Science.gov

Sample records for owners group assessment

  1. Safety Evaluation Report related to Hydrogen Control Owners Group assessment of Mark 3 containments

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.Y.; Kudrick, J.A.

    1990-10-01

    Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR), Section 50.44 Standards for Combustible Gas Control System in Light-Water-Cooled Power Reactors,'' requires that systems be provided to control hydrogen concentration in the containment atmosphere following an accident to ensure that containment integrity is maintained. The purpose of this report is to provide regulatory guidance to licensees with Mark III containments with regard to demonstrating compliance with 10 CFR 50.44, Section (c)(3)(vi) and (c)(3)(vii). In this report, the staff provides its evaluation of the generic methodology proposed by the Hydrogen Control Owners Group. This generic methodology is documented in Topical Report HGN-112-NP, Generic Hydrogen Control Information for BWR/6 Mark III Containments.'' In addition, the staff has recommended that the vulnerability to interruption of power to the hydrogen igniters be evaluated further on a plant-specific basis as part of the individual plant examination of the plants with Mark III containments. 10 figs., 1 tab.

  2. A Nordic survey of management practices and owners' attitudes towards keeping horses in groups.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, E; Bøe, K E; Christensen, J W; Hyyppä, S; Jansson, H; Jørgensen, G H M; Ladewig, J; Mejdell, C M; Norling, Y; Rundgren, M; Särkijärvi, S; Søndergaard, E; Keeling, L J

    2015-09-01

    Keeping horses in groups is widely recommended but limited information is available about how this is implemented in practice. The aim of this survey was to describe how horses are kept in the Nordic countries in relation to sex, age, breed, and equestrian discipline and to assess owners' attitudes toward keeping horses in groups. Horse owners in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden were approached using a web-based questionnaire, which was translated into 4 languages and distributed online via equestrian forums, organizations, and social media. The number of respondents was 3,229, taking care of 17,248 horses. Only 8% of horses were never kept in groups, 47% were permanently grouped for 24 h/d, and 45% were stabled singly but grouped during turnout. Yearlings were most often permanently kept in groups (75%), mares and geldings more commonly during parts of the day (50 and 51%, respectively), and stallions were often kept alone (38%). Icelandic horses were more likely to be permanently kept in groups (36%) than warmbloods (16%) and ponies (15%). Twice as many competition horses (51%) were never grouped compared with horses used for breeding (20%) or leisure purposes (15%). The majority of respondents (86%) strongly agreed that group housing benefits horse welfare and that it is important for horses to have the company of conspecifics (92%). Nevertheless, not all horses were kept in groups, showing that attitudes toward group housing may not necessarily reflect current management. The risk of injury was a concern of many respondents (45%), as was introducing unfamiliar horses into already established groups (40%) and challenges in relation to feeding in groups (44%). Safety of people (23%) and difficulties handling group-kept horses (19%) were regarded as less problematic. Results suggest that the majority of horses have the possibility to freely interact with other horses, either as fulltime members of a group during 24 h/d or during turnout. Future research should

  3. The Joint Owners' Group Program on MOV Periodic Verification

    SciTech Connect

    Damerell, Paul S.; Spears, Todd A.

    2002-07-01

    To address long-term motor operated valve (MOV) performance, the Babcock and Wilcox, Boiling Water Reactor, Combustion Engineering and Westinghouse Groups (B and WOG, BWROG, CEOG and WOG) teamed in 1997 to form the Joint Group (JOG) MOV Periodic Verification (PV) Program. This program is nearing completion, with 98 of the 103 operating U.S. reactor units participating. The goal of the program is to provide a justified approach for periodically testing MOVs, that addresses potential degradation. The program defines an interim approach that specifies periodic tests without flow and differential pressure (DP), at a frequency determined by the s risk significance and margin. To justify this approach, each participating plant is also DP testing 2 valves per unit. Each valve is tested three times over five years, with at least one year between tests. The data are evaluated jointly to confirm or adjust the initial guidance. The majority of the tests are complete and conclusions are coming into focus. For gate valves, when the valve factor is initially low, increases can occur between one test and a later test. One common way that the valve factor becomes low is disassembling and reassembling the valve. The data show that, following valve disassembly and re-assembly, the valve factor tends to be reduced, and it tends to increase in subsequent service. Outside of the valves disassembled and reassembled, some gate valves have low valve factors apparently because the valves are not stroked under DP conditions in service. For butterfly valves, there have been no observations of degradation in bearing friction coefficient. A few valves with bronze bearings in raw (untreated) water service have shown significant variations in friction, but they tend to be a mixture of increases and decreases with no pattern of degradation. Globe valves, both unbalanced and balanced, tend to show a constant valve factor with no indication of degradation. (authors)

  4. Assessment of knowledge, attitude and practice of dog owners to canine rabies in Wukari metropolis, Taraba State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ameh, Veronica O; Dzikwi, Asabe A; Umoh, Jarlath U

    2014-09-01

    Canine rabies is endemic and occurs throughout the year in all parts of Nigeria. A descriptive cross sectional study was designed to assess knowledge, attitude and practice of dog owners towards rabies, to check for the presence of rabies antigens in brain tissue of dogs slaughtered for human consumption and to assess rabies vaccination coverage of dogs in Wukari. Structured questionnaires were prepared and administered to 200 dog owners by face to face interview. The questionnaire sought information on demographic characteristics of the dog owners, their association with dogs, knowledge, attitude and practice of dog owners towards rabies. Associations between demographic variables and knowledge, attitude or practice scores were assessed using chi(2) analysis. Also, 188 brain samples from slaughtered dogs were analysed for presence of rabies antigen using direct fluorescent antibody test. Fifteen (7.89%) had rabies antigen. Record files and vaccination certificates of dogs presented to the State Veterinary Hospital Wukari were assessed for anti rabies vaccination coverage. Out of the 200 dog owners, only 26 (13%) knew that rabies virus can be found in nervous tissue, 121 (60.5%) were aware that rabies can be spread through the saliva of a rabid animal, but majority of respondents 172 (86%) did not know the age for first vaccination of dogs against rabies. Dog owners who were civil servants were 4.8 times more likely to have good knowledge (OR=4.84, 95% CI on OR 1.09-21.44) than those of other occupation groups. Positive attitude towards rabies increased with increase in age of dog owners, with respondents within the age group 20-30 years more likely to have negative attitude than those over 40 years. Civil servants were 9.8 times more likely to have good practice than other occupation groups. Rabies antigen was detected in 7.98% of slaughtered dogs. Out of 8370 dogs presented to the hospital between January 2003 and December 2012, only 1128 (13.50%) received anti

  5. Development and validation of a survey for quality of life assessment by owners of healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Lavan, R P

    2013-09-01

    Assessing and maintaining quality of life (QOL) is a growing concern in companion animal practice, as improved nutrition and healthcare have extended canine longevity. The objective of this study was to develop a validated survey for evaluating QOL in healthy dogs for use in clinical and research settings. A total of 174 dog owners completed an initial QOL survey containing 21 items grouped into seven domains (CHQLS-21). After factor analysis of the responses, a final survey was constructed containing 15 items grouped into four domains (happiness, physical functioning, hygiene and mental status), plus two questions on general health and an item asking for a direct QOL assessment (CHQLS-15). Psychometric analysis indicated that the CHQLS-15 had good validity, reliability, and internal consistency and was able to detect QOL changes affecting several domains across age groups in healthy dogs. The CHQLS-15 therefore provides a basis for dialog between clinicians and dog owners regarding the health of their pets, particularly in tracking changes in health status, evaluating response to treatment, and guiding end-of-life decisions. A validated QOL survey could be particularly useful in recognizing and managing functional decline as the healthy canine patient ages. PMID:23639368

  6. A new compact for owners and directors. The Working Group on Corporate Governance.

    PubMed

    1991-01-01

    The virtual demise of hostile takeovers and leveraged buyouts has not cooled the tensions over corporate governance. In congressional hearings, at annual meetings, and in proxy contests splashed across the business pages, senior executives and powerful shareholders continue to confront each other. The basic issues remain remarkably consistent. When do investors' legitimate needs for returns translate into destructive pressures on long-term corporate prosperity? What kinds of accountability do top managers owe shareholders in terms of strategic consultation and disclosure? What is the precise role of the board of directors as a management monitor and shareholder representative? More than a year ago, a working group of distinguished lawyers representing large public companies and leading institutional investors began a series of meetings to cut through the rancor. Their goal was to reach common ground on a set of principles that reconciles the tensions between owners and managers. Recently, the group agreed on a statement that all eight members endorsed. The statement, "A New Charter for Owners and Managers," deserves wide readership, scrutiny, and commentary. HBR is pleased the working group chose it as the exclusive forum to release its statement. PMID:10112919

  7. 43 CFR 3734.1 - Owner of claim to file notice of location and assessment work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... and assessment work. 3734.1 Section 3734.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands...; MINING IN POWERSITE WITHDRAWALS: GENERAL Location and Assessment Work § 3734.1 Owner of claim to file... tunnel site located on land described in § 3730.0-1 (a) and (b), shall file all notices or...

  8. 43 CFR 3734.1 - Owner of claim to file notice of location and assessment work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... and assessment work. 3734.1 Section 3734.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands...; MINING IN POWERSITE WITHDRAWALS: GENERAL Location and Assessment Work § 3734.1 Owner of claim to file... tunnel site located on land described in § 3730.0-1 (a) and (b), shall file all notices or...

  9. 43 CFR 3734.1 - Owner of claim to file notice of location and assessment work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... and assessment work. 3734.1 Section 3734.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands...; MINING IN POWERSITE WITHDRAWALS: GENERAL Location and Assessment Work § 3734.1 Owner of claim to file... tunnel site located on land described in § 3730.0-1 (a) and (b), shall file all notices or...

  10. 43 CFR 3734.1 - Owner of claim to file notice of location and assessment work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... and assessment work. 3734.1 Section 3734.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands...; MINING IN POWERSITE WITHDRAWALS: GENERAL Location and Assessment Work § 3734.1 Owner of claim to file... tunnel site located on land described in § 3730.0-1 (a) and (b), shall file all notices or...

  11. Babcock and Wilcox Owners' Group program: Trip reduction and transient response improvement

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, W.T.; Mercado, A.L.; Ganthner, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    In 1985, the average trip frequency for the industry was 4.3 trips per plant per year while Babcock Wilcox (B W)-designed plants had 4.5 trips. In early 1986, the B W Owners' Group (B WOG) established goals to reduce trip frequency and improve posttrip transient response. Through the recommendations of the B WOG Trip Reduction and Transient Response Improvement Program (TR/TRIP) and other utility initiatives, the trip frequency for the B WOG plants has been on a progressive downward trend and has been consistently below the industry average since 1986. The successful results in trip reduction for the B WOG plants are shown. The B WOG has implemented several programs that have resulted in fewer trips per plant. This success can be attributed to the following: (1) a comprehensive program to evaluate each trip and transient for root-cause determination, define corrective actions, share information, and peer reviews; (2) a broad program to review systems and components that contribute to trips and transients, identify specific recommendations to correct deficiencies, utility commitment to implementation, conduct internal monitoring and indirectly exert peer pressure; (3) an awareness of the goals at all levels in the organization coupled with strong executive-level involvement; and (4) timely implementation of recommendations.

  12. Assessing Minority Group Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Beeman N., Ed.

    Contents of this book include the following collection of articles: "Assessing Minority Group Children: Challenges for School Psychologists," Thomas Oakland; "The NEA Testing Moratorium," Boyd Bosma; "Cultural Myopia: The Need for a Corrective Lens," Martin H. Gerry; "Assumptions Underlying Psychological Testing," T. Ernest Newland;…

  13. A Bayesian Belief Network approach to assess the potential of non wood forest products for small scale forest owners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacik, Harald; Huber, Patrick; Hujala, Teppo; Kurtilla, Mikko; Wolfslehner, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    It is an integral element of the European understanding of sustainable forest management to foster the design and marketing of forest products, non-wood forest products (NWFPs) and services that go beyond the production of timber. Despite the relevance of NWFPs in Europe, forest management and planning methods have been traditionally tailored towards wood and wood products, because most forest management models and silviculture techniques were developed to ensure a sustained production of timber. Although several approaches exist which explicitly consider NWFPs as management objectives in forest planning, specific models are needed for the assessment of their production potential in different environmental contexts and for different management regimes. Empirical data supporting a comprehensive assessment of the potential of NWFPs are rare, thus making development of statistical models particularly problematic. However, the complex causal relationships between the sustained production of NWFPs, the available ecological resources, as well as the organizational and the market potential of forest management regimes are well suited for knowledge-based expert models. Bayesian belief networks (BBNs) are a kind of probabilistic graphical model that have become very popular to practitioners and scientists mainly due to the powerful probability theory involved, which makes BBNs suitable to deal with a wide range of environmental problems. In this contribution we present the development of a Bayesian belief network to assess the potential of NWFPs for small scale forest owners. A three stage iterative process with stakeholder and expert participation was used to develop the Bayesian Network within the frame of the StarTree Project. The group of participants varied in the stages of the modelling process. A core team, consisting of one technical expert and two domain experts was responsible for the entire modelling process as well as for the first prototype of the network

  14. The effect of long-term feeding of skin barrier-fortified diets on the owner-assessed incidence of atopic dermatitis symptoms in Labrador retrievers.

    PubMed

    van Beeck, Frank Looringh; Watson, Adrian; Bos, Margriet; Biourge, Vincent; Willemse, Ton

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of feeding a skin barrier function-augmenting diet early in dogs' lives on the appearance of clinical signs associated with canine atopic dermatitis. Pregnant bitches (starting 5 weeks after mating) and their subsequent litters (up to 1 year of age) were fed either supplemented or unsupplemented diets. Nutrients supplemented were nicotinamide, pantothenate, histidine, inositol and choline. Circulating IgE levels to dust mute allergens Der f and Der p were measured when the puppies were 6 and 12 months old. Two owner questionnaires were used to assess the occurrence of typical signs associated with atopic dermatitis when dogs were between the ages of 22 and 36, and 34 and 48 months. Using linear mixed models we observed higher levels of circulating anti-Der f (P = 0·021) and -Der p IgE (P = 0·01) during the first year in the dogs fed the unsupplemented than in those fed the supplemented diet. The owner-assessed incidence of atopic dermatitis signs amongst the dogs was significantly greater in the unsupplemented group at the time of the second follow-up questionnaire (10/33 dogs v. 2/24 dogs). These outcomes suggest that a nutritionally derived improvement to barrier function early in life may reduce the frequency of signs associated with atopic dermatitis. The effect is possibly the result of making the epidermis, now thought to be a major route of environmental allergen exposure, more resistant to penetration. PMID:26097705

  15. Group Assessment: Comparing Group and Individual Undergraduate Module Marks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almond, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes a small study that analysed module marks of one cohort of science undergraduates from one academic year. It explored how group summative assessment marking affected the overall marks in comparison with individual assessment. A tutor allocated students to mixed ability project groups. Individual marks for the group work…

  16. Equity Issues in Collaborative Group Assessment: Group Composition and Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Noreen M.; Nemer, Kariane M.; Chizhik, Alexander W.; Sugrue, Brenda

    1998-01-01

    Investigated the effects of group ability composition on group processes and outcomes in science performance assessments. Findings from 21 eighth-grade science classes (445 students) show that group ability composition has a great impact on performance and that heterogeneous groups provide more of a benefit for below-average students than a…

  17. Researching Group Assessment: Jazz in the Conservatoire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barratt, Elisabeth; Moore, Hilary

    2005-01-01

    This article presents the results of research into methods and scorings for jazz assessment in Trinity College of Music, London, focusing on the possibility of introducing group assessment. It considers the advantages of group assessment methods, contrasting these with the more traditional approach, firmly established in conservatoires, of…

  18. "Like Owner, Like Dog": Correlation between the Owner's Attachment Profile and the Owner-Dog Bond

    PubMed Central

    Siniscalchi, Marcello; Stipo, Carlo; Quaranta, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    During recent years, several studies have revealed that human-dog relationships are based on a well-established and complex bond. There is now evidence suggesting that the dog–human affectional bond can be characterized as an “attachment”. The present study investigated possible association between the owners' attachment profile assessed throughout a new semi-projective test (the 9 Attachment Profile) and the owner-dog attachment bond evaluated using a modified version of those used in studying human infants: Ainsworth's “strange situation”. The findings represented the first evidence for the presence of a correlation between the owners' attachment profile and the owner-dog attachment bond throughout procedure and behavioural analyses involving controlled observations. PMID:24205235

  19. A normative price for energy from an electricity generation system: An Owner-dependent Methodology for Energy Generation (system) Assessment (OMEGA). Volume 1: Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain, R. G.; McMaster, K. M.

    1981-10-01

    The utility owned solar electric system methodology is generalized and updated. The net present value of the system is determined by consideration of all financial benefits and costs (including a specified return on investment). Life cycle costs, life cycle revenues, and residual system values are obtained. Break even values of system parameters are estimated by setting the net present value to zero. While the model was designed for photovoltaic generators with a possible thermal energy byproduct, it applicability is not limited to such systems. The resulting owner-dependent methodology for energy generation system assessment consists of a few equations that can be evaluated without the aid of a high-speed computer.

  20. A normative price for energy from an electricity generation system: An Owner-dependent Methodology for Energy Generation (system) Assessment (OMEGA). Volume 1: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, R. G.; Mcmaster, K. M.

    1981-01-01

    The utility owned solar electric system methodology is generalized and updated. The net present value of the system is determined by consideration of all financial benefits and costs (including a specified return on investment). Life cycle costs, life cycle revenues, and residual system values are obtained. Break even values of system parameters are estimated by setting the net present value to zero. While the model was designed for photovoltaic generators with a possible thermal energy byproduct, it applicability is not limited to such systems. The resulting owner-dependent methodology for energy generation system assessment consists of a few equations that can be evaluated without the aid of a high-speed computer.

  1. Assessment Intelligence in Small Group Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xing, Wanli; Wu, Yonghe

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of groups in CSCL context is a challenging task fraught with many confounding factors collected and measured. Previous documented studies are by and large summative in nature and some process-oriented methods require time-intensive coding of qualitative data. This study attempts to resolve these problems for teachers to assess groups…

  2. Could it be colic? Horse-owner decision making and practices in response to equine colic

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Little is known about lay understanding and decision making in response to colic. Horse-owners/carers are key to identifying colic and initiating veterinary intervention. Understanding how owners think and act in relation to colic could assist veterinary surgeons in tailoring information about colic with the aim of improving colic outcomes. Methods A mixed methods approach was employed including qualitative in-depth interviews and a cross-sectional questionnaire. Qualitative data were analysed using Grounded theory to conceptualise processes involved in horse-owner management of colic. Following this, a cross-sectional survey was designed to test these concepts. Cluster analysis explored the role of the human-horse relationship upon colic management strategies. Results Fifteen horse-owners with a range of colic experience participated in the interviews. A theoretical conceptual model was developed and described how horse-owners’ recognised, assessed and responded to colic. Three main management strategies were used including ‘wait and see’, ‘lay treatments’ and ‘seek veterinary assistance’. Actions in response to colic were moderated by owners’ experience of colic and interpretation of the severity of colic signs. A postal questionnaire gathered data from 673 horse-owners from the North-West of the UK. The majority (605, 89.9%) of respondents were female. Cluster analysis revealed 5 meaningful groups of horse-owners based upon assessment of questionnaire items on the human-horse relationship. These groups included 2 professional and 3 amateur owner typologies. There were differences in the responses to some questionnaire items among the identified groups. Conclusions This study describes lay understanding and management of colic among a population of horse-owners from the North-West of the UK. The information may serve as a basis upon which to tailor existing programmes designed to educate owners about colic management strategies, and may

  3. Social referencing in dog-owner dyads?

    PubMed

    Merola, I; Prato-Previde, E; Marshall-Pescini, S

    2012-03-01

    Social referencing is the seeking of information from another individual to form one's own understanding and guide action. In this study, adult dogs were tested in a social referencing paradigm involving their owner and a potentially scary object. Dogs received either a positive or negative message from the owner. The aim was to evaluate the presence of referential looking to the owner, behavioural regulation based on the owner's (vocal and facial) emotional message and observational conditioning following the owner's actions towards the object. Most dogs (83%) looked referentially to the owner after looking at the strange object, thus they appear to seek information about the environment from the human, but little differences were found between dogs in the positive and negative groups as regards behavioural regulation: possible explanations for this are discussed. Finally, a strong effect of observational conditioning was found with dogs in the positive group moving closer to the fan and dogs in the negative group moving away, both mirroring their owner's behaviour. Results are discussed in relation to studies on human-dog communication, attachment and social learning. PMID:21874515

  4. Assessment Rocks? The Assessment of Group Composing for Qualification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorpe, Vicki

    2012-01-01

    Ensembles such as rock and pop bands are places of exciting creativity and intense, enjoyable music making for young people. A recent review of New Zealand's secondary school qualification, the National Certificates of Educational Achievement (NCEA), has resulted in a new composition assessment of individuals' achievement in groups. An analysis of…

  5. The ethical considerations associated with group work assessments.

    PubMed

    Noonan, Maria

    2013-11-01

    Assessments that require students to participate in group work are incorporated throughout programmes in Higher Education Institutions. Ethical dimensions are integral to all assessments including assessments that require students to participate in group work. Assessments should be fair and consideration needs to be given to preparing students and lecturers to undertake group work. Decisions such as group selection and allocation of marks for group assessments are important areas that will influence the outcome of group work assessments. The following article explores the above issues and identifies action points for optimising group work. PMID:23200886

  6. Risk Assessment of the Carbon Nanotube Group

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Yasuo; Ogura, Isamu; Kobayashi, Norihiro; Naya, Masato; Ema, Makoto; Endoh, Shigehisa; Shimada, Manabu; Ogami, Akira; Myojyo, Toshihiko; Oyabu, Takako; Gamo, Masashi; Kishimoto, Atsuo; Igarashi, Takuya; Hanai, Sosuke

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the health risks via inhalation and derived the occupational exposure limit (OEL) for the carbon nanotube (CNT) group rather than individual CNT material. We devised two methods: the integration of the intratracheal instillation (IT) data with the inhalation (IH) data, and the “biaxial approach.” A four‐week IH test and IT test were performed in rats exposed to representative materials to obtain the no observed adverse effect level, based on which the OEL was derived. We used the biaxial approach to conduct a relative toxicity assessment of six types of CNTs. An OEL of 0.03 mg/m3 was selected as the criterion for the CNT group. We proposed that the OEL be limited to 15 years. We adopted adaptive management, in which the values are reviewed whenever new data are obtained. The toxicity level was found to be correlated with the Brunauer‐Emmett‐Teller (BET)‐specific surface area (BET‐SSA) of CNT, suggesting the BET‐SSA to have potential for use in toxicity estimation. We used the published exposure data and measurement results of dustiness tests to compute the risk in relation to particle size at the workplace and showed that controlling micron‐sized respirable particles was of utmost importance. Our genotoxicity studies indicated that CNT did not directly interact with genetic materials. They supported the concept that, even if CNT is genotoxic, it is secondary genotoxicity mediated via a pathway of genotoxic damage resulting from oxidative DNA attack by free radicals generated during CNT‐elicited inflammation. Secondary genotoxicity appears to involve a threshold. PMID:25943334

  7. Assessing Effectiveness of Nurture Groups in Northern Scotland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaver, Isabel; McClatchey, Kirstie

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this small-scale study was to assess the effectiveness of nurture groups in Northern Scotland. Data were collected from children (N?=?19) and staff (N?=?5) from three nurture groups. Pre-and post-nurture group Boxall Profile information was also assessed for 33 children across two of the nurture groups. Analysis of the Boxall Profiles…

  8. Self, Peer and Group Assessment in E-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Tim S.

    2006-01-01

    Contributions from researchers and practitioners involved in self, peer and group assessment in an online or e-learning environment investigate how assessment practices can be used to assist and improve the learning process. The book describes the principal characteristics of self, peer and group assessment; presents guidelines for effective…

  9. Peer-Assessing Peers' Contribution to EFL Group Presentations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saito, Hidetoshi; Fujita, Tomoko

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is three-fold: (1) to examine the similarities and differences between instructor and peer assessments of EFL group presentations; (2) to understand the utility of peer assessment for discriminating each group member's contribution to group presentations in college EFL classrooms; and (3) to investigate the relationship…

  10. Portfolio Assessment of an Undergraduate Group Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuisma, Raija

    2007-01-01

    Students in the Physiotherapy Programme carried out a group project in their final year of studies. The objectives of the project were that the students learn and appreciate the process and activities involved in research, acquire deeper understanding of a topic in their professional interest, learn to work as a team, manage their own time,…

  11. Resistance patterns, ESBL genes, and genetic relatedness of Escherichia coli from dogs and owners

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, A.C.; Barbosa, A.V.; Arais, L.R.; Ribeiro, P.F.; Carneiro, V.C.; Cerqueira, A.M.F.

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli isolated from pet dogs can be considered a potential threat of infection for the human population. Our objective was to characterize the resistance pattern, extended spectrum beta-lactamase production and genetic relatedness of multiresistant E. coli strains isolated from dogs (n = 134), their owners (n = 134), and humans who claim to have no contact with dogs (n = 44, control), searching for sharing of strains. The strains were assessed for their genetic relatedness by phylogenetic grouping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Multiresistant E. coli strains were isolated from 42 (31.3%) fecal samples from pairs of dogs and owners, totaling 84 isolates, and from 19 (43.1%) control group subjects. The strains showed high levels of resistance to ampicillin, streptomycin, tetracycline, trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole regardless of host species or group of origin. The blaTEM, blaCTX-M, and blaSHV genes were detected in similar proportions in all groups. All isolates positive for bla genes were ESBL producers. The phylogenetic group A was the most prevalent, irrespective of the host species. None of the strains belonging to the B2 group contained bla genes. Similar resistance patterns were found for strains from dogs, owners and controls; furthermore, identical PFGE profiles were detected in four (9.5%) isolate pairs from dogs and owners, denoting the sharing of strains. Pet dogs were shown to be a potential household source of multiresistant E. coli strains. PMID:26887238

  12. Group Learning Assessment: Developing a Theory-Informed Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xing, Wanli; Wadholm, Robert; Petakovic, Eva; Goggins, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Assessment in Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) is an implicit issue, and most assessments are summative in nature. Process-oriented methods of assessment can vary significantly in their indicators and typically only partially address the complexity of group learning. Moreover, the majority of these assessment methods require…

  13. Customized Assessment Group Initiative: A Complementary Approach to Students' Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akindayomi, Akinloye

    2015-01-01

    This study, conducted in a US setting, examines the importance of group dynamics that emphasize cooperative team building through the proposed grouping strategy called Customized Assessment Group Initiative (CAGI). CAGI is a student grouping strategy designed to operationalize the mutual accountability concept central to the definition of teams by…

  14. Space Propulsion Synergy Group ETO technology assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, James

    The Space Propulsion Synergy Group (SPSG), which was chartered to support long-range strategic planning, has, using a broad industry/government team, evaluated and achieved consensus on the vehicles, propulsion systems, and propulsion technologies that have the best long-term potential for achieving desired system attributes. The breakthrough that enabled broad consensus was developing criteria that are measurable a priori. The SPSG invented a dual prioritization approach that balances long-term strategic thrusts with current programmatic constraints. This enables individual program managers to make decisions based on both individual project needs and long-term strategic needs. Results indicate that an SSTO using an integrated modular engine has the best long-term potential for a 20 Klb class vehicle, and that health monitoring and control technologies are among the highest dual priority liquid rocket technologies.

  15. Space Propulsion Synergy Group ETO technology assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, James

    There exists within the aerospace community a widely recognized need to improve future space launch systems. While these needs have been expressed by many national committees, potential solutions have not achieved consensus nor have they endured. Facing the challenge to remain competitive with limited national resources, the U.S. must improve its strategic planning efforts. A nationally accepted strategic plan for space would enable a focused research & development program. The Space Propulsion Synergy Group (SPSG), chartered to support long range strategic planning, has achieved several breakthroughs. First, using a broad industry/government team, the SPSG evaluated and achieved consensus on the vehicles, propulsion systems, and propulsion technologies that have the best long term potential for achieving desired system attributes. The breakthrough that enabled broad consensus was developing criteria that are measurable a-priori. Second, realizing that systems having the best long term payoffs can loose support when constraints are tight, the SPSG invented a dual prioritization approach that balances long term strategic thrusts with current programmatic constraints. This breakthrough enables individual program managers to make decisions based on both individual project needs and long term strategic needs. Results indicate that a SSTO using an integrated modular engine has the best long term potential for a 20 Klb class vehicle and that health monitoring and control technologies rank among the highest dual priority liquid rocket technologies.

  16. Dogs recall their owner's face upon hearing the owner's voice.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Ikuma; Kuwahata, Hiroko; Fujita, Kazuo

    2007-01-01

    We tested whether dogs have a cross-modal representation of human individuals. We presented domestic dogs with a photo of either the owner's or a stranger's face on the LCD monitor after playing back a voice of one of those persons. A voice and a face matched in half of the trials (Congruent condition) and mismatched in the other half (Incongruent condition). If our subjects activate visual images of the voice, their expectation would be contradicted in Incongruent condition. It would result in the subjects' longer looking times in Incongruent condition than in Congruent condition. Our subject dogs looked longer at the visual stimulus in Incongruent condition than in Congruent condition. This suggests that dogs actively generate their internal representation of the owner's face when they hear the owner calling them. This is the first demonstration that nonhuman animals do not merely associate auditory and visual stimuli but also actively generate a visual image from auditory information. Furthermore, our subject also looked at the visual stimulus longer in Incongruent condition in which the owner's face followed an unfamiliar person's voice than in Congruent condition in which the owner's face followed the owner's voice. Generating a particular visual image in response to an unfamiliar voice should be difficult, and any expected images from the voice ought to be more obscure or less well defined than that of the owners. However, our subjects looked longer at the owner's face in Incongruent condition than in Congruent condition. This may indicate that dogs may have predicted that it should not be the owner when they heard the unfamiliar person's voice. PMID:16802145

  17. Group Assessments: Dilemmas Facing Lecturers in Multicultural Tertiary Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Pat; U, Alice

    2007-01-01

    "Group is good, and group is good for curing all social ills" was the cynical observation of one of the lecturers in this study. Her comment reflects the uneasiness of lecturers at tertiary institutions with the notion that the educational advantages of group assessments far outweigh the disadvantages, and that such an approach promotes the…

  18. Use of a Group Support System for Collaborative Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwok, Ron C. W.; Ma, Jian

    1999-01-01

    Reports on the use of an Internet-based Group Support System (GSS) for the collaborative assessment of student projects. Results of an empirical study that was conducted on undergraduate students show that GSS-supported collaborative assessment encourages students to take a deep approach to learning, which leads to better project performance.…

  19. Peer Assessment in Small Groups: A Comparison of Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Diane F.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes and evaluates several peer evaluation tools used to assess student behavior in small groups. The two most common methods of peer assessment found in the literature are rating scales and single score methods. Three peer evaluation instruments, two using a rating scale and one using a single score method, are tested in several…

  20. Experimental Assessment of Delphi Procedures with Group Value Judgments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalkey, Norman C.; Rourke, Daniel L.

    This report describes the results of an experiment assessing the appropriateness of Delphi procedures for formulating group value judgments. Two groups of subjects--upperclass and graduate students from UCLA--were asked to generate and rate value categories relating to higher education and the quality of life. The initial lists (300 and 250 items…

  1. Assessment of cattle owner's perceptions and expectations, and identification of constraints on production in a peri-urban, resource-poor environment.

    PubMed

    Dreyer, K; Fourie, L J; Kok, D J

    1999-06-01

    This questionnaire survey was conducted amongst 200 farmers in the resource-poor, urban and per-urban environments of Botshabelo and Thaba Nchu towns in the Free State Province of South Africa. The questionnaire was divided into seven sections, namely demography, livestock, cattle, parasites, parasite control, livestock diseases and problems experienced. A total of 87.5% of the livestock owners were not employed (unemployed or pensioner). Cattle constituted more than 50% of the live-stock units owned in the area and farmers owned an average of 9.33 +/- 0.812 head of cattle. A total of 193 (96.5%) of the farmers indicated that milk was the most important product from their cattle. Only 26% of them slaughtered their own cattle for meat consumption. Eighty-eight percent of them indicated that external parasites on their livestock presented a problem, but only 72.9% of farmers implemented any tick control measures. Less than half (45.5%) of the farmers who attempted to control ticks used commercial acaricides. The remainder used various other methods, including the application of used engine oil and household detergents. Amongst the clinical diseases observed in their cattle, dry gallsickness was mentioned most often (20%). This figure, however, is believed to be inaccurate because dry gallsickness may be a clinical manifestation of some of the other diseases mentioned by the farmers, such as anaplasmosis, foreign body obstruction of the gastro-intestinal tract by plastic bags, pneumonia and mastitis. Animal husbandry problems experienced by the farmers included pollution (i.e. ingestion of plastic bags and string by their livestock), availability of water and theft. PMID:10486825

  2. Implementing Fairness in Racial-Group Assessment Requires Assessment of Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms, Janet E.

    2007-01-01

    Replies to comments by R. J. Griffore and D. A. Newman et al. on the author's original article on test validity and cultural bias in racial-group assessment. Helms notes that, given that within-group variance exceeds between-groups variance, racial groups are probably simulating a psychological construct that is more strongly related to…

  3. Owners of Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R.L.

    2000-01-12

    Commercial nuclear power plants in this country can be owned by a number of separate entities, each with varying ownership proportions. Each of these owners may, in turn, have a parent/subsidiary relationship to other companies. In addition, the operator of the plant may be a different entity as well. This report provides a compilation on the owners/operators for all commercial power reactors in the United States. While the utility industry is currently experiencing changes in organizational structure which may affect nuclear plant ownership, the data in this report is current as of November 1999. The report is divided into sections representing different aspects of nuclear plant ownership.

  4. Owners of nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, C.R.; White, V.S.

    1996-11-01

    Commercial nuclear power plants in this country can be owned by a number of separate entities, each with varying ownership proportions. Each of these owners may, in turn, have a parent/subsidiary relationship to other companies. In addition, the operator of the plant may be a different entity as well. This report provides a compilation on the owners/operators for all commercial power reactors in the United States. While the utility industry is currently experiencing changes in organizational structure which may affect nuclear plant ownership, the data in this report is current as of July 1996. The report is divided into sections representing different aspects of nuclear plant ownership.

  5. Does the attachment system towards owners change in aged dogs?

    PubMed

    Mongillo, Paolo; Pitteri, Elisa; Carnier, Paolo; Gabai, Gianfranco; Adamelli, Serena; Marinelli, Lieta

    2013-08-15

    Changes during senescence can significantly affect both the emotional and relational needs of old individuals and the characteristics of the attachment system. In order to determine whether the emotional response of dogs is affected by old age, we compared the behavioural parameters of adult (AD <7 years of age, n=25) and aged (AG ≥7 years of age, n=25) dogs in a distressing situation, which gives rise to attachment behaviour patterns (Strange Situation Test, SST). The physiological response of dogs was assessed by measurement of salivary cortisol variations in samples collected both at the dogs' homes and at the study location, before and after the SST. Both groups of dogs expressed clear-cut patterns of attachment to their owners. During the initial part of the procedure, AG dogs sought more physical contact, but behaved more passively and showed less interest in an unknown person during separation from their owners. Compared with AD dogs, AG ones showed a significant increase in salivary cortisol concentrations after the SST. The combination of physiological and behavioural data of the present study supports the hypothesis that, later in life, dogs cope less efficiently with emotional distress caused by mild social challenge. PMID:23911691

  6. Consider the source: the impact of media and authority in outreach to private forest and rangeland owners.

    PubMed

    Ferranto, Shasta; Huntsinger, Lynn; Stewart, William; Getz, Christy; Nakamura, Gary; Kelly, Maggi

    2012-04-30

    Over half of the United States is privately owned. Improving environmental sustainability requires that the scientific and management communities provide effective outreach to the many landowners making decisions about land use and management practices on these lands. We surveyed California forest and rangeland owners in ten counties throughout the state to assess the impact of existing outreach and identify gaps in information distribution and content. Although a number of organizations provide land management advice highly-ranked by landowners, no individual organization currently reaches more than 30% of forest and rangeland owners, and these groups together reach less than 60% of landowners. The lowest ranked advice came from wildlife and land management agencies, whereas the highest ranked advice came from private consultants and advisory organizations. The ecosystem services provided by forests and rangelands are strongly influenced by conservation scale, and this appears to be recognized in current outreach efforts. Owners of large properties (>200 ha) were substantially more likely to have received land management advice than smaller-sized properties, and from a broader group of organizations. As ownerships become increasingly fragmented, outreach focus and methods will need to shift to more effectively target the owners of smaller properties. On the other hand, some major outreach goals, such as conservation of wildlife, ranchland, or agricultural communities, will continue to rely on effective outreach to owners of larger properties. PMID:22266415

  7. Mediating Academic Research: The Assessment Reform Group Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daugherty, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The interface between education research and education policy in the UK has been discussed, explored and redefined over nearly two decades since the "Education Reform Act" of 1988. This contribution analyses how one group of researchers, in the field of assessment, has attempted to exploit the potential for evidence from research to influence…

  8. Continuous Assessment in a Large Group of Psychology Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clariana, Merce; Gotzens, Concepcion; Badia, Mar

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: A continuous classroom assessment method was applied to a higher education course aimed at a large group of educational psychology students at the "Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona". Following the Bologna directions and the constructivist model, both declarative and procedural knowledge was taught in the module, and the students…

  9. The Work Group Survey: Assessing Organizational Climate in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunwell, Robert R.

    The organizational climate of Southeast Missouri State University was assessed as part of an institutional self-study, and the appropriateness and effectiveness of the research instrument were evaluated. Twenty-five characteristics identified by Likert (1961, 1967) as descriptive of highly effective work groups were used as a framework for the…

  10. Needs Assessment Among Diverse Groups: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pooler, Anne E.; Toner, James F.

    A Teacher Corps project to deliver staff development services focused on five educational settings: a correctional youth center, a high school, a junior high school, a youth group home consortium, and a college of education. It was felt that comparing the results of needs assessments conducted at each facility would enable useful analyses of…

  11. Current Assessment Practices: A Report from the Virginia Assessment Study Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Adult Educators Research Network, Dayton.

    The report details the activities of the Virginia Assessment Study Group in documenting the utility of various approaches to assessing adult education programs and instruction within the state. A group of diverse practitioners convened during 1997 to establish project objectives and research questions and to report on their work. The reports of…

  12. Assessing Group Interaction with Social Language Network Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholand, Andrew J.; Tausczik, Yla R.; Pennebaker, James W.

    In this paper we discuss a new methodology, social language network analysis (SLNA), that combines tools from social language processing and network analysis to assess socially situated working relationships within a group. Specifically, SLNA aims to identify and characterize the nature of working relationships by processing artifacts generated with computer-mediated communication systems, such as instant message texts or emails. Because social language processing is able to identify psychological, social, and emotional processes that individuals are not able to fully mask, social language network analysis can clarify and highlight complex interdependencies between group members, even when these relationships are latent or unrecognized.

  13. Assessing group interaction with social language network analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Pennebaker, James; Scholand, Andrew Joseph; Tausczik, Yla R.

    2010-04-01

    In this paper we discuss a new methodology, social language network analysis (SLNA), that combines tools from social language processing and network analysis to assess socially situated working relationships within a group. Specifically, SLNA aims to identify and characterize the nature of working relationships by processing artifacts generated with computer-mediated communication systems, such as instant message texts or emails. Because social language processing is able to identify psychological, social, and emotional processes that individuals are not able to fully mask, social language network analysis can clarify and highlight complex interdependencies between group members, even when these relationships are latent or unrecognized.

  14. Ophthalmic and visual profile of guide dog owners in Scotland

    PubMed Central

    Refson, K; Jackson, A; Dusoir, A; Archer, D

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Out of an estimated 90 000 visually impaired people in Scotland, 509 make use of a guide dog. Initial research in Northern Ireland suggests that the ophthalmic profile of guide dog owners (GDOs) is highly specific. The aim of this study was to compare the ophthalmic and visual characteristics of Scottish GDOs with other groups of visually impaired people.
METHODS—A random sample of GDOs from central and northern Scotland (n=82) underwent a detailed assessment of residual vision (distance and near acuity, visual fields, contrast, and glare sensitivity). Comparative data were obtained from two populations of visually impaired non-GDOs—one group attending hospital ophthalmic and low vision clinics (n=50) the other social services rehabilitation clients (n=35). All participants completed a questionnaire to elicit ophthalmic history, age, and registration details.
RESULTS—GDOs were found to be significantly younger and more profoundly visually impaired than non-GDOs. The main causes of visual impairment were retinitis pigmentosa (23%), optic atrophy (15%), and retinopathy of prematurity (7%). Ninety nine per cent of GDOs were registered blind and had been visually impaired for an average of 39 years. Only 31% were totally blind.
CONCLUSION—GDOs represent a unique minority of the visually impaired population. Epidemiological registration trends would suggest that the numbers of young profoundly visually impaired people are unlikely to increase relative to their elderly counterparts. This has implications on the future demand for guide dog ownership.

 Keywords: ophthalmic profile; visual profile; guide dog owners; Scotland PMID:10434873

  15. 40 CFR 97.615 - Changing designated representative and alternate designated representative; changes in owners and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 1 Trading... new designated representative and the owners and operators of the TR SO2 Group 1 source and the TR SO2... alternate designated representative, the designated representative, and the owners and operators of the...

  16. 40 CFR 97.615 - Changing designated representative and alternate designated representative; changes in owners and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 1 Trading... new designated representative and the owners and operators of the TR SO2 Group 1 source and the TR SO2... alternate designated representative, the designated representative, and the owners and operators of the...

  17. 40 CFR 97.615 - Changing designated representative and alternate designated representative; changes in owners and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 1 Trading... new designated representative and the owners and operators of the TR SO2 Group 1 source and the TR SO2... alternate designated representative, the designated representative, and the owners and operators of the...

  18. Clustering Emergency Department patients - an assessment of group normality.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Thomas; Hallam, John; Lassen, Annmarie; Wiil, Uffe Kock

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents an investigation into clustering of vital signs from Emergency Department patients with an intention of uncovering distinct thresholds for groups of patients. Emergency Department clinicians have to deal with an enormous spectrum of symptoms and diseases. The variety in patients is a cause for false alarms which greatly burden clinicians. Better targeted alarm thresholds may mitigate the risk of alarm fatigue. The study is based on vital signs from a prospective cohort study at a Danish Hospital coupled with health registry data, and utilizes k-means clustering and novel evaluation metrics for cluster assessment. All combinations of 5 key vital signs are clustered in a range from 2..20. We evaluate the clustering of respiration and arterial peripheral oxygen saturation for k=7. The study fails to identify distinct groups, but does uncover relevant traits and contribute with an evaluation strategy for further studies. PMID:26737861

  19. Needs assessment for business strategies of anesthesiology groups' practices.

    PubMed

    Scurlock, Corey; Dexter, Franklin; Reich, David L; Galati, Maria

    2011-07-01

    Progress has been made in understanding strategic decision making influencing anesthesia groups' operating room business practices. However, there has been little analysis of the remaining gaps in our knowledge. We performed a needs assessment to identify unsolved problems in anesthesia business strategy based on Porter's Five Forces Analysis. The methodology was a narrative literature review. We found little previous investigation for 2 of the 5 forces (threat of new entrants and bargaining power of suppliers), modest understanding for 1 force (threat of substitute products or services), and substantial understanding for 2 forces (bargaining power of customers and jockeying for position among current competitors). Additional research in strategic decisions influencing anesthesia groups should focus on the threat of new entrants, bargaining power of suppliers, and the threat of substitute products or services. PMID:21490085

  20. Environmental Impact Assessment in the Visegrad Group countries

    SciTech Connect

    Gałaś, Slávka; Gałaś, Andrzej; Zeleňáková, Martina; Zvijáková, Lenka; Fialová, Jitka; and others

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Comparison and evaluation of EIA systems in the V4 countries are presented. • Strengths and weaknesses of EIA systems based on a questionnaire survey are stated. • The function and efficiency of the EIA application in the V4 countries are analysed. • Irregularities and shortcomings of EIA systems in the V4 should be eliminated. The Environmental Impact Assessment Directive (EIA Directive) has created a reference framework for the implementation of the system of Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) into the legal systems of the Member States of the European Union, including the countries belonging to the Visegrad Group (V4): Poland, Slovakia, the Czech Republic and Hungary. The Directive was the basis for the introduction of compulsory stages of the EIA process in the V4. The stages were then adapted to national requirements, including thresholds of the qualifying criteria of projects at the screening and scoping stages. The EIA system in the analysed countries has been growing, changing and being modified together with the political and economic changes of the last 30 years. Although all Visegrad Group countries are members of the EU and should harmonize the provisions of the EIA Directive and its amendments, there still exist singularities in each country's national EIA legislation, in terms of complementarities among the V4 countries, access to information resources, protection of natural resources, mitigation of socio-environmental impacts, or transboundary impact assessment. The article compares and evaluates the EIA systems in the four countries, specifies similarities and differences in the implementation of administrative proceedings and points out opportunities to strengthen the system. It presents selected results of a study conducted in 2013 within the framework of the international project “Assessment of the quality of the environment in the V4 Countries” (AQE V4). This paper indicates examples of good practice in the EIA

  1. Surface owner's estate becomes dominant: Wyoming's surface owner consent statute

    SciTech Connect

    Reese, T.

    1981-01-01

    This comment discusses the constitutionality of Wyoming's surface owner consent law in three areas. The first is whether Wyoming's statute is an unconstitutional taking without compensation of the dominant position of the mineral estate holder. The second theory will be that the federal government has preempted the area of mineral lands regulation and therefore Wyoming's statute is void. The third theory is that Wyoming's statute is unconstitutional because it denies equal protection of the law under the fourteenth amendment to the US Constitution. This comment will deal primarily with the reservations of mineral rights under lands the federal government disposed of to private interests. It will not deal with reservations of mineral estates by private parties.

  2. Ecological assessment plan for Waste Area Grouping 5

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.

    1992-04-01

    Waste Area Grouping (WAG)5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory contains 13 solid waste management units (SWMUs) covering a surface area of {approx}20 ha in Melton Valley south of the main plant area. The largest SWMUs are Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 5 and SWSA 5 North. These two SWMUs also contain most of the radioactive contamination. WAG 5 contains two surface impoundments and two intermittent streams; runoff from WAG 5 enters White Oak Creek and Melton Branch. Principal contaminants include fission-product radionuclides and transuranic elements, but trace metals and some organics may also be present. This document describes the ecological assessment that will perform to determine the ecological effects of contamination from WAG 5. This document also supports the baseline risk assessment and subsequent alternatives evaluations for WAG 5. Three specific tasks are incorporated in the WAG 5 ecological assessment: (1) threatened and endangered species surveys, (2) ambient toxicity tests of seeps, stream reaches, and soil that are identified as being contaminant sources, and (3) sampling of wildlife (specifically wild turkeys) that could potentially transfer contaminants from WAG 5 to humans.

  3. Evaluation of dog owners' perceptions concerning radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Denneberg, Nanna Åkerlund; Egenvall, Agneta

    2009-01-01

    Background External radiation therapy (RT) has been available for small animals in Sweden since 2006. This study was designed to obtain information on owner experiences and perceptions related to RT of cancer in their dogs. Another survey was used to determine the attitudes about use of RT in a group of Swedish veterinarians. Their responses were analyzed and compared to their level of knowledge of oncology and RT. Methods Owners of all dogs (n = 23) who had undergone RT for malignancy at Jönköping Small Animal Hospital between March 2006 to September 2007 were interviewed. A questionnaire was given to a selected group of veterinarians. Results All 23 owners responded. All owners thought that their dog did well during RT and most that their dog was also fine during the following phase when acute RT-related skin reactions occur and heal. Three owners stated that their dog had pain that negatively impacted quality of life because of radiation dermatitis. Five owners reported that RT positively impacted quality of life of the dog during the first weeks after RT because palliation was achieved. The owners were not disturbed by the efforts required of them. All but one owner (22 of 23) stated that they would make the same decision about RT again if a similar situation occurred. The most important factor for this decision was the chance to delay occurrence of tumour-related discomfort. The chance for cure was of less importance but still essential, followed by expected side effects. Time commitments, travel, number of treatments required and financial cost; all had low impact. The veterinarian survey showed that less background knowledge of small animal oncology/RT was associated with more negative expectations of RT for small animals. Conclusion The results show that for these owners, RT was a worthwhile treatment modality and that the discomfort for the dog was manageable and acceptable relative to the benefits. Improved continuing education about small animal RT in

  4. ABC3 Consensus: Assessment by a German Group of Experts.

    PubMed

    Thomssen, Christoph; Augustin, Doris; Ettl, Johannes; Haidinger, Renate; Lück, Hans-Joachim; Lüftner, Diana; Marmé, Frederik; Marschner, Norbert; Müller, Lothar; Overkamp, Friedrich; Ruckhäberle, Eugen; Thill, Marc; Untch, Michael; Wuerstlein, Rachel; Harbeck, Nadia

    2016-02-01

    The Advanced Breast Cancer Third International Consensus Conference on the diagnosis and treatment of advanced breast cancer took place in Lisbon, Portugal, on November 5-7, 2015. This year's conference (ABC3) was focused on the treatment of metastatic breast cancer (stage IV), as it was 4 years ago at the first consensus meeting (ABC1). A matter of particular interest was the patients' perspective. Thus, patient-relevant issues were addressed by the consensus discussions, such as those on treatment goals, quality of life, care of long-term survivors ('survivorship issues'), and coping with disease-related symptoms and the side effects of treatment. Further important issues on the agenda were the use of standardized instruments for the assessment of individual treatment success ('patient-reported outcome measures') and the evaluation of the benefit of novel drugs (e.g. the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale). Diagnosis and treatment of inoperable locally advanced breast cancer had already been discussed 2 years earlier at the ABC2 Consensus and were not dealt with in the framework of this year's ABC3 Consensus. With regard to country-specific peculiarities, which unavoidably found their way into the ABC Consensus, a working group of German breast cancer experts commented on the voting results of the ABC panelists. As for the past consensus, the group specially considered the German guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer (AGO (Gyneco-Oncology Working Group), S3, DGHO (German Society of Hematology and Medical Oncology)) in order to adapt the ABC3 consensus for everyday therapy in Germany. PMID:27051399

  5. How the Experience of Assessed Collaborative Writing Impacts on Undergraduate Students' Perceptions of Assessed Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scotland, James

    2016-01-01

    A time-series analysis was used to investigate Arabic undergraduate students' (n = 50) perceptions of assessed group work in a major government institution of higher education in Qatar. A longitudinal mixed methods approach was employed. Likert scale questionnaires were completed over the duration of a collaborative writing event. Additionally,…

  6. 29 CFR 541.101 - Business owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Business owner. 541.101 Section 541.101 Labor Regulations... Executive Employees § 541.101 Business owner. The term “employee employed in a bona fide executive capacity... equity interest in the enterprise in which the employee is employed, regardless of whether the...

  7. 29 CFR 541.101 - Business owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Business owner. 541.101 Section 541.101 Labor Regulations... Executive Employees § 541.101 Business owner. The term “employee employed in a bona fide executive capacity... equity interest in the enterprise in which the employee is employed, regardless of whether the...

  8. 29 CFR 541.101 - Business owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Business owner. 541.101 Section 541.101 Labor Regulations... Executive Employees § 541.101 Business owner. The term “employee employed in a bona fide executive capacity... equity interest in the enterprise in which the employee is employed, regardless of whether the...

  9. 29 CFR 541.101 - Business owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Business owner. 541.101 Section 541.101 Labor Regulations... Executive Employees § 541.101 Business owner. The term “employee employed in a bona fide executive capacity... equity interest in the enterprise in which the employee is employed, regardless of whether the...

  10. 29 CFR 541.101 - Business owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Business owner. 541.101 Section 541.101 Labor Regulations... Executive Employees § 541.101 Business owner. The term “employee employed in a bona fide executive capacity... equity interest in the enterprise in which the employee is employed, regardless of whether the...

  11. Preliminary Study of Pet Owner Adherence in Behaviour, Cardiology, Urology, and Oncology Fields

    PubMed Central

    Talamonti, Zita; Cassis, Chiara; Brambilla, Paola G.; Scarpa, Paola; Stefanello, Damiano; Cannas, Simona; Minero, Michela; Palestrini, Clara

    2015-01-01

    Successful veterinary treatment of animals requires owner adherence with a prescribed treatment plan. The aim of our study was to evaluate and compare the level of adherence of the owners of patients presented for behavioural, cardiological, urological, and oncological problems. At the end of the first examination, each owner completed a questionnaire. Then, the owners were called four times to fill out another questionnaire over the phone. With regard to the first questionnaire, statistically significant data concern behavioral medicine and cardiology. In the first area the owner's worry decreases during the follow-up and the number of owners who would give away the animal increases. In cardiology, owners who think that the pathology harms their animal's quality of life decreased significantly over time. With regard to the 9 additional follow-up questions, in behavioural medicine and urology the owner's discomfort resulting from the animal's pathology significantly decreases over time. Assessment of adherence appears to be an optimal instrument in identifying the positive factors and the difficulties encountered by owners during the application of a treatment protocol. PMID:26185708

  12. Preliminary Study of Pet Owner Adherence in Behaviour, Cardiology, Urology, and Oncology Fields.

    PubMed

    Talamonti, Zita; Cassis, Chiara; Brambilla, Paola G; Scarpa, Paola; Stefanello, Damiano; Cannas, Simona; Minero, Michela; Palestrini, Clara

    2015-01-01

    Successful veterinary treatment of animals requires owner adherence with a prescribed treatment plan. The aim of our study was to evaluate and compare the level of adherence of the owners of patients presented for behavioural, cardiological, urological, and oncological problems. At the end of the first examination, each owner completed a questionnaire. Then, the owners were called four times to fill out another questionnaire over the phone. With regard to the first questionnaire, statistically significant data concern behavioral medicine and cardiology. In the first area the owner's worry decreases during the follow-up and the number of owners who would give away the animal increases. In cardiology, owners who think that the pathology harms their animal's quality of life decreased significantly over time. With regard to the 9 additional follow-up questions, in behavioural medicine and urology the owner's discomfort resulting from the animal's pathology significantly decreases over time. Assessment of adherence appears to be an optimal instrument in identifying the positive factors and the difficulties encountered by owners during the application of a treatment protocol. PMID:26185708

  13. Using Group Projects to Assess the Learning of Sampling Distributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neidigh, Robert O.; Dunkelberger, Jake

    2012-01-01

    In an introductory business statistics course, student groups used sample data to compare a set of sample means to the theoretical sampling distribution. Each group was given a production measurement with a population mean and standard deviation. The groups were also provided an excel spreadsheet with 40 sample measurements per week for 52 weeks…

  14. Characterization of human-dog social interaction using owner report.

    PubMed

    Lit, Lisa; Schweitzer, Julie B; Oberbauer, Anita M

    2010-07-01

    Dog owners were surveyed for observations of social behaviors in their dogs, using questions adapted from the human Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) pre-verbal module. Using 939 responses for purebred and mixed-breed dogs, three factors were identified: initiation of reciprocal social behaviors (INIT), response to social interactions (RSPNS), and communication (COMM). There were small or no effects of sex, age, breed group or training. For six breeds with more than 35 responses (Border Collie, Rough Collie, German Shepherd, Golden Retriever, Labrador Retriever, Standard Poodle), the behaviors eye contact with humans, enjoyment in interactions with human interaction, and name recognition demonstrated little variability across breeds, while asking for objects, giving/showing objects to humans, and attempts to direct humans' attention showed higher variability across these breeds. Breeds with genetically similar backgrounds had similar response distributions for owner reports of dog response to pointing. When considering these breeds according to the broad categories of "herders" and "retrievers," owners reported that the "herders" used more eye contact and vocalization, while the "retrievers" used more body contact. Information regarding social cognitive abilities in dogs provided by owner report suggest that there is variability across many social cognitive abilities in dogs and offers direction for further experimental investigations. PMID:20438815

  15. Owner satisfaction with partial mandibulectomy or maxillectomy for treatment of oral tumors in 27 dogs.

    PubMed

    Fox, L E; Geoghegan, S L; Davis, L H; Hartzel, J S; Kubilis, P; Gruber, L A

    1997-01-01

    Twenty-seven dogs with oral tumors were treated with either rostral mandibulectomy, partial mandibulectomy, or partial maxillectomy. Owner satisfaction with the respective surgical procedure was assessed by telephone survey; 85% of owners were satisfied with the decision to treat their dogs. The percentage of satisfied owners was directly proportional to the increase in pet life span. Although difficulty in eating was noted for 12 (44%) of 27 dogs, pain was perceived to be reduced by the surgery for most animals. All owners found the cosmetic appearances of their dogs acceptable after facial hair regrew. The quality of the pets' lives was perceived by the owners to be most improved after rostral mandibulectomy and least improved after partial maxillectomy. PMID:8974022

  16. The Application of Games Theory to Group Project Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitt, M. J.

    2000-01-01

    Application of game theory to small-group project evaluation in higher education instruction finds that the best strategy for students wishing high grades may not be a strategy that promotes teamwork and cooperation. Suggests that putting students into groups may randomly disadvantage some students relative to others, producing serious unfairness…

  17. Mandibular outline assessment in three groups of orthodontic patients.

    PubMed

    Edler, Raymond; Wertheim, David; Greenhill, Darrel

    2002-12-01

    The feasibility of using computer-based parameters for quantifying mandibular asymmetry was investigated. Four methods of calculating asymmetry were used, based on the digitized facial photographs of three groups of patients: those with no observable asymmetry, a group with mild asymmetry, and a group presenting for orthognathic surgery. Three of the methods involved right/left difference ratios, namely, area, perimeter length, and compactness. The fourth, moment ratio (centre of area), was expressed as a percentage. Repeatability of both photography and digitization proved satisfactory, the standard deviation of the differences between repeated photographs being 0.016 and 0.014 for area and compactness ratios, respectively. Area, perimeter, and compactness successfully discriminated between the three groups. For area, median ratios (deviations from 1.00) for the 'normal', 'mild asymmetry', and 'surgical' groups were 0.015, 0.030, and 0.078, respectively. Those patients in the surgical group for whom asymmetry correction had been the main reason for surgery recorded higher asymmetry scores than the other subjects in that group. Moment ratio did not adequately distinguish between the three groups. Better repeatability for digitization was found when a baseline involving the ear insertions was used, than either the outer or inner canthi of the eyes. The potential uses of this approach are presented in relation to clinically relevant mild asymmetry, as well as auditing the outcome of surgical correction. PMID:12512778

  18. Clinical trials involving cats: What factors affect owner 1 participation?

    PubMed Central

    Gruen, Margaret E; Jiamachello, Katrina N; Thomson, Andrea; Lascelles, BDX

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials are frequently hindered by difficulty recruiting eligible participants, increasing the timeline and limiting generalizability of results. In veterinary medicine, where proxy enrollment is required, no studies have detailed what factors influence owner participation in studies involving cats. We aimed to investigate these factors through a survey of owners at first opinion practices. The survey was designed using feedback from a pilot study and input from clinical researchers. Owners were asked demographic questions and whether they would, would not, or were unsure about participating in a clinical trial with their cat. They then ranked the importance and influence of various factors on participation using a 5-point Likert-type scale, and incentives from most to least encouraging. A total of 413 surveys were distributed to cat owners at four hospitals, two feline-only and two multi-species; 88.6% were completed. Data for importance and influence factors as well as incentive rankings were analyzed overall, by hospital type, location and whether owners would consider participating. The most influential factors were trust in the organization, benefit to the cat and veterinarian recommendation. Importance and influence factors varied by willingness to participate. Ranked incentives were not significantly different across groups, with “Free Services” ranked highest. This study provides a first look at what factors influence participation in clinical trials with cats. Given the importance placed in the recommendation of veterinarians, continued work is needed to determine veterinarian related factors affecting clinical trial participation. The results provide guidance towards improved clinical trial design, promotion and education. PMID:24938313

  19. 40 CFR 280.110 - Reporting by owner or operator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TECHNICAL STANDARDS AND CORRECTIVE ACTION REQUIREMENTS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS (UST) Financial Responsibility § 280.110 Reporting by owner or operator. (a) An owner...

  20. 40 CFR 280.110 - Reporting by owner or operator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TECHNICAL STANDARDS AND CORRECTIVE ACTION REQUIREMENTS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS (UST) Financial Responsibility § 280.110 Reporting by owner or operator. (a) An owner...

  1. 40 CFR 280.110 - Reporting by owner or operator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TECHNICAL STANDARDS AND CORRECTIVE ACTION REQUIREMENTS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS (UST) Financial Responsibility § 280.110 Reporting by owner or operator. (a) An owner...

  2. 40 CFR 280.110 - Reporting by owner or operator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TECHNICAL STANDARDS AND CORRECTIVE ACTION REQUIREMENTS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS (UST) Financial Responsibility § 280.110 Reporting by owner or operator. (a) An owner...

  3. 40 CFR 280.110 - Reporting by owner or operator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TECHNICAL STANDARDS AND CORRECTIVE ACTION REQUIREMENTS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS (UST) Financial Responsibility § 280.110 Reporting by owner or operator. (a) An owner...

  4. 24 CFR 982.507 - Rent to owner: Reasonable rent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... whether the rent to owner is a reasonable rent in comparison to rent for other comparable unassisted units... rent to owner is not more than rent charged by the owner for comparable unassisted units in...

  5. 24 CFR 982.507 - Rent to owner: Reasonable rent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... whether the rent to owner is a reasonable rent in comparison to rent for other comparable unassisted units... rent to owner is not more than rent charged by the owner for comparable unassisted units in...

  6. 24 CFR 982.507 - Rent to owner: Reasonable rent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... whether the rent to owner is a reasonable rent in comparison to rent for other comparable unassisted units... rent to owner is not more than rent charged by the owner for comparable unassisted units in...

  7. 24 CFR 982.507 - Rent to owner: Reasonable rent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... whether the rent to owner is a reasonable rent in comparison to rent for other comparable unassisted units... rent to owner is not more than rent charged by the owner for comparable unassisted units in...

  8. 24 CFR 982.507 - Rent to owner: Reasonable rent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... whether the rent to owner is a reasonable rent in comparison to rent for other comparable unassisted units... rent to owner is not more than rent charged by the owner for comparable unassisted units in...

  9. Using the Competent Small Group Communicator Instrument to Assess Group Performance in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, Lawrence S.

    If being a competent small group problem solver is difficult, it is even more difficult to impart those competencies to others. Unlike athletic coaches who are near their players during the real game, teachers of small group communication are not typically present for on-the-spot coaching when their students are doing their problem solving. That…

  10. NATIONAL HUMAN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT SURVEY (NHEXAS) DATA ANALYSIS WORK GROUP

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three field studies were under conducted the National Human Exposure Assessment Survey. These studies measured exposures in three study regions - Arizona, the six EPA Region V States (Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, Illinois, Wisconsin, Minnesota), and Baltimore and four surrounding cou...

  11. The Use of Group versus Individual Settings for Assessing Student Achievement in Kindergarten and First Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkins-Burnett, Sally; Rowan, Brian; Correnti, Richard

    This paper reports on an experiment examining the consequences of assessing kindergarten and first-grade students' academic achievement in group versus individualized assessment settings. Students (n=442) blocked by classroom and grade level were randomly assigned to one of two assessment modes: a small group setting with 8 other students from…

  12. A Robust Approach for Mapping Group Marks to Individual Marks Using Peer Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spatar, Ciprian; Penna, Nigel; Mills, Henny; Kutija, Vedrana; Cooke, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Group work can form a substantial component of degree programme assessments. To satisfy institutional and student expectations, students must often be assigned individual marks for their contributions to the group project, typically by mapping a single holistic group mark to individual marks using peer assessment scores. Since the early 1990s,…

  13. Scale Development of a Measure to Assess Community-Based and Clinical Intervention Group Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Patrick A.; Hansen, Nathan B.; Tarakeshwar, Nalini; Neufeld, Sharon; Kochman, Arlene; Sikkema, Kathleen J.

    2008-01-01

    Though group interventions are widely used in community-based and clinical settings, there are few brief instruments for assessing the group environment. Two studies on the development of a brief measure to assess intervention group environments are described, and psychometric properties of the new scale are presented. The new measure is based on…

  14. Improving Group Selection and Assessment in an Asynchronous Collaborative Writing Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khandaker, Nobel; Soh, Leen-Kiat

    2010-01-01

    Two critical issues of the typical computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) systems are inappropriate selection of student groups and inaccurate assessment of individual contributions of the group members. Inappropriate selection of student groups often leads to ineffective and inefficient collaboration, while inaccurate assessment of…

  15. "Bipolar groupthink": assessing groupthink tendencies in authentic work groups.

    PubMed

    Rosander, M; Stiwne, D; Granström, K

    1998-06-01

    Research on regressive group processes such as Janis' (1982) "groupthink" phenomenon has rarely focused on work groups in authentic settings. In this study, teams from six different organisations (n = 308) were studied by using a groupthink questionnaire constructed in accordance with the symptoms of groupthink described by Janis. It was hypothesised that groupthink could be described as a bipolar construct identifying either an omnipotent or a depressive variant of a group's delusions about its own and other groups' features. The questionnaire showed reasonably good reliability as a whole and a factor analysis identified three factors in line with the proposed theoretical model in which the two different types of groupthink can be distinguished. We propose that any group might have a tendency or predisposition to react in either of the two directions during provocative circumstances. The six different organisations exhibited different types of groupthink to a varying degree. A religious sect was the one most characterised by omnipotent groupthink, while a technological company and a psychiatric team seemed to be the ones with most features of depressive groupthink. PMID:9676161

  16. NORTHEAST LOON STUDY WORKING GROUP PARTNERSHIP TO ASSESS ENVIRONMENTAL RISK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Northeast Loon Study Working Group (NELSWG) was formed in 1994 to proactively identify threats to one of the Northeast's most popular waterbirds, the common loon, Gavia immer. Seventeen institutions have come together to identify strategy, coordinate the work load, and share ...

  17. Deriving Oral Assessment Scales across Different Tests and Rater Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalhoub-Deville, Micheline

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to derive the criteria/dimensions underlying learners' second-language oral ability scores across three tests: an oral interview, a narration, and a read-aloud. A stimulus tape of 18 speech samples was presented to 3 native speaker rater groups for evaluation. Results indicate that researchers might need to reconsider…

  18. Evaluation Tools to Guide Students' Peer-Assessment and Self-Assessment in Group Activities for the Lab and Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenzel, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    Evaluation tools are provided that help students' peer-assessment and self-assessment in group activities for the laboratories and classroom. The self- and peer-evaluations have helped teachers provide better feedback to the students and feel more confident in assigning each individual a grade for their contribution to the group laboratory project.

  19. Validity and Reliability of the Group Leadership Effectiveness Scale Assessing Group Leader Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demask, Michael P.; O'Mara, Eileen McCabe; Walker, Candice

    2009-01-01

    The authors present the results of a validity and reliability study for the Group Leadership Effectiveness Scale (GLES). Seven consecutive semesters of data were gathered for this investigation, with 1 semester of data being reported and analyzed here. The results of the data support both validity and reliability for this instrument. A…

  20. Group and Family Day Care: A Comparative Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prescott, Elizabeth

    The point is made that studies of day-care use consistently confirm that the most common form of day care is in-home day care by a relative or another person. Group care as it now functions is most practical for a mother who works regular daytime hours and lives within manageable commuting distance of a center. The yearly costs per child reported…

  1. A Field Investigation of Peer Assessment as Part of the Student Group Grading Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keaten, James A.; Richardson, M. Elizabeth

    A study examined the effectiveness of an experimental system of peer assessment. Two speech communication classes consisting of 22 student groups (110 participants) served as subjects. At the beginning of the semester, students in both classes were assigned to groups. Each group was responsible for presenting a project. The groups met both inside…

  2. The Paradox of the Contented Female Business Owner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Gary N.; Eddleston, Kimberly A.

    2008-01-01

    According to survey responses from 201 business owners, although the firms of male business owners were more successful than those of female business owners on frequently used measures of business success (business performance compared to competitors and sales), business owner sex did not predict satisfaction with business success, supporting the…

  3. 28 CFR 29.8 - Motor vehicle owner participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Motor vehicle owner participation. 29.8 Section 29.8 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT PREVENTION ACT REGULATIONS § 29.8 Motor vehicle owner participation. In order to participate in this program, the owner(s) of...

  4. 28 CFR 29.8 - Motor vehicle owner participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Motor vehicle owner participation. 29.8 Section 29.8 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT PREVENTION ACT REGULATIONS § 29.8 Motor vehicle owner participation. In order to participate in this program, the owner(s) of...

  5. 28 CFR 29.8 - Motor vehicle owner participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Motor vehicle owner participation. 29.8 Section 29.8 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT PREVENTION ACT REGULATIONS § 29.8 Motor vehicle owner participation. In order to participate in this program, the owner(s) of...

  6. 28 CFR 29.8 - Motor vehicle owner participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Motor vehicle owner participation. 29.8 Section 29.8 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT PREVENTION ACT REGULATIONS § 29.8 Motor vehicle owner participation. In order to participate in this program, the owner(s) of...

  7. 28 CFR 29.8 - Motor vehicle owner participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Motor vehicle owner participation. 29.8 Section 29.8 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT PREVENTION ACT REGULATIONS § 29.8 Motor vehicle owner participation. In order to participate in this program, the owner(s) of...

  8. 43 CFR 3427.5 - Unqualified surface owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Unqualified surface owners. 3427.5 Section... § 3427.5 Unqualified surface owners. (a) Lease tracts involving surface owners who are not qualified (see § 3400.0-5(gg)) shall be leased subject to the protections afforded the surface owner by the...

  9. Correlates of smoke-free housing policies and interest in implementing policies among multiunit housing owners in New York City.

    PubMed

    Farley, Shannon M; Waddell, Elizabeth Needham; Coady, Micaela H; Grimshaw, Victoria; Wright, Danielle A; Mandel-Ricci, Jenna; Kansagra, Susan M

    2015-04-01

    Secondhand smoke exposure is a concern in multiunit housing, where smoke can migrate between apartments. In 2012, the New York City (NYC) Department of Health and Mental Hygiene conducted a cross-sectional mail and phone survey among a random sample of low-income and market-rate multiunit housing owners and managers in NYC. The study compared experiences and attitudes regarding smoke-free policies between owners/managers (owners) with and without low-income units. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the correlates of smoke-free residential unit rules and interest in adopting new smoke-free rules. Perceived benefits and challenges of implementing smoke-free rules were also examined. Overall, one-third of owners prohibited smoking in individual units. Among owners, nearly one-third owned or managed buildings with designated certified low-income units. Owners with low-income units were less likely than those without to have a smoke-free unit policy (26 vs. 36 %, p < 0.01) or be aware that owners can legally adopt smoke-free building policies (60 vs. 70 %, p < 0.01). In the final model, owners who believed that owners could legally adopt smoke-free policies were more likely to have a smoke-free unit policy, while current smokers and owners of larger buildings were less likely to have a policy. Nearly three quarters of owners without smoke-free units were interested in prohibiting smoking in all of their building/units (73 %). Among owners, correlates of interest in prohibiting smoking included awareness that secondhand smoke is a health issue and knowledge of their legal rights to prohibit smoking in their buildings. Current smokers were less likely to be interested in future smoke-free policies. Educational programs promoting awareness of owners' legal right to adopt smoke-free policies in residential buildings may improve the availability of smoke-free multiunit housing. PMID:25670210

  10. Small business owners' opinions about written health and safety information.

    PubMed

    Brosseau, Lisa M; Fredrickson, Ann L; Casey, Mary Anne

    2007-04-01

    Owners of small manufacturing businesses from twelve industrial sectors (n=40) participated in focus groups. They most frequently read trade and local business publications; few regularly read or receive health and safety materials. They select business-related materials that are specific to their business, give them new ideas, or have information that is easy to use. Insurance companies and business associations are the most frequently mentioned sources of health and safety information. The most important aspects of a prototype newsletter are sponsorship, color and graphics, length and relevance. Most are positive about a university logo, because it indicates a trusted source. The front page should have a table of contents with short descriptions of articles and catchy headlines. A newsletter should take no more than ten minutes to read. Owners did not like articles that were written in first person, used quotes, were too personal or gave no solutions. Owners think a newsletter will be successful if it is targeted to their industry, shows costs, includes case studies about local businesses, isn't too academic, focuses on a different topic with each issue, and gives readers an opportunity to provide feedback. PMID:17485864

  11. A Structural Equation Model at the Individual and Group Level for Assessing Faking-Related Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrando, Pere Joan; Anguiano-Carrasco, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    This article proposes a comprehensive approach based on structural equation modeling for assessing the amount of trait-level change derived from faking-motivating situations. The model is intended for a mixed 2-wave 2-group design, and assesses change at both the group and the individual level. Theoretically the model adopts an integrative…

  12. Batterers' Intervention: How Group Leaders Assess the Risk Levels of Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisz, Arlene N.; Black, Beverly M.; Lucero, Jessica L.; Kaiser, Angela; Rose, Isabel; Muzzi, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    Leaders of intervention groups for batterers must continuously assess how well they are meeting their goal of reducing violence. This article reports on survey and qualitative interview data from group leaders about their risk assessments. The practitioners were aware that their information about the risk levels of members was limited. They…

  13. Peer Assessment in Group Projects Accounting for Assessor Reliability by an Iterative Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ko, Sung-Seok

    2014-01-01

    This study proposes an advanced method to factor in the contributions of individual group members engaged in an integrated group project using peer assessment procedures. Conway et al. proposed the Individual Weight Factor (IWF) method for peer assessment which has been extensively developed over the years. However, most methods associated with…

  14. Using Generalized Mantel-Haenszel Statistics to Assess DIF among Multiple Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fidalgo, Angel M.; Scalon, Joao D.

    2010-01-01

    In spite of the growing interest in cross-cultural research and assessment, there is little research on statistical procedures that can be used to simultaneously assess the differential item functioning (DIF) across multiple groups. The chief objective of this work is to show a unified framework for the analysis of DIF in multiple groups using one…

  15. Group Assessment at First Year and Final Degree Level: A Comparative Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plastow, N.; Spiliotopoulou, G.; Prior, S.

    2010-01-01

    Group projects are an established but debated pedagogical technique in higher education. The purpose of this study was to assess the appropriateness of combining individual and group marks in assessment. A mixed method design involving correlational and comparative elements was used. The sample included one cohort of students who completed a group…

  16. Students' Attitudes toward a Group Coursework Protocol and Peer Assessment System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moraes, Caroline; Michaelidou, Nina; Canning, Louise

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses a knowledge gap by presenting an empirical investigation of a group coursework protocol and peer assessment system (GCP&PAS) used in a UK university to support postgraduate marketing students in their assessed group activities. The aim of the research was to examine students' understanding of the GCP&PAS and their…

  17. Assessing a Group of Physicians’ Ethical Sensitivity in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Çetin, M; Cimen, M

    2011-01-01

    Background: The objective was to measure the sensitivity of a group of physicians regarding the ethics-related situations, which they faced during patient care and treatment. Methods: All of 306 physicians who joined the Turkish Army for compulsory military service in December 2008 were included in the study. A “Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire”, formed by Kim Lutzen, was applied to all of them. Results: From total, 95% of physicians performed their job willingly, 88% of physicians attended ethic lessons (n=265), 72.4% (n=218) followed ethic publications, 67.4% (n=203) stated that there was an ethic committee at their institutions, and 5% worked as a member of the ethic committee. There were statistically significant differences between autonomy, benevolence meaning, conflict, and total scores according to workplace of physicians, employment period, and being specialists. Points of autonomy were found lower in physicians working at private hospital and health center than those at public hospital. Conclusion: Ethical sensitivity of physicians changed due to work place. We conclude that organizational arrangements are of beneficial effects to increase ethical sensitivity. PMID:23113090

  18. Distance Education of Pennsylvania Pond Owners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Katherine L.; Swistock, Bryan R.; Sharpe, William E.

    2003-01-01

    Evaluations by 175 of 557 Pennsylvania pond owners who attended an Extension program via satellite revealed that most were interested in aesthetic/recreational pond use and pond management. They wanted more in-depth information over a shorter time frame. Only 10% did not favor satellite delivery. Shorter, more focused satellite programs and…

  19. 24 CFR 982.452 - Owner responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Owner responsibilities. 982.452 Section 982.452 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (CONTINUED) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR PUBLIC AND INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SECTION 8 TENANT BASED...

  20. Early Owner Planning Leads to Project Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gainsboro, Dan

    2006-01-01

    In the vast majority of building projects, decisions made in the first 10 percent of project activity directly determine 90 percent of the final cost and schedule. When a project is poorly planned, project costs can expand beyond estimates by as much as 50 percent. Since the owner's rate of spending increases as a building project proceeds,…

  1. The Investigation of Peer Assessment in Primary School Cooperative Learning Groups with Respect to Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yurdabakan, Irfan

    2011-01-01

    There are studies especially at higher education level investigating the subsequent responses of students towards reciprocity, tacit agreement and assessment of peers, but research on the effect of gender on peer assessment is limited. The present study focuses on whether peer assessment used in cooperative learning groups varies with respect to…

  2. Early Interventionists' Reports of Authentic Assessment Methods through Focus Group Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keilty, Bonnie; LaRocco, Diana J.; Casell, Faye Bankler

    2009-01-01

    Authentic assessments are naturalistic methods to obtain functional, contextual information relevant to learning in routine activities. Seven focus groups were conducted with 73 practicing Part C early interventionists to gather their reports on authentic assessments. Participants reported various ways of applying authentic assessment methods,…

  3. Quantitative Approach to Collaborative Learning: Performance Prediction, Individual Assessment, and Group Composition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cen, Ling; Ruta, Dymitr; Powell, Leigh; Hirsch, Benjamin; Ng, Jason

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of collaborative learning, although widely reported, lack the quantitative rigor and detailed insight into the dynamics of interactions within the group, while individual contributions and their impacts on group members and their collaborative work remain hidden behind joint group assessment. To bridge this gap we intend to address…

  4. Short Circuits or Superconductors? Effects of Group Composition on High-Achieving Students' Science Assessment Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Noreen M.; Nemer, Kariane Mari; Zuniga, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    Studied the effects of group ability composition (homogeneous versus heterogeneous) on group processes and outcomes for high-ability students completing science assessments. Results for 83 high ability students show the quality of group functioning serves as the strongest predictor of high-ability students' performance and explained much of the…

  5. Teaching Medieval Towns: Group Exercises, Individual Presentations and Self-Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Andrew; Gunn, Vicky

    2002-01-01

    Examines the use of innovative collaborative small group activities in a Medieval History undergraduate honors course. Discusses student evaluations and feedback from a focus group to investigate the use of group exercises that involve the construction of three-dimensional models of medieval towns and the use of self-assessment. (Author/LRW)

  6. A comparison of noxious facilities` impacts for home owners versus renters

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.E. |; Nieves, L.A.

    1995-01-01

    The siting of noxious facilities, such as hazardous waste facilities, is often vigorously opposed by local residents, and thus it is now common for local residents to be compensated for the presence of the facility. One technique that has been employed to implicitly value noxious facilities is the intercity hedonic approach, which examines the wage and land rent premia between cities that result from the presence of the facility. However, most of the focus has been on the behavior of home owners as opposed to renters. Since these two groups of residents vary on numerous dimensions such as marital status, age, sex, and personal mobility, it would not be surprising to find different marginal valuations of local site characteristics. The authors use 1980 Census data to derive separate estimates for owners and renters of the implicit value placed on eight different types of noxious facilities. They find that renters and owners differ in their response to noxious facilities, although the differences are not systematic. Furthermore, the differences between owners and renters are not primarily due to differential mobility or socio-demographic factors. Controlling those factors decreases the differences between renters` and owners` implicit valuations of noxious facilities by less than 10%. Unmeasured differences between the two groups, such as tastes, risk aversion, or commitment to the community, must account for the remaining difference in valuations. These findings suggest that policymakers should separately consider the responses of owners and renters when estimating noxious facility impacts.

  7. Psychosocial needs assessment post kidney transplant: Feasibility of a post-transplant specific support group.

    PubMed

    Brijmohan, Angela; Famure, Olusegun; Sihota, Kiren; Shea, Mary; Marzario, Barbara; Mitchell, Margot

    2015-01-01

    This project assessed unmet psychosocial needs of kidney transplant recipients and the feasibility of a support group located at an urban Canadian hospital to meet those needs. A survey assessed transplant recipient concerns about psychosocial issues related to transplantation, interest in a support group, desired group composition, facilitation, leadership, barriers and alternative forms of support. Most respondents were more than two years since transplant and were more concerned about medical complications, returning to normalcy, and had a greater desire to talk to other transplant recipients. Forty per cent of respondents indicated they would be interested in a support group. However, 60% indicated that a support group hosted in the hospital setting would be a deterrent to attending, citing time and transportation as the greatest barriers. More research is needed to assess the feasibility of post-kidney transplant support groups closer to recipients' homes and the feasibility of alternative forms of support. PMID:26882632

  8. Psychiatric investigation of 18 bereaved pet owners.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yuya; Kawabata, Hidenobu; Maezawa, Masaji

    2011-08-01

    This survey explores the grief associated with the loss of a pet, and was carried out using a self-administered questionnaire. The questionnaires were handed out to 50 bereaved pet owners attending a public animal cremation service, and we received 18 responses. Participants responded within 0 to 44 (median 4) days of the death of their pet. Although most mental health problems immediately following mourning are presumed to be normal grief reactions, on the basis of several psychiatric scales, 8 of the 16 valid responses indicated depression and/or neurosis. Statistical analyses showed that the following factors were significantly associated with grief reactions: age of owner, other stressful life events, family size, age of deceased animal, rearing place, and preliminary veterinary consultation. PMID:21483181

  9. Using Classroom Assessment and Cognitive Scaffolding to Enhance the Power of Small-Group Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, James L.; Robinson, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    The authors describe several types of classroom assessment techniques (CATs) and cognitive scaffolding procedures that they have developed over the years. They then bring the procedures together in a sample lecture/group learning class presentation.

  10. Handling alternative dietary requests from pet owners.

    PubMed

    Parr, Jacqueline M; Remillard, Rebecca L

    2014-07-01

    The goal of this article was to provide veterinary practitioners with an overview of the types of alternative dietary options available to pet owners and a practical method by which to evaluate the nutritional adequacy of these various options. Our approach to categorizing the alternative dietary options is based on the nutritional adequacy of these dietary options, because patients will be at risk for nutrition-related diseases if fed a nutritionally incomplete or improperly balanced diet long term. PMID:24951340

  11. 31 CFR 210.13 - Notice to account owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AUTOMATED CLEARING HOUSE Reclamation of Benefit Payments § 210.13 Notice to account owners. Provision of... any notice required by the Service to be provided to account owners as specified in the Green...

  12. 31 CFR 210.13 - Notice to account owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... AUTOMATED CLEARING HOUSE Reclamation of Benefit Payments § 210.13 Notice to account owners. Provision of... any notice required by the Service to be provided to account owners as specified in the Green...

  13. 31 CFR 210.13 - Notice to account owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AUTOMATED CLEARING HOUSE Reclamation of Benefit Payments § 210.13 Notice to account owners. Provision of... any notice required by the Service to be provided to account owners as specified in the Green...

  14. 33 CFR 67.40-15 - Marking at owner's expense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Marking at owner's expense. The District Commander may mark, for the protection of marine commerce, any structure whenever the owner thereof has failed suitably to mark the same in accordance with this part,...

  15. Interrater Reliability of a Single Group Assessment Procedure Administered in Several Educational Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shechtman, Zipora

    1992-01-01

    The interrater reliability for 33 pairs of evaluators of a group assessment procedure developed from assessment center techniques was supported in 3 studies in Israel (admission to a counseling program for 109 candidates, admission of 94 candidates to teacher training, and selection of 69 candidates for Army teaching posts). (SLD)

  16. KEY ISSUES FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF THE ALLERGENIC POTENTIAL OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED FOODS: BREAKOUT GROUP REPORTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    On the final afternoon of the Workshop, Assessment of the Allergenic Potential of Genetically Modified Foods, speakers and participants met in breakout groups to discuss specific questions in the areas of 1) Use of Human Clinical Data; 2) Animal Models to Assess Food ...

  17. Human evolutionary history and contemporary evolutionary theory provide insight when assessing cultural group selection.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Agustin; Kissel, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Richerson et al. provide a much needed roadmap for assessing cultural group selection (CGS) theory and for applying it to understanding variation between contemporary human groups. However, the current proposal lacks connection to relevant evidence from the human evolutionary record and requires a better integration with contemporary evolutionary theory. The article also misapplies the F st statistic. PMID:27562510

  18. Gender and Ethnic Group Differences on the GMAT Analytical Writing Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridgeman, Brent; McHale, Frederick

    Gender and ethnic group differences on the Analytical Writing Assessment that is part of the Graduate Management Admissions Test were evaluated. Data from the first operational administration for 36,583 examinees in October 1994 were used. Standardized differences from the White male reference group were computed separately for men and women in…

  19. International Cultural Immersion: Assessing the Influence of a Group Intervention on Intercultural Sensitivity for Counselor Trainees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barden, Sejal M.; Shannonhouse, Laura; Mobley, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Scholars (e.g., Bemak & Chung, 2004) underscore the need for group workers to be culturally sensitive. One group training strategy, cultural immersion, is often employed to develop cultural sensitivity. However, no studies have utilized quasi-experimental methodologies to assess differences in cultural sensitivity between trainees that immerse…

  20. GUIDANCE ON SELECTING AGE GROUPS FOR MONITORING AND ASSESSING CHILDHOOD EXPOSURES TO ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This guidance document provides a set of early-lifestage age groups for Environmental Protection Agency scientists to consider when assessing children’s exposure to environmental contaminants and the resultant potential dose. These recommended age groups are based on current und...

  1. Student Perceptions and Use of an Assessment Rubric for a Group Concept Map in Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moni, Roger W.; Moni, Karen B.

    2008-01-01

    We previously reported how the opinions of second-year dentistry students and faculty members can be used to construct an assessment rubric to grade group-based concept maps in physiology (14). This article describes the second phase of this study of the subsequent year's cohort. A case study approach was used to investigate how groups of students…

  2. Group In-Course Assessment Promotes Cooperative Learning and Increases Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratten, Margaret K.; Merrick, Deborah; Burr, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    The authors describe and evaluate a method to motivate medical students to maximize the effectiveness of dissection opportunities by using In-Course-Assessments (ICAs) to encourage teamwork. A student's final mark was derived by combining the group dissection mark, group mark for questions, and their individual question mark. An analysis of…

  3. Assessing the Role of Peer Relationships in the Small Group Communication Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Scott A.; Shimotsu, Stephanie; Byrnes, Kerry; Frisby, Brandi N.; Durbin, James; Loy, Brianna N.

    2010-01-01

    Based on the typology posited by Kram and Isabella (1985) that identifies three peer relationships present in organizations (i.e., information, collegial, and special), this assessment examined the association between students' perceptions of their in-class group members and six group outcomes (i.e., grouphate, cohesion, relational satisfaction,…

  4. Exploring Teacher Beliefs and Use of Acceleration, Ability Grouping, and Formative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missett, Tracy C.; Brunner, Marguerite M.; Callahan, Carolyn M.; Moon, Tonya R.; Azano, Amy Price

    2014-01-01

    Few academic interventions for gifted students have generated more empirical support than acceleration and ability grouping, and formative assessment is advocated as a tool that educators can use to appropriately integrate accelerative practices and ability grouping into the classroom. However, the empirical support for accelerative practices,…

  5. Hendra virus and horse owners--risk perception and management.

    PubMed

    Kung, Nina; McLaughlin, Amanda; Taylor, Melanie; Moloney, Barbara; Wright, Therese; Field, Hume

    2013-01-01

    Hendra virus is a highly pathogenic novel paramyxovirus causing sporadic fatal infection in horses and humans in Australia. Species of fruit-bats (genus Pteropus), commonly known as flying-foxes, are the natural host of the virus. We undertook a survey of horse owners in the states of Queensland and New South Wales, Australia to assess the level of adoption of recommended risk management strategies and to identify impediments to adoption. Survey questionnaires were completed by 1431 respondents from the target states, and from a spectrum of industry sectors. Hendra virus knowledge varied with sector, but was generally limited, with only 13% of respondents rating their level of knowledge as high or very high. The majority of respondents (63%) had seen their state's Hendra virus information for horse owners, and a similar proportion found the information useful. Fifty-six percent of respondents thought it moderately, very or extremely likely that a Hendra virus case could occur in their area, yet only 37% said they would consider Hendra virus if their horse was sick. Only 13% of respondents stabled their horses overnight, although another 24% said it would be easy or very easy to do so, but hadn't done so. Only 13% and 15% of respondents respectively had horse feed bins and water points under solid cover. Responses varied significantly with state, likely reflecting different Hendra virus history. The survey identified inconsistent awareness and/or adoption of available knowledge, confusion in relation to Hendra virus risk perception, with both over-and under-estimation of true risk, and lag in the uptake of recommended risk minimisation strategies, even when these were readily implementable. However, we also identified frustration and potential alienation by horse owners who found the recommended strategies impractical, onerous and prohibitively expensive. The insights gained from this survey have broader application to other complex risk-management scenarios. PMID

  6. 49 CFR 563.11 - Information in owner's manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Information in owner's manual. 563.11 Section 563.11 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EVENT DATA RECORDERS § 563.11 Information in owner's manual. (a) The owner's manual in...

  7. 33 CFR 67.40-10 - Communication with owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Communication with owner. 67.40... Communication with owner. Communication with the owners of private aids to navigation by the District Commander shall be addressed to their usual or last known place of business, or to their local representative,...

  8. 33 CFR 67.40-10 - Communication with owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Communication with owner. 67.40... Communication with owner. Communication with the owners of private aids to navigation by the District Commander shall be addressed to their usual or last known place of business, or to their local representative,...

  9. 33 CFR 67.40-10 - Communication with owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Communication with owner. 67.40... Communication with owner. Communication with the owners of private aids to navigation by the District Commander shall be addressed to their usual or last known place of business, or to their local representative,...

  10. 33 CFR 67.40-10 - Communication with owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Communication with owner. 67.40... Communication with owner. Communication with the owners of private aids to navigation by the District Commander shall be addressed to their usual or last known place of business, or to their local representative,...

  11. 33 CFR 67.40-10 - Communication with owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Communication with owner. 67.40... Communication with owner. Communication with the owners of private aids to navigation by the District Commander shall be addressed to their usual or last known place of business, or to their local representative,...

  12. 24 CFR 401.450 - Owner evaluation of physical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Owner evaluation of physical... PROGRAM (MARK-TO-MARKET) Restructuring Plan § 401.450 Owner evaluation of physical condition. (a) Initial evaluation. The owner must evaluate the physical condition of the project and provide the...

  13. 24 CFR 401.450 - Owner evaluation of physical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Owner evaluation of physical... PROGRAM (MARK-TO-MARKET) Restructuring Plan § 401.450 Owner evaluation of physical condition. (a) Initial evaluation. The owner must evaluate the physical condition of the project and provide the...

  14. 24 CFR 401.450 - Owner evaluation of physical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Owner evaluation of physical... PROGRAM (MARK-TO-MARKET) Restructuring Plan § 401.450 Owner evaluation of physical condition. (a) Initial evaluation. The owner must evaluate the physical condition of the project and provide the...

  15. 24 CFR 401.450 - Owner evaluation of physical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Owner evaluation of physical... PROGRAM (MARK-TO-MARKET) Restructuring Plan § 401.450 Owner evaluation of physical condition. (a) Initial evaluation. The owner must evaluate the physical condition of the project and provide the...

  16. 49 CFR 563.11 - Information in owner's manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Information in owner's manual. 563.11 Section 563... manual. (a) The owner's manual in each vehicle covered under this regulation must provide the following... the vehicle or the EDR. (b) The owner's manual may include additional information about the...

  17. 46 CFR 160.076-37 - Owner's manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Owner's manual. 160.076-37 Section 160.076-37 Shipping... Owner's manual. (a) General. The manufacturer must provide an owner's manual with each inflatable PFD sold or offered for sale. A draft of the manual for each model must be submitted for approval...

  18. 33 CFR 203.51 - Levee owner's manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Maintenance Manual specified by 33 CFR 208.10(a)(10) will fulfill the requirement of providing a levee owner's... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Levee owner's manual. 203.51... Program § 203.51 Levee owner's manual. (a) Authority. In accordance with section 202(f) of Public Law...

  19. Can Academia Truly Help Small-Business Owners? Opinion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, David; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Seven small business owners, professors, and leaders answered the question of whether academia can help small business owners. In the opinion of a small business owner, academia offers too much theory and too few real skills. According to the president of the National Federation of Independent Business, academia can play a role in the development…

  20. 33 CFR 67.40-20 - Charges invoiced to owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Charges invoiced to owner. 67.40... Charges invoiced to owner. Charges to the owner for the cost of marking a structure by the Coast Guard shall be determined in accordance with Part 74 of this subchapter. All such charges shall be invoiced...

  1. Tobacco Assessment in Actively Accruing National Cancer Institute Cooperative Group Program Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Erica N.; Torres, Essie; Toll, Benjamin A.; Cummings, K. Michael; Gritz, Ellen R.; Hyland, Andrew; Herbst, Roy S.; Marshall, James R.; Warren, Graham W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Substantial evidence suggests that tobacco use has adverse effects on cancer treatment outcomes; however, routine assessment of tobacco use has not been fully incorporated into standard clinical oncology practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate tobacco use assessment in patients enrolled onto actively accruing cancer clinical trials. Methods Protocols and forms for 155 actively accruing trials in the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Clinical Trials Cooperative Group Program were evaluated for tobacco use assessment at enrollment and follow-up by using a structured coding instrument. Results Of the 155 clinical trials reviewed, 45 (29%) assessed any form of tobacco use at enrollment, but only 34 (21.9%) assessed current cigarette use. Only seven trials (4.5%) assessed any form of tobacco use during follow-up. Secondhand smoke exposure was captured in 2.6% of trials at enrollment and 0.6% during follow-up. None of the trials assessed nicotine dependence or interest in quitting at any point during enrollment or treatment. Tobacco status assessment was higher in lung/head and neck trials as well as phase III trials, but there was no difference according to year of starting accrual or cooperative group. Conclusion Most actively accruing cooperative group clinical trials do not assess tobacco use, and there is no observable trend in improvement over the past 8 years. Failure to incorporate standardized tobacco assessments into NCI-funded Cooperative Group Clinical Trials will limit the ability to provide evidence-based cessation support and will limit the ability to accurately understand the precise effect of tobacco use on cancer treatment outcomes. PMID:22689794

  2. Scope of the Problem and Perception by Owners and Veterinarians.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Jennifer A; Villaverde, Cecilia

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is a common disease of modern dogs and cats. Dog and cat owners often do not realize their animal is affected. Some pet owners are skeptical of the diagnosis or rationalize the overweight condition of their pets. Animal-related factors associated with obesity in dogs and cats include breed, neuter status, age, and gender, whereas owner-related factors include diet choice, feeding method, and provision of exercise. Owner characteristics, such as age and income, are also potential risk factors for pet obesity. Identifying such risk factors for both animals and owners may help provide targets for prevention or interventional tools. PMID:27264053

  3. Making instruction and assessment responsive to diverse students' progress: group-administered dynamic assessment in teaching mathematics.

    PubMed

    Jeltova, Ida; Birney, Damian; Fredine, Nancy; Jarvin, Linda; Sternberg, Robert J; Grigorenko, Elena L

    2011-01-01

    This study entailed a 3 (instructional intervention) × 2 (assessment-type) between-subjects experimental design employing a pretest-intervention-posttest methodology. The instructional interventions were administered between subjects in three conditions: (a) dynamic instruction, (b) triarchic or theory of successful intelligence-control instruction, and (c) standard-control instruction. The assessment-type consisted between subjects of either (a) a group-administered dynamic posttest or (b) the same group-administered posttest interspersed with a control filler activity. Performance in different mathematics content areas taught in fourth grade was investigated. In total, 1,332 students and 63 classroom teachers in 24 schools across six school districts participated in the study. The results indicate the advantages of using dynamic instruction and assessment in regular classrooms while teaching mathematics, especially when the student body is highly ethnically diverse. PMID:21965254

  4. Self and peer assessment - does it make a difference to student group work?

    PubMed

    Elliott, Naomi; Higgins, Agnes

    2005-01-01

    The use of group projects as an assessment strategy is increasing in popularity in education. However problems can arise if members of the group do not contribute equally to the process and required outcome. Self and peer assessment has been advocated as one means of overcoming the problem of ;free riders'. A review of the literature would suggest that the vast majority of research in the area of self and peer assessment has been carried out in disciplines other than nursing and midwifery. This paper provides a brief overview on the available literature on self and peer assessment and reports on an action research approach to the development and evaluation of a self and peer assessment strategy, designed to promote student participation in a group project. While further research is needed to substantiate the findings, the results support its continuing use within the programme. To aid the lecturer who is new to self and peer assessment and who may wish to pursue the idea within their own programme the assessment tool and guidelines used in the project are also included. PMID:19038177

  5. Dogs' social referencing towards owners and strangers.

    PubMed

    Merola, Isabella; Prato-Previde, Emanuela; Marshall-Pescini, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Social referencing is a process whereby an individual uses the emotional information provided by an informant about a novel object/stimulus to guide his/her own future behaviour towards it. In this study adult dogs were tested in a social referencing paradigm involving a potentially scary object with either their owner or a stranger acting as the informant and delivering either a positive or negative emotional message. The aim was to evaluate the influence of the informant's identity on the dogs' referential looking behaviour and behavioural regulation when the message was delivered using only vocal and facial emotional expressions. Results show that most dogs looked referentially at the informant, regardless of his/her identity. Furthermore, when the owner acted as the informant dogs that received a positive emotional message changed their behaviour, looking at him/her more often and spending more time approaching the object and close to it; conversely, dogs that were given a negative message took longer to approach the object and to interact with it. Fewer differences in the dog's behaviour emerged when the informant was the stranger, suggesting that the dog-informant relationship may influence the dog's behavioural regulation. Results are discussed in relation to studies on human-dog communication, attachment, mood modification and joint attention. PMID:23071828

  6. Key issues for the assessment of the allergenic potential of genetically modified foods: breakout group reports.

    PubMed Central

    Germolec, Dori R; Kimber, Ian; Goldman, Lynn; Selgrade, MaryJane

    2003-01-01

    On the final afternoon of the workshop "Assessment of the Allergenic Potential of Genetically Modified Foods," held 10-12 December 2001 in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, speakers and participants met in breakout groups to discuss specific questions in the areas of use of human clinical data, animal models to assess food allergy, biomarkers of exposure and effect, sensitive populations, dose-response assessment, and postmarket surveillance. Each group addressed general questions regarding allergenicity of genetically modified foods and specific questions for each subject area. This article is a brief summary of the discussions of each of the six breakout groups regarding our current state of knowledge and what information is needed to advance the field. PMID:12826486

  7. Encouraging family forest owners to create early successional wildlife habitat in Southern New England.

    PubMed

    Buffum, Bill; Modisette, Christopher; McWilliams, Scott R

    2014-01-01

    Encouraging family forest owners to create early successional habitat is a high priority for wildlife conservation agencies in the northeastern USA, where most forest land is privately owned. Many studies have linked regional declines in wildlife populations to the loss of early successional habitat. The government provides financial incentives to create early successional habitat, but the number of family forest owners who actively manage their forests remains low. Several studies have analyzed participation of family forest owners in federal forestry programs, but no study to date has focused specifically on creation of wildlife habitat. The objective of our study was to analyze the experience of a group of wildlife-oriented family forest owners who were trained to create early successional habitat. This type of family forest owners represents a small portion of the total population of family forest owners, but we believe they can play an important role in creating wildlife habitat, so it is important to understand how outreach programs can best reach them. The respondents shared some characteristics but differed in terms of forest holdings, forestry experience and interest in earning forestry income. Despite their strong interest in wildlife, awareness about the importance of early successional habitat was low. Financial support from the federal government appeared to be important in motivating respondents to follow up after the training with activities on their own properties: 84% of respondents who had implemented activities received federal financial support and 47% would not have implemented the activities without financial assistance. In order to mobilize greater numbers of wildlife-oriented family forest owners to create early successional habitat we recommend focusing outreach efforts on increasing awareness about the importance of early successional habitat and the availability of technical and financial assistance. PMID:24587160

  8. Encouraging Family Forest Owners to Create Early Successional Wildlife Habitat in Southern New England

    PubMed Central

    Buffum, Bill; Modisette, Christopher; McWilliams, Scott R.

    2014-01-01

    Encouraging family forest owners to create early successional habitat is a high priority for wildlife conservation agencies in the northeastern USA, where most forest land is privately owned. Many studies have linked regional declines in wildlife populations to the loss of early successional habitat. The government provides financial incentives to create early successional habitat, but the number of family forest owners who actively manage their forests remains low. Several studies have analyzed participation of family forest owners in federal forestry programs, but no study to date has focused specifically on creation of wildlife habitat. The objective of our study was to analyze the experience of a group of wildlife-oriented family forest owners who were trained to create early successional habitat. This type of family forest owners represents a small portion of the total population of family forest owners, but we believe they can play an important role in creating wildlife habitat, so it is important to understand how outreach programs can best reach them. The respondents shared some characteristics but differed in terms of forest holdings, forestry experience and interest in earning forestry income. Despite their strong interest in wildlife, awareness about the importance of early successional habitat was low. Financial support from the federal government appeared to be important in motivating respondents to follow up after the training with activities on their own properties: 84% of respondents who had implemented activities received federal financial support and 47% would not have implemented the activities without financial assistance. In order to mobilize greater numbers of wildlife-oriented family forest owners to create early successional habitat we recommend focusing outreach efforts on increasing awareness about the importance of early successional habitat and the availability of technical and financial assistance. PMID:24587160

  9. Do Owners Have a Clever Hans Effect on Dogs? Results of a Pointing Study

    PubMed Central

    Schmidjell, Teresa; Range, Friederike; Huber, Ludwig; Virányi, Zsófia

    2012-01-01

    Dogs are exceptionally successful at interpreting human pointing gestures to locate food hidden in one of two containers. However, it has repeatedly been questioned whether dogs rely on the pointing gesture or their success is increased by subtle cues from their human handler. In two experiments we used a standard two-way object-choice task to focus on this potential Clever Hans effect. We investigated if and how owners’ knowledge and beliefs influenced their dogs’ performance. In two experiments, as is typical in such pointing tasks, the owners sat behind their dogs, in close auditory and tactile contact with them. In Experiment 1, we systematically manipulated the owners’ knowledge of whether or not their dog should follow the pointing gesture, but at the same time instructed the owners to refrain from influencing the choice of their dog. We found no influence of subtle cues from the owners, if indeed they existed: dogs in the different groups followed the pointing uniformly. Furthermore, in the absence of pointing dogs chose randomly, even though the owners had been informed about the location of the reward. In Experiment 2, owners were instructed to actively influence the choice of their dogs, and they, indeed, succeeded in sending their dogs to the container they believed to be baited. However, their influence was significantly weaker if the experimenter had previously pointed to the other location. Overall the pointing gesture seems to have a strong effect on the choice of dogs in an object-choice task. Pointing can lead the dogs to success without help from their owners as well as it can counteract clear directional instructions provided by the owners. PMID:23272000

  10. Psychosocial Needs Assessment among Earthquake Survivors in Lorestan Province with an Emphasis on the Vulnerable Groups

    PubMed Central

    Forouzan, A.; Eftekhari, M. Baradaran; Falahat, K.; Dejman, M.; Heidari, N.; Habibi, E.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Iran is one of the ten most earthquake prone countries in the world. Earthquakes not only cause new psychological needs among the population but particularly so when one considers vulnerable groups. This in - depth study was conducted with the aim of assessing psychosocial needs six months after an earthquake happened in the west of the county in Lorestan province. Methods: This is a qualitative study using focus group discussion that focuses mainly on the vulnerable groups (women, children, elderly and disabled people) after an earthquake in Boz-azna; a village in Lorestan province in western part of Iran. Findings: Results of the psychosocial assessment indicated feelings of anxiety and worries in four vulnerable groups. Horror, hyper-excitement, avoidance and disturbing thoughts were observed in all groups with the exception of the elderly. Educational failures, loneliness and isolation were highlighted in children. All groups encountered socio-economic needs that included loss of assets and sense of insecurity and also reproductive problems were reported in women's group. Discussion and Conclusion: Modification of a protocol on psychosocial support considering the context of the rural and urban areas with emphasis on the specific needs of the vulnerable groups is an appropriate strategy in crisis management. It seems that appropriate public awareness regarding assistance programs can be effective in reducing stress and needs of disaster survivors. PMID:23777724

  11. Integrated Assessments and Policy Evaluation group and Center for International Energy Development. Program summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-04-01

    This report summarizes programmatic accomplishments since 1981 in two staff groups of the Energy and Environmental Systems Division: the Integrated Assessments and Policy Evaluation (IAPE) group and the Center for International Energy Development (CIED). This summary, presented in Sections 2-4, provides background information on major accomplishments. The introduction presents an overview of staffing and programs, and Section 5 lists recent publications. 38 figs., 13 tabs.

  12. Improvement of modelling capabilities for assessing urban contamination : The EMRAS Urban Remediation Working Group.

    SciTech Connect

    Thiessen, K. M.; Batandjieva, B.; Andersson, K. G.; Arkhipov, A.; Charnock, T. W.; Gallay, F.; Gaschak, S.; Golikov, V.; Hwang, W. T.; Kaiser, J. C.; Kamboj, S.; Steiner, M.; Tomas, J.; Trifunovic, D.; Yu, C.; Ziemer, R. L.; Zlobenko, B.; Environmental Science Division; SENES Oak Ridge; IAEA; Riso National Lab.; Chernobyl Center for Nuclear Safety; Health Protection Agency; IRSN; Inst. of Radiation Hygene of the Ministry of Public Health, Russian Federation; KAERI, Republic of Korea; GSF, Germany; BfS, Germany; CPHR, Cuba; State Office for Radiation Protection, Croatia; AECL, Canada; National Academy of Science, Ukraine

    2008-01-01

    The Urban Remediation Working Group of the International Atomic Energy Agency's Environmental Modeling for Radiation Safety (EMRAS) programme was established to improve modeling and assessment capabilities for radioactively contaminated urban situations, including the effects of countermeasures. An example of the Working Group's activities is an exercise based on Chernobyl fallout data in Ukraine, which has provided an opportunity to compare predictions among several models and with available measurements, to discuss reasons for discrepancies, and to identify areas where additional information would be helpful.

  13. Owner-collected swabs of pets: a method fit for the purpose of zoonoses research.

    PubMed

    Möbius, N; Hille, K; Verspohl, J; Wefstaedt, P; Kreienbrock, L

    2013-09-01

    As part of the preparation of a large cohort study in the entire German population, this study examined the feasibility of cat and dog owners collecting nasal and oral swabs of their animals at home as a method of assessing exposure to zoonoses. In veterinary clinics in Hannover, Germany, 100 pet owners were recruited. Nasal and oral swabs of pets were taken by a veterinarian at the clinic and owners took swabs at home. Swabs were analysed regarding bacterial growth and compared (owner vs. vet) using Cohen's kappa and McNemar's test. The return rate of kits was 92%, and 77% of owners thought it unnecessary to have veterinarian assistance to swab the mouth. McNemar's test results: oral swabs 78% agreement with Gram-positive bacterial growth, 87% agreement with Gram-negative bacterial growth; with similar results for nasal swabs. Although sample quality differed, this method allowed the receipt of swabs from pets in order to obtain information about colonization with zoonotic pathogens. PMID:23114113

  14. Green design assessment of electromechanical products based on group weighted-AHP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jinwei; Zhou, MengChu; Li, Zhiwu; Xie, Huiguang

    2015-11-01

    Manufacturing industry is the backbone of a country's economy while environmental pollution is a serious problem that human beings must face today. The green design of electromechanical products based on enterprise information systems is an important method to solve the environmental problem. The question on how to design green products must be answered by excellent designers via both advanced design methods and effective assessment methods of electromechanical products. Making an objective and precise assessment of green design is one of the problems that must be solved when green design is conducted. An assessment method of green design on electromechanical products based on Group Weighted-AHP (Analytic Hierarchy Process) is proposed in this paper, together with the characteristics of green products. The assessment steps of green design are also established. The results are illustrated via the assessment of a refrigerator design.

  15. Vicious dogs part 2: criminal thinking, callousness, and personality styles of their owners.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Allison M; Ragatz, Laurie L; Fremouw, William J

    2012-01-01

    Every year over 885,000 dog bites require serious medical attention. Based on human injury and insurance claims, six dog breeds were designated as "vicious" (Akitas, Chows, Dobermans, Pit Bulls, Rottweilers, and Wolf-mixes). This study was conducted to expand on previous research examining antisocial tendencies and personality styles of people choosing to own vicious breeds. Seven hundred and fifty-four college students completed a questionnaire assessing type of dog owned, criminal thinking, callousness, personality, alcohol usage, and deviant lifestyle behaviors. Vicious dog owners reported significantly higher criminal thinking, entitlement, sentimentality, and superoptimism tendencies. Vicious dog owners were arrested, engaged in physical fights, and used marijuana significantly more than other dog owners. However, the homogeneous sample utilized could impact the generalizability of these findings. Choosing to own a vicious dog may be a "thin slice" indicator of more antisocial tendencies. PMID:22074409

  16. The Internet and health information: differences in pet owners based on age, gender, and education

    PubMed Central

    Kogan, Lori R.; Schoenfeld-Tacher, Regina; Viera, Ann R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The research assessed the attitudes and behaviors of pet owners pertaining to online search behavior for pet health information. Methods: A survey was conducted with a random sample of pet owners drawn from two US metropolitan areas and surrounding cities. Participating clinics were chosen randomly, and each participating clinic was asked to distribute 100 surveys to their clients until all surveys were disbursed. Results: Although some perceptions and behaviors surrounding the use of the Internet for pet health information differ based on gender, age, or education level of pet owners, there are many aspects in which there are no differences based on these demographics. Conclusions: Results of the study suggest that closer examination of the common perception that gender, age, or education level has an effect on Internet behavior as it relates to veterinary medicine is required. Recommendations are made pertaining to the growing presence of the Internet and its impact on veterinary medicine. PMID:22879809

  17. Quality of life of dogs with skin diseases and their owners. Part 1: development and validation of a questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Noli, Chiara; Minafò, Giovanni; Galzerano, Mario

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a questionnaire on the quality of life (QoL) of dogs with skin diseases and their owners. Twenty-six qualitative interviews with owners of dogs affected with severe skin diseases were performed to identify which aspects of the life of dogs and owners were impaired. To assess the clarity of questions, a preliminary 19-item questionnaire (answer range, 0 = none to 3 = severe) was developed following current models from human dermatology and administered to a pilot sample of 20 owners. Questions with a low positive answering rate or statistical relevance were eliminated. A final 15-item questionnaire was distributed to the owners of 41 dogs with atopic dermatitis (AD) and 40 healthy dogs. The severity of the AD was assessed by an owners' severity scale (0-3), a descriptive Visual Analogue Scale for pruritus and CADESI-03. The correlation between these results and those of the questionnaire were analysed. Repeatability was evaluated by testing 44 owners of dogs with different skin diseases on two occasions 3 days apart. The QoL scores for dogs with AD and their owners were significantly different from those for healthy control dogs (P = 0.0001). There was a reliable repeatability of scores (α = 0.8). Owner-perceived severity correlated significantly with QoL scores (P = 0.02). The correlation between QoL and pruritus scores was high (>0.36), while that with CADESI-03 was lower (<0.26). PMID:21410569

  18. Environmental Assessment. Instructor Guide. Working for Clean Water: An Information Program for Advisory Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buskirk, E. Drannon, Jr.

    Described is an hour-long learning session on environmental assessment that is designed to help citizen advisory groups improve decision making in water quality planning. The instructor's guide addresses: (1) environmental considerations in water quality planning, and (2) the identification of primary and secondary impacts of wastewater projects.…

  19. Research and Teaching: Aligning Assessment to Instruction--Collaborative Group Testing in Large- Enrollment Science Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Marcelle; Roberts, Tina M.; Freyermuth, Sharyn K.; Witzig, Stephen B.; Izci, Kemal

    2015-01-01

    The authors describe a collaborative group-testing strategy implemented and studied in undergraduate science classes. This project investigated how the assessment strategy relates to student performance and perceptions about collaboration and focused on two sections of an undergraduate biotechnology course taught in separate semesters.

  20. Making Group Assessment Transparent: What Wikis Can Contribute to Collaborative Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caple, Helen; Bogle, Mike

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of new media technologies, in particular wikis, for the compiling and grading of group assessment tasks. Wikis are open web pages that can be viewed and modified by anyone with internet access and are well known for their collaborative nature. Wikis are also transparent, which means that any edit/modification is…

  1. The Parenting Questionnaire: An Inventory for Assessing Outcomes of Adlerian Parent Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiffany, Jeanne; Tollefson, Nona

    This study field tests and evaluates the Parenting Questionnaire, an instrument designed to assess parental attitudes and behavior, based on the child-raising theories of Dreikurs and Dinkmeyer and the Adlerian model for parent study groups. Dreikurs and Adler stress the purposive nature of children's behavior or misbehavior, and teach parents to…

  2. Assessment of Groups Influence on Management Style as Related to University Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irtwange, S. V.; Orsaah, S.

    2010-01-01

    The study was undertaken with the objective of assessing groups influence on management style as related to University governance with University of Agriculture, Makurdi as a case study from academic staff perspective. The management style of the Vice Chancellor of the University of Agriculture, Makurdi between the period September 3, 1996 to…

  3. Assessing Child Mental Health Services in New York: A Report on Three Focus Groups, Winter 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koyanagi, Chris; Semansky, Rafael

    In 2002, the Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law investigated the impact of expanding child mental health services in Medicaid on the actual availability of services to children. To assess family satisfaction, focus groups were held in two states: Oregon and New York. Both states have a comprehensive Medicaid mental health benefit for children…

  4. Using the Focus Group in Assessing Training Needs: Empowering Child Welfare Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denning, Janice D.; Verschelden, Cia

    1993-01-01

    Describes an assessment process in a public child welfare agency that included workers as a primary source of knowledge about their own needs. Argues that the use of focus groups (a marketing research technique) encourages high levels of direct input and helps engage workers in subsequent phases of the training process. (MM)

  5. Integrating Teacher- and Peer-Assessments of Group Coursework Assignments in Business Education: Some Innovative Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onyia, Okey Peter

    2014-01-01

    This paper is a sequel to an earlier one that examines "the efficacy of two innovative peer-assessment templates ("PET" and "PACT") introduced to enable students provide evidence of their fairness in evaluating peer contributions to group project work" (Onyia, O. P. and Allen, S., 2012). In the present paper, three…

  6. Implementation and Outcomes of Online Self and Peer Assessment on Group Based Honours Research Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Chengqing; Chanda, Emmanuel; Willison, John

    2014-01-01

    Honours research projects in the School of Civil, Environmental and Mining Engineering at the University of Adelaide are run with small groups of students working with an academic supervisor in a chosen area for one year. The research project is mainly self-directed study, which makes it very difficult to fairly assess the contribution of…

  7. Sociometry: An Approach for Assessing Group Dynamics in Web-Based Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daugherty, Martha; Turner, Jeff

    2003-01-01

    Student interactivity in web-based educational environments has shown to increase academic learning and motivation (Jiang, 1998; Petraglia, 1998). However, instructors often find it difficult to assess the quality of online group dynamics without visual observations of student behaviors. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of…

  8. Chair Report Consultancy Meeting on Nuclear Security Assessment Methodologies (NUSAM) Transport Case Study Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    Shull, Doug

    2015-08-19

    The purpose of the consultancy assignment was to (i) apply the NUSAM assessment methods to hypothetical transport security table top exercise (TTX) analyses and (ii) document its results to working materials of NUSAM case study on transport. A number of working group observations, using the results of TTX methodologies, are noted in the report.

  9. Comparison of individual answer and group answer with and without structured peer assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kablan, Zeynel

    2014-09-01

    Background:Cooperative learning activities provide active participation of students leading to better learning. The literature suggests that cooperative learning activities need to be structured for a more effective and productive interaction. Purpose: This study aimed to test the differences among three instructional conditions in terms of science achievement. Sample:A total of 79 fifth-grade students, 42 males (53%) and 37 females (47%), participated in the study. Design and Methods:In the first condition, students answered the teacher's questions individually by raising hands. In the second condition, students discussed the answer in groups and came up with a single group answer. In this condition, the teacher provided only verbal directions to the groups without using any strategy or material. In the third condition, students used a 'peer assessment form' before giving the group answer. A pre-/post-test experimental design was used. Multiple-choice and open-ended tests were used for data collection. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was conducted to test the differences in the test scores between the three groups (individual answer, unstructured group answer and structured group answer). Results:Results showed that there were no significant differences among the three learning conditions in terms of their multiple-choice test scores. In terms of the open-ended test scores, students in the structured group answer condition scored significantly higher than the students in the individual answer condition. Conclusions:Structuring the group work through peer assessment helped to monitor the group discussion, provided a better learning compared to the individual answer condition, and helped students to participate in the activity equally.

  10. Validating a work group climate assessment tool for improving the performance of public health organizations

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Cary; LeMay, Nancy; Rodway, Greg; Tracy, Allison; Galer, Joan

    2005-01-01

    Background This article describes the validation of an instrument to measure work group climate in public health organizations in developing countries. The instrument, the Work Group Climate Assessment Tool (WCA), was applied in Brazil, Mozambique, and Guinea to assess the intermediate outcomes of a program to develop leadership for performance improvement. Data were collected from 305 individuals in 42 work groups, who completed a self-administered questionnaire. Methods The WCA was initially validated using Cronbach's alpha reliability coefficient and exploratory factor analysis. This article presents the results of a second validation study to refine the initial analyses to account for nested data, to provide item-level psychometrics, and to establish construct validity. Analyses included eigenvalue decomposition analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, and validity and reliability analyses. Results This study confirmed the validity and reliability of the WCA across work groups with different demographic characteristics (gender, education, management level, and geographical location). The study showed that there is agreement between the theoretical construct of work climate and the items in the WCA tool across different populations. The WCA captures a single perception of climate rather than individual sub-scales of clarity, support, and challenge. Conclusion The WCA is useful for comparing the climates of different work groups, tracking the changes in climate in a single work group over time, or examining differences among individuals' perceptions of their work group climate. Application of the WCA before and after a leadership development process can help work groups hold a discussion about current climate and select a target for improvement. The WCA provides work groups with a tool to take ownership of their own group climate through a process that is simple and objective and that protects individual confidentiality. PMID:16223447

  11. Community Resilience: Workshops on Private Sector and Property Owner Requirements for Recovery and Restoration from a Diasaster

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Stein, Steven L.; Lesperance, Ann M.

    2008-12-22

    This report summarizes the results of a proejct sponsored by DTRA to 1) Assess the readiness of private-sector businesses, building owners, and service providers to restore property and recover operations in the aftermath of a wide-area dispersal of anthrax; and 2) Understand what private property owners and businesses "want and need" from federal, state, and local government to support recovery and restoration from such an incident.

  12. Focus Groups and Exit Interviews Are Components of Chemistry Department Program Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreisbach, Joseph H.; Hogan, Thomas P.; Stamford, Anne Marie; Greggo, John W.

    1998-10-01

    The Chemistry Department, in conjunction with the Assessment and Institutional Research Office (AIRO) and the Department of Counseling and Human Services developed an assessment plan which incorporates use of focus groups and exit interviews. As part of the five-year departmental review, a number of student focus groups were facilitated to evaluate (a) the freshman and sophomore organic chemistry programs which also service other departments and (b) the upper division lecture and laboratory program for majors. Use of direct conversation in program assessment yields less ambiguous results compared with other methods because responses can be clarified with careful follow up questions. Success of this project gave rise to use of annual exit interviews with graduating seniors from the chemistry department. The approach described can easily be modified to meet the needs of any academic setting.

  13. A comparison of noxious facilities` impacts for home owners versus renters

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.E. |; Nieves, L.A.

    1996-09-01

    The siting of noxious facilities, such as hazardous waste facilities, is often vigorously opposed by local residents. As a result, one would expect people`s residential and employment choices to reflect a desire to avoid proximity to such facilities. Ibis behavior would in turn affect labor and housing prices. One technique that has been employed to implicitly value impacts of noxious facilities is the intercity hedonic approach, which examines the wage and land rent differentials among cities that result from environmental amenities and disamenities. However, most of the research focus has been on the behavioral response of home owners as opposed to renters. Since these two groups of residents vary on numerous dimensions such as marital status, age, sex, and personal mobility, it would not be surprising to find different marginal valuations of local site characteristics. We use 1980 Census data to derive separate estimates for owners and renters of the implicit value placed on eight different types of noxious facilities. Although the magnitude of the responses of renters and owners to noxious facilities and other environmental characteristics varies, the signs are generally consistent. The differences in values between owners and renters are not primarily due to differential mobility or sociodemographic factors. Controlling those factors decreases the differences between renters` and owners` implicit valuations by less than 10%. Unmeasured differences in characteristics between the two groups, such as tastes, risk aversion, or commitment to the community, must account for the remaining difference in valuations. These findings suggest that policymakers should separately consider the responses of owners and renters when estimating noxious facility impacts.

  14. 25. INTERIOR VIEW OF OWNERS' SALON, WITH LAVATORY IN "UP" ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. INTERIOR VIEW OF OWNERS' SALON, WITH LAVATORY IN "UP" POSITION, LOOKING TOWARD PASSAGEWAY. - Schooner Yacht Coronet, International Yacht Restoration School, Thames Street, Newport, Newport County, RI

  15. 42 CFR 413.102 - Compensation of owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... sound conduct of the institution. (c) Application. (1) Owners of provider organizations often furnish..., if a proprietor furnishes necessary services for the institution, the institution is in...

  16. Neutering of cats and dogs in Ireland; pet owner self-reported perceptions of enabling and disabling factors in the decision to neuter.

    PubMed

    Downes, Martin J; Devitt, Catherine; Downes, Marie T; More, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    Background. Failure among pet owners to neuter their pets results in increased straying and overpopulation problems. Variations in neutering levels can be explained by cultural differences, differences in economic status in rural and urban locations, and owner perceptions about their pet. There are also differences between male and female pet owners. There is no research pertaining to Irish pet owner attitudes towards neutering their pets. This paper identified the perceptions of a sample of Irish cat and dog owners that influenced their decisions on pet neutering. Methods. This study was conducted using social science (qualitative) methods, including an interview-administered survey questionnaire and focus group discussions. Data was coded and managed using Nvivo 8 qualitative data analysis software. Results. Focus groups were conducted with 43 pet (cats and dogs) owners. Two major categories relating to the decision to neuter were identified: (1) enabling perceptions in the decision to neuter (subcategories were: controlling unwanted pet behaviour; positive perceptions regarding pet health and welfare outcomes; perceived owner responsibility; pet function; and the influence of veterinary advice), and (2) disabling perceptions in the decision to neuter (subcategories were: perceived financial cost of neutering; perceived adequacy of existing controls; and negative perceptions regarding pet health and welfare outcomes). Discussion. Pet owner sense of responsibility and control are two central issues to the decision to neuter their pets. Understanding how pet owners feel about topics such as pet neutering, can help improve initiatives aimed at emphasising the responsibility of population control of cats and dogs. PMID:26312187

  17. Neutering of cats and dogs in Ireland; pet owner self-reported perceptions of enabling and disabling factors in the decision to neuter

    PubMed Central

    Devitt, Catherine; Downes, Marie T.; More, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Failure among pet owners to neuter their pets results in increased straying and overpopulation problems. Variations in neutering levels can be explained by cultural differences, differences in economic status in rural and urban locations, and owner perceptions about their pet. There are also differences between male and female pet owners. There is no research pertaining to Irish pet owner attitudes towards neutering their pets. This paper identified the perceptions of a sample of Irish cat and dog owners that influenced their decisions on pet neutering. Methods. This study was conducted using social science (qualitative) methods, including an interview-administered survey questionnaire and focus group discussions. Data was coded and managed using Nvivo 8 qualitative data analysis software. Results. Focus groups were conducted with 43 pet (cats and dogs) owners. Two major categories relating to the decision to neuter were identified: (1) enabling perceptions in the decision to neuter (subcategories were: controlling unwanted pet behaviour; positive perceptions regarding pet health and welfare outcomes; perceived owner responsibility; pet function; and the influence of veterinary advice), and (2) disabling perceptions in the decision to neuter (subcategories were: perceived financial cost of neutering; perceived adequacy of existing controls; and negative perceptions regarding pet health and welfare outcomes). Discussion. Pet owner sense of responsibility and control are two central issues to the decision to neuter their pets. Understanding how pet owners feel about topics such as pet neutering, can help improve initiatives aimed at emphasising the responsibility of population control of cats and dogs. PMID:26312187

  18. Assessment of female sexual function in a group of uncircumcised obese Egyptian women.

    PubMed

    Elnashar, A R M; Ibrahim, N H; Ahmed, H-Eh; Hassanin, A M; Elgawady, M A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess female sexual function in an obese group (250 women) and to compare it with a control group (100 women), among 25-35-year-old uncircumcised Egyptian women, using female sexual function index (FSFI) score. FSFI total score of ⩽ 26.55 was considered diagnostic of Female Sexual Dysfunction (FSD). The percentage of FSD in the obese group was 73.6% while it was 71% in the control group, which was statistically insignificant (P > 0.05). The difference between both groups regarding the total (FSFI) score was insignificant (P > 0.05), but arousal and satisfaction domains scores were significantly lower in the obese group. In the obese group, a strong negative correlation between body mass index and arousal, orgasm and the total FSFI score was found. Women with excessive obesity had the lowest total FSFI score. In the obese group, college graduates had the highest total scores and all domain scores of FSFI followed by high school graduates while the least educated women had the lowest scores and when these subgroups were compared, significant differences were found among them. We conclude that in uncircumcised 25-35-year-old Egyptian women, obesity is not a major detrimental factor for FSD, but it may affect some sexual domains such as arousal and satisfaction, although excessive obesity is associated with FSD. Also, educational and cultural factors may have an impact on perception of sex and pleasure. PMID:26155831

  19. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the Department`s plutonium storage. Volume II, part 7: Mound working group assessment team report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    This is the report of a visit to the Mound site by the Working Group Assessment Team (WGAT) to assess plutonium vulnerabilities. Purposes of the visit were: to review results of the site`s self assessment of current practices for handling and storing plutonium; to conduct an independent assessment of these practices; to reconcile differences and assemble a final list of vulnerabilities; to calculate consequences and probability for each vulnerability; and to issue a report to the Working Group. This report, representing completion of the Mound visit, will be compiled along with those from all other sites with plutonium inventories as part of a final report to the Secretary of Energy.

  20. Pollutant Assessments Group Procedures Manual: Volume 1, Administrative and support procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This manual describes procedures currently in use by the Pollutant Assessments Group. The manual is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 includes administrative and support procedures, and Volume 2 includes technical procedures. These procedures are revised in an ongoing process to incorporate new developments in hazardous waste assessment technology and changes in administrative policy. Format inconsistencies will be corrected in subsequent revisions of individual procedures. The purpose of the Pollutant Assessments Groups Procedures Manual is to provide a standardized set of procedures documenting in an auditable manner the activities performed by the Pollutant Assessments Group (PAG) of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) of the Environmental Measurements and Applications Section (EMAS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The Procedures Manual ensures that the organizational, administrative, and technical activities of PAG conform properly to protocol outlined by funding organizations. This manual also ensures that the techniques and procedures used by PAG and other contractor personnel meet the requirements of applicable governmental, scientific, and industrial standards. The Procedures Manual is sufficiently comprehensive for use by PAG and contractor personnel in the planning, performance, and reporting of project activities and measurements. The Procedures Manual provides procedures for conducting field measurements and includes program planning, equipment operation, and quality assurance elements. Successive revisions of this manual will be archived in the PAG Document Control Department to facilitate tracking of the development of specific procedures.

  1. Assessment of a Novel Hybrid Delphi and Nominal Groups Technique to Evaluate Quality Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Sheryl; Romano, Patrick S; Schmidt, Eric M; Schultz, Ellen; Geppert, Jeffrey J; McDonald, Kathryn M

    2011-01-01

    Objective To test the implementation of a novel structured panel process in the evaluation of quality indicators. Data Source National panel of 64 clinicians rating usefulness of indicator applications in 2008–2009. Study Design Hybrid panel combined Delphi Group and Nominal Group (NG) techniques to evaluate 81 indicator applications. Principal Findings The Delphi Group and NG rated 56 percent of indicator applications similarly. Group assignment (Delphi versus Nominal) was not significantly associated with mean ratings, but specialty and research interests of panelists, and indicator factors such as denominator level and proposed use were. Rating distributions narrowed significantly in 20.8 percent of applications between review rounds. Conclusions The hybrid panel process facilitated information exchange and tightened rating distributions. Future assessments of this method might include a control panel. PMID:21790589

  2. "I'd Rather Vomit Up a Live Hedgehog"--L2 Students and Group Assessment in Mainstream University Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Pat

    2001-01-01

    Explores the pitfalls that may be encountered when group assessment is used as a means of evaluation, especially when the students involved are not native speakers of English. Issues of cultural differences and their impact on group formation and the problems surrounding free-loading in the group assessment are discussed. (Author/VWL) (Adjunct…

  3. Waste area Grouping 2 Phase I task data report: Human health risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Purucker, S.T.; Douthat, D.M.

    1996-06-01

    This report is one of five reports issued in 1996 that provide follow- up information to the Phase 1 Remedial Investigation (RI) Report for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The five reports address areas of concern that could cause potential human health risk and ecological risk within WAG2 at ORNL. The purpose of this report is to present a summary of the human health risk assessment results based on the data collected for the WAG 2 Phase 1 RI. Estimates of risk are provided based on measured concentrations in the surface water, floodplain soil, and sediment of White Oak Creek, Melton Branch, and their tributaries. The human health risk assessment methodology used in this risk assessment is based on Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund (RAGS). First, the data for the different media are elevated to determine usability for risk assessment. Second, through the process of selecting chemicals of potential concern (COPCs), contaminants to be considered in the risk assessment are identified for each assessment of exposure potential is performed, and exposure pathways are identified. Subsequently, exposure is estimated quantitatively, and the toxicity of each of the COPCs is determined. The results of these analyses are combined and summarized in a risk characterization.

  4. Oral health-related cultural beliefs for four racial/ethnic groups: Assessment of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Butani, Yogita; Weintraub, Jane A; Barker, Judith C

    2008-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess information available in the dental literature on oral health-related cultural beliefs. In the US, as elsewhere, many racial/ethnic minority groups shoulder a disproportionate burden of oral disease. Cultural beliefs, values and practices are often implicated as causes of oral health disparities, yet little is known about the breadth or adequacy of literature about cultural issues that could support these assertions. Hence, this rigorous assessment was conducted of work published in English on cultural beliefs and values in relation to oral health status and dental practice. Four racial/ethnic groups in the US (African-American, Chinese, Filipino and Hispanic/Latino) were chosen as exemplar populations. Methods The dental literature published in English for the period 1980–2006 noted in the electronic database PUBMED was searched, using keywords and MeSH headings in different combinations for each racial/ethnic group to identify eligible articles. To be eligible the title and abstract when available had to describe the oral health-related cultural knowledge or orientation of the populations studied. Results Overall, the majority of the literature on racial/ethnic groups was epidemiologic in nature, mainly demonstrating disparities in oral health rather than the oral beliefs or practices of these groups. A total of 60 relevant articles were found: 16 for African-American, 30 for Chinese, 2 for Filipino and 12 for Hispanic/Latino populations. Data on beliefs and practices from these studies has been abstracted, compiled and assessed. Few research-based studies were located. Articles lacked adequate identification of groups studied, used limited methods and had poor conceptual base. Conclusion The scant information available from the published dental and medical literature provides at best a rudimentary framework of oral health related ideas and beliefs for specific populations. PMID:18793438

  5. Grouping and Read-Across Approaches for Risk Assessment of Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Oomen, Agnes G.; Bleeker, Eric A. J.; Bos, Peter M. J.; van Broekhuizen, Fleur; Gottardo, Stefania; Groenewold, Monique; Hristozov, Danail; Hund-Rinke, Kerstin; Irfan, Muhammad-Adeel; Marcomini, Antonio; Peijnenburg, Willie J. G. M.; Rasmussen, Kirsten; Sánchez Jiménez, Araceli; Scott-Fordsmand, Janeck J.; van Tongeren, Martie; Wiench, Karin; Wohlleben, Wendel; Landsiedel, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Physicochemical properties of chemicals affect their exposure, toxicokinetics/fate and hazard, and for nanomaterials, the variation of these properties results in a wide variety of materials with potentially different risks. To limit the amount of testing for risk assessment, the information gathering process for nanomaterials needs to be efficient. At the same time, sufficient information to assess the safety of human health and the environment should be available for each nanomaterial. Grouping and read-across approaches can be utilised to meet these goals. This article presents different possible applications of grouping and read-across for nanomaterials within the broader perspective of the MARINA Risk Assessment Strategy (RAS), as developed in the EU FP7 project MARINA. Firstly, nanomaterials can be grouped based on limited variation in physicochemical properties to subsequently design an efficient testing strategy that covers the entire group. Secondly, knowledge about exposure, toxicokinetics/fate or hazard, for example via properties such as dissolution rate, aspect ratio, chemical (non-)activity, can be used to organise similar materials in generic groups to frame issues that need further attention, or potentially to read-across. Thirdly, when data related to specific endpoints is required, read-across can be considered, using data from a source material for the target nanomaterial. Read-across could be based on a scientifically sound justification that exposure, distribution to the target (fate/toxicokinetics) and hazard of the target material are similar to, or less than, the source material. These grouping and read-across approaches pave the way for better use of available information on nanomaterials and are flexible enough to allow future adaptations related to scientific developments. PMID:26516872

  6. Grouping and Read-Across Approaches for Risk Assessment of Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Oomen, Agnes G; Bleeker, Eric A J; Bos, Peter M J; van Broekhuizen, Fleur; Gottardo, Stefania; Groenewold, Monique; Hristozov, Danail; Hund-Rinke, Kerstin; Irfan, Muhammad-Adeel; Marcomini, Antonio; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M; Rasmussen, Kirsten; Jiménez, Araceli Sánchez; Scott-Fordsmand, Janeck J; van Tongeren, Martie; Wiench, Karin; Wohlleben, Wendel; Landsiedel, Robert

    2015-10-01

    Physicochemical properties of chemicals affect their exposure, toxicokinetics/fate and hazard, and for nanomaterials, the variation of these properties results in a wide variety of materials with potentially different risks. To limit the amount of testing for risk assessment, the information gathering process for nanomaterials needs to be efficient. At the same time, sufficient information to assess the safety of human health and the environment should be available for each nanomaterial. Grouping and read-across approaches can be utilised to meet these goals. This article presents different possible applications of grouping and read-across for nanomaterials within the broader perspective of the MARINA Risk Assessment Strategy (RAS), as developed in the EU FP7 project MARINA. Firstly, nanomaterials can be grouped based on limited variation in physicochemical properties to subsequently design an efficient testing strategy that covers the entire group. Secondly, knowledge about exposure, toxicokinetics/fate or hazard, for example via properties such as dissolution rate, aspect ratio, chemical (non-)activity, can be used to organise similar materials in generic groups to frame issues that need further attention, or potentially to read-across. Thirdly, when data related to specific endpoints is required, read-across can be considered, using data from a source material for the target nanomaterial. Read-across could be based on a scientifically sound justification that exposure, distribution to the target (fate/toxicokinetics) and hazard of the target material are similar to, or less than, the source material. These grouping and read-across approaches pave the way for better use of available information on nanomaterials and are flexible enough to allow future adaptations related to scientific developments. PMID:26516872

  7. IntelliCages and automated assessment of learning in group-housed mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puścian, Alicja; Knapska, Ewelina

    2014-11-01

    IntelliCage is a fully automated, computer controlled system, which can be used for long-term monitoring of behavior of group-housed mice. Using standardized experimental protocols we can assess cognitive abilities and behavioral flexibility in appetitively and aversively motivated tasks, as well as measure social influences on learning of the subjects. We have also identified groups of neurons specifically activated by appetitively and aversively motivated learning within the amygdala, function of which we are going to investigate optogenetically in the future.

  8. 49 CFR 563.11 - Information in owner's manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Information in owner's manual. 563.11 Section 563... SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EVENT DATA RECORDERS § 563.11 Information in owner's... personal data (e.g., name, gender, age, and crash location) are recorded. However, other parties, such...

  9. 49 CFR 563.11 - Information in owner's manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Information in owner's manual. 563.11 Section 563... SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EVENT DATA RECORDERS § 563.11 Information in owner's... personal data (e.g., name, gender, age, and crash location) are recorded. However, other parties, such...

  10. 49 CFR 563.11 - Information in owner's manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Information in owner's manual. 563.11 Section 563... SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EVENT DATA RECORDERS § 563.11 Information in owner's... personal data (e.g., name, gender, age, and crash location) are recorded. However, other parties, such...

  11. 24 CFR 880.601 - Responsibilities of owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... opportunity requirements. (c) Contracting for services. (1) For this part 880 and 24 CFR part 881 projects...) For 24 CFR part 883 projects, with approval of the Agency, the owner may contract with a private or... owner must submit to the contract adminstrator: (1) Financial information in accordance with 24 CFR...

  12. 24 CFR 880.601 - Responsibilities of owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... opportunity requirements. (c) Contracting for services. (1) For this part 880 and 24 CFR part 881 projects...) For 24 CFR part 883 projects, with approval of the Agency, the owner may contract with a private or... owner must submit to the contract adminstrator: (1) Financial information in accordance with 24 CFR...

  13. 24 CFR 880.601 - Responsibilities of owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... opportunity requirements. (c) Contracting for services. (1) For this part 880 and 24 CFR part 881 projects...) For 24 CFR part 883 projects, with approval of the Agency, the owner may contract with a private or... owner must submit to the contract adminstrator: (1) Financial information in accordance with 24 CFR...

  14. 24 CFR 880.601 - Responsibilities of owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... opportunity requirements. (c) Contracting for services. (1) For this part 880 and 24 CFR part 881 projects...) For 24 CFR part 883 projects, with approval of the Agency, the owner may contract with a private or... owner must submit to the contract adminstrator: (1) Financial information in accordance with 24 CFR...

  15. 24 CFR 880.601 - Responsibilities of owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... opportunity requirements. (c) Contracting for services. (1) For this part 880 and 24 CFR part 881 projects...) For 24 CFR part 883 projects, with approval of the Agency, the owner may contract with a private or... owner must submit to the contract adminstrator: (1) Financial information in accordance with 24 CFR...

  16. 24 CFR 983.51 - Owner proposal selection procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Owner proposal selection procedures. 983.51 Section 983.51 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN... URBAN DEVELOPMENT PROJECT-BASED VOUCHER (PBV) PROGRAM Selection of PBV Owner Proposals § 983.51...

  17. 43 CFR 9185.3-3 - Majority of land owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Majority of land owners. 9185.3-3 Section 9185.3-3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND... § 9185.3-3 Majority of land owners. A majority of the settlers in each township are required to join...

  18. 43 CFR 9185.3-3 - Majority of land owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Majority of land owners. 9185.3-3 Section 9185.3-3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND... § 9185.3-3 Majority of land owners. A majority of the settlers in each township are required to join...

  19. 43 CFR 9185.3-3 - Majority of land owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Majority of land owners. 9185.3-3 Section 9185.3-3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND... § 9185.3-3 Majority of land owners. A majority of the settlers in each township are required to join...

  20. 37 CFR 41.9 - Action by owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Board proceeding may act in the proceeding to the exclusion of the inventor (see § 3.73(b) of this title... proceeding may petition to act in the proceeding to the exclusion of an inventor or a co-owner. The petition must show the inability or refusal of an inventor or co-owner to prosecute the proceeding or...

  1. 37 CFR 41.9 - Action by owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Board proceeding may act in the proceeding to the exclusion of the inventor (see § 3.73(b) of this title... proceeding may petition to act in the proceeding to the exclusion of an inventor or a co-owner. The petition must show the inability or refusal of an inventor or co-owner to prosecute the proceeding or...

  2. 37 CFR 41.9 - Action by owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Board proceeding may act in the proceeding to the exclusion of the inventor (see § 3.73(b) of this title... proceeding may petition to act in the proceeding to the exclusion of an inventor or a co-owner. The petition must show the inability or refusal of an inventor or co-owner to prosecute the proceeding or...

  3. Aircraft Inspection for the General Aviation Aircraft Owner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Flight Standards Service.

    Presented is useful information for owners, pilots, student mechanics, and others with aviation interests. Part I of this booklet outlines aircraft inspection requirements, owner responsibilities, inspection time intervals, and sources of basic information. Part II is concerned with the general techniques used to inspect an aircraft. (Author/JN)

  4. 37 CFR 253.9 - Unknown copyright owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Unknown copyright owners. 253.9 Section 253.9 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT OFFICE, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS COPYRIGHT... NONCOMMERCIAL EDUCATIONAL BROADCASTING § 253.9 Unknown copyright owners. If PBS and its stations, NPR and...

  5. 37 CFR 253.9 - Unknown copyright owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Unknown copyright owners. 253.9 Section 253.9 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights U.S. COPYRIGHT OFFICE, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS... NONCOMMERCIAL EDUCATIONAL BROADCASTING § 253.9 Unknown copyright owners. If PBS and its stations, NPR and...

  6. 37 CFR 253.9 - Unknown copyright owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Unknown copyright owners. 253.9 Section 253.9 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT OFFICE, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS COPYRIGHT... NONCOMMERCIAL EDUCATIONAL BROADCASTING § 253.9 Unknown copyright owners. If PBS and its stations, NPR and...

  7. 37 CFR 253.9 - Unknown copyright owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Unknown copyright owners. 253.9 Section 253.9 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT OFFICE, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS COPYRIGHT... NONCOMMERCIAL EDUCATIONAL BROADCASTING § 253.9 Unknown copyright owners. If PBS and its stations, NPR and...

  8. 24 CFR 983.51 - Owner proposal selection procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... process and determines that the PHA-owned units were appropriately selected based on the selection... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Owner proposal selection procedures... URBAN DEVELOPMENT PROJECT-BASED VOUCHER (PBV) PROGRAM Selection of PBV Owner Proposals § 983.51...

  9. 9 CFR 107.1 - Veterinary practitioners and animal owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Veterinary practitioners and animal owners. 107.1 Section 107.1 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... animal owners. Products prepared as provided in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section and...

  10. 9 CFR 107.1 - Veterinary practitioners and animal owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Veterinary practitioners and animal owners. 107.1 Section 107.1 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... animal owners. Products prepared as provided in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section and...

  11. 9 CFR 107.1 - Veterinary practitioners and animal owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Veterinary practitioners and animal owners. 107.1 Section 107.1 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... animal owners. Products prepared as provided in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section and...

  12. Towards a common framework for assessing the activity and associations of groups who sexually abuse children

    PubMed Central

    Cockbain, Ella; Brayley, Helen; Sullivan, Joe

    2013-01-01

    Extensive social psychological research emphasises the importance of groups in shaping individuals’ thoughts and actions. Within the child sexual abuse (CSA) literature criminal organisation has been largely overlooked, with some key exceptions. This research was a novel collaboration between academia and the UK's Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre (CEOP). Starting from the premise that the group is, in itself, a form of social situation affecting abuse, it offers the first systematic situational analysis of CSA groups. In-depth behavioural data from a small sample of convicted CSA group-offenders (n = 3) were analysed qualitatively to identify factors and processes underpinning CSA groups’ activities and associations: group formation, evolution, identity and resources. The results emphasise CSA groups’ variability, fluidity and dynamism. The foundations of a general framework are proposed for researching and assessing CSA groups and designing effective interventions. It is hoped that this work will stimulate discussion and development in this long-neglected area of CSA, helping to build a coherent knowledge-base. PMID:26494978

  13. A Bayesian latent group analysis for detecting poor effort in the assessment of malingering.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Alonso; Wagenmakers, Eric-Jan; Lee, Michael D; Markowitsch, Hans J; Piefke, Martina

    2012-06-01

    Despite their theoretical appeal, Bayesian methods for the assessment of poor effort and malingering are still rarely used in neuropsychological research and clinical diagnosis. In this article, we outline a novel and easy-to-use Bayesian latent group analysis of malingering whose goal is to identify participants displaying poor effort when tested. Our Bayesian approach also quantifies the confidence with which each participant is classified and estimates the base rates of malingering from the observed data. We implement our Bayesian approach and compare its utility in effort assessment to that of the classic below-chance criterion of symptom validity testing (SVT). In two experiments, we evaluate the accuracy of both a Bayesian latent group analysis and the below-chance criterion of SVT in recovering the membership of participants assigned to the malingering group. Experiment 1 uses a simulation research design, whereas Experiment 2 involves the differentiation of patients with a history of stroke from coached malingerers. In both experiments, sensitivity levels are high for the Bayesian method, but low for the below-chance criterion of SVT. Additionally, the Bayesian approach proves to be resistant to possible effects of coaching. We conclude that Bayesian latent group methods complement existing methods in making more informed choices about malingering. PMID:22543568

  14. Aluminium in food and daily dietary intake assessment from 15 food groups in Zhejiang Province, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hexiang; Tang, Jun; Huang, Lichun; Shen, Xianghong; Zhang, Ronghua; Chen, Jiang

    2016-06-01

    Aluminium was measured in 2580 samples of 15 food groups and dietary exposure was estimated. Samples were purchased and analysed during 2010 to 2014. High aluminium levels were found in jellyfish (mean 4862 mg/kg), laver (mean 455.2 mg/kg) and fried twisted cruller (mean 392.4 mg/kg). Dietary exposure to aluminium was estimated for Zhejiang residents. The average dietary exposure to aluminium via 15 food groups in Zhejiang Province was 1.15 mg/kg bw/week, which is below the provisional tolerable weekly intake of 2 mg/kg bw /week. Jellyfish is the main Al contributor, providing 37.6% of the daily intake via these 15 food groups. This study provided new information on aluminium levels and assessment of aluminium (Al) dietary exposure in Zhejiang Province of China. PMID:26727195

  15. Can Research Assessments Themselves Cause Bias in Behaviour Change Trials? A Systematic Review of Evidence from Solomon 4-Group Studies

    PubMed Central

    McCambridge, Jim; Butor-Bhavsar, Kaanan; Witton, John; Elbourne, Diana

    2011-01-01

    Background The possible effects of research assessments on participant behaviour have attracted research interest, especially in studies with behavioural interventions and/or outcomes. Assessments may introduce bias in randomised controlled trials by altering receptivity to intervention in experimental groups and differentially impacting on the behaviour of control groups. In a Solomon 4-group design, participants are randomly allocated to one of four arms: (1) assessed experimental group; (2) unassessed experimental group (3) assessed control group; or (4) unassessed control group. This design provides a test of the internal validity of effect sizes obtained in conventional two-group trials by controlling for the effects of baseline assessment, and assessing interactions between the intervention and baseline assessment. The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate evidence from Solomon 4-group studies with behavioural outcomes that baseline research assessments themselves can introduce bias into trials. Methodology/Principal Findings Electronic databases were searched, supplemented by citation searching. Studies were eligible if they reported appropriately analysed results in peer-reviewed journals and used Solomon 4-group designs in non-laboratory settings with behavioural outcome measures and sample sizes of 20 per group or greater. Ten studies from a range of applied areas were included. There was inconsistent evidence of main effects of assessment, sparse evidence of interactions with behavioural interventions, and a lack of convincing data in relation to the research question for this review. Conclusions/Significance There were too few high quality completed studies to infer conclusively that biases stemming from baseline research assessments do or do not exist. There is, therefore a need for new rigorous Solomon 4-group studies that are purposively designed to evaluate the potential for research assessments to cause bias in behaviour change trials. PMID

  16. Building owner`s and manager`s guide: Optimizing facility performance

    SciTech Connect

    Curl, R.S.

    1999-09-01

    This book was written for professionals who manage buildings, and who have the responsibility of keeping occupants, tenants and owners satisfied. The material presented addresses all the key areas which contribute to effective management of building operational performance. Specific topics include occupant comfort and complaint resolution, sick building syndrome prevention and remediation, using smart building design to facilitate optimum operational performance, HVAC system and control considerations, overall equipment management, and accident prevention and safety. Also covered are corrosion remediation, odor and noise control, types and placement of controls, maintenance access, and legal liability issues with example court cases.

  17. Validity and reproducibility of a food frequency questionnaire to assess food group intake in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Marcelle Flores; Philippi, Sonia Tucunduva; Estima, Camilla; Leal, Greisse

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the validity and reproducibility of a food frequency questionnaire to assess intake of the food groups included in the food guide pyramid for adolescents (FFQ-FP). The final version of the FFQ-FP consisted of 50 food items. The study was carried out with a sample of 109 adolescents over a period of four months. A 24hr recall (24hr) was conducted four times and the FFQ-FP was conducted twice. Validity was determined by comparing the second FFQ-FP and the mean of the four 24hrs, while reproducibility was verified by comparing the results of the two FFQ-FPs. Statistical analysis was carried out using medians, standard deviations, Pearson and intraclass correlations and Kappa statistics to assess concordance. Best results were achieved for the rice (including bread, grains and starches), meats and sugars groups. Weakest correlation was observed for the variable vitamin C. The validity and reproducibility of the FFQ-FP was satisfactory for most variables. PMID:24068225

  18. Statistical Assessment of Crosstalk Enrichment between Gene Groups in Biological Networks

    PubMed Central

    Alexeyenko, Andrey; Sonnhammer, Erik L. L.

    2013-01-01

    Motivation Analyzing groups of functionally coupled genes or proteins in the context of global interaction networks has become an important aspect of bioinformatic investigations. Assessing the statistical significance of crosstalk enrichment between or within groups of genes can be a valuable tool for functional annotation of experimental gene sets. Results Here we present CrossTalkZ, a statistical method and software to assess the significance of crosstalk enrichment between pairs of gene or protein groups in large biological networks. We demonstrate that the standard z-score is generally an appropriate and unbiased statistic. We further evaluate the ability of four different methods to reliably recover crosstalk within known biological pathways. We conclude that the methods preserving the second-order topological network properties perform best. Finally, we show how CrossTalkZ can be used to annotate experimental gene sets using known pathway annotations and that its performance at this task is superior to gene enrichment analysis (GEA). Availability and Implementation CrossTalkZ (available at http://sonnhammer.sbc.su.se/download/software/CrossTalkZ/) is implemented in C++, easy to use, fast, accepts various input file formats, and produces a number of statistics. These include z-score, p-value, false discovery rate, and a test of normality for the null distributions. PMID:23372799

  19. Forest Owners' Response to Climate Change: University Education Trumps Value Profile.

    PubMed

    Blennow, Kristina; Persson, Johannes; Persson, Erik; Hanewinkel, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Do forest owners' levels of education or value profiles explain their responses to climate change? The cultural cognition thesis (CCT) has cast serious doubt on the familiar and often criticized "knowledge deficit" model, which says that laypeople are less concerned about climate change because they lack scientific knowledge. Advocates of CCT maintain that citizens with the highest degrees of scientific literacy and numeracy are not the most concerned about climate change. Rather, this is the group in which cultural polarization is greatest, and thus individuals with more limited scientific literacy and numeracy are more concerned about climate change under certain circumstances than those with higher scientific literacy and numeracy. The CCT predicts that cultural and other values will trump the positive effects of education on some forest owners' attitudes to climate change. Here, using survey data collected in 2010 from 766 private forest owners in Sweden and Germany, we provide the first evidence that perceptions of climate change risk are uncorrelated with, or sometimes positively correlated with, education level and can be explained without reference to cultural or other values. We conclude that the recent claim that advanced scientific literacy and numeracy polarizes perceptions of climate change risk is unsupported by the forest owner data. In neither of the two countries was university education found to reduce the perception of risk from climate change. Indeed in most cases university education increased the perception of risk. Even more importantly, the effect of university education was not dependent on the individuals' value profile. PMID:27223473

  20. Updated response assessment criteria for high-grade gliomas: response assessment in neuro-oncology working group.

    PubMed

    Wen, Patrick Y; Macdonald, David R; Reardon, David A; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Sorensen, A Gregory; Galanis, Evanthia; Degroot, John; Wick, Wolfgang; Gilbert, Mark R; Lassman, Andrew B; Tsien, Christina; Mikkelsen, Tom; Wong, Eric T; Chamberlain, Marc C; Stupp, Roger; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Vogelbaum, Michael A; van den Bent, Martin J; Chang, Susan M

    2010-04-10

    Currently, the most widely used criteria for assessing response to therapy in high-grade gliomas are based on two-dimensional tumor measurements on computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in conjunction with clinical assessment and corticosteroid dose (the Macdonald Criteria). It is increasingly apparent that there are significant limitations to these criteria, which only address the contrast-enhancing component of the tumor. For example, chemoradiotherapy for newly diagnosed glioblastomas results in transient increase in tumor enhancement (pseudoprogression) in 20% to 30% of patients, which is difficult to differentiate from true tumor progression. Antiangiogenic agents produce high radiographic response rates, as defined by a rapid decrease in contrast enhancement on CT/MRI that occurs within days of initiation of treatment and that is partly a result of reduced vascular permeability to contrast agents rather than a true antitumor effect. In addition, a subset of patients treated with antiangiogenic agents develop tumor recurrence characterized by an increase in the nonenhancing component depicted on T2-weighted/fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences. The recognition that contrast enhancement is nonspecific and may not always be a true surrogate of tumor response and the need to account for the nonenhancing component of the tumor mandate that new criteria be developed and validated to permit accurate assessment of the efficacy of novel therapies. The Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology Working Group is an international effort to develop new standardized response criteria for clinical trials in brain tumors. In this proposal, we present the recommendations for updated response criteria for high-grade gliomas. PMID:20231676

  1. A Two-Year Participatory Intervention Project with Owners to Reduce Lameness and Limb Abnormalities in Working Horses in Jaipur, India

    PubMed Central

    Reix, Christine E.; Dikshit, Amit K.; Hockenhull, Jo; Parker, Richard M. A.; Banerjee, Anindo; Burn, Charlotte C.; Pritchard, Joy C.; Whay, Helen R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Participatory methods are increasingly used in international human development, but scientific evaluation of their efficacy versus a control group is rare. Working horses support families in impoverished communities. Lameness and limb abnormalities are highly prevalent in these animals and a cause for welfare concern. We aimed to stimulate and evaluate improvements in lameness and limb abnormalities in horses whose owners took part in a 2-year participatory intervention project to reduce lameness (PI) versus a control group (C) in Jaipur, India. Methodology/Principal Findings In total, 439 owners of 862 horses participated in the study. PI group owners from 21 communities were encouraged to meet regularly to discuss management and work practices influencing lameness and poor welfare and to track their own progress in improving these. Lameness examinations (41 parameters) were conducted at the start of the study (Baseline), and after 1 year and 2 years. Results were compared with control horses from a further 21 communities outside the intervention. Of the 149 horses assessed on all three occasions, PI horses showed significantly (P<0.05) greater improvement than C horses in 20 parameters, most notably overall lameness score, measures of sole pain and range of movement on limb flexion. Control horses showed slight but significantly greater improvements in four parameters, including frog quality in fore and hindlimbs. Conclusions/Significance This participatory intervention succeeded in improving lameness and some limb abnormalities in working horses, by encouraging changes in management and work practices which were feasible within owners’ socioeconomic and environmental constraints. Demonstration of the potentially sustainable improvements achieved here should encourage further development of participatory intervention approaches to benefit humans and animals in other contexts. PMID:25898014

  2. A Video Recording and Viewing Protocol for Student Group Presentations: Assisting Self-Assessment through a Wiki Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Shane

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to firstly develop a protocol for video recording student group oral presentations, for later viewing and self-assessment by student group members. Secondly, evaluations of students' experiences of this process were undertaken to determine if this self-assessment method was a positive experience for them in gaining…

  3. Associations between Stress and Quality of Life: Differences between Owners Keeping a Living Dog or Losing a Dog by Euthanasia

    PubMed Central

    Tzivian, Lilian

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The loss of a pet may be stressful to the owner. The main objectives of this study were to compare the levels of stress and to explore the correlates of QOL of healthy adults who currently own or who have just lost their dog. Methods The study sample contained 110 current, and 103 bereaved dog owners, all females, who lost their dogs due to euthanasia. QOL was assessed with the WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire and divided into four major domains–Physical, Psychological, Relationship, and Environmental. Demographic variables, stress, health behaviors, and social support from family, friends, and significant other were included in multivariate analysis. Results Stress levels were significantly higher in bereaved owners. QOL in three of the four domains (Physical, Psychological, and Relationship) of current owners were significantly better than among bereaved owners. Stress was significantly associated with these three domains of QOL. Quality of life was found to be positively associated with social support. Age was related directly only to current owners’ QOL. Conclusions The results suggest that a loss of a dog is associated with stress for the bereaved owner and reduced physical, psychological, and relationship QOL. Lack of social support in the case of death of a companion animal has a strong effect on owners’ grief reactions. PMID:25826295

  4. Female alternative reproductive behaviors: the effect of female group size on mate assessment and copying.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Bernard J; Flaxman, Samuel M; Alonzo, Suzanne H

    2008-08-01

    Extensive theoretical and empirical research has focused on male alternative reproductive tactics. In comparison, female alternative tactics have attracted little attention, and further theoretical and empirical research are needed. Using a game theoretical model, we examine female choice alternatives (1) by considering assessment errors in a novel and more realistic manner than done previously, and (2) for the first time, by highlighting the formation of groups of females as an important consequence of copying behavior. We consider two alternatives: direct assessment of male quality by females and female copying of the choice of other females. Assessment and copying are predicted to coexist under a wide variety of circumstances and copying is favored when females make assessment errors, when high-quality males are either common or very rare, and when female fitness declines with the number of other females choosing the same male. We also find that the frequency of copying at equilibrium is predicted to decrease when the presence of other females mating with the same male has a positive effect on female fitness (e.g. through increased male parental effort, decreased predation risk or cooperation among females). Female alternative choice tactics also influence the potential for sexual selection. In our model, when the frequency of copying females is low, the potential for sexual selection can be higher than in the absence of female copying. However, contrary to previous theory, we find that as copying females become more common than assessing females, the potential for sexual selection will be low as more females copy the mate choice of other copiers without assessment. PMID:18511084

  5. Vulnerability as a Function of Individual and Group Resources in Cumulative Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    deFur, Peter L.; Evans, Gary W.; Hubal, Elaine A. Cohen; Kyle, Amy D.; Morello-Frosch, Rachel A.; Williams, David R.

    2007-01-01

    Background The field of risk assessment has focused on protecting the health of individual people or populations of wildlife from single risks, mostly from chemical exposure. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recently began to address multiple risks to communities in the “Framework for Cumulative Risk Assessment” [EPA/630/P02/001F. Washington DC:Risk Assessment Forum, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (2003)]. Simultaneously, several reports concluded that some individuals and groups are more vulnerable to environmental risks than the general population. However, vulnerability has received little specific attention in the risk assessment literature. Objective Our objective is to examine the issue of vulnerability in cumulative risk assessment and present a conceptual framework rather than a comprehensive review of the literature. In this article we consider similarities between ecologic and human communities and the factors that make communities vulnerable to environmental risks. Discussion The literature provides substantial evidence on single environmental factors and simple conditions that increase vulnerability or reduce resilience for humans and ecologic systems. This observation is especially true for individual people and populations of wildlife. Little research directly addresses the topic of vulnerability in cumulative risk situations, especially at the community level. The community level of organization has not been adequately considered as an end point in either human or ecologic risk assessment. Furthermore, current information on human risk does not completely explain the level of response in cumulative risk conditions. Ecologic risk situations are similarly more complex and unpredictable for cases of cumulative risk. Conclusions Psychosocial conditions and responses are the principal missing element for humans. We propose a model for including psychologic and social factors as an integral component of cumulative risk assessment. PMID

  6. Summary for Policymakers IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, WorkingGroup III

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, Terry; Bashmakov, Igor; Bernstein, Lenny; Bogner,Jean; Bosch, Peter; Dave, Rutu; Davidson, Ogunlade; Fisher, Brian; Grubb,Michael; Gupta, Sujata; Halsnaes, Kirsten; Heij, Bertjan; Kahn Ribeiro,Suzana; Kobayashi, Shigeki; Levine, Mark; Martino, Daniel; MaseraCerutti, Omar; Metz, Bert; Meyer, Leo; Nabuurs, Gert-Jan; Najam, Adil; Nakicenovic, Nebojsa; Rogner, Hans Holger; Roy, Joyashree; Sathaye,Jayant; Schock, Robert; Shukla, Priyaradshi; Sims, Ralph; Smith, Pete; Swart, Rob; Tirpak, Dennis; Urge-Vorsatz, Diana; Zhou, Dadi

    2007-04-30

    A. Introduction 1. The Working Group III contribution to theIPCC Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) focuses on new literature on thescientific, technological, environmental, economic and social aspects ofmitigation of climate change, published since the IPCC Third AssessmentReport (TAR) and the Special Reports on COB2B Capture and Storage (SRCCS)and on Safeguarding the Ozone Layer and the Global Climate System (SROC).The following summary is organised into six sections after thisintroduction: - Greenhouse gas (GHG) emission trends, - Mitigation in theshort and medium term, across different economic sectors (until 2030), -Mitigation in the long-term (beyond 2030), - Policies, measures andinstruments to mitigate climate change, - Sustainable development andclimate change mitigation, - Gaps in knowledge. References to thecorresponding chapter sections are indicated at each paragraph in squarebrackets. An explanation of terms, acronyms and chemical symbols used inthis SPM can be found in the glossary to the main report.

  7. Response assessment after stereotactic body radiotherapy for spinal metastasis: a report from the SPIne response assessment in Neuro-Oncology (SPINO) group.

    PubMed

    Thibault, Isabelle; Chang, Eric L; Sheehan, Jason; Ahluwalia, Manmeet S; Guckenberger, Matthias; Sohn, Moon-Jun; Ryu, Samuel; Foote, Matthew; Lo, Simon S; Muacevic, Alexander; Soltys, Scott G; Chao, Samuel; Gerszten, Peter; Lis, Eric; Yu, Eugene; Bilsky, Mark; Fisher, Charles; Schiff, David; Fehlings, Michael G; Ma, Lijun; Chang, Susan; Chow, Edward; Parelukar, Wendy R; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Sahgal, Arjun

    2015-12-01

    The SPine response assessment In Neuro-Oncology (SPINO) group is a committee of the Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology working group and comprises a panel of international experts in spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Here, we present the group's first report on the challenges in standardising imaging-based assessment of local control and pain for spinal metastases. We review current imaging modalities used in SBRT treatment planning and tumour assessment and review the criteria for pain and local control in registered clinical trials specific to spine SBRT. We summarise the results of an international survey of the panel to establish the range of current practices in assessing tumour response to spine SBRT. The ultimate goal of the SPINO group is to report consensus criteria for tumour imaging, clinical assessment, and symptom-based response criteria to help standardise future clinical trials. PMID:26678212

  8. International Myeloma Working Group consensus criteria for response and minimal residual disease assessment in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shaji; Paiva, Bruno; Anderson, Kenneth C; Durie, Brian; Landgren, Ola; Moreau, Philippe; Munshi, Nikhil; Lonial, Sagar; Bladé, Joan; Mateos, Maria-Victoria; Dimopoulos, Meletios; Kastritis, Efstathios; Boccadoro, Mario; Orlowski, Robert; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Spencer, Andrew; Hou, Jian; Chng, Wee Joo; Usmani, Saad Z; Zamagni, Elena; Shimizu, Kazuyuki; Jagannath, Sundar; Johnsen, Hans E; Terpos, Evangelos; Reiman, Anthony; Kyle, Robert A; Sonneveld, Pieter; Richardson, Paul G; McCarthy, Philip; Ludwig, Heinz; Chen, Wenming; Cavo, Michele; Harousseau, Jean-Luc; Lentzsch, Suzanne; Hillengass, Jens; Palumbo, Antonio; Orfao, Alberto; Rajkumar, S Vincent; San Miguel, Jesus; Avet-Loiseau, Herve

    2016-08-01

    Treatment of multiple myeloma has substantially changed over the past decade with the introduction of several classes of new effective drugs that have greatly improved the rates and depth of response. Response criteria in multiple myeloma were developed to use serum and urine assessment of monoclonal proteins and bone marrow assessment (which is relatively insensitive). Given the high rates of complete response seen in patients with multiple myeloma with new treatment approaches, new response categories need to be defined that can identify responses that are deeper than those conventionally defined as complete response. Recent attempts have focused on the identification of residual tumour cells in the bone marrow using flow cytometry or gene sequencing. Furthermore, sensitive imaging techniques can be used to detect the presence of residual disease outside of the bone marrow. Combining these new methods, the International Myeloma Working Group has defined new response categories of minimal residual disease negativity, with or without imaging-based absence of extramedullary disease, to allow uniform reporting within and outside clinical trials. In this Review, we clarify several aspects of disease response assessment, along with endpoints for clinical trials, and highlight future directions for disease response assessments. PMID:27511158

  9. Integrated Play Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glovak, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    As an occupational therapist running social play groups with sensory integration for children on the autism spectrum, the author frequently doubted the wisdom of combining several children on the spectrum into a group. In fact, as the owner of a clinic she said, "No more!" The groups seemed like a waste of parents' time and money, and she refused…

  10. Crowd-based breath analysis: assessing behavior, activity, exposures, and emotional response of people in groups.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jonathan; Pleil, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    A new concept for exhaled breath analysis has emerged wherein groups, or even crowds of people are simultaneously sampled in enclosed environments to detect overall trends in their activities and recent exposures. The basic idea is to correlate the temporal profile of known breath markers such as carbon dioxide, isoprene, or acetone with all other volatile organics in the air space. Those that trend similarly in time are designated as breath constituents. The ultimate goal of this work is to develop technology for assessing group based behaviors, chemical exposures or even changes in stress or mood. Applications are myriad ranging from chemical dose/toxicity screening to health and stress status for national security diagnostics. The basic technology employs real-time mass spectrometry capable of simultaneously measuring volatile chemicals and endogenous breath markers. PMID:27341381