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Sample records for outcome measure results

  1. Towards global consensus on outcome measures for atopic eczema research: results of the HOME II meeting.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Jochen; Spuls, Phyllis; Boers, Maarten; Thomas, Kim; Chalmers, Joanne; Roekevisch, Evelien; Schram, Mandy; Allsopp, Richard; Aoki, Valeria; Apfelbacher, Christian; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla; Bruin-Weller, Marjolein; Charman, Carolyn; Cohen, Arnon; Dohil, Magdalene; Flohr, Carsten; Furue, Masutaka; Gieler, Uwe; Hooft, Lotty; Humphreys, Rosemary; Ishii, Henrique Akira; Katayama, Ichiro; Kouwenhoven, Willem; Langan, Sinéad; Lewis-Jones, Sue; Merhand, Stephanie; Murota, Hiroyuki; Murrell, Dedee F; Nankervis, Helen; Ohya, Yukihiro; Oranje, Arnold; Otsuka, Hiromi; Paul, Carle; Rosenbluth, Yael; Saeki, Hidehisa; Schuttelaar, Marie-Louise; Stalder, Jean-Francois; Svensson, Ake; Takaoka, Roberto; Wahlgren, Carl-Fredrik; Weidinger, Stephan; Wollenberg, Andreas; Williams, Hywel

    2012-09-01

    The use of nonstandardized and inadequately validated outcome measures in atopic eczema trials is a major obstacle to practising evidence-based dermatology. The Harmonising Outcome Measures for Eczema (HOME) initiative is an international multiprofessional group dedicated to atopic eczema outcomes research. In June 2011, the HOME initiative conducted a consensus study involving 43 individuals from 10 countries, representing different stakeholders (patients, clinicians, methodologists, pharmaceutical industry) to determine core outcome domains for atopic eczema trials, to define quality criteria for atopic eczema outcome measures and to prioritize topics for atopic eczema outcomes research. Delegates were given evidence-based information, followed by structured group discussion and anonymous consensus voting. Consensus was achieved to include clinical signs, symptoms, long-term control of flares and quality of life into the core set of outcome domains for atopic eczema trials. The HOME initiative strongly recommends including and reporting these core outcome domains as primary or secondary endpoints in all future atopic eczema trials. Measures of these core outcome domains need to be valid, sensitive to change and feasible. Prioritized topics of the HOME initiative are the identification/development of the most appropriate instruments for the four core outcome domains. HOME is open to anyone with an interest in atopic eczema outcomes research. PMID:22844983

  2. Measuring Course Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keshavarz, Mohsen

    2011-01-01

    Accreditation criteria of programs require effective learning outcomes, assessment with documented procedures, tools, results, and actions to close the assessment loop with broad faculty involvement. This article describes a methodology for providing quantitative measurement of a course's learning outcomes. The methodology uses a linkage matrix…

  3. Why Measure Outcomes?

    PubMed

    Kuhn, John E

    2016-01-01

    The concept of measuring the outcomes of treatment in health care was promoted by Ernest Amory Codman in the early 1900s, but, until recently, his ideas were generally ignored. The forces that have advanced outcome measurement to the forefront of health care include the shift in payers for health care from the patient to large insurance companies or government agencies, the movement toward assessing the care of populations not individuals, and the effort to find value (or cost-effective treatments) amid rising healthcare costs. No ideal method exists to measure outcomes, and the information gathered depends on the reason the outcome information is required. Outcome measures used in research are best able to answer research questions. The methods for assessing physician and hospital performance include process measures, patient-experience measures, structure measures, and measures used to assess the outcomes of treatment. The methods used to assess performance should be validated, be reliable, and reflect a patient's perception of the treatment results. The healthcare industry must measure outcomes to identify which treatments are most effective and provide the most benefit to patients. PMID:27049223

  4. Action Research: Measuring Literacy Programme Participants' Learning Outcomes. Results of the Final Phase (2011-2014)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolly, Madina; Jonas, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Action Research on Measuring Literacy Programme Participants' Learning Outcomes (RAMAA) aims to develop, implement and collaborate on the creation of a methodological approach to measure acquired learning and study the various factors that influence its development. This report examines how RAMAA I has been implemented over the past four years in…

  5. Measuring and recording outcome.

    PubMed

    Murphy, P J

    2012-07-01

    Achieving good health outcomes for patients is the fundamental purpose of healthcare. What really matters to patients is the outcome of an intervention and the effect it will have on their wellbeing and life expectancy. After media coverage, and public enquiry into high mortality rates for paediatric cardiac surgery at the Bristol Royal Infirmary during the early 1990s, mortality rates for paediatric cardiac surgical procedures decreased dramatically both in Bristol and nationally. There can be little doubt that one of the prime 'drivers for change' was the placement of outcome data into the public domain. After events in Bristol, the Society for Cardiothoracic Surgery in Britain and Ireland (SCTS) has taken the lead in measuring and publishing clinical outcome data. It has also discussed how outcome data could be used to assess an individual's clinical performance and how, in the future, this might be linked to continuing professional development, appraisal, and revalidation. Measuring quality and outcome in healthcare is complex. Ideal outcome measures should be specific, sensitive, reliable, responsive, validated, timely, and easy to measure. Monitoring of outcomes can be 'process' orientated or 'clinically' orientated. The 2010 National Health Service (NHS) White Paper aimed for an NHS which 'moves away from centrally driven process targets and focuses on delivering outcomes which matter to people'. Measuring outcome in anaesthesia is problematic. There are issues around clinical coding, risk adjustment, the influence of clinical teamworking, and environmental factors. The National Institute of Academic Anaesthesia (NIAA) has identified that the description of clinical practice in anaesthesia and perioperative medicine is currently limited by a lack of valid, reliable quality measures. The NIAA suggests that there is a requirement for further research into identifying the anaesthetic outcome indicators which are most relevant to patients, and then benchmarking the performance of anaesthetic departments and anaesthetists. PMID:22654098

  6. Outcome measures in stapes surgery: postoperative results are independent from preoperative parameters.

    PubMed

    Koopmann, Mario; Weiss, Daniel; Savvas, Eleftherios; Rudack, Claudia; Stenner, Markus

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare audiometric results before and after stapes surgery and identify potential prognostic factors to appropriately select patients with otosclerosis who will most likely benefit from surgery. We enrolled 126 patients with otosclerosis (162 consecutive ears) in our study who underwent stapes surgery between 2007 and 2012 at our institution. Preoperative and postoperative data including pure-tone audiometry, speech audiometry, stapedial reflex audiometry and surgical data were analyzed. The average preoperative air-bone gap (ABG) was 28.9 ± 8.6 dB. Male patients and patients older than 45 years of age had greater preoperative ABGs in comparison to females and younger patients. Postoperative ABGs were 11.2 ± 7.4 dB. The average ABG gain was 17.7 ± 11.1 dB. Preoperative audiometric data, age, gender and type of surgery did not influence the postoperative results. Stapes surgery offers predictable results independent from disease progression or patient-related factors. While absolute values of hearing improvement are instrumental in reflecting audiometric results of a cohort, relative values better reflect individual's audiometric data resembling the patient's benefit. PMID:24906841

  7. Measuring Wheelchair Intervention Outcomes: Development of the Wheelchair Outcome Measure

    PubMed Central

    Mortenson, William B; Miller, William C; Miller-Pogar, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Provision of a wheelchair has immediate intuitive benefits; however, it can be difficult to evaluate which wheelchair and seating components best meet an individual’s needs. As well, funding agencies now prefer evidence of outcomes; and therefore measurement upon prescription of a wheelchair or its components is essential to demonstrate the efficacy of intervention. As no existing tool can provide individualized goal-oriented measure of outcome after wheelchair prescription, a research project was undertaken to create the Wheelchair Outcome Measure (WhOM). Method A mixed method research design was employed to develop the instrument, which used in-depth interviews of prescribers, individuals who use wheelchairs and their associates, supplemented by additional questions in which participant preferences in key areas of the measure were quantified. Results The WhOM is a client-specific wheelchair intervention measurement tool that is based on the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Function, Disability, and Health. It identifies desired outcomes at a participation level and also acknowledges concerns about body structure and function. Conclusion The new outcome instrument will allow clients to identify and evaluate the outcomes they wish to achieve with their wheelchairs and seating and provide clinicians a way to quantify outcomes of their interventions in a way that is meaningful to the client and potential funding sources. PMID:19263533

  8. [Responsiveness of outcome measures].

    PubMed

    de Yébenes Prous, María Jesús García; Rodríguez Salvanés, Francisco; Carmona Ortells, Loreto

    2008-12-01

    In medical research, particularly in the field of rheumatology, there is great interest about the concept of responsiveness of outcome measures as a sign of changes in the patient's health status. However, the terminology sorrounding this concept and the methods of analysis are confusing and lacking in consensus. We present a review about the concept and analysis of responsiveness taking into account both, the characteristics of the responsiveness and the type of design and predictable change in the sample being studied. PMID:21794541

  9. Lower limb orthopaedic surgery results in changes to coagulation and non-specific inflammatory biomarkers, including selective clinical outcome measures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background With an aging society and raised expectations, joint replacement surgery is likely to increase significantly in the future. The development of postoperative complications following joint replacement surgery (for example, infection, systemic inflammatory response syndrome and deep vein thrombosis) is also likely to increase. Despite considerable progress in orthopaedic surgery, comparing a range of biological markers with the ultimate aim of monitoring or predicting postoperative complications has not yet been extensively researched. The aim of this clinical pilot study was to test the hypothesis that lower limb orthopaedic surgery results in changes to coagulation, non-specific markers of inflammation (primary objective) and selective clinical outcome measures (secondary objective). Methods Test subjects were scheduled for elective total hip replacement (THR) or total knee replacement (TKR) orthopaedic surgery due to osteoarthritis (n = 10). Platelet counts and D-dimer concentrations were measured to assess any changes to coagulation function. C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were measured as markers of non-specific inflammation. Patients were monitored regularly to assess for any signs of postoperative complications, including blood transfusions, oedema (knee swelling), wound infection, pain and fever. Results THR and TKR orthopaedic surgery resulted in similar changes of coagulation and non-specific inflammatory biomarkers, suggestive of increased coagulation and inflammatory reactions postoperatively. Specifically, THR and TKR surgery resulted in an increase in platelet (P = 0.013, THR) and D-dimer (P = 0.009, TKR) concentrations. Evidence of increased inflammation was demonstrated by an increase in CRP and ESR (P ≤ 0.05, THR and TKR). Four patients received blood transfusions (two THR and two TKR patients), with maximal oedema, pain and aural temperatures peaking between days 1 and 3 postoperatively, for both THR and TKR surgery. None of the patients developed postoperative infections. Conclusions The most noticeable changes in biological markers occur during days 1 to 3 postoperatively for both THR and TKR surgery, and these may have an effect on such postoperative clinical outcomes as oedema, pyrexia and pain. This study may assist in understanding the postoperative course following lower limb orthopaedic surgery, and may help clinicians in planning postoperative management and patient care. PMID:24206644

  10. A novel simple measure correlates to the outcome in 57 patients with intracerebellar hematomas. Results of a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Doukas, Alexandros; Maslehaty, Homajoun; Barth, Harald; Hedderich, Jürgen; Petridis, Athanasios K.; Mehdorn, H. Maximilian

    2015-01-01

    Background: The incidence of intracerebellar hemorrhages approaches 5–10% of all intracerebral hematomas. The clinical presentation varies from headaches and dizziness to rapid deterioration of consciousness to the point of coma in severe cases. In order to find some concrete criteria that could influence the prognosis of these patients, we performed this retrospective study. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the factors influencing the outcome of 57 patients with intracerebellar hematomas treated in our clinic in the last 7 years. The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) on admission, as well as other parameters as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, presence of malign tumors in the medical history, or the intake of anticoagulants were assessed as independent factors influencing the outcome of the patients. On the other hand, various computed tomography parameters on admission were also correlated with the clinical outcome such as, tight posterior fossa (TPF), volume of the hematoma, hydrocephalus, compression of the fourth ventricle, intraventricular bleeding, as well as the ratio of the maximal width of the hematoma in comparison to the width of the PF were taken into consideration. Results: The results of the study showed that patients with poor GCS on admission had also a poor Glasgow Outcome Score. Interestingly there was a statistically significant correlation between the maximal width of the hematoma in comparison to the width of the PF and the outcome of the patients. It could be also shown that the patients with intraventricular hemorrhage, hydrocephalus, compression of the fourth ventricle over 50% of its maximal width and TPF, had a poor clinical outcome. Moreover, there was a statistically significant correlation of the volume of the hematoma and a poor clinical outcome. Conclusions: We introduced as a new factor that is, the cerebellar hemorrhage/PF ratio and found out that the value >35% was associated to an unfavorable outcome. PMID:26673852

  11. Asthma outcome measures.

    PubMed

    Watkins, K D

    1999-08-01

    Annually, asthma accounts for 10.4 million physician visits, 468,000 hospitalizations, 1.8 million emergency room visits, and 10 million missed school days. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the number of asthma deaths has increased progressively since 1978 form 1,800 to 5,400 per year. It is an expensive disease, accounting for about 1% of all health expenditure in the United States in 1990. Asthma has a significant impact on the patient and the community at large and the assessment of the clinical, physiologic, humanistic and economic outcomes will be measured. PMID:10563275

  12. Measuring fall program outcomes.

    PubMed

    Quigley, Pat; Neily, Julia; Watson, Mary; Wright, Marilyn; Strobe, Karen

    2007-05-01

    Nurses help to ensure patient safety, which includes preventing falls and fall related injuries. The aging Veteran population, like the general population, is at risk for falls and fall related injuries whether at home, in hospitals or in long term care facilities. Nurses are leading practice innovations to systematically assess patients' risk for falls and implement population based prevention interventions. To determine the effectiveness of programs, data can be analyzed using a variety of statistical measures to determine program impacts. Thus, data analysis of fall rates by type of fall and severity of fall related injury can help facilities examine the effectiveness of their interventions and program outcomes. Examples of actual fall prevention programs and their approaches to measurement are showcased in this article. PMID:21848355

  13. Advancing PROMIS’s methodology: results of the Third Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®) Psychometric Summit

    PubMed Central

    Carle, Adam C; Cella, David; Cai, Li; Choi, Seung W; Crane, Paul K; Curtis, S McKay; Gruhl, Jonathan; Lai, Jin-Shei; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Reise, Steven P; Teresi, Jeanne A; Thissen, David; Wu, Eric J; Hays, Ron D

    2012-01-01

    In 2002, the NIH launched the ‘Roadmap for Medical Research’. The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®) is one of the Roadmap’s key aspects. To create the next generation of patient-reported outcome measures, PROMIS utilizes item response theory (IRT) and computerized adaptive testing. In 2009, the NIH funded the second wave of PROMIS studies (PROMIS II). PROMIS II studies continue PROMIS’s agenda, but also include new features, including longitudinal analyses and more sociodemographically diverse samples. PROMIS II also includes increased emphasis on pediatric populations and evaluation of PROMIS item banks for clinical research and population science. These aspects bring new psychometric challenges. To address this, investigators associated with PROMIS gathered at the Third Psychometric Summit in September 2010 to identify, describe and discuss pressing psychometric issues and new developments in the field, as well as make analytic recommendations for PROMIS. The summit addressed five general themes: linking, differential item functioning, dimensionality, IRT models for longitudinal applications and new IRT software. In this article, we review the discussions and presentations that occurred at the Third PROMIS Psychometric Summit. PMID:22098283

  14. Evaluating more naturalistic outcome measures

    PubMed Central

    Bove, Riley; White, Charles C.; Giovannoni, Gavin; Glanz, Bonnie; Golubchikov, Victor; Hujol, Johnny; Jennings, Charles; Langdon, Dawn; Lee, Michelle; Legedza, Anna; Paskavitz, James; Prasad, Sashank; Richert, John; Robbins, Allison; Roberts, Susan; Weiner, Howard; Ramachandran, Ravi; Botfield, Martyn

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In this cohort of individuals with and without multiple sclerosis (MS), we illustrate some of the novel approaches that smartphones provide to monitor patients with chronic neurologic disorders in their natural setting. Methods: Thirty-eight participant pairs (MS and cohabitant) aged 18–55 years participated in the study. Each participant received an Android HTC Sensation 4G smartphone containing a custom application suite of 19 tests capturing participant performance and patient-reported outcomes (PROs). Over 1 year, participants were prompted daily to complete one assigned test. Results: A total of 22 patients with MS and 17 cohabitants completed the entire study. Among patients with MS, low scores on PROs relating to mental and visual function were associated with dropout (p < 0.05). We illustrate several novel features of a smartphone platform. First, fluctuations in MS outcomes (e.g., fatigue) were assessed against an individual's ambient environment by linking responses to meteorological data. Second, both response accuracy and speed for the Ishihara color vision test were captured, highlighting the benefits of both active and passive data collection. Third, a new trait, a person-specific learning curve in neuropsychological testing, was identified using spline analysis. Finally, averaging repeated measures over the study yielded the most robust correlation matrix of the different outcome measures. Conclusions: We report the feasibility of, and barriers to, deploying a smartphone platform to gather useful passive and active performance data at high frequency in an unstructured manner in the field. A smartphone platform may therefore enable large-scale naturalistic studies of patients with MS or other neurologic diseases. PMID:26516627

  15. Measuring Inclusive Education Outcomes in Alberta, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loreman, Tim

    2014-01-01

    This study details the results of a review of the academic and public sector literature on measuring inclusive education in large systems. It highlights some outcomes drawn from the international literature on inclusion that might be indicative of the presence and quality of inclusive education in an effort to develop a set of outcomes for…

  16. Measuring Inclusive Education Outcomes in Alberta, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loreman, Tim

    2014-01-01

    This study details the results of a review of the academic and public sector literature on measuring inclusive education in large systems. It highlights some outcomes drawn from the international literature on inclusion that might be indicative of the presence and quality of inclusive education in an effort to develop a set of outcomes for

  17. Physician outcome measurement: review and proposed model.

    PubMed

    Siha, S

    1998-01-01

    As health care moves from a free-for-service environment to a capitated arena, outcome measurements must change. ABC Children's Medical Center is challenged with developing comprehensive outcome measures for an employed physician group. An extensive literature review validates that physician outcomes must move beyond revenue production and measure all aspects of care delivery. The proposed measurement model for this physician group is a trilogy model. It includes measures of cost, quality, and service. While these measures can be examined separately, it is imperative to understand their integration in determining an organization's competitive advantage. The recommended measurements for the physician group must be consistent with the overall organizational goals. The long-term impact will be better utilization of resources. This will result in the most cost effective, quality care for the health care consumer. PMID:10339092

  18. Routine outcome measurement in Australia.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Philip; Pirkis, Jane; Coombs, Tim

    2015-08-01

    Australia has been implementing routine outcome measurement in its specialized public sector mental health services for over a decade. It uses a range of clinician-rated and consumer-rated measures that are administered at set times during episodes of inpatient, ambulatory and community residential episodes of care. Routine outcome measurement is now embedded in service delivery, and data are made available in a variety of ways to different audiences. These data are used by policy-makers and planners to inform decisions about system-wide reforms, by service managers to monitor quality and effectiveness, and by clinicians to guide clinical decision-making and to promote dialogue with consumers. Consumers, carers and the general community can use these data to ensure that services are accountable for the care they deliver. This paper describes the status quo in Australia with respect to routine outcome measurement, discusses the factors that led to its successful implementation, and considers the steps that are necessary for its continued development. PMID:25768326

  19. Results of a two-year pilot study of clinical outcome measures in collagen VI- and laminin alpha2-related congenital muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Meilleur, Katherine G; Jain, Minal S; Hynan, Linda S; Shieh, Ching-Yi; Kim, Eunice; Waite, Melissa; McGuire, Michelle; Fiorini, Courtney; Glanzman, Allan M; Main, Marion; Rose, Kristy; Duong, Tina; Bendixen, Roxanna; Linton, Melody M; Arveson, Irene C; Nichols, Carmel; Yang, Kelly; Fischbeck, Kenneth H; Wagner, Kathryn R; North, Kathryn; Mankodi, Ami; Grunseich, Christopher; Hartnett, Elizabeth J; Smith, Michaele; Donkervoort, Sandra; Schindler, Alice; Kokkinis, Angela; Leach, Meganne; Foley, A Reghan; Collins, James; Muntoni, Francesco; Rutkowski, Anne; Bnnemann, Carsten G

    2015-01-01

    Potential therapies are currently under development for two congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) subtypes: collagen VI-related muscular dystrophy (COL6-RD) and laminin alpha 2-related dystrophy (LAMA2-RD). However, appropriate clinical outcome measures to be used in clinical trials have not been validated in CMDs. We conducted a two-year pilot study to evaluate feasibility, reliability, and validity of various outcome measures, particularly the Motor Function Measure 32, in 33 subjects with COL6-RD and LAMA2-RD. In the first year, outcome measures tested included: Motor Function Measure 32 (MFM32), forced vital capacity (FVC) percent predicted sitting, myometry, goniometry, 10-meter walk, Egen Klassification 2, and PedsQL(TM) Generic and Neuromuscular Cores. In the second year, we added the North Star Ambulatory Assessment (NSAA), Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale (HFMS), timed functional tests, Measure of Activity Limitations (ACTIVLIM), Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test (QUEST), and Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) fatigue subscale. The MFM32 showed strong inter-rater (0.92) and internal consistency (0.96) reliabilities. Concurrent validity for the MFM32 was supported by large correlations (range 0.623-0.936) with the following: FVC, NSAA, HFMS, timed functional tests, ACTIVLIM, and QUEST. Significant correlations of the MFM32 were also found with select myometry measurements, mainly of the proximal extremities and domains of the PedsQL(TM) scales focusing on physical health and neuromuscular disease. Goniometry measurements were less reliable. The Motor Function Measure is reliable and valid in the two specific subtypes of CMD evaluated, COL6-RD and LAMA2-RD. The NSAA is useful as a complementary outcome measure in ambulatory individuals. Preliminary concurrent validity of several other clinical outcome measures was also demonstrated for these subtypes. PMID:25307854

  20. Routine outcome measures in Germany.

    PubMed

    Puschner, Bernd; Becker, Thomas; Bauer, Stephanie

    2015-08-01

    The German healthcare system offers comprehensive coverage for people with mental illness including inpatient, day hospital and outpatient services. These services are primarily financed through the statutory health and pension insurances. According to legal regulations, providers are required to base their services on current scientific evidence and to continuously assure the quality of their services. This paper gives an overview of recent initiatives to develop, evaluate and disseminate routine outcome measurement (ROM) in service settings in Germany. A large number of projects have shown outcome monitoring to be feasible, and that feedback of outcome may enhance routine care through an improved allocation of treatment resources. However, none of these initiatives have been integrated into routine care on a nationwide or trans-sectoral level, and their sustainability has been limited. This is due to various barriers in a fragmented mental health service system and to the lack of coordinated national or state-level service planning. The time is ripe for a concerted effort including policy-makers to pick up on these initiatives and move them towards wide-spread implementation in routine care accompanied by practice-oriented research including service user involvement. PMID:25800080

  1. Quality Markers in Cardiology. Main Markers to Measure Quality of Results (Outcomes) and Quality Measures Related to Better Results in Clinical Practice (Performance Metrics). INCARDIO (Indicadores de Calidad en Unidades Asistenciales del Área del Corazón): A SEC/SECTCV Consensus Position Paper.

    PubMed

    López-Sendón, José; González-Juanatey, José Ramón; Pinto, Fausto; Cuenca Castillo, José; Badimón, Lina; Dalmau, Regina; González Torrecilla, Esteban; López-Mínguez, José Ramón; Maceira, Alicia M; Pascual-Figal, Domingo; Pomar Moya-Prats, José Luis; Sionis, Alessandro; Zamorano, José Luis

    2015-11-01

    Cardiology practice requires complex organization that impacts overall outcomes and may differ substantially among hospitals and communities. The aim of this consensus document is to define quality markers in cardiology, including markers to measure the quality of results (outcomes metrics) and quality measures related to better results in clinical practice (performance metrics). The document is mainly intended for the Spanish health care system and may serve as a basis for similar documents in other countries. PMID:26315766

  2. Outcome measures in inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory rheumatic diseases are generally multifaceted disorders and, therefore, measurement of multiple outcomes is relevant to most of these diseases. Developments in outcome measures in the rheumatic diseases are promoted by the development of successful treatments. Outcome measurement will increasingly deal with measurement of low levels of disease activity and avoidance of disease consequences. It is an advantage for patient management and knowledge transfer if the same outcomes are used in practice and in trials. Continuous measures of change are generally the most powerful and, therefore, are preferred as primary outcomes in trials. For daily clinical practice, outcome measures should reflect the patients' state and have to be easily derivable. The objective of this review is to describe recent developments in outcome measures for inflammatory rheumatic diseases for trials and clinical practice, with an emphasis on rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:19849821

  3. Measurement outcomes from hip simulators.

    PubMed

    de Villiers, Danielle; Shelton, Julia C

    2016-05-01

    Simulation of wear in total hip replacements has been recognised as an important factor in determining the likelihood of clinical success. However, accurate measurement of wear can be problematic with factors such as number and morphology of wear particles produced as well as ion release proving more important in the biological response to hip replacements than wear volume or wear rate alone. In this study, hard-on-hard (CoCr alloy, AgCrN coating) and hard-on-soft (CoCr alloy and CrN coating on vitamin E blended highly cross-linked polyethylene) bearing combinations were tested in an orbital hip simulator under standard and some adverse conditions. Gravimetric wear rates were determined for all bearings, with cobalt and where applicable, silver release determined throughout testing. Isolation of wear particles from the lubricating fluid was used to determine the influence of different bearing combinations and wear conditions on particle morphology. It was found that cobalt and silver could be measured in the lubricating fluid even when volumetric wear was not detectable. In hard-on-hard bearings, Pearson's correlation of 0.98 was established between metal release into the lubricating fluid and wear volume. In hard-on-soft bearings, coating the head did not influence the polyethylene wear rates measured under standard conditions but did influence the cobalt release; the diameter influenced both polyethylene wear and cobalt release, and the introduction of adverse testing generated smaller polyethylene particles. While hip simulators can be useful to assess the wear performance of a new material or design, measurement of other outcomes may yield greater insight into the clinical behaviour of the bearings in vivo. PMID:26888886

  4. [Patient evaluation and outcome measures].

    PubMed

    Nieto Pol, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Both the initial evaluation and follow-up of patients with osteoarthritis require systematic evaluation of the indicators that provide information on the degree of involvement of the disease and allow its quantification. Reliable measures of disease progression help decision-making by clinicians and provide valid information on treatment response and the effectiveness of the distinct therapeutic interventions. The instruments recommended in research, as outcome measures in osteoarthritis, are pain evaluation, assessment of physical function, and self-reported global evaluation. In studies lasting more than 1 year, structural changes are evaluated through simple X-ray. Self-reported quality of life assessment and physician global assessment are also recommended as options. These indicators should be incorporated into routine clinical practice for adequate evaluation and correct follow-up of patients with osteoarthritis. The recommended pain evaluation method for use in clinical practice is the visual analog scale (VAS). The best instrument to evaluate physical function in patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis is the WOMAC scale (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index). For patient-reported global assessment in routine practice, the recommended scales are VAS or the SF-12 (12-item short-form health survey). PMID:24467959

  5. Measuring Outcomes in Children's Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christner, Anne Marshall, Ed.

    Outcomes evaluation can provide program managers and clinical directors in child welfare, juvenile justice, child mental health, and child protective services the necessary tools for program quality assurance and accountability. This guide describes the outcomes evaluation process and provides a summary of articles and reports detailing current…

  6. Measuring Assistive Technology Outcomes in Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edyburn, Dave

    2003-01-01

    This column examines issues associated with measuring assistive technology outcomes in writing. Following an introduction to assistive technology and writing, it looks specifically at design, measurement, analysis, and decision making factors in the process of creating an outcomes system for measuring the impact of assistive technology on writing.…

  7. Association between Gender, Process of Care Measures, and Outcomes in ACS in India: Results from the Detection and Management of Coronary Heart Disease (DEMAT) Registry

    PubMed Central

    Pagidipati, Neha J.; Huffman, Mark D.; Jeemon, Panniyammakal; Gupta, Rajeev; Negi, Prakash; Jaison, Thannikot M.; Sharma, Satyavan; Sinha, Nakul; Mohanan, Padinhare; Muralidhara, B. G.; Bijulal, Sasidharan; Sivasankaran, Sivasubramonian; Puri, Vijay K.; Jose, Jacob; Reddy, K. Srinath; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies from high-income countries have shown that women receive less aggressive diagnostics and treatment than men in acute coronary syndromes (ACS), though their short-term mortality does not appear to differ from men. Data on gender differences in ACS presentation, management, and outcomes are sparse in India. Methods and Results The Detection and Management of Coronary Heart Disease (DEMAT) Registry collected data from 1,565 suspected ACS patients (334 women; 1,231 men) from ten tertiary care centers throughout India between 2007–2008. We evaluated gender differences in presentation, in-hospital and discharge management, and 30-day death and major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE; death, re-hospitalization, and cardiac arrest) rates. Women were less likely to present with STEMI than men (38% vs. 55%, p<0.001). Overall inpatient diagnostics and treatment patterns were similar between men and women after adjustment for potential confounders. Optimal discharge management with aspirin, clopidogrel, beta-blockers, and statin therapy was lower for women than men, (58% vs. 65%, p = 0.03), but these differences were attenuated after adjustment (OR = 0.86 (0.62, 1.19)). Neither the outcome of 30-day mortality (OR = 1.40 (0.62, 3.16)) nor MACE (OR = 1.00 (0.67, 1.48)) differed significantly between men and women after adjustment. Conclusions ACS in-hospital management, discharge management, and 30-day outcomes did not significantly differ between genders in the DEMAT registry, though consistently higher treatment rates and lower event rates in men compared to women were seen. These findings underscore the importance of further investigation of gender differences in cardiovascular care in India. PMID:23637963

  8. Learning Outcomes across Disciplines and Professions: Measurement and Interpretation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caspersen, Joakim; Frølich, Nicoline; Karlsen, Hilde; Aamodt, Per Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Learning outcomes of higher education are a quality tool in a changing higher education landscape but cannot be seen as neutral measures across professions and disciplines. Survey results from graduates and recent graduates indicate that prevailing measures of learning outcomes yield the same result within and across disciplinary and professional…

  9. Patient reported outcome measures in septorhinoplasty surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, LR; Ward, MJ; Sunkaraneni, VS; Harries, PG; Salib, RJ

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Surgical procedures incorporating a cosmetic element such as septorhinoplasty and otoplasty are currently under threat in the National Health Service (NHS) as they are deemed to be procedures of ‘limited clinical benefit’ by many primary care providers. Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs), which assess the quality of care delivered from the patients’ perspective, are becoming increasingly important in documenting the effectiveness of such procedures. Methods The Rhinoplasty Outcomes Evaluation (ROE) questionnaire, a validated PROM tool, was used to assess patient satisfaction in 141 patients undergoing septorhinoplasty surgery over a 90-month period at the University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust. Results Overall, 100 patients with a mean follow-up period of 36 months completed the study. The mean ROE score was 73.3%. In addition, 75% of patients questioned were happy with the final result of their operation and 83% would undergo the procedure again if required. These benefits occurred irrespective of age, sex and primary versus revision surgery, and were maintained for up to 71 months following surgery. Conclusions This study has shown that patients are generally satisfied with their functional and cosmetic outcomes following septorhinoplasty surgery. These results help support the case for septorhinoplasty surgery to continue being funded as an NHS procedure. PMID:25519270

  10. Standardized Outcome Measurement for Patients With Coronary Artery Disease: Consensus From the International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM)

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Robert L; Spatz, Erica S; Kelley, Thomas A; Stowell, Caleb J; Beltrame, John; Heidenreich, Paul; Tresserras, Ricard; Jernberg, Tomas; Chua, Terrance; Morgan, Louise; Panigrahi, Bishnu; Rosas Ruiz, Alba; Rumsfeld, John S; Sadwin, Lawrence; Schoeberl, Mark; Shahian, David; Weston, Clive; Yeh, Robert; Lewin, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Background Coronary artery disease (CAD) outcomes consistently improve when they are routinely measured and provided back to physicians and hospitals. However, few centers around the world systematically track outcomes, and no global standards exist. Furthermore, patient-centered outcomes and longitudinal outcomes are under-represented in current assessments. Methods and Results The nonprofit International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM) convened an international Working Group to define a consensus standard set of outcome measures and risk factors for tracking, comparing, and improving the outcomes of CAD care. Members were drawn from 4 continents and 6 countries. Using a modified Delphi method, the ICHOM Working Group defined who should be tracked, what should be measured, and when such measurements should be performed. The ICHOM CAD consensus measures were designed to be relevant for all patients diagnosed with CAD, including those with acute myocardial infarction, angina, and asymptomatic CAD. Thirteen specific outcomes were chosen, including acute complications occurring within 30 days of acute myocardial infarction, coronary artery bypass grafting surgery, or percutaneous coronary intervention; and longitudinal outcomes for up to 5 years for patient-reported health status (Seattle Angina Questionnaire [SAQ-7], elements of Rose Dyspnea Score, and Patient Health Questionnaire [PHQ-2]), cardiovascular hospital admissions, cardiovascular procedures, renal failure, and mortality. Baseline demographic, cardiovascular disease, and comorbidity information is included to improve the interpretability of comparisons. Conclusions ICHOM recommends that this set of outcomes and other patient information be measured for all patients with CAD. PMID:25991011

  11. Challenges in Measuring Outcomes Following Digital Replantation

    PubMed Central

    Sebastin, Sandeep J.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2013-01-01

    In the early period of replantation surgery, the emphasis was on digit survival. Subsequently, with better microsurgical techniques and instrumentation, the focus has shifted to function and in recent years to consideration of cost-effectiveness. Despite over 40 years of effort in refining digital replantation surgery, a rigorous evaluation of the outcomes of digital replantation has not been performed. This is because of the many confounding variables that influence outcome comparisons. These variables include the mechanism of injury (guillotine, crush, avulsion), the injury itself (total, near total, subtotal, partial amputation), and the surgical procedure (replantation, revascularization). In addition, the traditional outcome measures (two-point discrimination, range of motion, grip strength, or the ability to return to work) are reported inconsistently and vary widely among publications. All these factors make meaningful comparison of outcomes difficult. The recent emphasis on outcome research and cost-effectiveness necessitates a rethinking in the way we report outcomes of digital replantation. In this article, the authors summarize the challenges in assessing outcomes of digital replantation and explain the need to measure outcomes using rigorous clinical research designs that incorporate cost-effectiveness studies in the research protocol. PMID:24872766

  12. Review Committee on Outcomes: Survey Results, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    In the spring of 2000, Alberta Education (previously Alberta Learning) appointed the Review Committee on Outcomes (RCO) to consult with Albertans to find out what they expected from the K-12 education system and how these expectations are being met. This report presents the main findings of the 2008 Satisfaction with Education in Alberta Surveys…

  13. Reference Undulator Measurement Results

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zachary; Levashov, Yurii; ,

    2011-08-18

    The LCLS reference undulator has been measured 22 times during the course of undulator tuning. These measurements provide estimates of various statistical errors. This note gives a summary of the reference undulator measurements and it provides estimates of the undulator tuning errors. We measured the reference undulator many times during the tuning of the LCLS undulators. These data sets give estimates of the random errors in the tuned undulators. The measured trajectories in the reference undulator are stable and straight to within {+-}2 {micro}m. Changes in the phase errors are less than {+-}2 deg between data sets. The phase advance in the cell varies by less than {+-}2 deg between data sets. The rms variation between data sets of the first integral of B{sub x} is 9.98 {micro}Tm, and the rms variation of the second integral of B{sub x} is 17.4 {micro}Tm{sup 2}. The rms variation of the first integral of B{sub y} is 6.65 {micro}Tm, and the rms variation of the second integral of B{sub y} is 12.3 {micro}Tm{sup 2}. The rms variation of the x-position of the fiducialized beam axis is 35 {micro}m in the final production run This corresponds to an rms uncertainty in the K value of {Delta}K/K = 2.7 x 10{sup -5}. The rms variation of the y-position of the fiducialized beam axis is 4 {micro}m in the final production run.

  14. Patient reported outcome measures in neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Roderick

    2016-01-01

    Many interventions for neurogenic bladder patients are directed towards improving quality of life (QOL). Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) are the primary method of evaluating QOL, and they provide an important quantification of symptoms which can’t be measured objectively. Our goal was to review general measurement principles, and identify and discuss PROMs relevant to neurogenic bladder patients. We identify two recent reviews of the state of the literature and updated the results with an additional Medline search up to September 1, 2015. Using the previous identified reviews, and our updated literature review, we identified 16 PROMs which are used for the assessment of QOL and symptoms in neurogenic bladder patients. Several are specifically designed for neurogenic bladder patients, such as the Qualiveen (for neurogenic bladder related QOL), and the Neurogenic Bladder Symptom Score (NBSS) (for neurogenic bladder symptoms). We also highlight general QOL measures for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and spinal cord injury (SCI) which include questions about bladder symptoms, and incontinence PROMs which are commonly used, but not specifically designed for neurogenic bladder patients. It is essential for clinicians and researchers with an interest in neurogenic bladder to be aware of the current PROMs, and to have a basic understanding of the principals of measurement in order to select the most appropriate one for their purpose. PMID:26904409

  15. Patient reported outcome measures in neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Clark, Roderick; Welk, Blayne

    2016-02-01

    Many interventions for neurogenic bladder patients are directed towards improving quality of life (QOL). Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) are the primary method of evaluating QOL, and they provide an important quantification of symptoms which can't be measured objectively. Our goal was to review general measurement principles, and identify and discuss PROMs relevant to neurogenic bladder patients. We identify two recent reviews of the state of the literature and updated the results with an additional Medline search up to September 1, 2015. Using the previous identified reviews, and our updated literature review, we identified 16 PROMs which are used for the assessment of QOL and symptoms in neurogenic bladder patients. Several are specifically designed for neurogenic bladder patients, such as the Qualiveen (for neurogenic bladder related QOL), and the Neurogenic Bladder Symptom Score (NBSS) (for neurogenic bladder symptoms). We also highlight general QOL measures for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and spinal cord injury (SCI) which include questions about bladder symptoms, and incontinence PROMs which are commonly used, but not specifically designed for neurogenic bladder patients. It is essential for clinicians and researchers with an interest in neurogenic bladder to be aware of the current PROMs, and to have a basic understanding of the principals of measurement in order to select the most appropriate one for their purpose. PMID:26904409

  16. Beyond screening: challenges in measuring outcomes.

    PubMed

    Santos Ocampo, Perla D; De Guzman, Rita Paz Rowena; Cavan, Barbra Charina; Padilla, Carmencita D

    2003-01-01

    There are several important messages for pediatricians concerned with what happens to patients after identification through newborn screening. Particularly important in many of the disorders are the developmental aspects of outcome. There are certain basic assumptions that are essential in improving developmental outcome as a result of newborn screening: 1) newborn screening leads to early case identification; 2) early diagnosis and intervention generally enhance developmental outcome; 3) sustained compliance is crucial for better developmental outcome; 4) increased awareness of other factors improves developmental outcome; 5) periodic developmental monitoring ensures quality follow-up. Even though the Philippine Newborn Screening Program is young, there are already experiences in these areas to draw from. Likewise, there are strategies that can be employed to overcome the challenges in a developing country, which can lead to better follow-up, characterized by desirable critical features of availability, accessibility, affordability, accuracy and adequacy. PMID:15906688

  17. Development of a symptom based outcome measure for asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Steen, N.; Hutchinson, A.; McColl, E.; Eccles, M. P.; Hewison, J.; Meadows, K. A.; Blades, S. M.; Fowler, P.

    1994-01-01

    Measuring symptom specific health outcome is complex, but the methodologies now exist to develop measures with the appropriate properties. As one element of a major programme to develop multidomain health outcome measures for chronic disease, a symptom based measure for asthma care has been developed for use in general practice and outpatient departments. This article outlines the development process, which used a framework recently described in the theoretical literature to show the constraints that scientific criteria place on the development of outcome measures and the means of overcoming such limiting factors. Although substantial effort is required to undertake a rigorous process of development, useful tools are the result. Two five item, symptom based outcome measures for adult asthma are described. PMID:7950742

  18. Testing Multiple Outcomes in Repeated Measures Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lix, Lisa M.; Sajobi, Tolulope

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates procedures for controlling the familywise error rate (FWR) when testing hypotheses about multiple, correlated outcome variables in repeated measures (RM) designs. A content analysis of RM research articles published in 4 psychology journals revealed that 3 quarters of studies tested hypotheses about 2 or more outcome…

  19. The Development of NOAA Education Common Outcome Performance Measures (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, J.

    2013-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Education Council has embarked on an ambitious Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) project that will allow it to assess education program outcomes and impacts across the agency, line offices, and programs. The purpose of this internal effort is to link outcome measures to program efforts and to evaluate the success of the agency's education programs in meeting the strategic goals. Using an outcome-based evaluation approach, the NOAA Education Council is developing two sets of common outcome performance measures, environmental stewardship and professional development. This presentation will examine the benefits and tradeoffs of common outcome performance measures that collect program results across a portfolio of education programs focused on common outcomes. Common outcome performance measures have a few benefits to our agency and to the climate education field at large. The primary benefit is shared understanding, which comes from our process for writing common outcome performance measures. Without a shared and agreed upon set of definitions for the measure of an outcome, the reported results may not be measuring the same things and would incorrectly indicate levels of performance. Therefore, our writing process relies on a commitment to developing a shared set of definitions based on consensus. We hope that by taking the time to debate and coming to agreement across a diverse set of programs, the strength of our common measures can indicate real progress towards outcomes we care about. An additional benefit is that these common measures can be adopted and adapted by other agencies and organizations that share similar theories of change. The measures are not without their drawbacks, and we do make tradeoffs as part of our process in order to continue making progress. We know that any measure is necessarily a narrow slice of performance. A slice that may not best represent the unique and remarkable contribution of an individual program, but does reflect a variety of contributions along a single dimension across a large portfolio of programs. The process has ended up pushing our working group to call for even more measures, to capture an increasing number of dimensions that reflect the nature of the portfolio of programs. This past year we have been working on developing two sets of common outcome performance measures for professional development (PD) and stewardship education programs. The outcome we chose for PD programs was the use of what was learned in the educator's practice. The outcome we chose for stewardship programs was the stewardship behaviors that participants learn and practice. The measurement of these outcomes will inform whether our strategies are having their intended impact. By knowing how and how much these outcomes are occurring as a result of our program, we can improve program performance over time. The common outcome performance measures help demonstrate how these programs engage audiences in supporting NOAA's mission. As AGU climate literacy community continues to grow, it is important to consider an approach to demonstrate the community's contribution to the Nation's climate literacy. Development of common outcome performance measures is one approach that could help focus the community in meeting its goals.

  20. Outcome measures in neuromuscular disease: is the world still flat?

    PubMed

    Lunn, Michael P; Van den Bergh, Peter Y K

    2015-09-01

    Valid, responsive, and meaningful outcome measures for the measurement of the impairment, activity limitations, and quality of life in patients with neuromuscular disease are crucial to identify the natural history of disease and benefits of therapy in clinical practice and trials. Although understanding of many aspects of neuromuscular diseases has advanced dramatically, the development of outcome measures has received less attention. The scales developed from Rasch theory by the PeriNomS Group represent the biggest significant shift in thought in neuromuscular outcome measures for decades. There remain problems with many of them, and further developments are required. However, incorporating them into our outcome sets for daily use and in clinical trials will lead to the more efficient capture of meaningful change and will result in better assessment of individuals and groups of patients in both clinical trials and neurological practice. PMID:26114965

  1. Biobehavioral Measures as Outcomes: A Cautionary Tale

    PubMed Central

    Kovach, Christine R.; Woods, Diana Lynn; Devine, Elizabeth C.; Logan, Brent R.; Raff, Hershel

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the use of biobehavioral measures as outcomes for healthcare intervention studies. Effect size (ES) values for salivary cortisol, and observation-based measures of pain and agitation are examined. Effects pre to post treatment were assessed separately for nursing home (NH) residents with and without acute psychotic symptoms. This study revealed large positive effects on both pain and agitation measures in the group with acute psychotic symptoms and small-to-medium positive effects on these same measures in the group without acute psychotic symptoms. In both of these groups the ES values were not consistently positive on the cortisol measures. Prior to determining if a measure can be used to estimate minimum clinically important differences, it is essential to consider if the biomarker will be responsive to therapy in the populations and contexts being studied. PMID:24158972

  2. Measuring Program Outcomes: Using Retrospective Pretest Methodology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Clara C.; McGuigan, William M.; Katsev, Aphra R.

    2000-01-01

    Used longitudinal data from 307 mothers of firstborn infants participating in a home-visitation, child abuse prevention program in a retrospective pretest methodology. Results shows that when response shift bias was present, the retrospective pretest methodology produced a more legitimate assessment of program outcomes than did the traditional…

  3. [Patient-reported outcomes: definition and measurement].

    PubMed

    Botturi, Davide; Rodella, Stefania

    2014-06-01

    The concept of "patient-reported outcomes" have been proposed by the Food and Drug Administration in the year 2000, in order to describe one of the different and potential sources of information on the drug's safety and effectiveness. It represents an "umbrella" term, which covers a multiplicity of meanings and primarily identifies a conceptual approach and a methodology specifically oriented to the patients' point of view on outcomes, instead of the traditional clinical and professional perspective. The patient-reported outcomes measures are frequently self-completed questionnaires. The measures can be classified in general and specific. The first one, general, relates to the assessment of the quality of life or the health status, in the general population or in subgroups with particular health problems (eg. SF-36 Health Survey, EQ-5D). The second one, specific, mainly relates to the assessment of particular types of symptoms (eg. pain, anxiety, fear, depression) and functions (eg. daily living activities), in population's subgroups with definite health problems, undergoing or not to a healthcare procedure (eg. Adult Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire, Kidney Disease Quality of Life Instrument, Oxford Hip Score, Oxford Knee Score). For the selection of an instrument a series of criteria needs to be taken into account, among which the psychometric properties, the expert judgement, the interpretability, the acceptability, and the feasibility of the entire process. PMID:25002284

  4. Clinical outcomes of pars plicata anterior vitrectomy: 2-year results

    PubMed Central

    Narang, Priya; Agarwal, Amar

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the safety and outcome of a surgical approach that uses pars plicata site for anterior vitrectomy during phacoemulsification procedure complicated by posterior capsule rupture and residual cortical matter. Design: Single center, retrospective, interventional, noncomparative study. Materials and Methods: Medical records of a consecutive series of 35 eyes of 35 patients who underwent pars plicata anterior vitrectomy (PPAV) were reviewed. The main outcome measures were corrected and uncorrected distance visual acuity (CDVA, UDVA), early and late postoperative complications and intraocular pressure (IOP). Ultrasound biomicroscopic (UBM) evaluation of sclerotomy site and spectral domain optical coherence tomography analysis for central macular thickness (CMT) was performed. The final visual outcome at 2 years was evaluated. Results: At 2 years follow-up, the mean postoperative UDVA (logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution [logMAR]) and CDVA (logMAR) was 0.49 ± 0.26 and 0.19 ± 0.14, respectively. There was no significant change in the IOP (P = 0.061) and the mean CMT at 2 years was 192.5 ± 5.54 μm. The postoperative UBM image of the sclerotomy site at 8 weeks demonstrated a clear wound without any vitreous adhesion or incarceration. Intraoperative hyphema was seen in 1 (2.8%) case and postoperative uveitis was seen in 2 (5.7%) cases, which resolved with medications. No case of an iatrogenic retinal break or retinal detachment was reported. Conclusions: PPAV enables a closed chamber approach, allows thorough cleanup of vitreous in the pupillary plane and anterior chamber and affords better access to the subincisional and retropupillary cortical remnant with a significant visual outcome and an acceptable complication rate. PMID:26632124

  5. The Utility of Outcome Measures in Total Knee Replacement Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Dowsey, Michelle M.; Choong, Peter F. M.

    2013-01-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) is the mainstay of treatment for people with end-stage knee OA among suitably “fit” candidates. As a high cost, high volume procedure with a worldwide demand that continues to grow it has become increasingly popular to measure response to surgery. While the majority who undergo TKR report improvements in pain and function following surgery, a significant proportion of patients report dissatisfaction with surgery as a result of ongoing pain or poor function. Poor outcomes of TKR require care that imposes on already overburdened health systems. Accurate and meaningful capture and interpretation of outcome data are imperative for appropriate patient selection, informing those at risk, and for developing strategies to mitigate the risk of poor results and dissatisfaction. The ways in which TKR outcomes are captured and analysed, the level of follow-up, the types of outcome measures used, and the timing of their application vary considerably within the literature. With this in mind, we reviewed four of the most commonly used joint specific outcome measures in TKR. We report on the utility, strengths, and limitations of the Oxford knee score (OKS), knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities osteoarthritis index (WOMAC), and knee society clinical rating system (KSS). PMID:24288541

  6. Measuring the Outcomes of a Pharmacy Continuing Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKennell, Thomas M; Grussing, Paul G.

    1979-01-01

    To determine if, as the result of a pharmacy continuing education program on professional liability, the behavior of participants would persist for eight months, a study was undertaken that measured three learning outcomes: knowledge of concepts; attitudes about professional standards and their relationship to malpractice; and self-reports of…

  7. Network meta-analysis of multiple outcome measures accounting for borrowing of information across outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Network meta-analysis (NMA) enables simultaneous comparison of multiple treatments while preserving randomisation. When summarising evidence to inform an economic evaluation, it is important that the analysis accurately reflects the dependency structure within the data, as correlations between outcomes may have implication for estimating the net benefit associated with treatment. A multivariate NMA offers a framework for evaluating multiple treatments across multiple outcome measures while accounting for the correlation structure between outcomes. Methods The standard NMA model is extended to multiple outcome settings in two stages. In the first stage, information is borrowed across outcomes as well across studies through modelling the within-study and between-study correlation structure. In the second stage, we make use of the additional assumption that intervention effects are exchangeable between outcomes to predict effect estimates for all outcomes, including effect estimates on outcomes where evidence is either sparse or the treatment had not been considered by any one of the studies included in the analysis. We apply the methods to binary outcome data from a systematic review evaluating the effectiveness of nine home safety interventions on uptake of three poisoning prevention practices (safe storage of medicines, safe storage of other household products, and possession of poison centre control telephone number) in households with children. Analyses are conducted in WinBUGS using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations. Results Univariate and the first stage multivariate models produced broadly similar point estimates of intervention effects but the uncertainty around the multivariate estimates varied depending on the prior distribution specified for the between-study covariance structure. The second stage multivariate analyses produced more precise effect estimates while enabling intervention effects to be predicted for all outcomes, including intervention effects on outcomes not directly considered by the studies included in the analysis. Conclusions Accounting for the dependency between outcomes in a multivariate meta-analysis may or may not improve the precision of effect estimates from a network meta-analysis compared to analysing each outcome separately. PMID:25047164

  8. Patient-reported outcome measures after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ramkumar, P. N.; Harris, J. D.; Noble, P. C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives A lack of connection between surgeons and patients in evaluating the outcome of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has led to the search for the ideal patient-reported outcome measure (PROM) to evaluate these procedures. We hypothesised that the desired psychometric properties of the ideal outcome tool have not been uniformly addressed in studies describing TKA PROMS. Methods A systematic review was conducted investigating one or more facets of patient-reported scores for measuring primary TKA outcome. Studies were analysed by study design, subject demographics, surgical technique, and follow-up adequacy, with the gold standard of psychometric properties being systematic development, validity, reliability, and responsiveness. Results A total of 38 articles reported outcomes from 47 different PROMS to 85 541 subjects at 26.3 months (standard deviation 30.8) post-operatively. Of the 38, eight developed new scores, 20 evaluated existing scores, and ten were cross-cultural adaptation of existing scores. Only six of 38 surveyed studies acknowledged all gold standard psychometric properties. The most commonly studied PROMS were the Oxford Knee Score, New Knee Society Score, Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index. Conclusions A single, validated, reliable, and responsive PROM addressing TKA patients priorities has not yet been identified. Moreover, a clear definition of a successful procedure remains elusive. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:120127 PMID:26220999

  9. 42 CFR 410.146 - Diabetes outcome measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Diabetes outcome measurements. 410.146 Section 410... MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Training and Diabetes Outcome Measurements § 410.146 Diabetes outcome measurements. (a)...

  10. 42 CFR 410.146 - Diabetes outcome measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Diabetes outcome measurements. 410.146 Section 410... MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Training and Diabetes Outcome Measurements § 410.146 Diabetes outcome measurements. (a)...

  11. 42 CFR 410.146 - Diabetes outcome measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Diabetes outcome measurements. 410.146 Section 410... MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Training and Diabetes Outcome Measurements § 410.146 Diabetes outcome measurements. (a)...

  12. 42 CFR 410.146 - Diabetes outcome measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Diabetes outcome measurements. 410.146 Section 410... MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Training and Diabetes Outcome Measurements § 410.146 Diabetes outcome measurements. (a)...

  13. 42 CFR 410.146 - Diabetes outcome measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Diabetes outcome measurements. 410.146 Section 410... MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Training and Diabetes Outcome Measurements § 410.146 Diabetes outcome measurements. (a)...

  14. Outcome Measures for Clinical Trials in Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Hessl, David; Abbeduto, Leonard; Reiss, Allan L.; Beckel-Mitchener, Andrea; Urv, Tiina K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Progress in basic neuroscience has led to identification of molecular targets for treatment in fragile X syndrome (FXS) and other neurodevelopmental disorders, however, there is a gap in translation to targeted therapies in humans. One major obstacle to the demonstration of efficacy in human trials has been the lack of generally accepted endpoints to assess improvement in function in individuals with FXS. To address this problem, the NIH convened a meeting of leading scientists and clinicians with the goal of identifying and standardizing outcome measures for use as potential endpoints in clinical trials in FXS. Methods Participants in the meeting included FXS experts, experts in the design and implementation of clinical trials and measure development, and representatives from advocacy groups, industry, and federal agencies. Results The group generated recommendations for optimal outcome measures in cognitive, behavioral, and biomarker/medical domains, including additional testing and validation of existing measures, and development of new measures in areas of need. Although no one endpoint or set of endpoints could be identified that met all criteria as an optimal measure, recommendations are presented in this report. Conclusion The report is expected to guide the selection of measures in clinical trials and lead to the use of a more consistent battery of measures across trials. Further, this will help to direct research toward gaps in the development of validated FXS-specific outcome measures, and to assist with interpretation of clinical trial data by creating templates for measurement of treatment efficacy. PMID:24042082

  15. Applying Outcome Measurements: A Guide to Educational Outcome Measurements and Their Uses. Seminar No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaser, Ezra

    This guide is essentially designed as a teaching aid for those who would inform planners, officials of educational ministries, school administrators, principals, and teachers about educational outcome measurements. In outline and graphic form, the guide presents topics for discussion in a seminar dealing with the application of outcome…

  16. General Outcome Measures for Verbal Operants

    PubMed Central

    Kubina, Richard M; Wolfe, Pamela; Kostewicz, Douglas E

    2009-01-01

    A general outcome measure (GOM) can be used to show progress towards a long-term goal. GOMs should sample domains of behavior across ages, be sensitive to change over time, be inexpensive and easy to use, and facilitate decision making. Skinner's (1957) analysis of verbal behavior may benefit from the development of GOM. To develop GOM, we conducted a review of the literature on mands, tacts, echoics, and intraverbals. The four areas reviewed included (a) an examination of the participant's response form (i.e., vocal or nonvocal), (b) the type of prompt used, (c) types of materials used, and (d) timing of responses or sessions. Based on the review of the literature, we developed GOM for mands and tacts. This paper attempts to bridge the concept of GOMs with Skinner's analysis of verbal behavior. PMID:22477427

  17. Child Outcome Measures in the Study of Child Care Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaslow, Martha; Halle, Tamara; Martin, Laurie; Cabrera, Natasha; Calkins, Julia; Pitzer, Lindsay; Margie, Nancy Geyelin

    2006-01-01

    This article assesses whether there are methodological problems with child outcome measures that may contribute to the small associations between child care quality and child outcomes found in the literature. Outcome measures used in 65 studies of child care quality published between 1979 and December 2005 were examined, taking the previous review…

  18. 42 CFR 486.318 - Condition: Outcome measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SUPPLIERS Requirements for Certification and Designation and Conditions for Coverage: Organ Procurement Organizations Organ Procurement Organization Outcome Requirements § 486.318 Condition: Outcome measures. (a..., territories, or possessions, an OPO must meet all 3 of the following outcome measures: (1) The OPO's...

  19. 42 CFR 486.318 - Condition: Outcome measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SUPPLIERS Requirements for Certification and Designation and Conditions for Coverage: Organ Procurement Organizations Organ Procurement Organization Outcome Requirements § 486.318 Condition: Outcome measures. (a..., territories, or possessions, an OPO must meet all 3 of the following outcome measures: (1) The OPO's...

  20. 42 CFR 486.318 - Condition: Outcome measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SUPPLIERS Requirements for Certification and Designation and Conditions for Coverage: Organ Procurement Organizations Organ Procurement Organization Outcome Requirements § 486.318 Condition: Outcome measures. (a..., territories, or possessions, an OPO must meet all 3 of the following outcome measures: (1) The OPO's...

  1. 42 CFR 486.318 - Condition: Outcome measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SUPPLIERS Requirements for Certification and Designation and Conditions for Coverage: Organ Procurement Organizations Organ Procurement Organization Outcome Requirements § 486.318 Condition: Outcome measures. (a..., territories, or possessions, an OPO must meet all 3 of the following outcome measures: (1) The OPO's...

  2. The Day-to-Day Acute Effect of Wake Therapy in Patients with Major Depression Using the HAM-D6 as Primary Outcome Measure: Results from a Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Martiny, Klaus; Refsgaard, Else; Lund, Vibeke; Lunde, Marianne; Sørensen, Lene; Thougaard, Britta; Lindberg, Lone; Bech, Per

    2013-01-01

    Background This paper reports day-to-day data for from a one-week intervention phase, part of a 9-weeks randomised parallel study with patient having major depression (data from weekly visits have been reported). Wake therapy (sleep deprivation) has an established antidepressant effect with onset of action within hours. Deterioration on the following night’s sleep is, however, common, and we used daily light therapy and sleep time stabilisation as a preventive measure. In particular, we evaluated the day-to-day acute effect of and tolerance to sleep deprivation and examined predictors of response. Methods Patients were assessed at psychiatric inpatient wards. In the wake group (n = 36), patients did three wake therapies in combination with light therapy each morning together with sleep time stabilisation. In the exercise group (n = 38), patients did daily exercise. Hamilton subscale scores were primary outcome (not blinded), secondary outcome was self-assessment data from the Preskorn scale and sleep. Results Patients in the wake therapy group had an immediate, large, stable, and statistically significant better antidepressant effect than patients in the exercise group with response rates at day5 of 75.0%/25.1% and remission rates of 58.6%/6.0%, respectively. The response and remission rates were diminished at day8 with response rates of 41.9%/10.1% and remission rates of 19.4%/4.7%, respectively. Patients and ward personnel found the method applicable with few side effects. Positive diurnal variation (mood better in the evening) predicted a larger response to wake therapy. In the wake group napping on days after intervention predicted greater deterioration on day8. Conclusions The intervention induced an acute antidepressant response without relapse between wake nights but with a diminishing effect after intervention. Development is still needed to secure maintenance of response. Avoiding napping in the days after wake therapy is important. Trial Registration Clinical trials.gov NCT00149110 PMID:23840645

  3. RASCH ANALYSIS OF CLINICAL OUTCOME MEASURES IN SPINAL MUSCULAR ATROPHY

    PubMed Central

    CANO, STEFAN J.; MAYHEW, ANNA; GLANZMAN, ALLAN M.; KROSSCHELL, KRISTIN J.; SWOBODA, KATHRYN J.; MAIN, MARION; STEFFENSEN, BIRGIT F.; BÉRARD, CAROLE; GIRARDOT, FRANÇOISE; PAYAN, CHRISTINE A.M.; MERCURI, EUGENIO; MAZZONE, ELENA; ELSHEIKH, BAKRI; FLORENCE, JULAINE; HYNAN, LINDA S.; IANNACCONE, SUSAN T.; NELSON, LESLIE L.; PANDYA, SHREE; ROSE, MICHAEL; SCOTT, CHARLES; SADJADI, REZA; YORE, MACKENSIE A.; JOYCE, CYNTHIA; KISSEL, JOHN T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Trial design for SMA depends on meaningful rating scales to assess outcomes. In this study Rasch methodology was applied to 9 motor scales in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Methods Data from all 3 SMA types were provided by research groups for 9 commonly used scales. Rasch methodology assessed the ordering of response option thresholds, tests of fit, spread of item locations, residual correlations, and person separation index. Results Each scale had good reliability. However, several issues impacting scale validity were identified, including the extent that items defined clinically meaningful constructs and how well each scale measured performance across the SMA spectrum. Conclusions The sensitivity and potential utility of each SMA scale as outcome measures for trials could be improved by establishing clear definitions of what is measured, reconsidering items that misfit and items whose response categories have reversed thresholds, and adding new items at the extremes of scale ranges. PMID:23836324

  4. A Review of Outcome Measures in Early Childhood Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mannan, Hasheem; Summers, Jean Ann; Turnbull, Ann P.; Poston, Denise J.

    2006-01-01

    The authors undertook a review of measures available for assessing outcomes of early childhood services for children with disabilities and their families. With principles of family-centered practice mandating the inclusion of both family and child outcome measures in effective evaluation plans, the review examined measures with established

  5. Does routine ultrasound scanning improve outcome in pregnancy? Meta-analysis of various outcome measures.

    PubMed Central

    Bucher, H C; Schmidt, J G

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To evaluate the effectiveness of routine ultrasound scanning in pregnancy by a meta-analysis of various outcome measures. DESIGN--Meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials evaluating the effect of routine ultrasound scanning on perinatal mortality and morbidity. Live birth rate (that is, live births per pregnancy) is included as a measure of pregnancy outcome in addition to the conventional perinatal mortality. SUBJECTS--15,935 pregnancies (7992 in which routine ultrasound scanning was used and 7943 controls with selective scanning) from four randomised controlled trials. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Perinatal mortality, live birth rate, rate of miscarriage, Apgar score < 7 at 1 minute, and number of induced labours. RESULTS--The live birth rate was identical in both screening and control groups (odds ratio = 0.99; 95% confidence interval 0.88 to 1.12) although the perinatal mortality was significantly lower in the group who had routine ultrasonography (0.64, 0.43 to 0.97). Differences in perinatal morbidity between the two groups as measured by the proportion of newborn babies with Apgar score < 7 at 1 minute were not significant (1.05; 0.93 to 1.19). CONCLUSION--Routine ultrasound scanning does not improve the outcome of pregnancy in terms of an increased number of live births or of reduced perinatal morbidity. Routine ultrasound scanning may be effective and useful as a screening for malformation. Its use for this purpose, however, should be made explicit and take into account the risk of false positive diagnosis in addition to ethical issues. PMID:8343659

  6. Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Systemic Sclerosis (Scleroderma).

    PubMed

    Pellar, Russell E; Tingey, Theresa M; Pope, Janet Elizabeth

    2016-05-01

    Scleroderma (systemic sclerosis) is a rare autoimmune connective tissue disease that can damage multiple organs and reduce quality of life. Patient-reported outcome measures capture the patient's perspective. Some measures are specific to systemic sclerosis and others are general. Patient-reported outcomes in systemic sclerosis are important to aid in understanding the impact of systemic sclerosis on patients. PMID:27133491

  7. Generating Outcome Measurements: Economic and Societal. A Guide to Educational Outcomes Measurements and Their Uses. Seminar No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mushkin, Selma J.; Billings, Bradley B.

    This guide is essentially designed as a teaching aid for those who would inform planners, officials of educational ministires, school administrators, principals, and teachers about educational outcome measurements. In outline and graphic form, the guide presents topics for discussion in a seminar dealing with generating outcome measurements:…

  8. Outcomes 'out of africa': the selection and implementation of outcome measures for palliative care in Africa

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background End-of-life care research across Africa is under-resourced and under-developed. A central issue in research in end-of-life care is the measurement of effects and outcomes of care on patients and families. Little is known about the experiences of health professionals' selection and implementation of outcome measures (OM) in clinical care, research, audit, or teaching in Africa. Methods An online survey was undertaken of those using outcome measures across the region, as part of the PRISMA project. A questionnaire addressing the use of OMs was developed for a similar survey in Europe and adapted for Africa. Participants were sampled through the contacts database of APCA. Invitation emails were sent out in January 2010 and reminders in February 2010. Results 168/301 invited contacts (56%) from 24 countries responded, with 78 respondents having previously used OM (65% in clinical practice, 12% in research and 23% for both). Main reasons for not using OM were a lack of guidance/training on using and analysing OM, with 49% saying that they would use the tools if this was provided. 40% of those using OM in clinical practice used POS, and 80% used them to assess, evaluate and monitor change. The POS was also the main tool used in research, with the principle criteria for use being validation in Africa, access to the tool and time needed to complete it. Challenges to the use of tools were shortage of time and resources, lack of guidance and training for the professionals, poor health status of patients and complexity of OM. Researchers also have problems analysing OM data. The APCA African POS was the most common version of the POS used, and was reported as a valuable tool for measuring outcomes. Respondents indicated the ideal outcome tool should be short, multi-dimensional and easy to use. Conclusion This was the first survey on professionals' views on OM in Africa. It showed that the APCA African POS was the most frequently OM used. Training and support are needed to help professionals utilise OM in palliative care, and OMs have an ongoing and important role in palliative care in Africa. PMID:22221932

  9. 42 CFR 486.318 - Condition: Outcome measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SUPPLIERS Requirements for Certification and Designation and Conditions for Coverage: Organ Procurement Organizations Organ Procurement Organization Outcome Requirements § 486.318 Condition: Outcome measures. (a... donation rate of eligible donors as a percentage of eligible deaths is no more than 1.5 standard...

  10. A Binomial Test of Group Differences with Correlated Outcome Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.; Levin, Joel R.; Ferron, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Building on previous arguments for why educational researchers should not provide effect-size estimates in the face of statistically nonsignificant outcomes (Robinson & Levin, 1997), Onwuegbuzie and Levin (2005) proposed a 3-step statistical approach for assessing group differences when multiple outcome measures are individually analyzed within…

  11. Measuring Assistive Technology Outcomes in Schools Using Functional Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Michelle Kaye; Stratman, Kristine Freiberg; Smith, Roger O.

    2000-01-01

    Activities of Project OATS (Outcomes of Assistive Technology in the Schools) are described, including identification and piloting of existing assessment instruments for use as an outcome measure, examining the validity of the School Function Assessment, and field testing the School Function Assessment-Assistive Technology Version, an adaptation of…

  12. What Do They Measure? Comparing Three Learning Outcomes Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steedle, Jeffrey; Kugelmass, Heather; Nemeth, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Many postsecondary institutions currently administer standardized tests of general college outcomes; more than a quarter of Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) member institutions do so. Using standardized tests for accountability purposes has been contentious mainly because these tests do not measure every important outcome

  13. Measuring clinically significant outcomes - LDQ, CORE-10 and SSQ as dimension measures of addiction

    PubMed Central

    Raistrick, Duncan; Tober, Gillian; Sweetman, Jenny; Unsworth, Sally; Crosby, Helen; Evans, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Aims and method To determine values for reliable change and clinically significant change for the Leeds Dependence Questionnaire (LDQ) and Social Satisfaction Questionnaire (SSQ). The performance of these two measures with the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation (CORE-10) as three dimension measures of addiction was then explored. Results The reliable change statistic for both LDQ and SSQ was ⩾4; the cut-offs for clinically significant change were LDQ ⩽10 males, ⩽5 females, and SSQ ⩾16. There was no overlap of 95% CIs for means by gender between ‘well-functioning’ and pre- and post-treatment populations. Clinical implications These data enable the measurement of clinically significant change using the LDQ and SSQ and add to the evidence for the performance of the LDQ, CORE-10 and SSQ as dimension measures of addiction. The CORE-10 and SSQ can be used as treatment outcome measures for mental health problems other than addiction. PMID:25237520

  14. Measuring clinically significant outcomes - LDQ, CORE-10 and SSQ as dimension measures of addiction.

    PubMed

    Raistrick, Duncan; Tober, Gillian; Sweetman, Jenny; Unsworth, Sally; Crosby, Helen; Evans, Tom

    2014-06-01

    Aims and method To determine values for reliable change and clinically significant change for the Leeds Dependence Questionnaire (LDQ) and Social Satisfaction Questionnaire (SSQ). The performance of these two measures with the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation (CORE-10) as three dimension measures of addiction was then explored. Results The reliable change statistic for both LDQ and SSQ was ⩾4; the cut-offs for clinically significant change were LDQ ⩽10 males, ⩽5 females, and SSQ ⩾16. There was no overlap of 95% CIs for means by gender between 'well-functioning' and pre- and post-treatment populations. Clinical implications These data enable the measurement of clinically significant change using the LDQ and SSQ and add to the evidence for the performance of the LDQ, CORE-10 and SSQ as dimension measures of addiction. The CORE-10 and SSQ can be used as treatment outcome measures for mental health problems other than addiction. PMID:25237520

  15. Outcome measures for clinical rehabilitation trials: impairment, function, quality of life, or value?

    PubMed

    Wade, Derick T

    2003-10-01

    Choosing outcome measures in rehabilitation research depends on the standard research skills of clear thinking, attention to detail, and minimizing the amount of data collected. In rehabilitation, outcome is more difficult to measure because (1) usually several outcomes are relevant, (2) relevant outcomes are affected by multiple factors in addition to treatment, and (3) even good measures rarely reflect the specific interest of any individual patient or member of the rehabilitation team, leading to some dissent. Measurement of general quality of life is not possible because there is little agreement as to the nature of the construct; moreover, measurement of relevant aspects of quality of life would probably give similar results. Cost in terms of resources can be estimated, but there is no validated or even widely accepted method of relating this to benefit in a fair, open, and rational way. Outcome is best measured at the level of behavior (activities), with other measures being used to aid interpretation. PMID:14502036

  16. Palliative care outcome measures in COPD patients: a conceptual review.

    PubMed

    Antoniu, Sabina Antonela; Boiculese, Lucian Vasile

    2016-04-01

    In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), palliative care is appropriate in very advanced stages based on recognition of its need when conventional therapy is no longer able to control symptoms, disease morbidity, or to improve/maintain an acceptable quality of life. Palliative care aims to improve quality of life, or, if applied specifically at the end-of-life, to ensure comfortable care. In COPD palliative care effectiveness of interventions should be quantified with outcome measures able to better capture the holistic nature of approaches and not only the specific features of disease. These should include: physical outcomes, psychological outcomes, social outcomes, spiritual outcomes. Such measures are discussed in this review along with arguments supporting their use. PMID:26967768

  17. Measuring outcomes in craniofacial and pediatric plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Wong, Karen W Y; Forrest, Christopher R; Goodacre, Tim E E; Klassen, Anne F

    2013-04-01

    This article discusses the measurement of outcomes in craniofacial and pediatric plastic surgery, using examples of craniosynostosis and cleft lip and/or palate (CLP). The challenges in measuring the standard outcomes of function, aesthetics, and health-related quality of life are discussed, along with the importance of developing evidence and studying quality improvement in this specialty. The need to define specific and comprehensive goals is discussed with a focus on patient-reported outcomes (PROs). Examples from the development of the CLEFT-Q, a PRO instrument for patients with CLP, are provided to support the need to seek the patient perspective. PMID:23506771

  18. Systematic methods for measuring outcomes: How they may be used to improve outcomes after Radical cystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Khurram M.; Izawa, Jonathan I.

    2015-01-01

    In the era of managed healthcare, the measuring and reporting of surgical outcomes is a universal mandate. The outcomes should be monitored and reported in a timely manner. Methods for measuring surgical outcomes should be continuous, free of bias and accommodate variations in patient factors. The traditional methods of surgical audits are periodic, resource-intensive and have a potential for bias. These audits are typically annual and therefore there is a long time lag before any effective remedial action could be taken. To reduce this delay the manufacturing industry has long used statistical control-chart monitoring systems, as they offer continuous monitoring and are better suited to monitoring outcomes systematically and promptly. The healthcare industry is now embracing such systematic methods. Radical cystectomy (RC) is one of the most complex surgical procedures. Systematic methods for measuring outcomes after RC can identify areas of improvements on an ongoing basis, which can be used to initiate timely corrective measures. We review the available methods to improve the outcomes. Cumulative summation charts have the potential to be a robust method which can prompt early warnings and thus initiate an analysis of root causes. This early-warning system might help to resolve the issue promptly with no need to wait for the report of annual audits. This system can also be helpful for monitoring learning curves for individuals, both in training or when learning a new technology. PMID:26413333

  19. Systematic methods for measuring outcomes: How they may be used to improve outcomes after Radical cystectomy.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Khurram M; Izawa, Jonathan I

    2015-06-01

    In the era of managed healthcare, the measuring and reporting of surgical outcomes is a universal mandate. The outcomes should be monitored and reported in a timely manner. Methods for measuring surgical outcomes should be continuous, free of bias and accommodate variations in patient factors. The traditional methods of surgical audits are periodic, resource-intensive and have a potential for bias. These audits are typically annual and therefore there is a long time lag before any effective remedial action could be taken. To reduce this delay the manufacturing industry has long used statistical control-chart monitoring systems, as they offer continuous monitoring and are better suited to monitoring outcomes systematically and promptly. The healthcare industry is now embracing such systematic methods. Radical cystectomy (RC) is one of the most complex surgical procedures. Systematic methods for measuring outcomes after RC can identify areas of improvements on an ongoing basis, which can be used to initiate timely corrective measures. We review the available methods to improve the outcomes. Cumulative summation charts have the potential to be a robust method which can prompt early warnings and thus initiate an analysis of root causes. This early-warning system might help to resolve the issue promptly with no need to wait for the report of annual audits. This system can also be helpful for monitoring learning curves for individuals, both in training or when learning a new technology. PMID:26413333

  20. US Valuation of Health Outcomes Measured Using the PROMIS-29

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Benjamin M.; Reeve, Bryce B.; Brown, Paul M.; Cella, David; Hays, Ron D.; Lipscomb, Joseph; Pickard, A. Simon; Revicki, Dennis A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Health valuation studies enhance economic evaluations of treatments by estimating the value of health-related quality of life (HRQoL). The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System® (PROMIS) includes a 29-item short-form HRQOL measure, the PROMIS-29. Methods To value PROMIS-29 responses on a quality-adjusted life year (QALY) scale, we conducted a national survey (N=7557) using quota sampling based on the US 2010 Census. Based on 541 paired comparisons with over 350 responses each, pair-specific probabilities were incorporated into a weighted least-squared estimator. Results All losses in HRQoL influenced choice; however, respondents valued losses in physical function, anxiety, depression, sleep, and pain more than those in fatigue and social functioning. Conclusions This paper introduces a novel approach to valuing HRQoL for economic evaluations using paired comparisons and provides a tool to translate PROMIS-29 responses into QALYs. PMID:25498780

  1. Durability of devices: long-term results and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Arsalan, Mani; Mack, Michael J

    2015-09-01

    Over the last decade, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has emerged to become the treatment of choice for inoperable patients and the preferred alternative for high-risk patients with severe, symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS). Questions about the long-term durability of TAVI valves were raised early in the history of the procedure. Although there has not yet been a significant signal of early structural valve deterioration (SVD), these concerns remain important today, especially if TAVI is to be considered for use in lower-risk and younger patients with longer life expectancy. Durability expectations for TAVI to some degree parallel those of surgical bioprostheses, but the different tissue, mounting design and crimping of TAVI devices might adversely influence long-term results. The experience with surgical bioprostheses has shown that deterioration of these valves is a slow and gradual process. Thus, despite promising midterm results of many surgical bioprostheses at five to seven years, design faults with higher failure rates have become manifest eight to 10 years after implantation. Similarly, although the initial five-year outcomes of TAVI are promising, these results cannot yet be extrapolated to predict long-term durability with any firm degree of assuredness, especially in younger patient populations. Thus, a high degree of caution is necessary when considering TAVI in intermediate-risk and younger patients until more evidence of durability equivalent to that of surgical bioprostheses is forthcoming. PMID:26384176

  2. Towards measurement of outcome for patients with varicose veins.

    PubMed Central

    Garratt, A M; Macdonald, L M; Ruta, D A; Russell, I T; Buckingham, J K; Krukowski, Z H

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To develop a valid and reliable outcome measure for patients with varicose veins. DESIGN--Postal questionnaire survey of patients with varicose veins. SETTING--Surgical outpatient departments and training general practices in Grampian region. SUBJECTS--373 patients, 287 of whom had just been referred to hospital for their varicose veins and 86 who had just consulted a general practitioner for this condition and, for comparison, a random sample of 900 members of the general population. MAIN MEASURES--Content validity, internal consistency, and criterion validity. RESULTS--281(76%) patients (mean age 45.8; 76% female) and 542(60%) of the general population (mean age 47.9; 54% female) responded. The questionnaire had good internal consistency as measured by item-total correlations. Factor analysis identified four important health factors: pain and dysfunction, cosmetic appearance, extent of varicosity and complications. The validity of the questionnaire was demonstrated by a high correlation with the SF-36 health profile, which is a general measure of patients' health. The perceived health of patients with varicose veins, as measured by the SF-36, was significantly lower than that of the sample of the general population adjusted for age and a lower proportion of women. CONCLUSION--A clinically derived questionnaire can provide a valid and reliable tool to assess the perceived health of patients with varicose veins. IMPLICATIONS--The questionnaire may be used to justify surgical treatment of varicose veins. PMID:10132081

  3. Asymmetry questionnaire outcomes correlate with several hemisphericity measures.

    PubMed

    Morton, Bruce E

    2003-04-01

    The asymmetry questionnaire segregated subjects (n=143) into two groups. These were significantly correlated with similar groups separated, not only by three new biophysical hemisphericity protocols (Dichotic Deafness Test, Phased Mirror Tracing, Best Hand Test), but also by two preference-type measures (polarity questionnaire, preference questionnaire). Each of the 15 asymmetry questionnaire statements was significantly correlated with the outcomes of these five laterality measures. This is the third questionnaire whose outcomes correlate with those of the new biophysical measures of hemisphericity. PMID:12727192

  4. Outcome Measures Used in Clinical Trials for Behçet Syndrome: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Hatemi, Gulen; Merkel, Peter A.; Hamuryudan, Vedat; Boers, Maarten; Direskeneli, Haner; Aydin, Sibel Z.; Yazici, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Behçet syndrome (BS) is a multisystem vasculitis that is most active during young adulthood, causing serious disability and significant impairment in quality of life. Differences in the disease course, severity, and organ involvement between patients, depending on the age at presentation and sex, makes it impossible to determine a single management strategy. The diversity and variability in the outcome measures used in clinical trials in BS makes it difficult to compare the results or inform physicians about the best management strategy for individual patients. There is a large unmet need to determine or develop validated outcome measures for use in clinical trials in BS that are acceptable to researchers and regulatory agencies. We conducted a systematic review to describe the outcomes and outcome measures that have been used in clinical trials in BS. This review revealed the diversity and variability in the outcomes and outcome measures and the lack of standard definitions for most outcomes and rarity of validated outcome tools for disease assessment in BS. This systematic literature review will identify domains and candidate instruments for use in a Delphi exercise, the next step in the development of a core set of outcome measures that are properly validated and widely accepted by the collaboration of researchers from many different regions of the world and from different specialties, including rheumatology, ophthalmology, dermatology, gastroenterology, and neurology. PMID:24488418

  5. Advances in Patient-Reported Outcomes: The NIH PROMIS® Measures

    PubMed Central

    Broderick, Joan E.; DeWitt, Esi Morgan; Rothrock, Nan; Crane, Paul K.; Forrest, Christopher B.

    2013-01-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PRO) are questionnaire measures of patients’ symptoms, functioning, and health-related quality of life. They are designed to provide important clinical information that generally cannot be captured with objective medical testing. In 2004, the National Institutes of Health launched a research initiative to improve the clinical research enterprise by developing state-of-the-art PROs. The NIH Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement System (PROMIS) and Assessment Center are the products of that initiative. Adult, pediatric, and parent-proxy item banks have been developed by using contemporary psychometric methods, yielding rapid, accurate measurements. PROMIS currently provides tools for assessing physical, mental, and social health using short-form and computer-adaptive testing methods. The PROMIS tools are being adopted for use in clinical trials and translational research. They are also being introduced in clinical medicine to assess a broad range of disease outcomes. Recent legislative developments in the United States support greater efforts to include patients’ reports of health experience in order to evaluate treatment outcomes, engage in shared decision-making, and prioritize the focus of treatment. PROs have garnered increased attention by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for evaluating drugs and medical devices. Recent calls for comparative effectiveness research favor inclusion of PROs. PROs could also potentially improve quality of care and disease outcomes, provide patient-centered assessment for comparative effectiveness research, and enable a common metric for tracking outcomes across providers and medical systems. PMID:25848562

  6. Outcome measurement in clinical trials for Ulcerative Colitis: towards standardisation

    PubMed Central

    Cooney, Rachel M; Warren, Bryan F; Altman, Douglas G; Abreu, Maria T; Travis, Simon PL

    2007-01-01

    Clinical trials on novel drug therapies require clear criteria for patient selection and agreed definitions of disease remission. This principle has been successfully applied in the field of rheumatology where agreed disease scoring systems have allowed multi-centre collaborations and facilitated audit across treatment centres. Unfortunately in ulcerative colitis this consensus is lacking. Thirteen scoring systems have been developed but none have been properly validated. Most trials choose different endpoints and activity indices, making comparison of results from different trials extremely difficult. International consensus on endoscopic, clinical and histological scoring systems is essential as these are the key components used to determine entry criteria and outcome measurements in clinical trials on ulcerative colitis. With multiple new therapies under development, there is a pressing need for consensus to be reached. PMID:17592647

  7. Clinicians' Attitudes Towards Outcome and Process Monitoring: A Validation of the Outcome Measurement Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Smits, Dave F; Claes, Laurence; Stinckens, Nele; Smits, Dirk J M

    2015-09-01

    Valid and reliable instruments to measure monitoring attitudes of clinicians are scarce. The influence of sociodemographics and professional characteristics on monitoring attitudes is largely unknown. First, we investigated the factor structure and reliability of the Outcome Measurement Questionnaire among a sample of Flemish mental health professionals (n = 170). Next, we examined the relationship between clinicians' sociodemographic and professional characteristics and monitoring attitudes. Construct validity was determined using a confirmatory factor analysis. Internal consistency was ascertained using Cronbach's alpha. Mean level differences in monitoring attitudes related to clinicians' gender, work setting, level of education and psychotherapeutic training, were investigated using ANOVAs. The relationships between clinicians' age, clinical experience and attitudes were calculated using the Pearson correlation coefficient. A model with one general factor and a method factor referring to reverse-worded items best fitted our data. Internal consistency was good. Clinicians with psychotherapeutic training reported more favorable monitoring attitudes than those without such training. Compared to clinicians working in subsidized outpatient services, private practitioners and clinicians from inpatient mental health clinics had more positive attitudes. Results highlight the need for sustained and targeted training, with particular focus on transforming measurement data into meaningful clinical support tools. PMID:25315180

  8. Outcome Measures for Clinical Trials in Interstitial Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lammi, Matthew R.; Baughman, Robert P.; Birring, Surinder S.; Russell, Anne-Marie; Ryu, Jay H.; Scholand, Marybeth; Distler, Oliver; LeSage, Daphne; Sarver, Catherine; Antoniou, Katerina; Highland, Kristin B.; Kowal-Bielecka, Otylia; Lasky, Joseph A.; Wells, Athol U.; Saketkoo, Lesley Ann

    2015-01-01

    The chronic fibrosing idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) are a group of heterogeneous pulmonary parenchymal disorders described by radiologic and histological patterns termed usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) and non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP). These include idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and those related to connective tissue disease (CTD) and are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Beyond the importance of establishing an appropriate diagnosis, designing optimal clinical trials for IIPs has been fraught with difficulties in consistency of clinical endpoints making power analyses, and the establishment of efficacy and interpretation of results across trials challenging. Preliminary recommendations, developed by rigorous consensus methods, proposed a minimum set of outcome measures, a ‘core set’, to be incorporated into future clinical trials (Saketkoo et al, THORAX. 2014.). This paper sets out to examine the candidate instruments for each domain (Dyspnea, Cough, Health Related Quality of Life, Imaging, Lung Physiology and Function, Mortality). Candidate measures that were not selected as well as measures that were not available for examination at the time of the consensus process will also be discussed.

  9. International Dermatology Outcome Measures Initiative as Applied to Psoriatic Disease Outcomes: An Update.

    PubMed

    Merola, Joseph F; Armstrong, April W; Saraiya, Ami; Latella, John; Garg, Amit; Callis Duffin, Kristina; Gottlieb, Alice B

    2016-05-01

    Previous publications have described the International Dermatology Outcome Measures (IDEOM) group, comprising patients, physicians, health economists, participating pharmaceutical industry partners, payers, and regulatory agencies. The goal of IDEOM is to create patient-centered, validated measures of dermatologic disease progression and treatment efficacy for use in both clinical trials and clinical practice. We provide an update of IDEOM activities as of our 2015 IDEOM meeting in Washington, DC, USA. PMID:27134269

  10. Inside Quality Reform: Early Results on Using Outcomes for Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Khawas, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    This article offers evidence on ways in which assessment of student learning outcomes made a difference for some academic institutions in the United States. It offers perspectives on the internal changes that took place, especially within academic programmes. Even after the capacity for assessment was developed, challenges remained in evaluating…

  11. Experimental evaluation of nonclassical correlations between measurement outcomes and target observable in a quantum measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iinuma, Masataka; Suzuki, Yutaro; Nii, Taiki; Kinoshita, Ryuji; Hofmann, Holger F.

    2016-03-01

    In general, it is difficult to evaluate measurement errors when the initial and final conditions of the measurement make it impossible to identify the correct value of the target observable. Ozawa proposed a solution based on the operator algebra of observables which has recently been used in experiments investigating the error-disturbance trade-off of quantum measurements. Importantly, this solution makes surprisingly detailed statements about the relations between measurement outcomes and the unknown target observable. In the present paper, we investigate this relation by performing a sequence of two measurements on the polarization of a photon, so that the first measurement commutes with the target observable and the second measurement is sensitive to a complementary observable. While the initial measurement can be evaluated using classical statistics, the second measurement introduces the effects of quantum correlations between the noncommuting physical properties. By varying the resolution of the initial measurement, we can change the relative contribution of the nonclassical correlations and identify their role in the evaluation of the quantum measurement. It is shown that the most striking deviation from classical expectations is obtained at the transition between weak and strong measurements, where the competition between different statistical effects results in measurement values well outside the range of possible eigenvalues.

  12. Evaluating outcomes of palliative photodynamic therapy: instrument development and preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodell, Teresa T.; Bargo, Paulo R.; Jacques, Steven L.

    2002-06-01

    Background: Subjective measures are considered the gold standard in palliative care evaluation, but no studies have evaluated palliative photodynamic therapy (PDT) subjectively. If PDT is to be accepted as a palliative therapy for later-stage obstructing esophageal and lung cancer, evidence of its effectiveness and acceptability to patients must be made known. Study Design/Materials and Methods: This ongoing study's major aim is to evaluate subjective outcomes of PDT in patients with obstructing esophageal and lung cancer. Existing measures of health status, dysphagia and performance status were supplemented with an instrument developed to evaluate PDT symptom relief and side effect burden, the PDT Side Effects Survey (PSES). Results: PDT patients treated with porfimer sodium (Photofrin) and 630-nm light experienced reduced dysphagia grade and stable performance status for at least one month after PDT (N= 10-17), but these effects did not necessarily persist at three months. Fatigue, appetite and quality of life may be the most burdensome issues for these patients. Conclusions: Preliminary data suggest that the PSES is an acceptable and valid tool for measuring subjective outcomes of palliative PDT. This study is the first attempt to systematically evaluate subjective outcomes of palliative PDT. Multi-center outcomes research is needed to draw generalizable conclusions that will establish PDT's effectiveness in actual clinical practice and enhance the wider adoption of PDT as a cancer symptom relief modality.

  13. What Do They Measure? Comparing Three Learning Outcomes Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steedle, Jeffrey; Kugelmass, Heather; Nemeth, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Many postsecondary institutions currently administer standardized tests of general college outcomes; more than a quarter of Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) member institutions do so. Using standardized tests for accountability purposes has been contentious mainly because these tests do not measure every important outcome…

  14. Conceptualizing Outcome and Impact Measures for Intelligence Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gainor, Rhiannon; Bouthillier, France

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this qualitative, exploratory study is to clarify ambiguous concepts in intelligence services literature specifically related to measurement of intelligence outcomes and impact. Method: Face to face interviews were held with five subject experts from various intelligence fields and countries regarding their…

  15. Measuring Student Learning Outcomes Using the SALG Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scholl, Kathleen; Olsen, Heather M.

    2014-01-01

    U.S. higher education institutions are being called to question their central nature, priorities, and functions, with prominent and unprecedented attention being given to accountability and the measurement of student learning outcomes. As higher education evolves in how it assesses student learning and leisure studies and recreation departments…

  16. Measuring and Documenting Outcomes: Going beyond Tradition in Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davila, Norma

    The evaluation of systemic educational reforms entails a paradigm shift among evaluators who must change the lens through which they look at the reforms. This paper proposes methodological and design alternatives to measure nontraditional outcomes, such as changes in policy, over the lifespan of the reforms. Systemic reforms include intended and…

  17. Measuring Student Learning Outcomes Using the SALG Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scholl, Kathleen; Olsen, Heather M.

    2014-01-01

    U.S. higher education institutions are being called to question their central nature, priorities, and functions, with prominent and unprecedented attention being given to accountability and the measurement of student learning outcomes. As higher education evolves in how it assesses student learning and leisure studies and recreation departments

  18. Upper Limb Outcome Measures Used in Stroke Rehabilitation Studies: A Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Santisteban, Leire; Térémetz, Maxime; Bleton, Jean-Pierre; Baron, Jean-Claude; Maier, Marc A.; Lindberg, Påvel G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Establishing which upper limb outcome measures are most commonly used in stroke studies may help in improving consensus among scientists and clinicians. Objective In this study we aimed to identify the most commonly used upper limb outcome measures in intervention studies after stroke and to describe domains covered according to ICF, how measures are combined, and how their use varies geographically and over time. Methods Pubmed, CinHAL, and PeDRO databases were searched for upper limb intervention studies in stroke according to PRISMA guidelines and477 studies were included. Results In studies 48different outcome measures were found. Only 15 of these outcome measures were used in more than 5% of the studies. The Fugl-Meyer Test (FMT)was the most commonly used measure (in 36% of studies). Commonly used measures covered ICF domains of body function and activity to varying extents. Most studies (72%) combined multiple outcome measures: the FMT was often combined with the Motor Activity Log (MAL), the Wolf Motor Function Test and the Action Research Arm Test, but infrequently combined with the Motor Assessment Scale or the Nine Hole Peg Test. Key components of manual dexterity such as selective finger movements were rarely measured. Frequency of use increased over a twelve-year period for the FMT and for assessments of kinematics, whereas other measures, such as the MAL and the Jebsen Taylor Hand Test showed decreased use over time. Use varied largely between countries showing low international consensus. Conclusions The results showed a large diversity of outcome measures used across studies. However, a growing number of studies used the FMT, a neurological test with good psychometric properties. For thorough assessment the FMT needs to be combined with functional measures. These findings illustrate the need for strategies to build international consensus on appropriate outcome measures for upper limb function after stroke. PMID:27152853

  19. Novel mechanisms, treatments, and outcome measures in childhood sleep.

    PubMed

    Colonna, Annalisa; Smith, Anna B; Pal, Deb K; Gringras, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disorders and sleep of insufficient duration and quality are on the increase due to changes in our lifestyle, particularly in children and adolescents. Sleep disruption is also more common in children with medical conditions, compounding their difficulties. Recent studies have focused on new mechanisms that explain how learning and cognitive performance depend on a good night's sleep. Growing alongside this latest understanding is an innovative new field of non-drug interventions that improve sleep architecture, with resulting cognitive improvements. However, we need to rigorously evaluate such potentially popular and self-administered sleep interventions with equally state-of-the-art outcome measurement tools. Animated hand-held games, that incorporate embedded sleep-dependent learning tasks, promise to offer new robust methods of measuring changes in overnight learning. Portable computing technology has the potential to offer practical, inexpensive and reliable tools to indirectly assess the quality of sleep. They may be adopted in both clinical and educational settings, providing a unique way of monitoring the effect of sleep disruption on learning, leading also to a radical rethink of how we manage chronic diseases. PMID:26029140

  20. Novel mechanisms, treatments, and outcome measures in childhood sleep

    PubMed Central

    Colonna, Annalisa; Smith, Anna B.; Pal, Deb K.; Gringras, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disorders and sleep of insufficient duration and quality are on the increase due to changes in our lifestyle, particularly in children and adolescents. Sleep disruption is also more common in children with medical conditions, compounding their difficulties. Recent studies have focused on new mechanisms that explain how learning and cognitive performance depend on a good night’s sleep. Growing alongside this latest understanding is an innovative new field of non-drug interventions that improve sleep architecture, with resulting cognitive improvements. However, we need to rigorously evaluate such potentially popular and self-administered sleep interventions with equally state-of-the-art outcome measurement tools. Animated hand-held games, that incorporate embedded sleep-dependent learning tasks, promise to offer new robust methods of measuring changes in overnight learning. Portable computing technology has the potential to offer practical, inexpensive and reliable tools to indirectly assess the quality of sleep. They may be adopted in both clinical and educational settings, providing a unique way of monitoring the effect of sleep disruption on learning, leading also to a radical rethink of how we manage chronic diseases. PMID:26029140

  1. Medical specialty boards can help measure graduate medical education outcomes.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Lars E; Carek, Peter; Holmboe, Eric S; Puffer, James C; Warm, Eric J; Phillips, Robert L

    2014-06-01

    U.S. graduate medical education (GME) training institutions are under increasing scrutiny to measure program outcomes as a demonstration of accountability for the sizeable funding they receive from the federal government. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) is a potential agent of measuring GME accountability but has no interaction with physicians after residency training is completed. American Board of Medical Specialty (ABMS) member boards interact with physicians throughout their careers through maintenance of certification (MOC) and are a potential source of valuable data on physician competency and quality of care, both of which could be used to measure GME accountability.The authors propose that ABMS boards and the ACGME deepen their existing relationship to better assess residency training outcomes. ABMS boards have a wealth of data on physicians collected as a by-product of MOC and business operations. Further, many ABMS boards collect practice demographics and scope-of-practice information through MOC enrollment surveys or recertification examination questionnaires. These data are potentially valuable in helping residencies know what their graduates are doing in practice. Part 4 of MOC generally involves assessment of the quality of care delivered in practice, and ABMS boards could share these deidentified data with the ACGME and residency programs to provide direct feedback on the practice outcomes of graduates.ABMS member boards and the ACGME should broaden their long-standing relationship to further develop shared roles and data-sharing mechanisms to better inform residencies and the public about GME training outcomes. PMID:24871232

  2. The Functional Status Score (FSS): A New Pediatric Outcome Measure

    PubMed Central

    Pollack, Murray M.; Holubkov, Richard; Glass, Penny; Dean, J. Michael; Meert, Kathleen L.; Zimmerman, Jerry; Anand, K. J. S.; Carcillo, Joseph; Newth, Christopher J. L.; Harrison, Rick; Willson, Douglas F.; Nicholson, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Objective To create a functional status outcome measure for large outcome studies that is well defined, quantitative, sufficiently rapid, reliable, minimally dependent on subjective assessments, and applicable to hospitalized pediatric patients across a wide spectrum of ages and inpatient environments. Patients and Methods The Functional Status Scale (FSS) was developed by a multidisciplinary consensus process. Domains of functioning included mental status, sensory, communication, motor, feeding, and respiratory categorized from normal (1) to very severe dysfunction (5). The Adaptive Behavior Assessment System (ABAS) II established construct validity and calibration within domains. Seven institutions provided pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) patients within 24 hours of PICU discharge, high-risk non-PICU patients within 24 hours of admission, and technology-dependent children. Primary care nurses completed the ABAS II based on patient’s functioning when the FSS was completed. Patients from 10% of the study days were used to evaluate inter-rater reliability. Data were randomly split into estimation and validation sets. Statistical analyses included Pearson correlations, construct validity, linear regression analysis, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis for discriminant validity, and the intraclass correlation for inter-rater reliability. Results A total of 836 children with a mean FSS of 10.3 (standard deviation 4.4) were studied. Eighteen percent had the minimum possible FSS = 6, 44% had FSS ≥ 10, 14% had a FSS ≥ 15, and 6% had FSS scores ≥ 20. Each FSS domain was associated with mean ABAS II (p<.0001). Cells in each domain were collapsed and reweighted, which improved correlations with ABAS II from −0.58 to −0.62 in the estimation sample, and −0.60 to −0.63 in the validation sample (p<0.001 for improvements). Discrimination was very good for moderate and severe dysfunction (ABAS II categories) and improved with FSS weighting (area under the ROC curve > 0.8). Intraclass correlations of original and weighted total FSS were 0.95 and 0.94 respectively. Conclusions The FSS met our objectives and is well suited for large outcome studies. PMID:19564265

  3. PERFORMANCE METRICS: AN OVERVIEW OF ECOLOGICAL "OUTCOME" MEASUREMENT AT EPA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The terms "Accountability" and "Outcome" are becoming ubiquitous in government agencies. The impetus for demonstrating results from government-sponsored research and regulation comes from Congress (e.g., statutes like the Government Performance Results Act of 1993 and reports fro...

  4. Generating Outcome Measurements: Achievement and Attitudes. A Guide to Educational Outcome Measurements and Their Uses. Seminar No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mushkin, Selma J.; Billings, Bradley B.

    This guide is essentially designed as a teaching aid for those who would inform planners, officials of educational ministries, school administrators, principals, and teachers about educational outcome measurements. In outline and graphic form, the guide presents topics for discussion in a seminar dealing with how to obtain information on…

  5. Evaluating psychological debriefing: are we measuring the right outcomes?

    PubMed

    Deahl, M P; Srinivasan, M; Jones, N; Neblett, C; Jolly, A

    2001-07-01

    The efficacy of critical incident stress debriefing (CISD) and psychological debriefing (PD) following potentially traumatising events has recently been challenged after a number of recent randomised controlled trials (RCTs) failed to demonstrate that CISD or PD prevents or reduces the incidence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). These studies have used measures of PTSD as the principal outcome and have generally not measured comorbid psychopathology, behavioral or social dysfunction. In a recent RCT of group debriefing amongst British soldiers returning from peacekeeping operations in Bosnia, PD had a significant effect in reducing a worrying level of alcohol misuse in the sample. The findings of this study suggest that that it is premature to conclude that debriefing is ineffective and that a broader range of outcome measures should be employed in future trials of debriefing. PMID:11534883

  6. Using Patient Reported Outcome Measures to Improve Service Effectiveness (UPROMISE): Training clinicians to Use Outcome Measures in Child Mental Health.

    PubMed

    Edbrooke-Childs, Julian; Wolpert, Miranda; Deighton, Jessica

    2016-05-01

    Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) are prevalent in child mental health services. In this point of view, we discuss our experience of training clinicians to use PROMs and to interpret and discuss feedback from measures. Findings from pre-post observational data from clinicians who attended either a 1- or 3-day training course showed that clinicians in both courses had more positive attitudes and higher levels of self-efficacy regarding administering measures and using feedback after training. We hope that this special issue will lead the way for future research on training clinicians to use outcome measures so that PROMs may be a source of clinically useful practice based evidence. PMID:25331446

  7. Understanding the outcomes measures used in Huntington disease pharmacologicaltrials: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Carlozzi, Noelle E; Miciura, Angela; Migliore, Nicholas; Dayalu, Praveen

    2014-01-01

    Background The identification of the gene mutation causing Huntington disease has raised hopes for new treatments to ease symptoms and slow functional decline. As such, there has been a push towards designing efficient pharmacological trials (i.e., drug trials), especially with regard to selecting outcomes measures that are both brief and sensitive to changes across the course of the disease, from subtle prodromal changes, to more severe end-stage changes. Objectives Recently, to aid in efficient development of new HD research studies, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) published recommendations for measurement selection in HD. While these recommendations are helpful, many of the recommended measures have little published data in HD. As such, we conducted a systematic review of the literature to identify the most common outcomes measures used in HD clinical trials. Methods Major medical databases, including PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, were used to identify peer-reviewed journal articles in English from 2001 through April 2013; 151 pharmacological trials were identified. Results The majority of HD clinical trials employed clinician-reported outcomes measures (93%); patient reported outcome measures (11%) and observer reported outcome measures (3%) were used with much less frequency. Conclusions We provide a review of the most commonly used measures across these trials, compare these measures to the clinical recommendations made by the NINDS working groups, and provide recommendations for selecting measures for future clinical trials that meet the Food and Drug Administration standards. PMID:25300328

  8. Current approaches to measuring health outcomes in pediatric research.

    PubMed

    Vivier, P M; Bernier, J A; Starfield, B

    1994-10-01

    Because improving health is the ultimate goal of a health care system, the measurement of health outcomes in research is a logical and important goal for the evaluation of the impact of health services. Although health can be defined in various ways, here we employ a conceptualization that has several domains including longevity, disease, comfort, perceived well being, activity, achievement, and resilience. Given that health is such a broad concept, the difficult task for outcomes research is to provide the means of measuring it. As this brief summary of current work indicates, a number of approaches have been used in recent pediatric studies. Most focus on a small subset of health concerns. However, some studies have attempted to broaden the assessment of health outcome either by using multiple health measures or developing multidimensional instruments for measuring health. Care must be taken in evaluating the usefulness of any of the instruments until sufficient data are obtained as to their reliability and validity. Further work in this area is needed, particularly with regards to multidimensional approaches, which are beginning to provide a more sensitive and comprehensive means of assessing the impact of health services. PMID:7820199

  9. Measure Once, Cut Twice – Adding Patient-Reported Outcome Measures to the Electronic Health Record for Comparative Effectiveness Research

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Albert W.; Kharrazi, Hadi; Boulware, L. Ebony; Snyder, Claire F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This paper presents the current state of patient-reported outcome measures, and explains new opportunities for leveraging the recent adoption of electronic health records to expand the application of patient-reported outcomes in both clinical care and comparative effectiveness research. Study Design and Setting Historic developments of patient-reported outcome, electronic health record, and comparative effectiveness research are analyzed in two dimensions: patient-centeredness and digitization. We pose the question: “What needs to be standardized around the collection of patient-reported outcomes in electronic health records for comparative effectiveness research?” Results We identified three converging trends: the progression of patient-reported outcomes toward greater patient centeredness and electronic adaptation; the evolution of electronic health records into personalized and fully digitized solutions; the shift toward patient-oriented comparative effectiveness research. Related to this convergence, we propose an architecture for patient-reported outcome standardization that could serve as a first step toward a more comprehensive integration of patient-reported outcomes with electronic health record for both practice and research. Conclusion The science of patient-reported outcome measurement has matured sufficiently to be integrated routinely into electronic health records and other e-health solutions to collect data on an ongoing basis for clinical care and comparative effectiveness research. Further efforts and ideally coordinated efforts from various stakeholders are needed to refine the details of the proposed framework for standardization. PMID:23849145

  10. A Preliminary Examination of a General Social Outcome Measure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stichter, Janine Peck; Herzog, Melissa J.; O'Connor, Karen V.; Schmidt, Carla

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with Pervasive Developmental Disorders (PDD) have social competence impairments that can result in negative adult outcomes. Despite considerable research on social skills training, little is available to evaluate these programs. This study describes the development, administration, and utility of a progress-monitoring tool for…

  11. Outcome Measures of Triple Board Graduates, 1991-2003

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Marla J.; Dunn, David W.; Rushton, Jerry

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To describe program outcomes for the Combined Training Program in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Pediatrics, and Psychiatry (Triple Board Program). Method: All Triple Board Program graduates to date (1991-2003) were asked to participate in a 37-item written survey from February to April 2004. Results: The response rate was 80.7%. Most…

  12. Revision surgery for recurrent and persistent carpal tunnel syndrome: Clinical results and factors affecting outcomes.

    PubMed

    Djerbi, I; Csar, M; Lenoir, H; Coulet, B; Lazerges, C; Chammas, M

    2015-12-01

    Thirty-eight hands in 36 patients with recurrent or persistent carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) were reviewed retrospectively after a mean of 51months (range 12-86) to identify factors that may lead to poor outcomes after surgical management. Clinical assessment focused on pain and sensitivity recovery, measured with a VAS and Weber's two-point discrimination test, respectively. At the latest follow-up, we found 11 excellent, 15 good, nine fair and three poor results. The risk of fair or poor results was significantly higher in the presence of intraneural fibrosis, severe preoperative sensory deficit, neuroma of the palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve, workers compensation claims and number of previous surgeries. This last factor also significantly increased the risk of intraneural fibrosis. Despite disappointing outcomes, identification of these factors may improve our prognostic ability for revision surgery in cases of recurrent CTS. PMID:26545311

  13. Outcomes measurement in patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Gourin, Christine G

    2014-03-01

    Outcomes research is defined as clinical and population-based research that investigates the results of healthcare practices or interventions through the filter of the benefit to the patient and other stakeholders. Outcomes research is an increasingly important field or research, because of the pressing need for evidence-based information that can be used to make better informed health and healthcare decisions, and define desired health care practices in the current era of healthcare reform. This article will review the head and neck cancer (HNCA) outcomes literature published in the past year, with a focus on studies evaluating treatment and survival, short-term and long-term complications, and quality of life (QOL). PMID:24488549

  14. The International Dermatology Outcome Measures initiative as applied to psoriatic disease outcomes: a report from the GRAPPA 2013 meeting.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Alice B; Armstrong, April W; Christensen, Robin; Garg, Amit; Duffin, Kristina Callis; Boehncke, Wolf-Henning; Merola, Joseph F; Gladman, Dafna D; Mease, Philip J; Swerlick, Robert A; Rosen, Cheryl F; Abernethy, April

    2014-06-01

    In the United States, access to care is the number one issue facing our patients with dermatological conditions. In part, this is because we do not have outcome measures that are useful in clinical practice and available in databases where payers and governmental agencies can compare the performance of physicians and treatments. There is a growing recognition that insufficient attention has been paid to the outcomes measured in clinical trials and subsequently in clinical practice. The International Dermatology Outcome Measures group includes all willing stakeholders: patients, physicians, payers, and pharmaceutical scientists. As reported herein, the group's goal is to develop outcome measures in dermatology that address the needs of all involved. PMID:24882858

  15. Development of indicators for measuring outcomes of water safety plans

    PubMed Central

    Lockhart, Gabriella; Oswald, William E.; Hubbard, Brian; Medlin, Elizabeth; Gelting, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Water safety plans (WSPs) are endorsed by the World Health Organization as the most effective method of protecting a water supply. With the increase in WSPs worldwide, several valuable resources have been developed to assist practitioners in the implementation of WSPs, yet there is still a need for a practical and standardized method of evaluating WSP effectiveness. In 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published a conceptual framework for the evaluation of WSPs, presenting four key outcomes of the WSP process: institutional, operational, financial and policy change. In this paper, we seek to operationalize this conceptual framework by providing a set of simple and practical indicators for assessing WSP outcomes. Using CDC’s WSP framework as a foundation and incorporating various existing performance monitoring indicators for water utilities, we developed a set of approximately 25 indicators of institutional, operational, financial and policy change within the WSP context. These outcome indicators hold great potential for the continued implementation and expansion of WSPs worldwide. Having a defined framework for evaluating a WSP’s effectiveness, along with a set of measurable indicators by which to carry out that evaluation, will help implementers assess key WSP outcomes internally, as well as benchmark their progress against other WSPs in their region and globally. PMID:26361540

  16. Convergent Validity of the Constant-Murley Outcome Measure in Patients with Rotator Cuff Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bean, Andrea; MacDermid, Joy C.; van Osnabrugge, Varda; Travers, Niki; Holtby, Richard

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: Despite the popularity of the Constant-Murley score (CMS), a combined patient-report and objective (health professional administered) shoulder outcome measure, minimal information exists on its reliability or validity. The purpose of this study was to examine (1) internal consistency and convergent validity of the CMS and (2) the degree to which other shoulder measures explain variation in range of motion and strength components of the CMS. Methods: In this cross-sectional study of outcome measures, 45 patients undergoing conservative or surgical treatment for rotator cuff disease participated. Two disease-specific outcome measures, one shoulder-specific measure, and one upper extremity outcome measure were compared to the CMS. Results: Correlations between competing measures and relative total CMS were moderate (0.56 to 0.75). The American Shoulder & Elbow Score, the Upper Extremity Functional Index, the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index, and the Rotator Cuff Quality of Life index explained 38%, 28%, 26%, and 10% of variance of the objective component of the CMS respectively. Conclusions: The patient-report component of the CMS measures a multidimensional concept. The strength component had moderate correlations with isometric strength measures of the shoulder external rotators and abductors. The total CMS appears to measure a construct that is not totally captured by competing measures. The unexplained variance may be due, in part, to the lack of importance of the patient's physical impairment to symptoms or activity limitations as measured by other instruments. PMID:20145743

  17. The use of shoulder scoring systems and outcome measures in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, J; Rambani, R; Venkateswaran, B

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In future, outcomes following shoulder surgery may be subject to public survey. Many outcome measures exist but we do not know whether there is a consensus between shoulder surgeons in the UK. The aim of this study was to survey the preferred outcome measures used by National Health Service (NHS) shoulder surgeons operating in the UK. Methods A total of 350 shoulder surgeons working in NHS hospitals were asked to complete a short written questionnaire regarding their use of scoring systems and outcome measures. Questionnaires were sent and responses were received by post. Results Overall, 217 responses were received (62%). Of the respondents, 171 (79%) use an outcome measure in their shoulder practice while 46 (21%) do not. There were 118 surgeons (69%) who use more than one outcome measure. The Oxford shoulder score was most commonly used by 150 surgeons (69%), followed by the Constant score with 106 (49%), the Oxford shoulder instability score with 82 (38%), and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score with 54 (25%). The less commonly used outcome measures were the SF-36® and SF-12® health questionnaires with 19 (9%), the University of California at Los Angeles activity score with 8 (4%), the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons shoulder assessment form with 8 (4%) and the EQ-5D™ with 10 (3%). Conclusions Validated outcome measures should be adopted by all practising surgeons in all specialties. This will allow better assessment of treatments in addition to assessment of surgical performance in a transparent way. PMID:25350180

  18. Direct anterior total hip arthroplasty: Comparative outcomes and contemporary results.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Keith P; Kamath, Atul F

    2016-02-18

    Direct anterior total hip arthroplasty has become increasingly more popular among arthroplasty surgeons, in large part due to the use of an intramuscular interval and desire to reduce soft tissue damage. Several studies have now been published comparing the anterior intramuscular to other commonly used approaches, and many studies have published complication rates on large series of patients. Review of comparative studies indicates direct anterior hips tend towards shorter hospital stays and high rates of patients discharged to home. Although some studies show evidence of early benefit in functional outcomes, there is no strong evidence that the anterior approach provides any long term functional improvements compared to other approaches. Additionally, evidence to support reduced damage to soft tissue may not translate to certain clinical significance. Rates of intra-operative femur fracture, operative time and blood loss rates are notably higher for those developing familiarity with this approach. However, when surgeons have performed a modest number of procedures, the complication rates tend to markedly decrease in most studies to levels comparable to other approaches. Accuracy of component positioning also favors the anterior approach in some studies. This review summarizes the available literature comparing the direct anterior to other approaches for total hip arthroplasty and provides a comprehensive summary of common complications. PMID:26925380

  19. Direct anterior total hip arthroplasty: Comparative outcomes and contemporary results

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Keith P; Kamath, Atul F

    2016-01-01

    Direct anterior total hip arthroplasty has become increasingly more popular among arthroplasty surgeons, in large part due to the use of an intramuscular interval and desire to reduce soft tissue damage. Several studies have now been published comparing the anterior intramuscular to other commonly used approaches, and many studies have published complication rates on large series of patients. Review of comparative studies indicates direct anterior hips tend towards shorter hospital stays and high rates of patients discharged to home. Although some studies show evidence of early benefit in functional outcomes, there is no strong evidence that the anterior approach provides any long term functional improvements compared to other approaches. Additionally, evidence to support reduced damage to soft tissue may not translate to certain clinical significance. Rates of intra-operative femur fracture, operative time and blood loss rates are notably higher for those developing familiarity with this approach. However, when surgeons have performed a modest number of procedures, the complication rates tend to markedly decrease in most studies to levels comparable to other approaches. Accuracy of component positioning also favors the anterior approach in some studies. This review summarizes the available literature comparing the direct anterior to other approaches for total hip arthroplasty and provides a comprehensive summary of common complications. PMID:26925380

  20. Streptococcus Endophthalmitis Outbreak after Intravitreal Injection of Bevacizumab: One-year Outcomes and Investigative Results

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Roger A.; Flynn, Harry W.; Miller, Darlene; Gonzalez, Serafin; Isom, Ryan F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To report the one-year clinical outcomes of an outbreak of Streptococcus endophthalmitis after intravitreal injection of bevacizumab, including visual acuity outcomes, microbiological testing and compound pharmacy investigations by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Design Retrospective consecutive case series. Participants 12 eyes of 12 patients who developed endophthalmitis after receiving intravitreal bevacizumab prepared by a single compounding pharmacy. Methods Medical records of patients were reviewed; phenotypic and DNA analyses were performed on microbes cultured from patients and from unused syringes. An inspection report by the FDA based on site-visits to the pharmacy that prepared the bevacizumab syringes was summarized. Main Outcome Measures Visual acuity, interventions received, time-to-intervention; microbiological consistency; FDA inspection findings. Results Between July 5 and July 8, 2011, 12 patients developed endophthalmitis after intravitreal bevacizumab from syringes prepared by a single compounding pharmacy. All patients received initial vitreous tap and injection, and eight (67%) subsequently underwent pars plana vitrectomy (PPV). After twelve months follow-up, outcomes have been poor: 7 patients (58%) required evisceration or enucleation, and only one patient regained pre-injection visual acuity. Molecular testing using real time polymerase chain reaction, partial sequencing of the groEL gene, and multilocus sequencing of 7 housekeeping genes confirmed the presence of a common strain of Streptococcus mitis/oralis in vitreous specimens and seven unused syringes prepared by the compounding pharmacy at the same time. An FDA investigation of the compounding pharmacy noted deviations from standard sterile technique, inconsistent documentation, and inadequate testing of equipment required for safe preparation of medications. Conclusions In this outbreak of endophthalmitis, outcomes have been generally poor and PPV did not improve visual results at one year follow-up. Molecular testing confirmed a common strain of Streptococcus mitis/oralis. Contamination appears to have occurred at the compounding pharmacy, where numerous problems in sterile technique were noted by public health investigators. PMID:23453511

  1. Pelvic Floor Disorders Registry: Study Design and Outcome Measures.

    PubMed

    Weber LeBrun, Emily; Adam, Rony A; Barber, Matthew D; Boyles, Sarah Hamilton; Iglesia, Cheryl B; Lukacz, Emily S; Moalli, Pamela; Moen, Michael D; Richter, Holly E; Subak, Leslee L; Sung, Vivian W; Visco, Anthony G; Bradley, Catherine S

    2016-01-01

    Pelvic floor disorders affect up to 24% of adult women in the United States, and many patients with pelvic organ prolapse (POP) choose to undergo surgical repair to improve their quality of life. While a variety of surgical repair approaches and techniques are utilized, including mesh augmentation, there is limited comparative effectiveness and safety outcome data guiding best practice. In conjunction with device manufacturers, federal regulatory organizations, and professional societies, the American Urogynecologic Society developed the Pelvic Floor Disorders Registry (PFDR) designed to improve the quality of POP surgery by facilitating quality improvement and research on POP treatments. The PFDR will serve as a resource for surgeons interested in benchmarking and outcomes data and as a data repository for Food and Drug Administration-mandated POP surgical device studies. Provider-reported clinical data and patient-reported outcomes will be collected prospectively at baseline and for up to 3 years after treatment. All data elements including measures of success, adverse events, and surgeon characteristics were identified and defined within the context of the anticipated multifunctionality of the registry, and with collaboration from multiple stakeholders. The PFDR will provide a platform to collect high-quality, standardized patient-level data from a variety of nonsurgical (pessary) and surgical treatments of POP and other pelvic floor disorders. Data from this registry may be used to evaluate short- and longer-term treatment outcomes, patient-reported outcomes, and complications, as well as to identify factors associated with treatment success and failure with the overall goal of improving the quality of care for women with these conditions. PMID:26825404

  2. Outcomes of a Family Based Pediatric Obesity Program - Preliminary Results

    PubMed Central

    RUEBEL, MEGHAN L.; HEELAN, KATE A.; BARTEE, TODD; FOSTER, NANCY

    2011-01-01

    Children that are classified as obese (body mass index (BMI) > 95th percentile for age and sex, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) have an increased risk for metabolic and cardiovascular complications. Family based programs that focus on physical activity (PA) and healthy eating are recommended for treatment of pediatric obesity. The purpose of the current study is to determine the outcomes of Building Healthy Families (BHF), a family-based pediatric weight loss treatment program composed of nutrition, physical activity and behavioral modification strategies. In addition, mediating variables that are associated with weight loss in children, in order to enhance the retention and success of this program will be identified. Twenty-two obese (>95th percentile BMI) children (age: 9.94 ± 1.58 yrs) volunteered to participate. Children and their parents (20 moms, 20 dads, 68% obese; BMI > 30 kg·m−2) participated in weekly nutrition education, family lifestyle PA, and one-on-one meetings with a behavioral psychologist. Overall, child participants lost an average of 2.3 ± 2.0 kg of body mass in 12 weeks while parents lost 6.4 ± 4.3 kg of their body mass. There was a significant inverse association between percentage of program goals met and weight loss (r = − 0.67, p < 0.05). Decreases in the child participants intake of high fat, high calorie foods significantly predicted weight change (R2=0.98, p<0.05). In conclusion, family based pediatric obesity programs may offer significant benefits and lead to healthier lifestyles for obese children and their parents.

  3. Outcome measures for routine use in dementia services: some practical considerations.

    PubMed Central

    Higginson, I J; Jefferys, P M; Hodgson, C S

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To work with specialist community teams to assess the practicality and acceptability of identified outcome measures for routine use in dementia services. SETTING: Seven specialist dementia services: four multidisciplinary teams, a specialist service for carers, a community psychiatric nurse team, and a day hospital. SUBJECTS: 20 members of staff from the specialist dementia services including psychiatry, community psychiatric nursing, social work, occupational therapy, Admiral nursing, ward management, geriatric nursing. MAIN MEASURE: A questionnaire designed to assess staff views on the use of six outcome measures in routine practice in terms of practicality, relevance, acceptability, and use in improving care. RESULTS: Each of the outcome measures took 15 to 30 minutes to administer. All were rated as easy to use and as relevant to dementia services and to carers. Staff commented that the measures could be useful in routine practice for structured assessment and service evaluation, but highlighted the need for sensitive use of measures with carers. CONCLUSIONS: These measures consider the main domains of functioning for people with dementia and their carers. The measures are suitable for use in routine practice in dementia services and are acceptable to staff and carers. The project underlined the need for management support, staff ownership of measures, and training in using outcome measures. Staff concerns about service evaluation need to be acknowledged. PMID:10173768

  4. Measuring Outcomes for Young Children and Their Families. Outcome Indicators for Everyday Kids, Everyday Lives: A Vision for Pennsylvania's Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trivette, Carol M.; Dunst, Carl J.

    2011-01-01

    This monograph includes the final report for a project funded by the Pennsylvania Developmental Disabilities Council for "Measuring Outcomes for Children" (2008 RFP). The goal of the project was to "develop and demonstrate the effectiveness of an instrument designed to measure life outcomes of children with disabilities being…

  5. Recent results from COMPASS muon scattering measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Capozza, Luigi [Irfu Collaboration: COMPASS Collaboration

    2012-10-23

    A sample of recent results in muon scattering measurements from the COMPASS experiment at CERN will be reviewed. These include high energy processes with longitudinally polarised proton and deuteron targets. High energy polarised measurements provide important constraints for studying the nucleon spin structure and thus permit to test the applicability of the theoretical framework of factorisation theorems and perturbative QCD. Specifically, latest results on longitudinal quark polarisation, quark helicity densities and gluon polarisation will be reviewed.

  6. Health outcomes in diabetics measured with Minnesota Community Measurement quality metrics

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Paul Y; St Sauver, Jennifer L; Finney Rutten, Lila J; Jacobson, Robert M; Jacobson, Debra J; McGree, Michaela E; Ebbert, Jon O

    2015-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to understand the relationship between optimal diabetes control, as defined by Minnesota Community Measurement (MCM), and adverse health outcomes including emergency department (ED) visits, hospitalizations, 30-day rehospitalization, intensive care unit (ICU) stay, and mortality. Patients and methods In 2009, we conducted a retrospective cohort study of empaneled Employee and Community Health patients with diabetes mellitus. We followed patients from 1 September 2009 until 30 June 2011 for hospitalization and until 5 January 2014 for mortality. Optimal control of diabetes mellitus was defined as achieving the following three measures: low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol <100 mg/mL, blood pressure <140/90 mmHg, and hemoglobin A1c <8%. Using the electronic medical record, we assessed hospitalizations, ED visits, ICU stays, 30-day rehospitalizations, and mortality. The chi-square or Wilcoxon rank-sum tests were used to compare those with and without optimal control. We used Cox proportional hazard models to estimate the associations between optimal diabetes mellitus status and each outcome. Results We identified 5,731 empaneled patients with diabetes mellitus; 2,842 (49.6%) were in the optimal control category. After adjustment, we observed that non-optimally controlled patients had higher risks for hospitalization (hazard ratio [HR] 1.11; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00–1.23), ED visits (HR 1.15; 95% CI 1.06–1.25), and mortality (HR 1.29; 95% CI 1.09–1.53) than diabetic patients with optimal control. No differences were observed in ICU stay or 30-day rehospitalization. Conclusion Diabetic patients without optimal control had higher risks of adverse health outcomes than those with optimal control. Patients with optimal control defined by the MCM were associated with decreased morbidity and mortality. PMID:25565873

  7. Patient-reported outcome measures for hip preservation surgery—a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Ramisetty, N.; Kwon, Y.; Mohtadi, N.

    2015-01-01

    Hip preservation surgery is rapidly advancing and patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures are becoming an integral part of measuring treatment effectiveness. Traditionally the modified Harris hip score has been used as the main outcome measure. More recently, new PRO tools in the field have been developed. We performed a systematic review of the English literature from MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and SPORTDiscus databases to identify the PRO tools used in hip preservation surgery. Our aim was to critically appraise the quality of the questionnaire properties in order to recommend the most appropriate PRO tool for future use. Measurement properties of each PRO questionnaire were rated from excellent to poor, based on Terwee criteria and the results from the included studies. Six PRO tools were identified with description or comparison of their measurement properties in 10 articles. While, most recently developed PRO tools, the hip outcome score (HOS), the Copenhagen hip and groin outcome score (HAGOS) and the international hip outcome tool (iHOT-33) scored better than the others in their measurement properties, iHOT-33 scored the best of all the PRO tools and is recommended for future use in hip preservation surgery.

  8. How measurement artifacts affect cerebral autoregulation outcomes: A technical note on transfer function analysis.

    PubMed

    Meel-van den Abeelen, Aisha S S; de Jong, Daan L K; Lagro, Joep; Panerai, Ronney B; Claassen, Jurgen A H R

    2016-05-01

    Cerebral autoregulation (CA) is the mechanism that aims to maintain adequate cerebral perfusion during changes in blood pressure (BP). Transfer function analysis (TFA), the most reported method in literature to quantify CA, shows large between-study variability in outcomes. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of measurement artifacts in this variation. Specifically, the role of distortion in the BP and/or CBFV measurementon TFA outcomes was investigated. The influence of three types of artifacts on TFA outcomes was studied: loss of signal, motion artifacts, and baseline drifts. TFA metrics of signals without the simulated artifacts were compared with those of signals with artifacts. TFA outcomes scattered highly when more than 10% of BP signal or over 8% of the CBFV signal was lost, or when measurements contained one or more artifacts resulting from head movement. Furthermore, baseline drift affected interpretation of TFA outcomes when the power in the BP signal was 5 times the power in the LF band. In conclusion, loss of signal in BP and loss in CBFV, affects interpretation of TFA outcomes. Therefore, it is vital to validate signal quality to the defined standards before interpreting TFA outcomes. PMID:26935320

  9. Outcome measures in MMN revisited: further improvement needed.

    PubMed

    Pruppers, Mariëlle H J; Draak, Thomas H P; Vanhoutte, Els K; Van der Pol, W-Ludo; Gorson, Kenneth C; Léger, Jean-Marc; Nobile-Orazio, Eduardo; Lewis, Richard A; van den Berg, Leonard H; Faber, Catharina G; Merkies, Ingemar S J

    2015-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to provide an overview of the outcome measures (OMs) applied in clinical trials in multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and to determine the responsiveness of a core set of selected OMs as part of the peripheral neuropathy outcome measures standardization (PeriNomS) study. The following OMs were serially applied in 26 patients with newly diagnosed or relapsing MMN, receiving intravenous immunoglobulin (assessments: T0/T3/T12 months): 14 muscle pairs MRC (Medical Research Council) scale, the Neuropathy Impairment Scale motor-subset, a self-evaluation scale, grip strength, and MMN-RODS© (Rasch-built overall disability scale). All data, except the grip strength, were subjected to Rasch analyses before determining responsiveness. For grip strength, responsiveness was examined using a combined anchor- (SF-36 question-2) and distribution-based (½ × SD) minimum clinically important difference (MCID) techniques, determining the proportion of patients exceeding both the identified cut-offs. For the remaining scales, the magnitude of change for each patient on each scale was determined using the MCID related to the individual SE (responder definition: MCID-SE ≥ 1.96). Overall, a great assortment of measures has been used in MMN trials with different responsiveness definitions. For the selected OMs, responsiveness was poor and only seen in one fourth to one third of the patients, the grip strength being more responsive. Despite the efforts taken to standardize outcome assessment, further clinimetric responsiveness studies are needed in MMN. PMID:26115442

  10. Mental health costs and outcomes under alternative capitation systems in Colorado: early results.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Joan R.; Hu Tw, Teh-wei; Wallace, Neal; Cuffel, Brian; Hausman, Jackie; Scheffler, Richard

    1998-03-01

    BACKGROUND: This study presents preliminary findings for the first nine months of the State of Colorado USA Medicaid capitation Pilot Project. Two different models of capitation (model I and model II) are compared with fee for service (FFS) in providing services to severely and persistently mentally ill adults. In model I the state's mental health authority contracts with community mental health centers (CMHCs) who both manage the care and deliver mental health services, while in model II the state contracted with a joint venture between a for-profit managed care firm who manage the care with either a single CMHC or an alliance of CMHCs who deliver the mental health services. AIMS: Our objective is to examine utilization, cost and outcomes of inpatient and outpatient (including community based) services before and after the implementation of a capitated payment system for Colorado's Medicaid mental health services compared to services that remained under FFS reimbursement. METHODS: The stratified, random sample includes 513 consumers (188 for model I, 179 for model II, and 146 for FFS). Consumer outcomes were collected by trained interviewers and include 17 measures of symptoms, health status, functioning, quality of life and consumer satisfaction. Utilization and cost of services are from the Medicaid claims data and a shadow billing data system (post-capitation) designed by Colorado. The first step of the two-step regression procedure adjusts for the presence of individuals with use or no service use during the specified time while the second step, ordinary least-squares regression, is applied to the sample who utilized services. RESULTS: These preliminary findings indicate consistent reductions in inpatient user costs and probability of outpatient use under capitation. Combining all services, there are consistent reductions in the probability of use in both models: model I had significantly higher initial probability of use for any service. Only model II showed a statistically significant decrease in post-capitation overall user costs, but they were initially higher than model I or FFS. Estimated total cost per person for model I suggests virtually no change from the pre- to post-capitation period. Model II had the highest pre-capitation and the lowest post-capitation estimated cost per person. Examination of pre measures of outcomes across capitated areas suggest that samples drawn from the FFS, model I and model II areas were comparable in severity of psychiatric symptoms, functioning, health status and quality of life. No changes were found in outcomes. DISCUSSION: These early findings are consistent with the limited literature on capitation. Both studies of capitation integrated with medical care and those specific to mental health settings did not find adverse changes in outcomes compared to FFS. Limitations include the short follow-up period, lack of detail and possible under-reporting of outpatient services provided by the shadow billing data system. CONCLUSIONS: For the short term, it is concluded that capitation can reduce service cost per person without significant change in clinical status. IMPLICATIONS FOR HEALTH CARE PROVISION AND USE: Implications are unclear until we can determine whether (i) reductions in the numbers receiving service indicates favorable consumer outcomes or reductions in access and (ii) lack of change in consumer outcomes is due to the benefits of capitation or the lack of sensitivity of the outcome measures. IMPLICATIONS FOR HEALTH CARE POLICY FORMULATION: Implications are premature for these early findings. IMPLICATIONS FOR FUTURE RESEARCH: Future research should include longer follow-up as well as analysis of long-term consequences for both cost savings and clinical outcomes. PMID:11964486

  11. Learning disability and epilepsy. 1, towards common outcome measures.

    PubMed

    Kerr, M P; Espie, C A

    1997-10-01

    A major component of the population of people who have epilepsy are people with a learning disability. As a group, such individuals often have complex epilepsy which is refractory to treatment. Current available measures to assess the outcomes of therapeutic interventions in epilepsy are based on seizure frequency, seizure severity and quality-of-life measures, but have not been validated in people with a learning disability. Thus, we do not know if such measures of outcome serve the needs of this group. This review examines how able we are to assess the efficacy of our interventions to control epilepsy in people with learning disability. It is suggested that a standard data set is necessary as the basis of the assessment of any therapeutic intervention. Central components of this data set would encompass a definition of important characteristics of an individual, a description of their epilepsy and an assessment of the impact of their condition on both their own and their carer's health. The approach to obtaining this information should employ a methodology which can allow for environmental influences. PMID:9663796

  12. Patient-reported outcome measures in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    El-Matary, Wael

    2014-01-01

    Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are increasingly used in both research and clinical health settings. With the recent development of United States Food and Drug Administration guidance on PROMs, more attention is being devoted to their role and importance in health care. Several methodological challenges in the development, validation and implementation of PROMs must be resolved to ensure their appropriate utilization and interpretation. The present review discusses recent developments and updates in PROMs, with specific focus on the area of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25390615

  13. Interpreting patient-reported outcome results: US FDA guidance and emerging methods.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Lori D; Coon, Cheryl D; Martin, Susan A; Fehnel, Sheri E; Hays, Ron D

    2011-04-01

    In recent years, the US FDA has become more critical of instruments used to measure patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in clinical trials. To facilitate decisions related to the approval of drugs, labels and promotional claims based on PROs, the FDA created the Study Endpoints and Label Development (SEALD) group. SEALD has developed a PRO guidance related to the use of PRO measures used to support drug approvals and label claims, including recommendations for establishing thresholds for meaningful change at the individual level (i.e., defining a responder). This article examines in detail the FDA-recommended methodology for defining a responder and analyzing responder-based PRO measure results. We also present other responder analysis approaches for consideration in furthering the precision and interpretation of this methodology. PMID:21476818

  14. Measurement properties of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMS) in Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Green, Andrew; Liles, Clive; Rushton, Alison; Kyte, Derek G

    2014-12-01

    This systematic review investigated the measurement properties of disease-specific patient-reported outcome measures used in Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome. Two independent reviewers conducted a systematic search of key databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINHAL+ and the Cochrane Library from inception to August 2013) to identify relevant studies. A third reviewer mediated in the event of disagreement. Methodological quality was evaluated using the validated COSMIN (Consensus-based Standards for the Selection of Health Measurement Instruments) tool. Data synthesis across studies determined the level of evidence for each patient-reported outcome measure. The search strategy returned 2177 citations. Following the eligibility review phase, seven studies, evaluating twelve different patient-reported outcome measures, met inclusion criteria. A 'moderate' level of evidence supported the structural validity of several measures: the Flandry Questionnaire, Anterior Knee Pain Scale, Functional Index Questionnaire, Eng and Pierrynowski Questionnaire and Visual Analogue Scales for 'usual' and 'worst' pain. In addition, there was a 'Limited' level of evidence supporting the test-retest reliability and validity (cross-cultural, hypothesis testing) of the Persian version of the Anterior Knee Pain Scale. Other measurement properties were evaluated with poor methodological quality, and many properties were not evaluated in any of the included papers. Current disease-specific outcome measures for Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome require further investigation. Future studies should evaluate all important measurement properties, utilising an appropriate framework such as COSMIN to guide study design, to facilitate optimal methodological quality. PMID:24997774

  15. Longitudinal evaluation of patient-reported outcomes measurement information systems measures in pediatric chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita; Carle, Adam; Barnett, Kimberly; Goldschneider, Kenneth R; Sherry, David D; Mara, Constance A; Cunningham, Natoshia; Farrell, Jennifer; Tress, Jenna; DeWitt, Esi Morgan

    2016-02-01

    The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) initiative is a comprehensive strategy by the National Institutes of Health to support the development and validation of precise instruments to assess self-reported health domains across healthy and disease-specific populations. Much progress has been made in instrument development, but there remains a gap in the validation of PROMIS measures for pediatric chronic pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the construct validity and responsiveness to change of 7 PROMIS domains for the assessment of children (ages: 8-18) with chronic pain--Pain Interference, Fatigue, Anxiety, Depression, Mobility, Upper Extremity Function, and Peer Relationships. The PROMIS measures were administered at the initial visit and 2 follow-up visits at an outpatient chronic pain clinic (CPC; N = 82) and at an intensive amplified musculoskeletal pain day-treatment program (N = 63). Aim 1 examined construct validity of PROMIS measures by comparing them with corresponding "legacy" measures administered as part of usual care in the CPC sample. Aim 2 examined sensitivity to change in both CPC and amplified musculoskeletal pain samples. Longitudinal growth models showed that PROMIS' Pain Interference, Anxiety, Depression, Mobility, Upper Extremity, and Peer Relationship measures and legacy instruments generally performed similarly with slightly steeper slopes of improvement in legacy measures. All 7 PROMIS domains showed responsiveness to change. Results offered initial support for the validity of PROMIS measures in pediatric chronic pain. Further validation with larger and more diverse pediatric pain samples and additional legacy measures would broaden the scope of use of PROMIS in clinical research. PMID:26447704

  16. A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF FUNCTIONAL AMBULATION OUTCOME MEASURES IN SPINAL CORD INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Tania; Noonan, Vanessa K.; Eng, Janice J.

    2011-01-01

    Study Design systematic review Objectives To systematically review the psychometric properties of outcome measures used to assess ambulation in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). Setting Vancouver, Canada Methods A keyword literature search of original articles that evaluated the psychometric properties of ambulation outcome measures in the SCI population was conducted using multiple databases. Multi-dimensional scales of function were included if specific data were available on ambulation-related sub-scales. Reliability, validity, and responsiveness values were extracted and conclusions drawn about the psychometric quality of each measure. Results Seven outcome measures were identified and were broadly categorized into timed and categorical measures of ambulation. Timed measures included timed walking tests that showed excellent reliability, construct validity, and responsiveness to change. The psychometric properties of the categorical scales were more variable, but those that were developed specifically for the SCI population had excellent reliability and validity. Categorical scales also exhibited some floor or ceiling effects. Conclusion Excellent tools are available for measuring functional ambulation capacity. Further work is required to develop and evaluate outcome measures to include environmental factors that contribute to the ability to achieve safe, functional ambulation in everyday settings. Sponsorship Rick Hansen Man-in-Motion Foundation and Ontario Neurotrauma Fund. PMID:17923844

  17. Japanese haemodialysis anaemia management practices and outcomes (1999–2006): results from the DOPPS

    PubMed Central

    Akizawa, Tadao; Pisoni, Ronald L.; Akiba, Takashi; Saito, Akira; Fukuhara, Shunichi; Asano, Yasushi; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Port, Friedrich K.; Kurokawa, Kiyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Background. Japanese haemodialysis (HD) patients not only have a very low mortality and hospitalization risk but also low haemoglobin (Hb) levels. Internationally, anaemia is associated with mortality, hospitalization and health-related quality of life (QoL) measures of HD patients. Methods. Longitudinal data collected from 1999 to 2006 from 60 to 64 representative Japanese dialysis units participating in the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS) were used to describe anaemia management practices and outcomes for Japanese HD patients. Results. From 1999 to 2006, patient mean Hb increased from 9.7 g/dl to 10.4 g/dl, and the percentage of facilities with median Hb ≥10 g/dl increased from 27% to 75%. Hb was measured in the supine position for 90% of patients, resulting in substantially lower reported Hb values than those seen in other countries. As of 2006, erythropoietin (Epo) was prescribed to 83% of HD patients; mean Epo dose was 5231 units/week; intravenous (IV) iron use was 33% and median IV iron dose was 160 mg/month. Many patient- and facility-level factors were significantly related to higher Hb. A consistent overall pattern of lower mortality risk with higher baseline Hb levels was seen (RR = 0.89 per 1 g/dl higher Hb, P = 0.003). Facilities with median Hb ≥10.4 displayed a lower mortality risk (RR = 0.77, P = 0.03) versus facility median Hb <10.4 g/dl. Lower Hb levels were not significantly related to hospitalization risk, but were associated with lower QoL scores. Conclusions. These results provide detailed information on anaemia management practices in Japan and the relationships of anaemia control with outcomes, with implications of anaemia management worldwide. PMID:18577535

  18. Selecting Rehabilitation Outcome Measures for People with Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Evan T; Potter, Kirsten; Allen, Diane D; Bennett, Susan E; Brandfass, Kathi G; Widener, Gail L; Yorke, Amy M

    2015-01-01

    Despite the well-known benefits of using standardized outcome measures (OMs) in clinical practice, a variety of barriers interfere with their use. In particular, rehabilitation therapists lack sufficient knowledge in selecting appropriate OMs. The challenge is compounded when working with people with multiple sclerosis (MS) owing to heterogeneity of the patient population and symptom variability in individual patients. To help overcome these barriers, the American Physical Therapy Association appointed the Multiple Sclerosis Outcome Measures Task Force to review and make evidence-based recommendations for OM use in clinical practice, education, and research specific to people with MS. Sixty-three OMs were reviewed based on their clinical utility, psychometric properties, and a consensus evaluation of the appropriateness of use for people with MS. We sought to illustrate use of the recommendations for two cases. The first case involves a 43-year-old man with new-onset problems after an exacerbation. The second case pertains to an outpatient clinic interested in assessing the effectiveness of their MS rehabilitation program. For each case, clinicians identified areas that were important to assess and various factors deemed important for OM selection. Criteria were established and used to assist in OM selection. In both cases, the described processes narrowed the selection of OMs and assisted with choosing the most appropriate ones. The recommendations, in addition to the processes described in these two cases, can be used by clinicians in any setting working with patients with MS across the disability spectrum. PMID:26300704

  19. Selecting Rehabilitation Outcome Measures for People with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Kirsten; Allen, Diane D.; Bennett, Susan E.; Brandfass, Kathi G.; Widener, Gail L.; Yorke, Amy M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the well-known benefits of using standardized outcome measures (OMs) in clinical practice, a variety of barriers interfere with their use. In particular, rehabilitation therapists lack sufficient knowledge in selecting appropriate OMs. The challenge is compounded when working with people with multiple sclerosis (MS) owing to heterogeneity of the patient population and symptom variability in individual patients. To help overcome these barriers, the American Physical Therapy Association appointed the Multiple Sclerosis Outcome Measures Task Force to review and make evidence-based recommendations for OM use in clinical practice, education, and research specific to people with MS. Sixty-three OMs were reviewed based on their clinical utility, psychometric properties, and a consensus evaluation of the appropriateness of use for people with MS. We sought to illustrate use of the recommendations for two cases. The first case involves a 43-year-old man with new-onset problems after an exacerbation. The second case pertains to an outpatient clinic interested in assessing the effectiveness of their MS rehabilitation program. For each case, clinicians identified areas that were important to assess and various factors deemed important for OM selection. Criteria were established and used to assist in OM selection. In both cases, the described processes narrowed the selection of OMs and assisted with choosing the most appropriate ones. The recommendations, in addition to the processes described in these two cases, can be used by clinicians in any setting working with patients with MS across the disability spectrum. PMID:26300704

  20. Measuring the Outcome of Biomedical Research: A Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Thonon, Frédérique; Boulkedid, Rym; Delory, Tristan; Rousseau, Sophie; Saghatchian, Mahasti; van Harten, Wim; O’Neill, Claire; Alberti, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    Background There is an increasing need to evaluate the production and impact of medical research produced by institutions. Many indicators exist, yet we do not have enough information about their relevance. The objective of this systematic review was (1) to identify all the indicators that could be used to measure the output and outcome of medical research carried out in institutions and (2) enlist their methodology, use, positive and negative points. Methodology We have searched 3 databases (Pubmed, Scopus, Web of Science) using the following keywords: [Research outcome* OR research output* OR bibliometric* OR scientometric* OR scientific production] AND [indicator* OR index* OR evaluation OR metrics]. We included articles presenting, discussing or evaluating indicators measuring the scientific production of an institution. The search was conducted by two independent authors using a standardised data extraction form. For each indicator we extracted its definition, calculation, its rationale and its positive and negative points. In order to reduce bias, data extraction and analysis was performed by two independent authors. Findings We included 76 articles. A total of 57 indicators were identified. We have classified those indicators into 6 categories: 9 indicators of research activity, 24 indicators of scientific production and impact, 5 indicators of collaboration, 7 indicators of industrial production, 4 indicators of dissemination, 8 indicators of health service impact. The most widely discussed and described is the h-index with 31 articles discussing it. Discussion The majority of indicators found are bibliometric indicators of scientific production and impact. Several indicators have been developed to improve the h-index. This indicator has also inspired the creation of two indicators to measure industrial production and collaboration. Several articles propose indicators measuring research impact without detailing a methodology for calculating them. Many bibliometric indicators identified have been created but have not been used or further discussed. PMID:25837969

  1. Current practices for measuring mental health outcomes in the USA: International overview of routine outcome measures in mental health.

    PubMed

    Essock, Susan M; Olfson, Mark; Hogan, Michael F

    2015-08-01

    The prevalence and impact of mental health conditions calls for measuring the adequacy of care, but progress in measuring mental health outcomes in the USA has been uneven, with some important domains (such as employment and other measures of everyday functioning) rarely captured. Bright spots include progress in adopting uniform measures of the quality of inpatient mental healthcare and early progress in measuring adequacy of medication and psychotherapy treatment. To some extent, progress in measurement has been limited by separate governing structures and payment rules in mental health and overall health settings. This is becoming a critical problem as awareness of the scope and impact of mental health co-morbidities emerges at the same time as pressures for healthcare cost controls intensify. A search for better measures may be accelerated as problems linked to co-morbid mental health problems (e.g. readmission to hospitals) come into sharper focus due to changes in healthcare financing related to the US Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, 2010. PMID:25800077

  2. Entanglement-assisted guessing of complementary measurement outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berta, Mario; Coles, Patrick J.; Wehner, Stephanie

    2014-12-01

    Heisenberg's uncertainty principle implies that if one party (Alice) prepares a system and randomly measures one of two incompatible observables, then another party (Bob) cannot perfectly predict the measurement outcomes. This implication assumes that Bob does not possess an additional system that is entangled to the measured one; indeed, the seminal paper of Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen (EPR) showed that maximal entanglement allows Bob to perfectly win this guessing game. Although not in contradiction, the observations made by EPR and Heisenberg illustrate two extreme cases of the interplay between entanglement and uncertainty. On the one hand, no entanglement means that Bob's predictions must display some uncertainty. Yet on the other hand, maximal entanglement means that there is no more uncertainty at all. Here we follow an operational approach and give an exact relation—an equality—between the amount of uncertainty as measured by the guessing probability and the amount of entanglement as measured by the recoverable entanglement fidelity. From this equality, we deduce a simple criterion for witnessing bipartite entanglement and an entanglement monogamy equality.

  3. Demystifying Results-Based Performance Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorjani, Hamid

    Many evaluators are convinced that Results-based Performance Measurement (RBPM) is an effective tool to improve service delivery and cost effectiveness in both public and private sectors. Successful RBPM requires self-directed and cross-functional work teams and the supporting infrastructure to make it work. There are many misconceptions and…

  4. The King's Outcome Scale for Childhood Head Injury and Injury Severity and Outcome Measures in Children with Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvert, Sophie; Miller, Helen E.; Curran, Andrew; Hameed, Biju; McCarter, Renee; Edwards, Richard J.; Hunt, Linda; Sharples, Peta Mary

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to relate discharge King's Outcome Scale for Childhood Head Injury (KOSCHI) category to injury severity and detailed outcome measures obtained in the first year post-traumatic brain injury (TBI). We used a prospective cohort study. Eighty-one children with TBI were studied: 29 had severe, 15 moderate, and 37 mild TBI. The…

  5. Development of the FOCUS (Focus on the Outcomes of Communication under Six), a Communication Outcome Measure for Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas-Stonell, Nancy L.; Oddson, Bruce; Robertson, Bernadette; Rosenbaum, Peter L.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Our aim was to develop an outcome measure, called Focus on the Outcomes of Communication Under Six (FOCUS), that captures real-world changes in preschool children's communication. Conceptually grounded in the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health framework, the FOCUS items were derived

  6. Development of the FOCUS (Focus on the Outcomes of Communication under Six), a Communication Outcome Measure for Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas-Stonell, Nancy L.; Oddson, Bruce; Robertson, Bernadette; Rosenbaum, Peter L.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Our aim was to develop an outcome measure, called Focus on the Outcomes of Communication Under Six (FOCUS), that captures real-world changes in preschool children's communication. Conceptually grounded in the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health framework, the FOCUS items were derived…

  7. Vision and vision-related outcome measures in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Balcer, Laura J.; Miller, David H.; Reingold, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Visual impairment is a key manifestation of multiple sclerosis. Acute optic neuritis is a common, often presenting manifestation, but visual deficits and structural loss of retinal axonal and neuronal integrity can occur even without a history of optic neuritis. Interest in vision in multiple sclerosis is growing, partially in response to the development of sensitive visual function tests, structural markers such as optical coherence tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, and quality of life measures that give clinical meaning to the structure-function correlations that are unique to the afferent visual pathway. Abnormal eye movements also are common in multiple sclerosis, but quantitative assessment methods that can be applied in practice and clinical trials are not readily available. We summarize here a comprehensive literature search and the discussion at a recent international meeting of investigators involved in the development and study of visual outcomes in multiple sclerosis, which had, as its overriding goals, to review the state of the field and identify areas for future research. We review data and principles to help us understand the importance of vision as a model for outcomes assessment in clinical practice and therapeutic trials in multiple sclerosis. PMID:25433914

  8. Vision and vision-related outcome measures in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Balcer, Laura J; Miller, David H; Reingold, Stephen C; Cohen, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Visual impairment is a key manifestation of multiple sclerosis. Acute optic neuritis is a common, often presenting manifestation, but visual deficits and structural loss of retinal axonal and neuronal integrity can occur even without a history of optic neuritis. Interest in vision in multiple sclerosis is growing, partially in response to the development of sensitive visual function tests, structural markers such as optical coherence tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, and quality of life measures that give clinical meaning to the structure-function correlations that are unique to the afferent visual pathway. Abnormal eye movements also are common in multiple sclerosis, but quantitative assessment methods that can be applied in practice and clinical trials are not readily available. We summarize here a comprehensive literature search and the discussion at a recent international meeting of investigators involved in the development and study of visual outcomes in multiple sclerosis, which had, as its overriding goals, to review the state of the field and identify areas for future research. We review data and principles to help us understand the importance of vision as a model for outcomes assessment in clinical practice and therapeutic trials in multiple sclerosis. PMID:25433914

  9. Using Cross-Cultural Dimensions Exercises to Improve and Measure Learning Outcomes in International Business Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zainuba, Mohamed; Rahal, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    This article proposes an approach for using cross-cultural dimensions exercises to improve and measure learning outcomes in international business courses. The following key issues are highlighted: (a) what are the targeted learning outcomes to be assessed, (b) how to measure the accomplishment of these learning outcomes, (c) the input measures

  10. Recent results from tokamak divertor plasma measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, S.L.

    1996-05-01

    New diagnostics have been developed to address key divertor physics questions, including: target plate heat flux reduction by radiation, basic edge transport issues, and plasma wall interactions (PWI) such as erosion. A system of diagnostics measures the target plate heat flux (imaging IR thermography) and particle flux (probes, pressure and Penning gauges, and visible emission arrays). Recently, T{sub e},n{sub e}, and P{sub e} (electron pressure) have been measured in 2-D with divertor Thomson Scattering. During radiative divertor operation T{sub e} is less than 2 eV, indicating that new atomic processes are important. Langmuir probes measure higher T{sub e} in some cases. In addition, the measured P{sub e} near the separatrix at the target plate is lower than the midplane pressure, implying radial momentum transport. Bolometer arrays, inverted with reconstruction algorithms, provide the 2-D core and divertor radiation profiles. Spectroscopic measurements identify the radiating species and provide information on impurity transport; both absolute chordal measurements and tomographic reconstructions of images are used. Either intrinsic carbon or an inert species (e.g., injected Ne) are usually observed, and absolute particle inventories are obtained. Computer codes are both benchmarked with the experimental data and provide important consistency checks. Several techniques are used to measure fundamental plasma transport and fluctuations, including probes and reflectometry. PWI issues are studied with in-situ coupons and insertable samples (DiMES). Representative divertor results from DIII-D with references to results on other tokamaks will be presented.

  11. Neighbourhood social capital: measurement issues and associations with health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mackenbach, J D; Lakerveld, J; van Lenthe, F J; Kawachi, I; McKee, M; Rutter, H; Glonti, K; Compernolle, S; De Bourdeaudhuij, I; Feuillet, T; Oppert, J-M; Nijpels, G; Brug, J

    2016-01-01

    We compared ecometric neighbourhood scores of social capital (contextual variation) to mean neighbourhood scores (individual and contextual variation), using several health-related outcomes (i.e. self-rated health, weight status and obesity-related behaviours). Data were analysed from 5,900 participants in the European SPOTLIGHT survey. Factor analysis of the 13-item social capital scale revealed two social capital constructs: social networks and social cohesion. The associations of ecometric and mean neighbourhood-level scores of these constructs with self-rated health, weight status and obesity-related behaviours were analysed using multilevel regression analyses, adjusted for key covariates. Analyses using ecometric and mean neighbourhood scores, but not mean neighbourhood scores adjusted for individual scores, yielded similar regression coefficients. Higher levels of social network and social cohesion were not only associated with better self-rated health, lower odds of obesity and higher fruit consumption, but also with prolonged sitting and less transport-related physical activity. Only associations with transport-related physical activity and sedentary behaviours were associated with mean neighbourhood scores adjusted for individual scores. As analyses using ecometric scores generated the same results as using mean neighbourhood scores, but different results when using mean neighbourhood scores adjusted for individual scores, this suggests that the theoretical advantage of the ecometric approach (i.e. teasing out individual and contextual variation) may not be achieved in practice. The different operationalisations of social network and social cohesion were associated with several health outcomes, but the constructs that appeared to represent the contextual variation best were only associated with two of the outcomes. PMID:26879117

  12. Systematic review of tools to measure outcomes for young children with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed Central

    McConachie, Helen; Parr, Jeremy R; Glod, Magdalena; Hanratty, Jennifer; Livingstone, Nuala; Oono, Inalegwu P; Robalino, Shannon; Baird, Gillian; Beresford, Bryony; Charman, Tony; Garland, Deborah; Green, Jonathan; Gringras, Paul; Jones, Glenys; Law, James; Le Couteur, Ann S; Macdonald, Geraldine; McColl, Elaine M; Morris, Christopher; Rodgers, Jacqueline; Simonoff, Emily; Terwee, Caroline B; Williams, Katrina

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The needs of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are complex and this is reflected in the number and diversity of outcomes assessed and measurement tools used to collect evidence about children's progress. Relevant outcomes include improvement in core ASD impairments, such as communication, social awareness, sensory sensitivities and repetitiveness; skills such as social functioning and play; participation outcomes such as social inclusion; and parent and family impact. OBJECTIVES To examine the measurement properties of tools used to measure progress and outcomes in children with ASD up to the age of 6 years. To identify outcome areas regarded as important by people with ASD and parents. METHODS The MeASURe (Measurement in Autism Spectrum disorder Under Review) research collaboration included ASD experts and review methodologists. We undertook systematic review of tools used in ASD early intervention and observational studies from 1992 to 2013; systematic review, using the COSMIN checklist (Consensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement Instruments) of papers addressing the measurement properties of identified tools in children with ASD; and synthesis of evidence and gaps. The review design and process was informed throughout by consultation with stakeholders including parents, young people with ASD, clinicians and researchers. RESULTS The conceptual framework developed for the review was drawn from the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, including the domains 'Impairments', 'Activity Level Indicators', 'Participation', and 'Family Measures'. In review 1, 10,154 papers were sifted - 3091 by full text - and data extracted from 184; in total, 131 tools were identified, excluding observational coding, study-specific measures and those not in English. In review 2, 2665 papers were sifted and data concerning measurement properties of 57 (43%) tools were extracted from 128 papers. Evidence for the measurement properties of the reviewed tools was combined with information about their accessibility and presentation. Twelve tools were identified as having the strongest supporting evidence, the majority measuring autism characteristics and problem behaviour. The patchy evidence and limited scope of outcomes measured mean these tools do not constitute a 'recommended battery' for use. In particular, there is little evidence that the identified tools would be good at detecting change in intervention studies. The obvious gaps in available outcome measurement include well-being and participation outcomes for children, and family quality-of-life outcomes, domains particularly valued by our informants (young people with ASD and parents). CONCLUSIONS This is the first systematic review of the quality and appropriateness of tools designed to monitor progress and outcomes of young children with ASD. Although it was not possible to recommend fully robust tools at this stage, the review consolidates what is known about the field and will act as a benchmark for future developments. With input from parents and other stakeholders, recommendations are made about priority targets for research. FUTURE WORK Priorities include development of a tool to measure child quality of life in ASD, and validation of a potential primary outcome tool for trials of early social communication intervention. STUDY REGISTRATION This study is registered as PROSPERO CRD42012002223. FUNDING The National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment programme. PMID:26065374

  13. Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemsky, Robert; Shaman, Susan; Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Collegiate Results Instrument (CRI), which measures a range of collegiate outcomes for alumni 6 years after graduation. The CRI was designed to target alumni from institutions across market segments and assess their values, abilities, work skills, occupations, and pursuit of lifelong learning. (EV)

  14. Implementation of Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in U.S. Total Joint Replacement Registries: Rationale, Status, and Plans

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Patricia D.; Lewallen, David; Bozic, Kevin; Hallstrom, Brian; Jiranek, William; Ayers, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In the U.S. and abroad, the use of patient-reported outcome measures to evaluate the impact of total joint replacement surgery on patient quality of life is increasingly common. Analyses of patient-reported outcomes have documented substantial pain relief and functional gain among the vast majority of patients managed with total joint replacement. In addition, postoperative patient-reported outcomes are useful to identify persistent pain and suboptimal outcomes in the minority of patients who have them. The leaders of five U.S. total joint replacement registries report the rationale, current status, and vision for the use of patient-reported outcome measures in U.S. total joint replacement registries. Methods: Surgeon leaders of the Function and Outcomes Research for Comparative Effectiveness in Total Joint Replacement registry, American Joint Replacement Registry, California Joint Replacement Registry, Michigan Arthroplasty Registry Collaborative Quality Initiative, and Virginia Joint Registry report the rationale supporting the adoption of patient-reported outcome measures, factors associated with the selection and successful implementation of patient-reported outcome measures, and barriers to complete and valid data. Results: U.S. registries are at varied stages of implementation of preoperative surveys and postoperative total joint replacement outcome measures. Surgeon leaders report unified rationales for adopting patient-reported outcome measures: to capture data on pain relief and functional gain following total joint replacement as well as to identify suboptimal implant performance. Key considerations in the selection of a patient-reported outcome measure include its ability to measure both joint pain and physical function while limiting any burden on patients and surgeons related to its use. Complete patient-reported outcomes data will be associated with varied modes of survey completion, including options for home-based completion, to ensure consistent timing and data capture. Conclusions: The current stage of implementation of patient-reported outcome measures varies widely among U.S. registries. Nonetheless, evidence from the Function and Outcomes Research for Comparative Effectiveness in Total Joint Replacement registry supports the feasibility of successful implementation of patient-reported outcome measures with careful attention to the selection of the outcome measure, mode and timing of postoperative administration, and minimization of any burden on the patient and surgeon. PMID:25520425

  15. Preliminary results of radiation measurements on EURECA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    The eleven-month duration of the EURECA mission allows long-term radiation effects to be studied similarly to those of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Basic data can be generated for projections to crew doses and electronic and computer reliability on spacecraft missions. A radiation experiment has been designed for EURECA which uses passive integrating detectors to measure average radiation levels. The components include a Trackoscope, which employs fourteen plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) stacks to measure the angular dependence of high LET (greater than or equal to 6 keV/micro m) radiation. Also included are TLD's for total absorbed doses, thermal/resonance neutron detectors (TRND's) for low energy neutron fluences and a thick PNTD stack for depth dependence measurements. LET spectra are derived from the PNTD measurements. Preliminary TLD results from seven levels within the detector array show that integrated does inside the flight canister varied from 18.8 +/- 0.6 cGy to 38.9 +/- 1.2 cGy. The TLD's oriented toward the least shielded direction averaged 53% higher in dose than those oriented away from the least shielded direction (minimum shielding toward the least shielded direction varied from 1.13 to 7.9 g/cm(exp 2), Al equivalent). The maximum dose rate on EURECA (1.16 mGy/day) was 37% of the maximum measured on LDEF and dose rates at all depths were less than measured on LDEF. The shielding external to the flight canister covered a greater solid angle about the canister than the LDEF experiments.

  16. Systematic review of outcome measures in trials of pediatric anaphylaxis treatment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Considerable heterogeneity has been observed in the selection and reporting of disease-specific pediatric outcome measures in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). This makes interpretation of results and comparison across trials challenging. Outcome measures in pediatric anaphylaxis trials have never previously been systematically assessed. This systematic review (SR) identified and assessed outcome measures used in RCTs of anaphylaxis treatment in children. As a secondary objective, this SR assessed the evidence for current treatment modalities for anaphylaxis in the pediatric population. Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and CINAHL from 2001 until December 2012. We also searched websites listing ongoing trials. We included randomized and controlled trials of anaphylaxis treatment in patients 0–18 years of age. Two authors independently assessed articles for inclusion. Results No published studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Conclusions There is an alarming absence of RCTs evaluating the treatments for anaphylaxis in children. High quality studies are needed and are possible to design, despite the severe and acute nature of this condition. Consensus about the selection and validation of appropriate outcome measures will enhance the quality of research and improve the care of children with anaphylaxis. Trial registration CRD42012002685 PMID:24950840

  17. Objective Measurement of Cosmetic Outcomes of Breast Conserving Therapy Using BCCT.core

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tosol; Eom, Keun-Yong; Jang, Na Young; Kim, Kyung Su; Koo, Tae Ryool; Kwon, Jeanny; Kim, Byoung Hyuck; Kang, Eunyoung; Kim, Sung-Won; Kim, Jae-Sung; Kim, In Ah

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to evaluate objective cosmetic outcomes and factors related to breast-conserving therapy (BCT) using the BCCT.core software. Materials and Methods Fifty-one patients who received BCT with informed consent were evaluated using the BCCT.core software. Patients were divided into two groups based on the BCCT score: excellent or good (n=42) vs. fair or poor (n=9). Analysis of clinical factors was performed to determine factors affecting cosmetic outcomes. Results The objective cosmetic outcome of BCT measured using the BCCT.core software was excellent in 10% of patients, good in 72%, and fair in 18%. None of the patients were classified as poor outcome. Tumor characteristics, systemic adjuvant therapy (chemotherapy and hormonal therapy), and radiation dose or energy of electron boost did not show correlation with the score measured by the BCCT.core program (p > 0.05). In univariate analysis, maximum dose within the breast (Dmax), width of tangential field, and excised tumor volume were smaller in patients with excellent or good by the BCCT.core compared to those with fair or poor (Dmax, 110.2±1.5% vs. 111.6±1.7%, p=0.019; width of tangential field, 8.0±1.1 cm vs. 8.6±0.7 cm, p=0.034; excised tumor volume, 64.0±35.8 cm3 vs. 95.3±54.4 cm3, p=0.067). In multivariate analysis, only Dmax was a significant factor for breast cosmetic outcome with a risk ratio of 1.697 (95% confidence interval, 1.006 to 2.863; p=0.047). Conclusion Objective measurement of cosmetic outcome of BCT using the BCCT.core software was feasible. The cosmetic outcome of BCT may be affected by the maximum dose within the breast. PMID:26130667

  18. Developing measures of community-relevant outcomes for violence prevention programs: a community-based participatory research approach to measurement.

    PubMed

    Hausman, Alice J; Baker, Courtney N; Komaroff, Eugene; Thomas, Nicole; Guerra, Terry; Hohl, Bernadette C; Leff, Stephen S

    2013-12-01

    Community-Based Participatory Research is a research paradigm that encourages community participation in designing and implementing evaluation research, though the actual outcome measures usually reflect the "external" academic researchers' view of program effect and the policy-makers' needs for decision-making. This paper describes a replicable process by which existing standardized psychometric scales commonly used in youth-related intervention programs were modified to measure indicators of program success defined by community partners. This study utilizes a secondary analysis of data gathered in the context of a community-based youth violence prevention program. Data were retooled into new measures developed using items from the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire, the Hare Area Specific Self-Esteem Scale, and the Youth Asset Survey. These measures evaluated two community-defined outcome indicators, "More Parental Involvement" and "Showing Kids Love." Results showed that existing scale items can be re-organized to create measures of community-defined outcomes that are psychometrically reliable and valid. Results also show that the community definitions of parent or parenting caregivers exemplified by the two indicators are similar to how these constructs have been defined in previous research, but they are not synonymous. There are nuanced differences that are important and worthy of better understanding, in part through better measurement. PMID:23846829

  19. Aquarius Third Stokes Parameter Measurements: Initial Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Utku, Cuneyt; Vine, David M Le; Abraham, S.; Piepmeier, J.

    2012-01-01

    The Aquarius/SAC-D observatory was launched on June 10, 2011 and the Aquarius instrument has been collecting data continuously since late August. One of the unique features of the L-band radiometers comprising Aquarius is the presence of a polarimetric channel to measure the third Stokes parameter. The purpose is to provide a measure of Faraday rotation, which can be important for remote sensing at L-band, especially in the case of remote sensing of salinity which requires high precision. Initial results are presented here showing a reasonable agreement between retrieved and modeled Faraday rotation and also the "noisy" behavior at land-water boundaries and other mixed scenes predicted by theory.

  20. Scale Model Thruster Acoustic Measurement Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, R. Jeremy; Vargas, Magda B.

    2013-01-01

    Subscale rocket acoustic data is used to predict acoustic environments for full scale rockets. Over the last several years acoustic data has been collected during horizontal tests of solid rocket motors. Space Launch System (SLS) Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) was designed to evaluate the acoustics of the SLS vehicle including the liquid engines and solid rocket boosters. SMAT is comprised of liquid thrusters scalable to the Space Shuttle Main engines (SSME) and Rocket Assisted Take Off (RATO) motors scalable to the 5-segment Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSTMV). Horizontal testing of the liquid thrusters provided an opportunity to collect acoustic data from liquid thrusters to characterize the acoustic environments. Acoustic data was collected during the horizontal firings of a single thruster and a 4-thruster (Quad) configuration. Presentation scope. Discuss the results of the single and 4-thruster acoustic measurements. Compare the measured acoustic levels of the liquid thrusters to the Solid Rocket Test Motor V - Nozzle 2 (SRTMV-N2).

  1. Comparing medical centers treating hip fractures in the elderly: the importance of multi-outcome measurements.

    PubMed

    Mozes, B; Maor, Y; Olmer, L; Shabtai, E

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the merit of multi-outcome measurements on the evaluation of quality of care, comparing different health care providers. We performed a cross-sectional study in 3 medical centers. Three hundred three patients undergoing surgical repair of traumatic femoral neck fracture were included. Trained nurses gathered data by patient and proxy interview and by chart abstraction. Multivariate analysis was performed to obtain an explanatory model for each outcome. Then, the additional contribution of each of the centers to the explanatory power of the model was examined. The outcomes were mortality, functional capacity, post-operative complications, and length of stay. Explanatory variables included were sociodemographic details, comorbidity indices, preoperative functional capacity, depression, and cognition. The results demonstrated that center A was a "good" outlier for mortality rate but, in contrast, was a "bad" outlier for complication rate and length of stay. Center B was a "bad" outlier for functional capacity but a "good" outlier for length of stay. We conclude that outcome studies for quality assurance programs should include all relevant outcomes, as the assumption that one major outcome may be representative for quality of care assessment may be misleading. PMID:10446674

  2. Using Cross-Cultural Dimensions Exercises to Improve and Measure Learning Outcomes in International Business Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zainuba, Mohamed; Rahal, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    This article proposes an approach for using cross-cultural dimensions exercises to improve and measure learning outcomes in international business courses. The following key issues are highlighted: (a) what are the targeted learning outcomes to be assessed, (b) how to measure the accomplishment of these learning outcomes, (c) the input measures…

  3. Nonprofit Organizations and Outcome Measurement: From Tracking Program Activities to Focusing on Frontline Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Lehn M.

    2012-01-01

    Why do we continue to see evidence that nonprofit staff feel like outcome measurement is missing important aspects of their work? Based on an analysis of over 1,000 pages of material in 10 outcome measurement guides and a focused literature review of frontline work in three types of nonprofit organizations, this article shows that existing outcome

  4. Lymph node density in oral cavity cancer: results of the International Consortium for Outcomes Research

    PubMed Central

    Patel, S G; Amit, M; Yen, T C; Liao, C T; Chaturvedi, P; Agarwal, J P; Kowalski, L P; Ebrahimi, A; Clark, J R; Cernea, C R; Brandao, S J; Kreppel, M; Zöller, J; Fliss, D; Fridman, E; Bachar, G; Shpitzer, T; Bolzoni, V A; Patel, P R; Jonnalagadda, S; Robbins, K T; Shah, J P; Gil, Z

    2013-01-01

    Background: Lymph node density (LND) has previously been reported to reliably predict recurrence risk and survival in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). This multicenter international study was designed to validate the concept of LND in OSCC. Methods: The study included 4254 patients diagnosed as having OSCC. The median follow-up was 41 months. Five-year overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), disease-free survival (DFS), locoregional control and distant metastasis rates were calculated using the Kaplan–Meier method. Lymph node density (number of positive lymph nodes/total number of excised lymph nodes) was subjected to multivariate analysis. Results: The OS was 49% for patients with LND⩽0.07 compared with 35% for patients with LND>0.07 (P<0.001). Similarly, the DSS was 60% for patients with LND⩽0.07 compared with 41% for those with LND>0.07 (P<0.001). Lymph node density reliably stratified patients according to their risk of failure within the individual N subgroups (P=0.03). A modified TNM staging system based on LND ratio was consistently superior to the traditional system in estimating survival measures. Conclusion: This multi-institutional study validates the reliability and applicability of LND as a predictor of outcomes in OSCC. Lymph node density can potentially assist in identifying patients with poor outcomes and therefore for whom more aggressive adjuvant treatment is needed. PMID:24064974

  5. Validation of GAITRite and PROMIS as High-Throughput Physical Function Outcome Measures Following ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Papuga, M. Owen; Beck, Christopher A.; Kates, Stephen L.; Schwarz, Edward M.; Maloney, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    New healthcare demands for quality measures of elective procedures, such as anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructive surgery, warrant the establishment of high through-put outcomes for high volume clinics. To this end we evaluated the PROMIS and GAITRite as physical function outcome measures to quantify early healing and post-operative complications in 106 patients at pre-op and 3, 10, 20 and 52 weeks post-ACL reconstruction with bone-tendon-bone autograft, and compared the results to the current IKDC validated outcome measure. The results showed that both PROMIS and GAITRite were significantly quicker to administer versus IKDC (p < 0.0001). Additional advantages were that PROMIS and GAITRite detected a significant decrease in physical function at 3 weeks post-op, and a significant improvement at 10 weeks post-op, versus pre-op (p<0.001), which were not detected with IKDC. GAITRite was limited by a low ceiling that could not detect improvement of physical function beyond 20 weeks, while both PROMIS and IKDC detected significant improvement out to 52 weeks postop (p<0.001). Linear regressions demonstrated a significant relationship between IKDC and PROMIS, with a combined correlation value of 0.8954 (p<.001) for all time points. Finally, ROC curve analysis demonstrated that PROMIS is a diagnostic test for poor outcomes. PMID:24532421

  6. Relationships Between Emerging Measures of Heart Failure Processes of Care and Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Adrian F.; Hammill, Bradley G.; Peterson, Eric D.; Yancy, Clyde W.; Schulman, Kevin A.; Curtis, Lesley H.; Fonarow, Gregg C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies have not confirmed associations between some current performance measures for inpatient heart failure processes of care and postdischarge outcomes. It is unknown if alternative measures are associated with outcomes. Methods Using data for 20,441 Medicare beneficiaries in the Organized Program to Initiate Lifesaving Treatment in Hospitalized Patients with Heart Failure (OPTIMIZE-HF) from March 2003 through December 2004, which we linked to Medicare claims data, we examined associations between hospital-level processes of care and patient outcomes. Performance measures included any beta-blocker for patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD); evidence-based beta-blocker for patients with LVSD; warfarin for patients with atrial fibrillation; aldosterone antagonist for patients with LVSD; implantable cardioverter-defibrillator for patients with ejection fraction ≤ 35%; and referral to disease management. Outcome measures were unadjusted and adjusted associations of each process measure with 60-day and 1-year mortality and cardiovascular readmission at the hospital-level. Results Adjusted hazard ratios for 1-year mortality with a 10% increase in hospital-level adherence were 0.94 for any beta-blocker (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.90–0.98; P = .004), 0.95 for evidence-based beta-blocker (95% CI, 0.92–0.98; P = .004); 0.97 for warfarin (95% CI, 0.92–1.03; P = .33); 0.94 for aldosterone antagonists (95% CI, 0.91–0.98; P = .006); 0.92 for implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (95% CI, 0.87–0.98; P = .007); and 1.01 for referral to disease management (95% CI, 0.99–1.03; P = .21). Conclusions Several evidence-based processes of care are associated with improved outcomes, can discriminate hospital-level quality of care, and could be considered as clinical performance measures. PMID:20211302

  7. Comparison of IKDC and SANE Outcome Measures Following Knee Injury in Active Female Patients

    PubMed Central

    Winterstein, Andrew P.; McGuine, Timothy A.; Carr, Kathleen E.; Hetzel, Scott J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Knee injury among young, active female patients remains a public health issue. Clinicians are called upon to pay greater attention to patient-oriented outcomes to evaluate the impact of these injuries. Little agreement exists on which outcome measures are best, and clinicians cite several barriers to their use. Single Assessment Numerical Evaluation (SANE) may provide meaningful outcome information while lessening the time burden associated with other patient-oriented measures. Hypothesis: The SANE and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores would be strongly correlated in a cohort of young active female patients with knee injuries from preinjury through 1-year follow-up and that a minimal clinically important difference (MCID) could be calculated for the SANE score. Study Design: Observational prospective cohort. Methods: Two hundred sixty-three subjects completed SANE and IKDC at preinjury by recall, time of injury, and 3, 6, and 12 months postinjury. Pearson correlation coefficients were used to assess the association between SANE and IKDC. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to determine differences in SANE and IKDC over time. MCID was calculated for SANE using IKDC MCID as an anchor. Results: Moderate to strong correlations were seen between SANE and IKDC (0.65-0.83). SANE, on average, was 2.7 (95% confidence interval, 1.5-3.9; P < 0.00) units greater than IKDC over all time points. MCID for the SANE was calculated as 7 for a 6-month follow-up and 19 for a 12-month follow-up. Conclusion: SANE scores were moderately to strongly correlated to IKDC scores across all time points. Reported MCID values for the SANE should be utilized to measure meaningful changes over time for young, active female patients with knee injuries. Clinical Relevance: Providing clinicians with patient-oriented outcome measures that can be obtained with little clinician and patient burden may allow for greater acceptance and use of outcome measures in clinical settings. PMID:24427427

  8. A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF OUTCOME TOOLS USED TO MEASURE LOWER LEG CONDITIONS

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Susan; Olszewski, Amanda; Ramsey, Olivia; Schmitz, Michelle; Wyatt, Verrelle

    2013-01-01

    Background Context: A variety of self‐report and physical performance‐based outcome measures are commonly used to assess progress and recovery in the lower leg, ankle, and foot. A requisite attribute of any outcome measure is its ability to detect change in a condition, a construct known as “responsiveness”. There is a lack of consistency in how responsiveness is defined in all outcome measures. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to review the currently used recovery outcome measures for lower leg, ankle and foot conditions in order to determine and report recommended responsiveness values. Methods: A systematic literature search that included electronic searches of PubMed, CINAHL and SportDiscus as well extensive cross‐referencing was performed in January, 2013. Studies were included if each involved: 1) a prospective, longitudinal study of any design; 2) any condition associated with the lower leg, ankle or foot; 3) a measure of responsiveness; and 4) was an acceptable type of outcome measure (eg. self‐report, physical performance, or clinician report). The quality of the included articles was assessed by two independent authors using the responsiveness sub‐component of the Consensus‐based Standards for the selection of health Measurement Instruments (COSMIN). Results: Sixteen different studies met the inclusion criteria for this systematic review. The most commonly used outcome measures were the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure and the Lower Extremity Functional Scale. Responsiveness was calculated in a variety of methods including effect size, standardized response mean, minimal clinically important difference/importance, minimal detectable change, and minimal important change. Conclusion: Based on the findings of this systematic review there is a lack of consistency for reporting responsiveness among recovery measures used in the lower leg, ankle or foot studies. It is possible that the variability of conditions that involve the lower leg, ankle and foot contribute to the discrepancies found in reporting responsiveness values. Further research must be conducted in order to standardize reporting measures for responsiveness. Level of evidence: 2a PMID:24377070

  9. Psychometric properties of carer-reported outcome measures in palliative care: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Michels, Charlotte TJ; Boulton, Mary; Adams, Astrid; Wee, Bee; Peters, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Background: Informal carers face many challenges in caring for patients with palliative care needs. Selecting suitable valid and reliable outcome measures to determine the impact of caring and carers’ outcomes is a common problem. Aim: To identify outcome measures used for informal carers looking after patients with palliative care needs, and to evaluate the measures’ psychometric properties. Design: A systematic review was conducted. The studies identified were evaluated by independent reviewers (C.T.J.M., M.B., M.P.). Data regarding study characteristics and psychometric properties of the measures were extracted and evaluated. Good psychometric properties indicate a high-quality measure. Data sources: The search was conducted, unrestricted to publication year, in the following electronic databases: Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, The Cochrane Library, EMBASE, PubMed, PsycINFO, Social Sciences Citation Index and Sociological Abstracts. Results: Our systematic search revealed 4505 potential relevant studies, of which 112 studies met the inclusion criteria using 38 carer measures for informal carers of patients with palliative care needs. Psychometric properties were reported in only 46% (n = 52) of the studies, in relation to 24 measures. Where psychometric data were reported, the focus was mainly on internal consistency (n = 45, 87%), construct validity (n = 27, 52%) and/or reliability (n = 14, 27%). Of these, 24 measures, only four (17%) had been formally validated in informal carers in palliative care. Conclusion: A broad range of outcome measures have been used for informal carers of patients with palliative care needs. Little formal psychometric testing has been undertaken. Furthermore, development and refinement of measures in this field is required. PMID:26407683

  10. Measuring Outcomes in Adult Weight Loss Studies That Include Diet and Physical Activity: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Millstein, Rachel A.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Measuring success of obesity interventions is critical. Several methods measure weight loss outcomes but there is no consensus on best practices. This systematic review evaluates relevant outcomes (weight loss, BMI, % body fat, and fat mass) to determine which might be the best indicator(s) of success. Methods. Eligible articles described adult weight loss interventions that included diet and physical activity and a measure of weight or BMI change and body composition change. Results. 28 full-text articles met inclusion criteria. Subjects, settings, intervention lengths, and intensities varied. All studies measured body weight (−2.9 to −17.3 kg), 9 studies measured BMI (−1.1 to −5.1 kg/m2), 20 studies measured % body fat (−0.7 to −10.2%), and 22 studies measured fat mass (−0.9 to −14.9 kg). All studies found agreement between weight or BMI and body fat mass or body fat % decreases, though there were discrepancies in degree of significance between measures. Conclusions. Nearly all weight or BMI and body composition measures agreed. Since body fat is the most metabolically harmful tissue type, it may be a more meaningful measure of health change. Future studies should consider primarily measuring % body fat, rather than or in addition to weight or BMI. PMID:25525513

  11. Relationships Between Patient-Reported Outcome Measures and Clinical Measures in Outpatients With Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Kathryn E.; Lin, Li; Ellis, Stephen J.; Russell, Stuart D.; Spertus, John A.; Whellan, David J.; Piña, Ileana L.; Fine, Lawrence J.; Schulman, Kevin A.; Weinfurt, Kevin P.

    2009-01-01

    Background Patient-reported outcomes are increasingly used to assess the efficacy of new treatments. Understanding relationships between these and clinical measures can facilitate their interpretation. We examined associations between patient-reported measures of health-related quality of life and clinical indicators of disease severity in a large, heterogeneous sample of patients with heart failure. Methods Patient-reported measures, including the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ) and the EuroQol Visual Analog Scale (VAS), and clinical measures, including peak VO2, 6-minute walk distance, and New York Heart Association (NYHA) class, were assessed at baseline in 2331 patients with heart failure. We used general linear models to regress patient-reported measures on each clinical measure. Final models adjusted for significant sociodemographic variables and 2-way interactions. Results The KCCQ was correlated with peak VO2 (r = .21) and 6-minute walk distance (r = .27). The VAS was correlated with peak VO2 (r = .09) and 6-minute walk distance (r = .11). Using the KCCQ as the response variable, a 1 SD difference in peak VO2 (4.7 mL/kg/min) was associated with a 2.86-point difference in the VAS (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.98-3.74) and a 4.75-point difference in the KCCQ (95% CI, 3.78-5.72). A 1 SD difference in 6-minute walk distance (105 m) was associated with a 2.78-point difference in the VAS (95% CI, 1.92-3.64) and a 5.92-point difference in the KCCQ (95% CI, 4.98-6.87). NYHA class III was associated with an 8.26-point lower VAS (95% CI, 6.59-9.93) and a 12.73-point lower KCCQ (95% CI, 10.92-14.53) than NYHA class II. Conclusions These data may inform deliberations about how to best measure benefits of heart failure interventions, and they generally support the practice of considering a 5-point difference on the KCCQ and a 3-point difference on the VAS to be clinically meaningful. PMID:19782791

  12. SAGE III solar ozone measurements: Initial results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Hsiang-Jui; Cunnold, Derek M.; Trepte, Chip; Thomason, Larry W.; Zawodny, Joseph M.

    2006-01-01

    Results from two retrieval algorithms, o3-aer and o3-mlr , used for SAGE III solar occultation ozone measurements in the stratosphere and upper troposphere are compared. The main differences between these two retrieved (version 3.0) ozone are found at altitudes above 40 km and below 15 km. Compared to correlative measurements, the SAGE II type ozone retrievals (o3-aer) provide better precisions above 40 km and do not induce artificial hemispheric differences in upper stratospheric ozone. The multiple linear regression technique (o3_mlr), however, can yield slightly more accurate ozone (by a few percent) in the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere. By using SAGE III (version 3.0) ozone from both algorithms and in their preferred regions, the agreement between SAGE III and correlative measurements is shown to be approx.5% down to 17 km. Below 17 km SAGE III ozone values are systematically higher, by 10% at 13 km, and a small hemispheric difference (a few percent) appears. Compared to SAGE III and HALOE, SAGE II ozone has the best accuracy in the lowest few kilometers of the stratosphere. Estimated precision in SAGE III ozone is about 5% or better between 20 and 40 km and approx.10% at 50 km. The precision below 20 km is difficult to evaluate because of limited coincidences between SAGE III and sondes. SAGE III ozone values are systematically slightly larger (2-3%) than those from SAGE II but the profile shapes are remarkably similar for altitudes above 15 km. There is no evidence of any relative drift or time dependent differences between these two instruments for altitudes above 15-20 km.

  13. Measuring Networking as an Outcome Variable in Undergraduate Research Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Hanauer, David I.; Hatfull, Graham

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose, present, and validate a simple survey instrument to measure student conversational networking. The tool consists of five items that cover personal and professional social networks, and its basic principle is the self-reporting of degrees of conversation, with a range of specific discussion partners. The networking instrument was validated in three studies. The basic psychometric characteristics of the scales were established by conducting a factor analysis and evaluating internal consistency using Cronbach’s alpha. The second study used a known-groups comparison and involved comparing outcomes for networking scales between two different undergraduate laboratory courses (one involving a specific effort to enhance networking). The final study looked at potential relationships between specific networking items and the established psychosocial variable of project ownership through a series of binary logistic regressions. Overall, the data from the three studies indicate that the networking scales have high internal consistency (α = 0.88), consist of a unitary dimension, can significantly differentiate between research experiences with low and high networking designs, and are related to project ownership scales. The ramifications of the networking instrument for student retention, the enhancement of public scientific literacy, and the differentiation of laboratory courses are discussed. PMID:26538387

  14. Routine outcome measurement in the Netherlands - A focus on benchmarking.

    PubMed

    Delespaul, Philippe A E G

    2015-08-01

    Routine outcome measurement (ROM) is a 'hot' topic in the Netherlands. Over recent years the Netherlands have developed a centralized monitoring system for all reimbursed mental health interventions, in an attempt to improve the quality of care. The Foundation for Benchmarking Mental Health (SBG) is an independent knowledge centre for mental health providers and insurance companies. It was founded to organize and manage the countrywide ROM initiative. A Dutch countrywide ROM initiative is appealing, and the procedures in the Netherlands are described. However, the national ROM system was oversold. Arguments are discussed. It would have been a far better strategy if insurance companies and authorities had not focused on a national system but stimulated local data collection and requested a managerial plan-do-check-act (PDCA) cycle to stimulate service improvements from year to year. Within the same service, chances are higher that the same kind of clientele is served from year to year and therefore it will be easier to interpret the data. The ROM should regain its clinical focus. Mobile ROM systems using smartphones that collect sampled experiences could be an interesting future solution. PMID:26107997

  15. A view from health services research and outcomes measurement.

    PubMed

    Sales, Anne E

    2007-01-01

    Depicted in this presentation is the relationship of the aims of the original articles in this issue--using theory in a substantive way; introducing a strong focus on the organization as a contributor to patient, provider, and system outcomes; accounting for organizational level; and moving the field toward a view of research utilization as an intermediate, not terminal, outcome--to outcomes research in health services generally and in nursing health services research more specifically. The insights and innovations described in this set of articles contribute significantly to the literature on research use in healthcare, specifically including the need to account more fully for organizational structure and hierarchy than has been the case to date in health services outcomes research, as well as a strong intimation that research use is not only an important intervening variable in the causal chain producing outcomes at the patient, provider, and system levels but also a latent or unobservable variable. PMID:17625476

  16. Optimal functional outcome measures for assessing treatment for Dupuytren’s disease: a systematic review and recommendations for future practice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dupuytren's disease of the hand is a common condition affecting the palmar fascia, resulting in progressive flexion deformities of the digits and hence limitation of hand function. The optimal treatment remains unclear as outcomes studies have used a variety of measures for assessment. Methods A literature search was performed for all publications describing surgical treatment, percutaneous needle aponeurotomy or collagenase injection for primary or recurrent Dupuytren’s disease where outcomes had been monitored using functional measures. Results Ninety-one studies met the inclusion criteria. Twenty-two studies reported outcomes using patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) ranging from validated questionnaires to self-reported measures for return to work and self-rated disability. The Disability of Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) score was the most utilised patient-reported function measure (n=11). Patient satisfaction was reported by eighteen studies but no single method was used consistently. Range of movement was the most frequent physical measure and was reported in all 91 studies. However, the methods of measurement and reporting varied, with seventeen different techniques being used. Other physical measures included grip and pinch strength and sensibility, again with variations in measurement protocols. The mean follow-up time ranged from 2 weeks to 17 years. Conclusions There is little consistency in the reporting of outcomes for interventions in patients with Dupuytren’s disease, making it impossible to compare the efficacy of different treatment modalities. Although there are limitations to the existing generic patient reported outcomes measures, a combination of these together with a disease-specific questionnaire, and physical measures of active and passive individual joint Range of movement (ROM), grip and sensibility using standardised protocols should be used for future outcomes studies. As Dupuytren’s disease tends to recur following treatment as well as extend to involve other areas of the hand, follow-up times should be standardised and designed to capture both short and long term outcomes. PMID:23575442

  17. Inadequate Performance Measures Affecting Practices, Organizations and Outcomes of Ontario's Family Health Teams

    PubMed Central

    Ashcroft, Rachelle

    2014-01-01

    Background: Emphasis on quantity as the main performance measure may be posing challenges for Family Health Team (FHT) practices and organizational structures. This study asked: What healthcare practices and organizational structures are encouraged by the FHT model? Methods: An exploratory qualitative design guided by discourse analysis was used. This paper presents findings from in-depth semi-structured interviews conducted with seven policy informants and 29 FHT leaders. Results: Participants report that performance measures value quantity and are not inclusive of the broad scope of attributes that comprise primary healthcare. Performance measures do not appear to be accurately capturing the demand for healthcare services, or the actual amount of services being provided by FHTs. Results suggest that unintended consequences of performance measures may be posing challenges to access and health outcomes. Conclusion: It is recommended that performance measures be developed and used to measure, support and encourage FHTs to achieve the goals of PHC. PMID:25410698

  18. Outcome Preferences in Patients With Noninfectious Uveitis: Results of a Best–Worst Scaling Study

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tsung; Holbrook, Janet T.; Thorne, Jennifer E.; Flynn, Terry N.; Van Natta, Mark L.; Puhan, Milo A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To estimate patient preferences regarding potential adverse outcomes of local versus systemic corticosteroid therapies for noninfectious uveitis by using a best–worst scaling (BWS) approach. Methods Local and systemic therapies are alternatives for noninfectious uveitis that have different potential adverse outcomes. Patients participating in the Multicenter Uveitis Steroid Treatment Trial Follow-up Study (MUST FS) and additional patients with a history of noninfectious uveitis treated at two academic medical centers (Johns Hopkins University and University of Pennsylvania) were surveyed about their preferences regarding six adverse outcomes deemed important to patients. Using “case 1” BWS, patients were asked to repeatedly select the most and least worrying from a list of outcomes (in the survey three outcomes per task). Results Eighty-two patients in the MUST FS and 100 patients treated at the academic medical centers completed the survey. According to BWS, patients were more likely to select vision not meeting the requirement for driving (individual BWS score: median = 3, interquartile range, 0–5), development of glaucoma (2, 1–4), and needing eye surgery (1, 0–3) as the most worrying outcomes as compared to needing medicine for high blood pressure/cholesterol (−2, −4 to 0), development of cataracts (−2, −3 to −1), or infection (sinusitis) (−3, −5 to 0). Larger BWS scores indicated the outcomes were more worrying to patients. Conclusions Patients with noninfectious uveitis considered impaired vision, development of glaucoma, and need for eye surgery worrying adverse outcomes, which suggests that it is especially desirable to avoid these outcomes if possible. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00132691.) PMID:26501236

  19. The barriers and facilitators to routine outcome measurement by allied health professionals in practice: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Allied Health Professionals today are required, more than ever before, to demonstrate their impact. However, despite at least 20 years of expectation, many services fail to deliver routine outcome measurement in practice. This systematic review investigates what helps and hinders routine outcome measurement of allied health professionals practice. Methods A systematic review protocol was developed comprising: a defined search strategy for PsycINFO, MEDLINE and CINHAL databases and inclusion criteria and systematic procedures for data extraction and quality appraisal. Studies were included if they were published in English and investigated facilitators and/or barriers to routine outcome measurement by allied health professionals. No restrictions were placed on publication type, design, country, or year of publication. Reference lists of included publications were searched to identify additional papers. Descriptive methods were used to synthesise the findings. Results 960 papers were retrieved; 15 met the inclusion criteria. Professional groups represented were Physiotherapy, Occupational Therapy, and Speech and Language Therapy. The included literature varied in quality and design. Facilitators and barriers to routine outcome measurement exist at individual, managerial and organisational levels. Key factors affecting professionals’ use of routine outcome measurement include: professionals’ level of knowledge and confidence about using outcome measures, and the degree of organisational and peer-support professionals received with a view to promoting their work in practice. Conclusions Whilst the importance of routinely measuring outcomes within the allied health professions is well recognised, it has largely failed to be delivered in practice. Factors that influence clinicians’ ability and desire to undertake routine outcome measurement are bi-directional: they can act as either facilitators or barriers. Routine outcome measurement may only be deliverable if appropriate action is taken at individual therapist, team, and organisational levels of an organisation. PMID:22506982

  20. Does a Depression Intervention Result in Improved Outcomes for Patients Presenting with Physical Symptoms?

    PubMed Central

    Keeley, Robert D; Smith, Jeffrey L; Nuttina, Paul A; Dickinson, Miriam L; Dickinson, Perry W; Rost, Kathryn M

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the effects of exclusively physical presentation of depression on 1) depression management and outcomes under usual care conditions, and 2) the impact of an intervention to improve management and outcomes. DESIGN AND SETTING Secondary analysis of a depression intervention trial in 12 community-based primary care practices. PARTICIPANTS Two hundred adults beginning a new treatment episode for depression. MEASUREMENTS Presenting complaint and physician depression query at index visit; antidepressant use, completion of adequate antidepressant trial, change in depressive symptoms, and physical and emotional role functioning at 6 months. MAIN RESULTS Sixty-six percent of depressed patients presented exclusively with physical symptoms. Under usual care conditions, psychological presenters were more likely than physical presenters to complete an adequate trial of antidepressant treatment but experienced equivalent improvements in depressive severity and role functioning. In patients presenting exclusively with physical symptoms, the intervention significantly improved physician query (40.8% vs 18.0%;P = .06), receipt of any antidepressant (63.0% vs 20.1%; P = .001), and an adequate antidepressant trial (34.9% vs 5.9%; P = .004), but did not significantly improve depression severity or role functioning. In patients presenting with psychological symptoms, the intervention significantly improved receipt of any antidepressant (79.9% vs 38.0%; P = .01) and an adequate anti(40.8% vs 18.0%;P = .06), receipt of any antidepressant and an adequate antidepressant trial (34.9% vs 5.9%; P = .004), and also improved depression severity and emotional role functioning. CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that there is a differential intervention effect by presentation style at the index visit. Thus, current interventions should be targeted at psychological presenters and new approaches should be developed for physical presenters. PMID:15209599

  1. Results and analysis of the GLONASS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suriya, Tatevyan

    2012-07-01

    With the purpose of improving the national geodetic reference frame an establishment of the new Fundamental Astro-Geodetic network (FAGN), based mainly on the combined use of GPS and GLONASS measurements, is now carried out in Russia. From the geodetic point of view, the advantages of combining both systems are numerous, especially in the urban, mountain and near polar areas. More than 30 permanent core sites of this network are provided with the dual GPS/GLONASS receivers. Several core sites of the FAGN network are collocated with the existing IERS stations, equipped with the SLR, VLBI and DORIS instruments. Now the constellation of the GLONASS consists of 24 satellites at three orbital planes, 8 satellites in each. Inclination of the orbit is 64.80, height 19100 km and revolution time 11h 15min. Analysis of the GLONASS data, obtained at the IGS sites, including most of the Russian sites, have been made with the use of GIPSY-OASIS 2 software. Results of estimation of GLONASS orbital parameters and station coordinates were compared with the GPS estimations at the collocated sites. Both solutions are related to the ITRF2005 coordinate system. Differences between solutions are in the limit of a few cm. The means of improvement of the GLONASS solution and adjustment of the GLONASS coordinate system with the ITRF are considered.

  2. The Aphasia Communication Outcome Measure (ACOM): Dimensionality, Item Bank Calibration, and Initial Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hula, William D.; Doyle, Patrick J.; Stone, Clement A.; Hula, Shannon N. Austermann; Kellough, Stacey; Wambaugh, Julie L.; Ross, Katherine B.; Schumacher, James G.; St. Jacque, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the structure and measurement properties of the Aphasia Communication Outcome Measure (ACOM), a patient-reported outcome measure of communicative functioning for persons with aphasia. Method: Three hundred twenty-nine participants with aphasia responded to 177 items asking about communicative…

  3. The Aphasia Communication Outcome Measure (ACOM): Dimensionality, Item Bank Calibration, and Initial Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hula, William D.; Doyle, Patrick J.; Stone, Clement A.; Hula, Shannon N. Austermann; Kellough, Stacey; Wambaugh, Julie L.; Ross, Katherine B.; Schumacher, James G.; St. Jacque, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the structure and measurement properties of the Aphasia Communication Outcome Measure (ACOM), a patient-reported outcome measure of communicative functioning for persons with aphasia. Method: Three hundred twenty-nine participants with aphasia responded to 177 items asking about communicative

  4. Implementing patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) in palliative care - users' cry for help

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Patient-reported outcome measurement (PROM) plays an increasingly important role in palliative care. A variety of measures exists and is used in clinical care, audit and research. However, little is known about professionals' views using these measures. The aim of this study is to describe the use and experiences of palliative care professionals with outcome measures. Methods A web-based online survey was conducted in Europe and Africa. Professionals working in clinical care, audit and research in palliative care were invited to the survey via national palliative care associations and various databases. Invitation e-mails were sent with a link to the questionnaire. Results Overall participation rate 42% (663/1592), overall completion rate 59% (392/663). The majority of respondents were female (63.4%), mean age 46 years (SD 9). 68.1% respondents from Europe and 73.3% from Africa had experiences with outcome measures in palliative care. Non-users reported time constraints, burden, lack of training and guidance as main reasons. In clinical care/audit, assessment of patients' situation, monitoring changes and evaluation of services were main reasons for use. Choice of OMs for research was influenced by validity of the instrument in palliative care and comparability with international literature. Main problems were related to patient characteristics, staff, and outcome measures. Participants expressed the need for more guidance and training in the use of PROMs. Conclusions Professionals need more support for the use and implementation of PROMs in clinical practice and research through training and guidance in order to improve patient care. PMID:21507232

  5. Use of Outcome Measures in Managing Neck Pain: An International Multidisciplinary Survey

    PubMed Central

    MacDermid, Joy C; Walton, David M; Côté, Pierre; Santaguida, P. Lina; Gross, Anita; Carlesso, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the outcome measures practice patterns in the neck pain management of various health disciplines. Methods: A survey of 381 clinicians treating patients with neck pain was conducted. Results: Respondents were more commonly male (54%) and either chiropractors (44%) or physiotherapists (32%). The survey was international (24 countries with Canada having the largest response (44%)). The most common assessment was a single-item pain assessment (numeric or visual analog) used by 75% of respondents. Respondents sometimes or routinely used the Neck Disability Index (49%), the Patient Specific Functional Scale (28%), and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (32%). Work status was recorded in terms of time lost by more than 50% of respondents, but standardized measures of work limitations or functional capacity testing were rarely used. The majority of respondents never used fear of movement, psychological distress, quality of life, participation measures, or global ratings of change (< 10% routinely use). Use of impairment measurers was prevalent, but the type selected was variable. Quantitative sensory testing was used sometimes or routinely by 53% of respondents, whereas 26% never used it. Ratings of segmental joint mobility were commonly used to assess motion (44% routinely use), whereas 66% of respondents never used inclinometry. Neck muscle strength, postural alignment and upper extremity coordination were assessed sometimes or routinely by a majority of respondents (>56%). With the exception of numeric pain ratings and verbal reporting of work status, all outcomes measures were less frequently used by physicians. Years of practice did not affect practice patterns, but reimbursement did affect selection of some outcome measures. Conclusions: Few outcome measures are routinely used to assess patients with neck pain other than a numeric pain rating scale. A comparison of practice patterns to current evidence suggessts overutilization of some measures that have questionable reliability and underutilization of some with better supporting evidence. This practice analysis suggests that there is substantial need to implement more consistent outcome measurement in practice. International consensus and better clinical measurement evidence are needed to support this. PMID:24115972

  6. You've heard about outcome measures, so how do you use them? Integrating clinically relevant outcome measures in orthotic management of stroke.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Christopher; Fatone, Stefania

    2013-02-01

    In today's healthcare environment it is increasingly important to be able to quantify the amount of change associated with a given intervention; this can be accomplished using one or more appropriate outcome measures. However, the selection and integration of outcome measures within clinical practice requires careful consideration. This includes identification of the measure construct which can be assisted by the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health; selection of outcome measures based on need, appropriateness and feasibility; and careful use in regular clinical practice including data collection, analysis and re-assessment of the process. We describe this process, focusing on orthotic management of stroke, in particular the improvement of mobility as a common goal. Clinical relevance The growing emphasis on improved documentation of patient care and outcomes requires that clinicians integrate clinically relevant outcome measures into their practice. We suggest a process to assist clinicians integrate outcome measures into clinical practice with a particular emphasis on the orthotic management of stroke. PMID:22683738

  7. Using theory and evidence to drive measurement of patient, nurse and organizational outcomes of professional nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Jeffs, Lianne; Sidani, Souraya; Rose, Donald; Espin, Sherry; Smith, Orla; Martin, Kirsten; Byer, Charlie; Fu, Kaiyan; Ferris, Ella

    2013-04-01

    An evolving body of literature suggests that the implementation of evidence based clinical and professional guidelines and strategies can improve patient care. However, gaps exist in our understanding of the effect of implementation of guidelines on outcomes, particularly patient outcomes. To address this gap, a measurement framework was developed to assess the impact of an organization-wide implementation of two nursing-centric best-practice guidelines on patient, nurse and organizational level outcomes. From an implementation standpoint, we anticipate that our data will show improvements in the following: (i) patient satisfaction scores and safety outcomes; (ii) nurses ability to value and engage in evidence based practice; and (iii) organizational support for evidence-informed nursing care that results in quality patient outcomes. Our measurement framework and multifaceted methodological approach outlined in this paper might serve as a blueprint for other organizations in their efforts to evaluate the impacts associated with implementation of clinical and professional guidelines and best practices. PMID:23577971

  8. Standards for definitions and use of outcome measures for clinical effectiveness research in perioperative medicine: European Perioperative Clinical Outcome (EPCO) definitions: a statement from the ESA-ESICM joint taskforce on perioperative outcome measures.

    PubMed

    Jammer, Ib; Wickboldt, Nadine; Sander, Michael; Smith, Andrew; Schultz, Marcus J; Pelosi, Paolo; Leva, Brigitte; Rhodes, Andrew; Hoeft, Andreas; Walder, Bernhard; Chew, Michelle S; Pearse, Rupert M

    2015-02-01

    There is a need for large trials that test the clinical effectiveness of interventions in the field of perioperative medicine. Clinical outcome measures used in such trials must be robust, clearly defined and patient-relevant. Our objective was to develop standards for the use of clinical outcome measures to strengthen the methodological quality of perioperative medicine research. A literature search was conducted using PubMed and opinion leaders worldwide were invited to nominate papers that they believed the group should consider. The full texts of relevant articles were reviewed by the taskforce members and then discussed to reach a consensus on the required standards. The report was then circulated to opinion leaders for comment and review. This report describes definitions for 22 individual adverse events with a system of severity grading for each. In addition, four composite outcome measures were identified, which were designed to evaluate postoperative outcomes. The group also agreed on standards for four outcome measures for the evaluation of healthcare resource use and quality of life. Guidance for use of these outcome measures is provided, with particular emphasis on appropriate duration of follow-up. This report provides clearly defined and patient-relevant outcome measures for large clinical trials in perioperative medicine. These outcome measures may also be of use in clinical audit. This report is intended to complement and not replace other related work to improve assessment of clinical outcomes following specific surgical procedures. PMID:25058504

  9. Efficacy Outcome Measures for Procedural Sedation Clinical Trials in Adults: An ACTTION Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mark R; McKeown, Andrew; Dexter, Franklin; Miner, James R; Sessler, Daniel I; Vargo, John; Turk, Dennis C; Dworkin, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    Successful procedural sedation represents a spectrum of patient- and clinician-related goals. The absence of a gold-standard measure of the efficacy of procedural sedation has led to a variety of outcomes being used in clinical trials, with the consequent lack of consistency among measures, making comparisons among trials and meta-analyses challenging. We evaluated which existing measures have undergone psychometric analysis in a procedural sedation setting and whether the validity of any of these measures support their use across the range of procedures for which sedation is indicated. Numerous measures were found to have been used in clinical research on procedural sedation across a wide range of procedures. However, reliability and validity have been evaluated for only a limited number of sedation scales, observer-rated pain/discomfort scales, and satisfaction measures in only a few categories of procedures. Typically, studies only examined 1 or 2 aspects of scale validity. The results are likely unique to the specific clinical settings they were tested in. Certain scales, for example, those requiring motor stimulation, are unsuitable to evaluate sedation for procedures where movement is prohibited (e.g., magnetic resonance imaging scans). Further work is required to evaluate existing measures for procedures for which they were not developed. Depending on the outcomes of these efforts, it might ultimately be necessary to consider measures of sedation efficacy to be procedure specific. PMID:26678470

  10. Volume–outcome relationship in revision hip replacement – Results from a low volume hospital

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Fahim; Shah, Kalpesh; McLean, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Mortality and morbidity are both increased during revision hip surgery. Higher hospital procedure volumes have been associated with lower rates of mortality and/or complications according to some reports – the “practice makes perfect” hypothesis. Aim The aim of the study was to test “practice makes perfect; hypothesis with regards to revision hip surgery at our low volume hospital. Methods This is a retrospective study of all the patients who underwent revision hip arthroplasty under the care of the senior author between February 2002 and January 2006. Data was collected about the 30-day and one-year mortality, post-operative complications like deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), superficial or deep wound infections, dislocations, and the Oxford hip score. Results The rate of revision hip surgery carried out in our hospital was 6.25 per year. There was no 30-day mortality, stroke within 3 months, dislocations within one year, re-admission within one month, one-year mortality and deep infections within one year. The final outcome after revision hip surgery, based on Oxford questionnaire, showed that 72% had an excellent outcome and 8% had poor outcome. Conclusion Volume and outcome relationship may not contribute towards the final outcome when individual surgeons and hospitals are considered. Good general hospital care can greatly affect the health outcome for a particular procedure. Strategies aimed at improving the general hospital care may benefit the patients as much as volume based regionalization. PMID:24396230

  11. When to operate: online patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) can help decide.

    PubMed

    Reeve, William John Edward; Williams, Daniel H

    2016-01-01

    We present a report on use of a web-based electronic patient-reported outcome measures (ePROMs) system to support decision-making for a patient with an osteoarthritic knee. After being placed on a waiting list for knee arthroplasty, the use of preoperative PROMs allowed the patient and surgical team to review ongoing disability, and, as a result, alter the management plan by deferring surgery. Ongoing clinical review and symptom management has been centred on ePROMs and has been tailored to the specific needs of the individual. PROMs data are increasingly becoming a necessary component of outcome measurement in many surgical areas. Often, these data are available to neither patient nor clinician in a way that prospectively allows meaningful management. This case highlights how ePROMs can directly influence patient care in real time. PMID:27090539

  12. Physician empathy: Definition, outcome-relevance and its measurement in patient care and medical education

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Melanie; Scheffer, Christian; Tauschel, Diethard; Lutz, Gabriele; Wirtz, Markus; Edelhäuser, Friedrich

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The present study gives a brief introduction into the definition of physician empathy (PE) and its influence on patients’ health outcomes. Furthermore we present assessment instruments to measure PE from the perspective of the patient and medical student. The latter topic will be explored in detail as we conducted a pilot study on the German versions of two self-assessment instruments of empathy, which are mostly used in medical education research, namely the “Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy, Student Version” (JSPE-S) and the “Interpersonal Reactivity Index” (IRI). Methods: We first present an overview of the current empirical and theoretical literature on the definition and outcome-relevance of PE. Additionally, we conducted basic psychometric analyses of the German versions of the JSPE-S and the IRI. Data for this analyses is based on a cross-sectional pilot-survey in N=44 medical students and N=63 students of other disciplines from the University of Cologne. Results: PE includes the understanding of the patient as well as verbal and non-verbal communication, which should result in a helpful therapeutic action of the physician. Patients’ health outcomes in different healthcare settings can be improved considerably from a high quality empathic encounter with their clinician. Basic psychometric results of the German JSPE-S and IRI measures show first promising results. Conclusion: PE as an essential and outcome-relevant element in the patient-physician relationship requires more consideration in the education of medical students and, thus, in medical education research. The German versions of the JSPE-S and IRI measures seem to be promising means to evaluate these education aims and to conduct medical education research on empathy. PMID:22403596

  13. Learning from Failure: A Cost-Benefit Analysis Study which Resulted in Unfavorable Financial Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Ronald L.; Hruby-Moore, Maria T.

    1998-01-01

    Describes a cost-benefit analysis study that resulted in unfavorable financial outcomes and discusses how this result became a learning opportunity for human-performance development/performance-improvement professionals in the organization. Considers failure in organizations and learning from failure. (Author/LRW)

  14. A review of the psychometric properties of the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS) family of measures

    PubMed Central

    Pirkis, Jane E; Burgess, Philip M; Kirk, Pia K; Dodson, Sarity; Coombs, Tim J; Williamson, Michelle K

    2005-01-01

    Background The Health of the Nation Outcome Scales was developed to routinely measure outcomes for adults with mental illness. Comparable instruments were also developed for children and adolescents (the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales for Children and Adolescents) and older people (the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales 65+). All three are being widely used as outcome measures in the United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand. There is, however, no comprehensive review of these instruments. This paper fills this gap by reviewing the psychometric properties of each. Method Articles and reports relating to the instruments were retrieved, and their findings synthesised to assess the instruments' validity (content, construct, concurrent, predictive), reliability (test-retest, inter-rater), sensitivity to change, and feasibility/utility. Results Mostly, the instruments perform adequately or better on most dimensions, although some of their psychometric properties warrant closer examination. Conclusion Collectively, the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales family of measures can assess outcomes for different groups on a range of mental health-related constructs, and can be regarded as appropriate for routinely monitoring outcomes. PMID:16313678

  15. Workaholism: definition, measurement, and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Spence, J T; Robbins, A S

    1992-02-01

    Questionnaires were developed to assess the concept of workaholism, defined in terms of high scores on measures of work involvement and driveness and low scores on a measure of enjoyment of work, and to contrast this profile with work enthusiasm, defined as high work involvement and enjoyment and low driveness. Additional scales were devised to test several predictions about the correlates of workaholism. A test battery including these scales was given in a mail survey to a national sample of male (n = 134) and female (n = 157) social workers with academic positions. The psychometric properties of the scales are described. Cluster analyses for each sex revealed groups who corresponded to the workaholic and work enthusiast profiles as well as several other profiles. As predicted, workaholics were higher than work enthusiasts (among other groups) on measures of perfectionism, nondelegation of responsibility, and job stress. They were also higher on a measure of health complaints. Investigations are being initiated to determine the association of workaholism and other score profiles with objectively diagnosed cardiac disorders and with measures of occupational performance. PMID:16370875

  16. Connecting Stuttering Management and Measurement: V. Deduction and Induction in the Development of Stuttering Treatment Outcome Measures and Stuttering Treatments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onslow, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Background: The development of evidence-based practice, which is increasingly popular in stuttering treatment, is closely linked to the development of outcome measures. Aims: Two approaches to the development of stuttering treatment outcome measures are outlined. The first is the deductive, top-down approach, where the development of specific…

  17. Recent results from satellite beacon measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darosa, A. V.

    1973-01-01

    The techniques are reviewed for measuring ionospheric electron content, the most important parameter in the study of transionospheric propagation. Data collected since 1964 have yielded a synoptic description of the behavior of the electron content in midlatitudes. Empirical relationships between the level of solar activity and the electron content were developed permitting the prognostication of the electron content values. Construction of such prognostication schemes was stimulated by current efforts to create accurate satellite borne navigation systems. Gravity waves propagating in the thermosphere leave a signature in the electron content records. Studies of such records have allowed the identification of the position of the gravity wave source, and its radiation pattern. A one-to-one relationship between these waves and polar substorms was revealed. Electron content measurements were used to monitor the protonosphere with good time resolution. Protonospheric storms were observed with this technique. Slab thickness data obtained from content measurements were used to determine the neutral air temperature in the thermosphere.

  18. Process of Care Performance Measures and Long-Term Outcomes in Patients Hospitalized With Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Mark E.; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Hammill, Bradley G.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Peterson, Eric D.; Schulman, Kevin A.; Curtis, Lesley H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent efforts to improve care for patients hospitalized with heart failure have focused on process-based performance measures. Data supporting the link between current process measures and patient outcomes are sparse. Objective To examine the relationship between adherence to hospital-level process measures and long-term patient-level mortality and readmission. Research Design Analysis of data from a national clinical registry linked to outcome data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS). Subjects 22750 Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries enrolled in the Organized Program to Initiate Lifesaving Treatment in Hospitalized Patients with Heart Failure (OPTIMIZE-HF) between March 2003 and December 2004. Measures Mortality at 1 year; cardiovascular readmission at 1 year; and adherence to hospital-level process measures, including discharge instructions, assessment of left ventricular function, prescription of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker at discharge, prescription of beta-blockers at discharge, and smoking cessation counseling for eligible patients. Results Hospital conformity rates ranged from 52% to 86% across the 5 process measures. Unadjusted overall 1-year mortality and cardiovascular readmission rates were 33% and 40%, respectively. In covariate-adjusted analyses, the CMS composite score was not associated with 1-year mortality (hazard ratio, 1.00; 95% confidence interval, 0.98-1.03; P = .91) or readmission (hazard ratio, 1.01; 95% confidence interval, 0.99-1.04; P = .37). Current CMS process measures were not independently associated with mortality, though prescription of beta-blockers at discharge was independently associated with lower mortality (hazard ratio, 0.94; 95% confidence interval, 0.90-098; P = .004). Conclusion Hospital process performance for heart failure as judged by current CMS measures is not associated with patient outcomes within 1 year of discharge, calling into question whether existing CMS metrics can accurately discriminate hospital quality of care for heart failure. PMID:20125043

  19. Measuring Student Satisfaction from the Student Outcomes Survey. Technical Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fieger, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Student Outcomes Survey is an annual national survey of vocational education and training (VET) students. Since 1995, participants have been asked to rate their satisfaction with different aspects of their training, grouped under three main themes: teaching, assessment, and generic skills and learning experiences. While the composition of the…

  20. Constructing a Consensus-based Prevention Outcome Measurement Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegal, Harvey A.; Lane, D. Timothy; Falck, Russel S.; Wang, Jichuan; Carlson, Robert G.; Rahman, Ahmmed; Chambers, Deborah T.

    2001-01-01

    Describes Ohio's Prevention Evaluation Project (PEP), that developed a questionnaire to assess behavioral and attitudinal outcomes in primary drug abuse prevention programs targeting young people aged twelve to seventeen. One of PEP's principal achievements was the inclusion of community prevention program providers in the evaluation instrument

  1. How to Measure Results of Sales Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahne, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    Describes the development of a training program for salespeople (trainees and managers) called Dimensional Sales Training (DST). It is noted that DST is designed to increase sales, build skills, and improve performance, while providing a systematic process of collecting data for measuring program effectiveness. (EM)

  2. Measuring Competition: Inconsistent Definitions, Inconsistent Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linick, Matthew Allen

    2014-01-01

    There is a developing literature examining how charter schools, through the effects of competition, impact performance in public school districts and district-run public schools, also known as the second-level effects of competition. What follows is an examination of how competition is measured in this literature that offers a critique of existing…

  3. A Systematic Review of Outcome Measurements and Quality of Studies Evaluating Fixed Tooth-Supported Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Devangkumar Rajnikant; O'Brien, Tim; Petrie, Aviva; Petridis, Haralampos

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this systematic review was to review clinical studies of fixed tooth-supported prostheses, and to assess the quality of evidence with an emphasis on the assessment of the reporting of outcome measurements. Multiple hypotheses were generated to compare the effect of study type on different outcome modifiers and to compare the quality of publications before and after January 2005. Materials and Methods An electronic search was conducted using specific databases (MEDLINE via Ovid, EMBASE via Ovid, Cochrane Library) through July 2012. This was complemented by hand searching the past 10 years of issues of the Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry, Journal of Prosthodontics, and the International Journal of Prosthodontics. All experimental and observational clinical studies evaluating survival, success, failure, and complications of tooth-supported extracoronal fixed partial dentures, crowns, and onlays were included. No restrictions on age or follow-up time were placed. Results The electronic search generated 14,869 papers, of which 206 papers were included for full-text review. Hand-searching added 23 papers. Inclusion criteria were met by 182 papers and were included for the review. The majority were retrospective studies. Only 8 (4.4%) were randomized controlled trials. The majority of the studies measured survival and failure, and few studies recorded data on success; however, more than 60% of the studies failed to define survival, success, and failure. Many studies did not use any standardized criteria for assessment of the quality of the restorations and, when standardized criteria were used, they were modified, thereby not allowing for comparisons with other studies. There was an increase of 21.8% in the number of studies evaluating outcome measurements of all-ceramic restorations in past 8 years. Conclusions Prosthodontic literature presents with a reduced percentage of RCTs compared to other disciplines in dentistry. The overall quality of recording prosthodontic outcome measurements has not improved greatly in the past 8 years. PMID:24947268

  4. RESNA Resource Guide for Assistive Technology Outcomes: Measurement Tools. Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RESNA: Association for the Advancement of Rehabilitation Technology, Arlington, VA.

    This resource guide, the first of three volumes, lays out the fundamentals of outcome measurements for assistive technology. It includes the whys and hows of gathering data so that assistive technology practitioners can integrate outcomes measurement activities in their daily practice. Chapters include: (1) "Concepts and Rationale for…

  5. Measures for the Final Common Core of Constructs. The Project on State-Level Child Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Trends, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The Project on State-Level Child Outcomes, a federal project designed to improve the measurement of child outcomes in state welfare evaluations and in other state data systems. This document provides measures for the common core of constructs that state representatives developed at the second national-level meeting of the Project's planning phase.…

  6. Nonprofit Organizations and Outcome Measurement: From Tracking Program Activities to Focusing on Frontline Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Lehn M.

    2012-01-01

    Why do we continue to see evidence that nonprofit staff feel like outcome measurement is missing important aspects of their work? Based on an analysis of over 1,000 pages of material in 10 outcome measurement guides and a focused literature review of frontline work in three types of nonprofit organizations, this article shows that existing outcome…

  7. Predicting Student Outcome Measures Using the ASCA National Model Program Audit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Lauren E.; Erford, Bradley T.

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the prediction of student outcome variables from the ASCA national model level of program implementation. A total sampling of schools from two suburban school districts was conducted. Outcome variables were measures of math and reading achievement scores, attendance and graduation rates. Such measures play a central role in…

  8. Measuring the Immeasurable: Linking Interventions to Outcomes in a Family Preservation Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen, Jennifer L.; Croasdaile, Susanne S.; Gansneder, Bruce M.

    The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of process-outcome evaluation in a broad-aim social program. Researchers collaborated with program staff to create outcome measures and measures of the services provided. Interventions for different groups of program participants were analyzed, using data on 122 children from…

  9. Area of lateral ventricles measured on cranial ultrasonography in preterm infants: association with outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Saliba, E; Bertrand, P; Gold, F; Marchand, S; Laugier, J

    1990-01-01

    The association between measurements of lateral ventricle area (determined by serial ultrasound scans) and outcome was studied in 70 preterm neonates of 33 weeks' gestation or less. The study group was subdivided into four groups according to cranial ultrasonographic findings at 2 weeks postnatal age: group A (n = 15) had isolated periventricular/intraventricular haemorrhage; group B (n = 20) had periventricular/intraventricular haemorrhage and dilated ventricles; group C (n = 24) had periventricular/intraventricular haemorrhage and periventricular leukomalacia with or without dilated ventricles; and group D (n = 11) had isolated periventricular leukomalacia. Eighty seven preterm infants with no evidence of intracranial disease and good neurodevelopmental outcomes at 2 years formed the control group. A poor outcome was observed in infants in group B, C, and D, particularly in those who had persistent dilated ventricles at 6 weeks postnatal age and extensive periventricular leukomalacia. There was no difference in outcome between group A and controls. During the first six weeks of life ventricular area growth velocities were significantly higher in groups B, C, D, compared with normal controls and group A. We suggest that persistent ventricular dilatation at this early stage carries a bad prognosis, which is the result of atrophy of the brain. PMID:1700670

  10. An outcome-based learning model to identify emerging threats : experimental and simulation results.

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Moyano, I. J.; Conrad, S. H.; Andersen, D. F.; Decision and Information Sciences; SNL; Univ. at Albany

    2007-01-01

    The authors present experimental and simulation results of an outcome-based learning model as it applies to the identification of emerging threats. This model integrates judgment, decision making, and learning theories to provide an integrated framework for the behavioral study of emerging threats.

  11. Targeted Estimation of Binary Variable Importance Measures with Interval-Censored Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    van der Laan, Mark J.; Page, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    In most experimental and observational studies, participants are not followed in continuous time. Instead, data is collected about participants only at certain monitoring times. These monitoring times are random and often participant specific. As a result, outcomes are only known up to random time intervals, resulting in interval-censored data. In contrast, when estimating variable importance measures on interval-censored outcomes, practitioners often ignore the presence of interval censoring, and instead treat the data as continuous or right-censored, applying ad hoc approaches to mask the true interval censoring. In this article, we describe targeted minimum lossbased estimation (TMLE) methods tailored for estimation of binary variable importance measures with interval-censored outcomes. We demonstrate the performance of the interval-censored TMLE procedure through simulation studies and apply the method to analyze the effects of a variety of variables on spontaneous hepatitis C virus clearance among injecton drug users, using data from the International Collaboration of Incident HIV and HCV in Injecting Cohorts project. PMID:24637001

  12. The use of collaboration science to define consensus outcome measures: a telemental health case study.

    PubMed

    Mishkind, Matthew C; Doarn, Charles R; Bernard, Jordana; Shore, Jay H

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide an overview of a collaboration science process used to develop recommendations for the field of telemental health (TMH) in the selection of outcome measures that best reflect programmatic impacts. A common use of group development techniques in medicine is the development of clinical guidelines, which typically occurs using one of two methods: the nominal group or the Delphi method. Both processes have been faulted for limited transparency, reliability, and sustainability. Recommendations to improve the traditional process include making goals explicit, making disagreements transparent, and publicly displaying levels of agreement. A group of 26 TMH experts convened during the American Telemedicine Association's 2012 Fall Forum in New Orleans, LA to participate in a 1-day, interactive, consensus-building workshop to initiate the development of a shared lexicon of outcomes. The workshop method was designed to improve on traditional methods of guideline development by focusing on clarity of expectations, transparency, and timeliness of group development work. Results suggest that, compared with other traditional methods, the current process involved more people, occurred more rapidly, was more transparent, and resulted in a comparable deliverable. Recommendations for further process development, both within and external to TMH, as well as an initial overview of defined outcome measures are discussed. PMID:23590175

  13. Female College Students' Media Use and Academic Outcomes: Results from a Longitudinal Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Jennifer L; Fielder, Robyn L; Carey, Kate B; Carey, Michael P

    2013-09-01

    This longitudinal study describes women's media use during their first year of college and examines associations between media use and academic outcomes. Female students (N = 483, Mage = 18.1 years) reported on their use of 11 media forms and their grade point average, academic behaviors, academic confidence, and problems affecting schoolwork. Allowing for multi-tasking, women reported nearly 12 hours of media use per day; use of texting, music, the Internet, and social networking was heaviest. In general, media use was negatively associated with academic outcomes after controlling for prior academics and demographics. Exceptions were newspaper reading and music listening, which were positively associated with academic outcomes. There were significant indirect effects of magazine reading and social networking on GPA via academic behaviors, confidence, and problems. Results show that female college students are heavy users of new media, and that some forms of media use may adversely impact academic performance. PMID:24505554

  14. Female College Students’ Media Use and Academic Outcomes: Results from a Longitudinal Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Jennifer L.; Fielder, Robyn L.; Carey, Kate B.; Carey, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal study describes women’s media use during their first year of college and examines associations between media use and academic outcomes. Female students (N = 483, Mage = 18.1 years) reported on their use of 11 media forms and their grade point average, academic behaviors, academic confidence, and problems affecting schoolwork. Allowing for multi-tasking, women reported nearly 12 hours of media use per day; use of texting, music, the Internet, and social networking was heaviest. In general, media use was negatively associated with academic outcomes after controlling for prior academics and demographics. Exceptions were newspaper reading and music listening, which were positively associated with academic outcomes. There were significant indirect effects of magazine reading and social networking on GPA via academic behaviors, confidence, and problems. Results show that female college students are heavy users of new media, and that some forms of media use may adversely impact academic performance. PMID:24505554

  15. Estimating a Preference-Based Index from the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation–Outcome Measure (CORE-OM)

    PubMed Central

    Brazier, John E.; Rowen, Donna; Barkham, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background. The Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation–Outcome Measure (CORE-OM) is used to evaluate the effectiveness of psychological therapies in people with common mental disorders. The objective of this study was to estimate a preference-based index for this population using CORE-6D, a health state classification system derived from the CORE-OM consisting of a 5-item emotional component and a physical item, and to demonstrate a novel method for generating states that are not orthogonal. Methods. Rasch analysis was used to identify 11 emotional health states from CORE-6D that were frequently observed in the study population and are, thus, plausible (in contrast, conventional statistical design might generate implausible states). Combined with the 3 response levels of the physical item of CORE-6D, they generate 33 plausible health states, 18 of which were selected for valuation. A valuation survey of 220 members of the public in South Yorkshire, United Kingdom, was undertaken using the time tradeoff (TTO) method. Regression analysis was subsequently used to predict values for all possible states described by CORE-6D. Results. A number of multivariate regression models were built to predict values for the 33 health states of CORE-6D, using the Rasch logit value of the emotional state and the response level of the physical item as independent variables. A cubic model with high predictive value (adjusted R2 = 0.990) was selected to predict TTO values for all 729 CORE-6D health states. Conclusion. The CORE-6D preference-based index will enable the assessment of cost-effectiveness of interventions for people with common mental disorders using existing and prospective CORE-OM data sets. The new method for generating states may be useful for other instruments with highly correlated dimensions. PMID:23178639

  16. Multiple trauma in children: predicting outcome and long-term results

    PubMed Central

    Letts, Mervyn; Davidson, Darin; Lapner, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Objective To analyze the management of pediatric trauma and the efficacy of the Pediatric Trauma Score (PTS) in classifying injury severity and predicting prognosis. Design A retrospective case series. Setting The Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, a major pediatric trauma centre. Patients One hundred and forty-nine traumatized children with 2 or more injuries to 1 body system or a single injury to 2 or more body systems. Interventions Use of the PTS and Glasgow Coma Scale score in trauma management. Main outcome measures Types of injuries sustained, complications, missed injuries, psychosocial effects and residual deficiencies. Results The average PTS was 8.5 (range from −3 to 11). The total number of injuries sustained was 494, most commonly closed head injury (86). Forty-two percent of children with an average trauma score of 8.5 were treated surgically. There were 13 missed injuries, and complications were encountered in 57 children, the most common being secondary to fractures. Forty-eight (32%) children had residual long-term deficiency, most commonly neurologic deficiency secondary to head injury. Conclusions Fractures should be stabilized early to decrease long-term complications. A deficiency of the PTS is the weighting of open fractures of a minor bone. For example, metacarpal fracture is given the same weight as an open fracture of the femur. Neuropsychologic difficulties secondary to trauma are a major sequela of trauma in children. PMID:11939656

  17. Typology of Learning Outcomes in Cognitive Domain: What Is Said vs. What Is Measured

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Doo H.; Yoon, Seung Won; Son, Su Jin; Park, Sunyoung

    2007-01-01

    Based on extensive literature review, this study reports the result of a meta analysis of learning outcome studies and presents an integrated typology of content types and learning outcomes. Examining the ERIC database for learning studies conducted from 1992 until 2006 shows that most empirical studies have assessed the learning outcome at lower…

  18. Need and greed in dermatology: disease and outcome measures in dermatological healthcare planning.

    PubMed

    Dalgard, Florence; Finlay, Andrew Y

    2006-01-01

    Assessing dermatological needs in the population and our ability to meet them is a challenge. The choice of outcome measures is central in dermatological healthcare planning. The concept of ill health and its relationship to dermatological outcome measures is described. Outcome measures used should provide information on these issues in order to gain insight into genuine needs and illness behavior in the population and to ensure quality of healthcare. Nevertheless, the dilemma of assigning priorities in healthcare planning remains; outcome measures in dermatology should be perceived as appropriate by patients as well as by caregivers and policy makers. It is important to stimulate research to develop and refine person-focused outcome measures. Their use is essential to assess dermatological health needs and to understand illness behavior. The information they can provide can enable provision and evaluation of healthcare quality and contribute to the challenge of making appropriate priority decisions in healthcare. PMID:17135732

  19. Predicting stroke outcome using DCE-CT measured blood velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oosterbroek, Jaap; Bennink, Edwin; Dankbaar, Jan Willem; Horsch, Alexander D.; Viergever, Max A.; Velthuis, Birgitta K.; de Jong, Hugo W. A. M.

    2015-03-01

    CT plays an important role in the diagnosis of acute stroke patients. Dynamic contrast enhanced CT (DCE-CT) can estimate local tissue perfusion and extent of ischemia. However, hemodynamic information of the large intracranial vessels may also be obtained from DCE-CT data and may contain valuable diagnostic information. We describe a novel method to estimate intravascular blood velocity (IBV) in large cerebral vessels using DCE-CT data, which may be useful to help predict stroke outcome. DCE-CT scans from 34 patients with isolated M1 occlusions were included from a large prospective multi-center cohort study of patients with acute ischemic stroke. Gaussians fitted to the intravascular data yielded the time-to-peak (TTP) and cerebral-blood-volume (CBV). IBV was computed by taking the inverse of the TTP gradient magnitude. Voxels with a CBV of at least 10% of the CBV found in the arterial input function were considered part of a vessel. Mid-sagittal planes were drawn manually and averages of the IBV over all vessel-voxels (arterial and venous) were computed for each hemisphere. Mean-hemisphere IBV differences, mean-hemisphere TTP differences, and hemisphere vessel volume differences were used to differentiate between patients with good and bad outcome (modified Rankin Scale score <3 versus ≥3 at 90 days) using ROC analysis. AUCs from the ROC for IBV, TTP, and vessel volume were 0.80, 0.67 and 0.62 respectively. In conclusion, IBV was found to be a better predictor of patient outcome than the parameters used to compute it and may be a promising new parameter for stroke outcome prediction.

  20. Outcome Measures of an Intracanal, Endoscopic Transforaminal Decompression Technique: Initial Findings from the MIS Prospective Registry

    PubMed Central

    Sclafani, Joseph A.; Raiszadeh, Kamshad; Laich, Dan; Shen, Jian; Bennett, Matthew; Blok, Robert; Liang, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Background Minimally invasive transforaminal endoscopic procedures can achieve spinal decompression through either direct or indirect techniques. Subtle variations in trajectory of the surgical corridor can dictate access to the pathologic tissue. Two general strategies exist: the intradiscal “inside-out” technique and the extradiscal, intracanal (IC) technique. The IC technique utilizes a more lateral transforaminal approach than the intradiscal technique, which allows for a more direct decompression of the spinal canal. Objective This study is an assessment of IC patient outcome data obtained through analysis of a previously validated MIS Prospective Registry. Methods Post-hoc analysis was performed on the MIS Prospective Registry database containing 1032 patients. A subgroup of patients treated with the endoscopic IC technique was identified. Patient outcome measures after treatment of symptomatic disk herniation and neuroforaminal stenosis were evaluated. Results A total of 86 IC patients were analyzed. Overall, there was significant improvement in employment and walking tolerance as soon as 6 weeks post-op as well as significant one year VAS and ODI score improvement. Subanalysis of IC patients with two distinct primary diagnoses was performed. Group IC-1 (disc herniation) showed improvement in ODI and VAS back and leg outcomes at 1 year post-op. Group IC-2 (foraminal stenosis) showed VAS back and leg score improvement at one year post-op but did not demonstrate significant improvement in overall ODI outcome at any time point. The one year re-operation rate was 2% (1/40) for group IC-1 and 28% (5/18) for group IC-2. Conclusions The initial results of the MIS Registry IC subgroup show a significant clinical improvement when the technique is employed to treat patients with lumbar disc herniation. The treatment of foraminal stenosis can lead to improved short-term clinical outcome but is associated with a high re-operation rate at 1 year post-op. PMID:26767161

  1. Responsiveness of Health-Related Quality of Life Outcome Measures in Cardiac Rehabilitation: Comparison of Cardiac Rehabilitation Outcome Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hevey, David; McGee, Hannah M.; Horgan, John

    2004-01-01

    Assessment instruments that are not responsive to change are unsuitable as outcome tools in cardiac rehabilitation because they underestimate the psychosocial benefits of program attendance. Nine questionnaires were assessed for responsiveness with the standardized response mean (SRM). Questionnaires were allocated into 3 batteries, and each…

  2. Quality of life measurement and outcome in aphasia

    PubMed Central

    Spaccavento, Simona; Craca, Angela; Del Prete, Marina; Falcone, Rosanna; Colucci, Antonia; Di Palma, Angela; Loverre, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Background Quality of life (QL) can be defined as the individual’s perception of their own well-being. Aphasia is the most important potential consequence of stroke and has a profound effect on a patient’s life, causing emotional distress, depression, and social isolation, due to loss of language functions. Aims To draw up a QL questionnaire for aphasics (QLQA) focusing particularly on difficulties in interpersonal relationships and on the loss of independence as a result of language disorders. We reported the results of a psychometric evaluation of this measure. Moreover, we experimentally focused on the differences in QLQA between patients affected only by neurological motor impairment and hemiparetic patients with aphasia (PWA) in order to verify the specific role of aphasia on QL. We also explored if the QLQA is sensitive to the severity of aphasia and to the time elapsing from the stroke. Methods A total of 146 consecutive PWA and 37 control subjects were enrolled to evaluate the reliability (internal consistency and test–retest reliability) and validity of the QLQA, using standard psychometric methods. Patients were divided into acute (within 3 months since stroke) and chronic (beyond 3 months) groups, and into mild and severe according to the severity of aphasia. The experimental group of only acute PWA was compared to control subjects, with right hemispherical lesion and without aphasia in QLQA total and partial scores. Results The QLQA had good internal consistency and test–retest reliability. Acute and chronic PWA and mild and severe ones differed in QLQA total, communication, and autonomy subscales. No differences were found in psychological condition. Between aphasic and control patients, significant differences were found in all QLQA subscales. Conclusion The QLQA is a valid measure of QL in PWA, contributing to a better distinction between severe and mild aphasia, and it is sensitive also to the variations in QL depending on the time interval from stroke. PMID:24368886

  3. The ACT College Outcome Measurement Project: A New Tool for Summative Evaluation of Nontraditional Postsecondary Education Programs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Eric F.; Pringle, Robert A.

    The American College Testing Program (ACT) developed tests as a result of the College Outcome Measures Project (COMP). These instruments were intended for evaluation of nontraditional and traditional postsecondary education programs. They measure skills rather than information. The study was designed to check on several aspects of use of the COMP…

  4. Measuring Critical Education Processes and Outcomes: Illustration from a Cluster Randomized Trial in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpin, Peter F.; Torrente, Catalina

    2014-01-01

    Using reliable and valid measures of students' outcomes which are sensitive to change is critical for obtaining interpretable and therefore useful results from evaluations of school-based interventions. While measurement development for use in experimental evaluations receives a great deal of attention in the U.S., it lags behind in low-income…

  5. Recommendations for the use of common outcome measures in pediatric traumatic brain injury research.

    PubMed

    McCauley, Stephen R; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Anderson, Vicki A; Bedell, Gary; Beers, Sue R; Campbell, Thomas F; Chapman, Sandra B; Ewing-Cobbs, Linda; Gerring, Joan P; Gioia, Gerard A; Levin, Harvey S; Michaud, Linda J; Prasad, Mary R; Swaine, Bonnie R; Turkstra, Lyn S; Wade, Shari L; Yeates, Keith O

    2012-03-01

    This article addresses the need for age-relevant outcome measures for traumatic brain injury (TBI) research and summarizes the recommendations by the inter-agency Pediatric TBI Outcomes Workgroup. The Pediatric Workgroup's recommendations address primary clinical research objectives including characterizing course of recovery from TBI, prediction of later outcome, measurement of treatment effects, and comparison of outcomes across studies. Consistent with other Common Data Elements (CDE) Workgroups, the Pediatric TBI Outcomes Workgroup adopted the standard three-tier system in its selection of measures. In the first tier, core measures included valid, robust, and widely applicable outcome measures with proven utility in pediatric TBI from each identified domain including academics, adaptive and daily living skills, family and environment, global outcome, health-related quality of life, infant and toddler measures, language and communication, neuropsychological impairment, physical functioning, psychiatric and psychological functioning, recovery of consciousness, social role participation and social competence, social cognition, and TBI-related symptoms. In the second tier, supplemental measures were recommended for consideration in TBI research focusing on specific topics or populations. In the third tier, emerging measures included important instruments currently under development, in the process of validation, or nearing the point of published findings that have significant potential to be superior to measures in the core and supplemental lists and may eventually replace them as evidence for their utility emerges. PMID:21644810

  6. Recommendations for the Use of Common Outcome Measures in Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury Research

    PubMed Central

    Wilde, Elisabeth A.; Anderson, Vicki A.; Bedell, Gary; Beers, Sue R.; Campbell, Thomas F.; Chapman, Sandra B.; Ewing-Cobbs, Linda; Gerring, Joan P.; Gioia, Gerard A.; Levin, Harvey S.; Michaud, Linda J.; Prasad, Mary R.; Swaine, Bonnie R.; Turkstra, Lyn S.; Wade, Shari L.; Yeates, Keith O.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract This article addresses the need for age-relevant outcome measures for traumatic brain injury (TBI) research and summarizes the recommendations by the inter-agency Pediatric TBI Outcomes Workgroup. The Pediatric Workgroup's recommendations address primary clinical research objectives including characterizing course of recovery from TBI, prediction of later outcome, measurement of treatment effects, and comparison of outcomes across studies. Consistent with other Common Data Elements (CDE) Workgroups, the Pediatric TBI Outcomes Workgroup adopted the standard three-tier system in its selection of measures. In the first tier, core measures included valid, robust, and widely applicable outcome measures with proven utility in pediatric TBI from each identified domain including academics, adaptive and daily living skills, family and environment, global outcome, health-related quality of life, infant and toddler measures, language and communication, neuropsychological impairment, physical functioning, psychiatric and psychological functioning, recovery of consciousness, social role participation and social competence, social cognition, and TBI-related symptoms. In the second tier, supplemental measures were recommended for consideration in TBI research focusing on specific topics or populations. In the third tier, emerging measures included important instruments currently under development, in the process of validation, or nearing the point of published findings that have significant potential to be superior to measures in the core and supplemental lists and may eventually replace them as evidence for their utility emerges. PMID:21644810

  7. In vivo electrical conductivity measurements during and after tumor electroporation: conductivity changes reflect the treatment outcome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivorra, Antoni; Al-Sakere, Bassim; Rubinsky, Boris; Mir, Lluis M.

    2009-10-01

    Electroporation is the phenomenon in which cell membrane permeability is increased by exposing the cell to short high-electric-field pulses. Reversible electroporation treatments are used in vivo for gene therapy and drug therapy while irreversible electroporation is used for tissue ablation. Tissue conductivity changes induced by electroporation could provide real-time feedback of the treatment outcome. Here we describe the results from a study in which fibrosarcomas (n = 39) inoculated in mice were treated according to different electroporation protocols, some of them known to cause irreversible damage. Conductivity was measured before, within the pulses, in between the pulses and for up to 30 min after treatment. Conductivity increased pulse after pulse. Depending on the applied electroporation protocol, the conductivity increase after treatment ranged from 10% to 180%. The most significant conclusion from this study is the fact that post-treatment conductivity seems to be correlated with treatment outcome in terms of reversibility.

  8. Modeling the Offensive-Defensive Interaction and Resulting Outcomes in Basketball

    PubMed Central

    Lamas, Leonardo; Santana, Felipe; Heiner, Matthew; Ugrinowitsch, Carlos; Fellingham, Gilbert

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We analyzed the interaction between offensive (i.e. space creation dynamics -SCDs) and defensive (i.e. space protection dynamics—SPDs) actions in six play outcomes (free shot, contested shot, new SCD, reset, foul, and turnover) in Spanish professional basketball games. Method Data consisted of 1548 SCD-SPD-outcome triples obtained from six play-off games. We used Bayesian methods to compute marginal probabilities of six outcomes following five different SCDs. We also computed probabilities of the six outcomes following the 16 most frequent SCD-SPD combinations. Results The pick action (e.g. pick and roll, pop and pop) was the most prevalent SCD (33%). However, this SCD did not produce the highest probability of a free shot (0.235). The highest probability of a free shot followed the SCD without ball (0.409). The pick was performed not only to attempt scoring but also to initiate offenses, as it produced the highest probability leading to a new SCD (0.403). Additionally, the SPD performed influenced the outcome of the SCD. This reinforces the notion that the opposition (offensive-defensive interaction) should be considered. To the best of our knowledge, in team sports, this is the first study to successfully model the tactical features involved in offense-defense interactions. Our analyses revealed that the high frequency of occurrence of some SCDs may be justified not only by an associated high probability of free shots but also by the possibility of progressively create more space in the defense (i.e. a new SCD as outcome). In the second case, it evidences offensive strategic features of progressive disruption of the defensive system through the concatenation of subsequent offensive actions. PMID:26659134

  9. Comparing measures of multimorbidity to predict outcomes in primary care: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Salisbury, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Background. An increasing proportion of people are living with multiple health conditions, or ‘multimorbidity’. Measures of multimorbidity are useful in studies of interventions in primary care to take account of confounding due to differences in case-mix. Objectives. Assess the predictive validity of commonly used measures of multimorbidity in relation to a health outcome (mortality) and a measure of health service utilization (consultation rate). Methods. We included 95372 patients registered on 1 April 2005 at 174 English general practices included in the General Practice Research Database. Using regression models we compared the explanatory power of six measures of multimorbidity: count of chronic diseases from the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF); Charlson index; count of prescribed drugs; three measures from the John Hopkins ACG software [Expanded Diagnosis Clusters count (EDCs), Adjusted Clinical Groups (ACGs), Resource Utilisation Bands (RUBs)]. Results. A model containing demographics and GP practice alone explained 22% of the uncertainty in consultation rates. The number of prescribed drugs, ACG category, EDC count, RUB category, QOF disease count, or Charlson index increased this to 42%, 37%, 36%, 35%, 30%, and 26%, respectively. Measures of multimorbidity made little difference to the fit of a model predicting 3-year mortality. Nonetheless, Charlson index score was the best performing measure, followed by the number of prescribed drugs. Conclusion. The number of prescribed drugs is the most powerful measure for predicting future consultations and the second most powerful measure for predicting mortality. It may have potential as a simple proxy measure of multimorbidity in primary care. PMID:23045354

  10. Biomass smoke exposures: health outcomes measures and study design.

    PubMed

    Noonan, Curtis W; Balmes, John R

    2010-02-01

    Epidemiological studies of biomass smoke health effects have been conducted in a variety of settings and with a variety of study designs. The Health Effects Workgroup discussed several approaches for the investigation of health effects in communities exposed to wood smoke from nearby wildland fires, intentional agricultural burning, or residential biomass burning devices such as woodstoves or cookstoves. This presentation briefly reviews observational and intervention studies that have been conducted within these exposure settings. The review is followed by a summary of discussion points among the workgroup members with particular emphasis on study design and the use of biomarkers for assessing outcomes in biomass smoke-exposed populations. PMID:20044883

  11. Scale Model Thruster Acoustic Measurement Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) is a 5% scale representation of the SLS vehicle, mobile launcher, tower, and launch pad trench. The SLS launch propulsion system will be comprised of the Rocket Assisted Take-Off (RATO) motors representing the solid boosters and 4 Gas Hydrogen (GH2) thrusters representing the core engines. The GH2 thrusters were tested in a horizontal configuration in order to characterize their performance. In Phase 1, a single thruster was fired to determine the engine performance parameters necessary for scaling a single engine. A cluster configuration, consisting of the 4 thrusters, was tested in Phase 2 to integrate the system and determine their combined performance. Acoustic and overpressure data was collected during both test phases in order to characterize the system's acoustic performance. The results from the single thruster and 4- thuster system are discussed and compared.

  12. Early Oxygenation and Ventilation Measurements After Pediatric Cardiac Arrest: Lack of Association With Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Kimberly Statler; Clark, Amy E.; Meert, Kathleen L.; Topjian, Alexis A.; Schleien, Charles L.; Shaffner, Donald H.; Dean, J. Michael; Moler, Frank W.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To explore oxygenation and ventilation status early after cardiac arrest in infants and children. We hypothesize that hyperoxia is common and associated with worse outcome after pediatric cardiac arrest. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Fifteen hospitals within the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network. Patients Children who suffered a cardiac arrest event and survived for at least 6 hours after return of circulation. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results Analysis of 195 events revealed that abnormalities in oxygenation and ventilation are common during the initial 6 hours after pediatric cardiac arrest. Hyperoxia was frequent, affecting 54% of patients. Normoxia was documented in 34% and hypoxia in 22% of patients. These percentages account for a 10% overlap of patients who had both hyperoxia and hypoxia. Ventilation status was more evenly distributed with hyperventilation observed in 38%, normoventilation in 29%, and hypoventilation in 46%, with a 13% overlap of patients who had both hyperventilation and hypoventilation. Derangements in both oxygenation and ventilation were common early after cardiac arrest such that both normoxia and normocarbia were documented in only 25 patients (13%). Neither oxygenation nor ventilation status was associated with outcome. After controlling for potential confounders, arrest location and rhythm were significantly associated with worse outcome; however, hyperoxia was not (odds ratio for good outcome, 1.02 [0.46, 2.84]; p = 0.96). Conclusions Despite recent resuscitation guidelines that advocate maintenance of normoxia and normoventilation after pediatric cardiac arrest, this is uncommonly achieved in practice. Although we did not demonstrate an association between hyperoxia and worse outcome, the small proportion of patients kept within normal ranges limited our power. Preclinical data suggesting potential harm with hyperoxia remain compelling, and further investigation, including prospective, large studies involving robust recording of physiological derangements, is necessary to further advance our understanding of this important topic. PMID:23552509

  13. A Healthy Bottom Line: Healthy Life Expectancy as an Outcome Measure for Health Improvement Efforts

    PubMed Central

    Stiefel, Matthew C; Perla, Rocco J; Zell, Bonnie L

    2010-01-01

    Context: Good health is the most important outcome of health care, and healthy life expectancy (HLE), an intuitive and meaningful summary measure combining the length and quality of life, has become a standard in the world for measuring population health. Methods: This article critically reviews the literature and practices around the world for measuring and improving HLE and synthesizes that information as a basis for recommendations for the adoption and adaptation of HLE as an outcome measure in the United States. Findings: This article makes the case for adoption of HLE as an outcome measure at the national, state, community, and health care system levels in the United States to compare the effectiveness of alternative practices, evaluate disparities, and guide resource allocation. Conclusions: HLE is a clear, consistent, and important population health outcome measure that can enable informed judgments about value for investments in health care. PMID:20377757

  14. Adult experience of mental health outcomes as a result of intimate partner violence victimisation: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Lagdon, Susan; Armour, Cherie; Stringer, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    Background Intimate partner violence (IPV) has been known to adversely affect the mental health of victims. Research has tended to focus on the mental health impact of physical violence rather than considering other forms of violence. Objective To systematically review the literature in order to identify the impact of all types of IPV victimisation on various mental health outcomes. Method A systematic review of 11 electronic databases (2004–2014) was conducted. Fifty eight papers were identified and later described and reviewed in relation to the main objective. Results Main findings suggest that IPV can have increasing adverse effects on the mental health of victims in comparison with those who have never experienced IPV or those experiencing other traumatic events. The most significant outcomes were associations between IPV experiences with depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and anxiety. Findings confirm previous observations that the severity and extent of IPV exposure can increase mental health symptoms. The effect of psychological violence on mental health is more prominent than originally thought. Individual differences such as gender and childhood experience of violence also increase IPV risk and affect mental health outcomes in diverse ways. Conclusions Psychological violence should be considered as a more serious form of IPV which can affect the mental health of victims. Experiencing more than one form of IPV can increase severity of outcomes. Researchers should look at IPV as a multi-dimensional experience. A uniformed definition and measure of IPV could help advance knowledge and understanding of this disparaging global issue. PMID:25279103

  15. Environmental outcome-based management: Using environmental goals and measures in the Chesapeake Bay program

    SciTech Connect

    1999-07-01

    Attention is focused on the following: Establishing Environmental Outcome-Based Management; Chesapeake Bay Program Environmental Indicators; Managing for Environmental Results; Future Directions; and Appendices.

  16. Evaluation of Diverse Community Asthma Interventions: Balancing Health Outcomes with Developing Community Capacity for Evidence-Based Program Measurement.

    PubMed

    Woodhouse, Lynn D; Livingood, William C; Toal, Russ; Keene, DeAnna; Hines, Robert B; Tedders, Stuart; Charles, Simone M; Lawrence, Raymona H; Gunn, Laura H; Williams, Natalie; Kellum, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    The challenge of evaluating community asthma management programs is complicated by balancing the emphasis on health outcomes with the need to build community process capacity for conducting and monitoring evidence-based programs. The evaluation of a Georgia Childhood Asthma Management Program, a Healthcare Georgia Foundation-supported initiative for multiple diverse programs and settings, provides an example of an approach and the results that address this challenge. A "developmental evaluation" approach was applied, using mixed methods of quantitative and qualitative data collection and analysis, to assess the progress of community asthma prevention programs in building community within the context of: where the community is starting, community-level systems changes, and the community's progress toward becoming more outcome measurement oriented and evidence based. Initial evaluation efforts revealed extensive mobilization of community assets to manage childhood asthma. However, there were minimal planned efforts to assess health outcomes and systems changes, and the lack of a logic model-based program design linking evidence-based practices to outcomes. Following developmental technical assistance within evaluation efforts, all programs developed logic models, linking practices to outcomes with data collection processes to assess progress toward achieving the selected outcomes. This developmental approach across diverse projects and communities, along with a quality improvement benchmarking approach to outcomes, created a focus on health status outcome improvement. Specifically, this approach complemented an emphasis on an improved community process capacity to identify, implement, and monitor evidence-based asthma practices that could be used within each community setting. PMID:25658512

  17. Alzheimer's disease biomarkers as outcome measures for clinical trials in MCI

    PubMed Central

    Caroli, Anna; Prestia, Annapaola; Wade, Sara; Chen, Kewei; Ayutyanont, Napatkamon; Landau, Susan M.; Madison, Cindee M.; Haense, Cathleen; Herholz, Karl; Reiman, Eric M.; Jagust, William J.; Frisoni, Giovanni B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Aim of this study was to compare the performance and power of the best-established diagnostic biological markers as outcome measures for clinical trials in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Methods MRI, FDG-PET markers, and ADAS-COG were compared in terms of effect size and statistical power over different followup periods in two MCI groups, selected from ADNI dataset based on CSF (abnormal CSF Aβ1-42 concentration - ABETA+) or MRI evidence of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) (positivity to hippocampal atrophy - HIPPO+). Biomarkers progression was modeled through mixed effect models. Scaled slope was chosen as measure of effect size. Biomarkers power was estimated using simulation algorithms. Results Seventy-four ABETA+ and 51 HIPPO+ MCI patients were included in the study. Imaging biomarkers of neurodegeneration, especially MR measurements, showed highest performance. For all biomarkers and both MCI groups, power increased with increasing follow-up time, irrespective of biomarker assessment frequency. Conclusions These findings provide information about biomarker enrichment and outcome measurements that could be employed to reduce MCI patient samples and treatment duration in future clinical trials. PMID:25437302

  18. Outcome measures of behavioral weight loss programs in perimenopause.

    PubMed

    Zargarian, Naira; Lindquist, Ruth; Gross, Cynthia R; Treat-Jacobson, Diane

    2014-08-01

    Obesity and being overweight are associated with many comorbid conditions and are major contributing factors to cardiovascular disease. The increased proportion of overweight and obese people in Western societies has been attributed largely to behaviors that include sedentary lifestyle and dietary excess. Women are at particular risk during perimenopause, when hormones change and metabolism slows. The purpose of this review was to examine published studies of weight loss programs for perimenopausal women using behavioral change strategies of diet alone, regular physical activity alone, or both in combination to determine the range of potential outcomes and reduction of cardiovascular risks. Based on the findings from this review, practice applications and recommendations for future research are proposed. PMID:25084185

  19. Toward Ensuring Health Equity: Readability and Cultural Equivalence of OMERACT Patient-reported Outcome Measures

    PubMed Central

    Petkovic, Jennifer; Epstein, Jonathan; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Welch, Vivian; Rader, Tamara; Lyddiatt, Anne; Clerehan, Rosemary; Christensen, Robin; Boonen, Annelies; Goel, Niti; Maxwell, Lara J.; Toupin-April, Karine; De Wit, Maarten; Barton, Jennifer; Flurey, Caroline; Jull, Janet; Barnabe, Cheryl; Sreih, Antoine G.; Campbell, Willemina; Pohl, Christoph; Duruöz, Mehmet Tuncay; Singh, Jasvinder A.; Tugwell, Peter S.; Guillemin, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Objective The goal of the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) 12 (2014) equity working group was to determine whether and how comprehensibility of patient-reported outcome measures (PROM) should be assessed, to ensure suitability for people with low literacy and differing cultures. Methods The English, Dutch, French, and Turkish Health Assessment Questionnaires and English and French Osteoarthritis Knee and Hip Quality of Life questionnaires were evaluated by applying 3 readability formulas: Flesch Reading Ease, Flesch-Kincaid grade level, and Simple Measure of Gobbledygook; and a new tool, the Evaluative Linguistic Framework for Questionnaires, developed to assess text quality of questionnaires. We also considered a study assessing cross-cultural adaptation with/without back-translation and/or expert committee. The results of this preconference work were presented to the equity working group participants to gain their perspectives on the importance of comprehensibility and cross-cultural adaptation for PROM. Results Thirty-one OMERACT delegates attended the equity session. Twenty-six participants agreed that PROM should be assessed for comprehensibility and for use of suitable methods (4 abstained, 1 no). Twenty-two participants agreed that cultural equivalency of PROM should be assessed and suitable methods used (7 abstained, 2 no). Special interest group participants identified challenges with cross-cultural adaptation including resources required, and suggested patient involvement for improving translation and adaptation. Conclusion Future work will include consensus exercises on what methods are required to ensure PROM are appropriate for people with low literacy and different cultures. PMID:26077410

  20. A systematic review of 'knowledge of dementia' outcome measures.

    PubMed

    Spector, Aimee; Orrell, Martin; Schepers, Astrid; Shanahan, Niamh

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of dementia measures are key to identifying areas of misinformation and establishing knowledge levels, thus guiding educational programmes and interventions. A three-step literature search was undertaken to identify measures of knowledge in dementia. An evaluation framework was employed articulating quality indicators for the psychometric properties of measures, based on their development and use within research studies. Five measures were identified: the Alzheimer's Disease Knowledge Test (ADKT, Dieckmann et al., 1988); the University of Alabama Alzheimer's Disease Knowledge Test for Health Professionals (UAB-ADKT, Barrett et al., 1997); the Dementia Quiz (DQ, Gilleard and Groom, 1994); the Knowledge of Aging and Memory Loss and Care (KAML-C, Kuhn et al., 2005) and the Alzheimer's Disease Knowledge Scale (ADKS, Carpenter et al., 2009). All measures followed a standard scale development process, generally with acceptable reliability and validity. Many studies used measures on populations beyond the target sample, without re-establishing the psychometric properties of the scales. There are limitations with all the measures, including weaknesses in psychometric properties, being outdated and having limited scope. Although the ADKT was once suited to international use and has established psychometric properties, some items are now outdated. The ADKS positions itself as an updated version of the ADKT, yet has not been used beyond the original development study. The DQ is most the suitable for family carers. All measures require periodic updates, to keep pace with the expanding field of dementia. More robust, contemporary measures of knowledge are required. PMID:21983429

  1. Measuring Spatial Infiltration in Stormwater Control Measures: Results and Implications

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will provide background information on research conducted by EPA-ORD on the use of soil moisture sensors in bioretention/bioinfiltration technologies to evaluate infiltration mechanisms and compares monitoring results to simplified modeling assumptions. A serie...

  2. Achievements in mental health outcome measurement in Australia: Reflections on progress made by the Australian Mental Health Outcomes and Classification Network (AMHOCN)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Australia’s National Mental Health Strategy has emphasised the quality, effectiveness and efficiency of services, and has promoted the collection of outcomes and casemix data as a means of monitoring these. All public sector mental health services across Australia now routinely report outcomes and casemix data. Since late-2003, the Australian Mental Health Outcomes and Classification Network (AMHOCN) has received, processed, analysed and reported on outcome data at a national level, and played a training and service development role. This paper documents the history of AMHOCN’s activities and achievements, with a view to providing lessons for others embarking on similar exercises. Method We conducted a desktop review of relevant documents to summarise the history of AMHOCN. Results AMHOCN has operated within a framework that has provided an overarching structure to guide its activities but has been flexible enough to allow it to respond to changing priorities. With no precedents to draw upon, it has undertaken activities in an iterative fashion with an element of ‘trial and error’. It has taken a multi-pronged approach to ensuring that data are of high quality: developing innovative technical solutions; fostering ‘information literacy’; maximising the clinical utility of data at a local level; and producing reports that are meaningful to a range of audiences. Conclusion AMHOCN’s efforts have contributed to routine outcome measurement gaining a firm foothold in Australia’s public sector mental health services. PMID:22640939

  3. Measuring Self-Efficacy and Outcome Expectations for Resisting Social Pressures to Smoke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langlois, Marietta A.; Petosa R. Linyak; Hallam, Jeffrey S.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a valid and reliable instrument to measure the Social Cognitive Theory (SCT) constructs of smoking refusal skill-efficacy, positive smoking refusal outcome expectations & importance and negative smoking refusal outcome expectations & importance. This article details the rigorous instrument development

  4. Measuring Self-Efficacy and Outcome Expectations for Resisting Social Pressures to Smoke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langlois, Marietta A.; Petosa R. Linyak; Hallam, Jeffrey S.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a valid and reliable instrument to measure the Social Cognitive Theory (SCT) constructs of smoking refusal skill-efficacy, positive smoking refusal outcome expectations & importance and negative smoking refusal outcome expectations & importance. This article details the rigorous instrument development…

  5. Measuring the Quality of VET Using the Student Outcomes Survey. Occasional Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Wang-Sheng; Polidano, Cain

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this report is to examine the potential use of information from the Student Outcomes Survey, including the use of student course satisfaction information and post-study outcomes, as a means of determining markers of training quality. In an analysis of the student course satisfaction measures, the authors found there are very small…

  6. Cost-Outcome Analysis: Measuring Costs. Evaluation Guides: Guide Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jana K.

    The first of two related pamphlets, this guide provides information on how to conduct cost-outcome analyses, with an emphasis on measuring costs. After an introduction that delineates the purpose of the two-part series, the pamphlet is divided into six major sections. The first section, "definitions and rationale," introduces cost-outcome analysis…

  7. Assessing the Psychological Changes of Gifted Students Attending a Residential High School with an Outcome Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rollins, Marlon R.; Cross, Tracy L.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the psychological changes that 272 students experienced while attending a residential school for gifted adolescents in the Midwest. This article shares the quantitative portion of a mixed-methods study. Outcome measurement data from the Youth Outcome Questionnaire Self-Report 2.0 (YOQ-SR) tracked students' level of…

  8. The National Outcomes Measurement System for Pediatric Speech-Language Pathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Robert; Schooling, Tracy

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association's (ASHA's) National Outcomes Measurement System (NOMS) was developed in the late 1990s. The primary purpose was to serve as a source of data for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) who found themselves called on to provide empirical evidence of the functional outcomes associated with their…

  9. Multiple Measures of Outcome in Assessing a Prison-Based Drug Treatment Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prendergast, Michael L.; Hall, Elizabeth A.; Wexler, Harry K.

    2003-01-01

    Evaluations of prison-based drug treatment programs typically focus on one or two dichotomous outcome variables related to recidivism. In contrast, this paper uses multiple measures of outcomes related to crime and drug use to examine the impact of prison treatment. Crime variables included self-report data of time to first illegal activity,…

  10. Development and Validation of the Keele Musculoskeletal Patient Reported Outcome Measure (MSK-PROM)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop and validate a patient report outcome measure (PROM) for clinical practice that can monitor health status of patients with a range of musculoskeletal (MSK) disorders. Methods Constructs for inclusion in the MSK-PROM were identified from a consensus process involving patients with musculoskeletal conditions, clinicians, purchasers of healthcare services, and primary care researchers. Psychometric properties of the brief tool, including face and construct validity, repeatability and responsiveness were assessed in a sample of patients with musculoskeletal pain consulting physiotherapy services in the United Kingdom (n=425). Results The consensus process identified 10 prioritised domains for monitoring musculoskeletal health status: pain intensity, quality of life, physical capacity, interference with social/leisure activities, emotional well-being, severity of most difficult thing, activities and roles, understanding independence, and overall impact. As the EuroQol (EQ-5D-5L) is a widely adopted PROMs tool and covers the first four domains listed, to reduce patient burden to a minimum the MSK-PROM was designed to capture the remaining six prioritised domains which are not measured by the EQ-5D-5L. The tool demonstrated excellent reliability, construct validity, responsiveness and acceptability to patients and clinicians for use in clinical practice. Conclusion We have validated a brief patient reported outcome measure (MSK-PROM) for use in clinical practice to measure musculoskeletal health status and monitor outcomes over time using domains that are meaningful to patients and sensitive to change. Further work will establish whether the MSK-PROM is useful in other musculoskeletal healthcare settings. PMID:25928807

  11. The measurement of patient-reported outcomes of refractive surgery: the refractive status and vision profile.

    PubMed Central

    Schein, O D

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: To develop a questionnaire, the Refractive Status and Vision Profile (RSVP), to assess health-related quality of life associated with refractive error and its correction. METHODS: The published literature on patient report of visual and overall function was reviewed, and the RSVP was self-administered by 550 participants with refractive error. Cross-sectional validation was performed using standard psychometric techniques. The responsiveness of the RSVP to surgical intervention was assessed prospectively in a subset of 176 patients. The principal outcomes measures were scores on the overall RSVP scale (S) and on 8 RSVP subscales (functioning, driving, concern, expectations, symptoms, glare, optical problems, problems with corrective lenses). RESULTS: The RSVP (S) and its subscales demonstrated very good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha, 0.70-0.93). S and several subscale scores were independently associated with satisfaction with vision and were more correlated with satisfaction with vision than with either visual acuity or refractive error. Higher refractive error was associated with lower scores on S and on 5 subscales. In the prospective surgical cohort, 15% of patients had some worsening in their total RSVP score; however, substantial variation was seen in the individual subscales where worsening ranged from 7% (problems with corrective lenses) to 41% (driving). The effect size (measure of responsiveness) of the RSVP and most of its subscales was very high. Approximately 14% of patients had significant worsening in 3 or more subscales, and this outcome was found to be independently associated with being dissatisfied with vision following surgery (OR, 5.84; 95% CI, 1.88, 8.13). CONCLUSIONS: The RSVP has been validated as a questionnaire that measures patient-reported quality of life related to refractive error and its correction. It is responsive to surgical intervention and provides important information regarding patient outcomes not available from standard clinical measurements. PMID:11190036

  12. A learning platform approach to outcome measurement in fragile X syndrome: a preliminary psychometric study

    PubMed Central

    Hall, S. S.; Hammond, J. L.; Hirt, M.; Reiss, A. L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical trials of medications to alleviate the cognitive and behavioural symptoms of individuals with fragile X syndrome (FXS) are now underway. However, there are few reliable, valid and/or sensitive outcome measures available that can be directly administered to individuals with FXS. The majority of assessments employed in clinical trials may be suboptimal for individuals with intellectual disability (ID) because they require face-to-face interaction with an examiner, taxing administration periods, and do not provide reinforcement and/or feedback during the test. We therefore examined the psychometric properties of a new computerised learning platform approach to outcome measurement in FXS. Method A brief computerised test, incorporated into the Discrete Trial Trainer a commercially available software program designed for children with ID was administered to 13 girls with FXS, 12 boys with FXS and 15 matched ID controls aged 10 to 23 years (mental age = 4 to 12 years). The software delivered automated contingent access to reinforcement, feedback, token delivery and prompting procedures (if necessary) on each trial to facilitate responding. The primary outcome measure was the participants learning rate, derived from the participants cumulative record of correct responses. Results All participants were able to complete the test and floor effects appeared to be minimal. Learning rates averaged approximately five correct responses per minute, ranging from one to eight correct responses per minute in each group. Testretest reliability of the learning rates was 0.77 for girls with FXS, 0.90 for boys with FXS and 0.90 for matched ID controls. Concurrent validity with raw scores obtained on the Arithmetic subtest of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-III was 0.35 for girls with FXS, 0.80 for boys with FXS and 0.56 for matched ID controls. The learning rates were also highly sensitive to change, with effect sizes of 1.21, 0.89 and 1.47 in each group respectively following 15 to 20, 15-min sessions of intensive discrete trial training conducted over 1.5 days. Conclusions These results suggest that a learning platform approach to outcome measurement could provide investigators with a reliable, valid and highly sensitive measure to evaluate treatment efficacy, not only for individuals with FXS but also for individuals with other ID. PMID:22533667

  13. Effect of anxiety on treatment presentation and outcome: results from the Marijuana Treatment Project.

    PubMed

    Buckner, Julia D; Carroll, Kathleen M

    2010-08-15

    Despite emerging evidence of the efficacy of psychotherapies for marijuana dependence, variability in outcome exists. This study examined the role of anxiety on treatment involvement and outcome. Four questions were examined: (1) Is greater anxiety associated with greater impairment at baseline? (2) Is baseline anxiety related to greater marijuana use and problems following treatment? (3) Does adding cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) to motivation enhancement therapy (MET) reduce anxiety relative to MET alone; (4) Are reductions in anxiety associated with better outcomes? The sample comprised 450 marijuana-dependent patients in the Marijuana Treatment Project. Marijuana use and anxiety were measured at pretreatment and 4- and 9-month follow-ups. At baseline, anxiety was linked to more marijuana-related problems. CBT was associated with less anxiety at follow-up compared to MET alone. Reductions in anxiety were related to less marijuana use. In fact, reduction in anxiety from baseline to 4-month follow-up was associated with less marijuana use at 9 months, but reduction in marijuana use did not predict subsequent anxiety. Data suggest that anxiety is an important variable that deserves further attention in marijuana-dependence treatment. PMID:20537406

  14. Effect of anxiety on treatment presentation and outcome: Results from the Marijuana Treatment Project

    PubMed Central

    Buckner, Julia D.; Carroll, Kathleen M.

    2009-01-01

    Despite emerging evidence of the efficacy of psychotherapies for marijuana dependence, variability in outcome exists. This study examined the role of anxiety on treatment involvement and outcome. Four questions were examined: (1) is greater anxiety associated with greater impairment at baseline; (2) is baseline anxiety related to greater marijuana use and problems following treatment; (3) does adding cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) to motivation enhancement therapy (MET) reduce anxiety relative to MET alone; (4) are reductions in anxiety associated with better outcomes. The sample was comprised of 450 marijuana dependent patients in the Marijuana Treatment Project. Marijuana use and anxiety were measured at pretreatment and 4- and 9-month follow-ups. At baseline, anxiety was linked to more marijuana-related problems. CBT was associated with less anxiety at follow-up compared to MET alone. Reductions in anxiety were related to less marijuana use. In fact, reduction in anxiety from baseline to 4-month follow-up was associated with less marijuana use at 9-months, but reduction in marijuana use did not predict subsequent anxiety. Data suggest anxiety is an important variable that deserves further attention in marijuana dependence treatment. PMID:20537406

  15. Outcome Measures in Tele-Rehabilitation and Virtual Reality for Stroke Survivors: Protocol for a Scoping Review

    PubMed Central

    Veras, Mirella; Kairy, Dahlia; Rogante, Marco; Giacomozzi, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Despite the increased interest about tele-rehabilitation, virtual reality and outcome measures for stroke rehabilitation, surprisingly little research has been done to map and summarize the most common outcome measures used in tele-rehabilitation. For this review, we propose to conduct a systematic search of the literature that reports outcome measures used in tele-rehabilitation or virtual reality for stroke rehabilitation. Specific objectives include: 1) to identify the outcome measures used in tele-rehabilitation studies; 2) to describe the psychometric properties of the outcome measures in the included studies; 3) to describe which parts of the International Classification of Functioning are measured in the studies. Methods: we will conduct a comprehensive search of relevant electronic databases (e.g., PUBMED, CINAHL, EMBASE, PSYCOINFO, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trial and PEDRO). The scoping review will include all study designs. Two reviewers will pilot-test the data extraction forms and will independently screen all the studies and extract the data. Disagreements about inclusion or exclusion will be resolved by consensus or by consulting a third reviewer. The results will be synthesized and reported considering the implications of the findings within the clinical practice and policy context. Dissemination: we anticipate that this scoping review will contribute to inform researchers and end-users (ie, clinicians and policy-makers), regarding the most appropriate outcome measures for tele-rehabilitation or virtual reality as well as help to identify gaps in current measures. Results will be disseminated through reports and open access journals, conference presentations, as well as newsletters, podcasts and meetings targeting all the relevant stakeholders. PMID:26234991

  16. Comparative Responsiveness of Pain Outcome Measures Among Primary Care Patients With Musculoskeletal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Krebs, Erin E.; Bair, Matthew J.; Damush, Teresa M.; Tu, Wanzhu; Wu, Jingwei; Kroenke, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Background Comparative responsiveness data are needed to inform choices about pain outcome measures. Objectives To compare responsiveness of pain intensity, pain-related function, and composite measures, using data from a randomized trial and observational study. Research Design Analysis of responsiveness. Subjects A total of 427 adults with persistent back, hip, or knee pain were recruited from primary care. Methods Participants completed Brief Pain Inventory, Chronic Pain Grade (CPG), Roland disability, SF-36 bodily pain, and pain global rating of change measures. We used the global rating as the anchor for standardized response mean and receiver operating characteristic curve analyses. We used the distribution-based standard error of measurement to estimate minimally important change. To assess responsiveness to the trial intervention, we evaluated standardized effect size statistics stratified by trial arm. Results All measures were responsive to global improvement and all had fair-to-good accuracy in discriminating between participants with and without improvement. SF bodily pain was less responsive than other measures in several analyses. The 3-item PEG was similarly responsive to full Brief Pain Inventory scales. CPG and SF bodily pain were less responsive to the trial intervention and did not perform well among participants with hip/knee pain. Agreement between anchor and distribution-based methods was modest. Conclusions If a brief measure is desired, the 3-item PEG is more responsive than the SF bodily pain scale. CPG and SF bodily pain scales may be relatively poor choices for trial outcome assessment. Both anchor and distribution-based methods should be considered when determining clinically important change. PMID:20856144

  17. The challenges of translating the clinical outcomes in Routine Evaluation-Outcome Measure (CORE-OM) into British Sign Language.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Katherine D; Young, Alys; Lovell, Karina; Evans, Chris

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses translation issues arising during the production of a British Sign Language (BSL) version of the psychological outcome measure "Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation-Outcome Measure" (CORE-OM). The process included forward translation, meeting with a team of translators, producing a second draft of the BSL version and back translating into English. Further modifications were made to the BSL version before piloting it with d/Deaf populations. Details of the translation process are addressed, including (a) the implications of translating between modalities (written text to visual language); (b) clarity of frequency anchors: analog versus digital encoding; (c) pronouns and the direction of signing; and (iv) the influence of the on-screen format. The discussion of item-specific issues encountered when producing a BSL version of the CORE-OM includes the expression of precise emotional states in a language that uses visual modifiers, problems associated with iconic signs, and the influence of Deaf world knowledge when interpreting specific statements. Finally, it addresses the extent to which lessons learned through this translation process are generalizable to other signed languages and spoken language translations of standardized instruments. Despite the challenges, a BSL version of the CORE-OM has been produced and found to be reliable. PMID:23382390

  18. Infant-parent attachment: Definition, types, antecedents, measurement and outcome.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Diane

    2004-10-01

    Attachment theory is one of the most popular and empirically grounded theories relating to parenting. The purpose of the present article is to review some pertinent aspects of attachment theory and findings from attachment research. Attachment is one specific aspect of the relationship between a child and a parent with its purpose being to make a child safe, secure and protected. Attachment is distinguished from other aspects of parenting, such as disciplining, entertaining and teaching. Common misconceptions about what attachment is and what it is not are discussed. The distinction between attachment and bonding is provided. The recognized method to assess infant-parent attachment, the Strange Situation procedure, is described. In addition, a description is provided for the four major types of infant-parent attachment, ie, secure, insecure-avoidant, insecure-resistant and insecure-disorganized. The antecedents and consequences of each of the four types of infant-parent attachment are discussed. A special emphasis is placed on the description of disorganized attachment because of its association with significant emotional and behavioural problems, and poor social and emotional outcomes in high-risk groups and in the majority of children who have disorganized attachment with their primary caregiver. Practical applications of attachment theory and research are presented. PMID:19680481

  19. Measuring end-of-life care outcomes prospectively.

    PubMed

    Steinhauser, Karen E

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the state of the science in prospective measurement in end-of-life research and identifies particular areas for focused attention. Topics include defining the scope of inquiry, evaluating experiences of patients too ill to communicate, the role of proxy and family response, measurement sensitivity to change, the role of theory in guiding measurement efforts, evaluating relationships between domains of end-of-life experience, and measurement of cultural comprehensiveness. The state of the sciences calls for future research to (1) conduct longitudinal studies to capture transitions in end-of-life trajectories; (2) evaluate the quality of proxy reporting as it varies by rater relationship, domain, and over time; (3) use state-of-the art psychometric and longitudinal techniques to validate measures and to assess sensitivity to change; (4) develop further and test conceptual models of the experience of dying; (5) study the inter-relatedness of multiple dimensions of end-of-life trajectories; (6) compile updated information evaluating available measurement tools; and (7) conduct population- based research with attention to ethnic and age diversity. PMID:16499466

  20. Conservation Covenants on Private Land: Issues with Measuring and Achieving Biodiversity Outcomes in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzsimons, James A.; Carr, C. Ben

    2014-09-01

    Conservation covenants and easements have become essential tools to secure biodiversity outcomes on private land, and to assist in meeting international protection targets. In Australia, the number and spatial area of conservation covenants has grown significantly in the past decade. Yet there has been little research or detailed policy analysis of conservation covenanting in Australia. We sought to determine how conservation covenanting agencies were measuring the biodiversity conservation outcomes achieved on covenanted properties, and factors inhibiting or contributing to measuring these outcomes. In addition, we also investigated the drivers and constraints associated with actually delivering the biodiversity outcomes, drawing on detailed input from covenanting programs. Although all conservation covenanting programs had the broad aim of maintaining or improving biodiversity in their covenants in the long term, the specific stated objectives of conservation covenanting programs varied. Programs undertook monitoring and evaluation in different ways and at different spatial and temporal scales. Thus, it was difficult to determine the extent Australian conservation covenanting agencies were measuring the biodiversity conservation outcomes achieved on covenanted properties on a national scale. Lack of time available to covenantors to undertake management was one of the biggest impediments to achieving biodiversity conservation outcomes. A lack of financial resources and human capital to monitor, knowing what to monitor, inconsistent monitoring methodologies, a lack of benchmark data, and length of time to achieve outcomes were all considered potential barriers to monitoring the biodiversity conservation outcomes of conservation covenants.

  1. Posttraumatic midshaft clavicular shortening does not result in relevant functional outcome changes

    PubMed Central

    Stegeman, Sylvia A; de Witte, Pieter Bas; Boonstra, Sjoerd; de Groot, Jurriaan H; Nagels, Jochem; Krijnen, Pieta; Schipper, Inger B

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Shoulder function may be changed after healing of a nonoperatively treated clavicular fracture, especially in cases of clavicular shortening or mal-union. We investigated scapular orientations and functional outcome in healed clavicular fractures with and without clavicular shortening. Patients and methods 32 participants with a healed nonoperatively treated midshaft clavicular fracture were investigated. Motions of the thorax, arm, and shoulder were recorded by standardized electromagnetic 3D motion tracking. The DASH score and Constant-Murley score were used to evaluate functional outcome. Orientation of the scapula and humerus at rest and during standardized tasks, and strength and function of the affected shoulders were compared with corresponding values for the uninjured contralateral shoulders. Results Mean clavicular shortening was 25 mm (SD 16). Scapula protraction had increased by mean 4.4° in rest position in the affected shoulders. During abduction, slightly more protraction, slightly more lateral rotation, and slightly less backward tilt was found for the affected shoulders. For anteflexion, the scapular orientations of the affected shoulders also showed slightly increased protraction, slightly increased lateral rotation, and slightly reduced backward tilt. Scapulohumeral kinematics, maximum humerus angles, and strength were not associated with the degree of clavicular shortening. All participants had excellent performance on the Constant-Murley score and DASH score. Interpretation Scapulohumeral kinematics in shoulders with a healed clavicular fracture differ from those in uninjured shoulders, but these changes are small, do not result in clinically relevant changes in outcome, and do not relate to the amount of clavicular shortening. These findings do not support routine operative reduction and fixation of shortened midshaft clavicular fractures based on the argument of functional outcome. PMID:25872962

  2. Psychometrics of the Personal Questionnaire: A client-generated outcome measure.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Robert; Wagner, John; Sales, Célia M D; Rodgers, Brian; Alves, Paula; Café, Maria J

    2016-03-01

    We present a range of evidence for the reliability and validity of data generated by the Personal Questionnaire (PQ), a client-generated individualized outcome measure, using 5 data sets from 3 countries. Overall pretherapy mean internal consistency (alpha) across clients was .80, and within-client alphas averaged .77; clients typically had 1 or 2 items that did not vary with the other items. Analyses of temporal structure indicated high levels of between-clients variance (58%), moderate pretherapy test-retest correlation (r = .57), and high session-to-session Lag-1 autocorrelation (.82). Scores on the PQ provided clear evidence of convergence with a range of outcome measures (within-client r = .41). Mean pre-post effects were large (d = 1.25). The results support a revised caseness cutoff of 3.25 and a reliable change index interval of 1.67. We conclude that PQ data meet criteria for evidence-based, norm-referenced measurement of client psychological distress for supporting psychotherapy practice and research. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26075406

  3. MEASURING THE IMPACT OF PARTICULATE MATTER REDUCTIONS BY ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH OUTCOME INDICATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantifiable indicators will measure the progress of local and national PM reduction strategies in lowering population exposure to PM and positively impacting public health. These environmental health outcome indicators will ultimately serve to inform and evaluate environmen...

  4. Assessment of murine lung mechanics outcome measures: alignment with those made in asthmatics

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Julia K. L.; Kraft, Monica; Fisher, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Although asthma is characterized as an inflammatory disease, recent reports highlight the importance of pulmonary physiology outcome measures to the clinical assessment of asthma control and risk of asthma exacerbation. Murine models of allergic inflammatory airway disease have been widely used to gain mechanistic insight into the pathogenesis of asthma; however, several aspects of murine models could benefit from improvement. This review focuses on aligning lung mechanics measures made in mice with those made in humans, with an eye toward improving the translational utility of these measures. A brief description of techniques available to measure murine lung mechanics is provided along with a methodological consideration of their utilization. How murine lung mechanics outcome measures relate to pulmonary physiology measures conducted in humans is discussed and we recommend that, like human studies, outcome measures be standardized for murine models of asthma. PMID:23408785

  5. Long-Term Outcomes of Cultivated Limbal Epithelial Transplantation: Evaluation and Comparison of Results in Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Ganger, Anita; Vanathi, M.; Mohanty, Sujata; Tandon, Radhika

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the long-term clinical outcomes of cultivated limbal epithelial transplantation (CLET) in children and adults with limbal stem cell deficiency. Design. Retrospective case series. Methods. Case records of patients with limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) who underwent CLET from April 2004 to December 2014 were studied. Outcome measures were compared in terms of anatomical success and visual improvement. Parameters for total anatomical success were avascular, epithelized, and clinically stable corneal surface without conjunctivalization, whereas partial anatomical success was considered when mild vascularization (sparing centre of cornea) and mild conjunctivalization were noted along with complete epithelization. Results. A total of 62 cases underwent the CLET procedure: 38 (61.3%) were children and 24 (38.7%) were adults. Patients with unilateral LSCD (33 children and 21 adults) had autografts and those with bilateral LSCD (5 children and 3 adults) had allografts. Amongst the 54 autografts partial and total anatomical success were noted in 21.2% and 66.6% children, respectively, and 19.0% and 80.9% in adults, respectively (p value 0.23). Visual improvement of 1 line and ≥2 lines was seen in 57.5% and 21.2% children, respectively, and 38% and 38% in adults, respectively (p value 0.31). Conclusion. Cultivated limbal epithelial transplantation gives good long-term results in patients with LSCD and the outcomes are comparable in children and adults. PMID:26770973

  6. Engaging the hearts and minds of clinicians in outcome measurement – the UK rehabilitation outcomes collaborative approach

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This article explores the rationale for choosing the instruments included within the UK Rehabilitation Outcomes Collaborative (UKROC) data set. Using one specialist neuro-rehabilitation unit as an exemplar service, it describes an approach to engaging the hearts and minds of clinicians in recording the data. Key messages and implications Measures included within a national data set for rehabilitation should be psychometrically robust and feasible to use in routine clinical practice; they should also support clinical decision-making so that clinicians actually want to use them. Learning from other international casemix models and benchmarking data sets, the UKROC team has developed a cluster of measures to inform the development of effective and cost-efficient rehabilitation services. These include measures of (1) “needs” for rehabilitation (complexity), (2) inputs provided to meet those needs (nursing and therapy intervention), and (3) outcome, including the attainment of personal goals as well as gains in functional independence. Conclusions By integrating the use of the data set measures in everyday clinical practice, we have achieved a very high rate of compliance with data collection. However, staff training and ongoing commitment from senior staff and managers are critical to the maintenance of effort required to provide assurance of data quality in the longer term. PMID:22506959

  7. An evaluation of interrupted and uninterrupted measurement of vocal stereotypy on perceived treatment outcomes.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Regina A; Kodak, Tiffany

    2014-01-01

    The type of procedure used to measure a target behavior may directly influence the perceived treatment outcomes. In the present study, we examined the influence of different data-analysis procedures on the outcomes of two commonly used treatments on the vocal stereotypy of 2 children with an autism spectrum disorder. In Study 1, we compared an interrupted and uninterrupted data-analysis procedure to measure vocal stereotypy during the implementation of response interruption and redirection (RIRD). The results showed that the interrupted data-analysis procedure overestimated the effectiveness of RIRD. In Study 2, we examined the influence of different data-analysis procedures on the interpretation of the relative effects of 2 different treatments for vocal stereotypy. Specifically, we compared interrupted and uninterrupted data-analysis procedures during the implementation of RIRD and noncontingent reinforcement (NCR) as a treatment for vocal stereotypy. The results showed that, as in Study 1, the interrupted data-analysis procedure overestimated the effectiveness of RIRD; however, this effect was not apparent with NCR. These findings suggest that different types of data analysis can influence the perceived success of a treatment. PMID:24764249

  8. Feedback from Outcome Measures and Treatment Effectiveness, Treatment Efficiency, and Collaborative Practice: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Gondek, Dawid; Edbrooke-Childs, Julian; Fink, Elian; Deighton, Jessica; Wolpert, Miranda

    2016-05-01

    Due to recent increases in the use of feedback from outcome measures in mental health settings, we systematically reviewed evidence regarding the impact of feedback from outcome measures on treatment effectiveness, treatment efficiency, and collaborative practice. In over half of 32 studies reviewed, the feedback condition had significantly higher levels of treatment effectiveness on at least one treatment outcome variable. Feedback was particularly effective for not-on-track patients or when it was provided to both clinicians and patients. The findings for treatment efficiency and collaborative practice were less consistent. Given the heterogeneity of studies, more research is needed to determine when and for whom feedback is most effective. PMID:26744316

  9. Consensus for tinnitus patient assessment and treatment outcome measurement: Tinnitus Research Initiative meeting, Regensburg, July 2006

    PubMed Central

    Langguth, B.; Goodey, R.; Azevedo, A.; Bjorne, A.; Cacace, A.; Crocetti, A.; Del Bo, L.; De Ridder, D.; Diges, I.; Elbert, T.; Flor, H.; Herraiz, C.; Sanchez, T. Ganz; Eichhammer, P.; Figueiredo, R.; Hajak, G.; Kleinjung, T.; Landgrebe, M.; Londero, A.; Lainez, M.J.A.; Mazzoli, M.; Meikle, M.B.; Melcher, J.; Rauschecker, J.P.; Sand, P.G.; Struve, M.; Van de Heyning, P.; Van Dijk, P.; Vergara, R.

    2014-01-01

    There is widespread recognition that consistency between research centres in the ways that patients with tinnitus are assessed and outcomes following interventions are measured would facilitate more effective co-operation and more meaningful evaluations and comparisons of outcomes. At the first Tinnitus Research Initiative meeting held in Regensburg in July 2006 an attempt was made through workshops to gain a consensus both for patient assessments and for outcome measurements. It is hoped that this will contribute towards better cooperation between research centres in finding and evaluating treatments for tinnitus by allowing better comparability between studies. PMID:17956816

  10. Craniofacial Measurements of Donors and Recipients Correlate with Aesthetic Outcome in Virtual Face Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    S. Wallins, Joseph; Chandawarkar, Akash A.; Dobry, Allison; Diaz-Siso, J. Rodrigo; Bueno, Ericka M.; Caterson, Edward J.; Jania, Camille; Hevelone, Nathanael D.; Lipsitz, Stuart R.; Mukundan, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Face transplantation is an increasingly feasible option for patients with severe disfigurement. Donors and recipients are currently matched based on immune compatibility, skin characteristics, age, and gender. Aesthetic outcomes of the match are not always optimal and not possible to study in actual cases due to ethical and logistical challenges. We have used a reproducible and inexpensive three-dimensional virtual face transplantation (VFT) model to study this issue. Methods: Sixty-one VFTs were performed using reconstructed high-resolution computed tomography angiographs of male and female subjects aged 20–69 years. Twenty independent reviewers evaluated the level of disfigurement of the posttransplant models. Absolute differences in 9 soft-tissue measurements and 16 bony cephalometric measurements from each of the VFT donor and recipient pretransplant model pairs were correlated to the reviewers’ evaluation of disfigurement after VFT through a multivariate logistic regression model. Results: Five soft-tissue measurements and 3 bony measurements were predictive of the rating of disfigurement after VFT (odds ratio; 95% confidence interval): trichion-to-nasion facial height (1.106; 1.066–1.148), endocanthal width (1.096; 1.051–1.142), exocanthal width (1.067; 1.036–1.099), mouth/chelion width (1.064; 1.019–1.110), subnasale-to-menton facial height (1.029; 1.003–1.056), inner orbit width (1.039; 1.009–1.069), palatal plane/occlusal plane angle (1.148; 1.047–1.258), and sella-nasion/mandibular plane angle (1.079; 1.013–1.150). Conclusions: This study provides early evidence for the importance of soft-tissue and bony measurements in planning of facial transplantation. With future improvements to immunosuppressive regimens and increased donor availability, these measurements may be used as an additional criterion to optimize posttransplant outcomes. PMID:26090275

  11. Association between thymic function and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation outcome: results of a pediatric study.

    PubMed

    Saglio, Francesco; Cena, Silvia; Berger, Massimo; Quarello, Paola; Boccasavia, Viola; Ferrando, Federica; Pittana, Laura; Bruno, Benedetto; Fagioli, Franca

    2015-06-01

    Robust T cell function recovery has been shown to be crucial in determining allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) outcome, and there is growing evidence that the thymus plays a central role in regulating this process. We performed a long-term analysis of the role of thymic activity recovery in a population of pediatric patients undergoing allogeneic HSCT by signal joint T cell receptor excision circle (sjTREC) quantification. In this study, characterized by a long-term follow-up (median, 72 months), we found patients with higher levels of sjTRECs before transplantation had a statistically significant reduced risk of death compared with patients with lower values (relative risk, .31; 95% confidence interval, .30 to .32; P = .02), showing this different outcome was mainly related to a reduction of relapse incidence (14% versus 43%, P = .02). Unlike previous reports, we observed no correlation between sjTREC levels and lymphocyte recovery. Moreover, we confirmed that only graft-versus-host disease influenced thymic activity after transplantation. In conclusion, our results suggest an association between pretransplantation thymic activity and the long-term outcome of pediatric patients undergoing HSCT, mainly through a reduction of relapse opportunities. PMID:25708218

  12. Open versus Laparoscopic Surgery: Does the Surgical Technique Influence Pain Outcome? Results from an International Registry

    PubMed Central

    Allvin, Renée; Rawal, Narinder; Johanzon, Eva; Bäckström, Ragnar

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative pain management relevant for specific surgical procedures is debated. The importance of evaluating pain with consideration given to type of surgery and the patient's perspective has been emphasized. In this prospective cohort study, we analysed outcome data from 607 patients in the international PAIN OUT registry for assessment and comparison of postoperative pain outcome within the 24 first hours after laparoscopic and open colonic surgery. Patients from the laparoscopic group scored minimum pain at a higher level than the open group (P = 0.012). Apart from minimum pain, no other significant differences in patient reported outcomes were observed. Maximum pain scores >3 were reported from 77% (laparoscopic) and 68% (open) patients (mean ≥ 5 in both groups). Pain interference with mobilization was reported by 87–93% of patients. Both groups scored high levels of patient satisfaction. In the open group, a higher frequency of patients received a combination of general and regional anaesthesia, which had an impact of the minimum pain score. Our results from registry data indicate that surgical technique does not influence the quality of postoperative pain management during the first postoperative day if adequate analgesia is given. PMID:27127649

  13. Research Choices for Measuring Outcome of High School Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Cynthia L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Assessed the efficacy of four group evaluation methods used to examine change in high school students' attitudes after participation in a drug abuse prevention group counseling treatment, including pre- and posttreatment measurement with a Likert scale or an open-ended questionnaire, and a case study approach. Discusses the relative merits of…

  14. 2-year outcomes in Initial survivors with Acute Liver failure: Results from a Prospective, Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Robert J.; Ellerbe, Caitlyn; Durkalski, Valerie E.; Rangnekar, Amol; Reddy, K. Rajender; Stravitz, Todd; McGuire, Brendan; Davern, Timothy; Reuben, Adrian; Liou, Iris; Fix, Oren; Ganger, Daniel R; Chung, Raymond T.; Schilsky, Mike; Han, Steven; Hynan, Linda S.; Sanders, Corron; Lee, William M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The long-term clinical outcomes in initial survivors with acute liver failure (ALF) are not well known. AIMS The aim of the current study is to provide an overview of the 2 year clinical outcomes amongst initial survivors and liver transplant (LT) recipients that were alive 3 weeks after enrollment in the Acute Liver Failure Study Group (ALFSG). METHODS Outcomes in adult ALFSG patients that were enrolled between 1998 and 2010 were reviewed. RESULTS 2-year patient survival was significantly higher in the 262 LT recipients (92.4%) compared to the 306 acetaminophen (APAP) spontaneous survivors (SS) (89.5%) and 200 non-APAP SS (75.5%) (p < 0.0001). The causes of death were similar in the 3 groups but the time to death was significantly longer in the LT recipients (p< 0.0001). Independent predictors of 2-year mortality in the APAP group were a high serum phosphate level and patient age (c-statistic = 0.65 (0.54, 0.76)), patient age and days from jaundice to ALF onset in the non-APAP group (c-statistic =0.69 (0.60, 0.78)), and patient age, days from jaundice, and higher coma grade in the LT recipients (c-statistic=0.74 (0.61, 0.87)). The LT recipients were significantly more likely to be employed and have a higher educational level (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS Two-year outcomes in initial survivors of ALF are generally good but non-APAP patients have a significantly lower survival which may relate to pre-existing medical co-morbidities. Spontaneous survivors with APAP overdose experience substantial morbidity during follow-up from ongoing psychiatric and substance abuse issues. PMID:25039930

  15. Outcome measures in major trauma care: a review of current international trauma registry practice.

    PubMed

    Sleat, Graham K J; Ardolino, Antonella M; Willett, Keith M

    2011-12-01

    Multiple reports over the past 20 years have criticised the care delivered to major trauma patients in England. The setting up of regional trauma networks is well underway to address these deficiencies. Outcomes currently collected in major trauma are restricted to mortality rates and process measures; however, many patients are left with long-term disabilities and reduced quality of life (QoL), which are not measured at present. Trauma systems need to develop outcome measures that capture this important information to judge the quality of care and influence the development of services. This review aimed to identify the current practice of international trauma registries with regard to outcome measurement and review the literature surrounding these measures. An internet-based search of international trauma registry websites including data dictionaries and annual reports was carried out as well as a literature review to determine what outcome measures are routinely collected by trauma registries. All registries were found to look at mortality and process measures, but only one registry routinely collected morbidity outcome measures for both adults and children. There is a considerable amount of disability and reduced QoL in survivors of major trauma that lasts for years following the injury. At present only the Victorian State Trauma Registry collects outcome measures that evaluate the extent of this. English regional trauma networks and the Trauma Audit and Research Network have the opportunity to learn from this experience and routinely start to collect measures of outcome that can drive service improvement and reduce patient morbidity. PMID:21890862

  16. Longitudinal changes of outcome measures in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Atsushi; Katsuno, Masahisa; Banno, Haruhiko; Suzuki, Keisuke; Suga, Noriaki; Mano, Tomoo; Atsuta, Naoki; Oe, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Sobue, Gen

    2012-09-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy is an adult-onset, hereditary motor neuron disease caused by the expansion of a trinucleotide CAG repeat within the gene encoding the androgen receptor. To date, several agents have been shown to prevent or slow disease progression in animal models of this disease. For the translational research of these agents, it is necessary to perform the detailed analysis of natural history with quantitative outcome measures and to establish sensitive and validated disease-specific endpoints in the clinical trials. To this end, we performed a prospective observation of disease progression over 3 years in 34 genetically confirmed Japanese patients with spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy by using quantitative outcome measures, including functional and blood parameters. The baseline evaluation revealed that CAG repeat length in the androgen receptor gene correlated not only with the age of onset but also with the timing of substantial changes in activity of daily living. Multiple regression analyses indicated that the serum level of creatinine is the most useful blood parameter that reflects the severity of motor dysfunction in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy. In 3-year prospective analyses, a slow but steady progression was affirmed in most of the outcome measures we examined. In the analyses using random coefficient models that summarize the individual data into a representative line, disease progression was not affected by CAG repeat length or onset age. These models showed large interindividual variation, which was also independent of the differences of CAG repeat size. Analyses using these models also demonstrated that the subtle neurological deficits at an early or preclinical stage were more likely to be detected by objective motor functional tests such as the 6-min walk test and grip power or serum creatinine levels than by functional rating scales, such as the revised amyotrophic lateral sclerosis functional rating scale or modified Norris scale. Categorization of the clinical phenotypes using factor analysis showed that upper limb function is closely related to bulbar function, but not to lower limb function at baseline, whereas the site of onset had no substantial effects on disease progression. These results suggest that patients with spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy show a slow but steady progression of motor dysfunction over time that is independent of CAG repeat length or clinical phenotype, and that objective outcome measures may be used to evaluate disease severity at an early stage of this disease. PMID:22773541

  17. Can Research Design Explain Variation in Head Start Research Results? A Meta-Analysis of Cognitive and Achievement Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shager, Hilary M.; Schindler, Holly S.; Magnuson, Katherine A.; Duncan, Greg J.; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Hart, Cassandra M. D.

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the extent to which differences in research design explain variation in Head Start program impacts. We employ meta-analytic techniques to predict effect sizes for cognitive and achievement outcomes as a function of the type and rigor of research design, quality and type of outcome measure, activity level of control group, and

  18. Can Research Design Explain Variation in Head Start Research Results? A Meta-Analysis of Cognitive and Achievement Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shager, Hilary M.; Schindler, Holly S.; Magnuson, Katherine A.; Duncan, Greg J.; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Hart, Cassandra M. D.

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the extent to which differences in research design explain variation in Head Start program impacts. We employ meta-analytic techniques to predict effect sizes for cognitive and achievement outcomes as a function of the type and rigor of research design, quality and type of outcome measure, activity level of control group, and…

  19. 26 CFR 801.6 - Business results measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 20 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Business results measures. 801.6 Section 801.6... BALANCED SYSTEM FOR MEASURING ORGANIZATIONAL AND EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE WITHIN THE INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE § 801.6 Business results measures. (a) In general. The business results measures will consist...

  20. Early Axonal Area Measurement Predicts Early Nerve Regeneration Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Neilson, Michael; Yan, Yuhui; Zhang, Lin-Ling; Wang, Ziyi; Agresti, Michael; Matloub, Hani; Yan, Ji-Gheng

    2016-03-01

    Background Study of peripheral nerve injury and regeneration in laboratory animals can be time consuming and expensive. This study determines if it is possible to reduce time and cost for a peripheral nerve regeneration study. Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine if nerve axonal area (NXA) or nerve fiber counting (NFC) correlates with compound muscle action potential (CMAP) recovery which is known to predict functional muscular recovery in the early stage of nerve regeneration. Methods In this study, six rats had a crush injury of the sciatic nerve without treatment. These rats were evaluated at 4 weeks of recovery with the following assessments: CMAP readings from the extensor digitorum longus, NXA measurement, and NFC. Results NXA correlated with CMAP; NFC did not correlate with CMAP. Conclusion NFC is not a reliable method for predicting muscular recovery in the early stages. NXA is a dependable assessment for muscular recovery in the early stages of nerve regeneration. Using NXA measurement can predict later electrophysiological and functional recovery. Using NXA with CMAP measurement for nerve injury, repair, and treatment in the animal study can save cost and time. PMID:26636887

  1. General Education Courses at the University of Botswana: Application of the Theory of Reasoned Action in Measuring Course Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garg, Deepti; Garg, Ajay K.

    2007-01-01

    This study applied the Theory of Reasoned Action and the Technology Acceptance Model to measure outcomes of general education courses (GECs) under the University of Botswana Computer and Information Skills (CIS) program. An exploratory model was validated for responses from 298 students. The results suggest that resources currently committed to…

  2. General Education Courses at the University of Botswana: Application of the Theory of Reasoned Action in Measuring Course Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garg, Deepti; Garg, Ajay K.

    2007-01-01

    This study applied the Theory of Reasoned Action and the Technology Acceptance Model to measure outcomes of general education courses (GECs) under the University of Botswana Computer and Information Skills (CIS) program. An exploratory model was validated for responses from 298 students. The results suggest that resources currently committed to

  3. Core outcome measures for opioid abuse liability laboratory assessment studies in humans: IMMPACT recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Comer, Sandra D.; Zacny, James P.; Dworkin, Robert H.; Turk, Dennis C.; Bigelow, George E.; Foltin, Richard W.; Jasinski, Donald R.; Sellers, Edward M.; Adams, Edgar H.; Balster, Robert; Burke, Laurie B.; Cerny, Igor; Colucci, Robert D.; Cone, Edward; Cowan, Penney; Farrar, John T.; Haddox, J. David; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A.; Hertz, Sharon; Jay, Gary W.; Johanson, Chris-Ellyn; Junor, Roderick; Katz, Nathaniel P.; Klein, Michael; Kopecky, Ernest A.; Leiderman, Deborah B.; McDermott, Michael P.; O’Brien, Charles; O’Connor, Alec B.; Palmer, Pamela P.; Raja, Srinivasa N.; Rappaport, Bob A.; Rauschkolb, Christine; Rowbotham, Michael C.; Sampaio, Cristina; Setnik, Beatrice; Sokolowska, Marta; Stauffer, Joseph W.; Walsh, Sharon L.

    2012-01-01

    A critical component in development of opioid analgesics is assessment of their abuse liability (AL). Standardization of approaches and measures used in assessing AL has the potential to facilitate comparisons across studies, research laboratories, and drugs. The goal of this report is to provide consensus recommendations regarding core outcome measures for assessing abuse potential of opioid medications in humans in a controlled laboratory setting. Although many of the recommended measures are appropriate for assessing the AL of medications from other drug classes, the focus here is on opioid medications because they present unique risks from both physiological (e.g., respiratory depression, physical dependence) and public health (e.g., individuals in pain) perspectives. A brief historical perspective on AL testing is provided and then those measures that can be considered primary and secondary outcomes and possible additional outcomes in AL assessment are discussed. These outcome measures include: (1) subjective effects (some of which comprise the primary outcome measures, including drug liking); (2) physiological responses; (3) drug self-administration behavior; and (4) cognitive and psychomotor performance. Prior to presenting recommendations for standardized approaches and measures to be used in AL assessments, the appropriateness of using these measures in clinical trials with patients in pain is discussed. PMID:22998781

  4. Outcome measures capturing ICF domains in patient with total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Alnahdi, Ali H

    2014-12-01

    The International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (ICF) represents a general framework for concepts of health and disability. The number of patients undergoing Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is increasing worldwide. Capturing the different health-related ICF domains in this increasing number of patients with TKA requires clinicians and researchers to be familiar with the tools that can be used in daily clinical practice to capture these health-related domains. This paper aimed to review the outcome measures related to the different ICF domains in patients with TKA and to review the psychometric properties of these outcome measures. An electronic search for relevant articles using MEDLINE and CINHAL databases up to March 2014 was performed. In addition to the electronic search, the articles retrieved were searched manually for relevant studies. Impairment-based outcome measures important to patients with TKA included measures of knee pain intensity, knee joint mobility, and muscle performance. Outcome measures capturing activity limitation in patients with TKA included both self-reported and performance-based measures as each capture a different aspect of the activity limitation construct. The disability component of the late life function and disability instrument can be used to quantify participation restriction patients with TKA. Clinicians and researchers are encouraged to measure the different health-related domains in patients with TKA using the outcome measures presented in this review. PMID:25221846

  5. Harmonising Outcome Measures for Eczema (HOME). Report from the First International Consensus Meeting (HOME 1), 24 July 2010, Munich, Germany.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, J; Williams, H

    2010-12-01

    Current clinical research in eczema (atopic dermatitis) is hampered by a profusion of outcome measures, most of which have not been developed or tested adequately. The first Harmonising Outcome Measures for Eczema meeting (HOME 1) was an exploratory meeting to determine whether there was sufficient interest and enthusiasm in the international scientific community to form a collaborative group to define a minimum set of core outcomes for future eczema (atopic dermatitis) research. The meeting was open to all participants of the 6th Georg Rajka Symposium/International Symposium on Atopic Dermatitis/New Trends in Allergy VII meeting in Munich, 22-24 July 2010. Approximately 40 individuals attended. Prior to the meeting, an international Delphi exercise was performed to develop consensus-based sets of core outcome domains for eczema for 'controlled trials' and 'clinical recordkeeping'. The results of this Delphi exercise were presented at the meeting and critically discussed by the attendees. The constructive group discussion identified several important issues for future eczema outcomes research such as the degree to which patients and carers can be involved and the importance of involving colleagues from countries not represented at the meeting. In summary, this exploratory meeting indicated a genuine interest in the academic eczema community to form an international multiprofessional group dedicated to harmonizing outcomes research in eczema. The group decided to continue collaboratively with the HOME initiative. PMID:21137114

  6. Model-based estimation of measures of association for time-to-event outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hazard ratios are ubiquitously used in time to event applications to quantify adjusted covariate effects. Although hazard ratios are invaluable for hypothesis testing, other adjusted measures of association, both relative and absolute, should be provided to fully appreciate studies results. The corrected group prognosis method is generally used to estimate the absolute risk reduction and the number needed to be treated for categorical covariates. Methods The goal of this paper is to present transformation models for time-to-event outcomes to obtain, directly from estimated coefficients, the measures of association widely used in biostatistics together with their confidence interval. Pseudo-values are used for a practical estimation of transformation models. Results Using the regression model estimated through pseudo-values with suitable link functions, relative risks, risk differences and the number needed to treat, are obtained together with their confidence intervals. One example based on literature data and one original application to the study of prognostic factors in primary retroperitoneal soft tissue sarcomas are presented. A simulation study is used to show some properties of the different estimation methods. Conclusions Clinically useful measures of treatment or exposure effect are widely available in epidemiology. When time to event outcomes are present, the analysis is performed generally resorting to predicted values from Cox regression model. It is now possible to resort to more general regression models, adopting suitable link functions and pseudo values for estimation, to obtain alternative measures of effect directly from regression coefficients together with their confidence interval. This may be especially useful when, in presence of time dependent covariate effects, it is not straightforward to specify the correct, if any, time dependent functional form. The method can easily be implemented with standard software. PMID:25106903

  7. Modeling Verdict Outcomes Using Social Network Measures: The Watergate and Caviar Network Cases

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Modelling criminal trial verdict outcomes using social network measures is an emerging research area in quantitative criminology. Few studies have yet analyzed which of these measures are the most important for verdict modelling or which data classification techniques perform best for this application. To compare the performance of different techniques in classifying members of a criminal network, this article applies three different machine learning classifiers–Logistic Regression, Naïve Bayes and Random Forest–with a range of social network measures and the necessary databases to model the verdicts in two real–world cases: the U.S. Watergate Conspiracy of the 1970’s and the now–defunct Canada–based international drug trafficking ring known as the Caviar Network. In both cases it was found that the Random Forest classifier did better than either Logistic Regression or Naïve Bayes, and its superior performance was statistically significant. This being so, Random Forest was used not only for classification but also to assess the importance of the measures. For the Watergate case, the most important one proved to be betweenness centrality while for the Caviar Network, it was the effective size of the network. These results are significant because they show that an approach combining machine learning with social network analysis not only can generate accurate classification models but also helps quantify the importance social network variables in modelling verdict outcomes. We conclude our analysis with a discussion and some suggestions for future work in verdict modelling using social network measures. PMID:26824351

  8. Validation of the CMT Pediatric Scale as an outcome measure of disability

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Joshua; Ouvrier, Robert; Estilow, Tim; Shy, Rosemary; Laurá, Matilde; Pallant, Julie F.; Lek, Monkol; Muntoni, Francesco; Reilly, Mary M.; Pareyson, Davide; Acsadi, Gyula; Shy, Michael E.; Finkel, Richard S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a common heritable peripheral neuropathy. There is no treatment for any form of CMT although clinical trials are increasingly occurring. Patients usually develop symptoms during the first two decades of life but there are no established outcome measures of disease severity or response to treatment. We identified a set of items that represent a range of impairment levels and conducted a series of validation studies to build a patient-centered multi-item rating scale of disability for children with CMT. Methods As part of the Inherited Neuropathies Consortium, patients aged 3–20 years with a variety of CMT types were recruited from the USA, UK, Italy and Australia. Initial development stages involved: definition of the construct, item pool generation, peer review and pilot testing. Based on data from 172 patients, a series of validation studies were conducted, including: item and factor analysis, reliability testing, Rasch modeling and sensitivity analysis. Results Seven areas for measurement were identified (strength, dexterity, sensation, gait, balance, power, endurance), and a psychometrically robust 11-item scale constructed (Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Pediatric Scale: CMTPedS). Rasch analysis supported the viability of the CMTPedS as a unidimensional measure of disability in children with CMT. It showed good overall model fit, no evidence of misfitting items, no person misfit and it was well targeted for children with CMT. Interpretation The CMTPedS is a well-tolerated outcome measure that can be completed in 25-minutes. It is a reliable, valid and sensitive global measure of disability for children with CMT from the age of 3 years. PMID:22522479

  9. Modeling Verdict Outcomes Using Social Network Measures: The Watergate and Caviar Network Cases.

    PubMed

    Masías, Víctor Hugo; Valle, Mauricio; Morselli, Carlo; Crespo, Fernando; Vargas, Augusto; Laengle, Sigifredo

    2016-01-01

    Modelling criminal trial verdict outcomes using social network measures is an emerging research area in quantitative criminology. Few studies have yet analyzed which of these measures are the most important for verdict modelling or which data classification techniques perform best for this application. To compare the performance of different techniques in classifying members of a criminal network, this article applies three different machine learning classifiers-Logistic Regression, Naïve Bayes and Random Forest-with a range of social network measures and the necessary databases to model the verdicts in two real-world cases: the U.S. Watergate Conspiracy of the 1970's and the now-defunct Canada-based international drug trafficking ring known as the Caviar Network. In both cases it was found that the Random Forest classifier did better than either Logistic Regression or Naïve Bayes, and its superior performance was statistically significant. This being so, Random Forest was used not only for classification but also to assess the importance of the measures. For the Watergate case, the most important one proved to be betweenness centrality while for the Caviar Network, it was the effective size of the network. These results are significant because they show that an approach combining machine learning with social network analysis not only can generate accurate classification models but also helps quantify the importance social network variables in modelling verdict outcomes. We conclude our analysis with a discussion and some suggestions for future work in verdict modelling using social network measures. PMID:26824351

  10. Measurement of Impairment among Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder as Part of Evaluating Treatment Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ansari, Ahmed M.

    2013-01-01

    This study assesses the impairment and treatment outcome of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in an outpatient child psychiatry clinic, using multiple sources, including the Children Global Assessment Scale (C-GAS). Methods: A total of 20 children, aged 4 to 16 years, were recruited serially in 2010 from the Child Psychiatric Unit of the Psychiatric Hospital, Manama, Bahrain. The children received a diagnosis of ADHD using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR). The children were assessed with the C-GAS by a blinded investigator, initially at the beginning of the treatment and then one year later. Results: The parents of the patients reported improvement in all cases; the improvement in impairment after one year, assessed using the C-GAS, was significant for all of the cases (P = 0.001) and low for those with comorbidity (P = 0.07). Conclusion: Measurement of improvement using the C-GAS was a suitable method of collecting data, and hence should be included in routine clinical practice for both ADHD diagnosis and outcome measurement. PMID:23862037

  11. The rheumatoid foot: a systematic literature review of patient-reported outcome measures

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The foot is often the first area of the body to be systematically affected by rheumatoid arthritis. The multidimensional consequences of foot problems for patients can be subjectively evaluated using patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). However, there is currently no systematic review which has focused specifically upon the PROMs available for the foot with rheumatoid arthritis. The aim of this systematic review was to appraise the foot-specific PROMs available for the assessment and/or evaluation of the foot affected with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods A systematic search of databases was conducted according to pre-defined inclusion/exclusion criteria. PROMs identified were reviewed in terms of: conceptual bases, quality of construction, measurement aims and evidence to support their measurement properties. Results A total of 11 PROMs were identified and 5 papers that provided evidence for the measurement properties of some of the PROMs. Only one of the PROMs was found to be RA disease-specific. The quality of construction, pretesting and presence of evidence for their measurement properties was found to be highly variable. Conceptual bases of many of the PROMs was either restricted or based on reductionist biomedical models. All of the PROMs were found to consist of fixed scales. Conclusions There is a need to develop an RA-disease and foot-specific PROM with a greater emphasis on a biopsychosocial conceptual basis, cognitive pre-testing methods, patient preference-based qualities and evidence to support the full complement of measurement properties. PMID:20618927

  12. Implementation and outcomes of telephone disclosure of clinical BRCA1/2 test results?

    PubMed Central

    Patrick-Miller, Linda; Egleston, Brian L.; Daly, Mary; Stevens, Evelyn; Fetzer, Dominique; Forman, Andrea; Bealin, Lisa; Rybak, Christina; Peterson, Candace; Corbman, Melanie; Bradbury, Angela R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: With an increasing demand for genetic services, effective and efficient delivery models for genetic testing are needed. Methods: In this prospective single-arm communication study, participants received clinical BRCA1/2 results by telephone with a genetic counselor and completed surveys at baseline, after telephone disclosure (TD) and after in-person clinical follow-up. Results: Sixty percent of women agreed to participate; 73% of decliners preferred in-person communication. Anxiety decreased from baseline to post-TD (p = 0.03) and satisfaction increased (p < 0.01). Knowledge did not change significantly from baseline to post-TD, but was higher post-clinical follow-up (p = 0.04). Cancer patients had greater declines in state anxiety and African-American participants reported less increase in satisfaction. 28% of participants did not return for in-person clinical follow-up, particularly those with less formal education, and higher post-disclosure anxiety and depression (p < 0.01). Conclusions: Telephone disclosure of BRCA1/2 test results may not be associated with negative cognitive and affective responses among willing patients, although some subgroups may experience less favorable responses. Some patients do not return for in-person clinical follow-up and longitudinal outcomes are unknown. Practice implications: Further evaluation of longitudinal outcomes of telephone disclosure and differences among subgroups can inform how to best incorporate telephone communication into delivery of genetic services. PMID:24075727

  13. Development and implementation of an evaluation strategy for measuring conservation outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Kathleen; Chessler, Melissa; York, Peter; Raynor, Jared

    2009-09-01

    The Philadelphia Zoo's Measuring Mission project assessed the conservation-related impacts of a visit to the Zoo and documented the results in a way that would provide a set of easily actionable planning strategies. A logic model provided a theoretical framework and guided the development of survey items. Three groups were surveyed using a pre-post retrospective instrument: zoo visitors, members, and volunteers. This report includes findings from the visitor surveys only. Data were analyzed using factor analysis, correlations, and t-tests. Results revealed that the Philadelphia Zoo has been most successful in providing its guests with a satisfying animal viewing experience, facilitated by accessible informative interpretive staff, but that guests do not always take advantage of opportunities to interact with staff. Success in achieving the Zoo's conservation mission was measured by comparing pre and posttest scores on five outcome factors (conservation motivation, conservation knowledge, pro-conservation consumer skills, conservation attitudes/values, readiness to take conservation action). The greatest gains were found in conservation knowledge and conservation motivation. Quality of exhibits and quality of staff stand out as the most important factors in influencing conservation outcomes. To ensure that results would be accessible to a wide variety of Zoo employees for planning, program and exhibit development, and staff training, nine strategies were identified as key to achieving success in the Zoo's mission. Measuring Mission has created a process for assessing the Zoo's mission impact, and has confirmed that high-quality exhibits interpreted by expert, readily available staff can influence conservation knowledge and motivation in particular. PMID:19725124

  14. Application of the National Institutes of Health Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®) to Mental Health Research

    PubMed Central

    Riley, William T.; Pilkonis, Paul; Cella, David

    2013-01-01

    Background The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) is a National Institutes of Health initiative to develop item banks measuring patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and to create and make available a computerized adaptive testing system (CAT) that allows for efficient and precise assessment of PROs in clinical research and practice. Aims of the Study Based on the presentation from a symposium on “Evidence-based Outcomes in Psychiatry: Updates on Measurement Using Patient-Reported Outcomes (PRO)” at the 2011 American Psychiatry Association Convention, this paper provides an overview of PROMIS and its application to mental health research. Methods The PROMIS methodology for item bank development and testing is described, with a focus on the implications of this work for mental health research. Results Utilizing qualitative item review and state-of-the-art applications of item response theory (IRT), PROMIS investigators have developed, tested, and released item banks measuring physical, mental, and social health components. Ongoing efforts continue to add new item banks and further validate existing banks. Discussion PROMIS provides item banks measuring several domains of interest to mental health researchers including emotional distress, social function, and sleep. PROMIS methodology also provides a rigorous standard for the development of new mental health measures. Implications for Health Care Provision Web-based CAT or administration of short forms derived from PROMIS item banks provide efficient and precise dimensional estimates of clinical outcomes that can be utilized to monitor patient progress and assess quality improvement. Implications for Future Research Use of the dimensional PROMIS metrics (and co-calibration of the PROMIS item banks with existing PROs) will allow comparisons of mental health and related health outcomes across disorders and studies. PMID:22345362

  15. Capturing Psychologists' Work in Integrated Care: Measuring and Documenting Administrative Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kearney, Lisa K; Smith, Clifford A; Pomerantz, Andrew S

    2015-12-01

    With the expansion of integrated primary care and the increased focus on fiscal sustainability, it is critical for clinical managers of these innovative systems to have practical methods for measuring administrative outcomes. Administrative outcomes will assist leadership in the development of efficient, streamlined clinics to provide services to the primary care population. Additionally, administrative measures can be utilized to provide information to assist in guiding resource utilization and management decisions. Several administrative outcomes are suggested for integrated primary care managers to consider for application, including: clinic utilization measures, integrated care administrative measures, wait time and access metrics, and productivity monitors. Effective utilization of these measures can help office managers and clinic leadership not only to maximize patient care, but also to enhance essential business operations, which increase the long-term sustainability of integrated primary care programs. PMID:26645090

  16. Relationship Between 1-Hour Glucose Challenge Test Results and Perinatal Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Dana; Landon, Mark B.; Mele, Lisa; Spong, Catherine Y.; Ramin, Susan M.; Casey, Brian; Wapner, Ronald J.; Varner, Michael W.; Thorp, John M.; Sciscione, Anthony; Catalano, Patrick; Harper, Margaret; Saade, George; Caritis, Steve N.; Sorokin, Yoram; Peaceman, Alan M.; Tolosa, Jorge E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To estimate the relationship between 1-hour 50 gm glucose challenge test (GCT) values and perinatal outcomes. Methods This was a secondary analysis of data from a multicenter treatment trial of mild gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Women with GCT 135199 mg/dL completed a 3-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Mild GDM was defined as fasting glucose less than 95 mg/dL and two or more abnormal OGTT values: 1-hour 180 mg/dL or more; 2-hour 155 mg/dL or more; 3-hour 140 mg/dL or more. Our study included untreated women with GCT 135–139 mg/dL, GCT 140–199 mg/dL, and a comparison group with GCT less than 120 mg/dL. Primary outcomes included a perinatal composite (stillbirth, neonatal death, hypoglycemia, hyperbilirubinemia, neonatal hyperinsulinemia, and birth trauma), large for gestational age (LGA, birth weight above the 90th percentile based on gender and race specific norms) and macrosomia (greater than 4,000gm). Results There were 436 women with GCT less than120 mg/dL and 1,403 with GCT 135 mg/dL or more (GCT 135–139, n=135; 140–199, n=1,268). The composite perinatal outcome occurred in 25.6% of those with GCT less than 120 mg/dL compared with 21.1% for GCT 135–139 mg/dL, and 35.3% for GCT 140–199 mg/dL. Rates of LGA by group were 6.6%, 6.8% and 12.4%, respectively. Rates of macrosomia by group were 7.8%, 6.1% and 12.1%, respectively. Compared with GCT less than 120 mg/dL, the adjusted odds ratios (OR) (95% confidence intervals [CI]) for GCT values of 140–199 mg/dL were 1.48 (1.14–1.93) for the composite outcome, 1.97 (1.29–3.11) for LGA, and 1.61(1.07–2.49) for macrosomia. For GCT values 135–139 mg/dL, adjusted ORs and 95% CIs were 0.75 (0.45–1.21), 1.04 (0.44–2.24) and 0.75 (0.30–1.66), respectively. The subcategories with GCT values 140–144 mg/dL and 145–149 mg/dL were also associated with an increase in selected outcomes when compared with those with GCT less than 120 mg/dL. Conclusions Glucose challenge test values of 135–139 mg/dL were not associated with adverse outcomes compared with GCT less than 120 mg/dL; however, GCT values 140 mg/dL or more were associated with an increase in odds of the composite perinatal outcome, LGA and macrosomia. PMID:23812458

  17. Evidence for Whom? ASHA's National Outcomes Measurement System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The growth of managed care and increasing demands by school systems resulted in of a number of new audiences looking for the evidence underlying the practice of speech-language pathology (SLP). Third-party payers, operating in an environment emphasizing ''return-on-investment,'' sought data linking expenditures on SLP services with tangible…

  18. Effectiveness of Evidence-based Pneumonia CPOE Order Sets Measured by Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Krive, Jacob; Shoolin, Joel S.; Zink, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Evidence-based sets of medical orders for the treatment of patients with common conditions have the potential to induce greater efficiency and convenience across the system, along with more consistent health outcomes. Despite ongoing utilization of order sets, quantitative evidence of their effectiveness is lacking. In this study, conducted at Advocate Health Care in Illinois, we quantitatively analyzed the benefits of community acquired pneumonia order sets as measured by mortality, readmission, and length of stay (LOS) outcomes. Methods In this study, we examined five years (2007–2011) of computerized physician order entry (CPOE) data from two city and two suburban community care hospitals. Mortality and readmissions benefits were analyzed by comparing “order set” and “no order set” groups of adult patients using logistic regression, Pearson’s chi-squared, and Fisher’s exact methods. LOS was calculated by applying one-way ANOVA and the Mann-Whitney U test, supplemented by analysis of comorbidity via the Charlson Comorbidity Index. Results The results indicate that patient treatment orders placed via electronic sets were effective in reducing mortality [OR=1.787; 95% CF 1.170-2.730; P=.061], readmissions [OR=1.362; 95% CF 1.015-1.827; P=.039], and LOS [F (1,5087)=6.885, P=.009, 4.79 days (no order set group) vs. 4.32 days (order set group)]. Conclusion Evidence-based ordering practices have the potential to improve pneumonia outcomes through reduction of mortality, hospital readmissions, and cost of care. However, the practice must be part of a larger strategic effort to reduce variability in patient care processes. Further experimental and/or observational studies are required to reduce the barriers to retrospective patient care analyses. PMID:26392842

  19. Outcome-centered antiepileptic therapy: Rate, rhythm and relief.: Implementing AAN Epilepsy Quality Measures in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    D'Cruz, O'Neill

    2015-12-01

    Clinicians who manage patients with epilepsy are expected to assess the relevance of clinical trial results to their practice, integrate new treatments into the care algorithm, and implement epilepsy quality measures, with the overall goal of improving patient outcomes. A disease-based clinical framework that helps with choice and combinations of interventions facilitates provision of efficient, cost-effective, and high-quality care. This article addresses the current conceptual framework that informs clinical evaluation of epilepsy, explores gaps between development of treatment options, quality measures and clinical goals, and proposes an outcome-centered approach that bridges these gaps with the aim of improving patient and population-level clinical outcomes in epilepsy. PMID:26539703

  20. THE FAILURE RATE OF CANDIDATES FOR BOARD CERTIFICATION: AN EDUCATIONAL OUTCOME MEASURE

    PubMed Central

    O’Day, Denis M.; Li, Chun

    2006-01-01

    Background Because most residents eventually become board certified, the overall certification rate for the American Board of Ophthalmology (ABO) is not a discriminating educational outcome measure. We have evaluated two related measures: (1) first-time failure (FTF) in the written examination, or FTF in the oral examination after passing the written examination the first time, and (2) failure to certify within 2 years of graduation (FC2). Methods We used the tracking system at the ABO to access and analyze information from 1998–2005 on resident performance from program match to certification. Results Ninety-seven percent of graduates entered the certification process. The FTF rate was 28%. The program FTF rate ranged from 0% to 89% (median, 28%). Programs with fewer than 16 graduates per 5 years were significantly more likely to have higher FTF rates than larger programs. The FC2 rate was 21%. Thirty-two programs accounted for 50% of the FTFs and 27 for 50% of the FC2s. Residents who voluntarily transferred programs performed significantly worse than nontransferring residents by both measures. Conclusion The FTF and FC2 rates are potentially useful outcome measures. However, the small size of many programs contributes to some imprecision. The rates should be used only in conjunction with other factors when assessing programs. These data provide an insight into the state of ophthalmic education in the United States. Although the eventual certification rate was high, graduates from a substantial minority of programs appeared inadequately prepared to sit the Board’s examinations. PMID:17471333

  1. 26 CFR 801.6 - Business results measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 20 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Business results measures. 801.6 Section 801.6... § 801.6 Business results measures. (a) In general. The business results measures will consist of... IRS personnel provided accurate tax law and account information. (3) Other work units. The...

  2. 26 CFR 801.6 - Business results measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 20 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Business results measures. 801.6 Section 801.6... § 801.6 Business results measures. (a) In general. The business results measures will consist of... IRS personnel provided accurate tax law and account information. (3) Other work units. The...

  3. 26 CFR 801.6 - Business results measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 20 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Business results measures. 801.6 Section 801.6 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INTERNAL REVENUE PRACTICE... § 801.6 Business results measures. (a) In general. The business results measures will consist...

  4. 26 CFR 801.6 - Business results measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 20 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Business results measures. 801.6 Section 801.6... § 801.6 Business results measures. (a) In general. The business results measures will consist of..., financial planning, resource management, and the formulation of case selection criteria. Records of...

  5. Measuring outcomes in palliative care: limitations of QALYs and the road to PalYs.

    PubMed

    Normand, Charles

    2009-07-01

    Tools for measuring outcomes in health and social care have become key parts of the processes of evaluation and setting priorities. Measures of output that can be used in all settings and specialties have the advantage that they facilitate comparisons and choices between and within patient groups. However, the most commonly used composite measure of outcomes, the quality-adjusted life year (QALY) appears not to work well in complex interventions, such as palliative care, leading to the paradox that there is evidence that people would give priority to interventions and services that would be shown not to be cost-effective, using QALYs as an outcome measure. This article explores the possible reasons for this paradox, and looks at alternative approaches that may provide better tools for setting priorities within palliative care and for comparison of palliative and other care services. PMID:19615624

  6. Relationship between changes in coronary atherosclerotic plaque burden measured by intravascular ultrasound and cardiovascular disease outcomes: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Carol; Quek, Ruben G W; Deshpande, Sohan; Worthy, Gill; Ross, Janine; Kleijnen, Jos; Gandra, Shravanthi R; Kassahun, Helina; Wong, Nathan D; Nicholls, Stephen J

    2016-06-01

    Objective Evidence from coronary imaging studies suggests an association between increased atherosclerotic plaque burden and cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcomes. A systematic review was performed to evaluate the relationship between coronary atherosclerotic plaque burden changes measured by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and CVD outcomes. Research design and methods Rigorous systematic review methodology was used to identify prospective studies of any design assessing the relationship between atherosclerotic plaque volume (percentage or total atheroma volume [PAV or TAV]) changes and CVD outcomes, using multivariable analyses. Main outcome measures CVD outcomes including major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) and major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCEs). Results Literature searches from inception to February 2015 retrieved 6958 records after de-duplication. From these four studies (14 papers) were included. One study reported a significantly lower rate of CVD outcomes associated with a greater reduction in PAV (hazard ratio [HR] 0.26, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.07-0.83). One study reported that large plaque volume was significantly associated with a greater risk of major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) (HR 1.73, 95% CI: 1.02-2.96). Similarly, a third study reported a significant increase in MACE with an increase in baseline PAV (HR 1.51, 95% CI: 1.06-2.51). Only one potentially inadequately powered Japanese study did not find a statistically significant relationship between PAV changes and MACE. Conclusions The current evidence suggests an independent and statistically significant association between increases in coronary atherosclerotic plaque burden measured by IVUS and greater long-term risk of future CVD outcomes. However, this evidence comes from a limited number of studies which mainly focus on Japanese populations and populations after PCI. Further large prospective studies are required to confirm these findings. PMID:26949994

  7. Advances in Patient-Reported Outcomes: The NIH PROMIS(®) Measures.

    PubMed

    Broderick, Joan E; DeWitt, Esi Morgan; Rothrock, Nan; Crane, Paul K; Forrest, Christopher B

    2013-01-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PRO) are questionnaire measures of patients' symptoms, functioning, and health-related quality of life. They are designed to provide important clinical information that generally cannot be captured with objective medical testing. In 2004, the National Institutes of Health launched a research initiative to improve the clinical research enterprise by developing state-of-the-art PROs. The NIH Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement System (PROMIS) and Assessment Center are the products of that initiative. Adult, pediatric, and parent-proxy item banks have been developed by using contemporary psychometric methods, yielding rapid, accurate measurements. PROMIS currently provides tools for assessing physical, mental, and social health using short-form and computer-adaptive testing methods. The PROMIS tools are being adopted for use in clinical trials and translational research. They are also being introduced in clinical medicine to assess a broad range of disease outcomes. Recent legislative developments in the United States support greater efforts to include patients' reports of health experience in order to evaluate treatment outcomes, engage in shared decision-making, and prioritize the focus of treatment. PROs have garnered increased attention by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for evaluating drugs and medical devices. Recent calls for comparative effectiveness research favor inclusion of PROs. PROs could also potentially improve quality of care and disease outcomes, provide patient-centered assessment for comparative effectiveness research, and enable a common metric for tracking outcomes across providers and medical systems. PMID:25848562

  8. Outcomes Measurement in Voice Disorders: Application of an Acoustic Index of Dysphonia Severity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awan, Shaheen N.; Roy, Nelson

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this experiment was to assess the ability of an acoustic model composed of both time-based and spectral-based measures to track change following voice disorder treatment and to serve as a possible treatment outcomes measure. Method: A weighted, four-factor acoustic algorithm consisting of shimmer, pitch sigma, the ratio of

  9. Outcomes Measurement in Voice Disorders: Application of an Acoustic Index of Dysphonia Severity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awan, Shaheen N.; Roy, Nelson

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this experiment was to assess the ability of an acoustic model composed of both time-based and spectral-based measures to track change following voice disorder treatment and to serve as a possible treatment outcomes measure. Method: A weighted, four-factor acoustic algorithm consisting of shimmer, pitch sigma, the ratio of…

  10. Outcome Classification of Preschool Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders Using Mri Brain Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akshoomoff, Natacha; Lord, Catherine; Lincoln, Alan J.; Courchesne, Rachel Y.; Carper, Ruth A.; Townsend, Jeanne; Courchesne, Eric

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that a combination of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain measures obtained during early childhood distinguish children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) from typically developing children and is associated with functional outcome. Method: Quantitative MRI technology was used to measure gray and white matter…

  11. Characterization of Potential Outcome Measures for Future Clinical Trials in Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Sumis, Allison; Kim, Ok-Kyung; Lara, Rebecca; Wuu, Joanne

    2008-01-01

    Clinical trials targeting recently elucidated synaptic defects in fragile X syndrome (FXS) will require outcome measures capable of assessing short-term changes in cognitive functioning. Potentially useful measures for FXS were evaluated here in a test-retest setting in males and females with FXS (N = 46). Good reproducibility, determined by an…

  12. Development of a multiple sclerosis functional composite as a clinical trial outcome measure.

    PubMed

    Cutter, G R; Baier, M L; Rudick, R A; Cookfair, D L; Fischer, J S; Petkau, J; Syndulko, K; Weinshenker, B G; Antel, J P; Confavreux, C; Ellison, G W; Lublin, F; Miller, A E; Rao, S M; Reingold, S; Thompson, A; Willoughby, E

    1999-05-01

    The primary clinical outcome measure for evaluating multiple sclerosis in clinical trials has been Kurtzke's expanded disability status scale (EDSS). New therapies appear to favourably impact the course of multiple sclerosis and render continued use of placebo control groups more difficult. Consequently, future trials are likely to compare active treatment groups which will most probably require increased sample sizes in order to detect therapeutic efficacy. Because more responsive outcome measures will be needed for active arm comparison studies, the National Multiple Sclerosis Society's Advisory Committee on Clinical Trials of New Agents in Multiple Sclerosis appointed a Task Force that was charged with developing improved clinical outcome measures. This Task Force acquired contemporary clinical trial and historical multiple sclerosis data for meta-analyses of primary and secondary outcome assessments to provide a basis for recommending a new outcome measure. A composite measure encompassing the major clinical dimensions of arm, leg and cognitive function was identified and termed the multiple sclerosis functional composite (MSFC). The MSFC consists of three objective quantitative tests of neurological function which are easy to administer. Change in this MSFC over the first year of observation predicted subsequent change in the EDSS, suggesting that the MSFC is more sensitive to change than the EDSS. This paper provides details concerning the development and testing of the MSFC. PMID:10355672

  13. TBI-QOL: Development and Calibration of Item Banks to Measure Patient Reported Outcomes Following Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tulsky, David S.; Kisala, Pamela A.; Victorson, David; Carlozzi, Noelle; Bushnik, Tamara; Sherer, Mark; Choi, Seung W.; Heinemann, Allen W.; Chiaravalloti, Nancy; Sander, Angelle M.; Englander, Jeffrey; Hanks, Robin; Kolakowsky-Hayner, Stephanie; Roth, Elliot; Gershon, Richard; Rosenthal, Mitchell; Cella, David

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To use a patient-centered approach or participatory action research design combined with advanced psychometrics to develop a comprehensive patient-reported outcomes (PRO) measurement system specifically for individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI). This TBI Quality-of-Life (TBI-QOL) measurement system expands the work of other large PRO measurement initiatives, that is, the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System and the Neurology Quality-of-Life measurement initiative. Setting: Five TBI Model Systems centers across the United States. Participants: Adults with TBI. Design: Classical and modern test development methodologies were used. Qualitative input was obtained from individuals with TBI, TBI clinicians, and caregivers of individuals with TBI through multiple methods, including focus groups, individual interviews, patient consultation, and cognitive debriefing interviews. Item pools were field tested in a large multisite sample (n = 675) and calibrated using item response theory methods. Main Outcomes Measures: Twenty-two TBI-QOL item banks/scales. Results: The TBI-QOL consists of 20 independent calibrated item banks and 2 uncalibrated scales that measure physical, emotional, cognitive, and social aspects of health-related quality of life. Conclusions: The TBI-QOL measurement system has potential as a common data element in TBI research and to enhance collection of health-related quality-of-life and PRO data in rehabilitation research and clinical settings. PMID:25931184

  14. Simulation as a New Tool to Establish Benchmark Outcome Measures in Obstetrics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background There are not enough clinical data from rare critical events to calculate statistics to decide if the management of actual events might be below what could reasonably be expected (i.e. was an outlier). Objectives In this project we used simulation to describe the distribution of management times as an approach to decide if the management of a simulated obstetrical crisis scenario could be considered an outlier. Design Twelve obstetrical teams managed 4 scenarios that were previously developed. Relevant outcome variables were defined by expert consensus. The distribution of the response times from the teams who performed the respective intervention was graphically displayed and median and quartiles calculated using rank order statistics. Results Only 7 of the 12 teams performed chest compressions during the arrest following the ‘cannot intubate/cannot ventilate’ scenario. All other outcome measures were performed by at least 11 of the 12 teams. Calculation of medians and quartiles with 95% CI was possible for all outcomes. Confidence intervals, given the small sample size, were large. Conclusion We demonstrated the use of simulation to calculate quantiles for management times of critical event. This approach could assist in deciding if a given performance could be considered normal and also point to aspects of care that seem to pose particular challenges as evidenced by a large number of teams not performing the expected maneuver. However sufficiently large sample sizes (i.e. from a national data base) will be required to calculate acceptable confidence intervals and to establish actual tolerance limits. PMID:26107661

  15. Clinical and Patient-reported Outcomes of a Zirconia Oral Implant: Three-year Results of a Prospective Cohort Investigation.

    PubMed

    Spies, B C; Balmer, M; Patzelt, S B M; Vach, K; Kohal, R J

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the clinical, radiographic, and patient-reported outcomes of a 1-piece alumina-toughened zirconia implant restored with single crowns (SCs) or 3-unit fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) after 3 y of observation. Forty patients received 53 implants, placed in a 1-stage operation with immediate temporization. Finally, 50 implants were restored with 24 SCs and 13 FDPs. To evaluate peri-implant bone loss, standardized radiographs were taken at implant insertion, at final restoration delivery, and after 1 and 3 y. Additionally, several soft tissue parameters and patient-reported outcome measures were evaluated. Linear mixed models with random intercept for each patient and patients as clusters were used to compare subgroups. Three patients did not receive a SC due to early implant loss, and 1 patient died. As a result, 36 patients with 49 implants were followed-up for 3 y, giving a cumulative survival rate of 94.2%. The average marginal bone loss amounted to 0.79 mm (SCs, 0.47 mm; FDPs, 1.07 mm; P < 0.001). After the delivery of the final prosthetic restoration, further bone loss was not statistically significant (0.09 mm; P = 0.700). Probing depth, clinical attachment level, and modified bleeding index increased significantly at the implant sites, whereas gingival recession decreased significantly. Compared with the pretreatment questionnaires, the patient-reported outcome measures showed a permanently improved perception of function, aesthetics, sense, speech and self-esteem. The survival rate of the investigated ceramic implant system seems to be comparable to reported survival rates of titanium implants when immediately restored. The recorded parameters suggest its potential for clinical utilization. PMID:26232388

  16. Health outcome and economic measurement in breast cancer surgery: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Cano, Stefan; Klassen, Anne F; Scott, Amie; Thoma, Achilleas; Feeny, David; Pusic, Andrea

    2010-10-01

    As breast cancer surgery techniques continue to advance, treatment options continue to increase, bringing with them increased scrutiny of health outcomes and healthcare cost. In addition, patients are becoming more involved in their own medical care and are demanding meaningful data to help them better understand expected outcomes. With these changes and advancements, there is a growing emphasis on evidence-based practice. In this article, we focus on scientific considerations, challenges to and opportunities for improving outcome measurement related to breast cancer surgery. There are two main messages from this article. First, until recently, rigorously developed specific patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures for breast cancer surgery patients have not been available for use. However, with the recent introduction of new PRO measures, such as the BREAST-Q, there is now good potential to collect useful outcome data on patient satisfaction and health-related quality of life, and to better understand the relative impact of different surgical procedures, decision making and clinical practice on patient outcome. Thus, PRO research using rigorously developed breast cancer surgery-specific measures is in its infancy, but growing steadily. Second, there is a great need but lack of specific health economic measures developed for use in breast cancer surgery research. In fact, research into the economic evaluation of breast cancer surgery is an area that has received less attention than that of PRO measure development, but there is good opportunity to expand this area of research in breast cancer surgery. Further studies are required to gain a clearer view of the role that generic preference and utility measures could play, how best to synthesize health-related quality of life and economic metrics data, and the potential use of new disease-specific tools. PMID:20950073

  17. Interrater agreement between telerehabilitation and face-to-face clinical outcome measurements for total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Cabana, Francois; Boissy, Patrick; Tousignant, Michel; Moffet, Hélène; Corriveau, Hélène; Dumais, Réjean

    2010-04-01

    Outcome measures in physical therapy provide the basis for determining the patient's rehabilitation needs, developing an individual intervention plan, and reassessing the evolution of the condition after therapeutic intervention. Questions surrounding the validity and reliability of outcome measures obtained in the context of telerehabilitation remain. The goal of this study was to explore which outcome measures can be used reliably in the context of telerehabilitation after discharge from an acute care hospital for lower limb orthopedic surgery. Fifteen patients recently discharged after total knee arthroplasty were evaluated by two experienced therapists. Each therapist evaluated under a given condition (face-to-face assessment, telerehabilitation assessment) eight outcome measures taken from standard clinical tests routinely used in the management of orthopedic rehabilitation after total knee arthroplasty. Evaluations were measured at 1-day intervals. Telerehabilitation evaluations were conducted with a videoconference link (H.264 CoDecs with Pan, Tilt, Zoom cameras) between either the participant's home or a clinical environment and a remote clinical station over residential DSL lines at 512 kbps. Interrater agreement between the two measurement modes was analyzed using the Bland and Altman method and Kripendorff's alpha reliability estimate. The 95% confidence interval for mean difference between evaluation methods varied between -20% and 8% for knee range of motion measures, -85% and 55% for scar management, -33% and 29% for functional evaluations. Five out of the eight outcome measures showed reliability estimates of >0.80, with lowest reliability obtained for the scar assessment scale (0.34) and the highest reliability for the evaluation of the range of motion at the knee (0.87 in flexion and 0.85 in extension). Clinical variables typically measured in face-to-face evaluations can be measured successfully under telerehabilitation conditions with moderate reliability. PMID:20406116

  18. Assessment of Cognitive Outcome Measures in Teenagers with 15q13.3 Microdeletion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Crutcher, Emeline; Ali, May; Harrison, John; Sovago, Judit; Gomez-Mancilla, Baltazar; Schaaf, Christian P

    2016-04-01

    15q13.3 microdeletion syndrome causes a spectrum of cognitive disorders, including intellectual disability and autism. We aimed to determine if any or all of three cognitive testing systems (the KiTAP, CogState, and Stanford-Binet) are suitable for assessment of cognitive function in affected individuals. These three tests were administered to ten individuals with 15q13.3 microdeletion syndrome (14-18 years of age), and the results were analyzed to determine feasibility of use, potential for improvement, and internal consistency. It was determined that the KiTAP, CogState, and Stanford-Binet are valid tests of cognitive function in 15q13.3 microdeletion patients. Therefore, these tests may be considered for use as objective outcome measures in future clinical trials, assessing change in cognitive function over a period of pharmacological treatment. PMID:26754479

  19. Single Versus Multilevel Fusion, For Single Level Degenerative Spondylolisthesis And Multilevel Lumbar Stenosis. Four-Year Results of the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial

    PubMed Central

    Smorgick, Yossi; Park, Daniel K.; Baker, Kevin C; Lurie, Jon D.; Tosteson, Tor D.; Zhao, Wenyan; Herkowitz, Harry; Fischgrund, Jeffrey S; Weinstein, James N.

    2013-01-01

    Study design A subanalysis study. Objective To compare surgical outcomes and complications of multi level decompression and single level fusion to multi level decompression and multi level fusion for patients with multilevel lumbar stenosis and single level degenerative spondylolisthesis. Summary of Background Data In patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis who are treated surgically, decompression and fusion provides a better clinical outcome than decompression alone. Surgical treatment for multilevel lumbar stenosis and degenerative spondylolisthesis typically includes decompression and fusion of the spondylolisthesis segment and decompression with or without fusion for the other stenotic segments. To date, no study has compared the results of these two surgical options for single level degenerative spondylolisthesis with multilevel stenosis. Methods The results from a multicenter randomized and observational study, the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT) comparing multilevel decompression and single level fusion and multi level decompression and multi level fusion for spinal stenosis with spondylolisthesis, were analyzed. The primary outcomes measures were the Bodily Pain and Physical Function scales of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-Form General Health Survey (SF-36) and the modified Oswestry Disability Index at 1,2, 3 and 4 years postoperatively. Secondary analysis consisted of stenosis bothersomeness index, low back pain bothersomeness, leg pain, patient satisfaction, and self-rated progress. Results Overall 207 patients were enrolled to the study, 130 had multlilevel decompression with one level fusion and 77 patients had multi level decompression and multi-level fusion. For all primary and secondary outcome measures, there were no statistically significant differences in surgical outcomes between the two surgical techniques. However, operative time and intraoperative blood loss were significantly higher in the multilevel fusion group. Conclusion Decompression and single level fusion and decompression and multi level fusion provide similar outcomes in patients with multilevel lumbar stenosis and single level degenerative spondylolisthesis. PMID:23169068

  20. Esophagogastric junction distensibility measurements during Heller myotomy and POEM for achalasia predict postoperative symptomatic outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Teitelbaum, Ezra N.; Soper, Nathaniel J.; Pandolfino, John E.; Kahrilas, Peter J.; Hirano, Ikuo; Boris, Lubomyr; Nicodème, Frédéric; Lin, Zhiyue; Hungness, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Background The functional lumen imaging probe (FLIP) is a novel diagnostic tool that can be used to measure esophagogastric junction (EGJ) distensibility. In this study we performed intraoperative FLIP measurements during laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM) and peroral esophageal myotomy (POEM) for treatment of achalasia and evaluated the relationship between EGJ distensibility and postoperative symptoms. Methods Distensibility index (DI) (defined as the minimum cross-sectional area at the EGJ divided by distensive pressure) was measured with FLIP at two time points during LHM and POEM: 1) at baseline after induction of anesthesia, and 2) after operation completion. Results Measurements were performed in 20 patients undergoing LHM and 36 undergoing POEM. Both operations resulted in an increase in DI, although this increase was larger with POEM (7±3.1 vs. 5.1±3.4mm2/mmHg, p<.05). The two patients (both LHM) with the smallest increases in DI (1 and 1.6mm2/mmHg) both had persistent symptoms postoperatively and, overall, LHM patients with larger increases in DI had lower postoperative Eckardt scores. In the POEM group, there was no correlation between change in DI and symptoms; however, all POEM patients experienced an increase in DI of >3mm2/mmHg. When all patients were divided into thirds based on final DI, none in the lowest DI group (<6mm2/mmHg) had symptoms suggestive of reflux (i.e., GerdQ score >7), as compared with 20% in the middle third (6–9mm2/mmHg) and 36% in the highest third (>9mm2/mmHg). Patients within an “ideal” final DI range (4.5–8.5 mm2/mmHg) had optimal symptomatic outcomes (i.e. Eckardt≤1 and GerdQ≤7) in 88% of cases, compared with 47% in those with a final DI above or below that range (p<.05). Conclusions Intraoperative EGJ distensibility measurements with FLIP were predictive of postoperative symptomatic outcomes. These results provide initial evidence that FLIP has the potential to act as a useful calibration tool during operations for achalasia. PMID:25055891

  1. Measuring situation awareness in emergency settings: a systematic review of tools and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Simon; Porter, Joanne; Peach, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Background Nontechnical skills have an impact on health care outcomes and improve patient safety. Situation awareness is core with the view that an understanding of the environment will influence decision-making and performance. This paper reviews and describes indirect and direct measures of situation awareness applicable for emergency settings. Methods Electronic databases and search engines were searched from 1980 to 2010, including CINAHL, Ovid Medline, Pro-Quest, Cochrane, and the search engine, Google Scholar. Access strategies included keyword, author, and journal searches. Publications identified were assessed for relevance, and analyzed and synthesized using Oxford evidence levels and the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme guidelines in order to assess their quality and rigor. Results One hundred and thirteen papers were initially identified, and reduced to 55 following title and abstract review. The final selection included 14 papers drawn from the fields of emergency medicine, intensive care, anesthetics, and surgery. Ten of these discussed four general nontechnical skill measures (including situation awareness) and four incorporated the Situation Awareness Global Assessment Technique. Conclusion A range of direct and indirect techniques for measuring situation awareness is available. In the medical literature, indirect approaches are the most common, with situation awareness measured as part of a nontechnical skills assessment. In simulation-based studies, situation awareness in emergencies tends to be suboptimal, indicating the need for improved training techniques to enhance awareness and improve decision-making. PMID:27147872

  2. The importance of rating scales in measuring patient-reported outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A critical component that influences the measurement properties of a patient-reported outcome (PRO) instrument is the rating scale. Yet, there is a lack of general consensus regarding optimal rating scale format, including aspects of question structure, the number and the labels of response categories. This study aims to explore the characteristics of rating scales that function well and those that do not, and thereby develop guidelines for formulating rating scales. Methods Seventeen existing PROs designed to measure vision-related quality of life dimensions were mailed for self-administration, in sets of 10, to patients who were on a waiting list for cataract extraction. These PROs included questions with ratings of difficulty, frequency, severity, and global ratings. Using Rasch analysis, performance of rating scales were assessed by examining hierarchical ordering (indicating categories are distinct from each other and follow a logical transition from lower to higher value), evenness (indicating relative utilization of categories), and range (indicating coverage of the attribute by the rating scale). Results The rating scales with complicated question format, a large number of response categories, or unlabelled categories, tended to be dysfunctional. Rating scales with five or fewer response categories tended to be functional. Most of the rating scales measuring difficulty performed well. The rating scales measuring frequency and severity demonstrated hierarchical ordering but the categories lacked even utilization. Conclusion Developers of PRO instruments should use a simple question format, fewer (four to five) and labelled response categories. PMID:22794788

  3. Measuring outcomes in outpatient child psychiatry: reliable improvement, deterioration, and clinically significant improvement.

    PubMed

    Murphy, J Michael; Blais, Mark; Baer, Lee; McCarthy, Alyssa; Kamin, Hayley; Masek, Bruce; Jellinek, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Given the increasing interest in demonstrating effectiveness in psychiatric treatment, the current paper seeks to advance outcome measurement in child psychiatry by demonstrating how more informative analytic strategies can be used to evaluate treatment in a real world setting using a brief, standardized parent-report measure. Questionnaires were obtained at intake for 1294 patients. Of these, 695 patients entered treatment and 531 (74%) had complete forms at intake and follow-up. Using this sample, we analyzed the data to determine effect sizes, rates of reliable improvement and deterioration, and rates of clinically significant improvement. Findings highlighted the utility of these approaches for evaluating treatment outcomes. Further suggestions for improving outcome measurement and evaluation are provided. PMID:23838693

  4. Systematic review to identify and appraise outcome measures used to evaluate childhood obesity treatment interventions (CoOR): evidence of purpose, application, validity, reliability and sensitivity.

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Maria; Ashton, Lee; Brown, Julia; Jebb, Susan; Wright, Judy; Roberts, Katharine; Nixon, Jane

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Lack of uniformity in outcome measures used in evaluations of childhood obesity treatment interventions can impede the ability to assess effectiveness and limits comparisons across trials. OBJECTIVE To identify and appraise outcome measures to produce a framework of recommended measures for use in evaluations of childhood obesity treatment interventions. DATA SOURCES Eleven electronic databases were searched between August and December 2011, including MEDLINE; MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations; EMBASE; PsycINFO; Health Management Information Consortium (HMIC); Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED); Global Health, Maternity and Infant Care (all Ovid); Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) (EBSCOhost); Science Citation Index (SCI) [Web of Science (WoS)]; and The Cochrane Library (Wiley) - from the date of inception, with no language restrictions. This was supported by review of relevant grey literature and trial databases. REVIEW METHODS Two searches were conducted to identify (1) outcome measures and corresponding citations used in published childhood obesity treatment evaluations and (2) manuscripts describing the development and/or evaluation of the outcome measures used in the childhood intervention obesity evaluations. Search 1 search strategy (review of trials) was modelled on elements of a review by Luttikhuis et al. (Oude Luttikhuis H, Baur L, Jansen H, Shrewsbury VA, O'Malley C, Stolk RP, et al. Interventions for treating obesity in children. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2009;1:CD001872). Search 2 strategy (methodology papers) was built on Terwee et al.'s search filter (Terwee CB, Jansma EP, Riphagen II, de Vet HCW. Development of a methodological PubMed search filter for finding studies on measurement properties of measurement instruments. Qual Life Res 2009;18:1115-23). Eligible papers were appraised for quality initially by the internal project team. This was followed by an external appraisal by expert collaborators in order to agree which outcome measures should be recommended for the Childhood obesity Outcomes Review (CoOR) outcome measures framework. RESULTS Three hundred and seventy-nine manuscripts describing 180 outcome measures met eligibility criteria. Appraisal of these resulted in the recommendation of 36 measures for the CoOR outcome measures framework. Recommended primary outcome measures were body mass index (BMI) and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Experts did not advocate any self-reported measures where objective measurement was possible (e.g. physical activity). Physiological outcomes hold potential to be primary outcomes, as they are indicators of cardiovascular health, but without evidence of what constitutes a minimally importance difference they have remained as secondary outcomes (although the corresponding lack of evidence for BMI and DXA is acknowledged). No preference-based quality-of-life measures were identified that would enable economic evaluation via calculation of quality-adjusted life-years. Few measures reported evaluating responsiveness. LIMITATIONS Proposed recommended measures are fit for use as outcome measures within studies that evaluate childhood obesity treatment evaluations specifically. These may or may not be suitable for other study designs, and some excluded measures may be more suitable in other study designs. CONCLUSIONS The CoOR outcome measures framework provides clear guidance of recommended primary and secondary outcome measures. This will enhance comparability between treatment evaluations and ensure that appropriate measures are being used. Where possible, future work should focus on modification and evaluation of existing measures rather than development of tools de nova. In addition, it is recommended that a similar outcome measures framework is produced to support evaluation of adult obesity programmes. FUNDING The National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment programme. PMID:25125212

  5. Evaluating the impact of California's full service partnership program using a multidimensional measure of outcomes.

    PubMed

    Brown, Timothy Tyler; Hong, Juliette S; Scheffler, Richard M

    2014-05-01

    This study evaluates the impact of California's full-service partnership (FSP) program using a multidimensional measure of outcomes. The FSP program is a key part of California's 2005 Mental Health Services Act. Secondary data were collected from the Consumer Perception Survey, the Client and Service Information System, and the Data Collection and Reporting System, all data systems which are maintained by the California Department of Mental Health. The analytic sample contained 39,681 observations of which 588 were FSP participants (seven repeated cross-sections from May 2005 to May 2008). We performed instrumental variables (IV) limited information maximum likelihood and IV Tobit analyses. The marginal monthly improvement in outcomes of services for FSP participants was approximately 3.5 % higher than those receiving usual care with the outcomes of the average individual in the program improving by 33.4 %. This shows that the FSP program is causally effective in improving outcomes among the seriously mentally ill. PMID:23456598

  6. Long-term results of oncoplastic breast surgery with latissimus dorsi flap reconstruction: a pilot study of the objective cosmetic results and patient reported outcome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyeong-Deok; Kim, Zisun; Kuk, Jung Cheol; Jeong, Jaehong; Choi, Kyu Sung; Hur, Sung Mo; Jeong, Gui Ae; Chung, Jun Chul; Cho, Gyu Seok; Shin, Eung Jin; Kim, Hyung Chul; Kang, Sang-Gue; Lee, Min Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The goal of oncoplastic breast surgery is to restore the appearance of the breast and improve patient satisfaction. Thus, the assessment of cosmetic results and patient-reported outcomes (PROs) using appropriately constructed and validated instruments is essential. The aim of the present study was to assess the long-term objective cosmetic results and corresponding PROs after oncoplastic breast surgery. Methods Cosmetic results were assessed by the patients, a medical panel, and a computer program (BCCT.core). PROs were assessed using BREAST-Q, a questionnaire that measures the perception of patients having breast surgery. The cosmetic results and PROs were analyzed in patients who underwent quadrantectomy and partial breast reconstruction utilizing the latissimus dorsi flap. Results The mean duration of the follow-up period was 91.6 months (range, 33.3–171.0 months), and mean age of the patients was 51 years old (range, 33–72 years). The mean tumor size was 2.1 cm (range, 0.9–5.5 cm). There was fair agreement between the medical panel and BCCT.core score (K = 0.32, P < 0.001), and a statistically significant correlation between the BCCT.core score and medical panel cosmetic results was identified (r = 0.606, P < 0.001). A better BCCT.core result was related to a higher PRO of each BREAST-Q domain—satisfaction with breasts (R2 = 0.070, P = 0.039), satisfaction with outcome (R2 = 0.087, P = 0.021), psychosocial well-being (R2 = 0.085, P = 0.023), sexual well-being (R2 = 0.082, P = 0.029), and satisfaction with information (R2 = 0.064, P = 0.049). Conclusion Our long-term results of oncoplastic surgery achieved a high level of patient satisfaction with good cosmetic results. The medical panel and BCCT.core results correlated well with the PROs of the patients using valid, reliable, and procedure-specific measures. PMID:26942154

  7. TU-A-BRD-01: Outcomes of Hypofractionated Treatments - Initial Results of the WGSBRT

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X; Lee, P; Ohri, N; Joiner, M; Kong, F; Jackson, A

    2014-06-15

    Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) has emerged in recent decades as a treatment paradigm that is becoming increasingly important in clinical practice. Clinical outcomes data are rapidly accumulating. Although published relations between outcomes and dose distributions are still sparse, the field has progressed to the point where evidence-based normal tissue dose-volume constraints, prescription strategies, and Tumor Control Probability (TCP) and Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) models can be developed. The Working Group on SBRT (WGSBRT), under the Biological Effects Subcommittee of AAPM, is a group of physicists and physicians working in the area of SBRT. It is currently performing critical literature reviews to extract and synthesize usable data and to develop guidelines and models to aid with safe and effective treatment. The group is investigating clinically relevant findings from SBRT in six anatomical regions: Cranial, Head and Neck, Thoracic, Abdominal, Pelvic, and Spinal. In this session of AAPM 2014, interim results are presented on TCP for lung and liver, NTCP for thoracic organs, and radiobiological foundations:• Lung TCP: Detailed modeling of TCP data from 118 published studies on early stage lung SBRT investigates dose response and hypothesized mechanisms to explain the improved outcomes of SBRT. This is presented from the perspective of a physicist, a physician, and a radiobiologist.• Liver TCP: For primary and metastatic liver tumors, individual patient data were extracted from published reports to examine the effects of biologically effective dose on local control.• Thoracic NTCP: Clinically significant SBRT toxicity of lung, rib / chest wall and other structures are evaluated and compared among published clinical data, in terms of risk, risk factors, and safe practice.• Improving the clinical utility of published toxicity reports from SBRT and Hypofractionated treatments. What do we want, and how do we get it? Methods and problems of synthesizing data from published reports. Learning Objectives: Common SBRT fractionation schemes and current evidence for efficacy. Evidence for normal tissue tolerances in hypofractionated treatments. Clinically relevant radiobiological effects at large fraction sizes.

  8. Responsiveness and uniqueness of the pediatric outcomes data collection instrument compared to the gross motor function measure for measuring orthopaedic and neurosurgical outcomes in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Damiano, Diane L; Gilgannon, Marc D; Abel, Mark F

    2005-01-01

    The Pediatrics Outcomes Data Collection Instrument (PODCI) is a valid and reliable measure of functional health status in children with acute and chronic musculoskeletal disorders, including cerebral palsy (CP), but its responsiveness has not been documented specifically for this population. The Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) and the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI) are the only two instruments validated specifically as evaluative measures for CP, and while widely used, they are limited by a ceiling effect when assessing higher-functioning children. The PEDI is further restricted to children who are 7 years old or less. The goal of this study was to evaluate the responsiveness, and secondarily the uniqueness, of the PODCI compared with the GMFM for evaluating surgical outcomes in CP. Changes in the GMFM and PODCI Parent forms were assessed at two time points in 64 children with spastic CP who underwent muscle-tendon lengthenings (MT; n = 22) or neurosurgical spasticity reduction consisting of either selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR; n = 18) or intrathecal baclofen pump implantation (ITB; n = 11) or who had no surgery between assessments (n = 13). The GMFM Total score was responsive to change after both MT surgery and SDR, with a nearly equivalent magnitude of change in both groups. However, the PODCI Global Function Scale was responsive to changes only after MT surgery, with improvement in the Sports and Physical Function subscale particularly prominent. No significant changes were noted in the ITB group for either measure. PMID:16199947

  9. Different measures, different outcomes? Survey into the effectiveness of chronic pain clinics in a London tertiary referral center

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Savan; Ho, Alexandra C; Kuehler, Bianca M; Childs, Susan R; Towlerton, Glyn; Goodall, Ian D; Bantel, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic pain clinics aim to improve challenging conditions, and although numerous studies have evaluated specific aspects of therapies and outcomes in this context, data concerning service impact on outcome measures in a general pain population are sparse. In addition, current trends in commissioning increasingly warrant services to provide evidence for their effectiveness. While a plethora of outcome measures, such as pain-intensity or improvement scores, exist for this purpose, it remains surprisingly unclear which one to use. It also remains uncertain what variables predict treatment success. Objectives This cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate clinic performance employing different tools (pain scores, pain categories, responder analysis, subjective improvement, satisfaction), and to determine predictors of outcome measures. Patients and methods Patients attending scheduled clinic follow-up appointments were approached. They were asked to complete the modified short-form Brief Pain Inventory (BPI-SF) that also included assessments for satisfaction and subjective improvement. Comparisons were made with BPI-SF responses that were completed by each patient on admission. Nonparametric tests were employed to evaluate service impact and to determine predictors for outcome. Results Data of 118 patients were analyzed. There was considerable variation in impact of pain clinics depending on the outcome measure employed. While median pain scores did not differ between admission and follow-up, scores improved individually in 30% of cases, such that more patients had mild pain on follow-up than on admission (relative risk 2.7). Furthermore, while only 41% reported at least moderate subjective improvement after admission to the service, the majority (83%) were satisfied with the service. Positive treatment responses were predicted by “number of painful regions” and “changes in mood”, whereas subjective improvement was predicted by “helpfulness of treatments”. Conclusion Depending on the outcome measure employed, pain clinics showed varying degrees of impact on patients’ pain experiences. This calls into question the current practice of using nonstandardized outcome reporting for evaluation of service performances. PMID:26346112

  10. Shifting management of a community volunteer system for improved child health outcomes: results from an operations research study in Burundi

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Community-based strategies that foster frequent contact between caregivers of children under five and provide credible sources of health information are essential to improve child survival. Care Groups are a community-based implementation strategy for the delivery of social and behavior change interventions. This study assessed if supervision of Care Group activities by Ministry of Health (MOH) personnel could achieve the same child health outcomes as supervision provided by specialized non-governmental organization (NGO) staff. Methods The study was a pretest-posttest quasi-experimental design implemented in Burundi. A total of 45 MOH-led Care Groups with 478 Care Group Volunteers (CGVs) were established in the intervention area; and 50 NGO-led Care Groups with 509 CGVs were formed in the comparison area. Data were collected from 593 and 700 mothers of children 0-23 months at baseline and endline, respectively. Pearson’s chi-squared test and difference-in-difference analysis assessed changes in 40 child health and nutrition outcomes. A qualitative process evaluation was also conducted midway through the study. Results The MOH-led Care Group model performed at least as well as the NGO-led model in achieving specific child health and nutrition outcomes. Mothers of children 0-23 months in the intervention and comparison sites reported similar levels of knowledge and practices for 38 of 40 dependent variables measured in the study, and these results remained unchanged after accounting for differences in the indicator values at baseline. Process monitoring data confirmed that the MOH-led Care Group model and the NGO-led Care Group model were implemented with similar intervention strength. Conclusions The study demonstrated that behavior change interventions traditionally led by NGOs can be implemented through the existing MOH systems and achieve similar results, thereby increasing the potential for sustainable child health outcomes. Future research on the MOH-led Care Group model is required to systematically document all inputs and monetary costs borne by the MOH to implement the model. PMID:26062624

  11. Is consuming yoghurt associated with weight management outcomes? Results from a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Eales, J; Lenoir-Wijnkoop, I; King, S; Wood, H; Kok, F J; Shamir, R; Prentice, A; Edwards, M; Glanville, J; Atkinson, R L

    2016-01-01

    Background: Yoghurt is part of the diet of many people worldwide and is commonly recognised as a ‘health food'. Epidemiological studies suggest that yoghurt may be useful as part of weight management programs. In the absence of comprehensive systematic reviews, this systematic review investigated the effect of yoghurt consumption by apparently healthy adults on weight-related outcomes. Methods: An extensive literature search was undertaken, as part of a wider scoping review, to identify yoghurt studies. A total of 13 631 records were assessed for their relevance to weight-related outcomes. Results: Twenty-two publications were eligible according to the review protocol. Cohort studies (n=6) and cross-sectional studies (n=7) all showed a correlation between yoghurt and lower or improved body weight/composition. Six randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and one controlled trial had various limitations, including small size and short duration. One RCT showed significant effects of yoghurt on weight loss, but was confounded by differences in calcium intake. One trial showed nonsignificant weight gain and the remaining five trials showed nonsignificant weight losses that were greater in yoghurt consumers. Conclusions: Yoghurt consumption is associated with lower body mass index, lower body weight/weight gain, smaller waist circumference and lower body fat in epidemiological studies. RCTs suggest weight reduction effects, but do not permit determination of a cause–effect relationship. Well-controlled, adequately powered trials in research and community settings appear likely to identify a modest but beneficial effect of yoghurt consumption for prevention of weight gain and management of obesity. The ready availability of yoghurt (a nutrient-dense food) and its ease of introduction to most diets suggests that educating the public to eat yoghurt as part of a balanced and healthy diet may potentially contribute to improved public health. Future carefully designed RCTs could provide proof of principle and large community-based studies could determine the practical impact of yoghurt on body weight/composition. PMID:26443336

  12. Functional outcome following a large head total hip arthroplasty: A retrospective analysis of mid term results

    PubMed Central

    Agarwala, Sanjay; Mohrir, Ganesh; Moonot, Pradeep

    2014-01-01

    Background: One of the reasons that hip resurfacing and large head metal on metal (MOM) total hip arthroplasty (THA) became popular in Asia was the possible increased range of movement and thereby improved function of the hip joint. Due to concerns of MOM articulation an alternative bearing was sought. Hence, a shift from large head MOM to large head ceramic on ceramic (COC) was made. The aim of this study was to compare the functional outcome including range of motion (ROM) and dislocation rates following large head MOM and large head COC THA. Materials and Methods: Retrospectively, 39 primary THA with large head MOM with a mean age of 56 years (range 36-72 years) and average followup of 54 months (range 38-70 months) were compared with 23 primary THA with large head COC bearing with a mean age of 48 years (range 36-68 years) and an average followup of 18 months (range 12-26 months). Functional outcome was assessed using the Modified Harris Hip Score. Dislocation rate and ROM were compared. Results: Global ROM averaged 248 degrees with MOM group and 252 degrees with the COC group. One patient with metal bearing had dislocation at an average 3 year followup which required revision THA while there were no complications in the COC group. MHHS averaged 89 points in MOM and 94 in COC THR. Conclusion: This study has shown that large head ceramic on ceramic THA is a good alternative to large head metal on metal THA with comparable dislocation rates and range of movements and without complications of metallosis in Asian patients. PMID:25143647

  13. Preferred reporting items for studies mapping onto preference-based outcome measures: The MAPS statement.

    PubMed

    Petrou, Stavros; Rivero-Arias, Oliver; Dakin, Helen; Longworth, Louise; Oppe, Mark; Froud, Robert; Gray, Alastair

    2015-01-01

    'Mapping' onto generic preference-based outcome measures is increasingly being used as a means of generating health utilities for use within health economic evaluations. Despite publication of technical guides for the conduct of mapping research, guidance for the reporting of mapping studies is currently lacking. The MAPS (MApping onto Preference-based measures reporting Standards) statement is a new checklist, which aims to promote complete and transparent reporting of mapping studies. The primary audiences for the MAPS statement are researchers reporting mapping studies, the funders of the research, and peer reviewers and editors involved in assessing mapping studies for publication.A de novo list of 29 candidate reporting items and accompanying explanations was created by a working group comprised of six health economists and one Delphi methodologist. Following a two-round, modified Delphi survey with representatives from academia, consultancy, health technology assessment agencies and the biomedical journal editorial community, a final set of 23 items deemed essential for transparent reporting, and accompanying explanations, was developed. The items are contained in a user friendly 23 item checklist. They are presented numerically and categorised within six sections, namely: (i) title and abstract; (ii) introduction; (iii) methods; (iv) results; (v) discussion; and (vi) other. The MAPS statement is best applied in conjunction with the accompanying MAPS explanation and elaboration document.It is anticipated that the MAPS statement will improve the clarity, transparency and completeness of reporting of mapping studies. To facilitate dissemination and uptake, the MAPS statement is being co-published by eight health economics and quality of life journals, and broader endorsement is encouraged. The MAPS working group plans to assess the need for an update of the reporting checklist in five years' time.This statement was published jointly in Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care, Journal of Medical Economics, Medical Decision Making, PharmacoEconomics, and Quality of Life Research. PMID:26232268

  14. Comparison of outcome measures for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in an outpatient setting

    PubMed Central

    Harper, R.; Brazier, J. E.; Waterhouse, J. C.; Walters, S. J.; Jones, N. M.; Howard, P.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To assist clinicians and researchers in choosing outcome measures for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease attending routine outpatient clinics, a comparative assessment was undertaken of four questionnaires designed to reflect the patients' perception of their physical and emotional health in terms of their feasibility, validity, reliability, and responsiveness to health change. METHODS: Two condition specific questionnaires, the St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) and Guyatt's Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire (CRQ), and two generic questionnaires, the Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36) and Euroqol (EQ), were compared for their discriminative and evaluative properties. Spirometric tests and a walking test were also performed. One hundred and fifty six adults who were clinically judged to have COPD and who attended an outpatient chest clinic were assessed at recruitment and six and 12 months later. Patients were also asked whether their health had changed since their last assessment. RESULTS: Completion rates and consistency between items for dimensions of the SGRQ were lower than for dimensions of the other questionnaires. The distributions of responses were skewed for certain dimensions in all questionnaires except the CRQ. Validity was supported for all instruments insofar as patients' scores were associated with differences in disease severity. The generic questionnaires better reflected other health problems. All instruments were reliable over time. The condition specific questionnaires were more responsive between baseline and first follow up visit but this difference did not persist. While certain dimensions of the SF-36 were responsive to patient perceived changes, this did not apply to the derived single index of the EQ. The rating scale of the EQ, however, provided a quick and easy indicator of change. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence from this study supports the CRQ and the SF-36 as comprehensive outcome measures for patients with longstanding COPD. 


 PMID:9404375

  15. Development of the NIH Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Gastrointestinal Symptom Scales

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, Brennan M.R.; Hays, Ron D.; Bolus, Roger; Melmed, Gil Y.; Chang, Lin; Whitman, Cynthia; Khanna, Puja P.; Paz, Sylvia H.; Hays, Tonya; Reise, Steve; Khanna, Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) is a standardized set of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) that cover physical, mental, and social health. The aim of this study was to develop the NIH PROMIS gastrointestinal (GI) symptom measures. METHODS We first conducted a systematic literature review to develop a broad conceptual model of GI symptoms. We complemented the review with 12 focus groups including 102 GI patients. We developed PROMIS items based on the literature and input from the focus groups followed by cognitive debriefing in 28 patients. We administered the items to diverse GI patients (irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), systemic sclerosis (SSc), and other common GI disorders) and a census-based US general population (GP) control sample. We created scales based on confirmatory factor analyses and item response theory modeling, and evaluated the scales for reliability and validity. RESULTS A total of 102 items were developed and administered to 865 patients with GI conditions and 1,177 GP participants. Factor analyses provided support for eight scales: gastroesophageal reflux (13 items), disrupted swallowing (7 items), diarrhea (5 items), bowel incontinence/soilage (4 items), nausea and vomiting (4 items), constipation (9 items), belly pain (6 items), and gas/bloat/flatulence (12 items). The scales correlated significantly with both generic and disease-targeted legacy instruments, and demonstrate evidence of reliability. CONCLUSIONS Using the NIH PROMIS framework, we developed eight GI symptom scales that can now be used for clinical care and research across the full range of GI disorders. PMID:25199473

  16. Outcomes Assessment for Beginning and Intermediate Spanish: One Program's Process and Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston, Tony

    2005-01-01

    Outcomes assessment is a process by which an academic unit defines and articulates its program goals and assesses its attainment of those goals. This article chronicles one language division's efforts at outcomes assessment for beginning and intermediate Spanish. The evidence used for program assessment consisted of WebCAPE placement scores,…

  17. Comparison of Outcomes of B.C. University College and University Baccalaureate Graduates. Research Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This document examines similarities and differences in outcomes of students who graduate from universities and from university colleges. Outcomes include education satisfaction levels, employment, income, further education, and student debt. The 2000 British Columbia University Baccalaureate Graduate Survey confirms that no matter where graduates…

  18. Measurement of Religiosity/Spirituality in Adolescent Health Outcomes Research: Trends and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    McGrady, Meghan E.; Rosenthal, Susan L.

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between religious/spiritual (R/S) factors and adolescent health outcomes has been studied for decades; however, the R/S measurement tools used may not be developmentally relevant for adolescents. A systematic literature review was conducted to review and evaluate trends in measuring R/S in adolescent health outcomes research. In this review a total of 100 articles met criteria for inclusion. Relatively few (n = 15) included adolescent-specific R/S measures or items accounting for developmentally relevant issues such as parental religiosity or age-appropriate language. Future R/S and health research with adolescents would be strengthened by incorporating developmentally relevant R/S measurement tools, psychometrics, and multidimensional measures. PMID:20127172

  19. A Novel Socioeconomic Measure Using Individual Housing Data in Cardiovascular Outcome Research

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Duk Won; Manemann, Sheila M.; Gerber, Yariv; Roger, Veronique L.; Lohse, Christine M.; Rand-Weaver, Jennifer; Krusemark, Elizabeth; Yawn, Barbara P.; Juhn, Young J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: To assess whether the individual housing-based socioeconomic status (SES) measure termed HOUSES was associated with post-myocardial infarction (MI) mortality. Methods: The study was designed as a population-based cohort study, which compared post-MI mortality among Olmsted County, Minnesota, USA, residents with different SES as measured by HOUSES using Cox proportional hazards models. Subjects’ addresses at index date of MI were geocoded to real property data to formulate HOUSES (a z-score for housing value, square footage, and numbers of bedrooms and bathrooms). Educational levels were used as a comparison for the HOUSES index. Results: 637 of the 696 eligible patients with MI (92%) were successfully geocoded to real property data. Post-MI survival rates were 60% (50–72), 78% (71–85), 72% (60–87), and 87% (81–93) at 2 years for patients in the first (the lowest SES), second, third, and fourth quartiles of HOUSES, respectively (p < 0.001). HOUSES was associated with post-MI all-cause mortality, controlling for all variables except age and comorbidity (p = 0.036) but was not significant after adjusting for age and comorbidity (p = 0.24). Conclusions: Although HOUSES is associated with post-MI mortality, the differential mortality rates by HOUSES were primarily accounted for by age and comorbid conditions. HOUSES may be useful for health disparities research concerning cardiovascular outcomes, especially in overcoming the paucity of conventional SES measures in commonly used datasets. PMID:25396769

  20. DTI measures track and predict motor function outcomes in stroke rehabilitation utilizing BCI technology

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jie; Nair, Veena A.; Young, Brittany M.; Walton, Leo M.; Nigogosyan, Zack; Remsik, Alexander; Tyler, Mitchell E.; Farrar-Edwards, Dorothy; Caldera, Kristin E.; Sattin, Justin A.; Williams, Justin C.; Prabhakaran, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Tracking and predicting motor outcomes is important in determining effective stroke rehabilitation strategies. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) allows for evaluation of the underlying structural integrity of brain white matter tracts and may serve as a potential biomarker for tracking and predicting motor recovery. In this study, we examined the longitudinal relationship between DTI measures of the posterior limb of the internal capsule (PLIC) and upper-limb motor outcomes in 13 stroke patients (median 20-month post-stroke) who completed up to 15 sessions of intervention using brain–computer interface (BCI) technology. Patients’ upper-limb motor outcomes and PLIC DTI measures including fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (AD), radial diffusivity (RD), and mean diffusivity (MD) were assessed longitudinally at four time points: pre-, mid-, immediately post- and 1-month-post intervention. DTI measures and ratios of each DTI measure comparing the ipsilesional and contralesional PLIC were correlated with patients’ motor outcomes to examine the relationship between structural integrity of the PLIC and patients’ motor recovery. We found that lower diffusivity and higher FA values of the ipsilesional PLIC were significantly correlated with better upper-limb motor function. Baseline DTI ratios were significantly correlated with motor outcomes measured immediately post and 1-month-post BCI interventions. A few patients achieved improvements in motor recovery meeting the minimum clinically important difference (MCID). These findings suggest that upper-limb motor recovery in stroke patients receiving BCI interventions relates to the microstructural status of the PLIC. Lower diffusivity and higher FA measures of the ipsilesional PLIC contribute toward better motor recovery in the stroke-affected upper-limb. DTI-derived measures may be a clinically useful biomarker in tracking and predicting motor recovery in stroke patients receiving BCI interventions. PMID:25964753

  1. Health economics research into supporting carers of people with dementia: a systematic review of outcome measures.

    PubMed

    Jones, Carys; Edwards, Rhiannon Tudor; Hounsome, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Advisory bodies, such as the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) in the UK, advocate using preference based instruments to measure the quality of life (QoL) component of the quality-adjusted life year (QALY). Cost per QALY is used to determine cost-effectiveness, and hence funding, of interventions. QALYs allow policy makers to compare the effects of different interventions across different patient groups. Generic measures may not be sensitive enough to fully capture the QoL effects for certain populations, such as carers, so there is a need to consider additional outcome measures, which are preference based where possible to enable cost-effectiveness analysis to be undertaken. This paper reviews outcome measures commonly used in health services research and health economics research involving carers of people with dementia. An electronic database search was conducted in PubMed, Medline, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PsycINFO, the National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database (NHS EED), Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) and Health Technology Assessment database. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they included an outcome measure for carers of people with dementia. 2262 articles were identified. 455 articles describing 361 studies remained after exclusion criteria were applied. 228 outcome measures were extracted from the studies. Measures were categorised into 44 burden measures, 43 mastery measures, 61 mood measures, 32 QoL measures, 27 social support and relationships measures and 21 staff competency and morale measures. The choice of instrument has implications on funding decisions; therefore, researchers need to choose appropriate instruments for the population being measured and the type of intervention undertaken. If an instrument is not sensitive enough to detect changes in certain populations, the effect of an intervention may be underestimated, and hence interventions which may appear to be beneficial to participants are not deemed cost-effective and are not funded. If this is the case, it is essential that additional outcome measures which detect changes in broader QoL are included, whilst still retaining preference based utility measures such as EQ-5D to allow QALY calculation for comparability with other interventions. PMID:23181515

  2. Universal health outcome measures for older persons with multiple chronic conditions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Older adults with multiple chronic conditions (MCC) require considerable health services and complex care. As health status is affected along multiple dimensions by the persistence and progression of diseases and courses of treatments, well-validated universal outcome measures across diseases are needed for research, clinical care and administrative purposes. An expert panel meeting held by the National Institute on Aging (NIA) in September 2011 recommends that older persons with MCC complete a brief initial composite measure that includes general health, pain, fatigue, and physical, mental health and social role function, along with gait speed measurement. Suitable composite measures include the Short-form 8 (SF-8) and 36 (SF-36) and the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System29-item Health Profile (PROMIS-29). Based on responses to items within the initial measure, short follow-on measures should be selectively targeted to the following areas: symptom burden, depression, anxiety and daily activities. Persons unable to walk a short distance for gait speed should be assessed using a physical function scale. Remaining gaps to be considered for measure development include disease burden, cognitive function and caregiver burden. Routine outcome assessment of MCC patients could facilitate system-based care improvement and clinical effectiveness research. PMID:23194184

  3. Development of process and outcome measures for improvement: lessons learned in a quality improvement collaborative for pediatric inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Crandall, Wallace V; Boyle, Brendan M; Colletti, Richard B; Margolis, Peter A; Kappelman, Michael D

    2011-10-01

    The Institute of Medicine's publications, To Err is Human and Crossing the Quality Chasm, publicized the widespread deficits in healthcare quality. The quality of care in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has not been comprehensively evaluated, in part due to a lack of well-established IBD measures of quality. Quality can be measured for evaluation, benchmarking, or continuous quality improvement, using structural, process, and outcome measures. Measurement is an essential component of the model for improvement, necessary to determine whether changes made have resulted in improvement. Measures used for quality improvement should be based on evidence and consensus, be clear and collectable in a timely fashion, occur with sufficient frequency, and have the potential to improve outcomes. While no current IBD measures of quality are perfect, an iterative process of measure development can produce a set of measures that are feasible, relevant, and useful for performing quality improvement. This review describes the history, rationale, and methods of quality measurement and discusses the early work and lessons learned from measuring quality of care in a pediatric IBD quality improvement collaborative. PMID:21456033

  4. Comparative study of outcome measures and analysis methods for traumatic brain injury trials.

    PubMed

    Alali, Aziz S; Vavrek, Darcy; Barber, Jason; Dikmen, Sureyya; Nathens, Avery B; Temkin, Nancy R

    2015-04-15

    Batteries of functional and cognitive measures have been proposed as alternatives to the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE) as the primary outcome for traumatic brain injury (TBI) trials. We evaluated several approaches to analyzing GOSE and a battery of four functional and cognitive measures. Using data from a randomized trial, we created a "super" dataset of 16,550 subjects from patients with complete data (n=331) and then simulated multiple treatment effects across multiple outcome measures. Patients were sampled with replacement (bootstrapping) to generate 10,000 samples for each treatment effect (n=400 patients/group). The percentage of samples where the null hypothesis was rejected estimates the power. All analytic techniques had appropriate rates of type I error (≤5%). Accounting for baseline prognosis either by using sliding dichotomy for GOSE or using regression-based methods substantially increased the power over the corresponding analysis without accounting for prognosis. Analyzing GOSE using multivariate proportional odds regression or analyzing the four-outcome battery with regression-based adjustments had the highest power, assuming equal treatment effect across all components. Analyzing GOSE using a fixed dichotomy provided the lowest power for both unadjusted and regression-adjusted analyses. We assumed an equal treatment effect for all measures. This may not be true in an actual clinical trial. Accounting for baseline prognosis is critical to attaining high power in Phase III TBI trials. The choice of primary outcome for future trials should be guided by power, the domain of brain function that an intervention is likely to impact, and the feasibility of collecting outcome data. PMID:25317951

  5. Comparison of Single-Level and Multiple-Level Outcomes of Total Disc Arthroplasty: 24-Month Results

    PubMed Central

    Ritter-Lang, Karsten; Gössel, Lutz; Dreßler, Nadine

    2015-01-01

    Background Low back pain is one of the most prevalent problems in industrialized countries, affecting as many as 80% of all adults at some time in their lives. Among the significant contributors to low back pain is degenerative disc disease (DDD). Although fusion has been well accepted for treatment of DDD, high rates of complications and stress to adjacent segments remain a concern. Lumbar total disc replacement (TDR) was developed with a goal of preserving motion and avoiding various fusion-related complications, but the relative merits of single vs. multiple level arthroplasty remain unclear. Methods This is a multi-center, single arm, prospective post-market registry of the M6-L, consisting of consecutive patients presenting with lumbar DDD who agreed to participate. This paper reports on those patients who have completed at least 24 months of followup to date. Clinical outcome measures include the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and back and leg Visual Analogue Scales (VAS). Radiographic analysis of disc angle and range of motion (ROM) was also performed. Results Results for 83 patients comprising 121 implants in two cohorts (49 single level (SL), 34 multiple levels (ML)) are reported. Both cohorts experienced significant improvement at 24 months including significant decreases in ODI and VAS. Relative to SL procedures, ML procedures demonstrated either comparable results, or results that trended favorably towards the ML procedures. Index and global ROM at 24 months were not significantly different between the two cohorts, while the disc angles were larger in the SL cohort regardless of index level. Conclusions This is the first study to report clinical and radiographic outcomes of TDR with the M6-L in SL vs ML procedures with two years of followup. The results suggest initial device safety and effectiveness when used for the treatment of lumbar degenerative disc disease at one or more levels. PMID:26056629

  6. Cognitive and Typing Outcomes Measured Simultaneously with Slow Treadmill Walking or Sitting: Implications for Treadmill Desks

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Michael J.; LeCheminant, James D.; Hill, Kyle; Carbine, Kaylie; Masterson, Travis; Christenson, Ed

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study compared cognitive (attention, learning, and memory) and typing outcomes during slow treadmill walking or sitting. Seventy-five healthy individuals were randomly assigned to a treadmill walking group (n=37; 23 female) or sitting group (n=38; 17 female). Methods The treadmill walking group completed a series of tests while walking at 1.5 mph. The sitting group performed the same tests while sitting at a standard desk. Tests performed by both groups included: the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test and a modified version of the Paced Auditory Serial Attention Test. In addition, typing performance was evaluated. Results Participants in the treadmill walking group performed worse on the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test for total learning than the sitting group; the main effect was significant (F(1,73)=4.75, p=0.03, ηp2=0.06); however, short- and long-delay recall performance did not differ between groups (p>0.05). For the Paced Auditory Serial Attention Test, total number of correct responses was lower in the treadmill walking group relative to the sitting group; the main effect was significant (F(1,73)=4.97, p=0.03, ηp2=0.06). The performance of both groups followed the same learning slope (Group x Trial interactions were not significant) for the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test and Paced Auditory Serial Attention Test. Individuals in the treadmill walking group performed significantly worse for all measures of typing (p<0.05). Conclusion Walking on a treadmill desk may result in a modest difference in total learning and typing outcomes relative to sitting, but those declines may not outweigh the benefit of the physical activity gains from walking on a treadmill. PMID:25874910

  7. Post-acute traumatic brain injury rehabilitation: effects on outcome measures and life care costs.

    PubMed

    Griesbach, Grace S; Kreber, Lisa A; Harrington, David; Ashley, Mark J

    2015-05-15

    Rehabilitation is the predominant post-acute treatment for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). We retrospectively evaluated the effectiveness of post-acute TBI rehabilitation by comparing outcome measures and life care cost with that of patients with cerebrovascular accident (CVA) who underwent a multidisciplinary rehabilitation program within the same facility. To better assess the effects of rehabilitation, we only included patients with no benefit limitations from the insurance carrier. Functional effectiveness was determined by comparing outcome scales, which included the Disability Rating Scale, Mayo Portland Inventory, Occupational Status Scale, Living Status Scale, and the Centre for Neuro Skills Scale. Cost-effectiveness was determined by having certified life care planners create separate cost projections from the admission and discharge patient files. This allowed us to compare cost projections with and without rehabilitation for each patient. Significant decreases in the cost projections, i.e., rehabilitation savings (RS), were found after rehabilitation for TBI. These RS were equivalent to those of patients with CVA. Likewise, equivalent improvements were found on all of the outcome scales for both brain injury groups. We also evaluated if the latency from TBI to admission in the rehabilitation program had an influence on outcome. Cost and functional effectiveness was more marked when rehabilitation was initiated within the first year after TBI. The effects of age of TBI were also evaluated. Although RS were most marked in younger patients, improvements in outcome measures were observed in all age groups after post-acute rehabilitation. PMID:25496475

  8. Student Identification with Business Education Models: Measurement and Relationship to Educational Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halbesleben, Jonathon R. B.; Wheeler, Anthony R.

    2009-01-01

    Although management scholars have provided a variety of metaphors to describe the role of students in management courses, researchers have yet to explore students' identification with the models and how they are linked to educational outcomes. This article develops a measurement tool for students' identification with business education models and…

  9. Clinical Utility of the Modified Stroop Task as a Treatment Outcome Measure: Questions Raised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Jillian R.; Mitchell, Philip B.; Touyz, Stephen W.; Griffiths, Rosalyn A.; Beumont, Pierre J. V.

    2004-01-01

    Data from an outpatient treatment trial for anorexia nervosa were examined to gain preliminary insights as to whether the modified Stroop colour-naming task might offer a useful measure of treatment outcome. It was hypothesised that interference for eating-, weight- and shape-related words on a modified version on the Stroop colour-naming task…

  10. In treating diabetes, what is important? Glucose levels or outcome measures?

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Anil K

    2015-01-01

    Gaps in knowledge prevail in recognizing which glycemic parameters to order and in determining glycemic control. However glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is most commonly ordered to determine glycemic control. HbA1c provides information of overtime glycemic control but does not inform post meal glycemic excusions. The latter may be significant in outcome measure such as cardiovascular disorder (CVD), renal failure or amputation in diabetes. In order to obviate the dilemma in the importance between fasting blood glucose (FBG) and 2-h post prandial glucose (2hPPG), we innovated delta (d) which is the difference between 2hPPG minus FBG. There is much information available relating 2hPPG or postprandial hyperglycemia to CVD and some information relating 2hPPG to renal failure or amputation. Thus much emphasis is laid upon glycemic control with little or no emphasis on the complications of diabetes or the outcome measures. The focus of this editorial is to draw attention to outcome measures by ordering fasting and 2-h postprandial (2hPP) basic metabolic panel (BMP) which provides glucose levels, renal function test and electrolytes. HbA1c significantly relates to 2hPPG, thus by ordering F and 2hPP BMP instead of HbA1c alone will serve both purposes: Glycemic control and outcome measure. Delta (d) glucose (dhPPG-FBG) is a stronger predictor than 2hPPG of renal function deterioration. PMID:26468340

  11. From Constructs to Measures: Finalizing the Common Core. The Project on State-Level Child Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Trends, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation at the Administration for Children and Families, and the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, are working together with states and other groups to improve the measurement of child outcomes in state welfare evaluations and in…

  12. Relationships between self-report and cognitive measures of hearing aid outcome

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Elaine Hoi Ning; Rudner, Mary; Lunner, Thomas; Rönnberg, Jerker

    2013-01-01

    This present study examined the relationship between cognitive measures and self-report hearing aid outcome. A sentence-final word identification and recall (SWIR) test was used to investigate how hearing aid use may relate to experienced explicit cognitive processing. A visually based cognitive test battery was also administered. To measure self-report hearing aid outcome, the International Outcome Inventory – Hearing Aids (IOI-HA) and the Speech, Spatial and Qualities of Hearing Scale (SSQ) were employed. Twenty-six experienced hearing aid users (mean age of 59 years) with symmetrical moderate-to-moderately severe sensorineural hearing loss were recruited. Free recall performance in the SWIR test correlated negatively with item 3 of IOI-HA, which measures residual difficulty in adverse listening situations. Cognitive abilities related to verbal information processing were correlated positively with self-reported hearing aid use and overall success. The present study showed that reported residual difficulty with hearing aid may relate to experienced explicit processing in difficult listening conditions, such that individuals with better cognitive capacity tended to report more remaining difficulty in challenging listening situations. The possibility of using cognitive measures to predict hearing aid outcome in real life should be explored in future research. PMID:26213622

  13. A "Learning Platform" Approach to Outcome Measurement in Fragile X Syndrome: A Preliminary Psychometric Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, S. S.; Hammond, J. L.; Hirt, M.; Reiss, A. L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Clinical trials of medications to alleviate the cognitive and behavioural symptoms of individuals with fragile X syndrome (FXS) are now underway. However, there are few reliable, valid and/or sensitive outcome measures available that can be directly administered to individuals with FXS. The majority of assessments employed in clinical

  14. Goal Attainment Scaling as an Outcome Measure in Randomized Controlled Trials of Psychosocial Interventions in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruble, Lisa; McGrew, John H.; Toland, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Goal attainment scaling (GAS) holds promise as an idiographic approach for measuring outcomes of psychosocial interventions in community settings. GAS has been criticized for untested assumptions of scaling level (i.e., interval or ordinal), inter-individual equivalence and comparability, and reliability of coding across different behavioral…

  15. A "Learning Platform" Approach to Outcome Measurement in Fragile X Syndrome: A Preliminary Psychometric Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, S. S.; Hammond, J. L.; Hirt, M.; Reiss, A. L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Clinical trials of medications to alleviate the cognitive and behavioural symptoms of individuals with fragile X syndrome (FXS) are now underway. However, there are few reliable, valid and/or sensitive outcome measures available that can be directly administered to individuals with FXS. The majority of assessments employed in clinical…

  16. A Measurement Feedback System (MFS) Is Necessary to Improve Mental Health Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickman, Leonard

    2008-01-01

    The importance of measurement feedback system (MFS) for the improvement of mental health services for youths is discussed. As feedback obtained from clients and families is subject to distortions, a standardized MFS including clinical processes, contexts, outcomes, and feedback to clinicians and supervisors is necessary for improvement in quality…

  17. Measuring Outcomes of Family-Centered Intervention: Development of the Life Participation for Parents (LPP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fingerhut, Patricia E.

    2009-01-01

    Raising a child with disabilities impacts the ability of parents to participate in life situations. This paper describes the development of a new instrument, Life Participation for Parents, to measure outcomes of pediatric therapy on parental participation. Items were reviewed by six occupational therapists with experience in pediatrics and

  18. Clinical Utility of the Modified Stroop Task as a Treatment Outcome Measure: Questions Raised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Jillian R.; Mitchell, Philip B.; Touyz, Stephen W.; Griffiths, Rosalyn A.; Beumont, Pierre J. V.

    2004-01-01

    Data from an outpatient treatment trial for anorexia nervosa were examined to gain preliminary insights as to whether the modified Stroop colour-naming task might offer a useful measure of treatment outcome. It was hypothesised that interference for eating-, weight- and shape-related words on a modified version on the Stroop colour-naming task

  19. Conceptualization and Measurement of Family Outcomes Associated with Families of Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turnbull, Ann P.; Summers, Jean Ann; Lee, Suk-Hyang; Kyzar, Kathleen

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to (a) document the current status of conceptualizing and measuring family outcomes related to having a member with an intellectual disability and (b) determine the extent to which family research focuses on internal family characteristics as contrasted to external family support. The reviewers collected 28 articles…

  20. Stimulus, Task, and Learning Effects on Measures of Temporal Resolution: Implications for Predictors of Language Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Nicholas A.; Trainor, Laurel J.; Gray, Kellie; Plantinga, Judy A.; Shore, David I.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Some studies find that temporal processing ability predicts language outcome whereas other studies do not. Resolution of this debate is hindered by the variety of temporal measures used, nonsensory loading of the tasks, and differential amounts of practice across studies. The goal of this study was to examine the effects of stimulus…

  1. Side Effects of Minocycline Treatment in Patients with Fragile X Syndrome and Exploration of Outcome Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utari, Agustini; Chonchaiya, Weerasak; Rivera, Susan M.; Schneider, Andrea; Hagerman, Randi J.; Faradz, Sultana M. H.; Ethell, Iryna M.; Nguyen, Danh V.

    2010-01-01

    Minocycline can rescue the dendritic spine and synaptic structural abnormalities in the fragile X knock-out mouse. This is a review and preliminary survey to document side effects and potential outcome measures for minocycline use in the treatment of individuals with fragile X syndrome. We surveyed 50 patients with fragile X syndrome who received…

  2. Measuring the Outcomes of Vocational Education and Training. Review of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dumbrell, Tom

    Outcome measures are one of three key dimensions of the performance of Australia's vocational education and training (VET) system. The government, employers, students, and the broader community all share an interest in ensuring that Australia's VET system produces skills needed in the labor market. However, each group's views of what constitutes a…

  3. Measuring the Outcomes of Vocational Education and Training. Review of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dumbrell, Tom

    Outcome measures are one of three key dimensions of the performance of Australia's vocational education and training (VET) system. The government, employers, students, and the broader community all share an interest in ensuring that Australia's VET system produces skills needed in the labor market. However, each group's views of what constitutes a

  4. Measuring Outcomes of Family-Centered Intervention: Development of the Life Participation for Parents (LPP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fingerhut, Patricia E.

    2009-01-01

    Raising a child with disabilities impacts the ability of parents to participate in life situations. This paper describes the development of a new instrument, Life Participation for Parents, to measure outcomes of pediatric therapy on parental participation. Items were reviewed by six occupational therapists with experience in pediatrics and…

  5. Measurement of Educational Progress in the Context of Local Demographics: Using General Outcome Measurement as a Basis for the Development and Use of Local Norms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koehler-Hak, Kathrine M.

    2014-01-01

    General outcome measurement, a specific type of formative evaluation, can be used to assess progress toward long-term academic goals. Curriculum-based measurement is a widely used type of general outcome measurement. When used to develop local norms, curriculum-based measurement data are helpful in making individual student and systems-level

  6. Measurement of Educational Progress in the Context of Local Demographics: Using General Outcome Measurement as a Basis for the Development and Use of Local Norms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koehler-Hak, Kathrine M.

    2014-01-01

    General outcome measurement, a specific type of formative evaluation, can be used to assess progress toward long-term academic goals. Curriculum-based measurement is a widely used type of general outcome measurement. When used to develop local norms, curriculum-based measurement data are helpful in making individual student and systems-level…

  7. Measurements results of SAW humidity sensor with nafion layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawalec, A.; Jasek, K.; Pasternak, M.

    2008-02-01

    The results of measurements of surface acoustic wave (SAW) humidity sensor with nafion layer are described in the paper. The sensitivity, response time as well as hysteresis for different temperatures have been investigated. The sensor sensitivity, linearity and hystersis are discussd. The results show that such sensor may be suitable for accurate humidity measurements in dry or hot enough environment.

  8. Mercury in fish and adverse reproductive outcomes: results from South Carolina

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mercury is a metal with widespread distribution in aquatic ecosystems and significant neurodevelopmental toxicity in humans. Fish biomonitoring for total mercury has been conducted in South Carolina (SC) since 1976, and consumption advisories have been posted for many SC waterways. However, there is limited information on the potential reproductive impacts of mercury due to recreational or subsistence fish consumption. Methods To address this issue, geocoded residential locations for live births from the Vital Statistics Registry (1995–2005, N = 362,625) were linked with spatially interpolated total mercury concentrations in fish to estimate potential mercury exposure from consumption of locally caught fish. Generalized estimating equations were used to test the hypothesis that risk of low birth weight (LBW, <2,500 grams) or preterm birth (PTB, <37 weeks clinical gestation) was greater among women living in areas with elevated total mercury in fish, after adjustment for confounding. Separate analyses estimated term LBW and PTB risks using residential proximity to rivers with fish consumption advisories to characterize exposure. Results Term LBW was more likely among women residing in areas in the upper quartile of predicted total mercury in fish (odds ratio [OR] = 1.04; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.00-1.09) or within 8 kilometers of a river with a ‘do not eat’ fish advisory (1.05; 1.00-1.11) compared to the lowest quartile, or rivers without fish consumption restrictions, respectively. When stratified by race, risks for term LBW or PTB were 10-18% more likely among African-American (AA) mothers living in areas with the highest total fish mercury concentrations. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine the relationship between fish total mercury concentrations and adverse reproductive outcomes in a large population-based sample that included AA women. The ecologic nature of exposure assessment in this study precludes causal inference. However, the results suggest a need for more detailed investigations to characterize patterns of local fish consumption and potential dose–response relationships between mercury exposure and adverse reproductive outcomes, particularly among AA mothers. PMID:25127892

  9. Higher Chest Wall Dose Results in Improved Locoregional Outcome in Patients Receiving Postmastectomy Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Panoff, Joseph E.; Takita, Cristiane; Hurley, Judith; Reis, Isildinha M.; Zhao, Wei; Rodgers, Steven E.; Gunaseelan, Vijayalakshmi; Wright, Jean L.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Randomized trials demonstrating decreased locoregional recurrence (LRR) and improved overall survival (OS) in women receiving postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) used up to 50 Gy to the chest wall (CW), but in practice, many centers boost the CW dose to {>=}60 Gy, despite lack of data supporting this approach. We evaluated the relationship between CW dose and clinical outcome. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 582 consecutively treated patients who received PMRT between January 1999 and December 2009. We collected data on patient, disease, treatment characteristics, and outcomes of LRR, progression-free survival (PFS) and OS. Results: Median follow-up from the date of diagnosis was 44.7 months. The cumulative 5-year incidence of LRR as first site of failure was 6.2%. CW dose for 7% (43 patients) was {<=}50.4 Gy (range, 41.4-50.4 Gy) and 93% received >50.4 Gy (range, 52.4-74.4 Gy). A CW dose of >50.4 Gy vs. {<=}50.4 Gy was associated with lower incidence of LRR, a 60-month rate of 5.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.7-8.2) vs. 12.7% (95% CI, 4.5-25.3; p = 0.054). Multivariate hazard ratio (HR) for LRR controlling for race, receptor status, and stage was 2.62 (95% CI, 1.02-7.13; p = 0.042). All LRR in the low-dose group occurred in patients receiving 50 to 50.4 Gy. Lower CW dose was associated with worse PFS (multivariate HR, 2.73; 95% CI, 1.64-4.56; p < 0.001) and OS (multivariate HR, 3.88; 95% CI, 2.16-6.99; p < 0.001). Conclusions: The addition of a CW boost above 50.4 Gy resulted in improved locoregional control and survival in this cohort patients treated with PMRT for stage II-III breast cancer. The addition of a CW boost to standard-dose PMRT is likely to benefit selected high-risk patients. The optimal technique, target volume, and patient selection criteria are unknown. The use of a CW boost should be studied prospectively, as has been done in the setting of breast conservation.

  10. Interventions designed to prevent adverse programming outcomes resulting from exposure to maternal obesity during development

    PubMed Central

    Nathanielsz, PW; Ford, SP; Long, NM; Vega, CC; Reyes-Castro, LA; Zambrano, E

    2013-01-01

    Maternal obesity is a global epidemic affecting the developed and developing world. Human and animal studies indicate that maternal obesity programs development predisposing offspring to later-life chronic diseases. Several mechanisms act together to produce these adverse health problems. There is a need for effective interventions that prevent these outcomes and guide management in human pregnancy. We report here dietary and exercise intervention studies in both altricial and precocial species, rats and sheep, designed to prevent adverse offspring outcomes. Both interventions present exciting opportunities to at least in part prevent adverse metabolic and other outcomes in mother and offspring. PMID:24147928

  11. Choice of Outcome Measure in an Economic Evaluation: A Potential Role for the Capability Approach.

    PubMed

    Lorgelly, Paula K

    2015-08-01

    The last decade has seen a renewed interest in Sen's capability approach; health economists have been instrumental in leading much of this work. One particular stream of research is the application of the approach to outcome measurement. To date, there have been a dozen attempts (some combined) to operationalise the approach, and produce an outcome measure that offers a broader evaluative space than health-related quality-of-life measures. Applications have so far been confined to public health, physical, mental health and social care interventions, but the capability approach could be of benefit to evaluations of pharmacotherapies and other technologies. This paper provides an introduction to the capability approach, reviews the measures that are available for use in an economic evaluation, including their current applications, and then concludes with a discussion of a number of issues that require further consideration before the approach is adopted more widely to inform resource allocation decisions. PMID:25862464

  12. An International Standard Set of Patient-Centered Outcome Measures After Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Joel; Sprinkhuizen, Sara M.; Ackerson, Teri; Bernhardt, Julie; Davie, Charlie; George, Mary G.; Gething, Stephanie; Kelly, Adam G.; Lindsay, Patrice; Liu, Liping; Martins, Sheila C.O.; Morgan, Louise; Norrving, Bo; Ribbers, Gerard M.; Silver, Frank L.; Smith, Eric E.; Williams, Linda S.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Value-based health care aims to bring together patients and health systems to maximize the ratio of quality over cost. To enable assessment of healthcare value in stroke management, an international standard set of patient-centered stroke outcome measures was defined for use in a variety of healthcare settings. Methods— A modified Delphi process was implemented with an international expert panel representing patients, advocates, and clinical specialists in stroke outcomes, stroke registers, global health, epidemiology, and rehabilitation to reach consensus on the preferred outcome measures, included populations, and baseline risk adjustment variables. Results— Patients presenting to a hospital with ischemic stroke or intracerebral hemorrhage were selected as the target population for these recommendations, with the inclusion of transient ischemic attacks optional. Outcome categories recommended for assessment were survival and disease control, acute complications, and patient-reported outcomes. Patient-reported outcomes proposed for assessment at 90 days were pain, mood, feeding, selfcare, mobility, communication, cognitive functioning, social participation, ability to return to usual activities, and health-related quality of life, with mobility, feeding, selfcare, and communication also collected at discharge. One instrument was able to collect most patient-reported subdomains (9/16, 56%). Minimum data collection for risk adjustment included patient demographics, premorbid functioning, stroke type and severity, vascular and systemic risk factors, and specific treatment/care-related factors. Conclusions— A consensus stroke measure Standard Set was developed as a simple, pragmatic method to increase the value of stroke care. The set should be validated in practice when used for monitoring and comparisons across different care settings. PMID:26604251

  13. Eosinophilia predicts poor clinical outcomes in recent-onset arthritis: results from the ESPOIR cohort

    PubMed Central

    Guellec, Dewi; Milin, Morgane; Cornec, Divi; Tobon, Gabriel J; Marhadour, Thierry; Jousse-Joulin, Sandrine; Chiocchia, Gilles; Vittecocq, Olivier; Devauchelle-Pensec, Valérie; Saraux, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the prevalence of eosinophilia in patients with recent-onset arthritis suggestive of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to describe their features and outcomes. Methods We performed an ancillary study of data from a French prospective multicentre cohort study monitoring clinical, laboratory and radiographic data in patients with inflammatory arthritis of 6 weeks to 6 months duration. We determined the proportion of patients with eosinophilia, defined as a count >500/mm3, at baseline and after 3 years. Features of patients with and without baseline eosinophilia were compared. Results Baseline eosinophilia was evidenced in 26 of 804 (3.2%) patients; their mean eosinophil count was 637.7±107/mm3. Baseline eosinophilia was ascribed to atopic syndrome in 6 of 26 (23.1%) patients. After 3 years, patients with eosinophilia had higher Health Assessment Questionnaire scores (0.9 vs 0.5, p=0.004), higher patient visual analogue scale activity score and morning stiffness intensity (p=0.05), and were more often taking disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (p=0.02). Baseline eosinophilia was not associated with presence of extra-articular manifestations. Conclusions Eosinophilia is rare in recent-onset arthritis suggestive of RA, and is usually directly related to the rheumatic disease. Our data suggest that patients with mild eosinophilia at diagnosis could respond worse to the treatment than those without. PMID:26509068

  14. CT-Guided Lumbar Sympathectomy: Results and Analysis of Factors Influencing the Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Heindel, Walter; Ernst, Stefan; Manshausen, Gudrun; Gawenda, Michael; Siemens, Peter; Krahe, Thomas; Walter, Michael; Lackner, Klaus

    1998-07-15

    Purpose: To prospectively analyze the effectiveness of computed tomography-guided percutaneous lumbar sympathectomy (CTLS) in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease in relation to angiographic findings and vascular risk factors. Methods: Eighty-three patients were treated by CTLS. After clinical evaluation of the risk profile and diagnostic intraarterial digital subtraction arteriography, 14 patients underwent unilateral, and 69 bilateral one-level treatment. Follow-up studies took place on the day following the intervention, after 3 weeks, and after 3 months. Results: A total of 152 interventions were performed in 83 patients. After 3 months, clinical examination of 54 patients (5 patients had died, 24 were lost to follow-up) revealed improvement in 46% (25/54), no change in 39% (21/54), and worsening (amputation) in 15% (8/54). There was no significant statistical correlation among any of the analyzed factors (diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension, smoking, hyperlipidemia, obesity, hyperuricemia, number of risk factors, ankle-arm index, and angiography score) and the outcome after CTLS. Three major complications occurred: one diabetic patient developed a retroperitoneal abscess 2 weeks after CTLS, and in two other patients ureteral strictures were detected 3 months and 2 years after CTLS, respectively. Conclusion: As no predictive criteria for clinical improvement in an individual patient could be identified, CTLS, as a safe procedure, should be employed on a large scale in patients who are unsuitable for treatment by angioplasty or revascularization.

  15. Does a Quality Improvement Intervention for Anxiety Result in Differential Outcomes for Lower Income Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Greer; Sherbourne, Cathy; Chavira, Denise A.; Craske, Michelle G.; Gollineli, Daniela; Han, Xiaotong; Rose, Raphael D.; Bystritsky, Alexander; Stein, Murray B.; Roy-Byrne, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study examined the effects of a collaborative care intervention for anxiety disorders in primary care on lower income participants relative to those with higher incomes. The authors hypothesized that lower income patients might show less improvement or improve at a lower rate given that they experience greater economic stress over the treatment course. Alternatively, lower income patients could improve at a higher rate because the intervention facilitates access to evidence-based treatment, which typically is less available to persons with lower incomes. Method The authors compared baseline demographic and clinical characteristics of patients with lower (n=287) and higher (n=717) income using t-tests and chi-square tests for continuous and categorical variables respectively. For the longitudinal analysis of intervention effects by income group, the authors jointly modeled the outcomes at the four assessment times by study site; income; time; intervention; time and intervention; income and time; income and intervention; and time, intervention and income. Results Although lower-income participants were more ill and disabled at baseline than those in the higher income group, the two income groups were very similar in their clinical response. The lower income participants experienced a comparable degree of clinical improvement, despite receiving fewer treatment sessions, less relapse prevention, and less continuous care. Conclusions These findings contribute to the ongoing discussion as to whether or not, and to what extent, quality improvement interventions work equally well across income groups or require tailoring for specific vulnerable populations. PMID:23377641

  16. Endovascular Treatment of Venous Sinus Stenosis in Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension: Complications, Neurological Outcomes, and Radiographic Results

    PubMed Central

    Starke, Robert M.; Wang, Tony; Ding, Dale; Durst, Christopher R.; Crowley, R. Webster; Chalouhi, Nohra; Hasan, David M.; Dumont, Aaron S.; Jabbour, Pascal; Liu, Kenneth C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) may result in a chronic debilitating disease. Dural venous sinus stenosis with a physiologic venous pressure gradient has been identified as a potential etiology in a number of IIH patients. Intracranial venous stenting has emerged as a potential treatment alternative. Methods. A systematic review was carried out to identify studies employing venous stenting for IIH. Results. From 2002 to 2014, 17 studies comprising 185 patients who underwent 221 stenting procedures were reported. Mean prestent pressure gradient was 20.1 mmHg (95% CI 19.4–20.7 mmHg) with a mean poststent gradient of 4.4 mmHg (95% CI 3.5–5.2 mmHg). Complications occurred in 10 patients (5.4%; 95% CI 4.7–5.4%) but were major in only 3 (1.6%). At a mean clinical follow-up of 22 months, clinical improvement was noted in 130 of 166 patients with headaches (78.3%; 95% CI 75.8–80.8%), 84 of 89 patients with papilledema (94.4%; 95% CI 92.1–96.6%), and 64 of 74 patients with visual symptoms (86.5%; 95% CI 83.0–89.9%). In-stent stenosis was noted in six patients (3.4%; 95% CI 2.5–4.3%) and stent-adjacent stenosis occurred in 19 patients (11.4%; 95% CI 10.4–12.4), resulting in restenting in 10 patients. Conclusion. In IIH patients with venous sinus stenosis and a physiologic pressure gradient, venous stenting appears to be a safe and effective therapeutic option. Further studies are necessary to determine the long-term outcomes and the optimal management of medically refractory IIH. PMID:26146651

  17. A Survey of Physiotherapists' Experience Using Outcome Measures in Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Westby, M.D.; Hoens, A.; Troughton, D.; Field, R.; Duggan, M.; Reid, W.D.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To identify physiotherapists' familiarity with and experience using outcome measures (OMs) along the care continuum for patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty (TJA) of the hip and knee. Views on future use and barriers were also captured. Methods: A stratified random sample of physiotherapists in one Canadian province completed a questionnaire about 19 standardized and clinically feasible OMs. Analyses included descriptive statistics and chi-square and McNemar tests to compare use of OMs for clinical decision making and program evaluation. Results: Of 694 physiotherapists surveyed, 298 (43%) responded. Of these, 172 (58%) treated TJA clients and completed the full questionnaire. A majority worked in public practice settings and >1 care phase (e.g., pre-op, acute, rehab). All physiotherapists reported using ?1 OM and having greater experience using performance-based measures than patient-reported OMs. OMs were used more often for clinical decision making than for program evaluation. Dissatisfaction with available tools was evident from respondents' comments. Several barriers to using OMs were identified in varied clinical settings and care phases. Conclusions: While physiotherapists use a variety of OMs along the TJA continuum, there remain challenges to routine use across clinical settings, care phases, and patient sub-groups. PMID:25125781

  18. The effect of guidance in the use of routine outcome measures in clinical meetings.

    PubMed

    Trauer, Tom; Pedwell, Glenda; Gill, Lisa

    2009-02-01

    Routine outcome measures (ROM) have now been introduced into all Australian public mental health services, but experience suggests that many clinical staff lack expertise in using them. In 2005 under the Quality Through Outcomes Network (QUATRO), the Victorian Department of Human Services set up three teams aimed at consolidating the use of ROM and furthering sustainability through a variety of peer-support activities. We report on an initiative undertaken by one of these teams. QUATRO team members attended team meetings of four adult community teams (three metropolitan and one rural) fortnightly over about 3 months. QUATRO staff contributed to discussion of outcome measures during routine clinical review, using local and national outcome measurement data and tools, and their own expertise. Attitudes of clinicians toward ROM in general and the specific instruments were assessed at the beginning and end of the period, and again after about 5 months. Qualitative findings consist of observations of factors that assist and hinder use of ROM. The initiative identified steps that staff can take to make ROM more useful in their work. PMID:19203344

  19. MEASURING AND IMPROVING RESPIRATORY OUTCOMES IN CYSTIC FIBROSIS LUNG DISEASE: OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES TO THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Zemanick, Edith T.; Harris, J. Kirk; Conway, Steven; Konstan, Michael W.; Marshall, Bruce; Quittner, Alexandra L.; Retsch-Bogart, George; Saiman, Lisa; Accurso, Frank J.

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening disease with significant morbidity. Despite overall improvements in survival, patients with CF experience frequent pulmonary exacerbations and declining lung function, which often accelerates during adolescence. New treatments target steps in the pathogenesis of lung disease, such as the basic defect in CF (CF Transmembrane Conductance Regulator [CFTR]), pulmonary infections, inflammation, and mucociliary clearance. These treatments offer hope but also present challenges to patients, clinicians, and researchers. Comprehensive assessment of efficacy is critical to identify potentially beneficial treatments. Lung function and pulmonary exacerbation are the most commonly used outcome measures in CF clinical research. Other outcome measures under investigation include measures of CFTR function; biomarkers of infection, inflammation, lung injury and repair; and patient-reported outcomes. Molecular diagnostics may help elucidate the complex CF airway microbiome. As new treatments are developed for patients with CF, efforts should be made to balance treatment burden with quality of life. This review highlights emerging treatments, obstacles to optimizing outcomes, and key future directions for research. PMID:19833563

  20. Creating a Novel Video Vignette Stroke Preparedness Outcome Measure Using a Community-Based Participatory Approach.

    PubMed

    Skolarus, Lesli E; Murphy, Jillian B; Dome, Mackenzie; Zimmerman, Marc A; Bailey, Sarah; Fowlkes, Sophronia; Morgenstern, Lewis B

    2015-07-01

    Evaluating the efficacy of behavioral interventions for rare outcomes is a challenge. One such topic is stroke preparedness, defined as inteventions to increase stroke symptom recognition and behavioral intent to call 911. Current stroke preparedness intermediate outcome measures are centered on written vignettes or open-ended questions and have been shown to poorly reflect actual behavior. Given that stroke identification and action requires aural and visual processing, video vignettes may improve on current measures. This article discusses an approach for creating a novel stroke preparedness video vignette intermediate outcome measure within a community-based participatory research partnership. A total of 20 video vignettes were filmed of which 13 were unambiguous (stroke or not stroke) as determined by stroke experts and had test discrimination among community participants. Acceptable reliability, high satisfaction, and cultural relevance were found among the 14 community respondents. A community-based participatory approach was effective in creating a video vignette intermediate outcome. Future projects should consider obtaining expert and community feedback prior to filming all the video vignettes to improve the proportion of vignettes that are usable. While content validity and preliminary reliability were established, future studies are needed to confirm the reliability and establish construct validity. PMID:25367896

  1. Validity of behavioral measures as proxies for HIV-related outcomes.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Rick S; Morisky, Donald E; Harrison, Lana; Mark, Hayley D

    2014-08-15

    Over the last 30 years, expectations for the quality, validity, and objectivity of the outcome measures used to assess the impact of behavior change interventions related to HIV have steadily increased. At this point (mid-2014 at this writing), biologic evidence or biomarkers of the incidence of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections in a target population is clearly preferable to self-reports of behavior. This kind of evidence is, however, much more expensive to collect than participants' reports of behavior change (eg, increased condom use, reduced substance use or abstinence from substance use, and high levels of medication adherence). In addition, although potentially less subject to reporting bias, biomarkers and biologic outcomes have their own flaws. In this article, we review the literature on the validity of self-reports of outcomes most relevant to HIV behavior change interventions, sexual behavior (ever having had sex and condom use), substance use, and medication adherence. We note the extent to which they may be adequate outcome measures without biologic data, and the conditions under which they may be most likely to be sufficient. We also argue, like many others, that where possible, both self-report and biologic measures should be collected. PMID:25007198

  2. Measures of Maternal Socioeconomic Status in Yemen and Association with Maternal and Child Health Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Alosaimi, Abdullah N; Luoto, Riitta; Al Serouri, Abdul Wahed; Nwaru, Bright I; Mouniri, Halima

    2016-02-01

    Background Reliable measurement of socioeconomic status (SES) in health research requires extensive resources and can be challenging in low-income countries. We aimed to develop a set of maternal SES indices and investigate their associations with maternal and child health outcomes in rural Yemen. Methods We applied factor analysis based on principal component analysis extraction to construct the SES indices by capturing household attributes for 7295 women of reproductive age. Data were collected from a sub-national household survey conducted in six rural districts in four Yemeni provinces in 2008-2009. Logistic regression models were fitted to estimate the associations between the SES indices and maternal mortality, spontaneous abortion, stillbirth, neonatal and infant mortality. Results Three SES indices (wealth, educational and housing quality) were extracted, which together explained 54 % of the total variation in SES. Factor scores were derived and categorized into tertiles. After adjusting for potential confounding factors, higher tertiles of all the indices were inversely associated with spontaneous abortion. Higher tertiles of wealth and educational indices were inversely associated with stillbirth, neonatal and infant mortality. None of the SES indices was strongly associated with maternal mortality. Conclusion By subjecting a number of household attributes to factor analysis, we derived three SES indices (wealth, educational, and housing quality) that are useful for maternal and child health research in rural Yemen. The indices were worthwhile in predicting a number of maternal and child health outcomes. In low-income settings, failure to account for the multidimensionality of SES may underestimate the influence of SES on maternal and child health. PMID:26530035

  3. The National Neurosurgery Quality and Outcomes Database Qualified Clinical Data Registry: 2015 measure specifications and rationale.

    PubMed

    Parker, Scott L; McGirt, Matthew J; Bekelis, Kimon; Holland, Christopher M; Davies, Jason; Devin, Clinton J; Atkins, Tyler; Knightly, Jack; Groman, Rachel; Zyung, Irene; Asher, Anthony L

    2015-12-01

    Meaningful quality measurement and public reporting have the potential to facilitate targeted outcome improvement, practice-based learning, shared decision making, and effective resource utilization. Recent developments in national quality reporting programs, such as the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Qualified Clinical Data Registry (QCDR) reporting option, have enhanced the ability of specialty groups to develop relevant quality measures of the care they deliver. QCDRs will complete the collection and submission of Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS) quality measures data on behalf of individual eligible professionals. The National Neurosurgery Quality and Outcomes Database (N(2)QOD) offers 21 non-PQRS measures, initially focused on spine procedures, which are the first specialty-specific measures for neurosurgery. Securing QCDR status for N(2)QOD is a tremendously important accomplishment for our specialty. This program will ensure that data collected through our registries and used for PQRS is meaningful for neurosurgeons, related spine care practitioners, their patients, and other stakeholders. The 2015 N(2)QOD QCDR is further evidence of neurosurgery's commitment to substantively advancing the health care quality paradigm. The following manuscript outlines the measures now approved for use in the 2015 N(2)QOD QCDR. Measure specifications (measure type and descriptions, related measures, if any, as well as relevant National Quality Strategy domain[s]) along with rationale are provided for each measure. PMID:26621418

  4. Drinking Goal Choice and Outcomes in a Web-based Alcohol Intervention: Results from VetChange

    PubMed Central

    Enggasser, Justin L.; Hermos, John A.; Rubin, Amy; Lachowicz, Mark; Rybin, Denis; Brief, Deborah J.; Roy, Monica; Helmuth, Eric; Rosenbloom, David; Keane, Terence M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To describe characteristics of participants who chose moderation and abstinence drinking goals, and to examine post-treatment drinking outcomes based on patterns of goal choice during a Web-based alcohol intervention for returning U.S. Veterans. Method We conducted a descriptive secondary analysis of a subsample of 305 of 600 Veterans who participated in a clinical trial of VetChange, an 8-module, cognitive-behavioral intervention. Participants self-selected abstinence or moderation drinking goals, initially at Module 3, and weekly during subsequent modules. Alcohol use and alcohol-related problems were measured using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), Quick Drink Screen (QDS), and Short Inventory of Problems (SIP-2R). Results Initial goal choices were 86.9% moderation and 13.1% abstinence. Approximately 20% of participants from each initial choice changed goals during the intervention; last goal choices were 68.6% moderation and 31.4% abstinence. Participants who initially chose moderation reported higher percent heavy drinking days at baseline; participants who initially chose abstinence were more likely to report recent substance abuse treatment and were older. Post-intervention levels of alcohol use and alcohol-related problems were significantly reduced in all goal-choice patterns (i.e., Moderation Only, Abstinence Only, Moderation to Abstinence, and Abstinence to Moderation; all measures p < 0.05 or less). Baseline drinking severity did not differentially relate to outcomes across goal-choice patterns. Conclusions Participants in a Web-based alcohol intervention for returning U.S. Veterans demonstrated improvements in drinking regardless of whether they chose an abstinence or moderation drinking goal, and whether the goal was maintained or changed over the course of the intervention. PMID:25671224

  5. Social and behavioral research in genomic sequencing: approaches from the Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research Consortium Outcomes and Measures Working Group

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Stacy W.; Martins, Yolanda; Feuerman, Lindsay Z.; Bernhardt, Barbara A.; Biesecker, Barbara B.; Christensen, Kurt D.; Joffe, Steven; Rini, Christine; Veenstra, David; McGuire, Amy L.

    2014-01-01

    The routine use of genomic sequencing in clinical medicine has the potential to dramatically alter patient care and medical outcomes. To fully understand the psychosocial and behavioral impact of sequencing integration into clinical practice, it is imperative that we identify the factors that influence sequencing-related decision making and patient outcomes. In an effort to develop a collaborative and conceptually grounded approach to studying sequencing adoption, members of the National Human Genome Research Institute's Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research Consortium formed the Outcomes and Measures Working Group. Here we highlight the priority areas of investigation and psychosocial and behavioral outcomes identified by the Working Group. We also review some of the anticipated challenges to measurement in social and behavioral research related to genomic sequencing; opportunities for instrument development; and the importance of qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-method approaches. This work represents the early, shared efforts of multiple research teams as we strive to understand individuals' experiences with genomic sequencing. The resulting body of knowledge will guide recommendations for the optimal use of sequencing in clinical practice. PMID:24625446

  6. Social and behavioral research in genomic sequencing: approaches from the Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research Consortium Outcomes and Measures Working Group.

    PubMed

    Gray, Stacy W; Martins, Yolanda; Feuerman, Lindsay Z; Bernhardt, Barbara A; Biesecker, Barbara B; Christensen, Kurt D; Joffe, Steven; Rini, Christine; Veenstra, David; McGuire, Amy L

    2014-10-01

    The routine use of genomic sequencing in clinical medicine has the potential to dramatically alter patient care and medical outcomes. To fully understand the psychosocial and behavioral impact of sequencing integration into clinical practice, it is imperative that we identify the factors that influence sequencing-related decision making and patient outcomes. In an effort to develop a collaborative and conceptually grounded approach to studying sequencing adoption, members of the National Human Genome Research Institute's Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research Consortium formed the Outcomes and Measures Working Group. Here we highlight the priority areas of investigation and psychosocial and behavioral outcomes identified by the Working Group. We also review some of the anticipated challenges to measurement in social and behavioral research related to genomic sequencing; opportunities for instrument development; and the importance of qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-method approaches. This work represents the early, shared efforts of multiple research teams as we strive to understand individuals' experiences with genomic sequencing. The resulting body of knowledge will guide recommendations for the optimal use of sequencing in clinical practice. PMID:24625446

  7. Spectral measurements in critical assemblies: MCNP specifications and calculated results

    SciTech Connect

    Stephanie C. Frankle; Judith F. Briesmeister

    1999-12-01

    Recently, a suite of 86 criticality benchmarks for the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code was developed, and the results of testing the ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI data (through Release 2) were published. In addition to the standard k{sub eff} measurements, other experimental measurements were performed on a number of these benchmark assemblies. In particular, the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) specifications contain experimental data for neutron leakage and central-flux measurements, central-fission ratio measurements, and activation ratio measurements. Additionally, there exists another set of fission reaction-rate measurements performed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) utilizing a {sup 252}Cf source. This report will describe the leakage and central-flux measurements and show a comparison of experimental data to MCNP simulations performed using the ENDF/B-V and B-VI (Release 2) data libraries. Central-fission and activation reaction-rate measurements will be described, and the comparison of experimental data to MCNP simulations using available data libraries for each reaction of interest will be presented. Finally, the NIST fission reaction-rate measurements will be described. A comparison of MCNP results published previously with the current MCNP simulations will be presented for the NIST measurements, and a comparison of the current MCNP simulations to the experimental measurements will be presented.

  8. Advanced Placement Results, 2013-14. Measuring Up. D&A Report No.15.01

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilleland, Kevin; Muli, Juliana

    2015-01-01

    Advanced Placement (AP) outcomes for Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) students have continued an upward trend for over 18 years, out-performing the state and the nation in all measures. In 2013-14 there were 13,757 exams taken by 6,955 WCPSS test-takers with almost 76% of the exams resulting in scores at or above 3, outperforming Guilford…

  9. Outcome of Radial Head Arthroplasty in Comminuted Radial Head Fractures: Short and Midterm Results

    PubMed Central

    Moghaddam, Arash; Raven, Tim Friedrich; Dremel, Eike; Studier-Fischer, Stefan; Grutzner, Paul Alfred; Biglari, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    Background: Comminuted radial head fractures are often associated with secondary injuries and elbow instability. Objectives: The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate how well the modular metallic radial head implant EVOLVE® prosthesis restores functional range of motion (ROM) and stability of the elbow in acute care. Patients and Methods: Eighty-five patients with comminuted radial head fractures and associated injuries received treatment with an EVOLVE® prosthesis between May 2001 and November 2009. Seventy-five patients were available for follow-up. On average, patients were followed for 41.5 months (33.0: 4.0 - 93.0). Outcome assessment was done on the basis of pain, ROM, strength, radiographic findings, and functional rating scores such as Broberg and Morrey, the Mayo elbow performance index (MEPI), and disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH). Our study is currently the largest analysis of clinical outcome of a modular radial head replacement in the literature. Results: Overall, there were 2 (2.7%) Mason II fractures, 21 (28%) Mason III fractures, and 52 (69.3%) Mason IV fractures. Arbeitsgemeinschaft fur osteosynthesefragen (AO) classification was also determined. Of the 85 patients in our study, 75 were available for follow-up. Follow-up averaged 41.5 months (range, 4 - 93 months). Average scores for the cohort were as follows: Morrey, 85.7 (median 90.2; range 44.4 - 100); MEPI, 83.3 (85.0; 40.0 - 100); and DASH 26.1 points (22.5; 0.0 - 75.8). Mean flexion/extension in the affected joint was 125.7°/16.5°/0° in comparison to the noninjured side 138.5°/0°/1.2°. Mean pronation/supination was 70.5°/0°/67.1° in comparison to the noninjured side 83.6°/0°/84.3°. Handgrip strength of the injured compared to the non-injured arm was 78.8%. The following complications were also documented: 58 patients had periprosthetic radioluceny shown to be neither clinically significant nor relevant according to evaluated scores; 26 patients had moderate or severe periarticular ossification, and scored substantially worse according to MEPI and Morrey. Four patients required revisional surgery due to loosening of the prosthesis and chronic pain. In addition, one patient required a neurolysis of the ulnaris nerve, one developed a neobursa, and one had extensive swelling and blistering. The time interval between injury and treatment appeared to have an effect on results. Thirty-five patients were treated within the first 5 days after accident and showed better results than the 40 patients who were treated after 5 days. Conclusions: Comminuted radial head fractures with elbow instability can be treated well with a modular radial head prosthesis, which restores stability in acute treatment. The modular radial head arthroplasty used in this study showed promising findings in short to midterm results. PMID:27218046

  10. Assessing the results: phase 1 hyperlipidemia outcomes in 27 health plans.

    PubMed

    Latts, L M

    2001-04-16

    In phase 1 of this hyperlipidemia outcomes management program, characteristics of 7,619 patients treated with statins at 27 US managed care plans were determined. Nearly 40% (3,018 patients) had documented coronary heart disease (CHD). Most (65%) had at least two CHD risk factors. Hyperlipidemia treatment included simvastatin (39%), atorvastatin (25%), fluvastatin (14%), pravastatin (12%), and lovastatin (2%). On-treatment low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels were available for 79% of patients; however, only 46% had both baseline and follow-up levels recorded in their charts. Of patients for whom follow-up data were available, 3,779 (63%) achieved their target LDL-C levels as recommended by the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP). Target LDL-C levels were reached by 1,381 (87%) of the patients with a goal of 160 mg/dL, 1,326 (65%) of those with a goal of 130 mg/dL, and 1,072 (44%) of those with a goal of 100 mg/dL. Overall, 66% of patients who met their treatment goal and 24% of those who did not required no more than a 25% reduction in LDL-C. In contrast, 8% of patients who achieved goals and 36% of patients who did not required >40% reduction in LDL-C. Phase 1 results did not suggest any substantial difference among statins for achievement of NCEP goals or decrease in LDL-C. These results show that therapy with statins is effective for achievement of NCEP targets in most patients and that there is potential for improvement in the quality and cost-effectiveness of statin therapy with carefully planned interventions. PMID:11311193

  11. Measuring the impact and outcomes of maternal child health federal programs.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Yhenneko J; Nies, Mary A

    2013-07-01

    Improving maternal and child health is a key objective of the United Nations' Millennium Development Goals and the Healthy People goals for improving the health of Americans. Government initiatives are important particularly for reducing disparities that affect disadvantaged populations. Head Start, Healthy Start, WIC and Medicaid are four federal programs that target disparities in maternal and child health outcomes. This paper reviews recent evaluations of these programs to identify outcomes assessed and opportunities for further evaluation of these programs. We conducted a review of recent evaluation studies assessing the impact of four maternal and child health programs on a health or healthcare outcome. Sources for published literature included the PubMed, Academic Search Complete, CINAHL and PsycInfo databases. Titles and abstracts of studies were examined to determine if they met inclusion criteria. Included studies were categorized by type of outcome examined. Twenty peer-reviewed studies published between January 2006 and June 2011 met inclusion criteria. The majority of studies examined infant outcomes (11), followed by breastfeeding/nutrition (4), maternal health (3), and unintended pregnancy (2). Measures used were consistent across studies; however, findings on the impact of programs were mixed reflecting differences in selection of comparison group, data source and statistical methods. The impact of maternal and child health programs may vary by setting and population served, but inconclusive findings remain. Health service researchers can build upon current evaluations to increase our understanding of what works, help target resources, and improve evaluation of programs in the future. PMID:22729661

  12. Side Effects of Minocycline Treatment in Patients With Fragile X Syndrome and Exploration of Outcome Measures

    PubMed Central

    Utari, Agustini; Chonchaiya, Weerasak; Rivera, Susan M.; Schneider, Andrea; Hagerman, Randi J.; Faradz, Sultana M. H.; Ethell, Iryna M.; Nguyen, Danh V.

    2014-01-01

    Minocycline can rescue the dendritic spine and synaptic structural abnormalities in the fragile X knock-out mouse. This is a review and preliminary survey to document side effects and potential outcome measures for minocycline use in the treatment of individuals with fragile X syndrome. We surveyed 50 patients with fragile X syndrome who received minocycline for at least 2 weeks and found that the most common reported side effect is gastrointestinal difficulty, including loss of appetite. The families reported an improvement in language and behavioral areas. Outcome measures in the design of future randomized clinical trials should include both behavioral and language measures. As with any other treatments, we emphasize that randomized clinical trials are needed to determine the efficacy of minocycline in fragile X syndrome. PMID:20687826

  13. Patient population management: taking the leap from variance analysis to outcomes measurement.

    PubMed

    Allen, K M

    1998-01-01

    Case managers today at BCHS have a somewhat different role than at the onset of the Collaborative Practice Model. They are seen throughout the organization as: Leaders/participants on cross-functional teams. Systems change agents. Integrating/merging with quality services and utilization management. Outcomes managers. One of the major cross-functional teams is in the process of designing a Care Coordinator role. These individuals will, as one of their functions, assume responsibility for daily patient care management activities. A variance tracking program has come into the Utilization Management (UM) department as part of a software package purchased to automate UM work activities. This variance program could potentially be used by the new care coordinators as the role develops. The case managers are beginning to use a Decision Support software, (Transition Systems Inc.) in the collection of data that is based on a cost accounting system and linked to clinical events. Other clinical outcomes data bases are now being used by the case manager to help with the collection and measurement of outcomes information. Hoshin planning will continue to be a framework for defining and setting the targets for clinical and financial improvements throughout the organization. Case managers will continue to be involved in many of these system-wide initiatives. In the words of Galileo, 1579, "You need to count what's countable, measure what's measurable, and what's not measurable, make measurable." PMID:9601411

  14. Content validity of patient-reported outcome measures: perspectives from a PROMIS meeting.

    PubMed

    Magasi, Susan; Ryan, Gery; Revicki, Dennis; Lenderking, William; Hays, Ron D; Brod, Meryl; Snyder, Claire; Boers, Maarten; Cella, David

    2012-06-01

    Content validity of patient-reported outcome measures (PROs) has been a focus of debate since the 2006 publication of the U.S. FDA Draft Guidance for Industry in Patient Reported Outcome Measurement. Under the auspices of the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) initiative, a working meeting on content validity was convened with leading PRO measurement experts. Platform presentations and participant discussion highlighted key issues in the content validity debate, including inconsistency in the definition and evaluation of content validity, the need for empirical research to support methodological approaches to the evaluation of content validity, and concerns that continual re-evaluation of content validity slows the pace of science and leads to the proliferation of study-specific PROs. We advocate an approach to the evaluation of content validity, which includes meticulously documented qualitative and advanced quantitative methods. To advance the science of content validity in PROs, we recommend (1) development of a consensus definition of content validity; (2) development of content validity guidelines that delineate the role of qualitative and quantitative methods and the integration of multiple perspectives; (3) empirical evaluation of generalizability of content validity across applications; and (4) use of generic measures as the foundation for PROs assessment. PMID:21866374

  15. Usefulness of the Core Outcome Measures Index in Daily Clinical Practice for Assessing Patients with Degenerative Lumbar Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lozano-Álvarez, Carlos; Pérez-Prieto, Daniel; Saló, Guillem; Molina, Antoni; Lladó, Andreu; Ramírez, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Outcome evaluation is an important aspect of the treatment of patients with degenerative lumbar disease. We evaluated the usefulness of the Core Outcome Measures Index (COMI) in assessing people affected by degenerative lumbar disease in daily clinical practice. Methods. We evaluated 221 patients who had completed preoperatively and 2 years after surgery VAS pain, Short Form-36 (SF-36), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and COMI. We calculated the change of scores and its sensitivity to change. The internal consistency of the COMI items and the correlation between the COMI scores and the scores of the other measurements were assessed. Results. Statistically significant differences were observed between the mean scores of the preoperative and 2 years questionnaires for nearly all measurements. COMI showed a good internal consistency, except for the preoperative pain subscale. The sensitivity to change was high for the total COMI and its pain and well-being subscales and moderate for the rest. The COMI demonstrated strong correlation with the other measurements. Conclusions. The COMI is a useful tool for assessing the patient-based outcome in the studied population. Given its simplicity, good correlation with the SF-36 and ODI and its good sensitivity to change, it could replace more cumbersome instruments in daily clinical practice. PMID:22518325

  16. Measurement of the Outcome of Learning: Health Care Performance Measurement and Continuing Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Geoffrey M.

    1999-01-01

    Continuing medical education (CME) must demonstrate its effect on the quality of health care. Performance measurement methods, such as public report cards, are gaining strength. CME providers should link timing and content of their offerings with performance measures. (SK)

  17. The case for an international patient-reported outcomes measurement information system (PROMIS®) initiative.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Jordi; Bartlett, Susan J; Rose, Matthias; Aaronson, Neil K; Chaplin, John E; Efficace, Fabio; Leplège, Alain; Lu, Aiping; Tulsky, David S; Raat, Hein; Ravens-Sieberer, Ulrike; Revicki, Dennis; Terwee, Caroline B; Valderas, Jose M; Cella, David; Forrest, Christopher B

    2013-01-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) play an increasingly important role in clinical practice and research. Modern psychometric methods such as item response theory (IRT) enable the creation of item banks that support fixed-length forms as well as computerized adaptive testing (CAT), often resulting in improved measurement precision and responsiveness. Here we describe and discuss the case for developing an international core set of PROs building from the US PROMIS® network.PROMIS is a U.S.-based cooperative group of research sites and centers of excellence convened to develop and standardize PRO measures across studies and settings. If extended to a global collaboration, PROMIS has the potential to transform PRO measurement by creating a shared, unifying terminology and metric for reporting of common symptoms and functional life domains. Extending a common set of standardized PRO measures to the international community offers great potential for improving patient-centered research, clinical trials reporting, population monitoring, and health care worldwide. Benefits of such standardization include the possibility of: international syntheses (such as meta-analyses) of research findings; international population monitoring and policy development; health services administrators and planners access to relevant information on the populations they serve; better assessment and monitoring of patients by providers; and improved shared decision making.The goal of the current PROMIS International initiative is to ensure that item banks are translated and culturally adapted for use in adults and children in as many countries as possible. The process includes 3 key steps: translation/cultural adaptation, calibration, and validation. A universal translation, an approach focusing on commonalities, rather than differences across versions developed in regions or countries speaking the same language, is proposed to ensure conceptual equivalence for all items. International item calibration using nationally representative samples of adults and children within countries is essential to demonstrate that all items possess expected strong measurement properties. Finally, it is important to demonstrate that the PROMIS measures are valid, reliable and responsive to change when used in an international context.IRT item banking will allow for tailoring within countries and facilitate growth and evolution of PROs through contributions from the international measurement community. A number of opportunities and challenges of international development of PROs item banks are discussed. PMID:24359143

  18. HoNOSCA in an adolescent psychiatric inpatient unit: an exploration of outcome measures.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jin-Min

    2015-09-01

    Routine Outcome Measures (ROM) are important tools, increasingly used to assess both patient progress and service-provider efficacy. The Health of the Nation Outcome Scales for Children and Adolescents (HoNOSCA) is a clinician- and patient-rated ROM which summarises a patient's global functioning within behaviour, impairment, symptoms and social domains. Recent literature suggests that consistent disparity exists between the patients' self-ratings and the clinicians' ratings on HoNOSCA. We analysed HoNOSCA data for our own adolescent inpatient unit and report similar findings. Studies have also shown significant differences in both physical and mental health outcomes based on the patient-clinician dynamic and effective communication. We thus investigated the predictive utility of the two HoNOSCA scores, and the disparity between them, with respect to other outcomes measures (CGAS, length of stay and improvement on HoNOSCA). HoNOSCA disparity scores were significantly associated with both patient- and clinician-rated HoNOSCA improvement scores. Moreover, higher admission HoNOSCA scores were associated with greater HoNOSCA improvement scores, for both patient and clinician ratings. We report admission and discharge HoNOSCA scores comparable to other child and adolescent psychiatric inpatient facilities. PMID:26417796

  19. Therapeutic Alliance and Outcome of Psychotherapy: Historical Excursus, Measurements, and Prospects for Research

    PubMed Central

    Ardito, Rita B.; Rabellino, Daniela

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a historical excursus of studies that have investigated the therapeutic alliance and the relationship between this dimension and outcome in psychotherapy. A summary of how the concept of alliance has evolved over time and the more popular alliance measures used in literature to assess the level of alliance are presented. The proposal of a therapeutic alliance characterized by a variable pattern over the course of treatment is also examined. The emerging picture suggests that the quality of the client–therapist alliance is a reliable predictor of positive clinical outcome independent of the variety of psychotherapy approaches and outcome measures. In our opinion, with regard to the relationship between the therapeutic alliance and outcome of psychotherapy, future research should pay special attention to the comparison between patients’ and therapists’ assessments of the therapeutic alliance. This topic, along with a detailed examination of the relationship between the psychological disorder being treated and the therapeutic alliance, will be the subject of future research projects. PMID:22028698

  20. Methods and results of boundary layer measurements on a glider

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nes, W. V.

    1978-01-01

    Boundary layer measurements were carried out on a glider under natural conditions. Two effects are investigated: the effect of inconstancy of the development of static pressure within the boundary layer and the effect of the negative pressure difference in a sublaminar boundary layer. The results obtained by means of an ion probe in parallel connection confirm those results obtained by means of a pressure probe. Additional effects which have occurred during these measurements are briefly dealt with.

  1. Patient-Reported Outcomes and Total Health Care Expenditure in Prediction of Patient Satisfaction: Results From a National Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiping; Chen, Wei; Bounsanga, Jerry; Cheng, Christine; Franklin, Jeremy D; Crum, Anthony B; Voss, Maren W; Hon, Shirley D

    2015-01-01

    Background Health care quality is often linked to patient satisfaction. Yet, there is a lack of national studies examining the relationship between patient satisfaction, patient-reported outcomes, and medical expenditure. Objective The aim of this study is to examine the contribution of physical health, mental health, general health, and total health care expenditures to patient satisfaction using a longitudinal, nationally representative sample. Methods Using data from the 2010-2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, analyses were conducted to predict patient satisfaction from patient-reported outcomes and total health care expenditures. The study sample consisted of adult participants (N=10,157), with sampling weights representative of 233.26 million people in the United States. Results The results indicated that patient-reported outcomes and total health care expenditure were associated with patient satisfaction such that higher physical and mental function, higher general health status, and higher total health care expenditure were associated with higher patient satisfaction. Conclusions We found that patient-reported outcomes and total health care expenditure had a significant relationship with patient satisfaction. As more emphasis is placed on health care value and quality, this area of research will become increasingly needed and critical questions should be asked about what we value in health care and whether we can find a balance between patient satisfaction, outcomes, and expenditures. Future research should apply big data analytics to investigate whether there is a differential effect of patient-reported outcomes and medical expenditures on patient satisfaction across different medical specialties.

  2. New and revised half-life measurements results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unterweger, M. P.; Hoppes, D. D.; Schima, F. J.

    1992-02-01

    The half-lives of many radionuclides have been measured in the Radioactivity Group of NIST over the last three decades. The results of these measurements for many long-lived radionuclides such as 60Co, 137Cs, 85Kr, 22Na, 133Ba, 207Bi, 152Eu, 1 33Eu, 134Eu, 135Eu, and 125Sb have been recently revised. The results for the half-lives of the many radionuclides measured over the last three decades are tabulated. Comparisons with the recommended values from the International Atomic Energy Agency Coordinated Research Program (IAEA-CRP) are given for the long-lived radionuclides.

  3. Recommendations for a Core Outcome Set for Measuring Standing Balance in Adult Populations: A Consensus-Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Sibley, Kathryn M.; Howe, Tracey; Lamb, Sarah E.; Lord, Stephen R.; Maki, Brian E.; Rose, Debra J.; Scott, Vicky; Stathokostas, Liza; Straus, Sharon E.; Jaglal, Susan B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Standing balance is imperative for mobility and avoiding falls. Use of an excessive number of standing balance measures has limited the synthesis of balance intervention data and hampered consistent clinical practice. Objective To develop recommendations for a core outcome set (COS) of standing balance measures for research and practice among adults. Methodology A combination of scoping reviews, literature appraisal, anonymous voting and face-to-face meetings with fourteen invited experts from a range of disciplines with international recognition in balance measurement and falls prevention. Consensus was sought over three rounds using pre-established criteria. Data sources The scoping review identified 56 existing standing balance measures validated in adult populations with evidence of use in the past five years, and these were considered for inclusion in the COS. Results Fifteen measures were excluded after the first round of scoring and a further 36 after round two. Five measures were considered in round three. Two measures reached consensus for recommendation, and the expert panel recommended that at a minimum, either the Berg Balance Scale or Mini Balance Evaluation Systems Test be used when measuring standing balance in adult populations. Limitations Inclusion of two measures in the COS may increase the feasibility of potential uptake, but poses challenges for data synthesis. Adoption of the standing balance COS does not constitute a comprehensive balance assessment for any population, and users should include additional validated measures as appropriate. Conclusions The absence of a gold standard for measuring standing balance has contributed to the proliferation of outcome measures. These recommendations represent an important first step towards greater standardization in the assessment and measurement of this critical skill and will inform clinical research and practice internationally. PMID:25768435

  4. Galectin-3, Renal Function, and Clinical Outcomes: Results from the LURIC and 4D Studies.

    PubMed

    Drechsler, Christiane; Delgado, Graciela; Wanner, Christoph; Blouin, Katja; Pilz, Stefan; Tomaschitz, Andreas; Kleber, Marcus E; Dressel, Alexander; Willmes, Christoph; Krane, Vera; Krämer, Bernhard K; März, Winfried; Ritz, Eberhard; van Gilst, Wiek H; van der Harst, Pim; de Boer, Rudolf A

    2015-09-01

    Galectin-3 has been linked to incident renal disease, experimental renal fibrosis, and nephropathy. However, the association among galectin-3, renal function, and adverse outcomes has not been described. We studied this association in two large cohorts of patients over a broad range of renal function. We measured galectin-3 concentrations in baseline samples from the German Diabetes mellitus Dialysis (4D) study (1168 dialysis patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus) and the Ludwigshafen Risk and Cardiovascular Health (LURIC) study (2579 patients with coronary angiograms). Patients were stratified into three groups: eGFR of ≥90 ml/min per 1.73 m(2), 60-89 ml/min per 1.73 m(2), and <60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2). We correlated galectin-3 concentrations with demographic, clinical, and biochemical parameters. The association of galectin-3 with clinical end points was assessed by Cox proportional hazards regression within 10 years (LURIC) or 4 years (4D) of follow-up. Mean±SD galectin-3 concentrations were 12.8±4.0 ng/ml (eGFR≥90 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)), 15.6±5.4 ng/ml (eGFR 60-89 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)), 23.1±9.9 ng/ml (eGFR<60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)), and 54.1±19.6 ng/ml (dialysis patients of the 4D study). Galectin-3 concentration was significantly associated with clinical end points in participants with impaired kidney function, but not in participants with normal kidney function. Per SD increase in log-transformed galectin-3 concentration, the risks of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, and fatal infection increased significantly. In dialysis patients, galectin-3 was associated with the combined end point of cardiovascular events. In conclusion, galectin-3 concentrations increased with progressive renal impairment and independently associated with cardiovascular end points, infections, and all-cause death in patients with impaired renal function. PMID:25568176

  5. Air exchange effectiveness in office buildings: Measurement techniques and results

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, W.J.; Faulkner, D.

    1992-07-01

    We define two air exchange effectiveness parameters which indicate the extent of short circuiting, mixing, or displacement air flow in an entire building, the air diffusion effectiveness which indicates the air flow pattern locally, and the normalized local age of air. After describing two tracer gas procedures for measuring these parameters, we discuss assumptions inherent in the data analysis that are often violated in large office buildings. To obtain valuable data, careful selection of buildings for measurements and assessments to determine if operating conditions are reasonably consistent with the assumptions are necessary. Multiple factors, in addition to the air flow pattern in the occupied space, can affect measurement results, consequently, the interpretation of measurements is not straightforward. We summarize the results of measurements in several office buildings and in a research laboratory. Almost all measurements indicate that the extent of both short circuiting and displacement flow is small. A moderate amount of short circuiting is evident from a few measurements in rooms with heated supply air. Ages of air and their reciprocals (local ventilation rates) often vary substantially between rooms, probably because of room-to-room variation in the rate of air supply. For future research, we suggest assessments of measurement accuracy, development of measurement approaches that may be practically applied for a broader range of buildings, and a greater focus on pollutant removal efficiencies.

  6. Breast Reduction versus Breast Reduction Plus Implants: A Comparative Study with Measurements and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background: Breast reduction is well-known to provide an improvement in physical symptoms. However, measurements show that this procedure is less effective in restoring upper-pole fullness. Breast implants effectively augment the upper pole. This study was undertaken to determine the effectiveness and safety of this treatment combination. Methods: This retrospective study consists of 3 parts: (1) a clinical study, (2) breast measurements, and (3) an outcome study. Eighty consecutive women undergoing breast reduction (n = 56) or breast reduction plus implants (n = 24) were evaluated. All breast implants were inserted submuscularly. All patients were treated with the same vertical reduction technique, using a medially based pedicle and intraoperative nipple positioning. Measurements were compared between preoperative photographs and photographs taken at least 3 months after surgery (n = 51). Patient surveys (n= 56) were evaluated. Results: There was no significant difference in complication or reoperation rates between groups. Both procedures elevated the breast mound and lower-pole level and increased the breast parenchymal ratio (upper-pole area/lower-pole area). Breast implants significantly increased upper-pole projection (P < 0.01). All surveyed patients who had simultaneous implants reported that they were pleased with their decision. Physical symptoms were reduced in both groups. Patient satisfaction was 92.5% for breast reduction and 93.8% for breast reduction plus implants. Both groups reported an improvement in quality of life. Conclusions: Vertical breast reduction with a medial pedicle may be combined safely and effectively with breast implants in patients who desire upper-pole fullness. PMID:25587515

  7. Comparison of measures to assess outcomes in total hip replacement surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, J; Fitzpatrick, R; Murray, D; Carr, A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To compare the performance of a disease specific and a general health questionnaire in assessing changes resulting from total hip replacement. DESIGN--Two stage prospective study of patients undergoing total hip replacement surgery involving an assessment at a clinic before and six months after surgery. 60(32%) patients were followed up by post. SETTING--Outpatient departments at a specialist orthopaedic hospital and peripheral clinics within Oxfordshire. PATIENTS--188 patients admitted for unilateral total hip replacement between February and mid-August 1994. MAIN MEASURES--Patients' self assessed scores with the 12 item Oxford hip score and SF-36 general health questionnaire together with surgeons' assessment with Charnley hip score obtained before and again at six months after surgery. RESULTS--186 patients were followed up six months after total hip replacement; a subsample (n=60) by post. Of the 60 postal patients, 59(98.3%) fully completed the Oxford hip score compared with 44(73.3%) who fully completed the SF-36. For the followup sample as a whole, post operative changes in scores produced a large effect size of 2.75 on the Oxford hip score, compared with -1.89 physical function (SF-36), -2.13 pain (SF-36). With the exception of physical function and role (physical), postoperative SF-36 scores were shown to be similar to or better than those found by two population surveys on patients of comparable age. The responsiveness of a disease specific questionnaire, the Oxford hip score, and relevant sections of a general questionnaire, SF-36, were found to be similar as assessed by three different criteria. CONCLUSIONS--A disease specific questionnaire, the Oxford hip score, and a general state of health questionnaire, SF-36, performed similarly in assessing outcomes of total hip replacement except that the disease specific questionnaire resulted in a higher completion rate and greater responsiveness in some sections. On the other hand the general health questionnaire drew attention to broader problems of physical function not considered by the Oxford hip score. The health questionnaires examined here offer a valid and practical means of monitoring outcomes of hip replacement surgery. PMID:10158596

  8. Cross-sectional and longitudinal construct validity of two rotator cuff disease-specific outcome measures

    PubMed Central

    Razmjou, Helen; Bean, Andrea; van Osnabrugge, Varda; MacDermid, Joy C; Holtby, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Background Disease-specific Quality Of Life (QOL) measures are devised to assess the impact of a specific disease across a spectrum of important domains of life. The purpose of this study was to examine the cross-sectional and longitudinal construct validity (sensitivity to change) of two rotator cuff disease-specific measures, the Rotator Cuff-Quality Of Life (RC-QOL) and the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff (WORC) index, in relation to one another and to other joint and limb specific measures in the same population of the patients suffering from rotator cuff pathology. Methods Participants enrolled were consecutive patients who received physical therapy for management of impingement syndrome or received treatment following rotator cuff repair, acromioplasty or decompression surgeries. All subjects received physical therapy treatment and completed four outcome measures at 3 single points (initial, interim, and final). Cross-sectional convergent validity was assessed at each of the 3 time-points by correlating the WORC and RC-QOL's scores to each other and to two alternative scales; a joint-specific scale, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) standardized shoulder assessment form and a limb-specific measure, the Upper Extremity Functional Index (UEFI). Non-parametric statistics (Spearman's rho and Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney tests) examined the construct validity. The standardized response mean (SRM) was used to examine sensitivity to change. Results Forty-one participants entered the study and their scores were compared at 3 cross sectional single points. The correlation coefficients among the 4 measures varied from 0.60 to 0.91. Correlation between corresponding domains of the WORC and RC-QOL varied from 0.45 to 0.85. The known group validity was not significantly different among individual sub-scores and total scores. The final SRMs were (1.42), (1.43), (1.44), and (1.54) for the ASES, RCQOL, WORC, and UEFI respectively. Conclusion The WORC and RC-QOL exhibit similar cross-sectional convergent validity in patients suffering from rotator cuff pathology. The sensitivity to change was very close among all scores, with the UEFI having the highest sensitivity. Further research is needed to examine the extent to which each physical or emotional domain contributes to prognostic or therapeutic decision-making. PMID:16533405

  9. Goals, Motivation for, and Outcomes of Personal Learning through Networks: Results of a Tweetstorm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sie, Rory L. L.; Pataraia, Nino; Boursinou, Eleni; Rajagopal, Kamakshi; Margaryan, Anoush; Falconer, Isobel; Bitter-Rijpkema, Marlies; Littlejohn, Allison; Sloep, Peter B.

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in the use of social media for learning have posed serious challenges for learners. The information overload that these online social tools create has changed the way learners learn and from whom they learn. An investigation of learners' goals, motivations and expected outcomes when using a personal learning network is…

  10. Relationship Between Upper Respiratory Tract Influenza Test Result and Clinical Outcomes Among Critically Ill Influenza Patients

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Krishna P.; Bajwa, Ednan K.; Parker, Robert A.; Onderdonk, Andrew B.; Walensky, Rochelle P.

    2016-01-01

    Among critically ill patients with lower respiratory tract (LRT)-confirmed influenza, we retrospectively observed worse 28-day clinical outcomes in upper respiratory tract (URT)-negative versus URT-positive subjects. This finding may reflect disease progression and highlights the need for influenza testing of both URT and LRT specimens to improve diagnostic yield and possibly inform prognosis. PMID:26966696

  11. Examining Student Spiritual Outcomes as a Result of a General Education Religion Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, John, III; Plummer, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    In an era in which part-time faculty are becoming a higher proportion of the teaching faculty on most campuses, this study addressed the question of whether student learning outcomes in religious education courses are significantly influenced by whether the instructor teaches in a full- or part-time capacity in the Department of Religion. We…

  12. Getting Results: Outcomes Management and the Annie E. Casey Foundations Jobs Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giloth, Robert; Phillips, William

    The Anne E. Casey Foundation (AECF) funded replications of effective jobs projects to achieve better job placement and retention for low-income, young adults. The six projects funded, collectively called the Jobs Initiative (JI), in Denver, Milwaukee, New Orleans, Philadelphia, Seattle, and St. Louis, used an outcomes framework developed by The…

  13. Outcomes: Content-Focused Learning Improves Teacher Practice and Student Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desimone, Laura

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses content focus and coherence, which are fundamental to professional development that helps teachers boost student learning. Learning Forward's Outcomes standard emphasizes that teacher learning should be focused on subject-matter content and how students learn that content, and consistent with the individual,…

  14. PBL-GIS in Secondary Geography Education: Does It Result in Higher-Order Learning Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yan; Bui, Elisabeth N.; Chang, Chew-Hung; Lossman, Hans G.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents research on evaluating problem-based learning using GIS technology in a Singapore secondary school. A quasi-experimental research design was carried to test the PBL pedagogy (PBL-GIS) with an experimental group of students and compare their learning outcomes with a control group who were exposed to PBL but not GIS. The…

  15. Goals, Motivation for, and Outcomes of Personal Learning through Networks: Results of a Tweetstorm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sie, Rory L. L.; Pataraia, Nino; Boursinou, Eleni; Rajagopal, Kamakshi; Margaryan, Anoush; Falconer, Isobel; Bitter-Rijpkema, Marlies; Littlejohn, Allison; Sloep, Peter B.

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in the use of social media for learning have posed serious challenges for learners. The information overload that these online social tools create has changed the way learners learn and from whom they learn. An investigation of learners' goals, motivations and expected outcomes when using a personal learning network is

  16. PBL-GIS in Secondary Geography Education: Does It Result in Higher-Order Learning Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yan; Bui, Elisabeth N.; Chang, Chew-Hung; Lossman, Hans G.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents research on evaluating problem-based learning using GIS technology in a Singapore secondary school. A quasi-experimental research design was carried to test the PBL pedagogy (PBL-GIS) with an experimental group of students and compare their learning outcomes with a control group who were exposed to PBL but not GIS. The

  17. Adjustment as process and outcome: Measuring adjustment to HIV in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Martin, Faith; Russell, Steve; Seeley, Janet

    2016-05-01

    'Adjustment' in health refers to both processes and outcomes. Its measurement and conceptualisation in African cultures is limited. In total, 263 people living with HIV and receiving anti-retroviral therapy in clinics in Uganda completed a translated Mental Adjustment to HIV Scale, depression items from the Hopkins checklist and demographic questions. Factor analysis revealed four Mental Adjustment to HIV factors of active coping, cognitive-social adjustment, hopelessness and denial/avoidance. Correlations with depression supported the Mental Adjustment to HIV's validity and the importance of active adjustment, while the role of cognitive adjustment was unclear. Factors were process or outcome focussed, suggesting a need for theory-based measures in general. PMID:25030794

  18. Development and Validation of a Multifactorial Treatment Outcome Measure for Eating Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Drew A.; Williamson, Donald A.; Duchmann, Erich G.; Gleaves, David H.; Barbin, Jane M.

    1999-01-01

    Developed a brief self-report inventory to evaluate treatment outcome for anorexia and bulimia nervosa, the Multifactorial Assessment of Eating Disorders, and evaluated the instrument in a series of studies involving 1,054 women. Results support a stable factor structure and satisfactory reliability and validity, and establish normative data. (SLD)

  19. Evaluation of the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System in a large cohort of patients with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kappelman, Michael D.; Long, Millie D.; Martin, Christopher; DeWalt, Darren A.; Kinneer, Patricia M.; Chen, Wenli; Lewis, James D.; Sandler, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Patient-reported outcomes (PRO) convey important aspects of health status, complementing physician-reported measures. The PRO Measurement Information System (PROMIS) provides valid, widely available measures applicable to patients with chronic illness and the general population. We sought to evaluate these measures in a large cohort of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Methods Using data from the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation Association Partners internet cohort, we performed cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses to evaluate associations between PROMIS measures and validated disease activity indices (Short Crohn’s Disease Activity Index and Simple Clinical Colitis Activity Index) and the Short IBD Questionnaire (SIBDQ) quality of life instrument. Results A total of 10,634 individuals (6689 with Crohn’s disease and 3945 with ulcerative colitis or indeterminate colitis) completed PRO testing. Compared with the general population (mean PROMIS score = 50), IBD patients in this cohort reported more depression (mean 54), anxiety (mean 52), fatigue (mean 56), sleep disturbance (mean 52), and pain interference (mean 53); they had less social satisfaction (mean 48). In each PROMIS domain, there was worse functioning with increasing levels of disease activity, and worsening SIBDQ scores (P<.001 for all). Longitudinal analyses demonstrated improved PROMIS scores with improved disease activity and worsening PROMIS scores with worsening disease (P<.001 for all comparisons). Conclusions In a cross-sectional and longitudinal study, we observed differences between patients with IBD and the general population in several important aspects of health. The improvement in diverse health outcome measures with improved disease control provides strong support for the construct validity of PROMIS measures in the IBD population. Their use should advance patient-centered outcomes research in IBD. PMID:24183956

  20. The Ohio Scales Youth Form: Expansion and Validation of a Self-Report Outcome Measure for Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowell, Kathy A.; Ogles, Benjamin M.

    2008-01-01

    We examined the validity and reliability of a self-report outcome measure for children between the ages of 8 and 11. The Ohio Scales Problem Severity scale is a brief, practical outcome measure available in three parallel forms: Parent, Youth, and Agency Worker. The Youth Self-Report form is currently validated for children ages 12 and older. The…

  1. The Autism Impact Measure (AIM): Initial Development of a New Tool for Treatment Outcome Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanne, Stephen M.; Mazurek, Micah O.; Sikora, Darryn; Bellando, Jayne; Branum-Martin, Lee; Handen, Benjamin; Katz, Terry; Freedman, Brian; Powell, Mary Paige; Warren, Zachary

    2014-01-01

    The current study describes the development and psychometric properties of a new measure targeting sensitivity to change of core autism spectrum disorder (ASD) symptoms, the Autism Impact Measure (AIM). The AIM uses a 2-week recall period with items rated on two corresponding 5-point scales (frequency and impact). Psychometric properties were…

  2. The effectiveness of providing peer benchmarked feedback to hip replacement surgeons based on patient-reported outcome measures—results from the PROFILE (Patient-Reported Outcomes: Feedback Interpretation and Learning Experiment) trial: a cluster randomised controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, Maria B; Browne, John P

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test whether providing surgeons with peer benchmarked feedback about patient-reported outcomes is effective in improving patient outcomes. Design Cluster randomised controlled trial. Setting Secondary care—Ireland. Participants Surgeons were recruited through the Irish Institute of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, and patients were recruited in hospitals prior to surgery. We randomly allocated 21 surgeons and 550 patients. Intervention Surgeons in the intervention group received peer benchmarked patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) feedback and education. Main outcome variable Postoperative Oxford Hip Score (OHS). Results Primary outcome data were available for 11 intervention surgeons with responsibility for 230 patients and 10 control surgeons with responsibility for 228 patients. The mean postoperative OHS for the intervention group was 40.8 (95% CI 39.8 to 41.7) and for the control group was 41.9 (95% CI 41.1 to 42.7). The adjusted effect estimate was −1.1 (95% CI −2.4 to 0.2, p=0.09). Secondary outcomes were the Hip Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), EQ-5D and the proportion of patients reporting a problem after surgery. The mean postoperative HOOS for the intervention group was 36.2 and for the control group was 37.1. The adjusted effect estimate was −1.1 (95% CI −2.4 to 0.3, p=0.1). The mean postoperative EQ-5D for the intervention group was 0.85 and for the control group was 0.87. The adjusted effect estimate was −0.02 (95% CI −0.05 to 0.008, p=0.2). 27% of intervention patients and 24% of control patients reported at least one complication after surgery (adjusted OR=1.2, 95% CI 0.6 to 2.3, p=0.6). Conclusions Outcomes for patients operated on by surgeons who had received peer benchmarked PROMs data were not statistically different from the outcomes of patients operated on by surgeons who did not receive feedback. PROMs information alone seems to be insufficient to identify opportunities for quality improvement. Trial registration number ISRCTN 69032522. PMID:26231755

  3. Examining the Effects of Displaying Clicker Voting Results on High School Students' Voting Behaviors, Discussion Processes, and Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chien, Yu-Ta; Lee, Yu-Hsien; Li, Tsung-Yen; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between students' clicking behaviors, discussion processes, learning outcomes, and a prominent feature of clicker systems--the whole class' response results aggregated by clickers in real time. The results indicate that, while teaching Newton's laws of motion, displaying the real-time responses of the whole…

  4. Examining the Effects of Displaying Clicker Voting Results on High School Students' Voting Behaviors, Discussion Processes, and Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chien, Yu-Ta; Lee, Yu-Hsien; Li, Tsung-Yen; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between students' clicking behaviors, discussion processes, learning outcomes, and a prominent feature of clicker systems--the whole class' response results aggregated by clickers in real time. The results indicate that, while teaching Newton's laws of motion, displaying the real-time responses of the whole

  5. Choosing the Best Newborn Anthropometric Measure Associated With the Risks and Outcomes of Intrauterine Growth Restriction.

    PubMed

    Lei, XiaoPing; Zhang, YongJun; Fang, Fang; Wu, Ting; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Jun

    2015-12-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is associated with various prenatal risks and postnatal adverse outcomes. The aim of this study is to choose the most sensitive newborn anthropometric measure, which is closely associated with IUGR-related risks and outcomes, to substitute IUGR after delivery. Data were obtained from the Collaborative Perinatal Project, a multicenter prospective cohort study in the United States from 1959 to 1976. Maternal heavy smoking and severe hypertensive disorders during pregnancy, neonatal polycythemia and hypothermia, low intelligence quotient (<70) at age 7 years were chosen as IUGR-related risks and outcomes. Eight anthropometric measures at birth were tested by logistic regression model. Birth weight-to-head circumference (W/HC) had the largest odds ratio (OR) for neonatal polycythemia (OR = 1.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.5-2.0), severe hypertensive disorders (OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.5-2.2), and maternal heavy smoking (OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.7-2.1) during pregnancy. It also had the highest summary OR (9.3). Thus, W/HC may be a good measure for IUGR. PMID:25854788

  6. Capabilities and Characteristics of Digital Measurement Feedback Systems: Results from a Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Aaron R; Lewis, Cara C; Boyd, Meredith R; Hendrix, Ethan; Liu, Freda

    2016-05-01

    Measurement feedback systems (MFS) are a class of health information technology (HIT) that function as an implementation support strategy for integrating measurement based care or routine outcome monitoring into clinical practice. Although many MFS have been developed, little is known about their functions. This paper reports findings from an application of health information technology-academic and commercial evaluation (HIT-ACE), a systematic and consolidated evaluation method, to MFS designed for use in behavioral healthcare settings. Forty-nine MFS were identified and subjected to systematic characteristic and capability coding. Results are presented with respect to the representation of characteristics and capabilities across MFS. PMID:26860952

  7. Blue Cone Monochromacy: Visual Function and Efficacy Outcome Measures for Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Iannaccone, Alessandro; Roman, Alejandro J.; Ditta, Lauren C.; Jennings, Barbara J.; Yatsenko, Svetlana A.; Sheplock, Rebecca; Sumaroka, Alexander; Swider, Malgorzata; Schwartz, Sharon B.; Wissinger, Bernd; Kohl, Susanne; Jacobson, Samuel G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Blue Cone Monochromacy (BCM) is an X-linked retinopathy caused by mutations in the OPN1LW / OPN1MW gene cluster, encoding long (L)- and middle (M)-wavelength sensitive cone opsins. Recent evidence shows sufficient structural integrity of cone photoreceptors in BCM to warrant consideration of a gene therapy approach to the disease. In the present study, the vision in BCM is examined, specifically seeking clinically-feasible outcomes for a future clinical trial. Methods BCM patients (n = 25, ages 572) were studied with kinetic and static chromatic perimetry, full-field sensitivity testing, and eye movement recordings. Vision at the fovea and parafovea was probed with chromatic microperimetry. Results Kinetic fields with a Goldmann size V target were generally full. Short-wavelength (S-) sensitive cone function was normal or near normal in most patients. Light-adapted perimetry results on conventional background lights were abnormally reduced; 600-nm stimuli were seen by rods whereas white stimuli were seen by both rods and S-cones. Under dark-adapted conditions, 500-nm stimuli were seen by rods in both BCM and normals. Spectral sensitivity functions in the superior retina showed retained rod and S-cone functions in BCM under dark-adapted and light-adapted conditions. In the fovea, normal subjects showed L/M-cone mediation using a 650-nm stimulus under dark-adapted conditions, whereas BCM patients had reduced sensitivity driven by rod vision. Full-field red stimuli on bright blue backgrounds were seen by L/M-cones in normal subjects whereas BCM patients had abnormally reduced and rod-mediated sensitivities. Fixation location could vary from fovea to parafovea. Chromatic microperimetry demonstrated a large loss of sensitivity to red stimuli presented on a cyan adapting background at the anatomical fovea and surrounding parafovea. Conclusions BCM rods continue to signal vision under conditions normally associated with daylight vision. Localized and retina-wide outcome measures were examined to evaluate possible improvement of L/M-cone-based vision in a clinical trial. PMID:25909963

  8. Comparison of Gome Bro Measurements With Slimcat Model Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, A.; Sinnhuber, B.-M.; Wittrock, F.; Burrows, J. P.

    One of the species that can be measured from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experi- ment (GOME) is bromine monoxide (BrO). In the stratosphere, BrO plays an impor- tant role in catalytic ozone destruction, and has been studied extensively both with measurements and models. As a result, the current version of the 3d-CTM SLIMCAT reproduces measured BrO concentrations in the stratosphere with good accuracy. In polar spring, large concentrations of BrO are observed in the boundary layer over sea-ice and along the coasts, and these BrO plumes have been associated to events of BL ozone loss. In general, BrO measurements from the ground and from GOME agree well in these circumstances. However, when comparing GOME measurements and SLIMCAT simulations in mid- and low latitudes, a clear discrepancy exists, GOME BrO being systematically larger. In this work, one year of measurements and model results is compared, and the results discussed both in view of possible errors in experimental and model data and with regard to recent findings indicating the existence a global tropospheric background of BrO.

  9. Advancing children's health care and outcomes through the pediatric quality measures program.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Kamila B; Chesley, Francis; LLanos, Karen; Dougherty, Denise

    2014-01-01

    In 2009 Congress passed the Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act (CHIPRA), which presented an unprecedented opportunity to measure and improve health care quality and outcomes for children. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, in partnership with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, has worked to fulfill a number of quality measurement provisions under CHIPRA, including establishing the Pediatric Quality Measures Program (PQMP). The PQMP was charged with establishing a publicly available portfolio of new and enhanced evidence-based pediatric quality measures for use by Medicaid/Children's Health Insurance Program and other public and private programs and to also provide opportunities to improve and strengthen the Child Core Set of quality measures. This article focuses on the PQMP and provides an overview of the program's goals and related activities, lessons learned, and future opportunities. PMID:25169453

  10. Multicenter Analysis of Immune Biomarkers and Heart Transplant Outcomes: Results of the Clinical Trials in Organ Transplantation-05 Study.

    PubMed

    Starling, R C; Stehlik, J; Baran, D A; Armstrong, B; Stone, J R; Ikle, D; Morrison, Y; Bridges, N D; Putheti, P; Strom, T B; Bhasin, M; Guleria, I; Chandraker, A; Sayegh, M; Daly, K P; Briscoe, D M; Heeger, P S

    2016-01-01

    Identification of biomarkers that assess posttransplant risk is needed to improve long-term outcomes following heart transplantation. The Clinical Trials in Organ Transplantation (CTOT)-05 protocol was an observational, multicenter, cohort study of 200 heart transplant recipients followed for the first posttransplant year. The primary endpoint was a composite of death, graft loss/retransplantation, biopsy-proven acute rejection (BPAR), and cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) as defined by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). We serially measured anti-HLA- and auto-antibodies, angiogenic proteins, peripheral blood allo-reactivity, and peripheral blood gene expression patterns. We correlated assay results and clinical characteristics with the composite endpoint and its components. The composite endpoint was associated with older donor allografts (p < 0.03) and with recipient anti-HLA antibody (p < 0.04). Recipient CMV-negativity (regardless of donor status) was associated with BPAR (p < 0.001), and increases in plasma vascular endothelial growth factor-C (OR 20; 95%CI:1.9-218) combined with decreases in endothelin-1 (OR 0.14; 95%CI:0.02-0.97) associated with CAV. The remaining biomarkers showed no relationships with the study endpoints. While suboptimal endpoint definitions and lower than anticipated event rates were identified as potential study limitations, the results of this multicenter study do not yet support routine use of the selected assays as noninvasive approaches to detect BPAR and/or CAV following heart transplantation. PMID:26260101

  11. Validating the SF-36 health survey questionnaire: new outcome measure for primary care.

    PubMed Central

    Brazier, J. E.; Harper, R.; Jones, N. M.; O'Cathain, A.; Thomas, K. J.; Usherwood, T.; Westlake, L.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To test the acceptability, validity, and reliability of the short form 36 health survey questionnaire (SF-36) and to compare it with the Nottingham health profile. DESIGN--Postal survey using a questionnaire booklet together with a letter from the general practitioner. Non-respondents received two reminders at two week intervals. The SF-36 questionnaire was retested on a subsample of respondents two weeks after the first mailing. SETTING--Two general practices in Sheffield. PATIENTS--1980 patients aged 16-74 years randomly selected from the two practice lists. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Scores for each health dimension on the SF-36 questionnaire and the Nottingham health profile. Response to questions on recent use of health services and sociodemographic characteristics. RESULTS--The response rate for the SF-36 questionnaire was high (83%) and the rate of completion for each dimension was over 95%. Considerable evidence was found for the reliability of the SF-36 (Cronbach's alpha greater than 0.85, reliability coefficient greater than 0.75 for all dimensions except social functioning) and for construct validity in terms of distinguishing between groups with expected health differences. The SF-36 was able to detect low levels of ill health in patients who had scored 0 (good health) on the Nottingham health profile. CONCLUSIONS--The SF-36 is a promising new instrument for measuring health perception in a general population. It is easy to use, acceptable to patients, and fulfils stringent criteria of reliability and validity. Its use in other contexts and with different disease groups requires further research. PMID:1285753

  12. Preferred reporting items for studies mapping onto preference-based outcome measures: The MAPS statement.

    PubMed

    Petrou, Stavros; Rivero-Arias, Oliver; Dakin, Helen; Longworth, Louise; Oppe, Mark; Froud, Robert; Gray, Alastair

    2015-11-01

    'Mapping' onto generic preference-based outcome measures is increasingly being used as a means of generating health utilities for use within health economic evaluations. Despite publication of technical guides for the conduct of mapping research, guidance for the reporting of mapping studies is currently lacking. The MAPS (MApping onto Preference-based measures reporting Standards) statement is a new checklist, which aims to promote complete and transparent reporting of mapping studies. The primary audiences for the MAPS statement are researchers reporting mapping studies, the funders of the research, and peer reviewers and editors involved in assessing mapping studies for publication. A de novo list of 29 candidate reporting items and accompanying explanations was created by a working group comprised of six health economists and one Delphi methodologist. Following a two-round, modified Delphi survey with representatives from academia, consultancy, health technology assessment agencies and the biomedical journal editorial community, a final set of 23 items deemed essential for transparent reporting, and accompanying explanations, was developed. The items are contained in a user friendly 23 item checklist. They are presented numerically and categorised within six sections, namely: (i) title and abstract; (ii) introduction; (iii) methods; (iv) results; (v) discussion; and (vi) other. The MAPS statement is best applied in conjunction with the accompanying MAPS explanation and elaboration document. It is anticipated that the MAPS statement will improve the clarity, transparency and completeness of reporting of mapping studies. To facilitate dissemination and uptake, the MAPS statement is being co-published by seven health economics and quality of life journals, and broader endorsement is encouraged. The MAPS working group plans to assess the need for an update of the reporting checklist in five years' time. PMID:26295698

  13. Preferred Reporting Items for Studies Mapping onto Preference-Based Outcome Measures: The MAPS Statement.

    PubMed

    Petrou, Stavros; Rivero-Arias, Oliver; Dakin, Helen; Longworth, Louise; Oppe, Mark; Froud, Robert; Gray, Alastair

    2015-10-01

    'Mapping' onto generic preference-based outcome measures is increasingly being used as a means of generating health utilities for use within health economic evaluations. Despite the publication of technical guides for the conduct of mapping research, guidance for the reporting of mapping studies is currently lacking. The MAPS (MApping onto Preference-based measures reporting Standards) statement is a new checklist, which aims to promote complete and transparent reporting of mapping studies. The primary audiences for the MAPS statement are researchers reporting mapping studies, the funders of the research, and peer reviewers and editors involved in assessing mapping studies for publication. A de novo list of 29 candidate reporting items and accompanying explanations was created by a working group comprising six health economists and one Delphi methodologist. Following a two-round modified Delphi survey with representatives from academia, consultancy, health technology assessment agencies and the biomedical journal editorial community, a final set of 23 items deemed essential for transparent reporting, and accompanying explanations, was developed. The items are contained in a user-friendly 23-item checklist. They are presented numerically and categorised within six sections, namely: (1) title and abstract; (2) introduction; (3) methods; (4) results; (5) discussion; and (6) other. The MAPS statement is best applied in conjunction with the accompanying MAPS explanation and elaboration document. It is anticipated that the MAPS statement will improve the clarity, transparency and completeness of reporting of mapping studies. To facilitate dissemination and uptake, the MAPS statement is being co-published by seven health economics and quality-of-life journals, and broader endorsement is encouraged. The MAPS working group plans to assess the need for an update of the reporting checklist in 5 years' time. PMID:26232201

  14. Assessment of Aging Individuals with Down Syndrome in Clinical Trials: Results of Baseline Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sano, Mary; Aisen, Paul S.; Dalton, Arthur J.; Andrews, Howard F.; Tsai, Wei-Yann

    2005-01-01

    A major challenge to developing therapeutic interventions for cognitive loss and dementia in aging individuals with Down syndrome (DS) is the selection of appropriate outcome measures. This report describes the adaptation of the Brief Praxis Test (a nonverbal cognitive test) as a primary outcome measure, as well as the selection of secondary…

  15. Comparing hospitals that perform coronary artery bypass surgery: the effect of outcome measures and data sources.

    PubMed Central

    Hartz, A J; Kuhn, E M

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The relative quality of hospital care often is judged by comparing risk-adjusted rates of adverse outcomes. This study evaluated whether hospital quality comparisons are affected by the choice of outcome and the use of administrative data instead of clinical data. METHODS. The data were collected from 2687 coronary artery bypass surgery patients from 17 hospitals. All patients were on Medicare. For 10 hospitals with 94 to 713 patients, risk-adjusted outcomes for death, major complications, and any complications were derived from a clinically rich database and an administrative database. RESULTS. The correlations between adjusted hospital rankings derived from the clinical and administrative databases were not significant: .48 for mortality, .21 for major complications, and -.14 for any complication. When only the clinical database was used, the correlation between risk-adjusted hospital rankings for mortality and major complications was .77 (P < .01) and the correlation between major complications and any complication was -.45. CONCLUSIONS. These results suggest assessing quality of care by the use of administrative data may not be adequate and that quality assessment by the use of clinical data may depend greatly on the outcome chosen. PMID:7943479

  16. The performance of the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales as measures of clinical severity.

    PubMed

    Müller, Mario; Vandeleur, Caroline; Weniger, Godehard; Prinz, Susanne; Vetter, Stefan; Egger, Stephan T

    2016-05-30

    The aim of this study was to examine the performance of the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS) against other measures of functioning and mental health in a full three-year cohort of admissions to a psychiatric hospital. A sample of N=1719 patients (35.3% females, aged 17-78 years) was assessed using observer-rated measures and self-reports of psychopathology at admission. Self-reports were available from 51.7% of the sample (34.4% females, aged 17-76 years). Functioning and psychopathology were compared across five ICD-10 diagnostic groups: substance use disorders, schizophrenia and psychotic disorders, affective disorders, anxiety/somatoform disorders and personality disorders. Associations between the measures were examined, stratifying by diagnostic subgroup. The HoNOS were strongly linked to other measures primarily in psychotic disorders (except for the behavioral subscale), while those with substance use disorders showed rather poor links. Those with anxiety/somatoform disorders showed null or only small associations. This study raises questions about the overall validity of the HoNOS. It seems to entail different levels of validity when applied to different diagnostic groups. In clinical practice the HoNOS should not be used as a stand-alone instrument to assess outcome but rather as part of a more comprehensive battery including diagnosis-specific measures. PMID:27137958

  17. The Cultural Adaptability of Intermediate Measures of Functional Outcome in Schizophrenia*

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Maureen; Fredrick, Megan M.; Mintz, Jim; Nuechterlein, Keith H.; Schooler, Nina R.; Jaeger, Judith; Peters, Nancy M.; Buller, Raimund; Marder, Stephen R.; Dube, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    The Measurement and Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia initiative was designed to encourage the development of cognitive enhancing agents for schizophrenia. For a medication to receive this indication, regulatory agencies require evidence of improvement in both cognition and functional outcome. Because medication trials are conducted across multiple countries, we examined ratings of the cross-cultural adaptability of 4 intermediate measures of functional outcome (Independent Living Scales, UCSD Performance-based Skills Assessment, Test of Adaptive Behavior in Schizophrenia, Cognitive Assessment Interview [CAI]) made by experienced clinical researchers at 31 sites in 8 countries. English-speaking research staff familiar with conducting medication trials rated the extent to which each subscale of each intermediate measure could be applied to their culture and to subgroups within their culture based on gender, geographic region, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status on the Cultural Adaptation Rating Scale. Ratings suggested that the CAI would be easiest to adapt across cultures. However, in a recent study, the CAI was found to have weaker psychometric properties than some of the other measures. Problems were identified for specific subscales on all the performance-based assessments across multiple countries. India, China, and Mexico presented the greatest challenges in adaptation. For international clinical trials, it would be important to use the measures that are most adaptable, to adapt subscales that are problematic for specific countries or regions, or to develop a battery composed of the subscales from different instruments that may be most acceptable across multiple cultures with minimal adaptation. PMID:21134973

  18. Measuring the outcomes and pharmacoeconomic consequences of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in major orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Sean D; Kahn, Susan R; Davidson, Bruce L; Borris, Lars; Bossuyt, Patrick; Raskob, Gary

    2003-01-01

    Patients who have undergone orthopaedic surgery represent a high-risk group for venous thromboembolism (VTE). Despite the routine prophylactic use of antithrombotic agents, patients still experience thrombotic events that can result in mortality and acute morbidity and, in significant numbers of patients, may lead to long-term consequences such as the post-thrombotic syndrome. Increasingly, initial VTE events occur after hospital discharge since the length of stay in hospital after major orthopaedic surgery has decreased in many countries. There is a need for further improvement in the prevention of VTE. As well as undergoing extensive safety and efficacy studies for registration purposes, new prophylactic strategies need to be evaluated from a pharmacoeconomic perspective to help guide their introduction into routine clinical practice. Over the past 15 years a number of pharmacoeconomic evaluation studies of VTE prophylaxis have been carried out in orthopaedic patients, most of which evaluated short-term clinical endpoints. During the same period, improvements in our understanding of the natural history of VTE as well as the emergence of new treatments have led to changes in the management of patients with, or at risk of, VTE. The aim of this paper was to address how best to conduct pharmacoeconomic analyses of new antithrombotic agents in light of changes in practice patterns for orthopaedic patients and greater understanding of the disease process. We put forward recommendations for relevant outcome measures, timeframes, endpoints and epidemiologic data sources. We also suggest a structure for a pharmacoeconomic model. In this model, the outcomes and costs of VTE-related care during both the acute and chronic phases of the disease are incorporated. Symptomatic deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, recurrent VTE, post-thrombotic syndrome, major hemorrhage and all-cause death are included. We also recommend that the relevance of quality-adjusted survival is investigated, and that economic appraisals are presented in both cost-consequence and budget-impact approaches. These recommendations are based on extensive examination of recent advances in the management of VTE combined with a greater understanding of its natural history. PMID:12696988

  19. SCIAMACHY lunar occultation water vapor measurements: retrieval and validation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azam, F.; Bramstedt, K.; Rozanov, A.; Weigel, K.; Bovensmann, H.; Stiller, G. P.; Burrows, J. P.

    2012-10-01

    SCIAMACHY (SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY) lunar occultation measurements have been used to derive vertical profiles of stratospheric water vapor for the Southern Hemisphere in the near infrared (NIR) spectral range of 1350-1420 nm. The focus of this study is to present the retrieval methodology including the sensitivity studies and optimizations for the implementation of the radiative transfer model on SCIAMACHY lunar occultation measurements. The study also includes the validation of the data product with the collocated measurements from two satellite occultation instruments and two instruments measuring in limb geometry. The SCIAMACHY lunar occultation water vapor measurement comparisons with the ACE-FTS (Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer) instrument have shown an agreement of 5% on the average that is well within the reported biases of ACE in the stratosphere. The comparisons with HALOE (Halogen Occultation Experiment) have also shown good results where the agreement between the instruments is within 5%. The validations of the lunar occultation water vapor measurements with MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder) instrument are exceptionally good, varying between 1.5 to around 4%. The validations with MIPAS (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding) are in the range of 10%. A validated dataset of water vapor vertical distributions from SCIAMACHY lunar occultation measurements is expected to facilitate the understanding of physical and chemical processes in the southern mid-latitudes and the dynamical processes related to the polar vortex.

  20. Increased Trauma Center Volume Is Associated With Improved Survival After Severe Injury: Results of a Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium Study

    PubMed Central

    Minei, Joseph P.; Fabian, Timothy C.; Guffey, Danielle M.; Newgard, Craig D.; Bulger, Eileen M.; Brasel, Karen J.; Sperry, Jason L.; MacDonald, Russell D.

    2014-01-01

    Structured Abstract OBJECTIVE The Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium (ROC) is a network of 11 centers and 60 hospitals conducting emergency care research. For many procedures, high volume centers demonstrate superior outcomes versus low volume centers. This remains controversial for trauma center outcomes. This study investigated the relationship of trauma center volume on outcome. METHODS This study was a secondary analysis of prospectively collected data from the ROC multicenter out-of-hospital Hypertonic Saline Trial in patients with GCS ≤ 8 (traumatic brain injury [TBI]) or SBP ≤ 90 and pulse ≥ 110 (shock). Regression analyses evaluated associations between trauma volume and the following outcomes: 24 hour mortality, 28 day mortality, ventilator free days (VFD), Multiple Organ Dysfunction Scale (MODS) incidence, worst MODS score, and poor 6 month Glasgow outcome scale extended. RESULTS 2070 patients were analyzed: 1251 in the TBI cohort and 819 in the shock cohort. Overall, 24-hour and 28-day mortality were 16% and 25%, respectively. For every increase of 500 trauma center admissions, there was a 7% decreased odds of both 24-hour and 28-day mortalities for all patients. As trauma center volume increased, non-organ dysfunction complications increased, VFD increased and worst MODS score decreased. The associations with higher trauma center volume were similar for the TBI cohort, including better neurologic outcomes at 6 months, but not for the shock cohort. CONCLUSIONS Increased trauma center volume was associated with increased survival, more ventilator free days and less severe organ failure. Trauma system planning and implementation should avoid unnecessary duplication of services. PMID:25115421

  1. The chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy outcome measures standardization study: from consensus to the first validity and reliability findings

    PubMed Central

    Cavaletti, G.; Cornblath, D. R.; Merkies, I. S. J.; Postma, T. J.; Rossi, E.; Frigeni, B.; Alberti, P.; Bruna, J.; Velasco, R.; Argyriou, A. A.; Kalofonos, H. P.; Psimaras, D.; Ricard, D.; Pace, A.; Galiè, E.; Briani, C.; Dalla Torre, C.; Faber, C. G.; Lalisang, R. I.; Boogerd, W.; Brandsma, D.; Koeppen, S.; Hense, J.; Storey, D.; Kerrigan, S.; Schenone, A.; Fabbri, S.; Valsecchi, M. G.; Mazzeo, A.; Pace, A.; Pessino, A.; Schenone, A.; Toscano, A.; Argyriou, A.A.; Brouwer, B.; Frigeni, B.; Piras, B.; Briani, C.; Dalla Torre, C.; Dominguez Gonzalez, C.; Faber, C. G.; Tomasello, C.; Binda, D.; Brandsma, D.; Cortinovis, D.; Psimaras, D.; Ricard, D.; Storey, D.; Cornblath, D.R.; Galiè, E.; Lindeck Pozza, E.; Rossi, E.; Vanhoutte, E.K.; Lanzani, F.; Pastorelli, F.; Altavilla, G.; Cavaletti, G.; Granata, G.; Kalofonos, H.P.; Ghignotti, I.; Merkies, I.S.J.; Bruna, J.; Hense, J.; Heimans, J.J.; Mattavelli, L.; Padua, L.; Reni, L.; Bakkers, M.; Boogerd, M.; Campagnolo, M.; Cazzaniga, M.; Eurelings, M.; Leandri, M.; Lucchetta, M.; Penas Prado, M.; Russo, M.; Valsecchi, M.G.; Piatti, M.L.; Alberti, P.; Bidoli, P.; Grant, R.; Plasmati, R.; Velasco, R.; Lalisang, R.I.; Meijer, R.J.; Fabbri, S.; Dorsey, S. G.; Galimberti, S.; Kerrigan, S.; Koeppen, S.; Postma, T.J.; Boogerd, W.; Grisold, W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a debilitating and dose-limiting complication of cancer treatment. Thus far, the impact of CIPN has not been studied in a systematic clinimetric manner. The objective of the study was to select outcome measures for CIPN evaluation and to establish their validity and reproducibility in a cross-sectional multicenter study. Patients and methods After literature review and a consensus meeting among experts, face/content validity were obtained for the following selected scales: the National Cancer Institute-Common Toxicity Criteria (NCI-CTC), the Total Neuropathy Score clinical version (TNSc), the modified Inflammatory Neuropathy Cause and Treatment (INCAT) group sensory sumscore (mISS), the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30, and CIPN20 quality-of-life measures. A total of 281 patients with stable CIPN were examined. Validity (correlation) and reliability studies were carried out. Results Good inter-/intra-observer scores were obtained for the TNSc, mISS, and NCI-CTC sensory/motor subscales. Test–retest values were also good for the EORTC QLQ-C30 and CIPN20. Acceptable validity scores were obtained through the correlation among the measures. Conclusion Good validity and reliability scores were demonstrated for the set of selected impairment and quality-of-life outcome measures in CIPN. Future studies are planned to investigate the responsiveness aspects of these measures. PMID:22910842

  2. Managing for Results--Linking Performance Measures and Budgets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, William L.; Fountain, James R., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    The Government Accounting Standards Board notion of service efforts and accomplishments reporting is one step in a process of managing for results that includes strategic planning, development and use of performance measures of managing ongoing programs, and outputs to budgetary appropriation. Reports a trial application to one school district.…

  3. Outcomes of a Mobile Health Coaching Platform: 12-Week Results of a Single-Arm Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, James K

    2016-01-01

    Background The number of mobile health coaching applications is expanding at a rapid rate. An application that uses a guiding intelligence to deliver an individualized structured program has the potential to provide a significant benefit. However, there are few studies of this approach that examine multiple clinical outcomes in a longitudinal manner. Objective The objective of the study was to conduct a 12-week evaluation of participants using the YouPlus Health mobile coaching platform, specifically examining the effects on body weight, waist measurement, blood pressure, lipid profile, glycohemoglobin (A1C), and maximum volume of oxygen consumption (VO2 max). Methods A quasi-experimental research design was used. This included a single-arm pre and post intervention assessment of outcomes. Participants underwent a 12-week intervention in which they received the entirety of the mobile health coaching program via an application on their mobile phones and were evaluated in the same physician’s office setting every two weeks. Data regarding app usage was continuously collected and maintained in a database. Results 10 subjects were enrolled in and completed the pilot study. The mean weight loss was 13.5 lbs. which represented 7.3% of baseline (P=.005). Mean waist circumference was reduced by 7.2 cm or 6.6% of baseline (P=.005). Both systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure measures were significantly lower after 12 weeks of intervention. Mean SBP fell 18.6 mmHg (P=.005) and mean DBP declined 6.4 mmHg (P=.005). VO2 max increased by an average of 3.13 ml/kg/min from baseline to study end (P=.005). From baseline to end-of-study HDL levels increased significantly by 4.0 mg/dL (P=.04) Total cholesterol, LDL, triglycerides, and glycohemoglobin (A1C) trended in the desired direction but did not meet statistical significance. All of the participants in the study completed the necessary in-app tutorials and also completed the in-app questions and received feedback. Every individual completed the appropriate amount of program levels necessary to give the specifics of the program, and the mean weekly app open rate ranged from 5.1 to 18.4. Conclusions Users of the YouPlus Health mobile coaching platform experienced significant reductions in body weight, waist circumference, and both systolic and diastolic blood pressures, while attaining significant increases in HDL and VO2 Max. PMID:26747611

  4. Measuring patient-reported outcomes: moving beyond misplaced common sense to hard science

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Interest in the patient's views of his or her illness and treatment has increased dramatically. However, our ability to appropriately measure such issues lags far behind the level of interest and need. Too often such measurement is considered to be a simple and trivial activity that merely requires the application of common sense. However, good quality measurement of patient-reported outcomes is a complex activity requiring considerable expertise and experience. This review considers the most important issues related to such measurement in the context of chronic disease and details how instruments should be developed, validated and adapted for use in additional languages. While there is often consensus on how best to undertake these activities, there is generally little evidence to support such accord. The present article questions these orthodox views and suggests alternative approaches that have been shown to be effective. PMID:21756344

  5. Planned versus actual outcomes as a result of animal feeding operation decisions for managing phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Cabot, Perry E; Nowak, Pete

    2005-01-01

    The paper explores how decisions made on animal feeding operations (AFOs) influence the management of manure and phosphorus. Variability among these decisions from operation to operation and from field to field can influence the validity of nutrient loss risk assessments. These assessments are based on assumptions that the decision outcomes regarding manure distribution will occur as they are planned. The discrepancy between planned versus actual outcomes in phosphorus management was explored on nine AFOs managing a contiguous set of 210 fields in south-central Wisconsin. A total of 2611 soil samples were collected and multiple interviews conducted to assign phosphorus index (PI) ratings to the fields. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients (r(S)) indicated that PI ratings were less sensitive to soil test phosphorus (STP) levels (r(S) = 0.378), universal soil loss equation (USLE) (r(S) = 0.261), ratings for chemical fertilizer application (r(S) = 0.185), and runoff class (r(S) = -0.089), and more sensitive to ratings for manure application (r(S) = 0.854). One-way ANOVA indicated that mean field STP levels were more homogenous than field PI ratings between AFOs. Kolmogorov-Smirnov (K-S) tests displayed several nonsignificant comparisons for cumulative distribution functions, S(x), of mean STP levels on AFO fields. On the other hand, the K-S tests of S(x) for PI ratings indicated that the majority of these S(x) functions were significantly different between AFOs at or greater than the 0.05 significance level. Interviews suggested multiple reasons for divergence between planned and actual outcomes in managing phosphorus, and that this divergence arises at the strategic, tactical, and operational levels of decision-making. PMID:15843639

  6. Item Banks for Measuring Emotional Distress From the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®): Depression, Anxiety, and Anger

    PubMed Central

    Pilkonis, Paul A.; Choi, Seung W.; Reise, Steven P.; Stover, Angela M.; Riley, William T.; Cella, David

    2011-01-01

    The authors report on the development and calibration of item banks for depression, anxiety, and anger as part of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®). Comprehensive literature searches yielded an initial bank of 1,404 items from 305 instruments. After qualitative item analysis (including focus groups and cognitive interviewing), 168 items (56 for each construct) were written in a first person, past tense format with a 7-day time frame and five response options reflecting frequency. The calibration sample included nearly 15,000 respondents. Final banks of 28, 29, and 29 items were calibrated for depression, anxiety, and anger, respectively, using item response theory. Test information curves showed that the PROMIS item banks provided more information than conventional measures in a range of severity from approximately −1 to +3 standard deviations (with higher scores indicating greater distress). Short forms consisting of seven to eight items provided information comparable to legacy measures containing more items. PMID:21697139

  7. Financial Health of the Higher Education Sector: Financial Results and TRAC Outcomes 2013-14. Issues Paper 2015/07

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higher Education Funding Council for England, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This report provides an overview of the financial health of the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE)-funded higher education sector in England. The analysis covers financial results for the academic year 2013-14, as submitted to HEFCE in December 2014, as well as the outcomes from the sector's Transparent Approach to Costing (TRAC)…

  8. Outcome Results from "Yo Veo": A Visual Intervention for Teachers Working with Immigrant Latino/Latina Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Mimi V.; Hall, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study reports results from the outcome evaluation of "Yo Veo," a visual intervention with schoolteachers, which structures conversations about challenges that teachers face teaching Latino/Latina immigrant students. Method: The intervention was delivered to teachers at two middle schools in the southeastern United States,…

  9. Pathways to Results: How Practitioners Address Student Access, Outcomes, and Equity in an Associate Degree Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickel, Jessica; Bragg, Debra D.

    2015-01-01

    At a time when the nation is focusing so much attention on college completion, what do we know about how students are completing their community college programs? Does the open-access mission of community colleges translate into equitable outcomes? Pathways to Results (PTR) engages practitioners in using data to close equity gaps for student…

  10. Does Previous Hip Surgery Effect the Outcome of Tönnis Triple Periacetabular Osteotomy? Mid-Term Results.

    PubMed

    Konya, Mehmet Nuri; Aydn, Bahattin Kerem; Yldrm, Timur; Sofu, Hakan; Gürsu, Sarper

    2016-03-01

    Hip dysplasia (HD) is 1 of the major reasons of coxarthrosis. The goal of the treatment of HD by Tönnis triple pelvic osteotomy (TPAO) is to improve the function of hip joint while relieving pain, delaying and possibly preventing end-stage arthritis. The aim of this study is to compare the clinical and radiological results of TPAO to determine if previous surgery has a negative effect on TPAO.Patients operated with TPAO between 2005 and 2010, included in this study. Patients divided into 2 groups: primary acetabular dysplasia (PAD) and residual acetabular dysplasia (RAD). Prepostoperatively, hip range of motion, Harris hip score (HHS), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) hip score, visual analog scores (VAS), impingement tests, and also the presence of Trendelenburg sign (TS) were investigated for clinical evaluation. For radiological analysis pre-postoperative, anterior-posterior (AP) pelvis and faux profile radiographs were used. Acetabular index, lateral center edge (LCE) angle, and Sharp angles were measured by AP pelvis; anterior center edge (ACE) angle were measured by faux profile radiography. All the clinical and radiological data of the groups were analyzed separately for the pre-postoperative scores also the amount of improvement in all parameters were analyzed.SPSS20 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL) was used for statistical analysis. Wilcoxon test, McNemar test, paired t tests, and Mann-Whitney U tests were used to compare the groups. P < 0.05 were defined as statistically significant.Study included 27 patients: 17 patients were in PAD and 10 patients were in RAD. The mean follow-up period was 6.2 years (5.2-10.3 years). In all patients, the radiological and the clinical outcomes were better after TPAO except the flexion of the hip parameter. When the patient groups were evaluated as pre-postoperatively, more statistically significant parameters were found in the PAD group when compared with RAD group. Extension, impingement, TS, VAS, HHS, WOMAC score parameters in clinical outcome and LCE, ACE, Sharp angle, coverage ratio in radiological results were significantly better in PAD group postoperatively but in RAD group; only extension, VAS, HHS, and WOMAC parameters were clinically and LCE and Coverage ratio were significantly different compared with the preoperative measurements. The change of the parameters that used for the evaluation of clinical and radiological results did not show a significant difference between groups.Our data suggest that TPAO can be performed on patients with HD for both groups. Although there were fewer parameters which changed significantly after TPAO in RAD patients; the improvement of radiological and clinical results was similar for groups. Further long-term follow-up studies with large number of patients are needed to determine the proper results of TPAO. PMID:26962829

  11. Survey and online discussion groups to develop a patient-rated outcome measure on acceptability of treatment response in vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Vitiligo is a chronic depigmenting skin disorder which affects around 0.5-1% of the world’s population. The outcome measures used most commonly in trials to judge treatment success focus on repigmentation. Patient-reported outcome measures of treatment success are rarely used, although recommendations have been made for their inclusion in vitiligo trials. This study aimed to evaluate the face validity of a new patient-reported outcome measure of treatment response, for use in future trials and clinical practice. Method An online survey to gather initial views on what constitutes treatment success for people with vitiligo or their parents/carers, followed by online discussion groups with patients to reach consensus on what constitutes treatment success for individuals with vitiligo, and how this can be assessed in the context of trials. Participants were recruited from an existing database of vitiligo patients and through posts on the social network sites Facebook and Twitter. Results A total of 202 survey responses were received, of which 37 were excluded and 165 analysed. Three main themes emerged as important in assessing treatment response: a) the match between vitiligo and normal skin (how well it blends in); b) how noticeable the vitiligo is and c) a reduction in the size of the white patches. The majority of respondents said they would consider 80% or more repigmentation to be a worthwhile treatment response after 9 months of treatment. Three online discussion groups involving 12 participants led to consensus that treatment success is best measured by asking patients how noticeable their vitiligo is after treatment. This was judged to be best answered using a 5-point Likert scale, on which a score of 4 or 5 represents treatment success. Conclusions This study represents the first step in developing a patient reported measure of treatment success in vitiligo trials. Further work is now needed to assess its construct validity and responsiveness to change. PMID:24929563

  12. The economics of mitigation and remediation measures - preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedemann, Carsten; Flegel, Sven Kevin; Vörsmann, Peter; Gelhaus, Johannes; Moeckel, Marek; Braun, Vitali; Kebschull, Christopher; Metz, Manuel

    2012-07-01

    Today there exists a high spatial density of orbital debris objects at about 800 km altitude. The control of the debris population in this region is important for the long-term evolution of the debris environment. The future debris population is investigated by simulations using the software tool LUCA (Long-Term Orbit Utilization Collision Analysis). It is likely that in the future there will occur more catastrophic collisions. Debris objects generated during such events may again trigger further catastrophic collisions. Current simulations have revealed that the number of debris objects will increase in the future. In a long-term perspective, catastrophic collisions may become the dominating mechanism in generating orbital debris. In this study it is investigated, when the situation will become unstable. To prevent this instability it is necessary to implement mitigation and maybe even remediation measures. It is investigated how these measures affect the future debris environment. It is simulated if the growth of the number of debris objects can be interrupted and how much this may cost. Different mitigation scenarios are considered. Furthermore also one remediation measure, the active removal of high-risk objects, is simulated. Cost drivers for the different measures are identified. It is investigated how selected measures are associated with costs. The goal is to find out which economic benefits may result from mitigation or remediation. First results of a cost benefit analyses are presented.

  13. DWPF STARTUP FRIT VISCOSITY MEASUREMENT ROUND ROBIN RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Edwards, Tommy B.; Russell, Renee L.; Workman, Phyllis J.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Schumacher, Ray F.; Smith, Donald E.; Peeler, David K.; Vienna, John D.

    2012-07-31

    A viscosity standard is needed to replace the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) glasses currently being used to calibrate viscosity measurement equipment. The current NIST glasses are either unavailable or less than ideal for calibrating equipment to measure the viscosity of high-level waste glasses. This report documents the results of a viscosity round robin study conducted on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) startup frit. DWPF startup frit was selected because its viscosity-temperature relationship is similar to most DWPF and Hanford high-level waste glass compositions. The glass underwent grinding and blending to homogenize the large (100 lb) batch. Portions of the batch were supplied to the laboratories (named A through H) for viscosity measurements following a specified temperature schedule with a temperature range of 1150 C to 950 C and with an option to measure viscosity at lower temperatures if their equipment was capable of measuring at the higher viscosities. Results were used to fit the Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher and Arrhenius equations to viscosity as a function of temperature for the entire temperature range of 460 C through 1250 C as well as the limited temperature interval of approximately 950 C through 1250 C. The standard errors for confidence and prediction were determined for the fitted models.

  14. Toward improved spectral measures of /s/: Results from adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Laura L.; Shadle, Christine H.; Preston, Jonathan L.; Mooshammer, Christine R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To introduce theoretically-driven acoustic measures of /s/ that reflect aerodynamic and articulatory conditions. The measures were evaluated by assessing whether they revealed expected changes over time and labiality effects, along with possible gender differences suggested by past work. Method Productions of /s/ were extracted from various speaking tasks from typically-speaking adolescents (6 boys; 6 girls). Measures were made of relative spectral energies in low- (550–3000 Hz), mid- (3000–7000 Hz), and high-frequency regions (7000–11025 Hz); the mid-frequency amplitude peak; and temporal changes in these parameters. Spectral moments were also obtained to permit comparison with existing work. Results Spectral balance measures in low–mid and mid–high frequency bands varied over the time course of /s/, capturing the development of sibilance at mid-fricative along with showing some effects of gender and labiality. The mid-frequency spectral peak was significantly higher in non-labial contexts, and in girls. Temporal variation in the mid-frequency peak differentiated ±labial contexts while normalizing over gender. Discussion The measures showed expected patterns, supporting their validity. Comparison of these data with studies of adults suggests some developmental patterns that call for further study. The measures may also serve to differentiate some cases of typical and misarticulated /s/. PMID:23785194

  15. Electric filed measurements onboard satellites - method, instrumentation and recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korepanov, Valery

    2015-04-01

    The electric field measurements in the conductive media, such as ground, water and space plasma, are one of the most complicated metrological tasks from the point of view of proper measurement method application. This is because the electric field sensors are always interacting with the surrounding medium and the parasitic potential is formed at this. In the result, the measured value consists of the sum of useful and parasitic signals; by this the signal-to-noise ratio is mostly below unity. To overcome these problems, special high demands are made to the electric sensor parameters, especially to its equal form and surface homogeneity. These are analyzed in the report and the ways to fulfill them are discussed. The successful examples of DC electric field measurements in space plasma are given. But if only AC component is necessary to measure, the problem becomes much easier to overcome and even the sensors with non-uniform surface may be used. Some examples of AC electric field measurements during recent space missions are given and main peculiarities of sensors installation onboard the satellites are discussed. The possible sensor arrangement for future spatial mission onboard cubesat is also discussed. This work is supported by EC Framework 7 funded project 607197 (SEAM).

  16. Comparing dynamic treatment regimes using repeated-measures outcomes: modeling considerations in SMART studies.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xi; Nahum-Shani, Inbal; Kasari, Connie; Lynch, Kevin G; Oslin, David W; Pelham, William E; Fabiano, Gregory; Almirall, Daniel

    2016-05-10

    A dynamic treatment regime (DTR) is a sequence of decision rules, each of which recommends a treatment based on a patient's past and current health status. Sequential, multiple assignment, randomized trials (SMARTs) are multi-stage trial designs that yield data specifically for building effective DTRs. Modeling the marginal mean trajectories of a repeated-measures outcome arising from a SMART presents challenges, because traditional longitudinal models used for randomized clinical trials do not take into account the unique design features of SMART. We discuss modeling considerations for various forms of SMART designs, emphasizing the importance of considering the timing of repeated measures in relation to the treatment stages in a SMART. For illustration, we use data from three SMART case studies with increasing level of complexity, in autism, child attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and adult alcoholism. In all three SMARTs, we illustrate how to accommodate the design features along with the timing of the repeated measures when comparing DTRs based on mean trajectories of the repeated-measures outcome. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26638988

  17. Quantitative muscle MRI: A powerful surrogate outcome measure in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Bonati, Ulrike; Hafner, Patricia; Schädelin, Sabine; Schmid, Maurice; Naduvilekoot Devasia, Arjith; Schroeder, Jonas; Zuesli, Stephanie; Pohlman, Urs; Neuhaus, Cornelia; Klein, Andrea; Sinnreich, Michael; Haas, Tanja; Gloor, Monika; Bieri, Oliver; Fischmann, Arne; Fischer, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    In muscular dystrophies quantitative muscle MRI (qMRI) detects disease progression more sensitively than clinical scores. This prospective one year observational study compared qMRI with clinical scores in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) to investigate if qMRI can serve as a surrogate outcome measure in clinical trials. In 20 DMD patients the motor function measure (MFM) total and subscores (D1-D3) were done for physical examination, and the fat fraction (MFF) of thigh muscle qMRI was obtained using the two-point Dixon method. Effect sizes (ES) were calculated for all measures. Sample size estimation (SS) was done modelling assumed treatment effects. Ambulant patients <7 years at inclusion improved in the MFM total and D1 score (ES 1.1 and 1.0). Ambulant patients >7 years (highest ES in the MFM D1 subscore (1.2)), and non-ambulant patients (highest ES in the total MFM score (0.7)) worsened. In comparison the ES of QMRI was much larger, e.g. SS estimations for qMRI data were up to 17 fold smaller compared to the MFM total score and up to 7 fold to the D1 subscore, respectively. QMRI shows pathophysiological changes in DMD and might serve as a surrogate outcome measure in clinical trials. PMID:26096788

  18. Preliminary Results from the Smoke Aerosol Measurement Experiment - Reflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, D. L.; Ruff, G. A.; Mulholland, G. W.; Yuan, Z.; Cleary, T.; Yang, J.; Meyer, M. E.; Bryg, V. M.

    2012-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented from the Reflight of the Smoke Aerosol Measurement Experiment (SAME- R) which was conducted during Expedition 24 (July- September 2010). The reflight experiment built upon the results of the original flight during Expedition 15 by adding diagnostic measurements and expanding the test matrix. Five different materials representative of those found in spacecraft (Teflon, Kapton, cotton, silicone rubber and Pyrell) were heated to temperatures below the ignition point with conditions controlled to provide repeatable sample surface temperatures and air flow. Particle size determinations were made using aerosol instruments and by capturing particles for ground based examination in a Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). Overall the majority of the average smoke particle sizes were found to be in the 200 to 400 nanometer range with the some of the quiescent cases producing substantially larger particles. When combined with particle morphology data from the TEM analysis, these results can be used to guide the design of future smoke detectors.

  19. Results and conclusions of stress measurements at Stripa

    SciTech Connect

    Doe, T.W.; Hustrulid, W.A.; Leijon, B.; Ingevald, K.; Strindell, L.; Carlsson, H.

    1982-10-01

    This paper describes the results of stress measurements at Stripa, compares the results obtained by different techniques, and recommends a stress measurement program for a hard rock repository site. The state of stress at the Stripa Mine has been measured both in a 381-m-deep hole drilled from the surface and in holes drilled from the drifts underground. Hydraulic fracturing and several overcoring methods have been used (Lulea triaxial gauge, CSIRO gauge, USBM gauge, Swedish State Power Board deep-hole Leeman triaxial gauge). The results of overcoring and hydraulic fracturing agree well, particularly for the magnitude and orientation of the greatest stress. A recommended program for stress measurement at a repository site would include hydraulic fracturing and deep-hole overcoring in a deep hole drilled from surface, and overcoring (Lulea gauge and USBM gauge) and hydraulic fracturing from holes drilled from underground openings when access is available. Propagation of the hydraulic fractures should be monitored acoustically to determine their location and orientation.

  20. The Cloud Physics Lidar: Instrument Description and Initial Measurement Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, Matthew; Hlavka, Dennis; Hart, William; Spinhirne, James; Scott, V. Stanley; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The new Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) has been built for use on the NASA ER-2 high altitude aircraft. The purpose of the CPL is to provide multi-wavelength measurements of cirrus, subvisual cirrus, and aerosols with high temporal and spatial resolution. The CPL utilizes state-of-the-art technology with a high repetition rate, a low pulse energy laser, and photon-counting detection. The first deployment for the CPL was the SAFARI-2000 field campaign during August-September 2000. We provide here an overview of the instrument and initial data results to illustrate the measurement capability of the CPL.

  1. Comparison of length of stay and outcomes of patients with positive versus negative blood culture results

    PubMed Central

    Hozhabri, Neda S. T.; Armstrong, Kris; Puthottile, Jason; Benavides, Raul; Beal, Stacy

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, sepsis is the leading cause of death in critically ill patients. The fatality rate for severe sepsis is about 40%, and treatment costs over $16 billion annually. It is critical to identify and treat the source of sepsis. While there are varying guidelines determining when to draw blood for culture, at Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas, blood cultures are ordered for patients with new onset of fever, immunosuppression, or a suspicion of an underlying infectious etiology. We conducted a retrospective study of patients who had blood cultures after hospital admission or in the emergency department in December 2013. We compared length of stay and outcomes of patients with positive versus negative blood cultures. There was no significant difference for length of stay or outcomes among patients with positive and negative blood cultures. For patients admitted from the emergency department, there was a longer length of stay for patients with positive cultures; however, the overall prognosis was not worse. PMID:25552786

  2. Developing a patient-centered outcome measure for complementary and alternative medicine therapies I: defining content and format

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients receiving complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies often report shifts in well-being that go beyond resolution of the original presenting symptoms. We undertook a research program to develop and evaluate a patient-centered outcome measure to assess the multidimensional impacts of CAM therapies, utilizing a novel mixed methods approach that relied upon techniques from the fields of anthropology and psychometrics. This tool would have broad applicability, both for CAM practitioners to measure shifts in patients' states following treatments, and conventional clinical trial researchers needing validated outcome measures. The US Food and Drug Administration has highlighted the importance of valid and reliable measurement of patient-reported outcomes in the evaluation of conventional medical products. Here we describe Phase I of our research program, the iterative process of content identification, item development and refinement, and response format selection. Cognitive interviews and psychometric evaluation are reported separately. Methods From a database of patient interviews (n = 177) from six diverse CAM studies, 150 interviews were identified for secondary analysis in which individuals spontaneously discussed unexpected changes associated with CAM. Using ATLAS.ti, we identified common themes and language to inform questionnaire item content and wording. Respondents' language was often richly textured, but item development required a stripping down of language to extract essential meaning and minimize potential comprehension barriers across populations. Through an evocative card sort interview process, we identified those items most widely applicable and covering standard psychometric domains. We developed, pilot-tested, and refined the format, yielding a questionnaire for cognitive interviews and psychometric evaluation. Results The resulting questionnaire contained 18 items, in visual analog scale format, in which each line was anchored by the positive and negative extremes relevant to the experiential domain. Because of frequent informant allusions to response set shifts from before to after CAM therapies, we chose a retrospective pretest format. Items cover physical, emotional, cognitive, social, spiritual, and whole person domains. Conclusions This paper reports the success of a novel approach to the development of outcome instruments, in which items are extracted from patients' words instead of being distilled from pre-existing theory. The resulting instrument, focused on measuring shifts in patients' perceptions of health and well-being along pre-specified axes, is undergoing continued testing, and is available for use by cooperating investigators. PMID:22206345

  3. The longer-term health outcomes for children born as a result of IVF treatment. Part II--Mental health and development outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hart, Roger; Norman, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Limited data exist with regard to longer-term mental health and psychological functioning of children born from IVF treatment. With the known adverse perinatal outcome for children born from IVF treatment, it would be expected that there is a negative impact upon their mental development. METHODS A search strategy restricted to studies relating to the medical condition of children of at least 1 year of age, born from IVF treatment was performed to include case series, data linkage and prospective studies published from 1 January 2000 to 1 April 2012. RESULTS Limited long-term follow-up data suggest that there is an increase in the incidence of cerebral palsy and neurodevelopmental delay related to the confounders of prematurity and low birthweight. Previous reports of associations with autism and attention-deficit disorder are believed to be related to maternal and obstetric factors. There exists a potential increase in the prevalence of early adulthood clinical depression and binge drinking in the offspring of IVF, with the reassuring data of no changes with respect to cognitive development, school performance, social functioning and behaviour. Whether these potential associations are related to the IVF treatment, the adverse obstetric outcomes associated with IVF treatment, the genetic or subsequent environmental influences on the children is yet to be determined. CONCLUSIONS In general, the longer-term mental and emotional health outcome for children born from IVF treatment is reassuring, and is very similar to that of naturally conceived children; however, further studies are required to explore any association with depression, and its causality in more detail. PMID:23449643

  4. Increasing disparities between resource inputs and outcomes, as measured by certain health deliverables, in biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Anthony; Casadevall, Arturo

    2015-09-01

    Society makes substantial investments in biomedical research, searching for ways to better human health. The product of this research is principally information published in scientific journals. Continued investment in science relies on society's confidence in the accuracy, honesty, and utility of research results. A recent focus on productivity has dominated the competitive evaluation of scientists, creating incentives to maximize publication numbers, citation counts, and publications in high-impact journals. Some studies have also suggested a decreasing quality in the published literature. The efficiency of society's investments in biomedical research, in terms of improved health outcomes, has not been studied. We show that biomedical research outcomes over the last five decades, as estimated by both life expectancy and New Molecular Entities approved by the Food and Drug Administration, have remained relatively constant despite rising resource inputs and scientific knowledge. Research investments by the National Institutes of Health over this time correlate with publication and author numbers but not with the numerical development of novel therapeutics. We consider several possibilities for the growing input-outcome disparity including the prior elimination of easier research questions, increasing specialization, overreliance on reductionism, a disproportionate emphasis on scientific outputs, and other negative pressures on the scientific enterprise. Monitoring the efficiency of research investments in producing positive societal outcomes may be a useful mechanism for weighing the efficacy of reforms to the scientific enterprise. Understanding the causes of the increasing input-outcome disparity in biomedical research may improve society's confidence in science and provide support for growing future research investments. PMID:26283360

  5. Increasing disparities between resource inputs and outcomes, as measured by certain health deliverables, in biomedical research

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Anthony; Casadevall, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Society makes substantial investments in biomedical research, searching for ways to better human health. The product of this research is principally information published in scientific journals. Continued investment in science relies on society’s confidence in the accuracy, honesty, and utility of research results. A recent focus on productivity has dominated the competitive evaluation of scientists, creating incentives to maximize publication numbers, citation counts, and publications in high-impact journals. Some studies have also suggested a decreasing quality in the published literature. The efficiency of society’s investments in biomedical research, in terms of improved health outcomes, has not been studied. We show that biomedical research outcomes over the last five decades, as estimated by both life expectancy and New Molecular Entities approved by the Food and Drug Administration, have remained relatively constant despite rising resource inputs and scientific knowledge. Research investments by the National Institutes of Health over this time correlate with publication and author numbers but not with the numerical development of novel therapeutics. We consider several possibilities for the growing input-outcome disparity including the prior elimination of easier research questions, increasing specialization, overreliance on reductionism, a disproportionate emphasis on scientific outputs, and other negative pressures on the scientific enterprise. Monitoring the efficiency of research investments in producing positive societal outcomes may be a useful mechanism for weighing the efficacy of reforms to the scientific enterprise. Understanding the causes of the increasing input-outcome disparity in biomedical research may improve society’s confidence in science and provide support for growing future research investments. PMID:26283360

  6. Primary outcome indices in illicit drug dependence treatment research: systematic approach to selection and measurement of drug use end-points in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Dennis M.; Bigelow, George E.; Brigham, Gregory S.; Carroll, Kathleen M.; Cohen, Allan J.; Gardin, John G.; Hamilton, John A.; Huestis, Marilyn A.; Hughes, John R.; Lindblad, Robert; Marlatt, G. Alan; Preston, Kenzie L.; Selzer, Jeffrey A.; Somoza, Eugene C.; Wakim, Paul G.; Wells, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Clinical trials test the safety and efficacy of behavioral and pharmacological interventions in drug-dependent individuals. However, there is no consensus about the most appropriate outcome(s) to consider in determining treatment efficacy or on the most appropriate methods for assessing selected outcome(s). We summarize the discussion and recommendations of treatment and research experts, convened by the US National Institute on Drug Abuse, to select appropriate primary outcomes for drug dependence treatment clinical trials, and in particular the feasibility of selecting a common outcome to be included in all or most trials. Methods A brief history of outcomes employed in prior drug dependence treatment research, incorporating perspectives from tobacco and alcohol research, is included. The relative merits and limitations of focusing on drug-taking behavior, as measured by self-report and qualitative or quantitative biological markers, are evaluated. Results Drug-taking behavior, measured ideally by a combination of self-report and biological indicators, is seen as the most appropriate proximal primary outcome in drug dependence treatment clinical trials. Conclusions We conclude that the most appropriate outcome will vary as a function of salient variables inherent in the clinical trial, such as the type of intervention, its target, treatment goals (e.g. abstinence or reduction of use) and the perspective being taken (e.g. researcher, clinical program, patient, society). It is recommended that a decision process, based on such trial variables, be developed to guide the selection of primary and secondary outcomes as well as the methods to assess them. PMID:21781202

  7. Dynamic patient data bases: the foundation of an integrated approach to outcome measures for the healthcare professionals.

    PubMed

    Kwok, H K; Stevens, N

    1995-01-01

    In recent years there has been a tremendous need among healthcare professionals to assess the effectiveness, efficiency, and appropriateness of the patient care services being provided through criteria-based outcome and program evaluation. Although the need for a tool which could evaluate the effectiveness of patient care is widely recognized, such an undertaking has been severely limited due to the lack of any automated means to collect and analyze patient data on a routine, continuous basis within a clinical setting. We have developed and implemented at Mineral Springs Hospital, Banff, Alberta an integrated and automated hospital information system that not only continuously collects administrative, financial, and patient data, but also contains an intelligent component for automated outcome measure and program evaluation. The system collects various non-duplicated data elements from each routine work process within the facility on a continuous basis. Through the creation of a dynamic patient database, data is transformed into information--a powerful decision support tool. The system provides flexible user-defined reports in patient-specific resource utilization, direct and/or indirect specific financial costs, result reporting of each intervention, service provided and user-defined criteria-based outcome, and program evaluation. The system design incorporates expert rules, dynamic data entry forms, quantitative models, and user-defined access control. Using information derived from the dynamic common database, managers and front-line clinicians can easily evaluate and modify management decisions or careplans on a macro or micro level. An external review is planned to evaluate whether the system has helped the assessment of effectiveness, efficiency and appropriateness of healthcare services being provided at the hospital. The fundamental concept behind the system design is that the patient is the center of activity for data collection. The system provides the answers to the 5 W's (who, what, where, when, and why) together with intervention and service result reports. A dynamic common patient database is the center of the system and is accessible to all with proper authorization. Common data elements are collected from routine work flow without extra data entry and this information is subsequently shared. Data collection is a continuous process. We believe that every process is the outcome of another sub-process or event. The design of the dynamic patient database incorporates patient-specific costing and outcome evaluation, user-defined flexible data entry forms, user-defined access control, outcome evaluation rules and information semantic rules. Such a patient database would provide the flexibility needed to accommodate diverse methodologies to evaluate outcomes whether it they be medical, cost, access and/or other combination of measures. The system was developed on a PC-based Network technology, using FOXPRO (XBase) as the database development tool incorporating advanced technology such as distributed processing and fault tolerant computing. We chose PC-based technology because it is economical, having relatively low maintenance costs and requires no major dependency on vendors. The developed system produces patient-specific reports with many dimensions. The reports are user-defined. The system reports general data, CMG, RGN, LOS, Expected LOS, and other user-defined demographic data. Resource utilization, financial costs, and result reportings are produced together with rule-based outcome assessments of any type of measures, including, but not limited to, pre-set functional/health goals, user satisfaction, clinicianUs text or codified comments etc. It provides the framework for continually capturing data at a practical, work-flow level. The incorporation of a dynamic patient database as the driving forece of an integrated, rule-based administration, financial and patient data system will provdie the tools for healthcar PMID:8591238

  8. The Selection and Use of Outcome Measures in Palliative and End-of-Life Care Research: The MORECare International Consensus Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Catherine J.; Benalia, Hamid; Preston, Nancy J.; Grande, Gunn; Gysels, Marjolein; Short, Vicky; Daveson, Barbara A.; Bausewein, Claudia; Todd, Chris; Higginson, Irene J.

    2013-01-01

    Context A major barrier to widening and sustaining palliative care service provision is the requirement for better selection and use of outcome measures. Service commissioning is increasingly based on patient, carer, and service outcomes as opposed to service activity. Objectives To generate recommendations and consensus for research in palliative and end-of-life care on the properties of the best outcome measures, enhancing the validity of proxy-reported data and optimal data collection time points. Methods An international expert workshop was convened and an online consensus survey was undertaken using the MORECare Transparent Expert Consultation to generate recommendations and level of agreement. We focused on three areas: 1) measurement properties, 2) use of proxies, and 3) measurement timing. Data analysis comprised descriptive analysis of aggregate scores and collation of narrative comments. Results There were 31 workshop attendees; 29 recommendations were included in the online survey, completed by 28 experts. The top three recommendations by area were the following: 1) the properties of the best outcome measures are responsive to change over time and capture clinically important data, 2) to enhance the validity of proxy data requires clear and specific guidelines to aid lay individuals' and/or professionals' completion of proxy measures, and 3) data collection time points need clear identification to establish a baseline. Conclusion Outcome measurement in palliative and end-of-life care requires the use of psychometrically robust measures that are clinically responsive, with defined data collection time points to establish a baseline and clear administration guidelines to complete proxy measures. To further the field requires clinical imperatives to more closely inform recommendations on outcome measurement. PMID:23628515

  9. Measuring Outcomes in Mental Health Services for Older People: An Evaluation of the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales for Elderly People (HoNOS65+)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gee, Susan B.; Croucher, Matthew J.; Beveridge, John

    2010-01-01

    The Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS) family of measures is routinely used in mental health services in the New Zealand, Australia, and the United Kingdom. However, the psychometric properties of the HoNOS65+ for elderly people have not been extensively evaluated. The aim of the present study was to examine the validity, reliability, and

  10. Measuring Outcomes in Mental Health Services for Older People: An Evaluation of the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales for Elderly People (HoNOS65+)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gee, Susan B.; Croucher, Matthew J.; Beveridge, John

    2010-01-01

    The Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS) family of measures is routinely used in mental health services in the New Zealand, Australia, and the United Kingdom. However, the psychometric properties of the HoNOS65+ for elderly people have not been extensively evaluated. The aim of the present study was to examine the validity, reliability, and…

  11. The SF36 as an outcome measure of services for end stage renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Wight, J. P.; Edwards, L.; Brazier, J.; Walters, S.; Payne, J. N.; Brown, C. B.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the use of the short form 36 (SF36) as a measure of health related quality of life of patients with end stage renal failure, document the results, and investigate factors, including mode of treatment, which may influence it. DESIGN: Cross sectional survey of patients with end stage renal failure, with the standard United Kingdom version of the SF36 supplemented by specific questions for end stage renal failure. SETTING: A teaching hospital renal unit. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: 660 patients treated at the Sheffield Kidney Institute by haemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, and transplantation. Internal consistency, percentage of maximal or minimal responses, SF36 scores, effect sizes, correlations between independent predictor variables and individual dimension scores of the SF36. Multiple regression analysis of the SF36 scores for the physical functioning, vitality, and mental health dimensions against treatment, age, risk (comorbidity) score, and other independent variables. RESULTS: A high response rate was achieved. Internal consistency was good. There were no floor or ceiling effects other than for the two "role" dimensions. Overall health related quality of life was poor compared with the general population. Having a functioning transplant was a significant predictor of higher score in the three dimensions (physical functioning, vitality, and mental health) for which multiple regression models were constructed. Age, sex, comorbidity, duration of treatment, level of social and emotional support, household numbers, and hospital dialysis were also (variably) significant predictors. CONCLUSIONS: The SF36 is a practical and consistent questionnaire in this context, and there is evidence to support its construct validity. Overall the health related quality of life of these patients is poor, although transplantation is associated with higher scores independently of the effect of age and comorbidity. Age, comorbidity, and sex are also predictive of the scores attained in the three dimensions studied. Further studies are required to ascertain whether altering those predictor variables which are under the influence of professional carers is associated with changes in health related quality of life, and thus confirm the value of this outcome as a measure of quality of care. PMID:10339023

  12. Results from the G0 forward angle measurement

    SciTech Connect

    J. Liu

    2006-07-01

    The results from the G0 forward angle experiment are reported in this talk. The parity-violating asymmetry of elastic e-p scattering has been measured within the range of the four-momentum transfer (Q2) from 0.12 to 1.0 (GeV/c)2, which yields linear combinations of the strange electric and magnetic form factors of the nucleon, G{sub E}{sup s} + etaG{sub M}{sup s}, in the same Q2 range. The G0 results, combined with the measurements from other experiments, indicate that G{sub E}{sup s} and G{sub M}{sup s} are both likely non-zero.

  13. An overview of animal models of pain: disease models and outcome measures

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, N; Harris, AL; Robinson, CR; Dougherty, PM; Fuchs, PN; Sluka, KA

    2013-01-01

    Pain is ultimately a perceptual phenomenon. It is built from information gathered by specialized pain receptors in tissue, modified by spinal and supraspinal mechanisms, and integrated into a discrete sensory experience with an emotional valence in the brain. Because of this, studying intact animals allows the multidimensional nature of pain to be examined. A number of animal models have been developed, reflecting observations that pain phenotypes are mediated by distinct mechanisms. Animal models of pain are designed to mimic distinct clinical diseases to better evaluate underlying mechanisms and potential treatments. Outcome measures are designed to measure multiple parts of the pain experience including reflexive hyperalgesia measures, sensory and affective dimensions of pain and impact of pain on function and quality of life. In this review we discuss the common methods used for inducing each of the pain phenotypes related to clinical pain syndromes, as well as the main behavioral tests for assessing pain in each model. PMID:24035349

  14. An Evaluation of Auditory Verbal Therapy Using the Rate of Early Language Development as an Outcome Measure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, Sarah; Stokes, Jacqueline; White, Catherine; Tyszkiewicz, Elizabeth; Woolgar, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    Providing unbiased data concerning the outcomes of particular intervention methods is imperative if professionals and parents are to assimilate information which could contribute to an "informed choice". An evaluation of Auditory Verbal Therapy (AVT) was conducted using a formal assessment of spoken language as an outcome measure. Spoken language…

  15. Outcome Rating Scale and Session Rating Scale in Psychological Practice: Clinical Utility of Ultra-Brief Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Alistair; Hemsley, Samantha

    2009-01-01

    The validity and reliability of the Outcome Rating Scale (ORS) and the Session Rating Scale (SRS) were evaluated against existing longer measures, including the Outcome Questionnaire-45, Working Alliance Inventory, Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21, Quality of Life Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and General Self-efficacy Scale. The measures…

  16. Preliminary result of Indonesian strain map based on geodetic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susilo, Meilano, Irwan; Abidin, Hasanuddin Z.; Sapiie, Benyamin; Efendi, Joni; Wijanarto, Antonius B.

    2016-05-01

    GPS measurements from 1993 until 2014 across Indonesia region are providing longer time series at 2 - 3 millimetre-level precision from which surface velocity estimates are derived. In this study, we use this GPS velocities field to construct a crustal strain rate map and not including the physical model yet. In our preliminary result, we only compute the magnitude of the strain rate. The strain map is useful to construct the deformation model in Indonesia and to support the Indonesia datum.

  17. Geodimeter measurements from Mishennaya Observatory: Analysis of observation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhtiarov, V. F.; Levin, V. E.; Saprykin, A. V.

    1992-02-01

    The data obtained by geodimeter measurements from the Mishennaya Observatory, city of Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky, are presented. Temporal sequences of horizontal deformations along lines 7-50 km long, are analyzed for the period 1979-1989. A qualitative model for the relationship between an earthquake and deformations along the polygonal lines is proposed. The results of the statistical analysis of observation sequences are given.

  18. Moving beyond Mindfulness: Defining Equanimity as an Outcome Measure in Meditation and Contemplative Research

    PubMed Central

    Gard, Tim; Hoge, Elizabeth A.; Hölzel, Britta K.; Kerr, Catherine; Lazar, Sara W.; Olendzki, Andrew; Vago, David R.

    2014-01-01

    In light of a growing interest in contemplative practices such as meditation, the emerging field of contemplative science has been challenged to describe and objectively measure how these practices affect health and well-being. While “mindfulness” itself has been proposed as a measurable outcome of contemplative practices, this concept encompasses multiple components, some of which, as we review here, may be better characterized as equanimity. Equanimity can be defined as an even-minded mental state or dispositional tendency toward all experiences or objects, regardless of their origin or their affective valence (pleasant, unpleasant, or neutral). In this article we propose that equanimity be used as an outcome measure in contemplative research. We first define and discuss the inter-relationship between mindfulness and equanimity from the perspectives of both classical Buddhism and modern psychology and present existing meditation techniques for cultivating equanimity. We then review psychological, physiological, and neuroimaging methods that have been used to assess equanimity, either directly or indirectly. In conclusion, we propose that equanimity captures potentially the most important psychological element in the improvement of well-being, and therefore should be a focus in future research studies. PMID:25750687

  19. Insomnia and Objectively Measured Sleep Disturbances Predict Treatment Outcome in Depressed Patients Treated with Psychotherapy or Psychotherapy-Pharmacotherapy Combinations

    PubMed Central

    Troxel, W.M.; Kupfer, D.J.; Reynolds, C.F.; Frank, E.; Thase, M.; Miewald, J.; Buysse, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Insomnia and objectively measured sleep disturbances predict poor treatment outcomes in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). However, prior research has utilized individual clinical trials with relatively small sample sizes and has focused on insomnia symptoms or objective measures, but not both. The present study is a secondary analysis that examines the degree to which insomnia, objective sleep disturbances, or their combination, predicts depression remission following pharmacotherapy and/or psychotherapy treatment. Methods Participants were 711 depressed patients drawn from six clinical trials. Remission status, defined as a score of ≤ 7 on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HDRS) over two consecutive months, served as the primary outcome. Insomnia was assessed via the 3 sleep items on the HDRS. Objectively measured short sleep duration (total sleep time < = 6 hours), and prolonged sleep latency (SL >30 minutes) or wakefulness after sleep onset (WASO>30) were derived from in-laboratory polysomnographic (PSG) sleep studies. Logistic regression predicted the odds of non-remission according to insomnia, each of the objective sleep disturbances, or their combination, after adjusting for age, sex, treatment modality, and baseline depressive symptoms. Results Prolonged sleep latency alone (OR = 1.82; CI: 1.23, 2.70) or in combination with insomnia (OR = 2.03; CI: 1.13, 3.95) predicted increased risk of non-remission. In addition, insomnia and sleep duration individually and in combination were each associated with a significantly increased risk of non-remission (p’s < .05). Conclusion Findings suggest that objectively measured prolonged sleep latency and short sleep duration independently, or in conjunction with insomnia are risk factors for poor depression treatment outcome. PMID:22152403

  20. Periodontal Research: Basics and beyond – Part II (Ethical issues, sampling, outcome measures and bias)

    PubMed Central

    Avula, Haritha

    2013-01-01

    A good research beginning refers to formulating a well-defined research question, developing a hypothesis and choosing an appropriate study design. The first part of the review series has discussed these issues in depth and this paper intends to throw light on other issues pertaining to the implementation of research. These include the various ethical norms and standards in human experimentation, the eligibility criteria for the participants, sampling methods and sample size calculation, various outcome measures that need to be defined and the biases that can be introduced in research. PMID:24174747

  1. Partial Breast Radiation Therapy With Proton Beam: 5-Year Results With Cosmetic Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, David A.; Do, Sharon; Lum, Sharon; Garberoglio, Carlos; Mirshahidi, Hamid; Patyal, Baldev; Grove, Roger; Slater, Jerry D.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: We updated our previous report of a phase 2 trial using proton beam radiation therapy to deliver partial breast irradiation (PBI) in patients with early stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible subjects had invasive nonlobular carcinoma with a maximal dimension of 3 cm. Patients underwent partial mastectomy with negative margins; axillary lymph nodes were negative on sampling. Subjects received postoperative proton beam radiation therapy to the surgical bed. The dose delivered was 40 Gy in 10 fractions, once daily over 2 weeks. Multiple fields were treated daily, and skin-sparing techniques were used. Following treatment, patients were evaluated with clinical assessments and annual mammograms to monitor toxicity, tumor recurrence, and cosmesis. Results: One hundred subjects were enrolled and treated. All patients completed the assigned treatment and were available for post-treatment analysis. The median follow-up was 60 months. Patients had a mean age of 63 years; 90% had ductal histology; the average tumor size was 1.3 cm. Actuarial data at 5 years included ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence-free survival of 97% (95% confidence interval: 100%-93%); disease-free survival of 94%; and overall survival of 95%. There were no cases of grade 3 or higher acute skin reactions, and late skin reactions included 7 cases of grade 1 telangiectasia. Patient- and physician-reported cosmesis was good to excellent in 90% of responses, was not changed from baseline measurements, and was well maintained throughout the entire 5-year follow-up period. Conclusions: Proton beam radiation therapy for PBI produced excellent ipsilateral breast recurrence-free survival with minimal toxicity. The treatment proved to be adaptable to all breast sizes and lumpectomy cavity configurations. Cosmetic results appear to be excellent and unchanged from baseline out to 5 years following treatment. Cosmetic results may be improved over those reported with photon-based techniques due to reduced breast tissue exposure with proton beam, skin-sparing techniques, and the dose fractionation schedule used in this trial.

  2. Measuring student engagement in science classrooms: An investigation of the contextual factors and longitudinal outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spicer, Justina Judy

    This dissertation includes three separate but related studies that examine the different dimensions of student experiences in science using data from two different datasets: the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09), and a dataset constructed using the Experience Sampling Method (ESM). This mixed-dataset approach provides a unique perspective on student engagement and the contexts in which it exists. Engagement is operationalized across the three studies using aspects of flow theory to evaluate how the challenges in science classes are experienced at the student level. The data provides information on a student's skill-level and efficacy during the challenge, as well as their interest level and persistence. The data additionally track how situations contribute to optimal learning moments, along with longitudinal attitudes and behaviors towards science. In the first part of this study, the construct of optimal moments is explored using in the moment data from the ESM dataset. Several different measures of engagement are tested and validated to uncover relationships between various affective states and optimal learning experiences with a focus on science classrooms. Additional analyses include investigating the links between in the moment engagement (situational), and cross-situational (stable) measures of engagement in science. The second part of this dissertation analyzes the ESM data in greater depth by examining how engagement varies across students and their contextual environment. The contextual characteristics associated with higher engagement levels are evaluated to see if these conditions hold across different types of students. Chapter three more thoroughly analyzes what contributes to students persisting through challenging learning moments, and the variation in levels of effort put forth when facing difficulty while learning in science. In chapter four, this dissertation explores additional outcomes associated with student engagement in science using the results for chapters two and three to identify aspects of engagement and learning in science. These findings motivate a set of variables and analytic approach that is undertaken in chapter four. Specifically, the questions how engagement influences experiences in ninth grade science and students' interest in pursuing a career in STEM using the HSLS:09 data. This multifaceted study contributes to the conceptualization of student engagement, and will help bring clarity to the relationship among engagement, context, and long-term outcomes in science. Engagement is more than being on-task or paying attention, but is a condition influenced by many factors including student background, the learning context of the classroom, teacher characteristics, and the features of instruction. Understanding this relationship between engagement and contextual factors is helpful in uncovering teacher actions and instructional activities that may elicit higher engagement in science classes. These findings highlight the importance of science instruction using more cognitively-demanding activities, such as problem-based learning.

  3. Results of ozone measurements in Northern Germany: A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Manfred

    1994-01-01

    At most of the German ozone recording stations which have records over a sufficiently long period, the results of the summer months of 1989 showed the highest values since the beginning of the measurements. One of the reasons for this phenomenon was the high duration of sunshine in that summer; for example, in Potsdam near Berlin in May 1989 the sunshine duration was the highest in May since the beginning of the records in 1893. For that reason we selected this summer for a case study. The basis for the study was mainly the ozone measuring stations of the network of Lower Saxony and the Federal Office of Environment (Umweltbundesamt). The results of these summer measurements point to intense sources of ozone, probably in form of gaseous precursors, in the Middle German industrial areas near Leipzig and Halle and in Northwestern Czechoslovakia, with coal-mining, chemical and petrochemical industries, coking plants and others. The maps of average ozone concentrations, number or days with high ozone maxima, ozone-windroses of the stations, etc., suggest that these areas could be a main source of precursors and of photochemical ozone production in summer smog episodes in Central Europe. Stations on the North Sea coast, at which early ozone measurements were made by our institute in 1973/74 are compared with similarly located stations of the Lower Saxon network in 1989 and the results show a reversal of the ozone-windroses. In 1973/74, the highest ozone concentrations were correlated with wind directions from the sea while in 1989 these concentrations were correlated with directions from the continent. In the recent years, photochemical ozone production on the continent is probably predominant, while in former years the higher ozone content of the maritime subpolar air masses has been explained by stratospheric-tropospheric exchange.

  4. Results from the BABAR Fully Inclusive Measurement of B? Xs?

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /University of Bergen, Institute of Physics, N-5007 Bergen, Norway /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29208, USA /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U. /Yale U. /Yale U. /Yale U. /Yale U. /Yale U.

    2005-09-20

    We present preliminary results from a lepton-tagged fully-inclusive measurement of B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma} decays, where X{sub s} is any strange hadronic state. Results are based on a BABAR data set of 88.5 million B{bar B} pairs at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. We present a reconstructed photon energy spectrum in the {Upsilon}(4S) frame, and partial branching fractions above minimum reconstructed photon energies of 1.9, 2.0, 2.1 and 2.2 GeV. We then convert these to measurements of partial branching fractions and truncated first and second moments of the true photon energy distribution in the B rest frame, above the same minimum photon energy values. The full correlation matrices between the first and second moments are included to allow fitting to any parameterized theoretical calculation. We also measure the direct CP asymmetry {Alpha}{sub CP}(B {yields} X{sub s+d{gamma}}) (based on the charge of the tagging lepton) above a reconstructed photon energy of 2.2 GeV.

  5. A review of functional outcome measures for cervical spine disorders: literature review

    PubMed Central

    Bussières, André

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assess the reliability, validity and usefulness of three outcome measures: cervical ranges of motion, sagittal neck muscle strength and presence or absence of the flexion relaxation phenomenon (FRP) in the neck. The literature search included the Index Medicus and computerized database of MEDLINE for relevant material. Articles were selected if they contained primary data on neck range of motion, sagittal muscle strengt