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Sample records for outer galaxy disks

  1. The Red and Featureless Outer Disks of Nearby Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Aaron E.; Mihos, J. Christopher; Harding, Paul

    2016-07-01

    We present results from deep, wide-field surface photometry of three nearby (D = 4–7 Mpc) spiral galaxies: M94 (NGC 4736), M64 (NGC 4826), and M106 (NGC 4258). Our imaging reaches a limiting surface brightness of {μ }B ∼ 28–30 mag arcsec‑2 and probes colors down to {μ }B ∼ 27.5 mag arcsec‑2. We compare our broadband optical data to available ultraviolet and high column density H i data to better constrain the star-forming history and stellar populations of the outermost parts of each galaxy’s disk. Each galaxy has a well-defined radius beyond which little star formation occurs and the disk light appears both azimuthally smooth and red in color, suggestive of old, well-mixed stellar populations. Given the lack of ongoing star formation or blue stellar populations in these galaxies’ outer disks, the most likely mechanisms for their formation are dynamical processes such as disk heating or radial migration, rather than inside-out growth of the disks. This is also implied by the similarity in outer disk properties despite each galaxy showing distinct levels of environmental influence, from a purely isolated galaxy (M94) to one experiencing weak tidal perturbations from its satellite galaxies (M106) to a galaxy recovering from a recent merger (M64), suggesting that a variety of evolutionary histories can yield similar outer disk structure. While this suggests a common secular mechanism for outer disk formation, the large extent of these smooth, red stellar populations—which reach several disk scale lengths beyond the galaxies’ spiral structure—may challenge models of radial migration given the lack of any nonaxisymmetric forcing at such large radii.

  2. STAR FORMATION IN THE OUTER DISK OF SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Kate L.; Van Zee, Liese; Cote, Stephanie; Schade, David E-mail: vanzee@astro.indiana.edu E-mail: David.Schade@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca

    2012-09-20

    We combine new deep and wide field of view H{alpha} imaging of a sample of eight nearby (d Almost-Equal-To 17 Mpc) spiral galaxies with new and archival H I and CO imaging to study the star formation and the star formation regulation in the outer disk. We find that, in agreement with previous studies, star formation in the outer disk has low covering fractions, and star formation is typically organized into spiral arms. The star formation in the outer disk is at extremely low levels, with typical star formation rate surface densities of {approx}10{sup -5} to 10{sup -6} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}. We find that the ratio of the radial extent of detected H II regions to the radius of the H I disk is typically {approx}>85%. This implies that in order to further our understanding of the implications of extended star formation, we must further our understanding of the formation of extended H I disks. We measure the gravitational stability of the gas disk, and find that the outer gaseous disk is typically a factor of {approx}2 times more stable than the inner star-forming disk. We measure the surface density of outer disk H I arms, and find that the disk is closer to gravitational instability along these arms. Therefore, it seems that spiral arms are a necessary, but not sufficient, requirement for star formation in the outer disk. We use an estimation of the flaring of the outer gas disk to illustrate the effect of flaring on the Schmidt power-law index; we find that including flaring increases the agreement between the power-law indices of the inner and outer disks.

  3. Star formation in the outer disks of spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Kate Lynn

    I present results from a multi-wavelength study of star formation and the gaseous content in the outer disks of a sample of eight nearby spiral galaxies. In particular, the study focuses on galaxies with typical HI-to-optical sizes of ˜1--2, to provide a comparison to studies of galaxies with star formation occurring in extended gas disks. The study features new, ultra-deep ground-based H-alpha imaging and deep ultraviolet (UV) imaging from the GALEX space telescope to trace the recent star formation. I find that star formation typically extends through most (>85%) of the gas disk, with an outermost star forming regime characterized by low covering fractions and low star formation rate surface densities. The result that star formation extends through most of the gas disk regardless of the HI-to-optical size implies that it is important to further our understanding of the formation of extended gas disks to fully understand the implications of extended star forming disks. I find that the outer gaseous disks are gravitationally stable, which is in agreement with the lower level of star formation. I use ultraviolet and H-alpha colors to probe the recent star formation in the outer disks and find significant variations between colors of young stellar clusters. I run stellar population synthesis models to show how episodic star formation histories (SFHs) with periods of 100--250 Myr could cause similar color variations as are seen in outer disks. An episodic SFH would have implications for the gas depletion time and chemical evolution of spiral galaxies. In addition to an episodic SFH, the observed ultraviolet and H-alpha colors of young stellar clusters in the outer disks of galaxies in our sample are also in agreement with recently published models of a stochastically sampled initial mass function (IMF). Therefore, there remains some uncertainty for the possible cause of this observational result. Finally, we present a pilot study of deep, near infrared (NIR) imaging

  4. Disk Galaxies in the Outer Local Supercluster: Optical CCD Surface Photometry and Distribution of Galaxy Disk Parameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, N. Y.

    1998-01-01

    We report new B-band CCD surface photometry on a sample of 76 disk galaxies brighter than BT = 14.5 mag in the Uppsala General Catalogue of Galaxies, which are confined within a volume located in the outer part of the Local Supercluster.

  5. Cepheid variables in the flared outer disk of our galaxy.

    PubMed

    Feast, Michael W; Menzies, John W; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Whitelock, Patricia A

    2014-05-15

    Flaring and warping of the disk of the Milky Way have been inferred from observations of atomic hydrogen but stars associated with flaring have not hitherto been reported. In the area beyond the Galactic centre the stars are largely hidden from view by dust, and the kinematic distances of the gas cannot be estimated. Thirty-two possible Cepheid stars (young pulsating variable stars) in the direction of the Galactic bulge were recently identified. With their well-calibrated period-luminosity relationships, Cepheid stars are useful distance indicators. When observations of these stars are made in two colours, so that their distance and reddening can be determined simultaneously, the problems of dust obscuration are minimized. Here we report that five of the candidates are classical Cepheid stars. These five stars are distributed from approximately one to two kiloparsecs above and below the plane of the Galaxy, at radial distances of about 13 to 22 kiloparsecs from the centre. The presence of these relatively young (less than 130 million years old) stars so far from the Galactic plane is puzzling, unless they are in the flared outer disk. If so, they may be associated with the outer molecular arm. PMID:24828192

  6. Bulge/Disk Decompositions of S0 Galaxies With Old Outer Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain, Leslie C.; Courteau, S.; McDonald, M.; Rose, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    We have performed galactic component decompositions for a sample of 22 S0 galaxies using a generalized Sersic component for the bulge and an exponential profile for the disk. Our main goal is to understand the nature of S0 galaxies that have substantially old ages (> 10 Gyr) in their outer regions. Our database consists of deep optical SDSS and NIR H and J photometry of nearby S0 galaxies. We find that nearly all galaxies in our sample contain outer regions that are disk dominated. Most importantly, our results indicate that the disk component is responsible for the old ages in galaxies with old outer regions. The ages of the disks of these galaxies place a constraint on models of hierarchical merging, requiring no major merger to have occurred for these galaxies in a very long time.

  7. Noncircular outer disks in unbarred S0 galaxies: NGC 502 and NGC 5485

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sil'chenko, O. K.

    2016-03-01

    Highly noncircular outer stellar disks have been detected in two SA0 (unbarred) galaxies by comparing the spectroscopic data on the rotation of stars and the photometric data on the shape and orientation of isophotes. In NGC 502, the oval distortion of the disk is manifested in the shape of the inner and outer elliptical rings occupying wide radial zones between the bulge and the disk and at the outer disk edge; such a structure can be a consequence of the so-called "dry minor merger," multiple cannibalization of gas-free satellites. In NGC 5485, the stellar kinematics is absolutely unrelated to the orientation of isophotes in the disk region, and for this galaxy the conclusion about its global triaxial structure is unavoidable.

  8. Synthetic HI observations of spiral structure in the outer disk in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoperskov, Sergey A.; Bertin, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    > By means of 3D hydrodynamical simulations, in a separate paper we have discussed the properties of non-axisymmetric density wave trains in the outermost regions of galaxy disks, based on the picture that self-excited global spiral modes in the bright optical stellar disk are accompanied by low-amplitude short trailing wave signals outside corotation; in the gas, such wave trains can penetrate through the outer Lindblad resonance and propagate outwards, forming prominent spiral patterns. In this paper we present the synthetic 21 cm velocity maps expected from simulated models of the outer gaseous disk, focusing on the case when the disk is dominated by a two-armed spiral pattern, but considering also other more complex situations. We discuss some aspects of the spiral pattern in the gaseous periphery of galaxy disks noted in our simulations that might be interesting to compare with specific observed cases.

  9. Young Star Clusters in the Outer Disks of LITTLE THINGS Dwarf Irregular Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Deidre A.; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Gehret, Elizabeth

    2016-06-01

    We examine FUV images of the LITTLE THINGS sample of nearby dwarf irregular (dIrr) and Blue Compact Dwarf galaxies to identify distinct young regions in their far outer disks. We use these data, obtained with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer satellite, to determine the furthest radius at which in situ star formation can currently be identified. The FUV knots are found at distances from the center of the galaxies of 1–8 disk scale lengths and have ages of ≤slant 20 Myr and masses of 20 M{}ȯ to 1 × 105M{}ȯ . The presence of young clusters and OB associations in the outer disks of dwarf galaxies shows that dIrrs do have star formation taking place there in spite of the extreme nature of the environment. Most regions are found where the H i surface density is ∼1 M{}ȯ pc‑2, though both the H i and dispersed old stars go out much further. This limiting density suggests a cutoff in the ability to form distinct OB associations and perhaps even stars. We compare the star formation rates in the FUV regions to the average rates expected at their radii and beyond from the observed gas, using the conventional correlation for gas-rich regions. The localized rates are typically 10% of the expected average rates for the outer disks. Either star formation in dIrrs at surface densities \\lt 1 {M}ȯ pc‑2 occurs without forming distinct associations, or the Kennicutt–Schmidt relation over-predicts the rate beyond this point. In the latter case, the stellar disks in the far-outer parts of dIrrs result from scattering of stars from the inner disk.

  10. STAR FORMATION IN THE OUTER DISKS OF SPIRAL GALAXIES: ULTRAVIOLET AND H{alpha} PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Kate L.; Van Zee, Liese; Skillman, Evan D. E-mail: vanzee@astro.indiana.edu

    2011-12-20

    We present an analysis of ultradeep UV and H{alpha} imaging of five nearby spiral galaxies to study the recent star formation in the outer disk. Using azimuthally averaged ellipse photometry as well as aperture photometry of individual young stellar complexes, we measure how star formation rates (SFRs) and UV and H{alpha} colors vary with radius. We detect azimuthally averaged UV flux to {approx}1.2-1.4 R{sub 25} in most galaxies; at the edge of the detected UV disk, the surface brightnesses are 28-29 mag arcsec{sup -2}, corresponding to SFR surface densities of {approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}. Additionally, we detect between 120 and 410 young stellar complexes per galaxy, with a significant number of detections out to {approx}1.5 R{sub 25}. We measure radial FUV-NUV profiles, and find that the dispersion in the UV colors of individual young stellar complexes increases with radius. We investigate how radial variations in the frequency of star formation episodes can create color gradients and increasing dispersion in the UV colors of star-forming regions, like those observed in our study. Specifically, we use recently published, high spatial and temporal resolution measurements of {Sigma}{sub SFR} throughout the disk of M33 to estimate the frequency of star formation episodes throughout the disk of a typical spiral galaxy. We use stellar synthesis models of these star formation histories (SFHs) to measure the variations in UV colors and find that we can replicate large dispersions in UV colors based on episodic SFHs.

  11. THE ACS NEARBY GALAXY SURVEY TREASURY. III. CEPHEIDS IN THE OUTER DISK OF M81

    SciTech Connect

    McCommas, Les P.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Davis, Matthew R.; Yoachim, Peter; Dolphin, Andrew E. E-mail: jd@astro.washington.edu E-mail: mrdavis@astro.washington.edu E-mail: adolphin@ratheon.com

    2009-06-15

    The ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury (ANGST) has acquired deep ACS imaging of a field in the outer disk of the large spiral galaxy M81. These data were obtained over a total of 20 Hubble Space Telescope orbits, providing a baseline long enough to reliably identify Cepheid variable stars in the field. Fundamental mode and first overtone types have been distinguished through comparative fits with corresponding Cepheid light curve templates derived from principal component analysis of confirmed Cepheids in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), Small Magellanic Cloud, and Milky Way. A distance modulus of 27.78 {+-} 0.05 {sub r} {+-} 0.14 {sub s} with a corresponding distance of 3.60 {+-} 0.23 Mpc has been calculated from a sample of 11 fundamental mode and two first overtone Cepheids (assuming an LMC distance modulus of {mu}{sub LMC} = 18.41 {+-} 0.10 {sub r} {+-} 0.13 {sub s})

  12. Constraints on Galaxy Formation from Stars in the Far Outer Disk of M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Johnson, Rachel A.

    2001-09-01

    Numerical simulations of galaxy formation within the cold dark matter (CDM) hierarchical clustering framework are unable to produce large disk galaxies without invoking some form of feedback to suppress gas cooling and collapse until a redshift of unity or below. An important observational consequence of delaying the epoch of disk formation until relatively recent times is that the stellar populations in the extended disk should be of predominantly young-to-intermediate age. We use a deep Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 archival pointing to investigate the mean age and metallicity of the stellar population in a disk-dominated field at 30 kpc along the major axis of M31. Our analysis of the color-magnitude diagram reveals the dominant population to have a significant mean age (>~8 Gyr) and a moderately high mean metallicity ([Fe/H]~-0.7) tentative evidence is also presented for a trace population of ancient (>=10 Gyr) metal-poor stars. These characteristics are unexpected in CDM models, and we discuss the possible implications of this result as well as alternative interpretations. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the data archive of the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  13. CLUES ON THE REJUVENATION OF THE S0 GALAXY NGC 404 FROM THE CHEMICAL ABUNDANCE OF ITS OUTER DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Bresolin, Fabio

    2013-08-01

    The oxygen abundance of the outer disk of the nearby S0 galaxy NGC 404, a prototypical early-type galaxy with extended star formation, has been derived from the analysis of H II region spectra. The high mean value found, 12 + log(O/H) = 8.6 {+-} 0.1, equivalent to approximately 80% of the solar value, argues against both the previously proposed cold accretion and recent merger scenarios as viable mechanisms for the assembly of the star-forming gas. The combination of the present-day gas metallicity with the published star formation history of this galaxy favors a model in which the recent star forming activity represents the declining tail of the original one.

  14. Ripples in disk galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Schweizer, F.; Seitzer, P.

    1988-05-01

    Evidence is presented that ripples occur not only in ellipticals but also in disk galaxies of Hubble types S0, S0/Sa, and Sa, and probably even in the Sbc galaxy NGC 3310. It is argued that the ripples cannot usually have resulted from transient spiral waves or other forced vibrations in existing disks, but instead consist of extraneous sheetlike matter. The frequent presence of major disk-shaped companions suggests that ripple material may be acquired not only through wholesale mergers but also through mass transfer from neighbor galaxies. The implications of ripples in early-type disk galaxies are addressed. 40 references.

  15. Secular Evolution in Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kormendy, John

    2013-10-01

    Self-gravitating systems evolve toward the most tightly bound configuration that is reachable via the evolution processes that are available to them. They do this by spreading -- the inner parts shrink while the outer parts expand -- provided that some physical process efficiently transports energy or angular momentum outward. The reason is that self-gravitating systems have negative specific heats. As a result, the evolution of stars, star clusters, protostellar and protoplanetary disks, black hole accretion disks and galaxy disks are fundamentally similar. How evolution proceeds then depends on the evolution processes that are available to each kind of self-gravitating system. These processes and their consequences for galaxy disks are the subjects of my lectures and of this Canary Islands Winter School. I begin with a review of the formation, growth and death of bars. Then I review the slow (`secular') rearrangement of energy, angular momentum, and mass that results from interactions between stars or gas clouds and collective phenomena such as bars, oval disks, spiral structure and triaxial dark haloes. The `existence-proof' phase of this work is largely over: we have a good heuristic understanding of how nonaxisymmetric structures rearrange disk gas into outer rings, inner rings and stuff dumped onto the centre. The results of simulations correspond closely to the morphology of barred and oval galaxies. Gas that is transported to small radii reaches high densities. Observations confirm that many barred and oval galaxies have dense central concentrations of gas and star formation. The result is to grow, on timescales of a few Gyr, dense central components that are frequently mistaken for classical (elliptical-galaxy-like) bulges but that were grown slowly out of the disk (not made rapidly by major mergers). The resulting picture of secular galaxy evolution accounts for the richness observed in galaxy structure. We can distinguish between classical and pseudo

  16. Secular Evolution in Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kormendy, John

    2013-10-01

    Self-gravitating systems evolve toward the most tightly bound configuration that is reachable via the evolution processes that are available to them. They do this by spreading -- the inner parts shrink while the outer parts expand -- provided that some physical process efficiently transports energy or angular momentum outward. The reason is that self-gravitating systems have negative specific heats. As a result, the evolution of stars, star clusters, protostellar and protoplanetary disks, black hole accretion disks and galaxy disks are fundamentally similar. How evolution proceeds then depends on the evolution processes that are available to each kind of self-gravitating system. These processes and their consequences for galaxy disks are the subjects of my lectures and of this Canary Islands Winter School. I begin with a review of the formation, growth and death of bars. Then I review the slow (`secular') rearrangement of energy, angular momentum, and mass that results from interactions between stars or gas clouds and collective phenomena such as bars, oval disks, spiral structure and triaxial dark haloes. The `existence-proof' phase of this work is largely over: we have a good heuristic understanding of how nonaxisymmetric structures rearrange disk gas into outer rings, inner rings and stuff dumped onto the centre. The results of simulations correspond closely to the morphology of barred and oval galaxies. Gas that is transported to small radii reaches high densities. Observations confirm that many barred and oval galaxies have dense central concentrations of gas and star formation. The result is to grow, on timescales of a few Gyr, dense central components that are frequently mistaken for classical (elliptical-galaxy-like) bulges but that were grown slowly out of the disk (not made rapidly by major mergers). The resulting picture of secular galaxy evolution accounts for the richness observed in galaxy structure. We can distinguish between classical and pseudo

  17. THE YOUNG OUTER DISK OF M83

    SciTech Connect

    Davidge, T. J.

    2010-08-01

    Deep near-infrared images recorded with NICI on Gemini South are used to investigate the evolved stellar content in the outer southeast quadrant of the spiral galaxy M83. A diffuse population of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars is detected, indicating that there are stars outside of the previously identified young and intermediate age star clusters in the outer disk. The brightest AGB stars have M {sub K} {>=} -8, and the AGB luminosity function (LF) is well matched by model LFs that assume ages {<=}1 Gyr. The specific star formation rate (SFR) during the past few Gyr estimated from AGB star counts is consistent with that computed from mid-infrared observations of star clusters at similar radii, and it is concluded that the disruption timescale for star clusters in the outer disk is <<1 Gyr. The LF and specific frequency of AGB stars vary with galactocentric radius, in a manner that is indicative of lower luminosity-weighted ages at larger radii. Modest numbers of red supergiants are also found, indicating that there has been star formation during the past 100 Myr, while the ratio of C stars to M giants is consistent with that expected for a solar metallicity system that has experienced a constant SFR for the past few Gyr. The results drawn from the properties of resolved AGB stars are broadly consistent with those deduced from integrated light observations in the UV.

  18. Supermassive disk galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buson, L. M.; Galletta, G.; Saglia, R. P.; Zeilinger, W. W.

    1991-03-01

    In order to investigate the properties of supermassive disk galaxies (SDGs), an extensive optical survey of SDG candidates in the Southern Hemisphere was performed with the 2.2-m ESO/MPI telescope at La Silla. The question of whether SDGs have in general an unusually high content of dark matter in the inner regions or, perhaps, an unusual stellar population is addressed. It is suggested that SDGs are formed as the result of a series of accretion events, possibly induced also by the progressive deepening of the galaxy potential well.

  19. A twisted disk equation that describes warped galaxy disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, K.

    1994-01-01

    Warped H1 gas layers in the outer regions of spiral galaxies usually display a noticeably twisted structure. This structure is thought to arise primarily as a result of differential precession in the H1 disk as it settles toward a 'preferred orientation' in an underlying dark halo potential well that is not spherically symmetric. In an attempt to better understand the structure and evolution of these twisted, warped disk structures, we have utilized the 'twist-equation' formalism. Specifically, we have generalized the twist equation to allow the treatment of non-Keplerian disks and from it have derived the steady-state structure of twisted disks that develop from free precession in a nonspherical, logarithmic halo potential. This generalized equation can also be used to examine the time-evolutionary behavior of warped galaxy disks.

  20. How The Inner Disk Communicates to the Outer Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Miwa

    2009-08-01

    We investigated how evolution in the outer disk has an influence on the inner disk of a protoplanetary disk system. Thanks to two-layer models that give the theoretical platform of disk geometry, we now have a good handle on how dust evolves in outer protoplanetary disks (>10 AU). It has long been thought that the outer and inner disks dissipate on roughly the same time scale as sub-mm observations of nearby T Tauri systems has suggested. However, new high spatial resolution observations point toward the dissipation of an inner disk as not being a simple extension of the outer disk. We performed preliminary tests of the differential disk evolution in gas and dust in the inner disks of Herbig Ae/Be stars using the CO vibrational band as the gas probe. The line luminosity of CO v = 1-0 P(30) has a reasonable correlation with the near-infrared excess over the stellar photosphere. It guarantees that the CO vibration band is a secure probe of the inner disk, as is expected from its high critical density, high excitation temperature, and kinematics. On the other hand, the line luminosity of P(30) does not show a clear trend either with far-infrared color, near-infrared/far-infrared-color, or the type of the spectral energy distribution (SED) (I/II). The inner disks (<1 AU) of Herbig Ae/Be stars of our sample are influenced little by the geometry of the outer disks.

  1. The Young Outer Disk of M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidge, T. J.

    2010-08-01

    Deep near-infrared images recorded with NICI on Gemini South are used to investigate the evolved stellar content in the outer southeast quadrant of the spiral galaxy M83. A diffuse population of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars is detected, indicating that there are stars outside of the previously identified young and intermediate age star clusters in the outer disk. The brightest AGB stars have M K >= -8, and the AGB luminosity function (LF) is well matched by model LFs that assume ages <=1 Gyr. The specific star formation rate (SFR) during the past few Gyr estimated from AGB star counts is consistent with that computed from mid-infrared observations of star clusters at similar radii, and it is concluded that the disruption timescale for star clusters in the outer disk is Lt1 Gyr. The LF and specific frequency of AGB stars vary with galactocentric radius, in a manner that is indicative of lower luminosity-weighted ages at larger radii. Modest numbers of red supergiants are also found, indicating that there has been star formation during the past 100 Myr, while the ratio of C stars to M giants is consistent with that expected for a solar metallicity system that has experienced a constant SFR for the past few Gyr. The results drawn from the properties of resolved AGB stars are broadly consistent with those deduced from integrated light observations in the UV. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a co-operative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council of Canada (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), the Ministerio da Ciencia e Technologia (Brazil), and the Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnologia e Innovacion Productiva (Argentina).

  2. On the Extended Knotted Disks of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaritsky, Dennis; Christlein, Daniel

    2007-07-01

    The stellar disks of many spiral galaxies are twice as large as generally thought. We use archival data from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer mission to quantify the statistical properties of young stellar clusters in the outer, extended disks of a sample of 11 nearby galaxies. We find an excess of sources between 1.25 and 2 optical radii, R25, for five of the galaxies, which statistically implies that at least a quarter of such galaxies have this cluster population (90% confidence level), and no significant statistical excess in the sample as a whole beyond 2R25, even though one galaxy (M83) individually shows such an excess. Although the excess is typically most pronounced for blue (FUV-NUV<1, NUV<25) sources, there is also an excess of sources with redder colors. Although from galaxy to galaxy the number of sources varies significantly, on average the galaxies with such sources have 75+/-10 blue sources at radii between 1.25R25 and 2R25. In addition, the radial distribution is consistent with the extended dust emission observed in the far-IR and with the properties of Hα sources, assuming a constant cluster formation rate over the last few hundred megayears. All of these results suggest that the phenomenon of low-level star formation well outside the apparent optical edges of disks (R~R25) is common and long lasting.

  3. Kinematic Mass Measurements of Inner and Outer Spiral Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Kimberly A.; Ciardullo, R.

    2010-01-01

    Our knowledge of the structure and kinematics of galactic disks and halos is quite limited. While integrated light spectroscopy has provided a large amount of information on inner disks, once outside 2.5 disk scale lengths, almost nothing is known. Does the mass-to-light ratio (M/L) stay constant in the outer regions? Does the stellar scale height stay constant or do disks flare? Are galactic disks really maximal and could there be any trends with Hubble type? Are dark matter halos fit better by NFW or pseudo-isothermal models? We have been using planetary nebulae (PNe) to probe the kinematic structure of face-on spiral disks by identifying large ( 100) samples of these objects via narrow-band imaging, and then measuring their radial velocities with follow-up, high-precision ( 5 km/s) spectroscopy. Our results for IC 342, M74, M83, M94, and M101 are quite interesting. With one exception (M101) the z-velocity dispersion (sigmaz) of galactic disks declines exponentially with the light out to 3 disk scale lengths. This is exactly as expected for a constant M/L, constant scale height disk. However, in the two galaxies with significant data past this radius, the values of sigmaz asymptote out at 20 km/s. Moreover, our analysis finds kinematic evidence for significant flaring in the outer regions, especially in M94. These observations are in excellent agreement with predictions derived from models of disk heating by halo substructure, and demonstrate how kinematic surveys in the outer disks of spirals can be used to test hierarchical models of galaxy formation. We also find that the disks of late-type galaxies are far from maximal, that the disks of early type spirals have higher M/L ratios than the disks of later-type objects, and that the unseen inner halos of spiral galaxies are better fit by pseudo-isothermal laws than by NFW models.

  4. High velocity clouds in nearby disk galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulman, Eric; Bregman, Joel N.; Roberts, Morton S.; Brinks, Elias

    1993-01-01

    Clouds of neutral hydrogen in our galaxy with the absolute value of v greater than 100 km/s cover approximately 10 percent of the sky to a limiting column density of 1 x 10(exp 18) cm(exp -2). These high velocity clouds (HVCs) may dominate the kinetic energy of neutral hydrogen in non-circular motion, and are an important though poorly understood component of galactic gas. It has been suggested that the HVCs can be reproduced by a combination of three phenomena: a galactic fountain driven by disk supernovae which would account for most of the HVCs, material tidally torn from the Magellanic Clouds, and an outer arm complex which is associated with the large scale structure of the warped galactic disk. We sought to detect HVCs in external galaxies in order to test the galactic fountain model.

  5. Circumnuclear Keplerian Disks in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertola, Francesco; Cappellari, Michele; Funes, S. J., José G.; Corsini, Enrico M.; Pizzella, Alessandro; Beltrán, Juan C. Vega

    1998-12-01

    In this Letter, we demonstrate the possibility of inferring the presence of Keplerian gaseous disks using properly equipped optical ground-based telescopes. We have modeled the peculiar bidimensional shape of the emission lines in a sample of five early-type disk galaxies as due to the motion of a gaseous disk rotating in the combined potential of a central pointlike mass and of an extended stellar disk. The value of the central mass concentration estimated for four galaxies of the sample (NGC 2179, NGC 4343, NGC 4435, and NGC 4459) is ~109 Msolar. This value, according to the assumptions made in our model, is overestimated. However, we have calculated that the effect is well within the errors. For the remaining galaxy, NGC 5064, an upper limit of 5×107 Msolar is estimated. Based on observations carried out at ESO, La Silla, (Chile) (ESO N. 58, A-0564) and at the Mount Graham International Observatory (AZ) with the VATT: the Alice P. Lennon Telescope and the Thomas J. Bannan Astrophysics Facility.

  6. Do elliptical galaxies have thick disks?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, R. C.; Wright, A. E.

    1990-01-01

    The authors discuss new evidence which supports the existence of thick disks in elliptical/SO galaxies. Numerical simulations of weak interactions with thick disk systems produce shell structures very similar in appearance to those observed in many shell galaxies. The authors think this model presents a more plausible explanation for the formation of shell structures in elliptical/SO galaxies than does the merger model and, if correct, supports the existence of thick disks in elliptical/SO galaxies.

  7. Disk Galaxy Stellar Velocity Ellipsoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westfall, Kyle B.; Bershady, M. A.; Verheijen, M. A. W.; Andersen, D. R.; Swaters, R. A.

    2007-12-01

    We have measured the disk stellar velocity ellipsoids in a subset of spiral galaxies observed for the Disk-Mass Survey, which provide information on disk stability and secular heating mechanisms. Our methodology invokes our 2D ionized gas and stellar kinematics and a suite of dynamical assumptions based on the Jeans' equations. When combined with orthogonal axes from our 2D data, either the epicycle approximation (EA) or asymmetric drift (AD) equation may close the necessary equation set, individually. We have isolated large observational and inherent systematic effects via EA-only, AD-only, and EA+AD ellipsoid decomposition methodologies. In an attempt to minimize these effects and generate robust ellipsoid measurements we explore constraints provided by higher order expansions of the Jeans' equations and direct orbital integrations. We compare our best ellipsoid axial ratio estimates to similar measurements made by, e.g., van der Kruit & de Grijs (1999, A&A, 352, 129) and Shapiro et al. (2003, AJ, 126, 2707). Finally, we discuss possibilities for the measurement of vertical velocity dispersions in low-surface-brightness galaxies by applying the characterization of the stellar velocity ellipsoid in late-type galaxies. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation (AST-0607516).

  8. POLAR DISK GALAXY FOUND IN WALL BETWEEN VOIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Stanonik, K.; Van Gorkom, J. H.; Platen, E.; Van de Weygaert, R.; Van der Hulst, J. M.; Aragon-Calvo, M. A.; Peebles, P. J. E.

    2009-05-01

    We have found an isolated polar disk galaxy in what appears to be a cosmological wall situated between two voids. This void galaxy is unique as its polar disk was discovered serendipitously in an H I survey of SDSS void galaxies, with no optical counterpart to the H I polar disk. Yet the H I mass in the disk is comparable to the stellar mass in the galaxy. This suggests slow accretion of the H I material at a relatively recent time. There is also a hint of a warp in the outer parts of the H I disk. The central, stellar disk appears relatively blue, with faint near-UV emission, and is oriented (roughly) parallel to the surrounding wall, implying gas accretion from the voids. The considerable gas mass and apparent lack of stars in the polar disk, coupled with the general underdensity of the environment, supports recent theories of cold flow accretion as an alternate formation mechanism for polar disk galaxies.

  9. Cluster tidal fields: Effects on disk galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valluri, Monica

    1993-01-01

    A variety of observations of galaxies in clusters indicate that the gas in these galaxies is strongly affected by the cluster environment. We present results of a study of the dynamical effects of the mean cluster tidal field on a disk galaxy as it falls into a cluster for the first time on a bound orbit with constant angular momentum (Valluri 1992). The problem is studied in the restricted 3-body framework. The cluster is modelled by a modified Hubble potential and the disk galaxy is modelled as a flattened spheroid.

  10. Dynamics of gas disks in triaxial galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Steiman-Cameron, T.Y.

    1984-01-01

    Increasing evidence has accumulated since the mid 1970's arguing that many, if not all, undisturbed galaxies may have triaxial mass distributions. The steady state configurations (preferred planes) of gas disks in triaxial galaxies with static and rotating surface figures is determined. In addition, the evolution of a gas disk as it settles into the steady state is followed for both axisymmetric and triaxial galaxies. Observational tests are provided for triaxial galactic geometry and give more accurate measures of settling times than those previously published. The preferred planes for gas disks in static and tumbling triaxial galaxies are determined using an analytic method derived from celestial mechanics. The evolution of gas disks which are not in the steady state is followed using numerical methods.

  11. Giant disk galaxies : Where environment trumps mass in galaxy evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtois, Helene M.; Zaritsky, Dennis; Sorce, Jenny G.; Pomarede, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    We identify some of the most HI massive and fastest rotating disk galaxies in the local universe with the aim of probing the processes that drive the formation of these extreme disk galaxies. By combining data from the Cosmic Flows project, which has consistently reanalyzed archival galaxy HI profiles, and 3.6 micron photometry obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope, with which we can measure stellar mass, we use the baryonic Tully-Fisher relationship to explore whether these massive galaxies are distinct.We discuss several results, but the most striking is the systematic offset of the HI-massive sample above the baryonic Tully-Fisher. These galaxies have both more gas and more stars in their disks than the typical disk galaxy of similar rotational velocity. The ``condensed" baryon fraction, fC, the fraction of the baryons in a dark matter halo that settle either as cold gas or stars into the disk, is twice as high in the HI-massive sample than typical, and almost reaches the universal baryon fraction in some cases, suggesting that the most extreme of these galaxies have little in the way of a hot baryonic component or cold baryons distributed well outside the disk. In contrast, the star formation efficiency, measured as the ratio of the mass in stars to that in both stars and gas, shows no difference between the HI-massive sample and the typical disk galaxies. We conclude that the star formation efficiency is driven by an internal, self-regulating process, while fC is affected by external factors. Neither the morphology nor the star formation rate of these galaxies is primarily determined by either their dark or stellar mass. We also found that the most massive HI detected galaxies are located preferentially in filaments. We present the first evidence of an environmental effect on galaxy evolution using a dynamical definition of a filament.

  12. Rotational Velocities of B Stars in the Outer Galactic Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmany, Catharine D.; Glaspey, J. W.; Bensby, T.; Daflon, S.; Cunha, K.; Oey, M. S.; Wolff, S. C.

    2010-01-01

    Metallicity gradients in the Milky Way disk are important constraints to models of chemical evolution and galaxy formation. As part of a long term project to better constrain the galactic metallicity gradient (Daflon & Cunha) we have obtained spectra of early B stars in the outer disk with the Magellan 6.5m (Clay) and MIKE double echelle spectrograph. We present herein a preliminary analysis of the projected rotational velocities (v sin i), for 150 early B stars in the third galactic quadrant. The stars were selected from the Case-Hamburg Catalog of Luminous Stars (Reed, 2005). Distances have been computed from the reddening-free Q parameter and published Mv values. We use the spectral type information in the catalog to further refine distances of the non-main sequence B stars in our sample. We have followed the method described by Daflon et al (2007) to estimate v sin i for these stars from their He I lines. These stars are primarily field B stars, with galactocentric distances between 8 and 16 kpc, and most of them lie outside dense clusters and associations. Our analysis will address two questions: 1) Is there any evidence for a difference in mean rotation rate as a function of galactocentric distance and/or metallicity; and 2) Do these stars have on average low rotation rates, as seem to characterize stars in the field and in expanding associations near the Sun (Wolff, et al. 2007).

  13. Steady, Near-exponential Galaxy Disks Produced by Scattering Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struck, Curtis; Elmegreen, Bruce

    2016-05-01

    Exponential surface brightness profiles are ubiquitous in galaxy disks over a wide range of Hubble types and masses. Radial migration and scattering via bars, waves, clumps and satellites have been discussed as causes, but most of these cannot account for the full range of the phenomenon. Numerical models of clump scattering show that this process can produce near-exponential or core-Sérsic profiles in a variety of circumstances, also suggesting a connection to bulge and elliptical galaxy profiles. Density profile forms do not depend on the specifics of the scattering processes, but stellar kinematics and profile evolution rates do. Analytic models, with a power-law times a Sérsic profile form, can satisfy Jeans equations in cases dominated by either halo potentials (outer disk) or self-gravity (inner disk).

  14. OUTER-DISK POPULATIONS IN NGC 7793: EVIDENCE FOR STELLAR RADIAL MIGRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Radburn-Smith, David J.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Roskar, Rok; Debattista, Victor P.; Streich, David; De Jong, Roelof S.; Vlajic, Marija; Holwerda, Benne W.; Purcell, Chris W.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Zucker, Daniel B.

    2012-07-10

    We analyzed the radial surface brightness profile of the spiral galaxy NGC 7793 using HST/ACS images from the GHOSTS survey and a new HST/WFC3 image across the disk break. We used the photometry of resolved stars to select distinct populations covering a wide range of stellar ages. We found breaks in the radial profiles of all stellar populations at 280'' ({approx}5.1 kpc). Beyond this disk break, the profiles become steeper for younger populations. This same trend is seen in numerical simulations where the outer disk is formed almost entirely by radial migration. We also found that the older stars of NGC 7793 extend significantly farther than the underlying H I disk. They are thus unlikely to have formed entirely at their current radii, unless the gas disk was substantially larger in the past. These observations thus provide evidence for substantial stellar radial migration in late-type disks.

  15. Rotational instability in the outer region of protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Tomohiro; Nomura, Hideko; Takeuchi, Taku

    2014-05-20

    We analytically calculate the marginally stable surface density profile for the rotational instability of protoplanetary disks. The derived profile can be utilized for considering the region in a rotating disk where radial pressure gradient force is comparable to the gravitational force, such as an inner edge, steep gaps or bumps, and an outer region of the disk. In this paper, we particularly focus on the rotational instability in the outer region of disks. We find that a protoplanetary disk with a surface density profile of similarity solution becomes rotationally unstable at a certain radius, depending on its temperature profile and a mass of the central star. If the temperature is relatively low and the mass of the central star is high, disks have rotationally stable similarity profiles. Otherwise, deviation from the similarity profiles of surface density could be observable, using facilities with high sensitivity, such as ALMA.

  16. Internal and environmental secular evolution of disk galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kormendy, John

    2015-03-01

    that are available to them. They do this by spreading - the inner parts shrink while the outer parts expand. Significant changes happen only if some process efficiently transports energy or angular momentum outward. The consequences are very general: evolution by spreading happens in stars, star clusters, protostellar and protoplanetary disks, black hole accretion disks and galaxy disks. This meeting is about disk galaxies, so the evolution most often involves the redistribution of angular momentum. We now have a good heuristic understanding of how nonaxisymmetric structures rearrange disk gas into outer rings, inner rings and stuff dumped onto the center. Numerical simulations reproduce observed morphologies very well. Gas that is transported to small radii reaches high densities that are seen in CO observations. Star formation rates measured (e.g.) in the mid-infrared show that many barred and oval galaxies grow, on timescales of a few Gyr, dense central `pseudobulges' that are frequently mistaken for classical (elliptical-galaxy-like) bulges but that were grown slowly out of the disk (not made rapidly by major mergers). Our resulting picture of secular evolution accounts for the richness observed in morphological classification schemes such as those of de Vaucouleurs (1959) and Sandage (1961). State-of-the art morphology discussions include the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxies (Buta et al. 2007) and Buta (2012, 2013). Pseudobulges as disk-grown alternatives to merger-built classical bulges are important because they impact many aspects of our understanding of galaxy evolution. For example, they are observed to contain supermassive black holes (BHs), but they do not show the well known, tight correlations between BH mass and host properties (Kormendy et al. 2011). We can distinguish between classical and pseudo bulges because the latter retain a `memory' of their disky origin. That is, they have one or more characteristics of disks: (1) flatter shapes than those of

  17. EXTENDED ULTRAVIOLET DISKS AND ULTRAVIOLET-BRIGHT DISKS IN LOW-MASS E/S0 GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Moffett, Amanda J.; Kannappan, Sheila J.; Baker, Andrew J.; Laine, Seppo

    2012-01-20

    We have identified 15 extended ultraviolet (XUV) disks in a largely field sample of 38 E/S0 galaxies that have stellar masses primarily below {approx}4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} and comparable numbers on the red and blue sequences. We use a new purely quantitative XUV-disk definition designed with reference to the 'Type 1' XUV-disk definition found in the literature, requiring UV extension relative to a UV-defined star formation threshold radius. The 39% {+-} 9% XUV-disk frequency for these E/S0s is roughly twice the {approx}20% reported for late-type galaxies (although differences in XUV-disk criteria complicate the comparison), possibly indicating that XUV disks are preferentially associated with galaxies experiencing weak or inefficient star formation. Consistent with this interpretation, we find that the XUV disks in our sample do not correlate with enhanced outer-disk star formation as traced by blue optical outer-disk colors. However, UV-Bright (UV-B) disk galaxies with blue UV colors outside their optical 50% light radii do display enhanced optical outer-disk star formation as well as enhanced atomic gas content. UV-B disks occur in our E/S0s with a 42{sup +9}{sub -8}% frequency and need not coincide with XUV disks; thus their combined frequency is 61% {+-} 9%. For both XUV and UV-B disks, UV colors typically imply <1 Gyr ages, and most such disks extend beyond the optical R{sub 25} radius. XUV disks occur over the full sample mass range and on both the red and blue sequences, suggesting an association with galaxy interactions or another similarly general evolutionary process. In contrast, UV-B disks favor the blue sequence and may also prefer low masses, perhaps reflecting the onset of cold-mode gas accretion or another mass-dependent evolutionary process. Virtually all blue E/S0s in the gas-rich regime below stellar mass M{sub t} {approx} 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} (the 'gas-richness threshold mass') display UV-B disks

  18. Sinking Satellites and Tilting Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Siqin

    I perform fully self-consistent disk+halo+satellite N-body simulations to investigate the dynamical interaction between a disk galaxy and an infalling satellite. In particular, I study the following three different dynamical responses of the disk to the infalling satellite: tilting, warping, and thickening, as well as the dynamical effects of the parent galaxy on the infalling satellite: orbital decay and tidal disruption. The model in this thesis is characterized with two cosmologically significant improvements. First, the satellite starts at a distance more than three times of the radius of the optical disk. This ensures a realistic interaction among the satellite, the disk, and the halo in the course of the satellite infall. Secondly, evolution of the structure and velocity ellipsoid of the disk due to internal heating is allowed. I study the commonly arising case of satellites having density profiles comparable to that of the parent galaxy in contrast to that of compact satellites considered in previous work. I find that a disk is mainly tilted rather than heated by infalling satellites. Satellites of 10%, 20%, and 30% of the disk mass tilt the disk by angles of (2.9 ± 0.3)o,/ (6.3 ± 0.1)o, and (10.6 ± 0.2)o, respectively. However, only 3.4%, 6.9%, and 11.1% of the orbital angular momentum is transferred to the parent galaxy. The kinetic energy associated with the vertical motion in the initial coordinate frame of the disk is increased by (6 ± 3)%, (26 ± 3)%, and (51 ± 5)%, respectively, whereas the corresponding thermal energy associated with the vertical random motion in the tilted coordinate frame is only increased by (4 ± 3)%, (6 ± 2)%, and (10 ± 2)%, respectively. I find that satellites are mainly accreted onto the parent halo. Satellites having up to 20% of the disk mass produce no observable thickening, whereas a satellite with 30% of the disk mass produces little observable thickening inside the half-mass radius of the disk but significant

  19. Stellar evolution in the outer Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczerba, Ryszard; Siódmiak, Natasza; Leśniewska, Aleksandra; Karska, Agata; Sewiło, Marta

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the distribution of different classes of spectroscopically identified sources and theoretical models in the color-color diagrams (CCDs) combining the near-infrared (NIR) and mid-infrared (MIR) data to develop a method to classify Outer Galaxy sources detected with the Spitzer Space Telescope (hereafter Spitzer) SMOG survey in the IRAC 3.68.0 µm and MIPS 24 µm bands. We supplement the Spitzer data with the data from other satellite and ground-based surveys. The main goal of our study is to discover and characterize the population of intermediate- and low-mass young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Outer Galaxy and use it to study star formation in a significantly different environment than the Galaxy inside the solar circle. Since the YSOs can be confused with evolved stars in the MIR, these classes of objects need to be carefully separated. Here we present the initial results of our analysis using the Ks-[8.0] vs. Ks-[24] CCD as an example. The evolved stars separated from YSOs in the YSO selection process will be investigated in detail in the follow-up study.

  20. Physical properties of molecular clouds in the southern outer Galaxy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, J.; Alvarez, H.; Bronfman, L.

    1997-11-01

    We have used a deep CO survey of the third galactic quadrant (May et al., 1993A&AS...99..105M) to derive the physical properties of molecular clouds in the outer Galaxy. Within the range of this survey, from 194° to 270° in galactic longitude, 177 molecular clouds have been identified beyond 2kpc from the Sun. Distances have been determined kinematically using the rotation curve of Brand (1986, Ph.D. Thesis, University of Leiden) with Rsun_=8.5kpc and {THETA}sun_=220km/s. Power-law relations between line widths and sizes of the clouds, and between their densities and sizes have been found, although they do not fulfill exactly the requirements to be in virial equilibrium. Adopting a CO luminosity-to-H_2_ conversion factor X=3.8x10^20^molecules/cm^2^/(K.km/s), the derived M_CO_ masses statistically agree with the virial masses. The derived size and mass distributions show that the clouds are smaller, less massive and with narrower lines than those in the inner Galaxy. However, the mass spectrum for the clouds in our sample with masses >=2.5x10^4^Msun_ has a slope -1.45 which is similar to that found for inner Galaxy clouds. The warping and flaring of the outer molecular disk is clearly delineated.

  1. SPATIALLY CORRELATED CLUSTER POPULATIONS IN THE OUTER DISK OF NGC 3184

    SciTech Connect

    Herbert-Fort, Stephane; Zaritsky, Dennis; Christlein, Daniel; Wilcots, Eric; Baruffolo, Andrea; Ragazzoni, Roberto; DiPaola, Andrea; Fontana, Adriano; Giallongo, Emanuele; Pogge, Richard W.; Smareglia, Riccardo

    2009-08-01

    We use deep ({approx}27.5 mag V-band point-source limiting magnitude) V- and U-band Large Binocular Telescope imaging to study the outer disk (beyond the optical radius R {sub 25}) of the non-interacting, face-on spiral galaxy NGC 3184 (D = 11.1 Mpc; R {sub 25} = 11.1 kpc) and find that this outer disk contains >1000 objects (or marginally resolved 'knots') resembling star clusters with masses {approx}10{sup 2}-10{sup 4} M {sub sun} and ages up to {approx}1 Gyr. We find statistically significant numbers of these cluster-like knots extending to {approx}1.4 R {sub 25}, with the redder knots outnumbering bluer at the largest radii. We measure clustering among knots and find significant correlation to galactocentric radii of 1.5 R {sub 25} for knot separations <1 kpc. The effective integrated surface brightness of this outer disk cluster population ranges from 30-32 mag arcsec{sup -2} in V. We compare the H I extent to that of the correlated knots and find that the clusters extend at least to the damped Lyman-{alpha} threshold of H I column density (2 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -2}; {approx}1.62 R {sub 25}). The blue knots are correlated with H I spiral structure to {approx}1.5 R {sub 25}, while the red knots may be correlated with the outer fringes of the H I disk to {approx}1.7 R {sub 25}. These results suggest that outer disks are well populated, common, and long-lasting features of many nearby disk galaxies.

  2. Spatially Correlated Cluster Populations in the Outer Disk of NGC 3184

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbert-Fort, Stéphane; Zaritsky, Dennis; Moustakas, John; Christlein, Daniel; Wilcots, Eric; Baruffolo, Andrea; Di Paola, Andrea; Fontana, Adriano; Giallongo, Emanuele; Pogge, Richard W.; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Smareglia, Riccardo

    2009-08-01

    We use deep (~27.5 mag V-band point-source limiting magnitude) V- and U-band Large Binocular Telescope imaging to study the outer disk (beyond the optical radius R 25) of the non-interacting, face-on spiral galaxy NGC 3184 (D = 11.1 Mpc; R 25 = 11.1 kpc) and find that this outer disk contains >1000 objects (or marginally resolved "knots") resembling star clusters with masses ~102-104 M sun and ages up to ~1 Gyr. We find statistically significant numbers of these cluster-like knots extending to ~1.4 R 25, with the redder knots outnumbering bluer at the largest radii. We measure clustering among knots and find significant correlation to galactocentric radii of 1.5 R 25 for knot separations <1 kpc. The effective integrated surface brightness of this outer disk cluster population ranges from 30-32 mag arcsec-2 in V. We compare the H I extent to that of the correlated knots and find that the clusters extend at least to the damped Lyman-α threshold of H I column density (2 × 1020 cm-2; ~1.62 R 25). The blue knots are correlated with H I spiral structure to ~1.5 R 25, while the red knots may be correlated with the outer fringes of the H I disk to ~1.7 R 25. These results suggest that outer disks are well populated, common, and long-lasting features of many nearby disk galaxies.

  3. HERSCHEL OBSERVATIONS OF THE T CHA TRANSITION DISK: CONSTRAINING THE OUTER DISK PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Cieza, Lucas A.; Olofsson, Johan; Henning, Thomas; Harvey, Paul M.; Evans II, Neal J.; Pinte, Christophe; Augereau, Jean-Charles; Menard, Francois; Najita, Joan

    2011-11-10

    T Cha is a nearby (d {approx} 100 pc) transition disk known to have an optically thin gap separating optically thick inner and outer disk components. Huelamo et al. recently reported the presence of a low-mass object candidate within the gap of the T Cha disk, giving credence to the suspected planetary origin of this gap. Here we present the Herschel photometry (70, 160, 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m) of T Cha from the 'Dust, Ice, and Gas in Time' Key Program, which bridges the wavelength range between existing Spitzer and millimeter data and provide important constraints on the outer disk properties of this extraordinary system. We model the entire optical to millimeter wavelength spectral energy distribution (SED) of T Cha (19 data points between 0.36 and 3300 {mu}m without any major gaps in wavelength coverage). T Cha shows a steep spectral slope in the far-IR, which we find clearly favors models with outer disks containing little or no dust beyond {approx}40 AU. The full SED can be modeled equally well with either an outer disk that is very compact (only a few AU wide) or a much larger one that has a very steep surface density profile. That is, T Cha's outer disk seems to be either very small or very tenuous. Both scenarios suggest a highly unusual outer disk and have important but different implications for the nature of T Cha. Spatially resolved images are needed to distinguish between the two scenarios.

  4. Outer-disk reddening and gas-phase metallicities: The CALIFA connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, R. A.; Gil de Paz, A.; Sánchez, S. F.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; Cardiel, N.; Castillo-Morales, A.; Pascual, S.; Vílchez, J.; Kehrig, C.; Mollá, M.; Mendez-Abreu, J.; Catalán-Torrecilla, C.; Florido, E.; Perez, I.; Ruiz-Lara, T.; Ellis, S.; López-Sánchez, A. R.; González Delgado, R. M.; de Lorenzo-Cáceres, A.; García-Benito, R.; Galbany, L.; Zibetti, S.; Cortijo, C.; Kalinova, V.; Mast, D.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Papaderos, P.; Walcher, C. J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.

    2016-01-01

    We study, for the first time in a statistically significant and well-defined sample, the relation between the outer-disk ionized-gas metallicity gradients and the presence of breaks in the surface brightness profiles of disk galaxies. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) g'- and r'-band surface brightness, (g' - r') color, and ionized-gasoxygen abundance profiles for 324 galaxies within the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area (CALIFA) survey are used for this purpose. We perform a detailed light-profile classification, finding that 84% of our disks show down- or up-bending profiles (Type II and Type III, respectively), while the remaining 16% are well fitted by one single exponential (Type I). The analysis of the color gradients at both sides of this break shows a U-shaped profile for most Type II galaxies with an average minimum (g' - r') color of ~0.5 mag and an ionized-gas metallicity flattening associated with it only in the case of low-mass galaxies. Comparatively, more massive systems show a rather uniform negative metallicity gradient. The correlation between metallicity flattening and stellar mass for these systems results in p-values as low as 0.01. Independent of the mechanism having shaped the outer light profiles of these galaxies, stellar migration or a previous episode of star formation in a shrinking star-forming disk, it is clear that the imprint in their ionized-gas metallicity was different for low- and high-mass Type II galaxies. In the case of Type III disks, a positive correlation between the change in color and abundance gradient is found (the null hypothesis is ruled out with a p-value of 0.02), with the outer disks of Type III galaxies with masses ≤1010 M⊙ showing a weak color reddening or even a bluing. This is interpreted as primarily due to a mass downsizing effect on the population of Type III galaxies that recently experienced an enhanced inside-out growth.

  5. Warped Disks and Inclined Rings around Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casertano, Stefano; Sackett, Penny D.; Briggs, Franklin H.

    2006-11-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; Workshop participants; Group photograph; 1. The intergalactic HI supply F. Briggs; 2. Neutral gas infall into NGC 628 J. Kamphuis and F. Briggs; 3. VLA HI observations of the radio galaxy Centaurus A J. M. van der Hulst, J. H. van Gorkom, A. D. Haschick and A. D. Tubbs; 4. A geometric model for the dust-band of Centaurus A R. A. Nicholson, K. Taylor and J. Bland; 5. The circumgalactic ring of gas in Leo S. E. Schneider; 6. Using gas kinematics to measure M/L in elliptical galaxies T. de Zeeuw; 7. Velocity fields of disks in triaxial potentials P. J. Teuben; 8. Modeling the atomic gas in NGC 4278 J. F. Lees; 9. A few statistics from the catalog of polar-ring galaxies B. C. Whitmore; 10. Dynamics of polar rings L. S. Sparke; 11. Mergers and the structure of disk galaxies L. Hernquist; 12. Formation of polar rings H.-W. Rix and N. Katz; 13. Gas-dynamical models of settling disks D. Christodoulou and J. E. Tohline; 14. Evolutionary processes affecting galactic accretion disks T. Steiman-Cameron; 15. Particle simulations of polar rings T. Quinn; 16. A bending instability in prolate stellar systems D. Merritt; 17. The Milky Way: lopsided or barred? K. Kuijken; 18. Merger origin of starburst galaxies L. Hernquist; 19. Warped and flaring HI disks A. Bosma; 20. Behaviour of warps in extended disks F. Briggs and J. Kamphuis; 21. Observational constraints for the explanation of warps E. Battaner, E. Florido, M.-L. Sanchez-Saavedra and M. Prieto; 22. Warps in S0s: observations versus theories G. Galletta; 23. Warps and bulges J. Pitesky; 24. Time evolution of galactic warps P. Hofner and L. S. Sparke; 25. Are warps normal modes? S. Casertano; 26. Disk warping in a slewing potential E. C. Ostriker; 27. Concluding discussion Moderator: K. C. Freeman; Name index; Object index; Subject index.

  6. Warped Disks and Inclined Rings around Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casertano, Stefano; Sackett, Penny D.; Briggs, Franklin H.

    1991-05-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; Workshop participants; Group photograph; 1. The intergalactic HI supply F. Briggs; 2. Neutral gas infall into NGC 628 J. Kamphuis and F. Briggs; 3. VLA HI observations of the radio galaxy Centaurus A J. M. van der Hulst, J. H. van Gorkom, A. D. Haschick and A. D. Tubbs; 4. A geometric model for the dust-band of Centaurus A R. A. Nicholson, K. Taylor and J. Bland; 5. The circumgalactic ring of gas in Leo S. E. Schneider; 6. Using gas kinematics to measure M/L in elliptical galaxies T. de Zeeuw; 7. Velocity fields of disks in triaxial potentials P. J. Teuben; 8. Modeling the atomic gas in NGC 4278 J. F. Lees; 9. A few statistics from the catalog of polar-ring galaxies B. C. Whitmore; 10. Dynamics of polar rings L. S. Sparke; 11. Mergers and the structure of disk galaxies L. Hernquist; 12. Formation of polar rings H.-W. Rix and N. Katz; 13. Gas-dynamical models of settling disks D. Christodoulou and J. E. Tohline; 14. Evolutionary processes affecting galactic accretion disks T. Steiman-Cameron; 15. Particle simulations of polar rings T. Quinn; 16. A bending instability in prolate stellar systems D. Merritt; 17. The Milky Way: lopsided or barred? K. Kuijken; 18. Merger origin of starburst galaxies L. Hernquist; 19. Warped and flaring HI disks A. Bosma; 20. Behaviour of warps in extended disks F. Briggs and J. Kamphuis; 21. Observational constraints for the explanation of warps E. Battaner, E. Florido, M.-L. Sanchez-Saavedra and M. Prieto; 22. Warps in S0s: observations versus theories G. Galletta; 23. Warps and bulges J. Pitesky; 24. Time evolution of galactic warps P. Hofner and L. S. Sparke; 25. Are warps normal modes? S. Casertano; 26. Disk warping in a slewing potential E. C. Ostriker; 27. Concluding discussion Moderator: K. C. Freeman; Name index; Object index; Subject index.

  7. Internal and environmental secular evolution of disk galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kormendy, John

    2015-03-01

    that are available to them. They do this by spreading - the inner parts shrink while the outer parts expand. Significant changes happen only if some process efficiently transports energy or angular momentum outward. The consequences are very general: evolution by spreading happens in stars, star clusters, protostellar and protoplanetary disks, black hole accretion disks and galaxy disks. This meeting is about disk galaxies, so the evolution most often involves the redistribution of angular momentum. We now have a good heuristic understanding of how nonaxisymmetric structures rearrange disk gas into outer rings, inner rings and stuff dumped onto the center. Numerical simulations reproduce observed morphologies very well. Gas that is transported to small radii reaches high densities that are seen in CO observations. Star formation rates measured (e.g.) in the mid-infrared show that many barred and oval galaxies grow, on timescales of a few Gyr, dense central `pseudobulges' that are frequently mistaken for classical (elliptical-galaxy-like) bulges but that were grown slowly out of the disk (not made rapidly by major mergers). Our resulting picture of secular evolution accounts for the richness observed in morphological classification schemes such as those of de Vaucouleurs (1959) and Sandage (1961). State-of-the art morphology discussions include the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxies (Buta et al. 2007) and Buta (2012, 2013). Pseudobulges as disk-grown alternatives to merger-built classical bulges are important because they impact many aspects of our understanding of galaxy evolution. For example, they are observed to contain supermassive black holes (BHs), but they do not show the well known, tight correlations between BH mass and host properties (Kormendy et al. 2011). We can distinguish between classical and pseudo bulges because the latter retain a `memory' of their disky origin. That is, they have one or more characteristics of disks: (1) flatter shapes than those of

  8. When did Round Disk Galaxies Form?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, T. M.; Ohta, K.; Yuma, S.; Yabe, K.

    2015-03-01

    When and how galaxy morphology, such as the disk and bulge seen in the present-day universe, emerged is still not clear. In the universe at z >~ 2, galaxies with various morphologies are seen, and star-forming galaxies at z ~ 2 show the intrinsic shape of bar-like structures. Then, when did the round disk structure form? Here we take a simple and straightforward approach to see the epoch when a round disk galaxy population emerged by constraining the intrinsic shape statistically based on the apparent axial ratio distribution of galaxies. We derived the distributions of the apparent axial ratios in the rest-frame optical light (~5000 Å) of star-forming main-sequence galaxies at 2.5 > z > 1.4, 1.4 > z > 0.85, and 0.85 > z > 0.5, and found that their apparent axial ratios show peaky distributions at z >~ 0.85, while a rather flat distribution at the lower redshift. By using a tri-axial model (A > B > C) for the intrinsic shape, we found that the best-fit models give the peaks of the B/A distribution of 0.81 ± 0.04, 0.84 ± 0.04, and 0.92 ± 0.05 at 2.5 > z > 1.4, 1.4 > z > 0.85, and 0.85 > z > 0.5, respectively. The last value is close to the local value of 0.95. Thickness (C/A) is ~0.25 at all the redshifts and is close to the local value (0.21). The results indicate that the shape of the star-forming galaxies in the main sequence changes gradually, and that the round disk is established at around z ~ 0.9. The establishment of the round disk may be due to the cessation of a violent interaction between galaxies or the growth of a bulge and/or a supermassive black hole residing at the center of a galaxy that dissolves the bar structure.

  9. FORMATION OF MASSIVE GALAXIES AT HIGH REDSHIFT: COLD STREAMS, CLUMPY DISKS, AND COMPACT SPHEROIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Dekel, Avishai; Sari, Re'em; Ceverino, Daniel E-mail: sari@phys.huji.ac.i

    2009-09-20

    We present a simple theoretical framework for massive galaxies at high redshift, where the main assembly and star formation occurred, and report on the first cosmological simulations that reveal clumpy disks consistent with our analysis. The evolution is governed by the interplay between smooth and clumpy cold streams, disk instability, and bulge formation. Intense, relatively smooth streams maintain an unstable dense gas-rich disk. Instability with high turbulence and giant clumps, each a few percent of the disk mass, is self-regulated by gravitational interactions within the disk. The clumps migrate into a bulge in {approx}<10 dynamical times, or {approx}<0.5 Gyr. The cosmological streams replenish the draining disk and prolong the clumpy phase to several Gigayears in a steady state, with comparable masses in disk, bulge, and dark matter within the disk radius. The clumps form stars in dense subclumps following the overall accretion rate, {approx}100 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, and each clump converts into stars in {approx}0.5 Gyr. While the clumps coalesce dissipatively to a compact bulge, the star-forming disk is extended because the incoming streams keep the outer disk dense and susceptible to instability and because of angular momentum transport. Passive spheroid-dominated galaxies form when the streams are more clumpy: the external clumps merge into a massive bulge and stir up disk turbulence that stabilize the disk and suppress in situ clump and star formation. We predict a bimodality in galaxy type by z {approx} 3, involving giant-clump star-forming disks and spheroid-dominated galaxies of suppressed star formation. After z {approx} 1, the disks tend to be stabilized by the dominant stellar disks and bulges. Most of the high-z massive disks are likely to end up as today's early-type galaxies.

  10. Dark Halo and Disk Galaxy Scaling Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, J. F.

    I highlight recent progress in our understanding of the origin of disk galaxy scaling laws in a hierarchically clustering universe. Numerical simulations of galaxy formation in Cold Dark Matter (CDM) dominated universes indicate that the slope and scatter of the I-band Tully-Fisher (TF) relation are well reproduced in this model, although not, as proposed in recent work, because of the cosmological equivalence between halo mass and circular velocity, but rather as a result of the dynamical response of the halo to the assembly of the luminous component of the galaxy. The zero-point of the TF relation is determined mainly by the stellar mass-to-light ratio (ΥI) as well as by the concentration (c) of the dark halo. For c ~ 10, as is typical of halos formed in the `concordance' ΛCDM model, we find that this requires ΥI ~ 1.5, in reasonable agreement with the mass-to-light ratios expected of stellar populations with colors similar to those of TF galaxies. This conclusion supersedes that of Navarro & Steinmetz (2000a,b), who claimed the ΛCDM halos were too concentrated to be consistent with the observed TF relation. The disagreement can be traced to an incorrect normalization of the power spectrum used in that work. Our new results show that simulated disk galaxies in the ΛCDM scenario are not clearly inconsistent with the observed I-band Tully-Fisher relation. On the other hand, their angular momenta is much lower than observed. Accounting simultaneously for the spin, size and luminosity of disk galaxies remains a challenge for hierarchical models of galaxy formation.

  11. The Edge-On Perspective of Bulgeless, Simple Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kautsch, Stefan J.

    2009-12-01

    This review focuses on flat and superthin galaxies. These are edge-on bulgeless galaxies, which are composed of a simple, stellar disk. The properties of these simple disks are at the end of a continuum that extends smoothly from bulge-dominated disk galaxies to the pure disks. On average, simple disks are low-mass galaxies with low surface brightnesses, blue colors, and slow rotational velocities. Widely-accepted cosmological models of galaxy formation and evolution were challenged by a relatively large observed fraction of pure disk galaxies, and only very recent models can explain the existence of simple disk galaxies. This makes simple disks an optimal galaxy type for the study of galaxy formation in a hierarchical universe. They enable us to analyze the environmental and internal influence on galaxy evolution, to study the stability of the disks, and to explain the nature and distribution of dark matter in galaxies. This review summarizes the current status of edge-on simple disk galaxies in the universe.

  12. DISK GALAXIES WITH BROKEN LUMINOSITY PROFILES FROM COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Serrano, F. J.; Serna, A.; Domenech-Moral, M.; Dominguez-Tenreiro, R.

    2009-11-10

    We present smoothed particle hydrodynamics cosmological simulations of the formation of three disk galaxies with a detailed treatment of chemical evolution and cooling. The resulting galaxies have properties compatible with observations: relatively high disk-to-total ratios, thin stellar disks, and good agreement with the Tully-Fisher and the luminosity-size relations. They present a break in the luminosity profile at 3.0 +- 0.5 disk scale lengths while showing an exponential mass profile without any apparent breaks, which is in line with recent observational results. Since the stellar mass profile is exponential, only differences in the stellar populations can be the cause of the luminosity break. Although we find a cutoff for the star formation rate (SFR) imposed by a density threshold in our star formation model, it does not coincide with the luminosity break and is located at 4.3 +- 0.4 disk scale lengths, with star formation going on between both radii. The color profiles and the age profiles are 'U-shaped', with the minimum for both profiles located approximately at the break radius. The SFR to stellar mass ratio increases until the break, explaining the coincidence of the break with the minimum of the age profile. Beyond the break, we find a steep decline in the gas density and, consequently, a decline in the SFR and redder colors. We show that most stars (64%-78%) in the outer disk originate in the inner disk and afterward migrate there. Such stellar migrations are likely the main origin of the U-shaped age profile and, therefore, of the luminosity break.

  13. The Neutral Hydrogen Disk of ARP 10 (=VV 362): A Nonequilibrium Disk Associated with a Galaxy with Rings and Ripples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charmandaris, V.; Appleton, P. N.

    1996-04-01

    We present VLA H I and optical spectra of the peculiar galaxy Arp 10. Originally believed to be an example of a classical colliding ring galaxy with multiple rings, the new observations show a large disturbed neutral hydrogen disk extending 2.7 times the radius of the bright optical ring. We also present evidence for optical shells or ripples in the outer isophotes of the galaxy reminiscent of the ripples seen in some early type systems. The small elliptical originally believed to be the companion is shown to be a background galaxy. The H I disk consists of two main parts: a very irregular outer structure, and a more regular inner disk associated with the main bright optical ring. In both cases, the H I structures do not exactly trace the optical morphology. In the outer parts, the H I distribution does not correlate well with the optical ripples. Even the inner H I disk does not correspond well morphologically nor kinematically to the optical rings. These peculiarities lead us to believe that the potential in which the H I disk resides is significantly out of equilibrium --- a situation which would inherently produce rings of star formation. We suggest that Arp 10 is the result of the intermediate stage of a merger between a large H I rich disk and a gas-poor disk system. As such, it may represent an example of a class of mergers which lies intermediate between the ``ripple and shell'' accretion systems and the head-on collisional ring galaxies.

  14. Long-time evolution of gas-free disk galaxies in binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, R.; Junqueira, S.

    2014-07-01

    We present the results of several detailed numerical N-body simulations of the dynamical interactions of two equal-mass disk galaxies. Both galaxies are embedded in spherical halos of dark matter and contain central bulges. Our analysis of the dynamical evolution of the binary system focuses on the morphological evolution of the stellar distribution of the disks. The satellite galaxy has coplanar or polar disk orientation in relation to the disk of the primary galaxy and their initial orbits are prograde eccentric (e = 0.1, e = 0.4 or e = 0.7). Both galaxies have mass and size similar to the Milky Way. We show that the merger of the two disk galaxies, depending on the relative orientation of the disks, can yield either a disk or lenticular remnant, instead of an elliptical one. These are the first reported simulations that show the formation of S0-like galaxies from protracted binary galaxy interactions. Additionally, we demonstrate that the time to merger increases linearly with the initial apocentric distance between the galaxies, and decreases with the initial orbital eccentricity. We also show that the tidal forces of the disks excite transient m = 1 and m = 2 wave modes, that is, lopsidedness, spiral arms, and bars. However, after the merging of the disks, these larger instabilities fade completely, and the remnant is thicker and more extended than the original disks. The maximum relative amplitude of these waves is at most about 15 times higher than the control case. The m = 2 wave mode is generated mainly by tidal interaction in the outer region of the disks. The m = 1 wave mode depends mostly on the interaction of the inner part of the disks, producing an off-centering effect of the wave mode center relative to the center of mass of the disk. These characteristics produce a time lag among the maximum formation of these two wave modes. Finally, the disk settles down quickly after the merger, in less than one outer disk rotation period.

  15. On the outer edges of protoplanetary dust disks

    SciTech Connect

    Birnstiel, Tilman; Andrews, Sean M. E-mail: sandrews@cfa.harvard.edu

    2014-01-10

    The expectation that aerodynamic drag will force the solids in a gas-rich protoplanetary disk to spiral in toward the host star on short timescales is one of the fundamental problems in planet formation theory. The nominal efficiency of this radial drift process is in conflict with observations, suggesting that an empirical calibration of solid transport mechanisms in a disk is highly desirable. However, the fact that both radial drift and grain growth produce a similar particle size segregation in a disk (such that larger particles are preferentially concentrated closer to the star) makes it difficult to disentangle a clear signature of drift alone. We highlight a new approach, by showing that radial drift leaves a distinctive 'fingerprint' in the dust surface density profile that is directly accessible to current observational facilities. Using an analytical framework for dust evolution, we demonstrate that the combined effects of drift and (viscous) gas drag naturally produce a sharp outer edge in the dust distribution (or, equivalently, a sharp decrease in the dust-to-gas mass ratio). This edge feature forms during the earliest phase in the evolution of disk solids, before grain growth in the outer disk has made much progress, and is preserved over longer timescales when both growth and transport effects are more substantial. The key features of these analytical models are reproduced in detailed numerical simulations, and are qualitatively consistent with recent millimeter-wave observations that find gas/dust size discrepancies and steep declines in dust continuum emission in the outer regions of protoplanetary disks.

  16. Atomic and Molecular Gas in Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Tony; Blitz, Leo; Kawamura, A.; Iritani, H.; Fukui, Y.

    Current knowledge of the radial distributions of atomic and molecular gas in disk galaxies is briefly reviewed. Almost all of our knowledge is based on observations of the Hi and CO lines at 21 cm and 2.6 mm wavelength, and some of the caveats associated with these methods are discussed. In nearby spiral galaxies the molecular gas fraction is observed to decrease with radius, which can be understood in terms of a decline in hydrostatic disk pressure. Within the LMC, the CO-Hi correlation shows considerable scatter on scales of ~50 pc, although a binning analysis shows a strong non-linear dependence of CO on Hi intensity. The implications for molecular cloud formation and star formation recipes are briefly discussed.

  17. DUST-DRIVEN WIND FROM DISK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Mahavir; Nath, Biman B.; Shchekinov, Yuri E-mail: biman@rri.res.in

    2011-08-01

    We study gaseous outflows from disk galaxies driven by radiation pressure on dust grains. We include the effect of bulge and dark matter halo and show that the existence of such an outflow implies a maximum value of disk mass-to-light ratio. We show that the terminal wind speed is proportional to the disk rotation speed in the limit of a cold gaseous outflow, and that in general there is a contribution from the gas sound speed. Using the mean opacity of dust grains and the evolution of the luminosity of a simple stellar population, we then show that the ratio of the wind terminal speed (v{sub {infinity}}) to the galaxy rotation speed (v{sub c}) ranges between 2 and 3 for a period of {approx}10 Myr after a burst of star formation, after which it rapidly decays. This result is independent of any free parameter and depends only on the luminosity of the stellar population and the relation between disk and dark matter halo parameters. We briefly discuss the possible implications of our results.

  18. Disk Galaxy Warp Formation via Close Encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeonghwan; Peirani, S.; Kim, S.; Yoon, S.

    2012-01-01

    Warped disks appear to be ubiquitous among spiral galaxies. We present a new scenario for the warp formation, in which galactic fly-by encounters are main drivers of the warp structure. Based on N-body simulation using a publicly available code Gadget2, we investigate morphological and kinematical structures of disk galaxies while the galaxies are undergoing fly-by encounters with adjacent dark matter halos. In this study, we find that warps can be excited by impulsive encounters and sustained for a few billion years. We also find that encounters cause the initially spherical halos to deform into intricate shape halos at the inner regions where warps are generated. Most of the warps from the simulation show inclination angles that are comparable to the observations. The creation of warps, their inclination and their lifetimes are governed primarily by the following three parameters: the impact parameter (the minimum distance between two halos), the mass ratio between two galaxies, and the incoming angle of the intruder. We discuss pros and cons about our alternative scenario in comparison with existing explanations.

  19. Far Outer Galaxy H II Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudolph, A. L.; deGues, E. J.; Brand, J.; Wouterloot, J. G. A.; Gross, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We have made a multifrequency (6, 3.6, and 2 cm), high-resolution (3"-6"), radio continuum survey of IRAS selected sources from the catalogue of Wouterloot & Brand (1989) to search for and study H II regions in the far outer Galaxy. We identified 31 sources in this catalog with well determined galactocentric distances, and with R approx.. greater than 15 kpc and L(sub FIR) approx.greater than 10(exp 4) solar luminosity, indicating the presence of high-mass star-formation. We have observed 11 of these sources with the Very Large Array (VLA). We observed the sources at 6 and 2 cm using "scaled arrays", making possible a direct and reliable comparison of the data at these two wavelengths for the determination of spectral indices. We detected a total of 12 radio sources, of which 10 have spectral indices consistent with optically-thin free-free emission from H II regions. Combined with previous VLA observations by other investigators, we have data on a total of 15 H II regions at galactocentric distances of 15 to 18.2kpc, among the most remote H II regions found in our Galaxy. The sizes of the H II regions range from approx. less than 0.10 to 2.3 pc. Using the measured fluxes and sizes, we determine the electron densities, emission measures, and excitation parameters of the H II regions, as well as the fluxes of Lyman continuum photons needed to keep the nebulae ionized. The sizes and electron densities are consistent with most of the sources detected in this survey being compact or ultracompact H II regions. Seven of the fifteen H II regions have sizes approx. less than 0.20 pc. Assuming simple pressure-driven expansion of the H II regions, these sizes indicate ages approx. less than 5 x 10(exp 4) yr, or only 1% of the lifetime of an O star, which implies an unlikely overabundance of O stars in the outer Galaxy. Thus, the large number of compact H II regions suggests that the time these regions spend in a compact phase must be much longer than their dynamical

  20. On the Holmberg asymmetry of the satellites of disk galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrd, Gene G.; Valtonen, Mauri J.

    1987-01-01

    A tidal explanation for the observation by Holmberg that the satellites of edge-on disk galaxies tend to avoid the sector within + or - 30 deg of the major axes of the disk galaxies is considered. It is shown that satellites with small orbit-to-disk inclinations are likely to become compact and consequently be left out in Holmberg's survey due to the resemblance to stars. The explanation is supported by the observation of an excess of compact galaxies near the major-axis direction of edge-on disk galaxies. The disk tidal explanation also predicts that the asymmetry should be weaker with larger satellites. It is found that the Karachentsev (1972, 1980) binary galaxy sample, where the typical companion is comparable to the primary galaxy, shows no Holmberg effect. The case of M32 as a compact satellite of the Andromeda galaxy is discussed as a nearby observationally supported example of the above processes.

  1. N-Body Simulations of Disk Galaxy Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Jeannette; Messick, Garrett; The, Lih-Sin

    2004-11-01

    We present results of N-body simulations for two interacting disk galaxies. The simulated galaxies are initially modeled with parameters fitting observations of the Milky Way Galaxy. We use a four-component model of a disk, dark matter halo, spheroid, and central concentration. In our present simulations, we neglect the gas component and associated star formation. Among our analysis, we address the question of member transference from one galaxy to another. We also examine the rate of member ejections from each disk system and final configurations after the disk interactions.

  2. Star formation rates and abundance gradients in disk galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Silk, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    Analytic models for the evolution of disk galaxies are presented, placing special emphasis on the radial properties. These models are straightforward extensions of the original Schmidt (1959, 1963) models, with a dependence of star formation rate on gas density. The models provide successful descriptions of several measures of galactic disk evolution, including solar neighborhood chemical evolution, the presence and amplitude of metallicity and color gradients in disk galaxies, and the global rates of star formation in disk galaxies, and aid in the understanding of the apparent connection between young and old stellar populations in spiral galaxies.

  3. Simulations of Disk Galaxy Formation in their Cosmological Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Simon D. M.

    2009-03-01

    Together with the discovery of the accelerated expansion of the present Universe and measurements of large-scale structure at low redshift, observations of the cosmic microwave background have established a standard paradigm in which all cosmic structure grew from small fluctuations generated at very early times in a flat universe which today consists of 72% dark energy, 23.5% dark matter and 4.5% ordinary baryons. The CMB sky provides us with a direct image of this universe when it was 400,000 years old and very nearly uniform. The galaxy formation problem is then to understand how observed galaxies with all their regularity and diversity arose from these very simple initial conditions. Although gravity is the prime driver, many physical processes appear to play an important role in this transformation, and direct numerical simulation has become the principal tool for detailed investigation of the complex and strongly nonlinear interactions between them. The evolution of structure in the gravitationally dominant Cold Dark Matter distribution can now be simulated in great detail, provided the effects of the baryons are ignored, and there is general consensus for the results on scales relevant to the formation of galaxies like our own. The basic nonlinear units are so-called “dark matter halos”, slowly rotating, triaxial, quasi-equilibrium systems with a universal cusped density profile and substantial substructure in the form of a host of much less massive subhalos which are concentrated primarily in their outer regions. Attempts to include the baryons, and so to model the formation of the visible parts of galaxies, have given much more diverse results. It has been known for 30 years that substantial feedback, presumably from stellar winds and supernovae, is required to prevent overcooling of gas and excessive star formation in the early stages of galaxy assembly. When realistic galaxy formation simulations first became possible in the early 1990's, this

  4. OUTSIDE-IN SHRINKING OF THE STAR-FORMING DISK OF DWARF IRREGULAR GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Hongxin; Hunter, Deidre A.; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Gao Yu; Schruba, Andreas E-mail: dah@lowell.edu E-mail: bge@us.ibm.com

    2012-02-15

    We have studied multi-band surface brightness profiles of a representative sample of 34 nearby dwarf irregular galaxies. Our data include Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) FUV/NUV, UBV, and H{alpha} and Spitzer 3.6 {mu}m images. These galaxies constitute the majority of the LITTLE THINGS survey (Local Irregulars That Trace Luminosity Extremes-The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey). By modeling the azimuthal averages of the spectral energy distributions with a complete library of star formation histories, we derived the stellar mass surface density distributions and the star formation rate averaged over three different timescales: the recent 0.1 Gyr, 1 Gyr, and a Hubble time. We find that, for {approx}80% (27 galaxies) of our sample galaxies, radial profiles (at least in the outer part) at shorter wavelengths, corresponding to younger stellar populations, have shorter disk scale lengths than those at longer wavelengths, corresponding to older stellar populations. This indicates that the star-forming disk has been shrinking. In addition, the radial distributions of the stellar mass surface density are well described as piece-wise exponential profiles, and {approx}80% of the galaxies have steeper mass profiles in the outer disk than in the inner region. The steep radial decline of the star formation rate in the outer parts compared to that in the inner disks gives a natural explanation for the down-bending stellar mass surface density profiles. Within the inner disks, our sample galaxies on average have constant ratios of recent star formation rate to stellar mass with radius. Nevertheless, {approx}35% (12 galaxies, among which 7 have baryonic mass {approx}<10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} ) of the sample exhibit negative slopes across the observed disk, which is in contrast with the so-called inside-out disk growth scenario suggested for luminous spiral galaxies. The tendency of star formation to become concentrated toward the inner disks in low-mass dwarf irregular galaxies is

  5. EXPONENTIAL GALAXY DISKS FROM STELLAR SCATTERING

    SciTech Connect

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Struck, Curtis E-mail: curt@iastate.edu

    2013-10-01

    Stellar scattering off of orbiting or transient clumps is shown to lead to the formation of exponential profiles in both surface density and velocity dispersion in a two-dimensional non-self gravitating stellar disk with a fixed halo potential. The exponential forms for both nearly flat rotation curves and near-solid-body rotation curves. The exponential does not depend on initial conditions, spiral arms, bars, viscosity, star formation, or strong shear. After a rapid initial development, the exponential saturates to an approximately fixed scale length. The inner exponential in a two-component profile has a break radius comparable to the initial disk radius; the outer exponential is primarily scattered stars.

  6. Resolving the stellar halos of six massive disk galaxies beyond the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monachesi, Antonela; Bell, Eric F.; Radburn-Smith, David J.; de Jong, Roelof S.; Bailin, Jeremy; Holwerda, Benne; Streich, David

    2016-08-01

    Models of galaxy formation in a hierarchical universe predict substantial scatter in the halo-to-halo stellar properties, owing to stochasticity in galaxies' merger histories. Currently, only few detailed observations of stellar halos are available, mainly for the Milky Way and M31. We present the stellar halo color/metallicity and density profiles of red giant branch stars out to ~60 kpc along the minor axis of six massive nearby Milky Way-like galaxies beyond the Local Group from the Galaxy Halos, Outer disks, Substructure, Thick disks and Star clusters (GHOSTS) HST survey. This enlargement of the sample of galaxies with observations of stellar halo properties is needed to understand the range of possible halo properties, i.e. not only the mean properties but also the halo-to-halo scatter, what a `typical' halo looks like, and how similar the Milky Way halo is to other halos beyond the Local Group.

  7. GHOSTS | Bulges, Halos, and the Resolved Stellar Outskirts of Massive Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, R. S.; Radburn-Smith, D. J.; Sick, J. N.

    2008-10-01

    In hierarchical galaxy formation the stellar halos of galaxies are formed by the accretion of minor satellites and therefore contain valuable information about the (early) assembly process of galaxies. Our GHOSTS survey measures the stellar envelope properties of 14 nearby disk galaxies by imaging their resolved stellar populations with HST/ACS and WFPC2. Most of the massive galaxies in the sample (V_{rot}>200 km s^{-1}) have very extended stellar envelopes with μ(r) ˜ r^{-2.5} power law profiles in the outer regions. For these massive galaxies there is some evidence that the stellar surface density of the profiles correlates with Hubble type and bulge-to-disk ratio, begging the question whether these envelopes are more related to bulges than to a Milky Way-type stellar halo. Smaller galaxies (V_{rot}˜100 km s^{-1}) have much smaller stellar envelopes, but depending on geometry, they could still be more luminous than expected from satellite remnants in hierarchical galaxy formation models. Alternatively, they could be created by disk heating through the bombardment of small dark matter sub-halos. We find that galaxies show varying amounts of halo substructure.

  8. Stellar Populations and Radial Migrations in Virgo Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roediger, Joel C.; Courteau, Stéphane; Sánchez-Blázquez, Patricia; McDonald, Michael

    2012-10-01

    We present new stellar age profiles, derived from well-resolved optical and near-infrared images of 64 Virgo cluster disk galaxies, whose analysis poses a challenge for current disk galaxy formation models. Our ability to break the age-metallicity degeneracy and the significant size of our sample represent key improvements over complementary studies of field disk galaxies. Our results can be summarized as follows: first, and contrary to observations of disk galaxies in the field, these cluster galaxies are distributed almost equally amongst the three main types of disk galaxy luminosity profiles (I/II/III), indicating that the formation and/or survival of Type II breaks is suppressed within the cluster environment. Second, we find examples of statistically significant inversions ("U-shapes") in the age profiles of all three disk galaxy types, reminiscent of predictions from high-resolution simulations of classically truncated Type II disks in the field. These features characterize the age profiles for only about a third (<=36%) of each disk galaxy type in our sample. An even smaller fraction of cluster disks (~11% of the total sample) exhibit age profiles that decrease outward (i.e., negative age gradients). Instead, flat and/or positive age gradients prevail (>=50%) within our Type I, II, and III subsamples. These observations thus suggest that while stellar migrations and inside-out growth can play a significant role in the evolution of all disk galaxy types, other factors contributing to the evolution of galaxies can overwhelm the predicted signatures of these processes. We interpret our observations through a scenario whereby Virgo cluster disk galaxies formed initially like their brethren in the field but which, upon falling into the cluster, were transformed into their present state through external processes linked to the environment (e.g., ram-pressure stripping and harassment). Current disk galaxy formation models, which have largely focused on field

  9. STELLAR POPULATIONS AND RADIAL MIGRATIONS IN VIRGO DISK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Roediger, Joel C.; Courteau, Stephane; Sanchez-Blazquez, Patricia; McDonald, Michael E-mail: courteau@astro.queensu.ca E-mail: mcdonald@space.mit.edu

    2012-10-10

    We present new stellar age profiles, derived from well-resolved optical and near-infrared images of 64 Virgo cluster disk galaxies, whose analysis poses a challenge for current disk galaxy formation models. Our ability to break the age-metallicity degeneracy and the significant size of our sample represent key improvements over complementary studies of field disk galaxies. Our results can be summarized as follows: first, and contrary to observations of disk galaxies in the field, these cluster galaxies are distributed almost equally amongst the three main types of disk galaxy luminosity profiles (I/II/III), indicating that the formation and/or survival of Type II breaks is suppressed within the cluster environment. Second, we find examples of statistically significant inversions ({sup U}-shapes{sup )} in the age profiles of all three disk galaxy types, reminiscent of predictions from high-resolution simulations of classically truncated Type II disks in the field. These features characterize the age profiles for only about a third ({<=}36%) of each disk galaxy type in our sample. An even smaller fraction of cluster disks ({approx}11% of the total sample) exhibit age profiles that decrease outward (i.e., negative age gradients). Instead, flat and/or positive age gradients prevail ({>=}50%) within our Type I, II, and III subsamples. These observations thus suggest that while stellar migrations and inside-out growth can play a significant role in the evolution of all disk galaxy types, other factors contributing to the evolution of galaxies can overwhelm the predicted signatures of these processes. We interpret our observations through a scenario whereby Virgo cluster disk galaxies formed initially like their brethren in the field but which, upon falling into the cluster, were transformed into their present state through external processes linked to the environment (e.g., ram-pressure stripping and harassment). Current disk galaxy formation models, which have largely

  10. THE EFFECTS OF EPISODIC STAR FORMATION ON THE FUV-NUV COLORS OF STAR FORMING REGIONS IN OUTER DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Kate L.; Van Zee, Liese; Dowell, Jayce D. E-mail: vanzee@astro.indiana.edu

    2013-09-20

    We run stellar population synthesis models to examine the effects of a recently episodic star formation history (SFH) on UV and Hα colors of star forming regions. Specifically, the SFHs we use are an episodic sampling of an exponentially declining star formation rate (SFR; τ model) and are intended to simulate the SFHs in the outer disks of spiral galaxies. To enable comparison between our models and observational studies of star forming regions in outer disks, we include in our models sensitivity limits that are based on recent deep UV and Hα observations in the literature. We find significant dispersion in the FUV-NUV colors of simulated star forming regions with frequencies of star formation episodes of 1 × 10{sup –8} to 4 × 10{sup –9} yr{sup –1}. The dispersion in UV colors is similar to that found in the outer disk of nearby spiral galaxies. As expected, we also find large variations in L{sub H{sub α}}/L{sub FUV}. We interpret our models within the context of inside-out disk growth, and find that a radially increasing τ and decreasing metallicity with an increasing radius will only produce modest FUV-NUV color gradients, which are significantly smaller than what is found for some nearby spiral galaxies. However, including moderate extinction gradients with our models can better match the observations with steeper UV color gradients. We estimate that the SFR at which the number of stars emitting FUV light becomes stochastic is ∼2 × 10{sup –6} M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, which is substantially lower than the SFR of many star forming regions in outer disks. Therefore, we conclude that stochasticity in the upper end of the initial mass function is not likely to be the dominant cause of dispersion in the FUV-NUV colors of star forming regions in outer disks. Finally, we note that if outer disks have had an episodic SFH similar to that used in this study, this should be taken into account when estimating gas depletion timescales and modeling chemical

  11. Massive Quiescent Disk Galaxies in the CANDELS survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesseli, Aurora; McGrath, E. J.; CANDELS Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Using data from the GOODS-S field of the CANDELS survey, we find evidence for an increasing fraction of disk-dominated galaxies at high-redshift ( 2) among the quiescent, or non-star-forming galaxy population, in agreement with a growing body of evidence from recent results in the literature. We selected all galaxies with mass M>1010 Msun within the redshift range 0.5 ≤ z ≤ 2.5, and imposed a two-color selection criteria using rest-frame U, V, and J-band flux to separate quiescent from star-forming galaxies. From this sample, we performed a qualitative visual classification and a quantitative classification using the galaxy-fitting program Galfit. Of the original 140 quiescent galaxies, 23 have a disk component that contributes 50% or more of the total integrated galaxy light, and most of these are at high-redshift. At a redshift of z ~ 2 a significant fraction of all quiescent galaxies showed strong disk components with 30% being disk-dominated. We also find that massive disk galaxies seem to live in less densely populated environments while massive ellipticals live in environments with more neighbors, which leads us to believe that there are two mechanisms for the creation of massive quiescent galaxies. For the disks, the lower density environment and the disk nature of these galaxies lead us to favor cold streams over the major merger model of galaxy formation. The ellipticals, which live in higher density environments, could be assembled through major mergers of already aged stellar populations (e.g., dry mergers). This research is supported by the Clare Boothe Luce Foundation.

  12. The Parker Instability in Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, L. F. S.; Sarson, G. R.; Shukurov, A.; Bushby, P. J.; Fletcher, A.

    2016-01-01

    We examine the evolution of the Parker instability in galactic disks using 3D numerical simulations. We consider a local Cartesian box section of a galactic disk, where gas, magnetic fields, and cosmic rays are all initially in a magnetohydrostatic equilibrium. This is done for different choices of initial cosmic-ray density and magnetic field. The growth rates and characteristic scales obtained from the models, as well as their dependences on the density of cosmic rays and magnetic fields, are in broad agreement with previous (linearized, ideal) analytical work. However, this nonideal instability develops a multimodal 3D structure, which cannot be quantitatively predicted from the earlier linearized studies. This 3D signature of the instability will be of importance in interpreting observations. As a preliminary step toward such interpretations, we calculate synthetic polarized intensity and Faraday rotation measure (RM) maps, and the associated structure functions of the latter, from our simulations; these suggest that the correlation scales inferred from RM maps are a possible probe for the cosmic-ray content of a given galaxy. Our calculations highlight the importance of cosmic rays in these measures, making them an essential ingredient of realistic models of the interstellar medium.

  13. Trapping dust particles in the outer regions of protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinilla, P.; Birnstiel, T.; Ricci, L.; Dullemond, C. P.; Uribe, A. L.; Testi, L.; Natta, A.

    2012-02-01

    Aims: We attempt to explain grain growth to mm sized particles and their retention in the outer regions of protoplanetary disks, as observed at sub-mm and mm wavelengths, by investigating whether strong inhomogeneities in the gas density profiles can decelerate excessive radial drift and help the dust particles to grow. Methods: We use coagulation/fragmentation and disk-structure models, to simulate the evolution of dust in a bumpy surface density profile, which we mimic with a sinusoidal disturbance. For different values of the amplitude and length scale of the bumps, we investigate the ability of this model to produce and retain large particles on million-year timescales. In addition, we compare the pressure inhomogeneities considered in this work with the pressure profiles that come from magnetorotational instability. Using the Common Astronomy Software Applications ALMA simulator, we study whether there are observational signatures of these pressure inhomogeneities that can be seen with ALMA. Results: We present the conditions required to trap dust particles and the corresponding calculations predicting the spectral slope in the mm-wavelength range, to compare with current observations. Finally, we present simulated images using different antenna configurations of ALMA at different frequencies, to show that the ring structures will be detectable at the distances of either the Taurus Auriga or Ophiucus star-forming regions.

  14. Wobbling The Galactic Disk with Bombardment of Satellite Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Onghia, Elena

    We propose to assess the effect of impacts of large visible satellite galaxies on a disk, as well as the relevance of the continuing bombardment of the Galactic disk by dark matter clumps as predicted by the current cosmological framework that can wobble the disk, heating it and eventually exciting ragged spiral structures. In particular, we make detailed predictions for observable features such as spiral arms, rings and their associated stars in galactic disks and relate them to the physical processes that drive their formation and evolution in our Milky Way galaxy and nearby spirals. To do this, we will combine analytic methods and numerical simulations that allow us to calculate observables, which we will compare to present and forthcoming observations. Our methodology utilizes a combination of state of the art hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy evolution and multi- wavelength radiative transfer simulations. Our primary goals are: (1) To identify the physical processes that are responsible for spiral structure formation observed in our Milky Way and nearby disk galaxies, from the flocculent to grand- designed spiral galaxies and to provide observable signatures to be compared with data on nearby galaxies combining maps of 24 micron emission (Spitzer) and cold gas, CO (Heracles) and HI (THINGS). (2) To explore different morphologies of spiral galaxies: from the multi-armed galaxies to the Milky Way sized galaxies with few arms. (3) For a Milky Way disk we will assess the effect of impacts of substructures passing through the disk to origin the asymmetry in the number density of stars recently discovered from SDSS and SEGUE data and confirmed from RAVE data. We will also investigate the disk heating in the vertical plane due to the formation of vertical oscillations that are produced by the impact and migration of stars in the disk as consequence of the heating as compared to the classical stellar migration mechanism. (4) We will measure the spiral pattern speed

  15. THE SPHERICALIZATION OF DARK MATTER HALOS BY GALAXY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Kazantzidis, Stelios; Abadi, Mario G.; Navarro, Julio F. E-mail: mario@oac.uncor.ed

    2010-09-01

    Cosmological simulations indicate that cold dark matter (CDM) halos should be triaxial. Validating this theoretical prediction is, however, less than straightforward because the assembly of galaxies is expected to modify halo shapes and to render them more axisymmetric. We use a suite of N-body simulations to quantitatively investigate the effect of the growth of a central disk galaxy on the shape of triaxial dark matter halos. In most circumstances, the halo responds to the presence of the disk by becoming more spherical. The net effect depends weakly on the timescale of the disk assembly but noticeably on the orientation of the disk relative to the halo principal axes, and it is maximal when the disk symmetry axis is aligned with the major axis of the halo. The effect depends most sensitively on the overall gravitational importance of the disk. Our results indicate that exponential disks whose contribution peaks at less than {approx}50% of their circular velocity are unable to noticeably modify the shape of the gravitational potential of their surrounding halos. Many dwarf and low surface brightness galaxies are expected to be in this regime, and therefore their detailed kinematics could be used to probe halo triaxiality, one of the basic predictions of the CDM paradigm. We argue that the complex disk kinematics of the dwarf galaxy NGC 2976 might be the reflection of a triaxial halo. Such signatures of halo triaxiality should be common in galaxies where the luminous component is subdominant.

  16. GAMA: Stellar Mass Assembly in Galaxy Bulges and Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffett, Amanda J.; Driver, Simon P.; Lange, Rebecca; Robotham, Aaron; Kelvin, Lee; GAMA Team

    2016-01-01

    The Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey has to date obtained spectra, redshifts, and 21-band multi-facility photometry for over 200,000 galaxies in five survey regions that total nearly 300 square degrees on sky. We consider here a low-redshift (z<0.06), volume-limited subsample of ~8,000 GAMA galaxies that have been morphologically classified by the survey team. In order to quantify the separate bulge and disk properties of these galaxies, we apply a large-scale automated procedure for fitting images with 2D, multi-component structure models, including evaluation of fit convergence using a grid of input parameter values for each galaxy. From this analysis, we calculate the total bulge and disk contributions to the local galaxy stellar mass budget and derive mass-size relations for both pure spheroid/disk systems and the separate bulge/disk components of multi-component galaxies. We further examine the fraction of total stellar mass assembled in spheroid and disk structures as a function of galaxy environment, where environment is quantified on multiple scales from membership in large-scale filaments to groups/clusters and down to local pairings. We then discuss the effect of environmental conditions on the mechanisms of stellar mass assembly, including the implied balance between merger accumulation and in situ mass growth in different environment regimes.

  17. Computer Model Shows a Disk Galaxy's Life History

    NASA Video Gallery

    This cosmological simulation follows the development of a single disk galaxy over about 13.5 billion years, from shortly after the Big Bang to the present time. Colors indicate old stars (red), you...

  18. Making the Near-Far Connection in Disk Galaxy Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, Jonathan C.; UW N-Body Shop

    2016-01-01

    Modern, high-resolution, cosmological galaxy formation simulations reveal that disks can grow ``upside-down" in the sense that progressively younger stellar populations are born with increasingly smaller vertical velocity dispersion, tracing the kinematics of the collapsing gas disk from which they form. We find that the upside-down model matches the most stringent observational constraints here in the MW, including the steep stellar age-velocity relationship measured in the solar neighborhood. Tracing the temporal evolution of our simulatedgalaxies, we find that the vertical velocity dispersion of young stars is highest at early times and decreases towards the present-day, matching the "disk settling" results found in disk galaxies from z~2 to now. Our findings suggest that the upside-down model is currently the only self-consistent disk formation mechanism to connect the multi-scale kinematics of galaxies in both the near and far field.

  19. MHD simulations of ram pressure stripping of a disk galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Mariana; Gomez, Gilberto

    2015-08-01

    The removal of the ISM of disk galaxies through ram pressure stripping (RPS) has been extensively studied in numerous simulations. These models show that this process has a significant impact on galaxy evolution (the truncation of the ISM will lead to a decrease in the star formation and the galaxy will become redder).Nevertheless, the role of the magnetic fields (MFs) on the dynamics of the gas in this process has been hardly studied, although the influence of magnetic fields on the large scale disk structure is well established. The presence of MFs produce a less compressible gas, thus increasing the scale height of the gas in the galaxy, that is, gas can be found farther away from the galactic potential well, which may lead to an easier removal of gas. We test this idea by performing a 3D MHD simulation of a disk galaxy that experiences RPS under the wind-tunnel approximation.

  20. Molecular clouds in the extreme outer galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Digel, S.; De Geus, E.; Thaddeus, P.

    1994-01-01

    We present observation of 11 molecular clouds with kinematic Galactocentric distances of 18-28 kpc. The most distant is approximately 10 kpc farther from the Galactic center than any previously known and apparently lies beyond the edge of the optical disk. All are associated with much larger H I concentrations, with typical offsets of approximately 40 pc from the H I peaks. CO observations with the CfA 1.2 m and National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) 12 m telescopes indicate typical sizes of 20-40 pc, velocity widths of 1-3 km/s, and kinetic temperatures of 10-25 K. They apparently have lower CO luminosities than clouds near the solar circle with similar properties. Some may have associated infrared sources, but owing to the great distances of the clouds, the only general conclusion that can be made about star formation is that stars earlier than B1 are absent. The apparent scarcity of clouds like these indicates that their contribution to the mass of the ISM beyond R = 18 kpc is not significant.

  1. Mapping the inner regions of the polar disk galaxy NGC 4650A with MUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iodice, E.; Coccato, L.; Combes, F.; de Zeeuw, T.; Arnaboldi, M.; Weilbacher, P. M.; Bacon, R.; Kuntschner, H.; Spavone, M.

    2015-11-01

    The polar disk galaxy NGC 4650A was observed during the commissioning of the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) at the ESO Very Large Telescope to obtain the first 2D map of the velocity and velocity dispersion for both stars and gas. The new MUSE data allow the analysis of the structure and kinematics towards the central regions of NGC 4650A, where the two components co-exist. These regions were unexplored by the previous long-slit literature data available for this galaxy. The stellar velocity field shows that there are two main directions of rotation, one along the host galaxy major axis (PA = 67 deg) and the other along the polar disk (PA = 160 deg). The host galaxy has, on average, the typical pattern of a rotating disk, with receding velocities on the SW side and approaching velocities on the NE side, and a velocity dispersion that remains constant at all radii (σstar ~ 50-60 km s-1). The polar disk shows a large amount of differential rotation from the centre up to the outer regions, reaching V ~ 100-120 km s-1 at R ~ 75 arcsec ~ 16 kpc. Inside the host galaxy, a velocity gradient is measured along the photometric minor axis. Close to the centre, for R ≤ 2 arcsec the velocity profile of the gas suggests a decoupled component and the velocity dispersion increases up to ~110 km s-1, while at larger distances it remains almost constant (σgas ~ 30-40 km s-1). The extended view of NGC 4650A given by the MUSE data is a galaxy made of two perpendicular disks that remain distinct and drive the kinematics right into the very centre of this object. In order to match this observed structure for NGC 4650A, we constructed a multicomponent mass model made by the combined projection of two disks. By comparing the observations with the 2D kinematics derived from the model, we found that the modelled mass distribution in these two disks can, on average, account for the complex kinematics revealed by the MUSE data, also in the central regions of the galaxy where the

  2. ECO and RESOLVE: Galaxy Disk Growth in Environmental Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffett, Amanda J.; Kannappan, Sheila J.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Eckert, Kathleen D.; Stark, David V.; Hendel, David; Norris, Mark A.; Grogin, Norman A.

    2015-10-01

    We study the relationships between galaxy environments and galaxy properties related to disk (re)growth, considering two highly complete samples that are approximately baryonic mass limited into the high-mass dwarf galaxy regime, the Environmental COntext catalog (data release herein) and the B-semester region of the REsolved Spectroscopy Of a Local VolumE survey. We quantify galaxy environments using both group identification and smoothed galaxy density field methods. We use by-eye and quantitative morphological classifications plus atomic gas content measurements and estimates. We find that blue early-type (E/S0) galaxies, gas-dominated galaxies, and UV-bright disk host galaxies all become distinctly more common below group halo mass ˜ {10}11.5 {M}⊙ , implying that this low group halo mass regime may be a preferred regime for significant disk growth activity. We also find that blue early-type and blue late-type galaxies inhabit environments of similar group halo mass at fixed baryonic mass, consistent with a scenario in which blue early-types can regrow late-type disks. In fact, we find that the only significant difference in the typical group halo mass inhabited by different galaxy classes is for satellite galaxies with different colors, where at fixed baryonic mass red early- and late-types have higher typical group halo masses than blue early- and late-types. More generally, we argue that the traditional morphology-environment relation (i.e., that denser environments tend to have more early-types) can be largely attributed to the morphology-galaxy mass relation for centrals and the color-environment relation for satellites.

  3. Discovery of an Edge-on Debris Disk with a Dust Ring and an Outer Disk Wing-tilt Asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, Markus; Apai, Dániel; Wagner, Kevin; Robberto, Massimo

    2015-10-01

    Using Very Large Telescope/SPHERE near-infrared dual-band imaging and integral field spectroscopy, we discovered an edge-on debris disk around the 17 Myr old A-type member of the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association HD 110058. The edge-on disk can be traced to about 0.″6 or 65 AU projected separation. In its northern and southern wings, the disk shows at all wavelengths two prominent, bright, and symmetrically placed knots at 0.″3 or 32 AU from the star. We interpret these knots as a ring of planetesimals whose collisions may produce most of the dust observed in the disk. We find no evidence for a bow in the disk, but we identify a pair of symmetric, hooklike features in both wings. Based on similar features in the Beta Pictoris disk, we propose that this wing-tilt asymmetry traces either an outer planetesimal belt that is inclined with respect to the disk midplane or radiation-pressure-driven dust blown out from a yet unseen inner belt that is inclined with respect to the disk midplane. The misaligned inner or outer disk may be a result of interaction with a yet unseen planet. Overall, the disk geometry resembles the nearby disk around Beta Pictoris, albeit seen at smaller radial scales.

  4. Tidally Induced Offset Disks in Magellanic Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardy, Stephen A.; D’Onghia, Elena; Athanassoula, E.; Wilcots, Eric M.; Sheth, Kartik

    2016-08-01

    Magellanic spiral galaxies are a class of one-armed systems that often exhibit an offset stellar bar and are rarely found around massive spiral galaxies. Using a set of N-body and hydrodynamic simulations, we consider a dwarf–dwarf galaxy interaction as the driving mechanism for the formation of this peculiar class of systems. We investigate here the relation between the dynamical, stellar, and gaseous disk center and the bar. In all our simulations the bar center always coincides with the dynamical center, while the stellar disk becomes highly asymmetric during the encounter, causing the photometric center of the Magellanic galaxy disk to become mismatched with both the bar and the dynamical center. The disk asymmetries persist for almost 2 Gyr, the time that it takes for the disk to be recentered with the bar, and well after the companion has passed. This explains the nature of the offset bar found in many Magellanic-type galaxies, including the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and NGC 3906. In particular, these results, once applied to the LMC, suggest that the dynamical center should reside in the bar center instead of the H i center as previously assumed, pointing to a variation in the current estimate of the north component of the LMC proper motion.

  5. On the Galactic Spin of Barred Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervantes-Sodi, Bernardo; Li, Cheng; Park, Changbom; Wang, Lixin

    2013-09-01

    We present a study of the connection between the galactic spin parameter (λ d ) and the bar fraction in a volume-limited sample of 10,674 disk galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. The galaxies in our sample are visually classified into one of three groups: non-barred galaxies and galaxies hosting long or short bars, respectively. We find that the spin distributions of these three classes are statistically different, with galaxies hosting long bars having the lowest λ d values, followed by non-barred galaxies, while galaxies with short bars present typically high spin parameters. The bar fraction presents its maximum at low to intermediate λ d values for the case of long bars, while the maximum for short bars is at high λ d . This bimodality is in good agreement with previous studies finding longer bars hosted by luminous, massive, red galaxies with a low content of cold gas, while short bars were found in low luminosity, low mass, blue galaxies that were typically gas rich. In addition, the rise and fall of the bar fraction as a function of λ d , within the long-bar sample shown in our results, can be explained as a result of two competing factors: the self-gravity of the disk that enhances bar instabilities and the support by random motions, instead of ordered rotational motion, that prevents the formation/growth of bars.

  6. ON THE GALACTIC SPIN OF BARRED DISK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Cervantes-Sodi, Bernardo; Li, Cheng; Wang, Lixin; Park, Changbom

    2013-09-20

    We present a study of the connection between the galactic spin parameter (λ{sub d}) and the bar fraction in a volume-limited sample of 10,674 disk galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. The galaxies in our sample are visually classified into one of three groups: non-barred galaxies and galaxies hosting long or short bars, respectively. We find that the spin distributions of these three classes are statistically different, with galaxies hosting long bars having the lowest λ{sub d} values, followed by non-barred galaxies, while galaxies with short bars present typically high spin parameters. The bar fraction presents its maximum at low to intermediate λ{sub d} values for the case of long bars, while the maximum for short bars is at high λ{sub d}. This bimodality is in good agreement with previous studies finding longer bars hosted by luminous, massive, red galaxies with a low content of cold gas, while short bars were found in low luminosity, low mass, blue galaxies that were typically gas rich. In addition, the rise and fall of the bar fraction as a function of λ{sub d}, within the long-bar sample shown in our results, can be explained as a result of two competing factors: the self-gravity of the disk that enhances bar instabilities and the support by random motions, instead of ordered rotational motion, that prevents the formation/growth of bars.

  7. PROGRESSIVELY MORE PROLATE DARK MATTER HALO IN THE OUTER GALAXY AS TRACED BY FLARING H I GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Arunima; Jog, Chanda J. E-mail: cjjog@physics.iisc.ernet.in

    2011-05-01

    A galactic disk in a spiral galaxy is generally believed to be embedded in an extended dark matter halo, which dominates its dynamics in the outer parts. However, the shape of the halo is not clearly understood. Here we show that the dark matter halo in the Milky Way is prolate in shape. Further, it is increasingly more prolate at larger radii, with the vertical-to-planar axis ratio monotonically increasing to 2.0 at 24 kpc. This is obtained by modeling the observed steeply flaring atomic hydrogen gas layer in the outer Galactic disk, where the gas is supported by pressure against the net gravitational field of the disk and the halo. The resulting prolate-shaped halo can explain several long-standing puzzles in galactic dynamics, for example, it permits long-lived warps thus explaining their ubiquitous nature.

  8. Structure of Disk-dominated Galaxies. II. Color Gradients and Stellar Population Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacArthur, Lauren A.; Courteau, Stéphane; Bell, Eric; Holtzman, Jon A.

    2004-06-01

    We investigate optical and near-IR color gradients in a sample of 172 low-inclination galaxies spanning Hubble types S0-Irr. The colors are compared with stellar population synthesis models from which luminosity-weighted average ages and metallicities are determined. We explore the effects of different underlying star formation histories and additional bursts of star formation. Our results are robust in a relative sense under the assumption that our galaxies shared a similar underlying star formation history and that no bursts involving more than ~10% of the galaxy mass have occurred in the past 1-2 Gyr. Because the observed gradients show radial structure, we measure ``inner'' and ``outer'' disk age and metallicity gradients. Trends in age and metallicity and their gradients are explored as a function of Hubble type, rotational velocity, total near-IR galaxy magnitude, central surface brightness, and scale length. We find strong correlations in age and metallicity with Hubble type, rotational velocity, total magnitude, and central surface brightness in the sense that earlier-type, faster rotating, more luminous, and higher surface brightness galaxies are older and more metal-rich, suggesting an early and more rapid star formation history for these galaxies. The increasing trends with rotational velocity and total magnitude level off for Vrot>~120kms-1 and MK<~-23 mag, respectively. This effect is stronger for metallicity (than age), which could reflect a threshold potential above which all metals are retained and thus metallicity saturates at the yield. Outer disk gradients are found to be weaker than the inner gradients as expected for a slower variation of the potential and surface brightness in the outer parts. We find that stronger age gradients are associated with weaker metallicity gradients. Trends in gradients with galaxy parameters are compared with model predictions: these trends do not agree with predictions of semianalytic models of hierarchical galaxy

  9. THE ACS NEARBY GALAXY SURVEY TREASURY. XI. THE REMARKABLY UNDISTURBED NGC 2403 DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Stilp, Adrienne; Radburn-Smith, David; Dolphin, Andrew; Skillman, Evan D. E-mail: jd@astro.washington.edu E-mail: dolphin@raytheon.com

    2013-03-10

    We present detailed analysis of color-magnitude diagrams of NGC 2403, obtained from a deep (m {approx}< 28) Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 observation of the outer disk of NGC 2403, supplemented by several shallow (m {approx}< 26) HST Advanced Camera for Surveys fields. We derive the spatially resolved star formation history of NGC 2403 out to 11 disk scale lengths. In the inner portions of the galaxy, we compare the recent star formation rates (SFRs) we derive from the resolved stars with those measured using GALEX FUV + Spitzer 24{mu} fluxes, finding excellent agreement between the methods. Our measurements also show that the radial gradient in recent SFR mirrors the disk exponential profile to 11 scale lengths with no break, extending to SFR densities a factor of {approx}100 lower than those that can be measured with GALEX and Spitzer ({approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}). Furthermore, we find that the cumulative stellar mass of the disk was formed at similar times at all radii. We compare these characteristics of NGC 2403 to those of its ''morphological twins'', NGC 300 and M 33, showing that the structure and age distributions of the NGC 2403 disk are more similar to those of the relatively isolated system NGC 300 than to those of the Local Group analog M 33. We also discuss the environments and HI morphologies of these three nearby galaxies, comparing them to integrated light studies of larger samples of more distant galaxy disks. Taken together, the physical properties and evolutionary history of NGC 2403 suggest that the galaxy has had no close encounters with other M 81 group members and may be falling into the group for the first time.

  10. Dynamics of the Polar Disk Galaxy NGC 4650A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napolitano, N. R.; Iodice, E.; Arnaboldi, M.

    2014-05-01

    We present the dark matter distribution around the polar disk galaxy NGC 4650A. We use extended H I data along the polar disk and long slit kinematics along the spheroid and constrain the dark matter halo scales along the two directions under equilibrium assumptions and a Navarro-Frank-White profile. The different scale lengths along the two axes show that the the dark halo has an axis ratio c/a≃0.5 in agreement with expectations from cosmological simulations.

  11. Theory of bending waves with applications to disk galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, J.W.K.

    1982-01-01

    A theory of bending waves is surveyed which provides an explanation for the required amplification of the warp in the Milky Way. It also provides for self-generated warps in isolated external galaxies. The shape of observed warps and partly their existence in isolated galaxies are indicative of substantial spheroidal components. The theory also provides a plausible explanation for the bending of the inner disk (<2 kpc) of the Milky Way.

  12. Searching for Outer Planet Debris Disks/Rings with WISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrutskie, M. F.; Masci, F.; Fowler, J.; Cutri, R. M.; Verbiscer, A.; Wright, E. L.

    2011-10-01

    The NASA Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) imaged the entire celestial sphere at 3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22μm during its 9 month cryogenic survey mission with typical 5-sigma sensitivity for point source detection near the ecliptic of 0.08, 0.11, 1, and 6 mJy (Wright et al. 2010). In addition to the detection of hundreds of millions of stars and galaxies as well as a vast number of known and new asteroids (Mainzer et al. 2011), WISE was sensitive to extended emission from warm dust in the Solar System, for example from zodiacal dust bands and comet debris trails. WISE also scanned all of the superior planets during its mission, encountering them serendipitously during normal Survey operations. This paper presents the result of searches for dust emission originating from irregular satellite impact debris or activity around Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune, primarily in the longest wavelength band at 22μm. WISE delivered angular resolution of 6 arcseconds in the three shorterwavelength bands and 12 arcseconds in the band most suited for outer Solar System dust detection at 22μm. Jupiter and Saturn heavily saturate the detectors and scattered light limits the inner radius for analysis. Since WISE acquired its observations over many days, and in some cases weeks, we have constructed deep coadds in the frame of the moving planet rather than using standard WISE Atlas Image Coadds. WISE typically dedicated about 70 sec of observation to each point on the sky near the ecliptic plane, so WISE observations are not nearly as sensitive as those possible with the Spitzer Space Telescope during its cryogenic mission. All of the giant planets were located in a region of the sky scanned in the second half of WISE's all-sky coverage. As a result none of these fields was included in the 57% of the sky covered in the April 2011 WISE Preliminary Data Release. At the time of the WISE Final Data Release, planned for Spring 2012, the individual calibrated "Level 1" frames

  13. Molecular clouds and supernova remnants in the outer galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Y.-L.; Thaddeus, P.

    1986-01-01

    The study of extragalactic supernova (SNs) suggests that Type II SNs, not Type I, tend to occur near extreme optical Population I objects, but the detection of these objects in the Galaxy is limited by heavy local obscuration. A CO survey has been conducted toward every confirmed outer Galaxy SNR from l = 70 to 210 deg, for a total of 26, and it is found that roughly half of them, within uncertainties of distance estimates, revealed spatial coincidences with large molecular cloud complexes. Most of the cloud complexes in these coincidences probably are the birthplaces of the progenitors of the corresponding Type II SNRs, because it is statistically improbable that the coincidences result from change superposition.

  14. MAGNETIC FIELDS IN COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS OF DISK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Pakmor, Rüdiger; Marinacci, Federico; Springel, Volker

    2014-03-01

    Observationally, magnetic fields reach equipartition with thermal energy and cosmic rays in the interstellar medium of disk galaxies such as the Milky Way. However, thus far cosmological simulations of the formation and evolution of galaxies have usually neglected magnetic fields. We employ the moving-mesh code AREPO to follow for the first time the formation and evolution of a Milky Way-like disk galaxy in its full cosmological context while taking into account magnetic fields. We find that a prescribed tiny magnetic seed field grows exponentially by a small-scale dynamo until it saturates around z = 4 with a magnetic energy of about 10% of the kinetic energy in the center of the galaxy's main progenitor halo. By z = 2, a well-defined gaseous disk forms in which the magnetic field is further amplified by differential rotation, until it saturates at an average field strength of ∼6 μG in the disk plane. In this phase, the magnetic field is transformed from a chaotic small-scale field to an ordered large-scale field coherent on scales comparable to the disk radius. The final magnetic field strength, its radial profile, and the stellar structure of the disk compare well with observational data. A minor merger temporarily increases the magnetic field strength by about a factor of two, before it quickly decays back to its saturation value. Our results are highly insensitive to the initial seed field strength and suggest that the large-scale magnetic field in spiral galaxies can be explained as a result of the cosmic structure formation process.

  15. The opacity of spiral disks from counts of distant galaxies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holwerda, B. W.; Gonzalez, R. A.; Allen, R. J.; van der Kruit, P. C.

    2004-12-01

    The numbers of distant galaxies seen in an HST image of a spiral galaxy is an indication of the average extinction by dust in the disk. This number of distant galaxies has to be calibrated for crowding effects and for this the ``Synthetic Field Method'' (SFM, Gonzalez et al. 1998) was developed. Synthetic fields are the science field with a dimmed Hubble Deep Field added. From the relation between the dimming and the number of synthetic galaxies, the average extinction in the science field can be derived. 32 HST/WFPC2 fields were analysed and from the numbers of distant galaxies an average radial extinction profile for spiral disks was constructed, for the whole sample, arm and disk regions and different Hubble types. When the average radial extinction profile is compared to the HI surface density profile, an estimate of the average gas-to-dust ratio as a function of radius can be obtained. The effects of the phase of the hydrogen and metallicity gradient in disks are discussed. The average radial extinction profile is compared to the light distribution of spiral disks. The relation between typical radii of light and dust and the relation between surface brightness and extinction is also explored. Combining the detailed images of dust emission from the Spitzer space telescope with the extinction measurements from counts in HST images could offer insight into the relative prominence of cold dust and possibly the dust geometry in the disk. Future work on dust extinction using the wealth of new imaging in the HST archive is briefly discussed. This research was supported by funding from STSCI, the Director's Discretionary Research Fund and the Kapteyn Institute.

  16. A UNIVERSAL NEUTRAL GAS PROFILE FOR NEARBY DISK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bigiel, F.; Blitz, L.

    2012-09-10

    Based on sensitive CO measurements from HERACLES and H I data from THINGS, we show that the azimuthally averaged radial distribution of the neutral gas surface density ({Sigma}{sub HI}+ {Sigma}{sub H2}) in 33 nearby spiral galaxies exhibits a well-constrained universal exponential distribution beyond 0.2 Multiplication-Sign r{sub 25} (inside of which the scatter is large) with less than a factor of two scatter out to two optical radii r{sub 25}. Scaling the radius to r{sub 25} and the total gas surface density to the surface density at the transition radius, i.e., where {Sigma}{sub HI} and {Sigma}{sub H2} are equal, as well as removing galaxies that are interacting with their environment, yields a tightly constrained exponential fit with average scale length 0.61 {+-} 0.06 r{sub 25}. In this case, the scatter reduces to less than 40% across the optical disks (and remains below a factor of two at larger radii). We show that the tight exponential distribution of neutral gas implies that the total neutral gas mass of nearby disk galaxies depends primarily on the size of the stellar disk (influenced to some degree by the great variability of {Sigma}{sub H2} inside 0.2 Multiplication-Sign r{sub 25}). The derived prescription predicts the total gas mass in our sub-sample of 17 non-interacting disk galaxies to within a factor of two. Given the short timescale over which star formation depletes the H{sub 2} content of these galaxies and the large range of r{sub 25} in our sample, there appears to be some mechanism leading to these largely self-similar radial gas distributions in nearby disk galaxies.

  17. Understanding the Structure and Evolution of Nearby Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand the structure and evolution of disk galaxies, we studied the stellar and gaseous components as well as the star formation rate in nearby disk galaxies. We used PS1 medium deep survey images to derive five-band (grizy) surface brightness profiles down to 30 ABmag/arcsec^2 for about 700 galaxies. From these stellar mass and mass-to-light ratio radial profiles are derived. The stellar mass radial profiles tend to bend-up at large radii, this often traces an extended old stellar population. The mass-to-light ratio profiles tend to rise outside the r25 radii. We also find a larger fraction of up-bending surface brightness profiles than Polen & Trujillo (2006). This may be because their sample is biased towards low surface brightness galaxies. We used HIPASS data as well as VLA HI 21cm data to study the gas component and dynamics of disk galaxies. We used the GALEX UV images to study the star formation of a HI-selected star-forming sample of about 400 galaxies, compiling a database of FUV and NUV radial profiles and related parameters. We used this to study the star forming efficiency (SFE, star formation rate per unit area divided by gas surface mass density) of the sample galaxies. We found that the UV based SFE has a tighter relationship with HI mass than an H_alpha based SFE as typically used in previous studies and the UV SFE is flat across wide range of stellar mass. We constructed a simple model to predict the distribution of interstellar medium and star formation rate in an equilibrium disk with constant two-fluid Toomre Q. This model can reproduces the SFE relations we derived.

  18. Long-Wavelength Excesses of FU Orionis Objects: Flared Outer Disks or Infalling Envelopes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhaohuan; Hartmann, Lee; Calvet, Nuria; Hernandez, Jesus; Tannirkulam, Ajay-Kumar; D'Alessio, Paola

    2008-09-01

    The mid- to far-infrared emission of the outbursting FU Orionis objects has been attributed either to a flared outer disk or to an infalling envelope. We revisit this issue using detailed radiative transfer calculations to model the recent, high signal-to-noise ratio data from the IRS instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope. In the case of FU Ori, we find that a physically plausible flared disk irradiated by the central accretion disk matches the observations. Building on our previous work, our accretion disk model with outer disk irradiation by the inner disk reproduces the spectral energy distribution between ~4000 Å and ~40 μm. Our model is consistent with near-infrared interferometry, but there are some inconsistencies with mid-infrared interferometric results. Including the outer disk allows us to refine our estimate of the outer radius of the outbursting, high mass accretion rate disk in FU Ori as ~0.5 AU, which is a crucial parameter in assessing theories of the FU Orionis phenomenon. We are able to place an upper limit on the mass infall rate of any remnant envelope infall rate to ~7 × 10-7 M⊙ yr -1 assuming a centrifugal radius of 200 AU. The FUor BBW 76 is also well modeled by a 0.6 AU inner disk and a flared outer disk. However, V1515 Cyg requires an envelope with an outflow cavity to adequately reproduce the IRS spectrum. In contrast with the suggestion by Green et al., we do not require a flattened envelope to match the observations; the inferred cavity shape is qualitatively consistent with typical protostellar envelopes. This variety of dusty structures suggests that the FU Orionis phase can be present at either early or late stages of protostellar evolution.

  19. A scaling law of radial gas distribution in disk galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Zhong

    1990-01-01

    Based on the idea that local conditions within a galactic disk largely determine the region's evolution time scale, researchers built a theoretical model to take into account molecular cloud and star formations in the disk evolution process. Despite some variations that may be caused by spiral arms and central bulge masses, they found that many late-type galaxies show consistency with the model in their radial atomic and molecular gas profiles. In particular, researchers propose that a scaling law be used to generalize the gas distribution characteristics. This scaling law may be useful in helping to understand the observed gas contents in many galaxies. Their model assumes an exponential mass distribution with disk radius. Most of the mass are in atomic gas state at the beginning of the evolution. Molecular clouds form through a modified Schmidt Law which takes into account gravitational instabilities in a possible three-phase structure of diffuse interstellar medium (McKee and Ostriker, 1977; Balbus and Cowie, 1985); whereas star formation proceeds presumably unaffected by the environmental conditions outside of molecular clouds (Young, 1987). In such a model both atomic and molecular gas profiles in a typical galactic disk (as a result of the evolution) can be fitted simultaneously by adjusting the efficiency constants. Galaxies of different sizes and masses, on the other hand, can be compared with the model by simply scaling their characteristic length scales and shifting their radial ranges to match the assumed disk total mass profile sigma tot(r).

  20. Precision Velocity Fields in Spiral Galaxies. I. Noncircular Motions and rms Noise in Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauvais, Charles; Bothun, G.

    1999-11-01

    Investigation of the symmetry of the major- and minor-axis rotation curves reveals strong evidence of nonconcentric gas orbits with the maximum center shift of ~300 pc. Comparisons between kinematic and photometric structure (e.g., position angles, inclinations, centers) show considerable noise on small scales. Although large-scale averages are in agreement, this noise is a matter of some concern in the application of the Tully-Fisher method to disk galaxies. Moreover, cases of significant misalignment in position angle between the inner and outer disks are seen in two of the sample galaxies and may indicate the transition between luminous and dark-matter-dominated regions (i.e., where the maximum-disk hypothesis begins to fail). The kinematic disk models are used to find the residual velocity fields, and typical residuals are found to be 10-15 km s-1 over regions 0.5-1.5 kpc in diameter. Correlations are shown to exist between the residual velocity fields and both the Hα intensity and the velocity dispersion images. This suggests that kinematic feedback to the gas from star formation is an important source of noncircular motion. However, the relative quiescence of the large-scale velocity field indicates that the effect does not cause a significant deviation from circular symmetry, kinematically indicating that star formation is not a hidden parameter in the Tully-Fisher relation. Finally, the residual velocity fields are examined for signs of noncircular orbits by looking for azimuthal angular harmonics that would be present if disk galaxies are embedded in a triaxial dark matter potential. For our sample we find the ellipticity of the gas orbits to be <~0.08, which implies the potential is relatively round. This is consistent with disks being maximal.

  1. Star formation and accretion in the circumnuclear disks of active galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wutschik, Stephanie; Schleicher, Dominik R. G.; Palmer, Thomas S.

    2013-12-01

    Aims: We explore the evolution of supermassive black holes (SMBH) centered in a circumnuclear disk (CND) as a function of the mass supply from the host galaxy and considering different star formation laws, which may give rise to a self-regulation via the injection of supernova-driven turbulence. Methods: A system of equations describing star formation, black hole accretion and angular momentum transport in the disk was solved self-consistently for an axisymmetric disk in which the gravitational potential includes contributions from the black hole, the disk and the hosting galaxy. Our model extends the framework provided by Kawakatu & Wada (2008, ApJ, 681, 73), by separately considering the inner and outer part of the disk, and by introducing a potentially non-linear dependence of the star formation rate on the gas surface density and the turbulent velocity. The star formation recipes are calibrated using observational data for NGC 1097, while the accretion model is based on turbulent viscosity as a source of angular momentum transport in a thin viscous accretion disk. Results: We find that current data provide no strong constraint on the star formation recipe, and can in particular not distinguish between models entirely regulated by the surface density, and models including a dependence on the turbulent velocity. The evolution of the black hole mass, on the other hand, strongly depends on the applied star formation law, as well as the mass supply from the host galaxy. We suggest to explore the star formation process in local AGN with high-resolution ALMA observations to break the degeneracy between different star formation models.

  2. The catalog of edge-on disk galaxies from SDSS. I. The catalog and the structural parameters of stellar disks

    SciTech Connect

    Bizyaev, D. V.; Kautsch, S. J.; Mosenkov, A. V.; Reshetnikov, V. P.; Sotnikova, N. Ya.; Yablokova, N. V.; Hillyer, R. W.

    2014-05-20

    We present a catalog of true edge-on disk galaxies automatically selected from the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). A visual inspection of the g, r, and i images of about 15,000 galaxies allowed us to split the initial sample of edge-on galaxy candidates into 4768 (31.8% of the initial sample) genuine edge-on galaxies, 8350 (55.7%) non-edge-on galaxies, and 1865 (12.5%) edge-on galaxies not suitable for simple automatic analysis because these objects either show signs of interaction and warps, or nearby bright stars project on it. We added more candidate galaxies from RFGC, EFIGI, RC3, and Galaxy Zoo catalogs found in the SDSS footprints. Our final sample consists of 5747 genuine edge-on galaxies. We estimate the structural parameters of the stellar disks (the stellar disk thickness, radial scale length, and central surface brightness) in the galaxies by analyzing photometric profiles in each of the g, r, and i images. We also perform simplified three-dimensional modeling of the light distribution in the stellar disks of edge-on galaxies from our sample. Our large sample is intended to be used for studying scaling relations in the stellar disks and bulges and for estimating parameters of the thick disks in different types of galaxies via the image stacking. In this paper, we present the sample selection procedure and general description of the sample.

  3. Far-Infrared Abundance Measurements in the Outer Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Alexander L.; Simpson, Janet P.; Haas, Michael R.; Erickson, Edwin F.; Fich, Michel

    1997-11-01

    Five H II regions at large distances from the center of the Galaxy (R = 13-17 kpc) have been observed in the far-IR emission lines of [O III] (52 and 88 μm), [N III] (57 μm), and [S III] (19 μm) using the Kuiper Airborne Observatory. These observations have been combined with Very Large Array radio continuum observations of these sources to determine the abundances of O++, N++, and S++ relative to hydrogen. A simple ionization correction scheme has been used to determine the total abundances of nitrogen and sulfur relative to hydrogen, as well as the relative abundance N/O. For the two sources in common with previous optical studies (S127 and S128), we find good agreement between the far-infrared and optical determinations of N/H, S/H, and N/O. Our results from the outer Galaxy have been combined with previous far-infrared results to determine the abundance gradient of these elements in the Milky Way over a range of Galactocentric radii from R = 0 to R = 17 kpc. Our results are consistent with a gradient of log N/H = -0.111 +/- 0.012 dex kpc-1 and a gradient of log S/H = -0.079 +/- 0.009 dex kpc-1. Our method is not able to determine independently the abundances of both S and O, although other evidence suggests that the O/S ratio is approximately constant. While these results differ from recent optical studies, which suggest that these abundance gradients flatten in the outer Galaxy, we do not yet have sufficient data to rule out such a change in the gradient. The log N/O data are better fitted by a two-step function with a value of -0.50 +/- 0.02 for R < 6.2 kpc and -0.83 +/- 0.04 for R > 6.2 kpc. Both of these values are consistent with secondary production of nitrogen. However, the outer Galaxy oxygen abundances are in the low abundance regime where nitrogen is expected to be produced by primary processes.

  4. HALL EFFECT CONTROLLED GAS DYNAMICS IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. II. FULL 3D SIMULATIONS TOWARD THE OUTER DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Xue-Ning

    2015-01-10

    We perform three-dimensional stratified shearing-box magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations on the gas dynamics of protoplanetary disks with a net vertical magnetic flux of B {sub z0}. All three nonideal MHD effects, Ohmic resistivity, the Hall effect, and ambipolar diffusion, are included in a self-consistent manner based on equilibrium chemistry. We focus on regions toward outer disk radii, from 5 to 60 AU, where Ohmic resistivity tends to become negligible, ambipolar diffusion dominates over an extended region across the disk height, and the Hall effect largely controls the dynamics near the disk midplane. We find that at around R = 5 AU the system launches a laminar or weakly turbulent magnetocentrifugal wind when the net vertical field B {sub z0} is not too weak. Moreover, the wind is able to achieve and maintain a configuration with reflection symmetry at the disk midplane. The case with anti-aligned field polarity (Ω⋅B{sub z0}<0) is more susceptible to the magnetorotational instability (MRI) when B {sub z0} decreases, leading to an outflow oscillating in radial directions and very inefficient angular momentum transport. At the outer disk around and beyond R = 30 AU, the system shows vigorous MRI turbulence in the surface layer due to far-UV ionization, which efficiently drives disk accretion. The Hall effect affects the stability of the midplane region to the MRI, leading to strong/weak Maxwell stress for aligned/anti-aligned field polarities. Nevertheless, the midplane region is only very weakly turbulent in both cases. Overall, the basic picture is analogous to the conventional layered accretion scenario applied to the outer disk. In addition, we find that the vertical magnetic flux is strongly concentrated into thin, azimuthally extended shells in most of our simulations beyond 15 AU, leading to enhanced radial density variations know as zonal flows. Theoretical implications and observational consequences are briefly discussed.

  5. Double DCO+ Rings Reveal CO Ice Desorption in the Outer Disk Around IM Lup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öberg, Karin I.; Furuya, Kenji; Loomis, Ryan; Aikawa, Yuri; Andrews, Sean M.; Qi, Chunhua; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Wilner, David J.

    2015-09-01

    In a protoplanetary disk, a combination of thermal and non-thermal desorption processes regulate where volatiles are liberated from icy grain mantles into the gas phase. Non-thermal desorption should result in volatile-enriched gas in disk-regions where complete freeze-out is otherwise expected. We present Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array observations of the disk around the young star IM Lup in 1.4 mm continuum, C18O 2–1, H13CO+ 3–2 and DCO+ 3–2 emission at ∼0.″5 resolution. The images of these dust and gas tracers are clearly resolved. The DCO+ line exhibits a striking pair of concentric rings of emission that peak at radii of ∼0.″6 and 2″ (∼90 and 300 AU, respectively). Based on disk chemistry model comparison, the inner DCO+ ring is associated with the balance of CO freeze-out and thermal desorption due to a radial decrease in disk temperature. The outer DCO+ ring is explained by non-thermal desorption of CO ice in the low-column-density outer disk, repopulating the disk midplane with cold CO gas. The CO gas then reacts with abundant H2D+ to form the observed DCO+ outer ring. These observations demonstrate that spatially resolved DCO+ emission can be used to trace otherwise hidden cold gas reservoirs in the outmost disk regions, opening a new window onto their chemistry and kinematics.

  6. The Outer Halo -- Halo Origins and Mass of the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Heather; Arabadjis, John; Dohm-Palmer, Robbie; Freeman, Ken; Harding, Paul; Mateo, Mario; Norris, John; Olszewski, Ed; Sneden, Chris

    2000-02-01

    Through our detection of distant halo stars, we are now well placed to map the regions of the Galactic halo where previously only satellite galaxies and a few globular clusters were known. Mapping this region is crucial for answering questions like: How and over what timescales was the Milky Way's stellar halo assembled? What is the total mass and shape of its dark halo? The Sagittarius dwarf has demonstrated that at least some of the stellar halo was accreted. But, HOW MUCH of the halo was accreted? Our previous efforts have proven that the Washington photometric system, in conjuction with spectroscopy, is capable of efficiently and unambiguously identifying halo stars out to 100 kpc or more. We require followup spectroscopy to map velocity substructure, which is more likely visible in the outer halo because of the long dynamical timescales, and to identify the rare objects in the extreme outer halo which will constrain the shape and size of its dark halo. We are applying for 4m/RCSP time at both CTIO and KPNO to observe faint outer-halo giant and BHB candidates.

  7. The Upside Down Construction of a Simulated Disk Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, J. C.; Kazantzidis, S.; Weinberg, D. H.; Guedes, J.; Callegari, S.; Mayer, L.; Madau, P.

    2014-03-01

    We analyze the dynamical evolution of stellar age cohorts, groups of stars with similar formation times, to determine the detailed structure formation history of the cosmological simulation of the formation of a disk galaxy similar to the Milky Way (the “Eris” simulation). There is a remarkably smooth correlation between structure and stellar age at z = 0, going from spheroidal distributions for the oldest stars to long, thin disks for the youngest populations. We find the velocity dispersion of a cohort increases monotonically with age. The smooth relationships between stellar age, structure, and dynamics seen at z = 0, which agree nicely with the observed properties of mono-abundance populations in the Milky Way, are largely established by the disk formation process. Stars continuously form as the initially spheroidal gas reservoir cools and contracts, increasing its rotational support and becomingly progressively longer and vertically thinner. Thus, the stellar disk forms “inside-out” radially and “upside-down” vertically.

  8. The Upside Down Assembly of Simulated Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, Jonathan C.; Kazantzidis, S.; Weinberg, D. H.; Guedes, J.; Callegari, S.; Mayer, L.; Madau, P.

    2014-01-01

    The puzzle of disk galaxy formation, and the formation of the Milky Way itself, remains unsolved. We analyze the present-day structure and assembly history of a high resolution hydrodynamic simulation of the formation of a Milky Way-like disk galaxy, from the ``Eris'' simulation suite, dissecting it into cohorts of stars formed at different epochs of cosmic history. The oldest disk cohorts form in structures that are radially compact and relatively thick, while subsequent cohorts form in progressively larger, thinner, colder configurations from gas with increasing levels of rotational support. The disk thus forms ``inside-out'' in a radial sense and ``upside-down'' in a vertical sense. While secular heating and radial migration may influence the final state of each age cohort, the dynamics of each co-eval population generically exhibit only minor evolution since formation. This assembly history is largely responsible for the galaxy's present-day correlations of stellar age with spatial and kinematic structure, which themselves are a good qualitative match to the observed correlations for mono-abundance stellar populations in the Milky Way.

  9. Low Angular Momentum in Clumpy, Turbulent Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obreschkow, Danail; Glazebrook, Karl; Bassett, Robert; Fisher, David B.; Abraham, Roberto G.; Wisnioski, Emily; Green, Andrew W.; McGregor, Peter J.; Damjanov, Ivana; Popping, Attila; Jørgensen, Inger

    2015-12-01

    We measure the stellar specific angular momentum {j}s={J}s/{M}s in four nearby (z ≈ 0.1) disk galaxies that have stellar masses {M}s near the break {M}s* of the galaxy mass function but look like typical star-forming disks at z ≈ 2 in terms of their low stability (Q ≈ 1), clumpiness, high ionized gas dispersion (40-50 {km} {{{s}}}-1), high molecular gas fraction (20%-30%), and rapid star formation (˜ 20{M}⊙ {{yr}}-1). Combining high-resolution (Keck-OSIRIS) and large-radius (Gemini-GMOS) spectroscopic maps, only available at low z, we discover that these targets have ˜ 3 times less stellar angular momentum than typical local spiral galaxies of equal stellar mass and bulge fraction. Theoretical considerations show that this deficiency in angular momentum is the main cause of their low stability, while the high gas fraction plays a complementary role. Interestingly, the low {j}s values of our targets are similar to those expected in the {M}s* population at higher z from the approximate theoretical scaling {j}s\\propto {(1+z)}-1/2 at fixed {M}s. This suggests that a change in angular momentum, driven by cosmic expansion, is the main cause for the remarkable difference between clumpy {M}s* disks at high z (which likely evolve into early-type galaxies) and mass-matched local spirals.

  10. Stellar Nuclei and Inner Polar Disks in Lenticular Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sil’chenko, Olga K.

    2016-09-01

    I analyze statistics of the stellar population properties for stellar nuclei and bulges of nearby lenticular galaxies in different environments by using panoramic spectral data of the integral-field spectrograph SAURON retrieved from the open archive of the Isaac Newton Group. I also estimate the fraction of nearby lenticular galaxies having inner polar gaseous disks by exploring the volume-limited sample of early-type galaxies of the ATLAS-3D survey. By inspecting the two-dimensional velocity fields of the stellar and gaseous components with the running tilted-ring technique, I have found seven new cases of inner polar disks. Together with those, the frequency of inner polar disks in nearby S0 galaxies reaches 10%, which is much higher than the frequency of large-scale polar rings. Interestingly, the properties of the nuclear stellar populations in the inner polar ring hosts are statistically the same as those in the whole S0 sample, implying similar histories of multiple gas-accretion events from various directions.

  11. OUR MILKY WAY AS A PURE-DISK GALAXY-A CHALLENGE FOR GALAXY FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Juntai; Rich, R. Michael; Howard, Christian D.; Kormendy, John; De Propris, Roberto; Kunder, Andrea

    2010-09-01

    Bulges are commonly believed to form in the dynamical violence of galaxy collisions and mergers. Here, we model the stellar kinematics of the Bulge Radial Velocity Assay (BRAVA) and find no sign that the Milky Way contains a classical bulge formed by scrambling pre-existing disks of stars in major mergers. Rather, the bulge appears to be a bar seen somewhat end-on, as hinted from its asymmetric boxy shape. We construct a simple but realistic N-body model of the Galaxy that self-consistently develops a bar. The bar immediately buckles and thickens in the vertical direction. As seen from the Sun, the result resembles the boxy bulge of our Galaxy. The model fits the BRAVA stellar kinematic data covering the whole bulge strikingly well with no need for a merger-made classical bulge. The bar in our best-fit model has a half-length of {approx}4 kpc and extends 20{sup 0} from the Sun-Galactic center line. We use the new kinematic constraints to show that any classical bulge contribution cannot be larger than {approx}8% of the disk mass. Thus, the Galactic bulge is a part of the disk and not a separate component made in a prior merger. Giant, pure-disk galaxies like our own present a major challenge to the standard picture in which galaxy formation is dominated by hierarchical clustering and galaxy mergers.

  12. Shocked Outflows and Gas Disks in Local Merging Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Kurt; Martin, C. L.; Prescott, M. K. M.; Armus, L.

    2012-01-01

    We have mapped the kinematic and physical properties of gas emitting optical emission lines across 39 gas-rich mergers, which were previously shown to host tidally-induced gas inflows, with deep ESI spectroscopy. In our unique analysis of these longslit spectra, we fitted multiple kinematic components to forbidden lines and recombination lines simultaneously, enabling an examination of the excitation mechanism in different kinematic components. We identify many rotating gas disks in systems whose stellar component is no longer a disk due to the merger. Many of these disks present gas excited by hot stars, but some of the disks present shock-like ratios of diagnostic emission lines, an observation we attribute to the collision of the two galaxies. In another subset of galaxies, we find very broad (sigma > 150 km/s) emission components that also present shock-like emission-line ratios. The large spatial extent of this emission favors shocks over the narrow-line region of a hidden AGN as the excitation mechanism. The high star formation rate, high dust content, and blueshift of the broad emission further suggest an origin in a galactic outflow. If this interpretation is correct, then our study of these nearby galaxies provides important insight for interpreting the broad emission lines associated with giant star-forming clumps in z 2 galaxies. It also shows that galactic outflows can be recognized via resolved emission lines, in addition to absorption lines, even in integrated spectra; and this technique could prove very powerful for studying galactic outflows in infrared spectra of high-redshift galaxies in the future. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under contract 0808161.

  13. The Red Halos of Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zackrisson, E.; Bergvall, N.; Flynn, C.; Caldwell, B.; Östlin, G.; Micheva, G.

    2008-10-01

    Deep optical/near-IR surface photometry of galaxies outside the Local Group have revealed the existence of faint and very red halos around objects as diverse as spirals and blue compact galaxies. The colors of these structures are much too extreme to be reconciled with resolved stellar populations like those seen in the halos of the Milky Way or M 31, and alternative explanations like dust reddening, high metallicities or nebular emission are also disfavored. A stellar population obeying an extremely bottom-heavy initial mass function, similar to that recently reported for the LMC field population, is on the other hand consistent with all available data. Because of its high mass-to-light ratio, such a population would effectively behave as baryonic dark matter and could account for some of the baryons still missing from local inventories. Here, we report on a number of recent developments in this field.

  14. Significant Enhancement of H2 Formation in Disk Galaxies under Strong Ram Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Benjamin; Bekki, Kenji

    2016-05-01

    We show for the first time that H2 formation on dust grains can be enhanced in disk galaxies under strong ram pressure (RP). We numerically investigate how the time evolution of H i and H2 components in disk galaxies orbiting a group/cluster of galaxies can be influenced by the hydrodynamical interaction between the gaseous components of the galaxies and the hot intracluster medium. We find that compression of H i caused by RP increases H2 formation in disk galaxies before RP rapidly strips H i, cutting off the fuel supply and causing a drop in H2 density. We also find that the level of this H2 formation enhancement in a disk galaxy under RP depends on the mass of its host cluster dark matter halo, the initial positions and velocities of the disk galaxy, and the disk inclination angle with respect to the orbital plane. We demonstrate that dust growth is a key factor in the evolution of the H i and H2 mass in disk galaxies under strong RP. We discuss how the correlation between H2 fractions and surface gas densities of disk galaxies evolves with time in the galaxies under RP. We also discuss whether galaxy-wide star formation rates (SFRs) in cluster disk galaxies can be enhanced by RP if the SFRs depend on H2 densities.

  15. Three-dimensional organization of nascent rod outer segment disk membranes

    PubMed Central

    Volland, Stefanie; Hughes, Louise C.; Kong, Christina; Burgess, Barry L.; Linberg, Kenneth A.; Luna, Gabriel; Zhou, Z. Hong; Fisher, Steven K.; Williams, David S.

    2015-01-01

    The vertebrate photoreceptor cell contains an elaborate cilium that includes a stack of phototransductive membrane disks. The disk membranes are continually renewed, but how new disks are formed remains poorly understood. Here we used electron microscope tomography to obtain 3D visualization of the nascent disks of rod photoreceptors in three mammalian species, to gain insight into the process of disk morphogenesis. We observed that nascent disks are invariably continuous with the ciliary plasma membrane, although, owing to partial enclosure, they can appear to be internal in 2D profiles. Tomographic analyses of the basal-most region of the outer segment show changes in shape of the ciliary plasma membrane indicating an invagination, which is likely a first step in disk formation. The invagination flattens to create the proximal surface of an evaginating lamella, as well as membrane protrusions that extend between adjacent lamellae, thereby initiating a disk rim. Immediately distal to this initiation site, lamellae of increasing diameter are evident, indicating growth outward from the cilium. In agreement with a previous model, our data indicate that mature disks are formed once lamellae reach full diameter, and the growth of a rim encloses the space between adjacent surfaces of two lamellae. This study provides 3D data of nascent and mature rod photoreceptor disk membranes at unprecedented z-axis depth and resolution, and provides a basis for addressing fundamental questions, ranging from protein sorting in the photoreceptor cilium to photoreceptor electrophysiology. PMID:26578801

  16. MISALIGNED DISKS AS OBSCURERS IN ACTIVE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, Andy; Elvis, Martin

    2010-05-01

    We critically review the evidence concerning the fraction of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) that appear as Type 2 AGNs, carefully distinguishing strict Type 2 AGNs from both more lightly reddened Type 1 AGNs, and from low excitation narrow line AGNs, which may represent a different mode of activity. Low-excitation AGNs occur predominantly at low luminosities; after removing these, true Type 2 AGNs represent 58% {+-} 5% of all AGNs, and lightly reddened Type 1 AGNs a further {approx}15%. Radio, IR, and volume-limited samples all agree in showing no change of Type 2 fraction with luminosity. X-ray samples do show a change with luminosity; we discuss possible reasons for this discrepancy. We test a very simple picture which produces this Type 2 fraction with minimal assumptions. In this picture, infall from large scales occurs in random directions, but must eventually align with the inner accretion flow, producing a severely warped disk on parsec scales. If the re-alignment is dominated by tilt, with minimal twist, a wide range of covering factors is predicted in individual objects, but with an expected mean fraction of Type 2 AGNs of exactly 50%. This 'tilted disk' picture predicts reasonable alignment of observed nuclear structures on average, but with distinct misalignments in individual cases. Initial case studies of the few well-resolved objects show that such misalignments are indeed present.

  17. The Chemical Composition of a Molecular Cloud at the Outer Edge of the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubowich, D. A.; Brammer, G.; Roberts, H.; Millar, T. J.; Henkel, C.; Pasachoff, J. M.

    Centimeter and millimeter-wave observations of a molecular cloud at the extreme outer edge of the Galactic disk (kinematic ga lactocentric distance: ˜28 kpc) are presented. We detected CO, 13CO, 18CO, CS, CN, SO, HCN, HNC, C2H, HCO+, H13CO+, HCS+, NH3, H2CO, C3H2 and CH3OH, while 17CO, 34CS, SiO, SiS, N2H+, D CN, DNC, DCO+, SO2 and HC3N remained undetected. From the NH3 and H2CO data, a kinetic temperature of Tkin ˜20 K and a density of n(H2) ˜5×103 cm-3 are derived. Nitrogen bearing molecules show , when detected, only weak lines. Commonly strong line emitters such as N2H+ and HC3N were not seen. Using a numeri cal network including 5300 chemical reactions we determined that N is depleted by approximately 24 times, and the metallicit y is reduced by a factor of five (similar to dwarf irregular galaxies or damped Lyman alpha systems) relative to the solar ne ighborhood. These unusual abundances are probably the result of the infall of halo gas enriched in O, C, and S from a burst o f massive star formation in the Galactic halo shortly after the Milky Way was formed. This activity would have produced both O and S, which are produced by massive stars; C, which is produced by massive and intermediate mass stars; but less N abundan ce because the secondary element N is produced primarily from low mass stars. Thus the edge cloud probably results from infal ling halo gas from the early Galaxy that was not significantly processed during the last 10 Gyr and provides a new way to und erstand the origin of the Galactic disk. Our observations of the early Galactic disk abundances will constrain models of nu cleosynthesis, Galactic chemical evolution, and astrochemistry.

  18. A MOLECULAR SPIRAL ARM IN THE FAR OUTER GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Dame, T. M.; Thaddeus, P. E-mail: pthaddeus@cfa.harvard.edu

    2011-06-10

    We have identified a spiral arm lying beyond the Outer Arm in the first Galactic quadrant {approx}15 kpc from the Galactic center. After tracing the arm in existing 21 cm surveys, we searched for molecular gas using the CfA 1.2 m telescope and detected CO at 10 of 220 positions. The detections are distributed along the arm from l = 13{sup 0}, v = -21 km s{sup -1} to l = 55{sup 0}, v = -84 km s{sup -1} and coincide with most of the main H I concentrations. One of the detections was fully mapped to reveal a large molecular cloud with a radius of 47 pc and a molecular mass of {approx}50,000 M{sub sun}. At a mean distance of 21 kpc, the molecular gas in this arm is the most distant yet detected in the Milky Way. The new arm appears to be the continuation of the Scutum-Centaurus Arm in the outer Galaxy, as a symmetric counterpart of the nearby Perseus Arm.

  19. Star formation in the outer Galaxy: coronal properties of NGC 1893

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caramazza, M.; Micela, G.; Prisinzano, L.; Sciortino, S.; Damiani, F.; Favata, F.; Stauffer, J. R.; Vallenari, A.; Wolk, S. J.

    2012-03-01

    Context. The outer Galaxy, where the environmental conditions are different from the solar neighborhood, is a laboratory in which it is possible to investigate the dependence of star formation process on the environmental parameters. Aims: We investigate the X-ray properties of NGC 1893, a young cluster (~1-2 Myr) in the outer part of the Galaxy (galactic radius ≥11 kpc) where we expect differences in the disk evolution and in the mass distribution of the stars, to explore the X-ray emission of its members and compare it with that of young stars in star-forming regions near to the Sun. Methods: We analyze 5 deep Chandra ACIS-I observations with a total exposure time of 450 ks. Source events of the 1021 X-ray sources have been extracted with the IDL-based routine ACIS-Extract. Using spectral fitting and quantile analysis of X-ray spectra, we derive X-ray luminosities and compare the respective properties of Class II and Class III members. We also evaluate the variability of sources using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and identify flares in the lightcurves. Results: The X-ray luminosity of NGC 1893 X-ray members is in the range 1029.5-1031.5 erg s-1. Diskless stars are brighter in X-rays than disk-bearing stars, given the same bolometric luminosity. We found that 34% of the 1021 lightcurves appear variable and that they show 0.16 flare per source, on average. Comparing our results with those relative to the Orion Nebula Cluster, we find that, by accounting for observational biases, the X-ray properties of NGC 1893 and the Orion ones are very similar. Conclusions: The X-ray properties in NGC 1893 are not affected by the environment and the stellar population in the outer Galaxy may have the same coronal properties of nearby star-forming regions. The X-ray luminosity properties and the X-ray luminosity function appear to be universal and can therefore be used for estimating distances and for determining stellar properties. Full Tables 1 and 3 are only available at the

  20. Pseudobulges in the Disk Galaxies NGC 7690 and NGC 4593

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kormendy, John; Cornell, Mark E.; Block, David L.; Knapen, Johan H.; Allard, Emma L.

    2006-05-01

    We present Ks-band surface photometry of NGC 7690 (Hubble type Sab) and NGC 4593 (SBb). We find that, in both galaxies, a major part of the ``bulge'' is as flat as the disk and has approximately the same color as the inner disk. In other words, the ``bulges'' of these galaxies have disklike properties. We conclude that these are examples of ``pseudobulges,'' that is, products of secular dynamical evolution. Nonaxisymmetries such as bars and oval disks transport disk gas toward the center. There star formation builds dense stellar components that look like-and often are mistaken for-merger-built bulges, but that were constructed slowly out of disk material. These pseudobulges can most easily be recognized when, as in the present galaxies, they retain disklike properties. NGC 7690 and NGC 4593 therefore contribute to the growing evidence that secular processes help to shape galaxies. NGC 4593 contains a nuclear ring of dust that is morphologically similar to nuclear rings of star formation that are seen in many barred and oval galaxies. The nuclear dust ring is connected to nearly radial dust lanes in the galaxy's bar. Such dust lanes are a signature of gas inflow. We suggest that gas is currently accumulating in the dust ring and hypothesize that the gas ring will starburst in the future. The observations of NGC 4593 therefore suggest that major starburst events that contribute to pseudobulge growth can be episodic. Based on observations made with the Anglo-Australian Telescope. Based in part on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the Data Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI). STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. The observations of NGC 7690 are associated with program IDs 7331 (NICMOS: M. Stiavelli) and 6359 (WFPC2: M. Stiavelli). The observations of NGC 4593 are associated with program IDs 7330 (NICMOS: J. Mulchaey), and 5479

  1. The Gas Distribution in the Outer Regions of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, D.; Vazza, F.; Ettori, S.; Molendi, S.; Nagai, D.; Lau, E. T.; Roncarelli, M.; Rossetti, M.; Snowden, L.; Gastaldello, F.

    2012-01-01

    Aims. We present our analysis of a local (z = 0.04 - 0.2) sample of 31 galaxy clusters with the aim of measuring the density of the X-ray emitting gas in cluster outskirts. We compare our results with numerical simulations to set constraints on the azimuthal symmetry and gas clumping in the outer regions of galaxy clusters. Methods. We have exploited the large field-of-view and low instrumental background of ROSAT/PSPC to trace the density of the intracluster gas out to the virial radius, We stacked the density profiles to detect a signal beyond T200 and measured the typical density and scatter in cluster outskirts. We also computed the azimuthal scatter of the profiles with respect to the mean value to look for deviations from spherical symmetry. Finally, we compared our average density and scatter profiles with the results of numerical simulations. Results. As opposed to some recent Suzaku results, and confirming previous evidence from ROSAT and Chandra, we observe a steepening of the density profiles beyond approximately r(sub 500). Comparing our density profiles with simulations, we find that non-radiative runs predict density profiles that are too steep, whereas runs including additional physics and/ or treating gas clumping agree better with the observed gas distribution. We report high-confidence detection of a systematic difference between cool-core and non cool-core clusters beyond approximately 0.3r(sub 200), which we explain by a different distribution of the gas in the two classes. Beyond approximately r(sub 500), galaxy clusters deviate significantly from spherical symmetry, with only small differences between relaxed and disturbed systems. We find good agreement between the observed and predicted scatter profiles, but only when the 1% densest clumps are filtered out in the ENZO simulations. Conclusions. Comparing our results with numerical simulations, we find that non-radiative simulations fail to reproduce the gas distribution, even well outside

  2. Observational and Numerical Diagnostics of Galaxy Cluster Outer Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, D.; Vazza, F.; Ettori, S.; Molendi, S.; Nagai, D.; Lau, E.; Roncarelli, M.; Rossetti, M.; Snowden, S. L.; Gastaldello, F.

    2011-01-01

    Aims. We present the analysis of a local (z = 0.04 - 0.2) sample of 31 galaxy clusters with the aim of measuring the density of the X-ray emitting gas in cluster outskirts. We compare our results with numerical simulations to set constraints on the azimuthal symmetry and gas clumping in the outer regions of galaxy clusters. Methods. We exploit the large field-of-view and low instrumental background of ROSAT/PSPC to trace the density of the intracluster gas out to the virial radius. We perform a stacking of the density profiles to detect a signal beyond r(sub 200) and measure the typical density and scatter in cluster outskirts. We also compute the azimuthal scatter of the profiles with respect to the mean value to look for deviations from spherical symmetry. Finally, we compare our average density and scatter profiles with the results of numerical simulations. Results. As opposed to several recent results, we observe a steepening of the density profiles beyond approximately 0.3r(sub 500). Comparing our density profiles with simulations, we find that non-radiative runs predict too steep density profiles, whereas runs including additional physics and/or gas clumping are in better agreement with the observed gas distribution. We note a systematic difference between cool-core and non-cool core clusters beyond approximately 0.3r(sub 200), which we explain by a different distribution of the gas in the two classes. Beyond approximately r(sub 500), galaxy clusters deviate significantly from spherical symmetry, with only little differences between relaxed and disturbed systems. We find good agreement between the observed and predicted scatter profiles, but only when the 1% densest clumps are filtered out in the simulations. Conclusions. The general trend of steepening density around the virial radius indicates that the shallow density profiles found in several recent works were probably obtained along particular directions (e.g., filaments) and are not representative of the

  3. The Gas Distribution in Galaxy Cluster Outer Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, D.; Vazza, F.; Ettori, S.; Molendi, S.; Nagai, D.; Laue, E. T.; Roncarelli, M.; Rossetti, M.; Snowden, S. L.; Gastaldello, F.

    2012-01-01

    Aims. We present the analysis of a local (z = 0.04 - 0.2) sample of 31 galaxy clusters with the aim of measuring the density of the X-ray emitting gas in cluster outskirts. We compare our results with numerical simulations to set constraints on the azimuthal symmetry and gas clumping in the outer regions of galaxy clusters. Methods. We exploit the large field-of-view and low instrumental background of ROSAT/PSPC to trace the density of the intracluster gas out to the virial radius. We perform a stacking of the density profiles to detect a signal beyond r200 and measure the typical density and scatter in cluster outskirts. We also compute the azimuthal scatter of the profiles with respect to the mean value to look for deviations from spherical symmetry. Finally, we compare our average density and scatter profiles with the results of numerical simulations. Results. As opposed to some recent Suzaku results, and confirming previous evidence from ROSAT and Chandra, we observe a steepening of the density profiles beyond approximately r(sub 500). Comparing our density profiles with simulations, we find that non-radiative runs predict too steep density profiles, whereas runs including additional physics and/or treating gas clumping are in better agreement with the observed gas distribution. We report for the first time the high-confidence detection of a systematic difference between cool-core and non-cool core clusters beyond 0.3r(sub 200), which we explain by a different distribution of the gas in the two classes. Beyond r(sub 500), galaxy clusters deviate significantly from spherical symmetry, with only little differences between relaxed and disturbed systems. We find good agreement between the observed and predicted scatter profiles, but only when the 1% densest clumps are filtered out in the simulations. Conclusions. Comparing our results with numerical simulations, we find that non-radiative simulations fail to reproduce the gas distribution, even well outside cluster

  4. DUST DISK AROUND A BLACK HOLE IN GALAXY NGC 4261

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a Hubble Space Telescope image of an 800-light-year-wide spiral-shaped disk of dust fueling a massive black hole in the center of galaxy, NGC 4261, located 100 million light-years away in the direction of the constellation Virgo. By measuring the speed of gas swirling around the black hole, astronomers calculate that the object at the center of the disk is 1.2 billion times the mass of our Sun, yet concentrated into a region of space not much larger than our solar system. The strikingly geometric disk -- which contains enough mass to make 100,000 stars like our Sun -- was first identified in Hubble observations made in 1992. These new Hubble images reveal for the first time structure in the disk, which may be produced by waves or instabilities in the disk. Hubble also reveals that the disk and black hole are offset from the center of NGC 4261, implying some sort of dynamical interaction is taking place, that has yet to be fully explained. Credit: L. Ferrarese (Johns Hopkins University) and NASA Image files in GIF and JPEG format, captions, and press release text may be accessed on Internet via anonymous ftp from oposite.stsci.edu in /pubinfo:

  5. Extraction of Rotational Velocities from Optical Rotation Curves of Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catinella, B.; Haynes, M. P.; Giovanelli, R.

    2002-12-01

    Long-slit spectra of spiral galaxies are widely used to complement 21 cm HI observations, providing rotational velocity widths for the application of the Tully-Fisher (TF) relation. The accuracy of the velocity width measurement is of a key importance for a TF-based peculiar velocity (PV) survey, being the single dominant contribution to the TF error budget (besides the intrinsic scatter). We have used a large database of H-alpha optical rotation curves (ORCs), HI-line profiles, and I-band photometry designed for PV studies to investigate the errors and systematics associated with the velocity width measurement. A detailed comparison between different methods of measuring velocity widths from ORCs shows the importance of taking the ORC shape into account. In particular, estimating a line width from the ORC velocity histogram alone introduces systematic errors that correlate with the slope of the outer regions of the ORC. We have also studied the dependence of the extent of the H-alpha emission on the HI deficiency, a measure of the HI content. We find that HI-poor disks also appear to be H-alpha-truncated. Since rotation curves are typically rising in the outer regions of the disks, the optical histogram widths of HI-deficient galaxies are therefore systematically underestimated compared to the ones of HI-normal galaxies. A more reliable width estimate can be obtained by fitting a function to the ORC and measuring the velocity at a fixed metric distance from the center of the disk. Rotational widths measured in this way can account for systematic and environmental effects. This work has been supported by NSF grant AST99-00695.

  6. Internal Absorption and the Luminosity of Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Boqi; Heckman, Timothy M.

    1996-02-01

    We investigate the correlation of the optical depth of dust in galactic disks with galaxy luminosity. We examine normal late-type (spiral and irregular) galaxies with measured far-ultraviolet (UV, λ ˜ 2000 Å) fluxes and compile the corresponding fluxes in the far-infrared (FIR, λ ˜ 40-120 μm) as measured by IRA S. The UV-to-FIR flux ratio is found to decrease rapidly with increasing FIR and FIR + UV luminosities. Since both the UV and FIR radiation originate mostly from the young stellar population in late-type galaxies, the UV-to-FIR flux ratio is a measure of the fraction of the light produced by young stars escaping from galaxy disks. Thus, the strong correlations above imply that the dust opacity increases with the luminosity of the young stellar population. We also find that the ratio of the UV-to-FIR flux decreases with increasing galaxy blue luminosity (a tracer of the intermediate-age stellar population) and with galaxy rotation speed (an indicator of galaxy mass). We supplement the UV sample of galaxies with an optically selected sample and find that the blue-to-FIR flux ratio declines with both FIR luminosity and galaxy rotation speed. We also examine a sample of galaxies for which the Hβ/Hα flux ratios can be obtained and find that the Hβ/Hα ratio, which also measures the extinction, decreases with the increasing FIR luminosity. We model the absorption and emission of radiation by dust to normal galactic disks with a simple model of a uniform plane-parallel slab in which the dust that radiates in the IRAS band is heated exclusively by UV light from relatively nearby hot stars. We then find that the relation between the UV-to-FIR flux ratio and the observed luminosities can be explained by the face-on extinction optical depth τ varying with the intrinsic luminosity as a power law in the intrinsic UV luminosity: τ = τ1(L/L1)β. The same scaling law may also account for the various correlations found between the blue-to-FIR flux ratio and

  7. The magnetic field in the disk of our Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, J. L.; Qiao, G. J.

    1994-08-01

    The magnetic field in the disk of our Galaxy is investigated by using the Rotation Measures (RMs) of pulsars and Extragalactic Radio Sources (ERSes). Through analyses of the RMs of carefully selected pulsar samples, it is found that the Galaxy has a global field of BiSymmetric Spiral (BSS) configuration, rather than a concentric ring or an AxiSymmetric Spiral (ASS) configuration. The Galactic magnetic field of BSS structure is supposed to be of primordial origin. The pitch angle of the BSS structure is -8.2deg+/-0.5deg. The field geometry shows that the field goes along the Carina-Sagittarius arm, which is delineated by Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs). The amplitude of the BSS field is 1.8+/-0.3μG. The first field strength maximum is at r_0_=11.9+/-0.15 kpc in the direction of l=180deg. The field is strong in the interarm regions and it reverses in the arm regions. In the vicinity of the Sun, it has a strength of ~1.4μG and reverses at 0.2-0.3kpc in the direction of l=0deg. Because of the unknown electron distribution of the Galaxy and other difficulties, it is impossible to derive the galactic field from the RMs of ERSes very quantitatively. Nevertheless, the RMs of ERSes located in the region of the two galactic poles are used to estimate the vertical component of the local galactic field, which is found to have a strength of 0.2-0.3μG and is directed from the south galactic pole to the north galactic pole. The scale height of the magnetic disk of the Galaxy is estimated from the RMs of all-sky distributed ERSes, being about 1.2+/-0.4pc. The regular magnetic field of our Galaxy, which is probably similar to that of M81, extends far from the optical disk.

  8. Warm to Cold HI Phase Transition in Galaxy Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radai, Yaron

    2012-10-01

    A well known feature of galaxy disks is the radial cutoff in star formation rate (SFR) and surface brightness while the HI component stretches far onwards. This suggests towards the existence of a star formation threshold (SFT) in the form of a critical gas column density, below which the SFR diminishes. This work advances our understanding of the SFT by studying the warm (~10,000K) to cold (~100K) HI phase transition in self-gravitating galactic gas disks. Assuming them thin, starless, isothermal, and warm, I construct a semi-analytic model for computing their physical properties under hydrostatic equilibrium and ionization-recombination balance. The disks are coupled via photoionizations to the metagalactic radiation background, and are confined by the pressure of a hot, ambient galactic corona. As a result, I find the critical columns under which the phase transition may and must occur at the mid-plane, thus bounding the critical column for cold gas formation between lower and upper limits and setting a lower limit upon the SFT. In the process I gain insight into the properties of warm gas galaxy disks, exposing a nice interplay between pressure, gravity, radiation and opacity.

  9. Ejection of Supernova-enriched Gas from Dwarf Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragile, P. Chris; Murray, Stephen D.; Lin, Douglas N. C.

    2004-12-01

    We examine the efficiency with which supernova-enriched gas may be ejected from dwarf disk galaxies, using a methodology previously employed to study the self-enrichment efficiency of dwarf spheroidal systems. Unlike previous studies that focused on highly concentrated starbursts, in the current work we consider discrete supernova events spread throughout various fractions of the disk. We model disk systems having gas masses of 108 and 109 Msolar with supernova rates of 30, 300, and 3000 Myr-1. The supernova events are confined to the midplane of the disk but distributed over radii of 0%, 30%, and 80% of the disk radius, consistent with expectations for Type II supernovae. In agreement with earlier studies, we find that the enriched material from supernovae is largely lost when the supernovae are concentrated near the nucleus, as expected for a starburst event. In contrast, however, we find the loss of enriched material to be much less efficient when the supernovae occur over even a relatively small fraction of the disk. The difference is due to the ability of the system to relax following supernova events that occur over more extended regions. Larger physical separations also reduce the likelihood of supernovae going off within low-density ``chimneys'' swept out by previous supernovae. We also find that for the most distributed systems, significant metal loss is more likely to be accompanied by significant mass loss. A comparison with theoretical predictions indicates that when undergoing self-regulated star formation, galaxies in the mass range considered will efficiently retain the products of Type II supernovae.

  10. The flaring Hi disk of the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 2683

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, B.; Nehlig, F.; Ibata, R.

    2016-02-01

    New deep VLA D array Hi observations of the highly inclined nearby spiral galaxy NGC 2683 are presented. Archival C array data were processed and added to the new observations. To investigate the 3D structure of the atomic gas disk, we made different 3D models for which we produced model Hi data cubes. The main ingredients of our best-fit model are (i) a thin disk inclined by 80°; (ii) a crude approximation of a spiral and/or bar structure by an elliptical surface density distribution of the gas disk; (iii) a slight warp in inclination between 10 kpc ≤ R ≤ 20 kpc (decreasing by 10°); (iv) an exponential flare that rises from 0.5 kpc at R = 9 kpc to 4 kpc at R = 15 kpc, stays constant until R = 22 kpc, and decreases its height for R> 22 kpc; and (v) a low surface-density gas ring with a vertical offset of 1.3 kpc. The slope of NGC 2683's flare is comparable, but somewhat steeper than those of other spiral galaxies. NGC 2683's maximum height of the flare is also comparable to those of other galaxies. On the other hand, a saturation of the flare is only observed in NGC 2683. Based on the comparison between the high resolution model and observations, we exclude the existence of an extended atomic gas halo around the optical and thin gas disk. Under the assumption of vertical hydrostatic equilibrium we derive the vertical velocity dispersion of the gas. The high turbulent velocity dispersion in the flare can be explained by energy injection by (i) supernovae; (ii) magneto-rotational instabilities; (iii) interstellar medium stirring by dark matter substructure; or (iv) external gas accretion. The existence of the complex large-scale warping and asymmetries favors external gas accretion as one of the major energy sources that drives turbulence in the outer gas disk. We propose a scenario where this external accretion leads to turbulent adiabatic compression that enhances the turbulent velocity dispersion and might quench star formation in the outer gas disk of NGC

  11. THE THICK DISKS OF SPIRAL GALAXIES AS RELICS FROM GAS-RICH, TURBULENT, CLUMPY DISKS AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Bournaud, Frederic; Martig, Marie; Elmegreen, Bruce G.

    2009-12-10

    The formation of thick stellar disks in spiral galaxies is studied. Simulations of gas-rich young galaxies show formation of internal clumps by gravitational instabilities, clump coalescence into a bulge, and disk thickening by strong stellar scattering. The bulge and thick disks of modern galaxies may form this way. Simulations of minor mergers make thick disks too, but there is an important difference. Thick disks made by internal processes have a constant scale height with galactocentric radius, but thick disks made by mergers flare. The difference arises because in the first case, perpendicular forcing and disk-gravity resistance are both proportional to the disk column density, so the resulting scale height is independent of this density. In the case of mergers, perpendicular forcing is independent of the column density and the low-density regions get thicker; the resulting flaring is inconsistent with observations. Late-stage gas accretion and thin-disk growth are shown to preserve the constant scale heights of thick disks formed by internal evolution. These results reinforce the idea that disk galaxies accrete most of their mass smoothly and acquire their structure by internal processes, in particular through turbulent and clumpy phases at high redshift.

  12. Misaligned Disks as Obscurers in Active Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, A.; Elvis, M.; /Edinburgh U., Inst. Astron. /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2010-06-02

    We review critically the evidence concerning the fraction of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) which appear as Type 2 AGN, carefully distinguishing strict Type 2 AGN from both more lightly reddened Type 1 AGN, and from low excitation narrow line AGN, which may represent a different mode of activity. Low excitation AGN occur predominantly at low luminosities; after removing these, true Type 2 AGN represent 58{-+}5% of all AGN, and lightly reddened Type 1 AGN a further {approx}15%. Radio, IR, and volume-limited samples all agree in showing no change of Type 2 fraction with luminosity. X-ray samples do show a change with luminosity; we discuss possible reasons for this discrepancy. We test a very simple picture which produces this Type 2 fraction with minimal assumptions. In this picture, infall from large scales occurs in random directions, but must eventually align with the inner accretion flow, producing a severely warped disk on parsec scales. If the re-alignment is dominated by tilt, with minimal twist, a wide range of covering factors is predicted in individual objects, but with an expected mean fraction of Type 2 AGN of exactly 50%. This 'tilted disc' picture predicts reasonable alignment of observed nuclear structures on average, but with distinct misalignments in individual cases. Initial case studies of the few well resolved objects show that such misalignments are indeed present.

  13. Physical Properties of Tidal Features of Interacting Disk Galaxies: Three-dimensional Self-consistent Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Sang Hoon; Kim, Woong-Tae; Lee, Hyung Mok

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the physical properties of non-axisymmetric features in a disk of a Milky-Way type galaxy created by a tidal interaction with its companion using self-consistent three-dimensional N-body simulations. By varying the companion mass and the pericenter distance, we explore various situations with different tidal strength parameterized by the relative tidal force P or the relative imparted momentum S. A stronger interaction results in a stronger but less wound tail that forms earlier. We find that formation of a stellar tidal tail in the outer part of the disk requires P ≳ 0.05 or S ≳ 0.07. Similarly, a strong tidal forcing produces stronger, more loosely wound spiral arms in the inner parts. The arms are approximately logarithmic in shape, with their amplitude and pitch angle decaying with time. The pattern speed of the arms decreases with radius and is close to the Ω-κ/2 curve, with Ω and κ denoting the angular and epicyclic frequencies, respectively, suggesting that the tidally-induced spiral arms are most likely kinematic density waves weakly modified by self-gravity. The three-dimensional density structure of the arms in non-linear regime is well described by the concentrated model while the arms in linear regime the sinusoidal model fits well. We also demonstrate that dynamical friction between interacting galaxies transfers the orbital angular momentum of one galaxy to the spin angular momentum of the companion’s halo.

  14. Not a galaxy: IRAS 04186+5143, a new young stellar cluster in the outer Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, J. L.; Elia, Davide; Djupvik, A. A.; Torrelles, J. M.; Molinari, S.

    2015-09-01

    We report the discovery of a new young stellar cluster in the outer Galaxy located at the position of an IRAS Point Source Catalog source that has been previously misidentified as an external galaxy. The cluster is seen in our near-infrared imaging towards IRAS 04186+5143 and in archive Spitzer images confirming the young stellar nature of the sources detected. There is also evidence of subclustering seen in the spatial distributions of young stars and of gas and dust. Near- and mid-infrared photometry indicates that the stars exhibit colours compatible with reddening by interstellar and circumstellar dust and are likely to be low- and intermediate-mass young stellar objects (YSOs) with a large proportion of Class I YSOs. Ammonia and CO lines were detected, with the CO emission well centred near the position of the richest part of the cluster. The velocity of the CO and NH3 lines indicates that the gas is Galactic and located at a distance of about 5.5 kpc, in the outer Galaxy. Herschel data of this region characterize the dust environment of this molecular cloud core where the young cluster is embedded. We derive masses, luminosities, and temperatures of the molecular clumps where the young stars reside and discuss their evolutionary stages.

  15. Dynamics of Non-steady Spiral Arms in Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, Junichi; Saitoh, Takayuki R.; Wada, Keiichi

    2013-01-01

    In order to understand the physical mechanisms underlying non-steady stellar spiral arms in disk galaxies, we analyzed the growing and damping phases of their spiral arms using three-dimensional N-body simulations. We confirmed that the spiral arms are formed due to a swing amplification mechanism that reinforces density enhancement as a seeded wake. In the damping phase, the Coriolis force exerted on a portion of the arm surpasses the gravitational force that acts to shrink the portion. Consequently, the stars in the portion escape from the arm, and subsequently they form a new arm at a different location. The time-dependent nature of the spiral arms originates in the continual repetition of this nonlinear phenomenon. Since a spiral arm does not rigidly rotate, but follows the galactic differential rotation, the stars in the arm rotate at almost the same rate as the arm. In other words, every single position in the arm can be regarded as the corotation point. Due to interaction with their host arms, the energy and angular momentum of the stars change, thereby causing radial migration of the stars. During this process, the kinetic energy of random motion (random energy) of the stars does not significantly increase, and the disk remains dynamically cold. Owing to this low degree of disk heating, short-lived spiral arms can recurrently develop over many rotational periods. The resultant structure of the spiral arms in the N-body simulations is consistent with the observational nature of spiral galaxies. We conclude that the formation and structure of spiral arms in isolated disk galaxies can be reasonably understood by nonlinear interactions between a spiral arm and its constituent stars.

  16. DYNAMICS OF NON-STEADY SPIRAL ARMS IN DISK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Junichi; Saitoh, Takayuki R.; Wada, Keiichi

    2013-01-20

    In order to understand the physical mechanisms underlying non-steady stellar spiral arms in disk galaxies, we analyzed the growing and damping phases of their spiral arms using three-dimensional N-body simulations. We confirmed that the spiral arms are formed due to a swing amplification mechanism that reinforces density enhancement as a seeded wake. In the damping phase, the Coriolis force exerted on a portion of the arm surpasses the gravitational force that acts to shrink the portion. Consequently, the stars in the portion escape from the arm, and subsequently they form a new arm at a different location. The time-dependent nature of the spiral arms originates in the continual repetition of this nonlinear phenomenon. Since a spiral arm does not rigidly rotate, but follows the galactic differential rotation, the stars in the arm rotate at almost the same rate as the arm. In other words, every single position in the arm can be regarded as the corotation point. Due to interaction with their host arms, the energy and angular momentum of the stars change, thereby causing radial migration of the stars. During this process, the kinetic energy of random motion (random energy) of the stars does not significantly increase, and the disk remains dynamically cold. Owing to this low degree of disk heating, short-lived spiral arms can recurrently develop over many rotational periods. The resultant structure of the spiral arms in the N-body simulations is consistent with the observational nature of spiral galaxies. We conclude that the formation and structure of spiral arms in isolated disk galaxies can be reasonably understood by nonlinear interactions between a spiral arm and its constituent stars.

  17. Galactic evolution. II - Disk galaxies with massive halos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostriker, J. P.; Thuan, T. X.

    1975-01-01

    Models of galactic evolution are computed in which matter shed by dying halo stars accumulates in a smaller, more rapidly rotating disk. The models are simpler and more successful than one-zone (pure disk) models in that (1) the observed absence of low-metal-abundance low-mass dwarfs is expected, not anomalous and (2) the relative birthrate function (or IMF) need not be a strongly variable function of time in agreement with recent interpretations of observed stellar populations and neutral hydrogen in our own and other galaxies. Even a simple 'Salpeter' IMF for both disk and halo will produce an acceptable model. The model with a halo 'Salpeter' IMF, roughly one-quarter of the mass in the secondary disk, and approximately half the metals produced in the halo seems most compatible with observations of the metal abundance in low-mass stars, the deuterium abundance, halo planetary nebulae, and light from Population II stars, as well as with arguments on the stability of the disk.

  18. High-Velocity Clouds and Superbubbles in Nearby Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulman, Eric

    1996-05-01

    The galactic fountain model predicts that energetic stellar winds and supernovae in OB associations produce superbubbles containing hot gas that breaks out of the Galactic disk, cools radiatively as it rises upward, and recombines and returns to the disk ballistically. The hot (T ~ 10^6 K) gas can be observed with X-ray telescopes, while the cool returning neutral hydrogen (H I) is detectable as 21 cm emission from high-velocity clouds (HVCs). In the Milky Way Galaxy, a combination of infalling material tidally torn from the Magellanic Clouds and a galactic fountain can explain the high-velocity clouds that cover about 10% of the sky down to a column density of 2 to 3 X 10^18 cm^-2. Sensitive H I observations of nearby disk galaxies were performed with the Arecibo 305 m radio telescope to search for and measure the mass of HVCs in other galaxies. Ten of 14 galaxies have high-velocity wings that can be modeled as arising from a component of galactic gas with a velocity dispersion of 30 or 50 km s^-1. The HVC mass for the 10 galaxies ranges from 6 X 10^7 solar mass to 4 X 10^9 solar mass, which corresponds to 4 to 14% of the total H I in the galaxies. This is the first survey to search for HVCs in more than a few galaxies, and the results imply that Galactic HVCs are a disk-wide phenomenon with a characteristic distance of 10 to 20 kpc, containing a substantial fraction (~10%) of the neutral hydrogen in the Galaxy and much of the random kinetic energy in neutral gas. 21 cm synthesis imaging of UGC 12732 and NGC 5668, performed with the Very Large Array, confirmed the Arecibo results that the former does not have high-velocity gas while the latter does. Two components of high-velocity gas are present in NGC~5668; one may be from an accretion event, while the other is visible due to the increased H I velocity dispersion throughout the optical disk and may be galactic fountain gas. Neither of these components are visible in the observations of UGC 12732, and this galaxy

  19. SIMULATIONS OF DISK GALAXIES WITH COSMIC RAY DRIVEN GALACTIC WINDS

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, C. M.; Agertz, Oscar; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2013-11-01

    We present results from high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations of isolated Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC)- and Milky-Way-sized galaxies that include a model for feedback from galactic cosmic rays (CRs). We find that CRs are naturally able to drive winds with mass loading factors of up to ∼10 in dwarf systems. The scaling of the mass loading factor with circular velocity between the two simulated systems is consistent with η∝v{sub circ}{sup 1-2} required to reproduce the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function. In addition, simulations with CR feedback reproduce both the normalization and the slope of the observed trend of wind velocity with galaxy circular velocity. We find that winds in simulations with CR feedback exhibit qualitatively different properties compared to supernova-driven winds, where most of acceleration happens violently in situ near star forming sites. The CR-driven winds are accelerated gently by the large-scale pressure gradient established by CRs diffusing from the star-forming galaxy disk out into the halo. The CR-driven winds also exhibit much cooler temperatures and, in the SMC-sized system, warm (T ∼ 10{sup 4} K) gas dominates the outflow. The prevalence of warm gas in such outflows may provide a clue as to the origin of ubiquitous warm gas in the gaseous halos of galaxies detected via absorption lines in quasar spectra.

  20. Physical Properties of Tidal Features of Interacting Disk Galaxies: Three-dimensional Self-consistent Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Sang Hoon; Kim, Woong-Tae; Lee, Hyung Mok

    2015-07-01

    Using self-consistent three-dimensional (3D) N-body simulations, we investigate the physical properties of nonaxisymmetric features in a disk galaxy created by a tidal interaction with its companion. The primary galaxy consists of a stellar disk, a bulge, and a live halo, corresponding to Milky-Way-type galaxies, while the companion is represented by a halo alone. We vary the companion mass and the pericenter distance to explore situations with differing tidal strength parameterized by either the relative tidal force P or the relative imparted momentum S. We find that the formation of a tidal tail in the outer parts requires P≳ 0.05 or S≳ 0.07. A stronger interaction results in a stronger, less wound tail that forms earlier. Similarly, a stronger tidal forcing produces stronger, more loosely wound spiral arms in the inner parts. The arms are approximately logarithmic in shape, with both amplitude and pitch angle decaying with time. The derived pattern speed decreases with radius and is close to the {{Ω }}-κ /2 curve at late time, with Ω and κ denoting the angular and epicycle frequencies, respectively. This suggests that the tidally induced spiral arms are most likely kinematic density waves weakly modified by self-gravity. Compared to the razor-thin counterparts, arms in the 3D models are weaker, have a smaller pitch angle, and wind and decay more rapidly. The 3D density structure of the arms is well described by the concentrated and sinusoidal models when the arms are in the nonlinear and linear regimes, respectively. We demonstrate that dynamical friction between interacting galaxies transfers the orbital angular momentum of one galaxy to the spin angular momentum of the companion halo.

  1. Merger Histories of Galaxy Halos and Implications for Disk Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Kyle R.; Bullock, James S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Maller, Ariyeh H.; Zentner, Andrew R.

    2008-05-16

    The authors study the merger histories of galaxy dark matter halos using a high resolution {Lambda}CDM N-body simulation. The merger trees follow {approx} 17,000 halos with masses M{sub 0} = (10{sup 11} - 10{sup 13})h{sup -1}M{sub {circle_dot}} at z = 0 and track accretion events involving objects as small as m {approx_equal} 10{sup 10} h{sup -1}M{sub {circle_dot}}. They find that mass assembly is remarkably self-similar in m/M{sub 0}, and dominated by mergers that are {approx}10% of the final halo mass. While very large mergers, m {approx}> 0.4 M{sub 0}, are quite rare, sizeable accretion events, m {approx} 0.1 M{sub 0}, are common. Over the last {approx} 10 Gyr, an overwhelming majority ({approx} 95%) of Milky Way-sized halos with M{sub 0} = 10{sup 12} h{sup -1}M{sub {circle_dot}} have accreted at least one object with greater total mass than the Milky Way disk (m > 5 x 10{sup 10} h{sup -1}M{sub {circle_dot}}), and approximately 70% have accreted an object with more than twice that mass (m > 10{sup 11} h{sup -1}M{sub {circle_dot}}). The results raise serious concerns about the survival of thin-disk dominated galaxies within the current paradigm for galaxy formation in a {Lambda}CDM universe. in order to achieve a {approx} 70% disk-dominated fraction in Milky Way-sized {Lambda}CDM halos, mergers involving m {approx_equal} 2 x 10{sup 11} h{sup -1}M{sub {circle_dot}} objects must not destroy disks. Considering that most thick disks and bulges contain old stellar populations, the situation is even more restrictive: these mergers must not heat disks or drive gas into their centers to create young bulges.

  2. Near-infrared Structure of Fast and Slow-rotating Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schechtman-Rook, Andrew; Bershady, Matthew A.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the stellar disk structure of six nearby edge-on spiral galaxies using high-resolution JHK s-band images and three-dimensional radiative transfer models. To explore how mass and environment shape spiral disks, we selected galaxies with rotational velocities between 69 km s-1 disk structure. Of the fast-rotating (V rot > 150 km s-1) galaxies, only NGC 4013 has the super-thin+thin+thick nested disk structure seen in NGC 891 and the Milky Way, albeit with decreased oblateness, while NGC 1055, a disturbed massive spiral galaxy, contains disks with hz <~ 200 pc. NGC 4565, another fast-rotator, contains a prominent ring at a radius ~5 kpc but no super-thin disk. Despite these differences, all fast-rotating galaxies in our sample have inner truncations in at least one of their disks. These truncations lead to Freeman Type II profiles when projected face-on. Slow-rotating galaxies are less complex, lacking inner disk truncations and requiring fewer disk components to reproduce their light distributions. Super-thin disk components in undisturbed disks contribute ~25% of the total K s-band light, up to that of the thin-disk contribution. The presence of super-thin disks correlates with infrared flux ratios; galaxies with super-thin disks have f{K_s}/f60 μ m ≤ 0.12 for integrated light, consistent with super-thin disks being regions of ongoing star-formation. Attenuation-corrected vertical color gradients in (J - K s) correlate with the observed disk structure and are consistent with population gradients with young-to-intermediate ages closer to the mid-plane, indicating that disk heating—or cooling—is a ubiquitous phenomenon.

  3. Unveiling the structure of barred galaxies at 3.6 μm with the Spitzer survey of stellar structure in galaxies (S{sup 4}G). I. Disk breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Taehyun; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Muñoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Sheth, Kartik; Madore, Barry F.; Ho, Luis C.; Elmegreen, Bruce; Knapen, Johan H.; Cisternas, Mauricio; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Zaritsky, Dennis; Comerón, Sébastien; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki; Holwerda, Benne; Hinz, Joannah L.; Buta, Ron; and others

    2014-02-20

    We have performed two-dimensional multicomponent decomposition of 144 local barred spiral galaxies using 3.6 μm images from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies. Our model fit includes up to four components (bulge, disk, bar, and a point source) and, most importantly, takes into account disk breaks. We find that ignoring the disk break and using a single disk scale length in the model fit for Type II (down-bending) disk galaxies can lead to differences of 40% in the disk scale length, 10% in bulge-to-total luminosity ratio (B/T), and 25% in bar-to-total luminosity ratios. We find that for galaxies with B/T ≥ 0.1, the break radius to bar radius, r {sub br}/R {sub bar}, varies between 1 and 3, but as a function of B/T the ratio remains roughly constant. This suggests that in bulge-dominated galaxies the disk break is likely related to the outer Lindblad resonance of the bar and thus moves outward as the bar grows. For galaxies with small bulges, B/T < 0.1, r {sub br}/R {sub bar} spans a wide range from 1 to 6. This suggests that the mechanism that produces the break in these galaxies may be different from that in galaxies with more massive bulges. Consistent with previous studies, we conclude that disk breaks in galaxies with small bulges may originate from bar resonances that may be also coupled with the spiral arms, or be related to star formation thresholds.

  4. SELF-PERPETUATING SPIRAL ARMS IN DISK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    D'Onghia, Elena; Vogelsberger, Mark; Hernquist, Lars

    2013-03-20

    The causes of spiral structure in galaxies remain uncertain. Leaving aside the grand bisymmetric spirals with their own well-known complications, here we consider the possibility that multi-armed spiral features originate from density inhomogeneities orbiting within disks. Using high-resolution N-body simulations, we follow the motions of stars under the influence of gravity, and show that mass concentrations with properties similar to those of giant molecular clouds can induce the development of spiral arms through a process termed swing amplification. However, unlike in earlier work, we demonstrate that the eventual response of the disk can be highly non-linear, significantly modifying the formation and longevity of the resulting patterns. Contrary to expectations, ragged spiral structures can thus survive at least in a statistical sense long after the original perturbing influence has been removed.

  5. Efficiency of particle trapping in the outer regions of protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Jacob B.; Armitage, Philip J.

    2014-03-20

    We investigate the strength of axisymmetric local pressure maxima (zonal flows) in the outer regions of protoplanetary disks, where ambipolar diffusion reduces turbulent stresses driven by the magnetorotational instability. Using local numerical simulations we show that in the absence of net vertical magnetic fields, the strength of turbulence in the ambipolar dominated region of the disk is low and any zonal flows that are present are weak. For net fields strong enough to yield observed protostellar accretion rates, however, zonal flows with a density amplitude of 10%-20% are formed. These strengths are comparable to those seen in simulations of ideal MHD disk turbulence. We investigate whether these zonal flows are able to reverse the inward radial drift of solids, leading to prolonged and enhanced concentration as a prelude to planetesimal formation. For commonly assumed mean surface density profiles (surface density Σ∝r {sup –1/2} or steeper) we find that the predicted perturbations to the background disk profile do not correspond to local pressure maxima. This is a consequence of radial width of the simulated zonal flows, which is larger than was assumed in prior analytic models of particle trapping. These larger scale flows would only trap particles for higher amplitude fluctuations than observed. We conclude that zonal flows are likely to be present in the outer regions of protoplanetary disks and are potentially large enough to be observable, but are unlikely to lead to strong particle trapping.

  6. Erratum: Precision Velocity Fields in Spiral Galaxies. I. Noncircular Motions and rms Noise in Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauvais, Charles; Bothun, G.

    2000-05-01

    In the paper ``Precision Velocity Fields in Spiral Galaxies. I. Noncircular Motions and rms Noise in Disks'' by Charles Beauvais and G. Bothun (ApJS, 125, 99) the abstract was incorrect. The corrected abstract is as follows: Imaging Fabry-Perot data have been acquired for a sample of spiral galaxies from which two-dimensional velocity fields have been constructed on a subkiloparsec resolution scale. These velocity fields are then examined for evidence of noncircular motions. Individual spectra are extracted and the resultant line profiles are fitted with Voigt, Gaussian, and Lorentzian functions. Gaussians are shown to provide a better model for simultaneously fitting a large number of line profiles, successfully fitting a higher fraction. The kinematic disk (i.e., tilted ring) modeling procedure is studied in detail and is shown to accurately recover the underlying rotational structure of galactic disks. The process of obtaining rotation curves from full two-dimensional velocity data is examined. Small-scale ``bumps and wiggles'' on the rotation curves are shown to be due to the inclusion of noncircular motions. Use of the rotation curve estimate returned by the modeling procedure rather than deprojection of the velocity field is recommended to avoid their inclusion. Investigation of the symmetry of the major- and minor-axis rotation curves reveal strong evidence of nonconcentric gas orbits with the maximum center shift of ~300 pc. Comparisons between kinematic and photometric structure (e.g., position angles, inclinations, centers) show considerable noise on small scales. Although large-scale averages are in agreement, this noise is a matter of some concern in the application of the Tully-Fisher method to disk galaxies. Moreover, cases of significant misalignment in position angle between the inner and outer disks are seen in two of the sample galaxies and may indicate the transition between luminous and dark-matter-dominated regions (i.e., where the maximum disk

  7. The Chemistry of Multiply Deuterated Molecules in Protoplanetary Disks: I. The Outer Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willacy, K.

    2007-01-01

    We present new models of the deuterium chemistry in protoplanetary disks, including, for the first time, multiply deuterated species. We use these models to explore whether observations in combination with models can give us clues as to which desorption processes occur in disks.We find, in common with other authors, that photodesorption can allow strongly bound molecules such as HDO to exist in the gas phase in a layer above the midplane. Models including this process give the best agreement with the observations. In the midplane, cosmic-ray heating can desorb weakly bound molecules such as CO and N2. We find the observations suggest that N2 is gaseous in this region, but that CO must be retained on the grains to account for the observed DCO+/HCO+. This could be achieved by CO having a higher binding energy than N2 (as may be the case when these molecules are accreted onto water ice) or by a smaller cosmic-ray desorption rate for CO than assumed here, as suggested by recent theoretical work. For gaseous molecules the calculated deuteration can be greatly changed by chemical processing in the disk from the input molecular cloud values. On the grains singly deuterated species tend to retain the D/H ratio set in the molecular cloud, whereas multiply deuterated species are more affected by the disk chemistry. Consequently, the D/H ratios observed in comets may be partly set in the parent cloud and partly in the disk, depending on the molecule.

  8. Simulating the growth of a disk galaxy and its supermassive black hole in a cosmological context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Robyn

    Supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are ubiquitous in the centers of galaxies. Their formation and subsequent evolution is inextricably linked to that of their host galaxies, and the study of galaxy formation is incomplete without the inclusion of SMBHs. The present work seeks to understand the growth and evolution of SMBHs through their interaction with the host galaxy and its environment. In the first part of the thesis (Chap. 2 and 3), we combine a simple semi-analytic model of outflows from active galactic nuclei (AGN) with a simulated dark matter density distribution to study the impact of SMBH feedback on cosmological scales. We find that constraints can be placed on the kinetic efficiency of such feedback using observations of the filling fraction of the Ly-a forest. We also find that AGN feedback is energetic enough to redistribute baryons over cosmological distances, having potentially significant effects on the interpretation of cosmological data which are sensitive to the total matter density distribution (e.g. weak lensing). However, truly assessing the impact of AGN feedback in the universe necessitates large-dynamic range simulations with extensive treatment of baryonic physics to first model the fueling of SMBHs. In the second part of the thesis (Chap. 4-6) we use a hydrodynamic adaptive mesh refinement simulation to follow the growth and evolution of a typical disk galaxy hosting a SMBH, in a cosmological context. The simulation covers a dynamical range of 10 million allowing us to study the transport of matter and angular momentum from super-galactic scales all the way down to the outer edge of the accretion disk around the SMBH. Focusing our attention on the central few hundred parsecs of the galaxy, we find the presence of a cold, self-gravitating, molecular gas disk which is globally unstable. The global instabilities drive super-sonic turbulence, which maintains local stability and allows gas to fuel a SMBH without first fragmenting completely

  9. Formation of ring structures in galactic disks during close passages of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutukov, A. V.; Fedorova, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    The formation of ring structures in galactic disks is investigated. It is shown that, in addition to the known mechanism of forming rings in "head-on" collisions between galaxies, ring structures can be formed during close passages of galaxies if the perturbing galaxy moves in a plane close to the equatorial plane of the perturbed disk galaxy, opposite to the direction of rotation of the disk. Numerical simulations of the formation of structures in the disk of a massive galaxy undergoing a passage with another galaxy are considered. The results of these cmputations show the formation of pronounced ring structures in the galactic disk when the initial inclination of the trajectory of the perturbing galaxy to the equatorial plane of the perturbed galaxy is no more than ~25°. However, the probability of close passages of galaxies with these parameters is small, as is the probability of head-on collisions. The characteristic time scale for the existence of pronounced rings is of order the dynamical time scale at the edge of the galaxy, 200-300 million years, close to the corresponding time for head-on collisions. The evolution of the rings has the same character in both cases: they gradually expand and move toward the periphery of the galaxy. The results of these simulations can also be applied to a close passage of one star by another star with a protoplanetary disk. According to the computation results, the characteristic time scale for the existence of pronounced rings in such a protoplanetary disk depends mainly on the size of the disk; this time scale can reach several tens of thousands of years for a disk radius of about 1000 AU. The formation of ring structures in such a disk could influence the formation and evolution of planetesimals, and possibly the character of the formation of planets and the distribution of their orbital semi-major axes.

  10. The effects of storm fronts over galaxy disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Daniel C.; Struck, C.

    2014-01-01

    The existence of partially ionized, diffuse gas and dust clouds at kiloparsec scale distances above the central planes of edge-on, galaxy disks was an unexpected discovery about 25 years ago. Observations showed that this extended or extraplanar diffuse interstellar gas (EDIG) has rotation velocities approximately 10-20% lower than those in the central plane, and has been hard to account for. In a previous publication we presented results of hydrodynamic models, with radiative cooling and heating from star formation. In models with star formation generated stochastically across the disk, we found an extraplanar gas layer is generated as long as the star formation is sufficiently strong but no difference in rotational velocities between the midplane gas and the extra planar gas. We found models that incorporate spiral or bar waves also generate EDIG layers, but only over the wave regions. This partial coverage caused radial as well as vertical motion in the EDIG resulting in the kinematic anomalies observed in galaxies with an EDIG component. In this paper, we present a comparison of this model to recent observations as well as other models that have been proposed to explain the rotational differences.

  11. PLANET-PLANET SCATTERING IN PLANETESIMAL DISKS. II. PREDICTIONS FOR OUTER EXTRASOLAR PLANETARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, Sean N.; Armitage, Philip J.; Gorelick, Noel

    2010-03-10

    We develop an idealized dynamical model to predict the typical properties of outer extrasolar planetary systems, at radii comparable to the Jupiter-to-Neptune region of the solar system. The model is based upon the hypothesis that dynamical evolution in outer planetary systems is controlled by a combination of planet-planet scattering and planetary interactions with an exterior disk of small bodies ('planetesimals'). Our results are based on 5000 long duration N-body simulations that follow the evolution of three planets from a few to 10 AU, together with a planetesimal disk containing 50 M{sub +} from 10 to 20 AU. For large planet masses (M {approx}> M{sub Sat}), the model recovers the observed eccentricity distribution of extrasolar planets. For lower-mass planets, the range of outcomes in models with disks is far greater than that which is seen in isolated planet-planet scattering. Common outcomes include strong scattering among massive planets, sudden jumps in eccentricity due to resonance crossings driven by divergent migration, and re-circularization of scattered low-mass planets in the outer disk. We present the distributions of the eccentricity and inclination that result, and discuss how they vary with planet mass and initial system architecture. In agreement with other studies, we find that the currently observed eccentricity distribution (derived primarily from planets at a {approx}< 3 AU) is consistent with isolated planet-planet scattering. We explain the observed mass dependence-which is in the opposite sense from that predicted by the simplest scattering models-as a consequence of strong correlations between planet masses in the same system. At somewhat larger radii, initial planetary mass correlations and disk effects can yield similar modest changes to the eccentricity distribution. Nonetheless, strong damping of eccentricity for low-mass planets at large radii appears to be a secure signature of the dynamical influence of disks. Radial velocity

  12. Stellar metallicity of the extended disk and distance of the spiral galaxy NGC 3621

    SciTech Connect

    Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Bresolin, Fabio; Hosek, Matthew W. Jr.; Urbaneja, Miguel A.; Przybilla, Norbert E-mail: bresolin@ifa.hawaii.edu E-mail: Miguel.Urbaneja-Perez@uibk.ac.at

    2014-06-10

    Low resolution (∼4.5 Å) ESO VLT/FORS spectra of blue supergiant stars are analyzed to determine stellar metallicities (based on elements such as iron, titanium, and magnesium) in the extended disk of the spiral galaxy, NGC 3621. Mildly subsolar metallicity (–0.30 dex) is found for the outer objects beyond 7 kpc, independent of galactocentric radius and compatible with the absence of a metallicity gradient, confirming the results of a recent investigation of interstellar medium H II region gas oxygen abundances. The stellar metallicities are slightly higher than those from the H II regions when based on measurements of the weak forbidden auroral oxygen line at 4363 Å but lower than the ones obtained with the R {sub 23} strong line method. It is shown that the present level of metallicity in the extended disk cannot be the result of chemical evolution over the age of the disk with the present rate of in situ star formation. Additional mechanisms must be involved. In addition to metallicity, stellar effective temperatures, gravities, interstellar reddening, and bolometric magnitudes are determined. After the application of individual reddening corrections for each target, the flux-weighted gravity-luminosity relationship of blue supergiant stars is used to obtain a distance modulus of 29.07 ± 0.09 mag (distance D = 6.52 ± 0.28 Mpc). This new distance is discussed in relation to Cepheid and the tip of the red giant branch distances.

  13. Color-mass-to-light-ratio relations for disk galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    McGaugh, Stacy S.; Schombert, James M. E-mail: jschombe@uoregon.edu

    2014-11-01

    We combine Spitzer 3.6 μm observations of a sample of disk galaxies spanning over 10 mag in luminosity with optical luminosities and colors to test population synthesis prescriptions for computing stellar mass. Many commonly employed models fail to provide self-consistent results: the stellar mass estimated from the luminosity in one band can differ grossly from that of another band for the same galaxy. Independent models agree closely in the optical (V band), but diverge at longer wavelengths. This effect is particularly pronounced in recent models with substantial contributions from TP-AGB stars. We provide revised color-mass-to-light ratio relations that yield self-consistent stellar masses when applied to real galaxies. The B – V color is a good indicator of the mass-to-light ratio. Some additional information is provided by V – I, but neither it nor J – K{sub s} are particularly useful for constraining the mass-to-light ratio on their own. In the near-infrared, the mass-to-light ratio depends weakly on color, with typical values of 0.6 M {sub ☉}/L {sub ☉} in the K{sub s} band and 0.47 M {sub ☉}/L {sub ☉} at 3.6 μm.

  14. The Local Universe of Disk Galaxies: Energy, Mass, and Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driver, Simon P.

    2015-08-01

    This talk will explore three themes: (1) Our understanding of the space density of disk systems in the nearby (z<0.1) Universe, their global properties including their panchromatic (FUV-far-IR) information (energy outputs), their dust properties (masses and temperatures), their (specific) star-formation rates, and ultimately the amount of stellar mass locked up in disc components. (2) The completeness of our local surveys, with a particular focus on the severe impact of low surface brightness selection bias, and how these can be overcome using the upcoming deep imaging studies. (3) The complexity of automated structural decomposition and experiences and results from profiling 8000 galaxies at z<0.06 allowing us to derive key relations such as the mass-size relation of disc systems. The data shown is drawn from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey. The GAMA survey builds upon the SDSS legacy by extending 2mags deeper spectroscopically (r<19.8mag) and also including panchromatic data from GALEX, VST, VISTA, WISE and Herschel-Atlas and shortly ASKAP for 300,000 galaxies over 250sq deg of sky. This talk will be aligned with the GAMA Panchromatic Data Release where all imaging data products will be publicly released.

  15. Galaxy Zoo Hubble: First results of the redshift evolution of disk fraction in the red sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, Melanie; Willett, Kyle; Fortson, Lucy; Scarlata, Claudia; Beck, Melanie; Masters, Karen; Melvin, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The transition of galaxies from the blue cloud to the red sequence is commonly linked to a morphological transformation from disk to elliptical structure. However, the correlation between color and morphology is not one-to-one, as evidenced by the existence of a significant population of red disks. As this stage in a galaxy's evolution is likely to be transitory, the mechanism by which red disks are formed offers insight to the processes that trigger quenching of star formation and the galaxy's position on the star-forming sequence. To study the population of disk galaxies in the red sequence as a function of cosmic time, we utilize data from the Galaxy Zoo: Hubble project, which uses crowdsourced visual classifications of images of galaxies selected from the AEGIS, COSMOS, GEMS, and GOODS surveys. We construct a large sample of over 10,000 disk galaxies spanning a wide (0 < z < 1.0) redshift range. We use this sample to examine the change in the fraction of disks in the red sequence with respect to all disks from z˜1 to the present day. Preliminary results confirm that the fraction of disks in the red sequence decreases as the Universe evolves. We discuss the quenching processes which may explain this trend, and which morphological transformations are most affected by it.

  16. Asymmetric mass models of disk galaxies. I. Messier 99

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemin, Laurent; Huré, Jean-Marc; Soubiran, Caroline; Zibetti, Stefano; Charlot, Stéphane; Kawata, Daisuke

    2016-04-01

    Mass models of galactic disks traditionally rely on axisymmetric density and rotation curves, paradoxically acting as if their most remarkable asymmetric features, such as lopsidedness or spiral arms, were not important. In this article, we relax the axisymmetry approximation and introduce a methodology that derives 3D gravitational potentials of disk-like objects and robustly estimates the impacts of asymmetries on circular velocities in the disk midplane. Mass distribution models can then be directly fitted to asymmetric line-of-sight velocity fields. Applied to the grand-design spiral M 99, the new strategy shows that circular velocities are highly nonuniform, particularly in the inner disk of the galaxy, as a natural response to the perturbed gravitational potential of luminous matter. A cuspy inner density profile of dark matter is found in M 99, in the usual case where luminous and dark matter share the same center. The impact of the velocity nonuniformity is to make the inner profile less steep, although the density remains cuspy. On another hand, a model where the halo is core dominated and shifted by 2.2-2.5 kpc from the luminous mass center is more appropriate to explain most of the kinematical lopsidedness evidenced in the velocity field of M 99. However, the gravitational potential of luminous baryons is not asymmetric enough to explain the kinematical lopsidedness of the innermost regions, irrespective of the density shape of dark matter. This discrepancy points out the necessity of an additional dynamical process in these regions: possibly a lopsided distribution of dark matter.

  17. H II Regions in the Disks of Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozas, M.

    1997-06-01

    The objective of the research presented in the thesis is to use photometrically calibrated high quality images in \\ha\\ of the disks of spiral galaxies to study their global star forming properties. In the first part of the study we catalog and study statistically the \\hii\\ regions in a set of spirals, imaged in \\ha\\ . The observed parameters of each region are its fluxes and diameters, from which we can also derive the mean surface brightness and its internal radial gradient (the latter for the largest most luminous regions). Plotting the luminosity function (LF) for a given galaxy (the number of regions versus \\ha\\ flux) we find a characteristic discontinuity: a peak accompanied by a change in gradient of the function, at a luminosity of 10$^{38.6}$ erg s$^{-1}$ per region. We attribute this to the change from ionization-bounded \\hii\\ regions, at luminosities below the transition, to density-bounded regions above the transition, and explain with a quantitative model based on this assumption why the transition takes place at a well-defined luminosity, and one which varies very little from galaxy to galaxy. In the six galaxies observed and analyzed in this way, the variance is 0.07 mag., making the transition a good prima facie candidate to be a powerful standard candle for accurate extragalactic distance measurements. Confirmation of the nature of the transition is provided by measurements of the internal brightness gradients, which show a jump from a constant value (predicted for ionization bounded regions) below the transition to a larger and increasing value above the transition. The theoretical model which can account for the transition was used to show how the gradients of the LF in the ionization bounded and the density bounded regimes can be used to derive the mass function of the ionizing stars in regions close to the transition luminosity, yielding a mean value for the slope of the MF in the galaxies observed of -2.4; the brightest stars in these

  18. Bars in Disk-dominated and Bulge-dominated Galaxies at z ~ 0: New Insights from ~3600 SDSS Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barazza, Fabio D.; Jogee, Shardha; Marinova, Irina

    2008-03-01

    We present a study of large-scale bars in the local universe, based on a large sample of 3692 galaxies, with 18.5 <= Mg < - 22.0 mag and redshift 0.01 <= z < 0.03, drawn from the Sloan Digitized Sky Survey. Our sample includes many galaxies that are disk-dominated and of late Hubble types. Both color cuts and Sérsic cuts yield a similar sample of ~2000 disk galaxies. We characterize bars and disks by ellipse-fitting r-band images and applying quantitative criteria. After excluding highly inclined (60°) systems, we find the following results. (1) The optical r-band fraction (fopt - r) of barred galaxies, when averaged over the whole sample, is ~48%-52%. (2) When galaxies are separated according to half light radius (re), or normalized re/R24, which is a measure of the bulge-to-disk (B/D) ratio, a remarkable result is seen: fopt - r rises sharply, from ~40% in galaxies that have small re/R24 and visually appear to host prominent bulges, to ~70% for galaxies that have large re/R24 and appear disk-dominated. (3) For galaxies with bluer colors, fopt - r rises significantly (by ~30%). A weaker rise (by ~15%-20%) is seen for lower luminosities or lower masses. (4) While hierarchical ΛCDM models of galaxy evolution models fail to produce galaxies without classical bulges, our study finds that ~20% of disk galaxies appear to be ``quasi-bulgeless." (5) We outline how the effect of a decreasing resolution and a rising obscuration of bars by gas and dust over z = 0.2-1.0 can cause a significant artificial loss of bars, and an artificial reduction in the optical bar fraction over z = 0.2-1.0.

  19. THE MILKY WAY AS A HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXY: THE IMPORTANCE OF THICK DISK FORMATION IN GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Lehnert, Matthew D.; Di Matteo, Paola; Haywood, Misha; Snaith, Owain N.

    2014-07-10

    We compare the star formation history and dynamics of the Milky Way (MW) with the properties of distant disk galaxies. During the first ∼4 Gyr of its evolution, the MW formed stars with a high star formation intensity (SFI), Σ{sub SFR} ≈ 0.6 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} kpc{sup –2} and as a result, generated outflows and high turbulence in its interstellar medium (ISM). This intense phase of star formation corresponds to the formation of the thick disk. The formation of the thick disk is a crucial phase that enables the MW to have formed approximately half of its total stellar mass by z ∼ 1 which is similar to ''MW progenitor galaxies'' selected by abundance matching. This agreement suggests that the formation of the thick disk may be a generic evolutionary phase in disk galaxies. Using a simple energy injection-kinetic energy relationship between the one-dimensional velocity dispersion and SFI, we can reproduce the average perpendicular dispersion in stellar velocities of the MW with age. This relationship, its inferred evolution, and required efficiency are consistent with observations of galaxies from z ≈ 0-3. The high turbulence generated by intense star formation naturally resulted in a thick disk, a chemically well-mixed ISM, and is the mechanism that links the evolution of MW to the observed characteristics of distant disk galaxies.

  20. THE 21 cm 'OUTER ARM' AND THE OUTER-GALAXY HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS: CONNECTED BY KINEMATICS, METALLICITY, AND DISTANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Tripp, Todd M.; Song Limin

    2012-02-20

    Using high-resolution ultraviolet spectra obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph and the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer, we study the metallicity, kinematics, and distance of the gaseous 'outer arm' (OA) and the high-velocity clouds (HVCs) in the outer Galaxy. We detect the OA in a variety of absorption lines toward two QSOs, H1821+643 and HS0624+6907. We search for OA absorption toward eight Galactic stars and detect it in one case, which constrains the OA Galactocentric radius to 9 kpc outer-Galaxy HVCs, including high velocities that are not consistent with Galactic rotation, suggests that the OA and outer-Galaxy HVCs could have a common origin.

  1. ABUNDANCES OF PLANETARY NEBULAE IN THE OUTER DISK OF M31

    SciTech Connect

    Kwitter, Karen B.; Lehman, Emma M. M.; Balick, Bruce; Henry, R. B. C. E-mail: emmalehman@gmail.com E-mail: rhenry@ou.edu

    2012-07-01

    We present spectroscopic observations and chemical abundances of 16 planetary nebulae (PNe) in the outer disk of M31. The [O III] {lambda}4363 line is detected in all objects, allowing a direct measurement of the nebular temperature essential for accurate abundance determinations. Our results show that the abundances in these M31 PNe display the same correlations and general behaviors as Type II PNe in the Milky Way. We also calculate photoionization models to derive estimates of central star properties. From these we infer that our sample PNe, all near the bright-end cutoff of the planetary nebula luminosity function, originated from stars near 2 M{sub Sun }. Finally, under the assumption that these PNe are located in M31's disk, we plot the oxygen abundance gradient, which appears shallower than the gradient in the Milky Way.

  2. Herschel-Resolved Outer Belts of Two-Belt Debris Disks--Evidence of Icy Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Farisa Y.; Bryden, Geoffrey; Werner, Michael W.; Stapelfeldt, Karl

    2015-12-01

    We present dual-band Herschel/PACS imaging for 57 main sequence stars (42 A-type and 15 solar-type) with previously known warm dust (Twarm ~200K) detected and characterized by Spitzer. About half of the star-disk systems in our sample have spectral energy distributions (SEDs) that suggest two-ring disk architectures that mirror that of the asteroid-Kuiper belt geometry of our own solar system. The Herschel observations at 70 and/or 100 micron spatially resolve the cold/outer dust component for 18 two-belt debris systems (15 for the first time; 10 are also resolved at 160 micron), finding evidence of planetesimals at >100 AU, i.e. larger size than assumed from a simple blackbody fit to the SED. By breaking the degeneracy between the grain properties and the dust's radial location, the resolved images help constrain the grain size distribution and hint at the dust's composition for each system. Based on the combined Spitzer/IRS+MIPS (5 to 70 micron), the Herschel/PACS (70 and/or 100 and 160 micron) dataset, and under the assumption of idealized spherical grains, we find that the majority of resolved cold/outer belts of star+disk systems are well fit with a mixed ice/rock composition, rather than pure rocky grains. In the absence of spectral features for ice, we find that the behavior of the continuum can help constrain the composition of the grains well (of icy nature and not pure rocky material) given the Herschel-resolved locations of the cold/outer dust belts. We have also begin to identify the presence of candidate companions via Keck direct imaging, which may be interacting with the observed dust.

  3. A High-Velocity Collision With Our Galaxy's Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-08-01

    What caused the newly discovered supershell in the outskirts of our galaxy? A new study finds evidence that a high-velocity cloud may have smashed into the Milky Ways disk millions of years ago.Mysterious Gas ShellsA single velocity-channel map of the supershell GS040.2+00.670, with red contours marking the high-velocity cloud at its center. [Adapted from Park et al. 2016]The neutral hydrogen gas that fills interstellar space is organized into structures like filaments, loops, and shells. Supershells are enormous shells of hydrogen gas that can have radii of a thousand light-years or more; weve spotted about 20 of these in our own galaxy, and more in nearby dwarfs and spiral galaxies.How do these structures form? One theory is that they result from several supernovae explosions occurring in the same area. But the energy needed to create a supershell is more than 3 x 1052 erg, which corresponds to over 30 supernovae quite a lot to have exploding in the same region.Theres an interesting alternative scenario: the supershells might instead be caused by the impacts of high-velocity clouds that fall into the galactic disk.Velocity data for the compact high-velocity cloud CHVC040. The cloud is moving fast enough to create the supershell observed. [Adapted from Park et al. 2016]The Milky Ways Speeding CloudsHigh-velocity clouds are clouds of mostly hydrogen that speed through the Milky Way with radial velocities that are very different from the material in the galactic disk. The origins of these clouds are unknown, but its proposed that they come from outside the galaxy they might be fragments of a nearby, disrupting galaxy, or they might have originated from flows of accreting gas in the space in between galaxies.Though high-velocity clouds have long been on the list of things that might cause supershells, weve yet to find conclusive evidence of this. But that might have just changed, with a recent discovery by a team of scientists led by Geumsook Park (Seoul National

  4. New optical nova candidate in the outer disk of M 31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietsch, W.; Henze, M.; Burwitz, V.; Kaur, A.; Hartmann, D. H.; Milne, P.; Williams, G.

    2011-02-01

    We report the discovery of a possible nova in the outer disk of M 31 on two 15x60s and 7x60s stacked R filter CCD images obtained with the robotic 60cm telescope with an E2V CCD (2kx2k, 13.5 micron sq. pixels) of the Livermore Optical Transient Imaging System (Super-LOTIS, located at Steward Observatory, Kitt Peak, Arizona, USA) on 2011 February 15.127 and 18.121 UT with magnitude of 18.7 and 18.0, respectively.

  5. Near-infrared structure of fast and slow-rotating disk galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Schechtman-Rook, Andrew; Bershady, Matthew A.

    2014-11-10

    We investigate the stellar disk structure of six nearby edge-on spiral galaxies using high-resolution JHK {sub s}-band images and three-dimensional radiative transfer models. To explore how mass and environment shape spiral disks, we selected galaxies with rotational velocities between 69 km s{sup –1} disk structure. Of the fast-rotating (V {sub rot} > 150 km s{sup –1}) galaxies, only NGC 4013 has the super-thin+thin+thick nested disk structure seen in NGC 891 and the Milky Way, albeit with decreased oblateness, while NGC 1055, a disturbed massive spiral galaxy, contains disks with h{sub z} ≲ 200 pc. NGC 4565, another fast-rotator, contains a prominent ring at a radius ∼5 kpc but no super-thin disk. Despite these differences, all fast-rotating galaxies in our sample have inner truncations in at least one of their disks. These truncations lead to Freeman Type II profiles when projected face-on. Slow-rotating galaxies are less complex, lacking inner disk truncations and requiring fewer disk components to reproduce their light distributions. Super-thin disk components in undisturbed disks contribute ∼25% of the total K {sub s}-band light, up to that of the thin-disk contribution. The presence of super-thin disks correlates with infrared flux ratios; galaxies with super-thin disks have f{sub K{sub s}}/f{sub 60} {sub μm}≤0.12 for integrated light, consistent with super-thin disks being regions of ongoing star-formation. Attenuation-corrected vertical color gradients in (J – K {sub s}) correlate with the observed disk structure and are consistent with population gradients with young-to-intermediate ages closer to the mid-plane, indicating that disk heating—or cooling—is a ubiquitous phenomenon.

  6. MOLECULAR GAS AND STAR FORMATION IN NEARBY DISK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Leroy, Adam K.; Munoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Walter, Fabian; Sandstrom, Karin; Meidt, Sharon; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schinnerer, Eva; Schruba, Andreas; Bigiel, Frank; Bolatto, Alberto; Brinks, Elias; De Blok, W. J. G.; Rosolowsky, Erik; Schuster, Karl-Friedrich; Usero, Antonio

    2013-08-01

    We compare molecular gas traced by {sup 12}CO (2-1) maps from the HERACLES survey, with tracers of the recent star formation rate (SFR) across 30 nearby disk galaxies. We demonstrate a first-order linear correspondence between {Sigma}{sub mol} and {Sigma}{sub SFR} but also find important second-order systematic variations in the apparent molecular gas depletion time, {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol}={Sigma}{sub mol}/{Sigma}{sub SFR}. At the 1 kpc common resolution of HERACLES, CO emission correlates closely with many tracers of the recent SFR. Weighting each line of sight equally, using a fixed {alpha}{sub CO} equivalent to the Milky Way value, our data yield a molecular gas depletion time, {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol}={Sigma}{sub mol}/{Sigma}{sub SFR}{approx}2.2 Gyr with 0.3 dex 1{sigma} scatter, in very good agreement with recent literature data. We apply a forward-modeling approach to constrain the power-law index, N, that relates the SFR surface density and the molecular gas surface density, {Sigma}{sub SFR}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub mol}{sup N}. We find N = 1 {+-} 0.15 for our full data set with some scatter from galaxy to galaxy. This also agrees with recent work, but we caution that a power-law treatment oversimplifies the topic given that we observe correlations between {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} and other local and global quantities. The strongest of these are a decreased {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} in low-mass, low-metallicity galaxies and a correlation of the kpc-scale {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} with dust-to-gas ratio, D/G. These correlations can be explained by a CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor ({alpha}{sub CO}) that depends on dust shielding, and thus D/G, in the theoretically expected way. This is not a unique interpretation, but external evidence of conversion factor variations makes this the most conservative explanation of the strongest observed {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} trends. After applying a D/G-dependent {alpha}{sub CO}, some weak correlations between {tau}{sub dep

  7. Witnessing the Differential Evolution in Luminosity and Size of Disk Galaxies via Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandara, Kaushala; Crampton, D.; Peng, C. Y.; Simard, L.

    2012-01-01

    We take advantage of the magnification in size and flux of a galaxy, provided by gravitational lensing, to analyze the properties of 62 strongly lensed galaxies of the Sloan Lens ACS (SLACS) Survey. The sample of lensed galaxies span a redshift range of 0.20 <= z <= 1.20 with a median redshift of z = 0.61. We use the lens modeling code LENSFIT to derive the luminosities, sizes and Sersic indices of the lensed galaxies. The measured properties of the lensed galaxies show a primarily compact, "disk"-like population with the peaks of the size and Sersic index distributions corresponding to ˜1.50 kpc and n˜1 respectively. Comparison of the SLACS lensed galaxies to a non-lensing, broad-band imaging based survey shows that a lensing survey allows us to probe a galaxy population that is typically ˜ 2 magnitudes fainter. Our analysis allows us to compare the = 0.61 disk galaxy sample (n <= 2.5) to an unprecedented local galaxy sample of 670,131 SDSS galaxies at z ˜ 0.1, which indicates that the evolution of the luminosity-size relation since z ˜ 1 cannot be explained fully in terms of pure size evolution but must be caused by a combination of luminosity and size evolution. Our observations are in excellent agreement with recent numerical simulations of disk galaxies since z ˜ 1 that show evidence of mass-dependent evolution where high-mass disk galaxies (stellar mass > 109 solar masses) evolve more in size and low-mass disk galaxies (stellar mass <= 109 solar masses) evolve more in luminosity. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support from the National Research Council of Canada and NSERC through Discovery grants. CYP is grateful for funding support through the Plaskett Fellowship of the Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics (National Research Council of Canada).

  8. Supermassive black holes do not correlate with galaxy disks or pseudobulges.

    PubMed

    Kormendy, John; Bender, R; Cornell, M E

    2011-01-20

    The masses of supermassive black holes are known to correlate with the properties of the bulge components of their host galaxies. In contrast, they seem not to correlate with galaxy disks. Disk-grown 'pseudobulges' are intermediate in properties between bulges and disks; it has been unclear whether they do or do not correlate with black holes in the same way that bulges do. At stake in this issue are conclusions about which parts of galaxies coevolve with black holes, possibly by being regulated by energy feedback from black holes. Here we report pseudobulge classifications for galaxies with dynamically detected black holes and combine them with recent measurements of velocity dispersions in the biggest bulgeless galaxies. These data confirm that black holes do not correlate with disks and show that they correlate little or not at all with pseudobulges. We suggest that there are two different modes of black-hole feeding. Black holes in bulges grow rapidly to high masses when mergers drive gas infall that feeds quasar-like events. In contrast, small black holes in bulgeless galaxies and in galaxies with pseudobulges grow as low-level Seyfert galaxies. Growth of the former is driven by global processes, so the biggest black holes coevolve with bulges, but growth of the latter is driven locally and stochastically, and they do not coevolve with disks and pseudobulges. PMID:21248845

  9. Extragalactic SETI: The Tully-Fisher Relation as a Probe of Dysonian Astroengineering in Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zackrisson, Erik; Calissendorff, Per; Asadi, Saghar; Nyholm, Anders

    2015-09-01

    If advanced extraterrestrial civilizations choose to construct vast numbers of Dyson spheres to harvest radiation energy, this could affect the characteristics of their host galaxies. Potential signatures of such astroengineering projects include reduced optical luminosity, boosted infrared luminosity, and morphological anomalies. Here, we apply a technique pioneered by Annis to search for Kardashev type III civilizations in disk galaxies, based on the predicted offset of these galaxies from the optical Tully-Fisher (TF) relation. By analyzing a sample of 1359 disk galaxies, we are able to set a conservative upper limit of ≲ 3% on the fraction of local disks subject to Dysonian astroengineering on galaxy-wide scales. However, the available data suggests that a small subset of disk galaxies actually may be underluminous with respect to the TF relation in the way expected for Kardashev type III objects. Based on the optical morphologies and infrared-to-optical luminosity ratios of such galaxies in our sample, we conclude that none of them stand out as strong Kardashev type III candidates and that their inferred properties likely have mundane explanations. This allows us to set a tentative upper limit at ≲ 0.3% on the fraction of Karashev type III disk galaxies in the local universe.

  10. Self-regulating galaxy formation. Part 1: HII disk and Lyman alpha pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, D. P.

    1983-01-01

    Assuming a simple but physically based prototype for behavior of interstellar material during formation of a disk galaxy, coupled with the lowest order description of infall, a scenario is developed for self-regulated disk galaxy formation. Radiation pressure, particularly that of Lyman depha (from fluorescence conversion Lyman continuum), is an essential component, maintaining an inflated disk and stopping infall when only a small fraction of the overall perturbation has joined the disk. The resulting galaxies consist of a two dimensional family whose typical scales and surface density are expressable in terms of fundamental constants. The model leads naturally to galaxies with a rich circumgalactic environment and flat rotation curves (but is weak in its analysis of the subsequent evolution of halo material).

  11. UNCOVERING DRIVERS OF DISK ASSEMBLY: BULGELESS GALAXIES AND THE STELLAR MASS TULLY-FISHER RELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Sarah H.; Sullivan, Mark; Ellis, Richard S.

    2013-01-01

    In order to determine what processes govern the assembly history of galaxies with rotating disks, we examine the stellar mass Tully-Fisher (TF) relation over a wide range in redshift partitioned according to whether or not galaxies contain a prominent bulge. Using our earlier Keck spectroscopic sample, for which bulge/total parameters are available from analyses of Hubble Space Telescope images, we find that bulgeless disk galaxies with z > 0.8 present a significant offset from the local (TF) relation whereas, at all redshifts probed, those with significant bulges fall along the local relation. Our results support the suggestion that bulge growth may somehow expedite the maturing of disk galaxies onto the (TF) relation. We discuss a variety of physical hypotheses that may explain this result in the context of kinematic observations of star-forming galaxies at redshifts z = 0 and z > 2.

  12. MCMC Analysis of biases in the interpretation of disk galaxy kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquino-Ortíz, E.; Valenzuela, O.; Cano-Díaz, M.; Sánchez-Sánchez, S. F.; Hernández-Toledo, H.

    2016-06-01

    The new generation of galaxy surveys like SAMI, CALIFA and MaNGA opens up the possibility of studying simultaneously properties of galaxies such as spiral arms, bars, disk geometry and orientation, stellar and gas mass distribution, 2D kinematics, etc. The previous task involves exploring a complicated multi-dimensional parameter space. Puglielli et al. (2010) introduced Bayesian statistics and MCMC (Monte Carlo Markov Chain) techniques to construct dynamical models of spiral galaxies. In our study we used synthetic velocity fields that include non-circular motions and assume different disk orientations in order to produce mock observations. We apply popular reconstruction techniques in order to estimate the geometrical disk parameters, systemic velocities, rotation curve shape and maximum circular velocity which are crucial to construct the scaling relations. We conclude that a detailed analysis of kinematics in galaxies using MCMC technique will be reflected in accurate estimations of galaxy properties and more robust scalings relations, otherwise physical conclusions may be importantly biased.

  13. Halo Orbits in Cosmological Disk Galaxies: Tracers of Formation History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valluri, Monica; Debattista, Victor P.; Stinson, Gregory S.; Bailin, Jeremy; Quinn, Thomas R.; Couchman, H. M. P.; Wadsley, James

    2013-04-01

    We analyze the orbits of stars and dark matter particles in the halo of a disk galaxy formed in a cosmological hydrodynamical simulation. The halo is oblate within the inner ~20 kpc and triaxial beyond this radius. About 43% of orbits are short axis tubes—the rest belong to orbit families that characterize triaxial potentials (boxes, long-axis tubes and chaotic orbits), but their shapes are close to axisymmetric. We find no evidence that the self-consistent distribution function of the nearly oblate inner halo is comprised primarily of axisymmetric short-axis tube orbits. Orbits of all families and both types of particles are highly eccentric, with mean eccentricity >~ 0.6. We find that randomly selected samples of halo stars show no substructure in "integrals of motion" space. However, individual accretion events can clearly be identified in plots of metallicity versus formation time. Dynamically young tidal debris is found primarily on a single type of orbit. However, stars associated with older satellites become chaotically mixed during the formation process (possibly due to scattering by the central bulge and disk, and baryonic processes), and appear on all four types of orbits. We find that the tidal debris in cosmological hydrodynamical simulations experiences significantly more chaotic evolution than in collisionless simulations, making it much harder to identify individual progenitors using phase space coordinates alone. However, by combining information on stellar ages and chemical abundances with the orbital properties of halo stars in the underlying self-consistent potential, the identification of progenitors is likely to be possible.

  14. HALO ORBITS IN COSMOLOGICAL DISK GALAXIES: TRACERS OF FORMATION HISTORY

    SciTech Connect

    Valluri, Monica; Debattista, Victor P.; Stinson, Gregory S.; Bailin, Jeremy; Quinn, Thomas R.; Couchman, H. M. P.; Wadsley, James

    2013-04-10

    We analyze the orbits of stars and dark matter particles in the halo of a disk galaxy formed in a cosmological hydrodynamical simulation. The halo is oblate within the inner {approx}20 kpc and triaxial beyond this radius. About 43% of orbits are short axis tubes-the rest belong to orbit families that characterize triaxial potentials (boxes, long-axis tubes and chaotic orbits), but their shapes are close to axisymmetric. We find no evidence that the self-consistent distribution function of the nearly oblate inner halo is comprised primarily of axisymmetric short-axis tube orbits. Orbits of all families and both types of particles are highly eccentric, with mean eccentricity {approx}> 0.6. We find that randomly selected samples of halo stars show no substructure in 'integrals of motion' space. However, individual accretion events can clearly be identified in plots of metallicity versus formation time. Dynamically young tidal debris is found primarily on a single type of orbit. However, stars associated with older satellites become chaotically mixed during the formation process (possibly due to scattering by the central bulge and disk, and baryonic processes), and appear on all four types of orbits. We find that the tidal debris in cosmological hydrodynamical simulations experiences significantly more chaotic evolution than in collisionless simulations, making it much harder to identify individual progenitors using phase space coordinates alone. However, by combining information on stellar ages and chemical abundances with the orbital properties of halo stars in the underlying self-consistent potential, the identification of progenitors is likely to be possible.

  15. THICK DISKS OF EDGE-ON GALAXIES SEEN THROUGH THE SPITZER SURVEY OF STELLAR STRUCTURE IN GALAXIES (S{sup 4}G): LAIR OF MISSING BARYONS?

    SciTech Connect

    Comeron, Sebastien; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Knapen, Johan H.; Salo, Heikki; Laine, Jarkko; Laurikainen, Eija; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert; Hinz, Joannah L.; De Paz, Armando Gil; Menendez-Delmestre, KarIn; Seibert, Mark; Ho, Luis C.; Elmegreen, Debra M.; Gadotti, Dimitri A.

    2011-11-01

    Most, if not all, disk galaxies have a thin (classical) disk and a thick disk. In most models thick disks are thought to be a necessary consequence of the disk formation and/or evolution of the galaxy. We present the results of a study of the thick disk properties in a sample of carefully selected edge-on galaxies with types ranging from T = 3 to T = 8. We fitted one-dimensional luminosity profiles with physically motivated functions-the solutions of two stellar and one gaseous isothermal coupled disks in equilibrium-which are likely to yield more accurate results than other functions used in previous studies. The images used for the fits come from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S{sup 4}G). We found that thick disks are on average more massive than previously reported, mostly due to the selected fitting function. Typically, the thin and thick disks have similar masses. We also found that thick disks do not flare significantly within the observed range in galactocentric radii and that the ratio of thick-to-thin disk scale heights is higher for galaxies of earlier types. Our results tend to favor an in situ origin for most of the stars in the thick disk. In addition, the thick disk may contain a significant amount of stars coming from satellites accreted after the initial buildup of the galaxy and an extra fraction of stars coming from the secular heating of the thin disk by its own overdensities. Assigning thick disk light to the thin disk component may lead to an underestimate of the overall stellar mass in galaxies because of different mass-to-light ratios in the two disk components. On the basis of our new results, we estimate that disk stellar masses are between 10% and 50% higher than previously thought and we suggest that thick disks are a reservoir of 'local missing baryons'.

  16. Detailed structure of the outer disk around HD 169142 with polarized light in H-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momose, Munetake; Morita, Ayaka; Fukagawa, Misato; Muto, Takayuki; Takeuchi, Taku; Hashimoto, Jun; Honda, Mitsuhiko; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Okamoto, Yoshiko K.; Kanagawa, Kazuhiro D.; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Grady, Carol A.; Sitko, Michael L.; Akiyama, Eiji; Currie, Thayne; Follette, Katherine B.; Mayama, Satoshi; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Abe, Lyu; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D.; Carson, Joseph C.; Egner, Sebastian; Feldt, Markus; Goto, Miwa; Guyon, Olivier; Hayano, Yutaka; Hayashi, Masahiko; Hayashi, Saeko S.; Henning, Thomas; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Ishii, Miki; Iye, Masanori; Janson, Markus; Kandori, Ryo; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Kwon, Jungmi; Matsuo, Taro; McElwain, Michael W.; Miyama, Shoken; Morino, Jun-Ichi; Moro-Martin, Amaya; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Serabyn, Eugene; Suenaga, Takuya; Suto, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Ryuji; Takahashi, Yasuhiro H.; Takami, Michihiro; Takato, Naruhisa; Terada, Hiroshi; Thalmann, Christian; Tomono, Daigo; Turner, Edwin L.; Watanabe, Makoto; Wisniewski, John; Yamada, Toru; Takami, Hideki; Usuda, Tomonori; Tamura, Motohide

    2015-10-01

    Coronagraphic imagery of the circumstellar disk around HD 169142 in H-band polarized intensity (PI) with Subaru/HiCIAO is presented. The emission scattered by dust particles at the disk surface in 0{^''.}2 ≤ r ≤ 1{^''.}2, or 29 ≤ r ≤ 174 au, is successfully detected. The azimuthally averaged radial profile of the PI shows a double power-law distribution, in which the PIs in r = 29-52 au and r = 81.2-145 au respectively show r-3 dependence. These two power-law regions are connected smoothly with a transition zone (TZ), exhibiting an apparent gap in r = 40-70 au. The PI in the inner power-law region shows a deep minimum whose location seems to coincide with the point source at λ = 7 mm. This can be regarded as another sign of a protoplanet in the TZ. The observed radial profile of the PI is reproduced by a minimally flaring disk with an irregular surface density distribution, an irregular temperature distribution, or with a combination of both. The depletion factor of surface density in the inner power-law region (r < 50 au) is derived to be ≥ 0.16 from a simple model calculation. The obtained PI image also shows small-scale asymmetries in the outer power-law region. Possible origins for these asymmetries include corrugation of the scattering surface in the outer region, and a shadowing effect by a puffed-up structure in the inner power-law region.

  17. Evidence for a CO Desorption Front in the Outer AS 209 Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jane; Öberg, Karin I.; Andrews, Sean M.

    2016-05-01

    Millimeter observations of CO isotopologues are often used to make inferences about protoplanetary disk gas density and temperature structures. The accuracy of these estimates depends on our understanding of CO freezeout and desorption from dust grains. Most models of these processes indicate that CO column density decreases monotonically with distance from the central star due to a decrease in gas density and freezeout beyond the CO snowline. We present ALMA Cycle 2 observations of 12CO, 13CO, and C18O J=2-1 emission that instead suggest CO enhancement in the outer disk of T Tauri star AS 209. Most notably, the C18O emission consists of a central peak and a ring at a radius of ∼ 1\\prime \\prime (120 au), well outside the expected CO snowline. We propose that the ring arises from the onset of CO desorption near the edge of the millimeter dust disk. CO desorption exterior to a CO snowline may occur via non-thermal processes involving cosmic rays or high-energy photons, or via a radial thermal inversion arising from dust migration.

  18. Cloudy intergalactic accretion flows in the outer discs of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Salcedo, F. J.; Santillán, A.; Franco, J.

    2007-02-01

    High-resolution two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations have been carried out to investigate the role of continuing infall of clumpy gas as a driver of turbulence in extended H I galactic discs. We have compared the responses of isothermal gas discs with sound speeds 4 and 8 km/s to infalling, condensed clouds. For mass accretion rates of ˜0.6 M⊙ yr -1, the turbulent motions in the outer disc become slightly faster than transonic. We suggest that the rain of compact high velocity clouds on the disc not only can fuel the Milky Way with fresh material but is a potential source of random motions in outer regions of H I discs.

  19. Discovery of Giant X-Ray Disk Sheds Light on Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-12-01

    Ohio University astronomers have discovered the largest disk of hot, X-ray emitting gas ever observed in the universe: At 90,000 light years in diameter, it's about 100,000 times the size of any comparable object. The disk, spinning through a distant galaxy, is more than just an interstellar oddity, the researchers say. The object could offer new information about the way certain galaxies form and evolve. About 20 percent of all galaxies are elliptical, the largest of the three types of galaxies in the universe. They differ from spiral galaxies like the Milky Way, as they lack new stars and spiral "arms." Scientists once believed that elliptical galaxies were ancient, simple systems that contained only old stars and formed in the early days of the universe. But new research suggests elliptical galaxies are more complex and dynamic. "It used to be thought that galaxies form and then sit there and age quietly over time. But now we understand that galaxies live, in the sense that there's an interplay of gas and stars," said Thomas Statler, an associate professor of physics and astronomy and lead author of the study, published in the Dec. 20 issue of the Astrophysical Journal. The newly discovered X-ray disk offers more evidence for that argument. Using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, an orbiting spacecraft that houses the most powerful X-ray telescope in existence, the astronomers discovered the disk while analyzing data collected from NGC 1700, a young elliptical galaxy about 160 million light years from Earth. Giant in size and about 8 million degrees in temperature, the disk was an unexpected find for Statler and colleague Brian McNamara. But while its gargantuan scale is striking, the disk also yielded another surprise: The hot gas is not in calm balance with the gravitational forces as expected, but spinning through the galaxy. In fact, the giant, rotating X-ray disk suggests that this elliptical galaxy and perhaps others like it wasn't created by the merger of

  20. SUSTAINING STAR FORMATION RATES IN SPIRAL GALAXIES: SUPERNOVA-DRIVEN TURBULENT ACCRETION DISK MODELS APPLIED TO THINGS GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Vollmer, Bernd; Leroy, Adam K.

    2011-01-15

    Gas disks of spiral galaxies can be described as clumpy accretion disks without a coupling of viscosity to the actual thermal state of the gas. The model description of a turbulent disk consisting of emerging and spreading clumps contains free parameters, which can be constrained by observations of molecular gas, atomic gas, and the star formation rate for individual galaxies. Radial profiles of 18 nearby spiral galaxies from THINGS, HERACLES, SINGS, and GALEX data are used to compare the observed star formation efficiency, molecular fraction, and velocity dispersion to the model. The observed radially decreasing velocity dispersion can be reproduced by the model. In the framework of this model, the decrease in the inner disk is due to the stellar mass distribution which dominates the gravitational potential. Introducing a radial break in the star formation efficiency into the model improves the fits significantly. This change in the star formation regime is realized by replacing the free-fall time in the prescription of the star formation rate with the molecule formation timescale. Depending on the star formation prescription, the break radius is located near the transition region between the molecular-gas-dominated and atomic-gas-dominated parts of the galactic disk or closer to the optical radius. It is found that only less massive galaxies (log M(M{sub sun}) {approx}< 10) can balance gas loss via star formation by radial gas accretion within the disk. These galaxies can thus access their gas reservoirs with large angular momentum. On the other hand, the star formation of massive galaxies is determined by the external gas mass accretion rate from a putative spherical halo of ionized gas or from satellite accretion. In the absence of this external accretion, star formation slowly exhausts the gas within the optical disk within the star formation timescale.

  1. WITNESSING THE DIFFERENTIAL EVOLUTION OF DISK GALAXIES IN LUMINOSITY AND SIZE VIA GRAVITATIONAL LENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Bandara, Kaushala; Crampton, David; Peng, Chien; Simard, Luc

    2013-11-01

    We take advantage of the magnification in size and flux of a galaxy provided by gravitational lensing to analyze the properties of 62 strongly lensed galaxies from the Sloan Lens ACS (SLACS) Survey. The sample of lensed galaxies spans a redshift range of 0.20 ≤ z ≤ 1.20 with a median redshift of z = 0.61. We use the lens modeling code LENSFIT to derive the luminosities, sizes, and Sérsic indices of the lensed galaxies. The measured properties of the lensed galaxies show a primarily compact, {sup d}isk{sup -}like population with the peaks of the size and Sérsic index distributions corresponding to ∼1.50 kpc and n ∼ 1, respectively. Comparison of the SLACS galaxies to a non-lensing, broadband imaging survey shows that a lensing survey allows us to probe a galaxy population that reaches ∼2 mag fainter. Our analysis allows us to compare the (z) = 0.61 disk galaxy sample (n ≤ 2.5) to an unprecedented local galaxy sample of ∼670, 000 SDSS galaxies at z ∼ 0.1; this analysis indicates that the evolution of the luminosity-size relation since z ∼ 1 may not be fully explained by a pure-size or pure-luminosity evolution but may instead require a combination of both. Our observations are also in agreement with recent numerical simulations of disk galaxies that show evidence of a mass-dependent evolution since z ∼ 1, where high-mass disk galaxies (M{sub *} > 10{sup 9} M{sub ☉}) evolve more in size and low-mass disk galaxies (M{sub *} ≤ 10{sup 9} M{sub ☉}) evolve more in luminosity.

  2. Self-regulating galaxy formation. I - H II disk and Lyman-alpha pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, D. P.

    1985-01-01

    The nascent interstellar medium and star formation model are incorporated into a scenario for the formation epoch of spiral galaxies. The structure, star formation time scale, and luminosity of a self-gravitating isothermal disk are evaluated as functions of the disk surface density. The importance of radiation pressure, particularly that of Lyman-alpha, in maintaining an inflated disk and halting infall is discussed. The Lyman-alpha pressure also supports a considerable halo of material in the vicinity of the disk. A first-order infall scenario and the time-dependent properties of the system it constructs are presented. Disk properties are evaluated at the epoch at which further material is supportable against infall by Lyman-alpha pressure. The two-dimensional family of disk galaxies whose scales and surface density are expressible in terms of fundamental constants and which arise from the three parameter sets of perturbations in the Hubble flow are determined.

  3. The dynamical settling of warped disks and angular momentum transport in galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, P.

    1994-01-01

    We present results of three-dimensional, hydrodynamic models of gaseous disks settling in a nonspherical potential. As the gas settles, differential precession creates a warped disk similar to the warps seen in spiral galaxies. A logarithmic potential, indicative of a massive halo, seems to induce warps more extreme than those produced by a l/r potential with a quadrupole distortion.

  4. Counter-rotating gaseous disks in the 'Evil Eye' galaxy NGC4826

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Robert; Walterbos, Rene A. M.; Kennicutt, Robert C., Jr.

    1992-12-01

    The discovery of two counterrotating gaseous disks in the otherwise normal early-type spiral NGC4826 is reported. This is the most disklike galaxy in which any kinematic substructure has yet been found. This discovery raises the possibility that even spiral galaxies may have undergone a significant degree of structural evolution due to mergers.

  5. Galactic abundance gradients from Cepheids. α and heavy elements in the outer disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemasle, B.; François, P.; Genovali, K.; Kovtyukh, V. V.; Bono, G.; Inno, L.; Laney, C. D.; Kaper, L.; Bergemann, M.; Fabrizio, M.; Matsunaga, N.; Pedicelli, S.; Primas, F.; Romaniello, M.

    2013-10-01

    Context. Galactic abundance gradients set strong constraints to chemo-dynamical evolutionary models of the Milky Way. Given the period-luminosity relations that provide accurate distances and the large number of spectral lines, Cepheids are excellent tracers of the present-day abundance gradients. Aims: We want to measure the Galactic abundance gradient of several chemical elements. While the slope of the Cepheid iron gradient did not vary much from the very first studies, the gradients of the other elements are not that well constrained. In this paper we focus on the inner and outer regions of the Galactic thin disk. Methods: We use high-resolution spectra (FEROS, ESPADONS, NARVAL) to measure the abundances of several light (Na, Al), α (Mg, Si, S, Ca), and heavy elements (Y, Zr, La, Ce, Nd, Eu) in a sample of 65 Milky Way Cepheids. Combining these results with accurate distances from period-Wesenheit relations in the near-infrared enables us to determine the abundance gradients in the Milky Way. Results: Our results are in good agreement with previous studies on either Cepheids or other tracers. In particular, we confirm an upward shift of ≈0.2 dex for the Mg abundances, as has recently been reported. We also confirm the existence of a gradient for all the heavy elements studied in the context of a local thermodynamic equilibrium analysis. However, for Y, Nd, and especially La, we find lower abundances for Cepheids in the outer disk than reported in previous studies, leading to steeper gradients. This effect can be explained by the differences in the line lists used by different groups. Conclusions: Our data do not support a flattening of the gradients in the outer disk, in agreement with recent Cepheid studies and chemo-dynamical simulations. This is in contrast to the open cluster observations but remains compatible with a picture where the transition zone between the inner disk and the outer disk would move outward with time. Based on observations obtained

  6. Far-Infrared Abundance Measurements in the Outer Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fich, Michel; Rudolph, Alexander; Simpson, Janet P.; Haas, Michael R.; Erickson, Edwin F.

    Six H ii regions at intermediate distances from the center of the Galaxy (R = 11-13 kpc) have been observed in the far-IR emission lines of O iii (52 micron, 88 micron) N iii (57 micron), and S iii (19 micron) using the Kuiper Airborne Observatory. A simple ionization correction scheme has been used to determine the total abundances of nitrogen and sulfur relative to hydrogen, as well as the relative abundance N/O. Our results are consistent with previously determined values for H ii regions at larger distances (Rudolph et al. 1997) and at smaller distances (Simpson et al. 1995).

  7. Extended Light in E/S0 Galaxies and Implications for Disk Rebirth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffett, Amanda J.; Kannappan, S. J.; Laine, S.; Wei, L. H.; Baker, A. J.; Impey, C. D.

    2010-01-01

    The recent discovery of extended ultraviolet (XUV) disks around a large fraction of late-type galaxies provides evidence for unexpectedly large-scale disk building at recent epochs. Combining GALEX UV observations with deep optical and Spitzer IR imaging, we search for XUV disks in a sample of nearby low-to-intermediate mass E/S0 galaxies to explore evidence for disk rebuilding after mergers. Preliminary visual classification yields ten XUV-disk candidates from the full sample of 30, intriguingly similar to the 30% frequency for late-type galaxies. These XUV candidates occur at a wide range of masses and on both the red and blue sequences in color vs. stellar mass, indicating a possible association with processes like gas accretion and/or galaxy interactions that would affect the galaxy population broadly. We go on to apply the quantitative Type 1 and Type 2 XUV-disk definitions to this sample and identify multiple Type 1 XUVs, i.e., galaxies with UV structure beyond the expected star formation threshold. We also find several galaxies that come close to satisfying the Type 2 definition, but that definition proves problematic to apply to this sample: the NUV-derived star formation threshold radii for our E/S0s often lie inside the 80% Ks-band light (K80) radii, violating an implicit assumption of the Type 2 definition, or lie outside but not as far as the definition requires. Nonetheless, we identify otherwise Type 2-like galaxies ("modified Type 2 XUVs") that have higher star formation rates and bluer FUV - NUV colors than Type 1 XUVs in the sample. We propose that Type 1 XUVs may reflect early or inefficient stages of star formation, while modified Type 2 XUVs perhaps reflect inside-out disk regrowth.

  8. Extended Light in E/S0 Galaxies and Implications for Disk Rebirth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffett, A. J.; Kannappan, S. J.; Laine, S.; Wei, L. H.; Baker, A. J.; Impey, C. D.

    2010-06-01

    The recent discovery of extended ultraviolet (XUV) disks around a large fraction of late-type galaxies provides evidence for unexpectedly large-scale disk building at recent epochs. Combining GALEX UV observations with deep optical and Spitzer IR imaging, we search for XUV disks in a sample of nearby low-to-intermediate mass E/S0 galaxies to explore evidence for disk rebuilding after mergers. Preliminary visual classification yields ten XUV-disk candidates from the full sample of 30, intriguingly similar to the ˜30% frequency for late-type galaxies. These XUV candidates occur at a wide range of masses and on both the red and blue sequences in color vs. stellar mass, indicating a possible association with processes like gas accretion and/or galaxy interactions that would affect the galaxy population broadly. We go on to apply the quantitative Type 1 and Type 2 XUV-disk definitions to a nine-galaxy subsample analyzed in detail. For this subsample, six of the nine are Type 1 XUVs, i.e., galaxies with UV structure beyond the expected star formation threshold. The other three come close to satisfying the Type 2 definition, but that definition proves problematic to apply to this sample: the NUV-derived star formation threshold radii for our E/S0s often lie inside the 80% Ks-band light (K80) radii, violating an implicit assumption of the Type 2 definition, or lie outside but not as far as the definition requires. Nonetheless, the three otherwise Type 2-like galaxies ("modified Type 2 XUVs") have higher star formation rates and bluer FUV - NUV colors than the Type 1 XUVs in the sample. We propose that Type 1 XUVs may reflect early or inefficient stages of star formation, while modified Type 2 XUVs perhaps reflect inside-out disk regrowth.

  9. Variations in the Star Formation Efficiency of the Dense Molecular Gas across the Disks of Star-forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usero, Antonio; Leroy, Adam K.; Walter, Fabian; Schruba, Andreas; García-Burillo, Santiago; Sandstrom, Karin; Bigiel, Frank; Brinks, Elias; Kramer, Carsten; Rosolowsky, Erik; Schuster, Karl-Friedrich; de Blok, W. J. G.

    2015-10-01

    same parameters and is ˜6-8 times lower near galaxy centers than in the outer regions of the galaxy disks. For fixed conversion factors, these results are incompatible with a simple model in which star formation depends only on the amount of gas mass above some density threshold. Moreover, only a very specific set of environment-dependent conversion factors can render our observations compatible with such a model. Whole cloud models, such as the theory of turbulence regulated star formation, do a better job of matching our observations. We explore one such model in which variations in the Mach number drive many of the trends within galaxy disks, while density contrasts drive the differences between disk and merging galaxies. Based on observations with the IRAM 30 m telescope. IRAM is supported by CNRS/INSU (France), the MPG (Germany), and the IGN (Spain).

  10. EVOLUTION OF WARPED ACCRETION DISKS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. I. ROLES OF FEEDING AT THE OUTER BOUNDARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yan-Rong; Wang, Jian-Min; Cheng, Cheng; Qiu, Jie

    2013-02-10

    We investigate the alignment processes of spinning black holes and their surrounding warped accretion disks in a frame of two different types of feeding at the outer boundaries. We consider (1) fixed flows in which gas is continually fed with a preferred angular momentum, and (2) free flows in which there is no gas supply and the disks diffuse freely at their outer edges. As expected, we find that for the cases of fixed flows the black hole disk systems always align on timescales of several 10{sup 6} yr, irrespective of the initial inclinations. If the initial inclination angles are larger than {pi}/2, the black hole accretion transits from retrograde to prograde fashion, and the accreted mass onto the black holes during these two phases is comparable. On the other hand, for the cases of free flows, both alignments and anti-alignments can occur, depending on the initial inclinations and the ratios of the angular momentum of the disks to that of the black holes. In such cases, the disks will be consumed within timescales of 10{sup 6} yr by black holes accreting at the Eddington limit. We propose that there is a close connection between the black hole spin and the lifetime for which the feeding persists, which determines the observable episodic lifetimes of active galactic nuclei. We conclude that careful inclusion of the disk feeding at the outer boundaries is crucial for modeling the evolution of the black hole spin.

  11. EXTREME GAS FRACTIONS IN CLUMPY, TURBULENT DISK GALAXIES AT z ∼ 0.1

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, David B.; Glazebrook, Karl; Bassett, Robert; Bolatto, Alberto; Obreschkow, Danail; Cooper, Erin Mentuch; Wisnioski, Emily; Abraham, Roberto G.; Damjanov, Ivana; Green, Andy; McGregor, Peter

    2014-08-01

    In this Letter, we report the discovery of CO fluxes, suggesting very high gas fractions in three disk galaxies seen in the nearby universe (z ∼ 0.1). These galaxies were investigated as part of the DYnamics of Newly Assembled Massive Objects (DYNAMO) survey. High-resolution Hubble Space Telescope imaging of these objects reveals the presence of large star forming clumps in the bodies of the galaxies, while spatially resolved spectroscopy of redshifted Hα reveals the presence of high dispersion rotating disks. The internal dynamical state of these galaxies resembles that of disk systems seen at much higher redshifts (1 < z < 3). Using CO(1-0) observations made with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer, we find gas fractions of 20%-30% and depletion times of t {sub dep} ∼ 0.5 Gyr (assuming a Milky-Way-like α{sub CO}). These properties are unlike those expected for low-redshift galaxies of comparable specific star formation rate, but they are normal for their high-z counterparts. DYNAMO galaxies break the degeneracy between gas fraction and redshift, and we show that the depletion time per specific star formation rate for galaxies is closely tied to gas fraction, independent of redshift. We also show that the gas dynamics of two of our local targets corresponds to those expected from unstable disks, again resembling the dynamics of high-z disks. These results provide evidence that DYNAMO galaxies are local analogs to the clumpy, turbulent disks, which are often found at high redshift.

  12. The growth of disks and bulges during hierarchical galaxy formation. I: fast evolution vs secular processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonini, C.; Mutch, S. J.; Croton, D. J.; Wyithe, J. S. B.

    2016-04-01

    We present a theoretical model for the evolution of mass, angular momentum and size of galaxy disks and bulges, and we implement it into the semi-analytic galaxy formation code SAGE. The model follows both secular and violent evolutionary channels, including smooth accretion, disk instabilities, minor and major mergers. We find that the combination of our recipe with hierarchical clustering produces two distinct populations of bulges: merger-driven bulges, akin to classical bulges and ellipticals, and instability-driven bulges, akin to secular (or pseudo-)bulges. The model mostly reproduces the mass-size relation of gaseous and stellar disks, the evolution of the mass-size relation of ellipticals, the Faber-Jackson relation, and the magnitude-colour diagram of classical and secular bulges. The model predicts only a small overlap of merger-driven and instability-driven components in the same galaxy, and predicts different bulge types as a function of galaxy mass and disk fraction. Bulge type also affects the star formation rate and colour at a given luminosity. The model predicts a population of merger-driven red ellipticals that dominate both the low-mass and high-mass ends of the galaxy population, and span all dynamical ages; merger-driven bulges in disk galaxies are dynamically old and do not interfere with subsequent evolution of the star-forming component. Instability-driven bulges dominate the population at intermediate galaxy masses, especially thriving in massive disks. The model green valley is exclusively populated by instability-driven bulge hosts. Through the present implementation the mass accretion history is perceivable in the galaxy structure, morphology and colours.

  13. Disk mass and disk heating in the spiral galaxy NGC 3223

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentile, G.; Tydtgat, C.; Baes, M.; De Geyter, G.; Koleva, M.; Angus, G. W.; de Blok, W. J. G.; Saftly, W.; Viaene, S.

    2015-04-01

    We present the stellar and gaseous kinematics of an Sb galaxy, NGC 3223, with the aim of determining the vertical and radial stellar velocity dispersion as a function of radius, which can help to constrain disk heating theories. Together with the observed NIR photometry, the vertical velocity dispersion is also used to determine the stellar mass-to-light (M/L) ratio, typically one of the largest uncertainties when deriving the dark matter distribution from the observed rotation curve. We find a vertical-to-radial velocity dispersion ratio of σz/σR = 1.21 ± 0.14, significantly higher than expectations from known correlations, and a weakly-constrained Ks-band stellar M/L ratio in the range 0.5-1.7, which is at the high end of (but consistent with) the predictions of stellar population synthesis models. Such a weak constraint on the stellar M/L ratio, however, does not allow us to securely determine the dark matter density distribution. To achieve this, either a statistical approach or additional data (e.g. integral-field unit) are needed. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, under proposal 68.B-0588.

  14. Abundances of Planetary Nebulae in the Outer Disk of M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwitter, Karen B.; Lehman, Emma M. M.; Balick, Bruce; Henry, R. B. C.

    2012-07-01

    We present spectroscopic observations and chemical abundances of 16 planetary nebulae (PNe) in the outer disk of M31. The [O III] λ4363 line is detected in all objects, allowing a direct measurement of the nebular temperature essential for accurate abundance determinations. Our results show that the abundances in these M31 PNe display the same correlations and general behaviors as Type II PNe in the Milky Way. We also calculate photoionization models to derive estimates of central star properties. From these we infer that our sample PNe, all near the bright-end cutoff of the planetary nebula luminosity function, originated from stars near 2 M ⊙. Finally, under the assumption that these PNe are located in M31's disk, we plot the oxygen abundance gradient, which appears shallower than the gradient in the Milky Way. Partially based on observations obtained with the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 m telescope, which is owned and operated by the Astrophysical Research Consortium; and on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministerio da Ciencia e Tecnologia (Brazil), and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).

  15. The bilayer enhances rhodopsin kinetic stability in bovine rod outer segment disk membranes.

    PubMed

    Corley, Scott C; Sprangers, Peter; Albert, Arlene D

    2011-06-22

    Rhodopsin is a kinetically stable protein constituting >90% of rod outer segment disk membrane protein. To investigate the bilayer contribution to rhodopsin kinetic stability, disk membranes were systematically disrupted by octyl-β-D-glucopyranoside. Rhodopsin kinetic stability was examined under subsolubilizing (rhodopsin in a bilayer environment perturbed by octyl-β-D-glucopyranoside) and under fully solubilizing conditions (rhodopsin in a micelle with cosolubilized phospholipids). As determined by DSC, rhodopsin exhibited a scan-rate-dependent irreversible endothermic transition at all stages of solubilization. The transition temperature (T(m)) decreased in the subsolubilizing stage. However, once the rhodopsin was in a micelle environment there was little change of the T(m) as the phospholipid/rhodopsin ratio in the mixed micelles decreased during the fully solubilized stage. Rhodopsin thermal denaturation is consistent with the two-state irreversible model at all stages of solubilization. The activation energy of denaturation (E(act)) was calculated from the scan rate dependence of the T(m) and from the rate of rhodopsin thermal bleaching at all stages of solubilization. The E(act) as determined by both techniques decreased in the subsolubilizing stage, but remained constant once fully solubilized. These results indicate the bilayer structure increases the E(act) to rhodopsin denaturation. PMID:21689528

  16. Dual effect of local anesthetics on the function of excitable rod outer segment disk membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Mashimo, T.; Abe, K.; Yoshiya, I.

    1986-04-01

    The effects of local anesthetics and a divalent cation, Ca2+, on the function of rhodopsin were estimated from the measurements of light-induced proton uptake. The light-induced proton uptake by rhodopsin in the rod outer segment disk membrane was enhanced at lower pH (4) but depressed at higher pHs (6 to 8) by the tertiary amine local anesthetics lidocaine, bupivacaine, tetracaine, and dibucaine. The order of local anesthetic-induced depression of the proton uptake followed that of their clinical anesthetic potencies. The depression of the proton uptake versus the concentration of the uncharged form of local anesthetic nearly describes the same curve for small and large dose of added anesthetic. Furthermore, a neutral local anesthetic, benzocaine, depressed the proton uptake at all pHs between 4 and 7. These results indicate that the depression of the proton uptake is due to the effect of only the uncharged form. It is hypothesized that the uncharged form of local anesthetics interacts hydrophobically with the rhodopsin in the disk membrane. The dual effect of local anesthetics on the proton uptake, on the other hand, suggests that the activation of the function of rhodopsin may be caused by the charged form. There was no significant change in the light-induced proton uptake by rhodopsin when 1 mM of Ca2+ was introduced into the disk membrane at varying pHs in the absence or presence of local anesthetics. This fact indicates that Ca2+ ion does not influence the diprotonating process of metarhodopsin; neither does it interfere with the local anesthetic-induced changes in the rhodopsin molecule.

  17. NEW CONSTRAINTS ON THE GALACTIC HALO MAGNETIC FIELD USING ROTATION MEASURES OF EXTRAGALACTIC SOURCES TOWARD THE OUTER GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, S. A.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Gaensler, B. M.; Brown, J. C.; Van Eck, C. L.; Stil, J. M.; Taylor, A. R.; Haverkorn, M.; Kronberg, P. P.; Shukurov, A.

    2012-08-10

    We present a study of the Milky Way disk and halo magnetic field, determined from observations of Faraday rotation measure (RM) toward 641 polarized extragalactic radio sources in the Galactic longitude range 100 Degree-Sign -117 Degree-Sign , within 30 Degree-Sign of the Galactic plane. For |b| < 15 Degree-Sign , we observe a symmetric RM distribution about the Galactic plane. This is consistent with a disk field in the Perseus arm of even parity across the Galactic mid-plane. In the range 15 Degree-Sign < |b| < 30 Degree-Sign , we find median RMs of -15 {+-} 4 rad m{sup -2} and -62 {+-} 5 rad m{sup -2} in the northern and southern Galactic hemispheres, respectively. If the RM distribution is a signature of the large-scale field parallel to the Galactic plane, then this suggests that the halo magnetic field toward the outer Galaxy does not reverse direction across the mid-plane. The variation of RM as a function of Galactic latitude in this longitude range is such that RMs become more negative at larger |b|. This is consistent with an azimuthal magnetic field of strength 2 {mu}G (7 {mu}G) at a height 0.8-2 kpc above (below) the Galactic plane between the local and the Perseus spiral arm. We propose that the Milky Way could possess spiral-like halo magnetic fields similar to those observed in M51.

  18. Discovery of star formation in the extreme outer galaxy possibly induced by a high-velocity cloud impact

    SciTech Connect

    Izumi, Natsuko; Kobayashi, Naoto; Hamano, Satoshi; Yasui, Chikako; Tokunaga, Alan T.; Saito, Masao

    2014-11-01

    We report the discovery of star formation activity in perhaps the most distant molecular cloud in the extreme outer galaxy. We performed deep near-infrared imaging with the Subaru 8.2 m telescope, and found two young embedded clusters at two CO peaks of 'Digel Cloud 1' at the kinematic distance of D = 16 kpc (Galactocentric radius R {sub G} = 22 kpc). We identified 18 and 45 cluster members in the two peaks, and the estimated stellar densities are ∼5 and ∼3 pc{sup –2}, respectively. The observed K-band luminosity function suggests that the age of the clusters is less than 1 Myr and also that the distance to the clusters is consistent with the kinematic distance. On the sky, Cloud 1 is located very close to the H I peak of high-velocity cloud Complex H, and there are some H I intermediate velocity structures between the Complex H and the Galactic disk, which could indicate an interaction between them. We suggest the possibility that Complex H impacting on the Galactic disk has triggered star formation in Cloud 1 as well as the formation of the Cloud 1 molecular cloud.

  19. BREAKS IN THIN AND THICK DISKS OF EDGE-ON GALAXIES IMAGED IN THE SPITZER SURVEY OF STELLAR STRUCTURE IN GALAXIES (S{sup 4}G)

    SciTech Connect

    Comeron, Sebastien; Salo, Heikki; Laurikainen, Eija; Laine, Jarkko; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert; Knapen, Johan H.; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Sheth, Kartik; Munoz-Mateos, Juan Carlos; Kim, Taehyun; Hinz, Joannah L.; Regan, Michael W.; Gil de Paz, Armando; Menendez-Delmestre, Karin; Seibert, Mark; Ho, Luis C.; Mizusawa, Trisha; Holwerda, Benne

    2012-11-10

    Breaks in the radial luminosity profiles of galaxies have until now been mostly studied averaged over disks. Here, we study separately breaks in thin and thick disks in 70 edge-on galaxies using imaging from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies. We built luminosity profiles of the thin and thick disks parallel to midplanes and we found that thin disks often truncate (77%). Thick disks truncate less often (31%), but when they do, their break radius is comparable with that in the thin disk. This suggests either two different truncation mechanisms-one of dynamical origin affecting both disks simultaneously and another one only affecting the thin disk-or a single mechanism that creates a truncation in one disk or in both depending on some galaxy property. Thin disks apparently antitruncate in around 40% of galaxies. However, in many cases, these antitruncations are an artifact caused by the superposition of a thin disk and a thick disk, with the latter having a longer scale length. We estimate the real thin disk antitruncation fraction to be less than 15%. We found that the ratio of the thick and thin stellar disk mass is roughly constant (0.2 < M{sub T} /M{sub t} < 0.7) for circular velocities v{sub c} > 120 km s{sup -1}, but becomes much larger at smaller velocities. We hypothesize that this is due to a combination of a high efficiency of supernova feedback and a slower dynamical evolution in lower-mass galaxies causing stellar thin disks to be younger and less massive than in higher-mass galaxies.

  20. Rest-frame ultraviolet morphologies: connecting local galaxies with the epoch of disk formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes Demello, Duilia; Soto, Emmaris

    2015-08-01

    At all redshifts rest-frame ultraviolet morphologies tend to be patchy and clumpy or extremely compact in nature. These morphological signatures could result from either merger interactions between two or multiple systems that trigger star formation, cloud collapse via gravitational instabilities in a gaseous disk that is fed by cold gas spiraling inwards along filamentary structures, or another mechanism still to be determined. Theoretical simulations of clumpy galaxy evolution suggest they could have evolved secularly through cold gas accretion onto rotating disks. Clumps in disks could have migrated to the center of the potential well of a galaxy and combined to form a bulge, or, if gravitationally unstable, could have dissipated forming the disk component. We are exploring potential correlations amongst different morphological properties at intermediate-z which is pivotal in bridging observations at high-z to the local extragalactic universe. We will show how flocculent galaxies, starburst galaxies and compact groups of galaxies may resemble clumpy disks at intermediate redshifts in the rest-frame UV.

  1. The co-evolution of spiral structure and mass distribution in disk galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seigar, Marc

    2005-07-01

    We propose to use a new diagnostic tool to study the mass buildup in disk galaxies as a function of look-back time out to z 1. The tight correlation between spiral arm pitch angle and rotation curve shear rate {Seigar et al. 2005} demonstrates that the tightness of spiral structure in disk galaxies depends on the central mass concentration {including dark matter}, as this determines the shear rate. Galaxies with high central mass concentration have a higher shear rate and more tightly wound spiral structure than those with low mass concentration. As a result, the evolution of spiral structure over time can be used to search for evolution in the mass distribution in spiral galaxies. The main goal of this project is to determine evolution in the mass distribution of disk galaxies, using spiral arm pitch angles as a quanitative indicator. In order to do this we will use nearly face-on disk galaxies with measurable spiral structure, observed in the GOODS fields.

  2. Simulating the Growth of a Disk Galaxy and its Supermassive Black Hole in a Cosmological Simulating the Growth of a Disk Galaxy and its Supermassive Black Hole in a Cosmological Context

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, Robyn Deborah; /JILA, Boulder

    2008-07-01

    Supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are ubiquitous in the centers of galaxies. Their formation and subsequent evolution is inextricably linked to that of their host galaxies, and the study of galaxy formation is incomplete without the inclusion of SMBHs. The present work seeks to understand the growth and evolution of SMBHs through their interaction with the host galaxy and its environment. In the first part of the thesis (Chap. 2 and 3), we combine a simple semi-analytic model of outflows from active galactic nuclei (AGN) with a simulated dark matter density distribution to study the impact of SMBH feedback on cosmological scales. We find that constraints can be placed on the kinetic efficiency of such feedback using observations of the filling fraction of the Ly{alpha} forest. We also find that AGN feedback is energetic enough to redistribute baryons over cosmological distances, having potentially significant effects on the interpretation of cosmological data which are sensitive to the total matter density distribution (e.g. weak lensing). However, truly assessing the impact of AGN feedback in the universe necessitates large-dynamic range simulations with extensive treatment of baryonic physics to first model the fueling of SMBHs. In the second part of the thesis (Chap. 4-6) we use a hydrodynamic adaptive mesh refinement simulation to follow the growth and evolution of a typical disk galaxy hosting a SMBH, in a cosmological context. The simulation covers a dynamical range of 10 million allowing us to study the transport of matter and angular momentum from super-galactic scales all the way down to the outer edge of the accretion disk around the SMBH. Focusing our attention on the central few hundred parsecs of the galaxy, we find the presence of a cold, self-gravitating, molecular gas disk which is globally unstable. The global instabilities drive super-sonic turbulence, which maintains local stability and allows gas to fuel a SMBH without first fragmenting

  3. Baryonic inflow and outflow histories in disk galaxies as revealed from observations of distant star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyouchi, Daisuke; Chiba, Masashi

    2016-08-01

    Gas inflow and outflow are the most important processes, which determine the structural and chemical evolution of a disk galaxy like the Milky Way. In order to get new insights into these baryonic processes in Milky Way like galaxies (MWLGs), we consider the data of distant star-forming galaxies and investigate the evolution of the radial density profile of their stellar components and the associated total amount of gaseous inflow and outflow. For this purpose, we analyze the redshift evolution of their stellar mass distribution, combined with the scaling relations between the mass of baryonic components, star formation rate and chemical abundance for both high- and low-z star-forming galaxies. As a result, we find the new relations between star formation rate and inflow/outflow rate as deduced from these distant galaxies, which will provide fundamental information for understanding the structural and chemical evolution of MWLGs.

  4. The power spectra of non-circular motions in disk galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westfall, Kyle; Laws, Anna S. E.; MaNGA Team

    2016-01-01

    Using data from the first year of the SDSS-IV/MaNGA survey, we present a preliminary study of the amplitude of non-circular motions in a sample of disk galaxies. We select galaxies that have either a visual classification as a spiral galaxy by the Galaxy Zoo project (Lintott et al. 2011) and/or a measured Sersic index of less than 2.5 from the NASA-Sloan Atlas (nsatlas.org). We also remove high-inclination systems by selecting galaxies with isophotal ellipticity measurements of less than 0.6, implying an inclination of less than 65 degrees. For each galaxy, we fit a tilted-disk model to the observed line-of-sight velocities (Andersen & Bershady 2013). The geometric projection of the circularly rotating disk is simultaneously fit to both the ionized-gas (H-alpha) and stellar kinematics, whereas the rotation curves of the two dynamical tracers are allowed to be independent. We deproject the residuals of the velocity-field fit to the disk-plane polar coordinates and select a radial region that is fully covered in aziumuth, yet not undersampled by the on-sky spaxel. Similar to the approach taken by Bovy et al. (2015) for the Milky Way, we then compute the two-dimensional power spectrum of this velocity-residual map, which provides the amplitude of non-circular motions at all modes probed by the data. Our preliminary analysis reveals disk-plane non-circular motions in both the stars and ionized-gas with typical peak amplitudes of approximately 20 km/s. Additionally, our initial findings appear to demonstrate that non-circular motions in barred galaxies are stronger in the ionized gas than in the stars, a trend not seen in unbarred galaxies.

  5. First Results from Galaxy Zoo CANDELS: The Settling of Galactic Disks from 0.5 < z < 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Brooke; Melvin, Tom; Lintott, Chris; Masters, Karen; Willett, Kyle; Keel, William C.; Smethurst, Rebecca; Cheung, Edmond; Nichol, Robert; Schawinski, Kevin; Galaxy Zoo, Candels

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale bar features in disk galaxies are tracers of the dynamical maturity of the population. Previous studies have found that the incidence of bars in disks decreases from the local Universe to z ~ 1, and by z > 1 simulations predict that bar features in dynamically mature disks should be extremely rare. We report the discovery of strong barred structures in massive disk galaxies at z ~ 1.5 in deep rest-frame optical images from CANDELS, implying the host disks are dynamically settled enough to be unstable to bar formation. The fraction of disk galaxies hosting barred structures does not significantly evolve across the redshift range 0.5 < z < 2 (fbar = 10.7+6.3-3.5% after correcting for incompleteness). We discuss the implications of this discovery in the context of existing simulations and our current understanding of the way disk galaxies have evolved over the last 11 billion years.

  6. Star formation in the outer Galaxy: membership and fundamental parameters of the young open cluster NGC 1893

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prisinzano, L.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Micela, G.; Caramazza, M.; Guarcello, M. G.; Sciortino, S.; Testi, L.

    2011-03-01

    Context. Different environmental conditions can play a crucial role in determining final products of the star formation process, and in this context, less favorable activities of star formation are expected in the external regions of our Galaxy. Aims: We studied the properties of the young open cluster NGC 1893 located about 12 Kpc from the galactic center, to investigate how different physical conditions can affect the process of star formation. Methods: By adopting a multiwavelength approach, we compiled a catalog extending from X-rays to NIR data to derive the cluster membership. In addition, optical and NIR photometric properties are used to evaluate the cluster parameters. Results: We find 415 diskless candidate members and 1061 young stellar objects with a circumstellar disk or class II candidate members, 125 of which are also Hα emitters. Considering the diskless candidate members, we find that the cluster distance is 3.6 ± 0.2 kpc and the mean interstellar reddening is E(B - V) = 0.6 ± 0.1 with evidence of differential reddening in the whole surveyed region. Conclusions: NGC 1893 contains a conspicuous population of pre-main sequence stars, together with the well-studied main sequence cluster population. We found a disk fraction of about 70% similar to the one found in clusters of similar age in the solar neighbor and then, despite expected unfavorable conditions for star formation, we conclude that very rich young clusters can also form in the outer regions of our Galaxy. Full Tables 5-8 are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/527/A77

  7. The Angular Momentum of Disk Galaxies: A Multi-Wavelength Study Using the Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortese, Luca; Catinella, B.; Springob, C. M.

    2006-12-01

    The determination of the angular momentum distribution of disk galaxies and its dependence on other galaxy properties and environment is essential in order to develop an accurate picture of galaxy formation and evolution. N-body simulations and semi-analytic models of galaxy formation within the standard cosmological framework identify the spin parameter of the dark matter halos as one of the main drivers of galaxy evolution and yield insights into its properties and distribution in present-day galaxies. Various relations have been proposed to link the halo spin parameter to observational data. In this work, we exploit such relations to obtain observational constraints for theoretical models of galaxy formation. To this extent, we used the Virtual Observatory to create a multi-wavelength database for the study of the properties of the angular momentum distribution of disk galaxies. Our sample builds upon the SFI++ database, which includes the largest collection of long-slit optical galaxy rotation curves currently available. Preliminary results of our analysis will be presented. This work is partially funded by PPARC under grant PPA/G/O/2002/00497. The Arecibo Observatory is part of the National Astronomy and Ionosphere Center, which is operated by Cornell University under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  8. Warp of the ionized gas layer in the outer Galaxy, traced by recombination line observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azcárate, I. N.; Cersosimo, J. C.

    We report results of H166α recombination line observations from the outer Galaxy in both the Northern and Southern Galactic Plane. The Southern observations were made with the 30 m antenna of the Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomía in Villa Elisa, Buenos Aires, Argentina, and the Northern ones ( more sensitive, high quality observations, performed with an ``state of the art'' receiver) with the 43 m antenna of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, in Green Bank, West Virginia, USA. >From the two sets of observations we obtain evidence of the warp of the low-density ionized gas layer, traced by the H166α emission in the outer Milky Way, towards positive galactic latitudes in the Northern and towards negative latitudes in the Southern Galaxy. The warp of this tracer qualitatively agrees with that of the HI.

  9. A study of the effects of self-regulation on the global properties of disk galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Daniel Carlton

    2001-12-01

    Late-type spiral galaxies share many universal properties. One school of thought proposes that this universality arises from common initial conditions at the formation of these galaxies. The initial conditions are frozen out once the disks have formed, thus accounting for common structure among disk galaxies. However, observations over the last decade suggest that most galaxies have had one or more encounters with other galaxies and that these interactions disturb their structures significantly. One solution to this paradox suggests that disks have a preferred hydrodynamic state and that some processes regulates these disks to that state. This self-regulation may occur during the initial disk formation and carry on through the life of the disk bringing it back to its preferred state even after an interaction has pushed it far from equilibrium. The interstellar medium of disk galaxies experience broad spectrum heating from supernovae, stellar winds and intense UV fluxes from young star clusters that drive turbulent flows and produce multiple thermal phases. Star formation processes from which these young stars arise are regulated by the heat and exchange of phases that they produce. While these star formation processes are effective locally, the overall thermohydrodynamic self- regulation must act globally to account for the large scale universal structure observed in disks. Study of these global regulatory processes is an important step to understanding the formation and evolution of large scale structure in disk galaxies. This dissertation describes our analytic and computational thermohydrodynamic models of gas disks with star formation feedback. The models suggest a number of results that are in accord with observation, as well as some novel predictions. The analytic model suggests the existence of opposing radial flows and a difference in rotational velocity between cold clouds in the midplane and warm and hot gas above and below the midplane. The heating and

  10. Galaxy Disks in the Balance: Vertical Settling as a Result of Inside-Out Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, Jonathan C.; Kazantzidis, Stelios; Brooks, Alyson; Governato, Fabio; Weinberg, David H.; Loebman, Sarah

    2016-05-01

    Over the last decade or more, both observations and simple physical models have established that disk galaxies grow first in their central regions and then form stars at larger radii from higher angular momentum gas. These galaxies grow "inside-out"; their half-mass and scale radii increase with time. Meanwhile, recent high-resolution, hydrodynamic simulations find that the vertical kinematics of the ISM are set by hydrostatic balance between the density and scale heights of both gas and stars. We combine these ideas of inside-out growth and hydrostatic equilibrium to show that as galaxies grow in radial extent, their mass-weighted vertical extent and vertical velocity dispersion must decrease. This has dramatic observational consequences. We use state of the art galaxy formation simulations to first establish that newly-formed stars have vertically isothermal kinematics that vary with the local midplane density as predicted from hydrostatic balance. The midplane density of the exponential disk decreases with radius, thus stars born at larger radii form with smaller vertical energies. We then show that the disk forms both inside-out and upside-down, i.e., the vertical velocity dispersion of the disk decreases with time as more stellar mass is added at larger radii. This kinematic evolution is at odds with the traditional ``disk heating'' paradigm in which the disk is continuously heated due to various scattering mechanisms. Upside-down formation, however, matches the ``era of disk settling'' observational results reported by recent IFU surveys of high-redshift disk galaxies. In addition, we find that the shape of the present-day stellar age-velocity relationship (AVR), long thought to be strong evidence of continuous disk heating, naturally arises from Upside-Down formation, providing a viable solution to the classic Milky Way ``heating problem''. We conclude that simple physical arguments demand disk galaxies form Upside-Down, resolving the tension between

  11. Colliding and merging galaxies. I - Evidence for the recent merging of two disk galaxies in NGC 7252

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweizer, F.

    1982-01-01

    Results from a photographic, spectroscopic, and photometric study of the 'Atoms-for-Peace' galaxy are presented. The observations reveal that NGC 7252 possesses a single nucleus, a nearly round main body marked by delicate ripples, faint surrounding loops, and two slender tails that project to 80 kpc and 130 kpc from the center. The principal body itself shows a spectrum indicative of young A stars and contains a small central disk of ionized gas. The disk rotates with v sin i approximately equal to 80-100 km/s around a well-defined axis, whereas the gas immediately beyond it follows a totally different motion pattern. Five characteristics taken together indicate a recent merger of two similarly massive disk galaxies: the two tails, the unusual isolation opposite tail motions, the single nucleus and body, and the two surviving motion systems of the gas.

  12. The complex structure of stars in the outer galactic disk as revealed by Pan-STARRS1

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, Colin T.; Bell, Eric F.; Schlafly, Edward F.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Morganson, Eric; Peñarrubia, Jorge; Bernard, Edouard J.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Martinez-Delgado, David; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Burgett, William S.; Chambers, Kenneth C.; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Kaiser, Nicholas; Magnier, Eugene A.; Tonry, John L.; Draper, Peter W.; Metcalfe, Nigel; Price, Paul A.; and others

    2014-08-10

    We present a panoptic view of the stellar structure in the Galactic disk's outer reaches commonly known as the Monoceros Ring, based on data from Pan-STARRS1. These observations clearly show the large extent of the stellar overdensities on both sides of the Galactic disk, extending between b = –25° and b = +35° and covering over 130° in Galactic longitude. The structure exhibits a complex morphology with both stream-like features and a sharp edge to the structure in both the north and the south. We compare this map to mock observations of two published simulations aimed at explaining such structures in the outer stellar disk, one postulating an origin as a tidal stream and the other demonstrating a scenario where the disk is strongly distorted by the accretion of a satellite. These morphological comparisons of simulations can link formation scenarios to observed structures, such as demonstrating that the distorted-disk model can produce thin density features resembling tidal streams. Although neither model produces perfect agreement with the observations—the tidal stream predicts material at larger distances that is not detected while in the distorted disk model, the midplane is warped to an excessive degree—future tuning of the models to accommodate these latest data may yield better agreement.

  13. The evolution of disk galaxies in cold dark matter halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Font, Andreea S.

    2005-11-01

    We use high resolution N-body simulations to investigate the dynamical effects that substructure in Cold Dark Matter (CDM) halos have on galactic disks, with particular emphasis on their secular evolution, heating, tilting and warping. The simulations analyzed here are some of the largest and most realistic simulations of disk heating/warping available in the appropriate cosmological context. Our detailed treatment of the dark matter distinguishes them from previous numerical simulations that have focused on the interaction with a single satellite. Our study shows that substructure halos with masses, densities and orbits expected in the CDM paradigm typically play only a minor dynamical role in the heating of the disk over several Gyrs, and thus do not typically pose a danger to the stability of thin disks. This is largely because the most massive dark satellites, which dominate the secular heating, seldom approach the disk, where tidal effects are strongest. Occasionally, however, massive subhalos couple effectively with the disk, resulting in noticeable tidal effects on the structure of the stellar disk, including: (i) tilting and (ii) the forcing of short-lived, asymmetric warps as a result of tidal impulses that arise during each pericentric passage. I show that this is a viable mechanism for creating asymmetric disk warps such as those observed in the local Universe. Moreover, the fact that a satellite can have recurrent interactions with the disk suggests a natural explanation for the observed frequency of the warps, which would otherwise be very short lived. I conclude that dark matter halo substructure does not preclude virialized CDM halos from being acceptable hosts of thin stellar disks like that of the Milky Way and that the ubiquity of minor stellar warps may be associated with the recurrent tidal influence on the disk of the most massive substructure halos.

  14. Three-dimensional distribution of the ISM in the Milky Way galaxy. III. The total neutral gas disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Sofue, Yoshiaki

    2016-02-01

    We present newly obtained three-dimensional gaseous maps of the Milky Way Galaxy: H I, H2, and total-gas (H I plus H2) maps, which were derived from the H I and 12CO(J = 1-0) survey data and rotation curves based on the kinematic distance. The H I and H2 face-on maps show that the H I disk is extended to a radius of 15-20 kpc and its outskirts are asymmetric to the Galactic center, while most of the H2 gas is distributed inside the solar circle. The total gas mass within a radius of 30 kpc amounts to 8.0 × 109 M⊙, 89% and 11% of which are H I and H2, respectively. The vertical slices show that the outer H I disk is strongly warped and the inner H I and H2 disks are corrugated. The total gas map is advantageous for tracing spiral structures from the inner to outer disk. Spiral structures such as the Norma-Cygnus, the Perseus, the Sagittarius-Carina, the Scutum-Crux, and the Orion arms are more clearly traced in the total gas map than ever. All the spiral arms are well explained by logarithmic spiral arms with pitch angles of 11°-15°. The molecular fraction of the total gas is high near the Galactic center and decreases with Galactocentric distance. The molecular fraction is also locally enhanced at the spiral arms compared with the inter-arm regions.

  15. A study of star formation in the disks of Sa galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, N.; Kennicutt, R.; Phillips, A.C.; Schommer, R.A. Steward Observatory, Tucson, AZ Washington Univ., Seattle Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ )

    1991-04-01

    This paper compares the luminosity functions of the H II regions in several Sa galaxies with those of later-type galaxies. Broad UV measurements confirm expectations that the knots associated with the regions are very blue; the converse is also true. The H II region luminosity functions are very steep. The total H-alpha luminosities for the galaxies are computed and used to derive the current star-formation rates. It is found that, in contrast to the late-type galaxies, the current star-formation rates in Sa disks are less than one-tenth of the average rate over the last 15 Gyr. The formal depletion times of gas through star formation are longer than a Hubble time. If the star formation in late-type galaxies takes on the character of that currently seen in the Sas, star formation in such galaxies could continue for much longer than the usual estimate of 5 Gyr. 35 refs.

  16. The Green Valley is a Red Herring: Different Evolutionary Pathways for Spheroidal and Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urry, C. M.; Schawinski, K.; Simmons, B. D.; Fortson, L.; Kaviraj, S.; Keel, W. C.; Lintott, C.; Masters, K.; Nichol, R.; Sarzi, M.; Skibba, R. A.; Treister, E.; Willett, K.; Wong, O.; Yi, S.; Zoo Citizen Scientists, Galaxy

    2014-01-01

    Using SDSS+GALEX+Galaxy Zoo data, we show that the green valley in the color-mass diagram (between the blue cloud of star-forming galaxies and the red sequence of quiescent galaxies) is not a single transitional state through which most blue galaxies evolve into red galaxies. Rather, an analysis that takes morphology and UV colors into account makes clear that only a small population of blue galaxies moves rapidly across the green valley, after star formation is abruptly quenched and the morphology is transformed from disk to spheroid. In contrast, the majority of blue star-forming galaxies retain significant disks as their star formation rates decline very slowly. We detail a range of observations that lead to these conclusions, including UV-optical colors and halo masses, which both show a striking dependence on morphological type. We interpret these results in terms of how much gas is available for star formation. We conclude that disky galaxies are consistent with a scenario where the cosmic supply of gas is shut off, perhaps at a critical halo mass, followed by a slow exhaustion of the remaining gas over several Gigayears, driven by secular and/or environmental processes. In contrast, spheroidal galaxies require the gas supply and gas reservoir to be destroyed virtually instantaneously, with rapid quenching accompanied by a morphological transformation from disk to spheroid. This gas reservoir destruction could be the consequence of a major merger, and mergers could play a role in inducing black hole accretion and possibly AGN feedback in this minority of galaxies.

  17. The external origin of the polar gaseous disk of the S0 galaxy IC 5181

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzella, A.; Morelli, L.; Corsini, E. M.; Dalla Bontà, E.; Cesetti, M.

    2013-12-01

    Context. Galaxies accrete material from the environment through acquisition and merging events. These processes contribute to galaxy assembly and leave their fingerprints on the galactic morphology, internal kinematics of gas and stars, and stellar populations. Aims: We study the nearby S0 galaxy IC 5181 to address the origin of the ionized gas component that orbits the galaxy on polar orbits. Methods: We measure the surface brightness distribution of the stars and ionized gas of IC 5181 from broadband and narrow-band imaging. The structural parameters of the galaxy are obtained with a photometric decomposition assuming a Sérsic and exponential profile for the bulge and disk, respectively. We measure the ionized-gas and stellar kinematics and the line strengths of the Lick indices of the stellar component along both the major and minor axis. The age, metallicity, and [α/Fe] enhancement of the stellar populations are derived using single stellar population models with variable element abundance ratios. The ionized-gas metallicity is obtained from the equivalent width of the emission lines. Results: The galaxy IC 5181 is a morphologically undisturbed S0 galaxy with a classical bulge made by old stars with super solar metallicity and overabundance. Stellar age and metallicity decrease in the disk region. The galaxy hosts a geometrically and kinematically decoupled component of ionized gas. It is elongated along the galaxy minor axis and in orthogonal rotation with respect to the galaxy disk. Conclusions: We interpret the kinematical decoupling as suggesting that there is a component of gas, which is not related to the stars and having an external origin. The gas was accreted by IC 5181 on polar orbits from the surrounding environment. Based on observation collected at the European Southern Observatory for the programme 63.N-0327(A).Tables 1-3 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. The role of interactions in triggering bars, spiral arms and AGN in disk galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Preethi; Ellison, Sara L.; Patton, David R.

    2016-01-01

    The role of secular structures like bars, rings and spiral arms in triggering star formation and AGN activity in disk galaxies are not well understood. In addition, the mechanisms which create and destroy these structures are not well characterized. Mergers are considered to be one of the main mechanisms which can trigger bars in massive disk galaxies. Using a sample of ~8000 close pair galaxies at 0.02 < z < 0.06 from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, I will present results illustrating the role of mergers in triggering bars, rings, spiral arms and AGN as a function of close pair separation and merger ratios as well as their dependence on morphology and other physical properties of the galaxies. Time permitting, I will show how resolved IFU observations from SDSS MaNGA will help to place stronger constraints on the role of these structures in triggering star formation and AGN.

  19. Clues to the Formation of Lenticular Galaxies Using Spectroscopic Bulge-Disk Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, E. J.; Aragón-Salamanca, A.; Merrifield, M. R.; Bedregal, A. G.

    2014-03-01

    Lenticular galaxies have long been thought of as evolved spirals, but the processes involved to quench the star formation are still unclear. By studying the individual star formation histories of the bulges and disks of lenticulars, it is possible to look for clues to the processes that triggered their transformation from spirals. To accomplish this feat, we present a new method for spectroscopic bulge-disk decomposition, in which a long-slit spectrum is decomposed into two one-dimensional spectra representing purely the bulge and disk light. We present preliminary results from applying this method to lenticular galaxies in the Virgo and Fornax Clusters, in which we show that the most recent star formation activity in these galaxies occurred within the bulges. We also find that the star formation timescales of the bulges are longer than the disks, and that more massive galaxies take longer to lose their gas during the transformation. These results point towards slow processes, such as ram-pressure stripping or harassment, being the mechanism responsible for the quenching of star formation in spirals, followed by a burst of star formation in the central regions from the gas that has been funnelled inwards through the disk.

  20. Stellar Dynamics And Accretion Disk Dynamics in the Centers of Galaxies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremaine, Scott

    We propose to investigate the behavior of stars and gas in the central regions of galaxies, where the dynamics is dominated by a supermassive black hole. The specific projects include: (i) explore novel orbit integrators for the gravitational N-body problem, which may allow much larger timesteps than the conventional leapfrog or Hermite integrators; (ii) investigate the behavior of warped accretion disks, believed to be common constituents of active galactic nuclei, where the self-gravity of the disk, viscous stresses, and the Lense-Thirring effect all play important roles in determining the disk shape; (iii) develop an N-wire code which averages over orbital phase by representing each star as an eccentric wire, and use this to study the timescale and outcome of resonant relaxation of a stellar system near a black hole, the secular stability of such systems, and the eccentric stellar disk at the center of M31; (iv) implement an N-disk code which represents each star as an annular disk by averaging over orbital phase and periapsis direction, and use this to model the complex structure of the young, massive stars between 0.1 and 0.5 pc from the Galactic center---variously interpreted as one warped disk, two disks, dissolving disks, etc.---as the result of resonant relaxation between a young stellar disk and the surrounding old stellar cluster.

  1. PLANETARY NEBULAE IN FACE-ON SPIRAL GALAXIES. III. PLANETARY NEBULA KINEMATICS AND DISK MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Kimberly A.; Ciardullo, Robin E-mail: rbc@astro.psu.ed

    2009-11-10

    Much of our understanding of dark matter halos comes from the assumption that the mass-to-light ratio (Y) of spiral disks is constant. The best way to test this hypothesis is to measure the disk surface mass density directly via the kinematics of old disk stars. To this end, we have used planetary nebulae (PNe) as test particles and have measured the vertical velocity dispersion (sigma{sub z}) throughout the disks of five nearby, low-inclination spiral galaxies: IC 342, M74 (NGC 628), M83 (NGC 5236), M94 (NGC 4736), and M101 (NGC 5457). By using H I to map galactic rotation and the epicyclic approximation to extract sigma{sub z} from the line-of-sight dispersion, we find that, with the lone exception of M101, our disks do have a constant Y out to approx3 optical scale lengths (h{sub R} ). However, once outside this radius, sigma{sub z} stops declining and becomes flat with radius. Possible explanations for this behavior include an increase in the disk mass-to-light ratio, an increase in the importance of the thick disk, and heating of the thin disk by halo substructure. We also find that the disks of early type spirals have higher values of Y and are closer to maximal than the disks of later-type spirals, and that the unseen inner halos of these systems are better fit by pseudo-isothermal laws than by NFW models.

  2. Mass Transport and Turbulence in Gravitationally Unstable Disk Galaxies. II: The Effects of Star Formation Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldbaum, Nathan J.; Krumholz, Mark R.; Forbes, John C.

    2016-08-01

    Self-gravity and stellar feedback are capable of driving turbulence and transporting mass and angular momentum in disk galaxies, but the balance between them is not well understood. In the previous paper in this series, we showed that gravity alone can drive turbulence in galactic disks, regulate their Toomre Q parameters to ∼1, and transport mass inwards at a rate sufficient to fuel star formation in the centers of present-day galaxies. In this paper we extend our models to include the effects of star formation feedback. We show that feedback suppresses galaxies’ star formation rates by a factor of ∼5 and leads to the formation of a multi-phase atomic and molecular interstellar medium. Both the star formation rate and the phase balance produced in our simulations agree well with observations of nearby spirals. After our galaxies reach steady state, we find that the inclusion of feedback actually lowers the gas velocity dispersion slightly compared to the case of pure self-gravity, and also slightly reduces the rate of inward mass transport. Nevertheless, we find that, even with feedback included, our galactic disks self-regulate to Q ∼ 1, and transport mass inwards at a rate sufficient to supply a substantial fraction of the inner disk star formation. We argue that gravitational instability is therefore likely to be the dominant source of turbulence and transport in galactic disks, and that it is responsible for fueling star formation in the inner parts of galactic disks over cosmological times.

  3. Forming Disk Galaxies in Wet Major Mergers. I. Three Fiducial Examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanassoula, E.; Rodionov, S. A.; Peschken, N.; Lambert, J. C.

    2016-04-01

    Using three fiducial N-body+SPH simulations, we follow the merging of two disk galaxies that each have a hot gaseous halo component, and examine whether the merger remnant can be a spiral galaxy. The stellar progenitor disks are destroyed by violent relaxation during the merging and most of their stars form a classical bulge, while the remaining stars, as well as stars born during the merging times, form a thick disk and its bar. A new stellar disk forms subsequently and gradually in the remnant from the gas accreted mainly from the halo. It is vertically thin and well extended in its equatorial plane. A bar starts forming before the disk is fully in place, which is contrary to what is assumed in idealized simulations of isolated bar-forming galaxies, and has morphological features such as ansae and boxy/peanut bulges. Stars of different ages populate different parts of the box/peanut. A disky pseudobulge also forms, so that by the end of the simulation all three types of bulges coexist. The oldest stars are found in the classical bulge, followed by those of the thick disk, then by those in the thin disk. The youngest stars are in the spiral arms and the disky pseudobulge. The disk surface density profiles are of type II (exponential with downbending); the circular velocity curves are flat and show that the disks are submaximum in these examples: two clearly so and one near-borderline between maximum and submaximum. On average, only roughly between 10% and 20% of the stellar mass is in the classical bulge of the final models, i.e., much less than in previous simulations.

  4. HOT GAS HALOS AROUND DISK GALAXIES: CONFRONTING COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS WITH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, Jesper; Sommer-Larsen, Jesper; Pedersen, Kristian; Toft, Sune; Grove, Lisbeth F.; Benson, Andrew; Bower, Richard G.

    2009-05-20

    Models of disk galaxy formation commonly predict the existence of an extended reservoir of accreted hot gas surrounding massive spirals at low redshift. As a test of these models, we use X-ray and H{alpha} data of the two massive, quiescent edge-on spirals NGC 5746 and NGC 5170 to investigate the amount and origin of any hot gas in their halos. Contrary to our earlier claim, the Chandra analysis of NGC 5746, employing more recent calibration data, does not reveal any significant evidence for diffuse X-ray emission outside the optical disk, with a 3{sigma} upper limit to the halo X-ray luminosity of 4 x 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1}. An identical study of the less massive NGC 5170 also fails to detect any extraplanar X-ray emission. By extracting hot halo properties of disk galaxies formed in cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, we compare these results to expectations for cosmological accretion of hot gas by spirals. For Milky-Way-sized galaxies, these high-resolution simulations predict hot halo X-ray luminosities which are lower by a factor of {approx}2 compared to our earlier results reported by Toft et al. We find the new simulation predictions to be consistent with our observational constraints for both NGC 5746 and NGC 5170, while also confirming that the hot gas detected so far around more actively star-forming spirals is in general probably associated with stellar activity in the disk. Observational results on quiescent disk galaxies at the high-mass end are nevertheless providing powerful constraints on theoretical predictions, and hence on the assumed input physics in numerical studies of disk galaxy formation and evolution.

  5. Wind from the black-hole accretion disk driving a molecular outflow in an active galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombesi, F.; Meléndez, M.; Veilleux, S.; Reeves, J. N.; González-Alfonso, E.; Reynolds, C. S.

    2015-03-01

    Powerful winds driven by active galactic nuclei are often thought to affect the evolution of both supermassive black holes and their host galaxies, quenching star formation and explaining the close relationship between black holes and galaxies. Recent observations of large-scale molecular outflows in ultraluminous infrared galaxies support this quasar-feedback idea, because they directly trace the gas from which stars form. Theoretical models suggest that these outflows originate as energy-conserving flows driven by fast accretion-disk winds. Proposed connections between large-scale molecular outflows and accretion-disk activity in ultraluminous galaxies were incomplete because no accretion-disk wind had been detected. Conversely, studies of powerful accretion-disk winds have until now focused only on X-ray observations of local Seyfert galaxies and a few higher-redshift quasars. Here we report observations of a powerful accretion-disk wind with a mildly relativistic velocity (a quarter that of light) in the X-ray spectrum of IRAS F11119+3257, a nearby (redshift 0.189) optically classified type 1 ultraluminous infrared galaxy hosting a powerful molecular outflow. The active galactic nucleus is responsible for about 80 per cent of the emission, with a quasar-like luminosity of 1.5 × 1046 ergs per second. The energetics of these two types of wide-angle outflows is consistent with the energy-conserving mechanism that is the basis of the quasar feedback in active galactic nuclei that lack powerful radio jets (such jets are an alternative way to drive molecular outflows).

  6. Wind from the black-hole accretion disk driving a molecular outflow in an active galaxy.

    PubMed

    Tombesi, F; Meléndez, M; Veilleux, S; Reeves, J N; González-Alfonso, E; Reynolds, C S

    2015-03-26

    Powerful winds driven by active galactic nuclei are often thought to affect the evolution of both supermassive black holes and their host galaxies, quenching star formation and explaining the close relationship between black holes and galaxies. Recent observations of large-scale molecular outflows in ultraluminous infrared galaxies support this quasar-feedback idea, because they directly trace the gas from which stars form. Theoretical models suggest that these outflows originate as energy-conserving flows driven by fast accretion-disk winds. Proposed connections between large-scale molecular outflows and accretion-disk activity in ultraluminous galaxies were incomplete because no accretion-disk wind had been detected. Conversely, studies of powerful accretion-disk winds have until now focused only on X-ray observations of local Seyfert galaxies and a few higher-redshift quasars. Here we report observations of a powerful accretion-disk wind with a mildly relativistic velocity (a quarter that of light) in the X-ray spectrum of IRAS F11119+3257, a nearby (redshift 0.189) optically classified type 1 ultraluminous infrared galaxy hosting a powerful molecular outflow. The active galactic nucleus is responsible for about 80 per cent of the emission, with a quasar-like luminosity of 1.5 × 10(46) ergs per second. The energetics of these two types of wide-angle outflows is consistent with the energy-conserving mechanism that is the basis of the quasar feedback in active galactic nuclei that lack powerful radio jets (such jets are an alternative way to drive molecular outflows). PMID:25810204

  7. Generation and maintenance of bisymmetric spiral magnetic fields in disk galaxies in differential rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawa, Takeyasu; Fujimoto, M.

    1993-05-01

    The approximate dynamo equation, which yields asymptotic solutions for the large scale bisymmetric spiral (BSS) magnetic fields rotating rigidly over a large area of the galactic disk, is derived. The vertical thickness and the dynamo strength of the gaseous disk which are necessary to generate and sustain the BSS magnetic fields is determined. The globally BSS magnetic fields which propagate over the disk as a wave without being twisted more tightly are reproduced. A poloidal field configuration is theoretically predicted in the halo around the disk, and is observed in the edge-on galaxy NGC4631. Mathematical methods for the galactic dynamo are shown to be equivalent. Those methods give different growth rates between the BSS and the axisymmetric spiral (ASS) magnetic fields in the disk. Magnetohydrodynamical excitation is discussed between the BSS magnetic fields and the two armed spiral density waves.

  8. A characteristic oxygen abundance gradient in galaxy disks unveiled with CALIFA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, S. F.; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Mollá, M.; Barrera-Ballesteros, J.; Marino, R. A.; Pérez, E.; Sánchez-Blazquez, P.; González Delgado, R.; Cid Fernandes, R.; de Lorenzo-Cáceres, A.; Mendez-Abreu, J.; Galbany, L.; Falcon-Barroso, J.; Miralles-Caballero, D.; Husemann, B.; García-Benito, R.; Mast, D.; Walcher, C. J.; Gil de Paz, A.; García-Lorenzo, B.; Jungwiert, B.; Vílchez, J. M.; Jílková, Lucie; Lyubenova, M.; Cortijo-Ferrero, C.; Díaz, A. I.; Wisotzki, L.; Márquez, I.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Ellis, S.; van de Ven, G.; Jahnke, K.; Papaderos, P.; Gomes, J. M.; Mendoza, M. A.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.

    2014-03-01

    We present the largest and most homogeneous catalog of H ii regions and associations compiled so far. The catalog comprises more than 7000 ionized regions, extracted from 306 galaxies observed by the CALIFA survey. We describe the procedures used to detect, select, and analyze the spectroscopic properties of these ionized regions. In the current study we focus on characterizing of the radial gradient of the oxygen abundance in the ionized gas, based on the study of the deprojecteddistribution of H ii regions. We found that all galaxies without clear evidence of an interaction present a common gradient in the oxygen abundance, with a characteristic slope of αO/H = -0.1 dex/re between 0.3 and 2 disk effective radii (re), and a scatter compatible with random fluctuations around this value, when the gradient is normalized to the disk effective radius. The slope is independent of morphology, the incidence of bars, absolute magnitude, or mass. Only those galaxies with evidence of interactions and/or clear merging systems present a significantly shallower gradient, consistent with previous results. The majority of the 94 galaxies with H ii regions detected beyond two disk effective radii present a flattening in the oxygen abundance. The flattening is statistically significant. We cannot provide a conclusive answer regarding the origin of this flattening. However, our results indicate that its origin is most probably related to the secular evolution of galaxies. Finally, we find a drop/truncation of the oxygen abundance in the inner regions for 26 of the galaxies. All of them are non-interacting, mostly unbarred Sb/Sbc galaxies. This feature is associated with a central star-forming ring, which suggests that both features are produced by radial gas flows induced by resonance processes. Our result suggests that galaxy disks grow inside-out, with metal enrichment driven by the local star formation history and with a small variation galaxy-by-galaxy. At a certain

  9. Megamaser Disks Reveal a Broad Distribution of Black Hole Mass in Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, J. E.; Seth, A.; Kim, M.; Läsker, R.; Goulding, A.; Gao, F.; Braatz, J. A.; Henkel, C.; Condon, J.; Lo, K. Y.; Zhao, W.

    2016-08-01

    We use new precision measurements of black hole (BH) masses from water megamaser disks to investigate scaling relations between macroscopic galaxy properties and supermassive BH mass. The megamaser-derived BH masses span 106–108 {M}ȯ , while all the galaxy properties that we examine (including total stellar mass, central mass density, and central velocity dispersion) lie within a narrower range. Thus, no galaxy property correlates tightly with {M}{BH} in ∼L* spiral galaxies as traced by megamaser disks. Of them all, stellar velocity dispersion provides the tightest relation, but at fixed {σ }* the mean megamaser {M}{BH} are offset by ‑0.6 ± 0.1 dex relative to early-type galaxies. Spiral galaxies with non-maser dynamical BH masses do not appear to show this offset. At low mass, we do not yet know the full distribution of BH mass at fixed galaxy property; the non-maser dynamical measurements may miss the low-mass end of the BH distribution due to an inability to resolve their spheres of influence and/or megamasers may preferentially occur in lower-mass BHs.

  10. Collisional removal of HI from the inner disks of Virgo cluster galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valluri, Monica; Jog, Chanda J.

    1990-01-01

    There is sufficient observational evidence to show that many Virgo Cluster spirals are HI deficient in their inner disks (in addition to being HI deficient globally, as previously established). It is shown here that collisions between galaxies in a cluster can lead to the removal of HI gas from these galaxies while leaving the H2 gas, undisturbed. This follows directly from the application of the Spitzer-Baade collisional gas removal mechanism to galaxies consisting of stars and a two-component interstellar medium (ISM) consisting of HI and H2, with HI having the largest filling factor. This can account for both the observed HI deficiency in the inner regions and the normal H2 content of these galaxies. The frequency of galaxy collisions in the Virgo Cluster is shown to be large enough to make collisional gas removal a viable mechanism.

  11. Star formation in the outer Galaxy: the young cluster NGC 1893

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz-Forcada, J.; Prisinzano, L.; Micela, G.; Caramazza, M.; Sciortino, S.

    2013-05-01

    Stellar formation in the outer Galaxy is expected to be less conspicuous due to worse conditions. Several stellar forming regions in the outer Galaxy have shown similar characteristics to others in the inner Galaxy. The very recent episodes of stellar formation in NGC 1893 (age ˜1.5 Myr) demonstrates it. This cluster is an optimal laboratory to study stellar formation phenomena: it includes the presence of at least 6 O-type stars, two pennant nebulae, dark nebular clouds, and a high disc frequency among its members. We are conducting a series of papers on this cluster based on multiwavelength data, including Spitzer and Chandra observations. We study membership, morphology of the cluster, the spatial distribution of stellar ages and circumstellar discs, and the influence of the massive stars of the cluster in the evolution of circumstellar discs. NGC 1893 has shown similar characteristics to other stellar forming regions at closer distances to the Sun. The ionizing UV flux from massive stars plays an important role in the earlier dissipation of circumstellar discs in closer stars. There is a disc frequency of 52% in a sample complete in the mass range 0.35-2 M_{⊙}. This frequency is slightly lower than in clusters of similar age at closer distance. We attribute this to the faster disc evaporation by radiation of massive stars, the use of a different mass range in each case, and/or the method employed to select stars with and without discs.

  12. Evolution of spiral galaxies. 3: Application of the multiphase model to the galactic disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrini, Federico; Molla, Mercedes; Pardi, Maria Chiara; Diaz, Angeles I.

    1994-06-01

    We present an application of the multiphase model of Ferrini and coworkers, developed for the solar neighborhood, to other regions of the disk of the Galaxy in order to reproduce the observed element abundance gradients. The model describes the Galaxy as a two-zone system (halo and disk) sliced into nine cylindrical concentric regions and studies the time evolution of the five populations which inhabit the Milky Way: diffuse gas, molecular clouds, low-mass (m less than 4 M solar masses) and high-mass stars, and stellar remnants. Our final aim is to reproduce the metallicity gradients that are observed in the Milky Way and in other external galaxies. We analyze the evolution of these gradients in time in order to relate their behavior to other galactic quantities such as the star formation rate and the infall rate. The model describes the Galaxy by fitting a large number of observational constraints: abundance gradients, age-metallicity relations for disk and halo, both gas and mass distributions (including radial differences in the characteristic shapes of atomic and molecular gas), and radial distribution and history of star formation rate. The time evolution of abundance gradients is computed, revealing a flattening of gradients with time. In particular, the oxygen abundance was steeper at early times as a consequence of a larger infall. Since the disk is evolving and the gas is consumed, a saturation level is reached in every ring and the gradient will decrease to a minimum value.

  13. The extragalactic radiation field and sharp edges to HI disks in galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloney, Philip Richard

    1990-01-01

    Observations of neutral hydrogen (HI) are widely used as a probe of the interstellar medium in galaxies and of galactic kinematics and dynamics. The 21-cm line can be used to determine galactic rotation curves far beyond the optical disk, and is one of the prime sources of evidence for the existence of dark haloes in spiral galaxies. However, a recent attempt to measure the 21-cm emission from NGC 3198 to very low column densities (N sub H approx. equals 5 times 10 to the 18th power) found that the HI disk is very sharply truncated at a column density of a few times 10 to the 19th power (Sancisi 1989, private communication). This discovery reinforces the earlier suggestion (Briggs et al. 1980) that extended, low-column density envelopes of neutral hydrogen are not common around galaxies. Here the author suggests that the sharp edge seen in the HI disk in NGC 3198 is consistent with a model in which a self-gravitating neutral HI disk is photoionized by the extragalactic radiation field. The possibility that the extragalactic background would produce sharp edges to HI disks was first suggested by Silk and Sunyaev (1976).

  14. Lenticular Galaxy IC 719: Current Building of the Counterrotating Large-scale Stellar Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katkov, Ivan Yu.; Sil'chenko, Olga K.; Afanasiev, Victor L.

    2013-06-01

    We have obtained and analyzed long-slit spectral data for the lenticular galaxy IC 719. In this gas-rich S0 galaxy, its large-scale gaseous disk counterrotates the global stellar disk. Moreover, in the IC 719 disk, we have detected a secondary stellar component corotating the ionized gas. By using emission line intensity ratios, we have proven the gas excitation by young stars and thus claim current star formation, the most intense in a ring-like zone at a radius of 10'' (1.4 kpc). The oxygen abundance of the gas in the star-forming ring is about half of the solar abundance. Since the stellar disk remains dynamically cool, we conclude that smooth prolonged accretion of the external gas from a neighboring galaxy provides the current building of the thin large-scale stellar disk. Based on observations collected with the 6 m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences, which is operated under the financial support of the Science Department of Russia (registration number 01-43).

  15. Galactic Winds Driven by Isotropic and Anisotropic Cosmic-Ray Diffusion in Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakmor, R.; Pfrommer, C.; Simpson, C. M.; Springel, V.

    2016-06-01

    The physics of cosmic rays (CRs) is a promising candidate for explaining the driving of galactic winds and outflows. Recent galaxy formation simulations have demonstrated the need for active CR transport either in the form of diffusion or streaming to successfully launch winds in galaxies. However, due to computational limitations, most previous simulations have modeled CR transport isotropically. Here, we discuss high-resolution simulations of isolated disk galaxies in a 1011 M ⊙ halo with the moving-mesh code Arepo that include injection of CRs from supernovae, advective transport, CR cooling, and CR transport through isotropic or anisotropic diffusion. We show that either mode of diffusion leads to the formation of strong bipolar outflows. However, they develop significantly later in the simulation with anisotropic diffusion compared to the simulation with isotropic diffusion. Moreover, we find that isotropic diffusion allows most of the CRs to quickly diffuse out of the disk, while in the simulation with anisotropic diffusion, most CRs remain in the disk once the magnetic field becomes dominated by its azimuthal component, which occurs after ∼300 Myr. This has important consequences for the gas dynamics in the disk. In particular, we show that isotropic diffusion strongly suppresses the amplification of the magnetic field in the disk compared to anisotropic or no diffusion models. We therefore conclude that reliable simulations which include CR transport inevitably need to account for anisotropic diffusion.

  16. No Supermassive Black Holes in Giant Galaxy Disks: M101 and NGC 6946

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kormendy, John; Drory, N.; Cornell, M. E.; Bender, R.

    2007-12-01

    The Hobby-Eberly Telescope was used to obtain high-resolution spectroscopy of the nuclear star clusters in the bulgeless, giant Scd galaxies M101 and NGC 6946. Their nuclei have velocity dispersions of 25 to 40 km/s. Any supermassive black holes in these clusters must have masses less than approximately 10**4 to 10**5 solar masses. Similar results are obtained for IC 342 from a published velocity dispersion. These limits are much smaller than masses that are predicted if black holes in bulgeless galaxies correlated with galaxy disk properties such as rotation velocities V in the same way that black holes correlate with elliptical galaxy and bulge properties such as velocity dispersions. Since these are giant galaxies with V = 200 km/s, this result provides an especially stringent check that black holes do not correlate with galaxy disks. All three galaxies contain little or no pseudobulge component, either, a result that can be understood from dynamical arguments. Therefore gas inflow processes like those that occur rapidly in galaxy mergers and slowly in internally driven secular evolution are essentially unavailable for black hole feeding. However, some (pseudo)bulgeless galaxies, including IC 342 and NGC 6946, show weak Seyfert activity, and some are known to contain relatively low-mass black holes. This is a hint that low-mass black holes in bulgeless galaxies and high-mass black holes in bulges and ellipticals may have fundamentally different formation histories. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation through grant AST-0607490.

  17. Properties of Star-forming Clumps in Galaxy Disks at z>1 from CANDELS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravindranath, Swara; Closson Ferguson, Henry; Guo, Yicheng

    2015-08-01

    Galaxies at z>1 often exhibit clumpy morphology, and the massive star-forming clumps are thought to be the result of violent disk instability in the gas-rich, turbulent galaxy disks. Their dynamical evolution happens on timescales much shorter compared to secular processes, transforming them into the more regular Hubble types. In order to study this transition, we have identified all the clumpy galaxies at 1galaxies, with redshift, and with the properties of the host galaxies, and discuss how these trends compare to the general predictions from theories of violent disk instabilities.

  18. ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCE RATIOS IN STARS OF THE OUTER GALACTIC DISK. IV. A NEW SAMPLE OF OPEN CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Yong, David; Carney, Bruce W.; Friel, Eileen D. E-mail: bruce@physics.unc.edu

    2012-10-01

    We present radial velocities and chemical abundances for nine stars in the old, distant open clusters Be18, Be21, Be22, Be32, and PWM4. For Be18 and PWM4, these are the first chemical abundance measurements. Combining our data with literature results produces a compilation of some 68 chemical abundance measurements in 49 unique clusters. For this combined sample, we study the chemical abundances of open clusters as a function of distance, age, and metallicity. We confirm that the metallicity gradient in the outer disk is flatter than the gradient in the vicinity of the solar neighborhood. We also confirm that the open clusters in the outer disk are metal-poor with enhancements in the ratios [{alpha}/Fe] and perhaps [Eu/Fe]. All elements show negligible or small trends between [X/Fe] and distance (<0.02 dex kpc{sup -1}), but for some elements, there is a hint that the local (R{sub GC} < 13 kpc) and distant (R{sub GC} > 13 kpc) samples may have different trends with distance. There is no evidence for significant abundance trends versus age (<0.04 dex Gyr{sup -1}). We measure the linear relation between [X/Fe] and metallicity, [Fe/H], and find that the scatter about the mean trend is comparable to the measurement uncertainties. Comparison with solar neighborhood field giants shows that the open clusters share similar abundance ratios [X/Fe] at a given metallicity. While the flattening of the metallicity gradient and enhanced [{alpha}/Fe] ratios in the outer disk suggest a chemical enrichment history different from that of the solar neighborhood, we echo the sentiments expressed by Friel et al. that definitive conclusions await homogeneous analyses of larger samples of stars in larger numbers of clusters. Arguably, our understanding of the evolution of the outer disk from open clusters is currently limited by systematic abundance differences between various studies.

  19. AN OBSERVED LINK BETWEEN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AND VIOLENT DISK INSTABILITIES IN HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bournaud, Frederic; Juneau, Stephanie; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Mullaney, James; Daddi, Emanuele; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Elbaz, David; Salmi, Fadia; Dekel, Avishai; Dickinson, Mark

    2012-09-20

    We provide evidence for a correlation between the presence of giant clumps and the occurrence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in disk galaxies. Giant clumps of 10{sup 8}-10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} arise from violent gravitational instability in gas-rich galaxies, and it has been proposed that this instability could feed supermassive black holes (BHs). We use emission line diagnostics to compare a sample of 14 clumpy (unstable) disks and a sample of 13 smoother (stable) disks at redshift z {approx} 0.7. The majority of clumpy disks in our sample have a high probability of containing AGNs. Their [O III] {lambda}5007 emission line is strongly excited, inconsistent with low-metallicity star formation (SF) alone. [Ne III] {lambda}3869 excitation is also higher. Stable disks rarely have such properties. Stacking ultra sensitive Chandra observations (4 Ms) reveals an X-ray excess in clumpy galaxies, which confirms the presence of AGNs. The clumpy galaxies in our intermediate-redshift sample have properties typical of gas-rich disk galaxies rather than mergers, being in particular on the main sequence of SF. This suggests that our findings apply to the physically similar and numerous gas-rich unstable disks at z > 1. Using the observed [O III] and X-ray luminosities, we conservatively estimate that AGNs hosted by clumpy disks have typical bolometric luminosities of the order of a few 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1}, BH growth rates m-dot{sub BH}{approx}10{sup -2} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, and that these AGNs are substantially obscured in X-rays. This moderate-luminosity mode could provide a large fraction of today's BH mass with a high duty cycle (>10%), accretion bursts with higher luminosities being possible over shorter phases. Violent instabilities at high redshift (giant clumps) are a much more efficient driver of BH growth than the weak instabilities in nearby spirals (bars), and the evolution of disk instabilities with mass and redshift could explain the simultaneous downsizing of

  20. The interstellar disk-halo connection in the spiral galaxy NGC 3079

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veilleux, Sylvain; Cecil, Gerald; Bland-Hawthorne, J.

    1995-01-01

    We discuss the morphology and excitation of ionized gas in the nearby Sc galaxy NGC 3079. The almost edge-on orientation is ideal for studying the vertical structure of the gaseous disk, and especially the diffuse ionized medium (DIM) found between the bright H II regions. We used the Hawaii Imaging Fabry-Perot Interferometer (HIFI) to map 150,000 H-alpha + (N II) lambda lambda 6548, 6583 emission-line profiles across the entire disk, with resolution 70 km/s at subarcsecond steps, down to a flux level of approximately 10(exp -17) ergs/s/sq cm (EM approximately equal to 4 cm(exp -6) pc). The DIM contributes approximately 30% of the total disk H-alpha emission within a radius of 10 kpc. The DIM has broader emission lines and larger (N II) H-alpha flux ratios than the adjacent H II regions. Within a radius of 5 kpc, we find that the X-shaped filaments reported in previous studies emerge from the inner (R approximately equal to 1.5 kpc) disk, and rise more than 4 kpc above the disk plane. The morphology, kinematics, and excitation of the filaments suggest that they form a biconic interface between the undisturbed disk gas, and gas entrained in the wide-angle outflow. The DIM beyond 5 kpc radius is more vertically extended than the thick ionized disk detected in our Galaxy and in a few nearby edge-on systems. After correcting for dust, the vertical profile of this DIM has an exponential scale height of about 1.1 kpc, similar to that of the H I disk. The (N II) lambda 6538/H-alpha flux ratio of the DIM increases monotonically with vertical height, reaching unity for absolute value of z greater than or approximately equal to 2.5 kpc. The flux required to keep the DIM ionized at R = 8 kpc is similar to that near the solar circle of our Galaxy. Highly dilute radiation from O stars in the galactic plane probably maintains the DIM. The total mass of the DIM is of order 10(exp 8) - 10(exp 9) solar mass, representing less than 1% of the total dynamical mass of NGC 3079

  1. Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera near-infrared features in the outer parts of S4G galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laine, Seppo; Knapen, Johan H.; Muñoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Kim, Taehyun; Comerón, Sébastien; Martig, Marie; Holwerda, Benne W.; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert; Johansson, Peter H.; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Gil de Paz, Armando; Hinz, Joannah; Laine, Jarkko; Laurikainen, Eija; Menéndez-Delmestre, Karín; Mizusawa, Trisha; Regan, Michael W.; Salo, Heikki; Sheth, Kartik; Seibert, Mark; Buta, Ronald J.; Cisternas, Mauricio; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Elmegreen, Debra M.; Ho, Luis C.; Madore, Barry F.; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2014-11-01

    We present a catalogue and images of visually detected features, such as asymmetries, extensions, warps, shells, tidal tails, polar rings, and obvious signs of mergers or interactions, in the faint outer regions (at and outside of R25) of nearby galaxies. This catalogue can be used in future quantitative studies that examine galaxy evolution due to internal and external factors. We are able to reliably detect outer region features down to a brightness level of 0.03 MJy sr-1 pixel-1 at 3.6 μm in the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G). We also tabulate companion galaxies. We find asymmetries in the outer isophotes in 22 ± 1 per cent of the sample. The asymmetry fraction does not correlate with galaxy classification as an interacting galaxy or merger remnant, or with the presence of companions. We also compare the detected features to similar features in galaxies taken from cosmological zoom re-simulations. The simulated images have a higher fraction (33 per cent) of outer disc asymmetries, which may be due to selection effects and an uncertain star formation threshold in the models. The asymmetries may have either an internal (e.g. lopsidedness due to dark halo asymmetry) or external origin.

  2. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Disk GalaxyFormation: the Magnetization of The Cold and Warm Medium

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Peng; Abel, Tom; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Santa Barbara, KITP

    2007-12-18

    Using magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) adaptive mesh refinement simulations, we study the formation and early evolution of disk galaxies with a magnetized interstellar medium. For a 10{sup 10} M{sub {circle_dot}} halo with initial NFW dark matter and gas profiles, we impose a uniform 10{sup -9} G magnetic field and follow its collapse, disk formation and evolution up to 1 Gyr. Comparing to a purely hydrodynamic simulation with the same initial condition, we find that a protogalactic field of this strength does not significantly influence the global disk properties. At the same time, the initial magnetic fields are quickly amplified by the differentially rotating turbulent disk. After the initial rapid amplification lasting {approx} 500 Myr, subsequent field amplification appears self-regulated. As a result, highly magnetized material begin to form above and below the disk. Interestingly, the field strengths in the self-regulated regime agrees well with the observed fields in the Milky Way galaxy both in the warm and the cold HI phase and do not change appreciably with time. Most of the cold phase shows a dispersion of order ten in the magnetic field strength. The global azimuthal magnetic fields reverse at different radii and the amplitude declines as a function of radius of the disk. By comparing the estimated star formation rate (SFR) in hydrodynamic and MHD simulations, we find that after the magnetic field strength saturates, magnetic forces provide further support in the cold gas and lead to a decline of the SFR.

  3. IMAGING THE INNER AND OUTER GAPS OF THE PRE-TRANSITIONAL DISK OF HD 169142 AT 7 mm

    SciTech Connect

    Osorio, Mayra; Anglada, Guillem; Macías, Enrique; Gómez, José F.; Mayen-Gijon, Juan M.; Torrelles, José M.; Nagel, Erick; Dent, William R. F.; Quanz, Sascha P.; Reggiani, Maddalena

    2014-08-20

    We present Very Large Array observations at 7 mm that trace the thermal emission of large dust grains in the HD 169142 protoplanetary disk. Our images show a ring of enhanced emission of radius ∼25-30 AU, whose inner region is devoid of detectable 7 mm emission. We interpret this ring as tracing the rim of an inner cavity or gap, possibly created by a planet or a substellar companion. The ring appears asymmetric, with the western part significantly brighter than the eastern one. This azimuthal asymmetry is reminiscent of the lopsided structures that are expected to be produced as a consequence of trapping of large dust grains. Our observations also reveal an outer annular gap at radii from ∼40 to ∼70 AU. Unlike other sources, the radii of the inner cavity, the ring, and the outer gap observed in the 7 mm images, which trace preferentially the distribution of large (millimeter/centimeter sized) dust grains, coincide with those obtained from a previous near-infrared polarimetric image, which traces scattered light from small (micron-sized) dust grains. We model the broadband spectral energy distribution and the 7 mm images to constrain the disk physical structure. From this modeling we infer the presence of a small (radius ∼0.6 AU) residual disk inside the central cavity, indicating that the HD 169142 disk is a pre-transitional disk. The distribution of dust in three annuli with gaps in between them suggests that the disk in HD 169142 is being disrupted by at least two planets or substellar objects.

  4. Unstable spiral modes in disk-shaped galaxies

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Y. Y.; Lin, C. C.; Mark, James W.-K.

    1976-01-01

    The mechanisms for the maintenance and the excitation of trailing spiral modes of density waves in diskshaped galaxies, as proposed by Lin in 1969 and by Mark recently, are substantiated by an analysis of the gas-dynamical model of the galaxy. The self-excitation of the unstable mode in caused by waves propagating outwards from the corotation circle, which carry away angular momentum of a sign opposite to that contained in the wave system inside that circle. Specifically, a simple dispersion relationship is given as a definite integral, which allows the immediate determination of the pattern frequency and the amplification rate, once the basic galactic model is known. PMID:16592313

  5. SAURON Observations of Disks in Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bureau, M.; Copin, Y.; Verolme, E. K.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Bacon, R.; Emsellem, E.; Davies, R. L.; Kuntschner, H.; Carollo, C. M.; Miller, B. W.; Monnet, G.; Peletier, R. F.

    We briefly describe the SAURON project, aimed at determining the intrinsic shape and internal dynamics of spheroids. We focus here on the ability of SAURON to identify gaseous and stellar disks and to measure their morphology and kinematics. We illustrate some of our results with complete maps of NGC 3377, NGC 3623, and NGC 4365.

  6. ARE THE KINEMATICS OF DLAs IN AGREEMENT WITH THEIR ARISING IN THE GAS DISKS OF GALAXIES?

    SciTech Connect

    Zwaan, Martin; Walter, Fabian; Ryan-Weber, Emma; Kennicutt, Robert C. Jr; Brinks, Elias; De Blok, W. J. G.

    2008-12-15

    We demonstrate in this paper that the velocity widths of the neutral gas in damped Ly{alpha} (DLA) systems are inconsistent with these systems originating in gas disks of galaxies, similar to those seen in the local universe. We examine the gas kinematics of local galaxies using the high-quality H I 21 cm data from the H I Nearby Galaxies Survey and make a comparison with the velocity profiles measured in the low-ionization metal lines observed in DLAs at high redshifts. The median velocity width of z = 0 H I gas above the DLA column density limit of N{sub HI} = 2 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -2} is approximately 30 km s{sup -1}, whereas the typical value in DLAs is a factor of 2 higher. We argue that the gas kinematics at higher redshifts are increasingly influenced by gas that is not participating in ordered rotation in cold disks, but is more likely associated with tidal gas related to galaxy interactions or processes such as superwinds and outflows. An analysis of the H I in the local interacting starburst galaxy M 82 shows that the velocity widths in this galaxy are indeed similar to what is seen in DLAs.

  7. The Dynamical Properties of Virgo Cluster Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouellette, N. N. Q.; Courteau, S.; Holtzman, J. A.; Dalcanton, J. J.; McDonald, M.; Zhu, Y.

    2014-03-01

    By virtue of its proximity, the Virgo Cluster is an ideal laboratory for testing our understanding of structure formation in the Universe. In this spirit, we present a dynamical study of Virgo galaxies as part of the Spectroscopic and H-band Imaging of Virgo (SHIVir) survey. Hα rotation curves (RC) for our gas-rich galaxies were modeled with a multi-parameter fit function from which various velocity measurements were inferred. Our study takes advantage of archival and our own new data as we aim to compile the largest Tully-Fisher relation (TFR) for a cluster to date. Extended velocity dispersion profiles (VDP) are integrated over varying aperture sizes to extract representative velocity dispersions (VDs) for gas-poor galaxies. Considering the lack of a common standard for the measurement of a fiducial galaxy VD in the literature, we rectify this situation by determining the radius at which the measured VD yields the tightest Fundamental Plane (FP). We found that radius to be at least 1 Re, which exceeds the extent of most dispersion profiles in other works.

  8. THE SPACE DENSITY OF EXTENDED ULTRAVIOLET (XUV) DISKS IN THE LOCAL UNIVERSE AND IMPLICATIONS FOR GAS ACCRETION ONTO GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Lemonias, Jenna J.; Schiminovich, David; Thilker, David; Bianchi, Luciana; Wyder, Ted K.; Martin, D. Christopher; Seibert, Mark; Madore, Barry F.; Treyer, Marie A.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Rich, R. Michael

    2011-06-01

    We present results of the first unbiased search for extended ultraviolet (XUV)-disk galaxies undertaken to determine the space density of such galaxies. Our sample contains 561 local (0.001 < z < 0.05) galaxies that lie in the intersection of available Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) deep imaging (exposure time >1.5 x 10{sup 4} s) and Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 footprints. We explore modifications to the standard classification scheme for our sample that includes both disk- and bulge-dominated galaxies. Visual classification of each galaxy in the sample reveals an XUV-disk frequency of up to 20% for the most nearby portion of our sample. On average over the entire sample (out to z = 0.05) the frequency ranges from a hard limit of 4%-14%. The GALEX imaging allows us to detect XUV disks beyond 100 Mpc. The XUV regions around XUV-disk galaxies are consistently bluer than the main bodies. We find a surprisingly high frequency of XUV emission around luminous red (NUV-r > 5) and green valley (3 < NUV-r < 5) galaxies. The XUV-disk space density in the local universe is >(1.5-4.2) x 10{sup -3} Mpc{sup -3}. Using the XUV emission as an indicator of recent gas accretion, we estimate that the cold gas accretion rate onto these galaxies is >(1.7-4.6) x 10{sup -3} M{sub sun} Mpc{sup -3} yr{sup -1}. The number of XUV disks in the green valley and the estimated accretion rate onto such galaxies points to the intriguing possibility that 7%-18% of galaxies in this population are transitioning away from the red sequence.

  9. Impact of magnetic fields on ram pressure stripping in disk galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Ruszkowski, M.; Brüggen, M.; Lee, D.; Shin, M.-S.

    2014-03-20

    Ram pressure stripping can remove significant amounts of gas from galaxies in clusters and massive groups and thus has a large impact on the evolution of cluster galaxies. Recent observations have shown that key properties of ram-pressure-stripped tails of galaxies, such as their width and structure, are in conflict with predictions by simulations. To increase the realism of existing simulations, we simulated for the first time a disk galaxy exposed to a uniformly magnetized wind including radiative cooling and self-gravity of the gas. We find that magnetic fields have a strong effect on the morphology of the gas in the tail of the galaxy. While in the purely hydrodynamical case the tail is very clumpy, the magnetohydrodynamical case shows very filamentary structures in the tail. The filaments can be strongly supported by magnetic pressure and, wherever this is the case, the magnetic fields vectors tend to be aligned with the filaments. The ram pressure stripping process may lead to the formation of magnetized density tails that appear as bifurcated in the plane of the sky and resemble the double tails observed in ESO 137-001 and ESO 137-002. Such tails can be formed under a variety of situations, both for the disks oriented face-on with respect to the intracluster medium (ICM) wind and for the tilted ones. While this bifurcation is the consequence of the generic tendency for the magnetic fields to produce very filamentary tail morphology, the tail properties are further shaped by the combination of the magnetic field orientation and the sliding of the field past the disk surface exposed to the wind. Despite the fact that the effect of the magnetic field on the morphology of the tail is strong, magnetic draping does not strongly change the rate of gas stripping. For a face-on galaxy, the field tends to reduce the amount of gas stripping compared to the pure hydrodynamical case, and is associated with the formation of a stable magnetic draping layer on the side of

  10. The rapid formation of a large rotating disk galaxy three billion years after the Big Bang.

    PubMed

    Genzel, R; Tacconi, L J; Eisenhauer, F; Schreiber, N M Förster; Cimatti, A; Daddi, E; Bouché, N; Davies, R; Lehnert, M D; Lutz, D; Nesvadba, N; Verma, A; Abuter, R; Shapiro, K; Sternberg, A; Renzini, A; Kong, X; Arimoto, N; Mignoli, M

    2006-08-17

    Observations and theoretical simulations have established a framework for galaxy formation and evolution in the young Universe. Galaxies formed as baryonic gas cooled at the centres of collapsing dark-matter haloes; mergers of haloes and galaxies then led to the hierarchical build-up of galaxy mass. It remains unclear, however, over what timescales galaxies were assembled and when and how bulges and disks--the primary components of present-day galaxies--were formed. It is also puzzling that the most massive galaxies were more abundant and were forming stars more rapidly at early epochs than expected from models. Here we report high-angular-resolution observations of a representative luminous star-forming galaxy when the Universe was only 20% of its current age. A large and massive rotating protodisk is channelling gas towards a growing central stellar bulge hosting an accreting massive black hole. The high surface densities of gas, the high rate of star formation and the moderately young stellar ages suggest rapid assembly, fragmentation and conversion to stars of an initially very gas-rich protodisk, with no obvious evidence for a major merger. PMID:16915282

  11. Fueling nuclear activity in disk galaxies: Starbursts and monsters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, Clayton H.; Shlosman, Isaac

    1994-03-01

    We study the evolution of the gas distribution in a globally unstable galactic disk with a particular emphasis on the gasdynamics in the central kiloparsec and the fueling activity there. The two-component self-gravitating disk is embedded in a responsive halo of comparable mass. The gas and stars are evolved using a three-dimensional hybrid smoothed particle hydrodynamics/N-body code and the gravitational interactions are calculated using a hierarchical TREE algorithm. A massive 'star formation' is introduced when the gas becomes Jeans unstable and locally exceeds the critical density of approximately 100 solar mass pc-3. The newly formed OB stars deposit energy in the gas by means of radiation-driven winds and supernovae. This energy is partially thermalized (efficiency of a few percent); the rest is radiated away. Models without star formation are evolved for a comparison. The effect of a massive object at the disk center is studied by placing a 'seed' black hole (BH) of 5 x 107 solar mass with an accretion radius of 20 pc. The tendency of the system to form a massive object 'spontaneously' is tested in models without the BH. We find that for models without star formation the bar- or dynamical friction-driven inflows lead to (1) domination of the central kpc by a few massive clouds that evolve into a single object probably via a cloud binary system, with and without a 'seed' BH, (2) accretion onto the BH which has a sporadic character, and (3) formation of remnant disks around the BH with a radius of 60-80 pc which result from the capture and digestion of clouds. For models with star formation, we find that (1) the enrgy input into the gas induces angular momentum loss and inflow rates by a factor less than 3, (2) the star formation is concentrated mainly at the apocenters of the gaseous circulation in the stellar bar and in the nuclear region, (3) the nuclear starburst phase appears to be very luminous approximately 1045-1046 erg/s and episodic with a typical

  12. The Effect of Large-Scale Structure on the Formation of Disk Galaxies : Specific Angular Momentum Point of View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ji Hoon

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the correlation between the environment parameters and central surface brightness of disk galaxies in order to study the effect of the large-scale structure on the formation of disk galaxies. In the standard galaxy formation picture, galaxy discs form out of primordial gas due to density fluctuation while conserving its specific angular momentum. The specific angular momentum of the pre-collapse gas is generally assumed to be equal to that of the dark matter, which is acquired by the tidal interactions with the surrounding matter distribution at its proto-halo stage. The difference of specific angular momentum of host dark matter halos is the favored origin for the difference between low surface brightness galaxies (LSBGs) and high surface brightness galaxies (HSBGs) which results in the different evolutionary paths. We utilize broadband photometry data from Simard et al. (2011) to extract the environment parameters and properties of individual galaxies. We calculate central surface brightness (μ0) for 1,123,718 galaxies based on absolute magnitude of model disk and exponential disk scale lengths in g'- and r'- bands. We convert g'- and r'-band central surface brightnesses into B-band central surface brightness (μ0,B) using conversion from Smith et al. (2002). We classify disk galaxies with μ0,B ≥ 22.5 mag arcsec-2 as LSBGs while ones with μ0,B < 22.7 mag arcsec-2 as HSBGs.Then we compute a surface galaxy number density estimated from the fifth nearest neighbour galaxies (Σ5). We are presenting a preliminary result based on our sample selection process and discussing the future prospect for the studies of disk galaxy formation with current and future facilities.

  13. Circumnuclear molecular gas in megamaser disk galaxies NGC 4388 and NGC 1194

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Jenny E.; Seth, Anil; Lyubenova, Mariya; Van de Ven, Glenn; Läsker, Ronald; Walsh, Jonelle

    2014-06-20

    We explore the warm molecular and ionized gas in the centers of two megamaser disk galaxies using K-band spectroscopy. Our ultimate goal is to determine how gas is funneled onto the accretion disk, here traced by megamaser spots on sub-parsec scales. We present NIR IFU data with a resolution of ∼50 pc for two galaxies: NGC 4388 with VLT/SINFONI and NGC 1194 with Keck/OSIRIS+AO. The high spatial resolution and rich spectral diagnostics allow us to study both the stellar and gas kinematics as well as gas excitation on scales only an order of magnitude larger than the maser disk. We find a drop in the stellar velocity dispersion in the inner ∼100 pc of NGC 4388, a common signature of a dynamically cold central component seen in many active nuclei. We also see evidence for noncircular gas motions in the molecular hydrogen on similar scales, with the gas kinematics on 100 parsec scales aligned with the megamaser disk. In contrast, the high ionization lines and Brγ trace outflow along the 100 parsec-scale jet. In NGC 1194, the continuum from the accreting black hole is very strong, making it difficult to measure robust two-dimensional kinematics, but the spatial distribution and line ratios of the molecular hydrogen and Brγ have consistent properties between the two galaxies.

  14. Kinematics of the Nuclear Gas Disk in the Galaxy M84

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Richard

    1997-07-01

    Detection of supermassive black holes {BHs} in active galactic nuclei {AGNs} is one of the grand challenges that HST was designed to meet. NGC 4374 = M84 = 3C272.1 is an ideal object for a BH search because it is one of the three nearest radio galaxies {Centaurus A and M87 are the other two}. Ground-based observations have revealed a nuclear disk of ionized gas whose rotation axis is well-aligned with the radio jet axis. The velocity gradient across the central part of the disk is unresolved from the ground {> 100 km s(-1) arcsec(-1) }, suggesting the presence of > 2 times 10(8) M_{odot} within a radius of 75 pc. Most importantly, our WFPC2 Halpha + [N II] image obtained during cycle 5 shows that the nuclear disk is very similar to the one in the radio galaxy M87. Using STIS to measure the kinematics of this gas disk along its major axis requires only a modest investment of HST time, since STIS has several advantages over FOS {including improved target acquisition, a long-slit, and higher throughput}. The separate approaches to determining BH masses in radio galaxies {using gas dynamics} and in broad-line radio-quiet AGNs {using stellar dynamics} are complementary. Knowing the masses of central engines in radio-loud and radio-quiet AGNs will constrain models for the generation of energy in these enigmatic objects.

  15. KK 246: A DWARF GALAXY WITH AN EXTENDED H I DISK IN THE LOCAL VOID

    SciTech Connect

    Kreckel, K.; Van Gorkom, J. H.; Peebles, P. J. E.; Van de Weygaert, R.; Van der Hulst, J. M.

    2011-06-15

    We have found that KK 246, the only confirmed galaxy located within the nearby Tully Void, is a dwarf galaxy with an extremely extended H I disk and signs of an H I cloud with anomalous velocity. It also exhibits clear misalignment between the kinematical major and minor axes, indicative of an oval distortion, and a general misalignment between the H I and optical major axes. We measure an H I mass of (1.05 {+-} 0.08) x 10{sup 8} M{sub sun}, and an H I extent five times that of the stellar disk, one of the most extended H I disks known. We estimate a dynamical mass of 4.1 x 10{sup 9} M{sub sun}, making this also one of the darkest galaxies known, with a mass-to-light ratio of 89. The relative isolation and extreme underdense environment make this an interesting case for examining the role of gas accretion in galaxy evolution.

  16. Do Disk Galaxies Have Different Central Velocity Dispersions At A Given Rotation Velocity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilovich, Taissa; Jones, H.; Mould, J.; Taylor, E.; Tonini, C.; Webster, R.

    2011-05-01

    Hubble's classification of spiral galaxies was one dimensional. Actually it was 1.5 dimensional, as he distinguished barred spirals. Van den Bergh's was two dimensional: spirals had luminosity classes too. Other schemes are summarized at http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/G/galaxyclassification.html A more quantitative approach is to classify spiral galaxies by rotation velocity. Their central velocity dispersion (bulge) tends to be roughly one half of their rotation velocity (disk). There is a trend from σ/W = 0.8 to σ/W = 0.2 as one goes from W = 100 to 500 km/s, where W is twice the rotation velocity. But some fraction of spirals have a velocity dispersion up to a factor of two larger than that. In hierarchical galaxy formation models, the relative contributions of σ and W depend on the mass accretion history of the galaxy, which determines the mass distribution of the dynamical components such as disk, bulge and dark matter halo. The wide variety of histories that originate in the hierarchical mass assembly produce at any value of W a wide range of σ/W, that reaches high values in more bulge- dominated systems. In a sense the two classifiers were both right: spirals are mostly one dimensional, but σ/W (bulge to disk ratio) is often larger than average. Is this a signature of merger history?

  17. Unveiling the sources of disk heating in spiral galaxies with the CALIFA survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinna, F.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Martig, M.; van de Ven, G.; Lyubenova, M.; Leaman, R.

    2016-06-01

    The stellar velocity ellipsoid (SVE) quantifies the amount of velocity dispersion in the vertical, radial and azimuthal directions. Since different disk heating mechanisms (e.g. spiral arms, giant molecular clouds, mergers, etc) affect these components differently, the SVE can constrain the sources of heating in disk galaxies. At present the 3D nature of the SVE can only be directly measured in the Milky Way but, thanks to integral-field surveys like CALIFA, we are now in position to carry out the same kind of analysis in external galaxies. For this purpose, we have gathered a sample of ~30 intermediate inclined spiral galaxies along the Hubble sequence (S0 to Scd types) with high quality stellar kinematic maps. This allows us to probe the SVE for each galaxy from different line-of-sights in different regions, and thus provide strong constraints on its shape. In this presentation we relate our preliminary findings to realistic numerical simulations of disks with different formation histories (quiescent vs mergers), and to results of previous works.

  18. DISSECTING THE STELLAR-MASS-SFR CORRELATION IN z = 1 STAR-FORMING DISK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Salmi, F.; Daddi, E.; Elbaz, D.; Sargent, M. T.; Bethermin, M.; Renzini, A.; Le Borgne, D. E-mail: edaddi@cea.fr

    2012-07-20

    Using a mass-limited sample of 24 {mu}m detected, star-forming galaxies at 0.5 < z < 1.3, we study the mass-star formation rate (SFR) correlation and its tightness. The correlation is well defined ({sigma} = 0.28 dex) for disk galaxies (n{sub Sersic} < 1.5), while more bulge-dominated objects often have lower specific SFRs (sSFRs). For disk galaxies, a much tighter correlation ({sigma} = 0.19 dex) is obtained if the rest-frame H-band luminosity is used instead of stellar mass derived from multi-color photometry. The sSFR correlates strongly with rest-frame optical colors (hence luminosity-weighted stellar age) and also with clumpiness (which likely reflects the molecular gas fraction). This implies that most of the observed scatter is real, despite its low level, and not dominated by random measurement errors. After correcting for these differential effects a remarkably small dispersion remains ({sigma} = 0.14 dex), suggesting that measurement errors in mass or SFR are {approx}< 0.10 dex, excluding systematic uncertainties. Measurement errors in stellar masses, the thickening of the correlation due to real sSFR variations, and varying completeness with stellar mass, can spuriously bias the derived slope to lower values due to the finite range over which observables (mass and SFR) are available. When accounting for these effects, the intrinsic slope for the main sequence for disk galaxies gets closer to unity.

  19. The Relation between Stellar and Dynamical Surface Densities in the Central Regions of Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelli, Federico; McGaugh, Stacy S.; Schombert, James M.; Pawlowski, Marcel S.

    2016-08-01

    We use the Spitzer Photometry and Accurate Rotation Curves database to study the relation between the central surface density of stars {{{Σ }}}\\star (0) and dynamical mass {{{Σ }}}{{dyn}}(0) in 135 disk galaxies (S0 to dIrr). We find that {{{Σ }}}{{dyn}}(0) correlates tightly with {{{Σ }}}\\star (0) over 4 dex. This central density relation can be described by a double power law. High surface brightness galaxies are consistent with a 1:1 relation, suggesting that they are self-gravitating and baryon dominated in the inner parts. Low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies systematically deviate from the 1:1 line, indicating that the dark matter contribution progressively increases but remains tightly coupled to the stellar one. The observed scatter is small (∼0.2 dex) and largely driven by observational uncertainties. The residuals show no correlations with other galaxy properties like stellar mass, size, or gas fraction.

  20. The Relation between Stellar and Dynamical Surface Densities in the Central Regions of Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelli, Federico; McGaugh, Stacy S.; Schombert, James M.; Pawlowski, Marcel S.

    2016-08-01

    We use the Spitzer Photometry and Accurate Rotation Curves database to study the relation between the central surface density of stars {{{Σ }}}\\star (0) and dynamical mass {{{Σ }}}{{dyn}}(0) in 135 disk galaxies (S0 to dIrr). We find that {{{Σ }}}{{dyn}}(0) correlates tightly with {{{Σ }}}\\star (0) over 4 dex. This central density relation can be described by a double power law. High surface brightness galaxies are consistent with a 1:1 relation, suggesting that they are self-gravitating and baryon dominated in the inner parts. Low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies systematically deviate from the 1:1 line, indicating that the dark matter contribution progressively increases but remains tightly coupled to the stellar one. The observed scatter is small (˜0.2 dex) and largely driven by observational uncertainties. The residuals show no correlations with other galaxy properties like stellar mass, size, or gas fraction.

  1. Effects of Interstellar Dust on the Photometric Properties of Faint Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruzual, G. A.; Magris, C.

    1986-02-01

    We compute the effects of interstellar dust on the photometric properties of disk galaxies in several photographic and photoelectric bands. The solution to the radiative transfer problem including absorption and multiple scattering 0+ light by dust grains is taken from a previous paper by the authors (Magris and Bruzual, this conference). We present magnitudes and colors V. redshift for galaxies seen at different inclination angles and with different values of the optical depth through the plane of the galaxy. The results are compared with those obtained from a straightforward application of the galactic extinction law. It is concluded that in order to properly take into account the effects of dust in the photometric properties of distant galaxies of cosmological interest it is necessary to use correction factors such as those of Magris and Bruzual.

  2. Red giants in the outer halo of the elliptical galaxy NGC 5128/Centaurus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, Sarah A.; Flynn, Chris; Harris, William E.; Valtonen, Mauri

    2015-03-01

    We used VIMOS on VLT to perform V and I band imaging of the outermost halo of NGC 5128/Centaurus A ((m - M)0 = 27.91±0.08), 65 kpc from the galaxy's center and along the major axis. The stellar population has been resolved to I0 ≈ 27 with a 50% completeness limit of I0 = 24.7, well below the tip of the red-giant branch (TRGB), which is seen at I0 ≈ 23.9. The surface density of NGC 5128 halo stars in our fields was sufficiently low that dim, unresolved background galaxies were a major contaminant in the source counts. We isolated a clean sample of red-giant-branch (RGB) stars extending to ≈0.8 mag below the TRGB through conservative magnitude and color cuts, to remove the (predominantly blue) unresolved background galaxies. We derived stellar metallicities from colors of the stars via isochrones and measured the density falloff of the halo as a function of metallicity by combining our observations with HST imaging taken of NGC 5128 halo fields closer to the galaxy center. We found both metal-rich and metal-poor stellar populations and found that the falloff of the two follows the same de Vaucouleurs' law profiles from ≈8 kpc out to ≈70 kpc. The metallicity distribution function (MDF) and the density falloff agree with the results of two recent studies of similar outermost halo fields in NGC 5128. We found no evidence of a "transition" in the radial profile of the halo, in which the metal-rich halo density would drop rapidly, leaving the underlying metal-poor halo to dominate by default out to greater radial extent, as has been seen in the outer halo of two other large galaxies. If NGC 5128 has such a transition, it must lie at larger galactocentric distances.

  3. Puzzling outer-density profile of the dark matter halo in the Andromeda galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirihara, Takanobu; Miki, Yohei; Mori, Masao

    2014-12-01

    The cold dark matter (CDM) cosmology, which is the standard theory of the structure formation in the universe, predicts that the outer density profile of dark matter halos decreases with the cube of distance from the center. However, so far not much effort has been expended in examining this hypothesis. In the halo of the Andromeda galaxy (M 31), large-scale stellar structures detected by the recent observations provide a potentially suitable window to investigate the mass-density distribution of the dark matter halo. We explore the density structure of the dark matter halo in M 31 using an N-body simulation of the interaction between an accreting satellite galaxy and M 31. To reproduce the Andromeda Giant Southern Stream and the stellar shells at the east and west sides of M 31, we find the sufficient condition for the power-law index α of the outer density distribution of the dark matter halo. The best-fitting parameter is α = -3.7, which is steeper than the CDM prediction.

  4. THE RISE AND FALL OF PASSIVE DISK GALAXIES: MORPHOLOGICAL EVOLUTION ALONG THE RED SEQUENCE REVEALED BY COSMOS

    SciTech Connect

    Bundy, Kevin; Hopkins, Philip; Ma, Chung-Pei; Scarlata, Claudia; Capak, Peter; Carollo, C. M.; Oesch, Pascal; Ellis, Richard S.; Salvato, Mara; Scoville, Nick; Drory, Niv; Leauthaud, Alexie; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Murray, Norman; Ilbert, Olivier; Pozzetti, Lucia

    2010-08-20

    The increasing abundance of passive 'red-sequence' galaxies since z {approx} 1-2 is mirrored by a coincident rise in the number of galaxies with spheroidal morphologies. In this paper, however, we show in detail, that, the correspondence between galaxy morphology and color is not perfect, providing insight into the physical origin of this evolution. Using the COSMOS survey, we study a significant population of red-sequence galaxies with disk-like morphologies. These passive disks typically have Sa-Sb morphological types with large bulges, but they are not confined to dense environments. They represent nearly one-half of all red-sequence galaxies and dominate at lower masses ({approx}<10{sup 10} M{sub sun}) where they are increasingly disk-dominated. As a function of time, the abundance of passive disks with M {sub *} {approx}< 10{sup 11} M{sub sun} increases, but not as fast as red-sequence spheroidals in the same mass range. At higher mass, the passive disk population has declined since z {approx} 1, likely because they transform into spheroidals. Based on these trends, we estimate that as much as 60% of galaxies transitioning onto the red sequence evolve through a passive disk phase. The origin of passive disks therefore has broad implications for our understanding of how star formation shuts down. Because passive disks tend to be more bulge-dominated than their star-forming counterparts, a simple fading of blue disks does not fully explain their origin. We explore the strengths and weaknesses of several more sophisticated explanations, including environmental effects, internal stabilization, and disk regrowth during gas-rich mergers. While previous work has sought to explain color and morphological transformations with a single process, these observations open the way to new insight by highlighting the fact that galaxy evolution may actually proceed through several separate stages.

  5. Dark filaments in the galaxy NGC 253: A boiling galactic disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofue, Yoshiaki; Wakamatsu, Ken-Ichi; Malin, David F.

    1994-12-01

    We study the morphology of dark lanes and filaments in the dust-rich galaxy NGC 253 using an unsharp-masked B-band optical photograph. Dust features are classified as 'arcs,' which have heights and scale radius of about 100 to 300 pc, connecting two or more dark clouds, and 'loops' and 'bubbles,' which are developed forms of arcs, expanding into the disk-halo interface. These have diameters of a few hundred pc to approximately 1 kpc. Among the bubbles, we notice a peculiar round-shaped bubble above the nucleus, which could be a large-diameter (approximately 300 pc) supernova remnant exploded in the halo over the nucleus. We also find 'vertical dust streamers,' which comprise bunches of narrow filaments with a thickness of a few tens of pc and are almost perpendicular to the galactic plane, extending coherently for 1 to 2 kpc toward the halo. Finally, we note 'short vertical dust filaments' (or spicules) are found in the central region. We interpret these features as due to three-dimensional structures of gas extending from the disk into the halo. We propose a 'boiling disk' model where the filamentary features are produced by star-forming activity in the disk as well as the influence of magnetic fluxes. We discuss the implication of the model for the chemical evolution of the interstellar medium (ISM) in a galaxy disk.

  6. Shrinking galaxy disks with fountain-driven accretion from the halo

    SciTech Connect

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Struck, Curtis; Hunter, Deidre A. E-mail: curt@iastate.edu

    2014-12-01

    Star formation in most galaxies requires cosmic gas accretion because the gas consumption time is short compared to the Hubble time. This accretion presumably comes from a combination of infalling satellite debris, cold flows, and condensation of hot halo gas at the cool disk interface, perhaps aided by a galactic fountain. In general, the accretion will have a different specific angular momentum than the part of the disk that receives it, even if the gas comes from the nearby halo. The gas disk then expands or shrinks over time. Here we show that condensation of halo gas at a rate proportional to the star formation rate in the fountain model will preserve an initial shape, such as an exponential, with a shrinking scale length, leaving behind a stellar disk with a slightly steeper profile of younger stars near the center. This process is slow for most galaxies, producing imperceptible radial speeds, and it may be dominated by other torques, but it could be important for blue compact dwarfs, which tend to have large, irregular gas reservoirs and steep blue profiles in their inner stellar disks.

  7. SAMI Galaxy Survey: Disk and Bar Kinematics, Mass Decompositions with Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecil, Gerald N.; Bland-Hawthorn, Jonathan; Fogarty, Lisa; SAMI Galaxy Survey Team, GAMA Survey Team

    2015-01-01

    The SAMI Galaxy Survey (SGS, P.I. Scott Croom, U. of Sydney) uses a custom multiple-integral-field feed to the Australian Astronomical Telescope (AAT) AAOmega dual-spectrograph to map the inner 15 arcsec diameter of 3400 galaxies a dozen at a time. The SGS spans environmental densities up to clusters, out to z = 0.1. (See http://sami-survey.org/edr for ~100 galaxies in the public Early Release Data.) We discuss circular speed curves (CSCs) of gas and stars derived from non-parametric fits to a flat disk in ~130 late-type barred and unbarred galaxies across the full mass range of the SGS, and at radii up to 4 r_e. Gas and stellar rotational fields agree well, but can differ substantially in line of nodes. At least 2/3 of the fitted CSCs are compatible with the ``universal rotation curve''. Velocity model residuals are compared to residuals from single-Sersic profile fits to SDSS photometry that highlight light asymmetries. For galaxies where photometry minus model residuals delineate stellar bars, the VIKING Z-band image is fit with a dual-Sersic form, one component addressing the bulge/bar, then gas kinematics are refit to include a bisymmetric (m=2) velocity distortion in the disk. This distortion often aligns with photometric residuals, and has amplitude at most 80 km/s but usually <20 km/s in the disk plane. Thus we debias the CSC from, and map the effects of, gas streaming due to a bar/oval. Because of generally low in-plane velocity distortions, only 2 of 18 barred galaxies have shock-indicating, emission-line flux ratios that correlate with m=2 spatio-kinematical variations and concentrate near the bar ends. Each dual- or single-Sersic fit is mapped into mass using one M/L constant with radius and the non-axisymmetric or axisymmetric CSC to decompose the mass distribution into luminous bulge and disk, and dark halo components. Some fits require a maximal luminous disk, others require a non-negligible or even dominant dark halo within the SAMI aperture. We

  8. EXTINCTION IN STAR-FORMING DISK GALAXIES FROM INCLINATION-DEPENDENT COMPOSITE SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, Ching-Wa; Szalay, Alex S.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Budavari, Tamas; Dobos, Laszlo; Csabai, Istvan E-mail: szalay@pha.jhu.ed

    2010-02-01

    Extinction in galaxies affects their observed properties. In scenarios describing the distribution of dust and stars in individual disk galaxies, the amplitude of the extinction can be modulated by the inclination of the galaxies. In this work, we investigate the inclination dependency in composite spectra of star-forming disk galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5. In a volume-limited sample within a redshift range 0.065-0.075 and a r-band Petrosian absolute magnitude range -19.5 to -22 mag which exhibits a flat distribution of inclination, the inclined relative to face-on extinction in the stellar continuum is found empirically to increase with inclination in the g, r, and i bands. Within the central 0.5 intrinsic half-light radius of the galaxies, the g-band relative extinction in the stellar continuum for the highly inclined objects (axis ratio b/a = 0.1) is 1.2 mag, agreeing with previous studies. The extinction curve of the disk galaxies is given in the rest-frame wavelengths 3700-8000 A, identified with major optical emission and absorption lines in diagnostics. The Balmer decrement, Halpha/Hbeta, remains constant with inclination, suggesting a different kind of dust configuration and/or reddening mechanism in the H II region from that in the stellar continuum. One factor is shown to be the presence of spatially non-uniform interstellar extinction, presumably caused by clumped dust in the vicinity of the H II region.

  9. The Frequency of Field Blue-Straggler Stars in the Thick Disk and Halo System of the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santucci, Rafael M.; Placco, Vinicius M.; Rossi, Silvia; Beers, Timothy C.; Reggiani, Henrique M.; Lee, Young Sun; Xue, Xiang-Xiang; Carollo, Daniela

    2015-03-01

    We present an analysis of a new, large sample of field blue-straggler stars (BSSs) in the thick disk and halo system of the Galaxy, based on stellar spectra obtained during the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE). Using estimates of stellar atmospheric parameters obtained from application of the SEGUE Stellar Parameter Pipeline, we obtain a sample of some 8000 BSSs, which are considered along with a previously selected sample of some 4800 blue horizontal-branch (BHB) stars. We derive the ratio of BSSs to BHB stars, FBSS/BHB, as a function of Galactocentric distance and distance from the Galactic plane. The maximum value found for FBSS/BHB is ∼ 4.0 in the thick disk (at 3 kpc\\lt |Z|\\lt 4 kpc), declining to on the order of ∼ 1.5-2.0 in the inner-halo region; this ratio continues to decline to ∼1.0 in the outer-halo region. We associate a minority of field BSSs with a likely extragalactic origin; at least 5% of the BSS sample exhibit radial velocities, positions, and distances commensurate with membership in the Sagittarius Stream.

  10. The Outer Disks of Herbig Stars From the UV to NIR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, C.; Fukagawa, M.; Maruta, Y.; Ohta, Y.; Wisniewski, J.; Hashimoto, J.; Okamoto, Y.; Momose, M.; Currie, T.; Mcelwain, M.; Muto, T.; Kotani, T.; Kusakabe, N.; Kudo, T.; Hayashi, M.; Ishii, M.; Iye, M.; Morino, J.-I.; Suenaga, T.; Suto, H.; Suzuki, R.; Takahashi, Y. H.; Takami, H.; Usuda, T.; Tamura, M.

    2014-01-01

    Spatially-resolved imaging of Herbig stars and related objects began with HST, but intensified with commissioning of high-contrast imagers on 8-m class telescopes. The bulk of the data taken from the ground have been polarized intensity imagery at H-band, with the majority of the sources observed as part of the Strategic Exploration of Exoplanets and Disks with Subaru (SEEDS) survey. Sufficiently many systems have been imaged that we discuss disk properties in scattered, polarized light in terms of groups defined by the IR spectral energy distribution. We find novel phenomena in many of the disks, including spiral density waves, and discuss the disks in terms of clearing mechanisms. Some of the disks have sufficient data to map the dust and gas components, including water ice dissociation products.

  11. The outer disks of Herbig stars from the UV to NIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grady, C.; Fukagawa, M.; Maruta, Y.; Ohta, Y.; Wisniewski, J.; Hashimoto, J.; Okamoto, Y.; Momose, M.; Currie, T.; McElwain, M.; Muto, T.; Kotani, T.; Kusakabe, N.; Feldt, M.; Sitko, M.; Follette, K.; Bonnefoy, M.; Henning, T.; Takami, M.; Karr, J.; Kwon, J.; Kudo, T.; Abe, L.; Brandner, W.; Brandt, T.; Carson, J.; Egner, S.; Goto, M.; Guyon, O.; Hayano, Y.; Hayashi, M.; Hayashi, S.; Hodapp, K.; Ishii, M.; Iye, M.; Janson, M.; Kandori, R.; Knapp, G.; Kuzuhara, M.; Matsuo, T.; Miyama, S.; Morino, J.-I.; Moro-Martín, A.; Nishimura, T.; Pyo, T.-S.; Serabyn, E.; Suenaga, T.; Suto, H.; Suzuki, R.; Takahashi, Y. H.; Takato, N.; Terada, H.; Thalmann, C.; Tomono, D.; Turner, E. L.; Watanabe, M.; Yamada, T.; Takami, H.; Usuda, T.; Tamura, M.

    2015-02-01

    Spatially-resolved imaging of Herbig stars and related objects began with HST, but intensified with commissioning of high-contrast imagers on 8-m class telescopes. The bulk of the data taken from the ground have been polarized intensity imagery at H-band, with the majority of the sources observed as part of the Strategic Exploration of Exoplanets and Disks with Subaru (SEEDS) survey. Sufficiently many systems have been imaged that we discuss disk properties in scattered, polarized light in terms of groups defined by the IR spectral energy distribution. We find novel phenomena in many of the disks, including spiral density waves, and discuss the disks in terms of clearing mechanisms. Some of the disks have sufficient data to map the dust and gas components, including water ice dissociation products.

  12. THE FIRST GALAXIES: ASSEMBLY OF DISKS AND PROSPECTS FOR DIRECT DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlik, Andreas H.; Milosavljevic, Milos; Bromm, Volker

    2011-04-10

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will enable observations of galaxies at redshifts z {approx}> 10 and hence allow us to test our current understanding of structure formation at very early times. Previous work has shown that the very first galaxies inside halos with virial temperatures T{sub vir} {approx}< 10{sup 4} K and masses M{sub vir} {approx}< 10{sup 8} M{sub sun} at z {approx}> 10 are probably too faint, by at least one order of magnitude, to be detected even in deep exposures with JWST. The light collected with JWST may therefore be dominated by radiation from galaxies inside 10 times more massive halos. We use cosmological zoomed smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations to investigate the assembly of such galaxies and assess their observability with JWST. We compare two simulations that are identical except for the inclusion of non-equilibrium H/D chemistry and radiative cooling by molecular hydrogen. In both simulations a large fraction of the halo gas settles in two nested, extended gas disks which surround a compact massive gas core. The presence of molecular hydrogen allows the disk gas to reach low temperatures and to develop marked spiral structure but does not qualitatively change its stability against fragmentation. We post-process the simulated galaxies by combining idealized models for star formation with stellar population synthesis models to estimate the luminosities in nebular recombination lines as well as in the ultraviolet continuum. We demonstrate that JWST will be able to constrain the nature of the stellar populations in galaxies such as simulated here based on the detection of the He1640 recombination line. Extrapolation of our results to halos with masses both lower and higher than those simulated shows that JWST may find up to a thousand star-bursting galaxies in future deep exposures of the z {approx}> 10 universe.

  13. GHOSTS: the age and structure of stellar halos around nearby disk galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Roelof S.; Bailin, Jeremy; Bell, Eric; Holwerda, Benne Willem; Monachesi, Antonela; Streich, David

    2015-08-01

    The stars in the halos around galaxies are thought to be for a significant fraction the result of tidally disrupted infalling smaller galaxies, an important process in the mass build up of galaxies. However, in recent year the realization has grown that a fraction of halo stars may have formed in situ or in the disk of the host galaxy.To understand the nature of stellar halos, the GHOSTS project has used the Hubble Space Telescope to observe the resolved stellar populations in the outskirts of 18 nearby massive galaxies, with a range of masses and seen from face-on to edge-on. From two filter observations (F814W and F606W) with both WFC3 and ACS, we map the different giant populations in these haloes: typically Asymptotic, Red, and He-burning Giants (AGB, RGB and HeB). By studying the distribution of these stellar populations, the GHOSTS project aims to characterize on a statistical basis the size, shape, age, amount of sub-structure, and chemical composition of stellar halos, thereby allowing us to constrain models of the hierarchical galaxy formation process.In this presentation we will in particular show the structural parameters of the observed stellar halos out to 70 kpc and present the rather small range in color gradients present in the RGB population indicative in small metallicity gradients in these halos. We also present the discovery of a surprisingly large population of AGB stars with ages <2 Gyr seen to ~20 kpc above the disks of many edge-on galaxies and speculations on the origin of these young populations at a location where no current star formation is seen.

  14. The X-ray halo of an extremely luminous LSB disk galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiner, Benjamin J.

    2004-01-01

    We are continuing to refine our upper limit on emission from halo gas in Malin 2. The upper limit is, of course, below the detected flux, but is made more difficult to quantify by the disk and possible AGN sources. We are also exploring spectral and spatial-size constraints to help separate the sources of emission. On the theory side, more recent work on the X-ray halo luminosity from halo gas leftover from galaxy formation has lowered the prediction for disk galaxies (e.g. Toft et al. 2002, MNRAS, 335, 799). While our upper limit is well below the original prediction, refinements in model have moved the theoretical goalposts, so that the observation may be consistent with newer models. A recent theoretical development, which our observations of Malin 2 appear to support, is that a substantial amount of mass can be accreted onto galaxies without being heated at a virial shock. The previous standard theory was that gas accreting into a halo hits a virial shock and is heated to high temperatures, which could produce X-ray halos in massive galaxies. Recent models show that "smooth accretion" of matter bypasses the virial shocking (Murali e t al. 2002, ApJ, 571, 1; Birnboim & Dekel 2003, MNRAS, 345, 349). Additionally, new hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy mergers by UCSC graduate student T. J. Cox show that hot gas halos can be created by gas blown out from the merger, taking up orbital energy of the merging galaxies (Cox et al. 2004, ApJ, 607, L87). If mergers rather than virial shocking are the origin of hot gas halos, the existence of an X-ray halo should depend more on past merger activity than halo mass. Then it makes sense that elliptical galaxies and poor groups with ellipticals, which are probably formed in mergers, have X-ray gas halos; while a giant, quiescent LSB disk galaxy like Malin 2, which has never suffered a major merger, does not have an X-ray halo. While both the observational expectations and theoretical models have changed since we began this

  15. Shaken, Not Stirred: The Disrupted Disk of the Starburst Galaxy NGC 253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidge, T. J.

    2010-12-01

    Near-infrared images obtained with WIRCam on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope are used to investigate the recent history of the nearby Sculptor Group spiral NGC 253, which is one of the nearest starburst galaxies. Bright asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are traced out to projected distances of ~22-26 kpc (~13-15 disk scale lengths) along the major axis. The distribution of stars in the disk is lopsided, in the sense that the projected density of AGB stars in the northeast portion of the disk between 10 and 20 kpc from the galaxy center is ~0.5 dex higher than on the opposite side of the galaxy. A large population of red supergiants is also found in the northeast portion of the disk and, with the exception of the central 2 kpc, this area appears to have been the site of the highest levels of star-forming activity in the galaxy during the past ~0.1 Gyr. It is argued that such high levels of localized star formation may have produced a fountain that ejected material from the disk, and the extraplanar H I detected by Boomsma et al. may be one manifestation of such activity. Diffuse stellar structures are found in the periphery of the disk, and the most prominent of these is to the south and east of the galaxy. Bright AGB stars, including cool C stars that are identified based on their J - K colors, are detected out to 15 kpc above the disk plane, and these are part of a diffusely distributed, flattened extraplanar component. Comparisons between observed and model luminosity functions suggest that the extraplanar regions contain stars that formed throughout much of the age of the universe. Additional evidence of a diffuse, extraplanar stellar component that contains moderately young stars comes from archival Galaxy Evolution Explorer images. It is suggested that the disk of NGC 253 was disrupted by a tidal encounter with a now defunct companion. This encounter introduced asymmetries that remain to this day, and the projected distribution of stars in and around NGC

  16. SHAKEN, NOT STIRRED: THE DISRUPTED DISK OF THE STARBURST GALAXY NGC 253

    SciTech Connect

    Davidge, T. J.

    2010-12-10

    Near-infrared images obtained with WIRCam on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope are used to investigate the recent history of the nearby Sculptor Group spiral NGC 253, which is one of the nearest starburst galaxies. Bright asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are traced out to projected distances of {approx}22-26 kpc ({approx}13-15 disk scale lengths) along the major axis. The distribution of stars in the disk is lopsided, in the sense that the projected density of AGB stars in the northeast portion of the disk between 10 and 20 kpc from the galaxy center is {approx}0.5 dex higher than on the opposite side of the galaxy. A large population of red supergiants is also found in the northeast portion of the disk and, with the exception of the central 2 kpc, this area appears to have been the site of the highest levels of star-forming activity in the galaxy during the past {approx}0.1 Gyr. It is argued that such high levels of localized star formation may have produced a fountain that ejected material from the disk, and the extraplanar H I detected by Boomsma et al. may be one manifestation of such activity. Diffuse stellar structures are found in the periphery of the disk, and the most prominent of these is to the south and east of the galaxy. Bright AGB stars, including cool C stars that are identified based on their J - K colors, are detected out to 15 kpc above the disk plane, and these are part of a diffusely distributed, flattened extraplanar component. Comparisons between observed and model luminosity functions suggest that the extraplanar regions contain stars that formed throughout much of the age of the universe. Additional evidence of a diffuse, extraplanar stellar component that contains moderately young stars comes from archival Galaxy Evolution Explorer images. It is suggested that the disk of NGC 253 was disrupted by a tidal encounter with a now defunct companion. This encounter introduced asymmetries that remain to this day, and the projected distribution

  17. Dynamical Effects of Nuclear Rings in Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, Clayton H.; Shlosman, Isaac

    1996-11-01

    We investigate the dynamical response of stellar orbits in a rotating barred galaxy potential to the perturbation by a nuclear gaseous ring. The change in three-dimensional periodic orbit families is examined as the gas accumulates between the inner Lindblad resonances. It is found that the phase space allowable to the x_2_ family of orbits is substantially increased, and a vertical instability strip appears with the growing mass of the ring. A significant distortion of the x_1_ orbits is observed in the vicinity of the ring, which leads to the intersection between orbits with different values of the Jacobi integral. We also examine the dependence of the orbital response to the eccentricity and alignment of the ring with the bar. Misalignment between an oval ring and a bar can leave observational footprints in the form of twisted near- infrared isophotes in the vicinity of the ring. It is inferred that a massive nuclear ring acts to weaken and dissolve the stellar bar exterior to the ring, whereas only weakly affecting the orbits interior to the inner Lindblad resonances. Consequences for gas evolution in the circumnuclear regions of barred galaxies are discussed as well.

  18. The role of cloud collisions in N-body simulations of disk galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaric, Mario

    1993-09-01

    I have created a cloud collision recipe for use in N-body, polar grid, 3-d code. As a result of collisions two clouds can undergo one of four major processes: coalescence, fragmentation, star formation, and dynamical disturbance. I tested my recipe in simulations of disk galaxies, both isolated and interacting. In cases of isolated disks, I have found that cloud collisions play a key role in bulge formation by scattering stars out of the disk plane, which then end up forming a bulge. I have also shown that cloud collisions turn an initially uniform cloud size spectrum into an exponential size spectrum, agreeing very well with observations by Solomon and Rivolo (1989). In addition, I have shown that a disk needs to have a stellar component to form a bar. The bar then often has blobs at its ends, primarily composed of older stars. As a case of interacting disks, I have studied NGC 2535/6, and found that it seems the primary stayed relatively isolated for a few rotation periods, and consequently relaxed to some degree. Then the companion started tidally interacting with the primary, changing its morphology, intensifying cloud collision rates, and bringing about an earlier onset of star formation, which does not reach the same maximum value as in comparable isolated disk.

  19. THE RECENT STELLAR ARCHEOLOGY OF M31-THE NEAREST RED DISK GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Davidge, T. J.; McConnachie, A. W.; Fardal, M. A.; Fliri, J.; Valls-Gabaud, D.; Chapman, S. C.; Lewis, G. F.; Rich, R. M.

    2012-05-20

    We examine the star-forming history of the M31 disk during the past few hundred Myr. The luminosity functions (LFs) of main-sequence stars at distances R{sub GC} > 21 kpc (i.e., >4 disk scale lengths) are matched by models that assume a constant star formation rate (SFR). However, at smaller R{sub GC} the LFs suggest that during the past {approx}10 Myr the SFR was 2-3 times higher than during the preceding {approx}100 Myr. The rings of cool gas that harbor a significant fraction of the current star-forming activity are traced by stars with ages {approx}100 Myr, indicating that (1) these structures have ages of at least 100 Myr and (2) stars in these structures do not follow the same relation between age and random velocity as their counterparts throughout the disks of other spiral galaxies, probably due to the inherently narrow orbital angular momentum distribution of the giant molecular clouds in these structures. The distribution of evolved red stars is not azimuthally symmetric, in the sense that the projected density along the northeast segment of the major axis is roughly twice that on the opposite side of the galaxy. The northeast arm of the major axis thus appears to be a fossil star-forming area that dates to intermediate epochs. Such a structure may be the consequence of interactions with a companion galaxy.

  20. On the Limits of Measuring the Bulge and Disk Properties of Local and High-redshift Massive Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davari, Roozbeh; Ho, Luis C.; Peng, Chien Y.

    2016-06-01

    A considerable fraction of the massive quiescent galaxies at z ≈ 2, which are known to be much more compact than galaxies of comparable mass today, appear to have a disk. How well can we measure the bulge and disk properties of these systems? We simulate two-component model galaxies in order to systematically quantify the effects of non-homology in structures and the methods employed. We employ empirical scaling relations to produce realistic-looking local galaxies with a uniform and wide range of bulge-to-total ratios (B/T), and then rescale them to mimic the signal-to-noise ratios and sizes of observed galaxies at z ≈ 2. This provides the most complete set of simulations to date for which we can examine the robustness of two-component decomposition of compact disk galaxies at different B/T. We confirm that the size of these massive, compact galaxies can be measured robustly using a single Sérsic fit. We can measure B/T accurately without imposing any constraints on the light profile shape of the bulge, but, due to the small angular sizes of bulges at high redshift, their detailed properties can only be recovered for galaxies with B/T ≳ 0.2. The disk component, by contrast, can be measured with little difficulty.

  1. NGC 3124: A Resonance Ring Disk Galaxy with a Skewed Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treuthardt, P.; Seigar, M. S.; Salo, H.; Kennefick, D.; Kennefick, J.; Lacy, C. H. S.

    2014-03-01

    NGC 3124 is a highly regular SB(r)bc galaxy harboring a skewed bar that appears to be a very open spiral, counter-winding relative to the outer spiral arms. We investigate whether such bar morphology can be due to secular processes or if a more violent interaction is necessary. We find that the dust morphology observed in the bar region has the same sense of winding as the outer spiral arms. We also find that the gas kinematics are consistent across the galaxy. Finally, we attempt to recreate the observed stellar morphology by simulating the behavior of a large number of stellar test particles in a rigidly rotating gravitational potential. We are able to reproduce the skewed stellar bar but find that it is transient in nature. This evidence is a strong indication that secular processes are responsible for this unusual bar morphology.

  2. Herschel's "Cold Debris Disks": Background Galaxies or Quiescent Rims of Planetary Systems?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krivov, A. V.; Eiroa, C.; Loehne, T.; Marshall, J. P.; Montesinos, B.; DelBurgo, C.; Absil, O.; Ardila, D.; Augereau, J.-C.; Bayo, A.; Bryden, G.; Danchi, W.; Ertel, S.; Lebreton, J.; Liseau, R.; Mora, A.; Mustill, A. J.; Mutschke, H.; Neuhaeuser, R.; Pilbratt, G. L.; Roberge, A.; Schmidt, T. O. B.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.; Thebault, Ph.; Vitense, Ch.; White, G. J.; Wolf, S.

    2013-01-01

    smaller than a few kilometers in size. If larger planetesimals were present, then they would stir the disk, triggering a collisional cascade and thus causing production of small debris, which is not seen. Thus, planetesimal formation, at least in the outer regions of the systems, has stopped before "cometary" or "asteroidal" sizes were reached.

  3. HERSCHEL's ''COLD DEBRIS DISKS'': BACKGROUND GALAXIES OR QUIESCENT RIMS OF PLANETARY SYSTEMS?

    SciTech Connect

    Krivov, A. V.; Loehne, T.; Mutschke, H.; Neuhaeuser, R.; Eiroa, C.; Marshall, J. P.; Mustill, A. J.; Montesinos, B.; Del Burgo, C.; Absil, O.; Ardila, D.; Augereau, J.-C.; Ertel, S.; Lebreton, J.; Bryden, G.; Danchi, W.; Liseau, R.; Mora, A.; Pilbratt, G. L. [ESA Astrophysics and Fundamental Physics Missions Division, ESTEC and others

    2013-07-20

    than a few kilometers in size. If larger planetesimals were present, then they would stir the disk, triggering a collisional cascade and thus causing production of small debris, which is not seen. Thus, planetesimal formation, at least in the outer regions of the systems, has stopped before 'cometary' or 'asteroidal' sizes were reached.

  4. DUST ATTENUATION IN DISK-DOMINATED GALAXIES: EVIDENCE FOR THE 2175 A DUST FEATURE

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, Charlie; Schiminovich, David; Blanton, Michael R.

    2010-07-20

    The attenuation of starlight by interstellar dust is investigated in a sample of low-redshift, disk-dominated star-forming galaxies using photometry from GALEX and SDSS. By considering broadband colors as a function of galaxy inclination, we are able to confidently separate trends arising from increasing dust opacity from possible differences in stellar populations, since stellar populations do not correlate with inclination. We are thus able to make firm statements regarding the wavelength-dependent attenuation of starlight for disk-dominated galaxies as a function of gas-phase metallicity and stellar mass. All commonly employed dust attenuation curves (such as the Calzetti curve for starbursts, or a power-law curve) provide poor fits to the ultraviolet colors for moderately and highly inclined galaxies. This conclusion rests on the fact that the average FUV-NUV color varies little from face-on to edge-on galaxies, while other colors such as NUV-u and u - r vary strongly with inclination. After considering a number of model variations, we are led to speculate that the presence of the strong dust extinction feature at 2175 A seen in the Milky Way extinction curve is responsible for the observed trends. If the 2175 A feature is responsible, these results would constitute the first detection of the feature in the attenuation curves of galaxies at low redshift. Independent of our interpretation, these results imply that the modeling of dust attenuation in the ultraviolet is significantly more complicated than traditionally assumed. These results also imply a very weak dependence of the FUV-NUV color on total FUV attenuation, and we conclude from this that it is extremely difficult to use only the observed UV spectral slope to infer the total UV dust attenuation, as is commonly done. We propose several simple tests that might finally identify the grain population responsible for the 2175 A feature.

  5. Seeking large-scale magnetic fields in a pure-disk dwarf galaxy NGC 2976

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drzazga, R. T.; Chyży, K. T.; Heald, G. H.; Elstner, D.; Gallagher, J. S.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: It is still unknown how magnetic field-generation mechanisms could operate in low-mass dwarf galaxies. Here, we present a detailed study of a nearby pure-disk dwarf galaxy NGC 2976. Unlike previously observed dwarf objects, this galaxy possesses a clearly defined disk. We also discuss whether NGC 2976 could serve as a potential source of the intergalactic magnetic field. Methods: For the purpose of our studies, we performed deep multi-frequency polarimetric observations of NGC 2976 with the VLA and Effelsberg radio telescopes. Additionally, we supplement them with re-imaged data from the WSRT-SINGS survey for which a rotation measure (RM) synthesis was performed. A new weighting scheme for the RM synthesis algorithm, consisting of including information about the quality of data in individual frequency channels, was proposed and investigated. Application of this new weighting to the simulated data, as well as to the observed data, results in an improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio in the Faraday depth space. Results: The magnetic field morphology discovered in NGC 2976 consists of a southern polarized ridge. This structure does not seem to be due to just a pure large-scale dynamo process (possibly cosmic-ray driven) at work in this object, as indicated by the RM data and dynamo number calculations. Instead, the field of NGC 2976 is modified by past gravitational interactions and possibly also by ram pressure inside the M 81 galaxy group environment. The estimates of total (7 μG) and ordered (3 μG) magnetic field strengths, as well as degree of field order (0.46), which is similar to those observed in spirals, suggest that tidally generated magnetized gas flows can further enhance dynamo action in the object. NGC 2976 is apparently a good candidate for the efficient magnetization of its neighbourhood. It is able to provide an ordered (perhaps also regular) magnetic field into the intergalactic space up to a distance of about 5 kpc. Conclusions: Tidal

  6. Shape Evolution of Massive Early-type Galaxies: Confirmation of Increased Disk Prevalence at z > 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yu-Yen; van der Wel, Arjen; Rix, Hans-Walter; Wuyts, Stijn; Zibetti, Stefano; Ramkumar, Balasubramanian; Holden, Bradford

    2013-01-01

    We use high-resolution K-band VLT/HAWK-I imaging over 0.25 deg2 to study the structural evolution of massive early-type galaxies since z ~ 2. Mass-selected samples, complete down to log(M/M ⊙) ~ 10.7 such that "typical" (L*) galaxies are included at all redshifts, are drawn from pre-existing photometric redshift surveys. We then separate the samples into different redshift slices and classify them as late- or early-type galaxies on the basis of their specific star formation rate. Axis-ratio measurements for the ~400 early-type galaxies in the redshift range 0.6 < z < 1.8 are accurate to 0.1 or better. The projected axis-ratio distributions are then compared with lower redshift samples. We find strong evidence for evolution of the population properties: early-type galaxies at z > 1 are, on average, flatter than at z < 1 and the median projected axis ratio at a fixed mass decreases with redshift. However, we also find that at all epochs z <~ 2, the most massive early-type galaxies (log(M/M ⊙) > 11.3) are the roundest, with a pronounced lack of galaxies that are flat in projection. Merging is a plausible mechanism that can explain both results: at all epochs, merging is required for early-type galaxies to grow beyond log(M/M ⊙) ~ 11.3, and all early types over time gradually and partially lose their disk-like characteristics.

  7. SHAPE EVOLUTION OF MASSIVE EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES: CONFIRMATION OF INCREASED DISK PREVALENCE AT z > 1

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yu-Yen; Van der Wel, Arjen; Rix, Hans-Walter; Ramkumar, Balasubramanian; Wuyts, Stijn; Zibetti, Stefano; Holden, Bradford

    2013-01-10

    We use high-resolution K-band VLT/HAWK-I imaging over 0.25 deg{sup 2} to study the structural evolution of massive early-type galaxies since z {approx} 2. Mass-selected samples, complete down to log(M/M {sub Sun }) {approx} 10.7 such that 'typical' (L*) galaxies are included at all redshifts, are drawn from pre-existing photometric redshift surveys. We then separate the samples into different redshift slices and classify them as late- or early-type galaxies on the basis of their specific star formation rate. Axis-ratio measurements for the {approx}400 early-type galaxies in the redshift range 0.6 < z < 1.8 are accurate to 0.1 or better. The projected axis-ratio distributions are then compared with lower redshift samples. We find strong evidence for evolution of the population properties: early-type galaxies at z > 1 are, on average, flatter than at z < 1 and the median projected axis ratio at a fixed mass decreases with redshift. However, we also find that at all epochs z {approx}< 2, the most massive early-type galaxies (log(M/M {sub Sun }) > 11.3) are the roundest, with a pronounced lack of galaxies that are flat in projection. Merging is a plausible mechanism that can explain both results: at all epochs, merging is required for early-type galaxies to grow beyond log(M/M {sub Sun }) {approx} 11.3, and all early types over time gradually and partially lose their disk-like characteristics.

  8. A new model for gravitational potential perturbations in disks of spiral galaxies. An application to our Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junqueira, T. C.; Lépine, J. R. D.; Braga, C. A. S.; Barros, D. A.

    2013-02-01

    Aims: We propose a new, more realistic description of the perturbed gravitational potential of spiral galaxies, with spiral arms having Gaussian-shaped groove profiles. The aim is to reach a self-consistent description of the spiral structure, that is, one in which an initial potential perturbation generates, by means of the stellar orbits, spiral arms with a profile similar to that of the imposed perturbation. Self-consistency is a condition for having long-lived structures. Methods: Using the new perturbed potential, we investigate the stable stellar orbits in galactic disks for galaxies with no bar or with only a weak bar. The model is applied to our Galaxy by making use of the axisymmetric component of the potential computed from the Galactic rotation curve, in addition to other input parameters similar to those of our Galaxy. The influence of the bulge mass on the stellar orbits in the inner regions of a disk is also investigated. Results: The new description offers the advantage of easy control of the parameters of the Gaussian profile of its potential. We compute the density contrast between arm and inter-arm regions. We find a range of values for the perturbation amplitude from 400 to 800 km2 s-2 kpc-1, which implies an approximate maximum ratio of the tangential force to the axisymmetric force between 3% and 6%. Good self-consistency of arm shapes is obtained between the Inner Lindblad resonance (ILR) and the 4:1 resonance. Near the 4:1 resonance the response density starts to deviate from the imposed logarithmic spiral form. This creates bifurcations that appear as short arms. Therefore the deviation from a perfect logarithmic spiral in galaxies can be understood as a natural effect of the 4:1 resonance. Beyond the 4:1 resonance we find closed orbits that have similarities with the arms observed in our Galaxy. In regions near the center, elongated stellar orbits appear naturally, in the presence of a massive bulge, without imposing any bar

  9. Gas-Rich Mergers in LCDM: Disk Survivability and the Baryonic Assembly of Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Kyle R.; Bullock, James S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Maller, Ariyeh H.; /New York City Coll. Tech.

    2009-08-03

    We use N-body simulations and observationally-normalized relations between dark matter halo mass, stellar mass, and cold gas mass to derive robust expectations about the baryonic content of major mergers out to redshift z {approx} 2. First, we find that the majority of major mergers (m/M > 0.3) experienced by Milky Way size dark matter halos should have been gas-rich, and that gas-rich mergers are increasingly common at high redshift. Though the frequency of major mergers into galaxy halos in our simulations greatly exceeds the observed late-type galaxy fraction, the frequency of gas-poor major mergers is consistent with the observed fraction of bulge-dominated galaxies across the halo mass range M{sub DM} {approx} 10{sup 11} - 10{sup 13} M{sub {circle_dot}}. These results lend support to the conjecture that mergers with high baryonic gas fractions play an important role in building and/or preserving disk galaxies in the universe. Secondly, we find that there is a transition mass below which a galaxy's past major mergers were primarily gas-rich and above which they were gas poor. The associated stellar mass scale corresponds closely to that marking the observed bimodal division between blue, star-forming, disk-dominated systems and red, bulge-dominated systems with old populations. Finally, we find that the overall fraction of a galaxy's cold baryons deposited directly via major mergers is substantial. Approximately 30% of the cold baryonic material in M{sub star} {approx} 10{sup 10} M{sub {circle_dot}} (M{sub DM} {approx} 10{sup 11.5} M{sub {circle_dot}}) galaxies is accreted as cold gas in major mergers. For more massive galaxies with M{sub star} {approx} 10{sup 11} M{sub {circle_dot}} (M{sub DM} {approx} 10{sup 13} M{sub {circle_dot}} the fraction of baryons amassed in mergers is even higher, {approx} 50%, but most of these accreted baryons are delivered directly in the form of stars. This baryonic mass deposition is almost unavoidable, and provides a limit on

  10. GAS-RICH MERGERS IN LCDM: DISK SURVIVABILITY AND THE BARYONIC ASSEMBLY OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Kyle R.; Bullock, James S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Maller, Ariyeh H.

    2009-09-01

    We use N-body simulations and observationally normalized relations between dark matter halo mass, stellar mass, and cold gas mass to derive robust expectations about the baryonic content of major mergers out to redshift z {approx} 2. First, we find that the majority of major mergers (m/M>0.3) experienced by the Milky Way size dark matter halos should have been gas-rich, and that gas-rich mergers are increasingly common at high redshifts. Though the frequency of major mergers into galaxy halos in our simulations greatly exceeds the observed early-type galaxy fraction, the frequency of gas-poor major mergers is consistent with the observed fraction of bulge-dominated galaxies across the halo mass range M{sub DM} {approx} 10{sup 11}-10{sup 13} M{sub sun}. These results lend support to the conjecture that mergers with high-baryonic gas fractions play an important role in building and/or preserving disk galaxies in the universe. Second, we find that there is a transition mass below which a galaxy's past major mergers were primarily gas-rich and above which they were gas-poor. The associated stellar mass scale corresponds closely to that marking the observed bimodal division between blue, star-forming, disk-dominated systems and red, bulge-dominated systems with old populations. Finally, we find that the overall fraction of a galaxy's cold baryons deposited directly via major mergers is significant. Approximately {approx}20%-30% of the cold baryonic material in M{sub star} {approx} 10{sup 10.5} M{sub sun} (M{sub DM} {approx} 10{sup 12} M{sub sun}) galaxies is accreted as cold gas or stars via major mergers since z = 2, with most of this accretion in the form of cold gas. For more massive galaxies with M{sub star} {approx} 10{sup 11} M{sub sun} (M {sub DM} {approx} 10{sup 13} M{sub sun}), the fraction of baryons amassed in mergers since z = 2 is even higher, {approx}40%, but most of these accreted baryons are delivered directly in the form of stars. This baryonic mass

  11. Polarimetric imaging of the polar ring galaxy NGC 660 - evidence for dust outside the stellar disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alton, P. B.; Stockdale, D. P.; Scarrott, S. M.; Wolstencroft, R. D.

    2000-05-01

    Optical imaging polarimetry has been carried out for the polar ring, starburst galaxy NGC 660. This galaxy has a highly inclined, severely tidally-disturbed disk which is surrounded by a gas-rich, polar ring. We detect scattered light from a large part of the halo and this is attributable to dust grains residing up to =~ 2.5 kpc from the stellar disk. There is evidence from emission-line imaging carried out in the past, that NGC 660 is host to an energetic outflow of hot gas along the minor axis (a `superwind'). Our results indicate that dust grains are entrained in this same outflow. Polarization due to scattering, however, is also present at positions away from the minor axis suggesting that grains may also be displaced from the stellar disk by tidal forces exerted during galactic collisions. Where the polar ring occludes the stellar disk we observe polarization due to magnetically aligned, dichroic grains. By comparing the recorded polarization with the associated optical extinction we infer that the magnetic field in the ring has a lower (but still comparable) strength to the magnetic field in the Milky Way. We also derive a dust-to-gas ratio for the ring and this is about a factor of 2-3 lower than in the solar neighbourhood (but close to the value measured in some nearby spirals). If the ring comprises the remnants of the `interloper' which collided with NGC 660, we expect that the ruptured galaxy was a massive, metal-rich spiral.

  12. THE LINK BETWEEN LIGHT AND MASS IN LATE-TYPE SPIRAL GALAXY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Swaters, Robert A.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Martinsson, Thomas P. K.; Westfall, Kyle B.; Andersen, David R.; Verheijen, Marc A. W.

    2014-12-20

    We present the correlation between the extrapolated central disk surface brightness (μ) and extrapolated central surface mass density (Σ) for galaxies in the DiskMass sample. This μ-Σ relation has a small scatter of 30% at the high surface brightness (HSB) end. At the low surface brightness (LSB) end, galaxies fall above the μ-Σ relation, which we attribute to their higher dark matter content. After correcting for the dark matter as well as for the contribution of gas and the effects of radial gradients in the disk, the LSB end falls back on the linear μ-Σ relation. The resulting scatter around the corrected μ-Σ relation is 25% at the HSB end and about 50% at the LSB end. The intrinsic scatter in the μ-Σ relation is estimated to be 10%-20%. Thus, if μ {sub K,} {sub 0} is known, the stellar surface mass density is known to within 10%-20% (random error). Assuming disks have an exponential vertical distribution of mass, the average Υ{sub ∗}{sup K} is 0.24 M {sub ☉}/L {sub ☉}, with an intrinsic scatter around the mean of at most 0.05 M {sub ☉}/L {sub ☉}. This value for Υ{sub ∗}{sup K} is 20% smaller than we found in Martinsson et al., mainly due to the correction for dark matter applied here. This small scatter means that among the galaxies in our sample, variations in scale height, vertical density profile shape, and/or the ratio of vertical over radial velocity dispersion must be small.

  13. A determination of the thick disk chemical abundance distribution: Implications for galaxy evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilmore, Gerard; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Jones, Bryn J.

    1995-01-01

    We present a determination of the thick disk iron abundance distribution obtained from an in situ sample of F/G stars. These stars are faint, 15 less than or approximately = V less than or approximately = 18, selected on the basis of color, being a subset of the larger survey of Gilmore and Wyse designed to determine the properties of the stellar populations several kiloparsecs from the Sun. The fields studied in the present paper probe the iron abundance distribution of the stellar populations of the galaxy at 500-3000 pc above the plane, at the solar Galactocentric distance. The derived chemical abundance distributions are consistent with no metallicity gradients in the thick disk over this range of vertical distance, and with an iron abundance distribution for the thick disk that has a peak at -0.7 dex. The lack of a vertical gradient argues against slow, dissipational settling as a mechanism for the formation of the thick disk. The photometric and metallicity data support a turn-off of the thick disk that is comparable in age to the metal-rich globular clusters, or greater than or approximately = 12 Gyr, and are consistent with a spread to older ages.

  14. COSMIC RAYS CAN DRIVE STRONG OUTFLOWS FROM GAS-RICH HIGH-REDSHIFT DISK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hanasz, M.; Kowalik, K.; Wóltański, D.; Lesch, H.; Naab, T.; Gawryszczak, A.

    2013-11-10

    We present simulations of the magnetized interstellar medium (ISM) in models of massive star-forming (40 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) disk galaxies with high gas surface densities (Σ{sub gas} ∼ 100 M {sub ☉} pc{sup –2}) similar to observed star-forming high-redshift disks. We assume that type II supernovae deposit 10% of their energy into the ISM as cosmic rays (CRs) and neglect the additional deposition of thermal energy or momentum. With a typical Galactic diffusion coefficient for CRs (3 × 10{sup 28} cm{sup 2} s{sup –1}), we demonstrate that this process alone can trigger the local formation of a strong low-density galactic wind maintaining vertically open field lines. Driven by the additional pressure gradient of the relativistic fluid, the wind speed can exceed 10{sup 3} km s{sup –1}, much higher than the escape velocity of the galaxy. The global mass loading, i.e., the ratio of the gas mass leaving the galactic disk in a wind to the star formation rate, becomes of order unity once the system has settled into an equilibrium. We conclude that relativistic particles accelerated in supernova remnants alone provide a natural and efficient mechanism to trigger winds similar to observed mass-loaded galactic winds in high-redshift galaxies. These winds also help in explaining the low efficiencies for the conversion of gas into stars in galaxies, as well as the early enrichment of the intergalactic medium with metals. This mechanism may be at least of similar importance to the traditionally considered momentum feedback from massive stars and thermal and kinetic feedback from supernova explosions.

  15. OPEN CLUSTERS IN THE MILKY WAY OUTER DISK: NEWLY DISCOVERED AND UNSTUDIED CLUSTERS IN THE SPITZER GLIMPSE-360, CYG-X, AND SMOG SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Zasowski, G.; Beaton, R. L.; Hamm, K. K.; Majewski, S. R.; Patterson, R. J.; Babler, B.; Churchwell, E.; Meade, M.; Whitney, B. A.; Benjamin, R. A.; Watson, C.

    2013-09-15

    Open stellar clusters are extremely valuable probes of Galactic structure, star formation, kinematics, and chemical abundance patterns. Near-infrared (NIR) data have enabled the detection of hundreds of clusters hidden from optical surveys, and mid-infrared (MIR) data are poised to offer an even clearer view into the most heavily obscured parts of the Milky Way. We use new MIR images from the Spitzer GLIMPSE-360, Cyg-X, and SMOG surveys to visually identify a large number of open cluster candidates in the outer disk of the Milky Way (65 Degree-Sign < l < 265 Degree-Sign ). Using NIR color-magnitude diagrams, stellar isochrones, and stellar reddening estimates, we derive cluster parameters (metallicity, distance, reddening) for those objects without previous identification and/or parameters in the literature. In total, we present coordinates and sizes of 20 previously unknown open cluster candidates; for 7 of these we also present metallicity, distance, and reddening values. In addition, we provide the first estimates of these values for nine clusters that had been previously cataloged. We compare our cluster sizes and other derived parameters to those in the open cluster catalog of Dias et al. and find strong similarities except for a higher mean reddening for our objects, which signifies our increased detection sensitivity in regions of high extinction. The results of this cluster search and analysis demonstrate the ability of MIR imaging and photometry to augment significantly the current census of open clusters in the Galaxy.

  16. Electron Heating in Magnetorotational Instability: Implications for Turbulence Strength in the Outer Regions of Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Shoji; Okuzumi, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) drives vigorous turbulence in a region of protoplanetary disks where the ionization fraction is sufficiently high. It has recently been shown that the electric field induced by the MRI can heat up electrons and thereby affect the ionization balance in the gas. In particular, in a disk where abundant dust grains are present, the electron heating causes a reduction of the electron abundance, thereby preventing further growth of the MRI. By using the nonlinear Ohm's law that takes into account electron heating, we investigate where in protoplanetary disks this negative feedback between the MRI and ionization chemistry becomes important. We find that the “e-heating zone,” the region where the electron heating limits the saturation of the MRI, extends out up to 80 AU in the minimum-mass solar nebula with abundant submicron-sized grains. This region is considerably larger than the conventional dead zone whose radial extent is ∼20 AU in the same disk model. Scaling arguments show that the MRI turbulence in the e-heating zone should have a significantly lower saturation level. Submicron-sized grains in the e-heating zone are so negatively charged that their collisional growth is unlikely to occur. Our present model neglects ambipolar and Hall diffusion, but our estimate shows that ambipolar diffusion would also affect the MRI in the e-heating zone.

  17. The role of the corotation resonance in the secular evolution of disks of spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lépine, J. R. D.; Scarano, S., Jr.; Barros, D. A.; Junqueira, T. C.; Dias, W. S.; Andrievsky, S.

    2014-10-01

    The corotation resonance plays an important role in the evolution of the disks of spiral galaxies, and in particular, of our Galaxy. Its effect on the chemical abundance gradients is even a tool to estimate the age of the present spiral arm structure, which we find to be long-lived, contrary to a recent common belief. The metallicity gradients usually decrease in the inner regions and become flat or rising at larger radii. In several galaxies, including the Milky Way, one observes not only a change in the slope of the abundance gradient, but also an abrupt step in metallicity at corotation. This step is because the corotation resonance separates the disk of a galaxy in two regions (inside corotation and outside corotation) which are isolated one from the other, so that the two sides evolve in an independent way. The barrier between the two regions is the result of the flow of gas in opposite directions on the two sides and by the ring-shaped void of gas observed at corotation. We investigated a sample of galaxies, which have a known corotation radius, and for which there are measurements of abundance gradients of Oxygen available in the literature. A very good correlation is found between corotation radii and the radii at which there is a break in the slope of the gradients. Besides this, an independent effect of corotation is a minimum of star formation associated with the minimum velocity at which the interstellar gas feeds the spiral arms (seen as potential wells and star-formation machines). Still another effect is the scattering of stars by the resonance, which causes their migration to different galactic radii.

  18. Pressure Support in Galaxy Disks: Impact on Rotation Curves and Dark Matter Density Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Stilp, Adrienne M.

    2010-09-01

    Rotation curves constrain a galaxy's underlying mass density profile, under the assumption that the observed rotation produces a centripetal force that exactly balances the inward force of gravity. However, most rotation curves are measured using emission lines from gas, which can experience additional forces due to pressure. In realistic galaxy disks, the gas pressure declines with radius, providing additional radial support to the disk. The measured tangential rotation speed will therefore tend to lag the true circular velocity of a test particle. The gas pressure is dominated by turbulence, and we evaluate its likely amplitude from recent estimates of the gas velocity dispersion and surface density. We show that where the amplitude of the rotation curve is comparable to the characteristic velocities of the interstellar turbulence, pressure support may lead to underestimates of the mass density of the underlying dark matter halo and the inner slope of its density profile. These effects may be significant for galaxies with rotation speeds lsim75 km s-1 but are unlikely to be significant in higher-mass galaxies. We find that pressure support can be sustained over long timescales, because any reduction in support due to the conversion of gas into stars is compensated for by an inward flow of gas. However, we point to many uncertainties in assessing the importance of pressure support in real or simulated galaxies. Thus, while pressure support may help to alleviate possible tensions between rotation curve observations and ΛCDM on kiloparsec scales, it should not be viewed as a definitive solution at this time.

  19. PRESSURE SUPPORT IN GALAXY DISKS: IMPACT ON ROTATION CURVES AND DARK MATTER DENSITY PROFILES

    SciTech Connect

    Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Stilp, Adrienne M. E-mail: adrienne@astro.washington.ed

    2010-09-20

    Rotation curves constrain a galaxy's underlying mass density profile, under the assumption that the observed rotation produces a centripetal force that exactly balances the inward force of gravity. However, most rotation curves are measured using emission lines from gas, which can experience additional forces due to pressure. In realistic galaxy disks, the gas pressure declines with radius, providing additional radial support to the disk. The measured tangential rotation speed will therefore tend to lag the true circular velocity of a test particle. The gas pressure is dominated by turbulence, and we evaluate its likely amplitude from recent estimates of the gas velocity dispersion and surface density. We show that where the amplitude of the rotation curve is comparable to the characteristic velocities of the interstellar turbulence, pressure support may lead to underestimates of the mass density of the underlying dark matter halo and the inner slope of its density profile. These effects may be significant for galaxies with rotation speeds {approx}<75 km s{sup -1} but are unlikely to be significant in higher-mass galaxies. We find that pressure support can be sustained over long timescales, because any reduction in support due to the conversion of gas into stars is compensated for by an inward flow of gas. However, we point to many uncertainties in assessing the importance of pressure support in real or simulated galaxies. Thus, while pressure support may help to alleviate possible tensions between rotation curve observations and {Lambda}CDM on kiloparsec scales, it should not be viewed as a definitive solution at this time.

  20. Stellar Orbital Studies in Normal Spiral Galaxies: Effect of Spiral Arms on Disk Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Villegas, A.; Pichardo, B.; Moreno, E.

    2015-10-01

    We have built a family of non-axisymmetric potential models for normal non-barred spiral galaxies. For this purpose, a three-dimensional self-gravitating model of spiral arms (PERLAS) is used. We analyze the stellar dynamics on the disk plane, varying structural and dynamical parameters such as pitch angle, strength of spiral arms and angular speed. For the pitch angle, we found two limits. The first limit, based on ordered behavior, periodic orbit studies show that for pitch angles up to approximately 15{(°) }, 18{(°) }, and 20{(°) } for Sa, Sb and Sc galaxies, respectively, the spiral arms could be long-lasting structures. Beyond those limits, spiral arms may be explained as transient features rather than long-lasting large-scale structures. In a second limit, from a phase space orbital study based on chaotic behavior, we found that for pitch angles larger than ˜ 30{(°) }, ˜ 40{(°) } and ˜ 50{(°) } for Sa, Sb, and Sc galaxies, respectively, chaotic orbits dominate all the prograde phase space region that surrounds the periodic orbits sculpting the spiral arms, and can even destroy them. Finally, we studied orbital dynamics varying other parameters such as the pattern speed and the spiral arm mass; also we looked for restrictions for these parameters in different morphological types. In these studies we noticed that the effect of spiral arms on the disk dynamics, when we vary the pattern speed and mass, is strongly linked to the pitch angle.

  1. MISSING LENSED IMAGES AND THE GALAXY DISK MASS IN CXOCY J220132.8-320144

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jacqueline; Lee, Samuel K.; Schechter, Paul L.; Castander, Francisco-Javier; Maza, Jose

    2013-05-20

    The CXOCY J220132.8-320144 system consists of an edge-on spiral galaxy lensing a background quasar into two bright images. Previous efforts to constrain the mass distribution in the galaxy have suggested that at least one additional image must be present. These extra images may be hidden behind the disk which features a prominent dust lane. We present and analyze Hubble Space Telescope observations of the system. We do not detect any extra images, but the observations further narrow the observable parameters of the lens system. We explore a range of models to describe the mass distribution in the system and find that a variety of acceptable model fits exist. All plausible models require 2 mag of dust extinction in order to obscure extra images from detection, and some models may require an offset between the center of the galaxy and the center of the dark matter halo of 1 kpc. Currently unobserved images will be detectable by future James Webb Space Telescope observations and will provide strict constraints on the fraction of mass in the disk.

  2. Stars and Ionized Gas in the S0 Galaxy NGC 7743: An Inclined Large-scale Gaseous Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katkov, Ivan Yu.; Moiseev, Alexei V.; Sil'chenko, Olga K.

    2011-10-01

    We used deep, long-slit spectra and integral-field spectral data to study the stars, ionized gas kinematics, and stellar population properties in the lenticular barred galaxy NGC 7743. We show that ionized gas at distances larger than 1.5 kpc from the nucleus settles in the disk, which is significantly inclined toward the stellar disk of the galaxy. Making different assumptions about the geometry of the disks and including different sets of emission lines in the fitting, under the assumption of thin, flat-disk circular rotation, we obtain the full possible range of angles between the disks to be 34° ± 9° or 77° ± 9°. The most probable origin of the inclined disk is the external gas accretion from a satellite orbiting the host galaxy, with a corresponding angular momentum direction. The published data on the H I distribution around NGC 7743 suggest that the galaxy has a gas-rich environment. The emission-line ratio diagrams imply the domination of shock waves in the ionization state of the gaseous disk, whereas the contribution of photoionization from recent star formation seems to be negligible. In some parts of the disk, a difference between the velocities of the gas emitting from the forbidden lines and Balmer lines is detected. This may be caused by the mainly shock-excited inclined disk, whereas some fraction of the Balmer-line emission is produced by a small amount of gas excited by young stars in the main stellar disk of NGC 7743. In the circumnuclear region (R < 200 pc), some evidence of the active galactic nucleus jet's interaction with an ambient interstellar medium was found. Based on the observations collected with the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences, which is operated under the financial support of the Science Department of Russia (registration number 01-43).

  3. A 21-cm line study of NGC 5963, an SC galaxy with a low-surface brightness disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosma, A.; Athanassoula, E.; van der Hulst, J. M.

    1988-06-01

    Results are presented from a detailed 21-cm line study of the Sc galaxy NGC 5963. The extent of the H I emission is found to be roughly coincident with the optical image, the latter being of much lower surface brightness than normal for Sc galaxies. The velocity field shows little deviation from axial symmetry, and the derived rotation curve is typical for Sc galaxies about twice as bright as NGC 5963. A composite mass model is presented using the observed light distribution to calculate a rotation curve for the luminous part of the galaxy (assuming a constant M/L-ratio with radius); this calculated rotation curve is compared to the observed one to derive a rotation law for a dark halo. Comparison with Sc galaxies having normal disk surface brightnesses suggests that the halo in NGC 5963 is more concentrated than in normal Scs with similar rotation curves. The origin of the low surface brightness of the disk is discussed.

  4. Extragalactic archeology with the GHOSTS Survey. I. Age-resolved disk structure of nearby low-mass galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streich, David; de Jong, Roelof S.; Bailin, Jeremy; Bell, Eric F.; Holwerda, Benne W.; Minchev, Ivan; Monachesi, Antonela; Radburn-Smith, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: We study the individual evolution histories of three nearby low-mass edge-on galaxies (IC 5052, NGC 4244, and NGC 5023). Methods: Using resolved stellar populations, we constructed star count density maps for populations of different ages and analyzed the change of structural parameters with stellar age within each galaxy. Results: We do not detect a separate thick disk in any of the three galaxies, even though our observations cover a wider range in equivalent surface brightness than any integrated light study. While scale heights increase with age, each population can be well described by a single disk. Two of the galaxies contain a very weak additional component, which we identify as the faint halo. The mass of these faint halos is lower than 1% of the mass of the disk. The three galaxies show low vertical heating rates, which are much lower than the heating rate of the Milky Way. This indicates that heating agents, such as giant molecular clouds and spiral structure, are weak in low-mass galaxies. All populations in the three galaxies exhibit no or only little flaring. While this finding is consistent with previous integrated light studies, it poses strong constraints on galaxy simulations, where strong flaring is often found as a result of interactions or radial migration.

  5. Low-metallicity Young Clusters in the Outer Galaxy. II. Sh 2-208

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Chikako; Kobayashi, Naoto; Saito, Masao; Izumi, Natsuko

    2016-05-01

    We obtained deep near-infrared images of Sh 2-208, one of the lowest-metallicity H ii regions in the Galaxy, [O/H] = ‑0.8 dex. We detected a young cluster in the center of the H ii region with a limiting magnitude of K = 18.0 mag (10σ), which corresponds to a mass detection limit of ∼0.2 M⊙. This enables the comparison of star-forming properties under low metallicity with those of the solar neighborhood. We identified 89 cluster members. From the fitting of the K-band luminosity function (KLF), the age and distance of the cluster are estimated to be ∼0.5 Myr and ∼4 kpc, respectively. The estimated young age is consistent with the detection of strong CO emission in the cluster region and the estimated large extinction of cluster members (AV ∼ 4–25 mag). The observed KLF suggests that the underlying initial mass function (IMF) of the low-metallicity cluster is not significantly different from canonical IMFs in the solar neighborhood in terms of both high-mass slope and IMF peak (characteristic mass). Despite the very young age, the disk fraction of the cluster is estimated at only 27% ± 6%, which is significantly lower than those in the solar metallicity. Those results are similar to Sh 2-207, which is another star-forming region close to Sh 2-208 with a separation of 12 pc, suggesting that their star-forming activities in low-metallicity environments are essentially identical to those in the solar neighborhood, except for the disk dispersal timescale. From large-scale mid-infrared images, we suggest that sequential star formation is taking place in Sh 2-207, Sh 2-208, and the surrounding region, triggered by an expanding bubble with a ∼30 pc radius.

  6. LATE ORBITAL INSTABILITIES IN THE OUTER PLANETS INDUCED BY INTERACTION WITH A SELF-GRAVITATING PLANETESIMAL DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Levison, Harold F.; Nesvorny, David; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Tsiganis, Kleomenis; Gomes, Rodney

    2011-11-15

    We revisit the issue of the cause of the dynamical instability during the so-called Nice model, which describes the early dynamical evolution of the giant planets. In particular, we address the problem of the interaction of planets with a distant planetesimal disk in the time interval between the dispersal of the proto-solar nebula and the instability. In contrast to previous works, we assume that the inner edge of the planetesimal disk is several AUs beyond the orbit of the outermost planet, so that no close encounters between planets and planetesimals occur. Moreover, we model the disk's viscous stirring, induced by the presence of embedded Pluto-sized objects. The four outer planets are assumed to be initially locked in a multi-resonant state that most likely resulted from a preceding phase of gas-driven migration. We show that viscous stirring leads to an irreversible exchange of energy between a planet and a planetesimal disk even in the absence of close encounters between the planet and disk particles. The process is mainly driven by the most eccentric planet, which is the inner ice giant in the case studied here. In isolation, this would cause this ice giant to migrate inward. However, because it is locked in resonance with Saturn, its eccentricity increases due to adiabatic invariance. During this process, the system crosses many weak secular resonances-many of which can disrupt the mean motion resonance and make the planetary system unstable. We argue that this basic dynamical process would work in many generic multi-resonant systems-forcing a good fraction of them to become unstable. Because the energy exchange proceeds at a very slow pace, the instability manifests itself late, on a timescale consistent with the epoch of the late heavy bombardment ({approx}700 Myr). In the migration mechanism presented here, the instability time is much less sensitive to the properties of the planetesimal disk (particularly the location of its inner edge) than in the

  7. Carbon Star Survey in the Local Group. V. The Outer Disk of M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battinelli, Paolo; Demers, Serge; Letarte, Bruno

    2003-03-01

    We employ the CFH12K mosaic to identify carbon stars, using the R, I, CN, and TiO photometric technique, in a 2240 arcmin2 area, ranging from 17 to 30 kpc of the southwest disk of M31, barely reaching the edge of the observed H I disk. We found 945 C stars with =19.94 and σ=0.47. The surface density of C stars along the major axis of M31 follows an exponential profile with a scale length of 4.85+/-0.35 kpc, in agreement with adopted values for the scale length of the disk population. Our survey partially overlaps with the recently discovered G1 density enhancement by Ferguson et al. We confirm that no AGB star excess is detectable in the surveyed part of the clump. The C/M ratio, along the major axis, is derived over a distance range of 7 kpc. The strong C/M gradient seen contrasts with results of previous studies of the C stars in M31.

  8. FORMATION OF LATE-TYPE SPIRAL GALAXIES: GAS RETURN FROM STELLAR POPULATIONS REGULATES DISK DESTRUCTION AND BULGE GROWTH

    SciTech Connect

    Martig, Marie; Bournaud, Frederic

    2010-05-10

    Spiral galaxies have most of their stellar mass in a large rotating disk, and only a modest fraction in a central spheroidal bulge. This challenges present models of galaxy formation: galaxies form at the center of dark matter halos through a combination of hierarchical merging and gas accretion along cold streams. Cosmological simulations thus predict that galaxies rapidly grow their bulge through mergers and instabilities and end up with most of their mass in the bulge and an angular momentum much below the observed level, except in dwarf galaxies. We propose that the continuous return of gas by stellar populations over cosmic times could help to solve this issue. A population of stars formed at a given instant typically returns half of its initial mass in the form of gas over 10 billion years, and the process is not dominated by supernovae explosions but by the long-term mass-loss from low- and intermediate-mass stars. Using simulations of galaxy formation, we show that this gas recycling can strongly affect the structural evolution of massive galaxies, potentially solving the bulge fraction issue, as the bulge-to-disk ratio of a massive galaxy can be divided by a factor of 3. The continuous recycling of baryons through star formation and stellar mass loss helps the growth of disks and their survival to interactions and mergers. Instead of forming only early-type, spheroid-dominated galaxies (S0 and ellipticals), the standard cosmological model can successfully account for massive late-type, disk-dominated spiral galaxies (Sb-Sc).

  9. An X-Ray Reprocessing Model of Disk Thermal Emission in Type 1 Seyfert Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, James

    2002-06-01

    Using a geometry consisting of a hot central Comptonizing plasma surrounded by a thin accretion disk, we model the optical through hard X-ray spectral energy distributions of the type 1 Seyfert galaxies NGC 3516 and NGC 7469. As in the model proposed by Poutanen, Krolik, & Ryde for the X-ray binary Cyg X-1 and later applied to Seyfert galaxies by Zdziarski, Lubiński, & Smith, feedback between the radiation reprocessed by the disk and the thermal Comptonization emission from the hot central plasma plays a pivotal role in determining the X-ray spectrum and, as we show, the optical and ultraviolet spectra as well. Seemingly uncorrelated optical/UV and X-ray light curves, similar to those that have been observed from these objects can, in principle, be explained by variations in the size, shape, and temperature of the Comptonizing plasma. Furthermore, by positing a disk mass accretion rate that satisfies a condition for global energy balance between the thermal Comptonization luminosity and the power available from accretion, one can predict the spectral properties of the heretofore poorly measured hard X-ray continuum above ~50 keV in type 1 Seyfert galaxies. Conversely, forthcoming measurements of the hard X-ray continuum by more sensitive hard X-ray and soft γ-ray telescopes, such as those aboard the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory, in conjunction with simultaneous optical, UV, and soft X-ray monitoring, will allow the mass accretion rates to be directly constrained for these sources in the context of this model.

  10. The Recent Stellar Archeology of M31—The Nearest Red Disk Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidge, T. J.; McConnachie, A. W.; Fardal, M. A.; Fliri, J.; Valls-Gabaud, D.; Chapman, S. C.; Lewis, G. F.; Rich, R. M.

    2012-05-01

    We examine the star-forming history of the M31 disk during the past few hundred Myr. The luminosity functions (LFs) of main-sequence stars at distances R GC > 21 kpc (i.e., >4 disk scale lengths) are matched by models that assume a constant star formation rate (SFR). However, at smaller R GC the LFs suggest that during the past ~10 Myr the SFR was 2-3 times higher than during the preceding ~100 Myr. The rings of cool gas that harbor a significant fraction of the current star-forming activity are traced by stars with ages ~100 Myr, indicating that (1) these structures have ages of at least 100 Myr and (2) stars in these structures do not follow the same relation between age and random velocity as their counterparts throughout the disks of other spiral galaxies, probably due to the inherently narrow orbital angular momentum distribution of the giant molecular clouds in these structures. The distribution of evolved red stars is not azimuthally symmetric, in the sense that the projected density along the northeast segment of the major axis is roughly twice that on the opposite side of the galaxy. The northeast arm of the major axis thus appears to be a fossil star-forming area that dates to intermediate epochs. Such a structure may be the consequence of interactions with a companion galaxy. Based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii.

  11. An X-Ray Reprocessing Model of Disk Thermal Emission in Type 1 Seyfert Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, James; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Using a geometry consisting of a hot central Comptonizing plasma surrounded by a thin accretion disk, we model the optical through hard X-ray spectral energy distributions of the type 1 Seyfert. galaxies NGC 3516 and NGC 7469. As in the model proposed by Poutanen, Krolik, and Ryde for the X-ray binary Cygnus X-1 and later applied to Seyfert galaxies by Zdziarski, Lubifiski, and Smith, feedback between the radiation reprocessed by the disk and the thermal Comptonization emission from the hot central plasma plays a pivotal role in determining the X-ray spectrum, and as we show, the optical and ultraviolet spectra as well. Seemingly uncorrelated optical/UV and X-ray light curves, similar to those which have been observed from these objects can, in principle, be explained by variations in the size, shape, and temperature of the Comptonizing plasma. Furthermore, by positing a disk mass accretion rate which satisfies a condition for global energy balance between the thermal Comptonization luminosity and the power available from accretion, one can predict the spectral properties of the heretofore poorly measured hard X-ray continuum above approximately 50 keV in type 1 Seyfert galaxies. Conversely, forthcoming measurements of the hard X-ray continuum by more sensitive hard X-ray and soft gamma-ray telescopes, such as those aboard the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) in conjunction with simultaneous optical, UV, and soft X-ray monitoring, will allow the mass accretion rates to be directly constrained for these sources in the context of this model.

  12. Magnetic fields in halos of spiral galaxies and the interstellar disk-halo connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dettmar, Ralf-Jürgen

    2005-09-01

    Observations of magnetic fields in halos of edge-on disk galaxies are discussed in relation to the different gaseous phases of the interstellar medium. For this comparison the presence of diffuse ionized gas (DIG) is introduced as a valuable tracer for gaseous halos which are originating from the star-formation driven disk-halo connection of the interstellar medium. The distribution of extraplanar DIG correlates on local and global scales with cosmic rays and magnetic fields as inferred from observations of the non-thermal radio continuum radiation and its polarization. From the polarization a large scale and well ordered magnetic field in these gaseous halos can be deduced. These observations indicate the presence of physical processes which generate and maintain magnetic fields on galactic scales. The importance of differential rotation of the gaseous halos for such processes is briefly discussed and the possible influence of magnetic fields on the dynamics of dust particles is addressed.

  13. Morphological and Kinematic Properties of Disk Galaxies Perturbed by a Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, R.; Junqueira, S.

    2003-04-01

    We present detailed numerical N-body simulations of the dynamical interaction of disk galaxies embedded in a spherical halo of dark matter and an orbiting satellite, in order to study the relationship between the kinematics and the stellar distribution of the disk. The satellite is held on a fixed, coplanar, eccentric (e=1/3), or nearly circular (e=0.02) orbit. It is shown that the density wave mode m=1 has an average phase angle shift of about 30° from the positive tangential velocity wave mode m=1 but presents greater values just after the pericentric satellite passage. It is also shown that the density m=2 coincides (within 10° on average) with the positive tangential velocity wave mode m=2. The pattern speeds obtained from the density and the three velocity component distributions are the same. The asymmetry parameter (A) derived from the stellar distribution agrees with the asymmetry parameter derived from the velocity field. The A(180deg) mode is dominant in comparison to A(90deg) when we consider the center of mass of the disk. However, this behavior is reversed when we calculate the asymmetry using the center of density of the disk or center of maximum luminosity.

  14. Low-redshift Lyman-alpha absorption lines and the dark matter halos of disk galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloney, Philip

    1992-01-01

    Ultraviolet observations of the low-redshift quasar 3C 273 using the Hubble Space Telescope have revealed many more Lyman-alpha absorption lines than would be expected from extrapolation of the absorption systems seen toward QSOs at z about 2. It is shown here that these absorption lines can plausibly be produced by gas at large radii in the disks of spiral and irregular galaxies; the gas is confined by the dark matter halos and ionized and heated by the extragalactic radiation field. This scenario does not require the extragalactic ionizing radiation field to decline as rapidly with decreasing z as the QSO emissivity. Observations of Ly-alpha absorption through the halos of known galaxies at low redshift will constrain both the extragalactic background and the properties of galactic halos.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: XUV-Disk galaxies in the Local Universe (Thilker+, 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thilker, D. A.; Bianchi, L.; Meurer, G.; Gil de Paz, A.; Boissier, S.; Madore, B. F.; Boselli, A.; Ferguson, A. M. N.; Munoz-Mateos, J. C.; Madsen, G. J.; Hameed, S.; Overzier, R. A.; Forster, K.; Friedman, P. G.; Martin, D. C.; Morrissey, P.; Neff, S. G.; Schiminovich, D.; Seibert, M.; Small, T.; Wyder, T. K.; Donas, J.; Heckman, T. M.; Lee, Y.-W.; Milliard, B.; Rich, R. M.; Szalay, A. S.; Welsh, B. Y.; Yi, S. K.

    2009-05-01

    GALEX obtained FUV and NUV direct imaging observations of our sample targets during primary mission surveys, principally the Nearby Galaxy Survey (NGS; Bianchi et al. 2003, in The Local Group as an Astrophysical Laboratory, ed. M. Livio & T. Brown (Baltimore: STScI), 10) and Medium Imaging Survey (MIS; Martin et al., 2005ApJ...619L...1M). Second-generation Digitial Sky Survey (DSS-II) imaging data were used for compared GALEX imagery to the visible morphology of targets. We obtained Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR5 ugriz imagery of confirmed XUV-disk objects whenever possible. 2MASS Large Galaxy Atlas (LGA; Jarrett et al., 2003AJ....125..525J) was our preferred source for Ks data. (2 data files).

  16. Sharp edges to neutral hydrogen disks in galaxies and the extragalactic radiation field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloney, Philip

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that the very sharp truncation of the neutral hydrogen distribution seen in NGC 3198 (and probably M33) is well modeled as the result of ionization of the atomic gas by the extragalactic radiation field. Below a critical column density of about a few times 10 exp 19/sq cm the gas is dominantly ionized and undetectable in the 21-cm line. It is inferred from the photoionization models that the total disk gas distribution in NGC 3198 is actually fairly axisymmetric. The critical column density for ionization is not a strong function of galaxy mass or mass distribution; thus, all galaxies should show a cutoff at approximately the same column density. Specific models of 3198 suggest that the extragalactic ionizing photon flux is 5000-10,000 photons/sq cm s.

  17. Detail studies of the physical properties in the outer regions of galaxy clusters using Suzaku observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babyk, Yu. V.

    2016-06-01

    A detailed physical analysis of five nearby galaxy clusters using Suzaku observationsis presented. The low and stable level of the instrumental background at large radii facilitate the determination of the main physical characteristics in clusters at the virial radius. The temperatures, metal abundances, and entropy profiles have been constructed out to the outskirts of the clusters. The temperature profiles all display the same shape, with a negative gradient towards to the center and a flat outer plateau. The strong temperature gradients in the central parts of the clusters are usually associated with strong peaks of the surface brightness profiles. The temperature systematically decrease outward from the central regions, by a factor of three at and slightly beyond the cluster outskirts. The temperature profiles are compared with profiles predicted by N-body and hydrodynamical simulations obtained using several numerical algorithms. The slopes in the observed and simulated temperature profiles are consistent with each other in the cluster outskirts. The central regions of the clusters are characterized by low entropy and high metallicity. The possible influence of cool cores on the cluster outskirts is also discussed. The total mass profiles were determined using the observed gas-density and temperature profiles, assuming hydrostatic equilibriumand spherical symmetry. The gas-density profiles were fitted using an improved three-dimensional model to fit the inner and outer regions of the cluster independently. The total mass profiles were described using an NFW model out to R 200. The measurements show clear evidence for universality of the total mass distribution. The scaled mass profiles in units of R 200 and M 200 display a dispersion of ~15% at 0.1 R 200. The fraction of gas out to R 200 was also found.

  18. Stability of the Stellar Disks of Flat Galaxies. III. The Effect of Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griv, Evgeny; Peter, William

    1996-09-01

    According to observations, the occurrence of gravitational collisions in the disk of our own Galaxy is evidenced by the encounters between stars and giant molecular clouds. In the solar vicinity the timescale for encounter between stars and clouds is around t ~ 10^9^ yr. Because this timescale is much smaller than the age of the Galaxy T ~ 10^10^ yr, the theory of stability of the stellar disk has to be extended to include the effects of star-cloud gravitational encounters. In this paper, a method of investigating the small-amplitude oscillations and their stability of a collisional two-dimensional galactic disk is developed, through the studying of dispersion relations. A spatially inhomogeneous, differentially rotating disk is considered, with the property that the epicyclic frequency, as well as the angular velocity of rotation, greatly exceeds the frequency v_c_ ~ 1/t of binary collisions between particles. The resulting kinetic equation for the perturbed distribution function can be solved by successive approximations, neglecting the influence of star-cloud encounters on the equilibrium velocity distribution of stars in the zeroth-order approximation. Kinetic theory with the model Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collisional integral is used, so that the analysis is extended to regions of wavelengths and eigenfrequencies ω of oscillations inaccessible by the hydrodynamic approach developed by Lynden-Bell & Pringle and others. A general dispersion relation is obtained and analyzed in the different cases of weak, ω^2^ >> v_c_^2^, and strong collisions, ω^2^ << v_c_^2^. Using this dispersion relation, the effects of encounters on the dispersion laws both of Jeans and gradient perturbations are considered. The influence of particle encounters on the growth of the oscillating instability, studied in the first paper of the series, is investigated also.

  19. A Green Bank Telescope Search for Highly Extended HI Disks Around Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, H. Alyson; Bregman, Joel

    2015-08-01

    Recent UV absorption line studies suggest that a large fraction of missing baryons are in the warm ionized and neutral phases, with about half of Milky Way-mass galaxies containing absorption systems with HI column densities of 10^18 cm^-2 or greater. This HI gas, which would have been difficult to detect with previous instruments, could have enough mass to account for the missing baryons. The Green Bank Telescope (GBT) presents a unique opportunity to detect this emission. We present GBT results from a sample of ten nearby optically luminous spirals in search of these extended disks of low column density HI.

  20. The vertical disk structure of the edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 3079

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veilleux, S.; Bland-Hawthorn, Jonathan; Cecil, G.; Tully, R. B.

    1993-01-01

    NGC 3079 is an edge-on SB(s)c galaxy at a redshift of 1225 km/s relative to the Local Group. Earlier researchers found a spectacular 'figure-eight' radio structure aligned along the minor axis of the galaxy, centered on the nucleus, and extending 3 kpc above and below the plane. The geometry of this structure and the evidence of unusually high nuclear gas velocities suggest that a wind-type outflow from the nucleus is taking place. The disk of NGC 3079 is also remarkable: it is extremely rich in H 2 regions and is the only unambiguous example of a galaxy outside M31 and our own Galaxy to exhibit 'Heiles-like' shells. Other researchers have also identified a nebulosity with a ragged X-shaped morphology formed by a system of lumpy filaments with individual lengths of 3 - 5 kpc. They suggest that this material is ambient halo gas entrained into the boundary layers of the nuclear outflow. The complex structure of the line emission in NGC 3079 makes this object an ideal target for an imaging spectroscopic study. The present paper reports the preliminary results of such a study.

  1. A Backwards Approach to the Formation of Disk Galaxies. I. Stellar and Gas Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreras, Ignacio; Silk, Joseph

    2001-08-01

    A simple chemical enrichment code is described where the two basic mechanisms driving the evolution of the ages and metallicities of the stellar populations are the star formation efficiency and the fraction of gas ejected from the galaxy. Using the observed Tully-Fisher relation in different passbands as a constraint, it is found that a steep correlation between the maximum disk rotational velocity (vROT) and star formation efficiency (Ceff) must exist-Ceff~v4ROT-either for a linear or a quadratic Schmidt law. Outflows do not play a major role. This result is in contrast with what we have found for early-type systems, where the Faber-Jackson constraint in different bands allows a significant range of outflows and requires a large star formation efficiency regardless of galaxy mass. The extremely low efficiencies found at low masses translate into a large spread in the distribution of stellar ages in these systems, as well as a large gas mass fraction independently of the star formation law. The model predictions are consistent with the star formation rates in low-mass local galaxies. However, our predictions for gas mass are in apparent conflict with the estimates of atomic hydrogen content observed through the flux of the 21 cm line of H I. The presence of large masses of cold molecular hydrogen-especially in systems with low mass and metallicity-is predicted, up to ratios M(H2)/M(H I)~4, in agreement with a recent tentative detection of warm H2. The redshift evolution of disk galaxies is explored, showing that a significant change in the slope of the Tully-Fisher relation (L~vγROT) is expected because of the different age distributions of the stellar components in high and low-mass disk galaxies. The slope measured in the rest frame B,K-bands is found to change from γB~3,γK~4 at z=0 up to ~4.5, 5 at z~1, with a slight dependence on formation redshift.

  2. X-ray observations of the starburst galaxy NGC 253 --- II. Extended emission from hot gas in the nuclear area, disk, and halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietsch, W.; Vogler, A.; Klein, U.; Zinnecker, H.

    2000-08-01

    Spatial and spectral analysis of deep ROSAT HRI and PSPC observations of the near edge-on starburst galaxy NGC 253 reveal diffuse soft X-ray emission, which contributes 80% to its total X-ray luminosity (LX = 5 1039 erg s-1, corrected for foreground absorption). The nuclear area, disk, and halo contribution to the luminosity is about equal. The starburst nucleus itself is highly absorbed and not visible in the ROSAT band. The emission from the nuclear area stems from a heavily absorbed source with an extent of 250 pc (FWHM) about 100 pc above the nucleus along the SE minor axis ("nuclear source", X34), and the "X-ray plume". The nuclear source is best described as having a thermal bremsstrahlung spectrum with a temperature of T = 1.2 keV (NH = 3 1021 cm-2) and LXexgal = 3 1038 erg s-1 (corrected for Galactic foreground absorption). The spectrum of the hollow-cone shaped plume (opening angle of 32̂ and extent of ~ 700 pc along the SE minor axis) is best modeled by a composite of a thermal bremsstrahlung (NH = 3 1020 cm-2, T = 1.2 keV, LXexgal = 4.6 1038 erg s-1) and a thin thermal plasma (Galactic foreground absorption, T = 0.33 keV, LXexgal = 4 1038 erg s-1). The diffuse nuclear emission components trace interactions between the galactic super-wind emitted by the starburst nucleus, and the dense interstellar medium of the disk. Diffuse emission from the disk is heavily absorbed and follows the spiral structure. It can be described by a thin thermal plasma spectrum (T = 0.7 keV, intrinsic luminosity LXintr = 1.2 1039 erg s-1), and most likely reflects a mixture of sources (X-ray binaries, supernova remnants, and emission from H II regions) and the hot interstellar medium. The surface brightness profile reveals a bright inner and a fainter outer component along the major axis with extents of ∓3.4 kpc and ∓7.5 kpc. We analysed the total halo emission separated into two geometrical areas; the "corona" (scale height ~ 1 kpc) and the "outer halo". The coronal

  3. Astrochemistry and star formation in nearby galaxies: from galaxy disks to hot nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalto, S.

    2016-05-01

    Studying the molecular phase of the interstellar medium in galaxies is fundamental for the understanding of the onset and evolution of compact and extended star formation, and of the growth of supermassive black holes. Molecular line emission is an excellent tracer of chemical, physical and dynamical conditions in the cold neutral gas. Key molecules in extragalactic studies are e.g. HCN, HCO+, HC3N, SiO, CH3OH, H2O. Furthermore, we can use IR excited molecular emission to probe the very inner regions of luminous infrared galaxies allowing us to get past the optically thick dust barrier of the compact obscured nuclei where lines of CO, HCN and HCO+ in their vibrational ground state (ν=0) may be self-absorbed. Finally, molecular outflows and their chemistry are briefly discussed - including new ALMA results on for example the outflow of the lenticular galaxy NGC1377 and a study of the chemistry of the outflow of the quasar Mrk231.

  4. No more active galactic nuclei in clumpy disks than in smooth galaxies at z ∼ 2 in CANDELS/3D-HST

    SciTech Connect

    Trump, Jonathan R.; Luo, Bin; Brandt, W. N.; Barro, Guillermo; Guo, Yicheng; Koo, David C.; Faber, S. M.; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Grogin, Norman A.; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Bell, Eric F.; Dekel, Avishai; Hopkins, Philip F.; Kocevski, Dale D.; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Momcheva, Ivelina; and others

    2014-10-01

    We use CANDELS imaging, 3D-HST spectroscopy, and Chandra X-ray data to investigate if active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are preferentially fueled by violent disk instabilities funneling gas into galaxy centers at 1.3 < z < 2.4. We select galaxies undergoing gravitational instabilities using the number of clumps and degree of patchiness as proxies. The CANDELS visual classification system is used to identify 44 clumpy disk galaxies, along with mass-matched comparison samples of smooth and intermediate morphology galaxies. We note that despite being mass-matched and having similar star formation rates, the smoother galaxies tend to be smaller disks with more prominent bulges compared to the clumpy galaxies. The lack of smooth extended disks is probably a general feature of the z ∼ 2 galaxy population, and means we cannot directly compare with the clumpy and smooth extended disks observed at lower redshift. We find that z ∼ 2 clumpy galaxies have slightly enhanced AGN fractions selected by integrated line ratios (in the mass-excitation method), but the spatially resolved line ratios indicate this is likely due to extended phenomena rather than nuclear AGNs. Meanwhile, the X-ray data show that clumpy, smooth, and intermediate galaxies have nearly indistinguishable AGN fractions derived from both individual detections and stacked non-detections. The data demonstrate that AGN fueling modes at z ∼ 1.85—whether violent disk instabilities or secular processes—are as efficient in smooth galaxies as they are in clumpy galaxies.

  5. Evolution of blue E/S0 galaxies from z ~ 1: merger remnants or disk-rebuilding galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huertas-Company, M.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Tresse, L.; Bolzonella, M.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Maier, C.

    2010-06-01

    Context. Studying outliers from the bimodal distribution of galaxies in the color-mass space, such as morphological early-type galaxies residing in the blue cloud (blue E/S0s), can help for better understanding the physical mechanisms that lead galaxy migrations in this space. Aims: In this paper we try to bring new clues to studying the evolution of the properties of a significant sample of blue E/S0 galaxies in the COSMOS field. Methods: We define blue E/S0 galaxies as objects having a clear early-type morphology on the HST/ACS images (according to our automated classification scheme galSVM) but with a blue rest-frame color (defined by using the SED best-fit template on the COSMOS primary photometric catalogs). Combining these two measurements with spectroscopic redshifts from the zCOSMOS 10k release, we isolated 210 IAB < 22 blue early-type galaxies with M_*/M_⊙ > 1010 in three redshift bins (0.2 < z < 0.55, 0.55 < z < 0.8, 0.8 < z < 1.4) and studied the evolution of their properties (number density, SFR, morphology, size). Results: The threshold mass (Mt), defined at z = 0 in previous studies as the mass below which the population of blue early-type galaxies starts to be abundant relative to passive E/S0s, evolves from log (M_*/M_⊙) ~ 10.1 ± 0.35 at z ~ 0.3 to log (M_*/M_⊙) ~ 10.9 ± 0.35 at z ~ 1. Interestingly, it follows the evolution of the crossover mass between the early and late type populations (bimodality mass) indicating that the abundance of blue E/S0 is another measure of the downsizing effect in the build-up of the red sequence. There seems to be a turn-over mass in the nature of blue E/S0 galaxies. Above log (M_*/M_⊙) ~ 10.8 blue E/S0 resemble to merger remnants probably migrating to the red sequence on a time scale of ˜3 Gyr. Below this mass, they seem to be closer to normal late-type galaxies, as if they were the result of minor mergers that triggered the central star formation and built a central bulge component or were (re)building a

  6. GRAVITATIONAL INSTABILITIES IN TWO-COMPONENT GALAXY DISKS WITH GAS DISSIPATION

    SciTech Connect

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.

    2011-08-10

    Growth rates for gravitational instabilities in a thick disk of gas and stars are determined for a turbulent gas that dissipates on the local crossing time. The scale heights are derived from vertical equilibrium. The accuracy of the usual thickness correction, (1 + kH){sup -1}, is better than 6% in the growth rate when compared to exact integrations for the gravitational acceleration in the disk. Gas dissipation extends the instability to small scales, removing the minimum Jeans length. This makes infinitesimally thin disks unstable for all Toomre-Q values and reasonably thick disks stable at high Q primarily because of thickness effects. The conventional gas+star threshold, Q{sub tot}, increases from {approx}1 without dissipation to 2 or 3 when dissipation has a rate equal to the crossing rate over a perturbation scale. Observations of Q{sub tot} {approx} 2-3 and the presence of supersonic turbulence suggest that disks are unstable over a wide range of scales. Such instabilities drive spiral structure if there is shear and clumpy structure if shear is weak; they may dominate the generation of turbulence. Feedback regulation of Q{sub tot} is complex because the stellar component does not cool; the range of spiral strengths from multiple arm to flocculent galaxies suggests that feedback is weak. Gravitational instabilities may have a connection to star formation even when the star formation rate scales directly with the molecular mass because the instabilities return dispersed gas to molecular clouds and complete the cycle of cloud formation and destruction. The mass flow to dense clouds by instabilities can be 10 times larger than the star formation rate.

  7. HALO GAS AND GALAXY DISK KINEMATICS OF A VOLUME-LIMITED SAMPLE OF Mg II ABSORPTION-SELECTED GALAXIES AT z {approx} 0.1

    SciTech Connect

    Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Cooke, Jeff; Churchill, Christopher W.; Barton, Elizabeth J. E-mail: jcooke@astro.swin.edu.au E-mail: ebarton@uci.edu

    2011-06-01

    We have directly compared Mg II halo gas kinematics to the rotation velocities derived from emission/absorption lines of the associated host galaxies. Our 0.096 {<=} z {<=} 0.148 volume-limited sample comprises 13 {approx}L{sub *} galaxies, with impact parameters of 12-90 kpc from background quasar sight lines, associated with 11 Mg II absorption systems with Mg II equivalent widths 0.3 A {<=} W{sub r} (2796) {<=} 2.3 A. For only 5/13 galaxies, the absorption resides to one side of the galaxy systemic velocity and trends to align with one side of the galaxy rotation curve. The remainder have absorption that spans both sides of the galaxy systemic velocity. These results differ from those at z {approx} 0.5, where 74% of the galaxies have absorption residing to one side of the galaxy systemic velocity. For all the z {approx} 0.1 systems, simple extended disk-like rotation models fail to reproduce the full Mg II velocity spread, implying that other dynamical processes contribute to the Mg II kinematics. In fact 55% of the galaxies are 'counter-rotating' with respect to the bulk of the Mg II absorption. These Mg II host galaxies are isolated, have low star formation rates (SFRs) in their central regions ({approx}< 1 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}), and SFRs per unit area well below those measured for galaxies with strong winds. The galaxy Na ID (stellar+ISM) and Mg Ib (stellar) absorption line ratios are consistent with a predominately stellar origin, implying kinematically quiescent interstellar media. These facts suggest that the kinematics of the Mg II absorption halos for our sample of galaxies are not influenced by galaxy-galaxy environmental effects, nor by winds intrinsic to the host galaxies. For these low-redshift galaxies, we favor a scenario in which infalling gas accretion provides a gas reservoir for low-to-moderate SFRs and disk/halo processes.

  8. GALAXY FORMATION IN HEAVILY OVERDENSE REGIONS AT z {approx} 10: THE PREVALENCE OF DISKS IN MASSIVE HALOS

    SciTech Connect

    Romano-Diaz, Emilio; Choi, Jun-Hwan; Shlosman, Isaac; Trenti, Michele

    2011-09-10

    Using a high-resolution cosmological numerical simulation, we have analyzed the evolution of galaxies at z {approx} 10 in a highly overdense region of the universe. These objects could represent the high-redshift galaxies recently observed by the Hubble's Wide Field Camera 3 and could as well be possible precursors of QSOs at z {approx} 6-7. To overcome the sampling and resolution problems in cosmological simulations of these rare regions, we have used the constrained realizations method. Our main result for z {approx} 10 shows the high-resolution central region of 3.5 h {sup -1} Mpc radius in comoving coordinates being completely dominated by disk galaxies in the total mass range of {approx}> 10{sup 9} h {sup -1} M{sub sun}. We have verified that the gaseous and stellar disks we identify are robust morphological features, capable of surviving the ongoing merger process at these redshifts. Below this mass range, we find a sharp decline in the disk fraction to negligible numbers. At this redshift, the disks appear to be gas-rich compared to z = 0, and the dark matter halos baryon-rich, by a factor of {approx}2-3 above the average fraction of baryons in the universe. The dominance of disk galaxies in the high-density peaks during the epoch of re-ionization is contrary to the morphology-density trend observed at low redshifts.

  9. How does the mass transport in disk galaxy models influence the character of orbits?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zotos, Euaggelos E.

    We explore the regular or chaotic nature of orbits of stars moving in the meridional (R,z) plane of an axially symmetric time-dependent disk galaxy model with a central, spherically symmetric nucleus. In particular, mass is linearly transported from the disk to the galactic nucleus, in order to mimic, in a way, the case of self-consistent interactions of an actual N-body simulation. We thus try to unveil the influence of this mass transportation on the different families of orbits of stars by monitoring how the percentage of chaotic orbits, as well as the percentages of orbits of the main regular resonant families, evolve as the galaxy develops a dense and massive nucleus in its core. The SALI method is applied to samples of orbits in order to distinguish safely between ordered and chaotic motion. In addition, a method based on the concept of spectral dynamics is used for identifying the various families of regular orbits and also for recognizing the secondary resonances that bifurcate from them. Our computations strongly suggest that the amount of the observed chaos is substantially increased as the nucleus becomes more massive. Furthermore, extensive numerical calculations indicate that there are orbits which change their nature from regular to chaotic and vice versa and also orbits which maintain their orbital character during the galactic evolution. The present outcomes are compared to earlier related work.

  10. Spectroscopic identification of 25 disk galaxy candidate gravitational lenses in the SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Focardi, P.; Rossetti, E.

    2015-09-01

    Context. Galaxy-scale gravitational lenses are powerful tools, which can be used to address major astrophysical questions that are still open. They can be identified either through imaging or through spectroscopy, which is less efficient than imaging but offers the major advantage of having both source and deflector red shift previously measured at discovery. Spectroscopic identification requires huge data sets of high spectral quality, such as the SDSS, and has so far focused on early-type galaxies, as the most massive galaxies are found among them. Aims: We aimed to perform spectroscopic identification of disk galaxies acting as gravitational lenses. Methods: We have selected about 300 000 galaxy spectra with EW(Hα) ≤-10 Å from the SDSS DR 8. On these spectra, we ran our original code RES, which is a fast, reliable tool able to provide a red-shift measure and to identify discordant red-shift systems if present. We have required RES to identify only systems based on a minimum number of four emission lines. We have inspected all the (54) SDSS images of the double z systems identified by RES and discarded systems for which z duplicity could be easily ascribed to the presence of two distinct objects. The remaining 25 systems, for which double z is very likely to be due to the gravitational lensing phenomenon, constitute our sample. Results: For each gravitational lens candidate system, we provide SDSS identification and image emission lines detected by RES and activity classification, when derivable. The disky nature of our candidate lenses is confirmed by their images, stellar mass estimates, g - r rest-frame colours and occurrence of star burst phenomena.

  11. CONNECTION BETWEEN THE ACCRETION DISK AND JET IN THE RADIO GALAXY 3C 111

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Ritaban; Marscher, Alan P.; Jorstad, Svetlana G.; Harrison, Brandon; Agudo, Ivan; Taylor, Brian W.; Markowitz, Alex; Rivers, Elizabeth; Rothschild, Richard E.; McHardy, Ian M.; Aller, Margo F.; Aller, Hugh D.; Laehteenmaeki, Anne; Tornikoski, Merja; Gomez, Jose L.; Gurwell, Mark

    2011-06-10

    We present the results of extensive multi-frequency monitoring of the radio galaxy 3C 111 between 2004 and 2010 at X-ray (2.4-10 keV), optical (R band), and radio (14.5, 37, and 230 GHz) wave bands, as well as multi-epoch imaging with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 43 GHz. Over the six years of observation, significant dips in the X-ray light curve are followed by ejections of bright superluminal knots in the VLBA images. This shows a clear connection between the radiative state near the black hole, where the X-rays are produced, and events in the jet. The X-ray continuum flux and Fe line intensity are strongly correlated, with a time lag shorter than 90 days and consistent with zero. This implies that the Fe line is generated within 90 lt-day of the source of the X-ray continuum. The power spectral density function of X-ray variations contains a break, with a steeper slope at shorter timescales. The break timescale of 13{sup +12}{sub -6} days is commensurate with scaling according to the mass of the central black hole based on observations of Seyfert galaxies and black hole X-ray binaries (BHXRBs). The data are consistent with the standard paradigm, in which the X-rays are predominantly produced by inverse Compton scattering of thermal optical/UV seed photons from the accretion disk by a distribution of hot electrons-the corona-situated near the disk. Most of the optical emission is generated in the accretion disk due to reprocessing of the X-ray emission. The relationships that we have uncovered between the accretion disk and the jet in 3C 111, as well as in the Fanaroff-Riley class I radio galaxy 3C 120 in a previous paper, support the paradigm that active galactic nuclei and Galactic BHXRBs are fundamentally similar, with characteristic time and size scales proportional to the mass of the central black hole.

  12. Disk-Jet Connection in the Radio Galaxy 3C 120

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Ritaban; Marscher, Alan P.; Jorstad, Svetlana G.; Olmstead, Alice R.; McHardy, Ian M.; Aller, Margo F.; Aller, Hugh D.; Lähteenmäki, Anne; Tornikoski, Merja; Hovatta, Talvikki; Marshall, Kevin; Miller, H. Richard; Ryle, Wesley T.; Chicka, Benjamin; Benker, A. J.; Bottorff, Mark C.; Brokofsky, David; Campbell, Jeffrey S.; Chonis, Taylor S.; Gaskell, C. Martin; Gaynullina, Evelina R.; Grankin, Konstantin N.; Hedrick, Cecelia H.; Ibrahimov, Mansur A.; Klimek, Elizabeth S.; Kruse, Amanda K.; Masatoshi, Shoji; Miller, Thomas R.; Pan, Hong-Jian; Petersen, Eric A.; Peterson, Bradley W.; Shen, Zhiqiang; Strel'nikov, Dmitriy V.; Tao, Jun; Watkins, Aaron E.; Wheeler, Kathleen

    2009-10-01

    We present the results of extensive multi-frequency monitoring of the radio galaxy 3C 120 between 2002 and 2007 at X-ray (2-10 keV), optical (R and V bands), and radio (14.5 and 37 GHz) wave bands, as well as imaging with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 43 GHz. Over the 5 yr of observation, significant dips in the X-ray light curve are followed by ejections of bright superluminal knots in the VLBA images. Consistent with this, the X-ray flux and 37 GHz flux are anti-correlated with X-ray leading the radio variations. Furthermore, the total radiative output of a radio flare is related to the equivalent width of the corresponding X-ray dip. This implies that, in this radio galaxy, the radiative state of accretion disk plus corona system, where the X-rays are produced, has a direct effect on the events in the jet, where the radio emission originates. The X-ray power spectral density of 3C 120 shows a break, with steeper slope at shorter timescale and the break timescale is commensurate with the mass of the central black hole (BH) based on observations of Seyfert galaxies and black hole X-ray binaries (BHXRBs). These findings provide support for the paradigm that BHXRBs and both radio-loud and radio-quiet active galactic nuclei are fundamentally similar systems, with characteristic time and size scales linearly proportional to the mass of the central BH. The X-ray and optical variations are strongly correlated in 3C 120, which implies that the optical emission in this object arises from the same general region as the X-rays, i.e., in the accretion disk-corona system. We numerically model multi-wavelength light curves of 3C 120 from such a system with the optical-UV emission produced in the disk and the X-rays generated by scattering of thermal photons by hot electrons in the corona. From the comparison of the temporal properties of the model light curves to that of the observed variability, we constrain the physical size of the corona and the distances of the

  13. EVIDENCE FOR A CLUMPY, ROTATING GAS DISK IN A SUBMILLIMETER GALAXY AT z = 4

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, J. A.; Walter, F.; Carilli, C. L.; De Blok, W. J. G.; Riechers, D.; Daddi, E.

    2012-11-20

    We present Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array observations of the CO(2-1) emission in the z = 4.05 submillimeter galaxy (SMG) GN20. These high-resolution data allow us to image the molecular gas at 1.3 kpc resolution just 1.6 Gyr after the big bang. The data reveal a clumpy, extended gas reservoir, 14 {+-} 4 kpc in diameter, in unprecedented detail. A dynamical analysis shows that the data are consistent with a rotating disk of total dynamical mass 5.4 {+-} 2.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} M {sub Sun }. We use this dynamical mass estimate to constrain the CO-to-H{sub 2} mass conversion factor ({alpha}{sub CO}), finding {alpha}{sub CO} = 1.1 {+-} 0.6 M {sub Sun }(K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}){sup -1}. We identify five distinct molecular gas clumps in the disk of GN20 with masses a few percent of the total gas mass, brightness temperatures of 16-31K, and surface densities of >3200-4500 Multiplication-Sign ({alpha}{sub CO}/0.8) M {sub Sun} pc{sup -2}. Virial mass estimates indicate they could be self-gravitating, and we constrain their CO-to-H{sub 2} mass conversion factor to be <0.2-0.7 M {sub Sun }(K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}){sup -1}. A multiwavelength comparison demonstrates that the molecular gas is concentrated in a region of the galaxy that is heavily obscured in the rest-frame UV/optical. We investigate the spatially resolved gas excitation and find that the CO(6-5)/CO(2-1) ratio is constant with radius, consistent with star formation occurring over a large portion of the disk. We discuss the implications of our results in the context of different fueling scenarios for SMGs.

  14. Indications of M-Dwarf Deficits in the Halo and Thick Disk of the Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konishi, Mihoko; Shibai, Hiroshi; Sumi, Takahiro; Fukagawa, Misato; Matsuo, Taro; Samland, Matthias S.; Yamamoto, Kodai; Sudo, Jun; Itoh, Yoichi; Arimoto, Nubuo; Kajisawa, Masaru; Lyu, Abe; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D.; Carson, Joseph; Currie, Thayne; Egner, Sebastian E.; Feldt, Markus; Goto, Miwa; Grady, Carol A.; Oliver, Guyon; Hashimoto, Jun; Hayano, Yutaka; Hayashi, Masahiko; Hayashi, Saeko S.; Henning, Thomas; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Ishii, Miki; Iye, Masanori; Janson, Markus; Kandori, Ryo; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kudo,Tomoyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Kwon, Jungmi; McElwain, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    We compared the number of faint stars detected in deep survey fields with the current stellar distribution model of the Galaxy and found that the detected number in the H band is significantly smaller than the predicted number. This indicates that M-dwarfs, the major component, are fewer in the halo and the thick disk. We used archived data of several surveys in both the north and south field of GOODS (Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey), MODS in GOODS-N, and ERS and CANDELS in GOODS-S. The number density of M-dwarfs in the halo has to be 20 +/- 13% relative to that in the solar vicinity, in order for the detected number of stars fainter than 20.5 mag in the H band to match with the predicted value from the model. In the thick disk, the number density of M-dwarfs must be reduced (52 +/- 13%) or the scale height must be decreased (approximately 600 pc). Alternatively, overall fractions of the halo and thick disks can be significantly reduced to achieve the same effect, because our sample mainly consists of faint M-dwarfs. Our results imply that the M-dwarf population in regions distant from the Galactic plane is significantly smaller than previously thought. We then discussed the implications this has on the suitability of the model predictions for the prediction of non-companion faint stars in direct imaging extrasolar planet surveys by using the best-fit number densities.

  15. Indications of M-Dwarf Deficits in the Halo and Thick Disk of the Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konishi, Mihoko; Shibai, Hiroshi; Sumi, Takahiro; Fukagawa, Misato; Matsuo, Taro; Samland, Matthias S.; Yamamoto, Kodai; Sudo, Jun; Itoh, Yoichi; Arimoto, Nobuo; Kajisawa, Masaru; Abe, Lyu; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D.; Carson, Joseph; Currie, Thayne; Egner, Sebastian E.; Feldt, Marcus; Goto, Miwa; Grady, Carol A.; Guyon, Oliver; Hashimoto, Jun; Hayano, Yutaka; Hayashi, Masahiko; McElwain, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    We compared the number of faint stars detected in deep survey fields with the current stellar distribution model of the Galaxy and found that the detected number in the H band is significantly smaller than the predicted number. This indicates that M-dwarfs, the major component, are fewer in the halo and the thick disk. We used archived data of several surveys in both the north and south field of GOODS (Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey), MODS in GOODS-N, and ERS and CANDELS in GOODS-S. The number density of M-dwarfs in the halo has to be 20+/-13% relative to that in the solar vicinity, in order for the detected number of stars fainter than 20.5 mag in the H band to match with the predicted value from the model. In the thick disk, the number density of M-dwarfs must be reduced (52+/-13%) or the scale height must be decreased ( approx. 600 pc). Alternatively, overall fractions of the halo and thick disks can be significantly reduced to achieve the same effect, because our sample mainly consists of faint M-dwarfs. Our results imply that the M-dwarf population in regions distant from the Galactic plane is significantly smaller than previously thought. We then discussed the implications this has on the suitability of the model predictions for the prediction of non-companion faint stars in direct imaging extrasolar planet surveys by using the best-fit number densities.

  16. A New Outer Galaxy Molecular Cloud Catalog: Applications to Galactic Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerton, C. R.; Brunt, C. M.; Pomerleau, C.

    2001-12-01

    We have generated a new molecular cloud catalog from a reprocessed version of the Five College Radio Astronomy (FCRAO) Observatory Outer Galaxy Survey (OGS) of 12CO (J=1--0) emission. The catalog has been used to develop a technique that uses the observed angular size-linewidth relation (ASLWR) as a distance indicator to molecular cloud ensembles. The new technique is a promising means to map out the large-scale structure of our Galaxy using the new high spatial dynamic range CO surveys currently available. The catalog was created using a two-stage object-identification algorithm. We first identified contiguous emission structures of a specified minimum number of pixels above a specified temperature threshold. Each structure so defined was then examined and localized emission enhancements within each structure were identified as separate objects. The resulting cloud catalog, contains basic data on 14595 objects. From the OGS we identified twenty-three cloud ensembles. For each, bisector fits to angular size vs. linewidth plots were made. The fits vary in a systematic way that allows a calibration of the fit parameters with distance to be made. Our derived distances to the ensembles are consistent with the distance to the Perseus Arm, and the accurate radial velocity measurements available from the same data are in accord with the known non-circular motions at the location of the Perseus Arm. The ASLWR method was also successfully applied to data from the Boston University/FCRAO Galactic Ring Survey (GRS) of 13CO(J=1--0) emission. Based upon our experience with the GRS and OGS, the ASLWR technique should be usable in any data set with sufficient spatial dynamic range to allow it to be properly calibrated. C.P. participated in this study through the Women in Engineering and Science (WES) program of NRC Canada. The Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory is a National Facility operated by the National Research Council. The Canadian Galactic Plane Survey is a Canadian

  17. Star formation activity in spiral galaxy disks and the properties of radio halos: Observational evidence for a direct dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahlem, Michael; Lisenfeld, Ute; Golla, Gotz

    1995-01-01

    In this article we address observationally the questions: how does star formation (SF) in the disks of galaxies lead to the creation of radio halos, and what minimum energy input into the interstellar medium (ISM) is needed to facilitate this? For the investigation we use a sample of five edge-on galaxies exhibiting radio continuum emmission in their halos and enhanced SF spread over large parts of their disks. In a detailed study of the two galaxies in our sample for which we have the best data, NGC 891 and NGC 4631, we show that the radio halos cut off abruptly at galactocentric radii smaller than those of the underlying thin radio disks. Our most important result is that the halo cutoffs are spatially coincident with the radii where the SF activity in the underlying disks drops sharply. The difference in radius of the emission distributions tracing ongoing SF in the disks (IRAS 50 micrometers, H alpha) versus that of the nonthermal radio continuum thin disks (tracing the distribution of cosmic-ray (CR) electrons) is typically a few kpc. This difference in extent is caused by CR diffusion. We have measured the CR diffusion coefficients in the thin disks of both NGC 891 and NGC 4631. For radial diffusion of CR electrons within the galactic disks the values are D(sub r) = 1.1-2.5 x 10 (exp 29) sq cm/s (NGC 4631) and D(sub r) = 1.2 x 10(exp 29) sq cm/s (NGC 891). For motions in the z-direction in areas within the thin disks where no outflows occur, we derive a firm upper limit of D(sub z) less than or equal to 0.2 x 10(exp 28) sq cm/s for NGC 891. The value for NGC 4631 is D(sub z = 1.4 x 10 (exp 28) sq cm/s. The other three galaxies in our sample, NGC 3044, NGC 4666, and NGC 5775 show (at the sensitivity of our data) less extended, more filamentary radio halos. Isolates spurs or filaments of nonthermal radio continuum emission in their halos are traced only above the most actively star-forming regions in the disks. This, in conjuction with the results obtained for

  18. The connection between inner and outer debris disks probed by infrared interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Absil, O.; Defrère, D.; Mollier, B.; Di Folco, E.; Augereau, J.-C.; Coudé du Foresto, V.; Le Bouquin, J.-B.; Mérand, A.

    2012-03-01

    The far-infrared surveys of nearby main sequence stars performed since the launch of IRAS have shown that a significant fraction of main sequence stars are surrounded by cold dust populations. These surveys are now culminating with the the DUNES and DEBRIS key projects of the Herschel Space Observatory, which is more sensitive than ever and is able to detect cold dust populations with densities similar to that of the solar system Kuiper belt. However, little is known about the occurence of warm dust populations, the equivalent of our zodiacal cloud. Since 2005, high-precision infrared interferometers have opened a new way to directly resolve these exozodiacal dust populations. Interferometric observations enable to reach dynamic ranges (larger than 100:1) that are generally not achievable with classical spectro-photometric observations. We are currently carrying out a survey to characterise the hot dust populations around main sequence stars. The first results of this survey, performed on the CHARA array with the FLUOR instrument, will be presented in this talk. The results are based on a magnitude-limited sample of stars surrounded by cold dust and on an equivalent sample of stars showing no cold dust emission. The statistics for the occurence of bright exozodiacal disks will be presented, and compared with the Spitzer and Herschel results. The possible (dynamical) connections between the two populations will be discussed. We will also review the results obtained by other interferometers and discuss the on-going projects.

  19. Simulations of Galaxy Formation in a Λ Cold Dark Matter Universe. I. Dynamical and Photometric Properties of a Simulated Disk Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadi, Mario G.; Navarro, Julio F.; Steinmetz, Matthias; Eke, Vincent R.

    2003-07-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the dynamical and photometric properties of a disk galaxy simulated in the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmogony. The galaxy is assembled through a number of high-redshift mergers followed by a period of quiescent accretion after z~1 that lead to the formation of two distinct dynamical components: a spheroid of mostly old stars and a rotationally supported disk of younger stars. The surface brightness profile is very well approximated by the superposition of an R1/4 spheroid and an exponential disk. Each photometric component contributes a similar fraction of the total luminosity of the system, although less than a quarter of the stars form after the last merger episode at z~1. In the optical bands the surface brightness profile is remarkably similar to that of Sab galaxy UGC 615, but the simulated galaxy rotates significantly faster and has a declining rotation curve dominated by the spheroid near the center. The decline in circular velocity is at odds with observation and results from the high concentration of the dark matter and baryonic components, as well as from the relatively high mass-to-light ratio of the stars in the simulation. The simulated galaxy lies ~1 mag off the I-band Tully-Fisher relation of late-type spirals but seems to be in reasonable agreement with Tully-Fisher data on S0 galaxies. In agreement with previous simulation work, the angular momentum of the luminous component is an order of magnitude lower than that of late-type spirals of similar rotation speed. This again reflects the dominance of the slowly rotating, dense spheroidal component, to which most discrepancies with observation may be traced. On its own, the disk component has properties rather similar to those of late-type spirals: its luminosity, its exponential scale length, and its colors are all comparable to those of galaxy disks of similar rotation speed. This suggests that a different form of feedback than adopted here is required to inhibit

  20. High-Resolution Imaging of the Multiphase Interstellar Thick Disk in Two Edge-On Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howk, J. Christopher; Rueff, K.

    2009-01-01

    We present broadband and narrow-band images, acquired from Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 and WIYN 3.5 m telescope respectively, of two edge-on spiral galaxies, NGC 4302 and NGC 4013. These high-resolution images (BVI + H-alpha) provide a detailed view of the thick disk interstellar medium (ISM) in these galaxies. Both galaxies show prominent extraplanar dust-bearing clouds viewed in absorption against the background stellar light. Individual clouds are found to z 2 kpc in each galaxy. These clouds each contain >10^4 to >10^5 solar masses of gas. Both galaxies have extraplanar diffuse ionized gas (DIG), as seen in our H-alpha images and earlier work. In addition to the DIG, discrete H II regions are found at heights up to 1 kpc from both galaxies. We compare the morphologies of the dusty clouds with the DIG in these galaxies and discuss the relationship between these components of the thick disk ISM.

  1. The Escape of Ionizing Photons from OB Associations in Disk Galaxies: Radiation Transfer through Superbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dove, James B.; Shull, J. Michael; Ferrara, Andrea

    2000-03-01

    By solving the time-dependent radiation transfer problem of stellar radiation through evolving superbubbles within a smoothly varying H I distribution, we estimate the fraction of ionizing photons emitted by OB associations that escapes the H I disk of our Galaxy into the halo and intergalactic medium (IGM). We consider both coeval star formation and a Gaussian star formation history with a time spread σt=2 Myr. We consider both a uniform H I distribution and a two-phase (cloud/intercloud) model, with a negligible filling factor of hot gas. We find that the shells of the expanding superbubbles quickly trap or attenuate the ionizing flux, so that most of the escaping radiation escapes shortly after the formation of the superbubble. Superbubbles of large associations can blow out of the H I disk and form dynamic chimneys, which allow the ionizing radiation to escape the H I disk directly. However, blowout occurs when the ionizing photon luminosity has dropped well below the association's maximum luminosity. For the coeval star formation history, the total fraction of Lyman Continuum photons that escape both sides of the disk in the solar vicinity is ~0.15+/-0.05. For the Gaussian star formation history, ~0.06+/-0.03, a value roughly a factor of 2 lower than the results of Dove & Shull, where superbubbles were not considered. For a local production rate of ionizing photons ΨLyC=4.95x107 cm-2 s-1, the flux escaping the disk is ΦLyC~(1.5-3.0)x106 cm-2 s-1 for coeval and Gaussian star formation, comparable to the flux required to sustain the Reynolds layer. Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities exist early in the OB association's evolutionary stages, possibly causing the shell to fragment and increasing . However, if a significant fraction of H I is distributed in cold clouds with nH~30 cm-3, can be reduced by a factor of ~2-5 if the cloud properties are similar to ``standard clouds'' with a disk geometry.

  2. The Interaction of Hot and Cold Gas in the Disk and Halo of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, Jonathan; Salamon, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    Most of the thermal energy in the Galaxy and perhaps most of the baryons in the Universe are found in hot (log T approximately 5.5 - 7) gas. Hot gas is detected in the local interstellar medium, in supernova remnants (SNR), the Galactic halo, galaxy clusters and the intergalactic medium (IGM). In our own Galaxy, hot gas exists in large superbubbles up to several hundred pc in diameter that locally dominate the interstellar medium (ISM) and determine its thermal and dynamic evolution. While X-ray observations using ROSAT, Chandra and XMM have allowed us to make dramatic progress in mapping out the morphology of the hot gas and in understanding some of its spectral characteristics, there remain fundamental questions that are unanswered. Chief among these questions is the way that hot gas interacts with cooler phase gas and the effects these interactions have on hot gas energetics. The theoretical investigations we proposed in this grant aim to explore these interactions and to develop observational diagnostics that will allow us to gain much improved information on the evolution of hot gas in the disk and halo of galaxies. The first of the series of investigations that we proposed was a thorough exploration of turbulent mixing layers and cloud evaporation. We proposed to employ a multi-dimensional hydrodynamical code that includes non-equilibrium ionization (NEI), radiative cooling and thermal conduction. These models are to be applied to high velocity clouds in our galactic halo that are seen to have O VI by FUSE (Sembach et ai. 2000) and other clouds for which sufficient constraining observations exist.

  3. THE ADVANCED CAMERA FOR SURVEYS NEARBY GALAXY SURVEY TREASURY. VI. THE ANCIENT STAR-FORMING DISK OF NGC 404

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Stilp, Adrienne; Dolphin, Andrew; Seth, Anil C.; Weisz, Daniel; Skillman, Evan E-mail: jd@astro.washington.ed E-mail: roskar@astro.washington.ed E-mail: aseth@cfa.harvard.ed E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.ed

    2010-06-10

    We present HST/WFPC2 observations across the disk of the nearby isolated dwarf S0 galaxy NGC 404, which hosts an extended gas disk. The locations of our fields contain a roughly equal mixture of bulge and disk stars. All of our resolved stellar photometry reaches m {sub F814W} = 26 (M {sub F814W} = -1.4), which covers 2.5 mag of the red giant branch and main-sequence stars with ages <300 Myr. Our deepest field reaches m {sub F814W} = 27.2 (M {sub F814W} = -0.2), sufficient to resolve the red clump and main-sequence stars with ages <500 Myr. Although we detect trace amounts of star formation at times more recent than 10 Gyr ago for all fields, the proportion of red giant stars to asymptotic giants and main-sequence stars suggests that the disk is dominated by an ancient (>10 Gyr) population. Detailed modeling of the color-magnitude diagram suggests that {approx}70% of the stellar mass in the NGC 404 disk formed by z {approx} 2 (10 Gyr ago) and at least {approx}90% formed prior to z {approx} 1 (8 Gyr ago). These results indicate that the stellar populations of the NGC 404 disk are on average significantly older than those of other nearby disk galaxies, suggesting that early- and late-type disks may have different long-term evolutionary histories, not simply differences in their recent star formation rates. Comparisons of the spatial distribution of the young stellar mass and FUV emission in Galaxy Evolution Explorer images show that the brightest FUV regions contain the youngest stars, but that some young stars (<160 Myr) lie outside of these regions. FUV luminosity appears to be strongly affected by both age and stellar mass within individual regions. Finally, we use our measurements to infer the relationship between the star formation rate and the gas density of the disk at previous epochs. We find that most of the history of the NGC 404 disk is consistent with star formation that has decreased with the gas density according to the Schmidt law. However, {approx} 0

  4. Structural Properties of Barred Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taehyun; Gadotti, D. A.; Sheth, K.; Lee, M.; S4G Team

    2014-01-01

    We have performed two-dimensional multicomponent decomposition of 144 local barred spiral galaxies using 3.6 micron images from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies. Our model fit includes up to four components (bulge, disk, bar, and a point source) and, most importantly, takes into account disk breaks. We present that ignoring the disk break and using a single disk scale length in the model fit for Type II (down- bending) disk galaxies can lead to differences of 40% in the disk scale length, 10% in bulge-to-total luminosity ratio (B/T), and 25% in bar-to-total luminosity ratios. We show that for galaxies with B/T > 0.1, the break radius to bar radius, r_br/R_bar, varies between 1 and 3, but as a function of B/T the ratio remains roughly constant. This suggests that in bulge-dominated galaxies the disk break is likely related to the outer Lindblad Resonance (OLR) of the bar, and thus the OLR also moves outwards at the same rate as the bar grows. For galaxies with B/T < 0.1, r_br/R_bar, spans a wide range from 1 to 6. This suggests that the mechanism that produces the break in these galaxies may be different from that in galaxies with more massive bulges. Consistent with previous studies, we conclude that disk breaks in galaxies with small bulges may originate from bar resonances that may be also coupled with the spiral arms, or be related to star formation thresholds. We quantifiy shapes of bar radial surface brightness profiles by measuring their Sersic indices and show that bars in higher B/T galaxies have flatter radial surface brightness profile than bulgeless galaxies do. In particular, bulgeless galaxies mostly have bars with steep profiles. We show that the normalized bar length is correlated with B/T, which is consistent with bars growing longer with time.

  5. A test of star formation laws in disk galaxies. II. Dependence on dynamical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Suwannajak, Chutipong; Tan, Jonathan C.; Leroy, Adam K.

    2014-05-20

    We use the observed radial profiles of the mass surface densities of total, Σ {sub g}, and molecular, Σ{sub H2}, gas, rotation velocity, and star formation rate (SFR) surface density, Σ{sub sfr}, of the molecular-rich (Σ{sub H2} ≥ Σ{sub HI}/2) regions of 16 nearby disk galaxies to test several star formation (SF) laws: a 'Kennicutt-Schmidt (K-S)' law, Σ{sub sfr}=A{sub g}Σ{sub g,2}{sup 1.5}; a 'Constant Molecular' law, Σ{sub sfr} = A {sub H2}Σ{sub H2,2}; the turbulence-regulated laws of Krumholz and McKee (KM05) and Krumholz, McKee, and Tumlinson (KMT09); a 'Gas-Ω' law, Σ{sub sfr}=B{sub Ω}Σ{sub g}Ω; and a shear-driven 'giant molecular cloud (GMC) Collision' law, Σ{sub sfr} = B {sub CC}Σ {sub g}Ω(1-0.7β), where β ≡ d ln v {sub circ}/d ln r. If allowed one free normalization parameter for each galaxy, these laws predict the SFR with rms errors of factors of 1.4-1.8. If a single normalization parameter is used by each law for the entire galaxy sample, then rms errors range from factors of 1.5-2.1. Although the Constant Molecular law gives the smallest rms errors, the improvement over the KMT, K-S, and GMC Collision laws is not especially significant, particularly given the different observational inputs that the laws utilize and the scope of included physics, which ranges from empirical relations to detailed treatment of interstellar medium processes. We next search for systematic variation of SF law parameters with local and global galactic dynamical properties of disk shear rate (related to β), rotation speed, and presence of a bar. We demonstrate with high significance that higher shear rates enhance SF efficiency per local orbital time. Such a trend is expected if GMC collisions play an important role in SF, while an opposite trend would be expected if the development of disk gravitational instabilities is the controlling physics.

  6. An ISOPHOT Study of the Disk of Galaxy NGC6946: 60(micro)m Infrared and Radio Continuum Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, N. Y.; Helou, G.; Tuffs, R.; Xu, C.; Malhotra, S.; Werner, M. W.; Thronson, H.

    1996-01-01

    We combine the ISOPHOT 60(micro)m image of Tuffs, et al. (1996) and VLA radio continuum images at 6 and 20cm from the literature to study the 60(micro)m light distribution and its correlation with radio continuum within the disk of nearby spiral galaxy NGC6946, at an effective resolution of + - 52.

  7. Stellar evolution in N-body simulations of disk galaxies. I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comins, N. F.

    1983-01-01

    The Kalnajs (1972, 1976) Omega models of global mass and velocity distributions are employed in the present two-dimensional N-body simulation, which allows for a spectrum of particle masses, stellar explosions, explosion remnant interactions with an interstellar medium, and the creation of new stars from the gas. Two sequences of runs using the Omega values of 0.8 and 0.9 examine the separate and combined effects of particle mass distribution, the gravitational influence of an interstellar gas distribution on the N-body particles, and stellar evolution, allowing for stellar explosions and star formation from the gas. It is found that both Omega values' nonequilibrium results dramatically change when evolution is allowed to occur. These results call for more realistic coupled N-body and evolution simulations in order to improve the understanding of disk galaxy evolution.

  8. The high-efficiency jets magnetically accelerated from a thin disk in powerful lobe-dominated FRII radio galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shuang-Liang

    2014-06-10

    A maximum jet efficiency line R ∼ 25 (R = L {sub jet}/L {sub bol}), found in FRII radio galaxies by Fernandes et al., was extended to cover the full range of jet power by Punsly. Recent general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of jet formation have mainly focused on the enhancement of jet power. In this work, we suggest that the jet efficiency could be very high even for conventional jet power if the radiative efficiency of disks was much smaller. We adopt the model of a thin disk with magnetically driven winds to investigate the observational high-efficiency jets in FRII radio galaxies. It is found that the structure of a thin disk can be significantly altered by the feedback of winds. The temperature of a disk gradually decreases with increasing magnetic field; the disk density, surface density, and pressure also change enormously. The lower temperature and higher surface density in the inner disk result in the rapid decrease of radiative efficiency. Thus, the jet efficiency is greatly improved even if the jet power is conventional. Our results can explain the observations quite well. The theoretical maximum jet efficiency of R ∼ 1000 suggested by our calculations is large enough to explain all of the high jet efficiency in observations, even considering the episodic activity of jets.

  9. Photoionization of disk galaxies: An explanation of the sharp edges in the H I distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dove, James B.; Shull, J. Michael

    1994-01-01

    We have reproduced the observed radial truncation of the H I distribution in isolated spiral galaxies with a model in which extragalactic radiation photoionizes the gaseous disk. For a galactic mass distribution model that reproduces the observed rotation curves, including dark matter in the disk and halo, the vertical structure of the gas is determined self-consistently. The ionization structure and column densities of H and He ions are computed by solving the radiation transfer equation for both continuum and lines. Our model is similar to that of Maloney, and the H I structure differs by less than 10%. The radial structure of the column density of H I is found to be more sensitive to the extragalactic radiation field than to the distribution of mass. For this reason, considerable progress can be made in determining the extragalactic flux of ionizing photons, phi(sub ex), with more 21 cm observations of isolated galaxies. However, owing to the uncertainty of the radial distribution of total hydrogen at large radii, inferring the extragalactic flux by comparing the observed edges to photoionization models is somewhat subjective. We find 1 x 10(exp 4)/sq cm/s is less than or approximately phi(sub ex) is less than or approximately 5 x 10(exp 4)/sq cm/s, corresponding to 2.1 is less than or approximately iota(sub 0) is less than or approximately 10.5 x 10(exp -23) ergs/sq cm/s/Hz/sr for a 1/nu spectrum. Although somewhat higher, our inferred range of iota(sub 0) is consistent with the large range of values obtained by Kulkarni & Fall from the 'proximity effect' toward Quasi-Stellar Objects (QSOs) at approximately 0.5.

  10. THE MASS-DEPENDENT STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF DISK GALAXIES: INFALL MODEL VERSUS OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, R. X.; Hou, J. L.; Shen, S. Y.; Shu, C. G.

    2010-10-10

    We introduce a simple model to explore the star formation histories of disk galaxies. We assume that the disk originate and grows by continuous gas infall. The gas infall rate is parameterized by the Gaussian formula with one free parameter: the infall-peak time t{sub p} . The Kennicutt star formation law is adopted to describe how much cold gas turns into stars. The gas outflow process is also considered in our model. We find that, at a given galactic stellar mass M{sub *}, the model adopting a late infall-peak time t{sub p} results in blue colors, low-metallicity, high specific star formation rate (SFR), and high gas fraction, while the gas outflow rate mainly influences the gas-phase metallicity and star formation efficiency mainly influences the gas fraction. Motivated by the local observed scaling relations, we 'construct' a mass-dependent model by assuming that the low-mass galaxy has a later infall-peak time t{sub p} and a larger gas outflow rate than massive systems. It is shown that this model can be in agreement with not only the local observations, but also with the observed correlations between specific SFR and galactic stellar mass SFR/M{sub *} {approx} M{sub *} at intermediate redshifts z < 1. Comparison between the Gaussian-infall model and the exponential-infall model is also presented. It shows that the exponential-infall model predicts a higher SFR at early stage and a lower SFR later than that of Gaussian infall. Our results suggest that the Gaussian infall rate may be more reasonable in describing the gas cooling process than the exponential infall rate, especially for low-mass systems.

  11. The Lyman alpha reference sample. VI. Lyman alpha escape from the edge-on disk galaxy Mrk 1486

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duval, Florent; Östlin, Göran; Hayes, Matthew; Zackrisson, Erik; Verhamme, Anne; Orlitova, Ivana; Adamo, Angela; Guaita, Lucia; Melinder, Jens; Cannon, John M.; Laursen, Peter; Rivera-Thorsen, Thoger; Herenz, E. Christian; Gruyters, Pieter; Mas-Hesse, J. Miguel; Kunth, Daniel; Sandberg, Andreas; Schaerer, Daniel; Månsson, Tore

    2016-03-01

    Context. Recent numerical simulations suggest that the strength of the Lyman alpha (Lyα) line of star-forming disk galaxies strongly depends on the inclination at which they are observed: from edge-on to face-on, we expect to see a change from a strongly attenuated Lyα line to a strong Lyα emission line. Aims: We aim to understand how a strong Lyα emission line is able to escape from the low-redshift highly inclined (edge-on) disk galaxy Mrk 1486 (z ~ 0.0338). To our knowledge, this work is the first observational study of Lyα transport inside an edge-on disk galaxy. Methods: Using a large set of HST imaging and spectroscopic data, we investigated the interstellar medium (ISM) structure and the dominant source of Lyα radiation inside Mrk 1486. Moreover, using a 3D Monte Carlo Lyα radiation transfer code, we studied the radiative transfer of Lyα and UV continuum photons inside a 3D geometry of neutral hydrogen (HI) and dust that models the ISM structure at the galaxy center. Our numerical simulations predicted the Lyα line profile that we then compared to the one observed in the HST/COS spectrum of Mrk 1486. Results: While a pronounced Lyα absorption line emerges from the disk of Mrk 1486, very extended Lyα structures are observed at large radii from the galaxy center: a large Lyα-halo and two very bright Lyα regions located slightly above and below the disk plane. The analysis of IFU Hα spectroscopic data of Mrk 1486 indicates the presence of two bipolar outflowing halos of HI gas at the same location as these two bright Lyα regions. Comparing different diagnostic diagrams (such as [OIII]5007/Hβ versus [OI]6300/Hα) to photo- and shock-ionization models, we find that the Lyα production of Mrk 1486 is dominated by photoionization inside the galaxy disk. From this perspective, our numerical simulations succeed in reproducing the strength and shape of the observed Lyα emission line of Mrk 1486 by assuming a scenario in which the Lyα photons are

  12. Modelling the Accretion History of the Galactic Disk (and the Gravitational Lensing of a High-z Galaxy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Over its long history, the Milky Way is expected to have accreted many dwarf galaxies. The debris from the destruction of most of these dwarf galaxies will by now be fully phase-mixed throughout the Galaxy and hence undetectable as local over-densities in position-space. However, the debris from these systems could have distinct kinematic signatures that may help distinguish these stars from, for example, the Galactic disk. We aim to construct a reliable method of determining the contributions to the Milky Way disk from accreted structures that could be applied to current kinematic data sets, such as SDSS's APOGEE survey. In an effort to mimic the kinematic traits of an accreted satellite, we construct single-orbit models to compare to a cosmologically motivated simulation of satellite accretion. We find that these orbit models adhere to the kinematic signatures of certain types of accreted galaxies better than others, giving us insight on which parameters to trust when searching for accreted populations. As a bonus, we describe a separate project in which we attempt to deduce the intrinsic properties of the 8 o'clock arc, a gravitationally lensed Lyman break galaxy at redshift 2.73. Using the lensmodel code and its pixel-based source reconstruction extension pixsrc, we derive a de-lensed image of the galaxy in the source plane.

  13. Star Formation in Disk Galaxies. III. Does Stellar Feedback Result in Cloud Death?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasker, Elizabeth J.; Wadsley, James; Pudritz, Ralph

    2015-03-01

    Stellar feedback, star formation, and gravitational interactions are major controlling forces in the evolution of giant molecular clouds (GMCs). To explore their relative roles, we examine the properties and evolution of GMCs forming in an isolated galactic disk simulation that includes both localized thermal feedback and photoelectric heating. The results are compared with the three previous simulations in this series, which consists of a model with no star formation, star formation but no form of feedback, and star formation with photoelectric heating in a set with steadily increasing physical effects. We find that the addition of localized thermal feedback greatly suppresses star formation but does not destroy the surrounding GMC, giving cloud properties closely resembling the run in which no stellar physics is included. The outflows from the feedback reduce the mass of the cloud but do not destroy it, allowing the cloud to survive its stellar children. This suggests that weak thermal feedback such as the lower bound expected for a supernova may play a relatively minor role in the galactic structure of quiescent Milky-Way-type galaxies, compared to gravitational interactions and disk shear.

  14. The violent interstellar medium in Milky-Way like disk galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karoline Walch, Stefanie

    2015-08-01

    Molecular clouds are cold, dense, and turbulent filamentary structures that condense out of the multi-phase interstellar medium. They are also the sites of star formation. The minority of new-born stars is massive, but these stars are particularly important for the fate of their parental molecular clouds as their feedback drives turbulence and regulates star formation.I will present results from the SILCC project (SImulating the Life Cycle of molecular Clouds), in which we study the formation and dispersal of molecular clouds within the multi-phase ISM using high-performance, three-dimensional simulations of representative pieces of disk galaxies. Apart from stellar feedback, self-gravity, an external stellar potential, and magnetic fields, we employ an accurate description of gas heating and cooling as well as a small chemical network including molecule formation and (self-)shielding from the interstellar radiation field. We study the impact of the supernova rate and the positioning of the supernova explosions with respect to the molecular gas in a well defined set of simulations. This allows us to draw conclusions on structure of the multi-phase ISM, the amount of molecular gas formed, and the onset of galactic outflows. Furthermore, we show how important stellar wind feedback is for regulating star formation in these disks.

  15. Indications of M-dwarf deficits in the halo and thick disk of the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konishi, Mihoko; Shibai, Hiroshi; Sumi, Takahiro; Fukagawa, Misato; Matsuo, Taro; Samland, Matthias S.; Yamamoto, Kodai; Sudo, Jun; Itoh, Yoichi; Arimoto, Nobuo; Kajisawa, Masaru; Abe, Lyu; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D.; Carson, Joseph; Currie, Thayne; Egner, Sebastian E.; Feldt, Markus; Goto, Miwa; Grady, Carol A.; Guyon, Olivier; Hashimoto, Jun; Hayano, Yutaka; Hayashi, Masahiko; Hayashi, Saeko S.; Henning, Thomas; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Ishii, Miki; Iye, Masanori; Janson, Markus; Kandori, Ryo; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Kwon, Jungmi; McElwain, Michael W.; Miyama, Shoken; Morino, Jun-Ichi; Moro-Martín, Amaya; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Serabyn, Eugene; Suenaga, Takuya; Suto, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Ryuji; Takahashi, Yasuhiro H.; Takami, Hideki; Takato, Naruhisa; Terada, Hiroshi; Thalmann, Christian; Tomono, Daigo; Turner, Edwin L.; Usuda, Tomonori; Watanabe, Makoto; Wisniewski, John P.; Yamada, Toru; Tamura, Motohide

    2015-02-01

    We compared the number of faint stars detected in deep survey fields with the current stellar distribution model of the Galaxy and found that the detected number in the H band is significantly smaller than the predicted number. This indicates that M-dwarfs, the major component, are fewer in the halo and the thick disk. We used archived data of several surveys in both the north and south field of GOODS (Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey), MODS (MOIRCS Deep Survey) in GOODS-N, and ERS (Early Release Science) and CANDELS (Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey) in GOODS-S. The number density of M-dwarfs in the halo has to be 20% ± 13% relative to that in the solar vicinity, in order for the detected number of stars fainter than 20.5 mag in the H band to match with the predicted value from the model. In the thick disk, the number density of M-dwarfs must be reduced (52% ± 13%) or the scale height must be decreased (˜ 600 pc). Alternatively, overall fractions of the halo and thick disks can be significantly reduced to achieve the same effect, because our sample mainly consists of faint M-dwarfs. Our results imply that the M-dwarf population in regions distant from the Galactic plane is significantly smaller than previously thought. We then discussed the implications this has on the suitability of the model predictions for the prediction of non-companion faint stars in direct imaging extrasolar planet surveys by using the best-fitting number densities.

  16. Classifying orbits of low and high energy stars in axisymmetric disk galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zotos, Euaggelos E.

    The ordered or chaotic character of orbits of stars moving in the meridional (R,z) plane of an analytic axisymmetric time-independent disk galaxy model with an additional spherically symmetric central nucleus is investigated. Our aim is to determine how the total energy influences the orbital structure of the galaxy. For this purpose we monitor how the percentage of chaotic orbits as well as the rates of orbits composing the main regular families evolve as a function of the value of the energy. In order to distinguish with certainty between chaotic and ordered motion we use the SALI method in extensive sets of initial conditions of orbits. Moreover, a spectral method is applied for identifying the various regular families and also for recognizing the secondary resonances that bifurcate from them. Our numerical computations suggest that for low energy levels the observed amount of chaos is high and the orbital content is rather poor, while for high energy levels, corresponding to global motion, regular motion dominates and many secondary higher resonances emerge. We also compared our results with previous related work.

  17. A DIRECT STELLAR METALLICITY DETERMINATION IN THE DISK OF THE MASER GALAXY NGC 4258

    SciTech Connect

    Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Gazak, Zachary; Hosek, Matthew W. Jr.; Bresolin, Fabio; Urbaneja, Miguel A.; Przybilla, Norbert

    2013-12-20

    We present the first direct determination of a stellar metallicity in the spiral galaxy NGC 4258 (D = 7.6 Mpc) based on the quantitative analysis of a low-resolution (∼5 Å) Keck Low Resolution Imaging Spectrograph spectrum of a blue supergiant star located in its disk. A determination of stellar metallicity in this galaxy is important for the absolute calibration of the Cepheid period-luminosity relation as an anchor for the extragalactic distance scale and for a better characterization of its dependence as a function of abundance. We find a value 0.2 dex lower than solar metallicity at a galactocentric distance of 8.7 kpc, in agreement with recent H II region studies using the weak forbidden auroral oxygen line at 4363 Å. We determine the effective stellar temperature, gravity, luminosity, and line-of-sight extinction of the blue supergiant being studied. We show that it fits well on the flux-weighted gravity-luminosity relation, strengthening the potential of this method as a new extragalactic distance indicator.

  18. THE HST/ACS COMA CLUSTER SURVEY. VIII. BARRED DISK GALAXIES IN THE CORE OF THE COMA CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Marinova, Irina; Jogee, Shardha; Weinzirl, Tim; Erwin, Peter; Trentham, Neil; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Hammer, Derek; Den Brok, Mark; Peletier, Reynier F.; Kleijn, Gijs V.; Graham, Alister W.; Carter, David; Mouhcine, Mustapha; Balcells, Marc; Guzman, Rafael; Hoyos, Carlos; Mobasher, Bahram; Peng, Eric W. E-mail: sj@astro.as.utexas.edu

    2012-02-20

    We use high-resolution ({approx}0.''1) F814W Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) images from the Hubble Space Telescope ACS Treasury survey of the Coma cluster at z {approx} 0.02 to study bars in massive disk galaxies (S0s), as well as low-mass dwarf galaxies in the core of the Coma cluster, the densest environment in the nearby universe. Our study helps to constrain the evolution of bars and disks in dense environments and provides a comparison point for studies in lower density environments and at higher redshifts. Our results are: (1) we characterize the fraction and properties of bars in a sample of 32 bright (M{sub V} {approx}< -18, M{sub *} > 10{sup 9.5} M{sub Sun }) S0 galaxies, which dominate the population of massive disk galaxies in the Coma core. We find that the measurement of a bar fraction among S0 galaxies must be handled with special care due to the difficulty in separating unbarred S0s from ellipticals, and the potential dilution of the bar signature by light from a relatively large, bright bulge. The results depend sensitively on the method used: the bar fraction for bright S0s in the Coma core is 50% {+-} 11%, 65% {+-} 11%, and 60% {+-} 11% based on three methods of bar detection, namely, strict ellipse fit criteria, relaxed ellipse fit criteria, and visual classification. (2) We compare the S0 bar fraction across different environments (the Coma core, A901/902, and Virgo) adopting the critical step of using matched samples and matched methods in order to ensure robust comparisons. We find that the bar fraction among bright S0 galaxies does not show a statistically significant variation (within the error bars of {+-}11%) across environments which span two orders of magnitude in galaxy number density (n {approx} 300-10,000 galaxies Mpc{sup -3}) and include rich and poor clusters, such as the core of Coma, the A901/902 cluster, and Virgo. We speculate that the bar fraction among S0s is not significantly enhanced in rich clusters compared to low

  19. The HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey. VIII. Barred Disk Galaxies in the Core of the Coma Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinova, Irina; Jogee, Shardha; Weinzirl, Tim; Erwin, Peter; Trentham, Neil; Ferguson, Henry C.; Hammer, Derek; den Brok, Mark; Graham, Alister W.; Carter, David; Balcells, Marc; Goudfrooij, Paul; Guzmán, Rafael; Hoyos, Carlos; Mobasher, Bahram; Mouhcine, Mustapha; Peletier, Reynier F.; Peng, Eric W.; Verdoes Kleijn, Gijs

    2012-02-01

    We use high-resolution (~0farcs1) F814W Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) images from the Hubble Space Telescope ACS Treasury survey of the Coma cluster at z ~ 0.02 to study bars in massive disk galaxies (S0s), as well as low-mass dwarf galaxies in the core of the Coma cluster, the densest environment in the nearby universe. Our study helps to constrain the evolution of bars and disks in dense environments and provides a comparison point for studies in lower density environments and at higher redshifts. Our results are: (1) we characterize the fraction and properties of bars in a sample of 32 bright (M V <~ -18, M * > 109.5 M ⊙) S0 galaxies, which dominate the population of massive disk galaxies in the Coma core. We find that the measurement of a bar fraction among S0 galaxies must be handled with special care due to the difficulty in separating unbarred S0s from ellipticals, and the potential dilution of the bar signature by light from a relatively large, bright bulge. The results depend sensitively on the method used: the bar fraction for bright S0s in the Coma core is 50% ± 11%, 65% ± 11%, and 60% ± 11% based on three methods of bar detection, namely, strict ellipse fit criteria, relaxed ellipse fit criteria, and visual classification. (2) We compare the S0 bar fraction across different environments (the Coma core, A901/902, and Virgo) adopting the critical step of using matched samples and matched methods in order to ensure robust comparisons. We find that the bar fraction among bright S0 galaxies does not show a statistically significant variation (within the error bars of ±11%) across environments which span two orders of magnitude in galaxy number density (n ~ 300-10,000 galaxies Mpc-3) and include rich and poor clusters, such as the core of Coma, the A901/902 cluster, and Virgo. We speculate that the bar fraction among S0s is not significantly enhanced in rich clusters compared to low-density environments for two reasons. First, S0s in rich clusters

  20. Modelling the spectral energy distribution of galaxies. V. The dust and PAH emission SEDs of disk galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, C. C.; Tuffs, R. J.; Dopita, M. A.; Fischera, J.; Kylafis, N. D.; Madore, B. F.

    2011-03-01

    We present a self-consistent model of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of spiral galaxies from the ultraviolet (UV) to the mid-infrared (MIR)/far-infrared (FIR)/submillimeter (submm) based on a full radiative transfer calculation of the propagation of starlight in galaxy disks. This model predicts not only the total integrated energy absorbed in the UV/optical and re-emitted in the infrared/submm, but also the colours of the dust emission based on an explicit calculation of the strength and colour of the UV/optical radiation fields heating the dust, and incorporating a full calculation of the stochastic heating of small dust grains and PAH molecules. The geometry of the translucent components of the model is empirically constrained using the results from the radiation transfer analysis of Xilouris et al. on spirals in the middle range of the Hubble sequence, while the geometry of the optically thick components is constrained from physical considerations with a posteriori checks of the model predictions with observational data. Following the observational constraints, the model has both a distribution of diffuse dust associated with the old and young disk stellar populations as well as a clumpy component arising from dust in the parent molecular clouds in star forming regions. In accordance with the fragmented nature of dense molecular gas in typical star-forming regions, UV light from massive stars is allowed to either freely stream away into the diffuse medium in some fraction of directions or be geometrically blocked and locally absorbed in clumps. These geometrical constraints enable the dust emission to be predicted in terms of a minimum set of free parameters: the central face-on dust opacity in the B-band τ^f_B, a clumpiness factor F for the star-forming regions, the star-formation rate SFR, the normalised luminosity of the old stellar population old and the bulge-to-disk ratio B/D. We show that these parameters are almost orthogonal in their

  1. A CATALOG OF BULGE+DISK DECOMPOSITIONS AND UPDATED PHOTOMETRY FOR 1.12 MILLION GALAXIES IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Simard, Luc; McConnachie, Alan W.; Trevor Mendel, J.; Ellison, Sara L.; Patton, David R.

    2011-09-01

    We perform two-dimensional, point-spread-function-convolved, bulge+disk decompositions in the g and r bandpasses on a sample of 1,123,718 galaxies from the Legacy area of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release Seven. Four different decomposition procedures are investigated which make improvements to sky background determinations and object deblending over the standard SDSS procedures that lead to more robust structural parameters and integrated galaxy magnitudes and colors, especially in crowded environments. We use a set of science-based quality assurance metrics, namely, the disk luminosity-size relation, the galaxy color-magnitude diagram, and the galaxy central (fiber) colors to show the robustness of our structural parameters. The best procedure utilizes simultaneous, two-bandpass decompositions. Bulge and disk photometric errors remain below 0.1 mag down to bulge and disk magnitudes of g {approx_equal} 19 and r {approx_equal} 18.5. We also use and compare three different galaxy fitting models: a pure Sersic model, an n{sub b} = 4 bulge + disk model, and a Sersic (free n{sub b}) bulge + disk model. The most appropriate model for a given galaxy is determined by the F-test probability. All three catalogs of measured structural parameters, rest-frame magnitudes, and colors are publicly released here. These catalogs should provide an extensive comparison set for a wide range of observational and theoretical studies of galaxies.

  2. HST WFC3/IR Observations of Active Galactic Nucleus Host Galaxies at z ~ 2: Supermassive Black Holes Grow in Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schawinski, Kevin; Treister, Ezequiel; Urry, C. Megan; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Simmons, Brooke; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2011-02-01

    We present the rest-frame optical morphologies of active galactic nucleus (AGN) host galaxies at 1.5 < z < 3, using near-infrared imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3, the first such study of AGN host galaxies at these redshifts. The AGNs are X-ray-selected from the Chandra Deep Field South and have typical luminosities of 1042 erg s-1galaxies of these AGNs have low Sérsic indices indicative of disk-dominated light profiles, suggesting that secular processes govern a significant fraction of the cosmic growth of black holes. That is, many black holes in the present-day universe grew much of their mass in disk-dominated galaxies and not in early-type galaxies or major mergers. The properties of the AGN host galaxies are furthermore indistinguishable from their parent galaxy population and we find no strong evolution in either effective radii or morphological mix between z ~ 2 and z ~ 0.05. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the data archive at the Space Telescope Institute. STScI is operated by the association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under the NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  3. The ionization sources of the diffuse ionized gas in nearby disk galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voges, Erica Susan

    Diffuse ionized gas (DIG) has been shown to be an important component of the interstellar medium (ISM), with its large filling factor (>= 20%) and a mass that makes it the most massive component of the Galactic ionized ISM. Given that it has been found to be ubiquitous in both the Galaxy and external disk galaxies, the energy source to create and maintain the DIG must necessarily be large. Massive OB stars are the only known sources with enough energy to power the DIG, and DIG is also linked morphologically to OB stars as it is brightest near bright star forming regions. However, the details of the location and spectral types of the ionizing stars, as well as the relevance of other ionizing mechanisms, are still not clear. I present the results of three different studies aimed at exploring the ionization sources of the DIG. Optical spectroscopy of DIG in M33 and NGC 891 using the Gemini-North telescope has been obtained to compare diagnostic emission line ratios with photoionization models. The first detection of (O I] l6300 was made in the DIG of M33. In M33, models in which ionizing photons leaking from H II regions are responsible for the ionization of the DIG best fit our observed line ratios. In NGC 891, we found evidence that shock ionization may need to be included along with photoionization in order to explain our observed emission line ratios. The diffuse Ha fraction in eight nearby galaxies was studied as a function of radius and star formation rate per unit area. We found no correlation with radius, but we did find that regions with higher star formation rates have lower diffuse fractions. Neither of these results had any dependence on galaxy type. These results have implications regarding the circumstances under which H II regions may be leaking ionizing photons and thus ionizing DIG. We also compared observed and predicted ionizing photon emission rates for 39 H II regions in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Our results indicate that five of the H II

  4. The DiskMass Survey. VI. Gas and stellar kinematics in spiral galaxies from PPak integral-field spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinsson, Thomas P. K.; Verheijen, Marc A. W.; Westfall, Kyle B.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Schechtman-Rook, Andrew; Andersen, David R.; Swaters, Rob A.

    2013-09-01

    We present ionized-gas ([Oiii]λ5007 Å) and stellar kinematics (velocities and velocity dispersions) for 30 nearly face-on spiral galaxies out to as many as three K-band disk scale lengths (hR). These data have been derived from PPak integral-field-unit spectroscopy from 4980-5370 Å observed at a mean resolution of λ/Δλ = 7700 (σinst = 17 km s-1). These data are a fundamental product of our survey and will be used in companion papers to, e.g., derive the detailed (baryonic+dark) mass budget of each galaxy in our sample. Our presentation provides a comprehensive description of the observing strategy and data reduction, including a robust measurement and removal of shift, scale, and rotation effects in the data due to instrumental flexure. Using an in-plane coordinate system determined by fitting circular-speed curves to our velocity fields, we derive azimuthally averaged rotation curves and line-of-sight velocity dispersion (σLOS) and luminosity profiles for both the stars and [Oiii]-emitting gas. Along with a clear presentation of the data, we demonstrate: (1) The [Oiii] and stellar rotation curves exhibit a clear signature of asymmetric drift with a rotation difference that is 11% of the maximum rotation speed of the galaxy disk, comparable to measurements in the solar neighborhood in the Milky Way. (2) The e-folding length of the stellar velocity dispersion (hσ) is 2hR on average, as expected for a disk with a constant scale height and mass-to-light ratio, with a scatter that is notably smaller for massive, high-surface-brightness disks in the most luminous galaxies. (3) At radii larger than 1.5hR, σLOS tends to decline slower than the best-fitting exponential function, which may be due to an increase in the disk mass-to-light ratio, disk flaring, or disk heating by the dark-matter halo. (4) A strong correlation exists between the central vertical stellar velocity dispersion of the disks (σz,0) and their circular rotational speed at 2.2hR (V2.2h

  5. No More Active Galactic Nuclei in Clumpy Disks Than in Smooth Galaxies at z ~ 2 in CANDELS/3D-HST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trump, Jonathan R.; Barro, Guillermo; Juneau, Stéphanie; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Luo, Bin; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Bell, Eric F.; Brandt, W. N.; Dekel, Avishai; Guo, Yicheng; Hopkins, Philip F.; Koo, David C.; Kocevski, Dale D.; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Momcheva, Ivelina; Faber, S. M.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Grogin, Norman A.; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Lotz, Jennifer; Maseda, Michael; Mozena, Mark; Nandra, Kirpal; Rosario, David J.; Zeimann, Gregory R.

    2014-10-01

    We use CANDELS imaging, 3D-HST spectroscopy, and Chandra X-ray data to investigate if active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are preferentially fueled by violent disk instabilities funneling gas into galaxy centers at 1.3 < z < 2.4. We select galaxies undergoing gravitational instabilities using the number of clumps and degree of patchiness as proxies. The CANDELS visual classification system is used to identify 44 clumpy disk galaxies, along with mass-matched comparison samples of smooth and intermediate morphology galaxies. We note that despite being mass-matched and having similar star formation rates, the smoother galaxies tend to be smaller disks with more prominent bulges compared to the clumpy galaxies. The lack of smooth extended disks is probably a general feature of the z ~ 2 galaxy population, and means we cannot directly compare with the clumpy and smooth extended disks observed at lower redshift. We find that z ~ 2 clumpy galaxies have slightly enhanced AGN fractions selected by integrated line ratios (in the mass-excitation method), but the spatially resolved line ratios indicate this is likely due to extended phenomena rather than nuclear AGNs. Meanwhile, the X-ray data show that clumpy, smooth, and intermediate galaxies have nearly indistinguishable AGN fractions derived from both individual detections and stacked non-detections. The data demonstrate that AGN fueling modes at z ~ 1.85—whether violent disk instabilities or secular processes—are as efficient in smooth galaxies as they are in clumpy galaxies. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA Inc, under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  6. RADIAL DISTRIBUTION OF STARS, GAS, AND DUST IN SINGS GALAXIES. III. MODELING THE EVOLUTION OF THE STELLAR COMPONENT IN GALAXY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz-Mateos, J. C.; Boissier, S.; Gil de Paz, A.; Zamorano, J.; Gallego, J.; Moustakas, J.; Prantzos, N. E-mail: gildepaz@gmail.com E-mail: j.gallego@fis.ucm.es E-mail: robk@ast.cam.ac.uk E-mail: prantzos@iap.fr

    2011-04-10

    We analyze the evolution of 42 spiral galaxies in the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey. We make use of ultraviolet (UV), optical, and near-infrared radial profiles, corrected for internal extinction using the total-infrared to UV ratio, to probe the emission of stellar populations of different ages as a function of galactocentric distance. We fit these radial profiles with models that describe the chemical and spectro-photometric evolution of spiral disks within a self-consistent framework. These backward evolutionary models successfully reproduce the multi-wavelength profiles of our galaxies, except for the UV profiles of some early-type disks for which the models seem to retain too much gas. From the model fitting we infer the maximum circular velocity of the rotation curve V{sub C} and the dimensionless spin parameter {lambda}. The values of V{sub C} are in good agreement with the velocities measured in H I rotation curves. Even though our sample is not volume limited, the resulting distribution of {lambda} is close to the lognormal function obtained in cosmological N-body simulations, peaking at {lambda} {approx} 0.03 regardless of the total halo mass. We do not find any evident trend between {lambda} and Hubble type, besides an increase in the scatter for the latest types. According to the model, galaxies evolve along a roughly constant mass-size relation, increasing their scale lengths as they become more massive. The radial scale length of most disks in our sample seems to have increased at a rate of 0.05-0.06 kpc Gyr{sup -1}, although the same cannot be said of a volume-limited sample. In relative terms, the scale length has grown by 20%-25% since z = 1 and, unlike the former figure, we argue that this relative growth rate can be indeed representative of a complete galaxy sample.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Disk galaxies at 0.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, A.; Ziegler, B. L.

    2016-06-01

    Redshifts, maximum rotation velocities, (Johnson) B-band absolute magnitudes and sizes are presented for a sample of 124 disk galaxies covering redshifts 0.1galaxies are selected from the FORS Deep Field (FDF), see Heidt et al. (2003A&A...398..49H), and the William Herschel Deep Field (WHDF), see Metcalfe et al. (2001MNRAS.323..779M). All given parameters assume a flat cosmology with H0=70km/s/Mpc, Omegamatter=0.3 and Omegalambda=0.7. (1 data file).

  8. Triggering active galactic nuclei in hierarchical galaxy formation: disk instability vs. interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menci, N.; Gatti, M.; Fiore, F.; Lamastra, A.

    2014-09-01

    Using a state-of-the-art semi analytic model for galaxy formation, we investigated in detail the effects of black hole (BH) accretion triggered by disk instabilities (DI) in isolated galaxies on the evolution of the AGN population. Specifically, we took on, developed, and expanded the Hopkins & Quataert (2011, MNRAS, 411, 1027) model for the mass inflow following disk perturbations, based on a physical description of nuclear inflows and tested against aimed N-body simulations. We compared the evolution of AGN due to such a DI accretion mode with that arising in a scenario where galaxy interactions (IT mode) produce the sudden destabilization of large quantities of gas feeding the AGN; this constitutes the standard AGN feeding mode implemented in the earliest versions of most semi-analytic models. To study the maximal contribution of DI to the evolution of the AGN population, we extended and developed the DI model to assess the effects of changing the assumed disk surface density profile, and to obtain lower limits for the nuclear star formation rates associated to the DI accretion mode. We obtained the following results: i) For AGN with luminosity M1450 ≳ - 26, the DI mode can provide the BH accretion needed to match the observed AGN luminosity functions up to z ≈ 4.5. In such a luminosity range and redshift, it constitutes a viable candidate mechanism to fuel AGN, and can compete with the IT scenario as the main driver of cosmological evolution of the AGN population. ii) The DI scenario cannot provide the observed abundance of high-luminosity QSO with M1450 ≤ -26 AGN, as well as the abundance of high-redhshift z ≳ 4.5 QSO with M1450 ≤ -24. As found in our earliest works, the IT scenario provides an acceptable match to the observed luminosity functions up to z ≈ 6. iii) The dispersion of the distributions of Eddington ratio λ for low- and intermediate-luminosity AGN (bolometric LAGN = 1043-1045 erg s-1) is predicted to be much smaller in the DI

  9. THE EXTENDED OPTICAL DISK OF M101

    SciTech Connect

    Mihos, J. Christopher; Harding, Paul; Spengler, Chelsea E.; Rudick, Craig S.; Feldmeier, John J. E-mail: paul.harding@case.edu E-mail: craig.rudick@phys.ethz.ch

    2013-01-10

    We have used deep, wide-field optical imaging to study the faint outskirts of the luminous spiral galaxy M101 (NGC 5457) as well as its surrounding environment. Over 6 deg{sup 2}, our imaging has a limiting surface brightness of {mu} {sub B} {approx} 29.5 mag arcsec{sup -2}, and has revealed the stellar structure of M101's disk out to nearly 25' (50 kpc), 3 times our measured R {sub 25} isophotal size of the optical disk. At these radii, the well-known asymmetry of the inner disk slews 180 Degree-Sign , resulting in an asymmetric plume of light at large radius which follows the very extended H I disk to the northeast of M101. This plume has very blue colors (B - V {approx} 0.2), suggesting that it is the somewhat more evolved (few hundred Myr to {approx}1 Gyr) counterpart of the young far-ultraviolet emitting population traced by Galaxy Evolution Explorer imaging. We also detect another, redder spur of extended light to the east of the disk, and both structures are reminiscent of features produced during fly-by galaxy interactions. However, we see no evidence of very extended tidal tails around M101 or any of its companions which might be expected from a recent encounter with a massive companion. We consider the properties of M101's outer disk in light of possible past interactions with the nearby companion galaxies NGC 5477 and NGC 5474. The detection of optical starlight at such large radii gives us the ability to study star formation histories and stellar populations in outer disks over longer timescales than those traced by the UV or H{alpha} emitting populations. Our data suggest an ongoing buildup of M101's outer disk due to encounters in the group environment triggering extended star formation and tidal heating of existing disk populations.

  10. Disk galaxy scaling relations at intermediate redshifts. I. The Tully-Fisher and velocity-size relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm, Asmus; Ziegler, Bodo L.

    2016-07-01

    Aims: Galaxy scaling relations such as the Tully-Fisher relation (between the maximum rotation velocity Vmax and luminosity) and the velocity-size relation (between Vmax and the disk scale length) are powerful tools to quantify the evolution of disk galaxies with cosmic time. Methods: We took spatially resolved slit spectra of 261 field disk galaxies at redshifts up to z ≈ 1 using the FORS instruments of the ESO Very Large Telescope. The targets were selected from the FORS Deep Field and William Herschel Deep Field. Our spectroscopy was complemented with HST/ACS imaging in the F814W filter. We analyzed the ionized gas kinematics by extracting rotation curves from the two-dimensional spectra. Taking into account all geometrical, observational, and instrumental effects, these rotation curves were used to derive the intrinsic Vmax. Results: Neglecting galaxies with disturbed kinematics or insufficient spatial rotation curve extent, Vmax was reliably determined for 124 galaxies covering redshifts 0.05 < z < 0.97. This is one of the largest kinematic samples of distant disk galaxies to date. We compared this data set to the local B-band Tully-Fisher relation and the local velocity-size relation. The scatter in both scaling relations is a factor of ~2 larger at z ≈ 0.5 than at z ≈ 0. The deviations of individual distant galaxies from the local Tully-Fisher relation are systematic in the sense that the galaxies are increasingly overluminous toward higher redshifts, corresponding to an overluminosity ΔMB = -(1.2 ± 0.5) mag at z = 1. This luminosity evolution at given Vmax is probably driven by younger stellar populations of distant galaxies with respect to their local counterparts, potentially combined with modest changes in dark matter mass fractions. The analysis of the velocity-size relation reveals that disk galaxies of a given Vmax have grown in size by a factor of ~1.5 over the past ~8 Gyr, most likely through accretion of cold gas and/or small satellites

  11. IDENTIFICATION OF MEMBERS IN THE CENTRAL AND OUTER REGIONS OF GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Serra, Ana Laura; Diaferio, Antonaldo

    2013-05-10

    The caustic technique measures the mass of galaxy clusters in both their virial and infall regions and, as a byproduct, yields the list of cluster galaxy members. Here we use 100 galaxy clusters with mass M{sub 200} {>=} 10{sup 14} h {sup -1} M{sub Sun} extracted from a cosmological N-body simulation of a {Lambda}CDM universe to test the ability of the caustic technique to identify the cluster galaxy members. We identify the true three-dimensional members as the gravitationally bound galaxies. The caustic technique uses the caustic location in the redshift diagram to separate the cluster members from the interlopers. We apply the technique to mock catalogs containing 1000 galaxies in the field of view of 12 h {sup -1} Mpc on a side at the cluster location. On average, this sample size roughly corresponds to 180 real galaxy members within 3r{sub 200}, similar to recent redshift surveys of cluster regions. The caustic technique yields a completeness, the fraction of identified true members, f{sub c} = 0.95 {+-} 0.03, within 3r{sub 200}. The contamination, the fraction of interlopers in the observed catalog of members, increases from f{sub i}=0.020{sup +0.046}{sub -0.015} at r{sub 200} to f{sub i}=0.08{sup +0.11}{sub -0.05} at 3r{sub 200}. No other technique for the identification of the members of a galaxy cluster provides such large completeness and small contamination at these large radii. The caustic technique assumes spherical symmetry and the asphericity of the cluster is responsible for most of the spread of the completeness and the contamination. By applying the technique to an approximately spherical system obtained by stacking the individual clusters, the spreads decrease by at least a factor of two. We finally estimate the cluster mass within 3r{sub 200} after removing the interlopers: for individual clusters, the mass estimated with the virial theorem is unbiased and within 30% of the actual mass; this spread decreases to less than 10% for the spherically

  12. Origins of the thick disk of the Milky Way Galaxy as traced by the elemental abundances of metal-poor stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruchti, Gregory Randal

    2010-12-01

    Understanding the formation and evolution of disks in galaxies in the early universe is very important for understanding the forms of galaxies today. Recent studies of the Milky Way Galaxy, an ideal galaxy for analyzing individual stars within its disk, indicate that the formation of the Galactic disk is very complex. Most of these studies, however, contain very few stars at low metallicities. Metal-poor stars are important, because they are potential survivors of the earliest star formation in the disk of the Milky Way Galaxy. I therefore measured elemental abundances of a statistically significant sample of metal-poor ([Fe/H] ≲ - 1.0) stars in the disk of the Galaxy, chosen from the RAVE survey in order to study the early formation history of the Galactic disk. I report on a sample of 214 red giant branch, 31 red clump/horizontal branch, and 74 dwarf/sub-giant metal-poor thick-disk candidate stars. I found that the [alpha/Fe] ratios are enhanced implying that enrichment proceeded by purely core-collapse supernovae. This requires that star formation in each star forming region had a short duration. The relative lack of scatter in the [alpha/Fe] ratios implies good mixing in the interstellar medium prior to star formation. In addition, the ratios resemble that of the halo, indicating that the halo and thick disk share a similar massive star initial mass function. I further looked for radial or vertical gradients in metallicity or alpha-enhancement for the metal-poor thick disk, never before done for such a sample. I found no radial gradient and a moderate vertical gradient in my derived iron abundance, and only minimal-amplitude gradients in [alpha/Fe]. In addition, I show that the distribution of orbital eccentricities for my metal-poor thick-disk stars requires that the thick disk was formed primarily in situ, with direct accretion being extremely minimal. I conclude that the alpha-enhancement of the metal-poor thick disk, and the lack of obvious radial or

  13. Accretion Disk Spectra of the Ultra-luminous X-ray Sources in Nearby Spiral Galaxies and Galactic Superluminal Jet Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor); Ebisawa, Ken; Zycki, Piotr; Kubota, Aya; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Watarai, Ken-ya

    2003-01-01

    Ultra-luminous Compact X-ray Sources (ULXs) in nearby spiral galaxies and Galactic superluminal jet sources share the common spectral characteristic that they have unusually high disk temperatures which cannot be explained in the framework of the standard optically thick accretion disk in the Schwarzschild metric. On the other hand, the standard accretion disk around the Kerr black hole might explain the observed high disk temperature, as the inner radius of the Kerr disk gets smaller and the disk temperature can be consequently higher. However, we point out that the observable Kerr disk spectra becomes significantly harder than Schwarzschild disk spectra only when the disk is highly inclined. This is because the emission from the innermost part of the accretion disk is Doppler-boosted for an edge-on Kerr disk, while hardly seen for a face-on disk. The Galactic superluminal jet sources are known to be highly inclined systems, thus their energy spectra may be explained with the standard Kerr disk with known black hole masses. For ULXs, on the other hand, the standard Kerr disk model seems implausible, since it is highly unlikely that their accretion disks are preferentially inclined, and, if edge-on Kerr disk model is applied, the black hole mass becomes unreasonably large (greater than or approximately equal to 300 Solar Mass). Instead, the slim disk (advection dominated optically thick disk) model is likely to explain the observed super- Eddington luminosities, hard energy spectra, and spectral variations of ULXs. We suggest that ULXs are accreting black holes with a few tens of solar mass, which is not unexpected from the standard stellar evolution scenario, and their X-ray emission is from the slim disk shining at super-Eddington luminosities.

  14. HERSCHEL-RESOLVED OUTER BELTS OF TWO-BELT DEBRIS DISKS AROUND A-TYPE STARS: HD 70313, HD 71722, HD 159492, AND F-TYPE: HD 104860

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, F. Y.; Bryden, G.; Werner, M. W.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.

    2013-10-20

    We present dual-band Herschel/Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer imaging for four stars whose spectral energy distributions (SEDs) suggest two-ring disk architectures that mirror that of the asteroid-Kuiper Belt geometry of our own solar system. The Herschel observations at 100 μm spatially resolve the cold/outer-dust component for each star-disk system for the first time, finding evidence of planetesimals at >100 AU, i.e., a larger size than assumed from a simple blackbody fit to the SED. By breaking the degeneracy between the grain properties and the dust's radial location, the resolved images help constrain the dust grain-size distribution for each system. Three of the observed stars are A-type and one solar-type. On the basis of the combined Spitzer/IRS+MIPS (5-70 μm), the Herschel/PACS (100 and 160 μm) dataset, and under the assumption of idealized spherical grains, we find that the cold/outer belts of the three A-type stars are well fit with a mixed ice/rock composition rather than pure rocky grains, while the debris around the solar-type star is consistent with either rock or ice/rock grains. For the solar-type star HD 104860, we find that the minimum grain size is larger than expected from the threshold set by radiative blowout. The A-type stars HD 71722 and HD 159492, on the other hand, require minimum grain sizes that are smaller than blowout for inner- and outer-ring populations. In the absence of spectral features for ice, we find that the behavior of the continuum can help constrain the composition of the grains (of icy nature and not pure rocky material) given the Herschel-resolved locations of the cold/outer-dust belts.

  15. The impact of galactic fountains on the global evolution of galaxy disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraternali, F.

    2016-06-01

    The evolution of the Milky Way, and its thin disc in particular, is a history of continuous accretion of fresh gas from the surrounding environment. Evidence for this accretion taking place include high-velocity clouds (HVCs) that appear to be raining down from the halo. I present a model that explains the formation of the prototypical HVC Complex C as gas cooling of the Galactic corona triggered by the explosion of a superbubble in the Outer arm occurred 150 Myr ago. This result is obtained with a new galactic fountain model combined with high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations. The material ejected by the superbubble has triggered the condensation of a large portion of the circumgalactic medium and caused its subsequent accretion on to the disc. This is a local manifestation of fountain-driven cooling of the lower Galactic corona that can contribute significantly in brining fresh low-metallicity gas to the disc of our Galaxy. The same model also reproduces the global-scale kinematics of the extraplanar gas and predicts a gas accretion that evolves inside-out.

  16. Probing the galactic disk and halo. 2: Hot interstellar gas toward the inner galaxy star HD 156359

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sembach, Kenneth R.; Savage, Blair D.; Lu, Limin

    1995-01-01

    We present Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph intermediate-resolution measurements of the 1233-1256 A spectral region of HD 156396, a halo star at l = 328.7 deg, b = -14.5 deg in the inner Galaxy with a line-of sight distance of 11.1 kpc and a z-distance of -2.8 kpc. The data have a resolution of 18 km/s Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) and a signal-to-noise ratio of approximately 50:1. We detect interstellar lines of Mg II, S II, S II, Ge II, and N V and determine log N/(Mg II) = 15.78 +0.25, -0.27, log N(Si II) greater than 13.70, log N(S II) greater than 15.76, log N(Ge II) = 12.20 +0.09,-0.11, and log N(N v) = 14.06 +/- 0.02. Assuming solar reference abundances, the diffuse clouds containing Mg, S, and Ge along the sight line have average logarithmic depletions D(Mg) = -0.6 +/- 0.3 dex, D(S) greater than -0.2 dex, and D(Ge) = -0.2 +/- 0.2 dex. The Mg and Ge depletions are approximately 2 times smaller than is typical of diffuse clouds in the solar vicinity. Galactic rotational modeling of the N v profiles indicates that the highly ionized gas traced by this ion has a scale height of approximately 1 kpc if gas at large z-distances corotates with the underlying disk gas. Rotational modeling of the Si iv and C iv profiles measured by the IUE satellite yields similar scale height estimates. The scale height results contrast with previous studies of highly ionized gas in the outer Milky Way that reveal a more extended gas distribtion with h approximately equals 3-4 kpc. We detect a high-velocity feature in N v and Si II v(sub LSR) approximately equals + 125 km/s) that is probably created in an interface between warm and hot gas.

  17. THE PHOTOMETRIC AND KINEMATIC STRUCTURE OF FACE-ON DISK GALAXIES. III. KINEMATIC INCLINATIONS FROM H{alpha} VELOCITY FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, David R.; Bershady, Matthew A. E-mail: mab@astro.wisc.edu

    2013-05-01

    Using the integral field unit DensePak on the WIYN 3.5 m telescope we have obtained H{alpha} velocity fields of 39 nearly face-on disks at echelle resolutions. High-quality, uniform kinematic data and a new modeling technique enabled us to derive accurate and precise kinematic inclinations with mean i{sub kin} = 23 Degree-Sign for 90% of these galaxies. Modeling the kinematic data as single, inclined disks in circular rotation improves upon the traditional tilted-ring method. We measure kinematic inclinations with a precision in sin i of 25% at 20 Degree-Sign and 6% at 30 Degree-Sign . Kinematic inclinations are consistent with photometric and inverse Tully-Fisher inclinations when the sample is culled of galaxies with kinematic asymmetries, for which we give two specific prescriptions. Kinematic inclinations can therefore be used in statistical ''face-on'' Tully-Fisher studies. A weighted combination of multiple, independent inclination measurements yield the most precise and accurate inclination. Combining inverse Tully-Fisher inclinations with kinematic inclinations yields joint probability inclinations with a precision in sin i of 10% at 15 Degree-Sign and 5% at 30 Degree-Sign . This level of precision makes accurate mass decompositions of galaxies possible even at low inclination. We find scaling relations between rotation speed and disk-scale length identical to results from more inclined samples. We also observe the trend of more steeply rising rotation curves with increased rotation speed and light concentration. This trend appears to be uncorrelated with disk surface brightness.

  18. A Simple Formula for the Third Integral of Motion of Disk-crossing Stars in the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Ronaldo S. S.; Ramos-Caro, Javier

    2014-05-01

    We present a simple analytical formula for an approximated third integral of motion associated with nearly equatorial orbits in the Galaxy: I_{3}=Z\\Sigma _{I}^{1/3}, where Z(R) is the vertical amplitude of the orbit at galactocentric distance R and Σ I (R) is the integrated dynamical surface mass density of the disk, a quantity which has recently become measurable. We also suggest that this relation is valid for disk-crossing orbits in a wide variety of axially symmetric galactic models, which range from razor-thin disks to disks with non-negligible thickness, whether or not the system includes bulges and halos. We apply our formalism to a Miyamoto-Nagai model and to a realistic model for the Milky Way. In both cases, the results provide fits for the shape of nearly equatorial orbits which are better than the corresponding curves obtained by the usual adiabatic approximation when the orbits have vertical amplitudes comparable to the disk's scale height. We also discuss the role of this approximate third integral of motion in modified theories of gravity.

  19. A simple formula for the third integral of motion of disk-crossing stars in the galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Vieira, Ronaldo S. S.; Ramos-Caro, Javier E-mail: javier@ufscar.br

    2014-05-01

    We present a simple analytical formula for an approximated third integral of motion associated with nearly equatorial orbits in the Galaxy: I{sub 3}=ZΣ{sub I}{sup 1/3}, where Z(R) is the vertical amplitude of the orbit at galactocentric distance R and Σ {sub I}(R) is the integrated dynamical surface mass density of the disk, a quantity which has recently become measurable. We also suggest that this relation is valid for disk-crossing orbits in a wide variety of axially symmetric galactic models, which range from razor-thin disks to disks with non-negligible thickness, whether or not the system includes bulges and halos. We apply our formalism to a Miyamoto-Nagai model and to a realistic model for the Milky Way. In both cases, the results provide fits for the shape of nearly equatorial orbits which are better than the corresponding curves obtained by the usual adiabatic approximation when the orbits have vertical amplitudes comparable to the disk's scale height. We also discuss the role of this approximate third integral of motion in modified theories of gravity.

  20. A kinematic measurement of ram pressure in the outer disc of regular galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haan, S.; Braun, R.

    2014-09-01

    While most ram pressure studies have focused on ram pressure stripping in galaxy clusters, we devise a novel approach based on a kinematic measurement of ram pressure perturbations in H I velocity fields for intergalactic material (IGM) densities and relative velocities that are one to two orders of magnitude lower than in galaxies showing ram pressure stripping. Our model evaluates ram pressure induced kinematic terms in gas discs with constant inclination as well as those with a warped geometry. Ram pressure perturbations are characterized by kinematic modes of even order, m = 0 and 2, corresponding to a ram wind perpendicular and parallel to the gas disc, respectively. Long-term consequences of ram pressure, such as warped discs as well as uncertainties in the disc geometry typically generate uneven modes (m = 1 and 3), that are clearly distinguishable from the kinematic ram pressure terms. We have applied our models to three nearby isolated galaxies, utilizing Markov chain Monte Carlo fitting routines to determine ram pressure perturbations in the velocity fields of NGC 6946 and NGC 3621 of ˜30 km s-1 (effective line-of-sight velocity change) at H I column densities below (4-10) × 1020 cm-2 (at radial scales greater than ˜15 kpc). In contrast, NGC 628 is dominated by a strongly warped disc. Our model fits reveal the three-dimensional vector of the galaxies' movement with respect to the IGM rest frame and provide constraints on the product of speed with IGM density, opening a new window for extragalactic velocity measurements and studies of the intergalactic medium.

  1. Can Massive Gravity Explain the Mass Discrepancy-Acceleration Relation of Disk Galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trippe, Sascha

    2013-06-01

    The empirical mass discrepancy-acceleration (MDA) relation of disk galaxies provides a key test for models of galactic dynamics. In terms of modified laws of gravity and/or inertia, the MDA relation quantifies the transition from Newtonian to modified dynamics at low centripetal accelerations a_c≲10^{-10} m s^{-2}. As yet, neither dynamical models based on dark matter nor proposed modifications of the laws of gravity/inertia have predicted the functional form of the MDA relation. In this work, I revisit the MDA data and compare them to four different theoretical scaling laws. Three of these scaling laws are entirely empirical; the fourth one - the ``simple μ'' function of Modified Newtonian Dynamics - derives from a toy model of gravity based on massive gravitons (the ``graviton picture''). All theoretical MDA relations comprise one free parameter of the dimension of an acceleration, Milgrom's constant am. I find that the ``simple μ'' function provides a good fit to the data free of notable systematic residuals and provides the best fit among the four scaling laws tested. The best-fit value of Milgrom's constant is am=(1.06±0.05)×10^{-10} m s^{-2}. Given the successful prediction of the functional form of the MDA relation, plus an overall agreement with the observed kinematics of stellar systems spanning eight orders of magnitude in size and 14 orders of magnitude in mass, I conclude that the ``graviton picture'' is sufficient (albeit probably not a necessary nor unique approach) to describe galactic dynamics on all scales well beyond the scale of the solar system. This suggests that, at least on galactic scales, gravity behaves as if it was mediated by massive particles.

  2. Probing the Disk-Jet Connection of the Radio Galaxy 3C120 Observed With Suzaku

    SciTech Connect

    Kataoka, Jun; Reeves, James N.; Iwasawa, Kazushi; Markowitz, Alex G.; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Arimoto, Makoto; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tsubuku, Yoshihiro; Ushio, Masayoshi; Watanabe, Shin; Gallo, Luigi C.; Madejski, Greg M.; Terashima, Yuichi; Isobe, Naoki; Tashiro, Makoto S.; Kohmura, Takayoshi; /Tokyo Inst. Tech. /NASA, Goddard /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE /JAXA, Sagamihara /SLAC /Ehime U. /Wako, RIKEN /Saitama U. /Kogakuin U.

    2007-01-03

    Broad line radio galaxies (BLRGs) are a rare type of radio-loud AGN, in which the broad optical permitted emission lines have been detected in addition to the extended jet emission. Here we report on deep (40ksec x 4) observations of the bright BLRG 3C 120 using Suzaku. The observations were spaced a week apart, and sample a range of continuum fluxes. An excellent broadband spectrum was obtained over two decades of frequency (0.6 to 50 keV) within each 40 ksec exposure. We clearly resolved the iron K emission line complex, finding that it consists of a narrow K{sub {alpha}} core ({sigma} {approx_equal} 110 eV or an EW of 60 eV), a 6.9 keV line, and an underlying broad iron line. Our confirmation of the broad line contrasts with the XMM-Newton observation in 2003, where the broad line was not required. The most natural interpretation of the broad line is iron K line emission from a face-on accretion disk which is truncated at {approx} 10 r{sub g}. Above 10 keV, a relatively weak Compton hump was detected (reflection fraction of R {approx_equal} 0.6), superposed on the primary X-ray continuum of {Lambda} {approx_equal} 1.75. Thanks to the good photon statistics and low background of the Suzaku data, we clearly confirm the spectral evolution of 3C 120, whereby the variability amplitude decreases with increasing energy. More strikingly, we discovered that the variability is caused by a steep power-law component of {Lambda} {approx_equal} 2.7, possibly related to the non-thermal jet emission. We discuss our findings in the context of similarities and differences between radio-loud/quiet objects.

  3. The Formation of Milky Way-mass Disk Galaxies in the First 500 Million Years of a Cold Dark Matter Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yu; Di Matteo, Tiziana; Croft, Rupert; Tenneti, Ananth; Bird, Simeon; Battaglia, Nicholas; Wilkins, Stephen

    2015-07-01

    Whether or not among the myriad tiny protogalaxies there exists a population with similarities to present-day galaxies is an open question. We show, using BlueTides, the first hydrodynamic simulation large enough to resolve the relevant scales, that the first massive galaxies to form are predicted to have extensive rotationally supported disks. Although their morphology resembles in some ways Milky Way types seen at much lower redshifts, these high-redshift galaxies are smaller, denser, and richer in gas than their low-redshift counterparts. From a kinematic analysis of a statistical sample of 216 galaxies at redshift z = 8-10, we have found that disk galaxies make up 70% of the population of galaxies with stellar mass {10}10{M}⊙ or greater. Cold dark matter cosmology therefore makes specific predictions for the population of large galaxies 500 million years after the Big Bang. We argue that wide-field satellite telescopes (e.g., WFIRST) will in the near future discover these first massive disk galaxies. The simplicity of their structure and formation history should make new tests of cosmology possible.

  4. Photoevaporating Disks Around Young Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David

    2004-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation from the central star or from a nearby massive star heats the surfaces of protoplanetary disks and causes the outer, less gravitationally bound part of the disks, to photoevaporate into interstellar space. Photoevaporation is likely the most important dispersal mechanism for the outer regions of disks. We focus in this talk on disks around low-mass stars like the Sun rather than high-mass stars, which we have treated previously. Stars often form in clusters and the ultraviolet flux from the most luminous star in the cluster can have a dramatic effect on the disk orbiting a nearby low-mass star. We apply our theoretical models to the evaporating protoplanetary disks (or "proplyds") in the Trapezium cluster in Orion, to the formation of gas giant planets like Jupiter around Sun-like stars in the Galaxy, and to the formation of Kuiper belts around low mass stars. We discuss recent models of the effects of the radiation from the central low mass star including both the predicted infrared spectra from the heated disks as well as preliminary results on the photoevaporation rates.

  5. The Gravitational Force and Potential of the Finite Mestel Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Earl

    2012-03-01

    Mestel determined the surface mass distribution of the finite disk for which the circular velocity is constant in the disk and found the gravitational field for points in the z = 0 plane. Here we find the exact closed form solutions for the potential and the gravitational field of this disk in cylindrical coordinates over all the space. The finite Mestel disk (FMD) is characterized by a cuspy mass distribution in the inner disk region and by an exponential distribution in the outer region of the disk. The FMD is quite different from the better known exponential disk or the untruncated Mestel disk which, being infinite in extent, are not realistic models of real spiral galaxies. In particular, the FMD requires significantly less mass to explain a measured velocity curve.

  6. JET PROPERTIES OF GeV-SELECTED RADIO-LOUD NARROW-LINE SEYFERT 1 GALAXIES AND POSSIBLE CONNECTION TO THEIR DISK AND CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiao-Na; Lin, Da-Bin; Liang, En-Wei; Zhang, Jin; Xue, Zi-Wei; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2015-01-01

    The observed spectral energy distributions of five GeV-selected narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxies are fitted with a model including the radiation ingredients from the relativistic jet, the accretion disk, and the corona. We compare the properties of these GeV NLS1 galaxies with flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs), BL Lacertae objects (BL Lacs), and radio-quiet (RQ) Seyfert galaxies, and explore possible hints for jet-disk/corona connection. Our results show that the radiation physics and the jet properties of the GeV NLS1 galaxies resemble that of FSRQs. The luminosity variations of PMN J0948+0022 and 1H 0323+342 at the GeV band is tightly correlated with the beaming factor (δ), similar to that observed in FSRQ 3C 279. The accretion disk luminosities and the jet powers of the GeV NLS1 galaxies cover both the ranges of FSRQs and BL Lacs. With the detection of bright corona emission in 1H 0323+342, we show that the ratio of the corona luminosity (L {sub corona}) to the accretion disk luminosity (L {sub d}) is marginally within the high end of this ratio distribution for an RQ Seyfert galaxy sample, and the variation of jet luminosity may connect with L {sub corona}. However, it is still unclear whether a system with a high L {sub corona}/L {sub d} ratio prefers to power a jet.

  7. TURBULENCE IN THE OUTER REGIONS OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. II. STRONG ACCRETION DRIVEN BY A VERTICAL MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Jacob B.; Armitage, Philip J.; Beckwith, Kris; Bai, Xue-Ning; Stone, James M.

    2013-09-20

    We carry out a series of local, vertically stratified shearing box simulations of protoplanetary disks that include ambipolar diffusion and a net vertical magnetic field. The ambipolar diffusion profiles we employ correspond to 30 AU and 100 AU in a minimum mass solar nebula (MMSN) disk model, which consists of a far-ultraviolet-ionized surface layer and low-ionization disk interior. These simulations serve as a follow-up to Simon et al., in which we found that without a net vertical field, the turbulent stresses that result from the magnetorotational instability (MRI) are too weak to account for observed accretion rates. The simulations in this work show a very strong dependence of the accretion stresses on the strength of the background vertical field; as the field strength increases, the stress amplitude increases. For a net vertical field strength (quantified by β{sub 0}, the ratio of gas to magnetic pressure at the disk mid-plane) of β{sub 0} = 10{sup 4} and β{sub 0} = 10{sup 5}, we find accretion rates M-dot ∼10{sup -8}-10{sup –7} M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. These accretion rates agree with observational constraints, suggesting a vertical magnetic field strength of ∼60-200 μG and 10-30 μG at 30 AU and 100 AU, respectively, in a MMSN disk. Furthermore, the stress has a non-negligible component due to a magnetic wind. For sufficiently strong vertical field strengths, MRI turbulence is quenched, and the flow becomes largely laminar, with accretion proceeding through large-scale correlations in the radial and toroidal field components as well as through the magnetic wind. In all simulations, the presence of a low-ionization region near the disk mid-plane, which we call the ambipolar damping zone, results in reduced stresses there.

  8. A massive cloud of cold atomic hydrogen in the outer Galaxy.

    PubMed

    Knee, L B; Brunt, C M

    2001-07-19

    A large fraction of the mass of the interstellar medium in our Galaxy is in the form of warm (103-104 K) and cool (50-100 K) atomic hydrogen (H i) gas. Cold (10-30 K) regions are thought to be dominated by dense clouds of molecular hydrogen. Cold H i is difficult to observe, and therefore our knowledge of its abundance and distribution in the interstellar medium is poor. The few known clouds of cold H i are much smaller in size and mass than typical molecular clouds. Here we report the discovery that the H i supershell GSH139-03-69 is very cold (10 K). It is about 2 kiloparsecs in size and as massive as the largest molecular complexes. The existence of such an immense structure composed of cold atomic hydrogen in the interstellar medium runs counter to the prevailing view that cold gas resides almost exclusively in clouds dominated by molecular hydrogen. PMID:11460155

  9. ACCRETION-INHIBITED STAR FORMATION IN THE WARM MOLECULAR DISK OF THE GREEN-VALLEY ELLIPTICAL GALAXY NGC 3226?

    SciTech Connect

    Appleton, P. N.; Bitsakis, T.; Alatalo, K.; Mundell, C.; Lacy, M.; Armus, L.; Charmandaris, V.; Duc, P.-A.; Lisenfeld, U.; Ogle, P.

    2014-12-20

    We present archival Spitzer photometry and spectroscopy and Herschel photometry of the peculiar ''Green Valley'' elliptical galaxy NGC 3226. The galaxy, which contains a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (AGN), forms a pair with NGC 3227 and is shown to lie in a complex web of stellar and H I filaments. Imaging at 8 and 16 μm reveals a curved plume structure 3 kpc in extent, embedded within the core of the galaxy and coincident with the termination of a 30 kpc long H I tail. In situ star formation associated with the infrared (IR) plume is identified from narrowband Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging. The end of the IR plume coincides with a warm molecular hydrogen disk and dusty ring containing 0.7-1.1 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉} detected within the central kiloparsec. Sensitive upper limits to the detection of cold molecular gas may indicate that a large fraction of the H{sub 2} is in a warm state. Photometry derived from the ultraviolet (UV) to the far-IR shows evidence for a low star-formation rate of ∼0.04 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} averaged over the last 100 Myr. A mid-IR component to the spectral energy distribution (SED) contributes ∼20% of the IR luminosity of the galaxy, and is consistent with emission associated with the AGN. The current measured star formation rate is insufficient to explain NGC 3226's global UV-optical ''green'' colors via the resurgence of star formation in a ''red and dead'' galaxy. This form of ''cold accretion'' from a tidal stream would appear to be an inefficient way to rejuvenate early-type galaxies and may actually inhibit star formation.

  10. Accretion-Inhibited Star Formation in the Warm Molecular Disk of the Green-valley Elliptical Galaxy NGC 3226?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleton, P. N.; Mundell, C.; Bitsakis, T.; Lacy, M.; Alatalo, K.; Armus, L.; Charmandaris, V.; Duc, P.-A.; Lisenfeld, U.; Ogle, P.

    2014-12-01

    We present archival Spitzer photometry and spectroscopy and Herschel photometry of the peculiar "Green Valley" elliptical galaxy NGC 3226. The galaxy, which contains a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (AGN), forms a pair with NGC 3227 and is shown to lie in a complex web of stellar and H I filaments. Imaging at 8 and 16 μm reveals a curved plume structure 3 kpc in extent, embedded within the core of the galaxy and coincident with the termination of a 30 kpc long H I tail. In situ star formation associated with the infrared (IR) plume is identified from narrowband Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging. The end of the IR plume coincides with a warm molecular hydrogen disk and dusty ring containing 0.7-1.1 × 107 M ⊙ detected within the central kiloparsec. Sensitive upper limits to the detection of cold molecular gas may indicate that a large fraction of the H2 is in a warm state. Photometry derived from the ultraviolet (UV) to the far-IR shows evidence for a low star-formation rate of ~0.04 M ⊙ yr-1 averaged over the last 100 Myr. A mid-IR component to the spectral energy distribution (SED) contributes ~20% of the IR luminosity of the galaxy, and is consistent with emission associated with the AGN. The current measured star formation rate is insufficient to explain NGC 3226's global UV-optical "green" colors via the resurgence of star formation in a "red and dead" galaxy. This form of "cold accretion" from a tidal stream would appear to be an inefficient way to rejuvenate early-type galaxies and may actually inhibit star formation.

  11. Chandra survey of nearby highly inclined disk galaxies - IV. New insights into the working of stellar feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q. Daniel; Li, Jiangtao; Jiang, Xiaochuan; Fang, Taotao

    2016-04-01

    Galaxy evolution is regulated by the interplay between galactic discs and their surrounding medium. We study this interplay by examining how the galactic coronal emission efficiency of stellar feedback depends on the (surface and specific) star formation rates (SFRs) and other parameters for a sample of 52 Chandra-observed nearby highly inclined disc galaxies. We first measure the star-forming galactic disc sizes, as well as the SFRs of these galaxies, using data from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer, and then show that (1) the specific 0.5-2 keV luminosity of the coronal emission correlates with the specific SFR in a sub-linear fashion: on average, LX/LK∝(SFR/M*)Γ with Γ = 0.29 ± 0.12; (2) the efficiency of the emission LX/SFR decreases with increasing surface SFR (ISFR; Γ = -0.44 ± 0.12); and (3) the characteristic temperature of the X-ray-emitting plasma weakly correlates with ISFR (Γ = 0.08 ± 0.04). These results, somewhat surprising and anti-intuitive, suggest that (i) the linear correlation between LX and SFR, as commonly presented, is largely due to the correlation of these two parameters with galaxy mass; (ii) much of the mechanical energy from stellar feedback likely drives global outflows with little X-ray cooling and with a mass-loading efficiency decreasing fast with increasing ISFR (Γ ≲ -0.5); (iii) these outflows heat and inflate the medium around the galactic disks of massive galaxies, reducing its radiative cooling rate, whereas for relatively low-mass galaxies, the energy in the outflows is probably dissipated in regions far away from the galactic discs.

  12. A UNIVERSAL, LOCAL STAR FORMATION LAW IN GALACTIC CLOUDS, NEARBY GALAXIES, HIGH-REDSHIFT DISKS, AND STARBURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Krumholz, Mark R.; Dekel, Avishai; McKee, Christopher F. E-mail: dekel@phys.huji.ac.il

    2012-01-20

    Star formation laws are rules that relate the rate of star formation in a particular region, either an entire galaxy or some portion of it, to the properties of the gas, or other galactic properties, in that region. While observations of Local Group galaxies show a very simple, local star formation law in which the star formation rate per unit area in each patch of a galaxy scales linearly with the molecular gas surface density in that patch, recent observations of both Milky Way molecular clouds and high-redshift galaxies apparently show a more complicated relationship in which regions of equal molecular gas surface density can form stars at quite different rates. These data have been interpreted as implying either that different star formation laws may apply in different circumstances, that the star formation law is sensitive to large-scale galaxy properties rather than local properties, or that there are high-density thresholds for star formation. Here we collate observations of the relationship between gas and star formation rate from resolved observations of Milky Way molecular clouds, from kpc-scale observations of Local Group galaxies, and from unresolved observations of both disk and starburst galaxies in the local universe and at high redshift. We show that all of these data are in fact consistent with a simple, local, volumetric star formation law. The apparent variations stem from the fact that the observed objects have a wide variety of three-dimensional size scales and degrees of internal clumping, so even at fixed gas column density the regions being observed can have wildly varying volume densities. We provide a simple theoretical framework to remove this projection effect, and we use it to show that all the data, from small solar neighborhood clouds with masses {approx}10{sup 3} M{sub Sun} to submillimeter galaxies with masses {approx}10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }, fall on a single star formation law in which the star formation rate is simply {approx}1% of

  13. The optical morphology of the kinematically peculiar galaxy NGC 4826

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walterbos, R. A. M.; Braun, R.; Kennicutt, R. C., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    We present charge coupled device (CCD) BVI photometry of the galaxy NGC 4826, the Evil- or Black-Eye galaxy, which was recently found to have two counter-rotating gas disks. We study the extinction in the inner gas disk, which gives NGC 4826 its nickname, and find that this disk can be coplanar or close to coplanar with the stellar disk and still cause the strong absorption that is seen on one side of the galaxy. We try to constrain the orientation of the outer gas disk by looking for a small overall asymmetry in the light distribution which would be present if there is dust in this disk, and if it is significantly tilted with respect to the main body of the galaxy. The test shows that the light distribution does not preclude the outer gas disk from being coplanar with the stellar disk as well. NGC 4826 has a small bulge, with a bulge to total light ratio of 0.17 in B. We confirm that this galaxy is indeed a spiral, with a perfect exponential disk down to 27 mag/sq arcsec in B. The close to coplanar orientation of the gas disks is one aspect which is in good agreement with what is expected on the basis of a merger model for the counter-rotating gas. The rotation direction of the inner gas disk with respect to the stars, however, is not. In addition, the existence of a well defined exponential disk probably implies that if a merger did occur it must have been between a gas-rich dwarf and a spiral, not between two equal mass spirals. The stellar spiral arms of NGC 4826 are trailing over part of the disk and leading in the outer disk. Recent numerical calculations by Byrd et al. for NGC 4622 suggest that long lasting leading arms could be formed by a close retrograde passage of a small companion. In this scenario, the outer counter-rotating gas disk in NGC 4826 might be the tidally stripped gas from the dwarf. However, in NGC 4826 the outer arms are leading, while it appears that in NGC 4622 the inner arms are leading. A realistic N-body/hydro simulation of a dwarf

  14. Kinematic Disturbances in Optical Rotation Curves among 89 Virgo Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Vera C.; Waterman, Andrew H.; Kenney, Jeffrey D. P.

    1999-07-01

    For 89 galaxies, mostly spirals, in the Virgo Cluster region, we have obtained optical long-slit major-axis spectra of the ionized gas. We find the following: (1) One-half of the Virgo galaxies we observed have regular rotation patterns, while the other half exhibit kinematic disturbances ranging from mild to major. Velocity complexities are generally consistent with those resulting from tidal encounters or accretion events. Since kinematic disturbances are expected to fade within ~10^9 yr, many Virgo galaxies have experienced several significant kinematic disturbances during their lifetimes. (2) There is no strong correlation of rotation curve complexity with Hubble type, with galaxy luminosity, with local galaxy density, or with H I deficiency. (3) A few Virgo galaxies have ionized gas of limited extent, with velocities exceptionally low for their luminosities. In these galaxies the gas must be not rotationally supported. (4) There is a remarkable difference in the distribution of galaxy systemic velocity for galaxies with regular rotation curves and galaxies with disturbed rotation curves. Galaxies with regular rotation patterns show a flat distribution with velocities ranging from V_0=-300 km s^-1 to V_0=+2500 km s^-1 galaxies with disturbed kinematics have a Gaussian distribution that peaks at V_0=+1172+/-100 km s^-1, close to the cluster mean velocity. This latter distribution is virtually identical to the distribution of systemic velocity for elliptical galaxies in Virgo. However, disturbed galaxies are less concentrated to the cluster core than are the ellipticals; those near the periphery have velocities closer to the mean cluster velocity. Thus, spirals with disturbed kinematics are preferentially on radial orbits, which bring them to the denser core, where tidal interactions are strong and/or more common. Because they spend much time near apocenter, we observe them near the cluster periphery. Some may be falling into the core for the first time. These

  15. The Outer Limits of Galaxy Clusters: Observations to the Virial Radius with Suzaku, XMM,and Chandra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Eric D.; Bautz, Marshall; George, Jithin; Mushotzky, Richard; Davis, David; Henry, J. Patrick

    2012-01-01

    The outskirts of galaxy clusters, near the virial radius, remain relatively unexplored territory and yet are vital to our understanding of cluster growth, structure, and mass. In this presentation, we show the first results from a program to constrain the sate of the outer intra-cluster medium (ICM) in a large sample of galaxy clusters, exploiting the strengths of three complementary X-ray observatories: Suzaku (low, stable background), XMM-Newton (high sensitivity),and Chandra (good spatial resolution). By carefully combining observations from the cluster core to beyond r200, we are able to identify and reduce systematic uncertainties that would impede our spatial and spectral analysis using a single telescope. Our sample comprises nine clusters at z is approximately 0.1-0.2 fully covered in azimuth to beyond r200, and our analysis indicates that the ICM is not in hydrostatic equilibrium in the cluster outskirts, where we see clear azimuthal variations in temperature and surface brightness. In one of the clusters, we are able to measure the diffuse X-ray emission well beyond r200, and we find that the entropy profile and the gas fraction are consistent with expectations from theory and numerical simulations. These results stand in contrast to recent studies which point to gas clumping in the outskirts; the extent to which differences of cluster environment or instrumental effects factor in this difference remains unclear. From a broader perspective, this project will produce a sizeable fiducial data set for detailed comparison with high-resolution numerical simulations.

  16. Disk dwarf galaxy as the progenitor of the Andromeda giant stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirihara, Takanobu; Miki, Yohei; Mori, Masao; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro

    2016-08-01

    We present a study of the morphology of a progenitor galaxy that has been disrupted and formed a giant southern stellar stream in the halo of Andromeda galaxy(M31). N-body simulations of a minor merger of M31 with a dwarf galaxy suggest that the progenitor's rotation plays an important role in the formation of an asymmetric surface brightness distribution of the stream.

  17. Galaxy evolution: The Milky Way perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majewski, Steven R.

    1993-01-01

    Various papers on the evolution of the Galaxy are presented. The individual topics addressed include: the possibility of a merger in the Galactic past; the age and formation redshift of the Galaxy; starcounts as a probe of Galactic structure; the history of the Galactic bulge; kinematics, chemistry, and stellar populations; Monte Carlo analyses of biased Galactic structure data; dynamical history of the Galactic disk; globular cluster kinematics; destruction of globular clusters in the Galaxy. Also discussed are: globular clusters of the outer halo as probes of the Galaxy's structure and early evolution; measuring relative ages of Galactic globular clusters; accretion-induced heating of disks in galaxies; formation and evolution of the Galactic bulge and halo; history of halo gas in normal galaxies.

  18. Gems in the outer galaxy: Near-infrared imaging of three young clusters at large galactic radii

    SciTech Connect

    Davidge, T. J.

    2014-02-01

    Images recorded with the Gemini South Adaptive Optics Imager (GSAOI) and corrected for atmospheric seeing by the Gemini Multi-conjugate Adaptive Optics System are used to investigate the stellar contents of the young outer Galactic disk clusters Haffner 17, NGC 2401, and NGC 3105. Ages estimated from the faint end of the main sequence (MS) and the ridgeline of the pre-main sequence on the (K, J – K) color-magnitude diagrams are consistent with published values that are based on the MS turnoff, with the GSAOI data favoring the younger end of the age range for NGC 2401 in the literature. The mass function (MF) of NGC 2401 is similar to that in the solar neighborhood, and stars spanning a wide range of masses in this cluster have similar clustering properties on the sky. It is concluded that NGC 2401 is not evolved dynamically. In contrast, the MF of Haffner 17 differs significantly from that in the solar neighborhood over all masses covered by these data, while the MF of NGC 3105 is deficient in objects with sub-solar masses when compared with the solar neighborhood. Low-mass objects in Haffner 17 and NGC 3105 are also more uniformly distributed on the sky than brighter, more massive, MS stars. This is consistent with both clusters having experienced significant dynamical evolution.

  19. A new catalog of H i supershell candidates in the outer part of the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suad, L. A.; Caiafa, C. F.; Arnal, E. M.; Cichowolski, S.

    2014-04-01

    Aims: The main goal of this work is to a have a new neutral hydrogen (H i) supershell candidate catalog to analyze their spatial distribution in the Galaxy and to carry out a statistical study of their main properties. Methods: This catalog was carried out making use of the Leiden-Argentine-Bonn (LAB) survey. The supershell candidates were identified using a combination of two techniques: a visual inspection plus an automatic searching algorithm. Our automatic algorithm is able to detect both closed and open structures. Results: A total of 566 supershell candidates were identified. Most of them (347) are located in the second Galactic quadrant, while 219 were found in the third one. About 98% of a subset of 190 structures (used to derive the statistical properties of the supershell candidates) are elliptical with a mean weighted eccentricity of 0.8 ± 0.1, and ~70% have their major axes parallel to the Galactic plane. The weighted mean value of the effective radius of the structures is ~160 pc. Owing to the ability of our automatic algorithm to detect open structures, we have also identified some "galactic chimney" candidates. We find an asymmetry between the second and third Galactic quadrants in the sense that in the second one we detect structures as far as 32 kpc, while for the 3rd one the farthest structure is detected at 17 kpc. The supershell surface density in the solar neighborhood is ~8 kpc-2, and decreases as we move farther away form the Galactic center. We have also compared our catalog with those by other authors. Full table is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/564/A116

  20. Disk Dispersal Around Young Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David

    2004-01-01

    We first review the evidence pertaining to the lifetimes of planet-forming disks of gas and dust around young stars and discuss possible disk dispersal mechanisms: 1) viscous accretion of material onto the central source, 2) close stellar encounters, 3) stellar winds, and 4) photoevaporation caused by the heating of the disk surface by ultraviolet radiation. Photoevaporation is likely the most important dispersal mechanism for the outer regions of disks, and this talk focuses on the evaporation caused by the presence of a nearby, luminous star rather than the central star itself. We also focus on disks around low-mass stars like the Sun rather than high-mass stars, which we have treated previously. Stars often form in clusters and the ultraviolet flux from the most luminous star in the cluster can have a dramatic effect on the disk orbiting a nearby low-mass star. We apply our theoretical models to the evaporating protoplanetary disks (or "proplyds") in the Trapezium cluster in Orion, to the formation of gas giant planets like Jupiter around Sun-like stars in the Galaxy, and to the formation of Kuiper belts around low mass stars. We find a possible explanation for the differences between Neptune and Jupiter, and make a prediction concerning recent searches for giant planets in large clusters. We discuss recent models of the infrared spectra from gaseous disks around young stars.

  1. GSH 91.5+2-114: A large H i shell in the outer part of the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cichowolski, S.; Pineault, S.

    2011-01-01

    GSH 91.5+2-114 is a large H i shell located in the outer Galaxy at a kinematic distance of about 15 kpc. It was first identified in the Canadian Galactic Plane Survey (CGPS) by Pineault et al. (2002, ASP Conf. Ser., 276, 332) as being possibly associated with objects possessing infrared colors, which indicates strong stellar winds. The H i shell has no obvious continuum counterpart in the CGPS radio images at 408 and 1420 MHz or in the IRAS images. We found no evidence for early-type massive stars, most likely as a result of the large extinction that is expected for this large distance. An analysis of the energetics and of the main physical parameters of the H i shell shows that this shell is likely the result of the combined action of the stellar winds and supernova explosions of many stars. We investigate whether a number of slightly extended regions characterized by a thermal radio continuum and located near the periphery of the H i shell could be the result of star formation triggered by the expanding shell.

  2. CONTRIBUTION OF THE ACCRETION DISK, HOT CORONA, AND OBSCURING TORUS TO THE LUMINOSITY OF SEYFERT GALAXIES: INTEGRAL AND SPITZER OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Sazonov, S.; Churazov, E.; Krivonos, R.; Revnivtsev, M.; Sunyaev, R.; Vikhlinin, A.; Hickox, R. C.; Gorjian, V.; Werner, M. W.; Fabian, A. C.; Forman, W. R.

    2012-10-01

    We estimate the relative contributions of the supermassive black hole (SMBH) accretion disk, corona, and obscuring torus to the bolometric luminosity of Seyfert galaxies, using Spitzer mid-infrared (MIR) observations of a complete sample of 68 nearby active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from the INTEGRAL all-sky hard X-ray (HX) survey. This is the first HX-selected (above 15 keV) sample of AGNs with complementary high angular resolution, high signal-to-noise, MIR data. Correcting for the host galaxy contribution, we find a correlation between HX and MIR luminosities: L{sub 15{mu}m}{proportional_to}L{sup 0.74{+-}0.06}{sub HX}. Assuming that the observed MIR emission is radiation from an accretion disk reprocessed in a surrounding dusty torus that subtends a solid angle decreasing with increasing luminosity (as inferred from the declining fraction of obscured AGNs), the intrinsic disk luminosity, L{sub Disk}, is approximately proportional to the luminosity of the corona in the 2-300 keV energy band, L{sub Corona}, with the L{sub Disk}/L{sub Corona} ratio varying by a factor of 2.1 around a mean value of 1.6. This ratio is a factor of {approx}2 smaller than for typical quasars producing the cosmic X-ray background. Therefore, over three orders of magnitude in luminosity, HX radiation carries a large, and roughly comparable, fraction of the bolometric output of AGNs. We estimate the cumulative bolometric luminosity density of local AGNs at {approx}(1-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3}. Finally, the Compton temperature ranges between kT{sub c} Almost-Equal-To 2 and Almost-Equal-To 6 keV for nearby AGNs, compared to kT{sub c} Almost-Equal-To 2 keV for typical quasars, confirming that radiative heating of interstellar gas can play an important role in regulating SMBH growth.

  3. Regrowth of stellar disks in mature galaxies: The two component nature of NGC 7217 revisited with VIRUS-W† ⋄

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabricius, Maximilian H.; Coccato, Lodovico; Bender, Ralf; Drory, Niv; Gössl, Claus; Landriau, Martin; Saglia, Roberto P.; Thomas, Jens; Williams, Michael J.

    2015-02-01

    We have obtained high spectral resolution (R ~ 9000), integral field observations of the three spiral galaxies NGC 3521, NGC 7217 and NGC 7331 using the new fiber-based Integral Field Unit instrument VIRUS-W at the 2.7 m telescope of the McDonald Observatory in Texas. Our data allow us to revisit previous claims of counter rotation in these objects. A detailed kinematic decomposition of NGC 7217 shows that no counter rotating stellar component is present. We find that NGC 7217 hosts a low dispersion, rotating disk that is embedded in a high velocity dispersion stellar halo or bulge that is co-rotating with the disk. Due to the very different velocity dispersions (~ 20 km s-1 vs. 150 km s-1) , we are further able to perform a Lick index analysis on both components separately which indicates that the two stellar populations are clearly separated in (Mgb,) space. The velocities and dispersions of the faster component are very similar to those of the interstellar gas as measured from the [O iii] emission. Morphological evidence of active star formation in this component further suggests that NGC 7217 may be in the process of (re)growing a disk inside a more massive and higher dispersion stellar halo.

  4. THE ASSEMBLY HISTORY OF DISK GALAXIES. II. PROBING THE EMERGING TULLY-FISHER RELATION DURING 1 < z < 1.7

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Sarah H.; Sullivan, Mark; Ellis, Richard S.; Newman, Andrew B.; Bundy, Kevin; Treu, Tommaso

    2012-07-01

    Through extended integrations using the recently installed deep depletion CCD on the red arm of the Keck I Low Resolution Imaging Spectrograph, we present new measurements of the resolved spectra of 70 morphologically selected star-forming galaxies with i{sub AB} < 24.1 in the redshift range 1 {approx}< z < 1.7. Using the formalism introduced in Paper I of this series and available Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys images, we successfully recover rotation curves using the extended emission line distribution of [O II] 3727 A to 2.2 times the disk scale radius for a sample of 42 galaxies. Combining these measures with stellar masses derived from HST and ground-based near-infrared photometry enables us to construct the stellar mass Tully-Fisher relation (M{sub *}-TFR) in the time interval between the well-constructed relation defined at z {approx_equal} 1 in Paper I and the growing body of resolved dynamics probed with integral field unit spectrographs at z > 2. Remarkably, we find a well-defined TFR with up to 60% increase in scatter and zero-point shift constraint of {Delta}M{sub *} = 0.02 {+-} 0.02 dex since z {approx} 1.7, compared to the local relation. Although our sample is incomplete in terms of either a fixed stellar mass or star formation rate limit, we discuss the implications that typical star-forming disk galaxies evolve to arrive on a well-defined TFR within a surprisingly short period of cosmic history.

  5. Warp of the ionized gas layer in the outer Galaxy, traced by Recombination Line Observations in both the First and Fourth Quadrants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azcarate, I. N.; Cersosimo, J. C.

    2000-05-01

    Results of H166α recombination line observations from the Outer Galaxy in both the Northern and Southern Galactic Plane, are reported. The Southern observations were made with the 30m antenna of the Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomia in Villa Elisa, Buenos Aires, Argentina and the Northern ones ( more sensitive, high quality observations, performed with an "state of the art" receiver) with the 43m antenna of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, in Green Bank, West Virginia, USA. From the two sets of observations, we obtain evidence of the warp of the low density ionized gas layer, traced by the H166α emission in the outer MIlky Way, towards positive galactic latitudes in the Northern and towards negative latitudes in the Southern Galaxy. The warp of this tracer qualitatively agrees with that of the HI.

  6. BLACK HOLE GROWTH AND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI OBSCURATION BY INSTABILITY-DRIVEN INFLOWS IN HIGH-REDSHIFT DISK GALAXIES FED BY COLD STREAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Bournaud, Frederic; Teyssier, Romain; Daddi, Emanuele; Dekel, Avishai; Cacciato, Marcello; Juneau, Stephanie; Shankar, Francesco E-mail: dekel@phys.huji.ac.il

    2011-11-10

    Disk galaxies at high redshift have been predicted to maintain high gas surface densities due to continuous feeding by intense cold streams leading to violent gravitational instability, transient features, and giant clumps. Gravitational torques between the perturbations drive angular momentum out and mass in, and the inflow provides the energy for keeping strong turbulence. We use analytic estimates of the inflow for a self-regulated unstable disk at a Toomre stability parameter Q {approx} 1, and isolated galaxy simulations capable of resolving the nuclear inflow down to the central parsec. We predict an average inflow rate {approx}10 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} through the disk of a 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} galaxy, with conditions representative of z {approx} 2 stream-fed disks. The inflow rate scales with disk mass and (1 + z){sup 3/2}. It includes clump migration and inflow of the smoother component, valid even if clumps disrupt. This inflow grows the bulge, while only a fraction of {approx}> 10{sup -3} of it needs to accrete onto a central black hole (BH), in order to obey the observed BH-bulge relation. A galaxy of 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} at z {approx} 2 is expected to host a BH of {approx}10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }, accreting on average with moderate sub-Eddington luminosity L{sub X} {approx} 10{sup 42}-10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1}, accompanied by brighter episodes when dense clumps coalesce. We note that in rare massive galaxies at z {approx} 6, the same process may feed {approx}10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} BH at the Eddington rate. High central gas column densities can severely obscure active galactic nuclei in high-redshift disks, possibly hindering their detection in deep X-ray surveys.

  7. Triple Scoop from Galaxy Hunter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1Figure 2Figure 3

    Silver Dollar Galaxy: NGC 253 (figure 1) Located 10 million light-years away in the southern constellation Sculptor, the Silver Dollar galaxy, or NGC 253, is one of the brightest spiral galaxies in the night sky. In this edge-on view from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer, the wisps of blue represent relatively dustless areas of the galaxy that are actively forming stars. Areas of the galaxy with a soft golden glow indicate regions where the far-ultraviolet is heavily obscured by dust particles.

    Gravitational Dance: NGC 1512 and NGC 1510 (figure 2) In this image, the wide ultraviolet eyes of NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer show spiral galaxy NGC 1512 sitting slightly northwest of elliptical galaxy NGC 1510. The two galaxies are currently separated by a mere 68,000 light-years, leading many astronomers to suspect that a close encounter is currently in progress.

    The overlapping of two tightly wound spiral arm segments makes up the light blue inner ring of NGC 1512. Meanwhile, the galaxy's outer spiral arm is being distorted by strong gravitational interactions with NGC 1510.

    Galaxy Trio: NGC 5566, NGC 5560, and NGC 5569 (figure 3) NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer shows a triplet of galaxies in the Virgo cluster: NGC 5560 (top galaxy), NGC 5566 (middle galaxy), and NGC 5569 (bottom galaxy).

    The inner ring in NGC 5566 is formed by two nearly overlapping bright arms, which themselves spring from the ends of a central bar. The bar is not visible in ultraviolet because it consists of older stars or low mass stars that do not emit energy at ultraviolet wavelengths. The outer disk of NGC 5566 appears warped, and the disk of NGC 5560 is clearly disturbed. Unlike its galactic neighbors, the disk of NGC 5569 does not appear to have been distorted by any passing

  8. SLOSHING COLD FRONTS IN GALAXY GROUPS AND THEIR PERTURBING DISK GALAXIES: AN X-RAY, OPTICAL, AND RADIO CASE STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Gastaldello, Fabio; Di Gesu, Laura; Ghizzardi, Simona; Rossetti, Mariachiara; Giacintucci, Simona; Girardi, Marisa; Roediger, Elke; Brighenti, Fabrizio; Buote, David A.; Humphrey, Philip J.; Eckert, Dominique; Ettori, Stefano; Mathews, William G.

    2013-06-10

    We present a combined X-ray, optical, and radio analysis of the galaxy group IC 1860 using the currently available Chandra and XMM data, multi-object spectroscopy data from the literature, and Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) data. The Chandra and XMM imaging and spectroscopy reveal two surface brightness discontinuities at 45 and 76 kpc shown to be consistent with a pair of cold fronts. These features are interpreted as due to sloshing of the central gas induced by an off-axis minor merger with a perturber. This scenario is further supported by the presence of a peculiar velocity of the central galaxy IC 1860 and the identification of a possible perturber in the optically disturbed spiral galaxy IC 1859. The identification of the perturber is consistent with the comparison with numerical simulations of sloshing. The GMRT observation at 325 MHz shows faint, extended radio emission contained within the inner cold front, as seen in some galaxy clusters hosting diffuse radio mini-halos. However, unlike mini-halos, no particle reacceleration is needed to explain the extended radio emission, which is consistent with aged radio plasma redistributed by the sloshing. There is a strong analogy between the X-ray and optical phenomenology of the IC 1860 group and that of two other groups, NGC 5044 and NGC 5846, showing cold fronts. The evidence presented in this paper is among the strongest supporting the currently favored model of cold-front formation in relaxed objects and establishes the group scale as a chief environment for studying this phenomenon.

  9. GAS SURFACE DENSITY, STAR FORMATION RATE SURFACE DENSITY, AND THE MAXIMUM MASS OF YOUNG STAR CLUSTERS IN A DISK GALAXY. I. THE FLOCCULENT GALAXY M 33

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Lopezlira, Rosa A.; Pflamm-Altenburg, Jan; Kroupa, Pavel

    2012-12-20

    We analyze the relationship between maximum cluster mass M{sub max} and surface densities of total gas ({Sigma}{sub gas}), molecular gas ({Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}}), and star formation rate ({Sigma}{sub SFR}) in the flocculent galaxy M 33, using published gas data and a catalog of more than 600 young star clusters in its disk. By comparing the radial distributions of gas and most massive cluster masses, we find that M{sub max}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sup 4.7{+-}0.4}{sub gas}, M{sub max}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sup 1.3{+-}0.1}{sub H{sub 2}}, and M{sub max}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sup 1.0{+-}0.1}{sub SFR}. We rule out that these correlations result from the size of the sample; hence, the change of the maximum cluster mass must be due to physical causes.

  10. Inside out and Upside down: Tracing the Assembly of a Simulated Disk Galaxy Using Mono-age Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, Jonathan C.; Kazantzidis, Stelios; Weinberg, David H.; Guedes, Javiera; Callegari, Simone; Mayer, Lucio; Madau, Piero

    2013-08-01

    We analyze the present day structure and assembly history of a high-resolution hydrodynamic simulation of the formation of a Milky-Way-(MW)-like disk galaxy, from the "Eris" simulation suite, dissecting it into cohorts of stars formed at different epochs of cosmic history. At z = 0, stars with t form < 2 Gyr mainly occupy the stellar spheroid, with the oldest (earliest forming) stars having more centrally concentrated profiles. The younger age cohorts populate disks of progressively longer radial scale lengths and shorter vertical scale heights. At a given radius, the vertical density profiles and velocity dispersions of stars vary smoothly as a function of age, and the superposition of old, vertically extended and young, vertically compact cohorts gives rise to a double-exponential profile like that observed in the MW. Turning to formation history, we find that the trends of spatial structure and kinematics with stellar age are largely imprinted at birth, or immediately thereafter. Stars that form during the active merger phase at z > 3 are quickly scattered into rounded, kinematically hot configurations. The oldest disk cohorts form in structures that are radially compact and relatively thick, while subsequent cohorts form in progressively larger, thinner, colder configurations from gas with increasing levels of rotational support. The disk thus forms "inside out" in a radial sense and "upside down" in a vertical sense. Secular heating and radial migration influence the final state of each age cohort, but the changes they produce are small compared to the trends established at formation. The predicted correlations of stellar age with spatial and kinematic structure are in good qualitative agreement with the correlations observed for mono-abundance stellar populations in the MW.

  11. INSIDE OUT AND UPSIDE DOWN: TRACING THE ASSEMBLY OF A SIMULATED DISK GALAXY USING MONO-AGE STELLAR POPULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, Jonathan C.; Kazantzidis, Stelios; Weinberg, David H.; Guedes, Javiera; Callegari, Simone; Mayer, Lucio; Madau, Piero

    2013-08-10

    We analyze the present day structure and assembly history of a high-resolution hydrodynamic simulation of the formation of a Milky-Way-(MW)-like disk galaxy, from the ''Eris'' simulation suite, dissecting it into cohorts of stars formed at different epochs of cosmic history. At z = 0, stars with t{sub form} < 2 Gyr mainly occupy the stellar spheroid, with the oldest (earliest forming) stars having more centrally concentrated profiles. The younger age cohorts populate disks of progressively longer radial scale lengths and shorter vertical scale heights. At a given radius, the vertical density profiles and velocity dispersions of stars vary smoothly as a function of age, and the superposition of old, vertically extended and young, vertically compact cohorts gives rise to a double-exponential profile like that observed in the MW. Turning to formation history, we find that the trends of spatial structure and kinematics with stellar age are largely imprinted at birth, or immediately thereafter. Stars that form during the active merger phase at z > 3 are quickly scattered into rounded, kinematically hot configurations. The oldest disk cohorts form in structures that are radially compact and relatively thick, while subsequent cohorts form in progressively larger, thinner, colder configurations from gas with increasing levels of rotational support. The disk thus forms ''inside out'' in a radial sense and ''upside down'' in a vertical sense. Secular heating and radial migration influence the final state of each age cohort, but the changes they produce are small compared to the trends established at formation. The predicted correlations of stellar age with spatial and kinematic structure are in good qualitative agreement with the correlations observed for mono-abundance stellar populations in the MW.

  12. A universal, turbulence-regulated star formation law: from Milky Way clouds to high-redshift disk and starburst galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinda Salim, Diane; Federrath, Christoph; Kewley, Lisa

    2015-08-01

    Whilst the star formation rate (SFR) of molecular clouds and galaxies is key in understanding galaxy evolution, the physical processes that determine the SFR remain unclear, with significant intrinsic scatter arising from previous approaches at describing its functional dependencies. In lieu of this, we extend upon preceding parameterisations which had defined the column density of star formation, ΣSFR by either the gas column density Σgas or the ratio between Σgas and the average, single-freefall time. We develop a new universal star formation (SF) law that relies predominantly on the probability density function (PDF) and the sonic Mach number of the turbulence in star-forming clouds. By doing so we derive a relation where the SFR correlates with the molecular gas mass per multi-freefall time. We define a new quantity called maximum (multi-freefall) gas consumption rate (MGCR) and show that the actual SFR is only about 0.4% of the MGCR, confirming the observed low efficiency of star formation. We show that placing observations in this new framework (ΣSFR vs. MGCR) yields a significantly improved correlation with 3-4 times reduced scatter compared to previous SF laws and a goodness-of-fit parameter R2=0.97, close to a perfect fit of R2=1. By inverting our new relationship, we provide sonic Mach number predictions for kpc-scale observations of Local Group galaxies as well as unresolved observations of local and high-redshift disk and starburst galaxies that do not have independent, reliable estimates for the turbulent cloud Mach number.

  13. A universal, turbulence-regulated star formation law: from Milky Way clouds to high-redshift disk and starburst galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federrath, Christoph; Salim, Diane; Kewley, Lisa

    2015-08-01

    Whilst the star formation rate (SFR) of molecular clouds and galaxies is key in understanding galaxy evolution, the physical processes which determine the SFR remain unclear. This uncertainty about the underlying physics has resulted in various different star formation laws, all having substantial intrinsic scatter. Extending upon previous works that define the column density of star formation (ΣSFR) by the gas column density (Σgas), we develop a new universal star formation (SF) law based on the multi-freefall prescription of gas. This new SF law relies predominantly on the probability density function (PDF) and on the sonic Mach number of the turbulence in the star-forming clouds. By doing so we derive a relation where the star formation rate (SFR) correlates with the molecular gas mass per multi-freefall time, whereas previous models had used the average, single-freefall time. We define a new quantity called maximum (multi-freefall) gas consumption rate (MGCR) and show that the actual SFR is only about 0.4% of this maximum possible SFR, confirming the observed low efficiency of star formation. We show that placing observations in this new framework (ΣSFR vs. MGCR) yields a significantly improved correlation with 3-4 times reduced scatter compared to previous SF laws and a goodness-of-fit parameter R2 = 0.97. By inverting our new relationship, we provide sonic Mach number predictions for kpc-scale observations of Local Group galaxies as well as unresolved observations of local and high-redshift disk and starburst galaxies that do not have independent, reliable estimates for the turbulent cloud Mach number.

  14. GeMS in the Outer Galaxy: Near-infrared Imaging of Three Young Clusters at Large Galactic Radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidge, T. J.

    2014-02-01

    Images recorded with the Gemini South Adaptive Optics Imager (GSAOI) and corrected for atmospheric seeing by the Gemini Multi-conjugate Adaptive Optics System are used to investigate the stellar contents of the young outer Galactic disk clusters Haffner 17, NGC 2401, and NGC 3105. Ages estimated from the faint end of the main sequence (MS) and the ridgeline of the pre-main sequence on the (K, J - K) color-magnitude diagrams are consistent with published values that are based on the MS turnoff, with the GSAOI data favoring the younger end of the age range for NGC 2401 in the literature. The mass function (MF) of NGC 2401 is similar to that in the solar neighborhood, and stars spanning a wide range of masses in this cluster have similar clustering properties on the sky. It is concluded that NGC 2401 is not evolved dynamically. In contrast, the MF of Haffner 17 differs significantly from that in the solar neighborhood over all masses covered by these data, while the MF of NGC 3105 is deficient in objects with sub-solar masses when compared with the solar neighborhood. Low-mass objects in Haffner 17 and NGC 3105 are also more uniformly distributed on the sky than brighter, more massive, MS stars. This is consistent with both clusters having experienced significant dynamical evolution. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil), and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).

  15. Disk filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, Werner

    1986-01-01

    An electric disk filter provides a high efficiency at high temperature. A hollow outer filter of fibrous stainless steel forms the ground electrode. A refractory filter material is placed between the outer electrode and the inner electrically isolated high voltage electrode. Air flows through the outer filter surfaces through the electrified refractory filter media and between the high voltage electrodes and is removed from a space in the high voltage electrode.

  16. Disk filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, W.

    1985-01-09

    An electric disk filter provides a high efficiency at high temperature. A hollow outer filter of fibrous stainless steel forms the ground electrode. A refractory filter material is placed between the outer electrode and the inner electrically isolated high voltage electrode. Air flows through the outer filter surfaces through the electrified refractory filter media and between the high voltage electrodes and is removed from a space in the high voltage electrode.

  17. A GREEN BANK TELESCOPE SURVEY FOR H I 21 cm ABSORPTION IN THE DISKS AND HALOS OF LOW-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Borthakur, Sanchayeeta; Tripp, Todd M.; Yun, Min S.; Meiring, Joseph D.; Bowen, David V.; York, Donald G.; Momjian, Emmanuel

    2011-01-20

    We present an H I 21 cm absorption survey with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) of galaxy-quasar pairs selected by combining galaxy data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and radio sources from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters (FIRST) survey. Our sample consists of 23 sight lines through 15 low-redshift foreground galaxy-background quasar pairs with impact parameters ranging from 1.7 kpc up to 86.7 kpc. We detected one absorber in the GBT survey from the foreground dwarf galaxy, GQ1042+0747, at an impact parameter of 1.7 kpc and another possible absorber in our follow-up Very Large Array (VLA) imaging of the nearby foreground galaxy UGC 7408. The line widths of both absorbers are narrow (FWHM of 3.6 and 4.8km s{sup -1}). The absorbers have sub-damped Ly{alpha} column densities, and most likely originate in the disk gas of the foreground galaxies. We also detected H I emission from three foreground galaxies including UGC 7408. Although our sample contains both blue and red galaxies, the two H I absorbers as well as the H I emissions are associated with blue galaxies. We discuss the physical conditions in the 21 cm absorbers and some drawbacks of the large GBT beam for this type of survey.

  18. A Classical Morphological Analysis of Galaxies in the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buta, Ronald J.; Sheth, Kartik; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, A.; Knapen, Johan H.; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki; Elmegreen, Debra; Ho, Luis C.; Zaritsky, Dennis; Courtois, Helene; Hinz, Joannah L.; Muñoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Kim, Taehyun; Regan, Michael W.; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Gil de Paz, Armando; Laine, Jarkko; Menéndez-Delmestre, Karín; Comerón, Sébastien; Erroz Ferrer, Santiago; Seibert, Mark; Mizusawa, Trisha; Holwerda, Benne; Madore, Barry F.

    2015-04-01

    The Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G) is the largest available database of deep, homogeneous middle-infrared (mid-IR) images of galaxies of all types. The survey, which includes 2352 nearby galaxies, reveals galaxy morphology only minimally affected by interstellar extinction. This paper presents an atlas and classifications of S4G galaxies in the Comprehensive de Vaucouleurs revised Hubble-Sandage (CVRHS) system. The CVRHS system follows the precepts of classical de Vaucouleurs morphology, modified to include recognition of other features such as inner, outer, and nuclear lenses, nuclear rings, bars, and disks, spheroidal galaxies, X patterns and box/peanut structures, OLR subclass outer rings and pseudorings, bar ansae and barlenses, parallel sequence late-types, thick disks, and embedded disks in 3D early-type systems. We show that our CVRHS classifications are internally consistent, and that nearly half of the S4G sample consists of extreme late-type systems (mostly bulgeless, pure disk galaxies) in the range Scd-Im. The most common family classification for mid-IR types S0/a to Sc is SA while that for types Scd to Sm is SB. The bars in these two type domains are very different in mid-IR structure and morphology. This paper examines the bar, ring, and type classification fractions in the sample, and also includes several montages of images highlighting the various kinds of “stellar structures” seen in mid-IR galaxy morphology.

  19. Distribution of Molecules in the Circumnuclear Disk and Surrounding Starburst Ring in the Seyfert Galaxy NGC 1068 Observed with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, S.; Nakajima, T.; Kohno, K.; Harada, N.; Herbst, E.; Tamura, Y.; Izumi, T.; Taniguchi, A.; Tosaki, T.

    2015-12-01

    We report distributions of several molecular transitions including shock and dust related species (13CO and C18O J = 1-0, 13CN N = 1-0, CS J = 2-1, SO JN = 32-21, HNCO JKa,Kc = 50,5-40,4, HC3N J = 11-10, 12-11, CH3OH JK = 2K-1K, and CH3CN JK = 6K-5K) in the nearby Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 observed with ALMA. The central ˜1' (˜4.3 kpc) of this galaxy was observed in the 100 GHz region with an angular resolution of ˜4" x 2" (290 pc x 140 pc) to study the effects of an active galactic nucleus and its surrounding starburst ring on molecular abundances. We report a classification of molecular distributions into three main categories. Organic molecules such as CH3CN are found to be concentrated in the circumnuclear disk. In the starburst ring, the intensity of methanol at each clumpy region is not consistent with that of 13CO.

  20. Progress and Challenges in SPH Simulations of Disk Galaxy Formation: The Combined Role of Resolution and the Star Formation Density Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, L.

    2012-07-01

    We review progress in cosmological SPH simulations of disk galaxy formation. We discuss the role of numerical resolution and sub-grid recipes of star formation and feedback from supernovae, higlighting the important role of a high star formation density threshold comparable to that of star forming molecular gas phase. Two recent succesfull examples, in simulations of the formation of gas-rich bulgeless dwarf galaxies and in simulations of late-type spirals (the ERIS simulations), are presented and discussed. In the ERIS simulations, already in the progenitors at z = 3 the resolution is above the threshold indicated by previous idealized numerical experiments as necessary to minimize numerical angular momentum loss (Kaufmann et al. 2007). A high star formation density threshold maintains an inhomogeneous interstellar medium, where star formation is clustered, and thus the local effect of supernovae feedback is enhanced. As a result, outflows are naturally generated removing 2/3 of the baryons in galaxies with Vvir˜50 km/s and ˜ 30% of the baryons in galaxies with (Vvir ˜ 150 km/s). Low angular momentum baryons are preferentially removed since the strongest bursts of star formation occur predominantly near the center, especially after a merger event. This produces pure exponential disks or small bulges depending on galaxy mass, and, correspondingly, slowly rising or nearly flat rotation curves that match those of observed disk galaxies. In dwarfs the rapid mass removal by outflows generates a core-like distribution in the dark matter. Furthermore, contrary to the common picture, in the ERIS spiral galaxies a bar/pseudobulge forms rapidly, and not secularly, as a result of mergers and interactions at high-z.

  1. Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Normal galaxies, radio galaxies, and Seyfert galaxies are considered. The large magellanic cloud and the great galaxy in Andromedia are highlighted. Quasars and BL lacertae objects are also discussed and a review of the spectral observations of all of these galaxies and celestial objects is presented.

  2. THE STAR-FORMING HISTORIES OF THE NUCLEUS, BULGE, AND INNER DISK OF NGC 5102: CLUES TO THE EVOLUTION OF A NEARBY LENTICULAR GALAXY {sup ,} {sup ,}

    SciTech Connect

    Davidge, T. J.

    2015-01-20

    Long slit spectra recorded with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph on Gemini South are used to examine the star-forming history (SFH) of the lenticular galaxy NGC 5102. Structural and supplemental photometric information are obtained from archival Spitzer [3.6] images. Absorption features at blue and visible wavelengths are traced out along the minor axis to galactocentric radii ∼60 arcsec (∼0.9 kpc), sampling the nucleus, bulge, and disk components. Comparisons with model spectra point to luminosity-weighted metallicities that are consistent with the colors of resolved red giant branch stars in the disk. The nucleus has a luminosity-weighted age at visible wavelengths of ∼1{sub −0.1}{sup +0.2} Gyr, and the integrated light is dominated by stars that formed over a time period of only a few hundred Myr. For comparison, the luminosity-weighted ages of the bulge and disk are ∼2{sub −0.2}{sup +0.5} Gyr and 10{sub −2}{sup +2} Gyr, respectively. The g' – [3.6] colors of the nucleus and bulge are consistent with the spectroscopically based ages. In contrast to the nucleus, models that assume star-forming activity spanning many Gyr provide a better match to the spectra of the bulge and disk than simple stellar population models. Isophotes in the bulge have a disky shape, hinting that the bulge was assembled from material with significant rotational support. The SFHs of the bulge and disk are consistent with the bulge forming from the collapse of a long-lived bar, rather than from the collapse of a transient structure that formed as the result of a tidal interaction. It is thus suggested that the progenitor of NGC 5102 was a barred disk galaxy that morphed into a lenticular galaxy through the buckling of its bar.

  3. STAR FORMATION IN TWO LUMINOUS SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Deidre A.; Ashburn, Allison; Wright, Teresa; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Rubin, Vera C.; Józsa, Gyula I. G.; Struve, Christian

    2013-10-01

    We examined star formation in two very luminous (M{sub V} = –22 to –23) Sc-type spiral galaxies, NGC 801 and UGC 2885, using ultra-deep Hα images. We combine these Hα images with UBV and Two-Micron All-Sky Survey JHK images and H I maps to explore the star formation characteristics of disk galaxies at high luminosity. Hα traces star formation in these galaxies to 4-6 disk scale lengths, but the lack of detection of Hα further out is likely due to the loss of Lyman continuum photons. Considering gravitational instabilities alone, we find that the gas and stars in the outer regions are marginally stable in an average sense, but considering dissipative gas and radial and azimuthal forcing, the outer regions are marginally unstable to forming spiral arms. Star formation is taking place in spiral arms, which are regions of locally higher gas densities. Furthermore, we have traced smooth exponential stellar disks over four magnitudes in V-band surface brightness and 4-6 disk scale lengths, in spite of a highly variable gravitational instability parameter. Thus, gravitational instability thresholds do not seem relevant to the stellar disk. One possibility for creating an exponential disk is that the molecular cloud densities and star formation rates have exponential profiles and this fact forces the stellar disk to build up such a profile. Another possibility is that the stellar disk is continuously adjusted to an exponential shape regardless of the star formation profile, for example, through global dynamical processes that scatter stars. However, such scattering processes are only known to operate in spiral systems, in which case they cannot explain the same dilemma of smooth exponential disks observed in dwarf irregular galaxies.

  4. IMPROVED MODELING OF THE MASS DISTRIBUTION OF DISK GALAXIES BY THE EINASTO HALO MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Chemin, Laurent; De Blok, W. J. G.; Mamon, Gary A. E-mail: edeblok@ast.uct.ac.za

    2011-10-15

    Analysis of the rotation curves (RCs) of spiral galaxies provides an efficient diagnostic for studying the properties of dark matter halos and their relations with baryonic material. Since the cored pseudo-isothermal (Iso) model usually provides a better description of observed RCs than does the cuspy Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) model, there have been concerns that the {Lambda}CDM primordial density fluctuation spectrum may not be the correct one. We have modeled the RCs of galaxies from The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey (THINGS) with the Einasto halo model, which has emerged as the best-fitting model of the halos arising in dissipationless cosmological N-body simulations. We find that the RCs are significantly better fit with the Einasto halo than with either Iso or NFW halo models. In our best-fit Einasto models, the radius of density slope -2 and the density at this radius are highly correlated. The Einasto index, which controls the overall shape of the density profile, is near unity on average for intermediate and low mass halos. This is not in agreement with the predictions from {Lambda}CDM simulations. The indices of the most massive halos are in rough agreement with those cosmological simulations and appear correlated with the halo virial mass. We find that a typical Einasto density profile declines more strongly in its outermost parts than any of the Iso or NFW models whereas it is relatively shallow in its innermost regions. The core nature of those regions of halos thus extends the cusp-core controversy found for the NFW model with low surface density galaxies to the Einasto halo with more massive galaxies like those of THINGS. The Einasto concentrations decrease as a function of halo mass, in agreement with trends seen in numerical simulations. However, they are generally smaller than values expected for simulated Einasto halos. We thus find that, so far, the Einasto halo model provides the best match to the observed RCs and can therefore be considered as a new

  5. LOCAL TADPOLE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Elmegreen, Debra Meloy; Putko, Joseph; Dewberry, Janosz; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Sanchez Almeida, Jorge; Munoz-Tunon, Casiana

    2012-05-10

    Tadpole galaxies have a giant star-forming region at the end of an elongated intensity distribution. Here we use Sloan Digital Sky Survey data to determine the ages, masses, and surface densities of the heads and tails in 14 local tadpoles selected from the Kiso and Michigan surveys of UV-bright galaxies, and we compare them to tadpoles previously studied in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. The young stellar mass in the head scales linearly with rest-frame galaxy luminosity, ranging from {approx}10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} at galaxy absolute magnitude U = -13 mag to 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} at U = -20 mag. The corresponding head surface density increases from several M {sub Sun} pc{sup -2} locally to 10-100 M{sub Sun} pc{sup -2} at high redshift, and the star formation rate (SFR) per unit area in the head increases from {approx}0.01 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2} locally to {approx}1 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2} at high z. These local values are normal for star-forming regions, and the increases with redshift are consistent with other cosmological SFRs, most likely reflecting an increase in gas abundance. The tails in the local sample look like bulge-free galaxy disks. Their photometric ages decrease from several Gyr to several hundred Myr with increasing z, and their surface densities are more constant than the surface densities of the heads. The far-outer intensity profiles in the local sample are symmetric and exponential. We suggest that most local tadpoles are bulge-free galaxy disks with lopsided star formation, perhaps from environmental effects such as ram pressure or disk impacts, or from a Jeans length comparable to half the disk size.

  6. The Relationship between the Dense Neutral and Diffuse Ionized Gas in the Thick Disks of Two Edge-on Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueff, Katherine M.; Howk, J. Christopher; Pitterle, Marissa; Hirschauer, Alec S.; Fox, Andrew J.; Savage, Blair D.

    2013-03-01

    We present high-resolution, optical images (BVI + Hα) of the multiphase interstellar medium (ISM) in the thick disks of the edge-on spiral galaxies NGC 4013 and NGC 4302. Our images from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), Large Binocular Telescope, and WIYN 3.5 m telescope reveal an extensive population of filamentary dust absorption seen to z ~2-2.5 kpc. Many of these dusty thick disk structures have characteristics reminiscent of molecular clouds found in the Milky Way disk. Our Hα images show that the extraplanar diffuse ionized gas (DIG) in these galaxies is dominated by a smooth, diffuse component. The strongly filamentary morphologies of the dust absorption have no counterpart in the smoothly distributed Hα emission. We argue that the thick disk DIG and dust-bearing filaments trace physically distinct phases of the thick disk ISM, the latter tracing a dense, warm or cold neutral medium. The dense, dusty matter in the thick disks of spiral galaxies is largely tracing matter ejected from the thin disk via energetic feedback from massive stars. The high densities of the gas may be a result of converging gas flows. This dense material fuels some thick disk star formation, as evidenced by the presence of thick disk H II regions. Based on observations obtained with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope operated at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. Also, based on data acquired using the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The LBT is an international collaboration among institutions in the US, Italy, and Germany. LBT Corporation partners are the University of Arizona, on behalf of the Arizona University System; Instituto Nazionale do Astrofisica, Italy; LBT Beteiligungsgesellschaft, Germany, representing the Max Planck Society, the Astrophysical Institute of Potsdam, and Heidelberg University; Ohio State University, and the Research Corporation, on

  7. GALAXY DISKS DO NOT NEED TO SURVIVE IN THE {Lambda}CDM PARADIGM: THE GALAXY MERGER RATE OUT TO z {approx} 1.5 FROM MORPHO-KINEMATIC DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Puech, M.; Hammer, F.; Flores, H.; Rodrigues, M.; Wang, J. L.; Yang, Y. B.; Hopkins, P. F.; Athanassoula, E.

    2012-07-10

    About two-thirds of present-day, large galaxies are spirals such as the Milky Way or Andromeda, but the way their thin rotating disks formed remains uncertain. Observations have revealed that half of their progenitors, six billion years ago, had peculiar morphologies and/or kinematics, which exclude them from the Hubble sequence. Major mergers, i.e., fusions between galaxies of similar mass, are found to be the likeliest driver for such strong peculiarities. However, thin disks are fragile and easily destroyed by such violent collisions, which creates a critical tension between the observed fraction of thin disks and their survival within the {Lambda}CDM paradigm. Here, we show that the observed high occurrence of mergers among their progenitors is only apparent and is resolved when using morpho-kinematic observations that are sensitive to all the phases of the merging process. This provides an original way of narrowing down observational estimates of the galaxy merger rate and leads to a perfect match with predictions by state-of-the-art {Lambda}CDM semi-empirical models with no particular fine-tuning needed. These results imply that half of local thin disks do not survive but are actually rebuilt after a gas-rich major merger occurring in the past nine billion years, i.e., two-thirds of the lifetime of the universe. This emphasizes the need to study how thin disks can form in halos with a more active merger history than previously considered and to investigate what is the origin of the gas reservoir from which local disks would reform.

  8. Small-scale properties of atomic gas in extended disks of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Borthakur, Sanchayeeta; Heckman, Timothy M.; Momjian, Emmanuel; York, Donald G.; Bowen, David V.; Yun, Min S.; Tripp, Todd M.

    2014-11-01

    We present high-resolution H I 21 cm observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array for three H I rich galaxies in absorption against radio quasars. Our sample contains six sightlines with impact parameters from 2.6 to 32.4 kpc. We detected a narrow H I absorber of FWHM 1.1 km s{sup –1} at 444.5 km s{sup –1} toward SDSS J122106.854+454852.16 probing the dwarf galaxy UCG 7408 at an impact parameter of 2.8 kpc. The absorption feature was barely resolved and its width corresponds to a maximum kinetic temperature, T{sub k} ≈ 26 K. We estimate a limiting peak optical depth of 1.37 and a column density of 6 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup –2}. The physical extent of the absorber is 0.04 kpc{sup 2} and covers ∼25%-30% of the background source. A comparison between the emission and absorption strengths suggests the cold-to-total H I column density in the absorber is ∼30%. Folding in the covering fraction, the cold-to-total H I mass is ∼10%. This suggest that condensation of warm H I (T{sub s} ∼ 1000 K) to cold phase (T{sub s} < 100 K) is suppressed in UGC 7408. The unusually low temperature of the H I absorber also indicates inefficiency in condensation of atomic gas into molecular gas. The suppression in condensation is likely to be the result of low metal content in this galaxy. The same process might explain the low efficiency of star formation in dwarf galaxies despite their huge gas reservoirs. We report the non-detection of H I in absorption in five other sightlines. This indicates that either the cold gas distribution is highly patchy or the gas is much warmer (T{sub s} > 1000 K) toward these sightlines.

  9. A new approach to detailed structural decomposition from the splash and phat surveys: Kicked-up disk stars in the Andromeda galaxy?

    SciTech Connect

    Dorman, Claire E.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; and others

    2013-12-20

    We characterize the bulge, disk, and halo subcomponents in the Andromeda galaxy (M31) over the radial range 4 kpc < R {sub proj} < 225 kpc. The cospatial nature of these subcomponents renders them difficult to disentangle using surface brightness (SB) information alone, especially interior to ∼20 kpc. Our new decomposition technique combines information from the luminosity function (LF) of over 1.5 million bright (20 < m {sub 814W} < 22) stars from the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury survey, radial velocities of over 5000 red giant branch stars in the same magnitude range from the Spectroscopic and Photometric Landscape of Andromeda's Stellar Halo survey, and integrated I-band SB profiles from various sources. We use an affine-invariant Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to fit an appropriate toy model to these three data sets. The bulge, disk, and halo SB profiles are modeled as a Sérsic, exponential, and cored power law, respectively, and the LFs are modeled as broken power laws. We present probability distributions for each of 32 parameters describing the SB profiles and LFs of the three subcomponents. We find that the number of stars with a disk-like LF is 5.2% ± 2.1% larger than the number with disk-like (dynamically cold) kinematics, suggesting that some stars born in the disk have been dynamically heated to the point that they are kinematically indistinguishable from halo members. This is the first kinematical evidence for a 'kicked-up disk' halo population in M31. The fraction of kicked-up disk stars is consistent with that found in simulations. We also find evidence for a radially varying disk LF, consistent with a negative metallicity gradient in the stellar disk.

  10. Future Large-Scale Surveys of 'Interesting' Stars in The Halo and Thick Disk of the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beers, T. C.

    The age of slow, methodical, star-by-star, single-slit spectroscopic observations of rare stars in the halo and thick disk of the Milky Way has come to an end. As the result of the labors of numerous astronomers over the past 40 years, spectroscopic data for some 2000 stars with metallicity less than [Fe/H] = -1.5 has been obtained. Under the assumption of a constant flux of astronomers working in this area (and taking 50 major players over the years), the long-term average yield works out to ONE (1!) such star per astronomer per year. The use of new spectroscopic and photometric survey techniques which obtain large sky coverage to faint magnitudes will enable substantially better "return on investment" in the near future. We review the present state of surveys for low metallicity and field horizontal-branch stars in the Galaxy, and describe several new lines of attack which should open the way to a more than one hundred-fold increase in the numbers of interesting stars with available spectroscopic and photometric information. The age of slow, methodical, star-by-star, single-slit spectroscopic observations of rare stars in the halo and thick disk of the Milky Way has come to an end. As the result of the labors of numerous astronomers over the past 40 years, spectroscopic data for some 2000 stars with metallicity less than [Fe/H] = -1.5 has been obtained. Under the assumption of a constant flux of astronomers working in this area (and taking 50 major players over the years), the long-term average yield works out to ONE (1!) such star per astronomer per year. The use of new spectroscopic and photometric survey techniques which obtain large sky coverage to faint magnitudes will enable substantially better "return on investment" in the near future. We review the present state of surveys for low metallicity and field horizontal-branch stars in the Galaxy, and describe several new lines of attack which should open the way to a more than one hundred-fold increase in the

  11. Strong Evidence for the Density-wave Theory of Spiral Structure in Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pour-Imani, Hamed; Kennefick, Daniel; Kennefick, Julia; Davis, Benjamin L.; Shields, Douglas W.; Shameer Abdeen, Mohamed

    2016-08-01

    The density-wave theory of galactic spiral-arm structure makes a striking prediction that the pitch angle of spiral arms should vary with the wavelength of the galaxy’s image. The reason is that stars are born in the density wave but move out of it as they age. They move ahead of the density wave inside the co-rotation radius, and fall behind outside of it, resulting in a tighter pitch angle at wavelengths that image stars (optical and near-infrared) than those that are associated with star formation (far-infrared and ultraviolet). In this study we combined large sample size with wide range of wavelengths, from the ultraviolet to the infrared to investigate this issue. For each galaxy we used an optical wavelength image (B-band: 445 nm) and images from the Spitzer Space Telescope at two infrared wavelengths (infrared: 3.6 and 8.0 μm) and we measured the pitch angle with the 2DFFT and Spirality codes. We find that the B-band and 3.6 μm images have smaller pitch angles than the infrared 8.0 μm image in all cases, in agreement with the prediction of density-wave theory. We also used images in the ultraviolet from Galaxy Evolution Explorer, whose pitch angles agreed with the measurements made at 8 μm.

  12. Insights from the outskirts: Chemical and dynamical properties in the outer parts of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, Benjamin; Koch, Andreas; Walker, Matthew; Johnson, Christian I.; Peñarrubia, Jorge; Gilmore, Gerard

    2014-12-01

    We present radial velocities and [Fe/H] abundances for 340 stars in the Fornax dwarf spheroidal from R ~ 16 000 spectra. The targets were obtained in the outer parts of the galaxy, a region that has been poorly studied. Our sample shows a wide range in [Fe/H], between -0.5 and -3.0 dex, in which we detect three subgroups. Removal of stars belonging to the most metal-rich population produces a truncated metallicity distribution function that is identical to Sculptor, indicating that these systems shared a similar early evolution, except that Fornax experienced a late, intense period of star formation (SF). The derived age-metallicity relation shows a fast increase in [Fe/H] at early ages, after which the enrichment flattens significantly for stars younger than ~ 8 Gyr. Additionally, the data indicate a strong population of stars around 4 Gyr, followed by a second rapid enrichment in [Fe/H]. A leaky-box chemical enrichment model generally matches the observed relation but predicts neither a significant population of young stars nor strong enrichment at late times. The young population in Fornax may therefore stem from an externally triggered SF event. Our dynamical analysis reveals an increasing velocity dispersion with decreasing [Fe/H] from σsys ≈ 7.5 km s-1 to ≥ 14 km s-1. The large velocity dispersion at low metallicities is possibly the result of a non-Gaussian velocity distribution among stars older than ~ 8 Gyr. Our sample also includes members from the Fornax globular clusters H2 and H5. In agreement with past studies we find [Fe/H] = -2.04 ± 0.04 and a mean radial velocity RV = 59.36 ± 0.31 km s-1 for H2 and [Fe/H] = -2.02 ± 0.11 and RV = 59.39 ± 0.44 km s-1 for H5. Finally, we test different calibrations of the calcium triplet over more than 2 dex in [Fe/H] and find best agreement with the calibration equations provided by Carrera et al. (2013, MNRAS, 434, 1681). Overall, we find high complexity in the chemical and dynamical properties, with

  13. Gravitational spurs and resonances - Effects of small mass disturbers in spiral galaxy disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrd, G. G.; Smith, B. F.; Miller, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    In the present simulations of a disturber in a complete stellar disk without the restrictive assumption, the disturber parameters of the NGC 206 cloud in M 31 were assumed as a realistic example. The resulting spur around the disturber was comparable in shape, size, and strength to Julian and Toomre's (1966) results. In addition, a complicated evolving pattern of strong density peaks appeared well inside and outside the disturber's orbit. Simulation with a ten-times-more-massive disturber showed a more clearly defined version of the same initial pattern, two spiral arms of density peaks rotating with the disturber in the stronger arm. The orbital radii of the density peaks correspond to those of epicyclic resonances with the orbiting disturber potential.

  14. GIANT MOLECULAR CLOUD FORMATION IN DISK GALAXIES: CHARACTERIZING SIMULATED VERSUS OBSERVED CLOUD CATALOGS

    SciTech Connect

    Benincasa, Samantha M.; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Wadsley, James; Tasker, Elizabeth J.

    2013-10-10

    We present the results of a study of simulated giant molecular clouds (GMCs) formed in a Milky Way-type galactic disk with a flat rotation curve. This simulation, which does not include star formation or feedback, produces clouds with masses ranging between 10{sup 4} M{sub ☉} and 10{sup 7} M{sub ☉}. We compare our simulated cloud population to two observational surveys: the Boston University-Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory Galactic Ring Survey and the BIMA All-Disk Survey of M33. An analysis of the global cloud properties as well as a comparison of Larson's scaling relations is carried out. We find that simulated cloud properties agree well with the observed cloud properties, with the closest agreement occurring between the clouds at comparable resolution in M33. Our clouds are highly filamentary—a property that derives both from their formation due to gravitational instability in the sheared galactic environment, as well as to cloud-cloud gravitational encounters. We also find that the rate at which potentially star-forming gas accumulates within dense regions—wherein n{sub thresh} ≥ 10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}—is 3% per 10 Myr, in clouds of roughly 10{sup 6} M{sub ☉}. This suggests that star formation rates in observed clouds are related to the rates at which gas can be accumulated into dense subregions within GMCs via filamentary flows. The most internally well-resolved clouds are chosen for listing in a catalog of simulated GMCs—the first of its kind. The cataloged clouds are available as an extracted data set from the global simulation.

  15. Compact stellar systems in the polar ring galaxies NGC 4650A and NGC 3808B: Clues to polar disk formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordenes-Briceño, Yasna; Georgiev, Iskren Y.; Puzia, Thomas H.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Arnaboldi, Magda

    2016-01-01

    Context. Polar ring galaxies (PRGs) are composed of two kinematically distinct and nearly orthogonal components, a host galaxy (HG) and a polar ring/disk (PR). The HG usually contains an older stellar population than the PR. The suggested formation channel of PRGs is still poorly constrained. Suggested options are merger, gas accretion, tidal interaction, or a combination of both. Aims: To constrain the formation scenario of PRGs, we study the compact stellar systems (CSSs) in two PRGs at different evolutionary stages: NGC 4650A with well-defined PR, and NGC 3808 B, which is in the process of PR formation. Methods: We use archival HST/WFPC2 imaging in the F450W, F555W, or F606W and F814W filters. Extensive completeness tests, PSF-fitting techniques, and color selection criteria are used to select cluster candidates. Photometric analysis of the CSSs was performed to determine their ages and masses using stellar population models at a fixed metallicity. Results: Both PRGs contain young CSSs (<1 Gyr) with masses of up to 5 × 106M⊙, mostly located in the PR and along the tidal debris. The most massive CSSs may be progenitors of metal-rich globular clusters or ultra compact dwarf