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Sample records for otoscope cone disinfection

  1. Otoscopic exam of the ear (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... intrument which is used to look into the ear canal. The ear speculum (a cone-shaped viewing piece of the otoscope) is slowly inserted into the ear canal while looking into the otoscope. The speculum ...

  2. Comparative evaluation of tensile strength of Gutta-percha cones with a herbal disinfectant

    PubMed Central

    Mahali, Raghunandhan Raju; Dola, Binoy; Tanikonda, Rambabu; Peddireddi, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate and compare the tensile strength values and influence of taper on the tensile strength of Gutta-percha (GP) cones after disinfection with sodium hypochlorite (SH) and Aloe vera gel (AV). Materials and Methods: Sixty GP cones of size 110, 2% taper, 60 GP cones F3 ProTaper, and 60 GP of size 30, 6% taper were obtained from sealed packs as three different groups. Experimental groups were disinfected with 5.25% SH and 90% AV gel except the control group. Tensile strengths of GP were measured using the universal testing machine. Results: The mean tensile strength values for Group IA, IIA and IIIA are 11.8 MPa, 8.69 MPa, and 9.24 MPa, respectively. Results were subjected to statistical analysis one-way analysis of variance test and Tukey post-hoc test. 5.25% SH solutions decreased the tensile strength of GP cones whereas with 90% AV gel it was not significantly altered. Conclusion: Ninety percent Aloe vera gel as a disinfectant does not alter the tensile strength of GP cones PMID:26752842

  3. Antimicrobial effect of three disinfecting agents on Resilon cones and their effect on surface topography: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Chandrappa, Mahesh Martur; Meharwade, Prasanna Mahadevasa; Srinivasan, Raghu; Bhandary, Shreetha; Nasreen, Farhat

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), 2% chlorhexidine (CHX), and 2% peracetic acid (PAA) in disinfecting Resilon cones and to evaluate topographical changes microscopically under scanning electron microscope (SEM) after rapid chemical disinfection. Materials and Methods: Resilon cones were disinfected in an ultraviolet (UV) light chamber for 20 min and contaminated by immersing in a microbial suspension of Enterococcus faecalis for 30 min. The contaminated cones were then immersed in the 5.25% NaOCl, 2% CHX, and 2% PAA for 1 min, 5 min, and 10 min, separately. The cones were then incubated at 37°C in thioglycollate broth for 7 days and examined for turbidity. The samples showing turbidity were subcultured on blood agar and incubated at 37°C for 48 h. Gram staining was done to confirm that the cultured bacteria were E. faecalis. Surface changes of disinfected Resilon cones were evaluated under SEM. Statistical Analysis Used: The data were analyzed statistically using Kruskal-Wallis, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Mann–Whitney U-test. Result: In eliminating E. faecalis, 5.25% NaOCl was most effective followed by 2% PAA and 2% CHX. Topographic examination of tested Resilon cones revealed some surface deposits after disinfection with 5.25% NaOCl and 2% CHX, whereas 2% PAA caused surface erosion. Conclusion: In disinfecting Resilon cones, 5.25% NaOCl is most effective followed by 2% PAA and 2% CHX. PMID:27099418

  4. Otoscope fogging: examination finding for perforated tympanic membrane

    PubMed Central

    Naylor, Jason F

    2014-01-01

    The author reports a recently recognised physical examination finding, otoscope fogging, for perforated tympanic membrane. Otoscope fogging is defined as condensation forming in the view field of the otoscope while inspecting the ear. In the setting of occult perforation secondary to the inability to visualise the entire tympanic membrane, otoscope fogging may provide the clinician with valuable information since medical management may differ if perforation is present. PMID:24879720

  5. Disinfection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, J. P.; Haas, C. N.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of wastewater disinfection for 1978. This review covers areas such as: (1) mechanisms of inactivation of negative microorganisms by chlorine and ozone; and (2) the effects of various treatment on over-all water quality. A list of 61 references is also presented. (HM)

  6. DISINFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary goal of the disinfection process in drinking water treatment is the inactivation of microbial pathogens. These pathogens comprise a diverse group of organisms which serve as the etiological agents of waterborne disease. Included in this group are bacterial, viral and ...

  7. Design of a positioning system for a holographic otoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrev, I.; Flores Moreno, J. M.; Furlong, C.; Harrington, E. J.; Rosowski, J. J.; Scarpino, C.

    2010-08-01

    Current ear examination procedures provide mostly qualitative information which results in insufficient or erroneous description of the patient's hearing. Much more quantitative and accurate results can be achieved with a holographic otoscope system currently under development. Various ways of accurate positioning and stabilization of the system in real-life conditions are being investigated by this project in an attempt to bring this new technology to the hospitals and clinics, in order to improve the quality of the treatments and operations of the human ear. The project is focused at developing a mechatronic system capable of positioning the holographic otoscope to the patient's ear and maintaining its relative orientation during the examination. The system will be able to be guided by the examiner, but it will maintain the chosen position automatically. To achieve that, various trajectories are being measured for existing otoscopes being guided by doctors in real medical conditions. Based on that, various kinematic configurations are to be synthesized and their stability and accuracy will be simulated and optimized with FEA. For simplification, the mechanism will contain no actuators, but only adjustable friction elements in a haptic feedback control system. This renders the positioning system safe and easily applicable to current examination rooms. Other means of stabilization of the system are being investigated such as custom designed packaging of all of the otoscope subsystems, interferometrically compensating for the heartbeat induced vibration of the tympanic membrane as well as methods for monitoring and active response to the motion of the patient's head.

  8. Terahertz otoscope and potential for diagnosing otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Young Bin; Moon, In-Seok; Bark, Hyeon Sang; Kim, Sang Hoon; Park, Dong Woo; Noh, Sam Kyu; Huh, Yong-Min; Suh, Jin-Seok; Oh, Seung Jae; Jeon, Tae-In

    2016-01-01

    We designed and fabricated a novel terahertz (THz) otoscope to help physicians to diagnose otitis media (OM) with both THz diagnostics and conventional optical diagnostics. We verified the potential of this tool for diagnosing OM using mouse skin tissue and a human tympanic membrane samples prior to clinical application. PMID:27446647

  9. Use of the Otoscope in the Evaluation of Common Injuries and Illnesses of the Ear

    PubMed Central

    Fincher, A. Louise

    1994-01-01

    Ear injuries and/or illnesses make up only a small percentage of the total injuries seen by the athletic trainer. However, if these conditions are left undetected or untreated, permanent ear damage could result. Many ear injuries involve structures that can only be viewed through the use of an otoscope. Although more athletic trainers are using the otoscope to evaluate the ear, there is little documentation available in athletic training literature regarding its proper use. This article describes the proper use of the otoscope in evaluating the ear and discusses the common pathological conditions that might confront the athletic trainer. This article will provide a resource that can be used in conjunction with the guidance of your team physician to help you develop the knowledge and skills required for performing an otoscopic examination. ImagesFig 3.Fig 4.Fig 5.Fig 6.Fig 7. PMID:16558262

  10. Disinfection Processes.

    PubMed

    Munakata, Naoko; Kuo, Jeff

    2016-10-01

    A review of the literature published in 2015 on topics relating to disinfection processes is presented. This review is divided into the following sections: disinfection methods, disinfection byproducts, and microbiology and microbial communities. PMID:27620087

  11. A short-wave infrared otoscope for middle ear disease diagnostics (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Jessica A.; Valdez, Tulio; Bruns, Oliver; Bawendi, Moungi

    2016-02-01

    Otitis media, a range of inflammatory conditions of the middle ear, is the second most common illness diagnosed in children. However, the diagnosis can be challenging, particularly in pediatric patients. Otitis media is commonly over-diagnosed and over-treated and has been identified as one of the primary factors in increased antibiotic resistance. We describe the development of a short-wave infrared (SWIR) otoscope for objective middle ear effusion diagnosis. The SWIR otoscope can unambiguously detect the presence of middle ear fluid based on its strong light absorption in the SWIR. This absorption causes a stark, visual contrast between the presence and absence of fluid behind the tympanic membrane. Additionally, when there is no middle ear fluid, the deeper tissue penetration of SWIR light allows the SWIR otoscope to better visualize middle ear anatomy through the tympanic membrane than is possible with visible light. We demonstrate that in healthy, adult human ears, SWIR otoscopy can image a range of middle ear anatomy, including landmarks of the entire ossicular chain, the promontory, the round window niche, and the chorda tympani. We suggest that SWIR otoscopy can provide valuable diagnostic information complementary to that provided by visible pneumotoscopy in the diagnosis of middle ear effusions, otitis media, and other maladies of the middle ear.

  12. A compact structured light based otoscope for three dimensional imaging of the tympanic membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Anshuman J.; Estrada, Julio C.; Ge, Zhifei; Dolcetti, Sara; Chen, Deborah; Raskar, Ramesh

    2015-02-01

    Three dimensional (3D) imaging of the tympanic membrane (TM) has been carried out using a traditional otoscope equipped with a high-definition webcam, a portable projector and a telecentric optical system. The device allows us to project fringe patterns on the TM and the magnified image is processed using phase shifting algorithms to arrive at a 3D description of the TM. Obtaining a 3D image of the TM can aid in the diagnosis of ear infections such as otitis media with effusion, which is essentially fluid build-up in the middle ear. The high resolution of this device makes it possible examine a computer generated 3D profile for abnormalities in the shape of the eardrum. This adds an additional dimension to the image that can be obtained from a traditional otoscope by allowing visualization of the TM from different perspectives. In this paper, we present the design and construction of this device and details of the imaging processing for recovering the 3D profile of the subject under test. The design of the otoscope is similar to that of the traditional device making it ergonomically compatible and easy to adopt in clinical practice.

  13. Holographic otoscope for nano-displacement measurements of surfaces under dynamic excitation

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Moreno, J. M.; Furlong, Cosme; Rosowski, John J.; Harrington, Ellery; Cheng, Jeffrey T.; Scarpino, C.; Santoyo, F. Mendoza

    2011-01-01

    Summary We describe a novel holographic otoscope system for measuring nano-displacements of objects subjected to dynamic excitation. Such measurements are necessary to quantify the mechanical deformation of surfaces in mechanics, acoustics, electronics, biology and many other fields. In particular, we are interested in measuring the sound-induced motion of biological samples, such as an eardrum. Our holographic otoscope system consists of laser illumination delivery (IS), optical head (OH), and image processing computer (IP) systems. The IS delivers the object beam (OB) and the reference beam (RB) to the OH. The backscattered light coming from the object illuminated by the OB interferes with the RB at the camera sensor plane to be digitally recorded as a hologram. The hologram is processed by the IP using Fresnel numerical reconstruction algorithm, where the focal plane can be selected freely. Our holographic otoscope system is currently deployed in a clinic, and is packaged in a custom design. It is mounted in a mechatronic positioning system to increase its maneuverability degrees to be conveniently positioned in front of the object to be measured. We present representative results highlighting the versatility of our system to measure deformations of complex elastic surfaces in the wavelength scale including a copper foil membrane and postmortem tympanic membrane (TM). PMID:21898459

  14. Detecting tympanostomy tubes from otoscopic images via offline and online training.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Valdez, Tulio A; Bi, Jinbo

    2015-06-01

    Tympanostomy tube placement has been commonly used nowadays as a surgical treatment for otitis media. Following the placement, regular scheduled follow-ups for checking the status of the tympanostomy tubes are important during the treatment. The complexity of performing the follow up care mainly lies on identifying the presence and patency of the tympanostomy tube. An automated tube detection program will largely reduce the care costs and enhance the clinical efficiency of the ear nose and throat specialists and general practitioners. In this paper, we develop a computer vision system that is able to automatically detect a tympanostomy tube in an otoscopic image of the ear drum. The system comprises an offline classifier training process followed by a real-time refinement stage performed at the point of care. The offline training process constructs a three-layer cascaded classifier with each layer reflecting specific characteristics of the tube. The real-time refinement process enables the end users to interact and adjust the system over time based on their otoscopic images and patient care. The support vector machine (SVM) algorithm has been applied to train all of the classifiers. Empirical evaluation of the proposed system on both high quality hospital images and low quality internet images demonstrates the effectiveness of the system. The offline classifier trained using 215 images could achieve a 90% accuracy in terms of classifying otoscopic images with and without a tympanostomy tube, and then the real-time refinement process could improve the classification accuracy by 3-5% based on additional 20 images. PMID:25889718

  15. Optoelectronic holographic otoscope for measurement of nano-displacements in tympanic membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Socorro Hernández-Montes, Maria; Furlong, Cosme; Rosowski, John J.; Hulli, Nesim; Harrington, Ellery; Cheng, Jeffrey Tao; Ravicz, Michael E.; Santoyo, Fernando Mendoza

    2009-05-01

    Current methodologies for characterizing tympanic membrane (TM) motion are usually limited to either average acoustic estimates (admittance or reflectance) or single-point mobility measurements, neither of which suffices to characterize the detailed mechanical response of the TM to sound. Furthermore, while acoustic and single-point measurements may aid in diagnosing some middle-ear disorders, they are not always useful. Measurements of the motion of the entire TM surface can provide more information than these other techniques and may be superior for diagnosing pathology. We present advances in our development of a new compact optoelectronic holographic otoscope (OEHO) system for full field-of-view characterization of nanometer-scale sound-induced displacements of the TM surface at video rates. The OEHO system consists of a fiber optic subsystem, a compact otoscope head, and a high-speed image processing computer with advanced software for recording and processing holographic images coupled to a computer-controlled sound-stimulation and recording system. A prototype OEHO system is in use in a medical research environment to address basic science questions regarding TM function. The prototype provides real-time observation of sound-induced TM displacement patterns over a broad frequency range. Representative time-averaged and stroboscopic holographic interferometry results in animals and human cadaver samples are shown, and their potential utility is discussed.

  16. In vitro tympanic membrane position identification with a co-axial fiber-optic otoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundberg, Mikael; Peebo, Markus; Strömberg, Tomas

    2011-09-01

    Otitis media diagnosis can be assisted by measuring the shape of the tympanic membrane. We have developed an ear speculum for an otoscope, including spatially distributed source and detector optical fibers, to generate source-detector intensity matrices (SDIMs), representing the curvature of surfaces. The surfaces measured were a model ear with a latex membrane and harvested temporal bones including intact tympanic membranes. The position of the tympanic membrane was shifted from retracted to bulging by air pressure and that of the latex membrane by water displacement. The SDIM was normalized utilizing both external (a sheared flat plastic cylinder) and internal references (neutral position of the membrane). Data was fitted to a two-dimensional Gaussian surface representing the shape by its amplitude and offset. Retracted and bulging surfaces were discriminated for the model ear by the sign of the Gaussian amplitude for both internal and external reference normalization. Tympanic membranes were separated after a two-step normalization: first to an external reference, adjusted for the distance between speculum and the surfaces, and second by comparison with an average normally positioned SDIM from tympanic membranes. In conclusion, we have shown that the modified otoscope can discriminate between bulging and retracted tympanic membranes in a single measurement, given a two-step normalization.

  17. Multiwavelength Fluorescence Otoscope for Video-Rate Chemical Imaging of Middle Ear Pathology

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A common motif in otolaryngology is the lack of certainty regarding diagnosis for middle ear conditions, resulting in many patients being overtreated under the worst-case assumption. Although pneumatic otoscopy and adjunctive tests offer additional information, white light otoscopy has been the main tool for diagnosis of external auditory canal and middle ear pathologies for over a century. In middle ear pathologies, the inability to avail high-resolution structural and/or molecular imaging is particularly glaring, leading to a complicated and erratic decision analysis. Here, we propose a novel multiwavelength fluorescence-based video-rate imaging strategy that combines readily available optical elements and software components to create a novel otoscopic device. This modified otoscope enables low-cost, detailed and objective diagnosis of common middle ear pathological conditions. Using the detection of congenital cholesteatoma as a specific example, we demonstrate the feasibility of fluorescence imaging to differentiate this proliferative lesion from uninvolved middle ear tissue based on the characteristic autofluorescence signals. Availability of real-time, wide-field chemical information should enable more complete removal of cholesteatoma, allowing for better hearing preservation and substantially reducing the well-documented risks, costs and psychological effects of repeated surgical procedures. PMID:25226556

  18. Choosing disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Fraise, A P

    1999-12-01

    Disinfectant choice is an important part of the role of the infection control team. Its importance has increased due to concern over transmission of blood-borne viruses and the need to identify alternatives to gluteraldehyde. Factors to be taken into account when choosing disinfectants include compliance with COSHH regulations, user acceptability, instrument compatibility and antimicrobial activity. Compounds vary in their suitability for different uses and an agent's properties must be fully evaluated before adopting it for a particular purpose. This review outlines the main properties that need to be established and covers the major characteristics of main classes of disinfectants. PMID:10658801

  19. Digital holographic otoscope for measurements of the human tympanic membrane in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrev, I.; Harrington, E. J.; Cheng, T.; Furlong, C.; Rosowski, J. J.

    We are developing an advanced computer-controlled digital optoelectronic holographic system (DOEHS) for diagnosing middle-ear conductive disorders and investigating the causes of failure of middle-ear surgical procedures. Our current DOEHS system can provide near real-time quantitative measurements of the sound-induced nano-meter scale motion of the eardrum. The DOEHS have been deployed and is currently being tested in clinical conditions, where it is being optimized for in-vivo measurements of patients. The stability of the measurement system during examination is crucial as the non-ideal clinical environment presents disturbances larger than the measured quantities from several domains - thermal, optical, electrical and mechanical. Examples include disturbances are due to heartbeat breathing, patients head's motion as well as environment induced mechanical disturbances (0.1-60Hz, 0.01-100 μm). In this paper we focus on our current progress in the analysis and implementation of various acquisition strategies and algorithms for minimization of the measurement error due to mechanical disturbances in a clinic. We have also developed and implemented a versatile and modular otoscope head (OH) design providing a variety of capabilities for acoustic and displacement measurements of both post-mortem samples of varying sizes (1-12mm) as well as in-vivo examination of patients. The OH offers hybrid on-axis and off axis digital Furrier holographic setup for high resolution (λ/35) 4 phase step measurements as well as fast (<0.1ms) single frame measurements for improved performance in the clinical environment. We also focus on the development of a mechatronic positioning system (MOP) for aiding in the localization of the TM in patients.

  20. Evaluation of an iPhone Otoscope in a Neurotrauma Clinic and as an Adjunct to Neurosurgical Education

    PubMed Central

    Sahyouni, Ronald; Moshtaghi, Omid; Rajaii, Ramin; Tran, Diem Kieu; Bustillo, David; Huang, Melissa; Chen, Jefferson W

    2016-01-01

    Introduction CellScope®, an iPhone-enabled otoscope, was introduced into the neurotrauma clinic at an American College of Surgeons certified Level I trauma center. CellScope is an innovative tool that digitally improves optical clarity of the tympanic membrane, providing the acquisition of HIPPA compliant images. We compared the CellScope to the traditional otoscope in teaching medical students, neurosurgery physician assistants, and neurosurgery residents. In addition, the utility of this device in a neurotrauma clinic was specifically examined because of the high frequency of otologic symptoms after head trauma. Method CellScope examination of the tympanic membranes was introduced as a standard/routine part of the exam of neurotrauma patients. We retrospectively reviewed the clinic charts of the NeuroTrauma patients during a three-month time period to determine if their otologic symptoms correlated with any CellScope visualized abnormalities. Medical students, P.A.s, residents, and attendings were surveyed before and after using CellScope to assess their comfort and skill in completing an otological exam, as well as their opinion on the utility of CellScope in their medical training. Results 18 medical professionals were surveyed before and after the use of CellScope. Surveys were graded on a 1-5 scale and indicated a greater preference for the CellScope (4.7/5.0) versus the otoscope (3.16/5.0). Similarly, there was a preference for the CellScope for medical education (4.7/5.0 versus 2.78/5.0). Finally, surveys showed a greater preference for CellScope in identifying abnormal pathology. The overall score showed a 49% increased preference for CellScope over the traditional otoscope. Six previously undiagnosed abnormalities of the tympanic membrane were identified in a total of 27 neurotrauma patients using CellScope. Conclusion The visualization of the tympanic membrane is an important part of the physical examination of the neurotrauma patient. Smartphone

  1. New formaldehyde base disinfectants.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, R.; Lindell, K. F.

    1973-01-01

    Preparations of formaldehyde in various organic liquids - ethylene glycol, glycerol, and propylene glycol - serve as effective disinfectants towards microbial vegetative cells and spores. This disinfection is a temperature-dependent process and is manifest when these formaldehyde base disinfectants are dissolved in water. The irritating vapors associated with formaldehyde disinfection are not present in either of these new formaldehyde base disinfectants or in aqueous solutions of them.

  2. Cone Heads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2005-01-01

    The author, a middle school art teacher, describes a sculpture project lesson involving Cone Heads (sculptures made from cardboard cones). Discussion of caricatures with exaggerated facial features and interesting profiles helped students understand that the more expressive the face, the better. This project took approximately four to five…

  3. [Skin and hand disinfection].

    PubMed

    Mathis, U

    1991-04-01

    In modern medicine, hygiene has become an issue of ever increasing importance. Disinfection of hands is crucial, since hands are the main vector of bacteria. Successful disinfection depends not only on the appropriate choice of an active agent, but equally so on proper techniques and skin care. The spectre and the time profile of activity as well as the skin-protecting properties of the chosen disinfectant must be known. Basic knowledge of disinfection is necessary for a rational interpretation of the information given in the glossy printed material of advertisement. PMID:1858061

  4. Humidifier disinfectants, unfinished stories

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yeyong

    2016-01-01

    Once released into the air, humidifier disinfectants became tiny nano-size particles, and resulted in chemical bronchoalveolitis. Families had lost their most beloved members, and even some of them became broken. Based on an estimate of two million potential victims who had experienced adverse effects from the use of humidifier disinfectants, we can say that what we have observed was only the tip of the iceberg. Problems of entire airways, as well as other systemic effects, should be examined, as we know these nano-size particles can irritate cell membranes and migrate into systemic circulation. The story of humidifier disinfectant is not finished yet. PMID:26987713

  5. Environmental cleaning and disinfection.

    PubMed

    Traverse, Michelle; Aceto, Helen

    2015-03-01

    The guidelines in this article provide veterinarians, veterinary technicians, and veterinary health care workers with an overview of evidence-based recommendations for the best practices associated with environmental cleaning and disinfection of a veterinary clinic that deals with small animals. Hospital-associated infections and the control and prevention programs necessary to alleviate them are addressed from an environmental perspective. Measures of hospital cleaning and disinfection include understanding mechanisms and types of contamination in veterinary settings, recognizing areas of potential concern, addressing appropriate decontamination techniques and selection of disinfectants, the management of potentially contaminated equipment, laundry, and waste management, and environmental surveillance strategies. PMID:25555560

  6. Humidifier disinfectants, unfinished stories.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yeyong; Paek, Domyung

    2016-01-01

    Once released into the air, humidifier disinfectants became tiny nano-size particles, and resulted in chemical bronchoalveolitis. Families had lost their most beloved members, and even some of them became broken. Based on an estimate of two million potential victims who had experienced adverse effects from the use of humidifier disinfectants, we can say that what we have observed was only the tip of the iceberg. Problems of entire airways, as well as other systemic effects, should be examined, as we know these nano-size particles can irritate cell membranes and migrate into systemic circulation. The story of humidifier disinfectant is not finished yet. PMID:26987713

  7. New Technologies to Improve Root Canal Disinfection.

    PubMed

    Plotino, Gianluca; Cortese, Teresa; Grande, Nicola M; Leonardi, Denise P; Di Giorgio, Gianni; Testarelli, Luca; Gambarini, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Effective irrigant delivery and agitation are prerequisites to promote root canal disinfection and debris removal and improve successful endodontic treatment. This paper presents an overview of the currently available technologies to improve the cleaning of the endodontic space and their debridement efficacy. A PubMed electronic search was conducted with appropriate key words to identify the relevant literature on this topic. After retrieving the full-text articles, all the articles were reviewed and the most appropriate were included in this review. Several different systems of mechanical activation of irrigants to improve endodontic disinfection were analysed: manual agitation with gutta-percha cones, endodontic instruments or special brushes, vibrating systems activated by low-speed hand-pieces or by sonic or subsonic energy, use of ultrasonic or laser energy to mechanically activate the irrigants and apical negative pressure irrigation systems. Furthermore, this review aims to describe systems designed to improve the intracanal bacterial decontamination by a specific chemical action, such as ozone, direct laser action or light-activated disinfection. The ultrasonic activation of root canal irrigants and of sodium hypochlorite in particular still remains the gold standard to which all other systems of mechanical agitation analyzed in this article were compared. From this overview, it is evident that the use of different irrigation systems can provide several advantages in the clinical endodontic outcome and that integration of new technologies, coupled with enhanced techniques and materials, may help everyday clinical practice. PMID:27007337

  8. DISINFECTION OF NEW WATER MAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 'AWWA Standard for Disinfecting Water Mains' (AWWA C601-68) has fallen into disuse by a number of water utilities because of repeated bacteriological failures following initial disinfection with the recommended high-dose chlorination. Other methods of disinfection, including ...

  9. CHLORINE DISINFECTION OF AEROMONAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bacterial genus Aeromonas is currently listed on the USEPA's Candidate Contaminant List (CCL). Resistance to chemical disinfection is an essential aspect regarding all microbial groups listed on the CCL. This study was designed to determine the inactivation kinetics of Aeromo...

  10. Disinfection of bedpans

    PubMed Central

    Darmady, E. M.; Hughes, K. E. A.; Jones, J. D.; Prince, D.; Verdon, Patricia

    1961-01-01

    A standard dish-washing machine fitted with an automatic cycle has been used to clean and disinfect bedpans. Visual and bacteriological examinations have shown that the machine produces superior and more reliable results than in trials of bedpans submitted to previously described methods. PMID:13719783

  11. Disinfection and wildlife.

    PubMed

    Corn, J L; Nettles, V F

    1995-06-01

    Capture, handling or transport of wildlife for purposes such as research, disease monitoring, wildlife damage control, relocation, and collection of zoological specimens can create risks of disease spread. Cleaning and disinfection procedures for equipment used in these activities must be routine and designed to eliminate the spread of pathogens to either animals or humans. General methods and materials for cleaning and disinfection apply to wildlife studies. Concepts involved in preparing a protocol specific to a wildlife investigation are discussed. The control of the spread of livestock and poultry pathogens via free-ranging mammals and birds prior to disinfection of contaminated premises is approached through an accurate assessment of the problem and, where necessary, the selection of appropriate wildlife control measures. The authors discuss the development of a problem assessment, and review potential methods for use in the control of wildlife. For an accurate problem assessment, information is needed on the presence of wild mammals and birds at the site, exposure of wild mammals and birds to the pathogen, and the potential for further transmission. When wildlife control is deemed necessary, techniques may be selected to disperse or exclude animals from premises or to depopulate the site. Dispersal or exclusion from premises is appropriate when movement of animals within or away from the contaminated premises would not result in further transmission of the pathogen. Depopulation is necessary when the continued presence or dispersal of wild mammals or birds would potentially result in further spread of the disease. PMID:7579643

  12. Cold knife cone biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    A cold knife cone biopsy (conization) is surgery to remove a sample of abnormal tissue from the cervix. The ... Cold knife cone biopsy is done to detect cervical cancer or early changes that lead to cancer. ...

  13. Cold knife cone biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003910.htm Cold knife cone biopsy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A cold knife cone biopsy (conization) is surgery to remove ...

  14. DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS: THE NEXT GENERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfection of drinking water is rightly hailed as a major public health triumph of the 20th Century. Before widespread disinfection of drinking water in the U.S. and Europe, millions of people died from infectious waterborne diseases, such as typhoid and cholera. The microbia...

  15. Sanitizers and Disinfectants Guide. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healthy Schools Network, Inc., 2012

    2012-01-01

    Sanitizers and disinfectants can play an important role in protecting public health. They are designed to kill "pests," including infectious germs and other microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, and fungi. Unfortunately, sanitizers and disinfectants also contain chemicals that are "pesticides." Exposure to persistent toxic chemicals in…

  16. Cone Early Maturity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hop cone early maturity is thought to be caused by diffuse infections of cone, just prior to harvest, by Podosphaera macularis. The disease is best managed by limiting the amount of leaf infection by P. macularis prior to bloom. The yield and quality reductions associated with Hop cone early matur...

  17. Occurrence and exposures to disinfectants and disinfection by-products

    SciTech Connect

    Cumming, R.B.; Jolley, R.L.

    1992-12-31

    Disinfection by-products are associated with all chemical disinfectants. The concentration and toxic nature of the disinfection byproducts (DBPs) is a direct function of the chemical nature of the disinfectant itself and/or of the chemical reactions of the disinfectant with reaction substrates in the water, especially organic constituents. A principal advantage of biological and physical water treatment processes, such as filtration, is the lack of chemical reactions producing disinfectant-related DBPs. The use of the highest quality source water available is important for minimization of DBP formation. In lieu of such high quality water, improvement of water quality by removal of DBP precursors through filtration or other means before application of chemical disinfectants is important. Most, if not all, water treatment experts are aware of these simplistic axioms. In view of the increasing knowledge being developed concerning DBPs including the identification of ``new`` DBPs, prudence dictates minimization of DBP formation. Wholesome drinking water is perhaps the biggest economic bargain available to consumers. The cost-effectiveness of water quality improvement should be evaluated with that in mind.

  18. Occurrence and exposures to disinfectants and disinfection by-products

    SciTech Connect

    Cumming, R.B.; Jolley, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    Disinfection by-products are associated with all chemical disinfectants. The concentration and toxic nature of the disinfection byproducts (DBPs) is a direct function of the chemical nature of the disinfectant itself and/or of the chemical reactions of the disinfectant with reaction substrates in the water, especially organic constituents. A principal advantage of biological and physical water treatment processes, such as filtration, is the lack of chemical reactions producing disinfectant-related DBPs. The use of the highest quality source water available is important for minimization of DBP formation. In lieu of such high quality water, improvement of water quality by removal of DBP precursors through filtration or other means before application of chemical disinfectants is important. Most, if not all, water treatment experts are aware of these simplistic axioms. In view of the increasing knowledge being developed concerning DBPs including the identification of new'' DBPs, prudence dictates minimization of DBP formation. Wholesome drinking water is perhaps the biggest economic bargain available to consumers. The cost-effectiveness of water quality improvement should be evaluated with that in mind.

  19. Dental unit waterlines disinfection using hypochlorous acid-based disinfectant

    PubMed Central

    Shajahan, Irfana Fathima; Kandaswamy, D; Srikanth, Padma; Narayana, L Lakshmi; Selvarajan, R

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to investigate the efficacy of a new disinfectant to disinfect the dental unit waterlines. Materials and Methods: New dental unit waterlines were installed in 13 dental chairs, and biofilm was allowed to grow for 10 days. Disinfection treatment procedure was carried out in the 12 units, and one unit was left untreated. The dental unit waterlines were removed and analyzed using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) (TESCAN VEGA3 SBU). Result: On examination, SEM images showed that there was no slime layer or bacterial cells seen in any of the 12 cut sections obtained from the treated dental waterlines which mean that there was no evident of biofilm formation. Untreated dental unit waterlines showed a microbial colonization with continuous filamentous organic matrix. There was significant biofilm formation in the control tube relative to the samples. Conclusion: The tested disinfectant was found to be effective in the removal of biofilm from the dental unit waterlines. PMID:27563184

  20. RISK ASSESSMENT OF WASTEWATER DISINFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A risk assessment data base is presented for several waste-water disinfection alternatives, including chlorination, ozonation, chlorination/dechlorination, and ultraviolet radiation. The data base covers hazards and consequences related to onsite use and transportation of the dis...

  1. DESIGN MANUAL: MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER DISINFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manual provides a comprehensive source of information to be used in the design of disinfection facilities for municipal wastewater treatment plants. he manual includes design information on halogenation/dehalogenation, ozonation, and ultraviolet radiation. he manual presents...

  2. Contamination of gutta-percha and Resilon cones taken directly from the manufacturer.

    PubMed

    Seabra Pereira, Osvaldo L; Siqueira, José F

    2010-06-01

    Any substance and material placed in the root canal either temporarily or definitively must be free of microbial contamination. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the percentage of contamination of Resilon cones, a polycaprolactone-based material, and seven different brands of gutta-percha cones available in the specialized market. Cones were removed from their original manufacturer boxes and immediately transferred to tubes containing thioglycolate broth. Tests were carried out in triplicate. In addition, for quantitative analysis of possible contaminants, cones were taken from their packages, transferred to tubes containing saline solution, agitated, and aliquots of this solution were seeded onto Mueller-Hinton agar plates. No sample showed contamination in any of the tests performed. Despite the absence of detectable contamination before the first use, a rationale for routinely disinfecting cones before placing them into root canals is given. PMID:19506921

  3. 40 CFR 141.54 - Maximum residual disinfectant level goals for disinfectants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Maximum residual disinfectant level goals for disinfectants. 141.54 Section 141.54 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Goals and Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goals § 141.54 Maximum residual disinfectant level...

  4. 40 CFR 141.54 - Maximum residual disinfectant level goals for disinfectants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Maximum residual disinfectant level goals for disinfectants. 141.54 Section 141.54 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Goals and Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goals § 141.54 Maximum residual disinfectant level...

  5. [Disinfection problems in food hygiene].

    PubMed

    Shandala, M G

    2013-01-01

    Based on the main tasks of hygienic support of balanced diet of the population, we consider different issues of disinfection contribution in:food safety, prevention of the emergence and dissemination of relevant infectious and noninfectious diseases, quality disruption of foodstuffs under various biological pathogens (bacteria, protozoa, helminthes, arthropods, rodents), which are the causative agents of human disease vectors or natural reservoirs of pathogens. The need to involve the disinfection competence in ensuring the safety and security of canned food, as well as the products long-term storage is stressed. Paper deals with factors, key for effectiveness of disinfection and, therefore, epidemiological and hygienic safety of the equipment and facilities, food industries and food service. We consider the need to take into account advantageous properties and shortcomings of some groups of disinfectants in terms both of microbicidal effectiveness and of their toxic safety, compatibility with the materials of processed objects, ease of use, etc. The focus is made on the need to select some disinfection technology in terms of the primary objective and current conditions taking the type and attributes of the relevant biological pathogens into account. PMID:24000699

  6. Disinfection of Human Teeth for Educational Purposes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tate, William H.; White, Robert S.

    1991-01-01

    A study investigated the efficacy of glutaraldehyde and several other disinfectants for disinfecting teeth to be used for teaching and research, as an alternative to autoclaving for teeth with amalgam restorations. Results indicate that formalin was the only disinfectant that penetrated tooth pulp chambers in effective antimicrobial…

  7. Review of water disinfection techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, Gerald V.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1987-01-01

    Throughout the history of manned space flight the supply of potable water to the astronauts has presented unique problems. Of particular concern has been the microbiological quality of the potable water. This has required the development of both preflight water system servicing procedures to disinfect the systems and inflight disinfectant addition and monitoring devices to ensure continuing microbiological control. The disinfectants successfully used to date have been aqueous chlorine or iodine. Because of special system limitations the use of iodine has been the most successful for inflight use and promises to be the agent most likely to be used in the future. Future spacecraft potable, hygiene, and experiment water systems will utilize recycled water. This will present special problems for water quality control. NASA is currently conducting research and development to solve these problems.

  8. Assessment of the Potential of CFC (Calcium hydroxide Flagyl Ciprofloxacin) for the Rapid Disinfection of Resilon and Gutta-Percha

    PubMed Central

    Hamza, Mariam Omer Bin; Gufran, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Obturating materials exposed to the dental operating environment has been shown to be contaminated, making rapid chair side disinfection mandatory to ensure the sterility of the root canals. Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of CFC (combination of Calcium hydroxide, Flagyl and Ciprofloxacin) for the rapid disinfection of Gutta-percha and Resilon cones. Materials and Methods Seventy new Gutta-percha and Resilon cones were randomly selected, contaminated with Enterococcus faecalis and divided into 4 group according to the irrigant used for disinfection {Group I: 5.25% Sodium Hypochlorite (NaOCl), Group II: MTAD, Group III: 2% Chlorhexidine (CHX), Group IV: CFC (a combination of Calcium hydroxide, Flagyl and Ciprofloxacin)}. All the samples were placed in a centrifuge tube with BHI broth after being washed with sterile water. The samples were then incubated for 7 days at 37oC. Samples were randomly plated on Mac Conkey agar plate and the colony count was recorded and the observations were drawn. Results A 5.25% NaOCl required 1 minute exposure for effective disinfection of all the samples. MTAD could eliminate E.faecalis from gutta-percha samples in 30 seconds whereas it required 1 minute of exposure for Resilon cones. Both 2% CHX and CFC could not disinfect the samples with 1 minute exposure and a minimum of 5 minute exposure was required. Conclusion A 5.25% NaOCl and Biopure MTAD required less chair side time to disinfect all the samples effectively when compared with 2% CHX and CFC. PMID:26557614

  9. New disinfection and sterilization methods.

    PubMed Central

    Rutala, W. A.; Weber, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    New disinfection methods include a persistent antimicrobial coating that can be applied to inanimate and animate objects (Surfacine), a high-level disinfectant with reduced exposure time (ortho-phthalaldehyde), and an antimicrobial agent that can be applied to animate and inanimate objects (superoxidized water). New sterilization methods include a chemical sterilization process for endoscopes that integrates cleaning (Endoclens), a rapid (4-hour) readout biological indicator for ethylene oxide sterilization (Attest), and a hydrogen peroxide plasma sterilizer that has a shorter cycle time and improved efficacy (Sterrad 50). PMID:11294738

  10. EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDIES OF DISINFECTANTS AND DISINFECTANT BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article provides a review of the epidemiologic evidence for human health effects that may be associated with the disinfection of drinking water. An epidemiologic study attempts to link human health effects with exposure to a specific agent (e.g., DBCM), agents (e.g., THMs or...

  11. 2017 Eclipse Shadow Cones

    NASA Video Gallery

    A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon's shadow falls on the Earth. The shadow comprises two concentric cones called the umbra and the penumbra. Within the smaller, central umbra, the Sun is complete...

  12. Vredefort shatter cones revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaysen, L. O.; Reimold, W. U.

    1999-03-01

    Shatter cones have been described from a number of circular and polygonal structures worldwide, the origin of which has been alternatively ascribed to the impacts of large extraterrestrial projectiles or to catastrophic endogenic processes. Despite their association with enigmatic, catastrophic processes, the nature of shatter cones and the physics involved in their formation have not been comprehensively researched. Results of detailed field and laboratory studies of shatter cones from three areas in the collar of the Vredefort Dome in South Africa are presented. Vredefort shatter cones are directly related to a widely displayed fracture phenomenon, termed ``multiply striated joint sets (MSJS)''. MSJs are planar to curviplanar fractures occuring at spacings of <1 to several millimeters. The joint sets have a fractal character. When a new measurement protocol is used in the field, involving study of all joint surfaces and all steps and striae exposed on these surfaces, new information is gained on the genesis and significance of the MSJS and on their relationship to striated conical fractures. The internal constitution of a rock specimen with MSJS was examined in detail, by documenting the precise geometry of many fractures in a suite of parallel thin sections transecting the specimen. The steps and striae on shatter cone surfaces have the characteristics of displacement fractures (microfaults), along which evidence of melting is observed. Shatter cone and MSJS surfaces are often covered with glassy films; we evaluate whether these fracture phenomena are linked to the formation of pseudotachylitic (friction) melt. Our field and petrographic observations can be interpreted as consistent with the generation of shatter cones/MSJS relatively late in the formation of the Vredefort structure. This scenario contrasts sharply with the widely held view that shatter cones are formed during the early ``compression'' phase of a shock event that affected horizontal strata.

  13. Lunar cinder cones.

    PubMed

    McGetchin, T R; Head, J W

    1973-04-01

    Data on terrestrial eruptions of pyroclastic material and ballistic considerations suggest that in the lunar environment (vacuum and reduced gravity) low-rimmed pyroclastic rings are formed rather than the high-rimmed cinder cones so abundant on the earth. Dark blanketing deposits in the Taurus-Littrow region (Apollo 17 landing area) are interpreted as being at least partly composed of lunar counterparts of terrestrial cinder cones. PMID:17757977

  14. Recycled Water Poses Disinfectant Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the possible health hazards resulting from released nucleic acid of inactivated viruses, chlorinated nonliving organic molecules, and overestimated reliability of waste treatment standards. Suggests the recycle system use a dual disinfectant such as chlorine and ozone in water treatment. (CC)

  15. Postoutbreak disinfection of mobile equipment.

    PubMed

    Alphin, R L; Ciaverelli, C D; Hougentogler, D P; Johnson, K J; Rankin, M K; Benson, E R

    2010-03-01

    Current control strategies for avian influenza virus, exotic Newcastle disease, and other highly contagious poultry diseases include surveillance, quarantine, depopulation, disposal, and decontamination. Skid steer loaders and other mobile equipment are extensively used during depopulation and disposal. Movement of contaminated equipment has been implicated in the spread of disease in previous outbreaks. One approach to equipment decontamination is to power wash the equipment, treat with a liquid disinfectant, change any removable filters, and let it sit idle for several days. In this project, multiple disinfectant strategies were individually evaluated for their effectiveness at inactivating Newcastle disease virus (NDV) on mechanical equipment seeded with the virus. A small gasoline engine was used to simulate typical mechanical equipment. A high titer of LaSota strain, NDV was applied and dried onto a series of metal coupons. The coupons were then placed on both interior and exterior surfaces of the engine. Liquid disinfectants that had been effective in the laboratory were not as effective at disinfecting the engine under field conditions. Indirect thermal fog showed a decrease in overall virus titer or strength. Direct thermal fog was more effective than liquid spray application or indirect thermal fog application. PMID:20521731

  16. DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT FORMATION BY ALTERNATIVE DISINFECTANTS AND REMOVAL BY GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of the use of the alternative disinfectants on the formation of halogenated disinfection by-products (DBPS) including total organic halide, trihalomethanes, haloacetic acids, haloacentonitriles, haloketones, chloral hydrate, and chloropicrin, were examined along with ...

  17. DISINFECTION EFFICIENCY AND RESIDUAL TOXICITY OF SEVERAL WASTEWATER DISINFECTANTS. VOLUME I. GRANDVILLE, MICHIGAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was conducted to determine the comparative effectiveness of chlorine, bromine chloride, and ozone as wastewater disinfectants, and to determine any residual toxicity associated with wastewater disinfection with these agents or with chlorinated wastewater which had been...

  18. DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT FORMATION BY ALTERNATIVE DISINFECTANTS AND REMOVAL BY GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of the use of the alternative disinfectants on the formation of halogenated disinfection by–products (DBPs) including total organic halide, trihalomethanes, haloacetic acids, haloacetonitriles, haloketones, chloral hydrate, and chloropicrin, were examined along ...

  19. Status report on analytical methods to support the disinfectant/disinfection by-products regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    The U.S. EPA is developng national regulations to control disinfectants and disinfection by-products in public drinking water supplies. Twelve disinfectants and disinfection by-products are identified for possible regulation under this rule. The document summarizes the analytical methods that EPA intends to propose as compliance monitoring methods. A discussion of surrogate measurements that are being considered for inclusion in the regulation is also provided.

  20. DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS: WHAT IS KNOWN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorine, ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine are currently the major disinfectants being used to disinfect drinking water. Although the alternative disinfectants (ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine) are increasing in popularity in the United States, chlorine is still us...

  1. Disinfecting Filters For Recirculated Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilichi, Carmine A.

    1992-01-01

    Simple treatment disinfects air filters by killing bacteria, algae, fungi, mycobacteria, viruses, spores, and any other micro-organisms filters might harbor. Concept applied to reusable stainless-steel wire mesh filters and disposable air filters. Treatment used on filters in air-circulation systems in spacecraft, airplanes, other vehicles, and buildings to help prevent spread of colds, sore throats, and more-serious illnesses.

  2. 9 CFR 71.11 - Cresylic disinfectant as permitted disinfectant; specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cresylic disinfectant as permitted disinfectant; specifications. 71.11 Section 71.11 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... ANIMAL PRODUCTS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 71.11 Cresylic disinfectant as permitted...

  3. 9 CFR 71.11 - Cresylic disinfectant as permitted disinfectant; specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cresylic disinfectant as permitted disinfectant; specifications. 71.11 Section 71.11 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... ANIMAL PRODUCTS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 71.11 Cresylic disinfectant as permitted...

  4. Disinfection Addition and Disinfection Changes: What It Means to the LCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    This slide presentation’s general points are: Many protective pipe scales are vey dependent on ORP, and hence, state of disinfection. Adding disinfection to anoxic systems will likely cause big chemistry changes in DS and corrosion. Changing disinfectants could cause major l...

  5. Decontamination formulations for disinfection and sterilization

    DOEpatents

    Tucker, Mark D.; Engler, Daniel E.

    2007-09-18

    Aqueous decontamination formulations that neutralize biological pathogens for disinfection and sterilization applications. Examples of suitable applications include disinfection of food processing equipment, disinfection of areas containing livestock, mold remediation, sterilization of medical instruments and direct disinfection of food surfaces, such as beef carcasses. The formulations include at least one reactive compound, bleaching activator, inorganic base, and water. The formulations can be packaged as a two-part kit system, and can have a pH value in the range of 7-8.

  6. Inactivation of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus by Disinfectants

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Herbert S.

    1970-01-01

    Twenty-four chemical disinfectants considered to be viricidal were tested. Ten disinfectants were not viricidal for vesicular stomatitis virus within 10 min at 20 C when an LD50 titer of 108.5 virus units per 0.1 ml were to be inactivated. Quantitative inactivation experiments were done with acid, alkaline, and a substituted phenolic disinfectant to determine the kinetics of the virus inactivation. Substituted phenolic disinfectants, halogens, and cresylic and hydrochloric acids were viricidal. Basic compounds such as lye and sodium metasilicate were not viricidal. PMID:4313317

  7. MUTAGENICITY OF DRINKING WATER FOLLOWING DISINFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many drinking water utilities in the USA are considering alternatives to chlorine for disinfection in order to comply with federal regulations regarding disinfection by-products. An evaluation is thus needed of the potential risks associated with the use of alternative disinfecta...

  8. CHLORINE DISINFECTION STUDIES OF ENCEPHALITOZOON (SEPTATA) INTESTINALIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A reproducible standardized assay was designed to determine two infective doses for E.intestinalis, the TCID50 and the MID. These doses can be used to assess the potential effectiveness of chlorine disinfection and can also be used to assess other disinfection parameters and ant...

  9. Disinfection: is it time to reconsider Spaulding?

    PubMed

    McDonnell, G; Burke, P

    2011-07-01

    The Spaulding classification, originally proposed in 1957, is a widely used system for matching the disinfection and sterilization of surfaces, particularly those of re-usable medical/surgical devices, with available processes. It presents a ranking, from simple disinfection through to sterilization, that should be considered in the reprocessing of devices, based on the risks associated with their use, ranging from 'critical' (presenting a high risk), through 'semi-critical' to 'non-critical' (presenting a low risk). The different levels of disinfection are based on demonstrating antimicrobial activity against established marker micro-organisms representing a range of pathogens. Although this classification system is probably as valid today as it was in 1957, the understanding of microbiology and micro-organisms has changed. This article discusses some examples of disinfection studies with viruses, bacteria, protozoa and prions that challenge the current definitions and expectations of high-, intermediate- and low-level disinfection. In many of these examples, the test micro-organisms demonstrate atypical tolerance or resistance profiles to disinfection processes. In addition to laboratory-based studies, there is now clinical evidence for at least some of these micro-organisms that biocide resistance can lead to infection outbreaks due to unexpected disinfection failure. These reports should encourage the reader to challenge current dogma, and reconsider the expectations of disinfection and sterilization practices. PMID:21664533

  10. Silver disinfection in water distribution systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestry Rodriguez, Nadia

    Silver was evaluated as disinfectant to maintain water quality in water distribution system. It was used to inhibit growth of two opportunistic bacteria in planktonik form and in biofilm formation in Robbins devices with stainless steel and PVC surfaces. The results of this work show that silver is a potential secondary disinfectant to be used in water distribution systems.

  11. 40 CFR 141.72 - Disinfection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... for Giardia lamblia cysts and viruses. If a system uses a disinfectant other than chlorine, the system...) The residual disinfectant concentration in the distribution system, measured as total chlorine, combined chlorine, or chlorine dioxide, as specified in § 141.74 (a)(2) and (b)(6), cannot be...

  12. 40 CFR 141.72 - Disinfection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for Giardia lamblia cysts and viruses. If a system uses a disinfectant other than chlorine, the system...) The residual disinfectant concentration in the distribution system, measured as total chlorine, combined chlorine, or chlorine dioxide, as specified in § 141.74 (a)(2) and (b)(6), cannot be...

  13. 9 CFR 71.10 - Permitted disinfectants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... § 71.10 Permitted disinfectants. (a) Disinfectants permitted for use on cars, boats, and other vehicles... least 4 fluid ounces to 1 gallon of water. (2) Liquefied phenol (U.S.P. strength 87 percent phenol) in... general use, may be used for the purpose of this part in accordance with directions on the labels...

  14. 9 CFR 71.10 - Permitted disinfectants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... § 71.10 Permitted disinfectants. (a) Disinfectants permitted for use on cars, boats, and other vehicles... least 4 fluid ounces to 1 gallon of water. (2) Liquefied phenol (U.S.P. strength 87 percent phenol) in... general use, may be used for the purpose of this part in accordance with directions on the labels...

  15. 9 CFR 71.10 - Permitted disinfectants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... § 71.10 Permitted disinfectants. (a) Disinfectants permitted for use on cars, boats, and other vehicles... least 4 fluid ounces to 1 gallon of water. (2) Liquefied phenol (U.S.P. strength 87 percent phenol) in... general use, may be used for the purpose of this part in accordance with directions on the labels...

  16. 9 CFR 71.10 - Permitted disinfectants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... § 71.10 Permitted disinfectants. (a) Disinfectants permitted for use on cars, boats, and other vehicles... least 4 fluid ounces to 1 gallon of water. (2) Liquefied phenol (U.S.P. strength 87 percent phenol) in... general use, may be used for the purpose of this part in accordance with directions on the labels...

  17. 9 CFR 71.10 - Permitted disinfectants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... § 71.10 Permitted disinfectants. (a) Disinfectants permitted for use on cars, boats, and other vehicles... least 4 fluid ounces to 1 gallon of water. (2) Liquefied phenol (U.S.P. strength 87 percent phenol) in... general use, may be used for the purpose of this part in accordance with directions on the labels...

  18. Ultraviolet (UV) Disinfection for Drinking Water Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    UV disinfection is an effective process for inactivating many microbial pathogens in water with potential to serve as stand-alone treatment or in combination with other disinfectants. USEPA provided guidance on the validation of UV reactors nearly a decade ago. Since then, lesson...

  19. Disinfection of Bacillus spores with acidified nitrite.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Jeffrey G; Adcock, Noreen J; Rice, Eugene W

    2014-10-01

    Disinfecting water generated from a bioterrorism contamination event will require large amounts of disinfectant since the volume of water flushed from a drinking water distribution system or wash water collected from a contaminated outdoor area can accumulate quickly. Commonly used disinfectants may be unavailable in the necessary amounts, so evaluation of alternative disinfectants is needed. This study focuses on disinfection of Bacillus spores in water using acidified nitrite. The effect of varying pH (2 or 3), temperature (5°C or 24°C), nitrite concentration (0.01 or 0.1M), buffer (Butterfields or Phosphate Buffered Saline, PBS) and Bacillus species (B. globigii and B. anthracis Sterne) was evaluated. B. globigii was more resistant to disinfection under all water quality conditions. Disinfection was more effective for B. globigii and B. anthracis Sterne at 0.1M nitrite, pH 2, and 24°C. Disinfection of B. anthracis Sterne was enhanced in low ionic strength Butterfields buffer compared to PBS. PMID:25065806

  20. ULTRAVIOLET DISINFECTION STUDIES WITH CCL LISTED MICROORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resistance to ultraviolet (UV) disinfection is an essential aspect regarding all microbial groups listed on the CCL. The U.S. drinking water industry is interested in including UV light treatment as an amendment to conventional treatment for disinfecting water supplies. UV disi...

  1. Comparative analysis of existing disinfection models.

    PubMed

    Andrianarison, T; Jupsin, H; Ouali, A; Vasel, J-L

    2010-01-01

    For a long time Marais's model has been the main tool for disinfection prediction in waste stabilization ponds (WSPs), although various authors have developed other disinfection models. Some ten other empirical models have been listed over the past fifteen years. Unfortunately, their predictions of disinfection in a given pond are very different. The existing models are too empirical to give reliable predictions: often their explanatory variables were chosen arbitrarily. In this work, we try to demonstrate that if influent variables have daily variations, the use of their average values in simulations may overestimate the disinfection effect. New methods are thus needed to provide better fittings of the models. Better knowledge of the mechanisms involved is needed to improve disinfection models. PMID:20182074

  2. Chemical Disinfection of Holding-Tank Sewage

    PubMed Central

    Sobsey, Mark D.; Wallis, Craig; Melnick, Joseph L.

    1974-01-01

    A number of chemical disinfectants were evaluated for their bactericidal and virucidal effectiveness in holding-tank sewage. It was found that the disinfection efficiencies of formaldehyde, benzalkonium chloride, cetylpyridinium chloride, and methylene blue were markedly improved if the pH of the sewage was raised from 8.0 to 10.5. When formaldehyde, benzalkonium chloride, and methylene blue were tested with either 2-week holding times with no sewage additions or 10-day holding times with daily sewage additions, disinfection effectiveness was maintained as long as the sewage pH was kept at 10.5 and the disinfectant concentration was kept at 100 mg/liter or more. Calcium hypochlorite, zinc sulfate, and phenol were found to be relatively ineffective disinfectants for holding-tank sewage. PMID:4374122

  3. Chemical disinfection of holding-tank sewage.

    PubMed

    Sobsey, M D; Wallis, C; Melnick, J L

    1974-11-01

    A number of chemical disinfectants were evaluated for their bactericidal and virucidal effectiveness in holding-tank sewage. It was found that the disinfection efficiencies of formaldehyde, benzalkonium chloride, cetylpyridinium chloride, and methylene blue were markedly improved if the pH of the sewage was raised from 8.0 to 10.5. When formaldehyde, benzalkonium chloride, and methylene blue were tested with either 2-week holding times with no sewage additions or 10-day holding times with daily sewage additions, disinfection effectiveness was maintained as long as the sewage pH was kept at 10.5 and the disinfectant concentration was kept at 100 mg/liter or more. Calcium hypochlorite, zinc sulfate, and phenol were found to be relatively ineffective disinfectants for holding-tank sewage. PMID:4374122

  4. Light cone matrix product

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, Matthew B

    2009-01-01

    We show how to combine the light-cone and matrix product algorithms to simulate quantum systems far from equilibrium for long times. For the case of the XXZ spin chain at {Delta} = 0.5, we simulate to a time of {approx} 22.5. While part of the long simulation time is due to the use of the light-cone method, we also describe a modification of the infinite time-evolving bond decimation algorithm with improved numerical stability, and we describe how to incorporate symmetry into this algorithm. While statistical sampling error means that we are not yet able to make a definite statement, the behavior of the simulation at long times indicates the appearance of either 'revivals' in the order parameter as predicted by Hastings and Levitov (e-print arXiv:0806.4283) or of a distinct shoulder in the decay of the order parameter.

  5. Progressive cone dystrophies.

    PubMed

    François, J; De Rouck, A; De Laey, J J

    1976-01-01

    Patients with progressive generalized cone dystrophy often present nystagmus (or strabism) and complain of photophobia, decrease in visual acuity or disturbances in colour perception. The most classic fundus abnormality is the bull's eye maculopathy or a pallor of the optic disc. Minimal macular changes are sometimes seen, which may progress to a bull's eye type of macular degeneration. The photopic ERG is always very affected, whereas at first the scotopic ERG seems normal. Progressive deterioration of the visual functions is accompanied by increasing fundus lesions and rod involvement, as suggested by the modifications of the dark adaptation curve and the scotopic ERG. However, the progression of typical generalized cone dysfunction is very slow. On the contrary, in some cases of so-called Stargardt's disease with peripheral participation, a very rapid progression has been observed. In such cases a normal ERG does not necessarily mean that the disease will remain localized to the macular area. No definite prognosis can be made on one single ERG. In 3 cases with sector pigmentary retinopathy the photopic ERG was more affected than the scotopic ERG. However, these cases are probably primary cone-rod dystrophies. Although there is no electrophysiological control, our clinical impression is that the evolution, if possible, is very slow. PMID:1066593

  6. Shatter cones: Diagnostic impact signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mchone, J. F.; Dietz, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Uniquely fractured target rocks known as shatter cones are associated with more than one half the world's 120 or so presently known impact structures. Shatter cones are a form of tensile rock failure in which a positive conical plug separates from a negative outer cup or mold and delicate ornaments radiating from an apex are preserved on surfaces of both portions. Although distinct, shatter cones are sometimes confused with other striated geologic features such as ventifacts, stylolites, cone-in-cone, slickensides, and artificial blast plumes. Complete cones or solitary cones are rare, occurrences are usually as swarms in thoroughly fractured rock. Shatter cones may form in a zone where an expanding shock wave propagating through a target decays to form an elastic wave. Near this transition zone, the expanding primary wave may strike a pebble or other inhomogeneity whose contrasting transmission properties produce a scattered secondary wave. Interference between primary and secondary scattered waves produce conical stress fields with axes perpendicular to the plane of an advancing shock front. This model supports mechanism capable of producing such shatter cone properties as orientation, apical clasts, lithic dependence, and shock pressure zonation. Although formational mechanics are still poorly understood, shatter cones have become the simplest geologic field criterion for recognizing astroblemes (ancient terrestrial impact structures).

  7. Quaternary Ammonium Disinfectant Issues Encountered in an Environmental Services Department.

    PubMed

    Boyce, John M; Sullivan, Linda; Booker, Arica; Baker, James

    2016-03-01

    We identified several factors affecting the use of quaternary ammonium-based (Quat) disinfectant in our facility. Microfiber wipers, cotton towels, and 1 of 2 types of disposable wipes soaked in a Quat disinfectant revealed significant binding of the disinfectant. Concentrations of Quat delivered by automated disinfectant dispensers varied widely. PMID:26821275

  8. Microbial resistance to disinfectants: mechanisms and significance

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, J.C.; Akin, E.W.

    1986-11-01

    Drinking water disinfection provides the final barrier to transmission of a wide variety of potentially waterborne infectious agents including pathogenic bacteria, viruses, and protozoa. These agents differ greatly in their innate resistance to inactivation by disinfectants, ranging from extremely sensitive bacteria to highly resistant protozoan cysts. The close similarity between microorganism inactivation rates and the kinetics of chemical reactions has long been recognized. Ideally, under carefully controlled conditions, microorganism inactivation rates simulate first-order chemical reaction rates, making it possible to predict the effectiveness of disinfection under specific conditions. In practice, changes in relative resistance and deviations from first-order kinetics are caused by a number of factors, including microbial growth conditions, aggregation, and association with particulate materials. The net effect of all these factors is a reduction in the effectiveness and predictability of disinfection processes. To ensure effective pathogen control, disinfectant concentrations and contact times greater than experimentally determined values may be required. Of the factors causing enhanced disinfection resistance, protection by association with particulate matter is the most significant. Therefore, removal of particulate matter is an important step in increasing the effectiveness of disinfection processes.

  9. Microbial resistance to disinfectants: mechanisms and significance.

    PubMed Central

    Hoff, J C; Akin, E W

    1986-01-01

    Drinking water disinfection provides the final barrier to transmission of a wide variety of potentially waterborne infectious agents including pathogenic bacteria, viruses, and protozoa. These agents differ greatly in their innate resistance to inactivation by disinfectants, ranging from extremely sensitive bacteria to highly resistant protozoan cysts. The close similarity between microorganism inactivation rates and the kinetics of chemical reactions has long been recognized. Ideally, under carefully controlled conditions, microorganism inactivation rates simulate first-order chemical reaction rates, making it possible to predict the effectiveness of disinfection under specific conditions. In practice, changes in relative resistance and deviations from first-order kinetics are caused by a number of factors, including microbial growth conditions, aggregation, and association with particulate materials. The net effect of all these factors is a reduction in the effectiveness and predictability of disinfection processes. To ensure effective pathogen control, disinfectant concentrations and contact times greater than experimentally determined values may be required. Of the factors causing enhanced disinfection resistance, protection by association with particulate matter is the most significant. Therefore, removal of particulate matter is an important step in increasing the effectiveness of disinfection processes. Images FIGURE 6. PMID:3816738

  10. [Disinfection efficiency for outlet water from biological activated carbon process by different disinfecting modes].

    PubMed

    Zhi, Xing-hua; Bai, Xiao-hui; Meng, Ming-qun

    2011-05-01

    Lab-scale tests were designed to treat the leak of bacteria from BAC process. Water samples from outlet of BAC pool in Xujing Waterworks in Shanghai were disinfected by NaClO and NH2Cl disinfectant to compare the disinfection efficiency. Heterotrophic bacteria in disinfected water were cultivated and counted and halo hydrocarbons were detected by GC. To keep the disinfecting efficacy [lg(N0/N)] over 2 under the water temperature of 30 degrees C, NaClO should have an initial concentration more than 1.84 mg/L total chlorine and contact with bacteria for about 30 minutes. As to NH2Cl disinfection, the initial concentration should be more than 2.20 mg/L total chlorine and contacting time should be prolonged to about 90 minutes. The production of CHCl3 ranged from 4.97 to 7.10 microg/L and CCl4 ranged from 0.01 to 0.71 microg/L in NaClO disinfection tests with a initial disinfecting concentration in the range of 1.53-2.42 mg/L total chlorine values. In NH2Cl disinfecting tests, CHCl3 ranged from 4.43 to 5.55 microg/L and CCl4 ranged from 0.01 to 0.64 microg/L when initial disinfecting concentration limited in the range of 2.10-2.86 mg/L total chlorine values. All was below the state drinking water standard. The results showed that the disinfection process can be divided into fast step and slow step. NaCl0 has higher disinfecting efficiency on bacteria than NH2Cl, but neither can reach 100% effectivity. Meanwhile the risk of producing halo hydrocarbon over standard was proved to be negligible. PMID:21780589

  11. [Virucidal activity of disinfectants. Influence of the serum protein upon the virucidal activity of disinfectants].

    PubMed

    Noda, M; Matsuda, S; Kobayashi, M

    2000-08-01

    Five disinfectants were tested for virucidal activity on three DNA viruses and three RNA viruses in the presence or absence of serum protein. Disinfectants of the aldehyde and halogen groups had a virucidal activity on human herpes virus, bovine rhabdo virus, human immunodeficiency virus, human adeno virus, porcine parvo virus, and polio virus. Disinfectants of the invert and amphoteric soap groups, and biganide group had a destructive effect on RNA and DNA viruses possessing an envelope. The presence of serum protein exerted great influence upon the virucidal activity of disinfectants of the invert and amphoteric soap groups. PMID:11019515

  12. Environmental Cleaning and Disinfecting for MRSA

    MedlinePlus

    ... stores and other retail stores. Check the disinfectant product’s label on the back of the container. Most, if ... check for an EPA registration number on the product’s label to confirm that it is registered). How should ...

  13. Disinfection, sterilization, and antisepsis: An overview.

    PubMed

    Rutala, William A; Weber, David J

    2016-05-01

    All invasive procedures involve contact by a medical device or surgical instrument with a patient's sterile tissue or mucous membranes. The level of disinfection or sterilization is dependent on the intended use of the object: critical (items that contact sterile tissue such as surgical instruments), semicritical (items that contact mucous membrane such as endoscopes), and noncritical (devices that contact only intact skin such as stethoscopes) items require sterilization, high-level disinfection and low-level disinfection, respectively. Cleaning must always precede high-level disinfection and sterilization. Antiseptics are essential to infection prevention as part of a hand hygiene program as well as several other uses such as surgical hand antisepsis and pre-operative skin preparation. PMID:27131128

  14. UV disinfection for onsite sand filter effluent

    SciTech Connect

    Lowery, J.D.; Romatzick, S.

    1982-05-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of using ultraviolet (uv) light as a viable alternative to chlorine as the required disinfectant for onsite sand filter effluents discharged to surface waters in Maine was determined. To obtain a reliable cross section of performance for sand filters in Maine, 74 filters were selected for an effluent characterization program. The effluent characterization study allowed general conclusions to be made with regard to the potential of uv disinfection. A simple suspended lamp uv disinfection unit was designed, constructed, and tested in the laboratory and in the field. The efficiency of the uv disinfection unit was determined through field testing at 10 of the 74 sand filter sites used in the effluent characterization program.

  15. Wastewater Disinfectants: Many Called--Few Chosen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, James W.

    1978-01-01

    Gives a comparative study of disinfectants used to rid wastewater of pathogens. Concentrates on the effects of chlorine and ozone, with some mention of ultra-violet irradiation, bromine chloride, and chlorine dioxide. (MA)

  16. ALTERNATIVE DISINFECTANTS FOR DRINKING WATER TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    During a one-year study at Jefferson Parish, Louisiana the chemical, microbiological, and mutagenic effects of using the major drinking water disinfectants (chlorine, chlorine dioxide, chloramine, ozone) were evaluated. ests were performed on samples collected from various treatm...

  17. DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS AND HUMAN SEMEN QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project, also called the Healthy Men Study will examine potential associations between human exposure to drinking water disinfection byproducts, particularly haloacetic acids (HAAs) and trihalomethanes (THMs), and male reproductive health as indicated by semen quality. Sinc...

  18. ALTERNATIVE DISINFECTION FOR DRINKING WATER TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    During a one-yr study at Jefferson Parish, La., the chemical, microbiological, and mutagenic effects os using the major drinkgin water disinfectants (chlorine, chlorine dioxide, chloramine, ozone) were evaluated. Tests were performed on samples collected from various treatment s...

  19. The Holographic Entropy Cone

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bao, Ning; Nezami, Sepehr; Ooguri, Hirosi; Stoica, Bogdan; Sully, James; Walter, Michael

    2015-09-21

    We initiate a systematic enumeration and classification of entropy inequalities satisfied by the Ryu-Takayanagi formula for conformal field theory states with smooth holographic dual geometries. For 2, 3, and 4 regions, we prove that the strong subadditivity and the monogamy of mutual information give the complete set of inequalities. This is in contrast to the situation for generic quantum systems, where a complete set of entropy inequalities is not known for 4 or more regions. We also find an infinite new family of inequalities applicable to 5 or more regions. The set of all holographic entropy inequalities bounds the phasemore » space of Ryu-Takayanagi entropies, defining the holographic entropy cone. We characterize this entropy cone by reducing geometries to minimal graph models that encode the possible cutting and gluing relations of minimal surfaces. We find that, for a fixed number of regions, there are only finitely many independent entropy inequalities. To establish new holographic entropy inequalities, we introduce a combinatorial proof technique that may also be of independent interest in Riemannian geometry and graph theory.« less

  20. Cone on Olympus Mons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03078 Cone on Olympus Mons

    This image shows just a small part of the eastern flank of Olympus Mons. On the far left side of the image a small volcanic cone can be seen. The shadow helps to identify this feature.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 15.7N, Longitude 229.7E. 18 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  1. The Holographic Entropy Cone

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Ning; Nezami, Sepehr; Ooguri, Hirosi; Stoica, Bogdan; Sully, James; Walter, Michael

    2015-09-21

    We initiate a systematic enumeration and classification of entropy inequalities satisfied by the Ryu-Takayanagi formula for conformal field theory states with smooth holographic dual geometries. For 2, 3, and 4 regions, we prove that the strong subadditivity and the monogamy of mutual information give the complete set of inequalities. This is in contrast to the situation for generic quantum systems, where a complete set of entropy inequalities is not known for 4 or more regions. We also find an infinite new family of inequalities applicable to 5 or more regions. The set of all holographic entropy inequalities bounds the phase space of Ryu-Takayanagi entropies, defining the holographic entropy cone. We characterize this entropy cone by reducing geometries to minimal graph models that encode the possible cutting and gluing relations of minimal surfaces. We find that, for a fixed number of regions, there are only finitely many independent entropy inequalities. To establish new holographic entropy inequalities, we introduce a combinatorial proof technique that may also be of independent interest in Riemannian geometry and graph theory.

  2. The holographic entropy cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Ning; Nezami, Sepehr; Ooguri, Hirosi; Stoica, Bogdan; Sully, James; Walter, Michael

    2015-09-01

    We initiate a systematic enumeration and classification of entropy inequalities satisfied by the Ryu-Takayanagi formula for conformal field theory states with smooth holographic dual geometries. For 2, 3, and 4 regions, we prove that the strong subadditivity and the monogamy of mutual information give the complete set of inequalities. This is in contrast to the situation for generic quantum systems, where a complete set of entropy inequalities is not known for 4 or more regions. We also find an infinite new family of inequalities applicable to 5 or more regions. The set of all holographic entropy inequalities bounds the phase space of Ryu-Takayanagi entropies, defining the holographic entropy cone. We characterize this entropy cone by reducing geometries to minimal graph models that encode the possible cutting and gluing relations of minimal surfaces. We find that, for a fixed number of regions, there are only finitely many independent entropy inequalities. To establish new holographic entropy inequalities, we introduce a combinatorial proof technique that may also be of independent interest in Riemannian geometry and graph theory.

  3. Application of disinfectants in poultry hatcheries.

    PubMed

    Samberg, Y; Meroz, M

    1995-06-01

    Veterinary control and routine sanitary procedures in commercial poultry hatcheries should include the following: choice of a suitable geographical location to ensure an isolated site; proper hatchery design with separation of major operations; one-way flow of work within the hatchery; adequate ventilation of each room; routine cleaning and disinfection; formaldehyde fumigation or alternative method for disinfection of eggs, equipment and incubators; a routine programme for monitoring microbial contamination levels within the hatchery. PMID:7579636

  4. Disinfection practices in intravenous drug administration.

    PubMed

    Helder, Onno K; Kornelisse, René F; Reiss, Irwin K M; Ista, Erwin

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effectiveness of a feedback intervention on adherence to disinfection procedures during intravenous medication preparation and administration. We found that full adherence to the protocols significantly improved from 7.3% to 21.5% (P < .001) regarding medication preparation and from 7.9% to 15.5% (P = .012) regarding medication administration. However, disinfection practices still need improvement. PMID:26899528

  5. An environmental disinfection odyssey: evaluation of sequential interventions to improve disinfection of Clostridium difficile isolation rooms.

    PubMed

    Sitzlar, Brett; Deshpande, Abhishek; Fertelli, Dennis; Kundrapu, Sirisha; Sethi, Ajay K; Donskey, Curtis J

    2013-05-01

    OBJECTIVE. Effective disinfection of hospital rooms after discharge of patients with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is necessary to prevent transmission. We evaluated the impact of sequential cleaning and disinfection interventions by culturing high-touch surfaces in CDI rooms after cleaning. DESIGN. Prospective intervention. SETTING. A Veterans Affairs hospital. INTERVENTIONS. During a 21-month period, 3 sequential tiered interventions were implemented: (1) fluorescent markers to provide monitoring and feedback on thoroughness of cleaning facility-wide, (2) addition of an automated ultraviolet radiation device for adjunctive disinfection of CDI rooms, and (3) enhanced standard disinfection of CDI rooms, including a dedicated daily disinfection team and implementation of a process requiring supervisory assessment and clearance of terminally cleaned CDI rooms. To determine the impact of the interventions, cultures were obtained from CDI rooms after cleaning and disinfection. RESULTS. The fluorescent marker intervention improved the thoroughness of cleaning of high-touch surfaces (from 47% to 81% marker removal; P < .0001). Relative to the baseline period, the prevalence of positive cultures from CDI rooms was reduced by 14% (P=.024), 48% (P <.001), and 89% (P=.006) with interventions 1, 2, and 3, respectively. During the baseline period, 67% of CDI rooms had positive cultures after disinfection, whereas during interventions periods 1, 2, and 3 the percentages of CDI rooms with positive cultures after disinfection were reduced to 57%, 35%, and 7%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS. An intervention that included formation of a dedicated daily disinfection team and implementation of a standardized process for clearing CDI rooms achieved consistent CDI room disinfection. Culturing of CDI rooms provides a valuable tool to drive improvements in environmental disinfection. PMID:23571361

  6. Light capture by human cones.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, B; Makous, W

    1989-01-01

    1. The variation in visual efficiency of light with varying pupillary entry (the Stiles-Crawford effect) was measured to determine the proportion of light incident on the cones that escapes them without recovery by other cones. 2. The variation in detectability of interference fringes with varying pupillary entry of the interfering beams was measured to determine the proportion of incident light that was recaptured by cones in the dark stripes after escaping cones in the bright stripes of the fringes. 3. By exclusion, these observations determine the variation, with varying pupillary entry, in the proportion of incident light that was captured and absorbed by the first cones it entered. 4. Some 70-90% of the light absorbed by the cones when it passes through the centre of the pupil, is entirely lost to the visual system if it passes instead through the margin of the (dilated) pupil. 5. Over half the light that cones absorb when the light enters the margin of the pupil is light that has previously passed through other cones. 6. If the spread of recaptured light is assumed to be Gaussian, its standard deviation is at most one minute of visual angle. 7. Such recaptured light makes a previously unknown contribution to the various Stiles-Crawford effects. PMID:2607444

  7. Making An Impact: Shatter Cones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blank, Lisa M.; Plautz, Michael R.; Crews, Jeffrey W.

    2004-01-01

    In 1990, a group of geologists discovered a large number of shatter cones in southwestern Montana. Shatter cones are a type of metamorphosed rock often found in impact structures (the remains of a crater after a meteor impact and years of Earth activity). Scientists have discovered only 168 impact craters around the world. If rocks could talk,…

  8. Aerodynamic Rear Cone for Trucks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullman, J.

    1985-01-01

    Wind-inflated cone reduces turbulence that ordinarily occurs in air just behind square-back truck traveling at high speed. Wind around truck would enter slits in folded cone and automatically deploy it. Energy lost to air turbulence greatly reduced, and fuel consumed by truck reduced accordingly. In addition, less air turbulence means less disturbance to nearby vehicles on highway.

  9. 40 CFR 141.54 - Maximum residual disinfectant level goals for disinfectants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maximum residual disinfectant level goals for disinfectants. 141.54 Section 141.54 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Maximum Contaminant Level Goals and Maximum...

  10. 40 CFR 141.54 - Maximum residual disinfectant level goals for disinfectants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Maximum residual disinfectant level goals for disinfectants. 141.54 Section 141.54 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Maximum Contaminant Level Goals and Maximum...

  11. 40 CFR 141.54 - Maximum residual disinfectant level goals for disinfectants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Maximum residual disinfectant level goals for disinfectants. 141.54 Section 141.54 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Maximum Contaminant Level Goals and Maximum...

  12. Transonic Flow Past Cone Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, George E

    1955-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for transonic flow post cone-cylinder, axially symmetric bodies. The drag coefficient and surface Mach number are studied as the free-stream Mach number is varied and, wherever possible, the experimental results are compared with theoretical predictions. Interferometric results for several typical flow configurations are shown and an example of shock-free supersonic-to-subsonic compression is experimentally demonstrated. The theoretical problem of transonic flow past finite cones is discussed briefly and an approximate solution of the axially symmetric transonic equations, valid for a semi-infinite cone, is presented.

  13. Evidence of effective penetration of Listeria monocytogenes biofilms by disinfectant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The generation of protective biofilms by microorganisms that aggregate on food processing equipment surfaces is a major contributing factor to contamination and disinfection failure in meat and poultry processing facilities. Traditional disinfectants and cleaners do not effectively penetrate the bi...

  14. Formation and Occurrence of Disinfection By-Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfection by-products (DBPs) are formed when disinfectants such as chlorine, ozone, chlorine dioxide, or chloramines react with naturally occurring organic matter, anthropogenic contaminants, bromide, and iodide during the production of drinking water. There is concern about D...

  15. MULTISPECTRAL IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the identification of organic disinfection byproducts (DBPs) at a pilot plant in Evansville, IN, which uses chlorine dioxide as a primary disinfectant. Unconventional multispectral identification techniques (gas chromatography combined with high- and low reso...

  16. Comparison of Disinfectants for Control of Listeria Biofilms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: The generation of protective biofilms by microorganisms that aggregate on food processing equipment surfaces is a major contributing factor to contamination and disinfection failure in meat and poultry processing facilities. Traditional disinfectants and cleaners do not effectively h...

  17. PARTICLE ASSOCIATION EFFECTS ON MICROBIAL INDICATOR CONCENTRATIONS AND CSO DISINFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Combined sewer overflow (CSO) and wastewater disinfection effectiveness are evaluated by measuring microbial indicator concentrations before and after disinfection. The standard techniques for quantifying indicators are membrane filtration and multiple-tube fermentation/most pro...

  18. 42 CFR 71.42 - Disinfection of imports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... imports. When the cargo manifest of a carrier lists articles which may require disinfection under the provisions of this part, the Director shall disinfect them on board or request the appropriate...

  19. 42 CFR 71.42 - Disinfection of imports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... imports. When the cargo manifest of a carrier lists articles which may require disinfection under the provisions of this part, the Director shall disinfect them on board or request the appropriate...

  20. 42 CFR 71.42 - Disinfection of imports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... imports. When the cargo manifest of a carrier lists articles which may require disinfection under the provisions of this part, the Director shall disinfect them on board or request the appropriate...

  1. 42 CFR 71.42 - Disinfection of imports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... imports. When the cargo manifest of a carrier lists articles which may require disinfection under the provisions of this part, the Director shall disinfect them on board or request the appropriate...

  2. 42 CFR 71.42 - Disinfection of imports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... imports. When the cargo manifest of a carrier lists articles which may require disinfection under the provisions of this part, the Director shall disinfect them on board or request the appropriate...

  3. DISINFECTION PROCESSES AND STABILITY REFINEMENTS TO BIOSOLIDS TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper reviews the current US sewage sludge disinfection regulations and their associated practices; discusses the limitations of the practices; discusses the criteria employed in evaluating a new (innovative or alternative) disinfection process and both notes some processes ...

  4. The History And Future Directions Of Biosolids Disinfection

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper reviews the history of disinfection practices, emphasizing their application to human fecal material and the residuals from wastewater treatment. It discusses development of the current US sewage sludge disinfection regulations and their associated practices; discusse...

  5. The History And Future Directions Of Biosolids Disinfection (Presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper reviews the history of disinfection practices, emphasizing their application to human fecal material and the residuals from wastewater treatment. It discusses development of the current US sewage sludge disinfection regulations and their associated practices; discusse...

  6. DISINFECTION OF BACTERIA ATTACHED TO GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heterotrophic plate count bacteria, coliform organisms, and pathogenic microorganisms attached to granular activated carbon (GAC) particles were examined for their susceptibility to chlorine disinfection. When these bacteria were grown on carbon particles and then disinfected wit...

  7. Origins of Small Volcanic Cones on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fagents, S. A.; Pace, K.; Greeley, R.

    2002-01-01

    Studies of volcanic cones identified in the MGS data indicate a range of possible origins, from primary vent constructs (cinder cones, tuff cones) to rootless cones formed by lava-ice interaction. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  8. [Evaluation of surface disinfectants utilized in dentistry].

    PubMed

    Silva, Célia Regina Gonçalves e; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2002-01-01

    Surface disinfection is a procedure carried out on the external parts of the dental equipment as well as on other items of the dental office. The aim of this study was to analyze the efficacy of 4 surface disinfectants utilized in dentistry: 77 degrees GL alcohol, phenolic compound (Duplofen), iodophor (PVP-I) and 77 degrees GL alcohol with 5% of chlorhexidine. Four surfaces of the equipment were analyzed in the study (the carter, the washbasin for hand-washing, the headrest of the chair and the external surface of the reflector), and the spray-wipe-spray procedure was carried out. From each surface, samples were collected by means of surface plates containing Mitis Salivarius bacitracin sucrose agar, Sabouraud Dextrose agar with chloramphenicol, MacConkey agar and blood agar, for counting mutans streptococci, Candida yeasts, gram-negative bacteria and total microorganisms, respectively (ufc/plate). The results were statistically analyzed by means of the Student's t test in order to compare the mean ufc/plate values. The most effective disinfectant was 77 degrees GL alcohol with 5% of chlorhexidine, mainly against gram-positive bacteria. Iodophor and phenolic compound were also effective in microbial reduction. 77 degrees GL alcohol was the least effective product - however, although it is not considered as a surface disinfectant, it produced, in this study, statistically significant microbial reduction after the disinfecting procedure. PMID:12131982

  9. An insight of disinfection by-product (DBP) formation by alternative disinfectants for swimming pool disinfection under tropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Linyan; Schmalz, Christina; Zhou, Jin; Zwiener, Christian; Chang, Victor W-C; Ge, Liya; Wan, Man Pun

    2016-09-15

    Sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) is the most commonly used disinfectant in pool treatment system. Outdoor pools usually suffer from the strong sunlight irradiation which degrades the free chlorine rapidly. In addition, more pools start to adopt the recirculation of swimming pool water, which intensifies the disinfection by-product (DBP) accumulation issue. Given these potential drawbacks of using NaClO in the tropical environment, two alternative organic-based disinfectants, trichloroisocyanuric acid (TCCA, C3Cl3N3O3) and bromochlorodimethylhydantoin (BCDMH, C5H6BrClN2O2), were investigated and compared to NaClO in terms of their self-degradation and the formation of DBPs, including trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs), under simulated tropical climate conditions. The result reveals that halogen stabilizer, TCCA, had the advantages of slower free chlorine degradation and lower DBP concentration compared to NaClO, which makes it a good alternative disinfectant. BCDMH was not recommended mainly due to the highly reactive disinfecting ingredient, hypobromous acid (HBrO), which fails to sustain the continuous disinfection requirement. Total disinfectant dosage was the main factor that affects residual chlorine/bromine and THM/HAA formation regardless of different disinfectant dosing methods, e.g. shock dosing (one-time spiking) in the beginning, and continuous dosing during the whole experimental period. Two-stage second-order-kinetic-based models demonstrate a good correlation between the measured and predicted data for chlorine decay (R(2) ≥ 0.95), THM (R(2) ≥ 0.99) and HAA (R(2) ≥ 0.83) formation. Higher temperature was found to enhance the DBP formation due to the temperature dependence of reaction rates. Thus, temperature control of pools, especially for those preferring higher temperatures (e.g. hydrotherapy and spa), should take both bather comfort and DBP formation potential into consideration. It is also observed that chlorine competition

  10. Integrated Disinfection By-Products Mixtures Research: Disinfection of Drinking Waters by Chlorination and Ozonation/Postchlorination Treatment Scenarios

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article describes disinfection of the same source water by two commonly used disinfection treatment scenarios for purposes of subsequent concentration, chemical analysis, and toxicological evaluation. Accompanying articles in this issue of the Journal of Toxicology and Envir...

  11. DETECTION OF INFECTIOUS ADENOVIRUS IN TERTIARY TREATED AND UV DISINFECTED WASTEWATER DURING A UV DISINFECTION PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    An infectious enteric adenovirus was isolated from urban wastewater receiving tertiary treatment and ultraviolet (UV) disinfection. A pilot study was undertaken to investigate the efficacy of UV disinfection (low pressure, high intensity radiation) of total and fecal coliform bac...

  12. Studies on Disinfection By-Products and Drinking Water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, Colleen E.

    2007-01-01

    Drinking water is disinfected with chemicals to remove pathogens, such as Giardia and Cryptosproridium, and prevent waterborne diseases such as cholera and typhoid. During disinfection, by-products are formed at trace concentrations. Because some of these by-products are suspected carcinogens, drinking water utilities must maintain the effectiveness of the disinfection process while minimizing the formation of by-products.

  13. Proteomic Adaptations to Starvation Prepare Escherichia coli for Disinfection Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zhe; Nandakumar, Renu; Nickerson, Kenneth; Li, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Despite the low nutrient level and constant presence of secondary disinfectants, bacterial re-growth still occurs in drinking water distribution systems. The molecular mechanisms that starved bacteria use to survive low-level chlorine-based disinfectants are not well understood. The objective of this study is to investigate these molecular mechanisms at the protein level that prepare starved cells for disinfection tolerance. Two commonly used secondary disinfectants chlorine and monochloramine, both at 1 mg/L, were used in this study. The proteomes of normal and starved Escherichia coli (K12 MG1655) cells were studied using quantitative proteomics. Over 60-min disinfection, starved cells showed significantly higher disinfection tolerance than normal cells based on the inactivation curves for both chlorine and monochloramine. Proteomic analyses suggest that starvation may prepare cells for the oxidative stress that chlorine-based disinfection will cause by affecting glutathione metabolism. In addition, proteins involved in stress regulation and stress responses were among the ones up-regulated under both starvation and chlorine/monochloramine disinfection. By comparing the fold changes under different conditions, it is suggested that starvation prepares E. coli for disinfection tolerance by increasing the expression of enzymes that can help cells survive chlorine/monochloramine disinfection. Protein co-expression analyses show that proteins in glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway that were up-regulated under starvation are also involved in disinfection tolerance. Finally, the production and detoxification of methylglyoxal may be involved in the chlorine-based disinfection and cell defense mechanisms. PMID:25463932

  14. 21 CFR 880.6890 - General purpose disinfectants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false General purpose disinfectants. 880.6890 Section... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6890 General purpose disinfectants. (a) Identification. A general purpose disinfectant is a germicide intended to process noncritical medical devices and equipment surfaces. A...

  15. 21 CFR 880.6890 - General purpose disinfectants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false General purpose disinfectants. 880.6890 Section... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6890 General purpose disinfectants. (a) Identification. A general purpose disinfectant is a germicide intended to process noncritical medical devices and equipment surfaces. A...

  16. 21 CFR 880.6890 - General purpose disinfectants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false General purpose disinfectants. 880.6890 Section... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6890 General purpose disinfectants. (a) Identification. A general purpose disinfectant is a germicide intended to process noncritical medical devices and equipment surfaces. A...

  17. Environmental health perspectives. Volume 46. Drinking water disinfectants - December 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Lucier, G.W.; Hook, G.E.R.

    1982-01-01

    Among subjects considered are chlorine dioxide, N-chloramines, mutagenic activity by disinfectant reaction products, trihalomethane and behavioral toxicity, and carcinogenic risk estimation. There are 27 papers on these and related topics. The volume stems from a symposium on drinking water disinfectants and disinfectant by-products.

  18. 21 CFR 880.6890 - General purpose disinfectants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false General purpose disinfectants. 880.6890 Section... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6890 General purpose disinfectants. (a) Identification. A general purpose disinfectant is a germicide intended to process noncritical medical devices and equipment surfaces. A...

  19. 21 CFR 880.6890 - General purpose disinfectants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false General purpose disinfectants. 880.6890 Section... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6890 General purpose disinfectants. (a) Identification. A general purpose disinfectant is a germicide intended to process noncritical medical devices and equipment surfaces. A...

  20. A Toxicological Perspective on Disinfection ByProducts

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfection of water is essential for reduction of microbes harmful to human health and chemical disinfection is considered one of the major public health triumphs of the 20th Century. An unintended consequence of disinfection with oxidizing chemicals is formation of disinfectio...

  1. MODELING DISINFECTANT RESIDUALS IN DRINKING-WATER STORAGE TANKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The factors leading to the loss of disinfectant residual in well-mixed drinking-water storage tanks are studied. quations relating disinfectant residual to the disinfectant's reaction rate, the tank volume, and the fill and drain rates are presented. n analytical solution for the...

  2. MODELING DISINFECTANT RESIDUALS IN DRINKING-WATER STORAGE TANKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The factors leading to the loss of disinfectant residual in well-mixed drinking-water storage tanks are studied. Equations relating disinfectant residual to the disinfectant's reation rate, the tank volume, and the fill and drain rates are presented. An analytical solution for ...

  3. 9 CFR 166.14 - Cleaning and disinfecting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cleaning and disinfecting. 166.14 Section 166.14 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION General Provisions § 166.14 Cleaning and disinfecting. (a) Disinfectants to be...

  4. 9 CFR 166.14 - Cleaning and disinfecting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cleaning and disinfecting. 166.14 Section 166.14 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION General Provisions § 166.14 Cleaning and disinfecting. (a) Disinfectants to be...

  5. OPTIMAL SCHEDULING OF BOOSTER DISINFECTION IN WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Booster disinfection is the addition of disinfectant at locations distributed throughout a water distribution system. Such a strategy can reduce the mass of disinfectant required to maintain a detectable residual at points of consumption in the distribution system, which may lea...

  6. THE TOXICOLOGY OF COMPLEX MIXTURES OF DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical disinfection of water is a major public health advance that has decreased dramatically water-borne disease. Chemical disinfectants react with naturally occurring organic and inorganic matter in water to produce a wide variety of disinfection byproducts (DBPs). DBP num...

  7. TOXICOLOGIC AND CHEMICAL EVALUATION OF ALTERNATIVE DISINFECTION TREATMENT SCENARIOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    More than 500 disinfecting byproducts have been identified. They result from the reaction of the disinfectants with the natural organic matter present in source waters. The concentrations and bromo/chloro speciation of these disinfection byproducts (DBPs) are influenced by source...

  8. Antiseptics and Disinfectants: Activity, Action, and Resistance

    PubMed Central

    McDonnell, Gerald; Russell, A. Denver

    1999-01-01

    Antiseptics and disinfectants are extensively used in hospitals and other health care settings for a variety of topical and hard-surface applications. A wide variety of active chemical agents (biocides) are found in these products, many of which have been used for hundreds of years, including alcohols, phenols, iodine, and chlorine. Most of these active agents demonstrate broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity; however, little is known about the mode of action of these agents in comparison to antibiotics. This review considers what is known about the mode of action and spectrum of activity of antiseptics and disinfectants. The widespread use of these products has prompted some speculation on the development of microbial resistance, in particular whether antibiotic resistance is induced by antiseptics or disinfectants. Known mechanisms of microbial resistance (both intrinsic and acquired) to biocides are reviewed, with emphasis on the clinical implications of these reports. PMID:9880479

  9. Bactericidal properties of a new water disinfectant.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, D E; Worley, S D; Wheatley, W B; Swango, L J

    1985-01-01

    The N-chloramine compound 3-chloro-4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazolidinone (agent I) has been compared with calcium hypochlorite as to its efficacy as a bactericide for the treatment of water. The study included concentration, contact time, pH, temperature, and water quality as controlled variables. The species of bacteria tested were Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Shigella boydii. In general, for highly pure, demand-free water, calcium hypochlorite was the more rapid disinfectant at a given total chlorine concentration, although for water containing a controlled amount of organic load, agent I was the better disinfectant. The differences in efficacy of each of the two disinfectants can be attributed primarily to their different stabilities in water at various controlled conditions. PMID:3922300

  10. Sterilization and disinfection in the physician's office.

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, D C; Skidmore, A G

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the principles and practice of sterilization and disinfection of medical instruments in the office setting. DATA SOURCES: Searches of MEDLINE for articles published from 1980 to 1990 on disinfection, sterilization, cross infection, surgical instruments and iatrogenic disease, bibliographies, standard texts and reference material located in a central processing department. STUDY SELECTION: We reviewed surveys of decontamination practices in physicians' offices, reviews of current recommendations for office decontamination procedures, case reports of cross infection in offices and much of the standard reference material on decontamination theory and practice. DATA SYNTHESIS: There have been few surveys of physicians' decontamination practices and few case reports of cross infection. Office practitioners have little access to practical information on sterilization and disinfection. CONCLUSION: The increasing threat of cross infection from medical instruments calls for greater knowledge about decontamination. We have adapted material from various sources and offer a primer on the subject. PMID:1913427

  11. Reproductive effects of alternative disinfectants.

    PubMed Central

    Carlton, B D; Barlett, P; Basaran, A; Colling, K; Osis, I; Smith, M K

    1986-01-01

    Organohalides formed through the reaction of chlorine and organic compounds in natural and waste waters pose potential health hazards. For this reason, alternative water disinfectants that do not form organohalides are being investigated with great interest. Limited data are available on the health effects, in particular reproductive toxicity effects, of these compounds. In our laboratory, we have examined the reproductive effects of chloramine and chlorine administered by gavage in Long-Evans rats. Animals were treated for a total of 66 to 76 days. Males were treated for 56 days and females for 14 days prior to breeding and throughout the 10-day breeding period. Females were treated throughout gestation and lactation. Following breeding, the males were necropsied and evaluated for sperm parameters and reproductive tract histopathology. Adult females and some pups were necropsied at weaning on postnatal day 21. Other pups were treated postweaning until 28 or 40 days of age. These pups were evaluated for the day of vaginal patency and thyroid hormone levels. No differences were observed between control rats and those rats exposed to up to 5 mg/kg/day chlorine or 10 mg/kg/day chloramine when fertility, viability, litter size, day of eye opening, or day of vaginal patency were evaluated. No alterations in sperm count, sperm direct progressive movement (micron/sec), percent motility, or sperm morphology were observed among adult male rats. In addition, male and female reproductive organ weights were comparable to their respective control groups, and no significant histopathologic changes were observed among chlorine- or chloramine-treated male and female rats. PMID:3816727

  12. New developments in disinfection and sterilization.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Craig A

    2016-05-01

    A review of regulatory clearances for selected new sterilization and disinfection products for the period January 2012-June 2015 indicates continued leverage of established technologies for steam and low-temperature sterilization, and high-level disinfection. New products in these areas were typically modified and improved versions of existing products, with the exception of a new combination hydrogen peroxide/ozone sterilizer. Development of new low-temperature sterilization technologies to address continued evolution of complex medical devices is expected to continue. PMID:27131131

  13. Disinfecting efficacy of three chemical disinfectants on contaminated diagnostic instruments: A randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Ganavadiya, Rahul; Chandra Shekar, B.R.; Saxena, Vrinda; Tomar, Poonam; Gupta, Ruchika; Khandelwal, Garima

    2014-01-01

    Context: Cross infection remains one of the major challenges in the dental profession, especially in field settings. Transmission of hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and human immunodeficiency virus have raised a major concern for patients and dental staff. These risks can be eliminated by effective sterilization and disinfection techniques. Aim: The aim was to compare the disinfecting efficacy of three chemical disinfectants on contaminated diagnostic instruments. Settings and Design: This was a randomized, cross over trial conducted among three participants selected from a research laboratory, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India. Materials and Methods: The study participants were examined 4 times on different days. Each time, the coded mouth mirrors of different make were used, and the disinfection was accomplished using coded disinfectants. The reduction in total viable count was compared between the three groups (2% glutaraldehyde, 6% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and 99.9% ethyl alcohol) with distilled water as negative control and autoclaving as a positive control. Furthermore, the predisinfection count was compared between the instruments of different make. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed using paired t-test and One-way ANOVA. The statistical significance was fixed at 0.05. Results: Autoclaved instruments resulted in complete elimination of viable micro-organisms. Maximum reduction in microbial load was observed after disinfection with H2O2 followed by glutaraldehyde, ethyl alcohol and distilled water in descending order. Furthermore, maximum microbial contamination was recorded on locally manufactured mirrors, while standard plain mirrors showed least contamination. Conclusions: Although, a significant reduction in total viable count was observed with all the disinfectants evaluated in the present study, none of the disinfectants was successful in completely eliminating the viable micro-organisms. PMID:25316989

  14. 40 CFR 141.72 - Disinfection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... treatment must be sufficient to ensure at least 99.9 percent (3-log) inactivation of Giardia lamblia cysts... for Giardia lamblia cysts and viruses. If a system uses a disinfectant other than chlorine, the system....9 percent (3-log) inactivation and/or removal of Giardia lamblia cysts and at least 99.99 percent...

  15. Effective disinfection methods of kitchen sponges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pathogenic foodborne bacteria can be disseminated in households through the use of contaminated sponges. Several household disinfecting treatments to kill bacteria, yeasts and molds on sponges were evaluated. Sponges were incubated in a suspension of ground beef and tryptic soy broth to develop bact...

  16. USE OF FENTON'S REAGENT AS A DISINFECTANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Combined sewage samples obtained from a wastewater treatment facility were disinfected by the Fenton's Reagent of several different compositions. The pre-settled samples contained both suspended solids (SS) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) at concentrations of 28 and 290 mg/L,...

  17. 40 CFR 141.72 - Disinfection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... serves water to the public. Water in the distribution system with a heterotrophic bacteria concentration... heterotrophic bacteria plate count (HPC) is measured; c=number of instances where the residual disinfectant... system with a heterotrophic bacteria concentration less than or equal to 500/ml, measured...

  18. 40 CFR 141.72 - Disinfection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... serves water to the public. Water in the distribution system with a heterotrophic bacteria concentration... heterotrophic bacteria plate count (HPC) is measured; c=number of instances where the residual disinfectant... system with a heterotrophic bacteria concentration less than or equal to 500/ml, measured...

  19. DISINFECTION: CHLORINE, MONOCHLORAMINE, AND CHLORINE DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disinfection process in the treatment of water is designed to insure the inactivation of microbial pathogens. These pathogens which serve as the etiological agents of waterborne disease comprise a diverse group of microorganisms, which include bacterial, viral and protozoan s...

  20. Effective household disinfection methods of kitchen sponges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several household disinfecting treatments to kill bacteria, yeasts and molds on kitchen sponges were evaluated. Sponges were soaked in 10 percent bleach for 3 min, lemon juice (pH 2.9) or deionized water for 1 min; placed in a microwave oven for 1 min; or placed in a dishwasher operating with a dryi...

  1. DISINFECTION AND THE CONTROL OF WATERBORNE GIARDIASIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the early 1970's, when giardiasis began to be recognized as an important waterborne disease, the understanding of the effects of disinfectants on the cysts of the etiologic agent, Giardia lamblia, was extremely limited. The results of more recent studies, using improved method...

  2. Microbial contamination and disinfection methods of pacifiers

    PubMed Central

    NELSON, Paulo; LOUVAIN, Márcia Costa; MACARI, Soraia; LUCISANO, Marília Pacífico; da SILVA, Raquel Assed Bezerra; de QUEIROZ, Alexandra Mussolino; GATON-HERNÁNDEZ, Patrícia; da SILVA, Léa Assed Bezerra

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the microbial contamination of pacifiers by Mutans Streptococci (MS) and the efficacy of different methods for their disinfection. Methods Twenty-eight children were assigned to a 4-stage changeover system with a 1-week interval. In each stage, children received a new pacifier and the parents were instructed to maintain their normal habits for 1 week. After this time, the pacifiers were subjected to the following 4 disinfection methods: spraying with 0.12% chlorhexidine solution, Brushtox® or sterile tap water, and immersion in boiling tap water for 15 minutes. Microbiological culture for MS and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) were performed. The results were analyzed statistically by Friedman’s non-parametric test (a=0.05). Results The 0.12% chlorhexidine spray was statistically similar to the boiling water (p>0.05) and more effective than the Brushtox® spray and control (p<0.05). The analysis of SEM showed the formation of a cariogenic biofilm in all groups with positive culture. Conclusions Pacifiers become contaminated by MS after their use by children and should be disinfected routinely. Spraying with a 0.12% chlorhexidine solution and immersion in boiling water promoted better disinfection of the pacifiers compared with a commercial antiseptic toothbrush cleanser (Brushtox®). PMID:26537723

  3. Shatter cones: (Mis)understood?

    PubMed

    Osinski, Gordon R; Ferrière, Ludovic

    2016-08-01

    Meteorite impact craters are one of the most common geological features in the solar system. An impact event is a near-instantaneous process that releases a huge amount of energy over a very small region on a planetary surface. This results in characteristic changes in the target rocks, from vaporization and melting to solid-state effects, such as fracturing and shock metamorphism. Shatter cones are distinctive striated conical fractures that are considered unequivocal evidence of impact events. They are one of the most used and trusted shock-metamorphic effects for the recognition of meteorite impact structures. Despite this, there is still considerable debate regarding their formation. We show that shatter cones are present in several stratigraphic settings within and around impact structures. Together with the occurrence of complete and "double" cones, our observations are most consistent with shatter cone formation due to tensional stresses generated by scattering of the shock wave due to heterogeneities in the rock. On the basis of field mapping, we derive the relationship D sc = 0.4 D a, where D sc is the maximum spatial extent of in situ shatter cones, and D a is the apparent crater diameter. This provides an important, new, more accurate method to estimate the apparent diameter of eroded complex craters on Earth. We have reestimated the diameter of eight well-known impact craters as part of this study. Finally, we suggest that shatter cones may reduce the strength of the target, thus aiding crater collapse, and that their distribution in central uplifts also records the obliquity of impact. PMID:27532050

  4. Shatter cones: (Mis)understood?

    PubMed Central

    Osinski, Gordon R.; Ferrière, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    Meteorite impact craters are one of the most common geological features in the solar system. An impact event is a near-instantaneous process that releases a huge amount of energy over a very small region on a planetary surface. This results in characteristic changes in the target rocks, from vaporization and melting to solid-state effects, such as fracturing and shock metamorphism. Shatter cones are distinctive striated conical fractures that are considered unequivocal evidence of impact events. They are one of the most used and trusted shock-metamorphic effects for the recognition of meteorite impact structures. Despite this, there is still considerable debate regarding their formation. We show that shatter cones are present in several stratigraphic settings within and around impact structures. Together with the occurrence of complete and “double” cones, our observations are most consistent with shatter cone formation due to tensional stresses generated by scattering of the shock wave due to heterogeneities in the rock. On the basis of field mapping, we derive the relationship Dsc = 0.4 Da, where Dsc is the maximum spatial extent of in situ shatter cones, and Da is the apparent crater diameter. This provides an important, new, more accurate method to estimate the apparent diameter of eroded complex craters on Earth. We have reestimated the diameter of eight well-known impact craters as part of this study. Finally, we suggest that shatter cones may reduce the strength of the target, thus aiding crater collapse, and that their distribution in central uplifts also records the obliquity of impact. PMID:27532050

  5. 40 CFR 141.541 - What are significant changes to disinfection practice?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Disinfection Benchmark § 141.541 What are significant... point of disinfection; (b) Changes to the disinfectant(s) used in the treatment plant; (c) Changes...

  6. Peracetic acid for secondary effluent disinfection: a comprehensive performance assessment.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, M; Turolla, A; Mezzanotte, V; Nurizzo, C

    2013-01-01

    The paper is a review of previous research on secondary effluent disinfection by peracetic acid (PAA) integrated with new data about the effect of a preliminary flash-mixing step. The process was studied at bench and pilot scale to assess its performance for discharge in surface water and agricultural reuse (target microorganisms: Escherichia coli and faecal coliform bacteria). The purposes of the research were: (1) determining PAA decay and disinfection kinetics as a function of operating parameters, (2) evaluating PAA suitability as a disinfectant, (3) assessing long-term disinfection efficiency, (4) investigating disinfected effluent biological toxicity on some aquatic indicator organisms (Vibrio fischeri, Daphnia magna and Selenastrum capricornutum), (5) comparing PAA with conventional disinfectants (sodium hypochlorite, UV irradiation). PAA disinfection was capable of complying with Italian regulations on reuse (10 CFU/100 mL for E. coli) and was competitive with benchmarks. No regrowth phenomena were observed, as long as needed for agricultural reuse (29 h after disinfection), even at negligible concentrations of residual disinfectant. The toxic effect of PAA on the aquatic environment was due to the residual disinfectant in the water, rather than to chemical modification of the effluent. PMID:24355852

  7. Cone Penetrometer N Factor Determination Testing Results

    SciTech Connect

    Follett, Jordan R.

    2014-03-05

    This document contains the results of testing activities to determine the empirical 'N Factor' for the cone penetrometer in kaolin clay simulant. The N Factor is used to releate resistance measurements taken with the cone penetrometer to shear strength.

  8. Small Molecules in the Cone Snail Arsenal.

    PubMed

    Neves, Jorge L B; Lin, Zhenjian; Imperial, Julita S; Antunes, Agostinho; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Olivera, Baldomero M; Schmidt, Eric W

    2015-10-16

    Cone snails are renowned for producing peptide-based venom, containing conopeptides and conotoxins, to capture their prey. A novel small-molecule guanine derivative with unprecedented features, genuanine, was isolated from the venom of two cone snail species. Genuanine causes paralysis in mice, indicating that small molecules and not just polypeptides may contribute to the activity of cone snail venom. PMID:26421741

  9. Reaction of silver nanoparticles in the disinfection process.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhihua; Chen, Yunbin; Li, Tingting; Yu, Chang-Ping

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated the dissolution, aggregation, and reaction kinetics of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with the three types of water disinfectants (ultraviolet, sodium hypochlorite, and ozone) under the different conditions of pH, ionic strength, or humic acid (HA). The physicochemical changes of AgNPs were measured by using UV-Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer. The results showed that when AgNPs contacted the disinfectants, oxidative dissolution was the primary reaction. In addition, the reaction kinetics studies revealed that the reaction rate of AgNPs with disinfectants was significantly influenced by different disinfectants along with different pH and the presence of sodium nitrate and HA. Our research demonstrated the potential effect of disinfectants on AgNPs, which will improve our understanding of the fate of AgNPs in the disinfection processes in the water and wastewater treatment plant. PMID:23830116

  10. Disinfectants for spacecraft applications - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, David W.; Mallary, Laura L.; Pierson, Duane L.

    1991-01-01

    The review of disinfectants for use on manned missions emphasizes the need for contamination control to prevent the detrimental effects of bacteria growth on crew health. Microbial control is possible by means of biocides, but the selected product has to meet stringent toxicity requirements for the small environments in spacecraft. The testing and evaluation is described of four biocide candidates: hydrogen peroxide, quaternary ammonium compounds, iodine, and glutaraldehyde. The effectiveness of the disinfectants are analyzed in terms of the ability to treat typical microbial counts from Skylab missions in a closed environment. It is shown that many biocide candidates are not compatible with the ECLSS, water-recovery management, and air-revitalization subsystems of the Space Station Freedom. The use of hydrogen peroxide is proposed with a secondary stronger agent for microbial spills from biological experiments.

  11. Lighting the way to improved disinfection

    SciTech Connect

    Valenti, M.

    1997-07-01

    Ultraviolet light has a proven track record of killing bacteria and viruses found in municipal wastewater. In addition, environmental concerns over the use of chemical disinfectants, coupled with improvements in ultraviolet-lighting technology, have led to the development of UV systems that treat spent metalworking fluids in the industrialized world; disinfect drinking water in developing countries; and clean aquaculture water, ballast water, and hospital air everywhere. A large-scale pilot plant capable of treating less than 1 million gallons per day was built on-site by Los Angeles-based Montgomery Watson and CCCSD in 1992. It demonstrated that UV was just as effective as chlorination in killing bacteria and slightly more effective in destroying viruses found in the Martinez plant`s wastewater. It also showed the lamps would need to be cleaned of fouling every two to four weeks. The paper discusses this plant and the use of UV light in the above-mentioned water treatment processes.

  12. 9 CFR 85.12 - Cleaning and disinfecting means of conveyance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... disinfected in accordance with § 71.7 of this chapter using one of the disinfectants registered under the... virucidal claims. These disinfectants shall be used in accordance with directions on their labels...

  13. 9 CFR 85.12 - Cleaning and disinfecting means of conveyance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... disinfected in accordance with § 71.7 of this chapter using one of the disinfectants registered under the... virucidal claims. These disinfectants shall be used in accordance with directions on their labels...

  14. 9 CFR 85.12 - Cleaning and disinfecting means of conveyance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... disinfected in accordance with § 71.7 of this chapter using one of the disinfectants registered under the... virucidal claims. These disinfectants shall be used in accordance with directions on their labels...

  15. 9 CFR 85.12 - Cleaning and disinfecting means of conveyance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... disinfected in accordance with § 71.7 of this chapter using one of the disinfectants registered under the... virucidal claims. These disinfectants shall be used in accordance with directions on their labels...

  16. 9 CFR 85.12 - Cleaning and disinfecting means of conveyance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... disinfected in accordance with § 71.7 of this chapter using one of the disinfectants registered under the... virucidal claims. These disinfectants shall be used in accordance with directions on their labels...

  17. Research Issues Underlying the Four-Lab Study: Integrated Disinfection Byproducts Mixtures Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical disinfection of drinking water is a major public health triumph of the 20th century, resulting in significant decreases in morbidity and mortality from waterborne diseases. Disinfection byproducts (DBPs) are chemicals formed by the reaction of oxidizing disinfectants wi...

  18. Silver-based Antibacterial Surfaces for Drinking Water Disinfection - An overview

    EPA Science Inventory

    Risks associated with current disinfection techniques, including the formation of disinfection by-products and multi-drug resistant bacterial species, have prompted the exploration of advanced disinfection methods. One such technique employs silver nanoparticles incorporation on ...

  19. THE UPTAKE OF WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS INTO FOODS DURING HOME PROCESSING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A variety of organic compounds in tap water are produced as a result of disinfection process. Use of chlorine-containing chemicals for disinfection produces many disinfection by-products (DBPs) including trihalomethanes, haloacetonitriles and haloacetic acid. Ozonation with secon...

  20. Regenerable Iodine Water-Disinfection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, Richard L.; Colombo, Gerald V.; Jolly, Clifford D.

    1994-01-01

    Iodinated resin bed for disinfecting water regenerated to extend useful life. Water flows through regeneration bed of crystalline iodine during regeneration. At other times, flow diverted around regeneration bed. Although regeneration cycle manually controlled readily automated to start and stop according to signals from concentration sensors. Further benefit of regeneration is bed provides highly concentrated biocide source when needed. Concentrated biocide used to superiodinate system after contamination from routine maintenance or unexpected introduction of large concentration of microbes.

  1. Disinfection of secondary effluents by infiltration percolation.

    PubMed

    Makni, H

    2001-01-01

    Among the most attractive applications of reclaimed wastewater are: irrigation of public parks, sports fields, golf courses and market gardening. These uses require advanced wastewater treatment including disinfection. According to WHO guidelines (1989) and current rules and regulations in Tunisia, faecal coliform levels have to be reduced to < 10(3) or 10(2) CFU/100 mL. In Tunisia, most wastewater plants are only secondary treatment and, in order to meet health related regulations, the effluents need to be disinfected. However, it is usual for secondary effluents to need filtration prior to disinfection. Effectiveness of conventional disinfection processes, such as chlorination and UV radiation, are dependent upon the oxidation level and the levels of suspended solids of the treated water. Ozonation is relatively expensive and energy consuming. The consideration of the advantages and disadvantages of conventional techniques, their reliability, investment needs and operational costs will lead to the use of less sophisticated alternative techniques for certain facilities. Among alternative techniques, soil aquifer treatment and infiltration percolation through sand beds have been studied in Arizona, Israel, France, Spain and Morocco. Infiltration percolation plants have been intermittently fed with secondary or high quality primary effluents which percolated through 1.5-2 m unsaturated coarse sand and were recovered by under-drains. In such infiltration percolation facilities, microorganisms were eliminated through numerous physical, physicochemical and biological inter-related processes (mechanical filtration, adsorption and microbial degradation respectively). Efficiency of faecal coliform removal was dependent upon the water detention times in the filtering medium and on the oxidation of the filtered water. Effluents of Sfax town aerated ponds were infiltrated through 1.5 m deep sand columns in order to determine the performance of infiltration percolation in the

  2. Influence of ultrasound enhancement on chlorine dioxide consumption and disinfection by-products formation for secondary effluents disinfection.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoqin; Zhao, Junyuan; Li, Zifu; Lan, Juanru; Li, Yajie; Yang, Xin; Wang, Dongling

    2016-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) has been promoted as an alternative disinfectant because of its high disinfection efficiency and less formation of organic disinfection by-products (DBPs). However, particle-associated microorganisms could be protected during the disinfection process, which decreases the disinfection efficiency or increases the required dosage. Besides, the formation of inorganic disinfection by-products is a significant concern in environment health. Ultrasound (US)-combined disinfection methods are becoming increasingly attractive because they are efficient and environmentally friendly. In this study, US was introduced as an enhancement method to identify its influence on ClO2 demand reduction and to minimize the production of potential DBPs for secondary effluents disinfection. Fecal coliform was used as an indicator, and DBPs, including trichloromethane (TCM), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA), trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), chlorite (ClO2(-)), and chlorate (ClO3(-)), were analyzed to observe the potential DBPs formation. Results show that US pretreatment could reduce half of ClO2 dosage compared with ClO2 disinfection alone for the same disinfection efficiency, and that an input power density of 2.64 kJ/L pretreatment with the 1.5mg/L ClO2 was enough to meet the discharge requirement in China (i.e., fecal coliform below 1000 CFU/L for Class 1A) for secondary effluent disinfection, and the ClO2(-) concentration in the disinfection effluent was only 1.37 mg/L at the same time. Furthermore, the different effects of US on the two processes (US as pretreatment and simultaneous US/ClO2 disinfection) were also analyzed, including deagglomerating, cell damage, and synergistic disinfection as well as degasing/sonolysis. It was proved that the production of TCM, DCAA, and TCAA was insignificantly influenced with the introduction of US, but US pretreatment did reduce the production of ClO2(-) and ClO3(-) effectually. In general, US pretreatment could be a better option for

  3. Effects of disinfectants in renal dialysis patients

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, E.

    1986-11-01

    Patients receiving hemodialysis therapy risk exposure to both disinfectants and sterilants. Dialysis equipment is disinfected periodically with strong solutions of hypochlorite or formaldehyde. Gross hemolysis resulting from accidental hypochlorite infusion has led to cardiac arrest, probably as a result of hyperkalemia. Formaldehyde is commonly used in 4% solutions to sterilize the fluid paths of dialysis controllers and to sterilize dialyzers before reuse. It can react with red cell antigenic surfaces leading to the formation of anti-N antibodies. The major exposure risk is the low concentration of disinfectant found in municipal water used to prepare 450 L dialysate weekly. With thrice-weekly treatment schedules, the quality requirements for water used to make this solution must be met rigorously. Standards for water used in the preparation of dialysate have recently been proposed but not all patients are treated with dialysate meeting such standards. The introduction of sterilants via tap water is insidious and has let to more pervasive consequences. Both chlorine and chloramines, at concentrations found in potable water, are strong oxidants that cause extensive protein denaturation and hemolysis. Oxidation of the Fe/sup 2 +/ in hemoglobin to Fe/sup 3 +/ forms methemoglobin, which is incapable of carrying either O/sub 2/ or CO/sub 2/. Chloramine can form not only methemoglobin, but can also denature proteins within the red cell, thus forming aggregates (Heinz bodies). Chloramines also inhibit hexose monophosphate shunt activity, a mechanism that makes the red cell even more susceptible to oxidant damage.

  4. Evaluation of toothbrush disinfection via different methods.

    PubMed

    Basman, Adil; Peker, Ilkay; Akca, Gulcin; Alkurt, Meryem Toraman; Sarikir, Cigdem; Celik, Irem

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of using a dishwasher or different chemical agents, including 0.12% chlorhexidine gluconate, 2% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), a mouthrinse containing essential oils and alcohol, and 50% white vinegar, for toothbrush disinfection. Sixty volunteers were divided into five experimental groups and one control group (n = 10). Participants brushed their teeth using toothbrushes with standard bristles, and they disinfected the toothbrushes according to instructed methods. Bacterial contamination of the toothbrushes was compared between the experimental groups and the control group. Data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Duncan's multiple range tests, with 95% confidence intervals for multiple comparisons. Bacterial contamination of toothbrushes from individuals in the experimental groups differed from those in the control group (p < 0.05). The most effective method for elimination of all tested bacterial species was 50% white vinegar, followed in order by 2% NaOCl, mouthrinse containing essential oils and alcohol, 0.12% chlorhexidine gluconate, dishwasher use, and tap water (control). The results of this study show that the most effective method for disinfecting toothbrushes was submersion in 50% white vinegar, which is cost-effective, easy to access, and appropriate for household use. PMID:26676193

  5. Bacterial contamination of a phenolic disinfectant.

    PubMed

    Simmons, N A; Gardner, D A

    1969-06-14

    Twenty ward stock bottles of aqueous 1% Printol were examined and 17 were found to be contaminated with Alcaligenes faecalis. Organisms were present in dead space behind the plastic liners of the bottle caps, where they could have survived washing. A. faecalis was also isolated from 31 out of 34 1% Printol solutions in use in the hospital. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was grown from two samples of 1% Printol in one ward, but not from stock bottles.The minimal bactericidal concentration (M.B.C.) in aqueous solution of Hycolin, Sudol, and Stericol for A. faecalis and Ps. aeruginosa was 1 in 320. The M.B.C. of Printol for both organisms was 1 in 80. The activity of all four disinfectants was reduced in the presence of large amounts of organic matter. Sudol was the least affected. Polyethylene, of which stock bottles were made, did not reduce the activity of the disinfectants. It is suggested that, ideally, stock bottles of disinfectant diluted ready for use should be autoclaved before they are refilled. PMID:4977328

  6. [Principles of antisepsis, disinfection and sterilization].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Navarrete, María-Jesús; Celorrio-Pascual, José-Miguel; Lapresta Moros, Carlos; Solano Bernad, Victor-Manuel

    2014-12-01

    This article aims to provide a brief review of the main concepts on which the prevention and control of infection are based. Antisepsis comprises a set of techniques aimed at the total sterilization, or at most, disinfection, removing germs that contaminate an environment. Both procedures must be preceded by an environmental cleanup in the location in which they intend to be applied. The disinfection is carried out using biocides or germicides. Antimicrobial chemicals, that have mechanisms of action and resistances very similar to antibiotics, are generating concern due to the possibility of crossing genetic information that aggravates the problem of bacterial resistance. Most biocides can act as antiseptics, and applied to skin tissue, or disinfectants on inanimate materials. The spectrum of action of germicides depends on the product itself and external controllable factors: temperature, concentration, exposure time, etc. Sterilization techniques are primarily physical, by exposing the material to steam, or sterilizing gas, using autoclaves. Major advances are the use of low temperatures with shorter exposure times, in parallel with technological advances in instrumentation in order to avoid high temperatures and high use rotations due to workload. PMID:25023372

  7. Disinfecting action of a new multi-purpose disinfection solution for contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, R A; Bell, W M; Abshire, R

    1999-01-01

    The disinfection activity of a new multipurpose disinfection solution (OPTI-FREE Express with ALDOX) was compared to several other contact lens disinfecting solutions. The new solution is preserved with polyquaternium-1 and myristamidopropyl dimethylamine. The other solutions included 3% hydrogen peroxide systems and multipurpose solutions (MPS) preserved with polyhexamethylene biguanide. The products were tested for antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Serratia marcescens, Candida albicans, Fusarium solani, and Aspergillus fumigatus. OPTI-FREE Express provided a broader range of antimicrobial activity than the MPS. It provided activity similar to that demonstrated by 3% hydrogen peroxide systems, but unlike the hydrogen peroxide system tested, it also prevented re growth of the organisms during extended storage. PMID:16303414

  8. Hydrogen Peroxide as an Effective Disinfectant for Pasteurella multocida

    PubMed Central

    Jung, In-Soo; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Jung, Won-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida (P. multocida) infections vary widely, from local infections resulting from animal bites and scratches to general infections. As of yet, no vaccine against P. multocida has been developed, and the most effective way to prevent pathogenic transmission is to clean the host environment using disinfectants. In this study, we identified which disinfectants most effectively inhibited environmental isolates of P. multocida. Three readily available disinfectants were compared: 3% hydrogen peroxide (HP), 70% isopropyl alcohol, and synthetic phenol. In suspension tests and zone inhibition tests, 3% HP was the most promising disinfectant against P. multocida. PMID:24954350

  9. Efficiency of water disinfectants against Legionella pneumophila and Acanthamoeba.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, Mathieu; Mazoua, Stéphane; Berne, Florence; Bodet, Charles; Garrec, Nathalie; Herbelin, Pascaline; Ménard-Szczebara, Florence; Oberti, Sandrine; Rodier, Marie-Hélène; Soreau, Sylvie; Wallet, France; Héchard, Yann

    2011-01-01

    Free-living amoebae might be pathogenic by themselves and be a reservoir for bacterial pathogens, such as Legionella pneumophila. Not only could amoebae protect intra-cellular Legionella but Legionella grown within amoebae could undergo physiological modifications and become more resistant and more virulent. Therefore, it is important to study the efficiency of treatments on amoebae and Legionella grown within these amoebae to improve their application and to limit their impact on the environment. With this aim, we compared various water disinfectants against trophozoites of three Acanthamoeba strains and L. pneumophila alone or in co-culture. Three oxidizing disinfectants (chlorine, monochloramine, and chlorine dioxide) were assessed. All the samples were treated with disinfectants for 1 h and the disinfectant concentration was followed to calculate disinfectant exposure (Ct). We noticed that there were significant differences of susceptibility among the Acanthamoeba strains. However no difference was observed between infected and non-infected amoebae. Also, the comparison between the three disinfectants indicates that monochloramine was efficient at the same level towards free or co-cultured L. pneumophila while chlorine and chlorine dioxide were less efficient on co-cultured L. pneumophila. It suggests that these disinfectants should have different modes of action. Finally, our results provide for the first time disinfectant exposure values for Acanthamoeba treatments that might be used as references for disinfection of water systems. PMID:21093012

  10. Resistance to chemical disinfection under conditions of microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchin, George L.

    1998-01-01

    In unit gravity, bacteria and disinfecting resin beads co-sediment to the septum in a fluid processing apparatus (FPA) resulting in effective chemical disinfection. In microgravity bacteria in suspension have access to a larger volume of the FPA because of a lack of sedimentation. Further, when disinfecting resin beads are added to the FPA they also remain in suspension reducing their effective concentration. Typically, therefore, disinfection experiments in microgravity return larger numbers of viable bacteria than ground-based controls. Preliminary experiments aboard the MIR Space Station with Pseudomonas aeruginosa additionally suggest that the longer bacteria are retained in microgravity the more resistant they become to chemical disinfection. This phenomenon is probably due to additional time to develop resistant biofilms on the interior of the FPA. To partially solve these problems we have developed additional disinfecting materials to use in conjunction with polyiodide containing resin beads. One of these materials carbon beads coated with 3-trimethoxy silylpropyl dimethyloctadecyl ammonium chloride (Dow-Corning 5700®), acts synergistically with polyiodide resin disinfectants. Carbon beads so treated are still able to remove aqueous iodine from the water stream while providing an additional level of chemical disinfection. This additional capability prevents contamination of the carbon beads with heterotrophic bacteria and insures that bacteria surviving iodine disinfection are efficiently devitalized.

  11. Efficacy comparisons of disinfectants used by the commercial poultry industry.

    PubMed

    Ruano, M; El-Attrache, J; Villegas, P

    2001-01-01

    Several commercially available disinfectants used by the poultry industry were evaluated for their effectiveness against selected bacteria and viruses. When tested in the absence of organic matter, most disinfectant products were effective at the manufacturer's recommended level within 10 min of contact time. However, when organic matter was present, longer contact times and/or higher disinfectant dosages were needed to maintain effectiveness. Pseudomona aeruginosa and infectious laryngotracheitis virus were very resistant organisms in the presence of organic matter. Evaluation of disinfectant efficacy against several microbials in the absence or presence of organic matter was highly practical, flexible, and reproducible. PMID:11785901

  12. Effectiveness of various chemical disinfectants versus cleaning combined with heat disinfection on Pseudomonas biofilm in hemodialysis machines.

    PubMed

    Holmes, C J; Degremont, A; Kubey, W; Straka, P; Man, N K

    2004-01-01

    The development of bacterial biofilms in the hydraulic circuit of hemodialysis machines is routinely prevented by frequent use of a variety of chemical and heat disinfection strategies. This study compared the effectiveness of several chemical disinfectants, commonly used either alone or in combination with a treatment regimen that involved cleaning plus heat disinfection using an in vitro Pseudomonas biofilm model. Effectiveness of these procedures was evaluated using total and viable biomass quantitation and polysaccharide and endotoxin determination. The chemical disinfection procedures were only partially successful in removing all biofilm components. Heat disinfection alone killed viable biofilm bacteria, but did not remove all the biomass components, including endotoxin. The combination of cleaning with citric acid followed by heat disinfection was the most effective in eliminating all biofilm components from the hydraulic circuit of the in vitro model. PMID:15359105

  13. Journey of water in pine cones

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kahye; Yeom, Eunseop; Seo, Seung-Jun; Kim, Kiwoong; Kim, Hyejeong; Lim, Jae-Hong; Joon Lee, Sang

    2015-01-01

    Pine cones fold their scales when it rains to prevent seeds from short-distance dispersal. Given that the scales of pine cones consist of nothing but dead cells, this folding motion is evidently related to structural changes. In this study, the structural characteristics of pine cones are studied on micro-/macro-scale using various imaging instruments. Raindrops fall along the outer scales to the three layers (bract scales, fibers and innermost lignified structure) of inner pine cones. However, not all the layers but only the bract scales get wet and then, most raindrops move to the inner scales. These systems reduce the amount of water used and minimize the time spent on structural changes. The result shows that the pine cones have structural advantages that could influence the efficient motion of pine cones. This study provides new insights to understand the motion of pine cones and would be used to design a novel water transport system. PMID:25944117

  14. Amoebicidal activity of a preserved contact lens multipurpose disinfecting solution compared to a disinfection/neutralisation peroxide system.

    PubMed

    Buck, S L; Rosenthal, R A; Abshire, R L

    1998-01-01

    The amoebicidal activity of a contact lens multipurpose disinfecting solution (MPDS) containing polyquaternium-1 and myristamidopropyl dimethylamine was compared to a disinfection/neutralisation peroxide system against Acanthamoeba castellanii and Acanthamoeba polyphaga trophozoites and cysts. A quantitative microtitre method was used to evaluate the solutions. The MPDS showed similar amoebicidal activity to the disinfection/neutralisation peroxide system against the trophozoites of both species and equal or more rapid activity against the cysts of both species. PMID:16303382

  15. Light-cone matrix product

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, M. B.

    2009-09-15

    We show how to combine the light-cone and matrix product algorithms to simulate quantum systems far from equilibrium for long times. For the case of the XXZ spin chain at {delta}=0.5, we simulate to a time of {approx_equal}22.5. While part of the long simulation time is due to the use of the light-cone method, we also describe a modification of the infinite time-evolving bond decimation algorithm with improved numerical stability, and we describe how to incorporate symmetry into this algorithm. While statistical sampling error means that we are not yet able to make a definite statement, the behavior of the simulation at long times indicates the appearance of either 'revivals' in the order parameter as predicted by Hastings and Levitov (e-print arXiv:0806.4283) or of a distinct shoulder in the decay of the order parameter.

  16. Cardiac cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Manzke, Robert . E-mail: robert.manzke@philips.com

    2005-10-15

    This doctoral thesis addresses imaging of the heart with retrospectively gated helical cone-beam computed tomography (CT). A thorough review of the CT reconstruction literature is presented in combination with a historic overview of cardiac CT imaging and a brief introduction to other cardiac imaging modalities. The thesis includes a comprehensive chapter about the theory of CT reconstruction, familiarizing the reader with the problem of cone-beam reconstruction. The anatomic and dynamic properties of the heart are outlined and techniques to derive the gating information are reviewed. With the extended cardiac reconstruction (ECR) framework, a new approach is presented for the heart-rate-adaptive gated helical cardiac cone-beam CT reconstruction. Reconstruction assessment criteria such as the temporal resolution, the homogeneity in terms of the cardiac phase, and the smoothness at cycle-to-cycle transitions are developed. Several reconstruction optimization approaches are described: An approach for the heart-rate-adaptive optimization of the temporal resolution is presented. Streak artifacts at cycle-to-cycle transitions can be minimized by using an improved cardiac weighting scheme. The optimal quiescent cardiac phase for the reconstruction can be determined automatically with the motion map technique. Results for all optimization procedures applied to ECR are presented and discussed based on patient and phantom data. The ECR algorithm is analyzed for larger detector arrays of future cone-beam systems throughout an extensive simulation study based on a four-dimensional cardiac CT phantom. The results of the scientific work are summarized and an outlook proposing future directions is given. The presented thesis is available for public download at www.cardiac-ct.net.

  17. Inside the cone of protection

    SciTech Connect

    Stahmann, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    Although lightning cones of protection and cones of attraction have been used for over 100 years, much confusion still remains as to their effectiveness, particularly as applied to personnel protection. At Kennedy Space Center, a 1:1 cone of protection with a straight side is standard for structure or equipment protection. However, at the launch pad, where a 400-foot lightning lightning rod on top of an insulating mast is used for pad lightning protection, the idea developed that personnel within a 400-foot radius of this mast would be safe from lightning and those outside it would not. Since it is obvious that a person 395 feet (120.4 m.) from the mast is only slightly safer than one at 405 feet (123.5 m.), an investigation was initiated to calculate the probabilities of a person being struck by lightning as he moves closer to the mast inside the cone of protection. Since the risk does not go to zero outside the structure, the risk level can then be estimated. To arrive at the expected strike frequency, it was necessary to measure the strike frequencies at KSC. Krider and others have found a mean area density of cloud-to-ground lightning at KSC of about 4.6 + or - 3.1 flashes per sq km per month in the summer. An overall frequency is estimated as about 20 flashes per sq km per year. With these data, the risk of exposure at various distances from the lightning mast can be calculated. Assuming continuous exposure during thunderstorms, this risk varies from about one strike per person in 1,400 years near the tower to one stroke per person in 300 years at about 400 foot (122 m.).

  18. An evaluation of drinking water samples treated with alternative disinfectants

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, K.S.; Lykins, B.W. Jr.; Garner, L.M.

    1995-10-01

    Due to concern over potential human health risks associated with the use of chlorine (Cl{sub 2}) for disinfection of drinking water, many utilities are considering alternative disinfectants. An evaluation is thus needed of the potential risks associated with the use of alternative disinfectants relative to those posed by Cl{sub 2}. At a pilot-scale drinking water plant in Jefferson Parish, LA., two studies were conducted in which clarified and sand filtered Mississippi River water was treated with either ozone (O{sub 3}), monochloramine (NH{sub 2}Cl), Cl{sub 2} or was not disinfected. Ozonated water was also post-disinfected with either NH{sub 2}Cl or Cl{sub 2}, to provide a disinfectant residual. For each treatment stream total organic carbon (TOC), total organic halide (TOX) and microbiological contaminants were determined. XAD resin concentrates were also prepared for mutagenicity testing in the Ames Salmonella assay. Water samples disinfected with O{sub 3} alone had low levels of mutagenic activity, the same as the non-disinfected water. The level of mutagenicity observed following chlorination was approximately twice that observed following treatment with NH{sub 2}Cl. Disinfection with O{sub 3} prior to treatment with either Cl{sub 2} or NH{sub 2}Cl resulted in a significantly lower level of mutagenicity than when either disinfectant was used alone. The concentrations of TOX present in the water samples showed a pattern similar to that of the mutagenicity data. The levels of TOC, by contrast, were similar for all the treatment streams. No significant baterial contamination was observed in water samples treated with either Cl{sub 2} or NH{sub 2}Cl alone or in combination with O{sub 3}, as determined by heterotrophic plate counts. However, O{sub 3} alone did not insure an acceptable level of disinfection at the end of the treatment stream.

  19. Bursting the Taylor cone bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zhao; Truscott, Tadd

    2014-11-01

    A soap bubble fixed on a surface and placed in an electric field will take on the shape of a cone rather than constant curvature (dome) when the electrical field is not present. The phenomenon was introduced by J. Zeleny (1917) and studied extensively by C.T. Wilson & G.I. Taylor (1925). We revisit the Taylor cone problem by studying the deformation and bursting of soap bubbles in a point charge electric field. A single bubble takes on the shape of a cone in the electric field and a high-speed camera equipped with a micro-lens is used to observe the unsteady dynamics at the tip. Rupture occurs as a very small piece of the tip is torn away from the bubble toward the point charge. Based on experiments, a theoretical model is developed that predicts when rupture should occur. This study may help in the design of foam-removal techniques in engineering and provide a better understanding of an electrified air-liquid interface.

  20. Prescriptionless light-cone integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, A. T.; Schmidt, A. G. M.

    2000-01-01

    Perturbative quantum gauge field theory as seen within the perspective of physical gauge choices such as the light-cone gauge entails the emergence of troublesome poles of the type (k\\cdot n)^{-α} in the Feynman integrals. These come from the boson field propagator, where α = 1,2,\\cdots and n^{μ} is the external arbitrary four-vector that defines the gauge proper. This becomes an additional hurdle in the computation of Feynman diagrams, since any graph containing internal boson lines will inevitably produce integrands with denominators bearing the characteristic gauge-fixing factor. How one deals with them has been the subject of research over decades, and several prescriptions have been suggested and tried in the course of time, with failures and successes. However, a more recent development at this fronteer which applies the negative dimensional technique to compute light-cone Feynman integrals shows that we can altogether dispense with prescriptions to perform the calculations. An additional bonus comes to us attached to this new technique, in that not only it renders the light-cone prescriptionless but, by the very nature of it, it can also dispense with decomposition formulas or partial fractioning tricks used in the standard approach to separate pole products of the type (k\\cdot n)^{-α}[(k-p)\\cdot n]^{-β} (β = 1,2,\\cdots ). In this work we demonstrate how all this can be done.

  1. Light-cone quantization of quantum chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J. ); Pauli, H.C. )

    1991-06-01

    We discuss the light-cone quantization of gauge theories from two perspectives: as a calculational tool for representing hadrons as QCD bound-states of relativistic quarks and gluons, and also as a novel method for simulating quantum field theory on a computer. The light-cone Fock state expansion of wavefunctions at fixed light cone time provides a precise definition of the parton model and a general calculus for hadronic matrix elements. We present several new applications of light-cone Fock methods, including calculations of exclusive weak decays of heavy hadrons, and intrinsic heavy-quark contributions to structure functions. A general nonperturbative method for numerically solving quantum field theories, discretized light-cone quantization,'' is outlined and applied to several gauge theories, including QCD in one space and one time dimension, and quantum electrodynamics in physical space-time at large coupling strength. The DLCQ method is invariant under the large class of light-cone Lorentz transformations, and it can be formulated such at ultraviolet regularization is independent of the momentum space discretization. Both the bound-state spectrum and the corresponding relativistic light-cone wavefunctions can be obtained by matrix diagonalization and related techniques. We also discuss the construction of the light-cone Fock basis, the structure of the light-cone vacuum, and outline the renormalization techniques required for solving gauge theories within the light-cone Hamiltonian formalism.

  2. 9 CFR 71.11 - Cresylic disinfectant as permitted disinfectant; specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... disinfectant for use under the provisions of § 71.10(b)(3): (a) The product shall remain a uniform liquid when... than the equivalent of 0.5 percent of sodium hydroxide, and not less than 21 percent of soap exclusive... glyceride, fat acid, or resin acid may be used in preparing the soap, but not all are suitable nor are...

  3. 9 CFR 71.11 - Cresylic disinfectant as permitted disinfectant; specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... disinfectant for use under the provisions of § 71.10(b)(3): (a) The product shall remain a uniform liquid when... than the equivalent of 0.5 percent of sodium hydroxide, and not less than 21 percent of soap exclusive... glyceride, fat acid, or resin acid may be used in preparing the soap, but not all are suitable nor are...

  4. 9 CFR 71.11 - Cresylic disinfectant as permitted disinfectant; specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... disinfectant for use under the provisions of § 71.10(b)(3): (a) The product shall remain a uniform liquid when... than the equivalent of 0.5 percent of sodium hydroxide, and not less than 21 percent of soap exclusive... glyceride, fat acid, or resin acid may be used in preparing the soap, but not all are suitable nor are...

  5. TRIBROMOPYRROLE, BROMINATED ACIDS, AND OTHER DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS PRODUCED BY DISINFECTION OF DRINKING WATER RICH IN BROMIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), we investigated the formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) from high bromide waters (2 mg/L) treated with chlorine or chlorine dioxide used in combination with chlorine and chloramines. This study represents the first comp...

  6. Drinking water and health: Disinfectants and disinfectant by-products. Volume 7

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    Studies of the toxicity of the by-products of disinfectants have focused on the trihalomethanes (THMs), which are formed during chlorination and for which considerable data on carcinogenicity have been developed. The level of total THMs in finished drinking water, currently regulated at 100 micrograms/L, should be reduced. Noting that chloroform is the principal THM produced by chlorination, the subcommittee found this level to be unsupportable on the basis of the risk values for chloroform developed in this review. Other, non-volatile by-products of chlorination may be important in contributing mutagenic properties to drinking water, especially when the natural water being treated contains high levels of organic matter. Short-term animal skin tests, although not conclusive, provide indications that organic concentrates from chlorinated water are tumorigenic under some experimental conditions. Unfortunately, many by-products of chlorination and other disinfection practices have not been identified. Consequently, the risks of ingesting cannot be quantified at present, but are potentially high enough to warrant continued efforts to analyze them. The use of alternative methods of drinking water disinfection is increasing, largely due to health and regulatory concerns about trihalomethanes. Thus, the nature and toxicity of the by-products of some other widely used water treatments (chloramination, ozonation, and chlorine dioxide) are also evaluated in the report to the extent allowed by available data. The subcommittee calculated quantitative risk assessment for disinfectants or their by-products when there was sufficient data.

  7. Comparing irradiation parameters on disinfecting enterrecoccus faecalis in root canal disinfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarp, Ayşe. S.; Gülsoy, Murat

    2016-02-01

    Although conventional method carries all the debris, studies on persisting infections in root canals show bacteria and their toxins spread from the root canal and contaminate the apical region. Thus developes apical periodontitis or symptoms, and loss of tooth. Even if the treatment has adequate success, anatomy of root canal system can be very complexwith accessory canals. The disinfecting effect of laser radiation has only recently been used in dentistry. Laser irradiation has a bactericidal effect. Each wavelength has its own advantages and limitations according to their different absorption characteristics, depending on their 'absorption coefficient'. The sterilizing efficiency of two types of wavelengths, a new fiber laser 1940- nm Thulium fiber Laser and an 2940 nm Er:YAG Laser were compared in this study. Irradiation with a power of 0.50 W with 1940- nm Thulium fiber Laser disinfected 95,15% of bacteria, however irradiation with same laser power with Er:YAG Laser caused a reduction of 96,48 %. But there was no significant difference in the disinfection effect of two different laser groups ( p < 0.05, Mann- U-Whitney Test). In addition to this, Er :YAG Laser caused three times more reduction from its own positive control group where 1940- nm Thulium fiber Laser caused 2,5 times effective disinfection.

  8. MUTAGENICITY AND DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN SURFACE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTED WITH PERACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aims of this research were to study the influence of peracetic acid (PAA) on the formation of mutagens in surface waters used for human consumption and to assess its potential application for the disinfection of drinking water. The results obtained using PAA were compared to ...

  9. Fundamental conical defects: The d-cone, its e-cone, and its p-cone.

    PubMed

    Seffen, Keith A

    2016-07-01

    We consider well-known surface disclinations by cutting, joining, and folding pieces of paper card. The resulting shapes have a discrete, folded vertex whose geometry is described easily by Gauss's mapping, in particular, we can relate the degree of angular excess, or deficit, to the size of fold line rotations by the area enclosed by the vector diagram of these rotations. This is well known for the case of a so-called "d-cone" of zero angular deficit, and we formulate the same for a general disclination. This method allows us to observe kinematic properties in a meaningful way without needing to consider equilibrium. Importantly, the simple vector nature of our analysis shows that some disclinations are primitive; and that other types, such as d-cones, are amalgamations of them. PMID:27575208

  10. ALTERNATIVE OXIDANT AND DISINFECTANT TREATMENT STRATEGIES FOR CONTROLLING TRIHALOMETHANE FORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    To comply with the maximum contaminant level (MCL) for total trihalomethanes (TTHM), many utilities have modified their pre-oxidation and disinfection practices by switching to alternative oxidants and disinfectants in place of free chlorine. To evaluate the impact of these chang...

  11. [Scanning electron microscope study of chemically disinfected endodontic files].

    PubMed

    Navarro, G; Mateos, M; Navarro, J L; Canalda, C

    1991-01-01

    Forty stainless steel endodontic files were observed at scanning electron microscopy after being subjected to ten disinfection cycles of 10 minutes each one, immersed in different chemical disinfectants. Corrosion was not observed on the surface of the files in circumstances that this study was made. PMID:1659857

  12. Drowning in Disinfection Byproducts? Swimming Pool Water Quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfection is mandatory for swimming pools, because transmission of disease by bacteria, virus and protozoa is the most significant health issue. However another issue arises, and care should be taken to minimize the risks from disinfection by-products (DBPs). Public pools are ...

  13. IDENTIFICATION OF DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN SWIMMING POOL WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to kill harmful pathogens, swimming pool water is treated with a disinfectant, such as chlorine or ozone. One of the most commonly used disinfectants is stabilized chlorine (typically trichloro-S-triazinetrione). Trichloro-S-triazinetrione reacts in water to form one m...

  14. Products identified at an alternative disinfection pilot plant

    SciTech Connect

    Lykins, B.W. Jr.; Koffskey, W.

    1986-11-01

    Many drinking water utilities have recently changed or are seriously considering changing their disinfection practice from chlorine to some alternative treatment process. However, most of these utilities are changing their disinfectants without evaluating chemical impacts. Therefore, a research cooperative agreement was developed with Jefferson Parish, LA, to evaluate four parallel streams treated with four different disinfectants (chlorine, monochloramine, chlorine dioxide, and ozone.) These streams, along with a fifth parallel stream, which was not treated with a disinfectant (control), were passed through both sand and granular activated carbon (GAC). Ozonation reduced the total organic carbon (TOC) and total organic halide (TOX) concentration by 0.3 mg/L and 10 micrograms/L, respectively. The average concentration of TOC for the other disinfectants was comparable to that associated with the nondisinfected stream (3.3 mg/L). The average instantaneous TOX concentration for chlorine dioxide, chloramine, and chlorine disinfection after 30 min contact time increased by 60, 92, and 238 micrograms/L, respectively, from a nondisinfected concentration of 25 micrograms/L. The volatile organics most affected by disinfection (chlorination) were the trihalomethanes. No significant change in concentration was noted after disinfection for the other volatile organics evaluated, such as 1,2-dichlorethane, dichloromethane, trichloroethylene, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, and carbon tetrachloride. Ozonation produced an average concentration reduction of 11 to 84% for most of the nonvolatiles evaluated. Conversely, a concentration increase of 43 to 100% was noted, after chlorination, for some of the nonvolatile organics.

  15. Microbial contamination in sprouts: how effective is seed disinfection treatment?

    PubMed

    Ding, Hongliu; Fu, Tong-Jen; Smith, Michelle A

    2013-04-01

    Microbial contamination of sprouts by Salmonella and Escherichia coli O157 : H7 has been a common cause of foodborne diseases and a continuing challenge to the sprout industry. Seed disinfection treatment has been recommended as a major intervention step in a multihurdle approach to reduce the risk of illness associated with contaminated sprouts. U.S. Food and Drug Administration cited 20000 ppm calcium hypochlorite as an example treatment in its recommendation for seed treatment and this treatment has been considered the reference standard for seed disinfection treatment for over a decade. However, promising new disinfection treatments have emerged in recent years. In this study, we summarized published data and compared the efficacies of different disinfection methods in the reduction of microbial contamination on seeds. Our findings suggest that while biological interventions such as competitive exclusion and certain chemical treatments appear to be similar to 20000 ppm calcium hypochlorite for seed disinfection, physical methods especially high pressure may be more effective than the reference standard regardless of the type of bacteria or seed. The combination of 2 or more treatments, sequentially or simultaneously, may further improve disinfection results. Since treatments with high levels of chemical disinfectants, especially 20000 ppm calcium hypochlorite, can pose environmental and worker safety risks, alternative intervention approaches should be considered. Additional studies to confirm the greater efficacy of certain physical and combined seed disinfection treatments and to identify other effective management strategies are needed to further improve sprout safety. PMID:23464679

  16. Efficacy of chlorine disinfection of soft contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, J T; Kriel, F; van der Merwe, D; Pheiffer, G

    1991-09-01

    We evaluated the chlorine system SOFTAB (Alcon) for the disinfection of soft contact lenses. The results indicate that a 1000-fold reduction in microorganisms was achieved within 6 h. Even with the slight interference of residual cleaner and the more significant interference of organic matter disinfection was still achieved. PMID:1745498

  17. 9 CFR 51.31 - Disinfecting premises, conveyances, and materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ANIMALS DESTROYED BECAUSE OF BRUCELLOSIS Indemnity for Sheep, Goats, and Horses § 51.31 Disinfecting... brucellosis, must be properly cleaned and disinfected in accordance with recommendations of the APHIS or State... the Veterinarian in Charge determines that an extension will not adversely affect the...

  18. 9 CFR 51.31 - Disinfecting premises, conveyances, and materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ANIMALS DESTROYED BECAUSE OF BRUCELLOSIS Indemnity for Sheep, Goats, and Horses § 51.31 Disinfecting... brucellosis, must be properly cleaned and disinfected in accordance with recommendations of the APHIS or State... the Veterinarian in Charge determines that an extension will not adversely affect the...

  19. Zero-G Condensing Heat Exchanger with Integral Disinfection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Kenneth A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The system that operates in a zero gravity environment and has an integral ozone generating capability is disclosed. The system contributes to the control of metabolic water vapors in the air, and also provided disinfection of any resulting condensate within the system, as well as disinfection of the air stream that flows throughout the disclosed system.

  20. PERFORMANCE OF OZONE AS A DISINFECTANT FOR COMBINED SEWER OVERFLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfection of combined sewer overflow (CSO) minimizes the amount of disease-causing microorganisms (pathogens) released into receiving waters. Currently, the primary disinfecting agent used in the US for wastewater treatment is chlorine (Cl2); however, Cl2 produces problems in ...

  1. The Next Generation of Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disinfection of drinking water has been rightly hailed as a public health triumph of the 20th century. Millions of people worldwide receive quality drinking water every day from their public water systems. However, chemical disinfection has also produced an unintended healt...

  2. HIGH-RATE DISINFECTION TECHNIQUES FOR COMBIND SEWER OVERFLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents high-rate disinfection technologies for combined sewer overflow (CSO). The high-rate disinfection technologies of interest are: chlorination/dechlorination, ultraviolet light irradiation (UV), chlorine dioxide (ClO2 ), ozone (O3), peracetic acid (CH3COOOH )...

  3. Design and bidding of UV disinfection equipment -- Case study

    SciTech Connect

    Akyurek, M.

    1998-07-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) disinfection systems are being widely considered for application to treated wastewaters, in lieu of conventional chlorination facilities. The number of UV systems operating in the US was approximately 50 in 1984. In 1990 there were over 500 systems, a ten-fold increase. The use of UV disinfection has increased since 1990, and will likely to increase in the future. It is anticipated that as many chlorine disinfection facilities reach their useful life, most of them will be replaced with UV disinfection systems. Several manufacturers offer different UV disinfection equipment. Each offers something different for the designer. There are also different approaches used in estimating the number of lamps needed for the disinfection system. The lack of standardization in determination of the number of lamps for a UV system poses problems for the designer. Such was the case during the design of the disinfection system for the Watertown, SD Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWRP). The purpose of this paper is to present a case study for the design and bidding of UV disinfection equipment.

  4. The Next Generation of Disinfection By-Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disinfection of drinking water has been rightly hailed as a public health triumph of the 20th century. Millions of people worldwide receive quality drinking water every day from their public water systems. However, chemical disinfection has also produced an unintended health ...

  5. Disinfection By-Products: Formation and Occurrence in Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disinfection of drinking water has been rightly hailed as a public health triumph of the twentieth century. Millions of people worldwide receive quality drinking water every day from their public water systems. However, chemical disinfection has also produced an unintended he...

  6. Genotoxicity of Disinfection By-products: Comparison to Carcinogenicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfection by-products (DBPs) can be formed when water is disinfected by various agents such as chlorine, ozone, or chloramines. Among the >600 DBPs identified in drinking water, 11 are regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and another ~70 DBPs that occur at s...

  7. 7 CFR 301.89-12 - Cleaning, disinfection, and disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cleaning, disinfection, and disposal. 301.89-12 Section 301.89-12 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Karnal Bunt § 301.89-12 Cleaning, disinfection, and disposal....

  8. New technologies and trends in sterilization and disinfection.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Philip M

    2013-05-01

    Continued improvements in low-temperature sterilization systems have resulted in reduced processing times and expanded capabilities for instrument reprocessing. As the relationship of environmental surface contamination and health care-associated infections has become more defined, area disinfection systems and antimicrobial surface technologies have emerged as new strategies for disinfection of surfaces. PMID:23622756

  9. The alternative methods for disinfection of E. coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yetim, Tuba; Görmez, Arzu; Gürkök, Sümeyra

    2016-04-01

    Recently, advanced oxidation processes have gained significant interest for bacterial inactivation. In the present study, the efficacy of sonolysis, photocatalysis and sonophotocatalysis was evaluated for disinfection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain. Sonophotocatalysis proved to be the most effective disinfection methods by generating greater amount of •OHradical.

  10. CONCERNS WITH USING CHLORINE DIOXIDE DISINFECTION IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a renewed interest in disinfection with chlorine dioxide in the United States because of upcoming Federal regulations on disinfection by-products. ench studies and field applications of chlorine dioxide have shown that it is an effective biocide that does not produce hal...

  11. ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT DISINFECTION OF COMBINED SEWER OVERFLOW (NEW ORLEANS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this state-of-the-art review is to examine the performance and effectiveness of ultraviolet (UV) light disinfection for combined sewer overflow (CSO) applications. Topics presented include the use of UV light as a disinfecting agent, its practical applications, d...

  12. Disinfection of water in recirculating aquaculture systems with peracetic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peracetic acid (PAA) has become a favoured alternative to chlorination in the disinfection of municipal waste water in recent years. It is also commonly used in the food industry as a disinfectant. Based on PAA concentration, the disulfide linkage in enzymes and proteins of microorganisms can be bro...

  13. ERGs, cone-isolating VEPs and analytical techniques in children with cone dysfunction syndromes.

    PubMed

    Kelly, John P; Crognale, Michael A; Weiss, Avery H

    2003-05-01

    Photoreceptor and post-receptoral function in children with congenital and acquired cone disorders was measured by full-field electroretinogram (ERG) and transient visual evoked potentials (VEPs). Subjects were five rod monochromats (RM), five with cone dystrophy (CD), and 30 controls. Patients were diagnosed by clinical findings, ERGs, and standard color vision tests. VEP stimuli were check reversals and color grating onsets that stimulated each photoreceptor type (L-, M-, or S-cones) or post-receptoral pathways (L-M, white/black). VEP signal-to-noise ratios (S/N) were calculated by Fourier analysis of VEP epochs. All RM patients showed extinguished cone ERGs. A near normal S-cone VEP was recorded from a blue-cone rod monochromat without any signal from the L- or M-cone stimuli. Two other RM patients were classified as incomplete RM based on a low-level VEP signal from either L- or M-cone stimuli. CD patients had mildly to severely reduced ERGs and VEPs were abnormal to all cone-isolating stimuli. The VEP S/N ratio was not significantly correlated with the amount of rod contrast in the color stimuli. Color VEPs provide an objective assessment of macular cone function in children with cone dysfunction syndromes that is more sensitive to residual central cone function than standard full-field ERGs. VEP techniques may be useful in the early detection of cone loss in children, especially in children who do not tolerate ERG testing. PMID:12737507

  14. Mutagenic activity of disinfection by-products.

    PubMed Central

    Cognet, L; Courtois, Y; Mallevialle, J

    1986-01-01

    Data on raw water quality, disinfection treatment practices, and the resulting mutagenic properties of the treated water were compiled from pilot- and full-scale treatment experiments to evaluate that parameter which might produce variability in the results of a mutagenic study. Analysis of the data and comparison of treatment practices indicated that the measured mutagenic activity is strongly related to the characteristics of the organic matter in the raw water, the methodology used to sample and detect mutagens, the scale of the study both in terms of treatment flow and period of study, and the point at which and the conditions under which oxidants are added during treatment. Conclusions regarding disinfection systems in full-scale water treatment plants include the following: When raw water is pretreated and high concentrations of organics are present in the raw water, both ozonation and chlorination increased mutagenic activity. However, no significant difference in mutagenicity was found between the two oxidants. Both in the case of a nitrified groundwater and a clarified surface water, the mutagenic activity of the water after ozonation was related to its mutagenic activity before ozonation. With ozonation, mutagenic activity decreased after granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration. Thus, when GAC filtration follows ozone disinfection, early addition of oxidants may not be deleterious to the finished water quality. When chlorine or chlorine dioxide is added after GAC filtration, chlorine dioxide was found to produce a less mutagenic water than chlorine. Although these conclusions suggest means of controlling mutagenic activity during treatment, it must be stressed that the measurement of mutagenicity is a presumptive index of contamination level. PMID:3816721

  15. Effectiveness of Four Disinfectants against Ebola Virus on Different Materials.

    PubMed

    Smither, Sophie; Phelps, Amanda; Eastaugh, Lin; Ngugi, Sarah; O'Brien, Lyn; Dutch, Andrew; Lever, Mark Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The West Africa Ebola virus (EBOV) outbreak has highlighted the need for effective disinfectants capable of reducing viral load in a range of sample types, equipment and settings. Although chlorine-based products are widely used, they can also be damaging to equipment or apparatus that needs continuous use such as aircraft use for transportation of infected people. Two aircraft cleaning solutions were assessed alongside two common laboratory disinfectants in a contact kill assay with EBOV on two aircraft relevant materials representative of a porous and non-porous surface. A decimal log reduction of viral titre of 4 is required for a disinfectant to be deemed effective and two of the disinfectants fulfilled this criteria under the conditions tested. One product, Ardrox 6092, was found to perform similarly to sodium hypochlorite, but as it does not have the corrosive properties of sodium hypochlorite, it could be an alternative disinfectant solution to be used for decontamination of EBOV on sensitive apparatus. PMID:27399759

  16. Exposure to common quaternary ammonium disinfectants decreases fertility in mice

    PubMed Central

    Melin, Vanessa E.; Potineni, Haritha; Hunt, Patricia; Griswold, Jodi; Siems, Bill; Werre, Stephen R.; Hrubec, Terry C.

    2014-01-01

    Quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) are antimicrobial disinfectants commonly used in commercial and household settings. Extensive use of QACs results in ubiquitous human exposure, yet reproductive toxicity has not been evaluated. Decreased reproductive performance in laboratory mice coincided with the introduction of a disinfectant containing both alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride (ADBAC) and didecyl dimethyl ammonium chloride (DDAC). QACs were detected in caging material over a period of several months following cessation of disinfectant use. Breeding pairs exposed for six months to a QAC disinfectant exhibited decreases in fertility and fecundity: increased time to first litter, longer pregnancy intervals, fewer pups per litter and fewer pregnancies. Significant morbidity in near term dams was also observed. In summary, exposure to a common QAC disinfectant mixture significantly impaired reproductive health in mice. This study illustrates the importance of assessing mixture toxicity of commonly used products whose components have only been evaluated individually. PMID:25483128

  17. Effectiveness of Four Disinfectants against Ebola Virus on Different Materials

    PubMed Central

    Smither, Sophie; Phelps, Amanda; Eastaugh, Lin; Ngugi, Sarah; O’Brien, Lyn; Dutch, Andrew; Lever, Mark Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The West Africa Ebola virus (EBOV) outbreak has highlighted the need for effective disinfectants capable of reducing viral load in a range of sample types, equipment and settings. Although chlorine-based products are widely used, they can also be damaging to equipment or apparatus that needs continuous use such as aircraft use for transportation of infected people. Two aircraft cleaning solutions were assessed alongside two common laboratory disinfectants in a contact kill assay with EBOV on two aircraft relevant materials representative of a porous and non-porous surface. A decimal log reduction of viral titre of 4 is required for a disinfectant to be deemed effective and two of the disinfectants fulfilled this criteria under the conditions tested. One product, Ardrox 6092, was found to perform similarly to sodium hypochlorite, but as it does not have the corrosive properties of sodium hypochlorite, it could be an alternative disinfectant solution to be used for decontamination of EBOV on sensitive apparatus. PMID:27399759

  18. Recent advances in drinking water disinfection: successes and challenges.

    PubMed

    Ngwenya, Nonhlanhla; Ncube, Esper J; Parsons, James

    2013-01-01

    Drinking water is the most important single source of human exposure to gastroenteric diseases, mainly as a result of the ingestion of microbial contaminated water. Waterborne microbial agents that pose a health risk to humans include enteropathogenic bacteria, viruses, and protozoa. Therefore, properly assessing whether these hazardous agents enter drinking water supplies, and if they do, whether they are disinfected adequately, are undoubtedly aspects critical to protecting public health. As new pathogens emerge, monitoring for relevant indicator microorganisms (e.g., process microbial indicators, fecal indicators, and index and model organisms) is crucial to ensuring drinking water safety. Another crucially important step to maintaining public health is implementing Water Safety Plans (WSPs), as is recommended by the current WHO Guidelines for Drinking Water Quality. Good WSPs include creating health-based targets that aim to reduce microbial risks and adverse health effects to which a population is exposed through drinking water. The use of disinfectants to inactivate microbial pathogens in drinking water has played a central role in reducing the incidence of waterborne diseases and is considered to be among the most successful interventions for preserving and promoting public health. Chlorine-based disinfectants are the most commonly used disinfectants and are cheap and easy to use. Free chlorine is an effective disinfectant for bacteria and viruses; however, it is not always effective against C. parvum and G. lamblia. Another limitation of using chlorination is that it produces disinfection by-products (DBPs), which pose potential health risks of their own. Currently, most drinking water regulations aggressively address DBP problems in public water distribution systems. The DBPs of most concern include the trihalomethanes (THMs), the haloacetic acids (HAAs), bromate, and chlorite. However, in the latest edition of the WHO Guidelines for Drinking Water Quality

  19. UV disinfection pilot plant study at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Huffines, R.L.; Beavers, B.A.

    1993-01-01

    An ultraviolet light disinfection system pilot plant was operated at the Savannah River Site Central Shops sanitary wastewater treatment package plant July 14, 1992 through August 13, 1992. The purpose was to determine the effectiveness of ultraviolet light disinfection on the effluent from the small package-type wastewater treatment plants currently used on-site. This pilot plant consisted of a rack of UV lights suspended in a stainless steel channel through which a sidestream of effluent from the treatment plant clarifier was pumped. Fecal coliform analyses were performed on the influent to and effluent from the pilot unit to verify the disinfection process. UV disinfection was highly effective in reducing fecal coliform colonies within NPDES permit limitations even under process upset conditions. The average fecal coliform reduction exceeded 99.7% using ultraviolet light disinfection under normal operating conditions at the package treatment plants.

  20. UV disinfection pilot plant study at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Huffines, R.L.; Beavers, B.A.

    1993-05-01

    An ultraviolet light disinfection system pilot plant was operated at the Savannah River Site Central Shops sanitary wastewater treatment package plant July 14, 1992 through August 13, 1992. The purpose was to determine the effectiveness of ultraviolet light disinfection on the effluent from the small package-type wastewater treatment plants currently used on-site. This pilot plant consisted of a rack of UV lights suspended in a stainless steel channel through which a sidestream of effluent from the treatment plant clarifier was pumped. Fecal coliform analyses were performed on the influent to and effluent from the pilot unit to verify the disinfection process. UV disinfection was highly effective in reducing fecal coliform colonies within NPDES permit limitations even under process upset conditions. The average fecal coliform reduction exceeded 99.7% using ultraviolet light disinfection under normal operating conditions at the package treatment plants.

  1. Impact of disinfection on drinking water biofilm bacterial community.

    PubMed

    Mi, Zilong; Dai, Yu; Xie, Shuguang; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Xiaojian

    2015-11-01

    Disinfectants are commonly applied to control the growth of microorganisms in drinking water distribution systems. However, the effect of disinfection on drinking water microbial community remains poorly understood. The present study investigated the impacts of different disinfectants (chlorine and chloramine) and dosages on biofilm bacterial community in bench-scale pipe section reactors. Illumina MiSeq sequencing illustrated that disinfection strategy could affect both bacterial diversity and community structure of drinking water biofilm. Proteobacteria tended to predominate in chloraminated drinking water biofilms, while Firmicutes in chlorinated and unchlorinated biofilms. The major proteobacterial groups were influenced by both disinfectant type and dosage. In addition, chloramination had a more profound impact on bacterial community than chlorination. PMID:26574105

  2. Isolating prompt photons with narrow cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catani, S.; Fontannaz, M.; Guillet, J. Ph.; Pilon, E.

    2013-09-01

    We discuss the isolation of prompt photons in hadronic collisions by means of narrow isolation cones and the QCD computation of the corresponding cross sections. We reconsider the occurence of large perturbative terms with logarithmic dependence on the cone size and their impact on the fragmentation scale dependence. We cure the apparent perturbative violation of unitarity for small cone sizes, which had been noticed earlier in next-to-leading-order (NLO) calculations, by resumming the leading logarithmic dependence on the cone size. We discuss possible implications regarding the implementation of some hollow cone variants of the cone criterion, which simulate the experimental difficulty to impose isolation inside the region filled by the electromagnetic shower that develops in the calorimeter.

  3. Regenerable Iodine Water-Disinfection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, Richard L.; Colombo, Gerald V.; Jolly, Clifford D.

    1994-01-01

    Iodinated resin bed for disinfecting water regenerated to extend its useful life. Water flows through regeneration bed of crystalline iodine during regeneration. At other times, flow diverted around regeneration bed. Although regeneration cycle was manually controlled in demonstration, readily automated to start and stop according to signals and stop according to signals from concentration sensors. Further benefit of regeneration is that regeneration bed provides highly concentrated biocide source (200 mg/L) when needed. Concentrated biocide used to superiodinate system after contamination from routine maintenance or unexpected introduction of large concentration of microbes.

  4. 21 CFR 874.4770 - Otoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR... device intended to allow inspection of the external ear canal and tympanic membrane under magnification. The device provides illumination of the ear canal for observation by using an AC- or...

  5. 21 CFR 874.4770 - Otoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR... device intended to allow inspection of the external ear canal and tympanic membrane under magnification. The device provides illumination of the ear canal for observation by using an AC- or...

  6. 21 CFR 874.4770 - Otoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR... device intended to allow inspection of the external ear canal and tympanic membrane under magnification. The device provides illumination of the ear canal for observation by using an AC- or...

  7. 21 CFR 874.4770 - Otoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR... device intended to allow inspection of the external ear canal and tympanic membrane under magnification. The device provides illumination of the ear canal for observation by using an AC- or...

  8. 21 CFR 874.4770 - Otoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR... device intended to allow inspection of the external ear canal and tympanic membrane under magnification. The device provides illumination of the ear canal for observation by using an AC- or...

  9. The role of surface disinfection in infection prevention

    PubMed Central

    Gebel, Jürgen; Exner, Martin; French, Gary; Chartier, Yves; Christiansen, Bärbel; Gemein, Stefanie; Goroncy-Bermes, Peter; Hartemann, Philippe; Heudorf, Ursel; Kramer, Axel; Maillard, Jean-Yves; Oltmanns, Peter; Rotter, Manfred; Sonntag, Hans-Günther

    2013-01-01

    Background: The Rudolf Schuelke Foundation addresses topics related to hygiene, infection prevention and public health. In this context a panel of scientists from various European countries discussed “The Role of Surface Disinfection in Infection Prevention”. The most important findings and conclusions of this meeting are summarised in the present consensus paper. Aim: Although the relevance of surface disinfection is increasingly being accepted, there are still a number of issues which remain controversial. In particular, the following topics were addressed: Transferral of microbes from surface to patients as a cause of infection, requirements for surface disinfectants, biocidal resistance and toxicity, future challenges. Methods and findings: After discussion and review of current scientific literature the authors agreed that contaminated surfaces contribute to the transmission of pathogens and may thus pose an infection hazard. Targeted surface disinfection based on a risk profile is seen as an indispensable constituent in a multibarrier approach of universal infection control precautions. Resistance and cross-resistance depend on the disinfectant agent as well as on the microbial species. Prudent implementation of surface disinfection regimens tested to be effective can prevent or minimize adverse effects. Conclusions: Disinfection must be viewed as a holistic process. There is a need for defining standard principles for cleaning and disinfection, for ensuring compliance with these principles by measures such as written standard operating procedures, adequate training and suitable audit systems. Also, test procedures must be set up in order to demonstrate the efficacy of disinfectants including new application methods such as pre-soaked wipes for surface disinfection. PMID:23967396

  10. Routine disinfection of the total dialysis fluid system.

    PubMed

    Gorke, A; Kittel, J

    2002-01-01

    The importance of bacteria and endotoxin free, sterile dialysis fluid for long term, high quality haemodialysis treatment is obvious and very much demanded (1,2). Dead spaces and connections between units (segments) of fluid production and delivery in elder systems are a continuous source for bacteria growth, biofilm generation and endotoxin release (3). After varying success with routine disinfection of system components showing partly fast recovery and growth of bacteria (i.e. < 48 hours) we changed to routine disinfection of the entire fluid production and distribution system. We call this'system disinfection'. We report the methods and results from observation of practice over 28 months of disinfection. The fluid system is composed of a soft water tank, reverse osmosis (double RO), RO fluid loop, central bicarbonate production and delivery system and dialysis stations with and without ultrafilter and citric-thermal disinfection before and after each haemodialysis. The system disinfection is carried out bimonthly with peracetic acid 3.5% in > 0.1% solution at a mean temperature of > 15 degrees C and at a minimum of 60 minutes of disinfection time. Samples for microbiological testing and endotoxin measurement were assessed 3-4 monthly at 7 measurement points. The tests were carried out 7 times on the 11th day (mean value [MV]) after routine system disinfection. The result was in 0.2 CFU/ml (MV) in 40 tests. The endotoxin levels (IU/L) were all < 0.25 except one at 0.325 in RO water. Endotoxin was assessed 5 times in 26 tests over 28 months. Samples were taken at 10.5 (MV) days after system disinfection. The Gel Clot or turbometric method was used. Efficient and preventive routine system disinfection of an entire dialysis fluid production and distribution system as standard in modern equipment - can support sufficient quality in dialysis fluid produced and distributed by elder and composed systems. PMID:12371736