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Sample records for overhauser enhanced mri

  1. Nitroxyl radicals-modified dendritic poly(l-lysine) as a contrast agent for Overhauser-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Niidome, Takuro; Gokuden, Risa; Watanabe, Kazuto; Mori, Takeshi; Naganuma, Tatsuya; Utsumi, Hideo; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Katayama, Yoshiki

    2014-01-01

    Overhauser-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (OMRI), which is a double resonance technique, creates images of free radical distribution in animals by enhancing the water proton signal intensity by the overhauser effect. In this study, we constructed a contrast agent by combining PROXYL groups that have nitroxyl radicals with PEG-modified dendritic poly(l-lysine) that accumulates in the tumor by enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. Addition of the PROXYL groups at the PEG chains' termini on KG6 was advantageous in OMRI, because the ESR signal of the nitroxyl radical was maintained without decay caused by mobility restriction, even if the PROXYL groups were attached at 25 mol% on one molecule. After intramuscular injection of the molecule modified at 25 mol%, that is, PR25-PEG-KG6, a significant OMRI signal was observed at the injected site. However, no signal was detected in the tumor after intravenous injection of PR25-PEG-KG6 to a tumor-bearing mouse, although PR25-PEG-KG6 itself accumulated in the tumor. The reason was that the nitroxyl radicals were immediately reduced in the blood after the injection, suggesting that use of stable nitroxyl radicals will enable detection of tumors by OMRI after intravenous injection. PMID:25088777

  2. Overhauser-enhanced magnetic resonance elastography.

    PubMed

    Salameh, Najat; Sarracanie, Mathieu; Armstrong, Brandon D; Rosen, Matthew S; Comment, Arnaud

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a powerful technique to assess the mechanical properties of living tissue. However, it suffers from reduced sensitivity in regions with short T2 and T2 * such as in tissue with high concentrations of paramagnetic iron, or in regions surrounding implanted devices. In this work, we exploit the longer T2 * attainable at ultra-low magnetic fields in combination with Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enable rapid MRE at 0.0065 T. A 3D balanced steady-state free precession based MRE sequence with undersampling and fractional encoding was implemented on a 0.0065 T MRI scanner. A custom-built RF coil for DNP and a programmable vibration system for elastography were developed. Displacement fields and stiffness maps were reconstructed from data recorded in a polyvinyl alcohol gel phantom loaded with stable nitroxide radicals. A DNP enhancement of 25 was achieved during the MRE sequence, allowing the acquisition of 3D Overhauser-enhanced MRE (OMRE) images with (1.5 × 2.7 × 9) mm(3) resolution over eight temporal steps and 11 slices in 6 minutes. In conclusion, OMRE at ultra-low magnetic field can be used to detect mechanical waves over short acquisition times. This new modality shows promise to broaden the scope of conventional MRE applications, and may extend the utility of low-cost, portable MRI systems to detect elasticity changes in patients with implanted devices or iron overload. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26915977

  3. Imaging human teeth by phosphorus magnetic resonance with nuclear Overhauser enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yi; Brauckmann, Ole; Nixdorf, Donald R.; Kentgens, Arno; Garwood, Michael; Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Heerschap, Arend

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional phosphorus MR images (31P MRI) of teeth are obtained at a nominal resolution of 0.5 mm in less than 15 minutes using acquisition pulse sequences sensitive to ultra-short transversal relaxation times. The images directly reflect the spatially resolved phosphorus content of mineral tissue in dentin and enamel; they show a lack of signal from pulp tissue and reduced signal from de-mineralized carious lesions. We demonstrate for the first time that the signal in 31P MR images of mineralized tissue is enhanced by a 1H-31P nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE). Using teeth as a model for imaging mineralized human tissue, graded differences in signal enhancement are observed that correlate well with known mineral content. From solid-state NMR experiments we conclude that the NOE is facilitated by spin diffusion and that the NOE difference can be assigned to a higher water content and a different micro-structure of dentin. Thus, a novel method for imaging mineral content without ionizing radiation is proposed. This method has potential use in the assessment of de-mineralization states in humans, such as caries of teeth and osteoporosis of bones. PMID:27498919

  4. Imaging human teeth by phosphorus magnetic resonance with nuclear Overhauser enhancement.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Brauckmann, Ole; Nixdorf, Donald R; Kentgens, Arno; Garwood, Michael; Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Heerschap, Arend

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional phosphorus MR images ((31)P MRI) of teeth are obtained at a nominal resolution of 0.5 mm in less than 15 minutes using acquisition pulse sequences sensitive to ultra-short transversal relaxation times. The images directly reflect the spatially resolved phosphorus content of mineral tissue in dentin and enamel; they show a lack of signal from pulp tissue and reduced signal from de-mineralized carious lesions. We demonstrate for the first time that the signal in (31)P MR images of mineralized tissue is enhanced by a (1)H-(31)P nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE). Using teeth as a model for imaging mineralized human tissue, graded differences in signal enhancement are observed that correlate well with known mineral content. From solid-state NMR experiments we conclude that the NOE is facilitated by spin diffusion and that the NOE difference can be assigned to a higher water content and a different micro-structure of dentin. Thus, a novel method for imaging mineral content without ionizing radiation is proposed. This method has potential use in the assessment of de-mineralization states in humans, such as caries of teeth and osteoporosis of bones. PMID:27498919

  5. A new model for Overhauser enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance using nitroxide radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Brandon D.; Han, Songi

    2007-09-01

    Nitroxide free radicals are the most commonly used source for dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments and are also exclusively employed as spin labels for electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy of diamagnetic molecules and materials. Nitroxide free radicals have been shown to have strong dipolar coupling to H1 in water, and thus result in large DNP enhancement of H1 NMR signal via the well known Overhauser effect. The fundamental parameter in a DNP experiment is the coupling factor, since it ultimately determines the maximum NMR signal enhancements which can be achieved. Despite their widespread use, measurements of the coupling factor of nitroxide free radicals have been inconsistent, and current models have failed to successfully explain our experimental data. We found that the inconsistency in determining the coupling factor arises from not taking into account the characteristics of the ESR transitions, which are split into three (or two) lines due to the hyperfine coupling of the electron to the N14 nuclei (or N15) of the nitric oxide radical. Both intermolecular Heisenberg spin exchange interactions as well as intramolecular nitrogen nuclear spin relaxation mix the three (or two) ESR transitions. However, neither effect has been taken into account in any experimental studies on utilizing or quantifying the Overhauser driven DNP effects. The expected effect of Heisenberg spin exchange on Overhauser enhancements has already been theoretically predicted and observed by Bates and Drozdoski [J. Chem. Phys. 67, 4038 (1977)]. Here, we present a new model for quantifying Overhauser enhancements through nitroxide free radicals that includes both effects on mixing the ESR hyperfine states. This model predicts the maximum saturation factor to be considerably higher by the effect of nitrogen nuclear spin relaxation. Because intramolecular nitrogen spin relaxation is independent of the nitroxide concentration, this

  6. Nuclear-Overhauser-enhanced MR imaging of (31)P-containing metabolites: multipoint-Dixon vs. frequency-selective excitation.

    PubMed

    Rink, Kristian; Berger, Moritz C; Korzowski, Andreas; Breithaupt, Mathies; Biller, Armin; Bachert, Peter; Nagel, Armin M

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop nuclear-Overhauser-enhanced (NOE) [(1)H]-(31)P magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based on 3D fully-balanced steady-state free precession (fbSSFP). Therefore, two implementations of a 3D fbSSFP sequence are compared using frequency-selective excitation (FreqSel) and multipoint-Dixon (MP-Dixon). (31)P-containing model solutions and four healthy volunteers were examined at field strengths of B0=3T and 7T. Maps of the distribution of phosphocreatine (PCr), inorganic phosphate (Pi), and adenosine 5´-triphosphate (ATP) in the human calf were obtained with an isotropic resolution of 1.5cm (1.0cm) in an acquisition time of 5min (10min). NOE-pulses had the highest impact on the PCr acquisitions enhancing the signal up to (82 ± 13) % at 3T and up to (37 ± 9) % at 7T. An estimation of the level of PCr in muscle tissue from [(1)H]-(31)P MRI data yielded a mean value of (33 ± 8) mM. In conclusion, direct [(1)H]-(31)P imaging using FreqSel as well as MP-Dixon is possible in clinically feasible acquisition times. FreqSel should be preferred for measurements where only a single metabolite resonance is considered. MP-Dixon performs better in terms of SNR if a larger spectral width is of interest. PMID:26248272

  7. Basic facts and perspectives of Overhauser DNP NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravera, Enrico; Luchinat, Claudio; Parigi, Giacomo

    2016-03-01

    After the first surprisingly large 1H DNP enhancements of the water signal in aqueous solutions of nitroxide radicals observed at high magnetic fields, Overhauser DNP is gaining increasing attention for a number of applications now flourishing, showing the potentialities of this mechanism in solution and solid state NMR as well as in MRI. Unexpected Overhauser DNP enhancements in insulating solids were recently measured at 100 K, with a magnitude which increases with the applied magnetic field. We recapitulate here the theoretical premises of Overhauser DNP in solution and analyze the effects of the various parameters on the efficacy of the mechanism, underlining the link between the DNP enhancements and the field dependent relaxation properties. Promisingly, more effective DNP enhancements are expected by exploiting the potentialities offered by 13C detection and the use of supercritical fluids.

  8. Basic facts and perspectives of Overhauser DNP NMR.

    PubMed

    Ravera, Enrico; Luchinat, Claudio; Parigi, Giacomo

    2016-03-01

    After the first surprisingly large (1)H DNP enhancements of the water signal in aqueous solutions of nitroxide radicals observed at high magnetic fields, Overhauser DNP is gaining increasing attention for a number of applications now flourishing, showing the potentialities of this mechanism in solution and solid state NMR as well as in MRI. Unexpected Overhauser DNP enhancements in insulating solids were recently measured at 100K, with a magnitude which increases with the applied magnetic field. We recapitulate here the theoretical premises of Overhauser DNP in solution and analyze the effects of the various parameters on the efficacy of the mechanism, underlining the link between the DNP enhancements and the field dependent relaxation properties. Promisingly, more effective DNP enhancements are expected by exploiting the potentialities offered by (13)C detection and the use of supercritical fluids. PMID:26920833

  9. Reduction process of nitroxyl spin probes used in Overhauser-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: An ESR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meenakumari, V.; Jawahar, A.; Premkumar, S.; Benial, A. Milton Franklin

    2016-05-01

    The Electron spin resonance studies on the reduction process of nitroxyl spin probes were carried out for 1mM 14N- labeled nitroxyl radicals in pure water and 1 mM concentration of ascorbic acid as a function of time. The electron spin resonance parameters, such as line width, hyperfine coupling constant, g-factor, signal intensity ratio and rotational correlation time were estimated. The 3-carbamoyl-PROXYL radical has narrowest line width and fast tumbling motion compared with 3-carboxy-PROXYL, 4-methoxy-TEMPO, and 4-acetamido-TEMPO radicals. The half life time and decay rate were estimated for 1mM concentration of 14N- labeled nitroxyl radicals in 1 mM concentration of ascorbic acid. From the results, the 3-carbamoyl-PROXYL has long half life time and high stability compared with 3-carboxy-PROXYL, 4-methoxy-TEMPO and 4-acetamido-TEMPO radicals. Therefore, this study reveals that the 3-carbamoyl-PROXYL radical can act as a good redox sensitive spin probe for Overhauser-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

  10. Completely automated, highly error-tolerant macromolecular structure determination from multidimensional nuclear overhauser enhancement spectra and chemical shift assignments.

    PubMed

    Kuszewski, John; Schwieters, Charles D; Garrett, Daniel S; Byrd, R Andrew; Tjandra, Nico; Clore, G Marius

    2004-05-26

    The major rate-limiting step in high-throughput NMR protein structure determination involves the calculation of a reliable initial fold, the elimination of incorrect nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) assignments, and the resolution of NOE assignment ambiguities. We present a robust approach to automatically calculate structures with a backbone coordinate accuracy of 1.0-1.5 A from datasets in which as much as 80% of the long-range NOE information (i.e., between residues separated by more than five positions in the sequence) is incorrect. The current algorithm differs from previously published methods in that it has been expressly designed to ensure that the results from successive cycles are not biased by the global fold of structures generated in preceding cycles. Consequently, the method is highly error tolerant and is not easily funnelled down an incorrect path in either three-dimensional structure or NOE assignment space. The algorithm incorporates three main features: a linear energy function representation of the NOE restraints to allow maximization of the number of simultaneously satisfied restraints during the course of simulated annealing; a method for handling the presence of multiple possible assignments for each NOE cross-peak which avoids local minima by treating each possible assignment as if it were an independent restraint; and a probabilistic method to permit both inactivation and reactivation of all NOE restraints on the fly during the course of simulated annealing. NOE restraints are never removed permanently, thereby significantly reducing the likelihood of becoming trapped in a false minimum of NOE assignment space. The effectiveness of the algorithm is demonstrated using completely automatically peak-picked experimental NOE data from two proteins: interleukin-4 (136 residues) and cyanovirin-N (101 residues). The limits of the method are explored using simulated data on the 56-residue B1 domain of Streptococcal protein G. PMID:15149223

  11. Towards Overhauser DNP in supercritical CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Meerten, S. G. J.; Tayler, M. C. D.; Kentgens, A. P. M.; van Bentum, P. J. M.

    2016-06-01

    Overhauser Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (ODNP) is a well known technique to improve NMR sensitivity in the liquid state, where the large polarization of an electron spin is transferred to a nucleus of interest by cross-relaxation. The efficiency of the Overhauser mechanism for dipolar interactions depends critically on fast local translational dynamics at the timescale of the inverse electron Larmor frequency. The maximum polarization enhancement that can be achieved for 1H at high magnetic fields benefits from a low viscosity solvent. In this paper we investigate the option to use supercritical CO2 as a solvent for Overhauser DNP. We have investigated the diffusion constants and longitudinal nuclear relaxation rates of toluene in high pressure CO2. The change in 1H T1 by addition of TEMPO radical was analyzed to determine the Overhauser cross-relaxation in such a mixture, and is compared with calculations based on the Force Free Hard Sphere (FFHS) model. By analyzing the relaxation data within this model we find translational correlation times in the range of 2-4 ps, depending on temperature, pressure and toluene concentration. Such short correlation times may be instrumental for future Overhauser DNP applications at high magnetic fields, as are commonly used in NMR. Preliminary DNP experiments have been performed at 3.4 T on high pressure superheated water and model systems such as toluene in high pressure CO2.

  12. Towards Overhauser DNP in supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    van Meerten, S G J; Tayler, M C D; Kentgens, A P M; van Bentum, P J M

    2016-06-01

    Overhauser Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (ODNP) is a well known technique to improve NMR sensitivity in the liquid state, where the large polarization of an electron spin is transferred to a nucleus of interest by cross-relaxation. The efficiency of the Overhauser mechanism for dipolar interactions depends critically on fast local translational dynamics at the timescale of the inverse electron Larmor frequency. The maximum polarization enhancement that can be achieved for (1)H at high magnetic fields benefits from a low viscosity solvent. In this paper we investigate the option to use supercritical CO2 as a solvent for Overhauser DNP. We have investigated the diffusion constants and longitudinal nuclear relaxation rates of toluene in high pressure CO2. The change in (1)H T1 by addition of TEMPO radical was analyzed to determine the Overhauser cross-relaxation in such a mixture, and is compared with calculations based on the Force Free Hard Sphere (FFHS) model. By analyzing the relaxation data within this model we find translational correlation times in the range of 2-4ps, depending on temperature, pressure and toluene concentration. Such short correlation times may be instrumental for future Overhauser DNP applications at high magnetic fields, as are commonly used in NMR. Preliminary DNP experiments have been performed at 3.4T on high pressure superheated water and model systems such as toluene in high pressure CO2. PMID:27082277

  13. Overhauser effects in insulating solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Can, T. V.; Caporini, M. A.; Mentink-Vigier, F.; Corzilius, B.; Walish, J. J.; Rosay, M.; Maas, W. E.; Baldus, M.; Vega, S.; Swager, T. M.; Griffin, R. G.

    2014-08-01

    We report magic angle spinning, dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments at magnetic fields of 9.4 T, 14.1 T, and 18.8 T using the narrow line polarizing agents 1,3-bisdiphenylene-2-phenylallyl (BDPA) dispersed in polystyrene, and sulfonated-BDPA (SA-BDPA) and trityl OX063 in glassy glycerol/water matrices. The 1H DNP enhancement field profiles of the BDPA radicals exhibit a significant DNP Overhauser effect (OE) as well as a solid effect (SE) despite the fact that these samples are insulating solids. In contrast, trityl exhibits only a SE enhancement. Data suggest that the appearance of the OE is due to rather strong electron-nuclear hyperfine couplings present in BDPA and SA-BDPA, which are absent in trityl and perdeuterated BDPA (d21-BDPA). In addition, and in contrast to other DNP mechanisms such as the solid effect or cross effect, the experimental data suggest that the OE in non-conducting solids scales favorably with magnetic field, increasing in magnitude in going from 5 T, to 9.4 T, to 14.1 T, and to 18.8 T. Simulations using a model two spin system consisting of an electron hyperfine coupled to a 1H reproduce the essential features of the field profiles and indicate that the OE in these samples originates from the zero and double quantum cross relaxation induced by fluctuating hyperfine interactions between the intramolecular delocalized unpaired electrons and their neighboring nuclei, and that the size of these hyperfine couplings is crucial to the magnitude of the enhancements. Microwave power dependent studies show that the OE saturates at considerably lower power levels than the solid effect in the same samples. Our results provide new insights into the mechanism of the Overhauser effect, and also provide a new approach to perform DNP experiments in chemical, biophysical, and physical systems at high magnetic fields.

  14. Overhauser effects in insulating solids

    SciTech Connect

    Can, T. V.; Corzilius, B.; Walish, J. J.; Griffin, R. G.; Caporini, M. A.; Rosay, M.; Maas, W. E.; Mentink-Vigier, F.; Vega, S.; Baldus, M.; Swager, T. M.

    2014-08-14

    We report magic angle spinning, dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments at magnetic fields of 9.4 T, 14.1 T, and 18.8 T using the narrow line polarizing agents 1,3-bisdiphenylene-2-phenylallyl (BDPA) dispersed in polystyrene, and sulfonated-BDPA (SA-BDPA) and trityl OX063 in glassy glycerol/water matrices. The {sup 1}H DNP enhancement field profiles of the BDPA radicals exhibit a significant DNP Overhauser effect (OE) as well as a solid effect (SE) despite the fact that these samples are insulating solids. In contrast, trityl exhibits only a SE enhancement. Data suggest that the appearance of the OE is due to rather strong electron-nuclear hyperfine couplings present in BDPA and SA-BDPA, which are absent in trityl and perdeuterated BDPA (d{sub 21}-BDPA). In addition, and in contrast to other DNP mechanisms such as the solid effect or cross effect, the experimental data suggest that the OE in non-conducting solids scales favorably with magnetic field, increasing in magnitude in going from 5 T, to 9.4 T, to 14.1 T, and to 18.8 T. Simulations using a model two spin system consisting of an electron hyperfine coupled to a {sup 1}H reproduce the essential features of the field profiles and indicate that the OE in these samples originates from the zero and double quantum cross relaxation induced by fluctuating hyperfine interactions between the intramolecular delocalized unpaired electrons and their neighboring nuclei, and that the size of these hyperfine couplings is crucial to the magnitude of the enhancements. Microwave power dependent studies show that the OE saturates at considerably lower power levels than the solid effect in the same samples. Our results provide new insights into the mechanism of the Overhauser effect, and also provide a new approach to perform DNP experiments in chemical, biophysical, and physical systems at high magnetic fields.

  15. Overhauser effects in insulating solids

    PubMed Central

    Can, T. V.; Caporini, M. A.; Mentink-Vigier, F.; Corzilius, B.; Walish, J. J.; Rosay, M.; Maas, W. E.; Baldus, M.; Vega, S.; Swager, T. M.; Griffin, R. G.

    2014-01-01

    We report magic angle spinning, dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments at magnetic fields of 9.4 T, 14.1 T, and 18.8 T using the narrow line polarizing agents 1,3-bisdiphenylene-2-phenylallyl (BDPA) dispersed in polystyrene, and sulfonated-BDPA (SA-BDPA) and trityl OX063 in glassy glycerol/water matrices. The 1H DNP enhancement field profiles of the BDPA radicals exhibit a significant DNP Overhauser effect (OE) as well as a solid effect (SE) despite the fact that these samples are insulating solids. In contrast, trityl exhibits only a SE enhancement. Data suggest that the appearance of the OE is due to rather strong electron-nuclear hyperfine couplings present in BDPA and SA-BDPA, which are absent in trityl and perdeuterated BDPA (d21-BDPA). In addition, and in contrast to other DNP mechanisms such as the solid effect or cross effect, the experimental data suggest that the OE in non-conducting solids scales favorably with magnetic field, increasing in magnitude in going from 5 T, to 9.4 T, to 14.1 T, and to 18.8 T. Simulations using a model two spin system consisting of an electron hyperfine coupled to a 1H reproduce the essential features of the field profiles and indicate that the OE in these samples originates from the zero and double quantum cross relaxation induced by fluctuating hyperfine interactions between the intramolecular delocalized unpaired electrons and their neighboring nuclei, and that the size of these hyperfine couplings is crucial to the magnitude of the enhancements. Microwave power dependent studies show that the OE saturates at considerably lower power levels than the solid effect in the same samples. Our results provide new insights into the mechanism of the Overhauser effect, and also provide a new approach to perform DNP experiments in chemical, biophysical, and physical systems at high magnetic fields. PMID:25134564

  16. Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization amplification of NMR flow imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingwood, Mark D.; Sederman, Andrew J.; Mantle, Mick D.; Gladden, Lynn F.; Han, Songi

    2012-03-01

    We describe the first study comparing the ability of phase shift velocity imaging and Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced imaging to generate contrast for visualizing the flow of water. Prepolarization of water by the Overhauser DNP mechanism is performed in the 0.35 T fringe field of an unshielded 2.0 T non-clinical MRI magnet, followed by the rapid transfer of polarization-enhanced water to the 2.0 T imaging location. This technique, previously named remotely enhanced liquids for image contrast (RELIC), produces a continuous flow of hyperpolarized water and gives up to an -8.2-fold enhanced signal within the image with respect to thermally polarized signal at 2.0 T. Using flow through a cylindrical expansion phantom as a model system, spin-echo intensity images with DNP are compared to 3D phase shift velocity images to illustrate the complementary information available from the two techniques. The spin-echo intensity images enhanced with DNP show that the levels of enhancement provide an estimate of the transient propagation of flow, while the phase shift velocity images quantitatively measure the velocity of each imaging voxel. Phase shift velocity images acquired with and without DNP show that DNP weights velocity values towards those of the inflowing (DNP-enhanced) water, while velocity images without DNP more accurately reflect the average steady-state velocity of each voxel. We conclude that imaging with DNP prepolarized water better captures the transient path of water shortly after injection, while phase shift velocity imaging is best for quantifying the steady-state flow of water throughout the entire phantom.

  17. Integrated speech enhancement for functional MRI environment.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Nishank; Milani, Ali A; Panahi, Issa; Briggs, Richard

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated speech enhancement (SE) method for the noisy MRI environment. We show that the performance of SE system improves considerably when the speech signal dominated by MRI acoustic noise at very low SNR is enhanced in two successive stages using two-channel SE methods followed by a single-channel post processing SE algorithm. Actual MRI noisy speech data are used in our experiments showing the improved performance of the proposed SE method. PMID:19964964

  18. Continuous flow Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization of water in the fringe field of a clinical magnetic resonance imaging system for authentic image contrast

    PubMed Central

    Lingwood, Mark D.; Siaw, Ting Ann; Sailasuta, Napapon; Ross, Brian D.; Bhattacharya, Pratip; Han, Songi

    2016-01-01

    We describe and demonstrate a system to generate hyperpolarized water in the 0.35 T fringe field of a clinical 1.5 T whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) magnet. Once generated, the hyperpolarized water is quickly and continuously transferred from the 0.35 T fringe to the 1.5 T center field of the same magnet for image acquisition using standard MRI equipment. The hyperpolarization is based on Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), which effectively and quickly transfers the higher spin polarization of free radicals to nuclear spins at ambient temperatures. We visualize the dispersion of hyperpolarized water as it flows through water-saturated systems by utilizing an observed −15 fold DNP signal enhancement with respect to the unenhanced 1H MRI signal of water at 1.5 T. The experimental DNP apparatus presented here is readily portable and can be brought to and used with any conventional unshielded MRI system. A new method of immobilizing radicals to gel beads via polyelectrolyte linker arms is described, which led to superior flow Overhauser DNP performance compared to previously presented gels. We discuss the general applicability of Overhauser DNP hyperpolarization of water and aqueous solutions in the fringe field of commercially available magnets with central fields up to 4.7 Tesla. PMID:20541445

  19. Background parenchymal enhancement in preoperative breast MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kohara, Satoko; Ishigaki, Satoko; Satake, Hiroko; Kawamura, Akiko; Kawai, Hisashi; Kikumori, Toyone; Naganawa, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We aimed to assess the influence of background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) on surgical planning performed using preoperative MRI for breast cancer evaluation. Between January 2009 and December 2010, 91 newly diagnosed breast cancer patients (mean age, 55.5 years; range, 30−88 years) who underwent preoperative bilateral breast MRI followed by planned breast conservation therapy were retrospectively enrolled. MRI was performed to assess the tumor extent in addition to mammography and breast ultrasonography. BPE in the contralateral normal breast MRI at the early dynamic phase was visually classified as follows: minimal (n=49), mild (n=27), moderate (n=7), and marked (n=8). The correlations between the BPE grade and age, menopausal status, index tumor size, changes in surgical management based on MRI results, positive predictive value (PPV) of MRI, and surgical margins were assessed. Patients in the strong BPE groups were significantly younger (p=0.002) and generally premenopausal (p<0.001). Surgical treatment was not changed in 67 cases (73.6%), while extended excision and mastectomy were performed in 12 cases (13.2%), each based on additional lesions on MRI. Six of 79 (7.6%) patients who underwent breast conservation therapy had tumor-positive resection margins. In cases where surgical management was changed, the PPV for MRI-detected foci was high in the minimal (91.7%) and mild groups (66.7%), and 0% in the moderate and marked groups (p=0.002). Strong BPE causes false-positive MRI findings and may lead to overly extensive surgery, whereas MRI may be beneficial in select patients with weak BPE. PMID:26412883

  20. MRI contrast enhancement using Magnetic Carbon Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Rakesh P.; Kangasniemi, Kim; Takahashi, Masaya; Mohanty, Samarendra K.; Koymen, Ali R.; Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington Team; University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center Team

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, nanotechnology has become one of the most exciting forefront fields in cancer diagnosis and therapeutics such as drug delivery, thermal therapy and detection of cancer. Here, we report development of core (Fe)-shell (carbon) nanoparticles with enhanced magnetic properties for contrast enhancement in MRI imaging. These new classes of magnetic carbon nanoparticles (MCNPs) are synthesized using a bottom-up approach in various organic solvents, using the electric plasma discharge generated in the cavitation field of an ultrasonic horn. Gradient echo MRI images of well-dispersed MCNP-solutions (in tube) were acquired. For T2 measurements, a multi echo spin echo sequence was performed. From the slope of the 1/T2 versus concentration plot, the R2 value for different CMCNP-samples was measured. Since MCNPs were found to be extremely non-reactive, and highly absorbing in NIR regime, development of carbon-based MRI contrast enhancement will allow its simultaneous use in biomedical applications. We aim to localize the MCNPs in targeted tissue regions by external DC magnetic field, followed by MRI imaging and subsequent photothermal therapy.

  1. An improved RF circuit for Overhauser magnetometer excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Di; Zhang, Shuang; Guo, Xin; Fu, Haoyang

    2015-08-01

    Overhauser magnetometer is a high-precision device for magnetostatic field measurement, which can be used in a wide variety of purposes: UXO detection, pipeline mapping and other engineering and environmental applications. Traditional proton magnetometer adopts DC polarization, suffering from low polarization efficiency, high power consumption and low signal noise ratio (SNR). Compared with the traditional proton magnetometer, nitroxide free radicals are used for dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). RF excitation is very important for electron resonance in nitrogen oxygen free radical solution, and it is primarily significant for the obtention of high SNR signal and high sensitive field observation. Therefore, RF excitation source plays a crucial role in the development of Overhauser magnetometer. In this paper, an improved design of a RF circuit is discussed. The new RF excitation circuit consists of two parts: Quartz crystal oscillator circuit and RF power amplifier circuit. Simulation and optimization designs for power amplifier circuit based on software ADS are presented. Finally we achieve a continuous and stable sine wave of 60MHz with 1-2.5 W output power, and the second harmonic suppression is close to -20dBc. The improved RF circuit has many merits such as small size, low-power consumption and high efficiency, and it can be applied to Overhauser magnetometer to obtain high sensitive field observation.

  2. USPIO-Enhanced MRI Neuroimaging: A Review.

    PubMed

    Gkagkanasiou, Maria; Ploussi, Agapi; Gazouli, Maria; Efstathopoulos, Efstathios P

    2016-03-01

    MRI is a powerful tool for the diagnosis and management for a variety of central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles are a novel category of MRI contrast agents that seem to play a crucial role in the imaging of CNS. Due to their physical properties, USPIOs act as blood pool agents. USPIOs improve visualization of tumor vasculature and relative cerebral blood volume measurements, tumor-associated inflammation, inflammatory-immune mediated disorders, stroke and vascular malformations. Ferumoxytol, a new type of USPIO agent, appears to have ideal characteristics for the imaging of CNS. The last few years, ferumoxytol has been successfully used to image CNS neoplasms, CNS inflammations and cerebral malformations offering useful information on cellular and molecular level. In addition, ferumoxytol studies focused on the pathophysiology of other CNS disorders like multiple sclerosis and epilepsy are already in progress. Aim of this review article is to provide the potential role of USPIO-enhanced MRI and the latest clinical applications of ferumoxytol agent in CNS imaging. PMID:26932522

  3. Microtesla MRI with dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zotev, Vadim S.; Owens, Tuba; Matlashov, Andrei N.; Savukov, Igor M.; Gomez, John J.; Espy, Michelle A.

    2010-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging at microtesla fields is a promising imaging method that combines the pre-polarization technique and broadband signal reception by superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors to enable in vivo MRI at microtesla-range magnetic fields similar in strength to the Earth magnetic field. Despite significant advances in recent years, the potential of microtesla MRI for biomedical imaging is limited by its insufficient signal-to-noise ratio due to a relatively low sample polarization. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a widely used approach that allows polarization enhancement by 2-4 orders of magnitude without an increase in the polarizing field strength. In this work, the first implementation of microtesla MRI with Overhauser DNP and SQUID signal detection is described. The first measurements of carbon-13 NMR spectra at microtesla fields are also reported. The experiments were performed at the measurement field of 96 μT, corresponding to Larmor frequency of 4 kHz for protons and 1 kHz for carbon-13. The Overhauser DNP was carried out at 3.5-5.7 mT fields using rf irradiation at 120 MHz. Objects for imaging included water phantoms and a cactus plant. Aqueous solutions of metabolically relevant sodium bicarbonate, pyruvate, alanine, and lactate, labeled with carbon-13, were used for NMR studies. All the samples were doped with TEMPO free radicals. The Overhauser DNP enabled nuclear polarization enhancement by factor as large as -95 for protons and as large as -200 for carbon-13, corresponding to thermal polarizations at 0.33 T and 1.1 T fields, respectively. These results demonstrate that SQUID-based microtesla MRI can be naturally combined with Overhauser DNP in one system, and that its signal-to-noise performance is greatly improved in this case. They also suggest that microtesla MRI can become an efficient tool for in vivo imaging of hyperpolarized carbon-13, produced by low-temperature dissolution DNP.

  4. Water 1H relaxation dispersion analysis on a nitroxide radical provides information on the maximal signal enhancement in Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization experiments.

    PubMed

    Bennati, Marina; Luchinat, Claudio; Parigi, Giacomo; Türke, Maria-Teresa

    2010-06-14

    Water (1)H relaxation rate measurements of (15)N-(2)H-TEMPONE solutions at temperatures ranging from 298 to 328 K have been performed as a function of magnetic field from 0.00023 to 9.4 T, corresponding to (1)H Larmor frequencies of 0.01 to 400 MHz. The relaxation profiles were analyzed according to the full theory for dipolar and contact relaxation, and used to estimate the coupling factor responsible for observed solution DNP effects. The experimental DNP enhancement at (1)H Larmor frequency of 15 MHz obtained by saturating one of the lines of the (15)N doublet is only ca. 20% lower than the limiting value predicted from the relaxation data, indicating that the experimental DNP setup is nearly optimal, the residual discrepancy arising from incomplete saturation of the other line. PMID:20458388

  5. Enhanced MRI and MRI-Guided Interventional Procedures in Women with Asymptomatic Silicone-Injected Breasts

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Yun-Chung; Chen, Shin-Chih; Lo, Yung-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Asymptomatic women who have received silicone injection for breast augmentation have a risk of underestimating breast cancer by palpation, mammography, or breast sonography. Enhanced breast MRI is sensitive to display certain nonspecific enhanced lesions or suspicious lesions. Such nonspecific MRI-detected lesions could be managed by American College Radiology BI-RADS lexicon and selectively with MRI-guided techniques biopsy to prevent unnecessary surgery. PMID:22536144

  6. A comparative study of 1H and 19F Overhauser DNP in fluorinated benzenes.

    PubMed

    Neudert, Oliver; Mattea, Carlos; Spiess, Hans Wolfgang; Stapf, Siegfried; Münnemann, Kerstin

    2013-12-21

    Hyperpolarization techniques, such as Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), can provide a dramatic increase in the signal obtained from nuclear magnetic resonance experiments and may therefore enable new applications where sensitivity is a limiting factor. In this contribution, studies of the (1)H and (19)F Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization enhancements at 345 mT are presented for three different aromatic solvents with the TEMPO radical for a range of radical concentrations. Furthermore, nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion measurements of the same solutions are analyzed, showing contributions from dipolar and scalar coupling modulated by translational diffusion and different coupling efficiency for different solvents and nuclei. Measurements of the electron paramagnetic resonance linewidth are included to support the analysis of the DNP saturation factor for varying radical concentration. The results of our study give an insight into the characteristics of nitroxide radicals as polarizing agents for (19)F Overhauser DNP of aromatic fluorinated solvents. Furthermore, we compare our results with the findings of the extensive research on Overhauser DNP that was conducted in the past for a large variety of other radicals. PMID:24192645

  7. Contrast Enhanced MRI in the Diagnosis of HCC

    PubMed Central

    Niendorf, Eric; Spilseth, Benjamin; Wang, Xiao; Taylor, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the 6th most common cancer worldwide. Imaging plays a critical role in HCC screening and diagnosis. Initial screening of patients at risk for HCC is performed with ultrasound. Confirmation of HCC can then be obtained by Computed Tomography (CT) or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), due to the relatively high specificity of both techniques. This article will focus on reviewing MRI techniques for imaging HCC, felt by many to be the exam of choice for HCC diagnosis. MRI relies heavily upon the use of gadolinium-based contrast agents and while primarily extracellular gadolinium-based contrast agents are used, there is an emerging role of hepatobiliary contrast agents in HCC imaging. The use of other non-contrast enhanced MRI techniques for assessing HCC will also be discussed and these MRI strategies will be reviewed in the context of the pathophysiology of HCC to help understand the MR imaging appearance of HCC. PMID:26854161

  8. Ferrite-enhanced MRI monitoring in hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Reinl, Herbert M; Peller, Michael; Hagmann, Mark; Turner, Paul; Issels, Rolf D; Reiser, Maximilian

    2005-12-01

    In an MRI hyperthermia hybrid system, T1 changes are investigated for monitoring thermal therapy at 0.2 T. The water bolus, which is needed for power transmission and cooling of the skin, limits MR image quality by signal compression and artifacts. Superparamagnetic ferrofluid in different concentration was investigated with MR relaxometry and MRI methods. We found that using ferrofluid in a low concentration of 70-90 ppm magnetite the water signal can be suppressed without susceptibility artifacts. With our method of signal suppression, a significant improvement of spatial and temporal resolution is possible. The ferrofluid is stable and allows RF heating at 100 MHz. This method of signal extinction may also be useful for other experimental setups where suppression of water is necessary. PMID:16376187

  9. Optimal contrast enhancement liquid for dynamic MRI of swallowing.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, M; Higaki, T; Nishikawa, K; Otonari-Yamamoto, M; Sugiyama, T; Ishida, R; Wakoh, M

    2016-09-01

    Several dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to observe swallowing and their parameters have been reported. Although these studies used several contrast enhancement liquids, no studies were conducted to investigate the most suitable liquids. The purpose of this study was to identify the optimal contrast enhancement liquid for dynamic MRI of swallowing. MRI was performed using a new sequence consisting of true fast imaging with steady-state precession, generalised auto-calibrating partially parallel acquisition and a keyhole imaging technique. Seven liquids were studied, including pure distilled water, distilled water with thickener at 10, 20 and 30 mg mL(-1) concentrations and oral MRI contrast medium at 1, 2 or 3 mg mL(-1) . Distilled water showed the highest signal intensity. There were statistically significant differences among the following contrast media: distilled water with thickener at 20 mg mL(-1) and the oral MRI contrast medium at 2 mg mL(-1) and 1 mg mL(-1) . It can be concluded that the optimal liquid for dynamic MRI of swallowing is a water-based substance that allows variations in viscosity. PMID:27328011

  10. Focal nodular hyperplasia: characterisation at gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and diffusion-weighted MRI

    PubMed Central

    An, H S; Kim, Y J; Jung, S I; Jeon, H J

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the enhancement patterns of hepatic focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) on gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and diffusion-weighted (DW) MRI. Methods: This retrospective study had institutional review board approval. Gadoxetic acid-enhanced and DW MR images were evaluated in 23 patients with 30 FNHs (26 histologically proven and 4 radiologically diagnosed). The lesion enhancement patterns of the hepatobiliary phase images were classified as heterogeneous or homogeneous signal intensity (SI), and as dominantly high/iso or low SI compared with those of adjacent liver parenchyma. Heterogeneous (any) SI lesions and homogeneous low SI lesions were categorised into the fibrosis group, whereas homogeneous high/iso SI lesions were categorised into the non-fibrosis group. Additionally, lesion SI on T2 weighted images, DW images and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were compared between the two groups. Results: The lesions showed heterogeneous high/iso SI (n=16), heterogeneous low SI (n=5), homogeneous high/iso SI (n=7) or homogeneous low SI (n=2) at the hepatobiliary phase MR images. The fibrosis group lesions were more likely to show high SI on DW images and T2 weighted images compared with those in the non-fibrosis group (p<0.05). ADC values tended to be lower in the fibrosis group than those in the non-fibrosis group without significance. Conclusion: FNH showed variable enhancement patterns on hepatobiliary phase images during gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI. SI on DW and T2 weighted images differed according to the fibrosis component contained in the lesion. Advances in knowledge: FNH shows a wide spectrum of imaging findings on gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and DW MRI. PMID:23873903

  11. Manganese-Enhanced MRI: Biological Applications in Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Malheiros, Jackeline Moraes; Paiva, Fernando Fernandes; Longo, Beatriz Monteiro; Hamani, Clement; Covolan, Luciene

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an excellent non-invasive tool to investigate biological systems. The administration of the paramagnetic divalent ion manganese (Mn2+) enhances MRI contrast in vivo. Due to similarities between Mn2+ and calcium (Ca2+), the premise of manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) is that the former may enter neurons and other excitable cells through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. As such, MEMRI has been used to trace neuronal pathways, define morphological boundaries, and study connectivity in morphological and functional imaging studies. In this article, we provide a brief overview of MEMRI and discuss recently published data to illustrate the usefulness of this method, particularly in animal models. PMID:26217304

  12. Overhauser Geomagnetic Sensor Based on the Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Effect for Magnetic Prospecting.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jian; Dong, Haobin; Liu, Huan; Yuan, Zhiwen; Dong, He; Zhao, Zhizhuo; Liu, Yonghua; Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Haiyang

    2016-01-01

    Based on the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) effect, an alternative design of an Overhauser geomagnetic sensor is presented that enhances the proton polarization and increases the amplitude of the free induction decay (FID) signal. The short-pulse method is adopted to rotate the enhanced proton magnetization into the plane of precession to create an FID signal. To reduce the negative effect of the powerful electromagnetic interference, the design of the anti-interference of the pick-up coil is studied. Furthermore, the radio frequency polarization method based on the capacitive-loaded coaxial cavity is proposed to improve the quality factor of the resonant circuit. In addition, a special test instrument is designed that enables the simultaneous testing of the classical proton precession and the Overhauser sensor. Overall, comparison experiments with and without the free radical of the Overhauser sensors show that the DNP effect does effectively improve the amplitude and quality of the FID signal, and the magnetic sensitivity, resolution and range reach to 10 pT/Hz 1 / 2 @1 Hz, 0.0023 nT and 20-100 μ T, respectively. PMID:27258283

  13. Overhauser Geomagnetic Sensor Based on the Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Effect for Magnetic Prospecting

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Jian; Dong, Haobin; Liu, Huan; Yuan, Zhiwen; Dong, He; Zhao, Zhizhuo; Liu, Yonghua; Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Haiyang

    2016-01-01

    Based on the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) effect, an alternative design of an Overhauser geomagnetic sensor is presented that enhances the proton polarization and increases the amplitude of the free induction decay (FID) signal. The short-pulse method is adopted to rotate the enhanced proton magnetization into the plane of precession to create an FID signal. To reduce the negative effect of the powerful electromagnetic interference, the design of the anti-interference of the pick-up coil is studied. Furthermore, the radio frequency polarization method based on the capacitive-loaded coaxial cavity is proposed to improve the quality factor of the resonant circuit. In addition, a special test instrument is designed that enables the simultaneous testing of the classical proton precession and the Overhauser sensor. Overall, comparison experiments with and without the free radical of the Overhauser sensors show that the DNP effect does effectively improve the amplitude and quality of the FID signal, and the magnetic sensitivity, resolution and range reach to 10 pT/Hz1/2@1 Hz, 0.0023 nT and 20–100 μT, respectively. PMID:27258283

  14. [Normal and abnormal meningeal enhancement: MRI features].

    PubMed

    Dietemann, J L; Correia Bernardo, R; Bogorin, A; Abu Eid, M; Koob, M; Nogueira, Th; Vargas, M I; Fakhoury, W; Zöllner, G

    2005-11-01

    The authors describe normal imaging of the meninges and meningeal spaces and MR (magnetic resonance) imaging findings in tumoral and nontumoral diseases. Dural or/and pial enhancement may be related to tumoral, infectious or granulomatous diseases. PMID:16269979

  15. [MRI with dynamic contrast enhancement in brain tumors].

    PubMed

    Panfilenko, A F; Iakovlev, S A; Pozdniakov, A V; Tiumin, L A; Shcherbuk, A Iu

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the leading method of radiation diagnosis of brain tumors. In conditions of the artificial contrast enhancement there are more clearly differentiated the boundaries of the tumor node on the back of peritumorous edema and identified structural features of the tumor. The purpose of this study was to examine indicators of the dynamics of accumulation and removal of contrast agents by brain tumors in MRI technique with dynamic contrast and identify opportunities of this method in the differential diagnosis of various types of tumors. PMID:23814831

  16. Ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI differentiation of meningioma from dural metastases: a pilot study with immunohistochemical observations.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Bronwyn E; Woltjer, Randall L; Prola-Netto, Joao; Nesbit, Gary M; Gahramanov, Seymur; Pham, Thao; Wagner, Jaime; Neuwelt, Edward A

    2016-09-01

    Malignant dural neoplasms are not reliably distinguished from benign dural neoplasms with contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI enhancement in central nervous system (CNS) diseases imaged with ferumoxytol has been attributed to intracellular uptake in macrophages rather than vascular leakage. We compared imaging to histopathology and immunohistochemistry in meningiomas and dural metastases having ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI (FeMRI) and gadolinium-enhanced MRI (GdMRI) in order to correlate enhancement patterns to macrophage presence and vascular state. All patients having extraaxial CNS tumors were retrospectively selected from one of two ongoing FeMRI studies. Enhancement was compared between GdMRI and FeMRI. Diagnoses were confirmed histologically and/or by characteristic imaging. Tumor and vascular histology was reviewed. Immunohistochemical staining for CD68 (a macrophage marker), Connexin-43 (Cx43) (a marker of normal gap junctions), and smooth muscle actin (SMA) as a marker of vascularity, was performed in seven study cases with available tissue. Immunohistochemistry was performed on archival material from 33 subjects outside of the current study as controls: 20 WHO grade I cases of meningioma and 13 metastatic tumors. Metastases displayed marked delayed enhancement on FeMRI, similar to GdMRI. Four patients with dural metastases and one patient with meningioma showed similar enhancement on FeMRI and GdMRI. Five meningiomas with typical enhancement on GdMRI lacked enhancement on FeMRI. Enhancement on FeMRI was better associated with decreased Cx43 expression than intralesional macrophages. These pilot data suggest that FeMRI may better differentiate metastatic disease from meningiomas than GdMRI, and that differences in tumor vasculature rather than macrophage presence could underlie differences in contrast enhancement. PMID:27393348

  17. Emerging concepts for myocardial late gadolinium enhancement MRI.

    PubMed

    Doltra, Adelina; Amundsen, Brage Hoyem; Gebker, Rolf; Fleck, Eckart; Kelle, Sebastian

    2013-08-01

    Late gadolinium enhancement is a useful tool for scar detection, based on differences in the volume of distribution of gadolinium, an extracellular agent. The presence of fibrosis in the myocardium amenable to be detected with late gadolinium enhancement MRI is found not only in ischemic cardiomyopathy, in which it offers information regarding viability and prognosis, but also in a wide variety of non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. In the following review we will discuss the methodological aspects of gadolinium-based imaging, as well as its applications and anticipated future developments. PMID:23909638

  18. De-enhancing the dynamic contrast-enhanced breast MRI for robust registration.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yuanjie; Yu, Jingyi; Kambhamettu, Chandra; Englander, Sarah; Schnall, Mitchell D; Shen, Dinggang

    2007-01-01

    Dynamic enhancement causes serious problems for registration of contrast enhanced breast MRI, due to variable uptakes of agent on different tissues or even same tissues in the breast. We present an iterative optimization algorithm to de-enhance the dynamic contrast-enhanced breast MRI and then register them for avoiding the effects of enhancement on image registration. In particular, the spatially varying enhancements are modeled by a Markov Random Field, and estimated by a locally smooth function with boundaries using a graph cut algorithm. The de-enhanced images are then registered by conventional B-spline based registration algorithm. These two steps benefit from each other and are repeated until the results converge. Experimental results show that our two-step registration algorithm performs much better than conventional mutual information based registration algorithm. Also, the effects of tumor shrinking in the conventional registration algorithms can be effectively avoided by our registration algorithm. PMID:18051148

  19. Efficient suppression of Overhauser field fluctuations with DNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeil, Robert; Botzem, Tim; Tenberg, Stefanie; Rubbert, Sebastian; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2015-03-01

    In certain spin-qubit schemes the Overhauser field is a tuned control parameter and in many spin qubits this fluctuating nuclear field is a significant factor limiting coherence. Nuclear spins can be driven via dynamic nuclear polarisation (DNP) to a chosen field and selective feedback applied narrowing the distribution of nuclear Overhauser field fluctuations. The achievable narrowing of the Overhauser field is related to the maximum pump rate and previous experiments on gated GaAs quantum dots were limited by the pump rate of the pumping mechanism used. We present a method to reduce nuclear fluctuations by increasing the max achievable pump rate. Sequentially applying two ac electric fields with frequencies slightly detuned from the desired Larmor frequency results in a pump curve with a stable fixed point. In the absence of spin-orbit interaction, driving electron spin flips via electric dipole spin resonance (EDSR) will also drive nuclear spin flips and this scheme is expected to result in stronger pumping and efficient suppression of the Overhauser field fluctuations. We will present experimental evidence of this driven nuclear polarization including tracking of EDSR resonances.

  20. Thermodynamics and phase transitions in the Overhauser model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffield, N. G.; Pulé, J. V.

    1989-01-01

    We analyze the thermodynamics of the Overhauser model and demonstrate rigorously the existence of a phase transition. This is achieved by extending techniques previously developed to treat the BCS model in the quasi-spin formulation. Additionally, we compare the thermodynamics of the quasi-spin and full-trace BCS models. The results are identical up to a temperature rescaling.

  1. Enhancement of virchow-robin spaces. An MRI evaluation.

    PubMed

    Tsitouridis, I; Papaioannou, S; Arvaniti, M; Tsitouridis, K; Rodokalakis, G; Papastergiou, C

    2009-01-20

    Virchow-Robin spaces are enclosed spaces filled with interstitial fluid and covered with pia that accompany arteries, arterioles, veins and venules as they perforate the brain. They are round, linear or punctuate areas depending on the image that parallel cerebrospinal fluid attenuation or signal intensity. They are classically described as isointense to cerebrospinal fluid on images obtained with all pulse sequences. They appear hypointense relative to brain on T1-weighted MR scans and present a high signal intensity on T2-weighted MR scans. They also show complete signal suppression on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) scans and no enhancement after intravenous contrast administration. However, many pathologic states result in abnormal dilation with an increased number of Virchow-Robin spaces visible on MRI imaging and many pathological conditions cause the spaces to enhance. The purpose of this study is to present the major causes of Virchow-Robin enhancement. PMID:24257044

  2. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI evaluation of cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Hart, Blaine L; Taheri, Saeid; Rosenberg, Gary A; Morrison, Leslie A

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study is to quantitatively evaluate the behavior of CNS cavernous malformations (CCMs) using a dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCEMRI) technique sensitive for slow transfer rates of gadolinium. The prospective study was approved by the institutional review board and was HIPPA compliant. Written informed consent was obtained from 14 subjects with familial CCMs (4 men and 10 women, ages 22-76 years, mean 48.1 years). Following routine anatomic MRI of the brain, DCEMRI was performed for six slices, using T1 mapping with partial inversion recovery (TAPIR) to calculate T1 values, following administration of 0.025 mmol/kg gadolinium DTPA. The transfer rate (Ki) was calculated using the Patlak model, and Ki within CCMs was compared to normal-appearing white matter as well as to 17 normal control subjects previously studied. All subjects had typical MRI appearance of CCMs. Thirty-nine CCMs were studied using DCEMRI. Ki was low or normal in 12 lesions and elevated from 1.4 to 12 times higher than background in the remaining 27 lesions. Ki ranged from 2.1E-6 to 9.63E-4 min(-1), mean 3.55E-4. Normal-appearing white matter in the CCM patients had a mean Ki of 1.57E-4, not statistically different from mean WM Ki of 1.47E-4 in controls. TAPIR-based DCEMRI technique permits quantifiable assessment of CCMs in vivo and reveals considerable differences not seen with conventional MRI. Potential applications include correlation with biologic behavior such as lesion growth or hemorrage, and measurement of drug effects. PMID:24323376

  3. MRI Background Parenchymal Enhancement Is Not Associated with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bennani-Baiti, Barbara; Dietzel, Matthias; Baltzer, Pascal Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background Previously, a strong positive association between background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) at magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and breast cancer was reported in high-risk populations. We sought to determine, whether this was also true for non-high-risk patients. Methods 540 consecutive patients underwent breast MRI for assessment of breast findings (BI-RADS 0–5, non-high-risk screening (no familial history of breast cancer, no known genetic mutation, no prior chest irradiation, or previous breast cancer diagnosis)) and subsequent histological work-up. For this IRB-approved study, BPE and fibroglandular tissue FGT were retrospectively assessed by two experienced radiologists according to the BI-RADS lexicon. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to explore associations between BPE, FGT, age and final diagnosis of breast cancer. Subsequently, multivariate logistic regression analysis, considering covariate colinearities, was performed, using final diagnosis as the target variable and BPE, FGT and age as covariates. Results Age showed a moderate negative correlation with FGT (r = -0.43, p<0.001) and a weak negative correlation with BPE (r = -0.28, p<0.001). FGT and BPE correlated moderately (r = 0.35, p<0.001). Final diagnosis of breast cancer displayed very weak negative correlations with FGT (r = -0.09, p = 0.046) and BPE (r = -0.156, p<0.001) and weak positive correlation with age (r = 0.353, p<0.001). On multivariate logistic regression analysis, the only independent covariate for prediction of breast cancer was age (OR 1.032, p<0.001). Conclusions Based on our data, neither BPE nor FGT independently correlate with breast cancer risk in non-high-risk patients at MRI. Our model retained only age as an independent risk factor for breast cancer in this setting. PMID:27379395

  4. Synthesis and characterization of magnetoliposomes for MRI contrast enhancement.

    PubMed

    Faria, M R; Cruz, M M; Gonçalves, M C; Carvalho, A; Feio, G; Martins, M B F

    2013-03-25

    This work assesses the characteristics of magnetoliposomes of soybean phosphatidylcholine (SPC):cholesterol (Chol) loaded with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) stabilized with tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAOH) and their capacity to enhance magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast. Magnetoliposomes of SPC were used for comparative studies. IONPs and magnetoliposomes were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, SQUID magnetometry, FTIR and MRI. The saturation magnetization at 10K was ~0.06 Am(2)/kg for SPC:Chol magnetoliposomes with 7 g iron oxide/mol of lipid and ~0.05 Am(2)/kg for SPC magnetoliposomes with 21 g iron oxide/mol of lipid. As these values are associated with the number of incorporated magnetic IONPs, the saturation magnetization is 1.2 times higher for magnetoliposomes of SPC:Chol as compared with magnetoliposomes of SPC alone. The behavior of temperature dependence in both cases is typical of superparamagnetic particles. FTIR spectra evidence the increase of magnetoliposome membrane ordering with the presence of Chol. Principal component analysis (PCA) applied to FTIR spectra evidenced a clear distinction between scores for SPC:Chol, and SPC magnetoliposomes and for SPC empty liposomes. PCA applied to FTIR data differentiate magnetoliposomes from empty liposomes. MR images of aqueous phantoms obtained with and without magnetoliposomes, clearly evidence their effect on T2 image weighting. PMID:23422275

  5. Theoretical treatment of pulsed Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization: Consideration of a general periodic pulse sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasibulov, E. A.; Kiryutin, A. S.; Yurkovskaya, A. V.; Vieth, H.-M.; Ivanov, K. L.

    2016-05-01

    A general theoretical approach to pulsed Overhauser-type dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is presented. Dynamic nuclear polarization is a powerful method to create non-thermal polarization of nuclear spins, thereby enhancing their nuclear magnetic resonance signals. The theory presented can treat pulsed microwave irradiation of electron paramagnetic resonance transitions for periodic pulse sequences of general composition. Dynamic nuclear polarization enhancement is analyzed in detail as a function of the microwave pulse length for rectangular pulses and pulses with finite rise time. Characteristic oscillations of the DNP enhancement are found when the pulse-length is stepwise increased, originating from coherent motion of the electron spins driven by the pulses. Experimental low-field DNP data are in very good agreement with this theoretical approach.

  6. Carbon and proton Overhauser DNP from MD simulations and ab initio calculations: TEMPOL in acetone.

    PubMed

    Küçük, Sami Emre; Biktagirov, Timur; Sezer, Deniz

    2015-10-14

    A computational analysis of the Overhauser effect is reported for the proton, methyl carbon, and carbonyl carbon nuclei of liquid acetone doped with the nitroxide radical TEMPOL. A practical methodology for calculating the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) coupling factors by accounting for both dipole-dipole and Fermi-contact interactions is presented. The contribution to the dipolar spectral density function of nuclear spins that are not too far from TEMPOL is computed through classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, whereas the contribution of distant spins is included analytically. Fermi contacts are obtained by subjecting a few molecules from every MD snapshot to ab initio quantum mechanical calculations. Scalar interaction is found to be an essential part of the (13)C Overhauser DNP. While mostly detrimental to the carbonyl carbon of acetone it is predicted to result in large enhancements of the methyl carbon signal at magnetic fields of 9 T and beyond. In contrast, scalar coupling is shown to be negligible for the protons of acetone. The additional influence of proton polarization on the carbon DNP (three-spin effect) is also analyzed computationally. Its effect, however, is concluded to be practically insignificant for liquid acetone. PMID:26343351

  7. Detection of Cortical Laminar Architecture Using Manganese-Enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Afonso C.; Lee, Junghee; Wu, Carolyn W.-H.; Tucciarone, Jason; Pelled, Galit; Aoki, Ichio; Koretsky, Alan P.

    2008-01-01

    Changes in Manganese-Enhanced MRI (MEMRI) contrast across the rodent somatosensory cortex were compared to the cortical laminae as identified by tissue histology and administration of an anatomical tracer to cortex and thalamus. Across the cortical thickness, MEMRI signal intensity was low in layer I, increased in layer II, decreased in layer III until mid-layer IV, and increased again, peaking in layer V, before decreasing through layer VI. The reeler mouse mutant was used to confirm that the cortical alternation in MEMRI contrast was related to laminar architecture. Unlike in wild-type mice, the reeler cortex showed no appreciable changes in MEMRI signal, consistent[ACS1] with absence of cortical laminae in histological slides. The tract-tracing ability of MEMRI was used to further confirm assignments and demonstrate laminar specificity. Twelve to sixteen hours after stereotaxic injections of MnCl2 to the ventroposterior thalamic nuclei, an overall increase in signal intensity was detected in primary somatosensory cortex compared to other brain regions. Maximum intensity projection images revealed a distinctly bright stripe located 600 − 700 μm below the pial surface, in layer IV. The data show that both systemic and tract-tracing forms of MEMRI are useful for studying laminar architecture in the brain. PMID:17936913

  8. Enhancement of resting-state fcMRI networks by prior sensory stimulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenxuan; Li, Zhixin; Ward, B Douglas; Dwinell, Melinda R; Lombard, Julian H; Hudetz, Anthony G; Pawela, Christopher P

    2014-11-01

    It is important to consider the effect of a previous experimental condition when analyzing resting-state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) data. In this work, a simple sensory stimulation functional MRI (fMRI) experiment was conducted between two resting-state fcMRI acquisitions in anesthetized rats using a high-field small-animal MR scanner. Previous human studies have reported fcMRI network alteration by prior task/stimulus utilizing similar experimental paradigms. An anesthetized rat preparation was used to test whether brain regions with higher level functions are involved in post-task/stimulus fcMRI network alteration. We demonstrate significant fcMRI enhancement poststimulation in the sensory cortical, limbic, and insular brain regions in rats. These brain regions have been previously implicated in vigilance and anesthetic arousal networks. We tested their experimental paradigm in several inbred strains of rats with known phenotypic differences in anesthetic susceptibility and cerebral vascular function. Brown Norway (BN), Dahl Salt-Sensitive (SS), and consomic SSBN13 strains were tested. We have previously shown significant differences in blood oxygen level-dependent fMRI activity and fcMRI networks across these strains. Here we report statistically significant interstrain differences in regional fcMRI poststimulation enhancement. In the SS strain, poststimulation enhancement occurred in posterior sensory and limbic cortical brain regions. In the BN strain, poststimulation enhancement appeared in anterior cingulate and subcortical limbic brain regions. These results imply that a prior condition has a significant impact on fcMRI networks that depend on intersubject difference in genetics and physiology. PMID:25387238

  9. Enhancement of Resting-State fcMRI Networks by Prior Sensory Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chenxuan; Li, Zhixin; Ward, B. Douglas; Dwinell, Melinda R.; Lombard, Julian H.; Hudetz, Anthony G.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract It is important to consider the effect of a previous experimental condition when analyzing resting-state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) data. In this work, a simple sensory stimulation functional MRI (fMRI) experiment was conducted between two resting-state fcMRI acquisitions in anesthetized rats using a high-field small-animal MR scanner. Previous human studies have reported fcMRI network alteration by prior task/stimulus utilizing similar experimental paradigms. An anesthetized rat preparation was used to test whether brain regions with higher level functions are involved in post-task/stimulus fcMRI network alteration. We demonstrate significant fcMRI enhancement poststimulation in the sensory cortical, limbic, and insular brain regions in rats. These brain regions have been previously implicated in vigilance and anesthetic arousal networks. We tested their experimental paradigm in several inbred strains of rats with known phenotypic differences in anesthetic susceptibility and cerebral vascular function. Brown Norway (BN), Dahl Salt-Sensitive (SS), and consomic SSBN13 strains were tested. We have previously shown significant differences in blood oxygen level-dependent fMRI activity and fcMRI networks across these strains. Here we report statistically significant interstrain differences in regional fcMRI poststimulation enhancement. In the SS strain, poststimulation enhancement occurred in posterior sensory and limbic cortical brain regions. In the BN strain, poststimulation enhancement appeared in anterior cingulate and subcortical limbic brain regions. These results imply that a prior condition has a significant impact on fcMRI networks that depend on intersubject difference in genetics and physiology. PMID:25387238

  10. PERIPATELLAR SYNOVITIS: COMPARISON BETWEEN NON-CONTRAST-ENHANCED AND CONTRAST-ENHANCED MRI AND ASSOCIATION WITH PAIN. THE MOST STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Crema, Michel D.; Felson, David T.; Roemer, Frank W.; Niu, Jingbo; Marra, Monica D.; Zhang, Yuqing; Lynch, John A.; El-Khoury, Georges Y.; Lewis, Cora E.; Guermazi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess the diagnostic performance of signal changes in Hoffa's fat pad (HFP) assessed on non-contrast-enhanced (CE) MRI in detecting synovitis, and the association of pain with signal changes in Hoffa’s fat pad on non-CE MRI and peripatellar synovial thickness on CE MRI. Methods The Multicenter Osteoarthritis (MOST) Study is an observational study of individuals who have or are at high risk for knee OA. All subjects with available non-CE and CE MRIs were included. Signal changes in HFP were scored from 0 to 3 in 2 regions using non-CE MRI. Synovial thickness was scored from 0 to 2 on CE MRI in 5 peripatellar regions. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of HFP signal changes were calculated considering synovial thickness on CE MRI as the reference standard. We used logistic regression to assess the associations of HFP changes (non-CE MRI) and synovial thickness (CE MRI) with pain from walking up or down stairs, after adjusting for potential confounders. Results A total of 393 subjects were included. Sensitivity of infrapatellar and intercondylar signal changes in HFP was high (71% and 88%), but specificity was low (55% and 30%). No significant associations were found between HFP changes on non-CE MRI and pain. Grade 2 synovial thickness assessed on CE MRI was significantly associated with pain after adjustments for potential confounders. Conclusion Signal changes in HFP detected on non-CE MRI are a sensitive but non-specific surrogate for the assessment of synovitis. CE MRI identifies associations with pain better than non-CE MRI. PMID:23277189

  11. MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... scan is an imaging test that uses powerful magnets and radio waves to create pictures of the ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  12. Major mouse placental compartments revealed by diffusion-weighted MRI, contrast-enhanced MRI, and fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Eddy; Avni, Reut; Hadas, Ron; Raz, Tal; Garbow, Joel Richard; Bendel, Peter; Frydman, Lucio; Neeman, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian models, and mouse studies in particular, play a central role in our understanding of placental development. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be a valuable tool to further these studies, providing both structural and functional information. As fluid dynamics throughout the placenta are driven by a variety of flow and diffusion processes, diffusion-weighted MRI could enhance our understanding of the exchange properties of maternal and fetal blood pools—and thereby of placental function. These studies, however, have so far been hindered by the small sizes, the unavoidable motions, and the challenging air/water/fat heterogeneities, associated with mouse placental environments. The present study demonstrates that emerging methods based on the spatiotemporal encoding (SPEN) of the MRI information can robustly overcome these obstacles. Using SPEN MRI in combination with albumin-based contrast agents, we analyzed the diffusion behavior of developing placentas in a cohort of mice. These studies successfully discriminated the maternal from the fetal blood flows; the two orders of magnitude differences measured in these fluids’ apparent diffusion coefficients suggest a nearly free diffusion behavior for the former and a strong flow-based component for the latter. An intermediate behavior was observed by these methods for a third compartment that, based on maternal albumin endocytosis, was associated with trophoblastic cells in the interphase labyrinth. Structural features associated with these dynamic measurements were consistent with independent intravital and ex vivo fluorescence microscopy studies and are discussed within the context of the anatomy of developing mouse placentas. PMID:24969421

  13. Major mouse placental compartments revealed by diffusion-weighted MRI, contrast-enhanced MRI, and fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Eddy; Avni, Reut; Hadas, Ron; Raz, Tal; Garbow, Joel Richard; Bendel, Peter; Frydman, Lucio; Neeman, Michal

    2014-07-15

    Mammalian models, and mouse studies in particular, play a central role in our understanding of placental development. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be a valuable tool to further these studies, providing both structural and functional information. As fluid dynamics throughout the placenta are driven by a variety of flow and diffusion processes, diffusion-weighted MRI could enhance our understanding of the exchange properties of maternal and fetal blood pools--and thereby of placental function. These studies, however, have so far been hindered by the small sizes, the unavoidable motions, and the challenging air/water/fat heterogeneities, associated with mouse placental environments. The present study demonstrates that emerging methods based on the spatiotemporal encoding (SPEN) of the MRI information can robustly overcome these obstacles. Using SPEN MRI in combination with albumin-based contrast agents, we analyzed the diffusion behavior of developing placentas in a cohort of mice. These studies successfully discriminated the maternal from the fetal blood flows; the two orders of magnitude differences measured in these fluids' apparent diffusion coefficients suggest a nearly free diffusion behavior for the former and a strong flow-based component for the latter. An intermediate behavior was observed by these methods for a third compartment that, based on maternal albumin endocytosis, was associated with trophoblastic cells in the interphase labyrinth. Structural features associated with these dynamic measurements were consistent with independent intravital and ex vivo fluorescence microscopy studies and are discussed within the context of the anatomy of developing mouse placentas. PMID:24969421

  14. Recent Advances in the Imaging Diagnosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Value of Gadoxetic Acid-Enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Ijin; Lee, Jeong Min

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DPTA), or gadoxetic acid for short, is a hepatocyte-specific contrast agent which is now increasingly used for the detection and characterization of focal hepatic lesions, particularly in patients at high-risk of developing hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). In fact, several recent guidelines now recognize gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI (Gd-EOB-MRI) as the primary diagnostic imaging modality for the noninvasive diagnosis of HCC, although it must be noted that several major guidelines still include only extracellular contrast media-enhanced computed tomography and MRI. The primary merits of Gd-EOB-MRI lie in the fact that it can provide not only dynamic imaging, but also hepatobiliary phase (HBP) imaging which can lead to high lesion-to-liver contrast and give additional information regarding hepatocyte uptake via organic anion transporting polypeptides. This, in turn, allows higher sensitivity in detecting small HCCs and helps provide additional information regarding the multistep process of hepatocarcinogenesis. Indeed, many recent studies have investigated the diagnostic value of Gd-EOB-MRI for early HCCs as well as its role as a potential imaging biomarker in predicting outcome. We herein review the recent advances in the imaging diagnosis of HCCs focusing on the applications of Gd-EOB-MRI and the challenging issues that remain. PMID:26989660

  15. Recent Advances in the Imaging Diagnosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Value of Gadoxetic Acid-Enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Joo, Ijin; Lee, Jeong Min

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DPTA), or gadoxetic acid for short, is a hepatocyte-specific contrast agent which is now increasingly used for the detection and characterization of focal hepatic lesions, particularly in patients at high-risk of developing hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). In fact, several recent guidelines now recognize gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI (Gd-EOB-MRI) as the primary diagnostic imaging modality for the noninvasive diagnosis of HCC, although it must be noted that several major guidelines still include only extracellular contrast media-enhanced computed tomography and MRI. The primary merits of Gd-EOB-MRI lie in the fact that it can provide not only dynamic imaging, but also hepatobiliary phase (HBP) imaging which can lead to high lesion-to-liver contrast and give additional information regarding hepatocyte uptake via organic anion transporting polypeptides. This, in turn, allows higher sensitivity in detecting small HCCs and helps provide additional information regarding the multistep process of hepatocarcinogenesis. Indeed, many recent studies have investigated the diagnostic value of Gd-EOB-MRI for early HCCs as well as its role as a potential imaging biomarker in predicting outcome. We herein review the recent advances in the imaging diagnosis of HCCs focusing on the applications of Gd-EOB-MRI and the challenging issues that remain. PMID:26989660

  16. MRI, enhanced CT, and FDG PET/CT in primary retroperitoneal mucinous cystadenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dong, Aisheng; Zhai, Zhijun; Wang, Yang; Zuo, Changjing

    2015-01-01

    Primary retroperitoneal mucinous cystadenocarcinoma (PRMC) is an extremely rare neoplasm. We present a case of PRMC with MRI, enhanced CT, and FDG PET/CT findings. Abdominal MRI showed a cystic lesion in the retroperitoneum with a mural nodule. The mural nodule showed progressive enhancement on enhanced CT and intense FDG uptake on early PET/CT with increased SUVmax on delayed PET/CT. Laparoscopy was performed. Retroperitoneal mucinous cystadenocarcinoma was confirmed histopathologically. Metastasis from gastrointestinal tract or ovary was excluded. This case indicates, although rare, PRMC should be considered when a hypermetabolic retroperitoneal cystic lesion with bilateral normal ovaries is found on FDG PET/CT. PMID:24445275

  17. Glucose Administration Enhances fMRI Brain Activation and Connectivity Related to Episodic Memory Encoding for Neutral and Emotional Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parent, Marise B.; Krebs-Kraft, Desiree L.; Ryan, John P.; Wilson, Jennifer S.; Harenski, Carla; Hamann, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Glucose enhances memory in a variety of species. In humans, glucose administration enhances episodic memory encoding, although little is known regarding the neural mechanisms underlying these effects. Here we examined whether elevating blood glucose would enhance functional MRI (fMRI) activation and connectivity in brain regions associated with…

  18. Signal enhancement ratio (SER) quantified from breast DCE-MRI and breast cancer risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shandong; Kurland, Brenda F.; Berg, Wendie A.; Zuley, Margarita L.; Jankowitz, Rachel C.; Sumkin, Jules; Gur, David

    2015-03-01

    Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is recommended as an adjunct to mammography for women who are considered at elevated risk of developing breast cancer. As a key component of breast MRI, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) uses a contrast agent to provide high intensity contrast between breast tissues, making it sensitive to tissue composition and vascularity. Breast DCE-MRI characterizes certain physiologic properties of breast tissue that are potentially related to breast cancer risk. Studies have shown that increased background parenchymal enhancement (BPE), which is the contrast enhancement occurring in normal cancer-unaffected breast tissues in post-contrast sequences, predicts increased breast cancer risk. Signal enhancement ratio (SER) computed from pre-contrast and post-contrast sequences in DCE-MRI measures change in signal intensity due to contrast uptake over time and is a measure of contrast enhancement kinetics. SER quantified in breast tumor has been shown potential as a biomarker for characterizing tumor response to treatments. In this work we investigated the relationship between quantitative measures of SER and breast cancer risk. A pilot retrospective case-control study was performed using a cohort of 102 women, consisting of 51 women who had diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer and 51 matched controls (by age and MRI date) with a unilateral biopsy-proven benign lesion. SER was quantified using fully-automated computerized algorithms and three SER-derived quantitative volume measures were compared between the cancer cases and controls using logistic regression analysis. Our preliminary results showed that SER is associated with breast cancer risk, after adjustment for the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS)-based mammographic breast density measures. This pilot study indicated that SER has potential for use as a risk factor for breast cancer risk assessment in women at elevated risk of developing breast cancer.

  19. Enhancement of robin-virchow spaces MRI evaluation.

    PubMed

    Tsitouridis, I; Papaioannou, S; Arvaniti, M; Tsitouridis, K; Rodokalakis, G; Papastergiou, C

    2008-10-01

    The perivascular spaces are normally microscopic. Even in normal brain some Robin-Virchow spaces are usually seen in the area of substantia innominata at the level of anterior commissure. Many pathologic states result in abnormal dilatation with an increased number of spaces visible on MRI imaging. Dilatation is most commonly associated with anterior abnormalities that arise due to aging, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, smoking, hypertension and other vascular risk factors. The precise etiology of dilatation is currently unknown. PMID:24256953

  20. Gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI for T-staging of gallbladder carcinoma: emphasis on liver invasion

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, J; Choi, D; Rhim, H; Lee, W J; Hong, S S; Chang, Y-W

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI with an emphasis on the usefulness of the hepatobiliary phase (HBP) in T-staging of gallbladder carcinoma. Methods: 66 patients with surgically confirmed gallbladder carcinoma underwent MRI. Two radiologists independently reviewed two sets of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI without and with the HBP. Local tumour spread was evaluated according to T-staging, and the results were compared with pathological findings. The diagnostic performance of two image sets to differentiate each T-stage was compared. Results: The sensitivities of MRI with the HBP to differentiate T1 vs ≥T2 lesions, ≤T2 vs ≥T3 lesions and ≤T3 vs T4 lesions were 96.3%, 85.7% and 100% for Observer 1 and 92.6%, 95.2% and 100% for Observer 2, respectively (p < 0.0001). By adding the HBP, the sensitivities to differentiate ≤T2 vs ≥T3 lesions were increased from 66.7% to 85.7% for Observer 1 and from 81.0% to 95.2% for Observer 2, although there was no significant difference (p > 0.05). The overall accuracies for T-staging were increased from 80.3% to 86.4% for Observer 1, a statistically significant degree (p = 0.046), and from 83.8% to 87.9% for Observer 2 (p > 0.05). The k-value for the two observers indicated excellent agreement. Conclusion: Gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI provided acceptable diagnostic performance for T-staging of gallbladder carcinoma. Addition of the HBP aids in the detection of liver invasion. Advances in knowledge: In the T-staging of gallbladder carcinoma, gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI with the HBP may enhance detection of liver invasion. PMID:24288397

  1. Tracing neural circuits in vivo with Mn-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Yusuke; Weber, Bruno; Saleem, Kadharbatcha S; Augath, Mark; Logothetis, Nikos K

    2006-05-01

    The application of MRI-visible paramagnetic tracers to reveal in vivo connectivity can provide important subject-specific information for multisite, multielectrode intracortical recordings in combined behavioral and physiology experiments. To establish the use of such tracers in the nonhuman primate, we recently compared the specificity of the anterograde tracer Mn2+ with that of wheat-germ-agglutinin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) in experiments tracing the neuronal connections of the basal ganglia of the monkey. It was shown that Mn2+ and WGA-HRP yield the same projection patterns and that the former tracer crosses at least two synapses, for it could be found in thalamus following injections into the striatum. Here we provide evidence that Mn2+ reaches the cortex following striatum injections and, thus, is transferred even further than previously shown. In other words, used as a paramagnetic MRI tracer, Mn2+ can permit the visualization of neural networks covering at least four processing stages. Moreover, unilateral intravitreal injections show that Mn2+ is sufficiently synapse specific to permit visualization of the lamina of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN). Interestingly, the transfer rate of the substance reflected the well-known axonal size differences between the parvocellular and magnocellular layers of dLGN. After intravitreal injections, we were able to demonstrate transfer of Mn2+ into several subcortical and cortical areas, including the inferotemporal cortex. The specificity of the transsynaptic transfer of manganese that we report here indicates the value of this tracer for chronic studies of development and plasticity, as well as for studies of brain pathology. PMID:16677940

  2. Assessment of liver function in primary biliary cirrhosis using Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced liver MRI

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Henrik; Blomqvist, Lennart; Douglas, Lena; Nordell, Anders; Jonas, Eduard

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Gd-EOB-DTPA (gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid) is a gadolinium-based hepatocyte-specific contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The aim of this study was to determine whether the hepatic uptake and excretion of Gd-EOB-DTPA differ between patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and healthy controls, and whether differences could be quantified. Methods Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced liver MRI was performed in 20 healthy volunteers and 12 patients with PBC. The uptake of Gd-EOB-DTPA was assessed using traditional semi-quantitative parameters (Cmax, Tmax and T1/2), as well as model-free parameters derived after deconvolutional analysis (hepatic extraction fraction [HEF], input-relative blood flow [irBF] and mean transit time [MTT]). In each individual, all parameters were calculated for each liver segment and the median of the segmental values was used to define a global liver median (GLM). Results Although the PBC patients had relatively mild disease according to their Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD), Child–Pugh and Mayo risk scores, they had significantly lower HEF and shorter MTT values compared with the healthy controls. These differences significantly increased with increasing MELD and Child–Pugh scores. Conclusions Dynamic hepatocyte-specific contrast-enhanced MRI (DHCE-MRI) has a potential role as an imaging-based liver function test. The high spatial resolution of MRI enables hepatic function to be assessed on segmental and sub-segmental levels. PMID:20887325

  3. Randomized multicentre trial of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI versus conventional MRI or CT in the staging of colorectal cancer liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Zech, C J; Korpraphong, P; Huppertz, A; Denecke, T; Kim, M-J; Tanomkiat, W; Jonas, E; Ba-Ssalamah, A

    2014-01-01

    Background This multicentre international randomized trial compared the impact of gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), MRI with extracellular contrast medium (ECCM-MRI) and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) as a first-line imaging method in patients with suspected colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRCLM). Methods Between October 2008 and September 2010, patients with suspected CRCLM were randomized to one of the three imaging modalities. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients for whom further imaging after initial imaging was required for a confident diagnosis. Secondary variables included confidence in the therapeutic decision, intraoperative deviations from the initial imaging-based surgical plan as a result of additional operative findings, and diagnostic efficacy of the imaging modalities versus intraoperative and pathological extent of the disease. Results A total of 360 patients were enrolled. Efficacy was analysed in 342 patients (118, 112 and 112 with gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI, ECCM-MRI and CE-CT respectively as the initial imaging procedure). Further imaging was required in 0 of 118, 19 (17·0 per cent) of 112 and 44 (39·3 per cent) of 112 patients respectively (P < 0·001). Diagnostic confidence was high or very high in 98·3 per cent of patients for gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI, 85·7 per cent for ECCM-MRI and 65·2 per cent for CE-CT. Surgical plans were changed during surgery in 28, 32 and 47 per cent of patients in the respective groups. Conclusion The diagnostic performance of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI was better than that of CE-CT and ECCM-MRI as the initial imaging modality. No further imaging was needed in the gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI group and comparison of diagnostic efficacy parameters demonstrated the diagnostic superiority of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI. Registration number: NCT00764621( http://clinicaltrials.gov ); EudraCT number: 2008-000583-16 ( https://eudract.ema.europa.eu/ ). PMID

  4. The Potential for an Enhanced Role for MRI in Radiation-therapy Treatment Planning

    PubMed Central

    Metcalfe, P.; Liney, G. P.; Holloway, L.; Walker, A.; Barton, M.; Delaney, G. P.; Vinod, S.; Tomé, W.

    2013-01-01

    The exquisite soft-tissue contrast of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has meant that the technique is having an increasing role in contouring the gross tumor volume (GTV) and organs at risk (OAR) in radiation therapy treatment planning systems (TPS). MRI-planning scans from diagnostic MRI scanners are currently incorporated into the planning process by being registered to CT data. The soft-tissue data from the MRI provides target outline guidance and the CT provides a solid geometric and electron density map for accurate dose calculation on the TPS computer. There is increasing interest in MRI machine placement in radiotherapy clinics as an adjunct to CT simulators. Most vendors now offer 70 cm bores with flat couch inserts and specialised RF coil designs. We would refer to these devices as MR-simulators. There is also research into the future application of MR-simulators independent of CT and as in-room image-guidance devices. It is within the background of this increased interest in the utility of MRI in radiotherapy treatment planning that this paper is couched. The paper outlines publications that deal with standard MRI sequences used in current clinical practice. It then discusses the potential for using processed functional diffusion maps (fDM) derived from diffusion weighted image sequences in tracking tumor activity and tumor recurrence. Next, this paper reviews publications that describe the use of MRI in patient-management applications that may, in turn, be relevant to radiotherapy treatment planning. The review briefly discusses the concepts behind functional techniques such as dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE), diffusion-weighted (DW) MRI sequences and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI). Significant applications of MR are discussed in terms of the following treatment sites: brain, head and neck, breast, lung, prostate and cervix. While not yet routine, the use of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map analysis indicates an exciting future

  5. Dynamic Glucose-Enhanced (DGE) MRI: Translation to Human Scanning and First Results in Glioma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiang; Yadav, Nirbhay N.; Knutsson, Linda; Hua, Jun; Kalyani, Rita; Hall, Erica; Laterra, John; Blakeley, Jaishri; Strowd, Roy; Pomper, Martin; Barker, Peter; Chan, Kannie; Liu, Guanshu; McMahon, Michael T.; Stevens, Robert D.; van Zijl, Peter C.M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent animal studies have shown that D-glucose is a potential biodegradable MRI contrast agent for imaging glucose uptake in tumors. Here, we show the first translation of that use of D-glucose to human studies. Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI at a single frequency offset optimized for detection of hydroxyl protons in D-glucose (glucoCEST) was used to image dynamic signal changes in the human brain at 7T during and after infusion of D-glucose. Dynamic glucose-enhanced (DGE) image data from four normal volunteers and three glioma patients showed strong signal enhancement in blood vessels, while the enhancement varied spatially over the tumor. Areas of enhancement differed spatially between DGE and conventional Gd-enhanced imaging, suggesting complementary image information content for these two types of agents. In addition, different tumor areas enhanced with D-glucose at different times post-infusion, suggesting a sensitivity to perfusion-related properties such as substrate delivery and blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability. These preliminary results suggest that DGE MRI is feasible to study glucose uptake in humans, providing a time-dependent set of data that contains information regarding arterial input function (AIF), tissue perfusion, glucose transport across the BBB and cell membrane, and glucose metabolism. PMID:26779568

  6. Synergistic enhancement of iron oxide nanoparticle and gadolinium for dual-contrast MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fan; Huang, Xinglu; Qian, Chunqi; Zhu, Lei; Hida, Naoki; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MR contrast agents exert influence on T{sub 1} or T{sub 2} relaxation time of the surrounding tissue. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combined use of iron oxide and Gd-DTPA can improve the sensitivity/specificity of lesion detection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dual contrast MRI enhances the delineation of tumor borders and small lesions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of DC-MRI can come from the high paramagnetic susceptibility of Gd{sup 3+}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of DC-MRI can also come from the distinct pharmacokinetic distribution of SPIO and Gd-DTPA. -- Abstract: Purpose: The use of MR contrast agents allows accurate diagnosis by exerting an influence on the longitudinal (T{sub 1}) or transverse (T{sub 2}) relaxation time of the surrounding tissue. In this study, we combined the use of iron oxide (IO) particles and nonspecific extracellular gadolinium chelate (Gd) in order to further improve the sensitivity and specificity of lesion detection. Procedures: With a 7-Tesla scanner, pre-contrasted, IO-enhanced and dual contrast agent enhanced MRIs were performed in phantom, normal animals, and animal models of lymph node tumor metastases and orthotopic brain tumor. For the dual-contrast (DC) MRI, we focused on the evaluation of T{sub 2} weighted DC MRI with IO administered first, then followed by the injection of a bolus of gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). Results: Based on the C/N ratios and MRI relaxometry, the synergistic effect of coordinated administration of Gd-DTPA and IO was observed and confirmed in phantom, normal liver and tumor models. At 30 min after administration of Feridex, Gd-DTPA further decreased T{sub 2} relaxation in liver immediately after the injection. Additional administration of Gd-DTPA also immediately increased the signal contrast between tumor and brain parenchyma and maximized the C/N ratio to -4.12 {+-} 0.71. Dual contrast MRI also enhanced the

  7. Applications of optically detected MRI for enhanced contrast and penetration in metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruangchaithaweesuk, Songtham; Yu, Dindi S.; Garcia, Nissa C.; Yao, Li; Xu, Shoujun

    2012-10-01

    We report quantitative measurements using optically detected magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for enhanced pH contrast and flow inside porous metals. Using a gadolinium chelate as the pH contrast agent, we show the response is 0.6 s-1 mM-1 per pH unit at the ambient magnetic field for the pH range 6-8.5. A stopped flow scheme was used to directly measure T1 relaxation time to determine the relaxivity. Flow profiles and images were obtained for a series of porous metals with different average pore sizes. The signal amplitudes and spatial distributions were compared. A clogged region in one of the samples was revealed using optically detected MRI but not optical imaging or scanning electron microscopy. These applications will significantly broaden the impact of optically detected MRI in chemical imaging and materials research.

  8. Utility of late gadolinium enhancement in pediatric cardiac MRI.

    PubMed

    Etesami, Maryam; Gilkeson, Robert C; Rajiah, Prabhakar

    2016-07-01

    Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging sequence is increasingly used in the evaluation of pediatric cardiovascular disorders, and although LGE might be a normal feature at the sites of previous surgeries, it is pathologically seen as a result of extracellular space expansion, either from acute cell damage or chronic scarring or fibrosis. LGE is broadly divided into ischemic and non-ischemic patterns. LGE caused by myocardial infarction occurs in a vascular distribution and always involves the subendocardial portion, progressively involving the outer regions in a waveform pattern. Non-ischemic cardiomyopathies can have a mid-myocardial (either linear or patchy), subepicardial or diffuse subendocardial distribution. Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy can have a linear mid-myocardial pattern, while hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can have fine, patchy enhancement in hypertrophied and non-hypertrophied segments as well as right ventricular insertion points. Myocarditis and sarcoidosis have a mid-myocardial or subepicardial pattern of LGE. Fabry disease typically affects the basal inferolateral segment while Danon disease typically spares the septum. Pericarditis is characterized by diffuse or focal pericardial thickening and enhancement. Thrombus, the most common non-neoplastic cardiac mass, is characterized by absence of enhancement in all sequences, while neoplastic masses show at least some contrast enhancement, depending on the pathology. Regardless of the etiology, presence of LGE is associated with a poor prognosis. In this review, we describe the technical modifications required for performing LGE cardiac MR sequence in children, review and illustrate the patterns of LGE in children, and discuss their clinical significance. PMID:26718199

  9. Oxygen-enhanced MRI accurately identifies, quantifies, and maps tumor hypoxia in preclinical cancer models

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, James PB; Boult, Jessica KR; Jamin, Yann; Babur, Muhammad; Finegan, Katherine G; Williams, Kaye J; Little, Ross A; Jackson, Alan; Parker, Geoff JM; Reynolds, Andrew R; Waterton, John C; Robinson, Simon P

    2015-01-01

    There is a clinical need for non-invasive biomarkers of tumor hypoxia for prognostic and predictive studies, radiotherapy planning and therapy monitoring. Oxygen enhanced MRI (OE-MRI) is an emerging imaging technique for quantifying the spatial distribution and extent of tumor oxygen delivery in vivo. In OE-MRI, the longitudinal relaxation rate of protons (ΔR1) changes in proportion to the concentration of molecular oxygen dissolved in plasma or interstitial tissue fluid. Therefore, well-oxygenated tissues show positive ΔR1. We hypothesized that the fraction of tumor tissue refractory to oxygen challenge (lack of positive ΔR1, termed “Oxy-R fraction”) would be a robust biomarker of hypoxia in models with varying vascular and hypoxic features. Here we demonstrate that OE-MRI signals are accurate, precise and sensitive to changes in tumor pO2 in highly vascular 786-0 renal cancer xenografts. Furthermore, we show that Oxy-R fraction can quantify the hypoxic fraction in multiple models with differing hypoxic and vascular phenotypes, when used in combination with measurements of tumor perfusion. Finally, Oxy-R fraction can detect dynamic changes in hypoxia induced by the vasomodulator agent hydralazine. In contrast, more conventional biomarkers of hypoxia (derived from blood oxygenation-level dependent MRI and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI) did not relate to tumor hypoxia consistently. Our results show that the Oxy-R fraction accurately quantifies tumor hypoxia non-invasively and is immediately translatable to the clinic. PMID:26659574

  10. Nanoparticle-based highly sensitive MRI contrast agents with enhanced relaxivity in reductive milieu.

    PubMed

    Sigg, Severin J; Santini, Francesco; Najer, Adrian; Richard, Pascal U; Meier, Wolfgang P; Palivan, Cornelia G

    2016-08-01

    Current magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents often produce insufficient contrast for diagnosis of early disease stages, and do not sense their biochemical environments. Herein, we report a highly sensitive nanoparticle-based MRI probe with r1 relaxivity up to 51.7 ± 1.2 mM(-1) s(-1) (3T). Nanoparticles were co-assembled from Gd(3+) complexed to heparin-poly(dimethylsiloxane) copolymer, and a reduction-sensitive amphiphilic peptide serving to induce responsiveness to environmental changes. The release of the peptide components leads to a r1 relaxivity increase under reducing conditions and increases the MRI contrast. In addition, this MRI probe has several advantages, such as a low cellular uptake, no apparent cellular toxicity (tested up to 1 mM Gd(3+)), absence of an anticoagulation property, and a high shelf stability (no increase in free Gd(3+) over 7 months). Thus, this highly sensitive T1 MRI contrast nanoparticle system represents a promising probe for early diagnosis through possible accumulation and contrast enhancement within reductive extracellular tumour tissue. PMID:27435820

  11. Perceptual enhancement of arteriovenous malformation in MRI angiography displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abhari, Kamyar; Baxter, John S. H.; Eagleson, Roy; Peters, Terry; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine

    2012-02-01

    The importance of presenting medical images in an intuitive and usable manner during a procedure is essential. However, most medical visualization interfaces, particularly those designed for minimally-invasive surgery, suffer from a number of issues as a consequence of disregarding the human perceptual, cognitive, and motor system's limitations. This matter is even more prominent when human visual system is overlooked during the design cycle. One example is the visualization of the neuro-vascular structures in MR angiography (MRA) images. This study investigates perceptual performance in the usability of a display to visualize blood vessels in MRA volumes using a contour enhancement technique. Our results show that when contours are enhanced, our participants, in general, can perform faster with higher level of accuracy when judging the connectivity of different vessels. One clinical outcome of such perceptual enhancement is improvement of spatial reasoning needed for planning complex neuro-vascular operations such as treating Arteriovenous Malformations (AVMs). The success of an AVM intervention greatly depends on fully understanding the anatomy of vascular structures. However, poor visualization of pre-operative MRA images makes the planning of such a treatment quite challenging.

  12. Clustered breast microcalcifications: Evaluation by dynamic contrast-enhanced subtraction MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Gilles, R.; Tardivon, A.A.; Vanel, D.; Guinebretiere, J.M.; Arriagada, R.

    1996-01-01

    Our goal was to evaluate dynamic contrast-enhanced subtraction MRI in the diagnosis of isolated clustered calcifications of the breast. One hundred seventy-two patients underwent surgical biopsy for isolated clustered breast calcifications. Their mammograms showed round (n = 88) or linear/irregular (n = 84) microcalcifications. All patients had a preoperative Gd-DOTA-enhanced subtraction dynamic study. Any early contrast enhancement in the breast parenchyma concomitant with early enhancement of normal vessels was considered positive. Fifty-eight in situ carcinomas, 22 invasive carcinomas, and 92 benign lesions were found at histological analysis. Dynamic MR sequences showed early contrast enhancement in 76 of 80 malignant lesions (sensitivity 95%) and in 45 of 92 benign lesions (specificity 51%). Two invasive and two intraductal carcinomas did not show early contrast enhancement. Three independent observers agreed in rating early contrast enhancement in 143 of 172 lesions. Poor specificity limits the diagnostic accuracy of dynamic contrast-enhanced subtraction MRI in distinguishing benign from malignant microcalcifications on mammography. 8 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Cardiac Amyloidosis: Typical Imaging Findings and Diffuse Myocardial Damage Demonstrated by Delayed Contrast-Enhanced MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Sueyoshi, Eijun Sakamoto, Ichiro; Okimoto, Tomoaki; Hayashi, Kuniaki; Tanaka, Kyouei; Toda, Genji

    2006-08-15

    Amyloidosis is a rare systemic disease. However, involvement of the heart is a common finding and is the most frequent cause of death in amyloidosis. We report the sonographic, scintigraphic, and MRI features of a pathologically proven case of cardiac amyloidosis. Delayed contrast-enhanced MR images, using an inversion recovery prepped gradient-echo sequence, revealed diffuse enhancement in the wall of both left and right ventricles. This enhancement suggested expansion of the extracellular space of the myocardium caused by diffuse myocardial necrosis secondary to deposition of amyloid.

  14. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI of Cervical Cancers: Temporal Percentile Screening of Contrast Enhancement Identifies Parameters for Prediction of Chemoradioresistance

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Erlend K.F.; Hole, Knut Hakon; Lund, Kjersti V.; Sundfor, Kolbein; Kristensen, Gunnar B.; Lyng, Heidi; Malinen, Eirik

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To systematically screen the tumor contrast enhancement of locally advanced cervical cancers to assess the prognostic value of two descriptive parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Methods and Materials: This study included a prospectively collected cohort of 81 patients who underwent DCE-MRI with gadopentetate dimeglumine before chemoradiotherapy. The following descriptive DCE-MRI parameters were extracted voxel by voxel and presented as histograms for each time point in the dynamic series: normalized relative signal increase (nRSI) and normalized area under the curve (nAUC). The first to 100th percentiles of the histograms were included in a log-rank survival test, resulting in p value and relative risk maps of all percentile-time intervals for each DCE-MRI parameter. The maps were used to evaluate the robustness of the individual percentile-time pairs and to construct prognostic parameters. Clinical endpoints were locoregional control and progression-free survival. The study was approved by the institutional ethics committee. Results: The p value maps of nRSI and nAUC showed a large continuous region of percentile-time pairs that were significantly associated with locoregional control (p < 0.05). These parameters had prognostic impact independent of tumor stage, volume, and lymph node status on multivariate analysis. Only a small percentile-time interval of nRSI was associated with progression-free survival. Conclusions: The percentile-time screening identified DCE-MRI parameters that predict long-term locoregional control after chemoradiotherapy of cervical cancer.

  15. Immobilized Contrast Enhanced (ICE) MRI: Gadolinium-based long-term MR Contrast Enhancement of the Vein Graft Vessel Wall*

    PubMed Central

    Mitsouras, Dimitris; Vemula, Praveen Kumar; Yu, Peng; Tao, Ming; Nguyen, Binh T.; Campagna, Christina M.; Karp, Jeffrey M.; Mulkern, Robert V.; Ozaki, C. Keith; Rybicki, Frank J.

    2010-01-01

    An implantable MR contrast agent that can be covalently immobilized on tissue during surgery has been developed. The rationale is that a durable increase in tissue contrast using an implantable contrast agent can enhance post-surgical tissue differentiation using MRI. For small vessel (e.g., vein graft) MRI, the direct benefit of such permanent “labeling” of the vessel wall by modification of its relaxation properties is to achieve more efficient imaging. This efficiency can be realized as either increased contrast leading to more accurate delineation of vessel wall and lesion tissue boundaries, or, faster imaging without penalizing contrast-to-noise ratio, or a combination thereof. We demonstrate, for the first time, stable long-term MRI enhancement using such an exogenous contrast mechanism based on immobilizing a modified Gd-DTPA complex on a human vein using a covalent amide bond. Signal enhancement due to the covalently immobilized contrast agent is demonstrated for excised human vein specimens imaged at 3T, and its long-term stability is demonstrated during a 4-month incubation period. PMID:20859994

  16. Kinetics of the in vivo31P 1H nuclear overhauser effect of the human-calf-muscle phosphocreatine resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachert, Peter; Bellemann, Matthias E.

    In 31P 1H double-resonance experiments in a 1.5 T whole-body MR system, we observed in vivo the truncated driven, transient, and steady-state 31P- 1H nuclear Overhauser effect of the phosphocreatine resonance in 31P MR spectra of human gastrocnemius muscle. Maximum signal enhancements of 0.52 ± 0.01, 0.20 ± 0.01, and 0.79 ± 0.02 were measured, respectively. Fitting the data with theoretical functions which solve the multispin Solomon equations for N protons (S spins) dipolar coupled to a 31P nucleus (I spin) yields cross-relaxation times {2}/{[Σ i=1-N σIS(i) ] } in the order of 20 s. In vivo experiments are feasible for studying relaxation mechanisms in coupled 31P 1H spin systems in intact tissue.

  17. MRI-guided gas bubble enhanced ultrasound heating in in vivo rabbit thigh.

    PubMed

    Sokka, S D; King, R; Hynynen, K

    2003-01-21

    In this study, we propose a focused ultrasound surgery protocol that induces and then uses gas bubbles at the focus to enhance the ultrasound absorption and ultimately create larger lesions in vivo. MRI and ultrasound visualization and monitoring methods for this heating method are also investigated. Larger lesions created with a carefully monitored single ultrasound exposure could greatly improve the speed of tumour coagulation with focused ultrasound. All experiments were performed under MRI (clinical, 1.5 T) guidance with one of two eight-sector, spherically curved piezoelectric transducers. The transducer, either a 1.1 or 1.7 MHz array, was driven by a multi-channel RF driving system. The transducer was mounted in an MRI-compatible manual positioning system and the rabbit was situated on top of the system. An ultrasound detector ring was fixed with the therapy transducer to monitor gas bubble activity during treatment. Focused ultrasound surgery exposures were delivered to the thighs of seven New Zealand while rabbits. The experimental, gas-bubble-enhanced heating exposures consisted of a high amplitude 300 acoustic watt, half second pulse followed by a 7 W, 14 W or 21 W continuous wave exposure for 19.5 s. The respective control sonications were 20 s exposures of 14 W, 21 W and 28 W. During the exposures, MR thermometry was obtained from the temperature dependency of the proton resonance frequency shift. MRT2-enhanced imaging was used to evaluate the resulting lesions. Specific metrics were used to evaluate the differences between the gas-bubble-enhanced exposures and their respective control sonications: temperatures with respect to time and space, lesion size and shape, and their agreement with thermal dose predictions. The bubble-enhanced exposures showed a faster temperature rise within the first 4 s and higher overall temperatures than the sonications without bubble formation. The spatial temperature maps and the thermal dose maps derived from the MRI

  18. Assessment of blood–brain barrier disruption using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Heye, Anna K.; Culling, Ross D.; Valdés Hernández, Maria del C.; Thrippleton, Michael J.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of the importance of blood–brain barrier (BBB) disruption in aging, dementia, stroke and multiple sclerosis in addition to more commonly-studied pathologies such as tumors. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) is a method for studying BBB disruption in vivo. We review pathologies studied, scanning protocols and data analysis procedures to determine the range of available methods and their suitability to different pathologies. We systematically review the existing literature up to February 2014, seeking studies that assessed BBB integrity using T1-weighted DCE-MRI techniques in animals and humans in normal or abnormal brain tissues. The literature search provided 70 studies that were eligible for inclusion, involving 417 animals and 1564 human subjects in total. The pathologies most studied are intracranial neoplasms and acute ischemic strokes. There are large variations in the type of DCE-MRI sequence, the imaging protocols and the contrast agents used. Moreover, studies use a variety of different methods for data analysis, mainly based on model-free measurements and on the Patlak and Tofts models. Consequently, estimated KTrans values varied widely. In conclusion, DCE-MRI is shown to provide valuable information in a large variety of applications, ranging from common applications, such as grading of primary brain tumors, to more recent applications, such as assessment of subtle BBB dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease. Further research is required in order to establish consensus-based recommendations for data acquisition and analysis and, hence, improve inter-study comparability and promote wider use of DCE-MRI. PMID:25379439

  19. Follow-up design of unexpected enhancing lesions on preoperative MRI of breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Joo-Yeon; Moon, Jin Hee

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to analyze the characteristics and long-term follow-up results of unexpected enhancing lesions on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of breast cancer patients. METHODS From August 2007 through February 2010, second-look ultrasound (SLUS) was recommended for 84 of 312 breast cancer patients having unexpected enhancing lesions on MRI. SLUS was performed for 85 unexpected enhancing lesions in 72 patients. We performed a retrospective review to determine the size, lesion type, enhancement kinetic curve, and location in relation to the index cancer. We obtained the pathologic outcome of the detected lesions and in case of a negative finding on SLUS, we performed follow-up examinations for at least two years. RESULTS Of 85 unexpected lesions, 72 (85%) were detected on SLUS. In total, 41 lesions (56.9%) were confirmed as malignant and 31 lesions (43.6%) as benign. Cancer rate was statistically higher in lesions having type III enhancement pattern, located at the same quadrant as the index cancer. However, no significant association was observed between the cancer rate and the lesion size and type. None of the 13 negative cases on SLUS developed cancer on follow-up. CONCLUSION In case of unexpected enhancing lesions on preoperative MRI of breast cancer patients, SLUS can be useful to find out the matched lesion. Lesions with type III enhancement pattern or those located at the same quadrant as the index cancer should be considered as a separate cancer. In the absence of any suspicious findings on SLUS, patient may be followed up with confidence. PMID:25430525

  20. Differentiation of Reactive and Tumor Metastatic Lymph Nodes with Diffusion-weighted and SPIO Enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Zhu, Lei; Huang, Xinglu; Niu, Gang; Chen, Siouan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Determination of lymphatic metastasis is of great importance for both treatment planning and patient prognosis. We aim to distinguish tumor metastatic lymph nodes (TLNs) and reactive lymph nodes (RLNs) with diffusion-weighted and superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and methods Ipsilateral popliteal lymph node metastasis or lymphadenitis model was established by hock injection of either luciferase-expressing 4T1 murine breast cancer cells or Complete Freund Adjuvant (CFA) in male Balb/C mice. At different time points after inoculation, bioluminescence imaging, T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted and SPIO enhanced MRI were performed. Imaging findings were confirmed by histopathological staining. Results Size enlargement was observed in both TLNs and RLNs. At day 28, TLNs showed strong bioluminescence signal and bigger size than RLNs (p < 0.01). At early stages up to day 21, both TLNs and RLNs appeared homogeneous on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). At day 28, TLNs showed heterogeneous apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map with significantly higher average ADC value of 0.41 ± 0.03 × 10−3 mm2/s than that of RLNs (0.34 ± 0.02 10−3 mm2/s, p < 0.05). On SPIO enhanced MRI, both TLNs and RLNs showed distinct T2 signal reduction at day 21 after inoculation. At day 28, TLNs demonstrated partial uptake of the iron oxide particles, which was confirmed by Prussian blue staining. Conclusions Both diffusion-weighted and SPIO enhanced MRI can distinguish tumor metastatic lymph nodes from reactive lymph nodes. However, neither method is able to detect tumor metastasis to the draining lymph nodes at early stages. PMID:22588595

  1. Detection of Vulnerable Atherosclerotic Plaques in Experimental Atherosclerosis with the USPIO-Enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Qi, Chun-Mei; Du, Lili; Wu, Wei-Heng; Li, Dong-Ye; Hao, Ji; Gong, Lei; Deng, Liangrong; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Yu

    2015-11-01

    This study's goal was to assess the diagnostic value of the USPIO-(ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide) enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detection of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques in abdominal aorta in experimental atherosclerosis. Thirty New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into two groups, Group A and Group B. Each group comprised 15 animals which were fed with high cholesterol diet for 8 weeks and then subjected to balloon-induced endothelial injury of the abdominal aorta. After another 8 weeks, animals in Group B received adenovirus carrying p53 gene that was injected through a catheter into the aortic segments rich in plaques. Two weeks later, all rabbits were challenged with the injection of Chinese Russell's viper venom and histamine. Pre-contrast images and USPIO-enhanced MRI images were obtained after pharmacological triggering with injection of USPIO for 5 days. Blood specimens were taken for biochemical and serological tests at 0 and 18 weeks. Abdominal aorta was histologically studied. The levels of serum ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 were quantified by ELISA. Vulnerable plaques appeared as a local hypo-intense signal on the USPIO-enhanced MRI, especially on T2*-weighted sequences. The signal strength of plaques reached the peak at 96 h. Lipid levels were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in both Group A and B compared with the levels before the high cholesterol diet. The ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 levels were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in Group B compared with Group A. The USPIO-enhanced MRI efficiently identifies vulnerable plaques due to accumulation of USPIO within macrophages in abdominal aorta plaques. PMID:27352319

  2. Automatic detection of regional heart rejection in USPIO-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsun-Hsien; Moura, José M F; Wu, Yijen L; Ho, Chien

    2008-08-01

    Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful to study the infiltration of cells in vivo. This research adopts ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particles as contrast agents. USPIO particles administered intravenously can be endocytosed by circulating immune cells, in particular, macrophages. Hence, macrophages are labeled with USPIO particles. When a transplanted heart undergoes rejection, immune cells will infiltrate the allograft. Imaged by T(2)(*)-weighted MRI, USPIO-labeled macrophages display dark pixel intensities. Detecting these labeled cells in the image facilitates the identification of acute heart rejection. This paper develops a classifier to detect the presence of USPIO-labeled macrophages in the myocardium in the framework of spectral graph theory. First, we describe a USPIO-enhanced heart image with a graph. Classification becomes equivalent to partitioning the graph into two disjoint subgraphs. We use the Cheeger constant of the graph as an objective functional to derive the classifier. We represent the classifier as a linear combination of basis functions given from the spectral analysis of the graph Laplacian. Minimization of the Cheeger constant based functional leads to the optimal classifier. Experimental results and comparisons with other methods suggest the feasibility of our approach to study the rejection of hearts imaged by USPIO-enhanced MRI. PMID:18672427

  3. Automatic Detection of Regional Heart Rejection in USPIO-Enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hsun-Hsien; Moura, José M. F.; Wu, Yijen L.; Ho, Chien

    2008-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful to study the infiltration of cells in vivo. This research adopts ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particles as contrast agents. USPIO particles administered intravenously can be endocytosed by circulating immune cells, in particular, macrophages. Hence, macrophages are labeled with USPIO particles. When a transplanted heart undergoes rejection, immune cells will infiltrate the allograft. Imaged by T2∗- weighted MRI, USPIO-labeled macrophages display dark pixel intensities. Detecting these labeled cells in the image facilitates the identification of acute heart rejection. This paper develops a classifier to detect the presence of USPIO-labeled macrophages in the myocardium in the framework of spectral graph theory. First, we describe a USPIO-enhanced heart image with a graph. Classification becomes equivalent to partitioning the graph into two disjoint subgraphs. We use the Cheeger constant of the graph as an objective functional to derive the classifier. We represent the classifier as a linear combination of basis functions given from the spectral analysis of the graph Laplacian. Minimization of the Cheeger constant based functional leads to the optimal classifier. Experimental results and comparisons with other methods suggest the feasibility of our approach to study the rejection of hearts imaged by USPIO-enhanced MRI. PMID:18672427

  4. Visualization of 3D geometric models of the breast created from contrast-enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leader, J. Ken, III; Wang, Xiao Hui; Chang, Yuan-Hsiang; Chapman, Brian E.

    2002-05-01

    Contrast enhanced breast MRI is currently used as an adjuvant modality to x-ray mammography because of its ability to resolve ambiguities and determine the extent of malignancy. This study described techniques to create and visualize 3D geometric models of abnormal breast tissue. MRIs were performed on a General Electric 1.5 Tesla scanner using dual phased array breast coils. Image processing tasks included: 1) correction of image inhomogeneity caused by the coils, 2) segmentation of normal and abnormal tissue, and 3) modeling and visualization of the segmented tissue. The models were visualized using object-based surface rendering which revealed characteristics critical to differentiating benign from malignant tissue. Surface rendering illustrated the enhancement distribution and enhancement patterns. The modeling process condensed the multi-slice MRI data information and standardized its interpretation. Visualizing the 3D models should improve the radiologist's and/or surgeon's impression of the 3D shape, extent, and accessibility of the malignancy compared to viewing breast MRI data slice by slice.

  5. Textural kinetics: a novel dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI feature for breast lesion classification.

    PubMed

    Agner, Shannon C; Soman, Salil; Libfeld, Edward; McDonald, Margie; Thomas, Kathleen; Englander, Sarah; Rosen, Mark A; Chin, Deanna; Nosher, John; Madabhushi, Anant

    2011-06-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast has emerged as an adjunct imaging tool to conventional X-ray mammography due to its high detection sensitivity. Despite the increasing use of breast DCE-MRI, specificity in distinguishing malignant from benign breast lesions is low, and interobserver variability in lesion classification is high. The novel contribution of this paper is in the definition of a new DCE-MRI descriptor that we call textural kinetics, which attempts to capture spatiotemporal changes in breast lesion texture in order to distinguish malignant from benign lesions. We qualitatively and quantitatively demonstrated on 41 breast DCE-MRI studies that textural kinetic features outperform signal intensity kinetics and lesion morphology features in distinguishing benign from malignant lesions. A probabilistic boosting tree (PBT) classifier in conjunction with textural kinetic descriptors yielded an accuracy of 90%, sensitivity of 95%, specificity of 82%, and an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.92. Graph embedding, used for qualitative visualization of a low-dimensional representation of the data, showed the best separation between benign and malignant lesions when using textural kinetic features. The PBT classifier results and trends were also corroborated via a support vector machine classifier which showed that textural kinetic features outperformed the morphological, static texture, and signal intensity kinetics descriptors. When textural kinetic attributes were combined with morphologic descriptors, the resulting PBT classifier yielded 89% accuracy, 99% sensitivity, 76% specificity, and an AUC of 0.91. PMID:20508965

  6. Added value of diffusion-weighted MRI in detection of cervical cancer recurrence: comparison with morphologic and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI sequences

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Rita; Dias, João Lopes; Cunha, Teresa Margarida

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the added value of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detecting post-treatment cervical cancer recurrence. The detection accuracy of T2-weighted (T2W) images was compared with that of T2W MRI combined with either dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI or DWI. METHODS Thirty-eight women with clinically suspected uterine cervical cancer recurrence more than six months after treatment completion were examined with 1.5 Tesla MRI including T2W, DCE, and DWI sequences. Disease was confirmed histologically and correlated with MRI findings. The diagnostic performance of T2W imaging and its combination with either DCE or DWI were analyzed. Sensitivity, positive predictive value, and accuracy were calculated. RESULTS Thirty-six women had histologically proven recurrence. The accuracy for recurrence detection was 80% with T2W/DCE MRI and 92.1% with T2W/DWI. The addition of DCE sequences did not significantly improve the diagnostic ability of T2W imaging, and this sequence combination misclassified two patients as falsely positive and seven as falsely negative. The T2W/DWI combination revealed a positive predictive value of 100% and only three false negatives. CONCLUSION The addition of DWI to T2W sequences considerably improved the diagnostic ability of MRI. Our results support the inclusion of DWI in the initial MRI protocol for the detection of cervical cancer recurrence, leaving DCE sequences as an option for uncertain cases. PMID:26200480

  7. fMRI feedback enhances emotion regulation as evidenced by a reduced amygdala response.

    PubMed

    Sarkheil, Pegah; Zilverstand, Anna; Kilian-Hütten, Niclas; Schneider, Frank; Goebel, Rainer; Mathiak, Klaus

    2015-03-15

    Deficits in emotion regulation are a prominent feature of psychiatric conditions and a promising target for treatment. For instance, cognitive reappraisal is regarded as an effective strategy for emotion regulation. Neurophysiological models have established the lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) as a key structure in the regulation of emotion processing through modulations of emotion-eliciting structures such as the amygdala. Feedback of the LPFC activity by real-time functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) may thus enhance the efficacy of cognitive reappraisal. During cognitive reappraisal of aversive visual stimuli, LPFC activity was fed back to the experimental group, whereas control participants received no such information. As a result, during reappraisal, amygdala activity was lower in the experimental group than in the controls. Furthermore, an increase of inter-hemispheric functional connectivity emerged in the feedback group. The current study extends the neurofeedback literature by suggesting that fMRI feedback can modify brain activity during a given task. PMID:25461265

  8. Description of focal liver lesions with Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    CARAIANI, COSMIN-NICOLAE; DAN, MARIAN; FENESAN, DIANA-IOANA; BADEA, RADU

    2015-01-01

    Imaging procedures play a fundamental role in the therapeutic management of focal liver lesions. The goals of imaging are to detect and correctly characterize focal liver lesions. This review highlights the performances of newer, liver-specific, contrast media in the diagnosis of focal liver lesions, particularly Gd-EOB-DTPA (Primovist), the most frequently used liver specific contrast media. It has been shown, in different papers, that Gd-EOB-DTPA has better performances compared to either triphasic contrast enhanced computed tomography or dynamic MRI in both detection and characterization of hepatocellular carcinoma on the cirrhotic liver. Therefore liver MRI with Primovist is considered, in many centers, the “state-of-the-art” imaging examination of the liver before surgery or liver transplantation. Gd-EOB-DTPA is also useful in the differential diagnosis of benign hypervascular focal liver lesions such as adenomas or focal nodular hyperplasias. PMID:26733231

  9. Engineering Gd-loaded nanoparticles to enhance MRI sensitivity via T1 shortening

    PubMed Central

    Bruckman, Michael A.; Yu, Xin; Steinmetz, Nicole F.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive imaging technique capable of obtaining high-resolution anatomical images of the body. Major drawbacks of MRI are the low contrast agent sensitivity and inability to distinguish healthy tissue from diseased tissue, making early detection challenging. To address this technological hurdle, paramagnetic contrast agents have been developed to increase the longitudinal relaxivity (R1), leading to an increased signal-to-noise ratio. This review focuses on methods and principles that enabled the design and engineering of nanoparticles to deliver contrast agents with enhanced ionic relaxivities. Different engineering strategies and nanoparticle platforms will be compared in terms of their manufacturability, biocompatibility properties, and their overall potential to make an impact in clinical MR imaging. PMID:24158750

  10. The dynamic of FUS-induced BBB Opening in Mouse Brain assessed by contrast enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenne, Jürgen W.; Krafft, Axel J.; Maier, Florian; Krause, Marie N.; Kleber, Susanne; Huber, Peter E.; Martin-Villalba, Ana; Bock, Michael

    2010-03-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) in combination with the administration of gas-filled microbubbles, can induce a localized and reversible opening of the blood brain barrier (BBB). Contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been demonstrated as a precise tool to monitor such a local BBB disruption. However, the opening/closing mechanisms of the BBB with FUS are still largely unknown. In this ongoing project, we study the BBB opening dynamics in mouse brain comparing an interstitial and an intravascular MR contrast agent (CA). FUS in mouse brain was performed with an MRI compatible treatment setup (1.7 MHz fix-focus US transducer, f' = 68 mm, NA = 0.44; focus: 8.1 mm length; O/ = 1.1 mm) in a 1.5 T whole body MRI system. For BBB opening, forty 10 ms-long FUS-pulses were applied at a repetition rate of 1 Hz at 1 MPa. The i.v. administration of the micro bubbles (50 μl SonoVue®) was started simultaneously with FUS exposure. To analyze the BBB opening process, short-term and long-term MRI signal dynamics of the interstitial MR contrast agent Magnevist® and the intravascular CA Vasovist® (Bayer-Schering) were studied. To assess short-term signal dynamics, T1-weighted inversion recovery turbo FLASH images (1s) were repeatedly acquired. Repeated 3D FLASH acquisitions (90 s) were used to assess long-term MRI signal dynamics. The short-term MRI signal enhancements showed comparable time constants for both types of MR contrast agents: 1.1 s (interstitial) vs. 0.8 s (intravascular). This time constant may serve as a time constant of the BBB opening process with the given FUS exposure parameters. For the long-term signal dynamics the intravascular CA (62±10 min) showed a fife times greater time constant as the interstitial contrast agent (12±10 min). This might be explained by the high molecular weight (˜60 kDa) of the intravascular Vasovist due to its reversible binding to blood serum albumin resulting in a prolonged half-life in the blood stream compared to the

  11. Simultaneous tDCS-fMRI Identifies Resting State Networks Correlated with Visual Search Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Callan, Daniel E.; Falcone, Brian; Wada, Atsushi; Parasuraman, Raja

    2016-01-01

    This study uses simultaneous transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and functional MRI (fMRI) to investigate tDCS modulation of resting state activity and connectivity that underlies enhancement in behavioral performance. The experiment consisted of three sessions within the fMRI scanner in which participants conducted a visual search task: Session 1: Pre-training (no performance feedback), Session 2: Training (performance feedback given), Session 3: Post-training (no performance feedback). Resting state activity was recorded during the last 5 min of each session. During the 2nd session one group of participants underwent 1 mA tDCS stimulation and another underwent sham stimulation over the right posterior parietal cortex. Resting state spontaneous activity, as measured by fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (fALFF), for session 2 showed significant differences between the tDCS stim and sham groups in the precuneus. Resting state functional connectivity from the precuneus to the substantia nigra, a subcortical dopaminergic region, was found to correlate with future improvement in visual search task performance for the stim over the sham group during active stimulation in session 2. The after-effect of stimulation on resting state functional connectivity was measured following a post-training experimental session (session 3). The left cerebellum Lobule VIIa Crus I showed performance related enhancement in resting state functional connectivity for the tDCS stim over the sham group. The ability to determine the relationship that the relative strength of resting state functional connectivity for an individual undergoing tDCS has on future enhancement in behavioral performance has wide ranging implications for neuroergonomic as well as therapeutic, and rehabilitative applications. PMID:27014014

  12. Histogram Analysis of Gadoxetic Acid-Enhanced MRI for Quantitative Hepatic Fibrosis Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Honsoul; Park, Seong Ho; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Park, Young Nyun; Park, Hae-Jeong; Choi, Jin-Young

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The diagnosis and monitoring of liver fibrosis is an important clinical issue; however, this is usually achieved by invasive methods such as biopsy. We aimed to determine whether histogram analysis of hepatobiliary phase images of gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide non-invasive quantitative measurement of liver fibrosis. Methods This retrospective study was approved by the institutional ethics committee, and a waiver of informed consent was obtained. Hepatobiliary phase images of preoperative gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI studies of 105 patients (69 males, 36 females; age 56.1±12.2) with pathologically documented liver fibrosis grades were analyzed. Fibrosis staging was F0/F1/F2/F3/F4 (METAVIR system) for 11/20/13/15/46 patients, respectively. Four regions-of-interest (ROI, each about 2 cm2) were placed on predetermined locations of representative images. The measured signal intensity of pixels in each ROI was used to calculate corrected coefficient of variation (cCV), skewness, and kurtosis. An average value of each parameter was calculated for comparison. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, and linear regression. Results The cCV showed statistically significant differences among pathological fibrosis grades (P<0.001) whereas skewness and kurtosis did not. Univariable linear regression analysis suggested cCV to be a meaningful parameter in predicting the fibrosis grade (P<0.001, β = 0.40 and standard error  = 0.06). For discriminating F0-3 from F4, the area under ROC score was 0.857, standard deviation 0.036, 95% confidence interval 0.785–0.928. Conclusion Histogram analysis of hepatobiliary phase images of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI can provide non-invasive quantitative measurements of hepatic fibrosis. PMID:25460180

  13. DCE@urLAB: a dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI pharmacokinetic analysis tool for preclinical data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background DCE@urLAB is a software application for analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging data (DCE-MRI). The tool incorporates a friendly graphical user interface (GUI) to interactively select and analyze a region of interest (ROI) within the image set, taking into account the tissue concentration of the contrast agent (CA) and its effect on pixel intensity. Results Pixel-wise model-based quantitative parameters are estimated by fitting DCE-MRI data to several pharmacokinetic models using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA). DCE@urLAB also includes the semi-quantitative parametric and heuristic analysis approaches commonly used in practice. This software application has been programmed in the Interactive Data Language (IDL) and tested both with publicly available simulated data and preclinical studies from tumor-bearing mouse brains. Conclusions A user-friendly solution for applying pharmacokinetic and non-quantitative analysis DCE-MRI in preclinical studies has been implemented and tested. The proposed tool has been specially designed for easy selection of multi-pixel ROIs. A public release of DCE@urLAB, together with the open source code and sample datasets, is available at http://www.die.upm.es/im/archives/DCEurLAB/. PMID:24180558

  14. Super-resolved enhancing and edge deghosting (SEED) for spatiotemporally encoded single-shot MRI.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Li, Jing; Zhang, Miao; Cai, Shuhui; Zhang, Ting; Cai, Congbo; Chen, Zhong

    2015-07-01

    Spatiotemporally encoded (SPEN) single-shot MRI is an ultrafast MRI technique proposed recently, which utilizes quadratic rather than linear phase profile to extract the spatial information. Compared to the echo planar imaging (EPI), this technique has great advantages in resisting field inhomogeneity and chemical shift effects. Super-resolved (SR) reconstruction is adopted to compensate the inherent low resolution of SPEN images. Due to insufficient sampling rate, the SR image is challenged by aliasing artifacts and edge ghosts. The existing SR algorithms always compromise in spatial resolution to suppress these undesirable artifacts. In this paper, we proposed a novel SR algorithm termed super-resolved enhancing and edge deghosting (SEED). Different from artifacts suppression methods, our algorithm aims at exploiting the relationship between aliasing artifacts and real signal. Based on this relationship, the aliasing artifacts can be eliminated without spatial resolution loss. According to the trait of edge ghosts, finite differences and high-pass filter are employed to extract the prior knowledge of edge ghosts. By combining the prior knowledge with compressed sensing, our algorithm can efficiently reduce the edge ghosts. The robustness of SEED is demonstrated by experiments under various situations. The results indicate that the SEED can provide better spatial resolution compared to state-of-the-art SR reconstruction algorithms in SPEN MRI. Theoretical analysis and experimental results also show that the SR images reconstructed by SEED have better spatial resolution than the images obtained with conventional k-space encoding methods under similar experimental condition. PMID:25910683

  15. Semi-quantitative assessment of pulmonary perfusion in children using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetita, Catalin; Thong, William E.; Ou, Phalla

    2013-03-01

    This paper addresses the study of semi-quantitative assessment of pulmonary perfusion acquired from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in a study population mainly composed of children with pulmonary malformations. The automatic analysis approach proposed is based on the indicator-dilution theory introduced in 1954. First, a robust method is developed to segment the pulmonary artery and the lungs from anatomical MRI data, exploiting 2D and 3D mathematical morphology operators. Second, the time-dependent contrast signal of the lung regions is deconvolved by the arterial input function for the assessment of the local hemodynamic system parameters, ie. mean transit time, pulmonary blood volume and pulmonary blood flow. The discrete deconvolution method implements here a truncated singular value decomposition (tSVD) method. Parametric images for the entire lungs are generated as additional elements for diagnosis and quantitative follow-up. The preliminary results attest the feasibility of perfusion quantification in pulmonary DCE-MRI and open an interesting alternative to scintigraphy for this type of evaluation, to be considered at least as a preliminary decision in the diagnostic due to the large availability of the technique and to the non-invasive aspects.

  16. P4 radiology of hepatobiliary diseases with gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI as a biomarker.

    PubMed

    Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed; Qayyum, Aliya; Bastati, Nina; Fakhrai, Negar; Herold, Christian J; Caseiro Alves, Filipe

    2014-02-01

    A recent paradigm shift in radiology has focused on the globalization of so-called P4 radiology. P4 radiology represents delivery of imaging results that are predictive, personalized, pre-emptive and participatory. The combination of the P4 approach and biomarkers is particularly pertinent to MRI, especially with technological advances such as diffusion-weighted imaging. The development of new liver-specific MRI contrast media, particularly gadoxetic acid, demonstrate specific pharmacokinetic properties, which provide combined morphologic and functional information in the same setting. The evaluation of hepatobiliary pathology beyond morphology gives rise to the possibilty of using gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI as an imaging biomarker of hepatobiliary diseases. The integration of functional imaging with an understanding of complex disease mechanisms forms the basis for P4 radiology, which may ultimately lead to individualized, cost-effective, targeted therapy for patients. This will enable radiologists to determine the prognosis of the disease and estimate early response to treatment, with the participation of all the required medical disciplines. PMID:24417263

  17. Using Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI to Quantitatively Characterize Maternal Vascular Organization in the Primate Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Frias, A.E.; Schabel, M.C.; Roberts, V.H.J.; Tudorica, A.; Grigsby, P.L.; Oh, K.Y.; Kroenke, C. D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The maternal microvasculature of the primate placenta is organized into 10-20 perfusion domains that are functionally optimized to facilitate nutrient exchange to support fetal growth. This study describes a dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) method for identifying vascular domains, and quantifying maternal blood flow in them. Methods A rhesus macaque on the 133rd day of pregnancy (G133, term=165 days) underwent Doppler ultrasound (US) procedures, DCE-MRI, and Cesarean-section delivery. Serial T1-weighted images acquired throughout intravenous injection of a contrast reagent (CR) bolus were analyzed to obtain CR arrival time maps of the placenta. Results Watershed segmentation of the arrival time map identified 16 perfusion domains. The number and location of these domains corresponded to anatomical cotyledonary units observed following delivery. Analysis of the CR wave front through each perfusion domain enabled determination of volumetric flow, which ranged from 9.03 to 44.9 mL/sec (25.2 ± 10.3 mL/sec). These estimates are supported by Doppler US results. Conclusions The DCE-MRI analysis described here provides quantitative estimates of the number of maternal perfusion domains in a primate placenta, and estimates flow within each domain. Anticipated extensions of this technique are to the study placental function in nonhuman primate models of obstetric complications. PMID:24753177

  18. Quantifying heterogeneity of lesion uptake in dynamic contrast enhanced MRI for breast cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karahaliou, A.; Vassiou, K.; Skiadopoulos, S.; Kanavou, T.; Yiakoumelos, A.; Costaridou, L.

    2009-07-01

    The current study investigates whether texture features extracted from lesion kinetics feature maps can be used for breast cancer diagnosis. Fifty five women with 57 breast lesions (27 benign, 30 malignant) were subjected to dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) on 1.5T system. A linear-slope model was fitted pixel-wise to a representative lesion slice time series and fitted parameters were used to create three kinetic maps (wash out, time to peak enhancement and peak enhancement). 28 grey level co-occurrence matrices features were extracted from each lesion kinetic map. The ability of texture features per map in discriminating malignant from benign lesions was investigated using a Probabilistic Neural Network classifier. Additional classification was performed by combining classification outputs of most discriminating feature subsets from the three maps, via majority voting. The combined scheme outperformed classification based on individual maps achieving area under Receiver Operating Characteristics curve 0.960±0.029. Results suggest that heterogeneity of breast lesion kinetics, as quantified by texture analysis, may contribute to computer assisted tissue characterization in DCE-MRI.

  19. Water-dispersible ascorbic-acid-coated magnetite nanoparticles for contrast enhancement in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreeja, V.; Jayaprabha, K. N.; Joy, P. A.

    2015-04-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles of size ~5 nm surface functionalized with ascorbic acid (vitamin C) form a stable dispersion in water with a hydrodynamic size of ~30 nm. The anti-oxidant property of ascorbic acid is retained after capping, as evidenced from the capability of converting methylene blue to its reduced leuco form. NMR relaxivity studies show that the ascorbic-acid-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide aqueous nanofluid is suitable as a contrast enhancement agent for MRI applications, coupled with the excellent biocompatibility and medicinal values of ascorbic acid.

  20. Enhancement of NMR and MRI in the presence of hyperpolarized noble gases

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Budinger, Thomas; Navon, Gil; Song, Yi-Qiao; Appelt, Stephan; Bifone, Angelo; Taylor, Rebecca; Goodson, Boyd; Seydoux, Roberto; Room, Toomas; Pietrass, Tanja

    2004-11-16

    The present invention relates generally to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for both spectroscopy and imaging. More particularly, the present invention relates to methods in which hyperpolarized noble gases (e.g., Xe and He) are used to enhance and improve NMR and MRI. Additionally, the hyperpolarized gas solutions of the invention are useful both in vitro and in vivo to study the dynamics or structure of a system. When used with biological systems, either in vivo or in vitro, it is within the scope of the invention to target the hyperpolarized gas and deliver it to specific regions within the system.

  1. Monitoring redox-sensitive paramagnetic contrast agent by EPRI, OMRI and MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyodo, Fuminori; Murugesan, Ramachandran; Matsumoto, Ken-ichiro; Hyodo, Emi; Subramanian, Sankaran; Mitchell, James B.; Krishna, Murali C.

    2008-01-01

    A comparative study of tissue redox-status imaging using commonly used redox sensitive nitroxides has been carried out using electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI), Overhauser magnetic resonance imaging (OMRI) and conventional T 1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, MRI. Imaging studies using phantoms of different nitroxides at different concentration levels showed that EPRI and OMRI sensitivities were found to be linearly dependent on line width of nitroxides up to 2 mM, and the enhancement in MRI intensity was linear up to 5 mM. The sensitivity and resolution of EPRI and OMRI images depended significantly on the line width of the nitroxides whereas the MRI images were almost independent of EPR line width. Reduction of the paramagnetic 3-carbamoyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine-1-oxyl (3CP) by ascorbic acid (AsA) to the diamagnetic by hydroxylamine was monitored from a sequence of temporal images, acquired using the three imaging modalities. The decay rates determined by all the three modalities were found to be similar. However the results suggest that T 1-weighted MRI can monitor the redox status, in addition to providing detailed anatomical structure in a short time. Therefore, a combination of MRI with nitroxides as metabolically responsive contrast agents can be a useful technique for the in vivo imaging probing tissue redox status.

  2. Monitoring redox-sensitive paramagnetic contrast agent by EPRI, OMRI and MRI.

    PubMed

    Hyodo, Fuminori; Murugesan, Ramachandran; Matsumoto, Ken-ichiro; Hyodo, Emi; Subramanian, Sankaran; Mitchell, James B; Krishna, Murali C

    2008-01-01

    A comparative study of tissue redox-status imaging using commonly used redox sensitive nitroxides has been carried out using electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI), Overhauser magnetic resonance imaging (OMRI) and conventional T(1)-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, MRI. Imaging studies using phantoms of different nitroxides at different concentration levels showed that EPRI and OMRI sensitivities were found to be linearly dependent on line width of nitroxides up to 2 mM, and the enhancement in MRI intensity was linear up to 5 mM. The sensitivity and resolution of EPRI and OMRI images depended significantly on the line width of the nitroxides whereas the MRI images were almost independent of EPR line width. Reduction of the paramagnetic 3-carbamoyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine-1-oxyl (3CP) by ascorbic acid (AsA) to the diamagnetic by hydroxylamine was monitored from a sequence of temporal images, acquired using the three imaging modalities. The decay rates determined by all the three modalities were found to be similar. However the results suggest that T(1)-weighted MRI can monitor the redox status, in addition to providing detailed anatomical structure in a short time. Therefore, a combination of MRI with nitroxides as metabolically responsive contrast agents can be a useful technique for the in vivo imaging probing tissue redox status. PMID:18006345

  3. Monitoring Redox-Sensitive Paramagnetic Contrast Agent by EPRI, OMRI and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Hyodo, Fuminori; Murugesan, Ramachandran; Matsumoto, Ken-ichiro; Hyodo, Emi; Subramanian, Sankaran; Mitchell, James B.; Krishna, Murali C.

    2008-01-01

    A comparative study of tissue redox-status imaging using commonly used redox sensitive nitroxides has been carried out using electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI), Overhauser magnetic resonance imaging (OMRI) and conventional T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, MRI. Imaging studies using phantoms of different nitroxides at different concentration levels showed that EPRI and OMRI sensitivities were found to be linearly dependent on line width of nitroxides up to 2 mM, and the enhancement in MRI intensity was linear up to 5 mM. The sensitivity and resolution of EPRI and OMRI images depended significantly on the line width of the nitroxides whereas the MRI images were almost independent of EPR line width. Reduction of the paramagnetic 3-carbamoyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine-1-oxyl (3CP) by ascorbic acid (AsA) to the diamagnetic by hydroxylamine was monitored from a sequence of temporal images, acquired using the three imaging modalities. The decay rates determined by all the three modalities were found to be similar. However the results suggest that T1 weighted MRI can monitor the redox status, in addition to providing detailed anatomical structure in a short time. Therefore, a combination of MRI with nitroxides as metabolically responsive contrast agents can be a useful technique for the in vivo imaging probing tissue redox status. PMID:18006345

  4. Complete biodegradable nature of calcium hydroxylapatite after injection for malar enhancement: an MRI study

    PubMed Central

    Pavicic, Tatjana

    2015-01-01

    Background Radiesse® (Calcium hydroxylapatite [CaHA]) is a biocompatible, injectable gel for facial soft tissue augmentation. It is a completely biodegradable filler and this is well documented, but objective imaging methods to confirm this property are scarce. Methods We present a case report in which CaHA was injected into the midface of a 50-year-old woman for volume restoration and shaping of the cheek region. On the right side of the face, 1.6 mL CaHA was injected as several (5−7) small depots (0.1−0.2 mL) using a 28G 3/4 inch needle and the vertical supraperiosteal depot technique. On the contralateral side of the face, the subject received 1.6 mL CaHA over three entry points using a 27G 1 1/2 inch blunt cannula and the fanning technique. CaHA location and degradation were assessed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Results CaHA appears as low-to-intermediate signal intensity on MRI images taken immediately after injection for malar enhancement with a symmetrical distribution. On MRI images taken 2.5 years after injection, no CaHA was visible but tissue volume remained increased, indicating a collagen-stimulating effect. The treatment was well tolerated. Conclusion In addition to producing long-lasting aesthetic and collagen-stimulating effects, MRI images confirm that CaHA is completely biodegradable with no product remaining 2.5 years after injection. PMID:25709485

  5. Quantitative assessment of intervertebral disc glycosaminoglycan distribution by gadolinium-enhanced MRI in orthopedic patients.

    PubMed

    Vaga, Stefania; Raimondi, Manuela Teresa; Caiani, Enrico Gianluca; Costa, Francesco; Giordano, Carmen; Perona, Franco; Zerbi, Alberto; Fornari, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    Our hypothesis was that the enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) imaging protocol could be used in patients to quantify the sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) in intervertebral discs (IVD). To test this hypothesis, 23 patients with degenerative disc pathology scheduled for surgery were studied by a specific dGEMRIC protocol: each patient underwent two MRI scans, before and 3.5 hr after Gd(DTPA)2-injection of a nonconventional dose of 40 mL. Then, T(1PRE-ENH) and T(1POST-ENH) parametric images of the disc were obtained, from which a new index DeltaT(1) of the molecular status of the IVD was computed (T(1PRE-ENH) - T(1POST-ENH)). A total of 31 tissue samples (one or two from each patient) obtained at herniectomy were collected and biochemically analyzed for sGAG content and used as the gold standard for comparison. DeltaT(1) values in correspondence to degenerated sectors were higher (158 +/- 36 ms) compared to normal sectors (80 +/- 13 ms). Linear regression analysis between MRI-derived and biochemistry-derived measurements resulted in a significant correlation (r = 0.73, P < 0.0001). The DeltaT(1) parametric images, calculated using the modified dGEMRIC technique, provided noninvasive quantitative information about sGAG content within discal tissue in vivo, which resulted in agreement with biochemical analysis. The application of this new MRI method could provide diagnostic information for standard treatment of lumbar discopathy and for innovative therapies of regenerative medicine. PMID:18050346

  6. Targeted Multifunctional Nanoparticles cure and image Brain Tumors: Selective MRI Contrast Enhancement and Photodynamic Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopelman, Raoul

    2008-03-01

    Aimed at targeted therapy and imaging of brain tumors, our approach uses targeted, multi-functional nano-particles (NP). A typical nano-particle contains a biologically inert, non-toxic matrix, biodegradable and bio-eliminable over a long time period. It also contains active components, such as fluorescent chemical indicators, photo-sensitizers, MRI contrast enhancement agents and optical imaging dyes. In addition, its surface contains molecular targeting units, e.g. peptides or antibodies, as well as a cloaking agent, to prevent uptake by the immune system, i.e. enabling control of the plasma residence time. These dynamic nano-platforms (DNP) contain contrast enhancement agents for the imaging (MRI, optical, photo-acoustic) of targeted locations, i.e. tumors. Added to this are targeted therapy agents, such as photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy (PDT). A simple protocol, for rats implanted with human brain cancer, consists of tail injection with DNPs, followed by 5 min red light illumination of the tumor region. It resulted in excellent cure statistics for 9L glioblastoma.

  7. Mn Enhancement and Respiratory Gating for In Utero MRI of the Embryonic Mouse Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Deans, Abby E.; Wadghiri, Youssef Zaim; Berrios-Otero, César A.; Turnbull, Daniel H.

    2009-01-01

    The mouse is the preferred model organism for genetic studies of mammalian brain development. MRI has potential for in utero studies of mouse brain development, but has been limited previously by challenges of maximizing image resolution and contrast while minimizing artifacts due to physiological motion. Manganese (Mn)-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) studies have demonstrated central nervous system (CNS) contrast enhancement in mice from the earliest postnatal stages. The purpose of this study was to expand MEMRI to in utero studies of the embryonic CNS in combination with respiratory gating to decrease motion artifacts. We investigated MEMRI-facilitated CNS segmentation and three-dimensional (3D) analysis in wild-type mouse embryos from midgestation, and explored effects of Mn on embryonic survival and image contrast. Motivated by observations that MEMRI provided an effective method for visualization and volumetric analysis of embryonic CNS structures, especially in ventral regions, we used MEMRI to examine Nkx2.1 mutant mice that were previously reported to have ventral forebrain defects. Quantitative MEMRI analysis of Nkx2.1 knockout mice demonstrated volumetric changes in septum (SE) and basal ganglia (BG), as well as alterations in hypothalamic structures. This method may provide an effective means for in utero analysis of CNS phenotypes in a variety of mouse mutants. PMID:18506798

  8. Quantitative cw Overhauser Dynamic Nuclear Polarization for the Analysis of Local Water Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Franck, John M.; Pavlova, Anna; Scott, John A.; Han, Songi

    2013-01-01

    Liquid state Overhauser Effect Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (ODNP) has experienced a recent resurgence of interest. The ODNP technique described here relies on the double resonance of electron spin resonance (ESR) at the most common, i.e. X-band (~ 10 GHz), frequency and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) at ~ 15 MHz. It requires only a standard continuous wave (cw) ESR spectrometer with an NMR probe inserted or built into an X-band cavity. Our focus lies on reviewing a new and powerful manifestation of ODNP as a high frequency NMR relaxometry tool that probes dipolar cross relaxation between the electron spins and the 1H nuclear spins at X-band frequencies. This technique selectively measures the translational mobility of water within a volume extending 0.5–1.5 nm outward from a nitroxide radical spin probe that is attached to a targeted site of a macromolecule. This method has been applied to study the dynamics of water that hydrates or permeates the surface or interior of proteins, polymers, and lipid membrane vesicles. We begin by reviewing the recent advances that have helped develop ODNP into a tool for mapping the dynamic landscape of hydration water with sub-nanometer locality. In order to bind this work coherently together, and to place it in the context of the extensive body of research in the field of NMR relaxometry, we then rephrase the analytical model and extend the description of the ODNP-derived NMR signal enhancements. This extended model highlights several aspects of ODNP data analysis, including the importance of considering all possible effects of microwave sample heating, the need to consider the error associated with various relaxation rates, and the unique ability of ODNP to probe the electron–1H cross-relaxation process, which is uniquely sensitive to fast (tens of ps) dynamical processes. By implementing the relevant corrections in a stepwise fashion, this paper draws a consensus result from previous ODNP procedures, and then shows

  9. Dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative susceptibility mapping with ultrashort echo time MRI for evaluating renal function.

    PubMed

    Xie, Luke; Layton, Anita T; Wang, Nian; Larson, Peder E Z; Zhang, Jeff L; Lee, Vivian S; Liu, Chunlei; Johnson, G Allan

    2016-01-15

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI can provide key insight into renal function. DCE MRI is typically achieved through an injection of a gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agent, which has desirable T1 quenching and tracer kinetics. However, significant T2* blooming effects and signal voids can arise when Gd becomes very concentrated, especially in the renal medulla and pelvis. One MRI sequence designed to alleviate T2* effects is the ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequence. In the present study, we observed T2* blooming in the inner medulla of the mouse kidney, despite using UTE at an echo time of 20 microseconds and a low dose of 0.03 mmol/kg Gd. We applied quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) and resolved the signal void into a positive susceptibility signal. The susceptibility values [in parts per million (ppm)] were converted into molar concentrations of Gd using a calibration curve. We determined the concentrating mechanism (referred to as the concentrating index) as a ratio of maximum Gd concentration in the inner medulla to the renal artery. The concentrating index was assessed longitudinally over a 17-wk course (3, 5, 7, 9, 13, 17 wk of age). We conclude that the UTE-based DCE method is limited in resolving extreme T2* content caused by the kidney's strong concentrating mechanism. QSM was able to resolve and confirm the source of the blooming effect to be the large positive susceptibility of concentrated Gd. UTE with QSM can complement traditional magnitude UTE and offer a powerful tool to study renal pathophysiology. PMID:26447222

  10. Assessment of vessel permeability by combining dynamic contrast-enhanced and arterial spin labeling MRI.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ho-Ling; Chang, Ting-Ting; Yan, Feng-Xian; Li, Cheng-He; Lin, Yu-Shi; Wong, Alex M

    2015-06-01

    The forward volumetric transfer constant (K(trans)), a physiological parameter extracted from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI, is weighted by vessel permeability and tissue blood flow. The permeability × surface area product per unit mass of tissue (PS) in brain tumors was estimated in this study by combining the blood flow obtained through pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (PCASL) and K(trans) obtained through DCE MRI. An analytical analysis and a numerical simulation were conducted to understand how errors in the flow and K(trans) estimates would propagate to the resulting PS. Fourteen pediatric patients with brain tumors were scanned on a clinical 3-T MRI scanner. PCASL perfusion imaging was performed using a three-dimensional (3D) fast-spin-echo readout module to determine blood flow. DCE imaging was performed using a 3D spoiled gradient-echo sequence, and the K(trans) map was obtained with the extended Tofts model. The numerical analysis demonstrated that the uncertainty of PS was predominantly dependent on that of K(trans) and was relatively insensitive to the flow. The average PS values of the whole tumors ranged from 0.006 to 0.217 min(-1), with a mean of 0.050 min(-1) among the patients. The mean K(trans) value was 18% lower than the PS value, with a maximum discrepancy of 25%. When the parametric maps were compared on a voxel-by-voxel basis, the discrepancies between PS and K(trans) appeared to be heterogeneous within the tumors. The PS values could be more than two-fold higher than the K(trans) values for voxels with high K(trans) levels. This study proposes a method that is easy to implement in clinical practice and has the potential to improve the quantification of the microvascular properties of brain tumors. PMID:25880892

  11. Prediction of background parenchymal enhancement on breast MRI using mammography, ultrasonography, and diffusion-weighted imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Akiko; Satake, Hiroko; Ishigaki, Satoko; Ikeda, Mitsuru; Kimura, Reiko; Shimamoto, Kazuhiro; Naganawa, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT This retrospective study assessed the effects of menopausal status and menstrual cycle on background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and investigated whether the degree of BPE can be predicted by findings of mammography, ultrasonography (US), and diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI). There were 160 study patients (80 premenopausal, 80 postmenopausal). Degree of BPE was classified into minimal, mild, moderate, or marked. Mammographic density was classified into fatty, scattered, heterogeneously dense, and extremely dense. BP echotexture on US and BP intensity on DWI were visually classified as homogeneous or heterogeneous. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of normal breast tissue were measured. Associations of the degree of BPE with menopausal status, menstrual cycle, or imaging features were evaluated by univariate and multivariate analyses. No significant correlation was found between mammographic density and BPE (p=0.085), whereas menopausal status (p=0.000), BP echotexture (p=0.000), and BP intensity on DWI (p= 0.000), and ADC values (p=0.000) showed significant correlations with BPE. Multivariate analysis showed that postmenopausal status was an independent predictor of minimal BPE (p=0.002, OR=3.743). In premenopausal women, there was no significant correlation between menstrual cycle and BPE, whereas BP echotexture was an independent predictor of whether BPE was less than mild or greater than moderate (p=0.001, OR=26.575). BPE on breast MRI is associated with menopausal status and the findings of US and DWI. Because premenopausal women with heterogeneous BP echotexture may be predicted to show moderate or marked BPE, scheduling of breast MRI should preferentially be adjusted to the menstrual cycle. PMID:26412889

  12. Small increases in enhancement on MRI may predict survival post radiotherapy in patients with glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Gzell, Cecelia Elizabeth; Wheeler, Helen R; McCloud, Philip; Kastelan, Marina; Back, Michael

    2016-05-01

    To assess impact of volumetric changes in tumour volume post chemoradiotherapy in glioblastoma. Patients managed with chemoradiotherapy between 2008 and 2011 were included. Patients with incomplete MRI sets were excluded. Analyses were performed on post-operative MRI, and MRIs at 1 month (M+1), 3 months (M+3), 5 months (M+5), 7 months (M+7), and 12 months (M+12) post completion of RT. RANO definitions of response were used for all techniques. Modified RANO criteria and two volumetric analysis techniques were used. The two volumetric analysis techniques involved utility of the Eclipse treatment planning software to calculate the volume of delineated tissue: surgical cavity plus all surrounding enhancement (Volumetric) versus surrounding enhancement only (Rim). Retrospective analysis of 49 patients with median survival of 18.4 months. Using Volumetric analysis the difference in MS for patients who had a <5 % increase versus ≥5 % at M+3 was 23.1 versus 15.1 months (p = 0.006), and M+5 was 26.3 versus 15.1 months (p = 0.006). For patients who were classified as progressive disease using modified RANO criteria at M+1 and M+3 there was a difference in MS compared with those who were not (M+1: 13.1 vs. 19.4 months, p = 0.017, M+3: 13.2 vs. 20.1 months, p = 0.096). An increase in the volume of cavity and enhancement of ≥5 % at M+3 and M+5 post RT was associated with reduced survival, suggesting that increases in radiological abnormality of <25 % may predict survival. PMID:26879084

  13. Combined 3 Tesla MRI Biomarkers Improve the Differentiation between Benign vs Malignant Single Ring Enhancing Brain Masses

    PubMed Central

    Salice, Simone; Esposito, Roberto; Ciavardelli, Domenico; delli Pizzi, Stefano; di Bastiano, Rossella; Tartaro, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate whether the combination of imaging biomarkers obtained by means of different 3 Tesla (3T) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) advanced techniques can improve the diagnostic accuracy in the differentiation between benign and malignant single ring-enhancing brain masses. Materials and Methods 14 patients presenting at conventional 3T MRI single brain mass with similar appearance as regard ring enhancement, presence of peri-lesional edema and absence of hemorrhage signs were included in the study. All lesions were histologically proven: 5 pyogenic abscesses, 6 glioblastomas, and 3 metastases. MRI was performed at 3 Tesla and included Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI), Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast -Perfusion Weighted Imaging (DSC-PWI), Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS), and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI). Imaging biomarkers derived by those advanced techniques [Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF), relative Cerebral Blood Volume (rCBV), relative Main Transit Time (rMTT), Choline (Cho), Creatine (Cr), Succinate, N-Acetyl Aspartate (NAA), Lactate (Lac), Lipids, relative Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (rADC), and Fractional Anisotropy (FA)] were detected by two experienced neuroradiologists in joint session in 4 areas: Internal Cavity (IC), Ring Enhancement (RE), Peri-Lesional edema (PL), and Contralateral Normal Appearing White Matter (CNAWM). Significant differences between benign (n = 5) and malignant (n = 9) ring enhancing lesions were tested with Mann-Withney U test. The diagnostic accuracy of MRI biomarkers taken alone and MRI biomarkers ratios were tested with Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis with an Area Under the Curve (AUC) ≥ 0.9 indicating a very good diagnostic accuracy of the variable. Results Five MRI biomarker ratios achieved excellent accuracy: IC-rADC/PL-NAA (AUC = 1), IC-rADC/IC-FA (AUC = 0.978), RE-rCBV/RE-FA (AUC = 0.933), IC-rADC/RE-FA (AUC = 0.911), and IC-rADC/PL-FA (AUC = 0.911). Only IC-rADC achieved a very good

  14. Enhanced emotional reactivity after selective REM sleep deprivation in humans: an fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Rosales-Lagarde, Alejandra; Armony, Jorge L.; del Río-Portilla, Yolanda; Trejo-Martínez, David; Conde, Ruben; Corsi-Cabrera, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Converging evidence from animal and human studies suggest that rapid eye movement (REM) sleep modulates emotional processing. The aim of the present study was to explore the effects of selective REM sleep deprivation (REM-D) on emotional responses to threatening visual stimuli and their brain correlates using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Twenty healthy subjects were randomly assigned to two groups: selective REM-D, by awakening them at each REM sleep onset, or non-rapid eye movement sleep interruptions (NREM-I) as control for potential non-specific effects of awakenings and lack of sleep. In a within-subject design, a visual emotional reactivity task was performed in the scanner before and 24 h after sleep manipulation. Behaviorally, emotional reactivity was enhanced relative to baseline (BL) in the REM deprived group only. In terms of fMRI signal, there was, as expected, an overall decrease in activity in the NREM-I group when subjects performed the task the second time, particularly in regions involved in emotional processing, such as occipital and temporal areas, as well as in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, involved in top-down emotion regulation. In contrast, activity in these areas remained the same level or even increased in the REM-D group, compared to their BL level. Taken together, these results suggest that lack of REM sleep in humans is associated with enhanced emotional reactivity, both at behavioral and neural levels, and thus highlight the specific role of REM sleep in regulating the neural substrates for emotional responsiveness. PMID:22719723

  15. Imaging corticospinal tract connectivity in injured rat spinal cord using manganese-enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Bilgen, Mehmet

    2006-01-01

    Background Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEI) offers a novel neuroimaging modality to trace corticospinal tract (CST) in live animals. This paper expands this capability further and tests the utility of MEI to image axonal fiber connectivity in CST of injured spinal cord (SC). Methods A rat was injured at the thoracic T4 level of the SC. The CST was labeled with manganese (Mn) injected intracortically at two weeks post injury. Next day, the injured SC was imaged using MEI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) modalities. Results In vivo MEI data obtained from cervical SC confirmed that CST was successfully labeled with Mn. Ex vivo MEI data obtained from excised SC depicted Mn labeling of the CST in SC sections caudal to the lesion, which meant that Mn was transported through the injury, possibly mediated by viable CST fibers present at the injury site. Examining the ex vivo data from the injury epicenter closely revealed a thin strip of signal enhancement located ventrally between the dorsal horns. This enhancement was presumably associated with the Mn accumulation in these intact fibers projecting caudally as part of the CST. Additional measurements with DTI supported this view. Conclusion Combining these preliminary results collectively demonstrated the feasibility of imaging fiber connectivity in experimentally injured SC using MEI. This approach may play important role in future investigations aimed at understanding the neuroplasticity in experimental SCI research. PMID:17112375

  16. Nuclear Overhauser effect as a probe of molecular structure, dynamics and order of axially reorienting molecules in membranes.

    PubMed

    Davis, James H; Komljenović, Ivana

    2016-02-01

    The location, orientation, order and dynamics of cholesterol in model membranes have been well characterized, therefore cholesterol is an ideal molecule for developing new methods for studying structured molecules undergoing rapid axially symmetric reorientation. The use of (13)C filtering via short contact cross polarization transfer to (1)H allows the recovery of the weak cholesterol (1)H magic angle spinning NMR signals from beneath the strong phospholipid background in bicelles composed of chain perdeuterated dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine/dicaproyl phosphatidylcholine/[3,4-(13)C]-cholesterol. Measurements of the nuclear Overhauser enhancement for (1)H nuclei located in the first ring of cholesterol are interpreted in terms of a simple two motion model consisting of axial reorientation, with a correlation time τ∥, and a slower reorientation of the diffusion axis relative to the bilayer normal, with correlation time τ⊥. This approach can be extended to other molecules which undergo rapid axial reorientation such as small membrane associated peptides. PMID:26607012

  17. Association between dynamic contrast enhanced MRI imaging features and WHO histopathological grade in patients with invasive ductal breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, JUAN; YU, JIANQUN; PENG, YULAN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and World Health Organization (WHO) histopathological grade in patients with invasive ductal breast cancer. A retrospective analysis on the results of DCE-MRI of 92 patients, who were diagnosed with invasive ductal breast cancer following surgery or biopsy, and these results were correlated with WHO histopathological grade. The statistical analysis demonstrated that the tumor size, shape and characteristics of early enhancement were associated with the WHO histopathological grade: The larger the lesion's long diameter, the higher the WHO histopathological grade; the WHO histopathological grades of round and oval masses were relatively lower, while those of lobulated and irregular masses were higher; and tumors with heterogeneous and ring-like enhancement exhibited higher WHO histopathological grades, while those of homogeneous enhancement were lower. The lesion's margin shape was not associated with the WHO histopathological grade. The present study demonstrates that features of DCE-MRI and WHO histopathological grade in patients with invasive ductal breast cancer are correlated, and these MRI features could be used to evaluate the biological behavior and prognosis of lesions. PMID:27123145

  18. Infarction of Uterine Fibroids After Embolization: Relationship Between Postprocedural Enhanced MRI Findings and Long-Term Clinical Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Katsumori, Tetsuya Kasahara, Toshiyuki; Kin, Yoko; Nozaki, Taiki

    2008-01-15

    Purpose. To retrospectively evaluate the relationship between the degree of infarction of uterine fibroids on enhanced MRI after embolization and long-term clinical outcomes. Methods. During 92 months, 290 consecutive patients with symptomatic uterine fibroids were treated with embolization; 221 who underwent enhanced MRI before embolization and 1 week after embolization were included in this study. The infarction rates of all fibroid tissue were assessed using enhanced MRI after embolization. Patients were divided into three groups according to the infarction rates: group A (100% infarction, n 142), group B (90-99% infarction, n = 74), group C (<90% infarction, n = 5). The cumulative rates of clinical outcomes were compared among groups using the Kaplan-Meier limited method. Results. Group A had a significantly higher rate of symptom control than groups B and C. The cumulative rates of symptom control at 5 years were 93%, 71%, and 60% in groups A, B, and C, respectively. Group A had a significantly lower rate of gynecologic intervention after embolization than groups B and C. The cumulative rates of additional gynecologic intervention at 5 years were 3%, 15%, and 20% in groups A, B, and C, respectively. Conclusions. The degree of infarction of uterine fibroids after embolization on enhanced MRI was related to long-term clinical outcomes. Complete infarction of all fibroid tissue can induce a higher rate of symptom control, with a lower rate of additional gynecologic intervention in the long term compared with incomplete infarction of fibroid tissue.

  19. Nanoparticle-Enhanced MRI to Evaluate Radiation Delivery to the Regional Lymphatics for Patients With Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, Shannon M.; Harisinghani, Mukesh G.; Katkar, Amol; Napolitano, Brian; Wolfgang, John; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: At present, radiation (RT) fields are based largely, and often solely, on bony anatomy. Recent efforts have been taken to better define lymphatic regions for RT planning. Lymphotrophic nanoparticle-enhanced MRI (LN-MRI) allows for accurate identification of malignant and benign lymph nodes. We sought to evaluate RT delivery to lymphatics for breast cancer using LN-MRI. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three patients with breast cancer underwent LN-MRI. MRIs were anatomically registered to a reference CT; benign and malignant lymph nodes were contoured. Standard RT fields were planned and dose calculated to prescribe 45-50 Gy. Lymphatic regions were contoured on CT. Coverage of LN-MRI lymph nodes by RT fields and contoured lymphatics were assessed. Results: Eighty-one percent of all lymph nodes defined by LN-MRI were covered by the 45-Gy isodose line; 82% of malignant and 79% of benign. The 50-Gy isodose line only encompassed 60% of LN-MRI defined lymph nodes-64% of malignant and 59% of benign. For nodal volumes contoured in the absence of a margin, 86% of actual lymph nodes were within contoured volumes. When a 5-mm expansion was added, 99% were included. Conclusions: LN-MRI is a useful tool to delineate the location of breast regional lymphatics. These results suggest less than desired coverage of lymph nodes using standard RT fields and that a margin may be advisable when defining nodal volumes by CT. The use of IMRT and RT in lieu of surgery makes accurate definition of the location of breast regional lymphatics of paramount importance.

  20. Efficiency of Non-Contrast-Enhanced Liver Imaging Sequences Added to Initial Rectal MRI in Rectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Gene-hyuk; Kim, Kyung Ah; Hwang, Seong Su; Park, Soo Youn; Kim, Hyun A.; Choi, Sun Young; Kim, Ji Woong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to estimate the value of addition of liver imaging to initial rectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detection of liver metastasis and evaluate imaging predictors of a high risk of liver metastasis on rectal MRI. Methods We enrolled 144 patients who from October 2010 to May 2013 underwent rectal MRI with T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) (b values = 50, 500, and 900 s/mm2) of the liver and abdominopelvic computed tomography (APCT) for the initial staging of rectal cancer. Two reviewers scored the possibility of liver metastasis on different sets of liver images (T2WI, DWI, and combined T2WI and DWI) and APCT and reached a conclusion by consensus for different analytic results. Imaging features from rectal MRI were also analyzed. The diagnostic performances of CT and an additional liver scan to detect liver metastasis were compared. Multivariate logistic regression to determine independent predictors of liver metastasis among rectal MRI features and tumor markers was performed. This retrospective study was approved by the Institutional Review Board, and the requirement for informed consent was waived. Results All sets of liver images were more effective than APCT for detecting liver metastasis, and DWI was the most effective. Perivascular stranding and anal sphincter invasion were statistically significant for liver metastasis (p = 0.0077 and p = 0.0471), while extramural vascular invasion based on MRI (mrEMVI) was marginally significant (p = 0.0534). Conclusion The addition of non-contrast-enhanced liver imaging, particularly DWI, to initial rectal MRI in rectal cancer patients could facilitate detection of liver metastasis without APCT. Perivascular stranding, anal sphincter invasion, and mrEMVI detected on rectal MRI were important imaging predictors of liver metastasis. PMID:26348217

  1. Differentiation of solid pancreatic tumors by using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seung Joon; Kim, Hyung Sik; Park, Hyunjin

    2014-01-01

    Distinguishing among different solid pancreatic tumor types, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas, neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), and solid pseudopapillary tumors (SPTs) is important, as the treatment options are vastly different. This study compared characteristics of solid pancreatic tumors by using dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Fifty patients underwent MR imaging of pancreatic masses with a histopathology that was later confirmed as an adenocarcinoma (n = 27), a NET (n = 16), and a SPT (n = 7). For qualitative analysis, two reviewers evaluated the morphologic features of the tumors: locations, margins, shapes, contained products, pancreatic ductal dilatation, and grade of signal intensity (SI). For the quantitative analysis, all phases of the MR images were co-registered using proprietary image registration software; thus, a region of interest (ROI) defined on one phase could be re-applied in other phases. The following four ratios were considered: tumor-to-uninvolved pancreas SI ratio, percent SI change, tumor-touninvolved pancreas enhancement index, and arterial-to-delayed washout rate. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were assessed for the four ratios. Adenocarcinomas had ill-defined margins, irregular shapes, and ductal dilatation compared with NETs and SPTs (P < 0.001). The tumor-to-uninvolved pancreas ratio on all dynamic phases was significantly higher for NETs than for both adenocarcinomas and SPTs (P < 0.05). Percentage SI changes of pancreatic tumors on the pancreatic and the portal venous phases were significantly higher for NETs than for both adenocarcinomas and SPTs (P < 0.05). A significant difference between NETs and adenocarcinomas was also found with respect to the tumor-to-uninvolved pancreas enhancement index and arterial-to-delayed washout rate. The percentage SI changes in the pancreatic phase and the arterial-to-delayed washout rate best distinguished between adenocarcinomas and

  2. Enhancement and suppression in a lexical interference fMRI-paradigm.

    PubMed

    Abel, Stefanie; Dressel, Katharina; Weiller, Cornelius; Huber, Walter

    2012-03-01

    Previous picture-word interference (PWI) fMRI-paradigms revealed ambiguous mechanisms underlying facilitation and inhibition in healthy subjects. Lexical distractors revealed increased (enhancement) or decreased (suppression) activation in language and monitoring/control areas. Performing a secondary examination and data analysis, we aimed to illuminate the relation between behavioral and neural interference effects comparing target-related distractors (REL) with unrelated distractors (UNREL). We hypothesized that interference involves both (A) suppression due to priming and (B) enhancement due to simultaneous distractor and target processing. Comparisons to UNREL should remain distractor unspecific even at a low threshold. (C) Distractor types with common characteristics should reveal overlapping brain areas. In a 3T MRI scanner, participants were asked to name pictures while auditory words were presented (stimulus onset asynchrony [SOA] = -200 msec). Associatively and phonologically related distractors speeded responses (facilitation), while categorically related distractors slowed them down (inhibition) compared to UNREL. As a result, (A) reduced brain activations indeed resembled previously reported patterns of neural priming. Each target-related distractor yielded suppressions at least in areas associated with vision and conflict/competition monitoring (anterior cingulate cortex [ACC]), revealing least priming for inhibitors. (B) Enhancements concerned language-related but distractor-unspecific regions. (C) Some wider brain regions were commonly suppressed for combinations of distractor types. Overlapping areas associated with conceptual priming were found for facilitatory distractors (inferior frontal gyri), and areas related to phonetic/articulatory processing (precentral gyri and left parietal operculum/insula) for distractors sharing feature overlap. Each distractor with semantic relatedness revealed nonoverlapping suppressions in lexical

  3. Water accessibility in a membrane-inserting peptide comparing Overhauser DNP and pulse EPR methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segawa, Takuya F.; Doppelbauer, Maximilian; Garbuio, Luca; Doll, Andrin; Polyhach, Yevhen O.; Jeschke, Gunnar

    2016-05-01

    Water accessibility is a key parameter for the understanding of the structure of biomolecules, especially membrane proteins. Several experimental techniques based on the combination of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy with site-directed spin labeling are currently available. Among those, we compare relaxation time measurements and electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) experiments using pulse EPR with Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at X-band frequency and a magnetic field of 0.33 T. Overhauser DNP transfers the electron spin polarization to nuclear spins via cross-relaxation. The change in the intensity of the 1H NMR spectrum of H2O at a Larmor frequency of 14 MHz under a continuous-wave microwave irradiation of the nitroxide spin label contains information on the water accessibility of the labeled site. As a model system for a membrane protein, we use the hydrophobic α-helical peptide WALP23 in unilamellar liposomes of DOPC. Water accessibility measurements with all techniques are conducted for eight peptides with different spin label positions and low radical concentrations (10-20 μM). Consistently in all experiments, the water accessibility appears to be very low, even for labels positioned near the end of the helix. The best profile is obtained by Overhauser DNP, which is the only technique that succeeds in discriminating neighboring positions in WALP23. Since the concentration of the spin-labeled peptides varied, we normalized the DNP parameter ɛ, being the relative change of the NMR intensity, by the electron spin concentration, which was determined from a continuous-wave EPR spectrum.

  4. Water accessibility in a membrane-inserting peptide comparing Overhauser DNP and pulse EPR methods.

    PubMed

    Segawa, Takuya F; Doppelbauer, Maximilian; Garbuio, Luca; Doll, Andrin; Polyhach, Yevhen O; Jeschke, Gunnar

    2016-05-21

    Water accessibility is a key parameter for the understanding of the structure of biomolecules, especially membrane proteins. Several experimental techniques based on the combination of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy with site-directed spin labeling are currently available. Among those, we compare relaxation time measurements and electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) experiments using pulse EPR with Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at X-band frequency and a magnetic field of 0.33 T. Overhauser DNP transfers the electron spin polarization to nuclear spins via cross-relaxation. The change in the intensity of the (1)H NMR spectrum of H2O at a Larmor frequency of 14 MHz under a continuous-wave microwave irradiation of the nitroxide spin label contains information on the water accessibility of the labeled site. As a model system for a membrane protein, we use the hydrophobic α-helical peptide WALP23 in unilamellar liposomes of DOPC. Water accessibility measurements with all techniques are conducted for eight peptides with different spin label positions and low radical concentrations (10-20 μM). Consistently in all experiments, the water accessibility appears to be very low, even for labels positioned near the end of the helix. The best profile is obtained by Overhauser DNP, which is the only technique that succeeds in discriminating neighboring positions in WALP23. Since the concentration of the spin-labeled peptides varied, we normalized the DNP parameter ϵ, being the relative change of the NMR intensity, by the electron spin concentration, which was determined from a continuous-wave EPR spectrum. PMID:27208942

  5. Significance of Additional Non-Mass Enhancement in Patients with Breast Cancer on Preoperative 3T Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI of the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yun Hee; Cho, Kyu Ran; Park, Eun Kyung; Seo, Bo Kyoung; Woo, Ok Hee; Cho, Sung Bum; Bae, Jeoung Won

    2016-01-01

    Background In preoperative assessment of breast cancer, MRI has been shown to identify more additional breast lesions than are detectable using conventional imaging techniques. The characterization of additional lesions is more important than detection for optimal surgical treatment. Additional breast lesions can be included in focus, mass, and non-mass enhancement (NME) on MRI. According to the fifth edition of the breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS®), which includes several changes in the NME descriptors, few studies to date have evaluated NME in preoperative assessment of breast cancer. Objectives We investigated the diagnostic accuracy of BI-RADS descriptors in predicting malignancy for additional NME lesions detected on preoperative 3T dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer. Patients and Methods Between January 2008 and December 2012, 88 patients were enrolled in our study, all with NME lesions other than the index cancer on preoperative 3T DCE-MRI and all with accompanying histopathologic examination. The MRI findings were analyzed according to the BI-RADS MRI lexicon. We evaluated the size, distribution, internal enhancement pattern, and location of NME lesions relative to the index cancer (i.e., same quadrant, different quadrant, or contralateral breast). Results On histopathologic analysis of the 88 NME lesions, 73 (83%) were malignant and 15 (17%) were benign. Lesion size did not differ significantly between malignant and benign lesions (P = 0.410). Malignancy was more frequent in linear (P = 0.005) and segmental (P = 0.011) distributions, and benignancy was more frequent in focal (P = 0.004) and regional (P < 0.001) NME lesions. The highest positive predictive value (PPV) for malignancy occurred in segmental (96.8%), linear (95.1%), clustered ring (100%), and clumped (92.0%) enhancement. Asymmetry demonstrated a high positive predictive value of 85.9%. The frequency of malignancy was higher

  6. Investigating the Influence of Flip Angle and k-Space Sampling on Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Breast Examinations

    PubMed Central

    Ledger, Araminta E.W.; Borri, Marco; Pope, Romney J.E.; Scurr, Erica D.; Wallace, Toni; Richardson, Cheryl; Usher, Marianne; Allen, Steven; Wilson, Robin M.; Thomas, Karen; deSouza, Nandita M.; Leach, Martin O.; Schmidt, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives To retrospectively investigate the effect of flip angle (FA) and k-space sampling on the performance of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) breast sequences. Materials and Methods Five DCE-MRI breast sequences were evaluated (10°, 14°, and 18° FAs; radial or linear k-space sampling), with 7–10 patients in each group (n = 45). All sequences were compliant with current technical breast screening guidelines. Contrast agent (CA) uptake curves were constructed from the right mammary artery for each examination. Maximum relative enhancement, Emax, and time-to-peak enhancement, Tmax, were measured and compared between protocols (analysis of variance and Mann–Whitney). For each sequence, calculated values of maximum relative enhancement, Ecalc, were derived from the Bloch equations and compared to Emax. Fat suppression performance (residual bright fat and chemical shift artifact) was rated for each examination and compared between sequences (Fisher exact tests). Results Significant differences were identified between DCE-MRI sequences. Emax increased significantly at higher FAs and with linear k-space sampling (P < .0001; P = .001). Radial protocols exhibited greater Tmax than linear protocols at FAs of both 14° (P = .025) and 18° (P < .0001), suggesting artificially flattened uptake curves. Good correlation was observed between Ecalc and Emax (r = 0.86). Fat suppression failure was more pronounced at an FA of 18° (P = .008). Conclusions This retrospective approach is validated as a tool to compare and optimize breast DCE-MRI sequences. Alterations in FA and k-space sampling result in significant differences in CA uptake curve shape which could potentially affect diagnostic interpretation. These results emphasize the need for careful parameter selection and greater standardization of breast DCE-MRI sequences. PMID:25179563

  7. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Kinetics of Invasive Breast Cancer: A Potential Prognostic Marker for Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Loiselle, Christopher R.; Eby, Peter R.; DeMartini, Wendy B.; Peacock, Sue M.S.; Bittner, Nathan; Lehman, Constance D.; Kim, Janice N.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Our goal was to determine the correlations between dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) kinetics of breast cancers and axillary nodal status (ANS) which may have prognostic value in designing radiation therapy recommendations. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review identified 167 consecutive patients treated with external beam radiotherapy for invasive breast cancer from Jan 1, 2006 to Nov 1, 2007. Patients with DCE-MRI kinetic data from our institution who underwent axillary surgical staging prior to chemotherapy were included. ANS was assessed as positive or negative by pathology record review. For each primary cancer, maximum tumor diameter and kinetic values for initial peak enhancement (PE), percent initial rapid enhancement (RE), and percent delayed washout enhancement (WE) were measured with a computer-aided evaluation program. Univariate, multivariate, and receiver operating characteristic curve analyses were performed according to the ANS. Results: Forty-six patients met study criteria, with 32 (70%) node-negative and 14 (30%) node-positive patients. Median PE was significantly greater in node-positive patients (209%) than in node-negative patients (138%, p = 0.0027). Similarly, median RE was significantly greater in node-positive patients (57%) than in node-negative patients (27%, p = 0.0436). WE was not different between groups (p = 0.9524). Median maximum tumor diameter was greater in node-positive patients (26 mm) than in node-negative patients (15 mm, p = 0.015). Multivariate analysis showed that only PE trended toward significance (p = 0.18). Conclusions: DCE-MRI kinetics of primary breast cancers correlate with ANS. Multivariate analysis demonstrates the correlation is not due simply to underlying lesion size. If validated prospectively, DCE-MRI kinetics may aid as a tool in selecting patients or designing fields for radiation therapy.

  8. In vivo trans-synaptic tract tracing from the murine striatum and amygdala utilizing manganese enhanced MRI (MEMRI).

    PubMed

    Pautler, Robia G; Mongeau, Raymond; Jacobs, Russell E

    2003-07-01

    Small focal injections of manganese ion (Mn(2+)) deep within the mouse central nervous system combined with in vivo high-resolution MRI delineate neuronal tracts originating from the site of injection. Previous work has shown that Mn(2+) can be taken up through voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels, transported along axons, and across synapses. Moreover, Mn(2+) is a paramagnetic MRI contrast agent, causing positive contrast enhancement in tissues where it has accumulated. These combined properties allow for its use as an effective MRI detectable neuronal tract tracer. Injections of low concentrations of MnCl(2) into either the striatum or amygdala produced significant contrast enhancement along the known neuronal circuitry. The observed enhancement pattern is different at each injection site and enhancement of the homotopic areas was observed in both cases. Ten days postinjection, the Mn(2+) had washed out, as evidenced by the absence of positive contrast enhancement within the brain. This methodology allows imaging of neuronal tracts long after the injection of the ion because Mn(2+) concentrates in active neurons and resides for extended periods of time. With appropriate controls, differentiation of subsets of neuronal pathways associated with behavioral and pharmacological paradigms should be feasible. PMID:12815676

  9. Diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in assessing response and recurrent disease in gynaecological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Hameeduddin, Ayshea; Sahdev, Anju

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has an established role in imaging pelvic gynaecological malignancies. It is routinely used in staging endometrial and cervical cancer, characterizing adnexal masses, selecting optimal treatment, monitoring treatment and detecting recurrent disease. MRI has also been shown to have an excellent performance and an evolving role in surveillance of patients after chemoradiotherapy in cervical cancer, post-trachelectomy, detecting early recurrence and planning exenterative surgery in isolated central recurrences in both cervical and endometrial cancer and in young patients on surveillance for medically managed endometrial cancer. However, conventional MRI still has limitations when the morphological appearance of early recurrent or residual disease overlaps with normal pelvic anatomy or treatment effects in the pelvis. In particular, after chemoradiotherapy for cervical cancer, distinguishing between radiotherapy changes and residual or early recurrent disease within the cervix or the vaginal vault can be challenging on conventional MRI alone. Therefore, there is an emerging need for functional imaging to overcome these limitations. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the emerging functional MRI techniques and their applications in predicting treatment response, detecting residual disease and early recurrent disease to optimize the treatment options available using diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast enhancement particularly in cervical and endometrial cancer. PMID:25889065

  10. Corticospinal Tract Tracing in the Marmoset with a Clinical Whole-Body 3T Scanner Using Manganese-Enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Plas, Benjamin; Bolan, Faye; Boulanouar, Kader; Renaud, Luc; Darmana, Robert; Vaysse, Laurence; Vieu, Christophe; Loubinoux, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) has been described as a powerful tool to depict the architecture of neuronal circuits. In this study we investigated the potential use of in vivo MRI detection of manganese for tracing neuronal projections from the primary motor cortex (M1) in healthy marmosets (Callithrix Jacchus). We determined the optimal dose of manganese chloride (MnCl2) among 800, 400, 40 and 8nmol that led to manganese-induced hyperintensity furthest from the injection site, as specific to the corticospinal tract as possible, and that would not induce motor deficit. A commonly available 3T human clinical MRI scanner and human knee coil were used to follow hyperintensity in the corticospinal tract 24h after injection. A statistical parametric map of seven marmosets injected with the chosen dose, 8 nmol, showed the corticospinal tract and M1 connectivity with the basal ganglia, substantia nigra and thalamus. Safety was determined for the lowest dose that did not induce dexterity and grip strength deficit, and no behavioral effects could be seen in marmosets who received multiple injections of manganese one month apart. In conclusion, our study shows for the first time in marmosets, a reliable and reproducible way to perform longitudinal ME-MRI experiments to observe the integrity of the marmoset corticospinal tract on a clinical 3T MRI scanner. PMID:26398500

  11. Identifying Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Using Background Parenchymal Enhancement Heterogeneity on Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI: A Pilot Radiomics Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jeff; Kato, Fumi; Oyama-Manabe, Noriko; Li, Ruijiang; Cui, Yi; Tha, Khin Khin; Yamashita, Hiroko; Kudo, Kohsuke; Shirato, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the added discriminative value of detailed quantitative characterization of background parenchymal enhancement in addition to the tumor itself on dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI at 3.0 Tesla in identifying “triple-negative" breast cancers. Materials and Methods In this Institutional Review Board-approved retrospective study, DCE-MRI of 84 women presenting 88 invasive carcinomas were evaluated by a radiologist and analyzed using quantitative computer-aided techniques. Each tumor and its surrounding parenchyma were segmented semi-automatically in 3-D. A total of 85 imaging features were extracted from the two regions, including morphologic, densitometric, and statistical texture measures of enhancement. A small subset of optimal features was selected using an efficient sequential forward floating search algorithm. To distinguish triple-negative cancers from other subtypes, we built predictive models based on support vector machines. Their classification performance was assessed with the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) using cross-validation. Results Imaging features based on the tumor region achieved an AUC of 0.782 in differentiating triple-negative cancers from others, in line with the current state of the art. When background parenchymal enhancement features were included, the AUC increased significantly to 0.878 (p<0.01). Similar improvements were seen in nearly all subtype classification tasks undertaken. Notably, amongst the most discriminating features for predicting triple-negative cancers were textures of background parenchymal enhancement. Conclusions Considering the tumor as well as its surrounding parenchyma on DCE-MRI for radiomic image phenotyping provides useful information for identifying triple-negative breast cancers. Heterogeneity of background parenchymal enhancement, characterized by quantitative texture features on DCE-MRI, adds value to such differentiation models as they are strongly

  12. Experimental study of USPIO-enhanced MRI in the detection of atherosclerotic plaque and the intervention of atorvastatin

    PubMed Central

    SHA, TING; QI, CHUNMEI; FU, WEI; HAO, JI; GONG, LEI; WU, HAO; ZHANG, QINGDUI

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) can identify atherosclerotic vulnerable plaque and atorvastatin can stabilize vulnerable plaque by inhibiting the inflammatory response. Using balloon injury in rabbit abdominal aortic endothelial cells and p53 gene transfecting the local plaque, we established an atherosclerotic vulnerable plaque model. In the treatment group, animals were treated with atorvastatin for 8 weeks. At the end of week 16, the animals in each group underwent medication trigger. USPIO-enhanced MRI was utilized to detect vulnerable plaque formation and the transformation of stable plaque in the treatment group. Pathological and serological studies were conducted in animal sera and tissues. The images from the USPIO-enhanced MRI, and the vulnerable plaque showed low signal, especially on T2*-weighted sequences (T2*WI). Plaque signal strength reached a negative enhancement peak at 96 h. Compared with the other groups, lipids, cell adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 levels were significantly lower (P<0.05) in the treatment group. In conclusion, USPIO-enhanced MRI can identify vulnerable plaque formation by deposition in macrophages, while atorvastatin is able to inhibit the progression of atherosclerosis and promote plaque transformation to the stable form. PMID:27347029

  13. Three-dimensional dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for the accurate, extensive quantification of microvascular permeability in atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Calcagno, Claudia; Lobatto, Mark E; Dyvorne, Hadrien; Robson, Philip M; Millon, Antoine; Senders, Max L; Lairez, Olivier; Ramachandran, Sarayu; Coolen, Bram F; Black, Alexandra; Mulder, Willem J M; Fayad, Zahi A

    2015-10-01

    Atherosclerotic plaques that cause stroke and myocardial infarction are characterized by increased microvascular permeability and inflammation. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) has been proposed as a method to quantify vessel wall microvascular permeability in vivo. Until now, most DCE-MRI studies of atherosclerosis have been limited to two-dimensional (2D) multi-slice imaging. Although providing the high spatial resolution required to image the arterial vessel wall, these approaches do not allow the quantification of plaque permeability with extensive anatomical coverage, an essential feature when imaging heterogeneous diseases, such as atherosclerosis. To our knowledge, we present the first systematic evaluation of three-dimensional (3D), high-resolution, DCE-MRI for the extensive quantification of plaque permeability along an entire vascular bed, with validation in atherosclerotic rabbits. We compare two acquisitions: 3D turbo field echo (TFE) with motion-sensitized-driven equilibrium (MSDE) preparation and 3D turbo spin echo (TSE). We find 3D TFE DCE-MRI to be superior to 3D TSE DCE-MRI in terms of temporal stability metrics. Both sequences show good intra- and inter-observer reliability, and significant correlation with ex vivo permeability measurements by Evans Blue near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF). In addition, we explore the feasibility of using compressed sensing to accelerate 3D DCE-MRI of atherosclerosis, to improve its temporal resolution and therefore the accuracy of permeability quantification. Using retrospective under-sampling and reconstructions, we show that compressed sensing alone may allow the acceleration of 3D DCE-MRI by up to four-fold. We anticipate that the development of high-spatial-resolution 3D DCE-MRI with prospective compressed sensing acceleration may allow for the more accurate and extensive quantification of atherosclerotic plaque permeability along an entire vascular bed. We foresee that this approach may allow for

  14. Modified Wideband Three-Dimensional Late Gadolinium Enhancement MRI for Patients with Implantable Cardiac Devices

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Shams; Rapacchi, Stanislas; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Plotnik, Adam; Finn, J. Paul; Hu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To study the effects of cardiac devices on three-dimensional (3D) late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) MRI and to develop a 3D LGE protocol for implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) patients with reduced image artifacts. Theory and Methods The 3D LGE sequence was modified by implementing a wideband inversion pulse, which reduces hyperintensity artifacts, and by increasing bandwidth of the excitation pulse. The modified wideband 3D LGE sequence was tested in phantoms and evaluated in six volunteers and five patients with ICDs. Results Phantom and in vivo studies results demonstrated extended signal void and ripple artifacts in 3D LGE that were associated with ICDs. The reason for these artifacts was slab profile distortion and the subsequent aliasing in the slice-encoding direction. The modified wideband 3D LGE provided significantly reduced ripple artifacts than 3D LGE with wideband inversion only. Comparison of 3D and 2D LGE images demonstrated improved spatial resolution of the heart using 3D LGE. Conclusion Increased bandwidth of the inversion and excitation pulses can significantly reduce image artifacts associated with ICDs. Our modified wideband 3D LGE protocol can be readily used for imaging patients with ICDs given appropriate safety guidelines are followed. PMID:25772155

  15. DCEMRI.jl: a fast, validated, open source toolkit for dynamic contrast enhanced MRI analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xia; Arlinghaus, Lori R.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Welch, E. Brian

    2015-01-01

    We present a fast, validated, open-source toolkit for processing dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) data. We validate it against the Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers Alliance (QIBA) Standard and Extended Tofts-Kety phantoms and find near perfect recovery in the absence of noise, with an estimated 10–20× speedup in run time compared to existing tools. To explain the observed trends in the fitting errors, we present an argument about the conditioning of the Jacobian in the limit of small and large parameter values. We also demonstrate its use on an in vivo data set to measure performance on a realistic application. For a 192 × 192 breast image, we achieved run times of <1 s. Finally, we analyze run times scaling with problem size and find that the run time per voxel scales as O(N1.9), where N is the number of time points in the tissue concentration curve. DCEMRI.jl was much faster than any other analysis package tested and produced comparable accuracy, even in the presence of noise. PMID:25922795

  16. Liver fibrosis and Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI: A histopathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Verloh, Niklas; Utpatel, Kirsten; Haimerl, Michael; Zeman, Florian; Fellner, Claudia; Fichtner-Feigl, Stefan; Teufel, Andreas; Stroszczynski, Christian; Evert, Matthias; Wiggermann, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Gadolinium ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA) is a hepatocyte-specific MRI contrast agent. Because the hepatic uptake of Gd-EOB-DTPA depends on the integrity of the hepatocyte mass, this uptake can be quantified to assess liver function. We report the relationship between the extent of Gd-EOB-DTPA uptake and the degree of liver fibrosis. T1-weighted volume-interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) sequences with fat suppression were acquired before and 20 minutes after contrast injection. Strong correlations of the uptake characteristics of Gd-EOB-DTPA with the relative enhancement (RE) of the liver parenchyma and the grade of fibrosis/cirrhosis, classified using the Ishak scoring system, were observed. The subdivisions between the grades of liver fibrosis based on RE were highly significant for all combinations, and a ROC revealed sensitivities ≥82% and specificities ≥87% for all combinations. MR imaging is a satisfactorily sensitive method for the assessment of liver fibrosis/cirrhosis. PMID:26478097

  17. Novel ways to noninvasively detect inflammation of the myocardium: contrast-enhanced MRI and myocardial contrast echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    van den Brink, M.R.; Geluk, C.A.; Lindner, J.R.; Velthuis, B.K.; Vonken, E.J.; Cramer, M.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Both contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) and myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) are promising tools to detect cardiac inflammation. CE-MRI can be used to characterise the location and extent of myocardial inflammation, since areas of abnormal signal enhancement associated with regional wall motion abnormalities reliably indicate areas of active myocarditis. In MCE, chemically composed microbubbles can be visualised by ultrasound and used to determine the status of the cardiac microvasculature. If there is any inflammation the microbubbles will be phagocytosed by neutrophils and monocytes, thus enabling the degree of inflammation to be assessed. These noninvasive techniques may allow early diagnosis and accurate evaluation of myocardial inflammation. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:25696203

  18. Impact of uncertainty in longitudinal T1 measurements on quantification of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Aryal, Madhava P; Chenevert, Thomas L; Cao, Yue

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the uncertainty in T1 measurement, by estimating the repeatability coefficient (RC) from two repeated scans, in normal appearing brain tissues employing two different T1 mapping methods. All brain MRI scans were performed on a 3 T MR scanner in 10 patients who had low grade/benign tumors and partial brain radiation therapy (RT) without chemotherapy, at pre-RT, 3 weeks into RT, end RT (6 weeks) and 11, 33, and 85 weeks after RT. T1-weighted images were acquired using (1) a spoiled gradient echo sequence with two flip angles (2FA: 5° and 15°) and (2) a progressive saturation recovery sequence (pSR) with five different TR values (100-2000 ms). Manually drawn volumes of interest (VOIs) included left and right normal putamen and thalamus in gray matter, and frontal and parietal white matter, which were distant from tumors and received a total of accumulated radiation doses less than 5 Gy at 3 weeks. No significant changes or even trends in mean T1 from pre-RT to 3 weeks into RT in these VOIs (p ≥ 0.11, Wilcoxon sign test) allowed us to calculate the repeatability statistics of between-subject means of squares, within-subject means of squares, F-score, and RC. The 2FA method produced RCs in the range of (9.7-11.7)% in gray matter and (12.2-14.5)% in white matter; while the pSR method led to RCs ranging from 10.9 to 17.9% in gray matter and 7.5 to 10.3% in white matter. The overall mean (±SD) RCs produced by the two methods, 12.0 (±1.6)% for 2FA and 12.0 (±3.8)% for pSR, were not significantly different (p = 0.97). A similar repeatability in T1 measurement produced by the time efficient 2FA method compared with the time consuming pSR method demonstrates that the 2FA method is desirable to integrate into dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for rapid acquisition. PMID:27358934

  19. Diagnostic per-patient accuracy of an abbreviated hepatobiliary phase gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI for hepatocellular carcinoma surveillance.

    PubMed

    Marks, Robert M; Ryan, Andrew; Heba, Elhamy R; Tang, An; Wolfson, Tanya J; Gamst, Anthony C; Sirlin, Claude B; Bashir, Mustafa R

    2015-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the per-patient diagnostic performance of an abbreviated gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI protocol for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) surveillance. MATERIALS AND METHODS. A retrospective review identified 298 consecutive patients at risk for HCC enrolled in a gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI-based HCC surveillance program. For each patient, the first gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI was analyzed. To simulate an abbreviated protocol, two readers independently read two image sets per patient: set 1 consisted of T1-weighted 20-minute hepatobiliary phase and T2-weighted single-shot fast spin-echo (SSFSE) images; set 2 included diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and images from set 1. Image sets were scored as positive or negative according to the presence of at least one nodule 10 mm or larger that met the predetermined criteria. Agreement was assessed using Cohen kappa statistics. A composite reference standard was used to determine the diagnostic performance of each image set for each reader. RESULTS. Interreader agreement was substantial for both image sets (κ = 0.72 for both) and intrareader agreement was excellent (κ = 0.97-0.99). Reader performance for image set 1 was sensitivity of 85.7% for reader A and 79.6% for reader B, specificity of 91.2% for reader A and 95.2% for reader B, and negative predictive value of 97.0% for reader A and 96.0% for reader B. Reader performance for image set 2 was nearly identical, with only one of 298 examinations scored differently on image set 2 compared with set 1. CONCLUSION. An abbreviated MRI protocol consisting of T2-weighted SSFSE and gadoxetic acid-enhanced hepatobiliary phase has high negative predictive value and may be an acceptable method for HCC surveillance. The inclusion of a DWI sequence did not significantly alter the diagnostic performance of the abbreviated protocol. PMID:25714281

  20. Angiogenic response of locally advanced breast cancer to neoadjuvant chemotherapy evaluated with parametric histogram from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yeun-Chung; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Liu, Yi-Jui; Chen, Jyh-Horng; Lu, Yen-Shen; Tseng, Wen-Yih I.

    2004-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate angiogenic compositions and tumour response in the course of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) using dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI. Thirteen patients with LABC underwent serial DCE MRI during the course of chemotherapy. DCE MRI was quantified using a two-compartment model on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Analysis of parametric histograms of amplitude, exchange rate kout and peak enhancement over the whole tumour was performed. The distribution patterns of histograms were correlated with the tumour response. Initial kurtosis and standard deviation of amplitude before chemotherapy correlated with tumour response, r = 0.63 and r = 0.61, respectively. Comparing the initial values with the values after the first course of chemotherapy, tumour response was associated with a decrease in standard deviation of amplitude (r = 0.79), and an increase in kurtosis and a decrease in standard deviation of kout (r = 0.57 and 0.57, respectively). Comparing the initial values with the values after completing the chemotherapy, tumours with better response were associated with an increase in kurtosis (r = 0.62), a decrease in mean (r = 0.84) and standard deviation (r = 0.77) of amplitude, and a decrease in mean of peak enhancement (r = 0.71). Our results suggested that tumours with better response tended to alter their internal compositions from heterogeneous to homogeneous distributions and a decrease in peak enhancement after chemotherapy. Serial analyses of parametric histograms of DCE MRI-derived angiogenic parameters are potentially useful to monitor the response of angiogenic compositions of a tumour throughout the course of chemotherapy, and might predict tumour response early in the course.

  1. Does the Gadoxetic Acid-Enhanced Liver MRI Impact on the Treatment of Patients with Colorectal Cancer? Comparison Study with 18F-FDG PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Ji-Won; Oh, Soon Nam; Choi, Joon Il; Choi, Moon Hyung; Yoo, Ie Ryung; Lee, Myung Ah; Yoo, Young-Kyung; Oh, Seong Taek

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated the value of Gadoxetic acid-enhanced liver MRI in the preoperative staging of colorectal cancer and estimated the clinical impact of liver MRI in the management plan of liver metastasis. Methods. We identified 108 patients who underwent PET/CT and liver MRI as preoperative evaluation of colorectal cancer, between January 2011 and December 2013. We evaluated the per nodule sensitivity of PET/CT and liver MRI for liver metastasis. Management plan changes were estimated for patients with metastatic nodules newly detected on liver MRI, to assess the clinical impact. Results. We enrolled 131 metastatic nodules (mean size 1.6 cm) in 41 patients (mean age 65 years). The per nodule sensitivities of PET/CT and liver MRI were both 100% for nodules measuring 2 cm or larger but were significantly different for nodules measuring less than 2 cm (59.8% and 95.1%, resp., P = 0.0001). At least one more metastatic nodule was detected on MRI in 16 patients. Among these, 7 patients indicated changes of management plan after performing MRI. Conclusions. Gadoxetic acid-enhanced liver MRI detected more metastatic nodules compared with PET/CT, especially for small (<2 cm) nodules. The newly detected nodules induced management plan change in 43.8% (7/16) of patients. PMID:27022613

  2. ACTIVE DELIVERY CABLE TUNED TO DEVICE DEPLOYMENT STATE: ENHANCED VISIBILITY OF NITINOL OCCLUDERS DURING PRE-CLINICAL INTERVENTIONAL MRI

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Jamie A.; Saikus, Christina E.; Ratnayaka, Kanishka; Barbash, Israel M.; Faranesh, Anthony Z.; Franson, Dominique N.; Sonmez, Merdim; Slack, Michael C.; Lederman, Robert J.; Kocaturk, Ozgur

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To develop an active delivery system that enhances visualization of nitinol cardiac occluder devices during deployment under real-time MRI. Materials and Methods We constructed an active delivery cable incorporating a loopless antenna and a custom titanium microscrew to secure the occluder devices. The delivery cable was tuned and matched to 50Ω at 64 MHz with the occluder device attached. We used real-time balanced SSFP in a wide-bore 1.5T scanner. Device-related images were reconstructed separately and combined with surface-coil images. The delivery cable was tested in vitro in a phantom and in vivo in swine using a variety of nitinol cardiac occluder devices. Results In vitro, the active delivery cable provided little signal when the occluder device was detached and maximal signal with the device attached. In vivo, signal from the active delivery cable enabled clear visualization of occluder device during positioning and deployment. Device release resulted in decreased signal from the active cable. Post-mortem examination confirmed proper device placement. Conclusions The active delivery cable enhanced the MRI depiction of nitinol cardiac occluder devices during positioning and deployment, both in conventional and novel applications. We expect enhanced visibility to contribute to effectiveness and safety of new and emerging MRI-guided treatments. PMID:22707441

  3. Development and characterization of a dynamic lesion phantom for the quantitative evaluation of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Freed, Melanie; de Zwart, Jacco A.; Hariharan, Prasanna; R. Myers, Matthew; Badano, Aldo

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a dynamic lesion phantom that is capable of producing physiological kinetic curves representative of those seen in human dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) data. The objective of this phantom is to provide a platform for the quantitative comparison of DCE-MRI protocols to aid in the standardization and optimization of breast DCE-MRI. Methods: The dynamic lesion consists of a hollow, plastic mold with inlet and outlet tubes to allow flow of a contrast agent solution through the lesion over time. Border shape of the lesion can be controlled using the lesion mold production method. The configuration of the inlet and outlet tubes was determined using fluid transfer simulations. The total fluid flow rate was determined using x-ray images of the lesion for four different flow rates (0.25, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 ml∕s) to evaluate the resultant kinetic curve shape and homogeneity of the contrast agent distribution in the dynamic lesion. High spatial and temporal resolution x-ray measurements were used to estimate the true kinetic curve behavior in the dynamic lesion for benign and malignant example curves. DCE-MRI example data were acquired of the dynamic phantom using a clinical protocol. Results: The optimal inlet and outlet tube configuration for the lesion molds was two inlet molds separated by 30° and a single outlet tube directly between the two inlet tubes. X-ray measurements indicated that 1.0 ml∕s was an appropriate total fluid flow rate and provided truth for comparison with MRI data of kinetic curves representative of benign and malignant lesions. DCE-MRI data demonstrated the ability of the phantom to produce realistic kinetic curves. Conclusions: The authors have constructed a dynamic lesion phantom, demonstrated its ability to produce physiological kinetic curves, and provided estimations of its true kinetic curve behavior. This lesion phantom provides a tool for the quantitative evaluation of DCE-MRI protocols, which may lead to

  4. Automated segmentation of reference tissue for prostate cancer localization in dynamic contrast enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vos, Pieter C.; Hambrock, Thomas; Barentsz, Jelle O.; Huisman, Henkjan J.

    2010-03-01

    For pharmacokinetic (PK) analysis of Dynamic Contrast Enhanced (DCE) MRI the arterial input function needs to be estimated. Previously, we demonstrated that PK parameters have a significant better discriminative performance when per patient reference tissue was used, but required manual annotation of reference tissue. In this study we propose a fully automated reference tissue segmentation method that tackles this limitation. The method was tested with our Computer Aided Diagnosis (CADx) system to study the effect on the discriminating performance for differentiating prostate cancer from benign areas in the peripheral zone (PZ). The proposed method automatically segments normal PZ tissue from DCE derived data. First, the bladder is segmented in the start-to-enhance map using the Otsu histogram threshold selection method. Second, the prostate is detected by applying a multi-scale Hessian filter to the relative enhancement map. Third, normal PZ tissue was segmented by threshold and morphological operators. The resulting segmentation was used as reference tissue to estimate the PK parameters. In 39 consecutive patients carcinoma, benign and normal tissue were annotated on MR images by a radiologist and a researcher using whole mount step-section histopathology as reference. PK parameters were computed for each ROI. Features were extracted from the set of ROIs using percentiles to train a support vector machine that was used as classifier. Prospective performance was estimated by means of leave-one-patient-out cross validation. A bootstrap resampling approach with 10,000 iterations was used for estimating the bootstrap mean AUCs and 95% confidence intervals. In total 42 malignant, 29 benign and 37 normal regions were annotated. For all patients, normal PZ was successfully segmented. The diagnostic accuracy obtained for differentiating malignant from benign lesions using a conventional general patient plasma profile showed an accuracy of 0.64 (0.53-0.74). Using the

  5. Manganese-impregnated mesoporous silica nanoparticles for signal enhancement in MRI cell labelling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillet-Nicolas, Rémy; Laprise-Pelletier, Myriam; Nair, Mahesh M.; Chevallier, Pascale; Lagueux, Jean; Gossuin, Yves; Laurent, Sophie; Kleitz, Freddy; Fortin, Marc-André

    2013-11-01

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) are used in drug delivery and cell tracking applications. As Mn2+ is already implemented as a ``positive'' cell contrast agent in preclinical imaging procedures (in the form of MnCl2 for neurological studies), the introduction of Mn in the porous network of MSNs would allow labelling cells and tracking them using MRI. These particles are in general internalized in endosomes, an acidic environment with high saline concentration. In addition, the available MSN porosity could also serve as a carrier to deliver medical/therapeutic substances through the labelled cells. In the present study, manganese oxide was introduced in the porous network of MCM-48 silica nanoparticles (Mn-M48SNs). The particles exhibit a narrow size distribution (~140 nm diam.) and high porosity (~60% vol.), which was validated after insertion of Mn. The resulting Mn-M48SNs were characterized by TEM, N2 physisorption, and XRD. Evidence was found with H2-TPR, and XPS characterization, that Mn(ii) is the main oxidation state of the paramagnetic species after suspension in water, most probably in the form of Mn-OOH. The colloidal stability as a function of time was confirmed by DLS in water, acetate buffer and cell culture medium. In NMR data, no significant evidence of Mn2+ leaching was found in Mn-M48SNs in acidic water (pH 6), up to 96 hours after suspension. High longitudinal relaxivity values of r1 = 8.4 mM-1 s-1 were measured at 60 MHz and 37 °C, with the lowest relaxometric ratios (r2/r1 = 2) reported to date for a Mn-MSN system. Leukaemia cells (P388) were labelled with Mn-M48SNs and nanoparticle cell internalization was confirmed by TEM. Finally, MRI contrast enhancement provided by cell labelling with escalated incubation concentrations of Mn-M48SNs was quantified at 1 T. This study confirmed the possibility of efficiently confining Mn into M48SNs using incipient wetness, while maintaining an open porosity and relatively high pore volume. Because

  6. High-resolution imaging of magnetisation transfer and nuclear Overhauser effect in the human visual cortex at 7 T.

    PubMed

    Mougin, Olivier; Clemence, Matthew; Peters, Andrew; Pitiot, Alain; Gowland, Penny

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to optimise a pulse sequence for high-resolution imaging sensitive to the effects of conventional macromolecular magnetisation transfer (MT(m)) and nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE), and to use it to investigate variations in these parameters across the cerebral cortex. A high-spatial-resolution magnetisation transfer-prepared turbo field echo (MT-TFE) sequence was designed to have high sensitivity to MT(m) and NOE effects, whilst being robust to B0 and B1 inhomogeneities, and producing a good point spread function across the cortex. This was achieved by optimising the saturation and imaging components of the sequence using simulations based on the Bloch equations, including exchange and an image simulator. This was used to study variations in these parameters across the cortex. Using the sequence designed to be sensitive to NOE and MT(m), a variation in signals corresponding to a variation in MT(m) and NOE across the cortex, consistent with a reduction in myelination from the white matter surface to the pial surface of the cortex, was observed. In regions in which the stria was visible on T2*-weighted images, it could also be detected in signals sensitive to MT(m) and NOE. There was greater variation in signals sensitive to NOE, suggesting that the NOE signal is more sensitive to myelination. A sequence has been designed to image variations in MT(m) and NOE at high spatial resolution and has been used to investigate variations in contrast in these parameters across the cortex. PMID:23801569

  7. Use of Myometrium as an Internal Reference for Endometrial and Cervical Cancer on Multiphase Contrast-Enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Ni; Liao, Yu-San; Chen, Wen-Chang; Wang, Yue-Sheng; Lee, Li-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Background Myometrial smooth muscle is normally within the field of view for the gynecological imaging. This study aimed to investigate the use of normal myometrium as an internal reference for endometrial and cervical cancer during multiphase contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MCE-MRI) and to explore whether this information regarding tumor enhancement relative to the myometrium could be used to discriminate between endometrial and cervical cancer. Methods MRI images, before and after contrast enhancement, were analyzed in newly diagnosed cervical (n = 18) and endometrial cancer (n = 19) patients. Signal intensities (SIs) from tumor tissue and non-neoplastic myometrium were measured using imaging software. Results The relative signal for cervical cancer was approximately 30% higher than that of endometrial cancer after contrast administration. The area under receiver operating characteristic curve for SI, relative signal enhancement, and tumor to myometrium contrast ratio (as used to discriminate between cervical cancer and endometrial cancer) was 0.7807, 0.7456 and 0.7895, respectively. There was no difference in SI of the normal myometrium between endometrial and cervical cancer patients prior to and after contrast administration. Using non-tumorous myometrium as an internal reference, the tumor to myometrium contrast ratio was significantly higher in tumor tissue from cervical cancer compared with that from endometrial cancer at 25 s post contrast enhancement (p = 0.0016), with an optimal sensitivity of 72.22% and specificity of 84.21%. Conclusion With SI normalized to baseline or normal myometrium, tumor tissue from cervical cancer patients showed significant hyperintensity compared with that of tumor tissue from endometrial cancer patients after contrast enhancement, yielding acceptable performance. The use of the myometrium as an internal reference may provide an alternative method to analyze MCE-MRI data. PMID:27326456

  8. Bioactive conformation of stromelysin inhibitors determined by transferred nuclear Overhauser effects.

    PubMed Central

    Gonnella, N C; Bohacek, R; Zhang, X; Kolossváry, I; Paris, C G; Melton, R; Winter, C; Hu, S I; Ganu, V

    1995-01-01

    The transferred nuclear Overhauser effect has been used to determine the biologically active conformations of two stromelysin inhibitors. Both inhibitors used in this study were hydroxamic acids generated via chemical synthesis. These structures, representing the conformation of each inhibitor bound to stromelysin, superimposed with excellent agreement. The study also provided information on the shape and orientation of the S2' and S1' pockets of the enzyme relative to thermolysin. Comparisons were made between stromelysin and thermolysin inhibitors to critically examine thermolysin as a template for stromelysin-inhibitor design. The enzyme-bound conformations of these stromelysin inhibitors were determined for use as a template in conformationally restricted drug design. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:7831311

  9. Improved parameter extraction and classification for dynamic contrast enhanced MRI of prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haq, Nandinee Fariah; Kozlowski, Piotr; Jones, Edward C.; Chang, Silvia D.; Goldenberg, S. Larry; Moradi, Mehdi

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), particularly dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging, has shown great potential in prostate cancer diagnosis and prognosis. The time course of the DCE images provides measures of the contrast agent uptake kinetics. Also, using pharmacokinetic modelling, one can extract parameters from the DCE-MR images that characterize the tumor vascularization and can be used to detect cancer. A requirement for calculating the pharmacokinetic DCE parameters is estimating the Arterial Input Function (AIF). One needs an accurate segmentation of the cross section of the external femoral artery to obtain the AIF. In this work we report a semi-automatic method for segmentation of the cross section of the femoral artery, using circular Hough transform, in the sequence of DCE images. We also report a machine-learning framework to combine pharmacokinetic parameters with the model-free contrast agent uptake kinetic parameters extracted from the DCE time course into a nine-dimensional feature vector. This combination of features is used with random forest and with support vector machine classi cation for cancer detection. The MR data is obtained from patients prior to radical prostatectomy. After the surgery, wholemount histopathology analysis is performed and registered to the DCE-MR images as the diagnostic reference. We show that the use of a combination of pharmacokinetic parameters and the model-free empirical parameters extracted from the time course of DCE results in improved cancer detection compared to the use of each group of features separately. We also validate the proposed method for calculation of AIF based on comparison with the manual method.

  10. Noninvasive assessment of tumor microenvironment using dynamic contrast enhanced MRI and 18F- fluoromisonidazole PET imaging in neck nodal metastases

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Jacobus F. A.; Schöder, Heiko; Lee, Nancy Y.; Wang, Ya; Pfister, David. G.; Fury, Matthew G.; Stambuk, Hilda. E.; Humm, John L.; Koutcher, Jason A.; Shukla-Dave, Amita

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Pretreatment multimodality imaging can provide useful anatomical and functional data about tumors, including perfusion and possibly hypoxia status. The purpose of our study was to assess non-invasively the tumor microenvironment of neck nodal metastases in patients with head and neck (HN) cancer by investigating the relationship between tumor perfusion measured using Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and hypoxia measured by 18F-fluoromisonidazole (18F-FMISO) PET. Methods and Materials Thirteen newly diagnosed HN cancer patients with metastatic neck nodes underwent DCE-MRI and 18F-FMISO PET imaging prior to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The matched regions of interests from both modalities were analyzed. To examine the correlations between DCE-MRI parameters and standard uptake value (SUV) measurements from 18F-FMISO PET, the non-parametric Spearman correlation coefficient was calculated. Furthermore, DCE-MRI parameters were compared between nodes with 18F-FMISO uptake and nodes with no 18F-FMISO uptake using Mann-Whitney U tests. Results For the 13 patients, a total of 18 nodes were analyzed. The nodal size strongly correlated with the 18F-FMISO SUV (ρ=0.74, p<0.001). There was a strong negative correlation between the median kep (ρ=−0.58, p=0.042) and the 18F-FMISO SUV. Hypoxic nodes (moderate to severe 18F-FMISO uptake) had significantly lower median Ktrans (p=0.049) and median kep (p=0.027) values than did non-hypoxic nodes (no 18F-FMISO uptake). Conclusion This initial evaluation of the preliminary results support the hypothesis that in metastatic neck lymph nodes, hypoxic nodes are poorly perfused (i.e., have significantly lower kep and Ktrans values) compared to non-hypoxic nodes. PMID:19906496

  11. The Role of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI in a Child with Sport-Induced Avascular Necrosis of the Scaphoid: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Jong, Bob; Tilman, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) of the scaphoid in children is very rare and there is currently no consensus when conservative or operative treatment is indicated. A 10-year-old boy, practicing karate, presented with acute pain in his left wrist after falling on the outstretched hand. Imaging showed a scaphoid waist fracture with signs of an ongoing AVN. The diagnosis of AVN was confirmed with signal loss of the scaphoid on MRI T1. A dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI was performed for further assessment of the proximal pole vascularity and treatment planning. As dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI showed fair perfusion of the proximal pole, an adequate healing potential with conservative treatment was estimated. We achieved union and good function with cast immobilization for fourteen weeks. This case study showed dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI to be a valuable tool in assessing whether conservative or operative treatment is indicated to achieve union and good functional outcome. PMID:27529045

  12. Respiratory Motion-Compensated Radial Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced (DCE)-MRI of Chest and Abdominal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei; Guo, Junyu; Rosen, Mark A.; Song, Hee Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI is becoming an increasingly important tool for evaluating tumor vascularity and assessing the effectiveness of emerging antiangiogenic and antivascular agents. In chest and abdominal regions, however, respiratory motion can seriously degrade the achievable image quality in DCE-MRI studies. The purpose of this work is to develop a respiratory motion-compensated DCE-MRI technique that combines the self-gating properties of radial imaging with the reconstruction flexibility afforded by the golden-angle view-order strategy. Following radial data acquisition, the signal at k-space center is first used to determine the respiratory cycle, and consecutive views during the expiratory phase of each respiratory period (34–55 views, depending on the breathing rate) are grouped into individual segments. Residual intra-segment translation of lesion is subsequently compensated for by an autofocusing technique that optimizes image entropy, while intersegment translation (among different respiratory cycles) is corrected using 3D image correlation. The resulting motion-compensated, undersampled dynamic image series is then processed to reduce image streaking and to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) prior to perfusion analysis, using either the k-space-weighted image contrast (KWIC) radial filtering technique or principal component analysis (PCA). The proposed data acquisition scheme also allows for high framerate arterial input function (AIF) sampling and free-breathing baseline T1 mapping. The performance of the proposed radial DCE-MRI technique is evaluated in subjects with lung and liver lesions, and results demonstrate that excellent pixelwise perfusion maps can be obtained with the proposed methodology. PMID:18956465

  13. Predicting response before initiation of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer using new methods for the analysis of dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE MRI) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGrandchamp, Joseph B.; Whisenant, Jennifer G.; Arlinghaus, Lori R.; Abramson, V. G.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Julio

    2016-03-01

    The pharmacokinetic parameters derived from dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI have shown promise as biomarkers for tumor response to therapy. However, standard methods of analyzing DCE MRI data (Tofts model) require high temporal resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and the Arterial Input Function (AIF). Such models produce reliable biomarkers of response only when a therapy has a large effect on the parameters. We recently reported a method that solves the limitations, the Linear Reference Region Model (LRRM). Similar to other reference region models, the LRRM needs no AIF. Additionally, the LRRM is more accurate and precise than standard methods at low SNR and slow temporal resolution, suggesting LRRM-derived biomarkers could be better predictors. Here, the LRRM, Non-linear Reference Region Model (NRRM), Linear Tofts model (LTM), and Non-linear Tofts Model (NLTM) were used to estimate the RKtrans between muscle and tumor (or the Ktrans for Tofts) and the tumor kep,TOI for 39 breast cancer patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). These parameters and the receptor statuses of each patient were used to construct cross-validated predictive models to classify patients as complete pathological responders (pCR) or non-complete pathological responders (non-pCR) to NAC. Model performance was evaluated using area under the ROC curve (AUC). The AUC for receptor status alone was 0.62, while the best performance using predictors from the LRRM, NRRM, LTM, and NLTM were AUCs of 0.79, 0.55, 0.60, and 0.59 respectively. This suggests that the LRRM can be used to predict response to NAC in breast cancer.

  14. fMRI neurofeedback of amygdala response to aversive stimuli enhances prefrontal-limbic brain connectivity.

    PubMed

    Paret, Christian; Ruf, Matthias; Gerchen, Martin Fungisai; Kluetsch, Rosemarie; Demirakca, Traute; Jungkunz, Martin; Bertsch, Katja; Schmahl, Christian; Ende, Gabriele

    2016-01-15

    Down-regulation of the amygdala with real-time fMRI neurofeedback (rtfMRI NF) potentially allows targeting brain circuits of emotion processing and may involve prefrontal-limbic networks underlying effective emotion regulation. Little research has been dedicated to the effect of rtfMRI NF on the functional connectivity of the amygdala and connectivity patterns in amygdala down-regulation with neurofeedback have not been addressed yet. Using psychophysiological interaction analysis of fMRI data, we present evidence that voluntary amygdala down-regulation by rtfMRI NF while viewing aversive pictures was associated with increased connectivity of the right amygdala with the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) in healthy subjects (N=16). In contrast, a control group (N=16) receiving sham feedback did not alter amygdala connectivity (Group×Condition t-contrast: p<.05 at cluster-level). Task-dependent increases in amygdala-vmPFC connectivity were predicted by picture arousal (β=.59, p<.05). A dynamic causal modeling analysis with Bayesian model selection aimed at further characterizing the underlying causal structure and favored a bottom-up model assuming predominant information flow from the amygdala to the vmPFC (xp=.90). The results were complemented by the observation of task-dependent alterations in functional connectivity of the vmPFC with the visual cortex and the ventrolateral PFC in the experimental group (Condition t-contrast: p<.05 at cluster-level). Taken together, the results underscore the potential of amygdala fMRI neurofeedback to influence functional connectivity in key networks of emotion processing and regulation. This may be beneficial for patients suffering from severe emotion dysregulation by improving neural self-regulation. PMID:26481674

  15. Enhanced control of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex neurophysiology with real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) neurofeedback training and working memory practice.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Matthew S; Kane, Jessica H; Weisend, Michael P; Parker, Jason G

    2016-01-01

    Real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) neurofeedback can be used to train localized, conscious regulation of blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signals. As a therapeutic technique, rt-fMRI neurofeedback reduces the symptoms of a variety of neurologic disorders. To date, few studies have investigated the use of self-regulation training using rt-fMRI neurofeedback to enhance cognitive performance. This work investigates the utility of rt-fMRI neurofeedback as a tool to enhance human cognition by training healthy individuals to consciously control activity in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). A cohort of 18 healthy participants in the experimental group underwent rt-fMRI neurofeedback from the left DLPFC in five training sessions across two weeks while 7 participants in the control group underwent similar training outside the MRI and without rt-fMRI neurofeedback. Working memory (WM) performance was evaluated on two testing days separated by the five rt-fMRI neurofeedback sessions using two computerized tests. We investigated the ability to control the BOLD signal across training sessions and WM performance across the two testing days. The group with rt-fMRI neurofeedback demonstrated a significant increase in the ability to self-regulate the BOLD signal in the left DLPFC across sessions. WM performance showed differential improvement between testing days one and two across the groups with the highest increases observed in the rt-fMRI neurofeedback group. These results provide evidence that individuals can quickly gain the ability to consciously control the left DLPFC, and this training results in improvements of WM performance beyond that of training alone. PMID:26348555

  16. Preliminary Study of Oxygen-Enhanced Longitudinal Relaxation in MRI: A Potential Novel Biomarker of Oxygenation Changes in Solid Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, James P.B.; Naish, Josephine H.; Parker, Geoff J.M.; Waterton, John C.; Watson, Yvonne; Jayson, Gordon C.; Buonaccorsi, Giovanni A.; Cheung, Sue; Buckley, David L.; McGrath, Deirdre M.; West, Catharine M.L.; Davidson, Susan E.; Roberts, Caleb; Mills, Samantha J.; Mitchell, Claire L.; Hope, Lynn; Ton, N. Chan; Jackson, Alan

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: There is considerable interest in developing non-invasive methods of mapping tumor hypoxia. Changes in tissue oxygen concentration produce proportional changes in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) longitudinal relaxation rate (R{sub 1}). This technique has been used previously to evaluate oxygen delivery to healthy tissues and is distinct from blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) imaging. Here we report application of this method to detect alteration in tumor oxygenation status. Methods and materials: Ten patients with advanced cancer of the abdomen and pelvis underwent serial measurement of tumor R{sub 1} while breathing medical air (21% oxygen) followed by 100% oxygen (oxygen-enhanced MRI). Gadolinium-based dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI was then performed to compare the spatial distribution of perfusion with that of oxygen-induced DELTAR{sub 1}. Results: DELTAR{sub 1} showed significant increases of 0.021 to 0.058 s{sup -1} in eight patients with either locally recurrent tumor from cervical and hepatocellular carcinomas or metastases from ovarian and colorectal carcinomas. In general, there was congruency between perfusion and oxygen concentration. However, regional mismatch was observed in some tumor cores. Here, moderate gadolinium uptake (consistent with moderate perfusion) was associated with low area under the DELTAR{sub 1} curve (consistent with minimal increase in oxygen concentration). Conclusions: These results provide evidence that oxygen-enhanced longitudinal relaxation can monitor changes in tumor oxygen concentration. The technique shows promise in identifying hypoxic regions within tumors and may enable spatial mapping of change in tumor oxygen concentration.

  17. A dimensionless dynamic contrast enhanced MRI parameter for intra-prostatic tumour target volume delineation: initial comparison with histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrinivich, W. Thomas; Gibson, Eli; Gaed, Mena; Gomez, Jose A.; Moussa, Madeleine; McKenzie, Charles A.; Bauman, Glenn S.; Ward, Aaron D.; Fenster, Aaron; Wong, Eugene

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: T2 weighted and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) show promise in isolating prostate tumours. Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI has also been employed as a component in multi-parametric tumour detection schemes. Model-based parameters such as Ktrans are conventionally used to characterize DCE images and require arterial contrast agent (CR) concentration. A robust parameter map that does not depend on arterial input may be more useful for target volume delineation. We present a dimensionless parameter (Wio) that characterizes CR wash-in and washout rates without requiring arterial CR concentration. Wio is compared to Ktrans in terms of ability to discriminate cancer in the prostate, as demonstrated via comparison with histology. Methods: Three subjects underwent DCE-MRI using gadolinium contrast and 7 s imaging temporal resolution. A pathologist identified cancer on whole-mount histology specimens, and slides were deformably registered to MR images. The ability of Wio maps to discriminate cancer was determined through receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis. Results: There is a trend that Wio shows greater area under the ROC curve (AUC) than Ktrans with median AUC values of 0.74 and 0.69 respectively, but the difference was not statistically significant based on a Wilcoxon signed-rank test (p = 0.13). Conclusions: Preliminary results indicate that Wio shows potential as a tool for Ktrans QA, showing similar ability to discriminate cancer in the prostate as Ktrans without requiring arterial CR concentration.

  18. Retrieval of Brain Tumors with Region-Specific Bag-of-Visual-Words Representations in Contrast-Enhanced MRI Images

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Meiyan; Yang, Wei; Yu, Mei; Lu, Zhentai; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan

    2012-01-01

    A content-based image retrieval (CBIR) system is proposed for the retrieval of T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) images of brain tumors. In this CBIR system, spatial information in the bag-of-visual-words model and domain knowledge on the brain tumor images are considered for the representation of brain tumor images. A similarity metric is learned through a distance metric learning algorithm to reduce the gap between the visual features and the semantic concepts in an image. The learned similarity metric is then used to measure the similarity between two images and then retrieve the most similar images in the dataset when a query image is submitted to the CBIR system. The retrieval performance of the proposed method is evaluated on a brain CE-MRI dataset with three types of brain tumors (i.e., meningioma, glioma, and pituitary tumor). The experimental results demonstrate that the mean average precision values of the proposed method range from 90.4% to 91.5% for different views (transverse, coronal, and sagittal) with an average value of 91.0%. PMID:23243462

  19. Multimodal visualization of 3D enhanced MRI and CT of acoustic schwannoma and related structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucharski, Tomasz; Kujawinska, Malgorzata; Niemczyk, Kazimierz; Marchel, Andrzej

    2005-09-01

    According to the necessity of supporting vestibular schwannoma surgery, there is a demand to develop a convenient method of medical data visualization. The process of making choice of optimal operating access way has been uncomfortable for a surgeon so far, because there has been a necessity of analyzing two independent 3D images series (CT -bone tissues visible, MRI - soft tissues visible) in the region of ponto-cerebellar angle tumors. The authors propose a solution that will improve this process. The system used is equipped with stereoscopic helmet mounted display. It allows merged CT and MRI data representing tissues in the region of of ponto-cerebellar angle to be visualized in stereoscopic way. The process of data preparation for visualization includes: -automated segmentation algorithms, -different types of 3D images (CT, MRI) fusion. The authors focused on the development of novel algorithms for segmentation of vestibular schwannoma. It is important and difficult task due to different types of tumors and their inhomogeneous character dependent on growth models. The authors propose algorithms based on histogram spectrum and multimodal character of MRI imaging (T1 and T2 modes). However due to a variety of objects the library of algorithms with specific modifications matching to selected types of images is proposed. The applicability and functionality of the algorithms and library was proved on the series of data delivered by Warsaw Central Medical University Hospital.

  20. Enhancing 4D PC-MRI in an aortic phantom considering numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratzke, Jonas; Schoch, Nicolai; Weis, Christian; Müller-Eschner, Matthias; Speidel, Stefanie; Farag, Mina; Beller, Carsten J.; Heuveline, Vincent

    2015-03-01

    To date, cardiovascular surgery enables the treatment of a wide range of aortic pathologies. One of the current challenges in this field is given by the detection of high-risk patients for adverse aortic events, who should be treated electively. Reliable diagnostic parameters, which indicate the urge of treatment, have to be determined. Functional imaging by means of 4D phase contrast-magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) enables the time-resolved measurement of blood flow velocity in 3D. Applied to aortic phantoms, three dimensional blood flow properties and their relation to adverse dynamics can be investigated in vitro. Emerging "in silico" methods of numerical simulation can supplement these measurements in computing additional information on crucial parameters. We propose a framework that complements 4D PC-MRI imaging by means of numerical simulation based on the Finite Element Method (FEM). The framework is developed on the basis of a prototypic aortic phantom and validated by 4D PC-MRI measurements of the phantom. Based on physical principles of biomechanics, the derived simulation depicts aortic blood flow properties and characteristics. The framework might help identifying factors that induce aortic pathologies such as aortic dilatation or aortic dissection. Alarming thresholds of parameters such as wall shear stress distribution can be evaluated. The combined techniques of 4D PC-MRI and numerical simulation can be used as complementary tools for risk-stratification of aortic pathology.

  1. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI serves as a predictor of HIFU treatment outcome for uterine fibroids with hyperintensity in T2-weighted images

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, WEN-PENG; CHEN, JIN-YUN; CHEN, WEN-ZHI

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in predicting the outcome of using ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (USgHIFU) ablation for the treatment of uterine fibroids with T2 hyperintensity under MRI. A total of 131 uterine fibroids from 131 patients that appeared hyperintense under T2-weighted MRI were analyzed. The uterine fibroids were subjectively categorized into slight, irregular or regular enhancement groups, according to pretreatment dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in the arterial phase within 60 sec after the injection of gadolinium. The non-perfused volume (NPV), which is indicative of successful ablation, was represented as the non-perfused area inside the uterine fibroids on enhanced MRI scans following treatment. Additionally, the treatment duration, treatment efficiency, sonication duration, energy efficiency ratio and any adverse events were recorded. The results indicated that the average NPV ratio for all the treated fibroids was 68.5%, while the average NPV ratios for fibroids with slight, irregular or regular enhancement were 84.7, 70.6 and 57.1%, respectively. Fibroids with regular enhancement were associated with the lowest NPV ratio and the lowest treatment efficiency, but exhibited the highest energy effect ratio and an elevated risk of severe adverse effects. The results of the present study indicate that hyperintense uterine fibroids with slight and irregular enhancement in the arterial phase of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI are suitable for USgHIFU treatment. By contrast, uterine fibroids with regular enhancement were associated with the lowest treatment efficacy and safety. PMID:26889263

  2. Atrial Fibrosis Quantified Using Late Gadolinium Enhancement MRI is Associated With Sinus Node Dysfunction Requiring Pacemaker Implant

    PubMed Central

    Akoum, Nazem; Mcgann, Christopher; Vergara, Gaston; Badger, Troy; Ranjan, Ravi; Mahnkopf, Christian; Kholmovski, Eugene; Macleod, Rob; Marrouche, Nassir

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Sinus node dysfunction (SND) commonly manifests with atrial arrhythmias alternating with sinus pauses and sinus bradycardia. The underlying process is thought to be because of atrial fibrosis. We assessed the value of atrial fibrosis, quantified using Late Gadolinium Enhanced-MRI (LGE-MRI), in predicting significant SND requiring pacemaker implant. Methods Three hundred forty-four patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) presenting for catheter ablation underwent LGE-MRI. Left atrial (LA) fibrosis was quantified in all patients and right atrial (RA) fibrosis in 134 patients. All patients underwent catheter ablation with pulmonary vein isolation with posterior wall and septal debulking. Patients were followed prospectively for 329 ± 245 days. Ambulatory monitoring was instituted every 3 months. Symptomatic pauses and bradycardia were treated with pacemaker implantation per published guidelines. Results The average patient age was 65 ± 12 years. The average wall fibrosis was 16.7 ± 11.1% in the LA, and 5.3 ± 6.4% in the RA. RA fibrosis was correlated with LA fibrosis (R2 = 0.26; P < 0.01). Patients were divided into 4 stages of LA fibrosis (Utah I: <5%, Utah II: 5–20%, Utah III: 20–35%, Utah IV: >35%). Twenty-two patients (mean atrial fibrosis, 23.9%) required pacemaker implantation during follow-up. Univariate and multivariate analysis identified LA fibrosis stage (OR, 2.2) as a significant predictor for pacemaker implantation with an area under the curve of 0.704. Conclusions In patients with AF presenting for catheter ablation, LGE-MRI quantification of atrial fibrosis demonstrates preferential LA involvement. Significant atrial fibrosis is associated with clinically significant SND requiring pacemaker implantation. PMID:21806700

  3. Enhancing Motor Network Activity Using Real-Time Functional MRI Neurofeedback of Left Premotor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Marins, Theo F.; Rodrigues, Erika C.; Engel, Annerose; Hoefle, Sebastian; Basílio, Rodrigo; Lent, Roberto; Moll, Jorge; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Neurofeedback by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a technique of potential therapeutic relevance that allows individuals to be aware of their own neurophysiological responses and to voluntarily modulate the activity of specific brain regions, such as the premotor cortex (PMC), important for motor recovery after brain injury. We investigated (i) whether healthy human volunteers are able to up-regulate the activity of the left PMC during a right hand finger tapping motor imagery (MI) task while receiving continuous fMRI-neurofeedback, and (ii) whether successful modulation of brain activity influenced non-targeted motor control regions. During the MI task, participants of the neurofeedback group (NFB) received ongoing visual feedback representing the level of fMRI responses within their left PMC. Control (CTL) group participants were shown similar visual stimuli, but these were non-contingent on brain activity. Both groups showed equivalent levels of behavioral ratings on arousal and MI, before and during the fMRI protocol. In the NFB, but not in CLT group, brain activation during the last run compared to the first run revealed increased activation in the left PMC. In addition, the NFB group showed increased activation in motor control regions extending beyond the left PMC target area, including the supplementary motor area, basal ganglia and cerebellum. Moreover, in the last run, the NFB group showed stronger activation in the left PMC/inferior frontal gyrus when compared to the CTL group. Our results indicate that modulation of PMC and associated motor control areas can be achieved during a single neurofeedback-fMRI session. These results contribute to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of MI-based neurofeedback training, with direct implications for rehabilitation strategies in severe brain disorders, such as stroke. PMID:26733832

  4. Enhancing Motor Network Activity Using Real-Time Functional MRI Neurofeedback of Left Premotor Cortex.

    PubMed

    Marins, Theo F; Rodrigues, Erika C; Engel, Annerose; Hoefle, Sebastian; Basílio, Rodrigo; Lent, Roberto; Moll, Jorge; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Neurofeedback by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a technique of potential therapeutic relevance that allows individuals to be aware of their own neurophysiological responses and to voluntarily modulate the activity of specific brain regions, such as the premotor cortex (PMC), important for motor recovery after brain injury. We investigated (i) whether healthy human volunteers are able to up-regulate the activity of the left PMC during a right hand finger tapping motor imagery (MI) task while receiving continuous fMRI-neurofeedback, and (ii) whether successful modulation of brain activity influenced non-targeted motor control regions. During the MI task, participants of the neurofeedback group (NFB) received ongoing visual feedback representing the level of fMRI responses within their left PMC. Control (CTL) group participants were shown similar visual stimuli, but these were non-contingent on brain activity. Both groups showed equivalent levels of behavioral ratings on arousal and MI, before and during the fMRI protocol. In the NFB, but not in CLT group, brain activation during the last run compared to the first run revealed increased activation in the left PMC. In addition, the NFB group showed increased activation in motor control regions extending beyond the left PMC target area, including the supplementary motor area, basal ganglia and cerebellum. Moreover, in the last run, the NFB group showed stronger activation in the left PMC/inferior frontal gyrus when compared to the CTL group. Our results indicate that modulation of PMC and associated motor control areas can be achieved during a single neurofeedback-fMRI session. These results contribute to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of MI-based neurofeedback training, with direct implications for rehabilitation strategies in severe brain disorders, such as stroke. PMID:26733832

  5. pH-Responsive Theranostic Polymer-Caged Nanobins (PCNs): Enhanced Cytotoxicity and T1 MRI Contrast by Her2-Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Bong Jin; Swindell, Elden P.; MacRenaris, Keith W.; Hankins, Patrick L.; Chipre, Anthony J.; Mastarone, Daniel J.; Ahn, Richard W.; Meade, Thomas J.; O’Halloran, Thomas V.

    2014-01-01

    A PCN theranostic platform comprises a doxorubicin (DXR)-loaded liposomal core and an acid-sensitive polymer shell that is functionalized with Herceptin and GdIII-based MRI contrast agents. In vitro testing reveals a 14-fold increase in DXR-based cytotoxicity versus a non-targeted analogue and an 120-fold improvement in cellular GdIII–uptake in comparison with clinically approved DOTA-GdIII, leading to significant T1 MRI contrast enhancement. PMID:24516291

  6. Pretreatment Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Improves Prediction of Early Distant Metastases in Patients With Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Shy-Chyi; Lin, Chien-Yu; Huang, Bing-Shen; Tsang, Ngan-Ming; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Ku, Yi-Kang; Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Chan, Sheng-Chieh; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Li, Cheng-He; Tseng, Hsiao-Jung; Liao, Chun-Ta; Liu, Ho-Ling; Sung, Kyunghyun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The identification of early distant metastases (DM) in patients with newly diagnosed, previously untreated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) plays an important role in selecting the most appropriate treatment approach. Here, we sought to investigate the predictive value of distinct MRI parameters for the detection of early DM. Between November 2010 and June 2011, a total of 51 newly diagnosed NPC patients were included. All of the study participants were followed until December 2014 at a single institution after completion of therapy. DM was defined as early when they were detected on pretreatment FDG-PET scans or within 6 months after initial diagnosis. The following parameters were tested for their ability to predict early DM: pretreatment FDG-PET standardized uptake value (SUV), MRI-derived AJCC tumor staging, tumor volume, and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) values. The DCE-derived ve was defined as the volume fraction of the extravascular, extracellular space. Compared with patients without early DM, patients with early DM had higher SUV, tumor volume, DCE mean (median) ve, ve skewness, ve kurtosis, and the largest mean ve selected among sequential slices (P < 0.05). No differences were identified when early DM were defined only according to the results of pretreatment FDG-PET. Among different quantitative DCE parameters, the mean ve had the highest area under curve (AUC, 0.765). However, the AUCs of SUV, tumor volume, mean ve, ve skewness, ve kurtosis, or the largest mean ve selected among the sequential slices did not differ significantly from one another (P = 0.82). Taken together, our results suggest that DCE-derived ve may be a useful parameter in combination with SUV and tumor volume for predicting early DM. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI may be complementary to FDG-PET for selecting the most appropriate treatment approach in NPC patients. PMID:26871776

  7. A New Approach Using Manganese-Enhanced MRI to Diagnose Acute Mesenteric Ischemia in a Rabbit Model: Initial Experience

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Cheng; Kuang, Lian-qin; Zhang, Yu-long; Cheng, Hai-yun; Min, Jia-yan; Wang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) has been applied to a wide range of biological and disease research. The purpose of the study was to use MEMRI to diagnose the acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI). Methods. The institutional experimental animal ethics committee approved this study. To optimize the dose of Mn2+ infusion, a dose-dependent curve was obtained using Mn2+-enhanced T1 map MRI by an intravenous infusion 2.5–20 nmol/g body weight (BW) of 50 nmol/L MnCl2. The eighteen animals were divided into control, sham-operated, and AMI groups. AMI models were performed by ligating the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). T1 values were measured on T1 maps in regions of the small intestinal wall and relaxation rate (ΔR1) was calculated. Results. A nonlinear relationship between infused MnCl2 solution dose and increase in small intestinal wall ΔR1 was observed. Control animal exhibited significant Mn2+ clearance over time at the dose of 15 nmol/g BW. In the AMI model, ΔR1 values (0.95 ± 0.13) in the small intestinal wall were significantly lower than in control group (2.05 ± 0.19) after Mn2+ infusion (P < 0.01). Conclusion. The data suggest that MEMRI shows potential as a diagnostic technique that is directly sensitive to the poor or absent perfusion in AMI. PMID:26693487

  8. Added value of hepatobiliary phase gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI for diagnosing hepatocellular carcinoma in high-risk patients

    PubMed Central

    Phongkitkarun, Sith; Limsamutpetch, Kuruwin; Tannaphai, Penampai; Jatchavala, Janjira

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To determine the added value of hepatobiliary phase (HBP) gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in evaluating hepatic nodules in high-risk patients. METHODS: The institutional review board approved this retrospective study and waived the requirement for informed consent. This study included 100 patients at high risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and 105 hepatic nodules that were larger than 1 cm. A blind review of two MR image sets was performed in a random order: set 1, unenhanced (T1- and T2-weighted) and dynamic images; and set 2, unenhanced, dynamic 20-min and HBP images. The diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were compared for the two image sets. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed on the MR characteristics utilized to diagnose HCC. RESULTS: A total of 105 hepatic nodules were identified in 100 patients. Fifty-nine nodules were confirmed to be HCC. The diameter of the 59 HCCs ranged from 1 to 12 cm (mean: 1.9 cm). The remaining 46 nodules were benign (28 were of hepatocyte origin, nine were hepatic cysts, seven were hemangiomas, one was chronic inflammation, and one was focal fat infiltration). The diagnostic accuracy significantly increased with the addition of HBP images, from 88.7% in set 1 to 95.5% in set 2 (P = 0.002). In set 1 vs set 2, the sensitivity and NPV increased from 79.7% to 93.2% and from 78.9% to 91.8%, respectively, whereas the specificity and PPV were not significantly different. The hypointensity on the HBP images was the most sensitive (93.2%), and typical arterial enhancement followed by washout was the most specific (97.8%). The multivariate analysis revealed that typical arterial enhancement followed by washout, hyperintensity on T2-weighted images, and hypointensity on HBP images were statistically significant MRI findings that could diagnose HCC (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: The addition of HBP gadoxetic acid-enhanced

  9. Why a standard contrast-enhanced MRI might be useful in intracranial internal carotid artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Oeinck, Maximilian; Rozeik, Christoph; Wattchow, Jens; Meckel, Stephan; Schlageter, Manuel; Beeskow, Christel; Reinhard, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    In patients with ischemic stroke of unknown cause cerebral vasculitis is a rare but relevant differential diagnosis, especially when signs of intracranial artery stenosis are found and laboratory findings show systemic inflammation. In such cases, high-resolution T1w vessel wall magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; 'black blood' technique) at 3 T is preferentially performed, but may not be available in every hospital. We report a case of an 84-year-old man with right hemispheric transient ischemic attack and signs of distal occlusion in the right internal carotid artery (ICA) in duplex sonography. Standard MRI with contrast agent pointed the way to the correct diagnosis since it showed an intramural contrast uptake in the right ICA and both vertebral arteries. Temporal artery biopsy confirmed the suspected diagnosis of a giant cell arteritis and dedicated vessel wall MRI performed later supported the suspected intracranial large artery inflammation. Our case also shows that early diagnosis and immunosuppressive therapy may not always prevent disease progression, as our patient suffered several infarcts in the left middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory with consecutive high-grade hemiparesis of the right side within the following four months. PMID:26988083

  10. Head MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... the head; MRI - cranial; NMR - cranial; Cranial MRI; Brain MRI; MRI - brain; MRI - head ... tell your health care provider if you have: Brain aneurysm clips Certain types of artificial heart valves ...

  11. Intraoperative detection of glioma invasion beyond MRI enhancement with Raman spectroscopy in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jermyn, Michael; Mok, Kelvin; Mercier, Jeanne; Desroches, Joannie; Pichette, Julien; Saint-Arnaud, Karl; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Petrecca, Kevin; Leblond, Frédéric

    2015-03-01

    Cancer tissue is frequently impossible to distinguish from normal brain during surgery. Gliomas are a class of brain cancer which invade into the normal brain. If left unresected, these invasive cancer cells are the source of glioma recurrence. Moreover, these invasion areas do not show up on standard-of-care pre-operative Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). This inability to fully visualize invasive brain cancers results in subtotal surgical resections, negatively impacting patient survival. To address this issue, we have demonstrated the efficacy of single-point in vivo Raman spectroscopy using a contact hand-held fiber optic probe for rapid detection of cancer invasion in 8 patients with low and high grade gliomas. Using a supervised machine learning algorithm to analyze the Raman spectra obtained in vivo, we were able to distinguish normal brain from the presence of cancer cells with sensitivity and specificity greater than 90%. Moreover, by correlating these results with pre-operative MRI we demonstrate the ability to detect low density cancer invasion up to 1.5cm beyond the cancer extent visible using MRI. This represents the potential for significant improvements in progression-free and overall patient survival, by identifying previously undetectable residual cancer cell populations and preventing the resection of normal brain tissue. While the importance of maximizing the volume of tumor resection is important for all grades of gliomas, the impact for low grade gliomas can be dramatic because surgery can even be curative. This convenient technology can rapidly classify cancer invasion in real-time, making it ideal for intraoperative use in brain tumor resection.

  12. In-Vivo Imaging of Cell Migration Using Contrast Enhanced MRI and SVM Based Post-Processing

    PubMed Central

    Budinsky, Lubos; Fabry, Ben

    2015-01-01

    The migration of cells within a living organism can be observed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in combination with iron oxide nanoparticles as an intracellular contrast agent. This method, however, suffers from low sensitivity and specificty. Here, we developed a quantitative non-invasive in-vivo cell localization method using contrast enhanced multiparametric MRI and support vector machines (SVM) based post-processing. Imaging phantoms consisting of agarose with compartments containing different concentrations of cancer cells labeled with iron oxide nanoparticles were used to train and evaluate the SVM for cell localization. From the magnitude and phase data acquired with a series of T2*-weighted gradient-echo scans at different echo-times, we extracted features that are characteristic for the presence of superparamagnetic nanoparticles, in particular hyper- and hypointensities, relaxation rates, short-range phase perturbations, and perturbation dynamics. High detection quality was achieved by SVM analysis of the multiparametric feature-space. The in-vivo applicability was validated in animal studies. The SVM detected the presence of iron oxide nanoparticles in the imaging phantoms with high specificity and sensitivity with a detection limit of 30 labeled cells per mm3, corresponding to 19 μM of iron oxide. As proof-of-concept, we applied the method to follow the migration of labeled cancer cells injected in rats. The combination of iron oxide labeled cells, multiparametric MRI and a SVM based post processing provides high spatial resolution, specificity, and sensitivity, and is therefore suitable for non-invasive in-vivo cell detection and cell migration studies over prolonged time periods. PMID:26656497

  13. Preoperative Gadoxetic Acid-Enhanced MRI and Simultaneous Treatment of Early Hepatocellular Carcinoma Prolonged Recurrence-Free Survival of Progressed Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients after Hepatic Resection

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Masanori; Ichikawa, Tomoaki; Amemiya, Hidetake; Maki, Akira; Watanabe, Mitsuaki; Kawaida, Hiromichi; Kono, Hiroshi; Sano, Katsuhiro; Motosugi, Utaroh; Fujii, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Background/Purpose. The purpose of this study was to clarify whether preoperative gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (EOB-MRI) and simultaneous treatment of suspected early hepatocellular carcinoma (eHCC) at the time of resection for progressed HCC affected patient prognosis following hepatic resection. Methods. A total of 147 consecutive patients who underwent their first curative hepatic resection for progressed HCC were enrolled. Of these, 77 patients underwent EOB-MRI (EOB-MRI (+)) before hepatic resection and the remaining 70 patients did not (EOB-MRI (−)). Suspected eHCCs detected by preoperative imaging were resected or ablated at the time of resection for progressed HCC. Results. The number of patients who underwent treatment for eHCCs was significantly higher in the EOB-MRI (+) than in the EOB-MRI (−) (17 versus 6; P = 0.04). Recurrence-free survival (1-, 3-, and 5-year; 81.4, 62.6, 48.7% versus 82.1, 41.5, 25.5%, resp., P < 0.01), but not overall survival (1-, 3-, and 5-year; 98.7, 90.7, 80.8% versus 97.0, 86.3, 72.4%, resp., P = 0.38), was significantly better in the EOB-MRI (+). Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that preoperative EOB-MRI was one of the independent factors significantly correlated with better recurrence-free survival. Conclusions. Preoperative EOB-MRI and simultaneous treatment of eHCC prolonged recurrence-free survival after hepatic resection. PMID:24701029

  14. Overhauser Magnetometers Development and Some Magnetic Field Variation and Long-wave Seismic Synchronous Registration Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusonsky, O.; Sapunov, V.; Denisova, O.

    Creation experience and advantages of the cyclic Overhauser magnetometers with double polarization by magnetostatic and high-frequency magnetic fields (DC-HF OVH magnetometers) are discussed for some geophysical tasks. In particular, DC- HF OVH method provides: · The high sensitivity (0.01-0.05nT) is achievable even for the bottom geomagnetic field range (10000-40000nT), is due to the simple ESR-structure of the radical in bias DC field, and that is especially useful for applications in equatorial conditions an d space. · The record gradient tolerance (up to 40000 nT/m) useful for borehole applications is reached, that is caused by an opportunity of adaptive reduction of the proton precession signal time registration. · The high-sensitivity registration of magnetic field variations up to 0.001 nT at rate about 10 seconds and high stability (0.05 nT/year), and absolute (up to 0.1 nT) measurements are possible that is useful at ground seismic researches. Addressing this last advantage of DC-HF OVH magnetometer, the magnetic field variation and long-wave seismic synchronous investigations at the Ural magnetic observatory ARTY has been made. Magnetometer POS-1 and digital seismic station IRIS/IDA recording elastic fluctuation from 0,1 up to 1000 sec and more duration were used. The observable correlation of elastic waves and geomagnetic variations, and also superlong-wave emission can testify that the Earth crust has high strain -sensing characteristics where supervision was carried out. The latter is peculiar to lithospher ic areas at astable condition near to a destruction barrier.

  15. Statistical mapping of sound-evoked activity in the mouse auditory midbrain using Mn-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xin; Zou, Jing; Babb, James S; Johnson, Glyn; Sanes, Dan H; Turnbull, Daniel H

    2008-01-01

    Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) has been developed to image brain activity in small animals, including normal and genetically modified mice. Here, we report the use of a MEMRI-based statistical parametric mapping method to analyze sound-evoked activity in the mouse auditory midbrain, the inferior colliculus (IC). Acoustic stimuli with defined frequency and amplitude components were shown to activate and enhance neuronal ensembles in the IC. These IC activity patterns were analyzed quantitatively using voxel-based statistical comparisons between groups of mice with or without sound stimulation. Repetitive 40-kHz pure tone stimulation significantly enhanced ventral IC regions, which was confirmed in the statistical maps showing active regions whose volumes increased in direct proportion to the amplitude of the sound stimuli (65 dB, 77 dB, and 89 dB peak sound pressure level). The peak values of the activity-dependent MEMRI signal enhancement also increased from 7% to 20% for the sound amplitudes employed. These results demonstrate that MEMRI statistical mapping can be used to analyze both the 3D spatial patterns and the magnitude of activity evoked by sound stimuli carrying different energy. This represents a significant advance in the development of MEMRI for quantitative and unbiased analysis of brain function in the deep brain nuclei of mice. PMID:17919926

  16. Ferritin Enhances SPIO Tracking of C6 Rat Glioma Cells by MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiandong; Xie, Jin; Zhou, Xiaojun; Cheng, Zhen; Gu, Ning; Teng, Gaojun; Hu, Qiujue; Zhu, Feipeng; Chang, Shuanghui; Zhang, Fan; Lu, Guangming; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effect of ferritin protein overexpression on superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particle labeling of C6 rat glioma cells, and track the labeled cells in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and Methods A plasmid of H-chain of murine ferritin gene was constructed and transfected into C6 cells. The parental and the transfected C6 cells labeled with SPIO were bilaterally inoculated subcutaneously into nude mice. The mice were imaged by multiple T2-weighted MR scans after C6 cell inoculation. The mice were killed 2 weeks later, and the concentration of iron in the tumor tissue was measured by inductively coupled plasma. Results The iron concentration in xenografts derived from SPIO-labeled C6 cells that were transfected with ferritin plasmid was significantly higher than that in xenografts from parental C6 cells that were labeled with SPIO but not transfected (p=0.034, N=5). Ferritin-transfected C6 cells showed an improved T2 contrast in vivo compared with parental cells labeled with SPIO but not transfected. Conclusion Coordinating ferritin with SPIO can lead to a longer MRI cellular tracking period. PMID:20440566

  17. Automated scoring of regional lung perfusion in children from contrast enhanced 3D MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, Tobias; Eichinger, Monika; Bauman, Grzegorz; Bischoff, Arved; Puderbach, Michael; Meinzer, Hans-Peter

    2012-03-01

    MRI perfusion images give information about regional lung function and can be used to detect pulmonary pathologies in cystic fibrosis (CF) children. However, manual assessment of the percentage of pathologic tissue in defined lung subvolumes features large inter- and intra-observer variation, making it difficult to determine disease progression consistently. We present an automated method to calculate a regional score for this purpose. First, lungs are located based on thresholding and morphological operations. Second, statistical shape models of left and right children's lungs are initialized at the determined locations and used to precisely segment morphological images. Segmentation results are transferred to perfusion maps and employed as masks to calculate perfusion statistics. An automated threshold to determine pathologic tissue is calculated and used to determine accurate regional scores. We evaluated the method on 10 MRI images and achieved an average surface distance of less than 1.5 mm compared to manual reference segmentations. Pathologic tissue was detected correctly in 9 cases. The approach seems suitable for detecting early signs of CF and monitoring response to therapy.

  18. Pilot study of non-contrast-enhanced MRI vs. ultrasound in renal transplant recipients with acquired cystic kidney disease: a prospective intra-individual comparison.

    PubMed

    Mühlfeld, Anja S; Lange, Christian; Kroll, Gisela; Floege, Jürgen; Krombach, Gabriele A; Kuhl, Christiane; Eitner, Frank; Schrading, Simone

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) after kidney transplantation is 15-fold increased. Acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD) is one of the known risk factors. We performed a small pilot study to assess the role of non-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a tool for intensified screening in renal transplant recipients with ACKD. Renal ultrasound was used to assess the native kidneys of 215 renal transplant recipients. Thirty patients with 54 kidneys, fulfilling the criteria of ACKD, underwent non-enhanced MRI at 1.5T using T2- and T1-weighed as well as diffusion-weighted sequences with a high spatial resolution. Among the 54 kidneys assessed by both methods, three RCCs were identified (6%). Of those, one RCC was detected by both imaging methods (33%), while two RCCs were diagnosed by MRI alone (67%). MRI identified an additional four proteinaceous or hemorrhagic cysts that did not fulfill the criteria for RCC but were classified as suspicious. All of these lesions were stable in size and appearance in follow-up studies. In conclusion, non-enhanced MRI was more sensitive than ultrasound in identifying RCCs and lesions suspicious for RCC and thus appears to be a useful secondary screening tool in patients with ACKD after renal transplantation. PMID:24118352

  19. Spinal Nerve Root Enhancement on MRI Scans in Children: A Review.

    PubMed

    Kontzialis, Marinos; Poretti, Andrea; Michell, Hans; Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Tekes, Aylin; Huisman, Thierry A G M

    2016-01-01

    Spinal nerve root enhancement in pediatric patients is generally nonspecific, and clinical and laboratory correlation is essential. Nerve root enhancement indicates lack of integrity of the blood-nerve barrier. In this review, we will present a range of pediatric conditions that can present with spinal nerve root enhancement including inflammatory, infectious, hereditary, and neoplastic causes. Familiarity with the various pathologic entities associated with spinal nerve root enhancement is important for a concise differential diagnosis in the appropriate clinical setting. This will avoid unnecessary additional investigations. PMID:26365273

  20. Functional Lung MRI in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Comparison of T1 Mapping, Oxygen-Enhanced T1 Mapping and Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Jobst, Bertram J.; Triphan, Simon M. F.; Sedlaczek, Oliver; Anjorin, Angela; Kauczor, Hans Ulrich; Biederer, Jürgen; Ley-Zaporozhan, Julia; Ley, Sebastian; Wielpütz, Mark O.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Monitoring of regional lung function in interventional COPD trials requires alternative endpoints beyond global parameters such as FEV1. T1 relaxation times of the lung might allow to draw conclusions on tissue composition, blood volume and oxygen fraction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential value of lung Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with native and oxygen-enhanced T1 mapping for the assessment of COPD patients in comparison with contrast enhanced perfusion MRI. Materials and Methods 20 COPD patients (GOLD I-IV) underwent a coronal 2-dimensional inversion recovery snapshot flash sequence (8 slices/lung) at room air and during inhalation of pure oxygen, as well as dynamic contrast-enhanced first-pass perfusion imaging. Regional distribution of T1 at room air (T1), oxygen-induced T1 shortening (ΔT1) and peak enhancement were rated by 2 chest radiologists in consensus using a semi-quantitative 3-point scale in a zone-based approach. Results Abnormal T1 and ΔT1 were highly prevalent in the patient cohort. T1 and ΔT1 correlated positively with perfusion abnormalities (r = 0.81 and r = 0.80; p&0.001), and with each other (r = 0.80; p<0.001). In GOLD stages I and II ΔT1 was normal in 16/29 lung zones with mildly abnormal perfusion (15/16 with abnormal T1). The extent of T1 (r = 0.45; p<0.05), ΔT1 (r = 0.52; p<0.05) and perfusion abnormalities (r = 0.52; p<0.05) showed a moderate correlation with GOLD stage. Conclusion Native and oxygen-enhanced T1 mapping correlated with lung perfusion deficits and severity of COPD. Under the assumption that T1 at room air correlates with the regional pulmonary blood pool and that oxygen-enhanced T1 reflects lung ventilation, both techniques in combination are principally suitable to characterize ventilation-perfusion imbalance. This appears valuable for the assessment of regional lung characteristics in COPD trials without administration of i.v. contrast. PMID:25822195

  1. Joint estimation of shape and deformation for the detection of lesions in dynamic contrast-enhanced breast MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Byung-Woo

    2013-11-01

    We propose a mathematical framework for simultaneously delineating the boundary of object and estimating its temporal motion in the application of lesion detection in a dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) breast MRI sequence where both the appearance and the shape of region of interest is assumed to change in time. A unified energy functional for a joint segmentation and registration is proposed based on the assumption that the statistical properties of dynamic intensity curves within a region of interest are homogeneous. Our algorithm is designed to provide the morphological properties of the enhanced region and its dynamic intensity profiles, called kinetic signatures, in the analysis of DCE imagery since these features are considered as significant cues in understanding images. The proposed energy comprises a combination of a segmentation energy and a registration energy. The segmentation energy is developed based on a convex formulation being insensitive to the initialization. The registration energy is designed to compensate motion artifacts that are usually involved in the temporal imaging procedure. The major objective of this work is to provide a mathematical framework for a joint segmentation and registration on a dynamic sequence of images, and we demonstrate the mutual benefit of the estimation of temporal deformations for the registration step and the localization of regions of interest for the segmentation step. The effectiveness of the developed algorithm has been demonstrated on a number of clinical DCE breast MRI data in the application of breast lesion detection and the results show its potential to improve the accuracy and the efficiency in the diagnosis of breast cancer.

  2. Joint estimation of shape and deformation for the detection of lesions in dynamic contrast-enhanced breast MRI.

    PubMed

    Hong, Byung-Woo

    2013-11-01

    We propose a mathematical framework for simultaneously delineating the boundary of object and estimating its temporal motion in the application of lesion detection in a dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) breast MRI sequence where both the appearance and the shape of region of interest is assumed to change in time. A unified energy functional for a joint segmentation and registration is proposed based on the assumption that the statistical properties of dynamic intensity curves within a region of interest are homogeneous. Our algorithm is designed to provide the morphological properties of the enhanced region and its dynamic intensity profiles, called kinetic signatures, in the analysis of DCE imagery since these features are considered as significant cues in understanding images. The proposed energy comprises a combination of a segmentation energy and a registration energy. The segmentation energy is developed based on a convex formulation being insensitive to the initialization. The registration energy is designed to compensate motion artifacts that are usually involved in the temporal imaging procedure. The major objective of this work is to provide a mathematical framework for a joint segmentation and registration on a dynamic sequence of images, and we demonstrate the mutual benefit of the estimation of temporal deformations for the registration step and the localization of regions of interest for the segmentation step. The effectiveness of the developed algorithm has been demonstrated on a number of clinical DCE breast MRI data in the application of breast lesion detection and the results show its potential to improve the accuracy and the efficiency in the diagnosis of breast cancer. PMID:24140912

  3. Assessment of metastatic liver disease in patients with primary extrahepatic tumors by contrast-enhanced sonography versus CT and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Christoph F; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Strobel, Deike; Danse, Etienne; Fessl, Robert; Bunk, Alfred; Vossas, Udo; Hauenstein, Karlheinz; Koch, Wilhelm; Blank, Wolfgang; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Hahn, Dietbert; Greis, Christian

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) using SonoVue® in the detection of liver metastases in patients with known extrahepatic primary tumors versus the combined gold standard comprising CT, MRI and clinical/histological data. METHODS: It is an international multicenter study, and there were 12 centres and 125 patients (64 males, 61 females, aged 59 ± 11 years) involved, with 102 patients per protocol. Primary tumors were colorectal in 35 %, breast in 27 %, pancreatic in 17 % and others in 21 %. CEUS using SonoVue® was employed with a low-mechanical-index technique and contrast-specific software using Siemens Elegra, Philips HDI 5000 and Acuson Sequoia; continuous scanning for at least five minutes. RESULTS: CEUS with SonoVue® increased significantly the number of focal liver lesions detected versus unenhanced sonography. In 31.4 % of the patients, more lesions were found after contrast enhancement. The total numbers of lesions detected were comparable with CEUS (55), triple-phase spiral CT (61) and MRI with a liver-specific contrast agent (53). Accuracy of detection of metastatic disease (i.e. at least one metastatic lesion) was significantly higher for CEUS (91.2 %) than for unenhanced sonography (81.4 %) and was similar to that of triple-phase spiral CT (89.2 %). In 53 patients whose CEUS examination was negative, a follow-up examination 3-6 mo later confirmed the absence of metastatic lesions in 50 patients (94.4 %). CONCLUSION: CEUS is proved to be reliable in the detection of liver metastases in patients with known extrahepatic primary tumors and suspected liver lesions. PMID:16586537

  4. Improved fuzzy clustering algorithms in segmentation of DC-enhanced breast MRI.

    PubMed

    Kannan, S R; Ramathilagam, S; Devi, Pandiyarajan; Sathya, A

    2012-02-01

    Segmentation of medical images is a difficult and challenging problem due to poor image contrast and artifacts that result in missing or diffuse organ/tissue boundaries. Many researchers have applied various techniques however fuzzy c-means (FCM) based algorithms is more effective compared to other methods. The objective of this work is to develop some robust fuzzy clustering segmentation systems for effective segmentation of DCE - breast MRI. This paper obtains the robust fuzzy clustering algorithms by incorporating kernel methods, penalty terms, tolerance of the neighborhood attraction, additional entropy term and fuzzy parameters. The initial centers are obtained using initialization algorithm to reduce the computation complexity and running time of proposed algorithms. Experimental works on breast images show that the proposed algorithms are effective to improve the similarity measurement, to handle large amount of noise, to have better results in dealing the data corrupted by noise, and other artifacts. The clustering results of proposed methods are validated using Silhouette Method. PMID:20703716

  5. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and CT provide comparable measurement of blood-brain barrier permeability in a rodent stroke model.

    PubMed

    Merali, Zamir; Wong, Teser; Leung, Jackie; Gao, Meah MingYang; Mikulis, David; Kassner, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    In the current management of acute ischemic stroke (AIS), clinical criteria are used to estimate the risk of hemorrhagic transformation (HT), which is a devastating early complication. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and computed tomography (DCE-CT) may serve as physiologically-based decision making tools to more reliably assess the risk of HT. Before these tools can be properly validated, the comparability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability measurements they generate should be assessed. Sixteen rats were subjected to a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion before successively undergoing DCE-CT and DCE-MRI at 24-hours. BBB permeability (K(trans)) values were generated from both modalities. A correlation of R=0.677 was found (p<0.01) and the resulting relationship was [DCE-CT=(0.610*DCE-MRI)+4.140]. A variance components analysis found the intra-rat coefficient of variation to be 0.384 and 0.258 for K(trans) values from DCE-MRI and DCE-CT respectively. Permeability measures from DCE-CT were 22% higher than those from DCE-MRI. The results of this study demonstrate for the first time comparability between DCE-CT and DCE-MRI in the assessment of AIS. These results may provide a foundation for future clinical trials making combined use of these modalities. PMID:26117703

  6. Hydrothermally synthesized PEGylated calcium phosphate nanoparticles incorporating Gd-DTPA for contrast enhanced MRI diagnosis of solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Mi, Peng; Kokuryo, Daisuke; Cabral, Horacio; Kumagai, Michiaki; Nomoto, Takahiro; Aoki, Ichio; Terada, Yasuko; Kishimura, Akihiro; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2014-01-28

    Organic-inorganic hybrid nanoparticles with calcium phosphate (CaP) core and PEGylated shell were developed to incorporate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid gadolinium (III) (Gd-DTPA) for noninvasive diagnosis of solid tumors. A two-step preparation method was applied to elaborate hybrid nanoparticles with a z-average hydrodynamic diameter about 80nm, neutral surface ξ-potential and high colloidal stability in physiological environments by self-assembly of poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(aspartic acid) block copolymer, Gd-DTPA, and CaP in aqueous solution, followed with hydrothermal treatment. Incorporation into the hybrid nanoparticles allowed Gd-DTPA to show significant enhanced retention ratio in blood circulation, leading to high accumulation in tumor positions due to enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. Moreover, Gd-DTPA revealed above 6 times increase of relaxivity in the nanoparticle system compared to free form, and eventually, selective and elevated contrast enhancements in the tumor positions were observed. These results indicate the high potential of Gd-DTPA-loaded PEGylated CaP nanoparticles as a novel contrast agent for noninvasive cancer diagnosis. PMID:24211705

  7. Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced 3.0-Tesla MRI findings for the preoperative detection of focal liver lesions: Comparison with iodine-enhanced multi-detector computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyong-Hu; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Im, In-Chul; Lee, Jae-Seung; Kim, Moon-Jib; Kwak, Byung-Joon; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Dong, Kyung-Rae

    2012-12-01

    The safety of gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic-acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA) has been confirmed, but more study is needed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) for whom surgical treatment is considered or with a metastatic hepatoma. Research is also needed to examine the rate of detection of hepatic lesions compared to multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT), which is used most frequently to localize and characterize a HCC. Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI and iodine-enhanced MDCT imaging were compared for the preoperative detection of focal liver lesions. The clinical usefulness of each method was examined. The current study enrolled 79 patients with focal liver lesions who preoperatively underwent MRI and MDCT. In these patients, there was less than one month between the two diagnostic modalities. Imaging data were taken before and after contrast enhancement in both methods. To evaluate the images, we analyzed the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the lesions and the liver parenchyma. To compare the sensitivity of the two methods, we performed a quantitative analysis of the percentage signal intensity of the liver (PSIL) on a high resolution picture archiving and communication system (PACS) monitor (paired-samples t-test, p < 0.05). The enhancement was evaluated based on a consensus of four observers. The enhancement pattern and the morphological features during the arterial and the delayed phases were correlated between the Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI findings and the iodine-enhanced MDCT by using an adjusted x2 test. The SNRs, CNRs, and PSIL all had a greater detection rate in Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced MRI than in iodine-enhanced MDCT. Hepatocyte-selective uptake was observed 20 minutes after the injection in the focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH, 9/9), adenoma (9/10), and highly-differentiated HCC (grade G1, 27/30). Rim

  8. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Using a Macromolecular MR Contrast Agent (P792): Evaluation of Antivascular Drug Effect in a Rabbit VX2 Liver Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee Sun; Lee, Jeong Min; Kim, Young Il; Woo, Sungmin; Yoon, Jung Hwan; Choi, Jin-Young; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the utility of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) using macromolecular contrast agent (P792) for assessment of vascular disrupting drug effect in rabbit VX2 liver tumor models. Materials and Methods This study was approved by our Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. DCE-MRI was performed with 3-T scanner in 13 VX2 liver tumor-bearing rabbits, before, 4 hours after, and 24 hours after administration of vascular disrupting agent (VDA), using gadomelitol (P792, n = 7) or low molecular weight contrast agent (gadoterate meglumine [Gd-DOTA], n = 6). P792 was injected at a of dose 0.05 mmol/kg, while that of Gd-DOTA was 0.2 mmol/kg. DCE-MRI parameters including volume transfer coefficient (Ktrans) and initial area under the gadolinium concentration-time curve until 60 seconds (iAUC) of tumors were compared between the 2 groups at each time point. DCE-MRI parameters were correlated with tumor histopathology. Reproducibility in measurement of DCE-MRI parameters and image quality of source MR were compared between groups. Results P792 group showed a more prominent decrease in Ktrans and iAUC at 4 hours and 24 hours, as compared to the Gd-DOTA group. Changes in DCE-MRI parameters showed a weak correlation with histologic parameters (necrotic fraction and microvessel density) in both groups. Reproducibility of DCE-MRI parameters and overall image quality was not significantly better in the P792 group, as compared to the Gd-DOTA group. Conclusion Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging using a macromolecular contrast agent shows changes of hepatic perfusion more clearly after administration of the VDA. Gadolinium was required at smaller doses than a low molecular contrast agent. PMID:26357497

  9. Additional Value of Diffusion-weighted MRI to Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced Hepatic MRI for the Detection of Liver Metastasis: the Difference Depending on the Experience of the Radiologists.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Wataru; Nakamura, Yuko; Higaki, Toru; Tatsugami, Fuminari; Iida, Makoto; Awai, Kazuo

    2015-06-01

    This retrospective study was to investigate whether adding diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI (EOB-MRI) improved the detection of liver metastasis in radiology resident and board-certified radiologist groups. It was approved by our institutional review board. We selected 18 patients with 35 liver metastases and 12 patients without liver tumors. Five board-certified radiologists and 5 radiology residents participated in the observer performance study. Each observer first interpreted T1- and T2-weighted-, plain-, arterial phase-, and hepatobiliary phase images and specified the location of the liver metastases. The software subsequently displayed the DWI images simultaneously and all participants repeated the reading. We used Jackknife alternative free-response receiver operating characteristic (JAFROC) analysis to compare the observer performance in detecting liver metastases. The mean values for the area under the curve (AUC) for EOB-MRI without and with DWI were 0.78 ± 0.13 [standard deviation: SD] and 0.87 ± 0.09, respectively, for the radiology residents, and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.045). For the board- certified radiologists these values were 0.92 ± 0.02 and 0.96 ± 0.01, respectively, and the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.092). EOB-MRI with DWI significantly improved the performance of radiology residents in the identification of liver metastases. PMID:26211220

  10. SU-D-303-03: Impact of Uncertainty in T1 Measurements On Quantification of Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Aryal, M; Cao, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Quantification of dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI requires native longitudinal relaxation time (T1) measurement. This study aimed to assess uncertainty in T1 measurements using two different methods. Methods and Materials: Brain MRI scans were performed on a 3T scanner in 9 patients who had low grade/benign tumors and partial brain radiotherapy without chemotherapy at pre-RT, week-3 during RT (wk-3), end-RT, and 1, 6 and 18 months after RT. T1-weighted images were acquired using gradient echo sequences with 1) 2 different flip angles (50 and 150), and 2) 5 variable TRs (100–2000ms). After creating quantitative T1 maps, average T1 was calculated in regions of interest (ROI), which were distant from tumors and received a total of accumulated radiation doses < 5 Gy at wk-3. ROIs included left and right normal Putamen and Thalamus (gray matter: GM), and frontal and parietal white matter (WM). Since there were no significant or even a trend of T1 changes from pre-RT to wk-3 in these ROIs, a relative repeatability coefficient (RC) of T1 as a measure of uncertainty was estimated in each ROI using the data pre-RT and at wk-3. The individual T1 changes at later time points were evaluated compared to the estimated RCs. Results: The 2-flip angle method produced small RCs in GM (9.7–11.7%) but large RCs in WM (12.2–13.6%) compared to the saturation-recovery (SR) method (11.0–17.7% for GM and 7.5–11.2% for WM). More than 81% of individual T1 changes were within T1 uncertainty ranges defined by RCs. Conclusion: Our study suggests that the impact of T1 uncertainty on physiological parameters derived from DCE MRI is not negligible. A short scan with 2 flip angles is able to achieve repeatability of T1 estimates similar to a long scan with 5 different TRs, and is desirable to be integrated in the DCE protocol. Present study was supported by National Institute of Health (NIH) under grant numbers; UO1 CA183848 and RO1 NS064973.

  11. Quantification of fibrosis in infarcted swine hearts by ex vivo late gadolinium-enhancement and diffusion-weighted MRI methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, Mihaela; Ghugre, Nilesh R.; Ramanan, Venkat; Morikawa, Lily; Stanisz, Greg; Dick, Alexander J.; Wright, Graham A.

    2013-08-01

    Many have speculated that MRI signal characteristics can be used to identify regions of heterogeneous infarct associated with an arrhythmogenic substrate; however, direct evidence of this relationship is limited. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the remodelling characteristics of fibrosis by means of histology and high-resolution MR imaging. For this purpose, we performed whole-mount histology in heart samples (n = 9) collected from five swine at six weeks post-infarction and compared the extent of fibrosis in the infarcted areas delineated in these histological images with that obtained ex vivo by MRI using late gadolinium-enhancement (LGE) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) methods. All MR images were obtained at a submillimetre resolution (i.e., voxel size of 0.6×0.6×1.2 mm3). Specifically, in the histology images, we differentiated moderate fibrosis (consisting of a mixture of viable and non-viable myocytes, known as border zone, BZ) from severe fibrosis (i.e., the dense scar). Correspondingly, tissue heterogeneities in the MR images were categorized by a Gaussian mixture model into healthy, BZ and scar. Our results showed that (a) both MRI methods were capable of qualitatively distinguishing sharp edges between dense scar and healthy tissue from regions of heterogeneous BZ; (b) the BZ and dense scar areas had intermediate-to-high increased values of signal intensity in the LGE images and of apparent diffusion coefficient in the DWI, respectively. In addition, as demonstrated by the Picrosirius Red and immunohistochemistry stains, the viable bundles in the BZ were clearly separated by thin collagen strands and had reduced expression of Cx43, whereas the core scar was composed of dense fibrosis. A quantitative analysis demonstrated that the comparison between BZ/scar extent in LGE and DWI to the corresponding areas identified in histology yielded very good correlations (i.e., for the scar identified by LGE, R2 was 0.96 compared to R2 = 0.93 for the

  12. Quality assurance in MRI breast screening: comparing signal-to-noise ratio in dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging protocols.

    PubMed

    Kousi, Evanthia; Borri, Marco; Dean, Jamie; Panek, Rafal; Scurr, Erica; Leach, Martin O; Schmidt, Maria A

    2016-01-01

    MRI has been extensively used in breast cancer staging, management and high risk screening. Detection sensitivity is paramount in breast screening, but variations of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as a function of position are often overlooked. We propose and demonstrate practical methods to assess spatial SNR variations in dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) breast examinations and apply those methods to different protocols and systems. Four different protocols in three different MRI systems (1.5 and 3.0 T) with receiver coils of different design were employed on oil-filled test objects with and without uniformity filters. Twenty 3D datasets were acquired with each protocol; each dataset was acquired in under 60 s, thus complying with current breast DCE guidelines. In addition to the standard SNR calculated on a pixel-by-pixel basis, we propose other regional indices considering the mean and standard deviation of the signal over a small sub-region centred on each pixel. These regional indices include effects of the spatial variation of coil sensitivity and other structured artefacts. The proposed regional SNR indices demonstrate spatial variations in SNR as well as the presence of artefacts and sensitivity variations, which are otherwise difficult to quantify and might be overlooked in a clinical setting. Spatial variations in SNR depend on protocol choice and hardware characteristics. The use of uniformity filters was shown to lead to a rise of SNR values, altering the noise distribution. Correlation between noise in adjacent pixels was associated with data truncation along the phase encoding direction. Methods to characterise spatial SNR variations using regional information were demonstrated, with implications for quality assurance in breast screening and multi-centre trials. PMID:26605957

  13. In Vivo Mn-Enhanced MRI for Early Tumor Detection and Growth Rate Analysis in a Mouse Medulloblastoma Model12

    PubMed Central

    Suero-Abreu, Giselle A.; Praveen Raju, G.; Aristizábal, Orlando; Volkova, Eugenia; Wojcinski, Alexandre; Houston, Edward J.; Pham, Diane; Szulc, Kamila U.; Colon, Daniel; Joyner, Alexandra L.; Turnbull, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    Mouse models have increased our understanding of the pathogenesis of medulloblastoma (MB), the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor that often forms in the cerebellum. A major goal of ongoing research is to better understand the early stages of tumorigenesis and to establish the genetic and environmental changes that underlie MB initiation and growth. However, studies of MB progression in mouse models are difficult due to the heterogeneity of tumor onset times and growth patterns and the lack of clinical symptoms at early stages. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is critical for noninvasive, longitudinal, three-dimensional (3D) brain tumor imaging in the clinic but is limited in resolution and sensitivity for imaging early MBs in mice. In this study, high-resolution (100 μm in 2 hours) and high-throughput (150 μm in 15 minutes) manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) protocols were optimized for early detection and monitoring of MBs in a Patched-1 (Ptch1) conditional knockout (CKO) model. The high tissue contrast obtained with MEMRI revealed detailed cerebellar morphology and enabled detection of MBs over a wide range of stages including pretumoral lesions as early as 2 to 3 weeks postnatal with volumes close to 0.1 mm3. Furthermore, longitudinal MEMRI allowed noninvasive monitoring of tumors and demonstrated that lesions within and between individuals have different tumorigenic potentials. 3D volumetric studies allowed quantitative analysis of MB tumor morphology and growth rates in individual Ptch1-CKO mice. These results show that MEMRI provides a powerful method for early in vivo detection and longitudinal imaging of MB progression in the mouse brain. PMID:25499213

  14. Quality assurance in MRI breast screening: comparing signal-to-noise ratio in dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kousi, Evanthia; Borri, Marco; Dean, Jamie; Panek, Rafal; Scurr, Erica; Leach, Martin O.; Schmidt, Maria A.

    2016-01-01

    MRI has been extensively used in breast cancer staging, management and high risk screening. Detection sensitivity is paramount in breast screening, but variations of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as a function of position are often overlooked. We propose and demonstrate practical methods to assess spatial SNR variations in dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) breast examinations and apply those methods to different protocols and systems. Four different protocols in three different MRI systems (1.5 and 3.0 T) with receiver coils of different design were employed on oil-filled test objects with and without uniformity filters. Twenty 3D datasets were acquired with each protocol; each dataset was acquired in under 60 s, thus complying with current breast DCE guidelines. In addition to the standard SNR calculated on a pixel-by-pixel basis, we propose other regional indices considering the mean and standard deviation of the signal over a small sub-region centred on each pixel. These regional indices include effects of the spatial variation of coil sensitivity and other structured artefacts. The proposed regional SNR indices demonstrate spatial variations in SNR as well as the presence of artefacts and sensitivity variations, which are otherwise difficult to quantify and might be overlooked in a clinical setting. Spatial variations in SNR depend on protocol choice and hardware characteristics. The use of uniformity filters was shown to lead to a rise of SNR values, altering the noise distribution. Correlation between noise in adjacent pixels was associated with data truncation along the phase encoding direction. Methods to characterise spatial SNR variations using regional information were demonstrated, with implications for quality assurance in breast screening and multi-centre trials.

  15. Value of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI to Detect Local Tumor Recurrence in Primary Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young Jun; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Sung, Yu Sub; Yoon, Ra Gyoung; Park, Ji Eun; Nam, Soon Yuhl; Baek, Jung Hwan

    2016-05-01

    Treatment failures in head and neck cancer patients are mainly related to locoregional tumor recurrence. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of model-free dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) to detect local recurrence during the surveillance of head and neck cancer patients.Our retrospective study enrolled 24 patients with primary head and neck cancer who had undergone definitive treatment. Patients were grouped into local recurrence (n = 12) or posttreatment change (n = 12) groups according to the results of biopsy or clinicoradiologic follow-up. The types of time-signal intensity (TSI) curves were classified as follows: "progressive increment" as type I, "plateau" as type II, and "washout" as type III. TSI curve types and their parameters (i.e., wash-in, Emax, Tmax, area under the curve [AUC]60, AUC90, and AUC120) were compared between the 2 study groups.The distributions of TSI curve types for local recurrence versus posttreatment change were statistically significant (P < 0.001) (i.e., 0% vs 83.3% for type I, 58.3% vs 16.7% for type II, and 41.7% vs 0% for type III). There were statistically significant differences in Emax, Tmax, and all of the AUC parameters between 2 groups (P < 0.0083 [0.05/6]). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses indicated that the TSI curve type was the best predictor of local recurrence with a sensitivity of 100% (95% CI, 73.5-100.0) and a specificity of 83.3% (95% CI, 51.6-97.9) (cutoff with type II).Model-free DCE-MRI using TSI curves and TSI curve-derived parameters detects local recurrence in head and neck cancer patients with a high diagnostic accuracy. PMID:27175712

  16. Novel Platform for MRI-Guided Convection-Enhanced Delivery of Therapeutics: Preclinical Validation in Nonhuman Primate Brain

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, R. Mark; Kells, Adrian P.; Martin, Alastair J.; Larson, Paul S.; Starr, Philip A.; Piferi, Peter G.; Bates, Geoffrey; Tansey, Lisa; Rosenbluth, Kathryn H.; Bringas, John R.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Bankiewicz, Krystof S.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims A skull-mounted aiming device and integrated software platform has been developed for MRI-guided neurological interventions. In anticipation of upcoming gene therapy clinical trials, we adapted this device for real-time convection-enhanced delivery of therapeutics via a custom-designed infusion cannula. The targeting accuracy of this delivery system and the performance of the infusion cannula were validated in nonhuman primates. Methods Infusions of gadoteridol were delivered to multiple brain targets and the targeting error was determined for each cannula placement. Cannula performance was assessed by analyzing gadoteridol distributions and by histological analysis of tissue damage. Results The average targeting error for all targets (n = 11) was 0.8 mm (95% CI = 0.14). For clinically relevant volumes, the distribution volume of gadoteridol increased as a linear function (R2 = 0.97) of the infusion volume (average slope = 3.30, 95% CI = 0.2). No infusions in any target produced occlusion, cannula reflux or leakage from adjacent tracts, and no signs of unexpected tissue damage were observed. Conclusions This integrated delivery platform allows real-time convection-enhanced delivery to be performed with a high level of precision, predictability and safety. This approach may improve the success rate for clinical trials involving intracerebral drug delivery by direct infusion. PMID:21494065

  17. A novel method for viability assessment by cinematographic and late contrast enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Gang; Cockshott, Paul W.; Martin, Thomas N.; Foster, John E.; Elliott, Alex; Dargie, Henry; Groenning, Bjoern A.

    2004-04-01

    Using cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, a combination of late contrast enhanced MR (ceMR) and cinematographic (CINE) images, a myocardial viability score can be derived. At present this score is produced by visual evaluation of wall motion abnormalities in combination with presence or absence of late hyper enhancement (LE) on ceMR. We set out to develop and validate image processing techniques derived from stereo vision capable of reducing the observer dependence and improving accuracy in the diagnosis of viable myocardium.

  18. Optimized time-resolved imaging of contrast kinetics (TRICKS) in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI after peptide receptor radionuclide therapy in small animal tumor models.

    PubMed

    Haeck, Joost; Bol, Karin; Bison, Sander; van Tiel, Sandra; Koelewijn, Stuart; de Jong, Marion; Veenland, Jifke; Bernsen, Monique

    2015-01-01

    Anti-tumor efficacy of targeted peptide-receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) relies on several factors, including functional tumor vasculature. Little is known about the effect of PRRT on tumor vasculature. With dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-) MRI, functional vasculature is imaged and quantified using contrast agents. In small animals DCE-MRI is a challenging application. We optimized a clinical sequence for fast hemodynamic acquisitions, time-resolved imaging of contrast kinetics (TRICKS), to obtain DCE-MRI images at both high spatial and high temporal resolution in mice and rats. Using TRICKS, functional vasculature was measured prior to PRRT and longitudinally to investigate the effect of treatment on tumor vascular characteristics. Nude mice bearing H69 tumor xenografts and rats bearing syngeneic CA20948 tumors were used to study perfusion following PRRT administration with (177) lutetium octreotate. Both semi-quantitative and quantitative parameters were calculated. Treatment efficacy was measured by tumor-size reduction. Optimized TRICKS enabled MRI at 0.032 mm(3) voxel size with a temporal resolution of less than 5 s and large volume coverage, a substantial improvement over routine pre-clinical DCE-MRI studies. Tumor response to therapy was reflected in changes in tumor perfusion/permeability parameters. The H69 tumor model showed pronounced changes in DCE-derived parameters following PRRT. The rat CA20948 tumor model showed more heterogeneity in both treatment outcome and perfusion parameters. TRICKS enabled the acquisition of DCE-MRI at both high temporal resolution (Tres ) and spatial resolutions relevant for small animal tumor models. With the high Tres enabled by TRICKS, accurate pharmacokinetic data modeling was feasible. DCE-MRI parameters revealed changes over time and showed a clear relationship between tumor size and Ktrans . PMID:25995102

  19. Distinguishing intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma from poorly differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma using precontrast and gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Asayama, Yoshiki; Nishie, Akihiro; Ishigami, Kousei; Ushijima, Yasuhiro; Takayama, Yukihisa; Fujita, Nobuhiro; Kubo, Yuichiro; Aishima, Shinichi; Shirabe, Ken; Yoshiura, Takashi; Honda, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to gain further insight in magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of mass-forming intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (mICC), its enhancement pattern with gadoxetic acid contrast agent, and distinction from poorly differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma (pHCC). METHODS Fourteen mICC and 22 pHCC nodules were included in this study. Two observers recorded the tumor shape, intratumoral hemorrhage, fat on chemical shift imaging, signal intensity at the center of the tumor on T2-weighted image, fibrous capsule, enhancement pattern on arterial phase of dynamic study, late enhancement three minutes after contrast injection (dynamic late phase), contrast uptake on hepatobiliary phase, apparent diffusion coefficient, vascular invasion, and intrahepatic metastasis. RESULTS Late enhancement was more common in mICC (n=10, 71%) than in pHCC (n=3, 14%) (P < 0.001). A fat component was observed in 11 pHCC cases (50%) versus none of mICC cases (P = 0.002). Fibrous capsule was observed in 13 pHCC cases (59%) versus none of mICC cases (P < 0.001). On T2-weighted images a hypointense area was seen at the center of the tumor in 43% of mICC (6/14) and 9% of pHCC (2/22) cases (P = 0.018). Other parameters were not significantly different between the two types of nodules. CONCLUSION The absence of fat and fibrous capsule, and presence of enhancement at three minutes appear to be most characteristic for mICC and may help its differentiation from pHCC. PMID:25698097

  20. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Parameters as Biomarkers in Assessing Head and Neck Lesions After Chemoradiotherapy Using a Wide-Bore 3 Tesla Scanner.

    PubMed

    Lerant, Gergely; Sarkozy, Peter; Takacsi-Nagy, Zoltan; Polony, Gabor; Tamas, Laszlo; Toth, Erika; Boer, Andras; Javor, Laszlo; Godeny, Maria

    2015-09-01

    Pilot studies have shown promising results in characterizing head and neck tumors (HNT) using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), differentiating between malignant and benign lesions and evaluating changes in response to chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Our aim was to find DCE-MRI parameters, biomarkers in evaluating the post-CRT status. Two hundred and five patients with head and neck lesions were examined with DCE-MRI sequences. The time intensity curves (TIC) were extracted and processed to acquire time-to-peak (TTP), relative maximum enhancement (RME), relative wash-out (RWO), and two new parameters attack and decay. These parameters were analyzed using univariate tests in SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, version 17, SPSS Inc. Chicago, USA) to identify parameters that could be used to infer tumor malignancy and post-CRT changes. Multiple parameters of curve characteristics were significantly different between malignant tumors after CRT (MACRT) and changes caused by CRT. The best-performing biomarkers were the attack and the decay. We also found multiple significant (p < 0.05) parameters for both the benign and malignant status as well as pre- and post-CRT status. Our large cohort of data supports the increasing role of DCE-MRI in HNT differentiation, particularly for the assessment of post-CRT status along with accurate morphological imaging. PMID:25920367

  1. Intracranial Hypertension as an Acute Complication of Aseptic Meningoencephalitis with Leptomeningeal Contrast Enhancement on FLAIR MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Marc E.; Eisele, Philipp; Schweizer, Yvonne; Alonso, Angelika; Gass, Achim; Hennerici, Michael G.; Szabo, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 19-year-old woman who developed intracranial hypertension as an unusual clinical complication of severe aseptic meningoencephalitis probably due to a diminished cerebrospinal fluid reabsorption capacity or leptomeningeal transudation as a consequence of blood-brain barrier dysfunction. These severe inflammatory changes were accompanied by prominent leptomeningeal contrast enhancement best visualized on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging. In such a prolonged course, a continuous lumbar drainage might be a temporary option to provide rapid symptom relief to the patient. PMID:26889150

  2. Intracranial Hypertension as an Acute Complication of Aseptic Meningoencephalitis with Leptomeningeal Contrast Enhancement on FLAIR MRI.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Marc E; Eisele, Philipp; Schweizer, Yvonne; Alonso, Angelika; Gass, Achim; Hennerici, Michael G; Szabo, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 19-year-old woman who developed intracranial hypertension as an unusual clinical complication of severe aseptic meningoencephalitis probably due to a diminished cerebrospinal fluid reabsorption capacity or leptomeningeal transudation as a consequence of blood-brain barrier dysfunction. These severe inflammatory changes were accompanied by prominent leptomeningeal contrast enhancement best visualized on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging. In such a prolonged course, a continuous lumbar drainage might be a temporary option to provide rapid symptom relief to the patient. PMID:26889150

  3. Hepatic schwannoma: imaging findings on CT, MRI and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Ota, Yu; Aso, Kazunobu; Watanabe, Kenji; Einama, Takahiro; Imai, Koji; Karasaki, Hidenori; Sudo, Ryuji; Tamaki, Yosui; Okada, Mituyoshi; Tokusashi, Yosihiko; Kono, Toru; Miyokawa, Naoyuki; Haneda, Masakazu; Taniguchi, Masahiko; Furukawa, Hiroyuki

    2012-09-21

    A primary benign schwannoma of the liver is extremely rare and is difficult to preoperatively discriminate from a malignant tumor. We compared the imaging and pathological findings, and examined the possibility of preoperatively diagnosing a benign liver schwannoma. A 72-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of a 4.6-cm mass in the liver. A malignant tumor was suspected, and a right hepatectomy was performed. After this, the diagnosis of a primary benign schwannoma of the liver was made through pathological examination. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) with Sonazoid showed minute blood flows into the septum and solid areas of the tumor in the vascular phase; most likely due to increased arterial flow associated with infiltration of chronic inflammatory cells. In the postvascular phase, CEUS showed contrast defect of cystic areas and delayed enhancement of solid areas; most likely due to aggregation of siderophores. Because discriminating between a benign and malignant schwannoma of the liver is difficult, surgery is generally recommended. However, the two key findings from CEUS may be useful in discriminating ancient schwannoma by recognizing the hemorrhage involved in the secondary degeneration and aggregation of siderophores. PMID:23002371

  4. Hepatic schwannoma: Imaging findings on CT, MRI and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Ota, Yu; Aso, Kazunobu; Watanabe, Kenji; Einama, Takahiro; Imai, Koji; Karasaki, Hidenori; Sudo, Ryuji; Tamaki, Yosui; Okada, Mituyoshi; Tokusashi, Yosihiko; Kono, Toru; Miyokawa, Naoyuki; Haneda, Masakazu; Taniguchi, Masahiko; Furukawa, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    A primary benign schwannoma of the liver is extremely rare and is difficult to preoperatively discriminate from a malignant tumor. We compared the imaging and pathological findings, and examined the possibility of preoperatively diagnosing a benign liver schwannoma. A 72-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of a 4.6-cm mass in the liver. A malignant tumor was suspected, and a right hepatectomy was performed. After this, the diagnosis of a primary benign schwannoma of the liver was made through pathological examination. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) with Sonazoid showed minute blood flows into the septum and solid areas of the tumor in the vascular phase; most likely due to increased arterial flow associated with infiltration of chronic inflammatory cells. In the postvascular phase, CEUS showed contrast defect of cystic areas and delayed enhancement of solid areas; most likely due to aggregation of siderophores. Because discriminating between a benign and malignant schwannoma of the liver is difficult, surgery is generally recommended. However, the two key findings from CEUS may be useful in discriminating ancient schwannoma by recognizing the hemorrhage involved in the secondary degeneration and aggregation of siderophores. PMID:23002371

  5. Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI for the assessment of liver function and volume in liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Blomqvist, L; Douglas, L; Nordell, A; Janczewska, I; Näslund, E; Jonas, E

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aims of this study were to use dynamic hepatocyte-specific contrast-enhanced MRI to evaluate liver volume and function in liver cirrhosis, correlate the results with standard scoring models and explore the inhomogeneous distribution of liver function in cirrhotic livers. Methods: 10 patients with liver cirrhosis and 20 healthy volunteers, serving as controls, were included. Hepatic extraction fraction (HEF), input relative blood flow and mean transit time were calculated on a voxel-by-voxel basis using deconvolutional analysis. Segmental and total liver volumes as well as segmental and total hepatic extraction capacity, expressed in HEFml, were calculated. An incongruence score (IS) was constructed to reflect the uneven distribution of liver function. The Mann–Whitney U-test was used for group comparison of the quantitative liver function parameters, liver volumes and ISs. Correlations between liver function parameters and clinical scores were assessed using Spearman rank correlation. Results: Patients had larger parenchymal liver volume, lower hepatocyte function and more inhomogeneous distribution of function compared with healthy controls. Conclusion: The study demonstrates the non-homogeneous nature of liver cirrhosis and underlines the necessity of a liver function test able to compensate for the heterogeneous distribution of liver function in patients with diseased liver parenchyma. Advances in knowledge: The study describes a new way to quantitatively assess the hepatic uptake of gadoxetate or gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid in the liver as a whole as well as on a segmental level. PMID:23403453

  6. High CD6 and low chemokine receptor expression on peripheral blood lymphocytes correlates with MRI gadolinium enhancement in MS.

    PubMed

    Jurewicz, Anna; Zaleski, Krzysztof; Domowicz, Malgorzata; Selmaj, Krzysztof

    2014-11-15

    Correlation between gadolinium-enhancing [Gd(+)] lesions on MRI and expression of CD6 molecules and a group of chemokine receptors on peripheral blood (PB) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) immune cells was measured in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Twenty remitting-relapsing MS patients with (n=10) and without (n=10) Gd(+) lesions entered the study. mRNA and surface expression of CD6 and CCR1, CCR2, CCR3 and CCR5 was measured by immunostaining and flow cytometry. Expression of mRNA and surface staining for CD6 in PB T lymphocytes was increased in Gd(+) compared to Gd(-) patients (p<0.01; p<0.05, respectively). CD6 mRNA correlated with the number and size of Gd(+) lesions (r=0.67, and r=0.65 respectively). mRNA and surface expression for CCR1, CCR2, and CCR3 in PB cells was lower in Gd(+) compared to Gd(-) MS patients (p<0.05, p<0.05). The frequency of cells co-expressing CD6 with CCR1 and CCR5 was low in PB T lymphocytes and high in CSF (p<0.05, p<0.05). These results suggest that Gd(+) correlates with increased expression of CD6 and decreased expression of chemokine receptors on PB T lymphocytes. Co-expression of CD6 with CCR1 and CCR5 predisposes cells for transmigration into CSF. PMID:25242631

  7. Amphiphilic Ditopic Bis-Aqua Gd-AAZTA-like Complexes Enhance Relaxivity of Lipidic MRI Nanoprobes.

    PubMed

    Gambino, Giuseppe; Tei, Lorenzo; Carniato, Fabio; Botta, Mauro

    2016-08-01

    Two amphiphilic mono- and dimeric GdAAZTA-like chelates composed of stable bis-aquo Gd(III) complexes (q=2) linked to one (for the monomer) or two dodecyl aliphatic chains (for the dimer) were synthesized. Both chelates showed high relaxivity when incorporated into the lipid bilayer of liposomes or after interaction with human serum albumin (HSA). The ditopic complex shows a significantly decreased internal motion relative to the monomeric complex, associated with an enhanced relaxivity (r1 ≈60 mm(-1)  s(-1) , at 30 MHz and 310 K). The presence of two metal-bound water molecules in fast exchange and the restricted rotational freedom make the relaxivity of this system the highest measured for paramagnetic liposomes. PMID:27325181

  8. In vivo Imaging of Optic Nerve Fiber Integrity by Contrast-Enhanced MRI in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Karl-Heinz; Reichenbach, Jürgen R.; Witte, Otto W.; Weih, Falk; Kretz, Alexandra; Haenold, Ronny

    2014-01-01

    The rodent visual system encompasses retinal ganglion cells and their axons that form the optic nerve to enter thalamic and midbrain centers, and postsynaptic projections to the visual cortex. Based on its distinct anatomical structure and convenient accessibility, it has become the favored structure for studies on neuronal survival, axonal regeneration, and synaptic plasticity. Recent advancements in MR imaging have enabled the in vivo visualization of the retino-tectal part of this projection using manganese mediated contrast enhancement (MEMRI). Here, we present a MEMRI protocol for illustration of the visual projection in mice, by which resolutions of (200 µm)3 can be achieved using common 3 Tesla scanners. We demonstrate how intravitreal injection of a single dosage of 15 nmol MnCl2 leads to a saturated enhancement of the intact projection within 24 hr. With exception of the retina, changes in signal intensity are independent of coincided visual stimulation or physiological aging. We further apply this technique to longitudinally monitor axonal degeneration in response to acute optic nerve injury, a paradigm by which Mn2+ transport completely arrests at the lesion site. Conversely, active Mn2+ transport is quantitatively proportionate to the viability, number, and electrical activity of axon fibers. For such an analysis, we exemplify Mn2+ transport kinetics along the visual path in a transgenic mouse model (NF-κB p50KO) displaying spontaneous atrophy of sensory, including visual, projections. In these mice, MEMRI indicates reduced but not delayed Mn2+ transport as compared to wild type mice, thus revealing signs of structural and/or functional impairments by NF-κB mutations. In summary, MEMRI conveniently bridges in vivo assays and post mortem histology for the characterization of nerve fiber integrity and activity. It is highly useful for longitudinal studies on axonal degeneration and regeneration, and investigations of mutant mice for genuine or

  9. Connectivity-based fixel enhancement: Whole-brain statistical analysis of diffusion MRI measures in the presence of crossing fibres.

    PubMed

    Raffelt, David A; Smith, Robert E; Ridgway, Gerard R; Tournier, J-Donald; Vaughan, David N; Rose, Stephen; Henderson, Robert; Connelly, Alan

    2015-08-15

    In brain regions containing crossing fibre bundles, voxel-average diffusion MRI measures such as fractional anisotropy (FA) are difficult to interpret, and lack within-voxel single fibre population specificity. Recent work has focused on the development of more interpretable quantitative measures that can be associated with a specific fibre population within a voxel containing crossing fibres (herein we use fixel to refer to a specific fibre population within a single voxel). Unfortunately, traditional 3D methods for smoothing and cluster-based statistical inference cannot be used for voxel-based analysis of these measures, since the local neighbourhood for smoothing and cluster formation can be ambiguous when adjacent voxels may have different numbers of fixels, or ill-defined when they belong to different tracts. Here we introduce a novel statistical method to perform whole-brain fixel-based analysis called connectivity-based fixel enhancement (CFE). CFE uses probabilistic tractography to identify structurally connected fixels that are likely to share underlying anatomy and pathology. Probabilistic connectivity information is then used for tract-specific smoothing (prior to the statistical analysis) and enhancement of the statistical map (using a threshold-free cluster enhancement-like approach). To investigate the characteristics of the CFE method, we assessed sensitivity and specificity using a large number of combinations of CFE enhancement parameters and smoothing extents, using simulated pathology generated with a range of test-statistic signal-to-noise ratios in five different white matter regions (chosen to cover a broad range of fibre bundle features). The results suggest that CFE input parameters are relatively insensitive to the characteristics of the simulated pathology. We therefore recommend a single set of CFE parameters that should give near optimal results in future studies where the group effect is unknown. We then demonstrate the proposed method

  10. Connectivity-based fixel enhancement: Whole-brain statistical analysis of diffusion MRI measures in the presence of crossing fibres

    PubMed Central

    Raffelt, David A.; Smith, Robert E.; Ridgway, Gerard R.; Tournier, J-Donald; Vaughan, David N.; Rose, Stephen; Henderson, Robert; Connelly, Alan

    2015-01-01

    In brain regions containing crossing fibre bundles, voxel-average diffusion MRI measures such as fractional anisotropy (FA) are difficult to interpret, and lack within-voxel single fibre population specificity. Recent work has focused on the development of more interpretable quantitative measures that can be associated with a specific fibre population within a voxel containing crossing fibres (herein we use fixel to refer to a specific fibre population within a single voxel). Unfortunately, traditional 3D methods for smoothing and cluster-based statistical inference cannot be used for voxel-based analysis of these measures, since the local neighbourhood for smoothing and cluster formation can be ambiguous when adjacent voxels may have different numbers of fixels, or ill-defined when they belong to different tracts. Here we introduce a novel statistical method to perform whole-brain fixel-based analysis called connectivity-based fixel enhancement (CFE). CFE uses probabilistic tractography to identify structurally connected fixels that are likely to share underlying anatomy and pathology. Probabilistic connectivity information is then used for tract-specific smoothing (prior to the statistical analysis) and enhancement of the statistical map (using a threshold-free cluster enhancement-like approach). To investigate the characteristics of the CFE method, we assessed sensitivity and specificity using a large number of combinations of CFE enhancement parameters and smoothing extents, using simulated pathology generated with a range of test-statistic signal-to-noise ratios in five different white matter regions (chosen to cover a broad range of fibre bundle features). The results suggest that CFE input parameters are relatively insensitive to the characteristics of the simulated pathology. We therefore recommend a single set of CFE parameters that should give near optimal results in future studies where the group effect is unknown. We then demonstrate the proposed method

  11. Quantitative assessment of microvasculopathy in arcAβ mice with USPIO-enhanced gradient echo MRI

    PubMed Central

    Deistung, Andreas; Ielacqua, Giovanna D; Seuwen, Aline; Kindler, Diana; Schweser, Ferdinand; Vaas, Markus; Kipar, Anja; Reichenbach, Jürgen R; Rudin, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging employing administration of iron oxide-based contrast agents is widely used to visualize cellular and molecular processes in vivo. In this study, we investigated the ability of R2* and quantitative susceptibility mapping to quantitatively assess the accumulation of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particles in the arcAβ mouse model of cerebral amyloidosis. Gradient-echo data of mouse brains were acquired at 9.4 T after injection of USPIO. Focal areas with increased magnetic susceptibility and R2* values were discernible across several brain regions in 12-month-old arcAβ compared to 6-month-old arcAβ mice and to non-transgenic littermates, indicating accumulation of particles after USPIO injection. This was concomitant with higher R2* and increased magnetic susceptibility differences relative to cerebrospinal fluid measured in USPIO-injected compared to non-USPIO-injected 12-month-old arcAβ mice. No differences in R2* and magnetic susceptibility were detected in USPIO-injected compared to non-injected 12-month-old non-transgenic littermates. Histological analysis confirmed focal uptake of USPIO particles in perivascular macrophages adjacent to small caliber cerebral vessels with radii of 2–8 µm that showed no cerebral amyloid angiopathy. USPIO-enhanced R2* and quantitative susceptibility mapping constitute quantitative tools to monitor such functional microvasculopathies. PMID:26661253

  12. Quantitative assessment of microvasculopathy in arcAβ mice with USPIO-enhanced gradient echo MRI.

    PubMed

    Klohs, Jan; Deistung, Andreas; Ielacqua, Giovanna D; Seuwen, Aline; Kindler, Diana; Schweser, Ferdinand; Vaas, Markus; Kipar, Anja; Reichenbach, Jürgen R; Rudin, Markus

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging employing administration of iron oxide-based contrast agents is widely used to visualize cellular and molecular processes in vivo. In this study, we investigated the ability of [Formula: see text] and quantitative susceptibility mapping to quantitatively assess the accumulation of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particles in the arcAβ mouse model of cerebral amyloidosis. Gradient-echo data of mouse brains were acquired at 9.4 T after injection of USPIO. Focal areas with increased magnetic susceptibility and [Formula: see text] values were discernible across several brain regions in 12-month-old arcAβ compared to 6-month-old arcAβ mice and to non-transgenic littermates, indicating accumulation of particles after USPIO injection. This was concomitant with higher [Formula: see text] and increased magnetic susceptibility differences relative to cerebrospinal fluid measured in USPIO-injected compared to non-USPIO-injected 12-month-old arcAβ mice. No differences in [Formula: see text] and magnetic susceptibility were detected in USPIO-injected compared to non-injected 12-month-old non-transgenic littermates. Histological analysis confirmed focal uptake of USPIO particles in perivascular macrophages adjacent to small caliber cerebral vessels with radii of 2-8 µm that showed no cerebral amyloid angiopathy. USPIO-enhanced [Formula: see text] and quantitative susceptibility mapping constitute quantitative tools to monitor such functional microvasculopathies. PMID:26661253

  13. The quantitation of nuclear Overhauser effect methods for total conformational analysis of peptides in solution. Application to gramicidin S.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, C R; Sikakana, C T; Hehir, S; Kuo, M C; Gibbons, W A

    1978-01-01

    The [1H:1H] nuclear Overhauser effects (NOE's) and spin-lattice relaxation times (T1's) are reported for the backbone protons of the decapeptide gramicidin S. Several methods for calculating interproton distances from these measurements are presented. Ratios of interproton distances were obtained from [1H:1H] NOE's and from the combination of [1H:1H]NOE'S and T1 values. Actual proton-proton distances were calculated from these ratios either by using the known distance between two geminal protons or distances derived from scalar coupling constants. The interproton distances calculated for gramicidin S are consistent with a II' beta-turn/antiparallel beta-sheet conformation. PMID:83886

  14. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI of Gd-albumin Delivery to the Rat Hippocampus In Vivo by Convection-Enhanced Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Hwan; Astary, Garrett W.; Nobrega, Tatiana L.; Kantorovich, Svetlana; Carney, Paul R.; Mareci, Thomas H.; Sarntinoranont, Malisa

    2013-01-01

    Convection enhanced delivery (CED) shows promise in treating neurological diseases due to its ability to circumvent the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and deliver therapeutics directly to the parenchyma of the central nervous system (CNS). Such a drug delivery method may be useful in treating CNS disorders involving the hippocampus such temporal lobe epilepsy and gliomas; however, the influence of anatomical structures on infusate distribution is not fully understood. As a surrogate for therapeutic agents, we used gadolinium-labeled-albumin (Gd-albumin) tagged with Evans blue dye to observe the time dependence of CED infusate distributions into the rat dorsal and ventral hippocampus in vivo with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). For finer anatomical detail, final distribution volumes (Vd) of the infusate were observed with high-resolution T1-weighted MR imaging and light microscopy of fixed brain sections. Dynamic images demonstrated that Gd-albumin preferentially distributed within the hippocampus along neuroanatomical structures with less fluid resistance and less penetration was observed in dense cell layers. Furthermore, significant leakage into adjacent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces such as the hippocampal fissure, velum interpositum and midbrain cistern occurred toward the end of infusion. Vd increased linearly with infusion volume (Vi) at a mean Vd/Vi ratio of 5.51 ± 0.55 for the dorsal hippocampus infusion and 5.30 ± 0.83 for the ventral hippocampus infusion. This study demonstrated the significant effects of tissue structure and CSF space boundaries on infusate distribution during CED. PMID:22687936

  15. MRI-based Kidney Volume Measurements in ADPKD: Reliability and Effect of Gadolinium Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Kyongtae T.; Tao, Cheng; Zhu, Fang; Bost, James E.; Chapman, Arlene B.; Grantham, Jared J.; Torres, Vicente E.; Guay-Woodford, Lisa M.; Meyers, Catherine M.; Bennett, William M.

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: To evaluate the inter- and intrareader reliability and the effect of gadolinium enhancement on kidney volume measurements obtained from pre- and postgadolinium T1 MR images in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Twenty subjects were randomly selected with approximately equal frequency from three kidney-size groups. Pre- and postgadolinium 3D T1 (pre-T1, post-T1) MR images were obtained. The stereology method was applied to segment and measure kidney volumes. The measurement process was repeated at two-wk intervals by two radiologists. Reliability was assessed with correlation coefficients. Intra- and inter-reader bias and measure differences were assessed with paired T-tests. The size effect on the pre- and post-T1 measurements was evaluated with one-way ANOVA. Results: The intra- and inter-reader reliability was extremely high in all measurements. No systematic intrareader bias but a small inter-reader bias for the post-T1 measurements was observed. All kidney volumes measured on the pre- and post-T1 images were highly correlated with each other for both readers. The post-T1 volumes were significantly higher than pre-T1 volumes. While the post-pre volume differences were relatively constant across the three kidney-size groups, the post-pre percent volume differences were significantly smaller as the size of the kidney increased. Conclusions: Kidney volume measurements can be made with minimum intra- and inter-reader variability on both pre- and post-T1 MR images. Kidney volumes measured on the pre-T1 were smaller than those on post-T1, and percent differences between pre-T1 and post-T1 kidney volumes decreased with increasing kidney size. PMID:19339416

  16. PEG-g-poly(GdDTPA-co-L-cystine): effect of PEG chain length on in vivo contrast enhancement in MRI.

    PubMed

    Mohs, Aaron M; Zong, Yuda; Guo, Junyu; Parker, Dennis L; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2005-01-01

    Biodegradable macromolecular Gd(III) complexes, Gd-DTPA cystine copolymers (GDCP), were grafted with PEG of different sizes to modify the physicochemical properties and in vivo MRI contrast enhancement of the agents and to study the effect of PEG chain length on these properties. Three new PEG-grafted biodegradable macromolecular gadolinium(III) complexes were synthesized and characterized as blood pool MRI contrast agents. One of three different lengths of MPEG-NH(2) (MW = 550, 1000, and 2000) was grafted to the backbone of GDCP to yield PEG(n)()-g-poly(GdDTPA-co-l-cystine), PEG(n)()-GDCP. The PEG chain length did not dramatically alter the T(1) relaxivity, r(1), of the modified agents. The MRI enhancement profile of PEG(n)()-GDCP with different PEG sizes was significantly different in mice with respect to both signal intensity and clearance profiles. PEG(2000)-GDCP showed more prominent enhancement in the blood pool for a longer period of time than either PEG(1000)-GDCP or PEG(550)-GDCP. In the kidney, PEG(2000)-GDCP had less enhancement at 2 min than PEG(1000)-GDCP, but both PEG(550)-GDCP and PEG(1000)-GDCP showed a more pronounced signal decay thereafter. The three agents behaved similarly in the liver, as compared to that in the heart. All three agents showed little enhancement in the muscle. Chemical grafting with PEG of different chain lengths is an effective approach to modify the physiochemistry and in vivo contrast enhancement dynamics of the biodegradable macromolecular contrast agents. The novel agents are promising for further clinical development for cardiovascular and cancer MR imaging. PMID:16004476

  17. Regional specificity of manganese accumulation and clearance in the mouse brain: implications for manganese-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Grünecker, B; Kaltwasser, S F; Zappe, A C; Bedenk, B T; Bicker, Y; Spoormaker, V I; Wotjak, C T; Czisch, M

    2013-05-01

    Manganese-enhanced MRI has recently become a valuable tool for the assessment of in vivo functional cerebral activity in animal models. As a result of the toxicity of manganese at higher dosages, fractionated application schemes have been proposed to reduce the toxic side effects by using lower concentrations per injection. Here, we present data on regional-specific manganese accumulation during a fractionated application scheme over 8 days of 30 mg/kg MnCl2 , as well as on the clearance of manganese chloride over the course of several weeks after the termination of the whole application protocol supplying an accumulative dose of 240 mg/kg MnCl2 . Our data show most rapid accumulation in the superior and inferior colliculi, amygdala, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, cornu ammonis of the hippocampus and globus pallidus. The data suggest that no ceiling effects occur in any region using the proposed application protocol. Therefore, a comparison of basal neuronal activity differences in different animal groups based on locally specific manganese accumulation is possible using fractionated application. Half-life times of manganese clearance varied between 5 and 7 days, and were longest in the periaqueductal gray, amygdala and entorhinal cortex. As the hippocampal formation shows one of the highest T1 -weighted signal intensities after manganese application, and manganese-induced memory impairment has been suggested, we assessed hippocampus-dependent learning as well as possible manganese-induced atrophy of the hippocampal volume. No interference of manganese application on learning was detected after 4 days of Mn(2+) application or 2 weeks after the application protocol. In addition, no volumetric changes induced by manganese application were found for the hippocampus at any of the measured time points. For longitudinal measurements (i.e. repeated manganese applications), a minimum of at least 8 weeks should be considered using the proposed protocol to allow for

  18. Cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization in rats correlates with nucleus accumbens activity on manganese-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Perrine, Shane A; Ghoddoussi, Farhad; Desai, Kirtan; Kohler, Robert J; Eapen, Ajay T; Lisieski, Michael J; Angoa-Perez, Mariana; Kuhn, Donald M; Bosse, Kelly E; Conti, Alana C; Bissig, David; Berkowitz, Bruce A

    2015-11-01

    A long-standing goal of substance abuse research has been to link drug-induced behavioral outcomes with the activity of specific brain regions to understand the neurobiology of addiction behaviors and to search for drug-able targets. Here, we tested the hypothesis that cocaine produces locomotor (behavioral) sensitization that correlates with increased calcium channel-mediated neuroactivity in brain regions linked with drug addiction, such as the nucleus accumbens (NAC), anterior striatum (AST) and hippocampus, as measured using manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI). Rats were treated with cocaine for 5 days, followed by a 2-day drug-free period. The following day, locomotor sensitization was quantified as a metric of cocaine-induced neuroplasticity in the presence of manganese. Immediately following behavioral testing, rats were examined for changes in calcium channel-mediated neuronal activity in the NAC, AST, hippocampus and temporalis muscle, which was associated with behavioral sensitization using MEMRI. Cocaine significantly increased locomotor activity and produced behavioral sensitization compared with saline treatment of control rats. A significant increase in MEMRI signal intensity was determined in the NAC, but not AST or hippocampus, of cocaine-treated rats compared with saline-treated control rats. Cocaine did not increase signal intensity in the temporalis muscle. Notably, in support of our hypothesis, behavior was significantly and positively correlated with MEMRI signal intensity in the NAC. As neuronal uptake of manganese is regulated by calcium channels, these results indicate that MEMRI is a powerful research tool to study neuronal activity in freely behaving animals and to guide new calcium channel-based therapies for the treatment of cocaine abuse and dependence. PMID:26411897

  19. Quantitative assessment of regional cerebral blood flow by dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced MRI, without the need for arterial blood signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enmi, Jun-ichiro; Kudomi, Nobuyuki; Hayashi, Takuya; Yamamoto, Akihide; Iguchi, Satoshi; Moriguchi, Tetsuaki; Hori, Yuki; Koshino, Kazuhiro; Zeniya, Tsutomu; Shah, Nadim Jon; Yamada, Naoaki; Iida, Hidehiro

    2012-12-01

    In dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI), an arterial input function (AIF) is usually obtained from a time-concentration curve (TCC) of the cerebral artery. This study was aimed at developing an alternative technique for reconstructing AIF from TCCs of multiple brain regions. AIF was formulated by a multi-exponential function using four parameters, and the parameters were determined so that the AIF curves convolved with a model of tissue response reproduced the measured TCCs for 20 regions. Systematic simulations were performed to evaluate the effects of possible error sources. DSC-MRI and positron emission tomography (PET) studies were performed on 14 patients with major cerebral artery occlusion. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) images were calculated from DSC-MRI data, using our novel method alongside conventional AIF estimations, and compared with those from 15O-PET. Simulations showed that the calculated CBF values were sensitive to variations in the assumptions regarding cerebral blood volume. Nevertheless, AIFs were reasonably reconstructed for all patients. The difference in CBF values between DSC-MRI and PET was -2.2 ± 7.4 ml/100 g/min (r = 0.55, p < 0.01) for our method, versus -0.2 ± 8.2 ml/100 g/min (r = 0.47, p = 0.01) for the conventional method. The difference in the ratio of affected to unaffected hemispheres between DSC-MRI and PET was 0.07 ± 0.09 (r = 0.82, p < 0.01) for our method, versus 0.07 ± 0.09 (r = 0.83, p < 0.01) for the conventional method. The contrasts in CBF images from our method were the same as those from the conventional method. These findings suggest the feasibility of assessing CBF without arterial blood signals.

  20. Application of contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI-based 3D reconstruction of the dural tail sign in meningioma resection.

    PubMed

    You, Binsheng; Cheng, Yanhao; Zhang, Jian; Song, Qimin; Dai, Chao; Heng, Xueyuan; Fei, Chang

    2016-07-01

    OBJECT The goal of this study was to investigate the significance of contrast-enhanced T1-weighted (T1W) MRI-based 3D reconstruction of dural tail sign (DTS) in meningioma resection. METHODS Between May 2013 and August 2014, 18 cases of convexity and parasagittal meningiomas showing DTS on contrast-enhanced T1W MRI were selected. Contrast-enhanced T1W MRI-based 3D reconstruction of DTS was conducted before surgical treatment. The vertical and anteroposterior diameters of DTS on the contrast-enhanced T1W MR images and 3D reconstruction images were measured and compared. Surgical incisions were designed by referring to the 3D reconstruction and MR images, and then the efficiency of the 2 methods was evaluated with assistance of neuronavigation. RESULTS Three-dimensional reconstruction of DTS can reveal its overall picture. In most cases, the DTS around the tumor is uneven, whereas the DTS around the dural vessels presents longer extensions. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) between the vertical and anteroposterior diameters of DTS measured on the contrast-enhanced T1W MR and 3D reconstruction images. The 3D images of DTS were more intuitive, and the overall picture of DTS could be revealed in 1 image, which made it easier to design the incision than by using the MR images. Meanwhile, assessment showed that the incisions designed using 3D images were more accurate than those designed using MR images (ridit analysis by SAS, F = 7.95; p = 0.008). Pathological examination showed that 34 dural specimens (except 2 specimens from 1 tumor) displayed tumor invasion. The distance of tumor cell invasion was 1.0-21.6 mm (5.4 ± 4.41 mm [mean ± SD]). Tumor cell invasion was not observed at the dural resection margin in all 36 specimens. CONCLUSIONS Contrast-enhanced T1W MRI-based 3D reconstruction can intuitively and accurately reveal the size and shape of DTS, and thus provides guidance for designing meningioma incisions. PMID:26654184

  1. Automated analysis of non-mass-enhancing lesions in breast MRI based on morphological, kinetic, and spatio-temporal moments and joint segmentation-motion compensation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Sebastian; Shutler, Jamie D.; Lobbes, Marc; Burgeth, Bernhard; Meyer-Bäse, Anke

    2013-12-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) represents an established method for the detection and diagnosis of breast lesions. While mass-like enhancing lesions can be easily categorized according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) MRI lexicon, a majority of diagnostically challenging lesions, the so called non-mass-like enhancing lesions, remain both qualitatively as well as quantitatively difficult to analyze. Thus, the evaluation of kinetic and/or morphological characteristics of non-masses represents a challenging task for an automated analysis and is of crucial importance for advancing current computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems. Compared to the well-characterized mass-enhancing lesions, non-masses have no well-defined and blurred tumor borders and a kinetic behavior that is not easily generalizable and thus discriminative for malignant and benign non-masses. To overcome these difficulties and pave the way for novel CAD systems for non-masses, we will evaluate several kinetic and morphological descriptors separately and a novel technique, the Zernike velocity moments, to capture the joint spatio-temporal behavior of these lesions, and additionally consider the impact of non-rigid motion compensation on a correct diagnosis.

  2. Protein composition alters in vivo resorption of PEG-based hydrogels as monitored by contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Berdichevski, Alexandra; Shachaf, Yonatan; Wechsler, Roni; Seliktar, Dror

    2015-02-01

    We report on the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based non-invasive monitoring to document the role of protein adjuvants in hydrogel implant integration in vivo. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogels were formed with different protein constituents, including albumin, fibrinogen and gelatin. The hydrogels were designed to exhibit similar material properties, including modulus, swelling and hydrolytic degradation kinetics. The in vivo resorption properties of these PEG-based hydrogels, which contained a tethered gadolinium contrast agent, were characterized by MRI and histology, and compared to their in vitro characteristics. MRI data revealed that PEG-Albumin implants remained completely intact throughout the experiments, PEG-Fibrinogen implants lost about 10% of their volume and PEG-Gelatin implants underwent prominent swelling and returned to their initial volume by day 25. Fully synthetic PEG-diacrylate (PEG-DA) control hydrogels lost about half of their volume after 25 days in vivo. Transverse MRI cross-sections of the implants revealed distinct mechanisms of the hydrogel's biodegradation: PEG-Fibrinogen and PEG-Albumin underwent surface erosion, whereas PEG-Gelatin and PEG-DA hydrogels mainly underwent bulk degradation. Histological findings substantiated the MRI data and demonstrated significant cellular response towards PEG-DA and PEG-Gelatin scaffolds with relatively low reaction towards PEG-Fibrinogen and PEG-Albumin hydrogels. These findings demonstrate that PEG-protein hydrogels can degrade via a different mechanism than PEG hydrogels, and that this difference can be linked to a reduced foreign body response. PMID:25542788

  3. Quantitative Myocardial Perfusion with Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Imaging in MRI and CT: Theoretical Models and Current Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Handayani, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Prakken, N. H. J.; Slart, R. H. J. A.; Oudkerk, M.; Van Ooijen, P. M. A.; Vliegenthart, R.; Sijens, P. E.

    2016-01-01

    Technological advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT), including higher spatial and temporal resolution, have made the prospect of performing absolute myocardial perfusion quantification possible, previously only achievable with positron emission tomography (PET). This could facilitate integration of myocardial perfusion biomarkers into the current workup for coronary artery disease (CAD), as MRI and CT systems are more widely available than PET scanners. Cardiac PET scanning remains expensive and is restricted by the requirement of a nearby cyclotron. Clinical evidence is needed to demonstrate that MRI and CT have similar accuracy for myocardial perfusion quantification as PET. However, lack of standardization of acquisition protocols and tracer kinetic model selection complicates comparison between different studies and modalities. The aim of this overview is to provide insight into the different tracer kinetic models for quantitative myocardial perfusion analysis and to address typical implementation issues in MRI and CT. We compare different models based on their theoretical derivations and present the respective consequences for MRI and CT acquisition parameters, highlighting the interplay between tracer kinetic modeling and acquisition settings. PMID:27088083

  4. Quantitative Myocardial Perfusion with Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Imaging in MRI and CT: Theoretical Models and Current Implementation.

    PubMed

    Pelgrim, G J; Handayani, A; Dijkstra, H; Prakken, N H J; Slart, R H J A; Oudkerk, M; Van Ooijen, P M A; Vliegenthart, R; Sijens, P E

    2016-01-01

    Technological advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT), including higher spatial and temporal resolution, have made the prospect of performing absolute myocardial perfusion quantification possible, previously only achievable with positron emission tomography (PET). This could facilitate integration of myocardial perfusion biomarkers into the current workup for coronary artery disease (CAD), as MRI and CT systems are more widely available than PET scanners. Cardiac PET scanning remains expensive and is restricted by the requirement of a nearby cyclotron. Clinical evidence is needed to demonstrate that MRI and CT have similar accuracy for myocardial perfusion quantification as PET. However, lack of standardization of acquisition protocols and tracer kinetic model selection complicates comparison between different studies and modalities. The aim of this overview is to provide insight into the different tracer kinetic models for quantitative myocardial perfusion analysis and to address typical implementation issues in MRI and CT. We compare different models based on their theoretical derivations and present the respective consequences for MRI and CT acquisition parameters, highlighting the interplay between tracer kinetic modeling and acquisition settings. PMID:27088083

  5. Fractionated manganese injections: effects on MRI contrast enhancement and physiological measures in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Grünecker, Barbara; Kaltwasser, Sebastian F; Peterse, Yorick; Sämann, Philipp G; Schmidt, Mathias V; Wotjak, Carsten T; Czisch, Michael

    2010-10-01

    Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) is an increasingly used imaging method in animal research, which enables improved T(1)-weighted tissue contrast. Furthermore accumulation of manganese in activated neurons allows visualization of neuronal activity. However, at higher concentrations manganese (Mn2+) exhibits toxic side effects that interfere with the animals' behaviour and well-being. Therefore, when optimizing MEMRI protocols, a compromise has to be found between minimizing side effects and intensifying image contrast. Recently, a low concentrated fractionated Mn2+ application scheme has been proposed as a promising alternative. In this study, we investigated effects of different fractionated Mn2+ dosing schemes on vegetative, behavioural and endocrine markers, and MEMRI signal contrast in C57BL/6N mice. Measurements of the animals' well-being included telemetric monitoring of body temperature and locomotion, control of weight and observation of behavioural parameters during the time course of the injection protocols. Corticosterone levels after Mn2+ application served as endocrine marker of the stress response. We compared three MnCl2  x 4H2O application protocols: 3 times 60 mg/kg with an inter-injection interval of 48 h, six times 30 mg/kg with an inter-injection interval of 48 h, and 8 times 30 mg/kg with an inter-injection interval of 24 h (referred to as 3 x 60/48, 6 x 30/48 and 8 x 30/24, respectively). Both the 6 x 30/48 and the 8 x 30/24 protocols showed attenuated effects on animals' well-being as compared to the 3 x 60/48 scheme. Best MEMRI signal contrast was observed for the 8 x 30/24 protocol. Together, these results argue for a fractionated application scheme such as 30 mg/kg every 24 h for 8 days to provide sufficient MEMRI signal contrast while minimizing toxic side effects and distress. PMID:20878969

  6. An investigation into the effects of temporal resolution on hepatic dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in volunteers and in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Andrew B.; Black, Richard T.; Bowden, David J.; Priest, Andrew N.; Graves, Martin J.; Lomas, David J.

    2014-06-01

    This study investigated the effect of temporal resolution on the dual-input pharmacokinetic (PK) modelling of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) data from normal volunteer livers and from patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. Eleven volunteers and five patients were examined at 3 T. Two sections, one optimized for the vascular input functions (VIF) and one for the tissue, were imaged within a single heart-beat (HB) using a saturation-recovery fast gradient echo sequence. The data was analysed using a dual-input single-compartment PK model. The VIFs and/or uptake curves were then temporally sub-sampled (at interval ▵t = [2-20] s) before being subject to the same PK analysis. Statistical comparisons of tumour and normal tissue PK parameter values using a 5% significance level gave rise to the same study results when temporally sub-sampling the VIFs to HB < ▵t <4 s. However, sub-sampling to ▵t > 4 s did adversely affect the statistical comparisons. Temporal sub-sampling of just the liver/tumour tissue uptake curves at ▵t ≤ 20 s, whilst using high temporal resolution VIFs, did not substantially affect PK parameter statistical comparisons. In conclusion, there is no practical advantage to be gained from acquiring very high temporal resolution hepatic DCE-MRI data. Instead the high temporal resolution could be usefully traded for increased spatial resolution or SNR.

  7. Intra-Tumor Distribution and Test-Retest Comparisons of Physiological Parameters quantified by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI in Rat U251 Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Aryal, Madhava P.; Nagaraja, Tavarekere N.; Brown, Stephen L.; Lu, Mei; Bagher-Ebadian, Hassan; Ding, Guangliang; Panda, Swayamprava; Keenan, Kelly; Cabral, Glauber; Mikkelsen, Tom; Ewing, James R.

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) parametric estimates in a rat U251 glioma model was analyzed. Using Magnevist as contrast agent (CA), 17 nude rats implanted with U251 cerebral glioma were studied by DCE-MRI twice in a 24 h interval. A data-driven analysis selected one of three models to estimate either: 1) CA plasma volume (vp), 2) vp and forward volume transfer constant (Ktrans; or 3) vp, Ktrans, and interstitial volume fraction (ve), constituting Models 1, 2 and 3, respectively. CA interstitial distribution volume (VD) was estimated in Model 3 regions by Logan plots. Regions of interest (ROIs) were selected by model. In the Model 3 ROI, descriptors of parameter distributions – mean, median, variance and skewness – were calculated and compared between the two time points for repeatability. All distributions of parametric estimates in Model 3 ROIs were positively skewed. Test-retest differences between population summaries for any parameter were not significant (p≥0.10; Wilcoxon signed-rank and paired t tests). This and similar measures of parametric distribution and test-retest variance from other tumor models can be used to inform the choice of biomarkers that best summarize tumor status and treatment effects. PMID:25125367

  8. NOTE: Characterizing early contrast uptake of ductal carcinoma in situ with high temporal resolution dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of the breast: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, S. A.; Fan, X.; Medved, M.; Abe, H.; Shimauchi, A.; Yang, C.; Zamora, M.; Foxley, S.; Olopade, O. I.; Karczmar, G. S.; Newstead, G. M.

    2010-10-01

    Improvements in the reliable diagnosis of preinvasive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) are needed. In this study, we present a new characterization of early contrast kinetics of DCIS using high temporal resolution (HiT) DCE-MRI and compare it with other breast lesions and normal parenchyma. Forty patients with mammographic calcifications suspicious for DCIS were selected for HiT imaging using T1-weighted DCE-MRI with ~7 s temporal resolution for 90 s post-contrast injection. Pixel-based and whole-lesion kinetic curves were fit to an empirical mathematical model (EMM) and several secondary kinetic parameters derived. Using the EMM parameterized and fitted concentration time curve for subsequent analysis allowed for calculation of kinetic parameters that were less susceptible to fluctuations due to noise. The parameters' initial area under the curve (iAUC) and contrast concentration at 1 min (C1 min) provided the highest diagnostic accuracy in the task of distinguishing pathologically proven DCIS from normal tissue. There was a trend for DCIS lesions with solid architectural pattern to exhibit a negative slope at 1 min (i.e. increased washout rate) compared to those with a cribriform pattern (p < 0.04). This pilot study demonstrates the feasibility of quantitative analysis of early contrast kinetics at high temporal resolution and points to the potential for such an analysis to improve the characterization of DCIS.

  9. Automatic classification of scar tissue in late gadolinium enhancement cardiac MRI for the assessment of left-atrial wall injury after radiofrequency ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Daniel; Morris, Alan; Burgon, Nathan; McGann, Christopher; MacLeod, Robert; Cates, Joshua

    2012-03-01

    Radiofrequency ablation is a promising procedure for treating atrial fibrillation (AF) that relies on accurate lesion delivery in the left atrial (LA) wall for success. Late Gadolinium Enhancement MRI (LGE MRI) at three months post-ablation has proven effective for noninvasive assessment of the location and extent of scar formation, which are important factors for predicting patient outcome and planning of redo ablation procedures. We have developed an algorithm for automatic classification in LGE MRI of scar tissue in the LA wall and have evaluated accuracy and consistency compared to manual scar classifications by expert observers. Our approach clusters voxels based on normalized intensity and was chosen through a systematic comparison of the performance of multivariate clustering on many combinations of image texture. Algorithm performance was determined by overlap with ground truth, using multiple overlap measures, and the accuracy of the estimation of the total amount of scar in the LA. Ground truth was determined using the STAPLE algorithm, which produces a probabilistic estimate of the true scar classification from multiple expert manual segmentations. Evaluation of the ground truth data set was based on both inter- and intra-observer agreement, with variation among expert classifiers indicating the difficulty of scar classification for a given a dataset. Our proposed automatic scar classification algorithm performs well for both scar localization and estimation of scar volume: for ground truth datasets considered easy, variability from the ground truth was low; for those considered difficult, variability from ground truth was on par with the variability across experts.

  10. Value of intravoxel incoherent motion and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for predicting the early and short-term responses to chemoradiotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jing; Yu, Xiaoping; Hu, Yin; Li, Feiping; Xiang, Wang; Wang, Lanlan; Wang, Hui; Lu, Qiang; Zhang, Zhongping; Zeng, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to investigate the value of intravoxel incoherent motion diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (IVIM-DWI) and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in predicting the early and short-term responses to chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Forty-three NPC patients underwent IVIM-DWI and DCE-MRI at baseline (pretreatment) and after the first cycle of induction chemotherapy (posttreatment). Based on whether locoregional lesions were identified, patients were divided into the residual and nonresidual groups at the end of CRT and into the good-responder and poor-responder groups 6 months after the end of CRT. The pretreatment and posttreatment IVIM-DWI parameters (ADC, D, D∗, and f) and DCE-MRI parameters (Ktrans, Kep, and Ve) values and their percentage changes (Δ%) were compared between the residual and nonresidual groups and between the good-responder and poor-responder groups. None of perfusion-related parametric values derived from either DCE-MRI or IVIM-DWI showed significant differences either between the residual and nonresidual groups or between the good-responder and poor-responder groups. The nonresidual group exhibited lower pre-ADC, lower pre-D, and higher Δ%D values than did the residual group (all P <0.05). The good-responder group had lower pre-D and pre-ADC values than did the poor-responder group (both P <0.05). Based on receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, pre-D had the highest area under the curve in predicting both the early and short-term responses to CRT for NPC patients (0.817 and 0.854, respectively). IVIM-DWI is more valuable than DCE-MRI in predicting the early and short-term response to CRT for NPC, and furthermore diffusion-related IVIM-DWI parameters (pre-ADC, pre-D, and Δ%D) are more powerful than perfusion-related parameters derived from both IVIM-DWI and DCE-MRI. PMID:27583847

  11. Value of intravoxel incoherent motion and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for predicting the early and short-term responses to chemoradiotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jing; Yu, Xiaoping; Hu, Yin; Li, Feiping; Xiang, Wang; Wang, Lanlan; Wang, Hui; Lu, Qiang; Zhang, Zhongping; Zeng, Wenbin

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the value of intravoxel incoherent motion diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (IVIM-DWI) and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in predicting the early and short-term responses to chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC).Forty-three NPC patients underwent IVIM-DWI and DCE-MRI at baseline (pretreatment) and after the first cycle of induction chemotherapy (posttreatment). Based on whether locoregional lesions were identified, patients were divided into the residual and nonresidual groups at the end of CRT and into the good-responder and poor-responder groups 6 months after the end of CRT. The pretreatment and posttreatment IVIM-DWI parameters (ADC, D, D*, and f) and DCE-MRI parameters (K, Kep, and Ve) values and their percentage changes (Δ%) were compared between the residual and nonresidual groups and between the good-responder and poor-responder groups.None of perfusion-related parametric values derived from either DCE-MRI or IVIM-DWI showed significant differences either between the residual and nonresidual groups or between the good-responder and poor-responder groups. The nonresidual group exhibited lower pre-ADC, lower pre-D, and higher Δ%D values than did the residual group (all P <0.05). The good-responder group had lower pre-D and pre-ADC values than did the poor-responder group (both P <0.05). Based on receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, pre-D had the highest area under the curve in predicting both the early and short-term responses to CRT for NPC patients (0.817 and 0.854, respectively).IVIM-DWI is more valuable than DCE-MRI in predicting the early and short-term response to CRT for NPC, and furthermore diffusion-related IVIM-DWI parameters (pre-ADC, pre-D, and Δ%D) are more powerful than perfusion-related parameters derived from both IVIM-DWI and DCE-MRI. PMID:27583847

  12. Visual spatial attention enhances the amplitude of positive and negative fMRI responses to visual stimulation in an eccentricity-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Bressler, David W; Fortenbaugh, Francesca C; Robertson, Lynn C; Silver, Michael A

    2013-06-01

    Endogenous visual spatial attention improves perception and enhances neural responses to visual stimuli at attended locations. Although many aspects of visual processing differ significantly between central and peripheral vision, little is known regarding the neural substrates of the eccentricity dependence of spatial attention effects. We measured amplitudes of positive and negative fMRI responses to visual stimuli as a function of eccentricity in a large number of topographically-organized cortical areas. Responses to each stimulus were obtained when the stimulus was attended and when spatial attention was directed to a stimulus in the opposite visual hemifield. Attending to the stimulus increased both positive and negative response amplitudes in all cortical areas we studied: V1, V2, V3, hV4, VO1, LO1, LO2, V3A/B, IPS0, TO1, and TO2. However, the eccentricity dependence of these effects differed considerably across cortical areas. In early visual, ventral, and lateral occipital cortex, attentional enhancement of positive responses was greater for central compared to peripheral eccentricities. The opposite pattern was observed in dorsal stream areas IPS0 and putative MT homolog TO1, where attentional enhancement of positive responses was greater in the periphery. Both the magnitude and the eccentricity dependence of attentional modulation of negative fMRI responses closely mirrored that of positive responses across cortical areas. PMID:23562388

  13. Automated error-tolerant macromolecular structure determination from multidimensional nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectra and chemical shift assignments

    PubMed Central

    Kuszewski, John J.; Thottungal, Robin Augustine; Schwieters, Charles D.; Clore, G. Marius

    2008-01-01

    We report substantial improvements to the previously introduced automated NOE assignment and structure determination protocol known as PASD. The improved protocol includes extensive analysis of input spectral data to create a low-resolution contact map of residues expected to be close in space. This map is used to obtain reasonable initial guesses of NOE assignment likelihoods which are refined during subsequent structure calculations. Information in the contact map about which residues are predicted to not be close in space is applied via conservative repulsive distance restraints which are used in early phases of the structure calculations. In comparison with the previous protocol, the new protocol requires significantly less computation time. We show results of running the new PASD protocol on six proteins and demonstrate that useful assignment and structural information is extracted on proteins of more than 220 residues. We show that useful assignment information can be obtained even in the case in which a unique structure cannot be determined. PMID:18668206

  14. Dynamic nuclear polarization properties of nitroxyl radical in high viscous liquid using Overhauser-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (OMRI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumara Dhas, M.; Utsumi, Hideo; Jawahar, A.; Milton Franklin Benial, A.

    2015-08-01

    The dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) studies were carried out for 15N labeled carbamoyl-PROXYL in pure water and pure water/glycerol mixtures of different viscosities (1.8 cP, 7 cP and 14 cP). The dependence of DNP parameters was demonstrated over a range of agent concentration, viscosities, RF power levels and ESR irradiation time. DNP spectra were also recorded for 2 mM concentration of 15N labeled carbamoyl-PROXYL in pure water and pure water/glycerol mixtures of different viscosities. The DNP factors were measured as a function of ESR irradiation time, which increases linearly up to 2 mM agent concentration in pure water and pure water/glycerol mixtures of different viscosities. The DNP factor started declining in the higher concentration region (∼3 mM), which is due to the ESR line width broadening. The water proton spin-lattice relaxation time was measured at very low Zeeman field (14.529 mT). The increased DNP factor (35%) was observed for solvent 2 (η = 1.8 cP) compared with solvent 1 (η = 1 cP). The increase in the DNP factor was brought about by the shortening of water proton spin-lattice relaxation time of solvent 2. The decreased DNP factors (30% and 53%) were observed for solvent 3 (η = 7 cP) and solvent 4 (η = 14 cP) compared with solvent 2, which is mainly due to the low value of coupling parameter in high viscous liquid samples. The longitudinal relaxivity, leakage factor and coupling parameter were estimated. The coupling parameter values reveal that the dipolar interaction as the major mechanism. The longitudinal relaxivity increases with the increasing viscosity of pure water/glycerol mixtures. The leakage factor showed an asymptotic increase with the increasing agent concentration. It is envisaged that the results reported here may provide guidelines for the design of new viscosity prone nitroxyl radicals, suited to the biological applications of DNP.

  15. Alertness in Young Healthy Subjects: An fMRI Study of Brain Region Interactivity Enhanced by a Warning Signal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perin, B.; Godefroy, O.; Fall, S.; de Marco, G.

    2010-01-01

    An effective connectivity study was carried out on 16 young, healthy subjects performing an alertness task. The objective of this study was to develop and to evaluate a putative network model of alertness by adapting structural equation modeling to fMRI data. This study was designed to evaluate the directed interactivity of an attentional network…

  16. Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI Assessing the Antiangiogenic Effect of Silencing HIF-1α with Targeted Multifunctional ECO/siRNA Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Malamas, Anthony S; Jin, Erlei; Gujrati, Maneesh; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2016-07-01

    Stabilization of hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), a biomarker of hypoxia, in hypoxic tumors mediates a variety of downstream genes promoting tumor angiogenesis and cancer cell survival as well as invasion, and compromising therapeutic outcome. In this study, dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) with a biodegradable macromolecular MRI contrast agent was used to noninvasively assess the antiangiogenic effect of RGD-targeted multifunctional lipid ECO/siHIF-1α nanoparticles in a mouse HT29 colon cancer model. The RGD-targeted ECO/siHIF-1α nanoparticles resulted in over 50% reduction in tumor size after intravenous injection at a dose of 2.0 mg of siRNA/kg every 3 days for 3 weeks compared to a saline control. DCE-MRI revealed significant decline in vascularity and over a 70% reduction in the tumor blood flow, permeability-surface area product, and plasma volume fraction vascular parameters in the tumor treated with the targeted ECO/siHIF-1α nanoparticles. The treatment with targeted ECO/siRNA nanoparticles resulted in significant silencing of HIF-1α expression at the protein level, which also significantly suppressed the expression of VEGF, Glut-1, HKII, PDK-1, LDHA, and CAIX, which are all important players in tumor angiogenesis, glycolytic metabolism, and pH regulation. By possessing the ability to elicit a multifaceted effect on tumor biology, silencing HIF-1α with RGD-targeted ECO/siHIF-1α nanoparticles has great promise as a single therapy or in combination with traditional chemotherapy or radiation strategies to improve cancer treatment. PMID:27264671

  17. A nuclear Overhauser effect investigation of the molecular and electronic structure of the heme crevice in lactoperoxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Thanabal, V.; La Mar, G.N. )

    1989-08-22

    The proton homonuclear nuclear Overhauser effect, NOE, in conjunction with paramagnetic-induced dipolar relaxation, is utilized to assign resonances and to probe the molecular and electronic structures of the heme cavity in the low-spin cyanide complex of resting-state bovine lactoperoxidase, LPO-CN. Predominantly primary NOEs were detected in spite of the large molecular weight of the enzyme, which demonstrates again the advantage of paramagnetism suppressing spin diffusion in large proteins. Both of the nonlabile ring protons of a coordinated histidine are located at resonance positions consistent with a deprotonated imidazole. Several methylene proton pairs are identified, of which the most strongly hyperfine-shifted pair is assigned to the unusual chemically functionalized 8-(mercaptomethylene) group of the prosthetic group. The large 8-(mercaptomethylene) proton contact shifts relative to that of the only resolved heme methyl signal are rationalized by the additive perturbations on the rhombic asymmetry of the functionalization of the 8-position and the alignment of the axial histidyl imidazole projection along a vector passing through pyrrole A and C of the prosthetic group. Such a stereochemistry is consistent with the resolution of only a single heme methyl group, 3-CH{sub 3}, as observed. A pair of hyperfine-shifted methylene protons, as well as a low-field hyperfine-shifted labile proton signal, exhibit dipolar connectivities similar to those previously reported for the distal arginine and histidine, respectively, of horseradish peroxidase suggesting that these catalytically relevant residues may also exist in LPO.

  18. Spin-labeled gel for the production of radical-free dynamic nuclear polarization enhanced molecules for NMR spectroscopy and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarney, Evan R.; Han, Songi

    2008-02-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) has recently received much attention as a viable approach to enhance the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and the contrast of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), where the significantly higher electron spin polarization of stable radicals is transferred to nuclear spins. In order to apply DNP-enhanced NMR and MRI signal to biological and in vivo systems, it is crucial to obtain highly polarized solution samples at ambient temperatures. As stable radicals are employed as the source for the DNP polarization transfer, it is also crucial that the highly polarized sample lacks residual radical concentration because the polarized molecules will be introduced to a biological system that will be sensitive to the presence of radicals. We developed an agarose-based porous media that is covalently spin-labeled with stable radicals. The loading of solvent accessible radical is sufficiently high and their mobility approximates that in solution, which ensures high efficiency for Overhauser mechanism induced DNP without physically releasing any measurable radical into the solution. Under ambient conditions at 0.35 T magnetic field, we measure the DNP enhancement efficiency of 1H signal of stagnant and continuously flowing water utilizing immobilized stable nitroxide radicals that contain two or three ESR hyperfine splitting lines and compare them to the performance of freely dissolved radicals.

  19. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI in Head-and-Neck Cancer: The Impact of Region of Interest Selection on the Intra- and Interpatient Variability of Pharmacokinetic Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Craciunescu, Oana I.; Yoo, David S.; Cleland, Esi; Muradyan, Naira; Carroll, Madeline D.; MacFall, James R.; Barboriak, Daniel P.; Brizel, David M.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI-extracted parameters measure tumor microvascular physiology and are usually calculated from an intratumor region of interest (ROI). Optimal ROI delineation is not established. The valid clinical use of DCE-MRI requires that the variation for any given parameter measured within a tumor be less than that observed between tumors in different patients. This work evaluates the impact of tumor ROI selection on the assessment of intra- and interpatient variability. Method and Materials: Head and neck cancer patients received initial targeted therapy (TT) treatment with erlotinib and/or bevacizumab, followed by radiotherapy and concurrent cisplatin with synchronous TT. DCE-MRI data from Baseline and the end of the TT regimen (Lead-In) were analyzed to generate the vascular transfer function (K{sup trans}), the extracellular volume fraction (v{sub e}), and the initial area under the concentration time curve (iAUC{sub 1min}). Four ROI sampling strategies were used: whole tumor or lymph node (Whole), the slice containing the most enhancing voxels (SliceMax), three slices centered in SliceMax (Partial), and the 5% most enhancing contiguous voxels within SliceMax (95Max). The average coefficient of variation (aCV) was calculated to establish intrapatient variability among ROI sets and interpatient variability for each ROI type. The average ratio between each intrapatient CV and the interpatient CV was calculated (aRCV). Results: Baseline primary/nodes aRCVs for different ROIs not including 95Max were, for all three MR parameters, in the range of 0.14-0.24, with Lead-In values between 0.09 and 0.2, meaning a low intrapatient vs. interpatient variation. For 95Max, intrapatient CVs approximated interpatient CVs, meaning similar data dispersion and higher aRCVs (0.6-1.27 for baseline) and 0.54-0.95 for Lead-In. Conclusion: Distinction between different patient's primary tumors and/or nodes cannot be made using 95Max ROIs. The other three

  20. MRI Scans

    MedlinePlus

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a large magnet and radio waves to look at organs and structures inside your body. Health care professionals use MRI scans to diagnose a variety of conditions, from torn ...

  1. Heart MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... severe kidney problems. People have been harmed in MRI machines when they did not remove metal objects from their clothes or when metal objects were left in the room by others. MRI is most often not recommended for traumatic injuries. ...

  2. Accurate high-resolution measurements of 3-D tissue dynamics with registration-enhanced displacement encoded MRI.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Arnold D; Merchant, Samer S; Hsu, Edward W

    2014-06-01

    Displacement fields are important to analyze deformation, which is associated with functional and material tissue properties often used as indicators of health. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques like DENSE and image registration methods like Hyperelastic Warping have been used to produce pixel-level deformation fields that are desirable in high-resolution analysis. However, DENSE can be complicated by challenges associated with image phase unwrapping, in particular offset determination. On the other hand, Hyperelastic Warping can be hampered by low local image contrast. The current work proposes a novel approach for measuring tissue displacement with both DENSE and Hyperelastic Warping, incorporating physically accurate displacements obtained by the latter to improve phase characterization in DENSE. The validity of the proposed technique is demonstrated using numerical and physical phantoms, and in vivo small animal cardiac MRI. PMID:24771572

  3. Accurate High-Resolution Measurements of 3-D Tissue Dynamics With Registration-Enhanced Displacement Encoded MRI

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Samer S.; Hsu, Edward W.

    2014-01-01

    Displacement fields are important to analyze deformation, which is associated with functional and material tissue properties often used as indicators of health. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques like DENSE and image registration methods like Hyperelastic Warping have been used to produce pixel-level deformation fields that are desirable in high-resolution analysis. However, DENSE can be complicated by challenges associated with image phase unwrapping, in particular offset determination. On the other hand, Hyperelastic Warping can be hampered by low local image contrast. The current work proposes a novel approach for measuring tissue displacement with both DENSE and Hyperelastic Warping, incorporating physically accurate displacements obtained by the latter to improve phase characterization in DENSE. The validity of the proposed technique is demonstrated using numerical and physical phantoms, and in vivo small animal cardiac MRI. PMID:24771572

  4. Facile non-hydrothermal synthesis of oligosaccharides coated sub-5 nm magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with dual MRI contrast enhancement effect

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jing; Wang, Liya; Zhong, Xiaodong; Li, Yuancheng; Yang, Lily

    2014-01-01

    Ultrafine sub-5 nm magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with oligosaccharides (SIO) with dual T1-T2 weighted contrast enhancing effect and fast clearance has been developed as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent. Excellent water solubility, biocompatibility and high stability of such sub-5 nm SIO nanoparticles were achieved by using the “in-situ polymerization” coating method, which enables glucose forming oligosaccharides directly on the surface of hydrophobic iron oxide nanocrystals. Reported ultrafine SIO nanoparticles exhibit a longitudinal relaxivity (r1) of 4.1 mM−1s−1 and a r1/r2 ratio of 0.25 at 3 T (clinical field strength), rendering improved T1 or “brighter” contrast enhancement in T1-weighted MRI in addition to typical T2 or “darkening” contrast of conventional iron oxide nanoparticles. Such dual contrast effect can be demonstrated in liver imaging with T2 “darkening” contrast in the liver parenchyma but T1 “bright” contrast in the hepatic vasculature. More importantly, this new class of ultrafine sub-5 nm iron oxide nanoparticles showed much faster body clearance than those with larger sizes, promising better safety for clinical applications. PMID:25181490

  5. Enhancing insight in scientific problem solving by highlighting the functional features of prototypes: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xin; Cui, Shuai; Li, Wenfu; Yang, Wenjing; Qiu, Jiang; Zhang, Qinglin

    2013-10-01

    Insight can be the first step toward creating a groundbreaking product. As evident in anecdotes and major inventions in history, heuristic events (heuristic prototypes) prompted inventors to acquire insight when solving problems. Bionic imitation in scientific innovation is an example of this kind of problem solving. In particular, heuristic prototypes (e.g., the lotus effect; the very high water repellence exhibited by lotus leaves) help solve insight problems (e.g., non-stick surfaces). We speculated that the biological functional feature of prototypes is a critical factor in inducing insightful scientific problem solving. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we selected scientific innovation problems and utilized "learning prototypes-solving problems" two-phase paradigm to test the supposition. We also explored its neural mechanisms. Functional MRI data showed that the activation of the middle temporal gyrus (MTG, BA 37) and the middle occipital gyrus (MOG, BA 19) were associated with the highlighted functional feature condition. fMRI data also indicated that the MTG (BA 37) could be responsible for the semantic processing of functional features and for the formation of novel associations based on related functions. In addition, the MOG (BA 19) could be involved in the visual imagery of formation and application of function association between the heuristic prototype and problem. Our findings suggest that both semantic processing and visual imagery could be crucial components underlying scientific problem solving. PMID:23994216

  6. MO-G-BRF-02: Enhancement of Texture-Based Metastasis Prediction Models Via the Optimization of PET/MRI Acquisition Protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Vallieres, M; Laberge, S; Levesque I, R; El Naqa, I

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We have previously identified a prediction model of lung metastases at diagnosis of soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) that is composed of two textural features extracted from FDG-PET and T1-weighted (T1w) MRI scans. The goal of this study is to evaluate whether the optimization in FDGPET and MRI acquisition parameters would enhance the prediction performance of texture-based models. Methods: Ten FDG-PET and T1w- MRI digitized tumor models were generated from imaging data of STS patients who underwent pre-treatment clinical scans between 2005 and 2011. Five of ten patients eventually developed lung metastases. Numerically simulated MR images were produced using echo times (TE) of 2 and 4 times the nominal clinical parameter (TEc), and repetition times (TR) of 0.5, 0.67, 1.5 and 2 times the nominal clinical parameter (TRc) found in the DICOM headers (TEc range: 9–13 ms, TRc range: 410-667 ms). PET 2D images were simulated using Monte-Carlo and were reconstructed using an ordered-subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) algorithm with 1 to 32 iterations and a post-reconstruction Gaussian filter of 0, 2, 4 or 6 mm width. For all possible combinations of PET and MRI acquisition parameters, the prediction model was constructed using logistic regression with new coefficients, and its associated prediction performance for lung metastases was evaluated using the area under the ROC curve (AUC). Results: The prediction performance over all simulations yielded AUCs ranging from 0.7 to 1. Notably, TR values below or equal to TRc and higher PET post-reconstruction filter widths yielded higher prediction performance. The best results were obtained with a combination of 4*TEc, TRc, 30 OSEM iterations and 2mm filter width. Conclusion: This work indicates that texture-based metastasis prediction models could be improved using optimized choices of FDG-PET and MRI acquisition protocols. This principle could be generalized to other texture-based models.

  7. Enhanced multi-protocol analysis via intelligent supervised embedding (EMPrAvISE): detecting prostate cancer on multi-parametric MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanath, Satish; Bloch, B. Nicholas; Chappelow, Jonathan; Patel, Pratik; Rofsky, Neil; Lenkinski, Robert; Genega, Elizabeth; Madabhushi, Anant

    2011-03-01

    Currently, there is significant interest in developing methods for quantitative integration of multi-parametric (structural, functional) imaging data with the objective of building automated meta-classifiers to improve disease detection, diagnosis, and prognosis. Such techniques are required to address the differences in dimensionalities and scales of individual protocols, while deriving an integrated multi-parametric data representation which best captures all disease-pertinent information available. In this paper, we present a scheme called Enhanced Multi-Protocol Analysis via Intelligent Supervised Embedding (EMPrAvISE); a powerful, generalizable framework applicable to a variety of domains for multi-parametric data representation and fusion. Our scheme utilizes an ensemble of embeddings (via dimensionality reduction, DR); thereby exploiting the variance amongst multiple uncorrelated embeddings in a manner similar to ensemble classifier schemes (e.g. Bagging, Boosting). We apply this framework to the problem of prostate cancer (CaP) detection on 12 3 Tesla pre-operative in vivo multi-parametric (T2-weighted, Dynamic Contrast Enhanced, and Diffusion-weighted) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, in turn comprising a total of 39 2D planar MR images. We first align the different imaging protocols via automated image registration, followed by quantification of image attributes from individual protocols. Multiple embeddings are generated from the resultant high-dimensional feature space which are then combined intelligently to yield a single stable solution. Our scheme is employed in conjunction with graph embedding (for DR) and probabilistic boosting trees (PBTs) to detect CaP on multi-parametric MRI. Finally, a probabilistic pairwise Markov Random Field algorithm is used to apply spatial constraints to the result of the PBT classifier, yielding a per-voxel classification of CaP presence. Per-voxel evaluation of detection results against ground truth for Ca

  8. Free-Breathing Contrast-Enhanced Multiphase MRI of the Liver Using a Combination of Compressed Sensing, Parallel Imaging, and Golden-Angle Radial Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Chandarana, Hersh; Feng, Li; Block, Tobias K.; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B.; Lim, Ruth P.; Babb, James S.; Sodickson, Daniel K.; Otazo, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objectives of this study were to develop a new method for free-breathing contrast-enhanced multiphase liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a combination of compressed sensing, parallel imaging, and radial k-space sampling and to demonstrate the feasibility of this method by performing image quality comparison with breath-hold cartesian T1-weighted (conventional) postcontrast acquisitions in healthy participants. Materials and Methods This Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act–compliant prospective study received approval from the institutional review board. Eight participants underwent 3 separate contrast-enhanced fat-saturated T1-weighted gradient-echo MRI examinations with matching imaging parameters: conventional breath-hold examination with cartesian k-space sampling volumetric interpolate breath hold examination (BH-VIBE) and free-breathing acquisitions with interleaved angle-bisection and continuous golden-angle radial sampling schemes. Interleaved angle-bisection and golden-angle data from each 100 consecutive spokes were reconstructed using a combination of compressed sensing and parallel imaging (interleaved-angle radial sparse parallel [IARASP] and golden-angle radial sparse parallel [GRASP]) to generate multiple postcontrast phases. Arterial- and venous-phase BH-VIBE, IARASP, and GRASP reconstructions were evaluated by 2 radiologists in a blinded fashion. The readers independently assessed quality of enhancement (QE), overall image quality (IQ), and other parameters of image quality on a 5-point scale, with the highest score indicating the most desirable examination. Mixed model analysis of variance was used to compare each measure of image quality. Results Images of BH-VIBE and GRASP had significantly higher QE and IQ values compared with IARASP for both phases (P < 0.05). The differences in QE between BH-VIBE and GRASP for the arterial and venous phases were not significant (P > 0.05). Although GRASP had lower IQ

  9. Identification of localized redox states in plant-type two-iron ferrodoxins using the nuclear Overhauser effect

    SciTech Connect

    Dugad, L.B.; La Mar, G.N. ); Banci, L.; Bertini, I. )

    1990-03-06

    The homonuclear Overhauser effect (NOE), in conjunction with nonselective spin-lattice relaxation measurements, has been employed to assign the contact-shifted resonances for the reduced form of two typical plant-type two-iron ferrodoxins from the algae Spirulina platensis and Porphyra umbilicalis. These results demonstrate that the NOE should have broad general applicability for the assignments and electronic structural elucidation of diverse subclasses of paramagnetic iron-sulfur cluster proteins. NOE connectivities were detected only among sets of resonances exhibiting characteristically different deviations from Curie behavior, providing strong support for the applicability of the spin Hamiltonian formulation for the NMR properties of the antiferromagnetically coupled iron clusters. The geminal {beta}-methylene protons for the two cysteines bound to the iron(II) center were clearly identified, as well as the C{sub {alpha}}H and one C{sub {beta}}H for each of the cysteines bound to the iron(III). The identification of the iron bound to cysteines 41 and 46 as the iron(II) in the reduced protein was effected on the basis of dipolar contacts between the bound cysteines. Resolved labile proton contact-shifted resonances are attributed to hydrogen bonding to the iron(III) center, and it is concluded that the contact-shifted resonances for the more numerous hydrogen bonds to the iron(II) center are not resolved from the diamagnetic envelope. The identification of the iron closer to the protein surface as the more reducible one is consistent with predictions based on a larger number of hydrogen bonds to this center.

  10. Enhancement of temporal resolution and BOLD sensitivity in real-time fMRI using multi-slab echo-volumar imaging.

    PubMed

    Posse, Stefan; Ackley, Elena; Mutihac, Radu; Rick, Jochen; Shane, Matthew; Murray-Krezan, Cristina; Zaitsev, Maxim; Speck, Oliver

    2012-05-15

    In this study, a new approach to high-speed fMRI using multi-slab echo-volumar imaging (EVI) is developed that minimizes geometrical image distortion and spatial blurring, and enables nonaliased sampling of physiological signal fluctuation to increase BOLD sensitivity compared to conventional echo-planar imaging (EPI). Real-time fMRI using whole brain 4-slab EVI with 286 ms temporal resolution (4mm isotropic voxel size) and partial brain 2-slab EVI with 136 ms temporal resolution (4×4×6 mm(3) voxel size) was performed on a clinical 3 Tesla MRI scanner equipped with 12-channel head coil. Four-slab EVI of visual and motor tasks significantly increased mean (visual: 96%, motor: 66%) and maximum t-score (visual: 263%, motor: 124%) and mean (visual: 59%, motor: 131%) and maximum (visual: 29%, motor: 67%) BOLD signal amplitude compared with EPI. Time domain moving average filtering (2s width) to suppress physiological noise from cardiac and respiratory fluctuations further improved mean (visual: 196%, motor: 140%) and maximum (visual: 384%, motor: 200%) t-scores and increased extents of activation (visual: 73%, motor: 70%) compared to EPI. Similar sensitivity enhancement, which is attributed to high sampling rate at only moderately reduced temporal signal-to-noise ratio (mean: -52%) and longer sampling of the BOLD effect in the echo-time domain compared to EPI, was measured in auditory cortex. Two-slab EVI further improved temporal resolution for measuring task-related activation and enabled mapping of five major resting state networks (RSNs) in individual subjects in 5 min scans. The bilateral sensorimotor, the default mode and the occipital RSNs were detectable in time frames as short as 75 s. In conclusion, the high sampling rate of real-time multi-slab EVI significantly improves sensitivity for studying the temporal dynamics of hemodynamic responses and for characterizing functional networks at high field strength in short measurement times. PMID:22398395

  11. Enhancement of Temporal Resolution and BOLD Sensitivity in Real-Time fMRI using Multi-Slab Echo-Volumar Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Posse, Stefan; Ackley, Elena; Mutihac, Radu; Rick, Jochen; Shane, Matthew; Murray-Krezan, Cristina; Zaitsev, Maxim; Speck, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a new approach to high-speed fMRI using multi-slab echo-volumar imaging (EVI) is developed that minimizes geometrical image distortion and spatial blurring, and enables nonaliased sampling of physiological signal fluctuation to increase BOLD sensitivity compared to conventional echo-planar imaging (EPI). Real-time fMRI using whole brain 4-slab EVI with 286 ms temporal resolution (4 mm isotropic voxel size) and partial brain 2-slab EVI with 136 ms temporal resolution (4×4×6 mm3 voxel size) was performed on a clinical 3 Tesla MRI scanner equipped with 12-channel head coil. Four-slab EVI of visual and motor tasks significantly increased mean (visual: 96%, motor: 66%) and maximum t-score (visual: 263%, motor: 124%) and mean (visual: 59%, motor: 131%) and maximum (visual: 29%, motor: 67%) BOLD signal amplitude compared with EPI. Time domain moving average filtering (2 s width) to suppress physiological noise from cardiac and respiratory fluctuations further improved mean (visual: 196%, motor: 140%) and maximum (visual: 384%, motor: 200%) t-scores and increased extents of activation (visual: 73%, motor: 70%) compared to EPI. Similar sensitivity enhancement, which is attributed to high sampling rate at only moderately reduced temporal signal-to-noise ratio (mean: − 52%) and longer sampling of the BOLD effect in the echo-time domain compared to EPI, was measured in auditory cortex. Two-slab EVI further improved temporal resolution for measuring task-related activation and enabled mapping of five major resting state networks (RSNs) in individual subjects in 5 min scans. The bilateral sensorimotor, the default mode and the occipital RSNs were detectable in time frames as short as 75 s. In conclusion, the high sampling rate of real-time multi-slab EVI significantly improves sensitivity for studying the temporal dynamics of hemodynamic responses and for characterizing functional networks at high field strength in short measurement times. PMID:22398395

  12. Correcting for Blood Arrival Time in Global Mean Regression Enhances Functional Connectivity Analysis of Resting State fMRI-BOLD Signals

    PubMed Central

    Erdoğan, Sinem B.; Tong, Yunjie; Hocke, Lia M.; Lindsey, Kimberly P.; deB Frederick, Blaise

    2016-01-01

    Resting state functional connectivity analysis is a widely used method for mapping intrinsic functional organization of the brain. Global signal regression (GSR) is commonly employed for removing systemic global variance from resting state BOLD-fMRI data; however, recent studies have demonstrated that GSR may introduce spurious negative correlations within and between functional networks, calling into question the meaning of anticorrelations reported between some networks. In the present study, we propose that global signal from resting state fMRI is composed primarily of systemic low frequency oscillations (sLFOs) that propagate with cerebral blood circulation throughout the brain. We introduce a novel systemic noise removal strategy for resting state fMRI data, “dynamic global signal regression” (dGSR), which applies a voxel-specific optimal time delay to the global signal prior to regression from voxel-wise time series. We test our hypothesis on two functional systems that are suggested to be intrinsically organized into anticorrelated networks: the default mode network (DMN) and task positive network (TPN). We evaluate the efficacy of dGSR and compare its performance with the conventional “static” global regression (sGSR) method in terms of (i) explaining systemic variance in the data and (ii) enhancing specificity and sensitivity of functional connectivity measures. dGSR increases the amount of BOLD signal variance being modeled and removed relative to sGSR while reducing spurious negative correlations introduced in reference regions by sGSR, and attenuating inflated positive connectivity measures. We conclude that incorporating time delay information for sLFOs into global noise removal strategies is of crucial importance for optimal noise removal from resting state functional connectivity maps. PMID:27445751

  13. Angiogenic response of MCF7 human breast cancer to hormonal treatment: assessment by dynamic GdDTPA-enhanced MRI at high spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Furman-Haran, E; Margalit, R; Maretzek, A F; Degani, H

    1996-01-01

    Dynamic gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA)-enhanced MRI was followed during growth and regression of MCF7 human breast tumors implanted in nude mice in the presence of estrogen and tamoxifen, respectively. Gradient-echo and spin-echo sequences were applied at a temporal resolution of 12 and 100 seconds, respectively, and a spatial resolution of 195 x 390 x 1000 microns. Maps of initial rates of contrast enhancement demonstrated stimulation of local growth of permeable microcapillaries at regions bordering necrotic areas, resulting from tamoxifen treatment. This localized angiogenic stimulation was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining of endothelial cells. After 1 week of tamoxifen treatment, the fraction of tumor pixels exhibiting rapid initial rate of contrast enhancement increased significantly from .28 +/- .05 to .46 +/- .06. In parallel, the fraction of tumor area showing contrast enhancement 3 minutes after Gd-DTPA injection also increased significantly, from .42 +/- .06 to .58 +/- .06. On the basis of these changes, it was possible to assess the response to tamoxifen therapy at an early stage. PMID:8851428

  14. Quasi-Cubic Magnetite/Silica Core-Shell Nanoparticles as Enhanced MRI Contrast Agents for Cancer Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cowell, Simon F.; Garg, Ashish; Eu, Peter; Bhargava, Suresh K.; Bansal, Vipul

    2011-01-01

    Development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents that can be readily applied for imaging of biological tissues under clinical settings is a challenging task. This is predominantly due to the expectation of an ideal MR agent being able to be synthesized in large quantities, possessing longer shelf life, reasonable biocompatibility, tolerance against its aggregation in biological fluids, and high relaxivity, resulting in better contrast during biological imaging. Although a repertoire of reports address various aforementioned issues, the previously reported results are far from optimal, which necessitates further efforts in this area. In this study, we demonstrate facile large-scale synthesis of sub-100 nm quasi-cubic magnetite and magnetite/silica core-shell (Mag@SiO2) nanoparticles and their applicability as a biocompatible T2 contrast agent for MRI of biological tissues. Our study suggests that silica-coated magnetite nanoparticles reported in this study can potentially act as improved MR contrast agents by addressing a number of aforementioned issues, including longer shelf life and stability in biological fluids. Additionally, our in vitro and in vivo studies clearly demonstrate the importance of silica coating towards improved applicability of T2 contrast agents for cancer imaging. PMID:21747962

  15. In Vivo Tracking of Phagocytic Immune Cells Using a Dual Imaging Probe with Gadolinium-Enhanced MRI and Near-Infrared Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Joong; Bhuniya, Sankarprasad; Lee, Hyunseung; Kim, Hyun Min; Shin, Weon Sup; Kim, Jong Seung; Hong, Kwan Soo

    2016-04-27

    A novel dual imaging probe for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and optical imaging was developed by combining gadolinium (Gd)-chelating MR probe and a near-infrared (NIR) fluorophore, aza-BODIPY (AB; BODIPY = boron-dipyrromethene). This aza-BODIPY-based bimodal contrast agent (AB-BCA) showed a significant fluorescence emission around the NIR range and an enhanced longitudinal relaxivity in MR modality. The probe was easily delivered to phagocytic cells of the innate immune system, together with macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), and presented high-performance fluorescence and MR imaging without obvious cytotoxicity. For in vivo visualization of AB-BCA using MRI and optical imaging, bone marrow-derived DCs were labeled and injected into the footpad of mice, and labeled DCs were tracked in vivo. We observed the migration of AB-BCA-labeled DCs into the lymph nodes via lymphatic vessels using NIR fluorescence and T1-weighted MR images. This dual-modality imaging probe was used for noninvasive monitoring of DC migration into lymph nodes and could be useful for investigating advanced cellular immunotherapy. PMID:27058603

  16. Validation of 10-Minute Delayed Hepatocyte Phase Imaging with 30° Flip Angle in Gadoxetic Acid-Enhanced MRI for the Detection of Liver Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dahye; Cho, Eun-Suk; Kim, Dae Jung; Kim, Joo Hee; Yu, Jeong-Sik; Chung, Jae-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To compare 10-minute delayed hepatocyte phase imaging using a 30° flip angle (10min-FA30) and 20-minute hepatocyte phase imaging using a 10° FA (20min-FA10) in gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI of patients with possible liver metastases, regarding lesion-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and focal hepatic lesion (FHL) detection to evaluate whether 10min-FA30 would be superior to 20min-FA10. Materials and Methods Eighty-three patients with 248 liver metastases and 78 benign FHLs who underwent gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI with 10min-FA30 and 20min-FA10 were enrolled. Lesion-to-liver CNRs were compared between the two image groups. Two radiologists independently assessed the presence of FHLs using a four-point scale and detection sensitivity was calculated. Results The mean CNR for liver metastases on the 10min-FA30 (248.5 ± 101.6) were significantly higher than that of the 20min-FA10 (187.4 ± 77.4) (p < 0.001). The mean CNR difference between the two image groups was 61.2 ± 56.8. There was no significant difference in detection sensitivity of FHLs for two readers between 10min-FA30 (mean 97.7%) and 20min-FA10 (mean 97.9%), irrespective of the lesion size or malignancy. Conclusion 10min-FA30 yielded higher CNR with similar sensitivity compared to 20min-FA10. This finding indicates that 10min-FA30 can potentially replace 20min-FA10 with higher diagnostic performance and save 10 minutes of time. PMID:26444677

  17. Comparison of gadoxetic acid and gadopentetate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI for HCC detection: prospective crossover study at 3 T

    PubMed Central

    Besa, Cecilia; Kakite, Suguru; Cooper, Nancy; Facciuto, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Background Gadoxetic acid and gadopentetate dimeglumine are gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) with an established role in HCC detection and characterization. Purpose To compare gadopentetate dimeglumine and gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for image quality and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) detection/conspicuity. Material and Methods In this IRB approved cross-over pilot prospective study, 12 patients (all men; mean age, 56 years) with chronic liver disease at risk of HCC underwent two repeat MRI examinations using gadopentetate dimeglumine and gadoxetic acid (mean interval between studies, 5 days). Two independent observers analyzed images for image quality and HCC detection/conspicuity. Per-lesion sensitivity, positive predictive value, quantitative enhancement, and lesion-to-liver contrast ratio were calculated for both contrast agents. Results There was no significant difference in image quality scores between both GBCAs (P = 0.3). A total of 20 HCCs were identified with reference standard in 12 patients (mean size 2.6 cm, range, 1.0–5.0 cm). Higher sensitivity was seen for observer 1 for gadoxetic acid-set in comparison with gadopentetate dimeglumine-set (sensitivity increased from 85.7% to 92.8%), while no difference was noted for observer 2 (sensitivity of 78.5%). Lesion conspicuity was significantly higher on hepatobiliary phase (HBP) images compared to arterial phase images with both GBCAs for both observers (P < 0.05). Lesion-to-liver contrast ratios were significantly higher for HBP compared to all dynamic phases for both agents (P < 0.05). Conclusion Our initial experience suggests that gadoxetic acid-set was superior to gadopentetate dimeglumine-set in terms of HCC detection for one observer, with improved lesion conspicuity and liver-to-lesion contrast on HBP images. PMID:25793110

  18. Dynamic contrast enhanced-magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) of photodynamic therapy (PDT) outcome and associated changes in the blood-brain barrier following Pc 4-PDT of glioma in an athymic nude rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belle, Vaijayantee; Anka, Ali; Cross, Nathan; Thompson, Paul; Mott, Eric; Sharma, Rahul; Gray, Kayla; Zhang, Ruozhen; Xu, Yueshuo; Sun, Jiayang; Flask, Chris A.; Oleinick, Nancy L.; Dean, David

    2012-02-01

    Introduction: Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) appears to provide an unambiguous means of tracking the outcome of photodynamic therapy (PDT) of brain tumors with the photosensitizer Pc 4. The increase in Gd enhancement observed after Pc 4-PDT may be due to a temporary opening of the blood-brain-barrier which, as noted by others, may offer a therapeutic window. Methods: We injected 2.5 x 105 U87 cells into the brains of 9 athymic nude rats. After 8-9 days peri-tumor DCE-MRI images were acquired on a 7.0 T microMRI scanner before and after the administration of 150 μL Gd. DCE-MRI scans were repeated three times following Pc 4-PDT. Results: The average, normalized peak enhancement in the tumor region, approximately 30-90 seconds after Gd administration, was 1.31 times greater than baseline (0.03 Standard Error [SE]) prior to PDT and was 1.44 (0.02 SE) times baseline in the first Post-PDT scans (Day 11), a statistically significant (p ~ 0.014, N=8) increase over the Pre- PDT scans, and was 1.38 (0.02 SE) times baseline in the second scans (Day 12), also a statistically significant (p ~ 0.008, N=7) increase. Observations were mixed in the third Post-PDT scans (Day 13), averaging 1.29 (0.03 SE) times baseline (p ~ 0.66, N=7). Overall a downward trend in enhancement was observed from the first to the third Post-PDT scans. Discussion: DCE-MRI may provide an unambiguous indication of brain tumor PDT outcome. The initial increase in DCE-MRI signal may correlate with a temporary, PDT-induced opening of the blood-brain-barrier, creating a potential therapeutic window.

  19. SElf-gated Non-Contrast-Enhanced FUnctional Lung imaging (SENCEFUL) using a quasi-random fast low-angle shot (FLASH) sequence and proton MRI.

    PubMed

    Fischer, André; Weick, Stefan; Ritter, Christian O; Beer, Meinrad; Wirth, Clemens; Hebestreit, Helge; Jakob, Peter M; Hahn, Dietbert; Bley, Thorsten; Köstler, Herbert

    2014-08-01

    Obtaining functional information on the human lung is of tremendous interest in the characterization of lung defects and pathologies. However, pulmonary ventilation and perfusion maps usually require contrast agents and the application of electrocardiogram (ECG) triggering and breath holds to generate datasets free of motion artifacts. This work demonstrates the possibility of obtaining highly resolved perfusion-weighted and ventilation-weighted images of the human lung using proton MRI and the SElf-gated Non-Contrast-Enhanced FUnctional Lung imaging (SENCEFUL) technique. The SENCEFUL technique utilizes a two-dimensional fast low-angle shot (FLASH) sequence with quasi-random sampling of phase-encoding (PE) steps for data acquisition. After every readout, a short additional acquisition of the non-phase-encoded direct current (DC) signal necessary for self-gating was added. By sorting the quasi-randomly acquired data according to respiratory and cardiac phase derived from the DC signal, datasets of representative respiratory and cardiac cycles could be accurately reconstructed. By application of the Fourier transform along the temporal dimension, functional maps (perfusion and ventilation) were obtained. These maps were compared with dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE, perfusion) as well as standard Fourier decomposition (FD, ventilation) reference datasets. All datasets were additionally scored by two experienced radiologists to quantify image quality. In addition, one initial patient examination using SENCEFUL was performed. Functional images of healthy volunteers and a patient diagnosed with hypoplasia of the left pulmonary artery and left-sided pulmonary fibrosis were successfully obtained. Perfusion-weighted images corresponded well to DCE-MRI data; ventilation-weighted images offered a significantly better depiction of the lung periphery compared with standard FD. Furthermore, the SENCEFUL technique hints at a potential clinical relevance by successfully detecting

  20. Ion pairing and salt structure in organic salts through diffusion, Overhauser, DFT and X-ray methods.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Aitor; Pregosin, Paul S; Veiros, Luis F; Albinati, Alberto; Rizzato, Silvia

    2009-07-13

    Pulsed gradient spin-echo (PGSE) diffusion characteristics for a) the new [brucinium][X] salts 6 a-f [a: X = BF(4)(-); b: X = PF(6)(-); c: X = MeSO(3)(-), d: X = CF(3)SO(3)(-); e: X = BArF(-); f: X = PtCl(3)(C(2)H(4))(-)], b) 4-tert-butyl-N-benzyl analogue, 7 and c) the aryl carbocations (p-R-C(6)H(4))(2)CH 9 a (R = CH(3)O) and 9 b (R = (CH(3))(2)N), (p-CH(3)O-C(6)H(4))(x)CPh(3-x)(+) 10 a-c (x = 1-3, respectively) and (p-R-C(6)H(4))(3)C(+) 11 (R = (CH(3))(2)N) and 12 (R = H) all in several different solvents, are reported. The solvent dependence suggests strong ion pairing in CDCl(3), intermediate ion pairing in CD(2)Cl(2) and little ion pairing in [D(6)]acetone. (1)H, (19)F HOESY NMR spectra (HOESY: heteronuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy) for 6 and 7 reveal a specific approach of the anion with respect to the brucinium cation plus subtle changes, which are related to the anion itself. Further, for carbocations 9-12, (all as BF(4)(-) salts) based on the NOE results, one finds marked changes in the relative positions of the BF(4)(-) anion. In these aryl cationic species the anion can be located either a) very close to the carbonium ion carbon b) in an intermediate position or c) proximate to the N or O atom of the p-substituent and remote from the formally positive C atom. This represents the first example of such a positional dependence of an anion on the structure of the carbocation. DFT calculations support the experimental HOESY results. The solid-state structures for 6 c and the novel Zeise's salt derivative, [brucinium][PtCl(3)(C(2)H(4))], 6 f, are reported. Analysis of (195)Pt NMR and other NMR measurements suggest that the eta(2)-C(2)H(4) bonding to the platinum centre in 6 f is very similar to that found in K[PtCl(3)(C(2)H(4))]. Field dependent T(1) measurements on [brucinium][PtCl(3)(C(2)H(4))] and K[PtCl(3)(C(2)H(4))], are reported and suggested to be useful in recognizing aggregation effects. PMID:19504520

  1. Quantitative Measurement of Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability in Human Using Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI with Fast T1 Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Taheri, Saeid; Gasparovic, Charles; Shah, Nadim Jon; Rosenberg, Gary A.

    2016-01-01

    Breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), occurring in many neurological diseases, has been difficult to measure noninvasively in humans. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging measures BBB permeability. However, important technical challenges remain and normative data from healthy humans is lacking. We report the implementation of a method for measuring BBB permeability, originally developed in animals, to estimate BBB permeability in both healthy subjects and patients with white matter pathology. Fast T1 mapping was used to measure the leakage of contrast agent Gadolinium diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) from plasma into brain. A quarter of the standard Gd-DTPA dose for dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging was found to give both sufficient contrast-to-noise and high T1 sensitivity. The Patlak graphical approach was used to calculate the permeability from changes in 1/T1. Permeability constants were compared with cerebrospinal fluid albumin index. The upper limit of the 95% confidence interval for white matter BBB permeability for normal subjects was 3 × 10−4 L/g min. MRI measurements correlated strongly with levels of cerebrospinal fluid albumin in those subjects undergoing lumbar puncture. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging with low dose Gd-DTPA and fast T1 imaging is a sensitive method to measure subtle differences in BBB permeability in humans and may have advantages over techniques based purely on the measurement of pixel contrast changes. PMID:21413067

  2. Safety and Efficacy of Gadoxetate Disodium–Enhanced Liver MRI in Pediatric Patients Aged >2 Months to <18 Years—Results of a Retrospective, Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Geller, James; Kasahara, Mureo; Martinez, Mercedes; Soresina, Annarosa; Kashanian, Fran; Endrikat, Jan

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To assess the safety and efficacy of gadoxetate disodium–enhanced liver MR imaging in pediatric patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS Retrospective, multicenter study including pediatric patients aged >2 months to <18 years who underwent contrast-enhanced liver MRI due to focal liver lesions. A single intravenous bolus injection of 0.025 to 0.05 mmol/kg body weight of gadoxetate disodium was administered. Adverse events (AEs) up to 24 hours after injection were recorded and a one-year follow-up was conducted for all serious and unexpected AEs. Efficacy was defined based on the additional diagnostic information obtained from the combined (pre- and postcontrast) image sets as compared with the precontrast image sets by blinded reading. RESULTS A total of 52 patients for safety and 51 patients for efficacy analyses were evaluated. Twenty-two patients (42.3%) reported a total of 51 serious AEs (SAEs) and one AE after one year. No SAE or AE was related to gadoxetate disodium injection. Gadoxetate disodium–related effects on vital signs were not seen. Additional diagnostic information was obtained for 86.3% of patients. The three most improved efficacy variables were lesion-to-background contrast, lesion characterization, and improved border delineation in 78.4%, 76.5%, and 70.6% of patients, respectively. CONCLUSION Gadoxetate disodium in pediatric patients did not raise any clinically significant safety concern. Contrast enhancement provided additional clinically relevant information. PMID:27478381

  3. Effects of cortical activations on enhancement of handgrip force during teeth clenching: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Kawakubo, Naomi; Miyamoto, Jun J; Katsuyama, Narumi; Ono, Takashi; Honda, Ei-Ichi; Kurabayashi, Tohru; Taira, Masato; Moriyama, Keiji

    2014-02-01

    We assessed the effect of teeth clenching on handgrip force behaviorally, and investigated cortical activity during the occurrence of facilitatory effects using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Twenty-three participants were assessed as to whether they had habitual teeth clenching during maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) exertion, and 21 of them were identified to have such a habit. For those participants, behavioral testing showed that MVC with clenching was greater compared with without clenching (approximately 108% greater on average). Next, cortical activity was measured under gripping with clenching (GwC), gripping without clenching (GwoC), and teeth clenching (C) conditions. We found that the activity of the hand region in primary motor cortex (M1), cingulate motor area/supplementary motor area (CMA/SMA) and anterior cerebellum (AC) was greater in contrast of GwC vs. (GwoC+C). Furthermore, significant correlation was observed between the increasing ratio of the handgrip force and the % signal change in the hand region of M1 and AC, but not in CMA/SMA. These results suggest that the activation in the hand region of M1 and AC may facilitate the spinal motoneurons, and the activation in the hand region in M1 by clenching may be due to a signal from CMA/SMA. PMID:24326095

  4. Segmental Difference of the Hepatic Fibrosis from Chronic Viral Hepatitis due to Hepatitis B versus C Virus Infection: Comparison Using Dual Contrast Material-Enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Jae Ho; Chung, Jae-Joon; Kim, Joo Hee; Kim, Ki Whang

    2011-01-01

    Objective We wanted to identify the geographic differences in hepatic fibrosis and their associations with the atrophy-hypertrophy complex in patients with chronic viral hepatitis using the dual-contrast material-enhanced MRI (DC-MRI) with gadopentetate dimeglumine and ferucarbotran. Materials and Methods Patients with chronic C (n = 22) and B-viral hepatitis (n = 35) were enrolled for determining the subjective grade of fibrosis (the extent and thickness of fibrotic reticulations) in the right lobe (RL), the caudate lobe (CL), the medial segment (MS) and the lateral segment (LS) of the liver, with using a 5-grade scale, on the gradient echo T2*-weighted images of DC-MRI. The fibrosis grades of different segments were compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test followed by post-hoc analysis to establish the segment-by-segment differences. The incidences of two pre-established morphologic signs of cirrhosis were also compared with each other between the two groups of patients. Results There were significant intersegmental differences in fibrosis grades of the C-viral group (p = 0.005), and the CL showed lower fibrosis grades as compared with the grades of the RL and MS, whereas all lobes were similarly affected in the B-viral group (p = 0.221). The presence of a right posterior hepatic notch was significantly higher in the patients with intersegmental differences of fibrosis between the RL and the CL (19 out of 25, 76%) than those without such differences (6 out of 32, 19%) (p < 0.001). An expanded gallbladder fossa showed no significant relationship (p = 0.327) with the segmental difference of the fibrosis grades between the LS and the MS. Conclusion The relative lack of fibrosis in the CL with more advanced fibrosis in the RL can be a distinguishing feature to differentiate chronic C-viral hepatitis from chronic B-viral hepatitis and this is closely related to the presence of a right posterior hepatic notch. PMID:21852903

  5. Assessment of the Precision and Reproducibility of Ventricular Volume, Function and Mass Measurements with Ferumoxytol-Enhanced 4D Flow MRI

    PubMed Central

    Hanneman, Kate; Kino, Aya; Cheng, Joseph Y; Alley, Marcus T; Vasanawala, Shreyas S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the precision and inter-observer agreement of ventricular volume, function and mass quantification by three-dimensional time-resolved (4D) flow MRI relative to cine steady state free precession (SSFP). Materials and Methods With research board approval, informed consent, and HIPAA compliance, 22 consecutive patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) (10 males, 6.4±4.8 years) referred for 3T ferumoxytol-enhanced cardiac MRI were prospectively recruited. Complete ventricular coverage with standard 2D short-axis cine SSFP and whole chest coverage with axial 4D flow were obtained. Two blinded radiologists independently segmented images for left ventricular (LV) and right ventricular (RV) myocardium at end systole (ES) and end diastole (ED). Statistical analysis included linear regression, ANOVA, Bland-Altman (BA) analysis, and intra-class correlation (ICC). Results Significant positive correlations were found between 4D flow and SSFP for ventricular volumes (r = 0.808–0.972, p<0.001), ejection fraction (EF) (r = 0.900–928, p<0.001), and mass (r = 0.884–0.934, p<0.001). BA relative limits of agreement for both ventricles were between −52% to 34% for volumes, −29% to 27% for EF, and −41% to 48% for mass, with wider limits of agreement for the RV compared to the LV. There was no significant difference between techniques with respect to mean square difference of ED-ES mass for either LV (F=2.05, p=0.159) or RV (F=0.625, p=0.434). Inter-observer agreement was moderate to good with both 4D flow (ICC 0.523–0.993) and SSFP (ICC 0.619–0.982), with overlapping confidence intervals. Conclusion Quantification of ventricular volume, function and mass can be accomplished with 4D flow MRI with precision and inter-observer agreement comparable to that of cine SSFP. PMID:26871420

  6. Assessment of Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI in Transient Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion Model after Localized Brain Cooling in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Soo; Kwon, Mi Jung; Lee, Phil Hye; Ju, Young-Su; Yoon, Dae Young; Kim, Hye Jeong; Lee, Kwan Seop

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of localized brain cooling on blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability following transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) in rats, by using dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI. Materials and Methods Thirty rats were divided into 3 groups of 10 rats each: control group, localized cold-saline (20℃) infusion group, and localized warm-saline (37℃) infusion group. The left middle cerebral artery (MCA) was occluded for 1 hour in anesthetized rats, followed by 3 hours of reperfusion. In the localized saline infusion group, 6 mL of cold or warm saline was infused through the hollow filament for 10 minutes after MCA occlusion. DCE-MRI investigations were performed after 3 hours and 24 hours of reperfusion. Pharmacokinetic parameters of the extended Tofts-Kety model were calculated for each DCE-MRI. In addition, rotarod testing was performed before tMCAO, and on days 1-9 after tMCAO. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) immunohisto-chemistry was performed to identify infiltrating neutrophils associated with the inflammatory response in the rat brain. Results Permeability parameters showed no statistical significance between cold and warm saline infusion groups after 3-hour reperfusion 0.09 ± 0.01 min-1 vs. 0.07 ± 0.02 min-1, p = 0.661 for Ktrans; 0.30 ± 0.05 min-1 vs. 0.37 ± 0.11 min-1, p = 0.394 for kep, respectively. Behavioral testing revealed no significant difference among the three groups. However, the percentage of MPO-positive cells in the cold-saline group was significantly lower than those in the control and warm-saline groups (p < 0.05). Conclusion Localized brain cooling (20℃) does not confer a benefit to inhibit the increase in BBB permeability that follows transient cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in an animal model, as compared with localized warm-saline (37℃) infusion group. PMID:27587960

  7. Deficits in axonal transport in hippocampal-based circuitry and the visual pathway in APP knock-out animals witnessed by manganese enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Joseph J.; Zhang, Xiaowei; Ziomek, Greg; Jacobs, Russell E.; Bearer, Elaine L.

    2012-01-01

    Mounting evidence implicates axonal transport defects, typified by the presence of axonal varicosities with aberrant accumulations of cargo, as an early event in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis. Work identifying amyloid precursor protein (APP) as a vesicular motor receptor for anterograde axonal transport further implicates axonal transport in AD. Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) detects axonal transport dynamics in preclinical studies. Here we pursue an understanding of the role of APP in axonal transport in the central nervous system by applying MEMRI to hippocampal circuitry and to the visual pathway in living mice homozygous for either wild type or a deletion in the APP gene (n = 12 for each genotype). Following intra-ocular or stereotaxic hippocampal injection, we performed time-lapse MRI to detect Mn2+ transport. Three dimensional whole brain datasets were compared on a voxel-wise basis using within-group pair-wise analysis. Quantification of transport to structures connected to injection sites via axonal fiber tracts was also performed. Histology confirmed consistent placement of hippocampal injections and no observable difference in glial-response to the injections. APP −/− mice had significantly reduced transport from the hippocampus to the septal nuclei and amygdala after 7 hours and reduced transport to the contralateral hippocampus after 25 hours; axonal transport deficits in the APP −/− animals were also identified in the visual pathway. These data support a system-wide role for APP in axonal transport within the central nervous system and demonstrate the power of MEMRI for assessing neuronal circuitry involved in memory and learning. PMID:22500926

  8. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI of the Prostate With High Spatiotemporal Resolution Using Compressed Sensing, Parallel Imaging, and Continuous Golden-Angle Radial Sampling: Preliminary Experience

    PubMed Central

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B.; Geppert, Christian; Grimm, Robert; Block, Tobias K.; Glielmi, Christian; Feng, Li; Otazo, Ricardo; Ream, Justin M.; Romolo, Melanie Moccaldi; Taneja, Samir S.; Sodickson, Daniel K.; Chandarana, Hersh

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the prostate with both high spatial and temporal resolution via a combination of golden-angle radial k-space sampling, compressed sensing, and parallel-imaging reconstruction (GRASP), and to compare image quality and lesion depiction between GRASP and conventional DCE in prostate cancer patients. Materials and Methods Twenty prostate cancer patients underwent two 3T prostate MRI examinations on separate dates, one using standard DCE (spatial resolution 3.0 × 1.9 × 1.9 mm, temporal resolution 5.5 sec) and the other using GRASP (spatial resolution 3.0 × 1.1 × 1.1 mm, temporal resolution 2.3 sec). Two radiologists assessed measures of image quality and dominant lesion size. The experienced reader recorded differences in contrast arrival times between the dominant lesion and benign prostate. Results Compared with standard DCE, GRASP demonstrated significantly better clarity of the capsule, peripheral/ transition zone boundary, urethra, and periprostatic vessels; image sharpness; and lesion conspicuity for both readers (P<0.001–0.020). GRASP showed improved interreader correlation for lesion size (GRASP: r=0.691–0.824, standard: r=0.495–0.542). In 8/20 cases, only GRASP showed earlier contrast arrival in tumor than benign; in no case did only standard DCE show earlier contrast arrival in tumor. Conclusion High spatiotemporal resolution prostate DCE is possible with GRASP, which has the potential to improve image quality and lesion depiction as compared with standard DCE. PMID:24833417

  9. Gadofullerene MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Bolskar, Robert D

    2008-04-01

    A promising new class of MRI contrast-enhancing agents with high relaxivities is based on gadolinium-containing metallofullerenes, which are also termed gadofullerenes. Detailed study of the water-proton relaxivity properties and intermolecular nanoclustering behavior of gadofullerene derivatives has revealed valuable information about their relaxivity mechanisms and given a deeper understanding of this new class of paramagnetic contrast agent. Here, the latest findings on water-solubilized gadofullerene materials and how these findings relate to their future applications in MRI are reviewed and discussed. PMID:18373426

  10. Musculoskeletal MRI.

    PubMed

    Sage, Jaime E; Gavin, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    MRI has the unique ability to detect abnormal fluid content, and is therefore unparalleled in its role of detection, diagnosis, prognosis, treatment planning and follow-up evaluation of musculoskeletal disease. MRI in companion animals should be considered in the following circumstances: a definitive diagnosis cannot be made on radiographs; a patient is nonresponsive to medical or surgical therapy; prognostic information is desired; assessing surgical margins and traumatic and/or infectious joint and bone disease; ruling out subtle developmental or early aggressive bone lesions. The MRI features of common disorders affecting the shoulder, elbow, stifle, carpal, and tarsal joints are included in this chapter. PMID:26928749

  11. IMRT boost dose planning on dominant intraprostatic lesions: Gold marker-based three-dimensional fusion of CT with dynamic contrast-enhanced and {sup 1}H-spectroscopic MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Emile N.J.T. van . E-mail: E.vanLin@rther.umcn.nl; Fuetterer, Jurgen J.; Heijmink, Stijn W.T.P.J.; Vight, Lisette P. van der; Hoffmann, Aswin L.; Kollenburg, Peter van; Huisman, Henk Jan J.; Scheenen, Tom W.J.; Witjes, J. Alfred; Leer, Jan Willem; Barentsz, Jelle O.; Visser, Andries G.

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the theoretical feasibility of integrating two functional prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques (dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI [DCE-MRI] and {sup 1}H-spectroscopic MRI [MRSI]) into inverse treatment planning for definition and potential irradiation of a dominant intraprostatic lesion (DIL) as a biologic target volume for high-dose intraprostatic boosting with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: In 5 patients, four gold markers were implanted. An endorectal balloon was inserted for both CT and MRI. A DIL volume was defined by DCE-MRI and MRSI using different prostate cancer-specific physiologic (DCE-MRI) and metabolic (MRSI) parameters. CT-MRI registration was performed automatically by matching three-dimensional gold marker surface models with the iterative closest point method. DIL-IMRT plans, consisting of whole prostate irradiation to 70 Gy and a DIL boost to 90 Gy, and standard IMRT plans, in which the whole prostate was irradiated to 78 Gy were generated. The tumor control probability and rectal wall normal tissue complication probability were calculated and compared between the two IMRT approaches. Results: Combined DCE-MRI and MRSI yielded a clearly defined single DIL volume (range, 1.1-6.5 cm{sup 3}) in all patients. In this small, selected patient population, no differences in tumor control probability were found. A decrease in the rectal wall normal tissue complication probability was observed in favor of the DIL-IMRT plan versus the plan with IMRT to 78 Gy. Conclusion: Combined DCE-MRI and MRSI functional image-guided high-dose intraprostatic DIL-IMRT planned as a boost to 90 Gy is theoretically feasible. The preliminary results have indicated that DIL-IMRT may improve the therapeutic ratio by decreasing the normal tissue complication probability with an unchanged tumor control probability. A larger patient population, with more variations in the number, size, and localization of the DIL

  12. Repeat Targeted Prostate Biopsy under Guidance of Multiparametric MRI-Correlated Real-Time Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound for Patients with Previous Negative Biopsy and Elevated Prostate-Specific Antigen: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Dong Ryul; Jung, Dae Chul; Oh, Young Taik; Noh, Songmi; Han, Kyunghwa; Kim, Kiwook; Rha, Koon-Ho; Choi, Young Deuk; Hong, Sung Joon

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To prospectively determine whether multi-parametric MRI (mpMRI) - contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) correlated, imaging-guided target biopsy (TB) method could improve the detection of prostate cancer in re-biopsy setting of patients with prior negative biopsy. Methods From 2012 to 2014, a total of 42 Korean men with a negative result from previous systematic biopsy (SB) and elevated prostate-specific antigen underwent 3T mpMRI and real-time CEUS guided TB. Target lesions were determined by fusion of mpMRI and CEUS. Subsequently, 12-core SB was performed by a different radiologist. We compared core-based cancer detection rates (CaDR) using the generalized linear mixed model (GLIMMIX) for each biopsy method. Results Core-based CaDR was higher in TB (17.92%, 38 of 212 cores) than in SB (6.15%, 31 of 504 cores) (p < 0.0001; GLIMMIX). In the cancer-positive TB cores, CaDR with suspicious lesions by mpMRI was higher than that by CEUS (86.8% vs. 60.5%, p= 0.02; paired t-test) and concordant rate between mpMRI and CEUS was significantly different with discordant rate (48% vs. 52%, p=0.04; McNemar’s test). Conclusion The mpMRI-CEUS correlated TB technique for the repeat prostate biopsy of patients with prior negative biopsy can improve CaDR based on the number of cores taken. PMID:26083348

  13. Heart MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... an imaging method that uses powerful magnets and radio waves to create pictures of the heart. It does ... radiation involved in MRI. The magnetic fields and radio waves used during the scan have not been shown ...

  14. Obstetric MRI.

    PubMed

    Levine, Deborah

    2006-07-01

    Ultrasound is the imaging modality of choice for pregnant patients. However, MRI is increasingly utilized in patients in whom the sonographic diagnosis is unclear. These include maternal conditions unique to pregnancy such as ectopic pregnancy, placenta accreta, and uterine dehiscence. MRI is also being increasingly utilized in the assessment of abdominopelvic pain in pregnancy, in particular in assessment for appendicitis. Fetal MRI is performed to assess central nervous system (CNS) abnormalities and patients who are considering fetal surgery for conditions such as neural tube defects, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, and masses that obstruct the airway. In the future, functional MRI and fetal volumetry may provide additional information that can aid in our care of complicated pregnancies. PMID:16736491

  15. Characterizing tumor changes during neoadjuvant treatment of locally advanced breast cancer patients (LABC) using dynamic-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DE-MRI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craciunescu, Oana I.; Jones, Ellen L.; Blackwell, Kimberly L.; Wong, Terence Z.; Rosen, Eric L.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; MacFall, James R.; Liotcheva, Vlayka; Lora-Michiels, Michael; Prosnitz, Leonard R.; Samulski, Thaddeus V.; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2005-04-01

    At Duke University Medical Center, selective LABC patients were treated on a protocol using neoadjuvant Myocet/Paclitaxel (ChT) and HT. With the purpose of generating perfusion/permeability parametric maps and to use gadolinium (Gd) enhancement curves to score and predict response to neoadjuvant treatment, a study was designed to acquire 3 sets of DE-MRI images along the 4 cycles of combined ChT and HT. A T1-weighted three-dimensional fast gradient echo technique was used over 30 minutes following bolus injection of Gd-based contrast agent. Perfusion/permeability maps were generated by fitting the signal intensity to a double exponential curve that generates washin (WiP) and washout (WoP), parameters that are associated with the tumors vascularity/permeability and cellularity. Based on the values of the WiP, the tumors were divided in lowWI (WiP < 100), mediumWI (100 200). During the HT treatments temperatures in the breast were measured invasively via a catheter inserted under CT guidance. Although minimum sampled temperatures give a crude indication of the temperature distribution, several thermal dose metrics were calculated for each of the HT fractions (e.g. T90, T50, T10). As expected, tumors that were more vascularized (i.e. higher WiP) heated less than tumors with low WiP, a degree on average. The adjuvant treatment also changed the shape and inhomogeneity of the perfusion/permeability maps, with dramatic changes after the first fraction in responders. The correlation between the thermal metrics and pathological response will be discussed, as well as possible correlation with other tumor physiology parameters. In conclusion, the Gd-enhancement analysis of DE-MRI images is able to generate information related to the tumor vascularity, permeability and cellularity that can correlate with the tumor's response to the neoadjuvant treatment in general, and to HT in particular. Work supported by a grant from the NCI CA42745.

  16. Enhanced reward sensitivity and decreased loss sensitivity in Internet addicts: an fMRI study during a guessing task.

    PubMed

    Dong, Guangheng; Huang, Jie; Du, Xiaoxia

    2011-11-01

    As the world's fastest growing "addiction", Internet addiction should be studied to unravel the potential heterogeneity. The present study is set to examine reward and punishment processing in Internet addicts as compared to healthy controls while they subjectively experience monetary gain and loss during the performance of a guessing task. The results showed that Internet addicts associated with increased activation in orbitofrontal cortex in gain trials and decreased anterior cingulate activation in loss trials than normal controls. The results suggested that Internet addicts have enhanced reward sensitivity and decreased loss sensitivity than normal comparisons. PMID:21764067

  17. fMRI evidence of degeneration-induced neuropathic pain in diabetes: enhanced limbic and striatal activations.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ming-Tsung; Chiang, Ming-Chang; Chao, Chi-Chao; Tseng, Wen-Yih I; Hsieh, Sung-Tsang

    2013-10-01

    Persistent neuropathic pain due to peripheral nerve degeneration in diabetes is a stressful symptom; however, the underlying neural substrates remain elusive. This study attempted to explore neuroanatomical substrates of thermal hyperalgesia and burning pain in a diabetic cohort due to pathologically proven cutaneous nerve degeneration (the painful group). By applying noxious 44°C heat stimuli to the right foot to provoke neuropathic pain symptoms, brain activation patterns were compared with those of healthy control subjects and patients with a similar degree of cutaneous nerve degeneration but without pain (the painless group). Psychophysical results showed enhanced affective pain ratings in the painful group. After eliminating the influence of different pain intensity ratings on cerebral responses, the painful group displayed augmented responses in the limbic and striatal structures, including the perigenual anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), superior frontal gyrus, medial thalamus, anterior insular cortex, lentiform nucleus (LN), and premotor area. Among these regions, blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signals in the ACC and LN were correlated with pain ratings to thermal stimulations in the painful group. Furthermore, activation maps of a simple regression analysis as well as a region of interest analysis revealed that responses in these limbic and striatal circuits paralleled the duration of neuropathic pain. However, in the painless group, BOLD signals in the primary somatosensory cortex and ACC were reduced. These results suggest that enhanced limbic and striatal activations underlie maladaptive responses after cutaneous nerve degeneration, which contributed to the development and maintenance of burning pain and thermal hyperalgesia in diabetes. PMID:22522975

  18. MRI-detectable polymeric micelles incorporating platinum anticancer drugs enhance survival in an advanced hepatocellular carcinoma model

    PubMed Central

    Vinh, Nguyen Quoc; Naka, Shigeyuki; Cabral, Horacio; Murayama, Hiroyuki; Kaida, Sachiko; Kataoka, Kazunori; Morikawa, Shigehiro; Tani, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most intractable and lethal cancers; most cases are diagnosed at advanced stages with underlying liver dysfunction and are frequently resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The development of tumor-targeting systems may improve treatment outcomes. Nanomedicine platforms are of particular interest for enhancing chemotherapeutic efficiency, and they include polymeric micelles, which enable targeting of multiple drugs to solid tumors, including imaging and therapeutic agents. This allows concurrent diagnosis, targeting strategy validation, and efficacy assessment. We used polymeric micelles containing the T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent gadolinium-diethylenetriaminpentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) and the parent complex of the anticancer drug oxaliplatin [(1,2-diaminocyclohexane)platinum(II) (DACHPt)] for simultaneous imaging and therapy in an orthotopic rat model of HCC. The Gd-DTPA/DACHPt-loaded micelles were injected into the hepatic artery, and magnetic resonance imaging performance and antitumor activity against HCC, as well as adverse drug reactions were assessed. After a single administration, the micelles achieved strong and specific tumor contrast enhancement, induced high levels of tumor apoptosis, and significantly suppressed tumor size and growth. Moreover, the micelles did not induce severe adverse reactions and significantly improved survival outcomes in comparison to oxaliplatin or saline controls. Our results suggest that Gd-DTPA/DACHPt-loaded micelles are a promising approach for effective diagnosis and treatment of advanced HCC. PMID:26203241

  19. MRI-detectable polymeric micelles incorporating platinum anticancer drugs enhance survival in an advanced hepatocellular carcinoma model.

    PubMed

    Vinh, Nguyen Quoc; Naka, Shigeyuki; Cabral, Horacio; Murayama, Hiroyuki; Kaida, Sachiko; Kataoka, Kazunori; Morikawa, Shigehiro; Tani, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most intractable and lethal cancers; most cases are diagnosed at advanced stages with underlying liver dysfunction and are frequently resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The development of tumor-targeting systems may improve treatment outcomes. Nanomedicine platforms are of particular interest for enhancing chemotherapeutic efficiency, and they include polymeric micelles, which enable targeting of multiple drugs to solid tumors, including imaging and therapeutic agents. This allows concurrent diagnosis, targeting strategy validation, and efficacy assessment. We used polymeric micelles containing the T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent gadolinium-diethylenetriaminpentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) and the parent complex of the anticancer drug oxaliplatin [(1,2-diaminocyclohexane)platinum(II) (DACHPt)] for simultaneous imaging and therapy in an orthotopic rat model of HCC. The Gd-DTPA/DACHPt-loaded micelles were injected into the hepatic artery, and magnetic resonance imaging performance and antitumor activity against HCC, as well as adverse drug reactions were assessed. After a single administration, the micelles achieved strong and specific tumor contrast enhancement, induced high levels of tumor apoptosis, and significantly suppressed tumor size and growth. Moreover, the micelles did not induce severe adverse reactions and significantly improved survival outcomes in comparison to oxaliplatin or saline controls. Our results suggest that Gd-DTPA/DACHPt-loaded micelles are a promising approach for effective diagnosis and treatment of advanced HCC. PMID:26203241

  20. Assessment of synovitis in the osteoarthritic knee: Comparison between manual segmentation, semiautomated segmentation, and semiquantitative assessment using contrast-enhanced fat-suppressed T1-weighted MRI.

    PubMed

    Fotinos-Hoyer, Amber Kassel; Guermazi, Ali; Jara, Hernán; Eckstein, Felix; Ozonoff, Al; Khard, Hussain; Norbash, Alexander; Bohndorf, Klaus; Roemer, Frank W

    2010-08-01

    Osteoarthritic joints regularly exhibit synovitis, which is ideally assessed on contrast-enhanced MRI. Manual segmentation is the reference standard for volumetric analysis but is labor intensive. The aim was to evaluate alternative semiautomated approaches of targeted thresholding and gaussian deconvolution. Volumetric and semiquantitative synovitis assessment was compared in addition. Thirty-two knees with osteoarthritis were scanned on a 1.5-T system. Synovitis volumes were plotted against each other and distributions fit with linear functions. The relationship between semiquantitative scores and synovitis volumes was assessed using Spearman's correlation coefficient. Semiautomated volume measurement was more time efficient than manual segmentation and showed a high correlation with manual analysis (R(2) = 0.88 and 0.82). Manual segmentation was correlated with summed and with maximum semiquantitative synovitis scores (rho = 0.71 and 0.47). In conclusion, semiautomated analysis provides comparable quantitative results when compared to manual segmentation but is approximately five times more time efficient. Semiquantitative assessment adds anatomic information on synovitis distribution. PMID:20665803

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) with retrograde intralumen contrast enhancement of the rectum in diagnostics of rectovaginal fistulas after combination therapy of rectal cancer. Experience of application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usova, A.; Frolova, I.; Afanasev, S.; Tarasova, A.; Molchanov, S.

    2016-02-01

    Experiment of use of MRI in diagnostics of rectovaginal fistulas after combination therapy of rectal cancer is shown on clinical examples. We used retrograde contrasting of a rectum with 150ml ultrasonic gel to make MRI more informative in case of low diagnostic efficiency of ultrasound, colonoscopy and gynecological examination.

  2. Combined Application of Gadoxetic Acid Disodium-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging (DWI) in the Diagnosis of Chronic Liver Disease-Induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Li, Chenxia; Wang, Rong; Ren, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Gadoxetic acid disodium (Gd-EOB-DTPA) is a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent to target the liver cells with normal function. In clinical practice, the Gd-EOB-DTPA produces high quality hepatocyte specific image 20 minutes after intravenous injection, so DWI sequence is often performed after the conventional dynamic scanning. However, there are still some disputes about whether DWI sequence will provide more effective diagnostic information in clinical practice. This study aimed to explore the diagnostic value of combining Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI and DWI in the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with chronic liver disease. Methods A systematic literature search was performed in the PubMed and Cochrane library database up to March 2015. The quality assessment of diagnostic accuracy studies (QUADAS) was used to evaluate the quality of studies. Heterogeneous test on the included literature was performed by using the software Review Manager 5.3. The MetaDiSc 1.4 software was used to calculate the pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio and negative likelihood ratio; meanwhile the summary receiver operating characteristics (SROC) curve was drawn to compare the diagnostic performance. Results A total of 13 literatures were included in this study. In 8 literatures regarding HCC diagnosis based on Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI, the pooled sensitivity: 0.90 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.88–0.93); specificity: 0.89 (95% CI: 0.85–0.92); positive likelihood ratio: 8.60 (95% CI: 6.20–11.92); negative likelihood ratio: 0.10 (95% CI: 0.08–0.14) were obtained. The area under curve (AUC) and Q values were 0.96 and 0.90, respectively. In 5 literatures relating to HCC diagnosis by combination of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI and DWI sequence, the pooled sensitivity: 0.88 (95% CI: 0.85–0.91), specificity: 0.96 (0.94–0.97), positive likelihood ratio: 19.63 (12.77–30.16), negative likelihood ratio: 0.10 (0.07–0

  3. Pair dynamics and the intermolecular nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) in liquids analysed by simulation and model theories: Application to an ionic liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Gabl, Sonja; Schröder, Christian; Braun, Daniel; Steinhauser, Othmar; Weingärtner, Hermann

    2014-05-14

    Combining simulation and model theories, this paper analyses the impact of pair dynamics on the intermolecular nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) in liquids. For the first time, we give a distance resolved NOE. When applied to the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium tetrafluoroborate the NOE turns out to be of long-range nature. This behaviour translates to the experimentally measured cross- and longitudinal relaxation rates. We were able to calculate the heteronuclear NOE from simulation data, despite the high computational effort. Model theories are computationally less demanding and cover the complete frequency range of the respective spectral density function, they are usually based on a very simple pair distribution function and the solution of the diffusion equation. In order to model the simulated data sufficiently, these simplifications in structure and dynamics have to be generalised considerably.

  4. Isotope-detected 1H NMR studies of proteins: a general strategy for editing interproton nuclear Overhauser effects by heteronuclear decoupling, with application to phage lambda repressor.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, M A; Redfield, A G; Griffey, R H

    1986-01-01

    A strategy for editing interproton nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) in proteins is proposed and illustrated. Selective incorporation of 13C- (or 15N)-labeled amino acids into a protein permits NOEs involving the labeled residues to be identified by heteronuclear difference decoupling. Such heteronuclear editing simplifies the NOE difference spectrum and avoids ambiguities due to spin diffusion. Isotope-detected 1H NMR thus opens to study proteins too large for conventional one- and two-dimensional NMR methods (20-75 kDa). We have applied this strategy to the N-terminal domain of phage lambda repressor, a protein of dimer molecular mass 23 kDa. A tertiary NOE from an internal aromatic ring (Phe-51) to a beta-13C-labeled alanine residue (Ala-62) is demonstrated. PMID:3006046

  5. Conformational analysis of 9β,19-cyclopropyl sterols: Detection of the pseudoplanar conformer by nuclear Overhauser effects and its functional implications

    PubMed Central

    Nes, W. David; Benson, Mabry; Lundin, Robert E.; Le, Phu H.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear Overhauser difference spectroscopy and variable temperature studies of the 9β,19-cyclopropyl sterols 24,25-dehydropollinastanol (4,4-desmethyl-5α-cycloart-24-en-3β-ol) and cyclolaudenol [(24S)-24-methyl-5α-cycloart-25(27)-en-3β-ol] have shown the solution conformation of the B/C rings to be twist-chair/twist-boat rather than boat/chair as suggested in the literature. This is very similar to the known crystal structure conformation of 9β,19-cyclopropyl sterols. The effect of these conformations on the molecular shape is highly significant: the first conformation orients into a pseudoplanar or flat shape analogous to lanosterol, whereas the latter conformation exhibits a bent shape. The results are interpreted to imply that, for conformational reasons, cyclopropyl sterols can be expected to maintain the pseudoplanar shape in membrane bilayers. PMID:16593969

  6. Manganese-Enhanced MRI Reflects Both Activity-Independent and Activity-Dependent Uptake within the Rat Habenulomesencephalic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Brown, P. Leon; Rea, William; Vaupel, Bruce; Yang, Yihong; Stein, Elliot; Shepard, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) is a powerful technique for assessing the functional connectivity of neurons within the central nervous system. Despite the widely held proposition that MEMRI signal is dependent on neuronal activity, few studies have directly tested this implicit hypothesis. In the present series of experiments, MnCl2 was injected into the habenula of urethane-anesthetized rats alone or in combination with drugs known to alter neuronal activity by modulating specific voltage- and/or ligand-gated ion channels. Continuous quantitative T1 mapping was used to measure Mn2+ accumulation in the interpeduncular nucleus, a midline structure in which efferents from the medial habenula terminate. Microinjection of MnCl2 into the habenular complex using a protocol that maintained spontaneous neuronal activity resulted in a time-dependent increase in MEMRI signal intensity in the interpeduncular nucleus consistent with fast axonal transport of Mn2+ between these structures. Co-injection of the excitatory amino-acid agonist AMPA, increased the Mn2+-enhanced signal intensity within the interpeduncular nucleus. AMPA-induced increases in MEMRI signal were attenuated by co-injection of either the sodium channel blocker, TTX, or broad-spectrum Ca2+ channel blocker, Ni2+, and were occluded in the presence of both channel blockers. However, neither Ni2+ nor TTX, alone or in combination, attenuated the increase in signal intensity following injection of Mn2+ into the habenula. These results support the premise that changes in neuronal excitability are reflected by corresponding changes in MEMRI signal intensity. However, they also suggest that basal rates of Mn2+ uptake by neurons in the medial habenula may also occur via activity-independent mechanisms. PMID:26009889

  7. Pathology-MRI Correlation of Hepatocarcinogenesis: Recent Update

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Jimi; Kim, Kyung Won; Kim, Jihun; Yu, Eunsil

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the important alterations during hepatocarcinogenesis as well as the characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histopathological features will be helpful for managing patients with chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma. Recent advances in MRI techniques, such as fat/iron quantification, diffusion-weighted images, and gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI, have greatly enhanced our understanding of hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:26018513

  8. Integration of DCE-MRI and DW-MRI Quantitative Parameters for Breast Lesion Classification

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Roberta; Sansone, Mario; Filice, Salvatore; Granata, Vincenza; Catalano, Orlando; Amato, Daniela Maria; Di Bonito, Maurizio; D'Aiuto, Massimiliano; Capasso, Immacolata; Rinaldo, Massimo; Petrillo, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of an imaging protocol combining dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) in patients with suspicious breast lesions. Materials and Methods. A total of 31 breast lesions (15 malignant and 16 benign proved by histological examination) in 26 female patients were included in this study. For both DCE-MRI and DW-MRI model free and model based parameters were computed pixel by pixel on manually segmented ROIs. Statistical procedures included conventional linear analysis and more advanced techniques for classification of lesions in benign and malignant. Results. Our findings indicated no strong correlation between DCE-MRI and DW-MRI parameters. Results of classification analysis show that combining of DCE parameters or DW-MRI parameter, in comparison of single feature, does not yield a dramatic improvement of sensitivity and specificity of the two techniques alone. The best performance was obtained considering a full combination of all features. Moreover, the classification results combining all features are dominated by DCE-MRI features alone. Conclusion. The combination of DWI and DCE-MRI does not show a potential to dramatically increase the sensitivity and specificity of breast MRI. DCE-MRI alone gave the same performance as in combination with DW-MRI. PMID:26339597

  9. AUR memorial award--1988. MRI enhancement of perfused tissues using chromium labeled red blood cells as an intravascular contrast agent

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenberg, A.D.; Conturo, T.E.; Price, R.R.; Holburn, G.E.; Partain, C.L.; James, A.E. Jr. )

    1989-10-01

    It has been demonstrated that chromium (Cr) labeling significantly decreases the relaxation times of packed red blood cells (RBCs). In this study, the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) of human red cells was shortened from 836 ms to 29 ms and the spin-spin relaxation time (T2) shortened from 134 ms to 18 ms, when the cells were labeled at a Cr incubation concentration of 50 mM. Labeling of canine cells at 50 mM resulted in a T1 of 36 ms and a T2 of 26 ms. A labeling concentration of 10 mM produced similar relaxation enhancement, with uptake of 47% of the available Cr, and was determined to be optimal. The enhancement of longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates (1/T1,-1/T2) per amount of hemoglobin-bound Cr are 6.9 s-1 mM-1 and 9.8 s-1 mM-1 respectively, different from those of a pure Cr+3 solution. Labeling cells at 10 mM decreased the survival half-time in vivo from 16.6 days to 4.7 days in dogs. No difference in red cell survival was found with the use of hetero-transfusion versus auto-transfusion of labeled RBCs. Significant shortening of the T1 (912 ms to 266 ms, P = .03) and T2 (90 ms to 70 ms, P = .006) of spleen and the T1 (764 ms to 282 ms, P = .005) and the T2 (128 ms to 86 ms, P = .005) of liver occurred when 10% of the RBC mass of dogs was exchanged with Cr labeled cells. Liver and spleen spin density changes (P greater than 0.23) and muscle spin density and relaxation changes (P greater than 0.4) were insignificant. The in vivo T1 of a canine spleen which had been infarcted did not change following transfusion with labeled cells, where the T1 of liver did shorten. We believe this preliminary study suggests that Cr labeled red cells may have the potential to become an intravascular magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent.

  10. Reproducibility of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI in Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Prospective Analysis on Intra- and Interobserver and Scan-Rescan Performance of Pharmacokinetic Parameters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiyi; Su, Zihua; Ye, Huiyi; Xu, Xiao; Sun, Zhipeng; Li, Lu; Duan, Feixue; Song, Yuanyuan; Lambrou, Tryphon; Ma, Lin

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the intra- and interobserver as well as scan-rescan reproducibility of quantitative parameters of renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). A total of 21 patients with clear cell RCCs (17 men, 4 woman; age 37-69 years, mean age 54.6 years, mean size, 5.0 ± 2.2 cm) were prospectively recruited from September 2012 to November 2012. Patients underwent paired DCE-MRI studies on a 3.0 T MR system with an interval of 48 to 72 hours. The extended-Tofts model and population-based arterial input function were used to calculate kinetic parameters. Three observers defined the 2-dimensional whole-tumor region of interest at the slice with the maximum diameter of the RCC. Intraobserver and scan-rescan differences were assessed using paired t tests, whereas interobserver differences using two-way analysis of variance. Intra- and interobserver reproducibility and scan-rescan reproducibility were evaluated using within-subject coefficient of variation (wCoV) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). There were no significant intra-, interobserver, or scan-rescan differences in parameters (all P > 0.05). All ICCs for intra- and interobserver agreements were >0.75 (P < 0.05), whereas the scan-rescan agreement was moderate to good; V(e) (0.764, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.378-0.925) and K(ep) (0.906, 95% CI: 0.710-0.972) had higher ICC than K(trans) (0.686; 95% CI: 0.212-0.898) and V(p) (0.657; 95% CI: 0.164-0.888). In intra- and interobserver variability analyses, all parameters except V(p) had low wCoV values. K(trans) and V(e) had slightly lower intraobserver wCoV (1.2% and 0.9%) compared with K(ep) (3.7%), whereas all 3 of these parameters had similar interobserver wCoV values (2.5%, 3.1%, and 2.9%, respectively). Regarding scan-rescan variability, K(trans) and K(ep) showed slightly higher variation (15.6% and 15.4%) than V(e) (10.1%). V(p) had the largest

  11. Portable MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle A.

    2012-06-29

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  12. Neural Correlates of Enhanced Visual Short-Term Memory for Angry Faces: An fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Margaret C.; Wolf, Claudia; Johnston, Stephen J.; Raymond, Jane E.; Linden, David E. J.

    2008-01-01

    Background Fluid and effective social communication requires that both face identity and emotional expression information are encoded and maintained in visual short-term memory (VSTM) to enable a coherent, ongoing picture of the world and its players. This appears to be of particular evolutionary importance when confronted with potentially threatening displays of emotion - previous research has shown better VSTM for angry versus happy or neutral face identities. Methodology/Principal Findings Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, here we investigated the neural correlates of this angry face benefit in VSTM. Participants were shown between one and four to-be-remembered angry, happy, or neutral faces, and after a short retention delay they stated whether a single probe face had been present or not in the previous display. All faces in any one display expressed the same emotion, and the task required memory for face identity. We find enhanced VSTM for angry face identities and describe the right hemisphere brain network underpinning this effect, which involves the globus pallidus, superior temporal sulcus, and frontal lobe. Increased activity in the globus pallidus was significantly correlated with the angry benefit in VSTM. Areas modulated by emotion were distinct from those modulated by memory load. Conclusions/Significance Our results provide evidence for a key role of the basal ganglia as an interface between emotion and cognition, supported by a frontal, temporal, and occipital network. PMID:18958158

  13. Optimization of rs-fMRI Pre-processing for Enhanced Signal-Noise Separation, Test-Retest Reliability, and Group Discrimination.

    PubMed

    Shirer, William R; Jiang, Heidi; Price, Collin M; Ng, Bernard; Greicius, Michael D

    2015-08-15

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) has become an increasingly important tool in mapping the functional networks of the brain. This tool has been used to examine network changes induced by cognitive and emotional states, neurological traits, and neuropsychiatric disorders. However, noise that remains in the rs-fMRI data after preprocessing has limited the reliability of individual-subject results, wherein scanner artifacts, subject movements, and other noise sources induce non-neural temporal correlations in the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) timeseries. Numerous preprocessing methods have been proposed to isolate and remove these confounds; however, the field has not coalesced around a standard preprocessing pipeline. In comparisons, these preprocessing methods are often assessed with only a single metric of rs-fMRI data quality, such as reliability, without considering other aspects in tandem, such as signal-to-noise ratio and group discriminability. The present study seeks to identify the data preprocessing pipeline that optimizes rs-fMRI data across multiple outcome measures. Specifically, we aim to minimize the noise in the data and maximize result reliability, while retaining the unique features that characterize distinct groups. We examine how these metrics are influenced by bandpass filter selection and noise regression in four datasets, totaling 181 rs-fMRI scans and 38 subject-driven memory scans. Additionally, we perform two different rs-fMRI analysis methods - dual regression and region-of-interest based functional connectivity - and highlight the preprocessing parameters that optimize both approaches. Our results expand upon previous reports of individual-scan reliability, and demonstrate that preprocessing parameter selection can significantly change the noisiness, reliability, and heterogeneity of rs-fMRI data. The application of our findings to rs-fMRI data analysis should improve the validity and reliability of rs-fMRI

  14. Bipolar radiofrequency ablation for liver tumors: comparison of contrast-enhanced ultrasound with contrast-enhanced MRI/CT in the posttreatment imaging evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Bo, Xiao-Wan; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Sun, Li-Ping; Zheng, Shu-Guang; Guo, Le-Hang; Lu, Feng; Wu, Jian; Xu, Xiao-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to assess the role of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in treatment response evaluation after percutaneous bipolar radiofrequency ablation (BRFA) for liver tumors. Methods: From May 2012 to May 2014, 39 patients with 73 tumors were treated by BRFA. One month after the treatment, CEUS and CEMRI/CECT were conducted to evaluate the treatment response. The results of CEUS were compared with CEMRI/CECT. Results: Of the 73 tumors ablated, eight (11.0%) were found to have residual viable tumor tissue and 65 (89.0%) were successfully ablated based on CEMRI/CECT within 1-month after ablation. CEUS detected seven of the eight residual tumors and 63 of 65 completely ablated tumors. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of CEUS were 87.5% (7/8), 96.9% (63/65), 77.8% (7/9), 98.4% (63/64) and 95.9% (70/73), respectively. The complete ablation (CR) rates for the tumors ≤3.0 cm, 3.1-5.0 cm, and >5.0 cm were 96.6% (58/60), 63.6% (7/11), and 0% (0/2), respectively (P<0.001). CR rates were 94.7% (36/38) for primary liver tumors and 82.9% (29/35) for metastatic liver tumors (P=0.212), and were 97.4% (38/39) for the tumors with curative treatment intention and 79.4% (27/34) for those with palliative treatment intention (P=0.037). Major complication was not encountered in this series. Conclusions: BRFA is an effective technique of percutaneous ablation for liver tumors and CEUS can be used to assess its therapeutic effect accurately. PMID:25337258

  15. HO-1 gene overexpression enhances the beneficial effects of superparamagnetic iron oxide labeled bone marrow stromal cells transplantation in swine hearts underwent ischemia/reperfusion: an MRI study.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yibo; Chen, Lijuan; Tang, Yaoliang; Ma, Genshan; Shen, Chengxing; Qi, Chunmei; Zhu, Qi; Yao, Yuyu; Liu, Naifeng

    2010-05-01

    To determine the effect of intracoronary transfer of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) labeled heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) overexpressed bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in a porcine myocardial ischemia/reperfusion model. Cell apoptosis was assayed and supernatant cytokine concentrations were measured in BMSCs that underwent hypoxia/reoxygen in vitro. Female mini-swines that underwent 1 h LAD occlusion followed by 1 h reperfusion were randomly allocated to receive intracoronary saline (control), 1 x 10(7) SPIO-labeled BMSCs transfected with pcDNA3.1-Lacz plasmid (Lacz-BMSCs), pcDNA3.1-human HO-1 (HO-1-BMSCs), pcDNA3.1-hHO-1 pretreated with a HO inhibitor, tin protoporphyrin (SnPP, n = 10 each). MRI and postmortem histological analysis were made at 1 week or 3 months thereafter. Post hypoxia/reoxygen in vitro, apoptosis was significantly reduced, supernatant VEGF significantly increased while TNF-alpha and IL-6 significantly reduced in HO-1-BMSCs group compared with Lacz-BMSCs group (all p < 0.05). Myocardial expression of VEGF was significantly higher in HO-1-BMSCs than in Lacz-BMSCs group at 1 week post transplantation (all p < 0.05). Signal voids induced by the SPIO were detected in the peri-infarction region in all BMSC groups at 1 week but not at 3 months post transplantation and the extent of the hypointense signal was the highest in HO-1-BMSCs group, and histological analysis showed that signal voids represented cardiac macrophages that engulfed the SPIO-labeled BMSCs. Pretreatment with SnPP significantly attenuated the beneficial effects of HO-1-BMSCs. Transplantation of HO-1-overexpressed BMSCs significantly enhanced the beneficial effects of BMSCs on improving cardiac function in this model. PMID:20033189

  16. Perspectives on DNP-enhanced NMR spectroscopy in solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bentum, Jan; van Meerten, Bas; Sharma, Manvendra; Kentgens, Arno

    2016-03-01

    More than 60 years after the seminal work of Albert Overhauser on dynamic nuclear polarization by dynamic cross relaxation of coupled electron-nuclear spin systems, the quest for sensitivity enhancement in NMR spectroscopy is as pressing as ever. In this contribution we will review the status and perspectives for dynamic nuclear polarization in the liquid state. An appealing approach seems to be the use of supercritical solvents that may allow an extension of the Overhauser mechanism towards common high magnetic fields. A complementary approach is the use of solid state DNP on frozen solutions, followed by a rapid dissolution or in-situ melting step and NMR detection with substantially enhanced polarization levels in the liquid state. We will review recent developments in the field and discuss perspectives for the near future.

  17. Perspectives on DNP-enhanced NMR spectroscopy in solutions.

    PubMed

    van Bentum, Jan; van Meerten, Bas; Sharma, Manvendra; Kentgens, Arno

    2016-03-01

    More than 60 years after the seminal work of Albert Overhauser on dynamic nuclear polarization by dynamic cross relaxation of coupled electron-nuclear spin systems, the quest for sensitivity enhancement in NMR spectroscopy is as pressing as ever. In this contribution we will review the status and perspectives for dynamic nuclear polarization in the liquid state. An appealing approach seems to be the use of supercritical solvents that may allow an extension of the Overhauser mechanism towards common high magnetic fields. A complementary approach is the use of solid state DNP on frozen solutions, followed by a rapid dissolution or in-situ melting step and NMR detection with substantially enhanced polarization levels in the liquid state. We will review recent developments in the field and discuss perspectives for the near future. PMID:26920831

  18. Battlefield MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging is the best method for non-invasive imaging of soft tissue anatomy, saving countless lives each year. It is regarded as the gold standard for diagnosis of mild to moderate traumatic brain injuries. Furthermore, conventional MRI relies on very high, fixed strength magnetic fields (> 1.5 T) with parts-per-million homogeneity, which requires very large and expensive magnets.

  19. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI detects acute radiotherapy-induced alterations in mandibular microvasculature: prospective assessment of imaging biomarkers of normal tissue injury

    PubMed Central

    Sandulache, Vlad C.; Hobbs, Brian P.; Mohamed, Abdallah S.R.; Frank, Steven J.; Song, Juhee; Ding, Yao; Ger, Rachel; Court, Laurence E.; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Hazle, John D.; Wang, Jihong; Awan, Musaddiq J.; Rosenthal, David I.; Garden, Adam S.; Gunn, G. Brandon; Colen, Rivka R.; Elshafeey, Nabil; Elbanan, Mohamed; Hutcheson, Katherine A.; Lewin, Jan S.; Chambers, Mark S.; Hofstede, Theresa M.; Weber, Randal S.; Lai, Stephen Y.; Fuller, Clifton D.

    2016-01-01

    Normal tissue toxicity is an important consideration in the continued development of more effective external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) regimens for head and neck tumors. The ability to detect EBRT-induced changes in mandibular bone vascularity represents a crucial step in decreasing potential toxicity. To date, no imaging modality has been shown to detect changes in bone vascularity in real time during treatment. Based on our institutional experience with multi-parametric MRI, we hypothesized that DCE-MRI can provide in-treatment information regarding EBRT-induced changes in mandibular vascularity. Thirty-two patients undergoing EBRT treatment for head and neck cancer were prospectively imaged prior to, mid-course, and following treatment. DCE-MRI scans were co-registered to dosimetric maps to correlate EBRT dose and change in mandibular bone vascularity as measured by Ktrans and Ve. DCE-MRI was able to detect dose-dependent changes in both Ktrans and Ve in a subset of patients. One patient who developed ORN during the study period demonstrated decreases in Ktrans and Ve following treatment completion. We demonstrate, in a prospective imaging trial, that DCE-MRI can detect dose-dependent alterations in mandibular bone vascularity during chemoradiotherapy, providing biomarkers that are physiological correlates of acute of acute mandibular vascular injury and recovery temporal kinetics. PMID:27499209

  20. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI detects acute radiotherapy-induced alterations in mandibular microvasculature: prospective assessment of imaging biomarkers of normal tissue injury.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Normal tissue toxicity is an important consideration in the continued development of more effective external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) regimens for head and neck tumors. The ability to detect EBRT-induced changes in mandibular bone vascularity represents a crucial step in decreasing potential toxicity. To date, no imaging modality has been shown to detect changes in bone vascularity in real time during treatment. Based on our institutional experience with multi-parametric MRI, we hypothesized that DCE-MRI can provide in-treatment information regarding EBRT-induced changes in mandibular vascularity. Thirty-two patients undergoing EBRT treatment for head and neck cancer were prospectively imaged prior to, mid-course, and following treatment. DCE-MRI scans were co-registered to dosimetric maps to correlate EBRT dose and change in mandibular bone vascularity as measured by Ktrans and Ve. DCE-MRI was able to detect dose-dependent changes in both Ktrans and Ve in a subset of patients. One patient who developed ORN during the study period demonstrated decreases in Ktrans and Ve following treatment completion. We demonstrate, in a prospective imaging trial, that DCE-MRI can detect dose-dependent alterations in mandibular bone vascularity during chemoradiotherapy, providing biomarkers that are physiological correlates of acute of acute mandibular vascular injury and recovery temporal kinetics. PMID:27499209

  1. Assessment of Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Glycosaminoglycan Content by Gadolinium-Enhanced MRI before and after 21-Days of Head-Down-Tilt Bedrest

    PubMed Central

    Koy, Timmo; Zange, Jochen; Rittweger, Jörn; Pohle-Fröhlich, Regina; Hackenbroch, Matthias; Eysel, Peer; Ganse, Bergita

    2014-01-01

    During spaceflight, it has been shown that intervertebral discs (IVDs) increase in height, causing elongation of the spine up to several centimeters. Astronauts frequently report dull lower back pain that is most likely of discogenic origin and may result from IVD expansion. It is unknown whether disc volume solely increases by water influx, or if the content of glycosaminoglycans also changes in microgravity. Aim of this pilot study was to investigate effects of the spaceflight analog of bedrest on the glycosaminoglycan content of human lumbar IVDs. Five healthy, non-smoking, male human subjects of European descent were immobilized in 6° head-down-tilt bedrest for 21 days. Subjects remained in bed 24 h a day with at least one shoulder on the mattress. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans were taken according to the delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (dGEMRIC) protocol before and after bedrest. The outcome measures were T1 and ΔT1. Scans were performed before and after administration of the contrast agent Gd-DOTA, and differences between T1-values of both scans (ΔT1) were computed. ΔT1 is the longitudinal relaxation time in the tissue and inversely related to the glycosaminoglycan-content. For data analysis, IVDs L1/2 to L4/5 were semi-automatically segmented. Zones were defined and analyzed separately. Results show a highly significant decrease in ΔT1 (p<0.001) after bedrest in all IVDs, and in all areas of the IVDs. The ΔT1-decrease was most prominent in the nucleus pulposus and in L4/5, and was expressed slightly more in the posterior than anterior IVD. Unexpected negative ΔT1-values were found in Pfirrmann-grade 2-discs after bedrest. Significantly lower T1 before contrast agent application was found after bedrest compared to before bedrest. According to the dGEMRIC-literature, the decrease in ΔT1 may be interpreted as an increase in glycosaminoglycans in healthy IVDs during bedrest. This interpretation seems contradictory to

  2. In vivo transport of Gd-DTPA2- into human meniscus and cartilage assessed with delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Impaired stability is a risk factor in knee osteoarthritis (OA), where the whole joint and not only the joint cartilage is affected. The meniscus provides joint stability and is involved in the early pathological progress of OA. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) has been used to identify pre-radiographic changes in the cartilage in OA, but has been used less commonly to examine the meniscus, and then using only a double dose of the contrast agent. The purpose of this study was to enable improved early OA diagnosis by investigate the temporal contrast agent distribution in the meniscus and femoral cartilage simultaneously, in healthy volunteers, using 3D dGEMRIC at two different doses of the contrast agent Gd-DTPA2-. Methods The right knee in 12 asymptomatic volunteers was examined using a 3D Look-Locker sequence on two occasions after an intravenous injection of a double or triple dose of Gd-DTPA2- (0.2 or 0.3 mmol/kg body weight). The relaxation time (T1) and relaxation rate (R1 = 1/T1) were measured in the meniscus and femoral cartilage before, and 60, 90, 120 and 180 minutes after injection, and the change in relaxation rate (ΔR1) was calculated. Paired t-test and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) were used for statistical evaluation. Results The triple dose yielded higher concentrations of Gd-DTPA2- in the meniscus and cartilage than the double dose, but provided no additional information. The observed patterns of ΔR1 were similar for double and triple doses of the contrast agent. ΔR1 was higher in the meniscus than in femoral cartilage in the corresponding compartments at all time points after injection. ΔR1 increased until 90-180 minutes in both the cartilage and the meniscus (p < 0.05), and was lower in the medial than in the lateral meniscus at all time points (p < 0.05). A faster increase in ΔR1 was observed in the vascularized peripheral region of the posterior medial meniscus, than in the avascular central

  3. Proton NMR studies on the covalently linked RNA-DNA hybrid r(GCG)d(TATACGC). Assignment of proton resonances by application of the nuclear Overhauser effect.

    PubMed Central

    Mellema, J R; Haasnoot, C A; van der Marel, G A; Wille, G; van Boeckel, C A; van Boom, J H; Altona, C

    1983-01-01

    Proton NMR spectra of a covalently linked self-complementary RNA X DNA hybrid, r(GCG)-d(TATACGC), are recorded in H2O and D2O. Imino proton resonances as well as the non-exchangeable base and H-1' resonances are unambiguously assigned by means of nuclear. Overhauser effect measurements. Additional information was obtained by 31P NMR and circular dichroism spectra. The RNA parts in the duplex attain full conformational purity and adopt the usual A-RNA conformation. The DNA residues opposite the RNA tract do not adopt an A-type structure completely. Their respective sugar rings still appear to possess a certain conformational freedom. The same holds true for the central d(-TATA-) sequence which forms a DNA X DNA duplex. There appears to be a structural break in this part: the first two residues, T(4) and A(5), are clearly influenced by the adjacent RNA structure, whereas residues T(6) and A(7) behave quite similar to what usually is found in DNA duplexes in aqueous solution. PMID:6193486

  4. Tumor Metabolism and Perfusion in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Pretreatment Multimodality Imaging With {sup 1}H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, Jacobus F.A.; Schoeder, Heiko; Lee, Nancy Y.; Stambuk, Hilda E.; Wang Ya; Fury, Matthew G.; Patel, Senehal G.; Pfister, David G.; Shah, Jatin P.; Koutcher, Jason A.; Shukla-Dave, Amita

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To correlate proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS), dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), and {sup 18}F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([{sup 18}F]FDG PET) of nodal metastases in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) for assessment of tumor biology. Additionally, pretreatment multimodality imaging was evaluated for its efficacy in predicting short-term response to treatment. Methods and Materials: Metastatic neck nodes were imaged with {sup 1}H-MRS, DCE-MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET in 16 patients with newly diagnosed HNSCC, before treatment. Short-term patient radiological response was evaluated at 3 to 4 months. Correlations among {sup 1}H-MRS (choline concentration relative to water [Cho/W]), DCE-MRI (volume transfer constant [K{sup trans}]; volume fraction of the extravascular extracellular space [v{sub e}]; and redistribution rate constant [k{sub ep}]), and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET (standard uptake value [SUV] and total lesion glycolysis [TLG]) were calculated using nonparametric Spearman rank correlation. To predict short-term responses, logistic regression analysis was performed. Results: A significant positive correlation was found between Cho/W and TLG ({rho} = 0.599; p = 0.031). Cho/W correlated negatively with heterogeneity measures of standard deviation std(v{sub e}) ({rho} = -0.691; p = 0.004) and std(k{sub ep}) ({rho} = -0.704; p = 0.003). Maximum SUV (SUVmax) values correlated strongly with MRI tumor volume ({rho} = 0.643; p = 0.007). Logistic regression indicated that std(K{sup trans}) and SUVmean were significant predictors of short-term response (p < 0.07). Conclusion: Pretreatment multimodality imaging using {sup 1}H-MRS, DCE-MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET is feasible in HNSCC patients with nodal metastases. Additionally, combined DCE-MRI and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET parameters were predictive of short-term response to treatment.

  5. Leg MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... imaging - leg; Magnetic resonance imaging - lower extremity; MRI - ankle; Magnetic resonance imaging - ankle; MRI - femur; MRI - leg ... or bone scan Birth defects of the leg, ankle, or foot Bone pain and fever Broken bone ...

  6. MRI Safety during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... during the exam? Contrast material MRI during pregnancy Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) If you are pregnant and your doctor wants to perform a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam, there is a possibility that your ...

  7. Cardiovascular MRI with ferumoxytol.

    PubMed

    Finn, J P; Nguyen, K-L; Han, F; Zhou, Z; Salusky, I; Ayad, I; Hu, P

    2016-08-01

    The practice of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA) has changed significantly in the span of a decade. Concerns regarding gadolinium (Gd)-associated nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in those with severely impaired renal function spurred developments in low-dose CEMRA and non-contrast MRA as well as efforts to seek alternative MR contrast agents. Originally developed for MR imaging use, ferumoxytol (an ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle), is currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia in adults with renal disease. Since its clinical availability in 2009, there has been rising interest in the scientific and clinical use of ferumoxytol as an MR contrast agent. The unique physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of ferumoxytol, including its long intravascular half-life and high r1 relaxivity, support a spectrum of MRI applications beyond the scope of Gd-based contrast agents. Moreover, whereas Gd is not found in biological systems, iron is essential for normal metabolism, and nutritional iron deficiency poses major public health challenges worldwide. Once the carbohydrate shell of ferumoxytol is degraded, the elemental iron at its core is incorporated into the reticuloendothelial system. These considerations position ferumoxytol as a potential game changer in the field of CEMRA and MRI. In this paper, we aim to summarise our experience with the cardiovascular applications of ferumoxytol and provide a brief synopsis of ongoing investigations on ferumoxytol-enhanced MR applications. PMID:27221526

  8. Automated error-tolerant macromolecular structure determination from multidimensional nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectra and chemical shift assignments: improved robustness and performance of the PASD algorithm.

    PubMed

    Kuszewski, John J; Thottungal, Robin Augustine; Clore, G Marius; Schwieters, Charles D

    2008-08-01

    We report substantial improvements to the previously introduced automated NOE assignment and structure determination protocol known as PASD (Kuszewski et al. (2004) J Am Chem Soc 26:6258-6273). The improved protocol includes extensive analysis of input spectral data to create a low-resolution contact map of residues expected to be close in space. This map is used to obtain reasonable initial guesses of NOE assignment likelihoods which are refined during subsequent structure calculations. Information in the contact map about which residues are predicted to not be close in space is applied via conservative repulsive distance restraints which are used in early phases of the structure calculations. In comparison with the previous protocol, the new protocol requires significantly less computation time. We show results of running the new PASD protocol on six proteins and demonstrate that useful assignment and structural information is extracted on proteins of more than 220 residues. We show that useful assignment information can be obtained even in the case in which a unique structure cannot be determined. PMID:18668206

  9. A nuclear Overhauser effect study of the active site of myeloperoxidase. Structural similarity of the prosthetic group to that on lactoperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Dugad, L B; La Mar, G N; Lee, H C; Ikeda-Saito, M; Booth, K S; Caughey, W S

    1990-05-01

    The low-spin, cyanide-ligated ferric complex of the intact bovine granulocyte myeloperoxidase (MPO-CN) has been studied by proton nuclear magnetic resonance utilizing the nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE). This is the largest globular protein (approximately 1.5 x 10(5) for the intact alpha 2 beta 2 tetrameric species) for which successful NOEs have been observed without serious interference of spin diffusion, and demonstrably confirms the utility of such studies on large paramagnetic as compared to diamagnetic proteins. The 1H NMR spectrum of MPO-CN is found to have a remarkable similarity in the number, resonance pattern, and metal ion-induced relaxation properties of the resolved, hyperfine-shifted resonances to those reported earlier for the analogous complex of bovine lactoperoxidase (LPO-CN); moreover, the interproton connectivities between pairs of hyperfine-shifted proton sets, as reflected by the NOEs, are also essentially the same (Thanabal, V., and La Mar, G. N. (1989) Biochemistry 28, 7038-7044). Since the extracted prosthetic group of lactoperoxidase is a porphyrin with proposed functionalization of the 8-methylene group (Nichol, A. W., Angel, L. A., Moon, T., and Clezy, P. S. (1987) Biochem. J. 247, 147-150), we interpret the resultant similarity in 1H NMR spectral parameters for LPO-CN and MPO-CN as indicating that the prosthetic groups in MPO and LPO are very similar, and hence likely both porphyrins with a similarly functionalized periphery that allows covalent linkage to the protein matrix. The hyperfine shift pattern of the broadest resolved lines lead to their assignment to the axial histidyl imidazole side chain. Two pairs of resonances are found to have similar relaxation properties and/or dipolar as similarly shifted resonances that arise from a distal His and Arg in horseradish peroxidase (as also found in LPO-CN), and suggest that MPO also possesses these catalytically functional residues in the distal heme pocket. PMID:2158989

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) KidsHealth > For Teens > Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Print A A A Text Size What's ... Exam Safety Getting Your Results What Is MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a type of safe, painless testing ...

  11. Competitive Advantage of PET/MRI

    PubMed Central

    Jadvar, Hossein; Colletti, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    Multimodality imaging has made great strides in the imaging evaluation of patients with a variety of diseases. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is now established as the imaging modality of choice in many clinical conditions, particularly in oncology. While the initial development of combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) was in the preclinical arena, hybrid PET/MR scanners are now available for clinical use. PET/MRI combines the unique features of MRI including excellent soft tissue contrast, diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, fMRI and other specialized sequences as well as MR spectroscopy with the quantitative physiologic information that is provided by PET. Most evidence for the potential clinical utility of PET/MRI is based on studies performed with side-by-side comparison or software-fused MRI and PET images. Data on distinctive utility of hybrid PET/MRI are rapidly emerging. There are potential competitive advantages of PET/MRI over PET/CT. In general, PET/MRI may be preferred over PET/CT where the unique features of MRI provide more robust imaging evaluation in certain clinical settings. The exact role and potential utility of simultaneous data acquisition in specific research and clinical settings will need to be defined. It may be that simultaneous PET/MRI will be best suited for clinical situations that are disease-specific, organ-specific, related to diseases of the children or in those patients undergoing repeated imaging for whom cumulative radiation dose must be kept as low as reasonably achievable. PET/MRI also offers interesting opportunities for use of dual modality probes. Upon clear definition of clinical utility, other important and practical issues related to business operational model, clinical workflow and reimbursement will also be resolved. PMID:23791129

  12. Competitive advantage of PET/MRI.

    PubMed

    Jadvar, Hossein; Colletti, Patrick M

    2014-01-01

    Multimodality imaging has made great strides in the imaging evaluation of patients with a variety of diseases. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is now established as the imaging modality of choice in many clinical conditions, particularly in oncology. While the initial development of combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) was in the preclinical arena, hybrid PET/MR scanners are now available for clinical use. PET/MRI combines the unique features of MRI including excellent soft tissue contrast, diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, fMRI and other specialized sequences as well as MR spectroscopy with the quantitative physiologic information that is provided by PET. Most evidence for the potential clinical utility of PET/MRI is based on studies performed with side-by-side comparison or software-fused MRI and PET images. Data on distinctive utility of hybrid PET/MRI are rapidly emerging. There are potential competitive advantages of PET/MRI over PET/CT. In general, PET/MRI may be preferred over PET/CT where the unique features of MRI provide more robust imaging evaluation in certain clinical settings. The exact role and potential utility of simultaneous data acquisition in specific research and clinical settings will need to be defined. It may be that simultaneous PET/MRI will be best suited for clinical situations that are disease-specific, organ-specific, related to diseases of the children or in those patients undergoing repeated imaging for whom cumulative radiation dose must be kept as low as reasonably achievable. PET/MRI also offers interesting opportunities for use of dual modality probes. Upon clear definition of clinical utility, other important and practical issues related to business operational model, clinical workflow and reimbursement will also be resolved. PMID:23791129

  13. Environmentally responsive MRI contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Gemma-Louise; Kramberger, Iris; Davis, Jason J.

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical imaging techniques can provide a vast amount of anatomical information, enabling diagnosis and the monitoring of disease and treatment profile. MRI uniquely offers convenient, non-invasive, high resolution tomographic imaging. A considerable amount of effort has been invested, across several decades, in the design of non toxic paramagnetic contrast agents capable of enhancing positive MRI signal contrast. Recently, focus has shifted towards the development of agents capable of specifically reporting on their local biochemical environment, where a switch in image contrast is triggered by a specific stimulus/biochemical variable. Such an ability would not only strengthen diagnosis but also provide unique disease-specific biochemical insight. This feature article focuses on recent progress in the development of MRI contrast switching with molecular, macromolecular and nanoparticle-based agents. PMID:24040650

  14. Preparation, Characterization and In Vivo Assessment of Gd-Albumin and Gd-Dendrimer Conjugates as Intravascular Contrast-Enhancing Agents for MRI

    PubMed Central

    Nwe, Kido; Milenic, Diane; Bryant, L. Henry; Regino, Celeste A. S.; Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2011-01-01

    We report in vivo and in vitro MRI properties of six gadolinium-dendrimer and gadolinium-albumin conjugates of derivatized acyclic diethylenetriamine-N,N’,N’,N’’, N’’-pentaacetic acid (1B4M) and macrocyclic 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N’,N’’,N’’’-tetraacetic acid (C-DOTA). The three albumin-based agents have comparable protein to chelate ratios (1:16–18) as well as molar relaxivity (8.8–10.4 mM−1s−1). The three dendrimer based agents have blood clearance half-lives ranging from 17 to 66 min while that of the three albumin-based agents are comparable to one another (40–47 min). The dynamic image obtained from use of the albumin conjugate based on the macrocycle (C-DOTA) showed a higher contrast compared to the remaining two albumin based agents. Our conclusion from all of the results is that the macrocyclic-based (DOTA) agents are more suitable than the acyclic-based (1B4M) agent for in vivo use based on their MRI properties combined with the kinetic inertness property associated with the more stable Gd(III) DOTA complex. PMID:21463567

  15. Polycatechol Nanoparticle MRI Contrast Agents.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiwen; Huang, Yuran; Wang, Zhao; Carniato, Fabio; Xie, Yijun; Patterson, Joseph P; Thompson, Matthew P; Andolina, Christopher M; Ditri, Treffly B; Millstone, Jill E; Figueroa, Joshua S; Rinehart, Jeffrey D; Scadeng, Miriam; Botta, Mauro; Gianneschi, Nathan C

    2016-02-01

    Amphiphilic triblock copolymers containing Fe(III) -catecholate complexes formulated as spherical- or cylindrical-shaped micellar nanoparticles (SMN and CMN, respectively) are described as new T1-weighted agents with high relaxivity, low cytotoxicity, and long-term stability in biological fluids. Relaxivities of both SMN and CMN exceed those of established gadolinium chelates across a wide range of magnetic field strengths. Interestingly, shape-dependent behavior is observed in terms of the particles' interactions with HeLa cells, with CMN exhibiting enhanced uptake and contrast via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared with SMN. These results suggest that control over soft nanoparticle shape will provide an avenue for optimization of particle-based contrast agents as biodiagnostics. The polycatechol nanoparticles are proposed as suitable for preclinical investigations into their viability as gadolinium-free, safe, and effective imaging agents for MRI contrast enhancement. PMID:26681255

  16. Multimodality Molecular Imaging (FDG-PET/CT, US Elastography, and DWI-MRI) as Complimentary Adjunct for Enhancing Diagnostic Confidence in Reported Intermediate Risk Category Thyroid Nodules on Bethesda Thyroid Cytopathology Reporting System

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Sandip; Mahajan, Abhishek; Arya, Supreeta

    2016-01-01

    The potential complimentary role of various molecular imaging modalities [fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT), ultrasound (US)-elastography, and diffusion weighted imaging-magnetic resonance imaging (DWI-MRI)] in characterizing thyroid nodules, which have been designated as “intermediate risk category” on the Bethesda thyroid cytopathology reporting system (BTCRS), is illustrated in this communication. The clinical cases described (category III thyroid nodules on BTCRS) show the imaging features and the final diagnostic impressions rendered by the interpreting physicians with the modalities that have been independently compared in a tabular format at the end; of particular note is the high negative predictive value of these (specifically FDG-PET/CT), which could aid in enhancing the diagnostic confidence in the reported “intermediate risk category” thyroid nodules, a “gray zone” from the patient management viewpoint. PMID:27134564

  17. What Is Chest MRI?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Chest MRI? Chest MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) is a safe, noninvasive ... creates detailed pictures of the structures in your chest, such as your chest wall, heart, and blood ...

  18. Arm MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... arm MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan uses strong magnets to create pictures of the upper and lower ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  19. Breast MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... breast MRI may be done in combination with mammography or ultrasound . It is not a replacement for mammography. ... breast screening with MRI as an adjunct to mammography. CA Cancer J Clin . 2007;57:75-89. ...

  20. Pelvis MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... The table slides into the middle of the MRI machine. Small devices, called coils, may be placed around ... anxious. Or your provider may suggest an open MRI in which the machine is not as close to the body. Before ...

  1. Lumbar MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... resonance imaging (MRI) scan uses energy from strong magnets to create pictures of the lower part of ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  2. MRI in cranial tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Just, M; Higer, H P; Betting, O; Bockenheimer, S; Pfannenstiel, P

    1987-11-01

    A case of multiple intracranial tuberculomas is presented. CT and MRI findings are discussed and compared. MRI showed multiple tuberculomas characterised by the same signal intensity as the surrounding brain parenchyma. Differentiation could be achieved only by the perifocal oedema of high signal intensity. Changes of the lesions during chemotherapy were monitored by CT and MRI and the results are presented. PMID:3691545

  3. MRI of brucella polyneuritis in a child.

    PubMed

    Tali, E T; Keskin, T; Oznur, I I; Simonson, T; Yuh, W T

    1996-05-01

    MRI of a rare case of polyneuritis following brucellosis is presented. An 8-year-old boy with a history of brucellosis showed marked enlargement of the origin of the left fifth cranial nerve and contrast enhancement of the fifth cranial nerves and the Gasserian ganglion in Meckel's caves. A well-defined low-signal cystic mass showing peripheral contrast enhancement lay anteromedial to the left seventh and eighth cranial nerves. The seventh and eighth nerves showed marked enhancement. The prechiasmatic portion of the right optic nerve showed fusiform enlargement with marked contrast enhancement of the nerve and right optic tract. MRI immediately after treatment showed no enhancement of the cranial nerves. Enlargement of the origin of the left fifth cranial nerve persisted, but there was no enlargement of the optic nerve. The mass near the left seventh and eighth cranial nerves was still present with no obvious morphological change, but no longer showed peripheral enhancement. PMID:8811713

  4. Estimating blood-brain barrier opening in a rat model of hemorrhagic transformation with Patlak plots of Gd-DTPA contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Fenstermacher, J D; Knight, R A; Ewing, J R; Nagaraja, T; Nagesh, V; Yee, J S; Arniego, P A

    2003-01-01

    Patlak plot processing of Gd-shifted T1 relaxation-time images from a rat model of hemorrhagic transformation yielded estimates and maps of the blood-to-brain influx rate constant of Gd-DTPA (K1). The Patlak plots also produced a heretofore unrecognized parameter, the distribution space of the intravascular-Gd-shifted protons (Vp), an index of blood-to-tissue transfer of water. The K1 values for Gd-DTPA were very high for the regions of blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening and were similar to those of 14C-sucrose concurrently obtained by quantitative autoradiographic (QAR) analysis. In these same ROI's, Vp was five-fold greater than normal, which suggests that the permeability of the BBB to water was also increased. The 14C-sucrose space of distribution in the ischemic ROI's was around 8%, thus indicating a sizable interstitial space. The spatial resolving power of Gd-DTPA-deltaT1 imaging was rather good, although no match for 14C-sucrose-QAR. This study shows that quantitative deltaT1-MRI estimates of regional blood-brain transfer constants of Gd-DTPA and water distribution are possible when Patlak plots are employed to process the data. This approach may be useful for tracking the time-course of BBB barrier function in both animals and humans. PMID:14753399

  5. Clinical Utility of Multimodality Imaging with Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI, Diffusion-Weighted MRI, and 18F-FDG PET/CT for the Prediction of Neck Control in Oropharyngeal or Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated with Chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Sheng-Chieh; Lin, Yu-Chun; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Liao, Chun-Ta; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Ko, Sheung-Fat; Wang, Hung- Ming; Chang, Chee-Jen; Wang, Jiun-Jie

    2014-01-01

    The clinical usefulness of pretreatment imaging techniques for predicting neck control in patients with oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OHSCC) treated with chemoradiation remains unclear. In this prospective study, we investigated the role of pretreatment dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging (DCE-PWI), diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI), and [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET)/CT derived imaging markers for the prediction of neck control in OHSCC patients treated with chemoradiation. Patients with untreated OHSCC scheduled for chemoradiation between August, 2010 and July, 2012 were eligible for the study. Clinical variables and the following imaging parameters of metastatic neck lymph nodes were examined in relation to neck control: transfer constant, volume of blood plasma, and volume of extracellular extravascular space (Ve) on DCE-PWI; apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) on DWI; maximum standardized uptake value, metabolic tumor volume, and total lesion glycolysis on 18F-FDG PET/CT. There were 69 patients (37 with oropharynx SCC and 32 with hypopharynx SCC) with successful pretreatment DCE-PWI and DWI available for analysis. After a median follow-up of 31 months, 25 (36.2%) participants had neck failure. Multivariate analysis identified hemoglobin level <14.3 g/dL (P = 0.019), Ve <0.23 (P = 0.040), and ADC >1.14×10−3 mm2/s (P = 0.003) as independent prognostic factors for 3-year neck control. A prognostic scoring system was formulated by summing up the three significant predictors of neck control. Patients with scores of 2–3 had significantly poorer neck control and overall survival rates than patients with scores of 0–1. We conclude that hemoglobin levels, Ve, and ADC are independent pretreatment prognostic factors for neck control in OHSCC treated with chemoradiation. Their combination may identify a subgroup of patients at high risk of developing neck failure. PMID:25531391

  6. Activity-induced manganese-dependent MRI (AIM-MRI) and functional MRI in awake rabbits during somatosensory stimulation.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Matthew P; Weiss, Craig; Procissi, Daniel; Wang, Lei; Disterhoft, John F

    2016-02-01

    Activity-induced manganese-dependent MRI (AIM-MRI) is a powerful tool to track system-wide neural activity using high resolution, quantitative T1-weighted MRI in animal models and has significant advantages for investigating neural activity over other modalities including BOLD fMRI. With AIM-MRI, Mn(2+) ions enter neurons via voltage-gated calcium channels preferentially active during the time of experimental exposure. A broad range of AIM-MRI studies using different species studying different phenomena have been performed, but few of these studies provide a systematic evaluation of the factors influencing the detection of Mn(2+) such as dosage and the temporal characteristics of Mn(2+) uptake. We identified an optimal dose of Mn(2+) (25 mg/kg, s.c.) in order to characterize the time-course of Mn(2+) accumulation in active neural regions in the rabbit. T1-weighted MRI and functional MRI were collected 0-3, 6-9, and 24-27 h post-Mn(2+) injection while the vibrissae on the right side were vibrated. Significant BOLD activation in the left somatosensory (SS) cortex and left ventral posteromedial (VPM) thalamic nucleus was detected during whisker vibration. T1-weighted signal intensities were extracted from these regions, their corresponding contralateral regions and the visual cortex (to serve as controls). A significant elevation in T1-weighted signal intensity in the left SS cortex (relative to right) was evident 6-9 and 24-27 h post-Mn(2+) injection while the left VPM thalamus showed a significant enhancement (relative to the right) only during the 24-27 h session. Visual cortex showed no hemispheric difference at any timepoint. Our results suggest that studies employing AIM-MRI would benefit by conducting experimental manipulations 6-24 h after subcutaneous MnCl2 injections to optimize the concentration of contrast agent in the regions active during the exposure. PMID:26589332

  7. Assessment of synovitis with contrast-enhanced MRI using a whole-joint semiquantitative scoring system in people with, or at high risk of, knee osteoarthritis: the MOST study

    PubMed Central

    Guermazi, Ali; Roemer, Frank W; Hayashi, Daichi; Crema, Michel D; Niu, Jingbo; Zhang, Yuqing; Marra, Monica D; Katur, Avinash; Lynch, John A; El-Khoury, George Y; Baker, Kristin; Hughes, Laura B; Nevitt, Michael C; Felson, David T

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To introduce a comprehensive and reliable scoring system for the assessment of whole-knee joint synovitis based on contrast-enhanced (CE) MRI. Methods Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study (MOST) is a cohort study of people with, or at high risk of, knee osteoarthritis (OA). Subjects are an unselected subset of MOST who volunteered for CE-MRI. Synovitis was assessed at 11 sites of the joint. Synovial thickness was scored semiquantitatively: grade 0 (<2 mm), grade 1 (2–4 mm) and grade 2 (>4 mm) at each site. Two musculoskeletal radiologists performed the readings and inter- and intrareader reliability was evaluated. Whole-knee synovitis was assessed by summing the scores from all sites. The association of Western Ontario and McMaster Osteoarthritis Index pain score with this summed score and with the maximum synovitis grade for each site was assessed. Results 400 subjects were included (mean age 58.8±7.0 years, body mass index 29.5±4.9 kg/m2, 46% women). For individual sites, intrareader reliability (weighted κ) was 0.67–1.00 for reader 1 and 0.60–1.00 for reader 2. Inter-reader agreement (κ) was 0.67–0.92. For the summed synovitis scores, intrareader reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC)) was 0.98 and 0.96 for each reader and inter-reader agreement (ICC) was 0.94. Moderate to severe synovitis in the parapatellar subregion was associated with the higher maximum pain score (adjusted OR (95% CI), 2.8 (1.4 to 5.4) and 3.1 (1.2 to 7.9), respectively). Conclusions A comprehensive semiquantitative scoring system for the assessment of whole-knee synovitis is proposed. It is reliable and identifies knees with pain, and thus is a potentially powerful tool for synovitis assessment in epidemiological OA studies. PMID:21187293

  8. MRI-Guided Vascular Access with an Active Visualization Needle

    PubMed Central

    Saikus, Christina E.; Ratnayaka, Kanishka; Barbash, Israel M.; Colyer, Jessica H.; Kocaturk, Ozgur; Faranesh, Anthony Z.; Lederman, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To develop an approach to vascular access under MRI, as a component of comprehensive MRI-guided cardiovascular catheterization and intervention. Materials and Methods We attempted jugular vein access in healthy pigs as a model of “difficult” vascular access. Procedures were performed under real-time MRI guidance using reduced field of view imaging. We developed an “active” MRI antenna-needle having an open-lumen, distinct tip appearance and indicators of depth and trajectory, in order to enhance MRI visibility during the procedure. We compared performance of the active needle against an unmodified commercial passively-visualized needle, measured by procedure success among operators with different levels of experience. Results MRI-guided central vein access was feasible using both the active needle and the unmodified passive needle. The active needle required less time (88 vs. 244 sec, p=0.022) and fewer needle passes (4.5 vs. 9.1, p=0.028), irrespective of operator experience. Conclusion MRI-guided access to central veins is feasible in our animal model. When image guidance is necessary for vascular access, performing this component under MRI will allow wholly MRI-guided catheterization procedures that do not require adjunctive imaging facilities such as X-ray or ultrasound. The active needle design showed enhanced visibility, as expected. These capabilities may permit more complex catheter-based cardiovascular interventional procedures enabled by enhanced image guidance. PMID:22006552

  9. T1-Weighted Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI as a Noninvasive Biomarker of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor vIII Status

    PubMed Central

    Arevalo-Perez, J.; Thomas, A.A.; Kaley, T.; Lyo, J.; Peck, K.K.; Holodny, A.I.; Mellinghoff, I.K.; Shi, W.; Zhang, Z.; Young, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Epidermal growth factor receptor variant III is a common mutation in glioblastoma, found in approximately 25% of tumors. Epidermal growth factor receptor variant III may accelerate angiogenesis in malignant gliomas. We correlated T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging perfusion parameters with epidermal growth factor receptor variant III status. MATERIALS AND METHODS Eighty-two consecutive patients with glioblastoma and known epidermal growth factor receptor variant III status who had dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging before surgery were evaluated. Volumes of interest were drawn around the entire enhancing tumor on contrast T1-weighted images and then were transferred onto coregistered dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging perfusion maps. Histogram analysis with normalization was performed to determine the relative mean, 75th percentile, and 90th percentile values for plasma volume and contrast transfer coefficient. A Wilcoxon rank sum test was applied to assess the relationship between baseline perfusion parameters and positive epidermal growth factor receptor variant III status. The receiver operating characteristic method was used to select the cutoffs of the dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging perfusion parameters. RESULTS Increased relative plasma volume and increased relative contrast transfer coefficient parameters were both significantly associated with positive epidermal growth factor receptor variant III status. For epidermal growth factor receptor variant III–positive tumors, relative plasma volume mean was 9.3 and relative contrast transfer coefficient mean was 6.5; for epidermal growth factor receptor variant III–negative tumors, relative plasma volume mean was 3.6 and relative contrast transfer coefficient mean was 3.7 (relative plasma volume mean, P < .001, and relative contrast transfer coefficient mean, P = .008). The predictive powers of relative plasma volume histogram metrics outperformed those of the

  10. Metabolomics of Breast Cancer Using High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Correlations with 18F-FDG Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography, Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging MRI

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Haesung; Yoon, Dahye; Yun, Mijin; Choi, Ji Soo; Park, Vivian Youngjean; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Jeong, Joon; Koo, Ja Seung; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Moon, Hee Jung; Kim, Suhkmann; Kim, Min Jung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Our goal in this study was to find correlations between breast cancer metabolites and conventional quantitative imaging parameters using high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and to find breast cancer subgroups that show high correlations between metabolites and imaging parameters. Materials and methods Between August 2010 and December 2013, we included 53 female patients (mean age 49.6 years; age range 32–75 years) with a total of 53 breast lesions assessed by the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System. They were enrolled under the following criteria: breast lesions larger than 1 cm in diameter which 1) were suspicious for malignancy on mammography or ultrasound (US), 2) were pathologically confirmed to be breast cancer with US-guided core-needle biopsy (CNB) 3) underwent 3 Tesla MRI with dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT), and 4) had an attainable immunohistochemistry profile from CNB. We acquired spectral data by HR-MAS MRS with CNB specimens and expressed the data as relative metabolite concentrations. We compared the metabolites with the signal enhancement ratio (SER), maximum standardized FDG uptake value (SUV max), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and histopathologic prognostic factors for correlation. We calculated Spearman correlations and performed a partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) to further classify patient groups into subgroups to find correlation differences between HR-MAS spectroscopic values and conventional imaging parameters. Results In a multivariate analysis, the PLS-DA models built with HR-MAS MRS metabolic profiles showed visible discrimination between high and low SER, SUV, and ADC. In luminal subtype breast cancer, compared to all cases, high SER, ADV, and SUV were more closely clustered by visual assessment. Multiple metabolites were correlated with SER and SUV in

  11. MRI of the shoulder

    SciTech Connect

    Zlatkin, M.B.; Iannotti, J.P.; Schnall, M.D.

    1991-01-01

    This book reports on the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in evaluating shoulder disorders. The book gives detailed information on MRI techniques and shoulder anatomy, describes and illustrates MRI findings for a wide range of shoulder disorders, and explains how abnormalities seen on MIR images relate to pathophysiology and clinical signs. Special attention is given to imaging of rotator cuff disease and shoulder instability conditions for which MRI is the imaging procedure of choice. Complementing the text are 365 high-quality scans depicting normal shoulder anatomy and showing the wide variety of pathologic findings encountered in practice.

  12. MRI Features of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Related to Biologic Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eun-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Imaging studies including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) play a crucial role in the diagnosis and staging of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Several recent studies reveal a large number of MRI features related to the prognosis of HCC. In this review, we discuss various MRI features of HCC and their implications for the diagnosis and prognosis as imaging biomarkers. As a whole, the favorable MRI findings of HCC are small size, encapsulation, intralesional fat, high apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value, and smooth margins or hyperintensity on the hepatobiliary phase of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI. Unfavorable findings include large size, multifocality, low ADC value, non-smooth margins or hypointensity on hepatobiliary phase images. MRI findings are potential imaging biomarkers in patients with HCC. PMID:25995679

  13. MRI features of hepatocellular carcinoma related to biologic behavior.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eun-Suk; Choi, Jin-Young

    2015-01-01

    Imaging studies including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) play a crucial role in the diagnosis and staging of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Several recent studies reveal a large number of MRI features related to the prognosis of HCC. In this review, we discuss various MRI features of HCC and their implications for the diagnosis and prognosis as imaging biomarkers. As a whole, the favorable MRI findings of HCC are small size, encapsulation, intralesional fat, high apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value, and smooth margins or hyperintensity on the hepatobiliary phase of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI. Unfavorable findings include large size, multifocality, low ADC value, non-smooth margins or hypointensity on hepatobiliary phase images. MRI findings are potential imaging biomarkers in patients with HCC. PMID:25995679

  14. Efficient Hilbert transform-based alternative to Tofts physiological models for representing MRI dynamic contrast-enhanced images in computer-aided diagnosis of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, Kevin M.; Wang, Shijun; Burtt, Karen E.; Turkbey, Baris; Weisenthal, Samuel; Pinto, Peter; Choyke, Peter; Wood, Bradford J.; Petrick, Nicholas; Sahiner, Berkman; Summers, Ronald M.

    2015-03-01

    In computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems for prostate cancer, dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging is useful for distinguishing cancerous and benign tissue. The Tofts physiological model is a commonly used representation of the DCE image data, but the parameters require extensive computation. Hence, we developed an alternative representation based on the Hilbert transform of the DCE images. The time maximum of the Hilbert transform, a binary metric of early enhancement, and a pre-DCE value was assigned to each voxel and appended to a standard feature set derived from T2-weighted images and apparent diffusion coefficient maps. A cohort of 40 patients was used for training the classifier, and 20 patients were used for testing. The AUC was calculated by pooling the voxel-wise prediction values and comparing with the ground truth. The resulting AUC of 0.92 (95% CI [0.87 0.97]) is not significantly different from an AUC calculated using Tofts physiological models of 0.92 (95% CI [0.87 0.97]), as validated by a Wilcoxon signed rank test on each patient's AUC (p = 0.19). The time required for calculation and feature extraction is 11.39 seconds (95% CI [10.95 11.82]) per patient using the Hilbert-based feature set, two orders of magnitude faster than the 1319 seconds (95% CI [1233 1404]) required for the Tofts parameter-based feature set (p<0.001). Hence, the features proposed herein appear useful for CAD systems integrated into clinical workflows where efficiency is important.

  15. Pharmacological enhancement of disc diffusion and differentiation of healthy, ageing and degenerated discs : Results from in-vivo serial post-contrast MRI studies in 365 human lumbar discs.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, S; Venkatadass, K; Naresh Babu, J; Ganesh, K; Shetty, Ajoy P

    2008-05-01

    Degenerative disc disease (DDD) is still a poorly understood phenomenon because of the lack of availability of precise definition of healthy, ageing and degenerated discs. Decreased nutrition is the final common pathway for DDD and the status of the endplate (EP) plays a crucial role in controlling the extent of diffusion, which is the only source of nutrition. The vascular channels in the subchondral plate have muscarinic receptors but the possibility of enhancing diffusion pharmacologically by dilation of these vessels has not been probed. Although it is well accepted that EP damage will affect diffusion and thereby nutrition, there is no described method to quantify the extent of EP damage. Precise definitions with an objective method of differentiating healthy, ageing and degenerated discs on the basis of anatomical integrity of the disc and physiological basis of altered nutrition will be useful. This information is an urgent necessity for better understanding of DDD and also strategizing prevention and treatment. Seven hundred and thirty endplates of 365 lumbar discs from 73 individuals (26 healthy volunteers and 47 patients) with age ranging from 10-64 years were evaluated by pre-contrast and 10 min, 2, 4, 6 and 12 h post contrast MRI after IV injection of 0.3 mmol/kg of Gadodiamide. End plates were classified according to the extent of damage into six grades and an incremental score was given for each category. A total endplate score (TEPS) was derived by adding the EP score of the two endplates for each concerned disc. The base line value (SI(base)) and the signal intensity at particular time periods were used to derive the enhancement percentage for each time period (Enhancement (%) = SI(tp) - SI(base)/SI(base) x 100). The enhancement percentage for each time period, the time for peak enhancement (T-max) and the time intensity curve (TIC) over 12 h were used to study and compare the diffusion characteristics. The differences in pattern of diffusion were

  16. Central Nervous Activity upon Systemic Salicylate Application in Animals with Kanamycin-Induced Hearing Loss--A Manganese-Enhanced MRI (MEMRI) Study.

    PubMed

    Gröschel, Moritz; Götze, Romy; Müller, Susanne; Ernst, Arne; Basta, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of systemic salicylate on central auditory and non-auditory structures in mice. Since cochlear hair cells are known to be one major target of salicylate, cochlear effects were reduced by using kanamycin to remove or impair hair cells. Neuronal brain activity was measured using the non-invasive manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging technique. For all brain structures investigated, calcium-related neuronal activity was increased following systemic application of a sodium salicylate solution: probably due to neuronal hyperactivity. In addition, it was shown that the central effect of salicylate was not limited to the auditory system. A general alteration of calcium-related activity was indicated by an increase in manganese accumulation in the preoptic area of the anterior hypothalamus, as well as in the amygdala. The present data suggest that salicylate-induced activity changes in the auditory system differ from those shown in studies of noise trauma. Since salicylate action is reversible, central pharmacological effects of salicylate compared to those of (permanent) noise-induced hearing impairment and tinnitus might induce different pathophysiologies. These should therefore, be treated as different causes with the same symptoms. PMID:27078034

  17. Spatial memory training induces morphological changes detected by manganese-enhanced MRI in the hippocampal CA3 mossy fiber terminal zone.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Binbin; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang; Tjio, Ci'en; Chen, Way Cherng; Sheu, Fwu-Shan; Routtenberg, Aryeh

    2016-03-01

    Hippocampal mossy fibers (MFs) can show plasticity of their axon terminal arbor consequent to learning a spatial memory task. Such plasticity is seen as translaminar sprouting from the stratum lucidum (SL) of CA3 into the stratum pyramidale (SP) and the stratum oriens (SO). However, the functional role of this presynaptic remodeling is still obscure. In vivo imaging that allows longitudinal observation of such remodeling could provide a deeper understanding of this presynaptic growth phenomenon as it occurs over time. Here we used manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI), which shows a high-contrast area that co-localizes with the MFs. This technique was applied in the detection of learning-induced MF plasticity in two strains of rats. Quantitative analysis of a series of sections in the rostral dorsal hippocampus showed increases in the CA3a' area in MEMRI of trained Wistar rats consistent with the increased SO+SP area seen in the Timm's staining. MF plasticity was not seen in the trained Lister-Hooded rats in either MEMRI or in Timm's staining. This indicates the potential of MEMRI for revealing neuro-architectures and plasticity of the hippocampal MF system in vivo in longitudinal studies. PMID:26254115

  18. Central Nervous Activity upon Systemic Salicylate Application in Animals with Kanamycin-Induced Hearing Loss - A Manganese-Enhanced MRI (MEMRI) Study

    PubMed Central

    Gröschel, Moritz; Götze, Romy; Müller, Susanne; Ernst, Arne; Basta, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of systemic salicylate on central auditory and non-auditory structures in mice. Since cochlear hair cells are known to be one major target of salicylate, cochlear effects were reduced by using kanamycin to remove or impair hair cells. Neuronal brain activity was measured using the non-invasive manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging technique. For all brain structures investigated, calcium-related neuronal activity was increased following systemic application of a sodium salicylate solution: probably due to neuronal hyperactivity. In addition, it was shown that the central effect of salicylate was not limited to the auditory system. A general alteration of calcium-related activity was indicated by an increase in manganese accumulation in the preoptic area of the anterior hypothalamus, as well as in the amygdala. The present data suggest that salicylate-induced activity changes in the auditory system differ from those shown in studies of noise trauma. Since salicylate action is reversible, central pharmacological effects of salicylate compared to those of (permanent) noise-induced hearing impairment and tinnitus might induce different pathophysiologies. These should therefore, be treated as different causes with the same symptoms. PMID:27078034

  19. Preparation and in vitro evaluation of folate-receptor-targeted SPION-polymer micelle hybrids for MRI contrast enhancement in cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Shveta; Koul, Veena; Choudhary, Veena; Shishodia, Gauri; Bharti, Alok C.

    2013-01-01

    Polymer-SPION hybrids were investigated for receptor-mediated localization in tumour tissue. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) prepared by high-temperature decomposition of iron acetylacetonate were monodisperse (9.27 ± 3.37 nm), with high saturation magnetization of 76.8 emu g-1. Amphiphilic copolymers prepared from methyl methacrylate and PEG methacrylate by atom transfer radical polymerization were conjugated with folic acid (for folate-receptor specificity). The folate-conjugated polymer had a low critical micellar concentration (0.4 mg l-1), indicating stability of the micellar formulation. SPION-polymeric micelle clusters were prepared by desolvation of the SPION dispersion/polymer solution in water. Magnetic resonance imaging of the formulation revealed very good contrast enhancement, with transverse (T2) relaxivity of 260.4 mM-1 s-1. The biological evaluation of the SPION micelles included cellular viability assay (MTT) and uptake in HeLa cells. These studies demonstrated the potential use of these nanoplatforms for imaging and targeting.

  20. Live nephron imaging by MRI.

    PubMed

    Qian, Chunqi; Yu, Xin; Pothayee, Nikorn; Dodd, Stephen; Bouraoud, Nadia; Star, Robert; Bennett, Kevin; Koretsky, Alan

    2014-11-15

    The local sensitivity of MRI can be improved with small MR detectors placed close to regions of interest. However, to maintain such sensitivity advantage, local detectors normally need to communicate with the external amplifier through cable connections, which prevent the use of local detectors as implantable devices. Recently, an integrated wireless amplifier was developed that can efficiently amplify and broadcast locally detected signals, so that the local sensitivity was enhanced without the need for cable connections. This integrated detector enabled the live imaging of individual glomeruli using negative contrast introduced by cationized ferritin, and the live imaging of renal tubules using positive contrast introduced by gadopentetate dimeglumine. Here, we utilized the high blood flow to image individual glomeruli as hyperintense regions without any contrast agent. These hyperintense regions were identified for pixels with signal intensities higher than the local average. Addition of Mn(2+) allowed the simultaneous detection of both glomeruli and renal tubules: Mn(2+) was primarily reabsorbed by renal tubules, which would be distinguished from glomeruli due to higher enhancement in T1-weighted MRI. Dynamic studies of Mn(2+) absorption confirmed the differential absorption affinity of glomeruli and renal tubules, potentially enabling the in vivo observation of nephron function. PMID:25186296

  1. Current MRI Techniques for the Assessment of Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Takamune; Wang, Feng; Quarles, Christopher C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Over the past decade a variety of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods have been developed and applied to many kidney diseases. These MRI techniques show great promise, enabling the noninvasive assessment of renal structure, function, and injury in individual subjects. This review will highlight current applications of functional MRI techniques for the assessment of renal disease and discuss future directions. Recent findings Many pathological (functional and structural) changes or factors in renal disease can be assessed by advanced MRI techniques. These include renal vascular structure and function (contrast-enhanced MRI, arterial spin labeling), tissue oxygenation (blood oxygen level-dependent MRI), renal tissue injury and fibrosis (diffusion or magnetization transfer imaging, MR elastography), renal metabolism (chemical exchange saturation transfer, spectroscopic imaging), nephron endowment (cationic-contrast imaging), sodium concentration (23Na-MRI), and molecular events (targeted-contrast imaging). Summary Current advances in MRI techniques have enabled the non-invasive investigation of renal disease. Further development, evaluation, and application of the MRI techniques should facilitate better understanding and assessment of renal disease and the development of new imaging biomarkers, enabling the intensified treatment to high-risk populations and a more rapid interrogation of novel therapeutic agents and protocols. PMID:26066472

  2. Clinical application of MRI in ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Kelly A.; Wollstein, Gadi; Schuman, Joel S.

    2010-01-01

    MRI has long been applied to clinical medical and neurological cases for the structural assessment of tissues as well as their physiological and functional needs and processes. These uses are at a variety of developmental stages in ophthalmology, from common use of clinical structural assessment for neuro-ophthalmology and evaluation of space-occupying lesions to the beginning stages of experimentally measuring functional activation of specific layers within the retina and measurement of physiological oxygen responses. New MRI methodologies, such as the use of orbital coils and Gd-DTPA image enhancement, have been researched, developed, and validated in the eye, opening new possibilities for this technology to enter the clinic. This review aims to summarize the clinical ophthalmological uses of MRI, focusing on the current use of the technology and future applications. PMID:18384176

  3. Implantable medical devices MRI safe.

    PubMed

    Dal Molin, Renzo; Hecker, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    Pacemakers, ICDs, neurostimulators like deep brain stimulator electrodes, spiral cord stimulators, insulin pumps, cochlear implants, retinal implants, hearing aids, electro cardio gram (ECG) leads, or devices in interventional MRI such as vascular guide wires or catheters are affected by MRI magnetic and electromagnetic fields. Design of MRI Safe medical devices requires computer modeling, bench testing, phantom testing, and animal studies. Implanted medical devices can be MRI unsafe, MRI conditional or MRI safe (see glossary). In the following paragraphs we will investigate how to design implanted medical devices MRI safe. PMID:23739365

  4. Benchmarking the ERG valve tip and MRI Interventions Smart Flow neurocatheter convection-enhanced delivery system's performance in a gel model of the brain: employing infusion protocols proposed for gene therapy for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sillay, Karl; Schomberg, Dominic; Hinchman, Angelica; Kumbier, Lauren; Ross, Chris; Kubota, Ken; Brodsky, Ethan; Miranpuri, Gurwattan

    2012-04-01

    Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) is an advanced infusion technique used to deliver therapeutic agents into the brain. CED has shown promise in recent clinical trials. Independent verification of published parameters is warranted with benchmark testing of published parameters in applicable models such as gel phantoms, ex vivo tissue and in vivo non-human animal models to effectively inform planned and future clinical therapies. In the current study, specific performance characteristics of two CED infusion catheter systems, such as backflow, infusion cloud morphology, volume of distribution (mm(3)) versus the infused volume (mm(3)) (Vd/Vi) ratios, rate of infusion (µl min(-1)) and pressure (mmHg), were examined to ensure published performance standards for the ERG valve-tip (VT) catheter. We tested the hypothesis that the ERG VT catheter with an infusion protocol of a steady 1 µl min(-1) functionality is comparable to the newly FDA approved MRI Interventions Smart Flow (SF) catheter with the UCSF infusion protocol in an agarose gel model. In the gel phantom models, no significant difference was found in performance parameters between the VT and SF catheter. We report, for the first time, such benchmark characteristics in CED between these two otherwise similar single-end port VT with stylet and end-port non-stylet infusion systems. Results of the current study in agarose gel models suggest that the performance of the VT catheter is comparable to the SF catheter and warrants further investigation as a tool in the armamentarium of CED techniques for eventual clinical use and application. PMID:22331865

  5. Benchmarking the ERG valve tip and MRI Interventions Smart Flow neurocatheter convection-enhanced delivery system's performance in a gel model of the brain: employing infusion protocols proposed for gene therapy for Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sillay, Karl; Schomberg, Dominic; Hinchman, Angelica; Kumbier, Lauren; Ross, Chris; Kubota, Ken; Brodsky, Ethan; Miranpuri, Gurwattan

    2012-04-01

    Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) is an advanced infusion technique used to deliver therapeutic agents into the brain. CED has shown promise in recent clinical trials. Independent verification of published parameters is warranted with benchmark testing of published parameters in applicable models such as gel phantoms, ex vivo tissue and in vivo non-human animal models to effectively inform planned and future clinical therapies. In the current study, specific performance characteristics of two CED infusion catheter systems, such as backflow, infusion cloud morphology, volume of distribution (mm3) versus the infused volume (mm3) (Vd/Vi) ratios, rate of infusion (µl min-1) and pressure (mmHg), were examined to ensure published performance standards for the ERG valve-tip (VT) catheter. We tested the hypothesis that the ERG VT catheter with an infusion protocol of a steady 1 µl min-1 functionality is comparable to the newly FDA approved MRI Interventions Smart Flow (SF) catheter with the UCSF infusion protocol in an agarose gel model. In the gel phantom models, no significant difference was found in performance parameters between the VT and SF catheter. We report, for the first time, such benchmark characteristics in CED between these two otherwise similar single-end port VT with stylet and end-port non-stylet infusion systems. Results of the current study in agarose gel models suggest that the performance of the VT catheter is comparable to the SF catheter and warrants further investigation as a tool in the armamentarium of CED techniques for eventual clinical use and application.

  6. Knee MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic resonance imaging) scan uses energy from strong magnets to create pictures of the knee joint and ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  7. Leg MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... resonance imaging) scan of the leg uses strong magnets to create pictures of the leg. This may ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  8. Cervical MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic resonance imaging) scan uses energy from strong magnets to create pictures of the part of the ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  9. Lumbar MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... may need a lumbar MRI if you have: Low back pain that does not get better after treatment Leg ... spine Injury or trauma to the lower spine Low back pain and a history or signs of cancer Multiple ...

  10. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    MedlinePlus

    ... some MRI exams, intravenous (IV) drugs, such as gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) are used to change the contrast of the MR image. Gadolinium-based contrast agents are rare earth metals that ...

  11. MRI of the Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a supplemental tool to breast screening with mammography or ultrasound. It may be used to screen ... following diagnosis, or further evaluate abnormalities seen on mammography. Breast MRI does not use ionizing radiation, and ...

  12. Towards MRI microarrays.

    PubMed

    Hall, Andrew; Mundell, Victoria J; Blanco-Andujar, Cristina; Bencsik, Martin; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael I; Cave, Gareth W V

    2010-04-14

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanometre scale particles have been utilised as contrast agents to image staked target binding oligonucleotide arrays using MRI to correlate the signal intensity and T(2)* relaxation times in different NMR fluids. PMID:20379545

  13. Sinus MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thomsen HS, Reimer P. Intravascular contrast media for radiology, CT, and MRI. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, ... JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ed. New ...

  14. Shoulder MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... an imaging test that uses energy from powerful magnets and to create pictures of the shoulder area. ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed in the room ...

  15. MRI in multiple myeloma: a pictorial review of diagnostic and post-treatment findings.

    PubMed

    Dutoit, Julie C; Verstraete, Koenraad L

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly being used in the diagnostic work-up of patients with multiple myeloma. Since 2014, MRI findings are included in the new diagnostic criteria proposed by the International Myeloma Working Group. Patients with smouldering myeloma presenting with more than one unequivocal focal lesion in the bone marrow on MRI are considered having symptomatic myeloma requiring treatment, regardless of the presence of lytic bone lesions. However, bone marrow evaluation with MRI offers more than only morphological information regarding the detection of focal lesions in patients with MM. The overall performance of MRI is enhanced by applying dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and diffusion weighted imaging sequences, providing additional functional information on bone marrow vascularization and cellularity.This pictorial review provides an overview of the most important imaging findings in patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, smouldering myeloma and multiple myeloma, by performing a 'total' MRI investigation with implications for the diagnosis, staging and response assessment. Main message • Conventional MRI diagnoses multiple myeloma by assessing the infiltration pattern. • Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI diagnoses multiple myeloma by assessing vascularization and perfusion. • Diffusion weighted imaging evaluates bone marrow composition and cellularity in multiple myeloma. • Combined morphological and functional MRI provides optimal bone marrow assessment for staging. • Combined morphological and functional MRI is of considerable value in treatment follow-up. PMID:27164915

  16. Optogenetic Functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Peter; Fang, Zhongnan; Liu, Jia; Lee, Jin Hyung

    2016-01-01

    The investigation of the functional connectivity of precise neural circuits across the entire intact brain can be achieved through optogenetic functional magnetic resonance imaging (ofMRI), which is a novel technique that combines the relatively high spatial resolution of high-field fMRI with the precision of optogenetic stimulation. Fiber optics that enable delivery of specific wavelengths of light deep into the brain in vivo are implanted into regions of interest in order to specifically stimulate targeted cell types that have been genetically induced to express light-sensitive trans-membrane conductance channels, called opsins. fMRI is used to provide a non-invasive method of determining the brain's global dynamic response to optogenetic stimulation of specific neural circuits through measurement of the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal, which provides an indirect measurement of neuronal activity. This protocol describes the construction of fiber optic implants, the implantation surgeries, the imaging with photostimulation and the data analysis required to successfully perform ofMRI. In summary, the precise stimulation and whole-brain monitoring ability of ofMRI are crucial factors in making ofMRI a powerful tool for the study of the connectomics of the brain in both healthy and diseased states. PMID:27167840

  17. Optogenetic Functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Lin, Peter; Fang, Zhongnan; Liu, Jia; Lee, Jin Hyung

    2016-01-01

    The investigation of the functional connectivity of precise neural circuits across the entire intact brain can be achieved through optogenetic functional magnetic resonance imaging (ofMRI), which is a novel technique that combines the relatively high spatial resolution of high-field fMRI with the precision of optogenetic stimulation. Fiber optics that enable delivery of specific wavelengths of light deep into the brain in vivo are implanted into regions of interest in order to specifically stimulate targeted cell types that have been genetically induced to express light-sensitive trans-membrane conductance channels, called opsins. fMRI is used to provide a non-invasive method of determining the brain's global dynamic response to optogenetic stimulation of specific neural circuits through measurement of the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal, which provides an indirect measurement of neuronal activity. This protocol describes the construction of fiber optic implants, the implantation surgeries, the imaging with photostimulation and the data analysis required to successfully perform ofMRI. In summary, the precise stimulation and whole-brain monitoring ability of ofMRI are crucial factors in making ofMRI a powerful tool for the study of the connectomics of the brain in both healthy and diseased states. PMID:27167840

  18. Quantification of in vivo pH-weighted amide proton transfer (APT) MRI in acute ischemic stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Iris Y.; Igarashi, Takahiro; Guo, Yingkun; Sun, Phillip Z.

    2015-03-01

    Amide proton transfer (APT) imaging is a specific form of chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI that probes the pH-dependent amide proton exchange.The endogenous APT MRI is sensitive to tissue acidosis, which may complement the commonly used perfusion and diffusion scans for characterizing heterogeneous ischemic tissue damage. Whereas the saturation transfer asymmetry analysis (MTRasym) may reasonably compensate for direct RF saturation, in vivo MTRasym is however, susceptible to an intrinsically asymmetric shift (MTR'asym). Specifically, the reference scan for the endogenous APT MRI is 7 ppm upfield from that of the label scan, and subjects to concomitant RF irradiation effects, including nuclear overhauser effect (NOE)-mediated saturation transfer and semisolid macromolecular magnetization transfer. As such, the commonly used asymmetry analysis could not fully compensate for such slightly asymmetric concomitant RF irradiation effects, and MTRasym has to be delineated in order to properly characterize the pH-weighted APT MRI contrast. Given that there is very little change in relaxation time immediately after ischemia and the concomitant RF irradiation effects only minimally depends on pH, the APT contrast can be obtained as the difference of MTRasym between the normal and ischemic regions. Thereby, the endogenous amide proton concentration and exchange rate can be solved using a dual 2-pool model, and the in vivo MTR'asym can be calculated by subtracting the solved APT contrast from asymmetry analysis (i.e., MTR'asym =MTRasym-APTR). In addition, MTR'asym can be quantified using the classical 2-pool exchange model. In sum, our study delineated the conventional in vivo pH-sensitive MTRasym contrast so that pHspecific contrast can be obtained for imaging ischemic tissue acidosis.

  19. Fluorine-Decoupled Carbon Spectroscopy for the Determination of Configuration at Fully Substituted, Trifluoromethyl- and Perfluoroalkyl-Bearing Carbons: Comparison with 19F–1H Heteronuclear Overhauser Effect Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of a series of α-trifluoromethylcyclohexanols and analogous trimethylsilyl ethers by addition of the Ruppert–Prakash reagent to substituted cyclohexanones is presented. A method for the assignment of configuration of such compounds, of related α-trifluoromethylcyclohexylamines and of quaternary trifluoromethyl-substituted carbons is described based on the determination of the 3JCH coupling constant between the fluorine-decoupled 13CF3 resonance and the vicinal hydrogens. This method is dubbed fluorine-decoupled carbon spectroscopy and abbreviated FDCS. The method is also applied to the configurational assignment of substances bearing mono-, di-, and perfluoroalkyl rather than trifluoromethyl groups. The configuration of all substances was verified by either 19F−1H heteronuclear Overhauser spectroscopy (HOESY) or X-ray crystallography. The relative merits of FDCS and HOESY are compared and contrasted. 2JCH, 3JCH, and 4JCH coupling constants to 19F decoupled CF3 groups in alkenes and arenes have also been determined and should prove to be useful in the structural assignment of trifluoromethylated alkenes and arenes. PMID:25561269

  20. Enhancement of the Two-Dimensional Conduction Electron Zeeman Energy Near v=1 by Optical Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, C.R.; Reno, J.L.; Simmons, J.A.; Vitkalov, S.A.

    1998-11-06

    Enhancement of the Zeeman energy of 2D conduction electrons near v = 1 by optical dynamic nuclear polarization (lINP), as observed by the Overhauser shift of the transport detected electron spin resonance, is measured quantitatively for the first time in GaAs/AIGaAs mukiquantum wells. The NMR signal enhancement is obtained under similar conditions in the same sample, allowing the hyperke coupling constant of 3.7T between between the nuclei and 2D conduction electrons to be measured for the first time. The potential to suppress the Zeeman energy by optical DNP is discussed in the context of its potential influence on Skyrmion formation.

  1. Studies of MRI relaxivities of gadolinium-labeled dendrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Hongmu; Daniel, Marie-Christine

    2011-05-01

    In cancer detection, imaging techniques have a great importance in early diagnosis. The more sensitive the imaging technique and the earlier the tumor can be detected. Contrast agents have the capability to increase the sensitivity in imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Until now, gadolinium-based contrast agents are mainly used for MRI, and show good enhancement. But improvement is needed for detection of smaller tumors at the earliest stage possible. The dendrons complexed with Gd(DOTA) were synthesized and evaluated as a new MRI contrast agent. The longitudinal and transverse relaxation effects were tested and compared with commercial drug Magnevist, Gd(DTPA).

  2. Radiotherapy planning using MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Maria A.; Payne, Geoffrey S.

    2015-11-01

    The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in radiotherapy (RT) planning is rapidly expanding. We review the wide range of image contrast mechanisms available to MRI and the way they are exploited for RT planning. However a number of challenges are also considered: the requirements that MR images are acquired in the RT treatment position, that they are geometrically accurate, that effects of patient motion during the scan are minimized, that tissue markers are clearly demonstrated, that an estimate of electron density can be obtained. These issues are discussed in detail, prior to the consideration of a number of specific clinical applications. This is followed by a brief discussion on the development of real-time MRI-guided RT.

  3. MRI Catheterization in Cardiopulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Toby; Ratnayaka, Kanishka

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis and prognostication in patients with complex cardiopulmonary disease can be a clinical challenge. A new procedure, MRI catheterization, involves invasive right-sided heart catheterization performed inside the MRI scanner using MRI instead of traditional radiographic fluoroscopic guidance. MRI catheterization combines simultaneous invasive hemodynamic and MRI functional assessment in a single radiation-free procedure. By combining both modalities, the many individual limitations of invasive catheterization and noninvasive imaging can be overcome, and additional clinical questions can be addressed. Today, MRI catheterization is a clinical reality in specialist centers in the United States and Europe. Advances in medical device design for the MRI environment will enable not only diagnostic but also interventional MRI procedures to be performed within the next few years. PMID:24394821

  4. Assessment of radiofrequency ablation margin by MRI-MRI image fusion in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Li; Li, Kai; Su, Zhong-Zhen; Huang, Ze-Ping; Wang, Ping; Zheng, Rong-Qin

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the feasibility and clinical value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-MRI image fusion in assessing the ablative margin (AM) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: A newly developed ultrasound workstation for MRI-MRI image fusion was used to evaluate the AM of 62 tumors in 52 HCC patients after radiofrequency ablation (RFA). The lesions were divided into two groups: group A, in which the tumor was completely ablated and 5 mm AM was achieved (n = 32); and group B, in which the tumor was completely ablated but 5 mm AM was not achieved (n = 29). To detect local tumor progression (LTP), all patients were followed every two months by contrast-enhanced ultrasound, contrast-enhanced MRI or computed tomography (CT) in the first year after RFA. Then, the follow-up interval was prolonged to every three months after the first year. RESULTS: Of the 62 tumors, MRI-MRI image fusion was successful in 61 (98.4%); the remaining case had significant deformation of the liver and massive ascites after RFA. The time required for creating image fusion and AM evaluation was 15.5 ± 5.5 min (range: 8-22 min) and 9.6 ± 3.2 min (range: 6-14 min), respectively. The follow-up period ranged from 1-23 mo (14.2 ± 5.4 mo). In group A, no LTP was detected in 32 lesions, whereas in group B, LTP was detected in 4 of 29 tumors, which occurred at 2, 7, 9, and 15 mo after RFA. The frequency of LTP in group B (13.8%; 4/29) was significantly higher than that in group A (0/32, P = 0.046). All of the LTPs occurred in the area in which the 5 mm AM was not achieved. CONCLUSION: The MRI-MRI image fusion using an ultrasound workstation is feasible and useful for evaluating the AM after RFA for HCC. PMID:25954109

  5. Development of hyperpolarized noble gas MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, M. S.; Balamore, D.

    1998-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging using the MR signal from hyperpolarized noble gases 129Xe and 3He may become an important new diagnostic technique. Alex Pines (adapting the hyperpolarization technique pioneered by William Happer) presented MR spectroscopy studies using hyperpolarized 129Xe. The current authors recognized that the enormous enhancement in the detectability of 129Xe, promised by hyperpolarization, would solve the daunting SNR problems impeding their attempts to use 129Xe as an in vivo MR probe, especially in order to study the action of general anesthetics. It was hoped that hyperpolarized 129Xe MRI would yield resolutions equivalent to that achievable with conventional 1H 2O MRI, and that xenon's solubility in lipids would facilitate investigations of lipid-rich tissues that had as yet been hard to image. The publication of hyperpolarized 129Xe images of excised mouse lungs heralded the emergence of hyperpolarized noble-gas MRI. Using hyperpolarized 3He, researchers have obtained images of the lung gas space of guinea pigs and of humans. Lung gas images from patients with pulmonary disease have recently been reported. 3He is easier to hyperpolarize than 129Xe, and it yields a stronger MR signal, but its extremely low solubility in blood precludes its use for the imaging of tissue. Xenon, however, readily dissolves in blood, and the T1 of dissolved 129Xe is long enough for sufficient polarization to be carried by the circulation to distal tissues. Hyperpolarized 129Xe dissolved-phase tissue spectra from the thorax and head of rodents and humans have been obtained, as have chemical shift 129Xe images from the head of rats. Lung gas 129Xe images of rodents, and more recently of humans, have been reported. Hyperpolarized 129Xe MRI (HypX-MRI) may elucidate the link between the structure of the lung and its function. The technique may also be useful in identifying ventilation-perfusion mismatch in patients with pulmonary embolism, in staging and tracking the

  6. Challenges for Molecular Neuroimaging with MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lelyveld, Victor S.; Atanasijevic, Tatjana; Jasanoff, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MRI)-based molecular imaging methods are beginning to have impact in neuroscience. A growing number of molecular imaging agents have been synthesized and tested in vitro, but so far relatively few have been validated in the brains of live animals. Here, we discuss key challenges associated with expanding the repertoire of successful molecular neuroimaging approaches. The difficulty of delivering agents past the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a particular obstacle to molecular imaging in the central nervous system. We review established and emerging techniques for trans-BBB delivery, including intracranial infusion, BBB disruption, and transporter-related methods. Improving the sensitivity with which MRI-based molecular agents can be detected is a second major challenge. Better sensitivity would in turn reduce the requirements for delivery and alleviate potential side effects. We discuss recent efforts to enhance relaxivity of conventional longitudinal relaxation time (T1) and transverse relaxation time (T2) MRI contrast agents, as well as strategies that involve amplifying molecular signals or reducing endogenous background influences. With ongoing refinement of imaging approaches and brain delivery methods, MRI-based techniques for molecular-level neuroscientific investigation will fall increasingly within reach. PMID:20808721

  7. Biparametric versus multiparametric MRI in the diagnosis of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Logager, Vibeke; Baslev, Ingerd; Møller, Jakob M; Hansen, Rasmus Hvass; Thomsen, Henrik S

    2016-01-01

    Background Since multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) of the prostate exceeds 30 min, minimizing the evaluation time of significant (Gleason scores > 6) prostate cancer (PCa) would be beneficial. A reduced protocol might be sufficient for the diagnosis. Purpose To study whether a short unenhanced biparametric MRI (bp-MRI) matches mp-MRI in detecting significant PCa. Material and Methods A total of 204 men (median age, 65 years; mean ± SD, 64.1; range 45–75 years; median serum PSA level, 14 ng/mL; range, 2.2–120 ng/mL; median prostate volume, 60 mL; range, 23–263 mL) fulfilled the criteria for being enrolled. They underwent mp-MRI and prostate biopsy from January through June 2014. Of the included patients, 9.3% underwent prostatectomy, 90.7% had TRUS-bx, and 10.8 had MRI-targeted TRUS-bx. Two radiologists separately assessed the mp-MRI examination (T2-weighted [T2W] imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging [DWI], apparent diffusion coefficient map [ADC-map] and dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging [DCE]). Two months later, the bp-MRI version (T2W imaging, DWI, and ADC-map) was evaluated. Results Reader 1: Assessing mp-MRI: 0 false negatives, sensitivity of 1, and specificity 0.04. Assessing bp-MRI: four false negatives, sensitivity of 0.94, and specificity 0.15. Reader 2: Assessing mp-MRI: five false negatives, sensitivity of 0.93, and specificity 0.16. Assessing bp-MRI: three false negatives, sensitivity of 0.96, and specificity 0.15. Intra-reader agreement Cohen’s Kappa (κ) was 0.87 for reader 1 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.83–0.92) and 0.84 for reader 2 (95% CI 0.78–0.89). Conclusion Bp-MRI is as good as mp-MRI at detecting PCa. A large prospective study seems to be strongly warranted. PMID:27583170

  8. MRI driven magnetic microswimmers.

    PubMed

    Kósa, Gábor; Jakab, Péter; Székely, Gábor; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2012-02-01

    Capsule endoscopy is a promising technique for diagnosing diseases in the digestive system. Here we design and characterize a miniature swimming mechanism that uses the magnetic fields of the MRI for both propulsion and wireless powering of the capsule. Our method uses both the static and the radio frequency (RF) magnetic fields inherently available in MRI to generate a propulsive force. Our study focuses on the evaluation of the propulsive force for different swimming tails and experimental estimation of the parameters that influence its magnitude. We have found that an approximately 20 mm long, 5 mm wide swimming tail is capable of producing 0.21 mN propulsive force in water when driven by a 20 Hz signal providing 0.85 mW power and the tail located within the homogeneous field of a 3 T MRI scanner. We also analyze the parallel operation of the swimming mechanism and the scanner imaging. We characterize the size of artifacts caused by the propulsion system. We show that while the magnetic micro swimmer is propelling the capsule endoscope, the operator can locate the capsule on the image of an interventional scene without being obscured by significant artifacts. Although this swimming method does not scale down favorably, the high magnetic field of the MRI allows self propulsion speed on the order of several millimeter per second and can propel an endoscopic capsule in the stomach. PMID:22037673

  9. Teratoma - MRI scan (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This MRI scan shows a tumor (teratoma) at the base of the spine (seen on the left lower edge of the screen), located in the sacrum and coccyx (sacrococcygeal) area. Teratomas are present at birth and may contain hair, teeth, and other tissues.

  10. High-quality breast MRI.

    PubMed

    Hendrick, R Edward

    2014-05-01

    Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demands the competing factors of high spatial resolution, good temporal resolution, high signal-to-noise ratios, and complete bilateral breast coverage. Achieving these competing factors requires modern MRI equipment with high magnetic field strength and homogeneity, high maximum gradient strength with short rise times, dedicated multichannel bilateral breast coils with prone patient positioning, and 3D (volume) gradient-echo MRI pulse sequences with short TR, short TE, high spatial resolution, and reasonably short acquisition times. This article discusses the equipment and pulse sequences needed to achieve high-quality breast MRI and summarizes requirements of the ACR Breast MRI Accreditation Program. PMID:24792656

  11. Advanced MRI in malignant neoplasms of the uterus.

    PubMed

    Kido, Aki; Fujimoto, Koji; Okada, Tomohisa; Togashi, Kaori

    2013-02-01

    Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) such as T1-weighted and T2-weighted images of the female pelvis provide morphological information with excellent tissue contrast, which reflects the pathology of malignant diseases of the uterus. Owing to the recent improvement in hardware and software, in combination with extensive research in imaging techniques, not only MRI at higher magnetic field was facilitated, but also insight into tumor pathophysiology was provided. These methods include diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) with pharmacokinetic analysis, and MR spectroscopy (MRS). The application of these techniques is expanding from the brain to the body because information on the tissue microenvironment and cytoarchitecture is helpful for lesion characterization, evaluation of treatment response after chemotherapy or radiation, differentiating posttherapeutic changes from residual active tumor, and for detecting recurrent cancer. These techniques may provide clues to optimize the treatment of patients with malignant diseases of the uterus. In the first half of this article we provide an overview of the technical aspects of MRI of the female pelvis, especially focusing on the state-of-the-art techniques such as 3 T MRI, DCE-MRI, DWI, etc. For the latter half we review the clinical aspects of these newly developed techniques, focusing on how these techniques are applicable, what has been revealed with respect to clinical impact, and the remaining problems. PMID:23355429

  12. FDG and (82)Rb PET/MRI features of brain metastasis of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yang

    2015-06-01

    A 64-year-old woman with stage IV breast cancer underwent an FDG and Rb PET brain studies. The PET brain images were fused with MRI brain T1 post-contrast images. The known enhancing left superoposterior frontal brain metastasis is positive on both FDG Rb PET/MRI images. The Rb PET/MRI showed better target-to-noise ratio, but showed nonspecific uptake in the superior sagittal sinus. PMID:25674864

  13. Correlation between MRI and Operative Findings in Bell's Palsy and Ramsay Hunt Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, In Sup; Shin, Seung-Ho; Kim, Jinna; Lee, Won-Sang

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the correlation between gadolinium enhanced magnetic resonance image (MRI) results and surgical findings of facial nerves in Bell's palsy and Ramsay Hunt syndrome. Materials and Methods From 1995 to 2004, MRI was performed on 13 patients with Bell's palsy or Ramsay Hunt syndrome, who were offered with surgical decompression of the facial nerve through the middle cranial fossa approach. Gadolinium enhanced MRI was performed on all patients and the enhancement of the facial nerve was evaluated by radiology specialists. Operative findings including the degree of the facial nerve segment swelling were examined. Furthermore, the time interval from the onset of palsy to surgery was evaluated. Results Swelling of facial nerve segments was found in patients with enhanced facial nerves from MRI. The swelling of the facial nerve in the labyrinthine segment in particular was identified in all patients with enhanced labyrinthine segments in MRI. The intraoperative swelling of geniculate ganglion of facial nerve was found in 78% of patients with enhanced facial segment in MRI (p = 0.01). The intraoperative swelling of tympanic segment was observed from fourth to ninth weeks after the onset of palsy. Conclusion MRI enhancement of facial nerves in Bell's palsy and Ramsay Hunt syndrome is associated with the extent of intratemporal lesions of facial nerves, especially in the labyrinthine segment. PMID:18159587

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies on yeast tRNAPhe. III. Assignments of the iminoproton resonances of the tertiary structure by means of nuclear Overhauser effect experiments at 500 MHz.

    PubMed Central

    Heerschap, A; Haasnoot, C A; Hilbers, C W

    1983-01-01

    Resonances of the water exchangeable iminoprotons of the tertiary structure of yeast tRNAPhe were studied by experiments involving Nuclear Overhauser Effects (NOE's). Direct NOE evidence is presented for the assignment of all resonances of iminoprotons participating in tertiary basepairing (except that of G19C56 which was assigned by an elimination procedure). The present results in conjunction with our previous assignment of secondary iminoprotons constitute for the first time a complete spectral assignment of all iminoprotons participating in basepairing in yeast tRNAPhe. In addition we have been able to assign the non(internally) hydrogen bonded N1 proton of psi 55 as well as the N3 proton of this residue, which is one of the two iminoprotons hydrogen bonded to a phosphate group according to X-ray results. No evidence could be obtained for the existence in solution of the other iminoproton-phosphate interaction: that between U33 N3H and P36 located in the anticodon loop. Remarkable is the assignment of a resonance at 12.4 - 12.5 ppm to the iminoproton of the tertiary basepair T54m1A58. The resonance positions obtained for the iminoprotons of G18 (9.8 ppm) and m2(2)G26 (10.4 ppm) are surprisingly far upfield considering that these protons are involved in hydrogen bonds according to X-ray diffraction results. As far as reported by changes in chemical shifts of iminoproton resonances the main structural event induced by Mg++ ions takes place near the tertiary interactions U8A14 and G22m7G46. PMID:6346269

  15. Evolving role of MRI in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Yacoub, Joseph H; Obara, Piotr; Oto, Aytekin

    2013-06-01

    MR enterography is playing an evolving role in the evaluation of small bowel Crohn's disease (CD). Standard MR enterography includes a combination of rapidly acquired T2 sequence, balanced steady-state acquisition, and contrast enhanced T1-weighted gradient echo sequence. The diagnostic performance of these sequences has been shown to be comparable, and in some respects superior, to other small bowel imaging modalities. The findings of CD on MR enterography have been well described in the literature. New and emerging techniques such as diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), cinematography, and magnetization transfer, may lead to improved accuracy in characterizing the disease. These advanced techniques can provide quantitative parameters that may prove to be useful in assessing disease activity, severity, and response to treatment. In the future, MR enterography may play an increasing role in management decisions for patients with small bowel CD; however, larger studies are needed to validate these emerging MRI parameters as imaging biomarkers. PMID:23712842

  16. Novel design of multimodal MRI/NIR optical contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Kevin; Lin, Franck; Akers, Walter; Zheng, Jie; Teng, Bao; Vasalatiy, Olga; Griffiths, Gary L.; Gandjbakhche, Amir; Berezin, Mikhail Y.; Achilefu, Samuel

    2011-03-01

    We present a novel, dual modality gadolinium based MRI/near-infrared optical probe. Utilizing a fluorescent dye as a scaffold with attached Gd-chelating moiety, we demonstrated a substantial shortening of T1 relaxation time of water protons in vitro. The probe was compared to the commonly used MRI Gd-based contrast agents Magnevist® and Multihance® and showed superior contrast properties. The enhancement was due to strong albumin binding of the hydrophobic fluorophore and overall rigidification of the contrast agent. Due to the near-infrared optical properties of the probe and excellent MRI activity the proposed construct can be potentially utilized as a dual probe in multimodal MRI/NIR optical imaging.

  17. Functional MRI-based lie detection: scientific and societal challenges.

    PubMed

    Farah, Martha J; Hutchinson, J Benjamin; Phelps, Elizabeth A; Wagner, Anthony D

    2014-02-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI)-based lie detection has been marketed as a tool for enhancing personnel selection, strengthening national security and protecting personal reputations, and at least three US courts have been asked to admit the results of lie detection scans as evidence during trials. How well does fMRI-based lie detection perform, and how should the courts, and society more generally, respond? Here, we address various questions — some of which are based on a meta-analysis of published studies — concerning the scientific state of the art in fMRI-based lie detection and its legal status, and discuss broader ethical and societal implications. We close with three general policy recommendations. PMID:24588019

  18. A technique to consider mismatches between fMRI and EEG/MEG sources for fMRI-constrained EEG/MEG source imaging: a preliminary simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Soo Yeol

    2006-12-01

    fMRI-constrained EEG/MEG source imaging can be a powerful tool in studying human brain functions with enhanced spatial and temporal resolutions. Recent studies on the combination of fMRI and EEG/MEG have suggested that fMRI prior information could be readily implemented by simply imposing different weighting factors to cortical sources overlapping with the fMRI activations. It has been also reported, however, that such a hard constraint may cause severe distortions or elimination of meaningful EEG/MEG sources when there are distinct mismatches between the fMRI activations and the EEG/MEG sources. If one wants to obtain the actual EEG/MEG source locations and uses the fMRI prior information as just an auxiliary tool to enhance focality of the distributed EEG/MEG sources, it is reasonable to weaken the strength of fMRI constraint when severe mismatches between fMRI and EEG/MEG sources are observed. The present study suggests an efficient technique to automatically adjust the strength of fMRI constraint according to the mismatch level. The use of the proposed technique rarely affects the results of conventional fMRI-constrained EEG/MEG source imaging if no major mismatch between the two modalities is detected; while the new results become similar to those of typical EEG/MEG source imaging without fMRI constraint if the mismatch level is significant. A preliminary simulation study using realistic EEG signals demonstrated that the proposed technique can be a promising tool to selectively apply fMRI prior information to EEG/MEG source imaging.

  19. Pearls and pitfalls in breast MRI

    PubMed Central

    Millet, I; Pages, E; Hoa, D; Merigeaud, S; Curros Doyon, F; Prat, X; Taourel, P

    2012-01-01

    At our academic institution, we have noticed repeated examples of both false-positive and false-negative MR diagnoses in breast cancer. The most common diagnostic errors in interpreting MRI of the breast are discussed in this review and experience-based advice is provided to avoid similar mistakes. The most common reasons for false-positive diagnoses are misinterpretation of artefacts, confusion between normal enhancing structures and tumours and, above all, insufficient use of the American College of Radiology breast imaging reporting and data system lexicon, whereas false-negative diagnoses are made as a result of missed tiny enhancement, a background-enhancing breast, or enhancement interpreted as benign rather than malignant. PMID:22128131

  20. The impact of increased mean airway pressure on contrast-enhanced MRI measurement of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV), regional mean transit time (rMTT), and regional cerebrovascular resistance (rCVR) in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kolbitsch, C; Lorenz, I H; Hörmann, C; Schocke, M; Kremser, C; Zschiegner, F; Felber, S; Benzer, A

    2000-11-01

    Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurement of cerebral perfusion is a diagnostic procedure increasingly gaining access to clinical practice not only in spontaneously breathing patients but also in mechanically ventilated patients. Effects of increased mean airway pressure on cerebral perfusion are entirely possible. Therefore, the present study used continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) (12 cm H2O) to study the effects of increased mean airway pressure on cerebral perfusion in volunteers. CPAP significantly reduced regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) but increased regional mean transit time (rMTT) and regional cerebrovascular resistance (rCVR). Active vasoconstriction (e.g., arterial) and/or passive compression of capillary and/or venous vessel areas are the most likely underlying mechanisms. The number of interhemispheric differences in rCBF, rCBV, rMTT, and rCVR found at baseline rose when mean airway pressure was increased. These results, although obtained in volunteers, should be taken into consideration for the interpretation of contrast-enhanced MRI perfusion measurements in mechanically ventilated patients with an increased positive airway pressure. PMID:11098799

  1. Brain MRI findings in Wernicke encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Wicklund, Meredith R; Knopman, David S

    2013-08-01

    A 71-year-old woman with myelofibrosis on chemotherapy experienced an acute illness with nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Two weeks later, she developed an acute confusional state characterized by disorientation and fluctuating alertness with normal speech and language. Her neurologic examination demonstrated an upper motor neuron pattern of right hemiparesis. She reported double vision though ophthalmoparesis was not appreciated. Her gait was normal. While hospitalized, she developed generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Brain MRI revealed a small area of restricted diffusion of the left precentral gyrus (figure). She was diagnosed with a stroke with secondary seizures; however, as the confusional state resolved, she developed profound retrograde and anterograde amnesia. Review of the brain MRI showed high T2 signal in the medial thalamus and contrast enhancement of the mamillary bodies; a diagnosis of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome was entertained and she was started on thiamine replacement. The encephalopathy and hemiparesis resolved though she remains severely amnestic. PMID:24195023

  2. MRI of the penis

    PubMed Central

    Kirkham, A

    2012-01-01

    MRI of the penis is an expensive test that is not always superior to clinical examination or ultrasound. However, it shows many of the important structures, and in particular the combination of tumescence from intracavernosal alprostadil, and high-resolution T2 sequences show the glans, corpora and the tunica albuginea well. In this paper we summarise the radiological anatomy and discuss the indications for MRI. For penile cancer, it may be useful in cases where the local stage is not apparent clinically. In priapism, it is an emerging technique for assessing corporal viability, and in fracture it can in most cases make the diagnosis and locate the injury. In some cases of penile fibrosis and Peyronie's disease, it may aid surgical planning, and in complex pelvic fracture may replace or augment conventional urethrography. It is an excellent investigation for the malfunctioning penile prosthesis. PMID:23118102

  3. Occupational exposure in MRI.

    PubMed

    McRobbie, D W

    2012-04-01

    This article reviews occupational exposure in clinical MRI; it specifically considers units of exposure, basic physical interactions, health effects, guideline limits, dosimetry, results of exposure surveys, calculation of induced fields and the status of the European Physical Agents Directive. Electromagnetic field exposure in MRI from the static field B(0), imaging gradients and radiofrequency transmission fields induces electric fields and currents in tissue, which are responsible for various acute sensory effects. The underlying theory and its application to the formulation of incident and induced field limits are presented. The recent International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) Bundesministerium für Arbeit und Soziales and Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers limits for incident field exposure are interpreted in a manner applicable to MRI. Field measurements show that exposure from movement within the B(0) fringe field can exceed ICNIRP reference levels within 0.5 m of the bore entrance. Rate of change of field dB/dt from the imaging gradients is unlikely to exceed the new limits, although incident field limits can be exceeded for radiofrequency (RF) exposure within 0.2-0.5 m of the bore entrance. Dosimetric surveys of routine clinical practice show that staff are exposed to peak values of 42 ± 24% of B(0), with time-averaged exposures of 5.2 ± 2.8 mT for magnets in the range 0.6-4 T. Exposure to time-varying fields arising from movement within the B(0) fringe resulted in peak dB/dt of approximately 2 T s(-1). Modelling of induced electric fields from the imaging gradients shows that ICNIRP-induced field limits are unlikely to be exceeded in most situations; however, movement through the static field may still present a problem. The likely application of the limits is discussed with respect to the reformulation of the European Union (EU) directive and its possible implications for MRI. PMID:22457400

  4. [MRI in coma survivors].

    PubMed

    Tshibanda, L; Vanhaudenhuyse, A; Bruno, M A; Boly, M; Soddu, A; Laureys, S; Moonen, G

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic and non-traumatic brain injured disorders of consciousness patients are still challenging for diagnosis, prognosis, ethical and socio-economic reasons. Currently, there remains a high rate of misdiagnosis of the vegetative state (Schnakers, et al. 2009). Recent advances in MRI techniques (diffusion tensor, magnetic resonance spectroscopy and functional imaging) provide data that could improve the diagnostic and prognostic evaluation and management of these patients. PMID:20085015

  5. MRI Anatomy of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    McCarley, Robert W.; Wible, Cynthia G.; Frumin, Melissa; Hirayasu, Yoshio; Levitt, James J.; Fischer, Iris A.; Shenton, Martha E.

    2010-01-01

    Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data have provided much evidence in support of our current view that schizophrenia is a brain disorder with altered brain structure, and consequently involving more than a simple disturbance in neurotransmission. This review surveys 118 peer–reviewed studies with control group from 1987 to May 1998. Most studies (81%) do not find abnormalities of whole brain/intracranial contents, while lateral ventricle enlargement is reported in 77%, and third ventricle enlargement in 67%. The temporal lobe was the brain parenchymal region with the most consistently documented abnormalities. Volume decreases were found in 62% of 37 studies of whole temporal lobe, and in 81% of 16 studies of the superior temporal gyrus (and in 100% with gray matter separately evaluated). Fully 77% of the 30 studies of the medial temporal lobe reported volume reduction in one or more of its constituent structures (hippocampus, amygdala, parahippocampal gyrus). Despite evidence for frontal lobe functional abnormalities, structural MRI investigations less consistently found abnormalities, with 55% describing volume reduction. It may be that frontal lobe volume changes are small, and near the threshold for MRI detection. The parietal and occipital lobes were much less studied; about half of the studies showed positive findings. Most studies of cortical gray matter (86%) found volume reductions were not diffuse, but more pronounced in certain areas. About two thirds of the studies of subcortical structures of thalamus, corpus callosum and basal ganglia (which tend to increase volume with typical neuroleptics), show positive findings, as do almost all (91%) studies of cavum septi pellucidi (CSP). Most data were consistent with a developmental model, but growing evidence was compatible also with progressive, neurodegenerative features, suggesting a “two– hit” model of schizophrenia, for which a cellular hypothesis is discussed. The relationship of

  6. MRI Findings in Neuroferritinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Emiko; Takiyama, Yoshihisa

    2012-01-01

    Neuroferritinopathy is a neurodegenerative disease which demonstrates brain iron accumulation caused by the mutations in the ferritin light chain gene. On brain MRI in neuroferritinopathy, iron deposits are observed as low-intensity areas on T2WI and as signal loss on T2∗WI. On T2WI, hyperintense abnormalities reflecting tissue edema and gliosis are also seen. Another characteristic finding is the presence of symmetrical cystic changes in the basal ganglia, which are seen in the advanced stages of this disorder. Atrophy is sometimes noted in the cerebellar and cerebral cortices. The variety in the MRI findings is specific to neuroferritinopathy. Based on observations of an excessive iron content in patients with chronic neurologic disorders, such as Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease, the presence of excess iron is therefore recognized as a major risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases. The future development of multimodal and advanced MRI techniques is thus expected to play an important role in accurately measuring the brain iron content and thereby further elucidating the neurodegenerative process. PMID:21808735

  7. Markers of Cochlear Inflammation Using MRI

    PubMed Central

    Floc’h, Johann Le; Tan, Winston; Telang, Ravindra S.; Vlajkovic, Srdjan M.; Nuttall, Alfred; Rooney, William D.; Pontré, Beau; Thorne, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify spatial and temporal inflammation-induced changes in vascular permeability and macrophage infiltration in guinea-pig (GP) cochlea using MRI. Materials and Methods: GPs were injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce cochlear inflammation. One group was injected with a gadolinium based contrast agent (GBCA) and dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI was performed at 4, 7, and 10 days after LPS treatment. A two-compartment pharmacokinetic model was used to determine the apparent rate constant of GBCA extravasation (Ktrans). A second group was injected with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (USPIOs) and studied at 2, 3, and 7 days after LPS treatment to detect tissue USPIO uptake and correlate with histology. For both groups, control GPs were scanned similarly. Results: The signal enhancement increased substantially and more rapidly at day 4 in LPS-treated than in control cochlea shortly following GBCA injection. Ktrans of LPS-treated cochlea was maximum on day 4 at 0.0218±0.0032 min−1 and then decreased to control level at 0.0036±0.0004 min−1 by day 10. In the second group, the relative signal intensity and T2 in cochlear perilymphatic spaces on day 2 decreased, on average, by 54% and 45%, respectively, compared with baseline and then remained under control levels by day 7. This suggests the infiltration of inflammatory cells, although unconfirmed by histology. Conclusion: This provides the first measurement of cochlear vascular permeability using MRI and a quantitative evaluation of the development of cochlear inflammation. MRI holds considerable potential for the assessment of disease processes such as clinical diagnosis of conditions such as labyrinthitis. PMID:23589173

  8. Frontoethmoidal Mucoceles: CT and MRI Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Tsitouridis, I; Michaelides, M; Bintoudi, A; Kyriakou, V

    2007-10-31

    Paranasal sinus mucocele is an expanded, airless, mucus-filled sinus caused by obstruction of the sinus ostium. It is a benign slow growing epithelial lined lesion, bulging against adjacent anatomical structures, without infiltrating them. The purpose of our study is to describe the CT and MR findings in 19 patients (ten women, nine men, 18-72 years, mean age: 48.1) with surgically confirmed frontoethmoidal mucoceles between 1999-2005. CT scans displayed mucoceles as non enhancing soft tissue density lesions, generally isodense to the brain parenchyma, expanding the sinuses in most cases, eroding adjacent bones and extending intraorbitally or intracranially. Signal intensity in T2WI and T1WI MR images varied, but generally lesions had high signal intensity in T2WI and low to intermediate signal intensity in T1WI. Some of the lesions demonstrated regular linear peripheral enhancement after administration of contrast medium. The causes of mucoceles included mucosal thickening from chronic sinusitis, adhesions from previous operation in the nasal cavity, previous trauma, small nasal polyps and a small osteoma, while in six patients (31.5%) the cause of the mucocele remained unrecognized even after surgery. No underlying malignant tumor was found in any of the cases as the cause of obstruction. CT and MRI established the correct diagnosis in all patients. CT was more sensitive in determining bone erosions, while MRI had the advantage of multiplanar imaging and was much more sensitive for differentiating mucocele from a tumor on the basis of MR signal intensity characteristics. In conclusion, CT and MRI are the methods of choice for diagnosing mucoceles of the paranasal sinuses and are of major importance for the treatment plan. Each method seems to have its own advantages and should be used as complementary investigations of sinonasal pathology. Enhanced CT scan should only be performed in the absence or contraindication for enhanced MR imaging. PMID:24299951

  9. Ultrahigh field MRI in clinical neuroimmunology: a potential contribution to improved diagnostics and personalised disease management.

    PubMed

    Sinnecker, Tim; Kuchling, Joseph; Dusek, Petr; Dörr, Jan; Niendorf, Thoralf; Paul, Friedemann; Wuerfel, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 1.5 Tesla (T) is limited by modest spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), impeding the identification and classification of inflammatory central nervous system changes in current clinical practice. Gaining from enhanced susceptibility effects and improved SNR, ultrahigh field MRI at 7 T depicts inflammatory brain lesions in great detail. This review summarises recent reports on 7 T MRI in neuroinflammatory diseases and addresses the question as to whether ultrahigh field MRI may eventually improve clinical decision-making and personalised disease management. PMID:26312125

  10. A brief report on MRI investigation of experimental traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Timothy Q.; Watts, Lora T.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a major cause of death and disability. This is a brief report based on a symposium presentation to the 2014 Chinese Neurotrauma Association Meeting in San Francisco, USA. It covers the work from our laboratory in applying multimodal MRI to study experimental traumatic brain injury in rats with comparisons made to behavioral tests and histology. MRI protocols include structural, perfusion, manganese-enhanced, diffusion-tensor MRI, and MRI of blood-brain barrier integrity and cerebrovascular reactivity. PMID:26981069

  11. Sodium MRI: methods and applications.

    PubMed

    Madelin, Guillaume; Lee, Jae-Seung; Regatte, Ravinder R; Jerschow, Alexej

    2014-05-01

    Sodium NMR spectroscopy and MRI have become popular in recent years through the increased availability of high-field MRI scanners, advanced scanner hardware and improved methodology. Sodium MRI is being evaluated for stroke and tumor detection, for breast cancer studies, and for the assessment of osteoarthritis and muscle and kidney functions, to name just a few. In this article, we aim to present an up-to-date review of the theoretical background, the methodology, the challenges, limitations, and current and potential new applications of sodium MRI. PMID:24815363

  12. Sodium MRI: Methods and applications

    PubMed Central

    Madelin, Guillaume; Lee, Jae-Seung; Regatte, Ravinder R.; Jerschow, Alexej

    2014-01-01

    Sodium NMR spectroscopy and MRI have become popular in recent years through the increased availability of high-field MRI scanners, advanced scanner hardware and improved methodology. Sodium MRI is being evaluated for stroke and tumor detection, for breast cancer studies, and for the assessment of osteoarthritis and muscle and kidney functions, to name just a few. In this article, we aim to present an up-to-date review of the theoretical background, the methodology, the challenges and limitations, and current and potential new applications of sodium MRI. PMID:24815363

  13. Widespread inflammation in CLIPPERS syndrome indicated by autopsy and ultra-high-field 7T MRI

    PubMed Central

    Blaabjerg, Morten; Ruprecht, Klemens; Sinnecker, Tim; Kondziella, Daniel; Niendorf, Thoralf; Kerrn-Jespersen, Bjørg Morell; Lindelof, Mette; Lassmann, Hans; Kristensen, Bjarne Winther; Paul, Friedemann

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine if there is widespread inflammation in the brain of patients with chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids (CLIPPERS) syndrome by using histology and ultra-high-field MRI at 7.0T. Methods: We performed a detailed neuropathologic examination in 4 cases, including 1 autopsy case, and studied 2 additional patients by MRI at 7.0T to examine (1) extension of inflammation to areas appearing normal on 3.0T MRI, (2) potential advantages of 7.0T MRI compared to 3.0T MRI in reflecting widespread inflammation, perivascular pathology, and axonal damage, and (3) the possibility of lymphoma. Results: In the autopsy case, perivascular inflammation dominated by CD4+ T cells was not only detected in the brainstem and cerebellum but also in brain areas with normal appearance on 3.0T MRI, including supratentorial regions and cranial nerve roots. There was no evidence of lymphoma in any of the 4 patients. The 7.0T MRI in clinical remission also revealed supratentorial lesions and perivascular pathology in vivo with contrast-enhancing lesions centered around a small venous vessel. Ultra-high-field MRI at 7.0T disclosed prominent T1 hypointensities in the brainstem, which were not seen on 3.0T MRI. This corresponded to neuropathologic detection of axonal injury in the autopsy case. Conclusion: Our findings suggest more widespread perivascular inflammation and postinflammatory axonal injury in patients with CLIPPERS. PMID:27144217

  14. Significance of Breast Lesion Descriptors in the ACR BI-RADS MRI Lexicon

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Garima; Su, Min-Ying; Nalcioglu, Orhan; Feig, Stephen A.; Chen, Jeon-Hor

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) has altered the clinical management for women with breast cancer. In March 2007, the American Cancer Society (ACS) issued a new guideline recommending annual MRI screening for high-risk women. This guideline is expected to substantially increase the number of women each year who receive breast MRI. The diagnosis of breast MRI involves the description of morphological and enhancement kinetics features. To standardize the communication language, the Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) MRI lexicon was developed by the American College of Radiology (ACR). In this article, we will review various appearances of breast lesions on MRI using the standardized terms of ACR BI-RADS MRI lexicon. The purpose is to familiarize all medical professionals with the breast MRI lexicon, since the use of this imaging modality is rapidly growing in the field of breast disease. Using this common language, a comprehensive analysis of both morphological and kinetic features used in image interpretation will help radiologists and other clinicians to communicate more clearly and consistently. This may in turn help physicians and patients to jointly select an appropriate management protocol for each patient’s clinical situation. PMID:19197974

  15. First soluble M@C60 derivatives provide enhanced access to metallofullerenes and permit in vivo evaluation of Gd@C60[C(COOH)2]10 as a MRI contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Bolskar, Robert D; Benedetto, Angelo F; Husebo, Lars O; Price, Roger E; Jackson, Edward F; Wallace, Sidney; Wilson, Lon J; Alford, J Michael

    2003-05-01

    M@C(60) and related endohedral metallofullerenes comprise a significant portion of the metallofullerene yield in the traditional arc synthesis, but their chemistry and potential applications have been largely overlooked because of their sparse solubility. In this work, procedures are described to solublize Gd@C(60) species for the first time by forming the derivative, Gd@C(60)[C(COOCH(2)CH(3))(2)](10), and its hydrolyzed water-soluble form, Gd@C(60)[C(COOH)(2)](10). Imparting water solubility to Gd@C(60) permits its evaluation as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent. Relaxometry measurements for Gd@C(60)[C(COOH)(2)](10) reveal it to possess a relaxivity (4.6 mM(-1) s(-1) at 20 MHz and 40 degrees C) comparable to that of commercially available Gd(III) chelate-based MRI agents. An in vivo MRI biodistribution study in a rodent model reveals Gd@C(60)[C(COOH)(2)](10) to possess the first non-reticuloendothelial system (RES) localizing behavior for a water-soluble endohedral metallofullerene species, consistent with its lack of intermolecular aggregation in solution as determined by light-scattering measurements. This first derivatization and use of a M@C(60) species suggests new potential for metallofullerene technologies by reducing reliance on the chromatographic purification procedures normally employed for the far less abundant M@C(82) and related endohedrals. The recognition that water-soluble fullerene derivatives can be designed to avoid high levels of RES uptake is an important step toward fullerene-based pharmaceutical development. PMID:12720461

  16. Iron shielded MRI optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, C. A.; Fabbri, M.

    1998-09-01

    The design of the main current systems of an actively shielded and of an iron shielded MRI device for nuclear resonance imaging, is considered. The model for the analysis of the magnetic induction produced by the current system, is based on the combination of a Boundary Element technique and of the integration of two Fredholm integral equations of the first and the second kind. The equivalent current magnetization model is used for the calculation of the magnetization produced by the iron shield. High field uniformity in a spherical region inside the device, and a low stray field in the neighborhood of the device are required. In order to meet the design requirements a multi-objective global minimization problem is solved. The minimization method is based on the combination of the filled function technique and the (1+1) evolution strategy algorithm. The multi-objective problem is treated by means of a penalty method. The actively shielded MRI system results to utilize larger amount of conductor and produce higher magnetic energy than the iron shield device. On veut étudier le projet du système des courants principaux d'un MRI à écran en fer et d'un MRI à écran actif. Le modèle d'analyse du champ magnétique produit par le système de courants est basé sur la combinaison d'une technique Boundary Element et de l'intégration de deux équations intégrales de Fredholm de première et de seconde sorte. On utilise pour calculer la magnétisation produite par l'écran en fer le modèle à cou rants de magné ti sa tion équivalents. On exige une élévation uniforme du champ dans une région sphérique au cœur de l'appareil et un bas champ magnétique dispersé à proximité de l'appareil. Dans le but de répondre aux impératifs du projet, on va résoudre un problème multiobjectif de minimisation globale. On utilise une technique de minimisation obtenue par la combinaison des méthodes “Filled Function” et “(1+1) Evolution Strategy”. Le probl

  17. Bolus-tracking MRI with a simultaneous T1- and T2*-measurement.

    PubMed

    Sourbron, S; Heilmann, M; Biffar, A; Walczak, C; Vautier, J; Volk, A; Peller, M

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to propose and evaluate a methodology to analyze simultaneously acquired T2*-weighted dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI and T(1)-weighted dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI data. Two generalized models of T2*-relaxation are proposed to account for tracer leakage, and a two-compartment exchange model is used to separate tracer in intra- and extravascular spaces. The methods are evaluated using data extracted from ROIs in three mice with subcutaneously implanted human colorectal tumors. Comparing plasma flow values obtained from DCE-MRI and DSC-MRI data defines a practical experimental paradigm to measure T2*-relaxivities, and reveals a factor of 15 between values in tissue and blood. Comparing mean transit time values obtained from DCE-MRI and DSC-MRI without leakage correction, indicates a significant reduction of susceptibility weighting in DSC-MRI during tracer leakage. A one-parameter gradient correction model provides a good approximation for this susceptibility loss, but redundancy of the parameter limits the practical potential of this model for DSC-MRI. Susceptibility loss is modeled more accurately with a variable T2*-relaxivity, which allows to extract new parameters that cannot be derived from DSC-MRI or DCE-MRI alone. They reflect the cellular and vessel geometry, and thus may lead to a more complete characterization of tissue structure. PMID:19585599

  18. Occupational exposure in MRI

    PubMed Central

    Mcrobbie, D W

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews occupational exposure in clinical MRI; it specifically considers units of exposure, basic physical interactions, health effects, guideline limits, dosimetry, results of exposure surveys, calculation of induced fields and the status of the European Physical Agents Directive. Electromagnetic field exposure in MRI from the static field B0, imaging gradients and radiofrequency transmission fields induces electric fields and currents in tissue, which are responsible for various acute sensory effects. The underlying theory and its application to the formulation of incident and induced field limits are presented. The recent International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) Bundesministerium für Arbeit und Soziales and Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers limits for incident field exposure are interpreted in a manner applicable to MRI. Field measurements show that exposure from movement within the B0 fringe field can exceed ICNIRP reference levels within 0.5 m of the bore entrance. Rate of change of field dB/dt from the imaging gradients is unlikely to exceed the new limits, although incident field limits can be exceeded for radiofrequency (RF) exposure within 0.2–0.5 m of the bore entrance. Dosimetric surveys of routine clinical practice show that staff are exposed to peak values of 42±24% of B0, with time-averaged exposures of 5.2±2.8 mT for magnets in the range 0.6–4 T. Exposure to time-varying fields arising from movement within the B0 fringe resulted in peak dB/dt of approximately 2 T s−1. Modelling of induced electric fields from the imaging gradients shows that ICNIRP-induced field limits are unlikely to be exceeded in most situations; however, movement through the static field may still present a problem. The likely application of the limits is discussed with respect to the reformulation of the European Union (EU) directive and its possible implications for MRI. PMID:22457400

  19. PARACEST MRI With Improved Temporal Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guanshu; Ali, M. Meser; Yoo, Byunghee; Griswold, Mark A.; Tkach, Jean A.; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    PARAmagnetic Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (PARACEST) is a novel contrast mechanism for MRI. A PARACEST MRI methodology with high temporal resolution is highly desired for in vivo MRI applications of molecular imaging. To address this need, a strategy has been developed that includes a long selective saturation period before each repetition of a Rapid Acquisition with Relaxation Enhancement (RARE) pulse sequence. This strategy is suitable for the application of PARACEST contrast agents to environments with long T1 relaxation times. An alternative strategy uses short selective saturation periods before the acquisition of each k-space trajectory to maintain steady state conditions, which can be implemented with a Fast Low Angle Shot (FLASH) pulse sequence. These short saturation periods lengthen the total scan time as compared to the first approach but compensate for the loss in PARACEST contrast related to T1 relaxation. Both approaches have been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo with significantly improved temporal resolutions as compared to a conventional gradient-echo PARACEST method without sacrificing CNR efficiency. These demonstrations also adopted a strategy for measuring the PARACEST effect that only requires selective saturation at a single MR frequency, which further improves temporal resolution for PARACEST detection. PMID:19165903

  20. Scalable multichannel MRI data acquisition system.

    PubMed

    Bodurka, Jerzy; Ledden, Patrick J; van Gelderen, Peter; Chu, Renxin; de Zwart, Jacco A; Morris, Doug; Duyn, Jeff H

    2004-01-01

    A scalable multichannel digital MRI receiver system was designed to achieve high bandwidth echo-planar imaging (EPI) acquisitions for applications such as BOLD-fMRI. The modular system design allows for easy extension to an arbitrary number of channels. A 16-channel receiver was developed and integrated with a General Electric (GE) Signa 3T VH/3 clinical scanner. Receiver performance was evaluated on phantoms and human volunteers using a custom-built 16-element receive-only brain surface coil array. At an output bandwidth of 1 MHz, a 100% acquisition duty cycle was achieved. Overall system noise figure and dynamic range were better than 0.85 dB and 84 dB, respectively. During repetitive EPI scanning on phantoms, the relative temporal standard deviation of the image intensity time-course was below 0.2%. As compared to the product birdcage head coil, 16-channel reception with the custom array yielded a nearly 6-fold SNR gain in the cerebral cortex and a 1.8-fold SNR gain in the center of the brain. The excellent system stability combined with the increased sensitivity and SENSE capabilities of 16-channel coils are expected to significantly benefit and enhance fMRI applications. PMID:14705057

  1. MRI atlas of the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, W.G. ); Bydder, G. )

    1990-01-01

    Since most radiologists will start from a basic of familiarity with pathophysiology of disease and a knowledge of cross-sectional imaging (at least in the transaxial plane), they are in a good position to recognize and diagnose many of the abnormalities we can currently see with CT. The appearance of these lesions on MRI is the basis for the majority of the images in this book. Chapters on Tumors, Infarcts and Ischemia, Demyelination and Infection. Hydrocephalus, and Pediatrics feature multiple images displaying the MR appearance of many common lesions with minimal associated text. Instead of focusing on pathophysiology, attention is directed to the variable appearance of these disease states using various MR imaging techniques. Although the MR contrast agent, Gadolinium-DTPA, has similar behavior (physiologically) to meglumine diatrizoate in CT, the MR techniques which result in optimal visualization of enhancing lesions are nonintuitive and are discussed. Similarly, the appearance of flowing blood and CSF and hemorrhage does not follow easily from a pre-existing CT base, therefore additional text has been devoted to these subjects.

  2. Molecular MRI enables early and sensitive detection of brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Serres, Sébastien; Soto, Manuel Sarmiento; Hamilton, Alastair; McAteer, Martina A; Carbonell, W Shawn; Robson, Matthew D; Ansorge, Olaf; Khrapitchev, Alexandre; Bristow, Claire; Balathasan, Lukxmi; Weissensteiner, Thomas; Anthony, Daniel C; Choudhury, Robin P; Muschel, Ruth J; Sibson, Nicola R

    2012-04-24

    Metastasis to the brain is a leading cause of cancer mortality. The current diagnostic method of gadolinium-enhanced MRI is sensitive only to larger tumors, when therapeutic options are limited. Earlier detection of brain metastases is critical for improved treatment. We have developed a targeted MRI contrast agent based on microparticles of iron oxide that enables imaging of endothelial vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Our objectives here were to determine whether VCAM-1 is up-regulated on vessels associated with brain metastases, and if so, whether VCAM-1-targeted MRI enables early detection of these tumors. Early up-regulation of cerebrovascular VCAM-1 expression was evident on tumor-associated vessels in two separate murine models of brain metastasis. Metastases were detectable in vivo using VCAM-1-targeted MRI 5 d after induction (<1,000 cells). At clinical imaging resolutions, this finding is likely to translate to detection at tumor volumes two to three orders of magnitude smaller (0.3-3 × 10(5) cells) than those volumes detectable clinically (10(7)-10(8) cells). VCAM-1 expression detected by MRI increased significantly (P < 0.0001) with tumor progression, and tumors showed no gadolinium enhancement. Importantly, expression of VCAM-1 was shown in human brain tissue containing both established metastases and micrometastases. Translation of this approach to the clinic could increase therapeutic options and change clinical management in a substantial number of cancer patients. PMID:22451897

  3. Molecular MRI enables early and sensitive detection of brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    Serres, Sébastien; Soto, Manuel Sarmiento; Hamilton, Alastair; McAteer, Martina A.; Carbonell, W. Shawn; Robson, Matthew D.; Ansorge, Olaf; Khrapitchev, Alexandre; Bristow, Claire; Balathasan, Lukxmi; Weissensteiner, Thomas; Anthony, Daniel C.; Choudhury, Robin P.; Muschel, Ruth J.; Sibson, Nicola R.

    2012-01-01

    Metastasis to the brain is a leading cause of cancer mortality. The current diagnostic method of gadolinium-enhanced MRI is sensitive only to larger tumors, when therapeutic options are limited. Earlier detection of brain metastases is critical for improved treatment. We have developed a targeted MRI contrast agent based on microparticles of iron oxide that enables imaging of endothelial vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Our objectives here were to determine whether VCAM-1 is up-regulated on vessels associated with brain metastases, and if so, whether VCAM-1–targeted MRI enables early detection of these tumors. Early up-regulation of cerebrovascular VCAM-1 expression was evident on tumor-associated vessels in two separate murine models of brain metastasis. Metastases were detectable in vivo using VCAM-1–targeted MRI 5 d after induction (<1,000 cells). At clinical imaging resolutions, this finding is likely to translate to detection at tumor volumes two to three orders of magnitude smaller (0.3–3 × 105 cells) than those volumes detectable clinically (107–108 cells). VCAM-1 expression detected by MRI increased significantly (P < 0.0001) with tumor progression, and tumors showed no gadolinium enhancement. Importantly, expression of VCAM-1 was shown in human brain tissue containing both established metastases and micrometastases. Translation of this approach to the clinic could increase therapeutic options and change clinical management in a substantial number of cancer patients. PMID:22451897

  4. MRI in the evaluation of pediatric multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Banwell, Brenda; Arnold, Douglas L; Tillema, Jan-Mendelt; Rocca, Maria A; Filippi, Massimo; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Zivadinov, Robert; Sormani, Maria Pia

    2016-08-30

    MRI plays a pivotal role in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) in children, as it does in adults. The presence of multiple lesions in CNS locations commonly affected by MS, along with the presence of both enhancing and nonenhancing lesions, can facilitate a diagnosis of MS at the time of a first attack, whereas the accrual of serial lesions or new clinical attacks over time confirms the diagnosis in patients not meeting such criteria at onset. T2 and enhancing lesion accrual could serve as a primary outcome metric for pediatric MS clinical trials of selected therapies with anti-inflammatory activity in order to facilitate feasible trial size numbers. More-advanced MRI techniques reveal the impact of MS on tissue integrity within both T2-bright and T1-hypointense lesions and regions of normal-appearing tissue. Volumetric MRI analyses quantify the impact of MS on age-expected brain growth, and fMRI reveals activation and resting-state functional connectivity patterns in patients with pediatric MS that differ from those seen in healthy age-matched youth. Such studies are of critical importance because MS onset during childhood may profoundly influence maturing and actively myelinating neural networks. High-field MRI visualizes MS pathology at a near-microscopic level and has the potential to more fully explain mechanisms for cognitive impairment, fatigue, and disability in patients with pediatric MS. PMID:27572868

  5. Hyperpolarized Xenon for NMR and MRI Applications

    PubMed Central

    Witte, Christopher; Kunth, Martin; Döpfert, Jörg; Rossella, Federica; Schröder, Leif

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) suffer from intrinsic low sensitivity because even strong external magnetic fields of ~10 T generate only a small detectable net-magnetization of the sample at room temperature 1. Hence, most NMR and MRI applications rely on the detection of molecules at relative high concentration (e.g., water for imaging of biological tissue) or require excessive acquisition times. This limits our ability to exploit the very useful molecular specificity of NMR signals for many biochemical and medical applications. However, novel approaches have emerged in the past few years: Manipulation of the detected spin species prior to detection inside the NMR/MRI magnet can dramatically increase the magnetization and therefore allows detection of molecules at much lower concentration 2. Here, we present a method for polarization of a xenon gas mixture (2-5% Xe, 10% N2, He balance) in a compact setup with a ca. 16000-fold signal enhancement. Modern line-narrowed diode lasers allow efficient polarization 7 and immediate use of gas mixture even if the noble gas is not separated from the other components. The SEOP apparatus is explained and determination of the achieved spin polarization is demonstrated for performance control of the method. The hyperpolarized gas can be used for void space imaging, including gas flow imaging or diffusion studies at the interfaces with other materials 8,9. Moreover, the Xe NMR signal is extremely sensitive to its molecular environment 6. This enables the option to use it as an NMR/MRI contrast agent when dissolved in aqueous solution with functionalized molecular hosts that temporarily trap the gas 10,11. Direct detection and high-sensitivity indirect detection of such constructs is demonstrated in both spectroscopic and imaging mode. PMID:22986346

  6. Typical CT and MRI signs of hepatic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma

    PubMed Central

    GAN, LU; CHANG, RUIPING; JIN, HUALAN; YANG, LI

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the typical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) features of hepatic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (HEH), the CT and MRI findings of 14 histopathologically confirmed cases of HEH were retrospectively analyzed. Non-contrast and dynamic contrast-enhanced scans were conducted in all cases. A total of 229 lesions were detected in the 14 cases. All cases were classified as one of three types: (i) Solitary nodular type (1 case, 7%); (ii) multifocal nodular type (11 cases, 79%); or (iii) diffuse type (2 cases, 14%). The diameter of the lesions ranged from 5 to 105 mm. For the first two types (solitary and multifocal nodular types), the CT findings included low density lesions with clear margins on non-contrast scans, centripetal enhancement in arterial phase, and homogeneous enhancement in the portal venous and delay phases. The findings of non-contrast MRI scans for these two types included low signal intensity on T1-weighted images, heterogeneous high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, and heterogeneous high signal intensity on diffusion-weighted images. The lesions were predominantly located in submarginal areas. On contrast-enhanced MRI, the findings for the first two types included peripheral ring-like enhancement with a central low signal intensity (‘black target-like’ sign) and a central enhanced core surrounded by a low signal intensity halo (‘white target-like’ sign). The findings for the third HEH type (diffuse type) on CT and MRI scans included low density or heterogeneous signal intensity lesions involving regions of part or the whole liver, coalescent lesions (‘strip-like’ sign), and gradual enhancement along central vessels (‘lollipop’ sign). Collectively, these findings indicate that the ‘white target-like’ sign, ‘black target-like’ sign, ‘lollipop’ sign and ‘strip-like’ sign, in addition to capsular contraction and submarginal location, on CT and MRI imaging may have

  7. RF HEATING OF MRI-ASSISTED CATHETER STEERING COILS FOR INTERVENTIONAL MRI

    PubMed Central

    Settecase, Fabio; Hetts, Steven W.; Martin, Alastair J.; Roberts, Timothy P. L.; Bernhardt, Anthony F.; Evans, Lee; Malba, Vincent; Saeed, Maythem; Arenson, Ronald L.; Kucharzyk, Walter; Wilson, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES To assess magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) radiofrequency (RF) related heating of conductive wire coils used in magnetically steerable endovascular catheters. MATERIALS AND METHODS A 3-axis microcoil was fabricated onto a 1.8 Fr catheter tip. In vitro testing was performed in a 1.5 T MRI system using an agarose gel filled vessel phantom, a transmit/receive body RF coil and a steady state free precession (SSFP) pulse sequence, and a fluoroptic thermometry system. Temperature was measured without simulated blood flow at varying distances from magnet isocenter and varying flip angles. Additional experiments were performed with laser-lithographed single-axis microcoil-tipped microcatheters in air and in a saline bath with varied grounding of the microcoil wires. Preliminary in vivo evaluation of RF heating was performed in pigs at 1.5 T with coil-tipped catheters in various positions in the common carotid arteries with SSFP pulse sequence on and off, and under physiologic flow and zero flow conditions. RESULTS In tissue-mimicking agarose gel, RF heating resulted in a maximal temperature increase of 0.35°C after 15 minutes of imaging, 15 cm from magnet isocenter. For a single axis microcoil, maximal temperature increases were 0.73-1.91°C in air and 0.45-0.55°C in saline. In vivo, delayed contrast enhanced MRI revealed no evidence of vascular injury and histopathological sections from the common carotid arteries confirmed the lack of vascular damage. CONCLUSIONS Microcatheter tip microcoils for endovascular catheter steering in MRI experience minimal RF heating under the conditions tested. These data provide the basis for further in vivo testing of this promising technology for endovascular interventional MRI. PMID:21075019

  8. Multiparametric MRI and targeted prostate biopsy: Improvements in cancer detection, localization, and risk assessment

    PubMed Central

    Bjurlin, Marc A.; Mendhiratta, Neil; Wysock, James S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Multiparametric-MRI (mp-MRI) is an evolving noninvasive imaging modality that increases the accurate localization of prostate cancer at the time of MRI targeted biopsy, thereby enhancing clinical risk assessment, and improving the ability to appropriately counsel patients regarding therapy. Material and methods We used MEDLINE/PubMed to conduct a comprehensive search of the English medical literature. Articles were reviewed, data was extracted, analyzed, and summarized. In this review, we discuss the mp-MRI prostate exam, its role in targeted prostate biopsy, along with clinical applications and outcomes of MRI targeted biopsies. Results Mp-MRI, consisting of T2-weighted imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, and possibly MR spectroscopy, has demonstrated improved specificity in prostate cancer detection as compared to conventional T2-weighted images alone. An MRI suspicion score has been developed and is depicted using an institutional Likert or, more recently, a standardized reporting scale (PI-RADS). Techniques of MRI-targeted biopsy include in-gantry MRI guided biopsy, TRUS-guided visual estimation biopsy, and software co-registered MRI-US guided biopsy (MRI-US fusion). Among men with no previous biopsy, MRI-US fusion biopsy demonstrates up to a 20% increase in detection of clinically significant cancers compared to systematic biopsy while avoiding a significant portion of low risk disease. These data suggest a potential role in reducing over-detection and, ultimately, over-treatment. Among men with previous negative biopsy, 72–87% of cancers detected by MRI targeted biopsy are clinically significant. Among men with known low risk cancer, repeat biopsy by MR-targeting improves risk stratification in selecting men appropriate for active surveillance secondarily reducing the need for repetitive biopsy during surveillance. Conclusions Use of mp-MRI for targeting prostate biopsies has the potential to reduce the

  9. MRI of plants and foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van As, Henk; van Duynhoven, John

    2013-04-01

    The importance and prospects for MRI as applied to intact plants and to foods are presented in view of one of humanity's most pressing concerns, the sustainable and healthy feeding of a worldwide increasing population. Intact plants and foods have in common that their functionality is determined by complex multiple length scale architectures. Intact plants have an additional level of complexity since they are living systems which critically depend on transport and signalling processes between and within tissues and organs. The combination of recent cutting-edge technical advances and integration of MRI accessible parameters has the perspective to contribute to breakthroughs in understanding complex regulatory plant performance mechanisms. In food science and technology MRI allows for quantitative multi-length scale structural assessment of food systems, non-invasive monitoring of heat and mass transport during shelf-life and processing, and for a unique view on food properties under shear. These MRI applications are powerful enablers of rationally (re)designed food formulations and processes. Limitations and bottlenecks of the present plant and food MRI methods are mainly related to short T2 values and susceptibility artefacts originating from small air spaces in tissues/materials. We envisage cross-fertilisation of solutions to overcome these hurdles in MRI applications in plants and foods. For both application areas we witness a development where MRI is moving from highly specialised equipment to mobile and downscaled versions to be used by a broad user base in the field, greenhouse, food laboratory or factory.

  10. fMRI adaptation revisited.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Jonas; Solomon, Samuel G; Kohn, Adam

    2016-07-01

    Adaptation has been widely used in functional magnetic imaging (fMRI) studies to infer neuronal response properties in human cortex. fMRI adaptation has been criticized because of the complex relationship between fMRI adaptation effects and the multiple neuronal effects that could underlie them. Many of the longstanding concerns about fMRI adaptation have received empirical support from neurophysiological studies over the last decade. We review these studies here, and also consider neuroimaging studies that have investigated how fMRI adaptation effects are influenced by high-level perceptual processes. The results of these studies further emphasize the need to interpret fMRI adaptation results with caution, but they also provide helpful guidance for more accurate interpretation and better experimental design. In addition, we argue that rather than being used as a proxy for measurements of neuronal stimulus selectivity, fMRI adaptation may be most useful for studying population-level adaptation effects across cortical processing hierarchies. PMID:26703375

  11. Functional MRI and CT biomarkers in oncology.

    PubMed

    Winfield, J M; Payne, G S; deSouza, N M

    2015-04-01

    Imaging biomarkers derived from MRI or CT describe functional properties of tumours and normal tissues. They are finding increasing numbers of applications in diagnosis, monitoring of response to treatment and assessment of progression or recurrence. Imaging biomarkers also provide scope for assessment of heterogeneity within and between lesions. A wide variety of functional parameters have been investigated for use as biomarkers in oncology. Some imaging techniques are used routinely in clinical applications while others are currently restricted to clinical trials or preclinical studies. Apparent diffusion coefficient, magnetization transfer ratio and native T1 relaxation time provide information about structure and organization of tissues. Vascular properties may be described using parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, dynamic contrast-enhanced CT, transverse relaxation rate (R2*), vessel size index and relative blood volume, while magnetic resonance spectroscopy may be used to probe the metabolic profile of tumours. This review describes the mechanisms of contrast underpinning each technique and the technical requirements for robust and reproducible imaging. The current status of each biomarker is described in terms of its validation, qualification and clinical applications, followed by a discussion of the current limitations and future perspectives. PMID:25578953

  12. SQUID-sensor-based ultra-low-field MRI calibration with phantom images: Towards quantitative imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabek, Juhani; Vesanen, Panu T.; Zevenhoven, Koos C. J.; Nieminen, Jaakko O.; Sepponen, Raimo; Ilmoniemi, Risto J.

    2012-11-01

    In ultra-low-field magnetic resonance imaging (ULF MRI), measured resonance signals oscillate at Larmor frequencies around 1 kHz compared to even above 100 MHz in high-field MRI. Thus, detection by induction coils in ULF MRI is not feasible, whereas superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors can measure these femtotesla-level signals. The signal-to-noise ratio is enhanced by prepolarization in a field that is typically 100-1000 times higher than the field during acquisition. Based on both measurements and simulations, a procedure for calibrating a SQUID-sensor-based MRI system with MR images is presented in this article. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) can be integrated with ULF MRI, and may also benefit from such a calibration procedure. Conventionally, electromagnet probe signals have been used for the SQUID-sensor calibration in MEG; the presented ULF-MRI-based approach using an imaging phantom could replace this procedure in hybrid MEG-MRI or ULF MRI alone. The necessary theory is provided here with experimental verification. The calibration procedure opens the possibility of performing quantitative ULF MRI without sample-specific reference scans.

  13. MRI Meets MPI: a bimodal MPI-MRI tomograph.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Patrick; Lother, Steffen; Rückert, Martin A; Kullmann, Walter H; Jakob, Peter M; Fidler, Florian; Behr, Volker C

    2014-10-01

    While magnetic particle imaging (MPI) constitutes a novel biomedical imaging technique for tracking superparamagnetic nanoparticles in vivo, unlike magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), it cannot provide anatomical background information. Until now these two modalities have been performed in separate scanners and image co-registration has been hampered by the need to reposition the sample in both systems as similarly as possible. This paper presents a bimodal MPI-MRI-tomograph that combines both modalities in a single system.MPI and MRI images can thus be acquired without moving the sample or replacing any parts in the setup. The images acquired with the presented setup show excellent agreement between the localization of the nanoparticles in MPI and the MRI background data. A combination of two highly complementary imaging modalities has been achieved. PMID:25291350

  14. Breast MRI: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Day, Deborah

    2009-12-01

    In 2007, the American Cancer Society published guidelines for using breast MRI to screen women who were at high risk for breast cancer. Although breast MRI, which is typically used as an adjunctto mammography, is highly sensitive for detecting breast cancers, its use is somewhat controversial for a number of reasons including its cost and lack of specificity. This article describes the indications for breast MRI and discusses the pros and cons of using it to screen women for cancer and evaluate the extent of disease in women who are newly diagnosed. PMID:20092173

  15. Advanced MRI may complement histological diagnosis of lower grade gliomas and help in predicting survival.

    PubMed

    Cuccarini, Valeria; Erbetta, A; Farinotti, M; Cuppini, L; Ghielmetti, F; Pollo, B; Di Meco, F; Grisoli, M; Filippini, G; Finocchiaro, G; Bruzzone, M G; Eoli, M

    2016-01-01

    MRI grading of grade II and III gliomas may have an important impact on treatment decisions. Occasionally,both conventional MRI (cMRI) and histology fail to clearly establish the tumour grade. Three cMRI features(no necrosis; no relevant oedema; absent or faint contrast enhancement) previously validated in 196 patients with supratentorial gliomas directed our selection of 68 suspected low-grade gliomas (LGG) that were also investigated by advanced MRI (aMRI), including perfusion weighted imaging (PWI), diffusion weighted imaging(DWI) and spectroscopy. All the gliomas had histopathological diagnoses. Sensitivity and specificity of cMRI preoperative diagnosis were 78.5 and 38.5 %, respectively, and 85.7 and 53.8 % when a MRI was included, respectively. ROC analysis showed that cut-off values of 1.29 for maximum rCBV, 1.69 for minimum rADC, 2.1 for rCho/Cr ratio could differentiate between LGG and HGG with a sensitivity of 61.5, 53.8, and 53.8 % and a specificity of 54.7, 43 and 64.3 %, respectively. A significantly longer OS was observed in patients with a maximum rCBV<1.46 and minimum rADC>1.69 (80 vs 55 months, p = 0.01; 80 vs 51 months, p = 0.002, respectively). This result was also confirmed when cases were stratified according to pathology (LGG vs HGG). The ability of a MRI to differentiate between LGG and HGG and to predict survival improved as the number of a MRI techniques considered increased. In a selected population of suspected LGG,classification by cMRI underestimated the actual fraction of HGG. aMRI slightly increased the diagnostic accuracy compared to histopathology. However, DWI and PWI were prognostic markers independent of histological grade. PMID:26468137

  16. MRI breast screening in high-risk women: cancer detection and survival analysis.

    PubMed

    Evans, D Gareth; Gareth, Evans D; Kesavan, Nisha; Nisha, Kesavan; Lim, Yit; Yit, Lim; Gadde, Soujanye; Soujanye, Gadde; Hurley, Emma; Emma, Hurley; Massat, Nathalie J; Maxwell, Anthony J; Ingham, Sarah; Sarah, Ingham; Eeles, Rosalind; Rosalind, Eeles; Leach, Martin O; Howell, Anthony; Anthony, Howell; Duffy, Stephen W; Stephen, Duffy

    2014-06-01

    Women with a genetic predisposition to breast cancer tend to develop the disease at a younger age with denser breasts making mammography screening less effective. The introduction of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for familial breast cancer screening programs in recent years was intended to improve outcomes in these women. We aimed to assess whether introduction of MRI surveillance improves 5- and 10-year survival of high-risk women and determine the accuracy of MRI breast cancer detection compared with mammography-only or no enhanced surveillance and compare size and pathology of cancers detected in women screened with MRI + mammography and mammography only. We used data from two prospective studies where asymptomatic women with a very high breast cancer risk were screened by either mammography alone or with MRI also compared with BRCA1/2 carriers with no intensive surveillance. 63 cancers were detected in women receiving MRI + mammography and 76 in women receiving mammography only. Sensitivity of MRI + mammography was 93 % with 63 % specificity. Fewer cancers detected on MRI were lymph node positive compared to mammography/no additional screening. There were no differences in 10-year survival between the MRI + mammography and mammography-only groups, but survival was significantly higher in the MRI-screened group (95.3 %) compared to no intensive screening (73.7 %; p = 0.002). There were no deaths among the 21 BRCA2 carriers receiving MRI. There appears to be benefit from screening with MRI, particularly in BRCA2 carriers. Extended follow-up of larger numbers of high-risk women is required to assess long-term survival. PMID:24687378

  17. New theoretical methodology for elucidating the solution structure of peptides from NMR data. II. Free energy of dominant microstates of Leu-enkephalin and population-weighted average nuclear Overhauser effects intensities.

    PubMed

    Meirovitch, E; Meirovitch, H

    1996-01-01

    A small linear peptide in solution may populate several stable states (called here microstates) in thermodynamic equilibrium; elucidating its dynamic three dimensional structure by multi- dimensional nmr is complex since the experimentally measured nuclear Overhauser effect intensities (NOEs) represent averages over the individual contributions. We propose a new methodology based on statistical mechanical considerations for analyzing nmr data of such peptides. In a previous paper (called paper I, H. Meirovitch et al. (1995) Journal of Physical Chemistry, 99, 4847-4854] we have developed theoretical methods for determining the contribution to the partition function Z of the most stable microstates, i.e. those that pertain to a given energy range above the global energy minimum (GEM). This relatively small set of dominant microstates provides the main contribution to medium- and long-range NOE intensities. In this work the individual populations and NOEs of the dominant microstates are determined, and then weighted averages are calculated and compared with experiment. Our methodology is applied to the pentapeptide Leu-enkephalin H-Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Leu-OH, described by the potential energy function ECEPP. Twenty one significantly different energy minimized structures are first identified within the range of 2 kcal/mol above the GEM by an extensive conformational search; this range has been found in paper I to contribute 0.6 of Z. These structures then become "seeds" for Monte Carlo (MC) simulations designed to keep the molecule relatively close to its seed. Indeed, the MC samples (called MC microstates) illustrate what we define as intermediate chain flexibility; some dihedral angles remain in the vicinity of their seed value, while others visit the full range of [-180 degrees, 180 degrees]. The free energies of the MC microstates (which lead to the populations) are calculated by the local states method, which (unlike other techniques) can handle any chain flexibility

  18. [Cardiac MRI: technology, clinical applications, and future directions].

    PubMed

    Pesenti-Rossi, D; Peyrou, J; Baron, N; Allouch, P; Aubert, S; Boueri, Z; Livarek, B

    2013-11-01

    The field of cardiovascular MRI has evolved rapidly over the past decade, feeding new applications across a broad spectrum of clinical and research areas. Advances in magnet hardware technology, and key developments such as segmented k-space acquisitions, advanced motion encoding techniques, ultra-rapid perfusion imaging and delayed myocardial enhancement imaging have all contributed to a revolution in how patients with ischemic and non-ischemic heart disease are diagnosed and treated. Actually, cardiac MRI is a widely accepted method as the "gold standard" for detection and characterization of many forms of cardiac diseases. The aim of this review is to present an overview of cardiac MRI technology, advances in clinical applications, and future directions. PMID:24035258

  19. Scientists attack European MRI rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Margaret

    2010-08-01

    A report by the European Science Foundation (ESF) has sharply criticized a European Union (EU) directive on electromagnetic fields, arguing that limits on workers' exposure will have "potentially disastrous" consequences for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

  20. BOLD MRI of the Kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lu-Ping; Halter, Sarah; Prasad, Pottumarthi V.

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis Oxygenation status plays a major role in renal physiology and pathophysiology and hence has attracted considerable attention in recent years. While much of the early work and a significant amount of present work is based on invasive methods or ex vivo analysis and hence restricted to animal models, BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent) MRI has been shown to extend these findings to humans. BOLD MRI is most useful in monitoring effects of physiological or pharmacological maneuvers. Several teams around the world have demonstrated reproducible data and have illustrated several useful applications. Studies supporting the use of renal BOLD MRI in characterizing disease with prognostic value have also been reported. Here, an overview of the current state-of-the art of renal BOLD MRI is provided. PMID:18926426

  1. Metalloprotein-based MRI probes

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Yuri; Jasanoff, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Metalloproteins have long been recognized as key determinants of endogenous contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of biological subjects. More recently, both natural and engineered metalloproteins have been harnessed as biotechnological tools to probe gene expression, enzyme activity, and analyte concentrations by MRI. Metalloprotein MRI probes are paramagnetic and function by analogous mechanisms to conventional gadolinium or iron oxide-based MRI contrast agents. Compared with synthetic agents, metalloproteins typically offer worse sensitivity, but the possibilities of using protein engineering and targeted gene expression approaches in conjunction with metalloprotein contrast agents are powerful and sometimes definitive strengths. This review summarizes theoretical and practical aspects of metalloprotein-based contrast agents, and discusses progress in the exploitation of these proteins for molecular imaging applications. PMID:23376346

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... any recent surgeries. Some conditions, such as severe kidney disease, may prevent you from being given gadolinium ... an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will be necessary ...

  3. MRI virtual biopsy and treatment of brain metastatic tumors with targeted nanobioconjugates: nanoclinic in the brain.

    PubMed

    Patil, Rameshwar; Ljubimov, Alexander V; Gangalum, Pallavi R; Ding, Hui; Portilla-Arias, Jose; Wagner, Shawn; Inoue, Satoshi; Konda, Bindu; Rekechenetskiy, Arthur; Chesnokova, Alexandra; Markman, Janet L; Ljubimov, Vladimir A; Li, Debiao; Prasad, Ravi S; Black, Keith L; Holler, Eggehard; Ljubimova, Julia Y

    2015-05-26

    Differential diagnosis of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enhancement(s) remains a significant problem, which may be difficult to resolve without biopsy, which can be often dangerous or even impossible. Such MRI enhancement(s) can result from metastasis of primary tumors such as lung or breast, radiation necrosis, infections, or a new primary brain tumor (glioma, meningioma). Neurological symptoms are often the same on initial presentation. To develop a more precise noninvasive MRI diagnostic method, we have engineered a new class of poly(β-l-malic acid) polymeric nanoimaging agents (NIAs). The NIAs carrying attached MRI tracer are able to pass through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and specifically target cancer cells for efficient imaging. A qualitative/quantitative "MRI virtual biopsy" method is based on a nanoconjugate carrying MRI contrast agent gadolinium-DOTA and antibodies recognizing tumor-specific markers and extravasating through the BBB. In newly developed double tumor xenogeneic mouse models of brain metastasis this noninvasive method allowed differential diagnosis of HER2- and EGFR-expressing brain tumors. After MRI diagnosis, breast and lung cancer brain metastases were successfully treated with similar tumor-targeted nanoconjugates carrying molecular inhibitors of EGFR or HER2 instead of imaging contrast agent. The treatment resulted in a significant increase in animal survival and markedly reduced immunostaining for several cancer stem cell markers. Novel NIAs could be useful for brain diagnostic MRI in the clinic without currently performed brain biopsies. This technology shows promise for differential MRI diagnosis and treatment of brain metastases and other pathologies when biopsies are difficult to perform. PMID:25906400

  4. Molecular MRI approaches to the detection of CNS inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sibson, Nicola R; Anthony, Daniel C; van Kasteren, Sander; Dickens, Alex; Perez-Balderas, Francisco; McAteer, Martina A; Choudhury, Robin P; Davis, Benjamin G

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation is a key component of many neurological diseases, yet our understanding of the contribution of these processes to tissue damage remains poor. For many such diseases, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become the method of choice for clinical diagnosis. However, many of the MRI parameters that enable disease detection, such as passive contrast enhancement across a compromised blood-brain barrier, are weighted towards late-stage disease. Moreover, whilst these methods may report on disease severity, they are not able to provide information on either disease activity or the underlying molecular processes. There is a need, therefore, to develop methods that enable earlier disease detection, potentially long before clinical symptoms become apparent, together with identification of specific molecular processes that may guide specific therapy. This chapter describes the methodology for the synthesis and validation of two novel, functional MRI-detectable probes, based on microparticles of iron oxide (MPIO), which target endothelial adhesion molecules. These contrast agents enable the detection of acute brain inflammation in vivo, at a time when pathology is undetectable by conventional MRI. Such molecular MRI methods are opening new vistas for the acute diagnosis of CNS disease, together with the possibility for individually tailored therapy and earlier, more sensitive assessment of the efficacy of novel therapies. PMID:21279613

  5. Quantitative pharmacologic MRI in mice.

    PubMed

    Perles-Barbacaru, Teodora-Adriana; Procissi, Daniel; Demyanenko, Andrey V; Jacobs, Russell E

    2012-04-01

    Pharmacologic MRI (phMRI) uses functional MRI techniques to provide a noninvasive in vivo measurement of the hemodynamic effects of drugs. The cerebral blood volume change (ΔCBV) serves as a surrogate for neuronal activity via neurovascular coupling mechanisms. By assessing the location and time course of brain activity in mouse mutant studies, phMRI can provide valuable insights into how different behavioral phenotypes are expressed in deferring brain activity response to drug challenge. In this report, we evaluate the utility of three different intravascular ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) contrast agents for phMRI using a gradient-echo technique, with temporal resolution of one min at high magnetic field. The tissue half-life of the USPIOs was studied using a nonlinear detrending model. The three USPIOs are candidates for CBV weighted phMRI experiments, with r(2)/r(1) ratios ≥ 20 and apparent half-lives ≥ 1.5 h at the described doses. An echo-time of about 10 ms or longer results in a functional contrast to noise ratio (fCNR) > 75 after USPIO injection, with negligible decrease between 1.5-2 h. phMRI experiments were conducted at 7 T using cocaine as a psychotropic substance and acetazolamide, a global vasodilator, as a positive control. Cocaine acts as a dopamine-serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, increasing extracellular concentrations of these neurotransmitters, and thus increasing dopaminergic, serotonergic and noradrenergic neurotransmission. phMRI results showed that CBV was reduced in the normal mouse brain after cocaine challenge, with the largest effects in the nucleus accumbens, whereas after acetazolamide, blood volume was increased in both cerebral and extracerebral tissue. PMID:21793079

  6. The place of conventional MRI and newly emerging MRI techniques in monitoring different aspects of treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Zivadinov, Robert; Stosic, Milena; Cox, Jennifer L; Ramasamy, Deepa P; Dwyer, Michael G

    2008-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most important paraclinical measure for assessing and monitoring the pathologic changes implicated in the onset and progression of multiple sclerosis (MS). Conventional MRI sequences, such as T1-weighted gadolinium (Gd) enhanced and spin-echo T2-weighted imaging, only provide an incomplete picture of the degree of inflammation and underlying neurodegenerative changes in this disease. Two- and three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and double inversion recovery sequences allow better identification of cortical, periventricular and infratentorial lesions. Ultra-high field strength MRI has the potential to detect subpial cortical and deep gray matter lesions. Unenhanced T1-weighted imaging can reveal hypointense black holes, a measure of chronic neurodegeneration. Magnetization transfer imaging (MTI) is increasingly used to characterize the evolution of MS lesions and normal-appearing brain tissue. Evidence suggests that the dynamics of magnetization transfer changes correlate with the extent of demyelination and remyelination. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which provides details on tissue biochemistry, metabolism, and function, also has the capacity to reveal neuroprotective mechanisms. By measuring the motion of water, diffusion imaging can provide information about the orientation, size, and geometry of tissue damage in white and gray matter. These advanced non-conventional MRI techniques relate better to clinical impairment, disease progression, accumulation of disability, and have the potential to detect neuroprotective effects of treatment. Although detecting the status of neuronal integrity using MRI techniques continues to improve, a "gold standard" model remains to be established. PMID:18317678

  7. Coaxial waveguide MRI.

    PubMed

    Alt, Stefan; Müller, Marco; Umathum, Reiner; Bolz, Armin; Bachert, Peter; Semmler, Wolfhard; Bock, Michael

    2012-04-01

    As ultrahigh-field MR imaging systems suffer from the standing wave problems of conventional coil designs, the use of antenna systems that generate travelling waves was suggested. As a modification to the original approach, we propose the use of a coaxial waveguide configuration with interrupted inner conductor. This concept can focus the radiofrequency energy to the desired imaging region in the human body and can operate at different Larmor frequencies without hardware modifications, as it is not limited by a lower cut-off frequency. We assessed the potential of the method with a hardware prototype setup that was loaded with a tissue equivalent phantom and operated with imaging areas of different size. Signal and flip angle distributions within the phantom were analyzed, and imaging at different Larmor frequencies was performed. Results were compared to a finite difference time domain simulation of the setup that additionally provides information on the spatial distribution of the specific absorption rate load. Furthermore, simulation results with a human model (virtual family) are presented. It was found that the proposed method can be used for MRI at multiple frequencies, achieving transmission efficiencies similar to other travelling wave approaches but still suffers from several limitations due to the used mode of wave propagation. PMID:22021117

  8. Multispectral optoacoustic and MRI coregistration for molecular imaging of orthotopic model of human glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Attia, Amalina Binte Ebrahim; Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Chandrasekharan, Prashant; Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Tay, Hui Chien; Burton, Neal C; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Olivo, Malini

    2016-07-01

    Multi-modality imaging methods are of great importance in oncologic studies for acquiring complementary information, enhancing the efficacy in tumor detection and characterization. We hereby demonstrate a hybrid non-invasive in vivo imaging approach of utilizing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Multispectral Optoacoustic Tomography (MSOT) for molecular imaging of glucose uptake in an orthotopic glioblastoma in mouse. The molecular and functional information from MSOT can be overlaid on MRI anatomy via image coregistration to provide insights into probe uptake in the brain, which is verified by ex vivo fluorescence imaging and histological validation. In vivo MSOT and MRI imaging of an orthotopic glioma mouse model injected with IRDye800-2DG. Image coregistration between MSOT and MRI enables multifaceted (anatomical, functional, molecular) information from MSOT to be overlaid on MRI anatomy images to derive tumor physiological parameters such as perfusion, haemoglobin and oxygenation. PMID:27091626

  9. Molecular imaging of tumors and metastases using chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivlin, Michal; Horev, Judith; Tsarfaty, Ilan; Navon, Gil

    2013-10-01

    The two glucose analogs 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) and 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) are preferentially taken up by cancer cells, undergo phosphorylation and accumulate in the cells. Owing to their exchangeable protons on their hydroxyl residues they exhibit significant chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) effect in MRI. Here we report CEST-MRI on mice bearing orthotopic mammary tumors injected with 2-DG or FDG. The tumor exhibited an enhanced CEST effect of up to 30% that persisted for over one hour. Thus 2-DG/FDG CEST MRI can replace PET/CT or PET/MRI for cancer research in laboratory animals, but also has the potential to be used in the clinic for the detection of tumors and metastases, distinguishing between malignant and benign tumors and monitoring tumor response to therapy as well as tumors metabolism noninvasively by using MRI, without the need for radio-labeled isotopes.

  10. [Dw-MRI and bone scintigraphy in monitoring radio-therapy response in bone metastases].

    PubMed

    Raucci, Antonio; Gatta, Gianluca; Cuccurullo, Vincenzo

    2012-11-01

    Bone is one of the most common sites of metastatic spread of malignancy, with possible deleterious effects including pain, hypercalcemia, and pathologic fracture. External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) remains the mainstay for treatment of painful bone metastases. Diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) has been described as an efficient method to differentiate good and poor responders to radiotherapy in bone metastases patients. The addition of DWI to conventional whole-body MRI sequences enhanced lesion conspicuity and improved diagnostic accuracy. We evaluate bone metastases patients with bone scintigraphy and DW-MRI. With technical optimization, whole-body MRI with DWI, as a nonionizing imaging modality, may potentially be useful as an alternative method to bone scintigraphy in the management of bone metastases. PMID:23096728

  11. MRI of hepatocellular carcinoma: an update of current practices

    PubMed Central

    Arif-Tiwari, Hina; Kalb, Bobby; Chundru, Surya; Sharma, Puneet; Costello, James; Guessner, Rainner W.; Martin, Diego R.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide, and liver transplantation is the optimal treatment for selected patients with HCC and chronic liver disease (CLD). Accurate selection of patients for transplantation is essential to maximize patient outcomes and ensure optimized allocation of donor organs. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful tool for the detection, characterization, and staging of HCC. In patients with CLD, the MRI findings of an arterial-enhancing mass with subsequent washout and enhancing capsule on delayed interstitial phase images are diagnostic for HCC. Major organizations with oversight for organ donor distribution, such as The Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN), accept an imaging diagnosis of HCC, no longer requiring tissue biopsy. In patients that are awaiting transplantation, or are not candidates for liver transplantation, localized therapies such as transarterial chemoembolization and radiofrequency ablation may be offered. MRI can be used to monitor treatment response. The purpose of this review article is to describe the role of imaging methods in the diagnosis, staging, and follow-up of HCC, with particular emphasis on established and evolving MRI techniques employing nonspecific gadolinium chelates, hepatobiliary contrast agents, and diffusion weighted imaging. We also briefly review the recently developed Liver Imaging Reporting and Data System (LI-RADS) formulating a standardized terminology and reporting structure for evaluation of lesions detected in patients with CLD. PMID:24808419

  12. Structural and functional effects of metastases in rat brain determined by multimodal MRI.

    PubMed

    Serres, Sébastien; Martin, Christopher J; Sarmiento Soto, Manuel; Bristow, Claire; O'Brien, Emma R; Connell, John J; Khrapitchev, Alexandre A; Sibson, Nicola R

    2014-02-15

    Metastasis to the brain results in significant impairment of brain function and poor patient survival. Currently, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is under-utilised in monitoring brain metastases and their effects on brain function. Here, we sought to establish a model of focal brain metastasis in the rat that enables serial multimodal structural and functional MRI studies, and to assess the sensitivity of these approaches to metastatic growth. Female Berlin-Druckrey-IX rats were injected intracerebrally with metastatic ENU1564 cells in the ventroposterior medial nucleus (VPM) of the thalamus, a relay node of the whisker-to-barrel cortex pathway. Animals underwent multimodal structural and vascular MRI, as well as functional MRI of the cortical blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) responses to whisker pad stimulation. T2 , diffusion, magnetisation transfer and perfusion weighted MRI enabled differentiation between a central area of more advanced metastatic growth and penumbral regions of co-optive perivascular micrometastatic growth, with magnetisation transfer MRI being the most sensitive to micrometastatic growth. Areas of cortical BOLD activation in response to whisker pad stimulation were significantly reduced in the hemisphere containing metastases in the VPM. The reduction in BOLD response correlated with metastatic burden in the thalamus, and was sensitive to the presence of smaller metastases than currently detectable clinically. Our findings suggest that multimodal MRI provides greater sensitivity to tumour heterogeneity and micrometastatic growth than single modality contrast-enhanced MRI. Understanding the relationships between these MRI parameters and the underlying pathology may greatly enhance the utility of MRI in diagnosis, staging and monitoring of brain metastasis. PMID:23913394

  13. MRI-guided Breast Biopsy: Outcomes and Impact on Patient Management

    PubMed Central

    Kamel, Ihab R; Macura, Katarzyna J

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to correlate the pathology results of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided breast biopsies at our institution to MRI findings and patient clinical history characteristics. The impact of MRI-guided breast biopsies on surgical management in patients with a new diagnosis of breast cancer was also assessed. Patients and Methods In this HIPAA-compliant study we retrospectively reviewed all MRI-guided breast biopsies performed 3/2006–5/2012. Clinical history, MRI features and pathology outcomes were reviewed. In patients undergoing breast MRI to evaluate extent of disease, any change in surgical management resulting from the MRI-guided biopsy was recorded. Statistical analysis included binary logistic regression and independent student’s t-test. Results Two-hundred fifteen lesions in 168 patients were included, of which 23 (10.7%) were malignant, 43 (20%) were high risk, and 149 (69.3%) were benign. No clinical characteristic was associated with malignancy in our cohort. MRI features associated with malignancy were: larger size (mean 2.6 cm versus 1.3 cm, p=0.046), washout kinetics (18% malignancy rate, p=0.02) and marked background parenchymal enhancement (40% malignancy rate, p-value <0.001 to 0.03). Nineteen (28%) of the 67 patients with a new diagnosis of breast cancer undergoing MRI-guided breast biopsy had a change in surgical management based on the biopsy result. Conclusions Malignancy rate was associated with lesion size, washout kinetics and marked background enhancement of the breast parenchyma but was not associated with any clinical history characteristics. Pre-operative MRI-guided breast biopsies changed surgical management in 28% of women with a new diagnosis of breast cancer. PMID:25499596

  14. Multi-Parametric MRI and Texture Analysis to Visualize Spatial Histologic Heterogeneity and Tumor Extent in Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Leland S.; Ning, Shuluo; Eschbacher, Jennifer M.; Gaw, Nathan; Dueck, Amylou C.; Smith, Kris A.; Nakaji, Peter; Plasencia, Jonathan; Ranjbar, Sara; Price, Stephen J.; Tran, Nhan; Loftus, Joseph; Jenkins, Robert; O’Neill, Brian P.; Elmquist, William; Baxter, Leslie C.; Gao, Fei; Frakes, David; Karis, John P.; Zwart, Christine; Swanson, Kristin R.; Sarkaria, Jann; Wu, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Background Genetic profiling represents the future of neuro-oncology but suffers from inadequate biopsies in heterogeneous tumors like Glioblastoma (GBM). Contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) targets enhancing core (ENH) but yields adequate tumor in only ~60% of cases. Further, CE-MRI poorly localizes infiltrative tumor within surrounding non-enhancing parenchyma, or brain-around-tumor (BAT), despite the importance of characterizing this tumor segment, which universally recurs. In this study, we use multiple texture analysis and machine learning (ML) algorithms to analyze multi-parametric MRI, and produce new images indicating tumor-rich targets in GBM. Methods We recruited primary GBM patients undergoing image-guided biopsies and acquired pre-operative MRI: CE-MRI, Dynamic-Susceptibility-weighted-Contrast-enhanced-MRI, and Diffusion Tensor Imaging. Following image coregistration and region of interest placement at biopsy locations, we compared MRI metrics and regional texture with histologic diagnoses of high- vs low-tumor content (≥80% vs <80% tumor nuclei) for corresponding samples. In a training set, we used three texture analysis algorithms and three ML methods to identify MRI-texture features that optimized model accuracy to distinguish tumor content. We confirmed model accuracy in a separate validation set. Results We collected 82 biopsies from 18 GBMs throughout ENH and BAT. The MRI-based model achieved 85% cross-validated accuracy to diagnose high- vs low-tumor in the training set (60 biopsies, 11 patients). The model achieved 81.8% accuracy in the validation set (22 biopsies, 7 patients). Conclusion Multi-parametric MRI and texture analysis can help characterize and visualize GBM’s spatial histologic heterogeneity to identify regional tumor-rich biopsy targets. PMID:26599106

  15. Functional MRI at the Crossroads

    PubMed Central

    Van Horn, John Darrell; Poldrack, Russell A.

    2009-01-01

    Since the observation of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect on measured MR signal in the brain, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has rapidly become the tool of choice for exploring brain function in cognitive neuroscience. Although fMRI is an exciting and powerful means to examining the brain in vivo, the field has sometimes permitted itself to believe that patterns of BOLD activity reveal more than it is possible to measure given the method’s spatial and temporal sampling, while concurrently not fully exploring the amount of information it provides. In this article, we examine some of the constraints on the kinds of inferences that can be supported by fMRI. We critique the concept of reverse inference that is often employed to say some cognitive function must be present given activity in a specific region. We review the consideration of functional and effective connectivity that remain infrequently applied in cognitive neuroimaging, highlighting recent thinking on the ways in which functional imaging can be used to characterize inter-regional communication. Recent advances in neuroimaging that make it possible to assess anatomical connectivity using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and we discuss how these may inform interpretation of fMRI results. Descriptions of fMRI studies in the media, in some instances, serve to misrepresent fMRI’s capabilities. We comment on how researchers need to faithfully represent fMRI’s promise and limitations in dealing with the media. Finally, as we stand at the crossroads of fMRI research, where one pathway leads toward a rigorous understanding of cognitive operations using fMRI and another leads us to a predictable collection of observations absent of clear insight, we offer our impressions of a fruitful path for future functional imaging research. PMID:19041348

  16. Hepatic Sinusoidal Obstruction Syndrome Caused by Herbal Medicine: CT and MRI Features

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hua; Wang, Yi-Xiang J.; Lou, Hai-yan; Xu, Xiao-jun

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the CT and MRI features of hepatic sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (HSOS) caused by herbal medicine Gynura segetum. Materials and Methods The CT and MRI features of 16 consecutive Gynura segetum induced HSOS cases (12 men, 4 women) were analyzed. Eight patients had CT; three patients had MRI, and the remaining five patients had both CT and MRI examinations. Based on their clinical presentations and outcomes, the patients were classified into three categories: mild, moderate, and severe. The severity of the disease was also evaluated radiologically based on the abnormal hepatic patchy enhancement in post-contrast CT or MRI images. Results Ascites, patchy liver enhancement, and main right hepatic vein narrowing or occlusion were present in all 16 cases. Hepatomegaly and gallbladder wall thickening were present in 14 cases (87.5%, 14/16). Periportal high intensity on T2-weighted images was present in 6 cases (75%, 6/8). Normal liver parenchymal enhancement surrounding the main hepatic vein forming a clover-like sign was observed in 4 cases (25%, 4/16). The extent of patchy liver enhancement was statistically associated with clinical severity classification (kappa = 0.565). Conclusion Ascites, patchy liver enhancement, and the main hepatic veins narrowing were the most frequent signs of herbal medicine induced HSOS. The grade of abnormal patchy liver enhancement was associated with the clinical severity. PMID:24643319

  17. The feasibility of atlas-based automatic segmentation of MRI for H&N radiotherapy planning.

    PubMed

    Wardman, Kieran; Prestwich, Robin J D; Gooding, Mark J; Speight, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Atlas-based autosegmentation is an established tool for segmenting structures for CT-planned head and neck radiotherapy. MRI is being increasingly integrated into the planning process. The aim of this study is to assess the feasibility of MRI-based, atlas-based autosegmentation for organs at risk (OAR) and lymph node levels, and to compare the segmentation accuracy with CT-based autosegmentation. Fourteen patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer in a prospective imaging study underwent a T1-weighted MRI and a PET-CT (with dedicated contrast-enhanced CT) in an immobilization mask. Organs at risk (orbits, parotids, brainstem, and spinal cord) and the left level II lymph node region were manually delineated on the CT and MRI separately. A 'leave one out' approach was used to automatically segment structures onto the remaining images separately for CT and MRI. Contour comparison was performed using multiple positional metrics: Dice index, mean distance to conformity (MDC), sensitivity index (Se Idx), and inclusion index (Incl Idx). Automatic segmentation using MRI of orbits, parotids, brainstem, and lymph node level was acceptable with a DICE coefficient of 0.73-0.91, MDC 2.0-5.1mm, Se Idx 0.64-0.93, Incl Idx 0.76-0.93. Segmentation of the spinal cord was poor (Dice coefficient 0.37). The process of automatic segmentation was significantly better on MRI compared to CT for orbits, parotid glands, brainstem, and left lymph node level II by multiple positional metrics; spinal cord segmentation based on MRI was inferior compared with CT. Accurate atlas-based automatic segmentation of OAR and lymph node levels is feasible using T1-MRI; segmentation of the spinal cord was found to be poor. Comparison with CT-based automatic segmentation suggests that the process is equally as, or more accurate, using MRI. These results support further translation of MRI-based segmentation methodology into clinicalpractice. PMID:27455480

  18. Direct MRI detection of the neuronal magnetic field: the effect of the dendrite branch.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying-Ling; Xiong, Hong-Chuan; Yao, De-Zhong

    2010-09-21

    In recent years, neuronal current MRI (nc-MRI) was proposed as a new imaging method to directly map the magnetic field change caused by neuronal activity. Nc-MRI could offer improved spatial and temporal resolution compared to blood hemodynamics-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In this paper, with a finite current dipole as the model of dendrite or dendrite branch, we investigated the spatial distribution of the magnetic field generated by synchronously activated neurons to evaluate the possibility of nc-MRI. Our simulations imply that the existence of a dendrite branch may not only increase the strength of the neuronal magnetic field (NMF), but also raise the non-uniform and unsymmetry of the NMF; therefore, it can enhance the detectability of the neuronal current magnetic field by MRI directly. The results show that the signal phase shift is enlarged, but it is unstable and is still very small, <1 radian, while the magnitude signal may be strong enough for a typical MRI voxel to be detected. We suggest making further efforts to measure the magnitude signal which may induce a large effect in an nc-MRI experiment. PMID:20808026

  19. MRI evaluation prior to Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI): When to acquire and how to interpret.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Abhishek; Hobbs, Susan K; Ling, Fred S; Chaturvedi, Apeksha; Knight, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) is increasingly being used in patients with severe aortic stenosis who are not candidates for surgery. ECG-gated CT angiography (CTA) plays an important role in the preoperative planning for these devices. As the number of patients undergoing these procedures increases, a subset of patients is being recognized who have contraindications to iodinated contrast medium, either due to a prior severe allergic type reaction or poor renal function. Another subgroup of patients with low flow and low gradient aortic stenosis is being recognized that are usually assessed for severity of aortic stenosis by stress echocardiography. There are contraindications to stress echocardiography and some of these patients may not be able to undergo this test. Non-contrast MRI can be a useful emerging modality for evaluating these patients. In this article, we discuss the emerging indications of non-contrast MRI in preoperative assessment for TAVI and describe the commonly used MRI sequences. A comparison of the most important measurements obtained for TAVI assessment on CTA and MRI from same subjects is included. Teaching Points • MRI can be used for preoperative assessment of aortic annulus. • MRI is an alternate to CTA when iodinated contrast is contraindicated. • Measurements obtained by non-contrast MRI are similar to contrast enhanced CTA. • MRI can be used to assess severity of aortic stenosis. PMID:26911969

  20. Hyperpolarized 83Kr MRI of lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, Zackary I.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Elkins, Nancy D.; Stupic, Karl F.; Repine, John E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2008-12-01

    Hyperpolarized (hp) 83Kr (spin I = 9/2) is a promising gas-phase contrast agent that displays sensitivity to the surface chemistry, surface-to-volume ratio, and surface temperature of the surrounding environment. This proof-of-principle study demonstrates the feasibility of ex vivo hp 83Kr magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of lungs using natural abundance krypton gas (11.5% 83Kr) and excised, but otherwise intact, rat lungs located within a custom designed ventilation chamber. Experiments comparing the 83Kr MR signal intensity from lungs to that arising from a balloon with no internal structure inflated to the same volume with krypton gas mixture suggest that most of the observed signal originated from the alveoli and not merely the conducting airways. The 83Kr longitudinal relaxation times in the rat lungs ranged from 0.7 to 3.7 s but were reproducible for a given lung. Although the source of these variations was not explored in this work, hp 83Kr T1 differences may ultimately lead to a novel form of MRI contrast in lungs. The currently obtained 1200-fold signal enhancement for hp 83Kr at 9.4 T field strength is found to be 180 times below the theoretical upper limit.

  1. MRI guidance for focused ultrasound surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDannold, Nathan; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2005-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based monitoring has been shown in recent years to enhance the effectiveness of minimally or noninvasive thermal therapy techniques, such as focused ultrasound surgery. MR imaging's unique soft tissue contrast and ability to image in three dimensions and in any orientation make it extremely useful for treatment planning and for imaging the tissue response to the therapy. The temperature sensitivity of several intrinsic parameters enables MRI to visualize and quantify the progress an ongoing thermal treatment. The most useful temperature-sensitive parameter appears to be the proton resonant frequency, which allows for precise and accurate temperature measurements in water-based tissues. By acquiring a time series of quantitative temperature images, it is possible to monitor the accumulated thermal dose delivered to the target tissue and accurately predict the areas that are thermally ablated, while at the same time ensuring nearby critical structures are not heated. The method is currently used in an FDA approved focused ultrasound device for the treatment of uterine fibroids. Our research and clinical experience with these techniques will be reviewed.

  2. MRI Contrasts in High Rank Rotating Frames

    PubMed Central

    Liimatainen, Timo; Hakkarainen, Hanne; Mangia, Silvia; Huttunen, Janne M.J.; Storino, Christine; Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Sorce, Dennis; Garwood, Michael; Michaeli, Shalom

    2014-01-01

    Purpose MRI relaxation measurements are performed in the presence of a fictitious magnetic field in the recently described technique known as RAFF (Relaxation Along a Fictitious Field). This method operates in the 2nd rotating frame (rank n = 2) by utilizing a non-adiabatic sweep of the radiofrequency effective field to generate the fictitious magnetic field. In the present study, the RAFF method is extended for generating MRI contrasts in rotating frames of ranks 1 ≤ n ≤ 5. The developed method is entitled RAFF in rotating frame of rank n (RAFFn). Methods RAFFn pulses were designed to generate fictitious fields that allow locking of magnetization in rotating frames of rank n. Contrast generated with RAFFn was studied using Bloch-McConnell formalism together with experiments on human and rat brains. Results Tolerance to B0 and B1 inhomogeneities and reduced specific absorption rate with increasing n in RAFFn were demonstrated. Simulations of exchange-induced relaxations revealed enhanced sensitivity of RAFFn to slow exchange. Consistent with such feature, an increased grey/white matter contrast was observed in human and rat brain as n increased. Conclusion RAFFn is a robust and safe rotating frame relaxation method to access slow molecular motions in vivo. PMID:24523028

  3. Estimating Motion From MRI Data

    PubMed Central

    OZTURK, CENGIZHAN; DERBYSHIRE, J. ANDREW; MCVEIGH, ELLIOT R.

    2007-01-01

    Invited Paper Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an ideal imaging modality to measure blood flow and tissue motion. It provides excellent contrast between soft tissues, and images can be acquired at positions and orientations freely defined by the user. From a temporal sequence of MR images, boundaries and edges of tissues can be tracked by image processing techniques. Additionally, MRI permits the source of the image signal to be manipulated. For example, temporary magnetic tags displaying a pattern of variable brightness may be placed in the object using MR saturation techniques, giving the user a known pattern to detect for motion tracking. The MRI signal is a modulated complex quantity, being derived from a rotating magnetic field in the form of an induced current. Well-defined patterns can also be introduced into the phase of the magnetization, and could be thought of as generalized tags. If the phase of each pixel is preserved during image reconstruction, relative phase shifts can be used to directly encode displacement, velocity and acceleration. New methods for modeling motion fields from MRI have now found application in cardiovascular and other soft tissue imaging. In this review, we shall describe the methods used for encoding, imaging, and modeling motion fields with MRI. PMID:18958181

  4. [MRI-guided musculoskeletal biopsy].

    PubMed

    Daecke, W; Libicher, M; Mädler, U; Rumpf, C; Bernd, L

    2003-02-01

    MRI-guided musculoskeletal biopsy has been mentioned to be a minimally invasive method to obtain specimens for diagnostic purposes in bone tumors. To evaluate the viability, to assess the accuracy, and to record possible complications of this method, clinical data of 19 MRI-guided biopsies were analyzed. Interventions were performed on 18 patients (1-78 years) as an outpatient procedure: 15 skeletal and 4 soft tissue biopsies were taken from the pelvis, upper limb,or lower limb. We used T1-weighted gradient echoes (GE) for locating the puncture site and T2-weighted turbo spin echoes (TSE) for visualization of needle position. In 14 of 18 MRI-guided biopsies, a definite histological diagnosis was obtained. According to the pathologist, the inadequate size of the specimen was the main reason for missing the diagnoses in four cases.Long intervention time and inappropriate biopsy tools proved to be the main disadvantages of MRI-guided biopsy, but technical improvement might solve these technical problems in future.A postbiopsy hematoma was the only complication observed. Once technically improved, MRI-guided biopsy could be a precise alternative routine method for musculoskeletal biopsies in future. PMID:12607083

  5. Segmentation precision of abdominal anatomy for MRI-based radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Noel, Camille E; Zhu, Fan; Lee, Andrew Y; Yanle, Hu; Parikh, Parag J

    2014-01-01

    The limited soft tissue visualization provided by computed tomography, the standard imaging modality for radiotherapy treatment planning and daily localization, has motivated studies on the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for better characterization of treatment sites, such as the prostate and head and neck. However, no studies have been conducted on MRI-based segmentation for the abdomen, a site that could greatly benefit from enhanced soft tissue targeting. We investigated the interobserver and intraobserver precision in segmentation of abdominal organs on MR images for treatment planning and localization. Manual segmentation of 8 abdominal organs was performed by 3 independent observers on MR images acquired from 14 healthy subjects. Observers repeated segmentation 4 separate times for each image set. Interobserver and intraobserver contouring precision was assessed by computing 3-dimensional overlap (Dice coefficient [DC]) and distance to agreement (Hausdorff distance [HD]) of segmented organs. The mean and standard deviation of intraobserver and interobserver DC and HD values were DC(intraobserver) = 0.89 ± 0.12, HD(intraobserver) = 3.6mm ± 1.5, DC(interobserver) = 0.89 ± 0.15, and HD(interobserver) = 3.2mm ± 1.4. Overall, metrics indicated good interobserver/intraobserver precision (mean DC > 0.7, mean HD < 4mm). Results suggest that MRI offers good segmentation precision for abdominal sites. These findings support the utility of MRI for abdominal planning and localization, as emerging MRI technologies, techniques, and onboard imaging devices are beginning to enable MRI-based radiotherapy. PMID:24726701

  6. Segmentation precision of abdominal anatomy for MRI-based radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, Camille E.; Zhu, Fan; Lee, Andrew Y.; Yanle, Hu; Parikh, Parag J.

    2014-10-01

    The limited soft tissue visualization provided by computed tomography, the standard imaging modality for radiotherapy treatment planning and daily localization, has motivated studies on the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for better characterization of treatment sites, such as the prostate and head and neck. However, no studies have been conducted on MRI-based segmentation for the abdomen, a site that could greatly benefit from enhanced soft tissue targeting. We investigated the interobserver and intraobserver precision in segmentation of abdominal organs on MR images for treatment planning and localization. Manual segmentation of 8 abdominal organs was performed by 3 independent observers on MR images acquired from 14 healthy subjects. Observers repeated segmentation 4 separate times for each image set. Interobserver and intraobserver contouring precision was assessed by computing 3-dimensional overlap (Dice coefficient [DC]) and distance to agreement (Hausdorff distance [HD]) of segmented organs. The mean and standard deviation of intraobserver and interobserver DC and HD values were DC{sub intraobserver} = 0.89 ± 0.12, HD{sub intraobserver} = 3.6 mm ± 1.5, DC{sub interobserver} = 0.89 ± 0.15, and HD{sub interobserver} = 3.2 mm ± 1.4. Overall, metrics indicated good interobserver/intraobserver precision (mean DC > 0.7, mean HD < 4 mm). Results suggest that MRI offers good segmentation precision for abdominal sites. These findings support the utility of MRI for abdominal planning and localization, as emerging MRI technologies, techniques, and onboard imaging devices are beginning to enable MRI-based radiotherapy.

  7. Clinical experience of MRI in two dogs with muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kija; Choi, Sooyoung; Choi, Hojung; Lee, Youngwon

    2016-09-01

    This study described high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) characteristics of muscle-invasive bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) in two dogs. Ultrasonography revealed a urinary bladder mass with ambiguous result about invasion to the muscular layer. Contrast-enhanced CT showed that the bladder wall in which the mass was attached was more intensely enhanced than the normal bladder walls, supporting invasion to the muscular layer. The mass revealed an intermediate signal intensity with interruption of the hypointense muscular layer on T2-weighted MRI and showed greater enhancement compared with the normal bladder wall on postcontrast T1-weighted images. T2-weighted MRI, postcontrast T1-weighted MRI and contrast-enhanced dual-phasic CT were useful for evaluating muscle-invasive bladder TCC in dogs. PMID:27149892

  8. MRI-based Preplanning Using CT and MRI Data Fusion in Patients With Cervical Cancer Treated With 3D-based Brachytherapy: Feasibility and Accuracy Study

    SciTech Connect

    Dolezel, Martin; Odrazka, Karel; Zizka, Jan; Vanasek, Jaroslav; Kohlova, Tereza; Kroulik, Tomas; Spitzer, Dusan; Ryska, Pavel; Tichy, Michal; Kostal, Milan; Jalcova, Lubica

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-assisted radiation treatment planning enables enhanced target contouring. The purpose of this study is to analyze the feasibility and accuracy of computed tomography (CT) and MRI data fusion for MRI-based treatment planning in an institution where an MRI scanner is not available in the radiotherapy department. Methods and Materials: The registration inaccuracy of applicators and soft tissue was assessed in 42 applications with CT/MRI data fusion. The absolute positional difference of the center of the applicators was measured in four different planes from the top of the tandem to the cervix. Any inaccuracy of registration of soft tissue in relation to the position of applicators was determined and dose-volume parameters for MRI preplans and for CT/MRI fusion plans with or without target and organs at risk (OAR) adaptation were evaluated. Results: We performed 6,132 measurements in 42 CT/MRI image fusions. Median absolute difference of the center of tandem on CT and MRI was 1.1 mm. Median distance between the center of the right ovoid on CT and MRI was 1.7 and 1.9 mm in the laterolateral and anteroposterior direction, respectively. Corresponding values for the left ovoid were 1.6 and 1.8 mm. Rotation of applicators was 3.1 Degree-Sign . Median absolute difference in position of applicators in relation to soft tissue was 1.93, 1.50, 1.05, and 0.84 mm in the respective transverse planes, and 1.17, 1.28, 1.27, and 1.17 mm in selected angular directions. The dosimetric parameters for organs at risk on CT/MRI fusion plans without OAR adaptation were significantly impaired whereas the target coverage was not influenced. Planning without target adaptation led to overdosing of the target volume, especially high-risk clinical target volume - D{sub 90} 88.2 vs. 83.1 (p < 0.05). Conclusions: MRI-based preplanning with consecutive CT/MRI data fusion can be safe and feasible, with an acceptable inaccuracy of soft tissue registration.

  9. Temporal bone chondroblastoma totally invisible on MRI.

    PubMed

    Hiraumi, Harukazu; Arakawa, Yoshiki; Yamamoto, Norio; Sakamoto, Tatsunori; Ito, Juichi

    2016-08-01

    We report a case of temporal bone chondroblastoma that was totally invisible on MRI. The patient was a 64-year-old man who presented with several months history of vertigo. The CT scan with bone window setting showed destruction of the temporomandibular joint, the floor of the middle cranial fossa, and the superior semicircular canal. Calcific foci were seen within the tumor. On MR imaging, the tumor, situating mainly medial to the temporomandibular joint, showed no signal on both T1- and T2-weighted images. The tumor was not enhanced with gadolinium. In summary, the tumor was totally signal negative or "invisible" on pre- and postcontrast T1- and T2-weighted images. The tumor was resected through transpetrosal - transzygomatic approach. PMID:26743837

  10. NMR and MRI apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; Kelso, Nathan; Lee, SeungKyun; Moessle, Michael; Myers, Whittier; McDermott, Robert; ten Haken, Bernard; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas

    2007-03-06

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. Additional signal to noise benefits are obtained by use of a low noise polarization coil, comprising litz wire or superconducting materials. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  11. In Vivo Molecular MRI Imaging of Prostate Cancer by Targeting PSMA with Polypeptide-Labeled Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yunkai; Sun, Ying; Chen, Yaqing; Liu, Weiyong; Jiang, Jun; Guan, Wenbin; Zhang, Zhongyang; Duan, Yourong

    2015-01-01

    The prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is broadly overexpressed on prostate cancer (PCa) cell surfaces. In this study, we report the synthesis, characterization, in vitro binding assay, and in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of PSMA targeting superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). PSMA-targeting polypeptide CQKHHNYLC was conjugated to SPIONs to form PSMA-targeting molecular MRI contrast agents. In vitro studies demonstrated specific uptake of polypeptide-SPIONs by PSMA expressing cells. In vivo MRI studies found that MRI signals in PSMA-expressing tumors could be specifically enhanced with polypeptide-SPION, and further Prussian blue staining showed heterogeneous deposition of SPIONs in the tumor tissues. Taken altogether, we have developed PSMA-targeting polypeptide-SPIONs that could specifically enhance MRI signal in tumor-bearing mice, which might provide a new strategy for the molecular imaging of PCa. PMID:25927579

  12. In Vivo Molecular MRI Imaging of Prostate Cancer by Targeting PSMA with Polypeptide-Labeled Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yunkai; Sun, Ying; Chen, Yaqing; Liu, Weiyong; Jiang, Jun; Guan, Wenbin; Zhang, Zhongyang; Duan, Yourong

    2015-01-01

    The prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is broadly overexpressed on prostate cancer (PCa) cell surfaces. In this study, we report the synthesis, characterization, in vitro binding assay, and in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of PSMA targeting superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). PSMA-targeting polypeptide CQKHHNYLC was conjugated to SPIONs to form PSMA-targeting molecular MRI contrast agents. In vitro studies demonstrated specific uptake of polypeptide-SPIONs by PSMA expressing cells. In vivo MRI studies found that MRI signals in PSMA-expressing tumors could be specifically enhanced with polypeptide-SPION, and further Prussian blue staining showed heterogeneous deposition of SPIONs in the tumor tissues. Taken altogether, we have developed PSMA-targeting polypeptide-SPIONs that could specifically enhance MRI signal in tumor-bearing mice, which might provide a new strategy for the molecular imaging of PCa. PMID:25927579

  13. CT and MRI evaluation of cardiac complications in patients with hematologic diseases: a pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Yun; Jung, Jung Im; Kim, Yoo Jin; Kim, Hwan Wook; Lee, Hae Giu

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac complications with hematologic diseases are not uncommon but it is difficult to diagnose, due to non-specific clinical symptoms. Prompt recognition of these potentially fatal complications by cardiac computed tomography (CT) or cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may help to direct clinicians to specific treatments according to causes. Thrombosis is often related to central venous catheter use and is usually located at the catheter tip near the atrial wall. Differentiation of thrombosis from normal structure is possible with CT and, distinction of a thrombus from a tumor is possible on a delayed enhancement MRI with a long inversion time (500-600 ms). Granulocytic sarcoma of the heart is indicated by an infiltrative nature with involvement of whole layers of myocardium on CT and MRI. MRI with T2* mapping is useful in evaluating myocardial iron content in patients with hemochromatosis. Diffuse subendocardial enhancement is typically observed on delayed MRIs in patients with cardiac amyloidosis. T1 mapping is an emerging tool to diagnose amyloidosis. Myocardial abscess can occur due to an immunocompromised status. CT and MRI show loculated lesions with fluid density and concomitant rim-like contrast enhancement. Awareness of CT and MRI findings of cardiac complications of hematologic diseases can be helpful to physicians for clinical decision making and treatment. PMID:25651878

  14. [MRI of the pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Langevad, Line; Madsen, Camilla Gøbel; Siebner, Hartwig; Garde, Ellen

    2014-11-10

    The pineal gland (CP) is located centrally in the brain and produces melatonin. Cysts and concrements are frequent findings on MRI but their significance is still unclear. The visualization of CP is difficult due to its location and surrounding structures and so far, no standardized method exists. New studies suggest a correlation between CP-morphology and melatonin secretion as well as a connection between melatonin, disturbed circadian rhythm, and the development of cancer and cardiovascular diseases, underlining the need for a standardized approach to CP on MRI. PMID:25394927

  15. Fetal MRI: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Rathee, Sapna; Joshi, Priscilla; Kelkar, Abhimanyu; Seth, Nagesh

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonography (USG) is the primary method for antenatal fetal evaluation. However, fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has now become a valuable adjunct to USG in confirming/excluding suspected abnormalities and in the detection of additional abnormalities, thus changing the outcome of pregnancy and optimizing perinatal management. With the development of ultrafast sequences, fetal MRI has made remarkable progress in recent times. In this pictorial essay, we illustrate a spectrum of structural abnormalities affecting the central nervous system, thorax, genitourinary and gastrointestinal tract, as well as miscellaneous anomalies. Anomalies in twin gestations and placental abnormalities have also been included. PMID:27081224

  16. MRI EVALUATION OF KNEE CARTILAGE

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Marcelo Bordalo; Camanho, Gilberto Luís

    2015-01-01

    Through the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to characterize soft tissue noninvasively, it has become an excellent method for evaluating cartilage. The development of new and faster methods allowed increased resolution and contrast in evaluating chondral structure, with greater diagnostic accuracy. In addition, physiological techniques for cartilage assessment that can detect early changes before the appearance of cracks and erosion have been developed. In this updating article, the various techniques for chondral assessment using knee MRI will be discussed and demonstrated. PMID:27022562

  17. The Raven MRI teaching file

    SciTech Connect

    Lufkin, R.B.; Bradley, W.G. Jr.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.

    1990-01-01

    This book presents individually bound guides for each section of the body, the 1,000 concise and clearly illustrated case files cover neoplastic, non-neoplastic, degenerative, inflammatory, congenital, and acquired disease of the brain, head and neck, spine, musculoskeletal system, cardiovascular system, chest, abdomen, and male and female pelvis. It focuses on specific body regions; one is devoted to pediatric MRI; and one reviews the principles of MRI and identifies frequently encountered artifacts. It contains 100 completed case studies, with high-resolution MR images.

  18. The inclusion of functional connectivity information into fMRI-based neurofeedback improves its efficacy in the reduction of cigarette cravings.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Youl; Yoo, Seung-Schik; Tegethoff, Marion; Meinlschmidt, Gunther; Lee, Jong-Hwan

    2015-08-01

    Real-time fMRI (rtfMRI) neurofeedback (NF) facilitates volitional control over brain activity and the modulation of associated mental functions. The NF signals of traditional rtfMRI-NF studies predominantly reflect neuronal activity within ROIs. In this study, we describe a novel rtfMRI-NF approach that includes a functional connectivity (FC) component in the NF signal (FC-added rtfMRI-NF). We estimated the efficacy of the FC-added rtfMRI-NF method by applying it to nicotine-dependent heavy smokers in an effort to reduce cigarette craving. ACC and medial pFC as well as the posterior cingulate cortex and precuneus are associated with cigarette craving and were chosen as ROIs. Fourteen heavy smokers were randomly assigned to receive one of two types of NF: traditional activity-based rtfMRI-NF or FC-added rtfMRI-NF. Participants received rtfMRI-NF training during two separate visits after overnight smoking cessation, and cigarette craving score was assessed. The FC-added rtfMRI-NF resulted in greater neuronal activity and increased FC between the targeted ROIs than the traditional activity-based rtfMRI-NF and resulted in lower craving score. In the FC-added rtfMRI-NF condition, the average of neuronal activity and FC was tightly associated with craving score (Bonferroni-corrected p = .028). However, in the activity-based rtfMRI-NF condition, no association was detected (uncorrected p > .081). Non-rtfMRI data analysis also showed enhanced neuronal activity and FC with FC-added NF than with activity-based NF. These results demonstrate that FC-added rtfMRI-NF facilitates greater volitional control over brain activity and connectivity and greater modulation of mental function than activity-based rtfMRI-NF. PMID:25761006

  19. Paramagnetic lanthanide chelates for multicontrast MRI.

    PubMed

    Cakić, Nevenka; Savić, Tanja; Stricker-Shaver, Janice; Truffault, Vincent; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Mirkes, Christian; Pohmann, Rolf; Scheffler, Klaus; Angelovski, Goran

    2016-07-28

    The preparation of a paramagnetic chelator that serves as a platform for multicontrast MRI, and can be utilized either as a T1-weighted, paraCEST or (19)F MRI contrast agent is reported. Its europium(iii) complex exhibits an extremely slow water exchange rate which is optimal for the use in CEST MRI. The potential of this platform was demonstrated through a series of MRI studies on tube phantoms and animals. PMID:27291157

  20. PCA-based groupwise image registration for quantitative MRI.

    PubMed

    Huizinga, W; Poot, D H J; Guyader, J-M; Klaassen, R; Coolen, B F; van Kranenburg, M; van Geuns, R J M; Uitterdijk, A; Polfliet, M; Vandemeulebroucke, J; Leemans, A; Niessen, W J; Klein, S

    2016-04-01

    Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) is a technique for estimating quantitative tissue properties, such as the T1 and T2 relaxation times, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and various perfusion measures. This estimation is achieved by acquiring multiple images with different acquisition parameters (or at multiple time points after injection of a contrast agent) and by fitting a qMRI signal model to the image intensities. Image registration is often necessary to compensate for misalignments due to subject motion and/or geometric distortions caused by the acquisition. However, large differences in image appearance make accurate image registration challenging. In this work, we propose a groupwise image registration method for compensating misalignment in qMRI. The groupwise formulation of the method eliminates the requirement of choosing a reference image, thus avoiding a registration bias. The method minimizes a cost function that is based on principal component analysis (PCA), exploiting the fact that intensity changes in qMRI can be described by a low-dimensional signal model, but not requiring knowledge on the specific acquisition model. The method was evaluated on 4D CT data of the lungs, and both real and synthetic images of five different qMRI applications: T1 mapping in a porcine heart, combined T1 and T2 mapping in carotid arteries, ADC mapping in the abdomen, diffusion tensor mapping in the brain, and dynamic contrast-enhanced mapping in the abdomen. Each application is based on a different acquisition model. The method is compared to a mutual information-based pairwise registration method and four other state-of-the-art groupwise registration methods. Registration accuracy is evaluated in terms of the precision of the estimated qMRI parameters, overlap of segmented structures, distance between corresponding landmarks, and smoothness of the deformation. In all qMRI applications the proposed method performed better than or equally well as

  1. Combination of 5-ALA and iMRI in re-resection of recurrent glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Quick-Weller, Johanna; Lescher, Stephanie; Forster, Marie-Therese; Konczalla, Jürgen; Seifert, Volker; Senft, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Background Tumour resection plays a role in the initial treatment but also in the setting of recurrent glioblastoma (rGBM). To achieve maximum resection, 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) and intraoperative MRI (iMRI) are used as surgical tools. Aiming at complete tumour re-resection, we started combining iMRI with 5-ALA to find out if this leads to better surgical results. Methods We performed tumour resections in seven patients with rGBM, combining 5-ALA (20 mg/kg bodyweight) with iMRI (0.15 T). Radiologically complete resections were intended in all seven patients. We assessed intraoperative fluorescence findings and compared these with intraoperative imaging. All patients had early postoperative MRI (3 T) to verify final iMRI scans and received adjuvant treatment according to interdisciplinary tumour board decision. Results Median patient age was 63 years. Median KPS score was 90, and median tumour volume was 8.2 cm(3). In six of seven patients (85%), 5-ALA induced fluorescence of tumour-tissue was detected intraoperatively. All tumours were good to visualise with iMRI and contrast media. One patient received additional resection of residual contrast enhancing tissue on intraoperative imaging, which did not show fluorescence. Radiologically complete resections according to early postoperative MRI were achieved in all patients. Median survival since second surgery was 7.6 months and overall survival since diagnosis was 27.8 months. Conclusions 5-ALA and iMRI are important surgical tools to maximise tumour resection also in rGBM. However, not all rGBMs exhibit fluorescence after 5-ALA administration. We propose the combined use of 5-ALA and iMRI in the surgery of rGBM. PMID:26743016

  2. Frequency-offset Cartesian feedback for MRI power amplifier linearization.

    PubMed

    Zanchi, Marta G; Stang, Pascal; Kerr, Adam; Pauly, John M; Scott, Greig C

    2011-02-01

    High-quality magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) requires precise control of the transmit radio-frequency (RF) field. In parallel excitation applications such as transmit SENSE, high RF power linearity is essential to cancel aliased excitations. In widely-employed class AB power amplifiers, gain compression, cross-over distortion, memory effects, and thermal drift all distort the RF field modulation and can degrade image quality. Cartesian feedback (CF) linearization can mitigate these effects in MRI, if the quadrature mismatch and dc offset imperfections inherent in the architecture can be minimized. In this paper, we present a modified Cartesian feedback technique called "frequency-offset Cartesian feedback" (FOCF) that significantly reduces these problems. In the FOCF architecture, the feedback control is performed at a low intermediate frequency rather than dc, so that quadrature ghosts and dc errors are shifted outside the control bandwidth. FOCF linearization is demonstrated with a variety of typical MRI pulses. Simulation of the magnetization obtained with the Bloch equation demonstrates that high-fidelity RF reproduction can be obtained even with inexpensive class AB amplifiers. Finally, the enhanced RF fidelity of FOCF over CF is demonstrated with actual images obtained in a 1.5 T MRI system. PMID:20959264

  3. MRI-Guided Target Motion Assessment using Dynamic Automatic Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenz, Daniel L.

    Motion significantly impacts the radiotherapy process and represents one of the persisting problems in treatment delivery. In order to improve motion management techniques and implement future image guided radiotherapy tools such as MRI-guidance, automatic segmentation algorithms hold great promise. Such algorithms are attractive due to their direct measurement accuracy, speed, and ability to assess motion trajectories for daily treatment plan modifications. We developed and optimized an automatic segmentation technique to enable target tracking using MR cines, 4D-MRI, and 4D-CT. This algorithm overcomes weaknesses in automatic contouring such as lack of image contrast, subjectivity, slow speed, and lack of differentiating feature vectors by the use of morphological processing. The software is enhanced with predictive parameter capabilities and dynamic processing. The 4D-MRI images are acquired by applying a retrospective phase binning approach to radially-acquired MR image projections. The quantification of motion is validated with a motor phantom undergoing a known trajectory in 4D-CT, 4D-MRI, and in MR cines from the ViewRay MR-Guided RT system. In addition, a clinical case study demonstrates wide-reaching implications of the software to segment lesions in the brain and lung as well as critical structures such as the liver. Auto-segmentation results from MR cines of canines correlate well with manually drawn contours, both in terms of Dice similarity coefficient and agreement of extracted motion trajectories.

  4. Synthetic ground truth for validation of brain tumor MRI segmentation.

    PubMed

    Prastawa, Marcel; Bullitt, Elizabeth; Gerig, Guido

    2005-01-01

    Validation and method of comparison for segmentation of magnetic resonance images (MRI) presenting pathology is a challenging task due to the lack of reliable ground truth. We propose a new method for generating synthetic multi-modal 3D brain MRI with tumor and edema, along with the ground truth. Tumor mass effect is modeled using a biomechanical model, while tumor and edema infiltration is modeled as a reaction-diffusion process that is guided by a modified diffusion tensor MRI. We propose the use of warping and geodesic interpolation on the diffusion tensors to simulate the displacement and the destruction of the white matter fibers. We also model the process where the contrast agent tends to accumulate in cortical csf regions and active tumor regions to obtain contrast enhanced T1w MR image that appear realistic. The result is simulated multi-modal MRI with ground truth available as sets of probability maps. The system will be able to generate large sets of simulation images with tumors of varying size, shape and location, and will additionally generate infiltrated and deformed healthy tissue probabilities. PMID:16685825

  5. Frequency-Offset Cartesian Feedback for MRI Power Amplifier Linearization

    PubMed Central

    Zanchi, Marta Gaia; Stang, Pascal; Kerr, Adam; Pauly, John Mark; Scott, Greig Cameron

    2011-01-01

    High-quality magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) requires precise control of the transmit radio-frequency field. In parallel excitation applications such as transmit SENSE, high RF power linearity is essential to cancel aliased excitations. In widely-employed class AB power amplifiers, gain compression, cross-over distortion, memory effects, and thermal drift all distort the RF field modulation and can degrade image quality. Cartesian feedback (CF) linearization can mitigate these effects in MRI, if the quadrature mismatch and DC offset imperfections inherent in the architecture can be minimized. In this paper, we present a modified Cartesian feedback technique called “frequency-offset Cartesian feedback” (FOCF) that significantly reduces these problems. In the FOCF architecture, the feedback control is performed at a low intermediate frequency rather than DC, so that quadrature ghosts and DC errors are shifted outside the control bandwidth. FOCF linearization is demonstrated with a variety of typical MRI pulses. Simulation of the magnetization obtained with the Bloch equation demonstrates that high-fidelity RF reproduction can be obtained even with inexpensive class AB amplifiers. Finally, the enhanced RF fidelity of FOCF over CF is demonstrated with actual images obtained in a 1.5 T MRI system. PMID:20959264

  6. Fetal MRI on a multi-element digital coil platform.

    PubMed

    Serai, Suraj D; Merrow, Arnold C; Kline-Fath, Beth M

    2013-09-01

    Fetal MRI has an increasing list of indications and is most commonly employed when anomalies detected by prenatal ultrasonography require further characterization. This may occur when sonography is technically challenging or where specific MRI findings will determine pre- and postnatal management, including critical in utero and/or peripartum interventions. In these circumstances, there are high expectations for MRI to sort out complex diagnostic dilemmas through exquisite anatomical imaging that fetal surgeons and obstetricians can comprehend and relay to their patients. These expectations, in light of evolving clinical innovations, continue to drive advances in fetal imaging. Increasing signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is fundamental to improving MR image quality, and proper coil selection is a key component of this pursuit. Since the introduction of parallel imaging techniques, the numbers of elements in phased-array coils have been continuously increased to achieve high SNR and shorter scan times. With the invention of a digital coil platform, it is now possible to connect combinations of multiple coil elements to enhance SNR beyond the capabilities of the adult eight-channel torso-coil routinely used in fetal imaging. This paper describes the application of multi-element radiofrequency coils on a digital broadband imaging platform with unique coil combinations to perform dedicated fetal MRI. PMID:23649206

  7. An MRI-compatible hand sensory vibrotactile system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fa; Lakshminarayanan, Kishor; Slota, Gregory P; Seo, Na Jin; Webster, John G

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the application of vibrotactile noise to the wrist or back of the hand has been shown to enhance fingertip tactile sensory perception (Enders et al 2013), supporting the potential for an assistive device worn at the wrist, that generates minute vibrations to help the elderly or patients with sensory deficit. However, knowledge regarding the detailed physiological mechanism behind this sensory improvement in the central nervous system, especially in the human brain, is limited, hindering progress in development and use of such assistive devices. To enable investigation of the impact of vibrotactile noise on sensorimotor brain activity in humans, a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-compatible vibrotactile system was developed to provide vibrotactile noise during an MRI of the brain. The vibrotactile system utilizes a remote (outside the MR room) signal amplifier which provides a voltage from -40 to +40 V to drive a 12 mm diameter piezoelectric vibrator (inside the MR room). It is portable and is found to be MRI-compatible which enables its use for neurologic investigation with MRI. The system was also found to induce an improvement in fingertip tactile sensation, consistent with the previous study. PMID:25501948

  8. Computerized breast parenchymal analysis on DCE-MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Giger, Maryellen L.; Yuan, Yading; Jansen, Sanaz A.; Lan, Li; Bhooshan, Neha; Newstead, Gillian M.

    2009-02-01

    Breast density has been shown to be associated with the risk of developing breast cancer, and MRI has been recommended for high-risk women screening, however, it is still unknown how the breast parenchymal enhancement on DCE-MRI is associated with breast density and breast cancer risk. Ninety-two DCE-MRI exams of asymptomatic women with normal MR findings were included in this study. The 3D breast volume was automatically segmented using a volume-growing based algorithm. The extracted breast volume was classified into fibroglandular and fatty regions based on the discriminant analysis method. The parenchymal kinetic curves within the breast fibroglandular region were extracted and categorized by use of fuzzy c-means clustering, and various parenchymal kinetic characteristics were extracted from the most enhancing voxels. Correlation analysis between th