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Sample records for overexpressing cell death

  1. Overexpression of Ref-1 Inhibits Lead-induced Endothelial Cell Death via the Upregulation of Catalase

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwon Ho; Lee, Sang Ki; Kim, Hyo Shin; Cho, Eun Jung; Joo, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Eun Ji; Lee, Ji Young; Park, Myoung Soo; Chang, Seok Jong; Cho, Chung-Hyun; Park, Jin Bong

    2009-01-01

    The role of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease1/redox factor-1 (Ref-1) on the lead (Pb)-induced cellular response was investigated in the cultured endothelial cells. Pb caused progressive cellular death in endothelial cells, which occurred in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. However, Ref-1 overexpression with AdRef-1 significantly inhibited Pb-induced cell death in the endothelial cells. Also the overexpression of Ref-1 significantly suppressed Pb-induced superoxide and hydrogen peroxide elevation in the endothelial cells. Pb exposure induced the downregulation of catalase, it was inhibited by the Ref-1 overexpression in the endothelial cells. Taken together, our data suggests that the overexpression of Ref-1 inhibited Pb-induced cell death via the upregulation of catalase in the cultured endothelial cells. PMID:20054488

  2. Atg3 Overexpression Enhances Bortezomib-Induced Cell Death in SKM-1 Cell

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Zhang, Jing; Zhu, Chen; Zhang, Lu; Xu, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Background Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a group of heterogeneous hematopoietic stem cell malignancies with a high risk of transformation into acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Clonal evolutions are significantly associated with transformation to AML. According to a gene expression microarray, atg3 is downregulated in MDS patients progressing to leukemia, but less is known about the function of Atg3 in the survival and death of MSD/AML cells. Moreover, the role of autophagy as a result of bortezomib treatment is controversial. The current study was designed to investigate the function of Atg3 in SKM-1 cells and to study the effect of Atg3 on cell viability and cell death following bortezomib treatment. Methods Four leukemia cell lines (SKM-1, THP-1, NB4 and K562) and two healthy patients’ bone marrow cells were analyzed for Atg3 expression via qRT-PCR and Western blotting analysis. The role of Atg3 in SKM-1 cell survival and cell death was analyzed by CCK-8 assay, trypan blue exclusion assay, DAPI staining and Annexin V/PI dual staining with or without bortezomib treatment. Western blotting analysis was used to detect proteins in autophagic and caspase signaling pathways. Electron microscopy was used to observe ultrastructural changes after Atg3 overexpression. Results Downregulation of Atg3 expression was detected in four leukemia cell lines compared with healthy bone marrow cells. Atg3 mRNA was significantly decreased in MDS patients’ bone marrow cells. Overexpression of Atg3 in SKM-1 cells resulted in AKT-mTOR-dependent autophagy, a significant reduction in cell proliferation and increased cell death, which could be overcome by the autophagy inhibitor 3-MA. SKM-1 cells overexpressing Atg3 were hypersensitive to bortezomib treatment at different concentrations via autophagic cell death and enhanced sensitivity to apoptosis in the SKM-1 cell line. Following treatment with 3-MA, the sensitivity of Atg3-overexpressing cells to bortezomib treatment was reduced

  3. Overexpression of Arabidopsis Ceramide Synthases Differentially Affects Growth, Sphingolipid Metabolism, Programmed Cell Death, and Mycotoxin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Luttgeharm, Kyle D; Chen, Ming; Mehra, Amit; Cahoon, Rebecca E; Markham, Jonathan E; Cahoon, Edgar B

    2015-10-01

    Ceramide synthases catalyze an N-acyltransferase reaction using fatty acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) and long-chain base (LCB) substrates to form the sphingolipid ceramide backbone and are targets for inhibition by the mycotoxin fumonisin B1 (FB1). Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) contains three genes encoding ceramide synthases with distinct substrate specificities: LONGEVITY ASSURANCE GENE ONE HOMOLOG1 (LOH1; At3g25540)- and LOH3 (At1g19260)-encoded ceramide synthases use very-long-chain fatty acyl-CoA and trihydroxy LCB substrates, and LOH2 (At3g19260)-encoded ceramide synthase uses palmitoyl-CoA and dihydroxy LCB substrates. In this study, complementary DNAs for each gene were overexpressed to determine the role of individual isoforms in physiology and sphingolipid metabolism. Differences were observed in growth resulting from LOH1 and LOH3 overexpression compared with LOH2 overexpression. LOH1- and LOH3-overexpressing plants had enhanced biomass relative to wild-type plants, due in part to increased cell division, suggesting that enhanced synthesis of very-long-chain fatty acid/trihydroxy LCB ceramides promotes cell division and growth. Conversely, LOH2 overexpression resulted in dwarfing. LOH2 overexpression also resulted in the accumulation of sphingolipids with C16 fatty acid/dihydroxy LCB ceramides, constitutive induction of programmed cell death, and accumulation of salicylic acid, closely mimicking phenotypes observed previously in LCB C-4 hydroxylase mutants defective in trihydroxy LCB synthesis. In addition, LOH2- and LOH3-overexpressing plants acquired increased resistance to FB1, whereas LOH1-overexpressing plants showed no increase in FB1 resistance, compared with wild-type plants, indicating that LOH1 ceramide synthase is most strongly inhibited by FB1. Overall, the findings described here demonstrate that overexpression of Arabidopsis ceramide synthases results in strongly divergent physiological and metabolic phenotypes, some of which have significance

  4. An alternative form of paraptosis-like cell death, triggered by TAJ/TROY and enhanced by PDCD5 overexpression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Li, Xianting; Wang, Lu; Ding, Peiguo; Zhang, Yingmei; Han, Wenling; Ma, Dalong

    2004-03-15

    Accumulating reports demonstrate that apoptosis does not explain all the forms of programmed cell death (PCD), particularly in individual development and neurodegenerative disease. Recently, a novel type of PCD, designated 'paraptosis', was described. Here, we show that overexpression of TAJ/TROY, a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, induces non-apoptotic cell death with paraptosis-like morphology in 293T cells. Transmission electron microscopy studies reveal extensive cytoplasmic vacuolation and mitochondrial swelling in some dying cells and no condensation or fragmentation of the nuclei. Characteristically, cell death triggered by TAJ/TROY was accompanied by phosphatidylserine externalization, loss of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential and independent of caspase activation. In addition, TAJ/TROY suppressed clonogenic growth of HEK293 and HeLa cells. Interestingly, overexpression of Programmed cell death 5 (PDCD5), an apoptosis-promoting protein, enhanced TAJ/TROY-induced paraptotic cell death. Moreover, cellular endogenous PDCD5 protein was significantly upregulated in response to TAJ/TROY overexpression. These results provide novel evidence that TAJ/TROY activates a death pathway distinct from apoptosis and that PDCD5 is an important regulator in both apoptotic and non-apoptotic PCD. PMID:15020679

  5. Overexpression of Aldose Reductase Render Mouse Hepatocytes More Sensitive to Acetaminophen Induced Oxidative Stress and Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Munzir M E; Al-Obosi, J A S; Osman, H M; Shayoub, M E

    2016-04-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) a commonly used drug for decrease the fever and pain but is capable to induced hepatotoxicity at over dose. This study was carried out to investigate the effect of APAP on the expression of anti-apoptotic and antioxidative defense genes, and whether aldose reductase over-expressing plasmid capable to protect against APAP-induced oxidative stress and cell death. APAP treatment induced oxidative stress and hepatotoxicity, and significantly increased aldose reductase mRNA and protein expression in mouse hepatocyte (AML-12). Unexpectedly, AML-12 cells over-expressing aldose reductase augmented APAP-induced reduction in cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, glutathione (GSH) depletion and glutathione S-transferase A2 expression. Moreover, over-expression of aldose reductase potentiated APAP induced reduction on proliferating cell nuclear antigen, B cell lymphoma-extra large (bcl-xL), catalase, glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPx-1) and abolished APAP-induced B-cell lymphoma 2 (bcl-2) inductions. Further, over-expression of aldose reductase significantly abolished AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity in APAP-treated cells and induced p53 expression. This results demonstrate that APAP induced toxicity in AML-12, increased aldose reductase expression, and over-expression of aldose reductase render this cell more susceptible to APAP induced oxidative stress and cell death, this probably due to inhibition AMPK or bcl-2 activity, or may due to competition between aldose reductase and glutathione reductase for NADPH. PMID:27069324

  6. Regulation of cancer cell death by a novel compound, C604, in a c-Myc-overexpressing cellular environment.

    PubMed

    Jo, Mun Jeong; Paek, A Rome; Choi, Ji Seung; Ok, Chang Youp; Jeong, Kyung Chae; Lim, Jae Hyang; Kim, Seok Hyun; You, Hye Jin

    2015-12-15

    The proto-oncogene c-Myc has been implicated in a variety of cellular processes, such as proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Several c-Myc targets have been studied; however, selective regulation of c-Myc is not easy in cancer cells. Herein, we attempt to identify chemical compounds that induce cell death in c-Myc-overexpressing cells (STF-cMyc and STF-Control) by conducting MTS assays on approximately 4000 chemical compounds. One compound, C604, induced cell death in STF-cMyc cells but not STF-Control cells. Apoptotic proteins, including caspase-3 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), were cleaved in C604-treated STF-cMyc cells. In addition, SW620, HCT116 and NCI-H23 cells, which exhibit higher basal levels of c-Myc, underwent apoptotic cell death in response to C604, suggesting a role for C604 as an inducer of apoptosis in cancer cells with c-Myc amplification. C604 induced cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase in cells, which was not affected by apoptotic inhibitors. Interestingly, C604 induced accumulation of c-Myc and Cdc25A proteins. In summary, a chemical compound was identified that may induce cell death in cancer cells with c-Myc amplification specifically through an apoptotic pathway. PMID:26607468

  7. Neonatal motoneurons overexpressing the bcl-2 protooncogene in transgenic mice are protected from axotomy-induced cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Dubois-Dauphin, M; Frankowski, H; Tsujimoto, Y; Huarte, J; Martinou, J C

    1994-01-01

    In vitro, the overexpression of the bcl-2 protooncogene in cultured neurons has been shown to prevent apoptosis induced by neurotrophic factor deprivation. We have generated transgenic mice overexpressing the Bcl-2 protein in neurons, including motoneurons of the facial nucleus. We have tested whether Bcl-2 could protect these motoneurons from experimentally induced cell death in new born mice. To address this question, we performed unilateral lesion of the facial nerve of wild-type and transgenic 2-day-old mice. In wild-type mice, the lesioned nerve and the corresponding motoneuron cell bodies in the facial nucleus underwent rapid degeneration. In contrast, in transgenic mice, facial motoneurons survived axotomy. Not only their cell bodies but also their axons were protected up to the lesion site. These results demonstrate that in vivo Bcl-2 protects neonatal motoneurons from degeneration after axonal injury. A better understanding of the mechanisms by which Bcl-2 prevents neuronal cell death in vivo could lead to the development of strategies for the treatment of motoneuron degenerative diseases. Images PMID:8159744

  8. GILZ overexpression attenuates endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated cell death via the activation of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    André, Fanny; Corazao-Rozas, Paola; Idziorek, Thierry; Quesnel, Bruno; Kluza, Jérome; Marchetti, Philippe

    2016-09-16

    The Glucocorticoïd-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) protein has profound anti-inflammatory activities in haematopoietic cells. GILZ regulates numerous signal transduction pathways involved in proliferation and survival of normal and neoplastic cells. Here, we have demonstrated the potential of GILZ in alleviating apoptosis induced by ER stress inducers. Whereas the glucocorticoid, dexamethasone, protects from tunicamycin-induced cell death, silencing endogeneous GILZ in dexamethasone-treated cancer cells alter the capacity of glucocorticoids to protect from tunicamycin-mediated apoptosis. Under ER stress conditions, overexpression of GILZ significantly reduced activation of mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis by maintaining Bcl-xl level. GILZ protein affects the UPR signaling shifting the balance towards pro-survival signals as judged by down-regulation of CHOP, ATF4, XBP1s mRNA and increase in GRP78 protein level. Interestingly, GILZ sustains high mitochondrial OXPHOS during ER stress and cytoprotection mediated by GILZ is abolished in cells depleted of mitochondrial DNA, which are OXPHOS-deficient. These findings reveal a new role of GILZ, which acts as a cytoprotector against ER stress through a pathway involving mitochondrial OXPHOS. PMID:27416758

  9. Overexpression of alpha-synuclein at non-toxic levels increases dopaminergic cell death induced by copper exposure via modulation of protein degradation pathways.

    PubMed

    Anandhan, Annadurai; Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Bohovych, Iryna; Griggs, Amy M; Zavala-Flores, Laura; Reyes-Reyes, Elsa M; Seravalli, Javier; Stanciu, Lia A; Lee, Jaekwon; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Franco, Rodrigo

    2015-09-01

    Gene multiplications or point mutations in alpha (α)-synuclein are associated with familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). An increase in copper (Cu) levels has been reported in the cerebrospinal fluid and blood of PD patients, while occupational exposure to Cu has been suggested to augment the risk to develop PD. We aimed to elucidate the mechanisms by which α-synuclein and Cu regulate dopaminergic cell death. Short-term overexpression of wild type (WT) or mutant A53T α-synuclein had no toxic effect in human dopaminergic cells and primary midbrain cultures, but it exerted a synergistic effect on Cu-induced cell death. Cell death induced by Cu was potentiated by overexpression of the Cu transporter protein 1 (Ctr1) and depletion of intracellular glutathione (GSH) indicating that the toxic effects of Cu are linked to alterations in its intracellular homeostasis. Using the redox sensor roGFP, we demonstrated that Cu-induced oxidative stress was primarily localized in the cytosol and not in the mitochondria. However, α-synuclein overexpression had no effect on Cu-induced oxidative stress. WT or A53T α-synuclein overexpression exacerbated Cu toxicity in dopaminergic and yeast cells in the absence of α-synuclein aggregation. Cu increased autophagic flux and protein ubiquitination. Impairment of autophagy by overexpression of a dominant negative Atg5 form or inhibition of the ubiquitin/proteasome system (UPS) with MG132 enhanced Cu-induced cell death. However, only inhibition of the UPS stimulated the synergistic toxic effects of Cu and α-synuclein overexpression. Our results demonstrate that α-synuclein stimulates Cu toxicity in dopaminergic cells independent from its aggregation via modulation of protein degradation pathways. PMID:25497688

  10. Overexpression of TDP-43 causes partially p53-dependent G2/M arrest and p53-independent cell death in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kikyo; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Aiso, Sadakazu; Matsuoka, Masaaki

    2012-01-11

    It has been hypothesized that the dysregulation of transactive response DNA-binding protein-43 (TDP-43) in neurons is closely linked to the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitinated inclusions. However, it remains undefined whether the dysregulation of TDP-43 in non-neuronal cells, such as glial cells, contributes to the pathogenesis of these neurodegenerative diseases. Primarily using HeLa cells, we show that a low-grade overexpression of TDP-43, 2- to 5-fold greater than endogenous expression, which is thought to mimic the gain of function of TDP-43, induced cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and cell death in cultured non-neuronal cells. Since the activation of p53 may induce G2/M arrest and/or cell death in many abnormal situations, we examined the mechanism underlying G2/M arrest from the standpoint of p53 regulation. It was determined that the TDP-43-induced G2/M arrest was attenuated, while TDP-43-induced death was not attenuated, in cells in which the p53 function was compromised. These data collectively indicate that TDP-43 causes G2/M arrest in a partially p53-dependent manner and it causes cell death in a p53-independent manner in cycling cells. Because it is likely that the impaired proliferation in glial cells causes a decrease in the neuron-supporting ability, these findings further suggests that the gain of function of TDP-43 may cause neurotoxicity by inducing cell cycle arrest and death in glial cells. PMID:22133803

  11. Overexpression of glutamate–cysteine ligase protects human COV434 granulosa tumour cells against oxidative and γ-radiation-induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Cortes-Wanstreet, Mabel M.; Giedzinski, Erich; Limoli, Charles L.; Luderer, Ulrike

    2009-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is toxic to ovarian follicles and can cause infertility. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been implicated in the toxicity of ionizing radiation in several cell types. We have shown that depletion of the antioxidant glutathione (GSH) sensitizes follicles and granulosa cells to toxicant-induced apoptosis and that supplementation of GSH is protective. The rate-limiting reaction in GSH biosynthesis is catalysed by glutamate–cysteine ligase (GCL), which consists of a catalytic subunit (GCLC) and a regulatory subunit (GCLM). We hypothesized that overexpression of Gclc or Gclm to increase GSH synthesis would protect granulosa cells against oxidant- and radiation-induced cell death. The COV434 line of human granulosa tumour cells was stably transfected with vectors designed for the constitutive expression of Gclc, Gclm, both Gclc and Gclm or empty vector. GCL protein and enzymatic activity and total GSH levels were significantly increased in the GCL subunit-transfected cells. GCL-transfected cells were resistant to cell killing by treatment with hydrogen peroxide compared to control cells. Cell viability declined less in all the GCL subunit-transfected cell lines 1–8 h after 0.5 mM hydrogen peroxide treatment than in control cells. We next examined the effects of GCL overexpression on responses to ionizing radiation. ROS were measured using a redox-sensitive fluorogenic dye in cells irradiated with 0, 1 or 5 Gy of γ-rays. There was a dose-dependent increase in ROS within 30 min in all cell lines, an effect that was significantly attenuated in Gcl-transfected cells. Apoptosis, assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labelling and activated caspase-3 immunoblotting, was significantly decreased in irradiated Gclc-transfected cells compared to irradiated control cells. Suppression of GSH synthesis in Gclc-transfected cells reversed resistance to radiation. These findings show that

  12. Overexpression of hsp27 Rescued Neuronal Cell Death and Reduction in Life- and Health-Span in Drosophila melanogaster Against Prolonged Exposure to Dichlorvos.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ashutosh; Saini, Sanjay; Khatoon, Rehana; Sharma, Divya; Narayan, Gopeshwar; Kar Chowdhuri, Debapratim

    2016-07-01

    Long-term exposure to dichlorvos (O,O-dimethyl-2,2-dichlorovinyl phosphate (DDVP), an organophosphate pesticide) is reported to exert neurotoxicity, i.e., generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), oxidative damage, and neuronal cell death along with life- and health-span reduction in nontarget organisms including humans. However, studies on genetic modulation towards neuroprotection against prolonged DDVP exposure are elusive. Hsp27 (a small heat shock protein) is involved in various cellular processes and thus has attained emphasis as a therapeutic target. We aimed to examine the protective effect of hsp27 overexpression against prolonged DDVP exposure using an in vivo model Drosophila melanogaster. Flies were exposed to 15.0 ng/ml DDVP for a prolonged period to examine neuronal cell death, locomotor performance, and lifespan. After prolonged exposure, cell death, ROS level, glutathione depletion, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate level (NADPH), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) activities were examined in fly brain tissues at different days of age (days 10, 20, and 30). Flies with ubiquitous overexpression of hsp27 showed better resistance (improved lifespan and locomotor performance) in comparison to that targeted to motor neurons and nervous system. These flies also exhibited lesser intracellular ROS level and glutathione depletion by restoring G6PD activity, NADPH level, and TrxR activity in their brains thereby resisted neuronal cell death. Conversely, hsp27 knockdown flies exhibited reversal of the above endpoints. The study evidenced the neuroprotective efficacy of hsp27 overexpression against prolonged DDVP exposure and favored Hsp27 as a therapeutic target towards achieving better organismal (including human) health against long-term chemical exposure. PMID:26033218

  13. Vesicular Trafficking Defects, Developmental Abnormalities, and Alterations in the Cellular Death Process Occur in Cell Lines that Over-Express Dictyostelium GTPase, Rab2, and Rab2 Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Maringer, Katherine; Saheb, Entsar; Bush, John

    2014-01-01

    Small molecular weight GTPase Rab2 has been shown to be a resident of pre-Golgi intermediates and required for protein transport from the ER to the Golgi complex, however, the function of Rab2 in Dictyostelium has yet to be fully characterized. Using cell lines that over-express DdRab2, as well as cell lines over-expressing constitutively active (CA), and dominant negative (DN) forms of the GTPase, we report a functional role in vesicular transport specifically phagocytosis, and endocytosis. Furthermore, Rab2 like other GTPases cycles between an active GTP-bound and an inactive GDP-bound state. We found that this GTP/GDP cycle for DdRab2 is crucial for normal Dictyostelium development and cell–cell adhesion. Similar to Rab5 and Rab7 in C. elegans, we found that DdRab2 plays a role in programmed cell death, possibly in the phagocytic removal of apoptotic corpses. PMID:25157910

  14. Obatoclax overcomes resistance to cell death in aggressive thyroid carcinomas by countering Bcl2a1 and Mcl1 overexpression

    PubMed Central

    Champa, Devora; Russo, Marika A.; Liao, Xiao-Hui; Refetoff, Samuel; Ghossein, Ronald A.; Di Cristofano, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Poorly differentiated tumors of the thyroid gland (PDTC) are generally characterized by a poor prognosis due to their resistance to available therapeutic approaches. The relative rarity of these tumors is a major obstacle to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to tumor aggressiveness and drug resistance, and consequently to the development of novel therapies. By simultaneously activating Kras and deleting p53 in thyroid follicular cells, we have developed a novel mouse model that develops papillary thyroid cancer invariably progressing to PDTC. In several cases, tumors further progress to anaplastic carcinomas. The poorly differentiated tumors are morphologically and functionally similar to their human counterparts and depend on MEK/ERK signaling for proliferation. Using primary carcinomas as well as carcinoma-derived cell lines, we also demonstrate that these tumors are intrinsically resistant to apoptosis due to high levels of expression of the Bcl2 family members Bcl2a1 and Mcl1, and can be effectively targeted by Obatoclax, a small molecule pan-inhibitor of the Bcl2 family. Furthermore, we show that Bcl2 family inhibition synergizes with MEK inhibition as well as with doxorubicin in inducing cell death. Thus, our studies in a novel, relevant mouse model, uncover a promising druggable feature of aggressive thyroid cancers. PMID:25012986

  15. PTEN Overexpression Cooperates With Lithium to Reduce the Malignancy and to Increase Cell Death by Apoptosis via PI3K/Akt Suppression in Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    de Araujo, Wallace Martins; Robbs, Bruno Kaufmann; Bastos, Lilian G; de Souza, Waldemir F; Vidal, Flávia C B; Viola, João P B; Morgado-Diaz, Jose A

    2016-02-01

    Lithium is a well-established non-competitive inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), a kinase that is involved in several cellular processes related to cancer progression. GSK-3β is regulated upstream by PI3K/Akt, which is negatively modulated by PTEN. The role that lithium plays in cancer is controversial because lithium can activate or inhibit survival signaling pathways depending on the cell type. In this study, we analyzed the mechanisms by which lithium can modulate events related to colorectal cancer (CRC) progression and evaluated the role that survival signaling pathways such as PI3K/Akt and PTEN play in this context. We show that the administration of lithium decreased the proliferative potential of CRC cells in a GSK-3β-independent manner but induced the accumulation of cells in G2/M phase. Furthermore, high doses of lithium increased apoptosis, which was accompanied by decreased proteins levels of Akt and PTEN. Then, cells that were induced to overexpress PTEN were treated with lithium; we observed that low doses of lithium strongly increased apoptosis. Additionally, PTEN overexpression reduced proliferation, but this effect was minor compared with that in cells treated with lithium alone. Furthermore, we demonstrated that PTEN overexpression and lithium treatment separately reduced cell migration, colony formation, and invasion, and these effects were enhanced when lithium treatment and PTEN overexpression were combined. In conclusion, our findings indicate that PTEN overexpression and lithium treatment cooperate to reduce the malignancy of CRC cells and highlight lithium and PTEN as potential candidates for studies to identify new therapeutic approaches for CRC treatment. PMID:26224641

  16. Development of salinity tolerance in rice by constitutive-overexpression of genes involved in the regulation of programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Thi M. L.; Moghaddam, Lalehvash; Williams, Brett; Khanna, Harjeet; Dale, James; Mundree, Sagadevan G.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental factors contribute to over 70% of crop yield losses worldwide. Of these drought and salinity are the most significant causes of crop yield reduction. Rice is an important staple crop that feeds more than half of the world’s population. However among the agronomically important cereals rice is the most sensitive to salinity. In the present study we show that exogenous expression of anti-apoptotic genes from diverse origins, AtBAG4 (Arabidopsis), Hsp70 (Citrus tristeza virus) and p35 (Baculovirus), significantly improves salinity tolerance in rice at the whole plant level. Physiological, biochemical and agronomical analyses of transgenic rice expressing each of the anti-apoptotic genes subjected to salinity treatment demonstrated traits associated with tolerant varieties including, improved photosynthesis, membrane integrity, ion and ROS maintenance systems, growth rate, and yield components. Moreover, FTIR analysis showed that the chemical composition of salinity-treated transgenic plants is reminiscent of non-treated, unstressed controls. In contrast, wild type and vector control plants displayed hallmark features of stress, including pectin degradation upon subjection to salinity treatment. Interestingly, despite their diverse origins, transgenic plants expressing the anti-apoptotic genes assessed in this study displayed similar physiological and biochemical characteristics during salinity treatment thus providing further evidence that cell death pathways are conserved across broad evolutionary kingdoms. Our results reveal that anti-apoptotic genes facilitate maintenance of metabolic activity at the whole plant level to create favorable conditions for cellular survival. It is these conditions that are crucial and conducive to the plants ability to tolerate/adapt to extreme environments. PMID:25870602

  17. Development of salinity tolerance in rice by constitutive-overexpression of genes involved in the regulation of programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Thi M L; Moghaddam, Lalehvash; Williams, Brett; Khanna, Harjeet; Dale, James; Mundree, Sagadevan G

    2015-01-01

    Environmental factors contribute to over 70% of crop yield losses worldwide. Of these drought and salinity are the most significant causes of crop yield reduction. Rice is an important staple crop that feeds more than half of the world's population. However among the agronomically important cereals rice is the most sensitive to salinity. In the present study we show that exogenous expression of anti-apoptotic genes from diverse origins, AtBAG4 (Arabidopsis), Hsp70 (Citrus tristeza virus) and p35 (Baculovirus), significantly improves salinity tolerance in rice at the whole plant level. Physiological, biochemical and agronomical analyses of transgenic rice expressing each of the anti-apoptotic genes subjected to salinity treatment demonstrated traits associated with tolerant varieties including, improved photosynthesis, membrane integrity, ion and ROS maintenance systems, growth rate, and yield components. Moreover, FTIR analysis showed that the chemical composition of salinity-treated transgenic plants is reminiscent of non-treated, unstressed controls. In contrast, wild type and vector control plants displayed hallmark features of stress, including pectin degradation upon subjection to salinity treatment. Interestingly, despite their diverse origins, transgenic plants expressing the anti-apoptotic genes assessed in this study displayed similar physiological and biochemical characteristics during salinity treatment thus providing further evidence that cell death pathways are conserved across broad evolutionary kingdoms. Our results reveal that anti-apoptotic genes facilitate maintenance of metabolic activity at the whole plant level to create favorable conditions for cellular survival. It is these conditions that are crucial and conducive to the plants ability to tolerate/adapt to extreme environments. PMID:25870602

  18. Calpastatin overexpression reduces oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial impairment and cell death in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells by decreasing calpain and calcineurin activation, induction of mitochondrial fission and destruction of mitochondrial fusion.

    PubMed

    Tangmansakulchai, Kulvadee; Abubakar, Zuroida; Kitiyanant, Narisorn; Suwanjang, Wilasinee; Leepiyasakulchai, Chaniya; Govitrapong, Piyarat; Chetsawang, Banthit

    2016-09-01

    Calpain is an intracellular Ca(2+)-dependent protease, and the activation of calpain has been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases. Calpain activity can be regulated by calpastatin, an endogenous specific calpain inhibitor. Several lines of evidence have demonstrated a potential role of calpastatin in preventing calpain-mediated pathogenesis. Additionally, several studies have revealed that calpain activation and mitochondrial damage are involved in the cell death process; however, recent evidence has not clearly indicated a neuroprotective mechanism of calpastatin against calpain-dependent mitochondrial impairment in the process of neuronal cell death. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the potential ability of calpastatin to inhibit calpain activation and mitochondrial impairment in oxidative stress-induced neuron degeneration. Calpastatin was stably overexpressed in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. In non-calpastatin overexpressing SH-SY5Y cells, hydrogen peroxide significantly decreased cell viability, superoxide dismutase activity, mitochondrial membrane potential, ATP production and mitochondrial fusion protein (Opa1) levels in the mitochondrial fraction but increased reactive oxygen species formation, calpain and calcineurin activation, mitochondrial fission protein (Fis1 and Drp1) levels in the mitochondrial fraction and apoptotic cells. Nevertheless, these toxic effects were abolished in hydrogen peroxide-treated calpastatin-overexpressing SH-SY5Y cells. The results of the present study demonstrate the potential ability of calpastatin to diminish calpain and calcineurin activation and mitochondrial impairment in neurons that are affected by oxidative damage. PMID:27453331

  19. Overexpression of Ipe protein from the coliphage mEp021 induces pleiotropic effects involving haemolysis by HlyE-containing vesicles and cell death.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Peñafiel, Eva; Fernández-Ramírez, Fernando; Ishida, Cecilia; Reyes-Cortés, Ruth; Sepúlveda-Robles, Omar; Guarneros-Peña, Gabriel; Bermúdez-Cruz, Rosa María; Kameyama, Luis

    2012-06-01

    Lysogenic Escherichia coli K-12 harbouring the prophage mEp021 displays haemolytic activity. From a genomic library of mEp021, we identified an open reading frame (ORF 4) that was responsible for the haemolytic activity. However, the ORF 4 sequence contains four initiation codons in the same frame: ORF 4.1-ORF 4.4, coding for 83-a.a., 82-a.a., 77-a.a. and 72-a.a. products, respectively. The expression of the cloned ORF 4.3, or inducer of pleiotropic effects (ipe), reproduced the haemolytic phenotype in a native strain carrying the gene hlyE(+), but not in the mutant hlyE(-) strain. The overexpression of Ipe induced several pleiotropic effects, such as the inhibition of cell growth and the deregulation of cell division, which resulted in a mixture of normal and desiccated-like cells: normal-filamentous, desiccated-like-filamentous bacilli, minicells etc. Other effects included abnormalities of the cell membrane, the production of vesicles containing HlyE, and finally, cell death. These events were analysed at the molecular level by microarray assays. The global transcription profile of E. coli K-12 strain MC4100, which expressed Ipe after 4 h, revealed differential expression of various genes, most of which were related either to cell membrane and murein biosynthesis or to cell division. The up-regulation of some of these transcripts was confirmed by qRT-PCR. Additional research is needed to determine whether these effects are directly related to Ipe activity or are consequences of the cellular responses to putative structural damage induced by Ipe. PMID:22365985

  20. Motor neuron cell death in wobbler mutant mice follows overexpression of the G-protein-coupled, protease-activated receptor for thrombin.

    PubMed Central

    Festoff, B. W.; D'Andrea, M. R.; Citron, B. A.; Salcedo, R. M.; Smirnova, I. V.; Andrade-Gordon, P.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration are actively sought for new therapeutic strategies. Transgenic, knockout and genetic mouse models greatly aid our understanding of the mechanisms for neuronal cell death. A naturally occurring, autosomal recessive mutant, known as wobbler, and mice transgenic for familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS) superoxide dismutase (SOD)1 mutations are available, but the molecular mechanisms remain equally unknown. Both phenotypes are detectable after birth. Wobbler is detectable in the third week of life, when homozygotes (wr/wr) exhibit prominent gliosis and significant motor neuron loss in the cervical, but not in lumbar, spinal cord segments. To address molecular mechanisms, we evaluated "death signals" associated with the multifunctional serine protease, thrombin, which leads to apoptotic motor neuronal cell death in culture by cleavage of a G-protein coupled, protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thrombin activities were determined with chromogenic substrate assays, Western immunoblots and immunohistochemistry were performed with anti-PAR-1 to observe localizations of the receptor and anti-GFAP staining was used to monitor astrocytosis. PAR-1 mRNA levels and locations were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and in situ hybridizations. Cell death was monitored with in situ DNA fragmentation assays. RESULTS: In preliminary studies we found a 5-fold increase in PAR-1 mRNA in cervical spinal cords from wr/wr, compared with wild-type (wt) littermates. Our current studies suggested that reactive astrocytosis and motor neuron cell death were causally linked with alterations in thrombin signaling. PAR-1 protein expression was increased, as demonstrated by immunocytochemistry and confirmed with in situ hybridization, in phenotypic wr/wr motor neurons, compared with wt, but not in astrocytes. This increase was much greater in cervical, compared with lumbar

  1. Overexpression of KCNN3 results in sudden cardiac death

    PubMed Central

    Mahida, Saagar; Mills, Robert W.; Tucker, Nathan R.; Simonson, Bridget; Macri, Vincenzo; Lemoine, Marc D.; Das, Saumya; Milan, David J.; Ellinor, Patrick T.

    2014-01-01

    Background A recent genome-wide association study identified a susceptibility locus for atrial fibrillation at the KCNN3 gene. Since the KCNN3 gene encodes for a small conductance calcium-activated potassium channel, we hypothesized that overexpression of the SK3 channel increases susceptibility to cardiac arrhythmias. Methods and results We characterized the cardiac electrophysiological phenotype of a mouse line with overexpression of the SK3 channel. We generated homozygote (SK3T/T) and heterozygote (SK3+/T) mice with overexpression of the channel and compared them with wild-type (WT) controls. We observed a high incidence of sudden death among SK3T/T mice (7 of 19 SK3T/T mice). Ambulatory monitoring demonstrated that sudden death was due to heart block and bradyarrhythmias. SK3T/T mice displayed normal body weight, temperature, and cardiac function on echocardiography; however, histological analysis demonstrated that these mice have abnormal atrioventricular node morphology. Optical mapping demonstrated that SK3T/T mice have slower ventricular conduction compared with WT controls (SK3T/T vs. WT; 0.45 ± 0.04 vs. 0.60 ± 0.09 mm/ms, P = 0.001). Programmed stimulation in 1-month-old SK3T/T mice demonstrated inducible atrial arrhythmias (50% of SK3T/T vs. 0% of WT mice) and also a shorter atrioventricular nodal refractory period (SK3T/T vs. WT; 43 ± 6 vs. 52 ± 9 ms, P = 0.02). Three-month-old SK3T/T mice on the other hand displayed a trend towards a more prolonged atrioventricular nodal refractory period (SK3T/T vs. WT; 61 ± 1 vs. 52 ± 6 ms, P = 0.06). Conclusion Overexpression of the SK3 channel causes an increased risk of sudden death associated with bradyarrhythmias and heart block, possibly due to atrioventricular nodal dysfunction. PMID:24296650

  2. Programmed cell death

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on the role programmed cell death plays in normal development and homeostasis of many organisms. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: invertebrate development; immunology/neurology; bcl-2 family; biochemistry; programmed cell death in viruses; oncogenesis; vertebrate development; and diseases.

  3. Chemotherapy Induces Programmed Cell Death-Ligand 1 Overexpression via the Nuclear Factor-κB to Foster an Immunosuppressive Tumor Microenvironment in Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jin; Hamanishi, Junzo; Matsumura, Noriomi; Abiko, Kaoru; Murat, Kumuruz; Baba, Tsukasa; Yamaguchi, Ken; Horikawa, Naoki; Hosoe, Yuko; Murphy, Susan K; Konishi, Ikuo; Mandai, Masaki

    2015-12-01

    Emerging evidence has highlighted the host immune system in modulating the patient response to chemotherapy, but the mechanism of this modulation remains unclear. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of chemotherapy on antitumor immunity in the tumor microenvironment of ovarian cancer. Treatment of ovarian cancer cell lines with various chemotherapeutic agents resulted in upregulated expression of MHC class I and programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) in a NF-κB-dependent manner and suppression of antigen-specific T-cell function in vitro. In a mouse model of ovarian cancer, treatment with paclitaxel increased CD8(+) T-cell infiltration into the tumor site, upregulated PD-L1 expression, and activated NF-κB signaling. In particular, tumor-bearing mice treated with a combination of paclitaxel and a PD-L1/PD-1 signal blockade survived longer than mice treated with paclitaxel alone. In summary, we found that chemotherapy induces local immune suppression in ovarian cancer through NF-κB-mediated PD-L1 upregulation. Thus, a combination of chemotherapy and immunotherapy targeting the PD-L1/PD-1 signaling axis may improve the antitumor response and offers a promising new treatment modality against ovarian cancer. PMID:26573793

  4. Classification of cell death

    PubMed Central

    Kroemer, G; Galluzzi, L; Vandenabeele, P; Abrams, J; Alnemri, ES; Baehrecke, EH; Blagosklonny, MV; El-Deiry, WS; Golstein, P; Green, DR; Hengartner, M; Knight, RA; Kumar, S; Lipton, SA; Malorni, W; Nuñez, G; Peter, ME; Tschopp, J; Yuan, J; Piacentini, M; Zhivotovsky, B; Melino, G

    2009-01-01

    Different types of cell death are often defined by morphological criteria, without a clear reference to precise biochemical mechanisms. The Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death (NCCD) proposes unified criteria for the definition of cell death and of its different morphologies, while formulating several caveats against the misuse of words and concepts that slow down progress in the area of cell death research. Authors, reviewers and editors of scientific periodicals are invited to abandon expressions like ‘percentage apoptosis’ and to replace them with more accurate descriptions of the biochemical and cellular parameters that are actually measured. Moreover, at the present stage, it should be accepted that caspase-independent mechanisms can cooperate with (or substitute for) caspases in the execution of lethal signaling pathways and that ‘autophagic cell death’ is a type of cell death occurring together with (but not necessarily by) autophagic vacuolization. This study details the 2009 recommendations of the NCCD on the use of cell death-related terminology including ‘entosis’, ‘mitotic catastrophe’, ‘necrosis’, ‘necroptosis’ and ‘pyroptosis’. PMID:18846107

  5. Optogenetic apoptosis: light-triggered cell death.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Robert M; Freeman, David J; Lamb, Kelsey N; Pollet, Rebecca M; Smith, Weston J; Lawrence, David S

    2015-10-01

    An optogenetic Bax has been designed that facilitates light-induced apoptosis. We demonstrate that mitochondrial recruitment of a genetically encoded light-responsive Bax results in the release of mitochondrial proteins, downstream caspase-3 cleavage, changes in cellular morphology, and ultimately cell death. Mutagenesis of a key phosphorylatable residue or modification of the C-terminus mitigates background (dark) levels of apoptosis that result from Bax overexpression. The mechanism of optogenetic Bax-mediated apoptosis was explored using a series of small molecules known to interfere with various steps in programmed cell death. Optogenetic Bax appears to form a mitochondrial apoptosis-induced channel analogous to that of endogenous Bax. PMID:26418181

  6. Transition metals activate TFEB in overexpressing cells

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Karina A.; Kiselyov, Kirill

    2015-01-01

    Transition metal toxicity is an important factor in the pathogenesis of numerous human disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Lysosomes have emerged as important factors in transition metal toxicity because they handle transition metals via endocytosis, autophagy, absorption from the cytoplasm and exocytosis. Transcription factor EB (TFEB) regulates lysosomal biogenesis and the expression of lysosomal proteins in response to lysosomal and/or metabolic stresses. Since transition metals cause lysosomal dysfunction, we proposed that TFEB may be activated to drive gene expression in response to transition metal exposure and that such activation may influence transition metal toxicity. We found that transition metals copper (Cu) and iron (Fe) activate recombinant TFEB and stimulate the expression of TFEB-dependent genes in TFEB-overexpressing cells. In cells that show robust lysosomal exocytosis, TFEB was cytoprotective at moderate levels of Cu exposure, decreasing oxidative stress as reported by the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) gene. However, at high levels of Cu exposure, particularly in cells with low levels of lysosomal exocytosis, activation of overexpressed TFEB was toxic, increasing oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage. Based on these data, we conclude that TFEB-driven gene network is a component of the cellular response to transition metals. These data suggest limitations and disadvantages of TFEB overexpression as a therapeutic approach. PMID:26251447

  7. Cell death in mammalian development.

    PubMed

    Penaloza, C; Orlanski, S; Ye, Y; Entezari-Zaher, T; Javdan, M; Zakeri, Z

    2008-01-01

    During embryogenesis there is an exquisite orchestration of cellular division, movement, differentiation, and death. Cell death is one of the most important aspects of organization of the developing embryo, as alteration in timing, level, or pattern of cell death can lead to developmental anomalies. Cell death shapes the embryo and defines the eventual functions of the organs. Cells die using different paths; understanding which path a dying cell takes helps us define the signals that regulate the fate of the cell. Our understanding of cell death in development stems from a number of observations indicating genetic regulation of the death process. With today's increased knowledge of the pathways of cell death and the identification of the genes whose products regulate the pathways we know that, although elimination of some of these gene products has no developmental phenotype, alteration of several others has profound effects. In this review we discuss the types and distributions of cell death seen in developing mammalian embryos as well as the gene products that may regulate the process. PMID:18220829

  8. The Influenza Virus H5N1 Infection Can Induce ROS Production for Viral Replication and Host Cell Death in A549 Cells Modulated by Human Cu/Zn Superoxide Dismutase (SOD1) Overexpression.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xian; Wang, Ruifang; Zou, Wei; Sun, Xin; Liu, Xiaokun; Zhao, Lianzhong; Wang, Shengyu; Jin, Meilin

    2016-01-01

    Highly pathogenic H5N1 infections are often accompanied by excessive pro-inflammatory response, high viral titer, and apoptosis; as such, the efficient control of these infections poses a great challenge. The pathogenesis of influenza virus infection is also related to oxidative stress. However, the role of endogenic genes with antioxidant effect in the control of influenza viruses, especially H5N1 viruses, should be further investigated. In this study, the H5N1 infection in lung epithelial cells decreased Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) expression at mRNA and protein levels. Forced SOD1 expression significantly inhibited the H5N1-induced increase in reactive oxygen species, decreased pro-inflammatory response, prevented p65 and p38 phosphorylation, and impeded viral ribonucleoprotein nuclear export and viral replication. The SOD1 overexpression also rescued H5N1-induced cellular apoptosis and alleviated H5N1-caused mitochondrial dysfunction. Therefore, this study described the role of SOD1 in the replication of H5N1 influenza virus and emphasized the relevance of this enzyme in the control of H5N1 replication in epithelial cells. Pharmacological modulation or targeting SOD1 may open a new way to fight H5N1 influenza virus. PMID:26761025

  9. Cell death proteomics database: consolidating proteomics data on cell death.

    PubMed

    Arntzen, Magnus Ø; Bull, Vibeke H; Thiede, Bernd

    2013-05-01

    Programmed cell death is a ubiquitous process of utmost importance for the development and maintenance of multicellular organisms. More than 10 different types of programmed cell death forms have been discovered. Several proteomics analyses have been performed to gain insight in proteins involved in the different forms of programmed cell death. To consolidate these studies, we have developed the cell death proteomics (CDP) database, which comprehends data from apoptosis, autophagy, cytotoxic granule-mediated cell death, excitotoxicity, mitotic catastrophe, paraptosis, pyroptosis, and Wallerian degeneration. The CDP database is available as a web-based database to compare protein identifications and quantitative information across different experimental setups. The proteomics data of 73 publications were integrated and unified with protein annotations from UniProt-KB and gene ontology (GO). Currently, more than 6,500 records of more than 3,700 proteins are included in the CDP. Comparing apoptosis and autophagy using overrepresentation analysis of GO terms, the majority of enriched processes were found in both, but also some clear differences were perceived. Furthermore, the analysis revealed differences and similarities of the proteome between autophagosomal and overall autophagy. The CDP database represents a useful tool to consolidate data from proteome analyses of programmed cell death and is available at http://celldeathproteomics.uio.no. PMID:23537399

  10. Plumbagin induces apoptosis in Her2-overexpressing breast cancer cells through the mitochondrial-mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Kawiak, Anna; Zawacka-Pankau, Joanna; Lojkowska, Ewa

    2012-04-27

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of death-related cancers in women. Approximately 30% of breast cancers overexpress the Her2 oncogene, which is associated with a poor prognosis and increased resistance to chemotherapy. Plumbagin (1), a constituent of species in the plant genera Drosera and Plumbago, displays antineoplastic activity toward various cancers. The present study was aimed at determining the anticancer potential of 1 toward Her2-overexpressing breast cancer cells and defining the mode of cell death induced in these cells. The results showed that 1 exhibited high antiproliferative activity toward the Her2-overexpressing cell lines SKBR3 and BT474. The antiproliferative activity of 1 was associated with apoptosis-mediated cell death, as revealed by caspase activation and an increase in the sub-G1 fraction of the cell cycle. Compound 1 increased the levels of the proapoptotic Bcl-2 family of proteins and decreased the level of the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein in SKBR3 and BT474 cells. Thus, these findings indicate that 1 induces apoptosis in Her2-overexpressing breast cancers through the mitochondrial-mediated pathway and suggest its potential for further investigation for the treatment of Her2-overexpressing breast cancer. PMID:22512718

  11. Inhibition of Prostaglandin Reductase 2, a Putative Oncogene Overexpressed in Human Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma, Induces Oxidative Stress-Mediated Cell Death Involving xCT and CTH Gene Expressions through 15-Keto-PGE2.

    PubMed

    Chang, Emily Yun-Chia; Chang, Yi-Cheng; Shun, Chia-Tung; Tien, Yu-Wen; Tsai, Shu-Huei; Hee, Siow-Wey; Chen, Ing-Jung; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Prostaglandin reductase 2 (PTGR2) is the enzyme that catalyzes 15-keto-PGE2, an endogenous PPARγ ligand, into 13,14-dihydro-15-keto-PGE2. Previously, we have reported a novel oncogenic role of PTGR2 in gastric cancer, where PTGR2 was discovered to modulate ROS-mediated cell death and tumor transformation. In the present study, we demonstrated the oncogenic potency of PTGR2 in pancreatic cancer. First, we observed that the majority of the human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tissues was stained positive for PTGR2 expression but not in the adjacent normal parts. In vitro analyses showed that silencing of PTGR2 expression enhanced ROS production, suppressed pancreatic cell proliferation, and promoted cell death through increasing 15-keto-PGE2. Mechanistically, silencing of PTGR2 or addition of 15-keto-PGE2 suppressed the expressions of solute carrier family 7 member 11 (xCT) and cystathionine gamma-lyase (CTH), two important providers of intracellular cysteine for the generation of glutathione (GSH), which is widely accepted as the first-line antioxidative defense. The oxidative stress-mediated cell death after silencing of PTGR2 or addition of 15-keto-PGE2 was further abolished after restoring intracellular GSH concentrations and cysteine supply by N-acetyl-L-cysteine and 2-Mercaptomethanol. Our data highlight the therapeutic potential of targeting PTGR2/15-keto-PGE2 for pancreatic cancer. PMID:26820738

  12. Inhibition of Prostaglandin Reductase 2, a Putative Oncogene Overexpressed in Human Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma, Induces Oxidative Stress-Mediated Cell Death Involving xCT and CTH Gene Expressions through 15-Keto-PGE2

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Emily Yun-Chia; Chang, Yi-Cheng; Shun, Chia-Tung; Tien, Yu-Wen; Tsai, Shu-Huei; Hee, Siow-Wey; Chen, Ing-Jung; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Prostaglandin reductase 2 (PTGR2) is the enzyme that catalyzes 15-keto-PGE2, an endogenous PPARγ ligand, into 13,14-dihydro-15-keto-PGE2. Previously, we have reported a novel oncogenic role of PTGR2 in gastric cancer, where PTGR2 was discovered to modulate ROS-mediated cell death and tumor transformation. In the present study, we demonstrated the oncogenic potency of PTGR2 in pancreatic cancer. First, we observed that the majority of the human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tissues was stained positive for PTGR2 expression but not in the adjacent normal parts. In vitro analyses showed that silencing of PTGR2 expression enhanced ROS production, suppressed pancreatic cell proliferation, and promoted cell death through increasing 15-keto-PGE2. Mechanistically, silencing of PTGR2 or addition of 15-keto-PGE2 suppressed the expressions of solute carrier family 7 member 11 (xCT) and cystathionine gamma-lyase (CTH), two important providers of intracellular cysteine for the generation of glutathione (GSH), which is widely accepted as the first-line antioxidative defense. The oxidative stress-mediated cell death after silencing of PTGR2 or addition of 15-keto-PGE2 was further abolished after restoring intracellular GSH concentrations and cysteine supply by N-acetyl-L-cysteine and 2-Mercaptomethanol. Our data highlight the therapeutic potential of targeting PTGR2/15-keto-PGE2 for pancreatic cancer. PMID:26820738

  13. The Effects of NDRG2 Overexpression on Cell Proliferation and Invasiveness of SW48 Colorectal Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Golestan, Ali; Mojtahedi, Zahra; Ghalamfarsa, Ghasem; Hamidinia, Maryam; Takhshid, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common causes of cancer-related death in the world. The expression of N-myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2) is down-regulated in CRC. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of NDRG2 overexpression on cell proliferation and invasive potential of SW48 cells. Methods: SW48 cells were transfected with a plasmid overexpressing NDRG2. After stable transfection, the effect of NDRG2 overexpression on cell proliferation was evaluated by MTT assay. The effects of NDRG2 overexpression on cell migration, invasion and cell motility and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) activities were also investigated using matrigel transwell assay, wound healing assay and gelatin zymography, respectively. Results: MTT assay showed that overexpression of NDRG2 caused attenuation of SW48 cell proliferation. Transwell and wound healing assay revealed that NDRG2 overexpression led to inhibition of migration, invasion, and motility of SW48 cells. The overexpression of NDRG2 also reduced the activity of secreted MMP-9. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that NDRG2 overexpression inhibits proliferation and invasive potential of SW48 cells, which likely occurs via suppression of MMP-9 activity. PMID:26379350

  14. Autophagy, cell death, and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lin; Baehrecke, Eric H

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved intracellular catabolic process that is used by all cells to degrade dysfunctional or unnecessary cytoplasmic components through delivery to the lysosome. Increasing evidence reveals that autophagic dysfunction is associated with human diseases, such as cancer. Paradoxically, although autophagy is well recognized as a cell survival process that promotes tumor development, it can also participate in a caspase-independent form of programmed cell death. Induction of autophagic cell death by some anticancer agents highlights the potential of this process as a cancer treatment modality. Here, we review our current understanding of the molecular mechanism of autophagy and the potential roles of autophagy in cell death, cancer development, and cancer treatment. PMID:27308466

  15. Perinatal asphyxia leads to PARP-1 overactivity, p65 translocation, IL-1β and TNF-α overexpression, and apoptotic-like cell death in mesencephalon of neonatal rats: prevention by systemic neonatal nicotinamide administration.

    PubMed

    Neira-Peña, T; Rojas-Mancilla, E; Munoz-Vio, V; Perez, R; Gutierrez-Hernandez, M; Bustamante, D; Morales, P; Hermoso, M A; Gebicke-Haerter, P; Herrera-Marschitz, M

    2015-05-01

    Perinatal asphyxia (PA) is a leading cause of neuronal damage in newborns, resulting in long-term neurological and cognitive deficits, in part due to impairment of mesostriatal and mesolimbic neurocircuitries. The insult can be as severe as to menace the integrity of the genome, triggering the overactivation of sentinel proteins, including poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1). PARP-1 overactivation implies increased energy demands, worsening the metabolic failure and depleting further NAD(+) availability. Using a global PA rat model, we report here evidence that hypoxia increases PARP-1 activity, triggering a signalling cascade leading to nuclear translocation of the NF-κB subunit p65, modulating the expression of IL-1β and TNF-α, pro-inflammatory molecules, increasing apoptotic-like cell death in mesencephalon of neonate rats, monitored with Western blots, qPCR, TUNEL and ELISA. PARP-1 activity increased immediately after PA, reaching a maximum 1-8 h after the insult, while activation of the NF-κB signalling pathway was observed 8 h after the insult, with a >twofold increase of p65 nuclear translocation. IL-1β and TNF-α mRNA levels were increased 24 h after the insult, together with a >twofold increase in apoptotic-like cell death. A single dose of the PARP-1 inhibitor nicotinamide (0.8 mmol/kg, i.p.), 1 h post delivery, prevented the effect of PA on PARP-1 activity, p65 translocation, pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and apoptotic-like cell death. The present study demonstrates that PA leads to PARP-1 overactivation, increasing the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cell death in mesencephalon, effects prevented by systemic neonatal nicotinamide administration, supporting the idea that PARP-1 inhibition represents a therapeutic target against the effects of PA. PMID:25835215

  16. IDS transfer from overexpressing cells to IDS-deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Millat, G; Froissart, R; Maire, I; Bozon, D

    1997-02-01

    Iduronate sulfatase (IDS) is responsible for mucopolysaccharidosis type II, a rare recessive X-linked lysosomal storage disease. The aim of this work was to test the ability of overexpressing cells to transfer IDS to deficient cells. In the first part of our work, IDS processing steps were compared in fibroblasts, COS cells, and lymphoblastoid cell lines and shown to be identical: the two precursor forms (76 and 90 kDa) were processed by a series of intermediate forms to the 55- and 45-kDa mature polypeptides. Then IDS transfer to IDS-deficient cells was tested either by incubation with cell-free medium of overexpressing cells or by coculture. Endocytosis and coculture experiments between transfected L beta and deleted fibroblasts showed that IDS transfer occurred preferentially by cell-to-cell contact as IDS precursors are poorly secreted by transfected L beta. The 76- and 62-kDa IDS polypeptides transferred to deleted fibroblasts were correctly processed to the mature 55- and 45-kDa forms. L beta were not able to internalize the 90-kDa phosphorylated precursor forms excreted in large amounts in the medium of overexpressing fibroblasts. Enzyme transfer occurred only by cell-to-cell contact, but the precursor forms transferred in L beta after cell-to-cell contact were not processed. This absence of maturation was probably due to a mistargeting of IDS precursors in these cells. PMID:9024795

  17. Cell Death in Genome Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Xinchen; Hardwick, J. Marie

    2015-01-01

    Inappropriate survival of abnormal cells underlies tumorigenesis. Most discoveries about programmed cell death have come from studying model organisms. Revisiting the experimental contexts that inspired these discoveries helps explain confounding biases that inevitably accompany such discoveries. Amending early biases has added a newcomer to the collection of cell death models. Analysis of gene-dependent death in yeast revealed the surprising influence of single gene mutations on subsequent eukaryotic genome evolution. Similar events may influence the selection for mutations during early tumorigenesis. The possibility that an early random mutation might drive the selection for a cancer driver mutation is conceivable but difficult to demonstrate. This was tested in yeast, revealing that mutation of almost any gene appears to specify the selection for a new second mutation. Some human tumors contain pairs of mutant genes homologous to co-occurring mutant genes in yeast. Here we consider how yeast again provide novel insights into tumorigenesis. PMID:25725369

  18. Pancreatic β Cell Mass Death.

    PubMed

    Marrif, Husnia I; Al-Sunousi, Salma I

    2016-01-01

    Type two diabetes (T2D) is a challenging metabolic disorder for which a cure has not yet been found. Its etiology is associated with several phenomena, including significant loss of insulin-producing, beta cellcell) mass via progressive programmed cell death and disrupted cellular autophagy. In diabetes, the etiology of β cell death and the role of mitochondria are complex and involve several layers of mechanisms. Understanding the dynamics of those mechanisms could permit researchers to develop an intervention for the progressive loss of β cells. Currently, diabetes research has shifted toward rejuvenation and plasticity technology and away from the simplified approach of hormonal compensation. Diabetes research is currently challenged by questions such as how to enhance cell survival, decrease apoptosis and replenish β cell mass in diabetic patients. In this review, we discuss evidence that β cell development and mass formation are guided by specific signaling systems, particularly hormones, transcription factors, and growth factors, all of which could be manipulated to enhance mass growth. There is also strong evidence that β cells are dynamically active cells, which, under specific conditions such as obesity, can increase in size and subsequently increase insulin secretion. In certain cases of aggressive or advanced forms of T2D, β cells become markedly impaired, and the only alternatives for maintaining glucose homeostasis are through partial or complete cell grafting (the Edmonton protocol). In these cases, the harvesting of an enriched population of viable β cells is required for transplantation. This task necessitates a deep understanding of the pharmacological agents that affect β cell survival, mass, and function. The aim of this review is to initiate discussion about the important signals in pancreatic β cell development and mass formation and to highlight the process by which cell death occurs in diabetes. This review also examines the

  19. Pancreatic β Cell Mass Death

    PubMed Central

    Marrif, Husnia I.; Al-Sunousi, Salma I.

    2016-01-01

    Type two diabetes (T2D) is a challenging metabolic disorder for which a cure has not yet been found. Its etiology is associated with several phenomena, including significant loss of insulin-producing, beta cellcell) mass via progressive programmed cell death and disrupted cellular autophagy. In diabetes, the etiology of β cell death and the role of mitochondria are complex and involve several layers of mechanisms. Understanding the dynamics of those mechanisms could permit researchers to develop an intervention for the progressive loss of β cells. Currently, diabetes research has shifted toward rejuvenation and plasticity technology and away from the simplified approach of hormonal compensation. Diabetes research is currently challenged by questions such as how to enhance cell survival, decrease apoptosis and replenish β cell mass in diabetic patients. In this review, we discuss evidence that β cell development and mass formation are guided by specific signaling systems, particularly hormones, transcription factors, and growth factors, all of which could be manipulated to enhance mass growth. There is also strong evidence that β cells are dynamically active cells, which, under specific conditions such as obesity, can increase in size and subsequently increase insulin secretion. In certain cases of aggressive or advanced forms of T2D, β cells become markedly impaired, and the only alternatives for maintaining glucose homeostasis are through partial or complete cell grafting (the Edmonton protocol). In these cases, the harvesting of an enriched population of viable β cells is required for transplantation. This task necessitates a deep understanding of the pharmacological agents that affect β cell survival, mass, and function. The aim of this review is to initiate discussion about the important signals in pancreatic β cell development and mass formation and to highlight the process by which cell death occurs in diabetes. This review also examines the

  20. Metabolic control of cell death

    PubMed Central

    Green, Douglas R.; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Summary Beyond their contribution to basic metabolism, the major cellular organelles, in particular mitochondria, can determine whether cells respond to stress in an adaptive or suicidal manner. Thus, mitochondria can continuously adapt their shape to changing bioenergetic demands as they are subjected to quality control by autophagy, or they can undergo a lethal permeabilization process that initiates apoptosis. Along similar lines, multiple proteins involved in metabolic circuitries including oxidative phosphorylation and transport of metabolites across membranes may participate in the regulated or catastrophic dismantling of organelles. Many factors that were initially characterized as cell death regulators are now known to physically or functionally interact with metabolic enzymes. Thus, several metabolic cues regulate the propensity of cells to activate self-destructive programs, in part by acting on nutrient sensors. This suggests the existence of “metabolic checkpoints” that dictate cell fate in response to metabolic fluctuations. Here, we discuss recent insights into the intersection between metabolism and cell death regulation that have major implications for the comprehension and manipulation of unwarranted cell loss. PMID:25237106

  1. Cell death in the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Bredesen, Dale E.; Rao, Rammohan V.; Mehlen, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease trigger neuronal cell death through endogenous suicide pathways. Surprisingly, although the cell death itself may occur relatively late in the course of the degenerative process, the mediators of the underlying cell-death pathways have shown promise as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:17051206

  2. Heme oxygenase-1 accelerates erastin-induced ferroptotic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Min-Young; Park, Eunhee

    2015-01-01

    The oncogenic RAS-selective lethal small molecule Erastin triggers a unique iron-dependent form of nonapoptotic cell death termed ferroptosis. Ferroptosis is dependent upon the production of intracellular iron-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS), but not other metals. However, key regulators remain unknown. The heme oxygenase (HO) is a major intracellular source of iron. In this study, the role of heme oxygenase in Erastin-triggered ferroptotic cancer cell death has been investigated. Zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP), a HO-1 inhibitor, prevented Erastin-triggered ferroptotic cancer cell death. Furthermore, Erastin induced the protein and mRNA levels of HO-1 in HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells. HO-1+/+ and HO-1−/− fibroblast, HO-1 overexpression, and chycloheximide-treated experiments revealed that the expression of HO-1 has a decisive effects in Erastin-triggered cell death. Hemin and CO-releasing molecules (CORM) promote Erastin-induced ferroptotic cell death, not by biliverdin and bilirubin. In addition, hemin and CORM accelerate the HO-1 expression in the presence of Erastin and increase membranous lipid peroxidation. Thus, HO-1 is an essential enzyme for iron-dependent lipid peroxidation during ferroptotic cell death. PMID:26405158

  3. Ayanin diacetate-induced cell death is amplified by TRAIL in human leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Marrero, Maria Teresa; Estevez, Sara; Negrin, Gledy; Quintana, Jose; Leon, Francisco; Estevez, Francisco

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ayanin diacetate as apoptotic inducer in leukemia cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell death was prevented by caspase inhibitors and by the overexpression of Bcl-x{sub L}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The intrinsic and the extrinsic pathways are involved in the mechanism of action. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Death receptors are up-regulated and TRAIL enhances apoptotic cell death. -- Abstract: Here we demonstrate that the semi-synthetic flavonoid ayanin diacetate induces cell death selectively in leukemia cells without affecting the proliferation of normal lymphocytes. Incubation of human leukemia cells with ayanin diacetate induced G{sub 2}-M phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis which was prevented by the non-specific caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk and reduced by the overexpression of Bcl-x{sub L}. Ayanin diacetate-induced cell death was found to be associated with: (i) loss of inner mitochondrial membrane potential, (ii) the release of cytochrome c, (iii) the activation of multiple caspases, (iv) cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and (v) the up-regulation of death receptors for TRAIL, DR4 and DR5. Moreover, the combined treatment with ayanin diacetate and TRAIL amplified cell death, compared to single treatments. These results provide a basis for further exploring the potential applications of this combination for the treatment of cancer.

  4. Cell death in the cardiovascular system

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Murray; Bennett, Martin; Littlewood, Trevor

    2007-01-01

    Cell death is important for both development and tissue homeostasis in the adult. As such, it is tightly controlled and deregulation is associated with diverse pathologies; for example, regulated cell death is involved in vessel remodelling during development or following injury, but deregulated death is implicated in pathologies such as atherosclerosis, aneurysm formation, ischaemic and dilated cardiomyopathies and infarction. We describe the mechanisms of cell death and its role in the normal physiology and various pathologies of the cardiovascular system. PMID:16547202

  5. [Morphological and biochemical criteria for cell death].

    PubMed

    Chernikov, V P; Belousova, T A; Kakturskiĭ, L V

    2010-01-01

    The state-of-the-art of classifications of and criteria for cell death in the light of the 2009 recommendations of the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death is presented as a lecture. Motivation is given for the necessity of using the unified criteria in the description of cell death and more than one study in its verification. The major structural and biochemical signs of four typical types of cell death--apoptosis, autophagia, keratinization, and necrosis are compared. Data are given on the major atypical forms of cell death--mitotic catastrophe, anoikis, exitotoxicity, Wallerian degeneration, paraptosis, pyroptosis, pyronecrosis, and entosis. PMID:20734836

  6. Pathogen Tactics to Manipulate Plant Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Mukhtar, M Shahid; McCormack, Maggie E; Argueso, Cristiana T; Pajerowska-Mukhtar, Karolina M

    2016-07-11

    Cell death is a vital process for multicellular organisms. Programmed cell death (PCD) functions in a variety of processes including growth, development, and immune responses for homeostasis maintenance. In particular, plants and animals utilize PCD to control pathogen invasion and infected cell populations. Despite some similarity, there are a number of key differences between how these organisms initiate and regulate cell death. In contrast to animals, plants are sessile, lack a circulatory system, and have additional cellular structures, including cell walls and chloroplasts. Plant cells have the autonomous ability to induce localized cell death using conserved eukaryotic pathways as well as unique plant-specific pathways. Thus, in order to successfully infect host cells, pathogens must subvert immune responses and avoid detection to prevent PCD and allow infection. Here we discuss the roles of cell death in plant immune responses and the tactics pathogens utilize to avert cell death. PMID:27404256

  7. How cell death shapes cancer

    PubMed Central

    Labi, V; Erlacher, M

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis has been established as a mechanism of anti-cancer defense. Members of the BCL-2 family are critical mediators of apoptotic cell death in health and disease, often found to be deregulated in cancer and believed to lead to the survival of malignant clones. However, over the years, a number of studies pointed out that a model in which cell death resistance unambiguously acts as a barrier against malignant disease might be too simple. This is based on paradoxical observations made in tumor patients as well as mouse models indicating that apoptosis can indeed drive tumor formation, at least under certain circumstances. One possible explanation for this phenomenon is that apoptosis can promote proliferation critically needed to compensate for cell loss, for example, upon therapy, and to restore tissue homeostasis. However, this, at the same time, can promote tumor development by allowing expansion of selected clones. Usually, tissue resident stem/progenitor cells are a major source for repopulation, some of them potentially carrying (age-, injury- or therapy-induced) genetic aberrations deleterious for the host. Thereby, apoptosis might drive genomic instability by facilitating the emergence of pathologic clones during phases of proliferation and subsequent replication stress-associated DNA damage. Tumorigenesis initiated by repeated cell attrition and repopulation, as confirmed in different genetic models, has parallels in human cancers, exemplified in therapy-induced secondary malignancies and myelodysplastic syndromes in patients with congenital bone marrow failure syndromes. Here, we aim to review evidence in support of the oncogenic role of stress-induced apoptosis. PMID:25741600

  8. Apoptotic Cell Death in Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuanyuan; Nakagawara, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is one of the most common malignant solid tumors in childhood, which derives from the sympathoadrenal lineage of the neural crest and exhibits extremely heterogeneous biological and clinical behaviors. The infant patients frequently undergo spontaneous regression even with metastatic disease, whereas the patients of more than one year of age who suffer from disseminated disease have a poor outcome despite intensive multimodal treatment. Spontaneous regression in favorable NBs has been proposed to be triggered by nerve growth factor (NGF) deficiency in the tumor with NGF dependency for survival, while aggressive NBs have defective apoptotic machinery which enables the tumor cells to evade apoptosis and confers the resistance to treatment. This paper reviews the molecules and pathways that have been recently identified to be involved in apoptotic cell death in NB and discusses their potential prospects for developing more effective therapeutic strategies against aggressive NB. PMID:24709709

  9. Matrix-Dependent Regulation of AKT in Hepsin-Overexpressing PC3 Prostate Cancer Cells12

    PubMed Central

    Wittig-Blaich, Stephanie M; Kacprzyk, Lukasz A; Eismann, Thorsten; Bewerunge-Hudler, Melanie; Kruse, Petra; Winkler, Eva; Strauss, Wolfgang S L; Hibst, Raimund; Steiner, Rudolf; Schrader, Mark; Mertens, Daniel; Sültmann, Holger; Wittig, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    The serine-protease hepsin is one of the most prominently overexpressed genes in human prostate carcinoma. Forced expression of the enzyme in mice prostates is associated with matrix degradation, invasive growth, and prostate cancer progression. Conversely, hepsin overexpression in metastatic prostate cancer cell lines was reported to induce cell cycle arrest and reduction of invasive growth in vitro. We used a system for doxycycline (dox)-inducible target gene expression in metastasis-derived PC3 cells to analyze the effects of hepsin in a quantitative manner. Loss of viability and adhesion correlated with hepsin expression levels during anchorage-dependent but not anchorage-independent growth. Full expression of hepsin led to cell death and detachment and was specifically associated with reduced phosphorylation of AKT at Ser473, which was restored by growth on matrix derived from RWPE1 normal prostatic epithelial cells. In the chorioallantoic membrane xenograft model, hepsin overexpression in PC3 cells reduced the viability of tumors but did not suppress invasive growth. The data presented here provide evidence that elevated levels of hepsin interfere with cell adhesion and viability in the background of prostate cancer as well as other tissue types, the details of which depend on the microenvironment provided. Our findings suggest that overexpression of the enzyme in prostate carcinogenesis must be spatially and temporally restricted for the efficient development of tumors and metastases. PMID:21750652

  10. Hair Cell Overexpression of Islet1 Reduces Age-Related and Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Mingqian; Kantardzhieva, Albena; Scheffer, Deborah; Liberman, M. Charles

    2013-01-01

    Isl1 is a LIM-homeodomain transcription factor that is critical in the development and differentiation of multiple tissues. In the mouse inner ear, Isl1 is expressed in the prosensory region of otocyst, in young hair cells and supporting cells, and is no longer expressed in postnatal auditory hair cells. To evaluate how continuous Isl1 expression in postnatal hair cells affects hair cell development and cochlear function, we created a transgenic mouse model in which the Pou4f3 promoter drives Isl1 overexpression specifically in hair cells. Isl1 overexpressing hair cells develop normally, as seen by morphology and cochlear functions (auditory brainstem response and otoacoustic emissions). As the mice aged to 17 months, wild-type (WT) controls showed the progressive threshold elevation and outer hair cell loss characteristic of the age-related hearing loss (ARHL) in the background strain (C57BL/6J). In contrast, the Isl1 transgenic mice showed significantly less threshold elevation with survival of hair cells. Further, the Isl1 overexpression protected the ear from noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL): both ABR threshold shifts and hair cell death were significantly reduced when compared with WT littermates. Our model suggests a common mechanism underlying ARHL and NIHL, and provides evidence that hair cell-specific Isl1 expression can promote hair cell survival and therefore minimize the hearing impairment that normally occurs with aging and/or acoustic overexposure. PMID:24048839

  11. Detection of Cell Death in Drosophila Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, Deepika; Ryoo, Hyung Don

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila has served as a particularly attractive model to study cell death due to the vast array of tools for genetic manipulation under defined spatial and temporal conditions in vivo as well as in cultured cells. These genetic methods have been well supplemented by enzymatic assays and a panel of antibodies recognizing cell death markers. This chapter discusses reporters, mutants and assays used by various laboratories to study cell death in the context of development and in response to external insults. PMID:27108437

  12. What cell death does in development.

    PubMed

    Zakeri, Zahra; Penaloza, Carlos G; Smith, Kyle; Ye, Yixia; Lockshin, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Cell death is prominent in gametogenesis and shapes and sculpts embryos. In non-mammalian embryos one sees little or no cell death prior to the maternal-zygotic transition, but, in mammalian embryos, characteristic deaths of one or two cells occur at the end of compaction and are apparently necessary for the separation of the trophoblast from the inner cell mass. Considerable sculpting of the embryo occurs by cell deaths during organogenesis, and appropriate cell numbers, especially in the CNS and in the immune system, are generated by massive overproduction of cells and selection of a few, with death of the rest. The timing, identity, and genetic control of specific cells that die have been well documented in Caenorhabditis, but in other embryos the stochastic nature of the deaths limit our ability to do more than identify the regions in which cells will die. Complete disruption of the cell death machinery can be lethal, but many mutations of the regulatory machinery yield only modest or no phenotypes, indicating substantial redundancy and compensation of regulatory mechanisms. Most of the deaths are apoptotic and are identified by techniques used to recognize apoptosis, but techniques identifying lysosomes (whether in dying or involuting cells or in the phagocytes that invade the tissue) also reveal patterns of cell death. Aberrant cell deaths that produce known phenotypes are typically localized, indicating that the mechanism of activating a programmed death in a specific region, rather than the mechanism of death, is aberrant. These results lead us to conclude that we need to know much more about the conversations among cells that lead cells to commit suicide. PMID:26374521

  13. Regulation of Ferroptotic Cancer Cell Death by GPX4

    PubMed Central

    Welsch, Matthew E.; Shimada, Kenichi; Skouta, Rachid; Viswanathan, Vasanthi S.; Cheah, Jaime H.; Clemons, Paul A.; Shamji, Alykhan F.; Clish, Clary B.; Brown, Lewis M.; Girotti, Albert W.; Cornish, Virginia W.; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Stockwell, Brent R.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Ferroptosis is a form of nonapoptotic cell death for which key regulators remain unknown. We sought a common mediator for the lethality of 12 ferroptosisinducing small molecules. We used targeted metabolomic profiling to discover that depletion of glutathione causes inactivation of glutathione peroxidases (GPXs) in response to one class of compounds and a chemoproteomics strategy to discover that GPX4 is directly inhibited by a second class of compounds. GPX4 overexpression and knockdown modulated the lethality of 12 ferroptosis inducers, but not of 11 compounds with other lethal mechanisms. In addition, two representative ferroptosis inducers prevented tumor growth in xenograft mouse tumor models. Sensitivity profiling in 177 cancer cell lines revealed that diffuse large B cell lymphomas and renal cell carcinomas are particularly susceptible to GPX4-regulated ferroptosis. Thus, GPX4 is an essential regulator of ferroptotic cancer cell death. PMID:24439385

  14. Molecular definitions of cell death subroutines: recommendations of the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death 2012

    PubMed Central

    Galluzzi, L; Vitale, I; Abrams, J M; Alnemri, E S; Baehrecke, E H; Blagosklonny, M V; Dawson, T M; Dawson, V L; El-Deiry, W S; Fulda, S; Gottlieb, E; Green, D R; Hengartner, M O; Kepp, O; Knight, R A; Kumar, S; Lipton, S A; Lu, X; Madeo, F; Malorni, W; Mehlen, P; Nuñez, G; Peter, M E; Piacentini, M; Rubinsztein, D C; Shi, Y; Simon, H-U; Vandenabeele, P; White, E; Yuan, J; Zhivotovsky, B; Melino, G; Kroemer, G

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death (NCCD) proposed a set of recommendations for the definition of distinct cell death morphologies and for the appropriate use of cell death-related terminology, including ‘apoptosis', ‘necrosis' and ‘mitotic catastrophe'. In view of the substantial progress in the biochemical and genetic exploration of cell death, time has come to switch from morphological to molecular definitions of cell death modalities. Here we propose a functional classification of cell death subroutines that applies to both in vitro and in vivo settings and includes extrinsic apoptosis, caspase-dependent or -independent intrinsic apoptosis, regulated necrosis, autophagic cell death and mitotic catastrophe. Moreover, we discuss the utility of expressions indicating additional cell death modalities. On the basis of the new, revised NCCD classification, cell death subroutines are defined by a series of precise, measurable biochemical features. PMID:21760595

  15. Programmed Cell Death During Caenorhabditis elegans Development.

    PubMed

    Conradt, Barbara; Wu, Yi-Chun; Xue, Ding

    2016-08-01

    Programmed cell death is an integral component of Caenorhabditis elegans development. Genetic and reverse genetic studies in C. elegans have led to the identification of many genes and conserved cell death pathways that are important for the specification of which cells should live or die, the activation of the suicide program, and the dismantling and removal of dying cells. Molecular, cell biological, and biochemical studies have revealed the underlying mechanisms that control these three phases of programmed cell death. In particular, the interplay of transcriptional regulatory cascades and networks involving multiple transcriptional regulators is crucial in activating the expression of the key death-inducing gene egl-1 and, in some cases, the ced-3 gene in cells destined to die. A protein interaction cascade involving EGL-1, CED-9, CED-4, and CED-3 results in the activation of the key cell death protease CED-3, which is tightly controlled by multiple positive and negative regulators. The activation of the CED-3 caspase then initiates the cell disassembly process by cleaving and activating or inactivating crucial CED-3 substrates; leading to activation of multiple cell death execution events, including nuclear DNA fragmentation, mitochondrial elimination, phosphatidylserine externalization, inactivation of survival signals, and clearance of apoptotic cells. Further studies of programmed cell death in C. elegans will continue to advance our understanding of how programmed cell death is regulated, activated, and executed in general. PMID:27516615

  16. Acetaminophen Induces Human Neuroblastoma Cell Death through NFKB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Posadas, Inmaculada; Santos, Pablo; Ceña, Valentín

    2012-01-01

    Neuroblastoma resistance to apoptosis may contribute to the aggressive behavior of this tumor. Therefore, it would be relevant to activate endogenous cellular death mechanisms as a way to improve neuroblastoma therapy. We used the neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line as a model to study the mechanisms involved in acetaminophen (AAP)-mediated toxicity by measuring CYP2E1 enzymatic activity, NFkB p65 subunit activation and translocation to the nucleus, Bax accumulation into the mitochondria, cytochrome c release and caspase activation. AAP activates the intrinsic death pathway in the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line. AAP metabolism is partially responsible for this activation, because blockade of the cytochrome CYP2E1 significantly reduced but did not totally prevent, AAP-induced SH-SY5Y cell death. AAP also induced NFkB p65 activation by phosphorylation and its translocation to the nucleus, where NFkB p65 increased IL-1β production. This increase contributed to neuroblastoma cell death through a mechanism involving Bax accumulation into the mitochondria, cytochrome c release and caspase3 activation. Blockade of NFkB translocation to the nucleus by the peptide SN50 prevented AAP-mediated cell death and IL-1β production. Moreover, overexpression of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL did not decrease AAP-mediated IL-1β production, but prevented both AAP and IL-1β-mediated cell death. We also confirmed the AAP toxic actions on SK-N-MC neuroepithelioma and U87MG glioblastoma cell lines. The results presented here suggest that AAP activates the intrinsic death pathway in neuroblastoma cells through a mechanism involving NFkB and IL-1β. PMID:23166834

  17. Cell death regulates muscle fiber number.

    PubMed

    Sarkissian, Tatevik; Arya, Richa; Gyonjyan, Seda; Taylor, Barbara; White, Kristin

    2016-07-01

    Cell death can have both cell autonomous and non-autonomous roles in normal development. Previous studies have shown that the central cell death regulators grim and reaper are required for the developmentally important elimination of stem cells and neurons in the developing central nervous system (CNS). Here we show that cell death in the nervous system is also required for normal muscle development. In the absence of grim and reaper, there is an increase in the number of fibers in the ventral abdominal muscles in the Drosophila adult. This phenotype can be partially recapitulated by inhibition of cell death specifically in the CNS, indicating a non-autonomous role for neuronal death in limiting muscle fiber number. We also show that FGFs produced in the cell death defective nervous system are required for the increase in muscle fiber number. Cell death in the muscle lineage during pupal stages also plays a role in specifying fiber number. Our work suggests that FGFs from the CNS act as a survival signal for muscle founder cells. Thus, proper muscle fiber specification requires cell death in both the nervous system and in the developing muscle itself. PMID:27131625

  18. Systems Approaches to Preventing Transplanted Cell Death in Cardiac Repair

    PubMed Central

    Robey, Thomas E.; Saiget, Mark K; Reinecke, Hans; Murry, Charles E.

    2008-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation may repair the injured heart, but tissue regeneration is limited by death of transplanted cells. Most cell death occurs in the first few days post-transplantation, likely from a combination of ischemia, anoikis and inflammation. Interventions known to enhance transplanted cell survival include heat shock, over-expressing anti-apoptotic proteins, free radical scavengers, anti-inflammatory therapy and co-delivery of extracellular matrix molecules. Combinatorial use of such interventions markedly enhances graft cell survival, but death still remains a significant problem. We review these challenges to cardiac cell transplantation and present an approach to systematically address them. Most anti-death studies use histology to assess engraftment, which is time- and labor-intensive. To increase throughput, we developed two biochemical approaches to follow graft viability in the mouse heart. The first relies on LacZ enyzmatic activity to track genetically modified cells, and the second quantifies human genomic DNA content using repetitive Alu sequences. Both show linear relationships between input cell number and biochemical signal, but require correction for the time lag between cell death and loss of signal. Once optimized, they permit detection of as few as 1 graft cell in 40,000 host cells. Pro-survival effects measured biochemically at three days predict long-term histological engraftment benefits. These methods permitted identification of carbamylated erythropoietin (CEPO) as a pro-survival factor for human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte grafts. CEPO’s effects were additive to heat shock, implying independent survival pathways. This system should permit combinatorial approaches to enhance graft viability in a fraction of the time required for conventional histology. PMID:18466917

  19. Anti-apoptotic effect of clusterin on cisplatin-induced cell death of retinoblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun Beom; Jun, Hyoung-Oh; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Yu, Young Suk; Kim, Kyu-Won; Min, Bon Hong; Kim, Jeong Hun

    2013-12-01

    Clusterin is a cytoprotective chaperone protein that is known to protect various retinal cells. It was also reported to be overexpressed in several types of malignant tumors, whose chemoresistance correlates with the expression of clusterin. Herein, we investigated the effect of clusterin on cisplatin-induced cell death of retinoblastoma cells. Firstly, evaluation of clusterin expression demonstrated that it was highly expressed in human retinoblastoma tissues and cell lines (SNUOT-Rb1 and Y79) particularly in the area between viable cells around vessels and necrotic zones in the relatively avascular area in human retinoblastoma tissues. Furthermore, the effects of cisplatin on retinoblastoma cells were evaluated. Cisplatin (1 µg/ml) significantly affected cell viability of SNUOT-Rb1 cells by inducing caspase-3-dependent apoptosis. Notably, the cell death due to cisplatin was prevented by 5 µg/ml of clusterin administered 4 h prior to cisplatin treatment by inhibiting cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, overexpression of clusterin exerted its anti-apoptotic effect on cisplatin-induced apoptosis, and effectively prevented cisplatin-induced cell death. These data suggest that clusterin, found to be expressed in human retinoblastoma, may exert anti-apoptotic effects on cisplatin-induced apoptosis and prevent cell death. Therefore, clusterin can contribute to cisplatin resistance of retinoblastoma. PMID:24085287

  20. Nonthermal-plasma-mediated animal cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Wanil; Woo, Kyung-Chul; Kim, Gyoo-Cheon; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2011-01-01

    Animal cell death comprising necrosis and apoptosis occurred in a well-regulated manner upon specific stimuli. The physiological meanings and detailed molecular mechanisms of cell death have been continuously investigated over several decades. Necrotic cell death has typical morphological changes, such as cell swelling and cell lysis followed by DNA degradation, whereas apoptosis shows blebbing formation and regular DNA fragmentation. Cell death is usually adopted to terminate cancer cells in vivo. The current strategies against tumour are based on the induction of cell death by adopting various methods, including radiotherapy and chemotherapeutics. Among these, radiotherapy is the most frequently used treatment method, but it still has obvious limitations. Recent studies have suggested that the use of nonthermal air plasma can be a prominent method for inducing cancer cell death. Plasma-irradiated cells showed the loss of genomic integrity, mitochondrial dysfunction, plasma membrane damage, etc. Tumour elimination with plasma irradiation is an emerging concept in cancer therapy and can be accelerated by targeting certain tumour-specific proteins with gold nanoparticles. Here, some recent developments are described so that the mechanisms related to plasma-mediated cell death and its perspectives in cancer treatment can be understood.

  1. Oncogenes in Cell Survival and Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Shortt, Jake; Johnstone, Ricky W.

    2012-01-01

    The transforming effects of proto-oncogenes such as MYC that mediate unrestrained cell proliferation are countered by “intrinsic tumor suppressor mechanisms” that most often trigger apoptosis. Therefore, cooperating genetic or epigenetic effects to suppress apoptosis (e.g., overexpression of BCL2) are required to enable the dual transforming processes of unbridled cell proliferation and robust suppression of apoptosis. Certain oncogenes such as BCR-ABL are capable of concomitantly mediating the inhibition of apoptosis and driving cell proliferation and therefore are less reliant on cooperating lesions for transformation. Accordingly, direct targeting of BCR-ABL through agents such as imatinib have profound antitumor effects. Other oncoproteins such as MYC rely on the anti-apoptotic effects of cooperating oncoproteins such as BCL2 to facilitate tumorigenesis. In these circumstances, where the primary oncogenic driver (e.g., MYC) cannot yet be therapeutically targeted, inhibition of the activity of the cooperating antiapoptotic protein (e.g., BCL2) can be exploited for therapeutic benefit. PMID:23209150

  2. STIM1 overexpression promotes colorectal cancer progression, cell motility and COX-2 expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, J-Y; Sun, J; Huang, M-Y; Wang, Y-S; Hou, M-F; Sun, Y; He, H; Krishna, N; Chiu, S-J; Lin, S; Yang, S; Chang, W-C

    2015-08-13

    Tumor metastasis is the major cause of death among cancer patients, with >90% of cancer-related death attributable to the spreading of metastatic cells to secondary organs. Store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) is the predominant Ca(2+) entry mechanism in most cancer cells, and stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) is the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) sensor for store-operated channels. Here we reported that the STIM1 was overexpressed in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. STIM1 overexpression in CRC was significantly associated with tumor size, depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis status and serum levels of carcinoembryonic antigen. Furthermore, ectopic expression of STIM1 promoted CRC cell motility, while depletion of STIM1 with short hairpin RNA inhibited CRC cell migration. Our data further suggested that STIM1 promoted CRC cell migration through increasing the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Importantly, ectopically expressed COX-2 or exogenous PGE2 were able to rescue migration defect in STIM1 knockdown CRC cells, and inhibition of COX-2 with ibuprofen and indomethacin abrogated STIM1-mediated CRC cell motility. In short, our data provided clinicopathological significance for STIM1 and SOCE in CRC progression, and implicated a role for COX-2 in STIM1-mediated CRC metastasis. Our studies also suggested a new approach to inhibit STIM1-mediated metastasis with COX-2 inhibitors. PMID:25381814

  3. [Programmed cell death comes in many flavors].

    PubMed

    Cabon, Lauriane; Martinez-Torres, Ana-Carolina; Susin, Santos A

    2013-12-01

    Apoptosis is nowadays what comes first to your scientist mind when someone mentions cellular suicide. However this is not the sole form of programmed cell death and many other alternative or atypical pathways have now been described. These pathways are indeed rather preferred to apoptosis in some instances based on tissue origin, cell type or development stage of the target cell. In this review, we describe many different programmed cell death subtypes according to their characteristics. Discrete, brutal, final or singular cell death pathways all participate in the elimination of unwanted, damaged or dangerous cells in organisms hence contributing to our knowledge of this particular feature of living beings: dying! Through description of anoikis, necroptosis, entosis, netosis, pyroptosis or ferroptosis, we have no choice but to realize that programmed cell death comes in many flavors. PMID:24356142

  4. Joint aging and chondrocyte cell death

    PubMed Central

    Grogan, Shawn P; D’Lima, Darryl D

    2010-01-01

    Articular cartilage extracellular matrix and cell function change with age and are considered to be the most important factors in the development and progression of osteoarthritis. The multifaceted nature of joint disease indicates that the contribution of cell death can be an important factor at early and late stages of osteoarthritis. Therefore, the pharmacologic inhibition of cell death is likely to be clinically valuable at any stage of the disease. In this article, we will discuss the close association between diverse changes in cartilage aging, how altered conditions influence chondrocyte death, and the implications of preventing cell loss to retard osteoarthritis progression and preserve tissue homeostasis. PMID:20671988

  5. Cell death independent of caspases: a review.

    PubMed

    Bröker, Linda E; Kruyt, Frank A E; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2005-05-01

    Patterns of cell death have been divided into apoptosis, which is actively executed by specific proteases, the caspases, and accidental necrosis. However, there is now accumulating evidence indicating that cell death can occur in a programmed fashion but in complete absence and independent of caspase activation. Alternative models of programmed cell death (PCD) have therefore been proposed, including autophagy, paraptosis, mitotic catastrophe, and the descriptive model of apoptosis-like and necrosis-like PCD. Caspase-independent cell death pathways are important safeguard mechanisms to protect the organism against unwanted and potential harmful cells when caspase-mediated routes fail but can also be triggered in response to cytotoxic agents or other death stimuli. As in apoptosis, the mitochondrion can play a key role but also other organelles such as lysosomes and the endoplasmic reticulum have an important function in the release and activation of death factors such as cathepsins, calpains, and other proteases. Here we review the various models of PCD and their death pathways at molecular and organelle level and discuss the relevance of the growing knowledge of caspase-independent cell death pathways for cancer. PMID:15867207

  6. Overexpression of kinesins mediates docetaxel resistance in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    De, Sarmishtha; Cipriano, Rocky; Jackson, Mark W; Stark, George R

    2009-10-15

    Resistance to chemotherapy remains a major barrier to the successful treatment of cancer. To understand mechanisms underlying docetaxel resistance in breast cancer, we used an insertional mutagenesis strategy to identify proteins whose overexpression confers resistance. A strong promoter was inserted approximately randomly into the genomes of tumor-derived breast cancer cells, using a novel lentiviral vector. We isolated a docetaxel-resistant clone in which the level of the kinesin KIFC3 was elevated. When KIFC3 or the additional kinesins KIFC1, KIF1A, or KIF5A were overexpressed in the breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB231 and MDA-MB 468, the cells became more resistant to docetaxel. The binding of kinesins to microtubules opposes the stabilizing effect of docetaxel that prevents cytokinesis and leads to apoptosis. Our finding that kinesins can mediate docetaxel resistance might lead to novel therapeutic approaches in which kinesin inhibitors are paired with taxanes. PMID:19789344

  7. Staying alive: cell death in antiviral immunity.

    PubMed

    Upton, Jason W; Chan, Francis Ka-Ming

    2014-04-24

    Programmed cell death is an integral part of host defense against invading intracellular pathogens. Apoptosis, programmed necrosis, and pyroptosis each serve to limit pathogen replication in infected cells, while simultaneously promoting the inflammatory and innate responses that shape effective long-term host immunity. The importance of carefully regulated cell death is evident in the spectrum of inflammatory and autoimmune disorders caused by defects in these pathways. Moreover, many viruses encode inhibitors of programmed cell death to subvert these host responses during infection, thereby facilitating their own replication and persistence. Thus, as both virus and cell vie for control of these pathways, the battle for survival has shaped a complex host-pathogen interaction. This review will discuss the multifaceted role that programmed cell death plays in maintaining the immune system and its critical function in host defense, with a special emphasis on viral infections. PMID:24766891

  8. Plant Proteases Involved in Regulated Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Zamyatnin, A A

    2015-12-01

    Each plant genome encodes hundreds of proteolytic enzymes. These enzymes can be divided into five distinct classes: cysteine-, serine-, aspartic-, threonine-, and metalloproteinases. Despite the differences in their structural properties and activities, members of all of these classes in plants are involved in the processes of regulated cell death - a basic feature of eukaryotic organisms. Regulated cell death in plants is an indispensable mechanism supporting plant development, survival, stress responses, and defense against pathogens. This review summarizes recent advances in studies of plant proteolytic enzymes functioning in the initiation and execution of distinct types of regulated cell death. PMID:26878575

  9. Entosis and Related Forms of Cell Death within Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Wang, X-D

    2015-01-01

    By eliminating the unneeded or mutant cells, programmed cell death actively participates in a wide range of biological processes from embryonic development to homeostasis maintenance in adult. Continuing efforts have identified multiple cell death pathways, with apoptosis, necrosis and autophage the mostly studied. Recently a unique cell death pathway called "cell-in-cell death" has been defined. Unlike traditional cell death pathways, cell-in-cell death, characterized by cell death within another cell, is triggered by the invasion of one cell into its neighbor and executed by either lysosome-dependent degradation or caspase-dependent apoptosis. With remarkable progresses on cell-in-cell over past few years, multiple mechanisms, including entosis, cannibalism and emperitosis, are found to be responsible for cell-in-cell death. Some key questions, such as specific biochemical markers to distinguish precisely the properties of different cell-in-cell structures and the physiological and pathological relevance, remain to be addressed. In light of this situation and a surge of interests, leading scientists in this field intend to share with readers current research progresses on cell-in-cell structures from different model systems through this special edition on cell-in-cell. The mechanistic advances will be highlighted while the future researches be speculated. PMID:26511710

  10. SNEV overexpression extends the life span of human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Voglauer, Regina; Chang, Martina Wei-Fen; Dampier, Brigitta; Wieser, Matthias; Baumann, Kristin; Sterovsky, Thomas; Schreiber, Martin; Katinger, Hermann; Grillari, Johannes . E-mail: j.grillari@iam.boku.ac.at

    2006-04-01

    In a recent screening for genes downregulated in replicatively senescent human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), we have isolated the novel protein SNEV. Since then SNEV has proven as a multifaceted protein playing a role in pre-mRNA splicing, DNA repair, and the ubiquitin/proteosome system. Here, we report that SNEV mRNA decreases in various cell types during replicative senescence, and that it is increased in various immortalized cell lines, as well as in breast tumors, where SNEV transcript levels also correlate with the survival of breast cancer patients. Since these mRNA profiles suggested a role of SNEV in the regulation of cell proliferation, the effect of its overexpression was tested. Thereby, a significant extension of the cellular life span was observed, which was not caused by altered telomerase activity or telomere dynamics but rather by enhanced stress resistance. When SNEV overexpressing cells were treated with bleomycin or bleomycin combined with BSO, inducing DNA damage as well as reactive oxygen species, a significantly lower fraction of apoptotic cells was found in comparison to vector control cells. These data suggest that high levels of SNEV might extend the cellular life span by increasing the resistance to stress or by improving the DNA repair capacity of the cells.

  11. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter silencing potentiates caspase-independent cell death in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, Merril C.; Peters, Amelia A.; Kenny, Paraic A.; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J.; Monteith, Gregory R.

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •Some clinical breast cancers are associated with MCU overexpression. •MCU silencing did not alter cell death initiated with the Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-263. •MCU silencing potentiated caspase-independent cell death initiated by ionomycin. •MCU silencing promoted ionomycin-mediated cell death without changes in bulk Ca{sup 2+}. -- Abstract: The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) transports free ionic Ca{sup 2+} into the mitochondrial matrix. We assessed MCU expression in clinical breast cancer samples using microarray analysis and the consequences of MCU silencing in a breast cancer cell line. Our results indicate that estrogen receptor negative and basal-like breast cancers are characterized by elevated levels of MCU. Silencing of MCU expression in the basal-like MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line produced no change in proliferation or cell viability. However, distinct consequences of MCU silencing were seen on cell death pathways. Caspase-dependent cell death initiated by the Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-263 was not altered by MCU silencing; whereas caspase-independent cell death induced by the calcium ionophore ionomycin was potentiated by MCU silencing. Measurement of cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} levels showed that the promotion of ionomycin-induced cell death by MCU silencing occurs independently of changes in bulk cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} levels. This study demonstrates that MCU overexpression is a feature of some breast cancers and that MCU overexpression may offer a survival advantage against some cell death pathways. MCU inhibitors may be a strategy to increase the effectiveness of therapies that act through the induction of caspase-independent cell death pathways in estrogen receptor negative and basal-like breast cancers.

  12. Loss of cyclophilin D reveals a critical role for mitochondrial permeability transition in cell death.

    PubMed

    Baines, Christopher P; Kaiser, Robert A; Purcell, Nicole H; Blair, N Scott; Osinska, Hanna; Hambleton, Michael A; Brunskill, Eric W; Sayen, M Richard; Gottlieb, Roberta A; Dorn, Gerald W; Robbins, Jeffrey; Molkentin, Jeffery D

    2005-03-31

    Mitochondria play a critical role in mediating both apoptotic and necrotic cell death. The mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) leads to mitochondrial swelling, outer membrane rupture and the release of apoptotic mediators. The mPT pore is thought to consist of the adenine nucleotide translocator, a voltage-dependent anion channel, and cyclophilin D (the Ppif gene product), a prolyl isomerase located within the mitochondrial matrix. Here we generated mice lacking Ppif and mice overexpressing cyclophilin D in the heart. Ppif null mice are protected from ischaemia/reperfusion-induced cell death in vivo, whereas cyclophilin D-overexpressing mice show mitochondrial swelling and spontaneous cell death. Mitochondria isolated from the livers, hearts and brains of Ppif null mice are resistant to mitochondrial swelling and permeability transition in vitro. Moreover, primary hepatocytes and fibroblasts isolated from Ppif null mice are largely protected from Ca2+-overload and oxidative stress-induced cell death. However, Bcl-2 family member-induced cell death does not depend on cyclophilin D, and Ppif null fibroblasts are not protected from staurosporine or tumour-necrosis factor-alpha-induced death. Thus, cyclophilin D and the mitochondrial permeability transition are required for mediating Ca2+- and oxidative damage-induced cell death, but not Bcl-2 family member-regulated death. PMID:15800627

  13. Overexpression of neurofilament H disrupts normal cell structure and function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szebenyi, Gyorgyi; Smith, George M.; Li, Ping; Brady, Scott T.

    2002-01-01

    Studying exogenously expressed tagged proteins in live cells has become a standard technique for evaluating protein distribution and function. Typically, expression levels of experimentally introduced proteins are not regulated, and high levels are often preferred to facilitate detection. However, overexpression of many proteins leads to mislocalization and pathologies. Therefore, for normative studies, moderate levels of expression may be more suitable. To understand better the dynamics of intermediate filament formation, transport, and stability in a healthy, living cell, we inserted neurofilament heavy chain (NFH)-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion constructs in adenoviral vectors with tetracycline (tet)-regulated promoters. This system allows for turning on or off the synthesis of NFH-GFP at a selected time, for a defined period, in a dose-dependent manner. We used this inducible system for live cell imaging of changes in filament structure and cell shape, motility, and transport associated with increasing NFH-GFP expression. Cells with low to intermediate levels of NFH-GFP were structurally and functionally similar to neighboring, nonexpressing cells. In contrast, overexpression led to pathological alterations in both filament organization and cell function. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Mitochondrial Cell Death Pathways in Caenorhabiditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Seervi, Mahendra; Xue, Ding

    2015-01-01

    Programmed cell death is an evolutionarily conserved process essential for animal development and tissue homeostasis. Mitochondria have been demonstrated to play a central role in regulating both the activation and the execution of apoptosis. In particular, mitochondria release multiple proapoptotic factors from its intermembrane space, leading to both caspase-dependent and -independent cell death. Despite the pivotal roles of invertebrate animal models, Caenorhabiditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster, in deciphering conserved pathways and mechanisms of programmed cell death, the importance of mitochondria to apoptosis of invertebrates remains elusive and largely unexplored. Recent studies have corroborated significant association between mitochondria and apoptosis in C. elegans, making it a thrust area of investigations. In this review, we detail the roles of mitochondrial proteins in mediating execution of cell death in C. elegans, including chromosome fragmentation, phosphatidylserine externalization, and elimination of mitochondria, and discuss the potential roles of mitochondria in the activation of C. elegans cell death. The combination of traditional powerful genetic tools and the emergence of the multiple new reverse genetic techniques, including the highly efficient CRISPR/Cas9 gene-editing method, should make C. elegans an ideal animal model for analyzing mitochondrial cell death pathways and associated regulatory mechanisms. PMID:26431563

  15. Inhibition of telomerase causes vulnerability to endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced neuronal cell death.

    PubMed

    Hosoi, Toru; Nakatsu, Kanako; Shimamoto, Akira; Tahara, Hidetoshi; Ozawa, Koichiro

    2016-08-26

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is implicated in several diseases, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, we investigated the possible involvement of telomerase in ER stress-induced cell death. ER stress-induced cell death was ameliorated in telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) over-expressing MCF7 cells (MCF7-TERT cell). Telomerase specific inhibitor, BIBR1532, reversed the inhibitory effect of TERT on ER stress-induced cell death in MCF7-TERT cells. These findings suggest that BIBR1532 may specifically inhibit telomerase activity, thereby inducing cell death in ER stress-exposed cells. TERT was expressed in the SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line. To analyze the possible involvement of telomerase in ER stress-induced neuronal cell death, we treated SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells with BIBR1532 and analyzed ER stress-induced cell death. We found that BIBR1532 significantly enhanced the ER stress-induced neuronal cell death. These findings suggest that inhibition of telomerase activity may enhance vulnerability to neuronal cell death caused by ER stress. PMID:27443785

  16. Cell death in the developing vertebrate retina.

    PubMed

    Vecino, Elena; Hernández, María; García, Mónica

    2004-01-01

    Programmed cell death occurs naturally, as a physiological process, during the embryonic development of multicellular organisms. In the retina, which belongs to the central nervous system, at least two phases of cell death have been reported to occur during development. An early phase takes place concomitant with the processes of neurogenesis, cell migration and cell differentiation. A later phase affecting mainly neurons occurs when connections are established and synapses are formed, resulting in selective elimination of inappropriate connections. This pattern of cell death in the developing retina is common among different vertebrates. However, the timing and magnitude of retinal cell death varies among species. In addition, a precise regulation of apoptosis during retinal development has been described. Factors such as neurotrophins, among many others, and electrical activity influence the survival of retinal cells during the course of development. In this paper, we present a summary of these different aspects of programmed cell death during retinal development, and examine how these differ among different species. PMID:15558487

  17. APP Overexpression Causes Aβ-Independent Neuronal Death through Intrinsic Apoptosis Pathway.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ning; Jiao, Song; Gumaste, Ankita; Bai, Li; Belluscio, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide in the brain is a central hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is thought to be the cause of the observed neurodegeneration. Many animal models have been generated that overproduce Aβ yet do not exhibit clear neuronal loss, questioning this Aβ hypothesis. We previously developed an in vivo mouse model that expresses a humanized amyloid precursor protein (hAPP) in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) showing robust apoptosis and olfactory dysfunction by 3 weeks of age, which is consistent with early OSN loss and smell deficits, as observed in AD patients. Here we show, by deleting the β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) in two distinct transgenic mouse models, that hAPP-induced apoptosis of OSNs is Aβ independent and remains cell autonomous. In addition, we reveal that the intrinsic apoptosis pathway is responsible for hAPP-induced OSN death, as marked by mitochondrial damage and caspase-9 activation. Given that hAPP expression causes OSN apoptosis despite the absence of BACE1, we propose that Aβ is not the sole cause of hAPP-induced neurodegeneration and that the early loss of olfactory function in AD may be based on a cell-autonomous mechanism, which could mark an early phase of AD, prior to Aβ accumulation. Thus, the olfactory system could serve as an important new platform to study the development of AD, providing unique insight for both early diagnosis and intervention. PMID:27517085

  18. APP Overexpression Causes Aβ-Independent Neuronal Death through Intrinsic Apoptosis Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ning; Jiao, Song; Gumaste, Ankita; Bai, Li

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide in the brain is a central hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and is thought to be the cause of the observed neurodegeneration. Many animal models have been generated that overproduce Aβ yet do not exhibit clear neuronal loss, questioning this Aβ hypothesis. We previously developed an in vivo mouse model that expresses a humanized amyloid precursor protein (hAPP) in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) showing robust apoptosis and olfactory dysfunction by 3 weeks of age, which is consistent with early OSN loss and smell deficits, as observed in AD patients. Here we show, by deleting the β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) in two distinct transgenic mouse models, that hAPP-induced apoptosis of OSNs is Aβ independent and remains cell autonomous. In addition, we reveal that the intrinsic apoptosis pathway is responsible for hAPP-induced OSN death, as marked by mitochondrial damage and caspase-9 activation. Given that hAPP expression causes OSN apoptosis despite the absence of BACE1, we propose that Aβ is not the sole cause of hAPP-induced neurodegeneration and that the early loss of olfactory function in AD may be based on a cell-autonomous mechanism, which could mark an early phase of AD, prior to Aβ accumulation. Thus, the olfactory system could serve as an important new platform to study the development of AD, providing unique insight for both early diagnosis and intervention. PMID:27517085

  19. Eiger-induced cell death relies on Rac1-dependent endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, W; Srinivasan, A; Lin, S; Kara, k-I; Barker, P A

    2016-01-01

    Signaling via tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily members regulates cellular life and death decisions. A subset of mammalian TNFR proteins, most notably the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), induces cell death through a pathway that requires activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs). However the receptor-proximal signaling events that mediate this remain unclear. Drosophila express a single tumor necrosis factor (TNF) ligand termed Eiger (Egr) that activates JNK-dependent cell death. We have exploited this model to identify phylogenetically conserved signaling events that allow Egr to induce JNK activation and cell death in vivo. Here we report that Rac1, a small GTPase, is specifically required in Egr-mediated cell death. rac1 loss of function blocks Egr-induced cell death, whereas Rac1 overexpression enhances Egr-induced killing. We identify Vav as a GEF for Rac1 in this pathway and demonstrate that dLRRK functions as a negative regulator of Rac1 that normally acts to constrain Egr-induced death. Thus dLRRK loss of function increases Egr-induced cell death in the fly. We further show that Rac1-dependent entry of Egr into early endosomes is a crucial prerequisite for JNK activation and for cell death and show that this entry requires the activity of Rab21 and Rab7. These findings reveal novel regulatory mechanisms that allow Rac1 to contribute to Egr-induced JNK activation and cell death. PMID:27054336

  20. Eiger-induced cell death relies on Rac1-dependent endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Ruan, W; Srinivasan, A; Lin, S; Kara, K-I; Barker, P A

    2016-01-01

    Signaling via tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily members regulates cellular life and death decisions. A subset of mammalian TNFR proteins, most notably the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), induces cell death through a pathway that requires activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs). However the receptor-proximal signaling events that mediate this remain unclear. Drosophila express a single tumor necrosis factor (TNF) ligand termed Eiger (Egr) that activates JNK-dependent cell death. We have exploited this model to identify phylogenetically conserved signaling events that allow Egr to induce JNK activation and cell death in vivo. Here we report that Rac1, a small GTPase, is specifically required in Egr-mediated cell death. rac1 loss of function blocks Egr-induced cell death, whereas Rac1 overexpression enhances Egr-induced killing. We identify Vav as a GEF for Rac1 in this pathway and demonstrate that dLRRK functions as a negative regulator of Rac1 that normally acts to constrain Egr-induced death. Thus dLRRK loss of function increases Egr-induced cell death in the fly. We further show that Rac1-dependent entry of Egr into early endosomes is a crucial prerequisite for JNK activation and for cell death and show that this entry requires the activity of Rab21 and Rab7. These findings reveal novel regulatory mechanisms that allow Rac1 to contribute to Egr-induced JNK activation and cell death. PMID:27054336

  1. Insulin depletion leads to adipose-specific cell death in obese but not lean mice.

    PubMed

    Loftus, T M; Kuhajda, F P; Lane, M D

    1998-11-24

    Mutation of the obese gene produces obesity, hyperinsulinemia, and compensatory "overexpression" of the defective gene. As insulin activates obese gene expression, it seemed possible that hyperinsulinemia might be responsible for overexpression of the gene. To address this question we rapidly neutralized circulating insulin by injection of an insulin antibody. Unexpectedly, insulin depletion in obese (ob/ob or db/db) mice caused massive adipose RNA degradation confirmed by histological analysis to result from adipocyte cell death by a largely necrotic mechanism. This effect was not observed in lean littermates and was completely corrected by coadministration of insulin. Comparison of multiple tissues demonstrated that the effect was restricted to adipose tissue. Insulin depletion in obese mice by administration of streptozotocin also led to cell death, but this death was less extensive and appeared to be apoptotic in mechanism. Thus insulin may promote the survival side of the physiological balance between adipocyte survival and death. PMID:9826672

  2. Neuroprotection by GH against excitotoxic-induced cell death in retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Moreno, Carlos G; Ávila-Mendoza, José; Wu, Yilun; Arellanes-Licea, Elvira Del Carmen; Louie, Marcela; Luna, Maricela; Arámburo, Carlos; Harvey, Steve

    2016-08-01

    Retinal growth hormone (GH) has been shown to promote cell survival in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) during developmental waves of apoptosis during chicken embryonic development. The possibility that it might also against excitotoxicity-induced cell death was therefore examined in the present study, which utilized quail-derived QNR/D cells as an in vitro RGC model. QNR/D cell death was induced by glutamate in the presence of BSO (buthionine sulfoxamide) (an enhancer of oxidative stress), but this was significantly reduced (P<0.01) in the presence of exogenous recombinant chicken GH (rcGH). Similarly, QNR/D cells that had been prior transfected with a GH plasmid to overexpress secreted and non-secreted GH. This treatment reduced the number of TUNEL-labeled cells and blocked their release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). In a further experiment with dissected neuroretinal explants from ED (embryonic day) 10 embryos, rcGH treatment of the explants also reduced (P<0.01) the number of glutamate-BSO-induced apoptotic cells and blocked the explant release of LDH. This neuroprotective action was likely mediated by increased STAT5 phosphorylation and increased bcl-2 production, as induced by exogenous rcGH treatment and the media from GH-overexpressing QNR/D cells. As rcGH treatment and GH-overexpression cells also increased the content of IGF-1 and IGF-1 mRNA this neuroprotective action of GH is likely to be mediated, at least partially, through an IGF-1 mechanism. This possibility is supported by the fact that the siRNA knockdown of GH or IGF-1 significantly reduced QNR/D cell viability, as did the immunoneutralization of IGF-1. GH is therefore neuroprotective against excitotoxicity-induced RGC cell death by anti-apoptotic actions involving IGF-1 stimulation. PMID:27129619

  3. Regulation of Cell Death by Transfer RNA

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Both transfer RNA (tRNA) and cytochrome c are essential molecules for the survival of cells. tRNA decodes mRNA codons into amino-acid-building blocks in protein in all organisms, whereas cytochrome c functions in the electron transport chain that powers ATP synthesis in mitochondrion-containing eukaryotes. Additionally, in vertebrates, cytochrome c that is released from mitochondria is a potent inducer of apoptosis, activating apoptotic proteins (caspases) in the cytoplasm to dismantle cells. A better understanding of both tRNA and cytochrome c is essential for an insight into the regulation of cell life and death. Recent Advances: A recent study showed that the mitochondrion-released cytochrome c can be removed from the cell-death pathway by tRNA molecules. The direct binding of cytochrome c by tRNA provides a mechanism for tRNA to regulate cell death, beyond its role in gene expression. Critical Issues: The nature of the tRNA–cytochrome c binding interaction remains unknown. The questions of how this interaction affects tRNA function, cellular metabolism, and apoptotic sensitivity are unanswered. Future Directions: Investigations into the critical issues raised above will improve the understanding of tRNA in the fundamental processes of cell death and metabolism. Such knowledge will inform therapies in cell death-related diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 583–594. PMID:23350625

  4. Rational Development of a Cytotoxic Peptide to Trigger Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Boohaker, Rebecca J.; Zhang, Ge; Lee, Michael W.; Nemec, Kathleen N.; Santra, Santimukul; Perez, J. Manuel; Khaled, Annette R.

    2012-01-01

    Defects in the apoptotic machinery can contribute to tumor formation and resistance to treatment, creating a need to identify new agents that kill cancer cells by alternative mechanisms. To this end, we examined the cytotoxic properties of a novel peptide, CT20p, derived from the C-terminal, alpha-9 helix of Bax, an amphipathic domain with putative membrane binding properties. Like many anti-microbial peptides, CT20p contains clusters of hydrophobic and cationic residues that could enable the peptide to associate with lipid membranes. CT20p caused the release of calcein from mitochondrial-like lipid vesicles without disrupting vesicle integrity and, when expressed as a fusion protein in cells, localized to mitochondria. The amphipathic nature of CT20p allowed it to be encapsulated in polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) that have the capacity to harbor targeting molecules, dyes or drugs. The resulting CT20p-NPs proved an effective killer of colon and breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, using a murine breast cancer tumor model. By introducing CT20p to Bax deficient cells, we demonstrated that the peptide’s lethal activity was independent of endogenous Bax. CT20p also caused an increase in the mitochondrial membrane potential that was followed by plasma membrane rupture and cell death, without the characteristic membrane asymmetry associated with apoptosis. We determined that cell death triggered by the CT20p-NPs was minimally dependent on effector caspases and resistant Bcl-2 over-expression, suggesting that it was independent of the intrinsic apoptotic death pathway. Furthermore, use of CT20p with the apoptosis-inducing drug, cisplatin, resulted in additive toxicity. These results reveal the novel features of CT20p that allow nanoparticle-mediated delivery to tumors and the potential application in combination therapies to activate multiple death pathways in cancer cells. PMID:22591113

  5. Mic60/mitofilin overexpression alters mitochondrial dynamics and attenuates vulnerability of dopaminergic cells to dopamine and rotenone.

    PubMed

    Van Laar, Victor S; Berman, Sarah B; Hastings, Teresa G

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in Parkinson's disease (PD) neuropathology. Mic60, also known as mitofilin, is a protein of the inner mitochondrial membrane and a key component of the mitochondrial contact site and cristae junction organizing system (MICOS). Mic60 is critical for maintaining mitochondrial membrane structure and function. We previously demonstrated that mitochondrial Mic60 protein is susceptible to both covalent modification and loss in abundance following exposure to dopamine quinone. In this study, we utilized neuronally-differentiated SH-SY5Y and PC12 dopaminergic cell lines to examine the effects of altered Mic60 levels on mitochondrial function and cellular vulnerability in response to PD-relevant stressors. Short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of endogenous Mic60 protein in neuronal SH-SY5Y cells significantly potentiated dopamine-induced cell death, which was rescued by co-expressing shRNA-insensitive Mic60. Conversely, in PC12 and SH-SY5Y cells, Mic60 overexpression significantly attenuated both dopamine- and rotenone-induced cell death as compared to controls. Mic60 overexpression in SH-SY5Y cells was also associated with increased mitochondrial respiration, and, following rotenone exposure, increased spare respiratory capacity. Mic60 knockdown cells exhibited suppressed respiration and, following rotenone treatment, decreased spare respiratory capacity. Mic60 overexpression also affected mitochondrial fission/fusion dynamics. PC12 cells overexpressing Mic60 exhibited increased mitochondrial interconnectivity. Further, both PC12 cells and primary rat cortical neurons overexpressing Mic60 displayed suppressed mitochondrial fission and increased mitochondrial length in neurites. These results suggest that altering levels of Mic60 in dopaminergic neuronal cells significantly affects both mitochondrial homeostasis and cellular vulnerability to the PD-relevant stressors dopamine and rotenone, carrying implications for PD

  6. Over-expression of tetraspanin 8 in malignant glioma regulates tumor cell progression

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Si-Jian; Wu, Yue-Bing; Cai, Shang; Pan, Yi-Xin; Liu, Wei; Bian, Liu-Guan; Sun, Bomin; Sun, Qing-Fang

    2015-03-13

    Tumor cell invasion and proliferation remain the overwhelming causes of death for malignant glioma patients. To establish effective therapeutic methods, new targets implied in these processes have to be identified. Tetraspanin 8 (Tspn8) forms complexes with a large variety of trans-membrane and/or cytosolic proteins to regulate several important cellular functions. In the current study, we found that Tspn8 was over-expressed in multiple clinical malignant glioma tissues, and its expression level correlated with the grade of tumors. Tspn8 expression in malignant glioma cells (U251MG and U87MG lines) is important for cell proliferation and migration. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Tspn8 markedly reduced in vitro proliferation and migration of U251MG and U87MG cells. Meanwhile, Tspn8 silencing also increased the sensitivity of temozolomide (TMZ), and significantly increased U251MG or U87MG cell death and apoptosis by TMZ were achieved with Tspn8 knockdown. We observed that Tspn8 formed a complex with activated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in both human malignant glioma tissues and in above glioma cells. This complexation appeared required for FAK activation, since Tspn8 knockdown inhibited FAK activation in U251MG and U87MG cells. These results provide evidence that Tspn8 contributes to the pathogenesis of glioblastoma probably by promoting proliferation, migration and TMZ-resistance of glioma cells. Therefore, targeting Tspn8 may provide a potential therapeutic intervention for malignant glioma. - Highlights: • Tspn8 is over-expressed in multiple clinical malignant glioma tissues. • Tspn8 expression is correlated with the grade of malignant gliomas. • Tspn8 knockdown suppresses U251MG/U87MG proliferation and in vitro migration. • Tspn8 knockdown significantly increases TMZ sensitivity in U251MG/U87MG cells. • Tspn8 forms a complex with FAK, required for FAK activation.

  7. Programmed cell death: many ways for cells to die decently.

    PubMed

    Jäättelä, Marja

    2002-01-01

    Apoptosis, a cell death programme mediated by the caspase family of cysteine proteases, is essential for appropriate removal of excess cells in many developmental and physiological settings. It would, however, be very dangerous for the organism to depend on a single protease family for clearance of unwanted and potentially dangerous cells. Indeed, the exclusive role of caspases in the execution of programmed cell death (PCD) has been challenged recently, and the understanding of the molecular control of alternative death pathways is emerging. Here, I review recently discovered triggers and molecular regulators of caspase-independent cell death programmes and discuss their potential as therapeutic targets for the treatment of cancer. PMID:12523503

  8. Induction of breast cancer in wild type p53 cells by BRCA1-IRIS overexpression.

    PubMed

    Elshamy, Wael M

    2010-08-01

    Cells ability to evade cell death and to proliferate post geno-/cell-toxic stresses, likely leads to formation of cancer. Activation of p38MAPK and p53 following these stresses help protect cells against cancer development by initiating apoptosis. The duration of p38MAPK and p53 activation is regulated by the WIP1 phosphatase. BRCA1-IRIS triggers WIP1 expression in p53-dependent and -independent manner. BRCA1-IRIS triggers the expression and cytoplasmic localization of the mRNA stabilization and translation inducer, HuR that binds p53 and PPM1D mRNA. Hence, BRCA1-IRIS overexpression inactivates p38MAPK and/or p53 by upregulating WIP1 expression. BRCA1-IRIS abrogation of the homeostatic balance maintained by p38MAPK-p53-WIP1 pathway suppressed cell death induced by a lethal dose of UVC, high dosages of etoposide or H2O2, and allowed cells to survive and proliferate post geno-/cell-toxic stresses. This mechanism represents a new link between geno-/cell-toxic stress and aggressive breast cancer formation in p53 wild-type cells. PMID:20845286

  9. Inflammasomes as polyvalent cell death platforms.

    PubMed

    de Vasconcelos, Nathalia M; Van Opdenbosch, Nina; Lamkanfi, Mohamed

    2016-06-01

    Inflammasomes are multi-protein platforms that are organized in the cytosol to cope with pathogens and cellular stress. The pattern recognition receptors NLRP1, NLRP3, NLRC4, AIM2 and Pyrin all assemble canonical platforms for caspase-1 activation, while caspase-11-dependent inflammasomes respond to intracellular Gram-negative pathogens. Inflammasomes are chiefly known for their roles in maturation and secretion of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin-(IL)1β and IL18, but they can also induce regulated cell death. Activation of caspases 1 and 11 in myeloid cells can trigger pyroptosis, a lytic and inflammatory cell death mode. Pyroptosis has been implicated in secretion of IL1β, IL18 and intracellular alarmins. Akin to these factors, it may have beneficial roles in controlling pathogen replication, but become detrimental in the context of chronic autoinflammatory diseases. Inflammasomes are increasingly implicated in induction of additional regulated cell death modes such as pyronecrosis and apoptosis. In this review, we overview recent advances in inflammasome-associated cell death research, illustrating the polyvalent roles of these macromolecular platforms in regulated cell death signaling. PMID:27048821

  10. β-Cell Specific Overexpression of GPR39 Protects against Streptozotocin-Induced Hyperglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Egerod, Kristoffer L.; Jin, Chunyu; Petersen, Pia Steen; Wierup, Nils; Sundler, Frank; Holst, Birgitte; Schwartz, Thue W.

    2011-01-01

    Mice deficient in the zinc-sensor GPR39, which has been demonstrated to protect cells against endoplasmatic stress and cell death in vitro, display moderate glucose intolerance and impaired glucose-induced insulin secretion. Here, we use the Tet-On system under the control of the proinsulin promoter to selectively overexpress GPR39 in the β cells in a double transgenic mouse strain and challenge them with multiple low doses of streptozotocin, which in the wild-type littermates leads to a gradual increase in nonfasting glucose levels and glucose intolerance observed during both food intake and OGTT. Although the overexpression of the constitutively active GPR39 receptor in animals not treated with streptozotocin appeared by itself to impair the glucose tolerance slightly and to decrease the β-cell mass, it nevertheless totally protected against the gradual hyperglycemia in the steptozotocin-treated animals. It is concluded that GPR39 functions in a β-cell protective manner and it is suggested that it is involved in some of the beneficial, β-cell protective effects observed for Zn++ and that GPR39 may be a target for antidiabetic drug intervention. PMID:22164158

  11. Apoptotic cell death induced by intracellular proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Williams, M S; Henkart, P A

    1994-11-01

    To mimic the injection of granzymes into target cells by cytotoxic lymphocytes or the activation of endogenous proteases in programmed cell death, the proteases chymotrypsin, proteinase K, or trypsin were loaded into the cytoplasm of several different cell types using the osmotic lysis of pinosomes technique. Internalization of these proteases caused cell lysis within several hours, accompanied by extensive nuclear damage in most but not all combinations of target cells and proteases. This nuclear damage, quantitated by DNA release from nuclei, was associated with apoptotic features including DNA fragmentation into nucleosomal ladders, chromatin condensation, nuclear fragmentation, and membrane blebbing. Agents reported to block programmed cell death, including aurintricarboxylic acid, inhibitors of energy metabolism, and protein or RNA synthesis, failed to block this protease-induced death, although some inhibited nuclear damage. In separate experiments, introduction of staphylococcal nuclease into cells led to near complete (at least 75% of total) nucleosomal DNA fragmentation within 6 to 8 h. Condensation of chromatin did not accompany this fragmentation to the same extent, and there was approximately a 10-h lag between half-maximal DNA fragmentation and 50% loss of membrane integrity. The results suggest that activation of intracellular proteases during cell death by any molecular pathway could give rise to apoptotic morphology and DNA fragmentation. PMID:7930626

  12. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aaron Yun; Qiu, Jianming

    2011-01-01

    The cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection have been widely documented. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death is often directly associated with disease outcomes (e.g., anemia resulting from loss of erythroid progenitors during parvovirus B19 infection). Apoptosis is the major form of cell death induced by parvovirus infection. However, nonapoptotic cell death, namely necrosis, has also been reported during infection of the minute virus of mice, parvovirus H-1 and bovine parvovirus. Recent studies have revealed multiple mechanisms underlying the cell death during parvovirus infection. These mechanisms vary in different parvoviruses, although the large nonstructural protein (NS)1 and the small NS proteins (e.g., the 11 kDa of parvovirus B19), as well as replication of the viral genome, are responsible for causing infection-induced cell death. Cell cycle arrest is also common, and contributes to the cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection. While viral NS proteins have been indicated to induce cell cycle arrest, increasing evidence suggests that a cellular DNA damage response triggered by an invading single-stranded parvoviral genome is the major inducer of cell cycle arrest in parvovirus-infected cells. Apparently, in response to infection, cell death and cell cycle arrest of parvovirus-infected cells are beneficial to the viral cell lifecycle (e.g., viral DNA replication and virus egress). In this article, we will discuss recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms underlying parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest. PMID:21331319

  13. Over-expression of secreted proteins from mammalian cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Annamarie C; Barton, William A

    2014-01-01

    Secreted mammalian proteins require the development of robust protein over-expression systems for crystallographic and biophysical studies of protein function. Due to complex disulfide bonds and distinct glycosylation patterns preventing folding and expression in prokaryotic expression hosts, many secreted proteins necessitate production in more complex eukaryotic expression systems. Here, we elaborate on the methods used to obtain high yields of purified secreted proteins from transiently or stably transfected mammalian cell lines. Among the issues discussed are the selection of appropriate expression vectors, choice of signal sequences for protein secretion, availability of fusion tags for enhancing protein stability and purification, choice of cell line, and the large-scale growth of cells in a variety of formats. PMID:24510886

  14. USP30 deubiquitylates mitochondrial Parkin substrates and restricts apoptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jin-Rui; Martinez, Aitor; Lane, Jon D; Mayor, Ugo; Clague, Michael J; Urbé, Sylvie

    2015-05-01

    Mitochondria play a pivotal role in the orchestration of cell death pathways. Here, we show that the control of ubiquitin dynamics at mitochondria contributes to the regulation of apoptotic cell death. The unique mitochondrial deubiquitylase, USP30, opposes Parkin-dependent ubiquitylation of TOM20, and its depletion enhances depolarization-induced cell death in Parkin-overexpressing cells. Importantly, USP30 also regulates BAX/BAK-dependent apoptosis, and its depletion sensitizes cancer cells to BH3-mimetics. These results provide the first evidence for a fundamental role of USP30 in determining the threshold for mitochondrial cell death and suggest USP30 as a potential target for combinatorial anti-cancer therapy. PMID:25739811

  15. USP30 deubiquitylates mitochondrial Parkin substrates and restricts apoptotic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jin-Rui; Martinez, Aitor; Lane, Jon D; Mayor, Ugo; Clague, Michael J; Urbé, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria play a pivotal role in the orchestration of cell death pathways. Here, we show that the control of ubiquitin dynamics at mitochondria contributes to the regulation of apoptotic cell death. The unique mitochondrial deubiquitylase, USP30, opposes Parkin-dependent ubiquitylation of TOM20, and its depletion enhances depolarization-induced cell death in Parkin-overexpressing cells. Importantly, USP30 also regulates BAX/BAK-dependent apoptosis, and its depletion sensitizes cancer cells to BH3-mimetics. These results provide the first evidence for a fundamental role of USP30 in determining the threshold for mitochondrial cell death and suggest USP30 as a potential target for combinatorial anti-cancer therapy. PMID:25739811

  16. How Kidney Cell Death Induces Renal Necroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Mulay, Shrikant R; Kumar, Santhosh V; Lech, Maciej; Desai, Jyaysi; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2016-05-01

    The nephrons of the kidney are independent functional units harboring cells of a low turnover during homeostasis. As such, physiological renal cell death is a rather rare event and dead cells are flushed away rapidly with the urinary flow. Renal cell necrosis occurs in acute kidney injuries such as thrombotic microangiopathies, necrotizing glomerulonephritis, or tubular necrosis. All of these are associated with intense intrarenal inflammation, which contributes to further renal cell loss, an autoamplifying process referred to as necroinflammation. But how does renal cell necrosis trigger inflammation? Here, we discuss the role of danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), mitochondrial (mito)-DAMPs, and alarmins, as well as their respective pattern recognition receptors. The capacity of DAMPs and alarmins to trigger cytokine and chemokine release initiates the recruitment of leukocytes into the kidney that further amplify necroinflammation. Infiltrating neutrophils often undergo neutrophil extracellular trap formation associated with neutrophil death or necroptosis, which implies a release of histones, which act not only as DAMPs but also elicit direct cytotoxic effects on renal cells, namely endothelial cells. Proinflammatory macrophages and eventually cytotoxic T cells further drive kidney cell death and inflammation. Dissecting the molecular mechanisms of necroinflammation may help to identify the best therapeutic targets to limit nephron loss in kidney injury. PMID:27339382

  17. Time-Lapse Imaging of Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Wallberg, Fredrik; Tenev, Tencho; Meier, Pascal

    2016-03-01

    The best approach to distinguish between necrosis and apoptosis is time-lapse video microscopy. This technique enables a biological process to be photographed at regular intervals over a period, which may last from a few hours to several days, and can be applied to cells in culture or in vivo. We have established two time-lapse microscopy methods based on different ways of calculating cell death: semiautomated and automated. In the semiautomated approach, cell death can be visualized by staining with combinations of Alexa Fluor 647-conjugated Annexin V and Sytox Green (SG), or Annexin V(FITC) and Propidium iodide (PI). The automated method is similar except that all cells are labeled with dyes. This allows faster quantification of data. To this end Cell Tracker Green is used to label all cells at time zero in combination with PI and Alexa Fluor 647-conjugated Annexin V. Necrotic cell death is accompanied by either simultaneous labeling with Annexin V and PI or SG (double-positive), or direct PI or SG staining. Additionally, necrotic cells display characteristic morphology, such as cytoplasmic swelling. In contrast to necrosis where membrane permeabilization is an early event, cells that die by apoptosis lose their membrane permeability relatively late. Therefore, the time between Annexin V staining and PI or SG uptake (double-positive) can be used to distinguish necrosis from apoptosis. This protocol describes the analysis of cell death by time-lapse imaging of HT1080 and L929 cells stained with these dyes, but it can be readily adapted to other cell types of interest. PMID:26933245

  18. ETosis: A Microbicidal Mechanism beyond Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães-Costa, Anderson B.; Nascimento, Michelle T. C.; Wardini, Amanda B.; Pinto-da-Silva, Lucia H.; Saraiva, Elvira M.

    2012-01-01

    Netosis is a recently described type of neutrophil death occurring with the release to the extracellular milieu of a lattice composed of DNA associated with histones and granular and cytoplasmic proteins. These webs, initially named neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), ensnare and kill microorganisms. Similarly, other cell types, such as eosinophils, mast cells, and macrophages, can also dye by this mechanism; thus, it was renamed as ETosis, meaning death with release of extracellular traps (ETs). Here, we review the mechanism of NETosis/etosis, emphasizing its role in diseases caused by protozoan parasites, fungi, and viruses. PMID:22536481

  19. Interaction of CSR1 with XIAP Reverses Inhibition of Caspases and Accelerates Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhong-Liang; Tan, Lang-Zhu; Yu, Yan P.; Michalopoulos, George; Luo, Jian-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Cellular Stress Response 1 (CSR1) is a tumor suppressor gene that is located at 8p21, a region that is frequently deleted in prostate cancer as well as a variety of human malignancies. Previous studies have indicated that the expression of CSR1 induces cell death. In this study, we found that CSR1 interacts with X-linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein (XIAP), using yeast two-hybrid screening analyses. XIAP overexpression has been found in many human cancers, and forced expression of XIAP blocks apoptosis. Both in vitro and in vivo analyses indicated that the C-terminus of CSR1 binds XIAP with high affinity. Through a series of in vitro recombinant protein-binding analyses, the XIAP-binding motif in CSR1 was determined to include amino acids 513 to 572. Targeted knock-down of XIAP enhanced CSR1-induced cell death, while overexpression of XIAP antagonized CSR1 activity. The binding of CSR1 with XIAP enhanced caspase-9 and caspase-3 protease activities, and CSR1-induced cell death was dramatically reduced on expression of a mutant CSR1 that does not bind XIAP. However, a XIAP mutant that does not interact with caspase-9 had no impact on CSR1-induced cell death. These results suggest that cell death is induced when CSR1 binds XIAP, preventing the interaction of XIAP with caspases. Thus, this study may have elucidated a novel mechanism by which tumor suppressors induce cell death. PMID:22683311

  20. Interaction of CSR1 with XIAP reverses inhibition of caspases and accelerates cell death.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhong-Liang; Tan, Lang-Zhu; Yu, Yan P; Michalopoulos, George; Luo, Jian-Hua

    2012-08-01

    Cellular Stress Response 1 (CSR1) is a tumor suppressor gene that is located at 8p21, a region that is frequently deleted in prostate cancer as well as a variety of human malignancies. Previous studies have indicated that the expression of CSR1 induces cell death. In this study, we found that CSR1 interacts with X-linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein (XIAP), using yeast two-hybrid screening analyses. XIAP overexpression has been found in many human cancers, and forced expression of XIAP blocks apoptosis. Both in vitro and in vivo analyses indicated that the C-terminus of CSR1 binds XIAP with high affinity. Through a series of in vitro recombinant protein-binding analyses, the XIAP-binding motif in CSR1 was determined to include amino acids 513 to 572. Targeted knock-down of XIAP enhanced CSR1-induced cell death, while overexpression of XIAP antagonized CSR1 activity. The binding of CSR1 with XIAP enhanced caspase-9 and caspase-3 protease activities, and CSR1-induced cell death was dramatically reduced on expression of a mutant CSR1 that does not bind XIAP. However, a XIAP mutant that does not interact with caspase-9 had no impact on CSR1-induced cell death. These results suggest that cell death is induced when CSR1 binds XIAP, preventing the interaction of XIAP with caspases. Thus, this study may have elucidated a novel mechanism by which tumor suppressors induce cell death. PMID:22683311

  1. Regulated cell death and adaptive stress responses.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Kepp, Oliver; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-06-01

    Eukaryotic cells react to potentially dangerous perturbations of the intracellular or extracellular microenvironment by activating rapid (transcription-independent) mechanisms that attempt to restore homeostasis. If such perturbations persist, cells may still try to cope with stress by activating delayed and robust (transcription-dependent) adaptive systems, or they may actively engage in cellular suicide. This regulated form of cell death can manifest with various morphological, biochemical and immunological correlates, and constitutes an ultimate attempt of stressed cells to maintain organismal homeostasis. Here, we dissect the general organization of adaptive cellular responses to stress, their intimate connection with regulated cell death, and how the latter operates for the preservation of organismal homeostasis. PMID:27048813

  2. Multidrug-resistant hela cells overexpressing MRP1 exhibit sensitivity to cell killing by hyperthermia: Interactions with etoposide

    SciTech Connect

    Souslova, Tatiana; Averill-Bates, Diana A. . E-mail: averill.diana@uqam.ca

    2004-12-01

    Purpose: Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains one of the primary obstacles in cancer chemotherapy and often involves overexpression of drug efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1). Regional hyperthermia is undergoing clinical investigation in combination with chemotherapy or radiotherapy. This study evaluates whether hyperthermia can reverse MDR mediated by MRP1 in human cervical adenocarcinoma (HeLa) cells. Methods and materials: Cytotoxicity of hyperthermia and/or etoposide was evaluated using sulforhodamine-B in HeLa cells overexpressing MRP1 and their drug-sensitive counterparts. Glutathione, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) were quantified by spectrophotometry. GST isoenzymes were quantified by immunodetection. Caspase activation was evaluated by fluorometry and chromatin condensation by fluorescence microscopy using Hoechst 33258. Necrosis was determined using propidium iodide. Results: The major finding is that HeLa and HeLaMRP cells are both sensitive to cytotoxicity of hyperthermia (41-45 deg C). Hyperthermia induced activation of caspase 3 and chromatin condensation. Although total levels of cell killing were similar, there was a switch from apoptotic to necrotic cell death in MDR cells. This could be explained by decreased glutathione and GPx in MDR cells. MDR cells also contained very low levels of GST and were resistant to etoposide-induced apoptosis. Hyperthermia caused a modest increase in etoposide-induced apoptosis in HeLa and HeLaMRP cells, which required appropriate heat-drug scheduling. Conclusions: Hyperthermia could be useful in eliminating MDR cells that overexpress MRP1.

  3. The deaths of a cell: how language and metaphor influence the science of cell death.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Andrew S

    2014-12-01

    Multicellular development and tissue maintenance involve the regular elimination of damaged and healthy cells. The science of this genetically regulated cell death is particularly rich in metaphors: 'programmed cell death' or 'cell suicide' is considered an 'altruistic' act on the part of a cell for the benefit of the organism as a whole. It is also considered a form of 'social control' exerted by the body/organism over its component cells. This paper analyzes the various functions of these metaphors and critical discussion about them within the scientific community. Bodies such as the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death (NCCD) have been charged with bringing order to the language of cell death to facilitate scientific progress. While the NCCD recommends adopting more objective biochemical terminology to describe the mechanisms of cell death, the metaphors in question retain an important function by highlighting the broader context within which cell death occurs. Scientific metaphors act as conceptual 'tools' which fulfill various roles, from highlighting a phenomenon as of particular interest, situating it in a particular context, or suggesting explanatory causal mechanisms. PMID:25085023

  4. Cell death pathways associated with PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessel, David; Reiners, John J., Jr.

    2006-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy leads to both direct and indirect tumor cell death. The latter also involves the consequences of vascular shut-down and immunologic effects. While these factors are a major factor in tumor eradication, there is usually an element of direct cell killing that can reduce the cell population by as much as 2-3 logs. Necrosis was initially believed to represent the predominant PDT death mechanism. An apoptotic response to PDT was first reported by Oleinick in 1991, using a sensitizer that targets the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Apoptosis leads to fragmentation of DNA and of cells into apoptotic bodies that are removed by phagocytosis. Inflammatory effects are minimized, and the auto- catalytic elements of the process can amplify the death signal. In this study, we examined consequences of Bcl-2 photodamage by a porphycene sensitizer that targets the ER and causes photodamage to the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Death patterns after Bcl-2 inactivation by a small-molecular antagonist were also assessed. In addition to apoptosis, we also characterized a hitherto undescribed PDT effect, the initiation of autophagy. Autophagy was initially identified as a cell survival pathway, allowing the recycling of components as nutrients become scarce. We propose that autophagy can also represent both a potential survival pathway after PDT damage to cellular organelles, as well as a cell-death pathway. Recent literature reports indicate that autophagy, as well as apoptosis, can be evoked after down-regulation of Bcl-2, a result consistent with results reported here.

  5. Caspase-1 induced pyroptotic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Edward A.; Rajan, Jayant V.; Aderem, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Summary Programmed cell death is a necessary part of development and tissue homeostasis enabling the removal of unwanted cells. In the setting of infectious disease, cells that have been commandeered by microbial pathogens become detrimental to the host. When macrophages and dendritic cells are compromised in this way, they can be lysed by pyroptosis, a cell death mechanism that is distinct from apoptosis and oncosis/necrosis. Pyroptosis is triggered by Caspase-1 after its activation by various inflammasomes, and results in lysis of the affected cell. Both pyroptosis and apoptosis are programmed cell death mechanisms, but are dependent on different caspases, unlike oncosis. Similar to oncosis, and unlike apoptosis, pyroptosis results in cellular lysis and release of the cytosolic contents to the extracellular space. This event is predicted to be inherently inflammatory, and additionally coincides with IL-1β and IL-18 secretion. We discuss the role of distinct inflammasomes, including NLRC4, NLRP3 and AIM2, as well as the role of the ASC focus in Caspase-1 signaling. We further review the importance of pyroptosis in vivo as a potent mechanism to clear intracellular pathogens. PMID:21884178

  6. High concentrations of glucose suppress etoposide-induced cell death of B-cell lymphoma through BCL-6.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yan; Ling, Chang Chun; Liu, Xu Qing

    2014-07-18

    Glucose is potentially a factor in the resistance to chemotherapy of B-cell lymphomas. In this study we investigated the expression of the glucose induced transcription factor Bcl-6 and the underlying mechanism by which it suppresses B-cell lymphoma cell death. Glucose was found to prevent etoposide-induced tumor cell death. BCL-6 expression was induced by glucose but down-regulated by etoposide. BCL-6 expression was regulated by the interaction of VDUP1 and p53. The molecular mechanism by which glucose prevented etoposide-induced tumor cell death was shown to involve the BCL-6 mediated caspase pathway. Our data suggest that glucose-induced BCL-6 overexpression could abrogate the etoposide chemotherapy effect on tumor cell death. PMID:24878528

  7. Peroxiredoxins and the Regulation of Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Hampton, Mark B.; O’Connor, Karina M.

    2016-01-01

    Cell death pathways such as apoptosis can be activated in response to oxidative stress, enabling the disposal of damaged cells. In contrast, controlled intracellular redox events are proposed to be a significant event during apoptosis signaling, regardless of the initiating stimulus. In this scenario oxidants act as second messengers, mediating the post-translational modification of specific regulatory proteins. The exact mechanism of this signaling is unclear, but increased understanding offers the potential to promote or inhibit apoptosis through modulating the redox environment of cells. Peroxiredoxins are thiol peroxidases that remove hydroperoxides, and are also emerging as important players in cellular redox signaling. This review discusses the potential role of peroxiredoxins in the regulation of apoptosis, and also their ability to act as biomarkers of redox changes during the initiation and progression of cell death. PMID:26810076

  8. Proteases in renal cell death: calpains mediate cell death produced by diverse toxicants.

    PubMed

    Schnellmann, R G; Williams, S W

    1998-09-01

    The role of proteases in renal cell death has received limited investigation. Calpains are non-lysosomal cysteine proteases that are Ca+2 activated. Calpain inhibitors that block the active site of calpains (calpain inhibitor 1 and 2) or the Ca+2 binding domain of calpains (PD150606) decreased calpain activity in rabbit renal proximal tubule (RPT) suspensions. The inhibition of calpain activity decreased cell death produced by the diverse toxicants antimycin A (mitochondrial inhibitor), tetrafluroethyl-L-cysteine (nephrotoxic halocarbon), bromohydroquinone (nephro-toxic quinone), t-butylhydroperoxide (model oxidant) and ionomycin (Ca+2 ionophore). In summary, calpains appear to play a common and critical role in cell injury produced by diverse toxicants with different mechanisms of action. The general cysteine protease inhibitor trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido (4-guanidino)-butane (E-64) decreased antimycin A- and tetrafluoroethyl-L-cysteine-induced cell death but had no effect on bromohydroquinone- or t-butylhydroperoxide-induced cell death. Serine/cysteine protease inhibitors (antipain, leupeptin) were not cytoprotective to RPT exposed to any of the toxicants. The cytoprotection associated with E-64 correlated with inhibition of lysosomal cathepsins and E-64 was only cytoprotective after some cell death had occurred. Since some cell death occurred prior to the E-64 cytoprotective effect, lysosomal cathepsins may be released from dying cells and subsequently target the remaining viable cells. PMID:9768434

  9. Gingerol sensitizes TRAIL-induced apoptotic cell death of glioblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dae-Hee; Kim, Dong-Wook; Jung, Chang-Hwa; Lee, Yong J.; Park, Daeho

    2014-09-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal and aggressive astrocytoma of primary brain tumors in adults. Although there are many clinical trials to induce the cell death of glioblastoma cells, most glioblastoma cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Here, we showed that gingerol as a major component of ginger can induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of glioblastoma. Gingerol increased death receptor (DR) 5 levels in a p53-dependent manner. Furthermore, gingerol decreased the expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins (survivin, c-FLIP, Bcl-2, and XIAP) and increased pro-apoptotic protein, Bax and truncate Bid, by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). We also found that the sensitizing effects of gingerol in TRAIL-induced cell death were blocked by scavenging ROS or overexpressing anti-apoptotic protein (Bcl-2). Therefore, we showed the functions of gingerol as a sensitizing agent to induce cell death of TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma cells. This study gives rise to the possibility of applying gingerol as an anti-tumor agent that can be used for the purpose of combination treatment with TRAIL in TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma tumor therapy. - Highlights: • Most GBM cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. • Gingerol enhances the expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins by ROS. • Gingerol enhances TRAIL-induced apoptosis through actions on the ROS–Bcl2 pathway.

  10. Chorein addiction in VPS13A overexpressing rhabdomyosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Honisch, Sabina; Yu, Willi; Liu, Guilai; Alesutan, Ioana; Towhid, Syeda T.; Tsapara, Anna; Schleicher, Sabine; Handgretinger, Rupert

    2015-01-01

    Chorein encoded by VPS13A (vacuolar protein sorting-associated protein 13A) is defective in chorea-acanthocytosis. Chorein fosters neuronal cell survival, cortical actin polymerization and cell stiffness. In view of its anti-apoptotic effect in neurons, we explored whether chorein is expressed in cancer cells and influences cancer cell survival. RT-PCR was employed to determine transcript levels, specific siRNA to silence chorein, FACS analysis to follow apoptosis and Western blotting to quantify protein abundance. Chorein transcripts were detected in various cancer cell types. The mRNA coding for chorein and chorein protein were most abundant in drug resistant, poorly differentiated human rhabdomyosarcoma cells. Chorein silencing significantly reduced the ratio of phosphorylated (and thus activated) to total phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI-3K), pointing to inactivation of this crucial pro-survival signaling molecule. Moreover, chorein silencing diminished transcript levels and protein expression of anti-apoptotic BCL-2 and enhanced transcript levels of pro-apoptotic Bax. Silencing of chorein in rhabdomyosarcoma cells was followed by mitochondrial depolarization, caspase 3 activation and stimulation of early and late apoptosis. In conclusion, chorein is expressed in various cancer cells. In cells with high chorein expression levels chorein silencing promotes apoptotic cell death, an effect paralleled by down-regulation of PI-3K activity and BCL-2/Bax expression ratio. PMID:25871399

  11. Sickle Cell Trait Not Linked to Early Death in Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Sickle Cell Trait Not Linked to Early Death in Study However, black soldiers with the gene ... cell gene variant, are at risk of premature death. People with the sickle cell gene variant do ...

  12. Mitochondrial Thioredoxin in Regulation of Oxidant-Induced Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Cai, Jiyang; Jones, Dean P

    2006-01-01

    Mitochondrial thioredoxin (mtTrx) can be oxidized in response to inducers of oxidative stress; yet the functional consequences of the oxidation have not been determined. This study evaluated the redox status of mtTrx and its association to oxidant-induced apoptosis. Results showed that mtTrx was oxidized after exposure to peroxides and diamide. Overexpression of mtTrx protected against diamide-induced oxidation and cytotoxicity. Oxidation of mtTrx was also achieved by knocking down its reductase; and lead to increased susceptibility to cell death. The data indicate that the redox status of mtTrx is a regulatory mechanism underlying the vulnerability of mitochondria to oxidative injury. PMID:17113580

  13. Five Xanthomonas type III effectors suppress cell death induced by components of immunity-associated MAP kinase cascades

    PubMed Central

    Teper, Doron; Sunitha, Sukumaran; Martin, Gregory B; Sessa, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades play a fundamental role in signaling of plant immunity and mediate elicitation of cell death. Xanthomonas spp. manipulate plant signaling by using a type III secretion system to deliver effector proteins into host cells. We examined the ability of 33 Xanthomonas effectors to inhibit cell death induced by overexpression of components of MAPK cascades in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Five effectors inhibited cell death induced by overexpression of MAPKKKα and MEK2, but not of MAP3Kϵ. In addition, expression of AvrBs1 in yeast suppressed activation of the high osmolarity glycerol MAPK pathway, suggesting that the target of this effector is conserved in eukaryotic organisms. These results indicate that Xanthomonas employs several type III effectors to suppress immunity-associated cell death mediated by MAPK cascades. PMID:26237448

  14. Programmed cell death in the plant immune system

    PubMed Central

    Coll, N S; Epple, P; Dangl, J L

    2011-01-01

    Cell death has a central role in innate immune responses in both plants and animals. Besides sharing striking convergences and similarities in the overall evolutionary organization of their innate immune systems, both plants and animals can respond to infection and pathogen recognition with programmed cell death. The fact that plant and animal pathogens have evolved strategies to subvert specific cell death modalities emphasizes the essential role of cell death during immune responses. The hypersensitive response (HR) cell death in plants displays morphological features, molecular architectures and mechanisms reminiscent of different inflammatory cell death types in animals (pyroptosis and necroptosis). In this review, we describe the molecular pathways leading to cell death during innate immune responses. Additionally, we present recently discovered caspase and caspase-like networks regulating cell death that have revealed fascinating analogies between cell death control across both kingdoms. PMID:21475301

  15. Cell Death and Autophagy in TB

    PubMed Central

    Moraco, Andrew H.; Kornfeld, Hardy

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis has succeeded in infecting one third of the human race though inhibition or evasion of innate and adaptive immunity. The pathogen is a facultative intracellular parasite that uses the niche provided by mononuclear phagocytes for its advantage. Complex interactions determine whether the bacillus will or will not be delivered to acidified lysosomes, whether the host phagocyte will survive infection or die, and whether the timing and mode of cell death works to the advantage of the host or the pathogen. Here we discuss cell death and autophagy in TB. These fundamental processes of cell biology feature in all aspects of TB pathogenesis and may be exploited to the treatment or prevention of TB disease. PMID:25453227

  16. Blocking CD147 induces cell death in cancer cells through impairment of glycolytic energy metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Miyako Inoue, Masahiro; Itoh, Kazuyuki; Nishizawa, Yasuko

    2008-09-12

    CD147 is a multifunctional transmembrane protein and promotes cancer progression. We found that the anti-human CD147 mouse monoclonal antibody MEM-M6/1 strongly induces necrosis-like cell death in LoVo, HT-29, WiDr, and SW620 colon cancer cells and A2058 melanoma cells, but not in WI-38 and TIG-113 normal fibroblasts. Silencing or overexpression of CD147 in LoVo cells enhanced or decreased the MEM-M6/1 induced cell death, respectively. CD147 is known to form complex with proton-linked monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs), which is critical for lactate transport and intracellular pH (pHi) homeostasis. In LoVo cells, CD147 and MCT-1 co-localized on the cell surface, and MEM-M6/1 inhibited the association of these molecules. MEM-M6/1 inhibited lactate uptake, lactate release, and reduced pHi. Further, the induction of acidification was parallel to the decrease of the glycolytic flux and intracellular ATP levels. These effects were not found in the normal fibroblasts. As cancer cells depend on glycolysis for their energy production, CD147 inhibition might induce cell death specific to cancer cells.

  17. [Cell death in malignant tumors. Relevance of cell death regulation for metastasis].

    PubMed

    Roth, W

    2015-11-01

    Defects in the regulation of cell death are important causes for both the development and therapy resistance of malignant tumors. Several distinct, molecularly defined types of cell death are known, such as apoptosis, anoikis, and necroptosis. Moreover, the specific triggering of cell death plays an important role in the prevention of metastasis. The results of recent studies have shown that various types of cell death are pivotal at different steps of the metastasis cascade, in order to prevent cellular detachment, migration, invasion, intravasation, extravasation and the establishment of micrometastasis and macrometastasis. At the subcellular level, numerous links exist between cell death regulation and metastasis, specifically regarding signaling pathways and individual proteins with dual or multiple functions. As an example, the decoy receptor 3 protein (DcR3) functions both as an anti-apoptotic protein and as a direct promotor of invasion and migration of tumor cells. In summary, the specific triggering of cell death plays a pivotal role for the prevention of metastasis. On the other hand, the stepwise process of metastasis represents a mechanism of selection resulting in established metastases with a multiresistant phenotype which corresponds to the clinical observation that many metastasized cancers are therapy resistant. In the future, innovative diagnostic tests to individually predict the resistance pattern and possibilities to overcome resistance are urgently needed. PMID:26400565

  18. Gingerol sensitizes TRAIL-induced apoptotic cell death of glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dae-Hee; Kim, Dong-Wook; Jung, Chang-Hwa; Lee, Yong J.; Park, Daeho

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal and aggressive astrocytoma of primary brain tumors in adults. Although there are many clinical trials to induce the cell death of glioblastoma cells, most glioblastoma cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Here, we showed that gingerol as a major component of ginger can induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of glioblastoma. Gingerol increased death receptor (DR) 5 levels in a p53-dependent manner. Furthermore, gingerol decreased the expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins (survivin, c-FLIP, Bcl-2, and XIAP) and increased pro-apoptotic protein, Bax and truncate Bid, by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS).We also found that the sensitizing effects of gingerol in TRAIL-induced cell death were blocked by scavenging ROS or overexpressing anti-apoptotic protein (Bcl-2). Therefore, we showed the functions of gingerol as a sensitizing agent to induce cell death of TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma cells. This study gives rise to the possibility of applying gingerol as an anti-tumor agent that can be used for the purpose of combination treatment with TRAIL in TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma tumor therapy. PMID:25034532

  19. Gingerol sensitizes TRAIL-induced apoptotic cell death of glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae-Hee; Kim, Dong-Wook; Jung, Chang-Hwa; Lee, Yong J; Park, Daeho

    2014-09-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal and aggressive astrocytoma of primary brain tumors in adults. Although there are many clinical trials to induce the cell death of glioblastoma cells, most glioblastoma cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Here, we showed that gingerol as a major component of ginger can induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of glioblastoma. Gingerol increased death receptor (DR) 5 levels in a p53-dependent manner. Furthermore, gingerol decreased the expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins (survivin, c-FLIP, Bcl-2, and XIAP) and increased pro-apoptotic protein, Bax and truncate Bid, by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). We also found that the sensitizing effects of gingerol in TRAIL-induced cell death were blocked by scavenging ROS or overexpressing anti-apoptotic protein (Bcl-2). Therefore, we showed the functions of gingerol as a sensitizing agent to induce cell death of TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma cells. This study gives rise to the possibility of applying gingerol as an anti-tumor agent that can be used for the purpose of combination treatment with TRAIL in TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma tumor therapy. PMID:25034532

  20. Protection against Cytokine Toxicity through Endoplasmic Reticulum and Mitochondrial Stress Prevention by Prostacyclin Synthase Overexpression in Insulin-producing Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Gurgul-Convey, Ewa; Lenzen, Sigurd

    2010-01-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus. One of the cytokine-regulated pathways mediating inflammation in this autoimmune disease is the arachidonic acid metabolism pathway, comprising both the induction of cyclooxygenases and the production of different prostaglandins. Cytokine toxicity is mediated in many cell types, including pancreatic β cells through this pathway. Interestingly, some cell types have been shown to be insensitive to such toxicity, and this correlated with a high expression of prostacyclin synthase (PGIS). Using insulin-producing RINm5F cells as a model for pancreatic β cells, PGIS was overexpressed and exhibited a large protective effect against cytokine toxicity. This protective effect of PGIS against cytokine toxicity correlated with a decreased activation of the transcription factor NFκB and the inducible NO synthase promoter as well as a reduced inducible NO synthase protein expression and nitrite production. A reduction in the cytokine-stimulated endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial stress was also found in the PGIS-overexpressing cells. Moreover, cytokine-induced caspase-3 activation and reduction of glucose oxidation and cell proliferation were suppressed. Thus, PGIS overexpression apparently protects insulin-producing cells against cytokine toxicity via suppression of endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial stress-mediated cell death pathways. PMID:20159982

  1. Programmed cell death during quinoa perisperm development

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, Sara

    2013-01-01

    At seed maturity, quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) perisperm consists of uniform, non-living, thin-walled cells full of starch grains. The objective of the present study was to study quinoa perisperm development and describe the programme of cell death that affects the entire tissue. A number of parameters typically measured during programmed cell death (PCD), such as cellular morphological changes in nuclei and cytoplasm, endoreduplication, DNA fragmentation, and the participation of nucleases and caspase-like proteases in nucleus dismantling, were evaluated; morphological changes in cytoplasm included subcellular aspects related to starch accumulation. This study proved that, following fertilization, the perisperm of quinoa simultaneously accumulates storage reserves and degenerates, both processes mediated by a programme of developmentally controlled cell death. The novel findings regarding perisperm development provide a starting point for further research in the Amaranthaceae genera, such as comparing seeds with and without perisperm, and specifying phylogeny and evolution within this taxon. Wherever possible and appropriate, differences between quinoa perisperm and grass starchy endosperm—a morphologically and functionally similar, although genetically different tissue—were highlighted and discussed. PMID:23833197

  2. Role of polyphenols in cell death control.

    PubMed

    Giovannini, Claudio; Masella, Roberta

    2012-05-01

    Dietary consumption of fruit, vegetables, fish, and olive oil has been demonstrated to exert beneficial effects on human health. This finding may be due to the high content of antioxidant compounds including polyphenols. Current evidence strongly supports a contribution of polyphenols to the prevention of several chronic degenerative diseases such as cancer, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases, central nervous system disorders, as well as aging. Apoptosis is a genetically controlled and evolutionarily conserved form of cell death of critical importance for the maintenance of tissue homeostasis in the adult organism. The malfunction of the death machinery may play a primary role in various pathologic processes, leading to proliferative or degenerative diseases. Polyphenols can interact with specific steps and/or proteins regulating the apoptotic process in different ways depending on their concentration, the cell system, the type or stage of the pathological process. Because of their ability to modulate cell death, polyphenols have been proposed as chemopreventive and therapeutic agents. This paper reviews and discusses the last 3-year findings related to the principal molecular mechanisms involved in the control of the balance between apoptosis and cell proliferation exerted by polyphenols. PMID:22584012

  3. Impairment of antioxidant defense via glutathione depletion sensitizes acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells for Smac mimetic-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Schoeneberger, H; Belz, K; Schenk, B; Fulda, S

    2015-07-30

    Evasion of apoptosis in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is linked to aberrant expression of inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins and dysregulated redox homeostasis, rendering leukemic cells vulnerable to redox-targeting therapies. Here we discover that inhibition of antioxidant defenses via glutathione (GSH) depletion by buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) primes ALL cells for apoptosis induced by the Smac mimetic BV6 that antagonizes IAP proteins. Similarly, BSO cooperates with BV6 to induce cell death in patient-derived primary leukemic samples, underscoring the clinical relevance. In contrast, BSO does not sensitize non-malignant lymphohematopoietic cells from healthy donors toward BV6, pointing to some tumor selectivity. Mechanistically, both agents cooperate to stimulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, which is required for BSO/BV6-induced cell death, as ROS inhibitors (that is, N-acetylcysteine, MnTBAP, Trolox) significantly rescue cell death. Further, BSO and BV6 cooperate to trigger lipid peroxidation, which is necessary for cell death, as genetic or pharmacological blockage of lipid peroxidation by GSH peroxidase 4 (GPX4) overexpression or α-tocopherol significantly inhibits BSO/BV6-mediated cell death. Consistently, GPX4 knockdown or GPX4 inhibitor RSL3 enhances lipid peroxidation and cell death by BSO/BV6 cotreatment. The discovery of redox regulation of Smac mimetic-induced cell death has important implications for developing rational Smac mimetic-based combination therapies. PMID:25381820

  4. Dasatinib Induces Autophagic Cell Death in Human Ovarian Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Le, Xiao-Feng; Mao, Weiqun; Lu, Zhen; Carter, Bing Z.; Bast, Robert C.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Dasatinib, an inhibitor of Src/Abl family kinases, can inhibit tumor growth of a number of solid tumors. However, the effect and mechanism of action of dasatinib in human ovarian cancer cells remains unknown. METHODS Dasatinib-induced autophagy was determined by acridine orange staining, punctate localization of GFP-LC3, LC3 protein blotting and electron microscopy. Significance of Beclin-1, AKT and Bcl-2 in dasatinib-induced autophagy and growth inhibition was assayed by small interfering RNA silencing and/or overexpression of gene of interest. RESULTS Dasatinib inhibited cell growth by inducing little apoptosis, but substantial autophagy in SKOv3 and HEY ovarian cancer cells. In vivo studies showed dasatinib inhibited tumor growth and induced both autophagy and apoptosis in a HEY xenograft model. Knockdown of Beclin 1 and Atg12 expression with their respective siRNAs diminished dasatinib-induced autophagy, whereas knockdown of p27Kip1 with specific siRNAs did not. shRNA knockdown of Beclin-1 expression reduced dasatinib-induced autophagy and growth inhibition. Dasatinib reduced the phosphorylation of AKT, mTOR, p70S6K and S6 kinase expression. Constitutive expression of AKT1 and AKT2 inhibited dasatinib-induced autophagy in both HEY and SKOv3 cells. Dasatinib also reduced Bcl-2 expression and activity. Overexpression of Bcl-2 partially prevented dasatinib-induced autophagy. CONCLUSIONS We conclude that dasatinib induces autophagic cell death in ovarian cancer that partially depends on Beclin-1, AKT and Bcl-2. These results may have implications for clinical use of dasatinib. PMID:20629079

  5. Romo1 expression contributes to oxidative stress-induced death of lung epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Jung Ar; Chung, Jin Sil; Cho, Sang-Ho; Kim, Hyung Jung; Yoo, Young Do

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: •Romo1 mediates oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial ROS production. •Romo1 induction by oxidative stress plays an important role in oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. •Romo1 overexpression correlates with epithelial cell death in patients with IPF. -- Abstract: Oxidant-mediated death of lung epithelial cells due to cigarette smoking plays an important role in pathogenesis in lung diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). However, the exact mechanism by which oxidants induce epithelial cell death is not fully understood. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) modulator 1 (Romo1) is localized in the mitochondria and mediates mitochondrial ROS production through complex III of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Here, we show that Romo1 mediates mitochondrial ROS production and apoptosis induced by oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells. Hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) treatment increased Romo1 expression, and Romo1 knockdown suppressed the cellular ROS levels and cell death triggered by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment. In immunohistochemical staining of lung tissues from patients with IPF, Romo1 was mainly localized in hyperplastic alveolar and bronchial epithelial cells. Romo1 overexpression was detected in 14 of 18 patients with IPF. TUNEL-positive alveolar epithelial cells were also detected in most patients with IPF but not in normal controls. These findings suggest that Romo1 mediates apoptosis induced by oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells.

  6. Effect of glutamine limitation on the death of attached Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfeliu, A.; Stephanopoulos, G. )

    1999-07-05

    The effect of glutamine depletion on the death of attached Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells was investigated. Experiments were performed using an anchorage dependent CHO cell line expressing [gamma]-IFN and a second cell line obtained by transfection of that cell line with the human bcl-2 (hbcl-2). Either cell line could grow in media devoid of glutamine with minimal cell death due to endogenous glutamine synthetase activity that allowed cells to synthesize glutamine from glutamic acid in the medium. However, compared to control cultures in glutamine-containing media, the cell growth rate in glutamine-free media was slower with an increased fraction of cells distributed in the G[sub 0]/G[sub 1] phase. The slower rate of cell cycling apparently protected the cells from entering apoptosis when they were stimulated to proliferate in an environment devoid of other protective factors, such as serum or over-expressed hbcl-2. The depletion of both glutamine and glutamic acid did cause cell death, which could be mitigated by hbcl-2 over-expression.

  7. Regulated cell death in diagnostic histopathology.

    PubMed

    Skenderi, Faruk; Vranic, Semir; Damjanov, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Regulated cell death (RCD) is a controlled cellular process, essential for normal development, tissue integrity and homeostasis, and its dysregulation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various conditions including developmental and immunological disorders, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer. In this review, we briefly discuss the historical perspective and conceptual development of RCD, we overview recent classifications and some of the key players in RCD; finally we focus on current applications of RCD in diagnostic histopathology. PMID:26009238

  8. Cell death and deubiquitinases: perspectives in cancer.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Seemana; Ghosh, Mrinal Kanti

    2014-01-01

    The process of cell death has important physiological implications. At the organism level it is mostly involved in maintenance of tissue homeostasis. At the cellular level, the strategies of cell death may be categorized as either suicide or sabotage. The mere fact that many of these processes are programmed and that these are often deregulated in pathological conditions is seed to thought. The various players that are involved in these pathways are highly regulated. One of the modes of regulation is via post-translational modifications such as ubiquitination and deubiquitination. In this review, we have first dealt with the different modes and pathways involved in cell death and then we have focused on the regulation of several proteins in these signaling cascades by the different deubiquitinating enzymes, in the perspective of cancer. The study of deubiquitinases is currently in a rather nascent stage with limited knowledge both in vitro and in vivo, but the emerging roles of the deubiquitinases in various processes and their specificity have implicated them as potential targets from the therapeutic point of view. This review throws light on another aspect of cancer therapeutics by targeting the deubiquitinating enzymes. PMID:25121098

  9. Cell Death and Deubiquitinases: Perspectives in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Seemana

    2014-01-01

    The process of cell death has important physiological implications. At the organism level it is mostly involved in maintenance of tissue homeostasis. At the cellular level, the strategies of cell death may be categorized as either suicide or sabotage. The mere fact that many of these processes are programmed and that these are often deregulated in pathological conditions is seed to thought. The various players that are involved in these pathways are highly regulated. One of the modes of regulation is via post-translational modifications such as ubiquitination and deubiquitination. In this review, we have first dealt with the different modes and pathways involved in cell death and then we have focused on the regulation of several proteins in these signaling cascades by the different deubiquitinating enzymes, in the perspective of cancer. The study of deubiquitinases is currently in a rather nascent stage with limited knowledge both in vitro and in vivo, but the emerging roles of the deubiquitinases in various processes and their specificity have implicated them as potential targets from the therapeutic point of view. This review throws light on another aspect of cancer therapeutics by targeting the deubiquitinating enzymes. PMID:25121098

  10. Programmed Cell Death of Dendritic Cells in Immune Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Min; Wang, Jin

    2010-01-01

    Summary Programmed cell death is essential for the maintenance of lymphocyte homeostasis and immune tolerance. Dendritic cells (DCs), the most efficient antigen presenting cells, represent a small cell population in the immune system. However, DCs play major roles in the regulation of both innate and adaptive immune responses. Programmed cell death in DCs is essential for regulating DC homeostasis and consequently, the scope of immune responses. Interestingly, different DC subsets show varied turnover rates in vivo. The conventional DCs are relatively short-lived in most lymphoid organs, while plasmacytoid DCs are long-lived cells. Mitochondrion-dependent programmed cell death plays an important role in regulating spontaneous DC turnover. Antigen-specific T cells are also capable of killing DCs, thereby providing a mechanism for negative feedback regulation of immune responses. It has been shown that a surplus of DCs due to defects in programmed cell death leads to overactivation of lymphocytes and the onset of autoimmunity. Studying programmed cell death in DCs will shed light on the roles for DC turnover in the regulation of the duration and magnitude of immune responses in vivo, and in the maintenance of immune tolerance. PMID:20636805

  11. Overexpression of Cathepsin L is associated with gefitinib resistance in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Cui, F; Wang, W; Wu, D; He, X; Wu, J; Wang, M

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer, the most common malignancy, is still the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for 80 % of all lung cancers. Recent studies showed Cathepsin L (CTSL) is overexpressed in various cancerous tissues; however, the association between CTSL expression and EGFR-TKI resistance remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the expression of CTSL in lung cancer specimens and matched normal tissues by quantitative real-time PCR and IHC. The functional role of CTSL in resistant PC-9/GR cell line was investigated by proliferation and apoptosis analysis compared with control PC-9 cells. Our results found that the level of CTSL expression was higher in NSCLC tissues compared with matched normal adjacent tissue samples, and CTSL was more highly expressed in PC-9/GR cells compared to PC-9 cells. Knocking-down of CTSL in PC-9/GR cells could decrease cell proliferation and potentiate apoptosis induced by gefitinib, suggesting CTSL may contribute to gefitinib resistance in NSCLC. CTSL might be explored as a candidate of therapeutic target for modulating EGFR-TKI sensitivity in NSCLC. PMID:26474873

  12. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter protein MCU is involved in oxidative stress-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yajin; Hao, Yumin; Chen, Hong; He, Qing; Yuan, Zengqiang; Cheng, Jinbo

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) is a conserved Ca(2+) transporter at mitochondrial in eukaryotic cells. However, the role of MCU protein in oxidative stress-induced cell death remains unclear. Here, we showed that ectopically expressed MCU is mitochondrial localized in both HeLa and primary cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). Knockdown of endogenous MCU decreases mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake following histamine stimulation and attenuates cell death induced by oxidative stress in both HeLa cells and CGNs. We also found MCU interacts with VDAC1 and mediates VDAC1 overexpression-induced cell death in CGNs. This finding demonstrates that MCU-VDAC1 complex regulates mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and oxidative stress-induced apoptosis, which might represent therapeutic targets for oxidative stress related diseases. PMID:25753332

  13. Current and Emerging Biomarkers of Cell Death in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kongning; Wu, Deng; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Ting; Zhang, Lu; Yi, Ying; Miao, Zhengqiang; Jin, Nana; Bi, Xiaoman; Wang, Hongwei; Wang, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Cell death is a critical biological process, serving many important functions within multicellular organisms. Aberrations in cell death can contribute to the pathology of human diseases. Significant progress made in the research area enormously speeds up our understanding of the biochemical and molecular mechanisms of cell death. According to the distinct morphological and biochemical characteristics, cell death can be triggered by extrinsic or intrinsic apoptosis, regulated necrosis, autophagic cell death, and mitotic catastrophe. Nevertheless, the realization that all of these efforts seek to pursue an effective treatment and cure for the disease has spurred a significant interest in the development of promising biomarkers of cell death to early diagnose disease and accurately predict disease progression and outcome. In this review, we summarize recent knowledge about cell death, survey current and emerging biomarkers of cell death, and discuss the relationship with human diseases. PMID:24949464

  14. Recurrent CDK1 overexpression in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bednarek, K; Kiwerska, K; Szaumkessel, M; Bodnar, M; Kostrzewska-Poczekaj, M; Marszalek, A; Janiszewska, J; Bartochowska, A; Jackowska, J; Wierzbicka, M; Grenman, R; Szyfter, K; Giefing, M; Jarmuz-Szymczak, M

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we analyzed the expression profile of four genes (CCNA2, CCNB1, CCNB2, and CDK1) in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) cell lines and tumor samples. With the application of microarray platform, we have shown the overexpression of these genes in all analyzed LSCC samples in comparison to non-cancer controls from head and neck region. We have selected CDK1 for further analysis, due to its leading role in cell cycle regulation. It is a member of the Ser/Thr protein kinase family of proven oncogenic properties. The results obtained for CDK1 were further confirmed with the application of reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) technique, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry (IHC). The observed upregulation of CDK1 in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma has encouraged us to analyze for genetic mechanisms that can be responsible this phenomenon. Therefore, with the application of array-CGH, sequencing analysis and two methods for epigenetic regulation analysis (DNA methylation and miRNA expression), we tried to identify such potential mechanisms. Our attempts to identify the molecular mechanisms responsible for observed changes failed as we did not observe significant alterations neither in the DNA sequence nor in the gene copy number that could underline CDK1 upregulation. Similarly, the pyrosequencing and miRNA expression analyses did not reveal any differences in methylation level and miRNA expression, respectively; thus, these mechanisms probably do not contribute to elevation of CDK1 expression in LSCC. However, our results suggest that alteration of CDK1 expression on both mRNA and protein level probably appears on the very early step of carcinogenesis. PMID:26912061

  15. Cellular functions of programmed cell death 5.

    PubMed

    Li, Ge; Ma, Dalong; Chen, Yingyu

    2016-04-01

    Programmed cell death 5 (PDCD5) was originally identified as an apoptosis-accelerating protein that is widely expressed and has been well conserved during the process of evolution. PDCD5 has complex biological functions, including programmed cell death and immune regulation. It can accelerate apoptosis in different type of cells in response to different stimuli. During this process, PDCD5 rapidly translocates from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. PDCD5 regulates the activities of TIP60, HDAC3, MDM2 and TP53 transcription factors. These proteins form part of a signaling network that is disrupted in most, if not all, cancer cells. Recent evidence suggests that PDCD5 participates in immune regulation by promoting regulatory T cell function via the PDCD5-TIP60-FOXP3 pathway. The stability and expression of PDCD5 are finely regulated by other molecules, such as NF-κB p65, OTUD5, YAF2 and DNAJB1. PDCD5 is phosphorylated by CK2 at Ser119, which is required for nuclear translocation in response to genotoxic stress. In this review, we describe what is known about PDCD5 and its cellular functions. PMID:26775586

  16. Cell Death Control by Matrix Metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Dirk; Gomez-Barrera, Juan A; Pasule, Christian; Brack-Frick, Ursula B; Sieferer, Elke; Nicholson, Tim M; Pfannstiel, Jens; Stintzi, Annick; Schaller, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    In contrast to mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that play important roles in the remodeling of the extracellular matrix in animals, the proteases responsible for dynamic modifications of the plant cell wall are largely unknown. A possible involvement of MMPs was addressed by cloning and functional characterization of Sl2-MMP and Sl3-MMP from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). The two tomato MMPs were found to resemble mammalian homologs with respect to gelatinolytic activity, substrate preference for hydrophobic amino acids on both sides of the scissile bond, and catalytic properties. In transgenic tomato seedlings silenced for Sl2/3-MMP expression, necrotic lesions were observed at the base of the hypocotyl. Cell death initiated in the epidermis and proceeded to include outer cortical cell layers. In later developmental stages, necrosis spread, covering the entire stem and extending into the leaves of MMP-silenced plants. The subtilisin-like protease P69B was identified as a substrate of Sl2- and Sl3-MMP. P69B was shown to colocalize with Sl-MMPs in the apoplast of the tomato hypocotyl, it exhibited increased stability in transgenic plants silenced for Sl-MMP activity, and it was cleaved and inactivated by Sl-MMPs in vitro. The induction of cell death in Sl2/3-MMP-silenced plants depended on P69B, indicating that Sl2- and Sl3-MMP act upstream of P69B in an extracellular proteolytic cascade that contributes to the regulation of cell death in tomato. PMID:27208293

  17. Mitochondrial fusion is regulated by Reaper to modulate Drosophila programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Thomenius, M; Freel, C D; Horn, S; Krieser, R; Abdelwahid, E; Cannon, R; Balasundaram, S; White, K; Kornbluth, S

    2011-10-01

    In most multicellular organisms, the decision to undergo programmed cell death in response to cellular damage or developmental cues is typically transmitted through mitochondria. It has been suggested that an exception is the apoptotic pathway of Drosophila melanogaster, in which the role of mitochondria remains unclear. Although IAP antagonists in Drosophila such as Reaper, Hid and Grim may induce cell death without mitochondrial membrane permeabilization, it is surprising that all three localize to mitochondria. Moreover, induction of Reaper and Hid appears to result in mitochondrial fragmentation during Drosophila cell death. Most importantly, disruption of mitochondrial fission can inhibit Reaper and Hid-induced cell death, suggesting that alterations in mitochondrial dynamics can modulate cell death in fly cells. We report here that Drosophila Reaper can induce mitochondrial fragmentation by binding to and inhibiting the pro-fusion protein MFN2 and its Drosophila counterpart dMFN/Marf. Our in vitro and in vivo analyses reveal that dMFN overexpression can inhibit cell death induced by Reaper or γ-irradiation. In addition, knockdown of dMFN causes a striking loss of adult wing tissue and significant apoptosis in the developing wing discs. Our findings are consistent with a growing body of work describing a role for mitochondrial fission and fusion machinery in the decision of cells to die. PMID:21475305

  18. Mitochondrial fusion is regulated by Reaper to modulate Drosophila programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Thomenius, M; Freel, C D; Horn, S; Krieser, R; Abdelwahid, E; Cannon, R; Balasundaram, S; White, K; Kornbluth, S

    2011-01-01

    In most multicellular organisms, the decision to undergo programmed cell death in response to cellular damage or developmental cues is typically transmitted through mitochondria. It has been suggested that an exception is the apoptotic pathway of Drosophila melanogaster, in which the role of mitochondria remains unclear. Although IAP antagonists in Drosophila such as Reaper, Hid and Grim may induce cell death without mitochondrial membrane permeabilization, it is surprising that all three localize to mitochondria. Moreover, induction of Reaper and Hid appears to result in mitochondrial fragmentation during Drosophila cell death. Most importantly, disruption of mitochondrial fission can inhibit Reaper and Hid-induced cell death, suggesting that alterations in mitochondrial dynamics can modulate cell death in fly cells. We report here that Drosophila Reaper can induce mitochondrial fragmentation by binding to and inhibiting the pro-fusion protein MFN2 and its Drosophila counterpart dMFN/Marf. Our in vitro and in vivo analyses reveal that dMFN overexpression can inhibit cell death induced by Reaper or γ-irradiation. In addition, knockdown of dMFN causes a striking loss of adult wing tissue and significant apoptosis in the developing wing discs. Our findings are consistent with a growing body of work describing a role for mitochondrial fission and fusion machinery in the decision of cells to die. PMID:21475305

  19. Autophagic cell death: Loch Ness monster or endangered species?

    PubMed

    Shen, Han-Ming; Codogno, Patrice

    2011-05-01

    The concept of autophagic cell death was first established based on observations of increased autophagic markers in dying cells. The major limitation of such a morphology-based definition of autophagic cell death is that it fails to establish the functional role of autophagy in the cell death process, and thus contributes to the confusion in the literature regarding the role of autophagy in cell death and cell survival. Here we propose to define autophagic cell death as a modality of non-apoptotic or necrotic programmed cell death in which autophagy serves as a cell death mechanism, upon meeting the following set of criteria: (i) cell death occurs without the involvement of apoptosis; (ii) there is an increase of autophagic flux, and not just an increase of the autophagic markers, in the dying cells; and (iii) suppression of autophagy via both pharmacological inhibitors and genetic approaches is able to rescue or prevent cell death. In light of this new definition, we will discuss some of the common problems and difficulties in the study of autophagic cell death and also revisit some well-reported cases of autophagic cell death, aiming to achieve a better understanding of whether autophagy is a real killer, an accomplice or just an innocent bystander in the course of cell death. At present, the physiological relevance of autophagic cell death is mainly observed in lower eukaryotes and invertebrates such as Dictyostelium discoideum and Drosophila melanogaster. We believe that such a clear definition of autophagic cell death will help us study and understand the physiological or pathological relevance of autophagic cell death in mammals. PMID:21150268

  20. Macrophage-Mediated Trogocytosis Leads to Death of Antibody-Opsonized Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Velmurugan, Ramraj; Challa, Dilip K; Ram, Sripad; Ober, Raimund J; Ward, E Sally

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the complex behavior of effector cells such as monocytes or macrophages in regulating cancerous growth is of central importance for cancer immunotherapy. Earlier studies using CD20-specific antibodies have demonstrated that the Fcγ receptor (FcγR)-mediated transfer of the targeted receptors from tumor cells to these effector cells through trogocytosis can enable escape from antibody therapy, leading to the viewpoint that this process is protumorigenic. In the current study, we demonstrate that persistent trogocytic attack results in the killing of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells. Further, antibody engineering to increase FcγR interactions enhances this tumoricidal activity. These studies extend the complex repertoire of activities of macrophages to trogocytic-mediated cell death of HER2-overexpressing target cells and have implications for the development of effective antibody-based therapies. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(8); 1879-89. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27226489

  1. Comparison of Types of Cell Death: Apoptosis and Necrosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Francis; Zuzel, Katherine

    2003-01-01

    Cell death is an essential factor in many biological processes including development. Discusses two types of cell death: (1) necrosis (induced by sodium azide); and (2) apoptosis (induced by sodium chromate). Illustrates key features that differ between these two types of cells death including loss of membrane integrity and internucleosomal DNA…

  2. ACCELERATED CELL DEATH2 suppresses mitochondrial oxidative bursts and modulates cell death in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Pattanayak, Gopal K.; Venkataramani, Sujatha; Hortensteiner, Stefan; Kunz, Lukas; Christ, Bastien; Moulin, Michael; Smith, Alison G.; Okamoto, Yukihiro; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Sugishima, Masakazu; Greenberg, Jean T.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The Arabidopsis ACCELERATED CELL DEATH 2 (ACD2) protein protects cells from programmed cell death (PCD) caused by endogenous porphyrin-related molecules like red chlorophyll catabolite or exogenous protoporphyrin IX. We previously found that during bacterial infection, ACD2, a chlorophyll breakdown enzyme, localizes to both chloroplasts and mitochondria in leaves. Additionally, acd2 cells show mitochondrial dysfunctions. In plants with acd2 and ACD2+ sectors, ACD2 functions cell autonomously, implicating a pro-death ACD2 substrate as cell non-autonomous in promoting spreading PCD. ACD2 targeted solely to mitochondria can reduce the accumulation of an ACD2 substrate that originates in chloroplasts, indicating that ACD2 substrate molecules are likely mobile within cells. Two different light-dependent reactive oxygen bursts in mitochondria play prominent and causal roles in the acd2 PCD phenotype. Finally, ACD2 can complement acd2 when targeted to mitochondria or chloroplasts, respectively, as long as it is catalytically active; the ability to bind substrate is not sufficient for ACD2 to function in vitro or in vivo. Together the data suggest that ACD2 localizes dynamically during infection to protect cells from pro-death mobile substrate molecules, some of which may originate in chloroplasts, but have major effects on mitochondria. PMID:21988537

  3. Overexpression of uncoupling protein 2 inhibits the high glucose-induced apoptosis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    HE, YING; LUAN, ZHOU; FU, XUNAN; XU, XUN

    2016-01-01

    Ectopic apoptosis of vascular cells plays a critical role in the early stage development of diabetic retinopathy (DR). Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) is a mitochondrial modulator which protects against endothelial dysfunction. However, the role which UCP2 plays in endothelial apoptosis and its association with DR was unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether UCP2 functioned as an inhibitor of DR in endothelial cells. Firstly, we noted that in UCP2-knockout mice retinal cell death and damage in vivo was similar to that of db/db diabetic mice. Additionally, UCP2 knockdown induced caspase-3 activation and exaggerated high glucose (HG)-induced apoptosis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Conversely, adenovirus-mediated UCP2 overexpression inhibited the apoptosis of HUVECs and HG-induced caspase-3 activation. Furthermore, HG treatment resulted in the opening of the permeability transition pore (PTP) and liberation of cytochrome c from mitochondria to the cytosol in HUVECs. Notably, UCP2 overexpression inhibited these processes. Furthermore, adenovirus-mediated UCP2 overexpression led to a significant increase in intracellular nitric oxide (NO) levels and a decrease in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in HUVECs. Collectively, these data suggest that UCP2 plays an anti-apoptotic role in endothelial cells. Thus, we suggest that approaches which augment UCP2 expression in vascular endothelial cells aid in preventing the early stage development and progression of DR. PMID:26846204

  4. Baicalein induces programmed cell death in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Dai, Bao-Di; Cao, Ying-Ying; Huang, Shan; Xu, Yong-Gang; Gao, Ping-Hui; Wang, Yan; Jiang, Yuan-Ying

    2009-08-01

    Recent evidence has revealed the occurrence of an apoptotic phenotype in Candida albicans that is inducible with environmental stresses such as acetic acid, hydrogen peroxide, and amphotericin B. In the present study, we found that the Chinese herbal medicine Baicalein (BE), which was one of the skullcapflavones, can induce apoptosis in C. albicans. The apoptotic effects of BE were detected by flow cytometry using Annexin V-FITC and DAPI, and it was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy analysis. After exposure to 4 microg/ml BE for 12 h, about 10% of C. albicans cells were apoptotic. Both the increasing intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and upregulation of some redox-related genes (CAP1, SOD2, TRR1) were observed. Furthermore, we compared the survivals of CAP1 deleted, wild-type, and overexpressed strains and found that Cap1p attenuated BE-initiated cell death, which was coherent with a higher mRNA level of the CAP1 gene. In addition, the mitochondrial membrane potential of C. albicans cells changed significantly ( p<0.001) upon BE treatment compared with control. Taken together, our results indicate that BE treatment induces apoptosis in C.albicans cells, and the apoptosis was associated with the breakdown of mitochondrial membrane potential. PMID:19734718

  5. Inhibition of caspases prevents ototoxic and ongoing hair cell death

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsui, Jonathan I.; Ogilvie, Judith M.; Warchol, Mark E.

    2002-01-01

    Sensory hair cells die after acoustic trauma or ototoxic insults, but the signal transduction pathways that mediate hair cell death are not known. Here we identify several important signaling events that regulate the death of vestibular hair cells. Chick utricles were cultured in media supplemented with the ototoxic antibiotic neomycin and selected pharmacological agents that influence signaling molecules in cell death pathways. Hair cells that were treated with neomycin exhibited classically defined apoptotic morphologies such as condensed nuclei and fragmented DNA. Inhibition of protein synthesis (via treatment with cycloheximide) increased hair cell survival after treatment with neomycin, suggesting that hair cell death requires de novo protein synthesis. Finally, the inhibition of caspases promoted hair cell survival after neomycin treatment. Sensory hair cells in avian vestibular organs also undergo continual cell death and replacement throughout mature life. It is unclear whether the loss of hair cells stimulates the proliferation of supporting cells or whether the production of new cells triggers the death of hair cells. We examined the effects of caspase inhibition on spontaneous hair cell death in the chick utricle. Caspase inhibitors reduced the amount of ongoing hair cell death and ongoing supporting cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. In isolated sensory epithelia, however, caspase inhibitors did not affect supporting cell proliferation directly. Our data indicate that ongoing hair cell death stimulates supporting cell proliferation in the mature utricle.

  6. Taip2 is a novel cell death-related gene expressed in the brain during development

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Kazumi; Akiyama, Nobutake; Yamada, Shuichi; Tanaka, Hiromitsu; Saito, Saburo; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Kizaka-Kondoh, Shinae

    2008-05-02

    TAIP2 was isolated as one of the homologous genes of TAIP3 (TGF-{beta}-up-regulated apoptosis-inducing-protein chromosome 3). The transcript of the mouse counterpart of TAIP2, designated mTaip2, was detected in several tissue specimens from embryos to adults, while mTaip2 was dominantly expressed in the embryonic brain. The overexpression of the full-length mTaip2 induced cell death in various cell lines. An analysis of mTaip2 deletion mutants revealed that the N-terminal half of mTaip2, but not the C-terminal half, had nuclear localization and cell death-inducing activities. The results indicate that mTaip2 is a novel cell death-related gene dominantly expressed in the embryonic brain, thus suggesting that mTaip2 may play a role in development of the brain.

  7. Apoptosis, oncosis, and necrosis. An overview of cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Majno, G.; Joris, I.

    1995-01-01

    The historical development of the cell death concept is reviewed, with special attention to the origin of the terms necrosis, coagulation necrosis, autolysis, physiological cell death, programmed cell death, chromatolysis (the first name of apoptosis in 1914), karyorhexis, karyolysis, and cell suicide, of which there are three forms: by lysosomes, by free radicals, and by a genetic mechanism (apoptosis). Some of the typical features of apoptosis are discussed, such as budding (as opposed to blebbing and zeiosis) and the inflammatory response. For cell death not by apoptosis the most satisfactory term is accidental cell death. Necrosis is commonly used but it is not appropriate, because it does not indicate a form of cell death but refers to changes secondary to cell death by any mechanism, including apoptosis. Abundant data are available on one form of accidental cell death, namely ischemic cell death, which can be considered an entity of its own, caused by failure of the ionic pumps of the plasma membrane. Because ischemic cell death (in known models) is accompanied by swelling, the name oncosis is proposed for this condition. The term oncosis (derived from ónkos, meaning swelling) was proposed in 1910 by von Reckling-hausen precisely to mean cell death with swelling. Oncosis leads to necrosis with karyolysis and stands in contrast to apoptosis, which leads to necrosis with karyorhexis and cell shrinkage. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:7856735

  8. How Heme Oxygenase-1 Prevents Heme-Induced Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Lanceta, Lilibeth; Mattingly, Jacob M.

    2015-01-01

    Earlier observations indicate that free heme is selectively toxic to cells lacking heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) but how this enzyme prevents heme toxicity remains unexplained. Here, using A549 (human lung cancer) and immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells incubated with exogenous heme, we find knock-down of HO-1 using siRNA does promote the accumulation of cell-associated heme and heme-induced cell death. However, it appears that the toxic effects of heme are exerted by “loose” (probably intralysosomal) iron because cytotoxic effects of heme are lessened by pre-incubation of HO-1 deficient cells with desferrioxamine (which localizes preferentially in the lysosomal compartment). Desferrioxamine also decreases lysosomal rupture promoted by intracellularly generated hydrogen peroxide. Supporting the importance of endogenous oxidant production, both chemical and siRNA inhibition of catalase activity predisposes HO-1 deficient cells to heme-mediated killing. Importantly, it appears that HO-1 deficiency somehow blocks the induction of ferritin; control cells exposed to heme show ~10-fold increases in ferritin heavy chain expression whereas in heme-exposed HO-1 deficient cells ferritin expression is unchanged. Finally, overexpression of ferritin H chain in HO-1 deficient cells completely prevents heme-induced cytotoxicity. Although two other products of HO-1 activity–CO and bilirubin–have been invoked to explain HO-1-mediated cytoprotection, we conclude that, at least in this experimental system, HO-1 activity triggers the induction of ferritin and the latter is actually responsible for the cytoprotective effects of HO-1 activity. PMID:26270345

  9. Adenovirus-Mediated Over-Expression of Nrf2 Within Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) Protected Rats Against Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadzadeh-Vardin, Mohammad; Habibi Roudkenar, Mehryar; Jahanian-Najafabadi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Recent developments in the field of cell therapy have led to a renewed interest in treatment of acute kidney injury (AKI). However, the early death of transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in stressful microenvironment of a recipient tissue is a major problem with this kind of treatment. The objective of this study was to determine whether overexpression of a cytoprotective factor, nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 (Nrf2), in MSCs could protect rats against AKI. Methods: The Nrf2 was overexpressed in MSCs by recombinant adenoviruses, and the MSCs were implanted to rats suffering from cisplatin-induced AKI. Results: The obtained results showed that transplantation with the engineered MSCs ameliorates cisplatin-induced AKI. Morphologic features of the investigated kidneys showed that transplantation with the MSCs in which Nrf2 had been overexpressed significantly improved the complications of AKI. Conclusion: These findings suggested that the engineered MSCs might be a good candidate to be further evaluated in clinical trials. However, detailed studies must be performed to investigate the possible carcinogenic effect of Nrf2 overexpression. PMID:26236658

  10. Melting Behaviour of Cell Death Lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Sherry; Sot, Jesus; Goni, Felix; Thewalt, Jenifer

    2009-05-01

    Sphingomyelin is a major lipid constituent of mammalian cell plasma membranes. It is converted into ceramide during programmed cell death. It is hypothesized that this conversion induces a structural change in membranes that is responsible for downstream signaling. To characterize these structural changes, deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is used to create a concentration-temperature phase diagram of palmitoyl sphingomyelin:ceramide multilamellar vesicles in excess water between 0-40 mol% ceramide and 25-80^oC. The two lipids are fully miscible at high temperatures and at 40 mol% ceramide. A variety of solid-liquid coexistence phase behavior is observed at lower concentrations. With increasing ceramide content, a gel phase is observed at progressively higher temperatures, implying that at physiological temperature, ceramide may increase the gel phase propensity of cell membranes.

  11. Programmed Cell Death in Unicellular Phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Bidle, Kay D

    2016-07-11

    Unicellular, planktonic, prokaryotic and eukaryotic photoautotrophs (phytoplankton) have an ancient evolutionary history on Earth during which time they have played key roles in the regulation of marine food webs, biogeochemical cycles, and Earth's climate. Since they represent the basis of aquatic ecosystems, the manner in which phytoplankton die critically determines the flow and fate of photosynthetically fixed organic matter (and associated elements), ultimately constraining nutrient flow. Programmed cell death (PCD) and associated pathway genes, which are triggered by a variety of abiotic (nutrient, light, osmotic) and biotic (virus infection, allelopathy) environmental stresses, have an integral grip on cell fate, and have shaped the ecological success and evolutionary trajectory of diverse phytoplankton lineages. A combination of physiological, biochemical, and genetic techniques in model algal systems has demonstrated a conserved molecular and mechanistic framework of stress surveillance, signaling, and death activation pathways, involving collective and coordinated participation of organelles, redox enzymes, metabolites, and caspase-like proteases. This mechanistic understanding has provided insight into the integration of sensing and transduction of stress signals into cellular responses, and the mechanistic interfaces between PCD, cell stress and virus infection pathways. It has also provided insight into the evolution of PCD in unicellular photoautotrophs, the impact of PCD on the fate of natural phytoplankton assemblages and its role in aquatic biogeochemical cycles. PMID:27404255

  12. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate Dehydrogenase Aggregate Formation Participates in Oxidative Stress-induced Cell Death*

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Hidemitsu; Amano, Wataru; Kubo, Takeya; Fukuhara, Ayano; Ihara, Hideshi; Azuma, Yasu-Taka; Tajima, Hisao; Inui, Takashi; Sawa, Akira; Takeuchi, Tadayoshi

    2009-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH)2 is a classic glycolytic enzyme that also mediates cell death by its nuclear translocation under oxidative stress. Meanwhile, we previously presented that oxidative stress induced disulfide-bonded GAPDH aggregation in vitro. Here, we propose that GAPDH aggregate formation might participate in oxidative stress-induced cell death both in vitro and in vivo. We show that human GAPDH amyloid-like aggregate formation depends on the active site cysteine-152 (Cys-152) in vitro. In SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma, treatment with dopamine decreases the cell viability concentration-dependently (IC50 = 202 μm). Low concentrations of dopamine (50–100 μm) mainly cause nuclear translocation of GAPDH, whereas the levels of GAPDH aggregates correlate with high concentrations of dopamine (200–300 μm)-induced cell death. Doxycycline-inducible overexpression of wild-type GAPDH in SH-SY5Y, but not the Cys-152-substituted mutant (C152A-GAPDH), accelerates cell death accompanying both endogenous and exogenous GAPDH aggregate formation in response to high concentrations of dopamine. Deprenyl, a blocker of GAPDH nuclear translocation, fails to inhibit the aggregation both in vitro and in cells but reduced cell death in SH-SY5Y treated with only a low concentration of dopamine (100 μm). These results suggest that GAPDH participates in oxidative stress-induced cell death via an alternative mechanism in which aggregation but not nuclear translocation of GAPDH plays a role. Moreover, we observe endogenous GAPDH aggregate formation in nigra-striatum dopaminergic neurons after methamphetamine treatment in mice. In transgenic mice overexpressing wild-type GAPDH, increased dopaminergic neuron loss and GAPDH aggregate formation are observed. These data suggest a critical role of GAPDH aggregates in oxidative stress-induced brain damage. PMID:19837666

  13. Macrophage cell death upon intracellular bacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Xin-He; Xu, Yunsheng; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Ren, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage-pathogen interaction is a complex process and the outcome of this tag-of-war for both sides is to live or die. Without attempting to be comprehensive, this review will discuss the complexity and significance of the interaction outcomes between macrophages and some facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens as exemplified by Francisella, Salmonella, Shigella and Yersinia. Upon bacterial infection, macrophages can die by a variety of ways, such as apoptosis, autophagic cell death, necrosis, necroptosis, oncosis, pyronecrosis, pyroptosis etc, which is the focus of this review. PMID:26690967

  14. Astroglia overexpressing heme oxygenase-1 predispose co-cultured PC12 cells to oxidative injury.

    PubMed

    Song, Linyang; Song, Wei; Schipper, Hyman M

    2007-08-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and pathologic iron deposition in the substantia nigra pars compacta of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) remain unclear. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in the oxidative degradation of heme to ferrous iron, carbon monoxide, and biliverdin, is upregulated in affected PD astroglia and may contribute to abnormal mitochondrial iron sequestration in these cells. To determine whether glial HO-1 hyper-expression is toxic to neuronal compartments, we co-cultured dopaminergic PC12 cells atop monolayers of human (h) HO-1 transfected, sham-transfected, or non-transfected primary rat astroglia. We observed that PC12 cells grown atop hHO-1 transfected astrocytes, but not the astroglia themselves, were significantly more susceptible to dopamine (1 microM) + H(2)O(2) (1 microM)-induced death (assessed by nuclear ethidium monoazide bromide staining and anti-tyrosine hydroxylase immunofluorescence microscopy) relative to control preparations. In the experimental group, PC12 cell death was attenuated significantly by the administration of the HO inhibitor, SnMP (1.5 microM), the antioxidant, ascorbate (200 microM), or the iron chelators, deferoxamine (400 microM), and phenanthroline (100 microM). Exposure to conditioned media derived from HO-1 transfected astrocytes also augmented PC12 cell killing in response to dopamine (1 microM) + H(2)O(2) (1 microM) relative to control media. In PD brain, overexpression of HO-1 in nigral astroglia and accompanying iron liberation may facilitate the bioactivation of dopamine to neurotoxic free radical intermediates and predispose nearby neuronal constituents to oxidative damage. PMID:17526019

  15. Interferon-inducible antiviral protein MxA enhances cell death triggered by endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Numajiri Haruki, Akiko; Naito, Tadasuke; Nishie, Tomomi; Saito, Shoko; Nagata, Kyosuke

    2011-11-01

    Human myxovirus resistance gene A (MxA) is a type I interferon-inducible protein and exhibits the antiviral activity against a variety of RNA viruses, including influenza virus. Previously, we reported that MxA accelerates cell death of influenza virus-infected cells through caspase-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Similar to other viruses, influenza virus infection induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which is one of cell death inducers. Here, we have demonstrated that MxA enhances ER stress signaling in cells infected with influenza virus. ER stress-induced events, such as expression of BiP mRNA and processing of XBP1 mRNA, were upregulated in cells expressing MxA by treatment with an ER stress inducer, tunicamycin (TM), as well as influenza virus infection. TM-induced cell death was also accelerated by MxA. Furthermore, we showed that MxA interacts with BiP and overexpression of BiP reduces MxA-promoted ER stress signaling. Because cell death in virus-infected cells is one of ultimate anti-virus mechanisms, we propose that MxA-enhanced ER stress signaling is a part of the antiviral activity of MxA by accelerating cell death. PMID:21992152

  16. p53 directly regulates the glycosidase FUCA1 to promote chemotherapy-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Baudot, Alice D; Crighton, Diane; O'Prey, Jim; Somers, Joanna; Sierra Gonzalez, Pablo; Ryan, Kevin M

    2016-09-01

    p53 is a central factor in tumor suppression as exemplified by its frequent loss in human cancer. p53 exerts its tumor suppressive effects in multiple ways, but the ability to invoke the eradication of damaged cells by programmed cell death is considered a key factor. The ways in which p53 promotes cell death can involve direct activation or engagement of the cell death machinery, or can be via indirect mechanisms, for example though regulation of ER stress and autophagy. We present here another level of control in p53-mediated tumor suppression by showing that p53 activates the glycosidase, FUCA1, a modulator of N-linked glycosylation. We show that p53 transcriptionally activates FUCA1 and that p53 modulates fucosidase activity via FUCA1 up-regulation. Importantly, we also report that chemotherapeutic drugs induce FUCA1 and fucosidase activity in a p53-dependent manner. In this context, while we found that over-expression of FUCA1 does not induce cell death, RNAi-mediated knockdown of endogenous FUCA1 significantly attenuates p53-dependent, chemotherapy-induced apoptotic death. In summary, these findings add an additional component to p53s tumor suppressive response and highlight another mechanism by which the tumor suppressor controls programmed cell death that could potentially be exploited for cancer therapy. PMID:27315169

  17. p53 directly regulates the glycosidase FUCA1 to promote chemotherapy-induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Baudot, Alice D.; Crighton, Diane; O'Prey, Jim; Somers, Joanna; Sierra Gonzalez, Pablo; Ryan, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT p53 is a central factor in tumor suppression as exemplified by its frequent loss in human cancer. p53 exerts its tumor suppressive effects in multiple ways, but the ability to invoke the eradication of damaged cells by programmed cell death is considered a key factor. The ways in which p53 promotes cell death can involve direct activation or engagement of the cell death machinery, or can be via indirect mechanisms, for example though regulation of ER stress and autophagy. We present here another level of control in p53-mediated tumor suppression by showing that p53 activates the glycosidase, FUCA1, a modulator of N-linked glycosylation. We show that p53 transcriptionally activates FUCA1 and that p53 modulates fucosidase activity via FUCA1 up-regulation. Importantly, we also report that chemotherapeutic drugs induce FUCA1 and fucosidase activity in a p53-dependent manner. In this context, while we found that over-expression of FUCA1 does not induce cell death, RNAi-mediated knockdown of endogenous FUCA1 significantly attenuates p53-dependent, chemotherapy-induced apoptotic death. In summary, these findings add an additional component to p53s tumor suppressive response and highlight another mechanism by which the tumor suppressor controls programmed cell death that could potentially be exploited for cancer therapy. PMID:27315169

  18. Targeting TRPM2 Channels Impairs Radiation-Induced Cell Cycle Arrest and Fosters Cell Death of T Cell Leukemia Cells in a Bcl-2-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Klumpp, Dominik; Misovic, Milan; Szteyn, Kalina; Shumilina, Ekaterina; Rudner, Justine; Huber, Stephan M.

    2016-01-01

    Messenger RNA data of lymphohematopoietic cancer lines suggest a correlation between expression of the cation channel TRPM2 and the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2. The latter is overexpressed in various tumor entities and mediates therapy resistance. Here, we analyzed the crosstalk between Bcl-2 and TRPM2 channels in T cell leukemia cells during oxidative stress as conferred by ionizing radiation (IR). To this end, the effects of TRPM2 inhibition or knock-down on plasma membrane currents, Ca2+ signaling, mitochondrial superoxide anion formation, and cell cycle progression were compared between irradiated (0–10 Gy) Bcl-2-overexpressing and empty vector-transfected Jurkat cells. As a result, IR stimulated a TRPM2-mediated Ca2+-entry, which was higher in Bcl-2-overexpressing than in control cells and which contributed to IR-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest. TRPM2 inhibition induced a release from G2/M arrest resulting in cell death. Collectively, this data suggests a pivotal function of TRPM2 in the DNA damage response of T cell leukemia cells. Apoptosis-resistant Bcl-2-overexpressing cells even can afford higher TRPM2 activity without risking a hazardous Ca2+-overload-induced mitochondrial superoxide anion formation. PMID:26839633

  19. Members of the XB3 Family from Diverse Plant Species Induce Programmed Cell Death in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaoen; Liu, Xueying; Chen, Xiuhua; Snyder, Anita; Song, Wen-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Programmed cell death has been associated with plant immunity and senescence. The receptor kinase XA21 confers resistance to bacterial blight disease of rice (Oryza sativa) caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). Here we show that the XA21 binding protein 3 (XB3) is capable of inducing cell death when overexpressed in Nicotiana benthamiana. XB3 is a RING finger-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase that has been positively implicated in XA21-mediated resistance. Mutation abolishing the XB3 E3 activity also eliminates its ability to induce cell death. Phylogenetic analysis of XB3-related sequences suggests a family of proteins (XB3 family) with members from diverse plant species. We further demonstrate that members of the XB3 family from rice, Arabidopsis and citrus all trigger a similar cell death response in Nicotiana benthamiana, suggesting an evolutionarily conserved role for these proteins in regulating programmed cell death in the plant kingdom. PMID:23717500

  20. Mechanisms of Cell Cycle Control Revealed by a Systematic and Quantitative Overexpression Screen in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Wei; Li, Zhihua; Zhan, Wenjing; Iyer, Vishwanath R.; Marcotte, Edward M.

    2008-01-01

    Regulation of cell cycle progression is fundamental to cell health and reproduction, and failures in this process are associated with many human diseases. Much of our knowledge of cell cycle regulators derives from loss-of-function studies. To reveal new cell cycle regulatory genes that are difficult to identify in loss-of-function studies, we performed a near-genome-wide flow cytometry assay of yeast gene overexpression-induced cell cycle delay phenotypes. We identified 108 genes whose overexpression significantly delayed the progression of the yeast cell cycle at a specific stage. Many of the genes are newly implicated in cell cycle progression, for example SKO1, RFA1, and YPR015C. The overexpression of RFA1 or YPR015C delayed the cell cycle at G2/M phases by disrupting spindle attachment to chromosomes and activating the DNA damage checkpoint, respectively. In contrast, overexpression of the transcription factor SKO1 arrests cells at G1 phase by activating the pheromone response pathway, revealing new cross-talk between osmotic sensing and mating. More generally, 92%–94% of the genes exhibit distinct phenotypes when overexpressed as compared to their corresponding deletion mutants, supporting the notion that many genes may gain functions upon overexpression. This work thus implicates new genes in cell cycle progression, complements previous screens, and lays the foundation for future experiments to define more precisely roles for these genes in cell cycle progression. PMID:18617996

  1. Caspase Functions in Cell Death and Disease

    PubMed Central

    McIlwain, David R.; Berger, Thorsten; Mak, Tak W.

    2013-01-01

    Caspases are a family of endoproteases that provide critical links in cell regulatory networks controlling inflammation and cell death. The activation of these enzymes is tightly controlled by their production as inactive zymogens that gain catalytic activity following signaling events promoting their aggregation into dimers or macromolecular complexes. Activation of apoptotic caspases results in inactivation or activation of substrates, and the generation of a cascade of signaling events permitting the controlled demolition of cellular components. Activation of inflammatory caspases results in the production of active proinflammatory cytokines and the promotion of innate immune responses to various internal and external insults. Dysregulation of caspases underlies human diseases including cancer and inflammatory disorders, and major efforts to design better therapies for these diseases seek to understand how these enzymes work and how they can be controlled. PMID:23545416

  2. Overexpression of Rcan1-1L inhibits hypoxia-induced cell apoptosis through induction of mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lijun; Hao, Yuewen; An, Rui; Li, Haixun; Xi, Cong; Shen, Guohong

    2014-11-01

    Mitophagy, a cellular process that selectively targets dysfunctional mitochondria for degradation, is currently a hot topic in research into the pathogenesis and treatment of many human diseases. Considering that hypoxia causes mitochondrial dysfunction, which results in cell death, we speculated that selective activation of mitophagy might promote cell survival under hypoxic conditions. In the present study, we introduced the Regulator of calcineurin 1-1L (Rcan1-1L) to initiate the mitophagy pathway and aimed to evaluate the effect of Rcan1-1L-induced mitophagy on cell survival under hypoxic conditions. Recombinant adenovirus vectors carrying Rcan1-1L were transfected into human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human adult cardiac myocytes. Using the 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide MTT assay and Trypan blue exclusion assay, Rcan1-1L overexpression was found to markedly reverse cell growth inhibition induced by hypoxia. Additionally, Rcan1-1L overexpression inhibited cell apoptosis under hypoxic conditions, as detected by annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)/propidium iodide (PI) apoptosis assay. Meanwhile, the mitochondria-mediated cell apoptotic pathway was inhibited by Rcan1-1L. In contrast, knockdown of Rcan1-1L accelerated hypoxia-induced cell apoptosis. Moreover, Rcan1-1L overexpression significantly reduced mitochondrial mass, decreased depolarized mitochondria, and downregulated ATP and reactive oxygen species production. We further delineated that the loss of mitochondrial mass was due to the activation of mitophagy induced by Rcan1-1L. Rcan1-1L overexpression activated autophagy flux and promoted translocation of the specific mitophagy receptor Parkin into mitochondria from the cytosol, whereas inhibition of autophagy flux resulted in the accumulation of Parkin-loaded mitochondria. Finally, we demonstrated that mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening was significantly increased by Rcan1-1L overexpression

  3. Armet, a UPR-upregulated protein, inhibits cell proliferation and ER stress-induced cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Apostolou, Andria; Shen Yuxian; Liang Yan; Luo Jun; Fang Shengyun

    2008-08-01

    The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes ER stress that initiates the unfolded protein response (UPR). UPR activates both adaptive and apoptotic pathways, which contribute differently to disease pathogenesis. To further understand the functional mechanisms of UPR, we identified 12 commonly UPR-upregulated genes by expression microarray analysis. Here, we describe characterization of Armet/MANF, one of the 12 genes whose function was not clear. We demonstrated that the Armet/MANF protein was upregulated by various forms of ER stress in several cell lines as well as by cerebral ischemia of rat. Armet/MANF was localized in the ER and Golgi and was also a secreted protein. Silencing Armet/MANF by siRNA oligos in HeLa cells rendered cells more susceptible to ER stress-induced death, but surprisingly increased cell proliferation and reduced cell size. Overexpression of Armet/MANF inhibited cell proliferation and improved cell viability under glucose-free conditions and tunicamycin treatment. Based on its inhibitory properties for both proliferation and cell death we have demonstrated, Armet is, thus, a novel secreted mediator of the adaptive pathway of UPR.

  4. Resveratrol activates autophagic cell death in prostate cancer cells via downregulation of STIM1 and the mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Senthil; Sun, Yuyang; Sukumaran, Pramod; Singh, Brij B

    2016-05-01

    Resveratrol (RSV), a natural polyphenol, has been suggested to induce cell cycle arrest and activate apoptosis-mediated cell death in several cancer cells, including prostate cancer. However, several molecular mechanisms have been proposed on its chemopreventive action, the precise mechanisms by which RSV exerts its anti-proliferative effect in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells remain questionable. In the present study, we show that RSV activates autophagic cell death in PC3 and DU145 cells, which was dependent on stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) expression. RSV treatment decreases STIM1 expression in a time-dependent manner and attenuates STIM1 association with TRPC1 and Orai1. Furthermore, RSV treatment also decreases ER calcium storage and store operated calcium entry (SOCE), which induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, thereby, activating AMPK and inhibiting the AKT/mTOR pathway. Similarly, inhibition of SOCE by SKF-96365 decreases the survival and proliferation of PC3 and DU145 cells and inhibits AKT/mTOR pathway and induces autophagic cell death. Importantly, SOCE inhibition and subsequent autophagic cell death caused by RSV was reversed by STIM1 overexpression. STIM1 overexpression restored SOCE, prevents the loss of mTOR phosphorylation and decreased the expression of CHOP and LC3A in PC3 cells. Taken together, for the first time, our results revealed that RSV induces autophagy-mediated cell death in PC3 and DU145 cells through regulation of SOCE mechanisms, including downregulating STIM1 expression and trigger ER stress by depleting ER calcium pool. © 2015 The Authors. Molecular Carcinogenesis, published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25917875

  5. Bcl-2 over-expression promotes genomic instability by inhibiting apoptosis of cells exposed to hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Cox, Andrew G; Hampton, Mark B

    2007-10-01

    The anti-apoptotic oncogene bcl-2 is hypothesized to increase the antioxidant status of cells, thereby protecting them from oxidative stress. In this study, we examined hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-mediated oxidative stress in Jurkat T lymphoma cells. Over-expression of Bcl-2 did not inhibit cytotoxicity at doses of H2O2 that caused necrosis (>200 microM), but it did block cell death at apoptotic doses (<200 microM). However, these cells exhibited the same initial level of protein and lipid oxidation following exposure to H2O2 as the parental cells, indicating that the anti-apoptotic activity is not associated with general antioxidant properties. Bcl-2 expression was able to protect against secondary protein carbonyl formation, which was linked to lysosome stabilization. Assessment of micronuclei formation in cells over-expressing Bcl-2 showed evidence of increased genomic instability, consistent with the impairment of apoptosis in damaged cells. We conclude that while Bcl-2 can block cytotoxicity associated with apoptosis-inducing levels of oxidative stress, it does not protect the cells from the stress itself. Bcl-2 may promote tumourigenesis by preventing the removal of oxidatively damaged cells. PMID:17434928

  6. Expanding roles of programmed cell death in mammalian neurodevelopment.

    PubMed

    De Zio, Daniela; Giunta, Luigi; Corvaro, Marco; Ferraro, Elisabetta; Cecconi, Francesco

    2005-04-01

    Programmed cell death is an orchestrated form of cell death in which cells are actively involved in their own demise. During neural development in mammals, many progenitor cells, immature cells or differentiated cells undergo the most clearly characterized type of cell death, apoptosis. Several pathways of apoptosis have been linked to neural development, but according to the numerous and striking phenotypes observed when apoptotic genes are inactivated, the mitochondrial death-route is the most important pathway in this context. Here, we discuss the relative importance of pro-growth/pro-death factors in the control of neural tissue development. We also discuss the impact of studying programmed cell death in development in order to better understand the basis of several human diseases and embryonic defects of the nervous system. PMID:15797838

  7. Hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) overexpression downregulates MV3 melanoma cell proliferation, migration and adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Takabe, Piia; Bart, Geneviève; Ropponen, Antti; Rilla, Kirsi; Tammi, Markku; Tammi, Raija; Pasonen-Seppänen, Sanna

    2015-09-10

    Malignant skin melanoma is one of the most deadly human cancers. Extracellular matrix (ECM) influences the growth of malignant tumors by modulating tumor cells adhesion and migration. Hyaluronan is an essential component of the ECM, and its amount is altered in many tumors, suggesting an important role for hyaluronan in tumorigenesis. Nonetheless its role in melanomagenesis is not understood. In this study we produced a MV3 melanoma cell line with inducible expression of the hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) and studied its effect on the behavior of the melanoma cells. HAS3 overexpression expanded the cell surface hyaluronan coat and decreased melanoma cell adhesion, migration and proliferation by cell cycle arrest at G1/G0. Melanoma cell migration was restored by removal of cell surface hyaluronan by Streptomyces hyaluronidase and by receptor blocking with hyaluronan oligosaccharides, while the effect on cell proliferation was receptor independent. Overexpression of HAS3 decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation suggesting that inhibition of MAP-kinase signaling was responsible for these suppressive effects on the malignant phenotype of MV3 melanoma cells. - Highlights: • Inducible HAS3-MV3 melanoma cell line was generated using Lentiviral transduction. • HAS3 overexpression inhibits MV3 cell migration via hyaluronan–receptor interaction. • HAS3 overexpression decreases MV3 melanoma cell proliferation and adhesion. • ERK1/2 phosphorylation is downregulated by 50% in HAS3 overexpressing cells. • The results suggest that hyaluronan has anti-cancer like effects in melanoma.

  8. Implication of different domains of the Leishmania major metacaspase in cell death and autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Casanova, M; Gonzalez, I J; Sprissler, C; Zalila, H; Dacher, M; Basmaciyan, L; Späth, G F; Azas, N; Fasel, N

    2015-01-01

    Metacaspases (MCAs) are cysteine peptidases expressed in plants, fungi and protozoa, with a caspase-like histidine–cysteine catalytic dyad, but differing from caspases, for example, in their substrate specificity. The role of MCAs is subject to debate: roles in cell cycle control, in cell death or even in cell survival have been suggested. In this study, using a Leishmania major MCA-deficient strain, we showed that L. major MCA (LmjMCA) not only had a role similar to caspases in cell death but also in autophagy and this through different domains. Upon cell death induction by miltefosine or H2O2, LmjMCA is processed, releasing the catalytic domain, which activated substrates via its catalytic dyad His/Cys and a proline-rich C-terminal domain. The C-terminal domain interacted with proteins, notably proteins involved in stress regulation, such as the MAP kinase LmaMPK7 or programmed cell death like the calpain-like cysteine peptidase. We also showed a new role of LmjMCA in autophagy, acting on or upstream of ATG8, involving Lmjmca gene overexpression and interaction of the C-terminal domain of LmjMCA with itself and other proteins. These results allowed us to propose two models, showing the role of LmjMCA in the cell death and also in the autophagy pathway, implicating different protein domains. PMID:26492367

  9. Elisidepsin Interacts Directly with Glycosylceramides in the Plasma Membrane of Tumor Cells to Induce Necrotic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Molina-Guijarro, José Manuel; García, Carolina; Macías, Álvaro; García-Fernández, Luis Francisco; Moreno, Cristina; Reyes, Fernando; Martínez-Leal, Juan Fernando; Fernández, Rogelio; Martínez, Valentín; Valenzuela, Carmen; Lillo, M. Pilar; Galmarini, Carlos M.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane integrity is essential for cell life. Any major break on it immediately induces the death of the affected cell. Different molecules were described as disrupting this cell structure and thus showing antitumor activity. We have previously defined that elisidepsin (Irvalec®, PM02734) inserts and self-organizes in the plasma membrane of tumor cells, inducing a rapid loss of membrane integrity, cell permeabilization and necrotic death. Here we show that, in sensitive HCT-116 colorectal cells, all these effects are consequence of the interaction of elisidepsin with glycosylceramides in the cell membrane. Of note, an elisidepsin-resistant subline (HCT-116-Irv) presented reduced levels of glycosylceramides and no accumulation of elisidepsin in the plasma membrane. Consequently, drug treatment did not induce the characteristic necrotic cell death. Furthermore, GM95, a mutant derivative from B16 mouse melanoma cells lacking ceramide glucosyltransferase (UGCG) activity and thus the synthesis of glycosylceramides, was also resistant to elisidepsin. Over-expression of UGCG gene in these deficient cells restored glycosylceramides synthesis, rendering them sensitive to elisidepsin, at a similar level than parental B16 cells. These results indicate that glycosylceramides act as membrane targets of elisidepsin, facilitating its insertion in the plasma membrane and the subsequent membrane permeabilization that leads to drug-induced cell death. They also indicate that cell membrane lipids are a plausible target for antineoplastic therapy. PMID:26474061

  10. Endoglin overexpression mediates gastric cancer peritoneal dissemination by inducing mesothelial cell senescence.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhi-Feng; Wu, Jian-Hua; Wang, Zhen-Ning; Zhao, Ting-Ting; Xu, Hui-Mian; Song, Yong-Xi; Xing, Ya-Nan; Huang, Jin-Yu; Zhang, Jun-Yan; Liu, Xing-Yu; Xu, Hao; Xu, Ying-Ying

    2016-05-01

    Peritoneal dissemination (PD), which is highly frequent in gastric cancer (GC) patients, is the main cause of death in advanced GC. Senescence of human peritoneal mesothelial cells (HPMC) may contribute to GC peritoneal dissemination (GCPD). In this study of 126 patients, we investigated the association between Endoglin expression in GC peritoneum and the clinicopathological features. The prognosis of patients was evaluated according to Endoglin and ID1 expression. In vitro, GC cell (GCC)-HPMC coculture was established. Endoglin and ID1 expression was evaluated by Western blot. Cell cycle and HPMC senescence were analyzed after harvesting HPMC from the coculture. GCC adhesion and invasion to HPMC were also assayed. Our results showed that positive staining of Endoglin (38%) was associated with a higher TNM stage and higher incidence of GCPD (both P < .05). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the patients who were Endoglin positive had a shorter survival time compared with Endoglin-negative patients (P = .02). Using the HPMC and GCC adherence and invasion assay, we demonstrated that transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β)1-induced HPMC senescence was attenuated by silencing the Endoglin expression, which also prevented GCC attachment and invasion. Our study indicated a positive correlation between Endoglin overexpression and GCPD. Up-regulated Endoglin expression induced HPMC senescence via TGF-β1 pathway. The findings suggest that Endoglin-induced HPMC senescence may contribute to peritoneal dissemination of GCCs. PMID:27067789

  11. Carnosic acid induces autophagic cell death through inhibition of the Akt/mTOR pathway in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qilong; Liu, Huaimin; Yao, Yamin; Geng, Liang; Zhang, Xinfeng; Jiang, Lifeng; Shi, Bian; Yang, Feng

    2015-05-01

    The therapeutic goal of cancer treatment is now geared towards triggering tumour-selective cell death with autophagic cell death being required for the chemotherapy of apoptosis-resistant cancer. In this study, Carnosic acid (CA), a polyphenolic diterpene isolated from Rosemary (Rosemarinus officinalis), significantly induced autophagic cell death in HepG2 cells. Ca treatment caused the formation of autophagic vacuoles produced an increasing ratio of LC3-II to LC3-I in a time- and dose-dependent manner but had no effect on the levels of autophagy-related protein ATG6 and ATG13 expression. Autophagy inhibitors, 3-methyladenine (3-MA), chloroquine and bafilomycin A1, or ATG genes silencing in HepG2 cells significantly inhibited CA-induced autophagic cell death. The CA treatment decreased the levels of phosphorylated Akt and mTOR without any effects on PI3K or PTEN. Most importantly, overexpression of Akt and knockdown of PTEN attenuated autophagy induction in CA-treated cells. Taken together, our results indicated that CA induced autophagic cell death through inhibition of the Akt/mTOR pathway in human hepatoma cells. These findings suggest that CA has a great potential for the treatment of hepatoma via autophagic induction. PMID:25178877

  12. Modes of Retinal Cell Death in Diabetic Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Feenstra, Derrick J; Yego, E Chepchumba; Mohr, Susanne

    2013-10-01

    Cell death seems to be a prominent feature in the progression of diabetic retinopathy. Several retinal cell types have been identified to undergo cell death in a diabetic environment. Most emphasis has been directed towards identifying apoptosis in the diabetic retina. However, new research has established that there are multiple forms of cell death. This review discusses the different modes of cell death and attempts to classify cell death of retinal cells known to die in diabetic retinopathy. Special emphasis is given to apoptosis, necrosis, autophagic cell death, and pyroptosis. It seems that different retinal cell types are dying by diverse types of cell death. Whereas endothelial cells predominantly undergo apoptosis, pericytes might die by apoptosis as well as necrosis. On the other hand, Müller cells are suggested to die by a pyroptotic mechanism. Diabetes leads to significant Müller cell loss at 7 months duration of diabetes in retinas of diabetic mice compared to non-diabetic, which is prevented by the inhibition of the caspase-1/IL-1β (interleukin-1beta) pathway using the IL-1 receptor knockout mouse. Since pyroptosis is characterized by the activation of the caspase-1/IL-1β pathway subsequently leading to cell death, Müller cells seem to be a prime candidate for this form of inflammation-driven cell death. Considering that diabetic retinopathy is now discussed to potentially be a chronic inflammatory disease, pyroptotic cell death might play an important role in disease progression. Understanding mechanisms of cell death will lead to a more targeted approach in the development of new therapies to treat diabetic retinopathy. PMID:24672740

  13. Inhibition of laminin-5 production in breast epithelial cells by overexpression of p300.

    PubMed

    Miller, K A; Chung, J; Lo, D; Jones, J C; Thimmapaya, B; Weitzman, S A

    2000-03-17

    The transcriptional coactivator p300 is essential for normal embryonic development and cellular differentiation. We have been studying the role of p300 in the transcription of a variety of genes, and we became interested in the role of this coactivator in the transcription of genes important in breast epithelial cell biology. From MCF-10A cells (spontaneously immortalized, nontransformed human breast epithelial cells), we developed cell lines that stably overexpress p300. These p300-overexpressing cells displayed reduced adhesion to culture dishes and were found to secrete an extracellular matrix deficient in laminin-5. Laminin-5 is the major extracellular matrix component produced by breast epithelium. Immunofluorescence studies, as well as experiments using normal matrix, confirmed that the decreased adhesion of p300-overexpressing cells is due to laminin-5-deficient extracellular matrix and not due to loss of laminin-5 receptors. Northern blots revealed markedly decreased levels of expression of two of the genes (designated LAMA3 and LAMC2) encoding the alpha3 and gamma2 chains of the laminin-5 heterotrimer in the cells that overexpress p300, whereas LAMB3 mRNA, encoding the third or beta3 chain of laminin-5, was not markedly reduced. Transient transfection experiments with a vector containing a murine LAMA3 promoter demonstrate that overexpressing p300 down-regulates the LAMA3 promoter. In summary, overexpression of p300 leads to down-regulation of laminin-5 production in breast epithelial cells, resulting in decreased adhesion. PMID:10713141

  14. SET overexpression in HEK293 cells regulates mitochondrial uncoupling proteins levels within a mitochondrial fission/reduced autophagic flux scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Almeida, Luciana O.; Goto, Renata N.; Neto, Marinaldo P.C.; Sousa, Lucas O.; Curti, Carlos; Leopoldino, Andréia M.

    2015-03-06

    We hypothesized that SET, a protein accumulated in some cancer types and Alzheimer disease, is involved in cell death through mitochondrial mechanisms. We addressed the mRNA and protein levels of the mitochondrial uncoupling proteins UCP1, UCP2 and UCP3 (S and L isoforms) by quantitative real-time PCR and immunofluorescence as well as other mitochondrial involvements, in HEK293 cells overexpressing the SET protein (HEK293/SET), either in the presence or absence of oxidative stress induced by the pro-oxidant t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP). SET overexpression in HEK293 cells decreased UCP1 and increased UCP2 and UCP3 (S/L) mRNA and protein levels, whilst also preventing lipid peroxidation and decreasing the content of cellular ATP. SET overexpression also (i) decreased the area of mitochondria and increased the number of organelles and lysosomes, (ii) increased mitochondrial fission, as demonstrated by increased FIS1 mRNA and FIS-1 protein levels, an apparent accumulation of DRP-1 protein, and an increase in the VDAC protein level, and (iii) reduced autophagic flux, as demonstrated by a decrease in LC3B lipidation (LC3B-II) in the presence of chloroquine. Therefore, SET overexpression in HEK293 cells promotes mitochondrial fission and reduces autophagic flux in apparent association with up-regulation of UCP2 and UCP3; this implies a potential involvement in cellular processes that are deregulated such as in Alzheimer's disease and cancer. - Highlights: • SET, UCPs and autophagy prevention are correlated. • SET action has mitochondrial involvement. • UCP2/3 may reduce ROS and prevent autophagy. • SET protects cell from ROS via UCP2/3.

  15. Dynamin-related protein 1 is involved in micheliolide-induced breast cancer cell death

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yongsheng; Zhou, Liyan; Tian, Chen; Shi, Yehui; Wang, Chen; Tong, Zhongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) is a newly discovered therapeutic target for tumor initiation, migration, proliferation, and chemosensitivity. Thus, therapeutic strategies that focus on targeting Drp1 and its related signaling pathway pave a new way to address the ineffectiveness of traditional cancer therapies. Micheliolide (MCL), a guaianolide sesquiterpene lactone, can selectively eradicate acute myeloid leukemia stem or progenitor cells. But the effect of MCL on the mitochondrial dynamics of cancer cells is still not well demonstrated. In this study, we show that MCL inhibited the growth of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, accompanied by increased mitochondrial fission and upregulation of Drp1. The results obtained from overexpression experiments of wild or dominant-negative mutant type of Drp1 demonstrate that Drp1 is both necessary and sufficient to induce MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cell death. Furthermore, mitochondrial membrane potential decreased, whereas reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, cytochrome c release, and PARP cleavage were enhanced after overexpression of Drp1 wild type. On the other hand, overexpression of Drp1-K38A (a dominant-negative mutant of Drp1) rescued cells from increased apoptosis, confirming the role of MCL-induced Drp1 in the observed apoptosis. Finally, MCL-induced Drp1-mediated cell death could be reversed by N-acetyl-L-cysteine (the ROS scavenger) in breast cancer cells. Taken together, the present study shows a novel role for Drp1 in MCL-induced breast cancer cell death, potentially through regulation of ROS–mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. PMID:26622184

  16. The silencing of adenine nucleotide translocase isoform 1 induces oxidative stress and programmed cell death in ADF human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lena, Annalisa; Rechichi, Mariarosa; Salvetti, Alessandra; Vecchio, Donatella; Evangelista, Monica; Rainaldi, Giuseppe; Gremigni, Vittorio; Rossi, Leonardo

    2010-07-01

    Adenine nucleotide translocases (ANTs) are multitask proteins involved in several aspects of cell metabolism, as well as in the regulation of cell death/survival processes. We investigated the role played by ANT isoforms 1 and 2 in the growth of a human glioblastoma cell line (ADF cells). The silencing of ANT2 isoform, by small interfering RNA, did not produce significant changes in ADF cell viability. By contrast, the silencing of ANT1 isoform strongly reduced ADF cell viability by inducing a non-apoptotic cell death process resembling paraptosis. We demonstrated that cell death induced by ANT1 depletion cannot be ascribed to the loss of the ATP/ADP exchange function of this protein. By contrast, our findings indicate that ANT1-silenced cells experience oxidative stress, thus allowing us to hypothesize that the effect of ANT1-silencing on ADF is mediated by the loss of the ANT1 uncoupling function. Several studies ascribe a pro-apoptotic role to ANT1 as a result of the observation that ANT1 overexpression sensitizes cells to mitochondrial depolarization or to apoptotic stimuli. In the present study, we demonstrate that, despite its pro-apoptotic function at a high expression level, the reduction of ANT1 density below a physiological baseline impairs fundamental functions of this protein in ADF cells, leading them to undertake a cell death process. PMID:20528917

  17. Nuclear localized protein-1 (Nulp1) increases cell death of human osteosarcoma cells and binds the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein

    SciTech Connect

    Steen, Hakan; Lindholm, Dan

    2008-02-08

    Nuclear localized protein-1 (Nulp1) is a recently identified gene expressed in mouse and human tissues particularly during embryonic development. Nulp1 belongs to the family of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins that are important in development. The precise function of Nulp1 in cells is however not known. We observed that overexpression of Nulp1 induces a large increase in cell death of human osteosarcoma Saos2 cells with DNA fragmentation. In mouse N2A neuroblastoma cells Nulp1 affected cell proliferation and sensitized cells towards death induced by staurosporine. Staining using a novel antibody localized Nulp1 mainly to the cell nucleus and to some extent to the cytoplasm. Nulp1 binds the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) and this interaction was increased during cell death. These results indicate that Nulp1 plays a role in cell death control and may influence tumor growth.

  18. Profilin potentiates chemotherapeutic agents mediated cell death via suppression of NF-κB and upregulation of p53.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Adeel H; Raviprakash, Nune; Mokhamatam, Raveendra B; Gupta, Pankaj; Manna, Sunil K

    2016-04-01

    The molecular mechanism by which Profilin acts as a tumor suppressor is still unclear. Several chemotherapeutic agents, used till date either have unfavorable side effects or acquired resistance in tumor cells. Our findings show that Profilin enhances cell death mediated by several chemotherapeutic-agents. The activation of NF-κB and its dependent genes, mediated by paclitaxel and vinblastine, was completely inhibited in Profilin overexpressing cells. This inhibition was due to the Profilin mediated attenuation of IκBα degradation, thereby preventing p65 nuclear translocation and low NF-κB DNA binding activity.Moreover, Profilin increases level of p53 in the presence of known inducers, such as doxorubicin, vinblastine, and benzofuran. This increased p53 level leads to enhanced cell death as indicated by activation of caspases 3, 8, 9, which results in cleavage of PARP.Furthermore, knocking down of p53 in Profilin overexpressing cells leads to decreased cell death. Ectopic expression of Profilin in HCT116 p53 knock out cells showed lesser cell death as compared to the HCT116 p53 wild type cells. For the first time, we provide evidences, which suggest that Profilin synergizes with chemotherapeutic drugs to induce tumor cell death by regulating NF-κB and p53. Thus, modulation of Profilin may be a useful strategy for effective combination therapy. PMID:26842845

  19. Drp1 Mediates Caspase-Independent Type III Cell Death in Normal and Leukemic Cells▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Bras, Marlène; Yuste, Victor J.; Roué, Gaël; Barbier, Sandrine; Sancho, Patricia; Virely, Clémence; Rubio, Manuel; Baudet, Sylvie; Esquerda, Josep E.; Merle-Béral, Hélène; Sarfati, Marika; Susin, Santos A.

    2007-01-01

    Ligation of CD47 triggers caspase-independent programmed cell death (PCD) in normal and leukemic cells. Here, we characterize the morphological and biochemical features of this type of death and show that it displays the hallmarks of type III PCD. A molecular and biochemical approach has led us to identify a key mediator of this type of death, dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1). CD47 ligation induces Drp1 translocation from cytosol to mitochondria, a process controlled by chymotrypsin-like serine proteases. Once in mitochondria, Drp1 provokes an impairment of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, which results in dissipation of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, reactive oxygen species generation, and a drop in ATP levels. Surprisingly, neither the activation of the most representative proapoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family, such as Bax or Bak, nor the release of apoptogenic proteins AIF (apoptosis-inducing factor), cytochrome c, endonuclease G (EndoG), Omi/HtrA2, or Smac/DIABLO from mitochondria to cytosol is observed. Responsiveness of cells to CD47 ligation increases following Drp1 overexpression, while Drp1 downregulation confers resistance to CD47-mediated death. Importantly, in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells, mRNA levels of Drp1 strongly correlate with death sensitivity. Thus, this previously unknown mechanism controlling caspase-independent type III PCD may provide the basis for novel therapeutic approaches to overcome apoptotic avoidance in malignant cells. PMID:17682056

  20. Overexpression of engulfment and cell motility 1 promotes cell invasion and migration of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiarui; Liu, Guoqing; Miao, Xiongying; Hua, Songwen; Zhong, Dewu

    2011-05-01

    Engulfment and cell motility 1 (Elmo1) has been linked to the invasive phenotype of glioma cells. The use of Elmo1 inhibitors is currently being evaluated in hepato-cellular carcinoma (HCC), but the molecular mechanisms of their therapeutic effect have yet to be determined. Elmo1 expression in HCC tissue samples from 131 cases and in 5 HCC cell lines was determined by immunohistochemistry, quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. To functionally characterize Elmo1 in HCC, Elmo1 expression in the HCCLM3 cell line was blocked by siRNA. Cell migration was measured by wound healing and transwell migration assays in vitro. Elmo1 overexpression was significantly correlated with cell invasion and the poor prognosis of HCC. Elmo1-siRNA-treated HCCLM3 cells demonstrated a reduction in cell migration. The present study demonstrated for the first time that the suppression of Elmo1 expression inhibits cell invasion in HCC. PMID:22977532

  1. Mipu1 overexpression protects macrophages from oxLDL-induced foam cell formation and cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Qu, Shun-Lin; Fan, Wen-Jing; Zhang, Chi; Guo, Fang; Han, Dan; Pan, Wen-Jun; Li, Wei; Feng, Da-Ming; Jiang, Zhi-Sheng

    2014-12-01

    Mipu1 (myocardial ischemic preconditioning upregulated protein 1) is a novel N-terminal Kruppel-associated box (KRAB)/C2H2 zinc finger superfamily protein, that displays a powerful effect in protecting H9c2 cells from oxidative stress-induced cell apoptosis. The present study aims to investigate the effect of Mipu1 overexpression on oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-induced foam cell formation, cell apoptosis, and its possible mechanisms. New Zealand healthy rabbits were used to establish atherosclerosis model, and serum levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were detected by an automatic biochemical analyzer. Sudan IV staining was used to detect atherosclerotic lesions. The RAW264.7 macrophage cell line was selected as the experimental material. Oil red O staining, high-performance liquid chromatography, and Dil-labeled lipoprotein were used to detect cholesterol accumulation qualitatively and quantitatively, respectively. Flow cytometry was used to determine cell apoptosis. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect the mRNA expression of the main proteins that are associated with the transport of cholesterol, such as ABCA1, ABCG1, SR-BI, and CD36. Western blot analysis was used to detect the protein expression of Mipu1. There were atherosclerotic lesions in the high-fat diet group with Sudan IV staining. High-fat diet decreased Mipu1 expression and increased CD36 expression significantly at the 10th week compared with standard-diet rabbits. Mipu1 overexpression decreased oxLDL-induced cholesterol accumulation, oxLDL uptake, cell apoptosis, and cleaved caspase-3. Mipu1 overexpression inhibited the oxLDL-induced CD36 mRNA and protein expression, but it did not significantly inhibit the mRNA expression of ABCA1, ABCG1, and SR-BI. Mipu1 overexpression inhibits oxLDL-induced foam cell formation and cell apoptosis. Mipu1 overexpression reduces the

  2. Cell block eleven, looking from the "Death Row" exercise yard, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cell block eleven, looking from the "Death Row" exercise yard, facing north (note cell block fifteen to the right and cell block fourteen in the distance_ - Eastern State Penitentiary, 2125 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  3. Ameliorating replicative senescence of human bone marrow stromal cells by PSMB5 overexpression

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Li; Song, Hui-Fang; Wei, Jiao-Long; Liu, Xue-Qin; Song, Wen-Hui; Yan, Ba-Yi; Yang, Gui-Jiao; Li, Ang; Yang, Wu-Lin

    2014-01-24

    Highlights: • PSMB5 overexpression restores the differentiation potential of aged hBMSCs. • PSMB5 overexpression enhances the proteasomal activity of late-stage hBMSCs. • PSMB5 overexpression inhibits replicative senescence and improved cell viability. • PSMB5 overexpression promotes cell growth by upregulating the Cyclin D1/CDK4 complex. - Abstract: Multipotent human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) potentially serve as a source for cell-based therapy in regenerative medicine. However, in vitro expansion was inescapably accompanied with cell senescence, characterized by inhibited proliferation and compromised pluripotency. We have previously demonstrated that this aging process is closely associated with reduced 20S proteasomal activity, with down-regulation of rate-limiting catalytic β-subunits particularly evident. In the present study, we confirmed that proteasomal activity directly contributes to senescence of hBMSCs, which could be reversed by overexpression of the β5-subunit (PSMB5). Knocking down PSMB5 led to decreased proteasomal activity concurrent with reduced cell proliferation in early-stage hBMSCs, which is similar to the senescent phenotype observed in late-stage cells. In contrast, overexpressing PSMB5 in late-stage cells efficiently restored the normal activity of 20S proteasomes and promoted cell growth, possibly via upregulating the Cyclin D1/CDK4 complex. Additionally, PSMB5 could enhance cell resistance to oxidative stress, as evidenced by the increased cell survival upon exposing senescent hBMSCs to hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, PSMB5 overexpression retained the pluripotency of late-stage hBMSCs by facilitating their neural differentiation both in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, our work reveals a critical role of PSMB5 in 20S proteasome-mediated protection against replicative senescence, pointing to a possible strategy for maintaining the integrity of culture-expanded hBMSCs by manipulating the expression of PSMB5.

  4. Fyn Activation of mTORC1 Stimulates the IRE1α-JNK Pathway, Leading to Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yichen; Yamada, Eijiro; Zong, Haihong; Pessin, Jeffrey E

    2015-10-01

    We previously reported that the skeletal muscle-specific overexpression of Fyn in mice resulted in a severe muscle wasting phenotype despite the activation of mTORC1 signaling. To investigate the bases for the loss of muscle fiber mass, we examined the relationship between Fyn activation of mTORC1, JNK, and endoplasmic reticulum stress. Overexpression of Fyn in skeletal muscle in vivo and in HEK293T cells in culture resulted in the activation of IRE1α and JNK, leading to increased cell death. Fyn synergized with the general endoplasmic reticulum stress inducer thapsigargin, resulting in the activation of IRE1α and further accelerated cell death. Moreover, inhibition of mTORC1 with rapamycin suppressed IRE1α activation and JNK phosphorylation, resulting in protecting cells against Fyn- and thapsigargin-induced cell death. Moreover, rapamycin treatment in vivo reduced the skeletal muscle IRE1α activation in the Fyn-overexpressing transgenic mice. Together, these data demonstrate the presence of a Fyn-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress that occurred, at least in part, through the activation of mTORC1, as well as subsequent activation of the IRE1α-JNK pathway driving cell death. PMID:26306048

  5. Singlet Oxygen-Induced Membrane Disruption and Serpin-Protease Balance in Vacuolar-Driven Cell Death1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Carmieli, Raanan; Mor, Avishai; Fluhr, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Singlet oxygen plays a role in cellular stress either by providing direct toxicity or through signaling to initiate death programs. It was therefore of interest to examine cell death, as occurs in Arabidopsis, due to differentially localized singlet oxygen photosensitizers. The photosensitizers rose bengal (RB) and acridine orange (AO) were localized to the plasmalemma and vacuole, respectively. Their photoactivation led to cell death as measured by ion leakage. Cell death could be inhibited by the singlet oxygen scavenger histidine in treatments with AO but not with RB. In the case of AO treatment, the vacuolar membrane was observed to disintegrate. Concomitantly, a complex was formed between a vacuolar cell-death protease, RESPONSIVE TO DESSICATION-21 and its cognate cytoplasmic protease inhibitor ATSERPIN1. In the case of RB treatment, the tonoplast remained intact and no complex was formed. Over-expression of AtSerpin1 repressed cell death, only under AO photodynamic treatment. Interestingly, acute water stress showed accumulation of singlet oxygen as determined by fluorescence of Singlet Oxygen Sensor Green, by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and the induction of singlet oxygen marker genes. Cell death by acute water stress was inhibited by the singlet oxygen scavenger histidine and was accompanied by vacuolar collapse and the appearance of serpin-protease complex. Over-expression of AtSerpin1 also attenuated cell death under this mode of cell stress. Thus, acute water stress damage shows parallels to vacuole-mediated cell death where the generation of singlet oxygen may play a role. PMID:26884487

  6. β-Cell-Specific Mafk Overexpression Impairs Pancreatic Endocrine Cell Development.

    PubMed

    Abdellatif, Ahmed M; Oishi, Hisashi; Itagaki, Takahiro; Jung, Yunshin; Shawki, Hossam H; Okita, Yukari; Hasegawa, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; El-Morsy, Salah E; El-Sayed, Mesbah A; Shoaib, Mahmoud B; Sugiyama, Fumihiro; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    The MAF family transcription factors are homologs of v-Maf, the oncogenic component of the avian retrovirus AS42. They are subdivided into 2 groups, small and large MAF proteins, according to their structure, function, and molecular size. MAFK is a member of the small MAF family and acts as a dominant negative form of large MAFs. In previous research we generated transgenic mice that overexpress MAFK in order to suppress the function of large MAF proteins in pancreatic β-cells. These mice developed hyperglycemia in adulthood due to impairment of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. The aim of the current study is to examine the effects of β-cell-specific Mafk overexpression in endocrine cell development. The developing islets of Mafk-transgenic embryos appeared to be disorganized with an inversion of total numbers of insulin+ and glucagon+ cells due to reduced β-cell proliferation. Gene expression analysis by quantitative RT-PCR revealed decreased levels of β-cell-related genes whose expressions are known to be controlled by large MAF proteins. Additionally, these changes were accompanied with a significant increase in key β-cell transcription factors likely due to compensatory mechanisms that might have been activated in response to the β-cell loss. Finally, microarray comparison of gene expression profiles between wild-type and transgenic pancreata revealed alteration of some uncharacterized genes including Pcbd1, Fam132a, Cryba2, and Npy, which might play important roles during pancreatic endocrine development. Taken together, these results suggest that Mafk overexpression impairs endocrine development through a regulation of numerous β-cell-related genes. The microarray analysis provided a unique data set of differentially expressed genes that might contribute to a better understanding of the molecular basis that governs the development and function of endocrine pancreas. PMID:26901059

  7. β-Cell-Specific Mafk Overexpression Impairs Pancreatic Endocrine Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Abdellatif, Ahmed M.; Oishi, Hisashi; Itagaki, Takahiro; Jung, Yunshin; Shawki, Hossam H.; Okita, Yukari; Hasegawa, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; El-Morsy, Salah E.; El-Sayed, Mesbah A.; Shoaib, Mahmoud B.; Sugiyama, Fumihiro; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    The MAF family transcription factors are homologs of v-Maf, the oncogenic component of the avian retrovirus AS42. They are subdivided into 2 groups, small and large MAF proteins, according to their structure, function, and molecular size. MAFK is a member of the small MAF family and acts as a dominant negative form of large MAFs. In previous research we generated transgenic mice that overexpress MAFK in order to suppress the function of large MAF proteins in pancreatic β-cells. These mice developed hyperglycemia in adulthood due to impairment of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. The aim of the current study is to examine the effects of β-cell-specific Mafk overexpression in endocrine cell development. The developing islets of Mafk-transgenic embryos appeared to be disorganized with an inversion of total numbers of insulin+ and glucagon+ cells due to reduced β-cell proliferation. Gene expression analysis by quantitative RT-PCR revealed decreased levels of β-cell-related genes whose expressions are known to be controlled by large MAF proteins. Additionally, these changes were accompanied with a significant increase in key β-cell transcription factors likely due to compensatory mechanisms that might have been activated in response to the β-cell loss. Finally, microarray comparison of gene expression profiles between wild-type and transgenic pancreata revealed alteration of some uncharacterized genes including Pcbd1, Fam132a, Cryba2, and Npy, which might play important roles during pancreatic endocrine development. Taken together, these results suggest that Mafk overexpression impairs endocrine development through a regulation of numerous β-cell-related genes. The microarray analysis provided a unique data set of differentially expressed genes that might contribute to a better understanding of the molecular basis that governs the development and function of endocrine pancreas. PMID:26901059

  8. Programmed cell death for defense against anomaly and tumor formation

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Sohei; Norimura, Toshiyuki; Nomura, Taisei

    1995-12-31

    Cell death after exposure to low-level radiation is often considered evidence that radiation is poisonous, however small the dose. Evidence has been accumulating to support the notion that cell death after low-level exposure to radiation results from activation of suicidal genes {open_quote}programmed cell death{close_quote} or {open_quote}apoptosis{close_quote} - for the health of the whole body. This paper gives experimental evidence that embryos of fruit flies and mouse fetuses have potent defense mechanisms against teratogenic or tumorigenic injury caused by radiation and carcinogens, which function through programmed cell death.

  9. Cell death sensitization of leukemia cells by opioid receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Friesen, Claudia; Roscher, Mareike; Hormann, Inis; Fichtner, Iduna; Alt, Andreas; Hilger, Ralf A.; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Miltner, Erich

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) regulates a number of cellular processes and modulates cell death induction. cAMP levels are altered upon stimulation of specific G-protein-coupled receptors inhibiting or activating adenylyl cyclases. Opioid receptor stimulation can activate inhibitory Gi-proteins which in turn block adenylyl cyclase activity reducing cAMP. Opioids such as D,L-methadone induce cell death in leukemia cells. However, the mechanism how opioids trigger apoptosis and activate caspases in leukemia cells is not understood. In this study, we demonstrate that downregulation of cAMP induced by opioid receptor activation using the opioid D,L-methadone kills and sensitizes leukemia cells for doxorubicin treatment. Enhancing cAMP levels by blocking opioid-receptor signaling strongly reduced D,L-methadone-induced apoptosis, caspase activation and doxorubicin-sensitivity. Induction of cell death in leukemia cells by activation of opioid receptors using the opioid D,L-methadone depends on critical levels of opioid receptor expression on the cell surface. Doxorubicin increased opioid receptor expression in leukemia cells. In addition, the opioid D,L-methadone increased doxorubicin uptake and decreased doxorubicin efflux in leukemia cells, suggesting that the opioid D,L-methadone as well as doxorubicin mutually increase their cytotoxic potential. Furthermore, we found that opioid receptor activation using D,L-methadone alone or in addition to doxorubicin inhibits tumor growth significantly in vivo. These results demonstrate that opioid receptor activation via triggering the downregulation of cAMP induces apoptosis, activates caspases and sensitizes leukemia cells for doxorubicin treatment. Hence, opioid receptor activation seems to be a promising strategy to improve anticancer therapies. PMID:23633472

  10. Arabidopsis ACCELERATED CELL DEATH2 Modulates Programmed Cell DeathW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Nan; Greenberg, Jean T.

    2006-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast protein ACCELERATED CELL DEATH2 (ACD2) modulates the amount of programmed cell death (PCD) triggered by Pseudomonas syringae and protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) treatment. In vitro, ACD2 can reduce red chlorophyll catabolite, a chlorophyll derivative. We find that ACD2 shields root protoplasts that lack chlorophyll from light- and PPIX-induced PCD. Thus, chlorophyll catabolism is not obligatory for ACD2 anti-PCD function. Upon P. syringae infection, ACD2 levels and localization change in cells undergoing PCD and in their close neighbors. Thus, ACD2 shifts from being largely in chloroplasts to partitioning to chloroplasts, mitochondria, and, to a small extent, cytosol. ACD2 protects cells from PCD that requires the early mitochondrial oxidative burst. Later, the chloroplasts of dying cells generate NO, which only slightly affects cell viability. Finally, the mitochondria in dying cells have dramatically altered movements and cellular distribution. Overproduction of both ACD2 (localized to mitochondria and chloroplasts) and ascorbate peroxidase (localized to chloroplasts) greatly reduces P. syringae–induced PCD, suggesting a pro-PCD role for mitochondrial and chloroplast events. During infection, ACD2 may bind to and/or reduce PCD-inducing porphyrin-related molecules in mitochondria and possibly chloroplasts that generate reactive oxygen species, cause altered organelle behavior, and activate a cascade of PCD-inducing events. PMID:16387834

  11. Triptolide induces apoptotic cell death of human cholangiocarcinoma cells through inhibition of myeloid cell leukemia-1

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), a devastating neoplasm, is highly resistant to current chemotherapies. CCA cells frequently overexpress the antiapoptotic protein myeloid cell leukemia-1(Mcl-1), which is responsible for its extraordinary ability to evade cell death. Triptolide, a bioactive ingredient extracted from Chinese medicinal plant, has been shown to inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in several cancers. Methods CCK-8 assay was performed to detect cell survival rate in vitro. DAPI staining and Flow cytometry were used to analyze apoptosis. Western blot was performed to determine the expression levels of caspase-3, caspase-7, caspase-9, PARP, and Mcl-1. Quantitative real-time PCR and immunofluorescence were used to detect the expression levels of Mcl-1. The nude mice xenograft model was used to evaluate the antitumor effect of triptolide in vivo. Results Triptolide reduced cell viability in cholangiocarcinoma cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner, with IC50 values of 12.6 ± 0.6 nM, 20.5 ± 4.2 nM, and 18.5 ± 0.7 nM at 48 h for HuCCT1, QBC939, and FRH0201 respectively. Triptolide induced apoptosis in CCA cell lines in part through mitochondrial pathway. Using quantitative real-time PCR, western blot and immunofluorescence, we have shown that triptolide downregulates Mcl-1 mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, triptolide inhibited the CCA growth in vivo. Conclusions Triptolide has profound antitumor effect on CCA, probably by inducing apoptosis through inhibition of Mcl-1. Triptolide would be a promising therapeutic agent for CCA. PMID:24742042

  12. Silencer of Death Domains Controls Cell Death through Tumour Necrosis Factor-Receptor 1 and Caspase-10 in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Naveed I.; Welschinger, Robert; Basnett, Jordan; Fung, Carina; Rizos, Helen; Bradstock, Kenneth F.; Bendall, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to apoptosis remains a significant problem in drug resistance and treatment failure in malignant disease. NO-aspirin is a novel drug that has efficacy against a number of solid tumours, and can inhibit Wnt signaling, and although we have shown Wnt signaling to be important for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cell proliferation and survival inhibition of Wnt signaling does not appear to be involved in the induction of ALL cell death. Treatment of B lineage ALL cell lines and patient ALL cells with NO-aspirin induced rapid apoptotic cell death mediated via the extrinsic death pathway. Apoptosis was dependent on caspase-10 in association with the formation of the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) incorporating pro-caspase-10 and tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNF-R1). There was no measurable increase in TNF-R1 or TNF-α in response to NO-aspirin, suggesting that the process was ligand-independent. Consistent with this, expression of silencer of death domain (SODD) was reduced following NO-aspirin exposure and lentiviral mediated shRNA knockdown of SODD suppressed expansion of transduced cells confirming the importance of SODD for ALL cell survival. Considering that SODD and caspase-10 are frequently over-expressed in ALL, interfering with these proteins may provide a new strategy for the treatment of this and potentially other cancers. PMID:25061812

  13. Predictive Efficacy Biomarkers of Programmed Cell Death 1/Programmed Cell Death 1 Ligand Blockade Therapy.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiao-Na; Fu, Li-Wu

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors of immune check-point molecule, programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and its ligand, programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1) have attracted much attention in cancer immunotherapy recently due to their durable antitumor effects in various malignances, especially the advanced ones. Unfortunately, only a fraction of patients with advanced tumors could benefit from anti-PD-1/PD-L1 therapy, while others still worsened. The key to this point is that there are no efficient biomarkers for screening anti-PD-1/PD-L1-sensitive patients. In this review, we aim at summarizing the latest advances of anti-PD-1/PDL1 immunotherapy and the potential predictive efficacy biomarkers to provide evidences for identifying anti-PD-1/PDL1- sensitive patients. The present article also includes the patent review coverage on this topic. PMID:26916881

  14. α-Synuclein and neuronal cell death

    PubMed Central

    Cookson, Mark R

    2009-01-01

    α-Synuclein is a small protein that has special relevance for understanding Parkinson disease and related disorders. Not only is α-synuclein found in Lewy bodies characteristic of Parkinson disease, but also mutations in the gene for α-synuclein can cause an inherited form of Parkinson disease and expression of normal α-synuclein can increase the risk of developing Parkinson disease in sporadic, or non-familial, cases. Both sporadic and familial Parkinson disease are characterized by substantial loss of several groups of neurons, including the dopaminergic cells of the substantia nigra that are the target of most current symptomatic therapies. Therefore, it is predicted that α-synuclein, especially in its mutant forms or under conditions where its expression levels are increased, is a toxic protein in the sense that it is associated with an increased rate of neuronal cell death. This review will discuss the experimental contexts in which α-synuclein has been demonstrated to be toxic. I will also outline what is known about the mechanisms by which α-synuclein triggers neuronal damage, and identify some of the current gaps in our knowledge about this subject. Finally, the therapeutic implications of toxicity of α-synuclein will be discussed. PMID:19193223

  15. Docosahexaenoic Acid Modulates a HER2-Associated Lipogenic Phenotype, Induces Apoptosis, and Increases Trastuzumab Action in HER2-Overexpressing Breast Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ravacci, Graziela Rosa; Brentani, Maria Mitzi; Tortelli, Tharcisio Citrângulo; Torrinhas, Raquel Suzana M. M.; Santos, Jéssica Reis; Logullo, Angela Flávia; Waitzberg, Dan Linetzky

    2015-01-01

    In breast cancer, lipid metabolic alterations have been recognized as potential oncogenic stimuli that may promote malignancy. To investigate whether the oncogenic nature of lipogenesis closely depends on the overexpression of HER2 protooncogene, the normal breast cell line, HB4a, was transfected with HER2 cDNA to obtain HER2-overexpressing HB4aC5.2 cells. Both cell lines were treated with trastuzumab and docosahexaenoic acid. HER2 overexpression was accompanied by an increase in the expression of lipogenic genes involved in uptake (CD36), transport (FABP4), and storage (DGAT) of exogenous fatty acids (FA), as well as increased activation of “de novo” FA synthesis (FASN). We further investigate whether this lipogenesis reprogramming might be regulated by mTOR/PPARγ pathway. Inhibition of the mTORC1 pathway markers, p70S6 K1, SREBP1, and LIPIN1, as well as an increase in DEPTOR expression (the main inhibitor of the mTOR) was detected in HB4aC5.2. Based on these results, a PPARγ selective antagonist, GW9662, was used to treat both cells lines, and the lipogenic genes remained overexpressed in the HB4aC5.2 but not HB4a cells. DHA treatment inhibited all lipogenic genes (except for FABP4) in both cell lines yet only induced death in the HB4aC5.2 cells, mainly when associated with trastuzumab. Neither trastuzumab nor GW9662 alone was able to induce cell death. In conclusion, oncogenic transformation of breast cells by HER2 overexpression may require a reprogramming of lipogenic genetic that is independent of mTORC1 pathway and PPARγ activity. This reprogramming was inhibited by DHA. PMID:26640797

  16. Photoreceptor cell death and rescue in retinal detachment and degenerations

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Yusuke; Notomi, Shoji; Hisatomi, Toshio; Nakazawa, Toru; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Miller, Joan W.; Vavvas, Demetrios G.

    2013-01-01

    Photoreceptor cell death is the ultimate cause of vision loss in various retinal disorders, including retinal detachment (RD). Photoreceptor cell death has been thought to occur mainly through apoptosis, which is the most characterized form of programmed cell death. The caspase family of cysteine proteases plays a central role for inducing apoptosis, and in experimental models of RD, dying photoreceptor cells exhibit caspase activation; however, there is a paradox that caspase inhibition alone does not provide a sufficient protection against photoreceptor cell loss, suggesting that other mechanisms of cell death are involved. Recent accumulating evidence demonstrates that non-apoptotic forms of cell death, such as autophagy and necrosis, are also regulated by specific molecular machinery, such as those mediated by autophagy-related proteins and receptor-interacting protein kinases, respectively. Here we summarize the current knowledge of cell death signaling and its roles in photoreceptor cell death after RD and other retinal degenerative diseases. A body of studies indicate that not only apoptotic but also autophagic and necrotic signaling are involved in photoreceptor cell death, and that combined targeting of these pathways may be an effective neuroprotective strategy for retinal diseases associated with photoreceptor cell loss. PMID:23994436

  17. Diva Reduces Cell Death in Response to Oxidative Stress and Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nicole Suyun; Du, Xiaoli; Lu, Jia; He, Bei Ping

    2012-01-01

    Diva is a member of the Bcl2 family but its function in apoptosis remains largely unclear because of its specific expression found within limited adult tissues. Previous overexpression studies done on various cell lines yielded conflicting conclusions pertaining to its apoptotic function. Here, we discovered the expression of endogenous Diva in PC12 neuronal-like cell line and rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), leading to their utilisation for the functional study of Diva. Through usage of recombinant Fas ligand, hydrogen peroxide, overexpression and knock down experiments, we discovered that Diva plays a crucial pro-survival role via the mitochondrial death pathway. In addition, immunoprecipitation studies also noted a decrease in Diva’s interaction with Bcl2 and Bax following apoptosis induced by oxidative stress. By overexpressing Diva in BMSCs, we had observed an increase in the cells’ capacity to survive under oxidative stress and microglial toxicity. The result obtained from our study gives us reason to believe that Diva plays an important role in controlling the survival of BMSCs. Through overexpression of Diva, the viability of these BMSCs may be boosted under adverse conditions. PMID:22905226

  18. Docetaxel induces Bcl-2- and pro-apoptotic caspase-independent death of human prostate cancer DU145 cells

    PubMed Central

    OGURA, TAKEHARU; TANAKA, YOSHIYUKI; TAMAKI, HIROKI; HARADA, MAMORU

    2016-01-01

    Docetaxel is a useful chemotherapeutic agent for the first-line treatment of hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Abnormal expression of Bcl-2 is commonly found in cancer cells, which increases their anti-apoptotic potency and chemo-resistance. We investigated the effects of Bcl-2 expression status on the susceptibility of DU145 cells, an androgen-independent human prostate cancer cell line, to docetaxel and other anticancer agents. A panel of Bcl-2-expressing DU145 cell lines was established. Bcl-2 expression levels were unrelated to the susceptibility of DU145 cells to docetaxel. The sensitivity of DU145 cells to cisplatin fluctuated, and the sensitivity to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α was decreased by Bcl-2 overexpression. In a xenograft mouse model, overexpression of Bcl-2 drastically decreased the sensitivity of DU145 cells to cisplatin and TNF-α; however, there was no change in the response to docetaxel. Fluorescent microscopy revealed that Bcl-2-overexpression had no effect on the docetaxel-induced death of DU145 cells, but significantly decreased DU145 cell death induced by cisplatin or TNF-α. Interestingly, docetaxel hardly induced caspase-3/7 activation in control or Bcl-2-overexpressing DU145 cells, but did at a low level in LNCaP cells, another prostate cancer cell line. Moreover, in contrast to LNCaP cells, the reduced viabilities of docetaxel-treated control and Bcl-2-overexpressing DU145 cells were not restored by the addition of either a Bid inhibitor or a panel of pro-apoptotic caspase inhibitors. These findings indicate that the antitumor effects of docetaxel on DU145 cells are independent of both Bcl-2 and pro-apoptotic caspases. PMID:27082738

  19. Docetaxel induces Bcl-2- and pro-apoptotic caspase-independent death of human prostate cancer DU145 cells.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Takeharu; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Tamaki, Hiroki; Harada, Mamoru

    2016-06-01

    Docetaxel is a useful chemotherapeutic agent for the first-line treatment of hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Abnormal expression of Bcl-2 is commonly found in cancer cells, which increases their anti-apoptotic potency and chemoresistance. We investigated the effects of Bcl-2 expression status on the susceptibility of DU145 cells, an androgen-independent human prostate cancer cell line, to docetaxel and other anticancer agents. A panel of Bcl-2-expressing DU145 cell lines was established. Bcl-2 expression levels were unrelated to the susceptibility of DU145 cells to docetaxel. The sensitivity of DU145 cells to cisplatin fluctuated, and the sensitivity to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α was decreased by Bcl-2 overexpression. In a xenograft mouse model, overexpression of Bcl-2 drastically decreased the sensitivity of DU145 cells to cisplatin and TNF-α; however, there was no change in the response to docetaxel. Fluorescent microscopy revealed that Bcl-2-overexpression had no effect on the docetaxel-induced death of DU145 cells, but significantly decreased DU145 cell death induced by cisplatin or TNF-α. Interestingly, docetaxel hardly induced caspase-3/7 activation in control or Bcl-2-overexpressing DU145 cells, but did at a low level in LNCaP cells, another prostate cancer cell line. Moreover, in contrast to LNCaP cells, the reduced viabilities of docetaxel-treated control and Bcl-2-overexpressing DU145 cells were not restored by the addition of either a Bid inhibitor or a panel of pro-apoptotic caspase inhibitors. These findings indicate that the antitumor effects of docetaxel on DU145 cells are independent of both Bcl-2 and pro-apoptotic caspases. PMID:27082738

  20. GLABROUS1 overexpression and TRIPTYCHON alter the cell cycle and trichome cell fate in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Szymanski, D B; Marks, M D

    1998-01-01

    Cellular competence, initiation cues, and inhibition signals control the distribution of trichomes on the Arabidopsis leaf. The GLABROUS1 (GL1) gene has a dual role in that it is required for trichome initiation, but GL1 overexpression reduces trichome number. We have found that a mutation in the TRIPTYCHON (TRY) gene partially suppresses the GL1 overexpression phenotype but not in a way that indicates that TRY directly controls an epidermal inhibition pathway. Surprisingly, cauliflower mosaic virus 35S::GL1 try plants contain a subclass of trichomes derived from the subepidermal layer. Altered cell cycle control was also detected in 35S::GL1 and try plants. A mutation in TRY led to increased epidermal and mesophyll cell number, a reduction in endoreduplication in the epidermis, and an increase in endoreduplication in trichomes. GL1 overexpression also reduced endoreduplication levels in both the epidermis and trichomes; however, in the presence of try, it synergistically enhanced trichome endoreduplication. Interactions with the COTYLEDON TRICHOME1 (COT1) gene indicate that GL1 and TRY control trichome development and may be involved in cell cycle control during leaf development. PMID:9836744

  1. S100A4 is frequently overexpressed in lung cancer cells and promotes cell growth and cell motility

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Na; Sato, Daisuke; Saiki, Yuriko; Sunamura, Makoto; Fukushige, Shinichi; Horii, Akira

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • We observed frequent overexpression of S100A4 in lung cancer cell lines. • Knockdown of S100A4 suppressed proliferation in lung cancer cells. • Forced expression of S100A4 accelerated cell motility in lung cancer cells. • PRDM2 was found to be one of the downstream suppressed genes of S100A4. - Abstract: S100A4, a small calcium-binding protein belonging to the S100 protein family, is commonly overexpressed in a variety of tumor types and is widely accepted to associate with metastasis by regulating the motility and invasiveness of cancer cells. However, its biological role in lung carcinogenesis is largely unknown. In this study, we found that S100A4 was frequently overexpressed in lung cancer cells, irrespective of histological subtype. Then we performed knockdown and forced expression of S100A4 in lung cancer cell lines and found that specific knockdown of S100A4 effectively suppressed cell proliferation only in lung cancer cells with S100A4-overexpression; forced expression of S100A4 accelerated cell motility only in S100A4 low-expressing lung cancer cells. PRDM2 and VASH1, identified as novel upregulated genes by microarray after specific knockdown of S100A4 in pancreatic cancer, were also analyzed, and we found that PRDM2 was significantly upregulated after S100A4-knockdown in one of two analyzed S100A4-overexpressing lung cancer cells. Our present results suggest that S100A4 plays an important role in lung carcinogenesis by means of cell proliferation and motility by a pathway similar to that in pancreatic cancer.

  2. The evolution of cell death programs as prerequisites of multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Huettenbrenner, Simone; Maier, Susanne; Leisser, Christina; Polgar, Doris; Strasser, Stephan; Grusch, Michael; Krupitza, Georg

    2003-06-01

    One of the hallmarks of multicellularity is that the individual cellular fate is sacrificed for the benefit of a higher order of life-the organism. The accidental death of cells in a multicellular organism results in swelling and membrane-rupture and inevitably spills cell contents into the surrounding tissue with deleterious effects for the organism. To avoid this form of necrotic death the cells of metazoans have developed complex self-destruction mechanisms, collectively called programmed cell death, which see to an orderly removal of superfluous cells. Since evolution never invents new genes but plays variations on old themes by DNA mutations, it is not surprising, that some of the genes involved in metazoan death pathways apparently have evolved from homologues in unicellular organisms, where they originally had different functions. Interestingly some unicellular protozoans have developed a primitive form of non-necrotic cell death themselves, which could mean that the idea of an altruistic death for the benefit of genetically identical cells predated the invention of multicellularity. The cell death pathways of protozoans, however, show no homology to those in metazoans, where several death pathways seem to have evolved in parallel. Mitochondria stands at the beginning of several death pathways and also determines, whether a cell has sufficient energy to complete a death program. However, the endosymbiotic bacterial ancestors of mitochondria are unlikely to have contributed to the recent mitochondrial death machinery and therefore, these components may derive from mutated eukaryotic precursors and might have invaded the respective mitochondrial compartments. Although there is no direct evidence, it seems that the prokaryotic-eukaryotic symbiosis created the space necessary for sophisticated death mechanisms on command, which in their distinct forms are major factors for the evolution of multicellular organisms. PMID:12787815

  3. Her-2 overexpression increases the metastatic outgrowth of breast cancer cells in the brain.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Diane; Bronder, Julie L; Herring, Jeanne M; Yoneda, Toshiyuki; Weil, Robert J; Stark, Andreas M; Kurek, Raffael; Vega-Valle, Eleazar; Feigenbaum, Lionel; Halverson, Douglas; Vortmeyer, Alexander O; Steinberg, Seth M; Aldape, Kenneth; Steeg, Patricia S

    2007-05-01

    Retrospective studies of breast cancer patients suggest that primary tumor Her-2 overexpression or trastuzumab therapy is associated with a devastating complication: the development of central nervous system (brain) metastases. Herein, we present Her-2 expression trends from resected human brain metastases and data from an experimental brain metastasis assay, both indicative of a functional contribution of Her-2 to brain metastatic colonization. Of 124 archival resected brain metastases from breast cancer patients, 36.2% overexpressed Her-2, indicating an enrichment in the frequency of tumor Her-2 overexpression at this metastatic site. Using quantitative real-time PCR of laser capture microdissected epithelial cells, Her-2 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mRNA levels in a cohort of 12 frozen brain metastases were increased up to 5- and 9-fold, respectively, over those of Her-2-amplified primary tumors. Co-overexpression of Her-2 and EGFR was also observed in a subset of brain metastases. We then tested the hypothesis that overexpression of Her-2 increases the colonization of breast cancer cells in the brain in vivo. A subclone of MDA-MB-231 human breast carcinoma cells that selectively metastasizes to brain (231-BR) overexpressed EGFR; 231-BR cells were transfected with low (4- to 8-fold) or high (22- to 28-fold) levels of Her-2. In vivo, in a model of brain metastasis, low or high Her-2-overexpressing 231-BR clones produced comparable numbers of micrometastases in the brain as control transfectants; however, the Her-2 transfectants yielded 3-fold greater large metastases (>50 microm(2); P < 0.001). Our data indicate that Her-2 overexpression increases the outgrowth of metastatic tumor cells in the brain in this model system. PMID:17483330

  4. Actin as Deathly Switch? How Auxin Can Suppress Cell-Death Related Defence

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Xiaoli; Riemann, Michael; Liu, Qiong; Nick, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Plant innate immunity is composed of two layers – a basal immunity, and a specific effector-triggered immunity, which is often accompanied by hypersensitive cell death. Initiation of cell death depends on a complex network of signalling pathways. The phytohormone auxin as central regulator of plant growth and development represents an important component for the modulation of plant defence. In our previous work, we showed that cell death is heralded by detachment of actin from the membrane. Both, actin response and cell death, are triggered by the bacterial elicitor harpin in grapevine cells. In this study we investigated, whether harpin-triggered actin bundling is necessary for harpin-triggered cell death. Since actin organisation is dependent upon auxin, we used different auxins to suppress actin bundling. Extracellular alkalinisation and transcription of defence genes as the basal immunity were examined as well as cell death. Furthermore, organisation of actin was observed in response to pharmacological manipulation of reactive oxygen species and phospholipase D. We find that induction of defence genes is independent of auxin. However, auxin can suppress harpin-induced cell death and also counteract actin bundling. We integrate our findings into a model, where harpin interferes with an auxin dependent pathway that sustains dynamic cortical actin through the activity of phospholipase D. The antagonism between growth and defence is explained by mutual competition for signal molecules such as superoxide and phosphatidic acid. Perturbations of the auxin-actin pathway might be used to detect disturbed integrity of the plasma membrane and channel defence signalling towards programmed cell death. PMID:25933033

  5. Cancer cell death by design: apoptosis, autophagy and glioma virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Matthew A; Ulasov, Ilya V; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2009-08-01

    Autophagy has been defined as a mechanism by which oncolytic adenoviruses mediate cell killing in some cancers, including malignant glioma. Until recently, however, adenovirus replication was regarded as a process that induced classical apoptosis in the infected cell. We have assessed the method of conditionally replicating adenovirus (CRAd) death in a model of malignant glioma, considering both autophagy and apoptosis as possible mechanisms of virally-induced cell death. Our initial investigations indicated that autophagy was the predominant system in CRAd-induced cell death in glioma. This appeared to be the case in vitro; however, further investigation in vivo shows that CRAds are capable of inducing both apoptotic and autophagic cell death. In this punctum, we summarize our latest research to uncover the method of oncolytic adenovirus-induced cell death in malignant glioma. Elucidating the relationship between autophagy and apoptosis in glioma virotherapy has significant implications for the design of optimal viral vectors. PMID:19430207

  6. Cytoplasmic PELP1 and ERRgamma Protect Human Mammary Epithelial Cells from Tam-Induced Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Brian J.; Regan Anderson, Tarah M.; Welch, Siya Lem; Nicely, Julie; Seewaldt, Victoria L.; Ostrander, Julie H.

    2015-01-01

    Tamoxifen (Tam) is the only FDA-approved chemoprevention agent for pre-menopausal women at high risk for developing breast cancer. While Tam reduces a woman's risk of developing estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer, the molecular mechanisms associated with risk reduction are poorly understood. Prior studies have shown that cytoplasmic proline, glutamic acid and leucine rich protein 1 (PELP1) promotes Tam resistance in breast cancer cell lines. Herein, we tested for PELP1 localization in breast epithelial cells from women at high risk for developing breast cancer and found that PELP1 was localized to the cytoplasm in 36% of samples. In vitro, immortalized HMECs expressing a nuclear localization signal (NLS) mutant of PELP1 (PELP1-cyto) were resistant to Tam-induced death. Furthermore, PELP1-cyto signaling through estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) promoted cell survival in the presence of Tam. Overexpression of ERRγ in immortalized HMECs protected cells from Tam-induced death, while knockdown of ERRγ sensitized PELP1-cyto expressing HMECs to Tam. Moreover, Tam-induced HMEC cell death was independent of apoptosis and involved accumulation of the autophagy marker LC3-II. Expression of PELP1-cyto and ERRγ reduced Tam-induced LC3-II accumulation, and knockdown of ERRγ increased LC3-II levels in response to Tam. Additionally, PELP1-cyto expression led to the upregulation of MMP-3 and MAOB, known PELP1 and ERRγ target genes, respectively. Our data indicate that cytoplasmic PELP1 induces signaling pathways that converge on ERRγ to promote cell survival in the presence of Tam. These data suggest that PELP1 localization and/or ERRγ activation could be developed as tissue biomarkers for Tam responsiveness. PMID:25789479

  7. Cytoplasmic PELP1 and ERRgamma protect human mammary epithelial cells from Tam-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Girard, Brian J; Regan Anderson, Tarah M; Welch, Siya Lem; Nicely, Julie; Seewaldt, Victoria L; Ostrander, Julie H

    2015-01-01

    Tamoxifen (Tam) is the only FDA-approved chemoprevention agent for pre-menopausal women at high risk for developing breast cancer. While Tam reduces a woman's risk of developing estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer, the molecular mechanisms associated with risk reduction are poorly understood. Prior studies have shown that cytoplasmic proline, glutamic acid and leucine rich protein 1 (PELP1) promotes Tam resistance in breast cancer cell lines. Herein, we tested for PELP1 localization in breast epithelial cells from women at high risk for developing breast cancer and found that PELP1 was localized to the cytoplasm in 36% of samples. In vitro, immortalized HMECs expressing a nuclear localization signal (NLS) mutant of PELP1 (PELP1-cyto) were resistant to Tam-induced death. Furthermore, PELP1-cyto signaling through estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) promoted cell survival in the presence of Tam. Overexpression of ERRγ in immortalized HMECs protected cells from Tam-induced death, while knockdown of ERRγ sensitized PELP1-cyto expressing HMECs to Tam. Moreover, Tam-induced HMEC cell death was independent of apoptosis and involved accumulation of the autophagy marker LC3-II. Expression of PELP1-cyto and ERRγ reduced Tam-induced LC3-II accumulation, and knockdown of ERRγ increased LC3-II levels in response to Tam. Additionally, PELP1-cyto expression led to the upregulation of MMP-3 and MAOB, known PELP1 and ERRγ target genes, respectively. Our data indicate that cytoplasmic PELP1 induces signaling pathways that converge on ERRγ to promote cell survival in the presence of Tam. These data suggest that PELP1 localization and/or ERRγ activation could be developed as tissue biomarkers for Tam responsiveness. PMID:25789479

  8. The JNK/c-Jun signaling axis contributes to the TDP-43-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hiroaki; Matsuoka, Masaaki

    2013-01-01

    Dysregulation of transactive response DNA-binding protein-43 (TDP-43) is closely linked to the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions (FTLD-U). The contribution of the upregulation of TDP-43 expression to the pathogenesis has been strongly suggested by the observation that the level of TDP-43 expression is increased in both ALS and FTLD-U patients. We previously found that the low-grade (twice to five times more than the endogenous level) overexpression of TDP-43 induces neuronal cell death through the upregulation of Bim and CHOP expression and the downregulation of Bcl-xL expression. In this study, we further show that the low-grade overexpression of TDP-43 increases the level of phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and the co-incubation with a JNK inhibitor, the expression of a dominant-negative JNK, or the expression of a dominant-negative c-Jun inhibited the TDP-43-induced death in NSC34 motor neuronal cells. These data together suggest that the JNK/c-Jun signaling axis contributes to the TDP-43-induced cell death. PMID:23001869

  9. Analysis of cell death inducing compounds.

    PubMed

    Spicker, Jeppe S; Pedersen, Henrik Toft; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Brunak, Søren

    2007-11-01

    Biomarkers for early detection of toxicity hold the promise of improving the failure rates in drug development. In the present study, gene expression levels were measured using full-genome RAE230 version 2 Affymetrix GeneChips on rat liver tissue 48 h after administration of six different compounds, three toxins (ANIT, DMN and NMF) and three non-toxins (Caeruelein, Dinitrophenol and Rosiglitazone). We identified three gene transcripts with exceptional predictive performance towards liver toxicity and/or changes in histopathology. The three genes were: glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR), ornithine aminotransferase (OAT) and Cytochrome P450, subfamily IIC (mephenytoin 4-hydroxylase) (Cyp2C29). RT-PCR for these three genes was performed and four additional compounds were included for validation. The quantitative RT-PCR analysis confirmed the findings based on the microarray data and using the three genes a classification rate of 55 of 57 samples was achieved for the classification of not toxic versus toxic. The single most promising biomarker (OAT) alone resulted in a surprisingly 100% correctly classified samples. OAT has not previously been linked to toxicity and cell death in the literature and the novel finding represents a putative hepatotoxicity biomarker. PMID:17503021

  10. Rab23 is overexpressed in human bladder cancer and promotes cancer cell proliferation and invasion.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuanjun; Han, Yushuang; Sun, Chaonan; Han, Chuyang; Han, Ning; Zhi, Weiwei; Qiao, Qiao

    2016-06-01

    Rab23 overexpression has been implicated in several human cancers. However, its expression pattern and biological roles in human bladder cancer have not been elucidated. In this study, we examined Rab23 expression in 93 bladder cancer specimens and analyzed its correlation with clinicopathological parameters. We found that Rab23 was overexpressed in 45 of 93 (48.3 %) cancer specimens. Significant association was found between Rab23 overexpression and tumor invasion depth (p = 0.0027). Rab23 overexpression also negatively correlated with FGFR3 protein expression (p = 0.021). We found that Rab23 expression was lower in normal bladder transitional cell line SV-HUC-1 than in bladder cancer cell lines BIU-87, 5637, and T24. We knocked down Rab23 expression in T24 cancer cells and transfected a Rab23 plasmid in the BIU-87 cell line. Rab23 depletion inhibited cell growth rate and invasion, while its overexpression resulted in increased cell growth and invasion. In addition, we demonstrated that Rab23 depletion decreased and its transfection upregulated expression of cyclin E, c-myc, and MMP-9. Furthermore, we showed that Rab23 knockdown inhibited NF-κB signaling and its overexpression upregulated NF-κB signaling. BAY 11-7082 (NF-κB inhibitor) partly inhibited the effect of Rab23 on cyclin E and MMP-9 expression. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that Rab23 overexpression facilitates malignant cell growth and invasion in bladder cancer through the NF-κB pathway. PMID:26715272

  11. HSPB1 as a novel regulator of ferroptotic cancer cell death.

    PubMed

    Sun, X; Ou, Z; Xie, M; Kang, R; Fan, Y; Niu, X; Wang, H; Cao, L; Tang, D

    2015-11-01

    Ferroptosis is an iron-dependent form of non-apoptotic cell death, but its molecular mechanism remains largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that heat shock protein beta-1 (HSPB1) is a negative regulator of ferroptotic cancer cell death. Erastin, a specific ferroptosis-inducing compound, stimulates heat shock factor 1 (HSF1)-dependent HSPB1 expression in cancer cells. Knockdown of HSF1 and HSPB1 enhances erastin-induced ferroptosis, whereas heat shock pretreatment and overexpression of HSPB1 inhibits erastin-induced ferroptosis. Protein kinase C-mediated HSPB1 phosphorylation confers protection against ferroptosis by reducing iron-mediated production of lipid reactive oxygen species. Moreover, inhibition of the HSF1-HSPB1 pathway and HSPB1 phosphorylation increases the anticancer activity of erastin in human xenograft mouse tumor models. Our findings reveal an essential role for HSPB1 in iron metabolism with important effects on ferroptosis-mediated cancer therapy. PMID:25728673

  12. Cdc42 overexpression induces hyperbranching in the developing mammary gland by enhancing cell migration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The Rho GTPase Cdc42 is overexpressed and hyperactivated in breast tumors compared to normal breast tissue. Cdc42 regulates key processes that are critical for mammary gland morphogenesis and become disrupted during the development, progression, and metastasis of breast cancer. However, the contribution of Cdc42 to normal and neoplastic mammary gland development in vivo remains poorly understood. We were therefore interested in investigating the effects of Cdc42 overexpression on mammary gland morphogenesis as a first step toward understanding how its overexpression may contribute to mammary tumorigenesis. Methods We developed a tetracycline-regulatable Cdc42 overexpression mouse model in which Cdc42 can be inducibly overexpressed in the developing mammary gland. The effects of Cdc42 overexpression during postnatal mammary gland development were investigated using in vivo and in vitro approaches, including morphometric analysis of wholemounted mammary glands, quantification of histological markers, and primary mammary epithelial cell (MEC) functional and biochemical assays. Results Analysis of Cdc42-overexpressing mammary glands revealed abnormal terminal end bud (TEB) morphologies, characterized by hyperbudding and trifurcation, and increased side branching within the ductal tree. Quantification of markers of proliferation and apoptosis suggested that these phenotypes were not due to increased cell proliferation or survival. Rather, Cdc42 overexpressing MECs were more migratory and contractile and formed dysmorphic, invasive acini in three-dimensional cultures. Cdc42 and RhoA activities, phosphorylated myosin light chain, and MAPK signaling, which contribute to migration and invasion, were markedly elevated in Cdc42 overexpressing MECs. Interestingly, Cdc42 overexpressing mammary glands displayed several features associated with altered epithelial-stromal interactions, which are known to regulate branching morphogenesis. These included increased

  13. Fetal PGC-1α Overexpression Programs Adult Pancreatic β-Cell Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Valtat, Bérengère; Riveline, Jean-Pierre; Zhang, Ping; Singh-Estivalet, Amrit; Armanet, Mathieu; Venteclef, Nicolas; Besseiche, Adrien; Kelly, Daniel P.; Tronche, François; Ferré, Pascal; Gautier, Jean-François; Bréant, Bernadette; Blondeau, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    Adult β-cell dysfunction, a hallmark of type 2 diabetes, can be programmed by adverse fetal environment. We have shown that fetal glucocorticoids (GCs) participate in this programming through inhibition of β-cell development. Here we have investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying this regulation. We showed that GCs stimulate the expression of peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), a coregulator of the GCs receptor (GR), and that the overexpression of PGC-1α represses genes important for β-cell development and function. More precisely, PGC-1α inhibited the expression of the key β-cell transcription factor pancreatic duodenal homeobox 1 (Pdx1). This repression required the GR and was mediated through binding of a GR/PGC-1α complex to the Pdx1 promoter. To explore PGC-1α function, we generated mice with inducible β-cell PGC-1α overexpression. Mice overexpressing PGC-1α exhibited at adult age impaired glucose tolerance associated with reduced insulin secretion, decreased β-cell mass, and β-cell hypotrophy. Interestingly, PGC-1α expression in fetal life only was sufficient to impair adult β-cell function whereas β-cell PGC-1α overexpression from adult age had no consequence on β-cell function. Altogether, our results demonstrate that the GR and PGC-1α participate in the fetal programming of adult β-cell function through inhibition of Pdx1 expression. PMID:23274887

  14. Triggering Death of Adherent Cells with Ultraviolet Radiation.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Lisa C; Waterhouse, Nigel J

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a convenient stimulus for triggering cell death that is available in most laboratories. We use a Stratalinker UV cross-linker because it is a safe, cheap, reliable, consistent, and easily controlled source of UV irradiation. This protocol describes using a Stratalinker to trigger UV-induced death of HeLa cells. PMID:27371593

  15. Redox regulation of Smac mimetic-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Fulda, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Cell death and survival programs are controlled by the cellular redox state, which is typically dysregulated during oncogenesis. A recent study reports that the inhibition of antioxidant defenses resulting from glutathione depletion can prime acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells for death induced by Smac mimetics. PMID:27308489

  16. Overexpression of Pax6 results in microphthalmia, retinal dysplasia and defective retinal ganglion cell axon guidance

    PubMed Central

    Manuel, Martine; Pratt, Thomas; Liu, Min; Jeffery, Glen; Price, David J

    2008-01-01

    Background The transcription factor Pax6 is expressed by many cell types in the developing eye. Eyes do not form in homozygous loss-of-function mouse mutants (Pax6Sey/Sey) and are abnormally small in Pax6Sey/+ mutants. Eyes are also abnormally small in PAX77 mice expressing multiple copies of human PAX6 in addition to endogenous Pax6; protein sequences are identical in the two species. The developmental events that lead to microphthalmia in PAX77 mice are not well-characterised, so it is not clear whether over- and under-expression of Pax6/PAX6 cause microphthalmia through similar mechanisms. Here, we examined the consequences of over-expression for the eye and its axonal connections. Results Eyes form in PAX77+/+ embryos but subsequently degenerate. At E12.5, we found no abnormalities in ocular morphology, retinal cell cycle parameters and the incidence of retinal cell death. From E14.5 on, we observed malformations of the optic disc. From E16.5 into postnatal life there is progressively more severe retinal dysplasia and microphthalmia. Analyses of patterns of gene expression indicated that PAX77+/+ retinae produce a normal range of cell types, including retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). At E14.5 and E16.5, quantitative RT-PCR with probes for a range of molecules associated with retinal development showed only one significant change: a slight reduction in levels of mRNA encoding the secreted morphogen Shh at E16.5. At E16.5, tract-tracing with carbocyanine dyes in PAX77+/+ embryos revealed errors in intraretinal navigation by RGC axons, a decrease in the number of RGC axons reaching the thalamus and an increase in the proportion of ipsilateral projections among those RGC axons that do reach the thalamus. A survey of embryos with different Pax6/PAX6 gene dosage (Pax6Sey/+, Pax6+/+, PAX77+ and PAX77+/+) showed that (1) the total number of RGC axons projected by the retina and (2) the proportions that are sorted into the ipsilateral and contralateral optic tracts at the

  17. Short-form RON overexpression augments benzyl isothiocyanate-induced apoptosis in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sehrawat, Anuradha; Singh, Shivendra V

    2016-05-01

    Chemoprevention of breast cancer is feasible with the use of non-toxic phytochemicals from edible and medicinal plants. Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) is one such plant compound that prevents mammary cancer development in a transgenic mouse model in association with tumor cell apoptosis. Prior studies from our laboratory have demonstrated a role for reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent Bax activation through the intermediary of c-Jun N-terminal kinases in BITC-induced apoptosis in human breast cancer cells. The present study demonstrates that truncated Recepteur d'Origine Nantais (sfRON) is a novel regulator of BITC-induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells. Overexpression of sfRON in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-361 cells resulted in augmentation of BITC-induced apoptosis when the apoptotic fraction was normalized against vehicle control for each cell type (untransfected and sfRON overexpressing cells). ROS generation and G2 /M phase cell cycle arrest resulting from BITC treatment were significantly attenuated in sfRON overexpressing cells after normalization with vehicle control for each cell type. Increased BITC-induced apoptosis by sfRON overexpression was independent of c-Jun N-terminal kinase or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase hyperphosphorylation. On the other hand, activation of Bax and Bak following BITC exposure was markedly more pronounced in sfRON overexpressing cells than in controls. sfRON overexpression also augmented apoptosis induction by structurally diverse cancer chemopreventive phytochemicals including withaferin A, phenethyl isothiocyanate, and D,L-sulforaphane. In conclusion, the present study provides novel mechanistic insights into the role of sfRON in apoptosis regulation by BITC and other electrophilic phytochemicals. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25857724

  18. Ultra-violet B (UVB)-induced skin cell death occurs through a cyclophilin D intrinsic signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Chao; Yang, Bo; Yang, Zhi; Tu, Ying; Yang, Yan-li; He, Li; Bi, Zhi-Gang

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UVB radiated skin keratinocytes show cyclophilin D (Cyp-D) upregulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NAC inhibits UVB induced Cyp-D expression, while H{sub 2}O{sub 2} facilitates it. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyp-D-deficient cells are significantly less susceptible to UVB induced cell death. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Over-expression of Cyp-D causes spontaneous keratinocytes cell death. -- Abstract: UVB-induced skin cell damage involves the opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), which leads to both apoptotic and necrotic cell death. Cyclophilin D (Cyp-D) translocation to the inner membrane of mitochondrion acts as a key component to open the mPTP. Our Western-Blot results in primary cultured human skin keratinocytes and in HaCaT cell line demonstrated that UVB radiation and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) induced Cyp-D expression, which was inhibited by anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). We created a stable Cyp-D deficiency skin keratinocytes by expressing Cyp-D-shRNA through lentiviral infection. Cyp-D-deficient cells were significantly less susceptible than their counterparts to UVB- or H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cell death. Further, cyclosporine A (Cs-A), a Cyp-D inhibitor, inhibited UVB- or H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced keratinocytes cell death. Reversely, over-expression of Cyp-D in primary keratinocytes caused spontaneous keratinocytes cell death. These results suggest Cyp-D's critical role in UVB/oxidative stress-induced skin cell death.

  19. LFC131 peptide-conjugated polymeric nanoparticles for the effective delivery of docetaxel in CXCR4 overexpressed lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruo-Tian; Zhi, Xiu-Yi; Yao, Shu-Yang; Zhang, Yi

    2015-09-01

    CXCR4 is a chemokine receptor which is over expressed in multiple cancers including lung cancers. LFC131 peptide (d-Tyr-Arg-Arg-2-Nal-Gly), an inhibitor of CXCR4-ligand binding, is a low molecular weight CXCR4 antagonist. In this study, we developed novel LFC131 peptide surface conjugated O-carboxymethyl chitosan nanoparticles (O-CMC NP) to target CXCR4 over expressed A549 lung cancer cells. CXCR4-targeted drug delivery system was characterized for its binding, uptake, targeting specificity, and in vitro antitumour effect. Our main goal was to increase the intracellular concentration of docetaxel (DTX) in the cancer cells via a targeted approach. We have reported a nanosized particle with spherical shape and showed a high loading capacity. The CMC NP showed a controlled release pattern and presence of LFC131 did not influence the release of DTX. The fluorescence analysis showed an enhanced cell uptake for targeted NP via CXCR4-LFC131 biological interactions. The receptor-mediated cellular internalization was further confirmed confocal microscopy. The cytotoxicity assays showed enhanced cancer cell death by targeted NPs due to the selective delivery of DTX. Consistent with the cellular uptake analysis, targeted NPs induced a greater caspase-3 activity in A549 cancer cells. LFC/CMC NP exhibited a remarkable cell apoptosis by inducing apoptotic and necrotic cell death. Together, targeted LFC/CMC NP significantly enhanced cancer cell death than compared to non-targeted and free drugs. This kind of targeted nanoplatform which is based on polymeric nanocarriers could further facilitate a treatment protocol for CXCR4 overexpressing A549 lung cancer cells. PMID:26070050

  20. Aire-Overexpressing Dendritic Cells Induce Peripheral CD4+ T Cell Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongbei; Li, Haijun; Fu, Haiying; Niu, Kunwei; Guo, Yantong; Guo, Chuan; Sun, Jitong; Li, Yi; Yang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune regulator (Aire) can promote the ectopic expression of peripheral tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs) in thymic medullary epithelial cells (mTECs), which leads to the deletion of autoreactive T cells and consequently prevents autoimmune diseases. However, the functions of Aire in the periphery, such as in dendritic cells (DCs), remain unclear. This study’s aim was to investigate the effect of Aire-overexpressing DCs (Aire cells) on the functions of CD4+ T cells and the treatment of type 1 diabetes (T1D). We demonstrated that Aire cells upregulated the mRNA levels of the tolerance-related molecules CD73, Lag3, and FR4 and the apoptosis of CD4+ T cells in STZ-T1D mouse-derived splenocytes. Furthermore, following insulin stimulation, Aire cells decreased the number of CD4+ IFN-γ+ T cells in both STZ-T1D and WT mouse-derived splenocytes and reduced the expression levels of TCR signaling molecules (Ca2+ and p-ERK) in CD4+ T cells. We observed that Aire cells-induced CD4+ T cells could delay the development of T1D. In summary, Aire-expressing DCs inhibited TCR signaling pathways and decreased the quantity of CD4+IFN-γ+ autoreactive T cells. These data suggest a mechanism for Aire in the maintenance of peripheral immune tolerance and provide a potential method to control autoimmunity by targeting Aire. PMID:26729097

  1. Capsaicin induces immunogenic cell death in human osteosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Tao; Wu, Hongyan; Wang, Yanlin; Peng, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Immunogenic cell death (ICD) is characterized by the early surface exposure of calreticulin (CRT). As a specific signaling molecule, CRT on the surface of apoptotic tumor cells mediates the recognition and phagocytosis of tumor cells by antigen presenting cells. To date, only a small quantity of anti-cancer chemicals have been found to induce ICD, therefore it is clinically important to identify novel chemicals that may induce ICD. The purpose of the present study is to explore the function of capsaicin in inducing ICD. In the current study, MTT assays were used to examine the growth inhibiting effects of MG-63 cells when they were treated with capsaicin or cisplatin. Mitochondrial membrane potential and western blot analysis were used to investigate capsaicin- and cisplatin-induced apoptosis. In addition, the effects of capsaicin and cisplatin were evaluated for their abilities in inducing calreticulin membrane translocation and mediating ICD in human osteosarcoma cells (MG-63). The results demonstrated that capsaicin and cisplatin can induce the apoptosis of MG-63 cells. However, only capsaicin induced a rapid translocation of CRT from the intracellular space to the cell surface. Treatment with capsaicin increased phagocytosis of MG-63 cells by dendritic cells (DCs), and these MG-63-loaded DCs could efficiently stimulate the secretion of IFN-γ by lymphocytes. These results identify capsaicin as an anti-cancer agent capable of inducing ICD in human osteosarcoma cells in vitro. PMID:27446273

  2. Capsaicinoids Cause Inflammation and Epithelial Cell Death through Activation of Vanilloid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, Christopher A.; Taylor, Jack L.; Lanza, Diane L.; Carr, Brian A.; Crouch, Dennis J.; Yost, Garold S.

    2008-01-01

    Capsaicinoids, found in less-than-lethal self-defense weapons, have been associated with respiratory failure and death in exposed animals and people. The studies described herein provide evidence for acute respiratory inflammation and damage to epithelial cells in experimental animals, and provide precise molecular mechanisms that mediate these effects using human bronchiolar and alveolar epithelial cells. Inhalation exposure of rats to pepper sprays (capsaicinoids) produced acute inflammation and damage to nasal, tracheal, bronchiolar, and alveolar cells in a dose-related manner. In vitro cytotoxicity assays demonstrated that cultured human lung cells (BEAS-2B and A549) were more susceptible to necrotic cell death than liver (HepG2) cells. Transcription of the human vanilloid receptor type-1, VR1 or TRPV1, was demonstrated by RT-PCR in all of these cells, and the relative transcript levels were correlated to cellular susceptibility. TRPV1 receptor activation was presumably responsible for cellular cytotoxicity, but prototypical functional antagonists of this receptor were cytotoxic themselves, and did not ameliorate capsaicinoid-induced damage. Conversely, the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine, as well as calcium chelation by EGTA ablated cytokine (IL-6) production after capsaicin exposure. To address these seemingly contradictory results, recombinant human TRPV1 was cloned and overexpressed in BEAS-2B cells. These cells exhibited dramatically increased cellular susceptibility to capsaicinoids, measured using IL-6 production and cytotoxicity, and an apoptotic mechanism of cell death. Surprisingly, the cytotoxic effects of capsaicin in TRPV1 overexpressing cells were also not inhibited by TRPV1 antagonists or by treatments that modified extracellular calcium. Thus, capsaicin interacted with TRPV1 expressed by BEAS-2B and other airway epithelial cells to cause the calcium-dependent production of cytokines and, conversely, calcium-independent cell death. These results

  3. Capsaicinoids cause inflammation and epithelial cell death through activation of vanilloid receptors.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Christopher A; Taylor, Jack L; Lanza, Diane L; Carr, Brian A; Crouch, Dennis J; Yost, Garold S

    2003-05-01

    Capsaicinoids, found in less-than-lethal self-defense weapons, have been associated with respiratory failure and death in exposed animals and people. The studies described herein provide evidence for acute respiratory inflammation and damage to epithelial cells in experimental animals, and provide precise molecular mechanisms that mediate these effects using human bronchiolar and alveolar epithelial cells. Inhalation exposure of rats to pepper sprays (capsaicinoids) produced acute inflammation and damage to nasal, tracheal, bronchiolar, and alveolar cells in a dose-related manner. In vitro cytotoxicity assays demonstrated that cultured human lung cells (BEAS-2B and A549) were more susceptible to necrotic cell death than liver (HepG2) cells. Transcription of the human vanilloid receptor type-1, VR1 or TRPV1, was demonstrated by RT-PCR in all of these cells, and the relative transcript levels were correlated to cellular susceptibility. TRPV1 receptor activation was presumably responsible for cellular cytotoxicity, but prototypical functional antagonists of this receptor were cytotoxic themselves, and did not ameliorate capsaicinoid-induced damage. Conversely, the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine, as well as calcium chelation by EGTA ablated cytokine (IL-6) production after capsaicin exposure. To address these seemingly contradictory results, recombinant human TRPV1 was cloned and overexpressed in BEAS-2B cells. These cells exhibited dramatically increased cellular susceptibility to capsaicinoids, measured using IL-6 production and cytotoxicity, and an apoptotic mechanism of cell death. Surprisingly, the cytotoxic effects of capsaicin in TRPV1 overexpressing cells were also not inhibited by TRPV1 antagonists or by treatments that modified extracellular calcium. Thus, capsaicin interacted with TRPV1 expressed by BEAS-2B and other airway epithelial cells to cause the calcium-dependent production of cytokines and, conversely, calcium-independent cell death. These results

  4. Mitochondrial involvement in cell death of non-mammalian eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Abdelwahid, Eltyeb; Rolland, Stephane; Teng, Xinchen; Conradt, Barbara; Hardwick, J. Marie; White, Kristin

    2010-01-01

    Although mitochondria are essential organelles for long-term survival of eukaryotic cells, recent discoveries in biochemistry and genetics have advanced our understanding of the requirements for mitochondria in cell death. Much of what we understand about cell death is based on the identification of conserved cell death genes in Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans. However, the role of mitochondria in cell death in these models has been much less clear. Considering the active role that mitochondria play in apoptosis in mammalian cells, the mitochondrial contribution to cell death in non-mammalian systems has been an area of active investigation. In this article, we review the current research on this topic in three non-mammalian models, C. elegans, Drosophila and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In addition, we discuss how non-mammalian models have provided important insight into the mechanisms of human disease as they relate to the mitochondrial pathway of cell death. The unique perspective derived from each of these model systems provides a more complete understanding of mitochondria in programmed cell death. PMID:20950655

  5. Cetuximab enhanced the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agent in ABCB1/P-glycoprotein-overexpressing cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao; Huang, Yue; Zhao, Jianming; Wang, Xiaokun; Yang, Ke; Ma, Shaolin; Huang, Liyan; Wah To, Kenneth Kin; Gu, Yong; Fu, Liwu

    2015-01-01

    The overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters is closely associated with the development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in certain types of cancer, which represents a formidable obstacle to the successful cancer chemotherapy. Here, we investigated that cetuximab, an EGFR monoclonal antibody, reversed the chemoresistance mediated by ABCB1, ABCG2 or ABCC1. Our results showed that cetuximab significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of ABCB1 substrate agent in ABCB1-overexpressing MDR cells but had no effect in their parental drug sensitive cells and ABCC1, ABCG2 overexpressing cells. Furthermore, cetuximab markedly increased intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin (DOX) and rhodamine 123 (Rho 123) in ABCB1-overexpressing MDR cancer cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Cetuximab stimulated the ATPase activity but did not alter the expression level of ABCB1 or block phosphorylation of AKT and ERK. Interestingly, cetuximab decreased the cell membrane fluidity which was known to decrease the function of ABCB1. Our findings advocate further clinical investigation of combination chemotherapy of cetuximab and conventional chemotherapeutic drugs in ABCB1 overexpressing cancer patients. PMID:26506420

  6. Downregulation of B-cell lymphoma/leukemia-2 by overexpressed microRNA 34a enhanced titanium dioxide nanoparticle-induced autophagy in BEAS-2B cells

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Wenlin; Chen, Yujiao; Sun, Pengling; Gao, Ai

    2016-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (TNPs) are manufactured worldwide for a wide range of applications and the toxic effect of TNPs on biological systems is gaining attention. Autophagy is recognized as an emerging toxicity mechanism triggered by nanomaterials. MicroRNA 34a (miR34a) acts as a tumor suppressor gene by targeting many oncogenes, but how it affects autophagy induced by TNPs is not completely understood. Here, we observed the activation of TNP-induced autophagy through monodansylcadaverine staining and LC3-I/LC3-II conversion. Meanwhile, the transmission electron microscope ultrastructural analysis showed typical morphological characteristics in autophagy process. We detected the expression of miR34a and B-cell lymphoma/leukemia-2 (Bcl-2). In addition, the underlying mechanism of TNP-induced autophagy was performed using overexpression of miR34a by lentivirus vector transfection. Results showed that TNPs induced autophagy generation evidently. Typical morphological changes in the process of autophagy were observed by the transmission electron microscope ultrastructural analysis and LC3-I/LC3-II conversion increased significantly in TNP-treated cells. Meanwhile, TNPs induced the downregulation of miR34a and increased the expression of Bcl-2. Furthermore, overexpressed miR34a decreased the expression of Bcl-2 both in messenger RNA and protein level, following which the level of autophagy and cell death rate increased after the transfected cells were incubated with TNPs for 24 hours. These findings provide the first evidence that overexpressed miR34a enhanced TNP-induced autophagy and cell death through targeted downregulation of Bcl-2 in BEAS-2B cells. PMID:27226226

  7. Ferroptosis: an iron-dependent form of nonapoptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Scott J; Lemberg, Kathryn M; Lamprecht, Michael R; Skouta, Rachid; Zaitsev, Eleina M; Gleason, Caroline E; Patel, Darpan N; Bauer, Andras J; Cantley, Alexandra M; Yang, Wan Seok; Morrison, Barclay; Stockwell, Brent R

    2012-05-25

    Nonapoptotic forms of cell death may facilitate the selective elimination of some tumor cells or be activated in specific pathological states. The oncogenic RAS-selective lethal small molecule erastin triggers a unique iron-dependent form of nonapoptotic cell death that we term ferroptosis. Ferroptosis is dependent upon intracellular iron, but not other metals, and is morphologically, biochemically, and genetically distinct from apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagy. We identify the small molecule ferrostatin-1 as a potent inhibitor of ferroptosis in cancer cells and glutamate-induced cell death in organotypic rat brain slices, suggesting similarities between these two processes. Indeed, erastin, like glutamate, inhibits cystine uptake by the cystine/glutamate antiporter (system x(c)(-)), creating a void in the antioxidant defenses of the cell and ultimately leading to iron-dependent, oxidative death. Thus, activation of ferroptosis results in the nonapoptotic destruction of certain cancer cells, whereas inhibition of this process may protect organisms from neurodegeneration. PMID:22632970

  8. Independent controls for neocortical neuron production and histogenetic cell death

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verney, C.; Takahashi, T.; Bhide, P. G.; Nowakowski, R. S.; Caviness, V. S. Jr

    2000-01-01

    We estimated the proportion of cells eliminated by histogenetic cell death during the first 2 postnatal weeks in areas 1, 3 and 40 of the mouse parietal neocortex. For each layer and for the subcortical white matter in each neocortical area, the number of dying cells per mm(2) was calculated and the proportionate cell death for each day of the 2-week interval was estimated. The data show that cell death proceeds essentially uniformly across the neocortical areas and layers and that it does not follow either the spatiotemporal gradient of cell cycle progression in the pseudostratified ventricular epithelium of the cerebral wall, the source of neocortical neurons, or the 'inside-out' neocortical neuronogenetic sequence. Therefore, we infer that the control mechanisms of neocortical histogenetic cell death are independent of mechanisms controlling neuronogenesis or neuronal migration but may be associated with the ingrowth, expansion and a system-wide matching of neuronal connectivity. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Further considerations on in vitro skeletal muscle cell death

    PubMed Central

    Battistelli, Michela; Salucci, Sara; Burattini, Sabrina; Falcieri, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    Summary The present review discusses the apoptotic behavior induced by chemical and physical triggers in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells, comparing myoblast to myotube sensitivity, and investigating it by means of morphological, biochemical and cytofluorimetric analyses. After all treatments, myotubes, differently from myoblasts, showed a poor sensitivity to cell death. Intriguingly, in cells exposed to staurosporine, etoposide and UVB radiation, apoptotic and normal nuclei within the same fibercould be revealed. The presence of nuclear-dependent “territorial” death domains in the syncytium could explain a delayed cell death of myotubes compared to mononucleated cells. Moreover, autophagic granules abundantly appeared in myotubes after each treatment. Autophagy could protect muscle cell integrity against chemical and physical stimuli, making C2C12 myotubes, more resistant to cell death induction. PMID:24596689

  10. Synchronized renal tubular cell death involves ferroptosis

    PubMed Central

    Skouta, Rachid; Himmerkus, Nina; Mulay, Shrikant R.; Dewitz, Christin; De Zen, Federica; Prokai, Agnes; Zuchtriegel, Gabriele; Krombach, Fritz; Welz, Patrick-Simon; Weinlich, Ricardo; Vanden Berghe, Tom; Vandenabeele, Peter; Pasparakis, Manolis; Bleich, Markus; Weinberg, Joel M.; Reichel, Christoph A.; Bräsen, Jan Hinrich; Kunzendorf, Ulrich; Anders, Hans-Joachim; Stockwell, Brent R.; Green, Douglas R.; Krautwald, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Receptor-interacting protein kinase 3 (RIPK3)-mediated necroptosis is thought to be the pathophysiologically predominant pathway that leads to regulated necrosis of parenchymal cells in ischemia–reperfusion injury (IRI), and loss of either Fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD) or caspase-8 is known to sensitize tissues to undergo spontaneous necroptosis. Here, we demonstrate that renal tubules do not undergo sensitization to necroptosis upon genetic ablation of either FADD or caspase-8 and that the RIPK1 inhibitor necrostatin-1 (Nec-1) does not protect freshly isolated tubules from hypoxic injury. In contrast, iron-dependent ferroptosis directly causes synchronized necrosis of renal tubules, as demonstrated by intravital microscopy in models of IRI and oxalate crystal-induced acute kidney injury. To suppress ferroptosis in vivo, we generated a novel third-generation ferrostatin (termed 16-86), which we demonstrate to be more stable, to metabolism and plasma, and more potent, compared with the first-in-class compound ferrostatin-1 (Fer-1). Even in conditions with extraordinarily severe IRI, 16-86 exerts strong protection to an extent which has not previously allowed survival in any murine setting. In addition, 16-86 further potentiates the strong protective effect on IRI mediated by combination therapy with necrostatins and compounds that inhibit mitochondrial permeability transition. Renal tubules thus represent a tissue that is not sensitized to necroptosis by loss of FADD or caspase-8. Finally, ferroptosis mediates postischemic and toxic renal necrosis, which may be therapeutically targeted by ferrostatins and by combination therapy. PMID:25385600

  11. Overexpression of Rac1 in leukemia patients and its role in leukemia cell migration and growth

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jiying; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Wei, Hui; Xing, Haiyan; Liu, Hang; Wang, Yanzhong; Tang, Kejing; Peng, Leiwen; Tian, Zheng; Wang, Jianxiang

    2009-09-04

    Rac1 belongs to the Rho family that act as critical mediators of signaling pathways controlling cell migration and proliferation and contributes to the interactions of hematopoietic stem cells with their microenvironment. Alteration of Rac1 might result in unbalanced interactions and ultimately lead to leukemogenesis. In this study, we analyze the expression of Rac1 protein in leukemia patients and determine its role in the abnormal behaviours of leukemic cells. Rac1 protein is overexpressed in primary acute myeloid leukemia cells as compared to normal bone marrow mononuclear cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of Rac1 in leukemia cell lines induced inhibition of cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, blocking Rac1 activity by an inhibitor of Rac1-GTPase, NSC23766, suppressed cell migration and growth. We conclude that overexpression of Rac1 contributes to the accelerated migration and high proliferation potential of leukemia cells, which could be implicated in leukemia development and progression.

  12. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 3 is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma and promotes tumor cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Chunyang; Xie, Haiyang; Zhou, Lin; Zhou, Wuhua; Zhang, Wu; Ding, Songming; Wei, Bajin; Yu, Xiaobo; Su, Rong; Zheng, Shusen

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDKN3 is commonly overexpressed in HCC and is associated with poor clinical outcome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of CDKN3 could stimulate the proliferation of HCC cells by promoting G1/S transition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDKN3 could inhibit the expression of p21 in HCC cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of CDKN3 has no effect on apoptosis and invasion of HCC cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We identified 61 genes co-expressed with CDKN3, and BIRC5 was located at the center of the co-expression network. -- Abstract: Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 3 (CDKN3) belongs to the protein phosphatases family and has a dual function in cell cycling. The function of this gene has been studied in several kinds of cancers, but its role in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains to be elucidated. In this study, we found that CDKN3 was frequently overexpressed in both HCC cell lines and clinical samples, and this overexpression was correlated with poor tumor differentiation and advanced tumor stage. Functional studies showed that overexpression of CDKN3 could promote cell proliferation by stimulating G1-S transition but has no impact on cell apoptosis and invasion. Microarray-based co-expression analysis identified a total of 61 genes co-expressed with CDKN3, with most of them involved in cell proliferation, and BIRC5 was located at the center of CDKN3 co-expression network. These results suggest that CDKN3 acts as an oncogene in human hepatocellular carcinoma and antagonism of CDKN3 may be of interest for the treatment of HCC.

  13. Programmed Cell Death and Complexity in Microbial Systems.

    PubMed

    Durand, Pierre M; Sym, Stuart; Michod, Richard E

    2016-07-11

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is central to organism development and for a long time was considered a hallmark of multicellularity. Its discovery, therefore, in unicellular organisms presents compelling questions. Why did PCD evolve? What is its ecological effect on communities? To answer these questions, one is compelled to consider the impacts of PCD beyond the cell, for death obviously lowers the fitness of the cell. Here, we examine the ecological effects of PCD in different microbial scenarios and conclude that PCD can increase biological complexity. In mixed microbial communities, the mode of death affects the microenvironment, impacting the interactions between taxa. Where the population comprises groups of relatives, death has a more explicit effect. Death by lysis or other means can be harmful, while PCD can evolve by providing advantages to relatives. The synchronization of death between individuals suggests a group level property is being maintained and the mode of death also appears to have had an impact during the origin of multicellularity. PCD can result in the export of fitness from the cell to the group level via re-usable resources and PCD may also provide a mechanism for how groups beget new groups comprising kin. Furthermore, PCD is a means for solving a central problem of group living - the toxic effects of death - by making resources in dying cells beneficial to others. What emerges from the data reviewed here is that while PCD carries an obvious cost to the cell, it can be a driver of complexity in microbial communities. PMID:27404254

  14. Cotreatment with Smac mimetics and demethylating agents induces both apoptotic and necroptotic cell death pathways in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Gerges, Steve; Rohde, Katharina; Fulda, Simone

    2016-05-28

    Treatment resistance in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is often caused by defects in programmed cell death, e.g. by overexpression of Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP) proteins. Here, we report that small-molecule Smac mimetics (i.e. BV6, LCL161, birinapant) that neutralize x-linked IAP (XIAP), cellular IAP (cIAP)1 and cIAP2 cooperate with demethylating agents (i.e. 5-azacytidine (5AC) or 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC)) to induce cell death in ALL cells. Molecular studies reveal that induction of cell death is preceded by BV6-mediated depletion of cIAP1 protein and involves tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α autocrine/paracrine signaling, since the TNFα-blocking antibody Enbrel significantly reduces BV6/5AC-induced cell death. While BV6/5AC cotreatment induces caspase-3 activation, the broad-range caspase inhibitor N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone (zVAD.fmk) only partly rescues ALL cells from BV6/5AC-induced cell death. This indicates that BV6/5AC cotreatment engages non-apoptotic cell death upon caspase inhibition. Indeed, genetic silencing of key components of necroptosis such as Receptor-Interacting Protein (RIP)3 or mixed lineage kinase domain-like (MLKL) in parallel with administration of zVAD.fmk provides a significantly better protection against BV6/5AC-induced cell death compared to the use of zVAD.fmk alone. Similarly, concomitant administration of pharmacological inhibitors of necroptosis (i.e. necrostatin-1s, GSK'872, dabrafenib, NSA) together with zVAD.fmk is superior in rescuing cells from BV6/5AC-induced cell death compared to the use of zVAD.fmk alone. These findings demonstrate that in ALL cells BV6/5AC-induced cell death is mediated via both apoptotic and necroptotic pathways. Importantly, BV6/5AC cotreatment triggers necroptosis in ALL cells that are resistant to apoptosis due to caspase inhibition. This opens new perspectives to overcome apoptosis resistance with important implications for the development of new treatment strategies

  15. Untangling the Roles of Anti-Apoptosis in Regulating Programmed Cell Death using Humanized Yeast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Clapp, Caitlin; Portt, Liam; Khoury, Chamel; Sheibani, Sara; Eid, Rawan; Greenwood, Matthew; Vali, Hojatollah; Mandato, Craig A.; Greenwood, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    Genetically programmed cell death (PCD) mechanisms, including apoptosis, are important for the survival of metazoans since it allows, among things, the removal of damaged cells that interfere with normal function. Cell death due to PCD is observed in normal processes such as aging and in a number of pathophysiologies including hypoxia (common causes of heart attacks and strokes) and subsequent tissue reperfusion. Conversely, the loss of normal apoptotic responses is associated with the development of tumors. So far, limited success in preventing unwanted PCD has been reported with current therapeutic approaches despite the fact that inhibitors of key apoptotic inducers such as caspases have been developed. Alternative approaches have focused on mimicking anti-apoptotic processes observed in cells displaying increased resistance to apoptotic stimuli. Hormesis and pre-conditioning are commonly observed cellular strategies where sub-lethal levels of pro-apoptotic stimuli lead to increased resistance to higher or lethal levels of stress. Increased expression of anti-apoptotic sequences is a common mechanism mediating these protective effects. The relevance of the latter observation is exemplified by the observation that transgenic mice overexpressing anti-apoptotic genes show significant reductions in tissue damage following ischemia. Thus strategies aimed at increasing the levels of anti-apoptotic proteins, using gene therapy or cell penetrating recombinant proteins are being evaluated as novel therapeutics to decrease cell death following acute periods of cell death inducing stress. In spite of its functional and therapeutic importance, more is known regarding the processes involved in apoptosis than anti-apoptosis. The genetically tractable yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has emerged as an exceptional model to study multiple aspects of PCD including the mitochondrial mediated apoptosis observed in metazoans. To increase our knowledge of the process of anti

  16. Sorafenib-induced defective autophagy promotes cell death by necroptosis

    PubMed Central

    Kharaziha, Pedram; Chioureas, Dimitris; Baltatzis, George; Fonseca, Pedro; Rodriguez, Patricia; Gogvadze, Vladimir; Lennartsson, Lena; Björklund, Ann-Charlotte; Zhivotovsky, Boris; Grandér, Dan; Egevad, Lars; Nilsson, Sten; Panaretakis, Theocharis

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is one of the main cytoprotective mechanisms that cancer cells deploy to withstand the cytotoxic stress and survive the lethal damage induced by anti-cancer drugs. However, under specific conditions, autophagy may, directly or indirectly, induce cell death. In our study, treatment of the Atg5-deficient DU145 prostate cancer cells, with the multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sorafenib, induces mitochondrial damage, autophagy and cell death. Molecular inhibition of autophagy by silencing ULK1 and Beclin1 rescues DU145 cells from cell death indicating that, in this setting, autophagy promotes cell death. Re-expression of Atg5 restores the lipidation of LC3 and rescues DU145 and MEF atg5−/− cells from sorafenib-induced cell death. Despite the lack of Atg5 expression and LC3 lipidation, DU145 cells form autophagosomes as demonstrated by transmission and immuno-electron microscopy, and the formation of LC3 positive foci. However, the lack of cellular content in the autophagosomes, the accumulation of long-lived proteins, the presence of GFP-RFP-LC3 positive foci and the accumulated p62 protein levels indicate that these autophagosomes may not be fully functional. DU145 cells treated with sorafenib undergo a caspase-independent cell death that is inhibited by the RIPK1 inhibitor, necrostatin-1. Furthermore, treatment with sorafenib induces the interaction of RIPK1 with p62, as demonstrated by immunoprecipitation and a proximity ligation assay. Silencing of p62 decreases the RIPK1 protein levels and renders necrostatin-1 ineffective in blocking sorafenib-induced cell death. In summary, the formation of Atg5-deficient autophagosomes in response to sorafenib promotes the interaction of p62 with RIPK leading to cell death by necroptosis. PMID:26416459

  17. Do all programmed cell deaths occur via apoptosis?

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, L M; Smith, S W; Jones, M E; Osborne, B A

    1993-01-01

    During development, large numbers of cells die by a nonpathological process referred to as programmed cell death. In many tissues, dying cells display similar changes in morphology and chromosomal DNA organization, which has been termed apoptosis. Apoptosis is such a widely documented phenomenon that many authors have assumed all programmed cell deaths occur by this process. Two well-characterized model systems for programmed cell death are (i) the death of T cells during negative selection in the mouse thymus and (ii) the loss of intersegmental muscles of the moth Manduca sexta at the end of metamorphosis. In this report we compare the patterns of cell death displayed by T cells and the intersegmental muscles and find that they differ in terms of cell-surface morphology, nuclear ultrastructure, DNA fragmentation, and polyubiquitin gene expression. Unlike the T cells, which are known to die via apoptosis, we find that the intersegmental muscles display few of the features that characterize apoptosis. These data suggest that more than one cell death mechanism is used during development. Images PMID:8430112

  18. Bcl-2 and Hsp27 act at different levels to suppress programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Guénal, I; Sidoti-de Fraisse, C; Gaumer, S; Mignotte, B

    1997-07-17

    Apoptosis and necrosis, two morphologically distinct forms of cell death, can be induced by common stimuli depending on the doses and the cell type. This study compares the protective effect of oncoprotein Bcl-2 and of the small stress protein Hsp27 on these two types of cell death. We use rat embryo fibroblasts conditionally immortalized by the tsA58 mutant of SV40 large T antigen as parental cells to develop cell lines carrying inducible bcl-2 or hsp27 genes. Two apoptotic stimuli were used: shift to the restrictive temperature that induced p53-mediated apoptosis and treatment with low doses of hydrogen peroxide. Necrosis was induced by high doses of hydrogen peroxide. Although Bcl-2 and Hsp27 protect these cells from necrotic death, only Bcl-2 appears capable of preventing apoptotic death. Bcl-2 protection is not mediated by a negative effect on the induction of the p53 responsive genes bax or waf1 but it slows down at least two stages of apoptosis: decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential and subsequent morphological changes. In contrast, although Hsp27 has been recently shown to inhibit apoptosis induced by various stimuli, its overexpression has no effect on apoptosis in this cell system. It should be also noticed that the apoptotic stimuli (temperature shift or hydrogen peroxide treatment) induce Hsp27, but not Bcl-2 accumulation suggesting that, in parental cells, Hsp27 might already provide some protection. However, taken together these results suggest that Hsp27, as well as Bcl-2, acts at several levels to inhibit cell death, but that their protective functions only partially overlap. PMID:9233769

  19. Host-Cell Survival and Death During Chlamydia Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Songmin; Pettengill, Matthew; Ojcius, David M.; Häcker, Georg

    2008-01-01

    Different Chlamydia trachomatis strains are responsible for prevalent bacterial sexually-transmitted disease and represent the leading cause of preventable blindness worldwide. Factors that predispose individuals to disease and mechanisms by which chlamydiae cause inflammation and tissue damage remain unclear. Results from recent studies indicate that prolonged survival and subsequent death of infected cells and their effect on immune effector cells during chlamydial infection may be important in determining the outcome. Survival of infected cells is favored at early times of infection through inhibition of the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Death at later times displays features of both apoptosis and necrosis, but pro-apoptotic caspases are not involved. Most studies on chlamydial modulation of host-cell death until now have been performed in cell lines. The consequences for pathogenesis and the immune response will require animal models of chlamydial infection, preferably mice with targeted deletions of genes that play a role in cell survival and death. PMID:18843378

  20. Over-expression of CKS1B activates both MEK/ERK and JAK/STAT3 signaling pathways and promotes myeloma cell drug-resistance

    PubMed Central

    Zangari, Maurizio; Xu, Hongwei; Cao, Thai M.; Xu, Chunjiao; Wu, Yong; Xiao, Fang; Liu, Yinghong; Yang, Ye; Salama, Mohamed; Li, Guiyuan; Tricot, Guido; Zhan, Fenghuang

    2010-01-01

    Here we demonstrate the crucial role of CKS1B in multiple myeloma (MM) progression and define CKS1B-mediated SKP2/p27Kip1-independent down-stream signaling pathways. Forced-expression of CKS1B in MM cells increased cell multidrug-resistance. CKS1B activates STAT3 and MEK/ERK pathways. In contrast, SKP2 knockdown or p27Kip1 over-expression resulted in activation of the STAT3 and MEK/ERK pathways. Further investigations showed that BCL2 is a downstream target of MEK/ERK signaling. Stimulation of STAT3 and MEK/ERK signaling pathways partially abrogated CKS1B knockdown induced MM cell death and growth inhibition. Targeting STAT3 and MEK/ ERK signaling pathways by specific inhibitors induced significant MM cell death and growth inhibition in CKS1B-overexpressing MM cells and their combinations resulted in synergy. Thus, our findings provide a rationale for targeting STAT3 and MEK/ERK/ BCL2 signaling in aggressive CKS1B-overexpressing MM. PMID:20930946

  1. MicroRNA-31 Is Overexpressed in Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Regulates Cell Motility and Colony Formation Ability of Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meisgen, Florian; Lohcharoenkal, Warangkana; Ståhle, Mona; Sonkoly, Enikö; Pivarcsi, Andor

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) is a malignancy of epidermal keratinocytes that is responsible for approximately 20% of skin cancer-related death yearly. We have previously compared the microRNA (miRNA) expression profile of cSCC to healthy skin and found the dysregulation of miRNAs in human cSCC. In this study we show that miR-31 is overexpressed in cSCC (n = 68) compared to healthy skin (n = 34) and precancerous skin lesions (actinic keratosis, n = 12). LNA in situ hybridization revealed that miR-31 was specifically up-regulated in tumor cells. Mechanistic studies of inhibition of endogenous miR-31 in human metastatic cSCC cells revealed suppressed migration, invasion and colony forming ability, whereas overexpression of miR-31 induced these phenotypes. These results indicate that miR-31 regulates cancer-associated phenotypes of cSCC and identify miR-31 as a potential target for cSCC treatment. PMID:25068518

  2. Mitochondrial and Nuclear Cross Talk in Cell Death: Parthanatos

    PubMed Central

    Andrabi, Shaida A.; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.

    2015-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) PARP-1 is an abundant nuclear protein first described to facilitate DNA base excision repair. Recent work has expanded the physiologic functions of PARP-1 and it is clear that the full range of biologic actions of this important protein are not yet fully understood. Regulation of the product of PARP-1, poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), is a dynamic process with poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) playing a major role in the degradation of the polymer. Under pathophysiologic situations, over activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) results in unregulated PAR synthesis and widespread neuronal cell death. Once thought to be necrotic cell death due to energy failure, we recently found that PARP-1 dependent cell death is dependent on the generation of PAR that triggers nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) to result in caspase-independent cell death. This form of cell death is distinct from apoptosis, necrosis or autophagy and is termed Parthanatos. PARP-1 dependent cell death has been implicated in tissues throughout the body and in diseases afflicting hundreds of millions world wide including stroke, Parkinson's disease, heart attack, diabetes, and ischemia reperfusion injury in numerous tissues. The breadth of indications for PARP-1 injury make Parthanatos a clinically important form of cell death to understand and control. PMID:19076445

  3. Nucleocytoplasmic trafficking is essential for BAK1- and BKK1-mediated cell-death control.

    PubMed

    Du, Junbo; Gao, Yang; Zhan, Yanyan; Zhang, Shasha; Wu, Yujun; Xiao, Yao; Zou, Bo; He, Kai; Gou, Xiaoping; Li, Guojing; Lin, Honghui; Li, Jia

    2016-02-01

    BRI1-ASSOCIATED KINASE 1 (BAK1) was initially identified as a co-receptor of the brassinosteroid (BR) receptor BRI1. Genetic analyses also revealed that BAK1 and its closest homolog BAK1-LIKE 1 (BKK1) regulate a BR-independent cell-death control pathway. The double null mutant bak1 bkk1 displays a salicylic acid- and light-dependent cell-death phenotype even without pathogen invasion. Molecular mechanisms of the spontaneous cell death mediated by BAK1 and BKK1 remain unknown. Here we report our identification of a suppressor of bak1 bkk1 (sbb1-1). Genetic analyses indicated that cell-death symptoms in a weak double mutant, bak1-3 bkk1-1, were completely suppressed by the loss-of-function mutation in SBB1, which encodes a nucleoporin (NUP) 85-like protein. Genetic analyses also demonstrated that individually knocking out three other nucleoporin genes from the SBB1-located sub-complex was also able to rescue the cell-death phenotype of bak1-3 bkk1-1. In addition, a DEAD-box RNA helicase, DRH1, was identified in the same protein complex as SBB1 via a proteomic approach. The drh1 mutation also rescues the cell-death symptoms of bak1-3 bkk1-1. Further analyses indicated that export of poly(A)(+) RNA was greatly blocked in the nup and drh1 mutants, resulting in accumulation of significant levels of mRNAs in the nuclei. Over-expression of a bacterial NahG gene to inactivate salicylic acid also rescues the cell-death phenotype of bak1-3 bkk1-1. Mutants suppressing cell-death symptoms always showed greatly reduced salicylic acid contents. These results suggest that nucleocytoplasmic trafficking, especially of molecules directly or indirectly involved in endogenous salicylic acid accumulation, is critical in BAK1- and BKK1-mediated cell-death control. PMID:26775605

  4. Low-Dose Bafilomycin Attenuates Neuronal Cell Death Associated with Autophagy-Lysosome Pathway Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Pivtoraiko, Violetta N.; Harrington, Adam J.; Mader, Burton J.; Luker, Austin M.; Caldwell, Guy A.; Caldwell, Kim A.; Roth, Kevin A.; Shacka, John J.

    2010-01-01

    We have shown previously that the plecomacrolide antibiotics bafilomycin A1 and B1 significantly attenuate cerebellar granule neuron death resulting from agents that disrupt lysosome function. To further characterize bafilomycin-mediated cytoprotection, we examined its ability to attenuate the death of naïve and differentiated neuronal SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells from agents that induce lysosome dysfunction in vitro, and from in vivo dopaminergic neuron death in C. elegans. Low-dose bafilomycin significantly attenuated SH-SY5Y cell death resulting from treatment with chloroquine, hydroxychloroquine amodiaquine and staurosporine. Bafilomycin also attenuated the chloroquine-induced reduction in processing of cathepsin D, the principal lysosomal aspartic acid protease, to its mature “active” form. Chloroquine induced autophagic vacuole accumulation and inhibited autophagic flux, effects that were attenuated upon treatment with bafilomycin and were associated with a significant decrease in chloroquine-induced accumulation of detergent-insoluble α-synuclein oligomers. In addition, bafilomycin significantly and dose-dependently attenuated dopaminergic neuron death in C. elegans resulting from in vivo over-expression of human wild-type α-synuclein. Together, our findings suggest that low-dose bafilomycin is cytoprotective in part through its maintenance of the autophagy-lysosome pathway, and underscores its therapeutic potential for treating Parkinson Disease and other neurodegenerative diseases that exhibit disruption of protein degradation pathways and accumulation of toxic protein species. PMID:20534000

  5. YM155 potently triggers cell death in breast cancer cells through an autophagy-NF-kB network

    PubMed Central

    Véquaud, Eloïse; Séveno, Céline; Loussouarn, Delphine; Engelhart, Lucie; Campone, Mario; Juin, Philippe; Barillé-Nion, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Specific overexpression in cancer cells and evidence of oncogenic functions make Survivin an attractive target in cancer tharapy. The small molecule compound YM155 has been described as the first “Survivin suppressant” but molecular mechanisms involved in its biological activity and its clinical potential remain obscure. We herein show that YM155 exerts single agent toxicity on primary breast cancer cells grown in an ex vivo assay preserving tumor microenvironment. In vitro assays indicate that YM155 more efficiently triggers cell death in breast cancer cells (including these with stem-cell like properties) than in non tumorigenic mammary cells. YM155-induced cell death is critically dependent on autophagy and NF-kB but independent of p53 and it coïncides with DNA damage an a DNA damage response in p53-proficient cells. Our results point out a crosstalk between NF-KB and autophagy controlling YM155-induced death in breast cancer cells and argue for the potential use of YM155 as a genotoxic agent in breast cancer therapy. PMID:25974963

  6. YM155 potently triggers cell death in breast cancer cells through an autophagy-NF-kB network.

    PubMed

    Véquaud, Eloïse; Séveno, Céline; Loussouarn, Delphine; Engelhart, Lucie; Campone, Mario; Juin, Philippe; Barillé-Nion, Sophie

    2015-05-30

    Specific overexpression in cancer cells and evidence of oncogenic functions make Survivin an attractive target in cancer therapy. The small molecule compound YM155 has been described as the first "Survivin suppressant" but molecular mechanisms involved in its biological activity and its clinical potential remain obscure. We herein show that YM155 exerts single agent toxicity on primary breast cancer cells grown in an ex vivo assay preserving tumor microenvironment. In vitro assays indicate that YM155 more efficiently triggers cell death in breast cancer cells (including these with stem-cell like properties) than in non tumorigenic mammary cells. YM155-induced cell death is critically dependent on autophagy and NF-kB but independent of p53 and it coïncides with DNA damage and a DNA damage response in p53-proficient cells. Our results point out a crosstalk between NF-kB and autophagy controlling YM155-induced death in breast cancer cells and argue for the potential use of YM155 as a genotoxic agent in breast cancer therapy. PMID:25974963

  7. Mitochondria and calcium: from cell signalling to cell death

    PubMed Central

    Duchen, Michael R

    2000-01-01

    While a pathway for Ca2+ accumulation into mitochondria has long been established, its functional significance is only now becoming clear in relation to cell physiology and pathophysiology. The observation that mitochondria take up Ca2+ during physiological Ca2+ signalling in a variety of cell types leads to four questions: (i) ‘What is the impact of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake on mitochondrial function?’ (ii) ‘What is the impact of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake on Ca2+ signalling?’ (iii) ‘What are the consequences of impaired mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake for cell function?’ and finally (iv) ‘What are the consequences of pathological [Ca2+]c signalling for mitochondrial function?’ These will be addressed in turn. Thus: (i) accumulation of Ca2+ into mitochondria regulates mitochondrial metabolism and causes a transient depolarisation of mitochondrial membrane potential. (ii) Mitochondria may act as a spatial Ca2+ buffer in many cells, regulating the local Ca2+ concentration in cellular microdomains. This process regulates processes dependent on local cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]c), particularly the flux of Ca2+ through IP3-gated channels of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the channels mediating capacitative Ca2+ influx through the plasma membrane. Consequently, mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake plays a substantial role in shaping [Ca2+]c signals in many cell types. (iii) Impaired mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake alters the spatiotemporal characteristics of cellular [Ca2+]c signalling and downregulates mitochondrial metabolism. (iv) Under pathological conditions of cellular [Ca2+]c overload, particularly in association with oxidative stress, mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake may trigger pathological states that lead to cell death. In the model of glutamate excitotoxicity, microdomains of [Ca2+]c are apparently central, as the pathway to cell death seems to require the local activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), itself held by scaffolding proteins in close

  8. Mechanical Stress Promotes Cisplatin-Induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Riad, Sandra; Bougherara, Habiba

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin (CisPt) is a commonly used platinum-based chemotherapeutic agent. Its efficacy is limited due to drug resistance and multiple side effects, thereby warranting a new approach to improving the pharmacological effect of CisPt. A newly developed mathematical hypothesis suggested that mechanical loading, when coupled with a chemotherapeutic drug such as CisPt and immune cells, would boost tumor cell death. The current study investigated the aforementioned mathematical hypothesis by exposing human hepatocellular liver carcinoma (HepG2) cells to CisPt, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and mechanical stress individually and in combination. HepG2 cells were also treated with a mixture of CisPt and carnosine with and without mechanical stress to examine one possible mechanism employed by mechanical stress to enhance CisPt effects. Carnosine is a dipeptide that reportedly sequesters platinum-based drugs away from their pharmacological target-site. Mechanical stress was achieved using an orbital shaker that produced 300 rpm with a horizontal circular motion. Our results demonstrated that mechanical stress promoted CisPt-induced death of HepG2 cells (~35% more cell death). Moreover, results showed that CisPt-induced death was compromised when CisPt was left to mix with carnosine 24 hours preceding treatment. Mechanical stress, however, ameliorated cell death (20% more cell death). PMID:25685789

  9. Sickle cell trait and sudden death--bringing it home.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Bruce L.

    2007-01-01

    Sickle cell trait continues to be the leading cause of sudden death for young African Americans in military basic training and civilian organized sports. The syndrome may have caused the death of up to 10 college football players since 1974 and, as recently as 2000, was suspected as the cause of death of three U.S. Army recruits. The penal military-style boot camps in the United States and the recent death of two teenagers with sickle cell trait merits renewed vigor in the education of athletic instructors, the military and the public about conditions associated with sudden death in individuals with sickle cell trait. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:17393956

  10. Autophagy-related cell death by pan-histone deacetylase inhibition in liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Di Fazio, Pietro; Waldegger, Petra; Jabari, Samir; Lingelbach, Susanne; Montalbano, Roberta; Ocker, Matthias; Slater, Emily P; Bartsch, Detlef K; Illig, Romana; Neureiter, Daniel; Wissniowski, Thaddeus T

    2016-05-17

    Autophagy is a homeostatic, catabolic degradation process and cell fate essential regulatory mechanism. Protracted autophagy triggers cell death; its aberrant function is responsible for several malignancies. Panobinostat, a potent pan-deacetylase inhibitor, causes endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced cell death. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of autophagy in deacetylase inhibitor-triggered liver cancer cell death.HepG2 (p53wt) and Hep3B (p53 null) liver cancer cell lines were exposed to panobinostat. RT-qPCR and western blot confirmed autophagic factor modulation. Immuno-fluorescence, -precipitation and -histochemistry as well as transmission electron microscopy verified autophagosome formation. The cytotoxicity of panobinostat and autophagy modulators was detected using a real time cell viability assay.Panobinostat induced autophagy-related factor expression and aggregation. Map1LC3B and Beclin1 were significantly over-expressed in HepG2 xenografts in nude mice treated with panobinostat for 4 weeks. Subcellular distribution of Beclin1 increased with the appearance of autophagosomes-like aggregates. Cytosolic loss of p53, in HepG2, and p73, in Hep3B cells, and a corresponding gain of their nuclear level, together with modulation of DRAM1, were observed. Autophagosome aggregation was visible after 6 h of treatment. Treatment of cells stably expressing GFP-RFPtag Map1LC3B resulted in aggregation and a fluorescence switch, thus confirming autophagosome formation and maturation. Tamoxifen, an inducer of autophagy, caused only a block in cell proliferation; but in combination with panobinostat it resulted in cell death.Autophagy triggers cell demise in liver cancer. Its modulation by the combination of tamoxifen and panobinostat could be a new option for palliative treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:27058414