Science.gov

Sample records for osteoarthritis oa patients

  1. [Osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Seizo

    2014-10-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common cause of arthritis, and is associated with significant pain and disability. Epidemiological study showed a large number of the eldery in Japan suffered OA, especially OA of the knee. Rapid diagnosis and conservative treatments those includes patient education, weight loss, exercise, physical and occupational therapy are effective at early stage. Pharmacologic treatment are acetaminophen and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) including cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) selective agents. Surgery of the joint arthroplasty significantly reduces knee and hip pain, and restores the functions of the patient at the end stage. PMID:25509795

  2. Pelvic Incidence in Patients with Hip Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, Ibrahim J.; Rasouli, Mohammad R.; Kepler, Christopher K.; Restrepo, Santiago; Albert, Todd J.; Radcliff, Kris E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hip osteoarthritis (OA) is a major cause of pain and disability that results in considerable social and medical costs. Mechanics such as posture, alignment and orientation of the hips and the spinal column and the relationship between these factors have been implicated in the development of both hip and spine pathologies. This study aims to test the hypothesis if pelvic incidence varies in patients with and without osteoarthritis. We assessed the relationship between spinopelvic alignment as measured by pelvic incidence (PI) and the presence of hip OA. Methods: We collected supine pelvis CT scans of 1,012 consecutive patients not known to have hip OA. Our first group consisted of 95 patients with moderate to severe hip OA as per radiology reports. The second group included 87 patients with no evidence of hip OA. Power analysis revealed the need for 77 patients per group to find a mean difference in PI of 5° or less between both groups. Two trained physicians independently measured the PI to account for inter-observer reliability. Results: Patients with moderate to severe hip OA had a mean PI of 56.5°±12.8°. The mean PI for patients without hip OA was 57.2°±7.5°. An independent samples t-test revealed no significant difference between the PI values of the two groups. Spearman’s correlation coefficient of 0.754 demonstrated a high inter-observer reliability. Conclusion: There was no difference in PI angle of hip OA patients and “healthy” patients. Our measurements of patients without OA were almost identical to the reported normal PI values in the literature. It appears that hip OA is not associated with PI angle, refuting the hypothesis made in previous studies, stating that elevated PI contributes to the future development of hip arthritis. CT scan seems to be a reliable and accurate way of assessing pelvic incidence. PMID:27200390

  3. Muscle Impairments in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Alnahdi, Ali H.; Zeni, Joseph A.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Context: Muscle impairments associated with knee osteoarthritis (OA) are the primary underlying cause of functional limitations. Understanding the extent of muscle impairments, its relationship with physical function and disease progression, and the evidence behind exercise therapy that targets muscle impairments is crucial. Evidence Acquisition: An electronic search for relevant articles using MEDLINE and CINHAL databases up to September 2011 was performed. In addition to the electronic search, retrieved articles were searched manually for relevant studies. Results: Quadriceps, hamstrings, and hip muscles are significantly impaired in subjects with knee OA compared with age-matched controls. Muscle strength, especially quadriceps, is a major determinant of both performance-based and self-reported physical function. Whether stronger quadriceps is protective against knee OA onset and progression is not clear. Exercise therapy, including global and targeted resistance training, is effective in reducing pain and improving function in subjects with knee OA. Conclusions: Subjects with knee OA have significant muscle impairments. These muscle impairments affect physical function and should be targeted in therapy. Further research is needed to explore the relationship between quadriceps strength and knee OA initiation and progression and to determine the optimal exercise prescription that augments outcomes in this patient population. PMID:23016099

  4. Pain threshold correlates with functional scores in osteoarthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Kuni, Benita; Wang, Haili; Rickert, Markus; Ewerbeck, Volker; Schiltenwolf, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Pain sensitization may be one of the reasons for persistent pain after technically successful joint replacement. We analyzed how pain sensitization, as measured by quantitative sensory testing, relates preoperatively to joint function in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) scheduled for joint replacement. Patients and methods We included 50 patients with knee OA and 49 with hip OA who were scheduled for joint replacement, and 15 control participants. Hip/knee scores, thermal and pressure detection, and pain thresholds were examined. Results Median pressure pain thresholds were lower in patients than in control subjects: 4.0 (range: 0–10) vs. 7.8 (4–10) (p = 0.003) for the affected knee; 4.5 (2–10) vs. 6.8 (4–10) (p = 0.03) for the affected hip. Lower pressure pain threshold values were found at the affected joint in 26 of the 50 patients with knee OA and in 17 of the 49 patients with hip OA. The American Knee Society score 1 and 2, the Oxford knee score, and functional questionnaire of Hannover for osteoarthritis score correlated with the pressure pain thresholds in patients with knee OA. Also, Harris hip score and the functional questionnaire of Hannover for osteoarthritis score correlated with the cold detection threshold in patients with hip OA. Interpretation Quantitative sensory testing appeared to identify patients with sensory changes indicative of mechanisms of central sensitization. These patients may require additional pain treatment in order to profit fully from surgery. There were correlations between the clinical scores and the level of sensitization. PMID:25323797

  5. [Treatment of patients with osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Vargas Negrín, Francisco; Medina Abellán, María D; Hermosa Hernán, Juan Carlos; de Felipe Medina, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic management of patients with osteoarthritis aims to decrease pain and inflammation, improve physical function, and to apply safe and effective treatments. A patient-centered approach implies the active participation of the patient in the design of the treatment plan and in timely and informed decision-making at all stages of the disease. The nucleus of treatment is patient education, physical activity and therapeutic exercise, together with weight control in overweight or obese patients. Self-care by the individual and by the family is fundamental in day-to-day patient management. The use of physical therapies, technical aids (walking sticks, etc.) and simple analgesics, opium alkaloids, and antiinflammatory drugs have demonstrated effectiveness in controlling pain, improving physical function and quality of life and their use is clearly indicated in the treatment of osteoarthritis. Conservative surgery and joint replacement is indicated when treatment goals are not achieved in specific patients. PMID:24467960

  6. The impact of nurse prescribing on patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Creedon, Rena; Weathers, Elizabeth

    2011-08-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is now considered one of the ten most disabling diseases in developed countries and it is estimated that worldwide, 18% of women and 9.6% of men aged over 60, suffer from OA. It is, therefore, vital to take into consideration the demographics of this disorder, including the health needs of this age group and associated problems, such as reduced mobility or immobility and the inability to perform everyday tasks associated with chronic pain. Older patients, however, are sometimes able to accept their condition and adopt a positive outlook towards their OA as a coping strategy. This association with and acceptance of pain by the patient as a normal part of the ageing process may compromise the patient's ability to undertake activities of daily living and impact their psychological wellbeing. PMID:21841633

  7. Impact and therapy of osteoarthritis: the Arthritis Care OA Nation 2012 survey.

    PubMed

    Conaghan, Philip G; Porcheret, Mark; Kingsbury, Sarah R; Gammon, Anne; Soni, Ashok; Hurley, Michael; Rayman, Margaret P; Barlow, Julie; Hull, Richard G; Cumming, Jo; Llewelyn, Kate; Moscogiuri, Federico; Lyons, Jane; Birrell, Fraser

    2015-09-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the fastest growing cause of disability worldwide. The aim of this study was to understand the impact of OA on individuals and to explore current treatment strategies. An online UK-wide survey of people with self-reported OA was conducted, composed of 52 questions exploring the impact of OA, diagnosis and treatment, the role of health professionals and self-management. Four thousand forty-three people were invited with 2,001 respondents (49 % response, 56 % women; mean age 65 years). Fifty-two percent reported that OA had a large impact on their lives. Fifteen percent of respondents had taken early retirement on average 7.8 years earlier than planned. In consultations with general practitioners, only half reported a discussion on pain; fewer reported discussing their fears (21 %) or management goals (15 %). Nearly half (48 %) reported not seeking medical help until pain was frequently unbearable. Oral analgesics (62 %), topical therapies (47 %), physiotherapy (38 %) and steroid injections (28 %) were commonly used. The majority (71 %) reported varying degrees of persistent pain despite taking all prescribed medication. Although 64 % knew that increasing exercise was important, only 36 % acted on this knowledge; 87 % who increased exercise found it beneficial. Over half had future concerns related to mobility (60 %), maintaining independence (52 %) and coping with everyday activities (51 %). OA had significant individual economic impact especially on employment. Current treatment strategies still leave most people in pain with significant fears for the future. There is considerable opportunity to improve the holistic nature of OA consultations especially in provision of information and promotion of self-management strategies. PMID:24889403

  8. [Rehabilitation of the patients with osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Sidorov, V D; Pershin, S B

    2015-01-01

    Under the term "osteoarthritis" (OA) is currently meant a clinical syndrome resulting from the combined effect of articular pain and disordered functional activity leading to the deterioration of the quality of life of the patients. The principal objective of rehabilitation of the patients presenting with GA in which all patients with this condition are in need practically after each next aggravation of the pathological process is to relive pain syndrome and restore the functional ability of the joints lost or deteriorated after each exacerbation in order to eventually improve the quality of life of the patients experiencing the constantly progressing degenerative process in the musculoskeletal system. The effectiveness of pain alleviation, the degree of improvement'of the joint functional activity and the general condition of the patient are considered as the criteria for the assessment of the effectiveness of the rehabilitative treatment. These criteria have been chosen in accordance with the recommendations of the OMERACT international working group (outcome measures in rheumatology). In addition, the quality of life associated with the health status and the adverse effects of the rehabilitative measures were estimated. Bearing in mind comorbidity in the patients presenting with OA, one of the main challenges is the development of the scientifically sound rationale for the application of non-pharmacological technologies of physical therapy, remedial gymnastics and massage for the prevention and elimination of an aggravation of the secondary aseptic inflammatory process associated with OA and the subsequent rehabilitative treatment for the restoration of the lost locomotory stereotype and the quality of life of the patients. One of the effective methods of physical therapy used for the treatment and rehabilitation of the patients presenting with GA is hyperbaric gaseous cryotherapy. This method makes use of the heat rejection phenomenon to which the organism

  9. Development of a Decision Support System to Predict Physicians' Rehabilitation Protocols for Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawamdeh, Ziad M.; Alshraideh, Mohammad A.; Al-Ajlouni, Jihad M.; Salah, Imad K.; Holm, Margo B.; Otom, Ali H.

    2012-01-01

    To design a medical decision support system (MDSS) that would accurately predict the rehabilitation protocols prescribed by the physicians for patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) using only their demographic and clinical characteristics. The demographic and clinical variables for 170 patients receiving one of three treatment protocols for knee…

  10. Body mass indices in patients with disabling hip osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Ray; Allegrante, John P

    2002-01-01

    Hip osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease that results in substantial morbidity. The disease may be preventable in some instances by reducing risk factors associated with the disease. We undertook a study to determine whether being overweight or obese, a health risk that applies to younger and older age groups, is commonly associated with hip joint OA. The body mass indices (BMIs) of 1021 males and females ranging in age from 23 to 94 years and requiring surgery for end-stage hip joint OA were analyzed to find the prevalence of high body weights at the time of surgery. Being overweight was defined as having a BMI of 25–29.9 kg/m2 and being obese as having a BMI >30 kg/m2. BMIs indicative of overweight were recorded for 68% of the patients surveyed. Of 35 patients aged 30–39 years, 53.3% had BMIs >25, with a mean of 28.8, which nearly reaches the lower limit defined for obesity. On average, patients who had had previous surgery and complications warranting reimplantation of new surgical devices had BMIs in the obese range. Our findings suggest that a high percentage of patients with end-stage hip OA are overweight, including younger adults and those with symptoms of 3–6 months' duration. Moreover, patients whose BMIs are in the obese range may be at increased risk for removal and reimplantation of their prosthesis. PMID:11879546

  11. Circulating T helper 9 cells and increased serum interleukin-9 levels in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Qi, Changlin; Shan, Yuxing; Wang, Jing; Ding, Fupeng; Zhao, Ding; Yang, Teng; Jiang, Yanfang

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the roles of T helper 9 (Th9) cells and the serum interleukin (IL)-9 level in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). The numbers of IL-9(+)  CD4(+)  CD8(-) T cells, interferon (IFN)-γ+ CD4(+)  CD8(-) T cells, IL-4(+) CD4(+)  CD8(-) T cells, and IL-17A(+ ) CD4(+ ) CD8(-) T cells in 25 OA patients and 13 healthy controls (HC) were examined by flow cytometry. The serum concentrations of IL-9, IL-4, IL-17A, and IFN-γ were also determined. The numbers of CD4(+) CD45RO(+) T cells, Th9 cells, Th1 cells, and Th17 cells in OA patients were significantly higher than those in HCs. Furthermore, serum IL-9, IL-17A, and IFN-γ levels in OA patients were higher than those in HCs. The number of Th9 cells was positively correlated with the number of Th17 cells in OA patients. Furthermore, greater numbers of Th9 cells were positively associated with elevated C-reactive protein, and both Th9 cells and IL-9 levels were positively correlated with the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis index in OA patients. Th9 cell numbers and IL-9 levels are correlated with OA patient symptoms and joint functionality and may be a marker of disease activity. PMID:26926842

  12. Evidence for central sensitization in patients with osteoarthritis pain: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Lluch, E; Torres, R; Nijs, J; Van Oosterwijck, J

    2014-11-01

    Hyperexcitability of the central nervous system (CNS) has been suggested to play an important role in the chronic pain experienced by osteoarthritis (OA) patients. A systematic review following PRISMA guidelines was performed to evaluate the existing evidence from the literature related to the presence of central sensitization (CS) in patients with OA.Electronic databases PubMed and Web of Science were searched to identify relevant articles using pre-defined keywords regarding CS and OA. Full-text clinical reports addressing studies of CS in human adults with chronic complaints due to osteoarthritis were included and screened for methodological quality by two independent reviewers. From the 40 articles that were initially eligible for methodological quality assessment, 36 articles achieved sufficient scores and therefore were discussed. The majority of these studies were case-control studies and addressed OA of the knee joint. Different subjective and objective parameters considered manifestations of CS, which have been previously reported in other chronic pain conditions such as whiplash or rheumatoid arthritis, were established in subjects with OA pain. Overall results suggest that, although peripheral mechanisms are involved in OA pain, hypersensitivity of the CNS plays a significant role in a subgroup of subjects within this population. Although the majority of the literature provides evidence for the presence of CS in chronic OA pain, clinical identification and treatment of CS in OA is still in its infancy, and future studies with good methodological quality are necessary. PMID:24700605

  13. Biomechanical Analysis of Stair Descent in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Igawa, Tatsuya; Katsuhira, Junji

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purposes of this study were to investigate the lower extremity joint kinematics and kinetics of patients with the knee osteoarthritis (knee OA) during stair descent and clarify the biomechanical factors related to their difficulty in stair descent. [Subjects and Methods] Eight healthy elderly persons and four knee OA patients participated in this study. A 3-D motion analysis system and force plates were employed to measure lower extremity joint angles, ranges of motion, joint moments, joint powers, and ratios of contribution for the joint powers while descending stairs. [Results] Knee joint flexion angle, extension moment, and negative power during the early stance phase in the knee OA group were smaller than those in the healthy subjects group. However, no significant changes in these parameters in the ankle joint were observed between the two subject groups. [Conclusion] Knee OA patients could not use the knee joint to absorb impact during the early stance phase of stair descent. Hence, they might compensate for the roles played by the intact knee joint by mainly using ipsilateral ankle kinematics and kinetics. PMID:24926119

  14. Corticospinal and Intracortical Excitability of the Quadriceps in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kittelson, Andrew J.; Thomas, Abbey C.; Kluger, Benzi M.; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E.

    2015-01-01

    Deficits in voluntary activation of the quadriceps muscle are characteristic of knee osteoarthritis (OA), contributing to the quadriceps weakness that is also a hallmark of the disease. The mechanisms underlying this central activation deficit (CAD) are unknown, although cortical mechanisms may be involved. Here, we utilize transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to assess corticospinal and intracortical excitability in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and in a comparably aged group of healthy older adults, to quantify group differences and to examine associations between TMS measures and pain, quadriceps strength, and CAD. Seventeen patients with knee OA and 20 healthy controls completed testing. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were measured at the quadriceps by superficial electromyographic (EMG) recordings. Corticospinal excitability was assessed by measuring resting motor threshold (RMT) to TMS stimulation of the quadriceps representation at primary motor cortex, and intracortical excitability was assessed via paired pulse paradigms for short interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) and intracortical facilitation (ICF). No statistically significant differences between patients with knee OA and healthy controls were found for RMT, SICI or ICF measures (p>0.05). For patients with knee OA, there were significant associations observed between pain and RMT, as well as between pain and ICF. No associations were observed between CAD and measures of corticospinal or intracortical excitability. These data suggest against direct involvement of corticospinal or intracortical pathways within primary motor cortex in the mechanisms of CAD. However, pain is implicated in the neural mechanisms of quadriceps motor control in patients with knee OA. PMID:25183161

  15. Effects of naproxcinod on blood pressure in patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    White, William B; Schnitzer, Thomas J; Bakris, George L; Frayssinet, Hayet; Duquesroix, Brigitte; Weber, Michael

    2011-05-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are associated with increases in blood pressure (BP), particularly in patients treated with antihypertensive therapy. Naproxcinod is a nitric oxide-donating cyclooxygenase inhibitor in development for osteoarthritis (OA). Thus, we characterized the effects of naproxcinod on BP in an integrated safety analysis of 3 pivotal trials of patients with OA of the hip or knee involving 2,734 patients. The changes from baseline in the systolic BP after 13 weeks of therapy with naproxcinod (375 and 750 mg), naproxen 500 mg (equipotent to naproxcinod 750 mg), or placebo twice daily were evaluated in all patients and in the subgroup taking renin-angiotensin system inhibitors. Heterogeneity testing showed no treatment-by-study interaction. The effects of naproxcinod 750 mg on the systolic BP was not different from placebo (mean change from baseline vs placebo -0.4 mm Hg, 95% confidence interval -1.6 to 0.8). Naproxen increased the systolic BP relative to placebo (mean change from baseline vs placebo +1.4 mm Hg, 95% confidence interval 0.1 to 2.7). In the renin-angiotensin system inhibitor-treated patients, the effect of naproxcinod 750 mg compared to naproxen 500 mg in the changes from baseline in the systolic BP was -4.3 mm Hg (95% confidence interval -8.5 to -0.0). In conclusion, naproxcinod had effects on BP similar to that of placebo in patients with OA. These results imply that naproxcinod would be less likely to alter systolic BP control in patients with OA than a conventional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, particularly in those treated with renin-angiotensin system inhibitor agents. PMID:21371681

  16. Real-Time Tracking of Knee Adduction Moment in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sang Hoon; Lee, Song Joo; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2014-01-01

    Background The external knee adduction moment (EKAM) is closely associated with the presence, progression, and severity of knee osteoarthritis (OA). However, there is a lack of convenient and practical method to estimate and track in real-time the EKAM of patients with knee OA for clinical evaluation and gait training, especially outside of gait laboratories. New Method A real-time EKAM estimation method was developed and applied to track and investigate the EKAM and other knee moments during stepping on an elliptical trainer in both healthy subjects and a patient with knee OA. Results Substantial changes were observed in the EKAM and other knee moments during stepping in the patient with knee OA. Comparison with Existing Method(s) This is the first study to develop and test feasibility of real-time tracking method of the EKAM on patients with knee OA using 3-D inverse dynamics. Conclusions The study provides us an accurate and practical method to evaluate in real-time the critical EKAM associated with knee OA, which is expected to help us to diagnose and evaluate patients with knee OA and provide the patients with real-time EKAM feedback rehabilitation training. PMID:24361759

  17. Progressive Change in Joint Degeneration in Patients with Knee or Hip Osteoarthritis Treated with Fentanyl in a Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Tatsuya; Takana, Koshi; Orita, Sumihisa; Inoue, Gen; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kuniyoshi, Kazuki; Aoki, Yasuchika; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Kamoda, Hiroto; Suzuki, Miyako; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Kubota, Gou; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Toyone, Tomoaki; Nakamura, Junichi; Kishida, Shunji; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Opioids improve pain from knee and hip osteoarthritis (OA) and decrease the functional impairment of patients. However, there is a possibility that opioids induce analgesia and suppress the physiological pain of OA in patients, thereby inducing the progression of OA changes in these patients. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the possibility of progressive changes in OA among patients using opioids. Materials and Methods Two hundred knee or hip OA patients were evaluated in the current prospective, randomized, active-controlled study. Patients were randomized 1:1:1 into three parallel treatment groups: loxoprofen, tramadol/acetaminophen, and transdermal fentanyl groups. Medication was administered for 12 weeks. Pain scores and progressive OA changes on X-ray films were evaluated. Results Overall, pain relief was obtained by all three groups. Most patients did not show progressive OA changes; however, 3 patients in the transdermal fentanyl group showed progressive OA changes during the 12 weeks of treatment. These 3 patients used significantly higher doses than others in the transdermal fentanyl group. Additionally, the average pain score for these 3 patients was significantly lower than the average pain score for the other patients in the transdermal fentanyl group. Conclusion Fentanyl may induce progressive changes in knee or hip OA during a relatively short period, compared with oral Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs or tramadol. PMID:25048500

  18. Expression of vaspin in the joint and the levels in the serum and synovial fluid of patients with osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Jia-Peng; Jiang, Li-Feng; Chen, Wei-Ping; Hu, Peng-Fei; Wu, Li-Dong

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the expression of vaspin in the joint and investigate the distribution between paired serum and synovial fluid (SF) in osteoarthritis (OA) patients, and serum in healthy controls. The gene expression of vaspin was measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in the OA joint tissues. The vaspin protein expression in the cartilage, synovium and osteophyte from OA patients who required total knee replacement (TKR) were detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Levels of vaspin in serum and SF were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), including 26 OA patients and 23 healthy controls. All the joint tissues including cartilage, synovium, meniscus, infrapatellar fat pad and osteophyte from OA patients expressed vaspin messenger RNA (mRNA), and the expression of vaspin protein was observed in OA cartilage, synovium and osteophyte. Furthermore, serum vaspin was reduced in OA patients compared to healthy controls, and serum vaspin levels from OA patients exceed those in the paired SF. Serum or SF vaspin were not related to age, gender, or body mass index (BMI). These results suggest that vaspin may be involved in the pathophysiology of OA and may have local effects in the joint during the process of OA. PMID:25419381

  19. Upregulation of fibroblast growth factor 1 in the synovial membranes of patients with late stage osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Li, R; Wang, B; He, C Q; Yang, Y Q; Guo, H; Chen, Y; Du, T H

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative disease of the systemic joint that involves multiple cytokines and growth factors. Fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF-1) is increased in patients with rheumatic arthritis. The aim of this study was to determine whether the expression and secretion of FGF-1 differed in synovial tissue from patients with late stage OA from that in normal tissues. We selected eight patients with late stage OA and eight healthy donors for this study. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to determine the amount of FGF-1 in the synovial fluid and in the culture medium of synovial fibroblasts. Real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis was performed to examine the expression levels of FGF-1 and FGF receptor 2 (FGFR2) in synovial and cartilage tissues. We detected FGF-1 in the synovial fluid from all eight donors, as well as in the culture medium of synovial fibroblasts. Synovial fluid from patients with OA and culture medium of OA synovial fibroblasts contained significantly more FGF-1 than those from controls. FGF-1 expression was also lower in the synovial membranes of normal donors than in those of OA patients. FGFR2 expression was also higher in OA cartilage than in normal cartilage. Overall, these results demonstrated that FGF-1 synthesis and secretion by synovial fibroblasts were significantly increased in OA. FGFR2 expression was also shown to be upregulated in patients with OA. These findings suggest that increased FGF-1 signaling correlates with an OA pathological condition. PMID:26400350

  20. Efficacy of action potential simulation and interferential therapy in the rehabilitation of patients with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Eftekharsadat, Bina; Habibzadeh, Afshin; Kolahi, Babak

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is the main cause of pain, physical impairment and chronic disability in older people. Electrotherapeutic modalities such as interferential therapy (IFT) and action potential simulation (APS) are used for the treatment of knee OA. In this study, we aim to evaluate the therapeutic effects of APS and IFT on knee OA. Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, 67 patients (94% female and 6% male with mean age of 52.80 ± 8.16 years) with mild and moderate knee OA were randomly assigned to be treated with APS (n = 34) or IFT (n = 33) for 10 sessions in 4 weeks. Baseline and post-treatment Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) subscales, visual analogue scale (VAS) and timed up and go (TUG) test were measured in all patients. Results: VAS and WOMAC subscales were significantly improved after treatment in APS and IFT groups (p < 0.001 for all). TUG was also significantly improved after treatment in APS group (p < 0.001), but TUG changes in IFT was not significant (p = 0.09). There was no significant difference in VAS, TUG and WOMAC subscales values before and after treatment as well as the mean improvement in VAS, TUG and WOMAC subscales during study between groups. Conclusion: Short-term treatment with both APS and IFT could significantly reduce pain and improve physical function in patients with knee OA. PMID:26029268

  1. Pain Coping Strategies in Osteoarthritis Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, Francis J.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Investigated the relation of pain coping strategies to pain, health status, and psychological distress in a group of osteoarthritis patients with chronic pain. Patients completed various questionnaires. Medical status variables were also used. The Pain Control and Rational Thinking factor derived from the Coping Strategies Questionnaire proved to…

  2. Treatment strategies for osteoarthritis patients with pain and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Verdecchia, Paolo; Angeli, Fabio; Mazzotta, Giovanni; Martire, Paola; Garofoli, Marta; Gentile, Giorgio; Reboldi, Gianpaolo

    2010-08-01

    Out of 100 patients with osteoarthritis (OA), almost 40 have a concomitant diagnosis of hypertension. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors may trigger a rise in blood pressure (BP), which is more marked in patients with established hypertension. NSAIDs and COX-2 inhibitors attenuate the antihypertensive effect of several antihypertensive agents. Frequent BP controls are needed in treated hypertensive patients who are concomitantly receiving NSAIDs or COX-2 inhibitors because even a small increase in BP may be associated with an important rise in the risk of major cardiovascular complications. In meta-analyses, an increase in systolic BP of 5mmHg was associated with a 25% higher risk of cardiovascular events. These data have been confirmed in randomized studies with rofecoxib and celecoxib, where a modest increase in BP was associated with a significantly higher risk of cardiovascular disease. There is emerging evidence that the COX-inhibiting nitric oxide donator (CINOD) class is promising in the treatment of patients with OA. Naproxcinod, the first CINOD investigated in clinical trials, is composed of the traditional NSAID naproxen covalently bound to the nitric oxide (NO)-donating moiety butanediol mono-nitrate (BDMN). The molecule has the potential to provide a sustained release of NO. In clinical studies, naproxcinod prevented the BP rise in normotensive and hypertensive patients observed with naproxen. The BP benefit of naproxcinod over naproxen was greater in patients concomitantly receiving angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers. These investigational data suggest that naproxcinod is a valuable alternative to NSAIDs and COX-2 inhibitors for treatment of OA patients. PMID:22870450

  3. Treatment Strategies for Osteoarthritis Patients with Pain and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Verdecchia, Paolo; Angeli, Fabio; Mazzotta, Giovanni; Martire, Paola; Garofoli, Marta; Gentile, Giorgio; Reboldi, Gianpaolo

    2010-01-01

    Out of 100 patients with osteoarthritis (OA), almost 40 have a concomitant diagnosis of hypertension. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors may trigger a rise in blood pressure (BP), which is more marked in patients with established hypertension. NSAIDs and COX-2 inhibitors attenuate the antihypertensive effect of several antihypertensive agents. Frequent BP controls are needed in treated hypertensive patients who are concomitantly receiving NSAIDs or COX-2 inhibitors because even a small increase in BP may be associated with an important rise in the risk of major cardiovascular complications. In meta-analyses, an increase in systolic BP of 5mmHg was associated with a 25% higher risk of cardiovascular events. These data have been confirmed in randomized studies with rofecoxib and celecoxib, where a modest increase in BP was associated with a significantly higher risk of cardiovascular disease. There is emerging evidence that the COX-inhibiting nitric oxide donator (CINOD) class is promising in the treatment of patients with OA. Naproxcinod, the first CINOD investigated in clinical trials, is composed of the traditional NSAID naproxen covalently bound to the nitric oxide (NO)-donating moiety butanediol mono-nitrate (BDMN). The molecule has the potential to provide a sustained release of NO. In clinical studies, naproxcinod prevented the BP rise in normotensive and hypertensive patients observed with naproxen. The BP benefit of naproxcinod over naproxen was greater in patients concomitantly receiving angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers. These investigational data suggest that naproxcinod is a valuable alternative to NSAIDs and COX-2 inhibitors for treatment of OA patients. PMID:22870450

  4. A rational program of exercise for patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Bunning, R D; Materson, R S

    1991-12-01

    This report provides a history of exercise therapy, gives background for and defines relevant terms, and describes common gross manifestations of osteoarthritis (OA). Bias and dogmatism concerning arthritis treatment are examined. Treatment using exercise and physical medicine modalities with reference to recent pertinent literature is reviewed. Human and animal studies demonstrating the efficacy of conditioning and strengthening in the treatment of OA are analyzed critically, and methods to enhance compliance and directions of future exercise research are discussed. PMID:1796304

  5. Baseline Vitamin D Status is Predictive of Longitudinal Change in Tibial BMD in Knee Osteoarthritis (OA)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With its lack of effective treatment and high prevalence, the public health impact of OA is substantial. Peri-articular bone in OA can be evaluated with the medial:lateral tibial BMD ratio (M:L BMD) obtained from dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Higher M:L BMD is associated with medial OA features...

  6. Prevalence of cartilage shards in synovium and their association with synovitis in patients with early and endstage osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Myers, S L; Flusser, D; Brandt, K D; Heck, D A

    1992-08-01

    It has been suggested that incorporation of shards of fibrillated cartilage into the synovium is a cause of synovitis in osteoarthritis (OA). We examined the prevalence with which fragments of cartilage are seen in synovium, and their association with synovitis, in patients with endstage OA and early OA of the knee. Samples of synovium were obtained from 12 patients with endstage OA who were undergoing knee joint replacement and 30 with only mild/moderate radiographic changes of OA who exhibited articular cartilage changes of OA at arthroscopy. The presence of cartilage shards was sought in synovium from the medial and lateral tibiofemoral compartments and the suprapatellar pouch of each patient. Comparable volumes of the synovial lining from patients with endstage and early OA were examined, and tissue mononuclear cell infiltration was graded as an indicator of synovitis. Cartilage shards were seen in synovium from 7 of 12 patients with endstage OA, all of whom had synovitis. No topographic relationship was found between shards and mononuclear cell infiltration. In contrast, cartilage fragments were not seen in synovium from any of the 30 patients with early OA, although 9 of them had full thickness cartilage ulcers and 17 had evidence of synovitis. PMID:1404161

  7. Effects of preoperative physiotherapy in hip osteoarthritis patients awaiting total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Czyżewska, Anna; Walesiak, Katarzyna; Krawczak, Karolina; Cabaj, Dominika; Górecki, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The World Health Organization (WHO) claimed osteoarthritis as a civilization-related disease. The effectiveness of preoperative physiotherapy among patients suffering hip osteoarthritis (OA) at the end of their conservative treatment is rarely described in the literature. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of life and musculoskeletal health status of patients who received preoperative physiotherapy before total hip replacement (THR) surgery within a year prior to admission for a scheduled THR and those who did not. Material and methods Forty-five patients, admitted to the Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology of Locomotor System for elective total hip replacement surgery, were recruited for this study. The assessment consisted of a detailed interview using various questionnaires: the Harris Hip Score (HHS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), and the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), as well as physical examination. Patients were assigned to groups based on their attendance of preoperative physiotherapy within a year prior to surgery. Results Among patients who received preoperative physiotherapy a significant improvement was found for pain, daily functioning, vitality, psychological health, social life, and (active and passive) internal rotation (p < 0.05). Conclusions Patients are not routinely referred to physiotherapy within a year before total hip replacement surgery. This study confirmed that pre-operative physiotherapy may have a positive influence on selected musculoskeletal system status indicators and quality of life in hip osteoarthritis patients awaiting surgery. PMID:25395951

  8. Osteoarthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... thumb joint also is commonly affected by osteoarthritis. Knees The knees are among the joints most commonly affected by osteoarthritis. Symptoms of knee osteoarthritis include stiffness, swelling, and pain, which make ...

  9. A hyaluronic acid-salmon calcitonin conjugate for the local treatment of osteoarthritis: chondro-protective effect in a rabbit model of early OA.

    PubMed

    Mero, Anna; Campisi, Monica; Favero, Marta; Barbera, Carlo; Secchieri, Cynthia; Dayer, Jean M; Goldring, Mary B; Goldring, Steven R; Pasut, Gianfranco

    2014-08-10

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by chronic degeneration of joints, involving mainly the articular cartilage and the underlying bone, and severely impairing the quality of life of the patient. Although with limited efficacy, currently available pharmacological treatments for OA aim to control pain and to retard disease progression. Salmon calcitonin (sCT) is a drug which has been shown to have therapeutic effects in experimental arthritis by inhibiting both bone turnover and cartilage degradation and reducing the activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP). High molecular weight hyaluronic acid (HA) is used as a lubricant in OA therapy, and, interestingly, HA polymers may normalize the levels of MMP-1, -3 and -13. We demonstrated that sCT rapidly clears from the knee joint of rat animal model, after intra-articular (i.a.) administration, and it induces systemic effects. Here, sCT was conjugated to HA (200kDa) with the aim of prolonging the residence time of the polypeptide in the joint space by reducing its clearance. An aldehyde derivative of HA was used for N-terminal site-selective coupling of sCT. The activity of sCT was preserved, both in vitro and in vivo, after its conjugation and the i.a. injection of HA-sCT did not trigger any systemic effects in rats. The efficacy of HA-sCT treatment was tested in a rabbit OA model and clear chondro-protective effect was proven by macro- and microscopic assessments and histological findings. Our results indicate that HAylation of sCT increases the size of the polypeptide in a stable covalent manner and delays its passage into the blood stream. We conclude that HA conjugation prolongs the anti-catabolic effects of sCT in joint tissues, including the synovial membrane and cartilage. PMID:24837189

  10. Development of a decision support system to predict physicians' rehabilitation protocols for patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hawamdeh, Ziad M; Alshraideh, Mohammad A; Al-Ajlouni, Jihad M; Salah, Imad K; Holm, Margo B; Otom, Ali H

    2012-09-01

    To design a medical decision support system (MDSS) that would accurately predict the rehabilitation protocols prescribed by the physicians for patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) using only their demographic and clinical characteristics. The demographic and clinical variables for 170 patients receiving one of three treatment protocols for knee OA were entered into the MDSS. Demographic variables in the model were age and sex. Clinical variables entered into the model were height, weight, BMI, affected side, severity of knee OA, and severity of pain. All patients in the study received one of three treatment protocols for patients with knee OA: (a) hot packs, followed by electrotherapy and exercise, (b) ice packs, followed by ultrasound and exercise and (c) exercise alone. The resilient back propagation artificial neural network algorithm was used, with a ten-fold cross-validation. It was estimated that the MDSS is able to accurately predict the treatment prescribed by the physician for 87% of the patients. We developed an artificial neural network-based decision support system that can viably aid physicians in determining which treatment protocol would best match the anthropometric and clinical characteristics of patients with knee OA. PMID:22508428

  11. Evaluation of the Degree of Knee Joint Osteoarthritis in Patients with Early Gray Hair

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, Behrooz; Ashraf, Alireza; Namazi, Mohammad Reza; Zarei, Fariba; Foruzi, Shima

    2013-01-01

    Background: Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis and one of the causes of pain and disability. The hair graying characteristic correlates strictly with chronological aging and take places to varying degrees in all individuals, disregarding gender or race. Aims: Comparison of the degrees of clinical and radiologic severity of the knee OA in individuals with early hair graying compared to ordinary individuals. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 patients with knee OA and similar demographic characteristics were enrolled in this study. All patients were classified in to 3 age subgroups in each of the case and control groups (30-40 year, 41-50 year, 51-60 year). In the case group, the patients must had early hair graying, too. Knee OA were classified using the Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grading scale. Western Ontario McMaster University Osteoarthritis index (WOMAC) was applied to assess clinical severity of the knee OA. Results: The mean ± SD of WOMAC index in the case group was 60.7 ± 15.9 and in the control group was 55.3 ± 15.3 (P = 0.1). The mean rank of KL scale in case group was 35.3 and in the control group was 25.6 (P = 0.02). Conclusion: Even at the same age of OA onset, the rate of progression of radiological findings and the grade of joint destruction in individuals with early hair graying are greater than normal individuals. However, clinical and functional relevant remain unclear. PMID:24403769

  12. Friction Coefficient and Superficial Zone Protein are Increased in Patients with Advanced Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Neu, C.P.; Reddi, A.H.; Komvopoulos, K.; Schmid, T.M.; Di Cesare, P.E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To quantify the concentration of superficial zone protein (SZP) in articular cartilage and synovial fluid of patients with advanced osteoarthritis (OA), and to further correlate the SZP content with the friction coefficient, OA severity, and levels of inflammatory cytokines. Methods Samples of articular cartilage and synovial fluid were obtained from patients undergoing elective total knee replacement surgery. Additional normal samples were obtained from donated body program and tissue bank sources. Regional SZP expression in cartilage obtained from the femoral condyles was quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay and visualized by immunohistochemistry. Friction coefficient measurements were obtained from cartilage plugs slid in the boundary lubrication regime. OA severity was graded using histochemical analyses. The concentration of SZP and inflammatory cytokines in synovial fluid were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assays. Results A pattern of SZP localization in knee cartilage was identified, with load-bearing regions exhibiting high SZP expression. SZP patterns correlated to friction coefficient and OA severity; however SZP expression was observed in all samples at the articular surface, regardless of OA severity. SZP expression and aspirate volume of synovial fluid were higher in OA patients compared to normal controls. Expressions of cytokines were elevated in the synovial fluid of some patients. Conclusion The results reveal a mechano-chemical coupling in which physical forces regulate OA severity and joint lubrication. The findings of this study also suggest that SZP may be ineffective in reducing joint friction in the boundary lubrication regime at an advanced OA stage where other mechanisms may dominate the observed tribological behavior. PMID:20499384

  13. Altered Expression of Wnt Signaling Pathway Components in Osteogenesis of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Osteoarthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Herranz, Eva; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Luis; Mucientes, Arkaitz; Abásolo, Lydia; Marco, Fernando; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Lamas, José Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by altered homeostasis of joint cartilage and bone, whose functional properties rely on chondrocytes and osteoblasts, belonging to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). WNT signaling acts as a hub integrating and crosstalking with other signaling pathways leading to the regulation of MSC functions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the existence of a differential signaling between Healthy and OA-MSCs during osteogenesis. Methods MSCs of seven OA patients and six healthy controls were isolated, characterised and expanded. During in vitro osteogenesis, cells were recovered at days 1, 10 and 21. RNA and protein content was obtained. Expression of WNT pathway genes was evaluated using RT-qPCR. Functional studies were also performed to study the MSC osteogenic commitment and functional and post-traslational status of β-catenin and several receptor tyrosine kinases. Results Several genes were downregulated in OA-MSCs during osteogenesis in vitro. These included soluble Wnts, inhibitors, receptors, co-receptors, several kinases and transcription factors. Basal levels of β-catenin were higher in OA-MSCs, but calcium deposition and expression of osteogenic genes was similar between Healthy and OA-MSCs. Interestingly an increased phosphorylation of p44/42 MAPK (ERK1/2) signaling node was present in OA-MSCs. Conclusion Our results point to the existence in OA-MSCs of alterations in expression of Wnt pathway components during in vitro osteogenesis that are partially compensated by post-translational mechanisms modulating the function of other pathways. We also point the relevance of other signaling pathways in OA pathophysiology suggesting their role in the maintenance of joint homeostasis through modulation of MSC osteogenic potential. PMID:26352263

  14. Radiographic measures of settlement phenomenon in patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Tianhua; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Fei; Yin, Bing; Tian, Ye; Zhang, Yingze

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we proposed for the first time the theory of "settlement phenomenon" in tibial plateau and carefully explored the role of settlement of tibial plateau in the occurrence and progression of medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA) through investigating the relationship between the degree of settlement and the radiographic severity of OA. One hundred twenty-seven patients with knee medial compartment OA were recruited and examined with weight-bearing radiographs of the entire lower limb. The radiographic severity of OA was evaluated using the Kellgren and Lawrence (KL) grading methods. The settlement value, hip-knee-ankle angle, minimum medial joint space width, and condylar plateau angle were measured at the same time. The settlement value increases with the upgrading of KL grades (r = 0.352, P < 0.001) and is significantly correlated with the changes of hip-knee-ankle angle, minimum medial joint space width, and condylar plateau angle (r = -0.527, -0.271, and 0.415, P < 0.001, respectively). These results suggest that the settlement of tibial plateau could be an evaluable indicator of medial compartment knee OA and be used in the early diagnosis and progression of OA. PMID:26712497

  15. Health service utilization patterns of primary care patients with osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rosemann, Thomas; Joos, Stefanie; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Laux, Gunter; Wensing, Michel

    2007-01-01

    Background To assess factors associated with visits to GPs, orthopaedists, and non-physician practitioners of complementary medicine (alternative practitioners) by primary care patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Cross-sectional survey among 1250 consecutively addressed patients from 75 primary care practices in Germany. All patients suffered from OA of the knee or hip according to ACR criteria. They received questionnaires collecting sociodemographic data, data about health service utilisation, prescriptions, comorbidities. They also included established instruments as the Arthritis Impact Measurement Scale (AIMS2-SF) to assess disease-specific quality of life and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) to assess depression. Hierarchical stepwise multiple linear regression models were used to reveal significant factors influencing health service utilization. Results 1021 of 1250 (81.6%) questionnaires were returned. Nonrespondents did not differ from participants. Factors associated with health service use (HSU) varied between providers of care. Not being in a partnership, achieving a high score on the PHQ-9, increased pain severity reflected in the “symptom” scale of the AIMS2-SF, and an increased number of drug prescriptions predicted a high frequency of GP visits. The PHQ-9 score was also a predictor for visits to orthopaedists, as were previous GP contacts, a high score in the "symptom" scale as well as a high score in the "lower limb scale" of the AIMS2-SF. Regarding visits to alternative practitioners, a high score in the AIMS -"social" scale was a positive predictor as older people were less likely to visit them. Conclusion Our results emphasize the need for awareness of psychological factors contributing to the use of health care providers. Addressing the revealed factors associated with HSU appropriately may lead to decreased health care utilization. But further research is needed to assess how this can be done successfully. PMID:17956605

  16. Osteoarthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis. It causes pain, swelling, and reduced motion in your ... it affects your hands, knees, hips or spine. Osteoarthritis breaks down the cartilage in your joints. Cartilage ...

  17. Adaptation and validation of the Osteoarthritis Knee and Hip Quality of Life (OAKHQOL) questionnaire for use in patients with osteoarthritis in Spain.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez Sáenz de Tejada, Marta; Escobar, Antonio; Herdman, Michael; Herrera, Carmen; García, Lidia; Sarasqueta, Cristina

    2011-12-01

    This study aims to adapt and validate the Spanish version of the Osteoarthritis Knee and Hip Quality of Life (OAKHQOL) questionnaire. The OAKHQOL was adapted into Spanish using a forward-backward translation methodology. The Spanish version was then validated in a prospective, mixed-design study of 759 patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA). Patients completed the OAKHQOL, Short Form 36 (SF-36), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, and the EQ-5D. The internal consistency was evaluated using Cronbach's alpha. Convergent validity was assessed by examining correlations between the OAKHQOL and other patient-reported instruments; known groups' validity was assessed by determining the capacity of the OAKHQOL to discriminate between patients with different levels of disease severity measured using the Lequesne Index. Test-retest reliability was evaluated by calculating the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for all OAKHQOL domains in 409 stable patients with OA. Responsiveness was evaluated by calculating effect sizes among 129 patients undergoing hip or knee replacement. Cronbach's alpha for the five domains of the OAKHQOL ranged from 0.60 to 0.93 while ICCs ranged from 0.75 to 0.81 for all domains except the two social domains. Statistically significant differences (p < 0.001) were observed between patients with different degrees of disease severity on all domains except "social support". The instrument showed convergent validity among hypothesized domains (p < 0.001). Results of the study supported that the Spanish version OAKHQOL questionnaire was a valid instrument to measure health-related quality of life in patients with OA of the lower limb. PMID:21947701

  18. Patient and provider interventions for managing osteoarthritis in primary care: protocols for two randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and knee are among the most common chronic conditions, resulting in substantial pain and functional limitations. Adequate management of OA requires a combination of medical and behavioral strategies. However, some recommended therapies are under-utilized in clinical settings, and the majority of patients with hip and knee OA are overweight and physically inactive. Consequently, interventions at the provider-level and patient-level both have potential for improving outcomes. This manuscript describes two ongoing randomized clinical trials being conducted in two different health care systems, examining patient-based and provider-based interventions for managing hip and knee OA in primary care. Methods / Design One study is being conducted within the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system and will compare a Combined Patient and Provider intervention relative to usual care among n = 300 patients (10 from each of 30 primary care providers). Another study is being conducted within the Duke Primary Care Research Consortium and will compare Patient Only, Provider Only, and Combined (Patient + Provider) interventions relative to usual care among n = 560 patients across 10 clinics. Participants in these studies have clinical and / or radiographic evidence of hip or knee osteoarthritis, are overweight, and do not meet current physical activity guidelines. The 12-month, telephone-based patient intervention focuses on physical activity, weight management, and cognitive behavioral pain management. The provider intervention involves provision of patient-specific recommendations for care (e.g., referral to physical therapy, knee brace, joint injection), based on evidence-based guidelines. Outcomes are collected at baseline, 6-months, and 12-months. The primary outcome is the Western Ontario and McMasters Universities Osteoarthritis Index (self-reported pain, stiffness, and function), and secondary outcomes are the

  19. A Water Rehabilitation Program in Patients with Hip Osteoarthritis Before and After Total Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Łyp, Marek; Kaczor, Ryszard; Cabak, Anna; Tederko, Piotr; Włostowska, Ewa; Stanisławska, Iwona; Szypuła, Jan; Tomaszewski, Wiesław

    2016-01-01

    Background Pain associated with coxarthrosis, typically occurring in middle-aged and elderly patients, very commonly causes considerable limitation of motor fitness and dependence on pharmacotherapy. This article provides an assessment of a rehabilitation program with tailored water exercises in patients with osteoarthritis before and after total hip replacement. Material/Methods A total of 192 patients (the mean age 61.03±10.89) suffering from hip osteoarthritis (OA) were evaluated before and after total hip replacement (THR). The clinical study covered measurements of hip active ranges of motion (HAROM) and the forces generated by pelvis stabilizer muscles. Pain intensity was assessed according to analogue-visual scale of pain (VAS) and according to the Modified Laitinen Questionnaire. The patients were divided into 6 groups (4 treatment and 2 control). We compared 2 rehabilitation programs using kinesitherapy and low-frequency magnetic field. One of them also had specially designed exercises in the water. Statistical analysis was carried out at the significance level α=0.05. This was a cross-sectional study. Results A positive effect of water exercises on a number of parameters was found in patients with OA both before and after total hip replacement surgery. We noted a significant reduction of pain (p<0.001), increased ranges of motion and muscle strength, and reduced use of medicines (NASAIDs) (p<0.001). A correlation was found between the degree of degenerative deforming lesions and the effects of the treatment process (p<0.01). Conclusions 1. The rehabilitation program including water exercises most significantly reduced pain in patients with OA before and after total hip replacement surgery. 2. Inclusion of water exercises in a rehabilitation program can reduce the use of medicines in patient with OA and after THR. PMID:27455419

  20. Influence of pain severity on health-related quality of life in Chinese knee osteoarthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Jian; Cao, Yue-Long; Zheng, Yu-Xin; Gao, Ning-Yang; Wang, Xue-Zong; Chen, Bo; Gu, Xin-Feng; Yuan, Weian; Zhang, Ming; Liu, Ting; Zhan, Hong-Sheng; Shi, Yin-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine the relationship among pain and other symptoms intensity, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in Chinese patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods: The study was cross-sectional, descriptive, and correlational. A convenience sample of 466 patients with knee OA was recruited in the study. Age, gender, body mass index (BMI), duration of disease, and Kellgren- Lawrence (KL) scores were recorded. HRQoL and symptoms were assessed using the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) and the Western Ontario and McMaster (WOMAC) index in participants. Results: The sample was predominantly female (82%) with mean age 56.56 years and mean BMI 24.53 kg/m2. We found that WOMAC subscale scores significantly negative correlated with the majority of SF-36 subscale scores in knee OA patients (P < 0.05). There were no correlations between BMI, duration of disease, KL score and the vast majority of SF-36 subscale scores in patients (P > 0.05). In addition, there was a significant correlation between age and PCS, gender and MCS in patients (P < 0.05). Regression analysis showed, WOMAC subscale scores significantly negative correlated with the vast majority of SF-36 subscale scores. WOMAC-pain score had the strongest relationship with SF-36 PCS and MCS scores. Conclusions: In summary, pain severity has a greater impact on HRQoL than patient characteristics, other joint symptoms and radiographic severity in Chinese knee OA patients. Relieving of knee symptoms may help to improve patients’ HRQOL. The study provided the evidence that relieving pain should be the first choice of therapy for knee osteoarthritis. PMID:26064371

  1. A Water Rehabilitation Program in Patients with Hip Osteoarthritis Before and After Total Hip Replacement.

    PubMed

    Łyp, Marek; Kaczor, Ryszard; Cabak, Anna; Tederko, Piotr; Włostowska, Ewa; Stanisławska, Iwona; Szypuła, Jan; Tomaszewski, Wiesław

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pain associated with coxarthrosis, typically occurring in middle-aged and elderly patients, very commonly causes considerable limitation of motor fitness and dependence on pharmacotherapy. This article provides an assessment of a rehabilitation program with tailored water exercises in patients with osteoarthritis before and after total hip replacement. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 192 patients (the mean age 61.03±10.89) suffering from hip osteoarthritis (OA) were evaluated before and after total hip replacement (THR). The clinical study covered measurements of hip active ranges of motion (HAROM) and the forces generated by pelvis stabilizer muscles. Pain intensity was assessed according to analogue-visual scale of pain (VAS) and according to the Modified Laitinen Questionnaire. The patients were divided into 6 groups (4 treatment and 2 control). We compared 2 rehabilitation programs using kinesitherapy and low-frequency magnetic field. One of them also had specially designed exercises in the water. Statistical analysis was carried out at the significance level α=0.05. This was a cross-sectional study. RESULTS A positive effect of water exercises on a number of parameters was found in patients with OA both before and after total hip replacement surgery. We noted a significant reduction of pain (p<0.001), increased ranges of motion and muscle strength, and reduced use of medicines (NASAIDs) (p<0.001). A correlation was found between the degree of degenerative deforming lesions and the effects of the treatment process (p<0.01). CONCLUSIONS 1. The rehabilitation program including water exercises most significantly reduced pain in patients with OA before and after total hip replacement surgery. 2. Inclusion of water exercises in a rehabilitation program can reduce the use of medicines in patient with OA and after THR. PMID:27455419

  2. Barriers and Facilitators Associated with Non-Surgical Treatment Use for Osteoarthritis Patients in Orthopaedic Practice

    PubMed Central

    Hofstede, Stefanie N.; Marang-van de Mheen, Perla J.; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P. M.; van den Ende, Cornelia H. M.; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.; van Bodegom-Vos, Leti

    2016-01-01

    Introduction International evidence-based guidelines for the management of patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) recommend to start with (a combination of) non-surgical treatments, and using surgical intervention only if a patient does not respond sufficiently to non-surgical treatment options. Despite these recommendations, there are strong indications that non-surgical treatments are not optimally used in orthopaedic practice. To improve the adoption of non-surgical treatments, more insight is needed into barriers and facilitators of these treatments. Therefore, this study assessed which barriers and facilitators are associated with the use and prescription of different non-surgical treatments before hip and knee OA in orthopaedic practice among patients and orthopaedic surgeons in the Netherlands. Materials and Methods We performed two internet-based surveys among 172 orthopaedic surgeons and 174 OA patients. Univariate association and multivariable regression techniques are used to identify barriers and facilitators associated with the use of non-surgical treatments. Results Most barriers and facilitators among patients were associated with the use of physical therapy, lifestyle advice and dietary therapy. Among orthopaedic surgeons, most were associated with prescription of acetaminophen, dietary therapy and physical therapy. Examples of barriers and facilitators among patients included “People in my environment had positive experiences with a surgery” (facilitator for education about OA), and “Advice of people in my environment to keep on moving” (facilitator for lifestyle and dietary advice). For orthopaedic surgeons, examples were “Lack of knowledge about guideline” (barrier for lifestyle advice), “Agreements/ deliberations with primary care” and “Easy communication with a dietician” (facilitators for dietary therapy). Also the belief in the efficacy of these treatments was associated with increased prescription. Conclusions

  3. Revealed aspect of metabolic osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Chadha, Rishmeen

    2016-12-01

    In current scenario there is an emerging trend to consider osteoarthritis (OA) phenotypes based on their risk factors and therefore offering potential for targeted therapies. OA prevalence with other coexistence diseases, such as systemic arterial hypertension, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and dyslipidemia are increasing. Majority of OA associated with MetS, despite overweight of patients, the occurrence of OA in joints do not bear load suggest, the chronic inflammation status existing in patients with MetS can alter the metabolism of cartilage, regardless of excessive weight. This paper indicates that factors responsible for metabolic syndrome has clear role in cartilage degeneration and further degradation. PMID:27453640

  4. Problems and needs for improving primary care of osteoarthritis patients: the views of patients, general practitioners and practice nurses

    PubMed Central

    Rosemann, Thomas; Wensing, Michel; Joest, Katharina; Backenstrass, Matthias; Mahler, Cornelia; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2006-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is highly prevalent and has substantial impact on quality of life as well as on healthcare costs. The general practitioner (GP) often is the first care provider for patients with this chronic disease. The aim of this study was to identify health care needs of patients with OA and to reveal possible obstacles for improvements in primary care management of OA patients. Methods We performed semi-structured interviews with a stratified sample of 20 patients, 20 GPs and 20 practice nurses. Results Diagnosing OA posed no major problem, but during the course of OA, GPs found it difficult to distinguish between complaints resulting from the affection of the joints and complaints related to a concomitant depression. Patients felt to be well informed about the degenerative nature of the disease and possible side effects of medications, but they lacked information on individual consequences of the disease. Therefore, the most important concerns of many patients were pain and fear of disability which they felt to be addressed by GPs only marginally. Regarding pain treatment, physicians and patients had an ambivalent attitude towards NSAIDs and opiates. Therefore, pain treatment was not performed according to prevailing guidelines. GPs felt frustrated about the impact of counselling regarding life style changes but on the other hand admitted to have no systematic approach to it. Patients stated to be aware of the impact of life style on OA but lacked detailed information e.g. on how to exercise. Several suggestions were made concerning improvement. Conclusion GPs should focus more on disability and pain and on giving information about treatment since these topics are inadequately addressed. Advanced approaches are needed to increase GPs impact on patients' life style. Being aware of the problem of labelling patients as chronically ill, a more proactive, patient-centred care is needed. PMID:16749935

  5. Measuring the impact and distress of osteoarthritis from the patients' perspective

    PubMed Central

    Pallant, Julie F; Keenan, Anne-Maree; Misajon, Roseanne; Conaghan, Philip G; Tennant, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Background To assess the internal construct validity of the Perceived Impact of Problem Profile (PIPP), a patient based outcome measure based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), which assesses impact and distress, in an osteoarthritis (OA) cohort. Methods A questionnaire comprising the 23-item PIPP, which assesses five domains (mobility, participation, self care, psychological well being and relationships), the Western Ontario McMasters University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), the General Well-Being Index (GWBI), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) was posted to people with clinician diagnosed OA. Assessment of the internal construct validity of the PIPP was undertaken using Rasch analysis performed with RUMM2020 software and concurrent validity through comparator measures. Results Two hundred and fifty-nine participants with OA responded. Analysis of the five individual domains of the PIPP indicated that there was good fit to the Rasch model, with high person separation reliability. One item required removal from the Mobility subscale and the Participation subscale. There were strong correlations between the PIPP Mobility scores and the WOMAC disability and pain subscales (rho = .73 and rho = .68), and between the PIPP Psychological well-being and HADS Depression (rho = .71) and GWBI (rho = -.69). High inter-correlations between the impact and distress subscales for each domain (range rho = .85 to .96), suggested redundancy of the latter. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the PIPP has good psychometric properties in an OA population. The PIPP, using just the impact subscales, provides a brief, reliable and valid means of assessing the impact of OA from the individual's perspective and operationalizing the bio-psychosocial model by the application of a single multi-domain questionnaire. PMID:19400966

  6. Current concepts in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    de Rezende, Márcia Uchôa; de Campos, Gustavo Constantino; Pailo, Alexandre Felício

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common form of joint disease, affects mainly the hips, knees, hands and feet, leading to severe disability and loss of quality of life, particularly in the elderly population. Its importance grows every year with the aging of the population, with a large increase in the elderly population compared to younger patients. The progressive understanding of the pathophysiology of OA, the perception that the process is not purely mechanical and / or aging, and clarification of the inflammatory pathways involved led recently to the clinical application of various drugs and other measures. This update aims to expose the current concepts on the pathophysiology and treatment of OA. PMID:24453655

  7. People Getting a Grip on Arthritis II: An Innovative Strategy to Implement Clinical Practice Guidelines for Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoarthritis Patients through Facebook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brosseau, Lucie; Wells, George A.; Brooks, Sydney; De Angelis, G.; Bell, Mary; Egan, Mary; Poitras, Stephane; King, Judy; Casimiro, Lynn; Loew, Laurianne; Novikov, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study is to determine if an updated online evidence-based educational programme delivered through Facebook is effective in improving the knowledge, skills, and self-efficacy of patients with arthritis in relation to evidence-based self-management rehabilitation interventions for osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid…

  8. Repeatability of gait analysis for measuring knee osteoarthritis pain in patients with severe chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Asay, Jessica L; Boyer, Katherine A; Andriacchi, Thomas P

    2013-07-01

    Gait measures are receiving increased attention in the evaluation of patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Yet, there remains a need to assess variability of gait analysis in patients with knee osteoarthritis over time and how pain affects variation in these gait parameters. The purpose of this study was to determine if important gait parameters, such as the knee adduction moment, knee flexion moment, peak vertical ground reaction force, and speed, were repeatable in patients with mild-to-moderate knee OA over a trial period of 12 weeks. Six patients were enrolled in this cross-over study design after meeting strict inclusion criteria. Gait tests were conducted three times at 4 week intervals and once after the placebo arm of a randomized treatment sequence; each gait test followed a 2-week period of receiving a placebo for a pain modifying drug. Repeatability for each gait variable was found using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) with a two-way random model. This study found that the knee adduction moment was repeatable throughout the four gait tests. However, normalized peak vertical ground reaction force and knee flexion moment were not as repeatable, varying with pain. This suggests that these gait outcomes could offer a more objective way to measure a patient's level of pain. PMID:23508626

  9. Outcome of Arthroscopy in Patients with Advanced Osteoarthritis of the Hip

    PubMed Central

    Daivajna, Sachin; Bajwa, Ali; Villar, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Hip arthroscopy has continued to expand its horizons in treating many conditions other than femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). However, the results of hip arthroscopy are known to be poor if the degree of articular cartilage damage is significant. We wanted to assess, whether the procedure might have a role in the management of young and active patients with advanced osteoarthritis (OA) and whether it should be offered as a treatment modality. 77 consecutive patients with Tönnis grade 2 and 3 osteoarthritis of the hip who had undergone hip arthroscopy were included in the study. Patients' medical notes, plain radiographs and outcome scores (modified Harris hip score (mHHS), non-arthritic hip score (NAHS)) preoperatively and postoperatively at six weeks, six months, one year and annually thereafter, were analysed. 77 patients consisted of 63 men and 14 women with mean follow-up of 2.8 years (2.2 to 4.2) and mean age at surgery of 43 years (19 to 64). The mean preoperative mHHS and NAHS scores were 58 (28 to 87) and 64 (27 to 93) respectively. The mean improvements in both the mHHS and NAHS scores were significant (p = 0.003 and p = 0.0001 for mHHS at one and two years, p = 0.002 and p = 0.0003 for NAHS at one and two years, respectively). There were 34 patients (44%) who required a total hip replacement at mean of 18 months (6 to 48) after hip arthroscopy. We conclude that hip arthroscopy improves outcome scores in 56% of patients with severe OA of the hip (Tönnis grade 2 and 3) for at least two years after surgery. We thus consider the procedure to be a reasonable option for patients with hip OA, although success of the procedure will be less than if undertaken for certain other conditions. PMID:25635392

  10. Variation in use of non-surgical treatments among osteoarthritis patients in orthopaedic practice in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Hofstede, Stefanie N; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P M; van den Ende, Cornelia H M; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Marang-van de Mheen, Perla J; van Bodegom-Vos, Leti

    2015-01-01

    Objectives National and international evidence-based guidelines for hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) recommend to start with non-surgical treatments, followed by surgical intervention if a patient does not respond sufficiently to non-surgical treatments, but there are indications that these are not optimally used. The aim of this study was to assess the extent to which all recommended non-surgical treatments were used by patients with hip or knee OA who receive(d) a total hip or knee replacement, as reported by patients and orthopaedic surgeons. Setting We performed two cross-sectional internet-based surveys among patients and orthopaedic surgeons throughout the Netherlands. Participants 195 OA patients either have undergone total knee arthroplasty or total hip arthroplasty no longer than 12 months ago or being on the waiting list for surgery with a confirmed date within 3 months and 482 orthopaedic surgeons were invited to participate. Primary and secondary outcome measures The use of recommended non-surgical treatments including education about OA/treatment options, lifestyle advice, dietary therapy, physical therapy, acetaminophen, NSAIDs and glucocorticoid injections. Results 174 OA patients (93%) and 172 orthopaedic surgeons (36%) completed the surveys. Most recommended non-surgical treatments were given to the majority of patients (eg, 80% education about OA, 73% physical therapy, 72% acetaminophen, 80% NSAIDs). However, only 6% of patients and 10% of orthopaedic surgeons reported using a combination of all recommended treatments. Dietary therapy was used least frequently. Only 11% of overweight and 30% of obese participants reported having received dietary therapy and 28% of orthopaedic surgeons reported to prescribe dietary therapy to overweight patients. Conclusions While most recommended non-surgical treatments were used frequently as single therapy, the combination is used in only a small percentage of OA patients. Especially, use of dietary therapy

  11. Validating Efficacy of Shea Nut Oil Extract in Knee Osteoarthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Sui-Foon; Wang, Yu-Chia; Chou, Tzu-Yi; Chang, Kang-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To examine and investigate the efficacy of shea nut oil extract (SheaFlex75) in relation to knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods. Thirty-three patients (age 63.6 ± 5.8 years) with knee OA were recruited. Real-time ultrasound imaging and surface electromyography were used to objectively assess the morphological changes and the activity of vastus medialis oblique (VMO) muscles during a 16-week intervention of SheaFlex75. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated to examine the reliability of the interscans. A paired-sample t-test was used to compare the findings in different stages. The Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was used to examine the relationship between the relevant variables of OA and percentage of thickness change of VMO at different contraction levels. Results. The baseline findings showed strong correlation, suggesting that the reliability of interscans at pretest was high. The ability to contract the muscles of the knee to a 30% contraction level showed significant change between the baseline and after 16-week testing, both in terms of morphological changes and muscle activity. Pain scale reported a significant decrease at the 16th week. Conclusion. The results suggest that SheaFlex75 can relieve the symptoms of knee OA and can result in improvement of muscle control of the knee. PMID:24454485

  12. Osteoarthritis

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... with the aging process. Osteoarthritis is a chronic disease causing the deterioration of the cartilage within a ... is roughened and becomes worn down. As the disease progresses, the cartilage becomes completely worn down and ...

  13. Osteoarthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes pain, swelling, and reduced motion in your joints. It can occur in any joint, but usually it affects your hands, knees, hips ... spine. Osteoarthritis breaks down the cartilage in your joints. Cartilage is the slippery tissue that covers the ...

  14. Osteoarthritis

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... osteoarthritis include loss of flexibility, limited movement, and pain and swelling within the joint. The condition results ... the margins of the joint. Part of the pain results from these bone spurs, which can restrict ...

  15. A Web-Based Platform for Patients With Osteoarthritis of the Hip and Knee: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Grahn, Daniel; Dahlberg, Jakob E; Thorstensson, Carina A

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic conditions are the leading cause of disability throughout the world and the most expensive problem facing the health care systems. One such chronic condition is osteoarthritis (OA), a frequent cause of major disability. Objective To describe the effect on joint pain for the first users of a newly developed Web-based osteoarthritis self-managing program, Joint Academy, and to examine whether these patients would recommend other OA patients to use the program. Methods Patients with clinically established knee or hip OA according to national and international guidelines were recruited from an online advertisement. A trained physiotherapist screened the eligible patients by scrutinizing their answers to a standardized questionnaire. The 6-week program consisted of eight 2- to 5-minute videos with lectures about OA, effects of physical activity, self-management, and coping strategies. In addition, exercises to improve lower extremity physical function were introduced in daily video activities. During the course of the program, communication between physiotherapist and patients was based on an asynchronous chat. After 6 weeks, patients were able to continue without support from the physiotherapist. Patients reported their current pain weekly by using a numeric rating scale (range 0-10; 0=no pain, 10=worst possible pain) as long as they were in the program. In addition, after 6 weeks patients answered the question “What is the probability that you would recommend Joint Academy to a friend?” Results The eligible cohort consisted of 53 individuals (39 women; body mass index: mean 27, SD 5; age: mean 57, SD 14 years). With the continued use of the program, patients reported a constant change in pain score from mean 5.1 (SD 2.1) at baseline to mean 3.6 (SD 2.0) at week 12. Six patients participated for 30 weeks (mean 3.2, SD 2.1). Overall, the patients would highly recommend Joint Academy to other OA patients, suggesting that the platform may be useful

  16. Synovial Fluid Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Levels Correlate with Severity of Self-Reported Pain in Knee Osteoarthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pei-liang; Liu, Jun; Xu, Li; Sun, Yan; Sun, Xue-cheng

    2016-01-01

    Background Inflammation is considered as one of the main pathogeneses in OA-induced pain. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a well known pro-inflammatory cytokine. We aimed to determine whether MIF levels in serum and synovial fluid (SF) are associated with severity of OA-induced pain. Material/Methods We recruited 226 patients with knee OA and 106 controls. Self-reported pain severity of OA patients was evaluated using the Western Ontario McMaster University Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) pain scores. MIF levels were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results OA patients had similar serum MIF levels compared to controls (11.93 [5.68–18.10] vs. 10.06 [6.60–14.61] ng/ml, P>0.05). In OA patients, MIF levels in SF were dramatically lower compared to paired serum samples (3.39 [1.87–5.89] vs. 11.93 [5.68–18.10] ng/ml, P<0.01). MIF levels in SF were significantly correlated with WOMAC pain scores (r=0.237, P<0.001), but MIF levels in serum had no significant correlation with WOMAC pain scores (r=0.009, P=0.898). Conclusions MIF levels in SF, but not in serum, were independently associated with the severity of self-reported pain in OA patients. The inhibition of MIF signaling pathways may be a novel therapeutic approach for ameliorating OA-induced pain. PMID:27342658

  17. Application of Computational Lower Extremity Model to Investigate Different Muscle Activities and Joint Force Patterns in Knee Osteoarthritis Patients during Walking

    PubMed Central

    Nha, Kyung Wook; Shin, Jun Ho; Kim, Jong In; Kwon, Jae Ho; Kim, Yoon Hyuk

    2013-01-01

    Many experimental and computational studies have reported that osteoarthritis in the knee joint affects knee biomechanics, including joint kinematics, joint contact forces, and muscle activities, due to functional restriction and disability. In this study, differences in muscle activities and joint force patterns between knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients and normal subjects during walking were investigated using the inverse dynamic analysis with a lower extremity musculoskeletal model. Extensor/flexor muscle activations and torque ratios and the joint contact forces were compared between the OA and normal groups. The OA patients had higher extensor muscle forces and lateral component of the knee joint force than normal subjects as well as force and torque ratios of extensor and flexor muscles, while the other parameters had little differences. The results explained that OA patients increased the level of antagonistic cocontraction and the adduction moment on the knee joint. The presented findings and technologies provide insight into biomechanical changes in OA patients and can also be used to evaluate the postoperative functional outcomes of the OA treatments. PMID:24302973

  18. Acupuncture modulates cortical thickness and functional connectivity in knee osteoarthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoyan; Spaeth, Rosa B; Retzepi, Kallirroi; Ott, Daniel; Kong, Jian

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated cortical thickness and functional connectivity across longitudinal acupuncture treatments in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Over a period of four weeks (six treatments), we collected resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans from 30 patients before their first, third and sixth treatments. Clinical outcome showed a significantly greater Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) pain score (improvement) with verum acupuncture compared to the sham acupuncture. Longitudinal cortical thickness analysis showed that the cortical thickness at left posterior medial prefrontal cortex (pMPFC) decreased significantly in the sham group across treatment sessions as compared with verum group. Resting state functional connectivity (rsFC) analysis using the left pMPFC as a seed showed that after longitudinal treatments, the rsFC between the left pMPFC and the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC), medial frontal pole (mFP) and periaquiduct grey (PAG) are significantly greater in the verum acupuncture group as compared with the sham group. Our results suggest that acupuncture may achieve its therapeutic effect on knee OA pain by preventing cortical thinning and decreases in functional connectivity in major pain related areas, therefore modulating pain in the descending pain modulatory pathway. PMID:25258037

  19. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Alterations in Bone Marrow Lesions in Patients With Hip Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, T. Mark; Churchman, Sarah M.; Gomez, Alejandro; McGonagle, Dennis; Conaghan, Philip G.; Ponchel, Frederique

    2016-01-01

    Objective In patients with osteoarthritis (OA), bone marrow lesions (BMLs) are intimately linked to disease progression. We hypothesized that aberrant multipotential stromal cell (also known as mesenchymal stem cell [MSC]) responses within bone tissue contributes to BML pathophysiology. The aim of this study was to investigate BML and non‐BML native subchondral bone MSCs for numeric, topographic, in vitro functional, and gene expression differences. Methods Ex vivo 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the femoral heads of 20 patients with hip OA was performed. MRI‐determined BML and non‐BML regions were excised and enzymatically treated to extract cells and quantify MSCs using flow cytometry and colony‐forming unit–fibroblast (CFU‐F) assay. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed to determine in vivo CD271+ MSC distribution. Culture‐expanded CD271+ cells were analyzed for tripotentiality and gene expression. Results BML regions were associated with greater trabecular bone area and cartilage damage compared with non‐BML regions. The proportion of CD45−CD271+ MSCs was higher in BML regions compared with non‐BML regions (median difference 5.6‐fold; P < 0.001); the CFU‐F assay showed a similar trend (median difference 4.3‐fold; P = 0.013). Immunohistochemistry revealed CD271+ cell accumulation in bone adjacent to cartilage defects and areas of osteochondral angiogenesis. BML MSCs had lower proliferation and mineralization capacities in vitro and altered expression of TNFSF11/RANKL and CXCR4/stromal cell–derived factor 1 receptor. OA MSCs showed up‐regulated transcripts for CXCR1 and CCR6 compared with MSCs derived from healthy or osteoporotic bone. Conclusion This study is the first to show numeric and topographic alterations in native MSCs in the diseased bone of patients with hip OA. Given the associated functional perturbation of MSCs, these data suggest that subchondral bone MSC manipulation may be an OA treatment target. PMID

  20. Patients' and Practitioners' Views of Knee Osteoarthritis and Its Management: A Qualitative Interview Study

    PubMed Central

    Alami, Sophie; Boutron, Isabelle; Desjeux, Dominique; Hirschhorn, Monique; Meric, Gwendoline; Rannou, François; Poiraudeau, Serge

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To identify the views of patients and care providers regarding the management of knee osteoarthritis (OA) and to reveal potential obstacles to improving health care strategies. Methods We performed a qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews of a stratified sample of 81 patients (59 women) and 29 practitioners (8 women, 11 general practitioners [GPs], 6 rheumatologists, 4 orthopedic surgeons, and 8 [4 GPs] delivering alternative medicine). Results Two main domains of patient views were identified: one about the patient–physician relationship and the other about treatments. Patients feel that their complaints are not taken seriously. They also feel that practitioners act as technicians, paying more attention to the knee than to the individual, and they consider that not enough time is spent on information and counseling. They have negative perceptions of drugs and a feeling of medical uncertainty about OA, which leads to less compliance with treatment and a switch to alternative medicine. Patients believe that knee OA is an inevitable illness associated with age, that not much can be done to modify its evolution, that treatments are of little help, and that practitioners have not much to propose. They express unrealistic fears about the impact of knee OA on daily and social life. Practitioners' views differ from those of patients. Physicians emphasize the difficulty in elaborating treatment strategies and the need for a tool to help in treatment choice. Conclusions This qualitative study suggests several ways to improve the patient–practitioner relationship and the efficacy of treatment strategies, by increasing their acceptability and compliance. Providing adapted and formalized information to patients, adopting more global assessment and therapeutic approaches, and dealing more accurately with patients' paradoxal representation of drug therapy are main factors of improvement that should be addressed. PMID:21573185

  1. Psychometric properties of the Brief Pain Inventory among patients with osteoarthritis undergoing total hip replacement surgery

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pain is a cardinal symptom of osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and important for deciding when to operate. This study assessed the internal consistency reliability, validity and responsiveness of the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) among patients with OA undergoing total hip replacement (THR). Methods We prospectively included 250 of 356 patients who were accepted to the waiting list for primary THR surgery. All participants responded to the BPI, WOMAC and SF-36 at baseline and 1 year after surgery. Results Internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's α) was >0.80 for the BPI, the WOMAC and five of the eight SF-36 scales The pattern of associations of the two BPI scales with corresponding and non-corresponding scales of the WOMAC and SF-36 largely supported the construct validity of the BPI. The responsiveness indices for change from baseline to 1 year after THR ranged from 1.52 to 2.05 for the BPI scales, from 1.69 to 2.84 for the WOMAC scales, and from 0.25 (general health) to 2.77 (bodily pain) for the SF-36 scales. Conclusions The BPI showed acceptable reliability, construct validity and responsiveness in patients with OA undergoing THR. BPI is short and therefore is easy to use and score, though the instrument offers few advantages over and duplicates scales of more comprehensive instruments, such as the WOMAC and SF-36. PMID:21143926

  2. Relationships of Fear, Anxiety, and Depression With Physical Function in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Scopaz, Kristen A.; Piva, Sara R.; Wisniewski, Stephen; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore whether the psychologic variables anxiety, depression, and fear-avoidance beliefs, and interactions between these variables, are associated with physical function in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). We hypothesized lower levels of function would be related to higher anxiety, higher depression, and higher fear-avoidance beliefs, and that high levels of 2 of these factors simultaneously might interact to have a greater adverse effect on physical function. Design Cross-sectional, correlational design. Setting Institutional practice. Participants Subjects included patients with knee OA (N=182; age, mean ± SD, 63.9±8.8y; 122 women). Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Self-report measures of function included the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) Osteoarthritis Index, the Lower Extremity Function Scale (LEFS), and the Knee Outcome Survey-Activity of Daily Living Scale. The Get Up and Go test was used as a physical performance measure of function. Self-report measures for psychologic variables included the Beck Anxiety Inventory, the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, and the Fear Avoidance Belief Questionnaire-Physical Activity Scale modified for the knee. Results Higher anxiety was related to poorer function on the WOMAC physical function. Both high anxiety and fear avoidance beliefs were related to poorer function on the LEFS and Knee Outcome Survey-Activity of Daily Living Scale. There was no association between the psychologic variables and the Get Up and Go test. The anxiety X depression interaction was associated with the LEFS. Conclusions Anxiety and fear-avoidance beliefs are associated with self-report measures of function in patients with knee OA. Depression may influence scores on the LEFS under conditions of low anxiety. PMID:19887210

  3. Identification of factors associated with the development of knee osteoarthritis in a young to middle-aged cohort of patients with knee complaints.

    PubMed

    Huétink, Kasper; Stoel, Berend C; Watt, Iain; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Bloem, Johan L; Malm, Steve H; Van't Klooster, Ronald; Nelissen, Rob G H H

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to identify risk factors for knee osteoarthritis (OA) development in a young to middle-aged population with sub-acute knee complaints. This, in order to define high risk patients who may benefit from early preventive or future disease modifying therapies. Knee OA development visible on radiographs and MR in 319 patients (mean age 41.5 years) 10 years after sub-acute knee complaints and subjective knee function (KOOS score) was studied. Associations between OA development and age, gender, activity level, BMI, meniscal or anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) lesions, OA in first-degree relatives and radiographic hand OA were determined using multivariable logistic regression analysis. OA on radiographs and MR in the TFC is associated with increased age (OR: 1.10, 95 % 1.04-1.16 and OR: 1.07, 95 % 1.02-1.13). TFC OA on radiographs only is associated with ACL and/or meniscal lesions (OR: 5.01, 95 % 2.14-11.73), presence of hand OA (OR: 4.69, 95 % 1.35-16.32) and higher Tegner activity scores at baseline before the complaints (OR: 1.20, 95 % 1.01-1.43). The presence of OA in the TFC diagnosed only on MRI is associated with a family history of OA (OR: 2.44, 95 % 1.18-5.06) and a higher BMI (OR: 1.13, 95 % 1.04-1.23). OA in the PFC diagnosed on both radiographs and MR is associated with an increased age (OR: 1.06, 95 % 1.02-1.12 and OR: 1.05, 95 % 1.00-1.09). PFC OA diagnosed on radiographs only is associated with a higher BMI (OR: 1.12, 95 % 1.02-1.22). The presence of OA in the PFC diagnosed on MR only is associated with the presence of hand OA (OR: 3.39, 95 % 1.10-10.50). Compared to normal reference values, the study population had significantly lower KOOS scores in the different subscales. These results show that knee OA development in young to middle aged patients with a history of sub-acute knee complaints is associated with the presence of known risk factors for knee OA. OA is already visible on radiographs and MRI after 10

  4. Neuromuscular exercise prior to joint arthroplasty in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee.

    PubMed

    Villadsen, Allan

    2016-04-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease affecting the whole joint and peri-articular structures like the muscles. The hallmark of OA is cartilage loss. The main symptoms are pain and decreased physical function leading to a reduced quality of life. OA ranks eight in leading causes of disability worldwide and it generates a heavy economic burden for society. The prevalence of OA increases with age and 10-18% aged above 60 years are affected. Currently there is no cure for OA and the various treatment modalities aim at addressing symptoms, i.e. reducing pain, improving physical function and preventing further progression of the disease. Exercise has proven to be a viable treatment option with regard to reducing pain and improving physical function in patients with mild to moderate knee OA and is today regarded a cornerstone in the treatment. The documentation is less clear for hip OA. Patients with severe OA of the hip or knee are treated with total joint arthroplasty (TJA). Although, in general, it is a very successful procedure, there are still challenges to overcome in this patient group, as approximately 10% of those having hip arthroplasty and 20% of those having knee arthroplasty have persistent symptoms. The evidence on the efficacy of exercise prior to TJA is sparse. It is based on insufficiently powered trials and with interventions of questionable validity. Two recent systematic reviews and meta-analyses reach conflicting conclusions and highlight the need for high quality trials with sufficient sample sizes. In this dissertation, I wanted to evaluate the effects of an individualised neuromuscular exercise programme (NEMEX-TJR) when administered prior to joint arthroplasty in patients with severe OA of the hip or knee joint. This intervention was previously found to be feasible with regard to pain level during exercise and it was possible to progress the training level in this patient group. The main question asked was: Does the addition of

  5. Controlled release formulation of oxycodone in patients with moderate to severe chronic osteoarthritis: a critical review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Robert; Raffa, Robert B; Pergolizzi, Joseph V

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a physically and emotionally debilitating disease that predominantly affects the aging adult population. Current pharmacologic treatment options primarily consist of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and/or acetaminophen, but associated side effects, analgesic limitations, especially in the elderly, and the need for around-the-clock analgesia have led physicians to search for alternative analgesics. Opioids have shown effectiveness at mitigating both chronic cancer and noncancer pain, and their ability to be placed into controlled release (CR) formulations suggests that they may prove efficacious for OA patients. One formulation, oxycodone CR, has shown effectiveness in cancer pain patients and in some trials of noncancer low back pain. In this review, the objective was to synthesize the reported findings by researchers in this field and present an up-to-date look at the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of oxycodone CR in OA patients. Public literature databases were searched using specific keywords (eg, oxycodone CR) for studies assessing the efficacy and safety profile of oxycodone CR and its use in patients with OA. A total of eleven articles that matched the criteria were identified, which included three placebo-controlled trials, six comparative trials, one pharmacokinetic study in the elderly, and one long-term safety trial. Analysis of the studies revealed that oxycodone CR is reasonably efficacious, safe, and tolerable when used to manage moderate to severe chronic OA pain, with similar side effects to that of other opioids. PMID:22570559

  6. DNA Methylation in Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    den Hollander, Wouter; Meulenbelt, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent disease of articular joints and primarily characterized by degradation and calcification of articular cartilage. Presently, no effective treatment other than pain relief exists and patients ultimately need to undergo replacement surgery of the affected joint. During disease progression articular chondrocytes, the single cell type present in articular cartilage, show altered transcriptional profiles and undergo phenotypic changes that resemble the terminal differentiation route apparent in growth plate chondrocytes. Hence, given its prominent function in both regulating gene expression and maintaining cellular phenotypes, DNA methylation of CpG dinucleotides is intensively studied in the context of OA. An increasing number of studies have been published that employed a targeted approach on genes known to play a role in OA pathophysiology. As of such, it has become clear that OA responsive DNA methylation changes seem to mediate disease associated aberrant gene expression. Furthermore, established OA susceptibility alleles such as GDF5 and DIO2 appear to confer OA risk via DNA methylation and respective pathophysiological expression changes. In more recent years, genome wide profiling of DNA methylation in OA affected articular cartilage has emerged as a powerful tool to address the epigenetic changes in their entirety, which has resulted in the identification of putative patient subgroups as well as generic OA associated pathways. PMID:27019616

  7. DNA Methylation in Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    den Hollander, Wouter; Meulenbelt, Ingrid

    2015-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent disease of articular joints and primarily characterized by degradation and calcification of articular cartilage. Presently, no effective treatment other than pain relief exists and patients ultimately need to undergo replacement surgery of the affected joint. During disease progression articular chondrocytes, the single cell type present in articular cartilage, show altered transcriptional profiles and undergo phenotypic changes that resemble the terminal differentiation route apparent in growth plate chondrocytes. Hence, given its prominent function in both regulating gene expression and maintaining cellular phenotypes, DNA methylation of CpG dinucleotides is intensively studied in the context of OA. An increasing number of studies have been published that employed a targeted approach on genes known to play a role in OA pathophysiology. As of such, it has become clear that OA responsive DNA methylation changes seem to mediate disease associated aberrant gene expression. Furthermore, established OA susceptibility alleles such as GDF5 and DIO2 appear to confer OA risk via DNA methylation and respective pathophysiological expression changes. In more recent years, genome wide profiling of DNA methylation in OA affected articular cartilage has emerged as a powerful tool to address the epigenetic changes in their entirety, which has resulted in the identification of putative patient subgroups as well as generic OA associated pathways. PMID:27019616

  8. Obesity affects the chondrocyte responsiveness to leptin in patients with osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Increasing evidence support the regulatory role of leptin in osteoarthritis (OA). As high circulating concentrations of leptin disrupt the physiological function of the adipokine in obese individuals, the current study has been undertaken to determine whether the elevated levels of leptin found in the joint from obese OA patients also induce changes in the chondrocyte response to leptin. Methods Chondrocytes isolated from OA patients with various body mass index (BMI) were treated with 20, 100 or 500 ng/ml of leptin. The expression of cartilage-specific components (aggrecan, type 2 collagen), as well as regulatory (IGF-1, TGFβ, MMP-13, TIMP 2) or inflammatory (COX-2, iNOS, IL-1) factors was investigated by real-time PCR to evaluate chondrocyte responsiveness to leptin. Furthermore, the effect of body mass index (BMI) on leptin signalling pathways was analyzed with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for STATs activation. Results Leptin at 20 ng/ml was unable to modulate gene expression in chondrocytes, except for MMP-13 in obese OA patients. Higher leptin levels induced the expression of IGF-1, type 2 collagen, TIMP-2 and MMP-13. However, the activity of the adipokine was shown to be critically dependent on both the concentration and the BMI of the patients with a negative association between the activation of regulated genes and BMI for 100 ng/ml of adipokine, but a positive association between chondrocyte responsiveness and BMI for the highest leptin dose. In addition, the gene encoding MMP-13 was identified as a target of leptin for chondrocytes originated from obese patients while mRNA level of TIMP-2 was increased in leptin-treated chondrocytes collected from normal or overweight patients. The adipokine at 500 ng/ml triggered signal transduction through a STAT-dependent pathway while 100 ng/ml of leptin failed to activate STAT 3 but induced STAT 1α phosphorylation in chondrocytes obtained from obese patients. Conclusions The current study

  9. An 8-Week Knee Osteoarthritis Treatment Program of Hyaluronic Acid Injection, Deliberate Physical Rehabilitation, and Patient Education is Cost Effective at 2 Years Follow-up: The OsteoArthritis Centers of AmericaSM Experience

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Larry E; Block, Jon E

    2014-01-01

    Numerous nonsurgical interventions have been reported to improve symptoms of knee osteoarthritis (OA) over the short term. However, longer follow-up is required to accurately characterize outcomes such as cost effectiveness and delayed arthroplasty. A total of 553 patients with symptomatic knee OA who previously underwent a single 8-week multimodal treatment program were contacted at 1 year (n = 336) or 2 years (n = 217) follow-up. The percentage of patients who underwent knee arthroplasty was 10% at 1 year and 18% at 2 years following program completion. The treatment program was highly cost effective at $12,800 per quality-adjusted life year at 2 years. Cost effectiveness was maintained under a variety of plausible assumptions and regardless of gender, age, body mass index, disease severity, or knee pain severity. In summary, a single 8-week multimodal knee OA treatment program is cost effective and may lower knee arthroplasty utilization through 2 years follow-up. PMID:25574144

  10. A genome-wide association study suggests that a locus within the ataxin 2 binding protein 1 gene is associated with hand osteoarthritis: the Treat-OA consortium

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, G; van Meurs, J B J; Livshits, G; Meulenbelt, I; Valdes, A M; Soranzo, N; Hart, D; Zhang, F; Kato, B S; Richards, J B; Williams, F M K; Inouye, M; Kloppenburg, M; Deloukas, P; Slagboom, E; Uitterlinden, A; Spector, T D

    2009-01-01

    To identify the susceptibility gene in hand osteoarthritis (OA) the authors used a two-stage approach genome-wide association study using two discovery samples (the TwinsUK cohort and the Rotterdam discovery subset; a total of 1804 subjects) and four replication samples (the Chingford Study, the Chuvasha Skeletal Aging Study, the Rotterdam replication subset and the Genetics, Arthrosis, and Progression (GARP) Study; a total of 3266 people). Five single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) had a likelihood of association with hand OA in the discovery stage and one of them (rs716508), was successfully confirmed in the replication stage (meta-analysis p = 1.81×10−5). The C allele conferred a reduced risk of 33% to 41% using a case–control definition. The SNP is located in intron 1 of the A2BP1 gene. This study also found that the same allele of the SNP significantly reduced bone density at both the hip and spine (p<0.01), suggesting the potential mechanism of the gene in hand OA might be via effects on subchondral bone. The authors' findings provide a potential new insight into genetic mechanisms in the development of hand OA. PMID:19508968

  11. Assessment of quality of life in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kawano, Marcio Massao; Araújo, Ivan Luis Andrade; Castro, Martha Cavalcante; Matos, Marcos Almeida

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE : To assess the quality of life of knee osteoarthritis patients using the SF-36 questionnaire METHODS : Cross-sec-tional study with 93 knee osteoarthritis patients. The sample was categorized according to Ahlbӓck score. All individuals were interviewed with the SF-36 questionnaire RESULTS : The main finding of the study is related to the association of edu-cation level with the functional capacity, functional limitation and pain. Patients with higher education level had better functional capacity when they were compared to patients with basic level of education CONCLUSION : Individuals with osteoarthritis have a low perception of their quality of life in functional capacity, functional limitation and pain. There is a strong association between low level of education and low perception of quality of life. Level of Evidence IV, Clinical Case Series. PMID:27057143

  12. Weight Status and Differences in Mobility Performance, Pain Symptoms, and Physical Activity in Older, Knee Osteoarthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Garver, Matthew J.; Focht, Brian C.; Dials, Justin; Lucas, Alexander R.; Devor, Steven T.; Emery, Charles F.; Hackshaw, Kevin V.; Rejeski, W. Jack

    2014-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of functional disability among American adults. Obesity is a strong independent risk factor for OA. While research emphasizes the role of obesity in the OA-physical function relationship, the extent to which weight status impacts salient physical, health, and pain measures in older, knee OA patients is not well delineated. The primary aim of this study was to assess differences in mobility performance (stair climb and 400-meter walk), mobility-related self-efficacy, pain symptoms (WOMAC), and measures of accelerometer-determined physical activity (PA) as a function of weight status. Analysis of covariance was conducted to examine differences on the dependent variables. Obese class III patients were outperformed by their counterparts on nearly every measure of mobility, mobility-related self-efficacy, and the assessment of pain symptoms. These outcomes did not differ among other weight comparisons. Normal weight subjects outperformed classes I, II, and III counterparts on most measures of PA (engagement in moderate or greater PA and total weekly steps). Additionally, overweight participants outperformed obese class II participants and obese class I participants outperformed obese classes II and III participants on total weekly steps. Collectively, these findings underscore the meaningful differences observed in relevant OA outcomes as a function of increasing levels of body weight. PMID:24963401

  13. Efficacy and safety of Meriva®, a curcumin-phosphatidylcholine complex, during extended administration in osteoarthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Belcaro, Gianni; Cesarone, Maria Rosaria; Dugall, Mark; Pellegrini, Luciano; Ledda, Andrea; Grossi, Maria Giovanna; Togni, Stefano; Appendino, Giovanni

    2010-12-01

    In a previous three-month study of Meriva, a proprietary curcumin-phosphatidylcholine phytosome complex, decreased joint pain and improvement in joint function were observed in 50 osteoarthritis (OA) patients. Since OA is a chronic condition requiring prolonged treatment, the long-term efficacy and safety of Meriva were investigated in a longer (eight months) study involving 100 OA patients. The clinical end points (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities [WOMAC] score, Karnofsky Performance Scale Index, and treadmill walking performance) were complemented by the evaluation of a series of inflammatory markers (interleukin [IL]-1beta, IL-6, soluble CD40 ligand [sCD40L], soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule (sVCAM)-1, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate [ESR]). This represents the most ambitious attempt, to date, to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of curcumin as an anti-inflammatory agent. Significant improvements of both the clinical and biochemical end points were observed for Meriva compared to the control group. This, coupled with an excellent tolerability, suggests that Meriva is worth considering for the long-term complementary management of osteoarthritis. PMID:21194249

  14. Tanezumab for Patients with Osteoarthritis of the Knee: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhi-Fang; Chen, Ling-Xiao; Bi, Ming-Chao; Sun, Jing-Cheng; Feng, Shi-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Objective Tanezumab is a new therapeutic intervention for patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. We performed the present meta-analysis to appraise the efficacy and safety of tanezumab for patients with knee OA. Methods We systematically searched randomized controlled trials from PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL). The primary outcomes were mean change in the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain, the WOMAC physical function and patient's global assessment (PGA). Outcomes were reported as the standard mean difference (SMD) or relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). We assessed the pooled data using a random-effects model. Results Of the identified studies, four were eligible and were included in this meta-analysis (N = 1839 participants). Compared with the placebo groups, tanezumab yielded a significant reduction in mean change in the WOMAC pain (SMD = 0.51, 95% CI 0.34 to 0.69, P<0.00001), the WOMAC physical function (SMD = 0.56, 95% CI 0.38 to 0.74, P<0.00001) and PGA (SMD = 0.34, 95% CI 0.22 to 0.47, P<0.00001). There was no significant difference in serious adverse events (RR = 1.06, 95% CI 0.59 to 1.92, P = 0.84) between the tanezumab and placebo groups. Tanezumab significantly increased discontinuations due to adverse events (RR = 2.89, 95% CI 1.59 to 5.26, P = 0.0005), abnormal peripheral sensations (RR = 3.14, 95% CI 2.12 to 4.66, P<0.00001), and peripheral neuropathy (RR = 6.05, 95% CI 2.32 to 15.81, P = 0.0002). Conclusion Tanezumab can alleviate pain and improve function for patients with OA of the knee. However, considering the limited number of studies, this conclusion should be interpreted cautiously and more clinical randomized controlled trials are needed to verify the efficacy and safety of tanezumab for OA of the knee. PMID:27294371

  15. Knee stabilization in patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lewek, Michael D.; Ramsey, Dan K.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Rudolph, Katherine S.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Individuals with medial knee osteoarthritis (MKOA) experience knee laxity and instability. Muscle stabilization strategies may influence the long term integrity of the joint. In this study we determined how individuals with medial knee OA respond to a rapid valgus knee movement to investigate the relationship between muscle stabilization strategies and knee instability. METHODS Twenty one subjects with MKOA and genu varum, and 19 control subjects were tested. Subjects stood with the test limb on a moveable platform that translated laterally to rapidly stress the knee’s medial periarticular structures and create a potentially destabilizing feeling at the knee joint. Knee motion and muscle responses were recorded. Subjects rated their knee instability with a self-report questionnaire about knee instability during daily activities. RESULTS Prior to plate movement the OA subjects demonstrated more medial muscle co-contraction (p=0.014). Following plate movement the OA subjects shifted less weight off the test limb (p = 0.013) and had more medial co-contraction (p=0.037). Those without instability had higher VMMH co-contraction than those who reported more instability (p=0.038). Knee stability correlated positively with VMMH co-contraction prior to plate movement (r = 0.459; p = 0.042). CONCLUSION This study demonstrates that individuals with MKOA attempt to stabilize the knee with greater medial muscle co-contraction in response to laxity that appears on only the medial side of the joint. This strategy presumably contributes to higher joint compression and could exacerbate joint destruction and needs to be altered to slow or stop the progression of the OA disease process. PMID:16142714

  16. Effects of Sesame Seed Supplementation on Lipid Profile and Oxidative Stress Biomarkers in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Khadem Haghighian, Mahdieh; Alipoor, Beitollah; Eftekhar Sadat, Bina; Malek Mahdavi, Aida; Moghaddam, Abdolvahab; Vatankhah, Amir-Mansour

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study was designed to assess the effect of sesame seed on lipid profile and oxidative stress biomarkers in knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients. Methods: Fifty patients with knee OA were allocated into two groups receiving 40 g of sesame seed daily along with standard medical therapy (n=25) or stan­dard treatment (n=25) for two months. Serum total antioxidant capacity, ma­londialdehyde (MDA) and lipid profile (total cholesterol (TC), HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, triglycerides) were measured. Results: After the intervention period two months of study, serum TC, LDL-cholesterol and MDA decreased significantly in the sesame group (P<0.05), while no significant difference in serum values of lipid profile and oxidative stress parameters was seen in the control group (P>0.05). There was no signifi­cant difference in pre and post-treatment values of lipid profile and oxidative parameters between the two groups (P>0.05). Conclusion: Current study showed a positive effect of sesame seed in improv­ing lipid profile and oxidative stress in patients with knee OA and indicated the fact that sesame seed might be of help to reduce oxidative stress in OA patients. PMID:25097842

  17. Knee Contact Force in Subjects with Symmetrical OA Grades: Differences between OA Severities

    PubMed Central

    Richards, C.; Higginson, J.S.

    2010-01-01

    In using musculoskeletal models, researchers can calculate muscle forces, and subsequently joint contact forces, providing insight into joint loading and the progression of such diseases as osteoarthritis (OA). The purpose of this study was to estimate the knee contact force (KCF) in patients with varying degrees of OA severity using muscle forces and joint reaction forces derived from OpenSim. Walking data was obtained from individuals with severe (n=2), moderate (n=10) and no signs of OA (n=14). For each subject, we generated 3D, muscle-actuated, forward dynamic simulations of the walking trials. Muscle forces that reproduced each subject’s gait were calculated. KCFs were then calculated using the vector sum of the muscle forces and joint reaction forces along the longitudinal axis of the femur. Moderate OA subjects exhibited a similar KCF pattern to healthy subjects, with lower KCF peaks (p = 0.0169). Although subjects with severe OA had similar initial peak KCF to healthy and moderate OA subjects (more than 4 times BW), the pattern of the KCF was very different between groups. After an initial peak, subjects with severe OA continually unloaded the joint, whereas healthy and moderate OA subjects reloaded the knee during late stance. In subjects with symmetric OA grades, there appears to be differences in loading between OA severities. Similar initial peaks of KCF imply that reduction of peak KCF may not be a compensatory strategy for OA patients; however, reducing duration of high magnitude loads may be employed. PMID:20627301

  18. Knee contact force in subjects with symmetrical OA grades: differences between OA severities.

    PubMed

    Richards, C; Higginson, J S

    2010-09-17

    In using musculoskeletal models, researchers can calculate muscle forces, and subsequently joint contact forces, providing insight into joint loading and the progression of such diseases as osteoarthritis (OA). The purpose of this study was to estimate the knee contact force (KCF) in patients with varying degrees of OA severity using muscle forces and joint reaction forces derived from OpenSim. Walking data was obtained from healthy individuals (n=14) and those with moderate (n=10) and severe knee OA (n=2). For each subject, we generated 3D, muscle-actuated, forward dynamic simulations of the walking trials. Muscle forces that reproduced each subject's gait were calculated. KCFs were then calculated using the vector sum of the muscle forces and joint reaction forces along the longitudinal axis of the femur. Moderate OA subjects exhibited a similar KCF pattern to healthy subjects, with lower second peaks (p=0.021). Although subjects with severe OA had similar initial peak KCF to healthy and moderate OA subjects (more than 4 times BW), the pattern of the KCF was very different between groups. After an initial peak, subjects with severe OA continually unloaded the joint, whereas healthy and moderate OA subjects reloaded the knee during late stance. In subjects with symmetric OA grades, there appears to be differences in loading between OA severities. Similar initial peaks of KCF imply that reduction of peak KCF may not be a compensatory strategy for OA patients; however, reducing duration of high magnitude loads may be employed. PMID:20627301

  19. Correlation of Adrenomedullin Concentrations with Knee Osteoarthritis Grade.

    PubMed

    Liu, Linghua; Huang, Ruokun; Ma, Dezhang; Cheng, Wenjun; Feng, Wei; Xing, Danmou; Kan, Wusheng; Xiao, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Adrenomedullin, a recently identified myokine, has an anti-inflammatory effect. Therefore, we aimed to assess the correlation of adrenomedullin concentrations with the presence and grade of severity of knee osteoarthritis (OA). MATERIAL AND METHODS We recruited 187 knee OA patients and 109 healthy subjects. The severity of OA was evaluated using the Kellgren-Lawrence grading system. RESULTS Compared with the control group, the knee OA group revealed markedly higher adrenomedullin concentrations. Serum and synovial fluid (SF) adrenomedullin concentrations increased with increased KL grades. CONCLUSIONS Serum and SF adrenomedullin concentrations show a correlation with the severity of knee OA. PMID:27495944

  20. Correlation of Adrenomedullin Concentrations with Knee Osteoarthritis Grade

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Linghua; Huang, Ruokun; Ma, Dezhang; Cheng, Wenjun; Feng, Wei; Xing, Danmou; Kan, Wusheng; Xiao, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    Background Adrenomedullin, a recently identified myokine, has an anti-inflammatory effect. Therefore, we aimed to assess the correlation of adrenomedullin concentrations with the presence and grade of severity of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Material/Methods We recruited 187 knee OA patients and 109 healthy subjects. The severity of OA was evaluated using the Kellgren-Lawrence grading system. Results Compared with the control group, the knee OA group revealed markedly higher adrenomedullin concentrations. Serum and synovial fluid (SF) adrenomedullin concentrations increased with increased KL grades. Conclusions Serum and SF adrenomedullin concentrations show a correlation with the severity of knee OA. PMID:27495944

  1. Mouse models of osteoarthritis: modelling risk factors and assessing outcomes.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hang; Beier, Frank

    2014-07-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent musculoskeletal disease that results in pain and low quality of life for patients, as well as enormous medical and socioeconomic burdens. The molecular mechanisms responsible for the initiation and progression of OA are still poorly understood. As such, mouse models of the disease are having increasingly important roles in OA research owing to the advancements of microsurgical techniques and the use of genetically modified mice, as well as the development of novel assessment tools. In this Review, we discuss available mouse models of OA and applicable assessment tools in studies of experimental OA. PMID:24662645

  2. Managing osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kodadek, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative disease that affects 27 million American women. All body joints can be affected. OA is more prevalent in women than men. Most women, with a diagnosis of OA report discomfort in the knee, hip, back and wrist joints. The discomforts of OA can be managed with life style changes before over the counter medications are introduced. Surgical interventions should be considered as the last treatment choice. Once a medication choice has been introduced, nurses can review methods to women that will improve their ability to continue activities of daily living and decrease the impact of the discomforts of OA. Nurses can be instrumental in the management of OA by providing education about different intervention choices for the management of OA symptoms. PMID:25690818

  3. Managing Osteoarthritis and Other Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain Disorders.

    PubMed

    Dubin, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common problem in society and can lead to significant disability and impairment of a patient's capacity to perform activities of daily living. The focus of this article is various treatment options for the management of OA, with emphasis on conservative management. The emphasis is on the role of exercise, pharmacology, intra-articular joint injections, and bracing options in the management of OA. PMID:26614724

  4. Three-Year Follow-up of Conservative Treatments of Shoulder Osteoarthritis in Older Patients.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiong Jiong; Wu, Kailun; Guan, Huaqing; Zhang, Lei; Ji, Cheng; Yang, Huilin; Tang, Tiansi

    2016-07-01

    Little is known about the mid-term results of nonsurgical treatment for shoulder osteoarthritis (OA), especially in a Chinese population. This study sought to determine the efficacy of nonsurgical management in older patients with shoulder OA. A total of 129 conservatively treated unilateral shoulder OA patients who were older than 65 years were evaluated prospectively at the initial office visit and then subsequently at 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 months later. During the 36-month follow-up period, all patients could receive conventional therapy, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication, corticosteroid injection, sodium hyaluronate, and education, at the discretion of treating physicians. Some patients received physiotherapy, rehabilitation training, and a shoulder strap to improve the range of motion and muscular strength training from a physical therapist. Parameters measured included comparative effectiveness of each therapeutic method, visual analog scale (VAS), Simple Shoulder Test (SST), and Short Form (36) Health Survey (SF-36) scores. At 3-year follow-up, most patients had a significant increase from their pretreatment values in pain, self-assessed shoulder function, mental health, and 5 of 8 SF-36 domains. The study showed a decline in SST and VAS at 6 and 12 months after an initial ascent at 3 months, and then it was rescued and continued at 3-year follow-up. Combined therapy could improve symptoms significantly. This study suggests that a conservative approach may be more appropriate and can produce satisfactory mid-term outcomes in selected cases. The findings of this study suggest that conservative treatments should be extended for longer than 12 months before the decision regarding shoulder arthroplasty is made. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):e634-e641.]. PMID:27286050

  5. Relationship between Knee Alignment and T1rho Values of Articular Cartilage and Menisci in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ligong; Vieira, Renata La Rocca; Rybak, Leon D.; Babb, James S.; Chang, Gregory; Krasnokutsky, Svetlana; Abramson, Steven; Regatte, Ravinder

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the relationship between knee alignment and subregional T1rho values of the femorotibial cartilage and menisci in patients with mild (Kellgren-Lawrence grade 1) to moderate (KL3) osteoarthritis (OA) at 3T. Materials and methods 26 subjects with a clinical diagnosis of KL1-3 OA were included and subdivided into three subgroups: varus, valgus, and neutral. All subjects were evaluated on a 3T MR scanner. Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon signed rank tests were performed to determine any statistically significant differences in subregional T1rho values of femorotibial cartilage and menisci among the three subgroups of KL1-3 OA patients. Results Medial femoral anterior cartilage subregion in varus group had significantly higher (p < 0.05) T1rho values than all cartilage subregions in valgus group. Medial tibial central cartilage subregion had significantly higher T1rho values (p < 0.05) than lateral tibial central cartilage subregion in varus group. The posterior horn of the medial meniscus in neutral group had significantly higher T1rho values (p < 0.0029) than all meniscus subregions in valgus group. Conclusion There exists some degree of association between knee alignment and subregional T1rho values of femorotibial cartilage and menisci in patients with clinical OA. PMID:23769189

  6. Platelet-Rich Plasma Treatment in Symptomatic Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gobbi, Alberto; Karnatzikos, Georgios; Mahajan, Vivek; Malchira, Somanna

    2012-01-01

    Background: With increasing frequency, platelet-rich plasma (PRP) preparations have been used to treat cartilage lesions to regenerate tissue homeostasis and retard the progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of intra-articular PRP injections in active patients with knee OA and to evaluate clinical outcomes in patients with and without previous surgical treatment for cartilage lesions. Study Design: Case series. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients with knee OA were followed for a minimum of 12 months. All were treated with 2 intra-articular injections of autologous PRP. Twenty-five patients had undergone a previous operative intervention for cartilage lesions, whereas 25 had not. Operated patients had undergone either cartilage shaving or microfracture. Multiple evaluative scores were collected at pretreatment and at 6 and 12 months posttreatment. The required sample of patients was determined beforehand by using statistical power analysis; International Knee Documentation Committee (subjective) score was defined as the primary parameter. A P value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. General linear model–repeated measure test evaluated within-time improvement for each variable for all patients. Post hoc test with Bonferroni adjustment for multiple comparisons was performed to investigate the significance in improvement within time evaluations for each variable for the total sample. The differences in improvement between operated and nonoperated patients were also investigated, as were those between sexes. Results: All patients showed significant improvement in all scores at 6 and 12 months (P < 0.01) and returned to previous activities. No significant difference in improvement was found between the evaluated subgroups (P < 0.01). Conclusions: The PRP treatment showed positive effects in patients with knee OA. Operated and nonoperated patients showed significant improvement by means of diminishing

  7. Detection of calcium phosphate crystals in the joint fluid of patients with osteoarthritis – analytical approaches and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Yavorskyy, Alexander; Hernandez-Santana, Aaron; McCarthy, Geraldine

    2008-01-01

    Clinically, osteoarthritis (OA) is characterised by joint pain, stiffness after immobility, limitation of movement and, in many cases, the presence of basic calcium phosphate (BCP) crystals in the joint fluid. The detection of BCP crystals in the synovial fluid of patients with OA is fraught with challenges due to the submicroscopic size of BCP, the complex nature of the matrix in which they are found and the fact that other crystals can co-exist with them in cases of mixed pathology. Routine analysis of joint crystals still relies almost exclusively on the use of optical microscopy, which has limited applicability for BCP crystal identification due to limited resolution and the inherent subjectivity of the technique. The purpose of this Critical Review is to present an overview of some of the main analytical tools employed in the detection of BCP to date and the potential of emerging technologies such as atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman microspectroscopy for this purpose. PMID:18299743

  8. Expression of adhesion molecules on synovial fluid and peripheral blood monocytes in patients with inflammatory joint disease and osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Koller, M; Aringer, M; Kiener, H; Erlacher, L; Machold, K; Eberl, G; Studnicka-Benke, A; Graninger, W; Smolen, J

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine the presence of adhesion molecules on monocytes/macrophages (Mϕ) from peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and inflammatory joint diseases (rheumatoid (RA) and reactive arthritis (ReA)) in order to improve our understanding of the possible mechanisms underlying the inflammatory process.
METHODS—Whole blood and SF cells were stained with monoclonal antibodies against CD11a (LFA-1), CD15 s (sialyl-Lewis X), CD44, CD54, VLA-4, and HLA-DR counterstained with anti-CD14 antibodies as a Mϕ marker for dual fluorescence analysis by flowcytometry. 
RESULTS—On PB-Mϕ, CD15s was markedly increased in both RA as well as ReA compared with OA. Furthermore, in the PB LFA-1, CD44, and HLA-DR showed a higher surface density on Mϕ in ReA than in OA. Comparison between SF and PB showed significantly higher CD44 and CD54 expression on SF-Mϕ. These molecules play an important part in lymphocyte-Mϕ interaction.
CONCLUSION—In PB from patients with inflammatory joint diseases, Mϕ are activated, allowing recruitment into the synovial compartment. These disorders, in contrast with OA seem to be "systemic" in nature. Within the SF, different adhesion molecules are expressed on CD14+ Mϕ as compared with PB.

 PMID:10531076

  9. Combined lateral retinacular release with drilling chondroplasty for treatment of patellofemoral osteoarthritis associated with patellar malalignment in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chi-Chuan

    2011-01-01

    This paper described a less invasive surgical technique that was performed for treatment of elderly patients with isolated patellofemoral (PF) osteoarthritis (OA) associated with patellar malalignment, although their tibiofemoral joints are minimally osteoarthritic. Two hundred and thirty-four knees in 126 consecutive elderly patients (average, 72 yrs) diagnosed with combined disorders were treated by lateral retinacular release with drilling chondroplasty. The inclusion criteria were patient age ≥ 65 yrs, isolated stage 2 or 3 PF-OA (modified Iwano staging by radiology), and a laterally subluxed patella shown on a Merchant's axial radiograph. Outcome was judged by three parameters: clinical PF function (modified Kujala scoring), congruence angle, and PF-OA staging. Two hundred and one knees in 107 patients were followed-up for an average of 4.2 yrs (range, 2.1-7.5 yrs) and 19 patients were lost to follow-up. No surgical complications occurred through the course of treatment. Clinical PF function improved in knees that showed unsatisfactory performance (modified Kujala scoring < 32) preoperatively, with 78.1% of the knees showing satisfactory performance (modified Kujala scoring ≥ 32) at the latest follow-up. Congruence angle improved in 85.6% of the knees and PF-OA staging improved in 77.1% of the knees. Combined lateral retinacular release with drilling chondroplasty is a feasible alternative for treatment of PF-OA associated with patellar malalignment in elderly patients where knee arthroplasty cannot be performed by various reasons. Advantages of this combined surgical technique include a less invasive procedure, minimal complication rate, and an acceptable success rate (78%, modified Kujala scoring≥32). PMID:20171107

  10. The efficacy and safety of low-dose radiotherapy on pain and functioning in patients with osteoarthritis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Minten, M J M; Mahler, E; den Broeder, A A; Leer, J W H; van den Ende, C H

    2016-01-01

    Low-dose radiotherapy (LD-RT) has been widely used for treatment of non-malignant disorders since its introduction and animal studies show anti-inflammatory effects in osteoarthritis (OA). However, the evidence for its effect in clinical practice remains unclear. Therefore, the aim of this study is to systematically summarise the literature on effectiveness of LD-RT on pain and functioning in patients with OA and its safety. Broad search terms were used to search PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science. Primary inclusion criteria were osteoarthritis as indication, radiotherapy as intervention, written in English, German or Dutch and published since 1980. Study quality was assessed using the EPHPP Quality Assessment Tool for Quantitative Studies (scale: strong, moderate, weak). Seven studies were suitable for inclusion, all with retrospective uncontrolled observational design. Methodological quality of all studies was judged as weak. Most studies used 2-3 RT sessions per week for 2 weeks, some with booster session after 6 weeks. Generally, non-validated single-item measurement instruments were used to evaluate the effect of LD-RT on pain and function. Across the studies, in 25-90 and 29-71 % of the patients pain and functioning improved, respectively. Side effects were described in one study, none were reported. Our results show that there is insufficient evidence for efficacy or to confirm the safety of LD-RT in treatment of OA, due to absence of high-quality studies. Therefore, a well-designed, sham-controlled and blinded randomised trial, using validated outcome measures is warranted to demonstrate the value of LD-RT for OA in clinical practice. PMID:26747050

  11. Body Composition in Individuals with Asymptomatic Osteoarthritis of the Knee.

    PubMed

    Ho-Pham, Lan T; Lai, Thai Q; Mai, Linh D; Doan, Minh C; Nguyen, Tuan V

    2016-02-01

    Greater body mass index (BMI) is associated with a greater risk of osteoarthritis (OA). This study sought to investigate whether the association is mediated by fat mass or lean mass. The study involved 170 men and 488 women aged between 20 and 90 (average age: 55) who were randomly recruited from Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. The presence of knee OA was radiographically diagnosed based on the Kellgren-Lawrence criteria. Lean mass (LM) and fat mass (FM) were obtained from the DXA whole body scan (Hologic QDR-4500). The relationship between OA, LM, and FM was analyzed by a series of multiple linear regression models which take into account the effects of gender and age. As expected, men and women with knee OA were older than those without OA (65 vs 51 year in men, and 64 vs 52 year in women). After adjusting for age, OA was associated with greater FM and percent body fat (PBF), but the association was only observed in women, not in men. There was no statistically significant difference in LM between OA and non-OA individuals. Moreover, after adjusting for age and BMI or PBF, bone density in OA patients was not significantly different from non-OA individuals. Women with OA of the knee have greater fat mass than non-OA individuals, and that there is no significant difference in bone density between OA and non-OA individuals. Thus, the association between body mass index and OA is mainly mediated by fat mass. PMID:26590808

  12. Pulsatile dry cupping in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee – a randomized controlled exploratory trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Cupping is used in various traditional medicine forms to relieve pain in musculoskeletal diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of cupping in relieving the symptoms of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods In a two-group, randomized controlled exploratory pilot study patients with a clinically and radiological confirmed knee OA (Kellgren-Lawrence Grading Scale: 2-4) and a pain intensity > 40 mm on a 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS) were included. 40 Patients were randomized to either 8 sessions of pulsatile dry cupping within 4 weeks or no intervention (control). Paracetamol was allowed on demand for both groups. Outcomes were the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) score, the pain intensity on a VAS (0 mm = no pain to 100 mm = maximum intensity) and Quality of Life (SF-36) 4 and 12 weeks after randomization. Use of Paracetamol was documented within the 4-week treatment period. Analyses were performed by analysis of covariance adjusting for the baseline value for each outcome. Results 21 patients were allocated to the cupping group (5 male; mean age 68 ± SD 7.2) and 19 to the control group (8 male; 69 ± 6.8). After 4 weeks the WOMAC global score improved significantly more in the cupping group with a mean of 27.7 (95% confidence interval 22.1; 33.3) compared to 42.2 (36.3; 48.1) in the control group (p = 0.001). After 12 weeks the WOMAC global score were still significantly different in favor for cupping (31.0 (24.9; 37.2) vs. 40.8 (34.4; 47.3) p = 0.032), however the WOMAC subscores for pain and stiffness were not significant anymore. Significantly better outcomes in the cupping group were also observed for pain intensity on VAS and for the SF-36 Physical Component Scale compared to the control group after 4 and 12 weeks. No significant difference was observed for the SF-36 Mental Component Scale and the total number of consumed Paracetamol tablets

  13. Inflammation (or synovitis)-driven osteoarthritis: an opportunity for personalizing prognosis and treatment?

    PubMed

    Siebuhr, A S; Bay-Jensen, A C; Jordan, J M; Kjelgaard-Petersen, C F; Christiansen, C; Abramson, S B; Attur, M; Berenbaum, F; Kraus, V; Karsdal, M A

    2016-03-01

    The disabling and painful disease osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis. Strong evidence suggests that a subpopulation of OA patients has a form of OA driven by inflammation. Consequently, understanding when inflammation is the driver of disease progression and which OA patients might benefit from anti-inflammatory treatment is a topic of intense research in the OA field. We have reviewed the current literature on OA, with an emphasis on inflammation in OA, biochemical markers of structural damage, and anti-inflammatory treatments for OA. The literature suggests that the OA patient population is diverse, consisting of several subpopulations, including one associated with inflammation. This inflammatory subpopulation may be identified by a combination of novel serological inflammatory biomarkers. Preliminary evidence from small clinical studies suggests that this subpopulation may benefit from anti-inflammatory treatment currently reserved for other inflammatory arthritides. PMID:26484849

  14. Lower expression of histamine H₄ receptor in synovial tissues from patients with rheumatoid arthritis compared to those with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Yamaura, Katsunori; Oda, Manabu; Suzuki, Masahiko; Ueno, Koichi

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the expression level of histamine H(4) receptor (H(4)R) mRNA in synovial tissues of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA) patients, and to study correlation of results with clinical characteristics of patients with RA. Synovial tissues were obtained from 7 RA and 7 OA patients undergoing artificial arthroplasty. Serum levels of erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), rheumatoid factors, and cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies were determined. The expression of H(4)R mRNA in synovial tissues was determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Expression of H(1)R and H(4)R mRNA were significantly lower in RA compared with OA patients (P < 0.005), while expression of H(2)R mRNA was comparable in both. While a significant negative correlation was found between H(4)R expression and serum MMP-3 concentration (r = -0.70, P < 0.05), no correlation was found between MMP-3 and H(1)R (r = -0.52) or H(2)R (r = 0.23). This study supports the supposition that H(4)R in synovial tissue may play a role in cartilage and bone destruction by influencing the secretion of MMP-3 in patients with RA. PMID:21881994

  15. Prescription patterns and appropriateness of NSAID therapy according to gastrointestinal risk and cardiovascular history in patients with diagnoses of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Prescription of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) should be based on the assessment of both gastrointestinal (GI) and cardiovascular (CV) risk for the individual patient. We aimed to assess the GI/CV risk profile and the pharmacological management of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) in clinical practice. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional, multicentre, observational study of consecutive OA patients that visited 1,760 doctors throughout the Spanish National Health System (NHS) in a single day. The presence of GI risk factors, CV histories, hypertension and current pharmacological treatments was recorded. Results Of the 60,868 patients, 17,105 had a diagnosis of OA and were evaluable. The majority (93.4%) had more than one GI risk factor and 60.3% were defined to be at high-GI risk. Thirty-two percent had a history of CV events, 57.6% were treated with anti-hypertensive therapy and 22.6% had uncontrolled hypertension. One-fifth of patients were treated with non-NSAID therapies, whereas the remaining patients received NSAIDs. Non-selective NSAIDs (nsNSAID) plus proton pump inhibitor (PPI) or cyclooxigenase-2 (COX-2)-selective NSAIDs alone were more frequently prescribed in patients at increased GI risk. Patients with a positive CV history received nsNSAIDs or COX-2-selective NSAIDs in 41.3% and 31.7% of cases, respectively. When both the GI and CV histories were combined, 51% of the overall population was being prescribed drugs that were either not recommended or contraindicated. Conclusions Over 90% of patients with OA are at increased GI and/or CV risk. In over half of these patients, the prescription of NSAIDs was not in accordance with current guidelines or recommendations made by regulatory agencies. PMID:21489310

  16. Comparison of therapeutic duration of therapeutic ultrasound in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Yıldırıım, Mustafa Aziz; Uçar, Demet; Öneş, Kadriye

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] The aim of study was to compare different durations of ultrasound in patients with knee osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] One hundred patients diagnosed with bilateral knee osteoarthritis (OA) were enrolled in this study. Patients were divided into two groups. The first group (G1) received 4 minutes of ultrasound. The second group (G2) received the exact same treatment, but the duration of ultrasound was longer at 8 minutes. Patients in both groups underwent a total of 10 ultrasound over 2 weeks. Following treatment, all patients provided self-evaluations of pain via the Visual Analog Scale (VAS), overall physical function with WOMAC, disability via the Lequesne index (Leq), and depressive symptoms with the Beck Depression Index (BDI). [Results] There were no significant differences in VAS, WOMAC Leq, and BDI values between groups 1 and 2. After treatment, VAS, WOMAC, Leq, and BDI values improved for both treatment groups. However, following treatment, G2 had significantly greater values for WOMAC functional and total scores than G1. No statistically significant differences were observed for VAS scores while inactive, WOMAC pain and stiffness scores, and BDI values after treatment between both groups. VAS pain scores while active and Leq index values were significantly lower in G1 than G2. [Conclusion] Patients in both groups demonstrated improved functionality, pain and psychological status following a consistent, 2-week regimen of 4-minute or 8-minute treatments with ultrasound. Yet, patients that experienced longer treatment durations of 8 minutes demonstrated better outcomes in pain and the ability to carry out activities of daily living. PMID:26834328

  17. Comparison of therapeutic duration of therapeutic ultrasound in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Yıldırıım, Mustafa Aziz; Uçar, Demet; Öneş, Kadriye

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of study was to compare different durations of ultrasound in patients with knee osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] One hundred patients diagnosed with bilateral knee osteoarthritis (OA) were enrolled in this study. Patients were divided into two groups. The first group (G1) received 4 minutes of ultrasound. The second group (G2) received the exact same treatment, but the duration of ultrasound was longer at 8 minutes. Patients in both groups underwent a total of 10 ultrasound over 2 weeks. Following treatment, all patients provided self-evaluations of pain via the Visual Analog Scale (VAS), overall physical function with WOMAC, disability via the Lequesne index (Leq), and depressive symptoms with the Beck Depression Index (BDI). [Results] There were no significant differences in VAS, WOMAC Leq, and BDI values between groups 1 and 2. After treatment, VAS, WOMAC, Leq, and BDI values improved for both treatment groups. However, following treatment, G2 had significantly greater values for WOMAC functional and total scores than G1. No statistically significant differences were observed for VAS scores while inactive, WOMAC pain and stiffness scores, and BDI values after treatment between both groups. VAS pain scores while active and Leq index values were significantly lower in G1 than G2. [Conclusion] Patients in both groups demonstrated improved functionality, pain and psychological status following a consistent, 2-week regimen of 4-minute or 8-minute treatments with ultrasound. Yet, patients that experienced longer treatment durations of 8 minutes demonstrated better outcomes in pain and the ability to carry out activities of daily living. PMID:26834328

  18. Mosaic chromosomal aberrations in synovial fibroblasts of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and other inflammatory joint diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kinne, Raimund W; Liehr, Thomas; Beensen, Volkmar; Kunisch, Elke; Zimmermann, Thomas; Holland, Heidrun; Pfeiffer, Robert; Stahl, Hans-Detlev; Lungershausen, Wolfgang; Hein, Gert; Roth, Andreas; Emmrich, Frank; Claussen, Uwe; Froster, Ursula G

    2001-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations were comparatively assessed in nuclei extracted from synovial tissue, primary-culture (P-0) synovial cells, and early-passage synovial fibroblasts (SFB; 98% enrichment; P-1, P-4 [passage 1, passage 4]) from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA; n = 21), osteoarthritis (OA; n = 24), and other rheumatic diseases. Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and skin fibroblasts (FB) (P-1, P-4) from the same patients, as well as SFB from normal joints and patients with joint trauma (JT) (n = 4), were used as controls. Analyses proceeded by standard GTG-banding and interphase centromere fluorescence in situ hybridization. Structural chromosomal aberrations were observed in SFB (P-1 or P-4) from 4 of 21 RA patients (19%), with involvement of chromosome 1 [e.g. del(1)(q12)] in 3 of 4 cases. In 10 of the 21 RA cases (48%), polysomy 7 was observed in P-1 SFB. In addition, aneusomies of chromosomes 4, 6, 8, 9, 12, 18, and Y were present. The percentage of polysomies was increased in P-4. Similar chromosomal aberrations were detected in SFB of OA and spondylarthropathy patients. No aberrations were detected in i) PBL or skin FB from the same patients (except for one OA patient with a karyotype 45,X[10]/46,XX[17] in PBL and variable polysomies in long-term culture skin FB); or ii) synovial tissue and/or P-1 SFB of normal joints or of patients with joint trauma. In conclusion, qualitatively comparable chromosomal aberrations were observed in synovial tissue and early-passage SFB of patients with RA, OA, and other inflammatory joint diseases. Thus, although of possible functional relevance for the pathologic role of SFB in RA, these alterations probably reflect a common response to chronic inflammatory stress in rheumatic diseases. PMID:11549374

  19. Effects of isometric exercise using biofeedback on maximum voluntary isometric contraction, pain, and muscle thickness in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun Lak; Kim, Bo Kyung; Hwang, Yong Pil; Moon, Ok Kon; Choi, Wan Suk

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of our study was to investigate the effects of isometric exercises using electromyographic biofeedback (EMGBF) and ultrasound biofeedback (USBF) on maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC), pain assessed by the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), and vastus medialis oblique (VMO) thickness in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). [Subjects and Methods] Thirty females over 65 years of age who had been diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis were recruited and randomly assigned to three groups, each comprising of 10 subjects. The Subjects in the EMGBF training and USBF training groups were trained with the corresponding physical training exercise program targeting the vastus medialis oblique, whereas the subjects in the control group were treated with conventional physical therapies, such as a hot pack, ultrasound, and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. Subjects in each group were trained or treated for 20 min, 3 times a week for 8 weeks. [Results] The MVIC in the EMGBF and USBF training groups was significantly increased compared with that in the control group, and the VAS score (for measurement of pain) in the EMGBF and USBF training groups was significantly decreased compared with that in the control group. Only the EMGBF training group showed a significantly increased VMO thickness compared with before training. [Conclusion] These results suggest that USBF training is similar to EMGBF training in terms of its effectiveness and is helpful for treating patients with knee OA. PMID:25642061

  20. Proliferative re-modeling of the spatial organization of human superficial chondrocytes distant to focal early osteoarthritis (OA)

    PubMed Central

    Rolauffs, Bernd; Williams, James M.; Aurich, Matthias; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Kuettner, Klaus E.; Cole, Ada A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Human superficial chondrocytes show distinct spatial organizations whereas they commonly aggregate near osteoarthritic (OA) fissures. It is not known whether remodeling or destruction of the spatial chondrocyte organization may occur distant to focal (early) OA lesions. Methods The intact cartilages (condyles, patellofemoral groove, proximal tibia) distant to focal OA lesions of human grade 2 joints were compared to location-matched non-degenerative (grade 0–1) cartilages. Chondrocyte nuclei were stained with propidium iodide and recorded by fluorescence-microscopy in a top-down view. Chondrocyte arrangements were tested for randomness or significant grouping via point pattern analyses (Clark and Evans Aggregation Index), and were correlated with OA grade and surface cell densities. Results In grade 2 cartilages, superficial chondrocytes were situated in horizontal patterns such as strings, cluster, pairs and singles comparable to non-degenerative cartilage. In the intact cartilages of grade 2 joints, the spatial organization included a novel pattern, consisting of chondrocytes that were aligned in two parallel lines building double strings. These double strings correlated with an increased number of chondrocytes per group (p<0.05), increased corresponding superficial zone cell density (p<0.001), and were observed in all grade 2 condyles (p<0.001), some grade 2 tibiae (p<0.05) but never in grade 0–1 cartilage (p<0.001). Conclusion The present study is the first to identify a distinct spatial re-organization of human superficial chondrocytes in response to distant early OA lesions and suggests that proliferation had occurred distant to focal early OA. This spatial re-organization may serve to recruit metabolically active units as attempt to repair focal damage. PMID:20112377

  1. Correlation between Gene Expression and Osteoarthritis Progression in Human.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Leilei; Huang, Xiaobin; Karperien, Marcel; Post, Janine N

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a multifactorial disease characterized by gradual degradation of joint cartilage. This study aimed to quantify major pathogenetic factors during OA progression in human cartilage. Cartilage specimens were isolated from OA patients and scored 0-5 according to the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) guidelines. Protein and gene expressions were measured by immunohistochemistry and qPCR, respectively. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays were used to detect apoptotic cells. Cartilage degeneration in OA is a gradual progress accompanied with gradual loss of collagen type II and a gradual decrease in mRNA expression of SOX9, ACAN and COL2A1. Expression of WNT antagonists DKK1 and FRZB was lost, while hypertrophic markers (RUNX2, COL10A1 and IHH) increased during OA progression. Moreover, DKK1 and FRZB negatively correlated with OA grading, while RUNX2 and IHH showed a significantly positive correlation with OA grading. The number of apoptotic cells was increased with the severity of OA. Taken together, our results suggested that genetic profiling of the gene expression could be used as markers for staging OA at the molecular level. This helps to understand the molecular pathology of OA and may lead to the development of therapies based on OA stage. PMID:27428952

  2. Correlation between Gene Expression and Osteoarthritis Progression in Human

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Leilei; Huang, Xiaobin; Karperien, Marcel; Post, Janine N.

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a multifactorial disease characterized by gradual degradation of joint cartilage. This study aimed to quantify major pathogenetic factors during OA progression in human cartilage. Cartilage specimens were isolated from OA patients and scored 0–5 according to the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) guidelines. Protein and gene expressions were measured by immunohistochemistry and qPCR, respectively. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays were used to detect apoptotic cells. Cartilage degeneration in OA is a gradual progress accompanied with gradual loss of collagen type II and a gradual decrease in mRNA expression of SOX9, ACAN and COL2A1. Expression of WNT antagonists DKK1 and FRZB was lost, while hypertrophic markers (RUNX2, COL10A1 and IHH) increased during OA progression. Moreover, DKK1 and FRZB negatively correlated with OA grading, while RUNX2 and IHH showed a significantly positive correlation with OA grading. The number of apoptotic cells was increased with the severity of OA. Taken together, our results suggested that genetic profiling of the gene expression could be used as markers for staging OA at the molecular level. This helps to understand the molecular pathology of OA and may lead to the development of therapies based on OA stage. PMID:27428952

  3. Dynamic Frequency Analyses of Lower Extremity Muscles during Sit-To-Stand Motion for the Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kentaro; Yagi, Masahide

    2016-01-01

    Objective Muscle activities during the sit-to-stand motion (STS) are characterized by coordinated movements between hip extensors and knee extensors. However, previous reports regarding the STS and lower extremity muscle activities have focused on some quantitative assessment, but little qualitative research. This study aimed to examine the muscle activities of the lower extremity both quantitatively and qualitatively. Methods Study participants included 13 patients with knee osteoarthritis (knee OA) and 11 age-matched asymptomatic controls. The task was STS from a chair with a height-adjustable seat. EMG activities were acquired using surface electromyogram. The root mean square signals normalized as a percentage of maximum voluntary isometric contraction values (RMS%MVC) and the mean power frequency (MPF) were calculated. Results During STS, knee OA patients had increased RMS%MVC of the vastus medialis and raised MPF of the rectus femoris before buttocks-off. Conclusion These findings suggest that STS of knee OA patients not only increased relative muscle activity of the vastus medialis, but also enlisted the rectus femoris in knee extension to improve muscle contraction force by activating more type II fibers to accomplish buttocks-off. PMID:26807578

  4. Identification of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis patients by transcriptome-based rule set generation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Discrimination of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients from patients with other inflammatory or degenerative joint diseases or healthy individuals purely on the basis of genes differentially expressed in high-throughput data has proven very difficult. Thus, the present study sought to achieve such discrimination by employing a novel unbiased approach using rule-based classifiers. Methods Three multi-center genome-wide transcriptomic data sets (Affymetrix HG-U133 A/B) from a total of 79 individuals, including 20 healthy controls (control group - CG), as well as 26 osteoarthritis (OA) and 33 RA patients, were used to infer rule-based classifiers to discriminate the disease groups. The rules were ranked with respect to Kiendl’s statistical relevance index, and the resulting rule set was optimized by pruning. The rule sets were inferred separately from data of one of three centers and applied to the two remaining centers for validation. All rules from the optimized rule sets of all centers were used to analyze their biological relevance applying the software Pathway Studio. Results The optimized rule sets for the three centers contained a total of 29, 20, and 8 rules (including 10, 8, and 4 rules for ‘RA’), respectively. The mean sensitivity for the prediction of RA based on six center-to-center tests was 96% (range 90% to 100%), that for OA 86% (range 40% to 100%). The mean specificity for RA prediction was 94% (range 80% to 100%), that for OA 96% (range 83.3% to 100%). The average overall accuracy of the three different rule-based classifiers was 91% (range 80% to 100%). Unbiased analyses by Pathway Studio of the gene sets obtained by discrimination of RA from OA and CG with rule-based classifiers resulted in the identification of the pathogenetically and/or therapeutically relevant interferon-gamma and GM-CSF pathways. Conclusion First-time application of rule-based classifiers for the discrimination of RA resulted in high performance, with means

  5. Efficacy of balneotherapy on pain, function and quality of life in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fioravanti, Antonella; Giannitti, Chiara; Bellisai, Barbara; Iacoponi, Francesca; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2012-07-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate whether balneotherapy with mineral sulphate-bicarbonate-calcium water could determine substantial symptomatic improvement, and to detect any changes in the quality of life (QoL) of patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA). This was a prospective randomized, single blind controlled trial. Sixty outpatients with primary bilateral knee OA, according to ACR criteria, were included in the study and randomized to one of two groups: group I (30 patients) was treated with a daily sulphate-bicarbonate-calcium mineral water bath; group II (30 patients), the control group, continued their regular outpatient care routine. At baseline, after 15 days and after 12 weeks, patients were evaluated by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for spontaneous pain, Lequesne and Womac Index for gonarthrosis, SF-36, Arthritis Impact Measurement Scale (AIMS) and symptomatic drugs consumption. We observed a significant improvement of all parameters at the end of the cycle of balneotherapy which persisted throughout the follow-up period, whereas in the control group no significant differences were noted. This symptomatic effect was confirmed by the significant reduction of symptomatic drugs consumption. The differences between the two groups were significant for all considered parameters already from the 15th day and persisted during follow-up. Tolerability of balneotherapy seemed to be good, with light and transitory side effects. Our results confirm that the beneficial effects of balneotherapy in patients with knee OA last over time, with positive effects on the painful symptomatology, a significant improvement on functional capacities and QoL. Balneotherapy can represent a useful backup to pharmacological treatment of knee OA or a valid alternative for patients who do not tolerate pharmacological treatments.

  6. Osteoarthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Read More Ankle replacement Arthritis Chronic Elbow replacement Hip joint replacement Knee joint replacement Knee microfracture surgery Overweight Shoulder arthroscopy Shoulder replacement Spinal fusion Systemic Patient ... replacement - discharge Elbow replacement - discharge Hip or knee replacement - after - what to ask your ...

  7. Patient-reported adherence to coprescribed proton pump inhibitor gastroprotection in osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis patients using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    PubMed Central

    Henriksson, Kenneth; From, Jesper; Stratelis, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with osteoarthritis (OA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), or ankylosing spondylitis (AS) are commonly treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), sometimes with a concomitant gastroprotective proton pump inhibitor (PPI). The present study examines real-life patient adherence to PPIs when coprescribed with NSAIDs. Methods This retrospective medical record survey identified patients diagnosed with OA, RA, or AS who had PPIs coprescribed with NSAIDs for prevention of NSAID-associated gastrointestinal ulcers. Actual NSAID and PPI intake was retrospectively recorded using a self-reported questionnaire. Adherence to PPI treatment was assessed using descriptive statistics. Results In total, 96 patients (69% female, mean age 67 years, 72% OA, 16% RA, 12% AS) were included. The mean patient-reported adherence to coprescribed PPIs was 73%–81%. The percentage of patients with a self-reported adherence of ≤80% was 26%. No predictive factors for low adherence could be identified. Conclusion Despite doctors’ instructions to use PPIs concomitantly with NSAIDs, the mean patient-reported adherence to coprescribed PPIs in this population indicates a risk of a “gastroprotective treatment gap”. The patients’ adherence to gastroprotective PPIs for the prevention of NSAID-associated upper gastrointestinal ulcers can be improved. PMID:25429206

  8. Nutraceuticals for the treatment of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Olsen, N J

    2011-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a highly prevalent human condition which is becoming an even greater health problem in an aging global population. Existing treatments for OA provide pain relief and some anti-inflammatory effects, but no truly disease-modifying treatments are available for this disease. Furthermore, the generally advanced age and frequent comorbid conditions present in OA patients limit safety of many available drugs. Treatments with enhanced safety margins and that offer chondroprotective effects are unmet needs. Nutraceuticals derived from foods and herbs have been long used in traditional medicine, and many have wide-ranging biologic effects suggesting novel mechanisms of action. Some of these have shown promise in controlled clinical trials in OA patients. Whether these approaches could offer safe symptom relief and possibly mediate beneficial joint remodeling in early OA are possibilities that merit further investigation. PMID:21317847

  9. An economic model of long-term use of celecoxib in patients with osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Loyd, Michael; Rublee, Dale; Jacobs, Philip

    2007-01-01

    Background Previous evaluations of the cost-effectiveness of the cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitor celecoxib (Celebrex, Pfizer Inc, USA) have produced conflicting results. The recent controversy over the cardiovascular (CV) risks of rofecoxib and other coxibs has renewed interest in the economic profile of celecoxib, the only coxib now available in the United States. The objective of our study was to evaluate the long-term cost-effectiveness of celecoxib compared with nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (nsNSAIDs) in a population of 60-year-old osteoarthritis (OA) patients with average risks of upper gastrointestinal (UGI) complications who require chronic daily NSAID therapy. Methods We used decision analysis based on data from the literature to evaluate cost-effectiveness from a modified societal perspective over patients' lifetimes, with outcomes expressed as incremental costs per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained. Sensitivity tests were performed to evaluate the impacts of advancing age, CV thromboembolic event risk, different analytic horizons and alternate treatment strategies after UGI adverse events. Results Our main findings were: 1) the base model incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for celecoxib versus nsNSAIDs was $31,097 per QALY; 2) the ICER per QALY was $19,309 for a model in which UGI ulcer and ulcer complication event risks increased with advancing age; 3) the ICER per QALY was $17,120 in sensitivity analyses combining serious CV thromboembolic event (myocardial infarction, stroke, CV death) risks with base model assumptions. Conclusion Our model suggests that chronic celecoxib is cost-effective versus nsNSAIDs in a population of 60-year-old OA patients with average risks of UGI events. PMID:17610716

  10. The effects of physical therapeutic agents on serum levels of stress hormones in patients with osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Tönük, Şükrü Burak; Serin, Erdinc; Ayhan, Fikriye Figen; Yorgancioglu, Zeynep Rezan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the effects of physical agents on the levels of stress hormones in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, hot packs, and therapeutic ultrasound were applied to the lumbar region and knees of patients with OA. Blood samples were taken for the measurement of the serum levels of glucose, insulin (INS), growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), cortisol (COR), and plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) immediately before and after the 1st session, to investigate the acute effects of those physical agents on the endocrine system. The hormone levels were also measured every 5 sessions in a total of 10 sessions. The treatment response was also evaluated by using the visual analogue scale (VAS), Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ), and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) throughout the therapy period. After the 1st session, there was a decrease in INS levels and a mild decrease in PRL levels (P = 0.001 and P < 0.05, respectively). Throughout the 10-session therapy period, the INS levels increased, whereas the ACTH and COR levels decreased (P < 0.05 for all). The VAS-spine, RMDQ, VAS-knee, and WOMAC scores decreased (P = 0.001 for VAS-spine and P < 0.001 for all others). A positive correlation was detected between the changes in serum COR and WOMAC-pain score (P < 0.05). Although the combination therapy caused changes in INS level accompanied with steady glucose levels, the application of physical agents did not adversely affect the hormone levels. The decrease in ACTH and COR levels may be attributed to the analgesic effect of agents and may be an indicator of patient comfort through a central action. PMID:27583888

  11. The effects of physical therapeutic agents on serum levels of stress hormones in patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Tönük, Şükrü Burak; Serin, Erdinc; Ayhan, Fikriye Figen; Yorgancioglu, Zeynep Rezan

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the effects of physical agents on the levels of stress hormones in patients with osteoarthritis (OA).Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, hot packs, and therapeutic ultrasound were applied to the lumbar region and knees of patients with OA. Blood samples were taken for the measurement of the serum levels of glucose, insulin (INS), growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), cortisol (COR), and plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) immediately before and after the 1st session, to investigate the acute effects of those physical agents on the endocrine system. The hormone levels were also measured every 5 sessions in a total of 10 sessions. The treatment response was also evaluated by using the visual analogue scale (VAS), Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ), and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) throughout the therapy period.After the 1st session, there was a decrease in INS levels and a mild decrease in PRL levels (P = 0.001 and P < 0.05, respectively). Throughout the 10-session therapy period, the INS levels increased, whereas the ACTH and COR levels decreased (P < 0.05 for all). The VAS-spine, RMDQ, VAS-knee, and WOMAC scores decreased (P = 0.001 for VAS-spine and P < 0.001 for all others). A positive correlation was detected between the changes in serum COR and WOMAC-pain score (P < 0.05).Although the combination therapy caused changes in INS level accompanied with steady glucose levels, the application of physical agents did not adversely affect the hormone levels. The decrease in ACTH and COR levels may be attributed to the analgesic effect of agents and may be an indicator of patient comfort through a central action. PMID:27583888

  12. Widespread somatosensory sensitivity in naturally occurring canine model of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Knazovicky, David; Helgeson, Erika S; Case, Beth; Gruen, Margaret E; Maixner, William; Lascelles, B Duncan X

    2016-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA)-associated pain is a leading cause of disability. Central sensitization (CS), as a result of OA, is recognized as an important facet of human patients' chronic pain and has been measured in people using quantitative sensory testing (QST) testing. The spontaneous canine OA model has been suggested as a good translational model, but CS has not been explored in this model. In this study, QST was performed on dogs with and without spontaneous hip or stifle OA to determine whether OA is associated with CS in this model. Mechanical (von Frey and blunt pressure) and thermal (hot and cold) sensory thresholds obtained in dogs with chronic OA-associated pain (n = 31) were compared with those of normal dogs (n = 23). Dogs were phenotyped and joint-pain scored, and testing was performed at the OA-affected joint, cranial tibial muscle, and dorsal metatarsal region. QST summary data were evaluated using mixed-effect models to understand the influence of OA status and covariates, and dogs with OA and control dogs were compared. The presence of OA was strongly associated with hyperalgesia across all QST modalities at the index joint, cranial tibial muscle, and metatarsal site. Mechanical QST scores were significantly moderately negatively correlated with total joint-pain scores. The spontaneous canine OA model is associated with somatosensory sensitivity, likely indicative of CS. These data further validate the canine spontaneous OA model as an appropriate model of the human OA pain condition. PMID:26901805

  13. Widespread somatosensory sensitivity in naturally occurring canine model of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Knazovicky, David; Helgeson, Erika S.; Case, Beth; Gruen, Margaret E.; Maixner, William; Lascelles, B. Duncan X.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Osteoarthritis (OA)-associated pain is a leading cause of disability. Central sensitization (CS), as a result of OA, is recognized as an important facet of human patients' chronic pain and has been measured in people using quantitative sensory testing (QST) testing. The spontaneous canine OA model has been suggested as a good translational model, but CS has not been explored in this model. In this study, QST was performed on dogs with and without spontaneous hip or stifle OA to determine whether OA is associated with CS in this model. Mechanical (von Frey and blunt pressure) and thermal (hot and cold) sensory thresholds obtained in dogs with chronic OA-associated pain (n = 31) were compared with those of normal dogs (n = 23). Dogs were phenotyped and joint-pain scored, and testing was performed at the OA-affected joint, cranial tibial muscle, and dorsal metatarsal region. QST summary data were evaluated using mixed-effect models to understand the influence of OA status and covariates, and dogs with OA and control dogs were compared. The presence of OA was strongly associated with hyperalgesia across all QST modalities at the index joint, cranial tibial muscle, and metatarsal site. Mechanical QST scores were significantly moderately negatively correlated with total joint-pain scores. The spontaneous canine OA model is associated with somatosensory sensitivity, likely indicative of CS. These data further validate the canine spontaneous OA model as an appropriate model of the human OA pain condition. PMID:26901805

  14. Surgical Management of Osteoarthritis of the Knee: Evidence-based Guideline.

    PubMed

    McGrory, Brian J; Weber, Kristy L; Jevsevar, David S; Sevarino, Kaitlyn

    2016-08-01

    Surgical Management of Osteoarthritis of the Knee: Evidence-based Guideline is based on a systematic review of the current scientific and clinical research. The guideline contains 38 recommendations pertaining to the preoperative, perioperative, and postoperative care of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee who are considering surgical treatment. The purpose of this clinical practice guideline is to help improve surgical management of patients with OA of the knee based on current best evidence. In addition to guideline recommendations, the work group highlighted the need for better research on the surgical management of OA of the knee. PMID:27355286

  15. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid suppresses endoplasmic reticulum stress in the chondrocytes of patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Cao, Yongping; Yang, Xin; Shan, Pengcheng; Liu, Heng

    2015-10-01

    The main pathogenic events in osteoarthritis (OA) include loss and abnormal remodeling of cartilage extracellular matrix. The present study aimed to evaluate the protective effect of tauroursodeoxycholic acid on chondrocyte apoptosis induced by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Articular cartilage tissues were collected from 18 patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty and were analyzed histologically. Subsequently, chondrocyte apoptosis was assessed by TUNEL. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis were employed to evaluate gene and protein expression, respectively, of ER stress markers, including glucose‑regulated protein 78 (GRP78), growth arrest and DNA‑damage‑inducible gene 153 (GADD153) and caspase‑12 along with type II collagen. Chondrocytes obtained from osteoarthritis patients at different stages were cultured in three conditions including: No treatment (CON group), tunicamycin treatment to induce ER stress (ERS group) and tauroursodeoxycholic acid treatment after 4 h of tunicamycin (TDA group); and cell proliferation, apoptosis, function and ER stress level were assessed. Degradation of cartilage resulted in histological damage with more apoptotic cartilage cells observed. Of note, GRP78, GADD153 and caspase‑12 mRNA and protein expression increased gradually from grade I to III cartilage tissue, while type II collagen expression decreased. Tunicamycin induced ER stress, as shown by a high expression of ER stress markers, reduced cell proliferation, increased apoptosis and decreased synthesis of type II collagen. Notably, tauroursodeoxycholic acid treatment resulted in the improvement of tunicamycin‑induced ER stress. These results indicated that ER stress is highly involved in the tunicamycin‑induced apoptosis in chondrocytes, which can be prevented by tauroursodeoxycholic acid. PMID:26238983

  16. Osteoarthritis: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Kentaro; Utturkar, Amol; Chang, Eric; Panush, Richard; Hata, Justin; Perret-Karimi, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    Patients with osteoarthritis (OA) are faced with a barrage of treatment options, from recommendations from friends and social media to medications prescribed by the primary care physician. The purpose of this article is to critically review current approaches to generalized or monoarticular OA based on available evidence and to illustrate multidisciplinary and multimodal treatment strategies for the management of OA. Treatment options assessed for efficacy include patient education; oral and topical pharmacological agents; complementary and alternative medicine; surgery; manual medicine; acupuncture; interventional procedures (corticosteroid injection, viscosupplementation, and pulsed radiofrequency); bracing; assistive devices; physical therapy; and physical modalities. Multidisciplinary and multimodal treatment strategies combined with early detection and prevention strategies provide the best benefit to patients. This review also illustrates that traditional and alternative modalities of treatment can be both synergistic and beneficial. Physicians should be aware of the variety of tools available for the management of OA and the associated symptoms. Those healthcare providers who can best individualize treatment plans for specific patients and inspire their patients to embrace healthy lifestyle modifications will achieve the best results. PMID:25750483

  17. Improvements in spinal alignment after high tibial osteotomy in patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Hyuk; Dorj, Ariunzaya; Han, Ahreum; Kim, Kyungsoo; Nha, Kyung Wook

    2016-07-01

    Since the correlation between spinal and lower extremity alignments is high, high tibial osteotomy (HTO) surgery may also affect spinal alignment, where the spinal alignment parameters are the most important parameters for the evaluation of spinal disorders. In this study, the effect of HTO surgery on spinal alignment during gait was investigated by comparing spinal alignment parameters between patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and healthy young controls. Eight patients (age, 55.0±5.1years; height, 160.3±7.0cm; weight, 71.3±14.1kg) with a medial compartment knee OA participated in the gait experiment two times approximately one week before and one year after HTO surgery and eight healthy young controls (age, 26.7±1.7years; height, 163.4±6.5cm; weight, 58.4±11.3kg) participated only once. Cervical curvature angle, thoracic curvature angle, lumbar curvature angle, coronal vertical axis, and coronal pelvic tilt in the coronal plane and cervical lordosis, thoracic kyphosis, lumbar lordosis, sagittal vertical axis, and sagittal pelvic tilt in the sagittal plane were estimated using motion analysis system with skin markers. All spinal alignment parameters after HTO surgery were significantly closer to those of healthy young subjects than those before HTO, especially in the coronal plane. These findings suggest that the HTO had a positive effect on spinal alignment, as well as lower extremity alignment, and moreover, reduced the abnormality that may result in spinal problems such as degeneration or pain. PMID:27236638

  18. Interleukin-29 Enhances Synovial Inflammation and Cartilage Degradation in Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lingxiao; Peng, Qiuyue; Xuan, Wenhua; Feng, Xiaoke; Zhang, Miaojia; Tan, Wenfeng; Xue, Meilang

    2016-01-01

    We have recently shown that IL-29 was an important proinflammatory cytokine in pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Inflammation also contributes to the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). The aim of this study was to investigate the effect and mechanism of IL-29 on cytokine production and cartilage degradation in OA. The mRNA levels of IL-29 and its specific receptor IL-28Ra in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were significantly increased in OA patients when compared to healthy controls (HC). In the serum, IL-29 protein levels were higher in OA patients than those in HC. Immunohistochemistry revealed that both IL-29 and IL-28Ra were dramatically elevated in OA synovium compared to HC; synovial fibroblasts (FLS) and macrophages were the main IL-29-producing cells in OA synovium. Furthermore, recombinant IL-29 augmented the mRNA expression of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and matrix-metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) in OA FLS and increased cartilage degradation when ex vivo OA cartilage explant was coincubated with OA FLS. Finally, in OA FLS, IL-29 dominantly activated MAPK and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), but not Jak-STAT and AKT signaling pathway as examined by western blot. In conclusion, IL-29 stimulates inflammation and cartilage degradation by OA FLS, indicating that this cytokine is likely involved in the pathogenesis of OA. PMID:27433031

  19. Interleukin-29 Enhances Synovial Inflammation and Cartilage Degradation in Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lingxiao; Peng, Qiuyue; Xuan, Wenhua; Feng, Xiaoke; Kong, Xiangqing; Zhang, Miaojia; Tan, Wenfeng; Xue, Meilang; Wang, Fang

    2016-01-01

    We have recently shown that IL-29 was an important proinflammatory cytokine in pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Inflammation also contributes to the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). The aim of this study was to investigate the effect and mechanism of IL-29 on cytokine production and cartilage degradation in OA. The mRNA levels of IL-29 and its specific receptor IL-28Ra in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were significantly increased in OA patients when compared to healthy controls (HC). In the serum, IL-29 protein levels were higher in OA patients than those in HC. Immunohistochemistry revealed that both IL-29 and IL-28Ra were dramatically elevated in OA synovium compared to HC; synovial fibroblasts (FLS) and macrophages were the main IL-29-producing cells in OA synovium. Furthermore, recombinant IL-29 augmented the mRNA expression of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and matrix-metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) in OA FLS and increased cartilage degradation when ex vivo OA cartilage explant was coincubated with OA FLS. Finally, in OA FLS, IL-29 dominantly activated MAPK and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), but not Jak-STAT and AKT signaling pathway as examined by western blot. In conclusion, IL-29 stimulates inflammation and cartilage degradation by OA FLS, indicating that this cytokine is likely involved in the pathogenesis of OA. PMID:27433031

  20. Risk factors and burden of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Palazzo, Clémence; Nguyen, Christelle; Lefevre-Colau, Marie-Martine; Rannou, François; Poiraudeau, Serge

    2016-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common joint disorders worldwide. Its prevalence is increasing because of the growing aging of the population in developed and developing countries as well as an increase in risk factors leading to OA, particularly obesity and a sedentary lifestyle. Risk factors of OA can be divided into person-level factors (age, gender, obesity, genetics and diet) and joint-level factors (injury, malalignment and abnormal loading of the joints) that interact in a complex manner. OA is the 11th cause of disability in the world. It is responsible for activity limitations, particularly walking, and affects participation and quality of life. Patients with OA are at greater risk of all-cause mortality, particularly for cardiovascular diseases, than the general population. This excess mortality is closely associated with disability level. Consequently, strategies to reduce burden through primary and secondary prevention programs are increasingly important. PMID:26904959

  1. Total hip arthroplasty in young patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Daras, Mariza; Macaulay, William

    2009-03-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA), an effective treatment for patients with end-stage arthritic hip conditions, provides dramatic pain relief, enhances mobility, and restores function.The success of THA in older patients, in concert with improvements in techniques and biomaterials, has stimulated demand for this procedure in younger, more active patients hoping to regain full activity. Although young age remains a relative contraindication to THA, the weight of this factor has diminished. Several investigators have reported results of low-friction arthroplasty in young patients. Unfortunately, the value of these studies is limited because of heterogeneous hip pathology in the younger groups, particularly given that preoperative pathology has proved to significantly affect implant survival. In this review of the literature, we focus on THA survival in young, active patients with a preoperative diagnosis of noninflammatory osteoarthritis. PMID:19377644

  2. Changes in Membrane Receptors and Ion Channels as Potential Biomarkers for Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Rebecca; Barrett-Jolley, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), a degenerative joint condition, is currently difficult to detect early enough for any of the current treatment options to be completely successful. Early diagnosis of this disease could increase the numbers of patients who are able to slow its progression. There are now several diseases where membrane protein biomarkers are used for early diagnosis. The numbers of proteins in the membrane is vast and so it is a rich source of potential biomarkers for OA but we need more knowledge of these before they can be considered practical biomarkers. How are they best measured and are they selective to OA or even certain types of OA? The first step in this process is to identify membrane proteins that change in OA. Here, we summarize several ion channels and receptors that change in OA models and/or OA patients, and may thus be considered candidates as novel membrane biomarkers of OA. PMID:26648874

  3. The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) in Persian Speaking Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H; Makhmalbaf, Hadi; Birjandinejad, Ali; Keshtan, Farideh Golhasani; Hoseini, Hosein A; Mazloumi, Seyed Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Osteoarthritis of the knee is the most common chronic joint disease that involves middle aged and elderly persons. There are different clinical instruments to quantify the health status of patients with knee osteoarthritis and one example is the WOMAC score that has been translated and adapted into different languages. The purpose of this study was cultural adaptation, validation and reliability testing of the Persian version of the WOMAC index in Iranians with knee osteoarthritis. Methods: We translated the original WOMAC questionnaire into Persian by the forward and backward technique, and then its psychometric study was done on 169 native Persian speaking patients with knee degenerative joint disease. Mean age of patients was 53.9 years. The SF-36 and KOOS were used to assess construct validity. Results: Reliability testing resulted in a Cronbach’s alpha of 0.917, showing the internal consistency of the questionnaire to be a reliable tool. Inter-correlation matrix among different scales of the Persian WOMAC index yielded a highly significant correlation between all subscales including stiffness, pain, and physical function. In terms of validity, Pearson`s correlation coefficient was significant between three domains of the WOMAC with PF, RP, BP, GH, VT, and PCS dimensions of the SF-36 health survey (P<0.005) and KOOS (P<0.0001) . Conclusions: The Persian WOMAC index is a valid and reliable patient- reported clinical instrument for knee osteoarthritis. PMID:25207315

  4. The Expression of Osteopontin and Wnt5a in Articular Cartilage of Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis and Its Correlation with Disease Severity

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Wenfeng; Deng, Zhenhan; Zeng, Chao; Li, Hui; Yang, Tuo; Li, Liangjun; Luo, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. This study is undertaken to investigate the relation between osteopontin (OPN) and Wnt5a expression in the progression and pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). Methods. 50 cartilage tissues from knee OA patients and normal controls were divided into four groups of severe, moderate, minor, and normal lesions based on the modified grading system of Mankin. Immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR were utilized to analyze the OPN and Wnt5a expression in articular cartilage. Besides, the relations between OPN and Wnt5a expression and the severity of OA were explored. Results. OPN and Wnt5a could be identified in four groups' tissues. Amongst the groups, the intercomparisons of OPN expression levels showed statistical differences (P < 0.01). Besides, the intercomparisons of Wnt5a expression degrees showed statistical differences (P < 0.05), except that between the minor and normal groups (P > 0.05). The scores of Mankin were demonstrated to relate to OPN expression (r = −0.847, P < 0.01) and Wnt5a expression in every group (r = −0.843, P < 0.01). Also, a positive correlation can be observed between the OPN and Wnt5a expression (r = 0.769, P < 0.01). Conclusion. In articular cartilage, the expressions of OPN and Wnt5a are positively related to progressive damage of knee OA joint. The correlation between Wnt5a and OPN might be important to the progression and pathogenesis of knee OA. PMID:27556044

  5. The Expression of Osteopontin and Wnt5a in Articular Cartilage of Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis and Its Correlation with Disease Severity.

    PubMed

    Li, Yusheng; Xiao, Wenfeng; Sun, Minghua; Deng, Zhenhan; Zeng, Chao; Li, Hui; Yang, Tuo; Li, Liangjun; Luo, Wei; Lei, Guanghua

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. This study is undertaken to investigate the relation between osteopontin (OPN) and Wnt5a expression in the progression and pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). Methods. 50 cartilage tissues from knee OA patients and normal controls were divided into four groups of severe, moderate, minor, and normal lesions based on the modified grading system of Mankin. Immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR were utilized to analyze the OPN and Wnt5a expression in articular cartilage. Besides, the relations between OPN and Wnt5a expression and the severity of OA were explored. Results. OPN and Wnt5a could be identified in four groups' tissues. Amongst the groups, the intercomparisons of OPN expression levels showed statistical differences (P < 0.01). Besides, the intercomparisons of Wnt5a expression degrees showed statistical differences (P < 0.05), except that between the minor and normal groups (P > 0.05). The scores of Mankin were demonstrated to relate to OPN expression (r = -0.847, P < 0.01) and Wnt5a expression in every group (r = -0.843, P < 0.01). Also, a positive correlation can be observed between the OPN and Wnt5a expression (r = 0.769, P < 0.01). Conclusion. In articular cartilage, the expressions of OPN and Wnt5a are positively related to progressive damage of knee OA joint. The correlation between Wnt5a and OPN might be important to the progression and pathogenesis of knee OA. PMID:27556044

  6. Gait Analysis Methods for Rodent Models of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Brittany Y.; Kloefkorn, Heidi E.; Allen, Kyle D.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with osteoarthritis (OA) primarily seek treatment due to pain and disability, yet the primary endpoints for rodent OA models tend to be histological measures of joint destruction. The discrepancy between clinical and preclinical evaluations is problematic, given that radiographic evidence of OA in humans does not always correlate to the severity of patient-reported symptoms. Recent advances in behavioral analyses have provided new methods to evaluate disease sequelae in rodents. Of particular relevance to rodent OA models are methods to assess rodent gait. While obvious differences exist between quadrupedal and bipedal gait sequences, the gait abnormalities seen in humans and in rodent OA models reflect similar compensatory behaviors that protect an injured limb from loading. The purpose of this review is to describe these compensations and current methods used to assess rodent gait characteristics, while detailing important considerations for the selection of gait analysis methods in rodent OA models. PMID:25160712

  7. Severity of Coexisting Patellofemoral Disease is Associated with Increased Impairments and Functional Limitations in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Farrokhi, Shawn; Piva, Sara R.; Gil, Alexandra B.; Oddis, Chester V.; Brooks, Maria M.; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association between severity of coexisting patellofemoral (PF) disease with lower limb impairments and functional limitations in patients with tibiofemoral (TF) osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Radiographic views of the TF and PF compartments, knee extension strength and knee range of motion were obtained for 167 patients with knee OA. Additionally, knee-specific symptoms and functional limitations were assessed using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and Activities of Daily Living Scale (ADLS). Results “Moderate/Severe PFOA” was associated with lower knee extension strength (1.4±0.5 Nm/BW) compared to “No PFOA” (1.8±0.5 Nm/BW). Additionally, total knee range of motion was significantly lower for patients with “Moderate/Severe PFOA” (120.8°±14.4°) compared to “No PFOA” (133.5°±10.7°) and “Mild PFOA” (125.8°±13.0°). “Moderate/Severe PFOA” and “Mild PFOA” were also associated with less pain while standing (OR= 0.2; 95% CI: 0.1,0.7 and OR= 0.2; 95% CI: 0.1,0.6, respectively) on the WOMAC and “Moderate/Severe PFOA” was associated with greater difficulty with going downstairs (OR=2.9; 95% CI: 1.0,8.1) on the ADLS. Conclusion It appears that knees with more severe coexisting PF disease demonstrate features distinct from those observed in TFOA in isolation or in combination with mild PF disease. Treatment strategies targeting the PF joint may be warranted to mitigate the specific lower limb impairments and functional problems present in this patient population. PMID:23045243

  8. Circulating levels of adiponectin, resistin, and visfatin after mud-bath therapy in patients with bilateral knee osteoarthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fioravanti, Antonella; Giannitti, Chiara; Cheleschi, Sara; Simpatico, Antonella; Pascarelli, Nicola Antonio; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2015-11-01

    Adipocytokines, including adiponectin, resistin, and visfatin may play an important role in the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis (OA). Spa therapy is one of the most commonly used non-pharmacological approaches for OA, but its mechanisms of action are not completely known. The aim of the present study was to assess whether a cycle of mud-bath therapy (MBT) influences the serum levels of adiponectin, resistin, and visfatin in patients with knee OA. As part of a prospective randomized, single blind-controlled trial evaluating the efficacy of MBT in knee OA, we included in this study 95 outpatients. One group ( n = 49) received a cycle of MBT at the spa center of Chianciano Terme (Italy) in addition to the usual treatment, and one group (control group; n = 46) continued their regular care routine alone. Patients were assessed at basal time and at the end of the study (15 days) for clinical and biochemical parameters. Clinical assessments included spontaneous pain on a visual analog scale (VAS) score and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities index (WOMAC) subscores for knee OA evaluated as total pain score (W-TPS), total stiffness score (W-TSS), and total physical function score (W-TPFS). Adiponectin, resistin and visfatin serum levels were assessed by enzyme immunoassay methods. At the end of the mud-bath therapy, serum adiponectin levels showed a significant decrease ( p < 0.001), while no significant modifications were found in the control group at day 15. Serum resistin showed a significant decrease ( p < 0.0001) in the MBT group at the end of the study and a significant increase in the control patients ( p < 0.001). No significant modifications of visfatin were found in MBT. Furthermore, we tested the relationships between demographic and clinical parameters and adipocytokine concentrations measured in the MBT group at basal and at the end of the study. In conclusion, the present study shows that a cycle of MBT can modify serum levels of adiponectin and

  9. Serum Levels of Proinflammatory Cytokines in Painful Knee Osteoarthritis and Sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Marta; Ezquerro, Fernando; Marcon Alfieri, Fábio; Vilas Boas, Lucy; Tozetto-Mendoza, Tania Regina; Chen, Janini; Özçakar, Levent; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disorder in the world. Among the mechanisms involved in osteoarthritis, biomarkers (cytokines profile) may be related to pain and pain intensity, functional capacity, and pressure pain thresholds (PPT). Thus, the study of these relationships may offer useful information about pathophysiology and associated mechanisms involved in osteoarthritis. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the seric concentration of pro (IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines in patients with painful knee osteoarthritis and to correlate the levels of these biomarkers with the patients' functional capacity and pressure pain threshold (PPT) values. PMID:25821631

  10. Prevalence of TTV DNA and GBV-C RNA in patients with systemic sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and osteoarthritis does not differ from that in healthy blood donors

    PubMed Central

    Seemayer, C; Viazov, S; Neidhart, M; Bruhlmann, P; Michel, B; Gay, R; Roggendorf, M; Gay, S

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine the prevalence of GB virus-C (GBV-C) RNA and TT virus (TTV) DNA in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and osteoarthritis (OA) as well as to compare the autoantibody pattern in patients with SSc with and without evidence of viral infection.
PATIENTS AND METHODS—The study included 168 patients (84 SSc, 41 RA, and 43 OA) diagnosed according to the American College of Rheumatology criteria and 122 volunteer blood donors. The presence of GBV-C RNA and TTV DNA in serum was assessed by nested reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and semi-nested PCR, respectively. Autoantibodies in patients with SSc were determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Hep-2 immunofluorescence.
RESULTS—TTV-DNA was detected in 10/84 (12%) patients with SSc, 9/41 (22%) patients with RA, 3/43 (7%) patients with OA, and 16/122 (13%) blood donors. GBV-C RNA was present in 4/84 (5%) patients with SSc, 2/43 (5%) patients with OA, and 5/122 (4%) blood donors. No patient with RA was positive for GBV-C RNA. One patient with SSc and one patient with OA showed a double infection with GBV-C and TTV. 74/84 (88%) patients with SSc were positive for at least one autoantibody species tested: 18/84 (21%) showed anticentromeric autoantibodies, 55/84 (66%) a speckled (36/84 (43%) fine, 19/84 (23%) coarse), and 20/84 (24%) a homogeneous nuclear Hep-2 pattern, and 21/84 (25%) had antinucleolar autoantibodies. Anti-Scl-70 antibodies were found in 31/84 (37%) and anti-RNP antibodies in 5/84 (6%) patients with SSc. No differences in the autoantibody pattern in patients with SSc with or without viral infection could be detected.
CONCLUSION—The prevalence of GBV-C RNA and TTV DNA in serum samples from patients with SSc, RA, and OA was low and comparable with that in blood donors. A continuing infection with TTV and or GBV-C was not associated with a significant change in the autoantibody pattern in patients with

  11. Therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cell based therapy for osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Burke, John; Hunter, Monte; Kolhe, Ravindra; Isales, Carlos; Hamrick, Mark; Fulzele, Sadanand

    2016-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic degenerative disease affecting articular cartilage in joints, and it is a leading cause of disability in the United States. Current pharmacological treatment strategies are ineffective to prevent the OA progression; however, cellular therapies have the potential to regenerate the lost cartilage, combat cartilage degeneration, provide pain relief, and improve patient mobility. One of the most promising sources of cellular regenerative medicine is from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). MSCs can be isolated from adipose tissue, bone marrow, synovial tissue, and other sources. The aim of this review is to compile recent advancement in cellular based therapy more specifically in relation to MSCs in the treatment of osteoarthritis. PMID:27510262

  12. Pain sensitivity profiles in patients with advanced knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Frey-Law, Laura A; Bohr, Nicole L; Sluka, Kathleen A; Herr, Keela; Clark, Charles R; Noiseux, Nicolas O; Callaghan, John J; Zimmerman, M Bridget; Rakel, Barbara A

    2016-09-01

    The development of patient profiles to subgroup individuals on a variety of variables has gained attention as a potential means to better inform clinical decision making. Patterns of pain sensitivity response specific to quantitative sensory testing (QST) modality have been demonstrated in healthy subjects. It has not been determined whether these patterns persist in a knee osteoarthritis population. In a sample of 218 participants, 19 QST measures along with pain, psychological factors, self-reported function, and quality of life were assessed before total knee arthroplasty. Component analysis was used to identify commonalities across the 19 QST assessments to produce standardized pain sensitivity factors. Cluster analysis then grouped individuals who exhibited similar patterns of standardized pain sensitivity component scores. The QST resulted in 4 pain sensitivity components: heat, punctate, temporal summation, and pressure. Cluster analysis resulted in 5 pain sensitivity profiles: a "low pressure pain" group, an "average pain" group, and 3 "high pain" sensitivity groups who were sensitive to different modalities (punctate, heat, and temporal summation). Pain and function differed between pain sensitivity profiles, along with sex distribution; however, no differences in osteoarthritis grade, medication use, or psychological traits were found. Residualizing QST data by age and sex resulted in similar components and pain sensitivity profiles. Furthermore, these profiles are surprisingly similar to those reported in healthy populations, which suggests that individual differences in pain sensitivity are a robust finding even in an older population with significant disease. PMID:27152688

  13. Association between diabetes mellitus and osteoarthritis: systematic literature review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Louati, Karine; Vidal, Céline; Berenbaum, Francis; Sellam, Jérémie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the prevalence of osteoarthritis (OA) in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and prevalence of DM in patients with OA and whether OA and DM are associated. Design A systematic literature review and meta-analysis. We included cohort, case–control and cross-sectional studies assessing the number of patients with DM and/or OA. The mean prevalence of OA among patients with DM and DM among patients with OA was calculated. Data from trials assessing an association of diabetes and OA were pooled and results are presented as unadjusted OR and 95% CI. Results From the 299 publications, we included 49 studies in the analysis, including 28 cross-sectional studies, 11 cohort studies and 10 case–control studies. In all, 21, 5 and 23 articles involved patients with OA exclusively, patients with DM and the general population, respectively. For 5788 patients with DM, the mean OA prevalence was 29.5±1.2%. For 645 089 patients with OA, the prevalence of DM was 14.4±0.1%. The risk of OA was greater in the DM than non-DM population (OR=1.46 (1.08 to 1.96), p=0.01), as was DM in the OA than non-OA population (OR=1.41 (1.21 to 1.65), p<0.00 001). Among the 12 studies reporting an OR adjusted on at least the body mass index, 5 showed no association of DM and OA and 7 identified DM as an independent risk factor. Conclusions This meta-analysis highlights a high frequency of OA in patients with DM and an association between both diseases, representing a further step towards the individualisation of DM-related OA within a metabolic OA phenotype. PMID:26535137

  14. Hyaluronic Acid Injections Are Associated with Delay of Total Knee Replacement Surgery in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: Evidence from a Large U.S. Health Claims Database

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Roy; Lim, Sooyeol; Steen, R. Grant; Dasa, Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Background The growing prevalence of osteoarthritis (OA) and the medical costs associated with total knee replacement (TKR) surgery for end-stage OA motivate a search for agents that can delay OA progression. We test a hypothesis that hyaluronic acid (HA) injection is associated with delay of TKR in a dose-dependent manner. Methods and Findings We retrospectively evaluated records in an administrative claims database of ~79 million patients, to identify all patients with knee OA who received TKR during a 6-year period. Only patients with continuous plan enrollment from diagnosis until TKR were included, so that complete medical records were available. OA diagnosis was the index event and we evaluated time-to-TKR as a function of the number of HA injections. The database included 182,022 patients with knee OA who had TKR; 50,349 (27.7%) of these patients were classified as HA Users, receiving ≥1 courses of HA prior to TKR, while 131,673 patients (72.3%) were HA Non-users prior to TKR, receiving no HA. Cox proportional hazards modelling shows that TKR risk decreases as a function of the number of HA injection courses, if patient age, gender, and disease comorbidity are used as background covariates. Multiple HA injections are therefore associated with delay of TKR (all, P < 0.0001). Half of HA Non-users had a TKR by 114 days post-diagnosis of knee OA, whereas half of HA Users had a TKR by 484 days post-diagnosis (χ2 = 19,769; p < 0.0001). Patients who received no HA had a mean time-to-TKR of 0.7 years; with one course of HA, the mean time to TKR was 1.4 years (χ2 = 13,725; p < 0.0001); patients who received ≥5 courses delayed TKR by 3.6 years (χ2 = 19,935; p < 0.0001). Conclusions HA injection in patients with knee OA is associated with a dose-dependent increase in time-to-TKR. PMID:26694145

  15. Traditional Chinese medicine in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Hou, Pu-Wei; Fu, Pin-Kuei; Hsu, Hsin-Cheng; Hsieh, Ching-Liang

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate whether the use of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM; zhōng yī) influences symptoms or functional outcomes in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee ( xī guān jié yán). A systematic review of randomized control trials was conducted. Searches for studies in PubMed that were performed between 1965 and August 2013, and retrieved studies were subjected to reference screening. The types of studies included in our review were 1) placebo-based or comparative studies; 2) open label, single-blinded or double-blinded studies; 3) studies evaluating the efficacy of TCM for treating OA of the knee; and 4) studies evaluating only TCM or combination preparations. Trials were conducted with participants over 18 years of age with knee pain and at least three of the following characteristics: 1) an age greater than 50 years; 2) morning stiffness lasting for fewer than 30 min; 3) a crackling or grating sensation; 4) bony tenderness of the knee; 5) bony enlargement of the knee; or 6) no detectable warmth of the joint to the touch. Studies were rated for risk of bias and graded for quality. After screening, 104 studies that satisfied the eligibility requirements were identified, and only 18 randomized control trials were included in the quantitative and qualitative synthesis. Upon review, we found "moderate-quality" evidence of effects from acupuncture ( zhēn jiǔ) on pain, which was measured using a visual analogue scale, and physical function, which was measured using qigong ( qì gōng) with motion. "Low-quality" evidence was found regarding the effects of acupuncture on physical function, and no evidence was found regarding the effects of herbal medicine on pain or physical function. Herbal patches ( yào bù) appeared to affect pain and physical and function, but these effects were not found to be significant. The initial findings included in this review suggest that acupuncture is a promising intervention according to the primary outcome measure, pain

  16. Traditional Chinese medicine in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Pu-Wei; Fu, Pin-Kuei; Hsu, Hsin-Cheng; Hsieh, Ching-Liang

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate whether the use of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM; 中醫 zhōng yī) influences symptoms or functional outcomes in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee (膝關節炎 xī guān jié yán). A systematic review of randomized control trials was conducted. Searches for studies in PubMed that were performed between 1965 and August 2013, and retrieved studies were subjected to reference screening. The types of studies included in our review were 1) placebo-based or comparative studies; 2) open label, single-blinded or double-blinded studies; 3) studies evaluating the efficacy of TCM for treating OA of the knee; and 4) studies evaluating only TCM or combination preparations. Trials were conducted with participants over 18 years of age with knee pain and at least three of the following characteristics: 1) an age greater than 50 years; 2) morning stiffness lasting for fewer than 30 min; 3) a crackling or grating sensation; 4) bony tenderness of the knee; 5) bony enlargement of the knee; or 6) no detectable warmth of the joint to the touch. Studies were rated for risk of bias and graded for quality. After screening, 104 studies that satisfied the eligibility requirements were identified, and only 18 randomized control trials were included in the quantitative and qualitative synthesis. Upon review, we found “moderate-quality” evidence of effects from acupuncture (針灸 zhēn jiǔ) on pain, which was measured using a visual analogue scale, and physical function, which was measured using qigong (氣功 qì gōng) with motion. “Low-quality” evidence was found regarding the effects of acupuncture on physical function, and no evidence was found regarding the effects of herbal medicine on pain or physical function. Herbal patches (藥布 yào bù) appeared to affect pain and physical and function, but these effects were not found to be significant. The initial findings included in this review suggest that acupuncture is a promising intervention

  17. Influence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in the fluctuation of the submaximal isometric torque of knee extensors in patients with early-grade osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Andressa; Mello, Marco T.; Serrão, Paula R.; Luz, Roberta P.; Bittencourt, Lia R.; Mattiello, Stela M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate whether obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) alters the fluctuation of submaximal isometric torque of the knee extensors in patients with early-grade osteoarthritis (OA). METHOD: The study included 60 male volunteers, aged 40 to 70 years, divided into four groups: Group 1 (G1) - Control (n=15): without OA and without OSA; Group 2 (G2) (n=15): with OA and without OSA; Group 3 (G3) (n=15): without OA and with OSA; and Group 4 (G4) (n=15) with OA and with OSA. Five patients underwent maximal isometric contractions of 10 seconds duration each, with the knee at 60° of flexion to determine peak torque at 60°. To evaluate the fluctuation of torque, 5 submaximal isometric contractions (50% of maximum peak torque) of 10 seconds each, which were calculated from the standard deviation of torque and coefficient of variation, were performed. RESULTS: Significant differences were observed between groups for maximum peak torque, while G4 showed a lower value compared with G1 (p=0.005). Additionally, for the average torque exerted, G4 showed a lower value compared to the G1 (p=0.036). However, no differences were found between the groups for the standard deviation (p=0.844) and the coefficient of variation (p=0.143). CONCLUSION: The authors concluded that OSA did not change the parameters of the fluctuation of isometric submaximal torque of knee extensors in patients with early-grade OA. PMID:26443974

  18. The Effects of Adherence to Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and Factors Influencing Drug Adherence in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to compare the clinical outcomes of knee osteoarthritis patients according to drug adherence; and to find out the factors the affecting those outcomes. We analyzed the drug adherence and clinical outcomes in 1,334 primary knee osteoarthritis patients who took non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for 3 weeks. Clinical outcomes of Pain Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and EQ-5D were compared at baseline and 3 weeks’ follow-up between the two groups of adherent group and non-adherent group (1,167 vs. 167 patients). Logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the factors affecting the adherence, and the reasons for the non-adherence were asked. The follow-up clinical outcomes of NRS and KOOS symptom, pain and activity of daily life were significantly higher in the adherence group (P = 0.003, P = 0.048, P = 0.005, and P = 0.003, respectively). The adherence was better in the elderly and in the male group (P = 0.042 and P = 0.034, respectively) and the top reason for no strict adherence was “symptom improved” (21.5%) followed by side effects. In this study, the patients with better adherence to NSAIDs showed better outcomes compared to those with poor adherence. This study can contribute to the patient education for the pharmacological treatment in knee OA patients. PMID:27134504

  19. Obesity and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Kunal; Karssiens, Timothy; Kumar, Vijay; Pandit, Hemant

    2016-07-01

    This paper provides an up-to-date review of obesity and lower limb osteoarthritis (OA). OA is a major global cause of disability, with the knee being the most frequently affected joint. There is a proven association between obesity and knee OA, and obesity is suggested to be the main modifiable risk factor. Obese patients (Body Mass Index, BMI, over 30kg/m(2)) are more likely to require total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The global prevalence of obesity has doubled since 1980; by 2025, 47% of UK men and 36% of women are forecast to be obese. This rising global burden is a key factor in the growing rise in the use of TKA. It is therefore important to appreciate the outcomes of surgery in patients with end-stage OA and a high BMI. This review found that while OA is felt to contribute to weight gain, it is unclear whether TKA facilitates weight reduction. Surgery in obese patients is more technically challenging. This is reflected in the evidence, which suggests higher rates of short- to medium-term complications following TKA, including wound infection and medical complications, resulting in longer hospital stay, and potentially higher rates of malalignment, dislocation, and early revision. However, despite slower initial recovery and possibly lower functional scores and implant survival in the longer term, obese patients can still benefit from TKA in terms of improved function, quality of life and satisfaction. In conclusion, despite higher risks and more uncertain outcomes of surgery, higher BMI in itself should not be a contraindication to TKA; instead, each patient's individual circumstances should be considered. PMID:27180156

  20. Spa therapy for elderly: a retrospective study of 239 older patients with osteoarthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karagülle, Mine; Kardeş, Sinan; Dişçi, Rian; Gürdal, Hatice; Karagülle, Müfit Zeki

    2016-01-01

    Very few studies tested the effectiveness of spa therapy in older patients with osteoarthritis. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the short-term effects of spa therapy in patients aged 65 years and older with generalized, knee, hip, and cervical and lumbar spine osteoarthritis. In an observational retrospective study design at the Medical Ecology and Hydroclimatology Department of Istanbul Medical Faculty, we analyzed the records of 239 patients aged over 65 years with the diagnosis of all types of osteoarthritis who were prescribed a spa therapy course in some spa resorts in Turkey between 7 March 2002 and 31 December 2012. They travelled to a spa resort where they stayed at a thermal spa hotel and followed the usual therapy packages for 2 weeks. Patients were assessed by an experienced physician within a week before the spa journey and within a week after the completion of the spa therapy. Compared with baseline in whole sample, statistically significant improvements were observed in pain (visual analog scale, VAS), patient and physician global assessments (VAS), Health Assessment Questionnaire disability index (HAQ-DI), Lequesne algofunctional index (LAFI) for knee, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities index (WOMAC), Waddell disability index (WDI), and Neck Pain and Disability Scale (NPAD). According to Outcome Measures in Rheumatology—Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OMERACT-OARSI) Set of Responder Criteria, responder rate were 63.8 % (51/80) in generalized, 52 % (13/25) in knee, 50 % (2/4) in hip, 66.7 % (8/12) in lumbar, and 100 % (6/6) in cervical osteoarthritis subgroups. Spa therapy improved pain and physical functional status in older patients with osteoarthritis, especially generalized osteoarthritis and multiple joint osteoarthritis with involvement of knee. This improvement was clinically important in majority of the patients. To confirm the results of this preliminary study, there is a need of a randomized controlled clinical study

  1. Altered Expression of Circulating MicroRNA in Plasma of Patients with Primary Osteoarthritis and In Silico Analysis of Their Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Borgonio Cuadra, Verónica M.; González-Huerta, Norma Celia; Romero-Córdoba, Sandra; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Miranda-Duarte, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze a set of circulating microRNA (miRNA) in plasma from patients with primary Osteoarthritis (OA) and describe the biological significance of altered miRNA in OA based on an in silico analysis of their target genes. Methods miRNA expression was analyzed using TaqMan Low Density Arrays and independent assays. The search for potential messenger RNA (mRNA) targets of the differentially expressed miRNA was performed by means of the miRWalk and miRecords database; we conducted the biological relevance of the predicted miRNA targets by pathway analysis with the Reactome and DAVID databases. Results We measured the expression of 380 miRNA in OA; 12 miRNA were overexpressed under the OA condition (p value, ≤0.05; fold change, >2). These results were validated by the detection of some selected miRNA by quantitative PCR (qPCR). In silico analysis showed that target messenger RNA (mRNA) were potentially regulated by these miRNA, including genes such as SMAD1, IL-1B, COL3A, VEGFA, and FGFR1, important in chondrocyte maintenance and differentiation. Some metabolic pathways affected by the miRNA: mRNA ratio are signaling Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP), Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and Nerve growth factor (NGF), these latter two involved in the process of pain. Conclusions We identified 12 miRNA in the plasma of patients with primary OA. Specific miRNA that are altered in the disease could be released into plasma, either due to cartilage damage or to an inherent cellular mechanism. Several miRNA could regulate genes and pathways related with development of the disease; eight of these circulating miRNA are described, to our knowledge, for first time in OA. PMID:24901787

  2. People Getting a Grip on Arthritis: A Knowledge Transfer Strategy to Empower Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoarthritis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brosseau, Lucie; Lineker, Sydney; Bell, Mary; Wells, George; Casimiro, Lynn; Egan, Mary; Cranney, Ann; Tugwell, Peter; Wilson, Keith G.; De Angelis, Gino; Loew, Laurianne

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was twofold. First, to help people with arthritis become aware of and utilize Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and Osteoarthritis (OA) Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) as they relate to self-management strategies. Second, to evaluate the impact of specific Knowledge Translation (KT) activities on CPG uptake. More…

  3. Can we identify patients with high risk of osteoarthritis progression who will respond to treatment? A focus on epidemiology and phenotype of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Bruyère, Olivier; Cooper, Cyrus; Arden, Nigel; Branco, Jaime; Brandi, Maria Luisa; Herrero-Beaumont, Gabriel; Berenbaum, Francis; Dennison, Elaine; Devogelaer, Jean-Pierre; Hochberg, Marc; Kanis, John; Laslop, Andrea; McAlindon, Tim; Reiter, Susanne; Richette, Pascal; Rizzoli, René; Reginster, Jean-Yves

    2015-03-01

    Osteoarthritis is a syndrome affecting a variety of patient profiles. A European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis and the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society working meeting explored the possibility of identifying different patient profiles in osteoarthritis. The risk factors for the development of osteoarthritis include systemic factors (e.g., age, sex, obesity, genetics, race, and bone density) and local biomechanical factors (e.g., obesity, sport, joint injury, and muscle weakness); most also predict disease progression, particularly joint injury, malalignment, and synovitis/effusion. The characterization of patient profiles should help to better orientate research, facilitate trial design, and define which patients are the most likely to benefit from treatment. There are a number of profile candidates. Generalized, polyarticular osteoarthritis and local, monoarticular osteoarthritis appear to be two different profiles; the former is a feature of osteoarthritis co-morbid with inflammation or the metabolic syndrome, while the latter is more typical of post-trauma osteoarthritis, especially in cases with severe malalignment. Other biomechanical factors may also define profiles, such as joint malalignment, loss of meniscal function, and ligament injury. Early- and late-stage osteoarthritis appear as separate profiles, notably in terms of treatment response. Finally, there is evidence that there are two separate profiles related to lesions in the subchondral bone, which may determine benefit from bone-active treatments. Decisions on appropriate therapy should be made considering clinical presentation, underlying pathophysiology, and stage of disease. Identification of patient profiles may lead to more personalized healthcare, with more targeted treatment for osteoarthritis. PMID:25701074

  4. Patient preference and willingness to pay for knee osteoarthritis treatments

    PubMed Central

    Posnett, John; Dixit, Sanjeev; Oppenheimer, Brooks; Kili, Sven; Mehin, Nazanin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To review treatments for osteoarthritis of the knee (OAK) received by patients across five European countries, and to obtain patients’ perceptions and willingness to pay for current treatments. Patients and methods A prospective, internet-based, double-blind survey of adults with OAK was conducted in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the United Kingdom. The questionnaire included questions about diagnosis, treatment history, and perceptions of OAK treatments, followed by a discrete choice-based conjoint exercise to identify preferred attributes of OAK treatments, evaluating 14 sets of four unbranded products. Results Two thousand and seventy-three patients with self-reported OAK completed the survey; 17.4% of patients rated their knee pain as drastically affecting their ability to perform normal daily activities, and 39.3% of employed patients reported that they had lost work time because of OAK. The most common treatments were exercise (69.7%), physical therapy (68.2%), and nonprescription oral pain medication (73.9%). Treatments perceived as most effective were: viscosupplement injections (74.1%), narcotics (67.8%), and steroid injection (67.6%). Patient co-pay, duration of pain relief, and type of therapy exhibited the largest impact on patient preference for OAK treatments. The average patient was willing to pay €35 and €64 more in co-pay for steroid and viscosupplement injections, respectively, over the cost of oral over-the-counter painkillers (per treatment course, per knee) (each P<0.05). Conclusion OAK is a debilitating condition that affects normal daily activities. In general, treatments most commonly offered to patients are not those perceived as being the most effective. Patients are willing to pay a premium for treatments that they perceive as being more effective and result in longer-lasting pain relief, and those that can be administered with fewer visits to a physician. PMID:26089650

  5. Homologous platelet-rich plasma for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis in selected elderly patients: an open-label, uncontrolled, pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Bottegoni, Carlo; Dei Giudici, Luca; Salvemini, Sergio; Chiurazzi, Enrico; Bencivenga, Rosella; Gigante, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and the effect of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) intra-articular injections obtained from blood donors (homologous PRP) on elderly patients with early or moderate knee osteoarthritis (OA) who are not candidates for autologous PRP treatment. Methods: A total of 60 symptomatic patients, aged 65–86 years, affected by hematologic disorders and early or moderate knee OA, were treated with 5 ml of homologous PRP intra-articular injections every 14 days for a total of three injections. Clinical evaluations before the treatment, and after 2 and 6 months were performed by International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and Equal Visual Analogue Scale (EQ VAS) scores. Adverse events and patient satisfaction were recorded. Results: No severe complications were noted during the treatment and the follow-up period. A statistically significant improvement from basal evaluation to the 2-month follow-up visit was observed, whereas a statistically significant worsening from the 2-month to the 6-month follow-up visit was showed. The overall worst results were observed in patients aged 80 years or over and in those affected by minor bone attrition. It was found that 90% of patients were satisfied at the 6-month evaluation. Conclusions: Homologous PRP has an excellent safety profile but offers only a short-term clinical improvement in selected elderly patients with knee OA who are not candidates for autologous PRP treatment. Increasing age and developing degeneration result in a decreased potential for homologous PRP injection therapy. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:27047571

  6. Postural stability disorders in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip.

    PubMed

    Truszczyńska, Aleksandra; Rąpała, Kazimierz; Gmitrzykowska, Elżbieta; Trzaskoma, Zbigniew; Drzał-Grabiec, Justyna

    2014-01-01

    The osteoarthritis of the hip dominant symptom is pain that leads to disability and to postural and gait disorders. The aim of this study was to analyze postural stability and its impact on disability and pain. The study population consisted of 60 patients and control group of 30. Group 1 (n=30) included patients with unilateral coxarthrosis, aged 56.2 (±12.3) years, BMI 25.17 (±2.87) kg/m2. There were 16 men (53.3%). The mean age of patients in group 2 (n=30) with bilateral coxarthrosis was 62.3 (±12.1) years; the mean BMI was 24.87 (±2.06) kg/m2. There were 15 men in this group (50%). The patients were evaluated using the WOMAC, the Harris Hip Score, VAS and the Biodex Balance System. Both study groups had stability index results different than the control group. There was a significant correlation between the stability indexes and BMI. VAS correlated with the M-L plane variance. In group 2, there were significant differences related to disability for the disability scales for all measured parameters. Balance disorder is a basic parameter found in coxathrosis. There is a statistically significant correlation between balance disorders and BMI, VAS and functional scales. PMID:24708175

  7. Editorial Commentary: Platelet-Rich Plasma Improves Knee Pain and Function in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H

    2015-11-01

    Systematic review of overlapping meta-analyses shows that platelet-rich plasma improves knee pain and function in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Ultimately, biologics hold promise for chondroprotection in addition to symptomatic relief. PMID:26542203

  8. Translating genomics into mechanisms of disease: Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Bomer, Nils; den Hollander, Wouter; Ramos, Yolande F M; Meulenbelt, Ingrid

    2015-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common age-related arthritic disorder and is characterized by aberrant extracellular matrix (ECM) content and surface disruptions that range from fibrillation, clefting and delamination, leading to articular surface erosion. Worldwide, over 20% of the population is affected with OA and 80% of these patients have limitations in movement, whereas 25% experience inhibition in major daily activities of life. OA is the most common disabling arthritic disease; nevertheless, no disease-modifying treatment is available except for the expensive total joint replacement surgery at end-stage disease. Lack of insight into the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of OA has considerably contributed to the inability of the scientific community to develop disease-modifying drugs. To overcome this critical barrier, focus should be on translation of identified robust gene deviations towards the underlying biological mechanisms. PMID:27107506

  9. Transdermal fentanyl improves pain control and functionality in patients with osteoarthritis: an open-label Canadian trial.

    PubMed

    Choquette, Denis; McCarthy, Timothy G; Rodrigues, Jude F N; Kelly, Allan J; Camacho, Fernando; Horbay, G L A; Husein-Bhabha, Farah A

    2008-05-01

    Current treatment guidelines advocate opioids for arthritis when standard analgesics produce inadequate relief. Efficacy, adverse effects (AEs), dosing regimens, physician expertise and patient preference influence treatment selection. This study assessed transdermal fentanyl (TDF) as a treatment option for osteoarthritis (OA) patients. This prospective, Canadian open-label, 8-week trial assessed the efficacy and safety of TDF in patients with OA of hip or knee with moderate-to-severe target joint pain inadequately controlled using weak opioids. TDF was initiated at 25 mcg/h and titrated to optimal pain control. Rescue acetaminophen 500 mg was allowed (maximum 4 g/day). The main endpoint was improvement in pain control assessment rating (five rating categories); pain intensity (0-10 numerical scale), functionality (WOMAC-OA Index), health-related quality of life (SF-36 Health Survey) and global impression were also evaluated. Eighty-one patients (61% female, mean age 60 years) were enrolled; 62 were evaluable. All had failed on previous weak opioid therapy, primarily codeine or codeine combinations. At treatment end, 65% rated pain control as improved (Pain Control Assessment rating change >or=1 category; p<0.0001); mean change in pain intensity was a reduction of greater than 2 (p<0.0001); almost 50% were maintained on TDF 25 mcg/h with less than 1.3 g/day of rescue acetaminophen. At 1 month and end of treatment, changes in the SF-36 physical global scale and individual sub-scores for the pain index and role-physical scales were highly significant (p<0.0001). Improvement in functionality was noted at 1 month and at end of treatment with significant reductions in total WOMAC score, individual pain, stiffness and physical function sub-scores (p<0.0001). AEs causing discontinuation (n=32) included nausea, dizziness and vomiting. Most treatment-related AEs were mild to moderate in intensity. TDF improved pain control, functionality and health-related quality of life

  10. Long term evaluation of disease progression through the quantitative magnetic resonance imaging of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis patients: correlation with clinical symptoms and radiographic changes

    PubMed Central

    Raynauld, Jean-Pierre; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Berthiaume, Marie-Josée; Beaudoin, Gilles; Choquette, Denis; Haraoui, Boulos; Tannenbaum, Hyman; Meyer, Joan M; Beary, John F; Cline, Gary A; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to further explore the cartilage volume changes in knee osteoarthritis (OA) over time using quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI). These were correlated with demographic, clinical, and radiological data to better identify the disease risk features. We selected 107 patients from a large trial (n = 1,232) evaluating the effect of a bisphosphonate on OA knees. The MRI acquisitions of the knee were done at baseline, 12, and 24 months. Cartilage volume from the global, medial, and lateral compartments was quantified. The changes were contrasted with clinical data and other MRI anatomical features. Knee OA cartilage volume losses were statistically significant compared to baseline values: -3.7 ± 3.0% for global cartilage and -5.5 ± 4.3% for the medial compartment at 12 months, and -5.7 ± 4.4% and -8.3 ± 6.5%, respectively, at 24 months. Three different populations were identified according to cartilage volume loss: fast (n = 11; -13.2%), intermediate (n = 48; -7.2%), and slow (n = 48; -2.3%) progressors. The predictors of fast progressors were the presence of severe meniscal extrusion (p = 0.001), severe medial tear (p = 0.005), medial and/or lateral bone edema (p = 0.03), high body mass index (p < 0.05, fast versus slow), weight (p < 0.05, fast versus slow) and age (p < 0.05 fast versus slow). The loss of cartilage volume was also slightly associated with less knee pain. No association was found with other Western Ontario McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores, joint space width, or urine biomarker levels. Meniscal damage and bone edema are closely associated with more cartilage volume loss. These data confirm the significant advantage of qMRI for reliably measuring knee structural changes at as early as 12 months, and for identifying risk factors associated with OA progression. PMID:16507119

  11. Strategies for the prevention of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Roos, Ewa M; Arden, Nigel K

    2016-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) has been thought of as a disease of cartilage that can be effectively treated surgically at severe stages with joint arthroplasty. Today, OA is considered a whole-organ disease that is amenable to prevention and treatment at early stages. OA develops slowly over 10-15 years, interfering with activities of daily living and the ability to work. Many patients tolerate pain, and many health-care providers accept pain and disability as inevitable corollaries of OA and ageing. Too often, health-care providers passively await final 'joint death', necessitating knee and hip replacements. Instead, OA should be viewed as a chronic condition, where prevention and early comprehensive-care models are the accepted norm, as is the case with other chronic diseases. Joint injury, obesity and impaired muscle function are modifiable risk factors amenable to primary and secondary prevention strategies. The strategies that are most appropriate for each patient should be identified, by selecting interventions to correct--or at least attenuate--OA risk factors. We must also choose the interventions that are most likely to be acceptable to patients, to maximize adherence to--and persistence with--the regimes. Now is the time to begin the era of personalized prevention for knee OA. PMID:26439406

  12. Premature development of erosive osteoarthritis of hands in patients with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, I J; Hurst, N P; Sebben, R; Milazzo, S C; Disney, A

    1990-01-01

    The prevalence of grade III or IV osteoarthritis was determined in 210 patients with chronic renal failure, of whom 94 were receiving chronic haemodialysis and 116 had functioning renal transplants. The prevalence of grade III or IV osteoarthritis was three times greater in patients under 65 than in a control population, and all but two affected patients also had erosion of subchondral bone in at least one affected joint. The excess of osteoarthritis was apparent in both the transplant recipients and those receiving haemodialysis. Over the age of 65 there was no significant difference in prevalence. Metabolic bone disease, including osteopenia, might contribute to the development of erosive osteoarthritis in chronic renal failure. Images PMID:2383060

  13. Clinical trial data in support of changing guidelines in osteoarthritis treatment

    PubMed Central

    Balmaceda, Casilda M

    2014-01-01

    Goals for the management of osteoarthritis (OA) emphasize pain relief, reduction of inflammation, and improvement in functioning. Among pharmacological pain management interventions, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are frequently recommended as the most effective treatment option for OA. However, the use of traditional oral NSAIDs is associated with risk of serious adverse events involving the gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and renal systems. Topical NSAIDs are an alternative with well-established tolerability and efficacy in the treatment of OA of the knee or hand. While the management of OA pain is evolving toward the more widespread use of topical NSAIDs, some OA management guidelines have yet to incorporate these agents in their recommendations. This review examines the efficacy and tolerability of topical NSAIDs, their current placement in OA management guidelines, and their potential role in enabling pain specialists to provide individualized care for their patients with OA. PMID:24748817

  14. Association between Wnt inhibitory factor-1 expression levels in articular cartilage and the disease severity of patients with osteoarthritis of the knee

    PubMed Central

    GAO, SHU-GUANG; ZENG, CHAO; LIU, JUN-JIE; TIAN, JIAN; CHENG, CHAO; ZHANG, FANG-JIE; XIONG, YI-LIN; PAN, DING; XIAO, YONG-BING; LEI, GUANG-HUA

    2016-01-01

    Wnt inhibitory factor (WIF)-1 is a potent extracellular Wnt antagonist which may be used as a potential molecular therapy for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Although previous studies have demonstrated that WIF-1 has a protective role in experimental studies of arthritis, its role in the various disease grades of osteoarthritis (OA) remains unclear. A total of 40 patients with various stages of primary OA of the knee and 10 control subjects were enrolled in the present study. Articular cartilage specimens were harvested from subjects following total knee arthroplasty or knee above amputation. Disease severity was determined according to Modified Mankin score and cartilage tissues were ascribed to four groups: Normal, mild, moderate and severe lesions. WIF-1 expression levels in articular cartilage were measured using immunohistochemical techniques. WIF-1 expression levels were detected in all cartilage tissues. As compared with the controls, patients with OA exhibited significantly decreased WIF-1 expression levels in the articular cartilage (0.19±0.05 vs. 0.26±0.04; P<0.01). Furthermore, articular cartilage WIF-1 expression levels in the moderate and severe lesion groups were significantly reduced, as compared with the controls (P<0.01) and mild lesion group (P<0.05). Subsequent analysis demonstrated that articular cartilage WIF-1 expression levels were negatively correlated with the severity of disease (r=−0.896, P<0.001). In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that WIF-1 expression levels in articular cartilage may be negatively associated with progressive joint damage in patients with OA of the knee; therefore, WIF-1 expression may be a potential indictor for monitoring OA disease severity. PMID:27073457

  15. Incorporating Novel Mobile Health Technologies Into Management of Knee Osteoarthritis in Patients Treated With Intra-Articular Hyaluronic Acid: Rationale and Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Skrepnik, Nebojsa; Toselli, Richard M; Leroy, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is one of the leading causes of disability in the United States. One relatively new strategy that could be helpful in the management of OA is the use of mHealth technologies, as they can be used to increase physical activity and promote exercise, which are key components of knee OA management. Objective Currently, no published data on the use of a mHealth approach to comprehensively monitor physical activity in patients with OA are available, and similarly, no data on whether mHealth technologies can impact outcomes are available. Our objective is to evaluate the effectiveness of mHealth technology as part of a tailored, comprehensive management strategy for patients with knee OA. Methods The study will assess the impact of a smartphone app that integrates data from a wearable activity monitor (thereby both encouraging changes in mobility as well as tracking them) combined with education about the benefits of walking on patient mobility. The results from the intervention group will be compared with data from a control group of individuals who are given the same Arthritis Foundation literature regarding the benefits of walking and wearable activity monitors but who do not have access to the data from those monitors. Activity monitors will capture step count estimates and will compare those with patients’ step goals, calories burned, and distance walked. Patients using the novel smartphone app will be able to enter information on their daily pain, mood, and sleep quality. The relationships among activity and pain, activity and mood, and sleep will be assessed, as will patient satisfaction with and adherence to the mobile app. Results We present information on an upcoming trial that will prospectively assess the ability of a mobile app to improve mobility for knee OA patients who are treated with intra-articular hyaluronic acid. Conclusions We anticipate the results of this study will support the concept that m

  16. Electromyographic power spectrum of jaw muscles during clenching in unilateral temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Park, I H; McCall, W D; Chung, J W

    2012-09-01

    The relationship between temporomandibular joints (TMJ) osteoarthritis and masticatory muscle disorders is poorly understood. The data are sparse, the results are conflicting, and electromyographic (EMG) power spectrum analysis has not been used. The aims of this study were to compare the differences in EMG power spectrum during, and pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) before and after, sustained clenching in patients with unilateral TMJ osteoarthritis and healthy control subjects. Nineteen patients with unilateral TMJ osteoarthritis without masticatory muscle pain and 20 control subjects were evaluated. We measured EMG amplitudes at maximum voluntary contraction, median frequency from the EMG power spectrum during sustained clenching at 70% and PPTs before and after the clenching in both temporalis and masseter muscles. There were no significant differences in PPT decrease between muscles or between groups during sustained clenching. There were no significant differences in maximum voluntary contraction EMG activity ratios of affected to unaffected sides between groups, or of masseter to temporalis muscles between affected and unaffected side of patients with TMJ osteoarthritis. Median frequencies decreased from the beginning to the end of the sustained clench, and the interaction between group and clench was significant: the median frequency decrease was larger in the osteoarthritis group. Our results suggested that masticatory muscles of patients with unilateral TMJ osteoarthritis are more easily fatigued during sustained clenching than normal subjects. PMID:22672238

  17. Pre-Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Brittberg, Mats; Eriksson, Karl; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Lindahl, Anders; Marlovits, Stefan; Möller, Per; Richardson, James B.; Steinwachs, Matthias; Zenobi-Wong, Marcy

    2015-01-01

    Objective An attempt to define pre-osteoarthritis (OA) versus early OA and definitive osteoarthritis. Methods A group of specialists in the field of cartilage science and treatment was formed to consider the nature of OA onset and its possible diagnosis. Results Late-stage OA, necessitating total joint replacement, is the end stage of a biological process, with many previous earlier stages. Early-stage OA has been defined and involves structural changes identified by arthroscopy or radiography. The group argued that before the “early-stage OA” there must exist a stage where cellular processes, due to the presence of risk factors, have kicked into action but have not yet resulted in structural changes. The group suggested that this stage could be called “pre-osteoarthritis” (pre-OA). Conclusions The group suggests that defining points of initiation for OA in the knee could be defined, for example, by traumatic episodes or surgical meniscectomy. Such events may set in motion metabolic processes that could be diagnosed by modern MRI protocols or arthroscopy including probing techniques before structural changes of early OA have developed. Preventive measures should preferably be applied at this pre-OA stage in order to stop the projected OA “epidemic.” PMID:26175861

  18. Knee motion variability in patients with knee osteoarthritis: the effect of self-reported instability

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, Jonathan A.; Robinson, Megan E.; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley; Tashman, Scott; Farrokhi, Shawn

    2015-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis has been previously associated with a stereotypical knee-stiffening gait pattern and reduced knee joint motion variability due to increased antagonist muscle co-contractions and smaller utilized arc of motion during gait. However, episodic self-reported instability may be a sign of excessive motion variability for a large subgroup of patients with knee osteoarthritis. The objective of this work was to evaluate the differences in knee joint motion variability during gait in patients with knee osteoarthritis with and without self-reported instability compared to a control group of older adults with asymptomatic knees. Methods Forty-three subjects, 8 with knee osteoarthritis but no reports of instability (stable), 11 with knee osteoarthritis and self-reported instability (unstable), and 24 without knee osteoarthritis or instability (control) underwent Dynamic Stereo X-ray analysis during a decline gait task on a treadmill. Knee motion variability was assessed using parametric phase plots during the loading response phase of decline gait. Findings The stable group demonstrated decreased sagittal-plane motion variability compared to the control group (p=0.04), while the unstable group demonstrated increased sagittal-plane motion variability compared to the control (p=0.003) and stable groups (p<0.001). The unstable group also demonstrated increased anterior-posterior joint contact point motion variability for the medial tibiofemoral compartment compared to the control (p=0.03) and stable groups (p=0.03). Interpretation The finding of decreased knee motion variability in patients with knee osteoarthritis without self-reported instability supports previous research. However, presence of self-reported instability is associated with increased knee motion variability in patients with knee osteoarthritis and warrants further investigation. PMID:25796536

  19. A morphological descriptors-based pattern recognition system for the characterization of hip osteoarthritis severity from X-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boniatis, I.; Costaridou, L.; Cavouras, D.; Panagiotopoulos, E.; Panayiotakis, G.

    2007-10-01

    A pattern recognition system is proposed for the characterization of hip osteoarthritis (OA) severity. Sixty-four (64) hips, corresponding to 32 unilateral and bilateral OA patients were studied. Employing the Kellgren and Lawrence scale, hips were grouped into three OA severity categories: "Normal", "Mild/Moderate", and "Severe". Utilizing custom-developed software, 64 ROIs, corresponding to patients' radiographic Hip Joint Spaces (HJSs), were determined on digitized radiographs. A Probabilistic Neural Network classifier was designed employing morphological descriptors of the HJS-ROIs. The classifier discriminated successfully between (i) normal and OA hips (92.2% accuracy) and (ii) hips of "Mild/Moderate" OA and of "Severe" OA (91.3% accuracy). The proposed system could contribute in assessing hip OA severity.

  20. The older worker with osteoarthritis of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Keith T

    2012-01-01

    Background Changing demographics mean that many patients with large joint arthritis will work beyond traditional retirement age. This review considers the impact of knee osteoarthritis (OA) on work participation and the relation between work and knee replacement (TKR). Sources Two systematic searches in Embase and Medline, supplemented by three systematic reviews. Areas of agreement Probably, although evidence is limited, knee OA considerably impairs participation in work (labour force participation, work attendance and work productivity). Areas of uncertainty/research need Little is known about effective interventions (treatments, work changes and policies) to improve vocational participation in patients with knee OA; or how type of work affects long-term clinical outcomes (e.g. pain, function, the need for revision surgery) in patients with TKRs. The need for such research is pressing and opportune, as increasing numbers of patients with knee OA or TKR expect to work on. PMID:22544779

  1. Using animal models in osteoarthritis biomarker research.

    PubMed

    Garner, Bridget C; Stoker, Aaron M; Kuroki, Keiichi; Evans, Richard; Cook, Cristi Reeves; Cook, James L

    2011-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a disease that commonly affects human and veterinary patients. Animal models are routinely used for OA research, and the dog is a nearly ideal species for translational investigation of human OA biomarkers. The cytokine, chemokine, and matrix metalloprotease (MMP) profiles of synovial fluid, serum, and urine from dogs with surgically induced and naturally occurring OA were compared with dogs without OA using xMAP technology (Qiagen Inc., Valencia, CA). Markers that exhibited significant differences between groups were identified (monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 [MCP1], interleukin 8 [IL8], keratinocyte-derived chemoattractant [KC], and MMP2 and MMP3), and their sensitivities and specificities were calculated to determine their diagnostic usefulness in a future biomarker panel. Synovial fluid IL8 was the most sensitive, but MCP1 was also highly sensitive and specific. The alterations in KC suggested that it may differentiate between cruciate disease and other types of OA, and the MMPs were most sensitive and specific in the serum. This study provided additional insight to the participation of cytokines, chemokines, and MMPs in OA, and potential diagnostic biomarker candidates were identified. A brief literature review of other biomarker candidates previously examined using animal models is discussed. PMID:22303754

  2. Characterization of the Cartilage DNA Methylome in Knee and Hip Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rushton, Michael D; Reynard, Louise N; Barter, Matt J; Refaie, Ramsay; Rankin, Kenneth S; Young, David A; Loughlin, John

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to characterize the genome-wide DNA methylation profile of chondrocytes from knee and hip cartilage obtained from patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and hip cartilage obtained from patients with femoral neck fracture, providing the first comparison of DNA methylation between OA and non-OA hip cartilage, and between OA hip and OA knee cartilage. Methods The study was performed using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array, which allows the annotation of ∼480,000 CpG sites. Genome-wide methylation was assessed in chondrocyte DNA extracted from 23 hip OA patients, 73 knee OA patients, and 21 healthy hip control patients with femoral neck fracture. Results Analysis revealed that chondrocytes from the hip cartilage of OA patients and healthy controls have unique methylation profiles, with 5,322 differentially methylated loci (DMLs) identified between the 2 groups. In addition, a comparison between hip and knee OA chondrocytes revealed 5,547 DMLs between the 2 groups, including DMLs in several genes known to be involved in the pathogenesis of OA. Hip OA samples were found to cluster into 2 groups. A total of 15,239 DMLs were identified between the 2 clusters, with an enrichment of genes involved in inflammation and immunity. Similarly, we confirmed a previous report of knee OA samples that also clustered into 2 groups. Conclusion We demonstrated that global DNA methylation using a high-density array can be a powerful tool in the characterization of OA at the molecular level. Identification of pathways enriched in DMLs between OA and OA-free cartilage highlight potential etiologic mechanisms that are involved in the initiation and/or progression of the disease and that could be therapeutically targeted. PMID:24838673

  3. Early results of the Acclaim total elbow replacement in patients with primary osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Naqui, S Z; Rajpura, A; Nuttall, D; Prasad, P; Trail, I A

    2010-05-01

    This is a retrospective review of the results of the Acclaim total elbow replacement in 11 older patients aged > or = 65 years with primary osteoarthritis of the elbow, with a mean follow-up of 57.6 months (30 to 86.4). Significant reductions in pain and improvement in range of movement and function were recorded. Radiological review revealed two patients with 1 mm lucencies in a single zone, and one patient with 1 mm lucencies in two zones. No components required revision. There were no deep infections, dislocations or mechanical failures. Complications included one intra-operative medial condylar fracture and one post-operative transient ulnar neuropathy, which resolved. This study demonstrates that the Acclaim prosthesis provides good symptomatic relief and improvement of function in patients with primary osteoarthritis, with low rates of loosening or other complications. This prosthesis can therefore be considered for patients aged > or = 65 years with primary osteoarthritis of the elbow. PMID:20436004

  4. Association between psychiatric disorders and osteoarthritis: a nationwide longitudinal population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shih-Wei; Wang, Wei-Te; Lin, Li-Fong; Liao, Chun-De; Liou, Tsan-Hon; Lin, Hui-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although the association between depressive disorders and osteoarthritis (OA) has been studied, the association of other psychiatric disorders with OA remains unclear. Here, we investigated whether psychiatric disorders are risk factors for OA. The data were obtained from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005 of Taiwan. We collected the ambulatory care claim records of patients who were diagnosed with psychiatric disorders according to the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2008. The prevalence and adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of osteoarthritis among patients with psychiatric disorders and the control cohort were estimated. Of 74,393 patients with psychiatric disorders, 16,261 developed OA during the 7-year follow-up period. The crude HR for OA was 1.44 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.39–1.49), which was higher than that of the control cohort. The adjusted HR for OA was 1.42 (95% CI, 1.39–1.42) among patients with psychiatric disorders during the 7-year follow-up period. Further analysis revealed that affective psychoses, neurotic illnesses or personality disorders, alcohol and drug dependence or abuse, and other mental disorders were risk factors for OA. This large-scale longitudinal population-based study revealed that affective psychoses, personality disorders, and alcohol and drug dependence or abuse are risk factors for OA. PMID:27368019

  5. Association between psychiatric disorders and osteoarthritis: a nationwide longitudinal population-based study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Wei; Wang, Wei-Te; Lin, Li-Fong; Liao, Chun-De; Liou, Tsan-Hon; Lin, Hui-Wen

    2016-06-01

    Although the association between depressive disorders and osteoarthritis (OA) has been studied, the association of other psychiatric disorders with OA remains unclear. Here, we investigated whether psychiatric disorders are risk factors for OA.The data were obtained from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005 of Taiwan. We collected the ambulatory care claim records of patients who were diagnosed with psychiatric disorders according to the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2008. The prevalence and adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of osteoarthritis among patients with psychiatric disorders and the control cohort were estimated.Of 74,393 patients with psychiatric disorders, 16,261 developed OA during the 7-year follow-up period. The crude HR for OA was 1.44 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.39-1.49), which was higher than that of the control cohort. The adjusted HR for OA was 1.42 (95% CI, 1.39-1.42) among patients with psychiatric disorders during the 7-year follow-up period. Further analysis revealed that affective psychoses, neurotic illnesses or personality disorders, alcohol and drug dependence or abuse, and other mental disorders were risk factors for OA.This large-scale longitudinal population-based study revealed that affective psychoses, personality disorders, and alcohol and drug dependence or abuse are risk factors for OA. PMID:27368019

  6. Topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for management of osteoarthritis in long-term care patients

    PubMed Central

    Argoff, Charles E; Gloth, F Michael

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is common in patients ≥65 years of age. Although nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are often prescribed for osteoarthritis pain, they pose age-related cardiovascular, renal, and gastrointestinal risks. Two topical NSAIDs, diclofenac sodium 1% gel (DSG) and diclofenac sodium 1.5% in 45.5% dimethylsulfoxide solution (D-DMSO), are approved in the US for the treatment of osteoarthritis pain. Topical NSAIDs have shown efficacy and safety in knee (DSG, D-DMSO) and hand (DSG) osteoarthritis. Analyses of data from randomized controlled trials of DSG in hand and knee osteoarthritis demonstrate significant improvement of pain and function in both younger patients (<65 years) and older patients (≥65 years) and suggest good safety and tolerability. However, long-term safety data in older patients are limited. Topical NSAIDs can ease medication administration and help address barriers to pain management in older patients, such as taking multiple medications and inability to swallow, and are a valuable option for long-term care providers. PMID:22076115

  7. One-year follow-up of mud-bath therapy in patients with bilateral knee osteoarthritis: a randomized, single-blind controlled trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fioravanti, A.; Bacaro, G.; Giannitti, C.; Tenti, S.; Cheleschi, S.; Guidelli, G. M.; Pascarelli, N. A.; Galeazzi, M.

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this prospective parallel randomized single-blind study was to assess that a cycle of mud-bath therapy (MBT) provides any benefits over usual treatment in patients with bilateral knee osteoarthritis (OA). Patients with symptomatic primary bilateral knee OA, according to ACR criteria, were included in the study and randomized to one of two groups: one group received a cycle of MBT at spa center of Chianciano Terme (Italy) in addition to the usual treatment, and one group continued their regular care routine alone. Clinical assessments were performed 7 days before enrollment (screening visit), at the time of enrollment (basal time), after 2 weeks, and after 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after the beginning of the study. All assessments were conducted by two researchers blinded to treatment allocation. The primary efficacy outcomes were the global pain score evaluated by Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) subscore for physical function (W-TPFS). Of the 235 patients screened, 103 met the inclusion criteria: 53 patients were included in the MBT group and 50 in the control group. In the group of patients treated with MBT, we observed a statistically significant ( p < 0.001) reduction of VAS and W-TPFS score at the end of the treatment; this improvement was significant ( p < 0.05) also at 3 months of follow-up. The control group did not show significant differences between baseline time and all other times. The differences between one group were significant for both primary parameters already from the 15th day and persisted up to the 9th month. This beneficial effect was confirmed by the significant reduction of symptomatic drug consumption. Tolerability of MBT seemed to be good, with light and transitory side effects. Our results confirm that a cycle of MBT added to usual treatment provides a beneficial effect on the painful symptoms and functional capacities in patients with knee OA that

  8. Comparison of AIMS2-SF, WOMAC, x-ray and a global physician assessment in order to approach quality of life in patients suffering from osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rosemann, Thomas; Joos, Stefanie; Koerner, Thorsten; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Laux, Gunter

    2006-01-01

    Background Chronic diseases like osteoarthritis (OA) substantially affect different dimensions of quality of life (QoL). The aim of the study was to reveal possible factors which mainly influence general practitioners (GPs) assessment of patients' QoL. Methods 220 primary care patients with OA of the knee or the hip treated by their general practitioner for at least one year were included. All GPs were asked to assess patients' QoL based on the patients' history, actual examination and existing x-rays by means of a visual analog scale (VAS scale), resulting in values ranging from 0 to 10. Patients were asked to complete the McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and the Arthritis Impact Measurement Scale2 Short Form (AIMS2-SF) questionnaire. Results Significant correlations were revealed between "GP assessment" and the AIMS2-SF scales "physical" (rho = 0.495) and "symptom" (rho = 0.598) as well as to the "pain" scale of the WOMAC (rho = 0.557). A multivariate ordinal regression analysis revealed only the AIMS2-SF "symptom" scale (coefficient beta = 0.2588; p = 0.0267) and the x-ray grading according to Kellgren and Lawrence as significant influence variables (beta = 0.6395; p = 0.0004). Conclusion The results of the present study suggest that physicians' assessment of patients' QoL is mainly dominated by physical factors, namely pain and severity of x-ray findings. Our results suggest that socioeconomic and psychosocial factors, which are known to have substantial impact on QoL, are underestimated or missed. Moreover, the overestimation of x-ray findings, which are known to be less correlated to QoL, may cause over-treatment while important and promising targets to increase patients' QoL are missed. PMID:16438717

  9. The Identity Crisis of Osteoarthritis in General Practice: A Qualitative Study Using Video-Stimulated Recall

    PubMed Central

    Paskins, Zoe; Sanders, Tom; Croft, Peter R.; Hassell, Andrew B.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Patients and doctors report marked disenchantment with primary care consultation experiences relating to osteoarthritis. This study aimed to observe and analyze interactions between general practitioners (GPs) and patients presenting with osteoarthritis (OA) to identify how to improve care for OA. METHODS We conducted an observational study in general practices in the United Kingdom using video-recorded real-life consultations of unselected patients and their GPs. Postconsultation interviews were conducted using video-stimulated recall. Both consultations and interviews were analyzed thematically. RESULTS Three key themes were identified in an analysis of 19 OA consultations and the matched GP and patient interviews: complexity, dissonance, and prioritization. The topic of osteoarthritis arises in the consultation in complex contexts of multimorbidity and multiple, often not explicit, patient agendas. Dissonance between patient and doctor was frequently observed and reported; this occurred when GPs normalized symptoms of OA as part of life and reassured patients who were not seeking reassurance. GPs used wear and tear in preference to osteoarthritis or didn’t name the condition at all. GPs subconsciously made assumptions that patients did not consider OA a priority and that symptoms raised late in the consultation were not troublesome. CONCLUSIONS The lack of a clear illness profile results in confusion between patients and doctors about what OA is and its priority in the context of multimorbidity. This study highlights generic communication issues regarding the potential negative consequences of unsought reassurance and the importance of validation of symptoms and raises new arguments for tackling OA’s identity crisis by developing a clearer medical language with which to explain OA. PMID:26553893

  10. Nutraceuticals: Potential for Chondroprotection and Molecular Targeting of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Daniel J.; Choudhury, Marwa; Hirsh, David M.; Hardin, John A.; Cobelli, Neil J.; Sun, Hui B.

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease and a leading cause of adult disability. There is no cure for OA, and no effective treatments which arrest or slow its progression. Current pharmacologic treatments such as analgesics may improve pain relief but do not alter OA disease progression. Prolonged consumption of these drugs can result in severe adverse effects. Given the nature of OA, life-long treatment will likely be required to arrest or slow its progression. Consequently, there is an urgent need for OA disease-modifying therapies which also improve symptoms and are safe for clinical use over long periods of time. Nutraceuticals—food or food products that provide medical or health benefits, including the prevention and/or treatment of a disease—offer not only favorable safety profiles, but may exert disease- and symptom-modification effects in OA. Forty-seven percent of OA patients use alternative medications, including nutraceuticals. This review will overview the efficacy and mechanism of action of commonly used nutraceuticals, discuss recent experimental and clinical data on the effects of select nutraceuticals, such as phytoflavonoids, polyphenols, and bioflavonoids on OA, and highlight their known molecular actions and limitations of their current use. We will conclude with a proposed novel nutraceutical-based molecular targeting strategy for chondroprotection and OA treatment. PMID:24284399

  11. Integrating lifestyle approaches into osteoarthritis care

    PubMed Central

    Garver, Matthew J; Focht, Brian C; Taylor, Sarah J

    2015-01-01

    As the lifetime risk, societal cost, and overall functional impact of osteoarthritis (OA) is imposing, it is imperative that clinicians provide an individualized care model for patients. Patients must be offered a multiplicity of care strategies and encouraged to embrace lifestyle approaches for self-managing the effects and symptoms of OA. Certainly, the attitude of the clinician and patient will directly influence receptivity and implementation of lifestyle approaches. This work proposes how the use of structured and routine assessments and cognitive therapy ideologies may complement a comprehensive treatment plan. Assessments described herein include objective and/or self-report measures of physical function, pain, attitude about social support, and sleep quality. Baseline assessments followed by systematic monitoring of the results may give patients and clinicians valuable insight into the effectiveness of the care plan. Empirical evidence from randomized trials with OA patients highlights the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral change strategies for addressing salient concerns for OA (pain control, mobility performance, and sleep quality). Cognitive restructuring can provide patients with renewed power in managing their disease. Cognitive therapy topics discussed presently include: 1) what is OA?, 2) effectiveness of exercise and FITT (frequency, intensity, time, and type) principles for OA patients, 3) goal-setting and barriers, and 4) translating to independent care. Woven within the discussion about cognitive therapy are ideas about how the results from baseline assessments and group-mediated dynamics might assist more favorable outcomes. There are a plethora of assessments and cognitive therapy topics that could be utilized in the care strategy that we are promoting, but the present topics were selected for their low clinician and patient burden and promising results in trials with OA patients. Clinicians who are comfortable and knowledgeable about a

  12. Integrating lifestyle approaches into osteoarthritis care.

    PubMed

    Garver, Matthew J; Focht, Brian C; Taylor, Sarah J

    2015-01-01

    As the lifetime risk, societal cost, and overall functional impact of osteoarthritis (OA) is imposing, it is imperative that clinicians provide an individualized care model for patients. Patients must be offered a multiplicity of care strategies and encouraged to embrace lifestyle approaches for self-managing the effects and symptoms of OA. Certainly, the attitude of the clinician and patient will directly influence receptivity and implementation of lifestyle approaches. This work proposes how the use of structured and routine assessments and cognitive therapy ideologies may complement a comprehensive treatment plan. Assessments described herein include objective and/or self-report measures of physical function, pain, attitude about social support, and sleep quality. Baseline assessments followed by systematic monitoring of the results may give patients and clinicians valuable insight into the effectiveness of the care plan. Empirical evidence from randomized trials with OA patients highlights the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral change strategies for addressing salient concerns for OA (pain control, mobility performance, and sleep quality). Cognitive restructuring can provide patients with renewed power in managing their disease. Cognitive therapy topics discussed presently include: 1) what is OA?, 2) effectiveness of exercise and FITT (frequency, intensity, time, and type) principles for OA patients, 3) goal-setting and barriers, and 4) translating to independent care. Woven within the discussion about cognitive therapy are ideas about how the results from baseline assessments and group-mediated dynamics might assist more favorable outcomes. There are a plethora of assessments and cognitive therapy topics that could be utilized in the care strategy that we are promoting, but the present topics were selected for their low clinician and patient burden and promising results in trials with OA patients. Clinicians who are comfortable and knowledgeable about a

  13. Correlation of changes in pain intensity with synovial fluid adenosine triphosphate levels after treatment of patients with osteoarthritis of the knee with high-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid.

    PubMed

    Kumahashi, Nobuyuki; Naitou, Kohei; Nishi, Hideyuki; Oae, Kazunori; Watanabe, Yohei; Kuwata, Suguru; Ochi, Mitsuo; Ikeda, Mitsugu; Uchio, Yuji

    2011-06-01

    We sought to determine whether a clinical association exists between osteoarthritis (OA)-associated knee pain and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels in synovial fluid (SF). A total of 28 patients with 28 primary OA knees were included. They routinely received intra-articular injection of high-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid (HA) once weekly for 5 weeks (treated group). Eight patients without knee pain who had undergone an operation for anterior or posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction 2 years ago were also examined (control group). SF and blood ATP concentrations, total amount of ATP, total SF volume, and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scores in all patients were measured and we compared pre-treatment values with those 1 week after the final treatment. We evaluated the correlation of change in total ATP (ΔATP) and change in VAS score (ΔVAS), ΔVAS and change in SF volume (ΔSF), and ATP concentration in SF and blood. In the treated group, SF ATP concentration, total amount of ATP, SF volume, and VAS score were all significantly lower post-treatment than pre-treatment (p = 0.0005, 0.0003, 0.0022, and < 0.0001, respectively). In treated group, ΔVAS was significantly associated with ΔATP (r = 0.56, p = 0.0032), ΔSF was significantly associated with ΔVAS (r = 0.78, p < 0.0001), and total amount of SF ATP and SF volume at pre-treatment were significantly higher than the control group (p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001) We demonstrated an association between SF ATP level changes and OA knee pain, which should facilitate a further understanding of OA pain mechanisms. PMID:20627733

  14. Phase 1, placebo-controlled, dose escalation trial of chicory root extract in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Extracts of chicory root have anti-inflammatory properties in vitro and in animal models of arthritis. The primary objective of this investigator-initiated, Phase 1, placebo-controlled, double blind, dose-escalating trial was to determine the safety and tolerability of a proprietary bioactive extract of chicory root in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Secondary objectives were to assess effects on the signs and symptoms of this disorder. Methods Individuals greater than 50 years of age with OA of the hip or knee were eligible for trial entry. A total of 40 patients were enrolled in 3 cohorts and were treated with escalating chicory doses of 600 mg/day, 1200 mg/day and 1800 mg/day for 1 month. The ratio of active treatment to placebo was 5:3 in cohorts 1 and 2 (8 patients) each and 16:8 in cohort 3 (24 patients). Safety evaluations included measurement of vital signs and routine lab tests at baseline and the end of the treatment period. Efficacy evaluations at baseline and final visits included self-assessment questionnaires and measurement of the 25-foot walking time. Results In the highest dose cohort, 18 patients who completed treatment per protocol were analyzed for efficacy. In this group, 13 patients showed at least 20% improvement in the defined response domains of pain, stiffness and global assessment: 9 of 10 (90%) patients randomized to active treatment with chicory and 4 of 8 (50%) patients randomized to placebo (P = 0.06). In general, the treatment was well-tolerated. Only one patient who was treated with the highest dose of chicory had to discontinue treatment due to an adverse event. Conclusions The results of this pilot study suggest that a proprietary bioactive extract of chicory root has a potential role in the management of OA and merits further investigation. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT 01010919. PMID:20618964

  15. Contralateral Sensory and Motor Effects of Unilateral Kaltenborn Mobilization in Patients with Thumb Carpometacarpal Osteoarthritis: A Secondary Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Villafañe, Jorge H.; de-las-Peñas, Cesar Fernandez; Silva, Guillermo B.; Negrini, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine changes in pressure sensitivity and pinch strength in patients with thumb carpometacarpal (CMC) osteoarthritis (OA) in the contralateral hand after unilateral Kaltenborn mobilization on the symptomatic hand. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-nine females with dominant hand thumb CMC osteoarthritis participated (age 70–90), and were randomized into 2 groups. The experimental group received a Kaltenborn mobilization, and the placebo group received a nontherapeutic dose of intermittent ultrasound. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) at the thumb CMC joint, scaphoid bone and hamate bone and tip and tripod pinch strength were assessed before and after the intervention and 1 week (1st follow-up) and 2 weeks (2nd follow-up) after the intervention. [Results] Significant increases in PPT in the experimental group at all follow-up periods as compared with baseline data were found. The post-intervention between-group mean differences for PPT were 1.1 (95%CI 0.4–1.8) for the CMC joint, 1.1 (95%CI 0.2–2.1) for the scaphoid, and 1.5 (95%CI 0.5–2.8) for the hamate. The post-intervention between-group mean differences were 0.5 (95%CI 0.2–0.9) for the tip pinch and 0.3 (95%CI 0.1–0.6) for the tripod pinch. [Conclusion] The current secondary analysis found that Kaltenborn mobilization for the symptomatic hand reduces pressure pain sensitivity (PPT increases) and also produces motor changes in the contralateral non-treated hand compared with a placebo group. PMID:25013272

  16. Contralateral sensory and motor effects of unilateral kaltenborn mobilization in patients with thumb carpometacarpal osteoarthritis: a secondary analysis.

    PubMed

    Villafañe, Jorge H; Fernandez de-Las-Peñas, Cesar; Silva, Guillermo B; Negrini, Stefano

    2014-06-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine changes in pressure sensitivity and pinch strength in patients with thumb carpometacarpal (CMC) osteoarthritis (OA) in the contralateral hand after unilateral Kaltenborn mobilization on the symptomatic hand. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-nine females with dominant hand thumb CMC osteoarthritis participated (age 70-90), and were randomized into 2 groups. The experimental group received a Kaltenborn mobilization, and the placebo group received a nontherapeutic dose of intermittent ultrasound. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) at the thumb CMC joint, scaphoid bone and hamate bone and tip and tripod pinch strength were assessed before and after the intervention and 1 week (1st follow-up) and 2 weeks (2nd follow-up) after the intervention. [Results] Significant increases in PPT in the experimental group at all follow-up periods as compared with baseline data were found. The post-intervention between-group mean differences for PPT were 1.1 (95%CI 0.4-1.8) for the CMC joint, 1.1 (95%CI 0.2-2.1) for the scaphoid, and 1.5 (95%CI 0.5-2.8) for the hamate. The post-intervention between-group mean differences were 0.5 (95%CI 0.2-0.9) for the tip pinch and 0.3 (95%CI 0.1-0.6) for the tripod pinch. [Conclusion] The current secondary analysis found that Kaltenborn mobilization for the symptomatic hand reduces pressure pain sensitivity (PPT increases) and also produces motor changes in the contralateral non-treated hand compared with a placebo group. PMID:25013272

  17. TKA for Posttraumatic Osteoarthritis Is More Complex and Needs More Surgical Resources.

    PubMed

    Dexel, Julian; Beyer, Franziska; Lützner, Cornelia; Kleber, Christian; Lützner, Jörg

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the surgical effort of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) for posttraumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) compared with primary osteoarthritis (OA). A total of 1841 TKAs were analyzed, including 170 patients with PTOA, that resulted from soft tissue trauma in 83 patients and fractures in 87 patients. Results showed that patients were significantly younger at the time of surgery in the posttraumatic group (62 vs 71 years; P<.001). Furthermore, fracture was associated with 3.7 years earlier need of TKA compared with soft tissue trauma. Operation time was significantly longer for both of the posttraumatic groups compared with OA (P<.001). Patients undergoing TKA after knee injuries are younger and surgical treatment is more challenging compared with TKA for OA. Extended operation time and implant systems with higher constraint and modular options are required. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):S36-S40.]. PMID:27219725

  18. Effects of Glucosamine-Chondroitin Sulfate, Glucosamine-Chondroitin Sulfate-Methylsulfonylmethane, or Placebo in Patients with First and Second Grade of Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wonggokusuma, Erick; Setyohadi, Bambang; Siagian, Carles; Lubis, Andri M.T.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Combination of glucosamine-chondroitin sulfate is often prescribed for patients with first and second grade Kellgren-Lawrence osteoarthritis (OA). Numerous studies have reported significant efficacy of this supplement and also their combinations with methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) for the treatment of OA. However, controversies emerged regarding the effectiveness of these supplements. This current study evaluated the efficacy of glucosamine-chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine-chondroitin sulfate-MSM on improvement of patients with first and second grade knee OA. Methods: This study was a double blind, randomized controlled clinical trial on 147 patients with first and second grade (Kellgren-Lawrence) of knee OA. Subjects were allocated by permuted block randomization to three groups, either glucosamine-chondroitin sulfate (GC) (n=49), or glucosamine-chondroitin sulfate-MSM (GCM) (n=48), or placebo (n=50). The GC group received 1500 mg glucosamine + 1200 mg chondroitin sulfate + 500 mg saccharum lactis; GCM group received 1500 mg glucosamine + 1200 mg chondroitin sulfate + 500 mg MSM; while placebo group received three matching capsules of saccharum lactis. These drugs were administered once a day for three consecutive months. VAS and WOMAC score were measured at the baseline, then at 12th week after treatment. Data was analysed by using t-independent test. Results: At week 12, WOMAC score in placebo group was significantly higher than that in GCM group (mean difference 7.15, CI 12.06-2.23, p=0.005), and it was also higher in GC group compared to GCM group (mean difference 8.17, CI 13.49-2.84, p=0.003). Whereas VAS score at week 12 in placebo group was significantly higher compared to that in GC group (mean difference 0.18, CI 1.18-0.19, p=0.007) and to that in GCM group (mean difference 0.86, CI 1.37-0.35, p=0.001). However, there was no significant difference of WOMAC score at week 12 between placebo and GC groups (p=0.681), and of VAS score between GC

  19. Tumour necrosis factor soluble receptors behave as acute phase reactants following surgery in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, chronic osteomyelitis and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Chikanza, I C; Roux-Lombard, P; Dayer, J M; Panayi, G S

    1993-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is involved in diverse biological processes including immune and inflammatory reactions and the response to surgical stress. Two soluble TNF receptor protein fragments, TNF-sR55 (from the p55 kD TNF receptor) and TNF-sR75 (from the p75 kD TNF receptor), are released by cells during inflammation and may modulate the e effects of TNF-alpha. We have studied the kinetics of secretion of TNF-alpha, TNF-sR55 and TNF-sR75 in the sera of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and control subjects with osteoarthritis (OA) or chronic osteomyelitis (OM) before and after major surgery. Significantly higher pre-operative levels of TNF-sR55 and TNF-sR75 were found in RA and OM as compared with OA (P < 0.02). Following surgery, TNF-sR55 increased within 24 h in RA, OM and OA (P < 0.05), whereas TNF-sR75 increased significantly only in OM and OA patients (P < 0.05). By contrast, no TNF-alpha was detectable before and after surgery in any of the subjects, but this may have been due to impaired detection (by ELISA) of TNF-alpha when it is bound to TNF-sR. These findings suggest that TNF-sR55 and TNF-sR75 may be further markers of the host's reaction to inflammatory insults. They may also play a role in modulating the immune and inflammatory reactions by inhibiting the systemic effects of TNF-alpha. PMID:8385584

  20. Efficacy and Safety of Celecoxib Therapy in Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chao; Gu, Ke; Yasen, Yalikun; Hou, Yanjie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis in older individuals and is among the most prevalent and disabling chronic conditions worldwide. We conducted a meta-analysis to determine the efficacy and safety of celecoxib, a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor in the treatment of osteoarthritis. Studies were pooled, and mean difference (MD), relative risk (RR), and its corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated. Fifteen relevant articles were included for this meta-analysis study. We observed that osteoarthritis total score (MD = −4.41, 95% CI −7.27 to −1.55), pain subscale score (MD = −0.86, 95% CI −1.10 to −0.62), and function subscale score (MD = −2.90, 95% CI −5.12 to −0.67) in OA patients treatment with celecoxib was significantly improved than that with placebo. There was no significant difference in the incidence of adverse events (AEs), SAEs, and discontinuations due to AEs; however, the incidence of gastrointestinal AEs in OA patients treatment with celecoxib is significantly higher than that with placebo. For AE, the incidence of abdominal pain in OA patients with celecoxib was significantly higher than that with placebo (RR = 2.24, 95% CI: 1.40–3.58; P = 0.839, I2 = 0%). There was no significant difference in diarrhea, dyspepsia, headache, and nausea. This meta-analysis indicated that celecoxib treatment (200 mg orally once daily) led to significant improvement in the pain and function of osteoarthritis. However, compared with placebo control, celecoxib resulted in greater gastrointestinal AEs, especially abdominal pain after approximately 10 to 13 weeks of treatment. The current study, therefore, provides valuable information to help physicians make treatment decisions for their patients with OA. PMID:27196460

  1. Pain relief in knee osteoarthritis reduces the propensity to trip on an obstacle.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Nirav K; Piotrowski, Gary A; Pottenger, Lawrence; Draganich, Louis F

    2007-01-01

    The pain associated with knee osteoarthritis (OA) has been shown to lead to an increased propensity to trip on an obstacle. Pain-relieving intra-articular injections are widely utilized in the treatment of knee OA. This study examined the effects of pain-relieving intra-articular knee injections on the ability to avoid contacting a suddenly appearing obstacle in patients with knee OA. Obstacle avoidance success rates, pain, body mass index, visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, depth perception, and single-leg stance duration were evaluated in nine patients with painful osteoarthritis of the knee and 14 age-matched healthy control subjects. Obstacle avoidance success rates, pain, and single leg stance duration were tested a second time in the patients with knee OA after they received their injections, which contained a fast-acting local anesthetic to provide rapid pain relief. After receiving the pain-relieving knee injections, patients with knee OA had 48% less pain and were 31% more successful in avoiding stepping on the obstacle. However, after receiving the injection, the obstacle avoidance success rates remained 20% less than those of the healthy controls. The results of this study suggest that knee pain-relief can decrease the propensity of people with painful knee OA to trip and fall over an obstacle. However, pain-relief alone did not return the patients with knee OA in this study to a disease-free risk of tripping. PMID:16529934

  2. A knee monitoring device and the preferences of patients living with osteoarthritis: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Papi, Enrica; Belsi, Athina; McGregor, Alison H

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify perspective of patients with osteoarthritis, in particular design requirements and mode of use, of wearable technology to support the rehabilitation pathway. This study is part of a user-centred design approach adopted to develop a rehabilitation tool for patients with osteoarthritis. Design Qualitative study using a focus group approach; data management via a thematic analysis of patients’ responses. Participants 21 patients with osteoarthritis (age range 45–65 years) participated in 1 of the 4 focus groups. Recruitment continued until data saturation. Setting The study was conducted in a university setting. Results Main determinants of user acceptance of a wearable technology were appearance and comfort during use. Patients were supportive of the use of wearable technologies during rehabilitation and could recognise their benefit as monitors for their progress, incentives to adhere to exercise, and tools for more informed interaction with clinicians. Conclusions This paper should encourage adoption and development of wearable technology to support rehabilitation of patients with osteoarthritis. It is pivotal that technological development takes into account patients’ views in that it should be small, light, discrete, not ‘appear medical’ or challenge the identity of the user. Derived data should be available to patients and clinicians. Furthermore, wearable technologies should be developed to operate in two modes: for exercise guidance and assessment only, and for unobtrusive everyday monitoring. The information obtained from this study should guide the design of new technologies and support their use in clinical practice. PMID:26346873

  3. Hylan G-F 20: Review of its Safety and Efficacy in the Management of Joint Pain in Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Migliore, A.; Giovannangeli, F.; Granata, M.; Laganà, B.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic degenerative joint disease that is a clinically and economically important disease. The increased prevalence of OA with aging, coupled to the demographics of aging populations, make OA a high priority health care problem. Viscosupplementation (VS) is a well-established treatment option in knee OA that is included in the professional guidelines for treatment of this joint disease, and could potentially provide a useful alternative in treating such patients with painful OA. Theoretically VS is an approach that should apply to all synovial joints. Objectives: The aim of this review is to assess the efficacy and safety of viscosupplementation with Hylan GF-20 (Synvisc®) in the management of joint pain in osteoarthritis. Methods: The following databases were searched: Medline, Database of Abstract on Reviews and Effectiveness, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Furthermore, the lists of references of retrieved publications were manually checked for additional references. The search terms Review, Viscosupplementation, Osteoarthritis, Hyaluronic acid, Hyaluronan, Sodium Hyaluronate, Hylan GF-20, Synvisc, intra-articular injection were used to identify all studies relating to the use of Synvisc® viscosupplementation therapy in OA. Results: Hylan GF-20 is a safe and effective treatment for decreasing pain and improving function in patients suffering from knee and hip OA but new evidences are emerging for its use in other joints. PMID:21151854

  4. Intercondylar Notch Stenosis of Knee Osteoarthritis and Relationship between Stenosis and Osteoarthritis Complicated with Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cong; Ma, Yinhua; Geng, Bin; Tan, Xiaoyi; Zhang, Bo; Jayswal, Chandan Kumar; Khan, Md. Shahidur; Meng, Huiqiang; Ding, Ning; Jiang, Jin; Wu, Meng; Wang, Jing; Xia, Yayi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to research whether the patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) exist intercondylar notch stenosis and the relationship between stenosis and OA complicated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A total of 79 cases of moderate–severe OA patients and 71 cases of healthy people were collected; among these OA patients, 38 were OA complicated with ACL injury and 41 were simple OA. The intercondylar notch was divided into A, U, and W types according to the notch shape in the axial sequence of MRI. Measurement of the notch width index (NWI) in the sequences of axial (NWI-1), coronal (NWI-2), and ACL attachment point at femoral (NWI-A) was done. The differences of NWI in different groups and different sequences were compared and the NWI cut-off values in different sequences were resolved by a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve which could be used as indicators for intercondylar notch narrowing were calculated. The proportion of type A in moderate–severe OA group was larger than healthy group, and similar to OA complicated with ACL injury and simple OA groups (P <0.05). The NWI values of the moderate–severe OA group in three sequences were smaller than the healthy group, and similar to OA complicated with ACL injury and simple OA groups (P <0.001). The cut-off values of ROC curve were NWI-1 <0.266, NWI-2 <0.247, and NWI-A <0.253 in the moderate–severe OA group, and NWI-1 <0.263, NWI-2 <0.246, and NWI-A <0.253 in the OA complicated with ACL injury group. The intercondylar notch of moderate–severe OA patients exist significant stenosis. Type A is one of the variables that predispose a notch to stenosis. Intercondylar notch stenosis and type A are risk factors for moderate–severe OA patients complicated with ACL injury. PMID:27124033

  5. Hip osteoarthritis: patients with complex comorbidities can make exceptional improvements following intensive exercise and education.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, Thomas William; Immins, Tikki; Middleton, Robert Gordon

    2015-01-01

    A 71-year-old man presenting with hip osteoarthritis, with a complex range of comorbidities was referred by his general practitioner to CHAIN (Cycling against Hip PAIN), a 6 week programme developed to aid self-management of hip osteoarthritis through exercise, education and advice, as defined by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines. Significant improvements were seen in Oxford hip score, the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS) - function score, sit-to-stand test, timed up and go test, pain scores and hip flexion. There was also a weight loss of 2.1 kg. The man reported 'an amazing difference' in his affected hip and leg, and improved fitness. Many clinicians would have questioned the man's suitability for the programme due to his coexisting medical conditions. This case study shows that patients may be much more able than we think to achieve significant improvement with exercise. PMID:25678618

  6. Cryopreserved Amniotic Suspension for the Treatment of Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Vines, Jeremy B; Aliprantis, Antonios O; Gomoll, Andreas H; Farr, Jack

    2016-08-01

    There are few treatment options for symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA). Human amniotic suspension allografts (ASA) have anti-inflammatory and chondroregenerative potential and thus represent a promising treatment strategy. In anticipation of a large, placebo-controlled trial of intra-articular ASA for symptomatic knee OA, an open-label prospective feasibility study was performed. Six patients with Kellgren-Lawrence grades 3 and 4 tibiofemoral knee OA were administered a single intra-articular ASA injection containing cryopreserved particulated human amnion and amniotic fluid cells. Patients were followed for 12 months after treatment. No significant injection reactions were noted. Compared with baseline there were (1) no significant effect of the ASA injection on blood cell counts, lymphocyte subsets, or inflammatory markers and (2) a small, but statistically significant increase in serum IgG and IgE levels. Patient-reported outcomes including International Knee Documentation Committee, Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome, and Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation scores were collected throughout the study and evaluated for up to 12 months. Overall, this study demonstrates the feasibility of a single intra-articular injection of ASA for the treatment of knee OA and provides the foundation for a large placebo-controlled trial of intra-articular ASA for symptomatic knee OA. PMID:26683979

  7. [Follow-up of patients with osteoarthritis. Coordinated management and criteria for referral between healthcare levels].

    PubMed

    Nieto Pol, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    The correct management of osteoarthritis requires an accurate diagnosis, evaluation of its spread and functional repercussions, and the application of comprehensive and effective individually-tailored treatment aimed at relieving pain and improving physical function with a consequent improvement in quality of life; treatment should also aim to prevent or delay disease progression and its effects. In the National Health Service, primary care is the basic level and the first point of access to healthcare; this level guarantees the continuity of care, coordinates patients, and regulates clinical workflow. Family physicians coordinate the healthcare processes related to chronic diseases and are responsible for the management, diagnosis, evaluation, treatment, and follow-up of patients with osteoarthritis. The clinical practice guidelines internationally accepted as the standard of care for the management of osteoarthritis should be adapted by both Spanish health planning strategies and clinical practice guidelines to the Spanish healthcare setting. The comprehensive assessment of osteoarthritis includes evaluation of its effects on the patient's physical function and quality of life; formulating a treatment plan in collaboration with the patient and adapted to his or her comorbidities; providing advice on basic treatments and their risks and benefits; and carrying out an individually-tailored periodic review. Referral criteria are based on diagnostic confirmation, poor treatment response, and surgical evaluation. PMID:24467961

  8. Hip Surgery Candidates: A Comparative Study of Hip Osteoarthritis and Prior Hip Fracture Patient Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Ray

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To assess similarities and differences in patient-related characteristics before and after surgery for painful disabling hip osteoarthritis among elderly subgroups with and without a trauma history. Method: First, a cohort of 1000 hospitalized patients were assessed for trends in: perceived duration of the condition, pain intensity, functional performance ability, walking distance, body mass, and comorbidity characteristics among other factors. Then, the most salient of these patient-related characteristics were compared between 42 cases of hip osteoarthritis without a trauma history and 42 cases with a trauma history matched for age and gender, using medical records and standard data recording and analysis procedures. Results: Hip osteoarthritis cases with a prior hip fracture history had a longer duration of disability, and were more impaired functionally before surgery (p < 0.05) than those with no such history. They also had lower leg muscle strength and used more assistive devices. Conclusion: Patients undergoing hip replacement surgery for painful hip osteoarthritis who have a hip fracture history are likely to be more impaired and disabled than those with no such history. PMID:19478931

  9. A Walking Education Program for Patients with Osteoarthritis of the Knee: Theory and Intervention Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegrante, John P.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A walking program for osteoarthritis patients promoted adoption by guided practice, reinforcement, and stimulus control; facilitated compliance by behavioral contracting; maintained behavior change through generalization and self-control strategies; and prevented relapse by realignment of normative beliefs and planned relapse techniques. (SK)

  10. Severity of Osteoarthritis Is Associated with Increased Arterial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Kals, Jaak; Zilmer, Mihkel; Paapstel, Kaido; Märtson, Aare

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Osteoarthritis (OA) is associated with increased cardiovascular comorbidity and mortality. Evidence is lacking about whether arterial stiffness is involved in OA. The objective of our study was to find out associations between OA, arterial stiffness, and adipokines. Design. Seventy end-stage knee and hip OA patients (age 62 ± 7 years) and 70 asymptomatic controls (age 60 ± 7 years) were investigated using the applanation tonometry to determine their parameters of arterial stiffness. Serum adiponectin, leptin, and matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3) levels were determined using the ELISA method. Correlation between variables was determined using Spearman's rho. Multiple regression analysis with a stepwise selection procedure was employed. Results. Radiographic OA grade was positively associated with increased carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV) (r = 0.272, p = 0.023). We found that OA grade was also associated with leptin and MMP-3 levels (rho = −0.246, p = 0.040 and rho = 0.235, p = 0.050, resp.). In addition, serum adiponectin level was positively associated with augmentation index and inversely with large artery elasticity index (rho = 0.293, p = 0.006 and rho = −0.249, p = 0.003, resp.). Conclusions. Our results suggest that OA severity is independently associated with increased arterial stiffness and is correlated with expression of adipokines. Thus, increased arterial stiffness and adipokines might play an important role in elevated cardiovascular risk in end-stage OA. PMID:27493667

  11. Altered Frontal and Transverse Plane Tibiofemoral Kinematics and Patellofemoral Malalignments During Downhill Gait in Patients with Mixed Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Farrokhi, Shawn; Meholic, Brad; Chuang, Wei-Neng; Gustafson, Jonathan A.; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley; Tashman, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Patients with knee osteoarthritis often present with signs of mixed tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joint disease. It has been suggested that altered frontal and transverse plane knee joint mechanics play a key role in compartment-specific patterns of knee osteoarthritis, but invivo evidence in support of this premise remains limited. Using Dynamic Stereo X-ray techniques, the aim of this study was to compare the frontal and transverse plane tibiofemoral kinematics and patellofemoral malalignments during the loading response phase of downhill gait in three groups of older adults: patients with medial tibiofemoral compartment and coexisting patellofemoral osteoarthritis (n=11); patients with lateral tibiofemoral compartment and coexisting patellofemoral osteoarthritis (n=10); and an osteoarthritis-free control group (n=22). Patients with lateral compartment osteoarthritis walked with greater and increasing degrees of tibiofemoral abduction compared to the medial compartment osteoarthritis and the control groups who walked with increasing degrees of tibiofemoral adduction. Additionally, the medial and lateral compartment osteoarthritis groups demonstrated reduced degrees of tibiofemoral internal rotation compared to the control group. Both medial and lateral compartment osteoarthritis groups also walked with increasing degrees of lateral patella tilt and medial patella translation during the loading response phase of downhill gait. Our findings suggest that despite the differences in frontal and transverse plane tibiofemoral kinematics between patients with medial and lateral compartment osteoarthritis, the malalignments of their arthritic patellofemoral joint appears to be similar. Further research is needed to determine if these kinematic variations are relevant targets for interventions to reduce pain and disease progression in patients with mixed disease. PMID:26087880

  12. Future directions for the management of pain in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sofat, Nidhi; Kuttapitiya, Anasuya

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the predominant form of arthritis worldwide, resulting in a high degree of functional impairment and reduced quality of life owing to chronic pain. To date, there are no treatments that are known to modify disease progression of OA in the long term. Current treatments are largely based on the modulation of pain, including NSAIDs, opiates and, more recently, centrally acting pharmacotherapies to avert pain. This review will focus on the rationale for new avenues in pain modulation, including inhibition with anti-NGF antibodies and centrally acting analgesics. The authors also consider the potential for structure modification in cartilage/bone using growth factors and stem cell therapies. The possible mismatch between structural change and pain perception will also be discussed, introducing recent techniques that may assist in improved patient phenotyping of pain subsets in OA. Such developments could help further stratify subgroups and treatments for people with OA in future. PMID:25018771

  13. Osteoarthritis: genes, nature-nurture interaction and the role of leptin.

    PubMed

    Garner, Malgorzata; Alshameeri, Zeiad; Khanduja, Vikas

    2013-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common disease affecting patients at different ages regardless of gender or ethnicity. As with many chronic diseases, OA is thought to have a multifactorial aetiology, which is not fully understood. Whereas the pathophysiological process of OA can be analysed at a cellular and molecular level, the interaction between genes and lifestyle remains an important factor in the development of this disease. The expanding awareness of different genes that may play a role in OA, together with many chemical mediators thought to be associated with the progression of the disease, will help in better management of this condition. Some of the chemical mediators recently implicated in this condition are the adipokines (leptin, adiponectin and resistin). Few but consistent studies suggest that leptin in association with obesity could be an important factor in OA aetiology. Hence, this could establish a strong and direct molecular link between patient life style (nurture) and the pathological process of OA (nature). However, neither a clear mechanism nor a direct clinical association linking leptin to OA has yet been established. In this article, we explore some of the genetic and environmental factors in OA aetiology. We discuss leptin in obesity and assess its possible association with OA aetiology. This should emphasise the important role of health professionals in treating obesity in order to control OA symptoms and possibly progression. PMID:24036528

  14. Outcome of total hip arthroplasty, but not of total knee arthroplasty, is related to the preoperative radiographic severity of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Tilbury, Claire; Holtslag, Maarten J; Tordoir, Rutger L; Leichtenberg, Claudia S; Verdegaal, Suzan H M; Kroon, Herman M; Fiocco, Marta; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P M

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose There is no consensus on the impact of radiographic severity of hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) on the clinical outcome of total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We assessed whether preoperative radiographic severity of OA is related to improvements in functioning, pain, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) 1 year after THA or TKA. Patients and methods This prospective cohort study included 302 THA patients and 271 TKA patients with hip or knee OA. In the THA patients, preoperatively 26% had mild OA and 74% had severe OA; in the TKA patients, preoperatively 27% had mild OA and 73% had severe OA. Radiographic severity was determined according to the Kellgren and Lawrence (KL) classification. Clinical assessments preoperatively and 1 year postoperatively included: sociodemographic characteristics and patient-reported outcomes (PROMs): Oxford hip/knee score, hip/knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (HOOS/KOOS), SF36, and EQ5D. Change scores of PROMs were compared with mild OA (KL 0–2) and severe OA (KL 3–4) using a multivariate linear regression model. Results Adjusted for sex, age, preoperative scores, BMI, and Charnley score, radiographic severity of OA in THA was associated with improvement in HOOS “Activities of daily living”, “Pain”, and “Symptoms”, and SF36 physical component summary (“PCS”) scale. In TKA, we found no such associations. Interpretation The decrease in pain and improvement in function in THA patients, but not in TKA patients, was positively associated with the preoperative radiographic severity of OA. PMID:26484651

  15. Accelerometer-based Physical Activity Monitoring in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: Objective and Ambulatory Assessment of Actual Physical Activity During Daily Life Circumstances

    PubMed Central

    Verlaan, L; Bolink, S.A.A.N; Van Laarhoven, S.N; Lipperts, M; Heyligers, I.C; Grimm, B; Senden, R

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is important to assess physical activity objectively during daily life circumstances, to understand the association between physical activity and diseases and to determine the effectiveness of interventions. Accelerometer-based physical activity monitoring seems a promising method and could potentially capture all four FITT (i.e. Frequency, Intensity, Time, Type) components of physical activity considered by the World Health Organization (WHO). Aim: To assess the four FITT components of physical activity with an accelerometer during daily life circumstances and compare with self-reported levels of physical activity in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and a healthy control group. Methods: Patients (n=30) with end-stage knee OA and age-matched healthy subjects (n=30) were measured. An ambulant tri-axial accelerometer was placed onto the lateral side of the upper leg. Physical activity was measured during four consecutive days. Using algorithm-based peak detection methods in Matlab, parameters covering the four FITT components were assessed. Self-reported physical activity was assessed using the Short questionnaire to assess health enhancing physical activity (SQUASH). Results: Knee OA patients demonstrated fewer walking bouts (154 ±79 versus 215 ±65 resp.; p=0.002), step counts (4402 ±2960 steps/day versus 6943 ±2581 steps/day; p=0.001) and sit-to-stand (STS) transfers (37 ±14 versus 44 ±12; p=0.031) compared to controls. Knee OA patients demonstrated more time sitting (65 ±15% versus 57 ±10% resp.; p=0.029), less time walking (8 ±4% versus 11 ±4% resp.; p=0.014) and lower walking cadence (87 ±11steps/min versus 99 ± 8steps/min resp.; p<0.001). Accelerometer-based parameters of physical activity were moderately-strong (Pearsons’s r= 0.28-0.49) correlated to self-reported SQUASH scores. Conclusion: A single ambulant accelerometer-based physical activity monitor feasibly captures the four FITT components of physical activity and

  16. A 6-week, multicentre, randomised, double-blind, double-dummy, active-controlled, clinical safety study of lumiracoxib and rofecoxib in osteoarthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Stricker, Kirstin; Yu, Sue; Krammer, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    Background Lumiracoxib is a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor effective in the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) with a superior gastrointestinal (GI) safety profile as compared to traditional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, ibuprofen and naproxen). This safety study compared the GI tolerability, the blood pressure (BP) profile and the incidence of oedema with lumiracoxib and rofecoxib in the treatment of OA. Rofecoxib was withdrawn worldwide due to an associated increased risk of CV events and lumiracoxib has been withdrawn from Australia, Canada, Europe and a few other countries following reports of suspected adverse liver reactions. Methods This randomised, double-blind study enrolled 309 patients (aged greater than or equal to 50 years) with primary OA across 51 centres in Europe. Patients were randomly allocated to receive either lumiracoxib 400 mg od (four times the recommended dose in OA) (n = 154) or rofecoxib 25 mg od (n = 155). The study was conducted for 6 weeks and assessments were performed at Weeks 3 and 6. The primary safety measures were the incidence of predefined GI adverse events (AEs) and peripheral oedema. The secondary safety measures included effect of treatment on the mean sitting systolic and diastolic blood pressure (msSBP and msDBP). Tolerability of lumiracoxib 400 mg was assessed by the incidence of AEs. Results Lumiracoxib and rofecoxib displayed similar GI safety profiles with no statistically significant difference in predefined GI AEs between the two groups (43.5% vs. 37.4%, respectively). The incidence and severity of individual predefined GI AEs was comparable between the two groups. The incidence of peripheral oedema was low and identical in both the groups (n = 9, 5.8%). Only one patient in the lumiracoxib group and three patients in the rofecoxib group had a moderate or severe event. At Week 6 there was a significantly lower msSBP and msDBP in the lumiracoxib group compared to the rofecoxib group (p < 0.05). A

  17. Clinical and cost outcomes from different hyaluronic acid treatments in patients with knee osteoarthritis: evidence from a US health plan claims database

    PubMed Central

    Dasa, Vinod; DeKoven, Mitch; Sun, Kainan; Scott, Allan; Lim, Sooyeol

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intra-articular injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) for knee osteoarthritis (OA) effectively reduces pain and delays total knee replacement (TKR) surgery; however, little is known about relative differences in clinical and cost outcomes among different HA products. Objective: To compare disease-specific costs and risk of TKR among patients receiving different HA treatments in a commercially insured cohort of patients with knee OA in the USA. Method: Retrospective analyses using IMS Health’s PharMetrics Plus Health Plan Claims Database were conducted by identifying knee OA patients with claims indicating initiation of HA treatment at an ‘index date’ during the selection period (2007–2010). Patients were required to be continuously enrolled in the database for 12 months preindex to 36 months postindex. A generalized linear model (GLM) with a gamma distribution and log-link function was used to model aggregate patient-based changes in disease-specific costs. A Cox proportional hazards model (PHM) was used to model the risk of TKR. Both multivariate models included covariates such as age, gender, comorbidities, and preindex healthcare costs. Results: 50,389 patients with HA treatment for knee OA were identified. 18,217 (36.2%) patients were treated with HA products indicated for five injections per treatment course (Supartz and Hyalgan). The remainder were treated with HA products indicated for fewer than five injections per treatment course, with 20,518 patients (40.7%) receiving Synvisc; 6,263 (12.4%), Euflexxa; and 5,391 (10.7%), Orthovisc. Synvisc- and Orthovisc-injected patients had greater disease-specific costs compared to Supartz/Hyalgan (9.0%, p<0.0001 and 6.8%, p=0.0050, respectively). Hazard ratios (HRs) showed a significantly higher risk of TKR for patients receiving Synvisc compared to Supartz/Hyalgan (HR=1.069, p=0.0009). Patients treated with Supartz/Hyalgan, Euflexxa, and Orthovisc had longer delays to TKR than those treated with

  18. Imaging for osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, D; Roemer, F W; Guermazi, A

    2016-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a widely prevalent disease worldwide and, with an increasing ageing society, is a challenge for the field of physical and rehabilitation medicine. Technologic advances and implementation of sophisticated post-processing instruments and analytic strategies have resulted in imaging playing a more and more important role in understanding the disease process of OA. Radiography is still the most commonly used imaging modality for establishing an imaging-based diagnosis of OA. The need for an effective non-surgical OA treatment is highly desired, but despite on-going research efforts no disease-modifying OA drugs have been discovered or approved to date. MR imaging-based studies have revealed some of the limitations of radiography. The ability of MR to image all relevant joint tissues within the knee and to visualize cartilage morphology and composition has resulted in MRI playing a key role in understanding the natural history of the disease and in the search for new therapies. Our review will focus on the roles and limitations of radiography and MRI with particular attention to knee OA. The use of other modalities (e.g. ultrasound, nuclear medicine, computed tomography (CT), and CT/MR arthrography) in clinical practice and OA research will also be briefly described. Ultrasound may be useful to evaluate synovial pathology in osteoarthritis, particularly in the hand. PMID:26797169

  19. Long-Term (1-Year) Safety and Efficacy of a Single 6-mL Injection of Hylan G-F 20 in Indian Patients with Symptomatic Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Sarvajeet; Thuppal, Sreedhar; Reddy, K.J; Avasthi, Sachin; Aggarwal, Anish; Bansal, Himanshu; Mohanasundaram, Senthilnathan; Bailleul, Francois

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The prevalence of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) among Asians ≥65 years is estimated to double by 2040. This study was designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a single, 6-mL intra-articular injection of hylan G-F 20 in Indian patients with knee OA at 26 weeks through to 52 weeks. Methods: This study was an open-label, multicentre, phase 4 clinical trial. Enrolled patients (N=394) were ≥30 years old with Kellgren-Lawrence grade 1–3 OA; all patients received hylan G-F 20. WOMAC, SF-12, PTGA, and COGA scores, and OA medication use were evaluated at weeks 1, 4, 12, 26, 39, and 52 (initial treatment phase). At 26, 39, or 52 weeks, eligible patients could participate in a repeat treatment phase. McNemar-Bowkers, paired t-tests and ANOVA analyses were performed (alpha=0.05). Results: At 26 weeks, statistically significant changes from baseline were observed in all efficacy parameters, including the primary efficacy endpoint of WOMAC A1 (p<0.0001). Improvements continued for 52 weeks. No significant changes occurred in concomitant medication use. Eleven patients (2.8%) were re-injected at week 26 or 52. After repeat injection, statistically significant decreases were observed in WOMAC A1, WOMAC C and PTGA scores (p≤0.028). Twenty-three (5.8%) patients reported 26 local target knee AEs. Conclusion: Among Indian patients within this study, a 6-mL hylan G-F 20 injection was well tolerated and effective in treating symptomatic knee OA with significant long-term (1 year) improvement of outcomes. When needed, repeat treatment was safe and efficacious for 4 weeks. Trial Registration: Clinical Trial Registry of India (CTRI/2010/091/000052) www.ctri.nic.in/Clinicaltrials/login.php. PMID:25328555

  20. Superior digestive tract side effects after prolonged treatment with NSAIDs in patients with osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rogoveanu, OC; Streba, CT; Vere, CC; Petrescu, L; Trăistaru, R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) represent one of the classes of drugs commonly recommended for patients with osteoarthritis. These drugs have side effects that sometimes affect the digestive tract. Patients and Methods: 30 patients with either axial or peripheral osteoarthritis, hospitalized between January 2013 and January 2015 in the Rehabilitation Clinic of the Clinical Emergency County Hospital of Craiova, were followed. All the patients included had upper gastrointestinal endoscopy performed, excluding patients who had a history of gastritis, endoscopically demonstrated ulcer or those with a history of gastrointestinal dyspeptic phenomena. Results: The endoscopic examination found acute erosive gastritis in eight cases, gastric ulcer (four cases) and duodenal ulcer (six cases). No serious complications were encountered. Four patients had no clinical manifestations with endoscopic expression. Lesions were mainly mild esophagitis (Grade I) and only in three cases, esophagitis grade II or III was found. Twelve patients (40%) had Helicobacter pylori infection and had endoscopic changes (gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer, or gastric lesions). Conclusions: The adverse effects of NSAIDs in patients with osteoarthritis vary in severity. Patient age significantly influences the severity of injuries. We have not found significant differences in the incidence of COX2 selective and non-selective NSAID-induced lesions. Pathogenic interaction between the NSAID and Helicobacter Pylori infection is most often a synergistic effect in the development of gastritis or gastroduodenal ulcer. PMID:26664470

  1. Pain Management in the Elderly: Transdermal Fentanyl for the Treatment of Pain Caused by Osteoarthritis of the Knee and Hip

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the utility of transdermal fentanyl (transdermal fentanyl, TDF) for the treatment of pain due to osteoarthritis (osteoarthritis, OA) of the knee and hip, which was not adequately controlled by nonopioid analgesics or weak opioids. WOMAC is a reliable, valid, and responsive multidimensional, self-administrated outcome measure designed specifically to evaluate patients with OA of the knee or hip. TDF significantly increased pain control and improved functioning and quality of life. Metoclopramide appeared to be of limited value in preventing nausea and vomiting. PMID:24527441

  2. Rehabilitation (exercise and strength training) and osteoarthritis: A critical narrative review.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Christelle; Lefèvre-Colau, Marie-Martine; Poiraudeau, Serge; Rannou, François

    2016-06-01

    Rehabilitation is widely recommended in national and international guidelines for managing osteoarthritis (OA) in primary care settings. According to the 2014 OA Research Society International (OARSI) recommendations, rehabilitation is even considered the core treatment of OA and is recommended for all patients. Rehabilitation for OA widely includes land- and water-based exercise, strength training, weight management, self-management and education, biomechanical interventions, and physically active lifestyle. We performed a critical narrative review of the efficacy and safety of rehabilitation for managing OA and discuss evidence-based international recommendations. The process of article selection was unsystematic. Articles were selected based on authors' expertise, self-knowledge, and reflective practice. For the purpose of the review, we focused on land- and water-based exercise and strength training for knee, hip and hand OA. Other aspects of rehabilitation in OA are treated elsewhere in this special issue. Exercise therapy is widely recommended for managing knee, hip and hand OA. However, the level of evidence varies according to OA location. Overall, consistent evidence suggests that exercise therapy and specific strengthening exercise or strength training for the lower limb reduce pain and improve physical function in knee OA. Evidence for other OA sites are less consistent. Therefore, because of the lack of specific studies, recommendations for hip and hand OA are mainly derived from studies of knee OA. In addition, no recommendations have been established regarding the exercise regimen. The efficacy and safety of exercise therapy and strength training need to be further evaluated in randomized controlled trials of patients with hip and hand OA. The optimal delivery of exercise programs also has to be more clearly defined. PMID:27155923

  3. Emerging drugs for osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Osteoarthritis (OA), the most prevalent form of joint disease, affecting as much as 13% of the world’s population. In the United States, it is the leading cause of disability in people over age 65 and is characterized by progressive cartilage loss, bone remodeling, osteophyte formation and synovial inflammation with resultant joint pain and disability. There are no treatments marketed for structural disease modification; current treatments mainly target symptoms, with >75% of patients reporting need for additional symptomatic treatment. Areas covered Drugs in later development (Phase II-III) for osteoarthritis pain and joint structural degeneration are reviewed. Not covered are procedural (e.g. arthrocentesis, physical therapy), behavioral (e.g. weight loss, pain coping techniques) or device (e.g. knee braces, surgical implants) based treatments. Expert opinion More in depth understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease, as well as elucidation of the link between clinical symptomatology and structural changes in the joint will likely lead to development of novel target classes with promising efficacy in the future. Efficacy notwithstanding, there remain significant hurdles to overcome in clinical development of these therapeutics, inherent in the progression pattern of the disease as well as challenges with readouts for both pain and structure modification trials. PMID:21542666

  4. Effect of vitamin D supplementation on progression of knee pain and cartilage volume loss in patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA), a disorder of cartilage and periarticular bone, is a public health problem without effective medical treatments. Some studies have suggested that vitamin D may protect against structural progression. A 2-year randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, clinical trial invo...

  5. Selective type II fibre muscular atrophy in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip.

    PubMed

    Sĭrca, A; Susec-Michieli, M

    1980-01-01

    The size and the distribution of type I and tye II fibres was determined in the gluteus maximus (21 cases), gluteus medius (56 cases) and tensor faciae latae (27 cases) muscles of patients with osteoarthritis of the hip. The patients were of both sexes, aged between 37 and 64 years (younger group) and between 65 and 78 years (older group). Autopsy material of the two comparable age groups and of a group of "normal" adults (aged 22-44 years) served as controls. It was shown statistically that the diameter of both types of fibres and the relative number of type II fibres diminished with progressing age. In patients with osteoarthritis the degree of the selective atrophy of type II fibres was significantly higher than in the control groups. The atrophy is interpreted as a consequence of diminished muscular activity. No neurogenic lesions were detected either in the muscles of the patients or in those of the control groups. PMID:6444440

  6. Ottawa Panel Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines for Patient Education Programmes in the Management of Osteoarthritis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Education Journal, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to develop guidelines and recommendations on patient education programmes of any type, targeted specially to individuals with OA and which were designed to improve the clinical effectiveness of managing OA. Methods: The Ottawa Methods Group contacted specialized organizations that focus on management for…

  7. Pes Anserine Bursitis in Symptomatic Osteoarthritis Patients: A Mesotherapy Treatment Study

    PubMed Central

    Di Stefano, Alexandra; Dodaj, Ira; Scarcello, Laura; Bellomo, Rosa Grazia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Pes anserine bursitis strongly affects quality of life in patients with osteoarthritis. Treatment includes nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), physiotherapy, and injections of corticosteroid, with highly variable responses; recovery can take 10 days to 36 months. Mesotherapy is a minimally invasive technique consisting of subcutaneous injections of bioactive substances. The goal is to modulate the pharmacokinetics of the injected substance and prolong the effects at a local level. Objective: To evaluate the effects of mesotherapy with diclofenac for anserine bursitis associated with knee osteoarthritis. Methods: One hundred and seventeen patients with anserine bursitis associated with grade II Kellgren-Lawrence knee osteoarthritis, assessed by clinical, radiographic, and ultrasonographic examination, were evaluated and treated. They were randomly divided into two groups (A, mesotherapy; B, control). Group A completed nine sessions of mesotherapy with sodium diclofenac (25 mg/1 mL; Akis®, IBSA, Lugano, Switzerland), 1 mL for each session, three times per week. Group B received 21 oral administrations of sodium diclofenac (50 mg; Voltaren®, Novartis, Parsippany, NJ), once a day for 3 weeks. Primary outcome measures were pain intensity assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS), along with ability to perform activities of daily living, ability to participate in sports, level of pain, symptoms, and quality of life, as assessed by the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score. These measures were performed before and after the treatment period and at 30 and 90 days' follow up. Results: In both groups pain level decreased significantly after the treatment period. Ultrasonography showed a reduction of the hypoechoic area related to anserine bursitis only in group A. Conclusion: Administration of conventional NSAIDs (diclofenac) by mesotherapy is effective in managing anserine bursitis in knee osteoarthritis in the short term and

  8. Analyzing the History of Falls in Patients with Severe Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Tsonga, Theano; Michalopoulou, Maria; Malliou, Paraskevi; Godolias, George; Gkasdaris, Grigorios; Soucacos, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    Background One out of three adults over the age of 65 years and one out of two over the age of 80 falls annually. Fall risk increases for older adults with severe knee osteoarthritis, a matter that should be further researched. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the history of falls including frequency, mechanism and location of falls, activity during falling and injuries sustained from falls examining at the same time their physical status. The secondary purpose was to determine the effect of age, gender, chronic diseases, social environment, pain elsewhere in the body and components of health related quality of life such as pain, stiffness, physical function, and dynamic stability on falls frequency in older adults aged 65 years and older with severe knee osteoarthritis. Methods An observational longitudinal study was conducted on 68 patients (11 males and 57 females) scheduled for total knee replacement due to severe knee osteoarthritis (grade 3 or 4) and knee pain lasting at least one year or more. Patients were personally interviewed for fall history and asked to complete self-administered questionnaires, such as the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC), and physical performance test was performed. Results The frequency of falls was 63.2% for the past year. The majority of falls took place during walking (89.23%). The main cause of falling was stumbling (41.54%). There was a high rate of injurious falling (29.3%). The time patients needed to complete the physical performance test implied the presence of disability and frailty. The high rates of fall risk, the high disability levels, and the low quality of life were confirmed by questionnaires and the mobility test. Conclusions Patients with severe knee osteoarthritis were at greater risk of falling, as compared to healthy older adults. Pain, stiffness, limited physical ability, reduced muscle strength, all consequences

  9. Early detection of aging cartilage and osteoarthritis in mice and patient samples using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolz, Martin; Gottardi, Riccardo; Raiteri, Roberto; Miot, Sylvie; Martin, Ivan; Imer, Raphaël; Staufer, Urs; Raducanu, Aurelia; Düggelin, Marcel; Baschong, Werner; Daniels, A. U.; Friederich, Niklaus F.; Aszodi, Attila; Aebi, Ueli

    2009-03-01

    The pathological changes in osteoarthritis-a degenerative joint disease prevalent among older people-start at the molecular scale and spread to the higher levels of the architecture of articular cartilage to cause progressive and irreversible structural and functional damage. At present, there are no treatments to cure or attenuate the degradation of cartilage. Early detection and the ability to monitor the progression of osteoarthritis are therefore important for developing effective therapies. Here, we show that indentation-type atomic force microscopy can monitor age-related morphological and biomechanical changes in the hips of normal and osteoarthritic mice. Early damage in the cartilage of osteoarthritic patients undergoing hip or knee replacements could similarly be detected using this method. Changes due to aging and osteoarthritis are clearly depicted at the nanometre scale well before morphological changes can be observed using current diagnostic methods. Indentation-type atomic force microscopy may potentially be developed into a minimally invasive arthroscopic tool to diagnose the early onset of osteoarthritis in situ.

  10. Knee pain during activities of daily living and its relationship with physical activity in patients with early and severe knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Fukutani, Naoto; Iijima, Hirotaka; Aoyama, Tomoki; Yamamoto, Yuko; Hiraoka, Masakazu; Miyanobu, Kazuyuki; Jinnouchi, Masashi; Kaneda, Eishi; Tsuboyama, Tadao; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether knee pain during various activities of daily living (ADLs) is associated with physical activity in patients with early and severe knee osteoarthritis (OA). We hypothesized that the painful ADLs associated with decreased physical activity differ according to disease severity. This cross-sectional study enrolled 270 patients with medial knee OA, assigned to either the early (Kellgren Lawrence [K/L] grade 1-2) or the severe group (K/L grade 3-4). Physical activity was assessed using a pedometer. Knee pain during six ADLs (waking up in the morning, walking on a flat surface, ascending stairs, etc.) was evaluated using a questionnaire. We performed multiple regression and quantile regression analysis to investigate whether knee pain during each ADL was associated with physical activity. In the early group, the more knee pain they experienced while ascending stairs, the lower their physical activity was (75th regression coefficient = -1033.70, P = 0.018). In the severe group, the more knee pain they experienced while walking on a flat surface or bending to the floor or standing up, the lower their physical activity was (unstandardized coefficients = -1850.87, P = 0.026; unstandardized coefficients = -2640.35, P = 0.010). Knee pain while ascending stairs and while walking on a flat surface or bending to the floor or standing up was a probable limiting factor for physical activity in early and severe knee OA, respectively. These findings suggested that a reduction in task-specific knee pain according to disease severity could improve physical activity levels. PMID:27041381

  11. The Effect of Risk Factors on the Levels of Chemical Elements in the Tibial Plateau of Patients with Osteoarthritis following Knee Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lanocha-Arendarczyk, Natalia; Kosik-Bogacka, Danuta Izabela; Prokopowicz, Adam; Kalisinska, Elzbieta; Sokolowski, Sebastian; Karaczun, Maciej; Zietek, Pawel; Podlasińska, Joanna; Pilarczyk, Bogumila; Tomza-Marciniak, Agnieszka; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Gutowska, Izabela; Safranow, Krzysztof; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the aforementioned chemical elements in tibial plateau samples obtained during knee arthroplasty. The gender-specific analysis of chemical element levels in the bone samples revealed that there were statistically significant differences in the concentration of Pb and Se/Pb ratio. The contents of elements in the tibial plateau in the patients with osteoarthritis (OA) can be arranged in the following descending order: F− > K > Zn > Fe > Sr > Pb > Mn > Se > Cd > THg. We observed statistical significant effects of environmental factors including smoking, seafood diet, and geographical distribution on the levels of the elements in tibial bone. Significant positive correlation coefficients were found for the relationships K-Cd, Zn-Sr, Zn-F−, THg-Pb, Pb-Cd, Se-Se/Pb, Se-Se/Cd, Se/Pb-Se/Cd, Pb-Cd/Ca, Cd-Cd/Ca, and F−-F−/Ca·1000. Significant negative correlations were found for the relationships THg-Se/Pb, Pb-Se/Pb, Cd-Se/Pb, K-Se/Cd, Pb-Se/Cd, Cd-Se/Cd, THg-Se/THg, Pb-Se/THg, Se-Pb/Cd, Zn-Cd/Ca, and Se/Cd-Cd/Ca. The results reported here may provide a basis for establishing reference values for the tibial plateau in patients with OA who had undergone knee replacement surgery. The concentrations of elements in the bone with OA were determined by age, presence of implants, smoking, fish and seafood diet, and sport activity. PMID:26583123

  12. Glenohumeral Joint Preservation: A Review of Management Options for Young, Active Patients with Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    van der Meijden, Olivier A.; Gaskill, Trevor R.; Millett, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    The management of osteoarthritis of the shoulder in young, active patients is a challenge, and the optimal treatment has yet to be completely established. Many of these patients wish to maintain a high level of activity, and arthroplasty may not be a practical treatment option. It is these patients who may be excellent candidates for joint-preservation procedures in an effort to avoid or delay joint replacement. Several palliative and restorative techniques are currently optional. Joint debridement has shown good results and a combination of arthroscopic debridement with a capsular release, humeral osteoplasty, and transcapsular axillary nerve decompression seems promising when humeral osteophytes are present. Currently, microfracture seems the most studied reparative treatment modality available. Other techniques, such as autologous chondrocyte implantation and osteochondral transfers, have reportedly shown potential but are currently mainly still investigational procedures. This paper gives an overview of the currently available joint preserving surgical techniques for glenohumeral osteoarthritis. PMID:22536514

  13. Alterations of amino acid metabolism in osteoarthritis: its implications for nutrition and health.

    PubMed

    Li, Yusheng; Xiao, Wenfeng; Luo, Wei; Zeng, Chao; Deng, Zhenhan; Ren, Wenkai; Wu, Guoyao; Lei, Guanghua

    2016-04-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common form of arthritis in humans. It has long been regarded as a non-inflammatory disease, but a degree of inflammation is now recognized as being a vital inducer of subpopulation of OA. Besides inflammation, the establishment and development of OA are associated with alterations in metabolism and profiles of amino acids (AA), including glutamate- and arginine-family AA as well as their related metabolites (e.g., creatinine, hydroxyproline, γ-aminobutyrate, dimethylarginines and homoarginine). Functional AA (e.g., glutamine, arginine, glutamate, glycine, proline, and tryptophan) have various benefits (i.e., anti-inflammation and anti-oxidation) in treatment of inflammation-associated diseases, including OA. Thus, these AA have potential as immunomodulatory nutrients for patients with inflammation-induced OA. PMID:26767374

  14. Mechanical and IL-1β Responsive miR-365 Contributes to Osteoarthritis Development by Targeting Histone Deacetylase 4

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xu; Guan, Yingjie; Tian, Shaoqi; Wang, Yuanhe; Sun, Kang; Chen, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical stress plays an important role in the initiation and progression of osteoarthritis. Studies show that excessive mechanical stress can directly damage the cartilage extracellular matrix and shift the balance in chondrocytes to favor catabolic activity over anabolism. However, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are emerging as important regulators in osteoarthritis pathogenesis. We have found that mechanical loading up-regulated microRNA miR-365 in growth plate chondrocytes, which promotes chondrocyte differentiation. Here, we explored the role of the mechanical responsive microRNA miR-365 in pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). We found that miR-365 was up-regulated by cyclic loading and IL-1β stimulation in articular chondrocytes through a mechanism that involved the transcription factor NF-κB. miR-365 expressed significant higher level in rat anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery induced OA cartilage as well as human OA cartilage from primary OA patients and traumatic OA Patients. Overexpression of miR-365 in chondrocytes increases gene expression of matrix degrading enzyme matrix metallopeptidase 13 (MMP13) and collagen type X (Col X). The increase in miR-365 expression in OA cartilage and in response to IL-1 may contribute to the abnormal gene expression pattern characteristic of OA. Inhibition of miR-365 down-regulated IL-1β induced MMP13 and Col X gene expression. We further showed histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) is a direct target of miR-365, which mediates mechanical stress and inflammation in OA pathogenesis. Thus, miR-365 is a critical regulator of mechanical stress and pro-inflammatory responses, which contributes cartilage catabolism. Manipulation of the expression of miR-365 in articular chondrocytes by miR-365 inhibitor may be a potent therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of osteoarthritis. PMID:27023516

  15. New developments in osteoarthritis and cartilage biology.

    PubMed

    Poulet, Blandine; Staines, Katherine A

    2016-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease and the most common form of arthritis. Characterised by articular cartilage loss, subchondral bone thickening and osteophyte formation, the OA joint afflicts much pain and disability. Whilst OA has been associated with many contributing factors, its underpinning molecular mechanisms are, nevertheless, not fully understood. Clinical management of OA is largely palliative and there is an ever growing need for an effective disease modifying treatment. This review discusses some of the recent progress in OA therapies in the different joint tissues affected by OA pathology. PMID:26921602

  16. Current Evidence for Osteoarthritis Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Anandacoomarasamy, Ananthila; March, Lyn

    2010-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis and the leading cause of chronic disability among older people. The burden of the disease is expected to rise with an aging population and the increasing prevalence of obesity. Despite this, there is as yet no cure for OA. However, in recent years, a number of potential therapeutic advances have been made, in part due to improved understanding of the underlying pathophysiology. This review provides the current evidence for symptomatic management of OA including nonpharmacological, pharmacological and surgical approaches. The current state of evidence for disease-modifying therapy in OA is also reviewed. PMID:22870434

  17. The inhibition of EZH2 ameliorates osteoarthritis development through the Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Linwei; Wu, Yaosen; Wu, Yan; Wang, Ye; Sun, Liaojun; Li, Fangcai

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to elucidate the role of the histone methyltransferase enhancer of zeste homologue 2 (EZH2) in the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis (OA) and to develop a strategy to modulate EZH2 activity for OA treatment. The expression of EZH2 in normal and OA human cartilage was compared by western blotting. The effect of EZH2 overexpression and inhibition on chondrocyte hypertrophy related gene expression was examined by real-time PCR, and histone methylation on the promoter of the Wnt inhibitor SFRP1 was analyzed using a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) PCR. Histological assessment of OA mice joint was carried out to assess the in vivo effects of EZH2 inhibitor EPZ005687. We found EZH2 level was significantly increased in the chondrocytes of OA patients compared to normal humans. Overexpression of EZH2 promoted Indian Hedgehog, MMP-13, ADAMTS-5 and COLX expression, while inhibition of EZH2 reversed this trend. Furthermore, the induction of EZH2 led to β-catenin signaling activation by increasing H3K27me3 on the promoter of SFRP1, while the inhibition of EZH2 silenced β-catenin signaling. Finally, intraarticular injection of EPZ005687 delayed OA development in mice. These results implicated EZH2 activity in OA development. Pharmacological inhibition of EZH2 may be an effective therapeutic approach for osteoarthritis. PMID:27539752

  18. The inhibition of EZH2 ameliorates osteoarthritis development through the Wnt/β-catenin pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Linwei; Wu, Yaosen; Wu, Yan; Wang, Ye; Sun, Liaojun; Li, Fangcai

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to elucidate the role of the histone methyltransferase enhancer of zeste homologue 2 (EZH2) in the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis (OA) and to develop a strategy to modulate EZH2 activity for OA treatment. The expression of EZH2 in normal and OA human cartilage was compared by western blotting. The effect of EZH2 overexpression and inhibition on chondrocyte hypertrophy related gene expression was examined by real-time PCR, and histone methylation on the promoter of the Wnt inhibitor SFRP1 was analyzed using a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) PCR. Histological assessment of OA mice joint was carried out to assess the in vivo effects of EZH2 inhibitor EPZ005687. We found EZH2 level was significantly increased in the chondrocytes of OA patients compared to normal humans. Overexpression of EZH2 promoted Indian Hedgehog, MMP-13, ADAMTS-5 and COLX expression, while inhibition of EZH2 reversed this trend. Furthermore, the induction of EZH2 led to β-catenin signaling activation by increasing H3K27me3 on the promoter of SFRP1, while the inhibition of EZH2 silenced β-catenin signaling. Finally, intraarticular injection of EPZ005687 delayed OA development in mice. These results implicated EZH2 activity in OA development. Pharmacological inhibition of EZH2 may be an effective therapeutic approach for osteoarthritis. PMID:27539752

  19. Summary of the OA biomarkers workshop 2010 - genetics and genomics: new targets in OA.

    PubMed

    Meulenbelt, I; Kraus, V B; Sandell, L J; Loughlin, J

    2011-09-01

    On November fourth and fifth 2010 a group of more than 100 international investigators gathered in Atlanta for the second Osteoarthritis (OA) Biomarkers Global Initiative workshop titled "Genetics and Genomics: New Targets in OA". The first workshop took place in April 2009 and focused on in vitro (soluble) biomarkers whilst the third and final workshop will take place in 2012 and will focus on imaging biomarkers. The OA Research Society International (OARSI) has organized the workshops. In addition to OARSI, the National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, the Arthritis Foundation, Amgen, Genzyme, the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine and Pfizer sponsored the second meeting. It was clear from this meeting that experiments in the genetics, epigenetics and genomics of OA, are yielding valuable insights into the etiology of this heterogeneous disease but that much still needs to be learnt. Combining genetic insights with conventional biomarkers and imaging modalities may provide scientists with the enhanced tools to understand this complex disease. With those tools in hand, clinicians and industry can develop protocols to ultimately improve patient care. PMID:21723402

  20. Post-operative rehabilitation and nutrition in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Mobasheri, Ali; Trovato, Francesca Maria; Szychlinska, Marta Anna; Imbesi, Rosa; Castrogiovanni, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative process involving the progressive loss of articular cartilage, synovial inflammation and structural changes in subchondral bone that lead to loss of synovial joint structural features and functionality of articular cartilage. OA represents one of the most common causes of physical disability in the world. Different OA treatments are usually considered in relation to the stage of the disease. In the early stages, it is possible to recommend physical activity programs that can maintain joint health and keep the patient mobile, as recommended by OA Research Society International (OARSI) and European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR). In the most severe and advanced cases of OA, surgical intervention is necessary. After, in early postoperative stages, it is essential to include a rehabilitation exercise program in order to restore the full function of the involved joint. Physical therapy is crucial for the success of any surgical procedure and can promote recovery of muscle strength, range of motion, coordinated walking, proprioception and mitigate joint pain. Furthermore, after discharge from the hospital, patients should continue the rehabilitation exercise program at home associated to an appropriate diet. In this review, we analyze manuscripts from the most recent literature and provide a balanced and comprehensive overview of the latest developments on the effect of physical exercise on postoperative rehabilitation in OA. The literature search was conducted using PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Google Scholar, using the keywords 'osteoarthritis', 'rehabilitation', 'exercise' and 'nutrition'. The available data suggest that physical exercise is an effective, economical and accessible to everyone practice, and it is one of the most important components of postoperative rehabilitation for OA. PMID:26962431

  1. Decreased Knee Joint Loading Associated With Early Knee Osteoarthritis After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wellsandt, Elizabeth; Gardinier, Emily S.; Manal, Kurt; Axe, Michael J.; Buchanan, Thomas S.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Background Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury predisposes individuals to early-onset knee joint osteoarthritis (OA). Abnormal joint loading is apparent after ACL injury and reconstruction. The relationship between altered joint biomechanics and the development of knee OA is unknown. Hypothesis Altered knee joint kinetics and medial compartment contact forces initially after injury and reconstruction are associated with radiographic knee OA 5 years after reconstruction. Study Design Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods Individuals with acute, unilateral ACL injury completed gait analysis before (baseline) and after (posttraining) preoperative rehabilitation and at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years after reconstruction. Surface electromyographic and knee biomechanical data served as inputs to an electromyographically driven musculoskeletal model to estimate knee joint contact forces. Patients completed radiographic testing 5 years after reconstruction. Differences in knee joint kinetics and contact forces were compared between patients with and those without radiographic knee OA. Results Patients with OA walked with greater frontal plane interlimb differences than those without OA (nonOA) at baseline (peak knee adduction moment difference: 0.00 ± 0.08 N·m/kg·m [nonOA] vs −0.15 ± 0.09 N·m/kg·m [OA], P = .014; peak knee adduction moment impulse difference: −0.001 ± 0.032 N·m·s/kg·m [nonOA] vs −0.048 ± 0.031 N·m·s/kg·m [OA], P = .042). The involved limb knee adduction moment impulse of the group with osteoarthritis was also lower than that of the group without osteoarthritis at baseline (0.087 ± 0.023 N·m·s/kg·m [nonOA] vs 0.049 ± 0.018 N·m·s/kg·m [OA], P = .023). Significant group differences were absent at posttraining but reemerged 6 months after reconstruction (peak knee adduction moment difference: 0.02 ± 0.04 N·m/kg·m [nonOA] vs −0.06 ± 0.11 N·m/kg·m [OA], P = .043). In addition, the OA group walked with lower peak

  2. Gait characterization for osteoarthritis patients using wearable gait sensors (H-Gait systems).

    PubMed

    Tadano, Shigeru; Takeda, Ryo; Sasaki, Keita; Fujisawa, Tadashi; Tohyama, Harukazu

    2016-03-21

    The objective of this work was to investigate the possibilities of using the wearable sensors-based H-Gait system in an actual clinical trial and proposes new gait parameters for characterizing OA gait. Seven H-Gait sensors, consisting of tri-axial inertial sensors, were attached to seven lower limb body segments (pelvis, both thighs, both shanks and both feet). The acceleration and angular velocity data measured were used to estimate three-dimensional kinematic parameters of patients during level walking. Three new parameters were proposed to assess the severity of OA based on the characteristics of these joint center trajectories in addition to conventional gait spatio-temporal parameters. The experiment was conducted on ten subjects with knee OA. The kinematic results obtained (hip, knee and ankle joint angles, joint trajectory in the horizontal and sagittal planes) were compared with those from a reference healthy (control) group. As a result, the angle between the right and left knee trajectories along with that of the ankle joint trajectories were almost twice as large (21.3° vs. 11.6° and 14.9° vs. 7.8°) compared to those of the healthy subjects. In conclusion, it was found that the ankle joints during stance abduct less to avoid adduction at the knee as the severity of OA increases and lead to more acute angles (less parallel) between the right and left knee/ankle joints in the horizontal plane. This method was capable to provide quantitative information about the gait of OA patients and has the advantage to allow for out-of-laboratory monitoring. PMID:26947036

  3. Genetics of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Fontenla, Cristina; Gonzalez, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a complex disease caused by the interaction of multiple genetic and environmental factors. This review focuses on the studies that have contributed to the discovery of genetic susceptibility factors in OA. The most relevant associations discovered until now are discussed in detail: GDF-5, 7q22 locus, MCF2L, DOT1L, NCOA3 and also some important findings from the arcOGEN study. Moreover, the different approaches that can be used to minimize the specific problems of the study of OA genetics are discussed. These include the study of microsatellites, phenotype standardization and other methods such as meta-analysis of GWAS and gene-based analysis. It is expected that these new approaches contribute to finding new susceptibility genetic factors for OA. PMID:24992825

  4. Joint instability and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Blalock, Darryl; Miller, Andrew; Tilley, Michael; Wang, Jinxi

    2015-01-01

    Joint instability creates a clinical and economic burden in the health care system. Injuries and disorders that directly damage the joint structure or lead to joint instability are highly associated with osteoarthritis (OA). Thus, understanding the physiology of joint stability and the mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA is of clinical significance. The first section of this review discusses the structure and function of major joint tissues, including periarticular muscles, which play a significant role in joint stability. Because the knee, ankle, and shoulder joints demonstrate a high incidence of ligament injury and joint instability, the second section summarizes the mechanisms of ligament injury-associated joint instability of these joints. The final section highlights the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanical and biological mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA. These advances may lead to new opportunities for clinical intervention in the prevention and early treatment of OA. PMID:25741184

  5. Joint Instability and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Blalock, Darryl; Miller, Andrew; Tilley, Michael; Wang, Jinxi

    2015-01-01

    Joint instability creates a clinical and economic burden in the health care system. Injuries and disorders that directly damage the joint structure or lead to joint instability are highly associated with osteoarthritis (OA). Thus, understanding the physiology of joint stability and the mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA is of clinical significance. The first section of this review discusses the structure and function of major joint tissues, including periarticular muscles, which play a significant role in joint stability. Because the knee, ankle, and shoulder joints demonstrate a high incidence of ligament injury and joint instability, the second section summarizes the mechanisms of ligament injury-associated joint instability of these joints. The final section highlights the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanical and biological mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA. These advances may lead to new opportunities for clinical intervention in the prevention and early treatment of OA. PMID:25741184

  6. Association of neuropathic pain with ultrasonographic measurements of femoral cartilage thickness and clinical parameters in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mesci, Nilgün; Mesci, Erkan; Külcü, Duygu Geler

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate whether neuropathic pain is associated with femoral condylar cartilage thickness, electrical pain threshold, and clinical parameters in patients with knee osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] Sixty patients over the age of 40 diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis were enrolled. The PainDETECT questionnaire, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Short Form-36 questionnaire were completed for all patients. Electrical sensory threshold and electrical pain threshold measurements were obtained. Femoral condylar cartilage thickness was determined by means of ultrasound. [Results] PainDETECT scores of 13 or greater were observed in 28 (46.7%) patients, indicating the presence of neuropathic pain. These patients were found to have greater average pain severity, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, and depression and anxiety scores and lower Short Form-36 scores than patients without neuropathic pain. Patients with neuropathic pain showed lower knee electrical sensory threshold and pain threshold values on average than patients without neuropathic pain. Femoral condylar cartilage thickness was not different between the two groups. [Conclusion] Neuropathic pain is associated with increased pain severity and decreased functional capacity and adversely affects quality of life and mood in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

  7. Verapamil Protects against Cartilage Degradation in Osteoarthritis by Inhibiting Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Takamatsu, Akira; Ohkawara, Bisei; Ito, Mikako; Masuda, Akio; Sakai, Tadahiro; Ishiguro, Naoki; Ohno, Kinji

    2014-01-01

    In past years, the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway has emerged as a critical regulator of cartilage development and homeostasis. FRZB, a soluble antagonist of Wnt signaling, has been studied in osteoarthritis (OA) animal models and OA patients as a modulator of Wnt signaling. We screened for FDA-approved drugs that induce FRZB expression and suppress Wnt/β-catenin signaling. We found that verapamil, a widely prescribed L-type calcium channel blocker, elevated FRZB expression and suppressed Wnt/β-catenin signaling in human OA chondrocytes. Expression and nuclear translocation of β-catenin was attenuated by verapamil in OA chondrocytes. Lack of the verapamil effects in LiCl-treated and FRZB-downregulated OA chondrocytes also suggested that verpamil suppressed Wnt signaling by inducing FRZB. Verapamil enhanced gene expressions of chondrogenic markers of ACAN encoding aggrecan, COL2A1 encoding collagen type II α1, and SOX9, and suppressed Wnt-responsive AXIN2 and MMP3 in human OA chondrocytes. Verapamil ameliorated Wnt3A-induced proteoglycan loss in chondrogenically differentiated ATDC5 cells. Verapamil inhibited hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes in the explant culture of mouse tibiae. Intraarticular injection of verapamil inhibited OA progression as well as nuclear localizations of β-catenin in a rat OA model. We propose that verapamil holds promise as a potent therapeutic agent for OA by upregulating FRZB and subsequently downregulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:24658359

  8. A multicenter, randomized, controlled trial to evaluate the safety profile, tolerability, and efficacy of rofecoxib in advanced elderly patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Truitt, K E; Sperling, R S; Ettinger, W H; Greenwald, M; DeTora, L; Zeng, Q; Bolognese, J; Ehrich, E

    2001-04-01

    This 6-week study was conducted to test the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of rofecoxib (a selective COX-2 inhibitor) compared to nabumetone (a non-selective NSAID) and placebo in osteoarthritis (OA) patients aged 80 and older. Three hundred forty-one patients, mean age 83 years, were randomized. Allocations were made in an approximately 1:2:1:2 ratio (placebo: 12.5 mg rofecoxib: 25 mg rofecoxib: 1500 mg nabumetone). Least square mean changes from baseline in the primary efficacy endpoint, Patient Global Assessment of Disease Status, were as follows (with negative numbers indicating improvement): -14.85 mm for placebo; -25.34 mm for 12.5 mg rofecoxib; -25.40 mm for 25 mg of rofecoxib; and -25.95 mm for nabumetone (p<0.001 for all active treatments vs placebo.) Results from secondary endpoints, including the 3 WOMAC sub-scales (pain, stiffness, and disability) and the Investigator Global Assessment of Disease Status, were consistent with those for the primary endpoint. No significant between-group differences were observed in the proportions of patients who discontinued treatment due to either clinical or laboratory adverse experiences. Renal safety (edema and hypertension adverse experiences) was similar for rofecoxib and nabumetone. No gastroduodenal ulcers occurred; however, the demonstration of gastrointestinal risk with rofecoxib or nabumetone was beyond the scope of this trial. We conclude that in patients 80 years and older, rofecoxib, 12.5 mg and 25 mg once daily, demonstrated clinical efficacy for the treatment for OA as did 1500 mg of nabumetone. Rofecoxib and nabumetone were generally well tolerated in this elderly population. PMID:11405384

  9. Modifiable lifestyle factors are associated with lower pain levels in adults with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, A Erin; Tucker, Amy J; Kott, Laima S; Wright, Amanda J; Duncan, Alison M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: With no cure or effective treatments for osteoarthritis (OA), the need to identify modifiable factors to decrease pain and increase physical function is well recognized. OBJECTIVE: To examine factors that characterize OA patients at different levels of pain, and to investigate the relationships among these factors and pain. METHODS: Details of OA characteristics and lifestyle factors were collected from interviews with healthy adults with knee OA (n=197). The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index was used to assess pain. Factors were summarized across three pain score categories, and χ2 and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to examine differences. Multiple linear regression analysis using a stepwise selection procedure was used to examine associations between lifestyle factors and pain. RESULTS: Multiple linear regression analysis indicated that pain was significantly higher with the use of OA medications and higher body mass index category, and significantly lower with the use of supplements and meeting physical activity guidelines (≥150 min/week). Stiffness and physical function scores, bilateral knee OA, body mass index category and OA medication use were significantly higher with increasing pain, whereas self-reported health, servings of fruit, supplement use and meeting physical activity guidelines significantly lower. No significant differences across pain categories were found for sex, age, number of diseases, duration of OA, ever smoked, alcoholic drinks/week, over-the-counter pain medication use, OA supplement use, physical therapy use, servings of vegetables or minutes walked/week. CONCLUSIONS: Healthy weight maintenance, exercise for at least 150 min/week and appropriate use of medications and supplements represent important modifiable factors related to lower knee OA pain. PMID:26125195

  10. Evaluation of correlation of articular cartilage staining for DDR2 and proteoglycans with histological tissue damage and the results of radiographic assessment in patients with early stages of knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Suutre, Siim; Kerna, Irina; Lintrop, Mare; Tamm, Hannes; Aunapuu, Marina; Arend, Andres; Tamm, Agu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine, if staining of articular cartilage for proteoglycans (natural element of healthy and functioning cartilage) and discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) (a protein associated with articular cartilage degradation) is correlated with histological tissue damage or radiographic assessment score in patients with early stages of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Method: 40 patients, with early stage OA were enrolled, from whom the biopsies for histological and immunohistochemical studies were obtained from edge of the femoral condyle during the arthroscopy. Semi-quantitative computer based analysis was used to evaluate the proportion of staining in histological sections. Results: No correlation was shown between the proportion of tissue stained for DDR2 and histological score or the results of radiographic assessment of tibiofemoral (TF) joint. There was a negative correlation between the proportion of tissue stained for DDR2 and radiographic grade of patellofemoral (PF) OA (Spearman r=-0.34; 95% CI -0.60 to -0.02; P=0.03). No correlation was shown between the proportion of tissue stained for proteoglycans and histological score or the results of radiographic assessment of TF and PF joints. A negative correlation was found between proportion of tissue stained for DDR2 and proteoglycans. Spearman r=-0.43; 95% CI=-0.66 to -0.12; P=0.006. Conclusion: Production of DDR2 in articular cartilage could be related to early stages of OA, as it is significantly correlated to decrease of staining for cartilage proteoglycans. The role of production of DDR2 in cartilage may be decreased in stages, where higher grades of OA are detected on the radiographs. PMID:26191278

  11. [Clinical use of chondroitin sulfate in patients with osteoarthritis in geriatric practice].

    PubMed

    Zotkin, E G; Kharitonova, T V; Shkireeva, S Iu

    2014-01-01

    The article presents the results of prospective longitudinal study. The aim of the study was to investigate influence of complex therapy with chondroitin sulfate on pain and functional disorders in elderly patients with knee osteoarthritis. The study shows sufficient decreasing of pain, stiffness and functional disorders with complex therapy with chondroitin sulfate in comparison with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) by the second month of therapy with stable effect the next 2 months. All patients decrease their NSAID intake by the end of the study. Satisfaction of complex therapy was high according to patient's and physician's opinion. PMID:25306673

  12. Update of ACR guidelines for osteoarthritis: role of the coxibs.

    PubMed

    Schnitzer, Thomas J

    2002-04-01

    The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) recently provided an update to the guidelines published in 1995 on the management of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee and hip. Members of the Ad Hoc Committee on OA Guidelines followed an evidence-based medicine approach to revise the guidelines by reviewing an extensive literature search of the Cochrane and Medline databases and published abstracts, and discussing evidence with expert rheumatologists. The goal of the guidelines is to provide recommendations to control patients' OA pain, improve function and health-related quality of life, and avoid therapeutic toxicity. As in the original guidelines, nonpharmacologic interventions involving patient education and physical measures are recommended following initial diagnosis of OA. The pharmacologic algorithm was updated to include currently available therapeutic agents. Acetaminophen remains first-line therapy because of its cost, efficacy, and safety profiles. Cyclooxygenase-2-selective inhibitors (coxibs) have been included as an alternative to nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in patients at risk for upper gastrointestinal adverse events. Tramadol is an available alternative for patients who have a contraindication to coxibs or nonselective NSAIDs or for those who have not responded to previous oral therapy. Intra-articular injections or topical therapy may be used as monotherapy, or as an adjunct to oral analgesia. Surgical treatment of OA remains a last resort for patients who have failed to respond to nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic treatment approaches, and have progressive limitation in their activities of daily living. Several therapies for the prevention or treatment of OA are currently under investigation, including nutritional supplements, such as glucosamine and chondroitin, disease-modifying OA drugs, and devices, such as acupuncture and electromagnetic therapy. It is anticipated that the guidelines for the management of OA will

  13. Randomised controlled trial of referral to a telephone-based weight management and healthy lifestyle programme for patients with knee osteoarthritis who are overweight or obese: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Kate M; Wiggers, John; Williams, Amanda; Campbell, Elizabeth; Yoong, Serene; Robson, Emma K; McAuley, James; Haskins, Robin; Kamper, Steven J; Williams, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common chronic diseases worldwide and is associated with significant pain and disability. Clinical practice guidelines consistently recommend weight management as a core aspect of care for overweight and obese patients with knee OA; however, provision of such care is suboptimal. Telephone-based interventions offer a novel approach to delivery of weight management care in these patients. The aim of the proposed study is to assess the effectiveness of referral to a telephone-based weight management and healthy lifestyle programme, previously shown to be effective in changing weight, in improving knee pain intensity in overweight or obese patients with knee OA, compared to usual care. Methods and analysis A parallel, randomised controlled trial will be undertaken. Patients with OA of the knee who are waiting for an outpatient orthopaedic consultation at a tertiary referral public hospital within New South Wales, Australia, will be allocated to either an intervention or a control group (1:1 ratio). After baseline data collection, patients in the intervention group will receive a 6-month telephone-based intervention, and patients in the control group will continue with usual care. Surveys will be conducted at baseline, 6 and 26 weeks post-randomisation. The study requires 60 participants per group to detect a two-point difference in pain intensity (primary outcome) 26 weeks after baseline. Ethics and dissemination The study is approved by the Hunter New England Health Human Research Ethics Committee (13/12/11/5.18) and the University of Newcastle Human Research Ethics Committee (H-2015-0043). The results will be disseminated in peer-reviewed journals and at scientific conferences. Trial registration number ACTRN12615000490572, Pre-results. PMID:26940110

  14. Greater Step Widths Reduce Internal Knee Abduction Moments in Medial Compartment Knee Osteoarthritis Patients During Stair Ascent.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Max R; Klipple, Gary; Zhang, Songning

    2015-08-01

    Increased step widths have been shown to reduce peak internal knee abduction moments in healthy individuals but not in knee osteoarthritis patients during stair descent. This study aimed to assess effects of increased step widths on peak knee abduction moments and associated variables in adults with medial knee osteoarthritis and healthy older adults during stair ascent. Thirteen healthy older adults and 13 medial knee osteoarthritis patients performed stair ascent using preferred, wide, and wider step widths. Three-dimensional kinematics and ground reaction forces (GRFs) using an instrumented staircase were collected. Increased step width reduced first and second peak knee abduction moments, and knee abduction moment impulse. In addition, frontal plane GRF at time of first and second peak knee abduction moment and lateral trunk lean at time of first peak knee abduction moment were reduced with increased step width during stair ascent in both groups. Knee abduction moment variables were not different between knee osteoarthritis patients and healthy controls. Our findings suggest that increasing step width may be an effective simple gait alteration to reduce knee abduction moment variables in both knee osteoarthritis and healthy adults during stair ascent. However, long term effects of increasing step width during stair ascent in knee osteoarthritis and healthy adults remain unknown. PMID:25781222

  15. Validity and reliability of the Persian versions of WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index and Lequesne Algofunctional Index.

    PubMed

    Nadrian, Haidar; Moghimi, Nasrin; Nadrian, Elham; Moradzadeh, Rahmatollah; Bahmanpour, Kaveh; Iranpour, Abedin; Bellamy, Nicholas

    2012-07-01

    The WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index and Lequesne Algofunctional Index have not been translated and validated for Iranian patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee or hip. The aim of this study was to validate the Persian form of WOMAC OA Index and Lequesne Algofunctional Index and to assess their test-retest reliability and convergent validity. Forward/backward translations and consensus panels were conducted to obtain the Persian versions of WOMAC OA Index and Lequesne Algofunctional Index. A non-probability sample of 116 patients with knee/hip osteoarthritis was asked to complete the WOMAC OA Index and Lequesne Algofunctional Index as well as Medical Outcomes Study-20-Item Short Form (SF-20) questionnaires, a visual analogue scales (VAS) of pain and demographic information form. Internal consistency (using Cronbach's alpha) and convergent validity (by examining the Pearson's correlation coefficients) were evaluated to determine the psychometric properties of the questionnaires. In order to evaluate test-retest reliability, 20 randomly selected patients completed the questionnaires, on a second occasion, 7-10 days later. Cronbach's alpha coefficients and intraclass correlation coefficients for the WOMAC OA Index and Algofunctional Index subscales ranged from 0.63 to 0.94 and from 0.53 to 0.96, respectively. Statistically significant correlations were found between WOMAC OA Index, Algofunctional Index and SF-20 subscales and VAS for pain. The Persian version of WOMAC demonstrated a more acceptable validity, internal consistency and reliability compared with the Lequesne Algofunctional Index. However, both indices are valid and reliable instruments for evaluating the OA severity of knee/hip in Iran. PMID:22526476

  16. Regenerative approaches for the treatment of early OA.

    PubMed

    de Girolamo, L; Kon, E; Filardo, G; Marmotti, A G; Soler, F; Peretti, G M; Vannini, F; Madry, H; Chubinskaya, S

    2016-06-01

    The diagnosis and the prompt treatment of early osteoarthritis (OA) represent vital steps for delaying the onset and progression of fully blown OA, which is the most common form of arthritis, involving more than 10 % of the world's population older than 60 years of age. Nonsurgical treatments such as physiotherapy, anti-inflammatory medications, and other disease-modifying drugs all have modest and short-lasting effect. In this context, the biological approaches have recently gained more and more attention. Growth factors, blood derivatives, such as platelet concentrates, and mesenchymal adult stem cells, either expanded or freshly isolated, are advocated amongst the most promising tool for the treatment of OA, especially in the early phases. Primarily targeted towards focal cartilage defects, these biological agents have indeed recently showed promising results to relieve pain and reduce inflammation in patients with more advanced OA as well, with the final aim to halt the progression of the disease and the need for joint replacement. However, despite of a number of satisfactory in vitro and pre-clinical studies, the evidences are still limited to support their clinical efficacy in OA setting. PMID:27120191

  17. The Roles of Mechanical Stresses in the Pathogenesis of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Donald D.; Brown, Thomas D.; Tochigi, Yuki; Martin, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Excessive joint surface loadings, either single (acute impact event) or repetitive (cumulative contact stress), can cause the clinical syndrome of osteoarthritis (OA). Despite advances in treatment of injured joints, the risk of OA following joint injuries has not decreased in the past 50 years. Cumulative excessive articular surface contact stress that leads to OA results from posttraumatic joint incongruity and instability, and joint dysplasia, but may also cause OA in patients without known joint abnormalities. In vitro investigations show that excessive articular cartilage loading triggers release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from mitochondria, and that these ROS cause chondrocyte death and matrix degradation. Preventing release of ROS or inhibiting their effects preserves chondrocytes and their matrix. Fibronectin fragments released from articular cartilage subjected to excessive loads also stimulate matrix degradation; inhibition of molecular pathways initiated by these fragments prevents this effect. Additionally, injured chondrocytes release alarmins that activate chondroprogentior cells in vitro that propogate and migrate to regions of damaged cartilage. These cells also release chemokines and cytokines that may contribute to inflammation that causes progressive cartilage loss. Distraction and motion of osteoarthritic human ankles can promote joint remodeling, decrease pain, and improve joint function in patients with end-stage posttraumatic OA. These advances in understanding of how altering mechanical stresses can lead to remodeling of osteoarthritic joints and how excessive stress causes loss of articular cartilage, including identification of mechanically induced mediators of cartilage loss, provide the basis for new biologic and mechanical approaches to the prevention and treatment of OA. PMID:25067995

  18. Translation of clinical problems in osteoarthritis into pathophysiological research goals

    PubMed Central

    Berenbaum, Francis; Blanco, Francisco J; Cosimo, de Bari; Lafeber, Floris; Hauge, Ellen; Higginbottom, Adele; Ioan-Facsinay, Andreea; Loughlin, John; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Moilanen, Eeva; Pitsillidou, Irene; Tsezou, Aspasia; van Meurs, Joyce; Vincent, Tonia; Wittoek, Ruth; Lories, Rik

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) accounts for more disability among the elderly than any other disease and is associated with an increased mortality rate. The prevalence in Europe will rise in the future since this continent has a strongly ageing population and an obesity epidemic; obesity and age both being major risk factors for OA. No adequate therapeutic options, besides joint replacement, are available, although they are greatly needed and should be acquired by adequate research investments. However, the perspective on OA from a researcher's point of view is not always aligned with the perspective of a patient with OA. Researchers base their views on OA mainly on abnormalities in structure and function while patients consider OA as a collection of symptoms. In this viewpoint paper, we discuss the possibility of translating the most important clinical problems into pathophysiological research goals to facilitate the translation from bench to bedside and vice versa. This viewpoint is the outcome of a dialogue within the ‘European League Against Rheumatism study group on OA’ and People with Arthritis/Rheumatism across Europe (PARE) representatives. PMID:27252894

  19. CAM use among overweight and obese persons with radiographic knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Obesity is associated with knee pain and is an independent predictor of incident knee osteoarthritis (OA); increased pain with movement often leads patients to adopt sedentary lifestyles to avoid pain. Detailed descriptions of pain management strategies by body mass index (BMI) level among OA patients are lacking. The objectives were to describe complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and conventional medication use by BMI level and identify correlates of CAM use by BMI level. Methods Using Osteoarthritis Initiative baseline data, 2,675 patients with radiographic tibiofemoral OA in at least one knee were identified. Use of CAM therapies and conventional medications was determined by interviewers. Potential correlates included SF-12, CES-D, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, and Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score quality of life. Multinomial logistic regression models adjusting for sociodemographic and clinical factors provided estimates of the association between BMI levels and treatment use; binary logistic regression identified correlates of CAM use. Results BMI was inversely associated with CAM use (45% users had BMI ≥35 kg/m2; 54% had BMI <25 kg/m2), but positively associated with conventional medication use (54% users had BMI ≥35 kg/m2; 35.1% had BMI <25 kg/m2). Those with BMI ≥30 kg/m2 were less likely to use CAM alone or in combination with conventional medications when compared to patients with BMI <25 kg/m2. Conclusions CAM use is common among people with knee OA but is inversely associated with BMI. Understanding ways to further symptom management in OA among overweight and obese patients is warranted. PMID:24073985

  20. Hypoxia Modulates the Phenotype of Osteoblasts Isolated From Knee Osteoarthritis Patients, Leading to Undermineralized Bone Nodule Formation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Joan; Jackson, Sonya G; Wardale, John; Jones, Simon W

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of hypoxia in the pathology of osteoarthritic (OA) bone by exploring its effect on the phenotype of isolated primary osteoblasts from patients with knee OA. Methods OA bone samples were collected at the time of elective joint replacement surgery for knee or hip OA. Normal bone samples were collected postmortem from cadaver donors. Primary osteoblasts were isolated from knee OA bone chips and cultured under normoxic or hypoxic (2% O2) conditions. Alkaline phosphatase activity was quantified using an enzymatic assay, and osteopontin and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production was assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Total RNA was extracted from bone and osteoblasts, and gene expression was profiled by quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. Results Human OA bone tissue sections stained positively for carbonic anhydrase IX, a biomarker of hypoxia, and exhibited differential expression of genes that mediate the vasculature and blood coagulation as compared to those found in normal bone. Culture of primary osteoblasts isolated from knee OA bone under hypoxic conditions profoundly affected the osteoblast phenotype, including the expression of genes that mediate bone matrix, bone remodeling, and bone vasculature. Hypoxia also increased the expression of cyclooxygenase 2 and the production of PGE2 by OA osteoblasts. Osteoblast expression of type II collagen α1 chain, angiopoietin-like 4, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 was shown to be mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1α. Chronic hypoxia reduced osteoblast- mineralized bone nodule formation. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that hypoxia can induce pathologic changes in osteoblast functionality consistent with an OA phenotype, providing evidence that hypoxia is a key driver of OA pathology. PMID:24574272

  1. Is blood neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio an independent predictor of knee osteoarthritis severity?

    PubMed

    Taşoğlu, Özlem; Bölük, Hüma; Şahin Onat, Şule; Taşoğlu, İrfan; Özgirgin, Neşe

    2016-06-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common forms of joint disease, affecting an increasing number of people worldwide. Latest data suggests that inflammation plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of OA. There are a number of inflammatory markers like cytokins and cartilage degradation products that can be used as indicators in OA. Blood neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) is a simple non-invasive and cost-effective marker of inflammation in various systemic diseases, but it has not been investigated in OA yet. The aim of the present study was to compare blood NLR levels in patients with severe - Kellgren and Lawrence (KL) grade 4 - knee OA and mild to moderate - KL grades 1-3 - knee OA. A total of 176 patients with knee OA were included in this cross-sectional study. KL grading was done according to the two-view (antero-posterior and lateral) plain radiography of both knees. Demographic characteristics, blood neutrophil, lymphocyte and platelet counts, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein were recorded. Blood NLR levels were calculated. In the severe knee OA group, blood NLR levels were found to be elevated as compared to the mild to moderate knee OA group. A blood NLR of ≥2.1 was taken as the cutoff based upon the receiver operating characteristics (roc). In the roc curve analysis, blood NLR ≥ 2.1 had 50 % sensitivity and 77 % specificity in predicting severe knee OA. In multivariate analysis, age and blood NLR ≥ 2.1 emerged as independent predictors of severe knee OA. The results of the present study, for the first time in the literature, suggests blood NLR as a novel and promising inflammatory marker indicating the severity of knee OA. PMID:26780447

  2. [Effectiveness and safety of intra-articular use of hyaluronic acid (Suplasyn I-Shot) in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Krzysztof, Miśkowiec; Artur, Gadek; Alicja, Jurecka; Justyna, Sówka; Jakub, Slusarski; Henryk, Liszka; Jerzy, Wordliczek

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the leading causes of disability in the elderly. The changes in the lubricating properties of synovial fluid lead to significant pain and loss of function. Viscosupplementation, in which hyaluronic acid (HA) is injected into the knee joint, has evolved into an important part of our current therapeutic regimen in addressing the patient with knee pain due to OA. Intra-articular HA has proven to be an effective, safe, and tolerable treatment for symptomatic knee OA. In an effort to limit cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and renal safety concerns with COX-2 selective and nonselective NSAIDs and maximize HA efficacy, it is even proposed using HA earlier in the treatment paradigm for knee OA and also as part of a comprehensive treatment strategy. Our study reconfirmed effectiveness and safety of intra-articular use of hyaluronic acid (Suplasyn) in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. PMID:27526423

  3. Quality of Life and Functional Independence in Patients with Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Ivan Luis Andrade; Castro, Martha Cavalcante; Daltro, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To verify the association between functional independence (FI) and quality of life (QOL) in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study composed of 93 patients with knee osteoarthritis was performed. Osteoarthritis was stratified according the classification of Ahlbach. For evaluation of the patient's overall FI, the Barthel index was used. The patient's QOL was measured by means of the Medical Outcomes Study 36–Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) questionnaire. Results The mean age of the patients was 60 years (range, 54.0 to 69.5 years) and only 32 patients (34.3%) were found to be independent. Dependent or independent individuals presented difference in all domains of the QOL including physical function (p=0.001), role-physical (p=0.005), bodily pain (p=0.001), general health (p=0.004), vitality (p=0.009), social function (p=0.010), role-emotional (p=0.002) and mental health (p=0.001). Correlation between FI and QOL was different for all domains of the SF-36. Correlation with FI was strongest for physical function (r=0.609, p<0.001), followed by the domains of bodily pain (r=0.410, p<0.001) and mental health (r=0.402, p<0.001). Conclusions Our data demonstrated a strong association of FI with QOL and positive correlations with all QOL domains, indicating the greater the FI is, the higher the QOL is. PMID:27595076

  4. Lithium Chloride Dependent Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 Inactivation Links Oxidative DNA Damage, Hypertrophy and Senescence in Human Articular Chondrocytes and Reproduces Chondrocyte Phenotype of Obese Osteoarthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Platano, Daniela; Cattini, Luca; Trisolino, Giovanni; Mariani, Erminia; Borzì, Rosa Maria

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Recent evidence suggests that GSK3 activity is chondroprotective in osteoarthritis (OA), but at the same time, its inactivation has been proposed as an anti-inflammatory therapeutic option. Here we evaluated the extent of GSK3β inactivation in vivo in OA knee cartilage and the molecular events downstream GSK3β inactivation in vitro to assess their contribution to cell senescence and hypertrophy. Methods In vivo level of phosphorylated GSK3β was analyzed in cartilage and oxidative damage was assessed by 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine staining. The in vitro effects of GSK3β inactivation (using either LiCl or SB216763) were evaluated on proliferating primary human chondrocytes by combined confocal microscopy analysis of Mitotracker staining and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production (2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate staining). Downstream effects on DNA damage and senescence were investigated by western blot (γH2AX, GADD45β and p21), flow cytometric analysis of cell cycle and light scattering properties, quantitative assessment of senescence associated β galactosidase activity, and PAS staining. Results In vivo chondrocytes from obese OA patients showed higher levels of phosphorylated GSK3β, oxidative damage and expression of GADD45β and p21, in comparison with chondrocytes of nonobese OA patients. LiCl mediated GSK3β inactivation in vitro resulted in increased mitochondrial ROS production, responsible for reduced cell proliferation, S phase transient arrest, and increase in cell senescence, size and granularity. Collectively, western blot data supported the occurrence of a DNA damage response leading to cellular senescence with increase in γH2AX, GADD45β and p21. Moreover, LiCl boosted 8-oxo-dG staining, expression of IKKα and MMP-10. Conclusions In articular chondrocytes, GSK3β activity is required for the maintenance of proliferative potential and phenotype. Conversely, GSK3β inactivation, although preserving chondrocyte survival, results in

  5. The rate of joint replacement in osteoarthritis depends on the patient's socioeconomic status.

    PubMed

    Wetterholm, Malin; Turkiewicz, Aleksandra; Stigmar, Kjerstin; Hubertsson, Jenny; Englund, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Background and purpose - Assessment of potential disparities in access to care is a vital part of achieving equity in health and healthcare. We have therefore studied the effect of socioeconomic status (SES) on the rates of knee and hip replacement due to osteoarthritis. Methods - This was a cohort study in Skåne, Sweden. We included all residents aged ≥ 35 years with consultations between 2004 and 2013 for hip or knee osteoarthritis. We retrieved individual information on income, education, and occupation and evaluated the rates of knee and hip replacement according to SES, with adjustment for age and sex. Professionals, legislators, senior officials, and managers, and individuals with the longest education, served as the reference group. Results - We followed 50,498 knee osteoarthritis patients (59% women) and 20,882 hip osteoarthritis patients (58% women). The mutually adjusted rate of knee replacement was lower in those with an elementary occupation (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.81, 95% CI: 0.72-0.92), in craft workers and those with related trades (HR = 0.88, CI: 0.79-0.98), and in skilled agricultural/fishery workers (HR = 0.83, CI: 0.72-0.96), but higher in the 2 least educated groups (HR = 1.2 in both). The rate of hip replacement was lower in those with an elementary occupation (HR = 0.77, 95% CI: 0.68-0.87), in plant and machine operators/assemblers (HR = 0.83, CI: 0.75-0.93), and service workers/shop assistants (HR = 0.88, CI: 0.80-0.96). The rate of hip replacement was higher in the highest income group (HR = 1.1, 95% CI: 1.0-1.2). Interpretation - There was a lower rate of joint replacement in osteoarthritis patients working in professions often associated with lower socioeconomic status, suggesting inequity in access to care. However, the results are not unanimous, as the rate of knee replacement was higher in the least educated groups. PMID:26982799

  6. Can a linear combination of gait principal component vectors identify hip OA stages?

    PubMed

    Ardestani, Marzieh M; Wimmer, Markus A

    2016-07-01

    Hip osteoarthritis (OA) has been shown to affect gait patterns of lower extremities. However, until now, no specific identifying gait characteristics for the various disease stages of hip OA have emerged. The present study addresses the following questions: (1) does a vector-based principal component analysis (PCA) discriminate between various disease stages? And, is this analysis more robust than using discrete gait variables? (2) Does the elimination of differences in walking speed affect the discriminatory robustness of a vector-based PCA? De-identified data sets of forty-five unilateral hip OA patients with varying disease stages and twenty-three age-matched, healthy control subjects were obtained from an available repository. PCA was performed on trial matrices consisting of all external joint moments and sagittal joint angles of one full gait cycle. Group differences in sagittal angles, external moments and the linear combination of PC vectors were investigated using spatial parameter mapping (SPM), a statistical vector field test. Several individual gait variables (i.e. joint moments or angles) demonstrated differences between healthy and moderately and/or severely affected subjects. Only the hip adduction moment could discriminate between the healthy and the early-stage OA group. There was no variable that could distinguish between all OA disease stages. In contrast, the linear combination of PC vectors demonstrated significant group differences between all stages of osteoarthritis; furthermore, these group differences stayed significant when matched speeds were input to the model. PMID:27255606

  7. Simple Scoring System and Artificial Neural Network for Knee Osteoarthritis Risk Prediction: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Tae Keun; Kim, Deok Won; Choi, Soo Beom; Oh, Ein; Park, Jee Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease of adults worldwide. Since the treatments for advanced radiographic knee OA are limited, clinicians face a significant challenge of identifying patients who are at high risk of OA in a timely and appropriate way. Therefore, we developed a simple self-assessment scoring system and an improved artificial neural network (ANN) model for knee OA. Methods The Fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (KNHANES V-1) data were used to develop a scoring system and ANN for radiographic knee OA. A logistic regression analysis was used to determine the predictors of the scoring system. The ANN was constructed using 1777 participants and validated internally on 888 participants in the KNHANES V-1. The predictors of the scoring system were selected as the inputs of the ANN. External validation was performed using 4731 participants in the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI). Area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic was calculated to compare the prediction models. Results The scoring system and ANN were built using the independent predictors including sex, age, body mass index, educational status, hypertension, moderate physical activity, and knee pain. In the internal validation, both scoring system and ANN predicted radiographic knee OA (AUC 0.73 versus 0.81, p<0.001) and symptomatic knee OA (AUC 0.88 versus 0.94, p<0.001) with good discriminative ability. In the external validation, both scoring system and ANN showed lower discriminative ability in predicting radiographic knee OA (AUC 0.62 versus 0.67, p<0.001) and symptomatic knee OA (AUC 0.70 versus 0.76, p<0.001). Conclusions The self-assessment scoring system may be useful for identifying the adults at high risk for knee OA. The performance of the scoring system is improved significantly by the ANN. We provided an ANN calculator to simply predict the knee OA risk. PMID:26859664

  8. Time to Talk: 6 Things You Should Know about Dietary Supplements for Osteoarthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Y Z 6 Things You Should Know About Dietary Supplements for Osteoarthritis Share: Osteoarthritis is the most common ... hormones). Many people with OA report trying various dietary supplements, including glucosamine and chondroitin, alone or in combination, ...

  9. Development and Validation of a Questionnaire Assessing Fears and Beliefs of Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: The Knee Osteoarthritis Fears and Beliefs Questionnaire (KOFBeQ)

    PubMed Central

    Benhamou, Mathilde; Baron, Gabriel; Dalichampt, Marie; Boutron, Isabelle; Alami, Sophie; Rannou, François; Ravaud, Philippe; Poiraudeau, Serge

    2013-01-01

    Objective We aimed to develop a questionnaire assessing fears and beliefs of patients with knee OA. Design We sent a detailed document reporting on a qualitative analysis of interviews of patients with knee OA to experts, and a Delphi procedure was adopted for item generation. Then, 80 physicians recruited 566 patients with knee OA to test the provisional questionnaire. Items were reduced according to their metric properties and exploratory factor analysis. Reliability was tested by the Cronbach α coefficient. Construct validity was tested by divergent validity and confirmatory factor analysis. Test–retest reliability was assessed by the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and the Bland and Altman technique. Results 137 items were extracted from analysis of the interview data. Three Delphi rounds were needed to obtain consensus on a 25-item provisional questionnaire. The item-reduction process resulted in an 11-item questionnaire. Selected items represented fears and beliefs about daily living activities (3 items), fears and beliefs about physicians (4 items), fears and beliefs about the disease (2 items), and fears and beliefs about sports and leisure activities (2 items). The Cronbach α coefficient of global score was 0.85. We observed expected divergent validity. Confirmation factor analyses confirmed higher intra-factor than inter-factor correlations. Test–retest reliability was good, with an ICC of 0.81, and Bland and Altman analysis did not reveal a systematic trend. Conclusions We propose an 11-item questionnaire assessing patients' fears and beliefs concerning knee OA with good content and construct validity. PMID:23349757

  10. The Relationship between Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury and Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Simon, David; Saltzman, Bryan M.; Rollins, Meaghan; Bach, Bernard R.; MacDonald, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are a common injury, particularly in the athletic and youth populations. The known association between ACL injury and subsequent osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee merits a more in-depth understanding of the relationship between the ACL-injured knee and osteoarthritis. ACL injury, especially with concomitant meniscal or other ligamentous pathology, predisposes the knee to an increased risk of osteoarthritis. ACL insufficiency results in deterioration of the normal physiologic knee bending culminating in increased anterior tibial translation and increased internal tibial rotation. This leads to increased mean contact stresses in the posterior medial and lateral compartments under anterior and rotational loading. However, surgical reconstruction of the ACL has not been shown to reduce the risk of future OA development back to baseline and has variability based on operative factors of graft choice, timing of surgery, presence of meniscal and chondral abnormalities, and surgical technique. Known strategies to prevent OA development are applicable to patients with ACL deficiency or after ACL reconstruction and include weight management, avoidance of excessive musculoskeletal loading, and strength training. Reconstruction of the ACL does not necessarily prevent osteoarthritis in many of these patients and may depend on several external variables. PMID:25954533

  11. Quantitative proteomic profiling of human articular cartilage degradation in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Lourido, Lucía; Calamia, Valentina; Mateos, Jesús; Fernández-Puente, Patricia; Fernández-Tajes, Juan; Blanco, Francisco J; Ruiz-Romero, Cristina

    2014-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common rheumatic pathology and is characterized primarily by articular cartilage degradation. Despite its high prevalence, there is no effective therapy to slow disease progression or regenerate the damaged tissue. Therefore, new diagnostic and monitoring tests for OA are urgently needed, which would also promote the development of alternative therapeutic strategies. In the present study, we have performed an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis of secretomes from healthy human articular cartilage explants, comparing their protein profile to those from unwounded (early disease) and wounded (advanced disease) zones of osteoarthritic tissue. This strategy allowed us to identify a panel of 76 proteins that are distinctively released by the diseased tissue. Clustering analysis allowed the classification of proteins according to their different profile of release from cartilage. Among these proteins, the altered release of osteoprotegerin (decreased in OA) and periostin (increased in OA), both involved in bone remodelling processes, was verified in further analyses. Moreover, periostin was also increased in the synovial fluid of OA patients. Altogether, the present work provides a novel insight into the mechanisms of human cartilage degradation and a number of new cartilage-characteristic proteins with possible biomarker value for early diagnosis and prognosis of OA. PMID:25383958

  12. Validating a new computed tomography atlas for grading ankle osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael M; Vela, Nathan D; Levine, Jason E; Barnoy, Eran A

    2015-01-01

    As the most common joint disease, osteoarthritis (OA) poses a significant source of pain and disability. It can be defined by classic radiographic findings, particular symptoms, or a combination of the 2. Although specific grading scales have been developed to evaluate OA in various joints, such as the shoulder, hip, and knee, no definitive classification system is available for grading OA in the ankle. The purpose of the present study was to create and validate a standardized atlas for grading (or staging) ankle osteoarthritis using computed tomography (CT) and "hallmark" findings noted on coronal, sagittal, and axial views extrapolated from the Kellgren-Lawrence radiographic scale. The CT scans of 226 patients at the Miami Veterans Affairs Medical Center were reviewed. An atlas was derived from a retrospective review of 30 remaining CT scans taken from July 2008 to November 2011. After this review, 3 orthogonal static CT images, obtained from 11 remaining patients, were chosen to represent the various stages on the OA scale and were used to test the validity of the atlas developed by 2 of us (M.M.C. and N.D.V.). A multispecialty panel of 9 examiners, excluding ourselves, independently rated the 11 CT scan subjects. The differences among examiners and specialties were calculated, including an intra-examiner agreement for 2 separate readings spaced 9 months apart. Although the small number of subspecialty examiners made the intraspecialty comparisons difficult to validate, the findings nevertheless indicated excellent agreement among all specialty groups, with good intra-investigational (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.962 and 1) inter-investigational (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.851) values. These results appeared to validate the CT ankle OA atlas, which we believe will be a valuable clinical and research tool, one that will likely be more beneficial than less relevant generalized OA grading scales in use today. PMID:25135101

  13. Arthroscopic debridement in the treatment of patients with osteoarthritis of the elbow, based on computer simulation.

    PubMed

    Miyake, J; Shimada, K; Oka, K; Tanaka, H; Sugamoto, K; Yoshikawa, H; Murase, T

    2014-02-01

    We retrospectively assessed the value of identifying impinging osteophytes using dynamic computer simulation of CT scans of the elbow in assisting their arthroscopic removal in patients with osteoarthritis of the elbow. A total of 20 patients were treated (19 men and one woman, mean age 38 years (19 to 55)) and followed for a mean of 25 months (24 to 29). We located the impinging osteophytes dynamically using computerised three-dimensional models of the elbow based on CT data in three positions of flexion of the elbow. These were then removed arthroscopically and a capsular release was performed. The mean loss of extension improved from 23° (10° to 45°) pre-operatively to 9° (0° to 25°) post-operatively, and the mean flexion improved from 121° (80° to 140°) pre-operatively to 130° (110° to 145°) post-operatively. The mean Mayo Elbow Performance Score improved from 62 (30 to 85) to 95 (70 to 100) post-operatively. All patients had pain in the elbow pre-operatively which disappeared or decreased post-operatively. According to their Mayo scores, 14 patients had an excellent clinical outcome and six a good outcome; 15 were very satisfied and five were satisfied with their post-operative outcome. We recommend this technique in the surgical management of patients with osteoarthritis of the elbow. PMID:24493190

  14. New horizons and perspectives in the treatment of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Berenbaum, Francis

    2008-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is increasingly prevalent worldwide and is associated with a significant economic burden. Despite the increasing number of patients with OA, treatments to manage the condition remain symptomatic, designed to control pain, and improve function and quality of life while limiting adverse events. Both the EULAR (European League Against Rheumatism) and the OARSI (Osteoarthritis Research Society International) issued new guidelines in 2007 and 2008 recommending a combination of nonpharmacological and pharmacological modalities to manage OA effectively. Because of gastrointestinal risks (including ulcer complications) and cardiovascular risks (including hypertension and thrombotic events associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs]), these guidelines propose acetaminophen as the first choice anti-inflammatory agents. However, NSAIDs are considered to be more effective than acetaminophen for relief of pain. Given the efficacy, safety, and tolerability issues associated with NSAIDs, development of new agents to manage the pain associated with arthritis but without the cardiovascular and gastrointestinal adverse events remains a priority. This review considers current recommendations for the treatment of OA, the most recent evidence on the cardiovascular risks associated with current NSAID treatments, and the potential of newer anti-inflammatory agents with improved benefit-risk profiles. PMID:19007426

  15. Emerging Targets in Osteoarthritis Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Goldring, Mary B.; Berenbaum, Francis

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a destructive joint disease in which the initiation may be attributed to direct injury and mechanical disruption of joint tissues, but the progressive changes are dependent on active cell-mediated processes that can be observed or inferred during the generally long time-course of the disease. Based on clinical observations and experimental studies, it is now recognized a that it is possible for individual patients to exhibit common sets of symptoms and structural abnormalities due to distinct pathophysiological pathways that act independently or in combination. Recent research that has focused on the underlying mechanisms involving biochemical cross talk among the cartilage, synovium, bone, and other joint tissues within a background of poorly characterized genetic factors will be addressed in this review. PMID:25863583

  16. Individuals with Primary Osteoarthritis Have Different Phenotypes Depending on the Affected Joint - A Case Control Study from Southern Sweden Including 514 Participants

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Magnus K; Karlsson, Caroline; Magnusson, Håkan; Cöster, Maria; von Schewelov, Tord; Nilsson, Jan Åke; Brudin, Lars; Rosengren, Björn E

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether primary osteoarthritis (OA), independent of affected joint, is associated with a phenotype that is different from the phenotype in a normative cohort. Material and Methods: We included 274 patients with primary OA, 30 women and 32 men (mean age 66 years, range 42-84) with primary hip OA, 38 women and 74 men (mean age 61 years; range 34-85) with primary knee OA, 42 women and 19 men (men age 64 years, range 42-87) with primary ankle or foot OA and 20 women and 19 men (mean age 66 years, range 47-88) with primary hand or finger OA. Of all patients included with OA, 23% had hip OA, 41% knee OA, 22% ankle or foot OA and 14% hand or finger OA. Serving as references were 122 women and 118 men of the same ages who were population-based, included as a control cohort. We measured total body BMD (g/cm2) and proportion of fat and lean mass (%) with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Height, weight and BMI (kg/m2) were also assessed. We then calculated Z-scores (number of standard deviations difference from the mean value of the control cohort) in the OA patients and compared these between the groups. Results: Individuals with hand OA and controls had similar phenotype. Individuals with lower extremity OA, irrespective of the affected joint, had similar weight, BMI and BMD, but higher than in individuals with hand OA and controls (all p<0.05). Individuals with lower extremity OA had higher fat and lower lean mass than individuals with hand OA and controls (all p<0.001). Conclusion: Individuals with primary OA in the lower extremity have a phenotype with higher BMD, higher BMI, proportionally higher fat content and lower lean body mass content. The different skeletal phenotypes in our patients with OA in the lower extremity and patients with hand OA indicate that separate pathophysiologic pathways may be responsible for primary OA in different joints PMID:25614774

  17. Fish Oil and Osteoarthritis: Current Evidence.

    PubMed

    Boe, Chelsea; Vangsness, C Thomas

    2015-07-01

    According to the 2005 US census, osteoarthritis (OA) was the leading cause of disability in the United States, affecting more than 50 million people. Current treatments are targeted at reducing symptoms of the inflammatory reaction that occurs after destruction of essential joint cartilage. However, these treatments do not prevent significant pain and activity restriction. We reviewed the literature to address claims that fish oil supplementation can prevent or decrease severity of OA. Our extensive search of databases covered all relevant terms related to omega-3-containing supplements and their effects on OA. We hypothesized there would be insufficient clinical studies to justify recommending supplementation to patients.Laboratory studies have shown that eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid reduce proinflammatory mediators and increase joint lubrication in vitro. In addition, canine trials have shown clinically significant reductions in various symptom parameters. Results of human clinical trials have not been consistently significant. Well-designed clinical trials are needed to substantiate or refute the potential benefit of fish oils in OA treatment. Long-term studies are needed to assess the possibility of prevention. In addition, standardization of the fish oil industry is needed for consistency of therapy. PMID:26161757

  18. Influences on the decision to use an osteoarthritis diagnosis in primary care: a cohort study with linked survey and electronic health record data

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, K.P.; Tan, V.; Edwards, J.J.; Chen, Y.; Englund, M.; Hubertsson, J.; Jöud, A.; Porcheret, M.; Turkiewicz, A.; Peat, G.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective Clinicians may record patients presenting with osteoarthritis (OA) symptoms with joint pain rather than an OA diagnosis. This may have implications for OA research studies and patient care. The objective was to assess whether older adults recorded with joint pain are similar to those with a recorded OA diagnosis. Method A study of adults aged ≥50 years in eight United Kingdom general practices, with electronic health records linked to survey data. Patients with a recorded regional OA diagnosis were compared to those with a recorded joint pain symptom on socio-demographics, risk factors, body region, pain severity, prescribed analgesia, and potential differential diagnoses. A sub-group was compared on radiographic knee OA. Results Thirteen thousand eight hundred and thirty-one survey responders consented to record review. One thousand four hundred and twenty-seven (10%) received an OA (n = 616) or joint pain (n = 811) code with wide practice variation. Receiving an OA diagnosis was associated with age (75+ compared to 50–64 OR 3.25; 95% Credible intervals (CrI) 2.36, 4.53), obesity (1.72; 1.22, 2.33), and pain interference (1.45; 1.09, 1.92). Analgesia management was similar. Radiographic OA was common in both groups. A quarter of those with a joint pain record received an OA diagnosis in the following 6 years. Conclusion Recording OA diagnoses are less common than recording a joint pain symptom and associated with risk factors and severity. OA studies in primary care need to consider joint pain symptoms to understand the burden and quality of care across the spectrum of OA. Patients recorded with joint pain may represent early cases of OA with need for early intervention. PMID:26746149

  19. Long Intergenic Noncoding RNAs Mediate the Human Chondrocyte Inflammatory Response and Are Differentially Expressed in Osteoarthritis Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Mark J.; Philp, Ashleigh M.; Heward, James A.; Roux, Benoit T.; Walsh, David A.; Davis, Edward T.; Lindsay, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), including long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs), antisense RNAs, and pseudogenes, associated with the inflammatory response in human primary osteoarthritis (OA) chondrocytes and to explore their expression and function in OA. Methods OA cartilage was obtained from patients with hip or knee OA following joint replacement surgery. Non‐OA cartilage was obtained from postmortem donors and patients with fracture of the neck of the femur. Primary OA chondrocytes were isolated by collagenase digestion. LncRNA expression analysis was performed by RNA sequencing (RNAseq) and quantitative reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction. Modulation of lncRNA chondrocyte expression was achieved using LNA longRNA GapmeRs (Exiqon). Cytokine production was measured with Luminex. Results RNAseq identified 983 lncRNAs in primary human hip OA chondrocytes, 183 of which had not previously been identified. Following interleukin‐1β (IL‐1β) stimulation, we identified 125 lincRNAs that were differentially expressed. The lincRNA p50‐associated cyclooxygenase 2–extragenic RNA (PACER) and 2 novel chondrocyte inflammation–associated lincRNAs (CILinc01 and CILinc02) were differentially expressed in both knee and hip OA cartilage compared to non‐OA cartilage. In primary OA chondrocytes, these lincRNAs were rapidly and transiently induced in response to multiple proinflammatory cytokines. Knockdown of CILinc01 and CILinc02 expression in human chondrocytes significantly enhanced the IL‐1–stimulated secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Conclusion The inflammatory response in human OA chondrocytes is associated with widespread changes in the profile of lncRNAs, including PACER, CILinc01, and CILinc02. Differential expression of CILinc01 and CIinc02 in hip and knee OA cartilage, and their role in modulating cytokine production during the chondrocyte inflammatory response, suggest that they may play an important role

  20. General practitioners miss disability and anxiety as well as depression in their patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Memel, D S; Kirwan, J R; Sharp, D J; Hehir, M

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: General practitioners (GPs) integrate physical, psychological, and social factors when assessing patients, particularly those with chronic diseases. Recently, the emphasis has been on assessment of depression but not of other factors. AIM: To determine functional disability, psychological morbidity, social situation, and use of health and social services in patients with osteoarthritis and examine GP knowledge of these factors. METHOD: Two hundred patients completed a validated postal questionnaire about functional disability (Health Assessment Questionnaire [HAQ]), mood (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale [HAD]), employment status, who they lived with, welfare benefits received, and use of health and social services. A similar questionnaire was completed by the patient's GP, including a HAQ. However, a three-point scale was used to assess depression and anxiety. RESULTS: Forty-seven per cent of patients were moderately or severely disabled (HAQ > 1). GPs underestimated functional disability: mean patient HAQ = 1.04 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.92-1.16), mean GP HAQ = 0.74 (95% CI = 0.65-0.83), and there was low correlation between patient and GP scores (kappa = 0.24). There was moderate prevalence of depression and high prevalence of anxiety, which the GP often did not recognise: patient depression = 8.3% (95% CI = 4.1%-12.8%), GP depression = 6.0% (95% CI = 2.4%-9.6%), kappa = 0.11; patient anxiety = 24.4% (95% CI = 17.8%-31.0%), GP anxiety = 11.9% (95% CI = 6.9%-16.9%), kappa = 0.19. Only 46% of severely disabled patients (HAQ > 2) were receiving disability welfare benefits. GPs were often unaware of welfare benefits received or the involvement of other professionals. CONCLUSION: GPs frequently lack knowledge about functional disability, social factors, and anxiety as well as depression in their patients with osteoarthritis. PMID:11042917

  1. Cost-effectiveness analysis for joint pain treatment in patients with osteoarthritis treated at the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS): Comparison of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) vs. cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Contreras-Hernández, Iris; Mould-Quevedo, Joaquín F; Torres-González, Rubén; Goycochea-Robles, María Victoria; Pacheco-Domínguez, Reyna Lizette; Sánchez-García, Sergio; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel; Garduño-Espinosa, Juan

    2008-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the main causes of disability worldwide, especially in persons >55 years of age. Currently, controversy remains about the best therapeutic alternative for this disease when evaluated from a cost-effectiveness viewpoint. For Social Security Institutions in developing countries, it is very important to assess what drugs may decrease the subsequent use of medical care resources, considering their adverse events that are known to have a significant increase in medical care costs of patients with OA. Three treatment alternatives were compared: celecoxib (200 mg twice daily), non-selective NSAIDs (naproxen, 500 mg twice daily; diclofenac, 100 mg twice daily; and piroxicam, 20 mg/day) and acetaminophen, 1000 mg twice daily. The aim of this study was to identify the most cost-effective first-choice pharmacological treatment for the control of joint pain secondary to OA in patients treated at the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS). Methods A cost-effectiveness assessment was carried out. A systematic review of the literature was performed to obtain transition probabilities. In order to evaluate analysis robustness, one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were conducted. Estimations were done for a 6-month period. Results Treatment demonstrating the best cost-effectiveness results [lowest cost-effectiveness ratio $17.5 pesos/patient ($1.75 USD)] was celecoxib. According to the one-way sensitivity analysis, celecoxib would need to markedly decrease its effectiveness in order for it to not be the optimal treatment option. In the probabilistic analysis, both in the construction of the acceptability curves and in the estimation of net economic benefits, the most cost-effective option was celecoxib. Conclusion From a Mexican institutional perspective and probably in other Social Security Institutions in similar developing countries, the most cost-effective option for treatment of knee and/or hip OA would be celecoxib. PMID

  2. Biomarkers of (osteo)arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mobasheri, Ali; Henrotin, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Arthritic diseases are a major cause of disability and morbidity, and cause an enormous burden for health and social care systems globally. Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis. The key risk factors for the development of OA are age, obesity, joint trauma or instability. Metabolic and endocrine diseases can also contribute to the pathogenesis of OA. There is accumulating evidence to suggest that OA is a whole-organ disease that is influenced by systemic mediators, inflammaging, innate immunity and the low-grade inflammation induced by metabolic syndrome. Although all joint tissues are implicated in disease progression in OA, articular cartilage has received the most attention in the context of aging, injury and disease. There is increasing emphasis on the early detection of OA as it has the capacity to target and treat the disease more effectively. Indeed it has been suggested that this is the era of “personalized prevention” for OA. However, the development of strategies for the prevention of OA require new and sensitive biomarker tools that can detect the disease in its molecular and pre-radiographic stage, before structural and functional alterations in cartilage integrity have occurred. There is also evidence to support a role for biomarkers in OA drug discovery, specifically the development of disease modifying osteoarthritis drugs. This Special Issue of Biomarkers is dedicated to recent progress in the field of OA biomarkers. The papers in this Special Issue review the current state-of-the-art and discuss the utility of OA biomarkers as diagnostic and prognostic tools. PMID:26954784

  3. Biomarkers of (osteo)arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mobasheri, Ali; Henrotin, Yves

    2015-12-01

    Arthritic diseases are a major cause of disability and morbidity, and cause an enormous burden for health and social care systems globally. Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis. The key risk factors for the development of OA are age, obesity, joint trauma or instability. Metabolic and endocrine diseases can also contribute to the pathogenesis of OA. There is accumulating evidence to suggest that OA is a whole-organ disease that is influenced by systemic mediators, inflammaging, innate immunity and the low-grade inflammation induced by metabolic syndrome. Although all joint tissues are implicated in disease progression in OA, articular cartilage has received the most attention in the context of aging, injury and disease. There is increasing emphasis on the early detection of OA as it has the capacity to target and treat the disease more effectively. Indeed it has been suggested that this is the era of "personalized prevention" for OA. However, the development of strategies for the prevention of OA require new and sensitive biomarker tools that can detect the disease in its molecular and pre-radiographic stage, before structural and functional alterations in cartilage integrity have occurred. There is also evidence to support a role for biomarkers in OA drug discovery, specifically the development of disease modifying osteoarthritis drugs. This Special Issue of Biomarkers is dedicated to recent progress in the field of OA biomarkers. The papers in this Special Issue review the current state-of-the-art and discuss the utility of OA biomarkers as diagnostic and prognostic tools. PMID:26954784

  4. Reliability of the Eight Guiding Principles and Syndrome Diagnosis in Chinese Medicine Diagnosis of Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hua, Bin; Abbas, Estelle; Hayes, Alan; Ryan, Peter F; Nelson, Lisa; O'Brien, Kylie

    2012-08-21

    Abstract Background: A Chinese medicine (CM) "Syndrome" or "pattern of disharmony" is a diagnostic subcategory of a disease/disorder or symptom, characterized by particular symptoms and signs, and indicative of the etiology and the state of pathogenesis at that point in time. In CM, treatment is aimed at addressing the disease/disorder and the underlying CM Syndrome. A few studies have assessed reliability of CM Syndrome diagnosis according to one of the major CM theories, Zang-Fu theory, but only 1 study has investigated the reliability of diagnosis according to a fundamental theory, that of the Eight Guiding Principles. Given that treatment follows diagnosis, if diagnosis is not reliable there will be lower confidence that optimal treatment is received. There have not yet been any reliability studies in osteoarthritis (OA). Little is known about the characteristics or Syndromes of OA with respect to the Eight Guiding Principles and Zang-Fu theory. Objectives: The objectives of this study were to characterize diagnostic subcategories of OA according to the Eight Guiding Principles and Zang-Fu theory and to investigate the inter-rater reliability of CM diagnosis according to these two theories. Methods: An inter-rater reliability study was conducted as a substudy of a clinical trial investigating the treatment of knee OA with Chinese herbal medicine. Two (2) experienced CM practitioners conducted a CM examination separately, within 2 hours of each other, of 40 participants. A CM assessment form was utilized to record the diagnostic data. Cohen's κ coefficient was used as a measure of reliability. Results: Results support the concept that knee OA is more likely a disease with characteristics of Interior, Deficiency, and Yin according to the Eight Guiding Principles. There was no clear agreement on CM Syndromes of knee OA according to Zang-Fu theory. The main Zang Organs involved were broadly agreed on; they were Kidney, Liver, and Spleen. Conclusions: Results lend

  5. Upregulation of lncRNA HOTAIR contributes to IL-1β-induced MMP overexpression and chondrocytes apoptosis in temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunping; Wang, Peng; Jiang, Pengfei; Lv, Yongbin; Dong, Changxia; Dai, Xiuyu; Tan, Lixia; Wang, Zhenlin

    2016-07-25

    Temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ OA) is a common and heterogeneous disease that causes painful and progressive joint degeneration, which restricts daily activities, including talking and chewing. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are an important class of genes involved in various physiological and pathological functions, including osteoarthritis (OA).The present study aimed to identify the lncRNAs that are important in TMJ OA and their potential functions. Here, we found that HOTAIR was significantly upregulated in the synovial fluid of TMJ OA patients compared with that of normal controls. Increased HOTAIR was similarly observed in the synovial fluid of TMJ OA rabbits as compared to control rabbits. Furthermore, in interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-induced TMJ OA in vitro model (primary rabbit condylar chondrocytes), the expressions of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, MMP3, MMP9 and HOTAIR were all dramatically increased. Most importantly, knockdown of HOTAIR in IL-1β-induced TMJ OA in vitro model could not only reverse the IL-1β-stimulated expressions of MMP1, MMP3 and MMP9, but also significantly decrease the apoptosis rate induced by IL-1β in primary rabbit condylar chondrocytes. Our data provides new insight into the mechanisms of chondrocytes destruction in TMJ OA. PMID:27063559

  6. Paracetamol and the Placebo Effect in Osteoarthritis Trials: A Missing Link?

    PubMed Central

    Zeidler, Henning

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the role of paracetamol in placebo-controlled osteoarthritis (OA) trials and the potential contribution to the large placebo response in such trials. Paracetamol is used as rescue medication in nearly all OA placebo-controlled trials. Triggered by the discussion about the placebo effect in general and because of the lack of systematic reviews of placebo effect in OA trials, a recent meta-analysis examined the placebo effect and its potential determinants in the treatment of OA, as the main result came out that placebo is very effective in the treatment of OA, especially for pain, stiffness, and self-reported function. However, mostly limited data are available from published OA trials on the starting dose, final dose, dose over time of paracetamol use, and the percentage of patients who used rescue medication during the study. Paracetamol may be an important additional simulated effect of placebo administration mimicking the true placebo effect and thus a missing link contributing partially to the large placebo response in OA trials. Therefore, the positive effect of paracetamol on symptom relief as well as the need for standardized recording of rescue medication should be taken into account when designing, executing, and interpreting placebo-controlled OA studies. PMID:22110930

  7. Current nutraceuticals in the management of osteoarthritis: a review.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Nahid; Haqqi, Tariq M

    2012-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive degenerative joint disease that has a major impact on joint function and quality of life. Nutraceuticals and dietary supplements derived from herbs have long been used in traditional medicine and there is considerable evidence that nutraceuticals may play an important role in inflammation and joint destruction in OA. We review the biological effects of some medicinal fruits and herbs - pomegranate, green tea, cat's claw, devil's claw, ginger, Indian olibaum, turmeric and ananas - in an attempt to understand the pivotal molecular targets involved in inflammation and the joint destruction process and to summarize their toxicities and efficacy for OA management. So far there is insufficient reliable evidence on the effectiveness of ginger, turmeric and ananas. Pomegranate and green tea only have preclinical evidence of efficacy due to the lack of clinical data. In vivo and clinical studies are required to understand their targets and efficacy in OA. Limited in vitro and in vivo evidence is available for cat's claw and Indian olibaum. More extensive studies are required before long-term controlled trials of whole cat's claw and Indian olibaum extracts, or isolated active compounds, are carried out in patients with OA to determine their long-term efficacy and safety. Devil's claw has not been rigorously tested to determine its antiarthritic potential in in vitro and in vivo models. There is strong clinical evidence of the effectiveness of devil's claw in pain reduction. However, high-quality clinical trials are needed to determine its effectiveness. No serious side effects have been reported for any fruits and herbs. Overall, these studies identify and support the use of nutraceuticals to provide symptomatic relief to patients with OA and to be used as adjunct therapy for OA management. More high-quality trials are needed to provide definitive answers to questions related to their efficacy and safety for OA prevention and

  8. Current nutraceuticals in the management of osteoarthritis: a review

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Nahid

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive degenerative joint disease that has a major impact on joint function and quality of life. Nutraceuticals and dietary supplements derived from herbs have long been used in traditional medicine and there is considerable evidence that nutraceuticals may play an important role in inflammation and joint destruction in OA. We review the biological effects of some medicinal fruits and herbs – pomegranate, green tea, cat’s claw, devil’s claw, ginger, Indian olibaum, turmeric and ananas – in an attempt to understand the pivotal molecular targets involved in inflammation and the joint destruction process and to summarize their toxicities and efficacy for OA management. So far there is insufficient reliable evidence on the effectiveness of ginger, turmeric and ananas. Pomegranate and green tea only have preclinical evidence of efficacy due to the lack of clinical data. In vivo and clinical studies are required to understand their targets and efficacy in OA. Limited in vitro and in vivo evidence is available for cat’s claw and Indian olibaum. More extensive studies are required before long-term controlled trials of whole cat’s claw and Indian olibaum extracts, or isolated active compounds, are carried out in patients with OA to determine their long-term efficacy and safety. Devil’s claw has not been rigorously tested to determine its antiarthritic potential in in vitro and in vivo models. There is strong clinical evidence of the effectiveness of devil’s claw in pain reduction. However, high-quality clinical trials are needed to determine its effectiveness. No serious side effects have been reported for any fruits and herbs. Overall, these studies identify and support the use of nutraceuticals to provide symptomatic relief to patients with OA and to be used as adjunct therapy for OA management. More high-quality trials are needed to provide definitive answers to questions related to their efficacy and safety for OA prevention

  9. Quantitative SHG imaging in osteoarthritis model mice, implying a diagnostic application.

    PubMed

    Kiyomatsu, Hiroshi; Oshima, Yusuke; Saitou, Takashi; Miyazaki, Tsuyoshi; Hikita, Atsuhiko; Miura, Hiromasa; Iimura, Tadahiro; Imamura, Takeshi

    2015-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) restricts the daily activities of patients and significantly decreases their quality of life. The development of non-invasive quantitative methods for properly diagnosing and evaluating the process of degeneration of articular cartilage due to OA is essential. Second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging enables the observation of collagen fibrils in live tissues or organs without staining. In the present study, we employed SHG imaging of the articular cartilage in OA model mice ex vivo. Consequently, three-dimensional SHG imaging with successive image processing and statistical analyses allowed us to successfully characterize histopathological changes in the articular cartilage consistently confirmed on histological analyses. The quantitative SHG imaging technique presented in this study constitutes a diagnostic application of this technology in the setting of OA. PMID:25780732

  10. A computer-based image analysis method for assessing the severity of hip joint osteoarthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boniatis, Ioannis; Costaridou, Lena; Cavouras, Dionisis; Panagiotopoulos, Elias; Panayiotakis, George

    2006-12-01

    A computer-based image analysis method was developed for assessing the severity of hip osteoarthritis (OA). Eighteen pelvic radiographs of patients with verified unilateral hip OA, were digitized and enhanced employing custom developed software. Two ROIs corresponding to osteoarthritic and contralateral-physiological radiographic Hip Joint Spaces (HJSs) were determined on each radiograph. Textural features were extracted from the HJS-ROIs utilizing the run-length matrices and Laws textural measures. A k-Nearest Neighbour based hierarchical tree structure was designed for classifying hips into three OA severity categories labeled as "Normal", "Mild/Moderate", and "Severe". Employing the run-length features, the overall classification accuracy of the hierarchical tree structure was 86.1%. The utilization of Laws' textural measures improved the system classification performance, providing an overall classification accuracy of 94.4%. The proposed method maybe of value to physicians in assessing the severity of hip OA.

  11. Therapeutic Potential of Differentiated Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Treatment of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Onju; Lee, Chang Youn; Kim, Ran; Lee, Jihyun; Oh, Sekyung; Lee, Min Young; Kim, Jongmin; Hwang, Ki-Chul; Maeng, Lee-So; Chang, Woochul

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic, progressive, and irreversible degenerative joint disease. Conventional OA treatments often result in complications such as pain and limited activity. However, transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has several beneficial effects such as paracrine effects, anti-inflammatory activity, and immunomodulatory capacity. In addition, MSCs can be differentiated into several cell types, including chondrocytes, osteocytes, endothelia, and adipocytes. Thus, transplantation of MSCs is a suggested therapeutic tool for treatment of OA. However, transplanted naïve MSCs can cause problems such as heterogeneous populations including differentiated MSCs and undifferentiated cells. To overcome this problem, new strategies for inducing differentiation of MSCs are needed. One possibility is the application of microRNA (miRNA) and small molecules, which regulate multiple molecular pathways and cellular processes such as differentiation. Here, we provide insight into possible strategies for cartilage regeneration by transplantation of differentiated MSCs to treat OA patients. PMID:26147426

  12. Changes in peripheral blood immune cell composition in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ponchel, F.; Burska, A.N.; Hensor, E.M.A.; Raja, R.; Campbell, M.; Emery, P.; Conaghan, P.G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives Immune age-related abnormalities may synergise with osteoarthritis (OA) pathology. We explored whether abnormalities in the blood immune cell composition are present in OA, beyond defects typically associated with ageing. Design Blood was collected from 121 healthy controls (HC) and 114 OA patients. Synovial biopsies were obtained from another 52 OA patients. Flow cytometry was used to establish the frequencies of lineage subsets, naïve, memory and regulatory T and B-cells, cells with an abnormal phenotype related to inflammation (IRC) and memory-like CD8+ T-cells. Multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) was used to determine whether the relative subset frequencies differed between HC and OA, controlling for age. Results Expected histology and T/B-cell infiltration were observed. Following age adjusted analysis, we confirmed the lack of age association in HC for CD4+, B, NK and NKT cells but a negative trend for CD8+ T-cells. In OA, CD4+ T-cell and B-cell frequency were lower compared to HC while CD8+ T-cell frequencies were higher. CD8+ memory-like cells were more likely to be found in OA (odds ratio = 15). Increased CD8+ IRC frequencies were also present in OA. The relationship between age and CD4+ or CD8+ naïve T-cells in HC were changed in OA while the age relationships with memory cells were lost. The increase in CD4+ Treg with age was also lost in OA. B-cells showed limited evidence of disturbance. Conclusions Immune dysfunction may be present in OA beyond what appears related to ageing; this requires further investigation. PMID:26162804

  13. Impact of OAS1 Exon 7 rs10774671 Genetic Variation on Liver Fibrosis Progression in Egyptian HCV Genotype 4 Patients.

    PubMed

    Bader El Din, Noha G; Anany, Mohamed A; Dawood, Reham M; Ibrahim, Marwa K; El-Shenawy, Reem; El Abd, Yasmin S; El Awady, Mostafa K

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of genetic variants of oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1) single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs10774671 at the exon 7 splice acceptor site on liver fibrosis progression and hepatitis C virus (HCV) outcome in Egyptian HCV genotype 4 patients. In this study, 195 subjects were enrolled; 60 controls and 135 chronic HCV genotype 4 patients with different fibrosis grades. All subjects were genotyped for OAS1 SNP rs10774671 polymorphism by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis. There was an increasing trend of liver fibrosis progression as 52.9% GG, 73.6% GA, and 83.3% AA genotypes were detected in late fibrosis patients (p = 0.025). The AA genotype was higher in the late fibrosis group than in the early fibrosis group (83.3% vs. 16.7%) (p = 0.001). The A allele was significantly affecting the liver fibrosis progression rate, more than the G allele (p = 0.001). The multivariate analysis showed that the OAS1 GA and AA genotypes were independent factors associated with liver progression (p = 0.009, odds ratio [OR] 3.467, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.273-7.584). In addition, the A allele was associated with liver fibrosis progression (p = 0.014, OR 2.525, 95% CI 1.157-4.545). The polymorphism at OAS1 exon 7 rs3741981 might be a potential genetic marker and can be useful in the assessment of liver fibrosis progression and disease outcome in HCV-infected patients. PMID:26505957

  14. Comparative assessment of the effectiveness and tolerability of lornoxicam 8 mg BID and diclofenac 50 mg TID in adult indian patients with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee: A 4-week, double-blind, randomized, comparative, multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Goregaonkar, Arvind; Mathiazhagan, K.J.; Shah, Ravindra R.; Kapoor, Paramjeet Singh; Taneja, Praveen; Sharma, Akhilesh; Bolmall, Chandrashekhar; Baliga, Vidyagauri P.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Reports of cardiovascular adverse events (AEs) associated with the use of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) have prompted the quest for a better-tolerated NSAID. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness and tolerability of lornoxicam 8 mg BID and diclofenac 50 mg TID in adult Indian patients with OA of the hip or knee. Methods: This 4-week, double-blind, randomized, comparative, multicenter study was undertaken to compare oral lornoxicam and diclofenac in patients with OA. Patients who met the selection criteria were enrolled consecutively from the outpatient clinics of each of the participating hospitals in India. Participants completed the Western Ontario and McMasters Individual Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC-OA), WOMAC Composite Index (WOMAC-CI) (for pain, stiffness, and physical function), and a 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS) (0–10 where 0 = no pain and 10 = worst possible pain or severe or excruciating pain) at each study visit (weeks 0 [baseline], 2, and 4 [or at early termination]). Patients' and physicians' global assessments of arthritis control were measured at each study visit when laboratory and clinical AEs were also monitored. The primary end points were the WOMAC-OA, the WOMAC-CI, and VAS scores for pain among the patients who completed the study. Results: Of the 273 patients (159 men, 114 women; mean [SD] age, 44.73 [10.72] years; range, 28–68 years) enrolled in the study, 13 (7 in the lornoxicam group and 6 in the diclofenac group) were lost to follow-up and their effectiveness and tolerability results were not included in the study analysis. Over the 4-week study period, both drugs provided significant (P < 0.05) sustained relief of OA symptoms compared with baseline. Compared with baseline, the mean pain score (WOMAC-CI) decreased 90.6% (13.88 [4.47] vs 1.30 [1.49]; P < 0.05) in the lornoxicam group and 88.9% (14.15 [4.56] vs 1.57 [1.49]; P < 0.05) in the diclofenac group

  15. Leptin Levels Are Negatively Correlated with 2-Arachidonoylglycerol in the Cerebrospinal Fluid of Patients with Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, James; Azim, Syed; Rebecchi, Mario J.; Galbavy, William; Feng, Tian; Reinsel, Ruth; Rizwan, Sabeen; Fowler, Christopher J.; Benveniste, Helene; Kaczocha, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background There is compelling evidence in humans that peripheral endocannabinoid signaling is disrupted in obesity. However, little is known about the corresponding central signaling. Here, we have investigated the relationship between gender, leptin, body mass index (BMI) and levels of the endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of primarily overweight to obese patients with osteoarthritis. Methodology/Principal Findings Patients (20 females, 15 males, age range 44-78 years, BMI range 24-42) undergoing total knee arthroplasty for end-stage osteoarthritis were recruited for the study. Endocannabinoids were quantified by liquid chromatography – mass spectrometry. AEA and 2-AG levels in the serum and CSF did not correlate with either age or BMI. However, 2-AG levels in the CSF, but not serum, correlated negatively with CSF leptin levels (Spearman’s ρ -0.48, P=0.0076, n=30). No such correlations were observed for AEA and leptin. Conclusions/Significance In the patient sample investigated, there is a negative association between 2-AG and leptin levels in the CSF. This is consistent with pre-clinical studies in animals, demonstrating that leptin controls the levels of hypothalamic endocannabinoids that regulate feeding behavior. PMID:25835291

  16. Basic science of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Cucchiarini, Magali; de Girolamo, Laura; Filardo, Giuseppe; Oliveira, J Miguel; Orth, Patrick; Pape, Dietrich; Reboul, Pascal

    2016-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent, disabling disorder of the joints that affects a large population worldwide and for which there is no definitive cure. This review provides critical insights into the basic knowledge on OA that may lead to innovative end efficient new therapeutic regimens. While degradation of the articular cartilage is the hallmark of OA, with altered interactions between chondrocytes and compounds of the extracellular matrix, the subchondral bone has been also described as a key component of the disease, involving specific pathomechanisms controlling its initiation and progression. The identification of such events (and thus of possible targets for therapy) has been made possible by the availability of a number of animal models that aim at reproducing the human pathology, in particular large models of high tibial osteotomy (HTO). From a therapeutic point of view, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) represent a promising option for the treatment of OA and may be used concomitantly with functional substitutes integrating scaffolds and drugs/growth factors in tissue engineering setups. Altogether, these advances in the fundamental and experimental knowledge on OA may allow for the generation of improved, adapted therapeutic regimens to treat human OA. PMID:27624438

  17. Epigenetics and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingcai; Wang, Jinxi

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of joint disease and the leading cause of chronic disability in middle-aged and older populations. The development of disease-modifying therapy for OA currently faces major obstacles largely because the regulatory mechanisms for the function of joint tissue cells remain unclear. Previous studies have found that the alterations in gene expression of specific transcription factors (TFs), pro- or anti-inflammatory cytokines, matrix proteinases and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in articular cartilage may be involved in the development of OA. However, the regulatory mechanisms for the expression of those genes in OA chondrocytes are largely unknown. The recent advances in epigenetic studies have shed lights on the importance of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the development of OA. In this review, we summarize and discuss the recent studies on the regulatory roles of various epigenetic mechanisms in the expression of genes for specific TFs, cytokines, ECM proteins and matrix proteinases, as well the significance of these epigenetic mechanisms in the pathogenesis of OA. PMID:25961070

  18. A 12-week randomized study of topical therapy with three dosages of ketoprofen in Transfersome® gel (IDEA-033) compared with the ketoprofen-free vehicle (TDT 064), in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Kneer, Werner; Rother, Matthias; Mazgareanu, Stefan; Seidel, Egbert J

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the safety and efficacy of ketoprofen in Transfersome® gel (IDEA-033) in comparison with a ketoprofen-free vehicle (TDT 064) for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Methods Patients with knee OA (N = 866) were randomly assigned to receive topical IDEA-033 containing 100, 50, or 25 mg ketoprofen, or TDT 064 twice daily for 12 weeks, in a double-blind trial. The primary efficacy endpoint was the change in the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC®) Osteoarthritis Index pain subscale score. The coprimary efficacy endpoints were the WOMAC function subscale score and the patient global assessment of response to therapy. The secondary endpoints included the numeric pain rating for the first 14 days of treatment and the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT)-Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) responder rates. Results The WOMAC pain scores were reduced by approximately 50% or more in all four groups. The 100 and 50 mg ketoprofen groups, but not the 25 mg group, showed a superior reduction in the WOMAC pain score versus the TDT 064 group (100 mg: −57.4% [P = 0.0383]; 50 mg: −57.1% [P = 0.0204]; and 25 mg: −53.4% [P = 0.3616] versus TDT 064: −49.5%). The superiority of the ketoprofen-containing formulations was not demonstrated for the WOMAC function subscale score, whereas the patient global assessment of 50 mg ketoprofen group, but not the 100 or 25 mg group, was superior to that of the TDT 064 group (P = 0.0283). Responder rates were significantly higher for all the IDEA-033 groups versus the TDT 064 group, but were high in all groups (100 mg: 88.6%; 50 mg: 86.8%; 25 mg: 88.6%; and TDT 064: 77.5%). Dermal reactions were the only relevant drug-related adverse events in all four groups. Conclusion The 50 and 100 mg ketoprofen doses of IDEA-033 were only marginally superior to TDT 064 for reducing pain associated with knee OA. The study indicates a high treatment response to the topical

  19. Role of the netrin system of repellent factors on synovial fibroblasts in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Schubert, T; Denk, A; Mägdefrau, U; Kaufmann, S; Bastone, P; Lowin, T; Schedel, J; Bosserhoff, A K

    2009-01-01

    Changes in the expression of repellent factors, i.e., Netrins and their receptors, may be responsible for the invasive behavior of the synovial tissue cells in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA). This study was carried out to analyze the expression of Netrins and their receptors in synovial cells of patients with RA, OA, and control subjects without synovial inflammation. Quantitative RT-PCR was performed to measure the expression of Netrin-1, -3, -4, Neogenin, DCC, UNC5A-D. The influence of Netrin-1 on synovial fibroblasts (SF) was analyzed by determining proliferation, migration, and their ability to organize collagen. SF expressed all repellent factors of the Netrin family. When comparing SF of healthy donors to patients with RA and OA, a stronger expression of UNC5B (4 fold) and UNC5C (769 fold) in RA and OA was found, whereas expression of the other molecules revealed no significant differences. Treating the SF-cells with recombinant Netrin-1 resulted in inhibition of migration of RA- and OA-SFs whereas control cells were not affected. The stronger expression of UNC5B and UNC5C receptors might contribute to the disordered phenotype of RA- and OA-SFs. Addition of Netrin-1 reduces the migratory ability of SFs, potentially by repulsion, as seen in neuronal cells in embryonic development. Due to its function, Netrin-1 may constitute a novel target in the treatment of OA and RA. PMID:19822088

  20. Long-term retention on treatment with lumiracoxib 100 mg once or twice daily compared with celecoxib 200 mg once daily: A randomised controlled trial in patients with osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Fleischmann, Roy; Tannenbaum, Hyman; Patel, Neha P; Notter, Marianne; Sallstig, Peter; Reginster, Jean-Yves

    2008-01-01

    Background The efficacy, safety and tolerability of lumiracoxib, a novel selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor, has been demonstrated in previous studies of patients with osteoarthritis (OA). As it is important to establish the long-term safety and efficacy of treatments for a chronic disease such as OA, the present study compared the effects of lumiracoxib at doses of 100 mg once daily (o.d.) and 100 mg twice daily (b.i.d.) with those of celecoxib 200 mg o.d. on retention on treatment over 1 year. Methods In this 52-week, multicentre, randomised, double-blind, parallel-group study, male and female patients (aged at least 40 years) with symptomatic primary OA of the hip, knee, hand or spine were randomised (1:2:1) to lumiracoxib 100 mg o.d. (n = 755), lumiracoxib 100 mg b.i.d. (n = 1,519) or celecoxib 200 mg o.d. (n = 758). The primary objective of the study was to demonstrate non-inferiority of lumiracoxib at either dose compared with celecoxib 200 mg o.d. with respect to the 1-year retention on treatment rate. Secondary outcome variables included OA pain in the target joint, patient's and physician's global assessments of disease activity, Short Arthritis assessment Scale (SAS) total score, rescue medication use, and safety and tolerability. Results Retention rates at 1 year were similar for the lumiracoxib 100 mg o.d., lumiracoxib 100 mg b.i.d. and celecoxib 200 mg o.d. groups (46.9% vs 47.5% vs 45.3%, respectively). It was demonstrated that retention on treatment with lumiracoxib at either dose was non-inferior to celecoxib 200 mg o.d. Similarly, Kaplan-Meier curves for the probability of premature discontinuation from the study for any reason were similar across the treatment groups. All three treatments generally yielded comparable results for the secondary efficacy variables and all treatments were well tolerated. Conclusion Long-term treatment with lumiracoxib 100 mg o.d., the recommended dose for OA, was as effective and well tolerated as celecoxib

  1. Brain activity for chronic knee osteoarthritis: dissociating evoked pain from spontaneous pain

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Elle L.; Geha, Paul Y.; Baliki, Marwan N.; Katz, Jeffrey; Schnitzer, Thomas J.; Apkarian, A. Vania

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pain is a hallmark of osteoarthritis (OA), yet little is known about its properties and representation in the brain. Here we use fMRI combined with psychophysics to study knee pain in 14 OA patients and 9 healthy controls. Mechanical painful pressure stimuli were applied to the knee in both groups and ratings of evoked pain and related brain activity examined. We observe that psychophysical properties and brain activation patterns of evoked pain are essentially the same between OA patients and healthy subjects, and between worse and better OA knees. In OA patients, stimulus-related brain activity could be distinguished from brain activity associated with spontaneous pain. The former activated brain regions commonly observed for acute painful stimuli in healthy subjects, while the spontaneous pain of OA engaged prefrontal-limbic regions closely corresponding to areas observed for spontaneous pain in other chronic pain conditions, such as chronic back pain and post-herpetic neuralgia. Arthritis-related clinical characteristics of knee OA also mapped to prefrontal-limbic regions. In a subgroup of patients (n = 6) we examined brain activity changes for a 2-week, repeat measure, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor (valdecoxib) therapy. Treatment decreased spontaneous pain for the worse knee and clinical characteristics of OA, and increased blood and csf levels of the drug which correlated positively with prefrontal-limbic brain activity. These findings indicate dissociation between mechanically induced and spontaneous OA knee pain, the latter engaging brain regions involved in emotional assessment of the self, and challenge the standard clinical view regarding the nature of OA pain. PMID:21315627

  2. Association between genetic variants of DVWA and osteoarthritis of the knee and hip: a comprehensive meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Yao, Jianfeng; Xu, Peng; Ji, Baohu; Voegeli, Géraldine; Hou, Weikun; Li, Hui; Wang, Yi; Kelsoe, John R; Ma, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Recently, double von Willebrand factor domain A (DVWA) gene, a previously unknown gene, was revealed to contain several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that showed consistent association with knee osteoarthritis (OA) in Japanese and Chinese cohorts. However, subsequent studies failed to confirm this result in several different populations. To deal with the issues raised by inconsistent results among those studies, we investigated the association between DVWA and OA using meta-analytic techniques, combining all published data up to December 2014. 10 independent samples from 4 teams contributed data for a possible association between SNP rs7639618 and knee or hip OA. The total number of cases and controls of this SNP was respectively 4,142 versus 6,575 for knee OA, and 2,325 versus 2,914 for hip OA. A trend of significant association was observed in the combined population with knee OA (P=0.06), and a significant difference was identified between patients with knee OA and controls for the G-allele of rs7639618 (P=0.02). Together with the reported functional studies, our results indicate that DVWA may have a small but strong effect on the susceptibility to knee OA, at least in Asian population. Further functional studies are needed to determine the underlying variation of DVWA and to relate this to the pathophysiology of OA. PMID:26309605

  3. Early osteoarthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Madry, Henning; Kon, Elizaveta; Condello, Vincenzo; Peretti, Giuseppe M; Steinwachs, Matthias; Seil, Romain; Berruto, Massimo; Engebretsen, Lars; Filardo, Giuseppe; Angele, Peter

    2016-06-01

    There is an increasing awareness on the importance in identifying early phases of the degenerative processes in knee osteoarthritis (OA), the crucial period of the disease when there might still be the possibility to initiate treatments preventing its progression. Early OA may show a diffuse and ill-defined involvement, but also originate in the cartilage surrounding a focal lesion, thus necessitating a separate assessment of these two entities. Early OA can be considered to include a maximal involvement of 50 % of the cartilage thickness based on the macroscopic ICRS classification, reflecting an OARSI grade 4. The purpose of this paper was to provide an updated review of the current status of the diagnosis and definition of early knee OA, including the clinical, radiographical, histological, MRI, and arthroscopic definitions and biomarkers. Based on current evidence, practical classification criteria are presented. As new insights and technologies become available, they will further evolve to better define and treat early knee OA. PMID:27000393

  4. Ochronosis of the knee with secondary osteoarthritis requiring total knee replacement in a patient with cryptogenic organising pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Jasper, Jorrit; Metsaars, Wieneke; Jansen, Joris

    2016-01-01

    Ochronosis is a rare autosomal recessive metabolic disease caused by homogentisic acid oxidase enzyme deficiency. High homogentisic acid levels will eventually result in black deposits in skin, sclerae, connective tissues and urine (alkaptonuria). It can lead to early degeneration of connective tissues and cartilage. Ochronosis can damage normal cartilage, leading to secondary osteoarthritis. The diagnosis is often delayed because of its low prevalence and non-specific early symptoms. In our patient, the secondary osteoarthritis due to ochronosis deposits in the cartilage was treated by total knee arthroplasty, with good clinical outcome. This article reports the first case of ochronosis with secondary osteoarthritis of the knee in a patient previously diagnosed with cryptogenic organising pneumonia (COP). PMID:27207988

  5. Epigenetic and microRNA regulation during osteoarthritis development

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Di; Shen, Jie; Hui, Tianqian

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative joint disease, the pathological mechanism of which is currently unknown. Genetic alteration is one of the key contributing factors for OA pathology. Recent evidence suggests that epigenetic and microRNA regulation of critical genes may contribute to OA development. In this article, we review the epigenetic and microRNA regulations of genes related to OA development. Potential therapeutic strategies may be developed on the basis of novel findings.

  6. Sex-Specific Protection of Osteoarthritis by Deleting Cartilage Acid Protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xianpeng; Ritter, Susan Y.; Tsang, Kelly; Shi, Ruirui; Takei, Kohtaro; Aliprantis, Antonios O.

    2016-01-01

    Cartilage acidic protein 1 (CRTAC1) was recently identified as an elevated protein in the synovial fluid of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) by a proteomic analysis. This gene is also upregulated in both human and mouse OA by transcriptomic analysis. The objective of this study was to characterize the expression and function of CRTAC1 in OA. Here, we first confirm the increase of CRTAC1 in cartilage biopsies from OA patients undergoing joint replacement by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, we report that proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor alpha upregulate CRTAC1 expression in primary human articular chondrocytes and synovial fibroblasts. Genetic deletion of Crtac1 in mice significantly inhibited cartilage degradation, osteophyte formation and gait abnormalities of post-traumatic OA in female, but not male, animals undergoing the destabilization of medial meniscus (DMM) surgery. Taken together, CRTAC1 is upregulated in the osteoarthritic joint and directly induced in chondrocytes and synovial fibroblasts by pro-inflammatory cytokines. This molecule is necessary for the progression of OA in female mice after DMM surgery and thus represents a potential therapy for this prevalent disease, especially for women who demonstrate higher rates and more severe OA. PMID:27415616

  7. The Monoiodoacetate Model of Osteoarthritis Pain in the Mouse.

    PubMed

    Pitcher, Thomas; Sousa-Valente, João; Malcangio, Marzia

    2016-01-01

    A major symptom of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) is pain that is triggered by peripheral as well as central changes within the pain pathways. The current treatments for OA pain such as NSAIDS or opiates are neither sufficiently effective nor devoid of detrimental side effects. Animal models of OA are being developed to improve our understanding of OA-related pain mechanisms and define novel pharmacological targets for therapy. Currently available models of OA in rodents include surgical and chemical interventions into one knee joint. The monoiodoacetate (MIA) model has become a standard for modelling joint disruption in OA in both rats and mice. The model, which is easier to perform in the rat, involves injection of MIA into a knee joint that induces rapid pain-like responses in the ipsilateral limb, the level of which can be controlled by injection of different doses. Intra-articular injection of MIA disrupts chondrocyte glycolysis by inhibiting glyceraldehyde-3-phosphatase dehydrogenase and results in chondrocyte death, neovascularization, subchondral bone necrosis and collapse, as well as inflammation. The morphological changes of the articular cartilage and bone disruption are reflective of some aspects of patient pathology. Along with joint damage, MIA injection induces referred mechanical sensitivity in the ipsilateral hind paw and weight bearing deficits that are measurable and quantifiable. These behavioral changes resemble some of the symptoms reported by the patient population, thereby validating the MIA injection in the knee as a useful and relevant pre-clinical model of OA pain. The aim of this article is to describe the methodology of intra-articular injections of MIA and the behavioral recordings of the associated development of hypersensitivity with a mind to highlight the necessary steps to give consistent and reliable recordings. PMID:27214709

  8. Gait Using Pneumatic Brace for End-Stage Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Bhaveen H; Cherian, Jeffrey Jai; Starr, Roland; Chughtai, Morad; Mont, Michael A; Harwin, Steven F; Bhave, Anil

    2016-04-01

    More than 20 million individuals in the United States are affected by knee osteoarthritis (OA), which can lead to altered biomechanics and excessive joint loading. The use of an unloader pneumatic brace with extension assist has been proposed as a nonoperative treatment modality that may improve gait mechanics and correct knee malalignment. We assessed the following parameters in patients who have knee OA treated with and without a brace: (1) changes in temporospatial parameters in gait; (2) knee range of motion, knee extension at heel strike, and foot placement; (3) knee joint moments and impulse; and (4) changes in dynamic stiffness and rate of change of knee flexion during midstance to terminal stance. This 2:1 prospective, randomized, single-blinded trial evaluated 36 patients (24 brace and 12 matching). OA knee patients were randomized to receive either a pneumatic unloader brace or a standard nonoperative treatment regimen as the matching cohort for a 3-month period. They underwent evaluation of gait parameters using a three-dimensional gait analysis system at their initial appointment and at 3 months follow-up. All the testing, pre- and postbracing were performed without wearing the brace to examine for retained effects. Treatment with the brace led to significant improvements versus standard treatment in various gait parameters. Patients in the brace group had improvements in walking speed, knee extension at heel strike, total range of motion, knee joint forces, and rate of knee flexion from midstance to terminal stance when compared with the matching cohort. Knee OA patients who used a pneumatic unloader brace for 3 months for at least 3 hours per day had significant improvements various gait parameters when compared with a standard nonoperative therapy cohort. Braced patients demonstrated gait-modifying affects when not wearing the brace. These results are encouraging and suggest that this device represents a promising treatment modality for knee OA that

  9. Sport and early osteoarthritis: the role of sport in aetiology, progression and treatment of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Vannini, F; Spalding, T; Andriolo, L; Berruto, M; Denti, M; Espregueira-Mendes, J; Menetrey, J; Peretti, G M; Seil, R; Filardo, G

    2016-06-01

    Sports activities are considered favourable for general health; nevertheless, a possible influence of sports practice on the development of early osteoarthritis (OA) is a cause for concern. A higher incidence of OA in knees and ankles of former high-impact sports players than in those of the normal population has been shown and it is still debatable whether the cause is either to be recognized generically in the higher number of injuries or in a joint overload. The possibility to address knee OA in its early phases may be strictly connected to the modification of specific extrinsic or intrinsic factors, related to the patient in order to save the joint from further disease progression; these include sport practice, equipment and load. Non-surgical therapies such as continuative muscles reinforce and training play a strong role in the care of athletes with early OA, particularly if professional. There is an overall agreement on the need of an early restoring of a proper meniscal, ligament and cartilage integrity in order to protect the knee and resume sports safely, whereas alignment is a point still strongly debatable especially for professional athletes. Remaining questions still to be answered are the risks of different sports in relation to one another, although an actual protective effect of low-impact sports, such as walking, swimming or cycling, has been recognized on the appearance or worsening of OA, the effect of continuing or ceasing to practice a sport on the natural history of early OA, and even following appropriate treatment is still unknown. PMID:27043343

  10. Symptomatic Early Osteoarthritis of the Knee Treated With Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Lad, Dnyanesh; Petrera, Massimo; Karnatzikos, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In vitro and in vivo studies have proven a pro-anabolic and anti-catabolic activity within cartilage with the use of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs). This has piqued interest of sports physicians for its use in the treatment of early osteoarthritis (OA). The aim was to determine if the use of PEMFs in patients with early OA of the knee would lead to an improved clinical outcome. Study design: Prospective case series. Methods: Twenty-two patients aged between 30 and 60 years who underwent treatment with PEMFs (4-hour treatment per day, duration 45 days) were included. All patients presented with symptomatic early OA with grade 0-2 changes (Kellgren-Lawrence classification) at the pretreatment evaluation. Patients were evaluated before treatment, at 1- and 2-year follow-up using visual analogue scale for pain, International Knee Documentation Committee objective, Tegner, and Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Scores. Results: A significant improvement in all scores was observed at 1-year follow-up (P = 0.008). At 2-year follow-up, results deteriorated but were still superior to pretreatment levels (P = 0.02). No adverse reactions or side effects were seen. Conclusions: This study showed that the use of PEMFs in patients with symptomatic early OA of the knee led to significant improvement in symptoms, knee function, and activity at 1-year follow-up. There was a significant decline in all the scores at 2-year follow-up. PMID:26069687

  11. Nacre extract restores the mineralization capacity of subchondral osteoarthritis osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Brion, A; Zhang, G; Dossot, M; Moby, V; Dumas, D; Hupont, S; Piet, M H; Bianchi, A; Mainard, D; Galois, L; Gillet, P; Rousseau, M

    2015-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common cause of joint chronic pain and involves the entire joints. Subchondral osteoarthritic osteoblasts present a mineralization defect and, to date, only a few molecules (Vitamin D3 and Bone Morphogenetic Protein2) could improve the mineralization potential of this cell type. In this context, we have tested for the first time the effect of nacre extract on the mineralization capacity of osteoblasts from OA patients. Nacre extract is known to contain osteogenic molecules which have demonstrated their activities notably on the MC3T3 pre-osteoblastic cell line. For this goal, molecules were extracted from nacre (ESM, Ethanol Soluble Matrix) and tested on osteoblasts of the subchondral bone from OA patients undergoing total knee replacement and on MC3T3 cells for comparison. We chose to investigate the mineralization with Alizarin Red staining and with the study of extracellular matrix (ECM) structure and composition. In a complementary way the structure of the ECM secreted during the mineralization phase was investigated using second harmonic generation (SHG). Nacre extract was able to induce the early presence (after 7 days) of precipitated calcium in cells. Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy showed the presence of nanograins of an early crystalline form of calcium phosphate in OA osteoblasts ECM and hydroxyapatite in MC3T3 ECM. SHG collagen fibers signal was present in both cell types but lower for OA osteoblasts. In conclusion, nacre extract was able to rapidly restore the mineralization capacity of osteoarthritis osteoblasts, therefore confirming the potential of nacre as a source of osteogenic compounds. PMID:26496825

  12. Physical Exercise and Weight Loss for Hip and Knee Osteoarthritis in Very Old Patients: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Quintrec, Jean-Laurent Le; Verlhac, Bernard; Cadet, Christian; Bréville, Philippe; Vetel, Jean M; Gauvain, Jean B; Jeandel, Claude; Maheu, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Background : Rheumatologic and geriatric scholarly organisations recommendations for the management of hip and knee osteoarthritis, which emphasise the usefulness of non-pharmacological therapies, are not scaled according to patient’s age and physical condition. We conducted a systematic review of clinical trials on exercise and weight loss in hip and knee osteoarthritis in very old patients. Methods : Electronic search in MEDLINE, EMBASE, PASCAL database, systematic search of the Cochrane Reviews, manual search in guidelines, meta-analyses and identified relevant articles. Results : We identified 83 trials, with only 2 on patients aged ≥ 75 years; we therefore lowered the mean age threshold to 70 years and found 15 trials, mainly performed in knee osteoarthritis and outpatients. Physical exercise (8 trials): was effective on pain and function (4 controlled trials), with a persistent effect only in case of self-rehabilitation. Aquatic exercise (5 trials): was as effective as land-based exercise. Weight loss (2 trials): only patients under diet + exercise had significant improvement on symptoms. Conclusion : Our systematic review confirms that international recommendations on exercise for knee osteoarthritis also apply to subjects aged 70-80 years. Long-term effectiveness requires a maintenance strategy. Specific trials on very old patients with various comorbidities are mandatory, given that these subjects are more exposed to drug-related iatrogenesis. PMID:25489352

  13. To Run or Not to Run: A Post-Meniscectomy Qualitative Risk Analysis Model for Osteoarthritis When Considering a Return to Recreational Running

    PubMed Central

    Baumgarten, Bob

    2007-01-01

    The increased likelihood of osteoarthritic change in the tibiofemoral joint following meniscectomy is well documented. This awareness often leads medical practitioners to advise patients previously engaged in recreational running who have undergone meniscectomy to cease all recreational running. This literature review examines the following questions: 1) Is there evidence to demonstrate that runners, post-meniscectomy, incur a great enough risk for early degenerative OA to cease all running? 2) Does the literature yield risk factors for early OA that would guide a physical therapist with regard to advising the post-meniscectomy patient contemplating a return to recreational running? Current literature related to meniscal structure and function, etiology and definition of osteoarthritis, methods for assessing osteoarthritis, relationship between running and osteoarthritis, and relationship between meniscectomy and osteoarthritis are reviewed. This review finds that while the probability for early osteoarthritis in the post-meniscectomy population is substantial, it is a probability and not a certainty. To help guide a physical therapist with regard to advising the patient for a safe return to running following a meniscectomy, a qualitative risk assessment based on identified risk factors for osteoarthritis in both the running and the post-meniscectomy populations is proposed. PMID:19125175

  14. Pharmacologic treatment of hand-, knee- and hip-osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Bobacz, Klaus

    2013-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a joint disease of high prevalence and affects > 90 % of the population, depending on several risk factors. Symptomatic OA is less frequent, but requires an individually tailored therapeutic regimen consisting of non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment modalities. Pharmacologic therapy, however, is mainly limited to analgetic and anti-inflammatory agents; structure modifying remedies do not exist. The therapeutic approach to hand-, knee- and hip-OA is basically similar and differs only at some minor points. Generally, topical agents or paracetamol are recommended as first-line agents. If unsuccessful oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or COX-2-selctive inhibitors should be introduced. Tramadol is an option in the case patients will not respond satisfactorily to NSAIDs. Glucosamine and chondroitine sulphate are no longer recommended in knee and hip OA, but chondroitine might be efficient in treating hand OA. Oral NSAIDs should be prescribed with caution due to potential side effects. Opioids are not recommended as their benefits are outweighed by an increased risk for serious adverse events. PMID:23715933

  15. The advance of non-invasive detection methods in osteoarthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jiao; Chen, Yanping

    2011-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases which badly affected the patients' living quality and economy. Detection and evaluation technology can provide basic information for early treatment. A variety of imaging methods in OA were reviewed, such as conventional X-ray, computed tomography (CT), ultrasound (US), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Among the existing imaging modalities, the spatial resolution of X-ray is extremely high; CT is a three-dimensional method, which has high density resolution; US as an evaluation method of knee OA discriminates lesions sensitively between normal cartilage and degenerative one; as a sensitive and nonionizing method, MRI is suitable for the detection of early OA, but the cost is too expensive for routine use; NIRS is a safe, low cost modality, and is also good at detecting early stage OA. In a word, each method has its own advantages, but NIRS is provided with broader application prospect, and it is likely to be used in clinical daily routine and become the golden standard for diagnostic detection.

  16. Post-operative rehabilitation and nutrition in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Mobasheri, Ali; Trovato, Francesca Maria; Szychlinska, Marta Anna; Imbesi, Rosa; Castrogiovanni, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative process involving the progressive loss of articular cartilage, synovial inflammation and structural changes in subchondral bone that lead to loss of synovial joint structural features and functionality of articular cartilage. OA represents one of the most common causes of physical disability in the world. Different OA treatments are usually considered in relation to the stage of the disease. In the early stages, it is possible to recommend physical activity programs that can maintain joint health and keep the patient mobile, as recommended by OA Research Society International (OARSI) and European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR). In the most severe and advanced cases of OA, surgical intervention is necessary. After, in early postoperative stages, it is essential to include a rehabilitation exercise program in order to restore the full function of the involved joint. Physical therapy is crucial for the success of any surgical procedure and can promote recovery of muscle strength, range of motion, coordinated walking, proprioception and mitigate joint pain. Furthermore, after discharge from the hospital, patients should continue the rehabilitation exercise program at home associated to an appropriate diet. In this review, we analyze manuscripts from the most recent literature and provide a balanced and comprehensive overview of the latest developments on the effect of physical exercise on postoperative rehabilitation in OA. The literature search was conducted using PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Google Scholar, using the keywords ‘osteoarthritis’, ‘rehabilitation’, ‘exercise’ and ‘nutrition’. The available data suggest that physical exercise is an effective, economical and accessible to everyone practice, and it is one of the most important components of postoperative rehabilitation for OA. PMID:26962431

  17. Predicting Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Bruce S; Woodhouse, Francis G; Besier, Thor F; Grodzinsky, Alan J; Lloyd, David G; Zhang, Lihai; Smith, David W

    2016-01-01

    Treatment options for osteoarthritis (OA) beyond pain relief or total knee replacement are very limited. Because of this, attention has shifted to identifying which factors increase the risk of OA in vulnerable populations in order to be able to give recommendations to delay disease onset or to slow disease progression. The gold standard is then to use principles of risk management, first to provide subject-specific estimates of risk and then to find ways of reducing that risk. Population studies of OA risk based on statistical associations do not provide such individually tailored information. Here we argue that mechanistic models of cartilage tissue maintenance and damage coupled to statistical models incorporating model uncertainty, united within the framework of structural reliability analysis, provide an avenue for bridging the disciplines of epidemiology, cell biology, genetics and biomechanics. Such models promise subject-specific OA risk assessment and personalized strategies for mitigating or even avoiding OA. We illustrate the proposed approach with a simple model of cartilage extracellular matrix synthesis and loss regulated by daily physical activity. PMID:26206679

  18. Proteomic analysis of synovial fluid as an analytical tool to detect candidate biomarkers for knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Weixiong; Li, Zhongli; Zhang, Hao; Li, Ji; Wang, Ketao; Yang, Yimeng

    2015-01-01

    We conducted research to detect the proteomic profiles in synovial fluid (SF) from knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients to better understand the pathogenesis and aetiology of OA. Our long-term goal is to identify reliable candidate biomarkers for OA in SF. The SF proteins obtained from 10 knee OA patients and 10 non-OA patients (9 of whom were patients with a meniscus injury in the knee; 1 had a discoid meniscus in the knee, and all exhibited intact articular cartilage) were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). The repeatability of the obtained protein spots regarding their intensity was tested via triplicate 2-DE of selected samples. The observed protein expression patterns were subjected to statistical analysis, and differentially expressed protein spots were identified via matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS). Our analyses showed low intrasample variability and clear intersample variation. Among the protein spots observed on the gels, there were 29 significant differences, of which 22 corresponded to upregulation and 7 to downregulation in the OA group. One of the upregulated protein spots was confirmed to be haptoglobin by mass spectrometry, and the levels of haptoglobin in SF are positively correlated with the severity of OA (r = 0.89, P < 0.001). This study showed that 2-DE could be used under standard conditions to screen SF samples and identify a small subset of proteins in SF that are potential markers associated with OA. Spots of interest identified by mass spectrometry, such as haptoglobin, may be associated with OA severity. PMID:26617706

  19. Comparison of Venous Thromboembolism after Total Artificial Joint Replacement between Musculoskeletal Tumors and Osteoarthritis of the Knee by a Single Surgeon

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Dong; Zhao, Yiqiong; Shen, Jiakang; Cai, Zhengdong; Hua, Yingqi

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare and evaluate the event of VTE (Venous Thromboembolism Event) after total artificial joint replacement between two groups diagnosed with either musculoskeletal tumors or osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. From 2004 to 2014, a total of 1,402 patients (308 in tumor group, 1,094 in OA group) were involved in this study. The rate of asymptomatic DVT (Deep vein thrombosis) was significantly higher in tumor group when compared with OA group. Though both the incidence of symptomatic DVT and PE (Pulmonary embolism) were slightly higher in tumor group, no significant difference was detected. Tumor patients suffered an almost equal risk of VTE compared with OA patients except a higher rate of asymptomatic DVT after total artificial joint replacement. For patients with tumor, no significant association was observed between any potential risk factor and DVT. PMID:27352130

  20. Pain, motor and gait assessment of murine osteoarthritis in a cruciate ligament transection model

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Merry ZC; Patel, Ronak M; Dawson, Brian C; Jiang, Ming-ming; Lee, Brendan HI

    2013-01-01

    Objective The major complaint of Osteoarthritis (OA) patients is pain. However, due to the nature of clinical studies and the limitation of animal studies, few studies have linked function impairment and behavioral changes in OA animal models to cartilage loss and histopathology. Our objective was to study surrogate markers of functional impairment in relation to cartilage loss and pathological changes in a post-traumatic mouse model of OA. Method We performed a battery of functional analyses in a mouse model of OA generated by cruciate ligament transection (CLT). The changes in functional analyses were linked to histological changes graded by OARSI standards, histological grading of synovitis, and volumetric changes of the articular cartilage and osteophytes quantified by phase contrast micro-CT. Results OA generated by CLT led to decreased time on rotarod, delayed response on hotplate analysis, and altered gait starting from 4 weeks after surgery. Activity in open field analysis did not change at 4, 8, or 12 weeks after CLT. The magnitude of behavioral changes was directly correlated with higher OARSI histological scores of OA, synovitis in the knee joints, cartilage volume loss, and osteophyte formation. Conclusion Our findings link functional analyses to histological grading, synovitis, comprehensive 3-dimensional assessment of cartilage volume and osteophyte formation. This serves as a reference for a mouse model in predicting outcomes of OA treatment. PMID:23973150

  1. Metabolic analysis of osteoarthritis subchondral bone based on UPLC/Q-TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Yang, Gang; Zhang, Hua; Chen, Tingmei; Zhu, Weiwen; Ding, Shijia; Xu, Kaiming; Xu, Zhongwei; Guo, Yanlei; Zhang, Jian

    2016-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), one of the most widespread musculoskeletal joint diseases among the aged, is characterized by the progressive loss of articular cartilage and continuous changes in subchondral bone. The exact pathogenesis of osteoarthritis is not completely clear. In this work, ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC/Q-TOF-MS) in combination with multivariate statistical analysis was applied to analyze the metabolic profiling of subchondral bone from 42 primary osteoarthritis patients. This paper described a modified two-step method for extracting the metabolites of subchondral bone from primary osteoarthritis patients. Finally, 68 metabolites were identified to be significantly changed in the sclerotic subchondral bone compared with the non-sclerotic subchondral bone. Taurine and hypotaurine metabolism and beta-alanine metabolism were probably relevant to the sclerosis of subchondral bone. Taurine, L-carnitine, and glycerophospholipids played a vital regulation role in the pathological process of sclerotic subchondral bone. In the sclerotic process, beta-alanine and L-carnitine might be related to the increase of energy consumption. In addition, our findings suggested that the intra-cellular environment of sclerotic subchondral bone might be more acidotic and hypoxic compared with the non-sclerotic subchondral bone. In conclusion, this study provided a new insight into the pathogenesis of subchondral bone sclerosis. Our results indicated that metabolomics could serve as a promising approach for elucidating the pathogenesis of subchondral bone sclerosis in primary osteoarthritis. Graphical Abstract Metabolic analysis of osteoarthritis subchondral bone. PMID:27074781

  2. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization as a Treatment for Medial Knee Pain in Patients with Mild to Moderate Osteoarthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Okuno, Yuji; Korchi, Amine Mohamed; Shinjo, Takuma; Kato, Shojiro

    2015-04-15

    PurposeOsteoarthritis is a common cause of pain and disability. Mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis that is resistant to nonsurgical options and not severe enough to warrant joint replacement represents a challenge in its management. On the basis of the hypothesis that neovessels and accompanying nerves are possible sources of pain, previous work demonstrated that transcatheter arterial embolization for chronic painful conditions resulted in excellent pain relief. We hypothesized that transcatheter arterial embolization can relieve pain associated with knee osteoarthritis.MethodsTranscatheter arterial embolization for mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis using imipenem/cilastatin sodium or 75 μm calibrated Embozene microspheres as an embolic agent has been performed in 11 and three patients, respectively. We assessed adverse events and changes in Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores.ResultsAbnormal neovessels were identified within soft tissue surrounding knee joint in all cases by arteriography. No major adverse events were related to the procedures. Transcatheter arterial embolization rapidly improved WOMAC pain scores from 12.2 ± 1.9 to 3.3 ± 2.1 at 1 month after the procedure, with further improvement at 4 months (1.7 ± 2.2) and WOMAC total scores from 47.3 ± 5.8 to 11.6 ± 5.4 at 1 month, and to 6.3 ± 6.0 at 4 months. These improvements were maintained in most cases at the final follow-up examination at a mean of 12 ± 5 months (range 4–19 months).ConclusionTranscatheter arterial embolization for mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis was feasible, rapidly relieved resistant pain, and restored knee function.

  3. Expression of miR-146a, miR-155, and miR-223 in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded synovial tissues of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kriegsmann, Mark; Randau, Thomas M; Gravius, Sascha; Lisenko, Katharina; Altmann, Carolin; Arens, Norbert; Kriegsmann, Jörg

    2016-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease with a heterogeneous clinical presentation affecting about 1 % of adults in developed countries. Currently, the diagnosis is based on the revised criteria of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) from 2010. These criteria include clinical and laboratory parameters. Because of the variability of the clinical picture, delayed diagnosis of RA occurs in a significant subset of patients. Therefore, the discovery of novel biomarkers that improve the diagnosis of RA is of particular interest. Recently, it became evident that miRNAs have regulatory activities in physiologic processes and human diseases. Upregulation of miR-146a, miR-155, and miR-223 has been shown in various compartments such as serum, blood, synovial fluid, and tissues in patients with RA. A total of 87 samples were analyzed (RA 50, osteoarthritis (OA) 37). RNA was isolated from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded synovial tissue (FFPE). The relative expression of miR-146a, miR-155, and miR-223 was determined by comparison to a housekeeping RNA molecule (snRNA U6) and an RNA pool from histologically and clinically verified OA samples. miR-146a, miR-155, and miR-223 were significantly elevated in RA compared to OA synovial tissues (p < 0.001). A strong correlation between the miRNAs could be observed. The sensitivity and specificity for the detection of RA were 0.76/0.80 (miR-146a), 0.80/0.95 (miR-155), and 0.86/0.81 (miR-223). The combination of miR-155 and miR-223 resulted in the highest area under the curve (AUC 0.92) with a sensitivity and specificity of 0.84/0.91, respectively. Significantly higher expression levels of miR-146a, miR-155, and miR-223 in FFPE synovial tissue samples of patients with established RA compared to patients with OA were shown. The usefulness of these miRs for the differential diagnosis of early phases of RA against OA remains to be investigated. PMID:27079198

  4. Sagittal alignment of the spine-pelvis-lower extremity axis in patients with severe knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, W. J.; Liu, F.; Zhu, Y.W.; Sun, M.H.; Qiu, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Normal sagittal spine-pelvis-lower extremity alignment is crucial in humans for maintaining an ergonomic upright standing posture, and pathogenesis in any segment leads to poor balance. The present study aimed to investigate how this sagittal alignment can be affected by severe knee osteoarthritis (KOA), and whether associated changes corresponded with symptoms of lower back pain (LBP) in this patient population. Methods Lateral radiograph films in an upright standing position were obtained from 59 patients with severe KOA and 58 asymptomatic controls free from KOA. Sagittal alignment of the spine, pelvis, hip and proximal femur was quantified by measuring several radiographic parameters. Global balance was accessed according to the relative position of the C7 plumb line to the sacrum and femoral heads. The presence of chronic LBP was documented. Comparisons between the two groups were carried by independent samples t-tests or chi-squared test. Results Patients with severe KOA showed significant backward femoral inclination (FI), hip flexion, forward spinal inclination, and higher prevalence of global imbalance (27.1% versus 3.4%, p < 0.001) compared with controls. In addition, patients with FI of 10° (n = 23) showed reduced lumbar lordosis and significant forward spinal inclination compared with controls, whereas those with FI > 10° (n = 36) presented with significant pelvic anteversion and hip flexion. A total of 39 patients with KOA (66.1%) suffered from LBP. There was no significant difference in sagittal alignment between KOA patients with and without LBP. Conclusions The sagittal alignment of spine-pelvis-lower extremity axis was significantly influenced by severe KOA. The lumbar spine served as the primary source of compensation, while hip flexion and pelvic anteversion increased for further compensation. Changes in sagittal alignment may not be involved in the pathogenesis of LBP in this patient population. Cite this article: W. J. Wang, F. Liu

  5. Hand, hip and knee osteoarthritis in a Norwegian population-based study - The MUST protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Knowledge about the prevalence and consequences of osteoarthritis (OA) in the Norwegian population is limited. This study has been designed to gain a greater understanding of musculoskeletal pain in the general population with a focus on clinically and radiologically confirmed OA, as well as risk factors, consequences, and management of OA. Methods/Design The Musculoskeletal pain in Ullensaker STudy (MUST) has been designed as an observational study comprising a population-based postal survey and a comprehensive clinical examination of a sub-sample with self-reported OA (MUST OA cohort). All inhabitants in Ullensaker municipality, Norway, aged 40 to 79 years receive the initial population-based postal survey questionnaire with questions about life style, general health, musculoskeletal pain, self-reported OA, comorbidities, health care utilisation, medication use, and functional ability. Participants who self-report OA in their hip, knee and/or hand joints are asked to attend a comprehensive clinical examination at Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, including a comprehensive medical examination, performance-based functional tests, different imaging modalities, cardiovascular assessment, blood and urine samples, and a number of patient-reported questionnaires including five OA disease specific instruments. Data will be merged with six national data registries. A subsample of those who receive the questionnaire has previously participated in postal surveys conducted in 1990, 1994, and 2004 with data on musculoskeletal pain and functional ability in addition to demographic characteristics and a number of health related factors. This subsample constitutes a population based cohort with 20 years follow-up. Discussion This protocol describes the design of an observational population-based study that will involve the collection of data from a postal survey on musculoskeletal pain, and a comprehensive clinical examination on those with self-reported hand, hip and

  6. Comparative study of hamstring and quadriceps strengthening treatments in the management of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Al-Johani, Ahmed H; Kachanathu, Shaji John; Ramadan Hafez, Ashraf; Al-Ahaideb, Abdulaziz; Algarni, Abdulrahman D; Meshari Alroumi, Abdulmohesn; Alanezi, Aqeel M

    2014-06-01

    [Purpose] Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is the most common form of joint disease. It is one of the major causes of impaired function that reduces quality of life (QOL) worldwide. The purpose of this study was to compare exercise treatments for hamstring and quadriceps strength in the management of knee osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] Forty patients with OA knee, aged 50-65 years were divided into 2 groups. The first group (57.65±4.78 years) received hot packs and performed strengthening exercises for the quadriceps and hamstring, and stretching exercises for the hamstring. The second group (58.15±5.11 years) received hot packs and performed strengthening exercises for only the quadriceps, and stretching exercise for the hamstring. Outcome measures were the WOMAC (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities OA index questionnaire), Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) assessment of pain, the Fifty-Foot Walk Test (FWS), and Handheld dynamometry. [Results] There was a significant difference between the groups. The first group showed a more significant result than the second group. [Conclusion] Strengthening of the hamstrings in addition to strengthening of the quadriceps was shown to be beneficial for improving subjective knee pain, range of motion and decreasing the limitation of functional performance of patients with knee osteoarthritis. PMID:25013274

  7. Racial Differences in Serum Adipokine and Insulin Levels in a Matched Osteoarthritis Sample: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Rajiv; Sharma, Anirudh; Kapoor, Mohit; Sundararajan, Kala; Perruccio, Anthony V.

    2016-01-01

    Background. In an attempt to correlate biomarkers with disease, serum-based biomarkers often are compared between individuals with osteoarthritis (OA) and control subjects. However, variable results have been reported. Some studies have suggested an association between certain adipokines and insulin and OA. We know that there are racial differences in OA prevalence and incidence, and from general population-based studies, those of Asian race consistently demonstrate a unique adipokine/insulin serum concentration profile as compared to Caucasians. Whether similar racial differences exist within OA samples is unknown and may have implications for selecting appropriate controls in comparative studies. Methods. Serum levels of adipokines, leptin, and adiponectin, along with insulin, were determined by ELISA in patients scheduled for total hip or knee replacement surgery for OA. Fifteen Asian patients were matched 1 : 1 on age (±2 years), gender, body mass index (±1.5 kg/m2), and surgical joint with Caucasian patients. Differences in serum concentrations were tested using paired t-tests. Results. Serum leptin and insulin levels were significantly higher in Asians compared to Caucasians (p < 0.05). While serum adiponectin levels were lower among Asians, the difference did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.12). Conclusion. Findings from this work suggest that when studying serum biomarker concentrations in OA versus controls, race may be an important factor to consider. Our findings warrant confirmation in larger studies.

  8. Recent advances in the understanding of molecular mechanisms of cartilage degeneration, synovitis and subchondral bone changes in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yingliang; Bai, Lunhao

    2016-07-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common form of degenerative joint disease, is linked to high morbidity. It is predicted to be the single greatest cause of disability in the general population by 2030. The development of disease-modifying therapy for OA currently face great obstacle mainly because the onset and development of the disease involve complex molecular mechanisms. In this review, we will comprehensively summarize biological and pathological mechanisms of three key aspects: degeneration of articular cartilage, synovial immunopathogenesis, and changes in subchondral bone. For each tissue, we will focus on the molecular receptors, cytokines, peptidases, related cell, and signal pathways. Agents that specifically block mechanisms involved in synovial inflammation, degeneration of articular cartilage, and subchondral bone remodeling can potentially be exploited to produce targeted therapy for OA. Such new comprehensive agents will benefit affected patients and bring exciting new hope for the treatment of OA. PMID:27285430

  9. Conservative biomechanical strategies for knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Neil D; Bowling, Frank L

    2011-02-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most prevalent forms of this disease, with the medial compartment most commonly affected. The direction of external forces and limb orientation during walking results in an adduction moment that acts around the knee, and this parameter is regarded as a surrogate measure of medial knee compression. The knee adduction moment is intimately linked with the development and progression of knee OA and is, therefore, a target for conservative biomechanical intervention strategies, which are the focus of this Review. We examine the evidence for walking barefoot and the use of lateral wedge insoles and thin-soled, flexible shoes to reduce the knee adduction moment in patients with OA. We review strategies that directly affect the gait, such as walking with the foot externally rotated ('toe-out gait'), using a cane, lateral trunk sway and gait retraining. Valgus knee braces and muscle strengthening are also discussed for their effect upon reducing the knee adduction moment. PMID:21289615

  10. Pilot Study of Massage in Veterans with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Juberg, Michael; Allen, Kelli D.; Dmitrieva, Natalia O.; Keever, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: To (1) assess the feasibility and acceptability of Swedish massage among Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health care users with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and (2) collect preliminary data on efficacy of Swedish massage in this patient group. Design: Experimental pilot study. Setting: Duke Integrative Medicine clinic and VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina. Patients: Twenty-five veterans with symptomatic knee OA. Interventions: Eight weekly 1-hour sessions of full-body Swedish massage. Outcome measures: Primary: Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and global pain (Visual Analog Scale [VAS]). Secondary: National Institutes of Health Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System-Pain Interference Questionnaire 6b (PROMIS-PI 6b), 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12 v1) and the EuroQol health status index (EQ-5D-5L), knee range of motion (ROM), and time to walk 50 feet. Results: Study feasibility was established by a 92% retention rate with 99% of massage visits and 100% of research visits completed. Results showed significant improvements in self-reported OA-related pain, stiffness and function (30% improvement in Global WOMAC scores; p=0.001) and knee pain over the past 7 days (36% improvement in VAS score; p<0.001). PROMIS-PI, EQ-5D-5L, and physical composite score of the SF-12 also significantly improved (p<0.01 for all), while the mental composite score of the SF-12 and knee ROM showed trends toward significant improvement. Time to walk 50 feet did not significantly improve. Conclusions: Results of this pilot study support the feasibility and acceptability of Swedish massage among VA health care users as well as preliminary data suggesting its efficacy for reducing pain due to knee OA. If results are confirmed in a larger randomized trial, massage could be an important component of regular care for these patients. PMID:25966332

  11. Low Vitamin D levels are associated with greater pain and slow walking speed in patients with knee osteoarthritis (KOA)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The clinical status of patients with knee OA is primarily predicated by their level of pain and their muscle function. Recent studies have shown that vitamin D influences both musculoskeletal health and neuromuscular function. Vitamin D deficiency is common among elders and those with comorbidities....

  12. Reflecting on pain management for patients with osteoarthritis and other rheumatic disorders: there's more to pain management than managing pain

    PubMed Central

    Perret, Danielle; Chang, Eric Y; Pang, Winnie; Shinada, Shuntaro; Panush, Richard S

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Medical progress is measured by advances in science and technology. The pace of discovery will surely accelerate. We are increasingly challenged not only to assimilate new information, but also to reconcile our learning with our art. We present the common clinical problem of managing pain in osteoarthritis as a paradigm for this dilemma in contemporary patient care. We do not yet have the understanding and interventions to do this optimally for all with osteoarthritis, leaving us with uncertainties as we struggle to care for these patients. In a world of growing complexity and sophistication we must not overlook the person who is our patient. It is easy to be seduced by electronic and informational advances, to be entranced by machinery, and to forget the unique individuality and needs of each patient. Osler taught that “the practice of medicine is an art, based on science”. This doesn't change. PMID:24654815

  13. Reflecting on pain management for patients with osteoarthritis and other rheumatic disorders: there's more to pain management than managing pain.

    PubMed

    Perret, Danielle; Chang, Eric Y; Pang, Winnie; Shinada, Shuntaro; Panush, Richard S

    2013-07-01

    SUMMARY Medical progress is measured by advances in science and technology. The pace of discovery will surely accelerate. We are increasingly challenged not only to assimilate new information, but also to reconcile our learning with our art. We present the common clinical problem of managing pain in osteoarthritis as a paradigm for this dilemma in contemporary patient care. We do not yet have the understanding and interventions to do this optimally for all with osteoarthritis, leaving us with uncertainties as we struggle to care for these patients. In a world of growing complexity and sophistication we must not overlook the person who is our patient. It is easy to be seduced by electronic and informational advances, to be entranced by machinery, and to forget the unique individuality and needs of each patient. Osler taught that "the practice of medicine is an art, based on science". This doesn't change. PMID:24654815

  14. Validation of a proposed WOMAC short form for patients with hip osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aims of this study were to propose a Spanish Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) short form based on previously shortened versions and to study its validity, reliability, and responsiveness for patients with hip osteoarthritis undergoing total hip replacement (THR). Methods Prospective observational study of two independent cohorts (788 and 445 patients, respectively). Patients completed the WOMAC and the Short Form (SF)-36 questionnaires before THR and 6 months afterward. Patients received the questionnaires by mailing, and two reminder letters were sent to patients who had not replied the questionnaire. Based on two studies from the literature, we selected the two shortened domains, the pain domain composed of three items and the function domain composed of eight items. Thus, we proposed an 11-items WOMAC short form. A complete validation process was performed, including confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and Rasch analysis, and a study of reliability, responsiveness, and agreement measured by the Bland-Altman approach. Results The mean age was about 69 years and about 49% were women. CFA analyses confirmed the two-factor model. The pain and function domains fit the Rasch model. Stability was supported with similar results in both cohorts. Cronbach's alpha coefficients were high, 0.74 and 0.88. The highest correlations in convergent validity were found with the bodily pain and physical function SF-36 domains. Significant differences were found according to different pain and function severity scales, supporting known-groups validity. Responsiveness parameters showed large changes (effect sizes, 2.11 and 2.29). Agreement between the WOMAC long and short forms was adequate. Conclusions Since short questionnaires result in improved patient compliance and response rates, it is very useful to have a shortened WOMAC version with the same good psychometric properties as the original version. The Spanish WOMAC short form

  15. Social determinants and osteoarthritis outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Luong, My-Linh N; Cleveland, Rebecca J; Nyrop, Kirsten A; Callahan, Leigh F

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most frequently occurring musculoskeletal diseases, posing a significant public health problem due to its impact on pain and disability. Traditional risk factors fail to account for all of the risk observed for OA outcomes. In recent years, our view of disease causation has broadened to include health risks that are created by an individual’s socioeconomic circumstances. Early research into social determinants has focused on social position and explored factors related to the individual such as education, income and occupation. Results from these investigations suggest that low education attainment and nonprofessional occupation are associated with poorer arthritis outcomes. More recently, research has expanded to examine how one’s neighborhood socioeconomic environment may be relevant to OA outcomes. This narrative review proposes a framework to help guide our understanding of how social context may interact with pathophysiological processes and individual-level variables to influence health outcomes in those living with OA. PMID:23243459

  16. Fibroblast growth factor-21 concentration in serum and synovial fluid is associated with radiographic bone loss of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhan-Chun; Xiao, Jie; Wang, Gang; Li, Mao-Qiang; Hu, Kong-Zu; Ma, Tao; Wang, Wei-Li; Liu, Zu-De; Zhang, Ji-Dong

    2015-04-01

    We aimed to evaluate whether FGF-21 concentration in serum and synovial fluid (SF) is associated with radiographic bone loss of knee osteoarthritis (OA). A total of 186 OA patients and 108 controls were recruited. The radiographic bone loss of knee OA was assessed by the Ahlbäck grading scale. FGF-21 concentration in serum and SF was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We demonstrated that OA patients had significantly higher serum FGF-21 concentration compared with controls (204.30 [range 158.25-279.16] ng/L vs. 130.72 [range 94.93-218.03] ng/L, p < 0.01). FGF-21 concentration in serum was well correlated with that in paired SF samples (r = 0.668, p < 0.001). In OA patients, those with a higher Ahlbäck grade had significantly higher serum and SF FGF-21 concentration (p < 0.001 for both). FGF-21 concentration in serum and SF was significantly and independently associated with the Ahlbäck grade (r = 0.403, p < 0.001 and r = 0.410, p < 0.001; respectively). These findings indicated that FGF-21 might be a potential biomarker for predicting bone loss of OA. Therapeutic interventions by blocking FGF-21 signaling pathways to delay the degenerative process of OA warrants further investigations. PMID:25549692

  17. Grading and quantification of hip osteoarthritis severity by analyzing the spectral energy distribution of radiographic hip joint space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boniatis, I.; Costaridou, L.; Panagiotopoulos, E.; Panayiotakis, G.

    2009-08-01

    An image analysis system is proposed for the assessment of hip osteoarthritis (OA) severity. Sixty four hips (18 normal, 46 osteoarthritic), corresponding to 32 patients of unilateral or bilateral hip OA were studied. Employing custom developed software, 64 Region Of Interest (ROI) images of Hip Joint Spaces (HJSs) were delineated on patients' digitized radiographs. The Fourier spectrum of each HJS-ROI was computed and expressed in polar coordinates. Spectral signatures, quantifying the radial and angular distribution of HJS spectral energy were formed. Signature descriptors were generated and utilized in the design of a two-level hierarchical decision tree, used for the grading of the severity of the disease. Accordingly, at Level 1, implemented by a multiple classifier system, the discrimination between normal and osteoarthritic hips was performed. At Level 2, the hips that had been successfully characterized as osteoarthritic at Level 1, were further characterized as of ``Mild / Moderate'' or ``Severe'' OA, by the Bayes classifier. A signature descriptors based regression model was designed, so as to quantify OA-severity. The system graded OA reliably, given that the accomplished classification accuracies for Level 1 and Level 2 were 98.4% and 100%, respectively. OA-severity values, expressed by HJS-narrowing, correlated highly (r = 0.9, p < 0.001) with values predicted by the model. The system may contribute to OA-patient management.

  18. Accuracy of CT-based patient-specific guides for total knee arthroplasty in patients with post-traumatic osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Schotanus, M G M; van Haaren, E H; Hendrickx, R P M; Jansen, E J P; Kort, N P

    2015-12-01

    Published clinical trials who studied the accuracy of patient-specific guides (PSG) for total knee arthroplasty exclude patients with articular deformity of the knee joint. We prospectively analysed a series of 30 patients with post-traumatic osteoarthritis of the knee joint with use of PSG. At 1 year post-operative, the achieved biomechanical (HKA) axis and varus/valgus of the femur and tibia components were measured on anterior-posterior (AP) long-standing weight-bearing radiographs. Flexion/extension of the femoral and AP slope of the tibia component was measured on standard lateral radiographs. Percentages >3° deviation of the pre-operative planned HKA axis and individual implant components were considered as outliers. Approved and used implant size, median blood loss (ml) and operation time (min) were obtained from the operation records. Pre- and 1-year post-operative patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) were performed. Eighty-three per cent of the patients had a HKA axis restored <3° of the pre-operative planned alignment. Varus/valgus outliers were 0.0 and 6.7 % for the femoral and tibial components, respectively. Percentages of outliers of flexion/extension were 36.7 % for the femoral component and 10.0 % for the AP slope of the tibial component. Median blood loss was 300 ml (50-700), while operation time was 67 min (44-144). In 20 % of all cases, the approved implant size was changed into one size smaller. One-year post-operative PROMs improved significantly. We conclude that the accuracy of CT-based PSG is not impaired in patients with post-traumatic osteoarthritis and this modality can restore biomechanical limb alignment. PMID:26265403

  19. The prevalence of TMJ osteoarthritis in asymptomatic patients with dentofacial deformities: a cone-beam CT study.

    PubMed

    Krisjane, Z; Urtane, I; Krumina, G; Neimane, L; Ragovska, I

    2012-06-01

    Osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) can be described as non-inflammatory arthritic condition that results in degenerative changes of the joint structures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the skeletal morphology of the TMJ in patients with osteoarthritis with severe skeletal malocclusions (Class II and Class III) and patients with Class I occlusion as controls. Cone beam computed tomography images of 45 Class I, 28 Class II and 44 Class III joints of Caucasian patients were assessed for the presence of any degenerative changes in the condyle and fossa/eminence complex as described in the research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders (RDC/TMD). In all groups, the most commonly observed features were articular surface flattening and subcortical sclerosis. A combination of features that corresponds to a diagnosis of osteoarthritis was observed in 3% Class I, 43% Class II and 20% Class III patient joints. In conclusion, degenerative TMJ changes were more common in patients with skeletal jaw discrepancies, but wide inter-individual variations can be observed even in patients with clinically similar malocclusions. PMID:22464854

  20. Quality of Life Analysis and Smoking Correlation in Symptomatic Spine Osteoarthritis: A Nationwide Health Survey Analysis of an Elderly Population with EQ-5D

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jae-Young; Han, Kyungdo; Shin, Dong-Hyup; Chun, Eun Mi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To analyze quality of life in people with symptomatic spine osteoarthritis (OA) using the results of a cross-sectional, nationwide survey. Materials and Methods This study used data from the Fifth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES V-5; 2010–2012). After excluding ineligible subjects, the total number of subjects in the study was 8,963, including 4,091 males and 4,872 females. All participants reported disabilities related to spine OA. Plain radiographs of the spine were taken for all participants. Results Age, sex, smoking, drinking, education, and income level were significantly related to spine OA morbidity (P<0.05). OA morbidity was significantly higher in female ex-smokers (OR; 2.94, P<0.05). Quality of life (EQ-5D: L1~5) was significantly compromised in the group with spine OA compared to the group without spine OA (P<0.05). Overall, LQ 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 domain scores were significantly higher in the group with spine OA (P<0.05). In the group with spine OA, quality of life was reduced on more than three questions for 34.3% of the group (EQ-5D: grade≥2); on two questions, for 18.5% of the group; and on one question, for 11.1% of the group. Mental stress, melancholy, and suicidal thinking were also more common in the group with spine OA (P<0.05). The group with radiographic spine OA but without symptoms did not have compromised EQ-5D scores, whereas the group with radiographic OA and symptoms showed a significantly reduced quality of life. Conclusions Quality of life was significantly reduced in the group with symptomatic spine OA in a large cross-sectional analysis. Physicians should consider quality of life in the treatment of patients with spine OA PMID:26991429

  1. The Effects of Prolotherapy With Hypertonic Dextrose Versus Prolozone (Intraarticular Ozone) in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Masoud; Jalili, Parviz; Mennati, Shirin; Koosha, Alireza; Rohanifar, Ramin; Madadi, Firouz; Razavi, Seyed Sajad; Taheri, Farinaz

    2015-01-01

    Background: Knee osteoarthritis (KOA) is a common disabling disease. Limited studies have demonstrated that prolotherapy with dextrose or with prolozone can be helpful in the treatment of patients with KOA. Objectives: In the current study, we compared the results between these two treatment methods. Patients and Methods: In the current randomized clinical trial, 80 patients with mild to moderate KOA were randomly assigned equally into two groups (ozone group and dextrose group). In each group, injections were repeated three times with 10-day intervals. Before the treatment and 3 months after the injections, the pain intensity was measured by using a visual analogue scale and the Western Ontario and McMaster university arthritis index scores. Finally, the results were compared between the two groups. Results: In the two groups, the pain intensity and WOMAC scores significantly decreased and increased, respectively (P < 0.001). However, there was no significant difference between the two groups. Conclusions: Prolotherapy with dextrose and with prolozone result in the same pain relief or functional improvement in patients with mild to moderate KOA. PMID:26587401

  2. Pain relief and improved physical function in knee osteoarthritis patients receiving ongoing hylan G-F 20, a high-molecular-weight hyaluronan, versus other treatment options: data from a large real-world longitudinal cohort in Canada.

    PubMed

    Petrella, Robert J; Wakeford, Craig

    2015-01-01

    From the Southwestern Ontario database, one of the largest primary-care datasets in Canada, 1,263 patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of one or both knees were identified who received two consecutive series of intra-articular (IA) injections of hylan G-F 20 preparation and no other prescribed OA medications, and were evaluated fully between 2006 and 2012. A cohort of 3,318 demographically matched OA patients who had not been treated with IA injection therapy was identified from the same database for comparison. Responses to therapy were assessed by means of a 10-point visual analog scale (VAS) for pain at rest and after completion of a 6-minute walk test (6 MWT), while physical capacity was measured by performance in the 6 MWT itself. After two cycles of hylan G-F 20 therapy, the average VAS score for pain at rest declined from 7.82 ± 1.27 at baseline to 4.16 ± 1.51 (average change 3.66 ± 1.78, significantly more than the reduction of 3.12 ± 2.03 seen in the reference group [P < 0.012]) and the average VAS score for pain after the 6 MWT decreased by 5.56 ± 1.74 points (from 9.58 ± 0.4 at baseline to 4.02 ± 1.67 at the final assessment), a significantly larger change than that seen in the reference group (Δ2.99 ± 1.85; P<0.001 for intergroup comparison). Distance walked in the 6 MWT increased on average by 115 m, significantly more than that seen in the reference group (Δ91 m; P < 0.001 for intergroup comparison). These findings from a primary-care database suggest sustained benefits in terms of pain and physical function from repeat cycles of IA injections of hylan G-F 20 and no other prescribed OA medications in adults with OA of the knee. PMID:26508838

  3. Pain relief and improved physical function in knee osteoarthritis patients receiving ongoing hylan G-F 20, a high-molecular-weight hyaluronan, versus other treatment options: data from a large real-world longitudinal cohort in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Petrella, Robert J; Wakeford, Craig

    2015-01-01

    From the Southwestern Ontario database, one of the largest primary-care datasets in Canada, 1,263 patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of one or both knees were identified who received two consecutive series of intra-articular (IA) injections of hylan G-F 20 preparation and no other prescribed OA medications, and were evaluated fully between 2006 and 2012. A cohort of 3,318 demographically matched OA patients who had not been treated with IA injection therapy was identified from the same database for comparison. Responses to therapy were assessed by means of a 10-point visual analog scale (VAS) for pain at rest and after completion of a 6-minute walk test (6MWT), while physical capacity was measured by performance in the 6MWT itself. After two cycles of hylan G-F 20 therapy, the average VAS score for pain at rest declined from 7.82±1.27 at baseline to 4.16±1.51 (average change 3.66±1.78, significantly more than the reduction of 3.12±2.03 seen in the reference group [P<0.012]) and the average VAS score for pain after the 6MWT decreased by 5.56±1.74 points (from 9.58±0.4 at baseline to 4.02±1.67 at the final assessment), a significantly larger change than that seen in the reference group (Δ2.99±1.85; P<0.001 for intergroup comparison). Distance walked in the 6MWT increased on average by 115 m, significantly more than that seen in the reference group (Δ91 m; P<0.001 for intergroup comparison). These findings from a primary-care database suggest sustained benefits in terms of pain and physical function from repeat cycles of IA injections of hylan G-F 20 and no other prescribed OA medications in adults with OA of the knee. PMID:26508838

  4. Autopsy study correlating degree of osteoarthritis, synovitis and evidence of articular calcification.

    PubMed

    Gordon, G V; Villanueva, T; Schumacher, H R; Gohel, V

    1984-10-01

    Inflammation has been suggested as a component in the osteoarthritic process. We have examined 150 knees at autopsy to correlate the degree of osteoarthritis (OA) with synovial inflammation, and with radiographic or pathologic evidence of calcification as a possible source of crystal induced inflammation. Roentgenographic evidence of calcification and histologic finding of synovial reaction (proliferation or inflammation) were seen more frequently (p less than .05) in the knees of patients with more advanced OA. Perichondrocytic staining for calcium and phosphorus was seen in 93% of patients with severe OA and in only 24% of those with normal or minimal OA. Calcium hydroxyapatite crystals were identified by electron microscopy in perichondrocytic and other areas in 8 of 15 cartilage samples with moderate to severe OA and in none with normal appearing cartilage. In advanced OA, there were bone fragments embedded in cartilage and synovium. Although the pathogenetic sequences are uncertain, we speculate that calcium hydroxyapatite (and pyrophosphate) crystals and/or bone shards can contribute to both synovitis and cartilage degeneration. PMID:6096542

  5. How does surgery compare with advanced intra-articular therapies in knee osteoarthritis: current thoughts

    PubMed Central

    Wehling, Peter; Moser, Carsten; Maixner, William

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of osteoarthritis (OA) management are to reduce pain and inflammation, slow cartilage degradation, improve function and reduce disability. Current strategies for managing knee OA include nonpharmacological interventions, oral pharmacological treatments, localized intra-articular injections, and surgery. It has become evident that the inflammatory response is a key contributor to the development and progression of knee OA. Signaling pathways involving growth factors and cytokines are being investigated for the development of new therapies that target the underlying biological processes causing the disease. This concept of ‘molecular orthopedics’ enables more patient-centered diagnostic and treatment strategies. In contrast to other conservative therapies, which ultimately only address OA symptoms, intra-articular injections, in particular autologous conditioned serum (ACS), provide benefits that have the potential to outweigh those of established pharmacological treatments and surgery. Surgery has historically been considered the final solution for treatment of knee OA, both by treating physicians and by patients; however, there are increasing concerns regarding the lack of randomized clinical trials providing evidence to support this opinion. Intra-articular injection of ACS has demonstrated efficacy as a treatment for knee OA in a number of studies, with a very low rate of adverse events and side effects, compared with surgery. Treatment with ACS utilizes the release of anti-inflammatory cytokines and regenerative growth factors to support the natural healing processes in the knee, and has the potential to provide a valuable alternative to surgical intervention. PMID:27247634

  6. Physicians’ accuracy and interrator reliability for the diagnosis of unstable meniscal tears in patients having osteoarthritis of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Dervin, Geoffrey F.; Stiell, Ian G.; Wells, George A.; Rody, Kelly; Grabowski, Jenny

    2001-01-01

    Objective To determine clinicians’ accuracy and reliability for the clinical diagnosis of unstable meniscus tears in patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis of the knee. Design A prospective cohort study. Setting A single tertiary care centre. Patients One hundred and fifty-two patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis of the knee refractory to conservative medical treatment were selected for prospective evaluation of arthroscopic débridement. Intervention Arthroscopic débridement of the knee, including meniscal tear and chondral flap resection, without abrasion arthroplasty. Outcome measures A standardized assessment protocol was administered to each patient by 2 independent observers. Arthroscopic determination of unstable meniscal tears was recorded by 1 observer who reviewed a video recording and was blinded to preoperative data. Those variables that had the highest interobserver agreement and the strongest association with meniscal tear by univariate methods were entered into logistic regression to model the best prediction of resectable tears. Results There were 92 meniscal tears (77 medial, 15 lateral). Interobserver agreement between clinical fellows and treating surgeons was poor to fair (κ < 0.4) for all clinical variables except radiographic measures, which were good. Fellows and surgeons predicted unstable meniscal tear preoperatively with equivalent accuracy of 60%. Logistic regression modelling revealed that a history of swelling and a ballottable effusion were negative predictors. A positive McMurray test was the only positive predictor of unstable meniscal tear. “Mechanical” symptoms were not reliable predictors in this prospective study. The model was 69% accurate for all patients and 76% for those with advanced medial compartment osteoarthritis defined by a joint space height of 2 mm or less. Conclusions This study underscored the difficulty in using clinical variables to predict unstable medial meniscal tears in patients with pre

  7. Temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis: cone beam computed tomography findings, clinical features, and correlations.

    PubMed

    Cömert Kiliç, S; Kiliç, N; Sümbüllü, M A

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of and associations between clinical signs and symptoms and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) findings of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA). Seventy-six patients (total 117 TMJ) with osteoarthritis were included in this study. Clinical signs and symptoms and CBCT findings were reviewed retrospectively. A considerable decrease in mandibular motions and mastication efficiency, and considerable increase in joint sounds and general pain complaints were observed. The most frequent condylar bony changes were erosion (110 joints, 94.0%), followed by flattening (108 joints, 92.3%), osteophytes (93 joints, 79.5%), hypoplasia (22 joints, 18.8%), sclerosis (14 joints, 12.0%), and subchondral cyst (four joints, 3.4%). Flattening of the articular eminence and pneumatization were each observed in five joints. Forty-one patients had bilateral degeneration and 35 had unilateral degeneration. Hypermobility was detected in 47 degenerative joints. Masticatory efficiency was negatively correlated with both condylar flattening and sclerosis, and general pain complaints was positively correlated with condylar flattening. Condylar erosion, flattening, osteophytes, pain, joint sounds, reduced jaw movements, and worsened mastication were common findings in TMJ-OA in the present study. Poor correlations were found between osseous changes and clinical signs and symptoms of TMJ-OA. CBCT is a powerful diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of TMJ-OA. PMID:26194774

  8. Unraveling the role of Mg(++) in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaqiang; Yue, Jiaji; Yang, Chunxi

    2016-02-15

    Mg(++) is widely involved in human physiological processes that may play key roles in the generation and progression of diseases. Osteoarthritis (OA) is a complex joint disorder characterized by articular cartilage degradation, abnormal mineralization and inflammation. Magnesium deficiency is considered to be a major risk factor for OA development and progression. Magnesium deficiency is active in several pathways that have been implicated in OA, including increased inflammatory mediators, cartilage damage, defective chondrocyte biosynthesis, aberrant calcification and a weakened effect of analgesics. Abundant in vitro and in vivo evidence in animal models now suggests that the nutritional supplementation or local infiltration of Mg(++) represent effective therapies for OA. The goal of this review is to summarize the current understanding of the role of Mg(++) in OA with particular emphasis on the related molecular mechanisms involved in OA progression. PMID:26800786

  9. Inflammatory mediators in osteoarthritis: A critical review of the state-of-the-art, current prospects, and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Rahmati, Maryam; Mobasheri, Ali; Mozafari, Masoud

    2016-04-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) has traditionally been defined as a prototypical non-inflammatory arthropathy, but today there is compelling evidence to suggest that it has an inflammatory component. Many recent studies have shown the presence of synovitis in a large number of patients with OA and demonstrated a direct association between joint inflammation and the progression of OA. Pro-inflammatory cytokines, reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide, matrix degrading enzymes and biomechanical stress are major factors responsible for the progression of OA in synovial joints. The aim of this review is to discuss the significance of a wide range of implicated inflammatory mediators and their contribution to the progression of OA. We also discuss some of the currently available guidelines, practices, and prospects. In addition, this review argues for new innovation in methodologies and instrumentation for the non-invasive detection of inflammation in OA by modern imaging techniques. We propose that identifying early inflammatory events and targeting these alterations will help to ameliorate the major symptoms such as inflammation and pain in OA patients. PMID:26812612

  10. Susceptibility to large-joint osteoarthritis (hip and knee) is associated with BAG6 rs3117582 SNP and the VNTR polymorphism in the second exon of the FAM46A gene on chromosome 6.

    PubMed

    Etokebe, Godfrey E; Jotanovic, Zdravko; Mihelic, Radovan; Mulac-Jericevic, Biserka; Nikolic, Tamara; Balen, Sanja; Sestan, Branko; Dembic, Zlatko

    2015-01-01

    Family with sequence similarity 46, member A (FAM46A) gene VNTR and BCL2-Associated Athanogene 6 (BAG6) gene rs3117582 polymorphisms were genotyped in a case-control study with 474 large-joint (hip and knee) osteoarthritis (OA) patients and 568 controls in Croatian population by candidate-gene approach for association with OA. We found that BAG6 rs3117582 SNP genotypes were associated with protection (major allele homozygote) and susceptibility (major-minor allele heterozygote) to OA. BAG6 rs3117582 major allele (A) was associated with reduced risk to OA while the minor allele (C) was associated with increased risk to OA. We identified 6 alleles harboring 2 to 7 repeats making 20 genotypes for FAM46A. A rare FAM46A VNTR genotype comprising VNTR alleles with four and seven repeats (c/f) was associated with increased OA risk in both genders. The genotype with four and six repeats (c/e) was also associated with increased risk to OA in males. A polymorphic FAM46A allele with six repeats (e) was associated with reduced risk to OA in females. Our results suggest association between the FAM46A gene, BAG6 gene and OA in Croatian population, respectively. This is the first study to show associations between these genetic loci and OA. PMID:25231575

  11. Relationship of bone mineral density to progression of knee osteoarthritis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective. To evaluate the longitudinal relationship between bone mineral density (BMD) and BMD changes and the progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA), as measured by cartilage outcomes. Methods. We used observational cohort data from the Vitamin D for Knee Osteoarthritis trial. Bilateral femoral ...

  12. Pharmacologic treatment of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Pinals, R S

    1992-01-01

    Current pharmacotherapy for osteoarthritis (OA) is aimed at relief of pain and functional disability. Although an inflammatory component may be found in some cases, there is little evidence that anti-inflammatory drugs commonly used in the treatment of OA provide more relief than simple analgesics. A growing body of knowledge about the pathophysiology of OA now offers opportunities to develop interventions aimed at retarding the progressive degeneration of articular cartilage. This is a function of an imbalance between cartilage matrix synthesis and breakdown. New and experimental treatments include oral, parenteral, and intra-articular agents, some of which are chemicals and others biological products. Their modes of action have generally not been established in humans, but may be inferred from in vitro culture systems and animal models. These mechanisms include inhibition of synovial cell-derived cytokines and chondrocyte-derived degradative enzymes, inactivation of superoxide free radicals, stimulation of matrix synthesis, and enhancement of synovial fluid lubrication. Many of these treatments have been shown to provide short- or long-term symptomatic improvement in clinical trials. Protection of cartilage or promotion of repair has been demonstrated in animal studies, but not convincingly in human OA studies. PMID:1386287

  13. The Cost-Effectiveness of Surgical Treatment of Medial Unicompartmental Knee Osteoarthritis in Younger Patients

    PubMed Central

    Konopka, Joseph F.; Gomoll, Andreas H.; Thornhill, Thomas S.; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Losina, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgical options for the management of medial compartment osteoarthritis of the varus knee include high tibial osteotomy, unicompartmental knee arthroplasty, and total knee arthroplasty. We sought to determine the cost-effectiveness of high tibial osteotomy and unicompartmental knee arthroplasty as alternatives to total knee arthroplasty for patients fifty to sixty years of age. Methods: We built a probabilistic state-transition computer model with health states defined by pain, postoperative complications, and subsequent surgical procedures. We estimated transition probabilities from published literature. Costs were determined from Medicare reimbursement schedules. Health outcomes were measured in quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). We conducted analyses over patients’ lifetimes from the societal perspective, with health and cost outcomes discounted by 3% annually. We used probabilistic sensitivity analyses to account for uncertainty in data inputs. Results: The estimated discounted QALYs were 14.62, 14.63, and 14.64 for high tibial osteotomy, unicompartmental knee arthroplasty, and total knee arthroplasty, respectively. Discounted total direct medical costs were $20,436 for high tibial osteotomy, $24,637 for unicompartmental knee arthroplasty, and $24,761 for total knee arthroplasty (in 2012 U.S. dollars). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was $231,900 per QALY for total knee arthroplasty and $420,100 per QALY for unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses showed that, at a willingness-to-pay (WTP) threshold of $50,000 per QALY, high tibial osteotomy was cost-effective 57% of the time; total knee arthroplasty, 24%; and unicompartmental knee arthroplasty, 19%. At a WTP threshold of $100,000 per QALY, high tibial osteotomy was cost-effective 43% of time; total knee arthroplasty, 31%; and unicompartmental knee arthroplasty, 26%. Conclusions: In fifty to sixty-year-old patients with medial unicompartmental knee

  14. Unilateral hip osteoarthritis: Its effects on preoperative lower limb muscle activation and intramuscular coordination patterns.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, André; Stief, Felix; Lenarz, Katharina; Froemel, Dara; Lutz, Frederick; Barker, John; Meurer, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to test if patients with unilateral hip osteoarthritis (OA) show greater muscle activity asymmetry between their affected and non-affected limbs than healthy controls between their left and right limbs. Seventeen patients with unilateral hip OA (7 females, 10 males) and 17 age-matched healthy controls (7 females, 10 males) participated in this study. Both groups performed instrumented gait analysis at comparable speeds. Muscle activity was recorded simultaneously for the tibialis anterior (TA), gastrocnemius medialis (GM), vastus lateralis (VL), semitendinosus (ST), tensor fasciae latae (TFL), and gluteus medius (GLM) muscles. In hip OA patients, EMG data showed greater activity of the TA muscle in the non-affected limb, and greater TFL muscle activity in the affected limb. Compared to healthy controls, greater asymmetries between paired limbs were observed for the TA and GM muscles. Finally, the TFL muscle of the affected limb contributed more to the total limb muscle activity than did the non-affected limb. The observed alterations in TA and GM muscle activity in hip OA patients may be due to the greater peak braking and peak vertical forces measured in the non-affected limb. Contrary to this, greater TLF muscle activity of the affected limb indicates the demands put on stabilizing the hip during stance phase. Further studies are necessary to test whether leg length discrepancy affects muscle activation alterations between the affected and non-affected limb in unilateral hip OA patients. PMID:26979904

  15. [Side effects of COX-2 selective inhibitors. Critic related with its administration in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Carrillo Gutiérrez, Ofmara Y; Pérez Sánchez, Adriana G; Medina Serriteño, Nicolás; Rodríguez Orozco, Alain R

    2007-01-01

    At the end of 2000 the new age of AINEs was introduced, specially the selective inhibitors of the COX-2, whose main function is to block the production of the prostaglandins and the acute tissue inflammation. These inhibitors have analgesic, antithermal and antiinflammatory effects similar to traditional AINEs; they are prescribed specifically to diminish pain and inflammation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. After them introduction, it was reported that they can produce cardiovascular effects, mainly infarcts. This revision exposes the adverse effects that selective inhibitors of the COX-2 produce when elevated doses are administered, during prolonged time, in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis; in addition, it comments present recommendations for them prescription. PMID:18297851

  16. Osteoarthritis year 2011 in review: biology

    PubMed Central

    Lotz, M.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY This review is focused on advances in understanding the biology of joint homeostasis and osteoarthritis (OA) pathogenesis mechanisms that have led to proof of concept studies on new therapeutic approaches. The three selected topics include angiogenesis in joint tissues, biomechanics and joint lubrication and mitochondrial dysfunction. This new information represents progress in the integration of mechanisms that control multiple aspects of OA pathophysiology. PMID:22179031

  17. Image-guided photoacoustic spectroscopy in diagnosis of osteoarthritis in hands: an initial study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhen; Xiao, J.; Sun, Yao; Sobel, Eric S.; He, Jishan; Jiang, Huabei

    2011-03-01

    We present for the first time in vivo experimental evidence that multispectral quantitative photoacoustic tomography (qPAT) has the potential to detect osteoarthritis (OA) in the finger joints. In this pilot study, 2 OA patients and 4 healthy volunteers were enrolled, and their distal interphalangeal (DIP) joints were examined photoacoustically by a multispectral PAT scanner. Images of tissue physiological/functional parameters including oxy-hemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, oxygen saturation and water content along with tissue acoustic velocity of all the examined joints were simultaneously recovered using a finite element reconstruction algorithm for multispectral photoacoustic measurements. The recovered multispectral photoacoustic images show that the OA joints have significantly elevated water content, decreased oxygen saturation, and increased acoustic velocity compared to the normal joints.

  18. Spa therapy: can be a valid option for treating knee osteoarthritis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenti, Sara; Cheleschi, Sara; Galeazzi, Mauro; Fioravanti, Antonella

    2015-08-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) continues to be one of the leading causes of `years lived with disability' worldwide. Symptomatic knee OA is highly prevalent among people aged 50 years and over and is destined to become an ever more important healthcare problem. Current management of knee OA includes non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatments. Spa therapy is one of the most commonly used non-pharmacological approaches for OA in many European countries, as well as in Japan and Israel. Despite its long history and popularity, spa treatment is still the subject of debate and its role in modern medicine continues to be unclear. The objective of this review is to summarize the currently available information on clinical effects and mechanisms of action of spa therapy in knee OA. Various randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) were conducted to assess the efficacy and tolerability of balneotherapy and mud-pack therapy in patients with knee OA. Data from these clinical trials support a beneficial effect of spa therapy on pain, function and quality of life in knee OA that lasts over time, until 6-9 months after the treatment. The mechanisms by which immersion in mineral or thermal water or the application of mud alleviate suffering in OA are not fully understood. The net benefit is probably the result of a combination of factors, among which the mechanical, thermal and chemical effects are most prominent. In conclusion, spa therapy seems to have a role in the treatment of knee OA. Additional RCTs and further studies of mechanisms of action with high methodological quality are necessary to prove the effects of spa therapy.

  19. Differences in the prevalence and characteristics of metabolic syndrome in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis: a multicentric study.

    PubMed

    Šalamon, Lea; Morović-Vergles, Jadranka; Marasović-Krstulović, Daniela; Kehler, Tatjana; Šakić, Davorin; Badovinac, Olga; Vlak, Tonko; Novak, Srđan; Štiglić-Rogoznica, Nives; Hanih, Marino; Bedeković, Dražen; Grazio, Simeon; Kadojić, Mira; Milas-Ahić, Jasminka; Prus, Višnja; Stamenković, Doris; Šošo, Daniela; Anić, Branimir; Babić-Naglić, Ðurđica; Gamulin, Stjepan

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine whether rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients have higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) than osteoarthritis (OA) patients in association with a higher level of chronic systemic inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis. A total of 583 RA and 344 OA outpatients were analyzed in this multicentric study. Metabolic syndrome was defined using the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. A 1.6-fold higher prevalence of MetS was found in patients with OA compared with the RA patients. Among the parameters of MetS, patients with OA had significantly higher levels of waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, fasting blood glucose and triglycerides, whereas HDL cholesterol and diastolic blood pressure values were similar in both groups of patients. Higher values of inflammatory markers [C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR)] in MetS than in non-MetS patients and higher prevalence of MetS in patients with CRP level ≥5 mg/L in both RA and OA patients were found. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, significant predictors of MetS were type of arthritis (OA vs. RA; OR 2.5 [95 % CI 1.82-3.43]), age (OR 1.04 [95 % CI 1.03-1.06]) and ESR (OR 1.01; [95 % CI 1.00-1.01]). The significant association between OA and MetS was maintained in the regression model that controlled for body mass index (OR 1.87 [95 % CI 1.34-2.61]). The present analysis suggests that OA is associated with an increased risk of MetS, which may be due to a common underlying pathogenic mechanism. PMID:26059944

  20. Indian Hedgehog signaling pathway members are associated with magnetic resonance imaging manifestations and pathological scores in lumbar facet joint osteoarthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuang, Feng; Zhou, Ying; Hou, Shu-Xun; Zhu, Jia-Liang; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Chun-Li; Tang, Jia-Guang

    2015-05-01

    Indian Hedgehog (HH) has been shown to be involved in osteoarthritis (OA) in articular joints, where there is evidence that Indian HH blockade could ameliorate OA. It seems to play a prominent role in development of the intervertebral disc (IVD) and in postnatal maintenance. There is little work on IHH in the IVD. Hence the aim of the current study was to investigate the role of Indian Hedgehog in the pathology of facet joint (FJ) OA. 24 patients diagnosed with lumbar intervertebral disk herniation or degenerative spinal stenosis were included. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) histopathology grading system was correlated to the mRNA levels of GLI1, PTCH1, and HHIP in the FJs. The Weishaupt grading and OARSI scores showed high positive correlation (r = 0.894) (P < 0.01). MRI Weishaupt grades showed positive correlation with GLI1 (r = 0.491), PTCH1 (r = 0.444), and HHIP (r = 0.654) mRNA levels (P < 0.05 in each case). OARSI scores were also positively correlated with GLI1 (r = 0. 646), PTCH1 (r = 0. 518), and HHIP (r = 0.762) mRNA levels (P < 0.01 in each case). Cumulatively our findings indicate that Indian HH signaling is increased in OA and is perhaps a key component in OA pathogenesis and progression.

  1. Indian Hedgehog signaling pathway members are associated with magnetic resonance imaging manifestations and pathological scores in lumbar facet joint osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Shuang, Feng; Zhou, Ying; Hou, Shu-Xun; Zhu, Jia-Liang; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Chun-Li; Tang, Jia-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Indian Hedgehog (HH) has been shown to be involved in osteoarthritis (OA) in articular joints, where there is evidence that Indian HH blockade could ameliorate OA. It seems to play a prominent role in development of the intervertebral disc (IVD) and in postnatal maintenance. There is little work on IHH in the IVD. Hence the aim of the current study was to investigate the role of Indian Hedgehog in the pathology of facet joint (FJ) OA. 24 patients diagnosed with lumbar intervertebral disk herniation or degenerative spinal stenosis were included. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) histopathology grading system was correlated to the mRNA levels of GLI1, PTCH1, and HHIP in the FJs. The Weishaupt grading and OARSI scores showed high positive correlation (r = 0.894) (P < 0.01). MRI Weishaupt grades showed positive correlation with GLI1 (r = 0.491), PTCH1 (r = 0.444), and HHIP (r = 0.654) mRNA levels (P < 0.05 in each case). OARSI scores were also positively correlated with GLI1 (r = 0. 646), PTCH1 (r = 0. 518), and HHIP (r = 0.762) mRNA levels (P < 0.01 in each case). Cumulatively our findings indicate that Indian HH signaling is increased in OA and is perhaps a key component in OA pathogenesis and progression. PMID:25992955

  2. Indian Hedgehog signaling pathway members are associated with magnetic resonance imaging manifestations and pathological scores in lumbar facet joint osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shuang, Feng; Zhou, Ying; Hou, Shu-Xun; Zhu, Jia-Liang; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Chun-Li; Tang, Jia-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Indian Hedgehog (HH) has been shown to be involved in osteoarthritis (OA) in articular joints, where there is evidence that Indian HH blockade could ameliorate OA. It seems to play a prominent role in development of the intervertebral disc (IVD) and in postnatal maintenance. There is little work on IHH in the IVD. Hence the aim of the current study was to investigate the role of Indian Hedgehog in the pathology of facet joint (FJ) OA. 24 patients diagnosed with lumbar intervertebral disk herniation or degenerative spinal stenosis were included. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) histopathology grading system was correlated to the mRNA levels of GLI1, PTCH1, and HHIP in the FJs. The Weishaupt grading and OARSI scores showed high positive correlation (r = 0.894) (P < 0.01). MRI Weishaupt grades showed positive correlation with GLI1 (r = 0.491), PTCH1 (r = 0.444), and HHIP (r = 0.654) mRNA levels (P < 0.05 in each case). OARSI scores were also positively correlated with GLI1 (r = 0. 646), PTCH1 (r = 0. 518), and HHIP (r = 0.762) mRNA levels (P < 0.01 in each case). Cumulatively our findings indicate that Indian HH signaling is increased in OA and is perhaps a key component in OA pathogenesis and progression. PMID:25992955

  3. miR-139 modulates MCPIP1/IL-6 expression and induces apoptosis in human OA chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Makki, Mohammad Shahidul; Haqqi, Tariq M

    2015-01-01

    IL-6 is an inflammatory cytokine and its overexpression plays an important role in osteoarthritis (OA) pathogenesis. Expression of IL-6 is regulated post-transcriptionally by MCPIP1. The 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of MCPIP1 mRNA harbors a miR-139 ‘seed sequence', therefore we examined the post-transcriptional regulation of MCPIP1 by miR-139 and its impact on IL-6 expression in OA chondrocytes. Expression of miR-139 was found to be high in the damaged portion of the OA cartilage compared with unaffected cartilage from the same patient and was also induced by IL-1β in OA chondrocytes. Inhibition of miR-139 decreased the expression of IL-6 mRNA by 38% and of secreted IL-6 protein by 40%. However, overexpression of miR-139 increased the expression of IL-6 mRNA by 36% and of secreted IL-6 protein by 56%. These data correlated with altered expression profile of MCPIP1 in transfected chondrocytes. Studies with a luciferase reporter construct confirmed the interactions of miR-139 with the ‘seed sequence' located in the 3′ UTR of MCPIP mRNA. Furthermore, miR-139 overexpression increased the catabolic gene expression but expression of anabolic markers remained unchanged. Overexpression of miR-139 also induced apoptosis in OA chondrocytes. Importantly, we also discovered that IL-6 is a potent inducer of miR-139 expression in OA chondrocytes. These findings indicate that miR-139 functions as a post-transcriptional regulator of MCPIP1 expression and enhances IL-6 expression, which further upregulates miR-139 expression in OA chondrocytes. These results support our hypothesis that miR-139-mediated downregulation of MCPIP1 promotes IL-6 expression in OA. Therefore, targeting miR-139 could be therapeutically beneficial in the management of OA. PMID:26450708

  4. Interplay between Cartilage and Subchondral Bone Contributing to Pathogenesis of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ashish R.; Jagga, Supriya; Lee, Sang-Soo; Nam, Ju-Suk

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common debilitating joint disorder, affecting large sections of the population with significant disability and impaired quality of life. During OA, functional units of joints comprising cartilage and subchondral bone undergo uncontrolled catabolic and anabolic remodeling processes to adapt to local biochemical and biological signals. Changes in cartilage and subchondral bone are not merely secondary manifestations of OA but are active components of the disease, contributing to its severity. Increased vascularization and formation of microcracks in joints during OA have suggested the facilitation of molecules from cartilage to bone and vice versa. Observations from recent studies support the view that both cartilage and subchondral bone can communicate with each other through regulation of signaling pathways for joint homeostasis under pathological conditions. In this review we have tried to summarize the current knowledge on the major signaling pathways that could control the cartilage-bone biochemical unit in joints and participate in intercellular communication between cartilage and subchondral bone during the process of OA. An understanding of molecular communication that regulates the functional behavior of chondrocytes and osteoblasts in both physiological and pathological conditions may lead to development of more effective strategies for treating OA patients. PMID:24084727

  5. Bone-cartilage interface crosstalk in osteoarthritis: potential pathways and future therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Yuan, X L; Meng, H Y; Wang, Y C; Peng, J; Guo, Q Y; Wang, A Y; Lu, S B

    2014-08-01

    Currently, osteoarthritis (OA) is considered a disease of the entire joint, which is not simply a process of wear and tear but rather abnormal remodelling and joint failure of an organ. The bone-cartilage interface is therefore a functioning synergistic unit, with a close physical association between subchondral bone and cartilage suggesting the existence of biochemical and molecular crosstalk across the OA interface. The crosstalk at the bone-cartilage interface may be elevated in OA in vivo and in vitro. Increased vascularisation and formation of microcracks associated with abnormal bone remodelling in joints during OA facilitate molecular transport from cartilage to bone and vice versa. Recent reports suggest that several critical signalling pathways and biological factors are key regulators and activate cellular and molecular processes in crosstalk among joint compartments. Therapeutic interventions including angiogenesis inhibitors, agonists/antagonists of molecules and drugs targeting bone remodelling are potential candidates for this interaction. This review summarised the premise for the presence of crosstalk in bone-cartilage interface as well as the current knowledge of the major signalling pathways and molecular interactions that regulate OA progression. A better understanding of crosstalk in bone-cartilage interface may lead to development of more effective strategies for treating OA patients. PMID:24928319

  6. Interplay between cartilage and subchondral bone contributing to pathogenesis of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashish R; Jagga, Supriya; Lee, Sang-Soo; Nam, Ju-Suk

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common debilitating joint disorder, affecting large sections of the population with significant disability and impaired quality of life. During OA, functional units of joints comprising cartilage and subchondral bone undergo uncontrolled catabolic and anabolic remodeling processes to adapt to local biochemical and biological signals. Changes in cartilage and subchondral bone are not merely secondary manifestations of OA but are active components of the disease, contributing to its severity. Increased vascularization and formation of microcracks in joints during OA have suggested the facilitation of molecules from cartilage to bone and vice versa. Observations from recent studies support the view that both cartilage and subchondral bone can communicate with each other through regulation of signaling pathways for joint homeostasis under pathological conditions. In this review we have tried to summarize the current knowledge on the major signaling pathways that could control the cartilage-bone biochemical unit in joints and participate in intercellular communication between cartilage and subchondral bone during the process of OA. An understanding of molecular communication that regulates the functional behavior of chondrocytes and osteoblasts in both physiological and pathological conditions may lead to development of more effective strategies for treating OA patients. PMID:24084727

  7. Evidence and recommendations for use of intra-articular injections for knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Christelle; Lefèvre-Colau, Marie-Martine; Poiraudeau, Serge; Rannou, François

    2016-06-01

    Pharmacological treatments are widely recommended in international guidelines for management of osteoarthritis (OA). However, the use of intra-articular (IA) therapies of diverse active drugs remains controversial. We critically reviewed studies of the efficacy and safety of IA injections of corticosteroids (CS), hyaluronic acid (HA), platelet-rich plasma (PRP), and botulinum toxin A (BTA) and evidence-based international recommendations for their use in treating knee OA. The process of article selection was unsystematic. Articles were selected on the basis of authors' expertise, self-knowledge, and reflective practice. Only studies assessing knee OA were included. IA CS and HA injections were conditionally to fully recommended for treating knee OA. No recommendations have been formulated for IA PRP or BTA. The evidence remains inconsistent and controversial for the use of IA therapies for knee OA. The characteristics of and selection criteria for the OA population that would likely benefit from these therapies need to be identified. Accurately phenotyping and selecting patients is mandatory in future randomized controlled trials. Therefore, efficacy and safety meta-analyses should be performed, as should qualitative and sensitivity analyses of published trial results. PMID:27103055

  8. Osteoarthritis of the hip or knee: which coexisting disorders are disabling?

    PubMed

    Reeuwijk, Kerstin G; de Rooij, Mariëtte; van Dijk, Gabriella M; Veenhof, Cindy; Steultjens, Martijn P; Dekker, Joost

    2010-07-01

    Exercise therapy is generally recommended in osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip or knee. However, coexisting disorders may bring additional impairments, which may necessitate adaptations to exercise for OA of the hip or knee. For the purpose of developing an adapted protocol for exercise therapy in OA patients with coexisting disorders, information is needed on which specific coexisting disorders in OA are associated with activity limitations and pain. To describe the relationship between specific coexisting disorders, activity limitations, and pain in patients with OA of the hip or knee, a cross-sectional cohort study among 288 older adults (50-85 years of age) with OA of hip or knee was conducted. Subjects were recruited from three rehabilitation centers and two hospitals. Demographic data, clinical data, information about coexisting disorders (i.e., comorbidity and other disorders), activity limitations (WOMAC: physical functioning domain), and pain (visual analogue scale (VAS)) were collected by questionnaire. Statistical analysis included descriptive statistics and multivariate regression analysis. Coexisting disorders associated with activity limitations were chronic back pain or hernia, arthritis of the hand or feet, and other chronic rheumatic diseases (all musculoskeletal disorders); diabetes and chronic cystitis (non-musculoskeletal disorders); hearing impairments in a face-to-face conversation, vision impairments in long distances, and dizziness in combination with falling (all sensory impairments); and overweight and obesity. Coexistent disorders associated with pain were arthritis of the hand or feet, other chronic rheumatic diseases (musculoskeletal disorders), and diabetes (non-musculoskeletal disorder). Specific disorders coexisting next to OA and associated with additional activity limitations and pain were identified. These coexisting disorders need to be addressed in exercise therapy and rehabilitation for patients with OA of the hip or knee. PMID

  9. Role of S100A12 in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, Motoshige; Sakai, Tadahiro; Hiraiwa, Hideki; Hamada, Takashi; Omachi, Takaaki; Ono, Yohei; Inukai, Norio; Ishizuka, Shinya; Matsukawa, Tetsuya; Oda, Tomoyuki; Takamatsu, Akira; Yamashita, Satoshi; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2012-06-08

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This is the first report of S100A12 expression in human OA articular cartilages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Exogenous S100A12 increased the production of MMP13 and VEGF in OA chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Soluble RAGE suppressed the increased production of MMP13 and VEGF. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p38MAPK and NF-{kappa}B inhibitors abrogated S100A12-induced MMP13 and VEGF production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S100A12 may contribute to OA progression by increasing MMP13 and VEGF production. -- Abstract: S100A12 is a member of the S100 protein family, which are intracellular calcium-binding proteins. Although there are many reports on the involvement of S100A12 in inflammatory diseases, its presence in osteoarthritic cartilage has not been reported. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of S100A12 in human articular cartilage in osteoarthritis (OA) and to evaluate the role of S100A12 in human OA chondrocytes. We analyzed S100A12 expression by immunohistochemical staining of cartilage samples obtained from OA and non-OA patients. In addition, chondrocytes were isolated from knee cartilage of OA patients and treated with recombinant human S100A12. Real-time RT-PCR was performed to analyze mRNA expression. Protein production of matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP-13) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the culture medium were measured by ELISA. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that S100A12 expression was markedly increased in OA cartilages. Protein production and mRNA expression of MMP-13 and VEGF in cultured OA chondrocytes were significantly increased by treatment with exogenous S100A12. These increases in mRNA expression and protein production were suppressed by administration of soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). Both p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) inhibitors also suppressed the increases

  10. A Huge Capital Drop with Compression of Femoral Vessels Associated with Hip Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Takasago, Tomoya; Goto, Tomohiro; Tsutsui, Takahiko; Kondo, Kenji; Hamada, Daisuke; Tonogai, Ichiro; Wada, Keizo; Sairyo, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    A capital drop is a type of osteophyte at the inferomedial portion of the femoral head commonly observed in hip osteoarthritis (OA), secondary to developmental dysplasia. Capital drop itself is typically asymptomatic; however, symptoms can appear secondary to impinge against the acetabulum or to irritation of the surrounding tissues, such as nerves, vessels, and tendons. We present here a case of unilateral leg edema in a patient with hip OA, caused by a huge bone mass occurring at the inferomedial portion of the femoral head that compressed the femoral vessels. We diagnosed this bone mass as a capital drop secondary to hip OA after confirming that the mass occurred at least after the age of 63 years based on a previous X-ray. We performed early resection and total hip arthroplasty since the patient's hip pain was due to both advanced hip OA and compression of the femoral vessels; moreover, we aimed to prevent venous thrombosis secondary to vascular compression considering the advanced age and the potent risk of thrombosis in the patient. A large capital drop should be considered as a cause of vascular compression in cases of unilateral leg edema in OA patients. PMID:26504606

  11. Knee loading inhibits osteoclast lineage in a mouse model of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinle; Yang, Jing; Liu, Daquan; Li, Jie; Niu, Kaijun; Feng, Shiqing; Yokota, Hiroki; Zhang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a whole joint disorder that involves cartilage degradation and periarticular bone response. Changes of cartilage and subchondral bone are associated with development and activity of osteoclasts from subchondral bone. Knee loading promotes bone formation, but its effects on OA have not been well investigated. Here, we hypothesized that knee loading regulates subchondral bone remodeling by suppressing osteoclast development, and prevents degradation of cartilage through crosstalk of bone-cartilage in osteoarthritic mice. Surgery-induced mouse model of OA was used. Two weeks application of daily dynamic knee loading significantly reduced OARSI scores and CC/TAC (calcified cartilage to total articular cartilage), but increased SBP (subchondral bone plate) and B.Ar/T.Ar (trabecular bone area to total tissue area). Bone resorption of osteoclasts from subchondral bone and the differentiation of osteoclasts from bone marrow-derived cells were completely suppressed by knee loading. The osteoclast activity was positively correlated with OARSI scores and negatively correlated with SBP and B.Ar/T.Ar. Furthermore, knee loading exerted protective effects by suppressing osteoclastogenesis through Wnt signaling. Overall, osteoclast lineage is the hyper responsiveness of knee loading in osteoarthritic mice. Mechanical stimulation prevents OA-induced cartilage degeneration through crosstalk with subchondral bone. Knee loading might be a new potential therapy for osteoarthritis patients. PMID:27087498

  12. Knee loading inhibits osteoclast lineage in a mouse model of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinle; Yang, Jing; Liu, Daquan; Li, Jie; Niu, Kaijun; Feng, Shiqing; Yokota, Hiroki; Zhang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a whole joint disorder that involves cartilage degradation and periarticular bone response. Changes of cartilage and subchondral bone are associated with development and activity of osteoclasts from subchondral bone. Knee loading promotes bone formation, but its effects on OA have not been well investigated. Here, we hypothesized that knee loading regulates subchondral bone remodeling by suppressing osteoclast development, and prevents degradation of cartilage through crosstalk of bone-cartilage in osteoarthritic mice. Surgery-induced mouse model of OA was used. Two weeks application of daily dynamic knee loading significantly reduced OARSI scores and CC/TAC (calcified cartilage to total articular cartilage), but increased SBP (subchondral bone plate) and B.Ar/T.Ar (trabecular bone area to total tissue area). Bone resorption of osteoclasts from subchondral bone and the differentiation of osteoclasts from bone marrow-derived cells were completely suppressed by knee loading. The osteoclast activity was positively correlated with OARSI scores and negatively correlated with SBP and B.Ar/T.Ar. Furthermore, knee loading exerted protective effects by suppressing osteoclastogenesis through Wnt signaling. Overall, osteoclast lineage is the hyper responsiveness of knee loading in osteoarthritic mice. Mechanical stimulation prevents OA-induced cartilage degeneration through crosstalk with subchondral bone. Knee loading might be a new potential therapy for osteoarthritis patients. PMID:27087498

  13. Statistical shape modeling describes variation in tibia and femur surface geometry between Control and Incidence groups from the Osteoarthritis Initiative database

    PubMed Central

    Bredbenner, Todd L.; Eliason, Travis D.; Potter, Ryan S.; Mason, Robert L.; Havill, Lorena M.; Nicolella, Daniel P.

    2010-01-01

    We hypothesize that variability in knee subchondral bone surface geometry will differentiate between patients at risk and those not at risk for developing osteoarthritis (OA) and suggest that statistical shape modeling (SSM) methods form the basis for developing a diagnostic tool for predicting the onset of OA. Using a subset of clinical knee MRI data from the osteoarthritis initiative (OAI), the objectives of this study were to (1) utilize SSM to compactly and efficiently describe variability in knee subchondral bone surface geometry and (2) determine the efficacy of SSM and rigid body transformations to distinguish between patients who are not expected to develop osteoarthritis (i.e. Control group) and those with clinical risk factors for OA (i.e. Incidence group). Quantitative differences in femur and tibia surface geometry were demonstrated between groups, although differences in knee joint alignment measures were not statistically significant, suggesting that variability in individual bone geometry may play a greater role in determining joint space geometry and mechanics. SSM provides a means of explicitly describing complete articular surface geometry and allows the complex spatial variation in joint surface geometry and joint congruence between healthy subjects and those with clinical risk of developing or existing signs of OA to be statistically demonstrated. PMID:20227696

  14. Bone alterations are associated with ankle osteoarthritis joint pain

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yukio; Uchiyama, Shigeharu; Kamimura, Mikio; Komatsu, Masatoshi; Ikegami, Shota; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    The etiology of ankle osteoarthritis (OA) is largely unknown. We analyzed 24 ankle OA of 21 patients diagnosed by plain radiographs using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ankle joint pain disappeared in 22 out of 24 joints by conservative treatment. MRI bone signal changes in and around the ankle joints were observed in 22 of 24 joints. Bone signal changes along the joint line were seen in 10 of 11 joints as a Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grade of II to IV. Such signal changes were witnessed in only 4 of 13 joints with KL grade 0 or I. In the talocrural joint, bone alterations occurred in both tibia and talus bones through the joint line in cases of KL grade III or IV, while focal bone alterations were present in the talus only in KL grade I or II cases. Sixteen of 24 joints exhibited intraosseous bone signal changes, which tended to correspond to joint pain of any ankle OA stage. Our results suggest that bone alterations around the ankle joint might be one of the etiologies of OA and associated with ankle joint pain. PMID:26776564

  15. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for osteoarthritis: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Wyles, Cody C; Houdek, Matthew T; Behfar, Atta; Sierra, Rafael J

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a painful chronic condition with a significant impact on quality of life. The societal burden imposed by OA is increasing in parallel with the aging population; however, no therapies have demonstrated efficacy in preventing the progression of this degenerative joint disease. Current mainstays of therapy include activity modification, conservative pain management strategies, weight loss, and if necessary, replacement of the affected joint. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a multipotent endogenous population of progenitors capable of differentiation to musculoskeletal tissues. MSCs have a well-documented immunomodulatory role, managing the inflammatory response primarily through paracrine signaling. Given these properties, MSCs have been proposed as a potential regenerative cell therapy source for patients with OA. Research efforts are focused on determining the ideal source for derivation, as MSCs are native to several tissues. Furthermore, optimizing the mode of delivery remains a challenge both for appropriate localization of MSCs and for directed guidance toward stemming the local inflammatory process and initiating a regenerative response. Scaffolds and matrices with growth factor adjuvants may prove critical in this effort. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current state of MSC-based therapeutics for OA and discuss potential barriers that must be overcome for successful implementation of cell-based therapy as a routine treatment strategy in orthopedics. PMID:26357483

  16. Osteoarthritis and all-cause mortality in worldwide populations: grading the evidence from a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Dan; Xu, Yuankun; Liu, Qiang; Ke, Yan; Wang, Bin; Li, Zhichang; Lin, Jianhao

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the association between osteoarthritis (OA) and all-cause mortality in worldwide populations and to develop recommendations according to GRADE evidence levels. Literature search through Nov 2015 was performed using the electronic databases (including MEDLINE, EMBASE, EBSCO and Cochrane library). The prospective cohort trials that investigated the association between the symptomatic OA (SxOA) or radiological OA (ROA) and all-cause mortality were identified. Hazard ratios (HR) of all-cause mortality in patients with RxOA or ROA were pooled respectively. The evidence quality was evaluated using the GRADE system, while the recommendations were taken according to the quality. Nine of the published literature met the eligible criteria. Meta-analysis revealed that there was no significant difference in the association between SxOA and all-cause mortality (HR = 0.91, 95% CI: 0.68–1.23) and between ROA and all-cause mortality (HR = 1.13, 95% CI: 0.95–1.35). The overall GARDE evidence quality was very low, which will lower our confidence in taking recommendations. To summarize, there was no reliable and confident evidence existed currently in respect of the association between OA and all-cause mortality. Due to the very low level of evidence quality currently, high-quality studies are still required. PMID:27087682

  17. Association of hip and pelvic geometrywith tibiofemoral osteoarthritis: Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study (MOST)

    PubMed Central

    Boissonneault, A; Lynch, JA; Wise, BL; Segal, NA; Gross, KD; Murray, DW; Nevitt, MC; Pandit, HG

    2014-01-01

    Objective Lateral tibiofemoral osteoarthritis (OA) is overall less common than medial tibiofemoral OA, but it is more prevalent in women. This may be explained by sex differences in hip and pelvic geometry. The aim of this study is to explore sex differences in hip and pelvic geometry and determine if such parameters are associated with the presence of compartment-specific knee OA. Methods This case-control study reports on 1,328 hips/knees from 664 participants and is an ancillary to the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study (MOST). Of the 1,328 knees, 219 had lateral OA, 260 medial OA, and 849 no OA. Hip and pelvic measurements were taken from full-limb radiographs on the ipsilateral side of the knee of interest. After adjusting for covariates, means were compared between sexes and also between knees with medial and lateral OA versus no OA using separate regression models. Results Women were shown to have a reduced femoral offset (mean 40.9 mm vs. 45.9 mm; p=0.001) and more valgus neck-shaft angle (mean 128.4° vs. 125.9°; p<0.001) compared to men. Compared to those with no OA, knees with lateral OA were associated with a reduced femoral offset (p=0.012), increased height of hip centre (p=0.003), more valgus neck-shaft angle (p=0.042), and increased abductor angle (p=0.031). Knees with medial OA were associated with a more varus neck-shaft angle (p=0.043) and a decreased abductor angle (p=0.003). Conclusion These data suggest anatomical variations at the hip and pelvis are associated with compartment-specific knee OA and may help to explain sex differences in patterns of knee OA. PMID:24971867

  18. Abnormal Subcortical Brain Morphology in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: A Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Cui Ping; Bai, Zhi Lan; Zhang, Xiao Na; Zhang, Qiu Juan; Zhang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Despite the involvement of subcortical brain structures in the pathogenesis of chronic pain and persistent pain as the defining symptom of knee osteoarthritis (KOA), little attention has been paid to the morphometric measurements of these subcortical nuclei in patients with KOA. The purpose of this study is to explore the potential morphological abnormalities of subcortical brain structures in patients with KOA as compared to the healthy control subjects by using high-resolution MRI. Structural MR data were acquired from 26 patients with KOA and 31 demographically similar healthy individuals. The MR data were analyzed by using FMRIB’s integrated registration and segmentation tool. Both volumetric analysis and surface-based shape analysis were performed to characterize the subcortical morphology. The normalized volumes of bilateral caudate nucleus were significantly smaller in the KOA group than in the control group (P = 0.004). There was also a trend toward smaller volume of the hippocampus in KOA as compared to the control group (P = 0.027). Detailed surface analyses further localized these differences with a greater involvement of the left hemisphere (P < 0.05, corrected) for the caudate nucleus. Hemispheric asymmetry (right larger than left) of the caudate nucleus was found in both KOA and control groups. Besides, no significant correlation was found between the structural data and pain intensities. Our results indicated that patients with KOA had statistically significant smaller normalized volumes of bilateral caudate nucleus and a trend toward smaller volume of the hippocampus as compared to the control subjects. Further investigations are necessary to characterize the role of caudate nucleus in the course of chronicity of pain associated with KOA. PMID:26834629

  19. Three year joint space narrowing predicts long term incidence of knee surgery in patients with osteoarthritis: an eight year prospective follow up study

    PubMed Central

    Bruyere, O; Richy, F; Reginster, J

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical relevance of mean and minimum femorotibial joint space narrowing (JSN) for predicting future osteoarthritis related surgery in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Methods: 126 subjects with primary knee osteoarthritis were followed prospectively for a mean eight years. Minimum and mean joint space width (JSW) were assessed from standard x rays at baseline and after a follow up of three years. The rate of knee osteoarthritis related surgery was recorded for the following five years. Results: After a mean follow up of eight years, 16 patients (12.7%) had received osteoarthritis related joint surgery. The areas under the curves (AUC) resulting from the receiver operating characteristic curve analyses for predicting osteoarthritis surgery were 0.73 (p = 0.006) for minimum JSN and 0.55 (p = 0.54) for mean JSN. The cut off for minimum JSN maximising sensitivity and specificity for predicting future surgery was a change of 0.7 mm or more in minimum joint space width over a period of three years. However, no meaningful differences were observed for cut off values between 0.5 and 0.8 mm The relative risk (adjusted for age, body mass index, baseline symptoms, and baseline JSW) of experiencing osteoarthritis related surgery during the eight year of follow up was 5.15 (95% confidence interval, 1.70 to 15.60) (p = 0.004) in patients with a minimum joint space narrowing of 0.7 mm or more during the first three years of the study. Conclusions: A cut off of 0.5 to 0.8 mm in minimum JSN, measured on standard x rays, reflects a clinically relevant progression in patients with knee osteoarthritis. PMID:15843444

  20. HIP osteoarthritis and work.

    PubMed

    Harris, E Clare; Coggon, David

    2015-06-01

    Epidemiological evidence points strongly to a hazard of hip osteoarthritis from heavy manual work. Harmful exposures may be reduced by the elimination or redesign of processes and the use of mechanical aids. Reducing obesity might help to protect workers whose need to perform heavy lifting cannot be eliminated. Particularly high relative risks have been reported in farmers, and hip osteoarthritis is a prescribed occupational disease in the UK for long-term employees in agriculture. Even where it is not attributable to employment, hip osteoarthritis impacts importantly on the capacity to work. Factors that may influence work participation include the severity of disease, the physical demands of the job, age and the size of the employer. Published research does not provide a strong guide to the timing of return to work following hip arthroplasty for osteoarthritis, and it is unclear whether patients should avoid heavy manual tasks in their future employment. PMID:26612242

  1. HIP OSTEOARTHRITIS AND WORK

    PubMed Central

    Harris, E Clare; Coggon, David

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence points strongly to a hazard of hip osteoarthritis from heavy manual work. Harmful exposures may be reduced by elimination or redesign of processes and use of mechanical aids. Reducing obesity might help to protect workers whose need to perform heavy lifting cannot be eliminated. Particularly high relative risks have been reported in farmers, and hip osteoarthritis is a prescribed occupational disease in the UK for long-term employees in agriculture. Even where it is not attributable to employment, hip osteoarthritis impacts importantly on capacity to work. Factors that may influence work participation include the severity of disease, the physical demands of the job, age, and the size of the employer. Published research does not provide a strong guide to the timing of return to work following hip arthroplasty for osteoarthritis, and it is unclear whether patients should avoid heavy manual tasks in their future employment. PMID:26612242

  2. Changes in Chondrogenic Progenitor Populations Associated with Aging and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Kyla; Dickinson, Sally C.

    2015-01-01

    Chondrogenic progenitor populations, including mesenchymal stem cells, represent promising cell-based transplantation or tissue engineering therapies for the regeneration of damaged cartilage. Osteoarthritis (OA) predominantly affects the elderly and is a leading cause of disability worldwide. Advancing age is a prominent risk factor that is closely associated with the onset and progression of the disease. Understanding the influence that aging and OA have on chondrogenic progenitor cells is important to determine how these processes affect the cellular mechanisms of the cells and their capacity to differentiate into functional chondrocytes for use in therapeutic applications. Here, we review the effect of age- and OA-related changes on the growth kinetics and differentiation potential of chondrogenic progenitor cell populations. Aging differentially influences the proliferative potential of progenitor cells showing reduced growth rates with increased senescence and apoptotic activity over time, while chondrogenesis appears to be independent of donor age. Cartilage tissue affected by OA shows evidence of progenitor populations with some potential for repair, however reports on the proliferative propensity of mesenchymal stem cells and their chondrogenic potential are contradictory. This is likely attributed to the narrow age ranges of samples assessed and deficits in definitively identifying donors with OA versus healthy patients across a wide scope of advancing ages. Further studies that investigate the mechanistic effects of chondrogenic progenitor populations associated with aging and the progression of OA using clearly defined criteria and age-matched control subject groups are crucial to our understanding of the clinical relevance of these cells for use in cartilage repair therapies. PMID:27340514

  3. A consensus statement on the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) algorithm for the management of knee osteoarthritis-From evidence-based medicine to the real-life setting.

    PubMed

    Bruyère, Olivier; Cooper, Cyrus; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Maheu, Emmanuel; Rannou, François; Branco, Jaime; Luisa Brandi, Maria; Kanis, John A; Altman, Roy D; Hochberg, Marc C; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Reginster, Jean-Yves

    2016-02-01

    The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) published a treatment algorithm for the management of knee osteoarthritis (OA) in 2014, which provides practical guidance for the prioritization of interventions. Further analysis of real-world data for OA provides additional evidence in support of pharmacological interventions, in terms of management of OA pain and function, avoidance of adverse events, disease-modifying effects and long-term outcomes, e.g., delay of total joint replacement surgery, and pharmacoeconomic factors such as reduction in healthcare resource utilization. This article provides an updated assessment of the literature for selected interventions in OA, focusing on real-life data, with the aim of providing easy-to-follow advice on how to establish a treatment flow in patients with knee OA in primary care clinical practice, in support of the clinicians' individualized assessment of the patient. In step 1, background maintenance therapy with symptomatic slow-acting drugs for osteoarthritis (SYSADOAs) is recommended, for which high-quality evidence is provided only for the prescription formulations of patented crystalline glucosamine sulfate and chondroitin sulfate. Paracetamol may be added for rescue analgesia only, due to limited efficacy and increasing safety signals. Topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may provide additional symptomatic treatment with the same degree of efficacy as oral NSAIDs without the systemic safety concerns. Oral NSAIDs maintain a central role in step 2 advanced management of persistent symptoms. However, oral NSAIDs are highly heterogeneous in terms of gastrointestinal and cardiovascular safety profile, and patient stratification with careful treatment selection is advocated to maximize the risk:benefit ratio. Intra-articular hyaluronic acid as a next step provides sustained clinical benefit with effects lasting up to 6 months after a short-course of

  4. Viscosupplementation for treating osteoarthritis in the military population.

    PubMed

    Langworthy, Michael J; Nelson, Fred; Owens, Brett D

    2014-08-01

    Military personnel have a greater risk of developing osteoarthritis (OA) than the general population. OA is a chronic, painful, and debilitating disease with a high cost burden. Compared with the general population, a higher prevalence of post-traumatic OA has been reported in the military. Using recent literature, we aim to improve the understanding of post-traumatic OA, with an exploration of the pathophysiology of OA. Our review encompasses the current treatment modalities for alleviating the pain from OA with a focus on viscosupplementation. A multimodal approach may be beneficial for the relief of OA pain and improvement of function in military personnel with early OA, and may lower the cost burden. PMID:25102523

  5. State-of-the-Art management of knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Fibel, Kenton H; Hillstrom, Howard J; Halpern, Brian C

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common type of arthritis found in the United States’ population and is also the most common disease of joints in adults throughout the world with the knee being the most frequently affected of all joints. As the United States’ population ages along with the increasing trends in obesity prevalence in other parts of the world, it is expected that the burden of OA on the population, healthcare system, and overall economy will continue to increase in the future without making major improvements in managing knee OA. Numerous therapies aim to reduce symptoms of knee OA and continued research has helped to further understand the complex pathophysiology of its disease mechanism attempting to uncover new potential targets for the treatment of OA. This review article seeks to evaluate the current practices for managing knee OA and discusses emerging therapies on the horizon. These practices include non-pharmacological treatments such as providing patient education and self-management strategies, advising weight loss, strengthening programs, and addressing biomechanical issues with bracing or foot orthoses. Oral analgesics and anti-inflammatories are pharmacologicals that are commonly used and the literature overall supports that some of these medications can be helpful for managing knee OA in the short-term but are less effective for long-term management. Additionally, more prolonged use significantly increases the risk of serious associated side effects that are not too uncommon. Disease-modifying osteoarthritis drugs are being researched as a treatment modality to potentially halt or slow disease progression but data at this time is limited and continued studies are being conducted to further investigate their effectiveness. Intra-articular injectables are also implemented to manage knee OA ranging from corticosteroids to hyaluronans to more recently platelet-rich plasma and even stem cells while several other injection therapies are

  6. State-of-the-Art management of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Fibel, Kenton H; Hillstrom, Howard J; Halpern, Brian C

    2015-02-16

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common type of arthritis found in the United States' population and is also the most common disease of joints in adults throughout the world with the knee being the most frequently affected of all joints. As the United States' population ages along with the increasing trends in obesity prevalence in other parts of the world, it is expected that the burden of OA on the population, healthcare system, and overall economy will continue to increase in the future without making major improvements in managing knee OA. Numerous therapies aim to reduce symptoms of knee OA and continued research has helped to further understand the complex pathophysiology of its disease mechanism attempting to uncover new potential targets for the treatment of OA. This review article seeks to evaluate the current practices for managing knee OA and discusses emerging therapies on the horizon. These practices include non-pharmacological treatments such as providing patient education and self-management strategies, advising weight loss, strengthening programs, and addressing biomechanical issues with bracing or foot orthoses. Oral analgesics and anti-inflammatories are pharmacologicals that are commonly used and the literature overall supports that some of these medications can be helpful for managing knee OA in the short-term but are less effective for long-term management. Additionally, more prolonged use significantly increases the risk of serious associated side effects that are not too uncommon. Disease-modifying osteoarthritis drugs are being researched as a treatment modality to potentially halt or slow disease progression but data at this time is limited and continued studies are being conducted to further investigate their effectiveness. Intra-articular injectables are also implemented to manage knee OA ranging from corticosteroids to hyaluronans to more recently platelet-rich plasma and even stem cells while several other injection therapies are

  7. Inter-relations between osteoarthritis and metabolic syndrome: A common link?

    PubMed

    Le Clanche, S; Bonnefont-Rousselot, D; Sari-Ali, E; Rannou, F; Borderie, D

    2016-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative disorder of the joint, principally occurring during aging, and characterized by a focal degradation of cartilage. It is the most prevalent rheumatic disease in industrialized countries and represents the second cause of disability in France. However, the etiology of OA remains unclear. There is only one cell type found in cartilage, chondrocyte, which is responsible for its repair and the synthesis of the elements of the extra-cellular matrix. A dysfunction of these cells results in an imbalance between repair and degradation in cartilage, leading to its destruction. Recently, a link between OA and metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been suggested, introducing a notion of metabolic OA, and a new vision of the disease. MetS is characterized by a cluster of factors (insulin resistance, hypertension, dyslipidemia, visceral obesity), although there is still no clear definition of it. During the 20th century, MetS dramatically increased with changes in population lifestyle, becoming a major health issue in industrialized countries. MetS concerns 10-30% of the worldwide population, but is prevalent in 59% of OA patients. Patients with both OA and MetS have more severe symptoms, occurring sooner than in the general population. Indeed, OA is generally a disease concerning the population over 65 years old, but with an associated MetS the target population is around 50 years old. In this review, we will focus on common factors in OA and MetS, such as hypertension, obesity, dyslipidemia, mitochondrial dysfunction and hyperglycemia, linking one disease to the other. PMID:26700146

  8. Unique gene expression profile in osteoarthritis synovium compared with cartilage: analysis of publicly accessible microarray datasets.

    PubMed

    Park, Robin; Ji, Jong Dae

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify a gene expression signature in osteoarthritis (OA) synovium and genomic pathways likely to be involved in the pathogenesis of OA. Four publicly accessible microarray studies from synovium of OA patients were integrated, and a transcriptomic and network-based meta-analysis was performed. Based on pathways according to the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes, functional enrichment analysis was performed. Meta-analysis results of OA synovium were compared to two previously published studies of OA cartilage to determine the relative number of common and specific DEGs of the cartilage and synovium. According to our meta-analysis, a total of 1350 genes were found to be differentially expressed in the synovium of OA patients as compared to that of healthy controls. Pathway analysis found 41 significant pathways in the total DEGs, and 22 and 16 pathways in the upregulated and downregulated DEGs, respectively. Cell adhesion molecules and cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction were the most significant pathway in the upregulated and downregulated DEGs, respectively. Comparison of meta-analysis results of OA synovium with results of two previous studies of OA cartilage identified 85 common genes and 1632 cartilage-specific DEGs and 1265 synovium-specific DEGs in the first study; and 142 common genes, and 856 cartilage-specific DEGs and 1208 synovium-specific DEGs in the second study. Our results show a small overlap between the DEGs of the synovium compared to DEGs of the cartilage, suggesting different pathogenic mechanisms that are specific to the synovium. PMID:26942917

  9. The use of opioids in the treatment of osteoarthritis: when, why, and how?

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Jeremy L R; Kraemer, Jan J; Bajwa, Zahid H

    2005-12-01

    As life expectancy increases every decade, the incidence and prevalence of osteoarthritis (OA) also will increase. Despite progress in our knowledge of the pathophysiology of OA, the management of OA-mediated pain continues to challenge physicians. Concern regarding the cardiovascular effects of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors and the gastrointestinal and renal side effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in general has limited the use of these medications in the management of chronic non-cancer pain. Appropriately dosed and monitored use of opioids for OA pain, when more conservative methods have failed, has potentially fewer life-threatening complications associated with it than the more commonly and often less successfully employed pharmacotherapeutic approaches to care. When used as part of a multimodal approach to pain control, opioids are a safe and effective treatment for joint pain, including that of OA. Patients for whom NSAIDs are contraindicated, or for whom combined acetaminophen, tramadol, and NSAID therapy is ineffective, may be started on low-dose opioids and titrated as needed and tolerated. Patient education and informed consent, exercise, complementary medicine, and the use of a controlled substance agreement increases the likelihood of patient compliance with treatment guidelines, improving functional capacity and quality of life. PMID:16282039

  10. Genetic Contribution to the Development of Radiographic Knee Osteoarthritis in a Population Presenting with Nonacute Knee Symptoms a Decade Earlier

    PubMed Central

    Huétink, Kasper; van der Voort, Paul; Bloem, Johan L.; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.; Meulenbelt, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the contribution of the osteoarthritis (OA) susceptibility genes ASPN, GDF5, DIO2, and the 7q22 region to the development of radiographic knee OA in patients with a mean age of 40.6 ± 7.9 years (standard deviation) and who suffered from nonacute knee complaints a decade earlier. Dose–response associations of four single nucleotide polymorphisms(SNPs) in the susceptibility genes were determined by comparing 36 patients who showed the development of OA on radiographs (Kellgren and Lawrence score ≥1) with 88 patients having normal cartilage with no development of OA on radiographs. Multivariate logistic regression analysis including the variables such as age, gender, body mass index, and reported knee trauma was performed. A dose–response association of DIO2 SNP rs225014: odds ratio (OR) 2.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1–4.5 (P = 0.019) and GDF5 SNP rs143383: OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.1–3.8 (P = 0.031) was observed with knee OA development. The ASPN and 7q22 SNPs were not associated with OA development. PMID:27158223

  11. Biochemical and immunological parameters as indicators of osteoarthritis subjects: role of OH-collagen in auto-antibodies generation

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Jalaluddin M.; Haque, Quazi S.; Tabrez, Shams; Choi, Inho; Ahmad, Saheem

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by inflammation of the knee joint, which is caused by accumulation of cytokines and C-reactive protein (CRP) in the extracellular matrix as an early immune response to infection. The articular cartilage destruction is discernible by elevated tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). In this study, blood samples of knee osteoarthritis patients were analyzed for biochemical and physiological parameters based on the lipid profile, uric acid, total leukocyte count (TLC), hemoglobin percentage (Hb%) and absolute lymphocyte count (ALC). Furthermore, immunological parameters including TNF-α , interleukin-6 (IL-6) and CRP were analyzed. The presence of antibodies against hydroxyl radical modified collagen-II (•OH-collagen-II) was also investigated in arthritis patients using direct binding ELISA. The uric acid and lipid profiles changed extensively. Specifically, increased uric acid levels were associated with OA in both genders, as were enhanced immunological parameters. The TNF-α level also increased in both genders suffering from OA. Finally, auto-antibodies against OH-collagen II antigen were found in the sera of arthritis patients. These results indicated that immunological parameters are better predictors or indexes for diagnosis of OA than biochemical parameters. PMID:26933405

  12. Evaluation of the effect of D-002, a mixture of beeswax alcohols, on osteoarthritis symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Puente, Roberto; Illnait, José; Mas, Rosa; Carbajal, Daisy; Fernández, Julio César; Mesa, Meilis; Gámez, Rafael; Reyes, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs relieve osteoarthritis (OA) symptoms but cause adverse effects. D-002, a mixture of beeswax alcohols, is effective against experimental OA. A pilot study found that D-002 (50 mg/day) for 8 weeks improves OA symptoms. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of D-002 (50 to 100 mg/day) administered for 6 weeks on OA symptoms. Methods Patients with OA symptoms were double-blindly randomized to D-002 (50 mg) or placebo for 6 weeks. Symptoms were assessed by the Western Ontario and McMaster Individual Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and the visual analog scale (VAS) scores. Patients without symptom improvement at week 3 were titrated to two daily tablets. The primary outcome was the total WOMAC score. WOMAC pain, joint stiffness and physical function scores, VAS score, and use of rescue medications were secondary outcomes. Results All randomized patients (n = 60) completed the study, and 23 experienced dose titration (two in the D-002 and 21 in the placebo groups). At study completion, D-002 reduced total WOMAC (65.4%), pain (54.9%), joint stiffness (76.8%), and physical function (66.9%) WOMAC scores, and the VAS score (46.8%) versus placebo. These reductions were significant beginning in the second week, and became enhanced during the trial. The use of rescue medication by the D-002 (6/30) group was lower than that in the placebo (17/30) group. The treatment was well tolerated. Seven patients (two in the D-002 and five in the placebo group) reported adverse events. Conclusions These results indicate that D-002 (50 to 100 mg/day) for 6 weeks ameliorated arthritic symptoms and was well tolerated. PMID:24648802

  13. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Liang, Yuting; Li, Hong; Li, Haibo; He, Quanze; Xue, Ying; Shen, Cong; Zhang, Chunhua; Xiang, Jingjing; Ding, Jie; Qiao, Longwei; Zheng, Qiping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Osteoarthritis (OA) is a complex disorder characterized by degenerative articular cartilage and is largely attributed to genetic risk factors. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are common DNA variants that have shown promising and efficiency, compared with positional cloning, to map candidate genes of complex diseases, including OA. In this study, we aim to provide an overview of multiple SNPs from a number of genes that have recently been linked to OA susceptibility. We also performed a comprehensive meta-analysis to evaluate the association of SNP rs7639618 of double von Willebrand factor A domains (DVWA) gene with OA susceptibility. A systematic search of studies on the association of SNPs with susceptibility to OA was conducted in PubMed and Google scholar. Studies subjected to meta-analysis include human and case-control studies that met the Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium model and provide sufficient data to calculate an odds ratio (OR). A total of 9500 OA cases and 9365 controls in 7 case-control studies relating to SNP rs7639618 were included in this study and the ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Over 50 SNPs from different genes have been shown to be associated with either hip (23), or knee (20), or both (13) OA. The ORs of these SNPs for OA and the subtypes are not consistent. As to SNP rs7639618 of DVWA, increased knee OA risk was observed in all genetic models analyzed. Specifically, people from Asian with G-allele showed significantly increased risk of knee OA (A versus G: OR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.13–1.46; AA versus GG: OR = 1.60, 95% CI 1.25–2.05; GA versus GG: OR = 1.31, 95% CI 1.18–1.44; AA versus GA+GG: OR = 1.34, 95% CI 1.12–1.61; AA+GA versus GG: OR = 1.40, 95% CI 1.19–1.64), but not in Caucasians or with hip OA. Our results suggest that multiple SNPs play different roles in the pathogenesis of OA and its subtypes; SNP rs7639618 of DVWA gene is associated with a significantly increased

  14. Cellular ageing mechanisms in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Sacitharan, P K; Vincent, T L

    2016-08-01

    Age is the strongest independent risk factor for the development of osteoarthritis (OA) and for many years this was assumed to be due to repetitive microtrauma of the joint surface over time, the so-called 'wear and tear' arthritis. As our understanding of OA pathogenesis has become more refined, it has changed our appreciation of the role of ageing on disease. Cartilage breakdown in disease is not a passive process but one involving induction and activation of specific matrix-degrading enzymes; chondrocytes are exquisitely sensitive to changes in the mechanical, inflammatory and metabolic environment of the joint; cartilage is continuously adapting to these changes by altering its matrix. Ageing influences all of these processes. In this review, we will discuss how ageing affects tissue structure, joint use and the cellular metabolism. We describe what is known about pathways implicated in ageing in other model systems and discuss the potential value of targeting these pathways in OA. PMID:27215642

  15. Osteoarthritis Pathogenesis: A Review of Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Bingjiang; Chen, Di; Zhang, Jushi; Hu, Songfeng; Jin, Hongting; Tong, Peijian

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), the most prevalent chronic joint disease, increases in prevalence with age, and affects majority of individuals over the age of 65 and is a leading musculoskeletal cause of impaired mobility in the elderly. Because the precise molecular mechanisms which are involved in the degradation of cartilage matrix and development of OA are poorly understood and there are currently no effective interventions to decelerate the progression of OA or retard the irreversible degradation of cartilage except for total joint replacement surgery. In this paper, the important molecular mechanisms related to OA pathogenesis will be summarized and new insights into potential molecular targets for the prevention and treatment of OA will be provided. PMID:25311420

  16. Variations in C-reactive protein, plasma free radicals and fibrinogen values in patients with osteoarthritis treated with Pycnogenol.

    PubMed

    Belcaro, G; Cesarone, M R; Errichi, S; Zulli, C; Errichi, B M; Vinciguerra, G; Ledda, A; Di Renzo, A; Stuard, S; Dugall, M; Pellegrini, L; Gizzi, G; Ippolito, E; Ricci, A; Cacchio, M; Cipollone, G; Ruffini, I; Fano, F; Hosoi, M; Rohdewald, P

    2008-01-01

    In a previous, double-blind, placebo-controlled study we evaluated the efficacy of a 3-month treatment with Pycnogenol for 156 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Pycnogenol significantly decreased joint pain and improved joint function as evaluated using the WOMAC score and walking performance of patients on a treadmill. In this study, we further investigated the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity of Pycnogenol in a subset of the osteoarthritis patients presenting with elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) and plasma-free radicals. Elevated CRP levels have been suggested to be associated with disease progression in osteoarthritis. In our study, 29 subjects of the Pycnogenol group and 26 patients in the placebo group showed CRP levels higher than 3 mg/l at baseline. Comparison of blood specimens drawn at baseline and after 3-month treatment showed that Pycnogenol significantly decreased plasma free radicals to 70.1% of baseline values. Plasma CRP levels decreased from baseline 3.9 mg/l to 1.1 mg/l in the Pycnogenol group whereas the control group had initial values of 3.9 mg/l which decreased to 3.6 mg/l. The CRP decrease in the Pycnogenol was statistical significant as compared to the control group (P < 0.05). Fibrinogen levels were found to be lowered to 62.8% of initial values (P < 0.05) in response to Pycnogenol. No significant changes for plasma free radicals, CRP and fibrinogen were found in the placebo-treated group. The decrease of systemic inflammatory markers suggests that Pycnogenol may exert anti-inflammatory activity in osteoarthritic joints and patients did not present with other ailments or infections. The nature of the anti-inflammatory effects of Pycnogenol with regard to CRP warrants further investigation. PMID:19017467

  17. The role of cumulative physical work load in symptomatic knee osteoarthritis – a case-control study in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Seidler, Andreas; Bolm-Audorff, Ulrich; Abolmaali, Nasreddin; Elsner, Gine

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To examine the dose-response relationship between cumulative exposure to kneeling and squatting as well as to lifting and carrying of loads and symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) in a population-based case-control study. Methods In five orthopedic clinics and five practices we recruited 295 male patients aged 25 to 70 with radiographically confirmed knee osteoarthritis associated with chronic complaints. A total of 327 male control subjects were recruited. Data were gathered in a structured personal interview. To calculate cumulative exposure, the self-reported duration of kneeling and squatting as well as the duration of lifting and carrying of loads were summed up over the entire working life. Results The results of our study support a dose-response relationship between kneeling/squatting and symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. For a cumulative exposure to kneeling and squatting > 10.800 hours, the risk of having radiographically confirmed knee osteoarthritis as measured by the odds ratio (adjusted for age, region, weight, jogging/athletics, and lifting or carrying of loads) is 2.4 (95% CI 1.1–5.0) compared to unexposed subjects. Lifting and carrying of loads is significantly associated with knee osteoarthritis independent of kneeling or similar activities. Conclusion As the knee osteoarthritis risk is strongly elevated in occupations that involve both kneeling/squatting and heavy lifting/carrying, preventive efforts should particularly focus on these "high-risk occupations". PMID:18625053

  18. A Blended Intervention for Patients With Knee and Hip Osteoarthritis in the Physical Therapy Practice: Development and a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kloek, Corelien; Snippe, Harm Wouter; Dekker, Joost; de Bakker, Dinny; Veenhof, Cindy

    2016-01-01

    Background Blended care, a combination of online and face-to-face care, is seen as a promising treatment option. However, actual use of blended interventions in practice is disappointing. Objective The objective of this study was two folded. The first aim was to develop a blended exercise therapy intervention for patients with knee and hip osteoarthritis that matches the values of the users and that can be implemented in the daily routine of physical therapists. The second aim was to investigate the feasibility through interviews and a pilot study. Methods In this paper, we employed the first 3 steps of the CeHRes road map to develop a blended intervention for patients with knee and hip osteoarthritis. We used interviews, a focus group and discussions with stakeholders to explore the needs, values, and requirements with respect to our to-be-developed blended intervention, which we called e-Exercise. The first version of e-Exercise was tested in a pilot study. Feasibility outcomes, including recruitment rates within each practice, website usage (assignments completed and website visits), and user satisfaction, were measured. In addition, therapists and patients from the pilot study were interviewed to investigate users’ experiences. Results The study captured important information about stakeholders’ needs and perspectives. Based on our findings, we created a first version and attuned the application’s content, functionality, and structure. Patients and, to lesser extent, physical therapists were satisfied with the e-Exercise intervention. Eight patients were recruited by 8 physical therapists. Of the 8 patients, 6 completed more than 7 of 12 modules. Conclusions This study outlines the development and feasibility of a blended exercise therapy intervention for patients with knee and hip osteoarthritis. E-Exercise offers an alternative approach in the physical therapy treatment of knee and hip osteoarthritis. This study provides valuable information to conduct

  19. Mortality and implant revision rates of hip arthroplasty in patients with osteoarthritis: registry based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    McMinn, D J W; Snell, K I E; Daniel, J; Treacy, R B C; Pynsent, P B

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To examine mortality and revision rates among patients with osteoarthritis undergoing hip arthroplasty and to compare these rates between patients undergoing cemented or uncemented procedures and to compare outcomes between men undergoing stemmed total hip replacements and Birmingham hip resurfacing. Design Cohort study. Setting National Joint Registry. Population About 275 000 patient records. Main outcome measures Hip arthroplasty procedures were linked to the time to any subsequent mortality or revision (implant failure). Flexible parametric survival analysis methods were used to analyse time to mortality and also time to revision. Comparisons between procedure groups were adjusted for age, sex, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade, and complexity. Results As there were large baseline differences in the characteristics of patients receiving cemented, uncemented, or resurfacing procedures, unadjusted comparisons are inappropriate. Multivariable survival analyses identified a higher mortality rate for patients undergoing cemented compared with uncemented total hip replacement (adjusted hazard ratio 1.11, 95% confidence interval 1.07 to 1.16); conversely, there was a lower revision rate with cemented procedures (0.53, 0.50 to 0.57). These translate to small predicted differences in population averaged absolute survival probability at all time points. For example, compared with the uncemented group, at eight years after surgery the predicted probability of death in the cemented group was 0.013 higher (0.007 to 0.019) and the predicted probability of revision was 0.015 lower (0.012 to 0.017). In multivariable analyses restricted to men, there was a higher mortality rate in the cemented group and the uncemented group compared with the Birmingham hip resurfacing group. In terms of revision, the Birmingham hip resurfacings had a similar revision rate to uncemented total hip replacements. Both uncemented total hip replacements and Birmingham hip

  20. Cancellous and Cortical Bone Microarchitectures of Femoral Neck in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoarthritis Compared with Donor Controls.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bailiang; Overgaard, Søren; Chemnitz, John; Ding, Ming

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the 3D microarchitecture of cancellous and cortical bones of the femoral neck in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthritis (OA) and donor controls. 26 femoral necks (including heads) were harvested during total hip replacement surgeries in 11 patients with RA (mean age 66.7 ± 12.8 years) and 15 patients with OA (67.3 ± 8.4 years). Femoral heads/necks were also harvested from 8 donors (74.9 ± 10.2 years). Bone samples of 10 mm thickness were prepared from each femoral neck and scanned with micro-CT to evaluate microarchitectural parameters. The RA and OA samples showed no significant differences in microarchitectural parameters in cancellous or cortical bone. Compared with the donor controls, bone volume fraction in RA and OA cancellous bone was significantly greater, the structure model index in OA was significantly lower, and the surface density in RA was significantly greater. The RA bone tissues showed erosion and marked osteophyte formation. This study demonstrated that RA and OA have similar trends of overall microarchitectural degeneration in the femoral neck, despite marked erosion in RA bone and osteophyte formation in OA bone. However, we could not eliminate the possibility of local differences between RA and OA bone. The age-related bone loss in RA and OA was less severe than those of normal ageing and osteoporosis, suggesting a compensatory effect of the diseases to increase bone density. PMID:26677127

  1. The effect of exercise therapy on knee osteoarthritis: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Nejati, Parisa; Farzinmehr, Azizeh; Moradi-Lakeh, Maziar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common musculoskeletal disease among old individuals which affects ability for sitting on the chair, standing, walking and climbing stairs. Our objective was to investigate the short and long-term effects of the most simple and the least expensive exercise protocols in combination to conventional conservative therapy for knee OA. Methods: It was a single blind RCT study with a 12-months follow-up. Totally, 56 patients with knee OA were assigned into 2 random groups. The patients in exercise group received exercise for knee muscles in combination with non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and 10 sessions acupuncture and physiotherapy modalities. Non-exercise group received similar treatments except exercise program. The changes in patients’ pain and functional status were evaluated by visual analog scale (VAS), knee and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) questionnaire and functional tests (4 steps, 5 sit up, and 6 min walk test) before and after treatment (1 and 3 months after intervention), and 1 year later at the follow-up. Results: The results showed that the patients with knee OA in exercise group had significant improvement in pain, disability, walking, stair climbing, and sit up speed after treatment at first and second follow-up when compared with their initial status and when compared with non-exercise group. At third follow up (1 year later) there was significant difference between groups in VAS and in three items of KOOS questionnaire in functional status. Conclusion: Non aerobic exercises for muscles around knee can augment the effect of other therapeutic interventions like medical therapy, acupuncture, and modalities for knee OA. PMID:26034739

  2. Osteoarthritis year in review 2015: clinical.

    PubMed

    Sharma, L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight clinical research in osteoarthritis (OA). A literature search was conducted using PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/) with the search terms "osteoarthritis [All Fields] AND treatment [All Fields]" and the following limits activated: humans, English language, all adult 19+ years, published between April 1, 2014 and April 1, 2015. A second literature search was then conducted with the search terms "osteoarthritis [All Fields] AND epidemiology [All Fields]", with the same limits. Reports of surgical outcome, case series, surgical technique, tissue sample or culture studies, trial protocols, and pilot studies were excluded. Of 1523, 150 were considered relevant. Among epidemiologic and observational clinical studies, themes included physical activity, early knee OA, and confidence/instability/falls. Symptom outcomes of pharmacologic treatments were reported for methotrexate, adalimumab, anti-nerve growth factor monoclonal antibodies, strontium ranelate, bisphosphonates, glucosamine, and chondroitin sulfate, and structural outcomes of pharmacologic treatments for strontium ranelate, recombinant human fibroblast growth factor 18, and glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate. Symptom outcomes of non-pharmacologic interventions were reported for: neuromuscular exercise, quadriceps strengthening, weight reduction and maintenance, TENS, therapeutic ultrasound, stepped care strategies, cognitive behavior therapy for sleep disturbance, acupuncture, gait modification, booster physical therapy, a web-based therapeutic exercise resource center for knee OA; hip physical therapy for hip OA; and joint protection and hand exercises for hand OA. Structure outcomes of non-pharmacologic interventions were reported for patellofemoral bracing. PMID:26707991

  3. Low Levels of Vitamin D and Worsening of Knee OA: Results from Two Longitudinal Studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: To confirm reports that 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH D) deficiency is associated with an increased risk of joint space narrowing or cartilage loss in osteoarthritis (OA). Methods: We measured 25-OH D levels in subjects from two longitudinal cohort studies, the Framingham Osteoarthritis Stud...

  4. Self-efficacy in multimorbid elderly patients with osteoarthritis in primary care--influence on pain-related disability.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Sven; Brenk-Franz, Katja; Kratz, Anne; Petersen, Juliana J; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G; Schäfer, Ingmar; Weyerer, Siegfried; Wiese, Birgitt; Fuchs, Angela; Maier, Wolfgang; Bickel, Horst; König, Hans-Helmut; Scherer, Martin; van den Bussche, Hendrik; Gensichen, Jochen

    2015-10-01

    The impact of self-efficacy on pain-related disability in multimorbid elderly patients in primary care is not known. The aim of our study was to analyze the influence of self-efficacy on the relation between pain intensity and pain-related disability, controlled for age and disease count, in aged multimorbid primary care patients with osteoarthritis and chronic pain. Patients were recruited in the German MultiCare study (trial registration: ISRCTN89818205). Pain was assessed using the Graded Chronic Pain Scale, and self-efficacy using the General Self-Efficacy Scale. We employed SPSS for statistical analysis. One thousand eighteen primary care patients were included in the study. Correlation analyses showed significant correlations between pain intensity and pain-related disability (r = 0.591, p < 0.001), pain intensity and general self-efficacy (r = 0.078, p < 0.05), and between general self-efficacy and pain-related disability (r = 0.153, p < 0.001). Multiple mediator analysis gives indications that self-efficacy partially mediates the relation between pain intensity and pain-related disability. In our results, we found little evidence that self-efficacy partially mediates the relation between pain intensity and pain-related disability in aged multimorbid primary care patients with osteoarthritis and chronic pain. Further research is necessary to prove the effect. PMID:25190365

  5. Aging Processes and the Development of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Loeser, Richard F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Aging is a primary risk factor for the development of osteoarthritis (OA) and the understanding of how aging processes contribute to the development of OA is an important area of active research. The most recent literature in this area was reviewed in order update investigators on the status of the field. Recent findings The field is beginning to move beyond a cartilage focus to include other joint tissues relevant to OA such as ligaments, meniscus, and bone. Synovitis also appears to play a role in OA but has not been a focus of aging studies. Studies in small animals, including mice and rats, demonstrate age-related changes that can contribute to OA and show that animal age is a key factor to be considered in interpreting the results of studies using surgically-induced models of OA. There is accumulating evidence that cellular processes such as damage-induced cell senescence contribute to OA and a growing body of literature on the role of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in aging and OA. Summary Not all OA is due to aging processes in joint tissues but the age-related changes being discovered certainly could play a major contributing role. PMID:23080227

  6. High abundance synovial fluid proteome: distinct profiles in health and osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gobezie, Reuben; Kho, Alvin; Krastins, Bryan; Sarracino, David A; Thornhill, Thomas S; Chase, Michael; Millett, Peter J; Lee, David M

    2007-01-01

    The development of increasingly high-throughput and sensitive mass spectroscopy-based proteomic techniques provides new opportunities to examine the physiology and pathophysiology of many biologic fluids and tissues. The purpose of this study was to determine protein expression profiles of high-abundance synovial fluid (SF) proteins in health and in the prevalent joint disease osteoarthritis (OA). A cross-sectional study of 62 patients with early OA (n = 21), patients with late OA (n = 21), and control individuals (n = 20) was conducted. SF proteins were separated by using one-dimensional PAGE, and the in-gel digested proteins were analyzed by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 362 spots were examined and 135 high-abundance SF proteins were identified as being expressed across all three study cohorts. A total of 135 SF proteins were identified. Eighteen proteins were found to be significantly differentially expressed between control individuals and OA patients. Two subsets of OA that are not dependent on disease duration were identified using unsupervised analysis of the data. Several novel SF proteins were also identified. Our analyses demonstrate no disease duration-dependent differences in abundant protein composition of SF in OA, and we clearly identified two previously unappreciated yet distinct subsets of protein profiles in this disease cohort. Additionally, our findings reveal novel abundant protein species in healthy SF whose functional contribution to SF physiology was not previously recognized. Finally, our studies identify candidate biomarkers for OA with potential for use as highly sensitive and specific tests for diagnostic purposes or for evaluating therapeutic response. PMID:17407561

  7. Strength and pain are related to different measures of functional ability in patients with end-stage hip osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zeni, Joseph; Abujaber, Sumayah; Pozzi, Federico; Raisis, Leo

    2014-01-01

    Objective Performance tests and self-reported questionnaires capture different domains of function in patients with lower extremity osteoarthritis, but the impairments related to each of these domains have not been elucidated. The purpose of this study was to determine how strength and joint pain influence performance-based tests and self-reported questionnaires of functional ability of individuals with end-stage hip osteoarthritis. Methods Fifty-six patients scheduled to undergo unilateral total hip arthroplasty were included in this cross sectional analysis. Subjects completed the Hip Outcome Survey (HOS) and pain in the affected hip was quantified on a scale from 0–10. Performance-based tests included the Six Minute Walk (6MW), Timed Up and Go (TUG), and Stair Climbing Test (SCT). Isometric strength of the hip abductors and knee extensors was collected. Hierarchical linear regressions were created to determine the contributions of pain, knee extensor strength, and hip strength for each outcome measure (TUG, 6MW, SCT, HOS). Height and BMI were entered first, followed by pain, then knee extensor strength, then hip abduction strength. Results Greater pain significantly predicted lower HOS scores, but hip strength did not significantly improve the model. Hip pain was also significantly related to TUG, SCT and 6MW values, but hip and knee strength explained additional variance for these performance-based measures. Conclusions Self-report and performance-based measures capture different aspects of disability and are influenced by different underlying impairments. Both types of outcome measures should be used in studies that evaluate functional changes in patients with hip osteoarthritis. PMID:24664893

  8. A comparison of the biomechanical effects of valgus knee braces and lateral wedged insoles in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Richard K; Nester, Christopher J; Richards, Jim D; Kim, Winston Y; Johnson, David S; Jari, Sanjiv; Laxton, Philip; Tyson, Sarah F

    2013-03-01

    Increases in the external knee adduction moment (EKAM) have been associated with increased mechanical load at the knee and progression of knee osteoarthritis. Valgus knee braces and lateral wedged insoles are common approaches to reducing this loading; however no study has directly compared the biomechanical and clinical effects of these two treatments in patients with medial tibiofemoral osteoarthritis. A cross-over randomised design was used where each intervention was worn by 28 patients for a two week period. Pre- and post-intervention gait kinematic/kinetic data and clinical outcomes were collected to evaluate the biomechanical and clinical effects on the knee joint. The valgus knee brace and the lateral wedged insole significantly increased walking speed, reduced the early stance EKAM by 7% and 12%, and the knee adduction angular impulse by 8.6 and 16.1% respectively. The lateral wedged insole significantly reduced the early stance EKAM compared to the valgus knee brace (p=0.001). The valgus knee brace significantly reduced the knee varus angle compared to the baseline and lateral wedged insole. Improvements in pain and function subscales were comparable for the valgus knee brace and lateral wedged insole. There were no significant differences between the two treatments in any of the clinical outcomes; however the lateral wedged insoles demonstrated greater levels of acceptance by patients. This is the first study to biomechanically compare these two treatments, and demonstrates that given the potential role of knee loading in osteoarthritis progression, that both treatments reduce this but lateral wedge insoles appear to have a greater effect. PMID:22920242

  9. Effects of PEMF on patients with osteoarthritis: Results of a prospective, placebo-controlled, double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Wuschech, Heinz; von Hehn, Ulrike; Mikus, Eberhard; Funk, Richard H

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) in a double blind study on patients with knee joint osteoarthritis. The MAGCELL ARTHRO electrode-less therapy delivered a sinusoidal magnetic field, varying in frequency between 4 and 12 Hz. In 1 cm tissue depth, magnetic flux density was 105 mT. A total of n = 57 patients were randomly assigned to the verum, PEMF or placebo group (placebo device). Their average age was 61.6 ± 12.0 years. According to American College of Rheumatology criteria the osteoarthritis level was 2.8 ± 0.8. Treatment was performed twice a day for 5 min over a period of 18 days. Treatment with the MAGCELL device versus control (sham exposed) showed a highly significant reduction in pain (P < 0.001), a significant reduction in stiffness (P = 0.032) and a significant reduction in disability in daily activities (P = 0.005) according to the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scales-with a good overall treatment tolerance. In the placebo group there was no evidence of a significant change between the initial and final examination in any of the three above-mentioned WOMAC scales. Results of this partly randomized placebo-controlled double-blind study show clinically at any rate, that use of PEMF lead to highly significant better results in the treatment group compared to the placebo group with regard to the total WOMAC global score and especially for visual analogue scale. Patient assessment of the "effectiveness" was rated in 29.5% as very good and good in 27.3% compared to 0.0% and 15.4% in controls. This therapy is thus a useful complementary treatment option with no side effects. PMID:26562074

  10. Treatment and Prevention of (Early) Osteoarthritis Using Articular Cartilage Repair—Fact or Fiction? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    de Windt, Tommy S.; Vonk, Lucienne A.; Brittberg, Mats

    2013-01-01

    Early osteoarthritis (OA) is increasingly being recognized in patients who wish to remain active while not accepting the limitations of conservative treatment or joint replacement. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the existing evidence for treatment of patients with early OA using articular cartilage repair techniques. A systematic search was performed in EMBASE, MEDLINE, and the Cochrane collaboration. Articles were screened for relevance and appraised for quality. Nine articles of generally low methodological quality (mean Coleman score 58) including a total of 502 patients (mean age range = 36-57 years) could be included. In the reports, both radiological and clinical criteria for early OA were applied. Of all patients included in this review, 75% were treated with autologous chondrocyte implantation. Good short-term clinical outcome up to 9 years was shown. Failure rates varied from 8% to 27.3%. The conversion to total knee arthroplasty rate was 2.5% to 6.5%. Although a (randomized controlled) trial in this patient category with long-term follow-up is needed, the literature suggests autologous chondrocyte implantation could provide good short- to mid-term clinical outcome and delay the need for total knee arthroplasty. The use of standardized criteria for early OA and implementation of (randomized) trials with long-term follow-up may allow for further expansion of the research field in articular cartilage repair to the challenging population with (early) OA. PMID:26069664

  11. Efficacy of strength and aerobic exercise on patient-reported outcomes and structural changes in patients with knee osteoarthritis: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite an extensive literature on treatment interventions for patients with knee osteoarthritis, studies comparing the efficacy of different exercise interventions and living the life as usual on quality of life, cartilage quality and cost-effectiveness are lacking. The aim of the present study is to compare the efficacy of two different exercise programs compared to a control group in individuals with established radiographic and symptomatic knee osteoarthritis on self-reported knee-related quality of life, knee pain, physical function, and cartilage quality. Methods/Design A three-armed randomized controlled trial involving two exercise interventions and a control group of individuals doing as they usually do is described. The patients will have mild to moderate radiographic osteoarthritis according to the Kellgren and Lawrence classification (grade 2–3), and fulfill the American College of Rheumatology clinical criteria, be aged between 45 and 65 years, and have no other serious physical or mental illnesses. The patients will be randomly allocated to a strength exercise group; a cycling group, or a control group. The primary outcome is the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score knee-related quality of life subscale. Secondary outcomes include all five Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score subscales, morphological evaluation of cartilage including focal thickness, subchondral bone marrow edema, proteoglycan content and collagen degradation (measured using magnetic resonance imaging clinical sequences, T2 mapping and T1ρ), specific serum biomarkers, isokinetic muscle strength, maximal oxygen uptake, quality of life (EuroQol 5D), and self-efficacy (Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale). A sample size calculation on the primary outcome showed that 207 individuals, 69 in each group, is needed to detect a clinically relevant difference of 10 points with 80% power and a significance level of 5%. Assessments will be conducted at baseline, 14

  12. Increased joint loads during walking--a consequence of pain relief in knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Marius; Simonsen, Erik B; Alkjaer, Tine; Lund, Hans; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente; Bliddal, Henning

    2006-12-01

    Joint pain is a primary symptom in knee osteoarthritis (OA), but the effect of pain and pain relief on the knee joint mechanics of walking is not clear. In this study, the effects of local knee joint analgesia on knee joint loads during walking were studied in a group of knee osteoarthritis patients. A group of healthy subjects was included as a reference group. The joint loads were calculated from standard gait analysis data obtained with standardised walking speed (4 km/h). The gait analyses were performed before and after pain relief by intra-articular injections of 10 mL lidocaine (1%). Pre-injection measurements revealed lower joint loads in the OA group compared to the reference group. Following injections pain during walking decreased significantly and the joint loads increased in the OA group during the late single support phase to a level comparable to the reference group. Although the patients walked with less compressive knee joint forces compared to the reference group, the effects of pain relief may accelerate the degenerative changes. PMID:17011194

  13. Validation of an algofunctional index for osteoarthritis of the hand.

    PubMed

    Dreiser, R L; Maheu, E; Guillou, G B; Caspard, H; Grouin, J M

    1995-06-01

    Although hand osteoarthritis is common, it has been the focus of few therapeutic trials. In addition to the problems raised by clinical trials in osteoarthritis in general and to the difficulties due to the unforeseeable course of osteoarthritis of the trapezometacarpal and finger joints, the lack of a clinical tool for assessing pain and function over time is an additional obstacle. We propose an algofunctional index designed for evaluation and symptomatic follow-up of patients with digital osteoarthritis. The index is based on a physician-administered questionnaire on 10 daily activities involving the hands. The patient is asked to answer each item using a 4-point verbal scale, from "possible without difficulty" (0) to "impossible" (3 points); thus, total scores range from 0 to 30. This index has been used in a few clinical placebo-controlled trials and was found sensitive to change. The aim of this study was to assess the metrological qualities of this index, including consistency (internal and external), sensitivity and specificity (by scoring the index in different groups of subjects), intra-observer reproducibility, and ease of use. Three hundred patients were recruited by 25 rheumatologists: 100 had a painful attack of digital and/or trapezometacarpal osteoarthritis (mean age: 64.9 years) with a score of more than 40 mm on a visual analog scale for overall pain severity (mean: 57.3 +/- 14 mm), 100 had "inactive" hand osteoarthritis (mean age 67.0 years), and 100 had no diseases of the upper limbs. Specificity/sensitivity: the mean index score was 12.41 +/- 5.41 in patients with painful OA, 4.28 +/- 3.87 in "inactive" cases, and 0.59 +/- 1.23 in controls. External consistency: the overall mean score was well correlated with pain severity: r = 0.49 (p < 0.001). Internal consistency: principal component analysis identified a primary axis responsible for 44.2% of the variance and two secondary axes each responsible for slightly more than 9% of the variance. None

  14. Early knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Favero, Marta; Ramonda, Roberta; Goldring, Mary B; Goldring, Steven R; Punzi, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Concepts regarding osteoarthritis, the most common joint disease, have dramatically changed in the past decade thanks to the development of new imaging techniques and the widespread use of arthroscopy that permits direct visualisation of intra-articular tissues and structure. MRI and ultrasound allow the early detection of pre-radiographic structural changes not only in the peri-articular bone but also in the cartilage, menisci, synovial membrane, ligaments and fat pad. The significance of MRI findings such as cartilage defects, bone marrow lesions, synovial inflammation/effusions and meniscal tears in patients without radiographic signs of osteoarthritis is not fully understood. Nevertheless, early joint tissue changes are associated with symptoms and, in some cases, with progression of disease. In this short review, we discuss the emerging concept of early osteoarthritis localised to the knee based on recently updated knowledge. We highlight the need for a new definition of early osteoarthritis that will permit the identification of patients at high risk of osteoarthritis progression and to initiate early treatment interventions. PMID:26557380

  15. Inhalation Therapy of Calcitonin Relieves Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Serin, Dilek Kaya; Calisir, Cüneyt; Dokumacioglu, Ali; Ozgen, Merih; Oner, Setenay; Alatas, Ozkan

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine if nasal salmon calcitonin has additional beneficial effects on clinical symptoms, serum NO, IL-1β, matrix metalloproteinase 3, urinary C-terminal telopeptide type II collagen (CTX-II) levels and MRI findings in knee osteoarthritis (OA) when used concomitantly with exercise therapy. Fifty female patients with knee OA were randomized into two groups. The first group (n = 30) received 200 IU/day nasal salmon calcitonin and a home exercise program; the second group (n = 20) received a home exercise program for 6 months. Compared with baseline,while significant improvements were observed in visual analogue scale (VAS), WOMAC pain, physical function scores, 20-m walking time (P < 0.001) and WOMAC stiffness score (P = 0.041) in the first group, walking and resting VAS, and WOMAC physical function scores were improved (P = 0.029) in the second group after treatment. Significantly increased levels of serum NO and urinary CTX-II (P < 0.001) and significant improvements in the area of medial femoral condyle (P < 0.05) were noted only in the first group. There were significant differences in VAS activation values (P = 0.032) and NO levels (P < 0.001) in the favor of the first group. In conclusion, nasal salmon calcitonin may have possible chondroprotective effects besides its known effects on symptoms in patients with knee OA. PMID:23166425

  16. Biomarkers of early stage osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and musculoskeletal health

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Usman; Anwar, Attia; Savage, Richard S.; Costa, Matthew L.; Mackay, Nicola; Filer, Andrew; Raza, Karim; Watts, Richard A.; Winyard, Paul G.; Tarr, Joanna; Haigh, Richard C.; Thornalley, Paul J.; Rabbani, Naila

    2015-01-01

    There is currently no biochemical test for detection of early-stage osteoarthritis (eOA). Tests for early-stage rheumatoid arthritis (eRA) such as rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti–cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibodies require refinement to improve clinical utility. We developed robust mass spectrometric methods to quantify citrullinated protein (CP) and free hydroxyproline in body fluids. We detected CP in the plasma of healthy subjects and surprisingly found that CP was increased in both patients with eOA and eRA whereas anti–CCP antibodies were predominantly present in eRA. A 4-class diagnostic algorithm combining plasma/serum CP, anti-CCP antibody and hydroxyproline applied to a cohort gave specific and sensitive detection and discrimination of eOA, eRA, other non-RA inflammatory joint diseases and good skeletal health. This provides a first-in-class plasma/serum-based biochemical assay for diagnosis and type discrimination of early-stage arthritis to facilitate improved treatment and patient outcomes, exploiting citrullinated protein and related differential autoimmunity. PMID:25788417

  17. Alcohol consumption in arthritic patients: clinical and laboratory studies.

    PubMed Central

    Bradlow, A; Mowat, A G

    1985-01-01

    In popular belief patients with chronic arthritis take alcohol for its analgesic effect. To test this we studied by validated questionnaire the past and present alcohol consumption of 103 patients with primary osteoarthritis of the hip (OA), 95 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and 90 orthopaedic non-arthritic controls. OA men were most likely and RA men least likely to have been heavy drinkers at any time of their lives. Mean red corpuscular volume (MCV), gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), and serum uric acid (SUA) levels did not correlate with reported alcohol consumption. Two of 93 OA femoral heads examined had avascular change; both were from heavy drinkers. The abstemiousness of RA men compared with their OA counterparts was due to a striking increase in joint pain after drinking alcohol (p = 0.004), fear of adverse drug reactions with alcohol, and a widespread belief not expressed by OA men that 'alcohol and arthritis do not mix'. PMID:2858181

  18. Identifying compositional and structural changes in spongy and subchondral bone from the hip joints of patients with osteoarthritis using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchwald, Tomasz; Niciejewski, Krzysztof; Kozielski, Marek; Szybowicz, Mirosław; Siatkowski, Marcin; Krauss, Hanna

    2012-01-01

    Raman microspectroscopy was used to examine the biochemical composition and molecular structure of extracellular matrix in spongy and subchondral bone collected from patients with clinical and radiological evidence of idiopathic osteoarthritis of the hip and from patients who underwent a femoral neck fracture, as a result of trauma, without previous clinical and radiological evidence of osteoarthritis. The objectives of the study were to determine the levels of mineralization, carbonate accumulation and collagen quality in bone tissue. The subchondral bone from osteoarthritis patients in comparison with control subject is less mineralized due to a decrease in the hydroxyapatite concentration. However, the extent of carbonate accumulation in the apatite crystal lattice increases, most likely due to deficient mineralization. The alpha helix to random coil band area ratio reveals that collagen matrix in subchondral bone is more ordered in osteoarthritis disease. The hydroxyapatite to collagen, carbonate apatite to hydroxyapatite and alpha helix to random coil band area ratios are not significantly changed in the differently loaded sites of femoral head. The significant differences also are not visible in mineral and organic constituents' content in spongy bone beneath the subchondral bone in osteoarthritis disease.

  19. Obtain osteoarthritis related molecular signature genes through regulation network.

    PubMed

    Li, Yawei; Wang, Bing; Lv, Guohua; Xiong, Guangzhong; Liu, Wei Dong; Li, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), also known as degenerative joint disease or osteoarthrosis, is the most common form of arthritis. OA occurs when cartilage in the joints wears down over time. We used the GSE1919 series to identify potential genes that correlated to OA. The aim of our study was to obtain a molecular signature of OA through the regulation network based on differentially expressed genes. From the result of regulation network construction in OA, a number of transcription factors (TFs) and pathways closely related to OA were linked by our method. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ also arises as hub nodes in our transcriptome network and certain TFs containing CEBPD, EGR2 and ETS2 were shown to be related to OA by a previous study. PMID:21946934

  20. Identification of Synovial Fluid Biomarkers for Knee Osteoarthritis and Correlation with Radiographic Assessment.

    PubMed

    Monibi, Farrah; Roller, Brandon L; Stoker, Aaron; Garner, Bridget; Bal, Sonny; Cook, James L

    2016-04-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a costly and debilitating condition that is typically not diagnosed early enough to prevent progression of disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate synovial fluid from knees with and without OA for potential markers of joint inflammation and degradation and to correlate these findings with radiographic severity of disease. With Institutional Review Board approval, synovial fluid samples were collected before the patient undergoing total knee arthroplasty. Control knees (n = 3) were patients younger than 30 years of age with no history of anterior cruciate ligament, posterior cruciate ligament, or meniscal injury, and no surgical history for either knee. Weight-bearing, anterior-posterior radiographic views were used to determine radiographic OA severity using the modified Kellgren and Lawrence scale. Synovial fluid samples from 18 patients (21 knees) were analyzed using a multiplex assay. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 (p < 0.001), interleukin (IL)-6 (p < 0.013), IL-8 (p < 0.024), and Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 (CCL5) (p < 0.006) were significantly higher in the synovial fluid of OA patients compared with normal patients. The radiographic score was significantly higher in patients with OA compared with normal knees (p < 0.002). MMP-1 had a moderate positive correlation with MMP-2, IL-6, IL-8, and CCL5. IL-6 had a strong positive correlation with IL-8 and a moderate positive correlation with MMP-2. Monocyte chemotactic protein 1 had a moderate positive correlation with IL-6 and a strong positive correlation with IL-8. Radiographic scores had a strong positive correlation with IL-6 and IL-8 and a moderate positive correlation with MCP-1. These data provide novel and clinically relevant information for the investigation of synovial fluid biomarkers for knee OA. PMID:25927354

  1. Cementless surface replacement hemiarthroplasty for primary glenohumeral osteoarthritis: results of over 5-year follow-up in patients with or without rotator cuff deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hadithy, Nawfal; Furness, Nicholas; Patel, Ronak; Jonas, Sam; Jobbagy, Attila; Lowdon, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Background Cementless surface replacement hemiarthroplasty (CSRHA) is an established treatment for glenohumeral osteoarthritis; however, studies evaluating its role in arthritis with rotator cuff deficiency are limited. This study reviews the outcomes of CSRHA for glenohumeral osteoarthritis with and without rotator cuff tears. Methods 41 CSRHA (Mark III Copeland prosthesis) were performed for glenohumeral osteoarthritis with intact rotator cuffs (n = 21) and cuff-deficient shoulders (n = 20). Patients were assessed using Oxford and Constant questionnaires, patient satisfaction, range of motion measurements and by radiography. Results Mean age and follow-up were 75 years and 5.1 years, respectively. Functional gains were significantly higher in patients with intact rotator cuffs compared to cuff-deficient shoulders, with Oxford Shoulder Score improving from 18 to 37.5 and 15 to 27 and forward flexion improved from 60° to 126° and 44° to 77° in each group, respectively. Two patients with deficient cuffs had deficient subscapularis tendons; one of which was dislocated anteriorly. Conclusions CSRHA provides significant improvements in pain and function in patients with glenohumeral osteoarthritis. In patients with deficient cuffs, functional gains are limited, and should be considered in low-demand patients where pain is the primary problem. Caution should be taken in patients with a deficient subscapularis as a result of the risk of dislocation.

  2. Effect of Home Exercise Program Performance in Patients with Osteoarthritis of the Knee or the Spine on the Visual Analog Scale after Discharge from Physical Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hamilton; Onishi, Kentaro

    2012-01-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the effect of the frequency of home exercise program (HEP) performance on pain [10-point visual analog scale (VAS)] in patients with osteoarthritis of the spine or knee after more than 6 months discharge from physical therapy (PT). We performed a retrospective chart review of 48 adult patients with a clinical…

  3. Early osteoarthritis of the trapeziometacarpal joint is not associated with joint instability during typical isometric loading.

    PubMed

    Halilaj, Eni; Moore, Douglas C; Patel, Tarpit K; Ladd, Amy L; Weiss, Arnold-Peter C; Crisco, Joseph J

    2015-11-01

    The saddle-shaped trapeziometacarpal (TMC) joint contributes importantly to the function of the human thumb. A balance between mobility and stability is essential in this joint, which experiences high loads and is prone to osteoarthritis (OA). Since instability is considered a risk factor for TMC OA, we assessed TMC joint instability during the execution of three isometric functional tasks (key pinch, jar grasp, and jar twist) in 76 patients with early TMC OA and 44 asymptomatic controls. Computed tomography images were acquired while subjects held their hands relaxed and while they applied 80% of their maximum effort for each task. Six degree-of-freedom rigid body kinematics of the metacarpal with respect to the trapezium from the unloaded to the loaded task positions were computed in terms of a TMC joint coordinate system. Joint instability was expressed as a function of the metacarpal translation and the applied force. We found that the TMC joint was more unstable during a key pinch task than during a jar grasp or a jar twist task. Sex, age, and early OA did not have an effect on TMC joint instability, suggesting that instability during these three tasks is not a predisposing factor in TMC OA. PMID:25941135

  4. The Healing Effect of Bone Marrow-Derived Stem Cells in Knee Osteoarthritis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Mehrabani, Davood; Mojtahed Jaberi, Fereidoon; Zakerinia, Maryam; Hadianfard, Mohammad Javad; Jalli, Reza; Tanideh, Nader; Zare, Shahrokh

    2016-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent chronic disease impacting on quality of life and has societal and economical burden increasing with age. Yet, no confirmed pharmacological, biological or surgical therapy could prevent the progressive destruction of OA joint. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with immunosuppressive activities emerged a potential therapy. We describe a magnetic resonance images (MRI) approved 47 years old nomad female suffering from a severe right knee OA. After intra-articular injection of 36×10(6) passage 2 of bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs), the patient's functional status of the knee, the number of stairs she could climb, the pain on visual analog scale (VAS) and walking distance improved after two months post-transplantation. MRI revealed an extension of the repaired tissue over subchondral bone. So as MSC transplantation is a simple technique, resulted into pain relief, minimized donor-site morbidity, provided a better quality of life, significantly improved cartilage quality with no need to hospitalization or surgery, cell transplantation can be considered as a reliable alternative treatment for chronic knee OA. Therefore these findings can be added to the literature on using BMSCs for treatment of OA. PMID:27579273

  5. Biological Basis for the Use of Botanicals in Osteoarthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Review

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee and hip is a debilitating disease affecting more women than men and the risk of developing OA increases precipitously with aging. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the most common form of inflammatory joint diseases, is a disease of unknown etiology and affects ∼1% of the population worldwide, and unlike OA, generally involves many joints because of the systemic nature of the disease. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the first drugs of choice for the symptomatic treatment of both OA and RA. Because of the risks associated with the use of NSAIDs and other limitations, the use of alternative therapies, such as acupuncture and medicinal herbs, is on the rise and according to reports ∼60–90% of dissatisfied arthritis patients are likely to seek the option of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). This paper reviews the efficacy of some of the common herbs that have a history of human use and their anti-inflammatory or antiarthritic properties have been evaluated in animal models of inflammatory arthritis, in studies employing well defined and widely accepted in vitro models that use human chondrocytes/cartilage explants or in clinical trials. Available data suggests that the extracts of most of these herbs or compounds derived from them may provide a safe and effective adjunctive therapeutic approach for the treatment of OA and RA. This, in turn, argues for trials to establish efficacy and optimum dosage of these compounds for treating human inflammatory and degenerative joint diseases. PMID:16136208

  6. Underlying molecular mechanisms of DIO2 susceptibility in symptomatic osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bomer, Nils; den Hollander, Wouter; Ramos, Yolande F M; Bos, Steffan D; van der Breggen, Ruud; Lakenberg, Nico; Pepers, Barry A; van Eeden, Annelies E; Darvishan, Arash; Tobi, Elmar W; Duijnisveld, Bouke J; van den Akker, Erik B; Heijmans, Bastiaan T; van Roon-Mom, Willeke MC; Verbeek, Fons J; van Osch, Gerjo J V M; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Slagboom, P Eline; Meulenbelt, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate how the genetic susceptibility gene DIO2 confers risk to osteoarthritis (OA) onset in humans and to explore whether counteracting the deleterious effect could contribute to novel therapeutic approaches. Methods Epigenetically regulated expression of DIO2 was explored by assessing methylation of positional CpG-dinucleotides and the respective DIO2 expression in OA-affected and macroscopically preserved articular cartilage from end-stage OA patients. In a human in vitro chondrogenesis model, we measured the effects when thyroid signalling during culturing was either enhanced (excess T3 or lentiviral induced DIO2 overexpression) or decreased (iopanoic acid). Results OA-related changes in methylation at a specific CpG dinucleotide upstream of DIO2 caused significant upregulation of its expression (β=4.96; p=0.0016). This effect was enhanced and appeared driven specifically by DIO2 rs225014 risk allele carriers (β=5.58, p=0.0006). During in vitro chondrogenesis, DIO2 overexpression resulted in a significant reduced capacity of chondrocytes to deposit extracellular matrix (ECM) components, concurrent with significant induction of ECM degrading enzymes (ADAMTS5, MMP13) and markers of mineralisation (ALPL, COL1A1). Given their concurrent and significant upregulation of expression, this process is likely mediated via HIF-2α/RUNX2 signalling. In contrast, we showed that inhibiting deiodinases during in vitro chondrogenesis contributed to prolonged cartilage homeostasis as reflected by significant increased deposition of ECM components and attenuated upregulation of matrix degrading enzymes. Conclusions Our findings show how genetic variation at DIO2 could confer risk to OA and raised the possibility that counteracting thyroid signalling may be a novel therapeutic approach. PMID:24695009

  7. Non-surgical treatments for the management of early osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Filardo, Giuseppe; Kon, Elizaveta; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Madry, Henning; Marchettini, Paolo; Marmotti, Antonio; Van Assche, Dieter; Zanon, Giacomo; Peretti, Giuseppe M

    2016-06-01

    Non-surgical treatments are usually the first choice for the management of knee degeneration, especially in the early osteoarthritis (OA) phase when no clear lesions or combined abnormalities need to be addressed surgically. Early OA may be addressed by a wide range of non-surgical approaches, from non-pharmacological modalities to dietary supplements and pharmacological therapies, as well as physical therapies and novel biological minimally invasive procedures involving injections of various substances to obtain a clinical improvement and possibly a disease-modifying effect. Numerous pharmaceutical agents are able to provide clinical benefit, but no one has shown all the characteristic of an ideal treatment, and side effects have been reported at both systemic and local level. Patients and physicians should have realistic outcome goals in pharmacological treatment, which should be considered together with other conservative measures. Among these, exercise is an effective conservative approach, while physical therapies lack literature support. Even though a combination of these therapeutic options might be the most suitable strategy, there is a paucity of studies focusing on combining treatments, which is the most common clinical scenario. Further studies are needed to increase the limited evidence on non-surgical treatments and their combination, to optimize indications, application modalities, and results with particular focus on early OA. In fact, most of the available evidence regards established OA. Increased knowledge about degeneration mechanisms will help to better target the available treatments and develop new biological options, where preliminary results are promising, especially concerning early disease phases. Specific treatments aimed at improving joint homoeostasis, or even counteracting tissue damage by inducing regenerative processes, might be successful in early OA, where tissue loss and anatomical changes are still at very initial stages. PMID

  8. Effects of Nordic walking on pelvis motion and muscle activities around the hip joints of adults with hip osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Homma, Daisuke; Jigami, Hirofumi; Sato, Naritoshi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Increased compensatory pelvic movement is remarkable in limping patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA). However, a method of improving limping has not been established. The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of two types of Nordic walking by analyzing the pelvic movement and muscle activities of adults with hip OA. [Subjects and Methods] Ten patients with OA of the hip performed Japanese-style Nordic walking (JS NW), European-style Nordic walking (ES NW), and Ordinary walking (OW), and the muscle activities around the hip joint and pelvic movements were analyzed. [Results] The pelvic rotation angle was significantly larger in ES NW than in JS NW. In the stance phase, hip abductor muscle activity was significantly decreased in JS NW compared to both OW and ES NW. In the swing phase, rectus abdominis muscle activity was significantly increased in both JS NW and ES NW compared to OW and lumbar erector spinae activity was significantly lower in JS NW than in OW. [Conclusion] JS NW style may reduce the compensatory pelvic rotation in patients with hip OA. JS NW might be better for joint protection and prevention of secondary disorders of the hip in OA patients. PMID:27190455

  9. Effects of fucoidan from Fucus vesiculosus in reducing symptoms of osteoarthritis: a randomized placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Stephen P; Mulder, Ann M; Baker, Don G; Robinson, Shelley R; Rolfe, Margaret I; Brooks, Lyndon; Fitton, J Helen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Preliminary investigation of a fucoidan with demonstrated reduction in the symptoms of osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and knee. Patients and methods A double-blind randomized controlled trial was carried out to determine the safety and efficacy of a 300 mg dose of a Fucus vesiculosus extract (85% fucoidan) over a 12-week period in a population (n=122) with mild-to-moderate OA of the hip and knee as measured by the validated instrument “Comprehensive Osteoarthritis Test.” Safety was measured by assessing cholesterol, liver function, renal function, and hematopoietic function, and closely monitoring adverse events. Result Ninety-six participants completed the study. The reduction in symptoms of OA was not significantly different from the placebo response. There were no changes in the blood measurements that were of any clinical significance during the course of the study. Conclusion The F. vesiculosus fucoidan extract was safe and well tolerated. At a dose of 300 mg, the extract showed no difference in reduction of OA symptoms from the placebo. PMID:27307702

  10. Osteoarthritis in the disabled population: a mechanical perspective.

    PubMed

    Morgenroth, David C; Gellhorn, Alfred C; Suri, Pradeep

    2012-05-01

    Primary disabling conditions, such as amputation, not only limit mobility, but also predispose individuals to secondary musculoskeletal impairments, such as osteoarthritis (OA) of the intact limb joints, that can result in additive disability. Altered gait biomechanics that cause increased loading of the intact limb have been suggested as a cause of the increased prevalence of intact limb knee and hip osteoarthritis in this population. Optimizing socket fit and prosthetic alignment, as well as developing and prescribing prosthetic feet with improved push-off characteristics, can lead to reduced asymmetric loading of the intact limb and therefore are potential strategies to prevent and treat osteoarthritis in the amputee population. Research on disabled populations associated with altered biomechanics offers an opportunity to focus on the mechanical risk factors associated with this condition. Continued research into the causes of secondary disability and the development of preventive strategies are critical to enable optimal rehabilitation practices to maximize function and quality of life in patients with disabilities. PMID:22632698

  11. The NAD-Dependent Deacetylase Sirtuin-1 Regulates the Expression of Osteogenic Transcriptional Activator Runt-Related Transcription Factor 2 (Runx2) and Production of Matrix Metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 in Chondrocytes in Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Terauchi, Koh; Kobayashi, Hajime; Yatabe, Kanaka; Yui, Naoko; Fujiya, Hiroto; Niki, Hisateru; Musha, Haruki; Yudoh, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Aging is one of the major pathologic factors associated with osteoarthritis (OA). Recently, numerous reports have demonstrated the impact of sirtuin-1 (Sirt1), which is the NAD-dependent deacetylase, on human aging. It has been demonstrated that Sirt1 induces osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. However, the role of Sirt1 in the OA chondrocytes still remains unknown. We postulated that Sirt1 regulates a hypertrophic chondrocyte lineage and degeneration of articular cartilage through the activation of osteogenic transcriptional activator Runx2 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 in OA chondrocytes. To verify whether sirtuin-1 (Sirt1) regulates chondrocyte activity in OA, we studied expressions of Sirt1, Runx2 and production of MMP-13, and their associations in human OA chondrocytes. The expression of Sirt1 was ubiquitously observed in osteoarthritic chondrocytes; in contrast, Runx2 expressed in the osteophyte region in patients with OA and OA model mice. OA relating catabolic factor IL-1βincreased the expression of Runx2 in OA chondrocytes. OA chondrocytes, which were pretreated with Sirt1 inhibitor, inhibited the IL-1β-induced expression of Runx2 compared to the control. Since the Runx2 is a promotor of MMP-13 expression, Sirt1 inactivation may inhibit the Runx2 expression and the resultant down-regulation of MMP-13 production in chondrocytes. Our findings suggest thatSirt1 may regulate the expression of Runx2, which is the osteogenic transcription factor, and the production of MMP-13 from chondrocytes in OA. Since Sirt1 activity is known to be affected by several stresses, including inflammation and oxidative stress, as well as aging, SIRT may be involved in the development of OA. PMID:27367673

  12. Knee Osteoarthritis Injection Choices: Platelet- Rich Plasma (PRP) Versus Hyaluronic Acid (A one-year randomized clinical trial)

    PubMed Central

    Raeissadat, Seyed Ahmad; Rayegani, Seyed Mansoor; Hassanabadi, Hossein; Fathi, Mohammad; Ghorbani, Elham; Babaee, Marzieh; Azma, Kamran

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common articular disease. Different methods are used to alleviate the symptoms of patients with knee OA, including analgesics, physical therapy, exercise prescription, and intra-articular injections (glucocorticoids, hyaluronic acid [HA], etc). New studies have focused on modern therapeutic methods that stimulate cartilage healing process and improve the damage, including the use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) as a complex of growth factors. Due to the high incidence of OA and its consequences, we decided to study the long-term effect of intraarticular injection of PRP and HA on clinical outcome and quality of life of patients with knee OA. METHOD This non-placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial involved 160 patients affected by knee OA, grade 1–4 of Kellgren–Lawrence scale. In the PRP group (n = 87), two intra-articular injections at 4-week interval were applied, and in the HA group (n = 73), three doses of intra-articular injection at 1-week interval were applied. All patients were prospectively evaluated before and at 12 months after the treatment by Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) and SF-36 questionnaires. The results were analyzed using SPSS 16.1 software (RCT code: IRCT2014012113442N5). RESULTS At the 12-month follow-up, WOMAC pain score and bodily pain significantly improved in both groups; however, better results were determined in the PRP group compared to the HA group (P < 0.001). Other WOMAC and SF-36 parameters improved only in the PRP group. More improvement (but not statistically significant) was achieved in patients with grade 2 OA in both the groups. CONCLUSION This study suggests that PRP injection is more efficacious than HA injection in reducing symptoms and improving quality of life and is a therapeutic option in select patients with knee OA who have not responded to conventional treatment. PMID:25624776

  13. Efficacy and safety of topical NSAIDs in the management of osteoarthritis: Evidence from real-life setting trials and surveys.

    PubMed

    Rannou, François; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne

    2016-02-01

    Topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are recommended in international and national guidelines as an early treatment option for the symptomatic management of knee and hand osteoarthritis (OA), and may be used ahead of oral NSAIDs due to their superior safety profile. The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) treatment algorithm recommends topical NSAIDs for knee OA in addition to the pharmacological background of symptomatic slow-acting drugs for osteoarthritis (SYSADOAs) and rescue analgesia with paracetamol and non-pharmacological treatment, if the patient is still symptomatic. Topical NSAIDs have a moderate effect on pain relief, with efficacy similar to that of oral NSAIDs, with the advantage of a better risk:benefit ratio. In real-life studies, topical and oral NSAIDs demonstrate an equivalent effect on knee pain over 1 year of treatment, with fewer adverse events due to lower systemic absorption of topical NSAIDs compared with oral NSAIDs. As a result, topical NSAIDs may be the preferred treatment option, especially in OA patients aged ≥75 years, and those with co-morbidities or at an increased risk of cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, or renal side effects. Furthermore, using topical NSAIDs in inflammatory rheumatic diseases leads to a 40% reduction in the need for concomitant oral NSAIDs. When selecting a topical NSAID, absorption and bioavailability are important because of heterogeneity among topical drug formulations. Molecules like etofenamate have a bioavailability of >20% and evidence for accumulation in synovial tissues, with efficacy demonstrated as improvement in pain and function in real-life studies of OA patients. Diclofenac also shows good efficacy alongside evidence that diclofenac accumulates in the synovium. PMID:26806189

  14. [Cross cultural adaptation of the lequesne algofunctional indices for german speaking patients with osteoarthritis of the hip and the knee].

    PubMed

    Ludwig, F J; Melzer, Ch; Grimmig, H; Daalmann, H H

    2002-08-01

    The Lequesne Algofunctional Index is a widespread international instrument and recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) for outcome measurement in hip and knee diseases. Up to now there has been no German version of the questionnaire fulfilling the guidelines for cross-cultural adaptation and providing satisfactory metric quality. Based on these guidelines, we developed the German version of the Lequesne Algofunctional Index regarding osteoarthritis of the hip and knee joints presented in this article. All of the questions it contains have been worded as whole sentences, questions concerning walking performance have been substantiated by examples. In testing of the metric outcome (hip: n = 112; knee: n = 83), both questionnaires showed an excellent reliability (IKK > 0,88). As a validity criterion, the correlation with the WOMAC score was tested. We received a Spearman coefficient between 0,63 and 0,81, indicating a high correlation. Time needed to fill in the Lequesne score was 2 min. in patients, physicians took 1,2 min. to evaluate the questionnaire. Regarding the questionnaires handed back, the Lequesne score showed better results than the WOMAC index. Sensitivity, measured by the "standardized response mean", was good in both regions for the total score. Comparing the data received on pain-related questions, the WOMAC score however showed a better sensitivity. The German version of the Lequesne Algofunctional Index is a suitable outcome instrument to measure the intensity of pain, walking capacity and activity of daily life in patients with osteoarthritis of hip and knee joints. PMID:12168149

  15. Role of vasoactive intestinal peptide in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Wang, Hua; Li, Yu-Sheng; Luo, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) plays important roles in many biological functions, such as, stimulation of contractility in the heart, vasodilation, promoting neuroendocrine-immune communication, lowering arterial blood pressure, and anti-inflammatory and immune-modulatory activity. Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic and degenerative bone disease, which is one of the most common causes of disability and most common in both sexes as people become older. Interestingly VIP can prevent chronic cartilage damage and joint remodeling. This review article provides update information on the association of VIP and OA and its treatment. Evidences suggest that VIP is down-regulated in synovial fluid of OA, and VIP down-regulation leads to increase in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines that might contribute to the pathogenesis of OA; however contradictory reports also exist suggesting that accumulation of VIP in joints can also contribute OA. A number of studies indicated that up-regulation of VIP can counteract the action of pro-inflammatory stimuli and alleviate the pain in OA. More clinical investigations are necessary to determine the biology of VIP and its therapeutic potential in OA that might represent the future standards of care for OA. PMID:27553659

  16. Systematic Identification, Characterization and Target Gene Analysis of microRNAs Involved in Osteoarthritis Subchondral Bone Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Prasadam, Indira; Batra, Jyotsna; Perry, Samuel; Gu, Wenyi; Crawford, Ross; Xiao, Yin

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to identify the microRNAs associated with sclerotic status of subchondral bone in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). Total RNA was extracted from non-sclerotic and sclerotic OA subchondral bone from patients undergoing knee replacement surgeries. miRCURY™ LNA miRNA chip and qRT-PCR were used to profile and validate differential microRNA expression. In addition, we further confirmed profiles of altered miRNAs in an OA rat meniscectomy animal model and their putative targets of the miRNAs were predicted using ingenuity (IPA) software. Finally, five short-listed miRNAs were reactivated by transient in vitro overexpression (miRNA mimics) in subchondral bone osteoblasts and their phenotypes were assessed. Functional screening identified 30 differentiated miRNAs in sclerotic subchondral bone compared to non-sclerotic bone of OA patients. Data integration resulted in confirmation of the eight miRNAs, with aberrant expression in independent human OA bone sample set. In silico analysis (IPA) identified 732 mRNA transcripts as putative targets of the eight altered miRNAs, of which twenty genes were validated to be differentially expressed in sclerotic compared to non-sclerotic bone samples. Out of eight dysregulated miRNA's, five of them showed consistent time-dependent downregulation in a rat OA model. Furthermore, synthetic miR-199a-3p, miR-199a-5p, miR-590-5p, and miR-211-5p mimics rescued the abnormal osteoarthritic subchondral bone osteoblast gene expression and mineralization. We have identified four novel miRNAs that play important roles in subchondral bone pathogenesis in OA. Additional studies are required to develop these miRNAs into therapeutic modalities for OA. PMID:26944279

  17. Matrix Gla Protein polymorphism, but not concentrations, is associated with radiographic hand osteoarthritis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective. Factors associated with mineralization and osteophyte formation in osteoarthritis (OA) are incompletely understood. Genetic polymorphisms of matrix Gla protein (MGP), a mineralization inhibitor, have been associated clinically with conditions of abnormal calcification. We therefore evalua...

  18. Effects of the cyclooxygenase inhibiting nitric oxide donator naproxcinod versus naproxen on systemic blood pressure in patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    White, William B; Schnitzer, Thomas J; Fleming, Rosanna; Duquesroix, Brigitte; Beekman, Maarten

    2009-09-15

    Traditional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are associated with the destabilization of blood pressure (BP) control, particularly in hypertensive patients treated with blockers of the renin-angiotensin system. To assess the potential impact of nitric oxide donation, the effects of naproxcinod with naproxen and placebo on changes in BP were compared in a randomized clinical trial of 916 patients with osteoarthritis after 13 weeks of therapy. In addition, the effects of naproxcinod versus naproxen and placebo on systolic BP in patients with hypertension treated with renin-angiotensin system blockers were evaluated. Naproxcinod 750 mg twice daily reduced systolic BP compared to naproxen 500 mg twice daily (p <0.02). The 2 doses of naproxcinod showed reductions from baseline in diastolic BP relative to naproxen (p <0.04) and similar changes compared to placebo. In 207 patients with hypertension treated with renin-angiotensin-blocking agents alone or with diuretics, the difference in mean change from baseline in systolic BP between naproxen 500 mg and naproxcinod 750 mg was 6.5 mm Hg in favor of naproxcinod (p <0.02). The proportion of patients in the overall population with systolic BP increases > or =10 mm Hg was greater with naproxen 500 mg (22%) compared to naproxcinod 750 mg (14%, p = 0.04), naproxcinod 375 mg (14%, p = 0.055), and placebo (15.6%, p = 0.155). In conclusion, naproxcinod did not induce elevations of BP seen with naproxen, and it had similar effects on BP to that of placebo in patients with osteoarthritis. PMID:19733721

  19. MicroRNA-9 regulates the development of knee osteoarthritis through the NF-kappaB1 pathway in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ronghe; Liu, Ning; Luo, Simin; Huang, Weiguo; Zha, Zhengang; Yang, Jie

    2016-09-01

    It has been suggested that microRNA-9 (miR-9) is associated with the development of knee osteoarthritis (OA). This study was aimed to investigate the association between the mechanism of miR-9 targeting nuclear factor kappa-B1 (NF-κB1) and the proliferation and apoptosis of knee OA chondrocytes.Cartilage samples were collected from 25 patients with knee OA and 10 traumatic amputees, and another 15 OA rat models, together with 15 rats without knee OA lesions were also established. MiR-9 expressions in both knee OA cartilage and normal cartilage samples were detected using quantitative real-time PCR. The expressions of related genes (NF-κB1, IL-6, and MMP-13) in the two groups were also detected. Dual luciferase reporter gene assay was employed to examine the effect of miR-9 on the luciferase activity of NF-κB1 3'UTR. Knee OA chondrocytes were transfected with miR-9 mimics, miR-9 inhibitor, and NF-κB1 siRNA, respectively, and changes in cellular proliferation and apoptosis were detected via MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis, respectively. Western blotting assay was used to detect the expressions of NF-κB1, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13).According to results from human OA samples and rat OA models, miR-9 was significantly downregulated in knee OA cartilage tissues compared with normal cartilage tissues (P < 0.01). The expressions of NF-κB1, IL-6, and MMP-13 in knee OA cartilage tissues were significantly higher than those in normal cartilage tissues (P < 0.01). Dual luciferase reporter gene assay showed that miR-9 could bind to the 3'UTR of NF-κB1 and significantly inhibit the luciferase activity by 37% (P < 0.01). Upregulation of miR-9 or downregulation of NF-κB1 could promote cell proliferation and suppress cell apoptosis.Conclusively, downregulated miR-9 can facilitate proliferation and antiapoptosis of knee OA chondrocytes by directly binding to NF-kB1, implying that stimulating miR-9 expressions might

  20. Role of Agnikarma in Sandhigata Vata (osteoarthritis of knee joint)

    PubMed Central

    Jethava, Nilesh G.; Dudhamal, Tukaram S.; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Sandhigata Vata is one of Vata Vyadhi characterized by the symptoms such as Sandhishoola (joint pain) and Sandhishopha (swelling of joint). Osteoarthritis (OA) is degenerative joint disorder, represents failure of the diarthrodial (movable, synovial-lined) joint. OA of knee joint comes under the inflammatory group which is almost identical to Sandhigata Vata described in Ayurveda with respect to etiology, pathology, and clinical features. Agnikarma (therapeutic heat burn) is one which gives instant relief from pain by balancing local Vata and Kapha Dosha without any untoward effects. Aim: To evaluate the efficacy of Agnikarma with Rajata and Loha Dhatu Shalaka in the management of Janugata Sandhivata (OA of knee joint). Materials and Methods: A total of 28 diagnosed patients of Janugata Sandhivata were registered and randomly divided into two groups. In Group-A, Agnikarma was done with Rajata Shalaka while in Group-B Agnikarma was performed by Loha Shalaka in four sittings. Assessment in relief of signs and symptoms was done by weekly interval, and Student's t-test was applied for statistical analysis. Results: Group-A provided 76.31% relief in pain while Group-B provided 83.77% relief. Relief from crepitus was observed in 57.13% of patients of Group-A, while 57.92% of patients of Group-B. There was statistically insignificant difference between both the groups. Loha Shalaka provided better result in pain relief than Rajata Shalaka. Conclusion: Agnikarma is effective nonpharmacological, parasurgical procedure for pain management in Sandhigata Vata (OA of knee joint). PMID:26730134

  1. Vitamin D supplementation in the management of knee osteoarthritis: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common health issue worldwide in the aging population who are also commonly deficient in vitamin D. Our previous study suggested that higher serum 25-(OH)D levels were associated with reduced knee cartilage loss, implying that vitamin D supplementation may prevent the progression of knee OA. The aim of the VItamin D Effects on OA (VIDEO) study is to compare, over a 2- year period, the effects of vitamin D supplementation versus placebo on knee structural changes, knee pain, and lower limb muscle strength in patients with symptomatic knee OA. Methods/design Randomised, placebo-controlled, and double-blind clinical trial aiming to recruit 400 subjects (200 from Tasmania and 200 from Victoria) with both symptomatic knee OA and vitamin D deficiency (serum [25-(OH)D] level of >12.5 nmol/liter and <60 nmol/liter). Participants will be randomly allocated to vitamin D supplementation (50,000 IU compounded vitamin D3 capsule monthly) or identical inert placebo group for 2 years. The primary endpoint is loss of knee cartilage volume measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Index of OA (WOMAC) knee pain score. The secondary endpoints will be other knee structural changes, and lower limb muscle strength. Several other outcome measures including core muscle images and central blood pressure will be recorded. Linear and logistic regression will be used to compare changes between groups using univariable and multivariable modeling analyses. Both intention to treat and per protocol analyses will be utilized. Discussion The trial is designed to test if vitamin D supplementation will reduce loss of knee cartilage volume, prevent the progression of other knee structural abnormalities, reduce knee pain and strengthen lower limb muscle strength, thus modify disease progression in knee OA. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01176344; Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials

  2. Association between the interaction of SMAD3 polymorphisms with body mass index and osteoarthritis susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Baolin; Zhao, Feng; Zhang, Xin; Deng, Xiao; He, Xijing

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to investigate the relationship between the interaction of SMAD3 polymorphisms (rs12102171 and rs2289263) with body mass index (BMI) and osteoarthritis (OA) susceptibility. Methods: This study involved 112 OA patients and 120 healthy people. The controls were frequency-matched with the cases by age and sex. Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) was tested by χ2 test in the control group. The rs12102171 and rs2289263 polymorphisms were genotyped by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. The relative risk of OA was represented by odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) calculated by chi-squared test. Gene-environment interaction was analyzed by crossover analysis. Results: The TT genotype and T allele of SMAD3 rs12102171 polymorphism were more frequent in case than control groups (P=0.04 in both of two polymorphisms), which increased the risk of OA (OR=3.39, 95% CI=1.03-11.11 and OR=1.64, 95% CI=1.03-2.59). GG genotype and G allele were also the risk factors for OA (OR=3.22, 95% CI=1.09-9.51 and OR=1.57, 95% CI=1.02-2.42). The BMI had interactions with genotype CC and CT+TT of rs12102171 and TT and TG+GG of rs2289263 (rs12102171: OR=2.15, P=0.02 and OR=3.99, P=1.00×10-3; rs2289263: OR=2.73, P=4.00×10-3 and OR=4.67, P=0). Conclusions: CC and CT+TT and TT and TG+GG genotypes of SMAD3 rs12102171 and rs2289263 polymorphisms together with BMI may be susceptible factors to OA, and interactions there between can possibly confer risk to OA. PMID:26261637

  3. Unraveling the confusion behind hyaluronic acid efficacy in the treatment of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Larry E; Altman, Roy D; McIntyre, Louis F

    2016-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a commonly prescribed treatment for knee pain resulting from osteoarthritis (OA). Although numerous HA products have been approved for use by the US Food and Drug Administration, the efficacy of HA injections for knee OA remains disputed with meta-analyses and societal clinical guidelines drawing disparate conclusions. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) recently published a best-evidence systematic review and concluded that available data did not support the routine use of HA for knee OA. The purpose of the current article is to highlight issues that confound interpretation of meta-analyses on HA for knee OA, to provide realistic estimates of the true efficacy of HA injections in knee OA, and to provide commentary on the methods and conclusions from the AAOS systematic review. In general, the clinical benefit of HA is underestimated using conventional meta-analytic techniques. When accounting for differential control group effects in HA studies, it can be reasonably concluded that HA injections may be beneficial to an appreciable number of patients with knee OA. In addition, the systematic review methodology used by AAOS was questionable due to exclusion of numerous relevant studies and inclusion of studies that used HAs not approved for use in the US, both of which underestimated the true efficacy of HA injections. Overall, the efficacy of HA injections for knee OA is likely better than previously reported. Future clinical trials and meta-analyses should account for differential control group effects in order to avoid the continued confusion surrounding HA injection efficacy.

  4. Can pain intensity in osteoarthritis joint be indicator of the impairment of endothelial function?

    PubMed

    Laskarin, Gordana; Persic, Viktor; Kukic, Sandra Rusac; Massari, Drazen; Legovic, Anita; Boban, Marko; Miskulin, Rajko; Rogoznica, Marija; Kehler, Tatjana

    2016-09-01

    We propose that pathological remodeling in joint tissues of osteoarthritis (OA) patients persistently stimulates local secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators, which overflow into the blood, activating leukocytes that impair endothelial function and accelerate the atherosclerotic process. During periods of pain, endothelial dysfunction progresses more aggressively due to elevated secretion of these pro-inflammatory mediators, which are involved in both atherosclerosis and the sensation of pain. Concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines and their antagonists, activating and decoy receptors of the broad interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-17 families, IL-15, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 should be measured in peripheral blood samples of OA patients and compared with (I) OA clinical severity; (II) subclinical parameters of atherosclerosis; (III) ischemic heart disease risk factors; (IV) soluble factors indicating endothelial dysfunction; (V) degree of bone destruction; and (VI) results of a six-minute walk test. Arthroscopy and joint replacement surgery provide an opportunity to estimate mRNA and protein expression of inflammatory mediators in specimens of synovial fluid, synovial membrane, cartilage, and/or subarticular bone. A range of methods, including questionnaires, X-ray, computed tomography, ultrasound, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunohistology, immunofluorescence, and reverse transcription and in situ polymerase chain reaction are available. Understanding the inflammatory and immune mechanisms underlying OA may allow the early identification of patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease, independently of classical coronary risk factors. Pain may constitute an extrinsic indicator of currently worsening endothelial function. PMID:27515191

  5. Prevalence of hip symptoms and radiographic and symptomatic hip osteoarthritis in African-Americans and Caucasians: The Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Joanne M.; Helmick, Charles G.; Renner, Jordan B.; Luta, Gheorghe; Dragomir, Anca D.; Woodard, Janice; Fang, Fang; Schwartz, Todd A.; Nelson, Amanda E.; Abbate, Lauren M.; Callahan, Leigh F.; Kalsbeek, William D.; Hochberg, Marc C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To report contemporary estimates of the prevalence of hip-related osteoarthritis (OA) outcomes in African-Americans and Caucasians aged ≥ 45 years. Methods Weighted prevalence estimates and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals for hip symptoms, radiographic hip OA, symptomatic hip OA, and severe radiographic hip OA were calculated using SUDAAN® for age, race, and sex subgroups among 3,068 participants (33% African-Americans, 38% men) in the baseline examination (1991–1997) of The Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project, a population-based study of OA in North Carolina. Radiographic hip OA was defined as Kellgren-Lawrence radiographic grade ≥ 2, moderate/severe radiographic hip OA as grades 3 and 4, and symptomatic hip OA as hip symptoms in a hip with radiographic OA. Results Hip symptoms were present in 36%; 28% had radiographic hip OA; nearly 10% had symptomatic hip OA; and 2.5% had moderate/severe radiographic hip OA. Prevalence of all 4 outcomes was higher in older individuals; most outcomes were higher for women and African-Americans. Conclusion These hip-related outcomes were common in this population, and African-Americans did not have a lower prevalence as previous studies have suggested. Increasing public and health system awareness of the relatively high prevalence of these outcomes, which can be disabling, may help to decrease their impact and ultimately prevent them. PMID:19286855

  6. An innovative care model coordinated by a physical therapist and nurse practitioner for osteoarthritis of the hip and knee in specialist care: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Voorn, Veronique M A; Vermeulen, Henricus M; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Huizinga, Tom W J; Leijerzapf, Nicolette A C; Kroon, Herman M; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P M; van der Linden, Henrica M J

    2013-07-01

    The subject of the study is to investigate whether health-related quality of life (HRQoL), pain and function of patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA) improves after a specialist care intervention coordinated by a physical therapist and a nurse practitioner (NP) and to assess satisfaction with this care at 12 weeks. This observational study included all consecutive patients with hip or knee OA referred to an outpatient orthopaedics clinic. The intervention consisted of a single, standardized visit (assessment and individually tailored management advice, to be executed in primary care) and a telephone follow-up, coordinated by a physical therapist and a NP, in cooperation with an orthopaedic surgeon. Assessments at baseline and 10 weeks thereafter included the short form-36 (SF-36), EuroQol 5D (EQ-5D), hip or knee disability and osteoarthritis outcome score (HOOS or KOOS), the intermittent and constant osteoarthritis pain questionnaire (ICOAP) for hip or knee and a multidimensional satisfaction questionnaire (23 items; 4 point scale). Eighty-seven patients (57 female), mean age 68 years (SD 10.9) were included, with follow-up data available in 63 patients (72 %). Statistically significant improvements were seen regarding the SF-36 physical summary component score, the EQ-5D, the ICOAP scores for hip and knee, the HOOS subscale sports and the KOOS subscales pain, symptoms and activities of daily living. The proportions of patients reporting to be satisfied ranged from 79 to 98 % per item. In patients with hip and knee OA pain, function and HRQoL improved significantly after a single-visit multidisciplinary OA management intervention in specialist care, with high patient satisfaction. PMID:23325095

  7. Nurse practitioners can effectively deliver pain coping skills training to osteoarthritis patients with chronic pain: A randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Broderick, Joan E.; Keefe, Francis J.; Bruckenthal, Patricia; Junghaenel, Doerte U.; Schneider, Stefan; Schwartz, Joseph E.; Kaell, Alan T.; Caldwell, David S.; McKee, Daphne; Reed, Shelby; Gould, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    A multisite, randomized, controlled clinical effectiveness trial was conducted for osteoarthritis patients with chronic pain of the knee or hip. Adult health nurse practitioners provided a 10-session intervention, pain coping skills training (PCST), in patients’ doctors’ offices (N = 129 patients); the control group received usual care (N = 127 patients). Primary outcomes assessed at baseline, posttreatment, 6-month follow-up, and 12-month follow-up were: pain intensity, physical functioning, psychological distress, self-efficacy, catastrophizing, use of coping strategies, and quality of life. Secondary measures included fatigue, social functioning, health satisfaction, and use of pain medication. Methods favoring external validity, consistent with pragmatic, effectiveness research, were utilized. Primary ITT and secondary per-protocol analyses were conducted. Attrition was within the expected range: 11% at posttreatment and 29% at 12-month follow-up; rates did not differ between groups. Omnibus ITT analyses across all assessment points indicated significant improvement for the PCST group compared with the control group for pain intensity, physical functioning, psychological distress, use of pain coping strategies, and self-efficacy, as well as fatigue, satisfaction with health, and reduced use of pain medication. Treatment effects were robust to covariates (demographics and clinical sites). Trends in the outcomes across the assessments were examined. All outcomes, except for self-efficacy, were maintained through the 12-month follow-up; effects for self-efficacy degraded over time. Per-protocol analyses did not yield greater effect sizes. Comparisons of PCST patients who were more vs less treatment adherent suggested greater effectiveness for patients with high adherence. Results support the effectiveness of nurse practitioner delivery of PCST for chronic osteoarthritis pain. PMID:24865795

  8. Effect of Ginger Supplementation on Proinflammatory Cytokines in Older Patients with Osteoarthritis: Outcomes of a Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Mozaffari-Khosravi, Hassan; Naderi, Zahra; Dehghan, Ali; Nadjarzadeh, Azadeh; Fallah Huseini, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    There is limited evidence that ginger powder consumption can relieve pain and inflammation due to specifi