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Sample records for osteochondral implant coupled

  1. The evaluation of a biphasic osteochondral implant coupled with an electrospun membrane in a large animal model.

    PubMed

    Ho, Saey Tuan Barnabas; Hutmacher, Dietmar Werner; Ekaputra, Andrew Krishna; Hitendra, Doshi; Hui, James Hoi

    2010-04-01

    Conventional clinical therapies are unable to resolve osteochondral defects adequately; hence, tissue engineering solutions are sought to address the challenge. A biphasic implant that was seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and coupled with an electrospun membrane was evaluated as an alternative. This dual phase construct comprised of a polycaprolactone (PCL) cartilage scaffold and a PCL-tricalcium phosphate osseous matrix. Autologous MSCs were seeded into the entire implant via fibrin and the construct was inserted into critically sized osteochondral defects located at the medial condyle and patellar groove of pigs. The defect was resurfaced with a PCL-collagen electrospun mesh, which served as a substitute for periosteal flap in preventing cell leakage. Controls without either implanted MSCs or resurfacing membrane were included. After 6 months, cartilaginous repair was observed with a low occurrence of fibrocartilage at the medial condyle. Osteochondral repair was promoted and host cartilage degeneration was arrested as shown by superior glycosaminoglycan maintenance. This positive morphological outcome was supported by a higher relative Young's modulus, which indicated functional cartilage restoration. Bone ingrowth and remodeling occurred in all groups, with a higher degree of mineralization in the experimental group. Tissue repair was compromised in the absence of the implanted cells or the resurfacing membrane. Moreover, healing was inferior at the patellar groove when compared with the medial condyle and this was attributed to the native biomechanical features. PMID:19863255

  2. Osteochondritis Dessicans- Primary Fixation using Bioabsorbable Implants

    PubMed Central

    Galagali, Anand; Rao, Muralidhar

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Osteochondritis dessicans (OCD) is a localized condition where a section of articular cartilage and underlying subchondral bone separate from the joint surface. It is important to diagnose unstable OCD early and fix the fragments primarily as the results of any surgical management at late presentations are guarded. Use of bioabsorbable implants for fixing OCD is recent and we report one such case in grade IV OCD. Case Report: We present a 14 year old girl who came with a history of acute pain, swelling, inability to bear weight on the right knee following a dance practice. MRI showed stage IV osteochondral fragment measuring 20x 8mm lying free. This was primarily fixed with bioabsorbable implants. 10 months follow up showed excellent clinical and functional results. Conclusion: This case highlights the advantages of early primary fixation whenever possible. By far, to our knowledge, this is the first case of successful treatment of stage IV OCD using bioabsorbable implants.

  3. MR imaging of osteochondral grafts and autologous chondrocyte implantation

    PubMed Central

    Millington, S. A.; Szomolanyi, P.; Marlovits, S.

    2006-01-01

    Surgical articular cartilage repair therapies for cartilage defects such as osteochondral autograft transfer, autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) or matrix associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) are becoming more common. MRI has become the method of choice for non-invasive follow-up of patients after cartilage repair surgery. It should be performed with cartilage sensitive sequences, including fat-suppressed proton density-weighted T2 fast spin-echo (PD/T2-FSE) and three-dimensional gradient-echo (3D GRE) sequences, which provide good signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios. A thorough magnetic resonance (MR)-based assessment of cartilage repair tissue includes evaluations of defect filling, the surface and structure of repair tissue, the signal intensity of repair tissue and the subchondral bone status. Furthermore, in osteochondral autografts surface congruity, osseous incorporation and the donor site should be assessed. High spatial resolution is mandatory and can be achieved either by using a surface coil with a 1.5-T scanner or with a knee coil at 3 T; it is particularly important for assessing graft morphology and integration. Moreover, MR imaging facilitates assessment of complications including periosteal hypertrophy, delamination, adhesions, surface incongruence and reactive changes such as effusions and synovitis. Ongoing developments include isotropic 3D sequences, for improved morphological analysis, and in vivo biochemical imaging such as dGEMRIC, T2 mapping and diffusion-weighted imaging, which make functional analysis of cartilage possible. PMID:16802126

  4. Novel metallic implantation technique for osteochondral defects of the medial talar dome

    PubMed Central

    van Bergen, Christiaan J A

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose A metallic inlay implant (HemiCAP) with 15 offset sizes has been developed for the treatment of localized osteochondral defects of the medial talar dome. The aim of this study was to test the following hypotheses: (1) a matching offset size is available for each talus, (2) the prosthetic device can be reproducibly implanted slightly recessed in relation to the talar cartilage level, and (3) with this implantation level, excessive contact pressures on the opposite tibial cartilage are avoided. Methods The prosthetic device was implanted in 11 intact fresh-frozen human cadaver ankles, aiming its surface 0.5 mm below cartilage level. The implantation level was measured at 4 margins of each implant. Intraarticular contact pressures were measured before and after implantation, with compressive forces of 1,000–2,000 N and the ankle joint in plantigrade position, 10° dorsiflexion, and 14° plantar flexion. Results There was a matching offset size available for each specimen. The mean implantation level was 0.45 (SD 0.18) mm below the cartilage surface. The defect area accounted for a median of 3% (0.02–18) of the total ankle contact pressure before implantation. This was reduced to 0.1% (0.02–13) after prosthetic implantation. Interpretation These results suggest that the implant can be applied clinically in a safe way, with appropriate offset sizes for various talar domes and without excessive pressure on the opposite cartilage. PMID:20515434

  5. Evaluation of oriented electrospun fibers for periosteal flap regeneration in biomimetic triphasic osteochondral implant.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xudong; Liu, Shen; Liu, Shenghe; Cui, Wenguo

    2014-10-01

    Osteochondral defects represent a serious clinical problem. Although the cell-scaffold complexes have been reported to be effective for repairing osteochondral defects, a periosteal flap is frequently needed to arrest leakage of the implanted cells into the defect and to contribute to the secretion of cytokines to stimulate cartilage repair. The electrospun mesh mimicking the function of the flap assists tissue regeneration by preventing cell leakage and merits favorable outcomes in the cartilaginous region. In this study, an oriented poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) fibrous membrane (OEM) was fabricated by electrospinning as a periosteal scaffold and then freeze-dried with a collagen type I and hyaluronic acid cartilage scaffold (CH) and finally, freeze-dried with a tricalcium phosphate (TCP) bone substratum. Scanning electron microscopic images show obvious microstructure formation of the trilayered scaffolds, and electrospun fibrous membranes have an oriented fibrous network structure for the periosteal phase. Also shown are opened and interconnected pores with well designed three-dimensional structure, able to be bound in the CH (chondral phase) and TCP (osseous phase) scaffolds. In vitro results showed that the OEM can promote the orientation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSCs) and BMSCs can penetrate into the CH and TCP. After successfully combining the BMSCs, the tissue-engineered cartilage which contained the OEM and TCP complex was successfully used to regenerate the osteochondral defects in the rabbit model with greatly improved repair effects. PMID:24644257

  6. Treatment of osteochondral defects in the rabbit's knee joint by implantation of allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells in fibrin clots.

    PubMed

    Berninger, Markus T; Wexel, Gabriele; Rummeny, Ernst J; Imhoff, Andreas B; Anton, Martina; Henning, Tobias D; Vogt, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of osteochondral articular defects has been challenging physicians for many years. The better understanding of interactions of articular cartilage and subchondral bone in recent years led to increased attention to restoration of the entire osteochondral unit. In comparison to chondral lesions the regeneration of osteochondral defects is much more complex and a far greater surgical and therapeutic challenge. The damaged tissue does not only include the superficial cartilage layer but also the subchondral bone. For deep, osteochondral damage, as it occurs for example with osteochondrosis dissecans, the full thickness of the defect needs to be replaced to restore the joint surface (1). Eligible therapeutic procedures have to consider these two different tissues with their different intrinsic healing potential (2). In the last decades, several surgical treatment options have emerged and have already been clinically established (3-6). Autologous or allogeneic osteochondral transplants consist of articular cartilage and subchondral bone and allow the replacement of the entire osteochondral unit. The defects are filled with cylindrical osteochondral grafts that aim to provide a congruent hyaline cartilage covered surface (3,7,8). Disadvantages are the limited amount of available grafts, donor site morbidity (for autologous transplants) and the incongruence of the surface; thereby the application of this method is especially limited for large defects. New approaches in the field of tissue engineering opened up promising possibilities for regenerative osteochondral therapy. The implantation of autologous chondrocytes marked the first cell based biological approach for the treatment of full-thickness cartilage lesions and is now worldwide established with good clinical results even 10 to 20 years after implantation (9,10). However, to date, this technique is not suitable for the treatment of all types of lesions such as deep defects involving the subchondral

  7. Polyvinyl Alcohol Hydrogel Irradiated and Acetalized for Osteochondral Defect Repair: Mechanical, Chemical, and Histological Evaluation after Implantation in Rat Knees

    PubMed Central

    Batista, N. A.; Rodrigues, A. A.; Bavaresco, V. P.; Mariolani, J. R. L.; Belangero, W. D.

    2012-01-01

    Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA) hydrogel plugs were implanted in artificial osteochondral defects on the trochlear groove of rat knees. After 0, 3, 6, 12, and 24 weeks of followup, samples containing the implants were mechanically evaluated by creep indentation test, chemically, and histologically by optical microscopy. The mechanical test pointed towards an increase of the implant creep modulus and the chemical analysis exhibited an increasing concentration of calcium and phosphorus within the implants over time. Optical microscopy showed no foreign body reaction and revealed formation, differentiation, and maintenance of new tissue at the defect/implant interface. The absence of implant wear indicated that the natural articular lubrication process was not disturbed by the implant. The performance of the irradiated and acetalized PVA was considered satisfactory for the proposed application. PMID:23197982

  8. Microsphere-based gradient implants for osteochondral regeneration: a long-term study in sheep

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Neethu; Gupta, Vineet; Sridharan, Banu Priya; Mellott, Adam J; Easley, Jeremiah T; Palmer, Ross H; Galbraith, Richard A; Key, Vincent H; Berkland, Cory J; Detamore, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Background: The microfracture technique for cartilage repair has limited ability to regenerate hyaline cartilage. Aim: The current study made a direct comparison between microfracture and an osteochondral approach with microsphere-based gradient plugs. Materials & methods: The PLGA-based scaffolds had opposing gradients of chondroitin sulfate and β-tricalcium phosphate. A 1-year repair study in sheep was conducted. Results: The repair tissues in the microfracture were mostly fibrous and had scattered fissures with degenerative changes. Cartilage regenerated with the gradient plugs had equal or superior mechanical properties; had lacunated cells and stable matrix as in hyaline cartilage. Conclusion: This first report of gradient scaffolds in a long-term, large animal, osteochondral defect demonstrated potential for equal or better cartilage repair than microfracture. PMID:26418471

  9. In vitro phenotypic modulation of chondrocytes from knees of patients with osteochondritis dissecans: implications for chondrocyte implantation procedures.

    PubMed

    Aurich, M; Hofmann, G O; Mückley, T; Mollenhauer, J; Rolauffs, B

    2012-01-01

    We attempted to characterise the biological quality and regenerative potential of chondrocytes in osteochondritis dissecans (OCD). Dissected fragments from ten patients with OCD of the knee (mean age 27.8 years (16 to 49)) were harvested at arthroscopy. A sample of cartilage from the intercondylar notch was taken from the same joint and from the notch of ten patients with a traumatic cartilage defect (mean age 31.6 years (19 to 52)). Chondrocytes were extracted and subsequently cultured. Collagen types 1, 2, and 10 mRNA were quantified by polymerase chain reaction. Compared with the notch chondrocytes, cells from the dissecate expressed similar levels of collagen types 1 and 2 mRNA. The level of collagen type 10 message was 50 times lower after cell culture, indicating a loss of hypertrophic cells or genes. The high viability, retained capacity to differentiate and metabolic activity of the extracted cells suggests preservation of the intrinsic repair capability of these dissecates. Molecular analysis indicated a phenotypic modulation of the expanded dissecate chondrocytes towards a normal phenotype. Our findings suggest that cartilage taken from the dissecate can be reasonably used as a cell source for chondrocyte implantation procedures. PMID:22219249

  10. Three-Dimensional Matrix-Induced Autologous Chondrocytes Implantation for Osteochondral Lesions of the Talus: Midterm Results

    PubMed Central

    Magnan, B.; Samaila, E.; Bondi, M.; Vecchini, E.; Micheloni, G. M.; Bartolozzi, P.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. We evaluate the midterm results of thirty patients who underwent autologous chondrocytes implantation for talus osteochondral lesions treatment. Materials and Methods. From 2002 to 2009, 30 ankles with a mean lesion size of 2,36 cm2 were treated. We evaluated patients using American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Surgery and Coughlin score, Van Dijk scale, recovering time, and Musculoskeletal Outcomes Data Evaluation and Management System. Results. The mean AOFAS score varied from 36.9 to 83.9 at follow-up. Average of Van Dijk scale was 141.1. Coughlin score was excellent/good in 24 patients. MOCART score varied from 6.3 to 3.8. Discussion. This matrix is easy to handle conformable to the lesion and apply by arthroscopy. No correlation between MRI imaging and clinical results is found. Conclusions. Our results, compared with those reported in literature with other surgical procedures, show no superiority evidence for our technique compared to the others regarding the size of the lesions. PMID:22570793

  11. Osteochondral autograft transplantation or autologous chondrocyte implantation for large cartilage defects of the knee: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Zeng; Zhu, Tianyi; Fan, Weimin

    2016-03-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and osteochondral autograft transplantation (OAT or mosaicplasty) are two effective surgeries for the treatment of large cartilage defects for more than two decades. But there are always some controversies about which one has the better outcomes for the patients. The purpose of this meta-analysis is to compare the outcomes of these two surgeries and give an advice to the clinical practices. The literature search was performed on multiple electronic databases with specific included criteria. After the assessments, five Randomized controlled trials (level II) were included and two of them were in the same cohort. The continuous data of outcomes were categorized into ranked ones (excellent, good, fair and poor) for comparisons. In the six comparisons of excellent or good results and poor results, the outcomes of ACI were significantly better than OAT in only one comparison (RR 2.57, 95 % CI 1.09-6.07, P = 0.03) while others had no significant differences. We may reach a primary conclusion that there is no significant different outcome between ACI and OAT in a short-term follow-up but it may indicate that the patients with OAT may be more likely to have worse condition than that with ACI for a long-term period. PMID:26068598

  12. Osteochondral Allograft of the Talus

    PubMed Central

    Bisicchia, Salvatore; Rosso, Federica; Amendola, Annunziato

    2014-01-01

    Osteochondral lesions of the talus are being recognized as an increasingly common injury. They are most commonly located postero-medially or antero-laterally, while centrally located lesions are uncommon. Large osteochondral lesions have significant biomechanical consequences and often require resurfacing with osteochondral autograft transfer, mosaicplasty, autologous chondrocyte implantation (or similar methods) or osteochondral allograft transplantation. Allograft procedures have become popular due to inherent advantages over other resurfacing techniques. Cartilage viability is one of the most important factors for successful clinical outcomes after transplantation of osteochondral allografts and is related to storage length and intra-operative factors. While there is abundant literature about osteochondral allograft transplantation in the knee, there are few papers about this procedure in the talus. Failure of non-operative management, initial debridement, curettage or microfractures are an indication for resurfacing. Patients should have a functional ankle motion, closed growth plates, absence of cartilage lesions on the tibial side. This paper reviews the published literature about osteochondral allograft transplantation of the talus focusing on indications, pre-operative planning, surgical approaches, postoperative management, results and complications of this procedure. PMID:25328456

  13. The promotion of osteochondral repair by combined intra-articular injection of parathyroid hormone-related protein and implantation of a bi-layer collagen-silk scaffold.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Jialin; Tao, Jiadong; Hu, Changchang; Chen, Longkun; Zhao, Hongshi; Xu, Guowei; Heng, Boon C; Ouyang, Hong Wei

    2013-08-01

    The repair of osteochondral defects can be enhanced with scaffolds but is often accompanied with undesirable terminal differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) has been shown to inhibit aberrant differentiation, but administration at inappropriate time points would have adverse effects on chondrogenesis. This study aims to develop an effective tissue engineering strategy by combining PTHrP and collagen-silk scaffold for osteochondral defect repair. The underlying mechanisms of the synergistic effect of combining PTHrP administration with collagen-silk scaffold implantation for rabbit knee joint osteochondral defect repair were investigated. In vitro studies showed that PTHrP treatment significantly reduced Alizarin Red staining and expression of terminal differentiation-related markers. This is achieved in part through blocking activation of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. For the in vivo repair study, intra-articular injection of PTHrP was carried out at three different time windows (4-6, 7-9 and 10-12 weeks) together with implantation of a bi-layer collagen-silk scaffold. Defects treated with PTHrP at the 4-6 weeks time window exhibited better regeneration (reconstitution of cartilage and subchondral bone) with minimal terminal differentiation (hypertrophy, ossification and matrix degradation), as well as enhanced chondrogenesis (cell shape, Col2 and GAG accumulation) compared with treatment at other time windows. Furthermore, the timing of PTHrP administration also influenced PTHrP receptor expression, thus affecting the treatment outcome. Our results demonstrated that intra-articular injection of PTHrP at 4-6 weeks post-injury together with collagen-silk scaffold implantation is an effective strategy for inhibiting terminal differentiation and enhancing chondrogenesis, thus improving cartilage repair and regeneration in a rabbit model. PMID:23702148

  14. Multiphasic construct studied in an ectopic osteochondral defect model

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, June E.; Vaquette, Cédryck; Theodoropoulos, Christina; Klein, Travis J.; Hutmacher, Dietmar W.

    2014-01-01

    In vivo osteochondral defect models predominantly consist of small animals, such as rabbits. Although they have an advantage of low cost and manageability, their joints are smaller and more easily healed compared with larger animals or humans. We hypothesized that osteochondral cores from large animals can be implanted subcutaneously in rats to create an ectopic osteochondral defect model for routine and high-throughput screening of multiphasic scaffold designs and/or tissue-engineered constructs (TECs). Bovine osteochondral plugs with 4 mm diameter osteochondral defect were fitted with novel multiphasic osteochondral grafts composed of chondrocyte-seeded alginate gels and osteoblast-seeded polycaprolactone scaffolds, prior to being implanted in rats subcutaneously with bone morphogenic protein-7. After 12 weeks of in vivo implantation, histological and micro-computed tomography analyses demonstrated that TECs are susceptible to mineralization. Additionally, there was limited bone formation in the scaffold. These results suggest that the current model requires optimization to facilitate robust bone regeneration and vascular infiltration into the defect site. Taken together, this study provides a proof-of-concept for a high-throughput osteochondral defect model. With further optimization, the presented hybrid in vivo model may address the growing need for a cost-effective way to screen osteochondral repair strategies before moving to large animal preclinical trials. PMID:24694896

  15. Multiphasic construct studied in an ectopic osteochondral defect model.

    PubMed

    Jeon, June E; Vaquette, Cédryck; Theodoropoulos, Christina; Klein, Travis J; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2014-06-01

    In vivo osteochondral defect models predominantly consist of small animals, such as rabbits. Although they have an advantage of low cost and manageability, their joints are smaller and more easily healed compared with larger animals or humans. We hypothesized that osteochondral cores from large animals can be implanted subcutaneously in rats to create an ectopic osteochondral defect model for routine and high-throughput screening of multiphasic scaffold designs and/or tissue-engineered constructs (TECs). Bovine osteochondral plugs with 4 mm diameter osteochondral defect were fitted with novel multiphasic osteochondral grafts composed of chondrocyte-seeded alginate gels and osteoblast-seeded polycaprolactone scaffolds, prior to being implanted in rats subcutaneously with bone morphogenic protein-7. After 12 weeks of in vivo implantation, histological and micro-computed tomography analyses demonstrated that TECs are susceptible to mineralization. Additionally, there was limited bone formation in the scaffold. These results suggest that the current model requires optimization to facilitate robust bone regeneration and vascular infiltration into the defect site. Taken together, this study provides a proof-of-concept for a high-throughput osteochondral defect model. With further optimization, the presented hybrid in vivo model may address the growing need for a cost-effective way to screen osteochondral repair strategies before moving to large animal preclinical trials. PMID:24694896

  16. Osteochondritis dissecans of the talus

    PubMed Central

    ZANON, GIACOMO; DI VICO, GIOVANNI; MARULLO, MATTEO

    2014-01-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) is an acquired idiopathic lesion of subchondral bone that can produce delamination and sequestration with or without articular cartilage involvement and instability. The cause of OCD is still debated: the most recognized etiology is the occurrence of repetitive micro-traumas associated with vascular impairment, causing progressive ankle pain and dysfunction in skeletally immature and young adult patients. Ankle OCD is classically located in the medial part of the talus, while lateral and posterior involvement is less frequent. Diagnosis of OCD, based on MRI findings, is quite straightforward; MRI examination can also be very useful for dating the defect and obtaining information about the associated bone bruise. Osteochondritis dissecans, if not recognized and treated appropriately, may lead to secondary osteoarthritis with pain and functional limitation. Surgical treatment is mandatory especially in young patients with unstable cartilage fragments. There are various surgical options: fixation, microfracture, or substitution using autologous chondrocyte implantation techniques. PMID:25606554

  17. Gold bead implants.

    PubMed

    Durkes, T E

    1992-03-01

    Gold bead implantation is an experimental area of study in the acupuncture field dealing with chronic diseases. Special acupuncture techniques are required to implant the gold beads successfully in the proper location. Gold beads are used to treat degenerative joint disease, osteochondritis, osteochondritis dessicans, ventral spondylosis, and seizures. PMID:1581658

  18. Osteochondral tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Martin, Ivan; Miot, Sylvie; Barbero, Andrea; Jakob, Marcel; Wendt, David

    2007-01-01

    Osteochondral defects (i.e., defects which affect both the articular cartilage and underlying subchondral bone) are often associated with mechanical instability of the joint, and therefore with the risk of inducing osteoarthritic degenerative changes. Current surgical limits in the treatment of complex joint lesions could be overcome by grafting osteochondral composite tissues, engineered by combining the patient's own cells with three-dimensional (3D) porous biomaterials of pre-defined size and shape. Various strategies have been reported for the engineering of osteochondral composites, which result from the use of one or more cell types cultured into single-component or composite scaffolds in a broad spectrum of compositions and biomechanical properties. The variety of concepts and models proposed by different groups for the generation of osteochondral grafts reflects that understanding of the requirements to restore a normal joint function is still poor. In order to introduce the use of engineered osteochondral composites in the routine clinical practice, it will be necessary to comprehensively address a number of critical issues, including those related to the size and shape of the graft to be generated, the cell type(s) and properties of the scaffold(s) to be used, the potential physical conditioning to be applied, the degree of functionality required, and the strategy for a cost-effective manufacturing. The progress made in material science, cell biology, mechanobiology and bioreactor technology will be key to support advances in this challenging field. PMID:16730354

  19. Treatment of Osteochondral Lesions of the Talus With Bone Marrow Stimulation and Chitosan–Glycerol Phosphate/Blood Implants (BST-CarGel)

    PubMed Central

    Vilá y Rico, Jesús; Dalmau, Antonio; Chaqués, Francisco Javier; Asunción, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow stimulation (BMS) techniques represent the first-line treatment for unstable osteochondral lesions of the talus or after conservative treatment failure. These techniques are intended to penetrate the subchondral bone to elicit bleeding and allow precursor cells and cytokines from bone marrow to populate the lesion. However, the fibrocartilaginous repair tissue arising after marrow stimulation confers inferior mechanical and biological properties compared with the original hyaline cartilage. The limitations of BMS can be overcome by the use of the soluble chitosan-based polymer BST-CarGel (Piramal Life Sciences, Laval, Quebec, Canada). When mixed with freshly drawn autologous whole blood and applied to a lesion surgically prepared by BMS, BST-CarGel acts as a natural bioscaffold that increases the quantity and improves the residency of the blood clot formed in the cartilage lesion, enhancing the local healing response. The use of BST-CarGel has been previously described in the knee and hip joints with successful results. We describe the arthroscopic technique for BST-CarGel application in combination with BMS techniques for the treatment of osteochondral lesions of the talus. PMID:26870643

  20. Influence of the gel thickness on in vivo hyaline cartilage regeneration induced by double-network gel implanted at the bottom of a large osteochondral defect: Short-term results

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A double-network (DN) gel, which is composed of poly(2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid) and poly(N,N’-dimethyl acrylamide), can induce hyaline cartilage regeneration in vivo in a large osteochondral defect. The purpose of this study was to clarify the influence of the thickness of the implanted DN gel on the induction ability of hyaline cartilage regeneration. Methods Thirty-eight mature rabbits were used in this study. We created an osteochondral defect having a diameter of 4.3-mm in the patellofemoral joint. The knees were randomly divided into 4 groups (Group I: 0.5-mm thick gel, Group II: 1.0-mm thick gel, Group III: 5.0-mm thick gel, and Group IV: untreated control). Animals in each group were further divided into 3 sub-groups depending on the gel implant position (2.0-, 3.0-, or 4.0-mm depth from the articular surface) in the defect. The regenerated tissues were evaluated with the Wayne’s gross and histological grading scales and real time PCR analysis of the cartilage marker genes at 4 weeks. Results According to the total Wayne’s score, when the depth of the final vacant space was set at 2.0 mm, the scores in Groups I, II, and III were significantly greater than that Group IV (p < 0.05), although there were no significant differences between Groups I and IV at a 3.0-mm deep vacant space. The expression levels of type-2 collagen in Groups II and III were significantly higher (p < 0.05) than that in Group IV. Conclusions The 1.0-mm thick DN gel sheet had the same ability to induce hyaline cartilage regeneration as the 5.0-mm thick DN gel plug. However, the induction ability of the 0.5-mm thick sheet was significantly lower when compared with the 1.0-mm thick gel sheet. The 1.0-mm DN gel sheet is a promising device to establish a cell-free cartilage regeneration strategy that minimizes bone loss from the gel implantation. PMID:23369101

  1. Refixation of osteochondral fractures by ultrasound-activated, resorbable pins

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, H.; Schulz, A. P.; Gille, J.; Klinger, M.; Jürgens, C.; Reimers, N.; Kienast, B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Osteochondral injuries, if not treated adequately, often lead to severe osteoarthritis. Possible treatment options include refixation of the fragment or replacement therapies such as Pridie drilling, microfracture or osteochondral grafts, all of which have certain disadvantages. Only refixation of the fragment can produce a smooth and resilient joint surface. The aim of this study was the evaluation of an ultrasound-activated bioresorbable pin for the refixation of osteochondral fragments under physiological conditions. Methods In 16 Merino sheep, specific osteochondral fragments of the medial femoral condyle were produced and refixed with one of conventional bioresorbable pins, titanium screws or ultrasound-activated pins. Macro- and microscopic scoring was undertaken after three months. Results The healing ratio with ultrasound-activated pins was higher than with conventional pins. No negative heat effect on cartilage has been shown. Conclusion As the material is bioresorbable, no further surgery is required to remove the implant. MRI imaging is not compromised, as it is with implanted screws. The use of bioresorbable pins using ultrasound is a promising technology for the refixation of osteochondral fractures. PMID:23610699

  2. Fabrication of tissue engineered osteochondral grafts for restoring the articular surface of diarthrodial joints

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Brendan L.; Hung, Clark T.; Cook, James L.; Ateshian, Gerard A.; Tan, Andrea R.

    2015-01-01

    Osteochondral allograft implantation is an effective cartilage restoration technique for large defects (>10 cm2), though the demand far exceeds the supply of available quality donor tissue. Large bilayered engineered cartilage tissue constructs with accurate anatomical features (i.e. contours, thickness, architecture) could be beneficial in replacing damaged tissue. When creating these osteochondral constructs, however, it is pertinent to maintain biofidelity to restore functionality. Here, we describe a step-by-step framework for the fabrication of a large osteochondral construct with correct anatomical architecture and topology through a combination of high-resolution imaging, rapid prototyping, impression molding, and injection molding. PMID:25794950

  3. Fabrication of tissue engineered osteochondral grafts for restoring the articular surface of diarthrodial joints.

    PubMed

    Roach, Brendan L; Hung, Clark T; Cook, James L; Ateshian, Gerard A; Tan, Andrea R

    2015-08-01

    Osteochondral allograft implantation is an effective cartilage restoration technique for large defects (>10 cm(2)), though the demand far exceeds the supply of available quality donor tissue. Large bilayered engineered cartilage tissue constructs with accurate anatomical features (i.e. contours, thickness, architecture) could be beneficial in replacing damaged tissue. When creating these osteochondral constructs, however, it is pertinent to maintain biofidelity to restore functionality. Here, we describe a step-by-step framework for the fabrication of a large osteochondral construct with correct anatomical architecture and topology through a combination of high-resolution imaging, rapid prototyping, impression molding, and injection molding. PMID:25794950

  4. Fixation with autogenous osteochondral grafts for the treatment of osteochondritis dissecans (stages III and IV)

    PubMed Central

    Balacó, Inês

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a clinical and functional assessment of the cases of osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) treated with small mosaicplasty type osteochondral grafts. Between 1999 and 2004, we operated on 12 knees with OCD stages III and IV. They were assessed using the International Cartilage Research Society (ICRS) scale, the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scale, X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The study was carried out using a clinical series, was retrospective and had a level of evidence of 4. Before surgery, all patients were in classes III and IV on the ICRS scale (four in class III and eight in class IV). At the time of surgery, the patient age was 27.5 ± 7.9 years, with male predominance (75%). Eleven of the cases were assessed as classes I and II on the ICRS scale (seven in class I and four in class II), with one patient in class IV. X-ray assessment was less favourable, revealing alterations in the articular space in 75% of cases. The results show that this technique enables the biological fixation of fragments and, functionally, the clinical results obtained were very good. The osteochondral grafts avoid the implantation of foreign material and make use of bone fragments of the same rigidity as the OCD fragment. We conclude that the technique described is an excellent alternative to the techniques normally used for the fixation of stage III and IV OCD. PMID:18038231

  5. Few electron quantum dot coupling to donor implanted electron spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Martin; Harvey-Collard, Patrick; Neilson, Erik; Gamble, John; Muller, Richard; Jacobson, Toby; Ten-Eyck, Greg; Wendt, Joel; Pluym, Tammy; Lilly, Michael; Carroll, Malcolm

    2015-03-01

    Donor-based Si qubits are receiving increased interest because of recent demonstrations of high fidelity electron or nuclear spin qubits and their coupling. Quantum dot (QD) mediated interactions between donors are of interest for future coupling of two donors. We present experiment and modeling of a polysilicon/Si MOS QD, charge-sensed by a neighboring many electron QD, capable of coupling to one or two donor implanted electron spins (D) while tuned to the few electron regime. The unique design employs two neighboring gated wire FETs and self-aligned implants, which supports many configurations of implanted donors. We can access the (0,1) ⇔(1,0) transition between the D and QD, as well as the resonance condition between the few electron QD and two donors ((0,N,1) ⇔(0,N +1,0) ⇔(1,N,0)). We characterize capacitances and tunnel rate behavior combined with semi-classical and full configuration interaction simulations to study the energy landscape and kinetics of D-QD transitions. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. The work was supported by the Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  6. How I Manage Osteochondritis Dissecans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiStefano, Vincent J.

    1986-01-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans, a lesion found most often on the femur at the knee joint, occurs most frequently in active adolescents. This article describes treatment for preadolescents, adolescents, and adults. Osteochondritus dissecans of the patella is also presented. (MT)

  7. Osteochondral Autograft Transplantation: A Review of the Surgical Technique and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Richter, Dustin L; Tanksley, John A; Miller, Mark D

    2016-06-01

    Isolated chondral and osteochondral defects of the knee are challenging clinical entities, particularly in younger patients. Cartilage treatment strategies have previously been characterized as palliation (ie, chondroplasty and debridement), repair (ie, drilling and microfracture), or restoration (ie, autologous chondrocyte implantation, osteochondral autograft, and osteochondral allograft). The osteochondral autograft transplantation procedure allows defects to be filled immediately with mature, hyaline articular cartilage by utilizing either an arthroscopic or a mini-open procedure. Graft harvest and placement can be technically demanding, but results show trends toward greater longevity, durability, and improved outcomes in high-demand patients when compared with alternative techniques. Improved results are shown in younger patients with isolated lesions between 1 and 4 cm. PMID:27135290

  8. Articular cartilage restoration in load-bearing osteochondral defects by implantation of autologous chondrocyte-fibrin constructs: an experimental study in sheep.

    PubMed

    Munirah, S; Samsudin, O C; Chen, H C; Salmah, S H Sharifah; Aminuddin, B S; Ruszymah, B H I

    2007-08-01

    Ovine articular chondrocytes were isolated from cartilage biopsy and culture expanded in vitro. Approximately 30 million cells per ml of cultured chondrocytes were incorporated with autologous plasma-derived fibrin to form a three-dimensional construct. Full-thickness punch hole defects were created in the lateral and medial femoral condyles. The defects were implanted with either an autologous 'chondrocyte-fibrin' construct (ACFC), autologous chondrocytes (ACI) or fibrin blanks (AF) as controls. Animals were killed after 12 weeks. The gross appearance of the treated defects was inspected and photographed. The repaired tissues were studied histologically and by scanning electron microscopy analysis. All defects were assessed using the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) classification. Those treated with ACFC, ACI and AF exhibited median scores which correspond to a nearly-normal appearance. On the basis of the modified O'Driscoll histological scoring scale, ACFC implantation significantly enhanced cartilage repair compared to ACI and AF. Using scanning electron microscopy, ACFC and ACI showed characteristic organisation of chondrocytes and matrices, which were relatively similar to the surrounding adjacent cartilage. Implantation of ACFC resulted in superior hyaline-like cartilage regeneration when compared with ACI. If this result is applicable to humans, a better outcome would be obtained than by using conventional ACI. PMID:17785753

  9. OSTEOCHONDRITIS DISSECANS OF THE KNEE: DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT

    PubMed Central

    Mestriner, Luiz Aurélio

    2015-01-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) is a pathological process affecting the subchondral bone of the knee in children and adolescents with open growth plates (juvenile OCD) and young adults with closed growth plates (adult OCD). It may lead to secondary effects on joint cartilage, such as pain, edema, possible formation of free bodies and mechanical symptoms, including joint locking. OCD may lead to degenerative changes may develop if left untreated. This article presents a review and update on this problem, with special emphasis on diagnosis and treatment. The latter may include either conservative methods, which show more predictable results for juvenile OCD, or various surgical methods, which include reparative techniques like isolated removal of the fragment, bone drilling and fixation of the osteochondral fragments, and restorative techniques like microfractures, autologous osteochondral transplantation (mosaicplasty), autologous chondrocyte implantation and fresh osteochondral allograft, depending on lesion stability, lesion viability, skeletal maturity and OCD process location. Recent assessments on the results from several types of treatment have shown that there is a lack of studies with reliable levels of evidence and have suggested that further multicenter prospective randomized and controlled studies on management of this disease should be conducted. PMID:27047865

  10. Osteochondral Autograft from the Ipsilateral Femoral Head by Surgical Dislocation for Treatment of Femoral Head Fracture Dislocation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Won, Yougun; Lee, Gi Soo; Kim, Sang Bum; Kim, Sun Joong; Yang, Kyu Hyun

    2016-11-01

    As anatomical reduction of the articular surface of femoral head fractures and restoration of damaged cartilage are essential for good long-term results, many treatment options have been suggested, including fixation of the fracture using various surgical exposures and implants, as well as arthroscopic irrigation and debridement, bone marrow stimulating techniques, osteochondral allograft, autograft, and autogenous chondrocyte implantation. We report a case of osteochondral autograft harvested from its own femoral articular surface through surgical hip dislocation. The osteochondral graft was harvested from the inferior non-weight-bearing articular surface and grafted to the osteochondral defect. One year later, the clinical and radiological results were good, without the collapse of the femoral head or arthritic change. This procedure introduced in our case is considered convenient and able to lessen surgical time without morbidity of the donor site associated with the harvest. PMID:27593886

  11. Chondrogenesis of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in an Osteochondral Environment Is Mediated by the Subchondral Bone

    PubMed Central

    de Vries–van Melle, Marloes L.; Narcisi, Roberto; Kops, Nicole; Koevoet, Wendy J.L.M.; Bos, P. Koen; Murphy, J. Mary; Verhaar, Jan A.N.; van der Kraan, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    In articular cartilage repair, cells that will be responsible for the formation of repair tissue are often exposed to an osteochondral environment. To study cartilage repair mechanisms in vitro, we have recently developed a bovine osteochondral biopsy culture model in which cartilage defects can be simulated reproducibly. Using this model, we now aimed at studying the chondrogenic potential of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) in an osteochondral environment. In contrast to standard in vitro chondrogenesis, it was found that supplementing transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) to culture medium was not required to induce chondrogenesis of hBMSCs in an osteochondral environment. hBMSC culture in defects created in osteochondral biopsies or in bone-only biopsies resulted in comparable levels of cartilage-related gene expression, whereas culture in cartilage-only biopsies did not induce chondrogenesis. Subcutaneous implantation in nude mice of osteochondral biopsies containing hBMSCs in osteochondral defects resulted in the formation of more cartilaginous tissue than hBMSCs in chondral defects. The subchondral bone secreted TGFβ; however, the observed results could not be attributed to TGFβ, as either capturing TGFβ with an antibody or blocking the canonical TGFβ signaling pathway did not result in significant changes in cartilage-related gene expression of hBMSCs in the osteochondral culture model. Inhibition of BMP signaling did not prevent chondrogenesis. In conclusion, we demonstrate that chondrogenesis of hBMSCs is induced by factors secreted from the bone. We have strong indications that this is not solely mediated by members of the TGFβ family but other, yet unknown, factors originating from the subchondral bone appeared to play a key role. PMID:23980750

  12. A new surgical technique to facilitate osteochondral autograft transfer in osteochondral defects of the capitellum: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bilsel, Kerem; Demirhan, Mehmet; Atalar, Ata Can; Akkaya, Semih

    2010-01-01

    A 17-year-old boy who was engaged in amateur weightlifting and body building presented with complaints of right elbow pain and limitation in elbow range of motion. Plain x-rays and magnetic resonance imaging showed an osteochondral defect in the medial third of the capitellum. At surgery, as a new technique, the lateral collateral ligament was detached from the humeral attachment to provide access to the capitellum with a clear and perpendicular exposure. Following removal of loose fragments within the joint, an osteochondral graft harvested from the lateral femoral condyle was implanted to the defect area of the capitellum. Postoperative radiologic controls showed that the defect was entirely filled by the graft with appropriate graft height. On follow-up examination at 12 months, the patient did not have any complaint about his elbow, and had no limitation of movement compared to the left elbow. Magnetic resonance imaging showed that the graft was successfully adapted to the recipient site without any sign of loosening. At final follow-up 40 months after surgery, the surface of the articular cartilage appeared normal. The range of elbow motion was preserved and the patient had no restriction in daily and sports activities. Considering technical difficulties posed by the narrow and complex structure of the elbow joint, this new technique involving detachment of the lateral collateral ligament facilitates perpendicular implantation of the graft. In our opinion, utilization of this new technique will improve functional and radiological results of osteochondral autograft transfer. PMID:20513997

  13. Osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum.

    PubMed

    Baker, Champ L; Romeo, Anthony A; Baker, Champ L

    2010-09-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum is a well-recognized cause of elbow pain and disability in the adolescent athlete. This condition typically affects young athletes, such as throwers and gymnasts, involved in high-demand, repetitive overhead, or weightbearing activities. The true cause, natural history, and optimal treatment of osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum remain unknown. Suspicion of this condition warrants investigation with proper radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging. Prompt recognition of this disorder and institution of nonoperative treatment for early, stable lesions can result in healing with later resumption of sporting activities. Patients with unstable lesions or those failing nonoperative therapy require operative intervention with treatment based on lesion size and extent. Historically, surgical treatment included arthrotomy with loose body removal and curettage of the residual osteochondral defect base. The introduction of elbow arthroscopy in the treatment of osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum permits a thorough lesion assessment and evaluation of the entire elbow joint with the ability to treat the lesion and coexistent pathology in a minimally invasive fashion. Unfortunately, the prognosis for advanced lesions remains more guarded, but short-term results after newer reconstruction techniques are promising. PMID:20097927

  14. Lateral femoral condyle osteochondral fracture combined to patellar dislocation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Callewier, A; Monsaert, A; Lamraski, G

    2009-02-01

    The authors report the case of an osteochondral fracture involving the weight-bearing portion of the lateral femoral condyle in a 23-year-old sportsman. The defect was concomitant to a lateral patellar dislocation involving a rare injury mechanism. Fixation of the osteochondral fragment was performed with bioabsorbable pins and healing was achieved within an acceptable time. Clinical and radiographic outcome at one year is highly satisfactory and bioabsorbable implant fixation reveals to be a worthwhile option in such a case. This rare lesion is diagnostically challenging and requires an adapted and prompt treatment. PMID:19251243

  15. Implantable flexible pressure measurement system based on inductive coupling.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Cristina C; Sepúlveda, Alexandra T; Almeida, Nuno; Wardle, Brian L; da Silva, José Machado; Rocha, Luís A

    2015-02-01

    One of the currently available treatments for aortic aneurysms is endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). In spite of major advances in the operating techniques, complications still occur and lifelong surveillance is recommended. In order to reduce and even eliminate the commonly used surveillance imaging exams, as well as to reduce follow-up costs, new technological solutions are being pursued. In this paper, we describe the development, including design and performance characterization, of a flexible remote pressure measurement system based on inductive-coupling for post-EVAR monitoring purposes. The telemetry system architecture and operation are described and main performance characteristics discussed. The implantable sensor details are provided and its model is presented. Simulations with the reading circuit and the sensor's model were performed and compared with measurements carried out with air and a phantom as media, in order to characterize the telemetry system and validate the models. The transfer characteristic curve (pressure versus frequency) of the monitoring system was obtained with measurements performed with the sensor inside a controlled pressure vacuum chamber. Additional experimental results which proof the system functionality were obtained within a hydraulic test bench that emulates the aorta. Several innovative aspects, when compared to the state of the art, both in the sensor and in the telemetry system were achieved. PMID:25347867

  16. Osteochondritis dissecans of the elbow.

    PubMed

    Churchill, Ryan W; Munoz, Julianne; Ahmad, Christopher S

    2016-06-01

    Capitellar osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) can be a significant problem in adolescent overhead athletes. The cause is likely multifactorial secondary to repetitive stresses, biomechanical mismatch, and a tenuous vascular supply of the capitellum. Recent literature reveals that the prevalence is likely higher than previously thought. This, in conjunction with increased levels of athletic competition in children at younger ages, has fed the recent interest in this topic. The literature continues to show that non-operative treatment is still successful for stable lesions. Unstable lesions, therefore, have been the focus of the new literature regarding operative management and outcomes. The aim of this paper is to provide a summary of current literature and an up-to-date approach to the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum. PMID:27125506

  17. The Impact of Compact Layer in Biphasic Scaffold on Osteochondral Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jian-Hua; Zhou, Wei; Xiong, Zhuo; Mu, Yun-Jing; Liu, Jian

    2013-01-01

    The structure of an osteochondral biphasic scaffold is required to mimic native tissue, which owns a calcified layer associated with mechanical and separation function. The two phases of biphasic scaffold should possess efficient integration to provide chondrocytes and osteocytes with an independent living environment. In this study, a novel biphasic scaffold composed of a bony phase, chondral phase and compact layer was developed. The compact layer-free biphasic scaffold taken as control group was also fabricated. The purpose of current study was to evaluate the impact of the compact layer in the biphasic scaffold. Bony and chondral phases were seeded with autogeneic osteoblast- or chondrocyte-induced bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), respectively. The biphasic scaffolds-cells constructs were then implanted into osteochondral defects of rabbits’ knees, and the regenerated osteochondral tissue was evaluated at 3 and 6 months after surgery. Anti-tensile and anti-shear properties of the compact layer-containing biphasic scaffold were significantly higher than those of the compact layer-free biphasic scaffold in vitro. Furthermore, in vivo studies revealed superior macroscopic scores, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen content, micro tomograph imaging results, and histological properties of regenerated tissue in the compact layer-containing biphasic scaffold compared to the control group. These results indicated that the compact layer could significantly enhance the biomechanical properties of biphasic scaffold in vitro and regeneration of osteochondral tissue in vivo, and thus represented a promising approach to osteochondral tissue engineering. PMID:23382984

  18. Biomimetic biphasic scaffolds for osteochondral defect repair

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuezhou; Ding, Jianxun; Wang, Jincheng; Zhuang, Xiuli; Chen, Xuesi

    2015-01-01

    The osteochondral defects caused by vigorous trauma or physical disease are difficult to be managed. Tissue engineering provides a possible option to regenerate the damaged osteochondral tissues. For osteochondral reconstruction, one intact scaffold should be considered to support the regeneration of both cartilage and subchondral bone. Therefore, the biphasic scaffolds with the mimic structures of osteochondral tissues have been developed to close this chasm. A variety of biomimetic bilayer scaffolds fabricated from natural or synthetic polymers, or the ones loading with growth factors, cells, or both of them make great progresses in osteochondral defect repair. In this review, the preparation and in vitro and/or in vivo verification of bioinspired biphasic scaffolds are summarized and discussed, as well as the prospect is predicted. PMID:26816644

  19. THE ELECTROCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF FOUR DENTAL CASTING SUPRASTRUCTURE ALLOYS COUPLED WITH TITANIUM IMPLANTS

    PubMed Central

    Tuna, Suleyman Hakan; Pekmez, Nuran Ozcícek; Keyf, Filiz; Canlí, Fulya

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: As the choice of suprastructure alloy to be combined with titanium for the oral cavity is still a much debated issue, the aim of this study was to investigate the electrochemical interaction of the suprastructure/implant couples under the determined experiment conditions. Material and Methods: The potentiodynamic polarization curves and open-circuit potentials (OCP) of four UCLA type suprastructures coupled with straight Swiss Plus implant fixtures were taken in Afnor type artificial saliva solution at 37°C. The concentration of ions leached into artificial saliva solutions was estimated with ICP-MS. SEM images of the margins of suprastructure/implant couples were obtained before and after the electrochemical tests. Results: The OCP value of titanium became passive at the most negative potential. The lowest difference between the initial and constant OCP value was exhibited by the Au based suprastructure. Suprastructures made greater contributions to the potentiodynamic polarization curves of the implant/suprastructure couples. According to the ICP-MS results, Pd based and Au based couples dissolved less than Co-Ni based and Co-Cr based couples. Conclusions: Within the conditions this study, it may be concluded that the titanium implant forms a stable passive oxide layer in artificial saliva exposed to open air and does not affect the corrosion properties of the suprastructures. Pd based and Au based couples have been found to be more corrosion-resistant than base alloy couples. PMID:19936528

  20. Viral Inactivation of Human Osteochondral Grafts with Methylene Blue and Light

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhixing; Call, Gazell M.; Gao, Jizong; Yao, Jian Q.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Cartilage injury is one of the most common disorders of synovial joints. Fresh osteochondral allografts are becoming a standard treatment; however, they are supply constrained with a potential risk of disease transmission. There are no known virucidal processes available for osteochondral allografts and most methods presently available are detrimental to cartilage. Methylene blue light treatment has been shown to be successful in the literature for viral inactivation of fresh frozen plasma. The purpose of this study was to determine the capacity of methylene blue light treatment to inactivate a panel of clinically relevant viruses inoculated onto osteochondral allografts. Design: Osteochondral grafts recovered from human cadaveric knees were inoculated with one of the following viruses: bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), hepatitis A virus (HAV), human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), porcine parvovirus (PPV), and pseudorabies virus (PrV). The samples were processed through a methylene blue light treatment, which consisted of an initial soak in nonilluminated circulating methylene blue at ambient temperature, followed by light exposure with circulating methylene blue at cool temperatures. The final titer was compared with the recovery control for the viral log reduction. Results: HIV-1, BVDV, and PrV were reduced to nondetectable levels while HAV and PPV were reduced by 3.1 and 5.6 logs, respectively. Conclusions: The methylene blue light treatment was effective in reducing (a) enveloped DNA and RNA viruses to nondetectable levels and (b) nonenveloped DNA and RNA viruses of inoculated human osteochondral grafts by 3.1 to 5.6 logs. This study demonstrates the first practical method for significantly reducing viral load in osteochondral implants. PMID:26069682

  1. Analysis of induced electrical currents from magnetic field coupling inside implantable neurostimulator leads

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Over the last decade, the number of neurostimulator systems implanted in patients has been rapidly growing. Nearly 50, 000 neurostimulators are implanted worldwide annually. The most common type of implantable neurostimulators is indicated for pain relief. At the same time, commercial use of other electromagnetic technologies is expanding, making electromagnetic interference (EMI) of neurostimulator function an issue of concern. Typically reported sources of neurostimulator EMI include security systems, metal detectors and wireless equipment. When near such sources, patients with implanted neurostimulators have reported adverse events such as shock, pain, and increased stimulation. In recent in vitro studies, radio frequency identification (RFID) technology has been shown to inhibit the stimulation pulse of an implantable neurostimulator system during low frequency exposure at close distances. This could potentially be due to induced electrical currents inside the implantable neurostimulator leads that are caused by magnetic field coupling from the low frequency identification system. Methods To systematically address the concerns posed by EMI, we developed a test platform to assess the interference from coupled magnetic fields on implantable neurostimulator systems. To measure interference, we recorded the output of one implantable neurostimulator, programmed for best therapy threshold settings, when in close proximity to an operating low frequency RFID emitter. The output contained electrical potentials from the neurostimulator system and those induced by EMI from the RFID emitter. We also recorded the output of the same neurostimulator system programmed for best therapy threshold settings without RFID interference. Using the Spatially Extended Nonlinear Node (SENN) model, we compared threshold factors of spinal cord fiber excitation for both recorded outputs. Results The electric current induced by low frequency RFID emitter was not significant to

  2. Genetics Home Reference: familial osteochondritis dissecans

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gentili C, Cancedda R. Cartilage and bone extracellular matrix. Curr Pharm Des. 2009;15(12):1334-48. ... the aggrecan C-type lectin domain disrupts extracellular matrix interactions and causes dominant familial osteochondritis dissecans. Am ...

  3. Repair and regeneration of osteochondral defects in the articular joints.

    PubMed

    Swieszkowski, Wojciech; Tuan, Barnabas Ho Saey; Kurzydlowski, Krzysztof J; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2007-11-01

    People suffering from pain due to osteoarthritic or rheumatoidal changes in the joints are still waiting for a better treatment. Although some studies have achieved success in repairing small cartilage defects, there is no widely accepted method for complete repair of osteochondral defects. Also joint replacements have not yet succeeded in replacing of natural cartilage without complications. Therefore, there is room for a new medical approach, which outperforms currently used methods. The aim of this study is to show potential of using a tissue engineering approach for regeneration of osteochondral defects. The critical review of currently used methods for treatment of osteochondral defects is also provided. In this study, two kinds of hybrid scaffolds developed in Hutmacher's group have been analysed. The first biphasic scaffold consists of fibrin and PCL. The fibrin serves as a cartilage phase while the porous PCL scaffold acts as the subchondral phase. The second system comprises of PCL and PCL-TCP. The scaffolds were fabricated via fused deposition modeling which is a rapid prototyping system. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal cells were isolated from New Zealand White rabbits, cultured in vitro and seeded into the scaffolds. Bone regenerations of the subchondral phases were quantified via micro CT analysis and the results demonstrated the potential of the porous PCL and PCL-TCP scaffolds in promoting bone healing. Fibrin was found to be lacking in this aspect as it degrades rapidly. On the other hand, the porous PCL scaffold degrades slowly hence it provides an effective mechanical support. This study shows that in the field of cartilage repair or replacement, tissue engineering may have big impact in the future. In vivo bone and cartilage engineering via combining a novel composite, biphasic scaffold technology with a MSC has been shown a high potential in the knee defect regeneration in the animal models. However, the clinical application of tissue

  4. Biofabrication of osteochondral tissue equivalents by printing topologically defined, cell-laden hydrogel scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Fedorovich, Natalja E; Schuurman, Wouter; Wijnberg, Hans M; Prins, Henk-Jan; van Weeren, P René; Malda, Jos; Alblas, Jacqueline; Dhert, Wouter J A

    2012-01-01

    Osteochondral defects are prone to induce osteoarthritic degenerative changes. Many tissue-engineering approaches that aim to generate osteochondral implants suffer from poor tissue formation and compromised integration. This illustrates the need for further improvement of heterogeneous tissue constructs. Engineering of these structures is expected to profit from strategies addressing the complexity of tissue organization and the simultaneous use of multiple cell types. Moreover, this enables the investigation of the effects of three-dimensional (3D) organization and architecture on tissue function. In the present study, we characterize the use of a 3D fiber deposition (3DF) technique for the fabrication of cell-laden, heterogeneous hydrogel constructs for potential use as osteochondral grafts. Changing fiber spacing or angle of fiber deposition yielded scaffolds of varying porosity and elastic modulus. We encapsulated and printed fluorescently labeled human chondrocytes and osteogenic progenitors in alginate hydrogel yielding scaffolds of 1×2 cm with different parts for both cell types. Cell viability remained high throughout the printing process, and cells remained in their compartment of the printed scaffold for the whole culture period. Moreover, distinctive tissue formation was observed, both in vitro after 3 weeks and in vivo (6 weeks subcutaneously in immunodeficient mice), at different locations within one construct. These results demonstrate the possibility of manufacturing viable centimeter-scaled structured tissues by the 3DF technique, which could potentially be used for the repair of osteochondral defects. PMID:21854293

  5. Unusual Appearance of an Osteochondral Lesion Accompanying Medial Meniscus Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mine, Takatomo; Ihara, Koichiro; Kawamura, Hiroyuki; Date, Ryo; Chagawa, Kazuki

    2014-01-01

    An osteochondral lesion in the knee joint is caused by a focal traumatic osteochondral defect, osteochondritis dissecans, an isolated degenerative lesion, or diffuse degenerative disease. An osteochondral lesion with a cleft-like appearance accompanying medial meniscus injury is rare without trauma. We report the case of a 13-year-old boy who complained of right knee pain and swelling, with radiographic findings of an osteochondral defect. Arthroscopic inspection showed an osteochondral lesion in the medial condyle of the femur and tibial plateau accompanying a partial medial meniscus discoid tear. Partial meniscectomy was performed, and a microfracture procedure was carried out on the osteochondral defect. The patient was asymptomatic at 2 years' follow-up. This technique is a relatively easy, completely arthroscopic procedure that spares the bone and cartilage and has yielded a good clinical outcome in a skeletally immature patient who had an osteochondral lesion with a cleft-like appearance. PMID:24749028

  6. Repair Mechanism of Osteochondral Defect Promoted by Bioengineered Chondrocyte Sheet

    PubMed Central

    Kamei, Naosuke; Adachi, Nobuo; Hamanishi, Michio; Kamei, Goki; Mahmoud, Elhussein Elbadry; Nakano, Tomohiro; Iwata, Takanori; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2015-01-01

    Cell sheet engineering has developed as a remarkable method for cell transplantation. In the field of cartilage regeneration, several studies previously reported that cartilage defects could be regenerated by transplantation of a chondrocyte sheet using cell sheet engineering. However, it remains unclear how such a thin cell sheet could repair a deep cartilage defect. We, therefore, focused on the mechanism of cartilage repair using cell sheet engineering in this study. Chondrocyte sheets and synovial cell sheets were fabricated using cell sheet engineering, and these allogenic cell sheets were transplanted to cover an osteochondral defect in a rat model. Macroscopic and histological evaluation was performed at 4 and 12 weeks after transplantation. Analysis of the gene expression of each cell sheet and of the regenerated tissue at 1 week after transplantation was performed. In addition, green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic rats were used as donors (transplanted chondrocyte sheets) or recipients (osteochondral defect models) to identify the cell origin of regenerated cartilage. Cartilage repair was significantly better in the group implanted with a chondrocyte sheet than in that with a synovial cell sheet. The results of gene expression analysis suggest that the possible factor contributing to cartilage repair might be TGFβ1. Cell tracking experiments using GFP transgenic rats showed that the regenerated cartilage was largely composed of cells derived from the transplanted chondrocyte sheets. PMID:25396711

  7. Strategies for osteochondral repair: Focus on scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Seog-Jin; Mahapatra, Chinmaya; Singh, Rajendra K; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2014-01-01

    Interest in osteochondral repair has been increasing with the growing number of sports-related injuries, accident traumas, and congenital diseases and disorders. Although therapeutic interventions are entering an advanced stage, current surgical procedures are still in their infancy. Unlike other tissues, the osteochondral zone shows a high level of gradient and interfacial tissue organization between bone and cartilage, and thus has unique characteristics related to the ability to resist mechanical compression and restoration. Among the possible therapies, tissue engineering of osteochondral tissues has shown considerable promise where multiple approaches of utilizing cells, scaffolds, and signaling molecules have been pursued. This review focuses particularly on the importance of scaffold design and its role in the success of osteochondral tissue engineering. Biphasic and gradient composition with proper pore configurations are the basic design consideration for scaffolds. Surface modification is an essential technique to improve the scaffold function associated with cell regulation or delivery of signaling molecules. The use of functional scaffolds with a controllable delivery strategy of multiple signaling molecules is also considered a promising therapeutic approach. In this review, we updated the recent advances in scaffolding approaches for osteochondral tissue engineering. PMID:25343021

  8. CAN OSTEOCHONDRAL GRAFTING BE AUGMENTED WITH MICROFRACTURE IN AN EXTENDED SIZED LESION OF ARTICULAR CARTILAGE

    PubMed Central

    Lane, JG; Healey, RM; Sah, RL; Chen, AC-S; Amiel, D

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Both microfracture and osteochondral autografting procedures have been useful in treating osteochondral lesions. HYPOTHESIS Combining microfracture and osteochondral autografting procedures can extend the size of lesions which can be treated with either technique. STUDY DESIGN Descriptive laboratory study. METHODS Eight adult goats underwent osteochondral autograft transfer of a 4.5mm femoral trochlea plug into an 8mm full thickness chondral defect in the weight bearing portion of the medial femoral condyle. In the gap region surrounding the autograft, microfracture was performed. The animals were allowed normal activity until the end of the experiment at 6 months, at which time the knees were harvested. At harvest the knees were assessed grossly, and then evaluation was performed by histology and histomorphometry, biochemistry and biomechanics. One animal died at 6 wks from gastroenteritis. RESULTS The osteochondral plugs healed well, with integration of the bone and preservation of the chondral cap. The chondral gap between the host site articular cartilage and the transferred plug had decreased from 3 mm at implant to less than 0.1 mm. Histological analysis demonstrated regions of variable cartilage repair, with integration of the cartilage layer at some sites but incomplete healing at others. Histomorphometry demonstrated filling of the chondral gap to 75–85% of the normal volume. Biochemical analysis revealed greater than 90% type II collagen at most sites with some areas containing 80% type II collagen. Biomechanical indentation testing, indicated that the repaired area had variable thickness and stiffness, with a trend of increased stiffness in the bulk graft and decreased softness at the proximal microfracture interface site. CONCLUSIONS The performance of a combined microfracture and osteochondral autograft transfer (OATS) procedure to resurface a large chondral defect appears promising. Transferred cartilage tissue can successfully be

  9. Subchondral pre-solidified chitosan/blood implants elicit reproducible early osteochondral wound-repair responses including neutrophil and stromal cell chemotaxis, bone resorption and repair, enhanced repair tissue integration and delayed matrix deposition

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In this study we evaluated a novel approach to guide the bone marrow-driven articular cartilage repair response in skeletally aged rabbits. We hypothesized that dispersed chitosan particles implanted close to the bone marrow degrade in situ in a molecular mass-dependent manner, and attract more stromal cells to the site in aged rabbits compared to the blood clot in untreated controls. Methods Three microdrill hole defects, 1.4 mm diameter and 2 mm deep, were created in both knee trochlea of 30 month-old New Zealand White rabbits. Each of 3 isotonic chitosan solutions (150, 40, 10 kDa, 80% degree of deaceylation, with fluorescent chitosan tracer) was mixed with autologous rabbit whole blood, clotted with Tissue Factor to form cylindrical implants, and press-fit in drill holes in the left knee while contralateral holes received Tissue Factor or no treatment. At day 1 or day 21 post-operative, defects were analyzed by micro-computed tomography, histomorphometry and stereology for bone and soft tissue repair. Results All 3 implants filled the top of defects at day 1 and were partly degraded in situ at 21 days post-operative. All implants attracted neutrophils, osteoclasts and abundant bone marrow-derived stromal cells, stimulated bone resorption followed by new woven bone repair (bone remodeling) and promoted repair tissue-bone integration. 150 kDa chitosan implant was less degraded, and elicited more apoptotic neutrophils and bone resorption than 10 kDa chitosan implant. Drilled controls elicited a poorly integrated fibrous or fibrocartilaginous tissue. Conclusions Pre-solidified implants elicit stromal cells and vigorous bone plate remodeling through a phase involving neutrophil chemotaxis. Pre-solidified chitosan implants are tunable by molecular mass, and could be beneficial for augmented marrow stimulation therapy if the recruited stromal cells can progress to bone and cartilage repair. PMID:23324433

  10. An Unexpected Complication after Headless Compression Screw Fixation of an Osteochondral Fracture of Patella

    PubMed Central

    Aydoğmuş, Suavi; Keçeci, Tolga

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated complications associated with implant depth in headless compression screw treatment of an osteochondral fracture associated with a traumatic patellar dislocation in a 21-year-old woman. Computed tomography and X-rays showed one lateral fracture fragment measuring 25 × 16 mm. Osteosynthesis was performed with two headless compression screws. Five months later, the screws were removed because of patella-femoral implant friction. We recommend that the screw heads be embedded to a depth of at least 3 mm below the cartilage surface. Further clinical studies need to examine the variation in cartilage thickness in the fracture fragment. PMID:27051547

  11. Knee salvage procedures: The indications, techniques and outcomes of large osteochondral allografts

    PubMed Central

    Chui, Karen; Jeys, Lee; Snow, Martyn

    2015-01-01

    The overall incidence of osteochondral defect in the general population is estimated to be 15 to 30 per 100000 people. These lesions can become symptomatic causing pain, swelling and decreased function of the knee, and may eventually progress to osteoarthritis. In the young and active population, partial or total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is rarely the treatment of choice due to risk of early failure. Osteochondral allograft transplantation has been demonstrated to be a safe and effective treatment of large osteochondral and chondral defects of the knee in appropriately selected patients. The treatment reduces pain, improves function and is a viable limb salvage procedure for patients, especially young and active patients for whom TKA is not recommended. Either large dowels generated with commercially available equipment or free hand shell allografts can be implanted in more posterior lesions. Current recommendations for fresh allografts stored at 4C advise implantation within 21-28 d of procurement for optimum chondrocyte viability, following screening and testing protocols. Higher rates of successful allograft transplantation are observed in younger patients, unipolar lesions, normal or corrected malalignment, and defects that are treated within 12 mo of symptom onset. Patients with bipolar lesions, uncorrectable malalignment, advanced osteoarthritis, and those over 40 tend to have less favourable outcomes. PMID:25893177

  12. Osteochondral Allografts in the Ankle Joint

    PubMed Central

    Vannini, Francesca; Buda, Roberto; Ruffilli, Alberto; Cavallo, Marco; Giannini, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this systematic review is to report about the clinical use of partial and total fresh osteochondral allograft in the ankle joint. The state of the art of allografts with regard to basic science, procurement and storage methods, immunogenicity, generally accepted indications and contraindications, and the rationale of the allografting procedure have been described. Methods: All studies published in PubMed from 2000 to January 2012 addressing fresh osteochondral allograft procedures in the ankle joint were identified, including those that fulfilled the following criteria: (a) level I-IV evidence addressing the areas of interest outlined above; (b) measures of functional, clinical, or imaging outcome; and (c) outcome related to ankle cartilage lesions or ankle arthritis treated by allografts. Results: The analysis showed a progressively increasing number of articles from 2000. The number of selected articles was 14; 9 of those focused on limited dimension allografts (plugs, partial) and 5 on bipolar fresh osteochondral allografts. The evaluation of evidence level showed 14 case series and no randomized studies. Conclusions: Fresh osteochondral allografts are now a versatile and suitable option for the treatment of different degrees of osteochondral disease in the ankle joint and may even be used as total joint replacement. Fresh osteochondral allografts used for total joint replacement are still experimental and might be considered as a salvage procedure in otherwise unsolvable situations. A proper selection of the patients is therefore a key point. Moreover, the patients should be adequately informed about the possible risks, benefits, and alternatives to the allograft procedure. PMID:26069666

  13. Hip Arthroscopic Osteochondral Autologous Transplantation for Treating Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Femoral Head

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Takanori; Utsunomiya, Hajime; Watanuki, Makoto; Hayashi, Hidetoshi; Sakai, Akinori; Uchida, Soshi

    2015-01-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the femoral head is not a common source of hip pain. Hip arthroscopy is becoming a more frequent indication for intra-articular pathologies of the hip. Osteochondral autologous transplantation is a promising technique that theoretically can reconstruct osteochondral lesions of the femoral head. We describe our technique for arthroscopic antegrade osteochondral autologous transplantation for the treatment of OCD of the femoral head. The advantages of this technique include that it is a less invasive method with the ability to assess and treat intra-articular pathologies associated with OCD of the femoral head at same time. Case series and outcomes after this technique are not currently reported in the literature; however, it could be a less invasive method and provide favorable clinical outcomes for patients with OCD lesions of the femoral head. PMID:26870645

  14. Coupling of a locally implanted rare-earth ion ensemble to a superconducting micro-resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Wisby, I. Tzalenchuk, A. Ya.; Graaf, S. E. de; Adamyan, A.; Kubatkin, S. E.; Gwilliam, R.; Meeson, P. J.; Lindström, T.

    2014-09-08

    We demonstrate the coupling of rare-earth ions locally implanted in a substrate (Gd{sup 3+} in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) to a superconducting NbN lumped-element micro-resonator. The hybrid device is fabricated by a controlled ion implantation of rare-earth ions in well-defined micron-sized areas, aligned to lithographically defined micro-resonators. The technique does not degrade the internal quality factor of the resonators which remain above 10{sup 5}. Using microwave absorption spectroscopy, we observe electron-spin resonances in good agreement with numerical modelling and extract corresponding coupling rates of the order of 1 MHz and spin linewidths of 50–65 MHz.

  15. Mechanical effects of surgical procedures on osteochondral grafts elucidated by osmotic loading and real-time ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Osteochondral grafts have become popular for treating small, isolated and full-thickness cartilage lesions. It is recommended that a slightly oversized, rather than an exact-sized, osteochondral plug is transplanted to achieve a tight fit. Consequently, impacting forces are required to insert the osteochondral plug into the recipient site. However, it remains controversial whether these impacting forces affect the biomechanical condition of the grafted articular cartilage. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanical effects of osteochondral plug implantation using osmotic loading and real-time ultrasound. Methods A full-thickness cylindrical osteochondral defect (diameter, 3.5 mm; depth, 5 mm) was created in the lateral lower quarter of the patella. Using graft-harvesting instruments, an osteochondral plug (diameter, 3.5 mm as exact-size or 4.5 mm as oversize; depth, 5 mm) was harvested from the lateral upper quarter of the patella and transplanted into the defect. Intact patella was used as a control. The samples were monitored by real-time ultrasound during sequential changes of the bathing solution from 0.15 M to 2 M saline (shrinkage phase) and back to 0.15 M saline (swelling phase). For cartilage sample assessment, three indices were selected, namely the change in amplitude from the cartilage surface (amplitude recovery rate: ARR) and the maximum echo shifts from the cartilage surface and the cartilage-bone interface. Results The ARR is closely related to the cartilage surface integrity, while the echo shifts from the cartilage surface and the cartilage-bone interface are closely related to tissue deformation and NaCl diffusion, respectively. The ARR values of the oversized plugs were significantly lower than those of the control and exact-sized plugs. Regarding the maximum echo shifts from the cartilage surface and the cartilage-bone interface, no significant differences were observed among the three groups. Conclusions These findings

  16. Traumatic Osteochondral Injury of the Femoral Head Treated by Mosaicplasty: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Shindle, Michael K.; Buly, Robert L.; Kelly, Bryan T.; Lorich, Dean G.

    2010-01-01

    The increased risk of symptomatic progression towards osteoarthritis after chondral damage has led to the development of multiple treatment options for cartilage repair. These procedures have evolved from arthroscopic lavage and debridement, to marrow stimulation techniques, and more recently, to osteochondral autograft and allograft transplants, and autogenous chondrocyte implantation. The success of mosaicplasty procedures in the knee has led to its application to other surfaces, including the talus, tibial plateau, patella, and humeral capitellum. In this report, we present two cases of a chondral defect to the femoral head after a traumatic hip dislocation, treated with an osteochondral autograft (OATS) from the ipsilateral knee, and the inferior femoral head, respectively, combined with a surgical dislocation of the hip. At greater than 1 year and greater than 5 years of follow-up, MRI studies have demonstrated good autograft incorporation with maintenance of articular surface conformity, and both patients clinically continue to have no pain and full active range of motion of their respective hips. In our opinion, treatment of osteochondral defects in the femoral head surface using a surgical dislocation combined with an OATS procedure is a promising approach, as full exposure of the femoral head can be obtained while preserving its vasculature, thus enabling adequate restoration of the articular cartilage surface. PMID:21886541

  17. Evaluation of a press-fit osteochondral poly(ester-urethane) scaffold in a rabbit defect model.

    PubMed

    Dresing, Iska; Zeiter, Stephan; Auer, Jörg; Alini, Mauro; Eglin, David

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact on osteochondral healing of press-fitted multiphasic osteochondral scaffolds consisting of poly(ester-urethane) (PUR) and hydroxyapatite into a cylindric osteochondral defect in the distal non-weight bearing femoral trochlear ridge of the rabbit. Two scaffolds were investigated, one with and one without an intermediate microporous membrane between the cartilage and the bone compartment of the scaffold. A control group without a scaffold placed into the defect was included. After 12 weeks macroscopic and histomorphological analyses were performed. The scaffold was easily press-fitted and provided a stable matrix for tissue repair. The membrane did not demonstrate a detrimental effect on tissue healing compared with the scaffold without membrane. However, the control group had statistically superior healing as reflected by histological differences in the cartilage and subchondral bone compartment between control group and each scaffold group. A more detailed analysis revealed that the difference was localized in the bone compartment healing. The present study demonstrates that an elastomeric PUR scaffold can easily be press-fitted into an osteochondral defect and provides a stable matrix for tissue repair. However, the multi-phasic scaffold did not provide a clear advantage for tissue healing. Future investigations should refine especially the bone phase of the implant to increase its stiffness, biocompatibility and osteoconductive activity. A more precise fabrication technique would be necessary for the matching of tissue organisation. PMID:24668269

  18. Osteochondral defects in the ankle: why painful?

    PubMed Central

    Reilingh, Mikel L.; Zengerink, Maartje; van Bergen, Christiaan J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Osteochondral defects of the ankle can either heal and remain asymptomatic or progress to deep ankle pain on weight bearing and formation of subchondral bone cysts. The development of a symptomatic OD depends on various factors, including the damage and insufficient repair of the subchondral bone plate. The ankle joint has a high congruency. During loading, compressed cartilage forces its water into the microfractured subchondral bone, leading to a localized high increased flow and pressure of fluid in the subchondral bone. This will result in local osteolysis and can explain the slow development of a subchondral cyst. The pain does not arise from the cartilage lesion, but is most probably caused by repetitive high fluid pressure during walking, which results in stimulation of the highly innervated subchondral bone underneath the cartilage defect. Understanding the natural history of osteochondral defects could lead to the development of strategies for preventing progressive joint damage. PMID:20151110

  19. Matching osteochondritis dissecans lesions in identical twin brothers.

    PubMed

    Richie, Lucas B; Sytsma, Mark J

    2013-09-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans is a disorder of unknown etiology that can result in fragmentation of osteochondral surfaces, most commonly of the knee, shoulder, elbow, and ankle. This may lead to sequelae of pain and an inability to participate in desired activities. Multiple theories exist as to the true cause of the disorder, but none have been fully proven. One such proposed etiology is genetic causation. Familial cases of osteochondritis dissecans are rare, yet these cases offer support to growing evidence that may support a genetic link. This article describes osteochondritis dissecans lesions of the femoral trochlea in monozygotic (identical) twins. Both twins presented with similar symptoms 1 year apart. Neither twin had any clear inciting trauma. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed osteochondral lesions in similar positions of the lateral trochlear of the same knee in both brothers. Osteochondral autograft transfer and tibial tubercle anteromedialization were performed on both patients. An identical postoperative protocol was followed, and recovery with full return to sport was comparable for the brothers. To the authors' knowledge, only 1 other case report exists of osteochondritis dissecans lesions in monozygotic twins. Although debate continues regarding the true etiology of this disorder, cases of identical twins presenting with a similar disease process are highly suggestive of a genetic component and may lead to early identification and treatment of these lesions. Continued research in the area of osteochondritis dissecans and its genetic basis is needed to completely understand this disorder. PMID:24025016

  20. Osteochondritis dissecans on the medial aspect of the humeral head

    PubMed Central

    Mima, Yuichiro; Matsumura, Noboru; Ogawa, Kiyohisa; Iwamoto, Takuji; Ochi, Kensuke; Sato, Kazuki; Toyama, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    The case of a 29-year-old man who had osteochondritis dissecans on the medial aspect of the humeral head is reported. Repetitive micro-trauma at a low elevated arm position was thought to have induced the osteochondral lesion. PMID:27186062

  1. Recent progress in interfacial tissue engineering approaches for osteochondral defects.

    PubMed

    Castro, Nathan J; Hacking, S Adam; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2012-08-01

    This review provides a brief synopsis of the anatomy and physiology of the osteochondral interface, scaffold-based and non-scaffold based approaches for engineering both tissues independently as well as recent developments in the manufacture of gradient constructs. Novel manufacturing techniques and nanotechnology will be discussed with potential application in osteochondral interfacial tissue engineering. PMID:22677924

  2. TruFit Plug for Repair of Osteochondral Defects—Where Is the Evidence? Systematic Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Clockaerts, S.; Van Osch, G.J.V.M.; Somville, J.; Verdonk, P.; Mertens, P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Treatment of osteochondral defects remains a challenge in orthopedic surgery. The TruFit plug has been investigated as a potential treatment method for osteochondral defects. This is a biphasic scaffold designed to stimulate cartilage and subchondral bone formation. The aim of this study is to investigate clinical, radiological, and histological efficacy of the TruFit plug in restoring osteochondral defects in the joint. Design: We performed a systematic search in five databases for clinical trials in which patients were treated with a TruFit plug for osteochondral defects. Studies had to report clinical, radiological, or histological outcome data. Quality of the included studies was assessed. Results: Five studies describe clinical results, all indicating improvement at follow-up of 12 months compared to preoperative status. However, two studies reporting longer follow-up show deterioration of early improvement. Radiological evaluation indicates favorable MRI findings regarding filling of the defect and incorporation with adjacent cartilage at 24 months follow-up, but conflicting evidence exists on the properties of the newly formed overlying cartilage surface. None of the included studies showed evidence for bone ingrowth. The few histological data available confirmed these results. Conclusion: There are no data available that support superiority or equality of TruFit compared to conservative treatment or mosaicplasty/microfracture. Further investigation is needed to improve synthetic biphasic implants as therapy for osteochondral lesions. Randomized controlled clinical trials comparing TruFit plugs with an established treatment method are needed before further clinical use can be supported. PMID:26069706

  3. Dysplasia Epiphysealis Hemimelica Treated with Osteochondral Allograft: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, Chris A.; Wolf, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Dysplasia epiphysealis hemimelica (DEH), or Trevor's disease, is a developmental disorder of the pediatric skeleton characterized by asymmetric osteochondral overgrowth. Methods We present the case of a five year old boy with a two year history of right knee pain and evidence of DEH on imaging who underwent initial arthroscopic resection of his lesion with subsequent recurrence. The patient then underwent osteochondral allograft revision surgery and was asymptomatic at two year follow-up with a congruent joint surface. Results To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a DEH lesion treated with osteochondral allograft and also the youngest reported case of osteochondral allograft placement in the literature. Conclusions Osteochondral allograft may be a viable option in DEH and other deformities of the pediatric knee. Level of Evidence Level V PMID:26361443

  4. OSTEOCHONDRAL INTERFACE REGENERATION OF THE RABBIT KNEE WITH MACROSCOPIC GRADIENTS OF BIOACTIVE SIGNALS

    PubMed Central

    Dormer, Nathan H.; Singh, Milind; Zhao, Liang; Mohan, Neethu; Berkland, Cory J.; Detamore, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    To date, most interfacial tissue engineering approaches have utilized stratified designs, in which there are two or more discrete layers comprising the interface. Continuously-graded interfacial designs, where there is no discrete transition from one tissue type to another, are gaining attention as an alternative to stratified designs. Given that osteochondral regeneration holds the potential to enhance cartilage regeneration by leveraging the healing capacity of the underlying bone, we endeavored to introduce a continuously graded approach to osteochondral regeneration. The purpose of this study was thus to evaluate the performance of a novel gradient-based scaffolding approach to regenerate osteochondral defects in the New Zealand White rabbit femoral condyle. Bioactive plugs were constructed from poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres with a continuous gradient transition between cartilage-promoting and bone-promoting growth factors. At six and 12 weeks of healing, results suggested that the implants provided support for the neo-synthesized tissue, and the gradient in bioactive signaling may have been beneficial for bone and cartilage regeneration compared to the blank control implant, as evidenced by histology. In addition, the effects of pre-seeding gradient scaffolds with umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells (UCMSCs) from the Wharton’s jelly of New Zealand White rabbits were evaluated. Results indicated that there may be regenerative benefits to pre-localizing UCMSCs within scaffold interiors. The inclusion of bioactive factors in a gradient-based scaffolding design is a promising new treatment strategy for defect repair in the femoral condyle. PMID:22009693

  5. Cartilage repair: A review of Stanmore experience in the treatment of osteochondral defects in the knee with various surgical techniques

    PubMed Central

    Vijayan, S; Bentley, G; Briggs, TWR; Skinner, JA; Carrington, RWJ; Pollock, R; Flanagan, AM

    2010-01-01

    Articular cartilage damage in the young adult knee, if left untreated, it may proceed to degenerative osteoarthritis and is a serious cause of disability and loss of function. Surgical cartilage repair of an osteochondral defect can give the patient significant relief from symptoms and preserve the functional life of the joint. Several techniques including bone marrow stimulation, cartilage tissue based therapy, cartilage cell seeded therapies and osteotomies have been described in the literature with varying results. Established techniques rely mainly on the formation of fibro-cartilage, which has been shown to degenerate over time due to shear forces. The implantation of autologous cultured chondrocytes into an osteochondral defect, may replace damaged cartilage with hyaline or hyaline-like cartilage. This clinical review assesses current surgical techniques and makes recommendations on the most appropriate method of cartilage repair when managing symptomatic osteochondral defects of the knee. We also discuss the experience with the technique of autologous chondrocyte implantation at our institution over the past 11 years. PMID:20697474

  6. Cartilage Repair and Subchondral Bone Migration Using 3D Printing Osteochondral Composites: A One-Year-Period Study in Rabbit Trochlea

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dichen; Wang, Kunzheng; Hao, Dingjun; Bian, Weiguo; He, Jiankang; Jin, Zhongmin

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidences show that subchondral bone may play a significant role in the repair or progression of cartilage damage in situ. However, the exact change of subchondral bone during osteochondral repair is still poorly understood. In this paper, biphasic osteochondral composite scaffolds were fabricated by 3D printing technology using PEG hydrogel and β-TCP ceramic and then implanted in rabbit trochlea within a critical size defect model. Animals were euthanized at 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, and 52 weeks after implantation. Histological results showed that hyaline-like cartilage formed along with white smooth surface and invisible margin at 24 weeks postoperatively, typical tidemark formation at 52 weeks. The repaired subchondral bone formed from 16 to 52 weeks in a “flow like” manner from surrounding bone to the defect center gradually. Statistical analysis illustrated that both subchondral bone volume and migration area percentage were highly correlated with the gross appearance Wayne score of repaired cartilage. Therefore, subchondral bone migration is related to cartilage repair for critical size osteochondral defects. Furthermore, the subchondral bone remodeling proceeds in a “flow like” manner and repaired cartilage with tidemark implies that the biphasic PEG/β-TCP composites fabricated by 3D printing provides a feasible strategy for osteochondral tissue engineering application. PMID:25177697

  7. Modeling of the Near Field Coupling Between an External Loop and an Implantable Spiral Chip Antennas in Biosensor Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the near field coupling between an external hand-held loop antenna and an implantable miniature (1x1 mm) printed square spiral chip antenna used in bio-MEMS sensors for contact-less powering and RF telemetry is investigated. The loop and the spiral are inductively coupled and effectively form a transformer. The numerical results include the quasi-stationary magnetic field pattern of the implanted antenna, near zone wave impedance as a function of the radial distance and the values of the lumped elements in the equivalent circuit model for the transformer.

  8. Reliable coupling of orthodontic elements to mini-implants: An in-vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Björn; Zipprich, Holger; Gebel, Britta; Piller, Ben; Antoszewska, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the reliability of mechanical and adhesive methods of fixing rectangular wires in the cross-slot of a mini-implant. Materials and Methods: A twin-hooked wire element was placed and fixed in the slot of a mini-implant via a NiTi spring under tension, or by means of an adhesive. For the purpose of mechanical anchorage, the wire was crimped with a special crimping tool to increase its thickness and prevent it from slipping through the slot. Before applying the adhesive, there were four possible methods of preparation: Untreated Wire (Adh. 1); ROCATEC-Pre (Adh. 2); ROCATEC-PRE + Espe Sil (Adh. 3); ROCATEC-PRE + ROCATEC-PLUS + Espe Sil (Adh. 4). The mechanical fixing and two adhesive fixings were aged by means of temperature change (500 cycles). A Zwick universal testing machine was used to measure the maximum strength of the coupling. Results: In all tests, the untreated wire + adhesive withstood the lowest maximum load (Ø 3 N and 10.8 N respectively) and failed the aging test after a maximum of eight cycles. The wires in test group Adh. 4 withstood the highest maximum load (Ø 43.3 N; 41.5 N; 45.9 N after aging) in all tests. The average load withstood by the crimped ligature was 38.7 N. Conclusion: The adhesive method of fixation performs best when the rectangular wire is sand blasted and silanized before application. The mechanical coupling using the crimped ligature is reliable. PMID:24987620

  9. Osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    van Bergen, Christiaan JA; van den Ende, Kimberly IM; ten Brinke, Bart; Eygendaal, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) is a disorder of articular cartilage and subchondral bone. In the elbow, an OCD is localized most commonly at the humeral capitellum. Teenagers engaged in sports that involve repetitive stress on the elbow are at risk. A high index of suspicion is warranted to prevent delay in the diagnosis. Plain radiographs may disclose the lesion but computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are more accurate in the detection of OCD. To determine the best treatment option it is important to differentiate between stable and unstable OCD lesions. Stable lesions can be initially treated nonoperatively with elbow rest or activity modification and physical therapy. Unstable lesions and stable lesions not responding to conservative therapy require a surgical approach. Arthroscopic debridement and microfracturing has become the standard initial procedure for treatment of capitellar OCD. Numerous other surgical options have been reported, including internal fixation of large fragments and osteochondral autograft transfer. The aim of this article is to provide a current concepts review of the etiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes of elbow OCD. PMID:26925381

  10. Osteochondritis dissecans of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Campos, P S F; Freitas, C E; Pena, N; Gonzalez, M O D; Almeida, S M; Mariz, A C R; Lorens, F G L

    2005-05-01

    A case is reported of a 43-year-old female patient presenting bilateral osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), in different stages for each side, associated with avascular necrosis (AVN) of the right condyle. Additionally observed was anterior disk displacement without reduction for both sides. We have proposed an adaptation of the previous classification of OCD for cases affecting the TMJ. We have also stressed the fundamental role of panoramic radiography on the diagnosis of stage 3 and stage 4 OCD of the TMJ. In relation to MRI, we have recommended sagittal (slice thickness of 2 mm) and coronal (slice thickness of 1 mm) fast spin-echo proton density-weighted sequences to better identify bone lesions (stage 1 and 2) and also localize osteochondral loose bodies; and coronal (slice thickness of 1 mm) fat-suppressed fast spin-echo T2 weighted sequence to better evaluate OCD (stable or unstable) and the features of the occasionally associated AVN (acute or chronic). PMID:15897292

  11. Treatment of osteochondral injuries with platelet gel

    PubMed Central

    Danieli, Marcus Vinicius; da Rosa Pereira, Hamilton; de Sá Carneiro, Carlos Augusto; Felisbino, Sérgio Luiz; Deffune, Elenice

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Treatments for injured articular cartilage have not advanced to the point that efficient regeneration is possible. However, there has been an increase in the use of platelet-rich plasma for the treatment of several orthopedic disorders, including chondral injuries. Our hypothesis is that the treatment of chondral injuries with platelet gel results in higher-quality repair tissue after 180 days compared with chondral injuries not treated with gel. METHODS: A controlled experimental laboratory study was performed on 30 male rabbits to evaluate osteochondral injury repair after treatment with or without platelet gel. Osteochondral injuries were surgically induced in both knees of each rabbit at the medial femoral condyle. The left knee injury was filled with the platelet gel, and the right knee was not treated. Microscopic analysis of both knee samples was performed after 180 days using a histological grading scale. RESULTS: The only histological evaluation criterion that was not significantly different between treatments was metachromasia. The group that was treated with platelet gel exhibited superior results in all other criteria (cell morphology, surface regularity, chondral thickness and repair tissue integration) and in the total score. CONCLUSION: The repair tissue was histologically superior after 180 days in the study group treated with platelet gel compared with the group of untreated injuries. PMID:25518022

  12. Treatment of unstable osteochondritis dissecans in adults with autogenous osteochondral grafts (Mosaicplasty): long-term results

    PubMed Central

    RONGA, MARIO; STISSI, PLACIDO; LA BARBERA, GIUSEPPE; VALOROSO, MARCO; ANGERETTI, GLORIA; GENOVESE, EUGENIO; CHERUBINO, PAOLO

    2015-01-01

    Purpose the unstable osteochondritis dissecans (OCD-type II and III according to the ICRS classification) of the knee largher than > 2.5 cm2 in adults are uncommon lesions and there is no consensus on how to treat them. Medium-term studies have reported good results using autogenous osteochondral plugs (mosaicplasty). The aim of this study is to analyze the long-term results of this technique for the treatment of unstable OCD in a selected group of adult patients. Methods four patients with OCD at either one of the femoral condyles were included in this prospective study. The average age was 21.2 years (range, 18–24 years). The OCD lesions were classified as type II in three patients and type III in one patient and the average size was 3.8 cm2 (range, 2.55–5.1 cm2). The lesions were treated in situ with a variable number of autogenous osteochondral plugs (Ø 4.5 mm2). The Modified Cincinnati, Lysholm II and Tegner scores were used for clinical and functional evaluation. Magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) was performed before surgery and at 2, 5 and 10 years after surgery. A modified MOCART score was used to evaluate MRA findings. Results the average follow-up duration was ten years and 6 months (range, 10–11 years). No complications occurred. At the final follow-up, all scores (clinical, functional and MOCART) improved. In all but one of the patients MRA showed complete osteochondral repair. Conclusions the fixation of large and unstable OCD lesions with mosaicplasty may be a good option for treating type II or III OCD lesions in adults. The advantages of this technique include stable fixation, promotion of blood supply to the base of the OCD fragment, and grafting of autologous cancellous bone that stimulates healing with preservation of the articular surface. Level of evidence Level IV, therapeutic case series. PMID:26904522

  13. Ectopic osteochondral formation of biomimetic porous PVA-n-HA/PA6 bilayered scaffold and BMSCs construct in rabbit.

    PubMed

    Qu, Dan; Li, Jihua; Li, Yubao; Khadka, Ashish; Zuo, Yi; Wang, Hang; Liu, Yiming; Cheng, Lin

    2011-01-01

    In this work, the novel poly vinyl alcohol/gelatin-nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide6 (PVA-n-HA/PA6) bilayered scaffold with biomimetic properties for articular cartilage and subchondral bone is developed. Furthermore, when these osteochondral scaffolds were seeded with induced bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) and implanted at ectopic sites, showed the potential for an engineered cartilage tissue and the corresponding subchondral bone. BMSCs were expanded in vitro and induced to chondrogenic or osteogenic potential by culturing in suitable media for 14 days. Subsequently, these induced cells were seeded into PVA-n-HA/PA6 separately, and the constructs were implanted into the rabbit muscle pouch for upto 12 weeks. Ectopic neocartilage formation in the PVA layer and reconstitution of the subchondral bone which remained confined within the n-HA/PA6 layer with the alteration of the cellular phenotype were identified with Masson's trichrome stain. Simultaneously, the RT-PCR results confirmed the expression of specific extracellular matrix (ECM) markers for cartilaginous tissue, such as collagen type II (Col-II), or alternatively, markers for osteoid tissue, such as collagen type I (Col-I) at the corresponding layers. During ectopic implantation, the underlying subchondral bone layer was completely integrated with the cartilage layer. The result from the ectopic osteochondral scaffolds implantation suggests that PVA-n-HA/PA6 with induced BMSCs is a possible substitute with potential in cartilage repair strategies. PMID:20967773

  14. The effect of platform switching on the levels of metal ion release from different implant-abutment couples.

    PubMed

    Alrabeah, Ghada O; Knowles, Jonathan C; Petridis, Haralampos

    2016-01-01

    The improved peri-implant bone response demonstrated by platform switching may be the result of reduced amounts of metal ions released to the surrounding tissues. The aim of this study was to compare the levels of metal ions released from platform-matched and platform-switched implant-abutment couples as a result of accelerated corrosion. Thirty-six titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) and cobalt-chrome alloy abutments were coupled with titanium cylinders forming either platform-switched or platform-matched groups (n=6). In addition, 18 unconnected samples served as controls. The specimens were subjected to accelerated corrosion by static immersion in 1% lactic acid for 1 week. The amount of metal ions ion of each test tube was measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and energy dispersive spectroscopy X-ray analyses were performed pre- and post-immersion to assess corrosion at the interface. The platform-matched groups demonstrated higher ion release for vanadium, aluminium, cobalt, chrome, and molybdenum compared with the platform-switched groups (P<0.05). Titanium was the highest element to be released regardless of abutment size or connection (P<0.05). SEM images showed pitting corrosion prominent on the outer borders of the implant and abutment platform surfaces. In conclusion, implant-abutment couples underwent an active corrosion process resulting in metal ions release into the surrounding environment. The highest amount of metal ions released was recorded for the platform-matched groups, suggesting that platform-switching concept has a positive effect in reducing the levels of metal ion release from the implant-abutment couples. PMID:27357323

  15. Design and characterization of a tissue-engineered bilayer scaffold for osteochondral tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Giannoni, Paolo; Lazzarini, Erica; Ceseracciu, Luca; Barone, Alberto C; Quarto, Rodolfo; Scaglione, Silvia

    2015-10-01

    Treatment of full-thickness cartilage defects relies on osteochondral bilayer grafts, which mimic the microenvironment and structure of the two affected tissues: articular cartilage and subchondral bone. However, the integrity and stability of the grafts are hampered by the presence of a weak interphase, generated by the layering processes of scaffold manufacturing. We describe here the design and development of a bilayer monolithic osteochondral graft, avoiding delamination of the two distinct layers but preserving the cues for selective generation of cartilage and bone. A highly porous polycaprolactone-based graft was obtained by combining solvent casting/particulate leaching techniques. Pore structure and interconnections were designed to favour in vivo vascularization only at the bony layer. Hydroxyapatite granules were added as bioactive signals at the site of bone regeneration. Unconfined compressive tests displayed optimal elastic properties and low residual deformation of the graft after unloading (< 3%). The structural integrity of the graft was successfully validated by tension fracture tests, revealing high resistance to delamination, since fractures were never displayed at the interface of the layers (n = 8). Ectopic implantation of grafts in nude mice, after seeding with bovine trabecular bone-derived mesenchymal stem cells and bovine articular chondrocytes, resulted in thick areas of mature bone surrounding ceramic granules within the bony layer, and a cartilaginous alcianophilic matrix in the chondral layer. Vascularization was mostly observed in the bony layer, with a statistically significant higher blood vessel density and mean area. Thus, the easily generated osteochondral scaffolds, since they are mechanically and biologically functional, are suitable for tissue-engineering applications for cartilage repair. PMID:23172816

  16. Novel nanostructured scaffold for osteochondral regeneration: pilot study in horses.

    PubMed

    Kon, E; Mutini, A; Arcangeli, E; Delcogliano, M; Filardo, G; Nicoli Aldini, N; Pressato, D; Quarto, R; Zaffagnini, S; Marcacci, M

    2010-06-01

    The present in vivo preliminary experiment is aimed at testing mechanical and biological behaviour of a new nano-structured composite multilayer biomimetic scaffold for the treatment of chondral and osteochondral defects. The three-dimensional biomimetic scaffold (Fin-Ceramica Faenza S.p.A., Faenza-Italy) was obtained by nucleating collagen fibrils with hydroxyapatite nanoparticles, in two configurations, bi- and tri-layered, to reproduce, respectively, chondral and osteochondral anatomy. Chondral defects (lateral condyle) and deep osteochondral defects (medial condyle) were made in the distal epiphysis of the third metacarpal bone of both forelimbs of two adult horses and treated respectively with the chondral and osteochondral grafts. Both animals were euthanised six months follow up. The images obtained at the second look arthroscopy evaluation, performed two months after surgery, demonstrated good filling of the chondral and osteo-chondral defects without any inflammatory reaction around and inside the lesions. At the histological analysis the growth of trabecular bone in the osteochondral lesion was evident. Only in one case, the whole thickness of the osteochondral lesion was filled by fibrocartilaginous tissue. The formation of a tidemark line was evident at the interface with the newly formed bone. Newly formed fibrocartilaginous tissue was present in the area of the chondral defect. Initial alignment of the collagen fibres was recognisable with polarised light in both groups. The results of the present pilot study showed that this novel osteochondral and chondral scaffold may act as a suitable matrix to facilitate orderly regeneration of bone and hyaline-like cartilage. PMID:20049745

  17. Effect of tenascin-C on the repair of full-thickness osteochondral defects of articular cartilage in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Ikemura, Shigeto; Hasegawa, Masahiro; Iino, Takahiro; Miyamoto, Keiichi; Imanaka-Yoshida, Kyoko; Yoshida, Toshimichi; Sudo, Akihiro

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of tenascin-C (TNC) on the repair of full-thickness osteochondral defects of articular cartilage in vivo. We used a gellan-gellan-sulfate sponge (Gellan-GS) to maintain a TNC-rich environment in the cartilage defects. We implanted Gellan-GS soaked in PBS only (Group 1), Gellan-GS soaked in 10 µg/ml of TNC (Group 2), and Gellan-GS soaked in 100 µg/ml of TNC (Group 3) into a full-thickness osteochondral defect of the patellar groove of rabbits. The defect area was examined grossly and histologically 4-12 weeks after surgery. Sections of synovium were also immunohistochemically investigated. Histologically as well as macroscopically, the defects in Group 2 showed better repair than the other groups at 8 and 12 weeks after surgery. Inflammation of the synovium tended to diminish over time in all groups, and the degree of synovitis was the same for all three groups at each time point. In conclusion, Gellan-GS soaked in TNC can be used as a novel scaffold for the repair of articular cartilage defects. This study also indicates that TNC promotes the repair of full-thickness osteochondral defects in vivo. PMID:25428773

  18. Osteochondritis dissecans of the lateral femoral condyle in a patient affected by osteogenesis imperfecta: a case report.

    PubMed

    Persiani, Pietro; Di Domenica, Marica; Martini, Lorena; Ranaldi, Filippo M; Zambrano, Anna; Celli, Mauro; Villani, Ciro

    2015-11-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans is a very uncommon phenomenon in osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). A 14-year-old boy, affected by OI and followed in our Center for Congenital Osteodystrophies, had a knee trauma and MRI indicated a hollowed area of 2.5×1.5 cm in the lateral femoral condyle, which was classified as grade III. The patient underwent surgery, performed as a one-step surgical treatment: the osteochondral fragment was removed, curettage of lesion's bottom was performed, and a biphasic scaffold was used to fill the defect, implanted with a press-fit technique. MRI at 12 and 24 months after surgery showed scaffold integration. At the final follow-up, the patient did not feel any pain or articular limitations. It is difficult to provide a guideline on osteochondritis dissecans in patients affected by OI because of the lack of literature reports on this rare disorder in a rare disease. According to our experience, in these patients, osteosynthesis of the bone fragment and the use of autograft are not recommended because of the patient's bone weakness and osteoporosis. Moreover, compared with two-step surgery, one-step surgery is preferred to reduce the risk related to anesthesia, often observed to be higher in these patients. PMID:25919806

  19. Osteochondral Allograft Transplantation in the Knee.

    PubMed

    Zouzias, Ioannis C; Bugbee, William D

    2016-06-01

    The technique of osteochondral allograft (OCA) transplantation has been used to treat a wide spectrum of cartilage deficiencies in the knee. Its use has been supported by basic science and clinical studies that show it is a safe and effective treatment option. What sets fresh OCA transplantation apart from other cartilage procedures in the knee, is the ability to treat large defects with mature hyaline cartilage. Studies looking at transplantation of fresh OCAs in the general population have shown reliable pain relief and return to activities of daily living. Reports of cartilage injuries in athletes have risen over the years and more research is needed in evaluating the successfulness of OCA transplantation in the athletic population. PMID:27135291

  20. Emerging genetic basis of osteochondritis dissecans

    PubMed Central

    Bates, J. Tyler; Jacobs, John C.; Shea, Kevin G.; Oxford, Julia Thom

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies provide an unbiased approach in the identification of genes that increase the risk for osteochondritis dissecans (OCD). OCD is a disorder of the bone and cartilage that affects humans, horses, pigs, dogs, and other mammals. Recent genome-wide association studies in humans, horses, and pigs are reviewed and genes identified. The identified genes tended to cluster with respect to function and biological processes such as the protein secretion pathway, extracellular matrix molecules, and growth plate maturation. Genome-wide association studies in humans are a critical next step in the effort to provide a better understanding of the causes of OCD, which will, in turn, allow preventive strategies for treatment of adolescent and young adults who are at risk for the development of degenerative joint disease due to the effects of OCD. PMID:24698039

  1. Osteochondral Diseases and Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Frederick S.

    2016-01-01

    Osteochondrodysplasias like thanatophoric dysplasia, osteogenesis imperfecta, achondroplasia, and other genetic skeletal disorders like fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva are infrequently seen in clinical practice. In cases of sporadic achondroplasia as well as in fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva, there is a strong association with paternal age, a relationship that is less evident in other genetic osteochondral diseases. No other constitutional or environmental factor has proven to be associated with these disorders. The use of prenatal ultrasonography as a routine component of prenatal care is crucial in the early suspicion of osteochondrodysplasias whereas definitive diagnosis is usually obtained by pre-natal molecular analysis. In the case of fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva, recognition of congenital great toe malformations associated with rapidly–appearing soft tissue swelling is sufficient to make the proper clinical diagnosis, which can be confirmed by genetic testing. Large regional centres will improve diagnosis performance, provide accurate genetic counselling, and ensure an integral assistance for these often severe and incapacitating conditions. PMID:20824454

  2. Development of a Comprehensive Osteochondral Allograft MRI Scoring System (OCAMRISS) With Histopathologic, Micro–Computed Tomography, and Biomechanical Validation

    PubMed Central

    Pallante-Kichura, Andrea L.; Bae, Won C.; Du, Jiang; Statum, Sheronda; Wolfson, Tanya; Gamst, Anthony C.; Cory, Esther; Amiel, David; Bugbee, William D.; Sah, Robert L.; Chung, Christine B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe and apply a semiquantitative MRI scoring system for multifeature analysis of cartilage defect repair in the knee by osteochondral allografts and to correlate this scoring system with histopathologic, micro–computed tomography (µCT), and biomechanical reference standards using a goat repair model. Design: Fourteen adult goats had 2 osteochondral allografts implanted into each knee: one in the medial femoral condyle and one in the lateral trochlea. At 12 months, goats were euthanized and MRI was performed. Two blinded radiologists independently rated 9 primary features for each graft, including cartilage signal, fill, edge integration, surface congruity, calcified cartilage integrity, subchondral bone plate congruity, subchondral bone marrow signal, osseous integration, and presence of cystic changes. Four ancillary features of the joint were also evaluated, including opposing cartilage, meniscal tears, synovitis, and fat-pad scarring. Comparison was made with histologic and µCT reference standards as well as biomechanical measures. Interobserver agreement and agreement with reference standards was assessed. Cohen’s κ, Spearman’s correlation, and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used as appropriate. Results: There was substantial agreement (κ > 0.6, P < 0.001) for each MRI feature and with comparison against reference standards, except for cartilage edge integration (κ = 0.6). There was a strong positive correlation between MRI and reference standard scores (ρ = 0.86, P < 0.01). Osteochondral allograft MRI scoring system was sensitive to differences in outcomes between the types of allografts. Conclusions: We have described a comprehensive MRI scoring system for osteochondral allografts and have validated this scoring system with histopathologic and µCT reference standards as well as biomechanical indentation testing. PMID:24489999

  3. Osteochondral allograft transplantation in cartilage repair: Graft storage paradigm, translational models, and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Bugbee, William D; Pallante-Kichura, Andrea L; Görtz, Simon; Amiel, David; Sah, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of articular cartilage injury and disease has become an increasingly relevant part of orthopaedic care. Articular cartilage transplantation, in the form of osteochondral allografting, is one of the most established techniques for restoration of articular cartilage. Our research efforts over the last two decades have supported the transformation of this procedure from experimental "niche" status to a cornerstone of orthopaedic practice. In this Kappa Delta paper, we describe our translational and clinical science contributions to this transformation: (1) to enhance the ability of tissue banks to process and deliver viable tissue to surgeons and patients, (2) to improve the biological understanding of in vivo cartilage and bone remodeling following osteochondral allograft (OCA) transplantation in an animal model system, (3) to define effective surgical techniques and pitfalls, and (4) to identify and clarify clinical indications and outcomes. The combination of coordinated basic and clinical studies is part of our continuing comprehensive academic OCA transplant program. Taken together, the results have led to the current standards for OCA processing and storage prior to implantation and also novel observations and mechanisms of the biological and clinical behavior of OCA transplants in vivo. Thus, OCA transplantation is now a successful and increasingly available treatment for patients with disabling osteoarticular cartilage pathology. PMID:26234194

  4. Effect of tissue culture storage on the in vivo survival of canine osteochondral allografts.

    PubMed

    Oates, K M; Chen, A C; Young, E P; Kwan, M K; Amiel, D; Convery, F R

    1995-07-01

    In vitro studies in our laboratory have shown that the biomechanical and biochemical characteristics of osteochondral grafts can be preserved for as long as 28 days under tissue culture conditions. This study represents an attempt to extend these results to an in vivo model. In adult mongrel dogs, either an autograft, a fresh allograft, or a stored allograft was placed in a standardized defect on the weight-bearing surface of the medial femoral condyle. The stored grafts were kept at 4 degrees C in tissue culture medium for 14 days prior to implantation. The animals were killed at 12 weeks. Cartilage from the contralateral knee served as a control. The modulus and permeability of the cartilage were assessed with confined compression creep tests. The collagen and glycosaminoglycan contents were measured, and the cartilage was analyzed histologically with hematoxylin and eosin and safranin O stains. Grossly, the cartilage appeared viable at harvest. The histologic results were similar in the treatment groups, with the same spectrum of mild degenerative changes being noted in each group. The glycosaminoglycan content was significantly less in the autograft group than in its control group and than in the fresh allograft group. The glycosaminoglycan content did not differ significantly between fresh and stored allografts. The collagen content, modulus, and permeability did not differ either between experimental and control groups or between graft types. Our results support the conclusion that osteochondral allografts can be stored for as many as 14 days without significantly affecting the results of the procedure. PMID:7674072

  5. Short-term studies using ceramic scaffolds in lapine model for osteochondral defect amelioration.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, F B; Shenoy, Sachin; Suresh Babu, S; Varma, H K; John, Annie

    2012-06-01

    This study was undertaken to glean preliminary information on the role of triphasic ceramic coated hydroxyapatite (HASi) and biphasic (alpha-tricalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite based) calcium phosphate (BCP) for the development of osteochondral constructs. The proposed constructs were tested for performance in vitro with rabbit adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (RADMSCs) and further analysed in vivo in a lapine model for osteochondral defect amelioration. Desirable scaffolding architecture ensuring favourable conditions for cell attachment, nutrient exchange and neo-tissue organization was achieved by the synthesis of porous ceramic blocks and characterizations were carried out using x-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The cytocompatibility of the scaffold-cell combination product was evaluated using microscopy techniques that proved the scaffold to be non-cytotoxic and favourable for cell growth and proliferation. Short-term implantation studies were conducted with bare cylindrical HASi and BCP scaffolds, press fit deep into the bony bed of the median femoral condyles of the rabbit, which resulted in favourable specific in vivo response of de novo cartilage-like cells on the surface and sub-surface bony trabeculae. The generated pilot data will help to assess the severity of proposed procedures before embarking on scaled-up efforts. PMID:22406527

  6. Osteochondral repair in hemophilic ankle arthropathy: from current options to future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    BUDA, ROBERTO; CAVALLO, MARCO; CASTAGNINI, FRANCESCO; FERRANTI, ENRICO; NATALI, SIMONE; GIANNINI, SANDRO

    2015-01-01

    Young hemophilic patients are frequently affected by ankle arthropathy. At the end stage of the disease, the current treatments are arthrodesis and arthroplasty, which have significant drawbacks. Validated procedures capable of slowing down or even arresting the progression towards the end stage are currently lacking. This review aims to discuss the rationale for and feasibility of applying, in mild hemophilic ankle arthropathy, the main techniques currently used to treat osteochondral defects, focusing in particular on ankle distraction, chondrocyte implantation, mesenchymal stem cell transplantation, allograft transplantation and the use of growth factors. To date, ankle distraction is the only procedure that has been successfully used in hemophilic ankle arthropathy. The use of mesenchymal stem cells have recently been evaluated as feasible for osteochondral repair in hemophilic patients. There may be a rationale for the use of growth factors if they are combined with the previous techniques, which could be useful to arrest the progression of the degeneration or delay end-stage procedures. PMID:26904526

  7. Reconstruction of Osteochondral Defects by Combined Bone Grafting and a Bilayer Collagen Membrane as a Sandwich Technique

    PubMed Central

    Petri, Maximilian; Ettinger, Max; von Falck, Christian; Hawi, Nael; Jagodzinski, Michael; Haasper, Carl

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of osteochondral lesions of the knee remains a major challenge in orthopedic surgery. Recently established procedures like autologous chondrocyte implantation or matrix-associated chondrocyte implantation yield good results, but include the disadvantage of two-step procedures. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging outcome of repairs of osteochondral defects of the knee by a combined procedure of bone grafting and covering with a bilayer collagen membrane in a sandwich technique. Seven male patients with a mean age of 42 (range 30-55) years and symptomatic focal osteochondral lesions of the knee grade IV according to the International Cartilage Repair Society classification were included. The mean diameter of defects was 28.6 (range 15-40) mm. Results were evaluated at a minimum of 24 months after surgery by International Knee Documentation Committee score, Lysholm-score, visual analogue scale, and magnetic resonance imaging with specific cartilage sequences, evaluating the ICRS score and the Magnetic Observation of Cartilage Repair Tissue (MOCART) score. All patients judged the operation as successful. Among the patients available for the long-term follow-up, mean visual analogue scale value was 1.3 (range 0-3) out of 10 points. Mean International Knee Documentation Committee score was 80.8 (range 63.2-88.5) out of 100 points. Mean Lysholm score was 85 (range 55-95) out of 100 points. None of the patients had to be reoperated until today. Evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging using the MOCART score revealed a good correlation to the clinical outcome. This is the first study reporting results after reconstruction of osteochondral defects of the knee joint by bone grafting and a bilayer collagen membrane. This new method offers the advantage of a one-step-procedure and yields both good clinical and magnetic resonance findings. We conclude that this procedure can be a valuable tool to improve joint function

  8. COMPARATIVE MACROSCOPIC STUDY OF OSTEOCHONDRAL DEFECTS PRODUCED IN FEMURS OF RABBITS REPAIRED WITH BIOPOLYMER GEL CANE SUGAR

    PubMed Central

    de Albuquerque, Paulo Cezar Vidal Carneiro; dos Santos, Saulo Monteiro; de Andrade Aguiar, José Lamartine; Filho, Nicodemus Pontes; de Mello, Roberto José Vieira; Costa, Mariana Lúcia Correia Ramos; de Albuquerque Olbertz, Clarissa Miranda Carneiro; de Souza Almeida, Tarciana Mendonça; da Silva Santos, Alessandro Henrique; da Silva, Joacil Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the surface, coloring, consistency, continuity and healing of osteochondral defects produced in the femoral condyles of rabbits and filled with sugar cane biopolymer gel (SCBG), after 90, 120 and 180 days, and in comparison with a control group. Method: Sixteen adult New Zealand white rabbits aged 6 to 7 months, weighing between 2 and 2.5 kg and without locomotor system abnormalities were studied. In all the animals, a defect was made in the femoral condyles of the right and left knees, measuring 3.2 mm in diameter and 4 mm in depth, using a trephine. The animals were divided into two groups: study group formed by the right knees, in which the medial and lateral condyles received implants of SCBG; and control group formed by the left knees, in which the medial and lateral condyles were allowed to heal naturally. The knees were assessed 90, 120 and 180 days after the operation. After the animals had been sacrificed, the anatomical specimens were resected and placed in Bouin's solution. They were then photographed with a Nikon Coolpix 5400® coupled to a Nikon SM2800® stereoscopic loupe, to analyze the surface, coloring, consistency, continuity and healing. Results: The results were evaluated using the chi-square test. There were no significant differences in the macroscopic assessments of healing between the study and control groups. Conclusion: With regard to the surface, coloring, consistency, continuity and healing of the defects, the macroscopic appearance of the tissue repaired with SCBG was similar to that of the control group. PMID:27027057

  9. The effects of ion implantation on the tribology of perfluoropolyether-lubricated 440C stainless steel couples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shogrin, Bradley; Jones, William R., Jr.; Wilbur, Paul J.; Pilar, Herrera-Fierro; Williamson, Don L.

    1995-01-01

    The lubricating lifetime of thin films of a perfluoropolyether (PFPE) based on hexafluoropropene oxide in the presence of ion implanted 440C stainless steel is presented. Stainless steel discs, either unimplanted or implanted with N2, C, Ti, Ti + N2, or Ti + C had a thin film of PFPE (60-400 A) applied to them reproducibly (+/- 20 percent) and uniformly (+/- 15 percent) using a device developed for this study. The lifetimes of these films were quantified by measuring the number of sliding-wear cycles required to induce an increase in the friction coefficient from an initial value characteristic of the lubricated wear couple to a final, or failure value, characteristic of an unlubricated, unimplanted couple. The tests were performed in a dry nitrogen atmosphere (less than 1 percent RH) at room temperature using a 3 N normal load with a relative sliding speed of 0.05 m/s. The lubricated lifetime of the 440C couple was increased by an order of magnitude by implanting the disc with Ti. Ranked from most to least effective, the implanted species were: Ti; Ti+C; unimplanted; N2; C approximately equals Ti+N2. The mechanism postulated to explain these results involves the formation of a passivating or reactive layer which inhibits or facilitates the production of active sites. The corresponding surface microstructures induced by ion implantation, obtained using x-ray diffraction and conversion electron Mossbauer spectroscopy, ranked from most to least effective in enhancing lubricant lifetime were: amorphous Fe-Cr-Ti; amorphous Fe-Cr-Ti-C + TiC; unimplanted; epsilon-(Fe,Cr)(sub x)N, x = 2 or 3; amorphous Fe-Cr-C approximately equals amorphous Fe-Cr-Ti-N.

  10. Fluoroquinolone Use in a Child Associated with Development of Osteochondritis Dissecans

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, John; Shea, Kevin; Oxford, Julia; Carey, James

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Several etiological theories have been proposed for the development of osteochondritis dissecans. Cartilage toxicity after fluoroquinolone use has been well documented in vitro. We present a case report of a 10-year-old child who underwent a prolonged 18-month course of ciprofloxacin therapy for chronic urinary tract infections. This patient later developed an osteochondritis dissecans lesion of the medial femoral condyle. We hypothesize that the fluoroquinolone therapy disrupted normal endochondral ossification, resulting in development of osteochondritis dissecans. The etiology of osteochondritis dissecans is still unclear, and this case describes an association between fluoroquinolone use and osteochondritis dissecans development. PMID:25228675

  11. Treatment of osteochondritis dissecans of the knee with a biomimetic scaffold. A prospective multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    DELCOGLIANO, MARCO; MENGHI, AMERIGO; PLACELLA, GIACOMO; SPEZIALI, ANDREA; CERULLI, GIULIANO; CARIMATI, GIULIA; PASQUALOTTO, STEFANO; BERRUTO, MASSIMO

    2014-01-01

    Purpose the aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of the treatment of osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the knee with a type-I collagen-hydroxyapatite nanostructural biomimetic osteochondral scaffold. Methods twenty-three patients affected by symptomatic knee OCD of the femoral condyles, grade 3 or 4 of the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) scale, underwent biomimetic scaffold implantation. The site of the defect was the medial femoral condyle in 14 patients, whereas in 9 patients the lateral femoral condyle was involved. The average size of the defects was 3.5±1.43 cm2. All patients were clinically evaluated using the ICRS subjective score, the IKDC objective score, the EQ-VAS and the Tegner Activity Score. Minimum follow-up was two years. MRI was performed at 12 and 24 months after surgery and then every 12 months thereafter. Results the ICRS subjective score improved from the baseline value of 50.93±20.6 to 76.44±18.03 at the 12 months (p<0.0005) and 82.23± 17.36 at the two-year follow-up (p<0.0005). The IKDC objective score confirmed the results. The EQ-VAS showed a significant improvement from 3.15±1.09 to 8.15±1.04 (p<0.0005) at two years of follow-up. The Tegner Activity Score improvement was statistically significant (p<0.0005). Conclusions biomimetic scaffold implantation was a good procedure for treating grade 3 and 4 OCD, in which other classic techniques are burdened by different limitations. This open one-step surgery gave promising stable results at short-term follow-up. Level of evidence Level IV, therapeutic case series. PMID:25606552

  12. Repair of articular osteochondral defects of the knee joint using a composite lamellar scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Y. M.; Yu, Q. S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The major problem with repair of an articular cartilage injury is the extensive difference in the structure and function of regenerated, compared with normal cartilage. Our work investigates the feasibility of repairing articular osteochondral defects in the canine knee joint using a composite lamellar scaffold of nano-ß-tricalcium phosphate (ß-TCP)/collagen (col) I and II with bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs) and assesses its biological compatibility. Methods The bone–cartilage scaffold was prepared as a laminated composite, using hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (nano-HAP)/collagen I/copolymer of polylactic acid–hydroxyacetic acid as the bony scaffold, and sodium hyaluronate/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) as the cartilaginous scaffold. Ten-to 12-month-old hybrid canines were randomly divided into an experimental group and a control group. BMSCs were obtained from the iliac crest of each animal, and only those of the third generation were used in experiments. An articular osteochondral defect was created in the right knee of dogs in both groups. Those in the experimental group were treated by implanting the composites consisting of the lamellar scaffold of ß-TCP/col I/col II/BMSCs. Those in the control group were left untreated. Results After 12 weeks of implantation, defects in the experimental group were filled with white semi-translucent tissue, protruding slightly over the peripheral cartilage surface. After 24 weeks, the defect space in the experimental group was filled with new cartilage tissues, finely integrated into surrounding normal cartilage. The lamellar scaffold of ß-TCP/col I/col II was gradually degraded and absorbed, while new cartilage tissue formed. In the control group, the defects were not repaired. Conclusion This method can be used as a suitable scaffold material for the tissue-engineered repair of articular cartilage defects. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:56–64 PMID:25837672

  13. Fresh osteochondral allografts in the knee: only a salvage procedure?

    PubMed

    Gobbi, Alberto; Scotti, Celeste; Lane, John G; Peretti, Giuseppe M

    2015-07-01

    The role of fresh allogeneic osteochondral allograft transplantation (OCA) in the cartilage repair algorithm has been long debated and this procedure is primarily considered as a salvage procedure, to be used when other, simple, techniques have failed. Gracitelli et al. in a retrospective comparison of patients who received OCA as primary treatment or as a salvage procedure, demonstrates that the outcome of this procedure is minimally influenced by a previous failed treatment and that OCA represents an effective solution for both primary and revision surgery of chondral and osteochondral lesions of the knee. In particular, optimal indications for OCA seem to be revision of previously failed bone marrow stimulation techniques with an impaired subchondral bone plate and primary treatment of large osteochondral defects. PMID:26261835

  14. Cell-free multi-layered collagen-based scaffolds demonstrate layer specific regeneration of functional osteochondral tissue in caprine joints.

    PubMed

    Levingstone, Tanya J; Ramesh, Ashwanth; Brady, Robert T; Brama, Pieter A J; Kearney, Clodagh; Gleeson, John P; O'Brien, Fergal J

    2016-05-01

    Developing repair strategies for osteochondral tissue presents complex challenges due to its interfacial nature and complex zonal structure, consisting of subchondral bone, intermediate calcified cartilage and the superficial cartilage regions. In this study, the long term ability of a multi-layered biomimetic collagen-based scaffold to repair osteochondral defects is investigated in a large animal model: namely critical sized lateral trochlear ridge (TR) and medial femoral condyle (MC) defects in the caprine stifle joint. The study thus presents the first data in a clinically applicable large animal model. Scaffold fixation and early integration was demonstrated at 2 weeks post implantation. Macroscopic analysis demonstrated improved healing in the multi-layered scaffold group compared to empty defects and a market approved synthetic polymer osteochondral scaffold groups at 6 and 12 months post implantation. Radiological analysis demonstrated superior subchondral bone formation in both defect sites in the multi-layered scaffold group as early as 3 months, with complete regeneration of subchondral bone by 12 months. Histological analysis confirmed the formation of well-structured subchondral trabecular bone and hyaline-like cartilage tissue in the multi-layered scaffold group by 12 months with restoration of the anatomical tidemark. Demonstration of improved healing following treatment with this natural polymer scaffold, through the recruitment of host cells with no requirement for pre-culture, shows the potential of this device for the treatment of patients presenting with osteochondal lesions. PMID:26901430

  15. Repair of osteochondral defects by mosaicplasty and allogeneic BMSCs transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xin; Sun, Yuan; Cheng, Xiangguo; Gao, Youshui; Hu, Bin; Wen, Gen; Qian, Yebin; Gu, Wenqi; Mao, Yanjie; Liu, Wanjun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility and efficacy of repairing osteochondral defects with mosaicplasty and allogeneic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) transplantation. Methods: BMSCs were harvested from rabbits and maintained in vitro. Cells of third passage were mixed with pluronic F-127. Osteochondral defect animal model was established in rabbits and then this defect was treated with autologous osteochondral grafts with or without BMSCs above mentioned. In control group, pure pluronic F-127 was filled in the defect. Histological and immunohistological examinations were performed for the evaluation of therapeutic effectiveness. Results: Autologous osteochondral grafts in both groups were not loose, prolapsed and depressed. In BMSCs group, the tissues in the “death space” became hyaline cartilage. The arrangement of chondrocytes was regular. At 4, 8, 12 and 16 weeks, O’Driscoll and Keeley and Salter score were 14.00±1.00, 16.75±1.71, 18.00±0.82 and 20.50±1.29 in BMSCs group, which were significantly higher than those in control group (7.67±0.58, 8.00±0.82, 8.50±0.58 and 9.00±0.82, respectively). There were significant differences among different treatments (F=584.028, P=0.000), but the score was comparable between right defect and left defect (F=0.028, P=0.890). In addition, significant difference was also observed at different time points (F=18.364, P=0.000), but there was no interaction between time and treatment (F=6.939, P=0.015). Moreover, interactions among other factors were also not observed. Conclusion: Mosaicplasty and BMSC transplantation are effective to repair the osteochondral defects and integrate the “death space”, achieving a better therapeutic efficacy. Thus, this combined therapy may become an effective strategy for the therapy of osteochondral defects. PMID:26131203

  16. Arthroscopic Management of Osteochondral Lesions of the Talus.

    PubMed

    Grambart, Sean T

    2016-10-01

    Osteochondral fractures of the ankle are typically caused by traumatic injuries of the ankle. Repetitive trauma can lead to further cartilage damage with subsequent increasing size of the lesion, ultimately leading to severe cartilage disorder and degenerative arthritis of the ankle. Arthroscopic bone marrow stimulation has been shown to be a highly successful option for patients with small osteochondral lesions. Studies show a higher failure rate for larger lesions and cystic changes that disrupt the subchondral plate. The threshold size seems to be 150 mm(2). PMID:27599437

  17. Repair of osteochondral defects with adipose stem cells and a dual growth factor-releasing scaffold in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Im, Gun-Il; Lee, Jin Ho

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the in vivo effectiveness of a TGF-beta(2) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-7-immobilized porous polycaprolactone (PCL)/F127 scaffold to enhance the healing of cartilage defect. An osteochondral defect was created on the patellar groove of the right distal femur of 12 rabbits and managed by one of the following methods: filling it with the scaffold only (Group I); the scaffold seeded with adipose stem cells (ASCs) (Group II); a TGF-beta(2) and BMP-7-immobilized scaffold (Group III); and a TGF-beta(2) and BMP-7-immobilized scaffold seeded with ASCs (Group IV). Each group had three rabbits. Nine weeks after the implantation, the implanted scaffolds were filled with yellowish, dense tissue, and had distinct margins with adjacent normal cartilage. The histological findings showed infiltration of foreign-body giant cells and blood vessel, more prominently in Groups III and IV. The presence of growth factor significantly increased the ICRS Macroscopic Score (p = 0.045) while the presence of ASC did not. The ICRS Visual Histological Score was not significantly affected by the presence of either growth factors or ASCs, showing similar values in all groups. In conclusion, the use of TGF-beta(2) and BMP-7-immobilized PCL/F127 scaffolds improved gross appearances of the osteochondral defects while not actually leading to better histological results and induced a greater degree of foreign body reaction. PMID:19957354

  18. Arthroscopic Allograft Cartilage Transfer for Osteochondral Defects of the Talus

    PubMed Central

    Min, Kyong S.; Ryan, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Arthroscopic treatment of osteochondral defects is well established but has had mixed results in larger lesions and revision operations. Particulated allograft cartilage transfer may provide an arthroscopic option for lesions that would otherwise have been treated through open approaches or osteotomies. The procedure is performed under noninvasive distraction with standard arthroscopic portals. PMID:26052496

  19. Diagnosing, planning and evaluating osteochondral ankle defects with imaging modalities.

    PubMed

    van Bergen, Christiaan Ja; Gerards, Rogier M; Opdam, Kim Tm; Terra, Maaike P; Kerkhoffs, Gino Mmj

    2015-12-18

    This current concepts review outlines the role of different imaging modalities in the diagnosis, preoperative planning, and follow-up of osteochondral ankle defects. An osteochondral ankle defect involves the articular cartilage and subchondral bone (usually of the talus) and is mostly caused by an ankle supination trauma. Conventional radiographs are useful as an initial imaging tool in the diagnostic process, but have only moderate sensitivity for the detection of osteochondral defects. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are more accurate imaging modalities. Recently, ultrasonography and single photon emission CT have been described for the evaluation of osteochondral talar defects. CT is the most valuable modality for assessing the exact location and size of bony lesions. Cartilage and subchondral bone damage can be visualized using MRI, but the defect size tends to be overestimated due to bone edema. CT with the ankle in full plantar flexion has been shown a reliable tool for preoperative planning of the surgical approach. Postoperative imaging is useful for objective assessment of repair tissue or degenerative changes of the ankle joint. Plain radiography, CT and MRI have been used in outcome studies, and different scoring systems are available. PMID:26716090

  20. Glenoid dysplasia and osteochondritis dissecans in a cat

    PubMed Central

    Schwarze, Rebecca A.; Tano, Cheryl A.; Carroll, Vincent W.

    2015-01-01

    A 2-year-old Maine coon cat was presented for a right forelimb lameness. Computed tomography of the shoulder revealed a shallow glenoid, osteophyte deposition at the caudal humeral head and medial glenoid, and an intra-articular osseous body. This cat had glenoid dysplasia and osteochondritis dissecans of the glenoid. PMID:26130839

  1. On the influence of mechanical conditions in osteochondral defect healing.

    PubMed

    Duda, Georg N; Maldonado, Zully M; Klein, Petra; Heller, Markus O W; Burns, Justin; Bail, Hermann

    2005-04-01

    Despite the introduction of new surgical techniques, the treatment of cartilage defects remains challenging. Delay or complete failure of cartilage healing is associated with problems in biological regeneration. The influence of mechanical conditions on this process, however, remains unevaluated. Osteochondral defects were generated on the left femoral condyle in 18 Yucatan minipigs. After 4, 6 and 12 weeks the defect filling, trabecular orientation and bone density were compared to the intact contralateral side. The mechanical straining during this period was then analyzed using an adaptive finite element technique. Histologically, the osteochondral defects showed bone resorption at the base and bone formation from the circumference. At 12 weeks, the macroscopically healed specimens showed fibrous cartilage formation, a minimally organized trabecular structure and increased trabecular volume fraction compared to the controls (p < 0.002). The amount of cancellous, cartilagineous, and fibrous tissue and the defect size as measured in histomorphometric analysis for the three time points (4, 6 and 12 weeks) was comparable in magnitude to that predicted by finite element analysis. The simulated osteochondral healing process was not fully capable of re-establishing a hyaline-like cartilage layer. The correlation between simulation and histology allows identification of mechanical factors that appear to have a larger impact on the healing of osteochondral defects than previously considered. PMID:15713306

  2. Diagnosing, planning and evaluating osteochondral ankle defects with imaging modalities

    PubMed Central

    van Bergen, Christiaan JA; Gerards, Rogier M; Opdam, Kim TM; Terra, Maaike P; Kerkhoffs, Gino MMJ

    2015-01-01

    This current concepts review outlines the role of different imaging modalities in the diagnosis, preoperative planning, and follow-up of osteochondral ankle defects. An osteochondral ankle defect involves the articular cartilage and subchondral bone (usually of the talus) and is mostly caused by an ankle supination trauma. Conventional radiographs are useful as an initial imaging tool in the diagnostic process, but have only moderate sensitivity for the detection of osteochondral defects. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are more accurate imaging modalities. Recently, ultrasonography and single photon emission CT have been described for the evaluation of osteochondral talar defects. CT is the most valuable modality for assessing the exact location and size of bony lesions. Cartilage and subchondral bone damage can be visualized using MRI, but the defect size tends to be overestimated due to bone edema. CT with the ankle in full plantar flexion has been shown a reliable tool for preoperative planning of the surgical approach. Postoperative imaging is useful for objective assessment of repair tissue or degenerative changes of the ankle joint. Plain radiography, CT and MRI have been used in outcome studies, and different scoring systems are available. PMID:26716090

  3. Effect of exposure environment on surface decomposition of SiC-silver ion implantation diffusion couples

    SciTech Connect

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Zheng, Guiqui; Field, Kevin G.; Allen, Todd R.

    2014-10-05

    SiC is a promising material for nuclear applications and is a critical component in the construction of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel. A primary issue with TRISO fuel operation is the observed release of 110m Ag from intact fuel particles. The release of Ag has prompted research efforts to directly measure the transport mechanism of Ag in bulk SiC. Recent research efforts have focused primarily on Ag ion implantation designs. The effect of the thermal exposure system on the ion implantation surface has been investigated. Results indicate the utilization of a mated sample geometry and the establishment of a static thermal exposure environment is critical to maintaining an intact surface for diffusion analysis. In conclusion, the nature of the implantation surface and its potential role in Ag diffusion analysis are discussed.

  4. Effect of exposure environment on surface decomposition of SiC-silver ion implantation diffusion couples

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Zheng, Guiqui; Field, Kevin G.; Allen, Todd R.

    2014-10-05

    SiC is a promising material for nuclear applications and is a critical component in the construction of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel. A primary issue with TRISO fuel operation is the observed release of 110m Ag from intact fuel particles. The release of Ag has prompted research efforts to directly measure the transport mechanism of Ag in bulk SiC. Recent research efforts have focused primarily on Ag ion implantation designs. The effect of the thermal exposure system on the ion implantation surface has been investigated. Results indicate the utilization of a mated sample geometry and the establishment of a static thermalmore » exposure environment is critical to maintaining an intact surface for diffusion analysis. In conclusion, the nature of the implantation surface and its potential role in Ag diffusion analysis are discussed.« less

  5. Spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in an osteochondral defect created in the femoral condyle using a novel double-network hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Functional repair of articular osteochondral defects remains a major challenge not only in the field of knee surgery but also in tissue regeneration medicine. The purpose is to clarify whether the spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in a large osteochondral defect created in the femoral condyle by means of implanting a novel double-network (DN) gel at the bottom of the defect. Methods Twenty-five mature rabbits were used in this study. In the bilateral knees of each animal, we created an osteochondral defect having a diameter of 2.4-mm in the medial condyle. Then, in 21 rabbits, we implanted a DN gel plug into a right knee defect so that a vacant space of 1.5-mm depth (in Group I), 2.5-mm depth (in Group II), or 3.5-mm depth (in Group III) was left. In the left knee, we did not apply any treatment to the defect to obtain the control data. All the rabbits were sacrificed at 4 weeks, and the gross and histological evaluations were performed. The remaining 4 rabbits underwent the same treatment as used in Group II, and real-time PCR analysis was performed at 4 weeks. Results The defect in Group II was filled with a sufficient volume of the hyaline cartilage tissue rich in proteoglycan and type-2 collagen. The Wayne's gross appearance and histology scores showed that Group II was significantly greater than Group I, III, and Control (p < 0.012). The relative expression level of type-2 collagen, aggrecan, and SOX9 mRNAs was significantly greater in Group II than in the control group (p < 0.023). Conclusions This study demonstrated that spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in vivo in an osteochondral defect created in the femoral condyle by means of implanting the DN gel plug at the bottom of the defect so that an approximately 2-mm deep vacant space was intentionally left in the defect. This fact has prompted us to propose an innovative strategy without cell culture to repair osteochondral lesions in the femoral

  6. Three-dimensional osteochondral microtissue to model pathogenesis of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Lozito, Thomas P; Alexander, Peter G; Lin, Hang; Gottardi, Riccardo; Cheng, Anthony Wai-Ming; Tuan, Rocky S

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), the most prevalent form of arthritis, affects up to 15% of the adult population and is principally characterized by degeneration of the articular cartilage component of the joint, often with accompanying subchondral bone lesions. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of OA is important for the rational development of disease-modifying OA drugs. While most studies on OA have focused on the investigation of either the cartilage or the bone component of the articular joint, the osteochondral complex represents a more physiologically relevant target because the disease ultimately is a disorder of osteochondral integrity and function. In our current investigation, we are constructing an in vitro three-dimensional microsystem that models the structure and biology of the osteochondral complex of the articular joint. Osteogenic and chondrogenic tissue components are produced using adult human mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow and adipose seeded within biomaterial scaffolds photostereolithographically fabricated with defined internal architecture. A three-dimensional-printed, perfusion-ready container platform with dimensions to fit into a 96-well culture plate format is designed to house and maintain the osteochondral microsystem that has the following features: an anatomic cartilage/bone biphasic structure with a functional interface; all tissue components derived from a single adult mesenchymal stem cell source to eliminate possible age/tissue-type incompatibility; individual compartments to constitute separate microenvironment for the synovial and osseous components; accessible individual compartments that may be controlled and regulated via the introduction of bioactive agents or candidate effector cells, and tissue/medium sampling and compositional assays; and compatibility with the application of mechanical load and perturbation. The consequences of mechanical injury, exposure to inflammatory cytokines, and

  7. The Treatment of Osteochondral Lesions of the Talus with Autologous Osteochondral Transplantation and Bone Marrow Aspirate Concentrate

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, John G.; Murawski, Christopher D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To present the functional results after autologous osteochondral transplantation with bone marrow aspirate concentrate in 72 patients, while placing an emphasis on the surgical technique. Methods: Between 2005 and 2009, 72 patients underwent autologous osteochondral transplantation under the care of the senior author. The mean patient age at the time of surgery was 34.19 years (range, 16-85 years). All patients were followed for a minimum of 1 year after surgery. The mean follow-up time was 28.02 months (range, 12-64 months). Patient-reported outcome measures were taken preoperatively and at final follow-up using the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS) and Short Form–12 (SF-12) general health questionnaire. Identical questionnaires were used in all instances. Results: The mean FAOS scores improved from 52.67 points preoperatively to 86.19 points postoperatively (range, 71-100 points). The mean SF-12 scores also improved from 59.40 points preoperatively to 88.63 points postoperatively (range, 52-98 points). Three patients reported donor site knee pain after surgery, and one patient required the decompression of a cyst that developed beneath the graft site approximately 2 years after the index procedure. Conclusion: Autologous osteochondral transplantation is a reproducible and primary treatment strategy for large osteochondral lesions of the talus. PMID:26069591

  8. Inductive coupling links for lowest misalignment effects in transcutaneous implanted devices.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Saad Mutashar; Hannan, Mahammad A; Samad, Salina A; Hussain, Aini

    2014-06-01

    Use of transcutaneous inductive links is a widely known method for the wireless powering of bio-implanted devices such as implanted microsystems. The design of the coil for inductive links is generally not optimal. In this study, inductive links were used on the basis of the small loop antenna theory to reduce the effects of lateral coil misalignments on the biological human tissue model at 13.56 MHz. The tissue, which measures 60 mm×70 mm×5 mm, separates the reader and the implanted coils. The aligned coils and the lateral misalignment coils were investigated in different parametric x-distance misalignments. The optimal coil layout was developed on the basis of the layout rules presented in previous studies. Results show that the gain around the coils, which were separated by wet and dry skin, was constant and confirmed the omnidirectional radiation pattern even though the lateral misalignment between coils was smaller or greater than the implanted coil radius. This misalignment can be <4 mm or >6 mm up to 8 mm. Moreover, coil misalignments and skin condition do not affect the efficient performance of the coil. PMID:24445231

  9. Biomaterials/scaffolds. Design of bioactive, multiphasic PCL/collagen type I and type II-PCL-TCP/collagen composite scaffolds for functional tissue engineering of osteochondral repair tissue by using electrospinning and FDM techniques.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Detlef; Ekaputra, Andrew K; Lam, Christopher X F; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2007-01-01

    Current clinical therapies for traumatic or chronic injuries involving osteochondral tissue result in temporary pain reduction and filling of the defect but with biomechanically inferior repair tissue. Tissue engineering of osteochondral repair tissue using autologous cells and bioactive biomaterials has the potential to overcome the current limitations and results in native-like repair tissue with good integration capabilities. For this reason, we applied two modem biomaterial design techniques, namely, electrospinning and fused deposition modeling (FDM), to produce bioactive poly(epsilon-caprolactone)/collagen (PCL/Col) type I and type II-PCL-tri-calcium phosphate (TCP)/Col composites for precursor cell-based osteochondral repair. The application of these two design techniques (electrospinning and FDM) allowed us to specifically produce the a suitable three-dimensional (3D) environment for the cells to grow into a particular tissue (cartilage and bone) in vitro prior to in vivo implantation. We hypothesize that our new designed biomaterials, seeded with autologous bone marrow-derived precursor cells, in combination with bioreactor-stimulated cell-culture techniques can be used to produce clinically relevant osteochondral repair tissue. PMID:18085205

  10. In vitro generation of a multilayered osteochondral construct with an osteochondral interface using rabbit bone marrow stromal cells and a silk peptide-based scaffold.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kelei; Shi, Pujiang; Teh, Thomas Kok Hiong; Toh, Siew Lok; Goh, James Ch

    2016-04-01

    Tissue engineering of a biological osteochondral multilayered construct with a cartilage-interface subchondral bone layer is a key challenge. This study presented a rabbit bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC)/silk fibroin scaffold-based co-culture approach to generate tissue-engineered osteochondral grafts with an interface. BMSC-seeded scaffolds were first cultured separately in osteogenic and chondrogenic stimulation media. The two differentiated pieces were then combined using an RADA self-assembling peptide and subsequently co-cultured. Gene expression, histological and biochemical analyses were used to evaluate the multilayered structure of the osteochondral graft. A complete osteochondral construct with a cartilage-subchondral bone interface was regenerated and BMSCs were used as the only cell source for the osteochondral construct and interface regeneration. Furthermore, in the intermediate region of co-cultured samples, hypertrophic chondrogenic gene markers type X collagen and MMP-13 were found on both chondrogenic and osteogenic section edges after co-culture. However, significant differences gene expression profile were found in distinct zones of the construct during co-culture and the section in the intermediate region had significantly higher hypertrophic chondrocyte gene expression. Biochemical analyses and histology results further supported this observation. This study showed that specific stimulation from osteogenic and chondrogenic BMSCs affected each other in this co-culture system and induced the formation of an osteochondral interface. Moreover, this system provided a possible approach for generating multilayered osteochondral constructs. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23413023

  11. Inorganic-organic hybrid scaffolds for osteochondral regeneration.

    PubMed

    Munoz-Pinto, Dany J; McMahon, Rebecca E; Kanzelberger, Melissa A; Jimenez-Vergara, Andrea C; Grunlan, Melissa A; Hahn, Mariah S

    2010-07-01

    Ligament graft failure frequently results from poor integration of the replacement tissue with associated bone. Thus, the ability to regenerate the bone-ligament osteochondral interface would be advantageous in ligament reconstruction. At the osteochondral interface, the tissue transitions from a bone-like matrix to fibrocartilage. Therefore, a scaffold which promotes a spatially regulated transition in cell behavior from osteoblast-like to chondrocyte-like would be desirable. Previous research indicates that addition of inorganic components to organic scaffolds can enhance the deposition of bone-like matrix by associated osteoblasts. We therefore reasoned that a gradient in the inorganic content of a hybrid inorganic-organic scaffold may induce an osteochondral-like transition in cell phenotype and matrix production. To test this hypothesis, hydrogels were prepared from poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and star poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS(star)). As anticipated, both the matrix deposition and phenotype of encapsulated osteoblasts varied with scaffold inorganic content, although the directionality of this modulation was contrary to expectation. Specifically, osteoblasts appeared to transdifferentiate into chondrocyte-like cells with increasing scaffold inorganic content, as indicated by increased chondroitin sulfate and collagen type II production and by upregulation of sox9, a transcription factor associated with chondrocytic differentiation. Furthermore, the deposition of bone-like matrix (collagen type I, calcium phosphate, and osteocalcin) decreased with increasing PDMS(star) content. The resistance of the PDMS(star)-PEG scaffolds to protein adsorption and/or the changes in gel modulus/mesh structure accompanying PDMS(star) incorporation may underlie the unexpected increase in chondrocytic phenotype with increasing inorganic content. Combined, the present results indicate that PDMS(star)-PEG hybrid gels may prove promising for osteochondral regeneration. (c) 2010

  12. [Patellar osteochondral injury as onset of patellar instability].

    PubMed

    Cepero-Campà, S; Ullot-Font, R; Pérez-López, L M

    2012-01-01

    Patellar osteochondral fractures with no dislocation are uncommon and usually affect the centromedial facet of the patella. We present the case of a 10 year-old, overweight, female patient. She was seen in the emergency room after suffering an accidental fall, assessed as an osteochondral fracture-dislocation of the right patella with upper-outer displaced free fragments. By patient interview, she referred to no previous episodes of patellar dislocation. To complete the study, we performed an MRI which showed a medial facet patellar fracture, with two osteochondral fragments located in the sub-quadricipital recess, associated with other lesions suggesting patellar subluxation. We considered that the best treatment was surgery, so the following was performed: an open reduction and internal fixation with absorbable bars, lateral patellar release (Ficat technique), patellar coverage by medial portion of quadriceps (Insall technique) and internal moving of the lateral half of the patellar tendon (Goldwaith technique). The injury was checked one year later using arthroscopy. It confirmed a good reconstruction of the articular surface, and right patellar centering. At follow-up, during the physiotherapy period, the patient began to have repeated episodes of instability in the contralateral patella. The CT scan confirmed the patellar lateralisation (TAGT 17). Centering surgery was indicated due to the occurrence of multiple dislocation episodes. The patient currently carries out normal physical activity and she has a complete range of movement. Patellar osteochondral fracture is an injury frequently associated with patellar instability, which may onset in the first episode. The medial location of the lesions and the involvement of the system of medial knee stability is a fundamental finding. This fact reinforces the diagnosis of pre-fracture patellar dislocation. This is not a fracture-dislocation, but a dislocation-fracture. We may, therefore, treat the injury and its

  13. Recent Advances in Egypt for Treatment of Talar Osteochondral Lesions.

    PubMed

    Haleem, Amgad M; AbouSayed, Mostafa M; Gomaa, Mohammed

    2016-06-01

    Treatment of osteochondral defects (OCLs) of the talus is a challenging orthopedic surgery. Treatment of talar OCLs has evolved through the 3 "R" paradigm: reconstruction, repair, and replacement. This article highlights current state-of-the-art techniques and reviews recent advances in the literature about articular cartilage repair using various novel tissue engineering approaches, including various scaffolds, growth factors, and cell niches; which include chondrocytes and culture-expanded bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. PMID:27261813

  14. Osteochondral and Meniscal Allograft Transplantation in the Football (Soccer) Player

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Riley J.; Gersoff, Wayne K.; Bugbee, William D.

    2012-01-01

    Knee injuries are common in football, frequently involving damage to the meniscus and articular cartilage. These injuries can cause significant disability, result in loss of playing time, and predispose players to osteoarthritis. Osteochondral allografting is an increasingly popular treatment option for osteoarticular lesions in athletes. Osteochondral allografts provide mature, orthotopic hyaline cartilage on an osseous scaffold that serves as an attachment vehicle, which is rapidly replaced via creeping substitution, leading to reliable graft integration that allows for simplified rehabilitation and accelerated return to sport. The indications for meniscal replacement in football players are currently still evolving. Meniscus allografts offer potential functional, analgesic, and chondroprotective benefits in the meniscectomized knee. In the player at the end of his or her professional/competitive career, meniscal allografts can play a role in averting progression of chondropenia and facilitating knee function and an active lifestyle. This article is intended to present a concise overview of the limited published results for osteochondral and meniscal allografting in the athletic population and to provide a practical treatment algorithm that is of relevance to the clinician as well as the patient/football player, based on current consensus of opinion. PMID:26069605

  15. 3D printing of novel osteochondral scaffolds with graded microstructure.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, Margaret A; Castro, Nathan J; Plesniak, Michael W; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-10-14

    Osteochondral tissue has a complex graded structure where biological, physiological, and mechanical properties vary significantly over the full thickness spanning from the subchondral bone region beneath the joint surface to the hyaline cartilage region at the joint surface. This presents a significant challenge for tissue-engineered structures addressing osteochondral defects. Fused deposition modeling (FDM) 3D bioprinters present a unique solution to this problem. The objective of this study is to use FDM-based 3D bioprinting and nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite for improved bone marrow human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) adhesion, growth, and osteochondral differentiation. FDM printing parameters can be tuned through computer aided design and computer numerical control software to manipulate scaffold geometries in ways that are beneficial to mechanical performance without hindering cellular behavior. Additionally, the ability to fine-tune 3D printed scaffolds increases further through our investment casting procedure which facilitates the inclusion of nanoparticles with biochemical factors to further elicit desired hMSC differentiation. For this study, FDM was used to print investment-casting molds innovatively designed with varied pore distribution over the full thickness of the scaffold. The mechanical and biological impacts of the varied pore distributions were compared and evaluated to determine the benefits of this physical manipulation. The results indicate that both mechanical properties and cell performance improve in the graded pore structures when compared to homogeneously distributed porous and non-porous structures. Differentiation results indicated successful osteogenic and chondrogenic manipulation in engineered scaffolds. PMID:27606933

  16. Review of the biomechanics and biotribology of osteochondral grafts used for surgical interventions in the knee

    PubMed Central

    Bowland, Philippa; Ingham, E; Jennings, Louise; Fisher, John

    2015-01-01

    A review of research undertaken to evaluate the biomechanical stability and biotribological behaviour of osteochondral grafts in the knee joint and a brief discussion of areas requiring further improvement in future studies are presented. The review takes into consideration osteochondral autografts, allografts, tissue engineered constructs and synthetic and biological scaffolds. PMID:26614801

  17. [Fixing of osteochondral fragments with fibrinogen glue. Clinical experiences (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Zilch, H; Friedebold, G

    1981-08-01

    Small osteochondral fragments are well fixed with the fibrinogen glue. This method is really a progress in comparison with the traditional fixation by screws or K-wires. The fragments were revascularized early. This is demonstrated by 31 glued osteochondral fragments which healed well. The joints must be immobilized during a period of 3 weeks. PMID:6118021

  18. Arthroscopically assisted autologous osteochondral transplantation for osteochondral lesions of the talar dome: an MRI and clinical follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Assenmacher, J A; Kelikian, A S; Gottlob, C; Kodros, S

    2001-07-01

    Osteochondral Lesions of the Talar Dome (OLT) are common problems encountered in orthopedics. Although the etiology remains uncertain, a myriad of treatment options exists. The authors describe arthroscopically assisted autologous osteochondral graft (OCG) transplantation procedures in the treatment of unstable OLTs in nine patients. The patients underwent standard preoperative MRI examination to assess fragment stability (using De Smet criteria for stability). Intraoperative arthroscopy was used to correlate the preoperative MRI assessment (using Cheng/Ferkel grading). After transplantation procedures, MRI (using De Smet criteria for stability) assessed graft incorporation for stability at an average of 9.3 months after the procedure. Preoperative MRI correlated highly with arthroscopic findings of OLT instability (sensitivity = 1.0). This has been demonstrated in the current orthopedic literature. The post transplantation MRI demonstrated stable graft osteointegration by De Smet criteria in all patients. Postoperative visual analogue pain scales showed significant improvement from preoperative assessment. Postoperative AOFAS Ankle-Hindfoot scores averaged 80.2 (S.D. +/- 18.9). Our favorable early results and those of other authors using similar techniques may validate OCG transplantation as a viable alternative for treating unstable osteochondral defects in the talus that are refractive to more commonly used surgical techniques. PMID:11503978

  19. Direct coupling of pulsed radio frequency and pulsed high power in novel pulsed power system for plasma immersion ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chunzhi; Tian, Xiubo; Yang, Shiqin; Fu, Ricky K Y; Chu, Paul K

    2008-04-01

    A novel power supply system that directly couples pulsed high voltage (HV) pulses and pulsed 13.56 MHz radio frequency (rf) has been developed for plasma processes. In this system, the sample holder is connected to both the rf generator and HV modulator. The coupling circuit in the hybrid system is composed of individual matching units, low pass filters, and voltage clamping units. This ensures the safe operation of the rf system even when the HV is on. The PSPICE software is utilized to optimize the design of circuits. The system can be operated in two modes. The pulsed rf discharge may serve as either the seed plasma source for glow discharge or high-density plasma source for plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII). The pulsed high-voltage glow discharge is induced when a rf pulse with a short duration or a larger time interval between the rf and HV pulses is used. Conventional PIII can also be achieved. Experiments conducted on the new system confirm steady and safe operation. PMID:18447526

  20. Implanted, inductively-coupled, radiofrequency coils fabricated on flexible polymeric material: Application to in vivo rat brain MRI at 7 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginefri, J.-C.; Rubin, A.; Tatoulian, M.; Woytasik, M.; Boumezbeur, F.; Djemaï, B.; Poirier-Quinot, M.; Lethimonnier, F.; Darrasse, L.; Dufour-Gergam, E.

    2012-11-01

    Combined with high-field MRI scanners, small implanted coils allow for high resolution imaging with locally improved SNR, as compared to external coils. Small flexible implantable coils dedicated to in vivo MRI of the rat brain at 7 T were developed. Based on the Multi-turn Transmission Line Resonator design, they were fabricated with a Teflon substrate using copper micromolding process and a specific metal-polymer adhesion treatment. The implanted coils were made biocompatible by PolyDimethylSiloxane (PDMS) encapsulation. The use of low loss tangent material achieves low dielectric losses within the substrate and the use of the PDMS layer reduces the parasitic coupling with the surrounding media. An implanted coil was implemented in a 7 T MRI system using inductive coupling and a dedicated external pick-up coil for signal transmission. In vivo images of the rat brain acquired with in plane resolution of (150 μm)2 thanks to the implanted coil revealed high SNR near the coil, allowing for the visualization of fine cerebral structures.

  1. Meniscoplasty for stable osteochondritis dissecans of the lateral femoral condyle combined with a discoid lateral meniscus: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Osteochondritis dissecans of the lateral femoral condyle is relatively rare, and it is reported to often be combined with a discoid lateral meniscus. Given the potential for healing, conservative management is indicated for stable osteochondritis dissecans in patients who are skeletally immature. However, patients with osteochondritis dissecans of the lateral femoral condyle combined with a discoid lateral meniscus often have persistent symptoms despite conservative management. Case presentation We present the case of a seven-year-old Korean girl who had osteochondritis dissecans of the lateral femoral condyle combined with a discoid lateral meniscus, which healed after meniscoplasty for the symptomatic lateral discoid meniscus without surgical intervention for the osteochondritis dissecans. In addition, healing of the osteochondritis dissecans lesion was confirmed by an MRI scan five months after the operation. Conclusions Meniscoplasty can be recommended for symptomatic stable juvenile osteochondritis dissecans of the lateral femoral condyle combined with a discoid lateral meniscus when conservative treatment fails. PMID:21896174

  2. OSTEOCHONDRAL INTERFACE REGENERATION OF THE RABBIT MANDIBULAR CONDYLE WITH BIOACTIVE SIGNAL GRADIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Dormer, Nathan H.; Busaidy, Kamal; Berkland, Cory J.; Detamore, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE Tissue engineering solutions focused on the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) have expanded in number and variety over the past decade to address the treatment of TMJ disorders. The existing literature on approaches for healing small defects in the TMJ condylar cartilage and subchondral bone, however, is sparse. The purpose of this study was thus to evaluate the performance of a novel gradient-based scaffolding approach to regenerate osteochondral defects in the rabbit mandibular condyle. MATERIALS AND METHODS Miniature bioactive plugs for regeneration of small mandibular condylar defects in New Zealand White rabbits were fabricated. The plugs were constructed from poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres with a gradient transition between cartilage-promoting and bone-promoting growth factors. RESULTS At six weeks of healing, results suggested that the implants provided support for the neo-synthesized tissue as evidenced by histology and 9.4T magnetic resonance imaging. CONCLUSION The inclusion of bioactive factors in a gradient-based scaffolding design is a promising new treatment strategy for focal defect repair in the TMJ. PMID:21470747

  3. [Implant allergies].

    PubMed

    Thomas, P; Thomsen, M

    2010-03-01

    An increasing number of patients receive and benefit from osteosynthesis materials or artificial joint replacement. The most common complications are mechanical problems or infection. Metals like nickel, chromium and cobalt as well as bone cement components like acrylates and gentamicin are potential contact allergens which can cause intolerance reactions to implants. Eczema, delayed wound/bone healing, recurrent effusions, pain and implant loosening all have been described as manifestation of implant allergy. In contrast to the high incidence of cutaneous metal allergy, allergies associated with implants are rare. Diagnosis of metal implant allergy is still difficult. Thus differential diagnoses--in particular infection--have to be excluded and a combined approach of allergologic diagnostics by patch test and histopathology of peri-implant tissue is recommended. It is still unknown which conditions induce allergic sensitization to implants or trigger peri-implant allergic reactions in the case of preexisting cutaneous metal allergy. Despite the risk of developing complications being unclear, titanium based osteosynthesis materials are recommended for metal allergic patients and the use of metal-metal couplings in arthroplasty is not recommended for such patients. If the regular CoCr-polyethylene articulation is employed, the patient should give informed written consent. PMID:20204719

  4. Technique: Osteochondral Grafting of Capitate Chondrosis in PRC

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Peter; Imbriglia, Joseph E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Proximal row carpectomy (PRC) is a useful treatment option for wrist arthritis, but the operation is contraindicated when there is arthritis of the capitate head. We describe a technique that involves resurfacing of a capitate that has focal chondrosis, using an osteochondral graft harvested from the resected carpal bones. Materials and Methods PRC patients who had a focal area of capitate chondrosis underwent osteochondral grafting of the capitate. Pre- and postoperative pain level, employment status, motion, grip strength, and Modified Mayo Wrist Scores (MMWS) were assessed. Postoperative Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) scores were also calculated. Description of Technique The articular surface of the capitate is assessed for need for grafting. The proximal row is resected with the lunate removed intact. The arthritic area is prepared. The graft is taken from the lunate and placed in the prepared site of the capitate. Results Eight patients (average age of 53 years) were followed for 18 months. Pain: Preoperatively, moderate to severe in 7 patients; postoperatively, mild to no pain in 7 patients. Motion: Preoperative, 84° (74% of the contralateral side); postoperative 75° (66%). Grip Strength: Preoperative, 29 kg (62%); postoperative, 34 kg (71%). Mayo Wrist Score: Preoperative, 51 (poor); postoperative, 68 (fair). Average postoperative DASH score was 19.5. Follow-up radiographs showed that 75% of patients had mild to no degeneration. Conclusions Osteochondral grafting in PRC offers satisfactory results in terms of pain relief, return to work, motion, and grip strength. Level of Evidence Therapeutic IV, Case series PMID:24436818

  5. Early Postoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings After Autologous Osteochondral Plug Grafts For Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Humeral Capitellum

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Masahiro; Takahara, Masatoshi; Harada, Mikio; Satake, Hiroshi; Uno, Tomohiro; Takagi, Michiaki

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Although good clinical outcomes of autologous osteochondral plug grafts for capitellar osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) have been reported, the timing of return to sports was various and still controversial. The period of graft incorporation and the lesion healing at repair site is important to establish the rehabilitation protocol, however there is little information. The aim of this study was to investigate early postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and clinical outcomes after autologous osteochondral plug grafts for capitellar OCD. Methods: Fifteen young baseball players with advanced lesions of capitellar OCD underwent a procedure using autologous osteochondral plug grafts and underwent MRI (1.5 T) scan at 3 and 6 months, postoperatively. Their mean age at the time of surgery was 13.5 years (range, 13-15 years). Four lesions were classified as International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) OCD III and 11 lesions as OCD IV. The mean size of the lesions (sagittal × coronal) was 16 × 14 mm and the mean surface area was 181 mm2. One to two osteochondral plug grafts, with a mean diameter of 7 mm (range, 6-8 mm), were harvested from the lateral femoral condyle and transplanted to the defects. The mean reconstruction rate was 41% (range, 12%-65%), which was calculated as (total surface area of the grafts × 100%)/ (surface area of the lesion). Patients were allowed to begin throwing after 3 months and to return to sports after 6 months. The mean follow-up was 21 months (range, 12-36 months). The MRI findings were assessed graft incorporation, which was indicated by no T1-low-signal-intensity at the graft and no fluid surrounding the graft on T2-weighted fat-suppression (Figure 1), and the lesion healing according to the scoring system of Henderson (4, complete healing; 16, no healing). MRI were blinded and randomized, and two observers reviewed independently and conferred when they differed. Clinical outcomes were evaluated as elbow pain

  6. Analysis and Optimization of Spiral Circular Inductive Coupling Link for Bio-Implanted Applications on Air and within Human Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Mutashar, Saad; Hannan, Mahammad A.; Samad, Salina A.; Hussain, Aini

    2014-01-01

    The use of wireless communication using inductive links to transfer data and power to implantable microsystems to stimulate and monitor nerves and muscles is increasing. This paper deals with the development of the theoretical analysis and optimization of an inductive link based on coupling and on spiral circular coil geometry. The coil dimensions offer 22 mm of mutual distance in air. However, at 6 mm of distance, the coils offer a power transmission efficiency of 80% in the optimum case and 73% in the worst case via low input impedance, whereas, transmission efficiency is 45% and 32%, respectively, via high input impedance. The simulations were performed in air and with two types of simulated human biological tissues such as dry and wet-skin using a depth of 6 mm. The performance results expound that the combined magnitude of the electric field components surrounding the external coil is approximately 98% of that in air, and for an internal coil, it is approximately 50%, respectively. It can be seen that the gain surrounding coils is almost constant and confirms the omnidirectional pattern associated with such loop antennas which reduces the effect of non-alignment between the two coils. The results also show that the specific absorption rate (SAR) and power loss within the tissue are lower than that of the standard level. Thus, the tissue will not be damaged anymore. PMID:24984057

  7. Analysis and optimization of spiral circular inductive coupling link for bio-implanted applications on air and within human tissue.

    PubMed

    Mutashar, Saad; Hannan, Mahammad A; Samad, Salina A; Hussain, Aini

    2014-01-01

    The use of wireless communication using inductive links to transfer data and power to implantable microsystems to stimulate and monitor nerves and muscles is increasing. This paper deals with the development of the theoretical analysis and optimization of an inductive link based on coupling and on spiral circular coil geometry. The coil dimensions offer 22 mm of mutual distance in air. However, at 6 mm of distance, the coils offer a power transmission efficiency of 80% in the optimum case and 73% in the worst case via low input impedance, whereas, transmission efficiency is 45% and 32%, respectively, via high input impedance. The simulations were performed in air and with two types of simulated human biological tissues such as dry and wet-skin using a depth of 6 mm. The performance results expound that the combined magnitude of the electric field components surrounding the external coil is approximately 98% of that in air, and for an internal coil, it is approximately 50%, respectively. It can be seen that the gain surrounding coils is almost constant and confirms the omnidirectional pattern associated with such loop antennas which reduces the effect of non-alignment between the two coils. The results also show that the specific absorption rate (SAR) and power loss within the tissue are lower than that of the standard level. Thus, the tissue will not be damaged anymore. PMID:24984057

  8. Controlled surface modification of Ti-40Nb implant alloy by electrochemically assisted inductively coupled RF plasma oxidation.

    PubMed

    Göttlicher, Markus; Rohnke, Marcus; Helth, Arne; Leichtweiß, Thomas; Gemming, Thomas; Gebert, Annett; Eckert, Jürgen; Janek, Jürgen

    2013-11-01

    Low temperature metal oxidation induced by plasma in the absence of liquid electrolytes can be useful for the surface preparation of orthopedic devices since residues from these may be harmful and need to be removed before implantation. In this study the oxidation of Ti-40Nb for biomedical application was achieved by employing an inductively coupled radio frequency oxygen plasma. The correlation between the growth mode of the surface oxide and the electric conductivity ratio of the plasma and the oxide phase were studied by varying the sample temperature, oxygen gas pressure and additional bias potential. The plasma treated samples were characterised by confocal laser microscopy, SEM, EBSD, XPS, TEM and ToF-SIMS. The surface energy was determined by contact angle measurements using the Owens-Wendt-Rabel-Kaelble method. Well adhering oxide layers consisting of TiO2 and Nb2O5 with thicknesses between 50 and 150 nm were obtained. Surface roughness values and microstructure indicate that the growth mode of the oxide can be well controlled by the sample temperature and oxygen gas pressure. At temperatures above 450°C a migration of Ti ions towards the surface controls the growth process. A bias potential higher than +50 V causes rough and defective surfaces with high surface energies. PMID:23891813

  9. Apparatus for simulating dynamic interactions between the spinal cord and soft-coupled intradural implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viljoen, S.; Oya, H.; Reddy, C. G.; Dalm, B. D.; Shurig, R.; Odden, K.; Gillies, G. T.; Howard, M. A.

    2013-11-01

    We have designed, built, and tested an apparatus used for investigating the biomechanical response of a novel intradural spinal cord stimulator to the simulated physiological movement of the spinal cord within the thecal sac. In this apparatus, the rostral-caudal displacements of an anthropomorphic spinal cord surrogate can be controlled with a resolution of approximately 0.1% of a target value for up to 107 lateral movement cycles occurring at a repetition rate of 2 Hz. Using this system, we have been able to determine that the restoring force of the stimulator's suspension system works in concert with the frictional coupling between the electrode array and the surrogate to overcome the 0.42 μN inertial force associated with the lateral motion of the array. The result is a positional stability of the array on the surrogate (in air) of better than 0.2 mm over ˜500 000 movement cycles. Design modifications that might lead to improved physiological performance are discussed.

  10. Diagnosis of Knee Osteochondral Lesions With Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Penttilä, Pekko; Liukkonen, Jukka; Joukainen, Antti; Virén, Tuomas; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Töyräs, Juha; Kröger, Heikki

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of articular cartilage and subchondral bone is essential in the diagnosis of joint diseases and injuries. Interobserver and intraobserver reproducibilities of arthroscopic grading are only poor to moderate. Thus, for quantitative and objective evaluation of cartilage and subchondral bone, ultrasound arthroscopy (UA) has been introduced to clarify this dilemma. Assessment of the clinical feasibility of high-frequency ultrasonography (US) during 6 knee arthroscopies was conducted, and the surgical technique is presented. US imaging was conducted with a flexible 9-MHz US catheter inserted into the joint through conventional portals. US and arthroscopy videos were synchronously recorded, and US parameters for cartilage and subchondral bone characteristics were measured. Arthroscopy and US imaging were combined to perform cartilage grading. UA produced quantitative data on lesion size, as well as cartilage quality, and showed subchondral bone changes. Visualization of an osteochondritis dissecans lesion not detected by conventional arthroscopy and US-guided retrograde drilling were possible with UA. To conclude, UA proved to be clinically feasible and aided in the diagnosis when assessing knee osteochondral lesions. PMID:26697300

  11. OSTEOCHONDRAL AUTOLOGOUS TRANSPLANTATION FOR TREATING CHONDRAL LESIONS IN THE PATELLA

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Moises; Amaro, Joicemar Tarouco; Fernandes, Ricardo de Souza Campos; Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Astur, Diego da Costa; Kaleka, Camila Cohen; Skaf, Abdalla

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The primary aim of this study was to assess the clinical and functional evolution of patients with total-thickness symptomatic cartilaginous injury of the patellar joint surface, treated by means of osteochondral autologous transplantation. Methods: This prospective study was conducted from June 2008 to March 2011 and involved 17 patients. The specific questionnaires of Lysholm, Kujala and Fulkerson were completed preoperatively and one year postoperatively in order to assess the affected knee, and SF-36 was used to assess these patients’ general quality of life. The nonparametric paired Wilcoxon test was used for statistical analysis on the pre and postoperative questionnaires. The data were analyzed using the SPSS for Windows software, version 16.0, and a significance level of 5% was used. Results: The Lysholm preoperative and postoperative average scores were 54.59 and 75.76 points (p < 0.05). The Fulkerson pre and postoperative average scores were 52.53 and 78.41 points (p < 0.05). Conclusions: We believe that autologous osteochondral transplantation is a good treatment method for total-thickness symptomatic chondral lesions of the joint surface of the patella. PMID:27042645

  12. Enhancing Osteochondral Allograft Viability: Effects of Storage Media Composition

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Margie S.; Yuen, Audrey S.

    2008-01-01

    Osteochondral allograft transplantation is a well-accepted treatment for articular cartilage damage. However, chondrocyte viability declines during graft storage, which may compromise graft performance. We first tested the hypothesis that the composition of commonly used storage media affects the viability of articular chondrocytes over time; we then tested the hypothesis that the addition of insulin growth factor-1 or the apoptosis inhibitor ZVAD-fmk could enhance the storage properties of serum-free media. Bovine osteochondral grafts were stored at 4°C in lactated Ringer’s, Dulbecco’s modified eagle’s media (DMEM), DMEM supplemented with either insulin growth factor-1 or ZVAD-fmk, and a commercial storage media. Chondrocyte viability in lactated Ringer’s declined rapidly to 20.4% at 2 weeks. Viability in DMEM declined more slowly to 54.8% at 2 weeks and 31.2% at 3 weeks. Viability in commercial storage media was 83.6% at 3 weeks and 44.8% at 4 weeks. Viability was increased in DMEM + insulin growth factor-1 (56.4%) and DMEM + ZVAD (52.4%) at 3 weeks compared with DMEM alone. These results confirm the hypotheses that media composition greatly influences chondrocyte viability during cold storage and that insulin growth factor-1 and ZVAD improve the storage properties of DMEM. PMID:18506560

  13. Enhancing osteochondral allograft viability: effects of storage media composition.

    PubMed

    Teng, Margie S; Yuen, Audrey S; Kim, Hubert T

    2008-08-01

    Osteochondral allograft transplantation is a well-accepted treatment for articular cartilage damage. However, chondrocyte viability declines during graft storage, which may compromise graft performance. We first tested the hypothesis that the composition of commonly used storage media affects the viability of articular chondrocytes over time; we then tested the hypothesis that the addition of insulin growth factor-1 or the apoptosis inhibitor ZVAD-fmk could enhance the storage properties of serum-free media. Bovine osteochondral grafts were stored at 4 degrees C in lactated Ringer's, Dulbecco's modified eagle's media (DMEM), DMEM supplemented with either insulin growth factor-1 or ZVAD-fmk, and a commercial storage media. Chondrocyte viability in lactated Ringer's declined rapidly to 20.4% at 2 weeks. Viability in DMEM declined more slowly to 54.8% at 2 weeks and 31.2% at 3 weeks. Viability in commercial storage media was 83.6% at 3 weeks and 44.8% at 4 weeks. Viability was increased in DMEM + insulin growth factor-1 (56.4%) and DMEM + ZVAD (52.4%) at 3 weeks compared with DMEM alone. These results confirm the hypotheses that media composition greatly influences chondrocyte viability during cold storage and that insulin growth factor-1 and ZVAD improve the storage properties of DMEM. PMID:18506560

  14. Management of Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Femoral Condyle.

    PubMed

    Shea, Kevin G; Carey, James L; Brown, Gregory A; Murray, Jayson N; Pezold, Ryan; Sevarino, Kaitlyn S

    2016-09-01

    The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons has developed the Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) document Management of Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Femoral Condyle. Evidence-based information, in conjunction with the clinical expertise of physicians, was used to develop the criteria to improve patient care and obtain the best outcomes while considering the subtleties and distinctions necessary in making clinical decisions. The AUC clinical patient scenarios were derived from patient indications that generally accompany osteochondritis dissecans of the femoral condyle, as well as from current evidence-based clinical practice guidelines and supporting literature. The 64 patient scenarios and 12 treatments were developed by the Writing Panel, a group of clinicians who are specialists in this AUC topic. Lastly, a separate, multidisciplinary Voting Panel (made up of specialists and nonspecialists) rated the appropriateness of treatment of each patient scenario using a 9-point scale to designate a treatment as Appropriate (median rating, 7 to 9), May Be Appropriate (median rating, 4 to 6), or Rarely Appropriate (median rating, 1 to 3). PMID:27479835

  15. Osteochondral tissue engineering: scaffolds, stem cells and applications

    PubMed Central

    Nooeaid, Patcharakamon; Salih, Vehid; Beier, Justus P; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2012-01-01

    Osteochondral tissue engineering has shown an increasing development to provide suitable strategies for the regeneration of damaged cartilage and underlying subchondral bone tissue. For reasons of the limitation in the capacity of articular cartilage to self-repair, it is essential to develop approaches based on suitable scaffolds made of appropriate engineered biomaterials. The combination of biodegradable polymers and bioactive ceramics in a variety of composite structures is promising in this area, whereby the fabrication methods, associated cells and signalling factors determine the success of the strategies. The objective of this review is to present and discuss approaches being proposed in osteochondral tissue engineering, which are focused on the application of various materials forming bilayered composite scaffolds, including polymers and ceramics, discussing the variety of scaffold designs and fabrication methods being developed. Additionally, cell sources and biological protein incorporation methods are discussed, addressing their interaction with scaffolds and highlighting the potential for creating a new generation of bilayered composite scaffolds that can mimic the native interfacial tissue properties, and are able to adapt to the biological environment. PMID:22452848

  16. The use of embryonic cells in the treatment of osteochondral defects of the knee: an ovine in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    MANUNTA, ANDREA FABIO; ZEDDE, PIETRO; PILICCHI, SUSANNA; ROCCA, STEFANO; POOL, ROY R.; DATTENA, MARIA; MASALA, GEROLAMO; MARA, LAURA; CASU, SARA; SANNA, DANIELA; MANUNTA, MARIA LUCIA; PASSINO, ERALDO SANNA

    2016-01-01

    Purpose the aim of this study was to determine whether local delivery of embryonic stem-like (ESL) cells into osteochondral defects in the femoral condyles of sheep would enhance regeneration of hyaline articular cartilage. Methods male ESL cells embedded in fibrin glue were engrafted into osteochondral defects in the medial condyles (ESL-M) of the left femur in 22 ewes. An identical defect was created in the medial condyle of the contralateral stifle joint and left untreated as a control (empty defect, ED). The ewes were divided into 5 groups. Four sheep each were euthanized at 1, 2, 6, and 12 months from surgery, and 6 ewes were euthanized 24 months post-implantation. To study the effect of varying loads on the long-term regeneration process, an identical defect was also created and ESL cell engraftment performed in the lateral condyle (ESL-L) of the left stifle joint of the animals in the 12- and 24-month groups. The evaluation of regenerated tissue was performed by biomechanical, macroscopic, histological, immunohistochemical (collagen type II) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) assays. Results no significant differences were found between treated and control sites in the biomechanical assays at any time point. ESL cell grafts showed significantly greater macroscopic evidence of regeneration as compared to controls at 24 months after surgery; significantly better histological evidence of repair in ESL-M samples versus controls was found throughout the considered period. At 24 months from surgery there was significantly improved integration of graft edges with the host tissue in the ESL-M as compared to the ESL-L samples, demonstrating that load bearing positively affects the long-term regeneration process. Conclusions ESL cells enhanced the regeneration of hyaline cartilage. FISH confirmed that the regenerative tissue originated from ESL cells. Clinical Relevance ESL cells are able to self-renew for prolonged periods without differentiation and, most

  17. The results of pregnancies after gender selection by pre implantation genetic diagnosis and its relation with couple's age

    PubMed Central

    Panahi, Sorayya; Fahami, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    Background: Non-medical utilization of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), like sex selection, is increasing, therefore it is necessary to follow-up the health and outcome of fertilization and newborn's birth followed PGD. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of fertilization after sex selection by PGD and the relation between the age of parents and the outcome of fertilization. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective descriptive correlative study conducted on 218 couples in Isfahan. Samples were selected through convenience sampling. The rate of chemical and clinical pregnancy and abortion, the frequency of success in achieving the desired sex, and the mean of gestational age and weight of newborns were gathered through reviewing medical files and phone interviews. Data was analyzed using independent t test and Pearson correlation test. Results: The rate of chemical and clinical pregnancy was 30.7% and 30.3% respectively, the rate of abortion was 26.9%, the frequency of success in achieving the desired sex was 100%, and the mean of gestational age and weight of newborns was 3260 (616) kg and 37.7 (2.07) weeks respectively. There was no significant relation between the age of parents and the rate of abortion, the rate of chemical and clinical pregnancy and newborn's gestational weight. But there was a significant relation between the age of men and gestational age of newborns (P = 0.04). Conclusions: PGD method was 100% successful in achieving the desired sex, but relatively high rate of abortion could indicate the effect of PGD on the embryo development process. PMID:26793251

  18. Osteochondral Fractures of the Lateral Femoral Trochlea in Young Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Stewart

    2016-01-01

    Method: Between May 2012 and September 2014 cluster of five patients with large osteochondral fractures of the lateral femoral trochlea were treated at our institution. These all occurred in high level male athletes, one at a decathlete and the other four soccer players. The MRI scan showed a characteristic appearance of a large subchondral fracture involving most of the lateral femoral trochlea. All patients were symptomatic. The patients were treated with open reduction and internal fixation using headless compression screws. The operative technique and short term results will be outlined. Results: Fixation appears successful in most cases. Conclusion: This appears to be a repetitive trauma related injury that occurs in young high-level athletes.

  19. [Animal experiments on cementing small osteochondral fragments with fibrin glue].

    PubMed

    Zilch, H

    1980-01-01

    An experiment on revascularization of glued osteochondral fragments was carried out. A chiseled part of the medial femoral condyle of the knee joint of the rabbit was fixed on the right side with an acryl adhesive and on the left side with a new fibrinogen adhesive system (FAS), consisting of highly concentrated fibrinogen, thrombin, and factor XIII. The animals were sacrificed after three, six, ten, and twenty eight days. The FAS is changed into granulation tissue rich in vessels and, therefore, there is a quick revascularization of the fragments soon after three days. On the contrary the acryl adhesive is a foreign body and prevents ingrowth of capillaries during the time of investigation. Immobilization with plaster is necessary to prevent the fragment from gliding off. PMID:6972890

  20. Cartilage resurfacing potential of PLGA scaffolds loaded with autologous cells from cartilage, fat, and bone marrow in an ovine model of osteochondral focal defect.

    PubMed

    Caminal, M; Peris, D; Fonseca, C; Barrachina, J; Codina, D; Rabanal, R M; Moll, X; Morist, A; García, F; Cairó, J J; Gòdia, F; Pla, A; Vives, J

    2016-08-01

    Current developments in tissue engineering strategies for articular cartilage regeneration focus on the design of supportive three-dimensional scaffolds and their use in combination with cells from different sources. The challenge of translating initial successes in small laboratory animals into the clinics involves pilot studies in large animal models, where safety and efficacy should be investigated during prolonged follow-up periods. Here we present, in a single study, the long-term (up to 1 year) effect of biocompatible porous scaffolds non-seeded and seeded with fresh ex vivo expanded autologous progenitor cells that were derived from three different cell sources [cartilage, fat and bone marrow (BM)] in order to evaluate their advantages as cartilage resurfacing agents. An ovine model of critical size osteochondral focal defect was used and the test items were implanted arthroscopically into the knees. Evidence of regeneration of hyaline quality tissue was observed at 6 and 12 months post-treatment with variable success depending on the cell source. Cartilage and BM-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC), but not those derived from fat, resulted in the best quality of new cartilage, as judged qualitatively by magnetic resonance imaging and macroscopic assessment, and by histological quantitative scores. Given the limitations in sourcing cartilage tissue and the risk of donor site morbidity, BM emerges as a preferential source of MSC for novel cartilage resurfacing therapies of osteochondral defects using copolymeric poly-D,L-lactide-co-glycolide scaffolds. PMID:25595211

  1. Articular chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells seeded on biodegradable scaffolds for the repair of cartilage in a rat osteochondral defect model.

    PubMed

    Dahlin, Rebecca L; Kinard, Lucas A; Lam, Johnny; Needham, Clark J; Lu, Steven; Kasper, F Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G

    2014-08-01

    This work investigated the ability of co-cultures of articular chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to repair articular cartilage in osteochondral defects. Bovine articular chondrocytes and rat MSCs were seeded in isolation or in co-culture onto electrospun poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds and implanted into an osteochondral defect in the trochlear groove of 12-week old Lewis rats. Additionally, a blank PCL scaffold and untreated defect were investigated. After 12 weeks, the extent of cartilage repair was analyzed through histological analysis, and the extent of bone healing was assessed by quantifying the total volume of mineralized bone in the defect through microcomputed tomography. Histological analysis revealed that the articular chondrocytes and co-cultures led to repair tissue that consisted of more hyaline-like cartilage tissue that was thicker and possessed more intense Safranin O staining. The MSC, blank PCL scaffold, and empty treatment groups generally led to the formation of fibrocartilage repair tissue. Microcomputed tomography revealed that while there was an equivalent amount of mineralized bone formation in the MSC, blank PCL, and empty treatment groups, the defects treated with chondrocytes or co-cultures had negligible mineralized bone formation. Overall, even with a reduced number of chondrocytes, co-cultures led to an equal level of cartilage repair compared to the chondrocyte samples, thus demonstrating the potential for the use of co-cultures of articular chondrocytes and MSCs for the in vivo repair of cartilage defects. PMID:24927682

  2. Microstructural Remodeling of Articular Cartilage Following Defect Repair by Osteochondral Autograft Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Raub, CB; Hsu, SC; Chan, EF; Shirazi, R; Chen, AC; Chnari, E; Semler, EJ; Sah, RL

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess collagen network alterations occurring with flow and other abnormalities of articular cartilage at medial femoral condyle (MFC) sites repaired with osteochondral autograft (OATS) after 6 and 12 months, using quantitative polarized light microscopy (qPLM) and other histopathological methods Design The collagen network structure of articular cartilage of OATS-repaired defects and non-operated contralateral control sites were compared by qPLM analysis of parallelism index (PI), orientation angle (α) relative to the local tissue axes, and retardance (Γ) as a function of depth. qPLM parameter maps were also compared to ICRS and Modified O’Driscoll grades, and cell and matrix sub-scores, for sections stained with H&E and Safranin-O, and for Collagen-I and II Results Relative to non-operated normal cartilage, OATS-repaired regions exhibited structural deterioration, with low PI and more horizontal α, and unique structural alteration in adjacent host cartilage: more aligned superficial zone, and reoriented deep zone lateral to the graft, and matrix disorganization in cartilage overhanging the graft. Shifts in α and PI from normal site-specific values were correlated with histochemical abnormalities and co-localized with changes in cell organization/orientation, cloning, or loss, indicative of cartilage flow, remodeling, and deterioration, respectively Conclusions qPLM reveals a number of unique localized alterations of the collagen network in both adjacent host and implanted cartilage in OATS-repaired defects, associated with abnormal chondrocyte organization. These alterations are consistent with mechanobiological processes and the direction and magnitude of cartilage strain. PMID:23528954

  3. Integrating biologically inspired nanomaterials and table-top stereolithography for 3D printed biomimetic osteochondral scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Castro, Nathan J; O'Brien, Joseph; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2015-09-01

    The osteochondral interface of an arthritic joint is notoriously difficult to regenerate due to its extremely poor regenerative capacity and complex stratified architecture. Native osteochondral tissue extracellular matrix is composed of numerous nanoscale organic and inorganic constituents. Although various tissue engineering strategies exist in addressing osteochondral defects, limitations persist with regards to tissue scaffolding which exhibit biomimetic cues at the nano to micro scale. In an effort to address this, the current work focused on 3D printing biomimetic nanocomposite scaffolds for improved osteochondral tissue regeneration. For this purpose, two biologically-inspired nanomaterials have been synthesized consisting of (1) osteoconductive nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA) (primary inorganic component of bone) and (2) core-shell poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanospheres encapsulated with chondrogenic transforming growth-factor β1 (TGF-β1) for sustained delivery. Then, a novel table-top stereolithography 3D printer and the nano-ink (i.e., nHA + nanosphere + hydrogel) were employed to fabricate a porous and highly interconnected osteochondral scaffold with hierarchical nano-to-micro structure and spatiotemporal bioactive factor gradients. Our results showed that human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell adhesion, proliferation, and osteochondral differentiation were greatly improved in the biomimetic graded 3D printed osteochondral construct in vitro. The current work served to illustrate the efficacy of the nano-ink and current 3D printing technology for efficient fabrication of a novel nanocomposite hydrogel scaffold. In addition, tissue-specific growth factors illustrated a synergistic effect leading to increased cell adhesion and directed stem cell differentiation. PMID:26234364

  4. Integrating biologically inspired nanomaterials and table-top stereolithography for 3D printed biomimetic osteochondral scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Nathan J.; O'Brien, Joseph; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2015-08-01

    The osteochondral interface of an arthritic joint is notoriously difficult to regenerate due to its extremely poor regenerative capacity and complex stratified architecture. Native osteochondral tissue extracellular matrix is composed of numerous nanoscale organic and inorganic constituents. Although various tissue engineering strategies exist in addressing osteochondral defects, limitations persist with regards to tissue scaffolding which exhibit biomimetic cues at the nano to micro scale. In an effort to address this, the current work focused on 3D printing biomimetic nanocomposite scaffolds for improved osteochondral tissue regeneration. For this purpose, two biologically-inspired nanomaterials have been synthesized consisting of (1) osteoconductive nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA) (primary inorganic component of bone) and (2) core-shell poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanospheres encapsulated with chondrogenic transforming growth-factor β1 (TGF-β1) for sustained delivery. Then, a novel table-top stereolithography 3D printer and the nano-ink (i.e., nHA + nanosphere + hydrogel) were employed to fabricate a porous and highly interconnected osteochondral scaffold with hierarchical nano-to-micro structure and spatiotemporal bioactive factor gradients. Our results showed that human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell adhesion, proliferation, and osteochondral differentiation were greatly improved in the biomimetic graded 3D printed osteochondral construct in vitro. The current work served to illustrate the efficacy of the nano-ink and current 3D printing technology for efficient fabrication of a novel nanocomposite hydrogel scaffold. In addition, tissue-specific growth factors illustrated a synergistic effect leading to increased cell adhesion and directed stem cell differentiation.

  5. Effect of the Presence of Subchondral Cysts on Treatment Results of Autologous Osteochondral Graft Transfer in Osteochondral Lesions of the Talus.

    PubMed

    Gül, Murat; Çetinkaya, Engin; Aykut, Ümit Selçuk; Özkul, Barış; Saygılı, Mehmet Selçuk; Akman, Yunus Emre; Kabukcuoglu, Yavuz Selim

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to clinically evaluate whether the presence of subchondral cysts had an effect on the treatment results of autologous osteochondral graft transfer in osteochondral lesions of the talus. Patients were enrolled in the present study according to the inclusion criteria. In the evaluation, we divided the patients into 2 groups according to presence (n = 13 patients) or absence (n = 15 patients) of a subchondral cyst. The mean age, body mass index, follow-up period, and lesion size in each group were measured and compared, and no statistically significant differences were found between the 2 groups (p > .05). The clinical assessment was performed using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Hindfoot scoring system, visual analog scale, and International Knee Society scoring system. No statistically significant difference was found between the pre- and postoperative scores of the 2 patient groups (p > .05). The successful results in both groups after a 2-year follow-up period have demonstrated that treatment of osteochondral lesions of the talus with osteochondral graft transfer is a safe method that can be performed independently of the presence of a subchondral cyst. PMID:27432027

  6. Gingival Mesenchymal Stem Cell (GMSC) Delivery System Based on RGD-Coupled Alginate Hydrogel with Antimicrobial Properties: A Novel Treatment Modality for Peri-Implantitis

    PubMed Central

    Diniz, Ivana M. A.; Chen, Chider; Ansari, Sahar; Zadeh, Homayoun H.; Moshaverinia, Maryam; Chee, Daniel; Marques, Márcia M.; Shi, Songtao; Moshaverinia, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Peri-implantitis is one of the most common inflammatory complications in dental implantology. Similar to periodontitis, in peri-implantitis, destructive inflammatory changes take place in the tissues surrounding a dental implant. Bacterial flora at the failing implant sites resemble the pathogens in periodontal disease and consist of Gram-negative anaerobic bacteria including Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa). Here we demonstrate the effectiveness of a silver lactate (SL)-containing RGD-coupled alginate hydrogel scaffold as a promising stem cell delivery vehicle with antimicrobial properties. Materials and Methods Gingival mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs) or human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSCs) were encapsulated in SL-loaded alginate hydrogel microspheres. Stem cell viability, proliferation, and osteo-differentiation capacity were analyzed. Results Our results showed that SL exhibited antimicrobial properties against Aa in a dose-dependent manner, with 0.50 mg/ml showing the greatest antimicrobial properties while still maintaining cell viability. At this concentration, SL-containing alginate hydrogel was able to inhibit Aa on the surface of Ti discs and significantly reduce the bacterial load in Aa suspensions. Silver ions were effectively released from the SL-loaded alginate microspheres for up to 2 weeks. Osteogenic differentiation of GMSCs and hBMMSCs encapsulated in the SL-loaded alginate microspheres were confirmed by the intense mineral matrix deposition and high expression of osteogenesis-related genes. Conclusion Taken together, our findings confirm that GMSCs encapsulated in RGD-modified alginate hydrogel containing SL show promise for bone tissue engineering with antimicrobial properties against Aa bacteria in vitro. PMID:26216081

  7. Retrospective Cohort Study of 207 Cases of Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Green, Daniel W.; Arbucci, John; Silberman, Jason; Luderowski, Eva; Uppstrom, Tyler J.; Nguyen, Joseph; Tuca, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Describe the clinical characteristics, image findings, and outcomes of patients with juvenile osteochondritis dissecans (JOCD) of the knee. To our knowledge, this is the largest single-surgeon cohort of JOCD patients. Methods: Retrospective cohort study of knee JOCD patients assessed by a single pediatric orthopaedic surgeon at a tertiary care center between 2005-2015. All diagnoses were confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients with patellar dislocations or osteochondral fractures were excluded. Demographic data, sports played, comorbidities, surgical procedures, and clinical data were extracted from charts. Images were analyzed to identify the location and size of lesions. Chi-square or Fisher’s exact tests were used to compare discrete variables, and Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal Wallis tests to compare continuous variables between groups. P-values of <0.05 were considered significant. Results: Sample consisted of 180 patients (207 knees), 124 boys and 56 girls. Average age at diagnosis was 12.8 years (7.5-17.5). Majority were active in sports (80.8%), primary soccer (36.7%) and basketball (29.4%). JOCD was present bilaterally in 27 patients (15%), 14 knees had bifocal OCD (6.8%), and only 1 patient had bifocal lesions in both knees. Most common location was medial femoral condyle (56.3%) followed by lateral femoral condyle (23.1%), trochlea (11.4%), patella (9%), and tibia (0.5%). In the sagittal view, most common location was the middle third of the condyles (48.7%). Surgery was performed in 72 knees (34.8%), with an average age at surgery of 14.1 years (9.3-18.1). Bilateral JOCD was present in 13 surgical patients (18.8%), but only 3 patients had bilateral surgery. Two operative patients had bifocal JOCD (2.7%) and surgery on both lesions. Location distribution did not differ between surgical and non-surgical lesions. The average normalized area of non-surgical JOCD lesions was 6.8 (0.1-18), whereas surgical lesions averaged a

  8. COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, B.C.

    1963-02-26

    This patent relates to a releasable coupling connecting a control rod to a control rod drive. This remotely operable coupling mechanism can connect two elements which are laterally and angviarly misaligned, and provides a means for sensing the locked condition of the elements. The coupling utilizes a spherical bayonet joint which is locked against rotation by a ball detent lock. (AEC)

  9. Hierarchical Structure of Articular Bone-Cartilage Interface and Its Potential Application for Osteochondral Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Weiguo; Qin, Lian; Li, Dichen; Wang, Jin; Jin, Zhongmin

    2010-09-01

    The artificial biodegradable osteochondral construct is one of mostly promising lifetime substitute in the joint replacement. And the complex hierarchical structure of natural joint is important in developing the osteochondral construct. However, the architecture features of the interface between cartilage and bone, in particular those at the micro-and nano-structural level, remain poorly understood. This paper investigates these structural data of the cartilage-bone interface by micro computerized tomography (μCT) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The result of μCT shows that important bone parameters and the density of articular cartilage are all related to the position in the hierarchical structure. The conjunctions of bone and cartilage were defined by SEM. All of the study results would be useful for the design of osteochondral construct further manufactured by nano-tech. A three-dimensional model with gradient porous structure is constructed in the environment of Pro/ENGINEERING software.

  10. Acute Osteochondral Fractures in the Lower Extremities - Approach to Identification and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, M.E; DaCambra, M.P; Jibri, Z; Dhillon, S; Jen, H; Jomha, N.M

    2015-01-01

    Chondral and osteochondral fractures of the lower extremities are important injuries because they can cause pain and dysfunction and often lead to osteoarthritis. These injuries can be misdiagnosed initially which may impact on the healing potential and result in poor long-term outcome. This comprehensive review focuses on current pitfalls in diagnosing acute osteochondral lesions, potential investigative techniques to minimize diagnostic errors as well as surgical treatment options. Acute osteochondral fractures are frequently missed and can be identified more accurately with specific imaging techniques. A number of different methods can be used to fix these fractures but attention to early diagnosis is required to limit progression to osteoarthritis. These fractures are common with joint injuries and early diagnosis and treatment should lead to improved long term outcomes. PMID:26587063

  11. TREATMENT OF OSTEOCHONDRAL LESIONS OF THE TALUS BY MEANS OF THEARTHROSCOPY-ASSISTED MICROPERFORATION TECHNIQUE

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, Everton; de Queiroz, Felipe; Lopes, Osmar Valadão; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate patients affected by osteochondral fractures of the talus who were treated surgically by means of arthroscopy-assisted microperforation. Methods: A retrospective study was carried out on 24 patients with osteochondral lesions of the talus who underwent microperforation assisted by videoarthroscopy of the ankle. They were evaluated using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score system before and after the operation. Results: There were 19 men and 5 women, with a mean age of 35.3 years (minimum of 17 years and maximum of 54 years). The minimum follow-up was two years (maximum of 39 months). All the patients showed an improvement in AOFAS score after surgery, with an average improvement of around 22.5 points. Conclusion: Videoarthroscopy-assisted microperforation is a good option for treating osteochondral lesions of the talus and provides good functional results. PMID:27027076

  12. Osteochondritis Dissecans Involving the Trochlear Groove Treated With Retrograde Drilling

    PubMed Central

    Kaji, Yoshio; Nakamura, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Konosuke; Yamamoto, Tetsuji

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) occurs frequently in the humeral capitellum of the upper extremity, whereas OCD involving the trochlear groove (trochlear groove OCD) is rarely reported. A standard treatment for trochlear groove OCD has therefore not been determined, although several methods have been tried. The case of a 14-year-old male gymnast with bilateral trochlear groove OCD is presented. Retrograde drilling from the lateral condyle of the humerus was applied for the OCD lesion of the left elbow, since it was larger in size than that in the right elbow and was symptomatic. Conversely, since the right lesion was small and asymptomatic, it was managed conservatively. After treatment, consolidation of the OCD lesions was observed in both elbows. However, the time to healing was shorter in the left elbow treated surgically than in the right elbow managed conservatively. In conclusion, retrograde drilling is a very simple and minimally invasive treatment. This case suggests that retrograde drilling for trochlear groove OCD may be a useful procedure that may accelerate the healing process for OCD lesions. PMID:26356703

  13. Citrate cross-linked gels with strain reversibility and viscoelastic behavior accelerate healing of osteochondral defects in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Paulomi; Rameshbabu, Arun Prabhu; Dhara, Santanu

    2014-07-22

    Most living tissues are viscoelastic in nature. Self-repair due to the dissipation of energy by reversible bonds prevents the rupture of the molecular backbone in these tissues. Recent studies, therefore, have aimed to synthesize biomaterials that approximate the mechanical performance of biological materials with self-recovery properties. We report an environmentally friendly method for the development of ionotropically cross-linked viscoelastic chitosan gels with a modulus comparable to that of living tissues. The strain recovery property was found to be highest for the gels with the lowest cross-linking density. The force-displacement curve showed significant hysteresis due to the presence of reversible bonds in the cross-linked gels. Nanoindentation studies demonstrated the creep phenomenon for the cross-linked chitosan gels. Creep, hysteresis, and plasticity index confirmed the viscoelastic behavior of the cross-linked gels. The viscoelastic gels were implanted at osteochondral defect sites to assess the tissue regeneration ability. In vivo results demonstrated early cartilage formation and woven bone deposition for defects filled with the gels compared to nontreated defects. PMID:24971647

  14. Osteochondritis dissecans of the lateral humeral condyle in a table tennis player.

    PubMed

    Pintore, E; Maffulli, N

    1991-08-01

    The case of a table tennis player suffering from intra-articular loose bodies of the elbow is reported. The patient developed the first signs of osteochondritis dissecans of the right lateral humeral condyle at age 16 but underwent surgery only 6 yr later. He has now resumed training and competition, despite some residual stiffness due to early osteoarthritis. This is the first case of osteochondritis dissecans of the elbow ascribed to this sport. It was probably due to repetitive valgus compressive stresses at the radiocapitellar joint during the forced movements imposed by high-level table tennis in a young athlete. PMID:1956260

  15. Chondroblastoma of the Knee Treated with Resection and Osteochondral Allograft Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Judd; Broehm, Cory; Treme, Gehron

    2014-01-01

    Case. This case report describes the operative management of 16-year-old male with a symptomatic chondroblastoma of the distal femur with breach of the chondral surface. Following appropriate imaging and core needle biopsy, the diagnosis was confirmed histologically. The patient then underwent intralesional curettage and osteochondral allograft reconstruction of the defect. At one-year follow-up the patient was pain-free and has obtained excellent range of motion. There is radiographic evidence of allograft incorporation and no evidence of local recurrence. Conclusion. Osteochondral allograft reconstruction is an effective option following marginal resection and curettage of chondroblastoma involving the chondral surface of the distal femur. PMID:25548701

  16. [Fibrinogen glue in osteochondral fractures with small fragments of the upper limb].

    PubMed

    Zilch, H; Talke, M

    1987-01-01

    Fibrin sealant presents a satisfactory possibility for reconstruction of the joint surface, especially in cases of little osteochondral fragments. Our experience in 16 patients is detailed. The patients average age was 23 years. 34 osteochondral fragments had been glued in these 16 cases, 10 times at the finger joints, 4 times at the caput radii and 2 times at the trochlea humeri. The patients, who had been operated on from June 1979 to December 1984 have been followed up at an average of 2,1 years after the fibrin gluing. This method can avoid an early arthrodesis or oversized osteosynthetic material. PMID:2447845

  17. The Maturation of Synthetic Scaffolds for Osteochondral Donor Sites of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Bedi, Asheesh; Foo, Li Foong; Williams, Riley J.; Potter, Hollis G.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to analyze the morphological imaging characteristics and incorporation of TruFit bone graft substitute (BGS) plugs using cartilage-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and quantitative T2 mapping. Design: Twenty-six patients (mean age, 28.72 years; range, 11-56 years) underwent osteochondral autologous transplantation (OATS) for chondral defects with filling of the knee joint donor sites using Trufit BGS plugs. The mean follow-up interval between implantation and MRI analysis was 21.3 months (range, 6-39 months). During this period, 43 cartilage-sensitive and 25 quantitative T2-mapping MRI studies were performed. The donor sites were assessed for plug and interface morphology, displacement, hypertrophy, subchondral edema, presence of bony overgrowth, percentage fill, and degree of incorporation. T2 relaxation times were measured for the superficial and deep layers of the repair tissue. A linear regression and correlational analysis was performed with Bonferroni correction, and P < 0.05 was defined as significant. Results: Longitudinal analysis revealed favorable plug appearance at early follow-up (≤6 months), with 75% of plugs demonstrating flush morphology and 78% demonstrating near complete to complete fill. Plug appearance deteriorated at intermediate follow-up (~12 months), with only 26% of plugs demonstrating flush morphology and 52% with near complete or complete fill. Plug appearance substantially improved with longer follow-up (≥16 months), with 70% of plugs demonstrating flush morphology and 90% demonstrating near complete or complete fill. Interface resorption was common at ~12 months (P < 0.0001) and was associated with older age (P = 0.01) or a single-plug configuration (P = 0.04). T2 values for the repair cartilage approached that of normal cartilage with increasing duration after surgery (P < 0.004), more so for single- compared with multiple-plug configurations (P = 0.03). Conclusions: The Trufit BGS

  18. Osteochondral Tissue Cell Viability Is Affected by Total Impulse during Impaction Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Balash, Paul; Kang, Richard W.; Schwenke, Thorsten; Cole, Brian J.; Wimmer, Markus A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Osteochondral graft transplantation has garnered significant attention because of its ability to replace the lesion with true hyaline cartilage. However, surgical impaction of the graft to anchor it into the defect site can be traumatic and lead to cell death and cartilage degeneration. This study aimed to test the hypothesis that increasing impulse magnitude during impaction of osteochondral plugs has a direct effect on loss of cell viability. Design: In this controlled laboratory study, the impaction force was kept constant while the impulse was varied. Ninety-six osteochondral plugs were extracted from the trochlea of bovine stifle joints and were randomly assigned into 3 experimental and 1 (nonimpacted) control group. The transferred impulse of the experimental groups reflected the median and the lower and upper quartiles of preceding clinical measurements. Data were obtained at day 0, day 4, and day 8; at each point, cell viability was assessed using the Live/Dead staining kit and histological assessments were performed to visualize matrix structural changes. Results: After impaction, cartilage samples stayed intact and did not show any histological signs of matrix disruption. As expected, higher impulse magnitudes introduced more cell death; however, this relationship was lost at day 8 after impaction. Conclusion: Impulse magnitude has a direct effect on cell viability of the graft. Because impulse magnitude is mostly governed by the press-fit characteristics of the recipient site, this study aids in the definition of optimal insertion conditions for osteochondral grafts. PMID:26069558

  19. Cartilage restoration of the hip using fresh osteochondral allograft: resurfacing the potholes.

    PubMed

    Khanna, V; Tushinski, D M; Drexler, M; Backstein, D B; Gross, A E; Safir, O A; Kuzyk, P R

    2014-11-01

    Cartilage defects of the hip cause significant pain and may lead to arthritic changes that necessitate hip replacement. We propose the use of fresh osteochondral allografts as an option for the treatment of such defects in young patients. Here we present the results of fresh osteochondral allografts for cartilage defects in 17 patients in a prospective study. The underlying diagnoses for the cartilage defects were osteochondritis dissecans in eight and avascular necrosis in six. Two had Legg-Calve-Perthes and one a femoral head fracture. Pre-operatively, an MRI was used to determine the size of the cartilage defect and the femoral head diameter. All patients underwent surgical hip dislocation with a trochanteric slide osteotomy for placement of the allograft. The mean age at surgery was 25.9 years (17 to 44) and mean follow-up was 41.6 months (3 to 74). The mean Harris hip score was significantly better after surgery (p<0.01) and 13 patients had fair to good outcomes. One patient required a repeat allograft, one patient underwent hip replacement and two patients are awaiting hip replacement. Fresh osteochondral allograft is a reasonable treatment option for hip cartilage defects in young patients. PMID:25381401

  20. Osteochondral Autograft Transfer for Treatment of Metacarpophalangeal and Interphalangeal Cartilage Defects.

    PubMed

    Micev, Alan J; Gaspar, Michael P; Culp, Randall W

    2016-09-01

    There is no general consensus regarding the optimal surgical treatment for cartilage defects of the metacarpophalangeal and interphalangeal joints in active patients who wish to preserve motion and functionality. We describe our technique of arthroscopically harvested femoral osteochondral autograft for treatment of metacarpophalangeal and interphalangeal cartilage defects. PMID:27280753

  1. Osteochondral defects of the upper extremity treated with particulated juvenile cartilage transfer.

    PubMed

    Dunn, John C; Kusnezov, Nicholas; Orr, Justin; Mitchell, Justin S

    2015-12-01

    We present the novel use of particulated juvenile cartilage transfer in the upper extremity. Our patient is an active duty solider with an osteochondral defect (OCD) of the capitellum that he sustained after an improvised explosive devise injury to his left elbow. PMID:26568723

  2. COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Frisch, E.; Johnson, C.G.

    1962-05-15

    A detachable coupling arrangement is described which provides for varying the length of the handle of a tool used in relatively narrow channels. The arrangement consists of mating the key and keyhole formations in the cooperating handle sections. (AEC)

  3. CHONDROCYTE VIABILITY IS HIGHER AFTER PROLONGED STORAGE AT 37°C THAN AT 4°C FOR OSTEOCHONDRAL GRAFTS

    PubMed Central

    Pallante, Andrea L.; Bae, Won C.; Chen, Albert C.; Görtz, Simon; Bugbee, William D.; Sah, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Osteochondral allografts are currently stored at 4°C for 2–6 weeks before implantation. At 4°C, chondrocyte viability, especially in the superficial zone, deteriorates starting at 2 weeks. Alternative storage conditions could maintain chondrocyte viability beyond 2 weeks, and thereby facilitate increased graft availability and enhanced graft quality. Purpose Determine effects of prolonged 37°C storage compared to traditional 4°C storage on chondrocyte viability and cartilage matrix content. Study Design Controlled Laboratory Study Methods Osteochondral samples from humeral heads of adult goats were analyzed (i) fresh, or after storage in medium for (ii) 14d at 4°C including 10% FBS, (iii) 28d at 4°C including 10% FBS, (iv) 28d at 37°C without FBS, (v) 28d at 37°C including 2% FBS, or (vi) 28d at 37°C including 10% FBS. Portions of samples were analyzed by microscopy after LIVE/DEAD® staining to determine chondrocyte viability and density, both en face (to visualize the articular surface) and vertically (overall and in superficial, middle, and deep zones). The remaining cartilage was analyzed for sulfated-glycosaminoglycan and collagen. Results 37°C storage maintained high chondrocyte viability compared to 4°C storage. Viability of samples after 28d at 37°C was ~80% at the cartilage surface en face, ~65% in the superficial zone, and ~70% in the middle zone, which was much higher than ~45%, ~20%, and ~35%, respectively, in 4°C samples after 28d, and slightly decreased from ~100%, ~85%, and ~95%, respectively, in fresh controls. Cartilage thickness, glycosaminoglycan content, and collagen content were maintained for 37°C and 4°C samples compared to fresh controls. Conclusion 37°C storage of osteochondral grafts supports long-term chondrocyte viability, especially at the vulnerable surface and superficial zone of cartilage. Clinical Relevance Storage of allografts at physiological temperature of 37°C may prolong storage duration, improve

  4. Development of novel three-dimensional printed scaffolds for osteochondral regeneration.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Benjamin; Zhu, Wei; Li, Jiaoyan; Lee, James D; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2015-01-01

    As modern medicine advances, various methodologies are being explored and developed in order to treat severe osteochondral defects in joints. However, it is still very challenging to cure the osteochondral defects due to their poor inherent regenerative capacity, complex stratified architecture, and disparate biomechanical properties. The objective of this study is to create novel three-dimensional (3D) printed osteochondral scaffolds with both excellent interfacial mechanical properties and biocompatibility for facilitating human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) growth and chondrogenic differentiation. For this purpose, we designed and 3D printed a series of innovative bi-phasic 3D models that mimic the osteochondral region of articulate joints. Our mechanical testing results showed that our bi-phasic scaffolds with key structures have enhanced mechanical characteristics in compression (a maximum Young's modulus of 31 MPa) and shear (a maximum fracture strength of 5768 N/mm(2)) when compared with homogenous designs. These results are also correlated with numerical simulation. In order to improve their biocompatibility, the scaffolds' surfaces were further modified with acetylated collagen (one of the main components in osteochondral extracellular matrix). MSC proliferation results demonstrated that incorporation of a collagen, along with biomimetically designed micro-features, can greatly enhance MSC growth after 5 days in vitro. Two weeks' chondrogenic differentiation results showed that our novel scaffolds (dubbed "key" scaffolds), both with and without surface collagen modification, displayed enhanced chondrogenesis (e.g., 130%, 114%, and 236% increases in glycosaminoglycan, type II collagen deposition, and total protein content on collagen-modified key scaffolds when compared with homogeneous controls). PMID:25088966

  5. Development of Novel Three-Dimensional Printed Scaffolds for Osteochondral Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Benjamin; Zhu, Wei; Li, Jiaoyan; Lee, James D.

    2015-01-01

    As modern medicine advances, various methodologies are being explored and developed in order to treat severe osteochondral defects in joints. However, it is still very challenging to cure the osteochondral defects due to their poor inherent regenerative capacity, complex stratified architecture, and disparate biomechanical properties. The objective of this study is to create novel three-dimensional (3D) printed osteochondral scaffolds with both excellent interfacial mechanical properties and biocompatibility for facilitating human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) growth and chondrogenic differentiation. For this purpose, we designed and 3D printed a series of innovative bi-phasic 3D models that mimic the osteochondral region of articulate joints. Our mechanical testing results showed that our bi-phasic scaffolds with key structures have enhanced mechanical characteristics in compression (a maximum Young's modulus of 31 MPa) and shear (a maximum fracture strength of 5768 N/mm2) when compared with homogenous designs. These results are also correlated with numerical simulation. In order to improve their biocompatibility, the scaffolds' surfaces were further modified with acetylated collagen (one of the main components in osteochondral extracellular matrix). MSC proliferation results demonstrated that incorporation of a collagen, along with biomimetically designed micro-features, can greatly enhance MSC growth after 5 days in vitro. Two weeks' chondrogenic differentiation results showed that our novel scaffolds (dubbed “key” scaffolds), both with and without surface collagen modification, displayed enhanced chondrogenesis (e.g., 130%, 114%, and 236% increases in glycosaminoglycan, type II collagen deposition, and total protein content on collagen-modified key scaffolds when compared with homogeneous controls). PMID:25088966

  6. Porous tantalum and poly-epsilon-caprolactone biocomposites for osteochondral defect repair: preliminary studies in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Mrosek, Eike H; Schagemann, Jan C; Chung, Hsi-Wei; Fitzsimmons, James S; Yaszemski, Michael J; Mardones, Rodrigo M; O'Driscoll, Shawn W; Reinholz, Gregory G

    2010-02-01

    Currently, various techniques are in use for the repair of osteochondral defects, none of them being truly satisfactory and they are often two step procedures. Comorbidity due to cancellous bone harvest from the iliac crest further complicates the procedure. Our previous in vitro studies suggest that porous tantalum (TM) or poly-epsilon-caprolactone scaffolds (PCL) in combination with periosteal grafts could be used for osteochondral defect repair. In this in vivo study, cylindrical osteochondral defects were created on the medial and lateral condyles of 10 rabbits and filled with TM/periosteum or PCL/periosteum biosynthetic composites (n = 8 each). The regenerated osteochondral tissue was then analyzed histologically, and evaluated in an independent and blinded manner by five different observers using a 30-point histological score. The overall histological score for PCL/periosteum was significantly better than for TM/periosteum. However, most of the regenerates were well integrated with the surrounding bone (PCL/periosteum, n = 6.4; TM/periosteum, n = 7) along with partial restoration of the tidemark (PCL/periosteum, n = 4.4; TM/periosteum, n = 5.6). A cover of hyaline-like morphology was found after PCL/periosteum treatment (n = 4.8), yet the cartilage yields were inconsistent. In conclusion, the applied TM and PCL scaffolds promoted excellent subchondral bone regeneration. Neo-cartilage formation from periosteum supported by a scaffold was inconsistent. This is the first study to show in vivo results of both PCL and TM scaffolds for a novel approach to osteochondral defect repair. PMID:19743507

  7. Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Catherine; Scott, Larry

    This brochure explains what a cochlear implant is, lists the types of individuals with deafness who may be helped by a cochlear implant, describes the process of evaluating people for cochlear implants, discusses the surgical process for implanting the aid, traces the path of sound through the cochlear implant to the brain, notes the costs of…

  8. Comparative repair capacity of knee osteochondral defects using regenerated silk fiber scaffolds and fibrin glue with/without autologous chondrocytes during 36 weeks in rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Kazemnejad, Somaieh; Khanmohammadi, Manijeh; Mobini, Sahba; Taghizadeh-Jahed, Masoud; Khanjani, Sayeh; Arasteh, Shaghayegh; Golshahi, Hannaneh; Torkaman, Giti; Ravanbod, Roya; Heidari-Vala, Hamed; Moshiri, Ali; Tahmasebi, Mohammad-Naghi; Akhondi, Mohammad-Mehdi

    2016-06-01

    The reconstruction capability of osteochondral (OCD) defects using silk-based scaffolds has been demonstrated in a few studies. However, improvement in the mechanical properties of natural scaffolds is still challengeable. Here, we investigate the in vivo repair capacity of OCD defects using a novel Bombyx mori silk-based composite scaffold with great mechanical properties and porosity during 36 weeks. After evaluation of the in vivo biocompatibility and degradation rate of these scaffolds, we examined the effectiveness of these fabricated scaffolds accompanied with/without autologous chondrocytes in the repair of OCD lesions of rabbit knees after 12 and 36 weeks. Moreover, the efficiency of these scaffolds was compared with fibrin glue (FG) as a natural carrier of chondrocytes using parallel clinical, histopathological and mechanical examinations. The data on subcutaneous implantation in mice showed that the designed scaffolds have a suitable in vivo degradation rate and regenerative capacity. The repair ability of chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds was typically higher than the scaffolds alone. After 36 weeks of implantation, most parts of the defects reconstructed by chondrocytes-seeded silk scaffolds (SFC) were hyaline-like cartilage. However, spontaneous healing and filling with a scaffold alone did not eventuate in typical repair. We could not find significant differences between quantitative histopathological and mechanical data of SFC and FGC. The fabricated constructs consisting of regenerated silk fiber scaffolds and chondrocytes are safe and suitable for in vivo repair of OCD defects and promising for future clinical trial studies. PMID:26822846

  9. Osteochondral Regeneration: Tuning Cell Differentiation into a 3D Scaffold Presenting a Pore Shape Gradient for Osteochondral Regeneration (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 14/2016).

    PubMed

    Di Luca, Andrea; Lorenzo-Moldero, Ivan; Mota, Carlos; Lepedda, Antonio; Auhl, Dietmar; Van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2016-07-01

    A combination of human mesenchymal stem cells with additive manufacturing technology for the fabrication of scaffolds with instructive properties is presented by Lorenzo Moroni and co-workers on page 1753. This new fiber deposition pattern allows the generation of pores of different shapes within the same construct. The most rhomboidal pore geometry sustained enhances alkaline phosphatase activity and osteogenic related genes expression with respect to the other gradient zones when the gradient scaffold is cultured in a medium supporting both osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. This may contribute to enhance osteochondral regeneration in orthopedic treatments. PMID:27436107

  10. Survival and Reoperation Rate Following Osteochondral Allograft Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Rachel M.; Levy, David; Scalise, Pamela Nina; Smith, Margaret Elizabeth; Cole, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to quantify survival for osteochondral allograft transplantation (OAT) and report findings at reoperation. Methods: A retrospective review of a prospectively collected database of patients who underwent OAT by a single surgeon with a minimum follow-up duration of 2-years was conducted. The reoperation rate, timing of reoperation, procedure performed at reoperation, and findings at surgery were reviewed. Failure was defined by revision OAT, conversion to knee arthroplasty, or gross appearance of graft failure at 2ndlook arthroscopy. Descriptive statistics, log-rank testing, cross-tabulation, and chi-square testing were performed, with P<0.05 set as significant. Results: 100 patients (average age 32.7±10.2 years; 53 males, 47 females) who underwent OAT at an average follow-up of 4.9±2.5 years (range, 2.0 to 11.3) were included. Ninety-five patients (95%) underwent an average of 2.7±1.7 prior surgical procedures on the ipsilateral knee prior to OAT. The average defect size was 452.7±181.6 mm2 and was located on the medial femoral condyle in 63 patients (63%). Fifty-one percent of OATs were isolated, while 49% were performed with concomitant procedures including meniscus allograft transplantation (MAT) in 27 (27%). Fifty-three patients (53%) returned to the operating room at an average 2.8±2.7 years, with 26% of these patients (14/53) undergoing additional reoperations (range, 1-3 additional reoperations). Arthroscopic debridement was performed in 91% of the initial reoperations (48/53); 55% of reoperations (29/53) were performed within 2 years of the index OAT. Twenty patients (20%) were considered failures at an average 4.0±2.7 years following index OAT either due to revision OAT (N=6), conversion to arthroplasty (N=10), or appearance of poorly incorporated allograft at arthroscopy (N=4). Patients requiring multiple reoperations had an odds ratio of 7.25 (95% CI, 1.85 to 28.37) of OAT failure (P=0.004), while patients

  11. Steroid-induced femoral head osteonecrosis in immune thrombocytopenia treatment with osteochondral autograft transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fotopoulos, Vasileios Ch; Mouzopoulos, George; Floros, Themistoklis; Tzurbakis, Matthaios

    2015-09-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a devastating complication of steroid administration and has rarely been observed in the treatment of immune thrombocytopenia. The treatment of osteochondral defects in advanced stages of avascular necrosis (AVN), characterized by collapse of the subchondral bone, remains an unsolved burden in orthopedic surgery. In this report, we present a case of a 19-year-old female that was admitted in the Emergency Department with walking disability and painful hip joint movement due to steroid-induced femoral head osteonecrosis. Two years before she was diagnosed with immune thrombocytopenia, for which she received pulse steroid therapy with high dose of dexamethasone and underwent a splenectomy. This case report is the first to describe the use of osteochondral autograft transplantation as a treatment of steroid-induced AVN of the femoral head due to immune thrombocytopenia at the age of 19 years with very good clinical and radiological results 3 years postoperatively. PMID:25173503

  12. Osteochondrosis of the capitellum of the humerus (Panner's disease, Osteochondritis Dissecans). Case study.

    PubMed

    Wróblewski, Robert; Urban, Mariusz; Michalik, Dariusz; Zakrzewski, Piotr; Langner, Maciej; Pomianowski, Stanisław

    2014-01-01

    The article presents a case of an adolescent patient suffering from osteochondritis of the humeral capitellum. Early symptoms of this disease appeared at an age typically associated with the onset of both Panner's disease and Osteochondritis Dissecans (OCD) of the humeral capitellum. About two years after the onset of the early symptoms, the patient reported to a specialised clinic. He was followed up for almost two years and was hospitalised and underwent surgical treatment during that period. Both diseases bear multiple similarities, which may entail diagnostic errors. The paper presents differences between these two similar clinical entities, in particular in terms of treatment and prognosis. Essential details potentially allowing for early diagnosis and classification of both conditions are described and discussed. Resolving the discussion may significantly contribute to improving performance and quality of life of patients suffering from necrosis of the humeral capitellum. PMID:24728797

  13. Treatment of a Lateral Tibial Plateau Osteochondritis Dissecans Lesion With Subchondral Injection of Calcium Phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Geoffrey D.; Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Harris, Joshua D.; Cole, Brian J.

    2013-01-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans lesions occur frequently in children and adolescents. Treatment can be challenging and depends on the status of the articular cartilage and subchondral bone. Injection of calcium phosphate bone substitute into the area of subchondral bone edema (Subchondroplasty; Knee Creations, West Chester, PA) may be an option. We present a case of a lateral tibial plateau osteochondritis dissecans lesion treated with subchondral injection of nanocrystalline calcium phosphate. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging is used to determine the area of subchondral edema, and intraoperative fluoroscopy is used to localize this area with the injection cannula. Calcium phosphate is injected by use of a series of syringes until the appropriate fill is obtained. Treatment of concomitant cartilage defects may also be carried out at this time. PMID:24265997

  14. Stem cell-based microphysiological osteochondral system to model tissue response to interleukin-1β.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hang; Lozito, Thomas P; Alexander, Peter G; Gottardi, Riccardo; Tuan, Rocky S

    2014-07-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic degenerative disease of the articular joint that involves both bone and cartilage degenerative changes. An engineered osteochondral tissue within physiological conditions will be of significant utility in understanding the pathogenesis of OA and testing the efficacy of potential disease-modifying OA drugs (DMOADs). In this study, a multichamber bioreactor was fabricated and fitted into a microfluidic base. When the osteochondral construct is inserted, two chambers are formed on either side of the construct (top, chondral; bottom, osseous) that is supplied by different medium streams. These medium conduits are critical to create tissue-specific microenvironments in which chondral and osseous tissues will develop and mature. Human bone marrow stem cell (hBMSCs)-derived constructs were fabricated in situ and cultured within the bioreactor and induced to undergo spatially defined chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation for 4 weeks in tissue-specific media. We observed tissue specific gene expression and matrix production as well as a basophilic interface suggesting a developing tidemark. Introduction of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) to either the chondral or osseous medium stream induced stronger degradative responses locally as well as in the opposing tissue type. For example, IL-1β treatment of the osseous compartment resulted in a strong catabolic response in the chondral layer as indicated by increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression and activity, and tissue-specific gene expression. This induction was greater than that seen with IL-1β application to the chondral component directly, indicative of active biochemical communication between the two tissue layers and supporting the osteochondral nature of OA. The microtissue culture system developed here offers novel capabilities for investigating the physiology of osteochondral tissue and pathogenic mechanisms of OA and serving as a high-throughput platform to test potential

  15. Stem Cell-Based Microphysiological Osteochondral System to Model Tissue Response to Interleukin-1β

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic degenerative disease of the articular joint that involves both bone and cartilage degenerative changes. An engineered osteochondral tissue within physiological conditions will be of significant utility in understanding the pathogenesis of OA and testing the efficacy of potential disease-modifying OA drugs (DMOADs). In this study, a multichamber bioreactor was fabricated and fitted into a microfluidic base. When the osteochondral construct is inserted, two chambers are formed on either side of the construct (top, chondral; bottom, osseous) that is supplied by different medium streams. These medium conduits are critical to create tissue-specific microenvironments in which chondral and osseous tissues will develop and mature. Human bone marrow stem cell (hBMSCs)-derived constructs were fabricated in situ and cultured within the bioreactor and induced to undergo spatially defined chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation for 4 weeks in tissue-specific media. We observed tissue specific gene expression and matrix production as well as a basophilic interface suggesting a developing tidemark. Introduction of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) to either the chondral or osseous medium stream induced stronger degradative responses locally as well as in the opposing tissue type. For example, IL-1β treatment of the osseous compartment resulted in a strong catabolic response in the chondral layer as indicated by increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression and activity, and tissue-specific gene expression. This induction was greater than that seen with IL-1β application to the chondral component directly, indicative of active biochemical communication between the two tissue layers and supporting the osteochondral nature of OA. The microtissue culture system developed here offers novel capabilities for investigating the physiology of osteochondral tissue and pathogenic mechanisms of OA and serving as a high-throughput platform to test potential

  16. Percutaneous CT-Guided Treatment of Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Sacroiliac Joint

    SciTech Connect

    Becce, Fabio; Mouhsine, Elyazid; Mosimann, Pascal John; Anaye, Anass; Letovanec, Igor; Theumann, Nicolas

    2012-08-15

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) is a joint disorder that affects the articular cartilage and subchondral bone, most commonly at the knee. OCD of the sacroiliac joint is extremely rare. Management of OCD remains controversial, and surgery is often needed, especially when conservative treatment fails. We present a rare case of OCD involving the left sacroiliac joint successfully treated by percutaneous computed tomography-guided retrograde drilling and debridement.

  17. Osteochondral interface generation by rabbit bone marrow stromal cells and osteoblasts coculture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kelei; Teh, Thomas Kok Hiong; Ravi, Sujata; Toh, Siew Lok; Goh, James Cho Hong

    2012-09-01

    Physiological osteochondral interface regeneration is a significant challenge. This study aims to investigate the effect of the coculture of chondrogenic rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (rBMSCs) with rabbit osteoblasts in a specially designed two-dimensional (2D)-three-dimensional (3D) co-interface culture to develop the intermediate osteochondral region in vitro. The 2D-3D coculture system was set up by first independently culturing chondrogenic rBMSCs on a scaffold and osteoblasts in cell culture plates, and subsequently placed in contact and cocultured. As control, samples not cocultured with osteoblasts were used. The regulatory effects exerted by osteoblasts on chondrogenic rBMSCs were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. To study the effect of coculture on cells located in different parts of the scaffold, samples were separated into two parts and significantly different gene expression patterns were found between them. In comparison with the control group, a significant moderate downregulation of chondrogenic marker genes, such as Collagen II and Aggrecan was observed. However, the Sox-9 and Collagen I expression increased. More importantly, chondrogenic rBMSCs in the coculture system were shown to form the osteochondral interface layer by expressing calcified cartilage zone specific extracellular matrix marker Collagen X and the hypertrophic chondrocyte marker MMP-13, which were not observed in the control group. Specifically, only the chondrogenic rBMSC layer in contact with the osteoblasts expressed Collagen X and MMP-13, indicating the positive influence of the coculture upon interface formation. Biochemical analyses, histology results, and immunohistochemical staining further supported this observation. In conclusion, this study revealed that specific regulatory stimulations from osteoblasts in the 2D-3D interface coculture system could induce the formation of ostochondral interface for the purpose of osteochondral tissue engineering. PMID

  18. [Cementing of small osteochondral fragments in hand surgery using a fibrin glue--clinical experiences].

    PubMed

    Zilch, H; Talke, M

    1980-01-01

    A short historical review of the development of a new fibrinogen adhesive system, consisting of highly concentrated fibrinogen, thrombin, and factor XIII, is given. Small osteochondral fragments are well fixed with this system. This was demonstrated in five cases with good success, the fragments being early revascularized. Some of these patients have had severe damage to the finger joint surface. The problems of a prematured fibrinolysis were discussed. PMID:6972891

  19. Development and characterisation of a decellularised bovine osteochondral biomaterial for cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Fermor, Hazel L; Russell, Serena L; Williams, Sophie; Fisher, John; Ingham, Eileen

    2015-05-01

    It is proposed that an acellular natural osteochondral scaffold will provide a successful repair material for the early intervention treatment of cartilage lesions, to prevent or slow the progression of cartilage deterioration to osteoarthritis. Here, we investigated the efficacy of methods for the decellularisation of bovine osteochondral plugs. The plugs were subject to four freeze/thaw cycles followed by two cycles of washes in hypotonic solution and low concentration (0.1% w/v) sodium dodecyl sulphate with protease inhibitors. Plugs were treated with nuclease (DNase and RNase) treatment followed by sterilization in peracetic acid. Full tissue decellularisation was achieved as confirmed by histological analysis and DNA quantification, however the resultant acellular matrix had reduced glycosaminoglycan content which led to an increased percent deformation of cartilage. Furthermore, the acellular scaffold was not reproducibly biocompatible. Additional terminal washes were included in the process to improve biocompatibility, however, this led to visible structural damage to the cartilage. This damage was found to be minimised by reducing the cut edge to cartilage area ratio through decellularisation of larger cuts of osteochondral tissue. PMID:25893393

  20. Arthroscopic retrograde osteochondral autologous transplantation to chondral lesion in femoral head.

    PubMed

    Cetinkaya, Sarper; Toker, Berkin; Taser, Omer

    2014-06-01

    This report describes the treatment of 2 cases of full-thickness cartilage defect of the femoral head. The authors performed osteochondral autologous transplantation with a different technique that has not been reported to date. One patient was 37 years old, and the other was 42 years old. Both presented with hip pain. In both patients, radiograph and magnetic resonance imaging scan showed a focal chondral defect on the weight-bearing area of the femoral head and acetabular impingement. A retrograde osteochondral autologous transplantation technique combined with hip arthroscopy and arthroscopic impingement treatment was performed. After a 2-month recovery period, the symptoms were resolved. In the first year of follow-up, Harris Hip scores improved significantly (case 1, 56.6 to 87.6; case 2, 58.6 to 90). The technique described yielded good short- and midterm clinical and radiologic outcomes. To the authors' knowledge, this report is the first to describe a retrograde osteochondral transplantation technique performed with hip arthroscopy in the femoral head. PMID:24972445

  1. Tuning Cell Differentiation into a 3D Scaffold Presenting a Pore Shape Gradient for Osteochondral Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Di Luca, Andrea; Lorenzo-Moldero, Ivan; Mota, Carlos; Lepedda, Antonio; Auhl, Dietmar; Van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2016-07-01

    Osteochondral regeneration remains nowadays a major problem since the outcome of current techniques is not satisfactory in terms of functional tissue formation and development. A possible solution is the combination of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with additive manufacturing technologies to fabricate scaffolds with instructive properties. In this study, the differentiation of hMSCs within a scaffold presenting a gradient in pore shape is presented. The variation in pore shape is determined by varying the angle formed by the fibers of two consequent layers. The fiber deposition patterns are 0-90, which generate squared pores, 0-45, 0-30, and 0-15, that generate rhomboidal pores with an increasing major axis as the deposition angle decreases. Within the gradient construct, squared pores support a better chondrogenic differentiation whereas cells residing in the rhomboidal pores display a better osteogenic differentiation. When cultured under osteochondral conditions the trend in both osteogenic and chondrogenic markers is maintained. Engineering the pore shape, thus creating axial gradients in structural properties, seems to be an instructive strategy to fabricate functional 3D scaffolds that are able to influence hMSCs differentiation for osteochondral tissue regeneration. PMID:27109461

  2. Mechanical loading regulates human MSC differentiation in a multi-layer hydrogel for osteochondral tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Neven J; Aisenbrey, Elizabeth A; Westbrook, Kristofer K; Qi, H Jerry; Bryant, Stephanie J

    2015-07-01

    A bioinspired multi-layer hydrogel was developed for the encapsulation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) as a platform for osteochondral tissue engineering. The spatial presentation of biochemical cues, via incorporation of extracellular matrix analogs, and mechanical cues, via both hydrogel crosslink density and externally applied mechanical loads, were characterized in each layer. A simple sequential photopolymerization method was employed to form stable poly(ethylene glycol)-based hydrogels with a soft cartilage-like layer of chondroitin sulfate and low RGD concentrations, a stiff bone-like layer with high RGD concentrations, and an intermediate interfacial layer. Under a compressive load, the variation in hydrogel stiffness within each layer produced high strains in the soft cartilage-like layer, low strains in the stiff bone-like layer, and moderate strains in the interfacial layer. When hMSC-laden hydrogels were cultured statically in osteochondral differentiation media, the local biochemical and matrix stiffness cues were not sufficient to spatially guide hMSC differentiation after 21 days. However dynamic mechanical stimulation led to differentially high expression of collagens with collagen II in the cartilage-like layer, collagen X in the interfacial layer and collagen I in the bone-like layer and mineral deposits localized to the bone layer. Overall, these findings point to external mechanical stimulation as a potent regulator of hMSC differentiation toward osteochondral cellular phenotypes. PMID:25900444

  3. A review of terminology for equine juvenile osteochondral conditions (JOCC) based on anatomical and functional considerations.

    PubMed

    Denoix, J-M; Jeffcott, L B; McIlwraith, C W; van Weeren, P R

    2013-07-01

    This manuscript describes a new classification of the various joint-related lesions that can be seen in the young, growing horse based on their anatomical and functional aetiopathogenesis. Juvenile osteochondral conditions (JOCC) is a term that brings together specific disorders according to their location in the joint and their biomechanical origin. When a biomechanical insult affects the process of endochondral ossification different types of osteochondrosis (OC) lesions may occur, including osteochondral fragmentation of the articular surface or of the periarticular margins, or the formation of juvenile subchondral bone cysts. In severe cases, osteochondral collapse of the articular surface or the epiphysis or even an entire small bone may occur. Tension on ligament attachments may cause avulsion fractures of epiphyseal (or metaphyseal) ossifying bone, which are classified as JOCC, but do not result from a disturbance of the process of endochondral ossification and are not therefore classified as a form of OC. The same applies to 'physitis' which can result from damage to the physeal growth plate. PMID:23683533

  4. A novel, visible light-induced, rapidly cross-linkable gelatin scaffold for osteochondral tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Mazaki, Tetsuro; Shiozaki, Yasuyuki; Yamane, Kentaro; Yoshida, Aki; Nakamura, Mariko; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Zhou, Di; Kitajima, Takashi; Tanaka, Masato; Ito, Yoshihiro; Ozaki, Toshifumi; Matsukawa, Akihiro

    2014-01-01

    Osteochondral injuries remain difficult to repair. We developed a novel photo-cross-linkable furfurylamine-conjugated gelatin (gelatin-FA). Gelatin-FA was rapidly cross-linked by visible light with Rose Bengal, a light sensitizer, and was kept gelled for 3 weeks submerged in saline at 37°C. When bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSCs) were suspended in gelatin-FA with 0.05% Rose Bengal, approximately 87% of the cells were viable in the hydrogel at 24 h after photo-cross-linking, and the chondrogenic differentiation of BMSCs was maintained for up to 3 weeks. BMP4 fusion protein with a collagen binding domain (CBD) was retained in the hydrogels at higher levels than unmodified BMP4. Gelatin-FA was subsequently employed as a scaffold for BMSCs and CBD-BMP4 in a rabbit osteochondral defect model. In both cases, the defect was repaired with articular cartilage-like tissue and regenerated subchondral bone. This novel, photo-cross-linkable gelatin appears to be a promising scaffold for the treatment of osteochondral injury. PMID:24662725

  5. Cartilage defect of lunate facet of distal radius after fracture treated with osteochondral autograft from knee.

    PubMed

    Mall, Nathan A; Rubin, David A; Brophy, Robert H; Goldfarb, Charles A

    2013-07-01

    We describe using an osteochondral autograft from the lateral femoral condyle of the knee to treat a symptomatic die-punch lesion of the lunate facet of the distal radius. An 18-year-old woman who sustained a distal radius fracture remained symptomatic after nonoperative treatment and diagnostic wrist arthroscopy with microfracture. We used a commercial harvesting system to transfer an osteochondral plug into a cartilage defect involving the lunate facet of the distal radius. At final follow-up, 34 months after surgery, the patient was assessed with a visual analog scale (VAS) and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) scores and with a comprehensive physical examination. Magnetic resonance arthrogram was used to assess articular cartilage status. VAS pain score improved from 7 before surgery to 0.5 after surgery. Postoperative DASH score was 0. The patient was asymptomatic and had satisfactory wrist motion without mechanical symptoms. Magnetic resonance arthrogram showed the transferred osteochondral autograft incorporated in excellent position. PMID:24078947

  6. Age-related differential gene and protein expression in postnatal cartilage canal and osteochondral junction chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Duesterdieck-Zellmer, Katja; Semevolos, Stacy; Kinsley, Marc; Riddick, Tara

    2015-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin, Indian hedgehog (Ihh)/Parathyroid-related peptide (PTHrP) and retinoid signaling pathways regulate cartilage differentiation, growth, and function during development and play a key role in endochondral ossification. The objective of this study was to elucidate the gene and protein expression of signaling molecules of these regulatory pathways in chondrocytes surrounding cartilage canals and the osteochondral junction during neonatal and pre-adolescent development. This study revealed cell-specific and age-related differences in gene and protein expression of signaling molecules of these regulatory pathways. A trend for higher gene expression of PTHrP along the cartilage canals and Ihh along the osteochondral junction suggests the presence of paracrine feedback in articular-epiphyseal cartilage. Differential expression of canonical (β-catenin, Wnt-4, Lrp4, Lrp6) and noncanonical Wnt signaling (Wnt-5b, Wnt-11) and their inhibitors (Dkk1, Axin1, sFRP3, sFRP5, Wif-1) surrounding the cartilage canals and osteochondral junction provides evidence of the complex interactions occurring during endochondral ossification. PMID:25479004

  7. Juvenile Osteochondritis Dissecans in a 13-year-old male athlete: A case report

    PubMed Central

    D’Angelo, Kevin; Kim, Peter; Murnaghan, M. Lucas

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To present the clinical management of juvenile osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the knee and highlight the importance of a timely diagnosis to optimize the time needed for less invasive, non-operative therapy. Clinical Features: A 13-year-old provincial level male soccer player presenting with recurrent anterior knee pain despite ongoing manual therapy. Intervention and Outcome: A multidisciplinary, non-operative treatment approach was utilized to promote natural healing of the osteochondral lesion. The plan of management consisted of patient education, activity modification, manual therapy, passive modalities and rehabilitation, while being overseen by an orthopaedic surgeon. Conclusions: Considering the serious consequences of misdiagnosing osteochondritis dissecans, such as the potential for future joint instability and accelerated joint degeneration, a high degree of suspicion should be considered with young individuals presenting with nonspecific, recurrent knee pain. A narrative review of the literature is provided to allow practitioners to apply current best practices to appropriately manage juvenile OCD and become more cognizant of the common knee differential diagnoses in the young athletic population. PMID:25550663

  8. Spatial Engineering of Osteochondral Tissue Constructs Through Microfluidically Directed Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Stephen M; Barabino, Gilda A

    2016-01-01

    The development of tissue engineered osteochondral units has been slowed by a number of technical hurdles associated with recapitulating their heterogeneous nature ex vivo. Subsequently, numerous approaches with respect to cell sourcing, scaffolding composition, and culture media formulation have been pursued, which have led to high variability in outcomes and ultimately the lack of a consensus bioprocessing strategy. As such, the objective of this study was to standardize the design process by focusing on differentially supporting formation of cartilaginous and bony matrix by a single cell source in a spatially controlled manner within a single material system. A cell-polymer solution of bovine mesenchymal stem cells and agarose was cast against micromolds of a serpentine network and stacked to produce tissue constructs containing two independent microfluidic networks. Constructs were fluidically connected to two controlled flow loops and supplied with independently tuned differentiation parameters for chondrogenic and osteogenic induction, respectively. Constructs receiving inductive media showed differential gene expression of both chondrogenic and osteogenic markers in opposite directions along the thickness of the construct that was recapitulated at the protein level with respect to collagens I, II, and X. A control group receiving noninductive media showed homogeneous expression of these biomarkers measured in lower concentrations at both the mRNA and protein level. This work represents an important step in the rational design of engineered osteochondral units through establishment of an enabling technology for further optimization of scaffolding formulations and bioprocessing conditions toward the production of commercially viable osteochondral tissue products. PMID:27190700

  9. Spatial Engineering of Osteochondral Tissue Constructs Through Microfluidically Directed Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Stephen M.; Barabino, Gilda A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The development of tissue engineered osteochondral units has been slowed by a number of technical hurdles associated with recapitulating their heterogeneous nature ex vivo. Subsequently, numerous approaches with respect to cell sourcing, scaffolding composition, and culture media formulation have been pursued, which have led to high variability in outcomes and ultimately the lack of a consensus bioprocessing strategy. As such, the objective of this study was to standardize the design process by focusing on differentially supporting formation of cartilaginous and bony matrix by a single cell source in a spatially controlled manner within a single material system. A cell-polymer solution of bovine mesenchymal stem cells and agarose was cast against micromolds of a serpentine network and stacked to produce tissue constructs containing two independent microfluidic networks. Constructs were fluidically connected to two controlled flow loops and supplied with independently tuned differentiation parameters for chondrogenic and osteogenic induction, respectively. Constructs receiving inductive media showed differential gene expression of both chondrogenic and osteogenic markers in opposite directions along the thickness of the construct that was recapitulated at the protein level with respect to collagens I, II, and X. A control group receiving noninductive media showed homogeneous expression of these biomarkers measured in lower concentrations at both the mRNA and protein level. This work represents an important step in the rational design of engineered osteochondral units through establishment of an enabling technology for further optimization of scaffolding formulations and bioprocessing conditions toward the production of commercially viable osteochondral tissue products. PMID:27190700

  10. A Silk Fibroin and Peptide Amphiphile-Based Co-Culture Model for Osteochondral Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Çakmak, Soner; Çakmak, Anıl S; Kaplan, David L; Gümüşderelioğlu, Menemşe

    2016-08-01

    New biomaterials with the properties of both bone and cartilage extracellular matrices (ECM) should be designed and used with co-culture systems to address clinically applicable osteochondral constructs. Herein, a co-culture model is described based on a trilayered silk fibroin-peptide amphiphile (PA) scaffold cultured with human articular chondrocytes (hACs) and human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) in an osteochondral cocktail medium for the cartilage and bone sides, respectively. The presence of hACs in the co-cultures significantly increases the osteogenic differentiation potential of hBMSCs based on ALP activity, RT-PCR for osteogenic markers, calcium analyses, and histological stainings, whereas hACs produces a significant amount of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) for the cartilage region, even in the absence of growth factor TGF-β family in the co-culture medium. This trilayered scaffold with trophic effects offers a promising strategy for the study of osteochondral defects. PMID:27139244

  11. Effects of magnetic field on pulse wave forms in plasma immersion ion implantation in a radio-frequency, inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Honghui; Fu, Ricky K. Y.; Tang, Deli; Zeng, Xuchu; Chu, Paul K.

    2002-09-01

    The time-dependent current wave forms measured using a pulse biased planar electrode in hydrogen radio-frequency (rf), inductively coupled plasma, plasma immersion ion implantation experiments are observed to vary in the presence of an external magnetic field B. Results further indicate that the magnitude of the pulse current is related to the strength and direction of the magnetic field, rf power, and pressure, but the pulse current curves can be primarily correlated with B. The plasma discharges are enhanced in all cases due to magnetic confinement of the electrons, enlargement of the plasma generation volume, and increase in the rf power absorbing efficiency. The plasma density diagnosed by Langmuir probe diminishes in front of the sample chuck with B, whereas the plasma is confined nearby the sidewall of the vacuum chamber at high magnetic field. The high degree of plasma density nonuniformity at high B in front of the sample chuck is not desirable for the processing of planar samples such as silicon wafers and must be compensated. The reduction in the plasma density and plasma density gradient in the sheath can be accounted for by the changes in the pulse current wave forms.

  12. Fabrication and development of artificial osteochondral constructs based on cancellous bone/hydrogel hybrid scaffold.

    PubMed

    Song, Kedong; Li, Liying; Yan, Xinyu; Zhang, Yu; Li, Ruipeng; Wang, Yiwei; Wang, Ling; Wang, Hong; Liu, Tianqing

    2016-06-01

    Using tissue engineering techniques, an artificial osteochondral construct was successfully fabricated to treat large osteochondral defects. In this study, porcine cancellous bones and chitosan/gelatin hydrogel scaffolds were used as substitutes to mimic bone and cartilage, respectively. The porosity and distribution of pore size in porcine bone was measured and the degradation ratio and swelling ratio for chitosan/gelatin hydrogel scaffolds was also determined in vitro. Surface morphology was analyzed with the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The physicochemical properties and the composition were tested by using an infrared instrument. A double layer composite scaffold was constructed via seeding adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) induced to chondrocytes and osteoblasts, followed by inoculation in cancellous bones and hydrogel scaffolds. Cell proliferation was assessed through Dead/Live staining and cellular activity was analyzed with IpWin5 software. Cell growth, adhesion and formation of extracellular matrix in composite scaffolds blank cancellous bones or hydrogel scaffolds were also analyzed. SEM analysis revealed a super porous internal structure of cancellous bone scaffolds and pore size was measured at an average of 410 ± 59 μm while porosity was recorded at 70.6 ± 1.7 %. In the hydrogel scaffold, the average pore size was measured at 117 ± 21 μm and the porosity and swelling rate were recorded at 83.4 ± 0.8 % and 362.0 ± 2.4 %, respectively. Furthermore, the remaining hydrogel weighed 80.76 ± 1.6 % of the original dry weight after hydration in PBS for 6 weeks. In summary, the cancellous bone and hydrogel composite scaffold is a promising biomaterial which shows an essential physical performance and strength with excellent osteochondral tissue interaction in situ. ADSCs are a suitable cell source for osteochondral composite reconstruction. Moreover, the bi-layered scaffold significantly enhanced cell proliferation compared to the cells seeded on

  13. Rotational osteoplasty and bioabsorbable polylactate pin fixation in Pipkin type 2 fracture with acute osteochondral defect: a case report.

    PubMed

    Maluta, Tommaso; Micheloni, Gian Mario; Sandri, Andrea; Regis, Dario; Costanzo, Alessandro; Magnan, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Pipkin fractures are relative rare high-energy lesions characterized by an intra-articular fracture of the femoral head after posterior hip dislocation. Early anatomic reduction and stable fixation are the main goals of treatment. This case evaluates the outcome of managing Pipkin type 2 fracture with acute osteochondral defect of the femoral head using "rotational osteoplasty" and bioabsorbable polylactate pin fixation. 24-year-old male patient was involved in a motorcycle accident, suffering from a left hip fracture-dislocation, and pelvic Computed Tomography revealed a Pipkin type 2 lesion. An open urgent treatment was performed. After  anatomic reduction of the femoral head fragment a large osteochondral defect in the anterior-superior weight bearing surface was evident. The pattern of the fracture allowed us to perform a "rotational osteoplasty" including rotation of the femoral head fragment, to obtain an osteochondral cartilage congruence of the anterior-superior surface. Stable fixation was obtained by three bioabsorbable polylactate pins. At four-year follow up the patient had an excellent outcome and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) showed fracture healing, minimal signs of arthritis, excluding osteonecrosis of the femoral head. The reported case confirms that Pipkin fractures are very insidious surgical urgencies. In selected cases, "rotational osteoplasty" may be an alternative to osteochondral transplant for acute osteochondral defect of the femoral head. Bioabsorbable polylactate pin fixation allowed us to have a stable fixation evaluating the bone healing process and vitality of femoral head by MRI. PMID:27104330

  14. Retrograde Percutaneous Drilling for Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Head of the Talus: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Corominas, Laura; Sanpera, Ignacio; Masrouha, Karim; Sanpera-Iglesias, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Osteochondral lesions of the talus might be a more common cause of pain than previously recognized, especially among those involved in athletic activities. However, the location of an osteochondral lesion on the talar head is much less common than such lesions localized to the dome of the talus and can pose diagnostic difficulties. We present the case of a 14-year-old soccer player who complained of longstanding pain in his left foot. After unsuccessful conservative treatment consisting of rest and bracing, he was ultimately treated with retrograde percutaneous drilling of the talar head performed by a medial approach. This was followed by casting and non-weightbearing for 6 weeks, after which physical therapy was undertaken. He was able to return to full activity and remained asymptomatic during a 5-year observation period. Although rare, osteochondritis dissecans of the talar head should be considered in young athletes with persistent foot pain that is unresponsive to reasonable therapy. PMID:25459089

  15. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... electrodes are inserted. The electronic device at the base of the electrode array is then placed under ... FDA approval for implants The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates cochlear implant devices for both adults ...

  16. Goserelin Implant

    MedlinePlus

    Goserelin implant is used in combination with radiation therapy and other medications to treat localized prostate cancer and is ... treatment of abnormal bleeding of the uterus. Goserelin implant is in a class of medications called gonadotropin- ...

  17. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    A cochlear implant is a small, complex electronic device that can help to provide a sense of sound. People who are ... of-hearing can get help from them. The implant consists of two parts. One part sits on ...

  18. Carmustine Implant

    MedlinePlus

    Carmustine implant is used along with surgery and sometimes radiation therapy to treat malignant glioma (a certain type of ... Carmustine implant comes as a small wafer that is placed in the brain by a doctor during surgery to ...

  19. Breast Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Updated Safety Information (Consumer Article) FDA Provides Updated Safety Data on Silicone Gel-Filled Breast Implants (Press Announcement) [ARCHIVED] Breast Implant Guidance for Industry (2006) Post Approval Studies Webpage Freedom of Information ...

  20. Cochlear implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... antenna. This part of the implant receives the sound, converts the sound into an electrical signal, and sends it to ... implants allow deaf people to receive and process sounds and speech. However, these devices do not restore ...

  1. Evaluation of the Early In Vivo Response of a Functionally Graded Macroporous Scaffold in an Osteochondral Defect in a Rabbit Model.

    PubMed

    Barron, Valerie; Neary, Martin; Mohamed, Khalid Merghani Salid; Ansboro, Sharon; Shaw, Georgina; O'Malley, Grace; Rooney, Niall; Barry, Frank; Murphy, Mary

    2016-05-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering is a multifactorial problem requiring a wide range of material property requirements from provision of biological cues to facilitation of mechanical support in load-bearing diarthrodial joints. The study aim was to design, fabricate and characterize a template to promote endogenous cell recruitment for enhanced cartilage repair. A polylactic acid poly-ε-caprolactone (PLCL) support structure was fabricated using laser micromachining technology and thermal crimping to create a functionally-graded open pore network scaffold with a compressive modulus of 9.98 ± 1.41 MPa and a compressive stress at 50% strain of 8.59 ± 1.35 MPa. In parallel, rabbit mesenchymal stem cells were isolated and their growth characteristics, morphology and multipotency confirmed. Sterilization had no effect on construct chemical structure and cellular compatibility was confirmed. After four weeks implantation in an osteochondral defect in a rabbit model to assess biocompatibility, there was no evidence of inflammation or giant cells. Moreover, acellular constructs performed better than cell-seeded constructs with endogenous progenitor cells homing through microtunnels, differentiating to form neo-cartilage and strengthening integration with native tissue. These results suggest, albeit at an early stage of repair, that by modulating the architecture of a macroporous scaffold, pre-seeding with MSCs is not necessary for hyaline cartilage repair. PMID:26438451

  2. Osteochondral differentiation and the emergence of stage-specific osteogenic cell-surface molecules by bone marrow cells in diffusion chambers.

    PubMed

    Bruder, S P; Gazit, D; Passi-Even, L; Bab, I; Caplan, A I

    1990-11-01

    The osteochondral potential and emergence of osteogenic cell-surface molecules by avian marrow cells was evaluated in in vivo diffusion chamber cultures. The chambers were inoculated with unselected marrow cells from young chick tibiae and implanted intraperitoneally into athymic mice. At the light microscopic level, morphologic evidence of de novo bone and cartilage formation, including specific immunostaining by antibody probes, was observed in 14 out of 16 chambers incubated for 20 days or longer. In order to monitor the osteogenic differentiation of the marrow-derived cells, indirect immunofluorescence was performed with monoclonal antibodies against stage-specific cell surface antigens on cells of the embryonic osteogenic lineage. The binding of these and other specific monoclonal antibodies in the developing tissue indicates that the cell surface and extracellular matrix molecules expressed by descendants of marrow-derived mesenchymal progenitor cells are indistinguishable from their in vivo counterparts found in embryonic skeletal structures. Furthermore, the experiments reported here describe the first molecular identification of osteogenic cells by probes which are selective for stage-specific surface antigens on cells of the osteogenic lineage. Importantly, bone formation by these marrow-derived cells appears to occur through a lineage progression which is similar to that observed for embryonic tibial osteoblasts. In summary, these data support the use of diffusion chambers inoculated with avian marrow to study aspects of osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. PMID:2268743

  3. Bilayered silk/silk-nanoCaP scaffolds for osteochondral tissue engineering: In vitro and in vivo assessment of biological performance.

    PubMed

    Yan, Le-Ping; Silva-Correia, Joana; Oliveira, Mariana B; Vilela, Carlos; Pereira, Hélder; Sousa, Rui A; Mano, João F; Oliveira, Ana L; Oliveira, Joaquim M; Reis, Rui L

    2015-01-01

    Novel porous bilayered scaffolds, fully integrating a silk fibroin (SF) layer and a silk-nano calcium phosphate (silk-nanoCaP) layer for osteochondral defect (OCD) regeneration, were developed. Homogeneous porosity distribution was achieved in the scaffolds, with calcium phosphate phase only retained in the silk-nanoCaP layer. The scaffold presented compressive moduli of 0.4MPa in the wet state. Rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (RBMSCs) were cultured on the scaffolds, and good adhesion and proliferation were observed. The silk-nanoCaP layer showed a higher alkaline phosphatase level than the silk layer in osteogenic conditions. Subcutaneous implantation in rabbits demonstrated weak inflammation. In a rabbit knee critical size OCD model, the scaffolds firmly integrated into the host tissue. Histological and immunohistochemical analysis showed that collagen II positive cartilage and glycosaminoglycan regeneration presented in the silk layer, and de novo bone ingrowths and vessel formation were observed in the silk-nanoCaP layer. These bilayered scaffolds can therefore be promising candidates for OCD regeneration. PMID:25449920

  4. Miniature implantable ultrasonic echosonometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, G. K. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A miniature echosonometer adapted for implantation in the interior of an animal for imaging the internal structure of a organ, tissue or vessel is presented. The echosonometer includes a receiver/transmitter circuit which is coupled to an ultrasonic transducer. Power is coupled to the echosonometer by electromagnetic induction through the animal's skin. Imaging signals from the echosonometer are electromagnetically transmitted through the animal's skin to an external readout apparatus.

  5. Effect of Impaction Sequence on Osteochondral Graft Damage: The Role of Repeated and Varying Loads

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Richard W.; Friel, Nicole A.; Williams, James M.; Cole, Brian J.; Wimmer, Markus A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Osteochondral autografts and allografts require mechanical force for proper graft placement into the defect site; however, impaction compromises the tissue. This study aimed to determine the effect of impaction force and number of hits to seat the graft on cartilage integrity. Hypothesis Under constant impulse conditions, higher impaction load magnitudes are more detrimental to cell viability, matrix integrity and collagen network organization and will result in proteoglycan loss and nitric oxide release. Study Design Controlled laboratory study Methods Osteochondral explants, harvested from fresh bovine trochleas, were exposed to a series of consistent impact loads delivered by a pneumatically driven device. Each plug received the same overall impulse of 7 Ns, reflecting the mean of 23 clinically inserted plugs. Impaction loads of 37.5N, 75N, 150N, and 300N were matched with 74, 37, 21, and 11 hits respectively. Following impaction, the plugs were harvested and cartilage was analyzed for cell viability, histology by safranin-o and picosirius red, and release of sulfated glycosaminoglycans and nitric oxide. Data were compared with non-impacted control. Results Impacted plugs had significantly lower cell viability than non-impacted plugs. A dose response relationship in loss of cell viability with respect to load magnitude was seen immediately and after 4 days but lost after 8 days. Histologic analysis revealed intact cartilage surface in all samples (loaded or control), with loaded samples showing alterations in birefringence. While the sulfated GAG release was similar across varying impaction loads, release of nitric oxide increased with increasing impaction magnitudes and time. Conclusions Impaction loading parameters have a direct effect on the time course of the viability of the cartilage in the graft tissue. Clinical Relevance Optimal loading parameters for surgical impaction of osteochondral grafts are those with lower load magnitudes and a greater

  6. Evaluation of an injectable thermoresponsive hyaluronan hydrogel in a rabbit osteochondral defect model.

    PubMed

    D'Este, Matteo; Sprecher, Christoph Martin; Milz, Stefan; Nehrbass, Dirk; Dresing, Iska; Zeiter, Stephan; Alini, Mauro; Eglin, David

    2016-06-01

    Articular cartilage displays very little self-healing capabilities, generating a major clinical need. Here, we introduce a thermoresponsive hyaluronan hydrogel for cartilage repair obtained by covalently grafting poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) to hyaluronan, to give a brush co-polymer HpN. The gel is fluid at room temperature and becomes gel at body temperature. In this pilot study HpN safety and repair response were evaluated in an osteochondral defect model in rabbit. Follow-up was of 1 week and 12 weeks and the empty defect served as a control, for a total of four experimental groups. At 12 weeks the defect sites were evaluated macroscopically and histologically. Local lymph nodes, spleen, liver, and kidneys were analyzed for histopathological evaluation. HpN could be easily injected and remained into the defect throughout the study. The macroscopic score was statistically superior for HpN versus empty. Histological score gave opposite trend but not statistically significant. A slight tissue reaction was observed around HpN, however, vascularization and subchondral bone formation were not impeded. An upper proteoglycans rich fibro-cartilaginous tissue with fairly good continuity and lateral integration into the existing articular cartilage was observed in all cases. No signs of local or systemic acute or subacute toxicity were observed. In conclusion, HpN is easily injectable, remains into an osteochondral defect within a moving synovial joint, is biocompatible and does not interfere with the intrinsic healing response of osteochondral defects in a rabbit model. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1469-1478, 2016. PMID:26833870

  7. Osteochondral lesion of the talus in a recreational athlete: a case report

    PubMed Central

    deGraauw, Chris

    1999-01-01

    A 23-year-old recreational male athlete presented with intermittent pain of three weeks duration, localized to the left ankle. Pain was aggravated by walking, although his symptoms had not affected the patient’s jogging activity which was performed three times per week. Past history revealed an inversion sprain of the left ankle, sustained fifteen months previously. Examination showed mild swelling anterior to the ankle mortise joint while other tests including range of motion, strength and motion palpation of specific joints of the ankle were noted to be unremarkable. Radiographic findings revealed a defect in the medial aspect of the talus. An orthopaedic referral was made for further evaluation. Tomography revealed a Grade III osteochondral lesion of the talus. It was determined that follow-up views be taken in three months to demonstrate if the lesion was progressing or healing. Within the three month period, activity modifications and modalities for pain control were indicated. Surgery was considered a reasonable option should conservative measures fail. The present case illustrates an osteochondral lesion of the talus, a condition which has not previously been reported in the chiropractic literature. A review of the pertinent orthopaedic literature has indicated an average delay of three years in diagnosing the existence of this lesion. Although considered rare, the diagnostic frequency of the condition appears to be on the rise due to increased awareness and the use of bone and CT scans. The osteochondral lesion of the talus deserves particular consideration by practitioners working with athletes due to its higher incidence within this group. This diagnosis should be considered in patients presenting with chronic ankle pain particularly when a history of an inversion sprain exists. The purpose of this report is to increase awareness of this condition, and review diagnosis and management strategies. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2

  8. Wireless power transfer to a cardiac implant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sanghoek; Ho, John S.; Chen, Lisa Y.; Poon, Ada S. Y.

    2012-08-01

    We analyze wireless power transfer between a source and a weakly coupled implant on the heart. Numerical studies show that mid-field wireless powering achieves much higher power transfer efficiency than traditional inductively coupled systems. With proper system design, power sufficient to operate typical cardiac implants can be received by millimeter-sized coils.

  9. Lapidus arthrodesis plus osteochondral autograft transplantation in the management of hallux rigidus with an elevated first ray.

    PubMed

    Klos, Kajetan; Simons, Paul

    2014-04-01

    The range of joint-sparing treatments for advanced hallux rigidus is still very limited. The authors describe an osteochondral autograft transplantation technique combined with Lapidus arthrodesis as a novel method of obtaining a relatively symptom-free first metatarsophalangeal joint function in patients with hallux rigidus and first-ray elevation. PMID:24379451

  10. Advancements in Orthopedic Intervention: Retrograde Drilling and Bone Grafting of Osteochondral Lesions of the Knee Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Seebauer, Christian J.; Bail, Hermann J.; Rump, Jens C. Walter, Thula Teichgraeber, Ulf K. M.

    2010-12-15

    Computer-assisted surgery is currently a novel challenge for surgeons and interventional radiologists. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided procedures are still evolving. In this experimental study, we describe and assess an innovative passive-navigation method for MRI-guided treatment of osteochondritis dissecans of the knee. A navigation principle using a passive-navigation device was evaluated in six cadaveric knee joint specimens for potential applicability in retrograde drilling and bone grafting of osteochondral lesions using MRI guidance. Feasibility and accuracy were evaluated in an open MRI scanner (1.0 T Philips Panorama HFO MRI System). Interactive MRI navigation allowed precise drilling and bone grafting of osteochondral lesions of the knee. All lesions were hit with an accuracy of 1.86 mm in the coronal plane and 1.4 mm the sagittal plane. Targeting of all lesions was possible with a single drilling. MRI allowed excellent assessment of correct positioning of the cancellous bone cylinder during bone grafting. The navigation device and anatomic structures could be clearly identified and distinguished throughout the entire drilling procedure. MRI-assisted navigation method using a passive navigation device is feasible for the treatment of osteochondral lesions of the knee under MRI guidance and allows precise and safe drilling without exposure to ionizing radiation. This method may be a viable alternative to other navigation principles, especially for pediatric and adolescent patients. This MRI-navigated method is also potentially applicable in many other MRI-guided interventions.

  11. Wnt/β-catenin signaling of cartilage canal and osteochondral junction chondrocytes and full thickness cartilage in early equine osteochondrosis.

    PubMed

    Kinsley, Marc A; Semevolos, Stacy A; Duesterdieck-Zellmer, Katja F

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to elucidate gene and protein expression of Wnt signaling molecules in chondrocytes of foals having early osteochondrosis (OC) versus normal controls. The hypothesis was that increased expression of components of Wnt signaling pathway in osteochondral junction (OCJ) and cartilage canal (CC) chondrocytes would be found in early OC when compared to controls. Paraffin-embedded osteochondral samples (7 OC, 8 normal) and cDNA from whole cartilage (7 OC, 10 normal) and chondrocytes surrounding cartilage canals and osteochondral junctions captured with laser capture microdissection (4 OC, 6 normal) were obtained from femoropatellar joints of 17 immature horses. Equine-specific Wnt signaling molecule mRNA expression levels were evaluated by two-step real-time qPCR. Spatial tissue protein expression of β-catenin, Wnt-11, Wnt-4, and Dkk-1 was determined by immunohistochemistry. There was significantly decreased Wnt-11 and increased β-catenin, Wnt-5b, Dkk-1, Lrp6, Wif-1, Axin1, and SC-PEP gene expression in early OC cartilage canal chondrocytes compared to controls. There was also significantly increased β-catenin gene expression in early OC osteochondral junction chondrocytes compared to controls. Based on this study, abundant gene expression differences in OC chondrocytes surrounding cartilage canals suggest pathways associated with catabolism and inhibition of chondrocyte maturation are targeted in early OC pathogenesis. PMID:25676127

  12. Osteochondral regeneration using an oriented nanofiber yarn-collagen type I/hyaluronate hybrid/TCP biphasic scaffold.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shen; Wu, Jinglei; Liu, Xudong; Chen, Desheng; Bowlin, Gary L; Cao, Lei; Lu, Jianxi; Li, Fengfeng; Mo, Xiumei; Fan, Cunyi

    2015-02-01

    Osteochondral defects affect both the articular cartilage and the underlying subchondral bone, but poor osteochondral regeneration is still a daunting challenge. Although the tissue engineering technology provides a promising approach for osteochondral repair, an ideal biphasic scaffold is in high demand with regards to proper biomechanical strength. In this study, an oriented poly(l-lacticacid)-co-poly(ε-caprolactone) P(LLA-CL)/collagen type I(Col-I) nanofiber yarn mesh, fabricated by dynamic liquid electrospinning served as a skeleton for a freeze-dried Col-I/Hhyaluronate (HA) chondral phase (SPONGE) to enhance the mechanical strength of the scaffold. In vitro results show that the Yarn Col-I/HA hybrid scaffold (Yarn-CH) can allow the cell infiltration like sponge scaffolds. Using porous beta-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) as the osseous phase, the Yarn-CH/TCP biphasic scaffold was then assembled by freeze drying. After combination of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, the biphasic complex was successfully used to repair the osteochondral defects in a rabbit model with greatly improved repairing scores and compressive modulus. PMID:24771686

  13. The adipokine lipocalin-2 in the context of the osteoarthritic osteochondral junction.

    PubMed

    Villalvilla, Amanda; García-Martín, Adela; Largo, Raquel; Gualillo, Oreste; Herrero-Beaumont, Gabriel; Gómez, Rodolfo

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and osteoarthritis (OA) form a vicious circle in which obesity contributes to cartilage destruction in OA, and OA-associated sedentary behaviour promotes weight gain. Lipocalin-2 (LCN2), a novel adipokine with catabolic activities in OA joints, contributes to the obesity and OA pathologies and is associated with other OA risk factors. LCN2 is highly induced in osteoblasts in the absence of mechanical loading, but its role in osteoblast metabolism is unclear. Therefore, because osteochondral junctions play a major role in OA development, we investigated the expression and role of LCN2 in osteoblasts and chondrocytes in the OA osteochondral junction environment. Our results showed that LCN2 expression in human osteoblasts and chondrocytes decreased throughout osteoblast differentiation and was induced by catabolic and inflammatory factors; however, TGF-β1 and IGF-1 reversed this induction. LCN2 reduced osteoblast viability in the presence of iron and enhanced the activity of MMP-9 released by osteoblasts. Moreover, pre-stimulated human osteoblasts induced LCN2 expression in human chondrocytes, but the inverse was not observed. Thus, LCN2 is an important catabolic adipokine in osteoblast and chondrocyte metabolism that is regulated by differentiation, inflammation and catabolic and anabolic stimuli, and LCN2 expression in chondrocytes is regulated in a paracrine manner after osteoblast stimulation. PMID:27385438

  14. Evaluation of cartilage, synovium and adipose tissue as cellular sources for osteochondral repair.

    PubMed

    Innes, J F; Gordon, C; Vaughan-Thomas, A; Rhodes, N P; Clegg, P D

    2013-09-01

    Osteochondral lesions are a major cause of pain and disability in several species including dogs, horses and human beings. The objective of this study was to assess three potential sources of canine cells for their osteochondral regenerative potential. Cartilage, synovium and adipose tissue cells were grown in pellet culture in chondrogenic or osteogenic media. Cartilage-derived pellets displayed the best chondrogenic differentiation as indicated by significantly higher COL2A1 and SOX9 mRNA expression, greater glycosaminoglycan content, and higher retention of Safranin-O stain compared to the synovium and adipose-derived cells. Following application of the osteogenic media, all three cell sources exhibited small areas of positive alizarin red staining. Poor intracellular alkaline phosphatase activity was found in all three cell types when stimulated although osteocalcin and RUNX2 expression were significantly increased. Cells isolated and cultured from canine articular cartilage retained their specific chondrocytic phenotype. Furthermore, canine adipocytes and synovial cells did not undergo chondrogenic differentiation and did not exhibit evidence of multipotency. Although osteogenic differentiation was initiated at a genomic level, phenotypic osteoblastic differentiation was not observed. The findings of this study suggest that cells isolated from canine adipose tissue and synovium are sub-optimal substitutes for chondrocytes when engineering articular cartilage in vitro. PMID:23886701

  15. Osteochondritis dissecans of the lateral femoral condyle of the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Mitsuoka, T; Shino, K; Hamada, M; Horibe, S

    1999-01-01

    Differences in the features of osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) affecting the lateral and medial femoral condyles were investigated in 13 patients (14 knees) treated from 1991 to 1994. OCD affected the lateral femoral condyle in 6 knees (lateral group) and the medial condyle in 8 knees (medial group). The lateral group was younger (mean age, 14 v. 20 years). The radiological stage (Brückl) of the lateral group was stage 2 in 3 knees and stage 3 in 3. The lateral menisci were all discoid and the condylar articular surface of the lesions was normal in two knees, softened in 3 and detached in 1. The medial group comprised 1 knee in stage 2, 1 in stage 3, 1 in stage 4, and 5 in stage 5. The OCD lesion showed softening in 2 knees and detachment in 6. Repetitive abnormal stress on weaker osteochondral structures in the growing period produced by a discoid meniscus during growth may cause OCD of the lateral femoral condyle. PMID:10024029

  16. A Hydrogel-Mineral Composite Scaffold for Osteochondral Interface Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Khanarian, Nora T.; Jiang, Jie; Wan, Leo Q.; Mow, Van C.

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the leading cause of physical disability among Americans, and tissue engineered cartilage grafts have emerged as a promising treatment option for this debilitating condition. Currently, the formation of a stable interface between the cartilage graft and subchondral bone remains a significant challenge. This study evaluates the potential of a hybrid scaffold of hydroxyapatite (HA) and alginate hydrogel for the regeneration of the osteochondral interface. Specifically, the effects of HA on the response of chondrocytes were determined, focusing on changes in matrix production and mineralization, as well as scaffold mechanical properties over time. Additionally, the optimal chondrocyte population for interface tissue engineering was evaluated. It was observed that the HA phase of the composite scaffold promoted the formation of a proteoglycan- and type II collagen–rich matrix when seeded with deep zone chondrocytes. More importantly, the elevated biosynthesis translated into significant increases in both compressive and shear moduli relative to the mineral-free control. Presence of HA also promoted chondrocyte hypertrophy and type X collagen deposition. These results demonstrate that the hydrogel–calcium phosphate composite supported the formation of a calcified cartilage-like matrix and is a promising scaffold design for osteochondral interface tissue engineering. PMID:21919797

  17. The adipokine lipocalin-2 in the context of the osteoarthritic osteochondral junction

    PubMed Central

    Villalvilla, Amanda; García-Martín, Adela; Largo, Raquel; Gualillo, Oreste; Herrero-Beaumont, Gabriel; Gómez, Rodolfo

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and osteoarthritis (OA) form a vicious circle in which obesity contributes to cartilage destruction in OA, and OA-associated sedentary behaviour promotes weight gain. Lipocalin-2 (LCN2), a novel adipokine with catabolic activities in OA joints, contributes to the obesity and OA pathologies and is associated with other OA risk factors. LCN2 is highly induced in osteoblasts in the absence of mechanical loading, but its role in osteoblast metabolism is unclear. Therefore, because osteochondral junctions play a major role in OA development, we investigated the expression and role of LCN2 in osteoblasts and chondrocytes in the OA osteochondral junction environment. Our results showed that LCN2 expression in human osteoblasts and chondrocytes decreased throughout osteoblast differentiation and was induced by catabolic and inflammatory factors; however, TGF-β1 and IGF-1 reversed this induction. LCN2 reduced osteoblast viability in the presence of iron and enhanced the activity of MMP-9 released by osteoblasts. Moreover, pre-stimulated human osteoblasts induced LCN2 expression in human chondrocytes, but the inverse was not observed. Thus, LCN2 is an important catabolic adipokine in osteoblast and chondrocyte metabolism that is regulated by differentiation, inflammation and catabolic and anabolic stimuli, and LCN2 expression in chondrocytes is regulated in a paracrine manner after osteoblast stimulation. PMID:27385438

  18. Specific inductive potential of a novel nanocomposite biomimetic biomaterial for osteochondral tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Manferdini, C; Cavallo, C; Grigolo, B; Fiorini, M; Nicoletti, A; Gabusi, E; Zini, N; Pressato, D; Facchini, A; Lisignoli, G

    2016-05-01

    Osteochondral lesions require treatment to restore the biology and functionality of the joint. A novel nanostructured biomimetic gradient scaffold was developed to mimic the biochemical and biophysical properties of the different layers of native osteochondral structure. The present results show that the scaffold presents important physicochemical characteristics and can support the growth and differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells (h-MSCs), which adhere and penetrate into the cartilaginous and bony layers. H-MSCs grown in chondrogenic or osteogenic medium decreased their proliferation during days 14-52 on both scaffold layers and in medium without inducing factors used as controls. Both chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation of h-MSCs occurred from day 28 and were increased on day 52, but not in the control medium. Safranin O staining and collagen type II and proteoglycans immunostaining confirmed that chondrogenic differentiation was specifically induced only in the cartilaginous layer. Conversely, von Kossa staining, osteocalcin and osteopontin immunostaining confirmed that osteogenic differentiation occurred on both layers. This study shows the specific potential of each layer of the biomimetic scaffold to induce chondrogenic or osteogenic differentiation of h-MSCs. These processes depended mainly on the media used but not the biomaterial itself, suggesting that the local milieu is fundamental for guiding cell differentiation. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23495253

  19. Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Talar Dome in a Collegiate Swimmer: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Michelle; Chang, Cindy J.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To present the case of an intercollegiate swimmer with a stage IV lateral talar dome injury and associated bony fragments. Background: Lack of distinct diagnostic symptoms, low index of clinical suspicion, and the difficulty of visualizing the early stages of this injury on standard x-rays cause frequent misdiagnosis of talar dome lesions. Differential Diagnosis: Ganglion cyst, with inflammatory synovitis secondary to rupture of cyst; loose bodies from previous occult fracture; osteochondral fracture. Treatment: Initial treatment with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs and a posterior splint for comfort, followed by arthroscopic excision of loose bodies with abrasion and drilling arthroplasty. Uniqueness: Patient presented to the team physician for care of acute left medial ankle pain after the athletic trainer had attempted to rupture a ganglion cyst on the anterolateral aspect of the patient's ankle. Conclusions: Increased clinical suspicion is necessary to correctly diagnose osteochondral lesions, particularly in the early stages. Aggressive treatment of talar dome lesions has a good success rate and may be an attractive option for competitive athletes. ImagesFigure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5. PMID:16558537

  20. Novel Vanadium-Loaded Ordered Collagen Scaffold Promotes Osteochondral Differentiation of Bone Marrow Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cortizo, Ana M.; Ruderman, Graciela; Mazzini, Flavia N.; Molinuevo, M. Silvina; Mogilner, Ines G.

    2016-01-01

    Bone and cartilage regeneration can be improved by designing a functionalized biomaterial that includes bioactive drugs in a biocompatible and biodegradable scaffold. Based on our previous studies, we designed a vanadium-loaded collagen scaffold for osteochondral tissue engineering. Collagen-vanadium loaded scaffolds were characterized by SEM, FTIR, and permeability studies. Rat bone marrow progenitor cells were plated on collagen or vanadium-loaded membranes to evaluate differences in cell attachment, growth and osteogenic or chondrocytic differentiation. The potential cytotoxicity of the scaffolds was assessed by the MTT assay and by evaluation of morphological changes in cultured RAW 264.7 macrophages. Our results show that loading of VOAsc did not alter the grooved ordered structure of the collagen membrane although it increased membrane permeability, suggesting a more open structure. The VOAsc was released to the media, suggesting diffusion-controlled drug release. Vanadium-loaded membranes proved to be a better substratum than C0 for all evaluated aspects of BMPC biocompatibility (adhesion, growth, and osteoblastic and chondrocytic differentiation). In addition, there was no detectable effect of collagen or vanadium-loaded scaffolds on macrophage viability or cytotoxicity. Based on these findings, we have developed a new ordered collagen scaffold loaded with VOAsc that shows potential for osteochondral tissue engineering. PMID:27293438

  1. Image-Guided Techniques Improve the Short-Term Outcome of Autologous Osteochondral Cartilage Repair Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, Steven M.; Hurtig, Mark B.; Waldman, Stephen D.; Rudan, John F.; Bardana, Davide D.; Stewart, A. James

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Autologous osteochondral cartilage repair is a valuable reconstruction option for cartilage defects, but the accuracy to harvest and deliver osteochondral grafts remains problematic. We investigated whether image-guided methods (optically guided and template guided) can improve the outcome of these procedures. Design: Fifteen sheep were operated to create traumatic chondral injuries in each knee. After 4 months, the chondral defect in one knee was repaired using (a) conventional approach, (b) optically guided method, or (c) template-guided method. For both image-guided groups, harvest and delivery sites were preoperatively planned using custom-made software. During optically guided surgery, instrument position and orientation were tracked and superimposed onto the surgical plan. For the template-guided group, plastic templates were manufactured to allow an exact fit between template and the joint anatomy. Cylindrical holes within the template guided surgical tools according to the plan. Three months postsurgery, both knees were harvested and computed tomography scans were used to compare the reconstructed versus the native pre-injury joint surfaces. For each repaired defect, macroscopic (International Cartilage Repair Society [ICRS]) and histological repair (ICRS II) scores were assessed. Results: Three months after repair surgery, both image-guided surgical approaches resulted in significantly better histology scores compared with the conventional approach (improvement by 55%, P < 0.02). Interestingly, there were no significant differences found in cartilage surface reconstruction and macroscopic scores between the image-guided and the conventional surgeries. PMID:26069658

  2. Repair of articular cartilage in rabbit osteochondral defects promoted by extracorporeal shock wave therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, C.-H.; Yen, Y.-S.; Chen, P.-L.; Wen, C.-Y.

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the stimulative effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) on the articular cartilage regeneration in the rabbit osteochondral defect model for the first time. An osteochondral defect, 3 mm in diameter and 3 mm in depth, was drilled in the patellar groove at the distal end of each femur in 24 mature New Zealand rabbits. The right patellar defects received 500 impulses of shock waves of (at 14 kV) at 1 week after surgery and were designated as the experimental samples; the left patellar defects served as control. At 4, 8, and 12 weeks after ESWT, cartilage repair was evaluated macroscopically and histologically using a semiquantitative grading scale. The total scores of the macroscopic evaluation at 4, 8, and 12 weeks in the experimental group were superior to those in the control group (statistical significance level ). As to the total scores of the histologic evaluation, the experimental group showed a tendency toward a better recovery than the control group at 4 weeks (). At 8 and 12 weeks the differences between the experimental and control groups became mild and had no significance on statistical analysis. These findings suggested that regeneration of articular cartilage defects might be promoted by ESWT, especially at the early stage. The easy and safe ESWT is potentially viable for clinical application.

  3. Implantable Microimagers

    PubMed Central

    Ng, David C.; Tokuda, Takashi; Shiosaka, Sadao; Tano, Yasuo; Ohta, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Implantable devices such as cardiac pacemakers, drug-delivery systems, and defibrillators have had a tremendous impact on the quality of live for many disabled people. To date, many devices have been developed for implantation into various parts of the human body. In this paper, we focus on devices implanted in the head. In particular, we describe the technologies necessary to create implantable microimagers. Design, fabrication, and implementation issues are discussed vis-à-vis two examples of implantable microimagers; the retinal prosthesis and in vivo neuro-microimager. Testing of these devices in animals verify the use of the microimagers in the implanted state. We believe that further advancement of these devices will lead to the development of a new method for medical and scientific applications.

  4. High Productivity Implantation ''PARTIAL IMPLANT''

    SciTech Connect

    Hino, Masayoshi; Miyamoto, Naoki; Sakai, Shigeki; Matsumoto, Takao

    2008-11-03

    The patterned ion implantation 'PARTIAL IMPLANT' has been developed as a productivity improvement tool. The Partial Implant can form several different ion dose areas on the wafer surface by controlling the speed of wafer moving and the stepwise rotation of twist axis. The Partial Implant system contains two implant methods. One method is 'DIVIDE PARTIAL IMPLANT', that is aimed at reducing the consumption of the wafer. The Divide Partial Implant evenly divides dose area on one wafer surface into two or three different dose part. Any dose can be selected in each area. So the consumption of the wafer for experimental implantation can be reduced. The second method is 'RING PARTIAL IMPLANT' that is aimed at improving yield by correcting electrical characteristic of devices. The Ring Partial Implant can form concentric ion dose areas. The dose of wafer external area can be selected to be within plus or minus 30% of dose of wafer central area. So the electrical characteristic of devices can be corrected by controlling dose at edge side on the wafer.

  5. Chondrocytes within osteochondral grafts are more resistant than osteoblasts to tissue culture at 37°C.

    PubMed

    Bastian, Johannes D; Egli, Rainer J; Ganz, Reinhold; Hofstetter, Willy; Leunig, Michael

    2011-01-01

    It is proposed that an ideal osteochondral allograft for cartilage repair consists of a devitalized bone but functional cartilage. The different modes of nutrient supply in vivo for bone (vascular support) and cartilage (diffusion) suggest that a modulation of storage conditions could differentially affect the respective cells, resulting in the proposed allograft. For this purpose, osteochondral tissues from porcine humeral heads were either cultured at 37°C for up to 24 hr or stored at 4°C for 24 hr, the temperature at which osteochondral allografts are routinely stored. Functionality of the cells was assessed by in situ hybridization for transcripts encoding collagen types I and II. At 37°C, a time-dependent significant reduction of the bone surface covered with functional cells was observed with only 5% ± 5% coverage left at 24 hr compared with 41% ± 10% at 0 hr. Similarly, cartilage area containing functional cells was significantly reduced from 84% ± 7% at 0 hr to 70% ± 3% after 24 hr. After 24 hr at 4°C, a significantly reduced amount of functional cells covering bone surfaces was observed (27% ± 5%) but not of cells within the cartilage (79% ± 8%). In the applied experimental setup, bone cells were more affected by tissue culture at 37°C than cartilage cells. Even though chondrocytes appear to be more sensitive to 37°C than to 4°C, the substantially reduced amount of functional bone cells at 37°C warrants further investigation of whether a preincubation of osteochondral allografts at 37°C--prior to regular storage at 4°C--might result in an optimized osteochondral allograft with devitalized bone but viable cartilage. PMID:21275527

  6. Effects of cryopreservation on the depth-dependent elastic modulus in articular cartilage and implications for osteochondral grafting.

    PubMed

    Kahn, David; Les, Clifford; Xia, Yang

    2015-05-01

    Cryopreservation of articular cartilage is often used in storage of experimental samples and osteochondral grafts, but the depth-dependence and concentration of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) are significantly altered when cryogenically stored without a cryoprotectant, which will reduce cartilage stiffness and affect osteochondral graft function and long-term viability. This study investigates our ability to detect changes due to cryopreservation in the depth-dependent elastic modulus of osteochondral samples. Using a direct-visualization method requiring minimal histological alterations, unconfined stepwise stress relaxation tests were performed on four fresh (never frozen) and three cryopreserved (-20 °C) canine humeral head osteochondral slices 125 ± 5 μm thick. Applied force was measured and tissue images were taken at the end of each relaxation phase using a 4× objective. Intratissue displacements were calculated by tracking chondrocytes through consecutive images for various intratissue depths. The depth-dependent elastic modulus was compared between fresh and cryopreserved tissue for same-depth ranges using analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Tukey post-test with a 95% confidence interval. Cryopreservation was found to significantly alter the force-displacement profile and reduce the depth-dependent modulus of articular cartilage. Excessive collagen fiber folding occurred at 40-60% relative depth, producing a "black line" in cryopreserved tissue. Force-displacement curves exhibited elongated toe-region in cryopreserved tissue while fresh tissue had nonmeasurable toe-region. Statistical analysis showed significant reduction in the elastic modulus and GAG concentration throughout the tissue between same-depth ranges. This method of cryopreservation significantly reduces the depth-dependent modulus of canine humeral osteochondral samples. PMID:25412272

  7. Role of oxygen as a regulator of stem cell fate during the spontaneous repair of osteochondral defects.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Adam; Kelly, Daniel J

    2016-06-01

    The complexity of the in vivo environment makes it is difficult to isolate the effects of specific cues on regulating cell fate during regenerative events such as osteochondral defect repair. The objective of this study was to develop a computational model to explore how joint specific environmental factors regulate mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) fate during osteochondral defect repair. To this end, the spontaneous repair process within an osteochondral defect was simulated using a tissue differentiation algorithm which assumed that MSC fate was regulated by local oxygen levels and substrate stiffness. The developed model was able to predict the main stages of tissue formation observed by a number of in vivo studies. Following this, a parametric study was conducted to better understand why interventions that modulate angiogenesis dramatically impact the outcome of osteochondral defect healing. In the simulations where angiogenesis was reduced, by week 12, the subchondral plate was predicted to remain below the native tidemark, although the chondral region was composed entirely of cartilage and fibrous tissue. In the simulations where angiogenesis was increased, more robust cell proliferation and cartilage formation were observed during the first 4 weeks, however, by week 12 the subchondral plate had advanced above the native tidemark although any remaining tissue was either hypertrophic cartilage or fibrous tissue. These results suggest that osteochondral defect repair could be enhanced by interventions where angiogenesis is promoted but confined to within the subchondral region of the defect. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1026-1036, 2016. PMID:26595173

  8. Characterization of mRNA expression for the endothelial differentiation G-protein-coupled (EDG) receptors in porcine endometrial tissue during the pre-implantation period of pregnancy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Establishment of pregnancy in the pig requires proper preparation of the uterine environment. Although the mechanisms by which the endometrium undergoes preparation for embryo implantation are not clear, recent evidence has suggested that lysophospholipids, such as sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and ...

  9. Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Osteochondral Autograft Transplantation versus Debridement in the Treatment of Osteochondritis Dessicans of the Capitellum

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Seth; Braunstein, Jacob; Rabinowitz, Justin; Barfield, William R.; Chhabra, Bobby; Haro, Marc Scott

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this systematic review and meta- analysis is to compare clinical results and functional outcomes in patients with osteochondritis dessicans (OCD) lesions of the capitellum treated with either osteochondral autograft transplantation (OATS) or debridement with or without microfracture. Methods: Systematic review of multiple medical databases was performed after PROSPERO registration and using PRISMA guidelines. A literature search was performed using the multiple medical databases and the methodological quality of the individual studies was assessed by two review authors using the Cochrane Collaboration’s “Risk of Bias” tool. Case reports were excluded and only case series of more than five patients and higher level of evidence were included. All study, subject, and surgery parameters were collected. Data was analyzed using statistical software. Odds ratios (OR) were calculated when possible. Data were compared using Pearson Chi-Square and independent sample T tests when applicable. Results: Fifteen studies were included involving 368 patients (326 males and 42 females). There were a total of 197 patients in the debridement group and 171 patients in the OATS group. The mean age was 16.9 +/-4.1 for the debridement group and 14.6 +/-1.2 for the OATS group. Mean follow up was 29.0 +/-24.3 and 38.0 +/-12.8 for the debridement and OATS groups, respectively. Patients that underwent an OATS procedure had a statistically significant improvement in overall arc range of motion compared to patients that had a debridement (P≤0.001). When compared to patients with debridement, patients with OATS were 5.6 times more likely to return to at least their pre-injury level of sports participation (p≤0.002). Conclusion: Post-operative range of motion was significantly improved in patients undergoing an OATS procedure versus a debridement for OCD lesions of the capitellum. Patients with an OATS were 5.7 times more likely to return to at least the pre

  10. Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Knee in Children and Adolescents: Our Experience with Transchondral Drilling.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Hasour Hassan; Vícha, Jan; Proček, Tomáš; Pavlata, Jaroslav; Kučera, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans(OCD) of the knee is identified with increasing frequency in the adolescent patient. Left untreated, OCD can cause significant impairment and restriction in physical activity and development of osteoarthritis at an early age. The diagnosis of lesions of OCD can be confirmed on plain radiographs. MRI has emerged as the gold standard to evaluate the stability of the lesion and the integrity of the overlying articular cartilage. Treatment of OCD lesions depend on the stability of the lesion. Stable lesions can be treated conservatively by physical activity modification and immobilization. Unstable lesions and stable lesions not responding to conservative measures should be treated surgically. Surgical options range from arthroscopic drilling, either transarticular or extra-articular drilling for stable lesions or salvage procedures such as autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT), mosaicplasty to restore joint and cartilage congruency. PMID:26686950

  11. Bioglass®/chitosan-polycaprolactone bilayered composite scaffolds intended for osteochondral tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingqing; Nooeaid, Patcharakamon; Detsch, Rainer; Roether, Judith A; Dong, Yanming; Goudouri, Ourania-Menti; Schubert, Dirk W; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2014-12-01

    Polymer-coated 45S5 Bioglass(®) (BG)/chitosan-polycaprolactone (BG/CS-PCL) bilayered composite scaffolds were prepared via foam replication and freeze-drying techniques for application in osteochondral tissue engineering. The CS-PCL coated and uncoated BG scaffolds were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The mechanical properties of the coated scaffolds were significantly improved in comparison to uncoated scaffolds. The bioactivity and biodegradation behavior of scaffolds were studied in simulated body fluid (SBF) for up to 28 days. The interface between the BG scaffold and the polymer coating layer was observed by SEM and a suitable interpenetration of the polymer into the scaffold struts was found. The effects of coated and uncoated BG scaffolds on MG-63 osteoblast-like cells were evaluated by cell viability, adhesion and proliferation. PMID:24677705

  12. Return to Sport After Operative Management of Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Capitellum

    PubMed Central

    Westermann, Robert W.; Hancock, Kyle J.; Buckwalter, Joseph A.; Kopp, Benjamin; Glass, Natalie; Wolf, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Capitellar osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) is commonly managed surgically in symptomatic adolesent throwers and gymnasts. Little is known about the impact that surgical technique has on return to sport. Purpose: To evaluate the clinical outcomes and return-to-sport rates after operative management of OCD lesions in adolescent athletes. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: The PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, SPORTDiscus (EBSCO), and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases were queried for studies evaluating outcomes and return to sport after surgical management of OCD of the capitellum. Two independent reviewers conducted a systematic review according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Studies reporting patient outcomes with return-to-sport data and minimum 6-month follow-up were included in the review. Results: After review, 24 studies reporting outcomes in 492 patients (mean age ± SD, 14.3 ± 0.9 years) were analyzed. The overall return-to-sport rate was 86% at a mean 5.6 months. Return to the highest preoperative level of sport was most common after osteochondral autograft procedures (94%) compared with debridement and marrow stimulation procedures (71%) or OCD fixation surgery (64%). Elbow range of motion improved by 15.9° after surgery. The Timmerman-Andrews subjective and objective scores significantly improved after surgery. Complications were low (<5%), with 2 cases of donor site morbidity after osteoarticular autograft transfer (OAT) autograft harvest. The most common indications for reoperation were repeat debridement/loose body removal. Conclusion: A high rate of return to sport was observed after operative management of capitellar OCD. Patients were more likely to return to their highest level of preoperative sport after OAT autograft compared with debridement or fixation. Significant improvements in elbow range of motion and patient outcomes are

  13. Osteochondritis dissecans and Osgood Schlatter disease in a family with Stickler syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Al Kaissi, Ali; Klaushofer, Klaus; Grill, Franz

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Stickler syndrome is among the most common autosomal dominant connective tissue disorders but is often unrecognised and therefore not diagnosed by clinicians. Despite much speculation, the cause of osteochondrosis in general and osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) and Osgood Schlatter syndrome (OSS) in particular remain unclear. Etiological understanding is essential. We describe a pair of family subjects presented with OCD and OSS as a symptom complex rather than a diagnosis. Methods Detailed clinical and radiographic examinations were undertaken with emphasis on the role of MRI imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging may allow early prediction of articular lesion healing potential in patients with Stickler syndrome. Results The phenotype of Stickler syndrome can be diverse and therefore misleading. The expectation that the full clinical criteria of any given genetic disorder such as Stickler syndrome will always be present can easily lead to an underestimation of these serious inheritable disorders. We report here two family subjects, a male proband and his aunt (paternal sister), both presented with the major features of Stickler syndrome. Tall stature with marfanoid habitus, astigmatism/congenital vitreous abnormality and submucus cleft palate/cleft uvula, and enlarged painful joints with early onset osteoarthritis. Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) and Osgood Schlatter syndrome (OSS) were the predominating joint abnormalities. Conclusion We observed that the nature of the articular and physeal abnormalities was consistent with a localised manifestation of a more generalised epiphyseal dysplasia affecting the weight-bearing joints. In these two patients, OCD and OSS appeared to be the predominant pathologic musculoskeletal consequences of an underlying Stickler's syndrome. It is empirical to consider generalised epiphyseal dysplasia as a major underlying causation that might drastically affect the weight-bearing joints. PMID:19193224

  14. Involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction and ER-stress in the physiopathology of equine osteochondritis dissecans (OCD).

    PubMed

    Desjardin, Clémence; Chat, Sophie; Gilles, Mailys; Legendre, Rachel; Riviere, Julie; Mata, Xavier; Balliau, Thierry; Esquerré, Diane; Cribiu, Edmond P; Betch, Jean-Marc; Schibler, Laurent

    2014-06-01

    Osteochondrosis (OC) is a developmental bone disorder affecting several mammalian species including the horse. Equine OC is described as a focal disruption of endochondral ossification, leading to osteochondral lesions (osteochondritis dissecans, OCD) that may release free bodies within the joint. OCD lesions trigger joint swelling, stiffness and lameness and affects about 30% of the equine population. OCD is considered as multifactorial but its physiopathology is still poorly understood and genes involved in genetic predisposition are still unknown. Our study compared two healthy and two OC-affected 18-month-old French Trotters diagnosed with OCD lesions at the intermediate ridge of the distal tibia. A comparative shot-gun proteomic analysis of non-wounded cartilage and sub-chondral bone from healthy (healthy samples) and OC-affected foals (predisposed samples) identified 83 and 53 modulated proteins, respectively. These proteins are involved in various biological pathways including matrix structure and maintenance, protein biosynthesis, folding and transport, mitochondrial activity, energy and calcium metabolism. Transmission electron microscopy revealed typical features of mitochondrial swelling and ER-stress, such as large, empty mitochondria, and hyper-dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum, in the deep zone of both OC lesions and predisposed cartilage. Abnormal fibril organization surrounding chondrocytes and abnormal features at the ossification front were also observed. Combining these findings with quantitative trait loci and whole genome sequencing results identified about 140 functional candidate genes carrying putative damaging mutations in 30 QTL regions. In summary, our study suggests that OCD lesions may result from defective hypertrophic terminal differentiation associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and ER-stress, leading to impaired cartilage and bone biomechanical properties, making them prone to fractures. In addition, 11 modulated proteins and

  15. Goserelin Implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... which the type of tissue that lines the uterus [womb] grows in other areas of the body ... with the treatment of abnormal bleeding of the uterus. Goserelin implant is in a class of medications ...

  16. Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langouche, G.; Yoshida, Y.

    In this tutorial we describe the basic principles of the ion implantation technique and we demonstrate that emission Mössbauer spectroscopy is an extremely powerful technique to investigate the atomic and electronic configuration around implanted atoms. The physics of dilute atoms in materials, the final lattice sites and their chemical state as well as diffusion phenomena can be studied. We focus on the latest developments of implantation Mössbauer spectroscopy, where three accelerator facilities, i.e., Hahn-Meitner Institute Berlin, ISOLDE-CERN and RIKEN, have intensively been used for materials research in in-beam and on-line Mössbauer experiments immediately after implantation of the nuclear probes.

  17. Dental Implants

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... facts so you can make an informed decision as to whether dental implants are right for your ... the jaw bone. It’s obviously not the same as the original connection , but functions just the same. ...

  18. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... additional visits are needed for activating, adjusting, and programming the various electrodes that have been implanted. Also, ... to the center for checkups once the final programming is made to the speech processor. Both children ...

  19. Histrelin Implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... bone growth and development of sexual characteristics) in girls usually between 2 and 8 years of age ... MRI scans (radiology techniques designed to show the images of body structures) to find the implant when ...

  20. Platelet autologous growth factors decrease the osteochondral regeneration capability of a collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffold in a sheep model

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Current research aims to develop innovative approaches to improve chondral and osteochondral regeneration. The objective of this study was to investigate the regenerative potential of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to enhance the repair process of a collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffold in osteochondral defects in a sheep model. Methods PRP was added to a new, multi-layer gradient, nanocomposite scaffold that was obtained by nucleating collagen fibrils with hydroxyapatite nanoparticles. Twenty-four osteochondral lesions were created in sheep femoral condyles. The animals were randomised to three treatment groups: scaffold, scaffold loaded with autologous PRP, and empty defect (control). The animals were sacrificed and evaluated six months after surgery. Results Gross evaluation and histology of the specimens showed good integration of the chondral surface in both treatment groups. Significantly better bone regeneration and cartilage surface reconstruction were observed in the group treated with the scaffold alone. Incomplete bone regeneration and irregular cartilage surface integration were observed in the group treated with the scaffold where PRP was added. In the control group, no bone and cartilage defect healing occurred; defects were filled with fibrous tissue. Quantitative macroscopic and histological score evaluations confirmed the qualitative trends observed. Conclusions The hydroxyapatite-collagen scaffold enhanced osteochondral lesion repair, but the combination with platelet growth factors did not have an additive effect; on the contrary, PRP administration had a negative effect on the results obtained by disturbing the regenerative process. In the scaffold + PRP group, highly amorphous cartilaginous repair tissue and poorly spatially organised underlying bone tissue were found. PMID:20875101

  1. Effect of insulin-like growth factor-1 and hyaluronic acid in experimentally produced osteochondral defects in rats

    PubMed Central

    Alemdar, Celil; Yücel, İstemi; Erbil, Barış; Erdem, Havva; Atiç, Ramazan; Özkul, Emin

    2016-01-01

    Background: The common purpose of almost all methods used to treat the osteochondral injuries is to produce a normal cartilage matrix. However current methods are not sufficient to provide a normal cartilage matrix. For that reason, researchers have studied to increase the effectiveness of this methods using chondrogenic and chondroprotective molecules in recent experimental studies. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and hyaluronic acid (HA) are two important agents used in this field. This study compared the effects of IGF-1 and HA in an experimental osteochondral defect in rat femora. Materials and Methods: The rats were divided into three groups (n = 15 per group) as follows: The IGF-1 group, HA group, and control group. An osteochondral defect of a diameter of 1.5 mm and a depth of 2 mm was created on the patellar joint side of femoral condyles. The IGF-1 group received an absorbable gelatin sponge soaked with 15 μg/15 μl of IGF-1, and the HA group received an absorbable gelatin sponge soaked with 80 μg HA. The control group received only an absorbable gelatin sponge. Rats were sacrificed at the 6th week, and the femur condyles were evaluated histologically. Results: According to the total Mankin scale, there was a statistically significant difference between IGF-1 and HA groups and between IGF-1 and control groups. There was also a significant statistical difference between HA and control groups. Conclusion: It was shown histopathologically that IGF-1 is an effective molecule for osteochondral lesions. Although it is weaker than IGF-1, HA also strengthened the repair tissue. PMID:27512224

  2. Rescuing failed oral implants via Wnt activation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xing; Li, Jingtao; Chen, Tao; Mouraret, Sylvain; Dhamdhere, Girija; Brunski, John B.; Zou, Shujuan; Helms, Jill A.

    2016-01-01

    Aim Implant osseointegration is not always guaranteed and once fibrous encapsulation occurs clinicians have few options other than implant removal. Our goal was to test whether a WNT protein therapeutic could rescue such failed implants. Material and Methods Titanium implants were placed in over-sized murine oral osteotomies. A lack of primary stability was verified by mechanical testing. Interfacial strains were estimated by finite element modelling and histology coupled with histomorphometry confirmed the lack of peri-implant bone. After fibrous encapsulation was established peri-implant injections of a liposomal formulation of WNT3A protein (L-WNT3A) or liposomal PBS (L-PBS) were then initiated. Quantitative assays were employed to analyse the effects of L-WNT3A treatment. Results Implants in gap-type interfaces exhibited high interfacial strains and no primary stability. After verification of implant failure, L-WNT3A or L-PBS injections were initiated. L-WNT3A induced a rapid, significant increase in Wnt responsiveness in the peri-implant environment, cell proliferation and osteogenic protein expression. The amount of peri-implant bone and bone in contact with the implant were significantly higher in L-WNT3A cases. Conclusions These data demonstrate L-WNT3A can induce peri-implant bone formation even in cases where fibrous encapsulation predominates. PMID:26718012

  3. Exploring Effectiveness of Computer-Aided Planning in Implant Positioning for a Single Immediate Implant Placement.

    PubMed

    Edelmann, Alexander R; Hosseini, Bashir; Byrd, Warren C; Preisser, John S; Tyndall, Donald A; Nguyen, Tung; Bencharit, Sompop

    2016-06-01

    The value of computer-aided implant planning using cone-beam computerized tomography (CBCT) for single immediate implants was explored. Eighteen patients requiring extraction of a tooth followed by a single immediate implant were enrolled. Small volume preoperative CBCT scans were used to plan the position of the implant. A taper screwed-type implant was immediately placed into a fresh socket using only the final 1 or 2 drills for osteotomy. Postoperative CBCTs were used for the analysis of actual implant placement positioning. Measurements of the planned and the actual implant position were made with respect to their position relative to the adjacent teeth. Mesio-distal displacements and the facial-lingual deviation of the implant from the planned position were determined. Changes in the angulation of the planned and actual implant position in relation to the clinical crown were also measured. To statistically summarize the results, box plots and 95% CIs for means of paired differences were used. The analysis showed no statistical difference between the planned position and final implant placement position in any measurement. The CBCT scans coupled with the computer-aided implant planning program along with a final 1-to-2 drill protocol may improve the accuracy of single immediate implant placement for taper screwed-type implants. PMID:26652644

  4. In vitro generation of whole osteochondral constructs using rabbit bone marrow stromal cells, employing a two-chambered co-culture well design.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kelei; Ng, Kian Siang; Ravi, Sujata; Goh, James C H; Toh, Siew Lok

    2016-04-01

    The regeneration of whole osteochondral constructs with a physiological structure has been a significant issue, both clinically and academically. In this study, we present a method using rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) cultured on a silk-RADA peptide scaffold in a specially designed two-chambered co-culture well for the generation of multilayered osteochondral constructs in vitro. This specially designed two-chambered well can simultaneously provide osteogenic and chondrogenic stimulation to cells located in different regions of the scaffold. We demonstrated that this co-culture approach could successfully provide specific chemical stimulation to BMSCs located on different layers within a single scaffold, resulting in the formation of multilayered osteochondral constructs containing cartilage-like and subchondral bone-like tissue, as well as the intermediate osteochondral interface. The cells in the intermediate region were found to be hypertrophic chondrocytes, embedded in a calcified extracellular matrix containing glycosaminoglycans and collagen types I, II and X. In conclusion, this study provides a single-step approach that highlights the feasibility of rabbit BMSCs as a single-cell source for multilayered osteochondral construct generation in vitro. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23495238

  5. Development of a Large Animal Model of Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, Christian G.; Kinsella, Stuart D.; Milby, Andrew H.; Fisher, Matthew B.; Belkin, Nicole S.; Mauck, Robert L.; Carey, James L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Treatment of osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the knee is challenging, and evidence for stage-dependent treatment options is lacking. Basic science approaches utilizing animal models have provided insight into the etiology of OCD but have yet to produce a reliable and reproducible large animal model of the disease on which to test new surgical strategies. Purpose/Hypotheses: The purpose of this study was to develop an animal model featuring an OCD-like lesion in terms of size, location, and International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) grading. The hypothesis was that surgical creation of an osteochondral defect followed by placement of a barrier between parent bone and progeny fragment would generate a reproducible OCD-like lesion. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Bilateral osteochondral lesions were created in the medial femoral condyles of 9 Yucatan minipigs. After lesion creation, a biodegradable membrane was interposed between the progeny and parent bone. Five different treatment groups were evaluated at 2 weeks: a control with no membrane (ctrl group; n = 4), a slowly degrading nanofibrous poly(∊-caprolactone) membrane (PCL group; n = 4), a fenestrated PCL membrane with 1.5-mm holes covering 25% of surface area (fenPCL group; n = 4), a collagen membrane (Bio-Gide) (CM group; n = 3), and a fenestrated CM (fenCM group; n = 3). Five unperturbed lateral condyles (1 from each treatment group) served as sham controls. After euthanasia on day 14, the lesion was evaluated by gross inspection, fluoroscopy, micro–computed tomography (micro-CT), and histology. To quantify changes between groups, a scoring system based on gross appearance (0-2), fluoroscopy (0-2), and micro-CT (0-6) was established. Micro-CT was used to quantify bone volume per total volume (BV/TV) in a defined region surrounding and inclusive of the defect. Results: The no scaffold group showed healing of the subchondral bone at 2 weeks, with continuity of

  6. The Incidence of Surgery in Osteochondritis Dissecans in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Jennifer M.; Nikizad, Hooman; Shea, Kevin G.; Gyurdzhyan, Samvel; Jacobs, John C.; Cannamela, Peter C.; Kessler, Jeffrey I.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The frequency of osteochondritis dissecans (OCD), a disorder of the subchondral bone and articular cartilage, is not well described. Purpose: To assess the frequency of pediatric OCD lesions that progress to surgery based on sex, joint involvement, and age. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: A retrospective chart review (2007-2011) was performed on OCD. Inclusion criteria included OCD of any joint and patients aged 2 to 19 years. Exclusion criteria included traumatic osteochondral fractures or coexistence of non-OCD intra-articular lesions. Differences in progression toward surgery were compared between age groups, sex, and joint location. Logistical regression analysis was performed by sex, age, and ethnicity. Results: Overall, 317 patients with a total of 334 OCD lesions were found. The majority of lesions (61.7%) were in the knee, with ankle, elbow, shoulder, and foot lesions representing 25.4%, 12.0%, 0.6%, and 0.3% of all lesions, respectively. The majority of joints needing surgery were in the knee (58.5%), with ankle and elbow lesions representing 22.9% and 18.6% of surgeries performed, respectively. The percentage of all OCD lesions progressing to surgery was 35.3%; surgical progression for knee, ankle, and elbow joints was 33.5%, 31.8%, and 55.0%, respectively. Logistic regression analysis found no statistically significant different risk of progressing to surgery for OCD of the knee, elbow, and ankle between sexes. Patients aged 12 to 19 years had a 7.4-times greater risk of progression to surgery for knee OCD lesions than 6- to 11-year-olds. Patients aged 12 to 19 years were 8.2 times more likely to progress to surgery for all OCD lesions than patients aged 6 to 11 years. Progression to surgery of ankle OCD did not significantly differ based on location. Three of 4 trochlear lesions progressed to surgery, along with 1 of 1 tibial, 1 of 3 patellar, 40.3% of lateral femoral condylar, and 28.2% of medial femoral condylar

  7. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... outside of the body, behind the ear. A second part is surgically placed under the skin. An implant does not restore normal hearing. It can help a person understand speech. Children and adults can benefit from them. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

  8. Cochlear implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... are sent along the auditory nerve to the brain. A deaf person does not have a functioning inner ear. A cochlear implant tries to replace the function of the inner ear by ... signals to the brain. Sound is picked up by a microphone worn ...

  9. Material Properties of Fresh Cold-stored Allografts for Osteochondral Defects at 1 Year

    PubMed Central

    Ranawat, Anil S.; Vidal, Armando F.; Chen, Chris T.; Zelken, Jonathan A.; Turner, A. Simon

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about the long-term properties of fresh cold-stored osteochondral allograft tissue. We hypothesized fresh cold-stored tissue would yield superior material properties in an in vivo ovine model compared to those using freeze-thawed acellular grafts. In addition, we speculated that a long storage time would yield less successful grafts. We created 10-mm defects in medial femoral condyles of 20 sheep. Defects were reconstructed with allograft plugs stored at 4°C for 1, 14, and 42 days; control specimens were freeze-thawed or defect-only. At 52 weeks, animals were euthanized and retrieved grafts were analyzed for cell viability, gross morphology, histologic grade, and biomechanical and biochemical analysis. Explanted cold-stored tissue had superior histologic scores over freeze-thawed and defect-only grafts. Specimens stored for 1 and 42 days had higher equilibrium moduli and proteoglycan content than freeze-thawed specimens. We observed no difference among any of the cold-stored specimens for chondrocyte viability, histology, equilibrium aggregate modulus, proteoglycan content, or hypotonic swelling. Reconstructing cartilage defects with cold-stored allograft resulted in superior histologic and biomechanical properties compared with acellular freeze-thawed specimens; however, storage time did not appear to be a critical factor in the success of the transplanted allograft. PMID:18528743

  10. Evaluation of biomarkers following autologous osteochondral transplantation in the equine stifle joint - An experimental study.

    PubMed

    Tuska, Pál; Tóth, Balázs; Vásárhelyi, Gábor; Hangody, László; Papp, Miklós; Bodó, Gábor

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in biomarker and synovial parameters following autologous osteochondral transplantation (AOT) in the equine stifle joint, to test the hypothesis whether synovial parameters would show significant differences at selected time points following the surgery (at days 3, 14, 60 and 180) compared to baseline level (at day 0). Surgical intervention was performed in both stifles of nine horses (n = 18). The joints were randomly assigned to operated and sham-operated groups. Grafts 8.5 mm in diameter were harvested from the femoropatellar (FP) joint under arthroscopic control and the medial femorotibial (MFT) joints had AOT using mosaicplasty (MP) instrumentation, while the sham FP and sham MFT joints underwent arthroscopy and miniarthrotomy without transplantation, respectively. Synovial fluid (SF) parameters were evaluated at days 4, 14, 60 and 180. Data were analysed by two-way repeated- measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), and P < 0.05 was considered significant. During the first 10-14 days after surgery, lameness of degree 2-3/5 [American Association of Equine Practitioners (AAEP) scores] was present, which disappeared after 60 days. Joints with transplantation showed significant increases in synovial white blood cell count (WBC), total protein (TP), substance P, C1,2C and CS846 epitope concentration at day 3 compared to baseline and shamoperated joints (P < 0.05). These parameters returned to the baseline values by two months after surgery and remained within normal levels at 6 months postoperatively. PMID:27342088