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Sample records for overriding continental plate

  1. Geodynamic models of continental subduction and obduction of overriding plate forearc oceanic lithosphere on top of continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Sarah J.; Schellart, Wouter P.; Duarte, Joao C.

    2015-07-01

    Continental subduction takes place in the final stage of subduction when all oceanic lithosphere is consumed and continental passive margin is pulled into the mantle. When the overriding plate is oceanic, dense forearc oceanic lithosphere might be obducted onto light continental crust forming an ophiolite (Tethyan-style ophiolite obduction). Four-dimensional dynamic analog subduction models have been constructed to evaluate the mechanical feasibility of continental subduction and forearc oceanic lithosphere obduction on top of continental crust. The roles of continental crust thickness, passive margin length, subducting lithosphere thickness, and overriding plate thickness were investigated to determine the maximum continental subduction depth, maximum forearc obduction distance, and forearc deformation during continental subduction. Our buoyancy-driven experiments indicate that deep continental subduction occurs in most circumstances (down to ~560 km) and that obduction of dense oceanic forearc lithosphere on top of light continental crust is mechanically feasible. Maximum obduction distances are relatively small (~26-37 km) but are sufficient to explain obduction of short ophiolite sheets, such as observed in New Caledonia. When including the thin (5-10 km thick) accretionary wedge of off-scraped deep sea sediments, oceanic crust, and mantle, then maximum obduction distances are much larger, ~60-160 km, sufficient to account for the obducted Northland Allochthon in New Zealand. Results indicate that increasing continental crust thickness decreases continental subduction depth, whereas increasing passive margin length and subducting lithosphere thickness increases continental subduction depth. Notably, during continental subduction, backarc extension continues, while forearc deformation (shortening) increases moderately compared to the preceding phase of normal (oceanic) subduction.

  2. Overriding Plate Controls on Subduction Zone Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharples, W. K.; Jadamec, M. A.; Moresi, L. N.; Capitanio, F. A.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic data, rock deformation experiments, and geochemical studies indicate variability in the thickness, buoyancy, and strength of the lithosphere at plate boundaries. However, geodynamic models of subduction commonly either omit an overriding plate or do not investigate role of the variation in overriding plate properties on the subduction evolution. We present time-dependent numerical models of subduction that vary the overriding plate thickness, strength, and density and allow for a plate interface that evolves with time via an anisotropic brittle failure rheology. We examine the emergence of (a) asymmetric versus symmetric subduction, (b) trench retreat versus advance, (c) subduction zone geometry, (d) slab stagnation versus penetration into the lower mantle, and (e) flat slab subduction. The majority of the models result in sustained asymmetric subduction. The models demonstrate that trench retreat is correlated with a thin overriding plate, whereas, trench advance is correlated with a thick and/or strong overriding plate. Slab dip, measured at a depth below the plate boundary interface, has a negative correlation with an increase in overriding plate thickness. Overriding plate thickness exerts a first order control over slab penetration into the lower mantle, with penetration most commonly occurring in models with a thick overriding plate. Periods of flat slab subduction occur with thick, strong overriding plates producing strong plate boundary interface coupling. The results provide insight into how the overriding plate plays a role in establishing advancing and retreating subduction, as well as providing an explanation for the variation of slab geometry observed in subduction zones on Earth.

  3. Overriding plate thickness control on subducting slab curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, A.; Buffett, B. A.; Becker, T. W.

    2014-12-01

    The curvature of subducting lithosphere controls deformation due to bending at the trench, which results in a force that dissipates gravitational potential energy and may affect seismic coupling. We use 2-D, thermo-mechanical subduction models to explore the dependence of the radius of curvature on the thickness of the subducting and overriding plates for models with both viscous and effectively plastic lithospheric rheologies. Such a plastic rheology has been shown to reproduce the bending stresses/moment computed using a kinematic strain rate description and a laboratory derived composite rheology. Laboratory and numerical models show that the bending geometry of subducting slabs with a viscous rheology is strongly dependent on slab thickness; thicker plates have a larger radius of curvature. However, the curvature of subducting plates on Earth, illuminated by the distribution of earthquake hypocenters, shows little to no dependence on the plate thickness or age. Such an observation is instead compatible with plates that have a plastic rheology. Indeed, our numerical models show that the radius of curvature of viscous plates has a stronger dependence on subducting plate thickness than in equivalent plastic models. In viscous plates, the bending moment produces a torque, which balances the torque exerted by buoyancy. However, for the plastic plate case the bending moment saturates at a maximum value and so cannot balance the gravitational torque. The saturation of bending moment means that, (a) the radius of curvature of the bending region is not constrained by this torque balance, and, (b) other forces are required to balance the gravitational torque. We explore the role that the overriding plate could play in controlling the subducting plate curvature in plastic plate models where the bending stresses have saturated. For such plates, we find that increasing the thickness of the overriding plate causes the radius of curvature to increase. The same correlation is

  4. Seismic evidence for deep fluid circulation in the overriding plate of subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauzin, B.; Reynard, B.; Bodin, T.; Perrillat, J. P.; Debayle, E.

    2015-12-01

    In subduction zones, non-volcanic tremors are associated with fluid circulations (Obara, 2002). Their sources are often located on the interplate boundary (Rogers and Dragert, 2003; Shelly et al, 2006; La Rocca, 2009), consistent with fluids released by the dehydration of subducted plates (Hacker et al., 2003). Reports of tremors in the overriding continental crust of several subduction zones in the world (Kao et al., 2005; Payero et al., 2008; Ide, 2012) suggest fluid circulation at shallower depths but potential fluid paths are poorly documented. Here we obtained seismic observations from receiver functions that evidence the close association between the shallow tremor zone, electrical conductivity, and tectonic features of the Cascadia overriding plate. A seismic discontinuity near 15 km depth in the crust of the overriding North American plate is attributed to the Conrad discontinuity. This interface is segmented, and its interruption is spatially correlated with conductive regions and shallow swarms of seismicity and non-volcanic tremors. These observations suggest that shallow fluid circulation, tremors and seismicity are controlled by fault zones limiting blocks of accreted terranes in the overriding plate (Brudzinski and Allen, 2007). These zones constitute fluid "escape" routes that may contribute unloading fluid pressure on the megathrust. Obara, K. (2002). Science, 296, 1679-1681. Rogers, G., & Dragert, H. (2003). Science, 300, 1942-1943. Shelly, D. R., et al. (2006). Nature, 442, 188-191. La Rocca, M., et al. (2009). Science, 323, 620-623. Kao, H., et al. (2005). Nature, 436, 841-844. Payero, J. S., et al. (2008). Geophysical Research Letters, 35. Ide, S. (2012). Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth, 117. Brudzinski, M. R., & Allen, R. M. (2007). Geology, 35, 907-910.

  5. Influence of overriding plate velocity changes on slab dip and deformation: insights from laboratory models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillaume, Benjamin; Hertgen, Solenn; Martinod, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    Over geological times, plate reorganization associated with mantle convection led to changes in absolute plate velocities, which may in turn have impacted the geometry of the subducting plate as well as the overriding plate regime of deformation. Indeed, previous studies have shown a very good correlation between the absolute motion of the overriding plate on one hand and slab dip and overriding plate deformation on the other hand: extension and steep slab are associated with an overriding plate moving away from the trench while shortening and shallow slab occur if the upper plate goes the other way. However, these correlations are established when subduction has reached a steady-state regime and for a constant motion of the overriding plate over the subducting plate, which may not always be the case on Earth. The response of the subduction system to changes in absolute overriding plate velocity still remain an open question. In this study, we conducted a set of 3-D mantle-scale laboratory models of subduction in which we incrementally changed the velocity of the overriding plate to reproduce changes of velocities that may arise from variations of far-field boundary conditions in Nature. We first show that strain rates in the overriding plate are correlated with overriding plate absolute velocity but also that the regime of deformation adjusts rapidly to changes of velocity. This may explain for instance why despite the subduction has been continuous beneath South America since at least the middle Jurassic, shortening along its active margin is only recorded episodically, the main phases of Andean orogeny roughly corresponding to periods of South American plate westward acceleration. We also show that slab dip adjusts to changes of overriding plate velocity but it requires several Myr before it stabilizes. It may explain why the correlation between absolute overriding plate motion and slab dip from the analysis of present-day subduction zones is only moderate, part

  6. A numerical study of the interaction between the mantle wedge, subducting slab, and overriding plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberle, Michael A.; Grasset, Olivier; Sotin, Christophe

    2002-12-01

    We have formulated a numerical model with strongly temperature-dependent viscosity to calculate thermal structure and flow-field in subduction zones. One important particularity of the model is that the overriding plate is not fixed over its whole thickness in order to allow material exchange between the wedge and the upper lithosphere. Numerical problems due to very high-viscosity contrasts are avoided by coupling a finite difference method and a finite element method for solving the energy conservation equation and the Stockes equation, respectively. In this model, a temperature decrease from 1400 to 1300 °C increases the viscosity by an order of magnitude. We study the temperature structure and the velocity field of the subducting slab and mantle wedge. Surface heat flow, velocity anomalies, and geometry of the partial melting zone are also calculated. To study the effect that boundary conditions play on the interaction between the mantle wedge, overriding plate and subducting plate, we examine models with both fixed and free-slip conditions applied to the overriding plate. When the overriding plate is allowed to move laterally (free-slip), the subducting slab is thick, and both the temperature field and the convective motions in the mantle wedge are similar to those observed when using constant viscosity numerical models or analytical corner flow models. If the surface of the overriding plate is fixed, the subducting slab is thin and the mantle wedge impinges upon the overriding plate forming a high-temperature nose between the overriding plate and subducting lithosphere. Furthermore, viscous decoupling occurs implicitly at shallow depth between the slab and the wedge because hot material from the wedge is entrained close to the trench. In that case, the subducting slab tectonically erodes the lower lithosphere of the overriding plate leading to high-temperatures, low seismic velocities, high attenuation and high heat flow beneath volcanic arc, in agreement

  7. Quantifying the energy dissipation of overriding plate deformation in three-dimensional subduction models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhihao; Schellart, Wouter P.; Duarte, João. C.

    2015-01-01

    In a subduction system the force and the energy required to deform the overriding plate are generally thought to come from the negative buoyancy of the subducted slab and its potential energy, respectively. Such deformation might involve extension and back-arc basin formation or shortening and mountain building. How much of the slab's potential energy is consumed during overriding plate deformation remains unknown. In this work, we present dynamic three-dimensional laboratory experiments of progressive subduction with an overriding plate to quantify the force (FOPD) that drives overriding plate deformation and the associated energy dissipation rate (ΦOPD), and we compare them with the negative buoyancy (FBU) of the subducted slab and its total potential energy release rate (ΦBU), respectively. We varied the viscosity ratio between the plates and the sublithospheric upper mantle with ηSP/ηUM = 157-560 and the thickness of the overriding plate with TOP = 0.5-2.5 cm (scaling to 25-125 km in nature). The results show that FOPD/FBU has average values of 0.5-2.0%, with a maximum of 5.3%, and ΦOPD/ΦBU has average values of 0.05-0.30%, with a maximum of 0.41%. The results indicate that only a small portion of the negative buoyancy of the slab and its potential energy are used to deform the overriding plate. Our models also suggest that the force required to deform the overriding plate is of comparable magnitude as the ridge push force. Furthermore, we show that in subduction models with an overriding plate bending dissipation at the subduction zone hinge remains low (3-15% during steady state subduction).

  8. Stress fields of the overriding plate at convergent margins and beneath active volcanic arcs.

    PubMed

    Apperson, K D

    1991-11-01

    Tectonic stress fields in the overriding plate at convergent plate margins are complex and vary on local to regional scales. Volcanic arcs are a common element of overriding plates. Stress fields in the volcanic arc region are related to deformation generated by subduction and to magma generation and ascent processes. Analysis of moment tensors of shallow and intermediate depth earthquakes in volcanic arcs indicates that the seismic strain field in the arc region of many convergent margins is subhorizontal extension oriented nearly perpendicular to the arc. A process capable of generating such a globally consistent strain field is induced asthenospheric corner flow below the arc region. PMID:17774792

  9. The Continental Plates are Getting Thicker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Richard A.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews seismological studies that provide evidence of the existence of continental roots beneath the continents. Suggests, that through the collisions of plate tectonics, continents stabilized part of the mobile mantle rock beneath them to form deep roots. (ML)

  10. Three-dimensional dynamic laboratory models of subduction with an overriding plate and variable interplate rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, João C.; Schellart, Wouter P.; Cruden, Alexander R.

    2013-10-01

    Subduction zones are complex 3-D features in which one tectonic plate sinks underneath another into the deep mantle. During subduction the overriding plate (OP) remains in physical contact with the subducting plate and stresses generated at the subduction zone interface and by mantle flow force the OP to deform. We present results of 3-D dynamic laboratory models of subduction that include an OP. We introduce new interplate materials comprising homogeneous mixtures of petrolatum and paraffin oil to achieve progressive subduction. The rheology of these mixtures is characterized by measurements using a strain rate controlled rheometer. The results show that the strength of the mixture increases with petrolatum content, which can be used as a proxy for the degree of mechanical coupling along the subduction interface. Results of subduction experiments are presented with different degrees of mechanical coupling and the influence this has on the dynamics and kinematics of subduction. The modelling results show that variations in the degree of mechanical coupling between the plates have a major impact on subduction velocities, slab geometry and the rate of OP deformation. In all experiments the OP is displaced following trench migration and experiences overall extension localized in the plate interior. This suggests that OP deformation is driven primarily by the toroidal component of subduction-related mantle return flow. The subduction rate is always very slow in experiments with medium mechanical coupling, and subduction stops prematurely in experiments with very high coupling. This implies that the shear forces along the plate interface in natural subduction zone systems must be relatively low and do not vary significantly. Otherwise a higher variability in natural subduction velocities should be observed for mature, non-perturbed subduction zones. The required low shear force is likely controlled by the rheology of highly hydrated sedimentary and basaltic rocks.

  11. Abrupt plate accelerations shape rifted continental margins.

    PubMed

    Brune, Sascha; Williams, Simon E; Butterworth, Nathaniel P; Müller, R Dietmar

    2016-08-11

    Rifted margins are formed by persistent stretching of continental lithosphere until breakup is achieved. It is well known that strain-rate-dependent processes control rift evolution, yet quantified extension histories of Earth's major passive margins have become available only recently. Here we investigate rift kinematics globally by applying a new geotectonic analysis technique to revised global plate reconstructions. We find that rifted margins feature an initial, slow rift phase (less than ten millimetres per year, full rate) and that an abrupt increase of plate divergence introduces a fast rift phase. Plate acceleration takes place before continental rupture and considerable margin area is created during each phase. We reproduce the rapid transition from slow to fast extension using analytical and numerical modelling with constant force boundary conditions. The extension models suggest that the two-phase velocity behaviour is caused by a rift-intrinsic strength--velocity feedback, which can be robustly inferred for diverse lithosphere configurations and rheologies. Our results explain differences between proximal and distal margin areas and demonstrate that abrupt plate acceleration during continental rifting is controlled by the nonlinear decay of the resistive rift strength force. This mechanism provides an explanation for several previously unexplained rapid absolute plate motion changes, offering new insights into the balance of plate driving forces through time. PMID:27437571

  12. Plate Tectonics and Continental Drift: Classroom Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, Prentice K.

    1983-01-01

    Suggests various classroom studies related to plate tectonics and continental drift, including comments on and sources of resource materials useful in teaching the topics. A complete list of magazine articles on the topics from the Sawyer Marine Resource Collection may be obtained by contacting the author. (JN)

  13. Causes for the Onset and Stability of Flat Slabs and Associated Overriding Plate Deformation Inferred from Numerical Thermo-Mechanical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, R. V. S.; Lowry, A. R.; Buiter, S. J.; Ellis, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Flat slab subduction comprises only ~10% of the present-day subduction systems. We systematically explore flat-slab subduction and over-riding plate deformation due to previously recognized factors (including a weak mantle wedge, a buoyant oceanic plateau/ridge, slab-age, presence of thick cratonic upper plate), as well as additional factors not considered before (transient plate-velocity variations, and the presence of stagnant slabs at the mantle transition zone). We use a visco-elasto-plastic code, SULEC (Buiter & Ellis, 2012), restrict ourselves to 2D models, and ignore phase transformations. We model a 6000 km by 1500 km domain with 1-10 km variable grid spacing using up-to-date laboratory-derived constitutive laws, and explore the effects of: (a) lateral/vertical structure of the crust and lithosphere (e.g., continental lithosphere with/without a craton; oceanic lithosphere with thickness governed by plate cooling, and a harzburgite layer); (b) a true free upper-surface to predict surface topography; and (c) only far-field (boundary) velocities driving plates, with trench-velocity depending on over-riding plate deformation and slab pull. As in previous studies, we find that positive trench-retreat velocity and weak integrated slab-strength (as measured by differential stress) are necessary, but not sufficient, conditions for flat-slab subduction. While mantle-wedge suction associated with the presence of a craton does promote flat slab subduction, models without a craton also produce flat-slabs when (a) trench-retreat velocities are large and (b) either the slab is positively (structurally or thermally) buoyant or there is an underlying slab at the mantle transition zone. In our models, the duration of flat slab subduction depends on overall slab buoyancy. Younger oceanic lithosphere, esp. if it contains a plateau/ridge, provides a longer-lasting flat-slab (~ 10 Myr or longer, e.g., central Mexico), while older slabs with oceanic ridge/plateau (e.g., Peru

  14. Overriding plate deformation and variability of fore-arc deformation during subduction: Insight from geodynamic models and application to the Calabria subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhihao; Schellart, Wouter P.; Duarte, João. C.

    2015-10-01

    In nature, subducting slabs and overriding plate segments bordering subduction zones are generally embedded within larger plates. Such large plates can impose far-field boundary conditions that influence the style of subduction and overriding plate deformation. Here we present dynamic laboratory models of progressive subduction in three-dimensional space, in which the far-field boundary conditions at the trailing edges of the subducting plate (SP) and overriding plate (OP) are varied. Four configurations are presented: Free (both plates free), SP-Fixed, OP-Fixed, and SP-OP-Fixed. We investigate their impact on the kinematics and dynamics of subduction, particularly focusing on overriding plate deformation. The results indicate that the variation in far-field boundary conditions has an influence on the slab geometry, subduction partitioning, and trench migration partitioning. Our models also indicate that in natural (narrow) subduction zones, assuming a homogeneous overriding plate, the formation of back-arc basins (e.g., Tyrrhenian Sea, Aegean Sea, and Scotia Sea) is generally expected to occur at a comparable location (250-700 km from the trench), irrespective of the boundary condition. In addition, our models indicate that the style of fore-arc deformation (shortening or extension) is influenced by the mobility of the overriding plate through controlling the force normal to the subduction zone interface (trench suction). Our geodynamic model that uses the SP-OP-Fixed setup is comparable to the Calabria subduction zone with respect to subduction kinematics, slab geometry, trench curvature, and accretionary configuration. Furthermore, the model can explain back-arc and fore-arc extension at the Calabria subduction zone since the latest middle Miocene as a consequence of subduction of the narrow Calabrian slab and the immobility of the subducting African plate and overriding Eurasian plate. This setting induced strong trench suction, driving fore-arc extension, and

  15. Current plate motions. [continental groupings and global modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demets, C.; Gordon, R. G.; Argus, D. F.; Stein, S.

    1990-01-01

    A global plate motion model, named NUVEL-1, which describes current plate motions between 12 rigid plates is described, with special attention given to the method, data, and assumptions used. Tectonic implications of the patterns that emerged from the results are discussed. It is shown that wide plate boundary zones can form not only within the continental lithosphere but also within the oceanic lithosphere; e.g., between the Indian and Australian plates and between the North American and South American plates. Results of the model also suggest small but significant diffuse deformation of the oceanic lithosphere, which may be confined to small awkwardly shaped salients of major plates.

  16. Continental tectonics in the aftermath of plate tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, Peter

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that the basic tenet of plate tectonics, rigid-body movements of large plates of lithosphere, fails to apply to continental interiors. There, buoyant continental crust can detach from the underlying mantle to form mountain ranges and broad zones of diffuse tectonic activity. The role of crustal blocks and of the detachment of crustal fragments in this process is discussed. Future areas of investigation are addressed.

  17. Dynamics of continental collision: influence of the plate contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Franco, Roberta; Govers, Rob; Wortel, Rinus

    2008-09-01

    Observations shows that continental collision may evolve in different ways, resulting in a wide range of tectonic responses. In search of the controlling conditions and parameters, we start from the results of our previous work, which demonstrated that the properties of the plate contact are important for the overall dynamics of convergent plate margins. Two fundamental types of subduction plate contact can be distinguished: one based on a fault and the other based on a weak subduction channel. In this study, we investigate how the plate contact affects the initial stage of continental collision. We use a finite element method to solve the heat and the time-dependent momentum equations for elastic, (power-law) viscous and plastic rheologies. For the same rheological properties and driving forces, varying the nature of the plate contact leads to three types of responses. The presence of a subduction channel promotes coherent and, when the boundary conditions allow it, plate-like subduction of the continental margin. In models with a subduction fault, coherent subduction of the incoming continental lithosphere occurs when the colliding passive margin has a gentle slope. The approaching continental sliver starts to subduct and the subduction is characterized by a non-plate like behaviour-slower subduction velocity than in channel models and strong slab deformation. If the continental margin is steep and the strength of the incoming continental crust is high, fault models result in locking of the trench, eventually leading to slab break-off. If the crustal strength is relatively low, shear delamination of part of the crust is expected. In the channel model, this type of delamination never occurs. The tectonic settings used in our experiments (prescribed plate velocity of the subducting plate versus fixed subducting plate corresponding to a landlocked basin setting) do not significantly influence the nature of the model response. We conclude that initial stages of

  18. Plate boundary and major fault system in the overriding plate within the Shumagin gap at the Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becel, A.; Shillington, D. J.; Nedimovic, M. R.; Keranen, K. M.; Li, J.; Webb, S. C.; Kuehn, H.

    2013-12-01

    Structure in the overriding plate is one of the parameters that may increase the tsunamigenic potential of a subduction zone but also influence the seismogenic behavior and segmentation of great earthquake rupture. The Alaska-Aleutian margin is characterized by along-strike changes in plate interface coupling over relatively small distances. Here, we present trench normal multichannel seismic (MCS) profiles acquired across the Shumagin gap that has not broken in many decades and appears to be weakly coupled. The high fold, deep penetration (636 channel, 8-km long streamer, 6600 cu.in airgun source) MCS data were acquired as part of the ALEUT project. This dataset gives us critical new constraints on the interplate boundary that can be traced over ~100 km distance beneath the forearc with high variation in its reflection response with depth. These profiles also reveal the detailed upper plate fault structure and forearc morphology. Clear reflections in the overriding plate appear to delineate one or more large faults that cross the shelf and the upper slope. These faults are observed 75 km back from the trench and seem to branch at depth and connect to the plate interface within this gap at ~11 s twtt. We compare the reflective structure of these faults to that of the plate boundary and examine where it intersects the megathrust with respect of the expected downdip limit of coupling. We also compare this major structure with the seismicity recorded in this sector. The imaged fault system is associated with a large deep basin (~6s twt) that is an inherited structure formed during the pre-Aleutian period. Basins faults appear to have accommodated primarily normal motion, although folding of sediments near the fault and complicated fault geometries in the shallow section may indicate that this fault has accommodated other types of motion during its history that may reflect the stress-state at the megathrust over time. The deformation within the youngest sediment also

  19. Modelling continental deformation within global plate tectonic reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, S.; Whittaker, J.; Heine, C.; Müller, P.

    2010-12-01

    A limitation of regional and global plate tectonic models is the way continental deformation is represented. Continental blocks are typically represented as rigid polygons - overlaps or gaps between adjacent continental blocks represent extension or compression respectively. Full-fit reconstructions of major ocean basins result in large overlaps between the conjugate continental plates, on the basis that the continental margins are highly extended compared to their pre-rift state. A fundamental challenge in generating more robust global-scale plate reconstructions is the incorporation of a more quantitative description of the kinematics within extended passive margins, based on observations. We have used the conjugate Southern Australia and Wilkes Land, Antarctica margins as a case study, and as part of this work have generated revised sediment thickness maps for these margins. These datasets are used to test different approaches for generating full-fit reconstructions in order to create a framework of methodologies that is globally applicable. One approach is to restore two conjugate continent-ocean boundaries (COBs) to their pre-rift configuration and then use the geometric fitting method of Hellinger (1981) and Royer and Chang (1991), used to generate fits of seafloor isochrons, to generate a “full-fit” Euler pole. To quantitatively restore the COBs to their palinspastic pre-rift configuration we integrate estimates of crustal thickness along small circle paths, defined by an initial estimate of the Euler stage pole describing plate motions during continental rifting. We then use the conjugate sets of restored COB’s as inputs to the geometric fitting method, treating them as isochrons, and so generate poles of rotation for the plate configuration prior to rifting. Two potential shortcomings of this methodology are that (1) the conjugate margins are treated independently, whereas in reality they were actually one continuous continental basin during rifting

  20. Overriding plate structure of the Nicaragua convergent margin: Constraints on the limits of the seismogenic zone and the 1992 tsunami earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallarès, V.; Meléndez, A.; Prada, M.; Ranero, C. R.; McIntosh, K.; Grevemeyer, I.

    2012-04-01

    We present 2D P-wave velocity models of the Nicaragua convergent margin along two perpendicular wide-angle seismic profiles acquired in the rupture area of the 1992 tsunami earthquake. The models focus on the structure of the overriding plate and the geometry of the inter-plate boundary. In the trench-perpendicular profile, the basement shows increasing velocity reflecting a progressive decrease in the degree of rock fracturing of the igneous basement. Upper mantle-like velocities are obtained at a depth of ~10 km beneath the fore-arc Sandino basin, indicating that the mantle wedge is shallow and located close to the trench. A mismatch between the inter-plate reflector in the velocity models and along coincident multi-channel seismic profiles is best explained by a ~15% velocity anisotropy, suggesting locally-enhanced rock fracturing which is related with the presence of a prominent subducted seamount. The frontal part of the overriding plate is probably too fractured to store elastic energy, unless the presence of local asperities such as the subducted seamount makes it conditionally stable by locally increasing the normal stress. The downdip limit of the seismogenic zone occurs near the tip of the mantle wedge, indicating that it is probably controlled by the presence of a weak, serpentinized mantle wedge beneath the Sandino basin. The hypocenter of the 1992 main shock is not particularly shallow (20-22 km), but seismological data indicate that it triggered sub-events near the trench, the main of which coincides with the subducted seamount. We show that the slow propagation velocity and long duration of the 1992 earthquake could be explained by rupture propagating within the fractured basement rocks and not into the sediments.

  1. Deciphering the mechanics of an imaged fault system in the over-riding plate at the Shumagin Seismic Gap, Alaska subduction zone using MCS waveform tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelson, C. A.; Delescluse, M.; Becel, A.; Nedimovic, M. R.; Shillington, D. J.; Louden, K. E.; Webb, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    The 2011 ALEUT program acquired 3500 km of multichannel seismic (MCS) data along a part of the western Alaska subduction zone, from the freely slipping Shumagin Seismic Gap to the locked regions in the Semidi segment and the western Kodiak asperity. The MCS profiles were acquired on the R/V Langseth using two 8-km-long streamers and span the entire locked zone on the megathrust, including the updip and downdip transitions to stable sliding. The primary goal was to characterize variations in the geometry and properties of the megathrust and the downgoing plate and relate them to downdip and along-strike changes in slip behavior and seismogenesis. The images capture the targeted megathrust reflectivity and its spatial variation. Notably, the two westernmost profiles show reflections arising from a major fault in the overriding plate within the Shumagin Seismic Gap located 75 km from the trench, which can be followed from the seafloor to the megathrust. The imaged normal fault bounds the seaward end of the Sanak forearc Cenozoic basin, formed after the Early Eocene reorganization of the Alaska subduction zone. The new reflection images also show that the seaward pair of the previously interpreted growth faults, thought to indicate deposition contemporaneous with basin subsidence, is a part of the imaged fault system. The unexpected imaging of this major fault system in the over-riding plate raises important questions: Has this fault been active during the most recent nearby megathrust earthquakes, such as the 1946 and 1948 earthquakes? Was the Sanak basin formed as a result of slip on the imaged normal fault system or is it a result of growth faulting that predates the formation of this fault? The timing and style of deformation on this fault has significant implications for both coupling on the megathrust seaward and landward of where the normal fault roots and tsunamigenesis. To complement constraints on the geometry and reflection characteristics of this structure

  2. Convective Removal of Continental Margin Lithosphere at the Edges of Subducting Oceanic Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levander, A.; Bezada, M. J.; Palomeras, I.; Masy, J.; Humphreys, E.; Niu, F.

    2013-12-01

    Although oceanic lithosphere is continuously recycled to the deeper mantle by subduction, the rates and manner in which different types of continental lithospheric mantle are recycled is unclear. Cratonic mantle can be chemically reworked and essentially decratonized, although the frequency of decratonization is unclear. Lithospheric mantle under or adjacent to orogenic belts can be lost to the deeper mantle by convective downwellings and delamination phenomena. Here we describe how subduction related processes at the edges of oceanic plates adjacent to passive continental margins removes the mantle lithosphere from beneath the margin and from the continental interior. This appears to be a widespread means of recycling non-cratonic continental mantle. Lithospheric removal requires the edge of a subducting oceanic plate to be at a relatively high angle to an adjacent passive continental margin. From Rayleigh wave and body wave tomography, and receiver function images from the BOLIVAR and PICASSO experiments, we infer large-scale removal of continental margin lithospheric mantle from beneath 1) the northern South American plate margin due to Atlantic subduction, and 2) the Iberian and North African margins due to Alboran plate subduction. In both cases lithospheric mantle appears to have been removed several hundred kilometers inland from the subduction zones. This type of ';plate-edge' tectonics either accompanies or pre-conditions continental margins for orogenic activity by thinning and weakening the lithosphere. These processes show the importance of relatively small convective structures, i.e. small subducting plates, in formation of orogenic belts.

  3. From Oceanic Lithosphere Subduction To Continental Collision: Influence Of The Plate Contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Franco, R.; Govers, R.; Wortel, R.

    2004-12-01

    We showed recently that the overall dynamics of oceanic subduction differ depending on whether the plate contact is a fault or a channel (De Franco & al., 2007. GJI, doi: 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2006.03498.x). Here we investigate how the plate contact affects the transition from oceanic lithosphere subduction to continental collision. We use a finite element method to solve the heat and the time dependent momentum equations for elastic, (power law) viscous and plastic rheologies. For the same rheological properties and driving forces , varying the nature of the plate contact leads to three types of responses: subduction of the entire continental lithosphere, shear delamination of the continental crust or slab break-off. We make the following observations from our numerical experiments. The presence of a subduction channel promotes coherent and, when the boundary conditions allow it, plate-like subduction of the continental margin. In models with a subduction fault, coherent subduction of the incoming continental lithosphere occurs when the colliding passive margin has a gentle ocean-continent transition. The approaching continental sliver starts to subduct and the subduction is characterized by a non-plate-like behavior, slower subduction velocity than in channel models and strong slab deformation. If the continental margin is steep and the strength of the incoming continental crust is high, fault models result in locking of the trench, eventually leading to slab break-off. If the crustal strength is relatively low, shear delamination of the upper crust is expected. In the channel model this type of delamination never occurs. The tectonic setting does not significantly affect the nature of the model response. We conclude that the plate contact type, together with the geometrical and rheological properties of the incoming continental fragment, is a crucial subduction characteristic controlling the response of continental collision during the transition from oceanic

  4. From Oceanic Lithosphere Subduction To Continental Collision: Influence Of The Plate Contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Franco, R.; Govers, R.; Wortel, R.

    2007-12-01

    We showed recently that the overall dynamics of oceanic subduction differ depending on whether the plate contact is a fault or a channel (De Franco & al., 2007. GJI, doi: 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2006.03498.x). Here we investigate how the plate contact affects the transition from oceanic lithosphere subduction to continental collision. We use a finite element method to solve the heat and the time dependent momentum equations for elastic, (power law) viscous and plastic rheologies. For the same rheological properties and driving forces , varying the nature of the plate contact leads to three types of responses: subduction of the entire continental lithosphere, shear delamination of the continental crust or slab break-off. We make the following observations from our numerical experiments. The presence of a subduction channel promotes coherent and, when the boundary conditions allow it, plate-like subduction of the continental margin. In models with a subduction fault, coherent subduction of the incoming continental lithosphere occurs when the colliding passive margin has a gentle ocean-continent transition. The approaching continental sliver starts to subduct and the subduction is characterized by a non-plate-like behavior, slower subduction velocity than in channel models and strong slab deformation. If the continental margin is steep and the strength of the incoming continental crust is high, fault models result in locking of the trench, eventually leading to slab break-off. If the crustal strength is relatively low, shear delamination of the upper crust is expected. In the channel model this type of delamination never occurs. The tectonic setting does not significantly affect the nature of the model response. We conclude that the plate contact type, together with the geometrical and rheological properties of the incoming continental fragment, is a crucial subduction characteristic controlling the response of continental collision during the transition from oceanic

  5. 30 CFR 281.31 - Overriding royalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Overriding royalties. 281.31 Section 281.31 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF MINERALS OTHER THAN OIL, GAS, AND SULPHUR IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Financial Considerations §...

  6. Lateral variations in the structure of the overriding and down-going plates in response to subduction of the Louisville Ridge seamount chain at the Tonga-Kermadec Trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratford, W. R.; Peirce, C.; Watts, A. B.; Grevemeyer, I.; Paulatto, M.; Bassett, D.; Hunter, J.; Kalnins, L. M.

    2011-12-01

    Seamount subduction at the Tonga-Kermadec trench is investigated using ~1800 km of new geophysical data collected along four profiles acquired during April-June, 2011 aboard the R/V Sonne. This NERC funded multidisciplinary, multi-institutional project obtained wide-angle and normal incidence seismic, gravity, magnetic and swath bathymetry data in the region of the Louisville Ridge subduction. Subduction of seamounts can be associated with changes in subduction zone seismogenesis, crustal structure, and trench strike and depth. Subduction of the Louisville ridge seamounts has already occurred at the trench and is postulated to have caused accelerated tectonic erosion of the overlying plate, collapse of the overriding plate into the trench and a gap in seismicity. The Tonga-Kermadec subduction system is of particular interest as it has some of the highest convergence rates seen globally, and has produced fatal earthquakes and Tsunami in recent years. Due to the oblique collision of the seamount chain at the trench, there is southward migration of the collision zone of ~200 km/Ma. Thus to the north of the Louisville Ridge, the forearc has already undergone seamount subduction, whereas to the south, it is yet to be perturbed by this process. We investigate collision at the trench with three new trench perpendicular profiles, one along axis of the seamount chain, one to the north and one to the south. The profiles were designed to cross the main tectonic features of the subduction zone explicitly to elucidate differences in crustal structure in the overlying plate. In addition, magmatic alteration of the crust of the down-going plate by the Louisville hot spot is investigated for flexural loading studies of the seamount chain and its intersection with the trench outer rise. New models for the crustal velocity structure from wide-angle data are presented and results are discussed in the context of changes in structure of the overriding plate associated with varying

  7. Analysis of Stress Field in Caribean Continental Plate - Southern Costa Rica zone - from CMT Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zevallos, I.; Quintero, R.; Jimenez, W.

    2007-12-01

    During the of period 1984 2007, 51 earthquakes were registered with magnitudes above 5.1 mb in southern Costa Rica. Depth distribution of hypocenters shows shallow (0 20 km) earthquakes located in continental area; intermediate depth hypocenters (20 60 km) corresponding to subduction of the Coco plate under the Caribean plate; and just one earthquake have focus under 60 km depth. We choose hypocenters shallower than 100 km because our goal is to study intraplate stresses. Centroid Moment Tensor solutions for subduction zone earthquakes have inverse fault mechanism. But, in continental area there are evidences of strike slip and normal fault mechanisms. Direction of main stress (σ3) at the southern continental zone is NE-SW; in the Pacific ocean border region, the main stresses are oriented parallel to the coast line; inside the valley region, mechanisms are predominantly strike slip with σ1 in the near N-S direction. This is a complex stress field, with rotation of main stresses in a short space. σ1 is vertical in some continental areas due to influence of elevated terrain. Stress axis paralell to coast line maybe also due to gravitational body force.

  8. Role of plate kinematics and plate-slip-vector partitioning in continental magmatic arcs: Evidence from the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    SciTech Connect

    McNulty, B.A.; Farber, D.L.; Wallace, G.S.; Lopez, R.; Palacios, O.

    1998-09-01

    New structural and geochronological data from the Cordillera Blanca batholith in the Peruvian Andes, coupled with Nazca-South American plate-slip-vector data, indicate that oblique convergence and associated strike-slip partitioning strongly influenced continental magmatic arc evolution. Both the strain field and mode of magmatism (plutonism vs. volcanism) in the late Miocene Peruvian Andes were controlled by the degree to which the arc-parallel component of the plate slip vector was partitioned into the arc. Strong strike-slip partitioning at ca. 8 Ma produced arc-parallel sinistral shear, strike-slip intercordilleran basins and east-west-oriented tension fractures that facilitated emplacement of the Cordillera Blanca batholith (ca. 8.2 {+-} 0.2 Ma). Periods during which the strike-slip component was not partitioned into the arc (ca. 10 and ca. 7 Ma) were associated with roughly arc-normal contraction and ignimbrite volcanism. The data thus support the contention that contraction within continental magmatic arcs favors volcanism, whereas transcurrent shear favors plutonism. The tie between oblique convergence and batholith emplacement in late Miocene Peruvian Andes provides a modern analogue for batholiths emplaced as the result of transcurrent shear in ancient arcs.

  9. Asymmetric vs. symmetric deep lithospheric architecture of intra-plate continental orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calignano, Elisa; Sokoutis, Dimitrios; Willingshofer, Ernst; Gueydan, Frédéric; Cloetingh, Sierd

    2015-08-01

    The initiation and subsequent evolution of intra-plate orogens, resulting from continental plate interior deformation due to transmission of stresses over large distances from the active plate boundaries, is controlled by lateral and vertical strength contrasts in the lithosphere. We present lithospheric-scale analogue models combining 1) lateral strength variations in the continental lithosphere, and 2) different vertical rheological stratifications. The experimental continental lithosphere has a four-layer brittle-ductile rheological stratification. Lateral heterogeneity is implemented in all models by increased crustal strength in a central narrow block. The main investigated parameters are strain rate and strength of the lithospheric mantle, both playing an important role in crust-mantle coupling. The experiments show that the presence of a strong crustal domain is effective in localizing deformation along its boundaries. After deformation is localized, the evolution of the orogenic system is governed by the mechanical properties of the lithosphere such that the final geometry of the intra-plate mountain depends on the interplay between crust-mantle coupling and folding versus fracturing of the lithospheric mantle. Underthrusting is the main deformation mode in case of high convergence velocity and/or thick brittle mantle with a final asymmetric architecture of the deep lithosphere. In contrast, lithospheric folding is dominant in case of low convergence velocity and low strength brittle mantle, leading to the development of a symmetric lithospheric root. The presented analogue modelling results provide novel insights for 1) strain localization and 2) the development of the asymmetric architecture of the Pyrenees.

  10. EAG Eminent Speaker: Two types of Archean continental crust: plume and plate tectonics on early Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Kranendonk, M. J.

    2012-04-01

    Over 4.5 billion years, Earth has evolved from a molten ball to a cooler planet with large continental plates, but how and when continents grew and plate tectonics started remain poorly understood. In this paper, I review the evidence that 3.5-3.2 Ga continental nuclei of the Pilbara (Australia) and Kaapvaal (southern Africa) cratons formed as thick volcanic plateaux over hot, upwelling mantle and survived due to contemporaneous development of highly depleted, buoyant, unsubductable mantle roots. This type of crust is distinct from, but complimentary to, high-grade gneiss terranes, as exemplified by the North Atlantic Craton of West Greenland, which formed through subduction-accretion tectonics on what is envisaged as a vigorously convecting early Earth with small plates. Thus, it is proposed that two types of crust formed on early Earth, in much the same way as in modern Earth, but with distinct differences resulting from a hotter Archean mantle. Volcanic plateaux provided a variety of stable habitats for early life, including chemical nutrient rich, shallow-water hydrothermal systems and shallow marine carbonate platforms.

  11. Misconceptions and Conceptual Changes Concerning Continental Drift and Plate Tectonics among Portuguese Students Aged 16-17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marques, Luis; Thompson, David

    1997-01-01

    This study investigates student misconceptions in the areas of continent, ocean, permanence of ocean basins, continental drift, Earth's magnetic field, and plates and plate motions. A teaching-learning model was designed based on a constructivist approach. Results show that students held a substantial number of misconceptions. (Author/DKM)

  12. Role of Plumes and Plates in the Construction and Preservation of Hadean-Archean Continental Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, P. A.; Mogk, D. W.; Henry, D.; Wooden, J.

    2014-12-01

    Crust and lithosphere formed in modern island arc and plume environments exhibit strong contrasts in both structure and composition compared to present day continents. The limited inventory of Hadean and Eoarchean material available for study, the possibility that the preserved record is biased, and the lack of continental crust on other terrestrial planets, make it difficult to determine the nature of the first continental nuclei. Nonetheless, certain first order similarities in preserved Archean continental crust suggest that these continental nuclei (microcontinents or protocontinents) allow us to establish limits on processes of early crustal genesis Based on geochemical (elemental and isotopic), geochronologic, and petrologic data from Paleo- to Mesoarchean rocks preserved in the northern Wyoming Province, we propose a multi-stage evolution of a continental nucleus that reflects a secular change from plume- to plate-related processes. 1) 4.0-4.1 Ga: mafic and ultramafic magmas formed a section of thickened lithosphere over a zone of upwelling primitive mantle; 2) 3.6-4.0 Ga: continuity of magmatism recorded in detrital zircons does not favor growth by episodic subduction; Hf isotopes in zircon suggest extensive crustal recycling with some juvenile additions; 3) 3.6-3.2 Ga: a major crust-forming interval with infusion of new crust derived from more depleted sources, including a hydrous, garnet-bearing source; 4) intervening granulite facies metamorphism of supracrustal rocks and orthogneisses, clockwise PTt path, coupled with ductile deformation (~ 750-800oC and 6-8 Kbar); 5) ~2.8-2-9 Ga: a second period of major magmatism resulted from subduction and a volcanic arc was built on the older 3.2-3.5 Ga crust. This geochemical record indicates that the earliest crust formed through diapiric upwelling and anhydrous melting of primitive mantle in a plume setting, followed by recycling of this crust with only limited juvenile additions in the Paleoarchean; in the

  13. Peruvian Trench to Andean Thrust Front: Evidence for Coupling of the Peruvian Flat Slab to the Over-Riding South American Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, B.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Scire, A. C.; Wagner, L. S.; Long, M. D.; Tavera, H.

    2014-12-01

    In central Peru the combination of an unusually shallow Wadati-Benioff zone and lack of arc volcanism are indicators of flat slab subduction and are associated with both the ongoing subduction of the Nazca Ridge and the prior subduction of the Inca Plateau. Data from the PULSE experiment has allowed us to better constrain the geometry of the southern half of the Peruvian flat slab through analysis of teleseismic receiver functions, Pn and Sn phases from regional intermediate (>100 km depth) and deep (>500 km depth) earthquakes at the margins of the flat slab region, and teleseismic tomgraphy. We observe a low velocity anomaly below the subducted portion of the Nazca Ridge in the teleseismic S-wave tomography. Utilizing both Pn and Sn phases from regional intermediate and deep earthquakes at the margins of the flat slab, we have found significant travel time delays for propagation paths passing through this anomaly, confirming the presence of this low velocity anomaly under the flat slab. This anomaly likely contributes to the buoyancy of this segment of the flat slab, increasing the coupling with the upper plate. Both the teleseismic tomographic and our receiver function results indicate that the southern segment of the Peruvian flat slab extends locally more than 100 km further inboard than previous estimates. As the shallow portion of the slab inboard of the subducting Nazca Ridge is largely aseismic, these new results help to better constrain the geometry of the Peruvian flat slab as it re-subducts back into the mantle. Between 10°S and 16°S the subducted oceanic crust along the inboard projection of the Nazca Ridge lies at a depth of 60 km to 70 km while subducted crust immediately north and south of the ridge projection lies at depths of 80 km to 90 km suggesting the slab is sinking north and south of the ridge. The unusually shallow depth of the slab along the ridge's projection may indicate that the subducted Nazca Plate is coupled to the South American

  14. Deep crust and mantle structure linked to subduction of the Pacific plate at a continental margin from an active seismic source study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, T. A.; Okaya, D. A.; Henrys, S. A.; Savage, M. K.; Sato, H.; Iwasaki, T.

    2013-12-01

    We present new results that bear on mantle structure in a subduction zone of both the down going and over-riding plates. Wellington region, New Zealand, sits on the Australian plate a mere ~ 15-25 km above the subducted Pacific plate. This is rare: most active continental margins have at least 30-50 km of free board above subduction zones (cf, Pacific NW, Honshu). Such a shallow setting offers unusually good conditions for making terrestrial observations of the subduction process. In 2010-11 an active source seismic experiment (SAHKE) was carried out across the Wellington region. Both active and passive seismic methods were used to establish a model of the crustal structure and upper mantle structure beneath SAHKE (Henrys et al , 2013). We recorded 12 x 500 kg dynamite shots on ~ 1000 recorders place at 100 m spacing from coast to coast. These data contain excellent returns from the subduction zone at two-way travel times of 7-15 s, but we also recorded coherent reflection energy down to 30 s two-way-travel-time on vertical recorders and 47 s on horizontal recorders. We performed a low-fold stack of these deep reflections and see two zones. The deepest reflections define a westward 17 degree-dipping zone at ~ 100 km deep that is possibly the base of the subducted Pacific plate. The westward dip on this 100 km deep reflector matches that for the top of the plate. Moreover, the total plate thickness implied is ~ 80 km, which matches that predicted for 100 my old oceanic lithosphere. The other deep reflection zone dips eastward across the shot gathers and is typically seen at two-way travel times of 18-25 s on the vertical phones. We also see the same event as a Vs arrival on horizontal phones at two-way travel times of 34-47s. When migrated these reflections define an east dipping reflector that is within the mantle of the overriding Australian plate, and the surface projection of the reflector is ~ 80 km west of SAHKE line. This finding raises the question of what

  15. Is Present Day Continental Deformation Nearly Plate-Like? If so, Why?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thatcher, W.

    2001-12-01

    Some indicators of deformation (seismicity, late Cenozoic faulting, regional topographic relief) suggest broad deformation zones. However, space geodetic mappings of current movements and Holocene fault distributions often show straining focussed in very narrow zones. Conventional wisdom has it that continental deformation is spread over broad regions while straining of oceanic lithosphere occurs in narrow zones. Here I present evidence, largely from recent GPS surveys, suggesting present day continental deformation is actually occurring in a largely plate-like manner through the relative motions of a small number of micro-plates within each deforming zone, sometimes perturbed by isolated zones of deformation driven by local lithospheric density gradients. How can this be so? I speculate that this behavior is caused by the inherent lateral heterogeneity of continental lithosphere and by frictional and ductile weakening and strengthening mechanisms that promote focussed deformation that migrates with time. Qualitative indications of active deformation can sometimes be misleading. In many active regions erosion and tectonism are in balance and very low rates of slip on inclined faults can generate significant steady-state topography. However, in currently inactive regions, erosion rates are very low, much less than rates of vertical movement in even moderately active deforming zones. Therefore landscape relief provides evidence for current activity but preserves it over long periods, millions to tens of millions of years (Ma) (e.g. Alps, Rocky Mountains). Secondly, background seismicity is a qualitative measure of tectonic activity and only the largest earthquakes contribute significantly to representative long term deformation rates, so the spatial distribution of all smaller events can be misleading. Finally, many mappings of `active' faults encompass features up to several Ma old that are not necessarily representative of current activity. In contrast, late

  16. Changes in plate motion and vertical movements along passive continental margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Japsen, P.; Cobbold, P. R.; Chalmers, J. A.; Green, P. F.; Bonow, J. M.

    2012-04-01

    The origin of the forces that produce elevated, passive continental margins (EPCMs) has been a hot topic in geoscience for many years. Studies of individual margins have led to models, which explain high elevations by invoking specific conditions for each margin in question. We have studied the uplift history of several margins and have found some striking coincidences between episodes of uplift and changes in plate motion. In the Campanian, Eocene and Miocene, pronounced events of uplift and erosion affected not only SE Brazil (Cobbold et al., 2001), but also NE Brazil and SW Africa (Japsen et al., 2012a). The uplift phases in Brazil also coincided with three main phases of Andean orogeny (Cobbold et al., 2001, 2007). These phases, Peruvian (90-75 Ma), Incaic (50-40 Ma), and Quechuan (25-0 Ma), were also periods of relatively rapid convergence at the Andean margin of South America (Pardo-Casas and Molnar, 1987). Because Campanian uplift in Brazil coincides, not only with rapid convergence at the Andean margin of South America, but also with a decline in Atlantic spreading rate, we suggest that all these uplift events have a common cause, which is lateral resistance to plate motion (Japsen et al., 2012a). Because the uplift phases in South America and Africa are common to the margins of two diverging plates, we also suggest that the driving forces can transmit across the spreading axis, probably at great depth, e.g. in the asthenosphere (Japsen et al., 2012a). Similarly, a phase of uplift and erosion at the Eocene-Oligocene transition (c. 35 Ma), which affected margins around the North Atlantic, correlates with a major plate reorganization there (Japsen et al., 2012b). Passive continental margins clearly formed as a result of extension. Despite this, the World Stress Map shows that, where data exist, all EPCMs are today under compression. We maintain that folds, reverse faults, reactivated normal faults and strike-slip faults that are typical of EPCMs are a result

  17. Continental lithosphere of the Arabian Plate: A geologic, petrologic, and geophysical synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Robert J.; Johnson, Peter

    2010-07-01

    The Arabian Plate originated ˜ 25 Ma ago by rifting of NE Africa to form the Gulf of Aden and Red Sea. It is one of the smaller and younger of the Earth's lithospheric plates. The upper part of its crust consists of crystalline Precambrian basement, Phanerozoic sedimentary cover as much as 10 km thick, and Cenozoic flood basalt (harrat). The distribution of these rocks and variations in elevation across the Plate cause a pronounced geologic and topographic asymmetry, with extensive basement exposures (the Arabian Shield) and elevations of as much as 3000 m in the west, and a Phanerozoic succession (Arabian Platform) that thickens, and a surface that descends to sea level, eastward between the Shield and the northeastern margin of the Plate. This tilt in the Plate is partly the result of marginal uplift during rifting in the south and west, and loading during collision with, and subduction beneath, the Eurasian Plate in the northeast. But a variety of evidence suggests that the asymmetry also reflects a fundamental crustal and mantle heterogeneity in the Plate that dates from Neoproterozoic time when the crust formed. The bulk of the Plate's upper crystalline crust is Neoproterozoic in age (1000-540 Ma) reflecting, in the west, a 300-million year process of continental crustal growth between ˜ 850 and 550 Ma represented by amalgamated juvenile magmatic arcs, post-amalgamation sedimentary and volcanic basins, and granitoid intrusions that make up as much as 50% of the Shield's surface. Locally, Archean and Paleoproterozoic rocks are structurally intercalated with the juvenile Neoproterozoic rocks in the southern and eastern parts of the Shield. The geologic dataset for the age, composition, and origin of the upper crust of the Plate in the east is smaller than the database for the Shield, and conclusions made about the crust in the east are correspondingly less definitive. In the absence of exposures, furthermore, nothing is known by direct observation about the

  18. The Break-up and Drifting of the Continental Plates in 2D Models of Convecting Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Zilio, L.; Faccenda, M.; Capitanio, F. A.

    2014-12-01

    Since the early theory of Wegener, the break-up and drift of continents have been controversial and hotly debated topics. To assist the interpretation of the break-up and drift mechanisms and its relation with mantle circulation patterns, we carried out a 2D numerical modelling of the dynamics of these processes. Different regimes of upper plate deformation are studied as consequence of stress coupling with convection patterns. Subduction of the oceanic plate and induced mantle flow propagate basal tractions to the upper plate. This mantle drag forces (FMD) can be subdivided in two types: (1) active mantle drag occurring when the flow drives plate motion (FAD), and (2) passive mantle drag (FPD), when the asthenosphere resists plate motion. The active traction generated by the convective cell is counterbalanced by passive mantle viscous drag away from it and therefore tension is generated within the continental plate. The shear stress profiles indicate that break-up conditions are met where the gradient of the basal shear stress is maximised, however the break-up location varies largely depending on the convection style primarily controlled by slab stagnation on the transition zone, avalanching through or subduction in the lower mantle. We found good correspondence between our models and the evolution of convergent margins on Earth, giving precious insights into the break-up and drifting mechanisms of some continental plates, such as the North and South American plates, Calabria and the Japan Arc.

  19. Continental Collision and the STEP-wise Evolution of Convergent Plate Boundaries: The Mediterranean Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wortel, M. J.; Govers, R.; Spakman, W.

    2008-12-01

    This contribution focusses on terminal stage subduction, often triggered by continent-continent or arc- continent collision. The landlocked basin setting of the Mediterranean region provides unique opportunities to study terminal stage subduction and its consequences. We use seismic tomography results on lithosphere and upper mantle structure as a source of information on plate boundary structure, and concentrate on the lithospheric scale aspects. Combining this structural information with process-oriented numerical modelling studies and regional observations, we present a 3D model for convergent plate boundary evolution after collision, in which slab detachment and the formation of tear or STEP (Subduction-Transform-Edge-Propagator; see R. Govers and M.J.R. Wortel, EPSL, 236, 505- 523, 2005) faults are key elements. A STEP fault laterally decouples subducting lithosphere from non- subducting lithosphere in a scissor type of fashion. It enhances the ability of a slab to retreat through the mantle flow around the edge of the subducted slab. In this way collision and back-arc extension may occur in close proximity. In our study area this specifically pertains to collision along the north African margin, STEP formation in easterly direction, CCW rotation of the southern Apennines slab and the opening of the Tyrrhenian Sea. Vertical tearing of subducted lithosphere may play an important role as well, but is probably not crucial. Similar processes are likely to have occurred in the eastern Mediterranean. On the basis of the good agreement between the Mediterranean-based model and the evolution of the Tonga-Fiji region we expect that the model may shed light on other complex convergent plate boundary regions, as well. In summary: Upon continental (or arc-continent) collision, along-trench variations in lithospheric properties of the subducting lithosphere may lead to disruption and segmentation of the subduction system. Following slab detachment along limited segments of

  20. Uplift along passive continental margins, changes in plate motion and mantle convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Japsen, Peter; Green, Paul F.; Chalmers, James A.; Bonow, Johan M.

    2014-05-01

    The origin of the forces that produce elevated, passive continental margins (EPCMs) is a hot topic in geoscience. It is, however, a new aspect in the debate that episodes of uplift coincide with changes in plate motion. This has been revealed, primarily, by studies of the burial, uplift and exhumation history of EPCMs based on integration on stratigraphic landscape analysis, low-temperature thermochronology and evidence from the geological record (Green et al., 2013). In the Campanian, Eocene and Miocene, uplift and erosion affected the margins of Brazil and Africa (Japsen et al., 2012b). The uplift phases in Brazil coincided with main phases of Andean orogeny which were periods of relatively rapid convergence at the Andean margin of South America (Cobbold et al., 2001). Because Campanian uplift in Brazil coincides, not only with rapid convergence at the Andean margin of South America, but also with a decline in Atlantic spreading rate, Japsen et al. (2012b) suggested that all these uplift events have a common cause, which is lateral resistance to plate motion. Because the uplift phases are common to margins of diverging plates, it was also suggested that the driving forces can transmit across the spreading axis; probably at great depth, e.g. in the asthenosphere. Late Eocene, Late Miocene and Pliocene uplift and erosion shaped the elevated margin of southern East Greenland (Bonow et al., in review; Japsen et al., in review). These regional uplift phases are synchronous with phases in West Greenland, overlap in time with similar events in North America and Europe and also correlate with changes in plate motion. The much higher elevation of East Greenland compared to West Greenland suggests dynamic support in the east from the Iceland plume. Japsen et al. (2012a) pointed out that EPCMs are typically located above thick crust/lithosphere that is closely juxtaposed to thinner crust/lithosphere. The presence of mountains along the Atlantic margin of Brazil and in East

  1. Lithosphere continental rifting and necking in 3D analogue experiments: role of plate divergence rate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestola, Y.; Storti, F.; Cavozzi, C.

    2014-12-01

    The evolution of lithosphere necking is a fundamental parameter controlling the structural architecture and thermal state of rifted margins. Despite a large number of analogue and numerical modelling studies on lithosphere extension are available in the literature, a quantitative experimental description of lithosphere necking evolution is still lacking. Extensional strain rate and thermal layering of the lithosphere exert a fundamental control on necking shape and evolution. We focused our experimental work on the former parameter and simulated the progression of lithosphere thinning and necking during asymmetric orthogonal rifting at different plate divergence rates. Our models involve a 4-layer mechanical continental lithosphere, which rests on a glucose syrup asthenosphere. Both the topography and the base of the lithosphere were monitored by time-lapse laser scanning. This technical approach allowed us to quantify the evolution in space and time of the thinning factors for the crust, mantle, and lithosphere as a whole. Laser-scanning monitoring provided also a detailed picture of the evolving neck shape, which shows a strong dependency on the strain-rate. At low strain-rates, necking is "boxed" with steep flanks and a flat-lying roof, and few deep basins develop at surface. At high strain-rates, more distributed thinning occurs and isolates portions of less deformed mantle. More distributed deformation affects the model topography. Despite large differences in shape, the aspect ratio (amplitude/wavelength) of the cross-sectional neck shapes converges towards very similar values at the end of the experiments.The significant differences and evolutionary pathways produced by the plate divergence rate on the lithosphere necking profile, suggest that this parameter exert a fundamental control on localization vs. distribution of deformation in the crust as in the whole mechanical lithosphere. Furthermore, it can exert a fundamental control on the time and space

  2. Development of the New Zealand and San Andreas Continental Transforms: From Plate Kinematics to Lithospheric Geodynamics (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlong, K. P.

    2009-12-01

    Although oftentimes compared as being two similar continental transforms, the development of the San Andreas and Alpine Fault plate boundary systems reflect two distinctly different geodynamic paths to formation, localization, and evolution. Characteristics that lead to fundamental differences in their present-day tectonic behavior. The San Andreas system has formed in response to the migration of two triple junctions, and it lengthens over time at these transitions from subduction to translation. The San Andreas system forms within the region of thin lithosphere left in the wake of slab removal or subduction cessation, and therefore thermal processes dominate in the development of a localized plate boundary. There are associated short-lived deformational events including significant crustal thickening and subsequent crustal thinning that serve to substantially modify the overlying North American crust during this 3-5 million year transition time. In contrast the development of the Alpine Fault plate boundary system through New Zealand follows a different geodynamic path, and this transform boundary reflects an intermediate point in the overall transition of that Australia-Pacific plate boundary through New Zealand from an extensional to convergent boundary. Since approximately 25 Ma, with rapid changes in Australia-Pacific plate interactions, the plate boundary structure through continental New Zealand rapidly changed from extensional to translation/transpression. This transpression was accommodated by the initiation of two subduction regimes, whose positions were controlled by continent-ocean transitions linked by the translational/transpressional (proto) Alpine Fault system. This trench-transform-trench plate boundary system has migrated southward, maintaining essentially a constant length, but not constant localization, and along the way, ephemerally incorporating segments of the Australia and Pacific plates into the boundary - modifying, exhuming, and removing

  3. Plate motions at the transition from the Lomonosov Ridge to Eurasian Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artyushkov, Eugene; Chekhovich, Peter; Petrov, Eugene

    2016-04-01

    Distribution of the Cenozoic plate motions in the Amerasian Basin is a serious problem. Cenozoic opening of the Gakkel Ridge has resulted in the eastward drift of the Lomonosov Ridge and Podvodnikov Basin. According to a popular point of view these two structures are separated from the Eurasian continent by the Khatanga-Lomonosov Transform Fault. It is supposed that this fault with a right-lateral displacement of about 300 km begins at the southern end of the Gakkel Ridge, passes between the southern end of the Lomonosov Ridge and the Asian Shelf probably continuing further to the east into the Podvodnikov Basin. During the last decade the area was covered by a number of seismic profiles. In 2007 reference profile A-7 was shot (Kazanin, Ivanov, UNCLOS Symposium, St.-Petersburg, May 26, 27 2014). This longitudinal profile 832 km long includes both seismic reflection and deep seismic profiling. It follows the eastern slope of the Lomonosov Ridge in the north and crosses the Asian Continental Rise and shelf of the Laptev Sea terminating near the Novosibirsk Islands in the south. The quality of the data is very high because at that time the area was completely free of ice. Transform faults with large strike-slip displacement are crossing many sedimentary basins (Liemiszki, Brown, GSA Bull., 1988, v. 100, p. 665-676 and others). In such basins the structure of the sedimentary cover changes completely across the fault. Not only sedimentary beds become disrupted but the thicknesses of synchronous sedimentary units on the fault walls commonly appear to be quite different. This indicates that during their movement the units were far one from another. The Khatanga-Lomonosov Transform Fault, if it exists, should cross profile A-7 in its middle part. The profile includes some normal faults slightly disrupting the sedimentary sequences. However, on both fault walls the thickness of the main units of the sedimentary cover separated by regional unconformities remains the same

  4. Geodynamic models of terrane accretion: Testing the fate of island arcs, oceanic plateaus, and continental fragments in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetreault, J. L.; Buiter, S. J. H.

    2012-08-01

    Crustal growth at convergent margins can occur by the accretion of future allochthonous terranes (FATs), such as island arcs, oceanic plateaus, submarine ridges, and continental fragments. Using geodynamic numerical experiments, we demonstrate how crustal properties of FATs impact the amount of FAT crust that is accreted or subducted, the type of accretionary process, and the style of deformation on the overriding plate. Our results show that (1) accretion of crustal units occurs when there is a weak detachment layer within the FAT, (2) the depth of detachment controls the amount of crust accreted onto the overriding plate, and (3) lithospheric buoyancy does not prevent FAT subduction during constant convergence. Island arcs, oceanic plateaus, and continental fragments will completely subduct, despite having buoyant lithospheric densities, if they have rheologically strong crusts. Weak basal layers, representing pre-existing weaknesses or detachment layers, will either lead to underplating of faulted blocks of FAT crust to the overriding plate or collision and suturing of an unbroken FAT crust. Our experiments show that the weak, ultramafic layer found at the base of island arcs and oceanic plateaus plays a significant role in terrane accretion. The different types of accretionary processes also affect deformation and uplift patterns in the overriding plate, trench migration and jumping, and the dip of the plate interface. The resulting accreted terranes produced from our numerical experiments resemble observed accreted terranes, such as the Wrangellia Terrane and Klamath Mountain terranes in the North American Cordilleran Belt.

  5. Tectonic lineaments in the cenozoic volcanics of southern Guatemala: Evidence for a broad continental plate boundary zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baltuck, M.; Dixon, T. H.

    1984-01-01

    The northern Caribbean plate boundary has been undergoing left lateral strike slip motion since middle Tertiary time. The western part of the boundary occurs in a complex tectonic zone in the continental crust of Guatemala and southernmost Mexico, along the Chixoy-Polochic, Motogua and possibly Jocotan-Chamelecon faults. Prominent lineaments visible in radar imagery in the Neogene volcanic belt of southern Guatemala and western El Salvador were mapped and interpreted to suggest southwest extensions of this already broad plate boundary zone. Because these extensions can be traced beneath Quaternary volcanic cover, it is thought that this newly mapped fault zone is active and is accommodating some of the strain related to motion between the North American and Caribbean plates. Onshore exposures of the Motoqua-Polochic fault systems are characterized by abundant, tectonically emplaced ultramafic rocks. A similar mode of emplacement for these off shore ultramafics, is suggested.

  6. Dynamics of continental accretion.

    PubMed

    Moresi, L; Betts, P G; Miller, M S; Cayley, R A

    2014-04-10

    Subduction zones become congested when they try to consume buoyant, exotic crust. The accretionary mountain belts (orogens) that form at these convergent plate margins have been the principal sites of lateral continental growth through Earth's history. Modern examples of accretionary margins are the North American Cordilleras and southwest Pacific subduction zones. The geologic record contains abundant accretionary orogens, such as the Tasmanides, along the eastern margin of the supercontinent Gondwana, and the Altaïdes, which formed on the southern margin of Laurasia. In modern and ancient examples of long-lived accretionary orogens, the overriding plate is subjected to episodes of crustal extension and back-arc basin development, often related to subduction rollback and transient episodes of orogenesis and crustal shortening, coincident with accretion of exotic crust. Here we present three-dimensional dynamic models that show how accretionary margins evolve from the initial collision, through a period of plate margin instability, to re-establishment of a stable convergent margin. The models illustrate how significant curvature of the orogenic system develops, as well as the mechanism for tectonic escape of the back-arc region. The complexity of the morphology and the evolution of the system are caused by lateral rollback of a tightly arcuate trench migrating parallel to the plate boundary and orthogonally to the convergence direction. We find geological and geophysical evidence for this process in the Tasmanides of eastern Australia, and infer that this is a recurrent and global phenomenon. PMID:24670638

  7. Crustal structure of a transform plate boundary: San Francisco Bay and the central California continental margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holbrook, W.S.; Brocher, T.M.; ten Brink, U.S.; Hole, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    Wide-angle seismic data collected during the Bay Area Seismic Imaging Experiment provide new glimpses of the deep structure of the San Francisco Bay Area Block and across the offshore continental margin. San Francisco Bay is underlain by a veneer (<300 m) of sediments, beneath which P wave velocities increase rapidly from 5.2 km/s to 6.0 km/s at 7 km depth, consistent with rocks of the Franciscan subduction assemblage. The base of the Franciscan at-15-18 km depth is marked by a strong wide-angle reflector, beneath which lies an 8- to 10-km-thick lower crust with an average velocity of 6.75??0.15 km/s. The lower crust of the Bay Area Block may be oceanic in origin, but its structure and reflectivity indicate that it has been modified by shearing and/or magmatic intrusion. Wide-angle reflections define two layers within the lower crust, with velocities of 6.4-6.6 km/s and 6.9-7.3 km/s. Prominent subhorizontal reflectivity observed at near-vertical incidence resides principally in the lowermost layer, the top of which corresponds to the "6-s reflector" of Brocher et al. [1994]. Rheological modeling suggests that the lower crust beneath the 6-s reflector is the weakest part of the lithosphere; the horizontal shear zone suggested by Furlong et al. [1989] to link the San Andreas and Hayward/Calaveras fault systems may actually be a broad zone of shear deformation occupying the lowermost crust. A transect across the continental margin from the paleotrench to the Hayward fault shows a deep crustal structure that is more complex than previously realized. Strong lateral variability in seismic velocity and wide-angle reflectivity suggests that crustal composition changes across major transcurrent fault systems. Pacific oceanic crust extends 40-50 km landward of the paleotrench but, contrary to prior models, probably does not continue beneath the Salinian Block, a Cretaceous arc complex that lies west of the San Andreas fault in the Bay Area. The thickness (10 km) and high

  8. Crustal structure of a transform plate boundary: San Francisco Bay and the central California continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbrook, W. Steven; Brocher, Thomas M.; ten Brink, Uri S.; Hole, John A.

    1996-10-01

    Wide-angle seismic data collected during the Bay Area Seismic Imaging Experiment provide new glimpses of the deep structure of the San Francisco Bay Area Block and across the offshore continental margin. San Francisco Bay is underlain by a veneer (<300 m) of sediments, beneath which P wave velocities increase rapidly from 5.2 km/s to 6.0 km/s at 7 km depth, consistent with rocks of the Franciscan subduction assemblage. The base of the Franciscan at 15-18 km depth is marked by a strong wide-angle reflector, beneath which lies an 8- to 10-km-thick lower crust with an average velocity of 6.75 ± 0.15 km/s. The lower crust of the Bay Area Block may be oceanic in origin, but its structure and reflectivity indicate that it has been modified by shearing and/or magmatic intrusion. Wide-angle reflections define two layers within the lower crust, with velocities of 6.4-6.6 km/s and 6.9-7.3 km/s. Prominent subhorizontal reflectivity observed at near-vertical incidence resides principally in the lowermost layer, the top of which corresponds to the "6-s reflector" of Brocher et al. [1994]. Rheological modeling suggests that the lower crust beneath the 6-s reflector is the weakest part of the lithosphere; the horizontal shear zone suggested by Furlong et al. [1989] to link the San Andreas and Hayward/Calaveras fault systems may actually be a broad zone of shear deformation occupying the lowermost crust. A transect across the continental margin from the paleotrench to the Hayward fault shows a deep crustal structure that is more complex than previously realized. Strong lateral variability in seismic velocity and wide-angle reflectivity suggests that crustal composition changes across major transcurrent fault systems. Pacific oceanic crust extends 40-50 km landward of the paleotrench but, contrary to prior models, probably does not continue beneath the Salinian Block, a Cretaceous arc complex that lies west of the San Andreas fault in the Bay Area. The thickness (10 km) and high

  9. Deformation of plate boundaries associated with subduction of continental margins: insights from 3D thermo-mechanical laboratory experiments (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutelier, D. A.; Cruden, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    The general sequence of tectonic events leading to the formation of collisional mountain belts includes closure of an ocean basin through oceanic subduction, subduction of a continental margin and deformation of the lithosphere. Laboratory experiments reproducing this fundamental chain of events investigate the three-dimensional and thermo-mechanical mechanics of the associated processes. Experiments reveal that this basic scenario can be considerably modified at the beginning of continental subduction. The buoyancy of the subducted passive margin causes a strong horizontal compression in the plates, which can lead to the formation of new thrusts in the magmatic arc or back-arc spreading center if the collision was preceded by oceanic subduction in the tensile regime. Several complex scenarios can develop, depending on the polarity of the new thrusts. If the new thrust in the arc or back-arc has the same polarity as the main subduction zone, the entire area located between the trench and the new thrust can be subducted, leaving little evidence of its former existence in the geological record. This process also modifies the thermal and mechanical regime of the subducted lithosphere, resulting in lower temperatures in the subducted crust thereby allowing deeper subduction. If the polarity of the new thrust is opposite to that of the existing subduction zone, the two slabs collide at depth, with the new slab generally cutting through the pre-existing slab. The distribution of convergence across several thrusts necessarily leads to a reduction of the convergence rate on the pre-existing subduction thrust. This leads to a reduction of the viscous coupling supporting the subducted lithosphere, causing an increase in downdip tension in the slab, and a rapid decrease of the slab strength due to temperature increase, eventually leading to slab break-off. Finally, the deformation caused by the subduction of the buoyant continental crust is fundamentally three

  10. Processes of subduction and exhumation of continental blocks in collisional orogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirel, C.; Brun, J.; Burov, E. B.; Wortel, M. J.; Lebedev, S.

    2009-12-01

    Understanding the mechanism of accretion, subduction and exhumation of rocks during orogeny is a fundamental issue for plate tectonics. Numerous models have been proposed in order to explain the tectonic events that accompany continental subduction. Here, in order to examine the different processes in a simple, self-consistent manner, the fully coupled thermo-mechanical numerical code PARAFLAM is used to perform a parametric study on the subduction mode and, particularly, on the continental subduction processes. A wide range of parameters including slab-pull magnitude, temperature and viscosity distribution, initial geometry of the subduction zone and rheology, is explored to understand the dynamics of accretion, the different processes of exhumation, the deformation of the slab and the deformation of the overriding plate. The first results of this study show the evolution of one or two small continental blocks (terranes) reaching the subduction-zone continental margin. A set of experiments demonstrates that the progressive incorporation of a continental block into the over-riding plate is governed by the dynamics of subduction. Initially, the continental block is partly or entirely subducted, which increases its buoyancy and induces its detachment from the subducting slab. By the time the emplacement of the block into the continental margin is completed, exhumation is likely to have occurred, depending mainly on the slab pull magnitude and the rheology of the continental block itself. As an example, some experiments show the continuous subduction of a continental block followed by an UHP-HP exhumation and a metamorphic-core-complex type of exhumation. These cases can be compared with the pattern of deformation observed in the Aegean-Sea domain or in the Tyrrhenian one.

  11. Processes accompanying of mantle plume emplacement into continental lithosphere: Evidence from NW Arabian plate, Western Syria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkov, E. V.

    2015-12-01

    Lower crustal xenoliths occurred in the Middle Cretaceous lamprophyre diatremes in Jabel Ansaria (Western Syria) (Sharkov et al., 1992). They are represented mainly garnet granulites and eclogite-like rocks, which underwent by deformations and retrograde metamorphism, and younger fresh pegmatoid garnet-kaersutite-clinopyroxene (Al-Ti augite) rocks; mantle peridotites are absent in these populations. According to mineralogical geothermobarometers, forming of garnet-granulite suite rocks occurred under pressure 13.5-15.4 kbar (depths 45-54 kn) and temperature 965-1115oC. At the same time, among populations of mantle xenoliths in the Late Cenozoic platobasalts of the region, quite the contrary, lower crustal xenoliths are absent, however, predominated spinel lherzolites (fragments of upper cooled rim of a plume head), derived from the close depths (30-40 km: Sharkov, Bogatikov, 2015). From this follows that ancient continental crust was existed here even in the Middle Cretaceous, but in the Late Cenozoic was removed by extended mantle plume head; at that upper sialic crust was not involved in geomechanic processes, because Precambrian metamorphic rocks survived as a basement for Cambrian to Cenozoic sedimentary cover of Arabian platform. In other words, though cardinal rebuilding of deep-seated structure of the region occurred in the Late Cenozoic but it did not affect on the upper shell of the ancient lithosphere. Because composition of mantle xenolithis in basalts is practically similar worldwide, we suggest that deep-seated processes are analogous also. As emplacement of the mantle plume heads accompanied by powerful basaltic magmatism, very likely that range of lower (mafic) continental crust existence is very convenient for extension of plume heads and their adiabatic melting. If such level, because of whatever reasons, was not reached, melting was limited but appeared excess of volatile matters which led to forming of lamprophyre or even kimberlite.

  12. The fluid budget of a continental plate boundary fault: Quantification from the Alpine Fault, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzies, Catriona D.; Teagle, Damon A. H.; Niedermann, Samuel; Cox, Simon C.; Craw, Dave; Zimmer, Martin; Cooper, Matthew J.; Erzinger, Jörg

    2016-07-01

    Fluids play a key role in modifying the chemical and physical properties of fault zones, which may prime them for repeated rupture by the generation of high pore fluid pressures and precipitation of commonly weak, secondary minerals. Fluid flow paths, sources and fluxes, and the permeability evolution of fault zones throughout their seismic cycles remain poorly constrained, despite their importance to understanding fault zone behaviour. Here we use geochemical tracers of fluid-rock exchange to determine budgets for meteoric, metamorphic and mantle fluids on a major compressional tectonic plate boundary. The Alpine Fault marks the transpressional Pacific-Australian plate boundary through South Island, New Zealand and appears to fail in regular (329 ± 68 yrs) large earthquakes (Mw ∼ 8) with the most recent event in 1717 AD. Significant convergent motion has formed the Southern Alps and elevated geothermal gradients in the hangingwall, which drive crustal fluid flow. Along the Alpine Fault the Alpine Schist of the Pacific Plate is thrust over radiogenic metasedimentary rocks on the Australian plate. The absence of highly radiogenic (87Sr/86Sr > 0.7200) strontium isotope ratios of hangingwall hot springs and hydrothermal minerals formed at a range of depths in the Alpine Fault damage zone indicates that the fluid flow is restricted to the hangingwall by a cross-fault fluid flow barrier throughout the seismogenic crust. Helium isotope ratios measured in hot springs near to the Alpine Fault (0.15-0.81 RA) indicate the fault is a crustal-scale feature that acts as a conduit for fluids from the mantle. Rock-exchanged oxygen, but meteoric water-like hydrogen isotope signatures of hydrothermal veins indicate that partially rock-exchanged meteoric fluids dominate down to the top of the brittle to ductile transition zone at ∼6 km. Geochemical tracer transport modelling suggests only ∼0.02 to 0.05% of total rainfall west of the Main Divide penetrates to depth, yet this

  13. Dynamic models of interseismic deformation and stress transfer from plate motion to continental transform faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Christopher S.; Fialko, Yuri

    2012-05-01

    We present numerical models of earthquake cycles on a strike-slip fault that incorporate laboratory-derived power law rheologies with Arrhenius temperature dependence, viscous dissipation, conductive heat transfer, and far-field loading due to relative plate motion. We use these models to explore the evolution of stress, strain, and thermal regime on "geologic" timescales (˜106-107 years), as well as on timescales of the order of the earthquake recurrence (˜102 years). Strain localization in the viscoelastic medium results from thermomechanical coupling and power law dependence of strain rate on stress. For conditions corresponding to the San Andreas fault (SAF), the predicted width of the shear zone in the lower crust is ˜3-5 km; this shear zone accommodates more than 50% of the far-field plate motion. Coupled thermomechanical models predict a single-layer lithosphere in case of "dry" composition of the lower crust and upper mantle, and a "jelly sandwich" lithosphere in case of "wet" composition. Deviatoric stress in the lithosphere in our models is relatively insensitive to the water content, the far-field loading rate, and the fault strength and is of the order of 102 MPa. Thermomechanical coupling gives rise to an inverse correlation between the fault slip rate and the ductile strength of the lithosphere. We show that our models are broadly consistent with geodetic and heat flow constrains from the SAF in Northern California. Models suggest that the regionally elevated heat flow around the SAF may be at least in part due to viscous dissipation in the ductile part of the lithosphere.

  14. Abbot Ice Shelf, structure of the Amundsen Sea continental margin and the southern boundary of the Bellingshausen Plate seaward of West Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Cochran, James R; Tinto, Kirsty J; Bell, Robin E

    2015-01-01

    Inversion of NASA Operation IceBridge airborne gravity over the Abbot Ice Shelf in West Antarctica for subice bathymetry defines an extensional terrain made up of east-west trending rift basins formed during the early stages of Antarctica/Zealandia rifting. Extension is minor, as rifting jumped north of Thurston Island early in the rifting process. The Amundsen Sea Embayment continental shelf west of the rifted terrain is underlain by a deeper, more extensive sedimentary basin also formed during rifting between Antarctica and Zealandia. A well-defined boundary zone separates the mildly extended Abbot extensional terrain from the deeper Amundsen Embayment shelf basin. The shelf basin has an extension factor, β, of 1.5–1.7 with 80–100 km of extension occurring across an area now 250 km wide. Following this extension, rifting centered north of the present shelf edge and proceeded to continental rupture. Since then, the Amundsen Embayment continental shelf appears to have been tectonically quiescent and shaped by subsidence, sedimentation, and the advance and retreat of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. The Bellingshausen Plate was located seaward of the Amundsen Sea margin prior to incorporation into the Antarctic Plate at about 62 Ma. During the latter part of its independent existence, Bellingshausen plate motion had a clockwise rotational component relative to Antarctica producing convergence across the north-south trending Bellingshausen Gravity Anomaly structure at 94°W and compressive deformation on the continental slope between 94°W and 102°W. Farther west, the relative motion was extensional along an east-west trending zone occupied by the Marie Byrd Seamounts. Key Points: Abbot Ice Shelf is underlain by E-W rift basins created at ∼90 Ma Amundsen shelf shaped by subsidence, sedimentation, and passage of the ice sheet Bellingshausen plate boundary is located near the base of continental slope and rise PMID:26709352

  15. Craton stability and continental lithosphere dynamics during plume-plate interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Van Hunen, J.; Pearson, D.

    2013-12-01

    Survival of thick cratonic roots in a vigorously convecting mantle system for billions of years has long been studied by the geodynamical community. A high cratonic root strength is generally considered to be the most important factor. We first perform and discuss new numerical models to investigate craton stability in both Newtonian and non-Newtonian rheology in the stagnant lid regime. The results show that only a modest compositional rheological factor of Δη=10 with non-Newtonian rheology is required for the survival of cratonic roots in a stagnant lid regime. A larger rheological factor (100 or more) is needed to maintain similar craton longevity in a Newtonian rheology environment. Furthermore, chemical buoyancy plays an important role on craton stability and its evolution, but could only work with suitable compositional rheology. During their long lifespan, cratons experienced a suite of dynamic, tectonothermal events, such as nearby subduction and mantle plume activity. Cratonic nuclei are embedded in shorter-lived, more vulnerable continental areas of different thickness, composition and rheology, which would influence the lithosphere dynamic when tectonothermal events happen nearby. South Africa provides a very good example to investigate such dynamic processes as it hosts several cratons and there are many episodic thermal events since the Mesozoic as indicated by a spectrum of magmatic activity. We numerically investigate such an integrated system using the topographic evolution of cratons and surrounding lithosphere as a diagnostic observable. The post-70Ma thinning of pericratonic lithosphere by ~50km around Kaapvaal craton (Mather et al., 2011) is also investigated through our numerical models. The results show that the pericratonic lithosphere cools and grows faster than cratons do, but is also more likely to be effected by episodic thermal events. This leads to surface topography change that is significantly larger around the craton than within

  16. Rapid plate motion variations and continental uplift: a window on the history of asthenospheric flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colli, Lorenzo; Stotz, Ingo; Bunge, Hans-Peter; Smethurst, Mark; Clark, Stuart; Iaffaldano, Giampiero; Tassara, Andres; Guillocheau, Francois

    2015-04-01

    Since the rifting of Gondwana ˜ 150 Myrs ago the South Atlantic Ocean experienced two phases of fast spreading in Late Cretaceous and Oligocene-Miocene, separated by a period of slow spreading around the K-T boundary and concluded by the recent slowdown since the Messinian. At the same time, it is becoming clear that the topographic evolution of Africa is characterized by two main periods of widespread uplift. These periods of uplift are co-eval with the two phases of fast spreading. The present-day situation presents an oceanic basin characterized by a strong topographic gradient with Africa being elevated and South America being depressed by non-isostatic forcing. These observations ' in particular the fast time-scale of plate motion variations ' are difficult to explain via shallow tectonic forces acting in the lithosphere. However, they are completely consistent with the fluid dynamics of a thin and low-viscosity asthenosphere. In particular, they can be easily understood as the result of unsteady pressure-driven flow in such a low-viscosity sublithospheric layer. Moreover, the idea of a thin asthenosphere of low viscosity is corroborated by a number of observations and inferences, ranging from seismic tomography to glacial isostatic adjustment to mineral physics.

  17. Formation of Australian continental margin highlands driven by plate-mantle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, R. Dietmar; Flament, Nicolas; Matthews, Kara J.; Williams, Simon E.; Gurnis, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Passive margin highlands occur on most continents on Earth and play a critical role in the cycle of weathering, erosion, and atmospheric circulation. Yet, in contrast to the well-developed understanding of collisional mountain belts, such as the Alps and Himalayas, the origin of less elevated (1-2 km) passive margin highlands is still unknown. The eastern Australian highlands are a prime example of these plateaus, but compared to others they have a well-documented episodic uplift history spanning 120 million years. We use a series of mantle convection models to show that the time-dependent interaction of plate motion with mantle downwellings and upwellings accounts for the broad pattern of margin uplift phases. Initial dynamic uplift of 400-600 m from 120-80 Ma was driven by the eastward motion of eastern Australia's margin away from the sinking eastern Gondwana slab, followed by tectonic quiescence to about 60 Ma in the south (Snowy Mountains). Renewed uplift of ∼700 m in the Snowy Mountains is propelled by the gradual motion of the margin over the edge of the large Pacific mantle upwelling. In contrast the northernmost portion of the highlands records continuous uplift from 120 Ma to present-day totalling about 800 m. The northern highlands experienced a continuous history of dynamic uplift, first due to the end of subduction to the east of Australia, then due to moving over a large passive mantle upwelling. In contrast, the southern highlands started interacting with the edge of the large Pacific mantle upwelling ∼ 40- 50 million years later, resulting in a two-phase uplift history. Our results are in agreement with published uplift models derived from river profiles and the Cretaceous sediment influx into the Ceduna sub-basin offshore southeast Australia, reflecting the fundamental link between dynamic uplift, fluvial erosion and depositional pulses in basins distal to passive margin highlands.

  18. Cenozoic analogues support a plate tectonic origin for the Earth’s earliest continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastie, A. R.; Kerr, A. C.; Mitchell, S. F.; McDonald, I.; Pearce, J. A.; Millar, I. L.; Wolstencroft, M.

    2009-12-01

    crust. The Newcastle magmas ascended and erupted without coming into contact with a mantle wedge thus forming the low MgO, Ni and Cr contents. Most Cenozoic adakites have compositions similar to the middle-late Archaean TTG suite of igneous rocks. In contrast, early (>3.5 Ga) Archaean TTG crustal rocks have lower Sr, MgO, Ni and Cr concentrations and prior to this study had no modern adakite analogue. However, the Newcastle adakites have similar compositions to the, early Archaean TTG. The discovery of these rocks has important implications for our understanding of the formation of the Earth’s earliest continental crust and so it is proposed that the Newcastle lavas be classified as a unique sub-group of adakites: Jamaican-type adakite.

  19. What do Great Subduction Earthquakes tell us About Continental Deformation of the Upper Plate in the Central Andes Forearc? Insights From Seismotectonics, Continental Deformation and Coulomb Modelisation Along Southern Peru Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audin, L.; Perfettini, H.; Tavera, H.

    2007-05-01

    Subduction of the Nazca plate beneath the Peruvian margin has produced numerous megathrust earthquakes during the last century and still constitutes mature seismic gaps in some places such as in between Ilo (Peru) and Arica (Chile). The rupture zones of the 1604, 1784 and 1868 southern Peru events were partially reactivated by the Arequipa 2001 (Mw = 8.5) seismic event, whose rupture zone was about 350km-long and stopped its propagation towards the south on Ilo Peninsula. Just after the occurrence of 2001 event, some reactivation of continental fault systems are identified and monitored thanks to the Peruvian seismic network and describe continental deformation processes occurring perpendicularly to the trench or parallel to the trench, traducing the continental plate response to major subduction earthquakes and some partitioning of the deformation. The Chololo and associated ( perpendicular to the trench) fault systems define some 80-km-long margin crustal blocks and the major one coincides with the 2001 earthquake southern limit of the rupture zone as it propagated to the south. These blocks are made from Late Jurassic and Cretaceous plutonic rocks from the Coastal Batholith; these are outcropping in some places and are evidenced by the aeromagnetic mapping elsewhere around the area. Northward along the subduction zone, another boundary between two rupture zones of major subduction earthquake was reactivated recently, perpendicularly to the trench, by the seismic crisis of October 2006, M=6.4, near Lima, right at the southern end of the rupture zone of the 1974 event (Mw=8.1).Those boundaries corresponding to discontinuities (lithospheric fault systems) in the upper plate, trending nearly perpendicular to the trench, act as earthquake barriers during rupture of large seismic events. Additionally occurred on 20 of November 2006 another seismic event (Mw=5.6 Neic, Ml=5.3) in Tacna region, showing a reverse focal mechanism compatible with the trend of the Sama

  20. Abbot Ice Shelf, structure of the Amundsen Sea continental margin and the southern boundary of the Bellingshausen Plate seaward of West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, James R.; Tinto, Kirsty J.; Bell, Robin E.

    2015-05-01

    Inversion of NASA Operation IceBridge airborne gravity over the Abbot Ice Shelf in West Antarctica for subice bathymetry defines an extensional terrain made up of east-west trending rift basins formed during the early stages of Antarctica/Zealandia rifting. Extension is minor, as rifting jumped north of Thurston Island early in the rifting process. The Amundsen Sea Embayment continental shelf west of the rifted terrain is underlain by a deeper, more extensive sedimentary basin also formed during rifting between Antarctica and Zealandia. A well-defined boundary zone separates the mildly extended Abbot extensional terrain from the deeper Amundsen Embayment shelf basin. The shelf basin has an extension factor, β, of 1.5-1.7 with 80-100 km of extension occurring across an area now 250 km wide. Following this extension, rifting centered north of the present shelf edge and proceeded to continental rupture. Since then, the Amundsen Embayment continental shelf appears to have been tectonically quiescent and shaped by subsidence, sedimentation, and the advance and retreat of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. The Bellingshausen Plate was located seaward of the Amundsen Sea margin prior to incorporation into the Antarctic Plate at about 62 Ma. During the latter part of its independent existence, Bellingshausen plate motion had a clockwise rotational component relative to Antarctica producing convergence across the north-south trending Bellingshausen Gravity Anomaly structure at 94°W and compressive deformation on the continental slope between 94°W and 102°W. Farther west, the relative motion was extensional along an east-west trending zone occupied by the Marie Byrd Seamounts. The copyright line for this article was changed on 5 JUN 2015 after original online publication.

  1. Continental Subduction and Subduction Initiation Leading to Extensional Exhumation of Ultra-High Pressure Rocks During Ongoing Plate Convergence in Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, W. R.; Petersen, K. D.

    2014-12-01

    Subduction of continental rocks is necessary to produce ultra-high pressure (UHP) rocks but the mechanism bringing them to the surface is disputed. A major question is whether this involves fairly small diapirs of crust that move up through the mantle or it involves an entire subducted plate that undergoes coherent 'reverse subduction' (sometimes called 'eduction'). Both mechanisms have been invoked to explain the only known region of on-going exhumation of UHP rocks, on the D'Entrecasteaux Islands of Papua New Guinea. Ductile flow fabrics in the island rocks have been used to argue for a diapiric model while constraints on the plate kinematics of the region require relatively large (>100 km) amounts of recent (>6 Myr) extension, supporting eduction as a primary mechanism. A self-consistent thermo-mechanical model of continental subduction shows that eduction can be accompanied by some ductile flow within the crust. Also we show, that subduction and stacking of continental crust can cause a subduction zone to lock up and lead to subduction initiation elsewhere. When this happens the region of earlier continental subduction can reverse direction causing exhumation of rocks from depth of ~100 km followed by localized extension and plate spreading. This can occur even if a region is in overall convergence. Applied to New Guinea our results are consistent with earlier suggestions that extension of the Woodlark Basin was caused by the initiation of the New Britain Trench, as indicated on the attached figure. We suggest that this subduction initiation event triggered eduction that led to exposure of the D'Entrcasteaux Islands and exhumation of the UHP rocks there. Our numerical results are broadly consistent with the recently refined seismic structure of the region around the islands. The model implies that the present-day basement of the ~70 km wide Goodenough Bay, south of the islands, was subducted then exhumed. This can be tested by drilling.

  2. 30 CFR 581.31 - Overriding royalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Overriding royalties. 581.31 Section 581.31 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF... interest of conservation, necessary to prevent premature abandonment of a producing mine, or to...

  3. 30 CFR 281.31 - Overriding royalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Overriding royalties. 281.31 Section 281.31 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... denial is determined to be in the interest of conservation, necessary to prevent premature abandonment...

  4. 30 CFR 581.31 - Overriding royalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Overriding royalties. 581.31 Section 581.31 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF... interest of conservation, necessary to prevent premature abandonment of a producing mine, or to...

  5. 30 CFR 581.31 - Overriding royalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Overriding royalties. 581.31 Section 581.31 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF... interest of conservation, necessary to prevent premature abandonment of a producing mine, or to...

  6. Ancient plate kinematics derived from the deformation pattern of continental crust: Paleo- and Neo-Tethys opening coeval with prolonged Gondwana-Laurussia convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroner, Uwe; Roscher, Marco; Romer, Rolf L.

    2016-06-01

    The formation and destruction of supercontinents requires prolonged convergent tectonics between particular plates, followed by intra-continental extension during subsequent breakup stages. A specific feature of the Late Paleozoic supercontinent Pangea is the prolonged and diachronous formation of the collisional belts of the Rheic suture zone coeval with recurrent continental breakup and subsequent formation of the mid-ocean ridge systems of the Paleo- and Neo-Tethys oceans at the Devonian and Permian margins of the Gondwana plate, respectively. To decide whether these processes are causally related or not, it is necessary to accurately reconstruct the plate motion of Gondwana relative to Laurussia. Here we propose that the strain pattern preserved in the continental crust can be used for the reconstruction of ancient plate kinematics. We present Euler pole locations for the three fundamental stages of the Late Paleozoic assembly of Pangea and closure of the Rheic Ocean: (I) Early Devonian (ca. 400 Ma) collisional tectonics affected Gondwana at the Armorican Spur north of western Africa and at the promontory of the South China block/Australia of eastern Gondwana, resulting in the Variscan and the Qinling orogenies, respectively. The Euler pole of the rotational axis between Gondwana and Laurussia is positioned east of Gondwana close to Australia. (II) Continued subduction of the western Rheic Ocean initiates the clockwise rotation of Gondwana that is responsible for the separation of the South China block from Gondwana and the opening of Paleo-Tethys during the Late Devonian. The position of the rotational axis north of Africa reveals a shift of the Euler pole to the west. (III) The terminal closure of the Rheic Ocean resulted in the final tectonics of the Alleghanides, the Mauritanides and the Ouachita-Sonora-Marathon belt, occurred after the cessation of the Variscan orogeny in Central Europe, and is coeval with the formation of the Central European Extensional

  7. Constraints of mapped and unfolded slabs on Oligocene to present-day Western Mediterranean plate reconstructions: potential role of north Iberia continental delamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yi-Te; Wu, Jonny; Wu, Yi-Min; Suppe, John; Sibuet, Jean-Claude; Chevrot, Sebastien

    2015-04-01

    Seismic tomographic images of subducted lithospheric remnants under the western Mediterranean have provided new constraints for Oligocene to present-day plate reconstructions. In this study, we mapped slabs under the western Mediterranean and Iberia from regional seismic tomography (Chevrot et al., 2014; Bezada et al., 2013) and from MITP08 global tomography (Li et al., 2008). A newly developed method was used to unfold (ie. structurally restore) the mapped slabs to a model spherical Earth surface, minimizing area and shape distortion. Slab constraints were input into plate tectonic reconstructions using Gplates software. Our mapping confirms the existence of western Mediterranean slabs including the Betic-Alboran, Algerian, and Calabrian slabs that were previously identified by Spakman and Wortel (2004). When unfolded these mapped slabs fit together in an Oligocene plate reconstruction, within tomographic resolution limits. Slab stretching was not required. Slab segmentation supports the existence of a North Balearic transform. Here we emphasize the potential importance for western Mediterranean tectonics of antoher slab under Iberia that we call the 'mid-Iberia slab'. This slab was first identified by Sibuet et al. (2004) and interpreted to be a Neotethyan suture. We have mapped this slab in detail from recent regional tomography (Chevrot et al., 2014). Our mapped slab is sub-vertical and strikes E-W under the southern margins of the Duero and Ebro basins. We newly interpret this slab to be delaminated northern Iberian continental lithosphere. We propose that continental delamination occurred during the Oligocene and produced uplifted Iberian Meseta topography, internally-drained basins, and high mean elevations that still persist today. We show how Oligocene northern Iberian continental delamination could have initiated subduction and rollback of the western Mediterranean

  8. Collision of continental corner from 3-D numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhong-Hai; Xu, Zhiqin; Gerya, Taras; Burg, Jean-Pierre

    2013-10-01

    Continental collision has been extensively investigated with 2-D numerical models assuming infinitely wide plates or insignificant along-strike deformation in the third dimension. However, the corners of natural collision zones normally have structural characteristics that differ from linear parts of mountain belt. We conducted 3-D high-resolution numerical simulations to study the dynamics of a continental corner (lateral continental/oceanic transition zone) during subduction/collision. The results demonstrate different modes between the oceanic subduction side (continuous subduction and retreating trench) and the continental collision side (slab break-off and topography uplift). Slab break-off occurs at a depth (⩽100 km to ˜300 km) that depends on the convergence velocity. The numerical models produce lateral extrusion of the overriding crust from the collisional side to the subduction side, which is also a phenomenon recognized around natural collision of continental corners, for instance around the western corner of the Arabia-Asia collision zone and around the eastern corner of the India-Asia collision zone. Modeling results also indicate that extrusion tectonics may be driven both from above by the topography and gravitational potentials and from below by the trench retreat and asthenospheric mantle return flow, which supports the link between deep mantle dynamics and shallower crustal deformation.

  9. Motion of continental slivers and creeping subduction in the northern Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocquet, J.-M.; Villegas-Lanza, J. C.; Chlieh, M.; Mothes, P. A.; Rolandone, F.; Jarrin, P.; Cisneros, D.; Alvarado, A.; Audin, L.; Bondoux, F.; Martin, X.; Font, Y.; Régnier, M.; Vallée, M.; Tran, T.; Beauval, C.; Maguiña Mendoza, J. M.; Martinez, W.; Tavera, H.; Yepes, H.

    2014-04-01

    Along the western margin of South America, plate convergence is accommodated by slip on the subduction interface and deformation of the overriding continent. In Chile, Bolivia, Ecuador and Colombia, continental deformation occurs mostly through the motion of discrete domains, hundreds to thousands of kilometres in scale. These continental slivers are wedged between the Nazca and stable South American plates. Here we use geodetic data to identify another large continental sliver in Peru that is about 300-400 km wide and 1,500 km long, which we call the Inca Sliver. We show that movement of the slivers parallel to the subduction trench is controlled by the obliquity of plate convergence and is linked to prominent features of the Andes Mountains. For example, the Altiplano is located at the boundary of converging slivers at the concave bend of the central Andes, and the extending Gulf of Guayaquil is located at the boundary of diverging slivers at the convex bend of the northern Andes. Motion of a few large continental slivers therefore controls the present-day deformation of nearly the entire Andes mountain range. We also show that a 1,000-km-long section of the plate interface in northern Peru and southern Ecuador slips predominantly aseismically, a behaviour that contrasts with the highly seismic neighbouring segments. The primary characteristics of this low-coupled segment are shared by ~20% of the subduction zones in the eastern Pacific Rim.

  10. Collapse of the northern Jalisco continental slope:Subduction erosion, forearc slivering, or subduction beneath the Tres Marias escarpment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandy, W. L.; Mortera-Gutierrez, C. A.; Ortiz-Zamora, G.; Ortega-Ramirez, J.; Galindo Dominguez, R. E.; Ponce-Núñez, F.; Pérez-Calderón, D.; Rufino-Contreras, I.; Valle-Hernández, S.; Pérez-González, E.

    2010-12-01

    The Jalisco subduction zone exhibits several interesting characteristics. Among these is that convergence between the Rivera and North American plate is highly oblique, especially north of 20N, the obliquity progressively increasing to the NW. By analogy to other better studied subduction zones, this distribution of forces should produce a NW-SE extension in the overriding plate, especially north of 20N. This has led to the proposal that the trench perpendicular Bahia de Banderas is an expression of this extension [Kostoglodov and Bandy, JGR, vol. 100, 1995]. To further investigate this proposal, multibeam bathymetric data and seafloor backscatter images, seismic reflection sub-bottom profiles and marine magnetic data were collected during the MORTIC08 campaign of the B.O. EL PUMA in March 2009. The bathymetric data provides for 100% coverage (20 to 200 meter spacing of the actual measured depth value depending on the water depth) of the continental slope and trench areas north of 20N. These data indicate that a marked change occurs in the morphology of the continental slope at 20N. To the north the slope consists of a broad, fairly flat plain lying between a steep lower inner trench slope to the west and a steep, concave seaward, escarpment to the east. In contrast, to the south the continental slope exhibits a more gradual deepening until the steep lower inner trench slope. A prominent submarine canyon deeply incises the continental slope between these two morphotectonic domains. This canyon appears to represent the boundary between two NW-SE diverging forearc blocks or slivers, consistent with the presence of oblique convergence. In contrast, the broad, fairly flat plain is better explained by subsidence induced by subduction erosion (i.e. erosion of the base of the overriding plate underneath the continental slope area). The shoaling of the trench axis northward towards the Puerto Vallarta Graben and subsequent deepening may be related to subduction of the

  11. Plate kinematics, slab shape and back-arc stress: A comparison between laboratory models and current subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuret, A.; Funiciello, F.; Faccenna, C.; Lallemand, S.

    2007-04-01

    A combination of statistical studies on present-day subduction zones and three-dimensional (3D) laboratory models is performed with the aim to clarify the way that plate kinematics control the geometry of the slab and the overriding plate deformation in subduction zones. In 3D laboratory models, the analogue of a two layer linearly viscous lithosphere-upper mantle system is achieved by means of silicon putty glucose syrup tank experiment. The subducting and overriding plate velocities are systematically changed by exploring the variability field of natural plate kinematics. Both statistical and modelling approaches recognize the importance of overriding plate motion on subduction process behavior: (1) trenches migrate at a rate close to the overriding plate motion, but always move slower than the overriding plates. The mechanism at work is a direct consequence of "slab anchoring" opposed by both lithosphere and mantle viscous resistance and is responsible for overriding plate deformation and slab geometry variability. (2) An overriding plate shortens when the overriding plate moves toward the trench and conditions that are favourable for overriding plate extension are created when the overriding plate moves away from the trench. (3) Shallow and steep dips are found if the overriding plate moves toward and away from the trench, respectively.

  12. Introducing tectonically and thermo-mechanically realistic lithosphere in the models of plume head -lithosphere interactions (PLI) including intra-continental plate boundaries.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillou-Frottier, L.; Burov, E.; Cloetingh, S.

    2007-12-01

    Plume-Lithosphere Interactions (PLI) in continets have complex topographic and magmatic signatures and are often identified near boundaries between younger plates (e.g., orogenic) and older stable plates (e.g., cratons), which represent important geometrical, thermal and rheological barriers that interact with the emplacement of the plume head (e.g., Archean West Africa, East Africa, Pannonian - Carpathian system). The observable PLI signatures are conditioned by plume dynamics but also by complex rheology and structure of continental lithosphere. We address this problem by considering a new free-surface thermo-mechanical numerical model of PLI with two stratified elasto-viscous-plastic (EVP) continental plates of contrasting age, thickness and structure. The results show that: (1) surface deformation is poly-harmonic and contains smaller wavelengths (50-500 km) than that associated with the plume head (>1000 km). (2) below intra-plate boundaries, plume head flattening is asymmetric, it is blocked from one side by the cold vertical boundary of the older plate, which leads to mechanical decoupling of crust from mantle lithosphere, and to localized faulting at the cratonic margin; (2) the return flow from the plume head results in sub-vertical down-thrusting (delamination) of the lithosphere at the margin, producing sharp vertical cold boundary down to the 400 km depth; (3) plume head flattening and migration towards the younger plate results in concurrent surface extension above the centre of the plume and in compression (pushing), down-thrusting and magmatic events at the cratonic margin (down-thrusting is also produced at the opposite border of the younger plate); these processes may result in continental growth at the "craton side"; (4) topographic signatures of PLI show basin-scale uplifts and subsidences preferentially located at cratonic margins. Negative Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in the lithosphere above the plume head provide a mechanism for crustal

  13. Focusing of relative plate motion at a continental transform fault: Cenozoic dextral displacement >700 km on New Zealand's Alpine Fault, reversing >225 km of Late Cretaceous sinistral motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Simon; Mortimer, Nick; Smith, Euan; Turner, Gillian

    2016-03-01

    The widely accepted ˜450 km Cenozoic dextral strike-slip displacement on New Zealand's Alpine Fault is large for continental strike-slip faults, but it is still less than 60% of the Cenozoic relative plate motion between the Australian and Pacific plates through Zealandia, with the remaining motion assumed to be taken up by rotation and displacement on other faults in a zone up to 300 km wide. We show here that the 450 km total displacement across the Alpine Fault is an artifact of assumptions about the geometry of New Zealand's basement terranes in the Eocene, and the actual Cenozoic dextral displacement across the active trace is greater than 665 km, with more than 700 km (and <785 km since 25 Ma) occurring in a narrow zone less than 10 km wide. This way, the Alpine Fault has accommodated almost all (>94%) of the relative plate motion in the last 25 Ma at an average rate in excess of 28 mm/yr. It reverses more than 225 km (and <300 km) of sinistral shear through Zealandia in the Late Cretaceous, when Zealandia lay on the margin of Gondwana, providing a direct constraint on the kinematics of extension between East and West Antarctica at this time.

  14. Petrology and age of volcanic-arc rocks from the continental margin of the Bering Sea: implications for Early Eocene relocation of plate boundaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, A.S.; Pickthorn, L.-B.G.; Vallier, T.L.; Marlow, M. S.

    1989-01-01

    Eocene volcanic flow and dike rocks from the Beringian margin have arc characteristics, implying a convergent history for this region during the early Tertiary. Chemical and mineralogical compositions are similar to those of modern Aleutian-arc lavas. They also resemble volcanic-arc compositions from western mainland Alaska, although greater chemical diversity and a stronger continental influence are observed in the Alaskan mainland rocks. Early Eocene ages of 54.4-50.2 Ma for the Beringian samples are well constrained by conventional K-Ar ages of nine plagioclase separates and by concordant 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating and total-fusion experiments. A concordant U-Pb zircon age of 53 Ma for the quartz-diorite dike is in good agreement with the K-Ar data. Plate motion studies of the North Pacific Ocean indicate more northerly directed subduction prior to the Tertiary and a continuous belt of arc-type volcanism extending from Siberia, along the Beringian margin, into mainland Alaska. Around 56 Ma (chron 25-24), subduction changed to a more westerly direction and subduction-related volcanism ceased for most of mainland Alaska. The increasingly oblique angle of convergence should have ended subduction along the Beringian margin as well. However, consistent ages of 54-50 Ma indicate a final pulse in arc-type magmatism during this period of plate adjustment. -from Authors

  15. Numerical modeling of outer rise deformation in the Tonga subduction system: Coupling between outer rise deformation, slab weakening and plate velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naliboff, J. B.; Billen, M. I.; Gerya, T.; Saunders, J. K.

    2012-12-01

    During subduction, bending and flexure of oceanic lithosphere generates a topographic bulge seaward of the trench known as the outer rise, which commonly exhibits extensional deformation attributed to slab pull forces and bending stresses. The resulting brittle and viscous deformation may play a significant role in long-term geodynamic processes by limiting the ability of subducted oceanic lithosphere to act as a stress guide driving surface plate motions through slab pull. Recent numerical studies provide varying estimates of slab pull's contribution to surface plate motions [e.g., van Summeren et al. 2012, Ghosh & Holt 2012], while observational constraints suggest old oceanic lithosphere may weaken by 3-4 orders of magnitude as it bends and descends beneath the overriding plate [Arredondo & Billen, 2012]. Preliminary numerical models of outer rise deformation during oceanic-continental convergence (40 Myr oceanic lithosphere) exhibit 10x-150x viscous weakening in the upper plate near the trench, with time-dependent variations related to both changes in slab depth and downgoing-overriding plate coupling (Naliboff et al., in prep). In order to more closely examine the relationship between outer rise deformation, geophysical observations and plate velocities, we consider 2D subduction models of the Tonga subduction system where flow will be strictly driven by upper mantle slab buoyancy as defined by the Slab1.0 model [Hayes et al. 2012]. The resulting subducting plate deformation patterns are compared to observations of outer rise faulting, elastic thickness measurements and outer rise seismicity. While keeping buoyancy forces fixed, we will examine the role of brittle rheology, hydration and downgoing-overriding plate coupling in patterns of subducting plate deformation. These results will provide improved physical understanding of the relationship between slab pull, plate velocities and downgoing plate weakening, and a basis for future work examining the role of

  16. Viscoelastic Postseismic Rebound to Strike-Slip Earthquakes in Regions of Oblique Plate Convergence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Steven C.

    1999-01-01

    According to the slip partitioning concept, the trench parallel component of relative plate motion in regions of oblique convergence is accommodated by strike-slip faulting in the overriding continental lithosphere. The pattern of postseismic surface deformation due to viscoelastic flow in the lower crust and asthenosphere following a major earthquake on such a fault is modified from that predicted from the conventual elastic layer over viscoelastic halfspace model by the presence of the subducting slab. The predicted effects, such as a partial suppression of the postseismic velocities by 1 cm/yr or more immediately following a moderate to great earthquake, are potentially detectable using contemporary geodetic techniques.

  17. 19 CFR 102.19 - NAFTA preference override.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false NAFTA preference override. 102.19 Section 102.19... TREASURY RULES OF ORIGIN Rules of Origin § 102.19 NAFTA preference override. (a) Except in the case of... single NAFTA country, the country of origin of such good is the last NAFTA country in which that...

  18. 19 CFR 102.19 - NAFTA preference override.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false NAFTA preference override. 102.19 Section 102.19... TREASURY RULES OF ORIGIN Rules of Origin § 102.19 NAFTA preference override. (a) Except in the case of... single NAFTA country, the country of origin of such good is the last NAFTA country in which that...

  19. 5 CFR 1320.15 - Independent regulatory agency override authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Independent regulatory agency override authority. 1320.15 Section 1320.15 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET OMB DIRECTIVES CONTROLLING PAPERWORK BURDENS ON THE PUBLIC § 1320.15 Independent regulatory agency override authority. (a)...

  20. 5 CFR 1320.15 - Independent regulatory agency override authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Independent regulatory agency override authority. 1320.15 Section 1320.15 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET OMB DIRECTIVES CONTROLLING PAPERWORK BURDENS ON THE PUBLIC § 1320.15 Independent regulatory agency override authority. (a)...

  1. 5 CFR 1320.15 - Independent regulatory agency override authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Independent regulatory agency override authority. 1320.15 Section 1320.15 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET OMB DIRECTIVES CONTROLLING PAPERWORK BURDENS ON THE PUBLIC § 1320.15 Independent regulatory agency override authority. (a)...

  2. 5 CFR 1320.15 - Independent regulatory agency override authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Independent regulatory agency override authority. 1320.15 Section 1320.15 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET OMB DIRECTIVES CONTROLLING PAPERWORK BURDENS ON THE PUBLIC § 1320.15 Independent regulatory agency override authority. (a)...

  3. 5 CFR 1320.15 - Independent regulatory agency override authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Independent regulatory agency override authority. 1320.15 Section 1320.15 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET OMB DIRECTIVES CONTROLLING PAPERWORK BURDENS ON THE PUBLIC § 1320.15 Independent regulatory agency override authority. (a)...

  4. Late Cenozoic tectonics of the Middle Atlas Mountains, Morocco: Continental deformation in the diffuse western Mediterranean plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Francisco Gustavo

    -Eurasian plate convergence since the Early Miocene. The diffuse plate boundary comprises large, relatively rigid crustal blocks (Moroccan Meseta, High Plateau, and Saharan Platform) bounded by narrow deformable zones (the Atlas). In this context, the Middle Atlas can be interpreted as an accommodation zone resulting from differential movements between two large crustal blocks impinging on stable Africa. The Atlas Mountains exemplify the possible structural influence of inherited crustal weaknesses in a diffuse plate boundary such as the western Mediterranean region.

  5. Plate Motion and Crustal Deformation Estimated with Geodetic Data from the Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argus, Donald F.; Heflin, Michael B.

    1995-01-01

    We use geodetic data taken over four years with the Global Positioning System (GPS) to estimate: (1) motion between six major plates and (2) motion relative to these plates of ten sites in plate boundary zones. The degree of consistency between geodetic velocities and rigid plates requires the (one-dimensional) standard errors in horizontal velocities to be approx. 2 mm/yr. Each of the 15 angular velocities describing motion between plate pairs that we estimate with GPS differs insignificantly from the corresponding angular velocity in global plate motion model NUVEL-1A, which averages motion over the past 3 m.y. The motion of the Pacific plate relative to both the Eurasian and North American plates is observed to be faster than predicted by NUVEL-1A, supporting the inference from Very Long B ase- line Interferometry (VLBI) that motion of the Pacific plate has speed up over the past few m.y. The Eurasia-North America pole of rotation is estimated to be north of NUVEL-1A, consistent with the independent hypothesis that the pole has recently migrated northward across northeast Asia to near the Lena River delta. Victoria, which lies above the main thrust at the Cascadia subduction zone, moves relative to the interior of the overriding plate at 30% of the velocity of the subducting plate, reinforcing the conclusion that the thrust there is locked beneath the continental shelf and slope.

  6. Formation and metasomatism of continental lithospheric mantle in intra-plate and subduction-related tectonic settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionov, Dmitri

    2010-05-01

    Our knowledge of the origin and evolution of the continental lithospheric mantle (CLM) remains fragmentary and partly controversial in spite of recent advances in petrologic, geochemical and geophysical studies of the deep Earth and experimental work. Debate continues on a number of essential topics, like relative contributions of partial melting, metasomatism and ‘re-fertilisation' as well as the timing, conditions and tectonic settings of those processes. These topics can be addressed by studies of ultramafic xenoliths in volcanic rocks which arguably provide the least altered samples of modern and ancient CLM. The subcontinental lithosphere is thought to be a mantle region from which melts have been extracted, thus making the lithosphere more refractory. Melting degrees can be estimated from Al contents while the depth of melt extraction can be assessed from Al-Fe (Mg#) relations in unmetasomatized melting residues in comparison with experimental data, e.g. [1]. High silica and opx in the residues may indicate melting in water-rich conditions. High-precision Mg# and Mn for olivine may constrain degrees and conditions of partial melting and/or metasomatism, tectonic settings, modal compositions (e.g. presence of garnet) and equilibration conditions of mantle peridotites [2]. These estimates require both adequate sampling and high-quality major element and modal data; sampling and analytical uncertainties in published work may contribute substantially to chemical heterogeneities (and different origins) inferred for CLM domains [3]. Very fertile peridotite xenolith suites are rare worldwide [3]. They were initially viewed as representing mantle domains that experienced only very small degrees of melt extraction but are attributed by some workers to ‘refertilization' of refractory mantle by percolating asthenospheric melts. Such alternative mechanisms might be valid for some rare hybrid and Fe-enriched peridotites but they fail to comprehensively explain modal

  7. Comparison of deep structure along three transects of the western North American continental margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuis, G.S.; Clowes, R.M.

    1993-01-01

    Similarities in geology and potential field data that have in the past been noted among the regions of southern Alaska, southern Vancouver Island, and central California are now seen to be accompanied by similarities in deep crustal structure. A number of tectonic elements have been identified in the deep structure along transects in these three regions, although not all elements are present along each transect. These elements are A) an actively subducting oceanic plate and B) an overriding continental plate that consists of 1) a Cenozoic accretionary prism, 2) a Mesozoic accretionary prism, 3) a backstop to the Mesozoic prism, 4) a tectonically underplated body of oceanic rocks, and 5) a crustal root. -from Authors

  8. Dynamic evolution of continental and oceanic lithosphere in global mantle convection model with plate-like tectonics and one sided subduction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulvrova, Martina; Coltice, Nicolas; Tackley, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Drifting of continents, spreading of the seafloor and subduction at convergent boundaries shape the surface of the Earth. On the timescales of several hundreds of millions of years, divergent boundaries at mid-ocean ridges are created and destroyed in within the Wilson cycle. This controls the evolution of the Earth as it determines the heat loss out. Presence of floating continents facilitates the Earth-like mobile lid style of convection as convective stresses are concentrated on the rheological boundary between oceanic and continental lithosphere. Subducting slabs allow for the surface material to be buried down into the mantle and have an important effect on surface tectonics. The main feature of the subduction zones observed on Earth is that it is single-sided forming the deep trenches. Recently, different numerical models were successful in reproducing one-sided subduction by allowing for the vertical deformation of the Earth surface (Crameri and Tackley 2014). In the meantime, advances were made in modelling continental break-up and formation (Rolf et al. 2014). In this study we perform numerical simulations of global mantle convection in spherical annulus geometry with strongly depth and temperature dependent rheology using StagYY code (Tackley 2008). In these models plate tectonics is generated self-consistently and features one-sided subduction on ocean-ocean plate boundary as well as floating continents. We focus on determining (1) the influence of one-sided subduction on the dynamics of the system (2) formation and breakup of continents. Rerefences: Crameri, F. and P. J. Tackley, Spontaneous development of arcuate single-sided subduction in global 3-D mantle convection models with a free surface, J. Geophys. Res., 119(7), 5921-5942, 2014. Rolf, T., N. Coltice and P. J. Tackley (2014), Statistical cyclicity of the supercontinent cycle, Geophys. Res. Lett. 41, 2014. Tackley, P. J., Modellng compressible mantle convection with large viscosity contrasts in

  9. 4-D Subduction Models Incorporating an Upper Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegman, D.; Capitanio, F. A.; Moresi, L.; Mueller, D.; Clark, S.

    2007-12-01

    Thus far, relatively simplistic models of free subduction have been employed in which the trench and plate kinematics are emergent features completely driven by the negative buoyancy of the slab. This has allowed us to build a fundamental understanding of subduction processes such as the kinematics of subduction zones, the strength of slabs, and mantle flow-plate coupling. Additionaly, these efforts have helped to develop appreciable insight into subduction processes when considering the energetics of subduction, in particular how energy is dissipated in various parts of the system such as generating mantle flow and bending the plate. We are now in a position to build upon this knowledge and shift our focus towards the dynamic controls of deformation in the upper plate (vertical motions, extension, shortening, and dynamic topography). Here, the state of stress in the overriding plate is the product of the delicate balance of large tectonic forces in a highly-coupled system, and must therefore include all components of the system: the subducting plate, the overriding plate, and the underlying mantle flow which couples everything together. We will present some initial results of the fully dynamic 3-D models of free subduction which incorporate an overriding plate and systematically investigate how variations in the style and strength of subduction are expressed by the tectonics of the overriding plate. Deformation is driven in the overriding plate by the forces generated from the subducting plate and the type of boundary condition on the non-subducting side of the overriding plate (either fixed or free). Ultimately, these new models will help to address a range of issues: how the overriding plate influences the plate and trench kinematics; the formation and evolution of back-arc basins; the variation of tractions on the base of the overriding plate; the nature of forces which drive plates; and the dynamics controls on seismic coupling at the plate boundary.

  10. Nature of the plate contact and subduction zones diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Franco, Roberta; Govers, Rob; Wortel, Rinus

    2008-07-01

    In recent studies we showed that the nature of the plate contact in subduction zones is an important physical feature in both oceanic lithospheric subduction and continental collision. We investigated two fundamental states of the plate contact: one based on a fault and the other based on a subduction channel. Using geodynamic modeling, we determined the specific signatures of both states of the subduction contact. We established that the nature of the plate contact influences the dynamic response of the overriding and subducting plate, and is one of the controlling factors whether back-arc extension develops or not. In the present study, we combine results of our previous numerical experiments with a re-analysis of published observations. Overall, our synthesis connects seismic moment release with back-arc deformation and tectonic processes at the margin. It leads us to identify four classes of subduction zones. The first two classes result directly from our numerical experiments. In class 1, subduction zones are characterized by a plate contact that is largely fault-like with an accretionary margin. In class 2, the plate contacts are largely channel-type and have an erosive margin. Class 3, where the plate contact is entirely channel-like, consists of accretionary margins with a high sediment supply. Subduction zones of class 4, mostly characterized by an erosive convergent margin (northern Chile, Peru, Honshu and Kuril), are more complicated. They can be explained by incorporating regional observations.

  11. Crustal structure of the Peruvian continental margin from wide-angle seismic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krabbenhöft, A.; Bialas, J.; Kopp, H.; Kukowski, N.; Hübscher, C.

    2004-11-01

    Active seismic investigations along the Pacific margin off Peru were carried out using ocean bottom hydrophones and seismometers. The structure and the P-wave velocities of the obliquely subducting oceanic Nazca Plate and overriding South American Plate from 8°S to 15°S were determined by modelling the wide-angle seismic data combined with the analysis of reflection seismic data. Three detailed cross-sections of the subduction zone of the Peruvian margin and one strike-line across the Lima Basin are presented here. The oceanic crust of the Nazca Plate, with a thin pelagic sediment cover, ranging from 0-200 m, has an average thickness of 6.4 km. At 8°S it thins to 4 km in the area of Trujillo Trough, a graben-like structure. Across the margin, the plate boundary can be traced to 25 km depth. As inferred from the velocity models, a frontal prism exists adjacent to the trench axis and is associated with the steep lower slope. Terrigeneous sediments are proposed to be transported downslope due to gravitational forces and comprise the frontal prism, characterized by low seismic P-wave velocities. The lower slope material accretes against a backstop structure, which is defined by higher seismic P-wave velocities, 3.5-6.0 km s-1. The large variations in surface slope along one transect may reflect basal removal of upper plate material, thus steepening the slope surface. Subduction processes along the Peruvian margin are dominated by tectonic erosion indicated by the large margin taper, the shape and bending of the subducting slab, laterally varying slope angles and the material properties of the overriding continental plate. The erosional mechanisms, frontal and basal erosion, result in the steepening of the slope and consequent slope failure.

  12. 30 CFR 1202.250 - Overriding royalty interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 1202.250 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE ROYALTIES Coal § 1202.250 Overriding royalty interest. The regulations governing... in 43 CFR group 3400....

  13. 30 CFR 1202.250 - Overriding royalty interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 1202.250 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE ROYALTIES Coal § 1202.250 Overriding royalty interest. The regulations governing... in 43 CFR group 3400....

  14. 30 CFR 1202.250 - Overriding royalty interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 1202.250 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE ROYALTIES Coal § 1202.250 Overriding royalty interest. The regulations governing... in 43 CFR group 3400....

  15. 14. INTERIOR, OPERATOR'S HOUSE, FOOTOPERATED LIMITED OVERRIDE SWITCHES New ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. INTERIOR, OPERATOR'S HOUSE, FOOT-OPERATED LIMITED OVERRIDE SWITCHES - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Mystic River Bridge, Spanning Mystic River between Groton & Stonington, Groton, New London County, CT

  16. Drug Interaction Alert Override Rates in the Meaningful Use Era

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, A.D.; Fletcher, G.S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Interruptive drug interaction alerts may reduce adverse drug events and are required for Stage I Meaningful Use attestation. For the last decade override rates have been very high. Despite their widespread use in commercial EHR systems, previously described interventions to improve alert frequency and acceptance have not been well studied. Objectives (1) To measure override rates of inpatient medication alerts within a commercial clinical decision support system, and assess the impact of local customization efforts. (2) To compare override rates between drug-drug interaction and drug-allergy interaction alerts, between attending and resident physicians, and between public and academic hospitals. (3) To measure the correlation between physicians’ individual alert quantities and override rates as an indicator of potential alert fatigue. Methods We retrospectively analyzed physician responses to drug-drug and drug-allergy interaction alerts, as generated by a common decision support product in a large teaching hospital system. Results (1) Over four days, 461 different physicians entered 18,354 medication orders, resulting in 2,455 visible alerts; 2,280 alerts (93%) were overridden. (2) The drug-drug alert override rate was 95.1%, statistically higher than the rate for drug-allergy alerts (90.9%) (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in override rates between attendings and residents, or between hospitals. (3) Physicians saw a mean of 1.3 alerts per day, and the number of alerts per physician was not significantly correlated with override rate (R2 = 0.03, p = 0.41). Conclusions Despite intensive efforts to improve a commercial drug interaction alert system and to reduce alerting, override rates remain as high as reported over a decade ago. Alert fatigue does not seem to contribute. The results suggest the need to fundamentally question the premises of drug interaction alert systems. PMID:25298818

  17. How is Silurian-Early Devonian faulting in the North America continental interior related to orogenic processes at plate boundaries? A working hypothesis from the Canadian North

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinet, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    The Paleozoic Appalachian/Franklinian orogen that rims the North America continent on its eastern and northern sides is comparable in size with Tethyan orogenic belts. However, the far-field effects in the continental interior of the multiple Ordovician to Carboniferous deformation phases that built the orogen were relatively minor if compared with those associated with the Himalayas and Alps, a characteristics related to the high integrated strength of the North American craton. Despite the generally little deformation of the continental interior, two regional-scale tectonic features preserved evidence of significant Paleozoic tectonism: the fault bounded Hudson Bay Central High (HBCH) and the Boothia uplift/Cornwallis fold belt (BUCF) in the Canadian Arctic. In the Hudson Bay intracratonic basin, the lower part of the sedimentary succession (Upper Ordovician to Lower Devonian) is cut by high-angle faults and overlain by a saucer-shape, essentially underformed sedimentary package (Middle to Upper Devonian). The main structural feature is the NNW-trending HBCH that extends for a minimum length of 500 km with normal faults characterized by throws up to 500 m that were mainly active during the Silurian - Early Devonian period. The >700-km long, N-trending BUCF is nearly perpendicular to the deformation front of the Franklinian mobile belt. In its southern segment (Boothia uplift), its western side is characterized by an east-dipping reverse fault zone that puts Precambrian rocks over Paleozoic strata. In its northern segment (Cornwallis fold belt), the Paleozoic succession is involved in open folds and cuts by steeply dipping reverse faults. Syn-tectonic clastic sediments constrain the age of structures to the latest Silurian-Early Devonian. Comparison of the HBCH and BUCF indicates that they are grossly parallel, partly contemporaneous but with different kinematics. This kinematic variability may be explained if they are genetically linked with different segments of

  18. Two-dimensional numerical modeling of tectonic and metamorphic histories at active continental margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerya, Taras; Stöckhert, Bernhard

    2006-04-01

    The evolution of an active continental margin is simulated in two dimensions, using a finite difference thermomechanical code with half-staggered grid and marker-in-cell technique. The effect of mechanical properties, changing as a function of P and T, assigned to different crustal layers and mantle materials in the simple starting structure is discussed for a set of numerical models. For each model, representative P T paths are displayed for selected markers. Both the intensity of subduction erosion and the size of the frontal accretionary wedge are strongly dependent on the rheology chosen for the overriding continental crust. Tectonically eroded upper and lower continental crust is carried down to form a broad orogenic wedge, intermingling with detached oceanic crust and sediments from the subducted plate and hydrated mantle material from the overriding plate. A small portion of the continental crust and trench sediments is carried further down into a narrow subduction channel, intermingling with oceanic crust and hydrated mantle material, and to some extent extruded to the rear of the orogenic wedge underplating the overriding continental crust. The exhumation rates for (ultra)high pressure rocks can exceed subduction and burial rates by a factor of 1.5 3, when forced return flow in the hanging wall portion of the self-organizing subduction channel is focused. The simulations suggest that a minimum rate of subduction is required for the formation of a subduction channel, because buoyancy forces may outweigh drag forces for slow subduction. For a weak upper continental crust, simulated by a high pore pressure coefficient in the brittle regime, the orogenic wedge and megascale melange reach a mid- to upper-crustal position within 10 20 Myr (after 400 600 km of subduction). For a strong upper crust, a continental lid persists over the entire time span covered by the simulation. The structural pattern is similar in all cases, with four zones from trench toward arc

  19. Modeling the influence of plate motions on subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillebrand, Bram; Thieulot, Cedric; van den Berg, Arie; Spakman, Wim

    2014-05-01

    Subduction zones are widely studied complex geodynamical systems. Their evolution is influenced by a broad range of parameters such as the age of the plates (both subducting and overriding) as well as their rheology, their nature (oceanic or continental), the presence of a crust and the involved plate motions to name a few. To investigate the importance of these different parameters on the evolution of subduction we have created a series of 2D numerical thermomechanical subduction models. These subduction models are multi-material flow models containing continental and oceanic crusts, a lithosphere and a mantle. We use the sticky air approach to allow for topography build up in the model. In order to model multi-material flow in our Eulerian finite element code of SEPRAN (Segal and Praagman, 2000) we use the well benchmarked level set method (Osher and Sethian, 1988) to track the different materials and their mode of deformation through the model domain. To our knowledge the presented results are the first subduction model results with the level set method. We will present preliminary results of our parametric study focusing mainly on the influence of plate motions on the evolution of subduction. S. Osher and J.A. Sethian. Fronts propagating with curvature-dependent speed: Algorithms based on hamilton-jacobi formulations. JCP 1988 A. Segal and N.P. Praagman. The SEPRAN package. Technical report, 2000 This research is funded by The Netherlands Research Centre for Integrated Solid Earth Science (ISES)

  20. Incorporating Cutting Edge Scientific Results from the Margins-Geoprisms Program into the Undergraduate Curriculum, Rupturing Continental Lithosphere Part II: Introducing Euler Poles Using Baja-North America Relative Plate Motion Across the Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveless, J. P.; Bennett, S. E. K.; Cashman, S. M.; Dorsey, R. J.; Goodliffe, A. M.; Lamb, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    The NSF-MARGINS Program funded a decade of research on continental margin processes. The NSF-GeoPRISMS Mini-lesson Project, funded by NSF-TUES, is designed to integrate the significant findings from the MARGINS program into open-source college-level curriculum. The Gulf of California (GOC) served as the focus site for the Rupturing Continental Lithosphere (RCL) initiative, which addressed several scientific questions: What forces drive rift initiation, localization, propagation and evolution? How does deformation vary in time and space, and why? How does crust evolve, physically and chemically, as rifting proceeds to sea-floor spreading? What is the role of sedimentation and magmatism in continental extension? We developed two weeks of curriculum, including lectures, labs, and in-class activities that can be used as a whole or individually. This component of the curriculum introduces students to the Euler pole description of relative plate motion (RPM) by examining the tectonic interactions of the Baja California microplate and North American plate. The plate boundary varies in rift obliquity along strike, from highly oblique and strike-slip dominated in the south to slightly less oblique and with a larger extensional component in the north. This Google Earth-based exercise provides students with a visualization of RPM using small circle contours of the local direction and magnitude of Baja-North America movement on a spherical Earth. Students use RPM to calculate the fault slip rates on transform, normal, and oblique-slip faults and examine how the varying faulting styles combine to accommodate RPM. MARGINS results are integrated via comparison of rift obliquity with the structural style of rift-related faults around the GOC. We find this exercise to fit naturally into courses about plate tectonics, geophysics, and especially structural geology, given the similarity between Euler pole rotations and stereonet-based rotations of structural data.

  1. Self-assembled software and method of overriding software execution

    DOEpatents

    Bouchard, Ann M.; Osbourn, Gordon C.

    2013-01-08

    A computer-implemented software self-assembled system and method for providing an external override and monitoring capability to dynamically self-assembling software containing machines that self-assemble execution sequences and data structures. The method provides an external override machine that can be introduced into a system of self-assembling machines while the machines are executing such that the functionality of the executing software can be changed or paused without stopping the code execution and modifying the existing code. Additionally, a monitoring machine can be introduced without stopping code execution that can monitor specified code execution functions by designated machines and communicate the status to an output device.

  2. 25 CFR 213.38 - Assignments and overriding royalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Assignments and overriding royalties. 213.38 Section 213.38 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF RESTRICTED LANDS OF MEMBERS OF FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING Operations § 213.38...

  3. 25 CFR 213.38 - Assignments and overriding royalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Assignments and overriding royalties. 213.38 Section 213.38 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF RESTRICTED LANDS OF MEMBERS OF FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING Operations § 213.38...

  4. 25 CFR 213.38 - Assignments and overriding royalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Assignments and overriding royalties. 213.38 Section 213.38 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF RESTRICTED LANDS OF MEMBERS OF FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING Operations § 213.38...

  5. 25 CFR 213.38 - Assignments and overriding royalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Assignments and overriding royalties. 213.38 Section 213.38 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF RESTRICTED LANDS OF MEMBERS OF FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING Operations § 213.38...

  6. 25 CFR 213.38 - Assignments and overriding royalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Assignments and overriding royalties. 213.38 Section 213.38 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF RESTRICTED LANDS OF MEMBERS OF FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING Operations § 213.38...

  7. 30 CFR 202.250 - Overriding royalty interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... interests, production payments, or similar interests created under Federal coal leases are in 43 CFR group... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Overriding royalty interest. 202.250 Section 202.250 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS...

  8. 25 CFR 227.26 - Assignments and overriding royalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Assignments and overriding royalties. 227.26 Section 227.26 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF CERTAIN LANDS IN WIND RIVER INDIAN RESERVATION, WYOMING, FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Operations §...

  9. 25 CFR 227.26 - Assignments and overriding royalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Assignments and overriding royalties. 227.26 Section 227.26 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF CERTAIN LANDS IN WIND RIVER INDIAN RESERVATION, WYOMING, FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Operations §...

  10. 25 CFR 227.26 - Assignments and overriding royalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Assignments and overriding royalties. 227.26 Section 227.26 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF CERTAIN LANDS IN WIND RIVER INDIAN RESERVATION, WYOMING, FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Operations §...

  11. 25 CFR 227.26 - Assignments and overriding royalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Assignments and overriding royalties. 227.26 Section 227.26 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF CERTAIN LANDS IN WIND RIVER INDIAN RESERVATION, WYOMING, FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Operations §...

  12. 25 CFR 227.26 - Assignments and overriding royalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Assignments and overriding royalties. 227.26 Section 227.26 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF CERTAIN LANDS IN WIND RIVER INDIAN RESERVATION, WYOMING, FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Operations §...

  13. H2O-fluid-saturated melting of subducted continental crust facilitates exhumation of ultrahigh-pressure rocks in continental subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrousse, L.; Duretz, T.; Gerya, T.

    2015-10-01

    We present two-dimensional numerical models of plate subduction and collision inspired by the Scandinavian Caledonian orogeny to investigate the possible impact of continental crust partial melting on the exhumation of ultra-high pressure metamorphic rocks. Three possible reactions were tested: low temperature solidus representing H2O-fluid-saturated partial melting, and two end-member reaction curves for dehydration melting. Thermo-mechanical effects of partial melting were implemented as (1) a viscosity decrease as a determined rheologically critical melt percentage was reached (here 0.1), (2) a change in effective heat capacity and adiabatic heating/cooling accounting for a latent heat term in the heat equation. Among the 3 tested reactions, only H2O-fluid-saturated partial melting drastically modifies the collision dynamics from the non-melting reference model holding all other parameters constant. A substantially low general viscosity truncation (here 1017 Pa s) is needed to properly resolve the effect of partial melting on deep collision processes. Low temperature melting indeed induces the development of a low viscosity buoyant plume prior to slab detachment, where migmatites exhume from UHP conditions at rates and with pressure-temperature paths similar to the natural values acknowledged for the Norwegian Caledonides. High temperature melting has no drastic influence on early collision dynamics. While positive buoyancy remains the first order driver for the exhumation of buried continental rocks, exhumation initiates in these cases with eduction subsequent to slab detachment. Melting and formation of a migmatite plume can later occur along decompression path while continental crust undergoes thermal reequilibration at temperatures above 900 °C. Some of the partially molten material can also relaminate in the overriding plate rather than exhume within the collision zone. Even if minor in terms of amount of magma produced, H2O-fluid-saturated partial melting

  14. The Peruvian Continental Margin: Results from wide angle seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krabbenhoeft, A.; Bialas, J.; Kopp, H.; Kukowski, N.; Huebscher, C.

    2003-04-01

    Within the scope of the GEOPECO (Geophysical Experiments at the Peruvian Continental Margin) project, seismic investigations along the Pacific margin of Peru were carried out using ocean bottom hydrophones (OBH) and seismometers (OBS) recording marine airgun shots. The structure and the P- wave velocity of the oblique subducting Nazca and overriding South-American Plates from 8°S to 15°S were determined by forward modeling and tomographic inversion of the wide-angle seismic data combined with the analysis of reflection seismic data. The region south of 12°S has been influenced by the southward migration of the aseismic Nazca Ridge the past 11 Ma. The oceanic Nazca Plate is divided by Mendana Fracture Zone (MFZ) which marks a transition zone of a different crustal age of approximately 28 Ma in the north to 38 Ma in the south at the Peruvian trench. North of MFZ the oceanic crust is influenced by Trujillo Trough trending N15E and the surrounding extensional stresses leading to a crustal thinning as can be seen in the northernmost refraction seismic model. The oceanic crust south of MFZ is overall homogeneous with a thin pelagic sedimentary layer and normal oceanic crustal layers. The P-wave velocity of the mantle is overall 7.9-8.1km/s. The Peruvian Continental Margin is characterized by the continental slope and several basins, Trujillo and Yaquina basin, Lima basin and Pisco basin, which are partly affected by the southward migration of the subducting Nazca Ridge. This caused uplift and subsidence along the margin leading to erosional tectonic features. The basins and continental basement could be mapped with forward modeling and tomographic inversion as well as the continental backstop on each profile. An accretionary prism is set up with a width of 20 to 30 km and 4 to 5 km thickness which does not further increase in size as revealed by the profiles recorded further north of Nazca Ridge. This and a taper of 14- 17 degrees at the collision zone indicates that

  15. Suggestions for Teaching the Principles of Continental Drift in the Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, William H.

    1977-01-01

    Provides a brief overview of current geographic ideas regarding continental drift and plate tectonics and suggests techniques for illustrating continental motions to elementary school pupils. (Author/DB)

  16. Controls on continental strain partitioning above an oblique subduction zone, Northern Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütt, Jorina M.; Whipp, David M., Jr.

    2016-04-01

    Strain partitioning is a common process at obliquely convergent plate margins dividing oblique convergence into margin-normal slip on the plate-bounding fault and horizontal shearing on a strike-slip system parallel to the subduction margin. In subduction zones, strain partitioning in the upper continental plate is mainly controlled by the shear forces acting on the plate interface and the strength of the continental crust. The plate interface forces are influenced by the subducting plate dip angle and the obliquity angle between the normal to the plate margin and the convergence velocity vector, and the crustal strength of the continent is strongly affected by the presence or absence of a volcanic arc, with the presence of the volcanic arcs being common at steep subduction zones. Along the ˜7000 km western margin of South America the convergence obliquity, subduction dip angles and presence of a volcanic arc all vary, but strain partitioning is only observed along parts of it. This raises the questions, to what extent do subduction zone characteristics control strain partitioning in the overriding continental plate, and which factors have the largest influence? We address these questions using lithospheric-scale 3D numerical geodynamic experiments to investigate the influence of subduction dip angle, convergence obliquity, and weaknesses in the crust owing to the volcanic arc on strain partitioning behavior. We base the model design on the Northern Volcanic Zone of the Andes (5° N - 2° S), characterized by steep subduction (˜ 35°), a convergence obliquity between 31° -45° and extensive arc volcanism, and where strain partitioning is observed. The numerical modelling software (DOUAR) solves the Stokes flow and heat transfer equations for a viscous-plastic creeping flow to calculate velocity fields, thermal evolution, rock uplift and strain rates in a 1600 km x 1600 km box with depth 160 km. Subduction geometry and material properties are based on a

  17. Interplate coupling at oblique subduction zones: influence on upper plate erosion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malatesta, Cristina; Gerya, Taras; Crispini, Laura; Federico, Laura; Scambelluri, Marco; Capponi, Giovanni

    2014-05-01

    In active subduction zones, when the converging plates cannot slip freely past each other, "plate coupling" occurs. The moving subducting slab and therefore the coupling/decoupling relationship between plates control both short- and long-term deformation of the upper plate. Short-term deformation is dominantly elastic, occurs at human timescales and can be directly associated with earthquakes. Long-term deformation is cumulative, permanent and prevails at the geological timescale (Hoffman-Rothe et al., 2006, Springer Berlin Heidelberg). Here we used 3D numerical simulations to test oblique subduction zones and to investigate: 1) how long-term deformation and coupling relationship vary along the trench-axis; 2) how this relationship influences erosion and down-drag of upper plate material. Our models are based on thermo-mechanical equations solved with finite differences method and marker-in-cell techniques combined with a multigrid approach (Gerya, 2010, Cambridge Univ. Press). The reference model simulates an intraoceanic subduction close to the continental margin (Malatesta et al., 2013, Nature Communications, 4:2456 DOI:10.1038/ncomms3456). The oceanic crust is layered with a 5-km-thick layer of gabbro overlain by a 3-km-thick layer of basalt. The ocean floor is covered by 1-km-thick sediments. Plates move with a total velocity of 3.15 cm/yr; the oblique convergence is obtained using velocity vectors that form an angle of 45° with the initial starting point of subduction (weak zone in the lithosphere). After initiation of plate convergence, part of sediments on top of the incoming plate enters the subduction zone and is buried; another part is suddenly transferred along strike at shallow depths and along the subducting slab according to the direction of the along-trench velocity component of subduction. The lateral migration of sediment causes the evolution of the trench along its strike from sediment-poor to sediment-rich. As soon as subduction starts, where

  18. Stereotypes override grammar: Social knowledge in sentence comprehension.

    PubMed

    Molinaro, Nicola; Su, Jui-Ju; Carreiras, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have provided evidence for the automaticity and immediacy with which stereotypical knowledge affects our behavior. However, less is known about how such social knowledge interacts with linguistic cues during comprehension. In this ERP sentence processing study we took advantage of the rich grammatical gender morphology of Spanish to explore the processing of role nouns in which stereotype and grammatical cues were simultaneously manipulated, in a factorial design. We show that stereotypical knowledge overrides syntactic cues, highlighting the immediacy with which stereotype knowledge is activated during language comprehension and supporting proposals claiming that social knowledge impacts on language processing differently from other forms of semantics. PMID:27108245

  19. Cognition overrides orientation dependence in tactile viewpoint selection.

    PubMed

    Hartcher-O'Brien, Jessica; Auvray, Malika

    2016-07-01

    Humans are capable of extracting spatial information through their sense of touch: when someone strokes their hand, they can easily determine stroke direction without visual information. However, when it comes to the coordinate system used to assign the spatial relations to the stimulation, it remains poorly understood how the brain selects the appropriate system for passive touch. In the study reported here, we investigated whether hand orientation can determine coordinate assignment to ambiguous tactile patterns, whether observers can cognitively override any orientation-driven perspectives on touch, and whether the adaptation transfers across body surfaces. Our results demonstrated that the orientation of the hand in the vertical plane determines the perspective taken: an external perspective is adopted when the hand faces the observer and a gaze-centred perspective is selected when the hand faces away. Participants were then adapted to a mirror-reversed perspective through training, and the results revealed that this adapted perspective holds for the adapted surface and generalises to non-adapted surfaces, including across the body midline. These results reveal plasticity in perspective taking which relies on low-level postural cues (hand orientation) but also on higher-order somatosensory processing that can override the low-level cues. PMID:26894892

  20. Linking plate reconstructions with deforming lithosphere to geodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, R. D.; Gurnis, M.; Flament, N.; Seton, M.; Spasojevic, S.; Williams, S.; Zahirovic, S.

    2011-12-01

    While global computational models are rapidly advancing in terms of their capabilities, there is an increasing need for assimilating observations into these models and/or ground-truthing model outputs. The open-source and platform independent GPlates software fills this gap. It was originally conceived as a tool to interactively visualize and manipulate classical rigid plate reconstructions and represent them as time-dependent topological networks of editable plate boundaries. The user can export time-dependent plate velocity meshes that can be used either to define initial surface boundary conditions for geodynamic models or alternatively impose plate motions throughout a geodynamic model run. However, tectonic plates are not rigid, and neglecting plate deformation, especially that of the edges of overriding plates, can result in significant misplacing of plate boundaries through time. A new, substantially re-engineered version of GPlates is now being developed that allows an embedding of deforming plates into topological plate boundary networks. We use geophysical and geological data to define the limit between rigid and deforming areas, and the deformation history of non-rigid blocks. The velocity field predicted by these reconstructions can then be used as a time-dependent surface boundary condition in regional or global 3-D geodynamic models, or alternatively as an initial boundary condition for a particular plate configuration at a given time. For time-dependent models with imposed plate motions (e.g. using CitcomS) we incorporate the continental lithosphere by embedding compositionally distinct crust and continental lithosphere within the thermal lithosphere. We define three isostatic columns of different thickness and buoyancy based on the tectonothermal age of the continents: Archean, Proterozoic and Phanerozoic. In the fourth isostatic column, the oceans, the thickness of the thermal lithosphere is assimilated using a half-space cooling model. We also

  1. Earthquakes and plate tectonics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, H.

    1977-01-01

    An explanation is to be found in plate tectonics, a concept which has revolutionized thinking in the Earth sciences in the last 10 years. The theory of plate tectonics combines many of the ideas about continental drift (originally proposed in 1912 by Alfred Wegener in Germany) and sea-floor spreading (suggested originally by Harry Hess of Princeton University). 

  2. Deformation and topography above the lateral transition from continental to oceanic subduction in three-dimensional laboratory models: what can we learn on the Hellenic subduction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillaume, B.; Funiciello, F.; Faccenna, C.; Husson, L.; Royden, L. H.

    2012-04-01

    We use three-dimensional dynamically self-consistent laboratory models to analyze relationships between surface evolution and deep dynamics at convergent margins. Our models are setup with a viscous plate of silicone (lithosphere) subducting under negative buoyancy in a viscous layer of glucose syrup (upper mantle). We focus on the subduction of a laterally heterogeneous lithosphere characterized by an abrupt transition of density using negatively and positively buoyant silicone to reproduce oceanic and continental subduction, respectively. We quantify and establish relationships between the subduction dynamics and resulting slab geometry, trench kinematics and pattern of horizontal/vertical deformation for both the overriding plate and the upper mantle. Assuming that our modeling results can be representative of the natural behavior of subduction zones, we compare them to the Neogene to Quaternary evolution of the Hellenic subduction zone. We more particularly focus on the deformation and topography of the Hellenic upper plate, which may have been influenced by the difference in subduction dynamics north and south of the Kephalonia Transform Zone, with a slowly subducting Adriatic continental lithosphere in the north and a rapidly subducting Ionian oceanic lithosphere in the south.

  3. Plate-mantle coupling from post-Pangea plate kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahirovic, Sabin; Dietmar Müller, R.; Seton, Maria; Flament, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    Convection in the Earth's mantle that involves plates at the surfaces gives rise to plate velocities that vary through time and depend on the balance of plate boundary forces, with the present-day providing a snapshot of this ongoing process. However, present-day plate velocities do not capture plate behaviour over geologically representative timeframes and thus cannot be used to evaluate factors limiting plate velocities. Previous studies investigated the effects of continental keels on plate speeds by either using the present-day snapshot or a limited number of reconstructed plate configurations, often leading to conflicting results. For example, an early assumption was that continental keels (especially cratons) were unlikely to impede fast plate motions because India's velocity approached ~20 cm/yr in the Eocene prior to the collision with Eurasia. We employ a modern plate reconstruction approach with evolving global topological plate boundaries for the post-Pangea timeframe (since 200 Ma) to evaluate factors controlling plate velocities. Plate boundary configurations and plate velocities are extracted from the open-source and cross-platform plate reconstruction package GPlates (www.gplates.org) at 1 Myr intervals. For each plate, at each timestep, the area of continental and cratonic lithosphere is calculated to evaluate the effect on plate velocities. Our results support that oceanic plates tend to be 2-3 times faster than plates with large portion of continental plate area, consistent with predictions of numerical models of mantle convection. The fastest plates (~8.5 cm/yr RMS) are dominated by oceanic plate area and high subducting portion of plate perimeter, while the slowest plates (~2.6-2.8 cm/yr RMS) are dominated by continental plate area and bounded by transforms and mid-oceanic ridge segments. Importantly, increasing cratonic fractions (both Proterozoic and Archean lithosphere) significantly impede plate velocities, suggesting that deep continental

  4. Effects of rheological weakening by fluids and melts for defining geodynamic regimes of oceanic-continental subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerya, Taras; Meilick, Irena

    2010-05-01

    The dynamics of subduction under an active margin is analyzed by using a 2D coupled petrological-thermomechanical numerical model of an oceanic-continental subduction process. This model includes spontaneous slab bending, dehydration of the subducted crust, aqueous fluid transport, partial melting of both crustal and mantle rocks and melt extraction processes resulting in magmatic arc crust growth. Based on our models we identify the following five geodynamic regimes of subduction which may potentially from at active margins: (1) stable subduction with no backarc spreading center and without plumes in the mantle wedge, (2) retreating subduction with the focused backarc spreading center and without plumes, (3) retreating subduction with distributed intra-arc extension and trans-lithospheric sedimentary plumes, (4) advancing subduction with underplating (laterally extending) sub-lithospheric plumes, (5) stable to advancing subduction with stationary (laterally limited) sub-lithospheric plumes. Transitions between these different regimes are mainly caused by the concurrence of rheological weakening effects of (1) aqueous fluids percolating from the subducting slab into the mantle wedge and (2) melts propagating from the partially molten areas formed in the mantle wedge toward the surface. The aqueous fluids mainly affect the forearc region. Strong fluid-related weakening promotes plates decoupling and reduces subduction drag causing stacking of sediments in the accretion prism. In contrast, reduced weakening by fluids results in strong coupling of the plates and leads to advancing collision-like subduction with enhanced subduction erosion. Thickening of the overriding plate and large sedimentary plumes in the mantle wedge are the consequences. On the other hand, melts are extracted from the hot regions above the slab and rheologically weaken mainly the lithosphere below the arc controlling overriding plate extension/shortening processes. Strong rheological weakening

  5. Override of spontaneous respiratory pattern generator reduces cardiovascular parasympathetic influence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patwardhan, A. R.; Vallurupalli, S.; Evans, J. M.; Bruce, E. N.; Knapp, C. F.

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the effects of voluntary control of breathing on autonomic function in cardiovascular regulation. Variability in heart rate was compared between 5 min of spontaneous and controlled breathing. During controlled breathing, for 5 min, subjects voluntarily reproduced their own spontaneous breathing pattern (both rate and volume on a breath-by-breath basis). With the use of this experimental design, we could unmask the effects of voluntary override of the spontaneous respiratory pattern generator on autonomic function in cardiovascular regulation without the confounding effects of altered respiratory pattern. Results from 10 subjects showed that during voluntary control of breathing, mean values of heart rate and blood pressure increased, whereas fractal and spectral powers in heart rate in the respiratory frequency region decreased. End-tidal PCO2 was similar during spontaneous and controlled breathing. These results indicate that the act of voluntary control of breathing decreases the influence of the vagal component, which is the principal parasympathetic influence in cardiovascular regulation.

  6. Override the controversy: Analytic thinking predicts endorsement of evolution.

    PubMed

    Gervais, Will M

    2015-09-01

    Despite overwhelming scientific consensus, popular opinions regarding evolution are starkly divided. In the USA, for example, nearly one in three adults espouse a literal and recent divine creation account of human origins. Plausibly, resistance to scientific conclusions regarding the origins of species-like much resistance to other scientific conclusions (Bloom & Weisberg, 2007)-gains support from reliably developing intuitions. Intuitions about essentialism, teleology, agency, and order may combine to make creationism potentially more cognitively attractive than evolutionary concepts. However, dual process approaches to cognition recognize that people can often analytically override their intuitions. Two large studies (total N=1324) found consistent evidence that a tendency to engage analytic thinking predicted endorsement of evolution, even controlling for relevant demographic, attitudinal, and religious variables. Meanwhile, exposure to religion predicted reduced endorsement of evolution. Cognitive style is one factor among many affecting opinions on the origin of species. PMID:26072277

  7. Implications of a comprehensive, spreading-aligned plate motion reference frame in light of seismic anisotropy and global trench migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, T. W.; Schaeffer, A. J.; Lebedev, S.; Conrad, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    An absolute plate motion model is required to address issues such as the thermo-chemical evolution of Earth's mantle, yet all such models have to rely on indirect inferences. Given that azimuthal seismic anisotropy in the uppermost mantle appears to show fast axes parallel to seafloor spreading, we explore a new, spreading-aligned reference frame. We show that this reference frame indeed fits azimuthal seismic anisotropy from surface waves and SKS splitting very well. The corresponding Euler pole (at 64∘E, 61∘S, with rotation of ~0.25∘/Myr) is close to those of hot spot reference frames, as expected if hot spots were due to relatively stationary mantle plumes. The new Euler pole is also close to that of ridge motion minimizing models, and its amplitude broadly consistent with estimates of net rotation generation by mantle convection with strong continental keels and a weak asthenosphere. The finding that relative spreading aligns with absolute plate motions implies that ridges are passive and that transform faults weak, allowing for easy realignment of spreading centers during slab-driven plate reorganizations. We also explore the implications of our new reference frame for slabs where we find that all of the major eastern Pacific subduction zone trenches are rolling back (away from the overriding plate). Fast trench advance is only predicted in regions with strong corner flow and pivoting (Tonga), continental plate interactions (Sumatra and Caribbean), and most clearly in an ocean-ocean setting for the Philippine Sea Plate where double subduction, slab-slab interactions may explain the fast advance of the Marianas. We conclude that a net rotation pole guided by the spreading-aligned model could indeed represent a comprehensive reference frame for present-day plate motions with respect to the deep mantle.

  8. Plate Tectonics: A Paradigm under Threat.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, David

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the challenges confronting plate tectonics. Presents evidence that contradicts continental drift, seafloor spreading, and subduction. Reviews problems posed by vertical tectonic movements. (Contains 242 references.) (DDR)

  9. A New Arabia-Africa-Eurasia GPS Velocity Field (1994-2014) and E Mediterranean Block Model: Implications for Continental Deformation in a Zone of Active Plate Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernant, P.; Floyd, M.; Ozener, H.; Ergintav, S.; Karakhanian, A.; Kadirov, F. A.; Sokhadze, G.; ArRajehi, A.; Nankali, H. R.; Georgiev, I.; Ganas, A.; Paradissis, D.; McClusky, S.; Gomez, F. G.; Reilinger, R. E.

    2014-12-01

    We present new GPS velocities for the Arabia-Africa-Eurasia region determined with GAMIT/GLOBK (>830 velocities) spanning the period 1994-2014. Here we consider the E Mediterranean region of plate interaction. We use DEFNODE software to develop block models and estimate slip rates on major faults and strain of some blocks. The wrms of residual velocities from our new model is 1.3 mm/yr. We identify small E-W extension within the newly defined Anatolian block confined to a 100-200 km wide zone south of the North Anatolian Fault (NAF) reaching 2-3 mm/yr with rates increasing towards the west. Possible causes we consider include, un-modeled postseismic effects of the 1999 Izmit/Duzce earthquake sequence, continuing post-seismic effects of the 20th Century sequence of M>7 earthquakes, and/or toroidal sub-lithospheric flow towards the subducting Hellenic slab. The overall strain rate of the Marmara Sea block is dominantly N-S extension, and the Van block, N-S compression. Present slip rates along the NAF increase from E to W, 22-24 mm/yr along the E to E-central segment and 27-28 mm/yr along the W segment. We quantify extension in the G. of Corinth, central Greece, and G. of Evia; the W, central and E sections of the Hellenic Trench are shortening with extension in the back-arc. The W Hellenic Trench and W Peloponnese have right-lateral strike-slip and the E Hellenic Trench, left-lateral ss. N-S extension (2-4 mm/yr) in N Greece and the N Aegean Sea extends at least to 42°N. Arabia-Sinai left-lateral motion across the Dead Sea Fault is ~5 mm/yr along the S segment; significant residual velocities along the N and S segments indicate lower slip rates in the N and require fault segmentation to account for slip rate variations along strike. We identify E-W contraction of the Arabian (Persian) Gulf (~3-5 mm/yr) that extends into the E part of the Arabian Plate. We will quantify and present these and other observed deformation patterns and discuss their tectonic implications.

  10. Unintended Consequences: The Impact of Proposition 2½ Overrides on School Segregation in Massachusetts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zabel, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    I investigate a possible unintended consequence of Proposition 2½ override behavior--that it led to increased segregation in school districts in Massachusetts. This can occur because richer, low-minority towns tend to have more successful override votes that attract similar households with relatively high demands for public services who can afford…

  11. A Video Recall Study of In-session Changes in Sentiment Override.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lee N; Tambling, Rachel B; Anderson, Shayne R

    2015-09-01

    This study examines in-session changes in sentiment override over the first three sessions of couple therapy. Couples viewed a video recording of therapy sessions immediately after each of the first three sessions and continuously rated their level of sentiment override. Ninety-eight changes were randomly chosen for analysis. Three talk turns prior to each change was coded using the Family Relational Communication Control Coding System. Results show that changes in sentiment override occur frequently. Repeated incidents of communication control were related to negative change in sentiment override for females. Repeated incidents of being left out of the conversation were related to negative changes in sentiment override for females and positive changes for males. PMID:25521172

  12. Petrogenesis of Tertiary continental intra-plate lavas between Siebengebirge and Westerwald, Germany: Constraints from trace element systematics and Nd, Sr and Pb isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, S.; Jung, S.; Pfänder, J. A.; Hauff, F.; Garbe-Schönberg, D.

    2015-10-01

    fractionation has occurred. Miocene intraplate basaltic volcanism in the area probably occurred as a result of minor "baby plume" activity. Each volcanic plug records evidence of a specific stage of fractionation with or without assimilation; however, in summary the lavas plot on a single fractionation path. This implies that during evolution of the volcanic field initial melting took place in the asthenosphere or at the lithosphere-asthenosphere interface. The melts moved through the lithospheric mantle and stagnated at crustal levels, however the observed fractionation paths suggest that they were fed from a single reservoir. This model, which involves small-scale plume impact followed by asthenosphere-lithosphere interaction together with minor crustal contamination, should also be applicable to other intra-continental rift-related areas.

  13. GPS constraints on the kinematics of continental deformation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thatcher, W.

    2003-01-01

    Recent GPS observations from the western United States, New Zealand, central Greece, and Japan indicate that present-day continental deformation is typically focused in narrow deforming zones whose extent is much smaller than the intervening largely inactive regions. However, these narrow zones are heterogeneously distributed, reflecting the inherent heterogeneity of continental lithospheric strength and internal buoyancy. Plate driving and resisting forces stress plate boundary zones and plate interiors and drive deformation. These forces change continuously and discontinuously, leading to continental deformation that typically evolves and migrates with time. Magmatic and tectonic processes alter lithospheric rheology and internal buoyancy and also contribute to the time-varying character of continental deformation.

  14. Western Hellenic subduction and Cephalonia Transform: local earthquakes and plate transport and strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachpazi, M.; Hirn, A.; Clément, C.; Haslinger, F.; Laigle, M.; Kissling, E.; Charvis, P.; Hello, Y.; Lépine, J.-C.; Sapin, M.; Ansorge, J.

    2000-04-01

    Focal parameters of local earthquakes in the region of the Ionian Islands of western Greece are constrained with a temporary dense array of three-component seismographs operated jointly offshore and onshore. Seismic deformation is documented to be confined to the east of the N20°E-striking steep continental slope west of Cephalonia island, the right-lateral Cephalonia Transform Fault, CTF, inferred from large earthquakes. The pre-Apulian continental material appears to be only deforming east of the transform fault, where it is in upper plate position to the Hellenic subduction. East of the transform fault, the transmission velocity tomography from local earthquakes, compared in depth-section with a previous marine reflection profile, provides evidence in support of a shallow landward dipping boundary around 12 km deep under the Ionian Islands along which they may override the lower plate. On either side of this interface local earthquakes occur with different focal mechanisms, in support with its interpretation as the interplate. Under Cephalonia island, reverse-faulting deforms the upper plate along NW-SE structures, which may also be affected by left-lateral bookshelf-faulting. Small earthquakes show normal faulting along the western coast of Cephalonia and its extension 20 km SSW, the trace of the CTF as inferred from the occurrence of the large strike-slip earthquakes. Another group of normal-fault earthquakes locates in the lower plate from under Cephalonia to Zante, just outboard of a possible change of interplate dip suggested from reflection seismics landward under the islands. These normal-fault earthquakes appear to coincide in position with that of the load imposed by the upper plate transported over them, rather than occurring in an outer rise, outboard the plate boundary and trench, as observed in other subductions and attributed to the control by the flexural bending of the lower plate under the pull of the sinking slab. Interpretation has to

  15. Continental aggregation, subduction initiation, and plume generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heron, P. J.; Lowman, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    Several processes unfold during the supercontinent cycle, more than one of which might result in an elevation in subcontinental mantle temperatures through the generation of mantle plumes. Paleogeographic plate reconstructions have indicated that sub-continental mantle upwellings appear below large continents that are extensively ringed by subduction zones. Moreover, several numerical simulations of supercontinent formation and dispersal attribute the genesis of sub-continental plumes to the generation of subduction zones on the edges of the supercontinent, rather than resulting from continental insulation. However, the role of the location of downwellings in producing a return-flow upwelling, and on increasing sub-continental mantle temperatures, is not fully understood. In this mantle convection study, we examine the evolution of mantle dynamics after supercontinent accretion over a subduction zone (analogous to the formation of Pangea) for a range of continental coverage. We present 2D and 3D Cartesian geometry mantle convection simulations, featuring geotherm- and pressure-dependent viscosity with thermally and mechanically distinct oceanic and continental plates. Through changing the size of the continent we are able to analyze the factors involved in the generation of mantle plumes in purely thermal convection. Furthermore, we change the upper and lower mantle viscosity to determine their relation to plume formation in vigorous mantle convection simulations. Elevated sub-continental temperatures are analyzed in relation to continental coverage to further understand the influence of continental tectonics on the thermal evolution of the mantle.

  16. Active Arc-Continent Accretion in Timor-Leste: New Structural Mapping and Quantification of Continental Subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, G. W.; McQuarrie, N.; Bakker, R.; van Hinsbergen, D. J.; Harris, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    The island of Timor represents the active accretion of the Banda volcanic arc to the Australian continental margin. Arc accretion marks the final closure of an ocean basin in the canonic Wilson tectonic cycle, yet the incipient stages as visible now on Timor are still poorly understood. In particular, ocean closure brings continental material into the subduction zone as part of the down-going plate. The positive buoyancy of this subducting continental crust presents a complex problem in crustal dynamics, with possible effects on overall plate motions, migration and/or reversal of the active subduction zone, and the modes of faulting within the upper crust. New mapping in Timor-Leste has provided a detailed view of the structural repetition of Australian continental sedimentary units structurally below overriding Banda Arc material. The central Dili-Same transect begins in the north with the low-grade metamorphic Aileu Formation of Australian affinity, thrust over the time-equivalent more proximal Maubisse Formation to the south. These in turn are thrust over the Australian intra-continental strata, the Triassic Aitutu and the Permian Cribas Formations. The Aitutu and Cribas Formations are deformed in a series of faulted ENE-striking anticlines exposed along the central axis of Timor. The southern end of the transect reveals a 15-km wide piggyback basin of synorogenic marine clays north of another faulted anticline of Aututu and Cribas on the south coast. The eastern Laclo-Barique transect exposes a deeper erosional level, showing three regional NNE-striking thrust faults with approximately 3 km spacing and 50-75 km along-strike extent, each one repeating the Aitutu and Cribas stratigraphy. The strike of Australian-affinity units in the eastern transect is rotated 50-60 degrees to the north compared to the units in the central transect. The Jurassic Wailuli shales and the Bobonaro tectonic mélange act as the upper décollement between this duplex and the Lolotoi

  17. Deformation of the overriding slab during incipient subduction in centrifuge modeling and its tectonic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mart, Yossi; Goren, Liran; Koyi, Hemin

    2015-04-01

    Analog models of subduction-related structural deformation emphasize the significance of differences in density and friction between the adjacent plates on the distortion of the overriding slab and its possible effect on the subduction procedure. Centrifuge experiments juxtaposed miniaturized lighter and denser lithospheres, which were floating on denser but less viscous asthenosphere. The lithosphere in the tests comprised brittle and ductile strata, which showed diversified styles of deformation, while factors of equivocal tectonic significance, such as lateral push or negative buoyancy, were not introduced into the experiments. The tests show that the juxtaposition of lighter and denser lithospheres would suffice to drive the denser lithosphere as a wedge between the asthenosphere and the lighter lithosphere, and that the rate of the process would depend on the rate of friction between the slabs, as well as on differential viscosity. It seems that the reduced friction in Nature was derived from the generation of serpentinites, which could be the main agent of lubrication. The underthrusting of the denser lithosphere leads to the uplift and collapse of the edge of the lighter slab, where extension, thinning, normal faulting and rifting took place, and diapiric ascent of parts of the ductile layer of the lighter slab occurred along several rifts. The analog experiments were carried out only to the stage where the denser slab was thrust under the lighter one, but the penetration of the lithosphere into the asthenosphere was not achieved. It seems plausible therefore, that only after eclogitization, and the upward motion of serpentinites, increased the density of the underthrust slab, would it dive and penetrate into the asthenosphere. The experiments indicate the plausibility of the constraints imposed on the subduction process by the deformation of the overthrust slab. The normal faults and rifts in the overthrust block could serve as conduits for the ascent of

  18. Australian plate motion and topography linked to fossil New Guinea slab below Lake Eyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schellart, W. P.; Spakman, W.

    2015-07-01

    Unravelling causes for absolute plate velocity change and continental dynamic topography change is challenging because of the interdependence of large-scale geodynamic driving processes. Here, we unravel a clear spatio-temporal relation between latest Cretaceous-Early Cenozoic subduction at the northern edge of the Australian plate, Early Cenozoic Australian plate motion changes and Cenozoic topography evolution of the Australian continent. We present evidence for a ∼4000 km wide subduction zone, which culminated in ophiolite obduction and arc-continent collision in the New Guinea-Pocklington Trough region during subduction termination, coinciding with cessation of spreading in the Coral Sea, a ∼5 cm/yr decrease in northward Australian plate velocity, and slab detachment. Renewed northward motion caused the Australian plate to override the sinking subduction remnant, which we detect with seismic tomography at 800-1200 km depth in the mantle under central-southeast Australia at a position predicted by our absolute plate reconstructions. With a numerical model of slab sinking and mantle flow we predict a long-wavelength subsidence (negative dynamic topography) migrating southward from ∼50 Ma to present, explaining Eocene-Oligocene subsidence of the Queensland Plateau, ∼330 m of late Eocene-early Oligocene subsidence in the Gulf of Carpentaria, Oligocene-Miocene subsidence of the Marion Plateau, and providing a first-order fit to the present-day, ∼200 m deep, topographic depression of the Lake Eyre Basin and Murray-Darling Basin. We propound that dynamic topography evolution provides an independent means to couple geological processes to a mantle reference frame. This is complementary to, and can be integrated with, other approaches such as hotspot and slab reference frames.

  19. Dynamics of Continental Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moresi, L. N.; Betts, P. G.; Miller, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    Subduction zones become congested when they try to swallow buoyant exotic crust. Accretionary mountain belts (orogens) that form at these convergent plate margins are the principal sites of lateral continental growth through Earth's history. Modern examples of accretionary margins are the North and South American Cordilleras and southwest Pacific. The geologic record is riddled with accretionary orogens, such as the Tasmanides along the eastern margin of the supercontinent Gondwana and the Altaides that formed on the southern margin of Laurasia. Both the modern and ancient examples are characterised by episodic switches between extension and shortening associated with transitions from collision of exotic crust and subduction related rollback. We present three-dimensional dynamic models that show for the first time how accretionary margins evolve from the initial collision, through a period of plate margin instability, to re-establishment of a stable convergent margin. The models illustrate how significant curvature of the orogenic system develops, as well as the mechanism for tectonic escape of the back arc region. The complexity of the morphology and evolution of the system are driven by lateral rollback of a tightly arcuate trench migrating parallel to the plate boundary and orthogonal to the convergence direction. We find geological and geophysical evidence for this process in the Tasmanides of eastern Australia, but infer that this is a global phenomena throughout Earth's evolution.

  20. The Plate Tectonics Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hein, Annamae J.

    2011-01-01

    The Plate Tectonics Project is a multiday, inquiry-based unit that facilitates students as self-motivated learners. Reliable Web sites are offered to assist with lessons, and a summative rubric is used to facilitate the holistic nature of the project. After each topic (parts of the Earth, continental drift, etc.) is covered, the students will…

  1. Continental Rifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosendahl, B. R.

    Continental Rifts, edited by A. M. Quennell, is a new member of the Benchmark Papers in Geology Series, edited in toto by R. W. Fairbridge. In this series the individual volume editors peruse the literature on a given topic, select a few dozen papers of ostensibly benchmark quality, and then reorder them in some sensible fashion. Some of the original papers are republished intact, but many are chopped into “McNuggets™” of information. Depending upon the volume editor, the chopping process can range from a butchering job to careful and prudent pruning. The collecting, sifting, and reorganizing tasks are, of course, equally editor-sensitive. The end product of this series is something akin to a set of Reader's Digest of Geology.

  2. The Brazilian continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, L. R.; Coutinho, P. N.

    1981-04-01

    The Brazilian continental margin, with its interesting morphology, structure and sediments, has become better known only during the last two decades. Six physiographical provinces can be recognized at the continental margin and the adjacent coast: (1) Cabo Orange-Parnaiba delta; (2) Parnaiba delta-Cabo Sa˜o Roque; (3) Cabo Sa˜o Roque-Belmonte; (4) Belmonte-Cabo Frio; (5) Cabo Frio-Cabo Santa Marta; and (6) Cabo Santa Marta-Chui. The shelf is rather wide near the Amazon Mouth, becoming narrower eastwards, continuing very narrow along the northeastern and eastern coast, and becoming wider again in the south towards the Plate River. Prominent morphological features along the margin are the Amazon cone, the marginal plateaus off northeastern Brazil, the Sa˜o Francisco cone and canyon, the Abrolhos Bank, and the deep-sea plateaus of Pernambuco and Sa˜o Paulo. On the shelf proper a number of relief elements exist, such as sand waves east of the Amazon, submarine terraces at various places, and irregularities of structural origin. The shelf break is rather smooth in the far north and south, more abrupt in the remainder. Surface sediments of the Brazilian shelf show five distinct facies types: littoral quartz sands, mud, transition sand-mud, coralline algae, and biodetrital. The terrigenous elastic fractions dominate off the Amazon and in southern Brazil; between these areas they occupy a very narrow strip near the coast. The carbonate facies, predominantly composed of calcareous algae, is abundant between the Parnaiba delta and Cabo Frio; to the south this facies is more biodetrital and restricted to the outer shelf. Economically important on the Brazilian continental margin besides oil, are sands and gravels, carbonate deposits, evaporites and some subsurface coal. Other possible mineral resources could be phosphate, heavy minerals and clays for ceramics.

  3. Characteristics and Consequences of Drug Allergy Alert Overrides in a Computerized Physician Order Entry System

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Tyken C.; Kuperman, Gilad J.; Jaggi, Tonushree; Hojnowski-Diaz, Patricia; Fiskio, Julie; Williams, Deborah H.; Bates, David W.; Gandhi, Tejal K.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine characteristics of drug allergy alert overrides, assess how often they lead to preventable adverse drug events (ADEs), and suggest methods for improving the allergy-alerting system. Design: Chart review was performed on a stratified random subset of all allergy alerts occurring during a 3-month period (August through October 2002) at a large academic hospital. Measurements: Factors that were measured were drug/allergy combinations that triggered alerts, frequency of specific override reasons, characteristics of ADEs, and completeness of allergy documentation. Results: A total of 6,182 (80%) of 7,761 alerts were overridden in 1,150 patients. In this sample, only 10% of alerts were triggered by an exact match between the drug ordered and allergy listed. Physicians' most common reasons for overriding alerts were “Aware/Will monitor” (55%), “Patient does not have this allergy/tolerates” (33%), and “Patient taking already” (10%). In a stratified random subset of 320 patients (28% of 1,150) on chart review, 19 (6%) experienced ADEs attributed to the overridden drug; of these, 9 (47%) were serious. None of the ADEs was considered preventable, because the overrides were deemed clinically justifiable. The degree of completeness of patients' allergy lists was highly variable and generally low in both paper charts and the CPOE system. Conclusion: Overrides of drug-allergy alerts were common and about 1 in 20 resulted in ADEs, but all of the overrides resulting in ADEs appeared clinically justifiable. The high rate of alert overrides was attributable to frequent nonexact match alerts and infrequent updating of allergy lists. Based on these findings, we have made specific recommendations for increasing the specificity of alerting and thereby improving the clinical utility of the drug allergy alerting system. PMID:15298998

  4. Plate motion controls on back-arc spreading. [Cenozoic movement in Western Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fein, J. B.; Jurdy, D. M.

    1986-01-01

    The motions of the subducting and the overriding plates influence the spatial and temporal distribution of back-arc spreading. Cenozoic plate motions in hot spot-fixed and no-net-rotation reference frames were studied with attention to correlations between changes in motion and episodes of back-arc spreading in the western Pacific. The results suggest that major back-arc opening occurs when both the overriding plate retreats from the trench in an absolute sense and the subducting plate undergoes a significant speed-up. Neither phenomenon alone is sufficient to initiate spreading. Three major plate velocity increases can be identified in the Cenozoic: (1) the Pacific plate 5-9 Ma; (2) the Indian plate at 27 Ma; and (3) the Pacific plate at 43 Ma, due to its shift from northerly to more westerly motion. At the present time, the Indian and Philippine are the only overriding plates that are retreating from their Pacific trenches and back-arc spreading occurs only on these two retreating plates. Although the Indian plate has been retreating for at least 25 Ma, back-arc spreading began only following the Pacific plate speed-up 5-9 Ma. Earlier, during the Indian plate speed-up, no overriding plates were retreating strongly and no back-arc spreading epsiodes are preserved from this time. For the earliest Pacific plate shift at 43 Ma, the Eurasian plate was not advancing, thus creating the only favorable plate kinematic conditions in the Cenozoic for back-arc basin formation in this region. It is unclear whether extension in the Japan Sea is a result of these conditions.

  5. High Override Rate for Opioid Drug-allergy Interaction Alerts: Current Trends and Recommendations for Future.

    PubMed

    Topaz, Maxim; Seger, Diane L; Lai, Kenneth; Wickner, Paige G; Goss, Foster; Dhopeshwarkar, Neil; Chang, Frank; Bates, David W; Zhou, Li

    2015-01-01

    This study examined trends in drug-allergy interaction (DAI) alert overrides for opioid medications - the most commonly triggered alerts in the computerized provider order entry (CPOE). We conducted an observational analysis of the DAI opioid alerts triggered over the last decade (2004-2013, n=342,338) in two large academic hospitals in Boston (United States). We found an increasing rate of DAI alert overrides culminating in 89.7% in 2013. Allergic reactions included a high proportion (38.2%) of non-immune mediated opioid reactions (e.g. gastrointestinal upset). The DAI alert override rate was high for immune mediated (88.6%) and life threatening reactions (87.8%). Exact allergy-medication matches were overridden less frequently (about 70%) compared to non-exact matches within allergy groups (over 90%). About one-third of the alert override reasons pointed to irrelevant alerts (i.e."Patient has tolerated the medication before") and 44.9% were unknown. Those findings warrant further investigation into providers' reasons for high override rate. User interfaces should evolve to enable less interruptive and more accurate alerts to decrease alert fatigue. PMID:26262047

  6. Mechanical obstacles to the movement of continent-bearing plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowman, P. D., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Selected geophysical problems associated with the concept of continental drift as an incidental corollary of plate movement are discussed. The problems include the absence of a suitable plate-driving mechanism for plates with continental leading edges, the absence of the low-velocity zone under shields, and continental roots of 400 to 700 km depths. It is shown that if continental drift occurs, it must use mechanisms not now understood, or that it may not occur at all, plate movement being confined to ocean basins.

  7. Magmatic processes that generate chemically distinct silicic magmas in NW Costa Rica and the evolution of juvenile continental crust in oceanic arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, T. A.; Deering, C. D.; Patino, L. C.; Alvarado, G. E.; Szymanski, D. W.

    2010-12-01

    Northwestern Costa Rica is built upon an oceanic plateau that has developed chemical and geophysical characteristics of the upper continental crust. A major factor in converting the oceanic plateau to continental crust is the production, evolution and emplacement of silicic magmas. In Costa Rica, the Caribbean Large Igneous Province (CLIP) forms the overriding plate in the subduction of the Cocos Plate - a process that has occurred for at least the last 25 my. Igneous rocks in Costa Rica older than about 10 Ma have chemical compositions typical of oceanic basalts and intra-oceanic arcs. In contrast, younger igneous deposits (<10 Ma) contain abundant silicic rocks with geochemical signatures similar to the average continental crust, which are significantly enriched in SiO2, alkalis and light rare-earth elements. The silicic deposits of NW Costa Rica occur in two major compositional groups: a high-Ti and a low-Ti group with no overlap between the two. The major and trace element characteristics of these groups are consistent with these magmas being derived from liquids that were extracted from crystal mushes. In relative terms, the high-Ti silicic liquids were extracted from a hot, dry crystal mush with low-oxygen fugacity where plagioclase and pyroxene were the dominant phases crystallizing, along with lesser amounts of hornblende. In contrast, the low-Ti silicic liquids were extracted from a cool, wet crystal mush with high oxygen fugacity where plagioclase and amphibole were the dominant phases crystallizing. The hot-dry-reducing magmas dominate the older sequence, but the youngest sequence contains only magmas from the cold-wet-oxidized group. Silicic volcanic deposits from other oceanic arcs (e.g. Izu-Bonin, Marianas) have chemical characteristics distinctly different from continental crust, whereas the NW Costa Rican silicic deposits have chemical characteristics nearly identical to the upper continental crust. The transition in NW Costa Rica from mafic oceanic

  8. Temporal change in plate coupling and long-term slow slip events in southwestern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochi, Tadafumi

    2015-12-01

    In the southwestern part of Japan, many large earthquakes have been reported and many geodetic or seismic observations have been performed to monitor crustal deformation due to the interaction between the subducting Philippine Sea plate and the overriding continental plate along the Suruga-Nankai trough. These precise observations provide insight into aseismic stress-releasing processes such as slow slip events (SSEs). In this study, I focus on the effect of SSEs on interplate coupling to reveal the overall temporal evolution of interplate states along the trough in southwestern Japan. I focus mainly on the western part of the subduction zone, called the Nankai region. In this part, three SSEs (in 1997, 2003, and 2010) were detected during the period in which observations are available. Interplate coupling recovered quickly after the SSEs terminated. The eastern part of this region shows consistently strong coupling whether SSEs occur or not. Long-term SSEs are distributed between the coupling area and the area where tremors occur. I also examine the balance between stress accumulation and release at four points in the region. Below the eastern part of the strongly coupled area, at a depth of ∼15 km, constant coupling of about 7 cm/yr takes place. In the center of the SSE region, at a depth of ∼25 km, ∼40% of the accumulated stress is released through SSEs, with the rest contributing to the stress accumulation process.

  9. Continental crust beneath southeast Iceland.

    PubMed

    Torsvik, Trond H; Amundsen, Hans E F; Trønnes, Reidar G; Doubrovine, Pavel V; Gaina, Carmen; Kusznir, Nick J; Steinberger, Bernhard; Corfu, Fernando; Ashwal, Lewis D; Griffin, William L; Werner, Stephanie C; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2015-04-14

    The magmatic activity (0-16 Ma) in Iceland is linked to a deep mantle plume that has been active for the past 62 My. Icelandic and northeast Atlantic basalts contain variable proportions of two enriched components, interpreted as recycled oceanic crust supplied by the plume, and subcontinental lithospheric mantle derived from the nearby continental margins. A restricted area in southeast Iceland--and especially the Öræfajökull volcano--is characterized by a unique enriched-mantle component (EM2-like) with elevated (87)Sr/(86)Sr and (207)Pb/(204)Pb. Here, we demonstrate through modeling of Sr-Nd-Pb abundances and isotope ratios that the primitive Öræfajökull melts could have assimilated 2-6% of underlying continental crust before differentiating to more evolved melts. From inversion of gravity anomaly data (crustal thickness), analysis of regional magnetic data, and plate reconstructions, we propose that continental crust beneath southeast Iceland is part of ∼350-km-long and 70-km-wide extension of the Jan Mayen Microcontinent (JMM). The extended JMM was marginal to East Greenland but detached in the Early Eocene (between 52 and 47 Mya); by the Oligocene (27 Mya), all parts of the JMM permanently became part of the Eurasian plate following a westward ridge jump in the direction of the Iceland plume. PMID:25825769

  10. Continental crust beneath southeast Iceland

    PubMed Central

    Torsvik, Trond H.; Amundsen, Hans E. F.; Trønnes, Reidar G.; Doubrovine, Pavel V.; Gaina, Carmen; Kusznir, Nick J.; Steinberger, Bernhard; Corfu, Fernando; Ashwal, Lewis D.; Griffin, William L.; Werner, Stephanie C.; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2015-01-01

    The magmatic activity (0–16 Ma) in Iceland is linked to a deep mantle plume that has been active for the past 62 My. Icelandic and northeast Atlantic basalts contain variable proportions of two enriched components, interpreted as recycled oceanic crust supplied by the plume, and subcontinental lithospheric mantle derived from the nearby continental margins. A restricted area in southeast Iceland—and especially the Öræfajökull volcano—is characterized by a unique enriched-mantle component (EM2-like) with elevated 87Sr/86Sr and 207Pb/204Pb. Here, we demonstrate through modeling of Sr–Nd–Pb abundances and isotope ratios that the primitive Öræfajökull melts could have assimilated 2–6% of underlying continental crust before differentiating to more evolved melts. From inversion of gravity anomaly data (crustal thickness), analysis of regional magnetic data, and plate reconstructions, we propose that continental crust beneath southeast Iceland is part of ∼350-km-long and 70-km-wide extension of the Jan Mayen Microcontinent (JMM). The extended JMM was marginal to East Greenland but detached in the Early Eocene (between 52 and 47 Mya); by the Oligocene (27 Mya), all parts of the JMM permanently became part of the Eurasian plate following a westward ridge jump in the direction of the Iceland plume. PMID:25825769

  11. A Simple Class Exercise on Plate Tectonic Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Denis E. B.

    1990-01-01

    Presented is an activity in which students construct a model of plate divergence with two sheets of paper to show the separation of two continental plates in a system of spreading ridges and faults. Diagrams and procedures are described. (CW)

  12. Mesozoic Plate Tectonic Evolution of the Northern Margin of Pangea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, E. L.

    2011-12-01

    Canadian margin and the Arctic-Siberian margin) might be explained by along-strike differences in the nature of motion of the overriding (continental) plate with respect to paleo-Pacific subduction zones (towards vs. away).

  13. BOLIVAR & GEODINOS: Investigations of the Southern Caribbean Plate Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levander, A.; Schmitz, M.; Working Groups, B.

    2006-12-01

    , and is associated with broad uplift of the coastal regions. This is likely a site of continental growth. 2) The accretionary wedge terranes of the Southern Caribbean Deformed Belt formed in the Neogene, and extend as far east as the Aves Ridge. They result from SA overriding the CAR LIP, which for a number of reasons, we do not regard as normal subduction. 3) Igneous rocks on the islands of the Leeward Antilles arc, Aruba to Los Testigos, show a steady decrease in age from west to east (94.7-37.4 Ma), suggesting that the islands have been progressively captured from the Antilles arc by the plate boundary during the prolonged island arc-continent collision. Terrane capture models thus far cannot completely explain the data. 4) High (> 6.5 km/s) P-velocity bodies are found in the shallow crust along the main strike-slip faults along much of the plate boundary. We interpret these as elements of the HP/LT metamorphic terranes found in the adjacent thrust belts of central Venezuela. This suggests to us that displacement partitioning in the trench and subsequent strike-slip both play important roles in exhumation of the HP/LT terranes. 5) Crustal thickness variations in the plate boundary region are large (> 10 km), of short spatial wavelength (< 100 km), and indicate that the highest elevations of the coastal mountain belts are not supported isostatically.

  14. Continental rifting: a planetary perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Muehlberger, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    The only inner planet that has abundant evidence of regional extension, and the consequent generation of rifts in the earth. The absence of plate motion on the other inner planets limits their rifts to localized bulges or subsidence areas. The rifting of oceanic lithosphere is seldom preserved in the geological record. Thus, such rifting must be inferred via plate tectonic interpretation: if there is rifting, then there must be subduction whose results are commonly well preserved. Modern continental rifts are found in many tectonic settings: continental breakup, extension transverse to collisional stresses, or wide regions of nearly uniform extension. Recognition of these settings in older rocks becomes more difficult the farther back in geologic time you travel. Rift basin fillings typically show rapid lateral and vertical facies and thickness changes, bimodal volcanism, and distinctive rift-drift sequences. Proterozoic rifts and aulacogens are well-documented in North America; ex. Keweenawan, western margin of Labrador fold belt, Belt-Uinta and the Wopmay-Athapuscow regions. Documented Archean rifts are rare. In Quebec, the truncated margin of the Minto craton bounded on the south by a 2.8 Ga greenstone belt implies an earlier rift event. The oldest proposed rift dated at 3.0 Ga contains the Pongola Supergroup in southeastern Africa. The presence of Archean dikes demonstrates a rigid crust and andesites as old as 3.5 Ga imply plate tectonics and thus, at least, oceanic rifting.

  15. Revenue/Expenditure Limits and Override Elections: The Experience of California School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osman, Jack W.; Gemello, John M.

    The revenue and expenditure limit contained in California's SB-90 legislation was the legislature's response to the Supreme Court's mandate to equalize spending among the state's public schools. An escape valve written into SB-90 granted districts the power to override the revenue limit by a simple majority vote. This paper examines the strategies…

  16. Family override of valid donor consent to postmortem donation: issues in law and practice.

    PubMed

    Downie, J; Shea, A; Rajotte, C

    2008-06-01

    In 2005, 3974 Canadians were on waiting lists for organ transplants and 275 patients died while waiting. Canada's organ shortage has led to calls for changes to Canada's organ donation system and its legal framework. Herein we examine an issue in which law reform could both increase the number of available organs and better align practice with respect for autonomy, a core value underpinning the Canadian legal system: the issue of family overrides of a valid donor consent to postmortem donation. That is, we examine what should happen when an individual consented to postmortem donation but the family would like to override that consent. First, we examine the requirements for valid donor consent. Second, we consider the legal status of family overrides of valid donor consent in relation to postmortem donation. Third, we describe the available data with regard to the practice of permitting families to override valid donor consent and discuss the possible reasons for this practice. Finally, we describe and defend the desired results with respect to law reform and describe the actions needed to realize these results. PMID:18589083

  17. Continental Growth and the Sedimentary Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhuime, B.; Hawkesworth, C. J.; Robinson, R. A. J.; Cawood, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    Detrital sedimentary rocks provide average samples of the continental crust formed at different times and in different places. Some materials are more susceptible to erosion and/or to preservation bias than others, and one issue is to understand how the compositions of a range of source rocks are then recorded in the sediments. Here we considered two different approaches to model the growth of the continental crust: (i) The variation of Nd isotopes in continental shales with different deposition ages, which requires a correction of the bias induced by preferential erosion of younger rocks through an erosion parameter usually referred to as 'K'. The determination of K, and the extent to which it varies in different erosion systems, thus have fundamental implications for the models of continental growth based on radiogenic isotopes in continental sediments. (ii) The variations in U-Pb, Hf and O isotopes in detrital zircons, from 'modern' sediments sampled worldwide. In this approach, O isotopes are used to screen 'hybrid' Hf model ages (i.e. ages resulting from mixing processes of crustal material from different ages) from Hf model ages that represent actual crust formation ages. These two approaches independently suggest that the continental crust has been generated continuously, but with a marked decrease in the continental growth rate at ~3 Ga. The >4 Ga to ~3 Ga period is characterised by relatively high net rates of continental growth (~3.0 km3.a-1), which are similar to the rates at which new crust is generated, and destroyed, at the present time. Net growth rates are much lower since 3 Ga (~0.8 km3.a-1), which may be attributed to higher rates of destruction of continental crust. The inflexion in the continental growth curve at ~3 Ga indicates a change in the way the crust was generated and preserved. This change may be linked to onset of subduction-driven plate tectonics and discrete subduction zones.

  18. The buoyancy variation of plate coupling from subduction to collision: an example across the northernmost Manila trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Chung-Liang; Doo, Wen-Bin; Kuo-Chen, Hao; Hsu, Shu-Kun

    2015-04-01

    The Manila trench is the boundary between the South China Sea (SCS) of Eurasian Plate (EU) and Philippine Sea Plate (PSP). The east subducting of SCS is a ceased rifting oceanic crust. To the north, the subduction is obscured and transits to collision extended to the Taiwan orogenesis. The Taiwan Integrated Geodynamics Research (TAIGER) project has implemented several offshore multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection and wide-angle seismic experiments to model the velocity structure of the incipient arc-continental collision. Amongst, along two trench perpendicular transects (MGL0905_23, 25) are associated with ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) deployed in the northern Manila trench. The transect MCS data and tomographic velocity structure provide well constraint on the recognition between the crust and mantle lithosphere that helps to reconstruct synthetic density structure to fit the observation gravity data. The synthetic gravity result along two transects also show that there exists an anomalous high density (~2.97 g/cm3) mass beneath the accretionary prism in the leading edge of overriding plate; however, unfortunately, the MCS and OBS data have no resolution there. Meanwhile, the buoyancies of crust (Hc) and mantle lithosphere (Hm) can be calculated associated with the residual topography based on the isostatic equilibrium. According to the contribution of Hm, the estimation of the plate coupling effect can be approached. Combining two transects data across the northern Manila trench and one profile across the Hengchun Peninsula in southern Taiwan (T29-33, TAICRUST project), a sequence from subduction to collision of plate coupling effect can therefore be evaluated, and also offers the opportunity to examine the lithospheric structure variation in the zone between Taiwan and northernmost Manila trench.

  19. Tectonic speed limits from plate kinematic reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahirovic, Sabin; Müller, R. Dietmar; Seton, Maria; Flament, Nicolas

    2015-05-01

    The motion of plates and continents on the planet's surface are a manifestation of long-term mantle convection and plate tectonics. Present-day plate velocities provide a snapshot of this ongoing process, and have been used to infer controlling factors on the speeds of plates and continents. However, present-day velocities do not capture plate behaviour over geologically representative periods of time. To address this shortcoming, we use a plate tectonic reconstruction approach to extract time-dependent plate velocities and geometries from which root mean square (RMS) velocities are computed, resulting in a median RMS plate speed of ∼ 4 cm /yr over 200 Myr. Linking tectonothermal ages of continental lithosphere to the RMS plate velocity analysis, we find that the increasing portions of plate area composed of continental and/or cratonic lithosphere significantly reduces plate speeds. Plates with any cratonic portion have a median RMS velocity of ∼ 5.8 cm /yr, while plates with more than 25% of cratonic area have a median RMS speed of ∼ 2.8 cm /yr. The fastest plates (∼ 8.5 cm /yr RMS speed) have little continental fraction and tend to be bounded by subduction zones, while the slowest plates (∼ 2.6- 2.8 cm /yr RMS speed) have large continental fractions and usually have little to no subducting part of plate perimeter. More generally, oceanic plates tend to move 2-3 times faster than continental plates, consistent with predictions of numerical models of mantle convection. The slower motion of continental plates is compatible with deep keels impinging on asthenospheric flow and increasing shear traction, thus anchoring the plate in the more viscous mantle transition zone. We also find that short-lived (up to ∼ 10 Myr) rapid accelerations of Africa (∼100 and 65 Ma), North America (∼100 and 55 Ma) and India (∼ 130 , 80 and 65 Ma) appear to be correlated with plume head arrivals as recorded by large igneous province (LIPs) emplacement. By evaluating

  20. Aeromagnetic data and geological structure of continental China: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Sheng-Qing; Tong, Jing; Ding, Yan-Yun; Li, Zhan-Kui

    2016-06-01

    We review the latest aeromagnetic geological data of continental China. We discuss the latest achievements in geological mapping and the newly detected features based on aeromagnetic data. Using aeromagnetic data collected for more than 50 years, a series of 1:5000000 and 1:1000000 aeromagnetic maps of continental China were compiled using state-of-the-art digital technology, and data processing and transformation. Guided by plate tectonics and continental dynamics, rock physical properties, and magnetic anomalies, we compiled maps of the depth of the magnetic basement of continental China and the major geotectonic units, and presented newly detected geological structures based on the aeromagnetic data.

  1. Upper Plate Tectonics and Fluid Flow Along the Middle America Convergent Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huguen, C.; Ranero, C. R.; Weinrebe, W.; Sahling, H.; Borhmann, G.; Klaucke, I.

    2002-12-01

    We present new multibeam bathymetry, side scan sonar, sub-bottom profiling, deep towed video camera images and sampling from active structures related to tectonics and fluid flow at the overriding plate of the Middle America subduction zone. Data were collected during SONNE 163-1 cruise at key locations based on full bathymetric coverage of the margin with a ~ 100 m grid. We surveyed normal faults along the middle-upper continental slope and associated mounds. Also, the locus of seamount subduction was investigated. The new bathymetry has been gridded at ~ 25 m. Deep towed side scan sonar data have a resolution of ~ 1 m. Subbottom high resolution profiling images the upper ~ 100 m of slope sediment. Deep towed camera observations and sampling were used to ground truth the geophysical data. The canyon system present in the upper slope terminates abruptly at the ~ mid slope where normal faulting develops. Roughly coincident with the faulting development, groups of small mounds (few 100s m to 1 km long and < 100 m to 150 m high) occur along the upper-middle slope. These mounds, previously interpreted as mud volcanoes, do not show evidence of mud flows in the side scan data. Deep towed camera and dredging at numerous locations indicate that the surface of the mounds is made of chemoherm carbonates that yield a characteristic high reflectivity in back scatter images. The mounds seem to be areas of fluid discharge and chemosynthetic fauna was observed locally in all of the structures investigated. The mounds are spatially coincident and may be associated to the development of the faults. Their fate may also be related to the faulting: mounds disappear downslope as the fault throw increases. Data from the areas of active seamount subduction show clear evidence for recent/ongoing tectonism at the uplifted overriding plate. The largest deformation occurs at the summit of the uplift and at the trail of the seamount where sliding and slumping are active. Areas of the summit

  2. Magmatic processes that generate chemically distinct silicic magmas in NW Costa Rica and the evolution of juvenile continental crust in oceanic arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deering, Chad D.; Vogel, Thomas A.; Patino, Lina C.; Szymanski, David W.; Alvarado, Guillermo E.

    2012-02-01

    Northwestern Costa Rica is built upon an oceanic plateau that has developed chemical and geophysical characteristics of the upper continental crust. A major factor in converting the oceanic plateau to continental crust is the production, evolution, and emplacement of silicic magmas. In Costa Rica, the Caribbean Large Igneous Province (CLIP) forms the overriding plate in the subduction of the Cocos Plate—a process that has occurred for at least the last 25 my. Igneous rocks in Costa Rica older than about 8 Ma have chemical compositions typical of ocean island basalts and intra-oceanic arcs. In contrast, younger igneous deposits contain abundant silicic rocks, which are significantly enriched in SiO2, alkalis, and light rare-earth elements and are geochemically similar to the average upper continental crust. Geophysical evidence (high Vp seismic velocities) also indicates a relatively thick (~40 km), addition of evolved igneous rocks to the CLIP. The silicic deposits of NW Costa Rica occur in two major compositional groups: a high-Ti and a low-Ti group with no overlap between the two. The major and trace element characteristics of these groups are consistent with these magmas being derived from liquids that were extracted from crystal mushes—either produced by crystallization or by partial melting of plutons near their solidi. In relative terms, the high-Ti silicic liquids were extracted from a hot, dry crystal mush with low oxygen fugacity, where plagioclase and pyroxene were the dominant phases crystallizing, along with lesser amounts of hornblende. In contrast, the low-Ti silicic liquids were extracted from a cool, wet crystal mush with high oxygen fugacity, where plagioclase and amphibole were the dominant phases crystallizing. The hot-dry-reducing magmas dominate the older sequence, but the youngest sequence contains only magmas from the cold-wet-oxidized group. Silicic volcanic deposits from other oceanic arcs (e.g., Izu-Bonin, Marianas) have chemical

  3. Why does continental convergence stop

    SciTech Connect

    Hynes, A.

    1985-01-01

    Convergence between India and Asia slowed at 45 Ma when they collided, but continues today. This requires that substantial proportions of the Indian and/or Asian lithospheric mantle are still being subducted. The resulting slab-pull is probably comparable with that from complete lithospheric slabs and may promote continued continental convergence even after collision. Since descending lithospheric slabs are present at all collision zones at the time of collision such continued convergence may be general after continental collisions. It may cease only when there is a major (global) plate reorganization which results in new forces on the convergent continents that may counteract the slab-pull. These inferences may be tested on the late Paleozoic collision between Gondwanaland and Laurasia. This is generally considered to have been complete by mid-Permian time (250 Ma). However, this may be only the time of docking of Gondwanaland with North America, not that of the cessation of convergence. Paleomagnetic polar-wander paths for the Gondwanide continents exhibit consistently greater latitudinal shifts from 250 Ma to 200 Ma than those of Laurasia when corrected for post-Triassic drift, suggesting that convergence continued through late Permian well into the Triassic. It may have been accommodated by crustal thickening under what is now the US Coastal Plain, or by strike-slip faulting. Convergence may have ceased only when Pangea began to fragment again, in which case the cause for its cessation may be related to the cause of continental fragmentation.

  4. SU-E-T-599: Patient Safety Enhancements Through a Study of R&V System Override Data

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, K; Vimolchalao, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Record and verify (R&V) software systems include safety checks that compare actual machine parameters with prescribed values for a patient’s treatment, such as treatment couch position, linac, energy, and MUs. The therapist is warned of a mismatch with a pop-up and prompted to approve an override in order to continue without changes. Override approval is often legitimate, but the pop-up can also genuinely indicate a problem that would Result in the wrong treatment. When there are numerous pop-up warnings, human nature leads us to approve any override without careful reading, undermining the effectiveness of the safety mechanism. Methods: Override data was collected from our R&V system for all patients treated between October 8 and 29, 2012, on four linacs and entered into a spreadsheet. Additional data collected included treatment technique, disease site, immobilization, time, linac, and whether localization images were obtained. Data were analyzed using spreadsheet tools to reveal trends, patterns and associations that might suggest appropriate process changes that could decrease the total number of overrides. Results: 76 out of 113 patients had overrides. Out of the 944 treatments, 599 override items were generated. The majority were due to couch positions. 74 of the 84 overrides on a linac equipped with a 6D couch were due to the use of the rotational corrections and the fact that the 6D couch control does not communicate with the R&V system; translations required to rotate the couch appear to the R&V system as translations outside the tolerance range. Conclusion: Many findings were interesting but did not suggest a process change. Proposed process changes include creating site-specific instead of just technique-specific tolerance tables for couch shifts. Proposed improvements to the vendor are to facilitate direct communication between the 6D couch and the R&V system to eliminate those override warnings related to lack of communication.

  5. Subduction-driven recycling of continental margin lithosphere.

    PubMed

    Levander, A; Bezada, M J; Niu, F; Humphreys, E D; Palomeras, I; Thurner, S M; Masy, J; Schmitz, M; Gallart, J; Carbonell, R; Miller, M S

    2014-11-13

    Whereas subduction recycling of oceanic lithosphere is one of the central themes of plate tectonics, the recycling of continental lithosphere appears to be far more complicated and less well understood. Delamination and convective downwelling are two widely recognized processes invoked to explain the removal of lithospheric mantle under or adjacent to orogenic belts. Here we relate oceanic plate subduction to removal of adjacent continental lithosphere in certain plate tectonic settings. We have developed teleseismic body wave images from dense broadband seismic experiments that show higher than expected volumes of anomalously fast mantle associated with the subducted Atlantic slab under northeastern South America and the Alboran slab beneath the Gibraltar arc region; the anomalies are under, and are aligned with, the continental margins at depths greater than 200 kilometres. Rayleigh wave analysis finds that the lithospheric mantle under the continental margins is significantly thinner than expected, and that thin lithosphere extends from the orogens adjacent to the subduction zones inland to the edges of nearby cratonic cores. Taking these data together, here we describe a process that can lead to the loss of continental lithosphere adjacent to a subduction zone. Subducting oceanic plates can viscously entrain and remove the bottom of the continental thermal boundary layer lithosphere from adjacent continental margins. This drives surface tectonics and pre-conditions the margins for further deformation by creating topography along the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. This can lead to development of secondary downwellings under the continental interior, probably under both South America and the Gibraltar arc, and to delamination of the entire lithospheric mantle, as around the Gibraltar arc. This process reconciles numerous, sometimes mutually exclusive, geodynamic models proposed to explain the complex oceanic-continental tectonics of these subduction zones

  6. Subduction-Driven Recycling of Continental Margin Lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levander, A.; Bezada, M. J.; Niu, F.; Palomeras, I.; Thurner, S.; Humphreys, E.; Miller, M. S.; Carbonell, R.; Gallart, J.; Schmitz, M.

    2014-12-01

    While subduction recycling of oceanic lithosphere is one of the central themes of plate tectonics, recycling continental lithosphere appears far more complicated and is less well understood. Delamination and convective downwelling are two widely recognized processes invoked to explain the removal of lithospheric mantle under or adjacent to orogenic belts. Here we describe another process that can lead to the loss of continental lithosphere adjacent to a subduction zone: Subducting oceanic plates can entrain and recycle lithospheric mantle from an adjacent continent and disrupt the continental lithosphere far inland from the subduction zone. Seismic images from recent dense broadband arrays on opposite sides of the Atlantic show higher than expected volumes of positive anomalies identified as the subducted Atlantic (ATL) slab under northeastern South America (SA), and the Alboran slab beneath the Gibraltar arc region (GA). The positive anomalies lie under and are aligned with the continental margins at depths greater than 200 km. Closer to the surface we find that the continental margin lithospheric mantle is significantly thinner than expected beneath the orogens adjacent to the subduction zones. Thinner than expected lithosphere extends inland as far as the edges of nearby cratonic cores. These observations suggest that subducting oceanic plates viscously entrain and remove continental mantle lithosphere from beneath adjacent continental margins, modulating the surface tectonics and pre-conditioning the margins for further deformation. The latter can include delamination of the entire lithospheric mantle, as around GA, inferred by results from active and passive seismic experiments. Secondary downwellings develop under the continental interior inland from the subduction zone: We image one under SA and one or more in the past were likely under GA. The process of subduction-driven continental margin lithosphere removal reconciles numerous, sometimes mutually

  7. Are We Heeding the Warning Signs? Examining Providers’ Overrides of Computerized Drug-Drug Interaction Alerts in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Slight, Sarah P.; Seger, Diane L.; Nanji, Karen C.; Cho, Insook; Maniam, Nivethietha; Dykes, Patricia C.; Bates, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Health IT can play a major role in improving patient safety. Computerized physician order entry with decision support can alert providers to potential prescribing errors. However, too many alerts can result in providers ignoring and overriding clinically important ones. Objective To evaluate the appropriateness of providers’ drug-drug interaction (DDI) alert overrides, the reasons why they chose to override these alerts, and what actions they took as a consequence of the alert. Design A cross-sectional, observational study of DDI alerts generated over a three-year period between January 1st, 2009, and December 31st, 2011. Setting Primary care practices affiliated with two Harvard teaching hospitals. The DDI alerts were screened to minimize the number of clinically unimportant warnings. Participants A total of 24,849 DDI alerts were generated in the study period, with 40% accepted. The top 62 providers with the highest override rate were identified and eight overrides randomly selected for each (a total of 496 alert overrides for 438 patients, 3.3% of the sample). Results Overall, 68.2% (338/496) of the DDI alert overrides were considered appropriate. Among inappropriate overrides, the therapeutic combinations put patients at increased risk of several specific conditions including: serotonin syndrome (21.5%, n=34), cardiotoxicity (16.5%, n=26), or sharp falls in blood pressure or significant hypotension (28.5%, n=45). A small number of drugs and DDIs accounted for a disproportionate share of alert overrides. Of the 121 appropriate alert overrides where the provider indicated they would “monitor as recommended”, a detailed chart review revealed that only 35.5% (n=43) actually did. Providers sometimes reported that patients had already taken interacting medications together (15.7%, n=78), despite no evidence to confirm this. Conclusions and Relevance We found that providers continue to override important and useful alerts that are likely to cause

  8. Plate motion

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, R.G. )

    1991-01-01

    The motion of tectonic plates on the earth is characterized in a critical review of U.S. research from the period 1987-1990. Topics addressed include the NUVEL-1 global model of current plate motions, diffuse plate boundaries and the oceanic lithosphere, the relation between plate motions and distributed deformations, accelerations and the steadiness of plate motions, the distribution of current Pacific-North America motion across western North America and its margin, plate reconstructions and their uncertainties, hotspots, and plate dynamics. A comprehensive bibliography is provided. 126 refs.

  9. Constraints on continental accretion from sedimentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Dallas

    1988-01-01

    Heat loss in the ancient Earth was discussed assuming that classical sea floor spreading was the only mechanism. This may be expressed as faster spreading or longer total ridge length. These have important implications as to the size and number of cratonic plates in the distant past, the degree to which they are flooded, the kinds of sediments and volcanics that would be expected, and the amount of recycling of continental material taking place. The higher proportion of marine sedimentary rocks and oceanic volcanics in the Archean, and the relative paucity of evaporites and continental volcanics may in part be due to smaller cratonic blocks. A model was developed of the percentage of continental flooding which utilizes round continents and a constant width of the zone of flooding. This model produces a reasonable good fit to the percentage of flooding on the present day continents.

  10. Characteristics and effects of nurse dosing over-rides on computer-based intensive insulin therapy protocol performance

    PubMed Central

    May, Addison K; Waitman, Lemuel R; Ozdas, Asli; Lorenzi, Nancy M; Gadd, Cynthia S

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine characteristics and effects of nurse dosing over-rides of a clinical decision support system (CDSS) for intensive insulin therapy (IIT) in critical care units. Design Retrospective analysis of patient database records and ethnographic study of nurses using IIT CDSS. Measurements The authors determined the frequency, direction—greater than recommended (GTR) and less than recommended (LTR)— and magnitude of over-rides, and then compared recommended and over-ride doses' blood glucose (BG) variability and insulin resistance, two measures of IIT CDSS associated with mortality. The authors hypothesized that rates of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia would be greater for recommended than over-ride doses. Finally, the authors observed and interviewed nurse users. Results 5.1% (9075) of 179 452 IIT CDSS doses were over-rides. 83.4% of over-ride doses were LTR, and 45.5% of these were ≥50% lower than recommended. In contrast, 78.9% of GTR doses were ≤25% higher than recommended. When recommended doses were administered, the rate of hypoglycemia was higher than the rate for GTR (p=0.257) and LTR (p=0.033) doses. When recommended doses were administered, the rate of hyperglycemia was lower than the rate for GTR (p=0.003) and LTR (p<0.001) doses. Estimates of patients' insulin requirements were higher for LTR doses than recommended and GTR doses. Nurses reported trusting IIT CDSS overall but appeared concerned about recommendations when administering LTR doses. Conclusion When over-riding IIT CDSS recommendations, nurses overwhelmingly administered LTR doses, which emphasized prevention of hypoglycemia but interfered with hyperglycemia control, especially when BG was >150 mg/dl. Nurses appeared to consider the amount of a recommended insulin dose, not a patient's trend of insulin resistance, when administering LTR doses overall. Over-rides affected IIT CDSS protocol performance. PMID:21402737

  11. Seismic slip on an upper-plate normal fault during a large subduction megathrust rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Stephen P.; Rietbrock, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Quantification of stress accumulation and release during subduction zone seismic cycles requires an understanding of the distribution of fault slip during earthquakes. Reconstructions of slip are typically constrained to a single, known fault plane. Yet, slip has been shown to occur on multiple faults within the subducting plate owing to stress triggering, resulting in phenomena such as earthquake doublets. However, rapid stress triggering from the plate interface to faults in the overriding plate has not been documented before. We have analysed seismic data from the magnitude 7.1 Araucania earthquake that occurred in the Chilean subduction zone in January 2011. We find that the earthquake, which was reported as a single event in global moment tensor solutions, was instead composed of two ruptures on two separate faults. We use 3-D full waveform simulations to better constrain the centroid of the second rupture. Within 12 s, a thrust earthquake (Mw 6.8) on the plate interface triggered a second large rupture on a normal fault 30 km away in the overriding plate (Mw 6.7). We define this set of events as a 'closely spaced doublet' (CSD). This configuration of partitioned rupture is consistent with normal-faulting mechanisms in the ensuing aftershock sequence. We conclude that plate interface rupture can trigger almost instantaneous slip in the overriding plate of a subduction zone. This shallow upper-plate rupture may be masked from teleseismic data, posing a challenge for real-time tsunami warning systems.

  12. Earth's continental crustal gold endowment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frimmel, H. E.

    2008-03-01

    The analysis of the temporal distribution of gold deposits, combined with gold production data as well as reserve and resource estimates for different genetic types of gold deposit, revealed that the bulk of the gold known to be concentrated in ore bodies was added to the continental crust during a giant Mesoarchaean gold event at a time (3 Ga) when the mantle temperature reached a maximum and the dominant style of tectonic movement changed from vertical, plume-related to subhorizontal plate tectonic. A magmatic derivation of the first generation of crustal gold from a relatively hot mantle that was characterized by a high degree of partial melting is inferred from the gold chemistry, specifically high Os contents. While a large proportion of that gold is still present in only marginally modified palaeoplacer deposits of the Mesoarchaean Witwatersrand Basin in South Africa, accounting for about 40% of all known gold, the remainder has been recycled repeatedly on a lithospheric scale, predominantly by plate-tectonically induced magmatic and hydrothermal fluid circulation, to produce the current variety of gold deposit types. Post-Archaean juvenile gold addition to the continental crust has been limited, but a mantle contribution to some of the largest orogenic or intrusion-related gold deposits is indicated, notably for the Late Palaeozoic Tien Shan gold province. Magmatic fluids in active plate margins seem to be the most effective transport medium for gold mobilization, giving rise to a large proportion of volcanic-arc related gold deposits. Due to their generally shallow crustal level of formation, they have a low preservation potential. In contrast, those gold deposits that form at greater depth are more widespread also in older rocks. This explains the high proportion of orogenic (including intrusion-related) gold (32%) amongst all known gold deposits. The overall proportion of gold concentrated in known ore bodies is only 7 × 10- 7 of the estimated total

  13. Deep continental margin reflectors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ewing, J.; Heirtzler, J.; Purdy, M.; Klitgord, Kim D.

    1985-01-01

    In contrast to the rarity of such observations a decade ago, seismic reflecting and refracting horizons are now being observed to Moho depths under continental shelves in a number of places. These observations provide knowledge of the entire crustal thickness from the shoreline to the oceanic crust on passive margins and supplement Consortium for Continental Reflection Profiling (COCORP)-type measurements on land.

  14. Freshly brewed continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazel, E.; Hayes, J. L.; Caddick, M. J.; Madrigal, P.

    2015-12-01

    Earth's crust is the life-sustaining interface between our planet's deep interior and surface. Basaltic crusts similar to Earth's oceanic crust characterize terrestrial planets in the solar system while the continental masses, areas of buoyant, thick silicic crust, are a unique characteristic of Earth. Therefore, understanding the processes responsible for the formation of continents is fundamental to reconstructing the evolution of our planet. We use geochemical and geophysical data to reconstruct the evolution of the Central American Land Bridge (Costa Rica and Panama) over the last 70 Ma. We also include new preliminary data from a key turning point (~12-6 Ma) from the evolution from an oceanic arc depleted in incompatible elements to a juvenile continental mass in order to evaluate current models of continental crust formation. We also discovered that seismic P-waves (body waves) travel through the crust at velocities closer to the ones observed in continental crust worldwide. Based on global statistical analyses of all magmas produced today in oceanic arcs compared to the global average composition of continental crust we developed a continental index. Our goal was to quantitatively correlate geochemical composition with the average P-wave velocity of arc crust. We suggest that although the formation and evolution of continents may involve many processes, melting enriched oceanic crust within a subduction zone, a process probably more common in the Achaean where most continental landmasses formed, can produce the starting material necessary for juvenile continental crust formation.

  15. Overriding "doing wrong" and "not doing right": validation of the Dispositional Self-Control Scale (DSC).

    PubMed

    Ein-Gar, Danit; Sagiv, Lilach

    2014-01-01

    We present the Dispositional Self-Control (DSC) Scale, which reflects individuals' tendency to override 2 types of temptations, termed doing wrong and not doing right. We report a series of 5 studies designed to test the reliability and validity of the scale. As hypothesized, high DSC predicts distant future orientation and low DSC predicts deviant behaviors such as aggression, alcohol misuse, and aberrant driving. DSC also predicts task performance among resource-depleted participants. Taken together, these findings suggest that the DSC Scale could be a useful tool toward further understanding the role of personality in overcoming self-control challenges. PMID:24611844

  16. Dual fuel gradients in uranium silicide plates

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, B.W.

    1997-08-01

    Babcock & Wilcox has been able to achieve dual gradient plates with good repeatability in small lots of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} plates. Improvements in homogeneity and other processing parameters and techniques have allowed the development of contoured fuel within the cladding. The most difficult obstacles to overcome have been the ability to evaluate the bidirectional fuel loadings in comparison to the perfect loading model and the different methods of instilling the gradients in the early compact stage. The overriding conclusion is that to control the contour of the fuel, a known relationship between the compact, the frames and final core gradient must exist. Therefore, further development in the creation and control of dual gradients in fuel plates will involve arriving at a plausible gradient requirement and building the correct model between the compact configuration and the final contoured loading requirements.

  17. A numerical investigation of continental collision styles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazian, Reza Khabbaz; Buiter, Susanne J. H.

    2013-06-01

    Continental collision after closure of an ocean can lead to different deformation styles: subduction of continental crust and lithosphere, lithospheric thickening, folding of the unsubducted continents, Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities and/or slab break-off. We use 2-D thermomechanical models of oceanic subduction followed by continental collision to investigate the sensitivity of these collision styles to driving velocity, crustal and lithospheric temperature, continental rheology and the initial density difference between the oceanic lithosphere and the asthenosphere. We find that these parameters influence the collision system, but that driving velocity, rheology and lithospheric (rather than Moho and mantle) temperature can be classified as important controls, whereas reasonable variations in the initial density contrast between oceanic lithosphere and asthenosphere are not necessarily important. Stable continental subduction occurs over a relatively large range of values of driving velocity and lithospheric temperature. Fast and cold systems are more likely to show folding, whereas slow and warm systems can experience RT-type dripping. Our results show that a continent with a strong upper crust can experience subduction of the entire crust and is more likely to fold. Accretion of the upper crust at the trench is feasible when the upper crust has a moderate to weak strength, whereas the entire crust can be scraped-off in the case of a weak lower crust. We also illustrate that weakening of the lithospheric mantle promotes RT-type of dripping in a collision system. We use a dynamic collision model, in which collision is driven by slab pull only, to illustrate that adjacent plates can play an important role in continental collision systems. In dynamic collision models, exhumation of subducted continental material and sediments is triggered by slab retreat and opening of a subduction channel, which allows upward flow of buoyant materials. Exhumation continues

  18. Numerical comparison of different convergent plate contacts: subduction channel and subduction fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Franco, Roberta; Govers, Rob; Wortel, Rinus

    2007-10-01

    At convergent plate boundaries, the properties of the actual plate contact are important for the overall dynamics. Convergent plate boundaries both mechanically decouple and link tectonic plates and accommodate large amounts of strain. We investigate two fundamental physical states of the subduction contact: one based on a fault and the other based on a subduction channel. Using a finite element method, we determine the specific signatures of both states of the subduction contact. We pay particular attention to the overriding plate. In a tectonic setting of converging plates, where the subducting plate is freely moving, the subduction channel reduces compression relative to the fault model. In a land-locked basin setting, where the relative motion between the far field of the plates is zero, the subduction channel model produces tensile stress regime in the overriding plate, even though the amount of slab roll-back is small. The fault model shows a stronger development of slab roll-back and a compressive stress regime in the upper plate. Based on a consistent comparison of fault and channel numerical models, we find that the nature of the plate contact is one of the controlling factors in developing or not of backarc extension. We conclude that, the type of plate contact plays a decisive role in controlling the backarc state of stress. To obtain backarc extension, roll-back is required as an underling geodynamic process, but it is not always a sufficient condition.

  19. Plate tectonics conserves angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowin, C.

    2009-03-01

    of seafloor spreading) are adjustment zones that accommodate strains in the lithosphere. Further, the interlocked pattern of the Australian and Pacific plates the past 42 Million years (with their absolute plate motions near 90° to each other) is taken as strong evidence that large thermally driven "roller" convection cells previously inferred as the driving mechanism in earlier interpretations of continental drift and plate tectonics, have not been active in the Earth's mantle the past 42 Million years, if ever. This report also presents estimates of the changes in location and magnitude of the Earth's axis of total plate tectonic angular momentum for the past 62 million years.

  20. Thermal and mechanical structure of the upper mantle: A comparison between continental and oceanic models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froidevaux, C.; Schubert, G.; Yuen, D. A.

    1976-01-01

    Temperature, velocity, and viscosity profiles for coupled thermal and mechanical models of the upper mantle beneath continental shields and old ocean basins show that under the continents, both tectonic plates and the asthenosphere, are thicker than they are beneath the oceans. The minimum value of viscosity in the continental asthenosphere is about an order of magnitude larger than in the shear zone beneath oceans. The shear stress or drag underneath continental plates is also approximately an order of magnitude larger than the drag on oceanic plates. Effects of shear heating may account for flattening of ocean floor topography and heat flux in old ocean basins.

  1. Oceanology of the antarctic continental shelf: Volume 43

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, S.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses the seas of the deep continental shelf, which play an important climatic role in sea ice production, deep ocean ventilation and wastage of the Antarctic ice sheet. This volume includes analyses of measurements taken from ships and satellites, and from sea ice and glacial ice. High resolution profiling equipment, long term bottom-moored instruments, continuous remote sensors, geochemical tracers and computer models have provided the basis for new insights into the continental shelf circulation. Color plates and an accompanying GEBCO Circum-Antarctic map effectively portray the continental shelf in relation to the glaciated continent, the sea ice and the surrounding Southern Ocean.

  2. Continental rifting - Progress and outlook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, B. H.; Morgan, P.

    1981-01-01

    It is noted that in spite of the flood of new data on continental rifts in the last 15 years, there is little consensus about the basic mechanisms and causes of rifting. The remarkable similarities in rift cross sections (shown in a figure), are considered to suggest that the anomalous lithospheric structure of rifts is more dependent on lithosphere properties than the mode of rifting. It is thought that there is a spectrum of rifting processes for which two fundamental mechanisms can be postulated: an active mechanism, whereby thermal energy is transmitted into the lithosphere from the underlying asthenosphere, and a passive mechanism by which mechanical energy is transmitted laterally through the lithosphere as a consequence of plate interactions at a distance. In order to permit the concept of the two fundamentally different mechanisms to be tested, a tentative classification is proposed that divides rifts into two basic categories: active rifting and passive rifting. Here, the magnitude of active rifting will depend on the rate at which lithosphere moves over the thermal source, with rifts being restricted to stationary or slow-moving plates.

  3. Beyond plate tectonics - Looking at plate deformation with space geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Thomas H.; Minster, J. Bernard

    1988-01-01

    The requirements that must be met by space-geodetic systems in order to constrain the horizontal secular motions associated with the geological deformation of the earth's surface are explored. It is suggested that in order to improve existing plate-motion models, the tangential components of relative velocities on interplate baselines must be resolved to an accuracy of less than 3 mm/yr. Results indicate that measuring the velocities between crustal blocks to + or - 5 mm/yr on 100-km to 1000-km scales can produce geologically significant constraints on the integrated deformation rates across continental plate-boundary zones such as the western United States.

  4. Petrogenesis of Cretaceous mafic intrusive rocks in the Fosdick Mountains, Marie Byrd Land, West Antarctica: melting of metasomatized sub-continental arc mantle along the active plate margin of Gondwana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, S.; Brown, M.; Korhonen, F. J.; Mcfadden, R. R.; Siddoway, C. S.

    2013-12-01

    A diorite pluton and widely distributed mafic dykes occur in the Fosdick migmatite-granite complex, which is interpreted to represent middle-to-lower crustal rocks of the paleo-Pacific active continental margin of Gondwana. The mafic dykes exhibit a variety of relationships with host rocks in the field ranging from undeformed dykes with sharp contacts with host gneisses to dismembered dykes with comingled textures and numerous back-veins of leucosome intruded from host migmatitic gneisses suggestive of significant interaction with crustal rocks. U-Pb ages for magmatic zircon in these rocks yields Cretaceous crystallization ages ranging from ca. 113 Ma to ca. 98 Ma for the mafic dykes and ca. 100 Ma for the diorite pluton. These mafic intrusive rocks, which contain abundant hydrous minerals, are medium- to high-K-series calc-alkaline rocks with basic-intermediate compositions (47-59 wt % SiO2 for mafic dykes and 52-56 wt % SiO2 for the diorite pluton). They have trace element patterns characterized by LILE enrichments and negative Nb anomalies indicating an origin from a hydrous mantle source metasomatized by slab-derived components. The samples without evidence of interaction with crustal rocks, which are likely to better reflect the mantle source composition, have positive ɛSr(100Ma) values (+8.1 to +14.5) and negative to slightly positive ɛNd(100Ma) values (-1.6 to +2.5) consistent with derivation from an enriched mantle source. These samples may be divided into two groups either characterized by higher LILE/HFSE ratios, less radiogenic ɛSr(100Ma) values and more radiogenic ɛNd(100Ma) values, or characterized by relatively lower LILE/ HFSE ratios, more radiogenic ɛSr(100Ma) values and less radiogenic ɛNd(100Ma) values suggesting differences in the mantle source. The results of this study are consistent with melting of a variably metasomatized sub-arc mantle source during a transition from a wrench to a transtensional tectonic setting, but are inconsistent

  5. Subduction evolution and mantle dynamics at a continental margin: Central North Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, T. A.; Stratford, W. R.; Salmon, M. L.

    2006-12-01

    Central North Island, New Zealand, provides an unusually complete geological and geophysical record of the onset and evolution of subduction at a continental margin. Whereas most subduction zones are innately two-dimensional, North Island of New Zealand displays a distinct three-dimensional character in the back-arc regions. Specifically, we observe "Mariana-type" subduction in the back-arc areas of central North Island in the sense of back-arc extension, high heat flow, prolific volcanism, geothermal activity, and active doming and exhumation of the solid surface. Evidence for emplacement of a significant percent of new lithosphere beneath the central North Island comes from heat flux of 25 MW/km of strike (of volcanic zone) and thinned crust underlain by rocks with a seismic wave speed consistent with underplated new crust. Seismic attenuation (Qp-1) is high (˜240), and rhyolitic and andesitic volcanism are widespread. Almost complete removal of mantle lithosphere is inferred here in Pliocene times on the basis of the rock uplift history and upper mantle seismic velocities as low as 7.4 ± 0.1 km/s. In contrast, southwestern North Island exhibits "Chilean-type" back-arc activity in the sense of compressive tectonics, reverse faulting, low-heat-flow, thickened lithosphere, and strong coupling between the subducted and overriding plates. This rapid switch from Mariana-type to Chilean-type subduction occurs despite the age of the subducted plate being constant under North Island. Moreover, stratigraphic evidence shows that processes that define the extensional back-arc area (the Central Volcanic Region) are advancing southward into the compressional system (Wanganui Basin) at about 10 mm/yr. We link the progression from one system to another to a gradual and viscous removal of thickened mantle lithosphere in the back-arc regions. Thickening occurred during the Miocene within the Taranaki Fault Zone. The process of thickening and convective removal is time- and

  6. Relationship between plume and plate tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchkov, V. N.

    2016-07-01

    The relationship between plate- and plume-tectonics is considered in view of the growth and breakdown of supercontinents, active rifting, the formation of passive volcanic-type continental margins, and the origin of time-progressive volcanic chains on oceanic and continental plates. The mantle wind phenomenon is described, as well as its effect on plume morphology and anisotropy of the ambient mantle. The interaction of plumes and mid-ocean ridges is discussed. The principles and problems of plume activity analysis in subduction- and collision-related foldbelts are considered and illustrated with examples.

  7. Overriding parents' medical decisions for their children: a systematic review of normative literature.

    PubMed

    McDougall, Rosalind J; Notini, Lauren

    2014-07-01

    This paper reviews the ethical literature on conflicts between health professionals and parents about medical decision-making for children. We present the results of a systematic review which addressed the question 'when health professionals and parents disagree about the appropriate course of medical treatment for a child,under what circumstances is the health professional ethically justified in overriding the parents' wishes?’ We identified nine different ethical frameworks that were put forward by their authors as applicable across various ages and clinical scenarios. Each of these frameworks centred on a different key moral concept including harm,constrained parental autonomy, best interests, medically reasonable alternatives, responsible thinking and rationality. PMID:23824967

  8. Characteristics and override rates of order checks in a practitioner order entry system.

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Thomas H.; Nichol, W. Paul; Hoey, Patty; Savarino, James

    2002-01-01

    Order checks are important error prevention tools when used in conjunction with practitioner order entry systems. We studied characteristics of order checks generated in a sample of consecutively entered orders during a 4 week period in an electronic medical record at VA Puget Sound. We found that in the 42,641 orders where an order check could potentially be generated, 11% generated at least one order check and many generated more than one order check. The rates at which the ordering practitioner overrode 'Critical drug interaction' and 'Allergy-drug interaction' alerts in this sample were 88% and 69% respectively. This was in part due to the presence of alerts for interactions between systemic and topical medications and for alerts generated during medication renewals. Refinement in order check logic could lead to lower override rates and increase practitioner acceptance and effectiveness of order checks. PMID:12463894

  9. Effects of successive relearning on recall: Does relearning override the effects of initial learning criterion?

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Kalif E; Dunlosky, John; Rawson, Katherine A

    2016-08-01

    Retrieval practice improves memory for many kinds of materials, and numerous factors moderate the benefits of retrieval practice, including the amount of successful retrieval practice (referred to as the learning criterion). In general, the benefits of retrieval practice are greater with more than with less successful retrieval practice; however, learning items to a higher (vs. lower) criterion requires more time and effort. If students plan on relearning material in a subsequent study session, does the benefit of learning to a higher criterion during an initial session persist? In Session 1, participants studied and successfully recalled Swahili-English word pairs one, two, three, four, five, six, or seven times. In subsequent sessions, all of the pairs were relearned to a criterion of one correct recall at one-week intervals across four or five successive relearning sessions. Experiments 1 and 2 revealed that the substantial benefits of learning to a higher initial criterion during the first session do not persist across relearning sessions. This relearning-override effect was also demonstrated in Experiment 2 after a one-month retention interval. The implications of relearning-override effects are important for theory and for education. For theories of test-enhanced learning, they support the predictions of one theory and appear inconsistent with the predictions of another. For education, if relearning is to occur, using extra time to learn to a higher initial learning criterion is not efficient. Instead, students should devote their time to subsequent spaced relearning sessions, which produce substantial gains in recall performance. PMID:27027887

  10. The adenovirus E1A protein overrides the requirement for cellular ras in initiating DNA synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, D W; Dobrowolski, S F; Piotrkowski, A; Harter, M L

    1994-01-01

    The adenovirus E1A protein can induce cellular DNA synthesis in growth-arrested cells by interacting with the cellular protein p300 or pRb. In addition, serum- and growth factor-dependent cells require ras activity to initiate DNA synthesis and recently we have shown that Balb/c 3T3 cells can be blocked in either early or late G1 following microinjection of an anti-ras antibody. In this study, the E1A 243 amino acid protein is shown through microinjection not only to shorten the G0 to S phase interval but, what is more important, to override the inhibitory effects exerted by the anti-ras antibody in either early or late G1. Specifically, whether E1A is co-injected with anti-ras into quiescent cells or injected 18 h following a separate injection of anti-ras after serum stimulation, it efficiently induces cellular DNA synthesis in cells that would otherwise be blocked in G0/G1. Moreover, injection of a mutant form of E1A that can no longer associate with p300 is just as efficient as wild-type E1A in stimulating DNA synthesis in cells whose ras activity has been neutralized by anti-ras. The results presented here show that E1A is capable of overriding the requirement of cellular ras activity in promoting the entry of cells into S phase. Moreover, the results suggest the possibility that pRb and/or pRb-related proteins may function in a ras-dependent pathway that enables E1A to achieve this activity. Images PMID:7813447

  11. Initiation and propagation of shear zones in a heterogeneous continental lithosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Tommasi, A.; Vauchez, A.

    1995-11-10

    Numerical methods were used to investigate the deformation of a continental plate in northeastern Brazil. Of particular interest are the perturbations induced by a stiff compressional deformation of a highly heterogeneous continental lithosphere on the development of a shear zone formed at the termination of a stiff block.

  12. Kinematics to dynamics in the New Zealand Plate boundary zone: implications for the strength of the lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Simon

    2015-05-01

    New Zealand straddles the boundary between the Australian and Pacific Plate. Cenozoic relative plate motion has resulted in a complex pattern of faulting and block rotation in a zone of continental lithosphere up to 250 km wide. I investigate the implications of the short-term kinematics for the strength of the deforming lithosphere. I use a compilation of seismic reflection/refraction studies and high quality receiver function analyses to determine both the regional structure of the crust, which ranges from 20 to 50 km thick, and fields of buoyancy stress (or GPE per unit volume). Deformation over thousands of years is quantified in terms of velocity and strain rate fields, based on an inversion of neotectonic fault slip and palaeomagnetic data, in the context of the short-term relative plate motions. Forces on the subduction megathrust, as well as deviatoric stresses in the behind subduction region, are calculated from simple 2-D force balances across the Hikurangi Margin, given negligible deviatoric stresses at the along-strike transition between backarc extension and compression. Average megathrust shear stresses are in the range 6-15 MPa, and average lithospheric stresses <20 MPa in the overriding plate. The regional lithospheric strength of the plate boundary zone, assuming a viscous rheology (Newtonian or power law), is determined from an inversion of the field of gradients of buoyancy stress (averaged over either the top 25 km of the crust, or 100-km-thick lithosphere) and strain rate, using the thin sheet stress balance equations, calibrated with the subduction force balance analysis. Effective viscosities for the deforming lithosphere and/or crust are in the range 0.1-5 × 1021 Pa s, with marked weakening in zones of high strain rate, and an abrupt transition to viscosities >1022 Pa s at the margins of the rigid plates. If lateral variations in effective viscosity are only due to non-Newtonian behaviour, these data indicate a bulk power law rheology, with

  13. Continental rift jumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Charles A.

    1983-05-01

    Continental rift jumps, analogous to jumps of oceanic spreading ridges, are here proposed to be common. Good examples exist in Iceland and Afar (both transitional from ridge to rift jumps), West Africa (Benue Trough and Cameroon Volcanic Line), and Kenya. Indeed, the Kenya rift appears to have jumped c. 100 km eastward c. 10 m.y. ago and is currently jumping further to the east. Possible jumps exist in the Baikal rift, the Limagne-Bresse rift pair, and parallel to ancient continental margins (e.g., the Triassic basins of the eastern U.S. to Baltimore Canyon and Georges Bank). Continental rifts jump distances that are approximately equal to local lithosphere thickness, suggesting that jumped rifts are controlled by lithosphere fracturing, but there appears to be no reason for the fracturing except migration of hot spots.

  14. Subduction-Driven Recycling of Continental Margin Lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levander, Alan; Bezada, Maximiliano; Niu, Fenglin; Palomeras, Imma; Thurner, Sally; Humphreys, Eugene; Carbonell, Ramon; Gallart, Josep; Schmitz, Michael; Miller, Meghan

    2015-04-01

    Subduction recycling of oceanic lithosphere, a central theme of plate tectonics, is relatively well understood, whereas recycling continental lithosphere is more difficult to recognize, and appears far more complicated. Delamination and localized convective downwelling are two widely recognized processes invoked to explain the removal of lithospheric mantle under or adjacent to orogenic belts. Here we describe another process that can lead to the loss of continental lithosphere adjacent to a subduction zone: Subducting oceanic plates can entrain and recycle lithospheric mantle from an adjacent continent and disrupt the continental lithosphere far inland from the subduction zone. Seismic images from recent dense broadband seismograph arrays in northeastern South America (SA) and in the western Mediterranean show higher than expected volumes of positive anomalies identified as the subducted Atlantic slab under northeastern SA, and the Alboran slab beneath the Gibraltar arc region (GA). The positive anomalies lie under and are aligned with the continental margins at depths greater than 200 km. Closer to the surface we find that the continental margin lithospheric mantle is significantly thinner than expected beneath the orogens adjacent to the subduction zones. The thinner than expected lithosphere extends inland as far as the edges of nearby cratonic cores. These observations suggest that subducting oceanic plates viscously entrain and remove continental mantle lithosphere from beneath adjacent continental margins, modulating the surface tectonics and pre-conditioning the margins for further deformation. The latter can include delamination of the entire lithospheric mantle, as around GA, inferred by results from active and passive seismic experiments. Viscous removal of continental margin lithosphere creates lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) topography which can give rise to secondary downwellings under the continental interior far inland from the subduction

  15. 43 CFR 3512.19 - Must I notify BLM if I intend to transfer an overriding royalty to another party?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Must I notify BLM if I intend to transfer an overriding royalty to another party? 3512.19 Section 3512.19 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR...

  16. 43 CFR 3512.19 - Must I notify BLM if I intend to transfer an overriding royalty to another party?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Must I notify BLM if I intend to transfer an overriding royalty to another party? 3512.19 Section 3512.19 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR...

  17. 43 CFR 3512.19 - Must I notify BLM if I intend to transfer an overriding royalty to another party?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Must I notify BLM if I intend to transfer an overriding royalty to another party? 3512.19 Section 3512.19 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR...

  18. 43 CFR 3512.19 - Must I notify BLM if I intend to transfer an overriding royalty to another party?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Must I notify BLM if I intend to transfer an overriding royalty to another party? 3512.19 Section 3512.19 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR...

  19. Tectonic and sedimentary evolution of a Cretaceous continental arc-backarc system in the Korean peninsula: New view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chough, S. K.; Sohn, Y. K.

    2010-08-01

    This paper focuses on the tectonic and sedimentary evolution of the Cretaceous volcanic rocks and nonmarine successions in the southeastern part of the Korean peninsula, which constitute an ancient continental arc system. The arc system (Gyeongsang Arc System), comprising an arc platform (Gyeongsang Volcanic Arc) and a backarc basin (Gyeongsang Backarc Basin), was a southwestward extension of the Japanese Arc formed by oblique northward subduction of the proto-Pacific (Izanagi) plate under the Asian continent. The backarc basin was initiated in the southeastern part of the Korean peninsula in the Early Cretaceous as a narrow NS-trending trough. The basin was bounded by a major fault in the northern part of the basin from which sediments largely emanated. Sediments were deposited in streamflow-dominated alluvial fans adjacent to the fault-bounded basin margin in the north and low-gradient fluvial systems of braided channels that extended southward and southeastward for tens of kilometers. Sediments were also derived from the western highland margin, draining Precambrian to Jurassic basement rocks. The initially narrow trough progressively expanded toward the east, resulting in eastward migration of depocenters that eventually generated a broad fluvio-lacustrine plain fringing the volcanic arc platform. The arc platform played an important role for the derivation of volcanogenic materials and accreted sediments into the backarc basin via extensive fluvial network. Pyroclastic density currents and landslides, which originated from the arc platform, also entered the basin. In addition, extrusion of basaltic volcanic rocks was continual within the basin during basin expansion. The resultant succession of mixed sedimentary and volcanogenic rocks is generally indicative of a temporal increase in volcanic activity in the arc platform and in subsidence rate of the basin. In the Late Cretaceous, andesitic to rhyolitic volcanism became climactic in the arc platform, producing

  20. Basins in ARC-continental collisions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, Amy E.; Clift, Peter D.

    2012-01-01

    Arc-continent collisions occur commonly in the plate-tectonic cycle and result in rapidly formed and rapidly collapsing orogens, often spanning just 5-15 My. Growth of continental masses through arc-continent collision is widely thought to be a major process governing the structural and geochemical evolution of the continental crust over geologic time. Collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with passive continental margins (a situation in which the arc, on the upper plate, faces the continent) involve a substantially different geometry than collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with active continental margins (a situation requiring more than one convergence zone and in which the arc, on the lower plate, backs into the continent), with variable preservation potential for basins in each case. Substantial differences also occur between trench and forearc evolution in tectonically erosive versus tectonically accreting margins, both before and after collision. We examine the evolution of trenches, trench-slope basins, forearc basins, intra-arc basins, and backarc basins during arc-continent collision. The preservation potential of trench-slope basins is low; in collision they are rapidly uplifted and eroded, and at erosive margins they are progressively destroyed by subduction erosion. Post-collisional preservation of trench sediment and trench-slope basins is biased toward margins that were tectonically accreting for a substantial length of time before collision. Forearc basins in erosive margins are usually floored by strong lithosphere and may survive collision with a passive margin, sometimes continuing sedimentation throughout collision and orogeny. The low flexural rigidity of intra-arc basins makes them deep and, if preserved, potentially long records of arc and collisional tectonism. Backarc basins, in contrast, are typically subducted and their sediment either lost or preserved only as fragments in melange sequences. A substantial proportion of the sediment derived from

  1. Lasting mantle scars lead to perennial plate tectonics

    PubMed Central

    Heron, Philip J.; Pysklywec, Russell N.; Stephenson, Randell

    2016-01-01

    Mid-ocean ridges, transform faults, subduction and continental collisions form the conventional theory of plate tectonics to explain non-rigid behaviour at plate boundaries. However, the theory does not explain directly the processes involved in intraplate deformation and seismicity. Recently, damage structures in the lithosphere have been linked to the origin of plate tectonics. Despite seismological imaging suggesting that inherited mantle lithosphere heterogeneities are ubiquitous, their plate tectonic role is rarely considered. Here we show that deep lithospheric anomalies can dominate shallow geological features in activating tectonics in plate interiors. In numerical experiments, we found that structures frozen into the mantle lithosphere through plate tectonic processes can behave as quasi-plate boundaries reactivated under far-field compressional forcing. Intraplate locations where proto-lithospheric plates have been scarred by earlier suturing could be regions where latent plate boundaries remain, and where plate tectonics processes are expressed as a ‘perennial' phenomenon. PMID:27282541

  2. Lasting mantle scars lead to perennial plate tectonics.

    PubMed

    Heron, Philip J; Pysklywec, Russell N; Stephenson, Randell

    2016-01-01

    Mid-ocean ridges, transform faults, subduction and continental collisions form the conventional theory of plate tectonics to explain non-rigid behaviour at plate boundaries. However, the theory does not explain directly the processes involved in intraplate deformation and seismicity. Recently, damage structures in the lithosphere have been linked to the origin of plate tectonics. Despite seismological imaging suggesting that inherited mantle lithosphere heterogeneities are ubiquitous, their plate tectonic role is rarely considered. Here we show that deep lithospheric anomalies can dominate shallow geological features in activating tectonics in plate interiors. In numerical experiments, we found that structures frozen into the mantle lithosphere through plate tectonic processes can behave as quasi-plate boundaries reactivated under far-field compressional forcing. Intraplate locations where proto-lithospheric plates have been scarred by earlier suturing could be regions where latent plate boundaries remain, and where plate tectonics processes are expressed as a 'perennial' phenomenon. PMID:27282541

  3. Lasting mantle scars lead to perennial plate tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heron, Philip J.; Pysklywec, Russell N.; Stephenson, Randell

    2016-06-01

    Mid-ocean ridges, transform faults, subduction and continental collisions form the conventional theory of plate tectonics to explain non-rigid behaviour at plate boundaries. However, the theory does not explain directly the processes involved in intraplate deformation and seismicity. Recently, damage structures in the lithosphere have been linked to the origin of plate tectonics. Despite seismological imaging suggesting that inherited mantle lithosphere heterogeneities are ubiquitous, their plate tectonic role is rarely considered. Here we show that deep lithospheric anomalies can dominate shallow geological features in activating tectonics in plate interiors. In numerical experiments, we found that structures frozen into the mantle lithosphere through plate tectonic processes can behave as quasi-plate boundaries reactivated under far-field compressional forcing. Intraplate locations where proto-lithospheric plates have been scarred by earlier suturing could be regions where latent plate boundaries remain, and where plate tectonics processes are expressed as a `perennial' phenomenon.

  4. Continental magnetic anomaly constraints on continental reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.; Olivier, R.; Bentley, C. R.

    1985-01-01

    Crustal magnetic anomalies mapped by the MAGSAT satellite for North and South America, Europe, Africa, India, Australia and Antarctica and adjacent marine areas were adjusted to a common elevation of 400 km and differentially reduced to the radial pole of intensity 60,000 nT. These radially polarized anomalies are normalized for differential inclination, declination and intensity effects of the geomagnetic field, so that in principle they directly reflected the geometric and magnetic polarization attributes of sources which include regional petrologic variations of the crust and upper mantle, and crustal thickness and thermal perturbations. Continental anomalies demonstrate remarkably detailed correlation of regional magnetic sources across rifted margins when plotted on a reconstruction of Pangea. Accordingly, they suggest further fundamental constraints on the geologic evolution of the continents and their reconstructions.

  5. The Magnetic Signature of Zones of Continental Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purucker, M. E.; Whaler, K. A.

    2007-12-01

    Near-surface and satellite maps of the crustal component of the magnetic field can be interpreted in terms of thermal conditions at depth because the magnetic properties of rocks depend on their temperature. Observations related to continental deformation at diffuse plate boundaries are often considered in relation to three length scales: the thickness of the seismogenic upper crust, the entire continental crust, and the mechanical lithosphere. The lower boundary of the magnetic crust coincides with the Moho, or in the presence of an elevated geotherm, with the Curie isotherm. New global perspectives on the magnetic signature of zones of continental collision are afforded by the recently published Magnetic Anomaly Map of the World (Purucker, 2007, EOS, 88, 263), the MF-5 satellite magnetic field (Maus et al., 2007, Gcubed), and NASA's ST-5 constellation mission in 2006. The thickness of the magnetic crust can be estimated by integrating the MF-5 satellite magnetic field into the 3SMAC compositional and thermal model of the lithosphere, and a minimum estimate of the magnetization can be estimated using a Greens function approach. We compare our magnetic maps with the diffuse plate boundary maps of Gordon (1998) and Dumoulin et al. (1998). The diffuse plate boundary zones exhibit intermediate (22-31 km) magnetic thicknessses, significantly less than those of the adjacent stable plate. The diffuse NE Asia plate boundary zone, from the Lena River delta to the Sea of Okhotsk, is especially well- expressed in both satellite and near-surface magnetic maps.

  6. The Continental Crust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burchfiel, B. Clark

    1983-01-01

    Continental crust underlies the continents, their margins, and also small shallow regions in oceans. The nature of the crust (much older than oceanic crust) and its dynamics are discussed. Research related to and effects of tectonics, volcanism, erosion, and sedimentation on the crust are considered. (JN)

  7. Continental Flood Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Continental flood basalts have been receiving considerable scientific attention lately. Recent publications have focused on several particular flood-basalt provinces (Brito-Arctic, Karoo, Parana', Deccan, and Columbia Plateau), and much attention has been given to the proposed connection between flood-basalt volcanism, bolide impacts, and mass extinctions. The editor of Continental Flood Basalts, J. D. Macdougall, conceived the book to assemble in a single volume, from a vast and scattered literature, an overview of each major post-Cambrian flood-basalt province.Continental Flood Basalts has 10 chapters; nine treat individual flood-basalt provinces, and a summary chapter compares and contrasts continental flood-basalts and mid-oceanic ridge basalts. Specifically, the chapters address the Columbia River basalt, the northwest United States including the Columbia River basalt, the Ethiopian Province, the North Atlantic Tertiary Province, the Deccan Traps, the Parana' Basin, the Karoo Province, the Siberian Platform, and Cenozoic basaltic rocks in eastern China. Each chapter is written by one or more individuals with an extensive background in the province.

  8. Continental drift before 1900.

    PubMed

    Rupke, N A

    1970-07-25

    The idea that Francis Bacon and other seventeenth and eighteenth century thinkers first conceived the notion of continental drift does not stand up to close scrutiny. The few authors who expressed the idea viewed the process as a catastrophic event. PMID:16057953

  9. Continental subduction induced tremor activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, H. J.; Chen, K. H.; Ide, S.; Mouyen, M.; Byrne, T. B.

    2015-12-01

    Southern Central Range of Taiwan, a place where deep-seated tectonic tremors (a proxy of slow slip) and earthquake swarms are closely located in space and highly correlated in time, provides rare opportunity towards the understanding of physical mechanisms governing different style of slip. To identify tremor events, we used the identification scheme similar to Ide et al. (2015) but applied slightly different techniques: (1) Higher waveform cross-correlation coefficient (>0.6) (2) careful visual inspection for excluding local earthquakes and short-lasted event (duration < 60 s) (3) Signal to noise ratio higher than 1.2 and lower than 30 (4) No spatio-temporal clustering technique used. During the study period of 2007-2012, we identified 2320 tremor events with duration ranging from 60 s to 1550 s. They are located underneath southern Central Range, forming a NS-striking and SE-dipping pipe-like structure at a depth of 20-40 km. The up-dip extension of this tremor structure reaches an aseismic zone under the western flank of Central Range at shallow depths, where is an area characterized by high heat flow, low Vp and Vs anomaly. Such seismic gap was explained by the buoyancy induced crust detachment during continental subduction of Eurasian Plate. This detachment may open a new channel for hot and ductile material ascending to shallow depth, producing high temperatures along the way. This provides a common mechanism for down-dip tremor and up-dip shallow seismic gap along the same eastern dipping channel. In addition, the tremor events are found to be mostly occurred in high tides and exhibit higher correlation with tide data from west coast of Taiwan. This may again imply the association between tremor activity and subduction of Eurasian Plate.

  10. Interseismic Plate coupling and strain partitioning in the Northeastern Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manaker, D. M.; Calais, E.; Freed, A. M.; Ali, S. T.; Przybylski, P.; Mattioli, G.; Jansma, P.; Prépetit, C.; de Chabalier, J. B.

    2008-09-01

    The northeastern Caribbean provides a natural laboratory to investigate strain partitioning, its causes and its consequences on the stress regime and tectonic evolution of a subduction plate boundary. Here, we use GPS and earthquake slip vector data to produce a present-day kinematic model that accounts for secular block rotation and elastic strain accumulation, with variable interplate coupling, on active faults. We confirm that the oblique convergence between Caribbean and North America in Hispaniola is partitioned between plate boundary parallel motion on the Septentrional and Enriquillo faults in the overriding plate and plate-boundary normal motion at the plate interface on the Northern Hispaniola Fault. To the east, the Caribbean/North America plate motion is accommodated by oblique slip on the faults bounding the Puerto Rico block to the north (Puerto Rico subduction) and to the south (Muertos thrust), with no evidence for partitioning. The spatial correlation between interplate coupling, strain partitioning and the subduction of buoyant oceanic asperities suggests that the latter enhance the transfer of interplate shear stresses to the overriding plate, facilitating strike-slip faulting in the overriding plate. The model slip rate deficit, together with the dates of large historical earthquakes, indicates the potential for a large (Mw7.5 or greater) earthquake on the Septentrional fault in the Dominican Republic. Similarly, the Enriquillo fault in Haiti is currently capable of a Mw7.2 earthquake if the entire elastic strain accumulated since the last major earthquake was released in a single event today. The model results show that the Puerto Rico/Lesser Antilles subduction thrust is only partially coupled, meaning that the plate interface is accumulating elastic strain at rates slower than the total plate motion. This does not preclude the existence of isolated locked patches accumulating elastic strain to be released in future earthquakes, but whose

  11. Peen plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babecki, A. J. (Inventor); Haehner, C. L.

    1973-01-01

    A process for metal plating which comprises spraying a mixture of metallic powder and small peening particles at high velocity against a surface is described. The velocity must be sufficient to impact and bond metallic powder onto the surface. In the case of metal surfaces, the process has as one of its advantages providing mechanical working (hardening) of the surface simultaneously with the metal plating.

  12. More than Motility: Salmonella Flagella Contribute to Overriding Friction and Facilitating Colony Hydration during Swarming

    PubMed Central

    Partridge, Jonathan D.

    2013-01-01

    We show in this study that Salmonella cells, which do not upregulate flagellar gene expression during swarming, also do not increase flagellar numbers per μm of cell length as determined by systematic counting of both flagellar filaments and hooks. Instead, doubling of the average length of a swarmer cell by suppression of cell division effectively doubles the number of flagella per cell. The highest agar concentration at which Salmonella cells swarmed increased from the normal 0.5% to 1%, either when flagella were overproduced or when expression of the FliL protein was enhanced in conjunction with stator proteins MotAB. We surmise that bacteria use the resulting increase in motor power to overcome the higher friction associated with harder agar. Higher flagellar numbers also suppress the swarming defect of mutants with changes in the chemotaxis pathway that were previously shown to be defective in hydrating their colonies. Here we show that the swarming defect of these mutants can also be suppressed by application of osmolytes to the surface of swarm agar. The “dry” colony morphology displayed by che mutants was also observed with other mutants that do not actively rotate their flagella. The flagellum/motor thus participates in two functions critical for swarming, enabling hydration and overriding surface friction. We consider some ideas for how the flagellum might help attract water to the agar surface, where there is no free water. PMID:23264575

  13. Plate motion and deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Minster, B.; Prescott, W.; Royden, L.

    1991-02-01

    Our goal is to understand the motions of the plates, the deformation along their boundaries and within their interiors, and the processes that control these tectonic phenomena. In the broadest terms, we must strive to understand the relationships of regional and local deformation to flow in the upper mantle and the rheological, thermal and density structure of the lithosphere. The essential data sets which we require to reach our goal consist of maps of current strain rates at the earth's surface and the distribution of integrated deformation through time as recorded in the geologic record. Our success will depend on the effective synthesis of crustal kinematics with a variety of other geological and geophysical data, within a quantitative theoretical framework describing processes in the earth's interior. Only in this way can we relate the snapshot of current motions and earth structure provided by geodetic and geophysical data with long-term processes operating on the time scales relevant to most geological processes. The wide-spread use of space-based techniques, coupled with traditional geological and geophysical data, promises a revolution in our understanding of the kinematics and dynamics of plate motions over a broad range of spatial and temporal scales and in a variety of geologic settings. The space-based techniques that best address problems in plate motion and deformation are precise space-geodetic positioning -- on land and on the seafloor -- and satellite acquisition of detailed altimetric and remote sensing data in oceanic and continental areas. The overall science objectives for the NASA Solid Earth Science plan for the 1990's, are to Understand the motion and deformation of the lithosphere within and across plate boundaries'', and to understand the dynamics of the mantle, the structure and evolution of the lithosphere, and the landforms that result from local and regional deformation. 57 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Plate tectonics conserves angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowin, C.

    2010-03-01

    velocity on the crests of convection cells driven by rising heat. The magnitude of these sinking mass anomalies is inferred also to be sufficient to overcome basal plate and transform fault frictions. These results imply that spreading centers are primarily passive reactive features, and fracture zones (and wedge-shaped sites of seafloor spreading) are adjustment zones that accommodate strains in the lithosphere. Further, the interlocked pattern of the Australian and Pacific plates the past 42 Million years (with their absolute plate motions near 90° to each other) is taken as strong evidence that large thermally driven "roller" convection cells previously inferred as the driving mechanism in earlier interpretations of continental drift and plate tectonics, have not been active in the Earth's mantle the past 42 Million years, if ever. This report also presents estimates of the changes in location and magnitude of the Earth's axis of total plate tectonic angular momentum for the past 62 million years.

  15. Caribbean tectonics and relative plate motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, K.; Dewey, J. F.; Cooper, C.; Mann, P.; Pindell, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    During the last century, three different ways of interpreting the tectonic evolution of the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean have been proposed, taking into account the Bailey Willis School of a permanent pre-Jurassic deep sea basin, the Edward Suess School of a subsided continental terrain, and the Alfred Wegener School of continental separation. The present investigation is concerned with an outline of an interpretation which follows that of Pindell and Dewey (1982). An attempt is made to point out ways in which the advanced hypotheses can be tested. The fit of Africa, North America, and South America is considered along with aspects of relative motion between North and South America since the early Jurasic. Attention is given to a framework for reconstructing Caribbean plate evolution, the evolution of the Caribbean, the plate boundary zones of the northern and southern Caribbean, and the active deformation of the Caribbean plate.

  16. Surface motions and intraplate continental deformation in Alaska driven by mantle flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finzel, Emily S.; Flesch, Lucy M.; Ridgway, Kenneth D.; Holt, William E.; Ghosh, Attreyee

    2015-06-01

    The degree to which the lithosphere and mantle are coupled and contribute to surface deformation beneath continental regions remains a fundamental question in the field of geodynamics. Here we use a new approach with a surface deformation field constrained by GPS, geologic, and seismicity data, together with a lithospheric geodynamic model, to solve for tractions inferred to be generated by mantle convection that (1) drive extension within interior Alaska generating southward directed surface motions toward the southern convergent plate boundary, (2) result in accommodation of the relative motions between the Pacific and North America in a comparatively small zone near the plate boundary, and (3) generate the observed convergence within the North American plate interior in the Mackenzie mountains in northwestern Canada. The evidence for deeper mantle influence on surface deformation beneath a continental region suggests that this mechanism may be an important contributing driver to continental plate assemblage and breakup.

  17. Plate Tectonics in the Late Paleozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domeier, Mat; Torsvik, Trond

    2014-05-01

    As the chronicle of plate motions through time, paleogeography is fundamental to our understanding of plate tectonics and its role in shaping the geology of the present-day. To properly appreciate the history of tectonics—and its influence on the deep Earth and climate—it is imperative to seek an accurate and global model of paleogeography. However, owing to the incessant loss of oceanic lithosphere through subduction, the paleogeographic reconstruction of 'full-plates' (including oceanic lithosphere) becomes increasingly challenging with age. Prior to 150 Ma ~60% of the lithosphere is missing and reconstructions are developed without explicit regard for oceanic lithosphere or plate tectonic principles; in effect, reflecting the earlier mobilistic paradigm of continental drift. Although these 'continental' reconstructions have been immensely useful, the next-generation of mantle models requires global plate kinematic descriptions with full-plate reconstructions. Moreover, in disregarding (or only loosely applying) plate tectonic rules, continental reconstructions fail to take advantage of a wealth of additional information in the form of practical constraints. Following a series of new developments, both in geodynamic theory and analytical tools, it is now feasible to construct full-plate models that lend themselves to testing by the wider Earth-science community. Such a model is presented here for the late Paleozoic (410-250 Ma). Although we expect this model to be particularly useful for numerical mantle modeling, we hope that it can also serve as a general framework for understanding late Paleozoic tectonics, one on which future improvements can be built and further tested.

  18. Health research and systems' governance are at risk: should the right to data protection override health?

    PubMed

    Di Iorio, C T; Carinci, F; Oderkirk, J

    2014-07-01

    The European Union (EU) Data Protection Regulation will have profound implications for public health, health services research and statistics in Europe. The EU Commission's Proposal was a breakthrough in balancing privacy rights and rights to health and healthcare. The European Parliament, however, has proposed extensive amendments. This paper reviews the amendments proposed by the European Parliament Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs and their implications for health research and statistics. The amendments eliminate most innovations brought by the Proposal. Notably, derogation to the general prohibition of processing sensitive data shall be allowed for public interests such as the management of healthcare services,but not health research, monitoring, surveillance and governance. The processing of personal health data for historical, statistical or scientific purposes shall be allowed only with the consent of the data subject or if the processing serves an exceptionally high public interest, cannot be performed otherwise and is legally authorised. Research, be it academic, government,corporate or market research, falls under the same rule.The proposed amendments will make difficult or render impossible research and statistics involving the linkage and analysis of the wealth of data from clinical,administrative, insurance and survey sources, which have contributed to improving health outcomes and health systems performance and governance; and may illegitimise efforts that have been made in some European countries to enable privacy-respectful data use for research and statistical purposes. If the amendments stand as written, the right to privacy is likely to override the right to health and healthcare in Europe. PMID:24310171

  19. Geometric figure–ground cues override standard depth from accretion-deletion

    PubMed Central

    Tanrıkulu, Ömer Dağlar; Froyen, Vicky; Feldman, Jacob; Singh, Manish

    2016-01-01

    Accretion-deletion is widely considered a decisive cue to surface depth ordering, with the accreting or deleting surface interpreted as behind an adjoining surface. However, Froyen, Feldman, and Singh (2013) have shown that when accretion-deletion occurs on both sides of a contour, accreting-deleting regions can also be perceived as in front and as self-occluding due to rotation in three dimensions. In this study we ask whether geometric figure–ground cues can override the traditional “depth from accretion-deletion” interpretation even when accretion-deletion takes place only on one side of a contour. We used two tasks: a relative-depth task (front/back), and a motion-classification task (translation/rotation). We conducted two experiments, in which texture in only one set of alternating regions was moving; the other set was static. Contrary to the traditional interpretation of accretion-deletion, the moving convex and symmetric regions were perceived as figural and rotating in three dimensions in roughly half of the trials. In the second experiment, giving different motion directions to the moving regions (thereby weakening motion-based grouping) further weakened the traditional accretion-deletion interpretation. Our results show that the standard “depth from accretion-deletion” interpretation is overridden by static geometric cues to figure–ground. Overall, the results demonstrate a rich interaction between accretion-deletion, figure–ground, and structure from motion that is not captured by existing models of depth from motion. PMID:26982528

  20. Eutrophication effects on greenhouse gas fluxes from shallow-lake mesocosms override those of climate warming.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Thomas A; Audet, Joachim; Svenning, Jens-Christian; Lauridsen, Torben L; Søndergaard, Martin; Landkildehus, Frank; Larsen, Søren E; Jeppesen, Erik

    2015-12-01

    Fresh waters make a disproportionately large contribution to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, with shallow lakes being particular hot spots. Given their global prevalence, how GHG fluxes from shallow lakes are altered by climate change may have profound implications for the global carbon cycle. Empirical evidence for the temperature dependence of the processes controlling GHG production in natural systems is largely based on the correlation between seasonal temperature variation and seasonal change in GHG fluxes. However, ecosystem-level GHG fluxes could be influenced by factors, which while varying seasonally with temperature are actually either indirectly related (e.g. primary producer biomass) or largely unrelated to temperature, for instance nutrient loading. Here, we present results from the longest running shallow-lake mesocosm experiment which demonstrate that nutrient concentrations override temperature as a control of both the total and individual GHG flux. Furthermore, testing for temperature treatment effects at low and high nutrient levels separately showed only one, rather weak, positive effect of temperature (CH4 flux at high nutrients). In contrast, at low nutrients, the CO2 efflux was lower in the elevated temperature treatments, with no significant effect on CH4 or N2 O fluxes. Further analysis identified possible indirect effects of temperature treatment. For example, at low nutrient levels, increased macrophyte abundance was associated with significantly reduced fluxes of both CH4 and CO2 for both total annual flux and monthly observation data. As macrophyte abundance was positively related to temperature treatment, this suggests the possibility of indirect temperature effects, via macrophyte abundance, on CH4 and CO2 flux. These findings indicate that fluxes of GHGs from shallow lakes may be controlled more by factors indirectly related to temperature, in this case nutrient concentration and the abundance of primary producers. Thus, at ecosystem

  1. The Architecture, Chemistry, and Evolution of Continental Magmatic Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducea, Mihai N.; Saleeby, Jason B.; Bergantz, George

    2015-05-01

    Continental magmatic arcs form above subduction zones where the upper plate is continental lithosphere and/or accreted transitional lithosphere. The best-studied examples are found along the western margin of the Americas. They are Earth's largest sites of intermediate magmatism. They are long lived (tens to hundreds of millions of years) and spatially complex; their location migrates laterally due to a host of tectonic causes. Episodes of crustal and lithospheric thickening alternating with periods of root foundering produce cyclic vertical changes in arcs. The average plutonic and volcanic rocks in these arcs straddle the compositional boundary between an andesite and a dacite, very similar to that of continental crust; about half of that comes from newly added mafic material from the mantle. Arc products of the upper crust differentiated from deep crustal (>40 km) residual materials, which are unstable in the lithosphere. Continental arcs evolve into stable continental masses over time; trace elemental budgets, however, present challenges to the concept that Phanerozoic arcs are the main factories of continental crust.

  2. The nature and location of the plate boundary between the Anatolian and African plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    deǧer Özbakır, Ali; Wortel, Rinus; Govers, Rob

    2010-05-01

    Overall convergence of the African, Arabian and Eurasian plates, and the westward escape of Anatolia has resulted in an evolving plate boundary zone since the Miocene. In the Eastern Mediterranean, the current location and nature of the plate boundary between the Anatolian and the African plates is difficult to trace due to the scattered crustal earthquakes, and the absence of deeper earthquakes. In this study we aim to better constrain the nature and the location of the plate boundary. GPS-derived velocity field and stresses from earthquake mechanism solutions comprise the datasets which short time scale (elastic) models can be compared to. We model the stresses and deformation on the overriding plate by incorporating convergence of Africa and Arabia towards stable Eurasia, and rollback of the Hellenic trench. Investigation of the plate boundary consists of constraining the directions of motions over the segments which make up the boundary. We assume various types and locations for the plate boundary within the observational limits. We use a spherical plane stress finite element model to test these possibilities. We find that stresses and displacements are sensitive to both the location and the nature of the plate boundary. We obtain the minimum misfit with the data in a model where we assume the following: (1) the segment between Hellenic and the Cyprus arcs have both down-dip and fault parallel motions, (2) the connection between the Cyprus arc and Arabia--Eurasia collision zone is pure strike-slip. In all our models, an extra pull force on Anatolia is required to explain the high velocities in southwest Anatolia. This force may be related to return flow around the lateral edge of the Aegean slab.

  3. Is There Really A North American Plate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krill, A.

    2011-12-01

    Lithospheric plates are typically identified from earthquake epicenters and evidence such as GPS movements. But no evidence indicates a plate boundary between the North American and South American Plates. Some plate maps show them separated by a transform boundary, but it is only a fracture zone. Other maps show an "undefined plate boundary" or put no boundary between these two plates (check Google images). Early plate maps showed a single large American Plate, quite narrow east of the Caribbean Plate (Le Pichon 1968, Morgan 1968). The North and South American Plates became established by the leading textbook Earth (Press & Siever 1974). On their map, from a Scientific American article by John Dewey (1972), these new plates were separated by an "uncertain plate boundary." The reasons for postulating a North American Plate were probably more psychological than geological. Each of the other continents of the world had its own plate, and North American geologists naturally wanted theirs. Similarly, European geographers used to view Europe as its own continent. A single large plate should again be hypothesized. But the term American Plate would now be ambiguous ("Which plate, North or South?") Perhaps future textbook authors could call it the "Two-American Plate." Textbook authors ultimately decide such global-tectonic matters. I became aware of textbook authors' opinions and influence from my research into the history of Alfred Wegener's continental drift (see Fixists vs. Mobilists by Krill 2011). Leading textbook author Charles Schuchert realized that continental drift would abolish his cherished paleogeographic models of large east-west continents (Eria, Gondwana) and small oceans (Poseiden, Nereis). He and his junior coauthors conspired to keep drift evidence out of their textbooks, from the 1934-editions until the 1969-editions (Physical Geology by Longwell et al. 1969, Historical Geology by Dunbar & Waage 1969). Their textbooks ruled in America. Textbooks

  4. Caribbean plate tectonics from seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ten Brink, U. S.; Villasenor, A.

    2012-12-01

    New seismic tomography in the Caribbean shows close links between the geometry and dynamics of subducting slabs and the geology of the overriding plate. Unlike most oceanic plates, the Caribbean plate lacks identifiable seafloor magnetic anomalies and fracture zones. The plate's history has therefore been inferred primarily from land geology along the plate boundary, which is complicated by large-scale shear deformation, and from finite rotations of surrounding plates.We used more than 14 million arrival times from 300,000 earthquakes to identify P-wave velocity anomalies. We relate the anomalies to the geometry and dynamics of subducting slabs and to patterns of earthquake activity, volcanism, topographic relief, and tectonic deformation. For example, we detect two separate slabs belonging to the North and South American plates, respectively, which appear to be responsible for morphologic and tectonic differences between the arcs of the Northern (from Guadeloupe northward) and Southern (from Dominica southward) Lesser Antilles. Variations in earthquake activity between Haiti and the Dominican Republic can be explained by a change in slab geometry from an underplated slab beneath Haiti to a subducting slab under the Dominican Republic. A shallow tear in the slab may explain the anomalously deep Puerto Rico Trench and the frequent earthquake swarms there. The westward shift in volcanic activity in the Northern Lesser Antilles from the Miocene Limestone Caribbees to the present arc can be attributed to the limit on convective flow imposed by the 3-D geometry of the slab at depth. A thinned South America slab under the southern Lesser Antilles may result from traction imposed on the slab by a wide forearc wedge. Variations in tectonic deformation of northern South America could be related to the location of the Caribbean Large Igneous Province north of the Maracaibo Block.

  5. Generation of continental crust in intra-oceanic arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazel, E.; Hayes, J. L.; Kelemen, P. B.; Everson, E. D.; Holbrook, W. S.; Vance, E.

    2014-12-01

    The origin of continental crust is still an unsolved mystery in the evolution of our planet. Although the best candidates to produce juvenile continental crust are intra-oceanic arcs these systems are dominated by basaltic lavas, and when silicic magmas are produced, the incompatible-element compositions are generally too depleted to be a good match for continental crust estimates. Others, such as the W. Aleutians, are dominated by andesitic melts with trace element compositions similar to average continental crust. In order to evaluate which intra-oceanic arcs produced modern continental crust, we developed a geochemical continental index (CI) through a statistical analysis that compared all available data from modern intra-oceanic arcs with global estimates of continental crust. Our results suggest that magmas from Costa Rica (<10 Ma) have a CI <50, closer to the CI (~20) computed from available average continental crust estimates. Transitional CI values of 50-100 were found in the Aleutians, the Iwo-Jima segment of Izu-Bonin, the L. Antilles, Panama, Nicaragua, and Vanuatu. The geochemical signature of the Costa Rican lavas is controlled by melts from the subducting Galapagos tracks. Iwo-Jima and Vanuatu are in a similar tectonic scenario with subducting intraplate seamounts. Melts from the subducting oceanic crust are thought to significantly control the geochemical signature in the W. Aleutians and Panama. In the L. Antilles and E. Aleutians the continental signature may reflect recycling of a component derived from subducting continental sediments. Most of Izu-Bonin, Marianas, S. Scotia and Tonga arcs with a CI >100 have the least continent-like geochemical signatures. In these arcs the subducting plate is old (>100 Ma), not overprinted by enriched intraplate volcanism and the geochemistry may be dominated by slab-derived, aqueous fluids. We also found a strong correlation between the CI and average crustal P-wave velocity, validating the geochemical index

  6. Absolute plate velocities from seismic anisotropy: Importance of correlated errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lin; Gordon, Richard G.; Kreemer, Corné

    2014-09-01

    The errors in plate motion azimuths inferred from shear wave splitting beneath any one tectonic plate are shown to be correlated with the errors of other azimuths from the same plate. To account for these correlations, we adopt a two-tier analysis: First, find the pole of rotation and confidence limits for each plate individually. Second, solve for the best fit to these poles while constraining relative plate angular velocities to consistency with the MORVEL relative plate angular velocities. Our preferred set of angular velocities, SKS-MORVEL, is determined from the poles from eight plates weighted proportionally to the root-mean-square velocity of each plate. SKS-MORVEL indicates that eight plates (Amur, Antarctica, Caribbean, Eurasia, Lwandle, Somalia, Sundaland, and Yangtze) have angular velocities that differ insignificantly from zero. The net rotation of the lithosphere is 0.25 ± 0.11° Ma-1 (95% confidence limits) right handed about 57.1°S, 68.6°E. The within-plate dispersion of seismic anisotropy for oceanic lithosphere (σ = 19.2°) differs insignificantly from that for continental lithosphere (σ = 21.6°). The between-plate dispersion, however, is significantly smaller for oceanic lithosphere (σ = 7.4°) than for continental lithosphere (σ = 14.7°). Two of the slowest-moving plates, Antarctica (vRMS = 4 mm a-1, σ = 29°) and Eurasia (vRMS = 3 mm a-1, σ = 33°), have two of the largest within-plate dispersions, which may indicate that a plate must move faster than ≈ 5 mm a-1 to result in seismic anisotropy useful for estimating plate motion. The tendency of observed azimuths on the Arabia plate to be counterclockwise of plate motion may provide information about the direction and amplitude of superposed asthenospheric flow or about anisotropy in the lithospheric mantle.

  7. Converting your Continental

    SciTech Connect

    Wirz, B.M.

    1981-07-01

    Inflation and higher fuel and environmental costs make conventional-generated power as unaffordable (as a Lincoln Continental in the automobile market) for retail and industrial customers, many of whom are looking for alternatives to purchase electric power. The loss of revenue from competing energy sources eliminates the monopoly status that utilities have enjoyed and is forcing utilities to provide what customers want and do it better than the competition. Utilities have only research and development or fuel switching to improve efficiency unless they rethink their approach and come up with new alternatives. 1 table. (DCK)

  8. On the Evolution of Glaciated Continental Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sverre Laberg, Jan; Rydningen, Tom Arne; Safronova, Polina A.; Forwick, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    Glaciated continental margins, continental margins where a grounded ice sheet repeatedly has been at or near the shelf break, are found at both northern and southern high-latitudes. Their evolution are in several aspects different from their low-latitude counterparts where eustatic sea-level variations possess a fundamental control on their evolution and where fluvial systems provide the main sediment input. From studies of the Norwegian - Barents Sea - Svalbard and NE Greenland continental margins we propose the following factors as the main control on the evolution of glaciated continental margins: 1) Pre-glacial relief controlling the accommodation space, 2) Ice sheet glaciology including the location of fast-flowing ice streams where source area morphology exerts a fundamental control, 3) Composition of the glacigenic sediments where the clay content in previous studies have been found to be important, and 4) Sea-level controlled both by eustacy and isostacy. From three case studies, 1) the western Barents Sea, 2) part of the North Norwegian (Troms), and 3) the Mid-Norwegian margin, the influence on these factors for the sea-floor morphology, sedimentary processes of the continental slope - deep sea and continental margin architecture are discussed. The pre-glacial relief of the mid-Norwegian and Troms margins relates to the onset of rifting and plate break-up from the early Cenozoic while for the SW Barents Sea, plate shear was followed by rifting. A wide zone of extended continental crust occurs offshore mid-Norway while this zone is much narrower offshore Troms leading to a more pronounced pre-glacial relief. Regarding sediment delivery and ice sheet glaciology the western Barents Sea exemplifies very high sediment input corresponding to an estimated average erosion of the source area of ~0.4 mm/yr (SW Barents Sea), much of which is related to subglacial erosion of Mesozoic - Cenozoic sedimentary rocks from large paleo-ice streams. The mid-Norwegian margin

  9. On the validity of density overrides for VMAT lung SBRT planning

    SciTech Connect

    Wiant, David Vanderstraeten, Caroline; Maurer, Jacqueline; Pursley, Jan; Terrell, Jonathon; Sintay, Benjamin J.

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Modeling dose to a moving target in lung is a very difficult task. Current approaches to planning lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) generally calculate dose on either free breathing or average computed tomography (CT) scans, which do not always accurately predict dose to parts of the target volume not occupied by tumor on the planning scan. In this work, the authors look at using density overrides of the target volumes to more accurately predict dose for lung SBRT using the analytic anisotropic algorithm (AAA). Methods: Volumetric modulated arc therapy plans were created on free breathing scans (FBP), time average scans (AVGP), free breathing scans with the internal target volume overridden to tumor density (ITVP), free breathing scans with the planning target volume overridden to tumor density (PTVP), and free breathing scan using a hybrid scheme with the internal target volume set to tumor density and the planning target volume minus the internal target volume set to a density intermediate between lung and tumor (HP) for the case of a 4D motion phantom and five patient cases. Radiochromic film measurements were made for the phantom plans, with gamma analysis used to compare the planned to delivered dose. The patient plans were recalculated on each of the phases of a 4DCT to evaluate tumor coverage and conformity index (CI). A modified modulation complexity score (MCSv) and average open area per control point (AA) metrics were used to evaluate multileaf collimator (MLC) modulation for each of the plans. Results: The HP plans showed significantly higher gamma passing rates (p < 0.05) than the FBP, AVGP, and ITVP for criteria of 2 mm/2% and 1 mm/1%. No significant correlation was observed between gamma values and AA or MCSv. The tumor volume was covered by the prescription dose on all phases of the 4DCT for all patient plans. The PTVP and HP yielded lower mean CI than the other plans for all five patients, with three of the cases showing

  10. Ras Transformation Overrides a Proliferation Defect Induced by Tpm3.1 Knockout.

    PubMed

    Coombes, Jason D; Schevzov, Galina; Kan, Chin-Yi; Petti, Carlotta; Maritz, Michelle F; Whittaker, Shane; Mackenzie, Karen L; Gunning, Peter W

    2015-12-01

    Extensive re-organisation of the actin cytoskeleton and changes in the expression of its binding proteins is a characteristic feature of cancer cells. Previously we have shown that the tropomyosin isoform Tpm3.1, an integral component of the actin cytoskeleton in tumor cells, is required for tumor cell survival. Our objective was to determine whether cancer cells devoid of Tpm3.1 would evade the tumorgenic effects induced by H-Ras transformation. The tropomyosin isoform (Tpm) expression profile of a range of cancer cell lines (21) demonstrates that Tpm3.1 is one of the most broadly expressed Tpm isoform. Consequently, the contribution of Tpm3.1 to the transformation process was functionally evaluated. Primary embryonic fibroblasts isolated from wild type (WT) and Tpm3.1 knockout (KO) mice were transduced with retroviral vectors expressing SV40 large T antigen and an oncogenic allele of the H-Ras gene, H-RasV12, to generate immortalized and transformed WT and KO MEFs respectively. We show that Tpm3.1 is required for growth factor-independent proliferation in the SV40 large T antigen immortalized MEFs, but this requirement is overcome by H-Ras transformation. Consistent with those findings, we found that Tpm3.1 was not required for anchorage independent growth or growth of H-Ras-driven tumors in a mouse model. Finally, we show that pERK and Importin 7 protein interactions are significantly decreased in the SV40 large T antigen immortalized KO MEFs but not in the H-Ras transformed KO cells, relative to control MEFs. The data demonstrate that H-Ras transformation overrides a requirement for Tpm3.1 in growth factor-independent proliferation of immortalized MEFs. We propose that in the SV40 large T antigen immortalized MEFs, Tpm3.1 is partly responsible for the efficient interaction between pERK and Imp7 resulting in cell proliferation, but this is overidden by Ras transformation. PMID:26274783

  11. Socioeconomic status overrides age and gender in determining health-seeking behaviour in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Syed Masud; Tomson, Göran; Petzold, Max; Kabir, Zarina Nahar

    2005-01-01

    indicators were the single most pervasive determinant of health-seeking behaviour among the study population, overriding age and sex, and in case of health-care expenditure, types of illness as well. PMID:15744403

  12. Foam as an agent to reduce gravity override effect during gas injection in oil reservoirs. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, J.C.; Sanyal, S.K.; Castanier, L.M.; Brigham, W.E.; Shah, D.O.

    1980-08-01

    A two-dimensional, vertical, rectangular plexiglas model holding a 45-1/2 in. high by 11-3/8 in. wide by 1/4 in. thick sandpack (1.147 x 0.237 x 0.008 m) was used to investigate gravity override of injected gases in gas drive processes. Saturation of the sandpack by a surfactant solution instead of pure water sharply increased liquid recovery and breakthrough time in a nitrogen flooding process. The improvement in production was shown to be due to a reduction of gravity override caused by in-situ generation of foam at the gas-liquid interface. Solutions of two different surfactants (Suntech IX and IV) of various concentrations with different amounts of alcohol were studied to determine their effectiveness as foamers. Surface tension and rate of drainage of the foamers as functions of surfactant concentration were measured. In-situ foaming in the model increased generally with surfactant concentration until an optimum concentration was reached; above this concentration, additional amounts of surfactant had very little effect on the phenomenon. Alcohols seem to improve the performance of low molecular weight surfactants and exhibitied a negative effect on the others. A similar increase of recovery and delay in the breakthrough time was observed in the oil flooding process. A slug of surfactant solution was injected into the pack which was saturated with a white mineral oil and water at irreducible water saturation, and then nitrogen was injected. Gravity override was much less than in the cases when no surfactant was present.

  13. Plate tectonics beyond plate boundaries: the role of ancient structures in intraplate orogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heron, Philip; Pysklywec, Russell; Stephenson, Randell

    2015-04-01

    The development of orogens that occur at a distance from plate boundaries (i.e., `intraplate' deformation) cannot be adequately explained through conventional plate tectonic theory. Intraplate deformation infers a more complex argument for lithospheric and mantle interaction than plate tectonic theory allows. As a result, the origins of intraplate orogenesis are enigmatic. One hypothesis is the amalgamation of continental material (i.e., micro-plates) leaves inherent scars on the crust and mantle lithosphere. Previous studies into continent-continent collisions identify a number of scenarios from accretionary tectonics that affect the crust and mantle (namely, the development of a Rayleigh-Taylor instability, lithospheric underplating, lithospheric delamination, and lithospheric subduction). Any of these processes may weaken the lithosphere allowing episodic reactivation of faults within continental interiors. Hence, continental convergence (i.e., shortening) at a time after continental collision may cause the already weakened crust and mantle lithosphere to produce intraplate deformation. In order to better understand the processes involved in deformation away from plate boundaries, we present suites of continental shortening models (using the high-resolution thermal-mechanical modelling code SOPALE) to identify the preferred style of deformation. We model ancient structures by applying weak subduction scarring, changing the rheological conditions, and modifying the thermal structure within the lithosphere. To highlight the role of surface processes on plate and lithosphere deformation, the effect of climate-driven erosion and deposition on the tectonic structure of intraplate deformation is also addressed. We explore the relevance of the models to previously studied regions of intraplate orogenesis, including the Pyrenees in Europe, the Laramide orogen in North America, Tien Shan orogen in Central Asia, and Central Australia. The findings of the simulations with

  14. Steady State Growth of Continental Crust?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowring, S. A.; Bauer, A.; Dudas, F. O.; Schoene, B.; McLean, N. M.

    2012-12-01

    More than twenty years since the publication of Armstrong's seminal paper, debate still rages about most aspects of the Earth's first billion years. Although orders of magnitude more data have been generated since then, the arguments remain the same. The debate is largely centered on the isotopic systematics of minerals and whole rocks, the major and trace element geochemistry of continental crust, and various geodynamic models for differentiation of the planet. Most agree that earth, like all the terrestrial planets, differentiated into a crust, mantle and core very early in its history. After that, models of crustal evolution diverge significantly, including the suggestions that modern style plate tectonics did not originate until ca. 2.7 Ga or younger and that plumes have played a major role in the generation of continental crust. Many believe that the preserved rock record and the detrital zircon record are consistent with episodic crustal growth, which in turn has led to geodynamic models of episodic mantle convection driving major crust forming events. High-precision and high-throughput geochronology have led to claims of episodicity even more pronounced than that presented in Gastil's 1960 paper. We believe that Earth history has been dominated by plate tectonics and that continental crust is formed largely by amalgamation of island arcs, seamounts, micro continents, and oceanic plateaus. While there are geochemical differences in the average composition of Archean igneous rocks when compared to younger rocks, the processes responsible for their formation may not have changed a great deal. In this view, the so-called crustal growth curves originated by Hurley are in fact crude approximations of crustal preservation. The most highly cited rationales for the view that little silicic crust formed during Earth's first billion years are the lack of known exposed crust older than 3.5 Ga and the paucity of detrital zircons older than 4.0 Ga in sedimentary rocks of

  15. Circum-arctic plate accretion - Isolating part of a pacific plate to form the nucleus of the Arctic Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Churkin, M., Jr.; Trexler, J.H., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A mosaic of large lithospheric plates rims the Arctic Ocean Basin, and foldbelts between these plates contain numerous allochthonous microplates. A new model for continental drift and microplate accretion proposes that prior to the late Mesozoic the Kula plate extended from the Pacific into the Arctic. By a process of circumpolar drift and microplate accretion, fragments of the Pacific basin, including parts of the Kula plate, were cut off and isolated in the Arctic Ocean, the Yukon-Koyukuk basin in Alaska, and the Bering Sea. ?? 1980.

  16. Rotational inertia of continents: A proposed link between polar wandering and plate tectonics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kane, M.F.

    1972-01-01

    A mechanism is proposed whereby displacement between continents and the earth's pole of rotation (polar wandering) gives rise to latitudinal transport of continental plates (continental drift) because of their relatively greater rotational inertia. When extended to short-term polar wobble, the hypothesis predicts an energy change nearly equivalent to the seismic energy rate.

  17. Continental collision slowing due to viscous mantle lithosphere rather than topography.

    PubMed

    Clark, Marin Kristen

    2012-03-01

    Because the inertia of tectonic plates is negligible, plate velocities result from the balance of forces acting at plate margins and along their base. Observations of past plate motion derived from marine magnetic anomalies provide evidence of how continental deformation may contribute to plate driving forces. A decrease in convergence rate at the inception of continental collision is expected because of the greater buoyancy of continental than oceanic lithosphere, but post-collisional rates are less well understood. Slowing of convergence has generally been attributed to the development of high topography that further resists convergent motion; however, the role of deforming continental mantle lithosphere on plate motions has not previously been considered. Here I show that the rate of India's penetration into Eurasia has decreased exponentially since their collision. The exponential decrease in convergence rate suggests that contractional strain across Tibet has been constant throughout the collision at a rate of 7.03 × 10(-16) s(-1), which matches the current rate. A constant bulk strain rate of the orogen suggests that convergent motion is resisted by constant average stress (constant force) applied to a relatively uniform layer or interface at depth. This finding follows new evidence that the mantle lithosphere beneath Tibet is intact, which supports the interpretation that the long-term strain history of Tibet reflects deformation of the mantle lithosphere. Under conditions of constant stress and strength, the deforming continental lithosphere creates a type of viscous resistance that affects plate motion irrespective of how topography evolved. PMID:22382982

  18. Coordination: Southeast continental shelf studies

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, D.W.

    1989-01-26

    The objective of this investigation is to obtain model descriptions of the flow modifications in the Southeast Atlantic continental shelf due to Gulf Stream fluctuations and topographic effects. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  19. MACMA: a Virtual Lab for Plate Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigne, C.; Combes, M.; Tisseau, C.

    2013-12-01

    boundaries is a feature that clearly seems interesting to students. They are used to see dynamic representations of continental drift, but this does not include the dynamics of the oceanic lithosphere and the corresponding fluctuations in seafloor age distribution. The 2-D geometry of the simulator is a simplification that actually brings a clearer view of plate boundary creations, migrations, and collisions, together with global plate tectonics reorganization events.

  20. Composite transform-convergent plate boundaries: description and discussion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryan, H.F.; Coleman, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    The leading edge of the overriding plate at an obliquely convergent boundary is commonly sliced by a system of strike-slip faults. This fault system is often structurally complex, and may show correspondingly uneven strain effects, with great vertical and translational shifts of the component blocks of the fault system. The stress pattern and strain effects vary along the length of the system and change through time. These margins are considered to be composite transform-convergent (CTC) plate boundaries. Examples are given of structures formed along three CTC boundaries: the Aleutian Ridge, the Solomon Islands, and the Philippines. The dynamism of the fault system along a CTC boundary can enhance vertical tectonism and basin formation. This concept provides a framework for the evaluation of petroleum resources related to basin formation, and mineral exploration related to igneous activity associated with transtensional processes. ?? 1992.

  1. A high-resolution local network study of the Nazca plate Wadati-Benioff zone under western Argentina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Robert F., Jr.; Isacks, Bryan L.

    1987-01-01

    Seismic data, recorded by INPRES telemetered network located above one of the subhorizontal segments of the subducted Nazca plate Wadati-Benioff zone beneath western Argentina, were analyzed to determine the zone's fine structure. The depth of the center and the thickness of the subhorizontal Wadati-Benioff zone beneath the network were calculated to be about 107 km and about 20 km, respectively, with most of the seismogenic zone concentrated in a region about 12 km thick. The Nazca plate is interpreted to be in a state of down-dip tension and to be decoupled from the overriding South American plate by a weak zone of asthenospheric or shear-heated material. The South American plate is estimated to be 80 km thick, based on the location of the subducted Nazca plate and an inferred decoupling zone between the plates.

  2. -induced continental warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamae, Youichi; Watanabe, Masahiro; Kimoto, Masahide; Shiogama, Hideo

    2014-11-01

    In this the second of a two-part study, we examine the physical mechanisms responsible for the increasing contrast of the land-sea surface air temperature (SAT) in summertime over the Far East, as observed in recent decades and revealed in future climate projections obtained from a series of transient warming and sensitivity experiments conducted under the umbrella of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5. On a global perspective, a strengthening of land-sea SAT contrast in the transient warming simulations of coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models is attributed to an increase in sea surface temperature (SST). However, in boreal summer, the strengthened contrast over the Far East is reproduced only by increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration. In response to SST increase alone, the tropospheric warming over the interior of the mid- to high-latitude continents including Eurasia are weaker than those over the surrounding oceans, leading to a weakening of the land-sea SAT contrast over the Far East. Thus, the increasing contrast and associated change in atmospheric circulation over East Asia is explained by CO2-induced continental warming. The degree of strengthening of the land-sea SAT contrast varies in different transient warming scenarios, but is reproduced through a combination of the CO2-induced positive and SST-induced negative contributions to the land-sea contrast. These results imply that changes of climate patterns over the land-ocean boundary regions are sensitive to future scenarios of CO2 concentration pathways including extreme cases.

  3. Dynamics of continental deformation in Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergnolle, M.; Calais, E.; Dong, L.

    2007-11-01

    The relevance of plate tectonics concepts to the description of deformation of large continental areas like Asia is subject to much debate. For some, the deformation of continents is better described by rigid motion of lithospheric blocks with strain concentrated along narrow fault zones. For others, it is better described by viscous flow of a continuously deforming solid in which faults play a minor role. Discriminating these end-member hypotheses requires spatially dense measurements of surface strain rates covering the whole deforming area. Here we revisit the issue of the forces and rheological structure that control present-day deformation in Asia. We use the "thin sheet" theory, with deformation driven by the balance of boundary and buoyancy stresses acting on a faulted lithosphere with laterally varying strength. Models are validated against a recent, homogeneous, GPS velocity field that covers most of Asia. In the models, deformation in compressional areas (Himalayas, Tien Shan, Altay) is well reproduced with strong coupling at the India/Eurasia plate contact, which allows for boundary forces to transfer into Asia. Southeastward motions observed in north and south China, however, require tensional, oceanward directed stresses, possibly generated by gravitational potential energy gradients across the Indonesian and Pacific subductions. Model and observed strain rates show that a large part of Asia undergoes no resolvable strain, with a kinematics apparently consistent with block- or plate-like motions. Internal strain, possibly continuous, is limited to high-elevation, mechanically weaker areas. Lateral variations of lithospheric strength appear to control the style of deformation in Asia, with a dynamics consistent with the thin sheet physical framework.

  4. New Alert Override Codes for the Drug Utilization Review System Derived from Outpatient Prescription Data from a Tertiary Teaching Hospital in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ki-Bong; Kim, Woojae; Park, Man Young; Ahn, Eun Kyoung; Park, Rae Woong

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This paper proposes new alert override reason codes that are improvements on existing Drug Utilization Review (DUR) codes based on an analysis of DUR alert override cases in a tertiary medical institution. Methods Data were obtained from a tertiary teaching hospital covering the period from April 1, 2012 to January 15, 2013. We analyzed cases in which doctors had used the 11 overlapping prescription codes provided by the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (HIRA) or had provided free-text reasons. Results We identified 27,955 alert override cases. Among these, 7,772 (27.8%) utilized the HIRA codes, and 20,183 (72.2%) utilized free-text reasons. According to the free-text content analysis, 8,646 cases (42.8%) could be classified using the 11 HIRA codes, and 11,537 (57.2%) could not. In the unclassifiable cases, we identified the need for codes for "prescription relating to operation" and "emergency situations." Two overlapping prescription codes required removal because they were not used. Codes A, C, F, H, I, and J (for drug non-administration cases) explained surrounding situations in too much detail, making differentiation between them difficult. These 6 codes were merged into code J4: "patient was not taking/will not take the medications involved in the DDI." Of the 11 HIRA codes, 6 were merged into a single code, 2 were removed, and 2 were added, yielding 6 alert override codes. We could codify 23,550 (84.2%) alert override cases using these codes. Conclusions These new codes will facilitate the use of the drug–drug interactions alert override in the current DUR system. For further study, an appropriate evaluation should be conducted with prescribing clinicians. PMID:26893949

  5. Current plate velocities relative to the hotspots incorporating the NUVEL-1 global plate motion model

    SciTech Connect

    Gripp, A.E.; Gordon, R.G. )

    1990-07-01

    NUVEL-1 is a new global model of current relative plate velocities which differ significantly from those of prior models. Here the authors incorporate NUVEL-1 into HS2-NUVEL1, a new global model of plate velocities relative to the hotspots. HS2-NUVEL1 was determined from the hotspot data and errors used by Minster and Jordan (1978) to determine AM1-2, which is their model of plate velocities relative to the hotspots. AM1-2 is consistent with Minster and Jordan's relative plate velocity model RM2. Here the authors compare HS2-NUVEL1 with AM1-2 and examine how their differences relate to differences between NUVEL-1 and RM2. HS2-NUVEL1 plate velocities relative to the hotspots are mainly similar to those of AM1-2. Minor differences between the two models include the following: (1) in HS2-NUVEL1 the speed of the partly continental, apparently non-subducting Indian plate is greater than that of the purely oceanic, subducting Nazca plate; (2) in places the direction of motion of the African, Antarctic, Arabian, Australian, Caribbean, Cocos, Eurasian, North American, and South American plates differs between models by more than 10{degree}; (3) in places the speed of the Australian, Caribbean, Cocos, Indian, and Nazca plates differs between models by more than 8 mm/yr. Although 27 of the 30 RM2 Euler vectors differ with 95% confidence from those of NUVEL-1, only the AM1-2 Arabia-hotspot and India-hotspot Euler vectors differ with 95% confidence from those of HS2-NUVEL1. Thus, substituting NUVEL-1 for RM2 in the inversion for plate velocities relative to the hotspots changes few Euler vectors significantly, presumably because the uncertainty in the velocity of a plate relative to the hotspots is much greater than the uncertainty in its velocity relative to other plates.

  6. Geodynamic settings of microcontinents, non-volcanic islands and submerged continental marginal plateau formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinin, Evgeny; Grokholsky, Andrey; Makushkina, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Complex process of continental lithosphere breakup is often accompanied by full or semi isolation of small continental blocks from the parent continent such as microcontinents or submerged marginal plateaus. We present different types of continental blocks formed in various geodynamic settings. The process depends on thermo-mechanical properties of rifting. 1) The continental blocks fully isolated from the parent continent. This kind of blocks exist in submerged form (Elan Bank, the Jan-Mayen Ridge, Zenith Plateau, Gulden Draak Knoll, Batavia Knoll) and in non-submerged form in case of large block size. Most of listed submerged blocks are formed in proximity of hot-spot or plume. 2) The continental blocks semi-isolated from the parent continent. Exmouth Plateau, Vøring, Agulhas, Naturaliste are submerged continental plateaus of the indicated category; Sri Lanka, Tasmania, Socotra are islands adjacent to continent here. Nowadays illustration of this setting is the Sinai block located between the two continental rifts. 3) The submerged linear continental blocks formed by the continental rifting along margin (the Lomonosov Ridge). Suggested evolution of this paragraph is the rift propagation along existing transtensional (or another type) transform fault. Future example of this type might be the California Peninsula block, detached from the North American plate by the rifting within San-Andreas fault. 4) The submerged continental blocks formed by extensional processes as the result of asthenosphere flow and shear deformations. Examples are submerged blocks in the central and southern Scotia Sea (Terror Bank, Protector Basin, Discovery Bank, Bruce Bank etc.). 5) The continental blocks formed in the transform fault systems originated in setting of contradict rifts propagation in presence of structure barriers, rifts are shifted by several hundreds kilometers from each other. Examples of this geodynamic setting are Equatorial Atlantic at the initial development stage

  7. Mantle flow geometry from ridge to trench beneath the Gorda-Juan de Fuca plate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Short, Robert; Allen, Richard M.; Bastow, Ian D.; Totten, Eoghan; Richards, Mark A.

    2015-12-01

    Tectonic plates are underlain by a low-viscosity mantle layer, the asthenosphere. Asthenospheric flow may be induced by the overriding plate or by deeper mantle convection. Shear strain due to this flow can be inferred using the directional dependence of seismic wave speeds--seismic anisotropy. However, isolation of asthenospheric signals is challenging; most seismometers are located on continents, whose complex structure influences the seismic waves en route to the surface. The Cascadia Initiative, an offshore seismometer deployment in the US Pacific Northwest, offers the opportunity to analyse seismic data recorded on simpler oceanic lithosphere. Here we use measurements of seismic anisotropy across the Juan de Fuca and Gorda plates to reconstruct patterns of asthenospheric mantle shear flow from the Juan de Fuca mid-ocean ridge to the Cascadia subduction zone trench. We find that the direction of fastest seismic wave motion rotates with increasing distance from the mid-ocean ridge to become aligned with the direction of motion of the Juan de Fuca Plate, implying that this plate influences mantle flow. In contrast, asthenospheric mantle flow beneath the Gorda Plate does not align with Gorda Plate motion and instead aligns with the neighbouring Pacific Plate motion. These results show that asthenospheric flow beneath the small, slow-moving Gorda Plate is controlled largely by advection due to the much larger, faster-moving Pacific Plate.

  8. Tillering in the sugary1 sweet corn is maintained by overriding the teosinte branched1 repressive signal

    PubMed Central

    Kebrom, Tesfamichael H; Brutnell, Thomas P

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of apical dominance in maize during domestication from teosinte is associated with higher expression from the teosinte branched1 (tb1) gene that inhibits tiller bud outgrowth. Unlike many standard maize varieties, the sweet corn inbred P39 that carries a mutation in a starch biosynthesis gene sugary1 produces multiple tillers and providing an opportunity to explore the diversification of the tb1 signal in maize. Through gene expression analysis, we show that tiller buds in P39 continue to grow by overriding the high expression level of tb1 that arrests bud outgrowth in maize inbred B73. In addition, we demonstrate that while B73 is largely non-responsive to shade, both P39 and teosinte respond through tb1-independent and tb1-dependent molecular mechanisms, respectively, leading to inhibition of tiller bud outgrowth. PMID:26399727

  9. Tillering in the sugary1 sweet corn is maintained by overriding the teosinte branched1 repressive signal.

    PubMed

    Kebrom, Tesfamichael H; Brutnell, Thomas P

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of apical dominance in maize during domestication from teosinte is associated with higher expression from the teosinte branched1 (tb1) gene that inhibits tiller bud outgrowth. Unlike many standard maize varieties, the sweet corn inbred P39 that carries a mutation in a starch biosynthesis gene sugary1 produces multiple tillers and providing an opportunity to explore the diversification of the tb1 signal in maize. Through gene expression analysis, we show that tiller buds in P39 continue to grow by overriding the high expression level of tb1 that arrests bud outgrowth in maize inbred B73. In addition, we demonstrate that while B73 is largely non-responsive to shade, both P39 and teosinte respond through tb1-independent and tb1-dependent molecular mechanisms, respectively, leading to inhibition of tiller bud outgrowth. PMID:26399727

  10. Reaction-induced rheological weakening enables oceanic plate subduction.

    PubMed

    Hirauchi, Ken-Ichi; Fukushima, Kumi; Kido, Masanori; Muto, Jun; Okamoto, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Earth is the only terrestrial planet in our solar system where an oceanic plate subducts beneath an overriding plate. Although the initiation of plate subduction requires extremely weak boundaries between strong plates, the way in which oceanic mantle rheologically weakens remains unknown. Here we show that shear-enhanced hydration reactions contribute to the generation and maintenance of weak mantle shear zones at mid-lithospheric depths. High-pressure friction experiments on peridotite gouge reveal that in the presence of hydrothermal water, increasing strain and reactions lead to an order-of-magnitude reduction in strength. The rate of deformation is controlled by pressure-solution-accommodated frictional sliding on weak hydrous phyllosilicate (talc), providing a mechanism for the 'cutoff' of the high peak strength at the brittle-plastic transition. Our findings suggest that infiltration of seawater into transform faults with long lengths and low slip rates is an important controlling factor on the initiation of plate tectonics on terrestrial planets. PMID:27562366

  11. Reaction-induced rheological weakening enables oceanic plate subduction

    PubMed Central

    Hirauchi, Ken-ichi; Fukushima, Kumi; Kido, Masanori; Muto, Jun; Okamoto, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Earth is the only terrestrial planet in our solar system where an oceanic plate subducts beneath an overriding plate. Although the initiation of plate subduction requires extremely weak boundaries between strong plates, the way in which oceanic mantle rheologically weakens remains unknown. Here we show that shear-enhanced hydration reactions contribute to the generation and maintenance of weak mantle shear zones at mid-lithospheric depths. High-pressure friction experiments on peridotite gouge reveal that in the presence of hydrothermal water, increasing strain and reactions lead to an order-of-magnitude reduction in strength. The rate of deformation is controlled by pressure-solution-accommodated frictional sliding on weak hydrous phyllosilicate (talc), providing a mechanism for the ‘cutoff' of the high peak strength at the brittle-plastic transition. Our findings suggest that infiltration of seawater into transform faults with long lengths and low slip rates is an important controlling factor on the initiation of plate tectonics on terrestrial planets. PMID:27562366

  12. The northern Egyptian continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawy, Ahmed; Mohamed, Gad; Omar, Khaled; Farid, Walid

    2015-01-01

    Africa displays a variety of continental margin structures, tectonics and sedimentary records. The northern Egyptian continental margin represents the NE portion of the North African passive continental margin. Economically, this region is of great importance as a very rich and productive hydrocarbon zone in Egypt. Moreover, it is characterized by remarkable tectonic setting accompanied by active tectonic processes from the old Tethys to recent Mediterranean. In this article, seismicity of the northern Egyptian continental margin has been re-evaluated for more than 100-years and the source parameters of three recent earthquakes (October 2012, January 2013 and July 2013) have been estimated. Moment tensor inversions of 19th October 2012 and 17th January 2013 earthquakes reveal normal faulting mechanism with strike-slip component having seismic moment of 3.5E16 N m and 4.3E15 N m respectively. The operation of the Egyptian National Seismic Network (ENSN) since the end of 1997 has significantly enhanced the old picture of earthquake activity across northern Egyptian continental margin whereas; the record-ability (annual rate) has changed from 2-events/year to 54-event/year before and after ENSN respectively. The spatial distribution of earthquakes foci indicated that the activity tends to cluster at three zones: Mediterranean Ridge (MR), Nile Cone (NC) and Eratosthenes Seamount (ERS). However, two seismic gaps are reported along Levant Basin (LEV) and Herodotus Basin (HER).

  13. Interrelationships between continental freeboard, tectonics and mantle temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galer, S. J. G.

    1991-01-01

    Oceanic hypsometry and isentropic melting models are combined to address the question of freeboard from the middle Archean to the present. In addition to the fraction of continental crust, the factors governing the long-term balance of the continental freeboard include the mantle potential temperature (TP), the oceanic lithosphere thickness, and the plate creation rate (C0). It is shown that variation in TP far outweighs the other factors in importance, with freeboard decreasing by 1 km for every TP increase of about 80 C. The huge ten- to thirtyfold increases in C0 backward in geological time that have been invoked to explain near-constant freeboard are shown to be unnecessary. The low value found for TP is consistent with the preservation of ancient diamonds in the deep South African lithosphere. It is concluded from this that the present cooling rate of the earth of about 46 C/Ga has general applicability over much of geological time.

  14. 76 FR 2919 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram and Supplemental Official Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-18

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram and Supplemental Official Outer Continental Shelf Block Diagrams AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean... American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83) Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram and...

  15. Bioenergetics of Continental Serpentinites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardace, D.; Meyer-Dombard, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    Serpentinization is the aqueous alteration of ultramafic (Fe- and Mg-rich) rocks, resulting in secondary mineral assemblages of serpentine, brucite, iron oxyhydroxides and magnetite, talc, and possibly carbonate and silica-rich veins and other minor phases-all depending on the evolving pressure-temperature-composition of the system. The abiotic evolution of hydrogen and possibly organic compounds via serpentinization (McCollom and Bach, 2009) highlights the relevance of this geologic process to carbon and energy sources for the deep biosphere. Serpentinization may fuel life over long stretches of geologic time, throughout the global seabed and in exposed, faulted peridotite blocks (as at Lost City Hydrothermal Field, Kelley et al., 2005), and in obducted oceanic mantle units in ophiolites (e.g., Tiago et al., 2004). Relatively little work has been published on life in continental serpentinite settings, though they likely host a unique resident microbiota. In this work, we systematically model the serpentinizing fluid as an environmental niche. Reported field data for high and moderate pH serpentinizing fluids were modeled from Cyprus, the Philippines, Oman, Northern California, New Caledonia, Yugoslavia, Portugal, Italy, Newfoundland Canada, New Zealand, and Turkey. Values for Gibbs Energy of reaction (ΔGr), kJ per mole of electrons transferred for a given metabolism, are calculated for each field site. Cases are considered both for (1) modest assumptions of 1 nanomolar hydrogen and 1 micromolar methane, based on unpublished data for a similar northern California field site (Cardace and Hoehler, in prep.) and (2) an upper estimate of 10 nanomolar hydrogen and 500 micromolar methane. We survey the feasibility of microbial metabolisms for key steps in the nitrogen cycle, oxidation of sulfur in pyrite, iron oxidation or reduction reactions, sulfate reduction coupled to hydrogen or methane oxidation, methane oxidation coupled to the reduction of oxygen, and

  16. Variations of upper plate mechanics, seismicity, and arc volcanism along the Middle America Trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruh, J.; Sallares, V.; Ranero, C. R.; van Dinther, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The Middle America Trench (MAT) extends from the Riviera Fracture Zone offshore Mexico down to the Panama Fracture Zone. Along the MAT, the oceanic Cocos plate changes in character from the older, deeper and relatively smooth plate offshore Guatemala-Nicaragua to the ~20 km thick crust of Cocos Ridge off Costa Rica. These changes occur because the northern part of the the Cocos plate has been formed at the East Pacific Rise, while the southern part is formed at the Cocos-Nazca spreading center, which is in turn influenced by the Galapagos Hotspot, originating prominent submarine structures such as the Cocos Ridge. In contrast, the terrane forming the overriding plate in the Pacific convergent margin, which is mainly made by the Caribbean Igneous Province rocks, is relatively homogeneous. Thus, this region is an excellent natural example to study the effect of changes in the incoming plate on the tectonics and deformation of the overriding plate. The Nicaragua lake in the north is a result of upper plate extension related to rollback of the subducting slab, whereas in the south, the Talamanca Cordillera indicates compression of the Caribbean crust probably related with the subduction of the Cocos Ridge. We present numerical models that help to understand the long-term effects of variable subducting oceanic crust age and thickness on upper plate deformation and magmatism. Furthermore, we investigate the seismic behavior of these different convergent systems. The applied numerical model consists of a 2D seismo-thermo-mechanical finite difference scheme with visco-elasto-plastic rheology and a stick-slip frictional formulation to simulate spontaneous nucleation, propagation and arrest of earthquake-like ruptures on physically consistent faults.

  17. Dual subduction tectonics and plate dynamics of central Japan shown by three-dimensional P-wave anisotropic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishise, Motoko; Miyake, Hiroe; Koketsu, Kazuki

    2015-07-01

    The central Japanese subduction zone is characterized by a complex tectonic setting affected by the dual subduction of oceanic plates and collisions between the island arcs. To better understand of the subduction system, we performed an anisotropic tomography analysis using P-wave arrival times from local earthquakes to determine the three-dimensional structure of P-wave azimuthal anisotropy in the overriding plate and the Pacific and Philippine Sea (PHS) slabs. The principal characteristics of anisotropy in the subducted and subducting plates are (1) in the overriding plate, the distribution pattern of fast direction of crustal anisotropy coincides with that of the strike of geological structure, (2) in the two oceanic plates, fast propagation directions of P-wave were sub-parallel to the directions of seafloor spreading. Additionally, our tomographic images demonstrate that (1) the bottom of the Median Tectonic Line, the longest fault zone in Japan, reaches to the lower crust, and seems to link to the source region of an inter-plate earthquake along the PHS slab, (2) the segmentation of the PHS slab - the Izu Islands arc, the Nishi-Shichito ridge, and the Shikoku basin - due to the formation history, is reflected in the regional variation of anisotropy. The tomographic study further implies that there might be a fragment of the Pacific slab suggested by a previous study beneath the Tokyo metropolitan area. The overall findings strongly indicate that seismic anisotropy analysis provide potentially useful information to understand a subduction zone.

  18. Continental crust: a geophysical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Meissner, R.

    1986-01-01

    This book develops an integrated and balanced picture of present knowledge of the continental crust. Crust and lithosphere are first defined, and the formation of crusts as a general planetary phenomenon is described. The background and methods of geophysical studies of the earth's crust and the collection of related geophysical parameters are examined. Creep and friction experiments and the various methods of radiometric age dating are addressed, and geophysical and geological investigations of the crustal structure in various age provinces of the continents are studied. Specific tectonic structures such as rifts, continental margins, and geothermal areas are discussed. Finally, an attempt is made to give a comprehensive view of the evolution of the continental crust and to collect and develop arguments for crustal accretion and recycling. 647 references.

  19. The continental drift convection cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, J. A.; Behn, Mark D.

    2015-06-01

    Continents on Earth periodically assemble to form supercontinents and then break up again into smaller continental blocks (the Wilson cycle). Previous highly developed numerical models incorporate fixed continents while others indicate that continent movement modulates flow. Our simplified numerical model suggests that continental drift is fundamental. A thermally insulating continent is anchored at its center to mantle flow on an otherwise stress-free surface for infinite Prandtl number cellular convection with constant material properties. Rayleigh numbers exceed 107, while continent widths and chamber lengths approach Earth's values. The Wilson cycle is reproduced by a unique, rugged monopolar "continental drift convection cell." Subduction occurs at the cell's upstream end with cold slabs dipping at an angle beneath the moving continent (as found in many continent/subduction regions on Earth). Drift enhances vertical heat transport up to 30%, especially at the core-mantle boundary, and greatly decreases lateral mantle temperature differences.

  20. Switching between alternative responses of the lithosphere to continental collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baes, Marzieh; Govers, Rob; Wortel, Rinus

    2011-12-01

    We study possible responses to arc-continent or continent-continent collision using numerical models. Our short-term integration models show that the initial stage of deformation following continental collision is governed by the competition between three potential weakness zones: (1) mantle wedge, (2) plate interface and (3) lower continental crust. Depending on which of these is the weakest zone in the system, three different responses can be recognized: (1) subduction polarity reversal, (2) continuation of subduction and (3) delamination and back stepping. Subduction polarity reversal occurs if the mantle wedge is the weakest zone in the system. This happens only if the viscosity of the mantle wedge is at least one order of magnitude lower than the average viscosity of the lithosphere. In continent-continent collision, one additional condition needs to be satisfied for subduction polarity reversal to occur: for the subducting lithosphere the ratio of the viscosity of the lower continental crust to the viscosity of the upper lithospheric mantle must be equal to or higher than 0.006. The time required for polarity reversal depends on several parameters: the convergence rate, the sinking velocity of the detached slab and the relative strength of the mantle wedge, arc and backarc. The response to collision is continued subduction if the plate interface is the weakest zone, and is delamination and back stepping if the lower continental crust is the weakest area in the system. Our finding that a low-viscosity wedge is a prerequisite for a reversal of subduction polarity agrees with inferences about regions for which subduction polarity reversal has been proposed.

  1. History and Evolution of Precambrian plate tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Ria; Gerya, Taras

    2014-05-01

    Plate tectonics is a global self-organising process driven by negative buoyancy at thermal boundary layers. Phanerozoic plate tectonics with its typical subduction and orogeny is relatively well understood and can be traced back in the geological records of the continents. Interpretations of geological, petrological and geochemical observations from Proterozoic and Archean orogenic belts however (e.g., Brown, 2006), suggest a different tectonic regime in the Precambrian. Due to higher radioactive heat production the Precambrian lithosphere shows lower internal strength and is strongly weakened by percolating melts. The fundamental difference between Precambrian and Phanerozoic tectonics is therefore the upper-mantle temperature, which determines the strength of the upper mantle (Brun, 2002) and the further tectonic history. 3D petrological-thermomechanical numerical modelling experiments of oceanic subduction at an active plate at different upper-mantle temperatures show these different subduction regimes. For upper-mantle temperatures < 175 K above the present day value a subduction style appears which is close to present day subduction but with more frequent slab break-off. At upper-mantle temperatures 175 - 250 K above present day values steep subduction continues but the plates are weakened enough to allow buckling and also lithospheric delamination and drip-offs. For upper-mantle temperatures > 250 K above the present day value no subduction occurs any more. The whole lithosphere is delaminating and due to strong volcanism and formation of a thicker crust subduction is inhibited. This stage of 200-250 K higher upper mantle temperature which corresponds roughly to the early Archean (Abbott, 1994) is marked by strong volcanism due to sublithospheric decompression melting which leads to an equal thickness for both oceanic and continental plates. As a consequence subduction is inhibited, but a compressional setup instead will lead to orogeny between a continental

  2. Transition on the Geometry of the Cocos Plate in Central-Southern Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Domínguez, M. Á.; Perez-Campos, X.; Valencia-Cabrera, D.; Clayton, R. W.; Cordoba-Montiel, F.; Valdes-Gonzales, C. M.; Brudzinski, M. R.; Cabral-Cano, E.; Arciniega-Ceballos, A.

    2014-12-01

    The tectonic setting, produced by the interaction between the Cocos and North American plates, follows complex geometries along the Pacific coast. Previous studies in central Mexico showed that the slab dips nearly horizontally before steeply subducting into the continental mantle; in contrast, in southern Mexico, the slabs dips under the continental plate at a constant angle. Receiver functions from four seismic networks: GECO (Geometry of Cocos), SSN (Servicio Sismológico Nacional), OxNet (Oaxaca Network) and UV (Universidad Veracruzana) are used to study the crustal structure underneath the stations, and image the subducting Cocos plate in order to define the geometry and the transition angle in central-southern Mexico.

  3. Influence of Earth crust composition on continental collision style in Precambrian conditions: Results of supercomputer modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavyalov, Sergey; Zakharov, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    A number of issues concerning Precambrian geodynamics still remain unsolved because of uncertainity of many physical (thermal regime, lithosphere thickness, crust thickness, etc.) and chemical (mantle composition, crust composition) parameters, which differed considerably comparing to the present day values. In this work, we show results of numerical supercomputations based on petrological and thermomechanical 2D model, which simulates the process of collision between two continental plates, each 80-160 km thick, with various convergence rates ranging from 5 to 15 cm/year. In the model, the upper mantle temperature is 150-200 ⁰C higher than the modern value, while the continental crust radiogenic heat production is higher than the present value by the factor of 1.5. These settings correspond to Archean conditions. The present study investigates the dependence of collision style on various continental crust parameters, especially on crust composition. The 3 following archetypal settings of continental crust composition are examined: 1) completely felsic continental crust; 2) basic lower crust and felsic upper crust; 3) basic upper crust and felsic lower crust (hereinafter referred to as inverted crust). Modeling results show that collision with completely felsic crust is unlikely. In the case of basic lower crust, a continental subduction and subsequent continental rocks exhumation can take place. Therefore, formation of ultra-high pressure metamorphic rocks is possible. Continental subduction also occurs in the case of inverted continental crust. However, in the latter case, the exhumation of felsic rocks is blocked by upper basic layer and their subsequent interaction depends on their volume ratio. Thus, if the total inverted crust thickness is about 15 km and the thicknesses of the two layers are equal, felsic rocks cannot be exhumed. If the total thickness is 30 to 40 km and that of the felsic layer is 20 to 25 km, it breaks through the basic layer leading to

  4. Sputtering and ion plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The proceedings of a conference on sputtering and ion plating are presented. Subjects discussed are: (1) concepts and applications of ion plating, (2) sputtering for deposition of solid film lubricants, (3) commercial ion plating equipment, (4) industrial potential for ion plating and sputtering, and (5) fundamentals of RF and DC sputtering.

  5. Development of transtensional and transpressive plate boundaries due to noncircular (cycloid) relative plate motion

    SciTech Connect

    Cronin, V.S. )

    1990-05-01

    The trace of a transform fault commonly is assumed to be circular and concentric with the finite relative motion of the plates adjacent to the fault. These assumptions have led to controversy as the transform fault label has been applied to the San Andreas fault in California because the San Andreas fault is neither circular nor concentric with the motion of the Pacific plate relative to the North American plate. The assumption of circular relative plate motion over a finite time interval is not generally valid. When finite relative plate motion is not circular, the length and orientation of a transform fault must change through time. The length and orientation of ridge-ridge transform faults in oceanic crust evolve through the migration, propagation, and abandonment of ridge segments. Transform faults that bound continental crust evolve differently than do transform faults along mid-ocean ridges because continental transform faults typically do not have ridges at both ends and because of the rheological differences between oceanic and continental crust. Along continent-continent transform faults in which the initial displacement is entirely strike slip, later displacements will be progressively more divergent or convergent (i.e., transtensive or transpressive). Transtension can result in the development of deep basins with high heat flow. Transpression can result in folding, reverse faulting, and decoupling of the crust from its lower crustal or mantle lithosphere in the region adjacent to the transform fault. Regardless of whether the transform boundary becomes transtensional or transpressional, the boundary evolves from a discrete transform fault to a broader, structurally complex accommodation zone (sensu lato).

  6. Signs of continental rifting in the southwestern Japanese Island Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernysheva, E. A.; Eroshenko, D. V.

    2016-03-01

    The southwestern margin of the Japan Arc evolved in the geodynamic regime of continental rifting during the Miocene-Pleistocene. This has been verified by broad manifestations of metasomatosis of mantle peridotites that underlie the lithosphere of the Japan Islands and by episodes of deep magmatism (kimberlites and melilitites) in the region. The high enrichment of deep melts in incompatible rare and rare earth elements is partially preserved in melts of regional basalts from smaller depths. In contrast, spreading basalts of the Sea of Japan and subduction basalts from the Nankai trench at the boundary with the Philippine Plate are extremely depleted in rare elements.

  7. The Aravalli sequence of Rajasthan, India: A Precambrian continental margin?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdougall, J. D.; Willis, R.; Lugmair, G. W.; Roy, A. B.; Gopalan, K.

    1985-01-01

    The extent to which plate tectonics in its present form operated during the Precambrian is unknown, but is a subject of considerable current interest. A remarkable succession of Precambrian rocks in Rajasthan, Northwestern India, which may help to shed more light on this question are discussed. Data indicates that the Aravalli sequence has a number of characteristics generally ascribed to active continental margins. Although much more work is required to bear this out, the evidence suggests that the processes operating in such an environment in the early Proterozoic or late Archean were not vastly different from today.

  8. Continental crust beneath the Agulhas Plateau, Southwest Indian Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Tucholke, B.E.; Houtz, R.E.; Barrett, D.M.

    1981-05-10

    The Agulhas Plateau lies 500 km off the Cape of Good Hope in the southwestern Indian Ocean. Acoustic basement beneath the northern one third of this large, aseismic structural high has rugged morphology, but basement in the south is anomalously smooth, excepting a 30- to 90-km-wide zone with irregular relief that trends south-southwest through the center of the plateau. Seismic refraction profiles across the southern plateau indicate that the zone of irregular acoustic basement overlies thickened oceanic crust and that continental crust, locally thinned and intruded by basalts, underlies several regions of smooth acoustic basement. Recovery of quartzo-feldspathic gneisses in dredge hauls confirms the presence of continental crust. The smoothness of acoustic basement probably results from erosion (perhaps initially subaerial) of topographic highs with depositions and cementation of debris in ponds to form high-velocity beds. Basalt flows and sills also may contribute locally to form smooth basement. The rugged basement of the northern plateau appears to be of oceanic origin. A plate reconstruction to the time of initial opening of the South Atlantic places the continental part of the southern plateau adjacent to the southern edge of the Falkland Plateau, and both abut the western Mozambique Ridge. Both the Agulhas and Falkland plateaus were displaced westward during initial rifting in the Early Cretaceous. Formation of an RRR triple junction at the northern edge of the Agulhas continental fragment during middle Cretaceous time may explain the origin of the rugged, thickened oceanic crust beneath plateau as well as the apparent extension of the continental crust and intrusion of basaltic magmas beneath the southern plateau.

  9. Inheritance of pre-existing weakness in continental breakup: 3D numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jie; Gerya, Taras

    2013-04-01

    The whole process of continental rifting to seafloor spreading is one of the most important plate tectonics on the earth. There are many questions remained related to this process, most of which are poorly understood, such as how continental rifting transformed into seafloor spreading? How the curved oceanic ridge developed from a single straight continental rift? How the pre-existing weakness in either crust or lithospheric mantle individually influences the continental rifting and oceanic spreading? By employing the state-of-the-art three-dimensional thermomechanical-coupled numerical code (using Eulerian-Lagrangian finite-difference method and marker-in-cell technic) (Gerya and Yuen, 2007), which can model long-term plate extension and large strains, we studied the whole process of continental rifting to seafloor spreading based on the following question: How the pre-existing lithospheric weak zone influences the continental breakup? Continental rifts do not occur randomly, but like to follow the pre-existing weakness (such as fault zones, suture zones, failed rifts, and other tectonic boundaries) in the lithosphere, for instance, the western branch of East African Rift formed in the relatively weak mobile belts along the curved western border of Tanzanian craton (Corti et al., 2007; Nyblade and Brazier, 2002), the Main Ethiopian Rift developed within the Proterozoic mobile belt which is believed to represent a continental collision zone (Keranen and Klemperer, 2008),the Baikal rift formed along the suture between Siberian craton and Sayan-Baikal folded belt (Chemenda et al., 2002). The early stage formed rift can be a template for the future rift development and continental breakup (Keranen and Klemperer, 2008). Lithospheric weakness can either reduce the crustal strength or mantle strength, and leads to the crustal or mantle necking (Dunbar and Sawyer, 1988), which plays an important role on controlling the continental breakup patterns, such as controlling the

  10. Estimation of continental precipitation recycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brubaker, Kaye L.; Entekhabi, Dara; Eagleson, P. S.

    1993-01-01

    The total amount of water that precipitates on large continental regions is supplied by two mechanisms: 1) advection from the surrounding areas external to the region and 2) evaporation and transpiration from the land surface within the region. The latter supply mechanism is tantamount to the recycling of precipitation over the continental area. The degree to which regional precipitation is supplied by recycled moisture is a potentially significant climate feedback mechanism and land surface-atmosphere interaction, which may contribute to the persistence and intensification of droughts. Gridded data on observed wind and humidity in the global atmosphere are used to determine the convergence of atmospheric water vapor over continental regions. A simplified model of the atmospheric moisture over continents and simultaneous estimates of regional precipitation are employed to estimate, for several large continental regions, the fraction of precipitation that is locally derived. The results indicate that the contribution of regional evaporation to regional precipitation varies substantially with location and season. For the regions studied, the ratio of locally contributed to total monthly precipitation generally lies between 0. 10 and 0.30 but is as high as 0.40 in several cases.

  11. The Continental Distillery: Building Thick Continental Crust in the Central Andes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, L. S.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Long, M. D.; Tavera, H.; Minaya, E.; Biryol, C. B.; Bishop, B.; Eakin, C. M.; Franca, G.; Knezevic Antonijevic, S.; Kumar, A.; Ryan, J. C.; Scire, A. C.; Ward, K. M.; Young, B. E.

    2013-12-01

    The formation of stable continental crust and the associated development and destruction of mantle lithospheric roots is central to our understanding of plate tectonics, both at its inception and as an ongoing process today. Subduction zones play an important role in the creation and refinement of continental crust, and also serve as a possible mechanism for the removal of residual mantle material. The central Andes provide an intriguing laboratory for the study of these processes. Up to 400 km wide, 1500 km long, and with an average elevation of 4 km, the Altiplano Plateau is the largest orogen on earth associated with an ocean-continent subduction zone. This is much larger than adjacent 'normal' sections of the Andes, raising the question of why this portion of South American crust became so much more substantial than surrounding areas. Over the past several years, new seismic data have made it possible for us to develop a more complete picture of the lithospheric and asthenospheric processes involved in the development of the Altiplano Plateau and the adjacent narrower orogen further to the north. The 'Central Andean Uplift and the Geodynamics of High Topography' (CAUGHT) comprises in part a broadband deployment of 50 stations across the northern flank of the Altiplano Plateau in southern Peru and northern Bolivia. The adjacent 'PerU Lithosphere and Slab Experiment' (PULSE) includes 40 broadband stations that cover the region directly north of the CAUGHT deployment, encompassing the northern edge of the Altiplano, the transition to 'normal' width orogen, and the transition in slab geometry from normal to flat from south to north across the study area. Uplift of the Altiplano Plateau is likely due to some combination shortening, isostasy due to lithospheric destruction or changes in crustal density, magmatic addition to the crust, and/or flow within the thickened crust. Our studies indicate pervasive low velocities across the Altiplano consistent with a

  12. Supercritical Submarine Channel Morphodynamics from Integrated Investigation of the Western North American Continental Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covault, J. A.; Fildani, A.; Hubbard, S. M.; Hughes Clarke, J. E.; Kostic, S.; Paull, C. K.; Sylvester, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Submarine channels are conduits through which turbidity currents and related mass movements transport sediment into the deep sea, thereby playing important roles in the development of continental margins and biogeochemical cycles. To gain a better understanding of submarine channel morphodynamic evolution we explore a variety of channel systems from the western North American continental margin with varying sinuosity and levee geometry, terraces, channel cut-offs, and sediment waves in incipient channels, along thalwegs of well-developed channels, and on levees. Repeat bathymetric surveys of submarine channels in fjords of British Columbia and the Monterey canyon underscore the transience of fine-scale detail in channelized geomorphology, and multi-phase bed reworking, local deposition, and bypass of turbidity currents. Numerical modeling is combined with interpretations of channel geomorphology and strata in the Monterey and San Mateo canyon-channel systems to demonstrate that some of the sediment waves are likely to be cyclic steps. Submarine cyclic steps are long-wave, upstream-migrating bedforms in which each bedform in the series is bounded by a hydraulic jump in an overriding turbidity current, which is Froude-supercritical over the lee side of the bedform and Froude-subcritical over the stoss side. Submarine turbidity currents are susceptible to supercritical flow because of the reduced gravitational acceleration of dilute suspensions. Higher submarine slopes common to the North American continental margin also promote supercritical flow, which might not be as common across lower slopes of large passive margins such as the Amazon, Indus, and Bengal submarine fans. We posit that cyclic steps are a common morphodynamic expression in many continental margins. Continued integration of high-resolution data, such as repeat geophysical surveys, acoustic doppler current profiler measurements, and turbidite outcrops, which provide insights into the longer

  13. Site History and Edaphic Features Override the Influence of Plant Species on Microbial Communities in Restored Tidal Freshwater Wetlands

    PubMed Central

    Prasse, Christine E.; Baldwin, Andrew H.

    2015-01-01

    Restored wetland soils differ significantly in physical and chemical properties from their natural counterparts even when plant community compositions are similar, but effects of restoration on microbial community composition and function are not well understood. Here, we investigate plant-microbe relationships in restored and natural tidal freshwater wetlands from two subestuaries of the Chesapeake Bay. Soil samples were collected from the root zone of Typha latifolia, Phragmites australis, Peltandra virginica, and Lythrum salicaria. Soil microbial composition was assessed using 454 pyrosequencing, and genes representing bacteria, archaea, denitrification, methanogenesis, and methane oxidation were quantified. Our analysis revealed variation in some functional gene copy numbers between plant species within sites, but intersite comparisons did not reveal consistent plant-microbe trends. We observed more microbial variations between plant species in natural wetlands, where plants have been established for a long period of time. In the largest natural wetland site, sequences putatively matching methanogens accounted for ∼17% of all sequences, and the same wetland had the highest numbers of genes coding for methane coenzyme A reductase (mcrA). Sequences putatively matching aerobic methanotrophic bacteria and anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME) were detected in all sites, suggesting that both aerobic and anaerobic methane oxidation are possible in these systems. Our data suggest that site history and edaphic features override the influence of plant species on microbial communities in restored wetlands. PMID:25769832

  14. Earth's plate motion evolution and its link to global mantle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolf, Tobias; Capitanio, Fabio; Tackley, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Present-day plate motions provide a global dataset that allows us to infer the present convective structure of the Earth's mantle. Moreover, present geological observations combined with the kinematic principles of plate tectonics enables us to reconstruct Earth's tectonic history back until Pangaean times, which improves our understanding of how Earth has evolved to its present state. However, several aspects are not yet sufficiently well understood, for instance, how surface motions are linked to deep mantle processes or how plate motion changes over time, including those timescales of several 100 Myr that are associated with supercontinent formation and dispersal. Here, we use global spherical models of mantle convection to investigate plate motion evolution in a general and dynamically fully consistent manner. These models include tectonic plates self-consistently evolving from mantle flow as well as Earth-like continental drift. We analyze the evolution of plate velocities over long timescales and observe fluctuations of globally averaged plate motions of a factor of 2-3, in agreement with kinematic reconstructions. The fluctuations are mainly driven by the onset of new subduction, highlighting the strong role of slab-related driving forces in the rates of plate motion. Average plate motions are increased with a stronger viscosity contrast between upper and lower mantle, partly due to an increased subduction flux into the lower mantle, which increases the driving forces of plate motion. The motion of individual plates shows much stronger fluctuation. Continental plate motions are modulated by continental assembly and dispersal. Continents usually move slower when strongly clustered and faster during dispersal and before collision. In a further step, we analyze changes in the direction of motion of these individual plates by calculating their Euler pole and its change with time. This allows us to characterize the variety of modeled plate reorganizations and to

  15. Computer animation of Phanerozoic plate motions

    SciTech Connect

    Scotese, C.R. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Since 1985, the PALEOMAP Project, in collaboration with research groups both in the US and abroad, has assembled a digital model that describes global plate motions during the last 600 million years. In this paper the authors present a series of computer animations that dynamically illustrates the movement of continents and terranes, and the evolution of the ocean basins since the breakup of the late Precambrian supercontinent. These animations depict the motion of the plates from both equatorial and polar perspectives. Mesozoic and Cenozoic plate tectonic reconstructions are based on a synthesis of linear magnetic anomalies, fracture zone locations, intracontinental rifts, collision and thrust belts, and zones of strike-slip. Paleozoic plate reconstructions, though more speculative, are based on evidence of past subduction, continental collision, and inferred sea floor spreading. The relative longitudinal positions of the continents during the Paleozoic and the width of intervening oceans have been adjusted to best explain changing biogeographic and paleoclimatic patterns. A new paleomagnetic/hot spot reference frame has been constructed that combines paleomagnetic data compiled by Rob Van der Voo (1992) with inferred motion relative to a fixed frame of hot spots. Using probable Early Mesozoic and Paleozoic hot spot tracks on the major continents, the authors have extended plate motions relative to the hot spot reference frame back to 400 million years.

  16. Plate Tectonics: From Initiation of Subduction to Global Plate Motions (Augustus Love Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnis, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Plates are driven by buoyancy forces distributed in the mantle, within cooling oceanic plates (ridge push) and within subducted slabs. Although the case is often made that subducted slabs provide the principle driving force on plate motion, consensus has not been achieved. This is at least partially due to the great difficulty in realistically capturing the role of slabs in observationally-constrained models as slabs act to drive and resist plate motions through their high effective viscosity. Slab buoyancy acts directly on the edge of the plate (slab pull), while inducing mantle flow that tends to drag both subducting and overriding plates toward the trench. While plates bend during subduction they undergo a form of 'plastic failure' (as evident through faulting, seismicity and reduction of flexural parameters at the outer trench wall). The birth of a new subduction zone, subduction initiation, provides important insight into plate motions and subduction dynamics. About half of all subduction zones initiated over the Cenozoic and the geophysical and geological observations of them provide first order constraints on the mechanics of how these margins evolved from their preexisting tectonic state to self-sustaining subduction. We have examples of subduction initiation at different phases of the initiation process (e.g. early versus late) as well as how margins have responded to different tectonic forcings. The consequences of subduction initiation are variable: intense trench roll back and extensive boninitic volcanism followed initiation of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc while both were absent during Aleutian arc initiation. Such differences may be related to the character of the preexisting plates, the size of and forces on the plates, and how the lithosphere was initially bending during initiation. I will address issues associated with the forces driving plate tectonics and initiating new subduction zones from two perspectives. A common thread is the origin and

  17. Plate Tectonics: From Plate Boundary Zone Tectonics To Extensive Intraplate Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, M.

    2004-12-01

    Plates makes up earth's surface, and tectonic activity is generally concentrated on plate boundary zones. In restrict meaning, plate tectonics of the earth is regarded as mixture of plate boundary zone tectonics and extensive intraplate tectonics. For example, the Asian continent never behaves as rigid plate that was deformed extensively when the Indian continent collided with it. I infer that extensive intraplate tectonics reflects rheological weakening of wet mantle. To demonstrate effect of H2O component on plate strength, one-dimensional rheological profiles of 100 km depth were constructed by assuming 20km thick upper crust and 20km thick lower crust. Temperature-depth profiles were calculated based on one-dimensional steady-state static heat transfer at given surface heat flows. Power law creep and Byerlee_fs law were used to estimate strength in ductile regime and brittle regime respectively. Creep strength for upper crust, lower crust, dry mantle and wet mantle were calculated using creep parameters of granite, granulite, dry dunite and wet dunite. The minimum value between power law creep strength and Byerlee_fs law strength gives the strength of the lithosphere. Strength profile at surface heat flow of 55mW/m2 (continental average is 56.5mW/m2) and strain rate of 10-15/s (intraplate deformation is about 10-15/s - 10-16/s in Asia) shows a significant difference in strength for using dry mantle and wet mantle. In case of dry mantle, the uppermost mantle is quite strong. However, if wet peridotite represent the upper mantle, there is very little strength in the uppermost mantle. The cumulative lithospheric strength, i.e. integral strength from surface to 100km depth, and the cumulative mantle strength, i.e. integral strength from 40km to 100km depth were calculated with changing strain rate. For example, to deform continental lithosphere at strain rate of 10-15/s, wet mantle has a cumulative strength of about 2x1012N/m whereas the cumulative strength of dry

  18. Earthquakes in Stable Continental Crust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Arch C.; Kanter, Lisa R.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are some of the reasons for earthquakes which occur in stable crust away from familiar zones at the ends of tectonic plates. Crust stability and the reactivation of old faults are described using examples from India and Australia. (CW)

  19. Dynamics of Mid-Palaeocene North Atlantic rifting linked with European intra-plate deformations.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Søren B; Stephenson, Randell; Thomsen, Erik

    2007-12-13

    The process of continental break-up provides a large-scale experiment that can be used to test causal relations between plate tectonics and the dynamics of the Earth's deep mantle. Detailed diagnostic information on the timing and dynamics of such events, which are not resolved by plate kinematic reconstructions, can be obtained from the response of the interior of adjacent continental plates to stress changes generated by plate boundary processes. Here we demonstrate a causal relationship between North Atlantic continental rifting at approximately 62 Myr ago and an abrupt change of the intra-plate deformation style in the adjacent European continent. The rifting involved a left-lateral displacement between the North American-Greenland plate and Eurasia, which initiated the observed pause in the relative convergence of Europe and Africa. The associated stress change in the European continent was significant and explains the sudden termination of a approximately 20-Myr-long contractional intra-plate deformation within Europe, during the late Cretaceous period to the earliest Palaeocene epoch, which was replaced by low-amplitude intra-plate stress-relaxation features. The pre-rupture tectonic stress was large enough to have been responsible for precipitating continental break-up, so there is no need to invoke a thermal mantle plume as a driving mechanism. The model explains the simultaneous timing of several diverse geological events, and shows how the intra-continental stratigraphic record can reveal the timing and dynamics of stress changes, which cannot be resolved by reconstructions based only on plate kinematics. PMID:18075591

  20. A great earthquake rupture across a rapidly evolving three-plate boundary.

    PubMed

    Furlong, Kevin P; Lay, Thorne; Ammon, Charles J

    2009-04-10

    On 1 April 2007 a great, tsunamigenic earthquake (moment magnitude 8.1) ruptured the Solomon Islands subduction zone at the triple junction where the Australia and Solomon Sea-Woodlark Basin plates simultaneously underthrust the Pacific plate with different slip directions. The associated abrupt change in slip direction during the great earthquake drove convergent anelastic deformation of the upper Pacific plate, which generated localized uplift in the forearc above the subducting Simbo fault, potentially amplifying local tsunami amplitude. Elastic deformation during the seismic cycle appears to be primarily accommodated by the overriding Pacific forearc. This earthquake demonstrates the seismogenic potential of extremely young subducting oceanic lithosphere, the ability of ruptures to traverse substantial geologic boundaries, and the consequences of complex coseismic slip for uplift and tsunamigenesis. PMID:19359581

  1. Continental collisions and seismic signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, R.; Wever, Th.; Sadowiak, P.

    1991-04-01

    Reflection seismics in compressional belts has revealed the structure of crustal shortening and thickening processes, showing complex patterns of indentation and interfingering of colliding crusts and subcrustal lithospheres. Generally, in the upper crust large zones of detachments develop, often showing duplexes and 'crocodile' structures. The lower crust from zones of active collision (e.g. Alps, Pyrenees) is characterized by strongly dipping reflections. The base of the crust with the Moho must be continuously equilibrating after orogenic collapse as areas of former continental collision exhibit flat Mohos and subhorizontal reflections. The depth to the Moho increases during collision and decreases after the onset of post-orogenic extension, until finally the crustal root disappears completely together with the erosion of the mountains. Processes, active during continental collisions and orogenic collapse, create distinct structures which are imaged by reflection seismic profiling. Examples are shown and discussed.

  2. Earth's Decelerating Tectonic Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Forte, A M; Moucha, R; Rowley, D B; Quere, S; Mitrovica, J X; Simmons, N A; Grand, S P

    2008-08-22

    Space geodetic and oceanic magnetic anomaly constraints on tectonic plate motions are employed to determine a new global map of present-day rates of change of plate velocities. This map shows that Earth's largest plate, the Pacific, is presently decelerating along with several other plates in the Pacific and Indo-Atlantic hemispheres. These plate decelerations contribute to an overall, globally averaged slowdown in tectonic plate speeds. The map of plate decelerations provides new and unique constraints on the dynamics of time-dependent convection in Earth's mantle. We employ a recently developed convection model constrained by seismic, geodynamic and mineral physics data to show that time-dependent changes in mantle buoyancy forces can explain the deceleration of the major plates in the Pacific and Indo-Atlantic hemispheres.

  3. ASSEMBLY OF PARALLEL PLATES

    DOEpatents

    Groh, E.F.; Lennox, D.H.

    1963-04-23

    This invention is concerned with a rigid assembly of parallel plates in which keyways are stamped out along the edges of the plates and a self-retaining key is inserted into aligned keyways. Spacers having similar keyways are included between adjacent plates. The entire assembly is locked into a rigid structure by fastening only the outermost plates to the ends of the keys. (AEC)

  4. Accelerated plate tectonics.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D L

    1975-03-21

    The concept of a stressed elastic lithospheric plate riding on a viscous asthenosphere is used to calculate the recurrence interval of great earthquakes at convergent plate boundaries, the separation of decoupling and lithospheric earthquakes, and the migration pattern of large earthquakes along an arc. It is proposed that plate motions accelerate after great decoupling earthquakes and that most of the observed plate motions occur during short periods of time, separated by periods of relative quiescence. PMID:17799689

  5. Formation and evolution of the Solander Basin, southwestern South Island, New Zealand, controlled by a major fault in continental crust and upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Rupert; Melhuish, Anne

    2000-02-01

    Seismic reflection and refraction data from the Solander Basin, southern New Zealand, show that its structural evolution has been controlled by a major fault, named here the Tauru Fault, that cuts the entire crust and splays into a diffuse zone in the upper mantle. The tectonic setting of the Solander Basin has evolved from Eocene-Oligocene extension and transtension to Miocene-Quaternary transpression and subduction. The Tauru Fault is 100 km east of the active Puysegur subduction zone thrust and is part of the overriding plate. On the basis of lower crustal reflectivity, the base of the crust beneath the adjacent Stewart Island shelf is at ˜30 km depth (˜9 s two-way time (TWT)), and rises to ˜20 km (˜8 s TWT) beneath the Solander Basin. This is consistent with gravity data. Prominent dipping reflections show that the Tauru Fault can be traced to ˜30 km depth (˜12 s TWT), where it merges with a zone of subhorizontal reflectors in the upper mantle. The Tauru Fault dips ˜30° northeast and appears to offset the Moho in a reverse sense. Stratigraphic relationships show that the Tauru Fault was active as a normal fault during Eocene extension, when Solander Basin crust was thinned and ocean crust was generated farther south in the Solander Trough. It has been reactivated as a reverse fault during at least two phases of Miocene-Quaternary compression and is still active. The strike of the Tauru Fault, which is parallel to Paleozoic-Mesozoic structures and was poorly oriented for the known Eocene extension direction, strongly suggests that it formed prior to Eocene time. The Tauru Fault significantly influenced the geometry of Eocene basin formation, producing a strongly asymmetric basin dominated by east dipping normal faults, with a single eastern boundary fault. Our data demonstrate that Miocene-Quaternary simple shear associated with the Tauru Fault cuts the whole crust and continues into the upper mantle. We conclude that variations in strength of the

  6. Dynamics of continental rift propagation: the end-member modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Wijk, J. W.; Blackman, D. K.

    2005-01-01

    An important aspect of continental rifting is the progressive variation of deformation style along the rift axis during rift propagation. In regions of rift propagation, specifically transition zones from continental rifting to seafloor spreading, it has been observed that contrasting styles of deformation along the axis of rift propagation are bounded by shear zones. The focus of this numerical modeling study is to look at dynamic processes near the tip of a weak zone in continental lithosphere. More specifically, this study explores how modeled rift behavior depends on the value of rheological parameters of the crust. A three-dimensional finite element model is used to simulate lithosphere deformation in an extensional regime. The chosen approach emphasizes understanding the tectonic forces involved in rift propagation. Dependent on plate strength, two end-member modes are distinguished. The stalled rift phase is characterized by absence of rift propagation for a certain amount of time. Extension beyond the edge of the rift tip is no longer localized but occurs over a very wide zone, which requires a buildup of shear stresses near the rift tip and significant intra-plate deformation. This stage represents a situation in which a rift meets a locked zone. Localized deformation changes to distributed deformation in the locked zone, and the two different deformation styles are balanced by a shear zone oriented perpendicular to the trend. In the alternative rift propagation mode, rift propagation is a continuous process when the initial crust is weak. The extension style does not change significantly along the rift axis and lengthening of the rift zone is not accompanied by a buildup of shear stresses. Model predictions address aspects of previously unexplained rift evolution in the Laptev Sea, and its contrast with the tectonic evolution of, for example, the Gulf of Aden and Woodlark Basin.

  7. Subduction and exhumation of continental crust: insights from laboratory models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialas, Robert W.; Funiciello, Francesca; Faccenna, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    When slivers of continental crust and sediment overlying oceanic lithosphere enter a subduction zone, they may be scraped off at shallow levels, subducted to depths of up to 100-200 km and then exhumed as high pressure (HP) and ultra-high pressure (UHP) rocks, or subducted and recycled in the mantle. To investigate the factors that influence the behaviour of subducting slivers of continental material, we use 3-D dynamically consistent laboratory models. A laboratory analogue of a slab-upper mantle system is set up with two linearly viscous layers of silicone putty and glucose syrup in a tank. A sliver of continental material, also composed of silicone putty, overlies the subducting lithosphere, separated by a syrup detachment. The density of the sliver, viscosity of the detachment, geometry of the subducting system (attached plate versus free ridge) and dimensions of the sliver are varied in 34 experiments. By varying the density of the sliver and viscosity of the detachment, we can reproduce a range of sliver behaviour, including subduction, subduction and exhumation from various depths and offscraping. Sliver subduction and exhumation requires sufficient sliver buoyancy and a detachment that is strong enough to hold the sliver during initial subduction, but weak enough to allow adequate sliver displacement or detachment for exhumation. Changes to the system geometry alter the slab dip, subduction velocity, pattern of mantle flow and amount of rollback. Shallower slab dips with more trench rollback produce a mantle flow pattern that aids exhumation. Steeper slab dips allow more buoyancy force to be directed in the up-dip direction of the plane of the plate, and aide exhumation of subducted slivers. Slower subduction can also aide exhumation, but if slab dip is too steep or subduction too slow, the sliver will subduct to only shallow levels and not exhume. Smaller slivers are most easily subducted and exhumed and influenced by the mantle flow.

  8. Plating Tank Control Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1998-03-01

    The Plating Tank Control Software is a graphical user interface that controls and records plating process conditions for plating in high aspect ratio channels that require use of low current and long times. The software is written for a Pentium II PC with an 8 channel data acquisition card, and the necessary shunt resistors for measuring currents in the millampere range.

  9. Rotatable shear plate interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Duffus, Richard C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotatable shear plate interferometer comprises a transparent shear plate mounted obliquely in a tubular supporting member at 45.degree. with respect to its horizontal center axis. This tubular supporting member is supported rotatably around its center axis and a collimated laser beam is made incident on the shear plate along this center axis such that defocus in different directions can be easily measured.

  10. Bile acids override steatosis in farnesoid X receptor deficient mice in a model of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Weibin; Liu, Xijun; Peng, Xiaomin; Xue, Ruyi; Ji, Lingling; Shen, Xizhong; Chen, She; Gu, Jianxin; Zhang, Si

    2014-05-23

    Highlights: • FXR deficiency enhanced MCD diet-induced hepatic fibrosis. • FXR deficiency attenuated MCD diet-induced hepatic steatosis. • FXR deficiency repressed genes involved in fatty acid uptake and triglyceride accumulation. - Abstract: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common liver diseases, and the pathogenesis is still not well known. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily and plays an essential role in maintaining bile acid and lipid homeostasis. In this study, we study the role of FXR in the pathogenesis of NFALD. We found that FXR deficient (FXR{sup −/−}) mice fed methionine- and choline-deficient (MCD) diet had higher serum ALT and AST activities and lower hepatic triglyceride levels than wild-type (WT) mice fed MCD diet. Expression of genes involved in inflammation (VCAM-1) and fibrosis (α-SMA) was increased in FXR{sup −/−} mice fed MCD diet (FXR{sup −/−}/MCD) compared to WT mice fed MCD diet (WT/MCD). Although MCD diet significantly induced hepatic fibrosis in terms of liver histology, FXR{sup −/−}/MCD mice showed less degree of hepatic steatosis than WT/MCD mice. Moreover, FXR deficiency synergistically potentiated the elevation effects of MCD diet on serum and hepatic bile acids levels. The super-physiological concentrations of hepatic bile acids in FXR{sup −/−}/MCD mice inhibited the expression of genes involved in fatty acid uptake and triglyceride accumulation, which may be an explanation for less steatosis in FXR{sup −/−}/MCD mice in contrast to WT/MCD mice. These results suggest that hepatic bile acids accumulation could override simple steatosis in hepatic injury during the progression of NAFLD and further emphasize the role of FXR in maintaining hepatic bile acid homeostasis in liver disorders and in hepatic protection.

  11. Perennial plate tectonics with lasting mantle lithosphere scars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heron, P.; Pysklywec, R. N.; Stephenson, R.

    2015-12-01

    Although the conventional theory of plate tectonics can explain non-rigid behaviour at plate boundaries, it cannot adequately explain the processes involved in deformation and seismicity within plate interiors. Here, we consider that the pre-existing deformation or "scarring" within the mantle lithosphere may have a very long lived presence that could incorporate deformation of the plate interior and plate boundary. Mantle lithosphere scars from continent-continent collisions could generate virtual plate boundaries that remain over long timescales, producing "perennial" plate tectonics. Local geophysical studies can map the crustal environment well, and global whole mantle tomography models are rapidly improving, yet high-resolution images of the mantle lithosphere are often not available in regions where scarring may be present. Where mantle lithosphere heterogeneities have been observed (usually interpreted simply as subduction scars), the same attention has not been afforded to them as, for example, re-activation of faults within the Earth's crust. In idealized numerical simulations, we compare how relic scarring at varying depths in the lithosphere affects patterns of deformation. High-resolution thermal-mechanical numerical experiments explore continental lithospheric deformation featuring a weakened crust and mantle lithosphere scars. Our models show that deep lithospheric scars can control the tectonic evolution of a region over shallow geological features, indicating the importance of mantle lithosphere heterogeneities. The Altyn Tagh Fault (ATF) in central China is an example of an ancient continental collision zone that undergoes periodic deformation during times of regional compression. We suggest that the ATF may be a locale where a long-lasting mantle lithosphere scar can control the subsequent crustal evolution and deformation, with ancient plate boundaries having a "perennial" plate tectonic presence.

  12. Overriding auditory attentional capture.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Polly; Lavie, Nilli

    2007-02-01

    Attentional capture by color singletons during shape search can be eliminated when the target is not a feature singleton (Bacon & Egeth, 1994). This suggests that a "singleton detection" search strategy must be adopted for attentional capture to occur. Here we find similar effects on auditory attentional capture. Irrelevant high-intensity singletons interfered with an auditory search task when the target itself was also a feature singleton. However, singleton interference was eliminated when the target was not a singleton (i.e., when nontargets were made heterogeneous, or when more than one target sound was presented). These results suggest that auditory attentional capture depends on the observer's attentional set, as does visual attentional capture. The suggestion that hearing might act as an early warning system that would always be tuned to unexpected unique stimuli must therefore be modified to accommodate these strategy-dependent capture effects. PMID:17557587

  13. Neotectonism along the Atlantic passive continental margin: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Thomas W.

    1989-09-01

    An extensive body of geologic data including the modern state of stress, historical seismicity, surface and subsurface stratigraphy, numerical models of crustal deformation, surficial geomorphic systems, and historical precise leveling and tidal gauge records constrain the style and rate of neotectonic deformation for the Appalachians and Atlantic passive continental margin. There are two major styles of neotectonism in the eastern United States. The northeastern United States is dominated by isostatic uplift and northward migration of peripheral bulge collapse in response to deglaciation. This locally rapid, but decreasing rate of deformation is superimposed upon slower, long-term deformation along the Atlantic margin. Most of the long-term, continental margin deformation is attributed to lithospheric flexuring in response to sediment loading in sedimentary basins (especially the Baltimore Canyon Trough and Carolina Trough), isostatic deformation in response to continental denudation and water loading of the shelf, and stress from far-field plate tectonic sources. Significant deformational features include an uplift anomaly near Cape Fear, N.C.; northward and southward tilting of the Coastal Plain into the Salisbury and Southeast Georgia Embayments respectively; seaward tilting of the Coastal Plain/Piedmont, and a complex pattern of postglacial uplift and later subsidence in the northeast. Estimates of vertical crustal velocities for similar locations vary over several orders of magnitude. Measurement interval bias and systematic leveling errors may account for some of the discrepancies. Evidence for periodic deformation in the eastern United States in substantial and it is possible that historic data indicate a period of accelerated deformation along the Atlantic continental margin.

  14. The flat to normal subduction transition study to obtain the Nazca plate morphology using high resolution seismicity data from the Nazca plate in Central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nacif, Silvina; Triep, Enrique G.; Spagnotto, Silvana L.; Aragon, Eugenio; Furlani, Renzo; Álvarez, Orlando

    2015-08-01

    Data from 45 seismological stations mostly temporary were used to obtain an accurate data set of intraslab seismicity of the Nazca subducted plate between 33°S and 35°S. The interest zone located in the transition section where the Nazca plate changes from flat slab north of ~ 33° to normal slab south of that latitude. In addition, the study region is located where the active volcanic arc appears. From a set of earthquakes which were relocated using a grid-search multiple events algorithm we obtained the plate geometry from latitudes of 33°S to 34.5°S and from 60 km to 120 km in depth. The obtained morphology shows notable similarity in its structure to Maipo Orocline revealing some possible strong connection between the overriding plate and the subducting plate. We suggest that the subducted plate at the trench has been deformed in its shape consistently with the Maipo Orocline pattern and its deformation is observed below the interface zone. Our results are consistent with van Keken et al., 2011 models, and based on this the seismicity located between 70 and 120 km is probably related with dehydration processes rather than mechanical processes. From our precise earthquake locations we observed a complete lack of intraslab seismicity below 120 km depth. This valuable finding can be used to better constrain thermal models for the subduction region of Central Chile.

  15. An improved plating process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Askew, John C.

    1994-01-01

    An alternative to the immersion process for the electrodeposition of chromium from aqueous solutions on the inside diameter (ID) of long tubes is described. The Vessel Plating Process eliminates the need for deep processing tanks, large volumes of solutions, and associated safety and environmental concerns. Vessel Plating allows the process to be monitored and controlled by computer thus increasing reliability, flexibility and quality. Elimination of the trivalent chromium accumulation normally associated with ID plating is intrinsic to the Vessel Plating Process. The construction and operation of a prototype Vessel Plating Facility with emphasis on materials of construction, engineered and operational safety and a unique system for rinse water recovery are described.

  16. Flow of material under compression in weak lower continental crust can cause post-rift uplift of passive continental margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalmers, James

    2014-05-01

    There are mountain ranges up to more than 2 km high along many passive continental margins (e.g. Norway, eastern Australia, eastern Brazil, SE and SW Africa, east and west Greenland etc.), dubbed Elevated Passive Continental Margins (EPCMs). EPCMs contain several features in common and observations indicate that uplift of these margins took place after continental break-up. There are many explanations for their formation but none that satisfy all the observations. Lack of a geodynamical mechanism has meant that there has been difficulty in getting the community to accept the observational evidence. Formation of a passive continental margin must take place under conditions of tension. After rifting ceases, however, the margin can come under compression from forces originating elsewhere on or below its plate, e.g. orogeny elsewhere in the plate or sub-lithospheric drag. The World Stress Map (www.world-stress-mp.org) shows that, where data exists, all EPCMs are currently under compression. Under sufficient compression, crust and/or lithosphere can fold, and Cloetingh & Burov (2010) showed that many continental areas may have folded in this way. The wavelengths of folding observed by Cloetingh & Burov (2010) imply that the lower crust is likely to be of intermediate composition; granitic lower crust would fold with a shorter wavelength and basic lower crust would mean that the whole lithosphere would have to fold as a unit resulting in a much longer wavelength. Continental crust more than 20 km thick would be separated from the mantle by a weak layer. However, crust less thick than that would contain no weak layers would become effectively annealed to the underlying strong mantle. Under sufficient horizontal compression stress, material can flow in the lower weak layer towards a continental margin from the continental side. The annealed extended crust and mantle under the rift means, however, that flow cannot continue towards the ocean. Mid- and lower crustal material

  17. Paper microzone plates.

    PubMed

    Carrilho, Emanuel; Phillips, Scott T; Vella, Sarah J; Martinez, Andres W; Whitesides, George M

    2009-08-01

    This paper describes 96- and 384-microzone plates fabricated in paper as alternatives to conventional multiwell plates fabricated in molded polymers. Paper-based plates are functionally related to plastic well plates, but they offer new capabilities. For example, paper-microzone plates are thin (approximately 180 microm), require small volumes of sample (5 microL per zone), and can be manufactured from inexpensive materials ($0.05 per plate). The paper-based plates are fabricated by patterning sheets of paper, using photolithography, into hydrophilic zones surrounded by hydrophobic polymeric barriers. This photolithography used an inexpensive formulation photoresist that allows rapid (approximately 15 min) prototyping of paper-based plates. These plates are compatible with conventional microplate readers for quantitative absorbance and fluorescence measurements. The limit of detection per zone loaded for fluorescence was 125 fmol for fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled bovine serum albumin, and this level corresponds to 0.02 the quantity of analyte per well used to achieve comparable signal-to-noise in a 96-well plastic plate (using a solution of 25 nM labeled protein). The limits of detection for absorbance on paper was approximately 50 pmol per zone for both Coomassie Brilliant Blue and Amaranth dyes; these values were 0.4 that required for the plastic plate. Demonstration of quantitative colorimetric correlations using a scanner or camera to image the zones and to measure the intensity of color, makes it possible to conduct assays without a microplate reader. PMID:19572563

  18. Multicolor printing plate joining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, W. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An upper plate having ink flow channels and a lower plate having a multicolored pattern are joined. The joining is accomplished without clogging any ink flow paths. A pattern having different colored parts and apertures is formed in a lower plate. Ink flow channels each having respective ink input ports are formed in an upper plate. The ink flow channels are coated with solder mask and the bottom of the upper plate is then coated with solder. The upper and lower plates are pressed together at from 2 to 5 psi and heated to a temperature of from 295 F to 750 F or enough to melt the solder. After the plates have cooled and the pressure is released, the solder mask is removed from the interior passageways by means of a liquid solvent.

  19. Plate tectonics, habitability and life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spohn, Tilman; Breuer, Doris

    2016-04-01

    The role of plate tectonics in defining habitability of terrestrial planets is being increasingly discussed (e.g., Elkins-Tanton, 2015). Plate tectonics is a significantly evolved concept with a large variety of aspects. In the present context, cycling of material between near surface and mantle reservoirs is most important. But increased heat transport through mixing of cold lithosphere with the deep interior and formation of continental crust may also matter. An alternative mechanism of material cycling between these reservoirs is hot-spot volcanism combined with crust delamination. Hot-spot volcanism will transport volatiles to the atmosphere while delamination will mix crust, possibly altered by sedimentation and chemical reactions, with the mantle. The mechanism works as long as the stagnant lithosphere plate has not grown thicker than the crust and as long as volcanic material is added onto the crust. Thermal evolution studies suggest that the mechanism could work for the first 1-2 Ga of planetary evolution. The efficiency of the mechanism is limited by the ratio of extrusive to intrusive volcanism, which is thought to be less than 0.25. Plate tectonics would certainly have an advantage by working even for more evolved planets. A simple, most-used concept of habitability requires the thermodynamic stability of liquid water on the surface of a planet. Cycling of CO2between the atmosphere, oceans and interior through subduction and surface volcanism is an important element of the carbonate-silicate cycle, a thermostat feedback cycle that will keep the atmosphere from entering into a runaway greenhouse. Calculations for a model Earth lacking plate tectonics but degassing CO2, N, and H2O to form a surface ocean and a secondary atmosphere (Tosi et al, 2016) suggest that liquid water can be maintained on the surface for 4.5Ga. The model planet would then qualify as habitable. It is conceivable that the CO2 buffering capability of its ocean together with silicate

  20. Spreading continents kick-started plate tectonics.

    PubMed

    Rey, Patrice F; Coltice, Nicolas; Flament, Nicolas

    2014-09-18

    Stresses acting on cold, thick and negatively buoyant oceanic lithosphere are thought to be crucial to the initiation of subduction and the operation of plate tectonics, which characterizes the present-day geodynamics of the Earth. Because the Earth's interior was hotter in the Archaean eon, the oceanic crust may have been thicker, thereby making the oceanic lithosphere more buoyant than at present, and whether subduction and plate tectonics occurred during this time is ambiguous, both in the geological record and in geodynamic models. Here we show that because the oceanic crust was thick and buoyant, early continents may have produced intra-lithospheric gravitational stresses large enough to drive their gravitational spreading, to initiate subduction at their margins and to trigger episodes of subduction. Our model predicts the co-occurrence of deep to progressively shallower mafic volcanics and arc magmatism within continents in a self-consistent geodynamic framework, explaining the enigmatic multimodal volcanism and tectonic record of Archaean cratons. Moreover, our model predicts a petrological stratification and tectonic structure of the sub-continental lithospheric mantle, two predictions that are consistent with xenolith and seismic studies, respectively, and consistent with the existence of a mid-lithospheric seismic discontinuity. The slow gravitational collapse of early continents could have kick-started transient episodes of plate tectonics until, as the Earth's interior cooled and oceanic lithosphere became heavier, plate tectonics became self-sustaining. PMID:25230662

  1. The Dauki Thrust Fault and the Shillong Anticline: An incipient plate boundary in NE India?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, E. K.; Seeber, L.; Steckler, M. S.; Akhter, S. H.; Mondal, D.; Lenhart, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Shillong Massif is a regional contractional structure developing across the Assam sliver of the Indian plate near the Eastern Syntaxis between the Himalaya and Burma arcs. Faulting associated with the Shillong Massif is a major source of earthquake hazard. The massif is a composite basement-cored asymmetric anticline and is 100km wide, >350km long and 1.8km high. The high relief southern limb preserves a Cretaceous-Paleocene passive margin sequence despite extreme rainfall while the gentler northern limb is devoid of sedimentary cover. This asymmetry suggests southward growth of the structure. The Dauki fault along the south limb builds this relief. From the south-verging structure, we infer a regional deeply-rooted north-dipping blind thrust fault. It strikes E-W and obliquely intersects the NE-SW margin of India, thus displaying three segments: Western, within continental India; Central, along the former passive margin; and Eastern, overridden by the west-verging Burma accretion system. We present findings from recent geologic fieldwork on the western and central segments. The broadly warped erosional surface of the massif defines a single anticline in the central segment, east of the intersection with the hinge zone of the continental margin buried by the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta. The south limb of the anticline forms a steep topographic front, but is even steeper structurally as defined by the Cretaceous-Eocene cover. Below it, Sylhet Trap Basalts intrude and cover Precambrian basement. Dikes, presumably parallel to the rifted margin, are also parallel to the front, suggesting thrust reactivation of rift-related faults. Less competent Neogene clastics are preserved only near the base of the mountain front. Drag folds in these rocks suggest north-vergence and a roof thrust above a blind thrust wedge floored by the Dauki thrust fault. West of the hinge zone, the contractional structure penetrates the Indian continent and bifurcates. After branching into the

  2. Plate tectonic patterns and convection in the Phanerozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanasewich, E. R.; Evans, M. E.; Havskov, J.

    Paleomagnetic observations, oceanic magnetic lineations and the present continental margins are combined in an interactive computer program to generate maps for seven periods in the Phanerozoic era. Geological evidence on the position of geosynclines, volcanic assemblages, and zones of diastrophism are used to model a reconstruction of major plate boundaries in the past. Only six to nine major plates are necessary to describe satisfactorily the main geological events in the paleomagnetic reconstruction of the continents. The stability of these plates over time is strong evidence that mantle-wide convection was, and is, present. The formation of the supercontinent Pangaea results from a change in the convective pattern from a third-order to a second-order system, while the breakup of Pangaea resulted from a shift back to a third-order convective pattern. It is concluded that the 10 principles of plate tectonics are a valuable guide for reconstructing the geological past.

  3. Seismic imaging of a convergent continental margin and plateau in the central Andes (Andean Continental Research Project 1996 (ANCORP'96))

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oncken, O.; Asch, G.; Haberland, C.; Metchie, J.; Sobolev, S.; Stiller, M.; Yuan, X.; Brasse, H.; Buske, S.; Giese, P.; GöRze, H.-J.; Lueth, S.; Scheuber, E.; Shapiro, S.; Wigger, P.; Yoon, M.-K.; Bravo, P.; Vieytes, H.; Chong, G.; Gonzales, G.; Wilke, H.-G.; Lüschen, E.; Martinez, E.; RöSsling, R.; Ricaldi, E.; Rietbrock, A.

    2003-07-01

    A 400-km-long seismic reflection profile (Andean Continental Research Project 1996 (ANCORP'96)) and integrated geophysical experiments (wide-angle seismology, passive seismology, gravity, and magnetotelluric depth sounding) across the central Andes (21°S) observed subduction of the Nazca plate under the South American continent. An east dipping reflector (Nazca Reflector) is linked to the down going oceanic crust and shows increasing downdip intensity before gradual breakdown below 80 km. We interpret parts of the Nazca Reflector as a fluid trap located at the front of recent hydration and shearing of the mantle, the fluids being supplied by dehydration of the oceanic plate. Patches of bright (Quebrada Blanca Bright Spot) to more diffuse reflectivity underlie the plateau domain at 15-30 km depth. This reflectivity is associated with a low-velocity zone, P to S wave conversions, the upper limits of high conductivity and high Vp/Vs ratios, and to the occurrence of Neogene volcanic rocks at surface. We interpret this feature as evidence of widespread partial melting of the plateau crust causing decoupling of the upper and lower crust during Neogene shortening and plateau growth. The imaging properties of the continental Moho beneath the Andes indicate a broad transitional character of the crust-mantle boundary owing to active processes like hydration of mantle rocks (in the cooler parts of the plate margin system), magmatic underplating and intraplating under and into the lowermost crust, mechanical instability at Moho, etc. Hence all first-order features appear to be related to fluid-assisted processes in a subduction setting.

  4. Seismic imaging of a convergent continental margin and plateau in the central Andes (Andean Continental Research Project 1996 (ANCORP'96))

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ANCORP Working Group,

    2003-07-01

    A 400-km-long seismic reflection profile (Andean Continental Research Project 1996 (ANCORP'96)) and integrated geophysical experiments (wide-angle seismology, passive seismology, gravity, and magnetotelluric depth sounding) across the central Andes (21°S) observed subduction of the Nazca plate under the South American continent. An east dipping reflector (Nazca Reflector) is linked to the down going oceanic crust and shows increasing downdip intensity before gradual breakdown below 80 km. We interpret parts of the Nazca Reflector as a fluid trap located at the front of recent hydration and shearing of the mantle, the fluids being supplied by dehydration of the oceanic plate. Patches of bright (Quebrada Blanca Bright Spot) to more diffuse reflectivity underlie the plateau domain at 15-30 km depth. This reflectivity is associated with a low-velocity zone, P to S wave conversions, the upper limits of high conductivity and high V p /V s ratios, and to the occurrence of Neogene volcanic rocks at surface. We interpret this feature as evidence of widespread partial melting of the plateau crust causing decoupling of the upper and lower crust during Neogene shortening and plateau growth. The imaging properties of the continental Moho beneath the Andes indicate a broad transitional character of the crust-mantle boundary owing to active processes like hydration of mantle rocks (in the cooler parts of the plate margin system), magmatic underplating and intraplating under and into the lowermost crust, mechanical instability at Moho, etc. Hence all first-order features appear to be related to fluid-assisted processes in a subduction setting.

  5. Thermal models pertaining to continental growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Paul; Ashwal, Lew

    1988-01-01

    Thermal models are important to understanding continental growth as the genesis, stabilization, and possible recycling of continental crust are closely related to the tectonic processes of the earth which are driven primarily by heat. The thermal energy budget of the earth was slowly decreasing since core formation, and thus the energy driving the terrestrial tectonic engine was decreasing. This fundamental observation was used to develop a logic tree defining the options for continental growth throughout earth history.

  6. Late Cenozoic deformation of the Eurasian and Burma Plates due to subduction of the Indian Plate beneath SE Tibetan Plateau and Myanmar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, J.; Holt, W. E.; Flesch, L. M.; Sandvol, E. A.; Hearn, T. M.; Schmerr, N. C.

    2015-12-01

    The late Cenozoic tectonics of the southeastern Tibetan Plateau and surrounding regions needs to be evaluated within the context of a larger dynamic system related to the subduction of the Indian oceanic lithosphere beneath Myanmar and Yunnan. The details of the geodynamic processes involve mantle flows associated with rollback and tears (which probably occur both laterally and horizontally) of the Indian slab with consequent effects on the geology of the overriding plate. These effects include: 1) volcanism in Tongchong, Yunnan Province, 2) clockwise rotational deformation of the overriding plate and 3) Burma Plate capture. In this talk we will present the strain rate throughout the region with a moment tensor summation of earthquake data. The deformation of SE Tibet, Yunnan and western Sichuan constitutes a distributed N-S oriented dextral shear zone with clockwise rotations up to 1.7° per million years. It is the clockwise vorticity relative to south China that accounts for the relative northward motion of India at a rate of 38±12 mm/yr at the Himalayas. Relative to south China, there is no southeastward extrusion of crustal material beyond the eastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau. Studies on earthquake seismic moment data, fault-slip data, and GPS measurements all show a clockwise rotational motion of SE Tibet, Yunnan, western Sichuan and eastern Myanmar around the EHS. The mirror image of this situation that is occurring today is the counterclockwise rotation of Anatolia, which is associated with the rollback of the Hellenic and Cyprian Trenches. In this talk we will also discuss the extreme oblique convergence between Indian and Burma plates and one of the effects of the oblique subducation is the transfer of right-lateral strike-slip faulting to the Indo Burma Range, one of the largest GeoPRISMs on Earth.

  7. Digital images of combined oceanic and continental data sets and their use in tectonic studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haxby, W. F.; Labrecque, J. L.; Weissel, J. K.; Karner, G. D.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown how crustal and lithospheric studies can benefit when continental and oceanic data sets are combined. It is also shown how digital imaging techniques provide an effective means for displaying the information contained in these combined data sets. The region of Australia, New Zealand, and the surrounding ocean is chosen for illustrating the advantages of combining continental and oceanic data sets. Here, the tectonic setting of Australia, a relatively stable continent in an intraplate environment, can be contrasted with New Zealand, which is traversed by one of the world's major plate boundaries. Simultaneous display and analysis of complementary data sets make possible a rapid geologic and tectonic interpretation of regional areas. It is shown, by way of example, that the relationship between topography and gravity anomalies in central Australia gives important new information concerning the state of isostasy of thrust terrains and their related sedimentary basins and hence provides a means of understanding the mechanical properties of the continental lithosphere.

  8. Mirrored Prominent Deck B Phenomenon: Frequent Small Losses Override Infrequent Large Gains in the Inverted Iowa Gambling Task

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ching-Hung; Song, Tzu-Jiun; Lin, Yu-Kai; Chiu, Yao-Chu

    2012-01-01

    Since Bechara et al. pioneered its development, the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) has been widely applied to elucidate decision behavior and medial prefrontal function. Although most decision makers can hunch the final benefits of IGT, ventromedial prefrontal lesions generate a myopic choice pattern. Additionally, the Iowa group developed a revised IGT (inverted IGT, iIGT) to confirm the IGT validity. Each iIGT trial was generated from the trial of IGT by multiplying by a “−” to create an inverted monetary value. Thus, bad decks A and B in the IGT become good decks iA and iB in the iIGT; additionally, good decks C and D in the IGT become bad decks iC and iD in the iIGT. Furthermore, IGT possessed mostly the gain trials, and iIGT possessed mainly the loss trials. Therefore, IGT is a frequent-gain–based task, and iIGT is a frequent-loss–based task. However, a growing number of IGT-related studies have identified confounding factors in IGT (i.e., gain-loss frequency), which are demonstrated by the prominent deck B phenomenon (PDB phenomenon). Nevertheless, the mirrored PDB phenomenon and guiding power of gain-loss frequency in iIGT have seldom been reexamined. This experimental finding supports the prediction based on gain-loss frequency. This study identifies the mirrored PDB phenomenon. Frequent small losses override occasional large gains in deck iB of the iIGT. Learning curve analysis generally supports the phenomenon based on gain-loss frequency rather than final outcome. In terms of iIGT and simple versions of iIGT, results of this study demonstrate that high-frequency loss, rather than a satisfactory final outcome, dominates the preference of normal decision makers under uncertainty. Furthermore, normal subjects prefer “no immediate punishment” rather than “final reward” under uncertainty. PMID:23091612

  9. Submarine slope failures along the convergent continental margin of the Middle America Trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harders, Rieka; Ranero, CéSar R.; Weinrebe, Wilhelm; Behrmann, Jan H.

    2011-06-01

    We present the first comprehensive study of mass wasting processes in the continental slope of a convergent margin of a subduction zone where tectonic processes are dominated by subduction erosion. We have used multibeam bathymetry along ˜1300 km of the Middle America Trench of the Central America Subduction Zone and deep-towed side-scan sonar data. We found abundant evidence of large-scale slope failures that were mostly previously unmapped. The features are classified into a variety of slope failure types, creating an inventory of 147 slope failure structures. Their type distribution and abundance define a segmentation of the continental slope in six sectors. The segmentation in slope stability processes does not appear to be related to slope preconditioning due to changes in physical properties of sediment, presence/absence of gas hydrates, or apparent changes in the hydrogeological system. The segmentation appears to be better explained by changes in slope preconditioning due to variations in tectonic processes. The region is an optimal setting to study how tectonic processes related to variations in intensity of subduction erosion and changes in relief of the underthrusting plate affect mass wasting processes of the continental slope. The largest slope failures occur offshore Costa Rica. There, subducting ridges and seamounts produce failures with up to hundreds of meters high headwalls, with detachment planes that penetrate deep into the continental margin, in some cases reaching the plate boundary. Offshore northern Costa Rica a smooth oceanic seafloor underthrusts the least disturbed continental slope. Offshore Nicaragua, the ocean plate is ornamented with smaller seamounts and horst and graben topography of variable intensity. Here mass wasting structures are numerous and comparatively smaller, but when combined, they affect a large part of the margin segment. Farther north, offshore El Salvador and Guatemala the downgoing plate has no large seamounts but

  10. Neogene rotations and quasicontinuous deformation of the Pacific Northwest continental margin

    SciTech Connect

    England, P. ); Wells, R.E. )

    1991-10-01

    Paleomagnetically determined rotations about vertical axes of 15 to 12 Ma flows of the Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group of Oregon and Washington decrease smoothly with distance from the plate margin, consistent with a simple physical model for continental deformation that assumes the lithosphere behaves as a thin layer of fluid. The average rate of northward translation of the continental margin since 15 Ma calculated from the rotations, using this model, is about 15 mm/year, which suggests that much of the tangential motion between the Juan de Fuca and North American plates since middle Miocene time has been taken up by deformation of North America. The fluid-like character of the large-scale deformation implies that the brittle upper crust follows the motions of the deeper parts of the lithosphere.

  11. Hypervelocity plate acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, S.P.; Tan, T.H.

    1991-01-01

    Shock tubes have been used to accelerate 1.5-mm-thick stainless steel plates to high velocity while retaining their integrity. The fast shock tubes are 5.1-cm-diameter, 15.2-cm-long cylinders of PBX-9501 explosive containing a 1.1-cm-diameter cylindrical core of low-density polystyrene foam. The plates have been placed directly in contact with one face of the explosive system. Plane-wave detonation was initiated on the opposite face. A Mach disk was formed in the imploding styrofoam core, which provided the impulse required to accelerate the metal plate to high velocity. Parametric studies were made on this system to find the effect of varying plate metal, plate thickness, foam properties, and addition of a barrel. A maximum plate velocity of 9.0 km/s has been observed. 6 refs., 17 figs.

  12. WFPDB: European Plate Archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, Milcho

    2007-08-01

    The Wide-Field Plate Database (WFPDB) gives an inventory of all wide-field (>~ 1 sq. deg) photographic observations archived in astronomical institutions over the world. So it facilitates and stimulates their use and preservation as a valuable source of information for future investigations in astronomy. At present WFPDB manages plate-index information for 25% of all existing plates providing on-line access from Sofia (http://www.skyarchive.org/search) and in CDS, Strasbourg. Here we present the new development of WFPDB as an instrument for searching of long term brightness variations of different sky objects stressing on the European photographic plate collections (from existing 2 million wide-field plates more than 55% are in Europe: Germany, Russia, Ukraine, Italy, Czech Republic, etc.). We comment examples of digitization (with flatbed scanners) of the European plate archives in Sonneberg, Pulkovo, Asiago, Byurakan, Bamberg, etc. and virtual links of WFPDB with European AVO, ADS, IBVS.

  13. The Coupling of Subduction Dynamics and Large-scale Continental Tectonics during Tethys Closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capitanio, F. A.

    2015-12-01

    The closure of Tethys Ocean and following collision is associated with the most remarkable examples of large-scale continental tectonics of our planet. It is known that this is the result of the coupling between oceanic subduction, where largest tectonic forces are generated, and continents, however why only some segments of the Asian margin display tectonics migration in the interiors remains unknown. Using numerical modeling the dynamics of the subducting and upper plates interactions is probed, emphasizing the role forces such as subducting slabs' buoyancy, viscous mantle drag, ridge push and far-field forces have in plate margins-interiors coupling. The perturbations to the force balance following slab breakoff, continent subduction and trench land-locking during oceanic closure leads to a range of different strain regimes in the upper plate, from large-scale extrusion to thickening along the collisional margin. The models support the combined interpretation of closing plates, subduction histories and continental tectonics, which is relevant to examples of Asian continent, where similar coupled subduction and upper plate tectonics evolutions are found. It is inferred that the subduction dynamics during Tethys closure strongly controlled the emergence of lithospheric faulting and thickening, indentation, extrusion and extension in the Asian continent.

  14. GOLD PLATING PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Seegmiller, R.

    1957-08-01

    An improved bath is reported for plating gold on other metals. The composition of the plating bath is as follows: Gold cyanide from about 15 to about 50 grams, potassium cyanide from about 70 to about 125 grams, and sulfonated castor oil from about 0.1 to about 10 cc. The gold plate produced from this bath is smooth, semi-hard, and nonporous.

  15. Plating methods, a survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkowitz, J. B.; Emerson, N. H.

    1972-01-01

    Results are presented of a comprehensive search of the literature available, much of which has been generated by the research centers of NASA and its contractors, on plating and coating methods and techniques. Methods covered included: (1) electroplating from aqueous solutions; (2) electroplating from nonaqueous solutions; (3) electroplating from fused-salt baths; (4) electroforming; (5) electroless plating, immersion plating, and mirroring; (6) electroplating from gaseous plasmas; and (7) anodized films and conversion coatings.

  16. CALUTRON FACE PLATE

    DOEpatents

    Brobeck, W.M.

    1959-08-25

    The construction of a removable cover plate for a calutron tank is described. The plate is fabricated of a rectangular frame member to which is welded a bowed or dished plate of thin steel, reinforced with transverse stiffening ribs. When the tank is placed between the poles of a magnet, the plate may be pivoted away from the tank and magnet and is adapted to support the ion separation mechanism secured to its inner side as well as the vacuum load within the tank.

  17. PLATES WITH OXIDE INSERTS

    DOEpatents

    West, J.M.; Schumar, J.F.

    1958-06-10

    Planar-type fuel assemblies for nuclear reactors are described, particularly those comprising fuel in the oxide form such as thoria and urania. The fuel assembly consists of a plurality of parallel spaced fuel plate mennbers having their longitudinal side edges attached to two parallel supporting side plates, thereby providing coolant flow channels between the opposite faces of adjacent fuel plates. The fuel plates are comprised of a plurality of longitudinally extending tubular sections connected by web portions, the tubular sections being filled with a plurality of pellets of the fuel material and the pellets being thermally bonded to the inside of the tubular section by lead.

  18. Modeling Continental Growth and Mantle Hydration in Earth's Evolution and the Impact of Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höning, Dennis; Spohn, Tilman

    2016-04-01

    The evolution of planets with plate tectonics is significantly affected by several intertwined feedback cycles. On Earth, interactions between atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, crust, and interior determine its present day state. We here focus on the feedback cycles including the evolutions of mantle water budget and continental crust, and investigate possible effects of the Earth's biosphere. The first feedback loop includes cycling of water into the mantle at subduction zones and outgassing at volcanic chains and mid-ocean ridges. Water is known to reduce the viscosity of mantle rock, and therefore the speed of mantle convection and plate subduction will increase with the water concentration, eventually enhancing the rates of mantle water regassing and outgassing. A second feedback loop includes the production and erosion of continental crust. Continents are formed above subduction zones, whose total length is determined by the total size of the continents. Furthermore, the total surface area of continental crust determines the amount of eroded sediments per unit time. Subducted sediments affect processes in subduction zones, eventually enhancing the production rate of new continental crust. Both feedback loops affect each other: As a wet mantle increases the speed of subduction, continental production also speeds up. On the other hand, the total length of subduction zones and the rate at which sediments are subducted (both being functions of continental coverage) affect the rate of mantle water regassing. We here present a model that includes both cycles and show how the system develops stable and unstable fixed points in a plane defined by mantle water concentration and surface of continents. We couple these feedback cycles to a parameterized thermal evolution model that reproduces present day observations. We show how Earth has been affected by these feedback cycles during its evolution, and argue that Earth's present day state regarding its mantle water

  19. 26 CFR 1.638-1 - Continental Shelf areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Continental Shelf areas. 1.638-1 Section 1.638-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Continental Shelf Areas § 1.638-1 Continental Shelf areas. (a) General rule. For.... The terms Continental Shelf of the United States and Continental Shelf of a possession of the...

  20. 26 CFR 1.638-1 - Continental Shelf areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Continental Shelf areas. 1.638-1 Section 1.638-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Continental Shelf Areas § 1.638-1 Continental Shelf areas. (a) General rule. For.... The terms Continental Shelf of the United States and Continental Shelf of a possession of the...

  1. 26 CFR 1.638-1 - Continental Shelf areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Continental Shelf areas. 1.638-1 Section 1.638-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Continental Shelf Areas § 1.638-1 Continental Shelf areas. (a) General rule. For.... The terms Continental Shelf of the United States and Continental Shelf of a possession of the...

  2. 26 CFR 1.638-1 - Continental Shelf areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Continental Shelf areas. 1.638-1 Section 1.638-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Continental Shelf Areas § 1.638-1 Continental Shelf areas. (a) General rule. For.... The terms Continental Shelf of the United States and Continental Shelf of a possession of the...

  3. 26 CFR 1.638-1 - Continental Shelf areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Continental Shelf areas. 1.638-1 Section 1.638-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Continental Shelf Areas § 1.638-1 Continental Shelf areas. (a) General rule. For.... The terms Continental Shelf of the United States and Continental Shelf of a possession of the...

  4. Considering bioactivity in modelling continental growth and the Earth's evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höning, D.; Spohn, T.

    2013-09-01

    The complexity of planetary evolution increases with the number of interacting reservoirs. On Earth, even the biosphere is speculated to interact with the interior. It has been argued (e.g., Rosing et al. 2006; Sleep et al, 2012) that the formation of continents could be a consequence of bioactivity harvesting solar energy through photosynthesis to help build the continents and that the mantle should carry a chemical biosignature. Through plate tectonics, the surface biosphere can impact deep subduction zone processes and the interior of the Earth. Subducted sediments are particularly important, because they influence the Earth's interior in several ways, and in turn are strongly influenced by the Earth's biosphere. In our model, we use the assumption that a thick sedimentary layer of low permeability on top of the subducting oceanic crust, caused by a biologically enhanced weathering rate, can suppress shallow dewatering. This in turn leads to greater vailability of water in the source region of andesitic partial melt, resulting in an enhanced rate of continental production and regassing rate into the mantle. Our model includes (i) mantle convection, (ii) continental erosion and production, and (iii) mantle water degassing at mid-ocean ridges and regassing at subduction zones. The mantle viscosity of our model depends on (i) the mantle water concentration and (ii) the mantle temperature, whose time dependency is given by radioactive decay of isotopes in the Earth's mantle. Boundary layer theory yields the speed of convection and the water outgassing rate of the Earth's mantle. Our results indicate that present day values of continental surface area and water content of the Earth's mantle represent an attractor in a phase plane spanned by both parameters. We show that the biologic enhancement of the continental erosion rate is important for the system to reach this fixed point. An abiotic Earth tends to reach an alternative stable fixed point with a smaller

  5. Gravity and Flexure Modelling of Subducting Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, J. A.; Watts, A. B.; SO 215 Shipboard Scientific Party

    2012-04-01

    The long-term strength of the lithosphere is determined by its flexural rigidity, which is commonly expressed through the effective elastic thickness, Te. Flexure studies have revealed a dependence of Te on thermal age. In the oceans, loads formed on young (70 Ma) seafloor. In the continents, loads on young (1000 Ma) lithosphere. Recent studies have questioned the relationship of Te with age, especially at subduction zones, where oceanic and continental lithosphere are flexed downwards by up to ~6 km over horizontal distances of up to ~350 km. We have therefore used free-air gravity anomaly and topography profile data, combined with forward and inverse modelling techniques, to re-assess Te in these settings. Preliminary inverse modelling results from the Tonga-Kermadec Trench - Outer Rise system, where the Pacific plate is subducting beneath the Indo-Australian plate, show large spatial variations in Te that are unrelated to age. In contrast to the southern end of the system, where Te is determined by the depth to the 600° C and 900° C isotherms, the northern end of the system shows a reduction in strength. Results also suggest a reduction in Te trenchward of the outer rise that is coincident with a region of pervasive extensional faulting visible in swath bathymetry data. In a continental setting, the Ganges foreland basin has formed by flexure of the Indo-Australian plate in front of the migrating loads of the Himalaya. Preliminary forward modelling results, using the Himalaya as a known surface topographic load, suggest that Te is high - consistent with the great age of Indian cratonic lithosphere. However, results from inverse modelling that solves for unknown loads (vertical shear force and bending moment) show significant scatter and display trade-offs between Te and these driving loads.

  6. Flexural characteristics of pre- and post-subduction lithosphere - the influence of large-scale plate loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peirce, C.; Knight, T. P.; Watts, A. B.; Grevemeyer, I.; Stratford, W. R.; Paulatto, M.; Bassett, D.; Hunter, J.; Kalnins, L. M.

    2012-12-01

    Global studies show an association between seamount subduction and rapid changes in subduction zone characteristics. Observations of seismic and volcanic quiescence, uplift and deformation of the overriding plate, and variations in back-arc extension rate have all been documented near subducting seamounts. Modelling of plate interactions suggests that it is the rate and angle of convergence that determines the style and extent of deformation observed. However, these studies do not include along-strike variations in the structure of the overriding plate or density variations in the subducting plate. Nor do they address the question of whether deformation is a flexural response to bending of a loaded plate or a plastic response due to crustal thickening during convergence. The collision zone between the Louisville Ridge seamount chain and the Tonga-Kermadec trench at 26°S is associated with changes in subduction zone seismogenesis, crustal structure, and trench strike and depth. This makes it an ideal locality to determine not only the mechanical properties of both the down-going and overriding plates, but also the effect of large-scale plate topography on subduction zone processes. Approximately 1800 km of coincident multi-channel and wide-angle seismic data, coupled with gravity, magnetic and swath bathymetry data were acquired throughout the Tonga-Kermadec-Louisville Ridge region between April-June 2011 during a cruise aboard the R/V Sonne (SO215), the second leg of the TOTAL (Tonga Thrust earthquake asperity at Louisville Ridge) project. Profiles follow a trend both parallel and perpendicular to the trench, and oblique to and along the Louisville Ridge. The along and across ridge profiles were designed to determine the background structure of the down-going plate, the response to magmatic and topographic loading and the volume and extent of any crustal underplate. The across trench profiles were designed to determine the structure of both the pre- and post

  7. Slab Driven Plate Motions and Three-dimensional Mantle Flow Pathways in the Central American Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadamec, M. A.; Fischer, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    We present a series of three-dimensional (3D), high-resolution, end-member tectonic configurations of the Central American plate system and use these to solve for the 3D viscous mantle flow and surface plate motions. The 3D geodynamic models test the relative control of the viscosity structure (Newtonian versus Composite), subducting plate geometry (continuous slab versus Cocos-Nazca slab gap), and overriding plate thickness (uniform versus laterally variable) on the predicted motion of the Cocos and Nazca plates and the slab-induced 3D flow field in the upper mantle. Models using the composite viscosity formulation result in increased surface plate motions, which better fit the observed motion of the Cocos and Nazca plates. This is particularly significant because these 3D regional models contain the entire Cocos plate, suggesting the importance of the non-linear rheology in models that aim to predict surface plate motions. Faster flow velocities occur in models using the composite viscosity due to the decreased resistance to subduction and reduced viscous support of the slab as the mantle surrounding the slab undergoes non-linear weakening. A zone of partial decoupling between the uppermost mantle and lithosphere, thus, naturally develops due to the composite viscosity formulation. Models that include a gap between the Cocos and Nazca slabs better fit the mantle flow pathways interpreted from the geochemical signatures, as material is brought from beneath the Cocos plate around the slab edge and northward into the mantle wedge beneath Central America. The mantle-lithosphere decoupling is enhanced in models with the slab gap, wherein the mantle flow field contains both counter-clockwise toroidal flow around the Cocos slab edge and clockwise toroidal flow around the northern Nazca slab edge, both of which are non-parallel to surface motions. The models also demonstrate that overriding plate thickness places a control on both the predicted surface motion and

  8. A Facies Model for Temperate Continental Glaciers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashley, Gail Mowry

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the presence and dynamics of continental glaciers in the domination of the physical processes of erosion and deposition in the mid-latitudes during the Pleistocene period. Describes the use of a sedimentary facies model as a guide to recognizing ancient temperate continental glacial deposits. (TW)

  9. How Continental Bank outsourced its "crown jewels.".

    PubMed

    Huber, R L

    1993-01-01

    No industry relies more on information than banking does, yet Continental, one of America's largest banks, outsources its information technology. Why? Because that's the best way to service the customers that form the core of the bank's business, says vice chairman Dick Huber. In the late 1970s and early 1980s, Continental participated heavily with Penn Square Bank in energy investments. When falling energy prices burst Penn Square's bubble in 1982, Continental was stuck with more than $1 billion in bad loans. Eight years later when Dick Huber came on board, Continental was working hard to restore its once solid reputation. Executives had made many tough decisions already, altering the bank's focus from retail to business banking and laying off thousands of employees. Yet management still needed to cut costs and improve services to stay afloat. Regulators, investors, and analysts were watching every step. Continental executives, eager to focus on the bank's core mission of serving business customers, decided to outsource one after another in-house service--from cafeteria services to information technology. While conventional wisdom holds that banks must retain complete internal control of IT, Continental bucked this argument when it entered into a ten-year, multimillion-dollar contract with Integrated Systems Solutions Corporation. Continental is already reaping benefits from outsourcing IT. Most important, Continental staffers today focus on their true core competencies: intimate knowledge of customers' needs and relationships with customers. PMID:10124146

  10. pRB-Dependent, J Domain-Independent Function of Simian Virus 40 Large T Antigen in Override of p53 Growth Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Gjoerup, Ole; Chao, Herta; DeCaprio, James A.; Roberts, Thomas M.

    2000-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen (LT) can immortalize and transform many cell types. These activities are attributed in large part to the binding and functional inactivation by LT of two major tumor suppressors: p53 and the retinoblastoma protein, pRB. Most effects of LT on pRB have been shown to additionally require an intact J domain, which mediates binding to Hsc70. We show here that the J domain is not required for p53 override in full-length LT. Although LT binds p53, it was shown previously that overcoming a p53-induced cell cycle arrest requires binding to pRB family members (R. S. Quartin et al., J. Virol. 68:1334–1341). We demonstrate that an LT mutant defective for pRB family member binding (K1) can be complemented for efficient override of p53 arrest by a construct encoding the first 135 amino acids of LT with a J domain-inactivating mutation, H42Q. Hence, complementation does not require the J domain, and pRB binding by LT is important for more than dissociating pRB-E2F complexes, which is J dependent. In accordance with this notion, LT alleviates pRB small-pocket-mediated transcriptional repression independently of the J domain. The LT K1 mutant can also be complemented for p53 override by small t antigen (st) in a manner independent of its J domain. Our observations underscore the importance of multiple SV40 functions, two in LT and one in st, that act cooperatively to counteract p53 growth suppression. PMID:10623749

  11. Blue Willow Story Plates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontes, Kris

    2009-01-01

    In the December 1997 issue of "SchoolArts" is a lesson titled "Blue Willow Story Plates" by Susan Striker. In this article, the author shares how she used this lesson with her middle-school students many times over the years. Here, she describes a Blue Willow plate painting project that her students made.

  12. Dynamics of intraoceanic subduction initiation: 2. Suprasubduction zone ophiolite formation and metamorphic sole exhumation in context of absolute plate motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.; Peters, Kalijn; Maffione, Marco; Spakman, Wim; Guilmette, Carl; Thieulot, Cedric; Plümper, Oliver; Gürer, Derya; Brouwer, Fraukje M.; Aldanmaz, Ercan; Kaymakcı, Nuretdin

    2015-06-01

    Analyzing subduction initiation is key for understanding the coupling between plate tectonics and the underlying mantle. Here we focus on suprasubduction zone (SSZ) ophiolites and how their formation links to intraoceanic subduction initiation in an absolute plate motion frame. SSZ ophiolites form the majority of exposed oceanic lithosphere fragments and are widely recognized to have formed during intraoceanic subduction initiation. Structural, petrological, geochemical, and plate kinematic constraints on their kinematic evolution show that SSZ crust forms at fore-arc spreading centers at the expense of a mantle wedge, thereby flattening the nascent slab. This leads to the typical inverted pressure gradients found in metamorphic soles that form at the subduction plate contact below and during SSZ crust crystallization. Former spreading centers are preserved in forearcs when subduction initiates along transform faults or off-ridge oceanic detachments. We show how these are reactivated when subduction initiates in the absolute plate motion direction of the inverting weakness zone. Upon inception of slab pull due to, e.g., eclogitization, the sole is separated from the slab, remains welded to the thinned overriding plate lithosphere, and can become intruded by mafic dikes upon asthenospheric influx into the mantle wedge. We propound that most ophiolites thus formed under special geodynamic circumstances and may not be representative of normal oceanic crust. Our study highlights how far-field geodynamic processes and absolute plate motions may force intraoceanic subduction initiation as key toward advancing our understanding of the entire plate tectonic cycle.

  13. Postcollisional mafic igneous rocks record crust-mantle interaction during continental deep subduction

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zi-Fu; Dai, Li-Qun; Zheng, Yong-Fei

    2013-01-01

    Findings of coesite and microdiamond in metamorphic rocks of supracrustal protolith led to the recognition of continental subduction to mantle depths. The crust-mantle interaction is expected to take place during subduction of the continental crust beneath the subcontinental lithospheric mantle wedge. This is recorded by postcollisional mafic igneous rocks in the Dabie-Sulu orogenic belt and its adjacent continental margin in the North China Block. These rocks exhibit the geochemical inheritance of whole-rock trace elements and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes as well as zircon U-Pb ages and Hf-O isotopes from felsic melts derived from the subducted continental crust. Reaction of such melts with the overlying wedge peridotite would transfer the crustal signatures to the mantle sources for postcollisional mafic magmatism. Therefore, postcollisonal mafic igneous rocks above continental subduction zones are an analog to arc volcanics above oceanic subduction zones, providing an additional laboratory for the study of crust-mantle interaction at convergent plate margins. PMID:24301173

  14. Postcollisional mafic igneous rocks record crust-mantle interaction during continental deep subduction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zi-Fu; Dai, Li-Qun; Zheng, Yong-Fei

    2013-01-01

    Findings of coesite and microdiamond in metamorphic rocks of supracrustal protolith led to the recognition of continental subduction to mantle depths. The crust-mantle interaction is expected to take place during subduction of the continental crust beneath the subcontinental lithospheric mantle wedge. This is recorded by postcollisional mafic igneous rocks in the Dabie-Sulu orogenic belt and its adjacent continental margin in the North China Block. These rocks exhibit the geochemical inheritance of whole-rock trace elements and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes as well as zircon U-Pb ages and Hf-O isotopes from felsic melts derived from the subducted continental crust. Reaction of such melts with the overlying wedge peridotite would transfer the crustal signatures to the mantle sources for postcollisional mafic magmatism. Therefore, postcollisonal mafic igneous rocks above continental subduction zones are an analog to arc volcanics above oceanic subduction zones, providing an additional laboratory for the study of crust-mantle interaction at convergent plate margins. PMID:24301173

  15. Turbine vane plate assembly

    DOEpatents

    Schiavo Jr., Anthony L.

    2006-01-10

    A turbine vane assembly includes a turbine vane having first and second shrouds with an elongated airfoil extending between. Each end of the airfoil transitions into a shroud at a respective junction. Each of the shrouds has a plurality of cooling passages, and the airfoil has a plurality of cooling passages extending between the first and second shrouds. A substantially flat inner plate and an outer plate are coupled to each of the first and second shrouds so as to form inner and outer plenums. Each inner plenum is defined between at least the junction and the substantially flat inner plate; each outer plenum is defined between at least the substantially flat inner plate and the outer plate. Each inner plenum is in fluid communication with a respective outer plenum through at least one of the cooling passages in the respective shroud.

  16. The thermal structure and thermal evolution of the continental lithosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, P.

    1984-01-01

    The thermal structure and evolution of the continental lithosphere are examined. Surface heat flow data and the factors which modify them are addressed, and the diversity of thermal phenomena in the lithosphere is discussed in the framework of plate interactions. The lithosphere is divided into three sections for the purposes of discussion. In the upper, near-surface zone, temperatures can be strongly affected by near-surface processes, which must be taken into account in the measurement and evaluation of surface heat flow. The thermal structure of the middle, internal zone of the lithosphere responds to the heat balance and thermal properties of the lithosphere, which define its steady state thermal structure. Internal deformation and magmatic intrusion within this zone, and interaction between the lithosphere and the asthenosphere in the lower boundary zone of the lithosphere cause transient thermal disturbances in the lithosphere. The criteria for defining the base of the thermal lithosphere are briefly discussed.

  17. 75 FR 61512 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf Official... Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams (OPDs) located within Atlantic Ocean areas, with... informational purposes only. Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams in the North Atlantic,...

  18. Slab Driven Mantle Deformation and Plate-Mantle Decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadamec, M. A.; MacDougall, J.; Fischer, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    Observations of shear wave splitting derived from local sources in subduction zones suggest viscous flow in the mantle wedge is commonly non-parallel to both the subducting plate velocity vector and the motion of the overriding plate. However, far from the subduction zone trench, observations indicate the fast axis of shear wave splitting tends to align with the velocity vector of the surface plates. Similarly, previous 3D geodynamic models show the slab can drive local decoupling of the mantle and surface plates, in both direction and speed. This suggests that there is some distance from the trench over which there is significant decoupling of the mantle flow from surface plate motion, and that this decoupling zone then decays with continued distance from the trench, resulting in far-field plate-mantle coupling. Here we present results from geodynamic models of subduction coupled with calculations of olivine fabric deformation and synthetic splitting to 1) examine the influence of slab strength, slab dip, and non-Newtonian viscosity on the deformation fabric in the mantle wedge and subslab mantle and 2) quantify the spatial extent and intensity of this slab driven decoupling zone. We compare the deformation fabric in a 2D corner flow solution with varying dip to that of a 2D free subduction model with varying initial dip and slab strength. The results show that using an experimentally derived flow law to define viscosity (both diffusion creep and dislocation creep deformation mechanisms) has a first order effect on the viscosity structure and flow velocity in the upper mantle. The free subduction models using the composite viscosity formulation produce a zone of subduction induced mantle weakening that results in reduced viscous support of the slab and lateral variability in coupling of the mantle to the base of the surface plates. The maximum yield stress, which places an upper bound on the slab strength, can also have a significant impact on the viscosity

  19. Characteristics and origin of Continental and Oceanic Intraplate Volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, E. I.; Conrad, C. P.; Johnsen, R. L.; Tibbetts, A. K.

    2009-12-01

    Intraplate volcanism not clearly associated with plate margin tectonics or mantle plumes occurs in both continental and oceanic environments. A compilation of intraplate volcanic fields indicates several common traits: (1) volcanoes are predominately alkali basalt although tholeiitic, bimodal rhyolite basalt and calc-alkaline magma types occur in the Basin and Range and Utah Transition Zone in the western US; (2) volcanoes are monogenetic and occur in separate volcanic fields that rarely display time migration; (3) intraplate continental volcanic fields form by repeated episodic eruptions over a long period of time (10 m.y. or longer) in a limited geographic area; (4) extended or fractured intraplate areas tend to localize volcanism and (5) in oceanic environments, intraplate volcanism may produce island chains, but chains lack the time progression expected in plume related volcanism. Although intraplate volcanoes have been studied for decades there is little agreement on a mechanism that explains their formation. A selection of recently proposed mechanisms include “hot fingers or mini plumes” (eastern Australia), melting of fertile lithospheric mantle (Jordan, Basin and Range USA), mantle diapirs and crustal extension (Calatrava Spain), “petit spot” volcanoes formed along fractures related to plate flexure (northwestern Pacific Plate), hot line or tectono-magmatic alignment (Cameroon west Africa), upwelling of hot asthenosphere associated with deep subduction and a stagnant slab (Changbai volcano China), rifting of foreland uplifts associated with distant subduction (Rhine Graben), mantle plumes (Eifel Germany), small scale sublithospheric convection (SSC) (Gilbert and Pukapuka ridges Pacific Plate) and shear driven asthenospheric upwelling (SDU) (Basin and Range USA). Although all of these mechanisms have their merits, few explain the longevity of intraplate volcanism and repeated eruptions in the same geographic area. SSC [1] invokes the slow replacement

  20. Tectonic structure and evolution of the Atlantic continental margin

    SciTech Connect

    Klitgord, K.D.; Schouten, H.; Hutchinson, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Atlantic continental margin developed across the boundary between continental and oceanic crust as rifting and then sea-floor spreading broke apart and separated the North American and African plates, forming the Atlantic Ocean Basin. Continental rifting began in Late Triassic with reactivation of Paleozoic thrust faults as normal faults and with extension across a broad zone of subparallel rift basins. Extension became localized in Early to Middle Jurassic along the zone that now underlies the large marginal basins, and other rift zones, such as the Newark, Hartford, and Fundy basins, were abandoned. Rifting and crustal stretching between the two continents gave way to sea-floor spreading Middle Jurassic and the formation of oceanic crust. This tectonic evolution resulted in formation of distinctive structural features. The marginal basins are underlain by a thinner crust and contain a variety of fault-controlled structures, including half-grabens, seaward- and landward-tilted blocks, faults that die out within the crust, and faults that penetrate the entire crust. This variable structure probably resulted from the late Triassic-Early Jurassic pattern of normal, listric, and antithetic faults that evolved from the Paleozoic thrust fault geometry. The boundary between marginal basins and oceanic crust is marked approximately by the East Coast Magnetic Anomaly (ECMA). A major basement fault is located in the Baltimore Canyon trough at the landward edge of the ECMA and a zone of seaward dipping reflectors is found just seaward of the ECMA off Georges Bank. The fracture zone pattern in Mesozoic oceanic crust can be traced landward to the ECMA.

  1. Continuum calculations of continental deformation in transcurrent environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonder, L. J.; England, P. C.; Houseman, G. A.

    1986-01-01

    A thin viscous sheet approximation is used to investigate continental deformation near a strike-slip boundary. The vertically averaged velocity field is calculated for a medium characterized by a power law rheology with stress exponent n. Driving stresses include those applied along boundaries of the sheet and those arising from buoyancy forces related to lateral differences in crustal thickness. Exact and approximate analytic solutions for a region with a sinusoidal strike-slip boundary condition are compared with solutions for more geologically relevant boundary conditions obtained using a finite element technique. The across-strike length scale of the deformation is approximately 1/4pi x sq rt n times the dominant wavelength of the imposed strike-slip boundary condition for both the analytic and the numerical solutions; this result is consistent with length scales observed in continental regions of large-scale transcurrent faulting. An approximate, linear relationship between displacement and rotation is found that depends only on the deformation length scale and the rheology. Calculated displacements, finite rotations, and distribution of crustal thicknesses are consistent with those observed in the region of the Pacific-North America plate boundary in California.

  2. Heat flow and continental breakup: The Gulf of Elat (Aqaba)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben-Avraham, Z.; Vonherzen, R. P.

    1985-01-01

    Heat flow measurements were made in the major basins of the Gulf of Elat (Aqaba), northern Red Sea. The gulf is located at the southern portion of the Dead Sea rift which is a transform plate boundary. Gradient measurements at each site were made with a probe which allows multiple penetration of the bottom during a single deployment of the instrument. Thermal conductivity was determined by needle probe measurements on sedimentary cores. The mean heat flux, about 80 mWm(-2), is significantly above the continental mean, and probably also above that from the adjacent Sinai and Arabian continental blocks. The heat flow appears to increase from north to south. Such an increase may be related to the more advanced rifting stage of the Red Sea immediately to the south, which presently includes creation of an oceanic crust. This trend also corresponds to the general trend of the deep crustal structure in the gulf. Evidence from various geophysical fields suggest a gradual thinning of the crust towards the direction of the Red Sea where a normal oceanic crust exists. The heat flow data, together with other geophysical data, indicate a propagation of mature rifting activity from the Red Sea into the Gulf of Elat. This process is acting simultaneously with the transform motion along the Dead Sea rift.

  3. The continental margin off Oregon from seismic investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerdom, M.; Trehu, A. M.; Flueh, E. R.; Klaeschen, D.

    2000-12-01

    In April and May 1996, a geophysical study of the Cascadia continental margin off Oregon and Washington was carried out aboard the German RV Sonne as a cooperative experiment between GEOMAR, the USGS and COAS. Offshore central Oregon, which is the subject of this study, the experiment involved the collection of wide-angle refraction and reflection data along three profiles across the continental margin using ocean-bottom seismometers (OBS) and hydrophones (OBH) as well as land recorders. Two-dimensional modelling of the travel times provides a detailed velocity structure beneath these profiles. The subducting oceanic crust of the Juan de Fuca plate can be traced from the trench to its position some 10 km landward of the coastline. At the coastline, the Moho has a depth of 30 km. The dip of the plate changes from 1.5° westward of the trench to about 6.5° below the accretionary complex and to about 16° further eastward below the coast. The backstop forming western edge of the Siletz terrane, an oceanic plateau that was accreted to North America about 50 Ma ago, is well defined by the observations. It is located about 60 km to the east of the deformation front and has a seaward dip of 40°. At its seaward edge, the base of the Siletz terrane seems to be in contact with the subducting oceanic crust implying that sediments are unlikely to be subducted to greater depths. The upper oceanic crust is thinner to the east of this contact than to the west. At depths greater than 18 km, the top of the oceanic crust is the origin of pre-critical reflections observable in several land recordings and in the data of one ocean bottom instrument. These reflections are most likely caused by fluids that are released from the oceanic crust by metamorphic facies transition.

  4. Development of topography in 3-D continental-collision models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusok, A. E.; Kaus, Boris J. P.

    2015-05-01

    Understanding the formation and evolution of high mountain belts, such as the Himalayas and the adjacent Tibetan Plateau, has been the focus of many tectonic and numerical models. Here we employ 3-D numerical simulations to investigate the role that subduction, collision, and indentation play on lithosphere dynamics at convergent margins, and to analyze the conditions under which large topographic plateaus can form in an integrated lithospheric and upper mantle-scale model. Distinct dynamics are obtained for the oceanic subduction side (trench retreat, slab rollback) and the continental-collision side (trench advance, slab detachment, topographic uplift, lateral extrusion). We show that slab pull alone is insufficient to generate high topography in the upper plate, and that external forcing and the presence of strong blocks such as the Tarim Basin are necessary to create and shape anomalously high topographic fronts and plateaus. Moreover, scaling is used to predict four different modes of surface expression in continental-collision models: (I) low-amplitude homogeneous shortening, (II) high-amplitude homogeneous shortening, (III) Alpine-type topography with topographic front and low plateau, and (IV) Tibet-Himalaya-type topography with topographic front and high plateau. Results of semianalytical models suggest that the Argand number governs the formation of high topographic fronts, while the amplitude of plateaus is controlled by the initial buoyancy ratio of the upper plate. Applying these results to natural examples, we show that the Alps belong to regime (III), the Himalaya-Tibet to regime (IV), whereas the Andes-Altiplano fall at the boundary between regimes (III) and (IV).

  5. Cenozoic evolution of the Antarctic Peninsula continental margin

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.B. )

    1990-05-01

    Cenozoic evolution of the Antarctic Peninsula continental margin has involved a series of ridge (Aluk Ridge)-trench collisions between the Pacific and Antarctic plates. Subduction occurred episodically between segments of the Pacific plate that are bounded by major fracture zones. The age of ridge-trench collisions decreases from south to north along the margin. The very northern part of the margin, between the Hero and Shackleton fracture zones, has the last surviving Aluk-Antarctic spreading ridge segments and the only remaining trench topography. The sedimentary cover on the northern margin is relatively thin generally less than 1.5 km, thus providing a unique setting in which to examine margin evolution using high resolution seismic methods. Over 5,000 km of high resolution (water gun) seismic profiles were acquired from the Antarctic Peninsula margin during four cruises to the region. The margin is divided into discrete fracture-zone-bounded segments; each segment displays different styles of development. Highly tectonized active margin sequences have been buried beneath a seaward-thickening sediment wedge that represents the passive stage of margin development Ice caps, which have existed in the Antarctic Peninsula region since at least the late Oligocene, have advanced onto the continental shelf on numerous occasions, eroding hundreds of meters into the shelf and depositing a thick sequence of deposits characterized by till tongues and glacial troughs. Glacial erosion has been the main factor responsible for overdeepening of the shelf; isostasy is of secondary importance. As the shelf was lowered by glacial erosion, it was able to accommodate thicker and more unstable marine ice sheets. The shelf also became a vast reservoir for cold, saline shelf water, one of the key ingredients of Antarctic bottom water.

  6. Rifting of Continental Interiors: Some New Geophysical Data and Interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, G. R.

    2005-12-01

    Rifting is one of the major processes that affect the evolution of the continents. This process sometimes leads to continental breakup and the formation of new oceans, but more often does not. This is presumably due to extension not progressing sufficiently to form a new plate margin resulting in a structure, which remains isolated in an intra-plate environment. The Southern Oklahoma aulacogen is such a feature, and the continental portion of the East African rift system may be a modern example. As more detailed geophysical and geological studies of rifts have become available in recent years, a complex picture of rift structure and evolution has emerged. Global patterns that reveal the connections between lithospheric structure (deep and shallow), magmatism (amount and style), amount of extension, uplift, and older structures remain elusive. However, our geophysical studies of modern and paleo rifts in North America, East Africa, and Europe makes it possible to make some general observations: 1). Magmatism in rifts is modest without the presence of a (pre-existing?) thermal anomaly in the mantle. 2). Magmatic modification of the crust takes many forms which probably depend on the nature of older structures present and the state of the lithosphere when rifting is initiated (i.e. cold vs. hot; fertility), 3) There is no clear relation between amount of extension and the amount of magmatic modification of the crust. 4) Brittle deformation in the upper crustal is complex, often asymmetrical and older features often play important roles in focusing deformation. However on a lithospheric scale, rift structure is usually symmetrical. 5) A better understanding of rift processes is emerging as we achieve higher levels of integration of a wide variety of geoscience data.

  7. Continental margin tectonics - Forearc processes

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, N.; Reed, D.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies of convergent plate margins and the structural development of forearc terranes are summarized in a critical review of U.S. research from the period 1987-1990. Topics addressed include the geometry of accretionary prisms (Coulomb wedge taper and vertical motion in response to tectonic processes), offscraping vs underplating or subduction, the response to oblique convergence, fluids in forearc settings, the thermal framework and the effects of fluid advection, and serpentinite seamounts. Also included is a comprehensive bibliography for the period.

  8. Long-term topographic feedbacks along glaciated continental margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egholm, David L.; Jansen, John; Knudsen, Mads F.; Pedersen, Vivi K.; Brædstrup, Christian F.; Ugelvig, Sofie V.; Andersen, Jane L.; Skov, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Deep troughs carved by glaciers during Quaternary cold intervals dominate high-latitude mountain ranges in Greenland, Norway, Canada, New Zealand, Chile and Antarctica (Sugden & John, 1976). In addition, areas of relatively low relief are typically found at high elevations between the troughs. These high areas are often draped by block-fields, indicating that slow weathering processes dominated their evolution, at least throughout the most recent series of interglacial periods (Ballantyne, 2010). Ice sheets must have repeatedly covered the high areas during glacial maxima, but the ice did not erode the underlying bedrock; most likely because the ice was predominantly frozen to its bed (Kleman & Stroeven, 1997). The geomorphic contrast between the troughs and the high-elevation, low-relief areas shows that factors controlling glacial erosion can fluctuate dramatically across short distances, and that landscapes in cold regions concurrently support some of the fastest and slowest surface-erosion processes on Earth (Sugden & John, 1976). However, the strong contrast in efficiency of subglacial erosion has likely evolved in response to landscape evolution. The gradual emergence of glacial troughs over time establishes a feedback between ice flux and subglacial erosion, leading to focused ice drainage and accelerating erosion in the troughs and stalling erosion in the high-elevation areas between the troughs (Kessler et al. 2008). This distinct pattern of selective erosion along cold-region continental margins during the Late Quaternary may therefore reflect the product of topographical feedbacks that focus glacial erosion over time. We used computational landscape evolution models to study these topographic feedbacks, with the objective to evaluate landscape evolution in the high areas prior to the development of deep glacial troughs. Our experiments suggest that early overriding ice-sheets most likely eroded the highs and smoothed the regional topography before

  9. Earthquakes and plate tectonics.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, H.

    1982-01-01

    Earthquakes occur at the following three kinds of plate boundary: ocean ridges where the plates are pulled apart, margins where the plates scrape past one another, and margins where one plate is thrust under the other. Thus, we can predict the general regions on the earth's surface where we can expect large earthquakes in the future. We know that each year about 140 earthquakes of magnitude 6 or greater will occur within this area which is 10% of the earth's surface. But on a worldwide basis we cannot say with much accuracy when these events will occur. The reason is that the processes in plate tectonics have been going on for millions of years. Averaged over this interval, plate motions amount to several mm per year. But at any instant in geologic time, for example the year 1982, we do not know, exactly where we are in the worldwide cycle of strain build-up and strain release. Only by monitoring the stress and strain in small areas, for instance, the San Andreas fault, in great detail can we hope to predict when renewed activity in that part of the plate tectonics arena is likely to take place. -from Author

  10. Lohse's historic plate archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, M.; Tsvetkova, K.; Richter, G.; Scholz, G.; Böhm, P.

    The description and the analysis of Oswald Lohse's astrophotographic plates, collected at the Astrophysical Observatory Potsdam in the period 1879 - 1889, are presented. 67 plates of the archive, taken with the greatest instrument of the observatory at that time - the refractor (D = 0.30 m, F = 5.40 m, scale = 38''/mm) and with the second heliographic objective (D = 0.13 m, F = 1.36 m, scale = 152''/mm) - - survived two world wars in relative good condition. The plate emulsions are from different manufacturers in the beginning of astrophotography (Gädicke, Schleussner, Beernaert, etc.). The sizes of the plates are usually 9x12 cm2, which corresponds to fields of 1.2deg and 5deg respectively for each instrument mentioned above. The average limiting magnitude is 13.0(pg). Besides of the plates received for technical experiments (work on photographic processes, testing of new instruments and methods of observations), the scientific observations follow programs for studies of planet surfaces, bright stars, some double stars, stellar clusters and nebulous objects. Lohse's archive is included into the Wide Field Plate Database (http://www.skyarchive.org) as the oldest systematic one, covering the fields of Orion (M42/43), Pleiades, h & chi Persei, M37, M3, M11, M13, M92, M31, etc. With the PDS 2020 GM+ microdensitometer of Münster University 10 archive plates were digitized.

  11. Arctic and Antarctic Crustal Thickness and Continental Lithosphere Thinning from Gravity Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusznir, Nick J.; Alvey, Andy; Vaughan, Alan P. M.; Ferraccioli, Fausto; Jordan, Tom A. R. M.; Roberts, Alan M.

    2013-04-01

    Basins consistent with these basins being oceanic or highly thinned continental crust. Larger crustal thicknesses, in the range 20 - 30 km, are predicted for the Lomonosov, Alpha and Mendeleev Ridges. Moho depths predicted compare well with seismic estimates. Predicted very thin continental or oceanic crust under the North Chuchki Basin and Laptev Sea has major implications for understanding the plate tectonic history of the Amerasia Basin. Our gravity inversion study predicts thick crust (> 45 km) under interior East Antarctica. Thin crust is predicted under the West Antarctica Rift System and the Ross Sea. Continent scale rifts are also seen within East Antarctica. Intermediate crustal thickness with a pronounced rift fabric is predicted under Coates Land. An extensive region of either thick oceanic crust or highly thinned continental crust is predicted offshore Oates Land and north Victoria Land. Superposition of illuminated satellite gravity data onto crustal thickness maps from gravity inversion provides improved determination of rift orientation, pre-breakup rifted margin conjugacy and continental breakup trajectory (e.g. for the Southern Ocean). Gravity inversion predictions of crustal thickness, OCT location and oceanic lithosphere distribution may be used to test plate tectonic reconstructions. Using gravity anomaly inversion mapping of continental lithosphere thinning we have developed and applied a new technique to predict basement heat-flow, important for the prediction of ice-sheet stability, for the Polar Regions.

  12. Introduction - Processes of continental rifting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, P.; Baker, B. H.

    1983-01-01

    It is thought likely that thermal thinning and/or diapirism can cause the extensional stress required for rifting. The rifting, however, will not occur unless the regional tectonic regime permits the sides of the rift to diverge. Whereas passive plate extension could cause rifting in isolation, the extension and rifting are likely to be localized where the lithosphere is weakest over an existing thermal anomaly. In those cases where asthenospheric diapirism occurs, which is essentially a response to thinning of the lithosphere by thermal thinning or plate extension, the effects of diapirism may completely mask the initiating mechanism. It is believed that anomalous heat transfer into the lithosphere, diapirism, and magmatism must all figure in rifting, along with a deviatoric stress field that will permit extension in a developing rift. Even though the models are useful in permitting idealized processes to be quantified and tested, better knowledge of lithosphere properties is considered necessary, in particular knowledge of mantle viscosity and its temperature dependence.

  13. Continental volume and freeboard through geological time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, G.; Reymer, A. P. S.

    1985-01-01

    The consequences of approximately constant freeboard for continental growth are explored using a model that relates the volumes of isostatically compensated continents and oceans to the secular decline in terrestrial heat flow. It is found that a post-Archean increase in freeboard by 200 m requires continental growth of only 10 percent, while a decrease in freeboard by 200 m during this same period necessitates a crustal growth of 40 percent. Shrinkage of the continental crust since the end of the Archean can be ruled out. Changes of more than 10 percent in post-Archean crustal thickness are highly unlikely.

  14. Seismic constraints on the evolution of the continental lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, H. A.; Hopper, E.; Fischer, K. M.; Lekic, V.; Selway, K.; Kelemen, P. B.

    2014-12-01

    While the interface between the lithosphere and the asthenosphere is often shown in textbooks as a schematically simple boundary, its existence in reality is considerably more complex, with debate existing over the physical and chemical properties that differentiate the overriding, rigid lithosphere from the convecting mantle below. Despite these uncertainties, receiver function analysis shows us that lateral variations in seismic properties (e.g., depth and velocity gradient) exist. These differences are often well-correlated with the tectonic age of the lithosphere, indicating that the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) evolves with time. In our presentation we will outline our work to image the LAB and other lithospheric structure with Sp receiver functions beneath continental North America. In portions of the tectonically active western U.S., detailed 3D imaging reveals a well-defined negative phase at depths of ~50-100 km, consistent with surface wave estimates of LAB depth. Modeling indicates that LAB velocity gradient in these regions is too large to be a function of temperature change alone and that changing composition, water or melt content is also needed. In contrast, there is a dearth of Sp receiver function phase energy present at depths appropriate to the transition from lithosphere to asthenosphere beneath many regions of stable continental interior. Where present, the LAB phase is considerably weaker than in tectonically active regions. A weak or absent phase can be explained through thermal changes alone, although other mechanisms cannot be ruled out. In the stable continental regions we also commonly detect one or more mid-lithospheric discontinuities (MLDs). The observation of such a phase is relatively new, and may be a globally present feature in older continental lithosphere. The MLD in our work appears as both a single phase as well as multiple discrete phases. At the global and regional scale the depth of the MLD, and the LAB in

  15. Images may show start of European-African plate collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascle, J.; Huguen, C.; Benkhelil, J.; Chamot-Rooke, N.; Chaumillon, E.; Foucher, J. P.; Griboulard, R.; Kopf, A.; Lamarche, G.; Volkonskaia, A.; Woodside, J.; Zitter, T.

    Aspects of the initial stages of a collision between European and African plates may have been documented in a geophysical survey of the central Mediterranean Ridge (MR) conducted last year. The idea of an incipient collision was first suggested by Finetti [1976],and details of the seafloor and tectonic deformation along the MR, revealed for the first time in the survey, seem to point in that direction.A unique opportunity may therefore exist for studying the beginnings of such a collision—between the passive margin of a major plate (Africa) acting as a continental indenter against the active margin of another plate (Europe). More wide angle data, deep penetrating multichannel seismic data, and drilling data are crucial to better assess the nature and the architecture of the underlying lithosphere, the styles of sedimentary deformation, and the consequences on fluid releases. Such data will make it possible to establish, or reject, a geodynamic collision model.

  16. Early breakup of Gondwana: constraints from global plate motion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seton, Maria; Zahirovic, Sabin; Williams, Simon; Whittaker, Joanne; Gibbons, Ana; Muller, Dietmar; Brune, Sascha; Heine, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Supercontinent break-up and amalgamation is a fundamental Earth cycle, contributing to long-term sea-level fluctuations, species diversity and extinction events, long-term greenhouse-icehouse cycles and changes in the long-wavelength density structure of the mantle. The most recent and best-constrained example involves the fragmentation of Gondwana, starting with rifting between Africa/Madagascar and Antarctica in the Early Jurassic and ending with the separation of the Lord Howe microcontinental blocks east of Australia in the Late Cretaceous. Although the first order configuration of Gondwana within modern reconstructions appears similar to that first proposed by Wegener a century ago, recent studies utilising a wealth of new geophysical and geological data provide a much more detailed picture of relative plate motions both during rifting and subsequent seafloor spreading. We present our latest global plate motion model that includes extensive, new regional analyses. These include: South Atlantic rifting, which started at 150 Ma and propagated into cratonic Africa by 145 Ma (Heine et al., 2013); rifting and early seafloor spreading between Australia, India and Antarctica, which reconciles the fit between Broken Ridge-Kergulean Plateau and the eastern Tasman region (Whittaker et al., 2013); rifting of continental material from northeastern Gondwana and its accretion onto Eurasia and SE Asia including a new model of microcontinent formation and early seafloor spreading in the eastern Indian Ocean (Gibbons et al., 2012; 2013; in review; Williams et al., 2013; Zahirovic et al., 2014); and a new model for the isolation of Zealandia east of Australia, with rifting initiating at 100 Ma until the start of seafloor spreading in the Tasman Sea at ~85 Ma (Williams et al., in prep). Using these reconstructions within the open-source GPlates software, accompanied by a set of evolving plates and plate boundaries, we can explore the factors that govern the behavior of plate

  17. Double subduction of continental lithosphere, a key to form wide plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Replumaz, Anne; Funiciello, Francesca; Reitano, Riccardo; Faccenna, Claudio; Balon, Marie

    2016-04-01

    The mechanisms involved in the creation of the high and wide topography, like the Tibetan Plateau, are still controversial. In particular, the behaviour of the indian and asian lower continental lithosphere during the collision is a matter of debate, either thickening, densifying and delaminating, or keeping its rigidity and subducting. But since several decades seismicity, seismic profiles and global tomography highlight the lithospheric structure of the Tibetan Plateau, and make the hypotheses sustaining the models more precise. In particular, in the western syntaxis, it is now clear that the indian lithosphere subducts northward beneath the Hindu Kush down to the transition zone, while the asian one subducts southward beneath Pamir (e.g. Negredo et al., 2007; Kufner et al., 2015). Such double subduction of continental lithospheres with opposite vergence has also been inferred in the early collision time. Cenozoic volcanic rocks between 50 and 30 Ma in the Qiangtang block have been interpreted as related to an asian subduction beneath Qiangtang at that time (De Celles et al., 2011; Guillot and Replumaz, 2013). We present here analogue experiments silicone/honey to explore the subduction of continental lithosphere, using a piston as analogue of far field forces. We explore the parameters that control the subductions dynamics of the 2 continental lithospheres and the thickening of the plates at the surface, and compare with the Tibetan Plateau evolution. We show that a continental lithosphere is able to subduct in a collision context, even lighter than the mantle, if the plate is rigid enough. In that case the horizontal force due to the collision context, modelled by the piston push transmitted by the indenter, is the driving force, not the slab pull which is negative. It is not a subduction driving by the weight of the slab, but a subduction induced by the collision, that we could call "collisional subduction".

  18. Tectonic Plate Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landalf, Helen

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity that employs movement to enable students to understand concepts related to plate tectonics. Argues that movement brings topics to life in a concrete way and helps children retain knowledge. (DDR)

  19. Flat plate solar oven

    SciTech Connect

    Parikh, M.

    1981-01-01

    The construction of an Indian Rs. 186 (US $20.33) flat-plate solar oven is described. Detailed drawings are provided and relevant information on cooking times and temperature for different foods is given.

  20. Plate tectonics: Metamorphic myth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korenaga, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Clear evidence for subduction-induced metamorphism, and thus the operation of plate tectonics on the ancient Earth has been lacking. Theoretical calculations indicate that we may have been looking for something that cannot exist.

  1. Violin plate modes.

    PubMed

    Gough, Colin

    2015-01-01

    As the first step toward developing a generic model for the acoustically radiating vibrational modes of the violin and related instruments, the modes of both freely supported and edge-constrained top and back plates have been investigated as functions of shape, arching height, elastic anisotropy, the f-holes and associated island area, thickness graduations, and the additional boundary constraints of the ribs, soundpost, and bass-bar present in the assembled instrument. Comsol shell structure finite element software has been used as a quasi-experimental tool, with physical and geometric properties varied smoothly, often over several orders of magnitude, allowing the development of the plate modes to be followed continuously from those of an initially square plate to those of doubly-arched, guitar-shaped, orthotropic plates and their dependence on all the above factors. PMID:25618046

  2. Continental margin deformation along the Andean subduction zone: Thermo-mechanical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbault, Muriel; Cembrano, J.; Mpodozis, C.; Farias, M.; Pardo, M.

    2009-12-01

    The Chilean Andes extend north-south for about 3000 km over the subducting Nazca plate, and show evidence of local rheological controls on first-order tectonic features. Here, rheological parameters are tested with numerical models of a subduction driven by slab-pull and upper plate velocities, and which calculate the development of stress and strain over a typical period of 4 Myr. The models test the effects of subduction interface strength, arc and fore-arc crust rheology, and arc temperature, on the development of superficial near-surface faulting as well as viscous shear zones in the mantle. Deformation geometries are controlled by the intersection of the subduction interface with continental rheological heterogeneities. Upper plate shortening and trench advance are both correlated, and favored, to a first-order by upper plate weakness, and to a second-order by interface strength. In cases of a strong interface, a weak fore-arc crust is dragged downward by “tectonic erosion”, a scenario for which indications are found along the northern Chilean margin. In contrast for a resistant fore-arc, the slab-pull force transmits to the surface and produces topographic subsidence. This process may explain present-day subsidence of the Salar de Atacama basin and/or the persistence of a Central Depression. Specific conditions for northern Chile produce a shear zone that propagates from the subduction zone in the mantle, through the Altiplano lower crust into the Sub-Andean crust, as proposed by previous studies. Models with a weak interface in turn, allow buoyant subducted material to rise into the continental arc. In case of cessation of the slab-pull, this buoyant material may rise enough to change the stress state in the continental crust, and lead to back-arc opening. In a case of young and hydrated oceanic plate forced by the slab-pull to subduct under a resistant continent, this plate is deviated and indented by the continental mantle, and stretches horizontally

  3. Positive battery plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlette, John R. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    The power characteristics of a lead acid battery are improved by incorporating a dispersion of 1 to 10% by weight of a thermodynamically stable conductivity additive, such as conductive tin oxide coated glass fibers (34) of filamentary glass wool (42) in the positive active layer (32) carried on the grid (30) of the positive plate (16). Positive plate potential must be kept high enough to prevent reduction of the tin oxide to tin by utilizing an oversized, precharged positive paste.

  4. Fractal multifiber microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Lee M.; Feller, W. B.; Kenter, Almus T.; Chappell, Jon H.

    1992-01-01

    The construction and performance of microchannel plates (MCPs) made using fractal tiling mehtods are reviewed. MCPs with 40 mm active areas having near-perfect channel ordering were produced. These plates demonstrated electrical performance characteristics equivalent to conventionally constructed MCPs. These apparently are the first MCPs which have a sufficiently high degree of order to permit single channel addressability. Potential applications for these devices and the prospects for further development are discussed.

  5. Plumes do not Exist: Plate Circulation is Confined to Upper Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, W. B.

    2002-12-01

    key to kinematics. Arcs advance and collide, fast-spreading Pacific shrinks, etc. A fore-arc basin atop an overriding plate shows that hinge and non-shortening plate front there track together: velocities of rollback and advance are equal. Convergence velocity commonly also equals rollback velocity but often is greater. Slabs sinking broadside push upper mantle back under incoming plates and force rapid Pacific spreading, whereas overriding plates flow forward with retreating hinges. Backarc basins open behind island arcs migrating with hinges. Slabs settle on uncrossable 660-km discontinuity. (Contrary tomographic claims reflect sampling and smearing artifacts, notably due to along-slab raypaths.) Plates advance over sunken slabs and mantle displaced rearward by them, and ridges spread where advancing plates pull away. Ridges migrate over asthenosphere, producing geophysical and bathymetric asymmetry, and tap fresh asthenosphere into which slab material is recycled upward. Sluggish deep-mantle circulation is decoupled from rapid upper-mantle circulation, so plate motions can be referenced to semistable lower mantle. Global plate motions make kinematic sense if Antarctica, almost ringed by departing ridges and varying little in Cenozoic paleomagnetic position, is stationary: hinges roll back, ridges migrate, and directions and velocities of plate rotations accord with subduction, including sliding and crowding of oceanic lithosphere toward free edges, as the dominant drive. (The invalid hotspot and no-net-rotation frames minimize motions of hinges and ridges, and their plate motions lack kinematic sense.) Northern Eurasia also is almost stationary, Africa rotates very slowly counterclockwise toward Aegean and Zagros, Pacific plate races toward surface-exit subduction systems, etc.

  6. Mapping the evolving strain field during continental breakup from crustal anisotropy in the Afar Depression.

    PubMed

    Keir, Derek; Belachew, M; Ebinger, C J; Kendall, J-M; Hammond, J O S; Stuart, G W; Ayele, A; Rowland, J V

    2011-01-01

    Rifting of the continents leading to plate rupture occurs by a combination of mechanical deformation and magma intrusion, yet the spatial and temporal scales over which these alternate mechanisms localize extensional strain remain controversial. Here we quantify anisotropy of the upper crust across the volcanically active Afar Triple Junction using shear-wave splitting from local earthquakes to evaluate the distribution and orientation of strain in a region of continental breakup. The pattern of S-wave splitting in Afar is best explained by anisotropy from deformation-related structures, with the dramatic change in splitting parameters into the rift axis from the increased density of dyke-induced faulting combined with a contribution from oriented melt pockets near volcanic centres. The lack of rift-perpendicular anisotropy in the lithosphere, and corroborating geoscientific evidence of extension dominated by dyking, provide strong evidence that magma intrusion achieves the majority of plate opening in this zone of incipient plate rupture. PMID:21505441

  7. Mapping the evolving strain field during continental breakup from crustal anisotropy in the Afar Depression

    PubMed Central

    Keir, Derek; Belachew, M.; Ebinger, C.J.; Kendall, J.-M.; Hammond, J.O.S.; Stuart, G.W.; Ayele, A.; Rowland, J.V.

    2011-01-01

    Rifting of the continents leading to plate rupture occurs by a combination of mechanical deformation and magma intrusion, yet the spatial and temporal scales over which these alternate mechanisms localize extensional strain remain controversial. Here we quantify anisotropy of the upper crust across the volcanically active Afar Triple Junction using shear-wave splitting from local earthquakes to evaluate the distribution and orientation of strain in a region of continental breakup. The pattern of S-wave splitting in Afar is best explained by anisotropy from deformation-related structures, with the dramatic change in splitting parameters into the rift axis from the increased density of dyke-induced faulting combined with a contribution from oriented melt pockets near volcanic centres. The lack of rift-perpendicular anisotropy in the lithosphere, and corroborating geoscientific evidence of extension dominated by dyking, provide strong evidence that magma intrusion achieves the majority of plate opening in this zone of incipient plate rupture. PMID:21505441

  8. Phononic plate waves.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tsung-Tsong; Hsu, Jin-Chen; Sun, Jia-Hong

    2011-10-01

    In the past two decades, phononic crystals (PCs) which consist of periodically arranged media have attracted considerable interest because of the existence of complete frequency band gaps and maneuverable band structures. Recently, Lamb waves in thin plates with PC structures have started to receive increasing attention for their potential applications in filters, resonators, and waveguides. This paper presents a review of recent works related to phononic plate waves which have recently been published by the authors and coworkers. Theoretical and experimental studies of Lamb waves in 2-D PC plate structures are covered. On the theoretical side, analyses of Lamb waves in 2-D PC plates using the plane wave expansion (PWE) method, finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, and finite-element (FE) method are addressed. These methods were applied to study the complete band gaps of Lamb waves, characteristics of the propagating and localized wave modes, and behavior of anomalous refraction, called negative refraction, in the PC plates. The theoretical analyses demonstrated the effects of PC-based negative refraction, lens, waveguides, and resonant cavities. We also discuss the influences of geometrical parameters on the guiding and resonance efficiency and on the frequencies of waveguide and cavity modes. On the experimental side, the design and fabrication of a silicon-based Lamb wave resonator which utilizes PC plates as reflective gratings to form the resonant cavity are discussed. The measured results showed significant improvement of the insertion losses and quality factors of the resonators when the PCs were applied. PMID:21989878

  9. Extending a thickened crustal bulge: toward a new geodynamic evolution model of the paleozoic NW Bohemian Massif, German Continental Deep Drilling site (SE Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krohe, Alexander

    1998-09-01

    -Devonian, such complexes did not experience any metamorphism. The recorded Devonian events consist of subduction and exhumation of HP-rocks and their exhumation involved thrusting and extensional tectonics. Upper tectonic complexes comprise fragments of both the plate that was subducted in this period and the overriding plate. In the footwall, Carboniferous extension has brought upper tectonic complexes against metamorphic complexes that essentially record Lower and Upper Carboniferous tectonometamorphic and magmatic events (lower tectonic complexes). In the lower tectonic complexes, such events are (1) consecutive extensional stages that created at least three sets of ductile normal detachment systems intersecting each other, and various associated thermal pulses, as well as (2) predetachment events that are only recorded as petrologic and structural relics transposed during extension. Inferred as predetachment events are crustal subduction as well as stacking that outlasted thrusting and exhumation of the upper tectonic complexes. In the deeper portion of the thickened crustal bulge represented by the lower tectonic complexes, spatial variations of P- T- t- d histories during decompression occurred as a result of continued differential exhumation on the three sets of detachment systems, and also from various thermal pulses that have affected different parts of this section during progressive shearing and exhumation to various degrees. Whereas the lower tectonic complexes of the Erzgebirge Gneiss Dome preserve the record of a Lower Carboniferous history of HP-metamorphism and crustal thickening followed by extension, in those of the Oberpfalz region (KTB site), a major Upper Carboniferous thermal pulse mostly erased the pre-Upper Carboniferous strain fabrics and metamorphic record. In the Oberpfalz region, ongoing extension emplaced mid-crustal rocks that pervasively equilibrated in the Upper Carboniferous at high temperatures and low pressures (low P/T ratio) against rocks not

  10. Volatile components and continental material of planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florenskiy, K. P.; Nikolayeva, O. V.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that the continental material of the terrestrial planets varies in composition from planet to planet according to the abundances and composition of true volatiles (H20, CO2, etc.) in the outer shells of the planets. The formation of these shells occurs very early in a planet's evolution when the role of endogenous processes is indistinct and continental materials are subject to melting and vaporizing in the absence of an atmosphere. As a result, the chemical properties of continental materials are related not only to fractionation processes but also to meltability and volatility. For planets retaining a certain quantity of true volatile components, the chemical transformation of continental material is characterized by a close interaction between impact melting vaporization and endogeneous geological processes.

  11. Modeling the dynamics of continental shelf carbon.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Eileen E; Cahill, Bronwyn; Fennel, Katja; Friedrichs, Marjorie A M; Hyde, Kimberly; Lee, Cindy; Mannino, Antonio; Najjar, Raymond G; O'Reilly, John E; Wilkin, John; Xue, Jianhong

    2011-01-01

    Continental margin systems are important contributors to global nutrient and carbon budgets. Effort is needed to quantify this contribution and how it will be modified under changing patterns of climate and land use. Coupled models will be used to provide projections of future states of continental margin systems. Thus, it is appropriate to consider the limitations that impede the development of realistic models. Here, we provide an overview of the current state of modeling carbon cycling on continental margins as well as the processes and issues that provide the next challenges to such models. Our overview is done within the context of a coupled circulation-biogeochemical model developed for the northeastern North American continental shelf region. Particular choices of forcing and initial fields and process parameterizations are used to illustrate the consequences for simulated distributions, as revealed by comparisons to observations using quantitative statistical metrics. PMID:21329200

  12. Seismic imaging of the southeast Caribbean plate margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, Tammy Katherine

    The SE Caribbean Margin Continental Dynamics Project is a multi-disciplinary investigation of the large scale structure and tectonic framework of the northern boundary of South America. To study the deeper mantle and lithospheric structure, we deployed and maintained an 83 station, broadband array in Venezuela with instruments spanning from the craton south of the Orinoco to the oceanic crust of the Caribbean plate. The first contribution of this work is documentation of the deployment and maintenance of the array. I applied body wave tomography to the data collected during the 18 month deployment. The body wave tomography results produce new constraints on the nature of the Caribbean-South American plate boundary, and provide a new tectonic interpretation of the plate relationships at depth. The tomography results indicate the subducting Atlantic plate descends into the mantle at a relatively low angle parallel to the strike-slip plate boundary in northern Venezuela. This contrasts with previous tomography models for this region that suggest the plate steepens to near vertical dip at its southern edge. I argue the previous results are likely a misinterpretation of artifacts from poorer coverage than what was available for this study. The main arguments for this claim are based on the geometry from a three-dimension plate model constructed for the entire Caribbean. Steepening of the plate implied by previous results requires a sharp reversal in the curvature of the subducting slab that is difficult to reconcile with the constraints imposed by active volcanoes in the Antilles Arc. Finally, a related three-dimensional model was developed for the complex southwestern corner of the Caribbean plate. While this area in Western Venezuela is not well resolved by our data, we can offer some constraints on the structure and explain deep earthquakes under Maracaibo.

  13. "Dynamic Kinematics": Towards Linking Earth's Plate Motions to the Evolution of Global Mantle Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolf, T.; Tackley, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    The theory of plate tectonics has been one of the major breakthroughs in solid-Earth science and is capable of explaining many of the tectonic processes on present-day Earth. Moreover, it allows us to reconstruct Earth's tectonic history back until times of the supercontinent Pangaea and thus improves our understanding how Earth developed to its present state. However, plate tectonics remains a kinematic theory that does not sufficiently incorporate the balance of forces in the Earth's mantle and can thus not explain the motion of Earth's tectonic plates in a dynamically consistent manner. Here, we use fully dynamic models of mantle convection in global spherical geometry to overcome this issue. These models include tectonic plates self-consistently evolving from mantle flow (using a viscoplastic rheology) as well as continental drift. We analyze the evolution of plate velocities over time periods considerably longer than those covered by modern plate reconstructions. We observe significant changes in plate velocity magnitude and direction over timescales relevant for the Earth. While some of these plate reorganizations appear to be rather local affecting only very few plates, others seem to have more global consequences. We characterize the variety of different reorganizations based on features of modeled spreading centers and subduction zones, for instance the flux of slab material into the lower mantle. Initial results suggest that global changes in plate configuration correlate with phases of major slab penetration into the lower mantle, while changes on individual plate-scale do not necessarily do so.

  14. Coordination: southeast continental shelf studies. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, D.W.

    1981-02-01

    The objectives are to identify important physical, chemical and biological processes which affect the transfer of materials on the southeast continental shelf, determine important parameters which govern observed temporal and spatial varibility on the continental shelf, determine the extent and modes of coupling between events at the shelf break and nearshore, and determine physical, chemical and biological exchange rates on the inner shelf. Progress in meeting these research objectives is presented. (ACR)

  15. Freshwater peat on the continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emery, K.O.; Wigley, R.L.; Bartlett, A.S.; Rubin, M.; Barghoorn, E.S.

    1967-01-01

    Freshwater peats from the continental shelf off northeastern United States contain the same general pollen sequence as peats from ponds that are above sea level and that are of comparable radiocarbon ages. These peats indicate that during glacial times of low sea level terrestrial vegetation covered the region that is now the continental shelf in an unbroken extension from the adjacent land areas to the north and west.

  16. Freshwater peat on the continental shelf.

    PubMed

    Emery, K O; Wigley, R L; Bartlett, A S; Rubin, M; Barghoorn, E S

    1967-12-01

    Freshwater peats from the continental shelf off northeastern United States contain the same general pollen sequence as peats from ponds that are above sea level and that are of comparable radiocarbon ages. These peats indicate that during glacial times of low sea level terrestrial vegetation covered the region that is now the continental shelf in an unbroken extension from the adjacent land areas to the north and west. PMID:17801856

  17. Archean upper crust transition from mafic to felsic marks the onset of plate tectonics.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ming; Chen, Kang; Rudnick, Roberta L

    2016-01-22

    The Archean Eon witnessed the production of early continental crust, the emergence of life, and fundamental changes to the atmosphere. The nature of the first continental crust, which was the interface between the surface and deep Earth, has been obscured by the weathering, erosion, and tectonism that followed its formation. We used Ni/Co and Cr/Zn ratios in Archean terrigenous sedimentary rocks and Archean igneous/metaigneous rocks to track the bulk MgO composition of the Archean upper continental crust. This crust evolved from a highly mafic bulk composition before 3.0 billion years ago to a felsic bulk composition by 2.5 billion years ago. This compositional change was attended by a fivefold increase in the mass of the upper continental crust due to addition of granitic rocks, suggesting the onset of global plate tectonics at ~3.0 billion years ago. PMID:26798012

  18. Archean upper crust transition from mafic to felsic marks the onset of plate tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ming; Chen, Kang; Rudnick, Roberta L.

    2016-01-01

    The Archean Eon witnessed the production of early continental crust, the emergence of life, and fundamental changes to the atmosphere. The nature of the first continental crust, which was the interface between the surface and deep Earth, has been obscured by the weathering, erosion, and tectonism that followed its formation. We used Ni/Co and Cr/Zn ratios in Archean terrigenous sedimentary rocks and Archean igneous/metaigneous rocks to track the bulk MgO composition of the Archean upper continental crust. This crust evolved from a highly mafic bulk composition before 3.0 billion years ago to a felsic bulk composition by 2.5 billion years ago. This compositional change was attended by a fivefold increase in the mass of the upper continental crust due to addition of granitic rocks, suggesting the onset of global plate tectonics at ~3.0 billion years ago.

  19. Seismic structure in central Mexico: Possible fragmentation of the subducted South Cocos plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, S. L.; Clayton, R. W.

    2012-12-01

    The fine-scale seismic structure of the central Mexico subduction zone is studied using moderate-sized (M4-6) intraslab earthquakes. Regional waveforms from the Meso America Subduction Experiment (MASE), Veracruz-Oaxaca (VEOX), and Servicio Sismológico Nacional (SSN) seismic arrays are complicated and contain detailed information about the subduction zone structure, including evidence of lateral heterogeneity. This waveform information is used to model the structure of the subducted plate, particularly along the transition from flat to normal subduction located to the east of the MASE array. Based on the results of plate motion studies showing that the Cocos plate moves differently on either side of the Orozco Fracture Zone (OFZ) coupled with our own structural modeling results across the flat-to-normal slab transition west of the MASE array, we recently proposed that the Cocos slab is currently fragmenting into a North Cocos plate and a South Cocos plate along the eastern projection of the OFZ. In the east, observations of a sudden change in slab dip combined with the abrupt end of the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt suggest a second possible slab tear located within the South Cocos plate. The eastern lateral extent of a thin ultra-slow velocity layer (USL) imaged atop the Cocos slab in recent studies along the MASE array is examined here using MASE, VEOX, and SSN waveforms to test if the USL ends along a lineament related to the potential slab tear. We observe changes in waveform complexity across the sharp transition in slab dip, which may indicate a possible tear in the South Cocos plate. We perform 1D and 2D waveform modeling in order to image the structure of the slab and overriding plate in this region. The tears could indicate a slab rollback mechanism in which separate slab segments move independently.

  20. The Continental Crust: A Geophysical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Nikolas I.

    Nearly 80 years ago, Yugoslavian seismologist Andrija Mohorovicic recognized, while studying a Balkan earthquake, that velocities of seismic waves increase abruptly at a few tens of kilometers depth , giving rise to the seismological definition of the crust. Since that discovery, many studies concerned with the nature of both the continental and oceanic crusts have appeared in the geophysical literature.Recently, interest in the continental crust has cascaded. This is largely because of an infusion of new data obtained from major reflection programs such as the Consortium for Continental Reflection Profiling (COCORP) and British Institutions Reflection Profiling Syndicate (BIRPS) and increased resolution of refraction studies. In addition, deep continental drilling programs are n ow in fashion. The Continental Crust: A Geophysical Approach is a summary of present knowledge of the continental crust. Meissner has succeeded in writing a book suited to many different readers, from the interested undergraduate to the professional. The book is well documented , with pertinent figures and a complete and up-to-date reference list.

  1. Relamination and the Differentiation of Continental Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, B. R.; Kelemen, P. B.; Behn, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    Most immature crust must be refined to attain the composition of mature continental crust. This refining may take the form of weathering, delamination, or relamination. Although delamination and relamination both call upon gravity-driven separation of felsic rock into the crust and mafic rock into the mantle, delamination involves foundering of rock from the base of active magmatic arcs, whereas relamination involves the underplating/diapirism of subducted sediment, arc crust, and continent crust to the base of the crust in any convergence zone. Relamination may be more efficient than lower crustal foundering at generating large volumes of material with the major- and trace-element composition of continental crust, and may have operated rapidly enough to have refined the composition of the entire continental crust over the lifetime of Earth. If so, felsic rocks could form much of the lower crust, and the bulk continental crust may be more silica rich than generally considered. Seismic wavespeeds require that only ~10-20% of the lowermost 5-15 km of continental crust must be mafic; combined heat-flow and wavespeed constraints permit continental lower crust to have 50 to 65 wt% SiO2.

  2. The rise and fall of continental arcs: Interplays between magmatism, uplift, weathering, and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Cin-Ty A.; Thurner, Sally; Paterson, Scott; Cao, Wenrong

    2015-09-01

    Continental arcs, such as the modern Andes or the Cretaceous Sierra Nevada batholith, are some of the highest topographic features on Earth. Continental arc volcanoes may produce more CO2 than most other types of volcanoes due to the interaction of magmas with sedimentary carbonates stored in the continental upper plate. As such, global flare-ups in continental arc magmatism may amplify atmospheric CO2 concentrations, leading to climatic warming. However, the high elevations of continental arcs may also enhance orographic precipitation and change global atmospheric circulation patterns, possibly increasing the efficiency of chemical weathering and drawdown of atmospheric CO2, which may subdue the climatic warming response to volcanic activity. To better evaluate the climatic response, we develop models that integrate magmatic crustal thickening, topographic uplift, isostasy and erosion. The topographic response is used to predict how soil formation rates, soil residence times, and chemical weathering rates vary during and after a magmatic episode. Although magmatism leads to crustal thickening, which requires topographic uplift, highest elevations peak ∼10 My after magmatism ends. Relatively high elevations, which enhance erosion and chemical weathering of the continental arc, persist for tens of million years after magmatism ends, depending on erosion kinetics. It has recently been suggested that the Cretaceous-Paleogene greenhouse (high atmospheric CO2 and warm climate) coincided with a global chain of continental arcs, whereas mid- to late Cenozoic icehouse conditions (low atmospheric CO2 and cold climate) coincided with a lull in continental arc activity after 50 Ma. Application of our models to the Sierra Nevada (California, USA) continental arc, which represents a segment of this global Cretaceous-Paleogene continental arc, reproduces the observed topographic and erosional response. Our models require that the newly formed continental arc crust remained

  3. Caribbean plate interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, M. )

    1993-02-01

    Vector analysis of plate motions, derived from studies of Atlantic magnetic lineations and fracture zone trends, indicates the following relative movements between the Caribbean, North American, and South American Plates. (1) During Early Jurassic to Early Cretaceous, the North American Plate moved 1900 km westward and 900 km northward relative to the South American Plate. A broad zone including the Caribbean region, i.e., the zone between the North and South America Plates, was a site of left-lateral shear and north-south extension. (2) During Early Cretaceous to Late Cretaceous, the North American Mate moved an additional 1200 km westward relative to South America across this zone. (3) During Late Cretaceous to the end of the Eocene, the North American Plate moved 200 km westward and 400 km northward relative to the South American Plate. (4) From the end of the Eocene to near the end of the Miocene, North America converged on South America some 200 km and moved 100 km eastward relative to it. Through the Mesozoic and earliest Tertiary history of the Caribbean, the region was a shear zone within which left-lateral displacement exceeded 3000 km and north-south extension exceeded 1300 km. In regard to time, 80% of the history of the Caribbean region is one of north-south extension and left-lateral shear. In terms of space, 97% of the shear is left-lateral and the ratio of divergence versus convergence is 7 to 1. Thus, characterizing the Caribbean region, and the Atlantic to its east, as a zone of north-south extension and left-lateral shear, is a fair generalization.

  4. North Sinai-Levant rift-transform continental margin

    SciTech Connect

    Ressetar, R.; Schamel, S.; Travis, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    The passive continental margin of northern Egypt and the Levant coast formed during the Early mesozoic as the relatively small Anatolia plate broke away from northern Africa. The oceanic basin of the eastern Mediterranean and the unusual right-angle bend in the North Sinai-Levant shelf margin are both products of plate separation along a rift-transform fracture system, the south arm of Tethys. The north-south trending Levant transform margin is considerably narrower than the east-west trending rift margin of northern Egypt. Both exhibit similar facies and depositional histories through the mid-Tertiary. Analysis of subsurface data and published reports of the regional stratigraphy point to a three-stage tectonic evolution of this passive margin. The Triassic through mid-Cretaceous was marked by crustal breakup followed by rapid rotational subsidence of the shelf margins about hinge lines located just south and east of the present shorelines. Reef carbonates localized on the shelf edge separated a deep marine basin to the north from a deltaic-shallow marine platform to the south and east. In the Late Cretaceous-Early Tertiary, inversion of earlier formed half-grabens produced broad anticlinal upwarps of the Syrian Arc on the shelf margin that locally influenced facies patterns. The episode of inversion corresponds with the onset of northward subduction of the Africa plate beneath southern Asia. Beginning in the Oligocene and continuing to the present, there has been renewed subsidence of the North Sinai shelf margin beneath thick, outward building clastic wedges. The source of this large volume of sediment is the updomed and erosionally stripped margins of the Suez-Red Sea Rift and the redirected Nile River.

  5. Using Plate Mapping to Examine Portion Size and Plate Composition for Large and Small Divided Plates

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, David E.; Sobal, Jeffery; Wansink, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Does the size of a plate influence the serving of all items equally, or does it influence the serving of some foods – such as meat versus starch versus vegetables – very differently? To examine this, we utilize a promising new plate mapping method where people drew a meal on a paper plate to examine sensitivity to small versus large three-compartment divided plates in portion size and meal composition in a sample of 109 university students. The total drawn meal area was 37% bigger on large plates than small plates, that is, the portion of plate coverage did not differ by plate size. Men and women drew bigger vegetable portions and men drew bigger meat portions on large plates when compared to small plates. These results suggest that men and women are differentially sensitive to plate size for overall meal size and for meal composition. Implications for decreasing portion size and improving meal balance are discussed. PMID:25280373

  6. Crustal and upper mantle structure of stable continental regions in North America and northern Europe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masse, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    From an analysis of many seismic profiles across the stable continental regions of North America and northern Europe, the crustal and upper mantle velocity structure is determined. Analysis procedures include ray theory calculations and synthetic seismograms computed using reflectivity techniques. The P wave velocity structure beneath the Canadian Shield is virtually identical to that beneath the Baltic Shield to a depth of at least 800 km. Two major layers with a total thickness of about 42 km characterize the crust of these shield regions. Features of the upper mantle of these region include velocity discontinuities at depths of about 74 km, 330 km, 430 km and 700 km. A 13 km thick P wave low velocity channel beginning at a depth of about 94 km is also present. A number of problems associated with record section interpretation are identified and a generalized approach to seismic profile analysis using many record sections is described. The S wave velocity structure beneath the Canadian Shield is derived from constrained surface wave data. The thickness of the lithosphere beneath the Canadian and Baltic Shields is determined to be 95-100 km. The continental plate thickness may be the same as the lithospheric thickness, although available data do not exclude the possibility of the continental plate being thicker than the lithosphere. ?? 1987 Birkha??user Verlag.

  7. Active NE-SW Compressional Strain Within the Arabian Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floyd, M. A.; ArRajehi, A.; King, R. W.; McClusky, S.; Reilinger, R. E.; Douad, M.; Sholan, J.; Bou-Rabee, F.

    2012-12-01

    Motion of the Arabian plate with respect to Eurasia has been remarkably steady over more than 25 Myr as revealed by comparison of geodetic and plate tectonic reconstructions (e.g., McQuarrie et al., 2003, GRL; ArRajehi et al., 2010, Tectonics). While internal plate deformation is small in comparison to the rate of Arabia-Eurasia convergence, the improved resolution of GPS observations indicate ~ NE-SW compressional strain that appears to affect much of the plate south of latitude ~ 30°N. Seven ~ NE-SW oriented inter-station baselines all indicated shortening at rates in the range of 0.5-2 mm/yr, for the most part with 1-sigma velocity uncertainties < 0.4 mm/yr. Plate-scale strain rates exceed 2×10-9/yr. The spatial distribution of strain can not be resolved from the sparse available data, but strain appears to extend at least to Riyadh, KSA, ~ 600 km west of the Zagros Fold and Thrust Belt that forms the eastern, collisional boundary of the Arabian plate with Eurasia (Iran). Geodetic velocities in the plate tectonic reference frame for Arabia, derived from magnetic anomalies in the Red Sea (Chu and Gordon, 1998, GJI), show no significant E-W motion for GPS stations located along the Red Sea coast (i.e., geodetic and plate tectonic spreading rates across the Red Sea agree within their resolution), in contrast to sites in the plate interior and along the east side of the plate that indicate east-directed motions. In addition, NE-SW contraction is roughly normal to ~ N-S striking major structural folds in the sedimentary rocks within the Arabian Platform. These relationships suggest that geodetically observed contraction has characterized the plate for at least the past ~ 3 Myr. Broad-scale contraction of the Arabian plate seems intuitively reasonable given that the east and north sides of the plate are dominated by active continental collision (Zagros, E Turkey/Caucasus) while the west and south sides are bordered by mid-ocean ridge spreading (Red Sea and Gulf of

  8. Cadmium plating replacements

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, M.J.; Groshart, E.C.

    1995-03-01

    The Boeing Company has been searching for replacements to cadmium plate. Two alloy plating systems seem close to meeting the needs of a cadmium replacement. The two alloys, zinc-nickel and tin-zinc are from alloy plating baths; both baths are neutral pH. The alloys meet the requirements for salt fog corrosion resistance, and both alloys excel as a paint base. Currently, tests are being performed on standard fasteners to compare zinc-nickel and tin-zinc on threaded hardware where cadmium is heavily used. The Hydrogen embrittlement propensity of the zinc-nickel bath has been tested, and just beginning for the tin-zinc bath. Another area of interest is the electrical properties on aluminum for tin-zinc and will be discussed. The zinc-nickel alloy plating bath is in production in Boeing Commercial Airplane Group for non-critical low strength steels. The outlook is promising that these two coatings will help The Boeing Company significantly reduce its dependence on cadmium plating.

  9. Cadmium plating replacements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Mary J.; Groshart, Earl C.

    1995-01-01

    The Boeing Company has been searching for replacements to cadmium plate. Two alloy plating systems seem close to meeting the needs of a cadmium replacement. The two alloys, zinc-nickel and tin-zinc are from alloy plating baths; both baths are neutral pH. The alloys meet the requirements for salt fog corrosion resistance, and both alloys excel as a paint base. Currently, tests are being performed on standard fasteners to compare zinc-nickel and tin-zinc on threaded hardware where cadmium is heavily used. The Hydrogen embrittlement propensity of the zinc-nickel bath has been tested, and just beginning for the tin-zinc bath. Another area of interest is the electrical properties on aluminum for tin-zinc and will be discussed. The zinc-nickel alloy plating bath is in production in Boeing Commercial Airplane Group for non-critical low strength steels. The outlook is promising that these two coatings will help The Boeing Company significantly reduce its dependence on cadmium plating.

  10. Hyper-extended continental crust deformation in the light of Coulomb critical wedge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirrengarten, Michael; Manatschal, Gianreto; Yuan, Xiaoping; Kusznir, Nick; Maillot, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    The rocks forming the wedge shape termination of hyper-extended continental crust are deformed in the frictional field during the last stage of continental rifting due to cooling and hydration. Seismic interpretation and field evidence show that the basal boundary of the wedge is a low frictional décollement level. The wedge shape, the frictional deformation and the basal décollement correspond to the requirements of the critical Coulomb wedge (CCW) theory which describes the stability limit of a frictional wedge over a décollement. In a simple shear separation model the upper-plate margin (in the hangingwall of the detachment fault) corresponds to a tectonic extensional wedge whereas the lower plate (in the footwall of the detachment fault) is a gravitational wedge. This major difference causes the asymmetry of conjugate hyper-extended rifted margins. We measure a dataset of upper and lower hyper-extended wedge and compare it to the stability envelope of the CCW theory for serpentine and clay friction. We find a good fit by adjusting fluid pressure. The main results of our analysis are that the crustal wedges of lower plate margins are close to the critical shape, which explains their low variability whereas upper plate wedges can be critical, sub- or sup- critical due to the detachment evolution during rifting. On the upper plate side, according to the Coulomb tectonic extensional wedge, faults should be oriented toward the continent. Observations showed some continentward faults in the termination of the continental crust but there are also oceanward faults. This can be explained by two processes, first continentward faults are created only over the detachment, therefore if part of the hyper-extended upper plate crust is not directly over the detachment it will not be part of the wedge. Secondly the tip block of the wedge can be detached creating an extensional allochthon induced by the flattening of the detachment near the surface, therefore continentward

  11. Paleozoic plate-tectonic evolution of the Tarim and western Tianshan regions, western China

    SciTech Connect

    Yangshen, S.; Huafu, L.; Dong, J.

    1994-11-01

    The plate-tectonic evolution of the Tarim basin and nearby western Tianshan region during Paleozoic time is reconstructed in an effort to further constrain the tectonic evolution of Central Asia, providing insights into the formation and distribution of oil and gas resources. The Tarim plate developed from continental rifting that progressed during early Paleozoic time into a passive continental margin. The Yili terrane (central Tianshan) broke away from the present eastern part of Tarim and became a microcontinent located somewhere between the Junggar ocean and the southern Tianshan ocean. The southern Tianshan ocean, between the Tarim craton and the Yili terrane, was subducting beneath the Yili terrane from Silurian to Devonian time. During the Late Devonian-Early Carboniferous, the Tarim plate collided with the Yili terrane by sinistral accretional docking that resulted in a late Paleozoic deformational episode. Intracontinental shortening (A-type subduction) continued through the Permian with the creation of a magmatic belt. 21 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Tectonic implications of post-30 Ma Pacific and North American relative plate motions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohannon, R.G.; Parsons, T.

    1995-01-01

    The Pacific plate moved northwest relative to North America since 42 Ma. The rapid half rate of Pacific-Farallon spreading allowed the ridge to approach the continent at about 29 Ma. Extinct spreading ridges that occur offshore along 65% of the margin document that fragments of the subducted Farallon slab became captured by the Pacific plate and assumed its motion proper to the actual subduction of the spreading ridge. This plate-capture process can be used to explain much of the post-29 Ma Cordilleran North America extension, strike slip, and the inland jump of oceanic spreading in the Gulf of California. Much of the post-29 Ma continental tectonism is the result of the strong traction imposed on the deep part of the continental crust by the gently inclined slab of subducted oceanic lithosphere as it moved to the northwest relative to the overlying continent. -from Authors

  13. Geometries of hyperextended continental crust in northeastern continental brazilian margin: insights from potential field and seismic interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magalhães, José; Barbosa, José; Ribeiro, Vanessa; Oliveira, Jefferson; Filho, Osvaldo; Buarque, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    The study region encompasses a set of three basins located at Northeast Brazilian continental margin: Pernambuco (south sector), Paraíba and Natal platform (north sector). These basins were formed during the last stage of separation between South America and African plates during Cretaceous. The continental breakup in these regions occurred probably during the Middle-Upper Albian (~102 m.y). The adjacent basement rocks belong to Borborema Province (BP), which was formed due a complex superposition between Pre-Cambrian orogenic cycles. The structural framework of BP is dominated by large shear zones that divided this province in three main tectonic domains: South, Central and North. The Pernambuco Basin is located in the South Domain and the Paraíba and Natal platform basins are related to the Central Domain. The tectonic and magmatic evolution of the Pernambuco Basin was influenced by oblique rifting (~ 35° to rift axis) and a thermal anomaly probably caused by the Santa Helena hotspot. The north sector represents a continental shelf characterized by basement high with a narrow platform and an abrupt shelf break on transition to the abyssal plain. The continental platform break of this sector was parallel to the rift axis. In this way, we present a regional structural interpretation of these sectors of Brazilian rifted margin based on interpretation and 2D forward modeling of potential field and 2D seismic data. The magnetic maps (Reduction to magnetic pole and Analytic signal) revealed the influence of an alternating pattern of large narrow magnetic and non-magnetic lineaments, oriented NE-SW, E-W and NW-SE. In the Pernambuco Basin these lineaments (NE-SW and E-W) are related to shear zones in the hyperextended basement which is interpreted as a continuation of the granitic-gneissic and metasedimentary rocks of the South Domain of BP. The Paraíba and Natal platform basins show a slight change in the orientation of structures trending E-W (shear zones in

  14. Interaction between subducting plates: results from numerical and analogue modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiraly, Agnes; Capitanio, Fabio A.; Funiciello, Francesca; Faccenna, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    The tectonic setting of the Alpine-Mediterranean area is achieved during the late Cenozoic subduction, collision and suturing of several oceanic fragments and continental blocks. In this stage, processes such as interactions among subducting slabs, slab migrations and related mantle flow played a relevant role on the resulting tectonics. Here, we use numerical models to first address the mantle flow characteristic in 3D. During the subduction of a single plate the strength of the return flow strongly depends on the slab pull force, that is on the plate's buoyancy, however the physical properties of the slab, such as density, viscosity or width, do not affect largely the morphology of the toroidal cell. Instead, dramatic effects on the geometry and the dynamics of the toroidal cell result in models where the thickness of the mantle is varied. The vertical component of the vorticity vector is used to define the characteristic size of the toroidal cell, which is ~1.2-1.3 times the mantle depth. This latter defines the range of viscous stress propagation through the mantle and consequent interactions with other slabs. We thus further investigate on this setup where two separate lithospheric plates subduct in opposite sense, developing opposite polarities and convergent slab retreat, and model different initial sideways distance between the plates. The stress profiles in time illustrate that the plates interacts when slabs are at the characteristic distance and the two slabs toroidal cells merge. Increased stress and delayed slab migrations are the results. Analogue models of double-sided subduction show similar maximum distance and allow testing the additional role of stress propagated through the plates. We use a silicon plate subducting on its two opposite margins, which is either homogeneous or comprises oceanic and continental lithospheres, differing in buoyancy. The modeling results show that the double-sided subduction is strongly affected by changes in plate

  15. Seismological constraints on the crustal structures generated by continental rejuvenation in northeastern China

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Tian-Yu; He, Yu-Mei; Yang, Jin-Hui; Zhao, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Crustal rejuvenation is a key process that has shaped the characteristics of current continental structures and components in tectonic active continental regions. Geological and geochemical observations have provided insights into crustal rejuvenation, although the crustal structural fabrics have not been well constrained. Here, we present a seismic image across the North China Craton (NCC) and Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) using a velocity structure imaging technique for receiver functions from a dense array. The crustal evolution of the eastern NCC was delineated during the Mesozoic by a dominant low seismic wave velocity with velocity inversion, a relatively shallow Moho discontinuity, and a Moho offset beneath the Tanlu Fault Zone. The imaged structures and geochemical evidence, including changes in the components and ages of continental crusts and significant continental crustal growth during the Mesozoic, provide insight into the rejuvenation processes of the evolving crust in the eastern NCC caused by structural, magmatic and metamorphic processes in an extensional setting. The fossil structural fabric of the convergent boundary in the eastern CAOB indicates that the back-arc action of the Paleo-Pacific Plate subduction did not reach the hinterland of Asia. PMID:26443323

  16. Stratigraphy and tectonic significance of Lower Paleozoic continental margin strata in northeastern Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Moira T.; Gehrels, George E.

    1992-06-01

    Lower Paleozoic eugeoclinal strata in the Kootenay Arc in northeastern Washington and southeastern British Columbia are transitional between autochthonous lower Paleozoic miogeoclinal strata and outboard volcanic arc terranes of uncertain paleogeographic affinity. They provide a record of lower Paleozoic continental margin depositional and tectonic processes oceanward of the continental shelf. The southernmost stratigraphic unit, the Covada Group, is divided into two formations, the Daisy Formation, a mid fan sequence of arkosic and subarkosic wacke and arenite, and the Early Ordovician Butcher Mountain Formation, consisting of alkalic(?) pillow basalt and tuff of within-plate affinity. Another unit, formerly part of the Covada Group, is excluded and informally named the Bradeen Hill assemblage. It contains chert, chert-quartz arenite, quartz arenite, chert pebble conglomerate, shale, and basalt, and may be Ordovician to Devonian on the basis of stratigraphic evidence and regional correlations. The Covada Group and Bradeen Hill assemblage record (1) deposition of continentally derived sediments in a submarine fan setting, (2) relatively quiescent starved basin conditions, (3) local faulting; and (4) intermittent periods of volcanism, perhaps reflecting local extension. They can be correlated with other stratigraphic units in the Kootenay Arc and resemble units as far north as the Selwyn basin in northern Canada and as far south as the Roberts Mountains allochthon in central Nevada. This unites the stratigraphic record and implies a high degree of synchroneity of tectonic events along over 2500 km of the outer continental margin during early Paleozoic time.

  17. Seismological constraints on the crustal structures generated by continental rejuvenation in northeastern China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Tian-Yu; He, Yu-Mei; Yang, Jin-Hui; Zhao, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Crustal rejuvenation is a key process that has shaped the characteristics of current continental structures and components in tectonic active continental regions. Geological and geochemical observations have provided insights into crustal rejuvenation, although the crustal structural fabrics have not been well constrained. Here, we present a seismic image across the North China Craton (NCC) and Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) using a velocity structure imaging technique for receiver functions from a dense array. The crustal evolution of the eastern NCC was delineated during the Mesozoic by a dominant low seismic wave velocity with velocity inversion, a relatively shallow Moho discontinuity, and a Moho offset beneath the Tanlu Fault Zone. The imaged structures and geochemical evidence, including changes in the components and ages of continental crusts and significant continental crustal growth during the Mesozoic, provide insight into the rejuvenation processes of the evolving crust in the eastern NCC caused by structural, magmatic and metamorphic processes in an extensional setting. The fossil structural fabric of the convergent boundary in the eastern CAOB indicates that the back-arc action of the Paleo-Pacific Plate subduction did not reach the hinterland of Asia. PMID:26443323

  18. The possible subduction of continental material to depths greater than 200 km.

    PubMed

    Ye, K; Cong, B; Ye, D

    2000-10-12

    Determining the depth to which continental lithosphere can be subducted into the mantle at convergent plate boundaries is of importance for understanding the long-term growth of supercontinents as well as the dynamic processes that shape such margins. Recent discoveries of coesite and diamond in regional ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphic rocks has demonstrated that continental material can be subducted to depths of at least 120 km (ref. 1), and subduction to depths of 150-300 km has been inferred from garnet peridotites in orogenic UHP belts based on several indirect observations. But continental subduction to such depths is difficult to trace directly in natural UHP metamorphic crustal rocks by conventional mineralogical and petrological methods because of extensive late-stage recrystallization and the lack of a suitable pressure indicator. It has been predicted from experimental work, however, that solid-state dissolution of pyroxene should occur in garnet at depths greater than 150 km (refs 6-8). Here we report the observation of high concentrations of clinopyroxene, rutile and apatite exsolutions in garnet within eclogites from Yangkou in the Sulu UHP metamorphic belt, China. We interpret these data as resulting from the high-pressure formation of pyroxene solid solutions in subducted continental material. Appropriate conditions for the Na2O concentrations and octahedral silicon observed in these samples are met at depths greater than 200 km. PMID:11048717

  19. Bipolar battery plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlette, John J. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A liquid-impermeable plate (10) having through-plate conductivity with essentially zero resistance comprises an insulator sheet (12) having a series of spaced perforations (14) each of which contains a metal element (16) sealingly received into the perforation (14). A low-cost plate can readily be manufactured by punching a thermoplastic sheet (40) such as polypropylene with a punching tool (52), filling the apertures with led spheres (63) having a diameter smaller than the holes (50) but larger than the thickness of the sheet, sweeping excess spheres (62) off the sheet with a doctor blade (60) and then pressing a heated platen (74) onto the sheet to swage the spheres into a cylindrical shape and melt the surrounding resin to form a liquid-impermeable collar (4) sealing the metal into the sheet.

  20. Nitrided Metallic Bipolar Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Tortorelli, Peter F; Pihl, Josh A; Toops, Todd J; More, Karren Leslie; Meyer III, Harry M; Vitek, John Michael; Wang, Heli; Turner, John; Wilson, Mahlon; Garzon, Fernando; Rockward, Tommy; Connors, Dan; Rakowski, Jim; Gervasio, Don

    2008-01-01

    The objectives are: (1) Develop and optimize stainless steel alloys amenable to formation of a protective Cr-nitride surface by gas nitridation, at a sufficiently low cost to meet DOE targets and with sufficient ductility to permit manufacture by stamping. (2) Demonstrate capability of nitridation to yield high-quality stainless steel bipolar plates from thin stamped alloy foils (no significant stamped foil warping or embrittlement). (3) Demonstrate single-cell fuel cell performance of stamped and nitrided alloy foils equivalent to that of machined graphite plates of the same flow-field design ({approx}750-1,000 h, cyclic conditions, to include quantification of metal ion contamination of the membrane electrode assembly [MEA] and contact resistance increase attributable to the bipolar plates). (4) Demonstrate potential for adoption in automotive fuel cell stacks. Thin stamped metallic bipolar plates offer the potential for (1) significantly lower cost than currently-used machined graphite bipolar plates, (2) reduced weight/volume, and (3) better performance and amenability to high volume manufacture than developmental polymer/carbon fiber and graphite composite bipolar plates. However, most metals exhibit inadequate corrosion resistance in proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) environments. This behavior leads to high electrical resistance due to the formation of surface oxides and/or contamination of the MEA by metallic ions, both of which can significantly degrade fuel cell performance. Metal nitrides offer electrical conductivities up to an order of magnitude greater than that of graphite and are highly corrosion resistant. Unfortunately, most conventional coating methods (for metal nitrides) are too expensive for PEMFC stack commercialization or tend to leave pinhole defects, which result in accelerated local corrosion and unacceptable performance.

  1. A lithospheric seismic profile across northern Taiwan, from arc-continental collision to extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Avendonk, H. J.; McIntosh, K. D.; Lavier, L. L.; Wu, F. T.; Okaya, D. A.; Kuochen, H.

    2012-12-01

    Taiwan is one of a few locations where a subduction zone is transitioning to arc-continent collision. The north-south trending Luzon arc, which is built on the Philippine Sea Plate, has been overriding the Eurasian margin here since the Late Miocene. Shortening of the Eurasian margin lead to the formation of the Taiwan mountain belt. The plate boundary is quite complicated in northeastern Taiwan, because the Philippine Sea Plate also subducts beneath the Eurasian plate along the east-west trending Ryukyu trench. Since the Pleistocene, backarc extension behind the Ryukyu arc in the Okinawa Trough has propagated into the Ilan Plain, a region that previously experienced shortening during collision with the Luzon arc. The deep structure of northern Taiwan can therefore give us insight in the evolution of the orogen from compression to post-collisional collapse. During the 2008 and 2009 field seasons of the TAIGER project we acquired active-source and earthquake seismic data in Taiwan and surrounding oceans to better understand the different stages of arc-continent collision. On the island of Taiwan, explosion seismic, onshore-offshore and marine seismic data constrain the crustal structure along three large east-west transects across the plate boundary. In the north, TAIGER transect T6 spans a distance of 360 km from the Taiwan Strait eastward across the Hsuehshan Range and the Central Range, and onto the Ryukyu forearc. Marine seismic data were shot with the R/V Marcus Langseth in the Taiwan Strait and east of Taiwan. Twelve ocean-bottom seismometers from National Taiwan Ocean University (NTOU) recorded seismic refractions offshore, and land-seismic stations from IRIS/PASSCAL recorded airgun shots from the Langseth and 4 large land seismic explosions. These different types of active-source data together provide good spatial coverage for imaging seismic velocity structure across the orogen and the plate boundary. The seismic refraction data include crustal turning

  2. Active upper plate thrust faulting in regions of low plate interface coupling, repeated slow slip events, and coastal uplift: Example from the Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountjoy, Joshu J.; Barnes, Philip M.

    2011-01-01

    Contractional fore-arc faulting and deformation is a characteristic feature of many subduction systems. Definition of the three-dimensional geometry and displacement rates of active, upper plate, out-of-sequence thrust faults along ˜250 km of the upper Hikurangi Margin enables us to examine the relationship between fore-arc deformation and the subduction interface in light of interseismic coupling estimates and distribution of slow slip events, both modeled from GPS measurements. These mid-fore-arc structures include the seaward vergent, outer shelf Lachlan and Ariel faults, with vertical separation rates up to 5 mm/yr, and several other major inner shelf faults with rates that are up to 3.8 mm/yr and comparable with Holocene coastal uplift rates. Seismic reflection imaging and geometric projection of these faults at depth indicate that they splay from the region of the plate interface where geodetic inversions for interseismic coupling and slow slip events suggest that the plate boundary undergoes aseismic slip. This observation may indicate either (1) that frictional properties and interseismic coupling on the plate interface are independent and unrelated to the active splay fault deformation in the inner-middle fore arc or (2) that the active splay faulting reflects long-term mechanical coupling related to higher shear stress, or the relative yield strength of the plate interface to the overriding plate, and that the current pattern of interseismic coupling may not be persistent over geological time scales of 20 ka. We compare structure and processes on the northern Hikurangi and Costa Rican margins and find similarities and significant differences astride these subduction systems.

  3. Reduced Plating Ignitron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A (Inventor); Pearson, J Boise (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An ignitron apparatus has an airtight tubular housing having a first sealed end and a second sealed end. An anode is connected at the first sealed end, projecting into the housing, and a recess at the second sealed and forms a well which contains a quantity of liquid gallium or gallium alloy making up the cathode. An ignitor projects through the liquid metal and into the housing. The inner surface of the housing includes at least one plating-reduction structure to prevent electrical shorting of the apparatus caused by plating of the liquid metal.

  4. NICKEL PLATING PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Hoover, T.B.; Zava, T.E.

    1959-05-12

    A simplified process is presented for plating nickel by the vapor decomposition of nickel carbonyl. In a preferred form of the invention a solid surface is nickel plated by subjecting the surface to contact with a mixture containing by volume approximately 20% nickel carbonyl vapor, 2% hydrogen sulfide and .l% water vapor or 1% oxygen and the remainder carbon dioxide at room temperature until the desired thickness of nickel is obtained. The advantage of this composition over others is that the normally explosive nickel carbonyl is greatly stabilized.

  5. Crust formation and plate motion in the early archean.

    PubMed

    Kröner, A; Layer, P W

    1992-06-01

    Mounting evidence for voluminous continental crust formation in the early Archean involving intracrustal melting and selective preservation of granitoid rocks suggests that initial crust formation crust formation and growth were predominantly by magmatic underplating in plumegenerated Iceland-type settings. Collision of these early islands to give rise to larger blocks is suggested by extensive horizontal shortening in both supracrustal and granitoid assemblages. Preservation of early Archean high-grade gneisses that were once at depths of 20 to 30 kilometers implies that these blocks developed thick, subcrustal roots despite high mantle heat flow. Rigid continental plates must have existed since at least 3.5 billion years ago, and greenstone belts (composed of mixed metavolcanic and metasedimentary sequences intruded by granitoid plutons) probably developed on or near these microcontinents. Paleomagnetic data with good age control from at least one ancient craton suggest that plate motion was at normal minimum average velocities of about 17 millimeters per year with respect to the poles during the period 3.5 billion to 2.4 billion years ago. If this is true on a global scale, Archean plate motion was not faster than in later geologic times. PMID:17791608

  6. The basins on the Argentine continental margin

    SciTech Connect

    Urien, C.M.

    1996-08-01

    After the stabilization of the central Gondwana Craton, orogenic belts were accreted, as a result of convergence events and an extensive passive margin developed in southwestern Gondwana. Thermal subsidence in Parana, Karoo-Ventania basins and the Late Paleozoic-Early Mesozoic rifts, were modified by the Gondwana breakup and the South Atlantic opening. Early Paleozoic marine transgressions deposited the Table Mountain Group in Ventania. In southwestern Patagonia foreland clastics were deposited. Magmatic arcs and marine units indicate a tectonic trough was formed, alternating with continental sequences, over Late Paleozoic metamorphics and intrusives, resulting from plastered terrains along the Gondwana margin. In Patagonia, Permo-Carboniferous continental and glacio marine clastics infill the basins, while in Ventania, paralic sequences, grade from neritic to continental to the northeast, extending beneath the continental margin. The Triassic-Jurassic rift basins progressed onto regional widespread acid lavas and were infilled by lagoonal organic-rich sequences. Early drift phase built basins transverse to the margin, with fluvio-lacustrine sequences: Salado, Colorado, Valdes-Rawson, San Julian and North Malvinas intracratonic basins, which underwent transtensional faulting. Post-Oxfordian to Neocomian brackish sequences, onlapped the conjugate basins during the margin`s drift, with petroleum systems, as in Austral and Malvinas. In the Valanginian, basic extrusions commenced to form on the continental border, heralding the oceanic phase. Due to thermal subsidence, offlaping sediments prograded onto the remaining half-grabens. Several petroleum systems, proven and hypothetical, are identified in this region.

  7. Plate convergence, transcurrent faults and internal deformation adjacent to Southeast Asia and the western Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitch, T. J.

    1971-01-01

    A model for oblique convergence between plates of lithosphere is proposed in which at least a fraction of slip parallel to the plate margin results in transcurrent movements on a nearly vertical fault which is located on the continental side of a zone of plate consumption. In an extreme case of complete decoupling only the component of slip normal to the plate margin can be inferred from underthrusting. Recent movements in the western Sunda region provide the most convincing evidence for decoupling of slip, which in this region is thought to be oblique to the plate margin. A speculative model for convergence along the margins of the Philippine Sea is constructed from an inferred direction of oblique slip in the Philippine region. This model requires that the triple point formed by the junction of the Japanese and Izu-Bonin trenches and the Nankai trough migrate along the Sagami trough.

  8. Magmatic expression of lithospheric thinning across continental rifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, R. N.; Gibson, S. A.

    1994-05-01

    Studies of magmatism associated with continental rifting have traditionally focused only on volcanism within the downfaulted axial zone and along its immediate flanks. Teleseismic travel-time delay studies during the last decade have confirmed the results of earlier gravity surveys of rifted areas, showing that thinning at the base of the continental lithosphere occurs throughout a zone up to about 10 times wider than the physiographic expression of the rift. It is, therefore, logical to consider rifting-related magmatism on the same scale. Potential sources of mafic magmas in rift zones are the thinned subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM), the convecting mantle beneath the continental plate and mixtures of the two. Detailed elemental and radiogenic isotope geochemical studies show that, during the initial extension of continental rifts, the associated mafic magmatism tends to be: (1) relatively sodic and from predominantly convecting mantle sources at the rift axis; (2) relatively potassic and from predominantly lithospheric mantle sources at the margins of the thinned-plate zone. This underlying geochemical pattern is obscured in many instances by such processes as crustal contamination and magma mixing within open-system reservoirs. The mafic ultrapotassic component that provides a distinctive input to SCLM-source magmas appears to be largely fusible at temperatures well below the dry solidus of SCLM; so that, in some cases, prolonged magmatism at a site causes removal of most or all of the potassic lithosphere-source melt (as mafic ultrapotassic magmas or as a contribution to mixed-source melts) without destruction of that lithosphere segment as a geophysically defined unit. Such a zone of refractory lithosphere permits subsequent, recognisable, convecting mantle source melts to penetrate it and reach the surface. These principles are illustrated by discussion of the Neogene-Quaternary magmatism of the Rio Grande, East African, Rhine and Baikal rifts, in

  9. Dynamic Linkages Between the Transition Zone & Surface Plate Motion in 2D Models of Subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arredondo, K.; Billen, M. I.

    2014-12-01

    Subduction zones exhibit a wide range of behavior, from slab stagnation at 660 km to direct penetration into the lower mantle. Due to uncertainties in the tectonic history of individual subduction zones, such as trench velocities, potential mechanisms for controlling slab behavior in the transition zone are explored using numerical models. Numerical simulations have utilized a range of assumptions to improve computational efficiency, such as ignoring latent heat, ignoring compositional effects or fixing the trench location: the net effect of these assumptions resulting modeled dynamics remains unclear. Additionally the eight major, composition-dependent, phase transitions for pyrolite, harzburgite and eclogite may be an important influence on subducting slab dynamics due to the additional forces that are dependent on depth and compositional layering within the slab (e.g., Ricard et al., 2005). With the goal of developing more complete, self-consistent, and less idealized simulations, we test the importance of various factors on slab behavior: the presence of shear, adiabatic and latent heating, compositional layering, composition-dependent phase transitions and explicit plate speeds versus dynamically evolving plate and trench velocities. Preliminary results indicate that individual components have a relatively minor effect, but produce large changes when combined together. The extent of slab folding and stagnation is overestimated by only modeling the 410 and 660 km phase transitions. Dynamic models with all seven composition-dependent phase transitions are very sensitive to the plate strength and weak zone viscosity, causing large changes in plate speed and slab detachment. Changes to the overriding plate buoyance and strength investigate the origin and influence of trench movement on slab deformation. These feedbacks and parameter-sensitive behavior indicate that the wide range of observed slab behavior may result from subtle differences in plate and plate

  10. A change in the geodynamics of continental growth 3 billion years ago.

    PubMed

    Dhuime, Bruno; Hawkesworth, Chris J; Cawood, Peter A; Storey, Craig D

    2012-03-16

    Models for the growth of continental crust rely on knowing the balance between the generation of new crust and the reworking of old crust throughout Earth's history. The oxygen isotopic composition of zircons, for which uranium-lead and hafnium isotopic data provide age constraints, is a key archive of crustal reworking. We identified systematic variations in hafnium and oxygen isotopes in zircons of different ages that reveal the relative proportions of reworked crust and of new crust through time. Growth of continental crust appears to have been a continuous process, albeit at variable rates. A marked decrease in the rate of crustal growth at ~3 billion years ago may be linked to the onset of subduction-driven plate tectonics. PMID:22422979

  11. Strain accommodation by slow slip and dyking in a youthful continental rift, East Africa.

    PubMed

    Calais, Eric; d'Oreye, Nicolas; Albaric, Julie; Deschamps, Anne; Delvaux, Damien; Déverchère, Jacques; Ebinger, Cynthia; Ferdinand, Richard W; Kervyn, François; Macheyeki, Athanas S; Oyen, Anneleen; Perrot, Julie; Saria, Elifuraha; Smets, Benoît; Stamps, D Sarah; Wauthier, Christelle

    2008-12-11

    Continental rifts begin and develop through repeated episodes of faulting and magmatism, but strain partitioning between faulting and magmatism during discrete rifting episodes remains poorly documented. In highly evolved rifts, tensile stresses from far-field plate motions accumulate over decades before being released during relatively short time intervals by faulting and magmatic intrusions. These rifting crises are rarely observed in thick lithosphere during the initial stages of rifting. Here we show that most of the strain during the July-August 2007 seismic crisis in the weakly extended Natron rift, Tanzania, was released aseismically. Deformation was achieved by slow slip on a normal fault that promoted subsequent dyke intrusion by stress unclamping. This event provides compelling evidence for strain accommodation by magma intrusion, in addition to slip along normal faults, during the initial stages of continental rifting and before significant crustal thinning. PMID:19079058

  12. Two opposed subduction modes at the southern Caribbean plate margin of Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammer, Andreas; Piraquive, Alejandro

    2014-05-01

    Cretaceous to Paleogene convergence at the southern Caribbean plate margin is still little deciphered and a generalized interpretation is hindered by the absence of regionally correlatable tectonic elements, like magmatic arcs, time constraints and an intense crustal fragmentation brought about by Neogene strike-slip tectonics. In order to illustrate the diversity of these subduction settings and discuss possible tectonic controls on their subsequent collisional evolution, we outline the structural evolution along a thickened and a thinned continental segment. The first case is exemplified by the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, a triangular block that exposes an imbricated lower crustal section capped by nested plutons and a volcanic sequence of a Jurassic to Early Cretaceous arc. This exceptionally thick crustal section forms the upper plate of a continent-ward dipping main suture that is underlain by strongly sheared platform sediments and transitional basement rocks of a lower plate. Penetrative deformation developed under medium-grade conditions with a uniform top-to-the NE shear attests to a stable subduction interval of a still unknown duration. Onset of a collisional phase is marked by a crustal imbrication further inboard of the main suture, leading to a further crustal thickening, and links in the Paleogene to the emplacement of the dome-like Santa Marta batholith within the lower plate. It is likely that the juxtaposition of thickened continental Southamerican and thinner oceanic Caribbean crust triggered a crustal channel flow that fed the magmatic dome in the transitional part of these crustal realms, leading thus to some gravitational collapse of the continental crust. The opposite case of the juxtaposition of a continental platform, previously thinned by Jurassic to Early Cretaceous rifting and a relatively thick Caribbean crust is documented in the northwestern Guajira Peninsula. Here platform sequences and their corresponding basement were subducted

  13. Nuclear reactor alignment plate configuration

    DOEpatents

    Altman, David A; Forsyth, David R; Smith, Richard E; Singleton, Norman R

    2014-01-28

    An alignment plate that is attached to a core barrel of a pressurized water reactor and fits within slots within a top plate of a lower core shroud and upper core plate to maintain lateral alignment of the reactor internals. The alignment plate is connected to the core barrel through two vertically-spaced dowel pins that extend from the outside surface of the core barrel through a reinforcement pad and into corresponding holes in the alignment plate. Additionally, threaded fasteners are inserted around the perimeter of the reinforcement pad and into the alignment plate to further secure the alignment plate to the core barrel. A fillet weld also is deposited around the perimeter of the reinforcement pad. To accomodate thermal growth between the alignment plate and the core barrel, a gap is left above, below and at both sides of one of the dowel pins in the alignment plate holes through with the dowel pins pass.

  14. Growth Plate Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... or crushed, the growth plate may close prematurely, forming a bony bridge or “bar.” The risk of ... this publication: James S. Panagis, M.D., M.P.H., NIAMS/NIH; R. Tracy Ballock, M.D., Case ...

  15. INL HIP Plate Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    B. H. Park; C. R. Clark; J. F. Jue

    2010-02-01

    This document outlines the process used to bond monolithic fuel plates by Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP). This method was developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program. These foils have been used in a number of irradiation experiments in support of the United States Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) program.

  16. Unitary plate electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlette, John J. (Inventor); Clough, Thomas J. (Inventor); Josefowicz, Jack Y. (Inventor); Sibert, John W. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    The unitary electrode (10) comprises a porous sheet (12) of fiberglass the strands (14) of which contain a coating (16) of conductive tin oxide. The lower portion of the sheet contains a layer (18) of resin and the upper layer (20) contains lead dioxide forming a positive active electrode on an electrolyte-impervious layer. The strands (14) form a continuous conduction path through both layers (16, 18). Tin oxide is prevented from reduction by coating the surface of the plate facing the negative electrode with a conductive, impervious layer resistant to reduction such as a thin film (130) of lead or graphite filled resin adhered to the plate with a layer (31) of conductive adhesive. The plate (10) can be formed by casting a molten resin from kettle (60) onto a sheet of glass wool (56) overlying a sheet of lead foil and then applying positive active paste from hopper (64) into the upper layer (68). The plate can also be formed by passing an assembly of a sheet ( 80) of resin, a sheet (86) of sintered glass and a sheet (90) of lead between the nip (92) of heated rollers (93, 95) and then filling lead oxide into the pores (116) of the upper layer (118).

  17. Tectonic evolution of Brazilian equatorial continental margin basins

    SciTech Connect

    Azevedo, R.P. )

    1993-02-01

    The structural style and stratigraphic relationships of sedimentary basins along the Brazilian Equatorial Atlantic Continental Margin were used to construct an empirical tectonic model for the development of ancient transform margins. The model is constrained by detailed structural and subsidence analyses of several basins along the margin. The structural framework of the basins was defined at shallow and deep levels by the integration of many geophysical and geological data sets. The Barreirinhas and Para-Maranhao Basins were divided in three tectonic domains: the Tutoia, Caete, and Tromai subbasins. The Caete area is characterized by northwest-southeast striking and northeast-dipping normal faults. A pure shear mechanism of basin formation is suggested for its development. The structure of the Tutoia and Tromai subbasins are more complex and indicative of a major strike-slip component with dextral sense of displacement, during early stages of basin evolution. These two later subbasins were developed on a lithosphere characterized by an abrupt transition (<50 km wide) from an unstretched continent to an oceanic lithosphere. The subsidence history of these basins do not comply with the classical models developed for passive margins or continental rifting. The thermo-mechanical model proposed for the Brazilian equatorial margin includes heterogeneous stretching combined with shearing at the plate margin. The tectonic history comprises: (1) Triassic-Jurassic limited extension associated with the Central Atlantic evolution; (2) Neocomian intraplate deformation consisting of strike-slip reactivation of preexisting shear zones; (3) Aptian-Cenomanian two-phase period of dextral shearing; and (4) Late Cretaceous-Cenozoic sea-floor spreading.

  18. New magnetic anomaly map of the East Antarctic continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golynsky, Alexander; Ivanov, Sergey; Kazankov, Andrey

    2010-05-01

    Marine magnetic survey coverage of the southern part of Indian Ocean is to a certain extent limited for defining the magnetic pattern of the continental margin of East Antarctica. The USA research vessels collected the bulk of the marine magnetic data in the beginning of 1960's. During the succeeding years Australian, German, Japanese, Russian and other international scientific programs made major contributions to the network of marine magnetic data. Since the beginning of new century only two nations (Russian and Australian) have acquired the marine magnetic data in the southern part of Indian Ocean. The marine surveys in the Cosmonaut Sea, the western part of the Cooperation Sea in the Davis and Mawson Seas were accomplished by the PMGRE in 2000-2009 field seasons. The marine magnetic data collected during two seasons (2001-2002) within the AASOPP Project which was established in early 2000 to define the outer limits of the continental shelf offshore of the Australian Antarctic Territory (AAT) covered the full length of the AAT from 40OE to 160OE. The new magnetic anomaly map of the East Antarctic continental margin incorporates all available data acquired by the international community since the IGY 1957-58 through to 2009. Results of the compilation do not radically alter recent models describing first-order motions between the Antarctic, Australian and Indian plates, but they help to resolve uncertainties in early break-up history of opening between these plates. The timing and direction of early seafloor spreading in the area off the Antarctic margin, once conjugate to part of the Southern Greater Indian margin and to Australian margin, along the largely unknown region of the Enderby Basin, Davis Sea and Mawson Sea has been analyzed by many authors using different data sets. It is highly likely that spreading in the Enderby Basin occurred around the same time as the well documented M-sequence (anomalies M10 to M0) off the Perth Basin, Western Australia

  19. Probing continental collision in the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, A. H. F.

    Knowledge about the processes of continental collisional would unlock a wealth of data for the field of tectonics, but such processes have been poorly documented by academic ocean drilling. On the basis of 1993 data confirming that the easternmost Mediterranean is in the initial stages of continental collision, the Ocean Drilling Program has scheduled two legs of drilling for summer 1995 in the eastern and western parts of the Mediterranean Sea.Effects of continental collision in the easternmost Mediterranean include the Quaternary uplift of Cyprus [Poole and Robertson, 1991] and the break up and subsidence of the Eratosthenes Seamount, which is located in the easternmost Mediterranean between Cyprus and the Levantine Basin (Figure 1).

  20. Negligible effect of hydrogen content on plate strength in East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selway, Kate

    2015-07-01

    Continental rifting requires weak zones to exist within the strong continental plates. This weakening is thought to be induced primarily by high hydrogen contents and temperatures, as well as small grain size. An ideal location to test models of plate strength in situ is the East African Rift--the best exposed continental rift on Earth--which is forming adjacent to the unrifted Tanzanian Craton. Here I use magnetotelluric data to investigate electrical conductivity, and hence hydrogen content, across the East African Rift and Tanzanian Craton. The images show that the Tanzanian Craton is extremely rich in hydrogen, whereas the parts of the continent that are being rifted are anhydrous, suggesting that high hydrogen content does not systematically reduce plate strength. Earlier deformation events may have reduced the grain size of the continental lithosphere in the East African Rift compared to the Tanzanian Craton. I therefore suggest that the localization of rifting and repeated reactivation of deformed regions may not be due to hydrogen content and is instead controlled by small grain size.

  1. Extension across the Laptev Sea continental rifts constrained by gravity modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, S.; Campbell, S.; Green, C.; Bouatmani, R.

    2015-03-01

    The Laptev Shelf is the area where the Gakkel Ridge, an active oceanic spreading axis, approaches a continental edge, causing a specific structural style dominated by extensive rift structures. From the latest Cretaceous to the Pliocene, extension exerted on the Laptev Shelf created there several deep subsided rifts and high-standing basement blocks. To understand syn-rift basin geometries and sediment supply relationships across the Laptev Shelf, accurate extension estimates are essential. Therefore, we used 2-D gravity modeling and 3-D gravity inversion to constrain the amount of crustal stretching across the North America-Eurasia plate boundary in the Laptev Shelf. The latest Cretaceous-Cenozoic extension in that area is partitioned among two rift zones, the Laptev Rift System and the New Siberian Rift. These rifts were both overprinted on the Eurasian margin that had been stretched by 190-250 km before the Late Cretaceous. While the Laptev Rift System, connected to the Gakkel Ridge, reveals increasing extension toward the shelf edge (190-380 km), the New Siberian Rift is characterized by approximately uniform stretching along strike (110-125 km). The architecture of the Laptev Rift System shows that the finite extension of about 500 km is sufficient to entirely eliminate crystalline continental crust. In the most stretched rift segment, continental mantle is exhumed at the base of the Late Mesozoic basement. The example of the Laptev Rift System shows that extension driven by divergent plate movement is a sufficient cause to produce almost complete continental breakup without an increased heat input from the asthenospheric mantle.

  2. The Alignment and Spacing of Volcanoes on Earth: Are Oceanic and Continental Settings Really That Different?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumann, T. R.

    2002-12-01

    The origin of the alignment and spacing of volcanoes has traditionally been treated from two fundamentally different perspectives: continental and oceanic. With the overwhelming evidence from the Hawaiian-Emperor chain, where a robust plume has generated a simple time-transgressive chain of volcanic islands, many oceanic alignments worldwide have been ascribed to plate motion above a fixed source of melting. Conversely, alignments of volcanoes in continental settings are primarily ascribed to some structural or tectonic pathway that serves to guide rising magmas. This fundamental difference of cause and effect, with respect to these two settings, has led to misinterpretations regarding the age and evolution of some island chains. In the Hawaiian Islands attributes like volcano age, elevation, morphology, and lava composition change systematically in the direction of plate motion away from the most recent activity on the island of Hawaii. However, some other plume-related volcanic archipelagoes have more diffuse volcanic activity and the relative ages among some the islands are not so clear. In the Galapagos Islands, although the maximum measured ages of the lava flows increase systematically eastward from Fernandina to San Cristobal, the large western volcanoes are essentially coeval. Similar ages imply that morphological and geochemical differences among these volcanoes are due to differences in melt generation and magma supply imposed by variations in plume strength and lithospheric structure rather than an evolutionary model like that predicted for Hawaiian systems. Comparisons of other volcanic chains and fields less voluminous than Hawaii indicate that although oceanic and continental magmas are chemically quite different, the controls governing their emplacement are not. The emplacement of smaller volume oceanic systems like the Galapagos, Canaries, Reunion, and many seamounts may share more aspects with continental volcanic fields than they do with large

  3. Detrital Zircon Record and Continental Growth: Differentiating Crustal Generation versus Preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cawood, Peter; Hawkesworth, Chris; Dhuime, Bruno; Kemp, Tony; Prave, Tony

    2010-05-01

    The detrital (and magmatic) zircon record is being increasingly used to understand the rate, duration and process of formation of continental crust. Compilations of zircons have identified peaks of ages of crystallisation and crust formation. Taken at face value these peaks suggest that continental crust formation is episodic with significant pulses of juvenile magmatism and crustal growth in the late Archean and Paleoproterozoic (2.7 Ga and 1.9 Ga), and with only subdued addition in the Phanerozoic. Punctuated crustal growth remains difficult to explain by global changes in plate tectonic regimes, and so it is typically attributed to mantle plume activity. However, the andesitic composition of continental crust and evidence that plate tectonics has been active since at least 3.0 Ga suggests magmatic arcs should be the major site of continental growth. Alternatively, we argue that peaks reflect variations in preservation potential in relation to tectonic setting and that peaks correspond with phases of supercontinent assembly: collisional belts have high preservation potential whereas magmatic arcs, which are sites for significant crustal generation, have a low preservation potential. The detrital zircon record can also be used to unravel tectonic setting. The key features of zircons sampled in different tectonic settings are (i) the time between crystallisation and incorporation into the sedimentary record, and (ii) the age distributions. The detrital record from magmatic arcs yields zircons with crystallisation ages close to that of the host sediment, and little range in ages. Other settings yield large differences between the ages of crystallisation and that of sedimentation, reflecting the history of the pre-existing crust, and the extent to which there was magmatism close to the time of sedimentation. The most marked example is for divergent margins that may be associated with little magmatism that crystallises zircon, and simply record peaks of older ages

  4. The Cretaceous iron belt of northern Chile: role of oceanic plates, a superplume event, and a major shear zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyarzun, Roberto; Oyarzún, Jorge; Ménard, Jean Jacques; Lillo, Javier

    2003-08-01

    The Cretaceous constitutes a turning point in the tectonic, magmatic, and metallogenic history of Chile. The geological evidence indicates that a major change occurred in late Neocomian time when superplume emplacement (Mid-Pacific Superplume) and plate reorganization processes took place in the Pacific. The superplume event resulted in a major ridge-push force resulting in increased coupling between the subducting and overriding plates. This completely changed the tectonic setting of Chile ending the Early Cretaceous extensional period (aborted rifting in the back-arc basin), and increasing stress at a crustal scale. As a consequence, overpressurized dioritic magmas were pushed up mainly along the best possible structural path in northern Chile, i.e., the Atacama Fault Zone, eventually forming a +500-km-long belt of Kiruna-type iron deposits with reserves of ~2,000 Mt (60% Fe), a unique case in Chile's geological history.

  5. Gas hydrates of outer continental margins

    SciTech Connect

    Kvenvolden, K.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline substances in which a rigid framework of water molecules traps molecules of gas, mainly methane. Gas-hydrate deposits are common in continental margin sediment in all major oceans at water depths greater than about 300 m. Thirty-three localities with evidence for gas-hydrate occurrence have been described worldwide. The presence of these gas hydrates has been inferred mainly from anomalous lacoustic reflectors seen on marine seismic records. Naturally occurring marine gas hydrates have been sampled and analyzed at about tensites in several regions including continental slope and rise sediment of the eastern Pacific Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico. Except for some Gulf of Mexico gas hydrate occurrences, the analyzed gas hydrates are composed almost exclusively of microbial methane. Evidence for the microbial origin of methane in gas hydrates includes (1) the inverse relation between methane occurence and sulfate concentration in the sediment, (2) the subparallel depth trends in carbon isotopic compositions of methane and bicarbonate in the interstitial water, and (3) the general range of {sup 13}C depletion ({delta}{sub PDB}{sup 13}C = {minus}90 to {minus}60 {per thousand}) in the methane. Analyses of gas hydrates from the Peruvian outer continental margin in particular illustrate this evidence for microbially generated methane. The total amount of methane in gas hydrates of continental margins is not known, but estimates of about 10{sup 16} m{sup 3} seem reasonable. Although this amount of methane is large, it is not yet clear whether methane hydrates of outer continental margins will ever be a significant energy resource; however, these gas hydrates will probably constitute a drilling hazard when outer continental margins are explored in the future.

  6. Ultrahigh-pressure metamorphism: tracing continental crust into the mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopin, Christian

    2003-07-01

    More and more evidence is being discovered in Phanerozoic collision belts of the burial of crustal rocks to previously unsuspected (and ever increasing) depths, presently on the order of 150-200 km, and of exhumation from such depths. This extends by almost one order of magnitude the depth classically ascribed to the metamorphic cycling of continental crust, and demonstrates its possible subduction. The pieces of evidence for this new, ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphism exclusively occur in the form of relics of high-pressure minerals that escaped back-transformation during decompression. The main UHP mineral indicators are the high-pressure polymorphs of silica and carbon, coesite and microdiamond, respectively; the latter often demonstrably precipitated from a metamorphic fluid and is completely unrelated to kimberlitic diamond or any shock event. Recent discoveries of pyroxene exsolutions in garnet and of coesite exsolutions in titanite suggest a precursor garnet or titanite containing six-fold coordinated silicon, therefore still higher pressures than implied by diamond stability, on the order of 6 GPa. The UHP rocks raise a formidable geological problem: that of the mechanisms responsible for their burial and, more pressingly, for their exhumation from the relevant depths. The petrological record indicates that large tracts of UHP rocks were buried to conditions of low T/ P ratio, consistent with a subduction-zone context. Decompression occurred in most instances under continuous cooling, implying continuous heat loss to the footwall and hangingwall of the rising body. This rise along the subduction channel - an obvious mechanical discontinuity and weak zone - may be driven by buoyancy up to mid-crustal levels as a result of the lesser density of the acidic crustal rocks (even if completely re-equilibrated at depth) after delamination from the lower crust, in a convergent setting. Chronological studies suggest that the rates involved are typical plate

  7. MAGSAT anomaly map and continental drift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemouel, J. L. (Principal Investigator); Galdeano, A.; Ducruix, J.

    1981-01-01

    Anomaly maps of high quality are needed to display unambiguously the so called long wave length anomalies. The anomalies were analyzed in terms of continental drift and the nature of their sources is discussed. The map presented confirms the thinness of the oceanic magnetized layer. Continental magnetic anomalies are characterized by elongated structures generally of east-west trend. Paleomagnetic reconstruction shows that the anomalies found in India, Australia, and Antarctic exhibit a fair consistency with the African anomalies. It is also shown that anomalies are locked under the continents and have a fixed geometry.

  8. Continental Lower-crustal Flow: Channel Flow and Laminar Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LI, Dewei

    Numerous geological, geophysical and geochemical investigations and finite element modeling indicate that crustal flow layers exist in the continental crust. Both channel flow model and laminar flow model have been created to explain the flow laws and flow mechanisms. As revealed by the channel flow model, a low-viscosity channel in middle to lower crust in orogen or plateau with thick crust and high elevation would flow outward from mountain root in response to lateral pressure gradient resulted from topographic loading or to denudation. However, according to the laminar flow model proposed based on investigation of the Qinghai-Tibet plateau, circulative movement of crustal lithologies with different rheological properties between basin and orogen would occur, under the driving forces resulted from dehydration and melting of subduction plate on active continental margin and from thermal energy related to upwelling and diapiring of intercontinental mantle plume or its gravitational interactions. Similarly, when driven by gravity, the softened or melted substances of the lower crust in a basin would flow laterally toward adjacent mountain root, which would result in a thinned basin crust and a thickened orogenic crust. Partially melted magma within the thickened orogenic lower crust would cause vertical movement of metamorphic rocks of lower to middle crust due to density inversion, and the vertical main stress induced by thermal underplating of lower crust would in turn lead to formation of metamorphic core complexes and low-angle detachment fault systems. Lateral spreading of uplifting mountain due to gravitation potential would result in thrust fault systems on the border between mountain and basin. Meanwhile, detritus produced synchronously by intense erosion of uplifting mountain would be transported and deposited along the marginal deep depression in the foreland basin dragged by lower crust flow. Channel flow is similar to laminar flow in a variety of aspects

  9. A Voyage through Scales - Archives of the Continental Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkesworth, Chris

    2015-04-01

    regional studies, and globally the continental crust is characterised by distinctive peaks and troughs in the distribution of ages of magmatic activity, metamorphism, continental margins and mineralisation. This is unexpected in the context of steady state plate tectonics, and it is thought to reflect the different preservation potential of rocks generated in different tectonic settings. In contrast there are other signals, such as the Sr isotope ratios of seawater, mantle temperatures, and redox conditions on the Earth, which appear to retain primary records because they are less sensitive to the numbers of samples of different ages that have been analysed. Bias does appear to be significant for signals that rely on distributions of ages.

  10. Thermo-mechanical controls on the mode of continental collision in the SE Carpathians (Romania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloetingh, S. A. P. L.; Burov, E.; Matenco, L.; Toussaint, G.; Bertotti, G.; Andriessen, P. A. M.; Wortel, M. J. R.; Spakman, W.

    2004-01-01

    The Carpathians orogenic system, with its along-arc variations in topography developed in the aftermath of continental collision, is associated with unusual foredeep basins, large-scale strain and seismicity concentration and high-velocity mantle bodies. The East Carpathians continental collision was non-cylindrical, leading to large-scale variations in thrust nappe kinematics, orogenic uplift patterns and foredeep subsidence, controlled by the mechanics and geometry of the lower plate. Thermo-mechanical modelling demonstrates that in this low-rate convergence regime, the subducted lithosphere had enough time to interact with the mantle to advance towards a thermal resettlement. This is favored by the low degree of metamorphism, mechanical weakness of the lower plate and the lack of active surface processes at the contact with and in the upper plate. In contrast, low-buoyant, thick lower crust and active surface processes keep the continuity of the slab intact and promote the development of typical foredeep basins. The model explains in a self-consistent manner the unusual geometry of the Vrancea seismogenic slab in the bend zone of the Romanian Carpathians. The model is also consistent with the presence of two high-velocity bodies inferred from seismic tomography studies and explains the depth zonation of seismicity in the Vrancea area. Differences between the northern part of East Carpathians and the southeastern bend of the Carpathians arc are largely controlled by lateral variations in crustal structure, topography emplacement and surface processes along the arc. Mechanical heterogeneity of the Carpathians subduction leads to the development of two end member modes of collision, allowing a study of these states and their transition. Lithospheric configuration and tectonic topography appear to be prime factors controlling variations in slab behavior. In the SE Carpathians, at the terminal phase of continental convergence, slab delamination, roll-back and

  11. Tertiary evolution and petroleum potential of Oregon-Washington continental margin

    SciTech Connect

    Snavely, P.D. Jr.

    1986-07-01

    The Oregon-Washington continental margin was the site of a deep marginal basin in which more than 7000 m of Tertiary sedimentary and volcanic rocks accumulated. Oceanic basalts of Paleocene to early Eocene age form the basin floor and are interpreted to represent eruptions in an elongate trough formed by rifting of the continental margin. Middle Eocene turbidite sandstone overlapped both the oceanic crust and the pre-Tertiary rocks of the Klamath Mountains, thus indicating that suturing of the Coast Range-Olympic terrane to North America was about 50 Ma. Oblique convergence between the Farallon and North American plates occurred during most of the middle Eocene to middle Miocene. Sedimentation, punctuated by episodes of volcanism, was essentially continuous in a forearc basin whose axis lay along the present inner continental shelf. The oblique interaction between the plates was interrupted by two periods of more head-on convergence during the middle late Eocene and late middle Miocene. Thick accretionary melange wedges of Eocene and of late Oligocene to late middle Miocene ages were formed during these strongly compressive episodes. Geochemical analyses indicate that the accretionary melange wedges, which crop out along the west side of the Olympic Peninsula and beneath the adjacent shelf, have the highest potential for oil and gas generation. They are the source rocks for numerous gas seeps and oil and gas shows in exploratory wells, and for the 12,000 bbl of 38.9 /sup 0/ API paraffin-based oil produced from a well drilled on the southwest Washington coast. Potential exploration targets exist where the Eocene and Oligocene-Miocene melanges are underplated to a position beneath the lower Eocene oceanic basalt. Hydrocarbons generated in the melanges could migrate upward into structures in strata that overlie the basalt in the upper plate.

  12. Plate Tectonics and Taiwan Orogeny based on TAIGER Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, F. T.; Kuochen, H.; McIntosh, K. D.

    2014-12-01

    Plate tectonics framework is usually complex in a collision zone, where continental lithosphere is involved. In the young Taiwan orogeny, with geologic understanding and large new geodetic and subsurface datasets now available an environment has been created for testing tectonic hypotheses regarding collision and orogeny. Against the background of the commonly accepted view of Taiwan as a southward propagating, self-similar 2-D orogen, a fully 3-D structure is envisaged. Along the whole length of the island the convergence of the Eurasian plate (EUP) the Philippine Sea plate (PSP) takes shape with different plate configurations. In northern Taiwan the convergence occurs with simultaneous collision of the oceanic PSP with continental EUP and the northward subduction of the PSP; in the south, EUP, in the guise of the South China Sea rifted Eurasian continent, subducts toward the east; in central Taiwan collision of oceanic PSP with continental EUP dominates. When relocated seismicity and focal mechanisms are superposed on subsurface P and Vp/Vs velocity images the configurations and the kinematics of the PSP and EUP collision and subduction become clear. While in northern Taiwan the subduction/collision explains well the high peaks and their dwindling (accompanied by crustal thinning) toward the north. In the south, mountains rise above the east-dipping EUP subduction zone as the Eurasian continental shelf veers toward the southwest, divergent from the trend of the Luzon Arc - calling into question the frequently cited arc-continent collision model of Taiwan orogeny. High velocity anomaly and Benioff seismicity coexist in the south. Going north toward Central Taiwan the high velocity anomaly persists for another 150 km or so, but it becomes seismically quiescent. Above the quiescent section the PSP and EUP collide to build the main part of the Central Range and its parallel neighbor the eastern Coastal Range. Key implications regarding orogeny include: 1) Significant

  13. Plate convergence measured by GPS across the Sundaland/Philippine Sea Plate deformed boundary: the Philippines and eastern Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangin, C.; Le Pichon, X.; Mazzotti, S.; Pubellier, M.; Chamot-Rooke, N.; Aurelio, M.; Walpersdorf, Andrea; Quebral, R.

    1999-11-01

    The western boundary of the Philippine Sea (PH) Plate in the Philippines and eastern Indonesia corresponds to a wide deformation zone that includes the stretched continental margin of Sundaland, the Philippine Mobile Belt (PMB), extending from Luzon to the Molucca Sea, and a mosaic of continental blocks around the PH/Australia/Sunda triple junction. The GPS GEODYSSEA data are used to decipher the present kinematics of this complex area. In the Philippines, the overall scheme is quite simple: two opposing rotations on either side of the left-lateral Philippine Fault, clockwise to the southwest and counterclockwise to the northeast, transfer 55 per cent of the PH/Sundaland convergence from the Manila Trench to the northwest to the Philippine Trench to the southeast. Further south, 80 per cent of the PH/Sunda convergence is absorbed in the double subduction system of the Molucca Sea and less than 20 per cent along both continental margins of northern Borneo. Finally, within the triple junction area between the Sundaland, PH and Australia plates, from Sulawesi to Irian Jaya, preferential subduction of the Celebes Sea induces clockwise rotation of the Sulu block, which is escaping toward the diminishing Celebes Sea oceanic space from the eastward-advancing PH Plate. To the south, we identify an undeformed Banda block that rotates counterclockwise with respect to Australia and clockwise with respect to Sundaland. The kinematics of this block can be defined and enable us to compute the rates of southward subduction of the Banda block within the Flores Trench and of eastward convergence of the Makassar Straits with the Banda block. The analysis made in this paper confirms that this deformation is compatible with the eastward motion of Sundaland with respect to Eurasia determined by the GEODYSSEA programme but is not compatible with the assumption that Sundaland belongs to Eurasia, as was often assumed prior to this study.

  14. Prediction of Plate Motions and Stresses from Global Dynamic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, A.; Holt, W. E.

    2011-12-01

    Predicting plate motions correctly has been a challenge for global dynamic models. In addition to predicting plate motions, a successful model must also explain the following features: plate rigidity, plate boundary zone deformation, as well as intraplate stress patterns and deformation. In this study we show that, given constraints from shallow lithosphere structure, history of subduction, and first order features from whole mantle tomography, it is possible to achieve a high level of accuracy in predicting plate motions and lithosphere deformation within plate boundary zones. Best-fit dynamic models presently provide an RMS velocity misfit of global surface motions (compared at 63,000 spaced points in the GSRM NNR model [Kreemer et al., 2006]) of order 1 cm/yr. We explore the relative contribution of shallow lithosphere structure vs. whole mantle convection in affecting surface deformation as well as plate motions. We show that shallow lithosphere structure that includes topography and lateral density variations in the lithosphere is an integral part of global force balance. Its inclusion in geodynamic models is essential in order to match observations of surface motions and stresses, particularly within continental zones of deformation. We also argue that stiff slabs may not be as important as has been previously claimed in controlling plate motion and lithosphere deformation. An important result of this study is the calibration of absolute stress magnitudes in the lithosphere, verified through benchmarking using whole mantle convection models. Given additional constraints of the matching of surface motions, we also calibrate the absolute effective lithosphere viscosities. Best-fit models require plates with effective viscosities of order 1023 Pa-s, with plate boundary zones possessing effective viscosities 1-3 orders of magnitude weaker. Given deviatoric stress magnitudes within the lithosphere of order 10 - 60 MPa, our global models predict less than 2 mm

  15. Geophysical study of the structure and processes of the continental convergence zones: Alpine-Himalayan Belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toksoez, M. N.

    1981-01-01

    The seismic wave velocity structure in the crust and upper mantle region beneath the Tibetan plateau was studied in detail. Also, a preliminary study of the uppermost mantle P wave velocity beneath Iran and Turkey was carried out, and the results are compared with those for the Tibetan plateau. These two studies compose the bulk of the efforts on the observational aspects of continental collision zones in addition to satellite derived data. On the theoretical aspects the thermal evolution of converging plate boundaries was explored using a finite difference scheme.

  16. Evolving Deformation Style and Rheology During Transpressive Segmentation and Uplift of Continental Lower Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumond, G.; Mahan, K. H.; Williams, M. L.; Goncalves, P.; Jercinovic, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding mechanisms for strain localization and partitioning in the lower crust beneath major fault systems is critical for constraining exactly how these faults accommodate plate convergence. Lateral and vertical variations in strength and material properties can strongly influence the distribution of strain in continental lithosphere, as observed in the vicinity of continental transform faults and intracontinental strike-slip faults. Numerical models that incorporate rheological heterogeneity highlight the importance of strength contrasts for facilitating strain localization. Questions regarding the importance of diffuse vs. localized strain, reactivation, and the role of lateral variation in rheology can be answered directly by studying exhumed deep crustal shear zones and their wall rocks in rare exposures of continental lower crust. We report on the evolving deformation style and rheology of a large panel of continental lower crust (>20,000 km2) during the interaction of two lithosphere-scale shear zones in the western Canadian Shield. Weak, partially molten rocks were juxtaposed against previously-dehydrated stronger rocks during dextral high-T transcurrent shearing along the >400 km-long Grease River strike-slip shear zone at 1.92-1.90 Ga. The pattern and timing of strain and metamorphism across the shear zone is compatible with development of a deep crustal flower structure coincident with this rheological "dichotomy" at ~30-40 km paleodepths. The Grease River shear zone was cut and uplifted in the hanging wall of the Legs Lake shear zone, a >500 km-long intracontinental thrust-sense structure. Reactivation of the Grease River shear zone occurred during uplift as both structures accommodated dextral transpressive strain during segmentation and uplift of continental lower crust (>1.0 GPa) to middle crustal levels (<0.5 GPa) at 1.85 Ga. The strength and style of deformation evolved from distributed strain across partially molten weak crust to localized

  17. Renewable liquid reflecting zone plate

    DOEpatents

    Toor, Arthur; Ryutov, Dmitri D.

    2003-12-09

    A renewable liquid reflecting zone plate. Electrodes are operatively connected to a dielectric liquid in a circular or other arrangement to produce a reflecting zone plate. A system for renewing the liquid uses a penetrable substrate.

  18. MyPlate Food Guide

    MedlinePlus

    ... follow throughout your life. 2. Fruits Like veggies, fruits contain vitamins, minerals, and fiber. The red section of MyPlate is slightly smaller than the green, but together fruits and veggies should fill half your plate. Whole ...

  19. What Are Growth Plate Injuries?

    MedlinePlus

    ... activities. Other reasons for growth plate injuries are:  Child abuse  Injury from extreme cold (for example, frostbite)  Radiation ( ... problems) treats most growth plate injuries. At other times, the child will see a pediatric orthopaedic surgeon (a doctor ...

  20. What Are Growth Plate Injuries?

    MedlinePlus

    ... activities. Other reasons for growth plate injuries are: Child abuse Injury from extreme cold (for example, frostbite) Radiation ( ... problems) treats most growth plate injuries. At other times, the child will see a pediatric orthopaedic surgeon (a doctor ...

  1. Ocean Basin Evolution and Global-Scale Plate Reorganization Events Since Pangea Breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, R. Dietmar; Seton, Maria; Zahirovic, Sabin; Williams, Simon E.; Matthews, Kara J.; Wright, Nicky M.; Shephard, Grace E.; Maloney, Kayla T.; Barnett-Moore, Nicholas; Hosseinpour, Maral; Bower, Dan J.; Cannon, John

    2016-06-01

    We present a revised global plate motion model with continuously closing plate boundaries ranging from the Triassic at 230 Ma to the present day, assess differences among alternative absolute plate motion models, and review global tectonic events. Relatively high mean absolute plate motion rates of approximately 9–10 cm yr‑1 between 140 and 120 Ma may be related to transient plate motion accelerations driven by the successive emplacement of a sequence of large igneous provinces during that time. An event at ˜100 Ma is most clearly expressed in the Indian Ocean and may reflect the initiation of Andean-style subduction along southern continental Eurasia, whereas an acceleration at ˜80 Ma of mean rates from 6 to 8 cm yr‑1 reflects the initial northward acceleration of India and simultaneous speedups of plates in the Pacific. An event at ˜50 Ma expressed in relative, and some absolute, plate motion changes around the globe and in a reduction of global mean plate speeds from about 6 to 4–5 cm yr‑1 indicates that an increase in collisional forces (such as the India–Eurasia collision) and ridge subduction events in the Pacific (such as the Izanagi–Pacific Ridge) play a significant role in modulating plate velocities.

  2. Microchannel plate streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Ching L.

    1989-01-01

    An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (UV to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1000 KeV x-rays.

  3. North American plate dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Randall M.; Reding, Lynn M.

    1991-01-01

    Deformation within the North American plate in response to various tectonic processes is modeled using an elastic finite element analysis. The tectonic processes considered in the modeling include ridge forces associated with the normal thermal evolution of oceanic lithosphere, shear and normal stresses transmitted across transforms, normal stresses transmitted across convergent boundaries, stresses due to horizontal density contrasts within the continent, and shear tractions applied along the base of the plate. Model stresses are calculated with respect to a lithostatic reference stress state. Shear stresses transmitted across transform boundaries along the San Andreas and Caribbean are small, of the order of 5-10 MPa. Also, compressive stresses of the order of 5-10 MPa transmitted across the major transforms improve the fit to the data. Compressive stresses across convergent margins along the Aleutians and the Middle America trench are important.

  4. Microchannel plate streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1989-03-21

    An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras is disclosed. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (UV to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1,000 KeV x-rays. 3 figs.

  5. Microchannel plate streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1984-09-28

    An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (uv to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1000 keV x-rays.

  6. Bipolar battery plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlette, John J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A liquid-impermeable plate (10) having throughplate conductivity with essentially zero resistance comprises an insulator sheet (12) having a series of spaced perforations (14) each of which contains a metal element (16) sealingly received into the perforation (14). A low-cost plate can readily be manufactured by punching a thermoplastic sheet (40) such as polypropylene with a punching tool (52), filling the apertures with lead spheres (63) having a diameter smaller than the holes (50) but larger than the thickness of the sheet, sweeping excess spheres (62) off the sheet with a doctor blade (60) and then pressing a heated platen (74) onto the sheet to swage the spheres into a cylindrical shape and melt the surrounding resin to form a liquid-impermeable collar (4) sealing the metal into the sheet.

  7. Smov FOS Plate Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinney, Anne

    1994-01-01

    The goal is to measure the precise plate scale and orientation. This will be acheived by performing a raster step and dwell sequence in the 4.3 arcsec aperture. The edges of the aperture should be avoided to prevent vignetting effects. An aperture map is required at each step of the dwell sequence. This test has to be conducted for both the RED and BLUE detectors. We will also determine the offset between the two detectors.

  8. Plated wire memory subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, L.; Tweed, H.

    1972-01-01

    The work performed entailed the design, development, construction and testing of a 4000 word by 18 bit random access, NDRO plated wire memory for use in conjunction with a spacecraft imput/output unit and central processing unit. The primary design parameters, in order of importance, were high reliability, low power, volume and weight. A single memory unit, referred to as a qualification model, was delivered.

  9. Martian plate tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleep, N. H.

    1994-03-01

    The northern lowlands of Mars have been produced by plate tectonics. Preexisting old thick highland crust was subducted, while seafloor spreading produced thin lowland crust during late Noachian and Early Hesperian time. In the preferred reconstruction, a breakup margin extended north of Cimmeria Terra between Daedalia Planum and Isidis Planitia where the highland-lowland transition is relatively simple. South dipping subduction occured beneath Arabia Terra and east dipping subduction beneath Tharsis Montes and Tempe Terra. Lineations associated with Gordii Dorsum are attributed to ridge-parallel structures, while Phelegra Montes and Scandia Colles are interpreted as transfer-parallel structures or ridge-fault-fault triple junction tracks. Other than for these few features, there is little topographic roughness in the lowlands. Seafloor spreading, if it occurred, must have been relatively rapid. Quantitative estimates of spreading rate are obtained by considering the physics of seafloor spreading in the lower (approx. 0.4 g) gravity of Mars, the absence of vertical scarps from age differences across fracture zones, and the smooth axial topography. Crustal thickness at a given potential temperature in the mantle source region scales inversely with gravity. Thus, the velocity of the rough-smooth transition for axial topography also scales inversely with gravity. Plate reorganizations where young crust becomes difficult to subduct are another constraint on spreading age. Plate tectonics, if it occurred, dominated the thermal and stress history of the planet. A geochemical implication is that the lower gravity of Mars allows deeper hydrothermal circulation through cracks and hence more hydration of oceanic crust so that more water is easily subducted than on the Earth. Age and structural relationships from photogeology as well as median wavelength gravity anomalies across the now dead breakup and subduction margins are the data most likely to test and modify hypotheses

  10. Elastic plate spallation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oline, L.; Medaglia, J.

    1972-01-01

    The dynamic finite element method was used to investigate elastic stress waves in a plate. Strain displacement and stress strain relations are discussed along with the stiffness and mass matrix. The results of studying point load, and distributed load over small, intermediate, and large radii are reported. The derivation of finite element matrices, and the derivation of lumped and consistent matrices for one dimensional problems with Laplace transfer solutions are included. The computer program JMMSPALL is also included.

  11. Plates with Incompatible Prestrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Kaushik; Lewicka, Marta; Schäffner, Mathias

    2016-07-01

    We study effective elastic behavior of the incompatibly prestrained thin plates, where the prestrain is independent of thickness and uniform through the plate's thickness h. We model such plates as three-dimensional elastic bodies with a prescribed pointwise stress-free state characterized by a Riemannian metric G, and seek the limiting behavior as {h to 0}. We first establish that when the energy per volume scales as the second power of h, the resulting {Γ} -limit is a Kirchhoff-type bending theory. We then show the somewhat surprising result that there exist non-immersible metrics G for whom the infimum energy (per volume) scales smaller than h 2. This implies that the minimizing sequence of deformations carries nontrivial residual three-dimensional energy but it has zero bending energy as seen from the limit Kirchhoff theory perspective. Another implication is that other asymptotic scenarios are valid in appropriate smaller scaling regimes of energy. We characterize the metrics G with the above property, showing that the zero bending energy in the Kirchhoff limit occurs if and only if the Riemann curvatures R 1213, R 1223 and R 1212 of G vanish identically. We illustrate our findings with examples; of particular interest is an example where {G_{2 × 2}}, the two-dimensional restriction of G, is flat but the plate still exhibits the energy scaling of the Föppl-von Kármán type. Finally, we apply these results to a model of nematic glass, including a characterization of the condition when the metric is immersible, for {G = Id3 + γ n ⊗ n} given in terms of the inhomogeneous unit director field distribution { n in R^3}.

  12. Notice of Release of 'Continental' Basin Wildrye

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    'Continental' basin wildrye (Leymus cinereus [Scribn. & Merr.] A. Love) has been released as a cultivar for use in rangeland seedings. It was developed from a hybrid between an induced octoploid (2n=56), generated from the natural tetraploid 'Trailhead' (2n=28), and the natural octoploid 'Magnar' (...

  13. Eocene continental climates and latitudinal temperature gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, David R.; Wing, Scott L.

    1995-11-01

    Global climate during the Mesozoic and early Cenozoic is thought to have been warmer than at present, but there is debate about winter temperatures. Paleontological data indicate mild temperatures even at high latitudes and in mid-latitude continental interiors, whereas computer simulations of continental paleoclimates produce winter temperatures closer to modern levels. Foliar physiognomy and floristic composition of 23 Eocene floras from the interior of North America and Australia indicate cold month means generally >2 °C, even where the mean annual temperature (MAT) was <15 °C. Reconstructed Eocene latitudinal gradients of MAT are curvilinear but are about 0.4 °C per 1° of latitude in continental interiors at mid-latitudes, much less than the 0.8 1.0 °C per 1° of latitude observed in eastern and central North America today, but similar to modern gradients in the Southern Hemisphere mid-latitudes and on the west coast of North America. Latitudinal temperature gradients reconstructed here are broadly representative of Eocene climates, showing that the discrepancy between proxy data and simulations will not be resolved by regional adjustments to paleogeography or reinterpretation of individual fossil assemblages. Similar discrepancies between proxy data and general circulation model simulations for other time periods suggest that there is a basic flaw with the way climate models simulate heat transport to, or loss from, continental surfaces.

  14. Coordination: Southeast Continental Shelf studies. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, D.W.

    1981-02-01

    An overview of the Oceanograhic Program of Skidaway Institute of Oceanograhy is presented. Included are the current five year plan for studies of the Southeast Continental Shelf, a summary of research accomplishments, proposed research for 1981-1982, current status of the Savannah Navigational Light Tower, and a list of publications. (ACR)

  15. Elephant teeth from the atlantic continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitmore, F.C., Jr.; Emery, K.O.; Cooke, H.B.S.; Swift, D.J.P.

    1967-01-01

    Teeth of mastodons and mastodons have been recovered by fishermen from at least 40 sites on the continental shelf as deep as 120 meters. Also present are submerged shorelines, peat deposits, lagoonal shells, and relict sands. Evidently elephants and other large mammals ranged this region during the glacial stage of low sea level of the last 25.000 years.

  16. The Interpretation of Crustal Dynamics Data in Terms of Plate Interactions and Active Tectonics of the Anatolian Plate and Surrounding Regions in the Middle East

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toksoz, M. Nafi; Reilinger, Robert E.

    1990-01-01

    During the past 6 months, efforts were concentrated on the following areas: (1) Continued development of realistic, finite element modeling of plate interactions and associated deformation in the Eastern Mediterranean; (2) Neotectonic field investigations of seismic faulting along the active fault systems in Turkey with emphasis on identifying seismic gaps along the North Anatolian fault; and (3) Establishment of a GPS regional monitoring network in the zone of ongoing continental collision in eastern Turkey (supported in part by NSF).

  17. The effect of thicker oceanic crust in the Archaean on the growth of continental crust through time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilks, M. E.

    1988-01-01

    Present crustal evolution models fail to account for the generation of the large volume of continental crust in the required time intervals. All Archaean plate tectonic models, whether invoking faster spreading rates, similar to today's spreading rates, or longer ridge lengths, essentially propose that continental crust has grown by island arc accretion due to the subduction of oceanic crust. The petrological differences that characterize the Archaean from later terrains result from the subduction of hotter oceanic crust into a hotter mantle. If the oceanic crust was appreciably thicker in the Archaean, as geothermal models would indicate, this thicker crust is surely going to have an effect on tectonic processes. A more valid approach is to compare the possible styles of convergence of thick oceanic crust with modern convergence zones. The best modern analog occurs where thick continental crust is colliding with thick continental crust. Oceanic crustal collision on the scale of the present-day Himalayan continental collision zone may have been a frequent occurrence in the Archaean, resulting in extensive partial melting of the hydrous underthrust oceanic crust to produce voluminous tonalite melts, leaving a depleted stabilized basic residuum. Present-day island arc accretion may not have been the dominant mechanism for the growth of the early Archaean crust.

  18. Numerical Modeling of Continental Subduction In Apennines Style Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toussaint, G.; Burov, E.; Jolivet, L.

    We performed numerical experiments of early stages of continental subduction and slab detachment at the mantle scale, using a 2D thermo-mechanical model which ac- counts for brittle-elasto-ductile behaviour, phase changes and surface processes. Our goal is to study the influence of various parameters on subduction-related orogens (for instance the Apennines) such as density contrasts, convergence rate, thermal state, eclogitisation and intensity of surface processes. The model reproduces the subduction cycle from early stages to penetration of the slab to the 660 km boundary. Depending of the parameters' combination, the evolution of the initiated slab varies from rapid detachment, stagnation of the subduction to stable, oceanic type subduction. An im- portant feature of our experiments is the almost systematic occurrence of underplating of the lower plate crust beneath the upper plate, leading to formation of double-Moho like structures. It appears that the subducted upper crust and sediments may play a role of lubrification layer, like the low friction coefficients used in some previous models, The results show that the main controlling parameter of slab evolution is the density contrast between the slab, subducted crust, and surrounding asthenosphere : for in- stance, when the contrast between the slab and the asthenosphere is larger than 0.02, the sinking rate of the slab is high, and slab detachment can occur within the first mil- lion years after onset of subduction. For smaller contrasts, stable subduction occurs only in case of full crustal metamorphism. The rate of convergence appears to be a second-order parameter, a high rate being able to prevent detachment. The intensity of surface processes predominantly controls the surface topography, and also seems to be able to influence deep processes such as the sinking rate. Thus, the same topography can be maintained for completely different subduction scenarios.

  19. Thermal Evolution of Continental Rifting in Corsica (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour, N. M.; Stockli, D. F.; Beltrando, M.; Smye, A.

    2014-12-01

    Present thermal evolution models for continental rifting are based on pure-shear extension (McKenzie 1978), in which crustal and mantle strain is co-located and all rocks cool throughout rifting. However, the multi-phase rift model of Lavier and Manatschal (2006) accommodates lithospheric extension via spatially offset crustal and mantle strains, producing depth-dependent thinning and exhumation of lithospheric mantle. Significant reheating of the upper plate is a natural consequence of this model. We seek to constrain the temperature-time history of the upper-plate Tethyan margin preserved in Corsica to discriminate between the two thermal models. A record of the conditions and timing of reheating is preserved in the age and trace element compositions of metamorphic zircon overgrowths. Zircon from the hanging wall and footwall of the Jurassic-age Belli Piani shear zone (Beltrando et al 2013) were depth-profiled for both U-Pb and trace element concentrations via LA-ICP-MS split streaming. Across both sides of the shear zone, U-Pb ages show a strong population of 275-300 Ma grains. However, a subset of footwall grains show 165-210 Ma overgrowths. These ages indicate that the margin reached temperature conditions sufficient for zircon saturation and subsequent zircon growth. These lower crustal findings are consistent with prior observations made within the sedimentary succession, which records rapid thermal uplift, karstification, and subsequent drowning of Triassic dolostones contemporaneous with the opening of the Alpine Tethys (Decarlis and Lualdis 2008). Ti-in-zircon thermometry yields temperatures of ~720°C in the hanging wall and ~830°C in the footwall. This is consistent with the appearance of overgrowths, and provides further support that the Belli Piani shear zone was active during Jurassic rifting. Collectively, these data point directly to a rift-coeval reheating event that affected the entire crustal pile and lend support to the multi-stage Lavier and

  20. Tracing lithosphere amalgamation through time: chemical geodynamics of sub-continental lithospheric mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittig, Nadine

    2014-05-01

    The theory of plate tectonics is a relatively young concept in the Earth Sciences and describes the surface expression of planetary cooling via magmatism and reconciles mantle convection and plate movement with orogenesis, earthquakes and volcanism. Detailed observation of current tectonic plate movement has purported a relatively clear picture of the planet's geodynamics. Modern oceanic basins are the predominant sites of thermal equilibration of Earth interior resulting from decompressional, convective melting of peridotites. This magmatism generates mid-ocean ridge mafic crust and depleted upper mantle and in this model, oceanic crust becomes associated with buoyant mantle to form oceanic lithosphere. Subduction zones return this material together with sediments into the deeper mantle and presumably aid the formation of continental crust via arc magmatism. The mechanisms of continental crust amalgamation with buoyant mantle are less clear, and distinctly more difficult to trace back in time because metamorphism and metasomatism render the processes associating convecting mantle with continental crust elusive. Paramount in assessing these mechanisms is understanding the timing of crust and mantle formation so that the onset of plate tectonics and potential changes in modi operandi with respect to convection, mantle composition and melting pressure and temperature may be traced from the early Hadean to the present day. Typically the formation age of continental crust is more easily determined from felsic samples that contain accessory and relatively robust phases such as zircon and monazite that render a geochronological approach feasible. The lack of equally robust minerals and pervasive and ubiquitous metasomatism afflicting obducted orogenic peridotites and mantle xenoliths obliterates primary mineralogical and geochemical information. Hence it has proven difficult to acquire mantle depletion ages from continental lithospheric mantle, perhaps with the exception

  1. Reconstruction of multiple tectonic events in continental margins by integrated tectonostratigraphic and geochronological analysis: the Mesozoic to Paleogene Caribbean-South American interaction in northeastern Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, Agustin; Montes, Camilo; Bayona, German; Valencia, Victor; Ramirez, Diego; Zapata, Sebastian; Lara, Mario; Lopez-Martinez, Margarita; Thomson, Stuart; Weber, Marion

    2013-04-01

    Although the older record and successive tectonic scenarios experienced by a continental margin is commonly fragmentary, integrated field, petrological and geochronological analysis can reconstruct the long term tectonic evolution of continental margins and characterized major controls on the orogenic style. We present new geochronological constraints from igneous and low to very low grade metasedimentary rocks from the Caribbean continental margin of northeastern Colombia (Guajira region) in order to reconstruct the different tectonic events recorded by the margin before, during and following the arc-continent collision with the front of the Caribbean plate. Zircon U-Pb LA-ICP-MS geochronology results from leucogranites associated with garnet amphibolites, tonalites and volcanic rocks that made the continental basement of northeastern Colombia reveals and Early to Middle Mesozoic tectonic activity with peaks at ca. 220-230 Ma and 170-180 Ma. This magmatic record is related to a collisional belt link to the final agglutination of Pangea and was followed by an overimposed far field back-arc setting associated to the subduction of the Pacific (Farrallon) plate under the Pangea supercontinent. Muscovite and biotite Ar-Ar geochronology from basement rocks and low grade Mesozoic metasediments also reveals the existence of Middle Jurassic to Early Cretaceous thermal events link to the final opening of the proto-Caribbean ocean. The South American continental margin was subsequently affected by an arc-continent collisional event with the front of the Caribbean plate. This event is recorded by the growth of a Banda-type collisional melange that mixed South American continental margin sediments with mafic and ultramafic blocks of intra-oceanic arc origin, the formation of a coherent metasedimentary belt also made of South American margin sediments, and the mylonitization of the continental basement. Ar-Ar temporal constraints on the low grade metasedimentary rocks and

  2. Deep observation and sampling of the earth's continental crust (DOSECC): Continental scientific drilling workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Research summaries are presented of ongoing or proposed deep drilling programs to explore hydrothermal systems, buried astroblemes, continental crust, magma systems, mountain belt tectonics, subduction zones, and volcanoes. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual papers. (ACR)

  3. Geohistory analysis of the Santa Maria basin, California, and its relationship to tectonic evolution of the continental margin

    SciTech Connect

    McCrory, P.A.; Arends, R.G. ); Ingle, J.C. Jr. ); Isaacs, C.M.; Stanley, R.G. ); Thornton, M.L.C. )

    1991-02-01

    The Santa Maria basin of central California is a geologically complex area located along the tectonically active California continental margin. The record of Cenozoic tectonism preserved in Santa Maria strata provides an opportunity to compare the evolution of the region with plate tectonic models for Cenozoic interactions along the margin. Geohistory analysis of Neogene Santa Maria basin strata provides important constraints for hypotheses of the tectonic evolution of the central California margin during its transition from a convergent to a transform plate boundary. Preliminary analyses suggest that the tectonic evolution of the Santa Maria area was dominated by coupling between adjacent oceanic plates and the continental margin. This coupling is reflected in the timing of major hiatuses within the basin sedimentary sequence and margin subsidence and uplift which occurred during periods of tectonic plate adjustment. Stratigraphic evidence indicates that the Santa Maria basin originated on the continental shelf in early Miocene time. A component of margin subsidence is postulated to have been caused by cessation of spreading on adjacent offshore microplates approximately 19-18 ma. A sharp reduction in rate of tectonic subsidence in middle Miocene time, observed in the Santa Maria basin both onshore and offshore, was coeval with rotation of crustal blocks as major shearing shifts shoreward. Tectonic uplift of two eastern sites, offshore Point Arguello and near Point Sal, in the late Miocene may have been related to a change to transpressional motion between the Pacific and North American plates, as well as to rotation of the western Transverse Ranges in a restraining geometry.

  4. Origin of Small Tectonic Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallard, C.; Coltice, N.; Seton, M.; Müller, D.; Tackley, P.

    2015-12-01

    The plate tectonic theory allowed to split the Earth surface into 6 (Le Pichon 1968) to 52 tectonic plates (Bird 2003). These plates are separated into two groups: the first of 7 large plates and the second of numerous smaller plates (Morra et al 2013). Previous studies using the reconstruction of the past 200 My, suggest that the size of large plates is driven by mantle flow. But the tools employed are descriptive (Morra et al 2013, Sornette and Pisarenko 2003), hence ignoring forces and physical principles within the lithosphere and the mantle. The processes at the origin of small plates remain unknown. We developed a new approach to explain the plate sizes. We demonstrate that the physics of convection drives it. We applied plate tectonics theory on 3D spherical convection models generating plate-like motions, which give access to a complete survey of data: velocities, viscosity and heat flow. Our data show that (1) the large plates depend on the dominating scale of the convective flow due to the initiation or the shutdown of subductions; (2) the smaller plates are generated thanks to large variability of regional stresses along subduction zone by slab pull and suction influenced by the geometry of trenches. Our results are consistent with the quick reorganizations of back-arc basins occuring synchronously with the modification of subduction zones geometry around the Pacific plate (Sdrolias et al 2004). Hence, we conclude that (1) the decreasing number of small plates in the plate reconstructions back in time is an artifact induced by their short lifetime, that is why they are artificially ignored; (2) the geometry of past trenches is simplified leading to an underestimation of the length of subduction zones.

  5. Steep Satellite Altimetry Gradients as a Proxy to the Edge of the Continental Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawver, L. A.; Gahagan, L. M.

    2005-05-01

    Tight-fit plate reconstructions are produced using a global database constrained by marine magnetic anomalies tied to a consistent timescale, paleomagnetic poles, seafloor age dates based on drilling results, and fracture zone and transform fault lineations picked from ship-track and satellite altimetry data. Where a prominent steep gradient in the satellite altimetry data is present near the continental-ocean transition, it is used as a proxy to the continental shelf break [CSB]. Continental block outlines are based on digitization of the steep gradient. In some places, notably off Namibia, there is a very close correlation between that gradient and the ocean-continent boundary deduced from seismic refraction and reflection data. In other regions, there may be some stretched continental crust oceanward of the steep gradient but for reconstruction purposes we assume the crust to be predominantly continental landward of the boundary and oceanic, seaward of the line. Good matchs for conjugate CSBs are found in many places world-wide along passive margins and these will be highlighted. Particularly good matches are observed between the cratonic edges of East Antarctica as determined by sub-ice topographic highs seen along the margins of East Antarctica with respect to Madagascar, Sri Lanka, the southern half of the eastern margin of India, and the region of Australia between 124° E and 133° E along the Great Australian Bight (GAB). There are overlaps of the reconstructed conjugate CSBs, with one overlap between India and East Antarctica (70° E to 85° E) and one between East Antarctica and the western section of the GAB (105° E to 120° E). These two overlaps are coincident with the outer margins of the Lambert Graben - Prydz Bay Basin and the Aurora Subglacial Basin, respectively. It is known that there are substantial glacially-derived sediments prograded off the continental margin onto oceanic crust at Prydz Bay where there may be as much as 200 km in width of

  6. Symmetries in laminated composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.

    1976-01-01

    The different types of symmetry exhibited by laminated anisotropic fibrous composite plates are identified and contrasted with the symmetries of isotropic and homogeneous orthotropic plates. The effects of variations in the fiber orientation and the stacking sequence of the layers on the symmetries exhibited by composite plates are discussed. Both the linear and geometrically nonlinear responses of the plates are considered. A simple procedure is presented for exploiting the symmetries in the finite element analysis. Examples are given of square, skew and polygonal plates where use of symmetry concepts can significantly reduce the scope and cost of analysis.

  7. Ophiolites and Continental Margins of the Mesozoic Western U.S. Cordillera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilek, Y.

    2001-12-01

    The Mesozoic tectonic history of the western U.S. Cordillera records evidence for multiple episodes of accretionary and collisional orogenic events and orogen-parallel strike-slip faulting. Paleozoic-Jurassic volcanic arc complexes and subduction zone assemblages extending from Mexico to Canada represent an East-Pacific magmatic arc system and an accretionary-type orogen evolved along the North American continental margin. Discontinuous exposures of Paleozoic upper mantle rocks and ophiolitic units structurally beneath this magmatic arc system are remnants of the Panthalassan oceanic lithosphere, which was consumed beneath the North American continent. Pieces of this subducted Panthalassan oceanic lithosphere that underwent high-P metamorphism are locally exposed in the Sierra Nevada foothills (e.g. Feather River Peridotite) indicating that they were subsequently (during the Jurassic) educted in an oblique convergent zone along the continental margin. This west-facing continental margin arc evolved in a broad graben system during much of the Jurassic as a result of extension in the upper plate, keeping pace with slab rollback of the east-dipping subduction zone. Lower to Middle Jurassic volcanoplutonic complexes underlain by an Upper Paleozoic-Lower Mesozoic polygenetic ophiolitic basement currently extend from Baja California-western Mexico through the Sierra-Klamath terranes to Stikinia-Intermontane Superterranes in Canada and represent an archipelago of an east-facing ensimatic arc terrane that developed west and outboard of the North American continental margin arc. The Smartville, Great Valley, and Coast Range ophiolites (S-GV-CR) in northern California are part of this ensimatic terrane and represent the island arc, arc basement, and back-arc tectonic settings, respectively. The oceanic Josephine-Rogue-Chetco-Rattlesnake-Hayfork tectonostratigraphic units in the Klamath Mountains constitute a west-facing island arc system in this ensimatic terrane as a

  8. Petrology and tectonics of Phanerozoic continent formation: From island arcs to accretion and continental arc magmatism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, C.-T.A.; Morton, D.M.; Kistler, R.W.; Baird, A.K.

    2007-01-01

    Mesozoic continental arcs in the North American Cordillera were examined here to establish a baseline model for Phanerozoic continent formation. We combine new trace-element data on lower crustal xenoliths from the Mesozoic Sierra Nevada Batholith with an extensive grid-based geochemical map of the Peninsular Ranges Batholith, the southern equivalent of the Sierras. Collectively, these observations give a three-dimensional view of the crust, which permits the petrogenesis and tectonics of Phanerozoic crust formation to be linked in space and time. Subduction of the Farallon plate beneath North America during the Triassic to early Cretaceous was characterized by trench retreat and slab rollback because old and cold oceanic lithosphere was being subducted. This generated an extensional subduction zone, which created fringing island arcs just off the Paleozoic continental margin. However, as the age of the Farallon plate at the time of subduction decreased, the extensional environment waned, allowing the fringing island arc to accrete onto the continental margin. With continued subduction, a continental arc was born and a progressively more compressional environment developed as the age of subducting slab continued to young. Refinement into a felsic crust occurred after accretion, that is, during the continental arc stage, wherein a thickened crustal and lithospheric column permitted a longer differentiation column. New basaltic arc magmas underplate and intrude the accreted terrane, suture, and former continental margin. Interaction of these basaltic magmas with pre-existing crust and lithospheric mantle created garnet pyroxenitic mafic cumulates by fractional crystallization at depth as well as gabbroic and garnet pyroxenitic restites at shallower levels by melting of pre-existing lower crust. The complementary felsic plutons formed by these deep-seated differentiation processes rose into the upper crust, stitching together the accreted terrane, suture and former

  9. Growth of early continental crust by partial melting of eclogite.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Robert P; Shimizu, Nobumichi; Norman, Marc D

    2003-10-01

    The tectonic setting in which the first continental crust formed, and the extent to which modern processes of arc magmatism at convergent plate margins were operative on the early Earth, are matters of debate. Geochemical studies have shown that felsic rocks in both Archaean high-grade metamorphic ('grey gneiss') and low-grade granite-greenstone terranes are comprised dominantly of sodium-rich granitoids of the tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG) suite of rocks. Here we present direct experimental evidence showing that partial melting of hydrous basalt in the eclogite facies produces granitoid liquids with major- and trace-element compositions equivalent to Archaean TTG, including the low Nb/Ta and high Zr/Sm ratios of 'average' Archaean TTG, but from a source with initially subchondritic Nb/Ta. In modern environments, basalts with low Nb/Ta form by partial melting of subduction-modified depleted mantle, notably in intraoceanic arc settings in the forearc and back-arc regimes. These observations suggest that TTG magmatism may have taken place beneath granite-greenstone complexes developing along Archaean intraoceanic island arcs by imbricate thrust-stacking and tectonic accretion of a diversity of subduction-related terranes. Partial melting accompanying dehydration of these generally basaltic source materials at the base of thickened, 'arc-like' crust would produce compositionally appropriate TTG granitoids in equilibrium with eclogite residues. PMID:14534583

  10. An inverted continental Moho and serpentinization of the forearc mantle.

    PubMed

    Bostock, M G; Hyndman, R D; Rondenay, S; Peacock, S M

    2002-05-30

    Volatiles that are transported by subducting lithospheric plates to depths greater than 100 km are thought to induce partial melting in the overlying mantle wedge, resulting in arc magmatism and the addition of significant quantities of material to the overlying lithosphere. Asthenospheric flow and upwelling within the wedge produce increased lithospheric temperatures in this back-arc region, but the forearc mantle (in the corner of the wedge) is thought to be significantly cooler. Here we explore the structure of the mantle wedge in the southern Cascadia subduction zone using scattered teleseismic waves recorded on a dense portable array of broadband seismometers. We find very low shear-wave velocities in the cold forearc mantle indicated by the exceptional occurrence of an 'inverted' continental Moho, which reverts to normal polarity seaward of the Cascade arc. This observation provides compelling evidence for a highly hydrated and serpentinized forearc region, consistent with thermal and petrological models of the forearc mantle wedge. This serpentinized material is thought to have low strength and may therefore control the down-dip rupture limit of great thrust earthquakes, as well as the nature of large-scale flow in the mantle wedge. PMID:12037564

  11. Cutting of the European continental lithosphere: Plasticity theory applied to the present Alpine collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus; Petit, Jean-Pierre

    1997-04-01

    Presently active European Alpine collision has a history of more than 100 Myr convergence. We investigate the collisional contact problem of an apparently rigid African promontory (currently the Italy/Adria block (IAB)) steadily penetrating at 1 cm/yr, over at least the past 45 Myr, into the deformable European plate. We assume that neither continental subduction nor delamination occurs presently in the 300-km-wide contact zone enabling use of the indenter-indentee approach. A key parameter is the aspect ratio h/a, defined by the width of the deformable foreland over the width of the indenter itself. This parameter controls the activation of two fundamentally different modes of deformation: (1) classical indentation mode for h/a≥4.4, described by previous authors, and having effect only in a portion of the deformable plate in the vicinity of the indenter and (2) cutting mode for h/a<4.4 giving plane strain longitudinal splitting of the entire deformable plate and plastic separation of the two halves. We use a matrix operator method to solve for slip lines in the mixed boundary value problem (obliquity, velocity, friction, stress) of the European Alpine case. Implications are as follows: (1) plane stress, vertical lithospheric thickening is the first indentation mode of continental collision; and (2) for the present ratio of h/a≈3 deformation is in the cutting mode and slow plane strain intraplate extension (rifting) is predicted. This mode explains the intraplate stress field obtained from borehole and earthquake data. Considering that the paleoindenter probably has been larger than the IAB it is inferred that h/a has been below 4.4 since at least the end of the Eocene and that consequently the intraplate graben system (Lower Rhine, Rhine, Bresse, Limagne) is due to the cutting of the European plate by Alpine collision.

  12. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  13. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines...

  14. 75 FR 1076 - Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-08

    ... Minerals Management Service Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties AGENCY: Minerals Management Service.... SUMMARY: The Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act requires the MMS to review the maximum daily civil penalty assessment for violations of regulations governing oil and gas operations in the Outer Continental Shelf...

  15. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  16. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines...

  17. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines...

  18. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  19. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines...

  20. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  1. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  2. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines...

  3. Eu Anomalies Constrain Recycling of Lower Continental Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, M.; Rudnick, R. L.; McDonough, W. F.; Gaschnig, R. M.; Huang, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Europium is fractionated from Sm and Gd during intra-crustal differentiation since Eu (II) strongly partitions into feldspar. Statistical analysis of Sm-Eu-Gd concentrations in over 2000 samples from the continental crust reveal that the bulk continental crust has a negative Eu anomaly. Samples include (1) shales, loess, and tillites which represent upper continental crust (n = 415); (2) amphibolite facies rocks, which represent the middle continental crust (n = 1325) and (3) granulite facies rocks (n = 845), which represent the lower continental crust. The upper and middle continental crust have a significant negative Eu anomaly, while the lower continental crust has a significant positive Eu anomaly. The Eu deficit in the upper and middle continental crust, however, cannot be compensated by the Eu excess in the lower continental crust, leaving the bulk continental crust with a negative Eu anomaly (Eu/Eu* = 0.81 ± 0.04, 95% conf.). Since the building blocks of the continental crust (mantle-derived basalts or tonalitic slab melts) do not possess a negative Eu anomaly, removal of lower continental crust, which is the only crustal reservoir enriched in Eu, is required during crustal evolution. A mass balance model of the continents, based on Sm-Eu-Gd systematics, indicates that at least 2.2-3.0 crustal masses may have been added back to the mantle over Earth history via lower crustal recycling.

  4. Fuel cell end plate structure

    DOEpatents

    Guthrie, Robin J.; Katz, Murray; Schroll, Craig R.

    1991-04-23

    The end plates (16) of a fuel cell stack (12) are formed of a thin membrane. Pressure plates (20) exert compressive load through insulation layers (22, 26) to the membrane. Electrical contact between the end plates (16) and electrodes (50, 58) is maintained without deleterious making and breaking of electrical contacts during thermal transients. The thin end plate (16) under compressive load will not distort with a temperature difference across its thickness. Pressure plate (20) experiences a low thermal transient because it is insulated from the cell. The impact on the end plate of any slight deflection created in the pressure plate by temperature difference is minimized by the resilient pressure pad, in the form of insulation, therebetween.

  5. Blocks or Continuous Deformation in Large-Scale Continental Geodynamics: Ptolemy Versus Copernicus, Kepler, and Newton (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, P. H.

    2010-12-01

    The enhanced precision and resolution of GPS velocity fields within active continental regions have highlighted two views of how best to describe these fields: (1) as relative movements of effectively rigid (or elastic) blocks, essentially plate tectonics with many plates, or (2) as continuous deformation of a (non-Newtonian) viscous fluid in a gravity field. The operative question is not: Are there blocks? Of course, there are. It is: Do blocks help us understand the deformation? Dan McKenzie used to say, 40 years ago, that the reason plate tectonics was accepted so easily was that the kinematics of plate motion could be analyzed separately from the dynamics that underlies that motion. No such separation seems to work for continental tectonics, where crust thickens or thins, and where the dynamics, both stresses and the gravitational body force, and kinematics are intimately connected via a constitutive relation that links strain rate to stress. Treating continental deformation in terms of blocks is like treating planetary orbits in terms of Ptolemaic epicycles; such a treatment provides an accurate description of the kinematics, but obscures dynamics. (Sea captains in the 15th Century would have been wise to use Ptolemy’s epicycles, not yet a Copernican system, to navigate their ships). A description in terms of blocks, however, seems unlikely to reveal insights into the dynamic processes and the viscosity structure of the deforming lithosphere. In Tibet, most hypothesized blocks are cut by obvious faults and must deform, if GPS measurements are not yet accurate enough to resolve such deformation. Presumably as the number of GPS control points and the precision of their velocities increase, so will numbers of blocks needed to describe the velocity field, with numbers of GPS points and numbers of blocks obeying a fractal relationship. The important unanswered question concerns how best to describe the constitutive equation for continental lithosphere? The

  6. Lower plate deformation structures along the Costa Rica erosive plate boundary - results from IODP Expedition 344 (CRISP 2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandstätter, Jennifer; Kurz, Walter; Micheuz, Peter; Krenn, Kurt

    2015-04-01

    The primary objective of Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 344 offshore the Osa Peninsula in Costa Rica was to sample and quantify the material entering the seismogenic zone of the Costa Rican erosive subduction margin. Fundamental to this objective is an understanding of the nature of both the subducting Cocos plate crust and of the overriding Caribbean plate. The subducting Cocos plate is investigated trying to define its hydrologic system and thermal state. The forearc structures recorded by the sediment deposited on the forearc, instead, document periods of uplift and subsidence and provide important information about the process of tectonic erosion that characterizes the Costa Rica margin. Offshore the western margin of Costa Rica, the oceanic Cocos plate subducts under the Caribbean plate, forming the southern end of the Middle America Trench. Subduction parameters including the age, convergence rate, azimuth, obliquity, morphology, and slab dip all vary along strike. The age of the Cocos plate at the Middle America Trench decreases from 24 Ma offshore the Nicoya Peninsula to 15 Ma offshore the Osa Peninsula. Subduction rates vary from 70 mm/y offshore Guatemala to 90 mm/y offshore southern Costa Rica. Convergence obliquity across the trench varies from offshore Nicaragua, where it is as much as 25° oblique, to nearly orthogonal southeast of the Nicoya Peninsula. Passage of the Cocos plate over the Galapagos hotspot created the aseismic Cocos Ridge, an overthickened welt of oceanic crust. This ridge is ~25 km thick, greater than three times normal oceanic crustal thickness. During IODP Expedition 344, the incoming Cocos plate was drilled at sites U1381 and U1414. Site U1381 is located ~4.5 km seaward of the deformation front offshore the Osa Peninsula and Caño Island. It is located on a local basement high. Basement relief often focuses fluid flow, so data from this site are likely to document the vigor of fluid flow in this area. Site U

  7. Generation of Continental Rifts, Basins and Swells by Lithosphere Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milelli, L.; Fourel, L.; Jaupart, C. P.

    2012-12-01

    Domal uplifts, volcanism, basin formation and rifting have often struck the same continent in different areas at the same time. Their characteristics and orientations are difficult to reconcile with mantle convection or tectonic forces and suggest a driving mechanism that is intrinsic to the continent. The rifts seem to develop preferentially at high angles to the edge of the continent whereas swells and basins seem confined to the interior. Another intriguing geometrical feature is that the rifts often branch out in complicated patterns at their landward end. In Western Africa, for example, magmatic activity currently occurs in a number of uplifted areas including the peculiar Cameroon Volcanic Line that stretches away from the continental margin over about 1000 km. Magmatic and volcanic activity has been sustained along this line for 70 My with no age progression. The mantle upwelling that feeds the volcanoes is not affected by absolute plate motions and hence is attached to the continent. The Cameroon Volcanic Line extends to the Biu swell to the North and the Jos plateau to the West defining a striking Y-shaped pattern. This structure segues into several volcanic domes including the Air, the Hoggar, the Darfur, the Tibesti and the Haruj domes towards the Mediterranean coast. Another example is provided by North America, where the late Proterozoic-early Ordovician saw the formation of four major basins, the Michigan, Illinois, Williston and Hudson Bay, as well as of major rifts in southern Oklahoma and the Mississipi Valley within a short time interval. At the same time, a series of uplifts developed, such as the Ozark and Nashville domes. Motivated by these observations, we have sought an explanation in the continental lithosphere itself. We describe a new type of convective instability at the base of the lithosphere that leads to a remarkable spatial pattern at the scale of an entire continent. We carried out fluid mechanics laboratory experiments on buoyant

  8. Paleomap PC: Plate tectonic reconstructions on IBM compatible computers

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, D.B.; Scotese, C.R. . Dept. Geology)

    1993-02-01

    PALEOMAP-PC (PMAPPC) allows users to interactively view Phanerozoic plate reconstructions on IBM compatible personal computers. This software compliments Macintosh and Unix software developed to conjunction with the PALEOMAP Project at the University of Texas at Arlington. The past positions of the continents can be viewed on the PC monitor in a variety of map projections including the spherical projection which gives a 3-D perspective of the Earth. Once a reconstruction time has been entered, the total finite rotations for over 150 independently moving plates are calculated and the plates are rotated back through time and drawn in reconstructed coordinates. The user can zoom in and out focusing on particular areas of interest. Hard copy output is available to a variety of output devices, both as a screen dump utility and as a selected option within the program. Although visualizing continental configurations through time is the core of the program, its primary strength is that user-defined data, such as stratigraphic or structural data, can be incorporated and plotted on reconstructed basemaps. This allows the time aspect of all geological data to be united with other user-supplied data within the plate tectonic framework.

  9. Wobble plate engine

    SciTech Connect

    Derderian, H.; Pronovost, J.

    1980-07-01

    A description is given of a conventional Stirling cycle engine of the type characterized by an elongated cylinder having a closed end and an open end, means for applying heat to the exterior of the cylinder to heat gas in the interior of the cylinder at the closed end thereof, a displacer piston mounted for a reciprocation within the closed end of the cylinder and a power piston axially aligned with the displacer piston and mounted for coaxial reciprocation between the displacer piston and the open end of the cylinder, the reciprocation of the displacer piston leading the corresponding stroke of the power piston by a predetermined phase angle, the improved means for properly phasing the reciprocation of the two pistons and for converting the reciprocation of the power piston into rotation of an output shaft which is parallel to the axis of reciprocation comprising: a supporting frame; an output shaft mounted on said frame for rotation about a first axis which is parallel to the axis of reciprocation of the two pistons, said shaft having an inclined cylindrical bearing surface the axis of which intersects said first axis at an acute angle; gimbal means pivotally mounted on said supporting frame for oscillation about a second axis perpendicular to and intersecting first axis; a wobble plate pivotally mounted on a third axis within said gimbal means for oscillation with said gimbal means and for further oscillation about said third axis which is mutually perpendicular to and intersecting said first and second axes, said wobble plate being rotatably mounted on said inclined cylindrical bearing surface in a plane which is perpendicular to said axis of said bearing surface whereby said output shaft can rotate about said first axis as said wobble plate oscillates about said second and third axes.

  10. Surficial sediments on the western Canadian continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornhold, Brian D.; Barrie, J. Vaughn

    1991-08-01

    The active continental margin off western Canada is characterized in the south by convergence between the Explorer and Juan de Fuca Plates and the America Plate, and in the north by transform fault motion between the Pacific and America Plates along the Queen Charlotte Fault. Except in some of the deepest troughs and basins shelf sediments are dominated by immature lithic arenites reflecting this tectonic setting. The Vancouver Island shelf is from 5 to 75 km wide and displays complex topography on the inner shelf and a relatively featureless mid- and outer shelf. An exception is the area off southwestern Vancouver Island where large basins bounded by morainal deposits extend more than two-thirds of the distance across the shelf. The shelf edge varies from 180 to 225 m depth and is indented by numerous canyons. Nearshore sediments consist mainly of gravels and boulders and become finer offshore such that muds are slowly accumulating in depths greater than 100 m. Off northwestern Vancouver Island calcareous sediments are abundant with carbonate values often exceeding 75%. High wave and current energies and efficient sediment trapping in coastal fiords have resulted in low rates of accumulation. Olive, glauconitic, Holocene muds and muddy sands are generally less than 0.3 m thick and accumulate only on the outer shelf over an extensive stiff, gray, glaciomarine sandy mud. Queen Charlotte Sound exhibits three broad, shallow, glacially scoured troughs, filled mainly with clayey silts and fine sands and separated by sand and gravel covered banks. Hecate Strait, between the Queen Charlotte Islands and the mainland, consists of a prominent southward-opening trough along the east side of the Strait bounded by Dogfish and Laskeek Banks on the west adjacent to Graham and Moresby Islands, respectively. The trough below 200 m is filled by silts. The banks are covered by discontinuous sands and gravels of variable calcareous content. The bank edges often display megaripples and

  11. Shuttle plate braiding machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huey, Jr., Cecil O. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A method and apparatus for moving yarn in a selected pattern to form a braided article. The apparatus includes a segmented grid of stationary support elements and a plurality of shuttles configured to carry yarn. The shuttles are supported for movement on the grid assembly and each shuttle includes a retractable plunger for engaging a reciprocating shuttle plate that moves below the grid assembly. Such engagement at selected times causes the shuttles to move about the grid assembly in a selected pattern to form a braided article of a particular geometry.

  12. Reduced hydrogen cadmium plating

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeller, T.; Ross, L. ); Varma, R. ); Agarwala, V.S. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the advantages of using a periodic reverse pulse plating method, incorporating a fast cathodic pulse which is separated from the subsequent anodic/cathodic pulses by a long rest period in producing silvery cadmium coatings on steel from aqueous fluoroborate electrolyte. Also, the deposition obtained by combination of pulse currents and turbulent electrolyte flow system (forced convection of electrolyte, Re {approximately} 20-25,000) result in a near hydrogen-free electrodeposition of fine- grained cadmium. This is confirmed by the determination of diffusible hydrogen by the electrochemical (Barnach Electrode) method.

  13. Plated wire memory subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, K. H.

    1974-01-01

    The design, construction, and test history of a 4096 word by 18 bit random access NDRO Plated Wire Memory for use in conjunction with a spacecraft input/output and central processing unit is reported. A technical and functional description is given along with diagrams illustrating layout and systems operation. Test data is shown on the procedures and results of system level and memory stack testing, and hybrid circuit screening. A comparison of the most significant physical and performance characteristics of the memory unit versus the specified requirements is also included.

  14. Ultrafast microchannel plate photomultipliers.

    PubMed

    Kume, H; Koyama, K; Nakatsugawa, K; Suzuki, S; Fatlowitz, D

    1988-03-15

    Performance characteristics of several new types of photomultiplier tubes (PMT) with microchannel plates (MCP) are presented in this paper. They are the MCP-PMT with 6-microm diam channels, MCP-PMT with an S-l photocathode, and MCP-PMT with multi (discrete) anode and gatable MCP-PMT. Important requirements of an optical detector for picosecond lasers, fluorescence measurements, and material analysis are low light detectability, ultrafast time response, and versatile operation including modulation. The basic configuration, characteristics, and practical results of these detectors are described. PMID:20531532

  15. Flexural deformation of the continental lithosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Prior work focused primarily on the Adriatic and northern Ionian regions. The results of these studies have been summarized previously, and so are only briefly discussed. More recent work focuses on two different topics: (1) analysis of foredeep basin geometry, sedimentary style, and thrust belt structure in light of the kinematics at the associated plate boundary and subduction zone dynamics; and (2) the evolution and plate<