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Sample records for outburst thermonuclear runaways

  1. Thermonuclear runaways in nova outbursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankar, Anurag; Arnett, David; Fryxell, Bruce A.

    1992-01-01

    Results of exploratory, two-dimensional numerical calculations of a local thermonuclear runaway on the surface of a white dwarf are reported. It is found that the energy released by the runaway can induce a significant amount of vorticity near the burning region. Such mass motions account naturally for mixing of core matter into the envelope during the explosion. A new mechanism for the lateral spread of nuclear burning is also discussed.

  2. The Thermonuclear Runaway and the Classical Nova Outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starrfield, S.; Iliadis, C.; Hix, W. R.

    2016-05-01

    Nova explosions occur on the white dwarf component of a cataclysmic variable binary stellar system that is accreting matter lost by its companion. When sufficient material has been accreted by the white dwarf, a thermonuclear runaway occurs and ejects material in what is observed as a classical nova explosion. We describe both the recent advances in our understanding of the progress of the outburst and outline some of the puzzles that are still outstanding. We report on the effects of improving both the nuclear reaction rate library and including a modern nuclear reaction network in our one-dimensional, fully implicit, hydrodynamic computer code. In addition, there has been progress in observational studies of supernovae Ia with implications about the progenitors, and we discuss that in this review.

  3. The Nova Outburst: Thermonuclear Runaways on Degenerated Dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Starrfield, S.; Truran, J.W.; Sparks, W.M.

    1999-07-08

    Observational and theoretical studies of the outbursts of classical novae have provided critical insights into a broad range of astrophysical phenomena. Thermonuclear runaways (TNRs) in accreted hydrogen-rich envelopes on the white dwarf (WD) components of close binary systems constitute not only the outburst mechanism for a classical nova explosion, but also the recurrent novae and a fraction of the symbiotic novae explosions. Studies of the general characteristics of these explosions, both in our own galaxy and in neighboring galaxies of varying metallicity, can teach us about binary stellar evolution, while studies of the evolution of nova binary systems can constrain models for the (as yet unidentified) progenitors of Type Ia supernovae. Further, the empirical relation between the peak luminosity of a nova and the rate of decline, which presents a challenge to theoretical models, allows novae to be utilized as standard candles for distance determinations out to the Virgo Cluster. E xtensive studies of novae with IUE and the resulting abundance determinations have revealed the existence of oxygen-neon white dwarfs in some systems. The high levels of enrichment of novae ejecta in elements ranging from carbon to sulfur confirm that there is significant dredge-up of matter from the core of the underlying white dwarf and enable novae to contribute to the chemical enrichment of the interstellar medium. Observations of the epoch of dust formation in the expanding shells of novae allow important constraints to be placed on the dust formation process and confirm that graphite, SiC, and SiO{sub 2} grains are formed by the outburst. It is possible that grains from novae were injected into the pre-solar nebula and can be identified with some of the pre-solar grains or ''stardust'' found in meteorites. Finally, g-ray observations during the first several years of their outburst, using the next generation of satellite observatories, could confirm

  4. A review of the thermonuclear runaway model of a nova outburst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, W. M.; Starrfield, S.; Truran, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Kraft's (1963) model for a nova outburst caused by a thermonuclear runaway in the hydrogen-rich matter accreted onto the white dwarf in a binary system is reviewed. Hydrostatic and hydrodynamic studies of this phenomenon are summarized, analyses of shock ejection based on hydrodynamic computer codes are discussed, and one specific hydrodynamic code is outlined. Results obtained with this code are presented and evaluated for an initial model containing a white dwarf with a hydrogen-rich envelope of 0.0001 to 0.001 solar mass in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium. It is shown that an implicit hydrodynamic computer code is required in order to study the thermonuclear-runaway phenomenon. The early evolution of three models with different intrinsic luminosities is illustrated, and enhancement of CNO nuclei at the bottom of the hydrogen-rich envelope is investigated. It is suggested that the concentration of C-13, N-15, and O-17 should be greatly enhanced in nova ejecta.

  5. Thermonuclear runaways in nova outbursts. 2: Effect of strong, instantaneous, local fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankar, Anurag; Arnett, David

    1994-01-01

    In an attempt to understand the manner in which nova outbursts are initiated on the surface of a white dwarf, we investigate the effects fluctuations have on the evolution of a thermonuclear runaway. Fluctuations in temperature density, or the composition of material in the burning shell may arise due to the chaotic flow field generated by convection when it occurs, or by the accretion process itself. With the aid of two-dimensional reactive flow calculations, we consider cases where a strong fluctutation in temperature arises during the early, quiescent accretion phase or during the later, more dynamic, explosion phase. In all cases we find that an instantaneous, local temperature fluctuation causes the affected material to become Rayleigh-Taylor unstable. The rapid rise and subsequent expansion of matter immediately cools the hot blob, which prevents the lateral propagation of burning. This suggests that local temperature fluctuations do not play a significant role in directly initiating the runaway, especially during the early stages. However, they may provide an efficient mechanism of mixing core material into the envelope (thereby pre-enriching the fuel for subsequent episodes of explosive hydrogen burning) and of mixing substantial amounts of the radioactive nucleus N-13 into the surface layers, making novae potential gamma-ray sources. This suggests that it is the global not the local, evolution of the core-envelope interface to high temperatures which dominates the development of the runaway. We also present a possible new scenario for the initiation of nova outbursts based on our results.

  6. A hydrodynamic study of a slow nova outburst. [computerized simulation of thermonuclear runaway in white dwarf envelope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, W. M.; Starrfield, S.; Truran, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    The paper reports use of a Lagrangian implicit hydrodynamics computer code incorporating a full nuclear-reaction network to follow a thermonuclear runaway in the hydrogen-rich envelope of a 1.25 solar-mass white dwarf. In this evolutionary sequence the envelope was assumed to be of normal (solar) composition and the resulting outburst closely resembles that of the slow nova HR Del. In contrast, previous CNO-enhanced models resemble fast nova outbursts. The slow-nova model ejects material by radiation pressure when the high luminosity of the rekindled hydrogen shell source exceeds the local Eddington luminosity of the outer layers. This is in contrast to the fast nova outburst where ejection is caused by the decay of the beta(+)-unstable nuclei. Nevertheless, radiation pressure probably plays a major role in ejecting material from the fast nova remnants. Therefore, the sequence from slow to fast novae can be interpreted as a sequence of white dwarfs with increasing amounts of enhanced CNO nuclei in their hydrogen envelopes, although other parameters such as the white-dwarf mass and accretion rate probably contribute to the observed variation between novae.

  7. Thermonuclear runaways on neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taam, R. E.; Picklum, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Thermonuclear runaways which develop when neutron stars of 0.476 solar masses accrete hydrogen-rich material at 10 to the -10th and 2 x 10 to the -9th solar masses/year have been followed using a numerical model. It is found that a thermal instability occurs at densities in excess of 10 to the 5th g/cu cm and that the maximum accumulated mass required to initiate the runaway is 0.7 x 10 to the -12th and 2.1 x 10 to the -12th solar masses for the mass accretion rates of 10 to the -10th and 2 x 10 to the -9th solar masses/year, respectively. Heating the of the neutron star envelope by hydrogen burning leads to the ignition of helium. The nonequilibrium burning of helium by a combination of (alpha, p), (p, gamma), and (alpha, gamma) reactions involving O-14, O-15, and other heavy nuclei provides the energy for an X-ray burst. The gross properties of these models bear suggestive resemblance to those observed for some X-ray burst sources.

  8. Local thermonuclear runaways among classical novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orio, Marina; Shaviv, Giora

    1993-04-01

    A classical nova may accrete a nonhomogeneous envelope, which can result in the ignition of a local thermonuclear runaway on the surface of the white dwarf. We studied the propagation of thermal flows along the meridian in the hydrogen rich envelope, to find the conditions under which a thermonuclear runaway is not spherically symmetric. We included mass accretion and tested the effect of temperature inhomogeneities in the secular evolution of the envelope, supposing perturbations with different wavelengths, ranging from very small to comparable with the radius of the white dwarf. The calculations were stopped at the onset of a thermonuclear runaway, when the hydrodynamic expansion starts. We found the ranges of accretion rates and masses of white dwarfs for which the runaway ignites locally. The propagation time of the runaway along the meridian may be as long as days and weeks. 'Local' thermonuclear runaways can explain the asymmetries and inhomogeneities of the nova shells and account for the slow rise time to maximum (about one week) of many novae.

  9. Thermonuclear runaways in thick hydrogen rich envelopes of neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starrfield, S. G.; Kenyon, S.; Truran, J. W.; Sparks, W. M.

    1981-01-01

    A Lagrangian, fully implicit, one dimensional hydrodynamic computer code was used to evolve thermonuclear runaways in the accreted hydrogen rich envelopes of 1.0 Msub solar neutron stars with radii of 10 km and 20 km. Simulations produce outbursts which last from about 750 seconds to about one week. Peak effective temeratures and luninosities were 26 million K and 80 thousand Lsub solar for the 10 km study and 5.3 millison and 600 Lsub solar for the 20 km study. Hydrodynamic expansion on the 10 km neutron star produced a precursor lasting about one ten thousandth seconds.

  10. Thermonuclear runaways in thick hydrogen rich envelopes of neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starrfield, S.; Kenyon, S.; Truran, J. W.; Sparks, W. M.

    1982-01-01

    A Lagrangian, fully implicit, one-dimensional hydrodynamic computer code is used to evolve thermonuclear runaways in the accreted hydrogen-rich envelopes of 1.0-solar-mass neutron stars with radii of 10 km and 20 km. The simulations produce outbursts lasting from approximately 750 seconds to approximately one week. The peak effective temperatures and luminosities are 2.6 x 10 to the 7th K and 8 x 10 to the 4th solar luminosities for the 10 km study and 5.3 x 10 to the 6th K and 600 solar luminosities for the 20 km study. It is found that hydrodynamic expansion on the 10 km neutron star produced a precursor lasting approximately 0.0001 second. The study assumes that the bursters and transient X-ray sources occur as a result of mass transfer from a secondary onto a neutron star in a fashion analogous to the nova phenomena. The peak temperatures and luminosities are found to be inversely proportional to the radius of the neutron stars and the calculations here, together with those in the literature, indicate that the actual radii of most neutron stars must be closer to 10 km than 20 km.

  11. The historical record for Sirius - Evidence for a white-dwarf thermonuclear runaway?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruhweiler, Frederick C.; Kondo, Yoji; Sion, Edward M.

    1986-01-01

    Evidence was recently presented that in medieval times Sirius was a bright red star, rather than the present bluish-white star. Here, the results of attempts to detect possible planetary nebula ejecta toward Sirius using data obtained by the IUE are presented. Based on these results and in the light of recent advances in understanding white-dwarf evolution, it is proposed that Sirius B underwent a recent thermonuclear runaway event triggered by a diffusion-induced CN reaction.

  12. The historical record for Sirius - Evidence for a white-dwarf thermonuclear runaway?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruhweiler, Frederick C.; Kondo, Yoji; Sion, Edward M.

    1986-11-01

    Schlosser and Bergmann (1985) presented evidence that in medieval times Sirius was a bright red star, rather than the present bluish-white star, from which they have suggested that Sirius B is a recently born white dwarf. However, their model poses severe evolutionary problems. The authors present the results of their attempts to detect possible planetary nebula ejecta toward Sirius, using data obtained by the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite. Based upon these results and in the light of recent advances in understanding white-dwarf evolution, the authors propose that Sirius B underwent a recent thermonuclear runaway event, triggered by a diffusion-induced CN reaction, to explain the historical behaviour of this star.

  13. A burst from a thermonuclear runaway on an ONeMg white dwarf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starrfield, S.; Politano, M.; Truran, J. W.; Sparks, W. M.

    1992-01-01

    Studies which examine the consequences of accretion, at rates of 10(exp -9) solar mass/yr and 10(exp -10) solar mass/yr, onto an ONeMg white dwarf with a mass of 1.35 solar masses are performed. In these studies, a Lagrangian, hydrodynamic, one-dimensional computer code was used. The code now includes a network with 89 nuclei up to Ca-40, elemental diffusion, new opacities, and new equation of state. The initial abundance distribution corresponded to a mixture that was enriched to either 25, 50, or 75 percent in products of carbon burning. The remaining material in each case is assumed to have a solar composition. The evolution of the thermonuclear runaway in the 1.35 solar mass white dwarf, with M = 10(exp -9) solar mass, produced peak temperatures in the shell source exceeding 300 million degrees. The sequence produced significant amounts of Na-22 from proton captures onto Ne-20 and significant amounts of Al-26 from proton captures on Mg-24. This sequence ejected 5.2 x 10(exp -6) solar mass moving with speeds from approximately 100 km/s to 2300 km/s. When the mass accretion rate was decreased to 10(exp -10) solar mass, the resulting thermonuclear runaway produced a shock that moved through the outer envelope of the white dwarf and raised the surface luminosity to L greater than 10(exp 7) solar luminosity and the effective temperature to values exceeding 10(exp 7) K. The interaction of the material expanding from off of the white dwarf with the accretion disk should produce a burst of gamma-rays.

  14. Runaways.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Keith Elliot

    This essay with photographs describes the experiences of two runaways, examining why they left home and how they found help. Although runaways have a reputation for being irresponsible, they usually have good reasons for leaving home. The nun who ran Noah's Ark, where both the runaways featured found shelter and help, estimated that only about two…

  15. Outbursts in Symbiotic Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, George (Technical Monitor); Keyes, Charles

    2005-01-01

    A major question for symbiotic stars concerns the nature and cause of their outbursts. A small subset of symbiotics, the slow novae are fairly well established as thermonuclear events that last on the order of decades. The several symbiotic recurrent novae, which are much shorter and last on the order of months, are also thought to be thermonuclear runaways. Yet the majority of symbiotics are neither slow novae nor recurrent novae. These are the so-called classical symbiotics, many of which show outbursts whose cause is not well understood. In some cases, jets are produced in association with an outburst, therefore an investigation into the causes of outbursts will yield important insights into the production of collimated outflows. To investigate the cause and nature of classical symbiotic outbursts, we initiated a program of multiwavelength observations of these events. In FUSE Cycle 2, we obtained six observational epochs of the 2000-2002 classic symbiotic outburst in the first target of our campaign - class prototype, Z Andromedae. That program was part of a coordinated multi-wavelength Target-of-Opportunity (TOO) campaign with FUSE, XMM, Chandra, MERLIN, the VLA, and ground-based spectroscopic and high time-resolution photometric observations. Our campaign proved the concept, utility, and need for coordinated multi-wavelength observations in order to make progress in understanding the nature of the outburst mechanisms in symbiotic stars. Indeed, the FUSE data were the cornerstone of this project

  16. CNO nucleosynthesis and the nova outburst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starrfield, S.; Truran, J.; Sparks, W.

    1977-01-01

    Predictions for CNO nucleosynthesis by the classical nova outburst are presented. Properties of the nova phenomenon pertinent to the production of CNO isotopes are discussed, the effect of beta(+) unstable nuclei on outburst evolution is examined, and the need for enhanced CNO nuclei in the envelope is described. Possible mechanisms for producing such enhancement are considered, and recent observations of enhanced CNO nuclei in nova ejecta are reviewed. Results of model evolutionary calculations are outlined which show that a thermonuclear runaway in the hydrogen envelope of a carbon-oxygen white dwarf can reproduce the gross features of the classical nova outburst, that the behavior of the outburst depends at least on the hydrogen-envelope mass and the degree of CNO enhancement, and that all degrees of isotopic enhancement result in an outburst that may be compared with observed events. Two enhancement mechanisms are identified, both of which involve mixing in the envelope.

  17. Outbursts in Symbiotic Binaries: Z and Continued Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, George (Technical Monitor); Keyes, Charles

    2005-01-01

    A major question for symbiotic stars concerns the nature and cause of their outbursts. A small subset of symbiotics, the "slow novae" are fairly well established as thermonuclear events that last on the order of decades. The several symbiotic "recurrent novae", which are much shorter and last on the order of months, are also thought to be thermonuclear runaways. Yet the majority of symbiotics are neither slow novae nor recurrent novae. These are the so-called "classical symbiotics," many of which show outbursts whose cause is not well understood. In some cases, jets are produced in association with an outburst, therefore an investigation into the causes of outbursts will yield important insights into the production of collimated outflows. To investigate the cause and nature of classical symbiotic outbursts, we initiated a program of multi- wavelength observations of these events. First of all in FUSE Cycle 2, we obtained six observational epochs of the 2000-2002 classic symbiotic outburst in the first target of our campaign - class prototype, Z Andromedae. That program was part of a coordinated multi-wavelength Target-of-Opportunity (TOO) campaign with FUSE, XMM, Chandra, MERLIN, the VLA, and ground-based spectroscopic and high time-resolution photometric observations. Our campaign proved the concept, utility, and need for coordinated multi-wavelength observations in order to make progress in understanding the nature of the outburst mechanisms in symbiotic stars. Indeed, the FUSE data were the cornerstone of this project. The present program is a continuation of that cycle 2 effort. Indeed, the observations acquired in this program are vital to the proper interpretation of the material acquired in cycle 2 as the new data cover the critical time period when the star continues to decline from outburst and actually returns to quiescence. The utilization of these data have allowed us to refine and complete description of our new model for classical symbiotic system

  18. Nova outbursts in the case of mild hibernation

    SciTech Connect

    Livio, M.; Shankar, A.; Truran, J.W.

    1988-02-01

    The necessary conditions for the production of strong thermonuclear runaways in the hibernation scenario are identified and explored. It is found that a reduction in the accretion rate by a factor of about 100, for a period longer than a few thousand years, is generally sufficient to ensure nova-type outbursts, even in the presence of rather high preoutburst accretion rates. Nova outbursts can be obtained under mild hibernation conditions on 1 solar mass white dwarfs as well as on very massive ones. A reduction in the accretion rate by a factor of 10 only is insufficient to produce a nova outburst, if the preoutburst accretion rate is as high as 10 to the -8th solar mass/yr. 28 references.

  19. Target of Opportunity Observations of TOADS: Finding the Dust in Super-Outburst Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoard, Donald; Ciardi, David; Howell, Steve

    2008-03-01

    Tremendous Outburst Amplitude Dwarf novae (TOADs) consist of a white dwarf primary star and an extremely low mass main sequence or brown dwarf-like secondary star. The latter fills its Roche lobe and transfers matter to the white dwarf through the inner Lagrange point into an accretion disk. TOADs undergo non-thermonuclear (i.e., disk instability) super-outbursts on timescales of decades. During the decline from super-outburst peak they display a characteristic dip in light curves at visible wavelengths, reminiscent of what is observed in slow classical (i.e., thermonuclear runaway) novae. In classical novae, the visible light dip is attributed to the formation of dust in the nova ejecta but, until now, the cause of the dip in TOAD light curves has remained unclear. In 2004, a previously unknown TOAD was discovered as it went into super-outburst, and our team was granted a Spitzer DDT program with which we have detected the likely formation of dust in the outburst ejecta. We now propose a Target of Opportunity program with Spitzer to observe an additional super-outbursting TOAD, in order to address the following questions: 1) Do all TOADs produce dust during their outbursts?; 2) What is the timescale for dust formation and dissipation?; 3) How much dust is produced during a super-outburst?; and 4) How does the dust production scale with the outburst amplitude? Spitzer is uniquely capable of detecting and characterizing the dust formed in the ejecta during super-outbursts and fundamentally changing the understanding of TOADs, their super-outbursts, and their contribution to the recycling of the interstellar medium.

  20. X ray and gamma ray emission from classical nova outbursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truran, James W.; Starrfield, Sumner; Sparks, Warren M.

    1992-01-01

    The outbursts of classical novae are now recognized to be consequences of thermonuclear runaways proceeding in accreted hydrogen-rich shells on white dwarfs in close binary systems. For the conditions that are known to exist in these environments, it is expected that soft x-rays can be emitted, and indeed x-rays were detected from a number of novae. The circumstances for which we expect novae to produce significant x-ray fluxes and provide estimates of the luminosities and effective temperatures are described. It is also known that at the high temperatures that are known to be achieved in this explosive hydrogen-burning environment, significant production of both Na-22 and Al-26 will occur. In this context, we identify the conditions for which gamma-ray emission may be expected to result from nova outbursts.

  1. CNO abundances and hydrodynamic models of the nova outburst.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starrfield, S.; Truran, J. W.; Sparks, W. M.; Kutter, G. S.

    1972-01-01

    We have used a fully implicit, Lagrangian, hydrodynamic computer code incorporating a nuclear reaction network to follow thermonuclear runaways in the hydrogen-rich envelopes of white dwarfs in order to produce a nova outburst. Because of the short time-scales and the high nuclear burning rates produced in our models, the nuclear reactions are far out of equilibrium and the beta-plus unstable nuclei become the most abundant nuclei in the envelope except for hydrogen and helium. Our models have ejected 1.00017 solar mass with kinetic energies of 8 times 10 to the 44-th power ergs, a value that agrees quite closely with the observed values for novae.

  2. CNO abundances and hydrodynamic models of the nova outburst. II - 1.00 solar mass models with enhanced carbon and oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starrfield, S.; Sparks, W. M.; Truran, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    Results of a computation of a variety of evolutionary sequences involving thermonuclear runaways in the hydrogen-rich envelopes of 1.00-solar-mass carbon-oxygen white dwarfs. The evidence concerning the location of the outburst in the nova system is reexamined, and it is concluded that the white dwarf is the seat of the outburst. An order-of-magnitude argument is presented which indicates that for a 1.00-solar-mass white dwarf it is impossible to achieve mass ejection without an energy generation of approximately 10 to the 16th ergs/g/sec. A description is given of models with low nuclear enhancements that do not produce an outburst, although their evolution has certain implications for the cause of the dwarf-nova outburst. The results for models that produced a nova outburst are then presented, and on the basis of these results it is found possible to explain continuous ejection, Kukarkin and Parenago's (1934) relationship, and other gross features of the nova phenomena.

  3. The thermonuclear model for γ-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woosley, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    The evolution of magnetized neutron stars with field strengths of ~1012 gauss that are accreting mass onto kilometer-sized polar regions at a rate of ~10-13 Msolar yr-1 is examined. Based on the results of one-dimensional calculations, one finds that stable hydrogen burning, mediated by the ``hot'' CNO-cycle, will lead to a critical helium mass in the range 1020 to 1022 g km-2. Owing to the extreme degeneracy of the electron gas providing pressure support, helium burning occurs as a violent thermonuclear runaway which may propagate either as a convective deflagration (Type I burst) or as a detonation wave (Type II burst). Complete combustion of helium into 56Ni releases from 1038 to 1040 erg km-2 and pushes hot plasma with β>~1 above the surface of the neutron star. Rapid expansion of the plasma channels a substantial fraction of the explosion energy into magnetic field stress. Spectral properties are expected to be complex with emission from both thermal and non-thermal processes. The hard γ-outburst of several seconds softens as the event proceeds and is followed by a period, typically of several minutes duration, of softer x-ray emission as the subsurface ashes of the thermonuclear explosion cool. In this model, most γ-ray bursts currently being observed are located at a distance of several hundred parsecs and should recur on a timescale of months to centuries with convective deflagrations (Type I bursts) being the more common variety. An explanation for ``Jacobson-like'' transients is also offered.

  4. Outbursts in Symbiotic Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Kenyon, Scott J.

    2003-01-01

    Two models have been proposed for the outbursts of symbiotic stars. In the thermonuclear model, outbursts begin when the hydrogen burning shell of a hot white dwarf reaches a critical mass. After a rapid increase in the luminosity and effective temperature, the white dwarf evolves at constant luminosity to lower effective temperatures, remains at optical maximum for several years, and then returns to quiescence along a white dwarf cooling curve. In disk instability models, the brightness rises when the accretion rate from the disk onto the central white dwarf abruptly increases by factors of 5-20. After a few month to several year period at maximum, both the luminosity and the effective temperature of the disk decline as the system returns to quiescence.

  5. CNO abundances and hydrodynamic models of the nova outburst. III - 0.5 solar mass models with enhanced carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starrfield, S.; Sparks, W. M.; Truran, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    Consideration of the evolution of thermonuclear runaways in the hydrogen-rich envelopes of 0.5 solar mass carbon-oxygen white dwarfs. The larger radii of these stars, compared with the 1.00 solar mass white dwarfs, results in a lesser degree of degeneracy at the same depth in the star. Four models of luminosity with .00355 solar luminosity, differing only in the initial abundances of C-12, N-14, and O-16, are presented. The degree of enhancement required to produce mass ejection, and thereby a nova-type outburst, is greater than for the 1.00 solar mass model. Nevertheless, the evolution of the 0.5 solar mass model that ejected material is very similar to that of the 1.00 solar mass models, and it also ejects significant amounts of C-13, N-15, and O-17 into the interstellar medium. The 0.5 solar mass outburst is considerably less intense than the 1.00 solar mass outburst (even under optimum conditions), and this lower mass behavior is interpreted as associated with the observed outburst of the slowest novae.

  6. Outbursts in Symbiotic Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, George (Technical Monitor); Kenyon, Scott J.

    2004-01-01

    Two models have been proposed for the outbursts of symbiotic stars. In the thermonuclear model, outbursts begin when the hydrogen burning shell of a hot white dwarf reaches a critical mass. After a rapid increase in the luminosity and effective temperature, the white dwarf evolves at constant luminosity to lower effective temperatures, remains at optical maximum for several years, and then returns to quiescence along a white dwarf cooling curve. In disk instability models, the brightness rises when the accretion rate from the disk onto the central white dwarf abruptly increases by factors of 5-20. After a few month to several year period at maximum, both the luminosity and the effective temperature of the disk decline as the system returns to quiescence. If most symbiotic stars undergo thermonuclear eruptions, then symbiotics are probably poor candidates for type I supernovae. However, they can then provide approx. 10% of the material which stars recycle back into the interstellar medium. If disk instabilities are the dominant eruption mechanism, symbiotics are promising type Ia candidates but recycle less material into the interstellar medium.

  7. Outburst activity of the symbiiotic binary AG Dra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gális, R.; Hric, L.; Leedjärv, L.; Merc, J.

    2016-03-01

    The outburst activity of the symbiotic system AG Dra has been studied using extensive spectroscopic observational material. High luminosity and temperature of the hot component of AG Dra indicate that quasi-steady thermonuclear shell burning takes place on the surface of the white dwarf. The major (cool) outbursts at the beginning of active phases might occur due to enhanced thermonuclear burning triggered by disk instability. Smaller scale hot outbursts might be explained by the accretion disc instability model like in dwarf novae. We discovered significant similarities in photometric and spectroscopic behaviour of AG Dra and prototypical symbiotic star Z And.

  8. National Runaway Safeline

    MedlinePlus

    ... Parents & Guardians Donate More Close Support Youth In Crisis Donate Volunteer Free Promotional Materials National Runaway Prevention Month Join our Street Team Want to Help Runaway Teenagers? Join our Youth ...

  9. Thermonuclear processes and accretion onto neutron star envelopes - X-ray burst and transient sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starrfield, S.; Kenyon, S.; Truran, J. W.; Sparks, W. M.

    1982-01-01

    A Lagrangian, fully implicit, one-dimensional hydrodynamic computer code is used to investigate the evolution of thermonuclear runaways in the thick accreted hydrogen-rich envelopes of 1.0-solar-mass neutron stars having radii of 10 km and 20 km. The simulations produce outbursts that range in time scale from about 2000 seconds to more than a day. For the 10-km study, the peak effective temperature is 3.3 x 10 to the 7th K, and the peak luminosity is 2 x 10 to the 5th solar luminosities. The 20-km neutron star produces a peak effective temperature and luminosity of 5.3 x 10 to the 6th K and 5.9 x 10 to the 2nd solar luminosities. Also investigated are the effects of changes in the rates of the O-14(alpha, proton) and O-15(alpha, gamma) reactions on the evolution. Hydrodynamic expansion on the 10-km neutron star produces a precursor lasting about 10 to the -6th sec. The evolution of a gas cloud impacting the surface of a 20-km, 1-solar-mass neutron star is studied in an attempt to simulate the magnetospheric gate model of the X-ray burst sources.

  10. Merging white dwarfs and thermonuclear supernovae.

    PubMed

    van Kerkwijk, M H

    2013-06-13

    Thermonuclear supernovae result when interaction with a companion reignites nuclear fusion in a carbon-oxygen white dwarf, causing a thermonuclear runaway, a catastrophic gain in pressure and the disintegration of the whole white dwarf. It is usually thought that fusion is reignited in near-pycnonuclear conditions when the white dwarf approaches the Chandrasekhar mass. I briefly describe two long-standing problems faced by this scenario, and the suggestion that these supernovae instead result from mergers of carbon-oxygen white dwarfs, including those that produce sub-Chandrasekhar-mass remnants. I then turn to possible observational tests, in particular, those that test the absence or presence of electron captures during the burning. PMID:23630372

  11. Runaway: Reality or Myth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gullotta, Thomas P.

    1978-01-01

    Cases of youngsters referred to a voluntary shelter program for runaways were examined. Three distinct subgroups were identified: runaways, "castaways" forced from home, and youngsters housed temporarily for other agencies. The demographic and circumstantial differences between these groups was felt to call into question the blanket designation of…

  12. Runaways: A Silent Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellenwood, Audrey E.; And Others

    This paper discusses several factors that contribute to running away, characteristics of runaways, and approaches to dealing with runaway youth. The decision of a youth to run away is usually the climax of several smaller events that have built over time and contribute to the youth's feeling out-of-control at home, in school, and in society. Peers…

  13. Nucleosynthesis in Thermonuclear Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Claudia, Travaglio; Hix, William Raphael

    2013-01-01

    We review our understanding of the nucleosynthesis that occurs in thermonuclear supernovae and their contribution to Galactic Chemical evolution. We discuss the prospects to improve the modeling of the nucleosynthesis within simulations of these events.

  14. Novae as Thermonuclear Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, D. D.

    2003-07-01

    Fred Hoyle undertook a study of observational consequences of the thermonuclear paradigm for the nova event in the years following his 1972 resignation from Cambridge University. The most fruitful of these have been in the areas of gamma-ray astronomy, by which one attempts to measure the level of radioactivity in the nova envelope, and of presolar grain studies in laboratories, by which one measures anomalous isotopic ratios that fingerprint condensation in the thermonuclear event. This work summarizes progress with these two astronomical measures of the novae.

  15. Thermonuclear land of plenty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasior, P.

    2014-11-01

    Since the process of energy production in the stars has been identified as the thermonuclear fusion, this mechanism has been proclaimed as a future, extremely modern, reliable and safe for sustaining energetic needs of the humankind. However, the idea itself was rather straightforward and the first attempts to harness thermonuclear reactions have been taken yet in 40s of the twentieth century, it quickly appeared that physical and technical problems of domesticating exotic high temperature medium known as plasma are far from being trivial. Though technical developments as lasers, superconductors or advanced semiconductor electronics and computers gave significant contribution for the development of the thermonuclear fusion reactors, for a very long time their efficient performance was out of reach of technology. Years of the scientific progress brought the conclusions that for the development of the thermonuclear power plants an enormous interdisciplinary effort is needed in many fields of science covering not only plasma physics but also material research, superconductors, lasers, advanced diagnostic systems (e.g. spectroscopy, interferometry, scattering techniques, etc.) with huge amounts of data to be processed, cryogenics, measurement-control systems, automatics, robotics, nanotechnology, etc. Due to the sophistication of the problems with plasma control and plasma material interactions only such a combination of the research effort can give a positive output which can assure the energy needs of our civilization. In this paper the problems of thermonuclear technology are briefly outlined and it is shown why this domain can be a broad field for the experts dealing with electronics, optoelectronics, programming and numerical simulations, who at first glance can have nothing common with the plasma or nuclear physics.

  16. Overview of Runaway Youth

    PubMed Central

    Feder, Stephen H.

    1991-01-01

    By being sensitive to the precursors of runaway behavior and by being aware of the morbidity associated with living on “the street,” the family physician can play both a preventive and therapeutic role. Advocacy by the family physician for appropriate shelters and rehabilitative services within the community can further contribute to effective management to this problem. Imagesp1212-a PMID:21229028

  17. 'The runaway ions' instability at the thermalization of the counterstreaming plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alipchenkov, V. M.; Grebenshchikov, Iu. V.; Konkashbaev, I. K.

    1982-05-01

    An analysis is presented of the possibility of the occurrence of the specific collisional runaway-ion instability in the interaction of two supersonic plasma streams. Attention is given to the possibility of bunching for any time less than the complete stream-breaking period; this problem is of interest in connection with the thermalization of accelerated streams to produce a hot (thermonuclear) plasma. Two cases of wave propagation in a relaxing plasma are considered: (1) waves in a radiatively cooling plasma; and (2) waves in counterstreaming plasma. The possibility of the runaway-ion instability is shown for the latter case. In both events the instability is explosive.

  18. Velocity Distributions of Runaway Stars Produced by Supernovae in the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yisikandeer, Abudusaimaitijiang; Zhu, Chunhua; Wang, Zhaojun; Lü, Guoliang

    2016-09-01

    Using a method of population synthesis, we investigate the runaway stars produced by disrupted binaries via asymmetric core collapse supernova explosions (CC-RASs) and thermonuclear supernova explosions (TN-RASs). We find the velocities of CC-RASs in the range of about 30-100 km s -1. The runaway stars observed in the galaxy are possibly CC-RASs. Due to differences in stellar chemical components and structures, TN-RASs are divided into hydrogen-rich TN-RASs and helium-rich TN-RASs. The velocities of the former are about 100-500 km s -1, while the velocities of the latter are mainly between 600 and 1100 km s -1. The hypervelocity stars observed in the galaxy may originate from thermonuclear supernova explosions. Our results possibly cover the US 708 which is a compact helium star and travels with a velocity of 1157 ±53 km s-1 in our galaxy.

  19. Observational selection among classical novae in outburst.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, H.; Politano, M. J.; Livio, M.; Webbink, R. F.

    The authors investigate to what extent observational selection can account for the prevalence of massive white dwarfs among classical novae as was originally proposed by Truran and Livio (1986). For this the authors elaborate on their approach by taking into account a detailed model distribution function for the masses of newly-formed cataclysmic binaries from Politano (1988, 1990), an improved ignition condition for the thermonuclear runaway, as well as effects of the secular evolution of the systems and flux limitation of the observations (including interstellar absorption). The results agree qualitatively with those obtained by Truran and Livio (1986). However, since Politano's model calculations do not take into account the formation of O-Ne-Mg white dwarfs, the authors cannot make any quantitative prediction as to their expected abundance among observed novae.

  20. Overshoot Convective Mixing in Nova Outbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasner, A. S.; Livne, E.; Truran, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    We present a 2D study of the overshoot convective mechanism in nova outbursts for a wide range of possible compositions of the layer underlying the accreted envelope. Previous surveys studied this mechanism only for solar composition matter accreted on top of carbon oxygen (CO) white dwarfs. Since, during the runaway, mixing with carbon enhances the hydrogen burning rates dramatically, one should question whether significant enrichment of the ejecta is possible also for other underlying compositions (He, O, Ne, Mg) predicted by stellar evolution models. When needed we upgraded our reaction network and simulated several non-carbon cases. Despite large differences in rates, time scales and energetics, our results show that the convective dredge up mechanism predicts significant enrichment in all cases, including that of helium enrichment in recurrent novae.

  1. Comet Halley's colorful outbursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, David K.; Russell, Ray W.

    1988-01-01

    Two preperihelion outbursts by Comet Halley were observed, each showing different brightness changes at 2.3, 3.6, 4.6 and 10.3 micrometers. Neither event was observed from beginning to end. The first observation on 8 Nov. 1985 lasted on the order of a day and was accompanied by a tail-like appendage recorded photographically. During the outburst the IR colors changed dramatically, showing no significant change at 10.3 micrometers but showing progressively more change at shorter wavelengths over a time scale of a few hours. The second outburst measurement extended over several days (10 to 13 Jan. 1986) during which time the intensities at the four wavelengths increased by roughly the same amount. Although the outbursts were of different duration, the IR measurements suggest that the first event involved volatile ice particles that evaporated, while the second was associated with long lived nonvolatile dust grains.

  2. EX Hydrae in outburst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hellier, C.; Mason, K. O.; Smale, A. P.; Corbet, R. H. D.; O'Donoghue, D.

    1989-01-01

    Photometry and red spectroscopy of the intermediate polar EX Hya in its rare outburst state are presented. Photometry during the declining phase of the July-August 1986 outburst shows the 67-min (spin) modulation to be present with similar characteristics to that in quiescence. In contrast, photometry from near the peak of the 1987 May outburst shows little evidence of the 67-min modulation, while spectroscopy obtained nearly simultaneously is similarly lacking in such evidence, despite its presence in quiescent spectroscopic data. Near the beginning of the May 1987 outburst the H alpha emission line develops a broad, high velocity base component whose velocity is modulated with the orbital cycle. The velocity and phase of the broad base component suggest that it is produced near the magnetosphere of the white dwarf at a point along the projected trajectory of the gas stream from the companion. The feature disappears later in the outburst and is not present during quiescence. It is suggested that the outbursts in EX Hya are caused by an increase in the rate of mass transfer from the companion, and that part of this enhanced mass-transfer stream skims over the top of the accretion disk to strike the magnetosphere directly. The interaction of the stream with the magnetosphere gives rise to the broad-base component observed.

  3. Pellet interaction with runaway electrons

    SciTech Connect

    James, A. N.; Hollmann, E. M.; Yu, J.H.; Austin, M. E.; Commaux, Nicolas JC; Evans, T.E.; Humphrey, D. A.; Jernigan, T. C.; Parks, P. B.; Putvinski, S.; Strait, E. J.; Tynan, G. R.; Wesley, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    We describe results from recent experiments studying interaction of solid polystyrene pellets with a runaway electron current channel generated after cryogenic argon pellet rapid shutdown of DIII-D. Fast camera imaging shows the pellet trajectory and continuum emission from the subsequent explosion, with geometric calibration providing detailed explosion analysis and runaway energy. Electron cyclotron emission also occurs, associated with knock-on electrons broken free from the pellet by RE which then accelerate and runaway, and also with a short lived hot plasma blown off the pellet surface. In addition, we compare heating and explosion times from observations and a model of pellet heating and breakdown by runaway interaction. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved

  4. A detailed photometric and spectroscopic study of the 2011 outburst of the recurrent nova T Pyxidis from 0.8 to 250 days after discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Surina, F.; Bode, M. F.; Darnley, M. J.; Harman, D. J.; Hounsell, R. A.; Walter, F. M.

    2014-05-01

    We investigated the optical light curve of T Pyx during its 2011 outburst by compiling a database of Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI) and AAVSO observations. The SMEI light curve, providing unprecedented detail covering t = 1.5-49 days post-discovery, was divided into four phases based on the idealized nova optical light curve: the initial rise (1.5-3.3 days), the pre-maximum halt (3.3-13.3 days), the final rise (14.7-27.9 days), and the early decline (27.9+ days). The SMEI light curve contains a strongly detected period of 1.44 ± 0.05 days during the pre-maximum halt phase. These oscillations resemble those found in recent thermonuclear runaway models arising from instabilities in the expanding envelope. No spectral variations that mirror the light curve periodicity were found, however. The marked dip at t ∼ 22-24 days just before the light curve maximum at t = 27.9 days may represent the same (shorter duration) phenomenon seen in other novae observed by SMEI and present in some model light curves. The spectra from the 2 m Liverpool Telescope and SMARTS 1.5 m telescope were obtained from t = 0.8-80.7 and 155.1-249.9 days, covering the major phases of development. The nova was observed very early in its rise where a distinct high-velocity ejection phase was evident with initially derived V {sub ej} ∼ 4000 km s{sup –1}. A marked drop occurred at t = 5.7 days, and then a gradual increase in derived V {sub ej} to stabilize at ∼1500 km s{sup –1} at the pre-maximum halt. Here, we propose two different stages of mass loss, a short-lived phase occurring immediately after outburst and lasting ∼6 days, followed by a more steadily evolving and higher mass loss phase. The overall spectral development follows that typical of a classical nova and comparison with the photometric behavior reveals consistencies with the simple evolving pseudo-photosphere model of the nova outburst. Comparing optical spectra to X-ray and radio light curves, weak [Fe X] 6375

  5. A Detailed Photometric and Spectroscopic Study of the 2011 Outburst of the Recurrent Nova T Pyxidis from 0.8 to 250 Days after Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surina, F.; Hounsell, R. A.; Bode, M. F.; Darnley, M. J.; Harman, D. J.; Walter, F. M.

    2014-05-01

    We investigated the optical light curve of T Pyx during its 2011 outburst by compiling a database of Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI) and AAVSO observations. The SMEI light curve, providing unprecedented detail covering t = 1.5-49 days post-discovery, was divided into four phases based on the idealized nova optical light curve: the initial rise (1.5-3.3 days), the pre-maximum halt (3.3-13.3 days), the final rise (14.7-27.9 days), and the early decline (27.9+ days). The SMEI light curve contains a strongly detected period of 1.44 ± 0.05 days during the pre-maximum halt phase. These oscillations resemble those found in recent thermonuclear runaway models arising from instabilities in the expanding envelope. No spectral variations that mirror the light curve periodicity were found, however. The marked dip at t ~ 22-24 days just before the light curve maximum at t = 27.9 days may represent the same (shorter duration) phenomenon seen in other novae observed by SMEI and present in some model light curves. The spectra from the 2 m Liverpool Telescope and SMARTS 1.5 m telescope were obtained from t = 0.8-80.7 and 155.1-249.9 days, covering the major phases of development. The nova was observed very early in its rise where a distinct high-velocity ejection phase was evident with initially derived V ej ~ 4000 km s-1. A marked drop occurred at t = 5.7 days, and then a gradual increase in derived V ej to stabilize at ~1500 km s-1 at the pre-maximum halt. Here, we propose two different stages of mass loss, a short-lived phase occurring immediately after outburst and lasting ~6 days, followed by a more steadily evolving and higher mass loss phase. The overall spectral development follows that typical of a classical nova and comparison with the photometric behavior reveals consistencies with the simple evolving pseudo-photosphere model of the nova outburst. Comparing optical spectra to X-ray and radio light curves, weak [Fe X] 6375 Å emission was marginally detected before the

  6. The Origin of Runaway Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoogerwerf, R.; de Bruijne, J. H. J.; de Zeeuw, P. T.

    2000-12-01

    Milliarcsecond astrometry provided by Hipparcos and by radio observations makes it possible to retrace the orbits of some of the nearest runaway stars and pulsars to determine their site of origin. The orbits of the runaways AE Aurigae and μ Columbae and of the eccentric binary ι Orionis intersected each other ~2.5 Myr ago in the nascent Trapezium cluster, confirming that these runaways were formed in a binary-binary encounter. The path of the runaway star ζ Ophiuchi intersected that of the nearby pulsar PSR J1932+1059, ~1 Myr ago, in the young stellar group Upper Scorpius. We propose that this neutron star is the remnant of a supernova that occurred in a binary system that also contained ζ Oph and deduce that the pulsar received a kick velocity of ~350 km s-1 in the explosion. These two cases provide the first specific kinematic evidence that both mechanisms proposed for the production of runaway stars, the dynamical ejection scenario and the binary-supernova scenario, operate in nature.

  7. Counter-beam thermonuclear fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumakhov, M. A.

    2013-11-01

    A method of organizing counter beams of deuterium and tritium in a ring with electrified walls is suggested. In such a ring, beams of ions are locked in a potential well the height of which is much larger than the energy of colliding particles. In this instance, the phase volume of the ion beams increases due to multiple scattering. Estimates are made of the probability of thermonuclear reactions under these conditions and of the parameters of a thermonuclear reactor based on this principle. A number of risks and hazards that researchers might expect to encounter on this way are considered.

  8. Runaway electrons in plasma current sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Gurevich, A.V.; Sudan, R.N. )

    1994-01-31

    It is shown that a runaway electron population accelerates along the main magnetic field in a Sweet-Parker current sheet. After a characteristic distance the entire current is carried by runaways. The thickness of this runaway sheet is much smaller than the original Ohmic sheet. The influence of microinstabilities is discussed.

  9. Pre-outburst Chandra observations of the recurrent nova T Pyxidis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balman, Ş.

    2014-12-01

    Aims: I study the spectral, temporal, and spatial characteristics of the quiescent X-ray emission (not in outburst) of the recurrent nova T Pyx. Methods: I performed the spectral analysis of the X-ray data obtained using the Chandra Observatory, Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS-S3) detector. I fit the spectra with several models that describe plasma emission characteristics. In addition, I calculated the light curve of the data and performed power spectral analysis using Fourier transform. Finally, I did high-resolution imaging analysis of the data at the subpixel level and produced radial surface brightness profiles. Results: I present a total of 98.8 ks (~ 3 × 30 ks) observation of T Pyx obtained with the ACIS-S3 detector onboard the Chandra Observatory obtained during the quiescent phase, about 2-3 months before its outburst in April 2011. The total Chandra spectrum of the source T Pyx gives a maximum temperature kTmax> 37.0 keV (2σ lower limit) with (0.9-1.5) × 10-13 erg s-1 cm-2 and (1.3-2.2) × 1032 erg s-1 (at 3.5 kpc) in the 0.1-50 keV range using a multitemperature plasma emission model with a power-law distribution of temperatures (i.e., CEVMKL in XSPEC). I find a ratio of (Lx/Ldisk) ≃ (2-7) × 10-4 and the ratio is smaller if Ldisk is higher than 3 × 1035 erg s-1 indicating considerable inefficiency of emission in the boundary layer. There is no soft X-ray blackbody emission from T Pyx with a 2σ upper limit on the blackbody temperature and the flux/luminosity as kTBB< 25 eV and Lsoft< 2.0 × 1033 erg s-1 in the 0.1-10.0 keV band. All fits yield only interstellar NH during quiescence. I suggest that T Pyx has an optically thin boundary layer merged with an advection-dominated accretion flow and/or X-ray corona in the inner disk indicating ongoing quasi-spherical accretion at (very) high rates during quiescent phases. Such a boundary layer structure may be excessively heating the white dwarf, influencing the thermonuclear runaway leading to

  10. Runaway Reaction: Solving for X.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartz, Solveig A.

    2003-01-01

    This article examines the runaway reaction as it was displayed by Barry, a 14-year-old eighth-grade boy with learning disabilities. It identifies some of the common characteristics of this response and proposes school intervention methods. Functional behavioral assessments and strength-based assessments are encouraged, along with using strategy…

  11. Remote Shutoff Stops Runaway Lawnmower

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grambo, Alan A.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how electronics students at Central Nine Career Center designed a kill switch circuit to stop a runaway lawnmower. This project is ideal for a career center since the electronics/robotics, small engines and horticulture classes can all work together on their respective parts of the modification, installation…

  12. A Theoretical Light-Curve Model for the 1999 Outburst of U Scorpii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachisu, Izumi; Kato, Mariko; Kato, Taichi; Matsumoto, Katsura

    2000-01-01

    A theoretical light curve for the 1999 outburst of U Scorpii is presented in order to obtain various physical parameters of the recurrent nova. Our U Sco model consists of a very massive white dwarf (WD) with an accretion disk and a lobe-filling, slightly evolved, main-sequence star (MS). The model includes a reflection effect by the companion and the accretion disk together with a shadowing effect on the companion by the accretion disk. The early visual light curve (with a linear phase of t~1-15 days after maximum) is well reproduced by a thermonuclear runaway model on a very massive WD close to the Chandrasekhar limit (MWD=1.37+/-0.01 Msolar), in which optically thick winds blowing from the WD play a key role in determining the nova duration. The ensuing plateau phase (t~15-30 days) is also reproduced by the combination of a slightly irradiated MS and a fully irradiated flaring-up disk with a radius ~1.4 times the Roche lobe size. The cooling phase (t~30-40 days) is consistent with a low-hydrogen content of X~0.05 of the envelope for the 1.37 Msolar WD. The best-fit parameters are the WD mass of MWD~1.37 Msolar, the companion mass of MMS~1.5 Msolar (0.8-2.0 Msolar is acceptable), the inclination angle of the orbit (i~80deg), and the flaring-up edge, the vertical height of which is ~0.30 times the accretion disk radius. The duration of the strong wind phase (t~0-17 days) is very consistent with the BeppoSAX supersoft X-ray detection at t~19-20 days because supersoft X-rays are self-absorbed by the massive wind. The envelope mass at the peak is estimated to be ~3×10-6 Msolar, which is indicates an average mass accretion rate of ~2.5×10-7 Msolar yr-1 during the quiescent phase between 1987 and 1999. These quantities are exactly the same as those predicted in a new progenitor model of Type Ia supernovae.

  13. Probing thermonuclear flame spreading on neutron stars using burst rise oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Manoneeta; Bhattacharyya, Sudip

    2016-07-01

    Intense X-ray bursts (type-I bursts), originated from runaway thermonuclear processes, are observed from the surfaces of many accreting neutron star Low Mass X-ray Binary (LMXB) systems and they provide an important tool to constrain the neutron star equation of state. Periodic intensity variations during these bursts, termed burst oscillations, are observed in about 10% of thermonuclear bursts. Oscillations during the rising phases of thermonuclear bursts are hypothesized to originate from an expanding hot-spot on the surface of the neutron star. We studied the evolution of oscillations during the rising phase of a large sample of thermonuclear bursts from 10 bursting neutron stars in order to probe the process of burning front propagation during an X-ray burst. Our results show observational evidences of expanding hot-spot with spin modulated flame speeds, possibly due to the effects of the Coriolis force present as a result of the high stellar spin (270-620 Hz). This implies that the flame propagation is latitude-dependent and we address the factors affecting the detection and non-detection of burst rise oscillations in the light of this Coriolis force modulated flame spreading scenario.

  14. THE 2008 OUTBURST OF EX Lup-SILICATE CRYSTALS IN MOTION

    SciTech Connect

    Juhasz, A.; Dullemond, C. P.; Van Boekel, R.; Bouwman, J.; Henning, Th.; Sicilia-Aguilar, A.; Abraham, P.; Moor, A.; Mosoni, L.; Regaly, Zs.; Sipos, N.; Acosta-Pulido, J. A.; Kospal, A.; Jones, A.; Szokoly, Gy.

    2012-01-10

    EX Lup is the prototype of the EXor class of eruptive young stars. These objects show optical outbursts which are thought to be related to runaway accretion onto the star. In a previous study we observed in situ crystal formation in the disk of EX Lup during its latest outburst in 2008, making the object an ideal laboratory to investigate circumstellar crystal formation and transport. This outburst was monitored by a campaign of ground-based and Spitzer Space Telescope observations. Here we modeled the spectral energy distribution (SED) of EX Lup in the outburst from optical to millimeter wavelengths with a two-dimensional radiative transfer code. Our results showed that the shape of the SED at optical wavelengths was more consistent with a single-temperature blackbody than a temperature distribution. We also found that this single-temperature component emitted 80%-100% of the total accretion luminosity. We concluded that a thermal instability, the most widely accepted model of EXor outbursts, was likely not the triggering mechanism of the 2008 outburst of EX Lup. Our mid-infrared Spitzer spectra revealed that the strength of all crystalline bands between 8 and 30 {mu}m increased right after the end of the outburst. Six months later, however, the crystallinity in the 10 {mu}m silicate feature complex decreased. Our modeling of the mid-infrared spectral evolution of EX Lup showed that, although vertical mixing should be stronger during the outburst than in the quiescent phase, fast radial transport of crystals (e.g., by stellar/disk wind) was required to reproduce the observed mid-infrared spectra.

  15. Runaway electron generation in tokamak disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, H. M.; Fehér, T.; Fülöp, T.; Gál, K.; Verwichte, E.

    2009-12-01

    Runaway electrons can be generated in disruptions by the Dreicer, hot tail and avalanche mechanisms. Analytical and numerical results for hot tail runaway generation are included in a one-dimensional model of electric field, temperature and runaway current, which is applied to simulate disruptions and fast shutdown. The peaked shape of the runaway current density profile may cause tearing modes to become unstable. Fast shutdown is studied by prescribing varying amounts of injected impurities. Large argon content suppresses runaways in JET simulations but causes hot tail generation in ITER. A pellet code is coupled to the runaway model, and it is extended to enable simulations of carbon doped deuterium pellet injection. Such pellets are seen not to give enough cooling for a fast current quench.

  16. Safe venting of ``red oil`` runaway reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Paddleford, D.F.; Fauske, H.K.

    1994-12-21

    Calorimetry testing of Tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) saturated with strong nitric acid was performed to determine the relationship between vent size and pressure buildup in the event of a runaway reaction. These experiments show that runaway can occur in an open system, but that even when runaway is induced in the TBP/HN0{sub 3} system, dangerous pressure buildup will be prevented with practical vent size.

  17. A Risk Profile Comparison of Runaway and Non-Runaway Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Gary L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Examination of data from 1985 visits by 110 runaway and 655 non-runaway youth to an outpatient medical clinic reveals that runaway youth are at greater risk for a wide variety of medical problems and of health-compromising behaviors including suicide, depression, prostitution, and drug use. (Author/BJV)

  18. Runaway Children in America: A Review of the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, William H.; Burkhead, E. Jane

    1989-01-01

    The paper reviews the literature regarding runaway children, defines runaway youth, and discusses predisposing factors. Suggestions are offered for further research on the etiology and treatment of runaway behavior. (JDD)

  19. Mechanism of instantaneous coal outbursts

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, P.; Wang, H.Y.; Zhang, Y.X.

    2009-10-15

    Thousands of mine workers die every year from mining accidents, and instantaneous coal outbursts in underground coal mines are one of the major killers. Various models for these outbursts have been proposed, but the precise mechanism is still unknown. We hypothesize that the mechanism of coal outbursts is similar to magma fragmentation during explosive volcanic eruptions; i.e., it is caused by high gas pressure inside coal but low ambient pressure on it, breaking coal into pieces and releasing the high-pressure gas in a shock wave. Hence, coal outbursts may be regarded as another type of gas-driven eruption, in addition to explosive volcanic, lake, and possible ocean eruptions. We verify the hypothesis by experiments using a shock-tube apparatus. Knowing the mechanism of coal outbursts is the first step in developing prediction and mitigation measures. The new concept of gas-driven solid eruption is also important to a better understanding of salt-gas outbursts, rock-gas outbursts, and mud volcano eruptions.

  20. The Meaning of Home for Runaway Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peled, Einat; Muzicant, Amit

    2008-01-01

    This naturalistic qualitative study examines the concept of "home" for runaway girls. Through the "home story" of girls who run away from home, the authors hoped to understand the many facets of home, as well as broaden the existing knowledge-base about the phenomenon of adolescent runaway girls. Data consisted of in-depth interviews with 15 girls…

  1. Runaway Slave Advertisements: Teaching from Primary Documents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa, Tom; Doyle, Brooke

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss how children can learn from runaway slave advertisements. The advertisements for runaway slaves that masters placed in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century newspapers are among the documentary sources available to teachers for studying the lives of African-American slaves. Such advertisements often describe a…

  2. Runaways: A Review of the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Jennifer; Mosteller, Frederick

    More than half of runaway adolescents cite poor family communication and conflict as the primary reasons for running. Runaways (.5-1.5 million annually) generally arrive on the streets with few survival skills and little money. They are often subject to abuse of various sorts, and many eventually resort to criminal activity or use drugs in efforts…

  3. Trapped-electron runaway effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, E.; Decker, J.; Fisch, N. J.; Peysson, Y.

    2015-08-01

    In a tokamak, trapped electrons subject to a strong electric field cannot run away immediately, because their parallel velocity does not increase over a bounce period. However, they do pinch toward the tokamak center. As they pinch toward the center, the trapping cone becomes more narrow, so eventually they can be detrapped and run away. When they run away, trapped electrons will have a very different signature from circulating electrons subject to the Dreicer mechanism. The characteristics of what are called trapped-electron runaways are identified and quantified, including their distinguishable perpendicular velocity spectrum and radial extent.

  4. Relativistic runaway electrons above thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtinen, Nikolai G.

    A three-dimensional Monte Carlo model of the uniform relativistic runaway electron breakdown in air in the presence of static electric and magnetic fields is developed and used to calculate electron distribution functions, avalanche rates and the direction and velocity of avalanche propagation. The Monte Carlo simulation results are used in a fluid model of a runaway electron beam in the middle atmosphere accelerated by quasi-electrostatic fields following a positive lightning stroke. We consider the case of lightning discharges which drain positive charge from remote regions of a laterally extensive (>100 km) thundercloud in a thunderstorm located at ~45° geomagnetic latitude, using a translationally invariant two-dimensional model. We also consider a cylindrically symmetric model with a vertical axis of symmetry, constrained to a vertical geomagnetic field. In both models, the optical emission intensities produced by the runaway electrons are found to be negligible compared to the emissions produced by thermal electrons heated in the conventional type of breakdown. The calculated γ-ray flux is of the same order as the terrestrial γ-ray flashes observed by the BATSE detector on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. The energetic electrons leaving the atmosphere undergo intense interactions with the background magnetospheric plasma, leading to rapid growth of Langmuir waves with rate found based on the energy electron distribution and intense scattering of the electrons. In the nonlinear stage, beam electrons acquire an isotropic thermal distribution with a typical energy of ~1 MeV within one interhemispheric traverse along the Earth's magnetic field lines. While the electrons within the loss cone precipitate out, most of the electrons get trapped and form detectable energetic electron curtains surrounding the Earth. Electrons with pitch angles below the loss cone encounter the Earth's atmosphere at the conjugate point, are scattered and produce light, ionization

  5. Intense soft x-rays from RS Ophiuchi during the 1985 outburst

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, K.O.; Cordova, F.A.; Bode, M.F.; Barr, P.

    1985-01-01

    Intense soft x-ray emission with a characteristic temperature of a few million degrees has been detected from the recurrent nova RS Oph approximately two months after its January 1985 optical outburst. This is the first detection of x-rays from such a system at outburst. The x-radiation is interpreted as emission from circumstellar gas that is shock heated by the passage of the blast wave from the nova explosion. The rapid decline of the x-ray flux between about 60 and 90 days after the outburst probably occurs because the blast wave has reached the edge of the volume filled, between outbursts, by the stellar wind of the red giant component of the binary system. Residual x-ray emission detected from RS Oph 250 days after the outburst is interpreted as coming from the surface of a white dwarf, at a temperature of approx.300,000K, where thermonuclear burning is persisting. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Runaway Stars in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannicke, Anna; Neuhaeuser, Ralph; Dinçel, Baha

    2016-07-01

    Half of all stars and in particular 70 % of the massive stars are a part of a multiple system. A possible development for the system after the core collapse supernova (SN) of the more massive component is as follows: The binary is disrupted by the SN. The formed neutron star is ejected by the SN kick whereas the companion star either remains within the system and is gravitationally bounded to the neutron star, or is ejected with a spatial velocity comparable to its former orbital velocity (up to 500 km/s). Such stars with a large peculiar space velocity are called runaway stars. We present our observational results of the supernova remnants (SNRs) G184.6-5.8, G74.0-8.5 and G119.5+10.2. The focus of this project lies on the detection of low mass runaway stars. We analyze the spectra of a number of candidates and discuss their possibility of being the former companions of the SN progenitor stars. The spectra were obtained with INT in Tenerife, Calar Alto Astronomical Observatory and the University Observatory Jena. Also we investigate the field stars in the neighborhood of the SNRs G74.0-8.5 and G119.5+10.2 and calculate more precise distances for these SNRs.

  7. Enigma of Runaway Stars Solved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-01-01

    Supernova Propels Companion Star through Interstellar Space The following success story is a classical illustration of scientific progress through concerted interplay of observation and theory. It concerns a 35-year old mystery which has now been solved by means of exciting observations of a strange double star. An added touch is the successive involvement of astronomers connected to the European Southern Observatory. For many years, astronomers have been puzzled by the fact that, among the thousands of very young, hot and heavy stars which have been observed in the Milky Way, there are some that move with exceptionally high velocities. In some cases, motions well above 100 km/sec, or ten times more than normal for such stars, have been measured. How is this possible? Which mechanism is responsible for the large amounts of energy needed to move such heavy bodies at such high speeds? Could it be that these stars are accelerated during the powerful explosion of a companion star as a supernova? Such a scenario was proposed in 1961 by Adriaan Blaauw [1], but until now, observational proof has been lacking. Now, however, strong supporting evidence for this mechanism has become available from observations obtained at the ESO La Silla observatory. The mysterious runaway stars OB-runaway stars [2] are heavy stars that travel through interstellar space with an anomalously high velocity. They have been known for several decades, but it has always been a problem to explain their high velocities. Although most OB-runaway stars are located at distances of several thousands of lightyears, their high velocity results in a measurable change in position on sky photos taken several years apart. The velocity component in the direction of the Earth can be measured very accurately from a spectrogram. From a combination of such observations, it is possible to measure the space velocity of OB-runaways. Bow shocks reveal runaway stars It has also been found that some OB-runaways display

  8. Experimental investigation of the 30S(α, p) thermonuclear reaction in x-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahl, D.; Chen, A. A.; Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Binh, D. N.; Chen, J.; Cherubini, S.; Duy, N. N.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Iwasa, N.; Jung, H. S.; Kato, S.; Kwon, Y. K.; Nishimura, S.; Ota, S.; Setoodehnia, K.; Teranishi, T.; Tokieda, H.; Yamada, T.; Yun, C. C.; Zhang, L. Y.

    2016-02-01

    We performed the first measurement of 30S+α resonant elastic scattering to experimentally examine the 30S(α, p) stellar reaction rate in type I x-ray bursts. These bursts are the most frequent thermonuclear explosions in the galaxy, resulting from thermonuclear runaway on the surface of accreting neutron star binaries. The 30S(α, p) reaction plays a critical role in burst models, yet very little is known about the compound nucleus 34Ar at these energies nor the reaction rate itself. We performed a measurement of alpha elastic scattering with a radioactive beam of 30S to experimentally probe the entrance channel. Utilizing a gaseous active target system and silicon detector array, we extracted the excitation function from 1.8 to 5.5 MeV near 160° in the center-of-mass frame. The experimental data were analyzed with an R-Matrix calculation, and we discovered several new resonances and extracted their quantum properties (resonance energy, width, spin, and parity). Finally, we calculated the narrow resonant thermonuclear reaction rate of 30S(α, p) for these new resonances.

  9. ACCRETION OUTBURSTS IN CIRCUMPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Lubow, S. H.; Martin, R. G.

    2012-04-20

    We describe a model for the long-term evolution of a circumplanetary disk that is fed mass from a circumstellar disk and contains regions of low turbulence (dead zones). We show that such disks can be subject to accretion-driven outbursts, analogous to outbursts previously modeled in the context of circumstellar disks to explain FU Ori phenomena. Circumplanetary disks around a proto-Jupiter can undergo outbursts for infall accretion rates onto the disks in the range M-dot{sub infall} approx. 10{sup -9} to 10{sup -7} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, typical of accretion rates in the T Tauri phase. During outbursts, the accretion rate and disk luminosity increases by several orders of magnitude. Most of the planet mass growth during planetary gas accretion may occur via disk outbursts involving gas that is considerably hotter than predicted by steady state models. For low infall accretion rates M-dot{sub infall} {approx}< 10{sup -10} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} that occur in late stages of disk accretion, disk outbursts are unlikely to occur, even if dead zones are present. Such conditions are favorable for the formation of icy satellites.

  10. Tidally-Induced Thermonuclear Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Rosswog, S.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Hix, William Raphael

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the results of 3D simulations of tidal disruptions of white dwarfs by moderate-mass black holes as they may exist in the cores of globular clusters or dwarf galaxies. Our simulations follow self-consistently the hydrodynamic and nuclear evolution from the initial parabolic orbit over the disruption to the build-up of an accretion disk around the black hole. For strong enough encounters (pericentre distances smaller than about 1/3 of the tidal radius) the tidal compression is reversed by a shock and finally results in a thermonuclear explosion. These explosions are not restricted to progenitor masses close to the Chandrasekhar limit, we find exploding examples throughout the whole white dwarf mass range. There is, however, a restriction on the masses of the involved black holes: black holes more massive than 2x105M{circle_dot} swallow a typical 0.6M{circle_dot} white dwarf before their tidal forces can overwhelm the star's selfgravity. Therefore, this mechanism is characteristic for black holes of moderate masses. The material that remains bound to the black hole settles into an accretion disk and produces an Xray flare close to the Eddington limit of L{sub Edd} {approx} 10{sup 41}erg/s (Mbh/1000M{circle_dot}), typically lasting for a few months. The combination of a peculiar thermonuclear supernova together with an X-ray flare thus whistle-blows the existence of such moderate-mass black holes. The next generation of wide field space-based instruments should be able to detect such events.

  11. Youth at Risk: Understanding Runaway and Exploited Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgess, Ann Wolbert

    This document describes a study of runaways (N=149) at a Toronto, Canada shelter which examined why urban adolescents run away from home; the role of sexual abuse in the life histories of runaways; and why runaways return home. The report begins with a discussion about adolescents at risk, with a definition of terms, numbers of runaways, and a new…

  12. THE PROPERTIES OF DYNAMICALLY EJECTED RUNAWAY AND HYPER-RUNAWAY STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Perets, Hagai B.; Subr, Ladislav

    2012-06-01

    Runaway stars are stars observed to have large peculiar velocities. Two mechanisms are thought to contribute to the ejection of runaway stars, both of which involve binarity (or higher multiplicity). In the binary supernova scenario, a runaway star receives its velocity when its binary massive companion explodes as a supernova (SN). In the alternative dynamical ejection scenario, runaway stars are formed through gravitational interactions between stars and binaries in dense, compact clusters or cluster cores. Here we study the ejection scenario. We make use of extensive N-body simulations of massive clusters, as well as analytic arguments, in order to characterize the expected ejection velocity distribution of runaway stars. We find that the ejection velocity distribution of the fastest runaways (v {approx}> 80 km s{sup -1}) depends on the binary distribution in the cluster, consistent with our analytic toy model, whereas the distribution of lower velocity runaways appears independent of the binaries' properties. For a realistic log constant distribution of binary separations, we find the velocity distribution to follow a simple power law: {Gamma}(v){proportional_to}v{sup -8/3} for the high-velocity runaways and v{sup -3/2} for the low-velocity ones. We calculate the total expected ejection rates of runaway stars from our simulated massive clusters and explore their mass function and their binarity. The mass function of runaway stars is biased toward high masses and strongly depends on their velocity. The binarity of runaways is a decreasing function of their ejection velocity, with no binaries expected to be ejected with v > 150 km s{sup -1}. We also find that hyper-runaways with velocities of hundreds of km s{sup -1} can be dynamically ejected from stellar clusters, but only at very low rates, which cannot account for a significant fraction of the observed population of hyper-velocity stars in the Galactic halo.

  13. Theory of runaway collisional transport

    SciTech Connect

    Tessarotto, M. ); White, R.B. )

    1993-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to formulate the transport problem for a multispecies rotating toroidal magnetoplasma in the so-called runaway regime, which is defined by an appropriate ordering of relevant characteristic frequencies, in particular, the Larmor frequency, the characteristic acceleration frequency due to the applied electric field and the effective collision frequency, all evaluated at some characteristic speed [ital v][sub 0]. A suitable form of the gyrokinetic equation is obtained to describe the time-dependent, multispecies plasma response to an applied electric field, in toroidal geometry and for a strongly rotating, quiescent, and collisional plasma. Its moment equations are proven to imply the reduction of the energy equation to Joule's law, as well as consequences on the form of Ohm's law and of the Grad--Shafranov equation. To construct an approximate solution of the gyrokinetic equation and to evaluate all relevant fluxes, appearing in the moment equations, a general variational solution method is developed.

  14. Runaway tails in magnetized plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moghaddam-Taaheri, E.; Vlahos, L.; Rowland, H. L.; Papadopoulos, K.

    1985-01-01

    The evolution of a runaway tail driven by a dc electric field in a magnetized plasma is analyzed. Depending on the strength of the electric field and the ratio of plasma to gyrofrequency, there are three different regimes in the evolution of the tail. The tail can be (1) stable with electrons accelerated to large parallel velocities, (2) unstable to Cerenkov resonance because of the depletion of the bulk and the formation of a positive slope, (3) unstable to the anomalous Doppler resonance instability driven by the large velocity anisotropy in the tail. Once an instability is triggered (Cerenkov or anomalous Doppler resonance) the tail relaxes into an isotropic distribution. The role of a convection type loss term is also discussed.

  15. On the inward drift of runaway electrons during the plateau phase of runaway current

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hu, Di; Qin, Hong

    2016-03-29

    The well observed inward drift of current carrying runaway electrons during runaway plateau phase after disruption is studied by considering the phase space dynamic of runaways in a large aspect ratio toroidal system. We consider the case where the toroidal field is unperturbed and the toroidal symmetry of the system is preserved. The balance between the change in canonical angular momentum and the input of mechanical angular momentum in such a system requires runaways to drift horizontally in configuration space for any given change in momentum space. The dynamic of this drift can be obtained by integrating the modified Euler-Lagrangemore » equation over one bounce time. It is then found that runaway electrons will always drift inward as long as they are decelerating. This drift motion is essentially non-linear, since the current is carried by runaways themselves, and any runaway drift relative to the magnetic axis will cause further displacement of the axis itself. A simplified analytical model is constructed to describe such inward drift both in the ideal wall case and no wall case, and the runaway current center displacement as a function of parallel momentum variation is obtained. The time scale of such displacement is estimated by considering effective radiation drag, which shows reasonable agreement with the observed displacement time scale. Furthermore, this indicates that the phase space dynamic studied here plays a major role in the horizontal displacement of runaway electrons during plateau phase. (C) 2016 AIP Publishing LLC.« less

  16. Controlled thermonuclear fusion, high temperature plasma physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-05-01

    The primary source of nuclear energy comes from the fission process of heavy nuclei. To utilize the energy released by a thermonuclear fusion process, methods of controlling the fusion reaction were studied. This is controlled thermonuclear fusion technology. The fuel used in a thermonuclear fusion process are isotopes of hydrogen: deuterium and tritium. They can be extracted from the almost unlimited seawater. Nuclear fusion also produces very little radioactive waste. Thermonuclear fusion is a promising energy source with an almost unlimited supply; it is economical, safe, and relatively clean. Ways to raise plasma temperature to a very high level and to maintain it to allow fusion reactions to take place are studied. The physical laws of high temperature plasma was studied to reach this goal which resulted in the development of high temperature plasma physics.

  17. Similarities between Stunted Outbursts in Nova-like Cataclysmic Variables and Outbursts in Ordinary Dwarf Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honeycutt, R. K.

    2001-04-01

    Stunted outbursts have been reported in old novae and nova-like cataclysmic variables by Honeycutt, Robertson, and Turner. These 0.4-1 mag outbursts were concluded to be either mass transfer events or disk outbursts similar to dwarf nova eruptions, but seen under unusual conditions. Honeycutt, Robertson, and Turner did not have enough evidence to favor either of these possibilities. This paper uses additional long-term photometry and analysis to argue that the similarities of these stunted outbursts to dwarf nova eruptions are now so numerous that the dwarf nova outburst choice is strongly favored. The similarities discussed here include the range of outburst spacings, the coherence and stability of the outbursts, and the presence of isolated outburst/dip pairs. As part of this discussion we note the presence of unexpectedly stable clocks over 9 years for the repetition interval of dwarf nova outbursts in SY Cnc and of stunted outbursts in FY Per.

  18. Taking the temperature of the superburster 4U 1608-522 after an outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keek, Laurens

    2010-10-01

    Superbursts are rare thermonuclear flashes from accreting neutron stars that can only ignite in case of a sufficiently high temperature of the neutron star crust, which is heated during accretion. Most superbursts take place when the neutron star accretes continuously for over 10 years. In 2005, however, a superburst was observed from the transient 4U 1608-522, when accretion started only 55 days earlier. Crustal heating models predict a significantly lower temperature than the superburst models require. If the superburst models are correct in their prediction of a high temperature, crustal cooling is observable after an accretion outburst. We propose to observe 4U 1608-522 two times for 30 ks. triggered after an outburst, to measure the presence of cooling.

  19. Taking the temperature of the superburster 4U 1608-522 after an outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keek, Laurens

    2011-09-01

    Superbursts are rare thermonuclear flashes from accreting neutron stars. One condition for ignition is a sufficiently high temperature of the neutron star crust, which is heated during accretion. Most superbursts take place when the neutron star was accreting continuously above 10% of the Eddington limit for more then 10 years. In 2005 a superburst was observed from the transient system 4U 1608-522, when accretion started 55 days earlier. Crustal heating models predict a significantly lower temperature than the superburst models require. If the superburst models are correct in their prediction of a high temperature, crustal cooling is observable after an accretion outburst. We propose to observe 4U 1608-522 two times for 30 ks triggered after an outburst, to measure the cooling rate.

  20. Possible Mechanism of Cometary Outbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibadov, Subhon

    The possibility of transformation of the kinetic energy of high-energy (more than 1 MeV) protons ejected during solar flares into the electrical energy of macroscopic electric double layer in the subsurface region of a cometary nucleus is considered. It is found that at certain conditions, concerning dielectric properties of the nucleus, the energy of the electric field generated during strong solar flares is restricted by discharge potential of the nucleus material. This energy is comparable to the energy of large cometary outbursts. Simulation of the electric discharge mechanism of cometary outbursts in the corresponding technical high-voltage generating device seems a relevant problem.

  1. What is the fate of runaway positrons in tokamaks?

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Jian; Qin, Hong; Fisch, Nathaniel J.; Teng, Qian; Wang, Xiaogang

    2014-06-19

    In this study, massive runaway positrons are generated by runaway electrons in tokamaks. The fate of these positrons encodes valuable information about the runaway dynamics. The phase space dynamics of a runaway position is investigated using a Lagrangian that incorporates the tokamak geometry, loop voltage, radiation and collisional effects. It is found numerically that runaway positrons will drift out of the plasma to annihilate on the first wall, with an in-plasma annihilation possibility less than 0.1%. The dynamics of runaway positrons provides signatures that can be observed as diagnostic tools.

  2. What is the fate of runaway positrons in tokamaks?

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jian; Qin, Hong; Fisch, Nathaniel J.; Teng, Qian; Wang, Xiaogang

    2014-06-15

    Massive runaway positrons are generated by runaway electrons in tokamaks. The fate of these positrons encodes valuable information about the runaway dynamics. The phase space dynamics of a runaway position is investigated using a Lagrangian that incorporates the tokamak geometry, loop voltage, radiation and collisional effects. It is found numerically that runaway positrons will drift out of the plasma to annihilate on the first wall, with an in-plasma annihilation possibility less than 0.1%. The dynamics of runaway positrons provides signatures that can be observed as diagnostic tools.

  3. Spreading of thermonuclear flames on the neutron star in SAX J1808.4-3658: an observational tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2005-01-01

    We analyse archival Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) proportional counter array (PCA) data of thermonuclear X-ray bursts from the 2002 outburst of the accreting millisecond pulsar SAX 51808.4-3658. We present evidence of a complex frequency modulation of oscillations during burst rise, and correlations among the time evolution of the oscillation frequency, amplitude, and the inferred burning region area. We discuss these findings in the context of a model, based on thermonuclear flame spreading on the neutron star surface, that can qualitatively explain these features. From our model, we infer that for the 2002 Oct. 15 thermonuclear burst, the ignition likely occurred in the mid-latitudes, the burning region took approx. 0.2 s to nearly encircle the equatorial region of the neutron star, and after that the lower amplitude oscillation originated from the remaining asymmetry of the burning front in the same hemisphere where the burst ignited. We emphasize that studies of the evolution of burst oscillation properties during burst rise can provide a powerful tool to understand thermonuclear flame spreading on neutron star surfaces under extreme physical conditions.

  4. MILLIHERTZ QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS AND THERMONUCLEAR BURSTS FROM TERZAN 5: A SHOWCASE OF BURNING REGIMES

    SciTech Connect

    Linares, M.; Chakrabarty, D.; Altamirano, D.; Cumming, A.; Keek, L.

    2012-04-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the thermonuclear bursts and millihertz quasi-periodic oscillations (mHz QPOs) from the neutron star (NS) transient and 11 Hz X-ray pulsar IGR J17480-2446, located in the globular cluster Terzan 5. The increase in burst rate that we found during its 2010 outburst, when persistent luminosity rose from 0.1 to 0.5 times the Eddington limit, is in qualitative agreement with thermonuclear burning theory yet contrary to all previous observations of thermonuclear bursts. Thermonuclear bursts gradually evolved into a mHz QPO when the accretion rate increased, and vice versa. The mHz QPOs from IGR J17480-2446 resemble those previously observed in other accreting NSs, yet they feature lower frequencies (by a factor {approx}3) and occur when the persistent luminosity is higher (by a factor 4-25). We find four distinct bursting regimes and a steep (close to inverse cubic) decrease of the burst recurrence time with increasing persistent luminosity. We compare these findings to nuclear burning models and find evidence for a transition between the pure helium and mixed hydrogen/helium ignition regimes when the persistent luminosity was about 0.3 times the Eddington limit. We also point out important discrepancies between the observed bursts and theory, which predicts brighter and less frequent bursts, and suggest that an additional source of heat in the NS envelope is required to reconcile the observed and expected burst properties. We discuss the impact of NS magnetic field and spin on the expected nuclear burning regimes, in the context of this particular pulsar.

  5. New outburst of NGC 2617

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oknyansky, V. L.; Huseynov, N. A.; Lipunov, .; Gorbovskoy, E. S.; Kuznetsov, A. S.; Balanutza, P. V.; Tatarnikov, A. M.; Metlov, V. G.; Shatsky, N. I.; Nadzhip, A. E.; Burlak, M. A.; Malanchev, K. L.; Gaskell, C. M.

    2016-05-01

    Optical and IR photometry show that the activity of NGC 2617 is continuing and that it is undergoing another outburst. We obtained further JK photometry with the 2.5-m telescope of the SAI Caucasus Mountain Observatory on May 11 (see ATel #9015 for details).

  6. On extended thermonuclear functions through pathway model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dilip

    when α → 1. The beauty of the result is that these different families of three different functional forms are covered through the pathway parameter α. In a physical set up if f (x) in (3) is the stable or limiting form, the Maxwell-Boltzmann approach to thermonuclear functions, then f (x) in (1) and (2) will contain a large variety of unstable or chaotic situations which will all tend to (3) in the limit. Thus we get a clear idea of all the stable and unstable situations around the Maxwell-Boltzmann approach. Thus the current theory is given a mathematical extension and physical interpretations can be found to situations in (1) and (2). Incidently Tsallis statistics is a special case of (1) for γ = 0, a = 1, δ = 1, η = 1. The Beck-Cohen superstatistics, discussed in current statistical mechanics literature is a special case of (2) for a = 1, η = 1, α > 1. The main purpose of the present paper is to investigate in some more detail, mathematically, the extended thermonuclear functions for Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics and in the cut-off case. The extended thermonuclear functions will be evaluated in closed form for all convenient values of the parameter by means of residue calculus. A comparison of the standard thermonuclear functions with the extended thermonuclear functions is also done. The results and derivations in this paper are new and these will be of interest to physicists, mathematicians, probabilists, and statisticians.

  7. Maltreatment among runaway and homeless youth.

    PubMed

    Powers, J L; Eckenrode, J; Jaklitsch, B

    1990-01-01

    A sample of 223 adolescents who sought services from runaway and homeless youth programs in New York State during 1986-1987 was identified as having a history of maltreatment. A demographic profile is presented and the nature of their maltreatment described. The majority of these youth were female and between 15-16 years of age. Less than 25% came from intact families and one-third were born to single mothers. Of the sample, 60% had allegedly experienced physical abuse, 42% emotional abuse, 48% neglect, and 21% sexual abuse. Over one-third were "pushed out" of their homes by their families. Biological mothers were the most frequently cited perpetrators of maltreatment (63%), followed by biological fathers (45%). The sample of maltreated runaways is compared to both statewide and national samples of runaway and homeless youth with regard to their demographic characteristics and the problems they present to staff at intake (e.g., depression, substance abuse, etc.). Youth in the maltreated sample were more likely to be female and were more likely to have engaged in suicidal behavior. Otherwise, the maltreated runaways were not readily distinguished from the runaway and homeless youth population at large. PMID:2310977

  8. Acceleration of runaway electrons in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moghaddam-Taaheri, E.; Goertz, C. K.

    1990-01-01

    The dc electric field acceleration of electrons out of a thermal plasma and the evolution of the runaway tail are studied numerically, using a relativistic quasi-linear code based on the Ritz-Galerkin method and finite elements. A small field-aligned electric field is turned on at a certain time. The resulting distribution function from the runaway process is used to calculate the synchrotron emission during the evolution of the runaway tail. It is found that, during the runaway tail formation, which lasts a few tens of seconds for typical solar flare conditions, the synchrotron emission level is low, almost ot the same order as the emission from the thermal plasma, at the high-frequency end of the spectrum. However, the emission is enhanced explosively in a few microseconds by several orders of magnitude at the time the runaway tail stops growing along the magnetic field and tends toward isotropy due to the pitch-angle scattering of the fast particles. Results indicate that, in order to account for the observed synchrotron emission spectrum of a typical solar flare, the electric field acceleration phase must be accompanied or preceded by a heating phase which yields an enhanced electron temperature of about 2-15 keV in the flare region if the electric field is 0.1-0.2 times the Dreicer field and cyclotron-to-plasma frequency ratios are of order 1-2.

  9. Acceleration of runaway electrons in solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Moghaddam-taaheri, E.; Goertz, C.K. )

    1990-03-01

    The dc electric field acceleration of electrons out of a thermal plasma and the evolution of the runaway tail are studied numerically, using a relativistic quasi-linear code based on the Ritz-Galerkin method and finite elements. A small field-aligned electric field is turned on at a certain time. The resulting distribution function from the runaway process is used to calculate the synchrotron emission during the evolution of the runaway tail. It is found that, during the runaway tail formation, which lasts a few tens of seconds for typical solar flare conditions, the synchrotron emission level is low, almost ot the same order as the emission from the thermal plasma, at the high-frequency end of the spectrum. However, the emission is enhanced explosively in a few microseconds by several orders of magnitude at the time the runaway tail stops growing along the magnetic field and tends toward isotropy due to the pitch-angle scattering of the fast particles. Results indicate that, in order to account for the observed synchrotron emission spectrum of a typical solar flare, the electric field acceleration phase must be accompanied or preceded by a heating phase which yields an enhanced electron temperature of about 2-15 keV in the flare region if the electric field is 0.1-0.2 times the Dreicer field and cyclotron-to-plasma frequency ratios are of order 1-2. 23 refs.

  10. The origin of OB runaway stars.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Michiko S; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2011-12-01

    About 20% of all massive stars in the Milky Way have unusually high velocities, the origin of which has puzzled astronomers for half a century. We argue that these velocities originate from strong gravitational interactions between single stars and binaries in the centers of star clusters. The ejecting binary forms naturally during the collapse of a young (≤1 million years old) star cluster. This model replicates the key characteristics of OB runaways in our galaxy, and it explains the presence of runaway stars of ≥100 solar masses (M(⊙)) around young star clusters, such as R136 and Westerlund 2. The high proportion and the distributions in mass and velocity of runaways in the Milky Way are reproduced if the majority of massive stars are born in dense and relatively low-mass (5000 to 10,000 M(⊙)) clusters. PMID:22096104

  11. Runaway Girls in Distress: Motivation, Background, and Personality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharlin, Shlomo A.; Mor-Barak, Michal

    1992-01-01

    Examined female adolescent runaways. Found that girls who "run to" were younger, more impulsive, had internal locus of control, and had history of more runaways and longer periods of staying away from home. Girls who "run from" were older, more reflective, had external locus of control, and had history of fewer runaways and shorter periods away…

  12. AST3: dwarf nova outbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Bin; Hu, Yi; Shang, Zhaohui; Wang, Lifan

    2016-05-01

    AST3#2 OT J024453.11-580940.1 discovery - new dwarf nova outburst with ampl > 5.8 The 2nd Antarctic Survey Telescope (AST3#2) discovered OT source at (RA, Dec) = 02:44:53.11 -58:09:40.1 on 2016-05-06.071 UT with Sloan-g magnitude of 15.5m (limit 18.6m).

  13. Neutron Stars and Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, Supid

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes neutron stars and thermonuclear x ray bursts. The contents include: 1) Neutron Stars: why do we care?; 2) Thermonuclear Bursts: why do we care?; 3) Neutron Stars: Mass, Radius and Spin: a. Continuum Spectroscopy of Bursts b. Spectral Lines from Bursts c. Timing Properties of Bursts; 4) Neutron Star Atmosphere: Thermonuclear Flame Spreading; and 5) Future Prospects and Conclusions.

  14. The polonium-210 problem in thermonuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Shchipakhin, O.L.; Borisov, N.B.; Churkin, S.L.

    1993-12-31

    Polonium 210 forms in the lithium-lead eutectic blanket of a thermonuclear reactor. On the basis of obtained experimental data some estimates have been calculated on the ITER blanket accident consequences. The LOCA type accident represents the failure of eutectic circuit in the process of transfusion of liquid eutectic from blanket to the tritium reprocessing plant.

  15. Plasma physics and controlled thermonuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Krikorian, R. )

    1989-01-01

    This proceedings contains papers on plasma physics and controlled thermonuclear fusion. Included are the following topics: Plasma focus and Z-pinch, Review of mirror fusion research, Progress in studies of x-ray and ion-beam emission from plasma focus facilities.

  16. Laser Fusion - A New Thermonuclear Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Ralph S.

    1975-01-01

    Describes thermonuclear processes induced by interaction of a laser beam with the surface of a fuel pellet. An expanding plasma is formed which results in compression of the element. Laser and reactor technology are discussed. Pictures and diagrams are included. (GH)

  17. Runaway breakdown and electrical discharges in thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milikh, Gennady; Roussel-Dupré, Robert

    2010-12-01

    This review considers the precise role played by runaway breakdown (RB) in the initiation and development of lightning discharges. RB remains a fundamental research topic under intense investigation. The question of how lightning is initiated and subsequently evolves in the thunderstorm environment rests in part on a fundamental understanding of RB and cosmic rays and the potential coupling to thermal runaway (as a seed to RB) and conventional breakdown (as a source of thermal runaways). In this paper, we describe the basic mechanism of RB and the conditions required to initiate an observable avalanche. Feedback processes that fundamentally enhance RB are discussed, as are both conventional breakdown and thermal runaway. Observations that provide clear evidence for the presence of energetic particles in thunderstorms/lightning include γ-ray and X-ray flux intensifications over thunderstorms, γ-ray and X-ray bursts in conjunction with stepped leaders, terrestrial γ-ray flashes, and neutron production by lightning. Intense radio impulses termed narrow bipolar pulses (or NBPs) provide indirect evidence for RB particularly when measured in association with cosmic ray showers. Our present understanding of these phenomena and their enduring enigmatic character are touched upon briefly.

  18. Runaway electrons from laboratory discharges in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanya, J.; March, V.

    2011-12-01

    The role of runaway electrons in the lightning discharge it is still unknown. High energy electrons are associated with lightning discharges and occur with electric field variations associated with leader lightning advancement. On the other hand, Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGF) are bursts of high energetic particles from the earth. TGF have been associated with lightning, but its origin is still under debate. In 2005 it was demonstrated that runaway electrons appear during high voltage impulses in the laboratory. These results opened the research of high energy particles in the laboratory and some researchers have focused its research in this field. From 2010 we have conducted different experiments using a Marx generator. We created impulse voltages up to 1 MV for air gaps between 30 and 100 cm. Shielded NaI(Tl) detectors were used to measure high energy particles from the discharge. We have designed experiments in order to discover the properties of these runaway electrons. From more than 2000 sparks, we showed that runaway electrons are affected by the rise time of the impulse, presented the role of each electrode in the acceleration of electrons and the role of the electric field in the process. In this presentation, we focus on the results of laboratory discharges and the possible implications in lightning discharges and TGF. The controlled impulse voltages in the laboratory can constitute an indirect way for study this phenomenon.

  19. Runaway electron beam in atmospheric pressure discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreshkin, E. V.; Barengolts, S. A.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Oreshkin, V. I.

    2015-11-01

    A numerical simulation was performed to study the formation of a runaway electron (RAE) beam from an individual emission zone in atmospheric pressure air discharges with a highly overvolted interelectrode gap. It is shown that the formation of a RAE beam in discharges at high overvoltages is much contributed by avalanche processes.

  20. A Runaway Red Supergiant in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Kate Anne; Massey, Philip

    2016-01-01

    A significant percentage of OB stars are runaways, so we should expect a similar percentage of their evolved descendants to also be runaways. However, recognizing such stars presents its own set of challenges, as these older, more evolved stars will have drifted further from their birthplace, and thus their velocities might not be obviously peculiar. Several Galactic red supergiants (RSGs) have been described as likely runaways, based upon the existence of bow shocks, including Betelgeuse. Here we announce the discovery of a runaway RSG in M31, based upon a 300 km s-1 discrepancy with M31's kinematics. The star is found about 21‧ (4.6 kpc) from the plane of the disk, but this separation is consistent with its velocity and likely age (˜10 Myr). The star, J004330.06+405258.4, is an M2 I, with MV=-5.7, log L/L⊙=4.76, an effective temperature of 3700 K, and an inferred mass of 12-15 M⊙. The star may be a high-mass analog of the hypervelocity stars, given that its peculiar space velocity is probably 400-450 km s-1, comparable to the escape speed from M31's disk. K. A. E.'s work was supported by the NSF's Research Experience for Undergraduates program through AST-1461200, and P. M.'s was partially supported by the NSF through AST-1008020 and through Lowell Observatory.

  1. A Runaway Red Supergiant in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Kate Anne; Massey, Philip

    2015-11-01

    A significant percentage of OB stars are runaways, so we can expect a similar percentage of their evolved descendants to also be runaways. However, recognizing such stars presents its own set of challenges, as these older, more evolved stars will have drifted farther from their birthplace, and thus their velocities might not be obviously peculiar. Several Galactic red supergiants (RSGs) have been described as likely runaways based on the existence of bow shocks, including Betelgeuse. Here we announce the discovery of a runaway RSG in M31 based on a 300 km s-1 discrepancy with M31's kinematics. The star is found about 21‧ (4.6 kpc) from the plane of the disk, but this separation is consistent with its velocity and likely age (˜10 Myr). The star, J004330.06+405258.4, is an M2 I, with MV = -5.7, {log}L/{L}⊙ = 4.76, an effective temperature of 3700 K, and an inferred mass of 12-15M⊙. The star may be a high-mass analog of the hypervelocity stars, given that its peculiar space velocity is probably 400-450 km s-1, comparable to the escape speed from M31's disk. Observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of the University of Arizona and the Smithsonian Institution. This paper uses data products produced by the OIR Telescope Data Center, supported by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory.

  2. Dynamics of runaway electrons in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Moghaddam-Taaheri, E.

    1986-01-01

    The evolution of a runaway electron tail driven by a subcritical dc electric field in a magnetized plasma is studied numerically using a quasi-linear numerical code (2-D in v- and k-space) based on the Ritz-Galerkin method and finite elements. Three different regimes in the evolution of the runaway tail depending on the strength of the dc electric field and the ratio of plasma to gyrofrequency, were found. The tail can be (a) stable and the electrons are accelerated to large parallel velocities, (b) unstable to the Cerenkov resonance due to the formation of a positive slope on the runaway tail, (c) unstable to the anomalous Doppler resonance instability driven by the large velocity anisotropy in the tail. Once an instability is triggered (Cerenkov or anomalous Doppler resonance) the tail relaxes into an isotropic distribution resulting in less acceleration. The synchrotron emission of the runaway electrons shows large enhancement in the radiation level at the high-frequency end of the spectrum during the pitch-angle scattering of the fast particles. The results are relevant to recent experimental data from the Princeton Large Torus (PLT) during current-drive experiments and to the microwave bursts observed during solar flares.

  3. Hot tail runaway electron generation in tokamak disruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H. M.; Verwichte, E.

    2008-07-15

    Hot tail runaway electron generation is caused by incomplete thermalization of the electron velocity distribution during rapid plasma cooling. It is an important runaway electron mechanism in tokamak disruptions if the thermal quench phase is sufficiently fast. Analytical estimates of the density of produced runaway electrons are derived for cases of exponential-like temperature decay with a cooling rate lower than the collision frequency. Numerical simulations, aided by the analytical results, are used to compare the strength of the hot tail runaway generation with the Dreicer mechanism for different disruption parameters (cooling rate, post-thermal quench temperature, and electron density) assuming that no losses of runaway electrons occur. It is seen that the hot tail runaway production is going to be the dominant of these two primary runaway mechanisms in ITER [R. Aymar et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 44, 519 (2002)].

  4. Synchrotron radiation from a runaway electron distribution in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Stahl, A.; Fülöp, T.; Landreman, M.; Papp, G.; Hollmann, E.

    2013-09-15

    The synchrotron radiation emitted by runaway electrons in a fusion plasma provides information regarding the particle momenta and pitch-angles of the runaway electron population through the strong dependence of the synchrotron spectrum on these parameters. Information about the runaway density and its spatial distribution, as well as the time evolution of the above quantities, can also be deduced. In this paper, we present the synchrotron radiation spectra for typical avalanching runaway electron distributions. Spectra obtained for a distribution of electrons are compared with the emission of mono-energetic electrons with a prescribed pitch-angle. We also examine the effects of magnetic field curvature and analyse the sensitivity of the resulting spectrum to perturbations to the runaway distribution. The implications for the deduced runaway electron parameters are discussed. We compare our calculations to experimental data from DIII-D and estimate the maximum observed runaway energy.

  5. On the avalanche generation of runaway electrons during tokamak disruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Martín-Solís, J. R.; Loarte, A.; Lehnen, M.

    2015-08-15

    A simple zero dimensional model for a tokamak disruption is developed to evaluate the avalanche multiplication of a runaway primary seed during the current quench phase of a fast disruptive event. Analytical expressions for the plateau runaway current, the energy of the runaway beam, and the runaway energy distribution function are obtained allowing the identification of the parameters dominating the formation of the runaway current during disruptions. The effect of the electromagnetic coupling to the vessel and the penetration of the external magnetic energy during the disruption current quench as well as of the collisional dissipation of the runaway current at high densities are investigated. Current profile shape effects during the formation of the runaway beam are also addressed by means of an upgraded one-dimensional model.

  6. Thermonuclear flash model for long X-ray tails from Aquila X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fushiki, Ikko; Taam, Ronald E.; Woosley, S. E.; Lamb, D. Q.

    1992-01-01

    Attention is given to a thermonuclear flash model for long X-ray tails from the recurrent transient Aql X-1, in which the extended phase of nuclear burning is due to the fact that the envelope is out of thermal equilibrium. Only the first X-ray burst emitted by Aql X-1 during its transient outburst exhibits a long X-ray tail. The properties of subsequent bursts are distinguished by a lack of an X-ray tail reflecting the much smaller accumulated masses which result from the effects of thermal inertia in the neutron star envelope. The characteristics of the latter bursts are similar to those of typical X-ray bursters. For a neutron star characterized by a mass and radius of 1.4 solar mass and 9.1 km, respectively, the occurrence of the long X-ray tail requires that the mass of the accumulated layer be less than 10 exp 23 g and that the envelope temperatures of the neutron star be less than 1.5 x 10 exp 7. This interpretation is found to be consistent with the thermal relaxation of the neutron star envelope during the quiescent state of Aql X-1 and with the mass accretion rates inferred for the transient outburst itself.

  7. Numerical analysis of thermonuclear detonation in dense plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avronin, Y. N.; Bunatyan, A. A.; Gadzhiyev, A. D.; Mustafin, K. A.; Nurbakov, A. S.; Pisarev, V. N.; Feoktistov, L. P.; Frolov, V. D.; Shibarshov, L. I.

    1985-01-01

    The propagation of thermonuclear combustion from the region heated to thermonuclear temperatures by an external source to the remaining part of the target was investigated. The target was a tube of inert material (gold, lead, beryllium, etc.) filled with a deuterium-tritium mixture. It was determined analytically that thermonuclear combustion can propagate from a small portion of a nonspherical target to the remainder of the target and that a steady-state thermonuclear detonation wave can be formed. The role of various physical processes in thermonuclear detonation was investigated. Shock wave is the main mechanism underlying detonation propagation. The detonation rate and intensity of the thermonuclear reaction is influenced by the leakage of heat due to transvere heat conductivity. The critical diameter for thermonuclear detonation was determined approximately for a plasma filament encased in a housing with twice the density of the fuel.

  8. Outbursts and cavities in comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipatov, Sergei

    Based on analysis of the images made during the first 13 minutes after the collision of the impact module of the Deep Impact (DI) spacecraft with Comet 9P/Tempel 1, Ipatov & A'Hearn [1] studied time variations of ejection of material after this impact. They showed that, besides the normal ejection, at time t_{e} after the DI collision between 8 s and 60 s there was a considerable additional ejection (a triggered outburst) of small (micron size) particles. It increased the mean velocities of observed small ejected particles (compared with the normal ejection). The outburst could be caused by excavation of a large cavity with dust and gas under pressure. The largest cavity excavated after the collision could be relatively deep because a considerable excess ejection lasted during about 50 s. Schultz et al. [2] concluded that the diameter d_{tc} of the DI transient crater was about 200 m. Some authors support smaller values of d_{tc}. The depth of the DI crater at t_{e}=8 s was estimated in [3] to be about 6 m for d_{tc}=200 m and 4 m for d_{tc}=100 m. The distance between the pre-impact surface of Comet 9P/Tempel 1 and the upper border of the largest excavated cavity equal to about 4-6 m, and sizes of particles inside the cavities of a few microns are in good agreement with the results obtained by Kossacki & Szutowicz [4]. In their models of the explosion of Comet 17P/Holmes, the initial sublimation front of the CO ice was located at a depth of 4 m, 10 m, or 20 m, and calculations were finished when the CO pressure exceeded the threshold value 10 kPa. It was shown that the pressure of CO vapor can rise to this value only when the nucleus is composed of very fine grains, a few microns in radius. The porous structure of comets provides enough space for sublimation. The projection of the velocity of the leading edge of the DI cloud (onto the plane perpendicular to the line of sight) was about 100-200 m/s and is typical for outburst particles ejected from comets

  9. Observations of classical novae in outburst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starrfield, S.; Stryker, L. L.; Sonneborn, G.; Sparks, Warren M.; Ferland, Gary; Wagner, R. M.; Williams, R. E.; Gehrz, Robert D.; Ney, Edward P.; Kenyon, Scott

    1988-01-01

    The IUE obtained ultraviolet data on novae in outburst. The characteristics of every one of the outbursts are different. Optical and infrared data on many of the same novae were also obtained. Three members of the carbon-oxygen class of novae are presented.

  10. Thermonuclear microdetonation macron accelerator for impact ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterberg, F.

    2008-03-01

    It is proposed to replace the expensive ~150 kJ petawatt laser as a means for the fast ignition of a highly compressed dense DT target by a small flyer plate propelled to high velocities by a thermonuclear microdetonation ignited at one end of a super-pinch. It appears that this can most efficiently be done with the previously proposed modification of the dense plasma focus device, adding a high voltage relativistic electron beam emitting diode inside the coaxial plasma focus discharge tube, igniting at the end of the plasma focus pinch column a thermonuclear detonation wave, propagating in the axial direction and accelerating at the end of the pinch a flyer plate to a velocity of 103 km s-1.

  11. Thermonuclear flashes on accreting neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joss, P. C.

    1979-01-01

    Observations of X-ray bursts from binary pulsars and globular clusters are reviewed. The previously proposed hypothesis is considered that such X-ray bursts result from thermonuclear flashes on accreting neutron stars. A general scenario for this mechanism is outlined, and numerical computations of the evolution of the surface layers of an accreting neutron star are discussed. The relation of these calculations to X-ray bursts and other phenomena is examined. Possible improvements in the numerical calculations are suggested.

  12. The neutron star transient XTE J1701-407 has returned to quiescence after a 3-year long outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degenaar, N.; Wijnands, R.; Altamirano, D.; Cackett, E.; Linares, M.; Homan, J.; Fridriksson, J.

    2011-08-01

    The neutron star low-mass X-ray binary and long thermonuclear burst source XTE J1701-407 (ATel #1618) has been active ever since its discovery in 2008 June (ATel #1569), displaying a typical 2-10 keV luminosity of ~5E36 erg/s (assuming a distance D=5.0 kpc; ATel #2814). However, routine monitoring of the Galactic bulge with the PCA aboard RXTE (Swank & Markwardt 2001, ASP conference series 251, 94) indicates that the outburst has now ceased: the source intensity has remained below the detection limit of the PCA since 2011 August 9 (see the link provided below).

  13. Numerical calculation of ion runaway distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Embréus, O.; Stahl, A.; Hirvijoki, E.; Fülöp, T.; Newton, S.

    2015-05-15

    Ions accelerated by electric fields (so-called runaway ions) in plasmas may explain observations in solar flares and fusion experiments; however, limitations of previous analytic work have prevented definite conclusions. In this work, we describe a numerical solver of the 2D non-relativistic linearized Fokker-Planck equation for ions. It solves the initial value problem in velocity space with a spectral-Eulerian discretization scheme, allowing arbitrary plasma composition and time-varying electric fields and background plasma parameters. The numerical ion distribution function is then used to consider the conditions for runaway ion acceleration in solar flares and tokamak plasmas. Typical time scales and electric fields required for ion acceleration are determined for various plasma compositions, ion species, and temperatures, and the potential for excitation of toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes during tokamak disruptions is considered.

  14. Numerical analysis on pump turbine runaway points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, L.; Liu, J. T.; Wang, L. Q.; Jiao, L.; Li, Z. F.

    2012-11-01

    To research the character of pump turbine runaway points with different guide vane opening, a hydraulic model was established based on a pumped storage power station. The RNG k-ε model and SMPLEC algorithms was used to simulate the internal flow fields. The result of the simulation was compared with the test data and good correspondence was got between experimental data and CFD result. Based on this model, internal flow analysis was carried out. The result show that when the pump turbine ran at the runway speed, lots of vortexes appeared in the flow passage of the runner. These vortexes could always be observed even if the guide vane opening changes. That is an important way of energy loss in the runaway condition. Pressure on two sides of the runner blades were almost the same. So the runner power is very low. High speed induced large centrifugal force and the small guide vane opening gave the water velocity a large tangential component, then an obvious water ring could be observed between the runner blades and guide vanes in small guide vane opening condition. That ring disappeared when the opening bigger than 20°. These conclusions can provide a theory basis for the analysis and simulation of the pump turbine runaway points.

  15. Collisionless pitch-angle scattering of runaway electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian; Wang, Yulei; Qin, Hong

    2016-06-01

    It is discovered that the tokamak field geometry generates a toroidicity induced broadening of the pitch-angle distribution of runaway electrons. This collisionless pitch-angle scattering is much stronger than the collisional scattering and invalidates the gyro-center model for runaway electrons. As a result, the energy limit of runaway electrons is found to be larger than the prediction of the gyro-center model and to depend heavily on the background magnetic field.

  16. The reproducible radio outbursts of SS Cygni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, T. D.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Altamirano, D.; O'Brien, T. J.; Page, K. L.; Templeton, M. R.; Körding, E. G.; Knigge, C.; Rupen, M. P.; Fender, R. P.; Heinz, S.; Maitra, D.; Markoff, S.; Migliari, S.; Remillard, R. A.; Russell, D. M.; Sarazin, C. L.; Waagen, E. O.

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of our intensive radio observing campaign of the dwarf nova SS Cyg during its 2010 April outburst. We argue that the observed radio emission was produced by synchrotron emission from a transient radio jet. Comparing the radio light curves from previous and subsequent outbursts of this system (including high-resolution observations from outbursts in 2011 and 2012) shows that the typical long and short outbursts of this system exhibit reproducible radio outbursts that do not vary significantly between outbursts, which is consistent with the similarity of the observed optical, ultraviolet and X-ray light curves. Contemporaneous optical and X-ray observations show that the radio emission appears to have been triggered at the same time as the initial X-ray flare, which occurs as disk material first reaches the boundary layer. This raises the possibility that the boundary region may be involved in jet production in accreting white dwarf systems. Our high spatial resolution monitoring shows that the compact jet remained active throughout the outburst with no radio quenching.

  17. The reproducible radio outbursts of SS Cygni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, T. D.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Altamirano, D.; O'Brien, T. J.; Page, K. L.; Templeton, M. R.; Körding, E. G.; Knigge, C.; Rupen, M. P.; Fender, R. P.; Heinz, S.; Maitra, D.; Markoff, S.; Migliari, S.; Remillard, R. A.; Russell, D. M.; Sarazin, C. L.; Waagen, E. O.

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of our intensive radio observing campaign of the dwarf nova SS Cyg during its 2010 April outburst. We argue that the observed radio emission was produced by synchrotron emission from a transient radio jet. Comparing the radio light curves from previous and subsequent outbursts of this system (including high-resolution observations from outbursts in 2011 and 2012) shows that the typical long and short outbursts of this system exhibit reproducible radio outbursts that do not vary significantly between outbursts, which is consistent with the similarity of the observed optical, ultraviolet and X-ray light curves. Contemporaneous optical and X-ray observations show that the radio emission appears to have been triggered at the same time as the initial X-ray flare, which occurs as disc material first reaches the boundary layer. This raises the possibility that the boundary region may be involved in jet production in accreting white dwarf systems. Our high spatial resolution monitoring shows that the compact jet remained active throughout the outburst with no radio quenching.

  18. FU Orionis Outbursts and the Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Robbins; Young, Rich (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Protostellar systems are variable on many timescales. The FU Orionis outburst is one of the most drastic forms of variability known to occur in low mass stellar systems. During a typical outburst lasting several decades, system luminosities may be a hundred times what is normal of the quiescent state. FU Orionis outburst events are believed to have significant impacts on the thermal structure of the protosolar nebula. Their existence has been utilized to explain features in the meteoritic record from thermally induced homogenization to chondrule formation. Recent numerical models have shown the viability of the hypothesis that the radiation observed during outburst is emitted by a luminous circumstellar disk transporting mass at a thousand times the quiescent rate. We will begin by describing what is known about the FU Orionis outburst phenomenon from recent observations and theory. We will discuss evidence that suggests that outburst radiation is emitted by a circumstellar disk rather than by the star and will briefly describe the thermal instability as a mechanism for outburst. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  19. Outbursts from cavities in comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipatov, S.

    2014-07-01

    In 2005 the impact module of the Deep Impact (DI) spacecraft collided with Comet 9P/Tempel 1. Based on analysis of the images made during the first 13 minutes after the collision of the DI impact module with the comet, Ipatov and A'Hearn [1] studied time variations of ejection of material after this impact. Observed brightness of the cloud of ejected material was mainly due to particles with diameters d<3 micron, and so we discussed ejection of such particles. It was shown that, besides the normal ejection of material from the crater, at time t_{e} after the DI collision between 8 s and 60 s there was a considerable additional ejection (a triggered outburst) of small (micron size) particles. It increased the mean velocities of observed small ejected particles (compared with the normal ejection). It is difficult to explain the time variations in the brightness of the DI cloud at distance 1outburst of particles with velocities of about 100 m/s. The outburst could be caused by excavation of a large cavity with dust and gas under pressure. Though the model of a layered target can play some role in an explanation of the variation in brightness of the DI cloud, it cannot explain all details of such variation (for example, at t_{e} sim 10 s there was simultaneously a jump in the direction from the place of ejection to the brightest pixel in an image of the DI cloud by 50 degrees, an increase in the rate of ejection of small particles, and an increase in the brightness of the brightest pixel; at t_{e} ≈ 60 s there was a sharp decrease in the rate of ejection of small particles, and at t_{e} ≈ 60 s the direction from the place of ejection to the brightest pixel returned to the direction at 1 < t_{e} <12 s; the mean ejection velocities of observed particles were almost the same at t_{e} about 10-20 s, etc.). In [1] it was concluded that particles could not increase their velocities by more than a few meters per second during those

  20. The impact of angular scattering on the runaway threshold definition, consequences on the thermal runaway acceleration mechanism.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanrion, O.; Bonaventura, Z.; Neubert, T.; Bourdon, A.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) by the Compton Gamma-ray Observatory in 1991 is now understood as X- and Gamma-rays emissions associated with thunderstorms. This interest led to a better understanding of the emissions, now explained by bremsstrahlung from high energy electrons which run away in electric fields associated with thunderstorms. In this presentation we discuss the influence of the scattering for the runaway mechanism and the runaway threshold. We compare the outcome of different models with increasing complexity in the description of the scattering. The results show that the inclusion of the scattering in the model firstly reduces the runaway production by allowing some electrons to diffuse out of the runaway regime before they reach energy high enough to justify a forward scattering model. Secondly they affect the definition of the runaway threshold itself. We purpose a alternative definition applicable for sub-MeV electrons and discuss the impact on runaway rates.

  1. Does Turbulence in the Iron Convection Zone Cause the Massive Outbursts of Eta Carinae?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, Richard B.

    1999-01-01

    Taken at face value, the observed properties of the central object in Eta-Car suggest a very massive, hot main-sequence star, only slightly evolved. If this is so, the star's extraordinarily high steady rate of mass loss must dynamically perturb its outer envelope down to the iron convection zone, where the kinetic energy associated with turbulent convection can be directly fed into mass ejection. Runaway mass loss, triggered by either internal (pulsational, rotational) or external (tidal) forcing, would produce a secular oscillation of the outer envelope. In either case, the oscillation is potentially able to account for the observed approximately 5 yr cycles of visual outbursts in Eta-Car, including the giant eruption of 1843.

  2. Convective overshoot mixing in Nova outbursts - the dependence on the composition of the underlyingwhitedwarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasner, S. Ami; Livne, Eli; Truran, James W.

    2012-12-01

    We present here, for the first time, a 2D study of the overshoot convective mechanism in nova outbursts for a wide range of possible compositions of the layer underlying the accreted envelope. Previous surveys studied this mechanism only for solar composition matter accreted on top of carbon-oxygen (C-O) white dwarfs. Since, during the runaway, mixing with carbon enhances the hydrogen burning rates dramatically, one should question whether significant enrichment of the ejecta is possible also for other underlying compositions (He, O, Ne, Mg), predicted by stellar evolution models. We simulated several non-carbon cases and found significant amounts of those underlying materials in the ejected hydrogen layer. Despite large differences in rates, time-scales and energetics between the cases, our results show that the convective dredge-up mechanism predicts significant enrichment in all our non-carbon cases, including helium enrichment in recurrent novae. The results are consistent with observations.

  3. Thermonuclear processes on accreting neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joss, P. C.

    1981-01-01

    Theoretical models for X-ray burst sources that invoke thermonuclear flashes on the surface layers of an accreting neutron star are discussed. The historical development of X-ray burst observation is summarized, and a physical picture of a neutron star undergoing accretion is drawn. Detailed numerical computations of the evolution of the surface layers of such a star are reviewed. The need for general relativistic corrections to the model is pointed out. Finally, comparisons are made with observations of X-ray bursts, the rapid burster, fast X-ray transients, X-ray pulsars, and gamma-ray burst sources.

  4. Comet outbursts and polymers of HCN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rettig, Terrence W.; Tegler, Stephen C.; Pasto, Daniel J.; Mumma, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    Dramatic cometary outbursts have been noted by observers for many years. These outbursts can sometimes increase the apparent brightness of a comet up to 9 mag and release energy on the order of 10 exp 19 ergs. A number of mechanisms have been suggested for outburst activity; however, none has been generally accepted. HCN is a known constituent of both interstellar icy grain mantles and cometary nuclei, and HCN polymers have been postulated to exist on the dark surface of comets such as P/Halley. Since polymerization is a strongly exothermic process, we investigate the possibility that HCN polymerization can provide the energy needed for outbursts. Polymerization may be continuing in the inhomogeneous interior of comets. In addition, the reactive CN groups in these oligomers can be hydrolyzed and may contribute to CO2 and CO pressure buildup in the interior of comets.

  5. Protoplanetary Formation and the FU Orionis Outburst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodenheimer, P. H.

    1996-01-01

    The following three publications which reference the above grant from the NASA Origins of Solar Systems program are attached and form the final technical report for this project. The research involved comparisons of the spectral energy distributions of FU Orionis objects with theoretical models and associated studies of the structure of the outbursting accretion disks, as well as related studies on the effects of magnetic fields in disks, which will lead in the future to models of FU Orionis outbursts which include the effects of magnetic fields. The project was renewed under a new grant NAGW-4456, entitled 'Effects of FU Orionis Outbursts on Protoplanetary Disks'. Work now being prepared for publication deals more specifically with the issue of the effects of the outbursts on protoplanetary formation. Models of the spectral energy distribution of FU Orionis stars. A simple model of a buoyant magnetic dynamo in accretion disks and a numerical study of magnetic buoyancy in an accretion disk have been submitted.

  6. Oscillations During Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    High amplitude, nearly coherent X-ray brightness oscillations during thermonuclear X-ray bursts were discovered with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in early 1996. Spectral and timing evidence strongly supports the conclusion that these oscillations are caused by rotational modulation of the burst emission and that they reveal the spin frequency of neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries, a long sought goal of X-ray astronomy. Studies carried out over the past year have led to the discovery of burst oscillations in four new sources, bringing to ten the number with confirmed burst oscillations. I review the status of our knowledge of these oscillations and indicate how they can be used to probe the physics of neutron stars. For a few burst oscillation sources it has been proposed that the strongest and most ubiquitous frequency is actually the first overtone of the spin frequency and hence that two nearly antipodal hot spots are present on the neutron star. This inference has important implications for both the physics of thermonuclear burning as well as the mass - radius relation for neutron stars, so its confirmation is crucial. I discuss recent attempts to confirm this hypothesis for 4U 1636-53, the source for which a signal at the putative fundamental (290Hz) has, been claimed.

  7. An Impact Triggered Runaway Greenhouse on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segura, T. L.; McKay, C. P.; Toon, O. B.

    2004-01-01

    When a planet is in radiative equilibrium, the incoming solar flux balances the outgoing longwave flux. If something were to perturb the system slightly, say the incoming solar flux increased, the planet would respond by radiating at a higher surface temperature. Since any radiation that comes in must go out, if the incoming is increased, the outgoing must also increase, and this increase manifests itself as a warmer equilibrium temperature. The increase in solar flux would correspond to an increase in temperature, which would increase the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere due to increased evaporation. Since water vapor is a greenhouse gas, it would absorb more radiation in the atmosphere leading to a yet warmer equilibrium temperature. The planet would reach radiative equilibrium at this new temperature. There exists a point, however, past which this positive feedback leads to a "runaway" situation. In this case, the planet does not simply evaporate a little more water and eventually come to a slightly higher equilibrium temperature. Instead, the planet keeps evaporating more and more water until all of the planet's available liquid and solid water is in the atmosphere. The reason for this is generally understood. If the planet's temperature increases, evaporation of water increases, and the absorption of radiation increases. This increases the temperature and the feedback continues until all water is in the atmosphere. The resulting equilibrium temperature is very high, much higher than the equilibrium temperature of a point with slightly lower solar flux. One can picture that as solar flux increases, planetary temperature also increases until the runaway point where temperature suddenly "jumps" to a higher value, in response to all the available water now residing in the atmosphere. This new equilibrium is called a "runaway greenhouse" and it has been theorized that this is what happened to the planet Venus, where the surface temperature is more than 700 K

  8. Runaway greenhouse atmospheres: Applications to Earth and Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasting, James F.

    1991-01-01

    Runaway greenhouse atmospheres are discussed from a theoretical standpoint and with respect to various practical situation in which they might occur. The following subject areas are covered: (1) runaway greenhouse atmospheres; (2) moist greenhouse atmospheres; (3) loss of water from Venus; (4) steam atmosphere during accretion; and (5) the continuously habitable zone.

  9. Becoming a Runaway: From the Accounts of Youthful Runners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ek, Carl A.; Steelman, Lala Carr

    1988-01-01

    Interviews with runaways reveals the following stages of a runaway episode: (1) problematic relationships at home, characterized by violence, power struggles, sibling favoritism, and a lack of love; (2) the fight, which includes a transgression and a parental threat; and (3) running away, where the youth must manage fear and handle logistical…

  10. Longitudinal Outcomes for Youth Receiving Runaway/Homeless Shelter Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollio, David E.; Thompson, Sanna J.; Tobias, Lisa; Reid, Donna; Spitznagel, Edward

    2006-01-01

    This research examined outcomes and use of specific types of services 6 weeks, 3 and 6 months post-discharge for a large sample of runaway/homeless youth using crisis shelter services. Data were collected for 371 runaway/homeless youth using emergency shelter and crisis services at eleven agencies across a four-state midwestern region. Outcomes…

  11. Predictors of Trauma-Related Symptoms among Runaway Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Michael D.; Thompson, Sanna J.

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about trauma-related symptoms among runaway adolescents. Precocious departure from familial homes often exposes youth to traumatic victimization. This study examined the extent to which runaway adolescents present trauma symptomotology and assessed factors that predict trauma symptoms. Participants (N = 350) were 12-18 years of age…

  12. Dwarf Nova Outbursts with Magnetorotational Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, M. S. B.; Kotko, I.; Blaes, O.; Lasota, J.-P.; Hirose, S.

    2016-08-01

    The phenomenological Disc Instability Model has been successful in reproducing the observed light curves of dwarf nova outbursts by invoking an enhanced Shakura-Sunyaev α parameter ˜0.1 - 0.2 in outburst compared to a low value ˜0.01 in quiescence. Recent thermodynamically consistent simulations of magnetorotational (MRI) turbulence with appropriate opacities and equation of state for dwarf nova accretion discs have found that thermal convection enhances α in discs in outburst, but only near the hydrogen ionization transition. At higher temperatures, convection no longer exists and α returns to the low value comparable to that in quiescence. In order to check whether this enhancement near the hydrogen ionization transition is sufficient to reproduce observed light curves, we incorporate this MRI-based variation in α into the Disc Instability Model, as well as simulation-based models of turbulent dissipation and convective transport. These MRI-based models can successfully reproduce observed outburst and quiescence durations, as well as outburst amplitudes, albeit with different parameters from the standard Disc Instability Models. The MRI-based model lightcurves exhibit reflares in the decay from outburst, which are not generally observed in dwarf novae. However, we highlight the problematic aspects of the quiescence physics in the Disc Instability Model and MRI simulations that are responsible for this behavior.

  13. Runaway electron dynamics in tokamak plasmas with high impurity content

    SciTech Connect

    Martín-Solís, J. R.; Loarte, A.; Lehnen, M.

    2015-09-15

    The dynamics of high energy runaway electrons is analyzed for plasmas with high impurity content. It is shown that modified collision terms are required in order to account for the collisions of the relativistic runaway electrons with partially stripped impurity ions, including the effect of the collisions with free and bound electrons, as well as the scattering by the full nuclear and the electron-shielded ion charge. The effect of the impurities on the avalanche runaway growth rate is discussed. The results are applied, for illustration, to the interpretation of the runaway electron behavior during disruptions, where large amounts of impurities are expected, particularly during disruption mitigation by massive gas injection. The consequences for the electron synchrotron radiation losses and the resulting runaway electron dynamics are also analyzed.

  14. Runaway electron dynamics in tokamak plasmas with high impurity content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Solís, J. R.; Loarte, A.; Lehnen, M.

    2015-09-01

    The dynamics of high energy runaway electrons is analyzed for plasmas with high impurity content. It is shown that modified collision terms are required in order to account for the collisions of the relativistic runaway electrons with partially stripped impurity ions, including the effect of the collisions with free and bound electrons, as well as the scattering by the full nuclear and the electron-shielded ion charge. The effect of the impurities on the avalanche runaway growth rate is discussed. The results are applied, for illustration, to the interpretation of the runaway electron behavior during disruptions, where large amounts of impurities are expected, particularly during disruption mitigation by massive gas injection. The consequences for the electron synchrotron radiation losses and the resulting runaway electron dynamics are also analyzed.

  15. The Be X-ray Binary Outburst Zoo II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehnel, M.; Kretschmar, P.; Nespoli, E.; Okazaki, A. T.; Schoenherr, G.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Falkner, S.; Brand, T.; Anders, F.; Schwarm, F.-W.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Mueller, S.; Pottschmidt, K.; Fuerst, F.; Grinberg, V.; Wilms, J.

    2015-03-01

    We have continued our recently started systematic study of Be X-ray binary (BeXRB) outbursts. Specifically, we are developing a catalogue of outbursts including their basic properties based on nearly all available X-ray all-sky-monitors. These properties are derived by fitting asymmetric Gaussians to the outburst lightcurves. This model describes most of the outbursts covered by our preliminary catalogue well; only 13% of all datasets show more complex outburst shapes. Analyzing the basic properties, we reveal a strong correlation between the outburst length and the reached peak flux. As an example, we discuss possible models describing the observed correlation in EXO 2030+375.

  16. ON THE EFFECT OF EXPLOSIVE THERMONUCLEAR BURNING ON THE ACCRETED ENVELOPES OF WHITE DWARFS IN CATACLYSMIC VARIABLES

    SciTech Connect

    Sion, Edward M.; Sparks, Warren E-mail: warrensparks@comcast.net

    2014-11-20

    The detection of heavy elements at suprasolar abundances in the atmospheres of some accreting white dwarfs in cataclysmic variables (CVs), coupled with the high temperatures needed to produce these elements, requires explosive thermonuclear burning. The central temperatures of any formerly more massive secondary stars in CVs undergoing hydrostatic CNO burning are far too low to produce these elements. Evidence is presented that at least some CVs contain donor secondaries that have been contaminated by white dwarf remnant burning during the common envelope phase and are transferring this material back to the white dwarf. This scenario does not exclude the channel in which formerly more massive donor stars underwent CNO processing in systems with thermal timescale mass transfer. Implications for the progenitors of CVs are discussed and a new scenario for the white dwarf's accretion-nova-outburst is given.

  17. Kinetic modelling of runaway electron avalanches in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, E.; Decker, J.; Peysson, Y.; Granetz, R. S.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Vlainic, M.

    2015-09-01

    Runaway electrons can be generated in tokamak plasmas if the accelerating force from the toroidal electric field exceeds the collisional drag force owing to Coulomb collisions with the background plasma. In ITER, disruptions are expected to generate runaway electrons mainly through knock-on collisions (Hender et al 2007 Nucl. Fusion 47 S128-202), where enough momentum can be transferred from existing runaways to slow electrons to transport the latter beyond a critical momentum, setting off an avalanche of runaway electrons. Since knock-on runaways are usually scattered off with a significant perpendicular component of the momentum with respect to the local magnetic field direction, these particles are highly magnetized. Consequently, the momentum dynamics require a full 3D kinetic description, since these electrons are highly sensitive to the magnetic non-uniformity of a toroidal configuration. For this purpose, a bounce-averaged knock-on source term is derived. The generation of runaway electrons from the combined effect of Dreicer mechanism and knock-on collision process is studied with the code LUKE, a solver of the 3D linearized bounce-averaged relativistic electron Fokker-Planck equation (Decker and Peysson 2004 DKE: a fast numerical solver for the 3D drift kinetic equation Report EUR-CEA-FC-1736, Euratom-CEA), through the calculation of the response of the electron distribution function to a constant parallel electric field. The model, which has been successfully benchmarked against the standard Dreicer runaway theory now describes the runaway generation by knock-on collisions as proposed by Rosenbluth (Rosenbluth and Putvinski 1997 Nucl. Fusion 37 1355-62). This paper shows that the avalanche effect can be important even in non-disruptive scenarios. Runaway formation through knock-on collisions is found to be strongly reduced when taking place off the magnetic axis, since trapped electrons can not contribute to the runaway electron population. Finally, the

  18. Intergalactic thermonuclear gamma-ray line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, D. D.

    1985-01-01

    The possibility of thermonculear reactions occurring in dilute space is briefly considered. X-ray emission from clusters of galaxies demonstrates that perhaps as much as 10 to the 14th solar masses of hot gas (T of about 100 million K) may often surround galaxies in clusters with a density of perhaps 0.004/cu cm. If the ion temperature is 100 million K, the thermonuclear reaction p + d to He-3 + gamma ray should emit gamma rays at a rate of roughly 4 x 10 to the 41st/sec with energy 5.516 + or -0.016 MeV. Such a source in teh virgo cluster at 15.7 Mpc would present a line flux of 1 x 10 to the -11th/sq cm/sec.

  19. Alfvénic instabilities driven by runaways in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fülöp, T.; Newton, S.

    2014-08-15

    Runaway particles can be produced in plasmas with large electric fields. Here, we address the possibility that such runaway ions and electrons excite Alfvénic instabilities. The magnetic perturbation induced by these modes can enhance the loss of runaways. This may have important implications for the runaway electron beam formation in tokamak disruptions.

  20. MULTI-INSTRUMENT X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF THERMONUCLEAR BURSTS WITH SHORT RECURRENCE TIMES

    SciTech Connect

    Keek, L.; Heger, A.; Galloway, D. K.; In't Zand, J. J. M.

    2010-07-20

    Type I X-ray bursts from low-mass X-ray binaries result from a thermonuclear runaway in the material accreted onto the neutron star. Although typical recurrence times are a few hours, consistent with theoretical ignition model predictions, there are also observations of bursts occurring as promptly as 10 minutes or less after the previous event. We present a comprehensive assessment of this phenomenon using a catalog of 3387 bursts observed with the BeppoSAX/WFCs and RXTE/PCA X-ray instruments. This catalog contains 136 bursts with recurrence times of less than 1 hr, that come in multiples of up to four events, from 15 sources. Short recurrence times are not observed from the so-called ultra-compact binaries, indicating that hydrogen-burning processes play a crucial role. As far as the neutron star spin frequency is known, these sources all spin fast at over 500 Hz; the rotationally induced mixing may explain burst recurrence times of the order of 10 minutes. Short recurrence time bursts generally occur at all mass accretion rates where normal bursts are observed, but for individual sources the short recurrence times may be restricted to a smaller interval of accretion rate. The fraction of such bursts is roughly 30%. We also report the shortest known recurrence time of 3.8 minutes.

  1. Outbursts from IGR J17473-2721

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Chen, Y.-P.; Wang, J.-M.; Torres, D. F.; Li, T.-P.

    2009-07-01

    Aims: IGR J17473-2721 was discovered by INTEGRAL as a neutron star low mass X-ray binary. To date, two outbursts have been detected in X-rays by RXTE/ASM and SWIFT: the one occurring in 2005 was weak and was characterized by a low/hard state spectrum; the one of March 2008 was strong and showed a 6-step evolution in its flux. We investigate their evolution, emphasizing the later outburst. Methods: We analyzed all available observations carried out by RXTE on IGR J17473-2721 during its later outburst. We analyzed as well all the available SWIFT/BAT data on this source. Results: The flux of the latter outburst rose in ~one month and then kept roughly constant for the following ~two months. During this time period, the source was in a low/hard state. The source moved to a high/soft state within the following three days, accompanied by the occurrence of an additional outburst at soft X-rays and the end of the preceding outburst in hard X-rays. During the decay of this soft outburst, the source went back to a low/hard state within 6 days, with a luminosity 4 times lower than the first transition. This shows a full cycle of the hysteresis in transition between the hard and the soft states. The fact that the flux remained roughly constant for ~two months at times prior to the spectral transition to a high/soft state might be regarded as the result of balancing the evaporation of the inner disk and the inward accretion flow, in a model in which the state transition is determined by the mass flow rate. Such a balance might be broken via an additional mass flow accreting onto the inner disk, which lightens the extra soft outburst and causes the state transition. However, the possibility of an origin of the emission from the jet during this time period cannot be excluded. The spectral analysis suggests an inclined XRB system for IGR J17473-2721. Such a long-lived preceding low/hard state makes IGR J17473-2721 resemble the behavior of outbursts seen in black hole X

  2. Evaluation of potential runaway generation in large-tokamak disruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischmann, H.H.; Zweben, S.J. . Plasma Physics Lab. Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY . School of Applied and Engineering Physics)

    1993-06-01

    A detailed evaluation of various potential mechanisms for the generation of strong runaway beams during disruptions of largetokamak devices, including TFTR, JET, DIIID and ITER, is performed based on typical operating parameters of these devices and the presently accepted disruption model. The main results include: (1) In the existing devices, the evaporative preicer'' process by itself can lead to sizable runaway beams in disruptions of high-current-medium-to-low-ne discharges. In ITER, such runaways are expected mainly for discharges with ne values sizably smaller than the projected typical ones. (2) Runaway generation also may occur during post-thermal-quench period through the untrapping of trapped hot-thermal electrons remaining from the pre-thermal-quench plasma; this process may be directly important in particular in disruptions of high-T[sub e] discharges with details depending on the time required for reclosure of the magnetic surfaces. Both processes (1) and (2) will occur and be completed mostly during the initial few 100 [mu]sec after the thermal quench. (3) Subsequently, close collisions of runaways with cold plasma electrons generally will lead to an exponential growth ( avalanching'') of runaway populations generated by processes (1) and/or (2) and/or others; this process will be effective in particular during the current quench phase and will continue until the resulting runaway beam will carry essentially all of the remaining discharge current. In presently existing devices, possible avalanche factors of up to 10[sup 2]--10[sup 5] may be expected; in ITER, avalanche factors of up to 10[sup 10]--10[sup 15] -- if not properly suppressed -- are expected to lead to strong runaway beams in most disruptions, except those at particularly high densities. At the same time, avalanching will shift the main part of their energy spectrum down to relatively low energies around 10--20 MeV, and may sizably change the spatial distribution of the runaways.

  3. Evaluation of potential runaway generation in large-tokamak disruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischmann, H.H.; Zweben, S.J. |

    1993-06-01

    A detailed evaluation of various potential mechanisms for the generation of strong runaway beams during disruptions of largetokamak devices, including TFTR, JET, DIIID and ITER, is performed based on typical operating parameters of these devices and the presently accepted disruption model. The main results include: (1) In the existing devices, the evaporative ``preicer`` process by itself can lead to sizable runaway beams in disruptions of high-current-medium-to-low-ne discharges. In ITER, such runaways are expected mainly for discharges with ne values sizably smaller than the projected typical ones. (2) Runaway generation also may occur during post-thermal-quench period through the untrapping of trapped hot-thermal electrons remaining from the pre-thermal-quench plasma; this process may be directly important in particular in disruptions of high-T{sub e} discharges with details depending on the time required for reclosure of the magnetic surfaces. Both processes (1) and (2) will occur and be completed mostly during the initial few 100 {mu}sec after the thermal quench. (3) Subsequently, close collisions of runaways with cold plasma electrons generally will lead to an exponential growth (``avalanching``) of runaway populations generated by processes (1) and/or (2) and/or others; this process will be effective in particular during the current quench phase and will continue until the resulting runaway beam will carry essentially all of the remaining discharge current. In presently existing devices, possible avalanche factors of up to 10{sup 2}--10{sup 5} may be expected; in ITER, avalanche factors of up to 10{sup 10}--10{sup 15} -- if not properly suppressed -- are expected to lead to strong runaway beams in most disruptions, except those at particularly high densities. At the same time, avalanching will shift the main part of their energy spectrum down to relatively low energies around 10--20 MeV, and may sizably change the spatial distribution of the runaways.

  4. Runaway of energetic test ions in a toroidal plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Eilerman, S. Anderson, J. K.; Sarff, J. S.; Forest, C. B.; Reusch, J. A.; Nornberg, M. D.; Kim, J.

    2015-02-15

    Ion runaway in the presence of a large-scale, reconnection-driven electric field has been conclusively measured in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch (RFP). Measurements of the acceleration of a beam of fast ions agree well with test particle and Fokker-Planck modeling of the runaway process. However, the runaway mechanism does not explain all measured ion heating in the RFP, particularly previous measurements of strong perpendicular heating. It is likely that multiple energization mechanisms occur simultaneously and with differing significance for magnetically coupled thermal ions and magnetically decoupled tail and beam ions.

  5. Runaway Geneeration In Disruptions Of Plasmas In TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, E. D.; Bell, M. G.; Taylor, G.; Medley, S. S.

    2014-03-31

    Many disruptions in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [D. Meade and the TFTR Group, in Proceedings of the International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion, Washington, DC, 1990 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1991), Vol. 1, pp. 9-24] produced populations of runaway electrons which carried a significant fraction of the original plasma current. In this paper, we describe experiments where, following a disruption of a low-beta, reversed shear plasma, currents of up to 1 MA carried mainly by runaway electrons were controlled and then ramped down to near zero using the ohmic transformer. In the longer lasting runaway plasmas, Parail-Pogutse instabilities were observed.

  6. Nucleosynthesis and the nova outburst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starrfield, S.; Truran, J.W.; Wiescher, M.; Sparks, W.M.

    1995-01-01

    A nova outburst is the consequence of the accretion of hydrogen rich material onto a white dwarf and it can be considered as the largest hydrogen bomb in the Universe. The fuel is supplied by a secondary star in a close binary system while the strong degeneracy of the massive white dwarf acts to contain the gas during the early stages of the explosion. The containment allows the temperature in the nuclear burning region to exceed 10(sup 8)K under all circumstances. As a result a major fraction of CNO nuclei in the envelope are transformed into (beta)(sup +)-unstable nuclei. We discuss the effects of these nuclei on the evolution. Recent observational studies have shown that there are two compositional classes of novae; one which occurs on carbon-oxygen white dwarfs, and a second class that occurs on oxygen-neon-magnesium white dwarfs. In this review we will concentrate on the latter explosions since they produce the most interesting nucleosynthesis. We report both on the results of new observational determinations of nova abundances and, in addition, new hydrodynamic calculations that examine the consequences of the accretion process on 1.0M(sub (circle dot)), 1.25M(sub (circle dot)), and 1.35M(sub (circle dot)) white dwarfs. Our results show that novae can produce (sup 22)Na, (sup 26)Al, and other intermediate mass nuclei in interesting amounts. We will present the results of new calculations, done with updated nuclear reaction rates and opacities, which exhibit quantitative differences with respect to published work.

  7. Nucleosynthesis and the nova outburst

    SciTech Connect

    Starrfield, S.; Truran, J.W.; Wiescher, M.; Sparks, W.M.

    1995-12-31

    A nova outburst is the consequence of the accretion of hydrogen rich material onto a white dwarf and it can be considered as the largest hydrogen bomb in the Universe. The fuel is supplied by a secondary star in a close binary system while the strong degeneracy of the massive white dwarf acts to contain the gas during the early stages of the explosion. The containment allows the temperature in the nuclear burning region to exceed 10{sup 8}K under all circumstances. As a result a major fraction of CNO nuclei in the envelope are transformed into {beta}{sup +}-unstable nuclei. We discuss the effects of these nuclei on the evolution. Recent observational studies have shown that there are two compositional classes of novae; one which occurs on carbon-oxygen white dwarfs, and a second class that occurs on oxygen-neon-magnesium white dwarfs. In this review we will concentrate on the latter explosions since they produce the most interesting nucleosynthesis. We report both on the results of new observational determinations of nova abundances and, in addition, new hydrodynamic calculations that examine the consequences of the accretion process on 1.0M{sub {circle_dot}}, 1.25M{sub {circle_dot}}, and 1.35M{sub {circle_dot}} white dwarfs. Our results show that novae can produce {sup 22}Na, {sup 26}Al, and other intermediate mass nuclei in interesting amounts. We will present the results of new calculations, done with updated nuclear reaction rates and opacities, which exhibit quantitative differences with respect to published work.

  8. Neutron Stars and Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, Sudip

    2007-01-01

    Studies of thermonuclear X-ray bursts can be very useful to constrain the spin rate, mass and radius of a neutron star approaching EOS model of high density cold matter in the neutron star cores. +k Extensive observation and analysis of the data from the rising portions of the bursts - modeling of burst oscillations and thermonuclear flame spreading. +k Theoretical study of thermonuclear flame spreading on the rapidly spinning neutron stars should be done considering all the main physical effects (including magnetic field, nuclear energy generation, Coriolis effect, strong gravity, etc.).

  9. X-ray bursts and neutron-star thermonuclear flashes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joss, P. C.

    1977-01-01

    A description is presented of a model concerning the production of X-ray bursts by thermonuclear flashes in the freshly accreted matter near the surface of an accreting neutron star. An investigation is conducted regarding the physical processes relevant to such thermonuclear flashes. It is concluded that thermonuclear flashes may account for some, but not all, of the observed X-ray burst sources. Attention is given to a neutron star undergoing accretion of mass from a binary stellar companion, aspects of energetics, nuclear reactions, and heat transport mechanisms.

  10. Understanding Neutron Stars using Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.

    2007-01-01

    Studies of thermonuclear X-ray bursts can be very useful to constrain the spin rate, mass and radius of a neutron star = EOS model of high density cold matter in the neutron star cores. Extensive observation and analysis of the data from the rising portions of the bursts = modeling of burst oscillations and thermonuclear flame spreading. Theoretical study of thermonuclear flame spreading on the rapidly spinning neutron stars should be done considering all the main physical effects (including magnetic field, nuclear energy generation, Coriolis effect, strong gravity, etc.).

  11. Naturalness from Runaways in Direct Mediation

    SciTech Connect

    Schafer-Nameki, Sakura; Tamarit, Carlos; Torroba, Gonzalo; /SLAC

    2011-02-07

    Postulating that the NMSSM singlet is a meson of a microscopic confining theory opens up new model-building possibilities. Based on this, we construct calculable models of direct mediation that solve the {mu}/B{mu} problem and simultaneously lead to realistic phenomenology. The singlet that couples to the Higgs fields develops a runaway produced by soft interactions, then stabilized by a small superpotential perturbation. The mechanism is first realized in an O'Raifeartaigh model of direct gauge mediation with metastable supersymmetry breaking. Focusing then on the microscopic theory, we argue that super QCD with massless and massive flavors in the free magnetic phase gives rise to this dynamics in the infrared. A deformation of the SQCD superpotential leads to large spontaneous R-symmetry breaking, gaugino masses naturally at the scale of the Higgs mass parameters, and absence of CP violating phases.

  12. Naturalness from runaways in direct mediation

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer-Nameki, Sakura; Tamarit, Carlos; Torroba, Gonzalo

    2011-02-01

    Postulating that the nonminimal supersymmetric standard model singlet is a meson of a microscopic confining theory opens up new model-building possibilities. Based on this, we construct calculable models of direct mediation that solve the {mu}/B{sub {mu}} problem and simultaneously lead to realistic phenomenology. The singlet that couples to the Higgs fields develops a runaway produced by soft interactions and then stabilized by a small superpotential perturbation. The mechanism is first realized in an O'Raifeartaigh model of direct gauge mediation with metastable supersymmetry breaking. Focusing then on the microscopic theory, we argue that super QCD with massless and massive flavors in the free magnetic phase gives rise to this dynamics in the infrared. A deformation of the super QCD superpotential leads to large spontaneous R-symmetry breaking, gaugino masses naturally at the scale of the Higgs mass parameters, and the absence of CP violating phases.

  13. Runaway electron generation as possible trigger for enhancement of magnetohydrodynamic plasma activity and fast changes in runaway beam behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Pankratov, I. M. E-mail: rjzhou@ipp.ac.cn; Zhou, R. J. E-mail: rjzhou@ipp.ac.cn; Hu, L. Q.

    2015-07-15

    Peculiar phenomena were observed during experiments with runaway electrons: rapid changes in the synchrotron spot and its intensity that coincided with stepwise increases in the electron cyclotron emission (ECE) signal (cyclotron radiation of suprathermal electrons). These phenomena were initially observed in TEXTOR (Tokamak Experiment for Technology Oriented Research), where these events only occurred in the current decay phase or in discharges with thin stable runaway beams at a q = 1 drift surface. These rapid changes in the synchrotron spot were interpreted by the TEXTOR team as a fast pitch angle scattering event. Recently, similar rapid changes in the synchrotron spot and its intensity that coincided with stepwise increases in the non-thermal ECE signal were observed in the EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) runaway discharge. Runaway electrons were located around the q = 2 rational magnetic surface (ring-like runaway electron beam). During the EAST runaway discharge, stepwise ECE signal increases coincided with enhanced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity. This behavior was peculiar to this shot. In this paper, we show that these non-thermal ECE step-like jumps were related to the abrupt growth of suprathermal electrons induced by bursting electric fields at reconnection events during this MHD plasma activity. Enhancement of the secondary runaway electron generation also occurred simultaneously. Local changes in the current-density gradient appeared because of local enhancement of the runaway electron generation process. These current-density gradient changes are considered to be a possible trigger for enhancement of the MHD plasma activity and the rapid changes in runaway beam behavior.

  14. Energy deposition and thermal effects of runaway electrons in ITER-FEAT plasma facing components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddaluno, G.; Maruccia, G.; Merola, M.; Rollet, S.

    2003-03-01

    The profile of energy deposited by runaway electrons (RAEs) of 10 or 50 MeV in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor-Fusion Energy Advanced Tokamak (ITER-FEAT) plasma facing components (PFCs) and the subsequent temperature pattern have been calculated by using the Monte Carlo code FLUKA and the finite element heat conduction code ANSYS. The RAE energy deposition density was assumed to be 50 MJ/m 2 and both 10 and 100 ms deposition times were considered. Five different configurations of PFCs were investigated: primary first wall armoured with Be, with and without protecting CFC poloidal limiters, both port limiter first wall options (Be flat tile and CFC monoblock), divertor baffle first wall, armoured with W. The analysis has outlined that for all the configurations but one (port limiter with Be flat tile) the heat sink and the cooling tube beneath the armour are well protected for both RAE energies and for both energy deposition times. On the other hand large melting (W, Be) or sublimation (C) of the surface layer occurs, eventually affecting the PFCs lifetime.

  15. Review of the classical nova outburst

    SciTech Connect

    Starrfield, S.; Sparks, W.M.

    1986-06-01

    Observational studies have not only identified a new class of novae but theoretical simulations of this class have been found to be in excellent agreement with the observations. This new class consists of outbursts occurring on ONeMg white dwarfs in close binar systems in contrast to the other outbursts which are occurring on CO white dwarfs. We also review the effects of the ..beta../sup +/-unstable nuclei and show how their presence has a major effect on the evolution. 77 refs.

  16. Reaction of runaway electron distributions to radiative processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, Adam; Embréus, Ola; Hirvijoki, Eero; Pusztai, István; Decker, Joan; Newton, Sarah L.; Fülöp, Tünde

    2015-11-01

    The emission of electromagnetic radiation by a charged particle in accelerated motion is associated with a reduction in its energy, accounted for by the inclusion of a radiation reaction force in the kinetic equation. For runaway electrons in plasmas, the dominant radiative processes are the emission of bremsstrahlung and synchrotron radiation. In this contribution, we investigate the impact of the associated radiation reaction forces on the runaway electron distribution, using both analytical and numerical studies, and discuss the corresponding change to the runaway electron growth rate, which can be substantial. We also report on the formation of non-monotonic features in the runaway electron tail as a consequence of the more complicated momentum-space dynamics in the presence of radiation reaction.

  17. The Runaway Child in America: A Social History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Libertoff, Ken

    1980-01-01

    Runaways have existed throughout American history. It is imperative to develop a context and perspective to understand running away and to formulate responsive and appropriate social policies to address this problem. (Author/NRB)

  18. Mitigating Thermal Runaway Risk in Lithium Ion Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darcy, Eric; Jeevarajan, Judy; Russell, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    The JSC/NESC team has successfully demonstrated Thermal Runaway (TR) risk reduction in a lithium ion battery for human space flight by developing and implementing verifiable design features which interrupt energy transfer between adjacent electrochemical cells. Conventional lithium ion (li-Ion) batteries can fail catastrophically as a result of a single cell going into thermal runaway. Thermal runaway results when an internal component fails to separate electrode materials leading to localized heating and complete combustion of the lithium ion cell. Previously, the greatest control to minimize the probability of cell failure was individual cell screening. Combining thermal runaway propagation mitigation design features with a comprehensive screening program reduces both the probability, and the severity, of a single cell failure.

  19. Empirical Quantification of the Runaway Greenhouse Limit on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldblatt, C.; Dewey, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    There have been many modeling studies of the runaway greenhouse effect and the conditions required to produce one on an Earth-like planet, however these models have not been verified with empirical evidence. It has been suggested that the Earth's tropics may be near a state of localized runaway greenhouse, meaning the surface temperature and atmospheric composition in those areas could cause runaway greenhouse, were it not for the tempering effects of meridional heat transport and circulation (Pierrehumbert, 1995). Using the assumption that some areas of the Earth's tropics may be under these conditions, this study uses measurements of the atmospheric properties, surface properties, and radiation budgets of these areas to quantify a radiation limit for runaway greenhouse on Earth, by analyzing the dependence of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) at the top of the atmosphere on surface temperature and total column water vapour. An upper limit on OLR for clear-sky conditions was found between 289.8 W/m2 and 292.2 W/m2, which occurred at surface temperatures near 300K. For surface temperatures above this threshold, total column water vapour increased, but OLR initially decreased and then remained relatively constant, between 273.6 W/m2 and 279.7 W/m2. These limits are in good agreement with recent modeling results (Goldblatt et al., 2013), supporting the idea that some of the Earth's tropics may be in localized runaway greenhouse, and that radiation limits for runaway greenhouse on Earth can be empirically derived. This research was done as part of Maura Dewey's undergraduate honours thesis at the University of Victoria. Refs: Robert T. Pierrehumbert. Thermostats, radiator fins, and the local runaway greenhouse. Journal of Atmospheric Sciences, 52(10):1784-1806, 1995. Colin Goldblatt, Tyler D. Robinson, Kevin J. Zahnle, and David Crisp. Low simulated radiation limit for runaway greenhouse climates. Nature Geoscience, 6:661-667, 2013.

  20. Spontaneous Deflagration-to-Detonation Transition in Thermonuclear Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poludnenko, Alexei; Gamezo, Vadim; Oran, Elaine

    2013-11-01

    We present the analysis of the spontaneous deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) in turbulent thermonuclear flames in Type Ia supernovae - explosions of degenerate white dwarf stars in binary stellar systems. We show results of first-principles numerical calculations that are used to develop and validate a subgrid-scale model for predicting the onset of DDT in full-star calculations. We also discuss detailed properties of laminar thermonuclear deflagrations for compositions and densities, at which DDT is expected to occur.

  1. Operating large controlled thermonuclear fusion research facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudreau, M.P.J.; Tarrh, J.M.; Post, R.S.; Thomas, P.

    1987-10-01

    The MIT Tara Tandem Mirror is a large, state of the art controlled thermonuclear fusion research facility. Over the six years of its design, implementation, and operation, every effort was made to minimize cost and maximize performance by using the best and latest hardware, software, and scientific and operational techniques. After reviewing all major DOE fusion facilities, an independent DOE review committee concluded that the Tara operation was the most automated and efficient of all DOE facilities. This paper includes a review of the key elements of the Tara design, construction, operation, management, physics milestones, and funding that led to this success. We emphasize a chronological description of how the system evolved from the proposal stage to a mature device with an emphasis on the basic philosophies behind the implementation process. This description can serve both as a qualitative and quantitative database for future large experiment planning. It includes actual final costs and manpower spent as well as actual run and maintenance schedules, number of data shots, major system failures, etc. The paper concludes with recommendations for the next generation of facilities. 13 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) in perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, C.D. )

    1989-10-20

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) team is completing the second year of a three-year conceptual design phase. The purpose of ITER is to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion power. It is to demonstrate plasma ignition and extended burn with steady state as the ultimate goal. In so doing, it is to provide the physics data base needed for a demonstration tokamak power reactor and to demonstrate reactor-relevant technologies, such as high-heat-flux and nuclear components for fusion power. To meet these objectives, many design compromises had to be reached by the participants following a careful review of the physics and technology base for fusion. The current ITER design features a 6-m major radius, a 2.15-m minor radius and a 22-MA plasma current. About 330 volt-seconds in the poloidal field system inductively drive the current for hundreds of seconds. Moreover, about 125 MW of neutral-beam, lower-hybrid, and electron-cyclotron power are provided for steady-state current drive and heating all these systems are discussed in this paper. 3 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Phase-space Dynamics of Runaway Electrons In Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaoyin Guan, Hong Qin, and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2010-08-31

    The phase-space dynamics of runaway electrons is studied, including the influence of loop voltage, radiation damping, and collisions. A theoretical model and a numerical algorithm for the runaway dynamics in phase space are developed. Instead of standard integrators, such as the Runge-Kutta method, a variational symplectic integrator is applied to simulate the long-term dynamics of a runaway electron. The variational symplectic integrator is able to globally bound the numerical error for arbitrary number of time-steps, and thus accurately track the runaway trajectory in phase space. Simulation results show that the circulating orbits of runaway electrons drift outward toward the wall, which is consistent with experimental observations. The physics of the outward drift is analyzed. It is found that the outward drift is caused by the imbalance between the increase of mechanical angular momentum and the input of toroidal angular momentum due to the parallel acceleration. An analytical expression of the outward drift velocity is derived. The knowledge of trajectory of runaway electrons in configuration space sheds light on how the electrons hit the first wall, and thus provides clues for possible remedies.

  4. Enhancement of runaway production by resonant magnetic perturbation on J-TEXT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z. Y.; Huang, D. W.; Izzo, V. A.; Tong, R. H.; Jiang, Z. H.; Hu, Q. M.; Wei, Y. N.; Yan, W.; Rao, B.; Wang, S. Y.; Ma, T. K.; Li, S. C.; Yang, Z. J.; Ding, D. H.; Wang, Z. J.; Zhang, M.; Zhuang, G.; Pan, Y.; J-TEXT Team

    2016-07-01

    The suppression of runaways following disruptions is key for the safe operation of ITER. The massive gas injection (MGI) has been developed to mitigate heat loads, electromagnetic forces and runaway electrons (REs) during disruptions. However, MGI may not completely prevent the generation of REs during disruptions on ITER. Resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) has been applied to suppress runaway generation during disruptions on several machines. It was found that strong RMP results in the enhancement of runaway production instead of runaway suppression on J-TEXT. The runaway current was about 50% pre-disruption plasma current in argon induced reference disruptions. With moderate RMP, the runway current decreased to below 30% pre-disruption plasma current. The runaway current plateaus reach 80% of the pre-disruptive current when strong RMP was applied. Strong RMP may induce large size magnetic islands that could confine more runaway seed during disruptions. This has important implications for runaway suppression on large machines.

  5. Fading outbursts of EXO 2030+375

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuerst, Felix; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Kretschmar, Peter; Kajava, Jari; Kuehnel, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    The Be X-ray binary pulsar EXO 2030+375, first detected in 1985 (Parmar et al., IAUC 4066), has shown a significant detected X-ray outburst at nearly every periastron passage of its 46-day orbit for the past ~25 years.

  6. Numerical modelling of the classical nova outburst

    SciTech Connect

    Kutter, G.S.; Sparks, W.M.

    1987-01-01

    We describe a mechanism that promises to explain how nova outbursts take place on white dwarf of 1 Msub solar or less and for accretion rates of 4 x 10/sup -10/ Msub solar yr/sup -1/ or greater. 7 refs.

  7. Experimental modelling of outburst flood - bed interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrivick, J. L.; Xie, Z.; Sleigh, A.; Hubbard, M.

    2009-04-01

    Outburst floods are a sudden release and advancing wave of water and sediment, with a peak discharge that is often several orders of magnitude greater than perennial flows. Common outburst floods from natural sources include those from glacial and moraine-impounded lakes, freshwater dyke and levee bursts, volcanic debris dams, landslides, avalanches, coastal bay-bars, and those from tree or vegetation dams. Outburst flood hazards are regularly incorporated into risk assessments for urban, coastal and mountainous areas, for example. Outburst flood hazards are primarily due to direct impacts, caused by a frontal surge wave, from debris within a flow body, and from the mass and consistency of the flows. A number of secondary impacts also pose hazards, including widespread deposition of sediment and blocked tributary streams. It is rapid landscape change, which is achieved the mobilization and redistribution of sediment that causes one of the greatest hazards due to outburst floods. The aim of this project is therefore to parameterise hydrodynamic - sedimentary interactions in experimental outburst floods. Specifically, this project applies laboratory flume modelling, which offers a hitherto untapped opportunity for examining complex interactions between water and sediment within outburst floods. The experimental set-up is of a tradition lock-gate design with a straight 4 m long tank. Hydraulics are scaled at 1:20 froude scale and the following controls on frontal wave flow-bed interactions and hence on rapid landscape change are being investigated: 1. Pre-existing mobile sediment effects, fixed bed roughness effects, sediment concentration effects, mobile bed effects. An emphasis is being maintained on examining the downstream temporal and spatial change in physical character of the water / sediment frontal wave. Facilities are state-of-the-art with a fully-automated laser bed-profiler to measure bed elevation after a run, Seatek arrays to measure transient flow

  8. Energetic runaway electrons emitted from streamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celestin, S. J.; Pasko, V. P.

    2010-12-01

    Streamers are filamentary plasmas, which are driven by highly nonlinear space charge waves. In tips of streamers, intense electric fields are produced, and the generation of runaway electrons in these discharges has been identified and discussed in the literature for more than two decades [Babich, Sov. Phys. Dokl., 263, 76, 1982, and references therein]. It has been proposed that with total potential differences on the order of tens of MV available in streamer zones of lightning leaders, during a highly transient negative corona flash stage of the development of negative stepped leader, electrons with energies 2-8 keV ejected from streamer tips near the leader head can be further accelerated to energies of hundreds of keV and possibly to several tens of MeV [Moss et al., JGR, 111, A02307, 2006]. It has been proposed that these energetic electrons may be responsible, through the bremsstrahlung process, for the generation of hard X-rays observed from ground and satellites [e.g., Fishman et al., Science, 264, 1313, 1994; Inan et al., GRL, 23, 1017, 1996; Moore et al., GRL, 28, 2141, 2001; Dwyer et al., GRL, 32, L01803, 2005; Smith et al., Science, 307, 1085, 2005; Cummer et al., GRL, 32, L08811, 2005; and references therein]. The current observations and theories of transient luminous events occurring above cloud tops and termed blue and gigantic jets are converging towards a clear connection between jet discharges and streamer zones of lightning leaders [Krehbiel et al., Nature Geosci., 1, 233, 2008; and references therein] and it has been suggested that the thermal runaway electron process operating in leaders may contribute to production of terrestrial gamma ray flashes from the jet discharges [Moss et al., 2006]. In the present work, we combine our recently developed Monte Carlo code simulating the propagation of electrons in air with energies varying from sub-eV to MeV [Celestin and Pasko, CEDAR Workshop, Boulder, CO, W2 ECCR245, 20-25 June, 2010] with streamer

  9. Symmetrically converging plane thermonuclear burn waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charakhch'yan, A. A.; Khishchenko, K. V.

    2013-10-01

    Five variants of a one-dimensional problem on synchronous bilateral action of two identical drivers on opposite surfaces of a plane layer of DT fuel with the normal or five times greater initial density, where the solution includes two thermonuclear burn waves propagating to meet one another at the symmetry plane, are simulated. A laser pulse with total absorption of energy at the critical density (in two variants) and a proton bunch that provides for a nearly isochoric heating (in three variants) are considered as drivers. A wide-range equation of state for the fuel, electron and ion heat conduction, self-radiation of plasma and plasma heating by α-particles are taken into account. In spite of different ways of ignition, various models of α-particle heat, whether the burn wave remains slow or transforms into the detonation wave, and regardless of way of such a transformation, the final value of the burn-up factor depends essentially on the only parameter Hρ0, where H is the half-thickness of the layer and ρ0 is the initial fuel density. This factor is about 0.35 at Hρ0 ≈ 1 g cm-2 and about 0.7 at Hρ0 ≈ 5 g cm-2. The expansion stage of the flow (after reflecting the burn or detonation wave from the symmetry plane) gives the main contribution in forming the final values of the burn-up factor and the gain at Hρ0 ≈ 1 g cm-2 and increases them approximately two times at Hρ0 ≈ 5 g cm-2. In the case of the proton driver, the final value of the gain is about 200 at Hρ0 ≈ 1 g cm-2 and about 2000 at Hρ0 ≈ 5 g cm-2. In the case of the laser driver, the above values are four times less in conformity with the difference between the driver energies.

  10. Nitride-based runaway effect devices.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komirenko, Sergiy M.; Kim, Ki Wook; Kochelap, Viacheslav A.; Dutta, Mitra; Stroscio, Michael A.

    2001-03-01

    We have investigated development of runaway effect (RAE) in polar semiconductors for the case when energy of LO phonon exceeds the lattice temperature. RAE manifest itself above some threshold electric field when the electrons gain energy from the field faster than they can dissipate it emmiting optical phonons. For superthreshold fields in bulk samples, the steady state occurs when electrons reach upper valleys so that observed velocities represent the velocities averaged over all populated valleys. We proposed and analyzed short nitride-based vertical heterostructures where electron transport can reach RAE-regime. For nitrides of Ga and Al, we found the RAE-threshold fields to be 142 kV/cm and 465 kV/cm, respectively. Our estimations reveal that in such RAE-devices the electrons can reach velocities appreciably higher than in bulk-like materials and their distribution over the energy demonstrates the population inversion. We discuss high-speed and high-power applications of RAE-devices.

  11. A MASSIVE RUNAWAY STAR FROM 30 DORADUS

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, C. J.; Walborn, N. R.; Massa, D.; Lennon, D. J.; Crowther, P. A.; Henault-Brunet, V.; Taylor, W. D.; Howarth, I. D.; Sana, H.; Van Loon, J. Th.

    2010-06-01

    We present the first ultraviolet (UV) and multi-epoch optical spectroscopy of 30 Dor 016, a massive O2-type star on the periphery of 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The UV data were obtained with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope as part of the Servicing Mission Observatory Verification program after Servicing Mission 4, and reveal no. 016 to have one of the fastest stellar winds known. From analysis of the C IV {lambda}{lambda}1548-51 doublet we find a terminal velocity, v {sub {infinity}} = 3450 {+-} 50 km s{sup -1}. Optical spectroscopy is from the VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey, from which we rule out a massive companion (with 2 days < P < 1 yr) to a confidence of 98%. The radial velocity of no. 016 is offset from the systemic value by -85 km s{sup -1}, suggesting that the star has traveled the 120 pc from the core of 30 Doradus as a runaway, ejected via dynamical interactions.

  12. Verification of runaway migration in a massive disk

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shengtai

    2009-01-01

    Runaway migration of a proto-planet was first proposed and observed by Masset and Papaloizou (2003). The semi-major axis of the proto-planet varies by 50% over just a few tens of orbits when runaway migration happens. More recent work by D'Angelo et al. (2005) solved the same problem with locally refined grid and found that the migration rate is sharply reduced and no runaway occurs when the grid cells surrounding the planet are refined enough. To verify these two seemly contradictory results, we independently perform high-resolution simulations, solving the same problem as Masset and Papaloizou (2003), with and without self-gravity. We find that the migration rate is highly dependent on the softening used in the gravitational force between thd disk and planet. When a small softening is used in a 2D massive disk, the mass of the circumplanetary disk (CPD) increases with time with enough resolution in the CPD region. It acts as the mass is continually accreted to the CPD, which cannot be settled down until after thousands of orbits. If the planet is held on a fixed orbit long enough, the mass of CPD will become so large that the condition for the runaway migration derived in Masset (2008) will not be satisfied, and hence the runaway migration will not be triggered. However, when a large softening is used, the mass of the CPD will begin to decrease after the initial increase stage. Our numerical results with and without disk-gravity confirm that the runaway migration indeed exists when the mass deficit is larger than the total mass of the planet and CPD. Our simulations results also show that the torque from the co-orbital region, in particular the planet's Hill sphere, is the main contributor to the runaway migration, and the CPD which is lagged behind by the planet becomes so asymmetric that it accelerates the migration.

  13. Thermonuclear supernova light curves: Progenitors and cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodney, Steven A.

    Thermonuclear Supernovae (TN SNe) are an extremely important tool in modern astronomy. In their role as cosmological distance probes, they have revealed the accelerated expansion of the universe and have begun to constrain the nature of the dark energy that may be driving that expansion. The next decade will see a succession of wide-field surveys producing thousands of TNSN detections each year. Traditional methods of SN analysis, rooted in time-intensive spectroscopic follow-up, will become completely impractical. To realize the potential of this coming tide of massive data sets, we will need to extract cosmographic parameters (redshift and luminosity distance) from SN photometry without any spectroscopic support. In this dissertation, I present the Supernova Ontology with Fuzzy Templates (SOFT) method, an innovative new approach to the analysis of SN light curves. SOFT uses the framework of fuzzy set theory to perform direct comparisons of SN candidates against template light curves, simultaneously producing both classifications and cosmological parameter estimates. The SOFT method allows us to shed new light on two rich archival data sets. I revisit the IfA Deep Survey and HST GOODS to extract new and improved measurements of the TNSN rate from z=0.2 out to z=1.6. Our new analysis shows a steady increase in the TNSN rate out to z˜1, and adds support for a decrease in the rate at z=1.5. Comparing these rate measurements to theoretical models, I conclude that the progenitor scenario most favored by the collective observational data is a single degenerate model, regulated by a strong wind from the accreting white dwarf. Using a compilation of SN light curves from five recent surveys, I demonstrate that SOFT is able to derive useful constraints on cosmological models from a data set with no spectroscopic information at all. Looking ahead to the near future, I find that photometric analysis of data sets containing 2,000 SNe will be able to improve our constraints on

  14. Thermal Runaway Severity Reduction Assessment and Implementation: On Li-Ion Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darcy, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Preventing cell-cell thermal runaway propagation and flames/sparks from exiting battery enclosure is possible with proper thermal & electrical design and cell thermal runaway ejecta/effluent management and can be had with minimal mass/volume penalty.

  15. Spectropolarimetric observations of OJ 287 during outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Diego, Jose A.; Gonzalez-Perez, Jose N.; Charles, Phil; Kidger, Mark

    1994-05-01

    The BL Lac object OJ287 has been studied with the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope (WHT) from the Spanish Observatory of La Palma on six nights in December 1993 and January 1994, as part of the OJ-94 International Campaign of monitoring of OJ287. At the time of the first observations, in mid-December the object was in the decline phase of a moderate outburst, reaching minimum in early January. In order to get both spectral and polarimetric observations, we used the ISIS double spectropolarimeter, giving us a spectral resolution of 3 Angstroms over the range from 5500-9000 Angstroms. This permits both the rapid continuum polarisation variations to be examined from individual exposures (resolution 40 minutes, provided by four individual integrations with different positions of the calcite retarder) and , by summing all the exposures of a full night (a total integration time of up to 8 hours), the weak emission lines may be studied at a resolution far higher than has ever previously been possible. A period or pseudoperiod of 11.65 yr has been claimed for the outbursts of this object (Sillapaa et al 1988, Kidger et al 1992), which has been interpreted as due to a binary black hole (Sillapaa et al 1988). This model predicts an outburst at some time in 1994. If the Winter 1993-94 eruption corresponds to the expected 1994 outburst, the rise in brightness would be associated to accretion processes and, therefore, we hope to find a polarized spectrum different of those originated by synchrotron sources. The WHT observations are, we believe, the first of their kind of a blazar and these data will help to elucidate this question, apart from supplying valuable information on the emission processes in active galactic nuclei. References: Sillanpaa A., Haarala S., Valtonen M., Sundelius B., Byrd G.G, 1988, ApJ, 325, 628 Kidger M., Takalo L., Sillanpaa A., 1992, A&A, 264, 32

  16. VARIABLE ACCRETION OUTBURSTS IN PROTOSTELLAR EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Jaehan; Hartmann, Lee; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Gammie, Charles E-mail: lhartm@umich.edu E-mail: gammie@illinois.edu

    2013-02-20

    We extend the one-dimensional, two-zone models of long-term protostellar disk evolution with infall of Zhu et al. to consider the potential effects of a finite viscosity in regions where the ionization is too low for the magnetorotational instability (MRI) to operate (the {sup d}ead zone{sup )}. We find that the presence of a small but finite dead zone viscosity, as suggested by simulations of stratified disks with MRI-active outer layers, can trigger inside-out bursts of accretion, starting at or near the inner edge of the disk, instead of the previously found outside-in bursts with zero dead zone viscosity, which originate at a few AU in radius. These inside-out bursts of accretion bear a qualitative resemblance to the outburst behavior of one FU Ori object, V1515 Cyg, in contrast to the outside-in burst models, which more closely resemble the accretion events in FU Ori and V1057 Cyg. Our results suggest that the type and frequency of outbursts are potentially a probe of transport efficiency in the dead zone. Simulations must treat the inner disk regions, R {approx}< 0.5 AU, to show the detailed time evolution of accretion outbursts in general and to observe the inside-out bursts in particular.

  17. Variable Accretion Outbursts in Protostellar Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Jaehan; Hartmann, Lee; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Gammie, Charles

    2013-02-01

    We extend the one-dimensional, two-zone models of long-term protostellar disk evolution with infall of Zhu et al. to consider the potential effects of a finite viscosity in regions where the ionization is too low for the magnetorotational instability (MRI) to operate (the "dead zone"). We find that the presence of a small but finite dead zone viscosity, as suggested by simulations of stratified disks with MRI-active outer layers, can trigger inside-out bursts of accretion, starting at or near the inner edge of the disk, instead of the previously found outside-in bursts with zero dead zone viscosity, which originate at a few AU in radius. These inside-out bursts of accretion bear a qualitative resemblance to the outburst behavior of one FU Ori object, V1515 Cyg, in contrast to the outside-in burst models, which more closely resemble the accretion events in FU Ori and V1057 Cyg. Our results suggest that the type and frequency of outbursts are potentially a probe of transport efficiency in the dead zone. Simulations must treat the inner disk regions, R <~ 0.5 AU, to show the detailed time evolution of accretion outbursts in general and to observe the inside-out bursts in particular.

  18. Pulsations and outbursts of luminous blue variables

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, A.N.; Guzik, J.A.; Soukup, M.S.; Despain, K.M.

    1997-06-01

    We propose an outburst mechanism for the most luminous stars in our and other galaxies. These million solar luminosity stars, with masses (after earlier mass loss) of between 20 and maybe 70 solar masses, are pulsationally unstable for both radial and low-degree nonradial modes. Some of these modes are ``strange,`` meaning mostly that the pulsations are concentrated near the stellar surface and have very rapid growth rates in linear theory. The pulsation driving is by both the high iron line opacity (near 150,000 K) and the helium opacity (near 30,000 K) kappa effects. Periods range from 5 to 40 days. Depending on the composition, pulsations periodically produce luminosities above the Eddington limit for deep layers. The radiative luminosity creates an outward push that readily eases the very low gamma envelope to very large outburst radii. A key point is that a super-Eddington luminosity cannot be taken up by the sluggish convection rapidly enough to prevent an outward acceleration of much of the envelope. As the helium abundance in the envelope stellar material increases by ordinary wind mass loss and the luminous blue variable outbursts, the opacity in the deep pulsation driving layers decreases. This makes the current Eddington luminosity even higher so that pulsations can then no longer give radiative luminosities exceeding the limit. For the lower mass and luminosity luminous blue variables there is considerably less iron line opacity driving, and pulsations are almost all caused by the helium ionization kappa effect.

  19. Comet outbursts and the meteor showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guliyev, A. S.; Kokhirova, G. I.; Poladova, U. D.

    2014-07-01

    The features of 116 comets that have shown an outbursts in their brightness, are considered in the paper. The hypothesis on that the outburst in activity of comets are caused by their passing through meteoroid streams is studied. For this purpose the orbital elements of such comets relative to the planes of motion of 68 meteor showers from Cook's catalogue are analyzed. It was found that four of the nearest and distant nodes of comet orbits relative to the planes of motion of nine meteor showers exceeds the average statistical background with confidence probability from 0.90 to 0.95, and more than 0.95, respectively. The October Draconids, Aurigids, kappa-Serpentids, delta-Draconids, sigma-Hydrids}, Coma Berenicids, Leonids, Leo Minorids, and Perseids showers are the most effective. The results of calculation show that often, the comets outbursts may be caused by collisions of comets with meteoroids under the passing through the meteoroid streams that are producing listed meteor showers as well as solar activity.

  20. Effects of Spatial Gradients on Electron Runaway Acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacNeice, Peter; Ljepojevic, N. N.

    1996-01-01

    The runaway process is known to accelerate electrons in many laboratory plasmas and has been suggested as an acceleration mechanism in some astrophysical plasmas, including solar flares. Current calculations of the electron velocity distributions resulting from the runaway process are greatly restricted because they impose spatial homogeneity on the distribution. We have computed runaway distributions which include consistent development of spatial gradients in the energetic tail. Our solution for the electron velocity distribution is presented as a function of distance along a finite length acceleration region, and is compared with the equivalent distribution for the infinitely long homogenous system (i.e., no spatial gradients), as considered in the existing literature. All these results are for the weak field regime. We also discuss the severe restrictiveness of this weak field assumption.

  1. Modeling of dust halo formation following comet outbursts Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gombosi, T. I.; Horanyi, M.

    1986-01-01

    Evolution of gas and dust distributions following a spatially and temporally localized comet outburst was calculated using a hybrid kinetic - hydrodynamic method. It was found that a comet outburst resulted in significantly increased dust terminal velocities. As these higher terminal velocity values result in larger apex distances, therefore the outburst generates distinct dust envelopes in front of the regular dust coma. Such envelopes were observed at several comets (cf. comet Donati).

  2. Outburst-related period changes of recurrent nova CI aquilae

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R. E.; Honeycutt, R. K. E-mail: rewilson@ufl.edu

    2014-11-01

    Pre-outburst and post-outburst light curves and post-outburst eclipse timings are analyzed to measure any period (P) change related to nova CI Aql's outburst of early 2000 and a mean post-outburst dP/dt, which then lead to estimates of the accreting component's rate of mass (M) change and its overall outburst-related change of mass over roughly a decade of observations. We apply a recently developed procedure for unified analysis of three timing-related data types (light curves, radial velocities, and eclipse timings), although with only light curves and timings in this case. Fits to the data are reasonably good without need for a disk in the light-curve model, although the disk certainly exists and has an important role in our post-outburst mass flow computations. Initial experiments showed that, although there seems to be an accretion hot spot, it has essentially no effect on derived outburst-related ΔP or on post-outburst dP/dt. Use of atomic time (HJED) in place of HJD also has essentially nil effect on ΔP and dP/dt. We find ΔP consistently negative in various types of solutions, although at best only marginally significant statistically in any one experiment. Pre-outburst HJD {sub 0} and P results are given, as are post-outburst HJD {sub 0}, P, and dP/dt, with light curves and eclipse times as joint input, and also with only eclipse time input. Post-outburst dP/dt is negative at about 2.4σ. Explicit formulae for mass transfer rates and epoch-to-epoch mass change are developed and applied. A known offset in the magnitude zero point for 1991-1994 is corrected.

  3. Study of runaway electrons with Hard X-ray spectrometry of tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevelev, A.; Kiptily, V.; Chugunov, I.; Khilkevitch, E.; Gin, D.; Doinikov, D.; Naidenov, V.; Plyusnin, V.; EFDA-JET contributors

    2014-08-01

    Hard-X-ray spectrometry is a tool widely used for diagnostic of runaway electrons in existing tokamaks. In future machines, ITER and DEMO, HXR spectrometry will be useful providing information on runaway electron energy, runaway beam current and its profile during disruption.

  4. Study of runaway electrons with Hard X-ray spectrometry of tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shevelev, A.; Chugunov, I.; Khilkevitch, E.; Gin, D.; Doinikov, D.; Naidenov, V.; Kiptily, V.; Collaboration: EFDA-JET Contributors

    2014-08-21

    Hard-X-ray spectrometry is a tool widely used for diagnostic of runaway electrons in existing tokamaks. In future machines, ITER and DEMO, HXR spectrometry will be useful providing information on runaway electron energy, runaway beam current and its profile during disruption.

  5. Rural Runaways: Rurality and Its Implications for Services to Children and Young People Who Run Away

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franks, Myfanwy; Goswami, Haridhan

    2010-01-01

    This article debates options for service provision to young rural runaways in the UK. Using data drawn from two national surveys and follow-on qualitative studies, the authors trace urban myths of rurality and their effects on runaway provision. The authors review models of rural refuge, systemic advocacy and mobile services for rural runaways.…

  6. Numerical characterization of bump formation in the runaway electron tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, J.; Hirvijoki, E.; Embreus, O.; Peysson, Y.; Stahl, A.; Pusztai, I.; Fülöp, T.

    2016-02-01

    Runaway electrons are generated in a magnetized plasma when the parallel electric field exceeds a critical value. For such electrons with energies typically reaching tens of MeV, the Abraham-Lorentz-Dirac (ALD) radiation force, in reaction to the synchrotron emission, is significant and can be the dominant process limiting electron acceleration. The effect of the ALD force on runaway electron dynamics in a homogeneous plasma is investigated using the relativistic finite-difference Fokker-Planck codes LUKE (Decker and Peysson 2004 Report EUR-CEA-FC-1736, Euratom-CEA), and CODE (Landreman et al 2014 Comput. Phys. Commun. 185 847). The time evolution of the distribution function is analyzed as a function of the relevant parameters: parallel electric field, background magnetic field, and effective charge. Under the action of the ALD force, we find that runaway electrons are subject to an energy limit, and that the electron distribution evolves towards a steady-state. In addition, a bump is formed in the tail of the electron distribution function if the electric field is sufficiently strong. The mechanisms leading to the bump formation and energy limit involve both the parallel and perpendicular momentum dynamics; they are described in detail. An estimate for the bump location in momentum space is derived. We observe that the energy of runaway electrons in the bump increases with the electric field amplitude, while the population increases with the bulk electron temperature. The presence of the bump divides the electron distribution into a runaway beam and a bulk population. This mechanism may give rise to beam-plasma types of instabilities that could, in turn, pump energy from runaway electrons and alter their confinement.

  7. Production of runaway electrons by negative streamer discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanrion, O.; Neubert, T.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper we estimate the probability that cold electrons can be accelerated by an ambient electric field into the runaway regime, and discuss the implications for negative streamer formation. The study is motivated by the discovery of ms duration bursts of γ-rays from the atmosphere above thunderstorms, the so-called Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes. The radiation is thought to be bremsstrahlung from energetic (MeV) electrons accelerated in a thunderstorm discharge. The observation goes against conventional wisdom that discharges in air are carried by electrons with energies below a few tens of eV. Instead the relativistic runaway electron discharge has been proposed which requires a lower threshold electric field; however, seed electrons must be born with energies in the runaway regime. In this work we study the fundamental problem of electron acceleration in a conventional discharge and the conditions on the electric field for the acceleration of electrons into the runaway regime. We use particle codes to describe the process of stochastic acceleration and introduce a novel technique that improves the statistics of the relatively few electrons that reach high energies. The calculation of probabilities for electrons to reach energies in the runaway regime shows that even with modest fields, electrons can be energized in negative streamer tips into the runaway regime, creating a beamed distribution in front of the streamer that affects its propagation. The results reported here suggest that theories of negative streamers and spark propagation should be reexamined with an improved characterization of the kinetic effects of electrons.

  8. Thermonuclear Supernovae: Simulations of the Deflagration Stage and Their Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamezo, Vadim N.; Khokhlov, Alexei M.; Oran, Elaine S.; Chtchelkanova, Almadena Y.; Rosenberg, Robert O.

    2003-01-01

    Large-scale, three-dimensional numerical simulations of the deflagration stage of a thermonuclear supernova explosion show the formation and evolution of a highly convoluted turbulent flame in the gravitational field of an expanding carbon-oxygen white dwarf. The flame dynamics are dominated by the gravity-induced Rayleigh-Taylor instability that controls the burning rate. The thermonuclear deflagration releases enough energy to produce a healthy explosion. The turbulent flame, however, leaves large amounts of unburned and partially burned material near the star center, whereas observations that imply these materials are present only in outer layers. This disagreement could be resolved if the deflagration triggers a detonation.

  9. Thermonuclear supernovae: simulations of the deflagration stage and their implications.

    PubMed

    Gamezo, Vadim N; Khokhlov, Alexei M; Oran, Elaine S; Chtchelkanova, Almadena Y; Rosenberg, Robert O

    2003-01-01

    Large-scale, three-dimensional numerical simulations of the deflagration stage of a thermonuclear supernova explosion show the formation and evolution of a highly convoluted turbulent flame in the gravitational field of an expanding carbon-oxygen white dwarf. The flame dynamics are dominated by the gravity-induced Rayleigh-Taylor instability that controls the burning rate. The thermonuclear deflagration releases enough energy to produce a healthy explosion. The turbulent flame, however, leaves large amounts of unburned and partially burned material near the star center, whereas observations that imply these materials are present only in outer layers. This disagreement could be resolved if the deflagration triggers a detonation. PMID:12446871

  10. AG Pegasi - now a classical symbiotic star in outburst?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomov, T. V.; Stoyanov, K. A.; Zamanov, R. K.

    2016-08-01

    Optical spectroscopy study of the recent AG Peg outburst observed during the second half of 2015 is presented. Considerable variations of the intensity and the shape of the spectral features as well as the changes of the hot component parameters, caused by the outburst, are discussed and certain similarities between the outburst of AG Peg and the outburst of a classical symbiotic stars are shown. It seems that after the end of the symbiotic nova phase, AG Peg became a member of the classical symbiotic stars group.

  11. Glacier lake outburst floods - modelling process chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaub, Yvonne; Huggel, Christian; Haeberli, Wilfried

    2013-04-01

    New lakes are forming in high-mountain areas all over the world due to glacier recession. Often they will be located below steep, destabilized flanks and are therefore exposed to impacts from rock-/ice-avalanches. Several events worldwide are known, where an outburst flood has been triggered by such an impact. In regions such as in the European Alps or in the Cordillera Blanca in Peru, where valley bottoms are densely populated, these far-travelling, high-magnitude events can result in major disasters. For appropriate integral risk management it is crucial to gain knowledge on how the processes (rock-/ice-avalanches - impact waves in lake - impact on dam - outburst flood) interact and how the hazard potential related to corresponding process chains can be assessed. Research in natural hazards so far has mainly concentrated on describing, understanding, modeling or assessing single hazardous processes. Some of the above mentioned individual processes are quite well understood in their physical behavior and some of the process interfaces have also been investigated in detail. Multi-hazard assessments of the entire process chain, however, have only recently become subjects of investigations. Our study aims at closing this gap and providing suggestions on how to assess the hazard potential of the entire process chain in order to generate hazard maps and support risk assessments. We analyzed different types of models (empirical, analytical, physically based) for each process regarding their suitability for application in hazard assessments of the entire process chain based on literature. Results show that for rock-/ice-avalanches, dam breach and outburst floods, only numerical, physically based models are able to provide the required information, whereas the impact wave can be estimated by means of physically based or empirical assessments. We demonstrate how the findings could be applied with the help of a case study of a recent glacier lake outburst event at Laguna

  12. An in situ runaway electron diagnostic for DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Wurden, G. A. Oertel, J. A.; Evans, T. E.

    2014-11-15

    We are designing a new diagnostic based on laser inverse Compton scattering to study the dynamics of runaway electron formation during killer-pellet triggered disruptions in DIII-D, and their subsequent loss. We can improve the expected S/N ratio by using a high-intensity short-pulse laser combined with gated x-ray imagers. With 80 ps sampling, time-of-flight spatial resolution within the laser chord can be obtained. We will measure the time-resolved spatial profile and energy distribution of the runaway electrons while they are in the core of the tokamak plasma.

  13. Cherenkov neutron detector for fusion reaction and runaway electron diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Cheon, MunSeong Kim, Junghee

    2015-08-15

    A Cherenkov-type neutron detector was newly developed and neutron measurement experiments were performed at Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research. It was shown that the Cherenkov neutron detector can monitor the time-resolved neutron flux from deuterium-fueled fusion plasmas. Owing to the high temporal resolution of the detector, fast behaviors of runaway electrons, such as the neutron spikes, could be observed clearly. It is expected that the Cherenkov neutron detector could be utilized to provide useful information on runaway electrons as well as fusion reaction rate in fusion plasmas.

  14. Cherenkov neutron detector for fusion reaction and runaway electron diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Cheon, MunSeong; Kim, Junghee

    2015-08-01

    A Cherenkov-type neutron detector was newly developed and neutron measurement experiments were performed at Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research. It was shown that the Cherenkov neutron detector can monitor the time-resolved neutron flux from deuterium-fueled fusion plasmas. Owing to the high temporal resolution of the detector, fast behaviors of runaway electrons, such as the neutron spikes, could be observed clearly. It is expected that the Cherenkov neutron detector could be utilized to provide useful information on runaway electrons as well as fusion reaction rate in fusion plasmas. PMID:26329194

  15. Thermal runaway in microwave heated isothermal slabs, cylinders, and spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vriezinga, C. A.

    1998-01-01

    The absorption of electromagnetic energy within a microwave heated isothermal slab, cylinder, and sphere is analyzed and compared to each other. It is shown that the absorbed heat oscillates as a function of temperature, regardless of the geometry of the irradiated object. It is possible to formulate this behavior in a simple mathematical equation, which proves that the oscillation is basically caused by resonance of the electromagnetic waves within the object. This oscillation, combined with the heat loss, is found to be responsible for thermal runaway phenomenon in isothermal objects. Based on such an observation, a general rule to prevent thermal runaway has been developed.

  16. Thermonuclear bursts from slowly and rapidly accreting neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linares, Manuel

    2012-07-01

    Models of thermonuclear burning on accreting neutron stars predict different ignition regimes, depending mainly on the mass accretion rate per unit area. For more than three decades, testing these regimes observationally has met with only partial success. I will present recent results from the Fermi-GBM all-sky X-ray burst monitor, which is yielding robust measurements of recurrence time of rare and highly energetic thermonuclear bursts at the lowest mass accretion rates. I will also present RXTE observations of thermonuclear bursts at high mass accretion rates, including the discovery of millihertz quasi-periodic oscillations and several bursting regimes in a neutron star transient and 11 Hz X-ray pulsar. This unusual neutron star, with higher magnetic field and slower rotation than any other known burster, showed copious bursting activity when the mass accretion rate varied between 10% and 50% of the Eddington rate. I will discuss the role of fuel composition and neutron star spin in setting the burst properties of this system, and the possible implications for the rest of thermonuclear bursters.

  17. Thermonuclear Fusion: An Energy Source for the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drummond, William E.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses current research in thermonuclear fusion with particular emphasis on the problem of confining hot plasma. Recent experiments indicate that magnetic bottles called tokamaks may achieve the necessary confinement times, and this break-through has given renewed optimism to the feasibility of commercial fusion power by the turn of the…

  18. A Family Systems Approach for Preventing Adolescent Runaway Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coco, E. Lane; Courtney, Linda J.

    1998-01-01

    Utilizes a family therapy approach to restructure family relationships in order to prevent further runaway behavior of a 15-year-old Mexican-American female. The approach involves a family interview, genogram, and family therapy. The Family Satisfaction Scale was administered to evaluate the effectiveness of the approach. (Author/MKA)

  19. Experiential Therapy with Homeless, Runaway and Street Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kallander, Karin; Levings, Laura

    This paper describes the services and activities of the Orion Center, a drop-in day-use facility for homeless and runaway youth in Seattle (Washington). Orion Center uses experiential therapy and adventure-based activities to develop trust, promote fun and relationship building, and facilitate growth and healing among this homeless population. A…

  20. Shelters for Runaway and Homeless Youths: Capacity and Occupancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Jody M.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Data from a nationally representative sample of shelters for runaway and homeless youths (n=160) were analyzed to determine shelter capacity, occupancy, and occupancy ratios. Analysis focused in particular on occupancy ratios by funding status, shelter size, metropolitan statistical area, season, and day of the week. Results showed a relatively…

  1. Conditions for electron runaway under leader breakdown of long gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Ul'yanov, K. N.

    2008-04-15

    An original hydrodynamic model in which inelastic collisions in the equations of motion and energy balance play a decisive role is developed and applied to simulate electron avalanches in strong electric fields. The mean energy and drift velocity of electrons, as well as the ionization coefficient and electric field in a wide range of mean electron energies, are determined for helium and xenon. A criterion is derived for the runaway of the average electron in discharges with ionization multiplication. It is shown that runaway can take place at any value of E/p, provided that the momentum mean free path exceeds the gap length. The voltage corresponding to electron runaway is found for helium, xenon, and air as a function of the electric field, the electron mean energy, and the parameter pd. Conditions for the formation of a precursor in electronegative gases are analyzed. It is shown that the presence of a precursor with a high electric conductance is necessary for the formation of a new leader step. The voltage and time ranges corresponding to efficient electron runaway and X-ray generation during leader breakdown in air are determined.

  2. Nbody Simulation Of Planetary Spin In Runaway/oligarchic Stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsukura, Daishi; Kokubo, E.; Ida, S.

    2011-09-01

    In our planetary system, all planets are rotating with wide varieties of obliquities and spin rates. Especially current spin properties of terrestrial planets give us much useful information to constrain the scenario of planetary formation. Ohtsuki and Ida(1998) have investigated the spin of protoplanet which accreted in a disk of planetesimals with non uniform spatial distribution. Their three-body calculations show that the current spin values of the Earth-Moon system is achieved by planetesimal accretion only in the case planetesimals are initially existing around the feeding zones of the protoplanet. In our study, we calculate the whole process of planetary spin by Nbody simulations during their growth stage. Our results show that the distribution of runaway bodies' obliquities are nearly isotropic after runaway growth stage. Additionally, planetesimals acquire their spin angular velocity up to their break-up speed but afterward runaway bodies begin to lose their spin angular velocity as they eat other small bodies. According to our results, runaway bodies statistically have rotation periods between 1-10 hours.

  3. Low Simulated Radiation Limit for Runaway Greenhouse Climates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldblatt, Colin; Robinson, Tyler D.; Zahnle, Kevin J.; Crisp, David

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial planet atmospheres must be in long-term radiation balance, with solar radiation absorbed matched by thermal radiation emitted. For hot moist atmospheres, however, there is an upper limit on the thermal emission which is decoupled from the surface temperature. If net absorbed solar radiation exceeds this limit the planet will heat uncontrollably, the so-called \\runaway greenhouse". Here we show that a runaway greenhouse induced steam atmosphere may be a stable state for a planet with the same amount of incident solar radiation as Earth has today, contrary to previous results. We have calculated the clear-sky radiation limits at line-by-line spectral resolution for the first time. The thermal radiation limit is lower than previously reported (282 W/sq m rather than 310W/sq m) and much more solar radiation would be absorbed (294W/sq m rather than 222W/sq m). Avoiding a runaway greenhouse under the present solar constant requires that the atmosphere is subsaturated with water, and that cloud albedo forcing exceeds cloud greenhouse forcing. Greenhouse warming could in theory trigger a runaway greenhouse but palaeoclimate comparisons suggest that foreseeable increases in greenhouse gases will be insufficient to do this.

  4. A Search for Pulsar Companions to OB Runaway Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayer, R. W.; Nice, D. J.; Kaspi, V. M.

    1996-04-01

    We have searched for radio pulsar companions to 40 nearby OB runaway stars. Observations were made at 575 and 770 MHz with the NRAO 140 foot (43 m) telescope. The survey was sensitive to long- period pulsars with flux densities of 1 mJy or more. No pulsar companions to OB runaways were discovered. One previously unknown pulsar was discovered, PSR J2044 +4614, while observing toward target 0 star BD +45°3260. Follow-up timing observations of the pulsar measured its position to high precision, revealing a 9' separation between the pulsar and the target star, unequivocally indicating they are not associated. The pulsar is ordinary, except that its dispersion measure, 315 pc cm-3, is unusually high given its Galactic longitude, l = 85°. The nondetection of pulsars bound to target stars places an upper limit of 8% (95% confidence) for the fraction of runaway OB stars with pulsar companions detectable via pulsed radio emission by surveys such as ours. Assuming standard models for the pulsar beaming fraction and luminosity function, we conclude most OB runaways do not have pulsar companions.

  5. Chandra Discovers Eruption and Pulsation in Nova Outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-09-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has discovered a giant outburst of X-rays and unusual cyclical pulsing from a white dwarf star that is closely orbiting another star -- the first time either of these phenomena has been seen in X-rays. The observations are helping scientists better understand the thermonuclear explosions that occur in certain binary star systems. The observations of Nova Aquilae were reported today at the "Two Years of Science with Chandra" symposium by an international team led by Sumner Starrfield of Arizona State University. "We found two important results in our Chandra observations. The first was an underlying pulsation every 40 minutes in the X-ray brightness, which we believe comes from the cyclical expansion and contraction of the outer layers of the white dwarf," said Starrfield. "The other result was an enormous flare of X-rays that lasted for 15 minutes. Nothing like this has been seen before from a nova, and we don't know how to explain it." Novas occur on a white dwarf (a star which used up all its nuclear fuel and shrank to roughly the size of the Earth) that is orbiting a normal size star. Strong gravity tides drag hydrogen gas off the normal star and onto the white dwarf, where it can take more than 100,000 years for enough hydrogen to accumulate to ignite nuclear fusion reactions. Gradually, these reactions intensify until a cosmic-sized hydrogen bomb blast results. The outer layers of the white dwarf are then blown away, producing a nova outburst that can be observed for a period of months to years as the material expands into space. "Chandra has allowed us to see deep into the gases ejected by this giant explosion and extract unparalleled information on the evolution of the white dwarf whose surface is exploding," said Jeremy Drake of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. The brightening of Nova Aquilae was first detected by optical astronomers in December 1999. "Although this star is at a distance of more than 6

  6. Simulation of runaway electrons, transport affected by J-TEXT resonant magnetic perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Z. H.; Wang, X. H.; Chen, Z. Y.; Huang, D. W.; Sun, X. F.; Xu, T.; Zhuang, G.

    2016-09-01

    The topology of a magnetic field and transport properties of runaway electrons can be changed by a resonant magnetic perturbation field. The J-TEXT magnetic topology can be effectively altered via static resonant magnetic perturbation (SRMP) and dynamic resonant magnetic perturbation (DRMP). This paper studies the effect of resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) on the confinement of runaway electrons via simulating their drift orbits in the magnetic perturbation field and calculating the orbit losses for different runaway initial energies and different runaway electrons, initial locations. The model adopted is based on Hamiltonian guiding center equations for runaway electrons, and the J-TEXT magnetic turbulences and RMP are taken into account. The simulation indicates that the loss rate of runaway electrons is sensitive to the radial position of electrons. The loss of energetic runaway beam is dominated by the shrinkage of the confinement region. Outside the shrinkage region of the runaway electrons are lost rapidly. Inside the shrinkage region the runaway beam is confined very well and is less sensitive to the magnetic perturbation. The experimental result on the response of runaway transport to the application RMP indicates that the loss of runaway electrons is dominated by the shrinkage of the confinement region, other than the external magnetic perturbation.

  7. Symbiotic variable V4018 Sgr in outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizabeth O. Waagen

    2012-09-01

    The symbiotic variable V4018 Sgr is undergoing an outburst, according to observations reported to the AAVSO and confirmed by spectroscopy by Ulisse Munari et al. Prompted by an observation and comment from John Bortle (Stormville, NY) (16 June 2012, visual magnitude 12.2) about a possible outburst, Steven O'Connor (St. George's, Bermuda) obtained an observation (10 August 2012, 11.44V) that confirmed V4018 Sgr was bright. His subsequent BVRI observations in September and visual observations by Bortle and Andrew Pearce (Nedlands, Western Australia) show the system brightening and at V magnitude 11.07 as of 2012 Sep. 17.091 UT. Ulisse Munari (INAF Astr. Obs. Padua, Italy) and colleagues Paolo Valisa and Sergio Dallaporta (ANS Collaboration), after being informed by the AAVSO of the bright state of V4018 Sgr, carried out spectroscopy. Munari writes: "A low resolution, absolutely fluxed 4000-8650 Ang spectrum of V4018 Sgr was obtained on Sept 13.90 UT with the 0.6m telescope ! of the Schiaparelli Observatory in Varese (Italy). It shows the spectrum of the M giant overwhelmed by a blue continuum up to 6000 Ang, and all high ionization emission lines typical of quiescence are gone, leaving only hydrogen Balmer and weak HeI lines in emission. The spectrum looks like a template one for a symbiotic star in outburst. CCD photometry was obtained on Sept 13.79 UT and provides V=11.027 ± 0.002, B-V=+0.621 ± 0.003. The B-V color is appreciably bluer and the V magnitude much brighter than typical in quiescence (on average V=13.3, B-V=+1.09; Henden and Munari 2008, Baltic Astronomy 17, 293), and support the idea V4018 Sgr is undergoing an outburst." According to Munari, the last bright outburst of V4018 Sgr was underway in June 1990. Observations in the AAVSO International Database from Albert Jones (Nelson, New Zealand) beginning in May 1992 show the variable at visual magnitude 11.0, with fluctuations between 10.5 and 11.9 through October 1995. Numerous ! other observers

  8. The prototype symbiotic star AX Per is in outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munari, U.; Dallaporta, S.; Righetti, G. L.; Castellani, F.; Cherini, G.

    2014-08-01

    The prototype symbiotic star AX Per is in outburst. This is the third such event in the current series of outbursts, the previous two peaking at V=10.41 on 2009 May 26 and at V=10.03 on 2012 Aug 28, according to ANS Collaboration intensive monitoring.

  9. Outburst floods from glacial Lake Missoula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, G. K. C.; Mathews, W. H.; Pack, R. T.

    1984-11-01

    The Pleistocene outburst floods from glacial Lake Missoula, known as the "Spokane Floods", released as much as 2184 km 3 of water and produced the greatest known floods of the geologic past. A computer simulation model for these floods that is based on physical equations governing the enlargement by water flow of the tunnel penetrating the ice dam is described. The predicted maximum flood discharge lies in the range 2.74 × 10 6-13.7 × 10 6 m 3 sec -1, lending independent glaciological support to paleohydrologic estimates of maximum discharge.

  10. MCNeil's Nebula in Orion: The Outburst History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briceño, C.; Vivas, A. K.; Hernández, J.; Calvet, N.; Hartmann, L.; Megeath, T.; Berlind, P.; Calkins, M.; Hoyer, S.

    2004-05-01

    We present a sequence of I-band images obtained at the Venezuela 1 m Schmidt telescope during the outburst of the nebula recently discovered by J. W. McNeil in the Orion L1630 molecular cloud. We derive photometry spanning the preoutburst state and the brightening itself, which is a unique record including 14 epochs and spanning a timescale of ~5 years. We constrain the beginning of the outburst at some time between 2003 October 28 and November 15. The light curve of the object at the vertex of the nebula, the likely exciting source of the outburst, reveals that it has brightened ~5 mag in about 4 months. The timescale for the nebula to develop is consistent with the light-travel time, indicating that we are observing light from the central source scattered by the ambient cloud into the line of sight. We also show recent FLWO optical spectroscopy of the exciting source and of the nearby HH 22. The spectrum of the source is highly reddened; in contrast, the spectrum of HH 22 shows a shock spectrum superposed on a continuum, most likely the result of reflected light from the exciting source reaching the HH object through a much less reddened path. The blue portion of this spectrum is consistent with an early B spectral type, similar to the early outburst spectrum of the FU Orionis variable star V1057 Cygni; we estimate a luminosity of L~219 Lsolar. The eruptive behavior of McNeil's Nebula, its spectroscopic characteristics and luminosity, suggest that we may be witnessing an FU Ori event on its way to maximum. By further monitoring this object, we will be able decide whether or not it qualifies as a member of this rare class of objects. Based on observations obtained at the Llano del Hato National Astronomical Observatory of Venezuela, operated by CIDA for the Ministerio de Ciencia y Tecnología, and at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory (FLWO) of the Smithsonian Institution.

  11. Complexity in battery systems: Thermal runaway in VRLA batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catherino, Henry A.

    During battery discharge, the heat generated is the sum of the Joule (resistive) and enthalpic (chemical) heating effects. Conversely, during battery charging, the heat generated is the Joule minus the enthalpic heating. If the conditions are carefully selected, one can observe a net battery cooling during charging. However, an interesting phenomenon takes place during overcharge. Those cells designed as sealed recombinant systems develop significant heating. Flooded designs do not exhibit this effect. The applied electric power generates energetic reaction products as a consequence of the electrochemical reactions. This is an energy absorbing process. The gasses are then vented into the environment. Since the sealed cells undergo a closed recombination cycle, i.e., no material is exchanged with the environment, the rate of heat generated is proportional to the power input to the cell. Essentially, the cell is behaving in the manner of a resistor. In this connection, the thermal runaway phenomenon that has been often observed in starved electrolyte cell designs raises a potential problem in battery applications. It is not efficient to design around the worst case scenario, i.e., anticipating the thermal runaway effect. It is wiser to detect its onset and shut down the charging process. An alternative approach is to develop an understanding of the thermal runaway process and, perhaps, develop a method for eliminating or effectively controlling it. A study was performed in an attempt to model the thermal runaway effect. In short, the effect appears to be related to the electrolyte distribution in the separator. This suggests that modification of the AGM separator properties could provide a means for better controlling the thermal runaway failure mode.

  12. The Impact of FU Orionis Outbursts and the Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Robbins; Young, Richard E. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Protostellar systems are variable on many timescales. One of the most dramatic forms of variability known to occur in low mass stellar systems is the FU Orionis outburst (Herbig 1977). Throughout a typical outburst lasting several decades, system luminosities may be a hundred times what is typical of the quiesent state. FU Orionis outburst events are thought to have significant impact on the thermal structure of the protosolar nebula; their existence has been used to explain features in the meteoritic record from thermally induced homogenization to the formation of chondrules. Until recently, the magnitude of the likely effect from such outbursts has been largely speculative due to the lack of a detailed understanding of the outburst mechanism. Recent numerical models (Bell\\& Lin 1994) have demonstrated the viability of the observational hypothesis (Hartmann\\& Kenyon 1985) that the radiation observed during outburst is emitted by a luminous circumstellar disk transporting mass at a thousand times the quiesent rate. Light curves and color and line width evolution observed in FU Orionis systems are naturally explained by time dependent outbursting model disks (Bell et al. 1995). The radial temperature structure and shape of the disk during outburst derived from these models may be used to calculate the outburst's expected impact on primitive material at various radii throughout the disk. In this review, we will begin by discussing what is known about the FU Orionis outburst phenomenon from recent observations and theory including statistically deduced outburst timescales and observed peak temperatures. Unless covered by another author, we will discuss the evidence which suggests that outburst radiation is emitted by a circumstellar disk rather than by the star and will briefly review the thermal instability as a mechanism for outburst. We will then report on recent work which investigates the likely heating of solar nebula material due to FU Orionis outbursts

  13. The 1987 outburst of the BL Lacertid AO 0235 + 164

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, J. R.; Smith, A. G.

    1989-08-01

    The violently variable BL Lacertid AO 0235 + 164 displayed a 3.24 magnitude outburst in early 1987. This outburst was observed intensively from Rosemary Hill Observatory in three colors. Long term monitoring observations made at Rosemary Hill are examined in an effort to find any recurring timescales associated with this outburst and previous large amplitude outbursts. The energetics of the 1987 outburst are analyzed in terms of the Shields and Wheeler model of a magnetized accretion disk. The timescales identified in the power spectrum (2.8 and 1.6 yr) are input into the model as the storage timescales. Since the emitted energy calculated from the optical burst cannot be stored in a magnetized disk at an allowable radius, it is concluded that either the storage timescales are longer than those identified in the power spectrum, or relativistic beaming effects must be considered, with a Doppler factor of 1.3 to 1.6.

  14. Behaviour of runaway electrons in the HL-2A plasmas with LHCD and ECCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J. X.; Yao, L. M.; Zhang, Y. P.; Yang, J. W.; Yang

    2015-12-01

    > The behaviour of runaway electrons have been investigated in lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) and electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) plasmas as well as the LHCD only plasmas in the HL-2A tokamak. The fast electrons generated by lower hybrid waves (LHWs) and electron cyclotron waves (ECWs) can act as a seed population for runaway electrons. In the LHCD only discharges, a large number of runaway electrons are produced after the termination of lower hybrid (LH) power by conversion of fast electrons into runaway electrons due to the fast electron tail which extends above the runaway critical energy. However, in contrast to LHCD only discharges, during the simultaneous application of LHCD and ECCD discharges, runaway electrons cannot be created by the termination of LH power when the ECCD is on duty. The runaway production is observed to be enhanced until the EC power termination. The loop voltage increase due to the termination of EC power gives rise to a decline in the critical runaway energy, which leads to some of the energetic fast electrons converting into runaway electrons via the acceleration from the toroidal electric field. That is, the fast electrons created by waves can be accelerated into the runaway regime due to the Dreicer process.

  15. Overview of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) engineering design activities*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimomura, Y.

    1994-05-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1988), ITER Documentation Series, No. 1] project is a multiphased project, presently proceeding under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency according to the terms of a four-party agreement among the European Atomic Energy Community (EC), the Government of Japan (JA), the Government of the Russian Federation (RF), and the Government of the United States (US), ``the Parties.'' The ITER project is based on the tokamak, a Russian invention, and has since been brought to a high level of development in all major fusion programs in the world. The objective of ITER is to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy for peaceful purposes. The ITER design is being developed, with support from the Parties' four Home Teams and is in progress by the Joint Central Team. An overview of ITER Design activities is presented.

  16. Thermonuclear-flash models for X-ray burst sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joss, P. C.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical models for X-ray burst sources that invoke thermonuclear flashes in the surface layers of an accreting neutron star are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the studies by Joss (1978) and Joss and Li (1979) on the evolution of the helium-burning shell. Numerical calculations with regard to the mass accretion rate, core temperature of the neutron star and the sensitivity of the flash properties to the assumed mass and radius of the neutron star are considered. Attention is also given to the behavior of the surface luminosity following a thermonuclear flash, the decline from maximum X-ray luminosity, structure of the surface layers prior to and during the first helium-burning flash and the temporal evolution of the first X-ray burst.

  17. On thermonuclear ignition criterion at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Baolian; Kwan, Thomas J. T.; Wang, Yi-Ming; Batha, Steven H.

    2014-10-15

    Sustained thermonuclear fusion at the National Ignition Facility remains elusive. Although recent experiments approached or exceeded the anticipated ignition thresholds, the nuclear performance of the laser-driven capsules was well below predictions in terms of energy and neutron production. Such discrepancies between expectations and reality motivate a reassessment of the physics of ignition. We have developed a predictive analytical model from fundamental physics principles. Based on the model, we obtained a general thermonuclear ignition criterion in terms of the areal density and temperature of the hot fuel. This newly derived ignition threshold and its alternative forms explicitly show the minimum requirements of the hot fuel pressure, mass, areal density, and burn fraction for achieving ignition. Comparison of our criterion with existing theories, simulations, and the experimental data shows that our ignition threshold is more stringent than those in the existing literature and that our results are consistent with the experiments.

  18. Thermonuclear Burning as a Probe of Neutron Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    2008-01-01

    Thermonuclear fusion is a fundamental process taking place in the matter transferred onto neutron stars in accreting binary systems. The heat deposited by nuclear reactions becomes readily visible in the X-ray band when the burning is either unstable or marginally stable, and results in the rich phenomenology of X-ray bursts, superbursts, and mHz quasiperiodic oscillations. Fast X-ray timing observations with NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) over the past decade have revealed a wealth of new phenomena associated with thermonuclear burning on neutron stars, including the discovery of nuclear powered pulsations during X-ray bursts and superbursts. I will briefly review our current observational and theoretical understanding of these new phenomena, with an emphasis on recent findings, and discuss what they are telling us about the structure of neutron stars.

  19. Shock ignition of thermonuclear fuel with high areal density.

    PubMed

    Betti, R; Zhou, C D; Anderson, K S; Perkins, L J; Theobald, W; Solodov, A A

    2007-04-13

    A novel method by C. Zhou and R. Betti [Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 50, 140 (2005)] to assemble and ignite thermonuclear fuel is presented. Massive cryogenic shells are first imploded by direct laser light with a low implosion velocity and on a low adiabat leading to fuel assemblies with large areal densities. The assembled fuel is ignited from a central hot spot heated by the collision of a spherically convergent ignitor shock and the return shock. The resulting fuel assembly features a hot-spot pressure greater than the surrounding dense fuel pressure. Such a nonisobaric assembly requires a lower energy threshold for ignition than the conventional isobaric one. The ignitor shock can be launched by a spike in the laser power or by particle beams. The thermonuclear gain can be significantly larger than in conventional isobaric ignition for equal driver energy. PMID:17501359

  20. Sonoluminescence, shock waves, and micro-thermonuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, W.C.; Clarke, D.B.; White, J.W.; Young, D.A.

    1995-08-01

    We have performed numerical hydrodynamic simulations of the growth and collapse of a sonoluminescing bubble in a liquid. Our calculations show that spherically converging shock waves are generated during the collapse of the bubble. The combination of the shock waves and a realistic equation of state for the gas in the bubble provides an explanation for the measured picosecond optical pulse widths and indicates that the temperatures near the center of the bubble may exceed 3O eV. This leads naturally to speculation about obtaining micro-thermonuclear fusion in a bubble filled with deuterium (D{sub 2}) gas. Consequently, we performed numerical simulations of the collapse of a D{sub 2} bubble in D{sub 2}0. A pressure spike added to the periodic driving amplitude creates temperatures that may be sufficient to generate a very small, but measurable number of thermonuclear D-D fusion reactions in the bubble.

  1. Statistical analysis of properties of dwarf novae outbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otulakowska-Hypka, Magdalena; Olech, Arkadiusz; Patterson, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    We present a statistical study of all measurable photometric features of a large sample of dwarf novae during their outbursts and superoutbursts. We used all accessible photometric data for all our objects to make the study as complete and up to date as possible. Our aim was to check correlations between these photometric features in order to constrain theoretical models which try to explain the nature of dwarf novae outbursts. We managed to confirm a few of the known correlations, that is the Stolz and Schoembs relation, the Bailey relation for long outbursts above the period gap, the relations between the cycle and supercycle lengths, amplitudes of normal and superoutbursts, amplitude and duration of superoutbursts, outburst duration and orbital period, outburst duration and mass ratio for short and normal outbursts, as well as the relation between the rise and decline rates of superoutbursts. However, we question the existence of the Kukarkin-Parenago relation but we found an analogous relation for superoutbursts. We also failed to find one presumed relation between outburst duration and mass ratio for superoutbursts. This study should help to direct theoretical work dedicated to dwarf novae.

  2. Prevalence and clinical correlates of explosive outbursts in Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kevin; Budman, Cathy L; Diego Herrera, Luis; Witkin, Joanna E; Weiss, Nicholas T; Lowe, Thomas L; Freimer, Nelson B; Reus, Victor I; Mathews, Carol A

    2013-02-28

    The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence and clinical correlates of explosive outbursts in two large samples of individuals with Tourette syndrome (TS), including one collected primarily from non-clinical sources. Participants included 218 TS-affected individuals who were part of a genetic study (N=104 from Costa Rica (CR) and N=114 from the US). The relationships between explosive outbursts and comorbid attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), tic severity, and prenatal and perinatal complications were examined using regression analyses. Twenty percent of participants had explosive outbursts, with no significant differences in prevalence between the CR (non-clinical) and the US (primarily clinical) samples. In the overall sample, ADHD, greater tic severity, and lower age of tic onset were strongly associated with explosive outbursts. ADHD, prenatal exposure to tobacco, and male gender were significantly associated with explosive outbursts in the US sample. Lower age of onset and greater severity of tics were significantly associated with explosive outbursts in the CR sample. This study confirms previous studies that suggest that clinically significant explosive outbursts are common in TS and associated with ADHD and tic severity. An additional potential risk factor, prenatal exposure to tobacco, was also identified. PMID:23040794

  3. Young AGN Outburst Running over Older X-Ray Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdan, Akos; van Weeren, Reinout Johannes; Kraft, Ralph; Forman, William; Scott, Randall; Giacintucci, Simona; Churazov, Eugene; O'Dea, Christopher; Baum, Stefi; Noell-Storr, Jacob; Jones, Christine

    2015-08-01

    Although the energetic feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is believed to have a profound effect on the evolution of galaxies and clusters of galaxies, details of AGN heating remain elusive. Here, we study NGC 193 -- a nearby lenticular galaxy in a group -- based on X-ray and radio observations. These data reveal the complex AGN outburst history of the galaxy: we detect a pair of inner X-ray cavities, an outer X-ray cavity, a shock front, and radio lobes extending beyond the inner cavities. We suggest that the inner cavities were produced about 78 Myr ago by a weaker AGN outburst, while the outer cavity, the radio lobes, and the shock front are due to a younger (13-26 Myr) and 4-8 times more powerful outburst. Combining this with the observed morphology of NGC 193, we conclude that NGC 193 likely represents the first example of a second, more powerful, AGN outburst overrunning an older, weaker outburst. These results help us to understand how the outburst energy is dissipated uniformly in the core of galaxies, and therefore may play a crucial role in resolving how AGN outbursts suppress the formation of large cooling flows at cluster centers.

  4. Statistical analysis of properties of dwarf novae outbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otulakowska-Hypka, Magdalena; Olech, Arkadiusz; Patterson, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    We present a statistical study of all measurable photometric features of a large sample of dwarf novae during their outbursts and superoutbursts. We used all accessible photometric data for all our objects to make the study as complete and up-to-date as possible. Our aim was to check correlations between these photometric features in order to constrain theoretical models which try to explain the nature of dwarf novae outbursts. We managed to confirm a few of the known correlations, that is the Stolz and Schoembs Relation, the Bailey Relation for long outbursts above the period gap, the relations between the cycle and supercycle lengths, amplitudes of normal and superoutbursts, amplitude and duration of superoutbursts, outburst duration and orbital period, outburst duration and mass ratio for short and normal outbursts, as well as the relation between the rise and decline rates of superoutbursts. However, we question the existence of the Kukarkin-Parenago Relation but we found an analogous relation for superoutbursts. We also failed to find one presumed relation between outburst duration and mass ratio for superoutbursts. This study should help to direct theoretical work dedicated to dwarf novae.

  5. YOUNG AGN OUTBURST RUNNING OVER OLDER X-RAY CAVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdán, Ákos; Van Weeren, Reinout J.; Kraft, Ralph P.; Forman, William R.; Randall, Scott; Jones, Christine; Giacintucci, Simona; Churazov, Eugene; O'Dea, Christopher P.; Baum, Stefi A.; Noell-Storr, Jacob

    2014-02-20

    Although the energetic feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is believed to have a profound effect on the evolution of galaxies and clusters of galaxies, details of AGN heating remain elusive. Here, we study NGC 193—a nearby lenticular galaxy—based on X-ray (Chandra) and radio (Very Large Array and Giant Meter-wave Radio Telescope) observations. These data reveal the complex AGN outburst history of the galaxy: we detect a pair of inner X-ray cavities, an outer X-ray cavity, a shock front, and radio lobes extending beyond the inner cavities. We suggest that the inner cavities were produced ∼78 Myr ago by a weaker AGN outburst, while the outer cavity, the radio lobes, and the shock front are due to a younger (13-26 Myr) and 4-8 times more powerful outburst. Combining this with the observed morphology of NGC 193, we conclude that NGC 193 likely represents the first example of a second, more powerful, AGN outburst overrunning an older, weaker outburst. These results help us to understand how the outburst energy is dissipated uniformly in the core of galaxies, and therefore may play a crucial role in resolving how AGN outbursts suppress the formation of large cooling flows at cluster centers.

  6. GIANT OUTBURSTS IN Be/X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Rebecca G.; Nixon, Chris; Armitage, Philip J.; Lubow, Stephen H.; Price, Daniel J.

    2014-08-01

    Be/X-ray binary systems exhibit both periodic (Type I) X-ray outbursts and giant (Type II) outbursts, whose origins have remained elusive. We suggest that Type II X-ray outbursts occur when a highly misaligned decretion disk around the Be star becomes eccentric, allowing the compact object companion to capture a large amount of material at periastron. Using three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations, we model the long-term evolution of a representative Be/X-ray binary system. We find that periodic (Type I) X-ray outbursts occur when the neutron star is close to periastron for all disk inclinations. Type II outbursts occur for large misalignment angles and are associated with eccentricity growth which occurs on a timescale of about 10 orbital periods. Mass capture from the eccentric decretion disk results in an accretion disk around the neutron star whose estimated viscous time is long enough to explain the extended duration of Type II outbursts. Previous studies suggested that the outbursts are caused by a warped disk but our results suggest that this is not sufficient; the disk must be both highly misaligned and eccentric to initiate a Type II accretion event.

  7. V1331 Cyg- An outburst of results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Arpita; Stecklum, Bringfried; Stapelfeldt, Karl

    2013-07-01

    FU Orionis objects are a class of young stars with large brightness outbursts in the optical. The outbursts lead to strong increase in luminosity due to enhanced accretion and dust removal by the accompanying wind. All FUors have large infrared excess emission from circumstellar dust, and some drive bipolar jets and outflows. V1331 Cyg is a pre-outburst FUor candidate: At distance of ~ 550 pc, at the border of the dark cloud LDN 981. It is associated with an arc-like reflection nebula. It has two nested rings of 9000 and 3300 AU radii respectively, encircled by an expanding CO ring. The HST-WFPC2 imaging was done in 2000 and 2009. The first epoch images were obtained for F606W and F814W filters. The second epoch observations were deeper with one more filter, F450W introduced. Wind-driven expansion has an imprint on the colour profile of the ring, the study of which will be the next step to do. There is a missing ring section to the NW not due to extinction by the dark cloud but represent a shadow, originating close to the star. Our PSF -subtracted planetary camera frames disclosed a knot at ~0.4" from the star in the same direction. Also our analysis of archival Subaru coronagraphic H-band imaging reveals scattered light associated with this feature which was not seen before. Both findings suggest increased height of the matter at distances of ~300 AU which casts the shadow. This might be related to planet formation in the circumstellar disk. The scattering knot is associated with two spiral arms which stretch further out. The UKIDSS JHK images show faint reddened stars in the gap, confirming the presence of dense matter from probably both the protostellar environment and the molecular cloud. Herschel and SCUBA data confirm that V1331 Cyg is the most luminous object in the surroundings, ONLY possible young stellar candidate responsible for the outflow. Narrow-band imaging in the Hα and [SII] line revealed a bipolar outflow, presumed to have a substantial

  8. Efficient GPU Accelerationfor Integrating Large Thermonuclear Networks in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidry, Mike

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate the systematic implementation of recently-developed fast explicit kinetic integration algorithms on modern graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerators. We take as representative test cases Type Ia supernova explosions with extremely stiff thermonuclear reaction networks having 150-365 isotopic species and 1600-4400 reactions, assumed coupled to hydrodynamics using operator splitting. In such examples we demonstrate the capability to integrate independent thermonuclear networks from ~250-500 hydro zones (assumed to be deployed on CPU cores) in parallel on a single GPU in the same wall clock time that standard implicit methods can integrate the network for a single zone. This two or more orders of magnitude increase in efficiency for solving systems of realistic thermonuclear networks coupled to fluid dynamics implies that important coupled, multiphysics problems in various scientific and technical disciplines that were intractable, or could be simulated only with highly schematic kinetic networks, are now computationally feasible. As examples of such applications I will discuss our ongoing deployment of these new methods for Type Ia supernova explosions in astrophysics and for simulation of the complex atmospheric chemistry entering into weather and climate problems.

  9. Method of achieving the controlled release of thermonuclear energy

    DOEpatents

    Brueckner, Keith A.

    1986-01-01

    A method of achieving the controlled release of thermonuclear energy by illuminating a minute, solid density, hollow shell of a mixture of material such as deuterium and tritium with a high intensity, uniformly converging laser wave to effect an extremely rapid build-up of energy in inwardly traveling shock waves to implode the shell creating thermonuclear conditions causing a reaction of deuterons and tritons and a resultant high energy thermonuclear burn. Utilizing the resulting energy as a thermal source and to breed tritium or plutonium. The invention also contemplates a laser source wherein the flux level is increased with time to reduce the initial shock heating of fuel and provide maximum compression after implosion; and, in addition, computations and an equation are provided to enable the selection of a design having a high degree of stability and a dependable fusion performance by establishing a proper relationship between the laser energy input and the size and character of the selected material for the fusion capsule.

  10. Runaway Electrification of Friable Self-Replicating Granular Matter

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We establish that the nonlinear dynamics of collisions between particles favors the charging of an insulating, friable, self-replicating granular material that undergoes nucleation, growth, and fission processes; we demonstrate with a minimal dynamical model that secondary nucleation produces a positive feedback in an electrification mechanism that leads to runaway charging. We discuss ice as an example of such a self-replicating granular material: We confirm with laboratory experiments in which we grow ice from the vapor phase in situ within an environmental scanning electron microscope that charging causes fast-growing and easily breakable palmlike structures to form, which when broken off may form secondary nuclei. We propose that thunderstorms, both terrestrial and on other planets, and lightning in the solar nebula are instances of such runaway charging arising from this nonlinear dynamics in self-replicating granular matter. PMID:24041221

  11. Runaway electrification of friable self-replicating granular matter.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Julyan H E; Escribano, Bruno; Grothe, Hinrich; Piro, Oreste; Sainz Díaz, C Ignacio; Tuval, Idan

    2013-10-15

    We establish that the nonlinear dynamics of collisions between particles favors the charging of an insulating, friable, self-replicating granular material that undergoes nucleation, growth, and fission processes; we demonstrate with a minimal dynamical model that secondary nucleation produces a positive feedback in an electrification mechanism that leads to runaway charging. We discuss ice as an example of such a self-replicating granular material: We confirm with laboratory experiments in which we grow ice from the vapor phase in situ within an environmental scanning electron microscope that charging causes fast-growing and easily breakable palmlike structures to form, which when broken off may form secondary nuclei. We propose that thunderstorms, both terrestrial and on other planets, and lightning in the solar nebula are instances of such runaway charging arising from this nonlinear dynamics in self-replicating granular matter. PMID:24041221

  12. Numerical simulation of thermal runaway in alumina during microwave processing

    SciTech Connect

    Clemens, J.; Saltiel, C.

    1995-12-31

    A numerical method is used to simulate heating of processed samples with microwave energy in a closed cavity. Explicit finite difference schemes for solving the unsteady equations governing electromagnetic propagation (Maxwell`s equations) and energy deposition and diffusion are coupled. Simulations are performed for processing of alumina at 2.45 GHz in a multi-mode cavity. Steady state temperature profiles are achieved if the electrical properties are assumed constant, but when more realistic temperature dependent property data are employed, local heating produces an exponential rise in temperature (thermal runaway). It is shown that by enlarging the sample for a respective cavity, thermal runaway can be avoided. The authors emphasize that understanding the parameters that influence electromagnetic intensity distributions and promote resonance is a prerequisite for developing processing methods to control sample temperature.

  13. EUVE photometry of SS Cygni: Dwarf nova outbursts and oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Mauche, C.W.

    1995-05-15

    The authors present EUVE Deep Survey photometry and AAVSO optical measurements of the 1993 August and 1994 June/July outbursts of the dwarf nova SS Cygni. The EUV and optical light curves are used to illustrate the different response of the accretion disk to outbursts which begin at the inner edge and propagate outward, and those which begin at the outer edge and propagate inward. Furthermore, the authors describe the properties of the quasi-coherent 7--9 s sinusoidal oscillations in the EUV flux detected during the rise and plateau stages of these outbursts.

  14. Runaway implantable defibrillator--a rare complication of radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Nemec, Jan

    2007-05-01

    A case of a patient with runaway implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) due to radiation therapy of a lung cancer is reported. This manifested as poorly tolerated wide complex tachycardia due to inappropriate rapid ventricular pacing, The event terminated with polymorphic VT, which inhibited pacing and ceased spontaneously before ICD discharge. The likely cause was corruption of device random access memory by ionizing radiation. PMID:17461884

  15. The Legal Status of Runaway Children. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaser, Herbert W.

    This project--to determine the current legal status of juvenile runaways in the United States--was undertaken on July 1, 1974 at the behest of and funded by the Office of Youth Development, Office of Human Development of the DHEW. It is only one part of a much broader in-depth effort covering a wide spectrum of subjects by many of the constituent…

  16. Breakdown and discharges in dense gases governed by runaway electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Babich, L.P.

    1996-03-01

    The phenomenon of runaway electrons (REs) at high values of the ratio field intensity/gas number density {ital E}/{ital N} and {ital N} up to the Loshmidt number {ital N}{sub {ital L}}{approx_equal}2.7{times}10{sup 19} cm{sup {minus}3} is described. REs are shown to govern the breakdown and discharges at such condition. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Note: Measurement of the runaway electrons in the J-TEXT tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, X. Q.; Luo, Y. H.; Jin, W.; Li, J. C.; Chen, Z. P.; Wang, Z. J.; Yang, Z. J.; Zhuang, G.

    2012-05-01

    The runaway electrons have been measured by hard x-ray detectors and soft x-ray array in the J-TEXT tokamak. The hard x-ray radiations in the energy ranges of 0.5-5 MeV are measured by two NaI detectors. The flux of lost runaway electrons can be obtained routinely. The soft x-ray array diagnostics are used to monitor the runaway beam generated in disruptions since the soft x-ray is dominated by the interaction between runaway electrons and metallic impurities inside the plasma. With the aid of soft x-ray array, runaway electron beam has been detected directly during the formation of runaway current plateau following the disruptions.

  18. THE NATURE OF THE HYPER-RUNAWAY CANDIDATE HIP 60350

    SciTech Connect

    Irrgang, Andreas; Przybilla, Norbert; Heber, Ulrich; Fernanda Nieva, M.; Schuh, Sonja

    2010-03-01

    Young, massive stars in the Galactic halo are widely supposed to be the result of an ejection event from the Galactic disk forcing some stars to leave their place of birth as so-called runaway stars. Here, we present a detailed spectroscopic and kinematic analysis of the runaway B star HIP 60350 to determine which runaway scenario-a supernova explosion disrupting a binary system or dynamical interaction in star clusters-may be responsible for HIP 60350's peculiar orbit. Based on a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium approach, a high-resolution optical echelle spectrum was examined to revise spectroscopic quantities and for the first time to perform a differential chemical abundance analysis with respect to the B-type star 18 Peg. The results together with proper motions from the Hipparcos Catalog further allowed the three-dimensional kinematics of the star to be studied numerically. The abundances derived for HIP 60350 are consistent with a slightly supersolar metallicity agreeing with the kinematically predicted place of birth {approx}6 kpc away from the Galactic center. However, they do not exclude the possibility of an alpha-enhanced abundance pattern expected in the case of the supernova scenario. Its outstanding high Galactic rest-frame velocity of 530 +- 35 km s{sup -1} is a consequence of ejection in the direction of Galactic rotation and slightly exceeds the local Galactic escape velocity in a standard Galactic potential. Hence, HIP 60350 may be unbound to the Galaxy.

  19. Relativistic runaway breakdown in low-frequency radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füllekrug, Martin; Roussel-Dupré, Robert; Symbalisty, Eugene M. D.; Chanrion, Olivier; Odzimek, Anna; van der Velde, Oscar; Neubert, Torsten

    2010-01-01

    The electromagnetic radiation emitted by an electron avalanche beam resulting from relativistic runaway breakdown within the Earth's atmosphere is investigated. It is found from theoretical modeling with a computer simulation that the electron beam emits electromagnetic radiation which is characterized by consecutive broadband pulses in the low-frequency radio range from ˜10 to 300 kHz at a distance of ˜800 km. Experimental evidence for the existence of consecutive broadband pulses is provided by low-frequency radio observations of sprite-producing lightning discharges at a distance of ˜550 km. The measured broadband pulses occur ˜4-9 ms after the sprite-producing lightning discharge, they exhibit electromagnetic radiation which mainly spans the frequency range from ˜50 to 350 kHz, and they exhibit complex waveforms without the typical ionospheric reflection of the first hop sky wave. Two consecutive pulses occur ˜4.5 ms and ˜3 ms after the causative lightning discharge and coincide with the sprite luminosity. It is concluded that relativistic runaway breakdown within the Earth's atmosphere can emit broadband electromagnetic pulses and possibly generates sprites. The source location of the broadband pulses can be determined with an interferometric network of wideband low-frequency radio receivers to lend further experimental support to the relativistic runaway breakdown theory.

  20. Positron production during relativistic runaway processes associated with thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, J. R.; Smith, D. M.; Rassoul, H.; Cramer, E. S.; Schaal, M.; Saleh, Z. H.; Grefenstette, B.; Hazelton, B. J.; Splitt, M. E.; Lazarus, S. M.; Fishman, G. J.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.

    2009-12-01

    Recent spacecraft observations of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) by Fermi/GBM and aircraft observations of the gamma-ray emissions from thunderclouds by ADELE have shown prominent 511 keV positron annihilation lines, demonstrating large enhancements in the positron populations. These observations show that significant pair-production must be taking place, most likely in association with the production of relativistic runaway electron avalanches. Using detailed Monte Carlo simulations, we investigate the production and subsequent transport of positrons by strong electric fields associated with thunderstorms. It will be shown that intense high-energy beams of positrons can be produced with energies reaching 100 MeV, well exceeding the average energy of the runaway electron population. These positrons, which may travel many kilometers before annihilating, generate a substantial amount of bremsstrahlung x-rays and annihilation gamma-rays. In this presentation, we shall discuss the theory of positron production by runaway electron avalanches and the feedback effects produced by these positrons. In addition, we shall use the Monte Carlo simulations to model the recent Fermi/GBM TGF and ADELE gamma-ray data.

  1. Can increased atmospheric CO2 levels trigger a runaway greenhouse?

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Ramses M; Kopparapu, Ravi Kumar; Lindner, Valerie; Kasting, James F

    2014-08-01

    Recent one-dimensional (globally averaged) climate model calculations by Goldblatt et al. (2013) suggest that increased atmospheric CO(2) could conceivably trigger a runaway greenhouse on present Earth if CO(2) concentrations were approximately 100 times higher than they are today. The new prediction runs contrary to previous calculations by Kasting and Ackerman (1986), which indicated that CO(2) increases could not trigger a runaway, even at Venus-like CO(2) concentrations. Goldblatt et al. argued that this different behavior is a consequence of updated absorption coefficients for H(2)O that make a runaway more likely. Here, we use a 1-D climate model with similar, up-to-date absorption coefficients, but employ a different methodology, to show that the older result is probably still valid, although our model nearly runs away at ∼12 preindustrial atmospheric levels of CO(2) when we use the most alarmist assumptions possible. However, we argue that Earth's real climate is probably stable given more realistic assumptions, although 3-D climate models will be required to verify this result. Potential CO(2) increases from fossil fuel burning are somewhat smaller than this, 10-fold or less, but such increases could still cause sufficient warming to make much of the planet uninhabitable by humans. PMID:25061956

  2. A POWERFUL AGN OUTBURST IN RBS 797

    SciTech Connect

    Cavagnolo, K. W.; McNamara, B. R.; Wise, M. W.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Gitti, M.; Brueggen, M.; Rafferty, D. A.

    2011-05-10

    Utilizing {approx}50 ks of Chandra X-Ray Observatory imaging, we present an analysis of the intracluster medium (ICM) and cavity system in the galaxy cluster RBS 797. In addition to the two previously known cavities in the cluster core, the new and deeper X-ray image has revealed additional structure associated with the active galactic nucleus (AGN). The surface brightness decrements of the two cavities are unusually large and are consistent with elongated cavities lying close to our line of sight. We estimate a total AGN outburst energy and mean jet power of {approx}(3-6) x 10{sup 60} erg and {approx}(3-6) x 10{sup 45} erg s{sup -1}, respectively, depending on the assumed geometrical configuration of the cavities. Thus, RBS 797 is apparently among the most powerful AGN outbursts known in a cluster. The average mass accretion rate needed to power the AGN by accretion alone is {approx}1 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. We show that accretion of cold gas onto the AGN at this level is plausible, but that Bondi accretion of the hot atmosphere is probably not. The brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) harbors an unresolved, non-thermal nuclear X-ray source with a bolometric luminosity of {approx}2 x 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}. The nuclear emission is probably associated with a rapidly accreting, radiatively inefficient accretion flow. We present tentative evidence that star formation in the BCG is being triggered by the radio jets and suggest that the cavities may be driving weak shocks (M {approx} 1.5) into the ICM, similar to the process in the galaxy cluster MS 0735.6+7421.

  3. Suppression of X-rays generated by runaway electrons in ATF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, D. A.; England, A. C.; Eberle, C. C.; Devan, W. R.; Harris, J. H.; Jernigan, T. C.; Kindsfather, R. R.; Morris, R. N.; Murakami, M.; Neilson, G. H.

    X-ray emission from runaway electrons on ATF is a serious issue. Runaway suppression techniques used on Heliotron-E are not adequate for ATF. Three approaches have been developed to suppress runaway production. Monitoring devices have been installed in occupied areas and personnel access and exposure will be limited. Additional shielding will be added as required. These systems will be ready for installation and testing on ATF prior to commissioning or first plasma operation.

  4. A note on runaway electrons in the presence of kinetic Alfven waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Assis, A. S.; de Azevedo, C. A.

    1993-04-01

    It is shown by the quasilinear Fokker-Planck approach that the shear kinetic Alfvén wave (KAW) cannot by itself produce runaway electrons, though it carries an electric field aligned with the ambient magnetic field. However, it can enhance the runaway production rate in case it propagates in presence of a background DC ambient electric field. Therefore, this note answers the question raised by Hollweg (1981) concerning the runaway electrons and nonthermal emission supposedly produced by KWA, without explanation until today. The main result presented here concerning the runaway production rate is valid for space or laboratory plasmas where the KWA and an ambient DC electric field coexist.

  5. Parametric upconversion of lower hybrid wave by runaway electrons in tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Kuley, Animesh; Tripathi, V. K.

    2010-06-15

    A kinetic formalism of parametric decay of a large amplitude lower hybrid pump wave into runaway electron mode and an upper sideband mode is investigated. The pump and the sideband exert a ponderomotive force on runaway electrons, driving the runaway mode. The density perturbation associated with the latter beats with the oscillatory velocity due to the pump to produce the sideband. The finite parallel velocity spread of the runaway electrons turns the parametric instability into a stimulated Compton scattering process where growth rate scales as the square of the pump amplitude. The large phase velocity waves thus generated can potentially generate relativistic electrons.

  6. The Runaway Greenhouse Effect on Earth and other Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabbette, Maura; Pilewskie, Peter; McKay, Christopher; Young, Robert

    2001-01-01

    Water vapor is an efficient absorber of outgoing longwave infrared radiation on Earth and is the primary greenhouse gas. Since evaporation increases with increasing sea surface temperature, and the increase in water vapor further increases greenhouse warming, there is a positive feedback. The runaway greenhouse effect occurs if this feedback continues unchecked until all the water has left the surface and enters the atmosphere. For Mars and the Earth the runaway greenhouse was halted when water vapor became saturated with respect to ice or liquid water respectively. However, Venus is considered to be an example of a planet where the runaway greenhouse effect did occur, and it has been speculated that if the solar luminosity were to increase above a certain limit, it would also occur on the Earth. Satellite data acquired during the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) under clear sky conditions shows that as the sea surface temperature (SST) increases, the rate of outgoing infrared radiation at the top of the atmosphere also increases, as expected. Over the pacific warm pool where the SST exceeds 300 K the outgoing radiation emitted to space actually decreases with increasing SST, leading to a potentially unstable system. This behavior is a signature of the runaway greenhouse effect on Earth. However, the SST never exceeds 303K, thus the system has a natural cap which stops the runaway. According to Stefan-Boltzmann's law the amount of heat energy radiated by the Earth's surface is proportional to (T(sup 4)). However, if the planet has a substantial atmosphere, it can absorb all infrared radiation from the lower surface before the radiation penetrates into outer space. Thus, an instrument in space looking at the planet does not detect radiation from the surface. The radiation it sees comes from some level higher up. For the earth#s atmosphere the effective temperature (T(sub e)) has a value of 255 K corresponding to the middle troposphere, above most of the

  7. New Outburst of Centaur Comet (60558) 174P/Echeclus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Young-Jun; Ishiguro, Masateru; Moon, Hong-Kyu

    2015-03-01

    We report observations of new outburst of Centaur (60558) 174P/Echeclus, using Suprime-Cam of Subaru tele-scope. The outburst was detected by Jager on May 30, 2011 (Jaeger et al., 2011). We made several follow-up observations for this outburst with 1m telescope at Mt. Lemon Optical Astronomy Observatory located in US and 60cm telescope at Sobaeksan Optical Astronomy Observatory in Korea. The very first presence of coma around (60558) 2000 EC98 has been detected by Choi and Weissman (2006) on 2005 December 30.50 UT with the Palomar 5m telescope. Soon after, the object was given the periodic comet designa-tion 174P/Echeclus. We will present the characterstics and discuss the reason of this recursive outburst.

  8. Prominent outburst of the blazar CTA 102 in 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionov, V. M.; Blinov, D. A.; Jorstad, S. G.; Marscher, A. P.; Villata, M.; Raiteri, C. M.; Agudo, I.; Smith, P. S.; Morozova, D. A.; Troitsky, I. S.; Clemens, D. P.

    2013-12-01

    After a few years of quiescence, the blazar CTA 102 underwent a large outburst in the fall of 2012. The flare has been tracked from γ-rays to near-infrared, including Fermi and Swift data as well as polarimetric data from several observatories. An intensive GASP-WEBT collaboration campaign in optical and NIR bands, with the addition of previously unpublished archival data, allows comparison of this outburst with the previous activity period of this blazar in the early 2000s. We find remarkable similarity between the optical and γ-ray behavior of CTA 102 during the outburst, without any time lag between the two light curves, indicating co-spatiality of the optical and γ-ray emission regions. A strong harder-when-brighter spectral dependence is seen both in γ-rays and optical. The polarimetric behavior of CTA 102 during the outburst conforms with a shock-in-jet interpretation.

  9. Physical Mechanism of Comet (and Asteroid) Outbursts: The Movie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, W. K.

    2015-07-01

    A film made during impact experiments at NASA Ames illustrates a mechanism in which regolith can become gas charged and then erupt to create outbursts as observed on comets (and "asteroids" such as 2060 Chiron).

  10. The September 1996 outbursts of Comet Hale-Bopp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, S. M.; Samarasinha, N.; Tao, J.; Hergenrother, C.

    2000-10-01

    Digitally enhanced pre-perihelion groundbased images of Comet Hale-Bopp taken in September 1996 show intersting morphology resulting from at least two outbursts. During that apparition, the coma was dominated by radial ``porcupine" morphology. However, a 2 magnitude outburst starting on 1996 September 9.5 UT (Tao et al., 2000, Plan. Sp. Sci. 48, 153-161) resulted in two expanding dust shells with apparent expansion speeds of 112 and 225 m/s and an arc in the NW quadrant. This morphology is very similar to that seen in post-perihelion NICMOS images of a similar outburst on 1997 August 27 (see Campins et al., DPS 2000 abstract). Similar, but less pronounced outburst activity can be seen later in the month and include evidence for ejection of discrete fragments. We explore the possible mechanisms for the observed morphology. This work is supported in part by the NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program.