurin B-Like Protein-Interacting Protein Kinase CIPK21 Regulates Osmotic and Salt Stress Responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Girdhar K; Kanwar, Poonam; Singh, Amarjeet; Steinhorst, Leonie; Pandey, Amita; Yadav, Akhlilesh K; Tokas, Indu; Sanyal, Sibaji K; Kim, Beom-Gi; Lee, Sung-Chul; Cheong, Yong-Hwa; Kudla, Jörg; Luan, Sheng

    2015-09-01

    The role of calcium-mediated signaling has been extensively studied in plant responses to abiotic stress signals. Calcineurin B-like proteins (CBLs) and CBL-interacting protein kinases (CIPKs) constitute a complex signaling network acting in diverse plant stress responses. Osmotic stress imposed by soil salinity and drought is a major abiotic stress that impedes plant growth and development and involves calcium-signaling processes. In this study, we report the functional analysis of CIPK21, an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) CBL-interacting protein kinase, ubiquitously expressed in plant tissues and up-regulated under multiple abiotic stress conditions. The growth of a loss-of-function mutant of CIPK21, cipk21, was hypersensitive to high salt and osmotic stress conditions. The calcium sensors CBL2 and CBL3 were found to physically interact with CIPK21 and target this kinase to the tonoplast. Moreover, preferential localization of CIPK21 to the tonoplast was detected under salt stress condition when coexpressed with CBL2 or CBL3. These findings suggest that CIPK21 mediates responses to salt stress condition in Arabidopsis, at least in part, by regulating ion and water homeostasis across the vacuolar membranes. PMID:26198257

  12. Influence of natural organic matter fouling and osmotic backwash on pressure retarded osmosis energy production from natural salinity gradients.

    PubMed

    Yip, Ngai Yin; Elimelech, Menachem

    2013-01-01

    Pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) has the potential to produce clean, renewable energy from natural salinity gradients. However, membrane fouling can lead to diminished water flux productivity, thus reducing the extractable energy. This study investigates organic fouling and osmotic backwash cleaning in PRO and the resulting impact on projected power generation. Fabricated thin-film composite membranes were fouled with model river water containing natural organic matter. The water permeation carried foulants from the feed river water into the membrane porous support layer and caused severe water flux decline of ∼46%. Analysis of the water flux behavior revealed three phases in membrane support layer fouling. Initial foulants of the first fouling phase quickly adsorbed at the active-support layer interface and caused a significantly greater increase in hydraulic resistance than the subsequent second and third phase foulants. The water permeability of the fouled membranes was lowered by ∼39%, causing ∼26% decrease in projected power density. A brief, chemical-free osmotic backwash was demonstrated to be effective in removing foulants from the porous support layer, achieving ∼44% recovery in projected power density. The substantial performance recovery after cleaning was attributed to the partial restoration of the membrane water permeability. This study shows that membrane fouling detrimentally impacts energy production, and highlights the potential strategies to mitigate fouling in PRO power generation with natural salinity gradients. PMID:24099133

  13. Applications of Electro-Osmotic Transport in the Processing of Textiles

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.F.; Krueger, R.; Hopper, R.; Cherepy, N.

    1999-11-29

    We report development of a pilot process for the industrial rinsing of fabrics. This process combines hydraulic (pressure-driven) transport with electro-osmotic transport. It reduces the total amount of water required in certain rinsing operations by a factor of about five. Cotton exhibits an electro-osmotic transport coefficient of about 6 x 10{sup -9} m{sup 2}/s-V resulting from a partial ionization of hydroxyl groups on the cellulose polymer substrate. This process applies a field transverse to the fabric to effect the movement of water in the spaces between the 10 {micro}m cotton fibers which constitute the yam. The field strength is adjusted so that the induced electro-osmotic flux is comparable to a pressure-driven flux, which moves preferentially in the more open channels between the yams. For a fixed current density, solution conductivity and electro-osmotic transport vary inversely. The process is most practical for removal of liquids of relatively low conductivity (<500 {micro}S/cm). For removal of solutions of conductivity greater than 1200 {micro}S/cm, the rate of electro-osmotic flow may be too low to benefit the rinsing process if current densities are restricted to practical levels of about 30 mA/cm{sup 2}. Electra-osmotic transport may have important applications in wet processing of extremely fine textiles, such as micro fiber fabrics. In addition to rinsing, electro-osmotic transport may also be used to speed the penetration of chemicals and dyestuffs that are applied to the surface of wet textiles.

  14. High throughput sequencing of small RNAs transcriptomes in two Crassostrea oysters identifies microRNAs involved in osmotic stress response

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuelin; Yu, Hong; Kong, Lingfeng; Liu, Shikai; Li, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that microRNAs post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression and are involved in responses to biotic and abiotic stress. However, the role of miRNAs involved in osmotic plasticity remains largely unknown in marine bivalves. In the present study, we performed low salinity challenge with two Crassostrea species (C. gigas and C. hongkongensis), and conducted high-throughput sequencing of four small RNA libraries constructed from the gill tissues. A total of 202 and 87 miRNAs were identified from C. gigas and C. hongkongensis, respectively. Six miRNAs in C. gigas and two in C. hongkongensis were differentially expressed in response to osmotic stress. The expression profiles of these eight miRNAs were validated by qRT-PCR. Based on GO enrichment and KEGG pathway analysis, genes associated with microtubule-based process and cellular component movement were enriched in both species. In addition, five miRNA-mRNA interaction pairs that showed opposite expression patterns were identified in the C. hongkongensis, Differential expression analysis identified the miRNAs that play important regulatory roles in response to low salinity stress, providing insights into molecular mechanisms that are essential for salinity tolerance in marine bivalves. PMID:26940974

  15. High throughput sequencing of small RNAs transcriptomes in two Crassostrea oysters identifies microRNAs involved in osmotic stress response.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xuelin; Yu, Hong; Kong, Lingfeng; Liu, Shikai; Li, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that microRNAs post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression and are involved in responses to biotic and abiotic stress. However, the role of miRNAs involved in osmotic plasticity remains largely unknown in marine bivalves. In the present study, we performed low salinity challenge with two Crassostrea species (C. gigas and C. hongkongensis), and conducted high-throughput sequencing of four small RNA libraries constructed from the gill tissues. A total of 202 and 87 miRNAs were identified from C. gigas and C. hongkongensis, respectively. Six miRNAs in C. gigas and two in C. hongkongensis were differentially expressed in response to osmotic stress. The expression profiles of these eight miRNAs were validated by qRT-PCR. Based on GO enrichment and KEGG pathway analysis, genes associated with microtubule-based process and cellular component movement were enriched in both species. In addition, five miRNA-mRNA interaction pairs that showed opposite expression patterns were identified in the C. hongkongensis, Differential expression analysis identified the miRNAs that play important regulatory roles in response to low salinity stress, providing insights into molecular mechanisms that are essential for salinity tolerance in marine bivalves. PMID:26940974

  16. Assessment of Full-Eye Response to Osmotic Stress in Mouse Model In Vivo Using Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Yang; Xu, Baisheng; Wu, Lan; Du, Chixin; Jiang, Bo; Ding, Zhihua; Li, Peng

    2015-01-01

    NaCl based solutions were applied as osmotic stress agents to alter the hydration state of the mouse eye. Full-eye responses to these osmotic challenges were monitored in vivo using a custom-built optical coherence tomography (OCT) with an extended imaging range of 12.38 mm. Dynamic changes in the mouse eye were quantified based on the OCT images using several parameters, including the central corneal thickness (CCT), the anterior chamber depth (ACD), the crystalline lens thickness (LT), the cornea-retina distance (CRD), the iris curvature (IC), and the lens scattering intensity (LSI). Apparent but reversible changes in the morphology of almost all the ocular components and the light transparency of the lens are exhibited. Particularly, the ocular dehydration induced by the hypertonic challenges resulted in a closing of the iridocorneal angle and an opacification of the lens. Our results indicated that the ocular hydration is an important physiological process which might be correlated with various ocular disorders, such as dry eye, cataract, and angle-closure glaucoma, and would affect the biometry and imaging of the eye. OCT uniquely enables the comprehensive study of the dynamic full-eye responses to the ocular hydration in vivo. PMID:26491552

  17. Application of Hollow Fiber Forward Osmosis Membranes for Produced and Process Water Volume Reduction: An Osmotic Concentration Process.

    PubMed

    Minier-Matar, Joel; Santos, Ana; Hussain, Altaf; Janson, Arnold; Wang, Rong; Fane, Anthony G; Adham, Samer

    2016-06-01

    Produced and process water (PPW) from oil and gas operations, specifically in Qatar, are disposed of by deep well injection in onshore facilities. Disposing large volumes of PPW may affect deep well formation sustainability highlighting the need for effective PPW management. Forward osmosis (FO) was applied as an "osmotic concentration" process to reduce PPW injection volumes by 50% using brines and seawater as draw solutions (DS). The energy intensive step of restoring the salinity of the DS was eliminated; the diluted DS would be simply discharged to the ocean. Both hollow fiber and flat sheet FO membranes were tested and the former exhibited better flux and rejection; they are the focus of this study. Optimization experiments, conducted using Box-Behnken statistical design, confirmed that temperature and DS concentration had a substantial effect on performance. To validate the concept, a long-term experiment, under optimized conditions, was conducted with PPW as feed and brine from thermal desalination plant as DS which yielded an average flux of 24 L/m(2)h. The results confirmed that low-energy osmotic concentration FO has the potential for full-scale implementation to reduce PPW injection volumes. Pilot testing opportunities are being evaluated to demonstrate the effectiveness of this technology under field conditions. PMID:27161935

  18. An Ethylene-responsive Factor BpERF11 Negatively Modulates Salt and Osmotic Tolerance in Betula platyphylla.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenhui; Yang, Guiyan; Mu, Dan; Li, Hongyan; Zang, Dandan; Xu, Hongyun; Zou, Xuezhong; Wang, Yucheng

    2016-01-01

    Ethylene responsive factors (ERFs) play important roles in the abiotic stress; however, only a few ERF genes from woody plants have been functionally characterized. In the present study, an ERF gene from Betula platyphylla (birch), BpERF11, was functionally characterized in response to abiotic stress. BpERF11 is a nuclear protein, which could specifically bind to GCC boxes and DRE motifs. BpERF11-overexpressing and BpERF11 RNA interference (RNAi) knockdown plants were generated for gain- and loss-of-function analysis. BpERF11 negatively regulates resistance to salt and severe osmotic stress, and the transgenic birch plants overexpressing BpERF11 shows increased electrolyte leakage and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents. BpERF11 inhibits the expression of an AtMYB61 homologous gene, resulting in increased stomatal aperture, which elevated the transpiration rate. Furthermore, BpERF11 downregulates the expression of P5CS, SOD and POD genes, but upregulates the expression of PRODH and P5CDH, which results in reduced proline levels and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. BpERF11 also significantly inhibits the expression of LEA and dehydrin genes that involve in abiotic stress tolerance. Therefore, BpERF11 serves as a transcription factor that negatively regulates salt and severe osmotic tolerance by modulating various physiological processes. PMID:26980058

  19. A comparative life cycle assessment of hybrid osmotic dilution desalination and established seawater desalination and wastewater reclamation processes.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Nathan T; Black, Nathan D; Cath, Tzahi Y

    2012-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the comparative environmental impacts of coupled seawater desalination and water reclamation using a novel hybrid system that consist of an osmotically driven membrane process and established membrane desalination technologies. A comparative life cycle assessment methodology was used to differentiate between a novel hybrid process consisting of forward osmosis (FO) operated in osmotic dilution (ODN) mode and seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO), and two other processes: a stand alone conventional SWRO desalination system, and a combined SWRO and dual barrier impaired water purification system consisting of nanofiltration followed by reverse osmosis. Each process was evaluated using ten baseline impact categories. It was demonstrated that from a life cycle perspective two hurdles exist to further development of the ODN-SWRO process: module design of FO membranes and cleaning intensity of the FO membranes. System optimization analysis revealed that doubling FO membrane packing density, tripling FO membrane permeability, and optimizing system operation, all of which are technically feasible at the time of this publication, could reduce the environmental impact of the hybrid ODN-SWRO process compared to SWRO by more than 25%; yet, novel hybrid nanofiltration-RO treatment of seawater and wastewater can achieve almost similar levels of environmental impact. PMID:22209275

  20. Hypo-osmotic shock-induced subclinical inflammation of skin in a rat model of disrupted skin barrier function.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Chihiro; Minematsu, Takeo; Huang, Lijuan; Mugita, Yuko; Kitamura, Aya; Nakagami, Gojiro; Yamane, Takumi; Yoshida, Mikako; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Funakubo, Megumi; Mori, Taketoshi; Sanada, Hiromi

    2015-03-01

    Aging disrupts skin barrier function and induces xerosis accompanied by pruritus. In many cases, elderly patients complain of pruritus during skin hygiene care, a condition called aquagenic pruritus of the elderly (APE). To date, the pathophysiology and mechanism of action of APE have not been elucidated. We conducted the present study to test the hypothesis that hypo-osmotic shock of epidermal cells induces skin inflammation and elongation of C-fibers by nerve growth factor β (NGFβ) as a basic mechanism of APE. The dorsal skin of HWY rats, which are a model for disrupted skin barrier function, was treated with distilled water (hypotonic treatment [Hypo] group) or normal saline (isotonic treatment [Iso] group) by applying soaked gauze for 7 days. Untreated rats were used as a control (no-treatment [NT] group). Histochemical and immunohistochemical analyses revealed inflammatory responses in the epidermis and the dermal papillary layer in the Hypo group, while no alterations were observed in the Iso or NT groups. Induction of expression and secretion of NGFβ and elongation of C-fibers into the epidermis were found in the Hypo group. In contrast, secretion of NGFβ was significantly lower and elongation of C-fibers was not observed in the Iso group. These results suggest that hypo-osmotic shock-induced inflammatory reactions promote hypersensitivity to pruritus in skin with disrupted barrier function. PMID:25681269

  1. An Ethylene-responsive Factor BpERF11 Negatively Modulates Salt and Osmotic Tolerance in Betula platyphylla

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenhui; Yang, Guiyan; Mu, Dan; Li, Hongyan; Zang, Dandan; Xu, Hongyun; Zou, Xuezhong; Wang, Yucheng

    2016-01-01

    Ethylene responsive factors (ERFs) play important roles in the abiotic stress; however, only a few ERF genes from woody plants have been functionally characterized. In the present study, an ERF gene from Betula platyphylla (birch), BpERF11, was functionally characterized in response to abiotic stress. BpERF11 is a nuclear protein, which could specifically bind to GCC boxes and DRE motifs. BpERF11-overexpressing and BpERF11 RNA interference (RNAi) knockdown plants were generated for gain- and loss-of-function analysis. BpERF11 negatively regulates resistance to salt and severe osmotic stress, and the transgenic birch plants overexpressing BpERF11 shows increased electrolyte leakage and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents. BpERF11 inhibits the expression of an AtMYB61 homologous gene, resulting in increased stomatal aperture, which elevated the transpiration rate. Furthermore, BpERF11 downregulates the expression of P5CS, SOD and POD genes, but upregulates the expression of PRODH and P5CDH, which results in reduced proline levels and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. BpERF11 also significantly inhibits the expression of LEA and dehydrin genes that involve in abiotic stress tolerance. Therefore, BpERF11 serves as a transcription factor that negatively regulates salt and severe osmotic tolerance by modulating various physiological processes. PMID:26980058

  2. Improvement of L-lactic acid production by osmotic-tolerant mutant of Lactobacillus casei at high temperature.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiang-Yang; Yuan, Jian; Qin, Hao; Zhang, Wei-Guo

    2011-01-01

    L-Lactic acid production by Lactobacillus casei was used as a model to study the mechanism of substrate inhibition and the strategy for enhancing L-lactic acid production. It was found that the concentration of cell growth and L-lactate decreased with the increase of glucose concentration and fermentation temperature. To enhance the osmotic stress resistance of the strain at high temperature, a mutant G-03 was screened and selected with 360 g/L glucose at 45°C as the selective criterion. To further increase the cell growth for lactic acid production, 3 g/L of biotin was supplemented to the medium. As a result, L: -lactate concentration by the mutant G-03 reached 198.2 g/L (productivity of 5.5 g L(-1) h(-1)) at 41°C in a 7-L fermentor with 210 g/L glucose as carbon source. L: -Lactate concentration and productivity of mutant G-03 were 115.2% and 97.8% higher than those of the parent strain, respectively. The strategy for enhancing L: -lactic acid production by increasing osmotic stress resistance at high temperature may provide an alternative approach to enhance organic acid production with other strains. PMID:20857288

  3. Ion fluxes and electro-osmotic fluid flow in electrolytes around a metallic nanowire tip under large applied ac voltage.

    PubMed

    Poetschke, M; Bobeth, M; Cuniberti, G

    2013-09-10

    Motivated by the analysis of electrochemical growth of metallic nanowires from solution, we studied ion fluxes near nanoelectrodes in a binary symmetric electrolyte on the basis of the modified Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations in the strongly nonlinear region at large applied ac voltage. For an approximate calculation of the electric field near the nanowire tip, concentric spherical blocking electrodes were considered with radius of the inner electrode being of typically a few ten nanometers. The spatiotemporal evolution of the ion concentrations within this spherical model was calculated numerically by using the finite element method. The potential drop at the electric double layer, the electric field enhancement at the electrode surface, and the field screening in the bulk solution were determined for different bulk concentrations, ac voltages, and frequencies. The appearance of ac electro-osmotic fluid flow at the tip of a growing metallic nanowire is discussed, based on an estimation of the body force in the liquid near the nanowire tip, which was modeled by a cylinder with hemispherical cap. Electric field components tangential to the electrode surface exist near the contact between cylinder and hemisphere. Our analysis suggests that ac electro-osmotic flow causes an additional convective transport of metal complexes to the tip of the growing metal nanowire and thus affects the nanowire growth velocity. PMID:23927385

  4. Changes of hydrogen peroxide and radical-scavenging activity of raspberry during osmotic, convective, and freeze-drying.

    PubMed

    Novaković, Miroslav M; Stevanović, Snežana M; Gorjanović, Stanislava Ž; Jovanovic, Predrag M; Tešević, Vele V; Janković, Miodrag A; Sužnjević, Desanka Ž

    2011-05-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the influence of different drying treatments on antioxidant (AO) activity and phenolic content of raspberry (Rubus idaeus), cultivar Willamette. Whole raspberry fruits were dried convectively (air-drying), osmotically, and freeze-dried. Acetone-water extracts of fresh and dried raspberries were assessed for total phenolic content by standard Folin-Ciocalteau method. Two AO assays were applied, a recently developed direct current (DC) polarographic assay based on decrease of anodic oxidation current of hydrogen peroxide and widely used radical scavenge against the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH). Strong correlation has been obtained between both AO assays and total phenolic content. In addition, some individual phenolic compounds present in raspberry have been assessed using DPPH and DC polarographic assay. Comparison and evaluation of drying methods has been based on preservation of AO activity and total phenolic content. Obtained results confirmed superiority of freeze-drying; convective drying caused slight changes while osmotic dehydration showed a significant decrease of phenolic compounds and AO activity. PMID:22417351

  5. Experimental investigation of a spiral-wound pressure-retarded osmosis membrane module for osmotic power generation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu Chang; Kim, Young; Oh, Dongwook; Lee, Kong Hoon

    2013-03-19

    Pressure-retarded osmosis (PRO) uses a semipermeable membrane to produce renewable energy from salinity-gradient energy. A spiral-wound (SW) design is one module configuration of the PRO membrane. The SW PRO membrane module has two different flow paths, axial and spiral, and two different spacers, net and tricot, for draw- and feed-solution streams, respectively. This study used an experimental approach to investigate the relationship between two interacting flow streams in a prototype SW PRO membrane module, and the adverse impact of a tricot fabric spacer (as a feed spacer) on the PRO performance, including water flux and power density. The presence of the tricot spacer inside the membrane envelope caused a pressure drop due to flow resistance and reduced osmotic water permeation due to the shadow effect. The dilution of the draw solution by water permeation resulted in the reduction of the osmotic pressure difference along a pressure vessel. For a 0.6 M NaCl solution and tap water, the water flux and corresponding maximum power density were 3.7 L m(-2)h(-1) and 1.0 W/m(2) respectively at a hydraulic pressure difference of 9.8 bar. The thickness and porosity of the tricot spacer should be optimized to achieve high SW PRO module performance. PMID:23398240

  6. Overexpression of a Cytosolic Abiotic Stress Responsive Universal Stress Protein (SbUSP) Mitigates Salt and Osmotic Stress in Transgenic Tobacco Plants

    PubMed Central

    Udawat, Pushpika; Jha, Rajesh K.; Sinha, Dinkar; Mishra, Avinash; Jha, Bhavanath

    2016-01-01

    The universal stress protein (USP) is a ubiquitous protein and plays an indispensable role in plant abiotic stress tolerance. The genome of Salicornia brachiata contains two homologs of intron less SbUSP gene which encodes for salt and osmotic responsive USP. In vivo localization reveals that SbUSP is a membrane bound cytosolic protein. The role of the gene was functionally validated by developing transgenic tobacco and compared with control [wild-type (WT) and vector control (VC)] plants under different abiotic stress condition. Transgenic lines (T1) exhibited higher chlorophyll, relative water, proline, total sugar, reducing sugar, free amino acids, polyphenol contents, osmotic potential, membrane stability, and lower electrolyte leakage and lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde content) under stress treatments than control (WT and VC) plants. Lower accumulation of H2O2 and O2− radicals was also detected in transgenic lines compared to control plants under stress conditions. Present study confers that overexpression of the SbUSP gene enhances plant growth, alleviates ROS buildup, maintains ion homeostasis and improves the physiological status of the plant under salt and osmotic stresses. Principal component analysis exhibited a statistical distinction of plant response to salinity stress, and a significant response was observed for transgenic lines under stress, which provides stress endurance to the plant. A possible signaling role is proposed that some downstream genes may get activated by abiotic stress responsive cytosolic SbUSP, which leads to the protection of cell from oxidative damages. The study unveils that ectopic expression of the gene mitigates salt or osmotic stress by scavenging ROS and modulating the physiological process of the plant. PMID:27148338

  7. Overexpression of a Cytosolic Abiotic Stress Responsive Universal Stress Protein (SbUSP) Mitigates Salt and Osmotic Stress in Transgenic Tobacco Plants.

    PubMed

    Udawat, Pushpika; Jha, Rajesh K; Sinha, Dinkar; Mishra, Avinash; Jha, Bhavanath

    2016-01-01

    The universal stress protein (USP) is a ubiquitous protein and plays an indispensable role in plant abiotic stress tolerance. The genome of Salicornia brachiata contains two homologs of intron less SbUSP gene which encodes for salt and osmotic responsive USP. In vivo localization reveals that SbUSP is a membrane bound cytosolic protein. The role of the gene was functionally validated by developing transgenic tobacco and compared with control [wild-type (WT) and vector control (VC)] plants under different abiotic stress condition. Transgenic lines (T1) exhibited higher chlorophyll, relative water, proline, total sugar, reducing sugar, free amino acids, polyphenol contents, osmotic potential, membrane stability, and lower electrolyte leakage and lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde content) under stress treatments than control (WT and VC) plants. Lower accumulation of H2O2 and [Formula: see text] radicals was also detected in transgenic lines compared to control plants under stress conditions. Present study confers that overexpression of the SbUSP gene enhances plant growth, alleviates ROS buildup, maintains ion homeostasis and improves the physiological status of the plant under salt and osmotic stresses. Principal component analysis exhibited a statistical distinction of plant response to salinity stress, and a significant response was observed for transgenic lines under stress, which provides stress endurance to the plant. A possible signaling role is proposed that some downstream genes may get activated by abiotic stress responsive cytosolic SbUSP, which leads to the protection of cell from oxidative damages. The study unveils that ectopic expression of the gene mitigates salt or osmotic stress by scavenging ROS and modulating the physiological process of the plant. PMID:27148338

  8. The effect of different high-fat diets on erythrocyte osmotic fragility, growth performance and serum lipid concentrations in male, Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica).

    PubMed

    Donaldson, J; Pillay, K; Madziva, M T; Erlwanger, K H

    2015-04-01

    Poultry diets are formulated with additional animal fat or vegetable oils to improve growth rate and feed conversion efficiency. High-fat diet feeding in rats and fish has been shown to result in alterations in the phospholipid composition and cholesterol content of the erythrocyte membrane, in turn affecting erythrocyte osmotic fragility. In contrast, the few studies performed using high-fat diet feeding in avian species show no changes in erythrocyte osmotic fragility. This study made use of the Japanese quail as no data exists on investigation of this species with respect to high-fat diet feeding and erythrocyte osmotic fragility. Fifty-seven male quail were randomly divided into six groups and fed either a standard diet (commercial poultry feed) or one of five high-fat diets (commercial poultry feed with 22% of either coconut oil, lard, palm oil, soya bean oil or sunflower oil on a weight/weight basis) for 12 weeks. All birds on the high-fat diets were significantly heavier (p < 0.05) after the 12-week feeding period, than when commencing the dietary intervention. Serum triglyceride concentrations of birds in all high-fat diet groups were significantly lower (p < 0.05) than birds in the standard diet group, whereas only birds in the palm oil group had significantly lower (p < 0.05) serum cholesterol concentrations compared to the standard diet group. Fragiligrams of erythrocytes from birds in the various dietary groups were similar. High-fat diet feeding with different types of additional fat did not affect the osmotic fragility of the quail erythrocytes. Feeding quail high-energy diets of varying degrees of fatty acid saturation was well tolerated and did not seem to affect the overall health status of the birds. Resistance of avian erythrocytes to modification by excess dietary fat may be a general characteristic of avian erythrocytes. PMID:25244110

  9. RBC deformability and amino acid concentrations after hypo-osmotic challenge may reflect chronic cell hydration status in healthy young men

    PubMed Central

    Stookey, Jodi D; Klein, Alexis; Hamer, Janice; Chi, Christine; Higa, Annie; Ng, Vivian; Arieff, Allen; Kuypers, Frans A; Larkin, Sandra; Perrier, Erica; Lang, Florian

    2013-01-01

    Biomarkers of chronic cell hydration status are needed to determine whether chronic hyperosmotic stress increases chronic disease risk in population-representative samples. In vitro, cells adapt to chronic hyperosmotic stress by upregulating protein breakdown to counter the osmotic gradient with higher intracellular amino acid concentrations. If cells are subsequently exposed to hypo-osmotic conditions, the adaptation results in excess cell swelling and/or efflux of free amino acids. This study explored whether increased red blood cell (RBC) swelling and/or plasma or urine amino acid concentrations after hypo-osmotic challenge might be informative about relative chronic hyperosmotic stress in free-living men. Five healthy men (20–25 years) with baseline total water intake below 2 L/day participated in an 8-week clinical study: four 2-week periods in a U-shaped A-B-C-A design. Intake of drinking water was increased by +0.8 ± 0.3 L/day in period 2, and +1.5 ± 0.3 L/day in period 3, and returned to baseline intake (0.4 ± 0.2 L/day) in period 4. Each week, fasting blood and urine were collected after a 750 mL bolus of drinking water, following overnight water restriction. The periods of higher water intake were associated with significant decreases in RBC deformability (index of cell swelling), plasma histidine, urine arginine, and urine glutamic acid. After 4 weeks of higher water intake, four out of five participants had ½ maximal RBC deformability below 400 mmol/kg; plasma histidine below 100 μmol/L; and/or undetectable urine arginine and urine glutamic acid concentrations. Work is warranted to pursue RBC deformability and amino acid concentrations after hypo-osmotic challenge as possible biomarkers of chronic cell hydration. PMID:24303184

  10. Different forms of osmotic stress evoke qualitatively different responses in rice.

    PubMed

    Hazman, Mohamed; Hause, Bettina; Eiche, Elisabeth; Riemann, Michael; Nick, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Drought, salinity and alkalinity are distinct forms of osmotic stress with serious impacts on rice productivity. We investigated, for a salt-sensitive rice cultivar, the response to osmotically equivalent doses of these stresses. Drought, experimentally mimicked by mannitol (single factor: osmotic stress), salinity (two factors: osmotic stress and ion toxicity), and alkalinity (three factors: osmotic stress, ion toxicity, and depletion of nutrients and protons) produced different profiles of adaptive and damage responses, both locally (in the root) as well as systemically (in the shoot). The combination of several stress factors was not necessarily additive, and we even observed cases of mitigation, when two (salinity), or three stressors (alkalinity) were compared to the single stressor (drought). The response to combinations of individual stress factors is therefore not a mere addition of the partial stress responses, but rather represents a new quality of response. We interpret this finding in a model, where the output to signaling molecules is not determined by their abundance per se, but qualitatively depends on their adequate integration into an adaptive signaling network. This output generates a systemic signal that will determine the quality of the shoot response to local concentrations of ions. PMID:27450493

  11. Deriving Second Osmotic Virial Coefficients from Equations of State and from Experiment.

    PubMed

    Koga, K; Holten, Vincent; Widom, B

    2015-10-22

    The osmotic virial coefficients, which are measures of the effective interactions between solute molecules in dilute solution, may be obtained from expansions of the osmotic pressure or of the solute activity in powers of the solute concentration. In these expansions, the temperature is held fixed, and one additional constraint is imposed. When the additional constraint is that of fixed chemical potential of the solvent, the coefficient of the second-order term yields directly the second osmotic virial coefficient itself. Alternative constraints, such as fixed pressure, fixed solvent density, or the specification of liquid-vapor equilibrium, yield alternative measures of the solute-solute interaction, different from but related to the osmotic virial coefficient. These relations are summarized and, where new, are derived here. The coefficient in question may be calculated from equations of state in which the parameters have been obtained by fitting to other experimental properties. Alternatively, the coefficients may be calculated from direct experimental measurements of the deviations from Henry's law based on measurements of the activity of the solute in a coexisting gas phase. It is seen for propane in water as a test case that with the latter method, even with what appear to be the best available experimental data, there are still large uncertainties in the resulting second osmotic virial coefficient. With the former method, by contrast, the coefficient may be obtained with high numerical precision but then depends for its accuracy on the quality of the equation of state from which it is derived. PMID:26378689

  12. Osmotic damage as a predictor of motility loss during convective desiccation of bovine sperm.

    PubMed

    Sitaula, Ranjan; Jimenez, Jorge; Bhowmick, Sankha

    2013-12-01

    Current state-of-the art technologies are lagging in the application of desiccation storage to mammalian cells using nonreducing sugars. For bovine sperm, motility is irreversibly lost before reaching a sufficiently low moisture content necessary for preservation. It is hypothesized that much of the damage during drying is related to the osmotic stress encountered due to increased osmolarity of the extracellular environment. To test this hypothesis, we subjected sperm to liquid hyperosmotic environments for varying time-periods and measured their motility. We then extracted parameters for two models for motility loss based on these experiments: a first-order rate injury model (Fast or Slow) and a multi-modal (MM) injury model. The MM injury model incorporated an additional function accounting for damage induced by a time-independent osmotic change. Based on these models, we predicted sperm motility loss measured from natural and forced convective desiccation experiments. The MM injury model was able to closely bracket motility loss for desiccation as an osmotic change event with time-independent and time-dependent components. While the mechanistic basis of osmotic damage requires further exploration, the model can serve as a bracketing tool for predicting motility loss during desiccation based on excipients designed to minimize osmotic damage. PMID:24835367

  13. Cystic fibrosis airway secretions exhibit mucin hyperconcentration and increased osmotic pressure

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Ashley G.; Ehre, Camille; Button, Brian; Abdullah, Lubna H.; Cai, Li-Heng; Leigh, Margaret W.; DeMaria, Genevieve C.; Matsui, Hiro; Donaldson, Scott H.; Davis, C. William; Sheehan, John K.; Boucher, Richard C.; Kesimer, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of mucoinfective lung disease in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients likely involves poor mucus clearance. A recent model of mucus clearance predicts that mucus flow depends on the relative mucin concentration of the mucus layer compared with that of the periciliary layer; however, mucin concentrations have been difficult to measure in CF secretions. Here, we have shown that the concentration of mucin in CF sputum is low when measured by immunologically based techniques, and mass spectrometric analyses of CF mucins revealed mucin cleavage at antibody recognition sites. Using physical size exclusion chromatography/differential refractometry (SEC/dRI) techniques, we determined that mucin concentrations in CF secretions were higher than those in normal secretions. Measurements of partial osmotic pressures revealed that the partial osmotic pressure of CF sputum and the retained mucus in excised CF lungs were substantially greater than the partial osmotic pressure of normal secretions. Our data reveal that mucin concentration cannot be accurately measured immunologically in proteolytically active CF secretions; mucins are hyperconcentrated in CF secretions; and CF secretion osmotic pressures predict mucus layer–dependent osmotic compression of the periciliary liquid layer in CF lungs. Consequently, mucin hypersecretion likely produces mucus stasis, which contributes to key infectious and inflammatory components of CF lung disease. PMID:24892808

  14. Micro-osmotic pumps for continuous release of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor bosutinib in juvenile rats and its impact on bone growth

    PubMed Central

    Tauer, Josephine Tabea; Hofbauer, Lorenz C.; Jung, Roland; Erben, Reinhold G.; Suttorp, Meinolf

    2013-01-01

    Background Bosutinib is a third-generation dual tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) inhibiting Abl and Src kinases. It was developed to act on up-regulated tyrosine kinases (TKs) like BCR-ABL in Philadelphia chromosome positive (Ph+) chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) when resistance to first- and second-generation TKIs developed. However, first- and second-generation TKIs show off-target effects on bone metabolism, whereas studies on skeletal adverse effects of bosutinib are still lacking. Therefore, it was the aim of this study to continuously expose juvenile rats to bosutinib and to analyze its influence on the growing bone. Material/Methods Starting after weaning, 4-week-old Wistar rats were chronically exposed over a 28-day period to varying concentrations of bosutinib, which were continuously administered subcutaneously via implanted Alzet® micro-osmotic pumps. After necropsy, the length of the femora and tibiae were analyzed. Results Continuous administration of bosutinib by micro-osmotic pumps led to serum drug levels in the lower therapeutic range, was well tolerated, and exhibited only minor adverse effects on the growing skeleton. Conclusions Micro-osmotic pumps represent a convenient system for continuous TKI release in young growing rats. Compared to first- and second-generation TKIs, bosutinib seems to exert fewer adverse effects on the growing bone. PMID:24185529

  15. Effects of Adrenal Cortical Steroids and Osmotic Blood-Brain Barrier Opening on Methotrexate Delivery to Gliomas in the Rodent: The Factor of the Blood-Brain Barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuwelt, Edward A.; Barnett, Peggy A.; Bigner, Darrell D.; Frenkel, Eugene P.

    1982-07-01

    The effect of adrenal cortical steroids and osmotic blood-brain barrier modification on methotrexate delivery to normal and glioma-bearing rats was studied. In animals with the avian sarcoma virus-induced glioma, osmotic blood-brain barrier modification resulted in significantly increased delivery of methotrexate to the tumor-bearing hemisphere (including the tumor, the brain around the tumor, and the brain distant to the tumor), compared to the nonmodified hemisphere or to control animals. The administration of adrenal steroids, followed by intracarotid methotrexate, resulted in slightly decreased chemotherapeutic agent (methotrexate) delivery to the tumor, the brain around the tumor, and the brain distant to the tumor. When adrenal steroids were given prior to barrier modification and methotrexate therapy, the level of methotrexate was significantly less in the tumor. These studies provide evidence that the blood-brain barrier exists in tumors and is a factor in drug delivery to tumors. Steroid administration greatly interferes with the enhancement of drug delivery to tumors that can be achieved with osmotic blood-brain barrier modification.

  16. Heat-transfer enhancement in AC electro-osmotic micro-flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. P.; Speetjens, M. F. M.; Frijns, A. J. H.; van Steenhoven, A. A.

    2012-11-01

    Heat transfer in micro-flows is essential to emerging technologies as advanced microelectronics cooling systems and chemical processes in lab-on-a-chip applications. The present study explores the potential of AC electro-osmotic (ACEO) flow forcing, a promising technique for the actuation and manipulation of micro-flows, for heat-transfer enhancement. Subjects of investigation include the 3D flow structure due to ACEO forcing via an array of electrodes in a micro-channel by way of 3D velocity measurements. Presence and properties of vortical structures of the 3D flow are quantified in laboratory experiments. Typical outcomes of the experimental study result from a number of 3D particle trajectories obtained by using 3D micro-Particle-Tracking Velocimetry (3D μ-PTV). The steady nature of the flow enables combination of results from a series of measurements into one dense data set. This facilitates accurate evaluation of quantities relevant for heat transfer by data-processing methods. The primary circulation is given above one half of an electrode in terms of the spanwise component of vorticity. The outline of the vortex boundary is determined via the eigenvalues of the strain-rate tensor. To estimate convective heat transfer, wall shear rate above one half of an electrode is quantitatively analyzed as function of voltage amplitude and frequency. These results yield first insights into the characteristics of 3D ACEO flows and ways to exploit and manipulate them for heat-transfer enhancement.

  17. Flow patterning in Hele-Shaw configurations using non-uniform electro-osmotic slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyko, Evgeniy; Rubin, Shimon; Gat, Amir D.; Bercovici, Moran

    2015-10-01

    We present an analytical study of electro-osmotic flow in a Hele-Shaw configuration with non-uniform zeta potential distribution. Applying the lubrication approximation and assuming thin electric double layer, we obtain a pair of uncoupled Poisson equations for the pressure and depth-averaged stream function, and show that the inhomogeneous parts in these equations are governed by gradients in zeta potential parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field, respectively. We obtain a solution for the case of a disk-shaped region with uniform zeta potential and show that the flow field created is an exact dipole, even in the immediate vicinity of the disk. In addition, we study the inverse problem where the desired flow field is known and solve for the zeta potential distribution required in order to establish it. Finally, we demonstrate that such inverse problem solutions can be used to create directional flows confined within narrow regions, without physical walls. Such solutions are equivalent to flow within channels and we show that these can be assembled to create complex microfluidic networks, composed of intersecting channels and turns, which are basic building blocks in microfluidic devices.

  18. Co-synergism of endophyte Penicillium resedanum LK6 with salicylic acid helped Capsicum annuum in biomass recovery and osmotic stress mitigation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Water-deficiency adversely affects crop growth by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) at cellular level. To mitigate such stressful events, it was aimed to investigate the co-synergism of exogenous salicylic acid (SA) and symbiosis of endophytic fungus with Capsicum annuum L. (pepper). Results The findings of the study showed that exogenous SA (10-6 M) application to endophyte (Penicillium resedanum LK6) infected plants not only increased the shoot length and chlorophyll content but also improved the biomass recovery of pepper plants under polyethylene glycol (15%) induced osmotic stress (2, 4 and 8 days). Endophyte-infected plants had low cellular injury and high photosynthesis rate. SA also enhanced the colonization rate of endophyte in the host-plant roots. Endophyte and SA, in combination, reduced the production of ROS by increasing the total polyphenol, reduce glutathione, catalase, peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase as compared to control plants. Osmotic stress pronounced the lipid peroxidation and superoxide anions formation in control plants as compared to endophyte and SA-treated plants. The endogenous SA contents were significantly higher in pepper plants treated with endophyte and SA under osmotic stress as compared to control. Conclusion Endophytic fungal symbiosis and exogenous SA application can help the plants to relieve the adverse effects of osmotic stress by decreasing losses in biomass as compared to non-inoculated plants. These findings suggest that SA application positively impact microbial colonization while in combination, it reprograms the plant growth under various intervals of drought stress. Such symbiotic strategy can be useful for expanding agriculture production in drought prone lands. PMID:23452409

  19. Vanilloid receptor-related osmotically activated channel (VR-OAC), a candidate vertebrate osmoreceptor

    PubMed Central

    Liedtke, Wolfgang; Choe, Yong; Martí-Renom, Marc A.; Bell, Andrea M.; Denis, Charlotte S.; Šali, Andrej; Hudspeth, A. J.; Friedman, Jeffrey M.; Heller, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY The detection of osmotic stimuli is essential for all organisms, yet few osmoreceptive proteins are known, none of them in vertebrates. By employing a candidate-gene approach based on genes encoding members of the TRP superfamily of ion channels, we cloned cDNAs encoding the vanilloid receptor-related osmotically activated channel (VR-OAC) from the rat, mouse, human, and chicken. This novel cation-selective channel is gated by exposure to hypotonicity within the physiological range. In the central nevous system, the channel is expressed neurons of the circumventricular organs, neurosensory cells responsive to systemic osmotic pressure. The channel also occurs in other neurosensory cells, including inner-ear hair cells, sensory neurons, and Merkel cells. PMID:11081638

  20. Impact of oxidative and osmotic stresses on Candida albicans biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Pemmaraju, Suma C; Padmapriya, Kumar; Pruthi, Parul A; Prasad, R; Pruthi, Vikas

    2016-09-01

    Candida albicans possesses an ability to grow under different host-driven stress conditions by developing robust protective mechanisms. In this investigation the focus was on the impact of osmotic (2M NaCl) and oxidative (5 mM H2O2) stress conditions during C. albicans biofilm formation. Oxidative stress enhanced extracellular DNA secretion into the biofilm matrix, increased the chitin level, and reduced virulence factors, namely phospholipase and proteinase activity, while osmotic stress mainly increased extracellular proteinase and decreased phospholipase activity. Fourier transform infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy analysis of mannan isolated from the C. albicans biofilm cell wall revealed a decrease in mannan content and reduced β-linked mannose moieties under stress conditions. The results demonstrate that C. albicans adapts to oxidative and osmotic stress conditions by inducing biofilm formation with a rich exopolymeric matrix, modulating virulence factors as well as the cell wall composition for its survival in different host niches. PMID:27472386

  1. Osmotic-pressure-controlled concentration of colloidal particles in thin-shelled capsules.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shin-Hyun; Park, Jin-Gyu; Choi, Tae Min; Manoharan, Vinothan N; Weitz, David A

    2014-01-01

    Colloidal crystals are promising structures for photonic applications requiring dynamic control over optical properties. However, for ease of processing and reconfigurability, the crystals should be encapsulated to form 'ink' capsules rather than confined in a thin film. Here we demonstrate a class of encapsulated colloidal photonic structures whose optical properties can be controlled through osmotic pressure. The ordering and separation of the particles within the microfluidically created capsules can be tuned by changing the colloidal concentration through osmotic pressure-induced control of the size of the individual capsules, modulating photonic stop band. The rubber capsules exhibit a reversible change in the diffracted colour, depending on osmotic pressure, a property we call osmochromaticity. The high encapsulation efficiency and capsule uniformity of this microfluidic approach, combined with the highly reconfigurable shapes and the broad control over photonic properties, make this class of structures particularly suitable for photonic applications such as electronic inks and reflective displays. PMID:24394965

  2. Osmotic-pressure-controlled concentration of colloidal particles in thin-shelled capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Shin-Hyun; Park, Jin-Gyu; Choi, Tae Min; Manoharan, Vinothan N.; Weitz, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Colloidal crystals are promising structures for photonic applications requiring dynamic control over optical properties. However, for ease of processing and reconfigurability, the crystals should be encapsulated to form ‘ink’ capsules rather than confined in a thin film. Here we demonstrate a class of encapsulated colloidal photonic structures whose optical properties can be controlled through osmotic pressure. The ordering and separation of the particles within the microfluidically created capsules can be tuned by changing the colloidal concentration through osmotic pressure-induced control of the size of the individual capsules, modulating photonic stop band. The rubber capsules exhibit a reversible change in the diffracted colour, depending on osmotic pressure, a property we call osmochromaticity. The high encapsulation efficiency and capsule uniformity of this microfluidic approach, combined with the highly reconfigurable shapes and the broad control over photonic properties, make this class of structures particularly suitable for photonic applications such as electronic inks and reflective displays.

  3. The Evolution of the Clinical Use of Osmotic Therapy in the Treatment of Cerebral Edema.

    PubMed

    Diringer, Michael N

    2016-01-01

    For almost a century, it has been known that hypertonic solutions shrink cerebral tissue. Early attempts used hypertonic solutions of ions (sodium, magnesium) and sugars (glucose, dextrose, sucrose), concentrated albumin, and, later, urea. These early attempts were largely abandoned because the effect was short lived and often followed by a period of rebound edema. This was a result, to a great extent, of the osmotic agent either being metabolized or crossing the cell membrane.Renewed interest in osmotic therapy came in the 1960s, with the introduction of intracranial pressure monitoring in head injury and the use of mannitol as an osmotic agent. In the 1990s, use of hypertonic saline was reintroduced as an alternative to address concerns about mannitol. More recently, administration of hypertonic saline has transitioned from boluses to continuous infusions. The rationale for and data supporting the use of continuous infusions are presented. PMID:26463914

  4. [Determination of tolerance ability of platelet to the change of solution osmotic pressure and its significance].

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Xi-Lin; Liu, Jing-Han; Gao, Dayong

    2003-02-01

    In order to determine the tolerance ability of platelet to change of osmotic pressure in solution, the isotonic fresh platelets were exposed to a series of crystal salt solutions with osmotic pressure range from 47 to 611 mOsm for 15 minutes. Then the platelets were returned to isotonic condition and kept for 15 minutes. The expressions of phosphatidylserine and CD62p were assayed in platelets. The results showed that the phosphatidylserine and CD62p expressions were increased when the osmotic pressure of solution was below 238 mOsm, but no significant rise was detected when the platelets were exposed to 611 mOsm solution. No increases of positive rate of CD62p and phosphatidylserine were detected in platelets returned to isotonic condition. It is concluded that platelets are sensitive to hypoosmotic solution and tolerated to hyperosmotic solution. Exceeding the platelet safe volume limitation may lead to injure of platelet osmosis in crystal salt solution. PMID:12667298

  5. Transcriptional regulation of gene expression during osmotic stress responses by the mammalian target of rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Ortells, M Carmen; Morancho, Beatriz; Drews-Elger, Katherine; Viollet, Benoit; Laderoute, Keith R; López-Rodríguez, Cristina; Aramburu, Jose

    2012-05-01

    Although stress can suppress growth and proliferation, cells can induce adaptive responses that allow them to maintain these functions under stress. While numerous studies have focused on the inhibitory effects of stress on cell growth, less is known on how growth-promoting pathways influence stress responses. We have approached this question by analyzing the effect of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a central growth controller, on the osmotic stress response. Our results showed that mammalian cells exposed to moderate hypertonicity maintained active mTOR, which was required to sustain their cell size and proliferative capacity. Moreover, mTOR regulated the induction of diverse osmostress response genes, including targets of the tonicity-responsive transcription factor NFAT5 as well as NFAT5-independent genes. Genes sensitive to mTOR-included regulators of stress responses, growth and proliferation. Among them, we identified REDD1 and REDD2, which had been previously characterized as mTOR inhibitors in other stress contexts. We observed that mTOR facilitated transcription-permissive conditions for several osmoresponsive genes by enhancing histone H4 acetylation and the recruitment of RNA polymerase II. Altogether, these results reveal a previously unappreciated role of mTOR in regulating transcriptional mechanisms that control gene expression during cellular stress responses. PMID:22287635

  6. Mass transfer during osmotic dehydration of celery stalks in a batch osmo-reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sareban, M.; Abbasi Souraki, B.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, dehydration behavior of bulk of celery stalks, during osmotic drying in a limited volume of salt solution, was investigated. Experiments were carried out in the three initial solution concentrations of 10, 18 and 25 % (w/w) and at the three temperatures of 35, 45 and 55 °C. The volume ratio of the fruit to the solution was considered 1:3. A two-parameter model was used for prediction of kinetics of mass transfer and values of equilibrium moisture loss and solid gain. Moisture and salt effective diffusivities in celery stalks were estimated by fitting the experimental data of moisture loss and solute gain to the analytical solution of Fick's second law of diffusion. The analytical model was solved by defining a partition factor, K, assuming that the concentration of solute just within the surface of the material is K times that in the solution. Results showed that moisture and salt effective diffusivities and equilibrium values of moisture loss and solute gain increased with increasing the temperature and solution concentration. Results showed a good agreement between the two parameter model (with mean relative error of 4.016 % for moisture loss and 5.977 % for solid gain), analytical solution of Fick's second law (with mean relative error of 8.924 % for moisture loss and 9.164 % for solid gain) and experimental data.

  7. The role of forward osmosis and microfiltration in an integrated osmotic-microfiltration membrane bioreactor system.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wenhai; Hai, Faisal I; Kang, Jinguo; Price, William E; Nghiem, Long D; Elimelech, Menachem

    2015-10-01

    This study investigates the performance of an integrated osmotic and microfiltration membrane bioreactor (O/MF-MBR) system for wastewater treatment and reclamation. The O/MF-MBR system simultaneously used microfiltration (MF) and forward osmosis (FO) membranes to extract water from the mixed liquor of an aerobic bioreactor. The MF membrane facilitated the bleeding of dissolved inorganic salts and thus prevented the build-up of salinity in the bioreactor. As a result, sludge production and microbial activity were relatively stable over 60 days of operation. Compared to MF, the FO process produced a better permeate quality in terms of nutrients, total organic carbon, as well as hydrophilic and biologically persistent trace organic chemicals (TrOCs). The high rejection by the FO membrane also led to accumulation of hydrophilic and biologically persistent TrOCs in the bioreactor, consequently increasing their concentration in the MF permeate. On the other hand, hydrophobic and readily biodegradable TrOCs were minimally detected in both MF and FO permeates, with no clear difference in the removal efficiencies between two processes. PMID:25966331

  8. Effects of Salinity on growth and osmotic regulation substances of callus induced from Reaumuria soongorica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Huijuan; Li, Xinrong; Liu, Yubing; Zhao, Xin

    2014-05-01

    Reaumuria soongorica (Pall.) Maxim is the strong xerophils plant in the northwest arid and semiarid regions in China. It plays very important roles in stabilizing sand dunes and in construction of agricultural shelter belts in north-west China.The present study aimed to evaluate the response to salinity of R. soongorica, which is more salt-resistant than other valuable shrub species used for afforestation on saline and alkaline desert, at the cellular level. To this purpose, callus was induced from shoot segments of R. soongorica on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with 0.2 mgL-16-benzyladenine (BA) and 2.0 mg mgL-1 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2 ,4-D). The relative growth rate of callus reached a maximum in the presence of 100 mmol L-1NaCl and growth was inhibited with increasing NaCl concentrations. Examination of the changes of osmotic substances under salt stress showed that accumulation of proline, trehalose, Glycine betain and flavonoids increased with increasing salt concentrations. The results indicate that the response of the callus of R. soongorica to salt stress is similar to that of the whole plant. .

  9. Characterization of prednisolone in controlled porosity osmotic pump pellets using solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sotthivirat, S; Lubach, J W; Haslam, J L; Munson, E J; Stella, V J

    2007-05-01

    The overall objective of this study was to demonstrate the influence of formulation and processing variables on the physical state of prednisolone (PDL) in formulations consisting of PDL, microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), and sulfobutylether-beta-cyclodextrin (CD). PDL was used as a model drug in controlled porosity osmotic pump pellet (CP-OPP) formulations, and was characterized using solid-state NMR spectroscopy and other complimentary analytical techniques. Dosage forms and the solid-state properties of drugs and excipients in a formulation may be influenced by the processing conditions used. Several processing parameters, such as amount of water used in wet granulation and subsequent drying conditions, were found to affect the solid-state transformation of PDL. In addition, the presence of excipients in the CP-OPP was observed to decrease the degree of PDL crystallinity, presumably by creating an inclusion complex with the CD. A hydrated form of PDL was created when PDL was ground with water alone; however, this form was not observed in formulated products. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy was shown to be a powerful technique for the analysis of drug formulations and investigations of the effects of processing conditions. PMID:17455361

  10. Applicability of a novel osmotic membrane bioreactor using a specific draw solution in wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nguyen Cong; Chen, Shiao-Shing; Nguyen, Hau Thi; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Hao, Chan Wen; Lin, Po-Hsun

    2015-06-15

    This study aims to develop a new osmotic membrane bioreactor by combining a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) with forward osmosis membrane bioreactor (FOMBR) to treat wastewater. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid disodium salt coupled with polyethylene glycol tert-octylphenyl ether was used as an innovative draw solution in this membrane hybrid system (MBBR-OsMBR) for minimizing the reverse salt flux and maintaining a healthy environment for the microorganism community. The results showed that the hybrid system achieved a stable water flux of 6.94 L/m(2) h and low salt accumulation in the bioreactor for 68 days of operation. At a filling rate of 40% (by volume of the bioreactor) of the polyethylene balls used as carriers, NH4(+)-N and PO4(3-)-P were almost removed (>99%) while producing relatively low NO3(-)-N and NO2(-)-N in the effluent (e.g. <0.56 and 0.96 mg/L, respectively). Furthermore, from analysis based on scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and fluorescence emission-excitation matrix spectrophotometry, there was a thin gel-like fouling layer on the FO membrane, which composed of bacteria as well as biopolymers and protein-like substances. Nonetheless, the formation of these fouling layers of the FO membrane in MBBR-OsMBR was reversible and removed by a physical cleaning technique. PMID:25790914

  11. Cellulose Acetate 398-10 Asymmetric Membrane Capsules for Osmotically Regulated Delivery of Acyclovir

    PubMed Central

    Sonkar, Alka; Kumar, Anil; Pathak, Kamla

    2016-01-01

    The study was aimed at developing cellulose acetate asymmetric membrane capsules (AMCs) of acyclovir for its controlled delivery at the absorption site. The AMCs were prepared by phase inversion technique using wet process. A 23 full factorial design assessed the effect of independent variables (level(s) of polymer, pore former, and osmogen) on the cumulative drug release from AMCs. The buoyant optimized formulation F7 (low level of cellulose acetate; high levels of both glycerol and sodium lauryl sulphate) displayed maximum drug release of 97.88 ± 0.77% in 8 h that was independent of variation in agitational intensity and intentional defect on the cellulose acetate AMC. The in vitro data best fitted zero-order kinetics (r2 = 0.9898). SEM micrograph of the transverse section confirmed the asymmetric nature of the cellulose acetate capsular membrane. Statistical analysis by Design Expert software indicated no interaction between the independent variables confirming the efficiency of the design in estimating the effects of variables on drug release. The optimized formulation F7 (desirability = 0.871) displayed sustenance of drug release over the drug packed in AMC in pure state proving the superiority of osmotically active formulation. Conclusively the AMCs have potential for controlled release of acyclovir at its absorption site. PMID:26981319

  12. Hyperthermia, dehydration, and osmotic stress: unconventional sources of exercise-induced reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    King, Michelle A; Clanton, Thomas L; Laitano, Orlando

    2016-01-15

    Evidence of increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is observed in the circulation during exercise in humans. This is exacerbated at elevated body temperatures and attenuated when normal exercise-induced body temperature elevations are suppressed. Why ROS production during exercise is temperature dependent is entirely unknown. This review covers the human exercise studies to date that provide evidence that oxidant and antioxidant changes observed in the blood during exercise are dependent on temperature and fluid balance. We then address possible mechanisms linking exercise with these variables that include shear stress, effects of hemoconcentration, and signaling pathways involving muscle osmoregulation. Since pathways of muscle osmoregulation are rarely discussed in this context, we provide a brief review of what is currently known and unknown about muscle osmoregulation and how it may be linked to oxidant production in exercise and hyperthermia. Both the circulation and the exercising muscle fibers become concentrated with osmolytes during exercise in the heat, resulting in a competition for available water across the muscle sarcolemma and other tissues. We conclude that though multiple mechanisms may be responsible for the changes in oxidant/antioxidant balance in the blood during exercise, a strong case can be made that a significant component of ROS produced during some forms of exercise reflect requirements of adapting to osmotic challenges, hyperthermia challenges, and loss of circulating fluid volume. PMID:26561649

  13. Effects of osmotic pressure, acid, or cold stresses on antibiotic susceptibility of Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Al-Nabulsi, Anas A; Osaili, Tareq M; Shaker, Reyad R; Olaimat, Amin N; Jaradat, Ziad W; Zain Elabedeen, Noor A; Holley, Richard A

    2015-04-01

    Prevalence of antibiotic resistance of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from a variety of foods has increased in many countries. L. monocytogenes has many physiological adaptations that enable survival under a wide range of environmental stresses. The objective of this study was to evaluate effects of osmotic (2, 4, 6, 12% NaC), pH (6, 5.5, 5.0) and cold (4 °C) stresses on susceptibility of three isolates of L. monocytogenes towards different antibiotics. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of tested antibiotics against unstressed (control), stressed or post-stressed L. monocytogenes isolates (an ATCC strain and a meat and dairy isolate) were determined using the broth microdilution method. Unstressed cells of L. monocytogenes were sensitive to all tested antibiotics. In general, when L. monocytogenes cells were exposed to salt, cold and pH stresses, their antibiotic resistance increased as salt concentration increased to 6 or 12%, as pH was reduced to pH 5 or as temperature was decreased to 10 °C. Results showed that both meat and dairy isolates were more resistant than the ATCC reference strain. Use of sub-lethal stresses in food preservation systems may stimulate antibiotic resistance responses in L. monocytogenes strains. PMID:25475279

  14. Unexpected Normal Colloid Osmotic Pressure in Clinical States with Low Serum Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Michelis, Regina; Sela, Shifra; Zeitun, Teuta; Geron, Ronit; Kristal, Batya

    2016-01-01

    Background In clinical states associated with systemic oxidative stress (OS) and inflammation such as chronic kidney disease (CKD), oxidative modifications of serum albumin impair its quantification, resulting in apparent hypoalbuminemia. As the maintenance of oncotic pressure/colloid osmotic pressure (COP) is a major function of albumin, this study examined the impact of albumin oxidation on COP, both in-vivo and in-vitro. Methods Patients with proteinuria and patients on chronic hemodialysis (HD) with systemic inflammation and OS were enrolled. Blood samples were collected from 134 subjects: 32 healthy controls (HC), proteinuric patients with high (n = 17) and low (n = 31) systemic inflammation and from 54 patients on chronic hemodialysis (HD) with the highest levels of OS and inflammation. Results In-vitro oxidized albumin showed significantly higher COP values than non-oxidized albumin at identical albumin levels. In vivo, in hypoalbuminemic HD patients with the highest OS and inflammation, COP values were also higher than expected for the low albumin levels. The contribution to COP by other prevalent plasma proteins, such as fibrinogen and immunoglobulins was negligible. We imply that the calculation of COP based on albumin levels should be revisited in face of OS and inflammation. Hence, in hypoalbuminemic proteinuric patients with systemic OS and inflammation the assumption of low COP should be verified by its measurements. PMID:27453993

  15. Spreading of porous vesicles subjected to osmotic shocks: the role of aquaporins.

    PubMed

    Berthaud, Alice; Quemeneur, François; Deforet, Maxime; Bassereau, Patricia; Brochard-Wyart, Françoise; Mangenot, Stéphanie

    2016-02-01

    Aquaporin 0 (AQP0) is a transmembrane protein specific to the eye lens, involved as a water carrier across the lipid membranes. During eye lens maturation, AQP0s are truncated by proteolytic cleavage. We investigate in this work the capability of truncated AQP0 to conduct water across membranes. We developed a method to accurately determine water permeability across lipid membranes and across proteins from the deflation under osmotic pressure of giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) deposited on an adhesive substrate. Using reflection interference contrast microscopy (RICM), we measure the spreading area of GUVs during deswelling. We interpret these results using a model based on hydrodynamic, binder diffusion towards the contact zone, and Helfrich's law for the membrane tension, which allows us to relate the spread area to the vesicle internal volume. We first study the specific adhesion of vesicles coated with biotin spreading on a streptavidin substrate. We then determine the permeability of a single functional AQP0 and demonstrate that truncated AQP0 is no more a water channel. PMID:26662491

  16. Non-isothermal electro-osmotic flow in a microchannel with charge-modulated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bautista, Oscar; Sanchez, Salvador; Mendez, Federico

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we present an theoretical analysis of a nonisothermal electro-osmotic flow of a Newtonian fluid over charge-modulated surfaces in a microchannel. Here, the heating in the microchannel is due to the Joule effect caused by the imposition of an external electric field. The study is conducted through the use of perturbation techniques and is validated by means of numerical simulations. We consider that both, viscosity and electrical conductivity of the fluid are temperature-dependent; therefore, in order to determine the heat transfer process and the corresponding effects on the flow field, the governing equations of continuity, momentum, energy and electric potential have to be solved in a coupled manner. The principal obtained results evidence that the flow patterns are perturbed in a noticeable manner in comparison with the isothernal case. Our results may be used for increasing microfluidics mixing by conjugating thermal effects with the use of charge-modulated surfaces. This work has been supported by the research grants no. 220900 of Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACYT) and 20150919 of SIP-IPN at Mexico. F. Méndez acknowledges also the economical support of PAPIIT-UNAM under contract number IN112215.

  17. Short and prolonged exposure to hyperglycaemia in human fibroblasts and endothelial cells: metabolic and osmotic effects.

    PubMed

    Moruzzi, Noah; Del Sole, Marianna; Fato, Romana; Gerdes, Jantje M; Berggren, Per-Olof; Bergamini, Christian; Brismar, Kerstin

    2014-08-01

    High blood glucose levels are the main feature of diabetes. However, the underlying mechanism linking high glucose concentration to diabetic complications is still not fully elucidated, particularly with regard to human physiology. Excess of glucose is likely to trigger a metabolic response depending on the cell features, activating deleterious pathways involved in the complications of diabetes. In this study, we aim to elucidate how acute and prolonged hyperglycaemia alters the biology and metabolism in human fibroblasts and endothelial cells. We found that hyperglycaemia triggers a metabolic switch from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis that is maintained over prolonged time. Moreover, osmotic pressure is a major factor in the early metabolic response, decreasing both mitochondrial transmembrane potential and cellular proliferation. After prolonged exposure to hyperglycaemia we observed decreased mitochondrial steady-state and uncoupled respiration, together with a reduced ATP/ADP ratio. At the same time, we could not detect major changes in mitochondrial transmembrane potential and reactive oxygen species. We suggest that the physiological and metabolic alterations observed in healthy human primary fibroblasts and endothelial cells are an adaptive response to hyperglycaemia. The severity of metabolic and bioenergetics impairment associated with diabetic complications may occur after longer glucose exposure or due to interactions with cell types more sensitive to hyperglycaemia. PMID:24814290

  18. Diffusional solute flux during osmotic water flow across the human red cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Brahm, J; Galey, W R

    1987-05-01

    The effect of solvent drag on the unidirectional efflux of labeled water, urea, and chloride from human red cells was studied by means of the continuous flow tube method under conditions of osmotic equilibrium and net volume flow. Solvent (water) flow out of cells was created by mixing cells equilibrated in 100 mM salt solution with a 200-mM or 250-mM salt solution, while flow of water into cells was obtained by equilibrating the cells in the higher concentration and mixing them with the 100-mM solution. Control experiments constitute measurements of efflux of [14C]ethanol in normal cells and 3H2O in cells treated with p-chloromercuribenzosulfonate under the conditions described above. In both instances, the solute is known to penetrate the membrane through nonporous pathways. As anticipated, the tracer flux of neither urea nor chloride showed any dependence on net solvent flow, regardless of the direction. If one assumes the recently reported reflection coefficient for urea of 0.7, the urea tracer flux should change by at least 24% under volume flow conditions. Since such changes would be easily detected with our method, we conclude that the pathways for water, for urea, and for chloride are functionally separated. PMID:3037007

  19. How does low-molecular-weight polystyrene dissolve: osmotic swelling vs. surface dissolution.

    PubMed

    Marcon, Valentina; van der Vegt, Nico F A

    2014-12-01

    By means of multiscale hierarchical modeling we study the real time evolution of low-molecular-weight polystyrene, below the glass transition temperature, in contact with its solvent, toluene. We observe two concurrent phenomena taking place: (1) the solvent diffuses into the polymer by a Case II mechanism, leading to osmotic driven swelling and progressive chain dilution (inside-out mechanism); (2) polymer chains are solvated, detach from the interface and move into the solvent before the film is completely swollen (outside-in mechanism). From our simulations we conclude that, below the entanglement length, a thin swollen layer, also observed in previous experiments, forms almost instantaneously, which allows for the outside-in mechanism to start a few tens of nanoseconds after the polymer-solvent initial contact. After this initial transient time the two mechanisms are concurrent. We furthermore observe that the presence of the solvent significantly enhances the mobility of the polymer chains of the surface layer, but only in the direction parallel to the interface. PMID:25300931

  20. Osmotic potential and projected drought tolerance of four phreatophytic shrub species in Owens Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dileanis, Peter D.; Groeneveld, David P.

    1989-01-01

    A substantial quantity of the water used by plant communities growing on the floor of Owens Valley, California, is derived from a shallow unconfined aquifer. Fluctuations in the water table caused by ground-water withdrawal may result in periods when this water supply is not accessible to plants. The capacity of the plants to adapt to these periods of water loss depends on the availability of water stored in the soil and on physiological characteristics related to the ability of the plants to resist dehydration and wilting. Osmotic adjustment occurred in four phreatophytic shrub species at sites near Bishop, California, where the water table had been lowered by a system of pump-equipped wells installed in the vicinity of vegetation transects. The pressure-volume technique was used to determine osmotic potential and cell-wall elasticity between March 1985 and September 1986 for Atriplex torreyi, Chrysothamnus nauseosus , Sarcobatus verm iculatus , and Artemisia tridentata. Although not usually classified as a phreatophyte, Artemisia tridentata, where it grows on the valley floor, is apparently dependent on the depth to the water table. During late summer, osmotic potentials were 0.37 to 0.41 MPa (megapascal) lower in plants growing on the site where the water table had been lowered compared to an adjacent site where the water table remained at its natural levels. Measurements of soil matric potential at the two sites indicated that osmotic adjustment occurred in response to stress caused by lowering the water table. A theoretical lower limit of osmotic adjustment was determined by comparing initial cell osmotic potentials with initial xylem water potentials. These experimentally derived limits indicated that Atriplex torreyi and S. vermiculatus may maintain leaf cell turgor at significantly lower cell water potentials (about -4.5 MPa) than C. nauseosus or Artemisia tridentata (about -2.5 MPa), which allows them to function in drier soil environments.

  1. Osmotic potential and projected drought tolerance of four phreatophytic shrub species in Owens Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dileanis, P.D.; Groeneveld, D.P.

    1988-01-01

    A large part of the water used by plant communities growing on the floor of Owens Valley, California, is derived from a shallow unconfined aquifer. Fluctuations in the water table caused by groundwater withdrawal may result in periods when this water supply is not accessible to plants. The capacity of the plants to adapt to these periods of water loss depend on the availability of water stored in the soil and on physiological characteristics related to the ability of the plants to resist dehydration and wilting. Osmotic adjustment occurred in four phreatophytic shrub species at sites near bishop, California, where the water table had been lowered by a system of pump-equipped wells installed in the vicinity of vegetation transects. The pressure-volume techniques was used to determine osmotic potential and cell-wall elasticity between March 1985 and September 1986 for Atriplex torreyi, Chrysothamnus nauseosus , Sarcobatus vermiculatus, and Artemisia tridentata. Although not usually classified as a phreatophyte, Artemisia tridentata, where it grows on the valley floor, is apparently dependent on the depth to the water table. During late summer, osmotic potentials were 0.37 to 0.41 megapascal lower in plants growing on the site where the water table had been lowered compared to an adjacent site where the water table remained at its natural levels. Measurements of soil matric potential at the two sites indicated that osmotic adjustment occurred in response to stress caused by lowering the water table. A theoretical lower limit of osmotic adjustment was determined by comparing initial cell osmotic potentials with initial xylem water potentials. These experimentally derived limits indicated that A. torreyi and S. vermiculatus may maintain leaf cell turgor at significantly lower cell water potentials (about -4.5 megapascals) than C. nauseosus or A. tridentata (about -2.5 megapascals) and allows them to function in dryer soil environments. (Author 's abstract)

  2. Osmotic Dependence of the Transmembrane Potential Difference of Broadbean Mesocarp Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ze-Sheng; Delrot, Serge

    1987-01-01

    Pod walls of broadbean (Vicia faba L. cv Aguadulce) were harvested at the import (S1), at the transition (S2) or at the export (S3) phase for assimilate transport. Measurements of the transmembrane potential difference (PD) of mesocarp cells were made under various osmotic conditions. Internal osmotic potentials and cell turgor were calculated from osmolality measurements of cell saps recovered by freeze-thawing, after correction for the contribution of the free-space solution. Changes in the mannitol concentration of the medium altered the PD within a few minutes, and new stable values of PD were reached within 20 minutes after the osmotic change. With mannitol as the osmoticum, the most negative PD was measured at an external osmotic potential of -0.70 megapascals (MPa) for S1 and S2, while the most negative was at -0.40 MPa for S3. Ethylene glycol, a permeant osmoticum, had little effect on PD, showing that the PD was sensitive to turgor, not to solute potential per se. For S1 and S2, the PD was less negative for turgor potentials lower than 0.1 MPa or greater than 0.3 MPa. S3 samples exhibited a different turgor dependence, with a sharp optimum of the negativity of the PD at 0.3 MPa. The data are consistent with the proposal that the proton pump acts as a transducer of the osmotic conditions. They show that the osmotic sensitivity of the PD of mesocarp cells of broadbean changes with the stage of development of the pod. PMID:16665540

  3. Distribution of cadmium in gravid CF-1 mice following chronic administration

    SciTech Connect

    Reihart, M.J.; Mahalik, M.P.; Hitner, H.W.; Prozialeck, W.C. )

    1991-03-11

    Previous studies, in which cadmium (Cd{sup 2+}) was administered via osmotic minipumps to gravid CF-1 mice showed that Cd{sup 2+} produces dose-dependent teratogenic effects. The present studies examined the patterns of distribution when Cd{sup 2+} is given by this route to gravid and non-gravid mice. A total dose of 5.6 umoles CdCl{sub 2} containing 1 uCi {sup 109}Cd{sup 2+} was administered via 14 day Alzet osmotic minipumps implanted subcutaneously on day 5 of gestation. On day 12 and day 18 of gestation, the animals were sacrificed. Samples of various tissues were removed, solubilized and counted for radioactivity in a liquid scintillation counter. The results showed that the highest levels of Cd were present in the maternal liver and kidney. The levels of Cd{sup 2+} in the kidney on day 18 were much higher than those on day 12 suggesting a gradual redistribution of Cd{sup 2+} accumulated in the placenta, little was present in the amnionic fluid or fetuses. These patterns of distribution for Cd{sup 2+} administered by osmotic minipumps are similar to those previously reported for other parenteral routes of administration. The authors finding that Cd{sup 2+} accumulates in the placenta but does not readily cross into the amniotic fluid or fetus is consistent with the hypothesis that Cd{sup 2+} may produce some of its teratogenic effects by selectively damaging the placenta.

  4. Development of polymeric coatings for control of electro-osmotic flow in ASTP MA-011 electrophoresis technology experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, W. J.

    1976-01-01

    The development of a methyl cellulose based coating system for control of electro-osmotic flow at the walls of electrophoresis cells is described. Flight electrophoresis columns were coated with this system, resulting in a flight set of six columns. In flight photography of MA-011 electrophoretic separations verified control of electro-osmotic flow.

  5. Bioequivalence of Sandoz methylphenidate osmotic-controlled release tablet with Concerta® (Janssen-Cilag)

    PubMed Central

    Schapperer, Elisabeth; Daumann, Heike; Lamouche, Stéphane; Thyroff-Friesinger, Ursula; Viel, François; Weitschies, Werner

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to assess the bioequivalence of Sandoz methylphenidate osmotic-controlled release (OCR) tablets (Sandoz [Methylphenidate[ MPH OCR) with Concerta®, a methylphenidate formulation indicated for the treatment of attention deficit/hyperactivity dis