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1

Trench migration and overriding plate stress in dynamic subduction models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

On Earth, oceanic plates subduct beneath a variety of overriding plate (OP) styles, from relatively thin and negatively buoyant oceanic OPs to thick and neutrally/positively buoyant continental OPs. The inclusion of an OP in numerical models of self-consistent subduction has been shown to reduce the rate that subducting slabs roll back relative to the equivalent single plate models. We use dynamic, 2-D subduction models to investigate how the mechanical properties, namely viscosity, thickness, and density, of the OP modify the slab rollback rate and the state of stress of the OP. In addition, we examine the role of the subducting plate (SP) viscosity. Because OP deformation accommodates the difference between the slab rollback rate and the far-field OP velocity, we find that the temporal variations in the rollback rate results in temporal variations in OP stress. The slabs in our models roll back rapidly until they reach the lower mantle viscosity increase, at which point the rollback velocity decreases. Concurrent with this reduction in rollback rate is a switch from an OP dominated by extensional stresses to a compressional OP. As in single plate models, the viscosity of the SP exerts a strong control on subducting slab kinematics; weaker slabs exhibit elevated sinking velocities and rollback rates. The SP viscosity also exerts a strong control on the OP stress regime. Weak slabs, either due to reduced bulk viscosity or stress-dependent weakening, have compressional OPs, while strong slabs have dominantly extensional OPs. While varying the viscosity of the OP alone does not substantially affect the OP stress state, we find that the OP thickness and buoyancy plays a substantial role in dictating the rate of slab rollback and OP stress state. Models with thick and/or negatively buoyant OPs have reduced rollback rates, and increased slab dip angles, relative to slabs with thin and/or positively buoyant OPs. Such elevated trench rollback for models with positively buoyant OPs induces extensional stresses in the OP, while OPs that are strongly negatively buoyant are under compression. While rollback is driven by the negative buoyancy of the subducting slab in such models of free subduction, we conclude that the physical properties of the OP potentially play a significant role in modulating both rollback rates and OP deformation style on Earth.

Holt, A. F.; Becker, T. W.; Buffett, B. A.

2015-04-01

2

The effects of the overriding plate thermal state on the slab dip in an ocean-continent subduction system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To evaluate the effects of variations in the thermal state of the overriding plate on the slab dip in an ocean-continent subduction system, a 2-D finite element thermo-mechanical model was implemented. The lithosphere base was located at the depth of the 1600 K isotherm. Numerical simulations were performed while taking into account four different initial thicknesses for the oceanic lithosphere (60, 80, 95 and 110 km) and five different thicknesses of the overriding plate, as compared in terms of the continental-oceanic plate thickness ratio (100, 120, 140, 160 and 200% of the oceanic lithosphere thickness). The results of numerical modeling indicate that a high variability of the subducting plate geometry occurs for an oceanic lithosphere thickness ranging from 60 to 80 km, while the variability decreases where the oceanic plates are thicker (95 and 110 km). Furthermore, the slab dip strongly depends on the thermal state of the overriding plate, and, in particular, the slab dip decreases with the increase in the upper plate thickness. The model predictions also confirm that a direct correlation between the slab dip and the age of the oceanic lithosphere does not exist, at least for subduction plates thinner that 110 km. These conclusions are supported by the good agreement between the model results and the natural data referring to worldwide ocean-continent subduction zones.

Roda, Manual; Marotta, Anna Maria; Iolle Spalla, Maria

2011-05-01

3

Copper enrichment in arc magmas controlled by overriding plate thickness  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Porphyry copper systems supply about 75% of the world's copper. They form above subduction zones and are preferentially associated with calc-alkaline magmas. Such magmas result from continuous iron depletion during differentiation, in contrast to tholeiitic magmas that show initial iron enrichment during differentiation. The formation of calc-alkaline magmas is favoured by high water content and oxygen fugacity. These characteristics, as well as magmatic metal contents, are thought to be imparted in the mantle source by fluids of the subducted slab. Yet this process does not explain why porphyry copper systems preferentially occur in thicker arcs. Here I present a statistical assessment of more than 40,000 published geochemical analyses of magmatic rocks from 23 Quaternary-aged volcanic arcs worldwide. I find that magmas of thicker arcs are systematically more calc-alkaline and more depleted in copper than magmas of thinner arcs. This implies that the missing copper in the former accumulates as copper sulphides within or at the base of thicker arcs. Such copper accumulations are an essential step in forming porphyry systems. These results suggest that the thickness of the overriding plate provides a more important control on magma differentiation than the composition of the mantle source, and can explain the preferential association of porphyry copper systems with calc-alkaline magmas and thicker arcs.

Chiaradia, Massimo

2014-01-01

4

Stress fields of the overriding plate at convergent margins and beneath active volcanic arcs.  

PubMed

Tectonic stress fields in the overriding plate at convergent plate margins are complex and vary on local to regional scales. Volcanic arcs are a common element of overriding plates. Stress fields in the volcanic arc region are related to deformation generated by subduction and to magma generation and ascent processes. Analysis of moment tensors of shallow and intermediate depth earthquakes in volcanic arcs indicates that the seismic strain field in the arc region of many convergent margins is subhorizontal extension oriented nearly perpendicular to the arc. A process capable of generating such a globally consistent strain field is induced asthenospheric corner flow below the arc region. PMID:17774792

Apperson, K D

1991-11-01

5

Non-steady-state subduction and trench-parallel flow induced by overriding plate structure  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The direction of plate tectonic motion and the direction of mantle flow, as inferred from observations of seismic anisotropy measurements, show a good global correlation far from subduction zones. However, this correlation is poor near subduction zones, where below the slab seismic anisotropy is aligned parallel to the trench and above the slab has a complex pattern, which has not been fully explained. Here we present time-dependent three-dimensional (3D) fully-dynamic simulations of subduction to study the effect of overriding plate structure on the evolution of slab geometry and induced mantle flow. We find that along-strike variation in thermal thickness of the overriding plate causes increased hydrodynamic suction and shallower slab dip beneath the colder portion of the overriding plate; the variation in slab geometry drives strong trench-parallel flow beneath the slab and a complex flow pattern above the slab. This new mechanism for driving trench-parallel flow provides a good explanation for seismic anisotropy observations from the Middle and South America subduction zones, where both slab dip and overriding plate thermal state are strongly variable and correlated, and thus may be an important mechanism in other subduction zones. The location and strength of trench-parallel flow vary with the time-dependent evolution of the slab, suggesting that the global variability in seismic anisotropy observations in subduction zones is in part due to the non-steady-state behavior of these systems.

Rodríguez-González, Juan; Billen, Magali I.; Negredo, Ana M.

2014-09-01

6

Sunda-Java trench kinematics, slab window formation and overriding plate deformation since the Cretaceous  

E-print Network

Sunda-Java trench kinematics, slab window formation and overriding plate deformation since along the 3200 km long Sunda-Java trench, one of the largest subduction systems on Earth. Combining window underlying the Java­South Sumatra region, and we propose that decreased mantle wedge viscosities

Müller, Dietmar

7

The Continental Plates are Getting Thicker.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews seismological studies that provide evidence of the existence of continental roots beneath the continents. Suggests, that through the collisions of plate tectonics, continents stabilized part of the mobile mantle rock beneath them to form deep roots. (ML)

Kerr, Richard A.

1986-01-01

8

Plate Tectonics and Continental Drift: Classroom Ideas.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Suggests various classroom studies related to plate tectonics and continental drift, including comments on and sources of resource materials useful in teaching the topics. A complete list of magazine articles on the topics from the Sawyer Marine Resource Collection may be obtained by contacting the author. (JN)

Stout, Prentice K.

1983-01-01

9

Strain weakening enables continental plate tectonics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Much debate exists concerning the strength distribution of the continental lithosphere, how it controls lithosphere-scale strain localization and hence enables plate tectonics. No rheological model proposed to date is comprehensive enough to describe both the weakness of plate boundary and rigid-like behaviour of plate interiors. Here we show that the duality of strength of the lithosphere corresponds to different stages of microstructural evolution. Geological constraints on lithospheric strength and large strain numerical experiments reveal that the development of layers containing weak minerals and the onset of grain boundary sliding upon grain size reduction in olivine cause strain localisation and reduce strength in the crust and subcontinental mantle, respectively. The positive feedback between weakening and strain localization leads to the progressive development of weak plate boundaries while plate interiors remain strong.

Gueydan, Frédéric; Précigout, Jacques; Montési, Laurent G. J.

2014-09-01

10

Continental tectonics in the aftermath of plate tectonics  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is shown that the basic tenet of plate tectonics, rigid-body movements of large plates of lithosphere, fails to apply to continental interiors. There, buoyant continental crust can detach from the underlying mantle to form mountain ranges and broad zones of diffuse tectonic activity. The role of crustal blocks and of the detachment of crustal fragments in this process is

Peter Molnar

1988-01-01

11

Current plate motions. [continental groupings and global modelling  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A global plate motion model, named NUVEL-1, which describes current plate motions between 12 rigid plates is described, with special attention given to the method, data, and assumptions used. Tectonic implications of the patterns that emerged from the results are discussed. It is shown that wide plate boundary zones can form not only within the continental lithosphere but also within the oceanic lithosphere; e.g., between the Indian and Australian plates and between the North American and South American plates. Results of the model also suggest small but significant diffuse deformation of the oceanic lithosphere, which may be confined to small awkwardly shaped salients of major plates.

Demets, C.; Gordon, R. G.; Argus, D. F.; Stein, S.

1990-01-01

12

Comment on "The potential influence of subduction zone polarity on overriding plate deformation, trench migration and slab dip angle" by W.P. Schellart  

E-print Network

Discussion Comment on "The potential influence of subduction zone polarity on overriding plate online xxxx The Schellart's [Schellart, W.P., 2007, The potential influence of subduction zone polarity are misleading for the study of the net rotation of the lithosphere since the first 125 km of subduction zones

Doglioni, Carlo

13

Continental tectonics in the aftermath of plate tectonics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

It is shown that the basic tenet of plate tectonics, rigid-body movements of large plates of lithosphere, fails to apply to continental interiors. There, buoyant continental crust can detach from the underlying mantle to form mountain ranges and broad zones of diffuse tectonic activity. The role of crustal blocks and of the detachment of crustal fragments in this process is discussed. Future areas of investigation are addressed.

Molnar, Peter

1988-01-01

14

Numerical modeling of subduction beneath non-uniform overriding plates: Time-dependent evolution of slab geometry and trench-parallel flow  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Seismic anisotropy measurements show that the fast spreading direction below the slab is aligned parallel to the trench in the central region and perpendicular near the edges. Above the slab it has a complex pattern, often showing abrupt transitions between trench-parallel and trench-perpendicular directions and sharp changes in intensity. The origin of this complex pattern is poorly understood, however, previous models have shown that variations in slab geometry can cause trench-parallel flow above the slab. In turn, overriding plate thermal state influences the slab dip, which suggests a causal link between overriding plate structure, slab geometry and mantle flow in subduction zones. We study the effect of along-strike variations in thermal thickness of the overriding plate on the evolution of slab geometry and induced mantle flow. To perform the study we implement generic 3D time dependent thermo mechanical numerical models of buoyancy driven subduction using CitcomS. We find that increased hydrodynamic suction beneath the colder portion of the overriding plate causes shallower slab dip. The variation in slab geometry drives strong trench-parallel flow beneath the slab and a complex flow pattern above the slab. The mantle flow pattern responds to the changing geometry of the slab, which makes the process strongly time-dependent. The location and strength of trench-parallel flow vary throughout the simulations, which suggests that the global variability in seismic anisotropy in present-day observations is in part due to the non-steady-state behavior of subduction systems. This new mechanism for driving trench-parallel flow provides a good explanation for seismic anisotropy observations from the Middle and South America subduction zones, where both slab dip and overriding plate thermal state are strongly variable and correlated.

Rodriguez-Gonzalez, Juan; Billen, Magali; Negredo, Ana

2014-05-01

15

Interaction of subducted slabs with the mantle transition-zone: A regime diagram from 2-D thermo-mechanical models with a mobile trench and an overriding plate  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

zone slab deformation influences Earth's thermal, chemical, and tectonic evolution. However, the mechanisms responsible for the wide range of imaged slab morphologies remain debated. Here we use 2-D thermo-mechanical models with a mobile trench, an overriding plate, a temperature and stress-dependent rheology, and a 10, 30, or 100-fold increase in lower mantle viscosity, to investigate the effect of initial subducting and overriding-plate ages on slab-transition zone interaction. Four subduction styles emerge: (i) a "vertical folding" mode, with a quasi-stationary trench, near-vertical subduction, and buckling/folding at depth (VF); (ii) slabs that induce mild trench retreat, which are flattened/"horizontally deflected" and stagnate at the upper-lower mantle interface (HD); (iii) inclined slabs, which result from rapid sinking and strong trench retreat (ISR); (iv) a two-stage mode, displaying backward-bent and subsequently inclined slabs, with late trench retreat (BIR). Transitions from regime (i) to (iii) occur with increasing subducting plate age (i.e., buoyancy and strength). Regime (iv) develops for old (strong) subducting and overriding plates. We find that the interplay between trench motion and slab deformation at depth dictates the subduction style, both being controlled by slab strength, which is consistent with predictions from previous compositional subduction models. However, due to feedbacks between deformation, sinking rate, temperature, and slab strength, the subducting plate buoyancy, overriding plate strength, and upper-lower mantle viscosity jump are also important controls in thermo-mechanical subduction. For intermediate upper-lower mantle viscosity jumps (×30), our regimes reproduce the diverse range of seismically imaged slab morphologies.

Garel, F.; Goes, S.; Davies, D. R.; Davies, J. H.; Kramer, S. C.; Wilson, C. R.

2014-05-01

16

Plate boundary and major fault system in the overriding plate within the Shumagin gap at the Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Structure in the overriding plate is one of the parameters that may increase the tsunamigenic potential of a subduction zone but also influence the seismogenic behavior and segmentation of great earthquake rupture. The Alaska-Aleutian margin is characterized by along-strike changes in plate interface coupling over relatively small distances. Here, we present trench normal multichannel seismic (MCS) profiles acquired across the Shumagin gap that has not broken in many decades and appears to be weakly coupled. The high fold, deep penetration (636 channel, 8-km long streamer, 6600 cu.in airgun source) MCS data were acquired as part of the ALEUT project. This dataset gives us critical new constraints on the interplate boundary that can be traced over ~100 km distance beneath the forearc with high variation in its reflection response with depth. These profiles also reveal the detailed upper plate fault structure and forearc morphology. Clear reflections in the overriding plate appear to delineate one or more large faults that cross the shelf and the upper slope. These faults are observed 75 km back from the trench and seem to branch at depth and connect to the plate interface within this gap at ~11 s twtt. We compare the reflective structure of these faults to that of the plate boundary and examine where it intersects the megathrust with respect of the expected downdip limit of coupling. We also compare this major structure with the seismicity recorded in this sector. The imaged fault system is associated with a large deep basin (~6s twt) that is an inherited structure formed during the pre-Aleutian period. Basins faults appear to have accommodated primarily normal motion, although folding of sediments near the fault and complicated fault geometries in the shallow section may indicate that this fault has accommodated other types of motion during its history that may reflect the stress-state at the megathrust over time. The deformation within the youngest sediment also suggests also that this fault system might be still active. The coincident wide-angle seismic data coincident with one MCS profile allow the addition of more information about the deep P-wave velocity structure whereas the streamer tomography (Michaelson-Rotermund et al., this session) around the fault system add more detailed view into the complex structure in the shallow portions (upper 2km) of these structures showing a low velocity zone along one large fault suggesting that this fault is still active. These large-scale structures imaged in the overriding plate within the Shumagin gap are probably sufficiently profound to play a major role in the behavior of the megathrust in this area, segmentation of great earthquake rupture area, tsunami generation and may influence the frictional properties of the seismogenic zone at depth.

Becel, A.; Shillington, D. J.; Nedimovic, M. R.; Keranen, K. M.; Li, J.; Webb, S. C.; Kuehn, H.

2013-12-01

17

Resistance of plate motion due to continental deformation (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Convergent plate margins that produce high mountains often induce deformation that extends for hundreds to thousands kilometers inboard of the plate boundary. Buoyancy forces that are derived from this thickened, elevated continental crust are commonly thought to resist further convergence and contribute to changes in plate rates as the balance of forces on a plate boundary evolves. For orogens that develop broad plateau-style topography, the strength of the deforming continent and the distance over which it deforms may also contribute to plate forces, although this forcing has rarely been considered. For example, the post-collisional slowing of India with respect to Eurasia challenges the role of topography as the cause of decreasing convergence rates and instead favors the role of deforming a confined mantle lithosphere as the cause of slowing. Here, geologic evidence suggests that compressional deformation began at the distal extent of the orogen when continental collision initiated and that the majority of deformation since has remained localized along what can be considered to be a stationary boundary. As post-collisional convergence continued, convergence rates have declined exponentially as did the distance across the intervening region of deformation. The decline in rate and distance occurred in tandem such that the bulk average strain rate across the orogen remained constant and is equal to the modern strain rate determined by GPS. For both linear and non-linear constitutive relationships, a constant average strain rate implies constant average stress (or constant forcing). A constant force per unit length of the plate boundary might be explained by the viscous resistance of the deforming continental mantle lithosphere, as opposed to a change in forces that would be expected from the buoyancy of the evolving high topography. A viscous resistance of the continental lithosphere has not previously been considered as a type of plate forcing, and the Indo-Asia orogen may offer one extreme example of such. Other examples include the ongoing Arabian-Eurasia continental collision and the ocean-continent subduction beneath South America, where exponentially decreasing convergence rates and mountain building are also observed. Long-lived, far-field deformation in the Arabian example may provide analogous to the Tibet case where decreasing convergence rates follow a decrease over which that convergence is absorbed by continental deformation. Unlike Tibet and Arabia, the outward expansion of deformation away from the plate boundary in the Andean orogen suggests that bulk strain rates must have decreased through time. Possibly, such differences may be related to time-dependent rheologic changes associated with subduction-related magmatism, changes in the frictional resistance along the plate contact, or the diminished role of viscous resistance in subduction settings compared to their continental collision counterpart.

Clark, M. K.

2013-12-01

18

Developing the plate tectonics from oceanic subduction to continental collision  

Microsoft Academic Search

The studies of continental deep subduction and ultrahigh-pressure metamorphism have not only promoted the development of solid\\u000a earth science in China, but also provided an excellent opportunity to advance the plate tectonics theory. In view of the nature\\u000a of subducted crust, two types of subduction and collision have been respectively recognized in nature. On one hand, the crustal\\u000a subduction occurs

YongFei Zheng; Kai Ye; LiFei Zhang

2009-01-01

19

Linking continental drift, plate tectonics and the thermal state of the Earth's mantle  

E-print Network

Linking continental drift, plate tectonics and the thermal state of the Earth's mantle T. Rolf a between continental drift, oceanic plate tectonics and the thermal state of the Earth's mantle, by using Arthur Holmes proposed that continental drift and seafloor kinematics are surface expressions of large

Tackley, Paul J.

20

Seismic investigation of the transition from continental to oceanic subduction along the western Hellenic Subduction Zone  

E-print Network

The western Hellenic subduction zone (WHSZ) exhibits well-documented along-strike variations in lithosphere density (i.e., oceanic versus continental), subduction rates, and overriding plate extension. Differences in slab ...

Pearce, Frederick Douglas

21

Deciphering the mechanics of an imaged fault system in the over-riding plate at the Shumagin Seismic Gap, Alaska subduction zone using MCS waveform tomography  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 2011 ALEUT program acquired 3500 km of multichannel seismic (MCS) data along a part of the western Alaska subduction zone, from the freely slipping Shumagin Seismic Gap to the locked regions in the Semidi segment and the western Kodiak asperity. The MCS profiles were acquired on the R/V Langseth using two 8-km-long streamers and span the entire locked zone on the megathrust, including the updip and downdip transitions to stable sliding. The primary goal was to characterize variations in the geometry and properties of the megathrust and the downgoing plate and relate them to downdip and along-strike changes in slip behavior and seismogenesis. The images capture the targeted megathrust reflectivity and its spatial variation. Notably, the two westernmost profiles show reflections arising from a major fault in the overriding plate within the Shumagin Seismic Gap located 75 km from the trench, which can be followed from the seafloor to the megathrust. The imaged normal fault bounds the seaward end of the Sanak forearc Cenozoic basin, formed after the Early Eocene reorganization of the Alaska subduction zone. The new reflection images also show that the seaward pair of the previously interpreted growth faults, thought to indicate deposition contemporaneous with basin subsidence, is a part of the imaged fault system. The unexpected imaging of this major fault system in the over-riding plate raises important questions: Has this fault been active during the most recent nearby megathrust earthquakes, such as the 1946 and 1948 earthquakes? Was the Sanak basin formed as a result of slip on the imaged normal fault system or is it a result of growth faulting that predates the formation of this fault? The timing and style of deformation on this fault has significant implications for both coupling on the megathrust seaward and landward of where the normal fault roots and tsunamigenesis. To complement constraints on the geometry and reflection characteristics of this structure from MCS [Bécel et al., this session] we have applied full waveform tomography to the prestack MCS data with the goal to form high-resolution velocity profiles for the shallow sections of the normal fault. The starting velocity model for waveform inversion was formed by traveltime tomography on picked refracted arrivals found at offsets from ~5-8 km. The preliminary, phase-only results along one profile show velocities reducing laterally across the shallow end of the normal fault by 200 m/s (from 2200 to 2000 m/s). We interpret this reduction in velocities to indicate that the fault system is active and that fluid flow may be involved. Some authors suggest that low or zero friction is a required mechanical condition to allow slip on such a normal fault system [McKenzie and Jackson, 2012]. Consequently, the obtained results could prove important to re-assessing both the tsunami risk and the plate interface coupling in the Shumagin Seismic Gap area.

Michaelson, C. A.; Delescluse, M.; Becel, A.; Nedimovic, M. R.; Shillington, D. J.; Louden, K. E.; Webb, S. C.

2013-12-01

22

Strain weakening enables continental plate tectonics Frdric GUEYDAN (1), Jacques PRCIGOUT (2) and Laurent G.J. MONTESI (3)  

E-print Network

1 Strain weakening enables continental plate tectonics Frédéric GUEYDAN (1), Jacques PRÉCIGOUT (2-scale strain localization and hence enables plate tectonics. No rheological model proposed to date is comprehensive enough to describe both the weakness of plate boundary and rigid-like behaviour of plate interiors

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

23

Implications of Continental Crust Extension for Plate Reconstruction: AN Example from the Gulf of Mexico  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The prerift reconstruction of continental plates bounded by rifted margins requires the closure of relative motion accomplished both by seafloor spreading and by the extension of continental crust during the rift phase of continental breakup. Continental extension is not expected to be pervasive throughout the plate, but to be confined to a zone of up to several hundred kilometers in width. The direction of particle motion in this zone is expected to be parallel to flow lines followed by the rigid portions of the plates. The "best fit" between rifted continental margins is then described by the rotation angle about an Euler pole which best closes both the oceanic crust and the extension within the continental crust, along small circles about the Euler pole. As an example application of these concepts, the pattern of Late Mesozoic crust extension within the Gulf of Mexico basin is used to constrain the location of the Euler pole and angle of rotation of the Yucatan block with respect to North America. Both crust type and the degree of extension within the transitional crust surrounding the basin are estimated on a point-by-point basis from bathymetry and basement depth. The root-mean-square (rms) misfit in the apparent total closure of both oceanic crust and extension within the continental crust is computed for a range of possible poles of opening. A contour map of misfit versus pole location reveals a global minimum rms misfit of ±47 km for a 45° counterclockwise opening of the Gulf of Mexico basin about an Euler pole at 25°N, 79°W. An elongate trend of poles, for which the misfit is less than 100 km, extends from the Bahama Islands eastward across the Atlantic and through North Africa. The reconstruction of the Gulf of Mexico for the best fit pole places the palinspastically restored Yucatan block in contact with North America along the Texas and Louisiana shelf. The resulting restored southern margin of North America fits against the the northern margin of South America in its prerift position to within the uncertainty in the North America-Africa-South America plate circuit. We conclude that the prerift placement of the Yucatan block between North and South America along the Texas-Louisiana shelf is consistent with both the pattern of extension within the Gulf of Mexico basin and seafloor spreading history of the central Atlantic basin.

Dunbar, John A.; Sawyer, Dale S.

1987-12-01

24

Role of plate kinematics and plate-slip-vector partitioning in continental magmatic arcs: Evidence from the Cordillera Blanca, Peru  

SciTech Connect

New structural and geochronological data from the Cordillera Blanca batholith in the Peruvian Andes, coupled with Nazca-South American plate-slip-vector data, indicate that oblique convergence and associated strike-slip partitioning strongly influenced continental magmatic arc evolution. Both the strain field and mode of magmatism (plutonism vs. volcanism) in the late Miocene Peruvian Andes were controlled by the degree to which the arc-parallel component of the plate slip vector was partitioned into the arc. Strong strike-slip partitioning at ca. 8 Ma produced arc-parallel sinistral shear, strike-slip intercordilleran basins and east-west-oriented tension fractures that facilitated emplacement of the Cordillera Blanca batholith (ca. 8.2 {+-} 0.2 Ma). Periods during which the strike-slip component was not partitioned into the arc (ca. 10 and ca. 7 Ma) were associated with roughly arc-normal contraction and ignimbrite volcanism. The data thus support the contention that contraction within continental magmatic arcs favors volcanism, whereas transcurrent shear favors plutonism. The tie between oblique convergence and batholith emplacement in late Miocene Peruvian Andes provides a modern analogue for batholiths emplaced as the result of transcurrent shear in ancient arcs.

McNulty, B.A. [California State Univ., Carson, CA (United States). Dept. of Earth Sciences] [California State Univ., Carson, CA (United States). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Farber, D.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Inst. of Geophysics and Planetary Physics] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Inst. of Geophysics and Planetary Physics; Wallace, G.S.; Lopez, R. [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States). Earth Science Dept.] [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States). Earth Science Dept.; Palacios, O. [Inst. de Geologico Minero y Metalurgico, Lima (Peru)] [Inst. de Geologico Minero y Metalurgico, Lima (Peru)

1998-09-01

25

Anomalous seismic and rheological behavior of the asthenosphere beneath oceanic and continental plates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The discovery of plate tectonics brought with it many questions regarding the very nature of a plate, how and why a rigid outer planetary shell is broken up, and what physical properties of the underlying mantle allow mobility of these rigid bodies. In addition early fluid dynamic models of mantle convection in the Earth's interior had to be reconciled with the idea of tectonics at the Earth's surface. In this doctoral thesis, I explore the seismic properties of the lithosphere and asthenosphere in continental and oceanic settings using inversion methods for Rayleigh waves and SKS phases. I improve previous inversion methods by considering the frequency-dependence of the incoming wavefield, testing for lateral resolution of velocity through checkerboard tests, measuring attenuation of Rayleigh waves, and considering the contribution from smaller 4theta terms in theoretical approximations for azimuthal anisotropy. I compare shear wave splitting in region S and teleseismic SKS phases for the first time in a continental setting in the western Himalayan syntaxis indicating strong sublithospheric mantle flow beneath the intensely compressional India-Asia collision zone. I also present fluid dynamic experiments of Saffman-Taylor instabilities and propose a new geodynamic model for asthenospheric flow in the oceanic mantle relating mantle converting plumes to surface plate tectonics. All of the studies presented here emphasize the importance of asthenospheric flow but is often only established after careful resolution of the lithospheric mantle. These studies show that there is significant and often complex interaction between whole mantle convection and surface plate tectonics warranting continued investigation into both continental and oceanic mantle dynamics.

Weeraratne, Dayanthie Sakunthala

26

Misconceptions and Conceptual Changes Concerning Continental Drift and Plate Tectonics among Portuguese Students Aged 16-17.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates student misconceptions in the areas of continent, ocean, permanence of ocean basins, continental drift, Earth's magnetic field, and plates and plate motions. A teaching-learning model was designed based on a constructivist approach. Results show that students held a substantial number of misconceptions. (Author/DKM)

Marques, Luis; Thompson, David

1997-01-01

27

The differ respond of China continental to the collision between Eurasian and Philippine Sea plate  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The southeastern margin of China continental is one of ideal area to study modern plate interaction. This area most attract geologists attention is largely covered by widely distributed late Mesozoic igneous rocks. In the past decades many studies focus on the relations of the collision between the Philippine Sea plate and the Eurasian plate in the east of Taiwan region based on geological and geophysical data. In the recent decades the globe or large regional passive and active source seismic images proposed a fine geometry model in which the crust present gradually thinning from inner continent to southeastern margin. This is regarded as evidence of the southeastern margin of China continental —Eurasian plate respond to the collision over against the Taiwan Strait. Relatively the partition feature—the Model if there is difference and how to vary across margin of mainland, still remains poorly defined. In this study, the data recorded by 20 flexible broadband stations deployed onshore along the margin of main continental in Fujian province from 2008 to 2010 and 130 permanent stations of New China Digital Seismology Network (NCDSN), was combined used. And totally 16664 reliable receiver functions were obtained for imaging the structure of the crust and upper mantle beneath the stations array. Only visually comparison, we find the receiver functions are evident different for teleseismic events between the station located at the southwest and the northeast of Fujian province. After the auto-searching algorithm, H-k method, which sums the amplitudes of the receiver functions at the predicted arrival times of Ps and its multiple phases, has been used to determine the best estimations of crustal thickness (H) and VP/VS ratio (k). The preliminary result show that crustal thicknesses stepwise vary from 33-36,32-30 to 29-27km in average north to south, that is a poignant contras with northeastward surface tectonic.the subordinate characteristic, there seems is a Moho ditch can be tracing from about longitude 118 degree from north to south. An obvious limitation of depth level range appears around latitude 26 degree. This result is helpful for explain why there is stronger earthquake activity and much geothermal resource the southwestern than northeastern of Fujian, China.

Li, Q.; Gao, R.; He, C.; Guan, Y.; Li, W.

2010-12-01

28

Inland jump of the Arabian northwest plate boundary from the Levant continental margin to the Dead Sea Transform  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

While the breakup of Arabia and Africa began in the early Oligocene, the northwestern boundary of the Arabian Plate along the Dead Sea Transform (DST) formed 10-15 Myr later (early-middle Miocene). During the early stage of breakup the Red Sea Rift continued propagating northwestward, forming the Suez Rift. The present ˜45° northward twist of the plate boundary from the Red Sea toward the Gulf of Eilat (Aqaba) still did not exist. What happened at the northern tip of the Suez Rift at that time? How was strain distributed to its surroundings, and where did the plate boundary continue from there? Here we describe an abandoned segment of the Arabian northwestern plate boundary that extended from the northern tip of the Suez Rift northeastward, along the Levant margin. Seismic data collected offshore Israel support a subsurface, deep-rooted fault zone running along the base of the continental slope. These faults indicate Oligocene transpressional lateral shearing. We propose that during the early stage of continental breakup a left-lateral strike-slip motion of ˜10 km took place along this embryonic plate boundary. Such deep-rooted tectonism implies that unlike the passive situation of the Israel-Sinai continental margin witnessed presently and before the Oligocene, during the early stage of the Africa-Arabia breakup this part of the continental margin was reactivated. We further suggest that the inland jump of the plate boundary toward the DST was not immediate and that during the transitional period the Israel-Sinai triangular block was an independent subplate with deformation all around it.

Gvirtzman, Zohar; Steinberg, Josh

2012-08-01

29

Uplift along passive continental margins, changes in plate motion and mantle convection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The origin of the forces that produce elevated, passive continental margins (EPCMs) is a hot topic in geoscience. It is, however, a new aspect in the debate that episodes of uplift coincide with changes in plate motion. This has been revealed, primarily, by studies of the burial, uplift and exhumation history of EPCMs based on integration on stratigraphic landscape analysis, low-temperature thermochronology and evidence from the geological record (Green et al., 2013). In the Campanian, Eocene and Miocene, uplift and erosion affected the margins of Brazil and Africa (Japsen et al., 2012b). The uplift phases in Brazil coincided with main phases of Andean orogeny which were periods of relatively rapid convergence at the Andean margin of South America (Cobbold et al., 2001). Because Campanian uplift in Brazil coincides, not only with rapid convergence at the Andean margin of South America, but also with a decline in Atlantic spreading rate, Japsen et al. (2012b) suggested that all these uplift events have a common cause, which is lateral resistance to plate motion. Because the uplift phases are common to margins of diverging plates, it was also suggested that the driving forces can transmit across the spreading axis; probably at great depth, e.g. in the asthenosphere. Late Eocene, Late Miocene and Pliocene uplift and erosion shaped the elevated margin of southern East Greenland (Bonow et al., in review; Japsen et al., in review). These regional uplift phases are synchronous with phases in West Greenland, overlap in time with similar events in North America and Europe and also correlate with changes in plate motion. The much higher elevation of East Greenland compared to West Greenland suggests dynamic support in the east from the Iceland plume. Japsen et al. (2012a) pointed out that EPCMs are typically located above thick crust/lithosphere that is closely juxtaposed to thinner crust/lithosphere. The presence of mountains along the Atlantic margin of Brazil and in East and West Greenland, close to where continental crust starts to thin towards oceanic crust, illustrates the common association between EPCMs and the edges of cratons. These observations indicate that the elevation of EPCMs may be due to processes operating where there is a rapid change in crustal/lithosphere thickness. Vertical motion of EPCMs may thus be related to lithosphere-scale folding caused by compressive stresses at the edge of a craton (e.g. Cloetingh et al., 2008). The compression may be derived either from orogenies elsewhere on a plate or from differential drag at the base of the lithosphere by horizontal asthenospheric flow (Green et al., 2013). Bonow, Japsen, Nielsen. Global Planet. Change in review. Cloetingh, Beekman, Ziegler, van Wees, Sokoutis, 2008. Geol. Soc. Spec. Publ. (London) 306. Cobbold, Meisling, Mount, 2001. AAPG Bull. 85. Green, Lidmar-Bergström, Japsen, Bonow, Chalmers, 2013. GEUS Bull. 2013/30. Japsen, Chalmers, Green, Bonow 2012a, Global Planet. Change 90-91. Japsen, Bonow, Green, Cobbold, Chiossi, Lilletveit, Magnavita, Pedreira, 2012b. GSA Bull. 124. Japsen, Green, Bonow, Nielsen. Global Planet. Change in review.

Japsen, Peter; Green, Paul F.; Chalmers, James A.; Bonow, Johan M.

2014-05-01

30

Eocene to Quaternary mafic-intermediate volcanism in San Luis Potosí, central Mexico: The transition from Farallon plate subduction to intra-plate continental magmatism  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The San Luis Potosí Volcanic Field (SLPVF) of central Mexico includes volcanic sequences of felsic, intermediate and basic compositions that were erupted as discrete episodes from the Eocene to the Pleistocene. Volcanism was dominated by widespread and voluminous rhyolitic ignimbrites of the mid-Tertiary Ignimbrite Flare-up. However, the complete volcanic history must consider basaltic and andesitic Eocene-Pleistocene volcanic successions that provide key evidence for understanding the geochemical evolution of the volcanism in the SLPVF during this time span. Five sequences are recognized according to their geochemical characteristics, each comprising a volcano-tectonic episode. The first episode comprises basaltic andesites and andesites erupted during three intervals, 45-42 Ma, 36-31 Ma, and 31-30 Ma. The oldest was derived from subduction magmatism, whereas the youngest has an intra-plate magmatic signature and this represents the transition from the end of a long lasting subduction regime of the Farallon plate to the initiation of intra-plate continental extension in the North American plate. The second episode, at 29.5-28 Ma, comprises a bimodal succession of high-silica rhyolites and alkaline basalts (hawaiites) that are interpreted as magmatism generated in an intra-plate continental extension regime during the Basin and Range faulting. The third episode, at 21 Ma, is characterized by trachybasalts and trachyandesites that represent mantle basaltic melts that were contaminated through assimilation of the lower crust during advanced stage of intra-plate extension that started at Oligocene. The fourth episode includes 12 Ma alkaline basalts and andesites that were erupted from fissures. These mantle derived magmas evolved to andesites by crustal anatexis and crystal fractionation within a continued, extensional, intra-plate regime. Lastly, the fifth episode comprises 5.0 to 0.6 Ma alkaline basalts (basanites) containing mantle xenoliths, that were erupted from maars and tuff cones, which are the youngest manifestations of mantle-derived intra-plate extensional events. Based upon this volcanic record, the last subduction manifestations of the extinct Farallon plate occurred at about 42 Ma, this was followed by a transition to intra-plate magmatism between 42 and 31 Ma, and an extensional, intra-plate tectonic setting from 31 Ma to almost Present.

Aguillón-Robles, Alfredo; Tristán-González, Margarito; de Jesús Aguirre-Díaz, Gerardo; López-Doncel, Rubén A.; Bellon, Hervé; Martínez-Esparza, Gilberto

2014-04-01

31

31. PLASTICITY CHARACTERISTICS OF THE QUATERNARY SEDIMENTS OF THE GUATEMALAN CONTINENTAL SLOPE, MIDDLE AMERICA TRENCH, AND COCOS PLATE—LEG 67, DEEP SEA DRILLING PROJECT1  

Microsoft Academic Search

The plasticity characteristics of the Quaternary sediments of the Guatemalan continental margin were determined from five sites drilled during Leg 67 of the Deep Sea Drilling Project. The 64 samples analyzed are from various marine environments, including the Cocos Plate, Middle America Trench, and the trench lower slope to midslope of the Guatemalan continental slope. The sediments are primarily hemipelagic

Atterberg Limits

32

Dynamics of continental accretion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Subduction zones become congested when they try to consume buoyant, exotic crust. The accretionary mountain belts (orogens) that form at these convergent plate margins have been the principal sites of lateral continental growth through Earth's history. Modern examples of accretionary margins are the North American Cordilleras and southwest Pacific subduction zones. The geologic record contains abundant accretionary orogens, such as the Tasmanides, along the eastern margin of the supercontinent Gondwana, and the Altaïdes, which formed on the southern margin of Laurasia. In modern and ancient examples of long-lived accretionary orogens, the overriding plate is subjected to episodes of crustal extension and back-arc basin development, often related to subduction rollback and transient episodes of orogenesis and crustal shortening, coincident with accretion of exotic crust. Here we present three-dimensional dynamic models that show how accretionary margins evolve from the initial collision, through a period of plate margin instability, to re-establishment of a stable convergent margin. The models illustrate how significant curvature of the orogenic system develops, as well as the mechanism for tectonic escape of the back-arc region. The complexity of the morphology and the evolution of the system are caused by lateral rollback of a tightly arcuate trench migrating parallel to the plate boundary and orthogonally to the convergence direction. We find geological and geophysical evidence for this process in the Tasmanides of eastern Australia, and infer that this is a recurrent and global phenomenon.

Moresi, L.; Betts, P. G.; Miller, M. S.; Cayley, R. A.

2014-04-01

33

Tectonic lineaments in the cenozoic volcanics of southern Guatemala: Evidence for a broad continental plate boundary zone  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The northern Caribbean plate boundary has been undergoing left lateral strike slip motion since middle Tertiary time. The western part of the boundary occurs in a complex tectonic zone in the continental crust of Guatemala and southernmost Mexico, along the Chixoy-Polochic, Motogua and possibly Jocotan-Chamelecon faults. Prominent lineaments visible in radar imagery in the Neogene volcanic belt of southern Guatemala and western El Salvador were mapped and interpreted to suggest southwest extensions of this already broad plate boundary zone. Because these extensions can be traced beneath Quaternary volcanic cover, it is thought that this newly mapped fault zone is active and is accommodating some of the strain related to motion between the North American and Caribbean plates. Onshore exposures of the Motoqua-Polochic fault systems are characterized by abundant, tectonically emplaced ultramafic rocks. A similar mode of emplacement for these off shore ultramafics, is suggested.

Baltuck, M.; Dixon, T. H.

1984-01-01

34

Continental island from the Upper Silurian (Ludlow) Sino-Korean plate  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent field studies on Upper Silurian stratigraphy and paleontology in the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region (for short Inner\\u000a Mongalia) near Bater Obo (=Bateaobao) resulted in the discovery of a small continental island with fossil invertebrates preserved\\u000a as encrusters (stromatoporoids and corals) attached directly to a rocky shore surface and buried by silty clay mud. The Bater\\u000a island (oamed herein) is

Jiayu Rong; M. E. Johnson; B. G. Baarli; Wenguo Li; Wenbo Su; Jian Wang

2001-01-01

35

Relation of plate kinematic parameters to deformation along the Andean margin from Late Jurassic to the present  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The geological consequences of temporal and spatial changes in subduction along the Andean margin from 170 Ma to the present were investigated in the context of a recently developed, global plate kinematic model. Geological events recorded by the overriding continental plate, including the development of extensional basins, orogeny and crustal growth accompanied by thickening and/or magmatism, were contrasted with the age of the subducting oceanic slab(s), the absolute plate velocity of South America both normal and parallel to the trench, and the relative convergence velocity between South America and the subducting slab(s) both normal and parallel to the trench. Preliminary results indicate that the absolute velocity of the overriding plate is strongly correlated with the extent of crustal extension; the development of marginal basins floored by oceanic crust occurred only when the absolute plate velocity of South America was directed away from the trench. This condition did not accompany the development of aborted marginal basins. An abrupt increase in relative convergence rates between the South American continent and the subducting slab also often accompanied the initiation of extension in the overriding plate. However, high convergence rates primarily accompanied the development of fold and thrust belts, and were linked with plateau uplift. Inter-dependencies between the various parameters are investigated to build a more complete model of conditions necessary for the development of significant geological events along continental margins controlled by subduction.

Maloney, K. T.; Clarke, G. L.; Quevedo, L. E.; Klepeis, K. A.

2011-12-01

36

43 CFR 3903.53 - Overriding royalties.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) OIL SHALE MANAGEMENT-GENERAL Fees, Rentals, and Royalties § 3903.53 Overriding royalties. The lessee must file...

2014-10-01

37

Plate Tectonics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students will go over the main points of plate tectonics, including the theory of continental drift, different types of plate boundaries, seafloor spreading, and convection currents. We have been spending time learning about plate tectonics. We have discussed the theory of continental drift, we have talked about the different types of plate boundaries, we have also learned about seafloor spreading and convection currents. Plate Boundary Diagram Now is your chance ...

Mrs. Rohlfing

2011-02-03

38

Craton stability and continental lithosphere dynamics during plume-plate interaction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Survival of thick cratonic roots in a vigorously convecting mantle system for billions of years has long been studied by the geodynamical community. A high cratonic root strength is generally considered to be the most important factor. We first perform and discuss new numerical models to investigate craton stability in both Newtonian and non-Newtonian rheology in the stagnant lid regime. The results show that only a modest compositional rheological factor of ??=10 with non-Newtonian rheology is required for the survival of cratonic roots in a stagnant lid regime. A larger rheological factor (100 or more) is needed to maintain similar craton longevity in a Newtonian rheology environment. Furthermore, chemical buoyancy plays an important role on craton stability and its evolution, but could only work with suitable compositional rheology. During their long lifespan, cratons experienced a suite of dynamic, tectonothermal events, such as nearby subduction and mantle plume activity. Cratonic nuclei are embedded in shorter-lived, more vulnerable continental areas of different thickness, composition and rheology, which would influence the lithosphere dynamic when tectonothermal events happen nearby. South Africa provides a very good example to investigate such dynamic processes as it hosts several cratons and there are many episodic thermal events since the Mesozoic as indicated by a spectrum of magmatic activity. We numerically investigate such an integrated system using the topographic evolution of cratons and surrounding lithosphere as a diagnostic observable. The post-70Ma thinning of pericratonic lithosphere by ~50km around Kaapvaal craton (Mather et al., 2011) is also investigated through our numerical models. The results show that the pericratonic lithosphere cools and grows faster than cratons do, but is also more likely to be effected by episodic thermal events. This leads to surface topography change that is significantly larger around the craton than within the craton itself. Given the considerable debate on the uplift history of southern African plateau (Nyblade and Sleep, 2003), our numerical models that encompass lithospheric heterogeneity within cratons could help to achieve a better understanding of this issue.

Wang, H.; Van Hunen, J.; Pearson, D.

2013-12-01

39

The REE-bearing minerals of intercratonic extensional zone in Chhotonagpur continental plate of Eastern Indian Shield  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The REE-bearing minerals occurring in the baryte-bearing pegmatites of Nawahatu (23°26'N, 86°04'E), Purulia District, belong to the intercratonic extensional zone in the Chhotonagpur continental plate of Eastern India. Mineralogical and microchemical investigations of REE-bearing minerals reveal their extreme inhomogeneity showing associations of both high temperature minerals like those of euxenite group and low temperature minerals like aeschynite. While the presence of Ba together with traces of Au, Cr, Ni, Fe?Mg-silicates and even P are evidences for the probable fractional crystallisation of the rare earth elements from the upper mantle, the Al and Si-bearing REE minerals are indicative of crustal origin. The presence of U 6+ together with Cl - and OH - shows metasomatic influence subsequent to hydrothermal activity. It is predicted that fractional crystallisation from the lower crust and partly from the upper mantle as well as the subsequent granite-pegmatite intrusion with metasomatic alteration have led to the formation of economically important REE-bearing minerals.

Bhadra Chaudhuri, J. N.; Helfmeier, H. U.; Galbert, F.

40

Collision of continental corner from 3-D numerical modeling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Continental collision has been extensively investigated with 2-D numerical models assuming infinitely wide plates or insignificant along-strike deformation in the third dimension. However, the corners of natural collision zones normally have structural characteristics that differ from linear parts of mountain belt. We conducted 3-D high-resolution numerical simulations to study the dynamics of a continental corner (lateral continental/oceanic transition zone) during subduction/collision. The results demonstrate different modes between the oceanic subduction side (continuous subduction and retreating trench) and the continental collision side (slab break-off and topography uplift). Slab break-off occurs at a depth (?100 km to ˜300 km) that depends on the convergence velocity. The numerical models produce lateral extrusion of the overriding crust from the collisional side to the subduction side, which is also a phenomenon recognized around natural collision of continental corners, for instance around the western corner of the Arabia-Asia collision zone and around the eastern corner of the India-Asia collision zone. Modeling results also indicate that extrusion tectonics may be driven both from above by the topography and gravitational potentials and from below by the trench retreat and asthenospheric mantle return flow, which supports the link between deep mantle dynamics and shallower crustal deformation.

Li, Zhong-Hai; Xu, Zhiqin; Gerya, Taras; Burg, Jean-Pierre

2013-10-01

41

Motion of continental slivers and creeping subduction in the northern Andes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Along the western margin of South America, plate convergence is accommodated by slip on the subduction interface and deformation of the overriding continent. In Chile, Bolivia, Ecuador and Colombia, continental deformation occurs mostly through the motion of discrete domains, hundreds to thousands of kilometres in scale. These continental slivers are wedged between the Nazca and stable South American plates. Here we use geodetic data to identify another large continental sliver in Peru that is about 300-400 km wide and 1,500 km long, which we call the Inca Sliver. We show that movement of the slivers parallel to the subduction trench is controlled by the obliquity of plate convergence and is linked to prominent features of the Andes Mountains. For example, the Altiplano is located at the boundary of converging slivers at the concave bend of the central Andes, and the extending Gulf of Guayaquil is located at the boundary of diverging slivers at the convex bend of the northern Andes. Motion of a few large continental slivers therefore controls the present-day deformation of nearly the entire Andes mountain range. We also show that a 1,000-km-long section of the plate interface in northern Peru and southern Ecuador slips predominantly aseismically, a behaviour that contrasts with the highly seismic neighbouring segments. The primary characteristics of this low-coupled segment are shared by ~20% of the subduction zones in the eastern Pacific Rim.

Nocquet, J.-M.; Villegas-Lanza, J. C.; Chlieh, M.; Mothes, P. A.; Rolandone, F.; Jarrin, P.; Cisneros, D.; Alvarado, A.; Audin, L.; Bondoux, F.; Martin, X.; Font, Y.; Régnier, M.; Vallée, M.; Tran, T.; Beauval, C.; Maguiña Mendoza, J. M.; Martinez, W.; Tavera, H.; Yepes, H.

2014-04-01

42

Collapse of the northern Jalisco continental slope:Subduction erosion, forearc slivering, or subduction beneath the Tres Marias escarpment?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Jalisco subduction zone exhibits several interesting characteristics. Among these is that convergence between the Rivera and North American plate is highly oblique, especially north of 20N, the obliquity progressively increasing to the NW. By analogy to other better studied subduction zones, this distribution of forces should produce a NW-SE extension in the overriding plate, especially north of 20N. This has led to the proposal that the trench perpendicular Bahia de Banderas is an expression of this extension [Kostoglodov and Bandy, JGR, vol. 100, 1995]. To further investigate this proposal, multibeam bathymetric data and seafloor backscatter images, seismic reflection sub-bottom profiles and marine magnetic data were collected during the MORTIC08 campaign of the B.O. EL PUMA in March 2009. The bathymetric data provides for 100% coverage (20 to 200 meter spacing of the actual measured depth value depending on the water depth) of the continental slope and trench areas north of 20N. These data indicate that a marked change occurs in the morphology of the continental slope at 20N. To the north the slope consists of a broad, fairly flat plain lying between a steep lower inner trench slope to the west and a steep, concave seaward, escarpment to the east. In contrast, to the south the continental slope exhibits a more gradual deepening until the steep lower inner trench slope. A prominent submarine canyon deeply incises the continental slope between these two morphotectonic domains. This canyon appears to represent the boundary between two NW-SE diverging forearc blocks or slivers, consistent with the presence of oblique convergence. In contrast, the broad, fairly flat plain is better explained by subsidence induced by subduction erosion (i.e. erosion of the base of the overriding plate underneath the continental slope area). The shoaling of the trench axis northward towards the Puerto Vallarta Graben and subsequent deepening may be related to subduction of the Rivera Plate beneath the Tres Marias Escarpment.

Bandy, W. L.; Mortera-Gutierrez, C. A.; Ortiz-Zamora, G.; Ortega-Ramirez, J.; Galindo Dominguez, R. E.; Ponce-Núñez, F.; Pérez-Calderón, D.; Rufino-Contreras, I.; Valle-Hernández, S.; Pérez-González, E.

2010-12-01

43

The role that plate tectonics, inferred stress changes and stratigraphic unconformities have on the evolution of the West and Central African Rift System and the Atlantic continental margins  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Muglad rift basin of Sudan, is a good example of polyphase rifting, with at least three major phases of basin development. Each phase has resulted in the generation of source rock, reservoir and seal geology with structural traps often closely linked to basement highs. In this paper we investigate on a regional scale the tectonic processes that have contributed to rift basin development. On a regional scale, the evolution of the Africa-wide Mesozoic rift system is intimately linked to relative movements of African sub-plates and to global plate tectonic processes and plate interactions. Changes in plate interactions are observed in the oceanic crust as azimuth changes of fracture zone geometries and by inference have caused significant modifications to both the orientation and magnitude of the motions of the African sub-plates. Such plate motion processes have controlled the polyphase development of the West and Central African Rift System. On the basinal scale, changes of sub-plate motions have resulted in changes in the stress field which have had a clear impact on the deformation and fault geometries of rift basins and on the resulting stratigraphy. The construction of the first unified stratigraphic chart for the West and Central African Rift System shows a close correlation in the timing of the major unconformities with the timing of changes in relative plate motion as observed in the changes of the azimuthal geometry of the oceanic fracture zones in the Central Atlantic. Since similarly timed unconformities exist along the continental margins of Africa and South America, we propose that the causative mechanism is change in relative plate motion which leads to an increase or decrease in the tension on the plate and thus controls the strength or effective elastic thickness, Te, of the crust/plate beneath the margins. This results in a focused change in isostatic response of the margin during short-period changes in relative plate motion; i.e. more tension will mean that loads are not compensated locally resulting in local uplift of the margin.

Fairhead, J. D.; Green, C. M.; Masterton, S. M.; Guiraud, R.

2013-05-01

44

Viscoelastic Postseismic Rebound to Strike-Slip Earthquakes in Regions of Oblique Plate Convergence  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

According to the slip partitioning concept, the trench parallel component of relative plate motion in regions of oblique convergence is accommodated by strike-slip faulting in the overriding continental lithosphere. The pattern of postseismic surface deformation due to viscoelastic flow in the lower crust and asthenosphere following a major earthquake on such a fault is modified from that predicted from the conventual elastic layer over viscoelastic halfspace model by the presence of the subducting slab. The predicted effects, such as a partial suppression of the postseismic velocities by 1 cm/yr or more immediately following a moderate to great earthquake, are potentially detectable using contemporary geodetic techniques.

Cohen, Steven C.

1999-01-01

45

From an active continental plate margin to continental collision: New constraints from the petrological, structural and geochronological record of the (ultra) high-P metamorphic Rhodope domain (N-Greece)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Rhodope domain occupies a key area along the suture between the European and the Apulian/Adriatic plate (Schmid et al., 2008), which collided in the early Tertiary (closure of the Vardar/Axios ocean, cf. Mposkos & Krohe, 2006). An integrated study of the geochronological, tectonic and petrological data of the Rhodope domain provides the unique opportunity resolving a 160 my lasting metamorphic evolution (Jurassic to Miocene) of an active plate margin to a high degree. The Greek Rhodope consists of several composite metamorphic complexes bounded by the Nestos thrust and several normal detachment systems. The PT- and structural records of the complexes constrain metamorphic, magmatic and tectonic processes, associated with subduction along a convergent plate margin including UHP metamorphism, MP to HP metamorphism associated with continental collision, and core complex formation linked to Aegean back arc extension. We focus on the Sidironero Complex that shows a polymetamorphic history. This is documented by SHRIMP and LA-ICP-MS U-Pb zircon ages of ca. 150 Ma from garnet-kyanite gneisses that are interpreted to record the HP/UHP metamorphism (Liati, 2005; Krenn et al., 2010). SHRIMP zircon ages of ca. 51 Ma from an amphibolitized eclogite is interpreted by Liati (2005) to record a second Eocene HP metamorphic event. We present new data from an integrated petrological, geochronological and tectonic study. Granulite facies and upper amphibolite facies metamorphic conditions are recorded by the mineral assemblage Grt-Ky-Bt-Pl-Kfs-Qtz-Rt and Grt-Ky-Bt-Ms-Pl-Qtz-Rt, respectively, in deformed migmatitic metapelites. Deformation occurred under granulite facies conditions. Monazites from the matrix, that formed during the granulite facies deformation, lack core/rim structures and are only locally patchy zoned. Monazite chemical compositions are related to varying reaction partners. Single grains and fractions of few grains yield ID-TIMS U-Pb ages that plot along the concordia between 64 to 60 Ma. One date of 55 Ma might represent Pb-loss during later fluid-induced dissolution-reprecipitation. We discuss the following questions: What is the history of the high-P metamorphic rocks in the Sidironero Complex? Were high-P rocks that have been already exhumed again dragged into the subduction channel? Which rocks from the upper plate are affected by high-P metamorphism evincing that subduction erosion is an important mechanism? We reconsider the significance of the P-T-t evolution in the light of the tectonic processes that took place along the depth extension of a convergent plate interface and during subsequent continental collision along the European/Apulian Suture zone. Krenn et al., 2010. Tectonics 29, TC4001. Liati, A., 2005. Contribution to Mineralogy and Petrology 150, 608-630. Mposkos, E. & Krohe, A. 2006. Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences 43, 1755-1776. Schmid S.M., et al. 2008. Swiss Journal of Geoscience 101, 139-183.

Mposkos, E.; Krohe, A.; Wawrzenitz, N.; Romer, R. L.

2012-04-01

46

Morphotectonic and morphometric analysis of the Nazca plate and the adjacent offshore Peruvian continental slope — Implications for submarine landscape evolution  

Microsoft Academic Search

We use new swath bathymetry data acquired during the RV Sonne cruise GEOPECO and complement them with swath data from adjacent regions to analyse the morphotectonics of the Peruvian convergent margin. The Nazca plate is not covered with sediments and therefore has a rough surface along the entire Peruvian trench. The styles of roughness differ significantly along the margin with

Nina Kukowski; Andrea Hampel; Silvan Hoth; Jörg Bialas

2008-01-01

47

oZONE Faculty and Staff Course Overrides  

E-print Network

oZONE Faculty and Staff Course Overrides and the Registration Add Errors They Resolve Departments of the overrides within the registration component of oZONE. We have, however, retained a few instances where some. There is also a link to this document on the Student Training and Instructions page in the oZONE info site

Oklahoma, University of

48

Comparison of deep structure along three transects of the western North American continental margin  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Similarities in geology and potential field data that have in the past been noted among the regions of southern Alaska, southern Vancouver Island, and central California are now seen to be accompanied by similarities in deep crustal structure. A number of tectonic elements have been identified in the deep structure along transects in these three regions, although not all elements are present along each transect. These elements are A) an actively subducting oceanic plate and B) an overriding continental plate that consists of 1) a Cenozoic accretionary prism, 2) a Mesozoic accretionary prism, 3) a backstop to the Mesozoic prism, 4) a tectonically underplated body of oceanic rocks, and 5) a crustal root. -from Authors

Fuis, G.S.; Clowes, R.M.

1993-01-01

49

Plate Tectonics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Plate Tectonics SciPack explores the various materials that make up Earth and the processes they undergo to provide a framework for understanding how continents are created and change over time. The focus is on Standards and Benchmarks related to Earth's layers, oceanic and continental plates and the interactions between plates.In addition to comprehensive inquiry-based learning materials tied to Science Education Standards and Benchmarks, the SciPack includes the following additional components:? Pedagogical Implications section addressing common misconceptions, teaching resources and strand maps linking grade band appropriate content to standards. ? Access to one-on-one support via e-mail to content "Wizards".? Final Assessment which can be used to certify mastery of the concepts.Learning Outcomes:Plate Tectonics: Layered Earth? Identify that Earth has layers (not necessarily name them), and that the interior is hotter and more dense than the crust.? Identify the crust as mechanically strong, and the underlying mantle as deformable and convecting.Plate Tectonics: Plates? Identify that the outermost layer of Earth is made up of separate plates.? Choose the correct speed of the motion of plates.? Identify the ocean floor as plate, in addition to the continents (to combat the common idea that only continents are plates, floating around on the oceans).? Recognize that oceans and continents can coexist on the same plate.Plate Tectonics: Plate Interactions? Identify the different interactions between plates.? Discuss what happens as a result of those interactions.Plate Tectonics: Consequences of Plate Interactions? Explain why volcanoes and earthquakes occur along plate boundaries. ? Explain how new sea floor is created and destroyed.? Describe features that may be seen on the surface as a result of plate interactions.Plate Tectonics: Lines of Evidence? Use plate tectonics to explain changes in continents and their positions over geologic time.? Provide evidence for the idea of plates, including the location of earthquakes and volcanoes, continental drift, magnetic orientation of rocks in the ocean floor, etc.

National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)

2007-03-21

50

Unique Signal Override Plug electromagnetic test report  

SciTech Connect

The MC4039 Unique Signal Override Plug (USOP) provides the unique signal for the B90 when fielded on aircraft that are not equipped with unique signal capability. Since the USOP is field installed, the concern is that it might be susceptible to electromagnetic radiation prior to installation on the weapon. This report documents a characterization of the USOP, evaluates various techniques for attaching electromagnetic shields, and evaluates the susceptibility of a fully assembled passive-USOP. Tests conducted evaluated the electromagnetic susceptibility of the passive, unconnected USOP. During normal operation the USOP is powered directly from the weapon. During the course of this test program two prototypes were developed. The prototype 1 USOP internal circuitry contains one SA3727 chip, five diodes, three resistors, and two capacitors; these are mounted on a circular circuit board and contained inside a metal back shell cover, which serves as an electromagnetic shield. The prototype 2 design incorporated four changes. The manufacturer of the SA3727 chip was changed from Lasarray to LSI Logic, the circuit board ground was tied to the case ground through a straight wire, Cl was changed from 1 microfarad to 0.1 microfarads. and the circuit board was changed, as required. 2 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs. (JF)

Bonn, R.H.

1990-10-01

51

25 CFR 227.26 - Assignments and overriding royalties.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...227.26 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF CERTAIN LANDS IN WIND RIVER INDIAN RESERVATION, WYOMING, FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Operations § 227.26 Assignments and overriding...

2012-04-01

52

25 CFR 227.26 - Assignments and overriding royalties.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...227.26 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF CERTAIN LANDS IN WIND RIVER INDIAN RESERVATION, WYOMING, FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Operations § 227.26 Assignments and overriding...

2014-04-01

53

25 CFR 227.26 - Assignments and overriding royalties.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...227.26 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF CERTAIN LANDS IN WIND RIVER INDIAN RESERVATION, WYOMING, FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Operations § 227.26 Assignments and overriding...

2011-04-01

54

25 CFR 227.26 - Assignments and overriding royalties.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...227.26 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF CERTAIN LANDS IN WIND RIVER INDIAN RESERVATION, WYOMING, FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Operations § 227.26 Assignments and overriding...

2013-04-01

55

Paternity uncertainty overrides sex chromosome selection for preferential grandparenting  

E-print Network

Paternity uncertainty overrides sex chromosome selection for preferential grandparenting Elizabeth grandchildren. Because males are heterozygous for sex chromosomes, however, grandparents are asymmetrically related to male and female grandchildren via the sex chromosomes. For example, the Y chromosome from

Getz, Wayne M.

56

Plate Tectonics Quiz  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This quiz for younger students asks them 10 questions about plate motions, rock types in continental and oceanic crust, crustal formation and mountain building, the supercontinent Pangea, and the theory of continental drift. A link to a page on continental drift provides information to answer the questions.

57

Modeling the influence of plate motions on subduction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Subduction zones are widely studied complex geodynamical systems. Their evolution is influenced by a broad range of parameters such as the age of the plates (both subducting and overriding) as well as their rheology, their nature (oceanic or continental), the presence of a crust and the involved plate motions to name a few. To investigate the importance of these different parameters on the evolution of subduction we have created a series of 2D numerical thermomechanical subduction models. These subduction models are multi-material flow models containing continental and oceanic crusts, a lithosphere and a mantle. We use the sticky air approach to allow for topography build up in the model. In order to model multi-material flow in our Eulerian finite element code of SEPRAN (Segal and Praagman, 2000) we use the well benchmarked level set method (Osher and Sethian, 1988) to track the different materials and their mode of deformation through the model domain. To our knowledge the presented results are the first subduction model results with the level set method. We will present preliminary results of our parametric study focusing mainly on the influence of plate motions on the evolution of subduction. S. Osher and J.A. Sethian. Fronts propagating with curvature-dependent speed: Algorithms based on hamilton-jacobi formulations. JCP 1988 A. Segal and N.P. Praagman. The SEPRAN package. Technical report, 2000 This research is funded by The Netherlands Research Centre for Integrated Solid Earth Science (ISES)

Hillebrand, Bram; Thieulot, Cedric; van den Berg, Arie; Spakman, Wim

2014-05-01

58

Self-assembled software and method of overriding software execution  

SciTech Connect

A computer-implemented software self-assembled system and method for providing an external override and monitoring capability to dynamically self-assembling software containing machines that self-assemble execution sequences and data structures. The method provides an external override machine that can be introduced into a system of self-assembling machines while the machines are executing such that the functionality of the executing software can be changed or paused without stopping the code execution and modifying the existing code. Additionally, a monitoring machine can be introduced without stopping code execution that can monitor specified code execution functions by designated machines and communicate the status to an output device.

Bouchard, Ann M.; Osbourn, Gordon C.

2013-01-08

59

Physicians' Decisions to Override Computerized Drug Alerts in Primary Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Although computerized physician order entry reduces medication errors among inpatients, little is known about the use of this system in primary care. Methods: We calculated the override rate among 3481 consecutivealertsgeneratedat5adultprimarycareprac- tices that use a common computerized physician order entry system for prescription writing. For detailed re- view, we selected a random sample of 67 alerts in which physicians

Saul N. Weingart; Maria Toth; Daniel Z. Sands; Mark D. Aronson; Roger B. Davis; Russell S. Phillips

2003-01-01

60

Overriding of Drug Safety Alerts in Computerized Physician Order Entry  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many computerized physician order entry (CPOE) systems have integrated drug safety alerts. The authors reviewed the literature on physician response to drug safety alerts and interpreted the results using Reason's framework of accident causation. In total, 17 papers met the inclusion criteria. Drug safety alerts are overridden by clinicians in 49% to 96% of cases. Alert overriding may often be

HELEEN VAN DER SIJS; ARNOLD VULTO; MARC BERG

61

Suggestions for Teaching the Principles of Continental Drift in the Elementary School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides a brief overview of current geographic ideas regarding continental drift and plate tectonics and suggests techniques for illustrating continental motions to elementary school pupils. (Author/DB)

Glenn, William H.

1977-01-01

62

Tectonic and sedimentary response to oblique and incipient continental - continental collision the easternmost Mediterranean (Cyprus)   

E-print Network

E-W, NE-SW and NW-SE structures. Subsequent deformation is documented in a compressional lineament in SW Cyprus. In addition, the over-riding plate in southwest Cyprus still appears to be undergoing gravity spreading outwards from the developing...

Kinnaird, Timothy C.

63

Primordial Ooze and Continental Drift  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this lesson, students will learn that continental plates drift and this affects the layers of the earth. Following a directed reading and discussion, they will perform an experiment in which they use chocolate frosting and graham crackers to simulate tectonic plates sliding about on the mantle.

64

Interplate coupling at oblique subduction zones: influence on upper plate erosion.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In active subduction zones, when the converging plates cannot slip freely past each other, "plate coupling" occurs. The moving subducting slab and therefore the coupling/decoupling relationship between plates control both short- and long-term deformation of the upper plate. Short-term deformation is dominantly elastic, occurs at human timescales and can be directly associated with earthquakes. Long-term deformation is cumulative, permanent and prevails at the geological timescale (Hoffman-Rothe et al., 2006, Springer Berlin Heidelberg). Here we used 3D numerical simulations to test oblique subduction zones and to investigate: 1) how long-term deformation and coupling relationship vary along the trench-axis; 2) how this relationship influences erosion and down-drag of upper plate material. Our models are based on thermo-mechanical equations solved with finite differences method and marker-in-cell techniques combined with a multigrid approach (Gerya, 2010, Cambridge Univ. Press). The reference model simulates an intraoceanic subduction close to the continental margin (Malatesta et al., 2013, Nature Communications, 4:2456 DOI:10.1038/ncomms3456). The oceanic crust is layered with a 5-km-thick layer of gabbro overlain by a 3-km-thick layer of basalt. The ocean floor is covered by 1-km-thick sediments. Plates move with a total velocity of 3.15 cm/yr; the oblique convergence is obtained using velocity vectors that form an angle of 45° with the initial starting point of subduction (weak zone in the lithosphere). After initiation of plate convergence, part of sediments on top of the incoming plate enters the subduction zone and is buried; another part is suddenly transferred along strike at shallow depths and along the subducting slab according to the direction of the along-trench velocity component of subduction. The lateral migration of sediment causes the evolution of the trench along its strike from sediment-poor to sediment-rich. As soon as subduction starts, where the sedimentary infill of the trench is almost nonexistent, short-term shallow coupling occurs and friction between the frontal sector of the overriding plate and the downgoing plate triggers upper-plate bending. In this sector, after the early short-term coupling, the overriding plate is hereafter decoupled from the subducting slab. Moving along trench-strike, where sediments amount increases, the upper plate couples with the subducting plate and is dragged coherently downwards. If a large amount of sediments is stored in the trench the overriding plate is scraped off and incorporated as fragments along the plate interface. Our results suggest that a) one main parameter controlling coupling at convergent plate margins is the occurrence and the amount of sediment at the trench; b) the upper plate margin is dragged to depth or destroyed only where sediments thickness at the trench is large enough to promote interplate coupling, suggesting that a variation of sediment amount along the trench-axis influences the amount and style of transport of upper-plate material in the mantle.

Malatesta, Cristina; Gerya, Taras; Crispini, Laura; Federico, Laura; Scambelluri, Marco; Capponi, Giovanni

2014-05-01

65

Plate Tectonics: Lines of Evidence  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Science Object is the fifth of five Science Objects in the Plate Tectonics SciPack. It explores the physical, geographical, and geological evidence for the theory of continental drift and plate tectonics. Plate tectonics provide a unifying framework for understanding Earth processes and history, and is supported by many lines of evidence. Over geologic time, plates move across the globe creating different continents (and positions of continents). Learning Outcomes:? Use plate tectonics to explain changes in continents and their positions over geologic time.? Provide evidence for the idea of plates, including the location of earthquakes and volcanoes, continental drift, magnetic orientation of rocks in the ocean floor, etc.

National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)

2006-11-01

66

2-Aminopurine overrides multiple cell cycle checkpoints in BHK cells.  

PubMed Central

BHK cells blocked at any of several points in the cell cycle override their drug-induced arrest and proceed in the cycle when exposed concurrently to the protein kinase inhibitor 2-aminopurine (2-AP). For cells arrested at various points in interphase, 2-AP-induced cell cycle progression is made evident by arrival of the drug-treated cell population in mitosis. Cells that have escaped from mimosine G1 arrest, from hydroxyurea or aphidicolin S-phase arrest, or from VM-26-induced G2 arrest subsequently have all the hallmarks of mitosis--such as a mitotic microtubule array, nuclear envelope breakdown, and chromatin condensation. In a synchronous population, the time course of arrival in mitosis and its duration in 2-AP-treated cells that have escaped drug-induced cell cycle blocks is indistinguishable from control cells. Cells arrested in mitosis by nocodazole or taxol quickly escape mitotic arrest and enter interphase when exposed to 2-AP. 2-AP by itself does not influence the timing of cell cycle progression. We conclude that 2-AP acts to override checkpoints in every phase of the cell cycle, perhaps by inhibiting a protein kinase responsible for control of multiple cell cycle checkpoints. Images PMID:1549593

Andreassen, P R; Margolis, R L

1992-01-01

67

When and why the continental crust is subducted: Examples of Hindu Kush Tetsuzo Seno a,  

E-print Network

by a foregoing oceanic plate, in other cases no oceanic plate is accompanied. Which extent of the continental, not associated with any oceanic plate. He attributed the subductability of the continental crust beneath HiduGR Letter When and why the continental crust is subducted: Examples of Hindu Kush and Burma Tetsuzo

Seno, Tetsuzo

68

Review of plate tectonics  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reviews advances in plate tectonics in a variety of different plate environments. Mapping using multibeam echo sounding and deep-water photographic and geophysical packages and understanding of mid-oceanic ridges, the subsidence of sea floor as oceanic lithosphere cools with age, the nature and behavior of oceanic and continental transform faults, and advances in knowledge of subduction zones including the

Kevin Burke; A. M. C. Sengor

1979-01-01

69

Override of spontaneous respiratory pattern generator reduces cardiovascular parasympathetic influence  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We investigated the effects of voluntary control of breathing on autonomic function in cardiovascular regulation. Variability in heart rate was compared between 5 min of spontaneous and controlled breathing. During controlled breathing, for 5 min, subjects voluntarily reproduced their own spontaneous breathing pattern (both rate and volume on a breath-by-breath basis). With the use of this experimental design, we could unmask the effects of voluntary override of the spontaneous respiratory pattern generator on autonomic function in cardiovascular regulation without the confounding effects of altered respiratory pattern. Results from 10 subjects showed that during voluntary control of breathing, mean values of heart rate and blood pressure increased, whereas fractal and spectral powers in heart rate in the respiratory frequency region decreased. End-tidal PCO2 was similar during spontaneous and controlled breathing. These results indicate that the act of voluntary control of breathing decreases the influence of the vagal component, which is the principal parasympathetic influence in cardiovascular regulation.

Patwardhan, A. R.; Vallurupalli, S.; Evans, J. M.; Bruce, E. N.; Knapp, C. F.

1995-01-01

70

Plate Tectonics: A Paradigm under Threat.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the challenges confronting plate tectonics. Presents evidence that contradicts continental drift, seafloor spreading, and subduction. Reviews problems posed by vertical tectonic movements. (Contains 242 references.) (DDR)

Pratt, David

2000-01-01

71

Tectonic Settings and Volcanic Activity: Continental volcanic arc & Volcanic-island-arc  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The representation depicts the formation of volcanic mountains at plate boundaries when an oceanic plate sinks under a continental plate, and when two oceanic plates collide and one sinks under the other. This representation is found under the "Continental volcanic arc" and "Volcanic island arc" tabs.

72

Unintended Consequences: The Impact of Proposition 2½ Overrides on School Segregation in Massachusetts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

I investigate a possible unintended consequence of Proposition 2½ override behavior--that it led to increased segregation in school districts in Massachusetts. This can occur because richer, low-minority towns tend to have more successful override votes that attract similar households with relatively high demands for public services who can afford…

Zabel, Jeffrey

2014-01-01

73

ConcepTest: Plate Tectonic Theory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Which of the following statements is not consistent with plate tectonic theory? a. Continental crust is generally older than oceanic crust. b. The number of plates has changed through time. c. Mountain chains are ...

74

Geodynamics: How plumes help to break plates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Computer models show how hot material that rises from Earth's interior is affected by plate tectonics, producing unexpected irregularities in Earth's topography and assisting in the break-up of continental plates. See Letter p.85

Buiter, Susanne

2014-09-01

75

Mountain Maker- Earth Shaker (Convergent Boundary: oceanic-continental)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The representation depicts plate boundary interactions. The convergent boundary is one part of a larger interactive diagram (the 2nd slider/ arrow from the left), that focuses on an ocean plate pressing against a continental plate. This review specifically addresses the part of the resource dealing with what happens when plates pull apart. The "show intro" link provides instruction for diagram manipulation.

76

A thermo-mechanical model of horizontal subduction below an overriding plate  

E-print Network

to the presence of non-linear mantle rheology. These results indicate that active obduction of oceanic lithosphere of model parameters. � 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: subduction; rheology Americas in the past and present [2^5]. Lithospheric doubling would result in shallow £attening of th

Utrecht, Universiteit

77

Earthquakes, Plate Boundaries, and Depth Indiana Standard Indicators  

E-print Network

, volcanoes, trenches, and mountains. ES.1.24 ­ Understand and discuss continental drift, sea-floor spreading of the ocean and continental crust and the depth of earthquakes, and types of plate boundaries where or continental crust? · What is the explanation behind the earthquakes that do not occur at plate boundaries? #12

Polly, David

78

43 CFR 3504.26 - May I create overriding royalties on my Federal lease?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LEASING OF SOLID MINERALS OTHER THAN COAL AND OIL SHALE Fees, Rental, Royalty and Bonds Royalties § 3504.26 May I create overriding royalties on my Federal...

2013-10-01

79

Tectono-stratigraphic evolution of the continental Miocene basins in southern Anatolia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The exposed portion of the Tauride fold-thrust belt in southern Turkey is flanked and overlain by Neogene sedimentary basins. To the south and on top of the high ranges, these basins are mainly marine, whereas previously poorly studied intra-montane basins dominated by continental deposits are exposed to the north. We have studied the stratigraphy and structure of these continental basins - the Alt?napa, Yalvaç and Ilg?n Basins. Their stratigraphy displays overall fining upward sequences of fluvio-lacustrine sediments, deposition of which interrupted by basin-wide unconformities; similar hiatuses seems to exist in each basin. The most prominent unconformity surface occurred during the Middle Miocene and corresponds to the timing of volcanic activity in the region. 40Ar/39Ar dating of the volcaniclastic samples from the Alt?napa and Ilg?n basins yielded 11.8-11.6 Ma ages. The main basin forming regional deformation phase was extensional and occurred during the Middle Miocene. The extension directions obtained from paleostress inversion techniques indicate multidirectional extension under vertical uniaxial stress which are compatible with the recent seismic activity and available focal mechanism solutions. The main basin-bounding faults, however, are constrained mainly N-S to NW-SE implying that they are reactivated structures. The Middle Miocene and onwards extensional history of these basins occurs behind and atop a thrust front along the Cyprus arc, extending towards the Antalya nappes and Aksu thrust in the heart of the Isparta angle. The synchrounous, curved pairs of thrust fronts associated with subduction and overriding plate extension suggests that the Cyprus subduction zone has been retreating relative to central Anatolia since, at least, the Middle Miocene time. In addition to extensional history of the region, these continental basins contain evidence for the post-Late Miocene differential uplift of the Taurides in southern Anatolia. All of these continental basins were above sea level during the Middle and Late Miocene and are now found at an elevation of 1 km. On the other hand, the upper Miocene marine deposits just south of the study area currently are at an elevation of ~2 km, and have therefore been uplifted at least 1 km more than the continental basins to the north. We conclude that the current high elevation of the Taurides is synchronous with, and at least in part related to late Neogene extension and vertical differential uplift, likely related to the dynamics of the Cyprian subduction zone.

Koç, Ayten; Kaymakci, Nuretdin; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.; Kuiper, Klaudia F.; Vissers, Reinoud L. M.

2014-05-01

80

Continental Drift  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson plan is part of the DiscoverySchool.com lesson plan library for grades 6-8. It focuses on Alfred Wegener's theory of Continental Drift and the evidence used to support it. Using fossil types and maps, students view similarities between continents that led Wegener to conclude that they had once been together as a supercontinent, Pangea. Included are objectives, materials, procedures, discussion questions, evaluation ideas, suggested readings, and vocabulary. There are videos available to order which complement this lesson, and links to teaching tools for making custom quizzes, worksheets, puzzles and lesson plans.

81

The growth of continental crust  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The petrological and geochemical composition of the mantle-derived igneous products that will eventually form the continental crust (protolith), the episodic nature, and the geodynamic sites of crustal growth are discussed. Models in which crustal growth takes place at converging boundaries from orogenic magmas contrast with those in which basaltic plume material is involved (underplating, loose-plate loading, oceanic plateaus). Because some chemical components of the crust are either preferentially returned to the mantle at subduction zones (Mg, Ca) or sequestered in the crust (Si, Al, Na, K), the composition of the crust and that of its protolith are probably very different. Continental crust may therefore form from basaltic magmas and not necessarily from intermediate (e.g., andesitic) magmas. Because subduction is a continuous process, the episodic pattern of crust formation ages is a strong argument against crustal growth at converging boundaries. The preferred model is based on major mantle instabilities (superplumes) and their surface expression, the oceanic plateaus where thick piles of plume basalts rapidly erupted on the ocean floor reach the buoyancy threshold that defines the status of continental crust. The plateaus are accreted against the continents, and the felsic magmas that stand out as the most conspicuous feature of continental crust chemistry, are produced subsequently upon subduction erosion and possibly by gravitational instability of thin hot young lithospheric plates.

Albarède, Francis

1998-10-01

82

Dynamics of Continental Accretion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Subduction zones become congested when they try to swallow buoyant exotic crust. Accretionary mountain belts (orogens) that form at these convergent plate margins are the principal sites of lateral continental growth through Earth's history. Modern examples of accretionary margins are the North and South American Cordilleras and southwest Pacific. The geologic record is riddled with accretionary orogens, such as the Tasmanides along the eastern margin of the supercontinent Gondwana and the Altaides that formed on the southern margin of Laurasia. Both the modern and ancient examples are characterised by episodic switches between extension and shortening associated with transitions from collision of exotic crust and subduction related rollback. We present three-dimensional dynamic models that show for the first time how accretionary margins evolve from the initial collision, through a period of plate margin instability, to re-establishment of a stable convergent margin. The models illustrate how significant curvature of the orogenic system develops, as well as the mechanism for tectonic escape of the back arc region. The complexity of the morphology and evolution of the system are driven by lateral rollback of a tightly arcuate trench migrating parallel to the plate boundary and orthogonal to the convergence direction. We find geological and geophysical evidence for this process in the Tasmanides of eastern Australia, but infer that this is a global phenomena throughout Earth's evolution.

Moresi, L. N.; Betts, P. G.; Miller, M. S.

2013-12-01

83

The Plate Tectonics Project  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Plate Tectonics Project is a multiday, inquiry-based unit that facilitates students as self-motivated learners. Reliable Web sites are offered to assist with lessons, and a summative rubric is used to facilitate the holistic nature of the project. After each topic (parts of the Earth, continental drift, etc.) is covered, the students will…

Hein, Annamae J.

2011-01-01

84

Plate Borders and Mountain Building  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page features animations of four different types of plate boundaries, including one animation of the collision of two pieces of continental crust, forming steep mountain ranges. The animations are all presented in flash, and the plate convergence offers a useful, generic view of orogeny.

Schlumberger Excellence in Educational Development, Inc.

85

Differences of Reasons for Alert Overrides on Contraindicated Co-prescriptions by Admitting Department  

PubMed Central

Objectives To reveal differences in drug-drug interaction (DDI) alerts and the reasons for alert overrides between admitting departments. Methods A retrospective observational study was performed using longitudinal Electronic Health Record (EHR) data and information from an alert and logging system. Adult patients hospitalized in the emergency department (ED) and general ward (GW) during a 46-month period were included. For qualitative analyses, we manually reviewed all reasons for alert overrides, which were recorded as free text in the EHRs. Results Among 14,780,519 prescriptions, 51,864 had alerts for DDIs (0.35%; 1.32% in the ED and 0.23% in the GW). The alert override rate was higher in the ED (94.0%) than in the GW (57.0%) (p < 0.001). In an analysis of the study population, including ED and GW patients, 'clinically irrelevant alert' (52.0%) was the most common reason for override, followed by 'benefit assessed to be greater than the risk' (31.1%) and 'others' (17.3%). The frequency of alert overrides was highest for anti-inflammatory and anti-rheumatic drugs (89%). In a sub-analysis of the population, 'clinically irrelevant alert' was the most common reason for alert overrides in the ED (69.3%), and 'benefit assessed to be greater than the risk' was the most common reason in the GW (61.4%). Conclusions We confirmed that the DDI alerts and the reasons for alert overrides differed by admitting department. Different strategies may be efficient for each admitting department. PMID:25405064

Ahn, Eun Kyoung; Cho, Soo-Yeon; Shin, Dahye; Jang, Chul

2014-01-01

86

The temporal evolution of plate driving forces: Importance of ``slab suction'' versus ``slab pull'' during the Cenozoic  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although mantle slabs ultimately drive plate motions, the mechanism by which they do so remains unclear. A detached slab descending through the mantle will excite mantle flow that exerts shear tractions on the base of the surface plates. This ``slab suction'' force drives subducting and overriding plates symmetrically toward subduction zones. Alternatively, cold, strong slabs may effectively transmit stresses to

Clinton P. Conrad; Carolina Lithgow-Bertelloni

2004-01-01

87

The temporal evolution of plate driving forces: Importance of “slab suction” versus “slab pull” during the Cenozoic  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although mantle slabs ultimately drive plate motions, the mechanism by which they do so remains unclear. A detached slab descending through the mantle will excite mantle flow that exerts shear tractions on the base of the surface plates. This “slab suction” force drives subducting and overriding plates symmetrically toward subduction zones. Alternatively, cold, strong slabs may effectively transmit stresses to

Clinton P. Conrad; Carolina Lithgow-Bertelloni

2004-01-01

88

The Brazilian continental margin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Brazilian continental margin, with its interesting morphology, structure and sediments, has become better known only during the last two decades. Six physiographical provinces can be recognized at the continental margin and the adjacent coast: (1) Cabo Orange-Parnaiba delta; (2) Parnaiba delta-Cabo Sa˜o Roque; (3) Cabo Sa˜o Roque-Belmonte; (4) Belmonte-Cabo Frio; (5) Cabo Frio-Cabo Santa Marta; and (6) Cabo Santa Marta-Chui. The shelf is rather wide near the Amazon Mouth, becoming narrower eastwards, continuing very narrow along the northeastern and eastern coast, and becoming wider again in the south towards the Plate River. Prominent morphological features along the margin are the Amazon cone, the marginal plateaus off northeastern Brazil, the Sa˜o Francisco cone and canyon, the Abrolhos Bank, and the deep-sea plateaus of Pernambuco and Sa˜o Paulo. On the shelf proper a number of relief elements exist, such as sand waves east of the Amazon, submarine terraces at various places, and irregularities of structural origin. The shelf break is rather smooth in the far north and south, more abrupt in the remainder. Surface sediments of the Brazilian shelf show five distinct facies types: littoral quartz sands, mud, transition sand-mud, coralline algae, and biodetrital. The terrigenous elastic fractions dominate off the Amazon and in southern Brazil; between these areas they occupy a very narrow strip near the coast. The carbonate facies, predominantly composed of calcareous algae, is abundant between the Parnaiba delta and Cabo Frio; to the south this facies is more biodetrital and restricted to the outer shelf. Economically important on the Brazilian continental margin besides oil, are sands and gravels, carbonate deposits, evaporites and some subsurface coal. Other possible mineral resources could be phosphate, heavy minerals and clays for ceramics.

Martins, L. R.; Coutinho, P. N.

1981-04-01

89

Magmatic processes that generate chemically distinct silicic magmas in NW Costa Rica and the evolution of juvenile continental crust in oceanic arcs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Northwestern Costa Rica is built upon an oceanic plateau that has developed chemical and geophysical characteristics of the upper continental crust. A major factor in converting the oceanic plateau to continental crust is the production, evolution, and emplacement of silicic magmas. In Costa Rica, the Caribbean Large Igneous Province (CLIP) forms the overriding plate in the subduction of the Cocos Plate—a process that has occurred for at least the last 25 my. Igneous rocks in Costa Rica older than about 8 Ma have chemical compositions typical of ocean island basalts and intra-oceanic arcs. In contrast, younger igneous deposits contain abundant silicic rocks, which are significantly enriched in SiO2, alkalis, and light rare-earth elements and are geochemically similar to the average upper continental crust. Geophysical evidence (high Vp seismic velocities) also indicates a relatively thick (~40 km), addition of evolved igneous rocks to the CLIP. The silicic deposits of NW Costa Rica occur in two major compositional groups: a high-Ti and a low-Ti group with no overlap between the two. The major and trace element characteristics of these groups are consistent with these magmas being derived from liquids that were extracted from crystal mushes—either produced by crystallization or by partial melting of plutons near their solidi. In relative terms, the high-Ti silicic liquids were extracted from a hot, dry crystal mush with low oxygen fugacity, where plagioclase and pyroxene were the dominant phases crystallizing, along with lesser amounts of hornblende. In contrast, the low-Ti silicic liquids were extracted from a cool, wet crystal mush with high oxygen fugacity, where plagioclase and amphibole were the dominant phases crystallizing. The hot-dry-reducing magmas dominate the older sequence, but the youngest sequence contains only magmas from the cold-wet-oxidized group. Silicic volcanic deposits from other oceanic arcs (e.g., Izu-Bonin, Marianas) have chemical characteristics distinctly different from continental crust, whereas the NW Costa Rican silicic deposits have chemical characteristics nearly identical to the upper continental crust. The transition in NW Costa Rica from mafic oceanic arc and intra-oceanic magma to felsic, upper continental crust-type magma is governed by a combination of several important factors that may be absent in other arc settings: (1) thermal maturation of the thick Caribbean plateau, (2) regional or local crustal extension, and (3) establishment of an upper crustal reservoir.

Deering, Chad D.; Vogel, Thomas A.; Patino, Lina C.; Szymanski, David W.; Alvarado, Guillermo E.

2012-02-01

90

Plate motion controls on back-arc spreading. [Cenozoic movement in Western Pacific  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The motions of the subducting and the overriding plates influence the spatial and temporal distribution of back-arc spreading. Cenozoic plate motions in hot spot-fixed and no-net-rotation reference frames were studied with attention to correlations between changes in motion and episodes of back-arc spreading in the western Pacific. The results suggest that major back-arc opening occurs when both the overriding plate retreats from the trench in an absolute sense and the subducting plate undergoes a significant speed-up. Neither phenomenon alone is sufficient to initiate spreading. Three major plate velocity increases can be identified in the Cenozoic: (1) the Pacific plate 5-9 Ma; (2) the Indian plate at 27 Ma; and (3) the Pacific plate at 43 Ma, due to its shift from northerly to more westerly motion. At the present time, the Indian and Philippine are the only overriding plates that are retreating from their Pacific trenches and back-arc spreading occurs only on these two retreating plates. Although the Indian plate has been retreating for at least 25 Ma, back-arc spreading began only following the Pacific plate speed-up 5-9 Ma. Earlier, during the Indian plate speed-up, no overriding plates were retreating strongly and no back-arc spreading epsiodes are preserved from this time. For the earliest Pacific plate shift at 43 Ma, the Eurasian plate was not advancing, thus creating the only favorable plate kinematic conditions in the Cenozoic for back-arc basin formation in this region. It is unclear whether extension in the Japan Sea is a result of these conditions.

Fein, J. B.; Jurdy, D. M.

1986-01-01

91

Mechanical obstacles to the movement of continent-bearing plates  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Selected geophysical problems associated with the concept of continental drift as an incidental corollary of plate movement are discussed. The problems include the absence of a suitable plate-driving mechanism for plates with continental leading edges, the absence of the low-velocity zone under shields, and continental roots of 400 to 700 km depths. It is shown that if continental drift occurs, it must use mechanisms not now understood, or that it may not occur at all, plate movement being confined to ocean basins.

Lowman, P. D., Jr.

1985-01-01

92

Plate T-11: Appalachian Mountains  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Appalachian Mountain landforms clearly demonstrate the relation of plate tectonics and structure to geomorphology. The folded rocks record the convergence of two continental plates in Pennsylvanian/Permian time. This page uses text, maps, and remotely sensed imagery to explain the relationship between plate tectonics, geologic structures, and the resulting landforms. It is part of an out-of-print NASA publication entitled 'Geomorphology from Space'. Links to the rest of the book are provided.

93

Future accreted terranes: a compilation of island arcs, oceanic plateaus, submarine ridges, seamounts, and continental fragments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Allochthonous accreted terranes are exotic geologic units that originated from anomalous crustal regions on a subducting oceanic plate and were transferred to the overriding plate by accretionary processes during subduction. The geographical regions that eventually become accreted allochthonous terranes include island arcs, oceanic plateaus, submarine ridges, seamounts, continental fragments, and microcontinents. These future allochthonous terranes (FATs) contribute to continental crustal growth, subduction dynamics, and crustal recycling in the mantle. We present a review of modern FATs and their accreted counterparts based on available geological, seismic, and gravity studies and discuss their crustal structure, geological origin, and bulk crustal density. Island arcs have an average crustal thickness of 26 km, average bulk crustal density of 2.79 g cm-3, and three distinct crustal units overlying a crust-mantle transition zone. Oceanic plateaus and submarine ridges have an average crustal thickness of 21 km and average bulk crustal density of 2.84 g cm-3. Continental fragments presently on the ocean floor have an average crustal thickness of 25 km and bulk crustal density of 2.81 g cm-3. Accreted allochthonous terranes can be compared to these crustal compilations to better understand which units of crust are accreted or subducted. In general, most accreted terranes are thin crustal units sheared off of FATs and added onto the accretionary prism, with thicknesses on the order of hundreds of meters to a few kilometers. However, many island arcs, oceanic plateaus, and submarine ridges were sheared off in the subduction interface and underplated onto the overlying continent. Other times we find evidence of terrane-continent collision leaving behind accreted terranes 25-40 km thick. We posit that rheologically weak crustal layers or shear zones that were formed when the FATs were produced can be activated as detachments during subduction, allowing parts of the FAT crust to accrete and others to subduct. In many modern FATs on the ocean floor, a sub-crustal layer of high seismic velocities, interpreted as ultramafic material, could serve as a detachment or delaminate during subduction.

Tetreault, J. L.; Buiter, S. J. H.

2014-12-01

94

Iranian Geology and Continental Drift in the Middle East  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article summarizes Iranian geology and continental drift in the Middle East. The relation of the two suggests that plate tectonics satisfactorily explain the geological development of the Middle East.

Manoochehr Takin

1972-01-01

95

A modelling study of vertical surface displacements at convergent plate margins  

E-print Network

of the overriding plate margin. This subsidence is reduced when roll-back takes place in a land-locked basin setting. Subduction zone roll-back due to sinking of the negatively buoyant subducting plate induces subsidence, finite element method, subduction, subsidence, uplift. 1 I N T R O D U C T I O N 1.1 Aims and approach

Buiter, Susanne

96

Catastrophic Plate Tectonics: A Global Flood Model of Earth History  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1859 Antonio Snider proposed that rapid, horizontal divergence of crustal plates occurred during Noah's Flood. Modern plate tectonics theory is now conflated with assumptions of uniformity of rate and ideas of continental \\

Steven A. Austin; John R. Baumgardner; D. Russell Humphreys; Andrew A. Snelling; Larry Vardiman; Kurt P. Wise

97

Mesozoic Plate Tectonic Evolution of the Northern Margin of Pangea  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Asia joined Laurentia and Baltica during the formation of the Urals in the Early Permian. Subsequently, the northern margin of Pangea shared a paleo-Pacific facing margin. Analysis of events along this (mostly active) margin provides insight into the plate tectonic setting and evolution of the Arctic basins and their temporal links to Pacific margin events. A 3-phase tectonic evolution characterizes the northern margin of Pangea during the Mesozoic: 1. Permo-Triassic rifting (Siberian Trap magmatism)was linked to rifting in a series of back-arc basins developed along the northern margin of Pangea. Triassic-Jurasic deep-water sedimentary seqences deposited in these basins were subsequently deformed during phase 2 events. 2. Lithospheric shortening/convergence across this margin deformed these basinal sediments and shed syn-orogenic deposits cratonward in the Jura-Cretaceous. Syn-orogenic basinal successions are widespread from the Verkoyansk margin of Siberia to the Brooks Range fold and thrust belt. Their sources are well-characterized by U-Pb ages of detrital zircon suites and include Pennsylvanian-Permian, Triassic and Jurassic magmatic belts, implying convergence and emplacement of a long-lived arc system onto the continental margin. 3. Structures related to phase 2 are cut and overprinted by voluminous, syn-extensional, slab-related magmatism that developed during southward or Pacific-ward migration of a N-dipping subducting slab. It is inferred that the earliest part of the Amerasia Basin likely opened during part of this magmatic event, 135 to 90 Ma. The final culmination of this magmatic event is the Ohotsk-Chukotsk volcanic belt, ~90-75 Ma;after this, magmatism continues to migrate Pacific-ward in a series of steps. Utilizing plate models of the Arctic by Lawver et al.(2002) it can be shown that some of the differences in the timing and style of Mesozoic orogenesis along the northern paleo-Pacific margin of Pangea (and especially the differences between the Canadian margin and the Arctic-Siberian margin) might be explained by along-strike differences in the nature of motion of the overriding (continental) plate with respect to paleo-Pacific subduction zones (towards vs. away).

Miller, E. L.

2011-12-01

98

Continental crust beneath southeast Iceland  

PubMed Central

The magmatic activity (0–16 Ma) in Iceland is linked to a deep mantle plume that has been active for the past 62 My. Icelandic and northeast Atlantic basalts contain variable proportions of two enriched components, interpreted as recycled oceanic crust supplied by the plume, and subcontinental lithospheric mantle derived from the nearby continental margins. A restricted area in southeast Iceland—and especially the Öræfajökull volcano—is characterized by a unique enriched-mantle component (EM2-like) with elevated 87Sr/86Sr and 207Pb/204Pb. Here, we demonstrate through modeling of Sr–Nd–Pb abundances and isotope ratios that the primitive Öræfajökull melts could have assimilated 2–6% of underlying continental crust before differentiating to more evolved melts. From inversion of gravity anomaly data (crustal thickness), analysis of regional magnetic data, and plate reconstructions, we propose that continental crust beneath southeast Iceland is part of ?350-km-long and 70-km-wide extension of the Jan Mayen Microcontinent (JMM). The extended JMM was marginal to East Greenland but detached in the Early Eocene (between 52 and 47 Mya); by the Oligocene (27 Mya), all parts of the JMM permanently became part of the Eurasian plate following a westward ridge jump in the direction of the Iceland plume. PMID:25825769

Torsvik, Trond H.; Amundsen, Hans E. F.; Trønnes, Reidar G.; Doubrovine, Pavel V.; Gaina, Carmen; Kusznir, Nick J.; Steinberger, Bernhard; Corfu, Fernando; Ashwal, Lewis D.; Griffin, William L.; Werner, Stephanie C.; Jamtveit, Bjørn

2015-01-01

99

Continental crust beneath southeast Iceland.  

PubMed

The magmatic activity (0-16 Ma) in Iceland is linked to a deep mantle plume that has been active for the past 62 My. Icelandic and northeast Atlantic basalts contain variable proportions of two enriched components, interpreted as recycled oceanic crust supplied by the plume, and subcontinental lithospheric mantle derived from the nearby continental margins. A restricted area in southeast Iceland-and especially the Öræfajökull volcano-is characterized by a unique enriched-mantle component (EM2-like) with elevated (87)Sr/(86)Sr and (207)Pb/(204)Pb. Here, we demonstrate through modeling of Sr-Nd-Pb abundances and isotope ratios that the primitive Öræfajökull melts could have assimilated 2-6% of underlying continental crust before differentiating to more evolved melts. From inversion of gravity anomaly data (crustal thickness), analysis of regional magnetic data, and plate reconstructions, we propose that continental crust beneath southeast Iceland is part of ?350-km-long and 70-km-wide extension of the Jan Mayen Microcontinent (JMM). The extended JMM was marginal to East Greenland but detached in the Early Eocene (between 52 and 47 Mya); by the Oligocene (27 Mya), all parts of the JMM permanently became part of the Eurasian plate following a westward ridge jump in the direction of the Iceland plume. PMID:25825769

Torsvik, Trond H; Amundsen, Hans E F; Trønnes, Reidar G; Doubrovine, Pavel V; Gaina, Carmen; Kusznir, Nick J; Steinberger, Bernhard; Corfu, Fernando; Ashwal, Lewis D; Griffin, William L; Werner, Stephanie C; Jamtveit, Bjørn

2015-04-14

100

Continental collision and slab break-off: modelling results and implications for topography, trench migration and magmatism  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Cenozoic closure of Tethys and collision of Africa and Eurasia is characterized by observables such as significant topographic features, trench migration, and collision-related magmatism. Slab break-off is dynamically expected to occur, and has been suggested on the basis of tomographic images. While often proposed to (partly) explain these observables, slab break-off has not been directly observed. Here, dynamical models of subduction-collision and subsequent slab break-off are discussed to provide more insight into the dynamics of continental collision and slab break-off. These will then be used to relate plate tectonics to surface observations. In particular, slab break-off has been invoked to explain collision-related magmatism. Modelling results provide temporal constraints, since they show how collision of mature oceanic plates like the former Tethys ocean can delay slab break-off until 20-25 Myrs after initial collision. This suggests that slab break-off for the Arabia-Eurasia collision was unlikely to occur before 10-15 Ma, correlating with an upsurge in magmatism on the Turkish-Iranian plateau after this time. Suture-parallel migration of the slab break-off tear has a model speed of 10-15 cm/yr in this case, but can be significantly faster if the closed ocean basin is relatively young. These values fit well with estimates from recent depocentre migrations in southern Italy. Modelling results further suggest slab steepening following the onset of continental collision, which creates a temporary depression above the mantle wedge, well before the onset of slab break-off. Such depression is in line, both temporally and spatially, with Upper Oligocene-Lower Miocene carbonate strata deposited to the NE of the Arabia-Eurasia suture. Such slab steepening furthermore induces trench advance (i.e. trench motion towards the overriding plate), which is in agreement with recorded trench migration along collision zones such as Arabia-Eurasia and India-Eurasia. External forcing (such as mantle flow, or effects of nearby mantle plumes or slabs) is often invoked to explain such trench advance, but our modelling, in which such external forcing is absent, indicates that intrinsic forces might play an important role too. Finally, we discuss implications for the enigmatic magmatism observed along the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone. The composition of the volcanic centres ranges from OIB-like alkali basalts to mature continental arc lavas. Their composition, and spatial and temporal distribution, suggests a correlation with earlier subduction events, but a wide range of geodynamical processes (including local mantle upwellings, lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary instabilities, chemical heterogeneities, and slab windows) may be required to explain this compositional variety.

Van Hunen, J.; Allen, M. B.; Bottrill, A.; Magni, V.; Kaislaniemi, L.; Neill, I.

2012-12-01

101

Abstract--This article describes the philosophy, design, and prototype implementation of an operator override system  

E-print Network

and liability to autonomous agents in the battlefield was presaged by Perri [7]. He assumes "at the very least presented herein. Index Terms--Autonomous Robots, Robot Ethics, Operator overrides I. INTRODUCTION HE advent of autonomous lethal robotic systems is well underway and it is a simple matter of time before autonomous

102

Abstract---This article describes the philosophy, design, and prototype implementation of an operator override system  

E-print Network

to attribute responsibility and liability to autonomous agents in the battlefield was presaged by Perri [7]. He presented herein. Index Terms---Autonomous Robots, Robot Ethics, Operator overrides I. INTRODUCTION HE advent of autonomous lethal robotic systems is well underway and it is a simple matter of time before

103

Continental rifting: a planetary perspective  

SciTech Connect

The only inner planet that has abundant evidence of regional extension, and the consequent generation of rifts in the earth. The absence of plate motion on the other inner planets limits their rifts to localized bulges or subsidence areas. The rifting of oceanic lithosphere is seldom preserved in the geological record. Thus, such rifting must be inferred via plate tectonic interpretation: if there is rifting, then there must be subduction whose results are commonly well preserved. Modern continental rifts are found in many tectonic settings: continental breakup, extension transverse to collisional stresses, or wide regions of nearly uniform extension. Recognition of these settings in older rocks becomes more difficult the farther back in geologic time you travel. Rift basin fillings typically show rapid lateral and vertical facies and thickness changes, bimodal volcanism, and distinctive rift-drift sequences. Proterozoic rifts and aulacogens are well-documented in North America; ex. Keweenawan, western margin of Labrador fold belt, Belt-Uinta and the Wopmay-Athapuscow regions. Documented Archean rifts are rare. In Quebec, the truncated margin of the Minto craton bounded on the south by a 2.8 Ga greenstone belt implies an earlier rift event. The oldest proposed rift dated at 3.0 Ga contains the Pongola Supergroup in southeastern Africa. The presence of Archean dikes demonstrates a rigid crust and andesites as old as 3.5 Ga imply plate tectonics and thus, at least, oceanic rifting.

Muehlberger, W.R.

1985-01-01

104

Worldwide distribution of ages of the continental lithosphere derived from a global seismic tomographic model  

E-print Network

). Continental plates do not subduct but oat on the asthenosphere and drift on the surface of the EarthWorldwide distribution of ages of the continental lithosphere derived from a global seismic August 2008 Accepted 27 October 2008 Available online xxxx Keywords: Continental lithosphere Seismic

Shapiro, Nikolai

105

Plate Tectonics Learning Module  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This plate tectonics unit was designed to be used with a college course in physical geography. Subject matter covered includes: the development of the theory including Wegener's Continental Drift Hypothesis and the existence of Pangaea, Harry Hess and his work on sea-floor spreading, and the final theory. It points out that global features such as deep oceanic trenches, mid-ocean ridges, volcanic activity, and the location of earthquake epicenters can now be related to the story of plate tectonics, since most geological activity occurs along plate boundaries. Divergent, convergent and transform plate boundaries are discussed in detail. This module contains a study guide and outline notes, study questions, and practice quizzes. One feature of the module is a web exploration section with links to twelve outside sites that augment the instruction.

Rita Haberlin

106

Tectonic speed limits from plate kinematic reconstructions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The motion of plates and continents on the planet's surface are a manifestation of long-term mantle convection and plate tectonics. Present-day plate velocities provide a snapshot of this ongoing process, and have been used to infer controlling factors on the speeds of plates and continents. However, present-day velocities do not capture plate behaviour over geologically representative periods of time. To address this shortcoming, we use a plate tectonic reconstruction approach to extract time-dependent plate velocities and geometries from which root mean square (RMS) velocities are computed, resulting in a median RMS plate speed of ? 4 cm /yr over 200 Myr. Linking tectonothermal ages of continental lithosphere to the RMS plate velocity analysis, we find that the increasing portions of plate area composed of continental and/or cratonic lithosphere significantly reduces plate speeds. Plates with any cratonic portion have a median RMS velocity of ? 5.8 cm /yr, while plates with more than 25% of cratonic area have a median RMS speed of ? 2.8 cm /yr. The fastest plates (? 8.5 cm /yr RMS speed) have little continental fraction and tend to be bounded by subduction zones, while the slowest plates (? 2.6- 2.8 cm /yr RMS speed) have large continental fractions and usually have little to no subducting part of plate perimeter. More generally, oceanic plates tend to move 2-3 times faster than continental plates, consistent with predictions of numerical models of mantle convection. The slower motion of continental plates is compatible with deep keels impinging on asthenospheric flow and increasing shear traction, thus anchoring the plate in the more viscous mantle transition zone. We also find that short-lived (up to ? 10 Myr) rapid accelerations of Africa (?100 and 65 Ma), North America (?100 and 55 Ma) and India (? 130 , 80 and 65 Ma) appear to be correlated with plume head arrivals as recorded by large igneous province (LIPs) emplacement. By evaluating factors influencing plate speeds over the Mesozoic and Cenozoic, our temporal analysis reveals simple principles that can guide the construction and evaluation of absolute plate motion models for times before the Cretaceous in the absence of hotspot tracks and seafloor spreading histories. Based on the post-Pangea plate motions, one principle that can be applied to pre-Pangea times is that plates with less than ? 50% continental area can reach RMS velocities of ? 20 cm /yr, while plates with more than 50% continental fraction do not exceed RMS velocities of ? 10 cm /yr. Similarly, plates with large portions of continental or cratonic area with RMS velocities exceeding ? 15 cm /yr for more than ? 10 Myr should be considered as potential artefacts requiring further justification of plate driving forces in such scenarios.

Zahirovic, Sabin; Müller, R. Dietmar; Seton, Maria; Flament, Nicolas

2015-05-01

107

Plate TectonicsPlate Tectonics Plate TectonicsPlate Tectonics  

E-print Network

Plate TectonicsPlate Tectonics #12;Plate TectonicsPlate Tectonics · Lithosphere ­ strong, rigid, transform boundaries ­ travel 1 to 11 cm/yr relative to one another #12;14 tectonic plates today #12;Mid asthenosphere that flows · 8 large lithospheric plates and 6 smaller ones ­ separated by divergent, convergent

Siebel, Wolfgang

108

An Introduction to the ABCs of Plate Tectonics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This introduction to plate tectonics covers plates and boundaries, subduction zones, colliding continents, plumes, and earthquakes. There is also more advanced material on buoyancy, floating continents, and rates of isostasy; sedimentation, continental growth, rifts and creation of continental margins, passive and active margins, and island arcs and back-arc basins; continental collision, folding of sedimentary layers, and collision of cratons; and the mechanism of plate tectonics including convective mantles, convection models, distribution of plumes, plume driven convection, plate rifting models, and triple junctions.

Donald Blanchard

109

Slab surface temperature in subduction zones: Influence of the interplate decoupling depth and upper plate thinning processes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The thermal state of the top of the subducting plate is strongly affected by the mantle wedge flow structure. We identify three main factors controlling the influence of the corner flow on the slab surface temperature: (1) the mantle rheology, (2) the interplate decoupling depth, and (3) the intensity of thermomechanical ablation of the overriding plate. The first two factors

D. Arcay; E. Tric; M.-P. Doin

2007-01-01

110

Paleoseismology of Upper Plate Faults in the Chilean Covergent Margin: Insights from 10BE and OSL Dating  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Chilean convergent margin is the locus of most of the largest subduction earthquakes recorded in history. Slip deficit along this plate boundary is absorbed by elastic deformation of the upper plate. Numerical models and geodetic data suggest a fully elastic behaviour of the overriding crust and that deformation is balanced between inter- and co-seismic phases earthquake cycle; thus, non

G. Gonzalez; J. A. Cortes; S. Binnie; R. Robinson; C. Toledo

2010-01-01

111

Why does continental convergence stop  

SciTech Connect

Convergence between India and Asia slowed at 45 Ma when they collided, but continues today. This requires that substantial proportions of the Indian and/or Asian lithospheric mantle are still being subducted. The resulting slab-pull is probably comparable with that from complete lithospheric slabs and may promote continued continental convergence even after collision. Since descending lithospheric slabs are present at all collision zones at the time of collision such continued convergence may be general after continental collisions. It may cease only when there is a major (global) plate reorganization which results in new forces on the convergent continents that may counteract the slab-pull. These inferences may be tested on the late Paleozoic collision between Gondwanaland and Laurasia. This is generally considered to have been complete by mid-Permian time (250 Ma). However, this may be only the time of docking of Gondwanaland with North America, not that of the cessation of convergence. Paleomagnetic polar-wander paths for the Gondwanide continents exhibit consistently greater latitudinal shifts from 250 Ma to 200 Ma than those of Laurasia when corrected for post-Triassic drift, suggesting that convergence continued through late Permian well into the Triassic. It may have been accommodated by crustal thickening under what is now the US Coastal Plain, or by strike-slip faulting. Convergence may have ceased only when Pangea began to fragment again, in which case the cause for its cessation may be related to the cause of continental fragmentation.

Hynes, A.

1985-01-01

112

Characteristics and Consequences of Drug Allergy Alert Overrides in a Computerized Physician Order Entry System  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to determine characteristics of drug allergy alert overrides, assess how often they lead to preventable adverse drug events (ADEs), and suggest methods for improving the allergy-alerting system.DesignChart review was performed on a stratified random subset of all allergy alerts occurring during a 3-month period (August through October 2002) at a large academic hospital.MeasurementsFactors that

Tyken C. Hsieh; Gilad J. Kuperman; Tonushree Jaggi; Patricia Hojnowski-Diaz; Julie Fiskio; Deborah H. Williams; David W. Bates; Tejal K. Gandhi

2004-01-01

113

Moral Convictions Often Override Concerns About Procedural Fairness: A Reply to Napier and Tyler  

Microsoft Academic Search

Napier and Tyler (this issue) question whether moral convictions about outcomes really override the influence of procedural\\u000a fairness (PF) on fairness judgments and decision acceptance. The empirical answer to this question is “yes.” When people have\\u000a strong moral convictions about outcomes, perceptions of outcome fairness and decision acceptance are primarily shaped by whether\\u000a the morally “correct” outcomes are achieved. Pre-decision

Linda J. Skitka; Elizabeth Mullen

2008-01-01

114

Plate-Tectonic Circulation is Driven by Cooling From the Top and is Closed Within the Upper Mantle  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Subduction drives plate tectonics and is due to cooling from the top: circulation is self-organized, and likely is closed above the discontinuity near 660 km. The contrary consensus that plate tectonics is driven by bottom heating and involves the entire mantle combines misunderstood kinematics with flawed concepts of through-the-mantle plumes and subduction. Plume conjecture came from the Emperor-Hawaii progression, the 45 Ma inflection in which was assumed to mark a 60-degree change in direction of that part of the Pacific plate over a fixed plume. Smooth spreading patterns around the east and south margin of the Pacific plate, and paleomagnetic data, disprove such a change. Speculations that plumes move, jump, etc. do not revive falsified conjecture. Geochemical distinctions between enriched island and depleted ridge basalts (which overlap) are expected products of normal upper-mantle processes, not plumes. MORB traverses solidus-T asthenosphere, whereas OIB zone-refines through subsolidus lithosphere and crust, crystallizing refractories to retain T of diminishing melt while assimilating and retaining fusibles. Tomographic inference of deep-mantle subduction is presented misleadingly and may reflect methodological and sampling artifacts (downward smearing, and concentration of recorded body waves in bundles within broad anomalies otherwise poorly sampled). Planetological and other data require hot Earth accretion, and thorough early fractionation, from material much more refractory than primitive meteorites, and are incompatible with the little-fractionated lower mantle postulated to permit whole-mantle circulation. The profound seismic discontinuity near 660 km is a thermodynamic and physical barrier to easy mass transfer in either direction. Refractory lower mantle convects slowly, perhaps in layers, and loses primarily original heat, whereas upper mantle churns rapidly, and the 660 decoupling boundary must have evolved into a compositional barrier also. Plate motions are driven by subduction, the passive falling away of oceanic lithosphere which is negatively buoyant because of top-down cooling. Slabs have top and bottom rolling hinges and sink subvertically (inclinations of slabs mark their positions, not trajectories) into the transition zone, where they are laid down on, and depress, the 660-km discontinuity. Rollback of upper hinges into subducting plates is required by plate behavior at all scales. That fronts of overriding plates advance at rollback velocity is required by common preservation atop their thin leading edges of little-deformed fore-arc basins. Convergence velocity also commonly equals rollback but is faster in some arcs. Steeply-sinking inclined slabs push sublithospheric upper mantle forward into the shrinking ocean from which they came, forcing seafloor spreading therein, and pull overriding plates behind them. Continental plates pass over sunken slabs like tanks above their basal treads, and material from, and displaced rearward by, sunken slabs is cycled into pull-apart oceans opening behind the continents, thus transferring mantle from shrinking to enlarging oceans. Hot mantle displaced above slabs enables backarc spreading. Spreading ridges, in both shrinking and enlarging oceans, are passive byproducts of subduction, and migrate because it is more energy efficient to process new asthenosphere than to get partial melt from increasingly distant sources. A plate-motion framework wherein hinges roll back, ridges migrate, Antarctica is approximately fixed, and intraplate deformation is integrated may approximate an absolute reference to sluggish lower mantle, whereas the hotspot frame is invalid, and the no-net-rotation frame minimizes trench and ridge motions.

Hamilton, W. B.

2001-12-01

115

Plate Tectonics: The Scientist Behind the Theory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This video segment adapted from A Science Odyssey profiles Alfred Wegener, the scientist who first proposed the theory of continental drift. Initially criticized, his theory was accepted after further evidence revealed the existence of tectonic plates and showed that these plates move.

2005-12-17

116

Whole Earth Structure and Plate Tectonics  

E-print Network

Whole Earth Structure and Plate Tectonics Earth Structure (2nd Edition), 2004 W.W. Norton & Co, New York Slide show by Ben van der Pluijm © WW Norton; unless noted otherwise #12;© EarthStructure (2nd ed evolution of Earth: from continental drift (early 1900's) to sea-floor spreading (early 1960's) to plate

117

The Plate Tectonic Story: A Scientific Jigsaw  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity has students read and answer questions based upon the article 'The plate tectonic story: a scientific jigsaw.' The article starts with the continental drift theory of Alfred Wegener and adds the evidence from the seafloor to arrive at plate tectonics. It concludes with remarks about mantle dynamics and the future ability to predict earthquakes.

118

Subduction-driven recycling of continental margin lithosphere.  

PubMed

Whereas subduction recycling of oceanic lithosphere is one of the central themes of plate tectonics, the recycling of continental lithosphere appears to be far more complicated and less well understood. Delamination and convective downwelling are two widely recognized processes invoked to explain the removal of lithospheric mantle under or adjacent to orogenic belts. Here we relate oceanic plate subduction to removal of adjacent continental lithosphere in certain plate tectonic settings. We have developed teleseismic body wave images from dense broadband seismic experiments that show higher than expected volumes of anomalously fast mantle associated with the subducted Atlantic slab under northeastern South America and the Alboran slab beneath the Gibraltar arc region; the anomalies are under, and are aligned with, the continental margins at depths greater than 200 kilometres. Rayleigh wave analysis finds that the lithospheric mantle under the continental margins is significantly thinner than expected, and that thin lithosphere extends from the orogens adjacent to the subduction zones inland to the edges of nearby cratonic cores. Taking these data together, here we describe a process that can lead to the loss of continental lithosphere adjacent to a subduction zone. Subducting oceanic plates can viscously entrain and remove the bottom of the continental thermal boundary layer lithosphere from adjacent continental margins. This drives surface tectonics and pre-conditions the margins for further deformation by creating topography along the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. This can lead to development of secondary downwellings under the continental interior, probably under both South America and the Gibraltar arc, and to delamination of the entire lithospheric mantle, as around the Gibraltar arc. This process reconciles numerous, sometimes mutually exclusive, geodynamic models proposed to explain the complex oceanic-continental tectonics of these subduction zones. PMID:25391963

Levander, A; Bezada, M J; Niu, F; Humphreys, E D; Palomeras, I; Thurner, S M; Masy, J; Schmitz, M; Gallart, J; Carbonell, R; Miller, M S

2014-11-13

119

Subduction-driven recycling of continental margin lithosphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Whereas subduction recycling of oceanic lithosphere is one of the central themes of plate tectonics, the recycling of continental lithosphere appears to be far more complicated and less well understood. Delamination and convective downwelling are two widely recognized processes invoked to explain the removal of lithospheric mantle under or adjacent to orogenic belts. Here we relate oceanic plate subduction to removal of adjacent continental lithosphere in certain plate tectonic settings. We have developed teleseismic body wave images from dense broadband seismic experiments that show higher than expected volumes of anomalously fast mantle associated with the subducted Atlantic slab under northeastern South America and the Alboran slab beneath the Gibraltar arc region; the anomalies are under, and are aligned with, the continental margins at depths greater than 200 kilometres. Rayleigh wave analysis finds that the lithospheric mantle under the continental margins is significantly thinner than expected, and that thin lithosphere extends from the orogens adjacent to the subduction zones inland to the edges of nearby cratonic cores. Taking these data together, here we describe a process that can lead to the loss of continental lithosphere adjacent to a subduction zone. Subducting oceanic plates can viscously entrain and remove the bottom of the continental thermal boundary layer lithosphere from adjacent continental margins. This drives surface tectonics and pre-conditions the margins for further deformation by creating topography along the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. This can lead to development of secondary downwellings under the continental interior, probably under both South America and the Gibraltar arc, and to delamination of the entire lithospheric mantle, as around the Gibraltar arc. This process reconciles numerous, sometimes mutually exclusive, geodynamic models proposed to explain the complex oceanic-continental tectonics of these subduction zones.

Levander, A.; Bezada, M. J.; Niu, F.; Humphreys, E. D.; Palomeras, I.; Thurner, S. M.; Masy, J.; Schmitz, M.; Gallart, J.; Carbonell, R.; Miller, M. S.

2014-11-01

120

Constraints on continental accretion from sedimentation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Heat loss in the ancient Earth was discussed assuming that classical sea floor spreading was the only mechanism. This may be expressed as faster spreading or longer total ridge length. These have important implications as to the size and number of cratonic plates in the distant past, the degree to which they are flooded, the kinds of sediments and volcanics that would be expected, and the amount of recycling of continental material taking place. The higher proportion of marine sedimentary rocks and oceanic volcanics in the Archean, and the relative paucity of evaporites and continental volcanics may in part be due to smaller cratonic blocks. A model was developed of the percentage of continental flooding which utilizes round continents and a constant width of the zone of flooding. This model produces a reasonable good fit to the percentage of flooding on the present day continents.

Abbott, Dallas

1988-01-01

121

What on Earth is Plate Tectonics?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This abbreviated explanation of the subject of plate tectonics is divided into several parts. The first section, entitled Into the Earth, describes the crust, mantle and core of the Earth, while the next section shows a world map with the plates delineated. The section called Action at the Edges uses text and diagrams to explain what is occurring at the plate boundaries. Links lead to a detailed discussion of converging boundaries including ocean-ocean, ocean-continental, and continental-continental. A wide range illustration shows both surface and cross-section views of plate interaction and a link leads to a similar diagram with labels. In the Moving through Time section, a series of color-coded maps is shown, illustrating the relative position of the continents over the past 650 million years. The last section shows a paleogeographic reconstruction of the Earth and explains how paleomagnetism, magnetic anomalies, paleobiogeography, paleoclimatology, and geologic history are used to create it.

122

Continental margin off Western India and Deccan Large Igneous Province  

Microsoft Academic Search

Massive, transient late syn-rift-to-breakup volcanism during separation between the Seychelles microcontinent and India formed the Deccan continental flood basalts and their equivalents on the Seychelles-Mascarene Plateau and on the conjugate continental margins, i.e. the Deccan Large Igneous Province. We estimate an original extrusive area of at least 1.8×106 km2, and a volume >1.8×106 km3, and suggest a plate tectonic model comprising: (1) development

Axel Todal; Olav Edholm

1998-01-01

123

Plate motion  

SciTech Connect

The motion of tectonic plates on the earth is characterized in a critical review of U.S. research from the period 1987-1990. Topics addressed include the NUVEL-1 global model of current plate motions, diffuse plate boundaries and the oceanic lithosphere, the relation between plate motions and distributed deformations, accelerations and the steadiness of plate motions, the distribution of current Pacific-North America motion across western North America and its margin, plate reconstructions and their uncertainties, hotspots, and plate dynamics. A comprehensive bibliography is provided. 126 refs.

Gordon, R.G. (USAF, Geophysics Laboratory, Hanscom AFB, MA (United States))

1991-01-01

124

Thermal and mechanical structure of the upper mantle: A comparison between continental and oceanic models  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Temperature, velocity, and viscosity profiles for coupled thermal and mechanical models of the upper mantle beneath continental shields and old ocean basins show that under the continents, both tectonic plates and the asthenosphere, are thicker than they are beneath the oceans. The minimum value of viscosity in the continental asthenosphere is about an order of magnitude larger than in the shear zone beneath oceans. The shear stress or drag underneath continental plates is also approximately an order of magnitude larger than the drag on oceanic plates. Effects of shear heating may account for flattening of ocean floor topography and heat flux in old ocean basins.

Froidevaux, C.; Schubert, G.; Yuen, D. A.

1976-01-01

125

Constraining Upper Plate Deformation in Nicaragua Through Delineation of the August 3, 2005 Mw 6.3 Strike Slip Earthquake Fault Plane  

Microsoft Academic Search

Deformation in the overriding plate imposes boundary conditions on flow in the mantle wedge and thus is important to understand for models of subduction zone thermal structure and melting processes. In the Nicaragua-Costa Rica subduction zone, the motion of the subducting Cocos plate has a moderate trench- parallel component, and the shear stresses induced by oblique subduction appear to produce

S. W. French; L. M. Warren; K. M. Fischer; G. A. Abers; W. Strauch; M. Protti; V. Gonzalez

2006-01-01

126

Deep continental margin reflectors  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In contrast to the rarity of such observations a decade ago, seismic reflecting and refracting horizons are now being observed to Moho depths under continental shelves in a number of places. These observations provide knowledge of the entire crustal thickness from the shoreline to the oceanic crust on passive margins and supplement Consortium for Continental Reflection Profiling (COCORP)-type measurements on land.

Ewing, J.; Heirtzler, J.; Purdy, M.; Klitgord, Kim D.

1985-01-01

127

Earthquakes in stable continental crust  

SciTech Connect

Earthquakes can strike even in stable crust, well away from the familiar earthquake zones at the edges of tectonic plates, but their mere occurrence is both a source of concern in planning critical facilities such as nuclear power plants. The authors sought answers to two major questions: Just how much seismic activity does take place within the stable parts of continents And are there specific geologic features that make some areas of stable crust particularly susceptible to earthquakes They began by studying North America alone, but it soon became clear that the fairly short record of these rare events on a single continent would not provide enough data for reliable analysis. Hence, they decided to substitute space for time--to survey earthquake frequency and distribution in stable continental areas worldwide. This paper discusses their findings.

Johnson, A.C.; Kanter, L.R. (Memphis State Univ., TN (USA))

1990-03-01

128

Mantle melting in within-plate continental settings: Sr-Nd-Pb and U-series isotope constraints in alkali basalts from the Sicily Channel (Pantelleria and Linosa Islands, Southern Italy)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The origin of the mantle sources of the Na-alkaline magmas erupted within the continental rift of the Sicily Channel and their melting behaviour are here investigated through the determination of Sr, Nd and Pb isotope ratios and U-series disequilibria on basaltic volcanic rocks from Linosa and Pantelleria. The isotope data, along with trace element ratios are used to assess the possible role of the interaction with the continental crust and/or the Sub-Continental Lithospheric Mantle (SCLM). The data show little variation in Sr and Nd isotopes and a continuous trend toward more radiogenic Pb isotope composition from Linosa to the oldest mafic activity of Pantelleria (i.e. Paleo-Pantelleria), with intermediate values measured in the youngest Pantelleria lavas (Neo-Pantelleria). Pantelleria basalts have ubiquitous 230Th-excess ranging from 7% to 20%. These data suggest the magmas are originated within the asthenospheric mantle, with little or no interaction with either the continental crust or the SCLM. The increasing FOZO-like character of the studied magmas and the variation of some key trace element ratios (e.g. Rb/La) argue for an increasing role of recycled oceanic material in the form of eclogite/pyroxenite dispersed within the mantle sources of these magmas. A completely distinct isotope composition is recorded in Neo-Pantelleria hawaiites from Khartibucale, which show significantly higher 87Sr/86Sr and lower 143Nd/144Nd, 206Pb/204Pb, (238U/232Th) and (230Th/232Th), but comparable (230Th/238U) with respect to all the other rocks studied. These rocks cannot be considered co-genetic with other Pantelleria basalts and are interpreted either as related to interaction with partial melts of the SCLM or to be originated from a mantle source enriched by recycled crustal material (EM-like). 235U-231Pa disequilibria were also measured in one Neo-Pantelleria hawaiite and one Neo-Pantelleria basalt. The coupled (230Th/238U) = 1.20 and (231Pa/235U) = 1.39 of the latter were used to perform quantitative dynamic melting models in order to constrain physical parameters of mantle melting in the Sicily Channel. The combined modelling yielded positive solutions only for high DU/DTh (? 2.5) and low melting rates (? < 1 × 10- 4 kg/m3/a). These data argue against any important role for amphibole in the genesis of these magmas and are consistent with a peridotite source possibly well mixed with recycled components. The modelled values of ? can also be converted into estimates of the upwelling rate of the mantle that are compatible with slow passive upwelling along the Sicily Channel rift.

Avanzinelli, Riccardo; Braschi, Eleonora; Marchionni, Sara; Bindi, Luca

2014-02-01

129

Deep vs. shallow expressions of continental cratons: Can cratonic roots be destroyed by subduction?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cratons are parts of continents that have remained tectonically quiescent over billion-year timescales. Although cratonic lithosphere has the stabilizing properties of chemical buoyancy and high viscosity, it can still be destroyed. The best known example of a missing cratonic root is beneath the eastern North China Craton (NCC). Despite strong evidence for the past existence of a craton in northern China, high heat flow, Mesozoic basin formation, extensive seismicity, and the lack of a fast seismic root imply that the deep cratonic lithosphere is missing. The mechanism for the lithospheric root loss is a source of much debate. Many mechanisms have been proposed, among them: shearing of the lithospheric root by asthenospheric flow induced by the Indo-Eurasian collision; ponding of the Pacific slab in the transition zone acting as a source of fluids that enable hydrous weakening; and thermal erosion due to the corner-flow upwelling of hot, deep material. It is generally agreed that the influence of subduction is key, both from the temporal coincidence of subduction with increased tectonomagmatic activity on the craton and from the spatial correlation of lithospheric loss adjacent to the Pacific trench. We investigate how cratons extend to depth through comparison between seismic signatures of the cratonic lithosphere in the upper mantle and surficial evidence of cratonic boundaries. We examine global and regional tomography, as well as receiver-function constraints on lithospheric thickness in the NCC. We define craton boundaries at the surface through analyses on crust and lithospheric mantle ages and kimberlite locations. We aim to identify regions where the fast cratonic root has been lost or altered beneath Archean and Proterozoic crust and in particular place constraints on the extent of the remaining cratonic root beneath North China. Given the common emphasis on the role of subduction as a driving force for the root loss beneath the eastern NCC, we focus on subduction-related mechanisms for the destabilization of a continental craton located on the overriding plate. We use the finite-element code CitcomCU to model thermo-mechanical subduction in the presence of a craton. Subduction is dynamically-driven, and the two lithospheric plates are decoupled by a thin weak crust, along which shear is localized. For NCC-type craton geometries, we examine how, and under what rheological parameterizations, the following mechanisms can destabilize a cratonic root: (i) thermal erosion due to the corner flow-driven upwelling of hot asthenosphere; (ii) viscosity reduction due to the hydrolytic weakening of olivine; (iii) collision-induced stress triggered weakening (for non-Newtonian rheologies). Additionally, we examine how various craton geometries and rheological formulations influence the development of a flat slab.

Perry-Houts, J.; Calo, M.; Eddy, C. L.; Guerri, M.; Holt, A.; Hopper, E.; Tesoniero, A.; Romanowicz, B. A.; Becker, T. W.; Wagner, L. S.

2013-12-01

130

From subduction to collision: Control of deep processes on the evolution of convergent plate boundary  

E-print Network

of oceanic subduction, (3) an episode of continental subduction, during which the trench absorbs all: Plate boundary-- general (3040); KEYWORDS: subduction, collision, continental subduction, oceanic of an oceanic basin. However, several orders of evidence indicate that arrival at the trench of a continental

131

Plate Tectonics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive Flash explores plate tectonics and provides an interactive map where users can identify plate boundaries with name and velocities as well as locations of earthquakes, volcanoes, and hotspots. The site also provides animations and supplementary information about plate movement and subduction. This resource is a helpful overview or review for introductory level high school or undergraduate physical geology or Earth science students.

Smoothstone

132

Plate Tectonics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Create a poster all about Plate Tectonics! Directions: Make a poster about Plate Tectonics. (20 points) Include at least (1) large picture (15 points) on your poster complete with labels of every part (10 points). (15 points) Include at least three (3) facts about Plate Tectonics. (5 points ...

Mrs. Walls

2011-01-30

133

Beyond plate tectonics - Looking at plate deformation with space geodesy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The requirements that must be met by space-geodetic systems in order to constrain the horizontal secular motions associated with the geological deformation of the earth's surface are explored. It is suggested that in order to improve existing plate-motion models, the tangential components of relative velocities on interplate baselines must be resolved to an accuracy of less than 3 mm/yr. Results indicate that measuring the velocities between crustal blocks to + or - 5 mm/yr on 100-km to 1000-km scales can produce geologically significant constraints on the integrated deformation rates across continental plate-boundary zones such as the western United States.

Jordan, Thomas H.; Minster, J. Bernard

1988-01-01

134

Relict basin closure during initial suturing accommodates continental convergence with minimal crustal shortening or reduction in convergence rates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In both the Indo-Eurasian and Arabia-Eurasian (Ab-Eu) collisions, documented post-collisional crustal shortening is hundreds to thousands of kilometers less than the amount of plate convergence determined from independent plate reconstructions. We propose that relict-basin closure may help resolve such shortening deficits, based on a synthesis of the late Cenozoic evolution of the Greater Caucasus Mountains in the Ab-Eu collision zone. This range is located ~700 km north of the Bitlis suture and defines the northern margin of the Ab-Eu collision zone between the Black and Caspian seas. The range formed from late Cenozoic tectonic inversion of the Greater Caucasus basin, a relict Mesozoic back-arc basin that originally formed in the Jurassic during north-dipping subduction of Neo-Tethys and rifting of the Lesser Caucasus arc from the southern margin of Eurasia (i.e., Scythia). This basin was originally wide enough to prevent sedimentary exchange of turbidites across it, as shown by provenance studies using U-Pb detrital zircon geochronology. The floor of the relict basin now forms a NE-dipping slab that extends to at least 158 km depth beneath the central and eastern Greater Caucasus, as revealed by a new earthquake compilation. Miocene to Quaternary felsic volcanic and intrusive rocks in the Greater Caucasus have geochemical signatures and eruptive centers similar to those in continental margin arcs. Based on these data we propose the Ab-Eu collision occurred in two stages. The first (soft collision) started when Arabia collided with Eurasia, closed the Bitlis suture, and caused the locus of convergence to jump ~700 km north to the Greater Caucasus basin. Initial exhumation of the Greater Caucasus started at ~25-30 Ma and continued until ~ 5 Ma at rates of a few °C/Ma during north-directed subduction of the back-arc basin, with little structural evidence of this crustal shortening preserved. The second phase (hard collision) started at ~ 5 Ma, when the relict basin finally closed and the Lesser Caucasus collided with Scythia and increased exhumation rates by as much as a factor of ten. Relict basin closure appears to have had a significant impact on the mechanical behavior of the Ab-Eu collision and appears to explain why deceleration of plate convergence was delayed 20-25 Myr after initial collision. Specifically, we suggest that initial collision and formation of the Bitlis suture did not significantly impede Ab-Eu convergence because deformation could jump to a relict basin within the overriding plate, continuing apace until that relict basin closed and triggered a switch from soft to hard collision and an associated structural reorganization of the whole Ab-Eu collision zone. Formation of such relict basins is likely common along continental margins during the protracted subduction and terrane accretion that occurs prior to continental collision at the end of a Wilson cycle. The Ab-Eu collision demonstrates the fundamental role that such basins can play in determining the deformational response of a continent during early collision.

Cowgill, E.; Forte, A. M.; Niemi, N. A.; Mumladze, T.; Elashvili, M.; Javakhishvili, Z.; Trexler, C.

2013-12-01

135

Ion damage overrides structural disorder in silicon surface nanopatterning by low-energy ion beam sputtering  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate the role of the initial structural condition in silicon surface nanopatterning by low-energy ion beam sputtering. Specifically, we address the influence of the target atomic structure in ripple formation under oblique irradiation by 500 eV \\text{Ar}+ ions. To this end, we compare results obtained on single-crystal, amorphous, and pre-implanted silicon targets. In spite of the differences in terms of structural order, and in contrast to previous results for medium energies, surface dynamics are found to be quantitatively similar in all these systems. We explain our results through molecular dynamics simulations of the initial irradiation stages, with the conclusion that the damage induced by low-energy ion bombardment overrides the initial atomic state of the silicon target, irrespectively of its preparation method and allows silicon re-using for nanostructuring.

Moreno-Barrado, A.; Gago, R.; Redondo-Cubero, A.; Vázquez, L.; Muñoz-García, J.; Cuerno, R.; Lorenz, K.; Castro, M.

2015-02-01

136

Brazilian continental cretaceous  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cretaceous deposits in Brazil are very well developed, chiefly in continental facies and in thick sequences. Sedimentation occurred essentially in rift-valleys inland and along the coast. Three different sequences can be distinguished: (1) a lower clastic non-marine section, (2) a middle evaporitic section, (3) an upper marine section with non-marine regressive lithosomes. Continental deposits have been laid down chiefly between

Setembrino Petri; Vilma A. Campanha

1981-01-01

137

Initiation and propagation of shear zones in a heterogeneous continental lithosphere  

SciTech Connect

Numerical methods were used to investigate the deformation of a continental plate in northeastern Brazil. Of particular interest are the perturbations induced by a stiff compressional deformation of a highly heterogeneous continental lithosphere on the development of a shear zone formed at the termination of a stiff block.

Tommasi, A.; Vauchez, A. [CNRS/Universite de Montpellier II (France)] [CNRS/Universite de Montpellier II (France)

1995-11-10

138

Tectonic Growth of a Collisional Continental Margin: Crustal Evolution of Southern Alaska  

E-print Network

Tectonic Growth of a Collisional Continental Margin: Crustal Evolution of Southern Alaska Edited : crustal evolution of southern Alaska / edited by Kenneth D. Ridgway . . . [et al.]. p. cm. -- (Special, Structural--Alaska. 2. Plate tectonics--Alaska. 3. Continental margins--Alaska. 4. Geology, Stratigraphic

139

Tectonic Plates and Plate Boundaries  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive activity adapted from NASA features world maps that identify different sections of the Earth's crust called tectonic plates. The locations of different types of plate boundaries are also identified, including convergent, divergent, and transform boundaries.

2005-12-17

140

Kinematics to dynamics in the New Zealand Plate boundary zone: implications for the strength of the lithosphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

New Zealand straddles the boundary between the Australian and Pacific Plate. Cenozoic relative plate motion has resulted in a complex pattern of faulting and block rotation in a zone of continental lithosphere up to 250 km wide. I investigate the implications of the short-term kinematics for the strength of the deforming lithosphere. I use a compilation of seismic reflection/refraction studies and high quality receiver function analyses to determine both the regional structure of the crust, which ranges from 20 to 50 km thick, and fields of buoyancy stress (or GPE per unit volume). Deformation over thousands of years is quantified in terms of velocity and strain rate fields, based on an inversion of neotectonic fault slip and palaeomagnetic data, in the context of the short-term relative plate motions. Forces on the subduction megathrust, as well as deviatoric stresses in the behind subduction region, are calculated from simple 2-D force balances across the Hikurangi Margin, given negligible deviatoric stresses at the along-strike transition between backarc extension and compression. Average megathrust shear stresses are in the range 6-15 MPa, and average lithospheric stresses <20 MPa in the overriding plate. The regional lithospheric strength of the plate boundary zone, assuming a viscous rheology (Newtonian or power law), is determined from an inversion of the field of gradients of buoyancy stress (averaged over either the top 25 km of the crust, or 100-km-thick lithosphere) and strain rate, using the thin sheet stress balance equations, calibrated with the subduction force balance analysis. Effective viscosities for the deforming lithosphere and/or crust are in the range 0.1-5 × 1021 Pa s, with marked weakening in zones of high strain rate, and an abrupt transition to viscosities >1022 Pa s at the margins of the rigid plates. If lateral variations in effective viscosity are only due to non-Newtonian behaviour, these data indicate a bulk power law rheology, with exponent n in the range 2-6. Average lithospheric or crustal deviatoric stresses <30 MPa. Such low driving stresses for the deforming crust are likely to be the result of a combination of pore fluid pressures much greater than hydrostatic (?40 per cent lithostatic) and low coefficients of friction (?0.6) on crustal faults.

Lamb, Simon

2015-05-01

141

From Convergence to Subduction - Plate Boundary Formation through New Zealand  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In contrast to the normal 'Wilson cycle' sequence of subduction leading to continental collision and associated mountain building, the evolution of the New Zealand plate boundary in the Neogene reflects the converse - initially a period of continental convergence that is followed by the emplacement of subduction. Plate reconstructions allow us to place limits on the location and timing of the continental convergence and subduction zones and the migration of the transition between the two plate boundary regimes. Relative plate motions and reconstructions since the Early to Mid-Miocene require significant continental convergence in advance of the emplacement of the southward migrating Hikurangi subduction - a sequence of tectonism seen in the present plate boundary geography of Hikurangi subduction beneath North Island and convergence in the Southern Alps along the Alpine Fault. In contrast to the transition from subduction to continental convergence where the leading edge of the upper plate is relatively thin and deformable, the transition from a continental convergent regime, with its associated crustal and lithospheric thickening, to subduction of oceanic lithosphere requires substantial thinning (removal) of upper plate continental lithosphere to make room for the slab. The simple structure of the Wadati-Benioff zone seen in the present day geometry of the subducting Pacific plate beneath North Island indicates that this lithospheric adjustment occurs quickly. Associated with this rapid lithospheric thinning is the development of a series of ephemeral basins, younging to the south, that straddle the migrating slab edge. Based on this association between localized vertical tectonics and slab emplacement, we argue that the tectonic history of these basins record the effects of lithospheric delamination driven by the southward migrating leading edge of the subducting Pacific slab. Although the New Zealand plate boundary is often described as simply two subduction zones linked by the transpressive Alpine Fault, in actuality the present is merely a snapshot view of an ongoing and complex evolution from convergence to subduction.

Furlong, K. P.; Kamp, P. J.; Hayes, G. P.

2007-12-01

142

Tectonic and sedimentary evolution of a Cretaceous continental arc-backarc system in the Korean peninsula: New view  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper focuses on the tectonic and sedimentary evolution of the Cretaceous volcanic rocks and nonmarine successions in the southeastern part of the Korean peninsula, which constitute an ancient continental arc system. The arc system (Gyeongsang Arc System), comprising an arc platform (Gyeongsang Volcanic Arc) and a backarc basin (Gyeongsang Backarc Basin), was a southwestward extension of the Japanese Arc formed by oblique northward subduction of the proto-Pacific (Izanagi) plate under the Asian continent. The backarc basin was initiated in the southeastern part of the Korean peninsula in the Early Cretaceous as a narrow NS-trending trough. The basin was bounded by a major fault in the northern part of the basin from which sediments largely emanated. Sediments were deposited in streamflow-dominated alluvial fans adjacent to the fault-bounded basin margin in the north and low-gradient fluvial systems of braided channels that extended southward and southeastward for tens of kilometers. Sediments were also derived from the western highland margin, draining Precambrian to Jurassic basement rocks. The initially narrow trough progressively expanded toward the east, resulting in eastward migration of depocenters that eventually generated a broad fluvio-lacustrine plain fringing the volcanic arc platform. The arc platform played an important role for the derivation of volcanogenic materials and accreted sediments into the backarc basin via extensive fluvial network. Pyroclastic density currents and landslides, which originated from the arc platform, also entered the basin. In addition, extrusion of basaltic volcanic rocks was continual within the basin during basin expansion. The resultant succession of mixed sedimentary and volcanogenic rocks is generally indicative of a temporal increase in volcanic activity in the arc platform and in subsidence rate of the basin. In the Late Cretaceous, andesitic to rhyolitic volcanism became climactic in the arc platform, producing a number of calderas or volcanotectonic depressions. Volcaniclastic aprons fringing the arc platform encroached upon the basin fill. Intraarc basins, produced by sinistral shearing of the arc platform, received sediments from active volcanoes and footwalls of contemporaneous faults, forming small-scale streamflow-dominated alluvial fans and floodplains with later development of a deep lake. Overall, the Gyeongsang Arc System formed under an extensional or transtensional (sinistral strike-slip) stress regime, suggesting that the subducting and the overriding plates were not strongly coupled. Both the volcanic arc and the backarc basin ceased to develop as volcanic activities shifted progressively eastward in the Paleogene accompanied with rollback of the subduction of the Izanagi plate.

Chough, S. K.; Sohn, Y. K.

2010-08-01

143

Why Does Fear Override Hope in Societies Engulfed by Intractable Conflict, as It Does in the Israeli Society?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The question of why fear overrides hope in societies embarked on the road of peacemaking after years of intractable conflict is answered on the basis of accumulated knowledge in the psychology and sociology of emotions. This knowledge suggests that fear is an automatic emotion, grounded in the perceived present and often based on the memorized past (also processed unconsciously), that

Daniel Bar-Tal

2001-01-01

144

Petrogenesis of Cretaceous mafic intrusive rocks in the Fosdick Mountains, Marie Byrd Land, West Antarctica: melting of metasomatized sub-continental arc mantle along the active plate margin of Gondwana  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A diorite pluton and widely distributed mafic dykes occur in the Fosdick migmatite-granite complex, which is interpreted to represent middle-to-lower crustal rocks of the paleo-Pacific active continental margin of Gondwana. The mafic dykes exhibit a variety of relationships with host rocks in the field ranging from undeformed dykes with sharp contacts with host gneisses to dismembered dykes with comingled textures and numerous back-veins of leucosome intruded from host migmatitic gneisses suggestive of significant interaction with crustal rocks. U-Pb ages for magmatic zircon in these rocks yields Cretaceous crystallization ages ranging from ca. 113 Ma to ca. 98 Ma for the mafic dykes and ca. 100 Ma for the diorite pluton. These mafic intrusive rocks, which contain abundant hydrous minerals, are medium- to high-K-series calc-alkaline rocks with basic-intermediate compositions (47-59 wt % SiO2 for mafic dykes and 52-56 wt % SiO2 for the diorite pluton). They have trace element patterns characterized by LILE enrichments and negative Nb anomalies indicating an origin from a hydrous mantle source metasomatized by slab-derived components. The samples without evidence of interaction with crustal rocks, which are likely to better reflect the mantle source composition, have positive ?Sr(100Ma) values (+8.1 to +14.5) and negative to slightly positive ?Nd(100Ma) values (-1.6 to +2.5) consistent with derivation from an enriched mantle source. These samples may be divided into two groups either characterized by higher LILE/HFSE ratios, less radiogenic ?Sr(100Ma) values and more radiogenic ?Nd(100Ma) values, or characterized by relatively lower LILE/ HFSE ratios, more radiogenic ?Sr(100Ma) values and less radiogenic ?Nd(100Ma) values suggesting differences in the mantle source. The results of this study are consistent with melting of a variably metasomatized sub-arc mantle source during a transition from a wrench to a transtensional tectonic setting, but are inconsistent with a mantle plume origin.

Saito, S.; Brown, M.; Korhonen, F. J.; Mcfadden, R. R.; Siddoway, C. S.

2013-12-01

145

The extent of continental crust beneath the Seychelles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The granitic islands of the Seychelles Plateau have long been recognised to overlie continental crust, isolated from Madagascar and India during the formation of the Indian Ocean. However, to date the extent of continental crust beneath the Seychelles region remains unknown. This is particularly true beneath the Mascarene Basin between the Seychelles Plateau and Madagascar and beneath the Amirante Arc. Constraining the size and shape of the Seychelles continental fragment is needed for accurate plate reconstructions of the breakup of Gondwana and has implications for the processes of continental breakup in general. Here we present new estimates of crustal thickness and VP/VS from H-? stacking of receiver functions from a year long deployment of seismic stations across the Seychelles covering the topographic plateau, the Amirante Ridge and the northern Mascarene Basin. These results, combined with gravity modelling of historical ship track data, confirm that continental crust is present beneath the Seychelles Plateau. This is ˜30-33 km thick, but with a relatively high velocity lower crustal layer. This layer thins southwards from ˜10 km to ˜1 km over a distance of ˜50 km, which is consistent with the Seychelles being at the edge of the Deccan plume prior to its separation from India. In contrast, the majority of the Seychelles Islands away from the topographic plateau show no direct evidence for continental crust. The exception to this is the island of Desroche on the northern Amirante Ridge, where thicker low density crust, consistent with a block of continental material is present. We suggest that the northern Amirantes are likely continental in nature and that small fragments of continental material are a common feature of plume affected continental breakup.

Hammond, J. O. S.; Kendall, J.-M.; Collier, J. S.; Rümpker, G.

2013-11-01

146

Continental collision slowing due to viscous mantle lithosphere rather than topography.  

PubMed

Because the inertia of tectonic plates is negligible, plate velocities result from the balance of forces acting at plate margins and along their base. Observations of past plate motion derived from marine magnetic anomalies provide evidence of how continental deformation may contribute to plate driving forces. A decrease in convergence rate at the inception of continental collision is expected because of the greater buoyancy of continental than oceanic lithosphere, but post-collisional rates are less well understood. Slowing of convergence has generally been attributed to the development of high topography that further resists convergent motion; however, the role of deforming continental mantle lithosphere on plate motions has not previously been considered. Here I show that the rate of India's penetration into Eurasia has decreased exponentially since their collision. The exponential decrease in convergence rate suggests that contractional strain across Tibet has been constant throughout the collision at a rate of 7.03?×?10(-16)?s(-1), which matches the current rate. A constant bulk strain rate of the orogen suggests that convergent motion is resisted by constant average stress (constant force) applied to a relatively uniform layer or interface at depth. This finding follows new evidence that the mantle lithosphere beneath Tibet is intact, which supports the interpretation that the long-term strain history of Tibet reflects deformation of the mantle lithosphere. Under conditions of constant stress and strength, the deforming continental lithosphere creates a type of viscous resistance that affects plate motion irrespective of how topography evolved. PMID:22382982

Clark, Marin Kristen

2012-03-01

147

Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 163 (2007) 3551 Parallel computing of multi-scale continental deformation  

E-print Network

is one of the best examples of diffuse continental tectonics that deviate from the plate tectonics; Cyberinfrastructure 1. Introduction In the plate tectonics paradigm, the outer shell of the Earth consists of a dozen rheology of continents and (2) driving forces that arise from plate boundaries as well as within

Liu, Mian

2007-01-01

148

Plate Tectonics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this lesson, students are introduced to the theory of plate tectonics and explore how the theory was developed and supported by evidence. Through class discussion, videos, and activities, students seek connections between tectonic activity and geologic features and investigate how the theory of plate tectonics evolved.

2006-01-01

149

Plate Tectonics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site contains 25 questions on the topic of plate tectonics, which covers the development of the theory, crustal movements, geologic features associated with tectonics, and plate boundaries (convergent, divergent, transform). This is part of the Principles of Earth Science course at the University of South Dakota. Users submit their answers and are provided immediate verification.

Timothy Heaton

150

Fuelling decisions in migratory birds: geomagnetic cues override the seasonal effect  

PubMed Central

Recent evaluations of both temporal and spatial precision in bird migration have called for external cues in addition to the inherited programme defining the migratory journey in terms of direction, distance and fuelling behaviour along the route. We used juvenile European robins (Erithacus rubecula) to study whether geomagnetic cues affect fuel deposition in a medium-distance migrant by simulating a migratory journey from southeast Sweden to the wintering area in southern Spain. In the late phase of the onset of autumn migration, robins exposed to the magnetic treatment attained a lower fuel load than control birds exposed to the ambient magnetic field of southeast Sweden. In contrast, robins captured in the early phase of the onset of autumn migration all showed low fuel deposition irrespective of experimental treatment. These results are, as expected, the inverse of what we have found in similar studies in a long-distance migrant, the thrush nightingale (Luscinia luscinia), indicating that the reaction in terms of fuelling behaviour to a simulated southward migration varies depending on the relevance for the species. Furthermore, we suggest that information from the geomagnetic field act as an important external cue overriding the seasonal effect on fuelling behaviour in migratory birds. PMID:17609189

Kullberg, Cecilia; Henshaw, Ian; Jakobsson, Sven; Johansson, Patrik; Fransson, Thord

2007-01-01

151

Identifying Plate Tectonic Boundaries for a Virtual Ocean Basin  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students observe a virtual ocean basin and two adjacent continental margins. From the characteristics of the sea floor and adjacent land, students infer where plate boundaries might be present. They then predict where earthquakes and volcanoes might occur. Finally, they draw their inferred plate boundaries in cross section.

Stephen Reynolds

152

DEM Simulation of Continental Collision in Asia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Indentation tectonics, a type of plate tectonic deformation due to a collision of a small continental block into a continent of larger size, causes complicated deformations around the boundary of the two continents. One typical example is the collision process of the Indian sub-continent to the Eurasian Plate, and a series of physical experiments explained the major tectonic features in the Eastern Asia excellently. This paper employed a numerical technique, the Discrete Element Method (DEM), to investigate the indentation tectonics and the results were compared with the experimental results. The overall geometry and progressive development of major fault systems associated with secondary basins showed similarity between the two techniques, whereas the secondary fault systems seen in the experiments were less developed in the simulation. Despite there still need further refinements in the technique, the DEM approach to the geological deformation can be a powerful tool to simulate fault related structures.

Yamada, Y.; Tanaka, A.; Matsuoka, T.

2002-12-01

153

Rise, transport, and storage of magma during continental rupture: Constraints from the Afar rifting episode (Invited)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The production, storage, and eruption of magma within continental and oceanic rift zones shapes the structure and morphology of the plate boundary, and the buoyancy force of the magma adds to the tectonic forces driving plate divergence. Dikes transport magma from crustal and sub-crustal magma reservoirs, accommodate extensional strain, and impart a length scale to rift deformation. From seismic and

C. J. Ebinger; M. Belachew; D. M. Cote; D. Keir; J. V. Rowland; J. Hammond

2009-01-01

154

Plate motions: fundamentals  

E-print Network

lithospheric plates" · Plate tectonics = a kinematic theory ­ Rigid plates (no intraplate deformation") · Convergent = subductions ("trenches") · Strike-slip = transform faults · Plate tectonics describesPlate motions: fundamentals · Assume a pie-shaped wedge plate B, rotating around E (=rotation pole

Déverchère, Jacques

155

Oceanic and Continental Crust  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site contains 25 questions on the topic of oceanic and continental crust, which covers the physical properties and features of the two crust types. This is part of the Principles of Earth Science course at the University of South Dakota. Users submit their answers and are provided immediate verification.

Timothy Heaton

156

The Continental Crust.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Continental crust underlies the continents, their margins, and also small shallow regions in oceans. The nature of the crust (much older than oceanic crust) and its dynamics are discussed. Research related to and effects of tectonics, volcanism, erosion, and sedimentation on the crust are considered. (JN)

Burchfiel, B. Clark

1983-01-01

157

CHAPTER SIXTEEN Continental  

E-print Network

of continental paleogeog- raphy to influence phylogenetic analysis, a "chronobiogeographic character" is devel. The chronobiogeographic character allows for a tradeoff between morpholog- ical character debt and "chronobiogeographic, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PR, United Kingdom. Primate Biogeography, edited by Shawn M. Lehman and John G

Seiffert, Erik

158

Continental magnetic anomaly constraints on continental reconstruction  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Crustal magnetic anomalies mapped by the MAGSAT satellite for North and South America, Europe, Africa, India, Australia and Antarctica and adjacent marine areas were adjusted to a common elevation of 400 km and differentially reduced to the radial pole of intensity 60,000 nT. These radially polarized anomalies are normalized for differential inclination, declination and intensity effects of the geomagnetic field, so that in principle they directly reflected the geometric and magnetic polarization attributes of sources which include regional petrologic variations of the crust and upper mantle, and crustal thickness and thermal perturbations. Continental anomalies demonstrate remarkably detailed correlation of regional magnetic sources across rifted margins when plotted on a reconstruction of Pangea. Accordingly, they suggest further fundamental constraints on the geologic evolution of the continents and their reconstructions.

Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.; Olivier, R.; Bentley, C. R.

1985-01-01

159

Shallow subduction, ridge subduction, and the evolution of continental lithosphere  

SciTech Connect

Subduction of oceanic lithosphere beneath continental crust at a shallow angle has occurred throughout the Phanerozoic Eon. Ridge subduction often follows shallow subduction and causes bimodal volcanism and crustal rifting, forming back-arc basins. Recent models for Archean plate tectonics propose very fast rates of spreading (400-800 km/Ma) and convergence, and sinking rates comparable to or slower (<10 km/Ma) than those of today. As faster convergence and slower sinking correspond to subduction at shallower angles, shallow subduction and ridge subduction must have been ubiquitous during the Archean permobile regime. This is compatible with a back-arc-basin origin for Archean greenstone belts. The common coexistence of tholeiitic and calc-alkaline igneous rocks in Archean greenstone belts, also implies ridge subduction. The authors envisage a transition, between 2.4 and 1.8 Ga., from a regime dominated by shallow subduction and repeated ridge subduction to one of normal plate tectonics with steeper subduction. Spreading rates decreased; continental plates became larger and stable shelves could develop at trailing margins. Shallow subduction became the exception, restricted to episodes of abnormally fast convergence; nevertheless, the long span of post-Archean time makes it unlikely that any part of the continental crust has escaped shallow subduction and ridge subduction. These processes recycle much volatile-rich oceanic crust into the sub-continental upper mantle, thereby underplating the crust, effecting upper-mantle metasomatism and affecting intraplate magmatism.

Helmstaedt, H.; Dixon, J.M.; Farrar, E.; Carmichael, D.M.

1985-01-01

160

Intermittent plate tectonics?  

PubMed

Although it is commonly assumed that subduction has operated continuously on Earth without interruption, subduction zones are routinely terminated by ocean closure and supercontinent assembly. Under certain circumstances, this could lead to a dramatic loss of subduction, globally. Closure of a Pacific-type basin, for example, would eliminate most subduction, unless this loss were compensated for by comparable subduction initiation elsewhere. Given the evidence for Pacific-type closure in Earth's past, the absence of a direct mechanism for termination/initiation compensation, and recent data supporting a minimum in subduction flux in the Mesoproterozoic, we hypothesize that dramatic reductions or temporary cessations of subduction have occurred in Earth's history. Such deviations in the continuity of plate tectonics have important consequences for Earth's thermal and continental evolution. PMID:18174440

Silver, Paul G; Behn, Mark D

2008-01-01

161

Plate motion and deformation  

SciTech Connect

Our goal is to understand the motions of the plates, the deformation along their boundaries and within their interiors, and the processes that control these tectonic phenomena. In the broadest terms, we must strive to understand the relationships of regional and local deformation to flow in the upper mantle and the rheological, thermal and density structure of the lithosphere. The essential data sets which we require to reach our goal consist of maps of current strain rates at the earth's surface and the distribution of integrated deformation through time as recorded in the geologic record. Our success will depend on the effective synthesis of crustal kinematics with a variety of other geological and geophysical data, within a quantitative theoretical framework describing processes in the earth's interior. Only in this way can we relate the snapshot of current motions and earth structure provided by geodetic and geophysical data with long-term processes operating on the time scales relevant to most geological processes. The wide-spread use of space-based techniques, coupled with traditional geological and geophysical data, promises a revolution in our understanding of the kinematics and dynamics of plate motions over a broad range of spatial and temporal scales and in a variety of geologic settings. The space-based techniques that best address problems in plate motion and deformation are precise space-geodetic positioning -- on land and on the seafloor -- and satellite acquisition of detailed altimetric and remote sensing data in oceanic and continental areas. The overall science objectives for the NASA Solid Earth Science plan for the 1990's, are to Understand the motion and deformation of the lithosphere within and across plate boundaries'', and to understand the dynamics of the mantle, the structure and evolution of the lithosphere, and the landforms that result from local and regional deformation. 57 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Minster, B.; Prescott, W.; Royden, L.

1991-02-01

162

Segmentation of the Nazca and South American plates along the Ecuador subduction zone from wide angle seismic profiles  

E-print Network

, related to the subduction of the oceanic Nazca plate beneath the South-American continental plate, along margin consists of the oceanic North-Andean block which was accreted to the Brazilian continental craton, normal oceanic crust subducts beneath the oceanic Cretaceous substratum of the margin underlined

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

163

Plate Motions  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

To prepare for this exercise students read the Chapter on plate tectonics in their text book. In class, they are given a color isochron map of the sea floor. They are given 4 tasks: Answer basic questions about the timing and rate of opening of the N. and S. Atlantic; Determine what has happened to the oceanic crust that is created on the eastern side of the East Pacific Rise; Determine what type of plate boundary existed on the western edge of the N. America plate before the San Andreas Fault and when this transition occurred; and Reconstruct the motion of the plates over the last 40 Ma assuming that the surface area of the Earth has not changed.

Jeffrey Nunn

164

Caribbean tectonics and relative plate motions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the last century, three different ways of interpreting the tectonic evolution of the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean have been proposed, taking into account the Bailey Willis School of a permanent pre-Jurassic deep sea basin, the Edward Suess School of a subsided continental terrain, and the Alfred Wegener School of continental separation. The present investigation is concerned with an outline of an interpretation which follows that of Pindell and Dewey (1982). An attempt is made to point out ways in which the advanced hypotheses can be tested. The fit of Africa, North America, and South America is considered along with aspects of relative motion between North and South America since the early Jurasic. Attention is given to a framework for reconstructing Caribbean plate evolution, the evolution of the Caribbean, the plate boundary zones of the northern and southern Caribbean, and the active deformation of the Caribbean plate.

Burke, K.; Dewey, J. F.; Cooper, C.; Mann, P.; Pindell, J. L.

1984-01-01

165

Plate Tectonics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This data tip from Bridge, the Ocean Sciences Education Teacher Resource Center archive, includes a variety of educational sites to visit on plate tectonic theory. Learners can use underwater earthquake data to identify plate boundaries with links to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Acoustic Monitoring Program Ocean Seismicity data. Data from the Northeast Pacific, eastern Equatorial Pacific, and North Atlantic are examined in more detail.

166

E2F-1:DP-1 induces p53 and overrides survival factors to trigger apoptosis.  

PubMed Central

The E2F DNA binding activity consists of a heterodimer between E2F and DP family proteins, and these interactions are required for association of E2F proteins with pRb and the pRb-related proteins p107 and p130, which modulate E2F transcriptional activities. E2F-1 expression is sufficient to release fibroblasts from G0 and induce entry into S phase, yet it also initiates apoptosis. To investigate the mechanisms of E2F-induced apoptosis, we utilized interleukin-3 (IL-3)-dependent 32D.3 myeloid cells, a model of hematopoietic progenitor programmed cell death. In the absence of IL-3, E2F-1 alone was sufficient to induce apoptosis, and p53 levels were diminished. DP-1 alone was not sufficient to induce cell cycle progression or alter rates of death following IL-3 withdrawal. However, overexpression of both E2F-1 and DP-1 led to the rapid death of cells even in the presence of survival factors. In the presence of IL-3, levels of endogenous wild-type p53 increased in response to E2F-1, and coexpression of DP-1 further augmented p53 levels. These results provide evidence that E2F is a functional link between the tumor suppressors p53 and pRb. However, induction of p53 alone was not sufficient to trigger apoptosis, suggesting that the ability of E2F to override survival factors involves additional effectors. PMID:8524253

Hiebert, S W; Packham, G; Strom, D K; Haffner, R; Oren, M; Zambetti, G; Cleveland, J L

1995-01-01

167

Health research and systems' governance are at risk: should the right to data protection override health?  

PubMed

The European Union (EU) Data Protection Regulation will have profound implications for public health, health services research and statistics in Europe. The EU Commission's Proposal was a breakthrough in balancing privacy rights and rights to health and healthcare. The European Parliament, however, has proposed extensive amendments. This paper reviews the amendments proposed by the European Parliament Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs and their implications for health research and statistics. The amendments eliminate most innovations brought by the Proposal. Notably, derogation to the general prohibition of processing sensitive data shall be allowed for public interests such as the management of healthcare services,but not health research, monitoring, surveillance and governance. The processing of personal health data for historical, statistical or scientific purposes shall be allowed only with the consent of the data subject or if the processing serves an exceptionally high public interest, cannot be performed otherwise and is legally authorised. Research, be it academic, government,corporate or market research, falls under the same rule.The proposed amendments will make difficult or render impossible research and statistics involving the linkage and analysis of the wealth of data from clinical,administrative, insurance and survey sources, which have contributed to improving health outcomes and health systems performance and governance; and may illegitimise efforts that have been made in some European countries to enable privacy-respectful data use for research and statistical purposes. If the amendments stand as written, the right to privacy is likely to override the right to health and healthcare in Europe. PMID:24310171

Di Iorio, C T; Carinci, F; Oderkirk, J

2014-07-01

168

Plate Tectonics in the Late Paleozoic  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As the chronicle of plate motions through time, paleogeography is fundamental to our understanding of plate tectonics and its role in shaping the geology of the present-day. To properly appreciate the history of tectonics—and its influence on the deep Earth and climate—it is imperative to seek an accurate and global model of paleogeography. However, owing to the incessant loss of oceanic lithosphere through subduction, the paleogeographic reconstruction of 'full-plates' (including oceanic lithosphere) becomes increasingly challenging with age. Prior to 150 Ma ~60% of the lithosphere is missing and reconstructions are developed without explicit regard for oceanic lithosphere or plate tectonic principles; in effect, reflecting the earlier mobilistic paradigm of continental drift. Although these 'continental' reconstructions have been immensely useful, the next-generation of mantle models requires global plate kinematic descriptions with full-plate reconstructions. Moreover, in disregarding (or only loosely applying) plate tectonic rules, continental reconstructions fail to take advantage of a wealth of additional information in the form of practical constraints. Following a series of new developments, both in geodynamic theory and analytical tools, it is now feasible to construct full-plate models that lend themselves to testing by the wider Earth-science community. Such a model is presented here for the late Paleozoic (410-250 Ma). Although we expect this model to be particularly useful for numerical mantle modeling, we hope that it can also serve as a general framework for understanding late Paleozoic tectonics, one on which future improvements can be built and further tested.

Domeier, Mat; Torsvik, Trond

2014-05-01

169

Crustal Structure of the Sunda-Banda Arc Transition: Linking Forearc Deformation and Lower Plate Variability  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Sunda-Banda arc transition, the easternmost portion of the Indonesian convergent margin, presents a probably unique natural laboratory to study lower plate variability and related upper plate deformation in the so-called 'subduction factory' for a deeper understanding of forearc evolution. In neighboring margin segments, we can observe strong changes of the incoming plate (transition from an oceanic to a continental

L. Planert; H. Kopp; A. Shulgin; E. Lueschen; C. Mueller; Y. Djajadihardja; E. Flueh; M. Engels

2008-01-01

170

ELSEVIER Earth-Science Reviews 40 (1996) 229-258 Continental break-up and collision in the Neoproterozoic and  

E-print Network

ELSEVIER Earth-Science Reviews 40 (1996) 229-258 Continental break-up and collision geodynamic models which limited the speeds at which large continental plates could move to an arbitrarily low value. Baltica and Laurentia probably shared a common drift history for the time interval 750-600 Ma

Torsvik, Trond Helge

171

Is There Really A North American Plate?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lithospheric plates are typically identified from earthquake epicenters and evidence such as GPS movements. But no evidence indicates a plate boundary between the North American and South American Plates. Some plate maps show them separated by a transform boundary, but it is only a fracture zone. Other maps show an "undefined plate boundary" or put no boundary between these two plates (check Google images). Early plate maps showed a single large American Plate, quite narrow east of the Caribbean Plate (Le Pichon 1968, Morgan 1968). The North and South American Plates became established by the leading textbook Earth (Press & Siever 1974). On their map, from a Scientific American article by John Dewey (1972), these new plates were separated by an "uncertain plate boundary." The reasons for postulating a North American Plate were probably more psychological than geological. Each of the other continents of the world had its own plate, and North American geologists naturally wanted theirs. Similarly, European geographers used to view Europe as its own continent. A single large plate should again be hypothesized. But the term American Plate would now be ambiguous ("Which plate, North or South?") Perhaps future textbook authors could call it the "Two-American Plate." Textbook authors ultimately decide such global-tectonic matters. I became aware of textbook authors' opinions and influence from my research into the history of Alfred Wegener's continental drift (see Fixists vs. Mobilists by Krill 2011). Leading textbook author Charles Schuchert realized that continental drift would abolish his cherished paleogeographic models of large east-west continents (Eria, Gondwana) and small oceans (Poseiden, Nereis). He and his junior coauthors conspired to keep drift evidence out of their textbooks, from the 1934-editions until the 1969-editions (Physical Geology by Longwell et al. 1969, Historical Geology by Dunbar & Waage 1969). Their textbooks ruled in America. Textbooks elsewhere, such as S.J. Shand (1933), E.B. Bailey (1939), and Arthur Holmes (1944), presented continental drift as a working hypothesis that could elegantly solve important geological problems. Americans were preconditioned to dislike continental drift theory, ever since James Dwight Dana taught in his Manual of Geology (1863...1895) that North America was the type continent of the world, and that it had stood alone since earliest time. Such beliefs sometimes trump geologic evidence. As noted by Stephen Jay Gould (1999) Sigmund Freud had much insight into the psychology of scientific revolutions: they involve a scientific development that shows humans to have lesser status than previously perceived. In the Copernican revolution (geocentrism vs. heliocentrism) humans no longer inhabited the center of the universe. In the Darwinian revolution (creationism vs. evolutionism) humans were no longer uniquely created. In the Wegenerian revolution (fixism vs. mobilism) North America was no longer uniquely created; it was just other fragment from Pangaea. North American geologists were pleased when Press & Siever gave them their own lithospheric plate. Being a global-tectonic killjoy, I would like to take away that small consolation as well. Or at least pose the question: Is there really a North American Plate?

Krill, A.

2011-12-01

172

Caribbean plate tectonics from seismic tomography  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

New seismic tomography in the Caribbean shows close links between the geometry and dynamics of subducting slabs and the geology of the overriding plate. Unlike most oceanic plates, the Caribbean plate lacks identifiable seafloor magnetic anomalies and fracture zones. The plate's history has therefore been inferred primarily from land geology along the plate boundary, which is complicated by large-scale shear deformation, and from finite rotations of surrounding plates.We used more than 14 million arrival times from 300,000 earthquakes to identify P-wave velocity anomalies. We relate the anomalies to the geometry and dynamics of subducting slabs and to patterns of earthquake activity, volcanism, topographic relief, and tectonic deformation. For example, we detect two separate slabs belonging to the North and South American plates, respectively, which appear to be responsible for morphologic and tectonic differences between the arcs of the Northern (from Guadeloupe northward) and Southern (from Dominica southward) Lesser Antilles. Variations in earthquake activity between Haiti and the Dominican Republic can be explained by a change in slab geometry from an underplated slab beneath Haiti to a subducting slab under the Dominican Republic. A shallow tear in the slab may explain the anomalously deep Puerto Rico Trench and the frequent earthquake swarms there. The westward shift in volcanic activity in the Northern Lesser Antilles from the Miocene Limestone Caribbees to the present arc can be attributed to the limit on convective flow imposed by the 3-D geometry of the slab at depth. A thinned South America slab under the southern Lesser Antilles may result from traction imposed on the slab by a wide forearc wedge. Variations in tectonic deformation of northern South America could be related to the location of the Caribbean Large Igneous Province north of the Maracaibo Block.

Ten Brink, U. S.; Villasenor, A.

2012-12-01

173

Absolute plate velocities from seismic anisotropy: Importance of correlated errors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The errors in plate motion azimuths inferred from shear wave splitting beneath any one tectonic plate are shown to be correlated with the errors of other azimuths from the same plate. To account for these correlations, we adopt a two-tier analysis: First, find the pole of rotation and confidence limits for each plate individually. Second, solve for the best fit to these poles while constraining relative plate angular velocities to consistency with the MORVEL relative plate angular velocities. Our preferred set of angular velocities, SKS-MORVEL, is determined from the poles from eight plates weighted proportionally to the root-mean-square velocity of each plate. SKS-MORVEL indicates that eight plates (Amur, Antarctica, Caribbean, Eurasia, Lwandle, Somalia, Sundaland, and Yangtze) have angular velocities that differ insignificantly from zero. The net rotation of the lithosphere is 0.25 ± 0.11° Ma-1 (95% confidence limits) right handed about 57.1°S, 68.6°E. The within-plate dispersion of seismic anisotropy for oceanic lithosphere (? = 19.2°) differs insignificantly from that for continental lithosphere (? = 21.6°). The between-plate dispersion, however, is significantly smaller for oceanic lithosphere (? = 7.4°) than for continental lithosphere (? = 14.7°). Two of the slowest-moving plates, Antarctica (vRMS = 4 mm a-1, ? = 29°) and Eurasia (vRMS = 3 mm a-1, ? = 33°), have two of the largest within-plate dispersions, which may indicate that a plate must move faster than ? 5 mm a-1 to result in seismic anisotropy useful for estimating plate motion. The tendency of observed azimuths on the Arabia plate to be counterclockwise of plate motion may provide information about the direction and amplitude of superposed asthenospheric flow or about anisotropy in the lithospheric mantle.

Zheng, Lin; Gordon, Richard G.; Kreemer, Corné

2014-09-01

174

Musical Plates  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This on-line project is part of the Center for Improved Engineering and Science Education (CIESE) program. As they complete this series of lessons, students will use real-time data to solve a problem, study the correlation between earthquakes and tectonic plates, and determine whether or not there is a relationship between volcanoes and plate boundaries. Musical Plates has four Core Activities that will teach students how to access and interpret real-time earthquake and volcano data and to how use the information to solve a real-world problem. Each of the core activities is designed to be used in a 45-minute class period. This unit also has three enrichment lessons and a final project lesson that can also be used for assessment.

2007-12-12

175

Metamorphism and Continental Collision  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Physical Geology students are required to understand the processes involved in plate tectonics. They are expected to know the geologic differences between continents and ocean basins and should be able to recall and use simple geologic terms to describe geologic processes and events. This activity is designed to improve student comprehension of the varied Earth materials and complex processes involved in plate collisions. The activity synthesizes material covered during the first eight weeks of Physical Geology on plate tectonics, rock types, volcanoes, and Earth's composition. The instructor introduces the exercise to the students as a component of the college's Critical Thinking Initiative. The "hook" for the students is that the exercise represents a chance for self-appraisal of course content and understanding prior to the next semester test. The grading rubric for the lab is discussed with the students in terms of the Bloom Pyramid so that they can assess their level of progress in the course.

Kenneth Howard

176

GEO-Logic: Continental Drift and Plate Tectonics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students are asked to match up lecturers with what day and time they teach, and how many students they have based on clues given from several different perspectives. In the second part of the activity, students are asked to learn more about the historic figures mentioned in the activity by doing reading and web research.

Laura Guertin

177

Continental Glaciation - Landforms  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

To prepare for this exercise, students participate in a teacher-led discussion about processes of erosion and deposition in different environments under and around continental ice sheets. They then work in small groups of 2-3 to examine stereopairs of examples of landforms representative of subglacial and end-glacial settings. The culminating set of questions require them to find and analyze the sequence of formation of a dozen or so landforms from different glacial environments scattered over one topographic quadrangle. Designed for a geomorphology course Has minimal/no quantitative component

Rich Whittecar

178

Geologic evolution of petroliferous basins on continental shelf of China  

SciTech Connect

The coastline of southeastern China is about 18,000 km (11,200 mi) in length, and its aggregate continental shelf area within 200-m (660-ft) water depth is well over 1 million km/sup 2/ (390,000 mi/sup 2/). Recent geophysical exploration and petroleum drilling records aid in understanding the geologic evolution of these petroliferous basins. Two types of tectonic basins are present on the continental shelf areas: (1) Bohai Gulf, South Yellow Sea, and Beibu Gulf are intraplate polyphase rift-depression basins, and (2) East China Sea, mouth of the Pearl River, and the Yingge Sea are epicontinental rift-depressions basins. Both types are believed to be of extensional origin. The severe convergence of the Indian plate with the Eurasia plate produced east-northeast-spreading of the South China Sea basin, which resulted in two triple junctions on its northern margins. The Pacific plate was subducted by downthrust beneath the Eurasia continental crust. The extension mechanism could be the rising of an upper mantle plume to produce two weak north-northeast-trending fracture zones. A series of intraplate and epicontinental riftdepression basins was formed. The depositional models and sea level variations of these basins have been interpreted from drilling records and seismic profiles. They can be explained by the tectonoeustatic changes in sea level and Cenozoic climatic changes in China.

Desheng, L.

1984-08-01

179

Major Ocean Features: Continental Margin  

E-print Network

41 Major Ocean Features: Continental Margin and Deep Sea This introduction summarizes ocean geology's continental shelf is a passive margin so the Ocean Exploration Hudson Canyon, Deep East and Islands as it relates to the Ocean Exploration expeditions. It is not a comprehensive examination of all aspects

180

Estimation of continental precipitation recycling  

Microsoft Academic Search

The total amount of water that precipitates on large continental regions is supplied by two mechanisms: (1) advection from the surrounding areas external to the region and (2) evaporation and transpiration from the land surface within the region. The latter supply mechanism is tantamount to the recycling of precipitation over the Continental area. The degree to which regional precipitation is

Kaye L. Brubaker; Dara Entekhabi; P. S. Eagleson

1993-01-01

181

Rotational inertia of continents: A proposed link between polar wandering and plate tectonics  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A mechanism is proposed whereby displacement between continents and the earth's pole of rotation (polar wandering) gives rise to latitudinal transport of continental plates (continental drift) because of their relatively greater rotational inertia. When extended to short-term polar wobble, the hypothesis predicts an energy change nearly equivalent to the seismic energy rate.

Kane, M.F.

1972-01-01

182

India-Eurasia collision chronology has implications for crustal shortening and driving mechanism of plates  

Microsoft Academic Search

The motion of the Indian plate is determined in an absolute frame of reference and compared with the position of the southern margin of Eurasia deduced from palaeomagnetic data in Tibet. The 2,600 + or - 900 km of continental crust shortening observed is shown to have occurred in three different episodes: subduction of continental crust, intracontinental thrusting and internal

Philippe Patriat; José Achache

1984-01-01

183

A 2000-year record of migrating earthquakes in North China: Implications for earthquake hazards in continental interiors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Plate tectonic theory provides a good sense of where to expect future large earthquakes on plate boundaries, and of the average time between them. However, no comparable model applies in continental interiors, where damaging earthquakes often pop up in unexpected places. This is well illustrated by the 2000-year record of earthquakes in North China, where large earthquakes are frequent and

Mian Liu; Seth Stein; Hui Wang

2010-01-01

184

Plus-end motors override minus-end motors during transport of squid axon vesicles on microtubules  

PubMed Central

Plus- and minus-end vesicle populations from squid axoplasm were isolated from each other by selective extraction of the minus-end vesicle motor followed by 5'-adenylyl imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP)- induced microtubule affinity purification of the plus-end vesicles. In the presence of cytosol containing both plus- and minus-end motors, the isolated populations moved strictly in opposite directions along microtubules in vitro. Remarkably, when treated with trypsin before incubation with cytosol, purified plus-end vesicles moved exclusively to microtubule minus ends instead of moving in the normal plus-end direction. This reversal in the direction of movement of trypsinized plus-end vesicles, in light of further observation that cytosol promotes primarily minus-end movement of liposomes, suggests that the machinery for cytoplasmic dynein-driven, minus-end vesicle movement can establish a functional interaction with the lipid bilayers of both vesicle populations. The additional finding that kinesin overrides cytoplasmic dynein when both are bound to bead surfaces indicates that the direction of vesicle movement could be regulated simply by the presence or absence of a tightly bound, plus-end kinesin motor; being processive and tightly bound, the kinesin motor would override the activity of cytoplasmic dynein because the latter is weakly bound to vesicles and less processive. In support of this model, it was found that (a) only plus-end vesicles copurified with tightly bound kinesin motors; and (b) both plus- and minus-end vesicles bound cytoplasmic dynein from cytosol. PMID:8896596

1996-01-01

185

Rifting consequences of three plate separation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Submarine sedimentary basins parallel to the trends of passive continental margins are well explained by tensional processes between two lithospheric plates. This leaves open the enigma of many basins which strike across margins. We use examples from the North Atlantic to show that such basins may be formed during the initial rifting stage due to enhanced lithospheric thinning caused by the separation of three plates. We suggest that volcanics can be emplaced in these basins and, in the extreme case, where mantle temperature and consequently the degree of partial melting are particularly high, that basaltic flows can be thick enough to fill and hide the basins.

Sibuet, Jean-Claude; Srivastava, Shiri

1994-04-01

186

Tectonic Plates and Plate Boundaries  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Continents were once thought to be static, locked tight in their positions in Earth's crust. Similarities between distant coastlines, such as those on opposite sides of the Atlantic, were thought to be the work of a scientist's overactive imagination, or, if real, the result of erosion on a massive scale. This interactive feature shows 11 tectonic plates and their names, the continents that occupy them, and the types of boundaries between them.

187

Diffuse oceanic plate boundaries: Strain rates, vertically averaged rheology, and comparisons with narrow plate boundaries and stable plate interiors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Diffuse plate boundaries occur in both oceanic and continental lithosphere and cover ? 15% of Earth's solid surface. The fastest plate speeds accommodated across diffuse oceanic plate boundaries are ? 15 mm/yr. The smallest strain rates averaged across narrow plate boundaries are at least 102 times larger than the largest strain rates across diffuse oceanic plate boundaries and at least 102 times larger than those across stable plate interiors. The effective viscosity (?eff) of the lithosphere is estimated from the ratio of vertically averaged shear stresses to strain rates for three tectonic settings: (i) oceanic transform fault zones, for which ?eff = 3 ×1016 to 5×1019 Pa s, comparable to estimates for the asthenosphere, (ii) diffuse oceanic plate boundaries, for which ?eff = 1×1023 to 6×l023 Pa s, ? 10 times larger than for diffuse continental plate boundaries, and (iii) stable plate interiors, for which ?eff = 1x1024 to 2×1027 Pa s. The rheology of oceanic lithosphere over times longer than earthquake cycles is modeled as a plastic layer overlying a layer that deforms by creeping flow [Martinod and Davy, 1992]. Oceanic lithosphere deforms when the yield strength of the upper lithosphere is exceeded. The vertically averaged rheology of deforming oceanic lithosphere can be approximated by a power-law fluid for which ?. ? (?s)n where ?. is the rate of shear strain and ?s is the shear stress. If the ratio of the yield strength of the upper lithosphere to the force required to deform the lower lithosphere at a strain rate of 10-16 s-1 is varied from 10-2 to 102 , the calculated value of n varies from ?3 to ?300. The map-view aspect ratio of a deforming zone in a thin sheet of power-law fluid is proportional to n-½ [England et al., 1985]. A profile of displacement versus distance inferred from a seismic profile across the Central Indian Basin (India-Capricorn diffuse oceanic plate boundary), where the lithosphere is about 60-Myr old, indicates that the lithosphere is being deformed in response to a rigid moving boundary near the north end of the basin. If so, the vertically averaged rheology of the lithosphere in the Central Indian Basin is described by a power-law fluid with n?8, which suggests that the yield strength of the upper lithosphere is a few times larger than the force required to deform the lower lithosphere. Owing to a lack of data, other diffuse oceanic plate boundaries can at best be interpreted qualitatively. Whereas the total aspect ratios (total along-strike length / total across-strike width) for diffuse oceanic plate boundaries in 60- to 90-Myr-old lithosphere are 1.25-1.8, they are 0.73-0.82 in young lithosphere adjacent to an active mid-ocean ridge, The latter aspect ratios suggest smaller values of n, indicating a relatively weaker brittle upper lithosphere relative to the force required to deform the lower lithosphere, similar to results for diffuse continental plate boundaries, for which n?3 [England and Molnar, 1991]. In contrast, the East Africa Rift has a large aspect ratio, 2.3, which suggests its lithosphere behaves more like 60- to 90-Myr-old oceanic lithosphere than like other diffuse continental plate boundaries.

Gordon, Richard G.

188

Extensional evolution of the central East Greenland Caledonides  

E-print Network

This thesis addresses the complexity of both syn- and post-orogenic extension in the overriding plate during Caledonian continental collision through field and laboratory investigations in the central East Greenland ...

White, Arthur Percy, 1972-

2001-01-01

189

Palaeomagnetism and the continental crust  

SciTech Connect

This book is an introduction to palaeomagnetism offering treatment of theory and practice. It analyzes the palaeomagnetic record over the whole of geological time, from the Archaean to the Cenozoic, and goes on to examine the impact of past geometries and movements of the continental crust at each geological stage. Topics covered include theory of rock and mineral magnetism, field and laboratory methods, growth and consolidation of the continental crust in Archaean and Proterozoic times, Palaeozoic palaeomagnetism and the formation of Pangaea, the geomagnetic fields, continental movements, configurations and mantle convection.

Piper, J.D.A.

1987-01-01

190

A high-resolution local network study of the Nazca plate Wadati-Benioff zone under western Argentina  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Seismic data, recorded by INPRES telemetered network located above one of the subhorizontal segments of the subducted Nazca plate Wadati-Benioff zone beneath western Argentina, were analyzed to determine the zone's fine structure. The depth of the center and the thickness of the subhorizontal Wadati-Benioff zone beneath the network were calculated to be about 107 km and about 20 km, respectively, with most of the seismogenic zone concentrated in a region about 12 km thick. The Nazca plate is interpreted to be in a state of down-dip tension and to be decoupled from the overriding South American plate by a weak zone of asthenospheric or shear-heated material. The South American plate is estimated to be 80 km thick, based on the location of the subducted Nazca plate and an inferred decoupling zone between the plates.

Smalley, Robert F., Jr.; Isacks, Bryan L.

1987-01-01

191

Composite transform-convergent plate boundaries: description and discussion  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The leading edge of the overriding plate at an obliquely convergent boundary is commonly sliced by a system of strike-slip faults. This fault system is often structurally complex, and may show correspondingly uneven strain effects, with great vertical and translational shifts of the component blocks of the fault system. The stress pattern and strain effects vary along the length of the system and change through time. These margins are considered to be composite transform-convergent (CTC) plate boundaries. Examples are given of structures formed along three CTC boundaries: the Aleutian Ridge, the Solomon Islands, and the Philippines. The dynamism of the fault system along a CTC boundary can enhance vertical tectonism and basin formation. This concept provides a framework for the evaluation of petroleum resources related to basin formation, and mineral exploration related to igneous activity associated with transtensional processes. ?? 1992.

Ryan, H.F.; Coleman, P.J.

1992-01-01

192

MACMA: a Virtual Lab for Plate Tectonics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

MACMA (Multi-Agent Convective MAntle) is a tool developed to simulate evolutive plate tectonics and mantle convection in a 2-D cylindrical geometry (Combes et al., 2012). The model relies mainly on a force balance to compute the velocity of each plate, and on empirical rules to determine how plate boundaries move and evolve. It includes first-order features of plate tectonics: (a) all plates on Earth do not have the same size, (b) subduction zones are asymmetric, (c) plates driven by subducting slabs and upper plates do not exhibit the same velocities, and (d) plate boundaries are mobile, can collide, merge and disappear, and new plate boundaries can be created. The MACMA interface was designed to be user-friendly and a simple use of the simulator can be achieved without any prerequisite knowledge in fluid dynamics, mantle rheology, nor in numerical methods. As a preliminary study, the simulator was used by a few students from bachelor's degree to master's degree levels. An initial configuration for plate tectonics has to be created before starting a simulation: the number and types of plate boundaries (ridge, subduction, passive margins) has to be defined and seafloor ages must be given. A simple but interesting exercise consists in letting students build such an initial configuration: they must analyze a map of tectonic plates, choose a 2-D section and examine carefully a map of seafloor ages. Students mentioned that the exercise made them realize that the 3-D spherical structure of plate tectonics does not translate directly in a simple 2-D section, as opposed to what is usually shown in books. Physical parameters: e.g. mantle viscosity, number of layers to consider in the mantle (upper and lower mantle, possible asthenosphere), initial time and mantle temperature, have to be chosen, and students can use this virtual lab to see how different scenarios emerge when parameters are varied. Very importantly, the direct visualization of the mobility of plate boundaries is a feature that clearly seems interesting to students. They are used to see dynamic representations of continental drift, but this does not include the dynamics of the oceanic lithosphere and the corresponding fluctuations in seafloor age distribution. The 2-D geometry of the simulator is a simplification that actually brings a clearer view of plate boundary creations, migrations, and collisions, together with global plate tectonics reorganization events.

Grigne, C.; Combes, M.; Tisseau, C.

2013-12-01

193

Plate Tectonics II: Plates, plate boundaries, and driving forces  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The distribution of earthquakes and volcanoes around the world confirmed the theory of plate tectonics first proposed by Wegener. These phenomena also help categorize plate boundaries into three different types: convergent, divergent, and transform.

Anne Egger

2003-03-18

194

Tectonic Plates and Plate Boundaries (WMS)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The earths crust is constantly in motion. Sections of the crust, called plates, push against each other due to forces from the molten interior of the earth. The areas where these plates collide often have increased volcanic and earthquake activity. These images show the locations of the plates and their boundaries in the earths crust. Convergent boundaries are areas where two plates are pushing against each other and one plate may be subducting under another. Divergent boundaries have two plates pulling away from each other and indicate regions where new land could be created. Transform boundaries are places where two plates are sliding against each other in opposite directions, and diffuse boundaries are places where two plates have the same relative motion. Numerous small microplates have been omitted from the plate image. These images have been derived from images made available by the United States Geological Surveys Earthquake Hazards Program.

Eric Sokolowsky

2004-06-14

195

-induced continental warming  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this the second of a two-part study, we examine the physical mechanisms responsible for the increasing contrast of the land-sea surface air temperature (SAT) in summertime over the Far East, as observed in recent decades and revealed in future climate projections obtained from a series of transient warming and sensitivity experiments conducted under the umbrella of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5. On a global perspective, a strengthening of land-sea SAT contrast in the transient warming simulations of coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models is attributed to an increase in sea surface temperature (SST). However, in boreal summer, the strengthened contrast over the Far East is reproduced only by increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration. In response to SST increase alone, the tropospheric warming over the interior of the mid- to high-latitude continents including Eurasia are weaker than those over the surrounding oceans, leading to a weakening of the land-sea SAT contrast over the Far East. Thus, the increasing contrast and associated change in atmospheric circulation over East Asia is explained by CO2-induced continental warming. The degree of strengthening of the land-sea SAT contrast varies in different transient warming scenarios, but is reproduced through a combination of the CO2-induced positive and SST-induced negative contributions to the land-sea contrast. These results imply that changes of climate patterns over the land-ocean boundary regions are sensitive to future scenarios of CO2 concentration pathways including extreme cases.

Kamae, Youichi; Watanabe, Masahiro; Kimoto, Masahide; Shiogama, Hideo

2014-11-01

196

Current plate velocities relative to the hotspots incorporating the NUVEL-1 global plate motion model  

SciTech Connect

NUVEL-1 is a new global model of current relative plate velocities which differ significantly from those of prior models. Here the authors incorporate NUVEL-1 into HS2-NUVEL1, a new global model of plate velocities relative to the hotspots. HS2-NUVEL1 was determined from the hotspot data and errors used by Minster and Jordan (1978) to determine AM1-2, which is their model of plate velocities relative to the hotspots. AM1-2 is consistent with Minster and Jordan's relative plate velocity model RM2. Here the authors compare HS2-NUVEL1 with AM1-2 and examine how their differences relate to differences between NUVEL-1 and RM2. HS2-NUVEL1 plate velocities relative to the hotspots are mainly similar to those of AM1-2. Minor differences between the two models include the following: (1) in HS2-NUVEL1 the speed of the partly continental, apparently non-subducting Indian plate is greater than that of the purely oceanic, subducting Nazca plate; (2) in places the direction of motion of the African, Antarctic, Arabian, Australian, Caribbean, Cocos, Eurasian, North American, and South American plates differs between models by more than 10{degree}; (3) in places the speed of the Australian, Caribbean, Cocos, Indian, and Nazca plates differs between models by more than 8 mm/yr. Although 27 of the 30 RM2 Euler vectors differ with 95% confidence from those of NUVEL-1, only the AM1-2 Arabia-hotspot and India-hotspot Euler vectors differ with 95% confidence from those of HS2-NUVEL1. Thus, substituting NUVEL-1 for RM2 in the inversion for plate velocities relative to the hotspots changes few Euler vectors significantly, presumably because the uncertainty in the velocity of a plate relative to the hotspots is much greater than the uncertainty in its velocity relative to other plates.

Gripp, A.E.; Gordon, R.G. (Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (USA))

1990-07-01

197

The Biggest Plates on Earth: Plate Tectonics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this lesson, students investigate the movement of Earth's tectonic plates, the results of these movements, and how magnetic anomalies present at spreading centers document the motion of the crust. As a result of this activity, students will be able to describe the motion of tectonic plates, differentiate between three types of plate boundaries, infer what type of boundary exists between two tectonic plates, and understand how magnetic anomalies provide a record of geologic history and crustal motion around spreading centers. As an example, they will also describe plate boundaries and tectonic activity in the vicinity of the Juan de Fuca plate adjacent to the Pacific Northwest coast of North America.

198

Earth's Decelerating Tectonic Plates  

Microsoft Academic Search

Space geodetic and oceanic magnetic anomaly constraints on tectonic plate motions are employed to determine a new global map of present-day rates of change of plate velocities. This map shows that Earth's largest plate, the Pacific, is presently decelerating along with several other plates in the Pacific and Indo-Atlantic hemispheres. These plate decelerations contribute to an overall, globally averaged slowdown

A M Forte; R Moucha; D B Rowley; S Quere; J X Mitrovica; N A Simmons; S P Grand

2008-01-01

199

Heat Flow Measurements at the Continental Margin off Peru Within the GEOPECO Project  

Microsoft Academic Search

The continental margin off Peru is dominated by the oblique subduction of the Nazca Plate and Nazca Ridge. The sedimentary wedge consists of folded and uplifted material. Along with compression, compaction, folding and faulting, processes of dewatering, material and energy migration occur. Bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs) are detectable in locations, indicating an abundant presence of methane. On the sea floor,

N. Kaul; R. Harris; M. Mueller

2001-01-01

200

The heat flow through oceanic and continental crust and the heat loss of the earth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oceans and continents are now considered to be mobile and interconnected. The paper discusses heat flow through the ocean floor, continental heat flow, heat loss of the earth, thermal structure and thickness of the lithosphere, as well as convection in the mantle and the thermal structure of the lithosphere, within the framework of the theory of plate tectonics. It is

J. G. Sclater; C. Jaupart; D. Galson

1980-01-01

201

Tectonics of the West Iberia continental margin from seismic reflection data  

Microsoft Academic Search

Continental rifting is a fundamental component of the plate tectonic cycle. The West Iberia passive margin is a classic example of a nonvolcanic rifted margin. The West Iberia margin contains an enigmatic north-south ridge of serpentinized peridotite located within the ocean-continent transition. Interpretation of multichannel seismic data and tectonic subsidence analyses suggests that the ridge is located within a broad

Alison Teagan Henning

2005-01-01

202

Plate Coupling, Block Rotation and Crustal Deformation in the Pacific Northwest  

Microsoft Academic Search

GPS measurements in the northwestern US and adjacent parts of Canada describe the relative motions of crustal blocks, the interseismic friction on faults, and the permanent deformation associated with convergence between the Juan de Fuca and North American plates. To estimate angular velocities of the oceanic Juan de Fuca and Explorer plates and several continental crustal blocks, we invert the

R. McCaffrey; A. I. Qamar; R. W. King; R. Wells

2006-01-01

203

Spatial distribution of earthquakes and subduction of the Nazca plate beneath South America  

Microsoft Academic Search

A detailed study of the spatial distribution of precisely located hypocenters of South American earthquakes that occurred between lat 0° and 45°S shows that the data can be explained by the simple model of a descending oceanic plate beneath a continental plate and that the following conditions obtain: (1) The hypocenters clearly define five segments of inclined seismic zones, in

Muawia Barazangi; Bryan L. Isacks

1976-01-01

204

Interrelationships between continental freeboard, tectonics and mantle temperature  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Oceanic hypsometry and isentropic melting models are combined to address the question of freeboard from the middle Archean to the present. In addition to the fraction of continental crust, the factors governing the long-term balance of the continental freeboard include the mantle potential temperature (TP), the oceanic lithosphere thickness, and the plate creation rate (C0). It is shown that variation in TP far outweighs the other factors in importance, with freeboard decreasing by 1 km for every TP increase of about 80 C. The huge ten- to thirtyfold increases in C0 backward in geological time that have been invoked to explain near-constant freeboard are shown to be unnecessary. The low value found for TP is consistent with the preservation of ancient diamonds in the deep South African lithosphere. It is concluded from this that the present cooling rate of the earth of about 46 C/Ga has general applicability over much of geological time.

Galer, S. J. G.

1991-01-01

205

Global Cretaceous plate tectonics and paleogeography  

SciTech Connect

The International Geologic Correlation Program (IGCP) Project 191, The Cretaceous Paleoclimatic Atlas Project has compiled 89 Cretaceous paleogeographic maps representing ten regions or continents. The map resolution varies from stage by stage (e.g. North America, Europe, USSR, Australia) to four maps (e.g. China, Southern South America) to a compilation of localities (Antarctica). The paleogeography is plotted here on global plate tectonic reconstructions for each stage. The reconstructions include continental positions and latitude. In addition, the oceanic plates are reconstructed including bathymetry based on a thermal age-depth relationship. The compiled paleogeography and plate tectonic base maps represent the most comprehensive framework for plotting and analyzing sedimentologic, geochemical and paleontologic data with respect to geography and latitude for the Cretaceous time period.

Barron, E.J.; Beeson, D.; Chen, P.; Dingle, R.V.; Frakes, L.A; Funnell, B.M.; Kauffman, E.G.; Petri, S.; Reyment, R.A.; Riccardi, A.C.

1985-01-01

206

Earthquakes and crustal structure beneath the central Cascadia continental margin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the summer of 2004, two clusters of "repeating" earthquakes occurred beneath the continental shelf of the central Cascadia subduction zone near 44.5N, 124.5W where the subduction megathrust is thought to be locked or transitional. The largest event in each cluster reached moment magnitude M=4.8-4.9. Seismicity has continued since with small (M<3) earthquakes occurring in each cluster on August 23-25, 2007. Moment tensor analysis for the main shock in each cluster indicates a 6-15 degree eastward dipping fault plane, consistent with the plate boundary dip of ~12 degrees. One cluster is serendipitously occurring on a transect along which crustal structure is well known from active source seismic experiments, and raytracing through this crustal model to match observed relative arrival times of secondary phases indicates a source depth of 16 ± 1 km, within 1 km of the plate boundary. This segment of the forearc also displays several characteristics indicative of along-strike and down-dip variations in plate coupling including: a subducted ridge on the downgoing plate; a "bright spot" on the plate boundary at a depth of ~15-20 km; an along-strike change in the gravity field and basement depth; a transition in plate coupling indicated by inversion of GPS data; geologic indications of active folding in the upper plate; and anomalous deformation in the adjacent oceanic plate. On the other hand, no obvious correlation with ETS in this region is observed. In September, 2007, we deployed an array of ocean bottom seismometers to record microseismicity and distinguish among several possible models for the physical properties of the megathrust.

Trehu, A. M.; Braunmiller, J.; Nabelek, J. L.

2004-12-01

207

Earthquakes and crustal structure beneath the central Cascadia continental margin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the summer of 2004, two clusters of "repeating" earthquakes occurred beneath the continental shelf of the central Cascadia subduction zone near 44.5N, 124.5W where the subduction megathrust is thought to be locked or transitional. The largest event in each cluster reached moment magnitude M=4.8-4.9. Seismicity has continued since with small (M<3) earthquakes occurring in each cluster on August 23-25, 2007. Moment tensor analysis for the main shock in each cluster indicates a 6-15 degree eastward dipping fault plane, consistent with the plate boundary dip of ~12 degrees. One cluster is serendipitously occurring on a transect along which crustal structure is well known from active source seismic experiments, and raytracing through this crustal model to match observed relative arrival times of secondary phases indicates a source depth of 16 ± 1 km, within 1 km of the plate boundary. This segment of the forearc also displays several characteristics indicative of along-strike and down-dip variations in plate coupling including: a subducted ridge on the downgoing plate; a "bright spot" on the plate boundary at a depth of ~15-20 km; an along-strike change in the gravity field and basement depth; a transition in plate coupling indicated by inversion of GPS data; geologic indications of active folding in the upper plate; and anomalous deformation in the adjacent oceanic plate. On the other hand, no obvious correlation with ETS in this region is observed. In September, 2007, we deployed an array of ocean bottom seismometers to record microseismicity and distinguish among several possible models for the physical properties of the megathrust.

Trehu, A. M.; Braunmiller, J.; Nabelek, J. L.

2007-12-01

208

Geometrical constraints of rift fissures on the formation of isolated micro continental blocks during transition from continental rifting to oceanic spreading based on analogue modelling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

From global ocean bathymetric data, we can observe many intraplate features such us submerged and non-submerged plateaus below sea level, islands, ridges, banks etc. All these features can be divided in three main groups: (1) blocks with oceanic crust; (2) blocks with continental crust; (3) complex features. There are many hypotheses that try to describe their origin. Hypotheses, which we carried on: (1) features with continental crust formed by ridge jumping into a continental margin; (2) features with igneous composition formed by eruption of huge volumes of volcanic rocks; (3) complex features with jigsaw crust composition. We present preliminary results of our experimental modeling that show geometrical constraints for the formation of isolated blocks in oceanic crust due to the evolution of overlapping spreading centers. These can lead to the formation of an isolated continental block if all following conditions are met: (1) the angle between extension direction and pre-existing fractures are between 45° to 60° ; (2) the length of two pre-existing fractures located on opposite sides of model plate is equal; (3) the offset between two pre-existing fractures located on opposite sides of model plate vary from 1.5 cm to 3 cm. Extension rates in the model vary from V = 1.67 *10-5 m/sec to V = 2.15×10-5 m/sec which correlate with slow spreading rates. The model plate size was 12×25 cm. These experiments provide us with a probable mechanism of isolated continental block formation. In addition, the experiments allow us to distinguish major geometrical parameters of continental break up modelling. These results are preliminary and we will study other experimental settings such us influence of hotspot activity, interaction between propagating ridge and weakened zones and zones with more stable properties. For example, we consider the conditions of formation Elan Bank in Kerguelen Plateau structure.

Makushkina, Anna; Dubinin, Evgeny; Grokholsky, Andrey

2014-05-01

209

The overriding function of tissue-engineered skin is to restore barrier function to patients in whom this has been severely compromised. Fig-  

E-print Network

-thickness skin of more than 4 cm in diameter will not heal well without a graft1 . In cases in which considerable amounts of skin are needed, the `gold standard' approach is to take split-thickness grafts that containThe overriding function of tissue-engineered skin is to restore barrier function to patients

Cai, Long

210

Orthogonal femoral plating  

PubMed Central

Objectives This study tests the biomechanical properties of adjacent locked plate constructs in a femur model using Sawbones. Previous studies have described biomechanical behaviour related to inter-device distances. We hypothesise that a smaller lateral inter-plate distance will result in a biomechanically stronger construct, and that addition of an anterior plate will increase the overall strength of the construct. Methods Sawbones were plated laterally with two large-fragment locking compression plates with inter-plate distances of 10 mm or 1 mm. Small-fragment locking compression plates of 7-hole, 9-hole, and 11-hole sizes were placed anteriorly to span the inter-plate distance. Four-point bend loading was applied, and the moment required to displace the constructs by 10 mm was recorded. Results We found that a 1 mm inter-plate distance supported greater moments than a 10 mm distance in constructs with only lateral plates. Moments supported after the addition of a 9- or 11-hole anterior plate were greater for both 10 mm and 1 mm inter-plate distance, with the 11-hole anterior plate supporting a greater moment than a 9-hole plate. Femurs with a 7-hole anterior plate fractured regardless of lateral inter-plate distance size. Conclusion This suggests that the optimal plate configuration is to minimise lateral inter-plate distance and protect it with an anterior plate longer than seven holes. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:23–8. PMID:25715873

Auston, D. A.; Werner, F. W.; Simpson, R. B.

2015-01-01

211

The northern Egyptian continental margin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Africa displays a variety of continental margin structures, tectonics and sedimentary records. The northern Egyptian continental margin represents the NE portion of the North African passive continental margin. Economically, this region is of great importance as a very rich and productive hydrocarbon zone in Egypt. Moreover, it is characterized by remarkable tectonic setting accompanied by active tectonic processes from the old Tethys to recent Mediterranean. In this article, seismicity of the northern Egyptian continental margin has been re-evaluated for more than 100-years and the source parameters of three recent earthquakes (October 2012, January 2013 and July 2013) have been estimated. Moment tensor inversions of 19th October 2012 and 17th January 2013 earthquakes reveal normal faulting mechanism with strike-slip component having seismic moment of 3.5E16 N m and 4.3E15 N m respectively. The operation of the Egyptian National Seismic Network (ENSN) since the end of 1997 has significantly enhanced the old picture of earthquake activity across northern Egyptian continental margin whereas; the record-ability (annual rate) has changed from 2-events/year to 54-event/year before and after ENSN respectively. The spatial distribution of earthquakes foci indicated that the activity tends to cluster at three zones: Mediterranean Ridge (MR), Nile Cone (NC) and Eratosthenes Seamount (ERS). However, two seismic gaps are reported along Levant Basin (LEV) and Herodotus Basin (HER).

Badawy, Ahmed; Mohamed, Gad; Omar, Khaled; Farid, Walid

2015-01-01

212

Caribbean plate tectonics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This illustration available at Wikimedia Commons shows the plate tectonic setting in the Caribbean. Plate boundaries are color-coded by margin type and plate motions are noted with direction and magnitude in mm/yr.

Sting

213

Inheritance of pre-existing weakness in continental breakup: 3D numerical modeling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The whole process of continental rifting to seafloor spreading is one of the most important plate tectonics on the earth. There are many questions remained related to this process, most of which are poorly understood, such as how continental rifting transformed into seafloor spreading? How the curved oceanic ridge developed from a single straight continental rift? How the pre-existing weakness in either crust or lithospheric mantle individually influences the continental rifting and oceanic spreading? By employing the state-of-the-art three-dimensional thermomechanical-coupled numerical code (using Eulerian-Lagrangian finite-difference method and marker-in-cell technic) (Gerya and Yuen, 2007), which can model long-term plate extension and large strains, we studied the whole process of continental rifting to seafloor spreading based on the following question: How the pre-existing lithospheric weak zone influences the continental breakup? Continental rifts do not occur randomly, but like to follow the pre-existing weakness (such as fault zones, suture zones, failed rifts, and other tectonic boundaries) in the lithosphere, for instance, the western branch of East African Rift formed in the relatively weak mobile belts along the curved western border of Tanzanian craton (Corti et al., 2007; Nyblade and Brazier, 2002), the Main Ethiopian Rift developed within the Proterozoic mobile belt which is believed to represent a continental collision zone (Keranen and Klemperer, 2008),the Baikal rift formed along the suture between Siberian craton and Sayan-Baikal folded belt (Chemenda et al., 2002). The early stage formed rift can be a template for the future rift development and continental breakup (Keranen and Klemperer, 2008). Lithospheric weakness can either reduce the crustal strength or mantle strength, and leads to the crustal or mantle necking (Dunbar and Sawyer, 1988), which plays an important role on controlling the continental breakup patterns, such as controlling the breakup order of crust and mantle (Huismans and Beaumont, 2011). However, the inheritance of pre-existing lithospheric weakness in the evolution of continental rifts and oceanic ridge is not well studied. We use 3D numerical modeling to study this problem, by changing the weak zone position and geometry, and the rheological structure of the model. In our study, we find that: 1).3D continental breakup and seafloor spreading patterns are controlled by (a) crust-mantle rheological coupling and (b) geometry and position of the pre-existing weak zones. 2).Three spreading patterns are obtained: (a) straight ridges, (b) curved ridges and (c) overlapping ridges. 3).When crust and mantle are decoupled, abandoned rift structures often form.

Liao, Jie; Gerya, Taras

2013-04-01

214

Convergent plate margin east of North Island, New Zealand  

SciTech Connect

The Indian-Pacific plate boundary passes along the eastern margin of North Island, New Zealand, with the Pacific plate being thrust under the Indian plate to the west. The continental slope forming the Indian plate margin is broad with a well-formed series of trench slope basins and intervening ridges along the continental slope and shelf, subparallel to the margin, and continuing onto land. Multichannel seismic reflection data recorded across this margin show a thick (2.5-km) sedimentary section overlying oceanic basement in the deep-water part of the profile, and part of this sedimentary section is apparently being subducted under the accretionary prism. At the toe of the continental slope, nascent thrusts, often showing little apparent offset but a change in reflection amplitude, occur over a broad region. Well-defined trench slope basins show several episodes of basin formation and thrusting and are similar to structural interpretations for adjacent onshore basins. A bottom simulating reflector, which may delineate a gas-hydrate layer, can be traced over the midslope part of the profile. A major reflector, interpreted as the base of the accretionary prism, can be traced discontinuously to the coast where it coincides with the top of a zone of high seismicity, considered to mark the top of the subducted Pacific plate.

Davey, F.J; Hampton, M.; Lewis, K.

1986-07-01

215

Bioenergetics of Continental Serpentinites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Serpentinization is the aqueous alteration of ultramafic (Fe- and Mg-rich) rocks, resulting in secondary mineral assemblages of serpentine, brucite, iron oxyhydroxides and magnetite, talc, and possibly carbonate and silica-rich veins and other minor phases-all depending on the evolving pressure-temperature-composition of the system. The abiotic evolution of hydrogen and possibly organic compounds via serpentinization (McCollom and Bach, 2009) highlights the relevance of this geologic process to carbon and energy sources for the deep biosphere. Serpentinization may fuel life over long stretches of geologic time, throughout the global seabed and in exposed, faulted peridotite blocks (as at Lost City Hydrothermal Field, Kelley et al., 2005), and in obducted oceanic mantle units in ophiolites (e.g., Tiago et al., 2004). Relatively little work has been published on life in continental serpentinite settings, though they likely host a unique resident microbiota. In this work, we systematically model the serpentinizing fluid as an environmental niche. Reported field data for high and moderate pH serpentinizing fluids were modeled from Cyprus, the Philippines, Oman, Northern California, New Caledonia, Yugoslavia, Portugal, Italy, Newfoundland Canada, New Zealand, and Turkey. Values for Gibbs Energy of reaction (?Gr), kJ per mole of electrons transferred for a given metabolism, are calculated for each field site. Cases are considered both for (1) modest assumptions of 1 nanomolar hydrogen and 1 micromolar methane, based on unpublished data for a similar northern California field site (Cardace and Hoehler, in prep.) and (2) an upper estimate of 10 nanomolar hydrogen and 500 micromolar methane. We survey the feasibility of microbial metabolisms for key steps in the nitrogen cycle, oxidation of sulfur in pyrite, iron oxidation or reduction reactions, sulfate reduction coupled to hydrogen or methane oxidation, methane oxidation coupled to the reduction of oxygen, and methanogenesis. We find that there is strong energetic yield from most reactions considered, except for transformation of nitrite to nitrate, ammonia to nitrite, ferrous to ferric iron, and carbon dioxide to methane. Laying out foundational metabolic models for microbiological communities sustained by chemosynthesis in this setting (mining energy from ultramafic rocks and chemical systems, not tied to photosynthesis in any way) has enticing relevance to the search for extraterrestrial life, in that similar rocks have been detected on our sibling planet Mars, with transient atmospheric detection of hydrogen and methane (Schulte et al., 2006, Mumma et al., 2009). To a first order, this work explores the intersection of serpentinite groundwater chemistry and bioenergetics to determine what kinds of life can be sustained in these significant subsurface settings. References cited: Kelley et al. 2005. Science 307:1428-1434. McCollom and Bach. 2009. GCA 73:856-875. Mumma et al., 2009. Science 323:1041-1045. Schulte et al., 2006. Astrobiology 6:364-376.

Cardace, D.; Meyer-Dombard, D. R.

2011-12-01

216

The Aravalli sequence of Rajasthan, India: A Precambrian continental margin?  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The extent to which plate tectonics in its present form operated during the Precambrian is unknown, but is a subject of considerable current interest. A remarkable succession of Precambrian rocks in Rajasthan, Northwestern India, which may help to shed more light on this question are discussed. Data indicates that the Aravalli sequence has a number of characteristics generally ascribed to active continental margins. Although much more work is required to bear this out, the evidence suggests that the processes operating in such an environment in the early Proterozoic or late Archean were not vastly different from today.

Macdougall, J. D.; Willis, R.; Lugmair, G. W.; Roy, A. B.; Gopalan, K.

1985-01-01

217

The Great Continental Drift Mystery  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This unit introduces students to the development of the theory of continental drift. They will examine the early work of Alfred Wegener and Alexander DuToit, investigate lines of evidence that resulted in the development of the theory, and learn about the final lines of evidence that resulted in the theory's acceptance. There is a set of activities in which the students construct a map of Pangea using Wegener's clues, familiarize themselves with some important geographic locations, and investigate how fossil distribution can be used to enhance the study of continental drift. Study questions and a bibliography are included.

218

The Continental Distillery: Building Thick Continental Crust in the Central Andes (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The formation of stable continental crust and the associated development and destruction of mantle lithospheric roots is central to our understanding of plate tectonics, both at its inception and as an ongoing process today. Subduction zones play an important role in the creation and refinement of continental crust, and also serve as a possible mechanism for the removal of residual mantle material. The central Andes provide an intriguing laboratory for the study of these processes. Up to 400 km wide, 1500 km long, and with an average elevation of 4 km, the Altiplano Plateau is the largest orogen on earth associated with an ocean-continent subduction zone. This is much larger than adjacent 'normal' sections of the Andes, raising the question of why this portion of South American crust became so much more substantial than surrounding areas. Over the past several years, new seismic data have made it possible for us to develop a more complete picture of the lithospheric and asthenospheric processes involved in the development of the Altiplano Plateau and the adjacent narrower orogen further to the north. The 'Central Andean Uplift and the Geodynamics of High Topography' (CAUGHT) comprises in part a broadband deployment of 50 stations across the northern flank of the Altiplano Plateau in southern Peru and northern Bolivia. The adjacent 'PerU Lithosphere and Slab Experiment' (PULSE) includes 40 broadband stations that cover the region directly north of the CAUGHT deployment, encompassing the northern edge of the Altiplano, the transition to 'normal' width orogen, and the transition in slab geometry from normal to flat from south to north across the study area. Uplift of the Altiplano Plateau is likely due to some combination shortening, isostasy due to lithospheric destruction or changes in crustal density, magmatic addition to the crust, and/or flow within the thickened crust. Our studies indicate pervasive low velocities across the Altiplano consistent with a dominantly felsic composition, together with even lower velocities in the mid crust beneath the Western Cordillera and Altiplano that are best explained as the intrusion of a Neogene - to - recent batholith. The lithospheric mantle appears to be highly variable across the study area, with some regions appearing to have lost most of their original roots and others indicating the persistence of a high velocity mantle lithosphere. These studies and others in progress will help us form a better idea of the processes involved in generating thick continental crust from otherwise 'normal' ocean-continent subduction zones, and those responsible for the development and destruction of continental lithospheric roots.

Wagner, L. S.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Long, M. D.; Tavera, H.; Minaya, E.; Biryol, C. B.; Bishop, B.; Eakin, C. M.; Franca, G.; Knezevic Antonijevic, S.; Kumar, A.; Ryan, J. C.; Scire, A. C.; Ward, K. M.; Young, B. E.

2013-12-01

219

Capturing Continental Rupture Processes in Afar  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Both continental and oceanic rifting processes are highly 3D, but the stability of the along-axis segmentation from rifting to breakup, and its relationship to seafloor spreading remains debated. Three-dimensional models of the interactions of faults and magmatism in time and space are in development, but modelling and observations suggest that magmatic segments may propagate and/or migrate during periods of magmatism. Our ability to discriminate between the various models in large part depends on the quality of data in the ocean-transition zone, or, observations from zones of incipient plate rupture. Largely 2D crustal-scale seismic data from magmatic passive margins reveal large magmatic additions to the crust, but the timing of this heat and mass transfer is weakly constrained. Thus, the lack of information on the across rift breadth of the deforming zone at rupture, and the relationship between the early rift segmentation and the seafloor spreading segmentation represent fundamental gaps in knowledge. Our study of Earth's youngest magmatic margin, the superbly exposed, tectonically active southern Red Sea, aims to answer the following questions: What are the geometry and kinematics of active fault systems across the 'passive margin' to zone of incipient plate rupture? What is the relationship between the initial border fault segmentation, and the breakup zone segmentation? What is the distribution of active deformation and magmatism, and how does it compare to time-averaged strain patterns? We integrate results of recent experiments that suggest widespread replacement of crust and mantle lithosphere beneath the 'passive' margin, and explain the ongoing seismic deformation as a consequence of bending stresses across the ocean-continent transition, with or without a dynamic component.

Ebinger, Cynthia; Belachew, Manahloh; Tepp, Gabrielle; Keir, Derek; Ayele, Atalay

2014-05-01

220

Physical processes in the growth of the continental crust  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Major mechanisms of crustal addition are volcanism and plutonism at plate boundaries and within plate interiors. One approach to deciding if island arc magmatism dominated ancient crustal growth is to assess the rate at which the process has operated in the recent past. The localized addition rates were found to be comparable to present day global rates. One physical observable that was used to constrain models of crustal growth is sea level. A simple physical model was developed to explore the consequences of constant freeboard (the height of the continents above sea level). Global geoid and sea floor topography data were used to identify and study oceanic plateaus and swells that have either continental crustal roots or anomalously thick ocean crusts.

Schubert, G.

1988-01-01

221

Site history and edaphic features override the influence of plant species on microbial communities in restored tidal freshwater wetlands.  

PubMed

Restored wetland soils differ significantly in physical and chemical properties from their natural counterparts even when plant community compositions are similar, but effects of restoration on microbial community composition and function are not well understood. Here, we investigate plant-microbe relationships in restored and natural tidal freshwater wetlands from two subestuaries of the Chesapeake Bay. Soil samples were collected from the root zone of Typha latifolia, Phragmites australis, Peltandra virginica, and Lythrum salicaria. Soil microbial composition was assessed using 454 pyrosequencing, and genes representing bacteria, archaea, denitrification, methanogenesis, and methane oxidation were quantified. Our analysis revealed variation in some functional gene copy numbers between plant species within sites, but intersite comparisons did not reveal consistent plant-microbe trends. We observed more microbial variations between plant species in natural wetlands, where plants have been established for a long period of time. In the largest natural wetland site, sequences putatively matching methanogens accounted for ?17% of all sequences, and the same wetland had the highest numbers of genes coding for methane coenzyme A reductase (mcrA). Sequences putatively matching aerobic methanotrophic bacteria and anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME) were detected in all sites, suggesting that both aerobic and anaerobic methane oxidation are possible in these systems. Our data suggest that site history and edaphic features override the influence of plant species on microbial communities in restored wetlands. PMID:25769832

Prasse, Christine E; Baldwin, Andrew H; Yarwood, Stephanie A

2015-05-15

222

Some remarks on continental drift  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary The continental drift may be explained by an expanding Earth only. In fact, there is a differences in the rate of heat flow between continents and oceans. Principially, there is a possibility of deriving the value of ancient radii by palaeomagnetic and age measurements.

L. Egyed

1960-01-01

223

Estimation of continental precipitation recycling  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The total amount of water that precipitates on large continental regions is supplied by two mechanisms: 1) advection from the surrounding areas external to the region and 2) evaporation and transpiration from the land surface within the region. The latter supply mechanism is tantamount to the recycling of precipitation over the continental area. The degree to which regional precipitation is supplied by recycled moisture is a potentially significant climate feedback mechanism and land surface-atmosphere interaction, which may contribute to the persistence and intensification of droughts. Gridded data on observed wind and humidity in the global atmosphere are used to determine the convergence of atmospheric water vapor over continental regions. A simplified model of the atmospheric moisture over continents and simultaneous estimates of regional precipitation are employed to estimate, for several large continental regions, the fraction of precipitation that is locally derived. The results indicate that the contribution of regional evaporation to regional precipitation varies substantially with location and season. For the regions studied, the ratio of locally contributed to total monthly precipitation generally lies between 0. 10 and 0.30 but is as high as 0.40 in several cases.

Brubaker, Kaye L.; Entekhabi, Dara; Eagleson, P. S.

1993-01-01

224

Sputtering and ion plating  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The proceedings of a conference on sputtering and ion plating are presented. Subjects discussed are: (1) concepts and applications of ion plating, (2) sputtering for deposition of solid film lubricants, (3) commercial ion plating equipment, (4) industrial potential for ion plating and sputtering, and (5) fundamentals of RF and DC sputtering.

1972-01-01

225

Copper Map Plate Detail  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

A portion of the engraving on the plate used to print points, lines, and text in black ink. Engravings on the plate are left-to-right reversed. This plate was cleaned and treated to improve the visibility of the engraving. The plate was used to print the Washington [D.C.] and vicinity, 1:31,680-sca...

226

Plate Tectonics Animation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Plate tectonics describes the behavior of Earth's outer shell, with pieces (plates) bumping and grinding and jostling each other about. Explore these maps and animations to get a jump start on understanding plate tectonic processes, history, and how motion of the plates affects our planet today.

2002-01-01

227

Planet Earth: Plate Tectonics  

E-print Network

, ice and sediment for long periods of geological time (>105 a). · Controlled and passive (e-plate system #12;Relative plate motions on a sphere A In a three-plate system, A, B and C, if AB and BC are known then CA can be found. See GG p23-24. Euler's theorem: motion of any spherical plate can

Watts, A. B. "Tony"

228

Dynamics of Mid-Palaeocene North Atlantic rifting linked with European intra-plate deformations.  

PubMed

The process of continental break-up provides a large-scale experiment that can be used to test causal relations between plate tectonics and the dynamics of the Earth's deep mantle. Detailed diagnostic information on the timing and dynamics of such events, which are not resolved by plate kinematic reconstructions, can be obtained from the response of the interior of adjacent continental plates to stress changes generated by plate boundary processes. Here we demonstrate a causal relationship between North Atlantic continental rifting at approximately 62 Myr ago and an abrupt change of the intra-plate deformation style in the adjacent European continent. The rifting involved a left-lateral displacement between the North American-Greenland plate and Eurasia, which initiated the observed pause in the relative convergence of Europe and Africa. The associated stress change in the European continent was significant and explains the sudden termination of a approximately 20-Myr-long contractional intra-plate deformation within Europe, during the late Cretaceous period to the earliest Palaeocene epoch, which was replaced by low-amplitude intra-plate stress-relaxation features. The pre-rupture tectonic stress was large enough to have been responsible for precipitating continental break-up, so there is no need to invoke a thermal mantle plume as a driving mechanism. The model explains the simultaneous timing of several diverse geological events, and shows how the intra-continental stratigraphic record can reveal the timing and dynamics of stress changes, which cannot be resolved by reconstructions based only on plate kinematics. PMID:18075591

Nielsen, Søren B; Stephenson, Randell; Thomsen, Erik

2007-12-13

229

Mapping Plate Tectonic Boundaries  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

To prepare for this activity, students do background reading on Plate Tectonics from the course textbook. Students also participate in a lecture on the discovery and formulation of the unifying theory of plate tectonics, and the relationship between plate boundaries and geologic features such as volcanoes. Lastly, in lecture, students are introduced to a series of geologic hazards caused by certain plate tectonic interactions. The activity gives students practices at identifying plate boundaries and allows them to explore lesser known tectonically active regions.

Michael Kerwin

230

Seismological studies of the continental lithosphere  

SciTech Connect

The lithosphere,'' as used here in the generally accepted sense, includes the crust of the earth and that part of its upper mantle that, together with the crust, constitute the moving tectonic plates. These are underlain by the more easily deformed asthenosphere'' at a depth on the order of 100 km. The seismic low-velocity zone (LVZ) in the mantle is usually identified with the asthenosphere. We are convinced that a better understanding of the continental lithosphere is vital to society, much of that understanding can only be gained by the application of modern seismological methods, and to accomplish these objectives the United States needs urgently to upgrade its seismological capability. Our aim in this report is to convey to the reader our convictions with the hope that they will be translated into action. We suggest specific studies that should be undertaken now and some actions that, if taken, should realize the full potential of seismological techniques. 110 refs., 35 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1984-01-01

231

Plate Tectonics: From Initiation of Subduction to Global Plate Motions (Augustus Love Medal Lecture)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Plates are driven by buoyancy forces distributed in the mantle, within cooling oceanic plates (ridge push) and within subducted slabs. Although the case is often made that subducted slabs provide the principle driving force on plate motion, consensus has not been achieved. This is at least partially due to the great difficulty in realistically capturing the role of slabs in observationally-constrained models as slabs act to drive and resist plate motions through their high effective viscosity. Slab buoyancy acts directly on the edge of the plate (slab pull), while inducing mantle flow that tends to drag both subducting and overriding plates toward the trench. While plates bend during subduction they undergo a form of 'plastic failure' (as evident through faulting, seismicity and reduction of flexural parameters at the outer trench wall). The birth of a new subduction zone, subduction initiation, provides important insight into plate motions and subduction dynamics. About half of all subduction zones initiated over the Cenozoic and the geophysical and geological observations of them provide first order constraints on the mechanics of how these margins evolved from their preexisting tectonic state to self-sustaining subduction. We have examples of subduction initiation at different phases of the initiation process (e.g. early versus late) as well as how margins have responded to different tectonic forcings. The consequences of subduction initiation are variable: intense trench roll back and extensive boninitic volcanism followed initiation of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc while both were absent during Aleutian arc initiation. Such differences may be related to the character of the preexisting plates, the size of and forces on the plates, and how the lithosphere was initially bending during initiation. I will address issues associated with the forces driving plate tectonics and initiating new subduction zones from two perspectives. A common thread is the origin and evolution of intense back arc spreading and rapid roll back associated with some ocean-ocean subduction zones. I will look at the dynamics driving global plate motions and the time-dependence of trench rollback regionally. Capitalizing on advances in adaptive mesh refinement algorithms on parallel computers with individual plate margins resolved down to a scale of 1 kilometer, observationally constrained, high-resolution models of global mantle flow now capture the role of slabs and show how plate tectonics is regulated by the rheology of slabs. Back-arc extension and slab rollback are emergent consequences of slab descent in the upper mantle. I will then describe regional, time-dependent models, address the causes and consequences of subduction initiation, and show that most back arc extension follows subduction initiation. Returning to the global models, inverse models using the full adjoint of the variable viscosity, Stokes equation are now possible and allow an even greater link between present-day geophysical observations and the dynamics from local to global scales.

Gurnis, Michael

2013-04-01

232

A great earthquake rupture across a rapidly evolving three-plate boundary.  

PubMed

On 1 April 2007 a great, tsunamigenic earthquake (moment magnitude 8.1) ruptured the Solomon Islands subduction zone at the triple junction where the Australia and Solomon Sea-Woodlark Basin plates simultaneously underthrust the Pacific plate with different slip directions. The associated abrupt change in slip direction during the great earthquake drove convergent anelastic deformation of the upper Pacific plate, which generated localized uplift in the forearc above the subducting Simbo fault, potentially amplifying local tsunami amplitude. Elastic deformation during the seismic cycle appears to be primarily accommodated by the overriding Pacific forearc. This earthquake demonstrates the seismogenic potential of extremely young subducting oceanic lithosphere, the ability of ruptures to traverse substantial geologic boundaries, and the consequences of complex coseismic slip for uplift and tsunamigenesis. PMID:19359581

Furlong, Kevin P; Lay, Thorne; Ammon, Charles J

2009-04-10

233

A Great Earthquake Rupture Across a Rapidly Evolving Three-Plate Boundary  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

On 1 April 2007 a great, tsunamigenic earthquake (moment magnitude 8.1) ruptured the Solomon Islands subduction zone at the triple junction where the Australia and Solomon Sea-Woodlark Basin plates simultaneously underthrust the Pacific plate with different slip directions. The associated abrupt change in slip direction during the great earthquake drove convergent anelastic deformation of the upper Pacific plate, which generated localized uplift in the forearc above the subducting Simbo fault, potentially amplifying local tsunami amplitude. Elastic deformation during the seismic cycle appears to be primarily accommodated by the overriding Pacific forearc. This earthquake demonstrates the seismogenic potential of extremely young subducting oceanic lithosphere, the ability of ruptures to traverse substantial geologic boundaries, and the consequences of complex coseismic slip for uplift and tsunamigenesis.

Furlong, Kevin P.; Lay, Thorne; Ammon, Charles J.

2009-04-01

234

Introduction to TETHYS—an interdisciplinary GIS database for studying continental collisions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The TETHYS GIS database is being developed as a way to integrate relevant geologic, geophysical, geochemical, geochronologic, and remote sensing data bearing on Tethyan continental plate collisions. The project is predicated on a need for actualistic model 'templates' for interpreting the Earth's geologic record. Because of their time-transgressive character, Tethyan collisions offer 'actualistic' models for features such as continental 'escape', collision-induced upper mantle flow magmatism, and marginal basin opening, associated with modern convergent plate margins. Large integrated geochemical and geophysical databases allow for such models to be tested against the geologic record, leading to a better understanding of continental accretion throughout Earth history. The TETHYS database combines digital topographic and geologic information, remote sensing images, sample-based geochemical, geochronologic, and isotopic data (for pre- and post-collision igneous activity), and data for seismic tomography, shear-wave splitting, space geodesy, and information for plate tectonic reconstructions. Here, we report progress on developing such a database and the tools for manipulating and visualizing integrated 2-, 3-, and 4-d data sets with examples of research applications in progress. Based on an Oracle database system, linked with ArcIMS via ArcSDE, the TETHYS project is an evolving resource for researchers, educators, and others interested in studying the role of plate collisions in the process of continental accretion, and will be accessible as a node of the national Geosciences Cyberinfrastructure Network—GEON via the World-Wide Web and ultra-high speed internet2. Interim partial access to the data and metadata is available at: http://geoinfo.geosc.uh.edu/Tethys/ and http://www.esrs.wmich.edu/tethys.htm. We demonstrate the utility of the TETHYS database in building a framework for lithospheric interactions in continental collision and accretion.

Khan, S. D.; Flower, M. F. J.; Sultan, M. I.; Sandvol, E.

2006-05-01

235

Geodetic evidence for low coupling on the Hellenic subduction plate interface  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We develop a block model for the Aegean and surrounding areas, constrained by Global Positioning System (GPS), in order to investigate the degree of coupling on the Hellenic subduction interface (i.e., the fraction of the motion across the plate boundary accommodated by elastic strain accumulation). We use previously published models, and seismicity to define the geometry of the interface separating the down-going Nubian slab from the overriding Aegean. This model provides a good fit to the GPS observations; for the ?200,000 km2 Aegean block the wrms of the residual velocities is 1.4 mm/yr for 80 GPS velocity estimates, approximately the 95% level of the GPS velocity uncertainties. We investigate the degree of coupling on the seismically active plate interface, the Hellenic trench splay fault (believed to be the source of the 365 AD Great Crete Earthquake and Tsunami), and the Kephalonia transform fault by comparing the modeled GPS residual velocity field for a range of coupling values. The GPS observations are almost insensitive to coupling on the Kephalonia transform fault, because of the vertical dip of the fault that creates interseismic deformation only close to the fault where few GPS sites exist. The absence of resolvable shortening of the leading edge of the Aegean Plate precludes coupling of more than 0.2 (20% of the full Nubia-Aegean convergence rate) on the modeled plate interface. Because of the shallow dip of the plate interface and trench splay fault, and high rate of convergence, if these boundaries were fully coupled, high elastic strain rates would be expected to extend well into the overriding Aegean plate. Based on our preferred value for the degree of coupling (0.1), and assuming characteristic earthquake behavior, we estimate a recurrence time for great earthquakes with slip similar to that for the 365 Crete event of 5700-8300 yr, consistent with the absence of subsequent great earthquakes on this segment of the subduction zone.

Vernant, Philippe; Reilinger, Robert; McClusky, Simon

2014-01-01

236

Earthquakes in Stable Continental Crust.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discussed are some of the reasons for earthquakes which occur in stable crust away from familiar zones at the ends of tectonic plates. Crust stability and the reactivation of old faults are described using examples from India and Australia. (CW)

Johnston, Arch C.; Kanter, Lisa R.

1990-01-01

237

Caffeine does not cause override of the G2/M block induced by UVc or gamma radiation in normal human skin fibroblasts  

PubMed Central

Caffeine has for many years been known to be involved in the sensitization of DNA to damage. One potential mechanism recently put forward is an override of the G2/M block induced by irradiation, which would leave the cells less time for DNA repair prior to mitosis. However, different cell types display a variety of responses and no clear pathway has yet emerged, especially as little is known about the capacity of this agent to enhance DNA damage in normal, untransformed cells. Continuous exposure to commonly used caffeine concentrations (1–5 mM) inhibited the proliferation of normal human fibroblasts (NHFs) in a dose-dependent manner to up to 80% at 5 mM. Exposure of exponentially growing NHFs to UVc radiation (20 J m–2) or ? radiation (2.5–8 Gy) led to a 45–60% inhibition of proliferation and protracted accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase. Addition of 2 mM caffeine after irradiation induced slowing of the S phase passage, with a resultant delay in G2/M accumulation mimicking a G2/M block override. These results were confirmed by stathmokinetic studies, which showed delayed entry of the cells into mitosis in the presence of caffeine. Our data demonstrate that caffeine primarily inhibits replicative DNA synthesis and suggest that, at least in normal cells, caffeine potentiates the cytotoxicity of radiation by intervening in DNA repair rather than by overriding the G2/M block. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10917550

Deplanque, G; Vincent, F; Mah-Becherel, M C M; Cazenave, J-P; Bergerat, J-P; Klein-Soyer, C

2000-01-01

238

Continental collisions and seismic signature  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Reflection seismics in compressional belts has revealed the structure of crustal shortening and thickening processes, showing complex patterns of indentation and interfingering of colliding crusts and subcrustal lithospheres. Generally, in the upper crust large zones of detachments develop, often showing duplexes and 'crocodile' structures. The lower crust from zones of active collision (e.g. Alps, Pyrenees) is characterized by strongly dipping reflections. The base of the crust with the Moho must be continuously equilibrating after orogenic collapse as areas of former continental collision exhibit flat Mohos and subhorizontal reflections. The depth to the Moho increases during collision and decreases after the onset of post-orogenic extension, until finally the crustal root disappears completely together with the erosion of the mountains. Processes, active during continental collisions and orogenic collapse, create distinct structures which are imaged by reflection seismic profiling. Examples are shown and discussed.

Meissner, R.; Wever, Th.; Sadowiak, P.

1991-04-01

239

Create Your Plate  

MedlinePLUS

... Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods Holiday Meal Planning ... Healthy Diet Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten Free Diets Holiday Meal Planning Cook with ...

240

Plate Tectonics: Further Evidence  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The representation depicts the spreading of the sea floor along the mid-ocean ridges. The resource generally describes the theory of plate tectonics, including the movement of plates with regard to one another.

241

Earth's Decelerating Tectonic Plates  

SciTech Connect

Space geodetic and oceanic magnetic anomaly constraints on tectonic plate motions are employed to determine a new global map of present-day rates of change of plate velocities. This map shows that Earth's largest plate, the Pacific, is presently decelerating along with several other plates in the Pacific and Indo-Atlantic hemispheres. These plate decelerations contribute to an overall, globally averaged slowdown in tectonic plate speeds. The map of plate decelerations provides new and unique constraints on the dynamics of time-dependent convection in Earth's mantle. We employ a recently developed convection model constrained by seismic, geodynamic and mineral physics data to show that time-dependent changes in mantle buoyancy forces can explain the deceleration of the major plates in the Pacific and Indo-Atlantic hemispheres.

Forte, A M; Moucha, R; Rowley, D B; Quere, S; Mitrovica, J X; Simmons, N A; Grand, S P

2008-08-22

242

External Resource: Plate Tectonics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Windows to the Universe interactive webpage connects students to the study and understanding of plate tectonics, the main force that shapes our planets surface. Topics: plate tectonics, lithosphere, subduction zones, faults, ridges.

1900-01-01

243

The PLATES Project  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the web page for PLATES, a program of research into plate tectonic and geologic reconstructions at the University of Texas at Austin Institute for Geophysics. The page contains links to a brief overview of plate tectonics and plate reconstructions using the PLATES Project's global plate reconstruction model, in addition to movies in the format of powerpoint animations which can be downloaded for later use. Models are shown on the evolution of the earth's oceans and the movement of the earth's tectonic plates from the Late Precambrian through the present day, reconstructing (i.e. "predicting") geological environments through geologic history. Maps of the following can be accessed: late Neo-Proterozoic, Silurian, early Jurassic, early Cretaceous, Cretaceous-Tertiary Boundary, and Oligocene. Movies are available on the following subjects: global plate motion, Jurassic to present day, opening of the Indian Ocean, and tectonic evolution of the Arctic region.

244

Growth Plate Injuries  

MedlinePLUS

... may be negatively affected. How Are Growth Plate Fractures Diagnosed? A child who has persistent pain, or ... 1999. Used with the author’s permission. Type I: Fracture Through the Growth Plate The epiphysis is completely ...

245

The Dauki Thrust Fault and the Shillong Anticline: An incipient plate boundary in NE India?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Shillong Massif is a regional contractional structure developing across the Assam sliver of the Indian plate near the Eastern Syntaxis between the Himalaya and Burma arcs. Faulting associated with the Shillong Massif is a major source of earthquake hazard. The massif is a composite basement-cored asymmetric anticline and is 100km wide, >350km long and 1.8km high. The high relief southern limb preserves a Cretaceous-Paleocene passive margin sequence despite extreme rainfall while the gentler northern limb is devoid of sedimentary cover. This asymmetry suggests southward growth of the structure. The Dauki fault along the south limb builds this relief. From the south-verging structure, we infer a regional deeply-rooted north-dipping blind thrust fault. It strikes E-W and obliquely intersects the NE-SW margin of India, thus displaying three segments: Western, within continental India; Central, along the former passive margin; and Eastern, overridden by the west-verging Burma accretion system. We present findings from recent geologic fieldwork on the western and central segments. The broadly warped erosional surface of the massif defines a single anticline in the central segment, east of the intersection with the hinge zone of the continental margin buried by the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta. The south limb of the anticline forms a steep topographic front, but is even steeper structurally as defined by the Cretaceous-Eocene cover. Below it, Sylhet Trap Basalts intrude and cover Precambrian basement. Dikes, presumably parallel to the rifted margin, are also parallel to the front, suggesting thrust reactivation of rift-related faults. Less competent Neogene clastics are preserved only near the base of the mountain front. Drag folds in these rocks suggest north-vergence and a roof thrust above a blind thrust wedge floored by the Dauki thrust fault. West of the hinge zone, the contractional structure penetrates the Indian continent and bifurcates. After branching into the Dapsi Fault, the Dauki Fault continues westward as the erosion-deposition boundary combined with a belt of N-S shortening. The Dapsi thrust fault strikes WNW across the Shillong massif and dips NNE. It is mostly blind below a topographically expressed fold involving basement and passive-margin cover. Recent fieldwork has shown that the fault is better exposed in the west, where eventually Archean basement juxtaposes folded and steeply dipping fluvial sediment. Both Dauki and Dapsi faults probably continue beyond the Brahmaputra River, where extreme fluvial processes mask them. The area between the two faults is a gentle southward monocline with little or no shortening. Thus uplift of this area stems from slip on the Dauki thrust fault, not from pervasive shortening. The Burma foldbelt overrides the Shillong Plateau and is warped but continuous across the eastern segment of the Dauki fault. The Haflong-Naga thrust front north of the Dauki merges with the fold-thrust belt in the Sylhet basin to the south, despite >150km of differential advance due to much greater advance of the accretionary prism in the basin. Where the Dauki and Haflong-Naga thrusts cross, the thrust fronts are nearly parallel and opposite vergence. We trace a Dauki-related topographic front eastward across the Burma Range. This and other evidence suggest that the Dauki Fault continues below the foldbelt.

Ferguson, E. K.; Seeber, L.; Steckler, M. S.; Akhter, S. H.; Mondal, D.; Lenhart, A.

2012-12-01

246

Strain rate and strength of the continental lithosphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Under the Wilson Cycle and Plate Tectonics paradigms, continents are divided between stable continental regions (SCR), which tend to remain un-deformed, and plate boundary zones (PBZ) that repeatedly accommodate deformation associated with opening and closing of tectonic plates. This long-term (> 1 Ma) perspective is reflected in short-term (< 100 a) deformation markers such as seismicity and GPS measurements, which highlight the first-order contrast in strain rates between SCR and PBZ. However, poor data resolution at low strain rates provides only rough upper limits on actual long- and short-term strain and seismicity rates in SCR regions, including in intraplate weak zones (paleo-PBZ) where debate is ongoing regarding short- and long-term deformation rates (e.g., New Madrid seismic zone). We propose to constrain first-order continental strain (and seismicity) rates using lithosphere rheological models, including new strain-weakening rheologies, driven by tectonic forces. We estimate average strain rates that satisfy near-failure equilibrium between net driving forces and lithosphere strength for cases that typify PBZ, cratons, and intraplate weak zones. Our model yields a range of strain rates that vary by up to six orders of magnitude between PBZ and cratons. In intraplate weak zones, structural and tectonic heritage results in significant weakening and yields strain rates compatible with GPS, seismicity, and geological markers. These results provide first-order constraints on long-term lithosphere strength and deformation rates. In particular, we explore upper and lower bounds of possible strain rates in intraplate weak zones of North America, using a range of geotherm, rheology, and local stress conditions. These can be used to derived limits on seismicity rates in these regions.

Mazzotti, S.; Gueydan, F.

2013-12-01

247

Plate Tectonic Primer  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site gives an in-depth look at the theory of plate tectonics and how it works. The structure of the Earth is discussed, with brief rock type descriptions. The structure of the lithosphere, plate boundaries, interplate relationships, and types of plates are all covered in detail.

Lynn Fichter

248

Earthquakes and Plate Tectonics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article describes the theory of plate tectonics and its relation to earthquakes and seismic zones. Materials include an overview of plate tectonics, a description of Earth's crustal plates and their motions, and descriptions of the four types of seismic zones.

249

Rotatable shear plate interferometer  

DOEpatents

A rotatable shear plate interferometer comprises a transparent shear plate mounted obliquely in a tubular supporting member at 45.degree. with respect to its horizontal center axis. This tubular supporting member is supported rotatably around its center axis and a collimated laser beam is made incident on the shear plate along this center axis such that defocus in different directions can be easily measured.

Duffus, Richard C. (Livermore, CA)

1988-01-01

250

Digital images of combined oceanic and continental data sets and their use in tectonic studies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

It is shown how crustal and lithospheric studies can benefit when continental and oceanic data sets are combined. It is also shown how digital imaging techniques provide an effective means for displaying the information contained in these combined data sets. The region of Australia, New Zealand, and the surrounding ocean is chosen for illustrating the advantages of combining continental and oceanic data sets. Here, the tectonic setting of Australia, a relatively stable continent in an intraplate environment, can be contrasted with New Zealand, which is traversed by one of the world's major plate boundaries. Simultaneous display and analysis of complementary data sets make possible a rapid geologic and tectonic interpretation of regional areas. It is shown, by way of example, that the relationship between topography and gravity anomalies in central Australia gives important new information concerning the state of isostasy of thrust terrains and their related sedimentary basins and hence provides a means of understanding the mechanical properties of the continental lithosphere.

Haxby, W. F.; Labrecque, J. L.; Weissel, J. K.; Karner, G. D.

1983-01-01

251

Spreading continents kick-started plate tectonics.  

PubMed

Stresses acting on cold, thick and negatively buoyant oceanic lithosphere are thought to be crucial to the initiation of subduction and the operation of plate tectonics, which characterizes the present-day geodynamics of the Earth. Because the Earth's interior was hotter in the Archaean eon, the oceanic crust may have been thicker, thereby making the oceanic lithosphere more buoyant than at present, and whether subduction and plate tectonics occurred during this time is ambiguous, both in the geological record and in geodynamic models. Here we show that because the oceanic crust was thick and buoyant, early continents may have produced intra-lithospheric gravitational stresses large enough to drive their gravitational spreading, to initiate subduction at their margins and to trigger episodes of subduction. Our model predicts the co-occurrence of deep to progressively shallower mafic volcanics and arc magmatism within continents in a self-consistent geodynamic framework, explaining the enigmatic multimodal volcanism and tectonic record of Archaean cratons. Moreover, our model predicts a petrological stratification and tectonic structure of the sub-continental lithospheric mantle, two predictions that are consistent with xenolith and seismic studies, respectively, and consistent with the existence of a mid-lithospheric seismic discontinuity. The slow gravitational collapse of early continents could have kick-started transient episodes of plate tectonics until, as the Earth's interior cooled and oceanic lithosphere became heavier, plate tectonics became self-sustaining. PMID:25230662

Rey, Patrice F; Coltice, Nicolas; Flament, Nicolas

2014-09-18

252

Spreading continents kick-started plate tectonics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stresses acting on cold, thick and negatively buoyant oceanic lithosphere are thought to be crucial to the initiation of subduction and the operation of plate tectonics, which characterizes the present-day geodynamics of the Earth. Because the Earth's interior was hotter in the Archaean eon, the oceanic crust may have been thicker, thereby making the oceanic lithosphere more buoyant than at present, and whether subduction and plate tectonics occurred during this time is ambiguous, both in the geological record and in geodynamic models. Here we show that because the oceanic crust was thick and buoyant, early continents may have produced intra-lithospheric gravitational stresses large enough to drive their gravitational spreading, to initiate subduction at their margins and to trigger episodes of subduction. Our model predicts the co-occurrence of deep to progressively shallower mafic volcanics and arc magmatism within continents in a self-consistent geodynamic framework, explaining the enigmatic multimodal volcanism and tectonic record of Archaean cratons. Moreover, our model predicts a petrological stratification and tectonic structure of the sub-continental lithospheric mantle, two predictions that are consistent with xenolith and seismic studies, respectively, and consistent with the existence of a mid-lithospheric seismic discontinuity. The slow gravitational collapse of early continents could have kick-started transient episodes of plate tectonics until, as the Earth's interior cooled and oceanic lithosphere became heavier, plate tectonics became self-sustaining.

Rey, Patrice F.; Coltice, Nicolas; Flament, Nicolas

2014-09-01

253

Role of mantle flow in Nubia-Somalia plate divergence  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Present-day continental extension along the East African Rift System (EARS) has often been attributed to diverging sublithospheric mantle flow associated with the African Superplume. This implies a degree of viscous coupling between mantle and lithosphere that remains poorly constrained. Recent advances in estimating present-day opening rates along the EARS from geodesy offer an opportunity to address this issue with geodynamic modeling of the mantle-lithosphere system. Here we use numerical models of the global mantle-plates coupled system to test the role of present-day mantle flow in Nubia-Somalia plate divergence across the EARS. The scenario yielding the best fit to geodetic observations is one where torques associated with gradients of gravitational potential energy stored in the African highlands are resisted by weak continental faults and mantle basal drag. These results suggest that shear tractions from diverging mantle flow play a minor role in present-day Nubia-Somalia divergence.

Stamps, D. S.; Iaffaldano, G.; Calais, E.

2015-01-01

254

An improved plating process  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An alternative to the immersion process for the electrodeposition of chromium from aqueous solutions on the inside diameter (ID) of long tubes is described. The Vessel Plating Process eliminates the need for deep processing tanks, large volumes of solutions, and associated safety and environmental concerns. Vessel Plating allows the process to be monitored and controlled by computer thus increasing reliability, flexibility and quality. Elimination of the trivalent chromium accumulation normally associated with ID plating is intrinsic to the Vessel Plating Process. The construction and operation of a prototype Vessel Plating Facility with emphasis on materials of construction, engineered and operational safety and a unique system for rinse water recovery are described.

Askew, John C.

1994-01-01

255

Angular shear plate  

DOEpatents

One or more disc-shaped angular shear plates each include a region thereon having a thickness that varies with a nonlinear function. For the case of two such shear plates, they are positioned in a facing relationship and rotated relative to each other. Light passing through the variable thickness regions in the angular plates is refracted. By properly timing the relative rotation of the plates and by the use of an appropriate polynomial function for the thickness of the shear plate, light passing therethrough can be focused at variable positions.

Ruda, Mitchell C. (Tucson, AZ); Greynolds, Alan W. (Tucson, AZ); Stuhlinger, Tilman W. (Tucson, AZ)

2009-07-14

256

Diachronous evolution of Late Jurassic-Cretaceous continental rifting in the northeast Atlantic (west Iberian margin)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Regional (2-D) seismic reflection profiles, outcrop, and borehole data are used to characterize the evolution of deep offshore sedimentary basins in southwest Iberia (Alentejo Basin). The interpreted data indicate the bulk of Late Jurassic-earliest Cretaceous subsidence occurred in the present-day continental slope area, as shown by (1) significant thickening of synrift strata basinward from a slope-bounding fault system (SFS), west of which the total thickness of sediment can reach more than 9.0 km, and (2) relatively thin Mesozoic strata east of the SFS, where thickening of synrift units against principal faults is limited. Five principal regressive events and their basal unconformities reflect tectonic uplift and relative emersion in proximal basins, which were located on the rift shoulder to subsiding tilt blocks west of the SFS. These regressive events are correlated with major rift-related events occurring on the deeper margin. Direct comparisons with the Peniche Basin of northwest Iberia reveal that significant portions of the Iberian lower plate margin were uplifted and eroded during the last stages of continental rifting. This process was repeated at different times (and in different areas) as the locus of rifting and continental breakup migrated northward. As a result, two distinct rift axes are recognized in west Iberia, a first axis extending from the Porto Basin to the Alentejo Basin and a second axis located on the outer proximal margin north of 38°30N. In addition, the SFS delimited (1) prograding deposits of Cretaceous-Paleogene age and (2) late Cenozoic deposits draping the modern continental slope. These latter facts demonstrate that on lower plate passive margins, the relative position of the continental slope is established during the final rifting episode(s) preceding continental breakup.

Alves, Tiago M.; Moita, Carlos; Cunha, Tiago; Ullnaess, Magnar; Myklebust, Reidun; Monteiro, José H.; Manuppella, G.

2009-08-01

257

NSTX Upgrade Armor Plate Backing Plate  

E-print Network

.1 Finite Element Software and OPERA Electromagnetic program. 3.) Opera electromagnetic program and results backing plate calculation 2.) Build and evaluate a Finite Element Model for The Armor Eddy Current

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

258

Basalt from Louisiana continental shelf  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A basalt outcrop was discovered on Alderdice Bank on the outer Louisiana continental shelf. The basalt shows an age of 76.8 ± 3.3 × 106 years. Textural, mineralogical, and chemical characteristics indicate that it is an alkali basalt of shallow intrusive origin. It was probably brought to the seafloor by salt tectonics and exposed due to salt dissolution. An accurate account of the Mesozoic geologic history of the Gulf of Mexico must consider the apparent consanguinity of all magmatic rocks of the region, including the Alderdice Bank basalt, and the apparent basinward decrease in age of magmatic activities.

Rezak, Richard; Tieh, Thomas T.

1984-06-01

259

Mantle Convection Moving Plates  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This demonstration models the manner in which the convection currents in the mantle of the Earth cause movement of the plates. Convection currents in the mantle were thought, for many years, to be solely responsible for plate tectonic movements, with the movement taking rocks down at destructive margins and new rocks forming when plates spread. It is now thought likely that there are three possible driving mechanisms for plate tectonics. In addition to movement of mantle convection currents as shown in this demonstration, scientists also consider the mass of the subducted plate (the sinking slab) at the subduction zone dragging the surface part of the plate across the surface and the new plate material sliding off the higher oceanic ridges at constructive margins.

260

Biotic vs. abiotic Earth: A model for mantle hydration and continental coverage  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The origin and evolution of life has undoubtedly had a major impact on the evolution of Earth's oceans and atmosphere. Recent studies have suggested that bioactivity may have had an even deeper impact and may have caused a change in the redox-state of the mantle and provided a path for the formation of continents. We here present a numerical model that assumes that bioactivity increases the continental weathering rate and that relates the sedimentation rate to the growth of continents and to the hydration of the mantle using elements of plate tectonics and mantle convection. The link between these factors is provided by assuming that an increase of the thickness of the sedimentary layer of low permeability on top of a subducting oceanic slab will reduce its dewatering upon subduction. This in turn leads to a greater availability of water in the source region of andesitic partial melt, resulting in an enhanced rate of continental crust production, and to an increased regassing rate of the mantle. The mantle in turn responds by reducing the mantle viscosity while increasing the convective circulation rate, degassing rate and plate speed. We use parameters that are observed for the present Earth and gauge uncertain parameters such that the present day continental surface area and mantle water concentration can be obtained. Our steady state results show two stable fixed points in a phase plane defined by the fractional continental surface area and the water concentration in the mantle, one of them pertaining to a wet mantle and the continental surface area of the present day Earth, and the other to a dry mantle and a small continental surface area. When the sedimentation rate is reduced, both fixed points move and the area of attraction of the latter fixed point increases systematically. We conclude that if the presence of life has increased the continental weathering rate, as is widely believed, and led to the observables of a wet mantle and a continental surface coverage of roughly 40%, an abiotic Earth would likely have evolved toward a dry mantle with a small continental surface area instead.

Höning, Dennis; Hansen-Goos, Hendrik; Airo, Alessandro; Spohn, Tilman

2014-08-01

261

The Deep Subsurface Microbiology Research in China: Results from Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling Project  

Microsoft Academic Search

Microbial abundance and community structure from ultra-high pressure metamorphic rocks and deep fluids from the Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling (CCSD) project were investigated by using geochemical and cultivation and molecular microbiology methods. The drilling site is located in the eastern part of the Dabie-Sulu ultra high-pressure metamorphic (UHPM) orogenic belt at the convergent plate boundary between the Sino-Korean and Yangtze

H. Dong; G. Zhang; L. Huang; X. Dai; Y. Wang; G. Lu; Z. Dong; X. Dong

2009-01-01

262

Travel-time residuals of PP waves reflected under oceanic and continental platform regions  

Microsoft Academic Search

PP waves have been used to transform PP residuals with respect to Jeffreys-Bullen time into P-wave travel-time delays close to the reflection point. It is found that P-wave travel-time delays decrease with the age of the plate for oceanic structures. Average oceanic lithosphere (100 My) has a residual similar to that of a typical continental platform (Siberia). The absence of

Nicole Girardin

1980-01-01

263

The lithospheric geodynamics of plate boundary transpression in New Zealand: Initiating and emplacing subduction along the Hikurangi margin, and the tectonic evolution of the Alpine Fault system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In contrast to the normal 'Wilson cycle' sequence of subduction leading to continental collision and associated mountain building, the evolution of the New Zealand plate boundary in the Neogene reflects the converse—initially a period of continental convergence that is followed by the emplacement of subduction. Plate reconstructions allow us to place limits on the location and timing of the continental convergence and subduction zones and the migration of the transition between the two plate boundary regimes. Relative plate motions and reconstructions since the Early to Mid-Miocene require significant continental convergence in advance of the emplacement of the southward migrating Hikurangi subduction—a sequence of tectonism seen in the present plate boundary geography of Hikurangi subduction beneath North Island and convergence in the Southern Alps along the Alpine Fault. In contrast to a transition from subduction to continental convergence where the leading edge of the upper plate is relatively thin and deformable, the transition from a continental convergent regime, with its associated crustal and lithospheric thickening, to subduction of oceanic lithosphere requires substantial thinning (removal) of upper plate continental lithosphere to make room for the slab. The simple structure of the Wadati-Benioff zone seen in the present-day geometry of the subducting Pacific plate beneath North Island indicates that this lithospheric adjustment occurs quickly. Associated with this rapid lithospheric thinning is the development of a series of ephemeral basins, younging to the south, that straddle the migrating slab edge. Based on this association between localized vertical tectonics and slab emplacement, the tectonic history of these basins records the effects of lithospheric delamination driven by the southward migrating leading edge of the subducting Pacific slab. Although the New Zealand plate boundary is often described as simply two subduction zones linked by the transpressive Alpine Fault, in actuality the present is merely a snapshot view of an ongoing and complex evolution from convergence to subduction.

Furlong, Kevin P.; Kamp, Peter J. J.

2009-09-01

264

77 FR 65050 - Continental Tire North America, LLC, Mootness of Petition for Decision of Inconsequential...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...SUMMARY: Continental Tire North America, LLC.\\1\\ (Continental...1\\ Continental Tire North America, LLC. (Continental) is a replacement...onto the Federal Docket Management System Web site at:...

2012-10-24

265

Thermal regime of continental subduction: The record from exhumed HP-LT terranes (New Caledonia, Oman, Corsica)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Unlike the thermal structures of present-day subduction or collision zones, the variety of possible thermal evolutions (or "thermal regimes") accompanying the transient stage of continental subduction (i.e., the shift from oceanic subduction to continental collision) remains poorly known. We herein show that the thermal regime of continental subduction can be confidently retrieved from three well-documented fossil settings (i.e., from high-pressure low temperature continental material from Oman, New Caledonia, Corsica) that were not modified by later collision or a later metamorphic imprint. Based on recently published data, we show the striking similarity of the overall thermal and tectonic patterns of these three HP belts derived from the subduction of a continental margin. These natural examples suggest that the thermal regime of continental subduction is largely invariant through time (hence suggesting a steady-state thermal structure) and independent from the initial geodynamic setting (i.e., from the initial thermal structure of oceanic subduction, the nature of the incoming plate or of the upper plate). We propose that continental cover units subducted over a short time period (i.e., ~ 10 My) represent cold underplated material that buffers the subduction thermal regime, whatever the exact structure, nature, or thermal structure of incoming material. Similarities in the type, size and P-T conditions of the various tectonic units and in the overall tectonic organization point to specific accretionary-type subduction dynamics, yet to differences in long-term mechanical coupling between the three case studies. Our study thereby provides constraints on exhumation dynamics and models of continental subduction.

Agard, Philippe; Vitale-Brovarone, Alberto

2013-08-01

266

Thermal regime of continental subduction: the record from exhumed HP-LT terranes (New Caledonia, Oman, Corsica)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Unlike the thermal regimes of present-day subduction or collision zones, the variety of possible thermal evolutions accompanying the transient stage of continental subduction (i.e., the shift from oceanic subduction to continental collision) remains poorly known. We herein show that the thermal regime of continental subduction can be confidently retrieved from three well-documented fossil settings (i.e., from high-pressure low temperature continental material from Oman, New Caledonia, Corsica) that were not modified by later collision or a later metamorphic imprint. We primarily focus on their thermal structures (derived from estimates of maximum temperatures, P-T data and age constraints) and overall tectonic organization. For the sake of comparison, new petrological investigations were performed on the metamorphic architecture of northern New Caledonia (Pam Peninsula) and are presented here. We show that the overall structure and metamorphic patterns of these three HP belts derived from continental subduction evidence striking similarities. In particular, the inferred thermal regime of continental subduction appears largely independent from the initial geodynamic setting (i.e., from the initial thermal regime of oceanic subduction, the nature of the incoming plate or of the upper plate). This suggests that continental cover units subducted over a short time period represent cold underplated material that buffers the subduction thermal regime, whatever the exact structure, nature, or thermal state of incoming material. Similarities in the type, size and P-T conditions of the various tectonic units and in the overall tectonic organization point to specific accretionary-type subduction dynamics, yet to differences in mechanical coupling between the three case studies. Our study thereby provides constraints on exhumation dynamics and models of continental subduction

Agard, Philippe; Vitale-Brovarone, Alberto

2013-04-01

267

The Evolution of Surface Plate Velocities and its Link to Mantle Dynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At the present day, the outermost shell of the Earth is subdivided into several tectonic plates whose velocities are well determined. By knowing these velocities, inferences about the present organization of Earth's deeper interior can be made, and consequently, understanding the evolution of plate velocities can likely constrain the evolution of plate tectonics in general and specifically its link to deeper mantle dynamics. In many previous studies using structure and velocities of the tectonic plates have been reconstructed within a kinematic framework, with some plates (e.g. India) showing significant temporal variations in their average velocity. However, these reconstructions are limited by the preservation of seafloor (i.e. < 200 Myr) and cannot explain Earth's surface evolution in a dynamically consistent manner. Here, we use fully dynamic 3D spherical mantle convection simulations with self-consistent plate tectonics and continental drift to study the structure and dynamic evolution of Earth's plate velocities over timescales that significantly exceed the kinematically reconstructed timespans as well as the duration of Earth's supercontinent cycle. In this study, we present long-term evolutions of oceanic and continental plate velocities. We observe significant fluctuations in velocity magnitude for both types of plates that seem to be linked to the assembly and break-up of large (super-)continents as well as large-scale reorganizations of mantle flow.

Rolf, Tobias; Tackley, Paul; Capitanio, Fabio

2014-05-01

268

Considering bioactivity in modelling continental growth and the Earth's evolution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The complexity of planetary evolution increases with the number of interacting reservoirs. On Earth, even the biosphere is speculated to interact with the interior. It has been argued (e.g., Rosing et al. 2006; Sleep et al, 2012) that the formation of continents could be a consequence of bioactivity harvesting solar energy through photosynthesis to help build the continents and that the mantle should carry a chemical biosignature. Through plate tectonics, the surface biosphere can impact deep subduction zone processes and the interior of the Earth. Subducted sediments are particularly important, because they influence the Earth's interior in several ways, and in turn are strongly influenced by the Earth's biosphere. In our model, we use the assumption that a thick sedimentary layer of low permeability on top of the subducting oceanic crust, caused by a biologically enhanced weathering rate, can suppress shallow dewatering. This in turn leads to greater vailability of water in the source region of andesitic partial melt, resulting in an enhanced rate of continental production and regassing rate into the mantle. Our model includes (i) mantle convection, (ii) continental erosion and production, and (iii) mantle water degassing at mid-ocean ridges and regassing at subduction zones. The mantle viscosity of our model depends on (i) the mantle water concentration and (ii) the mantle temperature, whose time dependency is given by radioactive decay of isotopes in the Earth's mantle. Boundary layer theory yields the speed of convection and the water outgassing rate of the Earth's mantle. Our results indicate that present day values of continental surface area and water content of the Earth's mantle represent an attractor in a phase plane spanned by both parameters. We show that the biologic enhancement of the continental erosion rate is important for the system to reach this fixed point. An abiotic Earth tends to reach an alternative stable fixed point with a smaller continental surface area and dryer mantle. The origin and evolution of life on Earth might be responsible for the rise of continents 3.5 billion years ago.

Höning, D.; Spohn, T.

2013-09-01

269

Anatomy of a diffuse cryptic suture zone exemplified by European Variscan belt: a new concept of continental tectonics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The plate tectonics paradigm has offered a link between the horizontal movement of lithospheric plates, closure of intervening oceanic basin and formation of oceanic suture zone preserved even during continental collision. On the example of the Bohemian Massif we document the evolution of Andean type orogen involved in continental collision. Based on combined geological data, geophysical imagery and fully scaled thermomechanical modelling a modified view on the internal architecture of collisional orogens is proposed. The characteristic feature of the model proposed for the Variscan orogen in the Bohemian Massif is the convergence of two contrasting domains of lithosphere, leading to subduction of an attenuated felsic metaigneous crust under the rifted (Gondwana) margin formed by a dense sequence of metasedimentary and metabasic rocks. The relamination of refractory light material rich in radioactive elements underneath the relatively dense upper plate is responsible for the gravitational instabilities that lead to the overturns in the thickened crust. This mechanism results in the formation of a diffuse cryptic suture zone, i.e., a wide zone in which materials from the lower and upper plates are mixed to form a hybrid continental crust. The diffuse cryptic suture zone remains the only evidence of the original plate boundary repeatedly re-appearing within the orogen. We propose that this model may have a general validity and possible link to modern orogens exemplified by comparison of Variscan and Tibetan orogenic systems is proposed based on petrological characteristics and similarities in geophysical signatures.

Lexa, Ondrej; Schulmann, Karel; Janoušek, Vojt?ch; Lardeaux, Jean Marc

2014-05-01

270

Postcollisional mafic igneous rocks record crust-mantle interaction during continental deep subduction  

PubMed Central

Findings of coesite and microdiamond in metamorphic rocks of supracrustal protolith led to the recognition of continental subduction to mantle depths. The crust-mantle interaction is expected to take place during subduction of the continental crust beneath the subcontinental lithospheric mantle wedge. This is recorded by postcollisional mafic igneous rocks in the Dabie-Sulu orogenic belt and its adjacent continental margin in the North China Block. These rocks exhibit the geochemical inheritance of whole-rock trace elements and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes as well as zircon U-Pb ages and Hf-O isotopes from felsic melts derived from the subducted continental crust. Reaction of such melts with the overlying wedge peridotite would transfer the crustal signatures to the mantle sources for postcollisional mafic magmatism. Therefore, postcollisonal mafic igneous rocks above continental subduction zones are an analog to arc volcanics above oceanic subduction zones, providing an additional laboratory for the study of crust-mantle interaction at convergent plate margins. PMID:24301173

Zhao, Zi-Fu; Dai, Li-Qun; Zheng, Yong-Fei

2013-01-01

271

Postcollisional mafic igneous rocks record crust-mantle interaction during continental deep subduction.  

PubMed

Findings of coesite and microdiamond in metamorphic rocks of supracrustal protolith led to the recognition of continental subduction to mantle depths. The crust-mantle interaction is expected to take place during subduction of the continental crust beneath the subcontinental lithospheric mantle wedge. This is recorded by postcollisional mafic igneous rocks in the Dabie-Sulu orogenic belt and its adjacent continental margin in the North China Block. These rocks exhibit the geochemical inheritance of whole-rock trace elements and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes as well as zircon U-Pb ages and Hf-O isotopes from felsic melts derived from the subducted continental crust. Reaction of such melts with the overlying wedge peridotite would transfer the crustal signatures to the mantle sources for postcollisional mafic magmatism. Therefore, postcollisonal mafic igneous rocks above continental subduction zones are an analog to arc volcanics above oceanic subduction zones, providing an additional laboratory for the study of crust-mantle interaction at convergent plate margins. PMID:24301173

Zhao, Zi-Fu; Dai, Li-Qun; Zheng, Yong-Fei

2013-01-01

272

Gravity and Flexure Modelling of Subducting Plates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The long-term strength of the lithosphere is determined by its flexural rigidity, which is commonly expressed through the effective elastic thickness, Te. Flexure studies have revealed a dependence of Te on thermal age. In the oceans, loads formed on young (70 Ma) seafloor. In the continents, loads on young (1000 Ma) lithosphere. Recent studies have questioned the relationship of Te with age, especially at subduction zones, where oceanic and continental lithosphere are flexed downwards by up to ~6 km over horizontal distances of up to ~350 km. We have therefore used free-air gravity anomaly and topography profile data, combined with forward and inverse modelling techniques, to re-assess Te in these settings. Preliminary inverse modelling results from the Tonga-Kermadec Trench - Outer Rise system, where the Pacific plate is subducting beneath the Indo-Australian plate, show large spatial variations in Te that are unrelated to age. In contrast to the southern end of the system, where Te is determined by the depth to the 600° C and 900° C isotherms, the northern end of the system shows a reduction in strength. Results also suggest a reduction in Te trenchward of the outer rise that is coincident with a region of pervasive extensional faulting visible in swath bathymetry data. In a continental setting, the Ganges foreland basin has formed by flexure of the Indo-Australian plate in front of the migrating loads of the Himalaya. Preliminary forward modelling results, using the Himalaya as a known surface topographic load, suggest that Te is high - consistent with the great age of Indian cratonic lithosphere. However, results from inverse modelling that solves for unknown loads (vertical shear force and bending moment) show significant scatter and display trade-offs between Te and these driving loads.

Hunter, J. A.; Watts, A. B.; SO 215 Shipboard Scientific Party

2012-04-01

273

Cretaceous high-pressure metamorphic belts of the Central Pontides (northern Turkey): pre-collisional Pacific-type accretionary continental growth of Laurasian Margin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cretaceous blueschist-facies metamorphic rocks crop out widely in the central part of the Pontides, an east-west trending mountain belt in northern Turkey. They comprise an accretionary wedge along to the southern Laurasian active continental margin and predate the opening of Black Sea basin. From North to South, the wedge consists of a low grade metaflysch unit with marble, Na-amphibole-bearing metabasite and serpentinite blocks. An extensional shear zone separates the accreted distal terrigenous sediments from HP/LT micaschists and metabasites of oceanic origin, known as Domuzda? Complex. The shear zone reaches up to one km in thickness and consists of tectonic slices of serpentinite, metabasite, marble, phyllite and micaschist with top to the NW sense of shear. The Domuzda? Complex predominantly consists of carbonaceous micaschist and metabasite with serpentinite, and minor metachert, marble and metagabbro. Metabasites consist mainly of epidote-blueschists sometimes with garnet. Fresh lawsonite-blueschists are found as blocks within the shear zone. Peak metamorphic assemblages in the micaschists are chloritoid-glaucophane and garnet-chloritoid-glaucophane-lawsonite in addition to phengite, paragonite, quartz, chlorite and rutile (P: 17 ± 1 Kbar, T: 390-450 °C). To the south, lithologies change slightly, with metabasite and thick, pale marble with few metachert and metapelitic horizons. The degree of metamorphism also changes. The metabasites range from high-pressure upper-greenschist facies with growth of sodic-amphibole to lower greenschist without any HP index mineral, suggesting a general decrease in pressure toward south within the prism. While Domuzda? Complex represents deep-seated underplated oceanic sediments and basalts, the carbonate-rich southern parts can be interpreted as seamounts integrated into the accretionary prism. Ar/Ar dating on phengite separates both from terrigenous and oceanic metasediments give consistent plateau ages of 100 ± 2 Ma. One of the Cld-micaschist, exposed to the South, gives a 92 ± 2 Ma age. This documents a southward younging of metamorphism within the accretionary prism. A mid-Jurassic (160 Ma) age, previously reported from a micaschist in the southern part of Domuzda? Complex, is also supported in this study. These rocks however differ from the Cretaceous HP unit both in lithology and degree of metamorphism (P: 10 ± 2 Kbar, T: 620 ± 30°C; Okay et al. 2013). It is not clear whether these rocks indicate episodic subduction process or represent tectonically emplaced slivers of the overriding plate which has widespread Mid-Jurassic high-grade metamorphic rocks and intrusions. The Cretaceous accretionary complex structurally overlies an arc-related low-grade metavolcanic unit, which is thrusted over the ophiolitic rocks of the main Tethyan ?zmir-Ankara-Erzincan Suture zone that separates the Pontides from the Gondwana-derived terranes. In the tectonic framework discussed above, the study area represents subduction and accretion related units, which are sandwiched between the southern Laurasian active margin and the Gondwana-derived K?r?ehir Block without any continental fragments. This indicates that Pacific-type pre-collisional accretion has a major role in the Tethyan geology of the Central Pontides during Cretaceous. Okay et al. (2013) Tectonics 32: 1247-1271.

Aygul, Mesut; Okay, Aral I.; Oberhaensli, Roland; Sudo, Masafumi

2014-05-01

274

Hypervelocity plate acceleration  

SciTech Connect

Shock tubes have been used to accelerate 1.5-mm-thick stainless steel plates to high velocity while retaining their integrity. The fast shock tubes are 5.1-cm-diameter, 15.2-cm-long cylinders of PBX-9501 explosive containing a 1.1-cm-diameter cylindrical core of low-density polystyrene foam. The plates have been placed directly in contact with one face of the explosive system. Plane-wave detonation was initiated on the opposite face. A Mach disk was formed in the imploding styrofoam core, which provided the impulse required to accelerate the metal plate to high velocity. Parametric studies were made on this system to find the effect of varying plate metal, plate thickness, foam properties, and addition of a barrel. A maximum plate velocity of 9.0 km/s has been observed. 6 refs., 17 figs.

Marsh, S.P.; Tan, T.H.

1991-01-01

275

Plates and FEM  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The word plate is a collective term for systems in which transfer of forces occurs in two directions; walls, deep beams, floors and bridge slabs are all plates. We distinguish two main categories, plates that are loaded in their plane, and plates loaded perpendicularly to their plane. For both categories we give an approach with differential equations, such that a basic understanding is provided and for certain characteristic cases an exact solution can be determined. We follow the displacement method, working with differential equations. In plates that are loaded in their plane, the plane stress state is called the membrane state. All stress components are parallel to the mid- plane of the plate. In special cases we can simply determine the stresses.

Blaauwendraad, J.

276

A Facies Model for Temperate Continental Glaciers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the presence and dynamics of continental glaciers in the domination of the physical processes of erosion and deposition in the mid-latitudes during the Pleistocene period. Describes the use of a sedimentary facies model as a guide to recognizing ancient temperate continental glacial deposits. (TW)

Ashley, Gail Mowry

1987-01-01

277

Oil, gas accumulations in China's continental basins  

Microsoft Academic Search

China is well known for its continental deposits in Meso-Cenozoic basins, in which giant and medium-size oil and gas fields with various types of pools currently produce 100 million tons of oil annually. Focusing on the characteristics of oil and gas migration and accumulation and the formation conditions of giant oil fields in continental basins, this study suggests defining depression,

G. Zhai; W. Zhang; C. Hu

1982-01-01

278

How Continental Bank outsourced its "crown jewels.".  

PubMed

No industry relies more on information than banking does, yet Continental, one of America's largest banks, outsources its information technology. Why? Because that's the best way to service the customers that form the core of the bank's business, says vice chairman Dick Huber. In the late 1970s and early 1980s, Continental participated heavily with Penn Square Bank in energy investments. When falling energy prices burst Penn Square's bubble in 1982, Continental was stuck with more than $1 billion in bad loans. Eight years later when Dick Huber came on board, Continental was working hard to restore its once solid reputation. Executives had made many tough decisions already, altering the bank's focus from retail to business banking and laying off thousands of employees. Yet management still needed to cut costs and improve services to stay afloat. Regulators, investors, and analysts were watching every step. Continental executives, eager to focus on the bank's core mission of serving business customers, decided to outsource one after another in-house service--from cafeteria services to information technology. While conventional wisdom holds that banks must retain complete internal control of IT, Continental bucked this argument when it entered into a ten-year, multimillion-dollar contract with Integrated Systems Solutions Corporation. Continental is already reaping benefits from outsourcing IT. Most important, Continental staffers today focus on their true core competencies: intimate knowledge of customers' needs and relationships with customers. PMID:10124146

Huber, R L

1993-01-01

279

Plating methods, a survey  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results are presented of a comprehensive search of the literature available, much of which has been generated by the research centers of NASA and its contractors, on plating and coating methods and techniques. Methods covered included: (1) electroplating from aqueous solutions; (2) electroplating from nonaqueous solutions; (3) electroplating from fused-salt baths; (4) electroforming; (5) electroless plating, immersion plating, and mirroring; (6) electroplating from gaseous plasmas; and (7) anodized films and conversion coatings.

Berkowitz, J. B.; Emerson, N. H.

1972-01-01

280

Understanding Plate Motions  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive site uses illustrations and photographs along with text to explain the movement of tectonic plates and the result of this movement on the surface of the Earth. There is a detailed discussion of the movement at each of the four types of plate boundaries: divergent, convergent, transform, and plate boundary zones. Both lateral and vertical movements are depicted by maps and diagrams and resulting Earth structures are shown in photographs.

281

Geology - Plate Tectonics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Visitors to this site can learn about the theory of plate tectonics, the history of its development, and the mechanisms that drive the formation, movement, and destruction of continents and tectonic plates. A selection of animations depicts the movements of crustal plates and continents through time. Each animation is accompanied by an interactive time scale that provides links to descriptions of the geology and paleontology of the selected era or period.

282

Surface preparation and plating  

SciTech Connect

This chapter covers electroplating and electroless nickel plating since coatings of this type play an important role in diamond turning technology. Items to be discussed include preparation of substrates prior to coating, plating defects such as pits and nodules and their influence on optics, the influence of stress in coatings, plating details for copper, gold, silver, and electroless nickel, and the importance of additives and their influence on grain size and structure of deposits. Some comments are made on future challenges that could be presented to the plating community to further improve the quality of coatings applied for diamond turning purposes. 60 references, 8 figures, 9 tables.

Dini, J.W.; Waldrop, F.B.; Reno, R.W.

1982-10-06

283

Plates on the Move  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This fun Web article is part of OLogy, where kids can collect virtual trading cards and create projects with them. Here, they learn about the Earth's outer shell and its constant movement. It begins with an overview that explains tectonic plates. There is an animation that shows recent earthquakes and their relationship to plate boundaries. Students can click to explore 12 individual volcanoes, mountains, hotspots, and earthquakes. For each of the geological formations or events, they will see a map that shows how the plates are moving, an animation about plate interaction, stats, and a story about that particular formation or event.

284

Acceleration of metal plates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High-explosive charges were used to accelerate stainless steel plates to velocities of 6 to 7 km/s. A two-stage system was used in which the first stage is a plane-wave detonating system that accelerates the plate down a short barrel. The second stage consists of a hollow cylindrical charge through which the moving plate passes. After an adjustable delay this charge is detonated on the outer circumference of the entry side of the charge. Flash radiographs and witness plates show no breakup in the first stage but bowing and frequent breakup in the second stage.

Marsh, S. P.; McQueen, R. G.; Tan, T. H.

1989-08-01

285

The Theory of Continental Drift  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a brief review of the Theory of Continental Drift and the evidence that led Alfred Wegener to state the theory. It describes evidence of matching but misplaced rocks, uncovered fossils in places they should not have been, and discovered evidence of astounding climatological changes. In addition, fossil remains of a prehistoric reptile known as the Mesosaurus had been uncovered on both sides of the South Atlantic and plant fossils indicated that tropical forests once existed only a few hundred miles from the North Pole. It also cites glacial and stratigraphic evidence. The site discusses objections to the theory and states that at the time of his death in 1930, Wegener's theory seemed well on its way to obscurity.

286

Quantifying the isotopic ‘continental effect’  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since the establishment of the IAEA-WMO precipitation-monitoring network in 1961, it has been observed that isotope ratios in precipitation (? 2H and ? 18O) generally decrease from coastal to inland locations, an observation described as the 'continental effect.' While discussed frequently in the literature, there have been few attempts to quantify the variables controlling this effect despite the fact that isotopic gradients over continents can vary by orders of magnitude. In a number of studies, traditional Rayleigh fractionation has proven inadequate in describing the global variability of isotopic gradients due to its simplified treatment of moisture transport and its lack of moisture recycling processes. In this study, we use a one-dimensional idealized model of water vapor transport along a storm track to investigate the dominant variables controlling isotopic gradients in precipitation across terrestrial environments. We find that the sensitivity of these gradients to progressive rainout is controlled by a combination of the amount of evapotranspiration and the ratio of transport by advection to transport by eddy diffusion, with these variables becoming increasingly important with decreasing length scales of specific humidity. A comparison of modeled gradients with global precipitation isotope data indicates that these variables can account for the majority of variability in observed isotopic gradients between coastal and inland locations. Furthermore, the dependence of the 'continental effect' on moisture recycling allows for the quantification of evapotranspiration fluxes from measured isotopic gradients, with implications for both paleoclimate reconstructions and large-scale monitoring efforts in the context of global warming and a changing hydrologic cycle.

Winnick, Matthew J.; Chamberlain, C. Page; Caves, Jeremy K.; Welker, Jeffrey M.

2014-11-01

287

Evolution of Oxidative Continental Weathering  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Great Oxidation Event (GOE) is currently viewed as a protracted process during which atmospheric oxygen levels increased above 10-5 times the present atmospheric level. This value is based on the loss of sulphur isotope mass independent fractionation (S-MIF) from the rock record, beginning at 2.45 Ga and disappearing by 2.32 Ga. However, a number of recent papers have pushed back the timing for oxidative continental weathering, and by extension, the onset of atmospheric oxygenation several hundreds of million years earlier despite the presence of S-MIF (e.g., Crowe et al., 2013). This apparent discrepancy can, in part, be resolved by the suggestion that recycling of older sedimentary sulphur bearing S-MIF might have led to this signal's persistence in the rock record for some time after atmospheric oxygenation (Reinhard et al., 2013). Here we suggest another possibility, that the earliest oxidative weathering reactions occurred in environments at profound redox disequilibrium with the atmosphere, such as biological soil crusts, riverbed and estuarine sediments, and lacustrine microbial mats. We calculate that the rate of O2 production via oxygenic photosynthesis in these terrestrial microbial ecosystems provides largely sufficient oxidizing potential to mobilise sulphate and a number of redox-sensitive trace metals from land to the oceans while the atmosphere itself remained anoxic with its attendant S-MIF signature. These findings reconcile geochemical signatures in the rock record for the earliest oxidative continental weathering with the history of atmospheric sulphur chemistry, and demonstrate the plausible antiquity of a terrestrial biosphere populated by cyanobacteria. Crowe, S.A., Dossing, L.N., Beukes, N.J., Bau, M., Kruger, S.J., Frei, R. & Canfield, D.E. Atmospheric oxygenation three billion years ago. Nature 501, 535-539 (2013). Reinhard, C.T., Planavsky, N.J. & Lyons, T.W. Long-term sedimentary recycling of rare sulphur isotope anomalies. Nature 497, 100-104 (2013).

Konhauser, Kurt; Lalonde, Stefan

2014-05-01

288

Continuum calculations of continental deformation in transcurrent environments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A thin viscous sheet approximation is used to investigate continental deformation near a strike-slip boundary. The vertically averaged velocity field is calculated for a medium characterized by a power law rheology with stress exponent n. Driving stresses include those applied along boundaries of the sheet and those arising from buoyancy forces related to lateral differences in crustal thickness. Exact and approximate analytic solutions for a region with a sinusoidal strike-slip boundary condition are compared with solutions for more geologically relevant boundary conditions obtained using a finite element technique. The across-strike length scale of the deformation is approximately 1/4pi x sq rt n times the dominant wavelength of the imposed strike-slip boundary condition for both the analytic and the numerical solutions; this result is consistent with length scales observed in continental regions of large-scale transcurrent faulting. An approximate, linear relationship between displacement and rotation is found that depends only on the deformation length scale and the rheology. Calculated displacements, finite rotations, and distribution of crustal thicknesses are consistent with those observed in the region of the Pacific-North America plate boundary in California.

Sonder, L. J.; England, P. C.; Houseman, G. A.

1986-01-01

289

Seismicity, structure and strength of the continental lithosphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Geological-geophysical transects of active and ancient plate margins as well as structural studies of exhumed fault rocks confirm the general validity of laboratory-based strength-depth profiles for the long-term (10 6-10 7 a) rheology of the continental lithosphere. The deep structure of orogens and rifted margins requires that a relatively strong, olivine-rich upper mantle underlies a weaker granitic to dioritic crust. The continental crust itself comprises one or more viscously deforming layers that are overlain by a stronger brittle layer. This view refutes recent speculation that because the thickness of the seismogenic zone within the crust varies with the effective elastic thickness of the lithosphere, the crust must be stronger than the upper mantle. We argue that seismicity is an ambiguous indicator of strength and propose that earthquakes are more reasonably interpreted as a manifestation of transient mechanical instability within shear zones. Shear zones are often long-lived zones of weakness in which viscous mylonitic creep is punctuated by ephemeral high-stress events involving fracture, frictional melting, and a temporary, local loss of cohesion. Seismicity may therefore be used to locate current zones of episodic decoupling between and beneath crustal blocks in active interplate fault systems.

Handy, M. R.; Brun, J.-P.

2004-07-01

290

Rifting of Continental Interiors: Some New Geophysical Data and Interpretations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rifting is one of the major processes that affect the evolution of the continents. This process sometimes leads to continental breakup and the formation of new oceans, but more often does not. This is presumably due to extension not progressing sufficiently to form a new plate margin resulting in a structure, which remains isolated in an intra-plate environment. The Southern Oklahoma aulacogen is such a feature, and the continental portion of the East African rift system may be a modern example. As more detailed geophysical and geological studies of rifts have become available in recent years, a complex picture of rift structure and evolution has emerged. Global patterns that reveal the connections between lithospheric structure (deep and shallow), magmatism (amount and style), amount of extension, uplift, and older structures remain elusive. However, our geophysical studies of modern and paleo rifts in North America, East Africa, and Europe makes it possible to make some general observations: 1). Magmatism in rifts is modest without the presence of a (pre-existing?) thermal anomaly in the mantle. 2). Magmatic modification of the crust takes many forms which probably depend on the nature of older structures present and the state of the lithosphere when rifting is initiated (i.e. cold vs. hot; fertility), 3) There is no clear relation between amount of extension and the amount of magmatic modification of the crust. 4) Brittle deformation in the upper crustal is complex, often asymmetrical and older features often play important roles in focusing deformation. However on a lithospheric scale, rift structure is usually symmetrical. 5) A better understanding of rift processes is emerging as we achieve higher levels of integration of a wide variety of geoscience data.

Keller, G. R.

2005-12-01

291

Cenozoic evolution of the Antarctic Peninsula continental margin  

SciTech Connect

Cenozoic evolution of the Antarctic Peninsula continental margin has involved a series of ridge (Aluk Ridge)-trench collisions between the Pacific and Antarctic plates. Subduction occurred episodically between segments of the Pacific plate that are bounded by major fracture zones. The age of ridge-trench collisions decreases from south to north along the margin. The very northern part of the margin, between the Hero and Shackleton fracture zones, has the last surviving Aluk-Antarctic spreading ridge segments and the only remaining trench topography. The sedimentary cover on the northern margin is relatively thin generally less than 1.5 km, thus providing a unique setting in which to examine margin evolution using high resolution seismic methods. Over 5,000 km of high resolution (water gun) seismic profiles were acquired from the Antarctic Peninsula margin during four cruises to the region. The margin is divided into discrete fracture-zone-bounded segments; each segment displays different styles of development. Highly tectonized active margin sequences have been buried beneath a seaward-thickening sediment wedge that represents the passive stage of margin development Ice caps, which have existed in the Antarctic Peninsula region since at least the late Oligocene, have advanced onto the continental shelf on numerous occasions, eroding hundreds of meters into the shelf and depositing a thick sequence of deposits characterized by till tongues and glacial troughs. Glacial erosion has been the main factor responsible for overdeepening of the shelf; isostasy is of secondary importance. As the shelf was lowered by glacial erosion, it was able to accommodate thicker and more unstable marine ice sheets. The shelf also became a vast reservoir for cold, saline shelf water, one of the key ingredients of Antarctic bottom water.

Anderson, J.B. (Rice Univ., Houston, TX (USA))

1990-05-01

292

Author's personal copy Plate tectonic reconstructions with continuously closing plates$  

E-print Network

Author's personal copy Plate tectonic reconstructions with continuously closing plates$ Michael May 2011 Keywords: Geodynamics Plate tectonics a b s t r a c t We present a new algorithm for modeling margins and plates, traditional global plate tectonic reconstructions have become inadequate

Bower, Dan J.

293

Visualizing Earthquakes at Divergent Plate Margins  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This screenshot from the visualization shows both continental rift zones, and ocean spreading centers, both types of divergent plate boundaries. The visualization shows how earthquakes at all types of divergent margins are shallow and have a low-magnitude. Click the image to enlarge or view the MP4 movie (MP4 Video 79.3MB Aug22 11).The purpose of this activity is to introduce students to the distribution and characteristics of earthquakes associated with divergent plate boundaries. Students will learn about how the magnitude and distribution of earthquakes at divergent boundaries are related to processes that occur at these boundaries and to the geometry and position of the two diverging plates. Because the depth of earthquakes can be difficult for students to visualize in 2D representations, this activity allows students to visualize the 3D distribution of earthquakes within Earth's surface, which is essential for understanding how different types of earthquakes occur in different tectonic settings. Locations featured in the visualization include the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, the East Pacific Rise, and the East African Rift Zone. Talking points and questions are included to facilitate using this visualization as part of an interactive lecture. In addition to playing back the visualization, instructors can also download the visualization software and data set and explore it themselves.

Cara Harwood

294

Visualizing Earthquakes at Convergent Plate Margins  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This screenshot shows the Fiji subduction zone, one of the featured convergent margins in this visualization. The visualization shows how earthquakes at this margin occur at depth, and define the slope of the subducting plate. This visualization also includes other examples of subduction zones and continental convergent margins (Himalayas). Click the image to enlarge or view the MP4 movie (MP4 Video 30.3MB Dec20 11). The purpose of this activity is to introduce students to the distribution and characteristics of earthquakes associated with convergent plate boundaries. Students will learn about how the magnitude and distribution of earthquakes at convergent boundaries are related to processes that occur at these boundaries and to the geometry and position of the two converging plates. Because the depth of earthquakes can be difficult for students to visualize in 2D representations, this activity allows students to visualize the 3D distribution of earthquakes within Earth's surface, which is essential for understanding how different types of earthquakes occur in different tectonic settings. Locations featured in the visualization include the Chile-Peru Subduction Zone, the Aleutian Islands, the Fiji Subeuction Zone, and the Himalayas. Talking points and questions are included to use this visualization as part of an interactive lecture. In addition to playing back the visualization, instructors can also download the visualization software and data set and explore it themselves.

Cara Harwood

295

Mapping Plate Boundaries  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This in-class exercise, profiled on the Starting Point website, is intended to have the students discover plate boundaries based on the uneven geographic occurrence of geologic hazards. The website details the learning goals, teaching notes and materials, and context for this activity. It offers an extensive list of links to additional resources and materials for lecture on geologic hazards and plate tectonics.

Rurik Johnson

2009-11-12

296

How Do Plates Move?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The representation shows the circulation of convection cells in the mantle related to plate movement. A static cross-sectional diagram and accompanying text illustrates the how material heated by the core rises and then sinks when it eventually cools down and attributes this cycle of heating and cooling to tectonic plate movement.

297

Blue Willow Story Plates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the December 1997 issue of "SchoolArts" is a lesson titled "Blue Willow Story Plates" by Susan Striker. In this article, the author shares how she used this lesson with her middle-school students many times over the years. Here, she describes a Blue Willow plate painting project that her students made.

Fontes, Kris

2009-01-01

298

The Moving Plates  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson focuses on relative versus absolute velocity. Students can use a program (must be connected to the internet) to calculate the different types of velocities for different points along plate boundaries. A very brief description of the earth's plates is given, with links to additional information and images. Includes discussion questions.

299

Fashion Plate Collection  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

There are fashion plates, and then there are the exquisite fashion plates that constitute the University of Washington Libraries digitized collection. The plates were first collected by long-time home economics professor Blanche Payne, who taught at the University from 1927 to 1966. The plates come from leading French, American, and British fashion journals of the 19th and early 20th century and they document many stylistic periods, such as the Empire, Romantic, Victorian, and Edwardian. Visitors will want to start by reading an essay on the collection, and then they should feel welcome to browse the collection of over 400 plates at their leisure, or to browse the collection by subject. One fascinating aspect of the site is an extended excerpt from the 1913 book "Dame fashion" which comments on the history and transformation of various fashions during the 19th century.

300

Thermophoresis of Graphene Plates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Thermophoresis of graphene plates in an air medium is discussed within the framework of a molecular-kinetic approach. Its rate is found to be independent of the plate area and the aspect ratio of a rectangular graphene. It does depend on the plate orientation in space, which is controlled by the principle of least resistance. The dependence is expressed via a geometrical parameter ?, whose limiting values within the variation interval are found to be 0.46 and 0.65. A solution of the Euler problem on the Brownian rotation of a plate around its center of mass as a result of collisions of molecules in the temperature gradient field allowed us to obtain for the graphene plates a statistical average of ? =0.5. This value turned out to be the same as the one for spherical nanoparticles, for which rotations are irrelevant.

Bubenchikov, A. M.; Bubenchikov, M. A.; Potekaev, A. I.; Maslov, A. S.; Ovcharenko, V. V.; Usenko, O. V.

2014-11-01

301

Plating To Reinforce Welded Joints  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Electrodeposition used to strengthen welded joints gouged, nicked, or suffered other mechanical damage. Plating cell, typically of acrylic plastic such as poly (Methylmetacrylate), is assembled around part to be plated. Areas not to be plated are masked with plater's tape. Weld area is plated in standard nickel-plating process.

Otousa, J. E.

1982-01-01

302

Plate Tectonics Prof. Thomas Herring  

E-print Network

1 Plate Tectonics Prof. Thomas Herring MIT 05/14/02 Lexington HS Plate tectonics 2 Contact/14/02 Lexington HS Plate tectonics 3 Overview · Development of the Plate tectonic theory · Geological Data ­ Sea-floor spreading ­ Fault types from earthquakes ­ Transform faults ­ Today's measurements of plate tectonics 05

Herring, Thomas

303

Neotectonics of the Owen Fracture Zone (NW Indian Ocean): structural evolution of an1 oceanic strike-slip plate boundary2  

E-print Network

-slip motion between India and Arabia plates. Because of slow pelagic18 sedimentation rates that preserve reflects a steady state plate motion between Arabia and32 India, such as inferred by kinematics in continental or oceanic domains display a variety of40 geological features that received considerable attention

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

304

New paradigm for the early Earth: did plate tectonics as we know it not operate until the end of the Archean?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Here, I question the apparent absence of ‘oceanic’ crust from the Archean and whether plate tectonics as we know it, involving ridges, deep oceans, subduction and continent-sized plates, operated during the Archean. The suggestion is advanced that the early seas were formed after the initiation of continental crust at >4 Ga; that this crust was globe enveloping; and that the

G. J. H. McCall

2010-01-01

305

3-D thermo-mechanical laboratory modeling of plate-tectonics: modeling scheme, technique and first experiments  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present an experimental apparatus for 3-D thermo-mechanical analogue modeling of plate tectonic processes such as oceanic and continental subductions, arc-continent or continental collisions. The model lithosphere, made of temperature-sensitive elasto-plastic analogue materials with strain softening, is submitted to a constant temperature gradient causing a strength reduction with depth in each layer. The surface temperature is imposed using infrared emitters,

D. Boutelier; O. Oncken

2011-01-01

306

PLATE TECTONICS USING GIS Understanding plate tectonics using real  

E-print Network

PLATE TECTONICS USING GIS Understanding plate tectonics using real global data sets pertaining OF THE UPSTATE, SC An afternoon field trip to observe the evidences for plate tectonic history, and to witness

307

Cenozoic tectonic jumping and implications for hydrocarbon accumulation in basins in the East Asia Continental Margin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tectonic migration is a common geological process of basin formation and evolution. However, little is known about tectonic migration in the western Pacific margins. This paper focuses on the representative Cenozoic basins of East China and its surrounding seas in the western Pacific domain to discuss the phenomenon of tectonic jumping in Cenozoic basins, based on structural data from the Bohai Bay Basin, the South Yellow Sea Basin, the East China Sea Shelf Basin, and the South China Sea Continental Shelf Basin. The western Pacific active continental margin is the eastern margin of a global convergent system involving the Eurasian Plate, the Pacific Plate, and the Indian Plate. Under the combined effects of the India-Eurasia collision and retrogressive or roll-back subduction of the Pacific Plate, the western Pacific active continental margin had a wide basin-arc-trench system which migrated or ‘jumped’ eastward and further oceanward. This migration and jumping is characterized by progressive eastward younging of faulting, sedimentation, and subsidence within the basins. Owing to the tectonic migration, the geological conditions associated with hydrocarbon and gashydrate accumulation in the Cenozoic basins of East China and its adjacent seas also become progressively younger from west to east, showing eastward younging in the generation time of reservoirs, seals, traps, accumulations and preservation of hydrocarbon and gashydrate. Such a spatio-temporal distribution of Cenozoic hydrocarbon and gashydrate is significant for the oil, gas and gashydrate exploration in the East Asian Continental Margin. Finally, this study discusses the mechanism of Cenozoic intrabasinal and interbasinal tectonic migration in terms of interplate, intraplate and underplating processes. The migration or jumping regimes of three separate or interrelated events: (1) tectonism-magmatism, (2) basin formation, and (3) hydrocarbon-gashydrate accumulation are the combined effects of the Late Mesozoic extrusion tectonics, the Cenozoic NW-directed crustal extension, and the regional far-field eastward flow of the western asthenosphere due to the India-Eurasia plate collision, accompanied by eastward jumping and roll-back of subduction zones of the Pacific Plate.

Suo, Yanhui; Li, Sanzhong; Yu, Shan; Somerville, Ian D.; Liu, Xin; Zhao, Shujuan; Dai, Liming

2014-07-01

308

Continental margin tectonics - Forearc processes  

SciTech Connect

Recent studies of convergent plate margins and the structural development of forearc terranes are summarized in a critical review of U.S. research from the period 1987-1990. Topics addressed include the geometry of accretionary prisms (Coulomb wedge taper and vertical motion in response to tectonic processes), offscraping vs underplating or subduction, the response to oblique convergence, fluids in forearc settings, the thermal framework and the effects of fluid advection, and serpentinite seamounts. Also included is a comprehensive bibliography for the period.

Lundberg, N.; Reed, D.L. (USAF, Geophysics Laboratory, Hanscom AFB, MA (United States))

1991-01-01

309

Continental volume and freeboard through geological time  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The consequences of approximately constant freeboard for continental growth are explored using a model that relates the volumes of isostatically compensated continents and oceans to the secular decline in terrestrial heat flow. It is found that a post-Archean increase in freeboard by 200 m requires continental growth of only 10 percent, while a decrease in freeboard by 200 m during this same period necessitates a crustal growth of 40 percent. Shrinkage of the continental crust since the end of the Archean can be ruled out. Changes of more than 10 percent in post-Archean crustal thickness are highly unlikely.

Schubert, G.; Reymer, A. P. S.

1985-01-01

310

Regional magnetic anomaly constraints on continental breakup  

SciTech Connect

Continental lithosphere magnetic anomalies mapped by the Magsat satellite are related to tectonic features associated with regional compositional variations of the crust and upper mantle and crustal thickness and thermal perturbations. These continental-scale anomaly patterns when corrected for varying observation elevation and the global change in the direction and intensity of the geomagnetic field show remarkable correlation of regional lithospheric magnetic sources across rifted continental margins when plotted on a reconstruction of Pangea. Accordingly, these anomalies provide new and fundamental constraints on the geologic evolution and dynamics of the continents and oceans.

von Frese, R.R.B.; Hinze, W.J.; Olivier, R.; Bentley, C.R.

1986-01-01

311

Mapping the evolving strain field during continental breakup from crustal anisotropy in the Afar Depression.  

PubMed

Rifting of the continents leading to plate rupture occurs by a combination of mechanical deformation and magma intrusion, yet the spatial and temporal scales over which these alternate mechanisms localize extensional strain remain controversial. Here we quantify anisotropy of the upper crust across the volcanically active Afar Triple Junction using shear-wave splitting from local earthquakes to evaluate the distribution and orientation of strain in a region of continental breakup. The pattern of S-wave splitting in Afar is best explained by anisotropy from deformation-related structures, with the dramatic change in splitting parameters into the rift axis from the increased density of dyke-induced faulting combined with a contribution from oriented melt pockets near volcanic centres. The lack of rift-perpendicular anisotropy in the lithosphere, and corroborating geoscientific evidence of extension dominated by dyking, provide strong evidence that magma intrusion achieves the majority of plate opening in this zone of incipient plate rupture. PMID:21505441

Keir, Derek; Belachew, M; Ebinger, C J; Kendall, J-M; Hammond, J O S; Stuart, G W; Ayele, A; Rowland, J V

2011-01-01

312

Mapping the evolving strain field during continental breakup from crustal anisotropy in the Afar Depression  

PubMed Central

Rifting of the continents leading to plate rupture occurs by a combination of mechanical deformation and magma intrusion, yet the spatial and temporal scales over which these alternate mechanisms localize extensional strain remain controversial. Here we quantify anisotropy of the upper crust across the volcanically active Afar Triple Junction using shear-wave splitting from local earthquakes to evaluate the distribution and orientation of strain in a region of continental breakup. The pattern of S-wave splitting in Afar is best explained by anisotropy from deformation-related structures, with the dramatic change in splitting parameters into the rift axis from the increased density of dyke-induced faulting combined with a contribution from oriented melt pockets near volcanic centres. The lack of rift-perpendicular anisotropy in the lithosphere, and corroborating geoscientific evidence of extension dominated by dyking, provide strong evidence that magma intrusion achieves the majority of plate opening in this zone of incipient plate rupture. PMID:21505441

Keir, Derek; Belachew, M.; Ebinger, C.J.; Kendall, J.-M.; Hammond, J.O.S.; Stuart, G.W.; Ayele, A.; Rowland, J.V.

2011-01-01

313

Plumes do not Exist: Plate Circulation is Confined to Upper Mantle  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Plumes from deep mantle are widely conjectured to define an absolute reference frame, inaugurate rifting, drive plates, and profoundly modify oceans and continents. Mantle properties and composition are assumed to be whatever enables plumes. Nevertheless, purported critical evidence for plume speculation is false, and all data are better interpreted without plumes. Plume fantasies are made ever more complex and ad hoc to evade contradictory data, and have no predictive value because plumes do not exist. All plume conjecture derives from Hawaii and the guess that the Emperor-Hawaii inflection records a 60-degree change in Pacific plate direction at 45 Ma. Paleomagnetic latitudes and smooth Pacific spreading patterns disprove any such change. Rationales for other fixed plumes collapse when tested, and hypotheses of jumping, splitting, and gyrating plumes are specious. Thermal and physical properties of Hawaiian lithosphere falsify plume predictions. Purported tomographic support elsewhere represents artifacts and misleading presentations. Asthenosphere is everywhere near solidus temperature, so melt needs a tensional setting for egress but not local heat. Gradational and inconsistent contrasts between MORB and OIB are as required by depth-varying melt generation and behavior in contrasted settings and do not indicate systematically unlike sources. MORB melts rise, with minimal reaction, through hot asthenosphere, whereas OIB melts react with cool lithosphere, and lose mass, by crystallizing refractories and retaining and assimilating fusibles. The unfractionated lower mantle of plume conjecture is contrary to cosmologic and thermodynamic data, for mantle below 660 km is more refractory than that above. Subduction, due to density inversion by top-down cooling that forms oceanic lithosphere, drives plate tectonics and upper-mantle circulation. It organizes plate motions and lithosphere stress, which controls plate boundaries and volcanic chains. Hinge rollback is the key to kinematics. Arcs advance and collide, fast-spreading Pacific shrinks, etc. A fore-arc basin atop an overriding plate shows that hinge and non-shortening plate front there track together: velocities of rollback and advance are equal. Convergence velocity commonly also equals rollback velocity but often is greater. Slabs sinking broadside push upper mantle back under incoming plates and force rapid Pacific spreading, whereas overriding plates flow forward with retreating hinges. Backarc basins open behind island arcs migrating with hinges. Slabs settle on uncrossable 660-km discontinuity. (Contrary tomographic claims reflect sampling and smearing artifacts, notably due to along-slab raypaths.) Plates advance over sunken slabs and mantle displaced rearward by them, and ridges spread where advancing plates pull away. Ridges migrate over asthenosphere, producing geophysical and bathymetric asymmetry, and tap fresh asthenosphere into which slab material is recycled upward. Sluggish deep-mantle circulation is decoupled from rapid upper-mantle circulation, so plate motions can be referenced to semistable lower mantle. Global plate motions make kinematic sense if Antarctica, almost ringed by departing ridges and varying little in Cenozoic paleomagnetic position, is stationary: hinges roll back, ridges migrate, and directions and velocities of plate rotations accord with subduction, including sliding and crowding of oceanic lithosphere toward free edges, as the dominant drive. (The invalid hotspot and no-net-rotation frames minimize motions of hinges and ridges, and their plate motions lack kinematic sense.) Northern Eurasia also is almost stationary, Africa rotates very slowly counterclockwise toward Aegean and Zagros, Pacific plate races toward surface-exit subduction systems, etc.

Hamilton, W. B.

2002-12-01

314

Earthquakes and plate tectonics.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Earthquakes occur at the following three kinds of plate boundary: ocean ridges where the plates are pulled apart, margins where the plates scrape past one another, and margins where one plate is thrust under the other. Thus, we can predict the general regions on the earth's surface where we can expect large earthquakes in the future. We know that each year about 140 earthquakes of magnitude 6 or greater will occur within this area which is 10% of the earth's surface. But on a worldwide basis we cannot say with much accuracy when these events will occur. The reason is that the processes in plate tectonics have been going on for millions of years. Averaged over this interval, plate motions amount to several mm per year. But at any instant in geologic time, for example the year 1982, we do not know, exactly where we are in the worldwide cycle of strain build-up and strain release. Only by monitoring the stress and strain in small areas, for instance, the San Andreas fault, in great detail can we hope to predict when renewed activity in that part of the plate tectonics arena is likely to take place. -from Author

Spall, H.

1982-01-01

315

Plate Tectonics Jigsaw  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity is a slight variation on an original activity, Discovering Plate Boundaries, developed by Dale Sawyer at Rice University. I made different maps, including more detail in all of the datasets, and used a different map projection, but otherwise the general progression of the activity is the same. More information about jigsaw activities in general can be found in the Jigsaws module. The activity occurs in several sections, which can be completed in one or multiple classes. In the first section, students are divided into "specialist" groups, and each group is given a global map with a single dataset: global seismicity, volcanoes, topography, age of the seafloor, and free-air gravity. Each student is also given a map of plate boundaries. Their task in the specialist group is to become familiar with their dataset and develop categories of plate boundaries based only on their dataset. Each group then presents their results to the class. In the second section, students reorganize into groups with 1-2 of each type of specialist per group. Each new group is given a plate, and they combine their different datasets on that one plate and look for patterns. Again, each plate group presents to the class. The common patterns and connections between the different datasets quickly become apparent, and the final section of the activity involves a short lecture from the instructor about types of plate boundaries and why the common features are generated at those plate boundaries. A follow-up section or class involves using a problem-solving approach to explain the areas that don't "fit" into the typical boundary types - intra-plate volcanism, earthquakes in the Eastern California Shear Zone, etc.

Anne Egger

316

Mountains and Moving Plates  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

These are the lecture notes for a class on plate tectonics and mountain building which is taught at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The course describes the connections between the earth's tectonic plates, earthquakes, and its many mountain ranges. Topics include basic geography, the structure of the earth's interior, the relationships between the seismic cycle, volcanism, and plate movements, erosion of mountains, and mass wasting. Links are provided to additional resources, including aerial photos of geologic features, an interactive map of geology and topography of the United States, and a glossary.

317

Plate Tectonics at Work  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a brief description of the results of plate movement according to the Theory of Plate Tectonics. It explains how divergence at the mid-ocean ridges accounts for the discoveries of Harry Hess. The site also refers to the invention of the magnetometer and the discovery of the young age of the ocean floor basalt. It concludes that these are the kinds of discoveries and thinking that ultimately led to the development of the theory of plate tectonics and that in just a few decades, have greatly changed our view of and notions about our planet and the sciences that attempt to explain its existence and development.

318

Volatile components and continental material of planets  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

It is shown that the continental material of the terrestrial planets varies in composition from planet to planet according to the abundances and composition of true volatiles (H20, CO2, etc.) in the outer shells of the planets. The formation of these shells occurs very early in a planet's evolution when the role of endogenous processes is indistinct and continental materials are subject to melting and vaporizing in the absence of an atmosphere. As a result, the chemical properties of continental materials are related not only to fractionation processes but also to meltability and volatility. For planets retaining a certain quantity of true volatile components, the chemical transformation of continental material is characterized by a close interaction between impact melting vaporization and endogeneous geological processes.

Florenskiy, K. P.; Nikolayeva, O. V.

1986-01-01

319

Oceanic core complexes in the Philippine Sea: results from Japan's extended continental shelf mapping  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The United Nations Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf (CLCS) issued its recommendations on Japan's extended continental shelf in April 2012, confirming Japan's rights over the vast areas within the Philippine Sea and Pacific Plates. Japan submitted information on the limits of its continental shelf beyond the EEZ to the CLCS on November 2008, which was the result of 25 years of nation's continental shelf survey project since 1983, involving all of Japan's agency relevant to geosciences. The huge geological and geophysical data obtained through the project give the scientists unprecedented opportunity to study the geology and tectonics of the Philippine Sea and Pacific Plates. In this contribution, we show such an example from the Philippine Sea Plate, relevant to the global mid-ocean ridge problem. Oceanic core complexes (OCC) are dome-shaped bathymetric highs identified in mid-ocean ridges, interpreted as portions of the lower crust and/or upper mantle denuded via low-angle detachment faulting. OCCs are characterized morphologically by axis-normal striations (corrugations, or mullion structure) on the dome, and exposures of mantle peridotite and/or lower crustal gabbro. A strikingly giant OCC (named 'Godzilla Megamullion') was discovered in the Parece Vela Basin by the continental shelf survey project in 2001. Godzilla Megamullion is morphologically the largest OCC in the world, consisting mainly of fertile mantle peridotite along its entire length of over 125 km. Following its discovery in 2001, several academic cruises investigated the structure in detail, providing numerous important findings relevant to mid-ocean ridge tectono-magmatic processes and Philippine Sea evolution, including the slow- to ultraslow-spreading environment for denudation of the detachment fault (< 2.5 cm/y) and associated decreasing degree of partial melting of the peridotites towards the termination of Godzilla Megamullion. In addition to Godzilla Megamullion, several potential OCCs have been discovered in the Philippine Sea Plate by the continental shelf survey project. These are: (1) the ones in the Shikoku Basin spreading axis at around 24 degrees north, (2) the Chaotic Terrain in the Parece Vela Basin, (3) Chaotic Terrain in the West Philippine Basin, near the CBF Rift (formerly known as the Central Basin Fault), (4) Chaotic Terrain in the Kita-Daito Basin, (5) the one in the Shikoku Basin floor to the east of Kyushu-Palau Ridge at 25 degrees north, (6) the Higashi-Ryusei Spur of the Kyushu-Palau Ridge at 26 degrees north, and (7) the one in the Daito Ridge adjoining to the Kida-Daito Basin. OCCs are commonly developed in slow-spreading ridges, providing excellent opportunities as tectonic windows to study the composition and structure of deep oceanic lithosphere. The OCCs in the Philippine Sea Plate in turn provide the opportunities to study the backarc basin lithosphere as well as the continental lithosphere (at the above examples 6 and 7). Although Godzilla Megamullion has been studied very well, the other OCCs are not well documented yet. The next step is to focus on these interesting targets to understand the lithospheric process in the Philippine Sea Plate.

Ohara, Y.; Yoshida, T.; Nishizawa, A.

2013-12-01

320

Freshwater peat on the continental shelf  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Freshwater peats from the continental shelf off northeastern United States contain the same general pollen sequence as peats from ponds that are above sea level and that are of comparable radiocarbon ages. These peats indicate that during glacial times of low sea level terrestrial vegetation covered the region that is now the continental shelf in an unbroken extension from the adjacent land areas to the north and west.

Emery, K.O.; Wigley, R.L.; Bartlett, A.S.; Rubin, M.; Barghoorn, E.S.

1967-01-01

321

Mg\\/Ca of Continental Ostracode Shells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Marine ionic chemistry is thought to remain constant. This, together with the belief that marine calcifiers partition Mg\\/Ca in a systematic manner as functions of temperature (and Mg\\/Ca) of water forms the basis of the Mg\\/Ca thermometer. In continental settings both of these assumptions are usually not true. Continental waters contain a wide variety of solutes in absolute and relative

E. Ito; R. M. Forester; J. Marco-Barba; F. Mezquita

2007-01-01

322

Continental transform margins : state of art and future milestones  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Transform faults were defined 45 years ago as ‘a new class of fault' (Wilson, 1965), and transform margins were consequently individualized as a new class of continental margins. While transform margins represent 20 to 25 % of the total length of continent-ocean transitions, they were poorly studied, especially when compared with the amount of data, interpretations, models and conceptual progress accumulated on divergent or convergent continental margins. The best studied examples of transform margins are located in the northern part of Norway, south of South Africa, in the gulf of California and on both sides of the Equatorial Atlantic. Here is located the Côte d'Ivoire - Ghana margin, where the more complete data set was acquired, based on numerous geological and geophysical cruises, including ODP Leg 159. The first models that encompassed the structure and evolution of transform margins were mainly driven by plate kinematic reconstructions, and evidenced the diachronic end of tectonic activity and the non-cylindrical character of these margins, with a decreasing strike-slip deformation from the convex to the concave divergent-transform intersections. Further thermo-mechanical models were more specifically designed to explain the vertical displacements along transform margins, and especially the occurrence of high-standing marginal ridges. These thermo-mechanical models involved either heat transfer from oceanic to continental lithospheres across the transform faults or tectonically- or gravity-driven mass transfer in the upper crust. These models were far from fully fit observations, and were frequently dedicated to specific example, and not easily generalizable. Future work on transform continental margins may be expected to fill some scientific gaps, and the definition of working directions can benefit from the studies dedicated to other types of margins. At regional scale the structural and sedimentological variability of transform continental margins has to be emphasized. There is not only one type of transform margins, but as for divergent margins huge changes from one margin to another in both structure and evolution. Multiple types have to be evidenced together with the various parameters that should control the variability. As for divergent margins, special attention should be paid to conjugated transform margins as a tool to assess symmetrical / asymmetrical processes in the oceanic opening. Attention should also be focused on the three-dimensional structure of the intersections between transform and divergent margins, such as the one where the giant oil field Jubilee was recently discovered. There is almost no 3D data available in these area, and their structures still have to be described. An other key point to develop is the mechanical behavior of the lithosphere in and in the vicinity of transform margins. The classical behaviors (isostasy, elastic flexure) have be tested extensively. The localization of the deformation by the transform fault, and the coupling of continental and oceanic lithosphere across the transform fault have to be adressed to understand the evolution of these margins. Again as for divergent margins, new concepts are needed to explain the variations in the post-rift and post-transform subsidence, that can not always be explained by classical subsidence models. But the most remarkable advance in our understanding of transform margins may be related to the study of interactions between the lithosphere and adjacent envelops : deep interactions with the mantle, as underplating, tectonic erosion, or possible lateral crustal flow ; surficial interactions between structural evolution, erosion and sedimentation processes in transform margins may affect the topography and bathymetry, thus the oceanic circulation with possible effects on regional and global climate.

Basile, Christophe

2010-05-01

323

Violin plate modes.  

PubMed

As the first step toward developing a generic model for the acoustically radiating vibrational modes of the violin and related instruments, the modes of both freely supported and edge-constrained top and back plates have been investigated as functions of shape, arching height, elastic anisotropy, the f-holes and associated island area, thickness graduations, and the additional boundary constraints of the ribs, soundpost, and bass-bar present in the assembled instrument. Comsol shell structure finite element software has been used as a quasi-experimental tool, with physical and geometric properties varied smoothly, often over several orders of magnitude, allowing the development of the plate modes to be followed continuously from those of an initially square plate to those of doubly-arched, guitar-shaped, orthotropic plates and their dependence on all the above factors. PMID:25618046

Gough, Colin

2015-01-01

324

myPlate (image)  

MedlinePLUS

... food choices. The guide encourages you to eat less and avoid oversized portions. Half your plate should be filled with fruits and vegetables. At least half of your grains should be whole grains. You also should switch ...

325

Tectonic Plate Movement.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an activity that employs movement to enable students to understand concepts related to plate tectonics. Argues that movement brings topics to life in a concrete way and helps children retain knowledge. (DDR)

Landalf, Helen

1998-01-01

326

elementsair ceramic plate  

E-print Network

many current day applications. Anything that creates waste heat (e.g. engines, computers, electronicsearth elementsair L ceramic plate Thermoelectric Module Construction for Low Temperature Gradient related carbon dioxide emissions are the largest contributors to greenhouse gasses [1]. Thermoelectric

327

Farallon Plate Remnants  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This image and short video from the NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio shows the remnants of the Farallon Plate based on seismic tomography studies. The studies were conducted by Hans-Peter Bunge at Princeton University in 2000.

NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio

328

Reduction of astrometric plates  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A rapid and accurate method for the reduction of comet or asteroid plates is described. Projection equations, scale length correction, rotation of coordinates, linearization, the search for additional reference stars, and the final solution are examined.

Stock, J.

1984-01-01

329

Flat plate solar oven  

SciTech Connect

The construction of an Indian Rs. 186 (US $20.33) flat-plate solar oven is described. Detailed drawings are provided and relevant information on cooking times and temperature for different foods is given.

Parikh, M.

1981-01-01

330

Growth Plate Fractures  

MedlinePLUS

... Harris system and is described here. Type I Fractures These fractures break through the bone at the ... and completely disrupting the growth plate. Type II Fractures These fractures break through part of the bone ...

331

Lack of proportionality. Seven specifications of public interest that override post-approval commercial interests on limited access to clinical data  

PubMed Central

For the protection of commercial interests, licensing bodies such as the EMA and health technology assessment institutions such as NICE restrict full access to unpublished evidence. Their respective policies on data transparency, however, lack a systematic account of (1) what kinds of commercial interests remain relevant after market approval has been granted, (2) what the specific types of public interest are that may override these commercial interests post approval, and, most importantly, (3) what criteria guide the trade-off between public interest and legitimate measures for the protection of commercial interest. Comparing potential commercial interests with seven specifications of relevant public interest reveals the lack of proportionality inherent in the current practices of EMA and NICE. PMID:22747684

2012-01-01

332

In Situ Stress in the Antarctic Continental Interior: Glaciotectonic Influence?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Antarctica is key to developing a better understanding of the net effects of plate-boundary and glaciotectonic forces on plate-interior stress regimes. From a tectonic perspective, the Antarctic intracontinental stress regime is expected to be compressive, because midocean spreading ridges segmented by transform faults surround the plate. The Cenozoic history of West Antarctica, however, is dominated by extensional tectonics and faults that cut the seafloor in the westernmost rift suggest that this regime may still be active. The crust of the Antarctic continental interior is also expected to be profoundly influenced by the growth and decay cycles of the Antarctic ice sheets through postglacial rebound and uplift/subsidence associated with glacial erosion and surface mass redistribution. One long-standing hypothesis is that the mass of the present Antarctic ice sheets, superimposed on a presumed compressive tectonic stress regime, promotes fault stability and aseismicity by decreasing the net differential stress (Johnson, 1987). Our research group has obtained the first in situ measurements of the orientation and magnitudes of the contemporary stress field in the Antarctic interior, from analysis of drilling-induced fractures observed in boreholes drilled by the international Cape Roberts Project drilling program. Our results document high, anisotropic horizontal stresses, with a strike-slip regime and a strike-slip/normal stress regime for two different boreholes. These results, if characteristic of the Antarctic interior, are inconsistent with suppression of seismicity by the present ice mass. The strike-slip stress regime is consistent with modeling that predicts strike-slip at the peripheries of the ice sheet upon deglaciation (Ivins & James, 2001). Sparse current data on Quaternary fault kinematics (Jones, 1997) are compatible with the NNW-SSE orientation of SHmax and the strike-slip stress regime found in this study. These key clues point to a glaciotectonic influence, but the full story of the Antarctic stress regime will require substantially more in situ data.

Wilson, T. J.; Jarrard, R. D.; Moos, D.; Paulsen, T. S.

2002-05-01

333

Tectonic implications of post-30 Ma Pacific and North American relative plate motions  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Pacific plate moved northwest relative to North America since 42 Ma. The rapid half rate of Pacific-Farallon spreading allowed the ridge to approach the continent at about 29 Ma. Extinct spreading ridges that occur offshore along 65% of the margin document that fragments of the subducted Farallon slab became captured by the Pacific plate and assumed its motion proper to the actual subduction of the spreading ridge. This plate-capture process can be used to explain much of the post-29 Ma Cordilleran North America extension, strike slip, and the inland jump of oceanic spreading in the Gulf of California. Much of the post-29 Ma continental tectonism is the result of the strong traction imposed on the deep part of the continental crust by the gently inclined slab of subducted oceanic lithosphere as it moved to the northwest relative to the overlying continent. -from Authors

Bohannon, R.G.; Parsons, T.

1995-01-01

334

Positive battery plate  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The power characteristics of a lead acid battery are improved by incorporating a dispersion of 1 to 10% by weight of a thermodynamically stable conductivity additive, such as conductive tin oxide coated glass fibers (34) of filamentary glass wool (42) in the positive active layer (32) carried on the grid (30) of the positive plate (16). Positive plate potential must be kept high enough to prevent reduction of the tin oxide to tin by utilizing an oversized, precharged positive paste.

Rowlette, John R. (Inventor)

1985-01-01

335

Plate Tectonics: An Introduction  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In the early 1900s, most geologists thought that Earth's appearance, including the arrangement of the continents, had changed little since its formation. This video segment describes the impact the theory of plate tectonics has had on our understanding of Earth's geological history, and provides a brief overview of what is currently known about the Earth's tectonic plates and their motions. The segment is two minutes twenty-one seconds in length. A background essay and list of discussion questions are also provided.

336

Stratigraphy and tectonic significance of Lower Paleozoic continental margin strata in northeastern Washington  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lower Paleozoic eugeoclinal strata in the Kootenay Arc in northeastern Washington and southeastern British Columbia are transitional between autochthonous lower Paleozoic miogeoclinal strata and outboard volcanic arc terranes of uncertain paleogeographic affinity. They provide a record of lower Paleozoic continental margin depositional and tectonic processes oceanward of the continental shelf. The southernmost stratigraphic unit, the Covada Group, is divided into two formations, the Daisy Formation, a mid fan sequence of arkosic and subarkosic wacke and arenite, and the Early Ordovician Butcher Mountain Formation, consisting of alkalic(?) pillow basalt and tuff of within-plate affinity. Another unit, formerly part of the Covada Group, is excluded and informally named the Bradeen Hill assemblage. It contains chert, chert-quartz arenite, quartz arenite, chert pebble conglomerate, shale, and basalt, and may be Ordovician to Devonian on the basis of stratigraphic evidence and regional correlations. The Covada Group and Bradeen Hill assemblage record (1) deposition of continentally derived sediments in a submarine fan setting, (2) relatively quiescent starved basin conditions, (3) local faulting; and (4) intermittent periods of volcanism, perhaps reflecting local extension. They can be correlated with other stratigraphic units in the Kootenay Arc and resemble units as far north as the Selwyn basin in northern Canada and as far south as the Roberts Mountains allochthon in central Nevada. This unites the stratigraphic record and implies a high degree of synchroneity of tectonic events along over 2500 km of the outer continental margin during early Paleozoic time.

Smith, Moira T.; Gehrels, George E.

1992-06-01

337

The Effect of Temperature Dependent Rheology on a Kinematic Model of Continental Breakup and Rifted Continental Margin Formation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of temperature dependent rheology has been examined for a model of continental lithosphere thinning by an upwelling divergent flow field within continental lithosphere and asthenosphere leading to continental breakup and rifted continental margin formation. The model uses a coupled FE fluid flow and thermal solution and is kinematically driven using a half divergence rate Vx and upwelling velocity

V. J. Tymms; N. J. Kusznir

2004-01-01

338

The influence of oceanic fracture zones on the segmentation of continental margins and the evolution of intra-continental rift systems: Case studies from the Atlantic  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It has been a long held view that oceanic fracture zones play an important role in the segmentation of continental margins and therefore provide a major structural control on their evolution and the development of associated petroleum systems. The geometry of fracture zones reflects the spreading history of the seafloor: subtle changes in plate motion causes stress-field reorientation, which in turn results in changes in the orientation of the fracture zone. These changes can introduce strike-perpendicular compression or extension across transform faults; the latter may lead to increased ridge segmentation and the initiation of new spreading centres. We present two examples of secondary fracture zone initiation and disappearance within the Atlantic Ocean between 1) the Atlantis and Kane major fracture zones in the Central Atlantic and 2) the Ascension and Rio de Janeiro fracture zones in the South Atlantic. We investigate the discontinuous nature of these fracture zones by exploring their relationship with major plate re-organisation events and seafloor spreading geometry. Using a series of stage reconstruction poles that represent the motion of both North and South America relative to Africa since the initiation of Atlantic seafloor spreading, we have performed a quantitative analysis of spreading directions along major Atlantic fracture zones. Our results demonstrate a notable correlation between the timing of major plate reorganisation events and the initiation and disappearance of secondary fracture zones. Such events are clearly recorded in the Atlantic margin stratigraphic record as major unconformities. We are therefore able to interpret fracture zone abundance in terms of palaeo-spreading geometry and the opening history of the Atlantic Ocean. This allows us to make important inferences about the influence of fracture zones on the segmentation and structural control of continental margins. Specifically, in our South Atlantic case study, where secondary fracture zones do not extend up to the offshore Angolan and conjugate Brazilian margins, we conclude that small offset transform faulting did not influence the evolution of the continental margin as has been previously suggested. On a regional scale, the evolution of the Africa-wide Mesozoic rift system is intimately linked to global plate tectonics and to changes in plate interactions. On a basinal scale, changes in the orientation of the dominant stress field resulting from plate reorganisation have had a clear impact on the deformation history and fault geometries of rift basins. We demonstrate this relationship by correlating the timing of changes in South Atlantic fracture zone geometries and African margin unconformities with major unconformities that are observed in a unified stratigraphy chart for the West and Central African Rift System. We propose a controlling mechanism in which changes in plate stress control the effective elastic strength of a plate, resulting in a focused change in isostatic response over continental margins.

Masterton, S.; Fairhead, J. D.; Green, C. M.

2012-12-01

339

An explanation for the age independence of oceanic elastic thickness estimates from flexural profiles at subduction zones, and implications for continental rheology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Most properties of oceanic lithosphere are widely observed to be dependent on the age of the plate, such as water depth, heat flow, and seismogenic thickness. However, estimates of the ‘effective elastic thickness' of oceanic lithosphere based on the deflection of the plate as it enters a subduction zone show little correlation with the age of the incoming lithosphere. This paradox requires reconciliation if we are to gain a full understanding of the structure, rheology, and behaviour of oceanic lithosphere. Here, we show that the permanent deformation of the plate due to outer-rise faulting, combined with uncertainties in the yield stress of the lithosphere, the in-plane forces transmitted through subduction zones, and the levels of noise in bathymetric and gravity data, prevents simple elastic plate modelling from accurately capturing the underlying rheological structure of the incoming plate. The age-independent estimates of effective elastic thickness obtained by purely elastic plate modelling are therefore not likely to represent the true rheology of the plate, and hence are not expected to correspond to the plate age. Similar effects may apply to estimates of elastic thickness from continental forelands, with implications for our understanding of continental rheology.

Craig, Timothy J.; Copley, Alex

2014-04-01

340

Deciphering the history and causes of the cryptic rise and fall of continental interiors using low temperature thermochronology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Low amplitude, long wavelength "epeirogenic" vertical motions in continental interiors are not easily explained by plate tectonic theory. The extent to which dynamic topography induced by deep mantle buoyancy forces can account for these cryptic continental displacements is a subject of increasing study. Testing the vertical motions predicted by mantle dynamic models is challenging, however, because it can be difficult to discriminate between continental elevation change and eustatic sea level fluctuations in the geologic record of continental interiors. This problem is reflected in a longstanding debate over the relative importance of epeirogeny and eustasy in causing repeated Phanerozoic continental flooding and associated deposition of thick sedimentary rock sequences across the cratonic interior of North America. Here we use a new approach to address this problem by applying low temperature thermochronology to exposed Proterozoic and Archean basement samples to better resolve the thermal imprint, thickness, spatial extent, and evolution of missing portions of the Phanerozoic sedimentary record across an ~1300 km region of the western Canadian shield. The sensitivity of apatite (U-Th)/He and fission-track data to 120-30 °C temperatures allows resolution of shallow (1-6 km) depositional and erosional episodes with which to infer subsidence and uplift phases even if the strata associated with those events are no longer preserved in the rock record. The data indicate that a far more extensive region of the continent was inundated in the Paleozoic than is recorded by the rock record, and reveal coherent spatial variability in the thickness and history of the missing Paleozoic sequences. The Paleozoic-Mesozoic history of burial and unroofing recorded by the data does not correlate with eustatic sea level chronologies, and the similarity of depositional and erosional patterns at this continental scale in this plate interior setting is not easily explained by plate margin tectonism. We therefore explore whether dynamic topography provides a viable explanation for these results. A three-dimensional model of thermochemical convection coupled with the plate motion history is used to predict the post-400 Ma change in dynamic topography for the western Canadian shield. The predicted history of elevation change compares well with the Paleozoic history of burial and unroofing inferred from the thermochronology data. Burial may be due to cold mantle downwellings that caused subsidence during Pangea assembly, with subsequent unroofing driven by development of warm mantle upwellings after Pangea amalgamation. We conclude that dynamic topography is a plausible first-order cause of long-wavelength elevation change in this continental interior. This result demonstrates a new approach for deciphering mantle and surface process interactions deep in Earth history.

Flowers, R. M.; Ault, A. K.; Kelley, S.; Zhang, N.; Zhong, S.

2011-12-01

341

Record of Cenozoic sedimentation from the Amanos Mountains, Southern Turkey: Implications for the inception and evolution of the Arabia–Eurasia continental collision  

Microsoft Academic Search

The sedimentary succession of the southern Amanos Mountains, bordering the eastern margin of the Karasu Rift in south central Turkey, provides a record of environmental change from the Eocene (Lutetian) to the Upper Miocene (Tortonian) that charts the final evolution of the northern margin of the Arabian plate prior to and during continental collision. Eocene shallow-marine carbonates (Hac?da?? Formation) are

Sarah J. Boulton

2009-01-01

342

A change in the geodynamics of continental growth 3 billion years ago.  

PubMed

Models for the growth of continental crust rely on knowing the balance between the generation of new crust and the reworking of old crust throughout Earth's history. The oxygen isotopic composition of zircons, for which uranium-lead and hafnium isotopic data provide age constraints, is a key archive of crustal reworking. We identified systematic variations in hafnium and oxygen isotopes in zircons of different ages that reveal the relative proportions of reworked crust and of new crust through time. Growth of continental crust appears to have been a continuous process, albeit at variable rates. A marked decrease in the rate of crustal growth at ~3 billion years ago may be linked to the onset of subduction-driven plate tectonics. PMID:22422979

Dhuime, Bruno; Hawkesworth, Chris J; Cawood, Peter A; Storey, Craig D

2012-03-16

343

Musical Plates: A Study of Plate Tectonics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this project, students use Real-Time earthquake and volcano data from the Internet to explore the relationship between earthquakes, plate tectonics, and volcanoes. There is a teachers guide that explains how to use real time data, and in the same section, there is a section for curriculum standards, Supplement and enrichment activities, and assessment suggestions. Included on this webpage are four core activities, and three enrichment activities, including an activity where the student writes a letter to the president. There is also a link to reference materials that might also interest you and your students.

2007-01-01

344

Two opposed subduction modes at the southern Caribbean plate margin of Colombia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cretaceous to Paleogene convergence at the southern Caribbean plate margin is still little deciphered and a generalized interpretation is hindered by the absence of regionally correlatable tectonic elements, like magmatic arcs, time constraints and an intense crustal fragmentation brought about by Neogene strike-slip tectonics. In order to illustrate the diversity of these subduction settings and discuss possible tectonic controls on their subsequent collisional evolution, we outline the structural evolution along a thickened and a thinned continental segment. The first case is exemplified by the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, a triangular block that exposes an imbricated lower crustal section capped by nested plutons and a volcanic sequence of a Jurassic to Early Cretaceous arc. This exceptionally thick crustal section forms the upper plate of a continent-ward dipping main suture that is underlain by strongly sheared platform sediments and transitional basement rocks of a lower plate. Penetrative deformation developed under medium-grade conditions with a uniform top-to-the NE shear attests to a stable subduction interval of a still unknown duration. Onset of a collisional phase is marked by a crustal imbrication further inboard of the main suture, leading to a further crustal thickening, and links in the Paleogene to the emplacement of the dome-like Santa Marta batholith within the lower plate. It is likely that the juxtaposition of thickened continental Southamerican and thinner oceanic Caribbean crust triggered a crustal channel flow that fed the magmatic dome in the transitional part of these crustal realms, leading thus to some gravitational collapse of the continental crust. The opposite case of the juxtaposition of a continental platform, previously thinned by Jurassic to Early Cretaceous rifting and a relatively thick Caribbean crust is documented in the northwestern Guajira Peninsula. Here platform sequences and their corresponding basement were subducted below the Caribbean crust, acquiring a penetrative transpressional deformation under low-grade conditions. An incipient collision is attested by the amplification of the crustal bend of the continental plate and the formation of imbricate slices along backthrusts that involve both basement rocks and platform sediments. Upper plate sediments record structures related to gravity sliding and thus attest to slope-forming processes. These sedimentary sequences further include ultramafic lenses and vestiges of serpentine mud volcanoes. Arc magmatism is recorded solely by a Paleogene stock. The differences in subduction polarity cannot be explained by two events separated in time but reflect two concurrent subduction modes, governed by compositional and physical differences of the continental plate.

Kammer, Andreas; Piraquive, Alejandro

2014-05-01

345

An Introduction to Plate Tectonics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page is a brief introduction to plate tectonics. It starts with a discussion of the evolution of the theory of plate tectonics and the arguments supporting it. It then discusses the processes associated with tectonics and the types of plate boundaries: divergent, convergent and transform boundaries. It concludes with a discussion of the current hypotheses of what causes plates to move.

346

Caribbean plate interactions  

SciTech Connect

Vector analysis of plate motions, derived from studies of Atlantic magnetic lineations and fracture zone trends, indicates the following relative movements between the Caribbean, North American, and South American Plates. (1) During Early Jurassic to Early Cretaceous, the North American Plate moved 1900 km westward and 900 km northward relative to the South American Plate. A broad zone including the Caribbean region, i.e., the zone between the North and South America Plates, was a site of left-lateral shear and north-south extension. (2) During Early Cretaceous to Late Cretaceous, the North American Mate moved an additional 1200 km westward relative to South America across this zone. (3) During Late Cretaceous to the end of the Eocene, the North American Plate moved 200 km westward and 400 km northward relative to the South American Plate. (4) From the end of the Eocene to near the end of the Miocene, North America converged on South America some 200 km and moved 100 km eastward relative to it. Through the Mesozoic and earliest Tertiary history of the Caribbean, the region was a shear zone within which left-lateral displacement exceeded 3000 km and north-south extension exceeded 1300 km. In regard to time, 80% of the history of the Caribbean region is one of north-south extension and left-lateral shear. In terms of space, 97% of the shear is left-lateral and the ratio of divergence versus convergence is 7 to 1. Thus, characterizing the Caribbean region, and the Atlantic to its east, as a zone of north-south extension and left-lateral shear, is a fair generalization.

Ball, M. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

1993-02-01

347

Plate convergence, transcurrent faults and internal deformation adjacent to Southeast Asia and the western Pacific  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A model for oblique convergence between plates of lithosphere is proposed in which at least a fraction of slip parallel to the plate margin results in transcurrent movements on a nearly vertical fault which is located on the continental side of a zone of plate consumption. In an extreme case of complete decoupling only the component of slip normal to the plate margin can be inferred from underthrusting. Recent movements in the western Sunda region provide the most convincing evidence for decoupling of slip, which in this region is thought to be oblique to the plate margin. A speculative model for convergence along the margins of the Philippine Sea is constructed from an inferred direction of oblique slip in the Philippine region. This model requires that the triple point formed by the junction of the Japanese and Izu-Bonin trenches and the Nankai trough migrate along the Sagami trough.

Fitch, T. J.

1971-01-01

348

Magmatic expression of lithospheric thinning across continental rifts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Studies of magmatism associated with continental rifting have traditionally focused only on volcanism within the downfaulted axial zone and along its immediate flanks. Teleseismic travel-time delay studies during the last decade have confirmed the results of earlier gravity surveys of rifted areas, showing that thinning at the base of the continental lithosphere occurs throughout a zone up to about 10 times wider than the physiographic expression of the rift. It is, therefore, logical to consider rifting-related magmatism on the same scale. Potential sources of mafic magmas in rift zones are the thinned subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM), the convecting mantle beneath the continental plate and mixtures of the two. Detailed elemental and radiogenic isotope geochemical studies show that, during the initial extension of continental rifts, the associated mafic magmatism tends to be: (1) relatively sodic and from predominantly convecting mantle sources at the rift axis; (2) relatively potassic and from predominantly lithospheric mantle sources at the margins of the thinned-plate zone. This underlying geochemical pattern is obscured in many instances by such processes as crustal contamination and magma mixing within open-system reservoirs. The mafic ultrapotassic component that provides a distinctive input to SCLM-source magmas appears to be largely fusible at temperatures well below the dry solidus of SCLM; so that, in some cases, prolonged magmatism at a site causes removal of most or all of the potassic lithosphere-source melt (as mafic ultrapotassic magmas or as a contribution to mixed-source melts) without destruction of that lithosphere segment as a geophysically defined unit. Such a zone of refractory lithosphere permits subsequent, recognisable, convecting mantle source melts to penetrate it and reach the surface. These principles are illustrated by discussion of the Neogene-Quaternary magmatism of the Rio Grande, East African, Rhine and Baikal rifts, in the context of the most recent published models of their geophysical structures to depths > 200 km. Teleseismic and gravity studies identify lithospheric thinning beneath the Rio Grande, East African and Baikal rifts across zones 700-800 km wide. The failure of the southern Rhine graben to show a similar deep seismic structure may be a result of efficient buoyant migration of low-viscosity mafic alkalic melt out of the underlying mantle during the 7 Ma period since magmatism ceased, causing seismically defined asthenosphere to revert to lithosphere. A 700 km geochemical traverse across the Rio Grande rift at ~ 37°N, focusing on Oligocene-Miocene magmatism minimally affected by post-genesis processes, shows a clear symmetrical pattern of relatively sodic volcanics at the rift axis and mafic, ultrapotassic magmatism on its outer flanks. The geochemistry of these contrasting magma types is consistent with the view that they originated predominantly within the convecting mantle and SCLM, respectively. The same geochemical pattern is detectable in the volcanism within the equatorial segment of the East African rift system but it is complicated in two zones: east of the Gregory rift and southwest of Lake Kivu, by the effects of previous Cretaceous-Palaeogene magmatism. Limited, published, appropriate, geochemical data show that regional compositional variation in the volcanics associated with the Baikal rift appear to fit the pattern proposed here as a general model for rifting-related magmatism.

Thompson, R. N.; Gibson, S. A.

1994-05-01

349

Cadmium plating replacements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Boeing Company has been searching for replacements to cadmium plate. Two alloy plating systems seem close to meeting the needs of a cadmium replacement. The two alloys, zinc-nickel and tin-zinc are from alloy plating baths; both baths are neutral pH. The alloys meet the requirements for salt fog corrosion resistance, and both alloys excel as a paint base. Currently, tests are being performed on standard fasteners to compare zinc-nickel and tin-zinc on threaded hardware where cadmium is heavily used. The Hydrogen embrittlement propensity of the zinc-nickel bath has been tested, and just beginning for the tin-zinc bath. Another area of interest is the electrical properties on aluminum for tin-zinc and will be discussed. The zinc-nickel alloy plating bath is in production in Boeing Commercial Airplane Group for non-critical low strength steels. The outlook is promising that these two coatings will help The Boeing Company significantly reduce its dependence on cadmium plating.

Nelson, Mary J.; Groshart, Earl C.

1995-01-01

350

Cadmium plating replacements  

SciTech Connect

The Boeing Company has been searching for replacements to cadmium plate. Two alloy plating systems seem close to meeting the needs of a cadmium replacement. The two alloys, zinc-nickel and tin-zinc are from alloy plating baths; both baths are neutral pH. The alloys meet the requirements for salt fog corrosion resistance, and both alloys excel as a paint base. Currently, tests are being performed on standard fasteners to compare zinc-nickel and tin-zinc on threaded hardware where cadmium is heavily used. The Hydrogen embrittlement propensity of the zinc-nickel bath has been tested, and just beginning for the tin-zinc bath. Another area of interest is the electrical properties on aluminum for tin-zinc and will be discussed. The zinc-nickel alloy plating bath is in production in Boeing Commercial Airplane Group for non-critical low strength steels. The outlook is promising that these two coatings will help The Boeing Company significantly reduce its dependence on cadmium plating.

Nelson, M.J.; Groshart, E.C.

1995-03-01

351

Limb lengthening over plate  

PubMed Central

Background: The limb lengthening over plate eliminates the associated risk of infection with limb lengthening over intramedullary nail. We present our experience of limb lengthening in 15 patients with a plate fixed on the proximal segment, followed by corticotomy and application of external fixator. Materials and Methods: 15 patients (7 females, 8 males) were included in this consecutive series. The average age was 18.1 years (range 8–35 years). Fifteen tibiae and one femur were lengthened in 15 patients. Lengthening was achieved at 1 mm/day followed by distal segment fixation with three or four screws on reaching the target length. Results: The preoperative target length was successfully achieved in all patients at a mean of 4.1 cm (range 1.8–6.5 cm). The mean duration of external fixation was 75.3 days (range 33–116 days) with the mean external fixation index at 19.2 days/cm (range 10.0–38.3 days/cm). One patient suffered deep infection up to the plate, three patients had mild procurvatum deformities, and one patient developed mild tendo achilles contracture. Conclusion: Lengthening over a plate allows early removal of external fixator and eliminates the risk of creating deep intramedullary infection as with lengthening over nail. Lengthening over plate is also applicable to children with open physis. PMID:22719123

Kulkarni, Ruta; Singh, Nishant; Kulkarni, Govind S; Kulkarni, Milind; Kulkarni, Sunil; Kulkarni, Vidisha

2012-01-01

352

Particular Mantle Dynamics Induced by Continental Roots  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Continental roots represent extensive regions of seismically fast, cold and chemically buoyant material compared to the surrounding mantle. These thick masses may affect circulation in the mantle and impart thermal conditions at their base which determine to some extent the style of convection. A 2-D Cartesian viscous flow model in which the mantle and lithosphere are described as compressible, Newtonian fluids is used. The continental root is sufficiently viscous such that it does not deform. A range of realistic Rayleigh Numbers are considered. The mantle is internally heated and heat production by the decay of radioactive elements U,K,Th in the lithosphere is incorporated into the model. The amount of continental heat production determines the thickness of the continental thermal boundary layer, and in turn the amplitude of lateral temperature anomalies between oceans and continents. Vertical temperature gradients beneath continents are significantly super-adiabatic with a thick thermal basal boundary layer. The thickness of this basal thermal boundary layer and the amplitude of lateral temperature anomalies determines to what extent continents affect deep mantle circulation below and around the root. We characterize families of solutions in which, depending on the heat production in the continental lithosphere, continents either alter mantle circulation below them or are displaced over time without imposing significant disruption on the mantle dynamic system. Differentiating between the two types of solutions may help to understand the evolution of mantle temperatures and dynamics over geologic time.

Perry, H.; Jaupart, C.; Tackley, P.

2004-12-01

353

The basins on the Argentine continental margin  

SciTech Connect

After the stabilization of the central Gondwana Craton, orogenic belts were accreted, as a result of convergence events and an extensive passive margin developed in southwestern Gondwana. Thermal subsidence in Parana, Karoo-Ventania basins and the Late Paleozoic-Early Mesozoic rifts, were modified by the Gondwana breakup and the South Atlantic opening. Early Paleozoic marine transgressions deposited the Table Mountain Group in Ventania. In southwestern Patagonia foreland clastics were deposited. Magmatic arcs and marine units indicate a tectonic trough was formed, alternating with continental sequences, over Late Paleozoic metamorphics and intrusives, resulting from plastered terrains along the Gondwana margin. In Patagonia, Permo-Carboniferous continental and glacio marine clastics infill the basins, while in Ventania, paralic sequences, grade from neritic to continental to the northeast, extending beneath the continental margin. The Triassic-Jurassic rift basins progressed onto regional widespread acid lavas and were infilled by lagoonal organic-rich sequences. Early drift phase built basins transverse to the margin, with fluvio-lacustrine sequences: Salado, Colorado, Valdes-Rawson, San Julian and North Malvinas intracratonic basins, which underwent transtensional faulting. Post-Oxfordian to Neocomian brackish sequences, onlapped the conjugate basins during the margin`s drift, with petroleum systems, as in Austral and Malvinas. In the Valanginian, basic extrusions commenced to form on the continental border, heralding the oceanic phase. Due to thermal subsidence, offlaping sediments prograded onto the remaining half-grabens. Several petroleum systems, proven and hypothetical, are identified in this region.

Urien, C.M. [Buenos Aires Technological Institute Petroleum School, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

1996-08-01

354

Tectonic Plates, Earthquakes, and Volcanoes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

According to theory of plate tectonics, Earth is an active planet -- its surface is composed of many individual plates that move and interact, constantly changing and reshaping Earth's outer layer. Volcanoes and earthquakes both result from the movement of tectonic plates. This interactive feature shows the relationship between earthquakes and volcanoes and the boundaries of tectonic plates. By clicking on a map, viewers can superimpose the locations of plate boundaries, volcanoes and earthquakes.

355

Lithospheric structure across the California Continental Borderland from receiver functions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

to its complex history of deformation, the California Continental Borderland provides an interesting geological setting for studying how the oceanic and continental lithosphere responds to deformation. We map variations in present-day lithospheric structure across the region using Ps and Sp receiver functions at permanent stations of the Southern California Seismic Network as well as ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) data gathered by the Asthenospheric and Lithospheric Broadband Architecture from the California Offshore Region Experiment (ALBACORE), which enhances coverage of the borderland and provides first direct constraints on the structure of the Pacific plate west of the Patton Escarpment. Noisiness of OBS data makes strict handpicking and bandpass filtering necessary in order to obtain interpretable receiver functions. Using H-? and common-conversion point stacking, we find pronounced lithospheric differences across structural blocks, which we interpret as indicating that the Outer Borderland has been translated with little to no internal deformation, while the Inner Borderland underwent significant lithospheric thinning, most likely related to accommodating the 90° clockwise rotation of the Western Transverse Range block. West of the Patton Escarpment, we find that the transition to typical oceanic crustal thickness takes place over a lateral distance of ˜ 50 km. We detect an oceanic seismic lithosphere-asthenosphere transition at 58 km depth west of the Patton Escarpment, consistent with only weak age-dependence of the depth to the seismic lithosphere-asthenosphere transition. Sp common-conversion point stacks confirm wholesale lithospheric thinning of the Inner Borderland and suggest the presence of a slab fragment beneath the Outer Borderland.

Reeves, Zachary; Leki?, Vedran; Schmerr, Nicholas; Kohler, Monica; Weeraratne, Dayanthie

2015-01-01

356

Linking mantle dynamics, plate tectonics and surface processes in the active plate boundary zones of eastern New Guinea (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Eastern New Guinea lies within the rapidly obliquely converging Australian (AUS)- Pacific (PAC) plate boundary zone and is characterized by transient plate boundaries, rapidly rotating microplates and a globally significant geoid high. As the AUS plate moved northward in the Cenozoic, its leading edge has been a zone of subduction and arc accretion. The variety of tectonic settings in this region permits assessment of the complex interplay among mantle dynamics, plate tectonics, and surface processes. Importantly, the timescale of tectonic events (e.g., subduction, (U)HP exhumation, seafloor spreading) are within the valid bounds of mantle convection models. A record of changes in bathymetry and topography are preserved in high standing mountain belts, exhumed extensional gneiss domes and core complexes, uplifted coral terraces, and marine sedimentary basins. Global seismic tomography models indicate accumulation of subducted slabs beneath eastern New Guinea at the bottom of the upper mantle (i.e., <660km depth). Some of the deeply subducted material may indeed be buoyant subducted AUS continental margin (to depths of ~250-300 km), as well as subducted continental material that has reached the point of no return (i.e., > 250-300 km). Preliminary global-scale backward advected mantle convection models, driven by density inferred from joint seismic-geodynamic tomography models, exhibit large-scale flow associated with these subducted slab remnants and predict the timing and magnitude (up to 1500 m) of dynamic topography change (both subsidence and uplift) since the Oligocene. In this talk we will explore the effects of large-scale background mantle flow and plate tectonics on the evolution of topography and bathymetry in eastern New Guinea, and discuss possible mechanisms to explain basin subsidence and surface uplift in the region.

Baldwin, S.; Moucha, R.; Fitzgerald, P. G.; Hoke, G. D.; Bermudez, M. A.; Webb, L. E.; Braun, J.; Rowley, D. B.; Insel, N.; Abers, G. A.; Wallace, L. M.; Vervoort, J. D.

2013-12-01

357

Bipolar battery plate  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A liquid-impermeable plate (10) having through-plate conductivity with essentially zero resistance comprises an insulator sheet (12) having a series of spaced perforations (14) each of which contains a metal element (16) sealingly received into the perforation (14). A low-cost plate can readily be manufactured by punching a thermoplastic sheet (40) such as polypropylene with a punching tool (52), filling the apertures with led spheres (63) having a diameter smaller than the holes (50) but larger than the thickness of the sheet, sweeping excess spheres (62) off the sheet with a doctor blade (60) and then pressing a heated platen (74) onto the sheet to swage the spheres into a cylindrical shape and melt the surrounding resin to form a liquid-impermeable collar (4) sealing the metal into the sheet.

Rowlette, John J. (Inventor)

1987-01-01

358

Flat plate project  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The flat plate project is a pilot study for the creation of intelligent robotic systems. In these systems vision robotics and artificial intelligence aspects have to be combined. The final goal is to give a robot the capacity to learn to solve the problem represented by a toy for a two year old child. This toy is called the ''Holle Bol'' in Dutch. It consists of a plastic ball with differently shaped holes in it and a number of small blocks that must be put into the corresponding holes. To investigate the problems associated with this project first a simplification of the problem has been studied. In this case a flat plate with differently shaped holes is used. The paper describes the results of the flat plate pilot project.

Wijbrans, Klaas C.; Korsten, Maarten J.

1991-03-01

359

Miniature plasmonic wave plates  

E-print Network

Linear birefringence, as implemented in wave plates, is a natural way to control the state of polarization of light. We report on a general method for designing miniature planar wave plates using surface plasmons. The resonant optical device considered here is a single circular aperture surrounded by an elliptical antenna grating. The difference in short and long axis of each ellipses introduces a phase shift on the surface plasmons which enables the realization of a quarter wave plate. Furthermore, the experimental results and the theoretical analysis show that the general procedure used does not influence the optical coherence of the polarization state and allows us to explore completely the surface of the unit Poincare sphere by changing only the shape of the elliptical grating.

Drezet, Aurelien; Ebbesen, Thomas W

2010-01-01

360

Miniature plasmonic wave plates.  

PubMed

Linear birefringence, as implemented in wave plates, is a natural way to control the state of polarization of light. We report on a general method for designing miniature planar wave plates using surface plasmons. The resonant optical device considered here is a single circular aperture surrounded by an elliptical antenna grating. The difference between the short and long axis of each ellipsis introduces a phase shift on the surface plasmons which enables the realization of a quarter wave plate. Furthermore, the experimental results and the theoretical analysis show that the general procedure used does not influence the optical coherence of the polarization state and allows us to explore completely the surface of the unit Poincaré sphere by changing only the shape of the elliptical grating. PMID:18764329

Drezet, Aurélien; Genet, Cyriaque; Ebbesen, Thomas W

2008-07-25

361

Basalt geochemistry and tectonic discrimination within continental flood basalt provinces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Continental flood basalts are usually regarded as a single tectonomagmatic entity but frequently quoted examples exhibit a variety of tectonic settings. In one well-studied, classic, flood basalt province, the Mesozoic Karoo province of southern Africa, magmatism occurred in the following tectonic settings: (a) continental rifting leading to ocean-floor spreading in the South Atlantic Ocean (Etendeka suite of Namibia); (b) stretched continental lithosphere and rifting not leading directly to ocean-floor formation (Lebombo suite of southeastern Africa); and (c) an a-tectonic, within-plate, continental setting characterized by an absence of faulting or warping (Lesotho highlands and Karoo dolerites of South Africa). By means of spidergrams of the elements Rb, Ba, Th, Nb, K, La, Ce, Sr, Nd, P, Hf, Zr, Sm, Ti, Tb, Y, V, Ni and Cr, uncontaminated tholeiites from (c) above [i.e. the Lesotho-type continental flood basalts (LTCFB)] are compared with mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB), ocean-island tholeiites (OIT), and tholeiites and calc-alkali basalts from subduction environments. The comparison reveals the LTCFBs are geochemically distinct. The differences are reflected in relative enrichments or depletions of the more incompatible elements (Rb-Ce) to less incompatible elements (Ce-Y), i.e. the overall slope of the spidergrams, and in anomalous enrichments or depletions of one or more of the elements Th, K, Nb, Sr, Ti, Hf, and Zr. The distinctive geochemical character of the Lesotho LTCFBs is interpreted in terms of a lithospheric mantle source for the basalts. This is supported by isotopic data. There are no major geochemical differences between Lesotho CFBs and basalts of the rift-related Etendeka and Lebombo suites, although the latter are somewhat enriched in Rb, Ba and K. However, unlike the Lesotho basalts, the Lebombo and Etendeka basalts are associated with voluminous silicic volcanics or intrusive centres and late-stage dolerites having MORB/OIT (i.e. asthenospheric) geochemical characteristics. The flood basalt/silicic magmatism/late-stage dyke swarm association is characteristic of several rift or thinned lithosphere environments (e.g., Ethiopia, Skye, eastern Greenland) but in many of these the flood basalts have ocean-island basalt (OIT) geochemical characteristics. The Lesotho-type CFB geochemistry is exhibited by the Grande Ronde Basalt of the Columbia River Group (a possible subduction-related flood basalt province) and the basic rocks associated with Mesozoic rifting in the North and South Atlantic. Basalt geochemistry alone is unhelpful in determining the tectonic setting of CFBs although the rift-related environments may be identified by the petrology and geochemistry of the whole igneous suite. A two-source model is proposed for the mantle-derived basic rocks in rift-related CFB provinces. Early enriched basalts are derived from the lithosphere and, following pronounced lithospheric attenuation or rifting, later MORB-like melts are emplaced from the rising asthenosphere. The presence of both Lesotho- and OIT-type geochemical patterns in rift-related CFBs suggests that the lithosphere exhibits different styles of enrichment.

Marsh, Julian S.

1987-06-01

362

Nitrided Metallic Bipolar Plates  

SciTech Connect

The objectives are: (1) Develop and optimize stainless steel alloys amenable to formation of a protective Cr-nitride surface by gas nitridation, at a sufficiently low cost to meet DOE targets and with sufficient ductility to permit manufacture by stamping. (2) Demonstrate capability of nitridation to yield high-quality stainless steel bipolar plates from thin stamped alloy foils (no significant stamped foil warping or embrittlement). (3) Demonstrate single-cell fuel cell performance of stamped and nitrided alloy foils equivalent to that of machined graphite plates of the same flow-field design ({approx}750-1,000 h, cyclic conditions, to include quantification of metal ion contamination of the membrane electrode assembly [MEA] and contact resistance increase attributable to the bipolar plates). (4) Demonstrate potential for adoption in automotive fuel cell stacks. Thin stamped metallic bipolar plates offer the potential for (1) significantly lower cost than currently-used machined graphite bipolar plates, (2) reduced weight/volume, and (3) better performance and amenability to high volume manufacture than developmental polymer/carbon fiber and graphite composite bipolar plates. However, most metals exhibit inadequate corrosion resistance in proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) environments. This behavior leads to high electrical resistance due to the formation of surface oxides and/or contamination of the MEA by metallic ions, both of which can significantly degrade fuel cell performance. Metal nitrides offer electrical conductivities up to an order of magnitude greater than that of graphite and are highly corrosion resistant. Unfortunately, most conventional coating methods (for metal nitrides) are too expensive for PEMFC stack commercialization or tend to leave pinhole defects, which result in accelerated local corrosion and unacceptable performance.

Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Tortorelli, Peter F [ORNL; Pihl, Josh A [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL; Vitek, John Michael [ORNL; Wang, Heli [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Turner, John [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Wilson, Mahlon [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Garzon, Fernando [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Rockward, Tommy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Connors, Dan [GenCell Corp; Rakowski, Jim [Allegheny Ludlum; Gervasio, Don [Arizona State University

2008-01-01

363

Tectonic Plate Motion  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The representation shows the direction of motion of the Earth's major plates as measured through NASA's satellite laser ranging (SLR) technology. A series of world maps, accompanying text, and the subsequent links explain this technology in great detail. One can click on the Index Map for Satellite Laser Ranging site Velocity and see the vectors (arrows) that indicate the direction and rate of movement of Earth's plates in much more detail. Accompanying text gives a more detailed explanation of what each sub map is showing.

364

License plate detection algorithm  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A novel algorithm for vehicle license plates localization is proposed. The algorithm is based on pixel intensity transition gradient analysis. Near to 2500 natural-scene gray-level vehicle images of different backgrounds and ambient illumination was tested. The best set of algorithm's parameters produces detection rate up to 0.94. Taking into account abnormal camera location during our tests and therefore geometrical distortion and troubles from trees this result could be considered as passable. Correlation between source data, such as license Plate dimensions and texture, cameras location and others, and parameters of algorithm were also defined.

Broitman, Michael; Klopovsky, Yuri; Silinskis, Normunds

2013-12-01

365

Reduced Plating Ignitron  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An ignitron apparatus has an airtight tubular housing having a first sealed end and a second sealed end. An anode is connected at the first sealed end, projecting into the housing, and a recess at the second sealed and forms a well which contains a quantity of liquid gallium or gallium alloy making up the cathode. An ignitor projects through the liquid metal and into the housing. The inner surface of the housing includes at least one plating-reduction structure to prevent electrical shorting of the apparatus caused by plating of the liquid metal.

Polzin, Kurt A (Inventor); Pearson, J Boise (Inventor)

2014-01-01

366

Plate Tectonics and Volcanism  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a lesson where learners explore plate movement and the relationship between plate tectonics and volcanoes. The lesson models scientific inquiry using the 5E instructional model and includes teacher notes, prerequisite concepts, common misconceptions, student journal and reading. This is lesson five in the Astro-Venture Geology Training Unit that was developed to increase students' awareness of and interest in astrobiology and the many career opportunities that utilize science, math and technology skills. The lessons are designed for educators to use with the Astro-Venture multimedia modules.

2012-08-03

367

Plating under reduced pressure  

SciTech Connect

Plating under reduced pressure was evaluated for both electroless nickel and electrodeposited copper systems. The objective was to reduce pitting of these coatings thereby further enhancing their usage for diamond turning applications. Cursory experiments with electroless nickel showed reduced porosity when deposition was done at around 500 torr. Detailed experiments with electrodeposited copper at around 100 torr provided similar results. Scanning tunneling microscopy was effectively used to show the improvement in the copper deposits plated under reduced pressure. Benefits included reduced surface roughness and finer and denser grain structure.

Dini, J.W.; Beat, T.G.; Cowden, W.C. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Ryan, L.E.; Hewitt, W.B. (TRW, Inc., Redondo Beach, CA (United States))

1992-06-01

368

Volcanoes, Plates, and Chains  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this lesson students will discover how seamounts in the Axial-Cobb-Eikelberg-Patton chain were formed. They will learn about the processes that form seamounts, describe the movement of tectonic plates in the Gulf of Alaska region and explain the types of volcanic activity that might be associated with these movements, and describe how a combination of hotspot activity and tectonic plate movement could produce the arrangement of seamounts observed in this chain. This hands-on activity uses online data resources and includes: focus questions, learning objectives, teaching time, audio/visual materials needed, background information, learning procedures, evaluations, extensions, as well as resources and student handouts.

369

Discovering Plate Boundaries  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Rice University's Earth Science Department offers the Discovering Plate Boundaries educational activity. The exercise is described as a "data rich exercise to help students discover the processes that occur at plate tectonic boundaries" and has been used successfully with 5th graders to undergraduates. The site provides the necessary downloads of maps; earthquake, volcanic, seafloor, topographic, and bathymetric data; and teacher guides and complete instructions. Because the activity can be geared towards such a large range of students, is well designed, and is easily accessible, educators will definitely appreciate the site.

370

Impact of arc-continent collision on the conditions of burial and exhumation of UHP\\/LT rocks: experimental and numerical modelling  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 2-D physical and finite-element numerical modelling of arc continent collision was performed to study the deformation and failure of the overriding lithosphere. The experimental technique allowed us to model the whole subduction\\/collision process from oceanic subduction to deep subduction of the continental crust. With the numerical approach we have modelled the deformation of the overriding plate only through initial

A. I. Chemenda; D. Hurpin; J.-C Tang; J.-F. Stephan; G. Buffet

2001-01-01

371

Geophysical study of the structure and processes of the continental convergence zones: Alpine-Himalayan Belt  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The seismic wave velocity structure in the crust and upper mantle region beneath the Tibetan plateau was studied in detail. Also, a preliminary study of the uppermost mantle P wave velocity beneath Iran and Turkey was carried out, and the results are compared with those for the Tibetan plateau. These two studies compose the bulk of the efforts on the observational aspects of continental collision zones in addition to satellite derived data. On the theoretical aspects the thermal evolution of converging plate boundaries was explored using a finite difference scheme.

Toksoez, M. N.

1981-01-01

372

From a collage of microplates to stable continental crust - an example from Precambrian Europe  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Svecofennian orogen (2.0-1.7 Ga) comprises the oldest undispersed orogenic belt on Baltica and Eurasian plate. Svecofennian orogenic belt evolved from a series of short-lived terrane accretions around Baltica's Archean nucleus during the formation of the Precambrian Nuna supercontinent. Geological and geophysical datasets indicate W-SW growth of Baltica with NE-ward dipping subduction zones. The data suggest a long-lived retreating subduction system in the southwestern parts whereas in the northern and central parts the northeasterly transport of continental fragments or microplates towards the continental nucleus is also documented. The geotectonic environment resembles that of the early stages of the Alpine-Himalayan or Indonesian orogenic system, in which dispersed continental fragments, arcs and microplates have been attached to the Eurasian plate margin. Thus the Svecofennian orogeny can be viewed as proxy for the initial stages of an internal orogenic system. Svecofennian orogeny is a Paleoproterozoic analogue of an evolved orogenic system where terrane accretion is followed by lateral spreading or collapse induced by change in the plate architecture. The exposed parts are composed of granitoid intrusions as well as highly deformed supracrustal units. Supracrustal rocks have been metamorphosed in LP-HT conditions in either paleo-lower-upper crust or paleo-upper-middle crust. Large scale seismic reflection profiles (BABEL and FIRE) across Baltica image the crust as a collage of terranes suggesting that the bedrock has been formed and thickened in sequential accretions. The profiles also image three fold layering of the thickened crust (>55 km) to transect old terrane boundaries, suggesting that the over-thickened bedrock structures have been rearranged in post-collisional spreading and/or collapse processes. The middle crust displays typical large scale flow structures: herringbone and anticlinal ramps, rooted onto large scale listric surfaces also suggestive of spreading. Close to the original ocean-continent plate boundary, in the core of the Svecofennian orogen, the thickened accretionary crust carries pervasive stretching lineations at surface and seismic vp-velocity anisotropy in the crust. The direction of spreading and crustal flow seems to be diverted by shapes of the pre-existing boundaries. It is concluded that lateral spreading and midcrustal flow not only rearrange the bedrock architecture but also stabilize the young accreted continental crust in emerging internal orogenic systems. Pre-existing microplate/terrane boundaries will affect the final architecture of the orogenic belt.

Korja, Annakaisa

2013-04-01

373

Characterizing Plate Boundaries  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

To prepare for this exercise students read about the processes that operate at plate boundaries and how they are related to the distinct patterns of seismicity, volcanism, surface elevations (e.g., ridges versus trenches), and seafloor ages characteristic of different boundary types. During the week the assignment is available online, students have access to: (1) an index map that locates three boundaries they are to study; and (2) four maps from Sawyer's Discovering Plate Boundaries website that provide the data mentioned above. Student tasks are to: (1) document patterns in each type of data along the three targeted boundaries; and (2) use these observations in conjunction with their understandings of the processes that operate along different types of boundaries to decide whether each of the targeted sites is most likely to be a divergent, convergent, or shear boundary. This activity gives students practice in map reading, interpreting the likely tectonic setting of a boundary by pulling together constraints from several types of data, and collaborating with their classmates in an online environment. The activity also provides a foundation for understanding a wide range of phenomena that are discussed later in the semester in the context of plate tectonic processes. Teaching Tips Adaptations that allow this activity to be successful in an online environment Sawyer's Discovering Plate Boundaries is a jigsaw exercise in which students collaboratively develop an empirical classification of plate boundaries by first studying an individual data set (e.g., seismicity) and then working as part of a multidisciplinary team to develop a composite classification for the boundaries of a single plate using several types of data. In order for the classification to be truly empirical, students are not introduced to the "traditional" classification of plate boundaries till the end of the exercise. In adapting this assignment to the online environment I have: (1) asked students to prepare by becoming familiar with the standard classification of plate boundaries and the processes that operate at them; (2) limited their work to three targeted boundaries of different types; and (3) provided guidance about which features to look for in the each data set. I have found that these modifications help online students, who often work alone "on their own schedules", to avoid getting "lost" and frustrated with the assignment and to compensate for the lack of collaborative input they would receive in a classroom setting. Elements of this activity that are most effective The success of this exercise is really seems to depend on how well a student follows the directions. If a student learns about the geologic differences among plate boundaries, makes careful observations, and thoughtfully compares his or her observations to the expected patterns he or she typically does quite well based on answers to the follow-up questions. If, on the other hand, a student simply looks up the types of the targeted boundaries on a map and then attempts to "back out" the observations that he or she thinks should fit, the result is often inconsistency and a poor score on the questions. (I can often tell which approach a student is taking based on the queries they post to the discussion board, but rarely seem to be able to get those who are trying to work backwards through the assignment to change direction.) Recommendations for other faculty adapting this activity to their own course: To date my experience developing an engaging online exercise to help students learn the principles of plate tectonics has only been partly successful. I think that having such an exercise is critical, however, because this topic provides the framework for so much of what we learn in the geosciences. Based on my efforts to adapt elements of Discovering Plate Boundaries to an online environment I would offer three recommendations. (1) Provide examples. Confronted with an unfamiliar map students are sometimes confused when asked to decide if seafloor age, for example, is uniform or variable

Bill Hirt

374

MAGSAT anomaly map and continental drift  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Anomaly maps of high quality are needed to display unambiguously the so called long wave length anomalies. The anomalies were analyzed in terms of continental drift and the nature of their sources is discussed. The map presented confirms the thinness of the oceanic magnetized layer. Continental magnetic anomalies are characterized by elongated structures generally of east-west trend. Paleomagnetic reconstruction shows that the anomalies found in India, Australia, and Antarctic exhibit a fair consistency with the African anomalies. It is also shown that anomalies are locked under the continents and have a fixed geometry.

Lemouel, J. L. (principal investigator); Galdeano, A.; Ducruix, J.

1981-01-01

375

Morphology and geology of the continental shelf and upper slope of southern Central Chile (33°S-43°S)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The continental shelf and slope of southern Central Chile have been subject to a number of international as well as Chilean research campaigns over the last 30 years. This work summarizes the geologic setting of the southern Central Chilean Continental shelf (33°S-43°S) using recently published geophysical, seismological, sedimentological and bio-geochemical data. Additionally, unpublished data such as reflection seismic profiles, swath bathymetry and observations on biota that allow further insights into the evolution of this continental platform are integrated. The outcome is an overview of the current knowledge about the geology of the southern Central Chilean shelf and upper slope. We observe both patches of reduced as well as high recent sedimentation on the shelf and upper slope, due to local redistribution of fluvial input, mainly governed by bottom currents and submarine canyons and highly productive upwelling zones. Shelf basins show highly variable thickness of Oligocene-Quaternary sedimentary units that are dissected by the marine continuations of upper plate faults known from land. Seismic velocity studies indicate that a paleo-accretionary complex that is sandwiched between the present, relatively small active accretionary prism and the continental crust forms the bulk of the continental margin of southern Central Chile.

Völker, David; Geersen, Jacob; Contreras-Reyes, Eduardo; Sellanes, Javier; Pantoja, Silvio; Rabbel, Wolfgang; Thorwart, Martin; Reichert, Christian; Block, Martin; Weinrebe, Wilhelm Reimer

2014-10-01

376

The effect of thicker oceanic crust in the Archaean on the growth of continental crust through time  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Present crustal evolution models fail to account for the generation of the large volume of continental crust in the required time intervals. All Archaean plate tectonic models, whether invoking faster spreading rates, similar to today's spreading rates, or longer ridge lengths, essentially propose that continental crust has grown by island arc accretion due to the subduction of oceanic crust. The petrological differences that characterize the Archaean from later terrains result from the subduction of hotter oceanic crust into a hotter mantle. If the oceanic crust was appreciably thicker in the Archaean, as geothermal models would indicate, this thicker crust is surely going to have an effect on tectonic processes. A more valid approach is to compare the possible styles of convergence of thick oceanic crust with modern convergence zones. The best modern analog occurs where thick continental crust is colliding with thick continental crust. Oceanic crustal collision on the scale of the present-day Himalayan continental collision zone may have been a frequent occurrence in the Archaean, resulting in extensive partial melting of the hydrous underthrust oceanic crust to produce voluminous tonalite melts, leaving a depleted stabilized basic residuum. Present-day island arc accretion may not have been the dominant mechanism for the growth of the early Archaean crust.

Wilks, M. E.

1988-01-01

377

Nuclear reactor alignment plate configuration  

DOEpatents

An alignment plate that is attached to a core barrel of a pressurized water reactor and fits within slots within a top plate of a lower core shroud and upper core plate to maintain lateral alignment of the reactor internals. The alignment plate is connected to the core barrel through two vertically-spaced dowel pins that extend from the outside surface of the core barrel through a reinforcement pad and into corresponding holes in the alignment plate. Additionally, threaded fasteners are inserted around the perimeter of the reinforcement pad and into the alignment plate to further secure the alignment plate to the core barrel. A fillet weld also is deposited around the perimeter of the reinforcement pad. To accomodate thermal growth between the alignment plate and the core barrel, a gap is left above, below and at both sides of one of the dowel pins in the alignment plate holes through with the dowel pins pass.

Altman, David A; Forsyth, David R; Smith, Richard E; Singleton, Norman R

2014-01-28

378

Reconstruction of multiple tectonic events in continental margins by integrated tectonostratigraphic and geochronological analysis: the Mesozoic to Paleogene Caribbean-South American interaction in northeastern Colombia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although the older record and successive tectonic scenarios experienced by a continental margin is commonly fragmentary, integrated field, petrological and geochronological analysis can reconstruct the long term tectonic evolution of continental margins and characterized major controls on the orogenic style. We present new geochronological constraints from igneous and low to very low grade metasedimentary rocks from the Caribbean continental margin of northeastern Colombia (Guajira region) in order to reconstruct the different tectonic events recorded by the margin before, during and following the arc-continent collision with the front of the Caribbean plate. Zircon U-Pb LA-ICP-MS geochronology results from leucogranites associated with garnet amphibolites, tonalites and volcanic rocks that made the continental basement of northeastern Colombia reveals and Early to Middle Mesozoic tectonic activity with peaks at ca. 220-230 Ma and 170-180 Ma. This magmatic record is related to a collisional belt link to the final agglutination of Pangea and was followed by an overimposed far field back-arc setting associated to the subduction of the Pacific (Farrallon) plate under the Pangea supercontinent. Muscovite and biotite Ar-Ar geochronology from basement rocks and low grade Mesozoic metasediments also reveals the existence of Middle Jurassic to Early Cretaceous thermal events link to the final opening of the proto-Caribbean ocean. The South American continental margin was subsequently affected by an arc-continent collisional event with the front of the Caribbean plate. This event is recorded by the growth of a Banda-type collisional melange that mixed South American continental margin sediments with mafic and ultramafic blocks of intra-oceanic arc origin, the formation of a coherent metasedimentary belt also made of South American margin sediments, and the mylonitization of the continental basement. Ar-Ar temporal constraints on the low grade metasedimentary rocks and detrital apatite fission track ages from younger sedimentary sequences suggest a Late Campanian age for this deformational event. Continuous convergence and the formation of a new subduction zone in the South American margin were responsible for the remobilization of inland extensional structures and the associated growth of an Early Paleocene mylonitic belt. During the Eocene the installation of a short duration magmatic arc and a widespread cooling event record the final installation of an oblique subduction setting. We argue that the pre-collisional tectonic evolution of the South American continental margin have prepare a warm continental margin with significant weakness zone that determined an arc-continent collisional style characterized by frontal accretion of the South American plate over the intra-oceanic Caribbean domain, and in which the younger compressional and thermal events are link to the remobilization of older structures.

Cardona, Agustin; Montes, Camilo; Bayona, German; Valencia, Victor; Ramirez, Diego; Zapata, Sebastian; Lara, Mario; Lopez-Martinez, Margarita; Thomson, Stuart; Weber, Marion

2013-04-01

379

The Interpretation of Crustal Dynamics Data in Terms of Plate Interactions and Active Tectonics of the Anatolian Plate and Surrounding Regions in the Middle East  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the past 6 months, efforts were concentrated on the following areas: (1) Continued development of realistic, finite element modeling of plate interactions and associated deformation in the Eastern Mediterranean; (2) Neotectonic field investigations of seismic faulting along the active fault systems in Turkey with emphasis on identifying seismic gaps along the North Anatolian fault; and (3) Establishment of a GPS regional monitoring network in the zone of ongoing continental collision in eastern Turkey (supported in part by NSF).

Toksoz, M. Nafi; Reilinger, Robert E.

1990-01-01

380

Tracing lithosphere amalgamation through time: chemical geodynamics of sub-continental lithospheric mantle  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The theory of plate tectonics is a relatively young concept in the Earth Sciences and describes the surface expression of planetary cooling via magmatism and reconciles mantle convection and plate movement with orogenesis, earthquakes and volcanism. Detailed observation of current tectonic plate movement has purported a relatively clear picture of the planet's geodynamics. Modern oceanic basins are the predominant sites of thermal equilibration of Earth interior resulting from decompressional, convective melting of peridotites. This magmatism generates mid-ocean ridge mafic crust and depleted upper mantle and in this model, oceanic crust becomes associated with buoyant mantle to form oceanic lithosphere. Subduction zones return this material together with sediments into the deeper mantle and presumably aid the formation of continental crust via arc magmatism. The mechanisms of continental crust amalgamation with buoyant mantle are less clear, and distinctly more difficult to trace back in time because metamorphism and metasomatism render the processes associating convecting mantle with continental crust elusive. Paramount in assessing these mechanisms is understanding the timing of crust and mantle formation so that the onset of plate tectonics and potential changes in modi operandi with respect to convection, mantle composition and melting pressure and temperature may be traced from the early Hadean to the present day. Typically the formation age of continental crust is more easily determined from felsic samples that contain accessory and relatively robust phases such as zircon and monazite that render a geochronological approach feasible. The lack of equally robust minerals and pervasive and ubiquitous metasomatism afflicting obducted orogenic peridotites and mantle xenoliths obliterates primary mineralogical and geochemical information. Hence it has proven difficult to acquire mantle depletion ages from continental lithospheric mantle, perhaps with the exception of Re-Os isotope dating of cratonic peridotites. Empiric mineralogical and geochemical data of continental and oceanic lithospheric mantle has been examined extensively and metasomatism has been studied in great detail. I will present a numerical modelling approach generating a comprehensive catalogue of variously depleted plagioclase-, spinel- and garnet-peridotite major and trace element compositions. In addition primary Pb, Sr, Nd, Hf and Os isotope data will approximate refractory mantle generated during Earth's major episodes of depletion and continental crust formation (1.2, 1.8, 2.9, 3.8 Ga). These hypothetical compositions will be compared to natural peridotites from on- and off-cratonic xenoliths, abyssal and orogenic peridotites to identify those rare samples least altered by interaction with silicate, hydrous and carbonatitic melts. Extremely depleted mantle has the potential to harbour Pb, Sr, Nd, Hf and Os isotope compositions that would be easily recognized if silicate melts were generated from this type of pristine mantle and the record of volcanic rocks will be examined to identify potential lithospheric melts.

Wittig, Nadine

2014-05-01

381

INL HIP Plate Fabrication  

SciTech Connect

This document outlines the process used to bond monolithic fuel plates by Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP). This method was developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program. These foils have been used in a number of irradiation experiments in support of the United States Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) program.

B. H. Park; C. R. Clark; J. F. Jue

2010-02-01

382

Unitary plate electrode  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The unitary electrode (10) comprises a porous sheet (12) of fiberglass the strands (14) of which contain a coating (16) of conductive tin oxide. The lower portion of the sheet contains a layer (18) of resin and the upper layer (20) contains lead dioxide forming a positive active electrode on an electrolyte-impervious layer. The strands (14) form a continuous conduction path through both layers (16, 18). Tin oxide is prevented from reduction by coating the surface of the plate facing the negative electrode with a conductive, impervious layer resistant to reduction such as a thin film (130) of lead or graphite filled resin adhered to the plate with a layer (31) of conductive adhesive. The plate (10) can be formed by casting a molten resin from kettle (60) onto a sheet of glass wool (56) overlying a sheet of lead foil and then applying positive active paste from hopper (64) into the upper layer (68). The plate can also be formed by passing an assembly of a sheet ( 80) of resin, a sheet (86) of sintered glass and a sheet (90) of lead between the nip (92) of heated rollers (93, 95) and then filling lead oxide into the pores (116) of the upper layer (118).

Rowlette, John J. (Inventor); Clough, Thomas J. (Inventor); Josefowicz, Jack Y. (Inventor); Sibert, John W. (Inventor)

1985-01-01

383

Earthquakes and Plates  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The representation depicts global distribution of earthquakes. A world map shows the location of large earthquakes that occurred from 1975-1995. A slider at the bottom left of the map allows the user to change the map to reveal the location of major plates or to select both views layered on top of one another.

384

University Center Plated Entrees  

E-print Network

, artichokes and herbs served with Crushed Yukon Golds and lemon-caper buerre blanc Pacific Salmon Florentine en Croute $23.95 Salmon filet and lemon creamed spinach wrapped in flaky puff pastry served with lemon-pecan Basmati pilaf and sauce Béarnaise #12;University Center Plated Entrees Poultry Moroccan

Lee, Herbie

385

Martian plate tectonics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The northern lowlands of Mars have been produced by plate tectonics. Preexisting old thick highland crust was subducted, while seafloor spreading produced thin lowland crust during late Noachian and Early Hesperian time. In the preferred reconstruction, a breakup margin extended north of Cimmeria Terra between Daedalia Planum and Isidis Planitia where the highland-lowland transition is relatively simple. South dipping subduction

N. H. Sleep

1994-01-01

386

Geohistory analysis of the Santa Maria basin, California, and its relationship to tectonic evolution of the continental margin  

SciTech Connect

The Santa Maria basin of central California is a geologically complex area located along the tectonically active California continental margin. The record of Cenozoic tectonism preserved in Santa Maria strata provides an opportunity to compare the evolution of the region with plate tectonic models for Cenozoic interactions along the margin. Geohistory analysis of Neogene Santa Maria basin strata provides important constraints for hypotheses of the tectonic evolution of the central California margin during its transition from a convergent to a transform plate boundary. Preliminary analyses suggest that the tectonic evolution of the Santa Maria area was dominated by coupling between adjacent oceanic plates and the continental margin. This coupling is reflected in the timing of major hiatuses within the basin sedimentary sequence and margin subsidence and uplift which occurred during periods of tectonic plate adjustment. Stratigraphic evidence indicates that the Santa Maria basin originated on the continental shelf in early Miocene time. A component of margin subsidence is postulated to have been caused by cessation of spreading on adjacent offshore microplates approximately 19-18 ma. A sharp reduction in rate of tectonic subsidence in middle Miocene time, observed in the Santa Maria basin both onshore and offshore, was coeval with rotation of crustal blocks as major shearing shifts shoreward. Tectonic uplift of two eastern sites, offshore Point Arguello and near Point Sal, in the late Miocene may have been related to a change to transpressional motion between the Pacific and North American plates, as well as to rotation of the western Transverse Ranges in a restraining geometry.

McCrory, P.A.; Arends, R.G. (Unocal Corp., Ventura, CA (United States)); Ingle, J.C. Jr. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States)); Isaacs, C.M.; Stanley, R.G. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States)); Thornton, M.L.C. (Unocal Corp., Ventura, CA (United States))

1991-02-01

387

Earth: Plates on the Move  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, students explore how the movement of tectonic plates forms mountains, volcanoes, oceans, and earthquakes. It first describes the plates and the various types of interaction at plate boundaries. An interactive map of the world shows the relationship between plate boundaries and earthquakes, allowing the student to click on selected place to explore a volcano, mountain, hotspot or earthquake. They then zoom in the see how the plates are moving, play an animation about the plate interaction, and read a story about the event. In addition, a set of links lead to more detailed information.

388

Complex Faulting in the Pacific-North America Transform Offshore Southern California And Implications on Plate Boundary Tectonics and Tsunamigenesis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Complexity in the tectonic model for Pacific-North America transform motion in the offshore southern California region is demonstrated by earthquakes near San Clemente Island and Fortymile Bank. Observed focal mechanisms show movements opposite to those predicted by the plate tectonic theory for right-slip on NW- trending transform faults and observed in other parts of the California Continental Borderland. Also, there

M. R. Legg; A. Barberopoulou

2007-01-01

389

Senonian basin inversion and rejuvenation of rifting in Africa and Arabia: synthesis and implications to plate-scale tectonics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The late Paleozoic to Tertiary stratigraphic record of much of the African plate reflects the effects of continental rifting and passive margin development. Several short-lived, but widespread and tectonically important, compressional or wrench-dominated events occurred, however, during the Permian to Recent evolution of Africa. We focus here on the best documented of these events, which occurred during the late Santonian.

René Guiraud; William Bosworth

1997-01-01

390

Embryonic stage of plate subduction in the Huatung Basin, off eastern Taiwan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Philippine Sea Plate is convergent northwestward with respect to the Eurasian Plate. Since ca. 9 Ma, the Luzon arc (belong to the Philippine Sea Plate) has collided the margin of the Eurasian Plate and formed the current Taiwan orogen. The Taiwan orogeny is still active as demonstrated by the 1999 Chi-Chi thrusting earthquake in western Taiwan. The uplift rate of the Central Range in Taiwan could be still as high as 35 mm/yr (Liu, 1995). However, several strike-slip earthquakes trending NE-SW are distributed along a belt roughly parallel to the Taitung Canyon in the Huatung Basin, off eastern Taiwan. We have processed two multi-channel reflection seismic profiles across the Taitung Canyon and found that the whole crust was ruptured along a surface dipping northwestward. The overriding plate is slightly uplifted near the top of the rupture surface. This is also demonstrated by a relatively uplifted bathymetry. The arched bathymetry is also revealed by relatively high free-air and Bouguer gravity anomalies. The 'new' subduction zone is almost perpendicular to the northwestward convergent direction. This subduction nucleation does not follow a fracture zone or a transform fault; instead, the future trench has cut obliquely to the fracture zones. However, currently most of the earthquakes observed along this zone are either strike-slip faulting or normal faulting. Almost no thrusting earthquakes are observed along this zone. Thus, we consider this zone as a very embryonic stage of the trench where the Philippine Sea Plate will subduct.

Hsu, S.; Yeh, Y.; Lo, C.; Doo, W.; Tsai, C.; Sibuet, J.

2013-12-01

391

Steep Satellite Altimetry Gradients as a Proxy to the Edge of the Continental Crust  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tight-fit plate reconstructions are produced using a global database constrained by marine magnetic anomalies tied to a consistent timescale, paleomagnetic poles, seafloor age dates based on drilling results, and fracture zone and transform fault lineations picked from ship-track and satellite altimetry data. Where a prominent steep gradient in the satellite altimetry data is present near the continental-ocean transition, it is used as a proxy to the continental shelf break [CSB]. Continental block outlines are based on digitization of the steep gradient. In some places, notably off Namibia, there is a very close correlation between that gradient and the ocean-continent boundary deduced from seismic refraction and reflection data. In other regions, there may be some stretched continental crust oceanward of the steep gradient but for reconstruction purposes we assume the crust to be predominantly continental landward of the boundary and oceanic, seaward of the line. Good matchs for conjugate CSBs are found in many places world-wide along passive margins and these will be highlighted. Particularly good matches are observed between the cratonic edges of East Antarctica as determined by sub-ice topographic highs seen along the margins of East Antarctica with respect to Madagascar, Sri Lanka, the southern half of the eastern margin of India, and the region of Australia between 124° E and 133° E along the Great Australian Bight (GAB). There are overlaps of the reconstructed conjugate CSBs, with one overlap between India and East Antarctica (70° E to 85° E) and one between East Antarctica and the western section of the GAB (105° E to 120° E). These two overlaps are coincident with the outer margins of the Lambert Graben - Prydz Bay Basin and the Aurora Subglacial Basin, respectively. It is known that there are substantial glacially-derived sediments prograded off the continental margin onto oceanic crust at Prydz Bay where there may be as much as 200 km in width of Eocene? and younger sediments outboard of the original CSB in the Prydz Bay region. When there is not a good match between conjugate CSBs then post-break up features can frequently be invoked to explain the mismatch. Abroulhos Bank off Brazil is an example of a post-break up [~40 m.y. later] magmatic construction that alters where the steep gradient in the satellite altimetry data is picked. In general, the CSBs are a good proxy to the original continental edge.

Lawver, L. A.; Gahagan, L. M.

2005-05-01

392

Moroccan Crustal Response to Continental Drift  

Microsoft Academic Search

The formation and development of a zone of spreading beneath the continental crust resulted in the breakup of Pangea and formation of the Atlantic Ocean. The crust of Morocco bears an extremely complete record of the crustal response to this episode of mantle dynamics. Structural and related depositional patterns indicate that the African margin had stabilized by the Middle Jurassic

W. H. Kanes; M. Saadi; E. Ehrlich; A. Alem

1973-01-01

393

Thermal structure of oceanic and continental lithosphere  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent studies of the focal depths of earthquakes in old continental lithosphere have shown that they are almost entirely confined to the crust. Except where recent subduction of oceanic lithosphere is likely to have occurred, no earthquakes with a magnitude of >5.5 have yet been located beneath the Moho. In contrast, in oceanic lithosphere earthquakes commonly occur within the mantle.

Dan McKenzie; James Jackson; Keith Priestley

2005-01-01

394

Introduction Fossil age constraints for continental sedimentary  

E-print Network

) for sedimentary rocks exposed primarily on Hitra and small islands south of Smøla; Early to Mid Devonian agesIntroduction Fossil age constraints for continental sedimentary deposits are invariably more; Osmundsen & Andersen 2001), precise dating of the Devonian sedimentary basins has been particularly

Andersen, Torgeir Bjørge

395

Starting plumes and continental break-up  

Microsoft Academic Search

Laboratory studies of fluid dynamic analogs of mantle plumes have led to important advances in our understanding of the life cycle of hotspots. Melting within the large volume heads of starting plumes gives rise to flood basalt provinces, while uplift of the surface above plumes results in horizontal deviatoric stresses that may precipitate considerable continental extension. However, for modern-day plumes

Robert I. Hill

1991-01-01

396

Coordination: Southeast Continental Shelf studies. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

An overview of the Oceanograhic Program of Skidaway Institute of Oceanograhy is presented. Included are the current five year plan for studies of the Southeast Continental Shelf, a summary of research accomplishments, proposed research for 1981-1982, current status of the Savannah Navigational Light Tower, and a list of publications. (ACR)

Menzel, D.W.

1981-02-01

397

Continental basaltic volcanoes — Processes and problems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Monogenetic basaltic volcanoes are the most common volcanic landforms on the continents. They encompass a range of morphologies from small pyroclastic constructs to larger shields and reflect a wide range of eruptive processes. This paper reviews physical volcanological aspects of continental basaltic eruptions that are driven primarily by magmatic volatiles. Explosive eruption styles include Hawaiian and Strombolian (sensu stricto) and

G. A. Valentine; T. K. P. Gregg

2008-01-01

398

Notice of Release of 'Continental' Basin Wildrye  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

'Continental' basin wildrye (Leymus cinereus [Scribn. & Merr.] A. Love) has been released as a cultivar for use in rangeland seedings. It was developed from a hybrid between an induced octoploid (2n=56), generated from the natural tetraploid 'Trailhead' (2n=28), and the natural octoploid 'Magnar' (...

399

Elephant teeth from the atlantic continental shelf  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Teeth of mastodons and mastodons have been recovered by fishermen from at least 40 sites on the continental shelf as deep as 120 meters. Also present are submerged shorelines, peat deposits, lagoonal shells, and relict sands. Evidently elephants and other large mammals ranged this region during the glacial stage of low sea level of the last 25.000 years.

Whitmore, F.C., Jr.; Emery, K.O.; Cooke, H.B.S.; Swift, D.J.P.

1967-01-01

400

Submarine landslide geomorphology, US continental slope  

Microsoft Academic Search

The morphometric analysis of submarine landslides in four distinctly different tectonic environments on the continental slopes of Oregon, central California, Texas, and New Jersey provides useful insight into submarine process, including sediment transport mechanisms and slope stability. Using Geographic Information System (GIS) software, we identify landslides from multibeam bathymetric and GLORIA sidescan surveys based solely on surficial morphology and reflectivity.

B. g. Mcadoo; L. f. Pratson; D. l. Orange

2000-01-01

401

Circulation on the newfoundland continental shelf  

Microsoft Academic Search

The circulation on the Newfoundland Continental Shelf derived from a review of different data sources generally agrees with the classical description of the flow in this area given by Smith et al. (1937). Hydrological, surface and bottom drifter, satellite?tracked buoy, ships drift, current meter and sea?level observations are used to estimate mean flows, transports, and fluctuating currents and to define

Brian Petrie; Carl Anderson

1983-01-01

402

Plate Puzzle Page 1 of 20 Plate Puzzle 1  

E-print Network

plotting activities. Good follow-up activities are: plate tectonics flip book, epicenter plotting using tectonics. The map is an attractive display of plate tectonic features such earthquake epicenters boundaries so that one can examine the relationship of the tectonic features to the plate boundaries. The map

Benitez-Nelson, Claudia

403

Ophiolites and Continental Margins of the Mesozoic Western U.S. Cordillera  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Mesozoic tectonic history of the western U.S. Cordillera records evidence for multiple episodes of accretionary and collisional orogenic events and orogen-parallel strike-slip faulting. Paleozoic-Jurassic volcanic arc complexes and subduction zone assemblages extending from Mexico to Canada represent an East-Pacific magmatic arc system and an accretionary-type orogen evolved along the North American continental margin. Discontinuous exposures of Paleozoic upper mantle rocks and ophiolitic units structurally beneath this magmatic arc system are remnants of the Panthalassan oceanic lithosphere, which was consumed beneath the North American continent. Pieces of this subducted Panthalassan oceanic lithosphere that underwent high-P metamorphism are locally exposed in the Sierra Nevada foothills (e.g. Feather River Peridotite) indicating that they were subsequently (during the Jurassic) educted in an oblique convergent zone along the continental margin. This west-facing continental margin arc evolved in a broad graben system during much of the Jurassic as a result of extension in the upper plate, keeping pace with slab rollback of the east-dipping subduction zone. Lower to Middle Jurassic volcanoplutonic complexes underlain by an Upper Paleozoic-Lower Mesozoic polygenetic ophiolitic basement currently extend from Baja California-western Mexico through the Sierra-Klamath terranes to Stikinia-Intermontane Superterranes in Canada and represent an archipelago of an east-facing ensimatic arc terrane that developed west and outboard of the North American continental margin arc. The Smartville, Great Valley, and Coast Range ophiolites (S-GV-CR) in northern California are part of this ensimatic terrane and represent the island arc, arc basement, and back-arc tectonic settings, respectively. The oceanic Josephine-Rogue-Chetco-Rattlesnake-Hayfork tectonostratigraphic units in the Klamath Mountains constitute a west-facing island arc system in this ensimatic terrane as a counterpart of the east-facing S-GV-CR system to the south. The Guerrero intra-oceanic island arc system in Mexico was also part of the ensimatic arc terrane. Incorporation of this super arc terrane into the North American continent occurred diachronously along the irregular continental margin in the Middle Jurassic (in the north) through Early Cretaceous (in the south) during an arc-continent collision, marking a collisional orogenic episode in the North American Cordilleran history. Rifting of this accreted arc in the Late Jurassic (155-148 Ma) might have resulted from a sinistral transtensional deformation associated with the rapid NW motion of North America. Magmas generated during this rifting event probably migrated through the accreted arc crust and the continental margin units in the tectonic lower plate. The Franciscan subduction zone dipping eastwards beneath the continent was established in the latest Jurassic, following the collisional event and restoring the North American Cordillera back into an accretionary-type, Andean-style orogen. Different episodes of orogen-parallel intra-continental strike-slip faulting facilitated lateral dispersion of accreted terranes and continental margin units during the Early Cretaceous and transpressional deformation and batholithic magmatism in the Sierra Nevada magmatic arc in the Late Cretaceous. A Jurassic-Cretaceous island arc system (Wrangellia-Insular Superterrane) that had developed west of the Jurassic archipelago collapsed into the edge of North America during Late Cretaceous-Tertiary time and underwent northward lateral translation along the continental margin. These observations and interpretations have strong implications for the tectonic evolution of Central America and the Caribbean region.

Dilek, Y.

2001-12-01

404

76 FR 2919 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram and Supplemental Official Outer Continental...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf...Shelf Block Diagrams AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE),...

2011-01-18

405

Cell Cycle Reprogramming for PI3K Inhibition Overrides Relapse-Specific C481S BTK Mutation Revealed by Longitudinal Functional Genomics in Mantle Cell Lymphoma  

PubMed Central

Despite the unprecedented clinical activity of the Bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib in MCL, acquired-resistance is common. By longitudinal integrative whole-exome and whole-transcriptome sequencing and targeted sequencing, we identified the first relapse-specific C481S mutation at the ibrutinib-binding site of BTK in MCL cells at progression following a durable response. This mutation enhanced BTK and AKT activation and tissue-specific proliferation of resistant MCL cells driven by CDK4 activation. It was absent, however, in patients with primary-resistance or progression following transient response to ibrutinib, suggesting alternative mechanisms of resistance. Through synergistic induction of PIK3IP1 and inhibition of PI3K-AKT activation, prolonged early G1 arrest induced by PD 0332991 (palbociclib) inhibition of CDK4 sensitized resistant lymphoma cells to ibrutinib killing when BTK was unmutated, and to PI3K inhibitors independent of C481S mutation. These data identify a genomic basis for acquired-ibrutinib resistance in MCL and suggest a strategy to override both primary- and acquired-ibrutinib resistance. PMID:25082755

Chiron, David; Di Liberto, Maurizio; Martin, Peter; Huang, Xiangao; Sharman, Jeff; Blecua, Pedro; Mathew, Susan; Vijay, Priyanka; Eng, Ken; Ali, Siraj; Johnson, Amy; Chang, Betty; Ely, Scott; Elemento, Olivier; Mason, Christopher E.; Leonard, John P.; Chen-Kiang, Selina

2014-01-01

406

Differences in flower visitation networks between an oceanic and a continental island  

E-print Network

Differences in flower visitation networks between an oceanic and a continental island ROCÍO CASTRO 31 October 2013 Two important biological differences between oceanic and continental islands, are oceanic and continental islands (continental frag- ments sensu Whittaker & Fernández-Palacios, 2007

Traveset, Anna

407

75 FR 73159 - Continental Tire North America, Inc., Receipt of Petition for Decision of Inconsequential...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Noncompliance Continental Tire North America, Inc., (Continental),\\1...1\\ Continental Tire North America, Inc. (Continental) is a replacement...onto the Federal Docket Management System (FDMS) Web site at...

2010-11-29

408

Renewable liquid reflecting zone plate  

DOEpatents

A renewable liquid reflecting zone plate. Electrodes are operatively connected to a dielectric liquid in a circular or other arrangement to produce a reflecting zone plate. A system for renewing the liquid uses a penetrable substrate.

Toor, Arthur; Ryutov, Dmitri D.

2003-12-09

409

Plate Tectonics: Lake Mead, Nevada  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Using animations to illustrate the theory of plate tectonics, this video segment adapted from Discovering Women takes you to Lake Mead, Nevada, to see visual evidence of how plate movement has been stretching the North American continent.

2005-10-21

410

Tectonic Plates, Earthquakes, and Volcanoes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The representation shows earthquake and volcanic activity corresponds to plate boundaries. This interactive topographical map with the ocean water removed shows the boundaries of major plates and the locations of major volcanic eruptions and earthquakes worldwide.

411

What Are Growth Plate Injuries?  

MedlinePLUS

... for growth plate injuries are: ? Falling down ? Competitive sports (like football) ? Recreational activities. Other reasons for growth plate injuries are: ? Child abuse ? Injury from extreme cold (for example, frostbite) ? Radiation ( ...

412

What Are Growth Plate Injuries?  

MedlinePLUS

... for growth plate injuries are: Falling down Competitive sports (like football) Recreational activities. Other reasons for growth plate injuries are: Child abuse Injury from extreme cold (for example, frostbite) Radiation ( ...

413

Towards 3D numerical modelling of Alpine-like continental collision  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The driving forces and the main deformation processes leading to the development and the evolution of a mountain belt have been matter of debate since the acceptance of plate tectonics. Most of the kinematic reconstructions of the 3D evolution of collision zones based on geological and geophysical data are generally not mechanically consistent. Since 20 years, reliable numerical models propose key parameters to rely the physical causes to the deformation observed, but, for technological reasons, they have been limited for long to two dimensions, inducing important limitations to understand the collision zones processes. For example, in 2D, it is impossible to take into account both the crustal thickening and micro-plate rotation and translation, which are two processes having a major role during collision, but which relative importance is debated. The European Alps are an excellent example of a well accessible small-scale mountain belt, which has been thoroughly examined from a geological point of view. During the past decades, the geological information has been complemented with geophysical data on the deep crustal structure of the Alps. Much of this information highlights the three-dimensional structure of the region, in which an Adriatic micro-plate is wedged between the Adriatic and European crust. Recently, a change in subduction polarity has been found between the Western and Eastern Alps, which is thought to be related to the anticlockwise rotation of the Adriatic micro-plate during collision. We recently developed a massively parallel 3D thermomechanical deformation code that is ideally suited to solve coupled mantle, lithosphere and surface processes and can model large deformations. Here, we employ this code to study several scenarios that might have resulted in the formation of the European Alps. The computations have been performed on Juqueen, FZ Jülich. Our model setup consists of an oceanic plate bearing a small rigid continent (Adria micro-plate) that moves northwards with an anticlockwise rotation component and subducts beneath a more viscous continental plate (Europe). We present initial results in which we vary the rheology of the continental and oceanic lithosphere.

Boutonnet, Emmanuelle; Kaus, Boris; Popov, Anton

2013-04-01

414

A combined rigid/deformable plate tectonic model for the evolution of the Indian Ocean  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Plate tectonic reconstructions are essential for placing geological information in its correct spatial context, understanding depositional environments, defining basin dimensions and evolution, and serve as a basis for palaeogeographic mapping and for palaeo-climate modelling. Traditional 'rigid' plate reconstructions often result in misfits (overlaps and underfits) in the geometries of juxtaposed plate margins when restored to their pre-rift positions. This has been attributed to internal deformation pre- and/or syn- continental break-up. Poorly defined continent-ocean boundaries add to these problems. To date, few studies have integrated continental extension within a global model. Recent plate tectonic reconstructions based on the relative motions of Africa, Madagascar, India and Antarctica during the break-up of eastern Gondwana have not taken into account the effects of deformation; particularly between India and Madagascar, and India and the Seychelles. A deformable plate model is in development that builds on the current rigid plate model to describe the complex multiphase break-up history between Africa, Madagascar, Seychelles and India, the associated magmatic activity and subsequent India/Eurasia collision. The break-up of eastern Gondwana occurred in the mid Jurassic by rifting between Africa and the India-Madagascar-Australian-Antarctica plates, followed by the Late Jurassic drift of India away from Australia and the Cretaceous break-up of Australia and Antarctica. The northwards drift of the Seychelles-India block in the Tertiary was accommodated by the opening of the Laxmi Basin. This was followed by the eruption of the extensive Deccan flood basalts and the separation of India and the Seychelles. Crustal domains on volcanic margins can be very difficult to define due to the accretion of magmatic material. On these margins, there is much speculation on the position of the continent-ocean boundary and the timing of rifting and sea-floor spreading. The presence of magnetic anomalies indicating variable rates of seafloor spreading and 'jumps' in the axis of seafloor spreading have not as yet been satisfactorily resolved by existing plate models. Integration of detailed geophysical and geological datasets, combined with published data will be used to produce an enhanced plate tectonic model. This will be coupled with deformable modelling of the extensional margins, incorporating stretching (?) factors and deformation trajectories to calculate the extent of crustal deformation for the main episodes of continental break-up. This will result in more accurate plate tectonic reconstructions for the determination of pre-rift geometries, palaeo-positions of the plates and exploration datasets intersected with them, to aid hydrocarbon exploration in the region.

Watson, J. G.; Glover, C. T.; Adriasola Munoz, A. C.; Harris, J. P.; Goodrich, M.

2012-04-01

415

78 FR 32184 - Importation of Fresh Apricots From Continental Spain  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Importation of Fresh Apricots From Continental Spain AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection...States of fresh apricots from continental Spain. This action will allow interested persons...importation of fresh apricots from continental Spain into the United States subject to a...

2013-05-29

416

78 FR 32183 - Importation of Avocados From Continental Spain  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...APHIS-2012-0002] RIN 0579-AD63 Importation of Avocados From Continental Spain AGENCY: Animal...rule that would allow the importation of avocados from continental Spain (excluding the...regulations to allow the importation of avocados from continental Spain (excluding...

2013-05-29

417

Radiation efficiency of damped plates.  

PubMed

The radiation efficiency of damped plates is discussed in this letter. Below the critical frequency of a plate, numerical results show that the radiation efficiency is much influenced by damping. Some modifications of the classical formulas given by Cremer for an infinite plate and Leppington for a finite rectangular plate are proposed to include the influence of the damping on the radiation efficiency. PMID:25698034

Kou, Yiwei; Liu, Bilong; Tian, Jing

2015-02-01

418

THE PARALLEL PLATE PLASMA PROBLEM  

Microsoft Academic Search

The parallel plate plasma problem is considered under the assumption of ; uniform density and a specular reflection boundary condition at the plates. The ; impedance of the device is derived for several different models of the plasma ; medium. The impedance of a hydromagnetic medium exhibits resonances whenever the ; plate separation is an odd multiple of a half

Hall

1962-01-01

419

Lesson 3. Plate Tectonics Overview  

E-print Network

Lesson 3. Plate Tectonics #12;Overview · Prior to the 1970s that with the development of the theory of plate tectonics. · Knowledge of the ocean floors of the Earth #12;Overview · Plate tectonics explains the formaBon of the Earth's two

Chen, Po

420

Glacial isostasy and plate motion  

Microsoft Academic Search

The influence of glacial-isostatic adjustment (GIA) on the motion of tectonic plates is usually neglected. Employing a recently developed numerical approach, we examine the effect of glacial loading on the motion of the Earth’s tectonic plates where we consider an elastic lithosphere of laterally variable strength and the plates losely connected by low viscous zones. The aim of this paper

Volker Klemann; Zdenek Martinec; Erik R. Ivins

2008-01-01

421

Bipolar battery plate  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A liquid-impermeable plate (10) having throughplate conductivity with essentially zero resistance comprises an insulator sheet (12) having a series of spaced perforations (14) each of which contains a metal element (16) sealingly received into the perforation (14). A low-cost plate can readily be manufactured by punching a thermoplastic sheet (40) such as polypropylene with a punching tool (52), filling the apertures with lead spheres (63) having a diameter smaller than the holes (50) but larger than the thickness of the sheet, sweeping excess spheres (62) off the sheet with a doctor blade (60) and then pressing a heated platen (74) onto the sheet to swage the spheres into a cylindrical shape and melt the surrounding resin to form a liquid-impermeable collar (4) sealing the metal into the sheet.

Rowlette, John J. (Inventor)

1985-01-01

422

North American plate dynamics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Deformation within the North American plate in response to various tectonic processes is modeled using an elastic finite element analysis. The tectonic processes considered in the modeling include ridge forces associated with the normal thermal evolution of oceanic lithosphere, shear and normal stresses transmitted across transforms, normal stresses transmitted across convergent boundaries, stresses due to horizontal density contrasts within the continent, and shear tractions applied along the base of the plate. Model stresses are calculated with respect to a lithostatic reference stress state. Shear stresses transmitted across transform boundaries along the San Andreas and Caribbean are small, of the order of 5-10 MPa. Also, compressive stresses of the order of 5-10 MPa transmitted across the major transforms improve the fit to the data. Compressive stresses across convergent margins along the Aleutians and the Middle America trench are important.

Richardson, Randall M.; Reding, Lynn M.

1991-01-01

423

Microchannel plate streak camera  

DOEpatents

An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras is disclosed. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (UV to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1,000 KeV x-rays. 3 figs.

Wang, C.L.

1989-03-21

424

Microchannel plate streak camera  

DOEpatents

An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (UV to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1000 KeV x-rays.

Wang, Ching L. (Livermore, CA)

1989-01-01

425

Microchannel plate streak camera  

DOEpatents

An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (uv to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1000 keV x-rays.

Wang, C.L.

1984-09-28

426

Elastic plate spallation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The dynamic finite element method was used to investigate elastic stress waves in a plate. Strain displacement and stress strain relations are discussed along with the stiffness and mass matrix. The results of studying point load, and distributed load over small, intermediate, and large radii are reported. The derivation of finite element matrices, and the derivation of lumped and consistent matrices for one dimensional problems with Laplace transfer solutions are included. The computer program JMMSPALL is also included.

Oline, L.; Medaglia, J.

1972-01-01

427

Generation of Continental Rifts, Basins and Swells by Lithosphere Instabilities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Domal uplifts, volcanism, basin formation and rifting have often struck the same continent in different areas at the same time. Their characteristics and orientations are difficult to reconcile with mantle convection or tectonic forces and suggest a driving mechanism that is intrinsic to the continent. The rifts seem to develop preferentially at high angles to the edge of the continent whereas swells and basins seem confined to the interior. Another intriguing geometrical feature is that the rifts often branch out in complicated patterns at their landward end. In Western Africa, for example, magmatic activity currently occurs in a number of uplifted areas including the peculiar Cameroon Volcanic Line that stretches away from the continental margin over about 1000 km. Magmatic and volcanic activity has been sustained along this line for 70 My with no age progression. The mantle upwelling that feeds the volcanoes is not affected by absolute plate motions and hence is attached to the continent. The Cameroon Volcanic Line extends to the Biu swell to the North and the Jos plateau to the West defining a striking Y-shaped pattern. This structure segues into several volcanic domes including the Air, the Hoggar, the Darfur, the Tibesti and the Haruj domes towards the Mediterranean coast. Another example is provided by North America, where the late Proterozoic-early Ordovician saw the formation of four major basins, the Michigan, Illinois, Williston and Hudson Bay, as well as of major rifts in southern Oklahoma and the Mississipi Valley within a short time interval. At the same time, a series of uplifts developed, such as the Ozark and Nashville domes. Motivated by these observations, we have sought an explanation in the continental lithosphere itself. We describe a new type of convective instability at the base of the lithosphere that leads to a remarkable spatial pattern at the scale of an entire continent. We carried out fluid mechanics laboratory experiments on buoyant blocks of finite size that became unstable due to cooling from above and describe the peculiar horizontal planform that developed. Dynamical behaviour depends on three dimensionless numbers, a Rayleigh number for the unstable block, a buoyancy number that scales the intrinsic density contrast to the thermal one and the aspect ratio of the block. Within the block, instability develops in two different ways in an outer annulus and in an inner region. In the outer annulus, upwellings and downwellings take the form of radial rolls spaced regularly. In the interior region, the planform adopts the more familiar form of polygonal cells. Translated to geological conditions, such instabilities should manifest themselves as linear rifts striking at a right angle to the continent-ocean boundary and an array of domal uplifts, volcanic swells and basins in the continental interior. The laboratory data lead to simple scaling laws for the dimensions and spacings of the convective structures. For the sub-continental lithospheric mantle, these dimensions and distances take values in the 500-1000 km range, close to geological examples. The large intrinsic buoyancy of Archean lithospheric roots prevents this type of instability, which explains why the widespread volcanic activity that currently affects Western Africa is confined to post-Archean domains.

Milelli, L.; Fourel, L.; Jaupart, C. P.

2012-12-01

428

Landscape formation by past continental ice sheets: insights into the subglacial environment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Glaciers and ice sheets are known as most powerful, climatically driven agents of large-scale sediment redistribution and landscape formation in the Earth system. During the Quaternary, repeated waxing and waning of continental ice sheets contributed to profound reshaping of the Earth surface and set the scene for the development of ecosystems in the post-glacial time. Despite the well-established impact of glaciers on the upper lithosphere the specific processes of glacial erosion, transport and deposition and the formation landforms at the ice-bed interface are contentious. In particular, the relative importance of direct ice impact versus the impact of glacial meltwater is highly controversial. Here, we focus on the southern peripheral area of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet hosting thick successions of soft, deformable sediments and examine some spectacular sediment/landform assemblages found nowadays in both terrestrial and marine settings to illustrate the nature of the subglacial processes. In order to decipher the past ice sheet behavior field, experimental and numerical approaches are combined. It is shown that the strength of the coupling between the ice and the bed that controls the response of the substratum to ice overriding and stress propagation depends primarily on the ability of the glacial system to evacuate meltwater from ice-bed interface. Strong coupling, locally enhanced by subglacial permafrost resulted in deeply rooted (100's of meters) glaciotectonic deformation reflected on the surface as ice-shoved hills whereas weak coupling promoted by water accumulating under the ice triggered the formation of deep (100's of meters) tunnel valley networks. Under the arteries of fast-flowing ice known as palaeo-ice streams, remoulding of soft sediments generated mega-scale glacial lineations and drumlins that hold the key to understanding glacier dynamics. The subglacial environment is envisaged as a four-dimensional mosaic of stable and deforming spots transient in time and space whose impact is embedded in the properties of sediment/landform systems.

Piotrowski, Jan A.

2014-05-01

429

Obduction at plate boundaries : thermo-mechanical modelling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Obduction involves the emplacement of fragments of oceanic lithosphere (ophiolites) over a continental one. Ophiolitic sequences, composed of mafic to ultramafic lithologies, are characterized by a much higher density than continental material. For this reason the processes that control obduction are not straightforward and rem