Science.gov

Sample records for oxalic acid solutions

  1. GADOLINIUM OXALATE SOLUBILITY MEASUREMENTS IN NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R.

    2012-02-22

    HB-Line will begin processing Pu solutions during FY2012 that will involve the recovery of Pu using oxalate precipitation and filtration. After the precipitation and filtration processes, the filtrate solution will be transferred from HB-Line to H-Canyon. The presence of excess oxalate and unfiltered Pu oxalate solids in these solutions create a criticality safety issue if they are sent to H-Canyon without controls in H-Canyon. One approach involves H-Canyon receiving the filtrate solution into a tank that is poisoned with soluble gadolinium (Gd). Decomposition of the oxalate will occur within a subsequent H-Canyon vessel. The receipt of excess oxalate into the H-Canyon receipt tanks has the potential to precipitate a portion of the Gd poison in the receipt tanks. Because the amount of Gd in solution determines the maximum amount of Pu solids that H-Canyon can receive, H-Canyon Engineering requested that SRNL determine the solubility of Gd in aqueous solutions of 4-10 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 4-12 g/L Gd, and 0.15-0.25 M oxalic acid (H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}) at 25 C. The target soluble Gd concentration is 6 g/L. The data indicate that the target can be achieved above 6 M HNO{sub 3} and below 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}. For 6 M HNO{sub 3}, 10.5 g/L and 7 g/L Gd are soluble in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. In 4 M HNO{sub 3}, the Gd solubility drops significantly to 2 g/L and 0.25 g/L in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. The solubility of Gd at 8-10 M HNO{sub 3} exceeds the solubility at 6 M HNO{sub 3}. The data for 4 M HNO{sub 3} showed good agreement with data in the literature. To achieve a target of 6 g/L soluble Gd in solution in the presence of 0.15-0.25 M oxalate, the HNO{sub 3} concentration must be maintained at or above 6 M HNO{sub 3}.

  2. GADOLINIUM OXALATE SOLUBILITY MEASUREMENTS IN NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R. A.

    2012-03-12

    HB-Line will begin processing Pu solutions during FY2012 that will involve the recovery of Pu using oxalate precipitation and filtration. After the precipitation and filtration processes, the filtrate solution will be transferred from HB-Line to H-Canyon. The presence of excess oxalate and unfiltered Pu oxalate solids in these solutions create a criticality safety issue if they are sent to H-Canyon without controls in H-Canyon. One approach involves H-Canyon receiving the filtrate solution into a tank that is poisoned with soluble gadolinium (Gd). Decomposition of the oxalate will occur within a subsequent H-Canyon vessel. The receipt of excess oxalate into the H-Canyon receipt tanks has the potential to precipitate a portion of the Gd poison in the receipt tanks. Because the amount of Gd in solution determines the maximum amount of Pu solids that H-Canyon can receive, H-Canyon Engineering requested that SRNL determine the solubility of Gd in aqueous solutions of 4-10 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 4-12 g/L Gd, and 0.15-0.25 M oxalic acid (H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}) at 25 °C. The target soluble Gd concentration is 6 g/L. The data indicate that the target can be achieved above 6 M HNO{sub 3} and below 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}. At 25 °C, for 6 M HNO{sub 3}, 11 g/L and 7 g/L Gd are soluble in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. In 4 M HNO{sub 3}, the Gd solubility drops significantly to 2.5 g/L and 0.8 g/L in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. The solubility of Gd at 8-10 M HNO{sub 3} exceeds the solubility at 6 M HNO{sub 3}. The data for 4 M HNO{sub 3} showed good agreement with data in the literature. To achieve a target of 6 g/L soluble Gd in solution in the presence of 0.15-0.25 M oxalate, the HNO{sub 3} concentration must be maintained at or above 6 M HNO{sub 3}. The solubility of Gd in 4 M HNO{sub 3} with 0.15 M oxalate at 10 °C is about 1.5 g/L. For 6 M HNO{sub 3} with 0.15 M oxalate, the solubility of Gd at 10

  3. Studies on the adsorption of americium on alumina from aqueous nitric acid-oxalic acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Subba Rao, M.; Gaikwad, A.M.; Rao, V.K.; Natarajan, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reports a study on the adsorption of Am(III) on alumina from oxalic acid-nitric acid solutions. Distribution coefficients for Am(III) on alumina at different oxalic acid-nitric acid concentrations have been determined and optimum conditions for loading and elution of Am from alumina columns have been established. Separation of Am from Pu and the effects of other ions, such as U(VI) and Fe(III), have also been studied. Am and Pu recoveries better than 99.5% were obtained. 3 references, 2 figures, 5 tables.

  4. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK CLEANING: CORROSION RATE FOR ONE VERSUS EIGHT PERCENT OXALIC ACID SOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Ketusky, E.; Subramanian, K.

    2011-01-20

    Until recently, the use of oxalic acid for chemically cleaning the Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive waste tanks focused on using concentrated 4 and 8-wt% solutions. Recent testing and research on applicable dissolution mechanisms have concluded that under appropriate conditions, dilute solutions of oxalic acid (i.e., 1-wt%) may be more effective. Based on the need to maximize cleaning effectiveness, coupled with the need to minimize downstream impacts, SRS is now developing plans for using a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution. A technology gap associated with using a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution was a dearth of suitable corrosion data. Assuming oxalic acid's passivation of carbon steel was proportional to the free oxalate concentration, the general corrosion rate (CR) from a 1-wt% solution may not be bound by those from 8-wt%. Therefore, after developing the test strategy and plan, the corrosion testing was performed. Starting with the envisioned process specific baseline solvent, a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution, with sludge (limited to Purex type sludge-simulant for this initial effort) at 75 C and agitated, the corrosion rate (CR) was determined from the measured weight loss of the exposed coupon. Environmental variations tested were: (a) Inclusion of sludge in the test vessel or assuming a pure oxalic acid solution; (b) acid solution temperature maintained at 75 or 45 C; and (c) agitation of the acid solution or stagnant. Application of select electrochemical testing (EC) explored the impact of each variation on the passivation mechanisms and confirmed the CR. The 1-wt% results were then compared to those from the 8-wt%. The immersion coupons showed that the maximum time averaged CR for a 1-wt% solution with sludge was less than 25-mils/yr for all conditions. For an agitated 8-wt% solution with sludge, the maximum time averaged CR was about 30-mils/yr at 50 C, and 86-mils/yr at 75 C. Both the 1-wt% and the 8-wt% testing demonstrated that if the sludge was removed from

  5. Dissolution of nickel ferrite in aqueous solutions containing oxalic acid and ferrous salts

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa, C.A.; Sileo, E.E.; Morando, P.J.; Blesa, M.A.

    2000-05-15

    The dissolution of nickel ferrite in oxalic acid and in ferrous oxalate-oxalic acid aqueous solution was studied. Nickel ferrite was synthesized by thermal decomposition of a mixed tartrate; the particles were shown to be coated with a thin ferric oxide layer. Dissolution takes place in two stages, the first one corresponding to the dissolution of the ferric oxide outer layer and the second one being the dissolution of Ni{sub 1.06}Fe{sub 1.96}O{sub 4}. The kinetics of dissolution during this first stage is typical of ferric oxides: in oxalic acid, both a ligand-assisted and a redox mechanism operates, whereas in the presence of ferrous ions, redox catalysis leads to a faster dissolution. The rate dependence on both oxalic acid and on ferrous ion is described by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood equation. In the second stage, Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics also describes the dissolution of iron and nickel from nickel ferrite. It may be concluded that oxalic acid operates to dissolve iron, and the ensuing disruption of the solid framework accelerates the release of nickel.

  6. Oxalic acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Symptoms of oxalic acid poisoning include: Abdominal pain Burns and blisters where the acid contacted the skin Collapse Convulsions Mouth pain Shock Throat pain Tremors (unintentional trembling) Vomiting

  7. Dissolution of Simulated and Radioactive Savannah River Site High-Level Waste Sludges with Oxalic Acid & Citric Acid Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    STALLINGS, MARY

    2004-07-08

    This report presents findings from tests investigating the dissolution of simulated and radioactive Savannah River Site sludges with 4 per cent oxalic acid and mixtures of oxalic and citric acid previously recommended by a Russian team from the Khlopin Radium Institute and the Mining and Chemical Combine (MCC). Testing also included characterization of the simulated and radioactive waste sludges. Testing results showed the following: Dissolution of simulated HM and PUREX sludges with oxalic and citric acid mixtures at SRTC confirmed general trends reported previously by Russian testing. Unlike the previous Russian testing six sequential contacts of a mixture of oxalic acid citric acids at a 2:1 ratio (v/w) of acid to sludge did not produce complete dissolution of simulated HM and PUREX sludges. We observed that increased sludge dissolution occurred at a higher acid to sludge ratio, 50:1 (v/w), compared to the recommended ratio of 2:1 (v/w). We observed much lower dissolution of aluminum in a simulated HM sludge by sodium hydroxide leaching. We attribute the low aluminum dissolution in caustic to the high fraction of boehmite present in the simulated sludge. Dissolution of HLW sludges with 4 per cent oxalic acid and oxalic/citric acid followed general trends observed with simulated sludges. The limited testing suggests that a mixture of oxalic and citric acids is more efficient for dissolving HM and PUREX sludges and provides a more homogeneous dissolution of HM sludge than oxalic acid alone. Dissolution of HLW sludges in oxalic and oxalic/citric acid mixtures produced residual sludge solids that measured at higher neutron poison to equivalent 235U weight ratios than that in the untreated sludge solids. This finding suggests that residual solids do not present an increased nuclear criticality safety risk. Generally the neutron poison to equivalent 235U weight ratios of the acid solutions containing dissolved sludge components are lower than those in the untreated

  8. Growth and characterization of urea-oxalic acid crystals by solution growth technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chithambaram, V.; Jerome Das, S.; Krishnan, Sivakumar; Basheer Ahamed, M.; Arivudai Nambi, R.

    2013-11-01

    Single crystals of urea-oxalic acid (UOA) have been grown from aqueous solution by slow evaporation technique. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed that the grown crystals belong to monoclinic system having space group P21/C. The presence of functional groups was confirmed by using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Optical absorption studies show very low absorption in entire visible region and the UV cut-off is found to be around 240 nm. Thermal analysis studies were carried out using TG/DTA analysis and the grown crystal is thermally stable up to 180 °C. Dielectric constant studies confirm the ferroelectric property of the materials and very low dielectric loss reveals very high purity of the crystal.

  9. Polishing of InSb in K2Cr2O7-HBr-HCl (oxalic acid) solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomashik, V. N.; Kusiak, N. V.; Tomashik, Z. F.; Danylenko, S. G.

    2001-02-01

    Dissolution of InAs in the K2Cr2O7-HBr-HCl (oxalic acid) solutions is studied in reproducible hydrodynamics conditions. The surfaces of equal etching rate are constructed using mathematical planning of experiment, and the limiting stages of the dissolution process are determined. The kinetic behavior of indicated semiconductors depending on the mixing rate and temperature of solution was investigated and it was shown that the dissolution of these semiconductor compounds in the solutions of the investigated systems is limited by the diffusion stages. The dissolution rates of InSb in such solutions distinguish weakly from each other and are within the interval of 0.5 - 6 micrometer/min. The solutions of K2Cr2O7-HBr-HCl (oxalic acid) systems can be employed for the developing of polishing solutions for the indium antimonide treatment with small etching rate.

  10. Porous aluminum room temperature anodizing process in a fluorinated-oxalic acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhahri, S.; Fazio, E.; Barreca, F.; Neri, F.; Ezzaouia, H.

    2016-08-01

    Anodizing of aluminum is used for producing porous insulating films suitable for different applications in electronics and microelectronics. Porous-type aluminum films are most simply realized by galvanostatic anodizing in aqueous acidic solutions. The improvement in application of anodizing technique is associated with a substantial reduction of the anodizing voltage at appropriate current densities as well as to the possibility to carry out the synthesis process at room temperature in order to obtain a self-planarizing dielectric material incorporated in array of super-narrow metal lines. In this work, the anodizing of aluminum to obtain porous oxide was carried out, at room temperature, on three different substrates (glass, stainless steel and aluminum), using an oxalic acid-based electrolyte with the addition of a relatively low amount of 0.4 % of HF. Different surface morphologies, from nearly spherical to larger porous nanostructures with smooth edges, were observed by means of scanning electron microscopy. These evidences are explained by considering the formation, transport and adsorption of the fluorine species which react with the Al3+ ions. The behavior is also influenced by the nature of the original substrate.

  11. Mechanisms of enhanced total organic carbon elimination from oxalic acid solutions by electro-peroxone process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huijiao; Yuan, Shi; Zhan, Juhong; Wang, Yujue; Yu, Gang; Deng, Shubo; Huang, Jun; Wang, Bin

    2015-09-01

    Electro-peroxone (E-peroxone) is a novel electrocatalytic ozonation process that combines ozonation and electrolysis process to enhance pollutant degradation during water and wastewater treatment. This enhancement has been mainly attributed to several mechanisms that increase O3 transformation to ·OH in the E-peroxone system, e.g., electro-generation of H2O2 from O2 at a carbon-based cathode and its subsequent peroxone reaction with O3 to ·OH, electro-reduction of O3 to ·OH at the cathode, and O3 decomposition to ·OH at high local pH near the cathode. To get more insight how these mechanisms contribute respectively to the enhancement, this study investigated total organic carbon (TOC) elimination from oxalic acid (OA) solutions by the E-peroxone process. Results show that the E-peroxone process significantly increased TOC elimination rate by 10.2-12.5 times compared with the linear addition of the individual rates of corresponding ozonation and electrolysis process. Kinetic analyses reveal that the electrochemically-driven peroxone reaction is the most important mechanism for the enhanced TOC elimination rate, while the other mechanisms contribute minor to the enhancement by a factor of 1.6-2.5. The results indicate that proper selection of electrodes that can effectively produce H2O2 at the cathode is critical to maximize TOC elimination in the E-peroxone process. PMID:25989593

  12. ELECTROCHEMICAL STUDIES ON THE CORROSION OF CARBON STEEL IN OXALIC ACID CLEANING SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B; John Mickalonis, J

    2007-10-08

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) will disperse or dissolve precipitated metal oxides as part of radioactive waste tank closure operations. Previously SRS has utilized oxalic acid to accomplish this task. Since the waste tanks are constructed of carbon steel, a significant amount of corrosion may occur. Although the total amount of corrosion may be insignificant for a short contact time, a significant amount of hydrogen may be generated due to the corrosion reaction. Linear polarization resistance and anodic/cathodic polarization tests were performed to investigate the corrosion behavior during the process. The effect of process variables such as temperature, agitation, aeration, sample orientation, light as well as surface finish on the corrosion behavior were evaluated. The results of the tests provided insight into the corrosion mechanism for the iron-oxalic acid system.

  13. CORROSION TESTING OF CARBON STEEL IN OXALIC ACID CHEMICAL CLEANING SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.; Mickalonis, J.; Subramanian, K.; Ketusky, E.

    2011-10-14

    Radioactive liquid waste has been stored in underground carbon steel tanks for nearly 60 years at the Savannah River Site. The site is currently in the process of removing the waste from these tanks in order to place it into vitrified, stable state for longer term storage. The last stage in the removal sequence is a chemical cleaning step that breaks up and dissolves metal oxide solids that cannot be easily pumped out of the tank. Oxalic acid has been selected for this purpose because it is an effective chelating agent for the solids and is not as corrosive as other acids. Electrochemical and immersion studies were conducted to investigate the corrosion behavior of carbon steel in simulated chemical cleaning environments. The effects of temperature, agitation, and the presence of sludge solids in the oxalic acid on the corrosion rate and the likelihood of hydrogen evolution were determined. The testing showed that the corrosion rates decreased significantly in the presence of the sludge solids. Corrosion rates increased with agitation, however, the changes were less noticeable.

  14. High variability of the heterogeneous ice nucleation potential of oxalic acid dihydrate and sodium oxalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R.; Möhler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Leisner, T.

    2010-04-01

    The heterogeneous ice nucleation potential of airborne oxalic acid dihydrate and sodium oxalate particles in the deposition and condensation mode has been investigated by controlled expansion cooling cycles in the AIDA aerosol and cloud chamber of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology at temperatures between 244 and 228 K. Previous laboratory studies have highlighted the particular role of oxalic acid dihydrate as the only species amongst a variety of other investigated dicarboxylic acids to be capable of acting as a heterogeneous ice nucleus in both the deposition and immersion mode. We could confirm a high deposition mode ice activity for 0.03 to 0.8 μm sized oxalic acid dihydrate particles that were either formed by nucleation from a gaseous oxalic acid/air mixture or by rapid crystallisation of highly supersaturated aqueous oxalic acid solution droplets. The critical saturation ratio with respect to ice required for deposition nucleation was found to be less than 1.1 and the size-dependent ice-active fraction of the aerosol population was in the range from 0.1 to 22%. In contrast, oxalic acid dihydrate particles that had crystallised from less supersaturated solution droplets and had been allowed to slowly grow in a supersaturated environment from still unfrozen oxalic acid solution droplets over a time period of several hours were found to be much poorer heterogeneous ice nuclei. We speculate that under these conditions a crystal surface structure with less-active sites for the initiation of ice nucleation was generated. Such particles partially proved to be almost ice-inactive in both the deposition and condensation mode. At times, the heterogeneous ice nucleation ability of oxalic acid dihydrate significantly changed when the particles had been processed in preceding cloud droplet activation steps. Such behaviour was also observed for the second investigated species, namely sodium oxalate. Our experiments address the atmospheric scenario that coating layers

  15. High variability of the heterogeneous ice nucleation potential of oxalic acid dihydrate and sodium oxalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R.; Möhler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Leisner, T.

    2010-08-01

    The heterogeneous ice nucleation potential of airborne oxalic acid dihydrate and sodium oxalate particles in the deposition and condensation mode has been investigated by controlled expansion cooling cycles in the AIDA aerosol and cloud chamber of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology at temperatures between 244 and 228 K. Previous laboratory studies have highlighted the particular role of oxalic acid dihydrate as the only species amongst a variety of other investigated dicarboxylic acids to be capable of acting as a heterogeneous ice nucleus in both the deposition and immersion mode. We could confirm a high deposition mode ice activity for 0.03 to 0.8 μm sized oxalic acid dihydrate particles that were either formed by nucleation from a gaseous oxalic acid/air mixture or by rapid crystallisation of highly supersaturated aqueous oxalic acid solution droplets. The critical saturation ratio with respect to ice required for deposition nucleation was found to be less than 1.1 and the size-dependent ice-active fraction of the aerosol population was in the range from 0.1 to 22%. In contrast, oxalic acid dihydrate particles that had crystallised from less supersaturated solution droplets and had been allowed to slowly grow in a supersaturated environment from still unfrozen oxalic acid solution droplets over a time period of several hours were found to be much poorer heterogeneous ice nuclei. We speculate that under these conditions a crystal surface structure with less-active sites for the initiation of ice nucleation was generated. Such particles partially proved to be almost ice-inactive in both the deposition and condensation mode. At times, the heterogeneous ice nucleation ability of oxalic acid dihydrate significantly changed when the particles had been processed in preceding cloud droplet activation steps. Such behaviour was also observed for the second investigated species, namely sodium oxalate. Our experiments address the atmospheric scenario that coating layers

  16. Influence of anodization parameters on the volume expansion of anodic aluminum oxide formed in mixed solution of phosphoric and oxalic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Tzung-Ta; Chang, Yao-Chung

    2014-01-01

    The growth of anodic alumina oxide was conducted in the mixed solution of phosphoric and oxalic acids. The influence of anodizing voltage, electrolyte temperature, and concentration of phosphoric and oxalic acids on the volume expansion of anodic aluminum oxide has been investigated. Either anodizing parameter is chosen to its full extent of range that allows the anodization process to be conducted without electric breakdown and to explore the highest possible volume expansion factor. The volume expansion factors were found to vary between 1.25 and 1.9 depending on the anodizing parameters. The variation is explained in connection with electric field, ion transport number, temperature effect, concentration, and activity of acids. The formation of anodic porous alumina at anodizing voltage 160 V in 1.1 M phosphoric acid mixed with 0.14 M oxalic acid at 2 °C showed the peak volume expansion factor of 1.9 and the corresponding moderate growth rate of 168 nm/min.

  17. Ascorbic acid intake and oxalate synthesis.

    PubMed

    Knight, John; Madduma-Liyanage, Kumudu; Mobley, James A; Assimos, Dean G; Holmes, Ross P

    2016-08-01

    In humans, approximately 60 mg of ascorbic acid (AA) breaks down in the body each day and has to be replaced by a dietary intake of 70 mg in women and 90 mg in men to maintain optimal health and AA homeostasis. The breakdown of AA is non-enzymatic and results in oxalate formation. The exact amount of oxalate formed has been difficult to ascertain primarily due to the limited availability of healthy human tissue for such research and the difficulty in measuring AA and its breakdown products. The breakdown of 60 mg of AA to oxalate could potentially result in the formation of up to 30 mg oxalate per day. This exceeds our estimates of the endogenous production of 10-25 mg oxalate per day, indicating that degradative pathways that do not form oxalate exist. In this review, we examine what is known about the pathways of AA metabolism and how oxalate forms. We further identify how gaps in our knowledge may be filled to more precisely determine the contribution of AA breakdown to oxalate production in humans. The use of stable isotopes of AA to directly assess the conversion of vitamin to oxalate should help fill this void. PMID:27002809

  18. Vacuolar deposition of ascorbate-derived oxalic acid in barley

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, G.J.

    1981-03-01

    L-(1-/sup 14/C)Ascorbic acid was supplied to detached barley seedlings to determine the subcellular location of oxalic acid, one of its metabolic products. Intact vacuoles isolated from protoplasts of labeled leaves contained (/sup 14/C)oxalic acid which accounted for about 70% of the intraprotoplast soluble oxalic acid. Tracer-labeled oxalate accounted for 36 and 72% of the /sup 14/C associated with leaf vacuoles of seedlings labeled for 22 and 96 hours, respectively.

  19. Kinetics of Mo, Ni, V and Al leaching from a spent hydrodesulphurization catalyst in a solution containing oxalic acid and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Szymczycha-Madeja, Anna

    2011-02-28

    The kinetics of molybdenum, nickel, vanadium and aluminium leaching from a spent hydrodesulphurization catalyst in a solution containing oxalic acid and hydrogen peroxide was investigated. The effects of temperature and particle size were examined. In addition, the reaction mechanism for the dissolution of the spent catalyst was discussed. The results of the kinetic analysis for various experimental conditions indicated that the reaction rate of leaching process is controlled by chemical reaction at the particle surface. The values of the activation energies of 31±2, 36±4, 30±4 and 57±3 kJ mol(-1) for Mo, Ni, V and Al, respectively, are characteristic for mechanism controlled by chemical reaction. PMID:21167639

  20. Directed synthesis of crystalline plutonium (III) and (IV) oxalates: accessing redox-controlled separations in acidic solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Runde, Wolfgang; Brodnax, Lia F; Goff, George S; Bean, Amanda C; Scott, Brian L

    2009-01-01

    Both binary and ternary solid complexes of Pu(III) and Pu(IV) oxalates have been previously reported in the literature. However, uncertainties regarding the coordination chemistry and the extent of hydration of some compounds remain mainly because of the absence of any crystallographic characterization. Single crystals of hydrated oxalates of Pu(III), Pu{sub 2}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}{center_dot}3H{sub 2}O (I) and Pu(IV), KPu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2}(OH){center_dot}2.5H{sub 2}O (II), were synthesized under moderate hydrothermal conditions and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Compounds I and II are the first plutonium(III) or (IV) oxalate compounds to be structurally characterized via single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Crystallographic data for I: monoclinic, space group P21/c, a = 11.246(3) A, b = 9.610(3) A, c = 10.315(3) A, Z = 4 and II: monoclinic, space group C2/c, a = 23.234(14) A, b = 7.502(4) A, c = 13.029(7) A, Z = 8.

  1. Red facts: Oxalic acid. Fact sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    All pesticides sold or used in the United States must be registered by EPA, based on scientific studies showing that they can be used without posing unreasonable risks to people or the environment. Because of advances in scientific knowledge, the law requires that pesticides which were first registered years ago be reregistered to ensure that they meet today's more stringent standards. Oxalic acid is registered for use as a disinfectant to control bacteria and germs, and as a sanitizer, in toilet bowls, urinals and bathroom premises. Oxalic acid also has many diverse, non-pesticidal, manufacturing and industrial uses including use in fabric printing and dyeing; bleaching straw hats; removing paint, varnish, rust or ink stains; and cleaning wood.

  2. The oxalic acid: 2-chloroacetamide crystallization: A new revelation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitra, R.; Choudhury, R. R.; Capet, Frederic; Roussel, Pascal

    2013-02-01

    The OH of COOH can acts as both donor and acceptor of hydrogen bond. OH of COOH as an acceptor was primarily observed in Oxalic acid Amide complexes. In order to further understand the packing in these complexes, oxalic acid was complexed with 2-tricholoroacetamide. This crystallization resulted in the formation of ammonium tetraoxalate dehydrate. A result similar to what was observed in complexation of oxalic acid with amide containing amino acids (asparagine and glutamine). Interestingly in all these cases, the amide bond is broken, to form the ammonium ion when trying to complex with oxalic acid.

  3. Effect of oxalic acid treatment on sediment arsenic concentrations and lability under reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Bostick, Benjamin C; Mailloux, Brian J; Ross, James M; Chillrud, Steven N

    2016-07-01

    Oxalic acid enhances arsenic (As) mobilization by dissolving As host minerals and competing for sorption sites. Oxalic acid amendments thus could potentially improve the efficiency of widely used pump-and-treat (P&T) remediation. This study investigates the effectiveness of oxalic acid on As mobilization from contaminated sediments with different As input sources and redox conditions, and examines whether residual sediment As after oxalic acid treatment can still be reductively mobilized. Batch extraction, column, and microcosm experiments were performed in the laboratory using sediments from the Dover Municipal Landfill and the Vineland Chemical Company Superfund sites. Oxalic acid mobilized As from both Dover and Vineland sediments, although the efficiency rates were different. The residual As in both Dover and Vineland sediments after oxalic acid treatment was less vulnerable to microbial reduction than before the treatment. Oxalic acid could thus improve the efficiency of P&T. X-ray absorption spectroscopy analysis indicated that the Vineland sediment samples still contained reactive Fe(III) minerals after oxalic acid treatment, and thus released more As into solution under reducing conditions than the treated Dover samples. Therefore, the efficacy of enhanced P&T must consider sediment Fe mineralogy when evaluating its overall potential for remediating groundwater As. PMID:26970042

  4. Catalytic kinetic spectrophotometry for the determination of trace amount of oxalic acid in biological samples with oxalic acid-rhodamine B-potassium dichromate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Qing-Zhou; Zhang, Xiao-Xia; Liu, Qing-Zhou

    2006-09-01

    A new catalytic kinetic spectrophotometric method was proposed for determining trace oxalic acid based on the catalytic effect of oxalate on the oxidation of potassium dichromate with rhodamin B in 0.10 M of sulfuric acid. Good linearity is obtained over the concentration range 0.40-6.0 μg/mL of oxalic acid. After the reactions of the catalytic and non-catalytic systems were terminated by using 2.00 mL of 4 M sodium hydroxide solution, they can be stable for 3 h at room temperature. The apparent activation energy of the catalytic reaction is 12.44 kJ/mol. The effect of 50 coexisting substances was observed. The method was used to determine trace oxalic acid in tea, spinach and urine samples with satisfactory results.

  5. Reregistration eligibility document (RED): Oxalic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    EPA is directed by the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act as amended in 1988 (FIFRA '88) to review all pesticide products containing active ingredients initially registered before November 1, 1984, and to reregister those products that have a substantially complete data base and do not pose unreasonable adverse effects to people or the environment. This pesticide reregistration program is to be completed by the late 1990's. The Reregistration Eligibility Document (or RED) for oxalic acid discusses the scientific data and other information supporting EPA's regulatory conclusion that products containing a pesticide do not pose unreasonable risks when used as directed by Agency-approved labeling, and are eligible for reregistration.

  6. Characterization of oxalic acid pretreatment on lignocellulosic biomass using oxalic acid recovered by electrodialysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong-Joo; Seo, Young-Jun; Lee, Jae-Won

    2013-04-01

    The properties of pretreated biomass and hydrolysate obtained by oxalic acid pretreatment using oxalic acid recovered through electrodialysis (ED) were investigated. Most of the oxalic acid was recovered and some of the fermentation inhibitors were removed by ED. For the original hydrolysate, the ethanol production was very low and fermentable sugars were not completely consumed by Pichia stipitis during fermentation. Ethanol yield was less than 0.12 g/g in all stage. For the ED-treated hydrolysate, ethanol production was increased by up to two times in all stages compared to the original hydrolysate. The highest ethanol production was 19.38 g/l after 72 h which correspond to the ethanol yield of 0.33 g/g. Enzymatic conversion of the cellulose to glucose for all the pretreated biomass was in the range of 76.03 and 77.63%. The hydrolysis rate on each pretreated biomass was not significantly changed when oxalic acid recovered by ED was used for pretreatment. PMID:23422303

  7. EFFECTIVENESS OF USING DILUTE OXALIC ACID TO DISSOLVEHIGH LEVEL WASTE IRON BASED SLUDGE SIMULANT

    SciTech Connect

    Ketusky, E

    2008-07-11

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken South Carolina, there is a crucial need to remove residual quantities of highly radioactive iron-based sludge from large select underground storage tanks (e.g., 19,000 liters of sludge per tank), in order to support tank closure. The use of oxalic acid is planned to dissolve the residual sludge, hence, helping in the removal. Based on rigorous testing, primarily using 4 and 8 wt% oxalic acid solutions, it was concluded that the more concentrated the acid, the greater the amount of residual sludge that would be dissolved; hence, a baseline technology on using 8 wt% oxalic acid was developed. In stark contrast to the baseline technology, reports from other industries suggest that the dissolution will most effectively occur at 1 wt% oxalic acid (i.e., maintaining the pH near 2). The driver for using less oxalic acid is that less (i.e., moles) would decrease the severity of the downstream impacts (i.e., required oxalate solids removal efforts). To determine the initial feasibility of using 1 wt% acid to dissolve > 90% of the sludge solids, about 19,000 liters of representative sludge was modeled using about 530,000 liters of 0 to 8 wt% oxalic acid solutions. With the chemical thermodynamic equilibrium based software results showing that 1 wt% oxalic acid could theoretically work, simulant dissolution testing was initiated. For the dissolution testing, existing simulant was obtained, and an approximate 20 liter test rig was built. Multiple batch dissolutions of both wet and air-dried simulant were performed. Overall, the testing showed that dilute oxalic acid dissolved a greater fraction of the stimulant and resulted in a significantly larger acid effectiveness (i.e., grams of sludge dissolved/mole of acid) than the baseline technology. With the potential effectiveness confirmed via simulant testing, additional testing, including radioactive sludge testing, is planned.

  8. Growth Conditions To Reduce Oxalic Acid Content of Spinach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Rutzke, Corinne

    2003-01-01

    A controlled-environment agricultural (CEA) technique to increase the nutritive value of spinach has been developed. This technique makes it possible to reduce the concentration of oxalic acid in spinach leaves. It is desirable to reduce the oxalic acid content because oxalic acid acts as an anti-nutritive calcium-binding component. More than 30 years ago, an enzyme (an oxidase) that breaks down oxalic acid into CO2 and H2O2 was discovered and found to be naturally present in spinach leaves. However, nitrate, which can also be present because of the use of common nitratebased fertilizers, inactivates the enzyme. In the CEA technique, one cuts off the supply of nitrate and keeps the spinach plants cool while providing sufficient oxygen. This technique provides the precise environment that enables the enzyme to naturally break down oxalate. The result of application of this technique is that the oxalate content is reduced by 2/3 in one week.

  9. Crystallization and immersion freezing ability of oxalic and succinic acid in multicomponent aqueous organic aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Robert; Höhler, Kristina; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Schnaiter, Martin

    2015-04-01

    This study reports on heterogeneous ice nucleation efficiency of immersed oxalic and succinic acid crystals in the temperature range from 245 to 215 K, as investigated with expansion cooling experiments using suspended particles. In contrast to previous laboratory work with emulsified solution droplets where the precipitation of solid inclusions required a preceding freezing/evaporation cycle, we show that immersed solids readily form by homogeneous crystallization within aqueous solution droplets of multicomponent organic mixtures, which have noneutonic compositions with an excess of oxalic or succinic acid. Whereas succinic acid crystals did not act as heterogeneous ice nuclei, immersion freezing by oxalic acid dihydrate crystals led to a reduction of the ice saturation ratio at freezing onset by 0.066-0.072 compared to homogeneous freezing, which is by a factor of 2 higher than previously reported laboratory data. These observations emphasize the importance of oxalic acid in heterogeneous ice nucleation.

  10. Oxalic acid degradation by a novel fungal oxalate oxidase from Abortiporus biennis.

    PubMed

    Grąz, Marcin; Rachwał, Kamila; Zan, Radosław; Jarosz-Wilkołazka, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Oxalate oxidase was identified in mycelial extracts of a basidiomycete Abortiporus biennis strain. Intracellular enzyme activity was detected only after prior lowering of the pH value of the fungal cultures by using oxalic or hydrochloric acids. This enzyme was purified using size exclusion chromatography (Sephadex G-25) and ion-exchange chromatography (DEAE-Sepharose). This enzyme exhibited optimum activity at pH 2 when incubated at 40°C, and the optimum temperature was established at 60°C. Among the tested organic acids, this enzyme exhibited specificity only towards oxalic acid. Molecular mass was calculated as 58 kDa. The values of Km for oxalate and Vmax for the enzyme reaction were 0.015 M and 30 mmol min(-1), respectively. PMID:27337220

  11. Oxalic acid in saliva, teeth and tooth tartar.

    PubMed

    Wahl, R; Kallee, E

    1994-11-01

    Oxalic acid was determined in human saliva, teeth, tartar, and in animal teeth. Saliva from dentally healthy male subjects contained 0.10 +/- 0.09 mmol/l (n = 41) and those of dentally healthy female subjects 0.18 +/- 0.17 mmol/l (n = 40). Oxalic acid in tartar from 16 patients was 3.3 +/- 1.2 mmol/kg tartar. In human teeth, oxalic acid was 1.0 +/- 0.3 mmol/kg in milk teeth (n = 12) and 0.9 +/- 0.6 mmol/kg in permanent teeth (n = 60). Human teeth were sorted into age groups and into molars, incisors and premolars. In animal teeth, oxalic acid content varied widely. The formed calcium oxalate is proposed to be a 'physiological' protective mechanism for teeth. PMID:7888477

  12. Oxalic acid decreases calcium absorption in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, C.M.; Martin, B.R.; Ebner, J.S.; Krueger, C.A.

    1987-11-01

    Calcium absorption from salts and foods intrinsically labeled with /sup 45/Ca was determined in the rat model. Calcium bioavailability was nearly 10 times greater for low oxalate kale, CaCO/sub 3/ and CaCl/sub 2/ than from CaC/sub 2/O/sub 4/ (calcium oxalate) and spinach (high in oxalates). Extrinsic and intrinsic labeling techniques gave a similar assessment of calcium bioavailability from kale but not from spinach.

  13. Effect of Oxalate on the Recycle of Neptunium Filtrate Solution by Anion Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Kyser, E

    2004-11-18

    A series of laboratory column runs has been performed that demonstrates the recovery of neptunium (Np) containing up to 0.05 M oxalate. Np losses were generally less than one percent to the raffinate for feed solutions that contained 2 to 10 g Np/L. Up to 16 percent Np losses were observed with lower Np feed concentrations, but those losses were attributed to the shortened residence times rather than the higher oxalate to Np ratios. Losses in the plant are expected to be significantly less due to the lower cross-section flowrate possible with existing plant pumps. Elimination of the permanganate treatment of filtrates appears to be reasonable since the amount of Np in those filtrates does not appear to be practical to recover. Combination of untreated filtrates with other actinide rich solutions is not advisable as precipitation problems are likely. If untreated filtrates are kept segregated from other actinide rich streams, the recovery of the remaining Np is probably still possible, but could be limited due to the excessively high oxalate to Np ratio. The persistence of hydrazine/hydrazoic acid in filtrate solutions dictates that the nitrite treatment be retained to eliminate those species from the filtrates prior to transfer to the canyon. Elimination of the permanganate treatment of precipitator flushes and recovery by anion exchange does not appear to be limited by the oxalate effect on anion exchange. Np from solutions with higher oxalate to Np molar ratios than expected in precipitator flushes was recovered with low to modest losses. Solubility problems appear to be unlikely when the moles of oxalate involved are less than the total number of moles of Np due to complexation effects. The presence of significant concentrations of iron (Fe) in the solutions will further decrease the probability of Np oxalate precipitation due the formation of Fe oxalate complexes. Np oxalate solubility data in 8 M HNO{sub 3} with from one to six times as much oxalate as Np have

  14. Determination of water-soluble forms of oxalic and formic acids in soils by ion chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karicheva, E.; Guseva, N.; Kambalina, M.

    2016-03-01

    Carboxylic acids (CA) play an important role in the chemical composition origin of soils and migration of elements. The content of these acids and their salts is one of the important characteristics for agrochemical, ecological, ameliorative and hygienic assessment of soils. The aim of the article is to determine water-soluble forms of same carboxylic acids — (oxalic and formic acids) in soils by ion chromatography with gradient elution. For the separation and determination of water-soluble carboxylic acids we used reagent-free gradient elution ion-exchange chromatography ICS-2000 (Dionex, USA), the model solutions of oxalate and formate ions, and leachates from soils of the Kola Peninsula. The optimal gradient program was established for separation and detection of oxalate and formate ions in water solutions by ion chromatography. A stability indicating method was developed for the simultaneous determination of water-soluble organic acids in soils. The method has shown high detection limits such as 0.03 mg/L for oxalate ion and 0.02 mg/L for formate ion. High signal reproducibility was achieved in wide range of intensities which correspond to the following ion concentrations: from 0.04 mg/g to 10 mg/L (formate), from 0.1 mg/g to 25 mg/L (oxalate). The concentration of formate and oxalate ions in soil samples is from 0.04 to 0.9 mg/L and 0.45 to 17 mg/L respectively.

  15. Production and Degradation of Oxalic Acid by Brown Rot Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Espejo, Eduardo; Agosin, Eduardo

    1991-01-01

    Our results show that all of the brown rot fungi tested produce oxalic acid in liquid as well as in semisolid cultures. Gloeophyllum trabeum, which accumulates the lowest amount of oxalic acid during decay of pine holocellulose, showed the highest polysaccharide-depolymerizing activity. Semisolid cultures inoculated with this fungus rapidly converted 14C-labeled oxalic acid to CO2 during cellulose depolymerization. The other brown rot fungi also oxidized 14C-labeled oxalic acid, although less rapidly. In contrast, semisolid cultures inoculated with the white rot fungus Coriolus versicolor did not significantly catabolize the acid and did not depolymerize the holocellulose during decay. Semisolid cultures of G. trabeum amended with desferrioxamine, a specific iron-chelating agent, were unable to lower the degree of polymerization of cellulose or to oxidize 14C-labeled oxalic acid to the extent or at the rate that control cultures did. These results suggest that both iron and oxalic acid are involved in cellulose depolymerization by brown rot fungi. PMID:16348522

  16. Oxalic acid, epsom salt and the poison bottle.

    PubMed

    Campbell, W A

    1982-03-01

    1 During the 19th century inadequate control of the sale of poisons, widespread illiteracy, and the English addiction to self-medication contributed to the high incidence of accidental poisoning by oxalic acid mistaken for Epsom salt. 2 Chemical methods for identifying oxalic acid failed when the product was adulterated. 3 Many mechanical devices were proposed to prevent careless dispensing; designs for poison bottles of distinctive shape, colour and texture appeared regularly for 40 years. PMID:6757103

  17. Hausmannite (Mn3O4) conversion to manganite (γ-MnOOH) in dilute oxalate solution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lind, Carol J.

    1988-01-01

    Oxalic acid retards the alteration of Mn3O4 to γ-MnOOH during aging at pH 7.4 ?? 0.2 in well-aerated, abiotic suspensions that contain 4.4 ?? 10-3 M total Mn. In solutions of 1.25 ?? 10-3 M oxalate and greater, about 15% of the initial Mn3O4 altered to ??-MnOOH by day 10, and in solutions of 6.7 ?? 10-4 M oxalate, about 45% altered to ??-MnOOH by day 67. Although precipitation continued through day 365, the degree of conversion remained the same as at day 10 and day 67, respectively. In oxalate-free suspensions, the conversion was about 80% complete by day 67 and 100% by day 109. Oxalate complexed most of the dissolved divalent Mn, lowered the free Mn(II) and MnSO40 concentrations, but increased the total dissolved Mn. Steric hindrance of surface reactions by a suggested manganese oxalate layer on the Mn3O4 surface may explain the blockage of the oxidation cycle.

  18. Effect of oxalic acid on Nosema ceranae infection.

    PubMed

    Nanetti, Antonio; Rodriguez-García, Cristina; Meana, Aránzazu; Martín-Hernández, Raquel; Higes, Mariano

    2015-10-01

    Nosema ceranae is a honey bee pathogen parasitizing the ventricular epithelium and potentially causing colony death. The effect of 0.25 M oxalic acid solution administered to the bees in the form of sugar syrup was determined in laboratory and field trials. The spore numbers in an 8-day laboratory experiment were significantly lower when AO was administered (treated: 11.86 ± 0.94 s.e. × 10^6; untreated: 30.64 ± 0.31 s.e.x10^6). When administered in autumn to free flying colonies twice, 3 weeks apart, the infection prevalence decreased in young (relative reduction of 53.8% ± 6.5 s.e.) and old bees (relative reduction of 44.4% ± 6.0 s.e.). Meanwhile increased prevalence in all the controls was detected (young and old bees: relative increase of 45.7% ± 22.8 s.e. and 10.2% ± 5.9 s.e., respectively). While all the treated colonies overwintered correctly, the untreated ones did not (3 out of 5 were dead). In the absence of commercial products approved in several countries to control nosemosis, oxalic acid syrup appears promising in the development of alternative management strategies. PMID:26412538

  19. A feasibility study on the multistage process for the oxalic acid pretreatment of a lignocellulosic biomass using electrodialysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong-Joo; Ahn, Sung Ju; Seo, Young-Jun; Lee, Jae-Won

    2013-02-01

    The present study investigated the feasibility of the recovery and reuse oxalic acid in a multistage process for the pretreatment of a lignocellulosic biomass. Electrodialysis (ED), an electrochemical process using ion exchange membranes, was used to recover and reuse oxalic acid in the multistage process. The ED optimal condition for recover oxalic acid was potential of 10V and pH 2.2 in synthetic solutions. The recovery efficiency of oxalic acid from hydrolysates reached 100% at potential of 10V. The power consumption to treat 1mol of oxalic acid was estimated to be 41.0wh. At the same time, ethanol production increased up to 19g/L in the ED-treated hydrolysate, corresponding to ethanol productivity of 0.27g/L/h. It was clearly shown that bioethanol fermentation efficiency increased using the ED process, due to a small loss of fermentable sugar and a significantly high removal of inhibitory chemicals. PMID:23306131

  20. Microelectrophoretic study of calcium oxalate monohydrate in macromolecular solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A.; Onoda, G. Y., Jr.; Finlayson, B.

    1987-01-01

    Electrophoretic mobilities were measured for calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) in solutions containing macromolecules. Two mucopolysaccharides (sodium heparin and chondroitin sulfate) and two proteins (positively charged lysozyme and negatively charged bovine serum albumin) were studied as adsorbates. The effects of pH, calcium oxalate surface charge (varied by calcium or oxalate ion activity), and citrate concentration were investigated. All four macromolecules showed evidence for adsorption. The macromolecule concentrations needed for reversing the surface charge indicated that the mucopolysaccharides have greater affinity for the COM surface than the proteins. Citrate ions at high concentrations appear to compete effectively with the negative protein for surface sites but show no evidence for competing with the positively charged protein.

  1. REMOVING SLUDGE HEELS FROM SAVANNAH RIVER SITE WASTE TANKS BY OXALIC ACID DISSOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M; David Herman, D; Fernando Fondeur, F; John Pareizs, J; Michael Hay, M; Bruce Wiersma, B; Kim Crapse, K; Thomas Peters, T; Samuel Fink, S; Donald Thaxton, D

    2009-03-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) will remove sludge as part of waste tank closure operations. Typically the bulk sludge is removed by mixing it with supernate to produce a slurry, and transporting the slurry to a downstream tank for processing. Experience shows that a residual heel may remain in the tank that cannot be removed by this conventional technique. In the past, SRS used oxalic acid solutions to disperse or dissolve the sludge heel to complete the waste removal. To better understand the actual conditions of oxalic acid cleaning of waste from carbon steel tanks, the authors developed and conducted an experimental program to determine its effectiveness in dissolving sludge, the hydrogen generation rate, the generation rate of other gases, the carbon steel corrosion rate, the impact of mixing on chemical cleaning, the impact of temperature, and the types of precipitates formed during the neutralization process. The test samples included actual SRS sludge and simulated SRS sludge. The authors performed the simulated waste tests at 25, 50, and 75 C by adding 8 wt % oxalic acid to the sludge over seven days. They conducted the actual waste tests at 50 and 75 C by adding 8 wt % oxalic acid to the sludge as a single batch. Following the testing, SRS conducted chemical cleaning with oxalic acid in two waste tanks. In Tank 5F, the oxalic acid (8 wt %) addition occurred over seven days, followed by inhibited water to ensure the tank contained enough liquid to operate the mixer pumps. The tank temperature during oxalic acid addition and dissolution was approximately 45 C. The authors analyzed samples from the chemical cleaning process and compared it with test data. The conclusions from the work are: (1) Oxalic acid addition proved effective in dissolving sludge heels in the simulant demonstration, the actual waste demonstration, and in SRS Tank 5F. (2) The oxalic acid dissolved {approx} 100% of the uranium, {approx} 100% of the iron, and {approx} 40% of the manganese

  2. A biogenic source of oxalic acid in marine aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facchini, M.; Rinaldi, M.; Ceburnis, D.; O'Dowd, C.; Sciare, J.; Burrows, J. P.

    2010-12-01

    Oxalic acid has been often observed in marine aerosol, nevertheless, given the ubiquitous character and the high concentrations found in polluted environments, its origin has often been attributed to continental sources. In this work, we present the results of oxalic acid analyses, on aerosol samples collected at Mace Head (Ireland, 53°20’N, 9°54’W) and Amsterdam Island (Indian Ocean, 37°48’S, 77°34’E), supporting the existence of a biogenic source of oxalic acid over the oceans. Measurements cover the year 2006, at the Northern Hemisphere site, and the period 2003-2007, at the Southern Hemisphere one. Aerosol oxalic acid was detected in clean marine air masses in concentrations ranging from 2.7 to 39 ng m-3, at Mace Head, and from 0.31 to 17 ng m-3, at Amsterdam Island. In both hemispheres, oxalic acid concentration showed a clear seasonal trend, with maxima in spring-summer and minima in the fall-winter period, in analogy with other marine biogenic aerosol components (e.g., MSA and amines). Oxalic acid was distributed along the whole aerosol size spectrum, with the major contribution given by the 1.0-2.0 µm size range, and by the lower accumulation mode (0.25-0.5 µm). Given the observed size distributions, marine aerosol oxalic acid can be assumed as the result of the combination of different formation processes, among which in-cloud oxidation of gaseous precursors [1] and photochemical degradation of biogenic unsaturated fatty acids [2] are likely the most important. Among aerosol oxalic acid precursors, glyoxal is the most likely candidate in the marine boundary layer, as a source of glyoxal over the oceans has recently been discovered by satellite observations [3] and confirmed by in situ measurements [4]. In support of this hypothesis, SCIAMACHY satellite retrieved glyoxal column concentrations, over the two sampling sites, resulted characterized by a clear seasonal trend, resembling the aerosol oxalic acid one. [1] Warneck, Atmospheric

  3. Oxalic acid adsorption states on the clean Cu(110) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortuna, Sara

    2016-11-01

    Carboxylic acids are known to assume a variety of configurations on metallic surfaces. In particular oxalic acid on the Cu(110) surface has been proposed to assume a number of upright configurations. Here we explore with DFT calculations the possible structures that oxalic acid can form on copper 110 at different protonation states, with particular attention at the possibility of forming structures composed of vertically standing molecules. In its fully protonated form it is capable of anchoring itself on the surface thanks to one of its hydrogen-free oxygens. We show the monodeprotonated upright molecule with two oxygens anchoring it on the surface to be the lowest energy conformation of a single oxalic molecules on the Cu(110) surface. We further show that it is possible for this configuration to form dense hexagonally arranged patterns in the unlikely scenario in which adatoms are not involved.

  4. The abiotic degradation of soil organic matter to oxalic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studenroth, Sabine; Huber, Stefan; Schöler, H. F.

    2010-05-01

    The abiotic degradation of soil organic matter to volatile organic compounds was studied intensely over the last years (Keppler et al., 2000; Huber et al., 2009). It was shown that soil organic matter is oxidised due to the presence of iron (III), hydrogen peroxide and chloride and thereby produces diverse alkyl halides, which are emitted into the atmosphere. The formation of polar halogenated compounds like chlorinated acetic acids which are relevant toxic environmental substances was also found in soils and sediments (Kilian et al., 2002). The investigation of the formation of other polar halogenated and non-halogenated compounds like diverse mono- and dicarboxylic acids is going to attain more and more importance. Due to its high acidity oxalic acid might have impacts on the environment e.g., nutrient leaching, plant diseases and negative influence on microbial growth. In this study, the abiotic formation of oxalic acid in soil is examined. For a better understanding of natural degradation processes mechanistic studies were conducted using the model compound catechol as representative for structural elements of the humic substances and its reaction with iron (III) and hydrogen peroxide. Iron is one of the most abundant elements on earth and hydrogen peroxide is produced by bacteria or through incomplete reduction of oxygen. To find suitable parameters for an optimal reaction and a qualitative and quantitative analysis method the following reaction parameters are varied: concentration of iron (III) and hydrogen peroxide, time dependence, pH-value and influence of chloride. Analysis of oxalic acid was performed employing an ion chromatograph equipped with a conductivity detector. The time dependent reaction shows a relatively fast formation of oxalic acid, the optimum yield is achieved after 60 minutes. Compared to the concentration of catechol an excess of hydrogen peroxide as well as a low concentration of iron (III) are required. In absence of chloride the

  5. Acute renal failure following oxalic acid poisoning: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Oxalic acid poisoning is being recognized as an emerging epidemic in the rural communities of Sri Lanka as it is a component of locally produced household laundry detergents. Herein we describe a case of a 32 year old female, presenting after direct ingestion of oxalic acid. She then went on to develop significant metabolic acidosis and acute renal failure, requiring dialysis. Renal biopsy revealed acute tubulointerstitial nephritis associated with diffuse moderate acute tubular damage with refractile crystals in some of the tubules. The patient symptomatically improved with haemodialysis and renal functions subsequently returned to normal. PMID:22978510

  6. The electrokinetic behavior of calcium oxalate monohydrate in macromolecular solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A.; Onoda, G. Y., Jr.; Finlayson, B.

    1988-01-01

    Electrophoretic mobilities were measured for calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) in solutions containing macromolecules. Two mucopolysaccharides (sodium heparin and chrondroitin sulfate) and two proteins (positively charged lysozyme and negatively charged bovine serum albumin) were studied as adsorbates. The effects of pH, calcium oxalate surface charge (varied by calcium or oxalate ion activity), and citrate concentration were investigated. All four macromolecules showed evidence for chemical adsorption. The macromolecule concentrations needed for reversing the surface charge indicated that the mucopopolysacchrides have greater affinity for the COM surface than the proteins. The amount of proteins that can chemically adsorb appears to be limited to approximately one monomolecular layer. When the surface charge is high, an insufficient number of proteins can chemically adsorb to neutralize or reverse the surface charge. The remaining surface charge is balanced by proteins held near the surface by longer range electrostatic forces only. Citrate ions at high concentrations appear to compete effectively with the negative protein for surface sites but show no evidence for competing with the positively charged protein.

  7. Solubility of the Sodium and Ammonium Salts of Oxalic Acid in Water with Ammonium Sulfate.

    PubMed

    Buttke, Lukas G; Schueller, Justin R; Pearson, Christian S; Beyer, Keith D

    2016-08-18

    The solubility of the sodium and ammonium salts of oxalic acid in water with ammonium sulfate present has been studied using differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray crystallography, and infrared spectroscopy. The crystals that form from aqueous mixtures of ammonium sulfate/sodium hydrogen oxalate were determined to be sodium hydrogen oxalate monohydrate under low ammonium sulfate conditions and ammonium hydrogen oxalate hemihydrate under high ammonium sulfate conditions. Crystals from aqueous mixtures of ammonium sulfate/sodium oxalate were determined to be ammonium oxalate monohydrate under moderate to high ammonium sulfate concentrations and sodium oxalate under low ammonium sulfate concentrations. It was also found that ammonium sulfate enhances the solubility of the sodium oxalate salts (salting in effect) and decreases the solubility of the ammonium oxalate salts (salting out effect). In addition, a partial phase diagram for the ammonium hydrogen oxalate/water system was determined. PMID:27482644

  8. Equilibrium aluminium hydroxo-oxalate phases during initial clay formation; H +-Al 3+-oxalic acid-Na + system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilinski, Halka; Horvath, Laszlo; Ingri, Nils; Sjöberg, Staffan

    1986-09-01

    The conditions necessary for initial clay formation have been studied in different model systems comprising different organic acids besides Si and Al. In the present paper the solid phases and the precipitation boundary characterizing the subsystem H +-Al 3+-oxalic acid (H 2L) are discussed. pH and tyndallometric measurements were performed in an ionic medium of 0.6 M Na(Cl) at 25 °C. The two phases Al 3(OH) 7(C 2O 4) · 3H 2O (phase I) and NaAl(OH) 2(C 2O 4) · 3H 2O (phase II) determine the precipitation boundary. The following formation constants for the two phases were deduced: lgβ1 = lg([ Al3+] -3[ H2C2O4] -1[ H+] 9 = -21.87 ± 0.08 and lgβ11 = lg([ Al3+] -1[ H2C2O4] -1[ H+] 4 = -5.61 ± 0.06. Phase I exists in the range [ Al] tot≥ 10 -4.4moldm-3,[ H2C2O4] tot ≥ 10 -4.9moldm-3 and at pH < 6.8, thus being a possible precipitate in oxalic-rich natural waters. The more soluble sodium phase is unlikely to exist in natural waters. The two phases are metastable relative to crystalline gibbsite and may be considered as the first precipitation step in the transition from aqueous Al oxalates down to stable Al hydroxide. Model calculations illustrating these competing hydrolysis-complexation reactions are discussed in terms of predominance and speciation diagrams. The solid phases have been characterized by X-ray analysis of powders, TGA and IR spectra, and tentative structures are proposed. Phase I seems to be an octahedral layer structure, in which 3/5 of the octahedral sites between two close packed oxygen sheets are occupied by Al 3+ and the oxalate ion acts as a bridge ligand between two aluminium atoms. Phase II forms a more open sheet structure and has ion exchange properties. Powder data for a phase crystallized from the studied solution after a year are also presented. This phase, Na 4Al 2(OH) 2(C 2O 4) 4 · 10H 2O, supports the results from the equilibrium analysis of recent solution data by SJöBERG and ÖHMAN (1985), who have found the dinuclear

  9. Reactivation of an aged commercial three-way catalyst by oxalic and citric acid washing.

    PubMed

    Christou, Stavroula Y; Birgersson, Henrik; Fierro, José L G; Efstathiou, Angelos M

    2006-03-15

    The efficiency of dilute oxalic and citric acid solutions on improving the oxygen storage capacity (OSC) and catalytic activity of a severely aged (83,000 km) commercial three-way catalyst (TWC) has been investigated. Washing procedures applied after optimization of experimental parameters, namely, temperature, flow-rate, and concentration of acid solution, led to significant improvements of OSC and catalytic activity (based on dynamometer test measurements) of the aged TWC. The latterwas made possible due to the removal of significant amounts of various contaminants accumulated on the catalyst surface (e.g., P, S, Pb, Ca, Zn, Si, Fe, Cu, and Ni) during driving conditions, as revealed by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analyses. For the first time, it is demonstrated that dilute oxalic acid solution significantly improves the catalytic activity of an aged commercial TWC toward CO, Cx,Hy, and NOx conversions under real exhaust gas conditions (dynamometer tests) by two to eight times in the 250-450 degrees C range and the OSC quantity by up to 50%. Oxalic acid appears to be more efficient than citric acid in removing specifically P- and S-containing compounds from the catalyst surface, whereas citric acid in removing Pb- and Zn-containing compounds, thus uncovering surface active catalytic sites. PMID:16570632

  10. Alleviation of chilling injury in tomato fruit by exogenous application of oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Li, Peiyan; Yin, Fei; Song, Lijun; Zheng, Xiaolin

    2016-07-01

    The effects of oxalic acid on the development of chilling injury (CI), energy metabolism and lycopene metabolism in tomato fruit (Solanum lycopersicum L.) were investigated. Mature green tomatoes were dipped in 10mmoll(-1) oxalic acid (OA) solution for 10min at 25°C. Tomatoes were subsequently stored at 4±0.5°C for 20days before being transferred to 25°C for 12days. Oxalic acid treatment apparently alleviated CI development and membrane damage; maintained higher levels of ATP and ADP; increased activities of succinic dehydrogenase (SDH), Ca(2+)-adenosine triphosphatase (Ca(2+)-ATPase) and H(+)-adenosine triphosphatase (H(+)-ATPase); and elevated lycopene accumulation associated with the upregulation of PSY1 and ZDS expression in tomatoes during a period at room temperature following exposure to chilling stress. Thus, oxalic acid treatment benefited the control of CI and the maintenance of fruit quality in tomatoes stored for long periods (approximately 32days). PMID:26920276

  11. Hydrogen Generation During the Corrosion of Carbon Steel in Oxalic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    WIERSMA, BRUCEJ.

    2004-08-01

    A literature review of the corrosion mechanism for carbon steel in oxalic acid was performed to determine the ratio of moles of iron corroded to moles of hydrogen evolved during the corrosion of iron in oxalic acid. The theory of corrosion of carbon steel in oxalic acid and experimental work were reviewed. It was concluded that the maximum ratio of moles of hydrogen evolved to moles of iron corroded is 1:1. This ratio would be observed in a de-aerated environment. If oxygen or other oxidizing species are present, the ratio could be much less than 1:1. Testing would be necessary to determine how much less than 1:1 the ratio might be. Although the ratio of hydrogen evolution to iron corroded will not exceed 1:1, the total amount of hydrogen evolved can be influenced by such things as a decrease in the exposed surface area, suppression of hydrogen generation by gamma radiation, the presence of corrosion products on steel surface, etc. These and other variables present during chemical cleaning operations of the waste tank have not been examined by the tests reported in the literature i.e., the tests have focused on clean corrosion coupons in oxalic acid solutions. It is expected that most of these variables would reduce the total amount of hydrogen evolved. Further testing would need to be performed to quantify the reduction in hydrogen generation rate associated with these variables.

  12. The effects of organic acids on the dissolution of silicate minerals: A case study of oxalate catalysis of kaolinite dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cama, Jordi; Ganor, Jiwchar

    2006-05-01

    Most studies agree that the dissolution rate of aluminosilicates in the presence of oxalic and other simple carboxylic acids is faster than the rate with non-organic acid under the same pH. However, the mechanisms by which organic ligands enhance the dissolution of minerals are in debate. The main goal of this paper was to study the mechanism that controls the dissolution rate of kaolinite in the presence of oxalate under far from equilibrium conditions (-29 < Δ Gr < -18 kcal mol -1). Two types of experiments were performed: non-stirred flow-through dissolution experiments and batch type adsorption isotherms. All the experiments were conducted at pH 2.5-3.5 in a thermostatic water-bath held at a constant temperature of 25.0, 50.0 or 70.0 ± 0.1 °C. Kaolinite dissolution rates were obtained based on the release of silicon and aluminum at steady state. The results show good agreement between these two estimates of kaolinite dissolution rate. At constant temperature, there is a general trend of increase in the overall dissolution rate as a function of the total concentration of oxalate in solution. The overall kaolinite dissolution rates in the presence of oxalate was up to 30 times faster than the dissolution rate of kaolinite at the same temperature and pH without oxalate as was observed in our previous study. Therefore, these rate differences are related to differences in oxalate and aluminum concentrations. Within the experimental variability, the oxalate adsorption at 25, 50, and 70 °C showed the same dependence on the sum of the activities of oxalate and bioxalate in solution. The change of oxalate concentration on the kaolinite surface ( Cs,ox) as a function of the sum of the activities of the oxalate and bioxalate in solution may be described by the general adsorption isotherm: C=6.1×10-7·{64·a}/{1+64·a}. The possible effect of oxalate on the proton-promoted dissolution rate was examined by comparing the results of the present study to literature

  13. Separation of americium, curium, and rare earths from high-level wastes by oxalate precipitation: experiments with synthetic waste solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1980-01-01

    The separation of trivalent actinides and rare earths from other fission products in high-level nuclear wastes by oxalate precipitation followed by ion exchange (OPIX) was experimentally investigated using synthetic wastes and a small-scale, continuous-flow oxalic acid precipitation and solid-liquid separation system. Trivalent actinide and rare earth oxalates are relatively insoluble in 0.5 to 1.0 M HNO/sub 3/ whereas other fission product oxalates are not. The continuous-flow system consisted of one or two stirred-tank reactors in series for crystal growth. Oxalic acid and waste solutions were mixed in the first tank, with the product solid-liquid slurry leaving the second tank. Solid-liquid separation was tested by filters and by a gravity settler. The experiments determined the fraction of rare earths precipitated and separated from synthetic waste streams as a function of number of reactors, system temperature, oxalic acid concentration, liquid residence time in the process, power input to the stirred-tank reactors, and method of solid-liquid separation. The crystalline precipitate was characterized with respect to form, size, and chemical composition. These experiments are only the first step in converting a proposed chemical flowsheet into a process flowsheet suitable for large-scale remote operations at high activity levels.

  14. Oxalic Acid Has an Additional, Detoxifying Function in Sclerotinia sclerotiorum Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Heller, Annerose; Witt-Geiges, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of the diseases caused by the necrotroph plant pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is not well understood. To investigate the role of oxalic acid during infection high resolution, light-, scanning-, transmission electron microscopy and various histochemical staining methods were used. Our inoculation method allowed us to follow degradation of host plant tissue around single hyphae and to observe the reaction of host cells in direct contact with single invading hyphae. After penetration the outer epidermal cell wall matrix appeared degraded around subcuticular hyphae (12-24 hpi). Calcium oxalate crystals were detected in advanced (36-48 hpi) and late (72 hpi) infection stages, but not in early stages. In early infection stages, surprisingly, no toxic effect of oxalic acid eventually secreted by S. sclerotiorum was observed. As oxalic acid is a common metabolite in plants, we propose that attacked host cells are able to metabolize oxalic acid in the early infection stage and translocate it to their vacuoles where it is stored as calcium oxalate. The effects, observed on healthy tissue upon external application of oxalic acid to non-infected, living tissue and cell wall degradation of dead host cells starting at the inner side of the walls support this idea. The results indicate that oxalic acid concentrations in the early stage of infection stay below the toxic level. In plant and fungi oxalic acid/calcium oxalate plays an important role in calcium regulation. Oxalic acid likely could quench calcium ions released during cell wall breakdown to protect growing hyphae from toxic calcium concentrations in the infection area. As calcium antimonate-precipitates were found in vesicles of young hyphae, we propose that calcium is translocated to the older parts of hyphae and detoxified by building non-toxic, stable oxalate crystals. We propose an infection model where oxalic acid plays a detoxifying role in late infection stages. PMID:23951305

  15. Production of oxalic acid from sugar beet molasses by formed nitrogen oxides.

    PubMed

    Gürü, M; Bilgesü, A Y; Pamuk, V

    2001-03-01

    Production of oxalic acid from sugar beet molasses was developed in a series of three reactors. Nitrogen oxides formed were used to manufacture oxalic acid in the second and third reactor. Parameters affecting the reaction were determined to be, air flow rate, temperature, the amount of V2O5 catalyst and the concentrations of molasses and H2SO4. The maximum yields in the second and third reactors were 78.9% and 74.6% of theoretical yield, respectively. Also, kinetic experiments were performed and the first-order rate constants were determined for the glucose consumption rate. Nitrogen oxides in off-gases from the final reactor were absorbed in water and concentrated sulphuric acid and reused in the following reactors giving slightly lower yields under similar conditions. In this novel way, it was possible to recover NO(x) and to prevent air pollution. Meanwhile, it was possible to reduce the unit cost of reactant for oxalic acid production. A maximum 77.5% and 74.1% of theoretical yield was obtained by using the absorption solutions with NO(x). PMID:11211079

  16. The oxalic acid biosynthetic activity of Burkholderia mallei is encoded by a single locus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although it is known that oxalic acid provides a selective advantage to the secreting microbe, our understanding of how this acid is biosynthesized remains incomplete. This study reports the identification, cloning, and partial characterization of the oxalic acid biosynthetic enzyme from the animal ...

  17. Chemical transformations of CO2 in trifluoroacetic acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnetskaya, M. V.; Ivanova, M. S.; Svichkarev, O. M.; Budynina, E. M.; Mel'nikov, M. Ya.

    2013-05-01

    It is established that a conversion reaction of carbon dioxide takes place at room temperature and atmospheric pressure in aqueous solutions of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), which leads to the formation of oxalic acid and heavier polymerized products.

  18. Heterogeneous photodegradation of bisphenol A with iron oxides and oxalate in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Li, F B; Li, X Z; Li, X M; Liu, T X; Dong, J

    2007-07-15

    To understand the degradation of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) with existence of iron oxides and polycarboxylic acids in the natural environment, the photodegradation of bisphenol A (BPA) at the interface of iron oxides under UV illumination was conducted. Four iron oxides were prepared by a hydrothermal process and then sintered at different temperatures of 65, 280, 310, and 420 degrees C named "IO-65," "IO-280," "IO-310," and "IO-420," respectively. The prepared iron oxides were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) methods. The XRD pattern of IO-65 showed a crystal structure of lepidocrocite (gamma-FeOOH) and that of IO-420 demonstrated a crystal structure of hematite (alpha-Fe(2)O(3)), while IO-280 and IO-310 have the mixed crystal structures of maghemite (gamma-Fe(2)O(3)) and hematite. The BET results revealed that the specific surface areas decreased with the increase of sintering temperature. The results demonstrated that the photodegradation of BPA depends strongly on the properties of iron oxides and oxalate, and pH. The properties of iron oxides influenced strongly the dependence of the BPA degradation on the oxalate concentration. The optimal initial concentrations of oxalate for BPA degradation under UV illumination were determined to be 2.0, 2.0, 2.4, and 2.0 mM for IO-65, IO-280, IO-310, and IO-420, respectively. The first-order kinetic constants k for BPA degradation under UV illumination in the presence of oxalate with the optimal initial concentration are ranked as IO-280>IO-310>IO-65>IO-420. The experiments demonstrated that the optimal pH value should be in the range of 3-4. Furthermore, the dependence of BPA degradation should be also attributable to the formation of the dissolved Fe-oxalate in the solution and the adsorbed Fe-oxalate on the surface of iron oxides, and also the formation of hydrogen peroxide. PMID:17451730

  19. COMPARISON OF OXALIC ACID CLEANING RESULTS AT SRS AND HANFORD AND THE IMPACT ON ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING DEPLOYMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Spires, R.; Ketusky, E.

    2010-01-05

    Waste tanks must be rendered clean enough to satisfy very rigorous tank closure requirements. During bulk waste removal, most of the radioactive sludge and salt waste is removed from the waste tank. The waste residue on the tank walls and interior components and the waste heel at the bottom of the tank must be removed prior to tank closure to render the tank clean enough to meet the regulatory requirement for tank closure. Oxalic acid has been used within the DOE complex to clean residual materials from carbon steel tanks with varying degrees of success. Oxalic acid cleaning will be implemented at both the Savannah River Site and Hanford to clean tanks and serves as the core cleaning technology in the process known as Enhanced Chemical Cleaning. Enhanced Chemical Cleaning also employs a process that decomposes the spent oxalic acid solutions. The oxalic acid cleaning campaigns that have been performed at the two sites dating back to the 1980's are compared. The differences in the waste characteristics, oxalic acid concentrations, flushing, available infrastructure and execution of the campaigns are discussed along with the impact on the effectiveness of the process. The lessons learned from these campaigns that are being incorporated into the project for Enhanced Chemical Cleaning are also explored.

  20. Hydroxyl radical substitution in halogenated carbonyls: oxalic acid formation.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Carrie J; Dalal, Shakeel S; Francisco, Joseph S; Mebel, Alexander M; Gaffney, Jeffrey S

    2010-03-01

    An ab initio study of OH radical substitution reactions in halogenated carbonyls is conducted. Hydroxyl radical substitution into oxalyl dichloride [ClC(O)C(O)Cl] and oxalyl dibromide [BrC(O)C(O)Br], resulting in the formation of oxalic acid, is presented. Analogous substitution reactions in formyl chloride [ClCH(O)], acetyl chloride [ClC(O)CH(3)], formyl bromide [BrCH(O)], and acetyl bromide [BrC(O)CH(3)] are considered. Energetics of competing hydrogen abstraction reactions for all applicable species are computed for comparison. Geometry optimizations and frequency computations are performed using the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) and the 6-31G(d) basis set for all minimum species and transition states. Single point energy computations are performed using fourth-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP4) and coupled cluster theory [CCSD(T)]. Potential energy surfaces, including activation energies and enthalpies, are determined from the computations. These potential energy surfaces show that OH substitution into ClC(O)C(O)Cl and BrC(O)C(O)Br, resulting in the formation of oxalic acid and other minor products, is energetically favorable. Energetics of analogous reactions with ClCH(O), BrCH(O), ClC(O)CH(3), and BrC(O)CH(3) are also computed. PMID:20131850

  1. Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 13525 containing an artificial oxalate operon and Vitreoscilla hemoglobin secretes oxalic acid and solubilizes rock phosphate in acidic alfisols.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Kavita; Kumar, Chanchal; Archana, G; Naresh Kumar, G

    2014-01-01

    Oxalate secretion was achieved in Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 13525 by incorporation of genes encoding Aspergillus niger oxaloacetate acetyl hydrolase (oah), Fomitopsis plaustris oxalate transporter (FpOAR) and Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (vgb) in various combinations. Pf (pKCN2) transformant containing oah alone accumulated 19 mM oxalic acid intracellularly but secreted 1.2 mM. However, in the presence of an artificial oxalate operon containing oah and FpOAR genes in plasmid pKCN4, Pf (pKCN4) secreted 13.6 mM oxalate in the medium while 3.6 mM remained inside. This transformant solubilized 509 μM of phosphorus from rock phosphate in alfisol which is 4.5 fold higher than the Pf (pKCN2) transformant. Genomic integrants of P. fluorescens (Pf int1 and Pf int2) containing artificial oxalate operon (plac-FpOAR-oah) and artificial oxalate gene cluster (plac-FpOAR-oah, vgb, egfp) secreted 4.8 mM and 5.4 mM oxalic acid, released 329 μM and 351 μM P, respectively, in alfisol. The integrants showed enhanced root colonization, improved growth and increased P content of Vigna radiata plants. This study demonstrates oxalic acid secretion in P. fluorescens by incorporation of an artificial operon constituted of genes for oxalate synthesis and transport, which imparts mineral phosphate solubilizing ability to the organism leading to enhanced growth and P content of V. radiata in alfisol soil. PMID:24705024

  2. The fluorimetric determination of oxalic acid in blood and other biological materials

    PubMed Central

    Zarembski, P. M.; Hodgkinson, A.

    1965-01-01

    1. Oxalic acid is separated from interfering substances by extraction with tri-n-butyl phosphate followed by co-precipitation with calcium sulphate. The precipitated oxalic acid is then reduced to glyoxylic acid, which is coupled with resorcinol to form a coloured fluorescent complex. 2. The spectrofluorometric method described is sensitive and highly specific, the minimum detectable amount of oxalic acid being 0·9μmole under the recommended conditions. 3. The concentration of oxalic acid in blood from 15 normal adults was 200–320μg./100ml. For serum the range was 135–280μg./100ml. The urinary excretion of oxalic acid by 60 normal adults on a normal diet was 9·0–28·5mg./24hr. PMID:5862411

  3. Oxalic acid biosynthesis is encoded by an operon in Burkholderia glumae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although the biosynthesis of oxalic acid is known to occur in a number of bacteria, the mechanism(s) regulating its production remains largely unknown. To date, there is no report on the identification of an oxalic acid biosynthetic pathway gene from bacteria. In an attempt to identify such a gene...

  4. Comparison of oxalate formation from ascorbic and glyoxyl acids in detached glandular heads of tobacco trichomes

    SciTech Connect

    Vogeli-Lange, R.; Wagner, G.J.

    1987-08-01

    Ca-oxalate crystal containing cells from detached glandular heads of trichomes from Nicotiana tabacum, TI 1068, are capable of converting (1-/sup 14/C) ascorbic acid (AA) and (1-/sup 14/C) glyoxylic acid (GA) to oxalate. AA was found to be a better precursor for oxalate formation than GA. In detached glandular heads, 3.6x more label was converted to oxalate from AA than from GA, in the epidermis the factor was 3x while that with petiole tissue was 7x. Oxalate formation from AA, in detached glandular heads, was only partially inhibited in the dark and in the presence of metabolic inhibitors, suggesting that a nonenzymatic component might be involved. Oxalate formation from GA increased in the presence of metabolic inhibitors. During treatment of detached glandular heads with 2 mM Ca-acetate for 2 days, oxalate formation from AA was stimulated 3 fold, while the presence of 2mM Ca-acetate had no effect on the oxalate formation from GA. These results suggest that Ca/sup 2 +/ stimulates the formation of Ca-oxalate crystals in glandular head cells, and that AA can serve as a precursor for oxalate production.

  5. Determination of trace amount of oxalic acid with zirconium(IV)-(DBS-arsenazo) by spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Qing-Zhou

    2008-11-01

    A novel method is proposed for the determination of trace amount of oxalic acid in the present article. In 1.0 M hydrochloric acid medium, oxalic acid can react with the zirconium(IV) in Zr(IV)-(DBS-arsenazo) complex and replaces the DBS-arsenazo to produce a hyperchromic effect at 520 nm. The hyperchromic degree is proportional to the concentration of the oxalic acid added over a defined range. Based on this property, a new method for the spectrophotometric determination of trace oxalic acid was developed. Beer's law is held over the concentration range of 9.0 × 10 -6 to 5.0 × 10 -4 M for oxalic acid with a correlation coefficient of 0.9995. The apparent molar absorptivity of the method is ɛ520 nm = 1.16 × 10 3 L mol -1 cm -1 and the detection limit for oxalic acid is 0.815 μg/mL. The developed method was directly applied to the determination of oxalic acid in tomato samples with satisfactory results.

  6. Photolytic destruction of oxalate in aqueous mixed waste

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, F.T.; Lum, B.Y.

    1995-03-01

    In aqueous plutonium processing, residual oxalic acid can be destroyed (oxalate kill) by UV light with hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in 1 M HCl solutions. By controlling the amount of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, the oxalate kill process will not affect the chloride concentration. In nitric acid solutions, UV light alone can destroy the oxalic acid. However, with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, the rate of destruction is faster. After the destruction of oxalic acid, the acidic solutions may be reusable without further purification process.

  7. The influence of dicarboxylic acids: Oxalic acid and tartaric acid on the compressive strength of glass ionomer cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permana, Ahmadi Jaya; Setyawati, Harsasi; Hamami, Murwani, Irmina Kris

    2016-03-01

    Glass ionomer cement (GIC) has limitation on the mechanical properties especially compressive strength. The change of compressive strength of GIC by adding oxalic acid and tartaric acid has been investigated. Oxalic acid and tartaric acid was added to the liquid components at concentrations of 0 - 15% (w/w). Powder component of GIC was made from optimum experimental powder glass SiO2-Al2O3-CaF2. GIC was characterized by compressive strength test, SEM-EDX and FTIR. The addition of tartaric acid to GIC has greater improvement than addition of oxalic acid. The addition of tartaric acid at 10 % (w/w) to GIC has greatest value of compressive strength.

  8. Modeling aqueous ozone/UV process using oxalic acid as probe chemical.

    PubMed

    Garoma, Temesgen; Gurol, Mirat D

    2005-10-15

    A kinetic model that describes the removal of organic pollutants by an ozone/UV process is described. Oxalic acid, which reacts with a very low rate constant with ozone and relatively high rate constant with hydroxyl radical (OH*), was used as the probe chemical to model the process. The model was verified by experimental data on concentrations of oxalic acid and hydrogen peroxide (H202) under various experimental conditions, i.e., ozone gas dosage, UV light intensity, and varying oxalic acid concentrations. PMID:16295862

  9. Enhanced Nitrogen Availability in Karst Ecosystems by Oxalic Acid Release in the Rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Pan, Fujing; Liang, Yueming; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Jie; Wang, Kelin

    2016-01-01

    In karst ecosystems, a high level of CaCO3 enhances the stabilization of soil organic matter (SOM) and causes nitrogen (N) and/or phosphorus (P) limitation in plants. Oxalic acid has been suggested to be involved in the nutrient-acquisition strategy of plants because its addition can temporarily relieve nutrient limitation. Therefore, understanding how oxalic acid drives N availability may help support successful vegetation restoration in the karst ecosystems of southwest China. We tested a model suggested by Clarholm et al. (2015) where oxalate reacts with Ca bridges in SOM, thus exposing previously protected areas to enzymatic attacks in a way that releases N for local uptake. We studied the effects of oxalic acid, microbial biomass carbon (MBC), and β-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAG) on potential N mineralization rates in rhizosphere soils of four plant species (two shrubs and two trees) in karst areas. The results showed that rhizosphere soils of shrubs grown on formerly deforested land had significantly lower oxalic acid concentrations and NAG activity than that of trees in a 200-year-old forest. The levels of MBC in rhizosphere soils of shrubs were significantly lower than those of trees in the growing season, but the measure of shrubs and trees were similar in the non-growing season; the potential N mineralization rates showed a reverse pattern. Positive relationships were found among oxalic acid, MBC, NAG activity, and potential N mineralization rates for both shrubs and trees. This indicated that oxalic acid, microbes, and NAG may enhance N availability for acquisition by plants. Path analysis showed that oxalic acid enhanced potential N mineralization rates indirectly through inducing microbes and NAG activities. We found that the exudation of oxalic acid clearly provides an important mechanism that allows plants to enhance nutrient acquisition in karst ecosystems. PMID:27252713

  10. Enhanced Nitrogen Availability in Karst Ecosystems by Oxalic Acid Release in the Rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Fujing; Liang, Yueming; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Jie; Wang, Kelin

    2016-01-01

    In karst ecosystems, a high level of CaCO3 enhances the stabilization of soil organic matter (SOM) and causes nitrogen (N) and/or phosphorus (P) limitation in plants. Oxalic acid has been suggested to be involved in the nutrient-acquisition strategy of plants because its addition can temporarily relieve nutrient limitation. Therefore, understanding how oxalic acid drives N availability may help support successful vegetation restoration in the karst ecosystems of southwest China. We tested a model suggested by Clarholm et al. (2015) where oxalate reacts with Ca bridges in SOM, thus exposing previously protected areas to enzymatic attacks in a way that releases N for local uptake. We studied the effects of oxalic acid, microbial biomass carbon (MBC), and β-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAG) on potential N mineralization rates in rhizosphere soils of four plant species (two shrubs and two trees) in karst areas. The results showed that rhizosphere soils of shrubs grown on formerly deforested land had significantly lower oxalic acid concentrations and NAG activity than that of trees in a 200-year-old forest. The levels of MBC in rhizosphere soils of shrubs were significantly lower than those of trees in the growing season, but the measure of shrubs and trees were similar in the non-growing season; the potential N mineralization rates showed a reverse pattern. Positive relationships were found among oxalic acid, MBC, NAG activity, and potential N mineralization rates for both shrubs and trees. This indicated that oxalic acid, microbes, and NAG may enhance N availability for acquisition by plants. Path analysis showed that oxalic acid enhanced potential N mineralization rates indirectly through inducing microbes and NAG activities. We found that the exudation of oxalic acid clearly provides an important mechanism that allows plants to enhance nutrient acquisition in karst ecosystems. PMID:27252713

  11. DEPOSITION TANK CORROSION TESTING FOR ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING POST OXALIC ACID DESTRUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.

    2011-08-29

    An Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process is being developed to aid in the high level waste tank closure at the Savannah River Site. The ECC process uses an advanced oxidation process (AOP) to destroy the oxalic acid that is used to remove residual sludge from a waste tank prior to closure. The AOP process treats the dissolved sludge with ozone to decompose the oxalic acid through reactions with hydroxyl radicals. The effluent from this oxalic acid decomposition is to be sent to a Type III waste tank and may be corrosive to these tanks. As part of the hazardous simulant testing that was conducted at the ECC vendor location, corrosion testing was conducted to determine the general corrosion rate for the deposition tank and to assess the susceptibility to localized corrosion, especially pitting. Both of these factors impact the calculation of hydrogen gas generation and the structural integrity of the tanks, which are considered safety class functions. The testing consisted of immersion and electrochemical testing of A537 carbon steel, the material of construction of Type III tanks, and 304L stainless steel, the material of construction for transfer piping. Tests were conducted in solutions removed from the destruction loop of the prototype ECC set up. Hazardous simulants, which were manufactured at SRNL, were used as representative sludges for F-area and H-area waste tanks. Oxalic acid concentrations of 1 and 2.5% were used to dissolve the sludge as a feed to the ECC process. Test solutions included the uninhibited effluent, as well as the effluent treated for corrosion control. The corrosion control options included mixing with an inhibited supernate and the addition of hydroxide. Evaporation of the uninhibited effluent was also tested since it may have a positive impact on reducing corrosion. All corrosion testing was conducted at 50 C. The uninhibited effluent was found to increase the corrosion rate by an order of magnitude from less than 1 mil per year (mpy

  12. Effect of heat treatment on the structure of incorporated oxalate species and photoluminescent properties of porous alumina films formed in oxalic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrublevsky, I.; Jagminas, A.; Hemeltjen, S.; Goedel, W. A.

    2008-09-01

    The present work focuses on the use of IR spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectral measurements for studying the treatment temperature effect on the compositional and luminescent properties of oxalic acid alumina films. In line with the recent researches we have also found that heat treatment of porous alumina films formed in oxalic acid leads to considerable changes in their photoluminescence properties: upon annealing the intensity of photoluminescence (PL) increases reaching a maximum at the temperature of around 500 °C and then decreases. IR spectra of as-grown and heat-treated films have proved that PL emission in the anodic alumina films is related with the state of 'structural' oxalate species incorporated in the oxide lattice. These results allowed us to conclude that PL behavior of oxalic acid alumina films can be explained through the concept of variations in the bonding molecular orbitals of incorporated oxalate species including σ- and π-bonds.

  13. Equilibrium studies of oxalate and aluminum containing solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M. S.; King, W. D.; Peters, T. B.; Jones, D. H.

    2015-11-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked to develop data on the solubility and conditions leading to precipitation of sodium oxalate, sodium nitrate, Bayerite (a polymorph of gibbsite, Al(OH)3), and sodium aluminosilicate solids recently found in the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). The data generated will be used to improve the OLI Systems thermodynamic database for these compounds allowing better prediction of solids formation by the modeling software in the future.

  14. A biogenic source of oxalic acid and glyoxal in marine boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facchini, C.; Rinaldi, M.; Ceburnis, D.; O'Dowd, C.; Sciare, J.; Burrows, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    We present the results of oxalic acid aerosol measurements samples performed at Mace Head (Ireland, 53°20'N, 9°54'W) and Amsterdam Island (Indian Ocean, 37°48'S, 77°34'E), supporting the existence of a biogenic source of oxalic acid over the oceans. Aerosol oxalic acid was detected in clean marine air masses in concentrations ranging from 2.7 to 39 ng m-3, at Mace Head, and from 0.31 to 17 ng m-3, at Amsterdam Island. In both hemispheres, oxalic acid concentration showed a clear seasonal trend, with maxima in spring-summer and minima in the fall-winter period, in analogy with other marine biogenic aerosol components (e.g., MSA and amines). Oxalic acid was distributed along the whole aerosol size spectrum, with the major contribution given by the 1.0-2.0 μm size range, and by the lower accumulation mode (0.25-0.5 μm). Given the observed size distributions, marine aerosol oxalic acid can be assumed as the result of the combination of different formation processes, among which in-cloud oxidation of gaseous precursors [1] and photochemical degradation of biogenic unsaturated fatty acids [2] are likely the most important. Among aerosol oxalic acid precursors, glyoxal is the most likely candidate in the marine boundary layer, as a source of glyoxal over the oceans has recently been discovered by satellite observations [3] and confirmed by in situ measurements [4]. In support of this hypothesis, SCIAMACHY satellite retrieved glyoxal column concentrations, over the two sampling sites, resulted characterized by a clear seasonal trend, resembling the aerosol oxalic acid one. [1] Warneck, Atmospheric Environment, 37, 2423-2427, 2003. [2] Kawamura & Sakaguchi, J. Geophys. Res., 104, D3, 3501-3509, 1999. [3] Fu et al., J. Geophys. Res., 113, D15303, doi:10.1029/2007JD009505, 2008 [4] Sinreich et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., 10, 15075-15107, 2010.

  15. Production of citric and oxalic acids and solubilization of calcium phosphate by Penicillium bilaii.

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, J E; Kuiack, C

    1992-01-01

    An isolate of Penicillium bilaii previously reported to solubilize mineral phosphates and enhance plant uptake of phosphate was studied. Using agar media with calcium phosphate and the pH indicator alizarin red S, the influence of the medium composition on phosphate solubility and medium acidification was recorded. The major acidic metabolites produced by P. bilaii in a sucrose nitrate liquid medium were found to be oxalic acid and citric acid. Citric acid production was promoted under nitrogen-limited conditions, while oxalic acid production was promoted under carbon-limited conditions. Citric acid was produced in both growth and stationary phases, but oxalic acid production occurred only in stationary phase. When submerged cultures which normally produce acid were induced to sporulate, the culture medium shifted toward alkaline rather than acid reaction with growth. PMID:1622211

  16. Oxalic acid capped iron oxide nanorods as a sensing platform.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anshu; Baral, Dinesh; Bohidar, H B; Solanki, Pratima R

    2015-08-01

    A label free impedimetric immunosensor has been fabricated using protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) and monoclonal antibodies against Vibrio cholerae (Ab) functionalized oxalic acid (OA) capped iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanorods for V. cholerae detection. The structural and morphological studies of Fe3O4 and OA-Fe3O4, were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. The average crystalline size of Fe3O4, OA-Fe3O4 nanorods were obtained as about 29±1 and 39±1nm, respectively. The hydrodynamic radius of nanorods is found as 116nm (OA-Fe3O4) and 77nm (Fe3O4) by DLS measurement. Cytotoxicity of Fe3O4 and OA-Fe3O4 nanorods has been investigated in the presence of human epithelial kidney (HEK) cell line 293 using MTT assay. The cell viability and proliferation studies reveal that the OA-Fe3O4 nanorods facilitate cell growth. The results of electrochemical response studies of the fabricated BSA/Ab/OA-Fe2O3/ITO immunosensor exhibits good linearity in the range of 12.5-500ng mL(-1) with low detection limit of 0.5ng mL(-1), sensitivity 0.1Ωng(-1)ml(-1)cm(-2) and reproducibility more than 11 times. PMID:26048074

  17. Oxalic acid: a signal molecule for fungus-feeding bacteria of the genus Collimonas?

    PubMed

    Rudnick, M B; van Veen, J A; de Boer, W

    2015-10-01

    Mycophagous (=fungus feeding) soil bacteria of the genus Collimonas have been shown to colonize and grow on hyphae of different fungal hosts as the only source of energy and carbon. The ability to exploit fungal nutrient resources might require a strategy for collimonads to sense fungi in the soil matrix. Oxalic acid is ubiquitously secreted by soil fungi, serving different purposes. In this study, we investigated the possibility that collimonads might use oxalic acid secretion to localize a fungal host and move towards it. We first confirmed earlier indications that collimonads have a very limited ability to use oxalic acid as growth substrate. In a second step, with using different assays, we show that oxalic acid triggers bacterial movement in such a way that accumulation of cells can be expected at micro-sites with high free oxalic acid concentrations. Based on these observations we propose that oxalic acid functions as a signal molecule to guide collimonads to hyphal tips, the mycelial zones that are most sensitive for mycophagous bacterial attack. PMID:25858310

  18. Screening of Indigenous Oxalate Degrading Lactic Acid Bacteria from Human Faeces and South Indian Fermented Foods: Assessment of Probiotic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Kavitha, Murugan; Selvi, M. S.; Selvam, Govindan Sadasivam

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have the potential to degrade intestinal oxalate and this is increasingly being studied as a promising probiotic solution to manage kidney stone disease. In this study, oxalate degrading LAB were isolated from human faeces and south Indian fermented foods, subsequently assessed for potential probiotic property in vitro and in vivo. Based on preliminary characteristics, 251 out of 673 bacterial isolates were identified as LAB. A total of 17 strains were found to degrade oxalate significantly between 40.38% and 62.90% and were subjected to acid and bile tolerance test. Among them, nine strains exhibited considerable tolerance up to pH 3.0 and at 0.3% bile. These were identified as Lactobacillus fermentum and Lactobacillus salivarius using 16S rDNA sequencing. Three strains, Lactobacillus fermentum TY5, Lactobacillus fermentum AB1, and Lactobacillus salivarius AB11, exhibited good adhesion to HT-29 cells and strong antimicrobial activity. They also conferred resistance to kanamycin, rifampicin, and ampicillin, but were sensitive to chloramphenicol and erythromycin. The faecal recovery rate of these strains was observed as 15.16% (TY5), 6.71% (AB1), and 9.3% (AB11) which indicates the colonization ability. In conclusion, three efficient oxalate degrading LAB were identified and their safety assessments suggest that they may serve as good probiotic candidates for preventing hyperoxaluria. PMID:24723820

  19. Biological Control of Meloidogyne incognita by Aspergillus niger F22 Producing Oxalic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Ja Yeong; Choi, Yong Ho; Shin, Teak Soo; Kim, Tae Hoon; Shin, Kee-Sun; Park, Hae Woong; Kim, Young Ho; Kim, Hun; Choi, Gyung Ja; Jang, Kyoung Soo; Cha, Byeongjin; Kim, In Seon; Myung, Eul Jae

    2016-01-01

    Restricted usage of chemical nematicides has led to development of environmentally safe alternatives. A culture filtrate of Aspergillus niger F22 was highly active against Meloidogyne incognita with marked mortality of second-stage juveniles (J2s) and inhibition of egg hatching. The nematicidal component was identified as oxalic acid by organic acid analysis and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). Exposure to 2 mmol/L oxalic acid resulted in 100% juvenile mortality at 1 day after treatment and suppressed egg hatching by 95.6% at 7 days after treatment. Oxalic acid showed similar nematicidal activity against M. hapla, but was not highly toxic to Bursaphelenchus xylophilus. The fungus was incubated on solid medium and dried culture was used for preparation of a wettable powder-type (WP) formulation as an active ingredient. Two WP formulations, F22-WP10 (ai 10%) and oxalic acid-WP8 (ai 8%), were prepared using F22 solid culture and oxalic acid. In a field naturally infested with M. incognita, application of a mixture of F22-WP10 + oxalic acid-WP8 at 1,000- and 500-fold dilutions significantly reduced gall formation on the roots of watermelon plants by 58.8 and 70.7%, respectively, compared to the non-treated control. The disease control efficacy of the mixture of F22-WP10 + oxalic acid-WP8 was significantly higher than that of a chemical nematicide, Sunchungtan (ai 30% fosthiazate). These results suggest that A. niger F22 can be used as a microbial nematicide for the control of root-knot nematode disease. PMID:27258452

  20. Biological Control of Meloidogyne incognita by Aspergillus niger F22 Producing Oxalic Acid.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ja Yeong; Choi, Yong Ho; Shin, Teak Soo; Kim, Tae Hoon; Shin, Kee-Sun; Park, Hae Woong; Kim, Young Ho; Kim, Hun; Choi, Gyung Ja; Jang, Kyoung Soo; Cha, Byeongjin; Kim, In Seon; Myung, Eul Jae; Kim, Jin-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Restricted usage of chemical nematicides has led to development of environmentally safe alternatives. A culture filtrate of Aspergillus niger F22 was highly active against Meloidogyne incognita with marked mortality of second-stage juveniles (J2s) and inhibition of egg hatching. The nematicidal component was identified as oxalic acid by organic acid analysis and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). Exposure to 2 mmol/L oxalic acid resulted in 100% juvenile mortality at 1 day after treatment and suppressed egg hatching by 95.6% at 7 days after treatment. Oxalic acid showed similar nematicidal activity against M. hapla, but was not highly toxic to Bursaphelenchus xylophilus. The fungus was incubated on solid medium and dried culture was used for preparation of a wettable powder-type (WP) formulation as an active ingredient. Two WP formulations, F22-WP10 (ai 10%) and oxalic acid-WP8 (ai 8%), were prepared using F22 solid culture and oxalic acid. In a field naturally infested with M. incognita, application of a mixture of F22-WP10 + oxalic acid-WP8 at 1,000- and 500-fold dilutions significantly reduced gall formation on the roots of watermelon plants by 58.8 and 70.7%, respectively, compared to the non-treated control. The disease control efficacy of the mixture of F22-WP10 + oxalic acid-WP8 was significantly higher than that of a chemical nematicide, Sunchungtan (ai 30% fosthiazate). These results suggest that A. niger F22 can be used as a microbial nematicide for the control of root-knot nematode disease. PMID:27258452

  1. Comparison of sulfuric and oxalic acid anodizing for preparation of thermal control coatings for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Huong G.; Watcher, John M.; Smith, Charles A.

    1988-01-01

    The development of thermal control surfaces, which maintain stable solar absorptivity and infrared emissivity over long periods, is challenging due to severe conditions in low-Earth orbit (LEO). Some candidate coatings are second-surface silver-coated Teflon; second-surface, silvered optical solar reflectors made of glass or quartz; and anodized aluminum. Sulfuric acid anodized and oxalic acid anodized aluminum was evaluated under simulated LEO conditions. Oxalic acid anodizing shows promise of greater stability in LEO over long missions, such as the 30 years planned for the Space Station. However, sulfuric acid anodizing shows lower solar absorptivity.

  2. The effect of oxalic and itaconic acids on threo-Ds-isocitric acid production from rapeseed oil by Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Kamzolova, Svetlana V; Allayarov, Ramil K; Lunina, Julia N; Morgunov, Igor G

    2016-04-01

    The effect of oxalic and itaconic acids, the inhibitors of the isocitrate lyase, on the production of isocitric acid by the wild strain Yarrowia lipolytica VKM Y-2373 grown in the medium containing rapeseed oil was studied. In the presence of oxalic and itaconic acids, strain Y. lipolytica accumulated in the medium isocitric acid (70.0 and 82.7 g/L, respectively) and citric acid (23.0 and 18.4 g/L, respectively). In control experiment, when the inhibitors were not added to the medium, the strain accumulated isocitric and citric acids at concentrations of 62.0 and 28.0 g/L, respectively. Thus, the use of the oxalic and itaconic acids as additives to the medium is a simple and convenient method of isocitric acid production with a minimum content of citric acid. PMID:26851896

  3. Interaction of Gas Phase Oxalic Acid with Ammonia and its Atmospheric Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Xiu-Qiu; Liu, Yi-Rong; Huang, Teng; Jiang, Shuai; Huang, Wei

    2015-04-14

    Oxalic acid is believed to play an important role in the formation and growth of atmospheric organic aerosols. However, as a common organic acid, the understanding of the larger clusters formed by gas phase oxalic acid with multiple ammonia molecules is incomplete. In this work, the structural characteristics and thermodynamics of oxalic acid clusters with up to six ammonia molecules have been investigated at the PW91PW91/6-311++G(3df,3pd) level of theory. We found that oxalic acid forms relatively stable clusters with ammonia molecules, and that ionization events play a key role. The analyses of the thermodynamics and atmospheric relevance indicate that the heterodimer (H2C2O4)(NH3) shows an obvious relative concentration in the atmosphere, and thus likely participates in new particle formation. However, with increasing number of ammonia molecules, the concentration of clusters decreases gradually. Additionally, clusters of oxalic acid with ammonia molecules are predicted to form favorably in low temperature conditions and show high Rayleigh scattering intensities.

  4. LITERATURE REVIEW FOR OXALATE OXIDATION PROCESSES AND PLUTONIUM OXALATE SOLUBILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.

    2012-02-03

    A literature review of oxalate oxidation processes finds that manganese(II)-catalyzed nitric acid oxidation of oxalate in precipitate filtrate is a viable and well-documented process. The process has been operated on the large scale at Savannah River in the past, including oxidation of 20 tons of oxalic acid in F-Canyon. Research data under a variety of conditions show the process to be robust. This process is recommended for oxalate destruction in H-Canyon in the upcoming program to produce feed for the MOX facility. Prevention of plutonium oxalate precipitation in filtrate can be achieved by concentrated nitric acid/ferric nitrate sequestration of oxalate. Organic complexants do not appear practical to sequester plutonium. Testing is proposed to confirm the literature and calculation findings of this review at projected operating conditions for the upcoming campaign. H Canyon plans to commence conversion of plutonium metal to low-fired plutonium oxide in 2012 for eventual use in the Mixed Oxide Fuel (MOX) Facility. The flowsheet includes sequential operations of metal dissolution, ion exchange, elution, oxalate precipitation, filtration, and calcination. All processes beyond dissolution will occur in HB-Line. The filtration step produces an aqueous filtrate that may have as much as 4 M nitric acid and 0.15 M oxalate. The oxalate needs to be removed from the stream to prevent possible downstream precipitation of residual plutonium when the solution is processed in H Canyon. In addition, sending the oxalate to the waste tank farm is undesirable. This report addresses the processing options for destroying the oxalate in existing H Canyon equipment.

  5. Influence of Amitraz and Oxalic Acid on the Cuticle Proteolytic System of Apis mellifera L. Workers

    PubMed Central

    Strachecka, Aneta; Paleolog, Jerzy; Olszewski, Krzysztof; Borsuk, Grzegorz

    2012-01-01

    This work verifies that amitraz and oxalic acid treatment affect honeybee cuticle proteolytic enzymes (CPE). Three bee groups were monitored: oxalic acid treatment, amitraz treatment, control. Electrophoresis of hydrophilic and hydrophobic CPE was performed. Protease and protease inhibitor activities (in vitro) and antifungal/antibacterial efficiencies (in vivo), were analyzed. Amitraz and oxalic acid treatment reduced hydrophobic, but did not affect hydrophilic, protein concentrations and reduced both hydrophilic and hydrophobic body surface asparagine and serine protease activities in relation to most substrates and independently of pH. The activities of natural cuticle inhibitors of acidic, neutral, and alkaline proteases were suppressed as a result of the treatments, corresponding with reduced antifungal and antibacterial activity. Electrophoretic patterns of low-, medium-, and high-molecular-weight proteases and protease inhibitors were also affected by the treatments. PMID:26466630

  6. Evidence of a natural marine source of oxalic acid and a possible link to glyoxal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldi, Matteo; Decesari, Stefano; Carbone, Claudio; Finessi, Emanuela; Fuzzi, Sandro; Ceburnis, Darius; O'Dowd, Colin D.; Sciare, Jean; Burrows, John P.; Vrekoussis, Mihalis; Ervens, Barbara; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Facchini, Maria Cristina

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents results supporting the existence of a natural source of oxalic acid over the oceans. Oxalate was detected in "clean-sector" marine aerosol samples at Mace Head (Ireland) (53°20'N, 9°54'W) during 2006, and at Amsterdam Island (37°48'S, 77°34'E) from 2003 to 2007, in concentrations ranging from 2.7 to 39 ng m-3 and from 0.31 to 17 ng m-3, respectively. The oxalate concentration showed a clear seasonal trend at both sites, with maxima in spring-summer and minima in fall-winter, being consistent with other marine biogenic aerosol components (e.g., methanesulfonic acid, non-sea-salt sulfate, and aliphatic amines). The observed oxalate was distributed along the whole aerosol size spectrum, with both a submicrometer and a supermicrometer mode, unlike the dominant submicrometer mode encountered in many polluted environments. Given its mass size distribution, the results suggest that over remote oceanic regions oxalate is produced through a combination of different formation processes. It is proposed that the cloud-mediated oxidation of gaseous glyoxal, recently detected over remote oceanic regions, may be an important source of submicrometer oxalate in the marine boundary layer. Supporting this hypothesis, satellite-retrieved glyoxal column concentrations over the two sampling sites exhibited the same seasonal concentration trend of oxalate. Furthermore, chemical box model simulations showed that the observed submicrometer oxalate concentrations were consistent with the in-cloud oxidation of typical marine air glyoxal mixing ratios, as retrieved by satellite measurements, at both sites.

  7. Ion exhange and molecular sorption of oxalic acid with a highly basic anion exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krisilova, E. V.; Oros, G. Yu.; Krisilov, A. V.; Selemenev, V. F.

    2014-04-01

    Ab initio modeling of a matrix fragment of resin and geometry optimization of the molecular structure of oxalic acid were performed. The isotherm of oxalic acid sorption with AV-17-8 anion exchange resin was obtained by the variable concentrations technique. The ion-exchange and molecular components of sorbate fixation with the ion exchanger were determined. The hydration of the highly basic anion exchanger that absorbed different quantities of dicarboxylic acid was evaluated by the centrifuging method. The dependence of the amount of water and sorbate concentration in the resin was linear antibatic.

  8. Oxalic acid alleviates chilling injury in peach fruit by regulating energy metabolism and fatty acid contents.

    PubMed

    Jin, Peng; Zhu, Hong; Wang, Lei; Shan, Timin; Zheng, Yonghua

    2014-10-15

    The effects of postharvest oxalic acid (OA) treatment on chilling injury, energy metabolism and membrane fatty acid content in 'Baifeng' peach fruit stored at 0°C were investigated. Internal browning was significantly reduced by OA treatment in peaches. OA treatment markedly inhibited the increase of ion leakage and the accumulation of malondialdehyde. Meanwhile, OA significantly increased the contents of adenosine triphosphate and energy charge in peach fruit. Enzyme activities of energy metabolism including H(+)-adenosine triphosphatase, Ca(2+)-adenosine triphosphatase, succinic dehydrogenase and cytochrome C oxidase were markedly enhanced by OA treatment. The ratio of unsaturated/saturated fatty acid in OA-treated fruit was significantly higher than that in control fruit. These results suggest that the alleviation in chilling injury by OA may be due to enhanced enzyme activities related to energy metabolism and higher levels of energy status and unsaturated/saturated fatty acid ratio. PMID:24837925

  9. In Situ Investigation of a Self-Accelerated Cocrystal Formation by Grinding Pyrazinamide with Oxalic Acid.

    PubMed

    Kulla, Hannes; Greiser, Sebastian; Benemann, Sigrid; Rademann, Klaus; Emmerling, Franziska

    2016-01-01

    A new cocrystal of pyrazinamide with oxalic acid was prepared mechanochemically and characterized by PXRD, Raman spectroscopy, solid-state NMR spectroscopy, DTA-TG, and SEM. Based on powder X-ray diffraction data the structure was solved. The formation pathway of the reaction was studied in situ using combined synchrotron PXRD and Raman spectroscopy. Using oxalic acid dihydrate the initially neat grinding turned into a rapid self-accelerated liquid-assisted grinding process by the release of crystallization water. Under these conditions, the cocrystal was formed directly within two minutes. PMID:27428942

  10. THORIUM OXALATE-URANYL ACETATE COUPLED PROCEDURE FOR THE SEPARATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS

    DOEpatents

    Gofman, J.W.

    1959-08-11

    The recovery of fission products from neutronirradiated uranium is described. The neutron-irradiated uranium is dissolved in acid and thorium oxalate is precipitated in ihe solution formed, whereby the fission products are carried on the thorium oxalate. The separated thorium oxalate precipitate is then dissolved in an aqueous oxalate solution and the solution formed is acidified, limiting ihe excess acidity to a maximum of 2 N, whereby thorium oxalate precipitates and carries lanthanum-rareearth- and alkaline-earth-metal fission products while the zirconium-fission-product remains in solution. This precipitate, too, is dissolved in an aqaeous oxalate solution at elevated temperature, and lanthanum-rare-earth ions are added to the solution whereby lanthanum-rare-earth oxalate forms and the lanthanum-rare-earth-type and alkalineearth-metal-type fission products are carried on the oxalate. The precipitate is separated from the solution.

  11. Response to oxalic acid as a resistance assay for Sclerotinia minor in peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Response to oxalic acid was evaluated as a potential assay for screening peanut breeding lines for resistance to Sclerotinia blight caused by Sclerotinia minor. Detached stems of seven Spanish- and six runner-type peanut cultivars and advanced breeding lines, varying in resistance to Sclerotinia bl...

  12. In Situ Oxalic Acid Injection to Accelerate Arsenic Remediation at a Superfund Site in New Jersey

    PubMed Central

    Wovkulich, Karen; Stute, Martin; Mailloux, Brian J.; Keimowitz, Alison R.; Ross, James; Bostick, Benjamin; Sun, Jing; Chillrud, Steven N.

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic is a prevalent contaminant at a large number of US Superfund sites; establishing techniques that accelerate As remediation could benefit many sites. Hundreds of tons of As were released into the environment by the Vineland Chemical Co. in southern New Jersey during its manufacturing lifetime (1949–1994), resulting in extensive contamination of surface and subsurface soils and sediments, groundwater, and the downstream watershed. Despite substantial intervention at this Superfund site, sufficient aquifer cleanup could require many decades if based on traditional pump and treat technologies only. Laboratory column experiments have suggested that oxalic acid addition to contaminated aquifer solids could promote significant As release from the solid phase. To evaluate the potential of chemical additions to increase As release in situ and boost treatment efficiency, a forced gradient pilot scale study was conducted on the Vineland site. During spring/summer 2009, oxalic acid and bromide tracer were injected into a small portion (~50 m2) of the site for 3 months. Groundwater samples indicate that introduction of oxalic acid led to increased As release. Between 2.9 and 3.6 kg of As were removed from the sampled wells as a result of the oxalic acid treatment during the 3-month injection. A comparison of As concentrations on sediment cores collected before and after treatment and analyzed using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy suggested reduction in As concentrations of ~36% (median difference) to 48% (mean difference). While further study is necessary, the addition of oxalic acid shows potential for accelerating treatment of a highly contaminated site and decreasing the As remediation time-scale. PMID:25598701

  13. Correlation between the production of exopolysaccharides and oxalic acid secretion by Ganoderma applanatum and Tyromyces palustris.

    PubMed

    Osińska-Jaroszuk, Monika; Wlizło, Kamila; Szałapata, Katarzyna; Jarosz-Wilkołazka, Anna

    2014-12-01

    The secretion of exopolysaccharides and oxalic acid in cultures of a white rot Ganoderma applanatum strain and a brown rot Tyromyces palustris strain were tested in terms of culture time, pH range, and temperature. The high yield of exopolysaccharides (EPS) required a moderate temperature of 28 °C for G. applanatum and 20 °C for T. palustris. G. applanatum and T. palustris accumulated more EPS when the concentration of the carbon source (maltose for G. applanatum and fructose for T. palustris) was 30 g/L. The results indicate that the production of oxalic acid by G. applanatum is correlated with the initial pH value of the culture medium and the concentration of oxalic acid increased to 1.66 ± 0.2 mM at the initial pH of 6.5 during the fungal growth. During the growth of T. palustris, the reduction of the initial pH value of the growing medium lowered the oxalic acid concentration from 7.7 ± 0.6 mM at pH 6.0 to 1.99 ± 0.2 mM at pH 3.5. T. palustris accumulated considerably more oxalic acid than G. applanatum and its presence did not affect significantly the production of exopolysaccharides. We also observed that the maximum amounts of exopolysaccharides secreted during cultivation of G. applanatum and T. palustris were 45.8 ± 1.2 and 19.1 ± 1.2 g/L, respectively. PMID:25178492

  14. Immobilization of lead in anthropogenic contaminated soils using phosphates with/without oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaojuan; Zhu, Jun; Fu, Qingling; Zuo, Jichao; Liu, Yonghong; Hu, Hongqing

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the effects of oxalic acid (OA) on the immobilization of Pb(II) in contaminated soils by phosphate materials, has considerable benefits for risk assessment and remediation strategies for the soil. A series of phosphate amendments with/without oxalic acid were applied to two anthropogenic contaminated soils. We investigated the immobilization of Pb(II) by KH2PO4, phosphate rock (PR), activated phosphate rock (APR) and synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAP) at different phosphate:Pb (P:Pb) molar ratios (0, 0.6, 2.0 and 4.0) in the presence/absence of 50 mmol oxalic acid/kg soil, respectively. The effects of treatments were evaluated using single extraction with deionized water or CaCl2, Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) sequential extraction and toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) methods. Our results showed that the concentration of water extractable, exchangeable and TCLP-Pb all decreased with incubation time. The concentration of water-extractable Pb after 120 days was reduced by 100% when soils were amended with APR, HAP and HAP+OA, and the TCLP-Pb was <5 mg/L for the red soil at P:Pb molar ratio 4.0. Water-soluble Pb could not be detected and the TCLP-Pb was <5 mg/L at all treatments applied to the yellow-brown soil. BCR results indicated that APR was most effective, although a slight enhancement of water-soluble phosphate was detected at the P:Pb molar ratio 4.0 at the beginning of incubation. Oxalic acid activated phosphates, and so mixing insoluble phosphates with oxalic acid may be a useful strategy to improve their effectiveness in reducing Pb bioavailability. PMID:25662240

  15. Evaluation Of Sludge Heel Dissolution Efficiency With Oxalic Acid Cleaning At Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Sudduth, Christie; Vitali, Jason; Keefer, Mark

    2014-01-08

    The chemical cleaning process baseline strategy at the Savannah River Site was revised to improve efficiency during future execution of the process based on lessons learned during previous bulk oxalic acid cleaning activities and to account for operational constraints imposed by safety basis requirements. These improvements were also intended to transcend the difficulties that arise from waste removal in higher rheological yield stress sludge tanks. Tank 12 implemented this improved strategy and the bulk oxalic acid cleaning efforts concluded in July 2013. The Tank 12 radiological removal results were similar to previous bulk oxalic acid cleaning campaigns despite the fact that Tank 12 contained higher rheological yield stress sludge that would make removal more difficult than the sludge treated in previous cleaning campaigns. No appreciable oxalate precipitation occurred during the cleaning process in Tank 12 compared to previous campaigns, which aided in the net volume reduction of 75-80%. Overall, the controls established for Tank 12 provide a template for an improved cleaning process.

  16. Electronic properties of passive films grown on Al 7075 in solutions containing oxalate and chromate

    SciTech Connect

    Kobotiatis, L.; Kioupis, N.; Koutsoukos, P.G.

    1997-07-01

    Electronic properties of passive layers grown anodically on Al 7075 (UNS A97075) in chromate and oxalate solutions during polarization at 500 mV{sub SCE} were investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Impedance results were analyzed in terms of capacitance-vs-frequency plots during reverse polarization from 500 mV{sub SCE} to more negative potentials. Plots yielded capacitance values dependent upon both frequency and applied potential. Increases in capacitance with decreasing potential were attributed to width variations of a space charge inside the passive film. Mott-Schottky plots gave slopes and intersection potentials dependent upon the imposed alternating current signal frequency. Data were interpreted on the basis of the amorphous semiconductor/electrolyte junction theory. Differences were found in semiconducting properties of the passive layers formed in solutions containing chromate and oxalate ions. These differences were related to the anticorrosive resistance toward pitting, since it is well known that chromate is a more effective inhibitor than oxalate. The oxide developed in the presence of chromate ions exhibited less noble flat-band potentials and lower average densities of states.

  17. Hippuric Acid as a Significant Regulator of Supersaturation in Calcium Oxalate Lithiasis: The Physiological Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Atanassova, Stoyanka S.; Gutzow, Ivan S.

    2013-01-01

    At present, the clinical significance of existing physicochemical and biological evidence and especially the results we have obtained from our previous in vitro experiments have been analyzed, and we have come to the conclusion that hippuric acid (C6H5CONHCH2COOH) is a very active solvent of Calcium Oxalate (CaOX) in physiological solutions. Two types of experiments have been discussed: clinical laboratory analysis on the urine excretion of hippuric acid (HA) in patients with CaOX lithiasis and detailed measurements of the kinetics of the dissolution of CaOX calculi in artificial urine, containing various concentrations of HA. It turns out that the most probable value of the HA concentration in the control group is approximately ten times higher than the corresponding value in the group of the stone-formers. Our in vitro analytical measurements demonstrate even a possibility to dissolve CaOX stones in human urine, in which increased concentration of HA have been established. A conclusion can be that drowning out HA is a significant regulator of CaOX supersaturation and thus a regulation of CaOX stone formation in human urine. Discussions have arisen to use increased concentration of HA in urine both as a solubilizator of CaOX stones in the urinary tract and on the purpose of a prolonged metaphylactic treatment. PMID:24307993

  18. Corrosion Testing of Carbon Steel in Oxalic Acid that Contains Dissolved Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, Bruce J.; Mickalonis, John I.; Subramanian, Karthik H.

    2012-10-11

    Radioactive liquid waste has been stored in underground carbon steel tanks for nearly 60 years at the Savannah River Site. The site is currently in the process of removing the waste from these tanks in order to place it into vitrified, stable state for longer term storage. The last stage in the removal sequence is a chemical cleaning step that breaks up and dissolves metal oxide solids that cannot be easily pumped out of the tank. Oxalic acid (OA) will be used to chemically clean the tanks after waste retrieval is completed. The waste tanks at SRS were constructed from carbon steel materials and thus are vulnerable to corrosion in acidic media. In addition to structural impacts, the impact of corrosion on the hydrogen generated during the process must be assessed. Electrochemical and coupon immersion tests were used to investigate the corrosion mechanism at anticipated process conditions. The testing showed that the corrosion rates were dependent upon the reduction of the iron species that had dissolved in solution. Initial corrosion rates were elevated due to the reduction of the ferric species to ferrous species. At later times, as the ferric species depleted, the corrosion rate decreased. On the other hand, the hydrogen evolution reaction became more dominant.

  19. Dilute oxalic acid pretreatment for high total sugar recovery in pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Qing, Qing; Huang, Meizi; He, Yucai; Wang, Liqun; Zhang, Yue

    2015-12-01

    Oxalic acid was evaluated as an alternative reagent to mineral inorganic acid in pretreatment of corncob to achieve high xylose yield in addition to highly digestible solid residue. A quadratic polynomial model of xylose formation was developed for optimization of pretreatment process by the response surface methodology based on the impact factors of pretreatment temperature, reaction time, acid concentration, and solid-to-liquid ratio. The highest xylose yield was 94.3 % that was obtained under the pretreatment condition of 140 °C for 40 min with 0.5 wt% oxalic acid at a solid loading of 7.5 %. Under these conditions, the xylose yield results of verification experiments were very close to the model prediction, which indicated that the model was applicable. The solid residue generated under this condition also demonstrated a satisfactory enzymatic digestibility and fermentability. PMID:26494137

  20. Proton transfer aiding phase transitions in oxalic acid dihydrate under pressure.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Himal; Mishra, A K; Murli, Chitra; Verma, Ashok K; Garg, Nandini; Deo, M N; Sharma, Surinder M

    2016-03-21

    Oxalic acid dihydrate, an important molecular solid in crystal chemistry, ecology and physiology, has been studied for nearly 100 years now. The most debated issues regarding its proton dynamics have arisen due to an unusually short hydrogen bond between the acid and water molecules. Using combined in situ spectroscopic studies and first-principles simulations at high pressures, we show that the structural modification associated with this hydrogen bond is much more significant than ever assumed. Initially, under pressure, proton migration takes place along this strong hydrogen bond at a very low pressure of 2 GPa. This results in the protonation of water with systematic formation of dianionic oxalate and hydronium ion motifs, thus reversing the hydrogen bond hierarchy in the high pressure phase II. The resulting hydrogen bond between a hydronium ion and a carboxylic group shows remarkable strengthening under pressure, even in the pure ionic phase III. The loss of cooperativity of hydrogen bonds leads to another phase transition at ∼ 9 GPa through reorientation of other hydrogen bonds. The high pressure phase IV is stabilized by a strong hydrogen bond between the dominant CO2 and H2O groups of oxalate and hydronium ions, respectively. These findings suggest that oxalate systems may provide useful insights into proton transfer reactions and assembly of simple molecules under extreme conditions. PMID:26924455

  1. An ATP and oxalate generating variant tricarboxylic acid cycle counters aluminum toxicity in Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ranji; Lemire, Joseph; Mailloux, Ryan J; Chénier, Daniel; Hamel, Robert; Appanna, Vasu D

    2009-01-01

    Although the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is essential in almost all aerobic organisms, its precise modulation and integration in global cellular metabolism is not fully understood. Here, we report on an alternative TCA cycle uniquely aimed at generating ATP and oxalate, two metabolites critical for the survival of Pseudomonas fluorescens. The upregulation of isocitrate lyase (ICL) and acylating glyoxylate dehydrogenase (AGODH) led to the enhanced synthesis of oxalate, a dicarboxylic acid involved in the immobilization of aluminum (Al). The increased activity of succinyl-CoA synthetase (SCS) and oxalate CoA-transferase (OCT) in the Al-stressed cells afforded an effective route to ATP synthesis from oxalyl-CoA via substrate level phosphorylation. This modified TCA cycle with diminished efficacy in NADH production and decreased CO(2)-evolving capacity, orchestrates the synthesis of oxalate, NADPH, and ATP, ingredients pivotal to the survival of P. fluorescens in an Al environment. The channeling of succinyl-CoA towards ATP formation may be an important function of the TCA cycle during anaerobiosis, Fe starvation and O(2)-limited conditions. PMID:19809498

  2. Enhanced bioethanol production from yellow poplar by deacetylation and oxalic acid pretreatment without detoxification.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Chandan; Lee, Hong-Joo; Lee, Jae-Won

    2015-02-01

    In order to produce ethanol from yellow poplar, deacetylation was performed using sodium hydroxide (NaOH). Optimal deacetylation conditions were determined by a response surface methodology. The highest acetic acid concentration obtained was 7.06 g/L when deacetylation was performed at 60 °C for 80 min with 0.8% NaOH. Acetic acid was recovered by electrodialysis from the deacetylated hydrolysate. The oxalic acid pretreatment of deacetylated biomass was carried out and the hydrolysate directly used for ethanol production without detoxification. Ethanol yields ranged from 0.34 to 0.47 g/g and the highest ethanol yield was obtained when pretreatment was carried out at 150 °C with 50 mM oxalic acid. The highest ethanol concentration obtained from pretreated biomass was 27.21 g/L at 170 °C, using a 50 mM of oxalic acid for the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). Overall, 20.31 g of ethanol was obtained by hydrolysate and SSF from 100 g of deacetylated yellow poplar. PMID:25205056

  3. Pre-storage application of oxalic acid alleviates chilling injury in mango fruit by modulating proline metabolism and energy status under chilling stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Peiyan; Zheng, Xiaolin; Liu, Yan; Zhu, Yuyan

    2014-01-01

    Effects of oxalic acid on chilling injury, proline metabolism and energy status in mango fruit were investigated after mango fruit (Mangifera indica L. cv. Zill) were dipped in 5mM oxalic acid solution for 10min at 25°C and then stored at low temperature (10±0.5°C) for 49days thereafter transferred to 25°C for 4days. Pre-storage application of oxalic acid apparently inhibited the development of chilling injury, notably elevated proline accumulation actually associated with increase in Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase (P5CS) activity and decrease in proline dehydrogenase (PDH) activity in the peel and the flesh, without activation of ornithine-δ-aminotransferase (OAT) activity, and maintained high ATP level and energy charge in the flesh during storage. It was suggested that these effects of oxalic acid might collectively contribute to improving chilling tolerance, thereby alleviating chilling injury and maintaining quality of mango fruit in long term cold storage. PMID:24001814

  4. IN-SITU MONITORING OF CORROSION DURING A LABORATORY SIMULATION OF OXALIC ACID CHEMICAL CLEANING

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B; John Mickalonis, J; Michael Poirier, M; John Pareizs, J; David Herman, D; David Beam, D; Samuel Fink, S; Fernando Fondeur, F

    2007-10-08

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) will disperse or dissolve precipitated metal oxides as part of radioactive waste tank closure operations. Previously SRS used oxalic acid to accomplish this task. To better understand the conditions of oxalic acid cleaning of the carbon steel waste tanks, laboratory simulations of the process were conducted to determine the corrosion rate of carbon steel and the generation of gases such as hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Open circuit potential measurements, linear polarization measurements, and coupon immersion tests were performed in-situ to determine the corrosion behavior of carbon steel during the demonstration. Vapor samples were analyzed continuously to determine the constituents of the phase. The combined results from these measurements indicated that in aerated environments, such as the tank, that the corrosion rates are manageable for short contact times and will facilitate prediction and control of the hydrogen generation rate during operations.

  5. Oxidation of ferrocene by thiocyanic acid in the presence of ammonium oxalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruslin, Farah bt; Yamin, Bohari M.

    2014-09-01

    A flake-like crystalline salt was obtained from the reaction of ferrocene, oxalic acid and ammonium thiocyanate in ethanol The elemental analysis and spectroscopic data were in agreement with the preliminary X-ray molecular structure. The compound consists of four ferrocenium moieties and a counter anion consisting of two (tetraisothiocyanato)iron(III) linked by an oxalato bridging group in such a way that both iron central atoms adopt octahedral geometries.

  6. Oxidation of ferrocene by thiocyanic acid in the presence of ammonium oxalate

    SciTech Connect

    Ruslin, Farah bt; Yamin, Bohari M.

    2014-09-03

    A flake-like crystalline salt was obtained from the reaction of ferrocene, oxalic acid and ammonium thiocyanate in ethanol The elemental analysis and spectroscopic data were in agreement with the preliminary X-ray molecular structure. The compound consists of four ferrocenium moieties and a counter anion consisting of two (tetraisothiocyanato)iron(III) linked by an oxalato bridging group in such a way that both iron central atoms adopt octahedral geometries.

  7. Bioethanol production from deacetylated yellow poplar pretreated with oxalic acid recovered through electrodialysis.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Chandan; Jeong, So-Yeon; Lee, Jae-Won

    2016-05-01

    Electrodialysis (ED) was used to develop a multistage oxalic acid recovery and pretreatment system to produce ethanol from deacetylated yellow poplar. Pretreatment of the biomass was performed at 150°C for 42 min using 0.16 M oxalic acid. The efficiency of oxalic acid recovery from the hydrolysate reached up to 92.32% in all the stages. Ethanol production and ethanol yield of ED-treated hydrolysate in each stage showed a uniform pattern ranging from 6.81 g/L to 7.21 g/L and 0.40 g/g to 0.43 g/g, respectively. The results showed that efficiency of ethanol production increased when deacetylated biomass and ED process was used. Ethanol yield from the pretreated biomass using simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) was in the range of 80.59-83.36% in all the stages. The structural characterization of the pretreated biomass at each stage was investigated and structural changes were not significantly different among the various pretreated biomass. PMID:26943934

  8. Evidence of Polaron Excitations in Low Temperature Raman Spectra of Oxalic Acid Dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Mohaček-Grošev, Vlasta; Grdadolnik, Jože; Hadži, Dušan

    2016-05-12

    Low temperature Raman spectra of oxalic acid dihydrate (8-300 K) for both the polycrystalline and single crystal phase show strong variation with temperature in the interval from 1200 to 2000 cm(-1). Previous low temperature diffraction studies all confirmed the stability of the crystal P21/n phase with no indications of any phase transition, reporting the existence of a strong hydrogen bond between the oxalic acid and a water molecule. A new group of Raman bands in the 1200-1300 cm(-1) interval below 90 K is observed, caused by possible loss of the center of inversion. This in turn could originate either due to disorder in hydroxyl proton positions or due to proton transfer from carboxylic group to water molecule. The hypothesis of proton transfer is further supported by the emergence of new bands centered at 1600 and 1813 cm(-1), which can be explained with vibrations of H3O(+) ions. The broad band at 1600 cm(-1) looses intensity, while the band at 1813 cm(-1) gains intensity on cooling. The agreement between quantum calculations of vibrational spectra and experimentally observed Raman bands of hydronium ions in oxalic acid sesquihydrate crystal corroborates this hypothesis. PMID:27093217

  9. Field assessment of yeast- and oxalic Acid-generated carbon dioxide for mosquito surveillance.

    PubMed

    Harwood, James F; Richardson, Alec G; Wright, Jennifer A; Obenauer, Peter J

    2014-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) sources improve the efficacy of mosquito traps. However, traditional CO2 sources (dry ice or compressed gas) may be difficult to acquire for vector surveillance during military contingency operations. For this reason, a new and convenient source of CO2 is required. Two novel CO2 generators were evaluated in order to address this capability gap: 1) an electrolyzer that converts solid oxalic acid into CO2 gas, and 2) CO2 produced by yeast as it metabolizes sugar. The flow rate and CO2 concentration produced by each generator were measured, and each generator's ability to attract mosquitoes to BG-Sentinel™ traps during day surveillance and to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention light traps with incandescent bulbs during night surveillance was compared to dry ice and compressed gas in Jacksonville, FL. The electrolyzed oxalic acid only slightly increased the number of mosquitoes captured compared to unbaited traps. Based on the modest increase in mosquito collection for traps paired with the oxalic acid, it is not a suitable stand-in for either of the 2 traditional CO2 sources. Conversely, the yeast-generated CO2 resulted in collections with mosquito abundance and species richness more closely resembling those of the traditional CO2 sources, despite achieving a lower CO2 flow rate. Therefore, if dry ice or compressed gas cannot be acquired for vector surveillance, yeast-generated CO2 can significantly improve trap capability. PMID:25843133

  10. Influence of oxalic acid on the agglomeration process and total soda content in precipitated Al(OH) 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolić, I.; Blec̆ić, D.; Blagojević, N.; Radmilović, V.; Kovac̆ević, K.

    2003-05-01

    Decomposition of caustic soda solutions is an important part of Bayer process for alumina production. The physico-chemical properties of precipitated Al(OH) 3 are dependent on several processes that take place simultaneously during the decomposition process and they are: nucleation, agglomeration and Al(OH) 3 crystals. An important industrial requirement is increase of Al(OH) 3 crystal grain size, and hence agglomeration and growth of Al(OH) 3 crystals become important processes and they enable increase of particle size. The influence of oxalic acid concentration on the agglomeration process and total soda content in precipitated Al(OH) 3 at different temperatures and caustic soda concentrations has been investigated. The results have shown that the agglomeration process is increased with increase of temperature and decrease of caustic soda concentration. Total soda content in precipitated Al(OH) 3 is changed in the same way. Besides, agglomeration process of Al(OH) 3 particles is favored in the presence of oxalic acid.

  11. Oxalate catabolism in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxalic acid is found in most plant species and can serve beneficial roles that protect the plant from a variety of environmental stresses. Excessive amounts of oxalate, however, can be detrimental to plant health. Thus, careful coordination of oxalate metabolism is needed. Despite the important impa...

  12. Five year evaluation of class III composite resin restorations in cavities pre-treated with an oxalic- or a phosphoric acid conditioner.

    PubMed

    van Dijken, J W; Olofsson, A L; Holm, C

    1999-05-01

    An oxalic acid solution has been proposed as a conditioning agent for resin composite restorations in two commercial adhesive systems. The durability of 163 class III restorations, including 12 class IV restorations, in cavities pre-treated with an oxalic acid total etch technique or an enamel etch with phosphoric acid was studied. Each of 52 patients received at least one of each of three experimental restorations. The restorations were evaluated yearly with slightly modified United States Public Health Service (USPHS) criteria. After 5 years 95% of the restorations were evaluated as acceptable. Reasons for failure were the fracture of four fillings, including three class IV, secondary caries contiguous to two fillings and a non-acceptable colour match for one restoration. For eight class III restorations a fracture of the incisal tooth structure was registered. No differences were seen between the three experimental restorations. PMID:10373082

  13. Various factors affecting photodecomposition of methylene blue by iron-oxides in an oxalate solution.

    PubMed

    Gulshan, Fahmida; Yanagida, Sayaka; Kameshima, Yoshikazu; Isobe, Toshihiro; Nakajima, Akira; Okada, Kiyoshi

    2010-05-01

    The effect of various factors on the photodecomposition of methylene blue (MB) by iron oxides calcined at various temperatures in various concentrations of oxalate solutions was investigated by illuminating with UV, visible and solar radiation. Iron oxides were prepared by a gel evaporation method and calcined at 200-700 degrees C. XRD showed that the as-synthesized iron oxides were amorphous, but formed maghemite (gamma-Fe(2)O(3)) at 200-400 degrees C and hematite (alpha-Fe(2)O(3)) at > or =500 degrees C. The effect of the various iron oxides, their contents, the oxalate concentration and wavelength of the light source (UV, visible and solar) were all found to strongly influence MB photodecomposition. The optimal contents of the iron oxides increased greatly from 25 to 2000 mg/L at higher calcining temperatures. The MB photodecomposition rate at each optimal iron oxide content was related to the calcining temperature in the order 700 degrees C6, consistent with the presence of iron-oxalate complexes. A much higher concentration of hydroxyl radicals was generated in the present system compared with those from a commercial TiO(2) (ST-01), as determined by the coumarin method. Since this process does not require the addition of hydrogen peroxide and shows good efficiency even under solar light, it is an economically viable method for pre-treating and/or decolorizing wastewaters containing dyes. PMID:20188391

  14. Use of Microfocused X-ray Techniques to Investigate the Mobilization of As by Oxalic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Wovkulich, Karen; Mailloux, Brian J.; Bostick, Benjamin C.; Dong, Hailiang; Bishop, Michael E.; Chillrud, Steven N.

    2012-01-01

    Improved linkages between aqueous phase transport and solid-phase reactions are needed to better predict and model transport of contaminants through the subsurface. Here we develop and apply a new method for measuring As mobilization in situ within soil columns that utilizes synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence. By performing these measurements in situ during column transport experiments, we simultaneously monitor grain-scale solid phase reactions and column-scale transport. Arsenic may be effectively mobilized by oxalic acid but the geochemical and mineralogical factors that influence the rate and extent of mobilization are not well understood. Column experiments (~4 cm long × 0.635 cm ID) using As contaminated sediments from the Vineland Chemical Company Superfund site were performed on the laboratory bench as well as in the synchrotron beamline. Microfocused synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (μSXRF) maps for As and Fe were collected at the same location in the columns (<1 mm2) before and during treatment with 10 mM oxalic acid. The fraction of As and Fe removed by oxalic acid treatment was calculated from the change in flux-normalized counts for each pixel in the map images, and these data were used to calculate kinetic parameters over the studied area. Between 79% and 83% of the As was removed from the sediments by the oxalic acid treatment based on μSXRF data; these removal percentages agreed well with laboratory data based on column effluent (88–95%). Considerably less Fe was removed by oxalic acid treatment, 14–25% based on μSXRF counts, which is somewhat higher than the 7–9% calculated from laboratory column effluent concentrations. Microfocused X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (μXANES) on a subset of points indicates most of the Fe was oxidized and present as a mixture of goethite, hematite, and ferrihydrite on sand grain coatings. Treatment with oxalic acid led to subtle shifts in Fe (III) species following oxalic acid treatment, either

  15. Use of microfocused X-ray techniques to investigate the mobilization of arsenic by oxalic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wovkulich, Karen; Mailloux, Brian J.; Bostick, Benjamin C.; Dong, Hailiang; Bishop, Michael E.; Chillrud, Steven N.

    2012-08-01

    Improved linkages between aqueous phase transport and solid-phase reactions are needed to better predict and model transport of contaminants through the subsurface. Here we develop and apply a new method for measuring As mobilization in situ within soil columns that utilizes synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence. By performing these measurements in situ during column transport experiments, we simultaneously monitor grain-scale solid phase reactions and column-scale transport. Arsenic may be effectively mobilized by oxalic acid but the geochemical and mineralogical factors that influence the rate and extent of mobilization are not well understood. Column experiments (˜4 cm long × 0.635 cm ID) using As contaminated sediments from the Vineland Chemical Company Superfund site were performed on the laboratory bench as well as in the synchrotron beamline. Microfocused synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (μSXRF) maps for As and Fe were collected at the same location in the columns (<1 mm2) before and during treatment with 10 mM oxalic acid. The fraction of As and Fe removed by oxalic acid treatment was calculated from the change in flux-normalized counts for each pixel in the map images, and these data were used to calculate kinetic parameters over the studied area. Between 79% and 83% of the As was removed from the sediments by the oxalic acid treatment based on μSXRF data; these removal percentages agreed well with laboratory data based on column effluent (88-95%). Considerably less Fe was removed by oxalic acid treatment, 14-25% based on μSXRF counts, which is somewhat higher than the 7-9% calculated from laboratory column effluent concentrations. Microfocused X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (μXANES) on a subset of points indicates most of the Fe was oxidized and present as a mixture of goethite, hematite, and ferrihydrite on sand grain coatings. Treatment with oxalic acid led to subtle shifts in Fe (III) species following oxalic acid treatment, either removing

  16. New cloud chamber experiments on the heterogeneous ice nucleation ability of oxalic acid in the deposition nucleation and immersion freezing modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moehler, O.; Wagner, R.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Leisner, T.

    2010-12-01

    Dicarboxylic acids are ubiquitous components of the water-soluble organic fraction of the tropospheric aerosol. Their contribution to the total particulate organic carbon typically ranges from 1 - 3 wt% in urban and semi-urban areas to up to 10 wt% in remote marine atmospheres [1,2]. Oxalic acid, malonic acid, and succinic acid are usually the most abundant species, partly comprising more than 80% of the total diacid mass concentrations [3]. Several recent studies have addressed the ice nucleation potential of solid low-molecular weight dicarboxylic acids. On the one hand, the dicarboxylic acids can act as deposition mode ice nuclei provided that they are directly exposed to an ice supersaturated environment, e.g. in form of a coating layer that was formed by physical and chemical processing on prevalent particulates such as mineral dust and soot. At typical tropospheric relative humidities, diacids of low water solubility like oxalic and succinic acid may, on the other hand, also be present as solids that are immersed in aqueous inorganic and/or organic solution droplets [4,5]. These embedded crystals can act as ice nuclei in the immersion mode. Here we present new results from recent experiments at the aerosol and cloud chamber facility of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. The ice nucleation ability of aqueous and crystalline oxalic acid aerosol particles was investigated at expansion cooling conditions in the temperature range between 244 and 228 K [6]. Oxalic acid dihydrate particles with diameters between 0.03 to 0.8 μm, that were either formed by nucleation from a gaseous oxalic acid/air mixture or by rapid crystallisation of highly supersaturated aqueous oxalic acid solution droplets, showed a high deposition mode ice activity at temperatures around 244 K. The ice onset humidity was below 110 % with respect to ice, and the ice-active fraction of the aerosol population was in the range from 0.1 to 22%. In contrast, oxalic acid dihydrate particles

  17. PREPARATION OF OXALATES OF METALS OF ATOMIC NUMBER GREATER THAN 88

    DOEpatents

    Duffield, R.B.

    1959-02-01

    A method is presented for the preparation of oxalates of metals of atomic number greater than 88. A solid peroxide of the heavy metal is contacted with an aqueous oxalic acid solution ai a temperature of about 50 C for a period of time sufficient to form the insoluble metal oxalate which is subsequentiy recovered as a pures crystalline compound.

  18. [EXPERIENCE OF USE OF BLEMAREN® IN THE TREATMENT OF PATIENTS IN URIC ACID AND CALCIUM OXALATE UROLITHIASIS].

    PubMed

    Konstantinova, O V; Yanenko, E K

    2015-01-01

    154 patients with urolithiasis were under outpatient observation for 2-8 years. Among them there were 76 women and 78 men aged 21-66 years, of which 46 patients with uric acid urolithiasis, and 88--with calcium oxalate urolithiasis. Treatment of patients was carried out systematically, depending on their condition. Indications for the application of Blemaren® included the presence of uric acid stones, uric acid and/or oxalate crystalluria. The duration of treatment was 6.1 months. The dosage of the drug varied from 6 to 18 g per day and was selected individually, depending on the purpose of the appointment of Blemaren®. Reduction of the urine pH to 6.2- 6.8-7.2 was the criterion for properly selected dose. To dissolve uric acid stones in the presence of hyperuricemia and/or hyperuricuria, Blemaren® was administered in combination with allopurinol at a dose of 0.1 g 3-4 times a day. Besides pharmacotherapy, treatment included diet therapy. It was found that the morning urine pH in urate urolithiasis is sustainable and has a range of 5.0-6.0, in 80.4% of cases--range of 5.0-5.5. In calcium oxalate urolithiasis this parameter is also stable and has a range of 5.0-6.7, in 82.9% of cases--range of 5.5-6.0. Optimal urine pH to eliminate uric acid and oxalate crystalluria in patients with uric acid and calcium oxalate urolithiasis is the interval of 6.2-6.4. It was shown that Blemaren® is a highly effective agent for treatment and prevention of uric acid and calcium oxalate crystalluria in calcium oxalate and uric acid urolithiasis. Further, its effectiveness in dissolving of uric acid stones in the absence of an infectious inflammatory process is 82.3%. PMID:26859932

  19. Evaluation of oxalate decarboxylase and oxalate oxidase for industrial applications.

    PubMed

    Cassland, Pierre; Sjöde, Anders; Winestrand, Sandra; Jönsson, Leif J; Nilvebrant, Nils-Olof

    2010-05-01

    Increased recirculation of process water has given rise to problems with formation of calcium oxalate incrusts (scaling) in the pulp and paper industry and in forest biorefineries. The potential in using oxalate decarboxylase from Aspergillus niger for oxalic acid removal in industrial bleaching plant filtrates containing oxalic acid was examined and compared with barley oxalate oxidase. Ten different filtrates from chemical pulping were selected for the evaluation. Oxalate decarboxylase degraded oxalic acid faster than oxalate oxidase in eight of the filtrates, while oxalate oxidase performed better in one filtrate. One of the filtrates inhibited both enzymes. The potential inhibitory effect of selected compounds on the enzymatic activity was tested. Oxalate decarboxylase was more sensitive than oxalate oxidase to hydrogen peroxide. Oxalate decarboxylase was not as sensitive to chlorate and chlorite as oxalate oxidase. Up to 4 mM chlorate ions, the highest concentration tested, had no inhibitory effect on oxalate decarboxylase. Analysis of the filtrates suggests that high concentrations of chlorate present in some of the filtrates were responsible for the higher sensitivity of oxalate oxidase in these filtrates. Oxalate decarboxylase was thus a better choice than oxalate oxidase for treatment of filtrates from chlorine dioxide bleaching. PMID:19763895

  20. Communication: Remarkable electrophilicity of the oxalic acid monomer: An anion photoelectron spectroscopy and theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Buonaugurio, Angela; Graham, Jacob; Buytendyk, Allyson; Bowen, Kit H. E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu; Ryder, Matthew R. Gutowski, Maciej E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu; Keolopile, Zibo G. E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu; Haranczyk, Maciej

    2014-06-14

    Our experimental and computational results demonstrate an unusual electrophilicity of oxalic acid, the simplest dicarboxylic acid. The monomer is characterized by an adiabatic electron affinity and electron vertical detachment energy of 0.72 and 1.08 eV (±0.05 eV), respectively. The electrophilicity results primarily from the bonding carbon-carbon interaction in the singly occupied molecular orbital of the anion, but it is further enhanced by intramolecular hydrogen bonds. The well-resolved structure in the photoelectron spectrum is reproduced theoretically, based on Franck-Condon factors for the vibronic anion → neutral transitions.

  1. Manganese Peroxidase-Dependent Oxidation of Glyoxylic and Oxalic Acids Synthesized by Ceriporiopsis subvermispora Produces Extracellular Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Urzúa, Ulises; Kersten, Philip J.; Vicuña, Rafael

    1998-01-01

    The ligninolytic system of the basidiomycete Ceriporiopsis subvermispora is composed of manganese peroxidase (MnP) and laccase. In this work, the source of extracellular hydrogen peroxide required for MnP activity was investigated. Our attention was focused on the possibility that hydrogen peroxide might be generated by MnP itself through the oxidation of organic acids secreted by the fungus. Both oxalate and glyoxylate were found in the extracellular fluid of C. subvermispora cultures grown in chemically defined media, where MnP is also secreted. The in vivo oxidation of oxalate was measured; 14CO2 evolution was monitored after addition of exogenous [14C]oxalate to cultures at constant specific activity. In standard cultures, evolution of CO2 from oxalate was maximal at day 6, although the MnP titers were highest at day 12, the oxalate concentration was maximal (2.5 mM) at day 10, and the glyoxylate concentration was maximal (0.24 mM) at day 5. However, in cultures containing low nitrogen levels, in which the pH is more stable, a better correlation between MnP titers and mineralization of oxalate was observed. Both MnP activity and oxidation of [14C]oxalate were negligible in cultures lacking Mn(II). In vitro assays confirmed that Mn(II)-dependent oxidation of [14C]oxalate by MnP occurs and that this reaction is stimulated by glyoxylate at the concentrations found in cultures. In addition, both organic acids supported phenol red oxidation by MnP without added hydrogen peroxide, and glyoxylate was more reactive than oxalate in this reaction. Based on these results, a model is proposed for the extracellular production of hydrogen peroxide by C. subvermispora. PMID:16349495

  2. High efficient removal of fluoride from aqueous solution by a novel hydroxyl aluminum oxalate adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shibiao; Zhang, Kaisheng; He, Junyong; Cai, Xingguo; Chen, Kai; Li, Yulian; Sun, Bai; Kong, Lingtao; Liu, Jinhuai

    2016-02-15

    A novel adsorbent, hydroxyl aluminum oxalate (HAO), for the high efficient removal of fluoride from aqueous solution was successfully synthesized. The adsorbent was characterized and its performance in fluoride (F(-)) removal was evaluated for the first time. Kinetic data reveal that the F(-) adsorption is rapid in the beginning followed by a slower adsorption process; 75.9% adsorption can be achieved within 1min and only 16% additional removal occurred in the following 239min. The F(-) adsorption kinetics was well described by the pseudo second-order kinetic model. The calculated adsorption capacity of this adsorbent for F(-) by Langmuir model was 400mgg(-1) at pH 6.5, which is one of the highest capabilities of today's materials. The thermodynamic parameters calculated from the temperature-dependent isotherms indicate that the adsorption reaction of F(-) on the HAO is a spontaneous process. The FT-IR spectra of HAO before and after adsorbing F(-) show adsorption mechanism should be hydroxyl and oxalate interchange with F(-). PMID:26624529

  3. Thermodynamics of the Complexation of Uranium(VI) by oxalate in aqueous solution at 10-70oC

    SciTech Connect

    Di Bernardo, Plinio; Zanonato, Pier Luigi; Tian, Guoxin; Tolazzi, Marilena; Rao, Linfeng

    2009-03-31

    The protonation reactions of oxalate (ox) and the complex formation of uranium(VI) with oxalate in 1.05 mol kg{sup -1} NaClO{sub 4} were studied at variable temperatures (10-70 C). Three U(VI)/ox complexes (UO{sub 2}ox{sub j}{sup (2-2j){sup +}} with j = 1, 2, 3) were identified in this temperature range. The formation constants and the molar enthalpies of complexation were determined by spectrophotometry and calorimetry. The complexation of uranium(VI) with oxalate ion is exothermic at lower temperatures (10-40 C) and becomes endothermic at higher temperatures (55-70 C). In spite of this, the free energy of complexation becomes more negative at higher temperatures due to increasingly more positive entropy of complexation that exceeds the increase of the enthalpy of complexation. The thermodynamic parameters at different temperatures, in conjunction with the literature data for other dicarboxylic acids, provide insight into the relative strength of U(VI) complexes with a series of dicarboxylic acids (oxalic, malonic and oxydiacetic) and rationalization for the highest stability of U(VI)/oxalate complexes in the series. The data reported in this study are of importance in predicting the migration of uranium(VI) in geological environments in the case of failure of the engineering barriers which protect waste repositories.

  4. A new approach to the decontamination of asbestos-polluted waters by treatment with oxalic acid under power ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Turci, Francesco; Tomatis, Maura; Mantegna, Stefano; Cravotto, Giancarlo; Fubini, Bice

    2008-04-01

    A suspension of chrysotile asbestos fibres in aqueous 0.5M oxalic acid was subjected to power ultrasound with the aim to disrupt and detoxify the mineral by the leaching action of oxalic acid on its structural cations acting simultaneously with a vigorous acoustic cavitation. Sonication was performed in a "cavitating tube", a vertical hollow vibrating cylinder made of titanium, operating at 19.2 kHz and 150 W. Treatment lasted from 2.5 to 21 h. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that the joint action of the chelating agent and ultrasound (though not of either when applied independently) mostly converted asbestos fibres into micrometric aggregates and nano-sized debris, whose morphology totally differed from asbestos fibres. When treated suspensions were filtered through CA membranes (pore size 0.20 microm), more than half of the asbestos went through the filter because it had either been brought in solution or dispersed in the form of extremely small particles. Most of the structural metal ions were brought into solution (ICP-AES). After the treatment the BET surface area of the recovered solid was tenfold greater than the original. The crystalline fraction of residual solids, though resembling the original sample in XRD, was shown by micro-Raman spectra to be made of antigorite, a polymorph form of serpentine. Furthermore, as the length of these antigorite fibrils lay outside the fibre range rated as a health hazard under worldwide regulations, our procedure can be employed for the decontamination of chrysotile-polluted waters and sediments. PMID:17931951

  5. Novel approach to recover cobalt and lithium from spent lithium-ion battery using oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xianlai; Li, Jinhui; Shen, Bingyu

    2015-09-15

    With the booming of consumer electronics (CE) and electric vehicle (EV), a large number of spent lithium-ion battery (LIBs) have been generated worldwide. Resource depletion and environmental concern driven from the sustainable industry of CE and EV have motivated spent LIBs should be recovered urgently. However, the conventional process combined with leaching, precipitating, and filtering was quite complicated to recover cobalt and lithium from spent LIBs. In this work, we developed a novel recovery process, only combined with oxalic acid leaching and filtering. When the optimal parameters for leaching process is controlled at 150 min retention time, 95 °C heating temperature, 15 g L(-1) solid-liquid ratio, and 400 rpm rotation rate, the recovery rate of lithium and cobalt from spent LIBs can reach about 98% and 97%, respectively. Additionally, we also tentatively discovered the leaching mechanism of lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO2) using oxalic acid, and the leaching order of the sampling LiCoO2 of spent LIBs. All the obtained results can contribute to a short-cut and high-efficiency process of spent LIBs recycling toward a sound closed-loop cycle. PMID:25897692

  6. Bioleaching of spent refinery processing catalyst using Aspergillus niger with high-yield oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Santhiya, Deenan; Ting, Yen-Peng

    2005-03-16

    A spent refinery processing catalyst was physically and chemically characterized, and subjected to one-step and two-step bioleaching processes using Aspergillus niger. During bioleaching of the spent catalysts of various particle sizes ("as received", 100-150 microm, <37 microm, and x =2.97 (average) microm) and pulp densities, the biomass dry weight and pH were determined. The corresponding leach liquor was analysed for excreted organic acids along with heavy metal values extracted from the catalyst. Chemical characterization of the spent catalyst confirmed the presence of heavy metal including Al (33.3%), Ni (6.09%) and Mo (13.72%). In general, the presence of the spent catalyst caused a decrease in the biomass yield and an increase in oxalic acid secretion by A. niger. The increase in oxalic acid secretion with a decrease in the catalyst particle size (up to <37 microm) led to corresponding increase in the extraction of metal values. The highest extraction of metal values from the spent catalyst (at 1% w/v pulp density and particle size <37 microm) were found to be 54.5% Al, 58.2% Ni and 82.3% Mo in 60 days of bioleaching. Oxalic acid secretion by A. niger in the presence of the spent catalyst was stimulated using 2-[N-Morpholino]ethanesulfonic acid (MES) buffer (pH 6), which resulted in comparable metal extraction (58% Al, 62.8% Ni and 78.9% Mo) in half the time required by the fungus in the absence of the buffer. Spent medium of A. niger grown in the absence and in the presence of MES buffer were found to leach almost similar amounts of Al and Ni, except Mo for which the spent medium of buffered culture was significantly more effective than the non-buffered culture. Overall, this study shows the possible use of bioleaching for the extraction of metal resources from spent catalysts. It also demonstrated the advantages of buffer-stimulated excretion of organic acids by A. niger in bioleaching of the spent catalyst. PMID:15664081

  7. ISOLATED MEDICAGO TRUNCATULA MUTANTS WITH INCREASED CALCIUM OXALATE CRYSTAL ACCUMULATION HAVE DECREASED ASCORBIC ACID LEVELS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mechanisms controlling oxalate biosynthesis and calcium oxalate formation in plants remains largely unknown. As an initial step toward gaining insight into these regulatory mechanisms we initiated a mutant screen to identify plants that over-accumulate crystals of calcium oxalate. Four new mut...

  8. Separation of Am-Cm from Al(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/ waste solutions by in-canyon-tank precipitation as oxalates

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, L.W.; Burney, G.A.; Wilson, T.W.; McKibben, J.M.; Bibler, N.E.; Holtzscheiter, E.W.; Campbell, T.G.

    1982-04-01

    A process for recovery of Am-Cm residues from high-activity waste concentrates has been developed specifically for application in Savannah River Plant (SRP) canyon tanks. The Am-Cm residues were collected from a campaign to produce plutonium containing high isotopic concentrations of /sup 242/Pu. The separation of Am-Cm from the high-activity waste stream, containing about 2M Al(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/, is necessary to produce an acceptable feed solution for a later pressurized cation exchange chromatography separation and purification step. The new process includes formic acid denitration, adjustment of contaminating cations by evaporation and water dilution, and oxalate precipitation of the actinides and lanthanides. After washing, the precipitate was dissolved in 8M nitric acid and the oxalate was destroyed by nitric acid oxidation that was catalyzed by manganous ions. This new process generates about one-fourth the waste of the californium solvent extraction process, which it replaced. The new process also produces a cleaner feed solution for the pressurized cation exchange chromatography separation and purification step.

  9. Effects of acid-etching solutions on human enamel and dentin.

    PubMed

    Fanchi, M; Breschi, L

    1995-06-01

    Nine noncarious human molars were extracted and stored in saline solution. Three standard occlusal cavities with beveled enamel margins were prepared on each tooth and etched with the etching solutions of three dentinal adhesive systems: (1) 37% phosphoric acid solution, (2) 4.3% oxalic acid and 2.6% aluminum salts solution, and (3) 10% maleic acid solution. Scanning electron microscopic analysis revealed that all the etching solutions affected the enamel surface morphology. The solution of oxalic acid and aluminum salts removed primarily the prism core material and partially the periphery of the prisms, but did not affect the nonbeveled enamel surface. Phosphoric and maleic acids removed both prism core materials and prism periphery; these specimens also showed areas in which no prism morphology could be detected. These two acids also removed apatite crystals from the prism core of the intact enamel surface. PMID:8602425

  10. The effects of oxalate treatment on the smear layer of ground surfaces of human dentine.

    PubMed

    Pashley, D H; Galloway, S E

    1985-01-01

    The layer was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and by measurement of hydraulic conductance before and after 2-min topical treatment with potassium chloride, neutral potassium oxalate, half-neutralized oxalic acid or both neutral and acidic oxalates. The treated smear layers were then re-evaluated microscopically and functionally both before and after acid challenge. The layers treated with KCl were not altered either microscopically or functionally and were susceptible to acid etching. Dentine surfaces treated with either oxalate solutions became less permeable and were acid-resistant. PMID:3866520

  11. Structural tuning of photoluminescence in nanoporous anodic alumina by hard anodization in oxalic and malonic acids

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We report on an exhaustive and systematic study about the photoluminescent properties of nanoporous anodic alumina membranes fabricated by the one-step anodization process under hard conditions in oxalic and malonic acids. This optical property is analysed as a function of several parameters (i.e. hard anodization voltage, pore diameter, membrane thickness, annealing temperature and acid electrolyte). This analysis makes it possible to tune the photoluminescent behaviour at will simply by modifying the structural characteristics of these membranes. This structural tuning ability is of special interest in such fields as optoelectronics, in which an accurate design of the basic nanostructures (e.g. microcavities, resonators, filters, supports, etc.) yields the control over their optical properties and, thus, upon the performance of the nanodevices derived from them (biosensors, interferometers, selective filters, etc.) PMID:22515214

  12. Structure Determination and Refinement of Acid Strontium Oxalate from X-Ray and Neutron Powder Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanhoyland, G.; Bourée, F.; Van Bael, M. K.; Mullens, J.; Van Poucke, L. C.

    2001-03-01

    The structure of acid strontium oxalate Sr(HC2O4)·{1}/{2}(C2O4)·H2O has been determined by conventional X-ray powder diffractometry. The diffraction pattern was indexed from a monoclinic unit cell with cell parameters a=6.341(1) Å, b=16.880(2) Å, c=5.7798(8) Å, and β=97.60(1)°; space group, P21/n (No. 14) with Z=4. Final (isotropic) Rietveld refinement of the neutron powder data yielded RB=4.57%, RF=2.87%, and Rwp=7.87% as conventional Rietveld parameters. Strontium is eight-fold coordinated and can be described as a distorted bicapped trigonal prism. The SrO8 polyhedra form one-dimensional chains along the c-axis by sharing edges. In contrast to all other known strontium oxalates, in this compound H2O acts as bridging ligand between two Sr atoms. SDPD-D classification (1): Sr(HC2O4)-{1}/{2}(C2O4)-H2O, P21/n, C1=14, Nc=42, C2=11, XC1+N/TREOR-97 & DICVOL-91, EXTRA, EQUI, SIRPOW-92 (DM), GFOURIER, FULLPROF.

  13. Poly(acrylic acid) to induce competitive crystallization of a theophylline/oxalic acid cocrystal and a theophylline polymorph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jisun; Kim, Il Won

    2016-01-01

    Polymeric additives to induce competitive crystallization of pharmaceutical compounds were explored. A cocrystal of theophylline and oxalic acid was used as a model system, and poly(acrylic acid), poly(caprolactone), and poly(ethylene glycol) were the additives. The cocrystal formation was selectively hindered with addition of poly(acrylic acid). First the size of the cocrystals were reduced, and eventually the cocrystallization was inhibited to generate neat theophylline crystals. The theophylline crystals were of a distinctively different crystal structure from known polymorphs, based on powder X-ray diffraction. They were also obtained in nanoscale size, when millimeter-scale crystals formed without poly(acrylic acid). Polymeric additives that could form specific interactions with crystallizing compounds seem to be useful tools for the phase and size control of pharmaceutical crystals.

  14. Effect of oxalic acid pre-treatment in restorations of non-carious cervical lesions: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, André Mattos Brito; Colares, Regina Claudia Ramos; Mendonça, Juliano Satori; Rodrigues, Lidiany Karla Azevedo; Santiago, Sérgio Lima

    2014-01-01

    Context: Non-carious cervical lesions are usually associated with dentin hypersensitivity. The use of oxalic acid in restorations of these lesions could be beneficial in relieving pain. Aims: To evaluate the use of oxalic acid in restorations of non-carious cervical lesions. Settings and Design: A randomized clinical trial. Subjects and Methods: One operator placed 90 restorations in 20 volunteers of both sexes, with at least two lesions to be restored with the techniques: Control — Restoration with total-etch technique and Experimental — Restoration with pretreatment with oxalic acid followed by application of adhesive system. The restorative adhesive system used was XP Bond/Durafill. The restorations were directly assessed by two independent examiners using a modified United States Public Health Service (USPHS) method at baseline, 6 and 12 months, taking into account the following criteria: Retention (R), marginal integrity (MI), marginal discoloration (MD), postoperative sensitivity (S), caries (C), and anatomic form (AF). Statistical analysis used: The data were statistically analyzed using the Fisher exact and McNemar tests. The level of significance was set at 5%. Results: After 1 year, the results of restorations clinically satisfactory obtained for the control and experimental group respectively were: R (97% / 89%), MI (100% / 100%), MD (100% / 100%), S (100% / 100%), C (100% / 100%), and AF (100% / 100%). Conclusions: The use of oxalic acid as an agent of dentin pretreatment did not influence the clinical performance of restorations in non-carious cervical lesions after 1 year. PMID:25298641

  15. A Neat Trick Using Oxalic Acid Dihydrate and Potassium Permanganate and Other Experiments with Small Organic Amine or Oxygenated Compounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelland, Malcolm A.

    2011-01-01

    Solid potassium permanganate (KMnO[subscript 4]) is shown to react in a variety of ways with small organic amines or oxygenated compounds depending on whether they are liquids or solids and whether water is present. In particular, its reaction with solid oxalic acid dihydrate can be initiated by the moisture in one's breath, making an intriguing…

  16. Improved Thermoelectric Properties of PEDOT:PSS Nanofilms Treated with Oxalic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Congcong; Shi, Hui; Xu, Jingkun; Jiang, Qinglin; Song, Haijun; Zhu, Zhengyou

    2015-06-01

    Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrenesulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) nanofilms were prepared by a simple spin-coating method. The thermoelectric properties of PEDOT:PSS nanofilms were improved by treatment with different concentrations of oxalic acid at 140°C. The electrical conductivity of PEDOT:PSS nanofilms can be improved from 0.48 to over 800 S cm-1, that is, by a factor of more than 1600 higher than for untreated PEDOT:PSS films. The Seebeck coefficient of the PEDOT:PSS nanofilms decreases slightly and the electrical conductivity increases. The maximum power factor of PEDOT:PSS nanofilms is up to 6.96 μW m-1 K-2. Atomic force microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were conducted to characterize the PEDOT:PSS nanofilms.

  17. Self-Ordered Nanoporous Alumina Templates Formed by Anodization of Aluminum in Oxalic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vida-Simiti, Ioan; Nemes, Dorel; Jumate, Nicolaie; Thalmaier, Gyorgy; Sechel, Niculina

    2012-10-01

    Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes with highly ordered nanopores serve as ideal templates for the formation of various nanostructured materials. The procedure of the template preparation is based on a two-step self-organized anodization of aluminum. In the current study, AAO templates were fabricated in 0.3 M oxalic acid under the anodizing potential range of 30-60 V at an electrolyte temperature of ~5°C. The AAO templates were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and differential thermal analysis. The as obtained layers are amorphous; the mean pore size is between 40 nm and 75 nm and increases with the increase of the anodization potential. Well-defined pores across the whole aluminum template, a pore density of ~1010 pores/cm2, and a tendency to form a porous structure with hexagonal symmetry were observed.

  18. Suppression of Growth Rate of Colony-Associated Fungi by High Fructose Corn Syrup Feeding Supplement, Formic Acid, and Oxalic Acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Select colony-associated fungi (bee isolates). Absidia sp., Ascosphaera apis, Aspergillus flavus, Fusarium sp., Penicillium glabrum, Mucor sp., showed a 40% reduction in radial growth rate with formic acid, a 28% reduction with oxalic acid, and a 15% reduction with fructose and high fructose corn sy...

  19. Improvement of the fermentability of oxalic acid hydrolysates by detoxification using electrodialysis and adsorption.

    PubMed

    Jeong, So-Yeon; Trinh, Ly Thi Phi; Lee, Hong-Joo; Lee, Jae-Won

    2014-01-01

    A two-step detoxification process consisting of electrodialysis and adsorption was performed to improve the fermentability of oxalic acid hydrolysates. The constituents of the hydrolysate differed significantly between mixed hardwood and softwood. Acetic acid and furfural concentrations were high in the mixed hardwood, whereas 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) concentration was relatively low compared with that of the mixed softwood. The removal efficiency of acetic acid reached 100% by electrodialysis (ED) process in both hydrolysates, while those of furfural and HMF showed very low, due to non-ionizable properties. Most of the remaining inhibitors were removed by XAD-4 resin. In the mixed hardwood hydrolysate without removal of the inhibitors, ethanol fermentation was not completed. Meanwhile, both ED-treated hydrolysates successfully produced ethanol with 0.08 and 0.15 g/Lh ethanol productivity, respectively. The maximum ethanol productivity was attained after fermentation with 0.27 and 0.35 g/Lh of detoxified hydrolysates, which were treated by ED, followed by XAD-4 resin. PMID:24321607

  20. Solubility and dissolution kinetics of calcium oxalate renal calculi in solutions containing L-arginine: In-vitro experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassova, S.

    2010-06-01

    The kinetics of dissolution of calcium oxalate (CaOX) calculi in physiological solutions containing L-arginine at different concentrations were studied using the change in the Archimedean weight of samples immersed in the solution. It was faound that arginine, which is a normal constituent of human urine, acts at increased concentrations as a dissolving agent with respect to CaOX calculi. The possible effect of L-arginine as a natural regulator of CaOX supersaturation and crystalization in human urine is also disscused.

  1. Cooperativity Assisted Shortening of Hydrogen Bonds in Crystalline Oxalic Acid Dihydrate: DFT and NBO Model Studies.

    PubMed

    Stare, Jernej; Hadži, Dušan

    2014-04-01

    The distance of ∼2.49 Å separating the carboxylic OH oxygen from the water oxygen atom in the α-polymorph of crystalline oxalic acid dihydrate is by ∼0.1 Å shorter than the average distance in carboxylic acid monohydrates. It is also by ∼0.2 Å shorter than the corresponding distance presently calculated for the heterotrimer consisting of one acid and two water molecules. The large difference between RO···O in the heterotrimer and in the crystal is attributed to the cooperative effect in the latter; this is supported by calculations carried out on clusters constituted of an increasing number of acid and water molecules. The present DFT calculations with geometry optimization include seven isolated model clusters, the largest of which contains five acid and eight water molecules. The RO···O of the short hydrogen bond shortens progressively with increasing the number of cluster constituents; in the largest cluster, it reaches 2.50 Å. This is remarkably close to both the experimental distance as well as to the distance obtained by the periodic DFT calculation. The electronic effects were studied by Natural Bond Orbital analysis, revealing an enhancement of hydrogen bonding on extending the network by increased polarization of the carbonyl group and by the increased delocalization interaction between the lone electron pair on the acceptor oxygen atom and the OH antibond orbital. The formation of circular motifs appears to be the most important factor in the cooperative shortening of the hydrogen bonds. In agreement with the measured hydrogen bond distances, inspection of the electron density reveals a notable difference in hydrogen bond shrinking tendency between the two known polymorphs of the title system. PMID:26580388

  2. Short term tolvaptan increases water intake and effectively decreases urinary calcium oxalate, calcium phosphate, and uric acid supersaturations

    PubMed Central

    Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Erickson, Stephen B.; Rule, Andrew D.; Enders, Felicity; Lieske, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Many patients cannot effectively increase water intake and urine volume to prevent urinary stones. Tolvaptan, a V2 receptor antagonist, blocks water reabsorption in the collecting duct and should reduce urinary supersaturation (SS) of stone forming solutes, but this has never been proven. Materials and Methods We conducted a double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study in 21 adult calcium urinary stone formers stratified as majority calcium oxalate(CaOx, n=10) or calcium phosphate(CaP, n=11). Patients received tolvaptan 45 mg/day or placebo for 1 week, followed by a washout week and crossover to tolvaptan or placebo for week 3. A 24h urines was collected at the end of weeks 1 and 3. Results Tolvaptan vs. placebo decreased urinary osmolality (204±96 vs 529±213 mOsm/kg, P<0.001) and increased urinary volume (4.8±2.9 vs 1.8±0.9 L, P<0.001). The majority of urinary solute excretion rates including sodium and calcium did not significantly change, although oxalate secretion slightly increased (23±8 to 15±8 mg/24h, P = 0.009). Urinary CaOx SS (−0.01±1.14 vs 0.95±0.87 DG, P<0.001), CaP SS (−1.66±1.17 vs −0.13±1.02 DG, P<0.001) and Uric Acid SS (−2.05±4.05 vs −5.24±3.12 DG, P=0.04) all dramatically decreased. Effects did not differ between CaOx and CaP groups (P>0.05 for all interactions). Conclusions Tolvaptan increases urine volume and decreases urinary SS in calcium stone formers. Further study is needed to determine if long term use of V2 receptor antagonists results in fewer stone events. PMID:26598423

  3. Non-enzymatic oxalic acid sensor using platinum nanoparticles modified on graphene nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaomei; Cai, Zhixiong; Huang, Zhiyong; Oyama, Munetaka; Jiang, Yaqi; Chen, Xi

    2013-06-01

    An enzyme-free oxalic acid (OA) electrochemical sensor was assembled using a platinum nanoparticle-loaded graphene nanosheets (PtNPGNs)-modified electrode. The PtNPGNs, with a high yield of PtNPs dispersed on the graphene nanosheets, were successfully achieved by a green, rapid, one-step and template-free method. The resulting PtNPGNs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and an X-ray diffraction technique. Electrochemical oxidation of OA on the PtNPGNs-modified electrode was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry methods. Based on the results, the modified electrode exhibited high electrochemical activity with well-defined peaks of OA oxidation and a notably decreased overpotential compared to the bare or even the GNs-modified electrode. Under optimized conditions, a good linear response was observed for the concentration of OA and its current response was in the range of 0.1-15 mM and 15-50 mM with a detection limit (S/N = 3) of 10 μM. Furthermore, the electrochemical sensor presented good characteristics in terms of stability and reproducibility, promising the applicability of the sensor in practical analysis.An enzyme-free oxalic acid (OA) electrochemical sensor was assembled using a platinum nanoparticle-loaded graphene nanosheets (PtNPGNs)-modified electrode. The PtNPGNs, with a high yield of PtNPs dispersed on the graphene nanosheets, were successfully achieved by a green, rapid, one-step and template-free method. The resulting PtNPGNs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and an X-ray diffraction technique. Electrochemical oxidation of OA on the PtNPGNs-modified electrode was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry methods. Based on the results, the modified

  4. A growth mechanism of porous film formed on Al in 0.6 M oxalic acid electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Han, Seong Ho; Kim, Hyoung Chan

    2012-04-01

    Understanding of mechanism of porous film formation is of fundamental importance for anodizing in general because, the onset of pore initiation terminates the barrier film growth process over the macroscopic metal surface. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain pore formation. They include direct injection of aluminum ions into electrolyte and a field-assisted dissolution mechanism. High-resolution scanning electron microscopy of anodized surfaces and direct TEM of ion beam thinned films and ultrarmicrotomed film sections have been employed to gain further insight into the mechanism of initial porous film growth in 0.6 M oxalic acid. From detailed examination of the behavior of the xenon-tagged layer in the film during pore initiation and development in oxalic acid, the film structure of the barrier layer is found to be unstable during pore initiation and the instability of the film structure is possibly related to the field-assisted structure modification process. PMID:22849190

  5. Effects of acid-base variables and the role of carbonic anhydrase on oxalate secretion by the mouse intestine in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Whittamore, Jonathan M; Frost, Susan C; Hatch, Marguerite

    2015-01-01

    Hyperoxaluria is a major risk factor for calcium oxalate kidney stones and the intestine is recognized as an important extra-renal pathway for eliminating oxalate. The membrane-bound chloride/bicarbonate (Cl−/) exchangers are involved in the transcellular movement of oxalate, but little is understood about how they might be regulated. , CO2, and pH are established modulators of intestinal NaCl cotransport, involving Na+/H+ and Cl−/ exchange, but their influence on oxalate transport is unknown. Measuring 14C-oxalate and 36Cl fluxes across isolated, short-circuited segments of the mouse distal ileum and distal colon we examined the role of these acid-base variables and carbonic anhydrase (CA) in oxalate and Cl− transport. In standard buffer both segments performed net oxalate secretion (and Cl− absorption), but only the colon, and the secretory pathway were responsive to and CO2. Ethoxzolamide abolished net oxalate secretion by the distal colon, and when used in tandem with an impermeant CA inhibitor, signaled an intracellular CA isozyme was required for secretion. There was a clear dependence on as their removal eliminated secretion, while at 42 mmol/L was also decreased and eradicated. Independent of pH, raising Pco2 from 28 to 64 mmHg acutely stimulated net oxalate secretion 41%. In summary, oxalate secretion by the distal colon was dependent on , CA and specifically modulated by CO2, whereas the ileum was remarkably unresponsive. These findings highlight the distinct segmental heterogeneity along the intestine, providing new insights into the oxalate transport mechanism and how it might be regulated. PMID:25716924

  6. Esophageal mucosa exfoliation induced by oxalic acid poisoning: A case report

    PubMed Central

    WANG, JIERU; KAN, BAOTIAN; JIAN, XIANGDONG; WU, XIAOPENG; YU, GUANCAI; SUN, JING

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the case of a 44-year-old woman with oral oxalic acid poisoning. As the illness progressed, the patient exhibited severe metabolic acidosis, large-area esophageal mucosa injury and acute kidney injury, which required dialysis. A guide wire slipped out of position during the process of hemodialysis and moved back and forth in the veins, but was removed successfully by interventional endovascular treatment. However, the patient's esophageal mucosa exfoliated, which lead to severe benign esophageal stenosis and dysphagia. Balloon distention was conducted twice in the upper digestive tract using X-ray location in combination with a dumb-bell bladder and interventional wire. The patient exhibited convulsions, shock, embolism and loss of consciousness while undergoing the second balloon distention procedure. Following symptomatic treatment, the patient eventually remained in a stable condition, the digestive tract expansion procedure was not resumed and a jejunostomy was performed in order to facilitate enteral nutrition, which was administered via the jejunum and had little stimulatory effect on the pancreas. Following various treatments, the patient's condition improved markedly, with renal function returning to normal. PMID:26889241

  7. Fermentation parameter optimization of microbial oxalic acid production from cashew apple juice.

    PubMed

    Betiku, Eriola; Emeko, Harrison A; Solomon, Bamidele O

    2016-02-01

    The potential of cashew apple juice (CAJ) as a carbon source for oxalic acid (OA) production via fermentation process was investigated in this study. The effects and interactions of CAJ concentration, time, pH, NaNO3 concentration and methanol concentration on OA production were determined in a central composite design (CCD) and the process was modelled and optimized using response surface methodology (RSM). The results showed that OA fermentation can be described significantly (p < 0.05) by a quadratic model giving regression coefficient (R (2)) of 0.9964. NaNO3 concentration was the most significant positive variable while methanol was not a significant variable. A maximum OA concentration of 122.68 g/l could be obtained using the optimum levels of CAJ of 150.0 g/l, pH of 5.4, time of 7.31 days, NaNO3 of 2 g/l and methanol of 1% volume. The production of OA was found to increase from 106.75 to 122.68 g/l using the statistically design optimization. This study revealed that CAJ could serve as an inexpensive and abundant feedstock for fermentative OA production, the resulting model could be used in the design of a typical pilot plant for a scale up production. PMID:27441258

  8. Comparison of hot hydroxylamine hydrochloride and oxalic acid leaching of stream sediment and coated rock samples as anomaly enhancement techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Filipek, L.H.; Chao, T.T.; Theobald, P.K., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A hot hydroxylamine hydrochloride (H-Hxl) extraction in 25% acetic acid is compared with the commonly used oxalic acid extraction as a method of anomaly enhancement for Cu and Zn in samples from two very different metal deposits and climatic environments. Results obtained on minus-80-mesh stream sediments from an area near the Magruder massive sulfide deposit in Lincoln County, Georgia, where the climate is humid subtropical, indicate that H-Hxl enhances the anomaly for Cu by a factor of 2 and for Zn by a factor of 1.5, compared to the oxalic method. Analyses of Fe oxide-coated rock samples from outcrops overlying the North Silver Bell porphyry copper deposit near Tucson, Arizona, where the climate is semi-arid to arid, indicate that both techniques effectively outline the zones of hydrothermal alteration. The H-Hxl extraction can also perform well in high-carbonate or high-clay environments, where other workers have suggested that oxalic acid is not very effective. Therefore, the H-Hxl method is recommended for general exploration use. ?? 1982.

  9. An improved thermodynamic model for the complexation of trivalent actinides and lanthanide with oxalic acid valid to high ionic strength.

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xiong, Yongliang; Thakur, Punam; Borkowski, Marian

    2015-07-30

    The dissociation constants of oxalic acid (Ox), and the stability constants of Am3+, Cm3+ and Eu3+ with Ox2– have been determined at 25 °C, over a range of concentration varying from 0.1 to 6.60 m NaClO4 using potentiometric titration and extraction techniques, respectively. The experimental data support the formation of complexes, M(Ox)n3 – 2n, where (M = Am3+, Cm3+ and Eu3+ and n = 1 and 2). The dissociation constant and the stability constant values measured as a function of NaClO4 concentration were used to estimate the Pitzer parameters for the respective interactions of Am3+, Cm3+ and Eu3+ with Ox.more » Furthermore, the stability constants data of Am3+ –Ox measured in NaClO4 and in NaCl solutions from the literature were simultaneously fitted in order to refine the existing actinide–oxalate complexation model that can be used universally in the safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal. The thermodynamic stability constant: log β0101 = 6.30 ± 0.06 and log β0102 = 10.84 ± 0.06 for Am3+ was obtained by simultaneously fitting data in NaCl and NaClO4 media. Additionally, log β0101 = 6.72 ± 0.08 and log β0102 = 11.05 ± 0.09 for the Cm3+ and log β0101 = 6.67 ± 0.08 and log β0102 = 11.15 ± 0.09 for the Eu3+ were calculated by extrapolation of data to zero ionic strength in NaClO4 medium only. For all stability constants, the Pitzer model gives an excellent representation of the data using interaction parameters β(0), β(1), and CΦ determined in this work. The thermodynamic model developed in this work will be useful in accurately modeling the potential solubility of trivalent actinides and early lanthanides to ionic strength of 6.60 m in low temperature environments in the presence of Ox. Furthermore, the work is also applicable to the accurate modeling transport of rare earth elements in various environments under the surface conditions.« less

  10. Thermodynamical and structural study of protactinium(V) oxalate complexes in solution.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Mickaël; Hamadi, Séna; Le Naour, Claire; Roques, Jérôme; Jeanson, Aurélie; Den Auwer, Christophe; Moisy, Philippe; Topin, Sylvain; Aupiais, Jean; Hennig, Christoph; Di Giandomenico, Maria-Vita

    2010-11-01

    The complexation of protactinium(V) by oxalate was studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), density functional theory (DFT) calculations, capillary electrophoresis coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (CE-ICP-MS) and solvent extraction. XAS measurements showed unambiguously the presence of a short single oxo-bond, and the deduced structure agrees with theoretical calculations. CE-ICP-MS results indicated the formation of a highly charged anionic complex. The formation constants of PaO(C(2)O(4))(+), PaO(C(2)O(4))(2)(-), and PaO(C(2)O(4))(3)(3-) were determined from solvent extraction data by using protactinium at tracer scale (C(Pa) < 10(-10) M). Complexation reactions of Pa(V) with oxalate were found to be exothermic with relatively high positive entropic variation. PMID:20883035

  11. Contrasting Effects of Water on the Barriers to Decarboxylation of Two Oxalic Acid Monohydrates: A Combined Rotational Spectroscopic and Ab Initio Study.

    PubMed

    Schnitzler, Elijah G; Badran, Courtenay; Jäger, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Using rotational spectroscopy, we have observed two isomers of the monohydrate of oxalic acid, the most abundant dicarboxylic acid in the atmosphere. In the lowest-energy isomer, water hydrogen-bonds to both carboxylic acid groups, and the barrier to decarboxylation decreases. In the second isomer, water bonds to only one carboxylic acid group, and the barrier increases. Though the lower barrier in the former is not unequivocal evidence that water acts as a photocatalyst, the higher barrier in the latter indicates that water acts as an inhibitor in this topology. Oxalic acid is unique among dicarboxylic acids: for the higher homologues calculated, the inhibiting topology of the monohydrate is lowest in energy and most abundant under atmospheric conditions. Consequently, oxalic acid is the only dicarboxylic acid for which single-water catalysis of overtone-induced decarboxylation in the atmosphere is plausible. PMID:26963633

  12. Efficient electron-induced removal of oxalate ions and formation of copper nanoparticles from copper(II) oxalate precursor layers.

    PubMed

    Rückriem, Kai; Grotheer, Sarah; Vieker, Henning; Penner, Paul; Beyer, André; Gölzhäuser, Armin; Swiderek, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Copper(II) oxalate grown on carboxy-terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAM) using a step-by-step approach was used as precursor for the electron-induced synthesis of surface-supported copper nanoparticles. The precursor material was deposited by dipping the surfaces alternately in ethanolic solutions of copper(II) acetate and oxalic acid with intermediate thorough rinsing steps. The deposition of copper(II) oxalate and the efficient electron-induced removal of the oxalate ions was monitored by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). Helium ion microscopy (HIM) reveals the formation of spherical nanoparticles with well-defined size and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirms their metallic nature. Continued irradiation after depletion of oxalate does not lead to further particle growth giving evidence that nanoparticle formation is primarily controlled by the available amount of precursor. PMID:27547602

  13. Efficient electron-induced removal of oxalate ions and formation of copper nanoparticles from copper(II) oxalate precursor layers

    PubMed Central

    Rückriem, Kai; Grotheer, Sarah; Vieker, Henning; Penner, Paul; Beyer, André; Gölzhäuser, Armin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Copper(II) oxalate grown on carboxy-terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAM) using a step-by-step approach was used as precursor for the electron-induced synthesis of surface-supported copper nanoparticles. The precursor material was deposited by dipping the surfaces alternately in ethanolic solutions of copper(II) acetate and oxalic acid with intermediate thorough rinsing steps. The deposition of copper(II) oxalate and the efficient electron-induced removal of the oxalate ions was monitored by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). Helium ion microscopy (HIM) reveals the formation of spherical nanoparticles with well-defined size and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirms their metallic nature. Continued irradiation after depletion of oxalate does not lead to further particle growth giving evidence that nanoparticle formation is primarily controlled by the available amount of precursor. PMID:27547602

  14. ACTUAL-WASTE TESTS OF ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING FOR RETRIEVAL OF SRS HLW SLUDGE TANK HEELS AND DECOMPOSITION OF OXALIC ACID

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, C.; King, W.; Ketusky, E.

    2012-01-12

    Savannah River National Laboratory conducted a series of tests on the Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process using actual Savannah River Site waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. Testing involved sludge dissolution with 2 wt% oxalic acid, the decomposition of the oxalates by ozonolysis (with and without the aid of ultraviolet light), the evaporation of water from the product, and tracking the concentrations of key components throughout the process. During ECC actual waste testing, the process was successful in decomposing oxalate to below the target levels without causing substantial physical or chemical changes in the product sludge.

  15. Method to Determine Oxalate in High-Level Sludge by Ion Chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, C.J.

    2002-12-19

    The Sludge Batch 3 macrobatch feed to the DWPF is expected to contain a relatively high concentration of oxalate. A simple acid addition at room temperature has been shown to be in high-level sludge. This sample preparation requires only about five minutes and yields solutions suitable for oxalate determinations by ion chromatography.

  16. Literature review for oxalate oxidation processes and plutonium oxalate solubility

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C. A.

    2015-10-01

    A literature review of oxalate oxidation processes finds that manganese(II)-catalyzed nitric acid oxidation of oxalate in precipitate filtrate is a viable and well-documented process. The process has been operated on the large scale at Savannah River in the past, including oxidation of 20 tons of oxalic acid in F-Canyon. Research data under a variety of conditions show the process to be robust. This process is recommended for oxalate destruction in H-Canyon in the upcoming program to produce feed for the MOX facility. Prevention of plutonium oxalate precipitation in filtrate can be achieved by concentrated nitric acid/ferric nitrate sequestration of oxalate. Organic complexants do not appear practical to sequester plutonium. Testing is proposed to confirm the literature and calculation findings of this review at projected operating conditions for the upcoming campaign.

  17. Oxalic acid and diacylglycerol 36:3 are cross-species markers of sleep debt

    PubMed Central

    Weljie, Aalim M.; Meerlo, Peter; Goel, Namni; Sengupta, Arjun; Kayser, Matthew S.; Abel, Ted; Birnbaum, Morris J.; Dinges, David F.; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Sleep is an essential biological process that is thought to have a critical role in metabolic regulation. In humans, reduced sleep duration has been associated with risk for metabolic disorders, including weight gain, diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease. However, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying effects of sleep loss is only in its nascent stages. In this study we used rat and human models to simulate modern-day conditions of restricted sleep and addressed cross-species consequences via comprehensive metabolite profiling. Serum from sleep-restricted rats was analyzed using polar and nonpolar methods in two independent datasets (n = 10 per study, 3,380 measured features, 407 identified). A total of 38 features were changed across independent experiments, with the majority classified as lipids (18 from 28 identified). In a parallel human study, 92 metabolites were identified as potentially significant, with the majority also classified as lipids (32 of 37 identified). Intriguingly, two metabolites, oxalic acid and diacylglycerol 36:3, were robustly and quantitatively reduced in both species following sleep restriction, and recovered to near baseline levels after sleep restriction (P < 0.05, false-discovery rate < 0.2). Elevated phospholipids were also noted after sleep restriction in both species, as well as metabolites associated with an oxidizing environment. In addition, polar metabolites reflective of neurotransmitters, vitamin B3, and gut metabolism were elevated in sleep-restricted humans. These results are consistent with induction of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and disruptions of the circadian clock. The findings provide a potential link between known pathologies of reduced sleep duration and metabolic dysfunction, and potential biomarkers for sleep loss. PMID:25675494

  18. Oxalic acid and diacylglycerol 36:3 are cross-species markers of sleep debt.

    PubMed

    Weljie, Aalim M; Meerlo, Peter; Goel, Namni; Sengupta, Arjun; Kayser, Matthew S; Abel, Ted; Birnbaum, Morris J; Dinges, David F; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-02-24

    Sleep is an essential biological process that is thought to have a critical role in metabolic regulation. In humans, reduced sleep duration has been associated with risk for metabolic disorders, including weight gain, diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease. However, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying effects of sleep loss is only in its nascent stages. In this study we used rat and human models to simulate modern-day conditions of restricted sleep and addressed cross-species consequences via comprehensive metabolite profiling. Serum from sleep-restricted rats was analyzed using polar and nonpolar methods in two independent datasets (n = 10 per study, 3,380 measured features, 407 identified). A total of 38 features were changed across independent experiments, with the majority classified as lipids (18 from 28 identified). In a parallel human study, 92 metabolites were identified as potentially significant, with the majority also classified as lipids (32 of 37 identified). Intriguingly, two metabolites, oxalic acid and diacylglycerol 36:3, were robustly and quantitatively reduced in both species following sleep restriction, and recovered to near baseline levels after sleep restriction (P < 0.05, false-discovery rate < 0.2). Elevated phospholipids were also noted after sleep restriction in both species, as well as metabolites associated with an oxidizing environment. In addition, polar metabolites reflective of neurotransmitters, vitamin B3, and gut metabolism were elevated in sleep-restricted humans. These results are consistent with induction of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and disruptions of the circadian clock. The findings provide a potential link between known pathologies of reduced sleep duration and metabolic dysfunction, and potential biomarkers for sleep loss. PMID:25675494

  19. Evidence for 13-carbon enrichment in oxalic acid via iron catalyzed photolysis in aqueous phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavuluri, Chandra Mouli; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2012-02-01

    To investigate the effect of photochemical aging on the stable carbon isotopic ratio (δ13C) of oxalic acid (OxA), a dominant organic species in atmospheric aerosols, we conducted a laboratory photolysis of OxA under H2O2-Fe3+(Fe2+)-UV system in aqueous phase and measured δ13C of remaining OxA. Our results showed that a significant photolysis of OxA occurred with OH radical but the isotopic fractionation of OxA was insignificant. In contrast, in the presence of Fe3+ (Fe2+), we found a significant enrichment of 13C in remaining OxA. We also found that kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of OxA largely depends on photochemical age (irradiation time) and concentration ratios of OxA to iron; 3.20 ± 0.49‰ (2.18 ± 1.18‰) and 21.62 ± 5.41‰ in 90 min and 180 min irradiation, in which OxA and Fe3+ (Fe2+) ratios were 50:1 and 200:1, respectively. The enrichment of 13C in remaining OxA was more significant during the photolysis catalyzed by Fe3+ (7‰) than by Fe2+ (3‰) in 90 min irradiation when OxA and iron ratios are the same (50:1). This study provides a laboratory evidence for the isotopic enrichment of 13C in OxA with photochemical aging. This approach is useful for better interpretation of atmospheric isotopic measurements in terms of the extent of atmospheric processing of aerosols.

  20. Ascorbate metabolism and the developmental demand for tartaric and oxalic acids in ripening grape berries

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Fresh fruits are well accepted as a good source of the dietary antioxidant ascorbic acid (Asc, Vitamin C). However, fruits such as grapes do not accumulate exceptionally high quantities of Asc. Grapes, unlike most other cultivated fruits do however use Asc as a precursor for the synthesis of both oxalic (OA) and tartaric acids (TA). TA is a commercially important product in the wine industry and due to its acidifying effect on crushed juice it can influence the organoleptic properties of the wine. Despite the interest in Asc accumulation in fruits, little is known about the mechanisms whereby Asc concentration is regulated. The purpose of this study was to gain insights into Asc metabolism in wine grapes (Vitis vinifera c.v. Shiraz.) and thus ascertain whether the developmental demand for TA and OA synthesis influences Asc accumulation in the berry. Results We provide evidence for developmentally differentiated up-regulation of Asc biosynthetic pathways and subsequent fluctuations in Asc, TA and OA accumulation. Rapid accumulation of Asc and a low Asc to dehydroascorbate (DHA) ratio in young berries was co-ordinated with up-regulation of three of the primary Asc biosynthetic (Smirnoff-Wheeler) pathway genes. Immature berries synthesised Asc in-situ from the primary pathway precursors D-mannose and L-galactose. Immature berries also accumulated TA in early berry development in co-ordination with up-regulation of a TA biosynthetic gene. In contrast, ripe berries have up-regulated expression of the alternative Asc biosynthetic pathway gene D-galacturonic acid reductase with only residual expression of Smirnoff-Wheeler Asc biosynthetic pathway genes and of the TA biosynthetic gene. The ripening phase was further associated with up-regulation of Asc recycling genes, a secondary phase of increased accumulation of Asc and an increase in the Asc to DHA ratio. Conclusion We demonstrate strong developmental regulation of Asc biosynthetic, recycling and catabolic

  1. Recovery of zinc and manganese, and other metals (Fe, Cu, Ni, Co, Cd, Cr, Na, K) from Zn-MnO2 and Zn-C waste batteries: Hydroxyl and carbonate co-precipitation from solution after reducing acidic leaching with use of oxalic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobianowska-Turek, A.; Szczepaniak, W.; Maciejewski, P.; Gawlik-Kobylińska, M.

    2016-09-01

    The article discusses the current situation of the spent batteries and portable accumulators management. It reviews recycling technologies of the spent batteries and portable accumulators which are used in the manufacturing installations in the world. Also, it presents the authors' research results on the reductive acidic leaching of waste material of the zinc-carbon batteries (Zn-C) and zinc-manganese batteries (alkaline Zn-MnO2) delivered by a company dealing with mechanical treatment of this type of waste stream. The research data proved that the reductive acidic leaching (H2SO4 + C2H2O4) of the battery's black mass allows to recover 85.0% of zinc and 100% of manganese. Moreover, it was found that after the reductive acidic leaching it is possible to recover nearly 100% of manganese, iron, cadmium, and chromium, 98.0% of cobalt, 95.5% of zinc, and 85.0% of copper and nickel from the solution with carbonate method. On the basis of the results, it is possible to assume that the carbonate method can be used for the preparation of manganese-zinc ferrite.

  2. Enhanced efficiency of cadmium removal by Boehmeria nivea (L.) Gaud. in the presence of exogenous citric and oxalic acids.

    PubMed

    Li, Huaying; Liu, Yunguo; Zeng, Guangming; Zhou, Lu; Wang, Xin; Wang, Yaqin; Wang, Chunlin; Hu, Xinjiang; Xu, Weihua

    2014-12-01

    Boehmeria nivea (L.) Gaud. is a potential candidate for the remediation of Cd contaminated sites. The present investigation aims to explore Cd tolerance threshold and to quickly identify the role of exogenous organic acids in Cd uptake and abiotic metal stress damage. Elevated Cd levels (0-10mg/L) resulted in an obvious rise in Cd accumulation, ranging from 268.0 to 374.4 in root and 25.2 to 41.2mg/kg dry weight in shoot, respectively. Citric acid at 1.5 mmol/L significantly facilitated Cd uptake by 26.7% in root and by 1-fold in shoot, respectively. Cd translocation efficiency from root to shoot was improved by a maximum of 66.4% under 3 mmol/L of oxalic acid. Citric acid exhibited more prominent mitigating effect than oxalic acid due to its stronger ligand affinity for chelating with metal and avoiding the toxicity injury of free Cd ions more efficiently. The present work provides a potential strategy for efficient Cd remediation with B. nivea. PMID:25499499

  3. Adsorption and photodegradation of methylene blue by iron oxide impregnated on granular activated carbons in an oxalate solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadirova, Zukhra C.; Katsumata, Ken-ichi; Isobe, Toshihiro; Matsushita, Nobuhiro; Nakajima, Akira; Okada, Kiyoshi

    2013-11-01

    The photocatalytic adsorbents BAU-OA, BAU-CL and BAU-HA with varying iron oxide content (9-10 mass%) were prepared by heat treatment at 250 °C from commercial activated carbon (BAU) impregnated with iron oxalate, chloride, tris-benzohydroxamate, respectively. The XRD patterns showed amorphous structure in the BAU-CL sample (SBET 50 m2/g) and low crystallinity (as FeOOH and Fe2O3 phases) in the BAU-HA and BAU-OA samples (SBET 4 and 111 m2/g, respectively). The methylene blue adsorption capacities was decreased in order of BAU-OA < BAU-CL < BAU-HA sample and the adsorption followed Langmuir model. The apparent MB photodegradation rate constant (kapp) was increased in same order BAU-HA < BAU-CL < BAU-OA under the standard experimental conditions (initial MB concentrations 0.015-0.025 mM; sample content - 10 mg/l; initial oxalic acid concentration - 0.43 mM; pH 3-4; UV illumination). The process included high efficiency combination of adsorption, heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis under UV and solar lights illumination without addition of hydrogen peroxide. The detoxification of water sample containing organic dyes was confirmed after combined sorption-photocatalytic treatment.

  4. Acidity of frozen electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Carmen; Boxe, C S; Guzman, M I; Colussi, A J; Hoffmann, M R

    2006-04-20

    Ice is selectively intolerant to impurities. A preponderance of implanted anions or cations generates electrical imbalances in ice grown from electrolyte solutions. Since the excess charges are ultimately neutralized via interfacial (H(+)/HO(-)) transport, the acidity of the unfrozen portion can change significantly and permanently. This insufficiently recognized phenomenon should critically affect rates and equilibria in frozen media. Here we report the effective (19)F NMR chemical shift of 3-fluorobenzoic acid as in situ probe of the acidity of extensively frozen electrolyte solutions. The sign and magnitude of the acidity changes associated with freezing are largely determined by specific ion combinations, but depend also on solute concentration and/or the extent of supercooling. NaCl solutions become more basic, those of (NH(4))(2)SO(4) or Na(2)SO(4) become more acidic, while solutions of the 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid zwitterion barely change their acidity upon freezing. We discuss how acidity scales based on solid-state NMR measurements could be used to assess the degree of ionization of weak acids and bases in frozen media. PMID:16610849

  5. Pre-harvest application of oxalic acid increases quality and resistance to Penicillium expansum in kiwifruit during postharvest storage.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuyan; Yu, Jie; Brecht, Jeffrey K; Jiang, Tianjia; Zheng, Xiaolin

    2016-01-01

    Kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa cv. Bruno) fruits were sprayed with 5mM oxalic acid (OA) at 130, 137, and 144 days after full blossom, and then harvested at commercial maturity [soluble solid content (SSC) around 10.0%] and stored at room temperature (20 ± 1 °C). Pre-harvest application of OA led to fruit with higher ascorbic acid content at harvest, slowed the decreases in fruit firmness and ascorbic acid content and increase in SSC during storage, and also decreased the natural disease incidence, lesion diameter, and patulin accumulation in fruit inoculated with Penicillium expansum, indicating that the OA treatment increased quality and induced disease resistance in kiwifruit. It was suggested that the increase in activities of defense-related enzymes and in levels of substances related to disease resistance might collectively contribute to resistance in kiwifruit against fungi such as P. expansum in storage. PMID:26213007

  6. An improved thermodynamic model for the complexation of trivalent actinides and lanthanide with oxalic acid valid to high ionic strength.

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Yongliang; Thakur, Punam; Borkowski, Marian

    2015-07-30

    The dissociation constants of oxalic acid (Ox), and the stability constants of Am3+, Cm3+ and Eu3+ with Ox2– have been determined at 25 °C, over a range of concentration varying from 0.1 to 6.60 m NaClO4 using potentiometric titration and extraction techniques, respectively. The experimental data support the formation of complexes, M(Ox)n3 – 2n, where (M = Am3+, Cm3+ and Eu3+ and n = 1 and 2). The dissociation constant and the stability constant values measured as a function of NaClO4 concentration were used to estimate the Pitzer parameters for the respective interactions of Am3+, Cm3+ and Eu3+ with Ox. Furthermore, the stability constants data of Am3+ –Ox measured in NaClO4 and in NaCl solutions from the literature were simultaneously fitted in order to refine the existing actinide–oxalate complexation model that can be used universally in the safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal. The thermodynamic stability constant: log β0101 = 6.30 ± 0.06 and log β0102 = 10.84 ± 0.06 for Am3+ was obtained by simultaneously fitting data in NaCl and NaClO4 media. Additionally, log β0101 = 6.72 ± 0.08 and log β0102 = 11.05 ± 0.09 for the Cm3+ and log β0101 = 6.67 ± 0.08 and log β0102 = 11.15 ± 0.09 for the Eu3+ were calculated by extrapolation of data to zero ionic strength in NaClO4 medium only. For all stability constants, the Pitzer model gives an excellent representation of the data using interaction parameters β(0), β(1), and CΦ determined in this work. The thermodynamic model developed in this work will be useful in accurately modeling the potential solubility of trivalent

  7. Biocontrol agents-mediated suppression of oxalic acid induced cell death during Sclerotinia sclerotiorum-pea interaction.

    PubMed

    Jain, Akansha; Singh, Akanksha; Singh, Surendra; Sarma, Birinchi Kumar; Singh, Harikesh Bahadur

    2015-05-01

    Oxalic acid (OA) is an important pathogenic factor during early Sclerotinia sclerotiorum-host interaction and might work by reducing hydrogen peroxide production (H2 O2 ). In the present investigation, oxalic acid-induced cell death in pea was studied. Pea plants treated with biocontrol agents (BCAs) viz., Pseudomonas aeruginosa PJHU15, Bacillus subtilis BHHU100, and Trichoderma harzianum TNHU27 either singly and/or in consortium acted on S. sclerotiorum indirectly by enabling plants to inhibit the OA-mediated suppression of oxidative burst via induction of H2 O2 . Our results showed that BCA treated plants upon treatment with culture filtrate of the pathogen, conferred the resistance via. significantly decreasing relative cell death of pea against S. sclerotiorum compared to control plants without BCA treatment but treated with the culture filtrate of the pathogen. The results obtained from the present study indicate that the microbes especially in consortia play significant role in protection against S. sclerotiorum by modulating oxidative burst and partially enhancing tolerance by increasing the H2 O2 generation, which is otherwise suppressed by OA produced by the pathogen. PMID:24920251

  8. Synthesis and characterization of nanocrystalline nickel oxide using NaOH and oxalic acid as oxide sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathishkumar, K.; Shanmugam, N.; Kannadasan, N.; Cholan, S.; Viruthagiri, G.

    2014-04-01

    Precursors of nickel oxide (NiO) nanoparticles were synthesized through a simple chemical precipitation method by changing the oxide source used for the synthesis. The synthesized precursors were subjected to thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) to determine the temperature at which the precursors decompose into nickel oxide. The obtained results of TGA suggest that precursor NiO prepared using sodium hydroxide (NaOH) showed NiO formation at 600 °C, whereas, when oxalic acid was used as oxide source the formation of NiO took place at 400 °C. After calcinations of the precursors at respective temperatures, NiO nanocrystals have been harvested. The synthesized NiO powders were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) analysis. An FE-TEM image of NiO prepared using oxalic acid showed spherical and elliptical particles with sizes in the range of 15 nm. The Williamson-Hall (W-H) plots were drawn for the annealed products to study their lattice strain and crystallite size. The sizes of NiO nanocrystals obtained from W-H analysis are well correlated with sizes estimated using Scherrer’s formula. The relatively low saturation magnetization of NiO confirms its super paramagnetic behavior.

  9. Use of a ruthenium(III), iron(II), and nickel(II) hexacyanometallate-modified graphite electrode with immobilized oxalate oxidase for the determination of urinary oxalate.

    PubMed

    Milardović, S; Grabarić, Z; Rumenjak, V; Blau, N; Milosević, D

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the performance of a biosensor with an Ru(III), Ni(II), and Fe(II) hexacyanometallate-modified graphite electrode and immobilized oxalate oxidase for the determination of urinary oxalate. The addition of ruthenium enhances the electrochemical reversibility and chemical stability of the electrocrystallized layer and improves the sensitivity of the biosensor. Hydrogen peroxide, produced by the enzyme-catalyzed oxidation of oxalate, was measured at -50 mV vs an Hg Hg2CI2 3M KCl electrode in a solution of pH 3.6 succinic buffer, 0.1 M KCl, and 5.4mM ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. The linear concentration range for the determination of oxalate was 0.18-280 microM. The recoveries of added oxalate (10-35 microM) from aqueous solution ranged from 99.5 to 101.7%, whereas from urine samples without oxalate (or with a concentration of oxalate below the detection limit) the recoveries of added oxalate ranged from 91.4 to 106.6%. The oxalate in 24 h urine samples, taken during their daily routine from 35 infants and children, was measured and found to range from 0.6 to 121.7 mg/L. There were no interferences from uric acid, acetylsalicylic acid, and urea in the concentration range investigated, but paracetamol and ascorbic acid did interfere. A good correlation (R2 = 0.9242) was found between values obtained for oxalate in real urine samples by 2 laboratories, with the proposed biosensor and ion chromatography, respectively. PMID:11767164

  10. Selective dissolution of magnetic iron oxides in the acid-ammonium oxalate/ferrous iron extraction method-I. Synthetic samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oorschot, Ingeborg H. M.; Dekkers, Mark J.

    2001-06-01

    In soil magnetism, the magnetic parameters alone are not always sufficient to distinguish the lithogenic from the pedogenic magnetic fractions. Sequential extraction techniques have therefore been incorporated into magnetic studies to constrain the environmental interpretation. Here we report on the dissolution behaviour of magnetite and maghemite in the acid-ammonium oxalate method to see whether the method is suitable for specific dissolution of magnetic minerals from soils and sediments. To prevent changes in the extraction mechanism during the experiments (see Appendix A), we used an adapted version of the acid-ammonium oxalate (AAO) method, in which Fe2+ is added to the extraction solution prior to the experiment [the AAO-Fe(II) method]. The procedure was divided into several 30min extraction steps to check the dissolution progress. Synthetic samples containing a quartz matrix with 0.1wt per cent of iron oxides were extracted with the AAO-Fe(II) method. The iron oxides consisted of either magnetite or maghemite with grain sizes of <0.5µm (fine grained or SD/PSD) and <5µm (coarse grained or MD/PSD), or a 1:1 mixture of both minerals. Because only magnetite and maghemite were studied, the changes in magnetic characteristics could be monitored after each extraction step by analysis of the bulk susceptibility and hysteresis parameters measured at room temperature. The AAO-Fe(II) method preferentially dissolved the smaller iron oxides from the samples. For samples containing iron oxides with coarse grain size there is a preference for dissolving maghemite rather than magnetite. Extractions of the samples containing mixtures of two different grain sizes or with different mineralogy show that the method preferentially dissolves the smaller grains before attacking the coarse grains in the sample.

  11. Oxalic acid mediated synthesis of WO{sub 3}.H{sub 2}O nanoplates and self-assembled nanoflowers under mild conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Li Linzhi; Zhao Jingzhe; Wang Yi; Li Yunling; Ma Dechong; Zhao Yan; Hou Shengnan; Hao Xinli

    2011-07-15

    Tungsten oxide hydrate (WO{sub 3}.H{sub 2}O) nanoplates and flower-like assemblies were successfully synthesized via a simple aqueous method. The effects of reaction parameters in solution on the preparation were studied. Nanoplates and nanoflowers can be selectively prepared by changing the amount of H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}. In-situ assembly of nanoplates to nanoflowers was also proposed for the formation of assembled nanostructures. In addition, the reaction time and temperature have important effects on the sizes of the as-obtained samples. Crystal structure, morphology, and composition of final nanostructures were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Optical properties of the synthesized samples and the growth mechanism were studied by UV-vis detection. Degradation experiments of Rhodamine B (RhB) were also performed on samples of nanoplates and nanoflowers under visible light illumination. Nanoflower sample exhibited preferable photocatalytic property to nanoplate sample. - Graphical abstract: The oxalic acid has a key role for the structure of WO{sub 3}.H{sub 2}O evolution from plates to flowers and the dehydration process of WO{sub 3}.2H{sub 2}O to WO{sub 3}.H{sub 2}O. Highlights: > Tungsten oxides hydrate was synthesized via a simple aqueous method. > The size of WO{sub 3}.H{sub 2}O was controlled by the reaction time and temperature. > The assembly of WO{sub 3}.H{sub 2}O nanoplates to nanoflowers was achieved with higher H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}/Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4} ratio. > Oxalic acid has a key role in the dehydration process of WO{sub 3}.2H{sub 2}O to WO{sub 3}.H{sub 2}O.

  12. A comparative density functional theory study of electronic structure and optical properties of γ-aminobutyric acid and its cocrystals with oxalic and benzoic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva Filho, J. G.; Freire, V. N.; Caetano, E. W. S.; Ladeira, L. O.; Fulco, U. L.; Albuquerque, E. L.

    2013-11-01

    In this letter, we study the electronic structure and optical properties of the active medicinal component γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and its cocrystals with oxalic (OXA) and benzoic (BZA) acid by means of the density functional theory formalism. It is shown that the cocrystallization strongly weakens the zwitterionic character of the GABA molecule leading to striking differences among the electronic band structures and optical absorption spectra of the GABA crystal and GABA:OXA, GABA:BZA cocrystals, originating from distinct sets of hydrogen bonds. Calculated band widths and Δ-sol band gap estimates indicate that both GABA and GABA:OXA, GABA:BZA cocrystals are indirect gap insulators.

  13. Oxalic acid under adhesive restorations as a means to reduce dentin sensitivity: a four-month clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Barrientos, Claudia; Xaus, Gloria; Leighton, Catherine; Martin, Javier; Gordan, Valeria V; Moncada, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial was to evaluate the reduction of dentin sensitivity using an oxalate-based compound, placed under adhesive restorations, during a four-month period. One hundred three preoperatively sensitive teeth, on 36 patients aged 25-66 years (mean, 40.3±7), were included in the study. Group A (experimental) was treated with oxalic acid (BisBlock) before resin-based composite (RBC) restorations (n=52), and group B (control) was treated with distilled water before RBC restorations (n=51). The first tooth in each patient was randomly assigned to group A, and the second tooth received group B. Clinical evaluation as made by a thermal/evaporation test with an air syringe and measurement by visual analog scale (VAS) at baseline and four months after treatment. The results showed sensitivity reduction during the evaluation period (expressed in VAS values): group A, 7.6 to 0.8; group B, 7.3 to 2.6. We concluded from this study that both treatments reduced dentin sensitivity during the evaluation period, with group A showing significantly less dentin sensitivity after four months (p<0.05). PMID:21777095

  14. In vivo measurements of changes in pH triggered by oxalic acid in leaf tissue of transgenic oilseed rape.

    PubMed

    Zou, Qiu-Ju; Liu, Sheng-Yi; Dong, Xu-Yan; Bi, Yan-Hua; Cao, Yuan-Cheng; Xu, Qiao; Zhao, Yuan-Di; Chen, Hong

    2007-01-01

    Oxalic acid (OA), a non-host-specific toxin secreted by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum during pathogenesis, has been demonstrated to be a major phytotoxic and pathogenic factor. Oxalate oxidase (OXO) is an enzyme associated with the detoxification of OA, and hence the introduction of an OXO gene into oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) to break down OA may be an alternative way of increasing the resistance of the plant to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. In order to investigate the activation of OXO in transgenic oilseed rape, a convenient and accessible method was used to monitor changes in pH in response to stress induced by OA. The pH sensor, a platinum microcylinder electrode modified using polyaniline film, exhibited a linear response within the pH range from 3 to 7, with a Nernst response slope of 70 mV/pH at room temperature. The linear correlation coefficient was 0.9979. Changes induced by OA in the pH values of leaf tissue of different oilseed rape species from Brassica napus L. were monitored in real time in vivo using this electrode. The results clearly showed that the transgenic oilseed rape was more resistant to OA than non-transgenic oilseed rape. PMID:17623369

  15. Oxaloacetate acetylhydrolase gene mutants of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum do not accumulate oxalic acid, but do produce limited lesions on host plants.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaofei; Liberti, Daniele; Li, Moyi; Kim, Young-Tae; Hutchens, Andrew; Wilson, Ron; Rollins, Jeffrey A

    2015-08-01

    The oxaloacetate acetylhydrolase (OAH, EC 3.7.1.1)-encoding gene Ss-oah1 was cloned and functionally characterized from Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Ss-oah1 transcript accumulation mirrored oxalic acid (OA) accumulation with neutral pH induction dependent on the pH-responsive transcriptional regulator Ss-Pac1. Unlike previously characterized ultraviolet (UV)-induced oxalate-deficient mutants ('A' mutants) which retain the capacity to accumulate OA, gene deletion Δss-oah1 mutants did not accumulate OA in culture or during plant infection. This defect in OA accumulation was fully restored on reintroduction of the wild-type (WT) Ss-oah1 gene. The Δss-oah1 mutants were also deficient in compound appressorium and sclerotium development and exhibited a severe radial growth defect on medium buffered at neutral pH. On a variety of plant hosts, the Δss-oah1 mutants established very restricted lesions in which the infectious hyphae gradually lost viability. Cytological comparisons of WT and Δss-oah1 infections revealed low and no OA accumulation, respectively, in subcuticular hyphae. Both WT and mutant hyphae exhibited a transient association with viable host epidermal cells at the infection front. In summary, our experimental data establish a critical requirement for OAH activity in S. sclerotiorum OA biogenesis and pathogenesis, but also suggest that factors independent of OA contribute to the establishment of primary lesions. PMID:25285668

  16. Oxalate content of cereals and cereal products.

    PubMed

    Siener, Roswitha; Hönow, Ruth; Voss, Susanne; Seidler, Ana; Hesse, Albrecht

    2006-04-19

    Detailed knowledge of food oxalate content is of essential importance for dietary treatment of recurrent calcium oxalate urolithiasis. Dietary oxalate can contribute considerably to the amount of urinary oxalate excretion. Because cereal foods play an important role in daily nutrition, the soluble and total oxalate contents of various types of cereal grains, milling products, bread, pastries, and pasta were analyzed using an HPLC-enzyme-reactor method. A high total oxalate content (>50 mg/100 g) was found in whole grain wheat species Triticum durum (76.6 mg/100 g), Triticum sativum (71.2 mg/100 g), and Triticum aestivum (53.3 mg/100 g). Total oxalate content was comparably high in whole grain products of T. aestivum, that is, wheat flakes and flour, as well as in whole grain products of T. durum, that is, couscous, bulgur, and pasta. The highest oxalate content was demonstrated for wheat bran (457.4 mg/100 g). The higher oxalate content in whole grain than in refined grain cereals suggests that oxalic acid is primarily located in the outer layers of cereal grains. Cereals and cereal products contribute to the daily oxalate intake to a considerable extent. Vegetarian diets may contain high amounts of oxalate when whole grain wheat and wheat products are ingested. Recommendations for prevention of recurrence of calcium oxalate stone disease have to take into account the oxalate content of these foodstuffs. PMID:16608223

  17. Oxidative photodegradation of herbicide fenuron in aqueous solution by natural iron oxide α-Fe2O3, influence of polycarboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Kribéche, Mohamed El Amine; Mechakra, Hind; Sehili, Tahar; Brosillon, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    The photodegradation of the herbicide fenuron (1,1-dimethyl-3-phenylurea) by using a natural iron oxide (NIO), α-Fe2O3, in aqueous solution at acidic pH has been undertaken. The NIO was characterized by the Raman spectroscopy method. The degradation pathways and the formation of degradation products were studied. A high-pressure mercury lamp and sunlight were employed as light source. Fenuron photodegradation using NIO with oxalic acid followed the pseudo-first-order kinetics, the optimal experimental conditions were [oxalic acid]0 = 10(-3) M and [NIO] = 0.1 g L(-1) at pH 3. A UVA/NIO/oxalic acid system led to a low fenuron half-life (60 min). The results were even better when solar light is used (30 min). The variables studied were the doses of iron oxide, of carboxylic acids, the solution pH and the effect of sunlight irradiation. The effects of four carboxylic acids, oxalic, citric, tartaric and malic acids, on the fenuron photodegradation with NIO have been investigated, oxalic acid was the most effective carboxylic acid used at pH 3. A similar trend was observed for the removal of total organic carbon (TOC), 75% of TOC was removed. The analytical study showed many aromatic intermediates, short-chain carboxylic acids and inorganic ion. PMID:26102217

  18. Actual-Waste Tests of Enhanced Chemical Cleaning for Retrieval of SRS HLW Sludge Tank Heels and Decomposition of Oxalic Acid - 12256

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, Christopher J.; King, William D.; Ketusky, Edward T.

    2012-07-01

    Savannah River National Laboratory conducted a series of tests on the Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process using actual Savannah River Site waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. Testing involved sludge dissolution with 2 wt% oxalic acid, the decomposition of the oxalates by ozonolysis (with and without the aid of ultraviolet light), the evaporation of water from the product, and tracking the concentrations of key components throughout the process. During ECC actual waste testing, the process was successful in decomposing oxalate to below the target levels without causing substantial physical or chemical changes in the product sludge. During ECC actual waste testing, the introduction of ozone was successful in decomposing oxalate to below the target levels. This testing did not identify physical or chemical changes in the ECC product sludge that would impact downstream processing. The results from these tests confirm observations made by AREVA NP during larger scale testing with waste simulants. This testing, however, had a decreased utilization of ozone, requiring approximately 5 moles of ozone per mole of oxalate decomposed. Decomposition of oxalates in sludge dissolved in 2 wt% OA to levels near 100 ppm oxalate using ECC process conditions required 8 to 12.5 hours without the aid of UV light and 4.5 to 8 hours with the aid of UV light. The pH and ORP were tracked during decomposition testing. Sludge components were tracked during OA decomposition, showing that most components have the highest soluble levels in the initial dissolved sludge and early decomposition samples and exhibit lower soluble levels as OA decomposition progresses. The Deposition Tank storage conditions that included pH adjustment to approximately 1 M free hydroxide tended to bring the soluble concentrations in the ECC product to nearly the same level for each test regardless of storage time, storage temperature, and contact with other tank sludge material. (authors)

  19. Oxalic-acid leaching of rock, soil, and stream-sediment samples as an anomaly-accentuated technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alminas, Henry V.; Mosier, Elwin L.

    1976-01-01

    In many instances total-rock and sieved-soil and stream-sediment samples lack the sensitivity and contrast required for reconnaissance exploration and necessary in the search for blind ore deposits. Heavy-mineral concentrates incorporate the required sensitivity and contrast but are overly expensive for two reasons: time-consuming sample preparation is required to obtain them, and they cannot be easily derived from all bulk-sample types. Trace-metal-content comparisons of the oxalic-acid-leachable portions with heavy-mineral concentrates show that the leachates are equal to the heavy-mineral concentrates in sensitivity and contrast. Simplicity of preparation and the resultant cost savings are additional advantages of this proposed method.

  20. Mechanistic insight into chromium(VI) reduction by oxalic acid in the presence of manganese(II).

    PubMed

    Wrobel, Katarzyna; Corrales Escobosa, Alma Rosa; Gonzalez Ibarra, Alan Alexander; Mendez Garcia, Manuel; Yanez Barrientos, Eunice; Wrobel, Kazimierz

    2015-12-30

    Over the past few decades, reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) has been studied in many physicochemical contexts. In this research, we reveal the mechanism underlying the favorable effect of Mn(II) observed during Cr(VI) reduction by oxalic acid using liquid chromatography with spectrophotometric diode array detector (HPLC-DAD), nitrogen microwave plasma atomic emission spectrometry (HPLC-MP-AES), and high resolution mass spectrometry (ESI-QTOFMS). Both reaction mixtures contained potassium dichromate (0.67 mM Cr(VI)) and oxalic acid (13.3mM), pH 3, one reaction mixture contained manganese sulfate (0.33 mM Mn(II)). In the absence of Mn(II) only trace amounts of reaction intermediates were generated, most likely in the following pathways: (1) Cr(VI)→ Cr(IV) and (2) Cr(VI)+Cr(IV)→ 2Cr(V). In the presence of Mn(II), the active reducing species appeared to be Mn(II) bis-oxalato complex (J); the proposed reaction mechanism involves a one-electron transfer from J to any chromium compound containing CrO bond, which is reduced to CrOH, and the generation of Mn(III) bis-oxalato complex (K). Conversion of K to J was observed, confirming the catalytic role of Mn(II). Since no additional acidification was required, the results obtained in this study may be helpful in designing a new, environmentally friendly strategy for the remediation of environments contaminated with Cr(VI). PMID:26177490

  1. Oxalate minerals on Mars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applin, D. M.; Izawa, M. R. M.; Cloutis, E. A.; Goltz, D.; Johnson, J. R.

    2015-06-01

    Small amounts of unidentified organic compounds have only recently been inferred on Mars despite strong reasons to expect significant concentrations and decades of searching. Based on X-ray diffraction and reflectance spectroscopic analyses we show that solid oxalic acid and its most common mineral salts are stable under the pressure and ultraviolet irradiation environment of the surface of Mars, and could represent a heretofore largely overlooked reservoir of organic carbon in the martian near-surface. In addition to the delivery to Mars by carbonaceous chondrites, oxalate minerals are among the predicted breakdown products of meteoritic organic matter delivered to the martian surface, as well as any endogenic organic carbon reaching the martian surface from the interior. A reinterpretation of pyrolysis experiments from the Viking, Phoenix, and Mars Science Laboratory missions shows that all are consistent with the presence of significant concentrations of oxalate minerals. Oxalate minerals could be important in numerous martian geochemical processes, including acting as a possible nitrogen sink (as ammonium oxalate), and contributing to the formation of “organic” carbonates, methane, and hydroxyl radicals.

  2. Contribution of calcium oxalate to soil-exchangeable calcium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dauer, Jenny M.; Perakis, Steven S.

    2013-01-01

    Acid deposition and repeated biomass harvest have decreased soil calcium (Ca) availability in many temperate forests worldwide, yet existing methods for assessing available soil Ca do not fully characterize soil Ca forms. To account for discrepancies in ecosystem Ca budgets, it has been hypothesized that the highly insoluble biomineral Ca oxalate might represent an additional soil Ca pool that is not detected in standard measures of soil-exchangeable Ca. We asked whether several standard method extractants for soil-exchangeable Ca could also access Ca held in Ca oxalate crystals using spike recovery tests in both pure solutions and soil extractions. In solutions of the extractants ammonium chloride, ammonium acetate, and barium chloride, we observed 2% to 104% dissolution of Ca oxalate crystals, with dissolution increasing with both solution molarity and ionic potential of cation extractant. In spike recovery tests using a low-Ca soil, we estimate that 1 M ammonium acetate extraction dissolved sufficient Ca oxalate to contribute an additional 52% to standard measurements of soil-exchangeable Ca. However, in a high-Ca soil, the amount of Ca oxalate spike that would dissolve in 1 M ammonium acetate extraction was difficult to detect against the large pool of exchangeable Ca. We conclude that Ca oxalate can contribute substantially to standard estimates of soil-exchangeable Ca in acid forest soils with low soil-exchangeable Ca. Consequently, measures of exchangeable Ca are unlikely to fully resolve discrepancies in ecosystem Ca mass balance unless the contribution of Ca oxalate to exchangeable Ca is also assessed.

  3. Automated homogeneous oxalate precipitation of Pu(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Yarbro, S.L.; Schreiber, S.B.; Dunn, S.L.; Mills, C.W.

    1990-01-01

    Homogeneous oxalate precipitation using diethyl oxalate was compared to precipitating Pu(III) oxalate with solid oxalic acid. The diethyl oxalate technique at 75{degree}C is better because it gives 50% less plutonium in the filtrate with a reasonable filtering time. Also, the procedure for the homogeneous precipitation is easier to automate because the liquid diethyl oxalate is simpler to introduce into the precipitator than solid oxalic acid. It also provides flexibility because the hydrolysis rate and therefore the precipitation rate can be controlled by varying the temperature. 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Oxalate desensitising treatment of dentinal surface.

    PubMed

    Mongiorgi, R; Prati, C; Toschi, E; Riva di Sanseverino, L

    1991-04-01

    It is well known that a typical painful feeling is caused by impact of different agents and by thermodynamic conditions upon the dentine layer of the tooth. Therefore the action by artificial solutions should be tested to study how the induced modifications might inhibit the pain. The aim of the present study is to evaluate by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) the morphology of dentine surface after different chemical treatments. Oxalate solutions are able to produce a layer of large crystals, while acid solutions remove the smear layer and open the dentinal tubules. PMID:1910743

  5. Preharvest application of oxalic acid increased fruit size, bioactive compounds, and antioxidant capacity in sweet cherry cultivars (Prunus avium L.).

    PubMed

    Martínez-Esplá, Alejandra; Zapata, Pedro Javier; Valero, Daniel; García-Viguera, Cristina; Castillo, Salvador; Serrano, María

    2014-04-16

    Trees of 'Sweet Heart' and 'Sweet Late' sweet cherry cultivars (Prunus avium L.) were treated with oxalic acid (OA) at 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mM at 98, 112, and 126 days after full blossom. Results showed that all treatments increased fruit size at harvest, manifested by higher fruit volume and weight in cherries from treated trees than from controls, the higher effect being found with 2.0 mM OA (18 and 30% higher weight for 'Sweet Heart' and 'Sweet Late', respectively). Other quality parameters, such as color and firmness, were also increased by OA treatments, although no significant differences were found in total soluble solids or total acidity, showing that OA treatments did not affect the on-tree ripening process of sweet cherry. However, the increases in total anthocyanins, total phenolics, and antioxidant activity associated with the ripening process were higher in treated than in control cherries, leading to fruit with high bioactive compounds and antioxidant potential at commercial harvest (≅45% more anthocyanins and ≅20% more total phenolics). In addition, individual anthocyanins, flavonols, and chlorogenic acid derivatives were also increased by OA treatment. Thus, OA preharvest treatments could be an efficient and natural way to increase the quality and functional properties of sweet cherries. PMID:24684635

  6. Solution properties of polygalacturonic acid

    PubMed Central

    Stoddart, R. W.; Spires, I. P. C.; Tipton, K. F.

    1969-01-01

    1. The specimen of polygalacturonic acid used in these studies was shown to contain very little neutral sugar, methyl ester groups or ash, and only residues of galacturonic acid. Its electrophoretic homogeneity was examined in pyridine–acetic acid buffer at pH6·5 and in borate buffer at pH9·2. The distribution of effective particle weights was shown to be fairly narrow. 2. The pH-titration curve of the polymer gave a pK value of 3·7. 3. The interaction of the polymer with Ruthenium Red was studied and titration curves were obtained for the spectral shifts associated with the formation of a complex. 4. Optical-rotatory-dispersion studies showed that the Drude constant, λc, was dependent on pH. 5. Polygalacturonic acid was shown to display non-Newtonian properties in solution and to have an anomalously high relative specific viscosity at low concentrations. 6. Studies were made of the pH-dependence of the sedimentation coefficient of the polymer. 7. These results are discussed in terms of the structure of the molecule and their relevance to the properties of pectic substances. PMID:5343801

  7. Ions in hyaluronic acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horkay, Ferenc; Basser, Peter J.; Londono, David J.; Hecht, Anne-Marie; Geissler, Erik

    2009-11-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is an anionic biopolymer that is almost ubiquitous in biological tissues. An attempt is made to determine the dominant features that account for both its abundance and its multifunctional role, and which set it apart from other types of biopolymers. A combination of osmotic and scattering techniques is employed to quantify its dynamic and static properties in near-physiological solution conditions, where it is exposed both to mono- and divalent counterions. An equation of state is derived for the osmotic pressure Π in the semidilute concentration region, in terms of two variables, the polymer concentration c and the ionic strength J of the added salt, according to which Π =1.4×103c9/4/J3/4 kPa, where c and J are expressed in mole. Over the physiological ion concentration range, the effect of the sodium chloride and calcium chloride on the osmotic properties of HA solutions is fully accounted for by their contributions to the ionic strength. The absence of precipitation, even at high CaCl2 concentrations, distinguishes this molecule from other biopolymers such as DNA. Dynamic light scattering measurements reveal that the collective diffusion coefficient in HA solutions exceeds that in aqueous solutions of typical neutral polymers by a factor of approximately 5. This property ensures rapid adjustment to, and recovery from, stress applied to HA-containing tissue. Small angle x-ray scattering measurements confirm the absence of appreciable structural reorganization over the observed length scale range 10-1000 Å, as a result of calcium-sodium ion exchange. The scattered intensity in the transfer momentum range q >0.03 Å-1 varies as 1/q, indicating that the HA chain segments in semidilute solutions are linear over an extended concentration range. The osmotic compression modulus c ∂Π/∂c, a high value of which is a prerequisite in structural biopolymers, is several times greater than in typical neutral polymer solutions.

  8. Catalytic performance of Fe3O4-CoO/Al2O3 catalyst in ozonation of 2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)propionic acid, nitrobenzene and oxalic acid in water.

    PubMed

    Tong, Shaoping; Shi, Rui; Zhang, Hua; Ma, Chunan

    2010-01-01

    Fe3O4-CoO/Al2O3 catalyst was prepared by incipient wetness impregnation using Fe(NO3)3 x 9H2O and Co(NO3)2 x 6H2O as the precursors, and its catalytic performance was investigated in ozonation of 2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)propionic acid (2,4-DP), nitrobenzene and oxalic acid. The experimental results indicated that Fe3O4-CoO/Al2O3 catalyst enabled an interesting improvement of ozonation efficiency during the degradation of each organic pollutant, and the Fe3O4-CoO/Al2O3 catalytic ozonation system followed a radical-type mechanism. The kinetics of ozonation alone and Fe3O4-CoO/Al2O3 catalytic ozonation of three organic pollutants in aqueous solution were discussed under the mere consideration of direct ozone reaction and OH radical reaction to well investigate its performance. In the catalytic ozonation of 2,4-DP, the apparent reaction rate constants (k) were determined to be 1.456 x 10(-2) min(-1) for ozonation alone and 4.740 x 10(-2) min(-1) for O3/Fe3O4-CoO/Al203. And O3/Fe3O4-CoO/Al2O3 had a larger R(ct) (6.614 x 10(-9)) calculated by the relative method than O3 did (1.800 x 10(-9)), showing O3/Fe3O4-CoO/Al2O3 generated more hydroxyl radical. Similar results were also obtained in the catalytic ozonation of nitrobenzene and oxalic acid. The above results demonstrated that the catalytic performance of Fe3O4-CoO/Al2O3 in ozonation of studied organic substance was universal to a certain degree. PMID:21235195

  9. Estimation of the oxalate content of foods and daily oxalate intake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, R. P.; Kennedy, M.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The amount of oxalate ingested may be an important risk factor in the development of idiopathic calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis. Reliable food tables listing the oxalate content of foods are currently not available. The aim of this research was to develop an accurate and reliable method to measure the food content of oxalate. METHODS: Capillary electrophoresis (CE) and ion chromatography (IC) were compared as direct techniques for the estimation of the oxalate content of foods. Foods were thoroughly homogenized in acid, heat extracted, and clarified by centrifugation and filtration before dilution in water for analysis. Five individuals consuming self-selected diets maintained food records for three days to determine their mean daily oxalate intakes. RESULTS: Both techniques were capable of adequately measuring the oxalate in foods with a significant oxalate content. With foods of very low oxalate content (<1.8 mg/100 g), IC was more reliable than CE. The mean daily intake of oxalate by the five individuals tested was 152 +/- 83 mg, ranging from 44 to 352 mg/day. CONCLUSIONS: CE appears to be the method of choice over IC for estimating the oxalate content of foods with a medium (>10 mg/100 g) to high oxalate content due to a faster analysis time and lower running costs, whereas IC may be better suited for the analysis of foods with a low oxalate content. Accurate estimates of the oxalate content of foods should permit the role of dietary oxalate in urinary oxalate excretion and stone formation to be clarified. Other factors, apart from the amount of oxalate ingested, appear to exert a major influence over the amount of oxalate excreted in the urine.

  10. Dissolution kinetics and biodurability of tremolite particles in mimicked lung fluids: Effect of citrate and oxalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozalen, Marisa; Ramos, M. Elena; Huertas, F. Javier; Fiore, Saverio; Gervilla, Fernando

    2013-11-01

    The effect of citrate and oxalate on tremolite dissolution rate was measured at 37 °C in non-stirred flow-through reactors, using modified Gamble's solutions at pH 4 (macrophages), 7.4 (interstitial fluids) and 5.5 (intermediate check point) containing 0, 0.15, 1.5 and 15 mmol L-1 of citrate or oxalate. The dissolution rates calculated from Si concentration in the output solutions without organic ligands depend on pH, decreasing when the pH increases from -13.00 (pH 4) to -13.35 (pH 7.4) mol g-1 s-1 and following a proton-promoted mechanism. The presence of both ligands enhances dissolution rates at every pH, increasing this effect when the ligand concentration increases. Citrate produces a stronger effect as a catalyst than oxalate, mainly at more acidic pHs and enhances dissolution rates until 20 times for solutions with 15 mmol L-1 citrate. However, at pH 7.4 the effect is lighter and oxalate solutions (15 mmol L-1) only enhances dissolution rates eight times respect to free organic ligand solutions. Dissolution is promoted by the attack to protons and organic ligands to the tremolite surface. Magnesium speciation in oxalate and citrate solutions shows that Mg citrate complexes are more effective than oxalate ones during the alteration of tremolite in magrophages, but this tendency is the opposite for interstitial fluids, being oxalate magnesium complexes stronger. The biodurability estimations show that the destruction of the fibers is faster in acidic conditions (macrophages) than in the neutral solutions (interstitial fluid). At pH 4, both ligands oxalate and citrate reduce the residence time of the fibers with respect to that calculated in absence of ligands. Nevertheless, at pH 7.4 the presence of ligands does not reduce significantly the lifetime of the fibers.

  11. CO2-Free Power Generation on an Iron Group Nanoalloy Catalyst via Selective Oxidation of Ethylene Glycol to Oxalic Acid in Alkaline Media

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Takeshi; Sadakiyo, Masaaki; Ooi, Mei Lee; Kitano, Sho; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Matsumura, Syo; Kato, Kenichi; Takeguchi, Tatsuya; Yamauchi, Miho

    2014-01-01

    An Fe group ternary nanoalloy (NA) catalyst enabled selective electrocatalysis towards CO2-free power generation from highly deliverable ethylene glycol (EG). A solid-solution-type FeCoNi NA catalyst supported on carbon was prepared by a two-step reduction method. High-resolution electron microscopy techniques identified atomic-level mixing of constituent elements in the nanoalloy. We examined the distribution of oxidised species, including CO2, produced on the FeCoNi nanoalloy catalyst in the EG electrooxidation under alkaline conditions. The FeCoNi nanoalloy catalyst exhibited the highest selectivities toward the formation of C2 products and to oxalic acid, i.e., 99 and 60%, respectively, at 0.4 V vs. the reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE), without CO2 generation. We successfully generated power by a direct EG alkaline fuel cell employing the FeCoNi nanoalloy catalyst and a solid-oxide electrolyte with oxygen reduction ability, i.e., a completely precious-metal-free system. PMID:25004118

  12. Origin of Urinary Oxalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Ross P.; Knight, John; Assimos, Dean G.

    2007-04-01

    Urinary oxalate is mostly derived from the absorption of ingested oxalate and endogenous synthesis. The breakdown of vitamin C may also contribute small amounts to the urinary oxalate pool. The amount of oxalate absorbed is influenced by the oxalate content of the diet, the concentrations of divalent cations in the gut, the presence of oxalate-degrading organisms, transport characteristics of the intestinal epithelium, and other factors associated with the intestinal environment. Knowledge of pathways associated with endogenous oxalate synthesis is limited. Urinary oxalate excretion can be modified using strategies that limit dietary oxalate absorption and the ingestion of oxalogenic substrates such as hydroxyproline.

  13. A novel digestion method based on a choline chloride-oxalic acid deep eutectic solvent for determining Cu, Fe, and Zn in fish samples.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Emadaldin; Ghanemi, Kamal; Fallah-Mehrjardi, Mehdi; Dadolahi-Sohrab, Ali

    2013-01-31

    A novel and efficient digestion method based on choline chloride-oxalic acid (ChCl-Ox) deep eutectic solvent (DES) was developed for flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) determination of Cu, Zn, and Fe in biological fish samples. Key parameters that influence analyte recovery were investigated and optimized, using the fish protein certified reference material (CRM, DORM-3) throughout the procedure. In this method, 100 mg of the sample was dissolved in ChCl-Ox (1:2, molar ratio) at 100°C for 45 min. Then, 5.0 mL HNO(3) (1.0 M) was added. After centrifugation, the supernatant solution was filtered, diluted to a known volume, and analyzed by FAAS. Under optimized conditions, an excellent agreement between the obtained results and the certified values was observed, using Student's t-test (P=0.05); the extraction recovery of the all elements was greater than 95.3%. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of analytes in different tissues (muscle, liver, and gills) having a broad concentration range in a marine fish sample. The reproducibility of the method was validated by analyzing all samples by our method in a different laboratory, using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). For comparison, a conventional acid digestion (CAD) method was also used for the determination of analytes in all studied samples. The simplicity of the proposed experimental procedure, high extraction efficiency, short analysis time, lack of concentrated acids and oxidizing agents, and the use of safe and inexpensive components demonstrate the high potential of ChCl-Ox (1:2) for routine trace metal analysis in biological samples. PMID:23327946

  14. Plutonium oxalate precipitation for trace elemental determination in plutonium materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xu, Ning; Gallimore, David; Lujan, Elmer; Garduno, Katherine; Walker, Laurie; Taylor, Fiona; Thompson, Pam; Tandon, Lav

    2015-05-26

    In this study, an analytical chemistry method has been developed that removes the plutonium (Pu) matrix from the dissolved Pu metal or oxide solution prior to the determination of trace impurities that are present in the metal or oxide. In this study, a Pu oxalate approach was employed to separate Pu from trace impurities. After Pu(III) was precipitated with oxalic acid and separated by centrifugation, trace elemental constituents in the supernatant were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy with minimized spectral interferences from the sample matrix.

  15. Metamagnetism and weak ferromagnetism in nickel (II) oxalate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Tela, E.; Mendoza, M. E.; Escudero, R.

    2012-05-01

    Microcrystals of orthorhombic nickel (II) oxalate dihydrate were synthesized through a precipitation reaction of aqueous solutions of nickel chloride and oxalic acid. Magnetic susceptibility exhibits a sharp peak at 3.3 K and a broad rounded maximum near 43 K. We associated the lower maximum with a metamagnetic transition that occurs when the magnetic field is about ≥ 3.5 T. The maximum at 43 K is typical of 1D antiferromagnets, whereas weak ferromagnetism behavior was observed in the range of 3.3-43 K.

  16. Metamagnetism and weak ferromagnetism in nickel (II) oxalate crystals.

    PubMed

    Romero-Tela, E; Mendoza, M E; Escudero, R

    2012-05-16

    Microcrystals of orthorhombic nickel (II) oxalate dihydrate were synthesized through a precipitation reaction of aqueous solutions of nickel chloride and oxalic acid. Magnetic susceptibility exhibits a sharp peak at 3.3 K and a broad rounded maximum near 43 K. We associated the lower maximum with a metamagnetic transition that occurs when the magnetic field is about ≥3.5 T. The maximum at 43 K is typical of 1D antiferromagnets, whereas weak ferromagnetism behavior was observed in the range of 3.3–43 K. PMID:22517212

  17. Analysis of nanopore arrangement of porous alumina layers formed by anodizing in oxalic acid at relatively high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaraska, Leszek; Stępniowski, Wojciech J.; Jaskuła, Marian; Sulka, Grzegorz D.

    2014-06-01

    Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) layers were formed by a simple two-step anodization in 0.3 M oxalic acid at relatively high temperatures (20-30 °C) and various anodizing potentials (30-65 V). The effect of anodizing conditions on structural features of as-obtained oxides was carefully investigated. A linear and exponential relationships between cell diameter, pore density and anodizing potential were confirmed, respectively. On the other hand, no effect of temperature and duration of anodization on pore spacing and pore density was found. Detailed quantitative and qualitative analyses of hexagonal arrangement of nanopore arrays were performed for all studied samples. The nanopore arrangement was evaluated using various methods based on the fast Fourier transform (FFT) images, Delaunay triangulations (defect maps), pair distribution functions (PDF), and angular distribution functions (ADF). It was found that for short anodizations performed at relatively high temperatures, the optimal anodizing potential that results in formation of nanostructures with the highest degree of pore order is 45 V. No direct effect of temperature and time of anodization on the nanopore arrangement was observed.

  18. Effect of Organic Acid Additions on the General and Localized Corrosion Susceptibility of Alloy 22 in Chloride Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Carranza, R M; Giordano, C M; Rodr?guez, M A; Ilevbare, G O; Rebak, R B

    2007-08-28

    Electrochemical studies such as cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were performed to determine the corrosion behavior of Alloy 22 (N06022) in 1M NaCl solutions at various pH values from acidic to neutral at 90 C. All the tested material was wrought Mill Annealed (MA). Tests were also performed in NaCl solutions containing weak organic acids such as oxalic, acetic, citric and picric. Results show that the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 was significantly higher in solutions containing oxalic acid than in solutions of pure NaCl at the same pH. Citric and picric acids showed a slightly higher corrosion rate, and acetic acid maintained the corrosion rate of pure chloride solutions at the same pH. Organic acids revealed to be weak inhibitors for crevice corrosion. Higher concentration ratios, compared to nitrate ions, were needed to completely inhibit crevice corrosion in chloride solutions. Results are discussed considering acid dissociation constants, buffer capacity and complex formation constants of the different weak acids.

  19. An acidic peptide sequence of nucleolin-related protein can mediate the attachment of calcium oxalate to renal tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Sorokina, Elena A; Wesson, Jeffrey A; Kleinman, Jack G

    2004-08-01

    Crystals that form in tubular fluid must be retained in the kidney to become stones. Nucleolin-related protein (NRP) is found on the surface of inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD) cells in culture (cIMCD) and selectively adsorbs to calcium oxalate (CaOx). We proposed that NRP mediates attachment to the renal tubular epithelium of Ca stone crystals through an electrostatic interaction with a highly acidic region (acidic fragment [AF]) similar to those of other proteins that have been reported to affect urinary crystal formation. The current studies demonstrate that nucleolin is expressed on both apical and basolateral cell surfaces of cIMCD, reaching a peak in the late stages of mitosis and gradually declining to undetectable levels with maturation of the polarized epithelium. Scraping areas of mature monolayers stimulated the cells surrounding the defects to migrate and proliferate so as to repair them, and these areas demonstrate surface NRP expression and enhanced attachment of CaOx monohydrate crystals. Surface expression of the NRP AF was produced by cloning the NRP AF into a display vector. Transfected cIMCD demonstrating copious surface expression of AF enhanced CaOx attachment 6.7-fold compared with control cIMCD, whereas cells transfected with a vector without the AF did not differ from control. AF was also cloned into a replication-deficient adenovirus and expressed in 293 cells, resulting in AF secretion into the nutrient medium. This medium inhibited CaOx attachment to cIMCD, compared with conditioned medium from cells infected with wild-type virus. These results demonstrate that surface-bound AF can mediate CaOx attachment and that secreted AF can inhibit attachment. These results support the notion that surface-associated NRP could mediate attachment of CaOx to the renal tubule epithelium, thereby causing retention of crystals that might eventually become kidney stones. PMID:15284292

  20. Inhibition of crystallization of calcium oxalate by the extraction of Tamarix gallica L.

    PubMed

    Bensatal, Ahmed; Ouahrani, M R

    2008-12-01

    The main objective is to study the inhibitor effect of acid fraction of the extract of Tamarix gallica L on the crystallization of calcium oxalate. The extract of Tamarix gallica L is very rich by acid compounds that are used as an inhibitor of nephrolithiasis (calcium oxalate). Our study of the calcium oxalate crystallization is based on the model of turbidimetry by means of a spectrophotometer. The calcium oxalate formation is induced by the addition of oxalate solutions of sodium and of calcium chloride. The addition of inhibitor with various concentrations enabled us to give information on the percentage of inhibition. The comparison between the turbidimetric slopes with and without inhibitor gives the effectiveness of inhibitor for the acid fraction. By comparing the photographs of with and without inhibitor, we concluded that the extract of Tamarix gallica L acts at the stage of growth. The acid fraction of the extract of Tamarix gallica L gives an activity remarkable in the formation of urinary lithiasis (calcium oxalate); this effectiveness is due to the presence of functions of acid. PMID:19002446

  1. Stability Constants of Technetium (IV) Oxalate Complexes as a Function of Ionic Strength

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Yuanxian; Hess, Nancy J.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2006-03-01

    Solvent extraction methods were used to determine the stability constants of Tc(IV) with oxalate anions in NaCl solutions ranging in concentration from 0.5 M to 2.0 M. All experiments were conducted in an atmosphere-controlled chamber under Ar atmosphere (< 1.0ppm O2). A reducing agent (hydrazine) was used during extractions to maintain technetium in the tetravalent oxidation state. Independent tests confirmed that the oxidation state of technetium did not change during extractions. The distribution ratio of Tc(IV) between the organic and aqueous phases was found to decrease as the concentration of oxalic acid increased. At the oxalic acid concentrations used in these experiments, the complexes TcO(Ox) and TcO(Ox)22- were found to be the dominant aqueous species. Based on these data, the thermodynamic stability constants of Tc(IV) with oxalate complexes were calculated by the Specific Ion Interaction Theory (SIT).

  2. USE OF AN EQUILIBRIUM MODEL TO FORECAST DISSOLUTION EFFECTIVENESS, SAFETY IMPACTS, AND DOWNSTREAM PROCESSABILITY FROM OXALIC ACID AIDED SLUDGE REMOVAL IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANKS 1-15

    SciTech Connect

    KETUSKY, EDWARD

    2005-10-31

    This thesis details a graduate research effort written to fulfill the Magister of Technologiae in Chemical Engineering requirements at the University of South Africa. The research evaluates the ability of equilibrium based software to forecast dissolution, evaluate safety impacts, and determine downstream processability changes associated with using oxalic acid solutions to dissolve sludge heels in Savannah River Site High Level Waste (HLW) Tanks 1-15. First, a dissolution model is constructed and validated. Coupled with a model, a material balance determines the fate of hypothetical worst-case sludge in the treatment and neutralization tanks during each chemical adjustment. Although sludge is dissolved, after neutralization more is created within HLW. An energy balance determines overpressurization and overheating to be unlikely. Corrosion induced hydrogen may overwhelm the purge ventilation. Limiting the heel volume treated/acid added and processing the solids through vitrification is preferred and should not significantly increase the number of glass canisters.

  3. Nanouric acid or nanocalcium phosphate as central nidus to induce calcium oxalate stone formation: a high-resolution transmission electron microscopy study on urinary nanocrystallites

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jie; Xue, Jun-Fa; Xu, Meng; Gui, Bao-Song; Wang, Feng-Xin; Ouyang, Jian-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to accurately analyze the relationship between calcium oxalate (CaOx) stone formation and the components of urinary nanocrystallites. Method High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), selected area electron diffraction, fast Fourier transformation of HRTEM, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were performed to analyze the components of these nanocrystallites. Results The main components of CaOx stones are calcium oxalate monohydrate and a small amount of dehydrate, while those of urinary nanocrystallites are calcium oxalate monohydrate, uric acid, and calcium phosphate. The mechanism of formation of CaOx stones was discussed based on the components of urinary nanocrystallites. Conclusion The formation of CaOx stones is closely related both to the properties of urinary nanocrystallites and to the urinary components. The combination of HRTEM, fast Fourier transformation, selected area electron diffraction, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy could be accurately performed to analyze the components of single urinary nanocrystallites. This result provides evidence for nanouric acid and/or nanocalcium phosphate crystallites as the central nidus to induce CaOx stone formation. PMID:25258530

  4. Mimicking the growth of a pathologic biomineral: shape development and structures of calcium oxalate dihydrate in the presence of polyacrylic acid.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Annu; Rosseeva, Elena; Hochrein, Oliver; Carrillo-Cabrera, Wilder; Simon, Paul; Duchstein, Patrick; Zahn, Dirk; Kniep, Rüdiger

    2012-03-26

    The morphogenesis of calcium oxalate hydrates in aqueous solutions was investigated by varying the pH, oxalate concentration, and the concentration of the sodium salt of polyacrylate (PAA). With increasing amounts of PAA in solution, the shape of tetragonal calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) changes from bipyramidal through elongated bipyramidal prisms to dumbbells and finally reverts to rodlike tetragonal bipyramidal prisms. PAA is incorporated into the prismatic zones of the growing COD crystals, thereby reducing the growth rate of the {100} faces along the <100> direction. Dumbbells start to develop through "non-crystallographic" branching from the prism faces and the formation of "multiple head" crystals. Adsorption of PAA on the rough surfaces of the splitting individuals supports the selection of new subindividuals and leads to the formation of core-shell patterns. The various shapes and structures of the biomimetic COD/PAA crystals and aggregates are closely related to the well-known "pathologic" individuals observed in the urine of patients with urinary disease (including urinary stones). PMID:22354632

  5. Nitric acid recovery from waste solutions

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, A. S.

    1959-04-14

    The recovery of nitric acid from aqueous nitrate solutions containing fission products as impurities is described. It is desirable to subject such solutions to concentration by evaporation since nitric acid is regenerated thereby. A difficulty, however, is that the highly radioactive fission product ruthenium is volatilized together with the nitric acid. It has been found that by adding nitrous acid, ruthenium volatilization is suppressed and reduced to a negligible degree so that the distillate obtained is practically free of ruthenium.

  6. ELECTROLYTIC REDUCTION OF NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Alter, H.W.; Barney, D.L.

    1958-09-30

    A process is presented for the treatment of radioactivc waste nitric acid solutions. The nitric acid solution is neutralized with an alkali metal hydroxide in an amount sufficient to precipitate insoluble hydroxides, and after separation of the precipitate the solution is electrolyzed to convert the alkali nitrate formed, to alkali hydroxide, gaseous ammonla and oxygen. The solution is then reusable after reducing the volume by evaporating the water and dissolved ammonia.

  7. REINVESTIGATING THE PROCESS IMPACTS FROM OXALIC ACIDHIGH LEVEL WASTE TANK CLEANING

    SciTech Connect

    Ketusky, E

    2008-01-22

    The impacts and acceptability of using oxalic acid to clean the Savannah River Site, High Level Waste Tanks 1-8, were re-investigated using a two-phased approach. For the first phase, using a representative Tank 1-8 sludge, the chemical equilibrium based software, OLI ESP{copyright} and Savannah River Site laboratory test results were used to develop a chemically speciated material balance and a general oxalate mass balance. Using 8 wt% oxalic acid with a 100% molar excess, for every 1 kg of sludge solid that was dissolved, about 3.4 kg of resultant solids would form for eventual vitrification, while about 0.6 kg of soluble oxalate would precipitate in the evaporator system, and form a salt heel. Using available analyses, a list of potential safety and process impacts were developed, screened, and evaluated for acceptability. The results showed that the use of oxalic acid had two distinct types of impacts, those which were safety based and required potential upgrades or additional studies. Assuming such were performed and adequate, no further actions were required. The second type of impacts were also acceptable, but were long-term, and as such, would need to be managed. These impacts were directly caused by the solubility characteristics of oxalate in a concentrated sodium solution and, occurred after pH restoration. Since oxalate destruction methods are commonly available, their use should be considered. Using an oxalate destruction method could enable the benefits of oxalic to applied, while eliminating the long-term impacts that must be managed, and hence should be considered.

  8. Complex dynamic behavior in the bromate-oxalic acid-acetone-Mn(II) oscillating reaction in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Lucyane C.; Faria, Roberto B.

    2007-05-01

    The oscillating reaction bromate-oxalic acid-acetone-Mn(II)-sulfuric acid was observed for the first time in a CSTR at 20 °C. Depending on the bromate concentrations and flow rate, the system showed large amplitude oscillations, two kinds of mixed mode oscillations, quasiperiodicity and bursts of large amplitude oscillations, all mapped in a phase diagram. More complex behavior was favored at low bromate concentrations. The system without acetone was discovered to oscillate too, but the more complex patterns were not seen, indicating that acetone is implied in their formation.

  9. Turning sunlight into stone: the oxalate-carbonate pathway in a tropical tree ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cailleau, G.; Braissant, O.; Verrecchia, E. P.

    2011-07-01

    An African oxalogenic tree, the iroko tree (Milicia excelsa), has the property to enhance carbonate precipitation in tropical oxisols, where such accumulations are not expected due to the acidic conditions in these types of soils. This uncommon process is linked to the oxalate-carbonate pathway, which increases soil pH through oxalate oxidation. In order to investigate the oxalate-carbonate pathway in the iroko system, fluxes of matter have been identified, described, and evaluated from field to microscopic scales. In the first centimeters of the soil profile, decaying of the organic matter allows the release of whewellite crystals, mainly due to the action of termites and saprophytic fungi. In addition, a concomitant flux of carbonate formed in wood tissues contributes to the carbonate flux and is identified as a direct consequence of wood feeding by termites. Nevertheless, calcite biomineralization of the tree is not a consequence of in situ oxalate consumption, but rather related to the oxalate oxidation inside the upper part of the soil. The consequence of this oxidation is the presence of carbonate ions in the soil solution pumped through the roots, leading to preferential mineralization of the roots and the trunk base. An ideal scenario for the iroko biomineralization and soil carbonate accumulation starts with oxalatization: as the iroko tree grows, the organic matter flux to the soil constitutes the litter, and an oxalate pool is formed on the forest ground. Then, wood rotting agents (mainly termites, saprophytic fungi, and bacteria) release significant amounts of oxalate crystals from decaying plant tissues. In addition, some of these agents are themselves producers of oxalate (e.g. fungi). Both processes contribute to a soil pool of "available" oxalate crystals. Oxalate consumption by oxalotrophic bacteria can then start. Carbonate and calcium ions present in the soil solution represent the end products of the oxalate-carbonate pathway. The solution is

  10. Turning sunlight into stone: the oxalate-carbonate pathway in a tropical tree ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cailleau, G.; Braissant, O.; Verrecchia, E. P.

    2011-02-01

    An African oxalogenic tree, the iroko tree (Milicia excelsa), has the property to enhance carbonate precipitation in tropical oxisols, where such accumulations are not expected due to the theoretical acidic conditions of these soils. This uncommon process is linked to the oxalate-carbonate pathway, which increases soil pH through oxalate oxidation. In order to investigate the oxalate-carbonate pathway in the iroko system, fluxes of matter have been identified, described, and evaluated from field to microscopic scales. In the first centimeters of the soil profile, decaying of the organic matter allows the release of whewellite crystals, mainly due to the action of termites and saprophytic fungi. Regarding the carbonate flux, another direct consequence of wood feeding is a concomitant flux of carbonate formed in wood tissues, which is not consumed by termites. Nevertheless, calcite biomineralization of the tree is not a consequence of in situ oxalate consumption, but rather related to the oxalate oxidation inside the upper part of the soil. The consequence of this oxidation is the presence of carbonate ions in the soil solution pumped through the roots, leading to preferential mineralization of the roots and the trunk base. An ideal scenario for the iroko biomineralization and soil carbonate accumulation starts with oxalatization: as the iroko tree grows, the organic matter flux to the soil constitutes the litter. Therefore, an oxalate pool is formed on the forest ground. Then, wood rotting gents (mainly termites, fungi, and bacteria) release significant amounts of oxalate crystals from decaying plant tissues. In addition some of these gents are themselves producers of oxalate (fungi). Both processes contribute to a soil pool of "available" oxalate crystals. Oxalate consumption by oxalotrophic bacteria can start. Carbonate and calcium ions present in the soil solution represent the end products of the oxalate-carbonate pathway. The solution is pumped through the

  11. CONCENTRATION OF Pu USING OXALATE TYPE CARRIER

    DOEpatents

    Ritter, D.M.; Black, R.P.S.

    1960-04-19

    A method is given for dissolving and reprecipitating an oxalate carrier precipitate in a carrier precipitation process for separating and recovering plutonium from an aqueous solution. Uranous oxalate, together with plutonium being carried thereby, is dissolved in an aqueous alkaline solution. Suitable alkaline reagents are the carbonates and oxulates of the alkali metals and ammonium. An oxidizing agent selected from hydroxylamine and hydrogen peroxide is then added to the alkaline solution, thereby oxidizing uranium to the hexavalent state. The resulting solution is then acidified and a source of uranous ions provided in the acidified solution, thereby forming a second plutoniumcarrying uranous oxalate precipitate.

  12. Atomically mixed Fe-group nanoalloys: catalyst design for the selective electrooxidation of ethylene glycol to oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takeshi; Sadakiyo, Masaaki; Ooi, Mei Lee; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Matsumura, Syo; Kato, Kenichi; Takeguchi, Tatsuya; Ozawa, Nobuki; Kubo, Momoji; Yamauchi, Miho

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate electric power generation via the electrooxidation of ethylene glycol (EG) on a series of Fe-group nanoalloy (NA) catalysts in alkaline media. A series of Fe-group binary NA catalysts supported on carbon (FeCo/C, FeNi/C, and CoNi/C) and monometallic analogues (Fe/C, Co/C, and Ni/C) were synthesized. Catalytic activities and product distributions on the prepared Fe-group NA catalysts in the EG electrooxidation were investigated by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry, and compared with those of the previously reported FeCoNi/C, which clarified the contributory factors of the metal components for the EG electrooxidation activity, C2 product selectivity, and catalyst durability. The Co-containing catalysts, such as Co/C, FeCo/C, and FeCoNi/C, exhibit relatively high catalytic activities for EG electrooxidation, whereas the catalytic performances of Ni-containing catalysts are relatively low. However, we found that the inclusion of Ni is a requisite for the prevention of rapid degradation due to surface modification of the catalyst. Notably, FeCoNi/C shows the highest selectivity for oxalic acid production without CO2 generation at 0.4 V vs. the reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE), resulting from the synergetic contribution of all of the component elements. Finally, we performed power generation using the direct EG alkaline fuel cell in the presence of the Fe-group catalysts. The power density obtained on each catalyst directly reflected the catalytic performances elucidated in the electrochemical experiments for the corresponding catalyst. The catalytic roles and alloying effects disclosed herein provide information on the design of highly efficient electrocatalysts containing Fe-group metals. PMID:25848911

  13. Removal of arsenic and cadmium with sequential soil washing techniques using Na2EDTA, oxalic and phosphoric acid: Optimization conditions, removal effectiveness and ecological risks.

    PubMed

    Wei, Meng; Chen, Jiajun; Wang, Xingwei

    2016-08-01

    Testing of sequential soil washing in triplicate using typical chelating agent (Na2EDTA), organic acid (oxalic acid) and inorganic weak acid (phosphoric acid) was conducted to remediate soil contaminated by heavy metals close to a mining area. The aim of the testing was to improve removal efficiency and reduce mobility of heavy metals. The sequential extraction procedure and further speciation analysis of heavy metals demonstrated that the primary components of arsenic and cadmium in the soil were residual As (O-As) and exchangeable fraction, which accounted for 60% and 70% of total arsenic and cadmium, respectively. It was determined that soil washing agents and their washing order were critical to removal efficiencies of metal fractions, metal bioavailability and potential mobility due to different levels of dissolution of residual fractions and inter-transformation of metal fractions. The optimal soil washing option for arsenic and cadmium was identified as phosphoric-oxalic acid-Na2EDTA sequence (POE) based on the high removal efficiency (41.9% for arsenic and 89.6% for cadmium) and the minimal harmful effects of the mobility and bioavailability of the remaining heavy metals. PMID:27179243

  14. Zirconium-carbon hybrid sorbent for removal of fluoride from water: oxalic acid mediated Zr(IV) assembly and adsorption mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Halla, Velazquez-Jimenez Litza; Hurt Robert, H; Juan, Matos; Rene, Rangel-Mendez Jose

    2014-01-01

    When activated carbon (AC) is modified with zirconium(IV) by impregnation or precipitation, the fluoride adsorption capacity is typically improved. There is significant potential to improve these hybrid sorbent by controlling the impregnation conditions, which determine the assembly and dispersion of the Zr phases on carbon surfaces. Here, commercial activated carbon was modified with Zr(IV) together with oxalic acid (OA) used to maximize the zirconium dispersion and enhance fluoride adsorption. Adsorption experiments were carried out at pH 7 and 25 °C with a fluoride concentration of 40 mg L−1. The OA/Zr ratio was varied to determine the optimal conditions for subsequent fluoride adsorption. The data was analyzed using the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. FTIR, XPS and the surface charge distribution were performed to elucidate the adsorption mechanism. Potentiometric titrations showed that the modified activated carbon (ZrOx-AC) possesses positive charge at pH lower than 7, and FTIR analysis demonstrated that zirconium ions interact mainly with carboxylic groups on the activated carbon surfaces. Moreover, XPS analysis demonstrated that Zr(IV) interacts with oxalate ions, and the fluoride adsorption mechanism is likely to involve –OH− exchange from zirconyl oxalate complexes. PMID:24359079

  15. Speciation in experimental C-O-H fluids produced by the thermal dissociation of oxalic acid dihydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, G.B.; Chou, I.-Ming; Pasteris, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    Fluid speciations and their related reaction pathways were studied in C-O-H-system fluids produced by the thermal dissociation of oxalic acid dihydrate (OAD: H2C2O4 ?? 2H2O) sealed in silica glass capsules. Experiments were conducted in the temperature range 230-750??C, with bulk fluid densities in the range 0.01-0.53 g/cm3. Pressure was controlled by temperature and density in the isochoric systems. The quenched products of dissociation experiments were an aqueous liquid and one (supercritical fluid) or, rarely, two (vapor plus liquid) carbonic phase (s). In-situ Raman microanalyses were performed on the quenched carbonic phases at room temperature, at which fluid pressures ranged from about 50 to 340 bars. Bulk fluid speciations were reconstructed from the Raman analyses via mass balance constraints, and appear to monitor the true fluid speciations at run conditions. In experiments from the lowtemperature range (230-350??C), fluid speciations record the dissociation of OAD according to the reaction OAD = CO2 + CO + 3H2O. A process of the form CO + H2O = CO2 + H2 is driven to the right with increasing temperature. The hydrogen gas produced tends to escape from the sample systems via diffusion into/through the silica glass capsules, shifting bulk compositions toward equimolar binary H2O-CO2 mixtures. The speciations of fluids in experiments with minimal hydrogen loss show poor agreement with speciations calculated for equilibrium fluids by the corresponding-states model of Saxena and Fei (1988). Such disagreement suggests that the formations of CH4 and graphite are metastably inhibited in the current experiments, which correlates with their absence or trivial abundances in experimental products. Moreover, calculations in which the stabilities of methane and graphite are suppressed suggest that such metastable equilibrium is approached only in experiments at temperatures greater than about 600-650??C. These results have applications to fluid processes in geological

  16. Endoscopic and Histologic Findings in a Cohort of Uric Acid and Calcium Oxalate Stone Formers

    PubMed Central

    Viers, BR; Lieske, JC; Vrtiska, TJ; Herrera Hernandez, LP; Vaughan, LE; Mehta, RA; Bergstralh, EJ; Rule, AD; Holmes, DR; Krambeck, AE

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To characterize the endoscopic and histologic renal papillary lesions in a cohort of uric acid (UA) stone formers (SF). Methods Data was prospectively obtained during percutaneous nephrolithotomy between 2009–2013. Renal papillae were endoscopically analyzed to quantitate surface area (SA) occupied by plaque or plug, and biopsies were obtained. UA SF were compared to non-SF controls and patients with >50% CaOx in the absence of UA. Results There were 23 UA SF; of which 19 stones (83%) were admixed with CaOx and 4 (17%) were pure. Compared to CaOx SF and controls, UA SF had a higher prevalence of diabetes and obesity, greater serum creatinine and UA, lower eGFR and urine pH, and elevated UA supersaturation. Characteristics of UA SF were compared to 95 CaOx SF, and 19 controls. Overall, 23 (100%) UA SF had endoscopic plaque and 13 (57%) plugs. Endoscopically, UA SF displayed a greater incidence of plugging (57% vs 45% vs 11%; p=0.006) relative to CaOx SF and controls. Likewise, UA SF had a greater %SA of plugging (0.1 vs 0.0; p=0.002) and plaque (2.0 vs 0.9, p=0.006) than controls; but similar amounts to CaOx SF. Histologic plugs were similar in UA and CaOx SF, although CaOx SF demonstrated greater interstitial inflammation on endoscopic biopsy. Conclusions UA and CaOx SF have similar amounts of plaque, while UA SF have more endoscopic but not histological collecting duct plugs. These data suggest overlap between the pathogenesis of UA and CaOx stones. The anchoring site for UA stones remains uncertain. PMID:25681832

  17. Mineralogical basis for the interpretation of multi-element (ICP-AES), oxalic acid, and aqua regia partial digestions of stream sediments for reconnaissance exploration geochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, S.E.; Mosier, E.L.; Motooka, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    We have applied partial digestion procedures, primarily oxalic acid and aqua regia leaches, to several regional geochemical reconnaissance studies carried out using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analytical methods. We have chosen to use these two acids because the oxalic acid primarily attacks those compounds formed during secondary geochemical processes, whereas aqua regia will digest the primary sulfide phases as well as secondary phases. Application of the partial digestion technique has proven superior to total digestion because the concentration of metals in hydromorphic compounds and the sulfides is enhanced relative to the metals bound in the unattacked silicate phases. The aqua regia digestion attacks and leaches metals from the mafic chain silicates and the phyllosilicates (coordination number of VI or more), yielding a characteristic geochemical signature, but does not leach appreciable metal from many other silicates. In order to interpret the results from these leach studies, we have initiated an investigation of a large suite of hand-picked mineral separates. The study includes analyses of about two hundred minerals representing the common rock-forming minerals as well as end-member compositions of various silicates, oxides, sulfides, carbonates, sulfates, and some vanadates, molybdates, tungstates, and phosphates. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of leaching by acids of particular lattice sites in specific mineral structures. ?? 1987.

  18. High abundances of oxalic, azelaic, and glyoxylic acids and methylglyoxal in the open ocean with high biological activity: Implication for secondary OA formation from isoprene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bikkina, Srinivas; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Miyazaki, Yuzo; Fu, Pingqing

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric dicarboxylic acids (DCA) are a ubiquitous water-soluble component of secondary organic aerosols (SOA), which can act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), affecting the Earth's climate. Despite the high abundances of oxalic acid and related compounds in the marine aerosols, there is no consensus on what controls their distributions over the open ocean. Marine biological productivity could play a role in the production of DCA, but there is no substantial evidence to support this hypothesis. Here we present latitudinal distributions of DCA, oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls in the marine aerosols from the remote Pacific. Their concentrations were found several times higher in more biologically influenced aerosols (MBA) than less biologically influenced aerosols. We propose isoprene and unsaturated fatty acids as sources of DCA as inferred from significantly higher abundances of isoprene-SOA tracers and azelaic acid in MBA. These results have implications toward the reassessment of climate forcing feedbacks of marine-derived SOA.

  19. A simple, efficient and environmentally benign synthetic protocol for the synthesis of spirooxindoles using choline chloride-oxalic acid eutectic mixture as catalyst/solvent system.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Sarita; Rajawat, Anshu; Tailor, Yogesh Kumar; Kumar, Mahendra

    2014-01-01

    An efficient and environmentally benign domino protocol has been presented for the synthesis of structurally diverse spirooxindoles spiroannulated with pyranopyridopyrimidines, indenopyridopyrimidines, and chromenopyridopyrimidines involving three-component reaction of aminouracils, isatins and cyclic carbonyl compounds in deep eutectic solvent (choline chloride-oxalic acid: 1:1) which acts as efficient catalyst and environmentally benign reaction medium. The present protocol offers several advantages such as operational simplicity with easy workup, shorter reaction times excellent yields with superior atom economy and environmentally benign reaction conditions with the use of cost-effective, recyclable, non-toxic and bio-degradable DES as catalyst/solvent. PMID:25329839

  20. Biogenesis of Oxalate in Plant Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chi-Cheng; Beevers, Harry

    1968-01-01

    Red beet root discs aerated in potassium phosphate for 2 to 3 days and young spinach leaves actively produce oxalate. A series of labeled compounds was supplied to each of these tissues to determine the extent of conversion to oxalate. Similar results were obtained with the 2 tissues except that in the leaf tissue glyoxylate and glycolate were outstandingly good precursors. Carbon from glucose, acetate, and particularly from some acids of the tricarboxylic acid cycle was recovered in oxalate. Extracts from both tissues were found to contain an enzyme which converts oxaloacetate to oxalate and acetate. The enzyme was partially purified and some of its properties are described. A pathway of oxalate synthesis which does not include glycolate or its oxidase is therefore proposed. PMID:16656975

  1. Multi-element analysis of milk by ICP-oa-TOF-MS after precipitation of calcium and proteins by oxalic and nitric acid.

    PubMed

    Husáková, Lenka; Urbanová, Iva; Šrámková, Jitka; Konečná, Michaela; Bohuslavová, Jana

    2013-03-15

    In this work a simple technique employing oxalic and nitric acid to cow's milk samples prior to analysis by inductively coupled plasma orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ICP-oa-TOF-MS) was introduced. After the precipitation of calcium and proteins via oxalic and nitric acid, respectively, the resulting liquid phase was aspirated with a concentric glass nebulizer for ICP-TOF-MS determination of trace elements. Precipitation of proteins is essential for better separation of solid and liquid phase of modified samples. Separation of calcium as a precipitated non-soluble oxalate enables the elimination of spectral interferences originating from different calcium containing species like (40)Ca(35)Cl(+), (40)Ca(37)Cl(+), (43)Ca(16)O(+), (40)Ca(18)O(+), (44)Ca(16)O(+), (43)Ca(16)O(1)H(+) onto the determination of As, Se, Co and Ni whose assay is more difficult when using conventional quadrupole instruments. High detection capability is further an advantage as the approach enables the analysis without dilution. The methodology may serve, in addition, for a fast and sensitive determination of some other elements. After that, direct, reliable and simultaneous determination of 16 elements (Li, Be, B, V, Cr, Mn, Ni, Co, Ga, As, Se, Mo, Sn, Sb, Cs, Tl) at trace and ultra-trace levels in milk can be performed under optimum instrumental conditions and by using Rh as an internal standard. Accuracy and precision was assessed by measuring NCS ZC73015 milk powder control standard, yielding results in agreement with certified values and RSD <10%. The accuracy was also checked by comparison of the results of the proposed method with those found by a method based on a microwave-assisted digestion of real samples. PMID:23598096

  2. Reuse of sewage sludge as a catalyst in ozonation--efficiency for the removal of oxalic acid and the control of bromate formation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Gang; Pan, Zhi-Hui; Ma, Jun; Liu, Zheng-Qian; Zhao, Lei; Li, Jun-Jing

    2012-11-15

    Sewage derived sludge is produced with an annual amount increase of 2% all over the world and it is an urgent issue to be addressed by human being. In the present study, sludge was converted into sludge-based catalyst (SBC) with ZnCl2 as activation agent and characterized by several methods (e.g., scanning electron microscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscope and Fourier transform infrared spectroscope). Then it was used as a catalyst to enhance the removal of refractory organic matter, oxalic acid, and to control the formation of bromate (BrO3-) in bench semi-continuous ozonation experiments. The effects of various operating parameters on the control of BrO3- formation were investigated. Furthermore, the mechanism for the enhancement of organic matter removal and the control of BrO3- formation was discussed as well. Results indicate that the combination of SBC with ozone shows a strong synergistic effect, resulting in a notable improvement on oxalic acid removal. A crucial surface reaction mechanism for the enhancement of organic matter removal is proposed on the basis of negative effect of higher pH and no inhibition effect of tert-butanol. The control for BrO3- formation was demonstrated and the reason for its control in the process of O3/SBC is the combined effect of SBC reductive properties, ozone exposure decrease and hydrogen peroxide concentration increase. PMID:23021317

  3. Degradation of ascorbic acid in ethanolic solutions.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsin-Yun; Tsai, Yi-Chin; Fu, Chi-Chang; Wu, James Swi-Bea

    2012-10-24

    Ascorbic acid occurs naturally in many wine-making fruits. The industry also uses ascorbic acid as an antioxidant and color stabilizer in the making of alcoholic beverages including white wine, wine cooler, alcopop, and fruit liqueur. However, the degradation of ascorbic acid itself may cause browning and the deterioration of color quality. This study was aimed to monitor the degradation of ascorbic acid, the formation of degradation products, and the browning in storage of ascorbic acid containing 0-40% (v/v) ethanolic solutions buffered at pH 3.2 as models of alcoholic beverages. The results show that ascorbic acid degradation in the ethanolic solutions during storage follows first-order reaction, that the degradation and browning rates increase with the increase of ethanol concentration, that the activation energy for the degradation of ascorbic acid is in the range 10.35-23.10 (kcal/mol), that 3-hydroxy-2-pyrone is an indicator and a major product of ascorbic acid degradation, and that aerobic degradation pathway dominants over anaerobic pathway in ascorbic acid degradation in ethanolic solutions. PMID:22994409

  4. ANL progress in minimizing effects of LEU conversion on calcination of fission-product {sup 99}Mo acid waste solution.

    SciTech Connect

    Bakel, A.; Vandegrift, G.; Quigley, K.; Aase, S.; Neylon, M.; Carney, K.

    2003-01-01

    A partnership between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), MDS Nordion (MDSN), Atomic Energy Canada Limited (AECL) and SGN (France) has addressed the conversion of the MAPLE Reactor 99Mo production process from high-enriched uranium (HEU) targets to low-enriched uranium (LEU) targets. One effect of the conversion would be to increase the amount of solid uranium waste five-fold; we have worked to minimize the effect of the additional waste on the overall production process and, in particular, solid waste storage. Two processes were investigated for the treatment of the uranium-rich acidic waste solution: direct calcination, and oxalate precipitation as a prelude to calcination. Direct calcination generates a dense UO3 solid that should allow a significantly greater amount of uranium in one waste container than is planned for the HEU process, but doing so results in undesirable sputtering. These results suggest that direct calcination could be adapted for use with LEU targets without a large effect on the uranium waste treatment procedures. The oxalate-calcination generates a lower-density granular U3O8 product; sputtering is not significant during calcination of the uranyl oxalate precipitate. A physical means to densify the product would need to be developed to increase the amount of uranium in each waste container. Future work will focus on the specific chemical reactions that occur during the direct and oxalate calcination processes.

  5. The complexation of Cm(III) with oxalate in aqueous solution at T = 20-90 °C: a combined TRLFS and quantum chemical study.

    PubMed

    Skerencak-Frech, Andrej; Maiwald, Martin; Trumm, Michael; Froehlich, Daniel R; Panak, Petra J

    2015-02-16

    The complexation of Cm(III) with oxalate is studied in aqueous solution as a function of the ligand concentration, the ionic strength (NaCl), and the temperature (T = 20–90 °C) by time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) and quantum chemical calculations. Four complex species ([Cm(Ox)n](3–2n), n = 1, 2, 3, 4) are identified, and their molar fractions are determined by peak deconvolution of the emission spectra. The conditional log K′n(T) values of the first three complexes are calculated and extrapolated to zero ionic strength with the specific ion interaction theory approach. The [Cm(Ox)4](5–) complex forms only at high temperatures. Thus, the log K4(0)(T) value was determined at T > 60 °C. The log K1(0)(25 °C) = 6.86 ± 0.02 decreases by 0.1 logarithmic units in the studied temperature range. The log K2(0)(25 °C) = 4.68 ± 0.09 increases by 0.35, and log K3(0)(25 °C) = 2.11 ± 0.05 increases by 0.37 orders of magnitude. The log Kn(0)(T) (n = 1, 2, 3) values are linearly correlated with the reciprocal temperature. Thus, their temperature dependencies are fitted with the linear Van’t Hoff equation yielding the standard reaction enthalpy (ΔrHm(0)) and standard reaction entropy (ΔrSm(0)) of the stepwise formation of the [Cm(Ox)n](3–2n) species (n = 1, 2, 3). Furthermore, the binary ion–ion interaction coefficients of the four Cm(III) oxalate species with Cl(–)/Na(+) are determined. The binding energies, bond lengths, and bond angles of the different Cm(III) oxalate complexes are calculated in the gas phase as well as in a box containing 1000 H2O molecules by ab inito calculations and molecular dynamics simulations, respectively. PMID:25646935

  6. A Novel Methodology for Processing of Plutonium-Bearing Waste as Ammonium Plutonium(III)-Oxalate

    SciTech Connect

    Sali, Sanjay Krishnarao; Noronha, Donal Marshal; Mhatre, Hemakant Ramkrishna; Mahajan, Murlidhar Anna; Chander, Keshav; Aggarwal, Suresh Kumar; Venugopal, Venkatarama

    2005-09-15

    A novel methodology has been developed for the recovery of Pu from different types of waste solutions generated during various operations involved in the chemical quality control/assurance of nuclear fuels. The method is based on the precipitation of Pu as ammonium plutonium(III)-oxalate and involves the adjustment of acidity of the Pu solution to 1 N, the addition of ascorbic acid (0.05 M) to reduce Pu to Pu(III), followed by the addition of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} (0.5 M) and a stoichiometric amount of saturated oxalic acid maintaining a 0.2 M excess of oxalic acid concentration in the supernatant. The precipitate was characterized by X-ray powder diffraction and thermal and chemical analysis and was found to have the composition NH{sub 4}Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2}.3H{sub 2}O. This compound can be easily decomposed to PuO{sub 2} on heating in air at 823 K. Decontamination factors of U, Fe, and Cr determined showed quantitative removal of these ions during the precipitation of Pu as ammonium plutonium(III)-oxalate.A semiautomatic assembly based on the transfer of solutions by suction arrangement was designed and fabricated for processing large volumes of Pu solution. This assembly reduced the corrosion of the glove-box material and offered the advantage of lower radiation exposure to the working personnel.

  7. Dentin Hypersensitivity and Oxalates

    PubMed Central

    Cunha-Cruz, J.; Stout, J.R.; Heaton, L.J.; Wataha, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of dentin hypersensitivity with oxalates is common, but oxalate efficacy remains unclear. Our objective was to systematically review clinical trials reporting an oxalate treatment compared with no treatment or placebo with a dentin hypersensitivity outcome. Risk-of-bias assessment and data extraction were performed independently by two reviewers. Standardized mean differences (SMD) were estimated by random-effects meta-analysis. Of 677 unique citations, 12 studies with high risk-of-bias were included. The summary SMD for 3% monohydrogen-monopotassium oxalate (n = 8 studies) was -0.71 [95% Confidence Interval: -1.48, 0.06]. Other treatments, including 30% dipotassium oxalate (n = 1), 30% dipotassium oxalate plus 3% monohydrogen monopotassium oxalate (n = 3), 6% monohydrogen monopotassium oxalate (n = 1), 6.8% ferric oxalate (n = 1), and oxalate-containing resin (n = 1), also were not statistically significantly different from placebo treatments. With the possible exception of 3% monohydrogen monopotassium oxalate, available evidence currently does not support the recommendation of dentin hypersensitivity treatment with oxalates. PMID:21191127

  8. Diffusion of sulfuric acid in concentrated solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Umino, S.; Newman, J. )

    1993-08-01

    Aqueous sulfuric acid is an economically important chemical reagent. It is one of the largest volume chemical commodities, finding uses in fertilizer production, petroleum refining, extraction of metals from their ores, production of inorganic pigments, pickling of iron and steel, synthesis of surface-active agents, and as a reactant in the lead-acid storage battery. The restricted diffusion method was used to measure the differential diffusion coefficient of sulfuric acid in water at 25 C for the concentration range from 0.3 to 7.5 molar. The concentration gradients of diffusing species were observed by Rayleigh interferometry. Experimental transport data are analyzed with concentrated solution theory of electrolytes in order to elucidate macroscopic transport characteristics of sulfuric acid in terms of specific binary interactions in solution. Results indicate that the transport properties of sulfuric acid are determined by the hydrogen ion-water molecule.

  9. Reference electrode for strong oxidizing acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Rigdon, Lester P.; Harrar, Jackson E.; Bullock, Sr., Jack C.; McGuire, Raymond R.

    1990-01-01

    A reference electrode for the measurement of the oxidation-reduction potentials of solutions is especially suitable for oxidizing solutions such as highly concentrated and fuming nitric acids, the solutions of nitrogen oxides, N.sub.2 O.sub.4 and N.sub.2 O.sub.5, in nitric acids. The reference electrode is fabricated of entirely inert materials, has a half cell of Pt/Ce(IV)/Ce(III)/70 wt. % HNO.sub.3, and includes a double-junction design with an intermediate solution of 70 wt. % HNO.sub.3. The liquid junctions are made from Corning No. 7930 glass for low resistance and negligible solution leakage.

  10. OXALATE MASS BALANCE DURING CHEMICAL CLEANING IN TANK 6F

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.; Fink, S.

    2011-07-22

    The Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is preparing Tank 6F for closure. The first step in preparing the tank for closure is mechanical sludge removal. Following mechanical sludge removal, SRS performed chemical cleaning with oxalic acid to remove the sludge heel. Personnel are currently assessing the effectiveness of the chemical cleaning to determine whether the tank is ready for closure. SRR personnel collected liquid samples during chemical cleaning and submitted them to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for analysis. Following chemical cleaning, they collected a solid sample (also known as 'process sample') and submitted it to SRNL for analysis. The authors analyzed these samples to assess the effectiveness of the chemical cleaning process. Analysis of the anions showed the measured oxalate removed from Tank 6F to be approximately 50% of the amount added in the oxalic acid. To close the oxalate mass balance, the author collected solid samples, leached them with nitric acid, and measured the concentration of cations and anions in the leachate. Some conclusions from this work are: (1) Approximately 65% of the oxalate added as oxalic acid was removed with the decanted liquid. (2) Approximately 1% of the oxalate (added to the tank as oxalic acid) formed precipitates with compounds such as nickel, manganese, sodium, and iron (II), and was dissolved with nitric acid. (3) As much as 30% of the oxalate may have decomposed forming carbon dioxide. The balance does not fully account for all the oxalate added. The offset represents the combined uncertainty in the analyses and sampling.

  11. Effects of oxalate exposure on Madin-Darby canine kidney cells in culture: renal prothrombin fragment-1 mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Moryama, Manabu T; Domiki, Chizue; Miyazawa, Katsuhito; Tanaka, Tatsuro; Suzuki, Koji

    2005-12-01

    It has been suggested that renal tubular cell damage induced by oxalic acid, one of the components of urinary calculi, may be involved in a variety of ways in the development of urolithiasis. During our study on a calculus related protein, renal prothrombin fragment-1 (RPTF-1), we noted that this is an inflammation related substance that mediates an acute inflammatory reaction, one of the original roles of prothrombin. RPTF-1 is a part of prothrombin that is a coagulation factor known to be expressed in the renal tubule. We examined whether oxalic acid may cause cytotoxic effects on tubular epithelial cells and whether such chemical stimulation may promote the translation of RPTF-1 mRNA into RPTF-1 proteins. We used Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells derived from the distal tubule of a dog kidney. In this study, the effects of oxalic acid in culture solution at different concentrations on cytotoxicity were assessed using a MTT assay. The location of active oxygen species was identified using dichlorofluorescein diacetate. After the prothrombin sequence of RPTF-1 was confirmed in MDCK cells, RPTF-1 mRNA expression was determined by RT-PCR. The gene sequence of the same promoter area was ligated, and a luciferase sequence was inserted downstream of the vector. The target sequence was transfected into MDCK cells and the relation between oxalic acid and prothrombin promoter was examined. In addition, the variable expression of RPTF-1 mRNA was quantitatively compared depending on oxalic acid concentrations using real-time PCR. When cytotoxicity was investigated, cells were not damaged but, by contrast, were stimulated and activated under oxalic acid below a certain concentration. The relation between cytotoxicity on the cultured MDCK cell membrane and active oxygen species was confirmed. Luminescence in MDCK cells containing the luciferase gene was detected by the addition of oxalic acid, which activated the prothrombin promoter. A part of the prothrombin gene

  12. In vivo oxalate degradation by liposome encapsulated oxalate oxidase in rat model of hyperoxaluria

    PubMed Central

    Dahiya, Tulika; Pundir, C.S.

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: High level of urinary oxalate substantially increases the risk of hyperoxaluria, a significant risk factor for urolithiasis. The primary goal of this study was to reduce urinary oxalate excretion employing liposome encapsulated oxalate oxidase in animal model. Methods: A membrane bound oxalate oxidase was purified from Bougainvillea leaves. The enzyme in its native form was less effective at the physiological pH of the recipient animal. To increase its functional viability, the enzyme was immobilized on to ethylene maleic anhydride (EMA). Rats were injected with liposome encapsulated EMA- oxalate oxidase and the effect was observed on degradation of oxalic acid. Results: The enzyme was purified to apparent homogeneity with 60-fold purification and 31 per cent yield. The optimum pH of EMA-derivative enzyme was 6.0 and it showed 70 per cent of its optimal activity at pH 7.0. The EMA-bound enzyme encapsulated into liposome showed greater oxalate degradation in 15 per cent casein vitamin B6 deficient fed rats as compared with 30 per cent casein vitamin B6 deficient fed rats and control rats. Interpretation & conclusions: EMA-oxalate oxidase encapsulated liposome caused oxalate degradation in experimental hyperoxaluria indicating that the enzyme could be used as a therapeutic agent in hyperoxaluria leading to urinary stones. PMID:23481063

  13. Micro-mechanical model of calcium oxalate monohydrate aggregation in supersaturated solutions: Effect of crystal form and seed concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitt, K.; Mitchell, G. P.; Ray, A.; Heywood, B. R.; Hounslow, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    In this paper we report crystal growth and aggregation behaviour for calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) in a stirred tank for two differing seed types - rounded and well defined - at various seed loadings. Initially we used our previously developed model [1] to study the growth and aggregation. In this model a dimensionless strength, termed the Mumtaz number, has been formulated, which accounts for the effects of stirring, supersaturation and particle size on the aggregation rate of COM. Subtle differences in growth and aggregation rates were observed between the two populations of crystals; the model was unable to describe this behaviour. These differences were attributed to their different surface characteristics. Growth and aggregation kinetic parameters were also seen to be highly dependent on seed loading. This is attributed to poisoning by an unknown trace impurity, the effect of which is dependent on seed loading. This has led to the development of a new model to account for both surface characteristics and the presence of a trace impurity that adsorbs onto the surface of crystals pinning growth steps. At low seeds loadings, surface coverage by the impurity is higher and so growth rates are reduced. These results are very well described by an extension of the approach of Weaver et al. [2]. We use Liew et al.'s [1] model to represent aggregation by a collision efficiency that depends on a modified Mumtaz number. This model requires the determination of a simple group of parameters that we term the 'aggregation tendency'. The relationship between aggregation tendency and growth rate constant suggests that aggregation is in fact controlled by the growth rate of some high-energy facets not expressed macroscopically. The fact that aggregation tendency increases with surface coverage of impurity further suggests that the presence of impurity gives rise to longer or more numerous linear features along which initial contact between crystals takes place. The combined

  14. A Potentiometric, Spectrophotometric and Pitzer Ion-Interaction Study of Reaction Equilibria in the Aqueous H+-Al3+, H+-Oxalate and H+-Al3+-Oxalate Systems up to 5 mol*dm-3 NaCl

    SciTech Connect

    Boily, Jean F.; Qafoku, Odeta; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2007-12-01

    Aluminium-oxalate complexation was determined in acidic media of aqueous NaCl solutions ranging from 0.1-5.0 mol•dm-3. Complexation in the H+-Al3+ and H+-Oxalate systems was also studied to provide a set of internally consistent thermodynamic data. The ionic strength dependent formation constants describing the stabilities of the Al3+, AlOH2+, Al3(OH)45+, Al13O4(OH)247+, H2L, HL-, L2-, AlL+, AlL2- and AlL33- species (where L is the oxalate ion) was also described using a Pitzer ion interaction model. The derived parameters can be used to predict chemical speciation in the H+-Al3+-Oxalate system in the 0.1-5.0 mol•dm-3 NaCl range.

  15. Electrical conductivity of acidic sulfate solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majima, Hiroshi; Peters, Ernest; Awakura, Yasuhiro; Park, Sung Kook

    1987-03-01

    The electrical conductivities of the aqueous solution system of H2SO4-MSO4 (involving ZnSO4, MgSO4, Na2SO4, and (NH4)2SO4), reported by Tozawa et al., were examined in terms of a (H2O) and H+ ion concentration. The equations to compute the concentrations of various species in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions containing metal sulfates were derived for a typical example of the H2SO4-ZnSO4-MgSO4-(Na2SO4)-H2O system. It was found that the H+ ion concentrations in concentrated sulfuric acid solutions corresponding to practical zinc electrowinning solutions are very high and remain almost constant with or without the addition of metal sulfates. The addition of metal sulfates to aqueous sulfuric acid solution causes a decrease in electrical conductivity, and this phenomenon is attributed to a decrease in water activity, which reflects a decrease in the amount of free water. The relationship between conductivity and water activity at a constant H+ ion concentration is independent of the kind of sulfates added. On the other hand, any increase in H+ ion concentration results in an increase in electrical conductivity. A novel method for the prediction of electrical conductivity of acidic sulfate solution is proposed that uses the calculated data of water activity and the calculated H+ ion concentration. Also, the authors examined an extension of the Robinson-Bower equation to calculate water activity in quarternary solutions based on molarity instead of molality, and found that such calculated values are in satisfactory agreement with those determined experimentally by a transpiration method.

  16. Aquatic photolysis: photolytic redox reactions between goethite and adsorbed organic acids in aqueous solutions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldberg, M.C.; Cunningham, K.M.; Weiner, Eugene R.

    1993-01-01

    Photolysis of mono and di-carboxylic acids that are adsorbed onto the surface of the iron oxyhydroxide (goethite) results in an oxidation of the organic material and a reduction from Fe(III) to Fe(II) in the iron complex. There is a subsequent release of Fe2+ ions into solution. At constant light flux and constant solution light absorption, the factors responsible for the degree of photolytic reaction include: the number of lattice sites that are bonded by the organic acid; the rate of acid readsorption to the surface during photolysis; the conformation and structure of the organic acid; the degree of oxidation of the organic acid; the presence or absence of an ??-hydroxy group on the acid, the number of carbons in the di-acid chain and the conformation of the di-acid. The ability to liberate Fe(III) at pH 6.5 from the geothite lattice is described by the lyotropic series: tartrate>citrate> oxalate > glycolate > maleate > succinate > formate > fumarate > malonate > glutarate > benzoate = butanoate = control. Although a larger amount of iron is liberated, the series is almost the same at pH 5.5 except that oxalate > citrate and succinate > maleate. A set of rate equations are given that describe the release of iron from the goethite lattice. It was observed that the pH of the solution increases during photolysis if the solutions are not buffered. There is evidence to suggest the primary mechanism for all these reactions is an electron transfer from the organic ligand to the Fe(III) in the complex. Of all the iron-oxyhydroxide materials, crystalline goethite is the least soluble in water; yet, this study indicates that in an aqueous suspension, iron can be liberated from the goethite lattice. Further, it has been shown that photolysis can occur in a multiphase system at the sediment- water interface which results in an oxidation of the organic species and release of Fe2+ to solution where it becomes available for further reaction. ?? 1993.

  17. Evidence for size and charge permselectivity of rat ascending colon. Effects of ricinoleate and bile salts on oxalic acid and neutral sugar transport.

    PubMed Central

    Kathpalia, S C; Favus, M J; Coe, F L

    1984-01-01

    We have measured unidirectional transmural fluxes of oxalate and neutral sugars across rat ascending colon in vitro, under short-circuit conditions, to characterize permeability barriers selective for size and charge. Ionic oxalate appears to be transported preferentially to sodium oxalate. Mucosal addition of taurocholate (1 mM), deoxycholate (1 mM), or ricinoleate (1 mM) increased bidirectional oxalate fluxes, and the ricinoleate effects were independent of medium calcium. Bidirectional fluxes of uncharged sugar molecules fell sharply at molecular weights above 76 (molecular radius above 3 A), and oxalate transport was retarded relative to that of uncharged molecules of similar size, suggesting that there is both size and charge permselectivity. Ricinoleate increased fluxes of all neutral molecules tested but changed neither the exclusion limits nor the cation selectivity of the epithelium. Bile salts and ricinoleate increase oxalate transport, probably by making more channels available, but do not alter size and charge selectivity. PMID:6432849

  18. Oxalates in some Indian green leafy vegetables.

    PubMed

    Radek, M; Savage, G P

    2008-05-01

    The soluble and total oxalate contents of 11 leafy vegetables grown in India were determined. Spinach, purple and green amaranth and colocasia contained high levels of total oxalates, which ranged from 5,138.0 +/- 37.6 mg/100 g dry matter up to 12,576.1 +/- 107.9 mg/100 g dry matter. Seven other leafy vegetables (curry, drumstick, shepu, fenugreek, coriander, radish and onion stalks) contained only insoluble oxalate, which ranged from 209.0 +/- 5.0 mg/100 g dry matter to 2,774.9 +/-18.4 mg/100 g dry matter. In vitro digestion of the samples showed that the gastric available oxalate was 10% lower than the values obtained from acid extraction and that intestinal available oxalate was 20% lower than the values obtained following hot water extraction. The percentage calcium bound in the insoluble oxalate fraction of the dried leafy vegetables ranged from 3.3% to 86.7% of the total calcium. Addition of four different sources of calcium (low fat milk, whole milk, calcium carbonate and calcium sulphate) resulted in a range of 32-100% reductions of intestinal available oxalate in the mixture. PMID:18335334

  19. Sustainable Soil Washing: Shredded Card Filtration of Potentially Toxic Elements after Leaching from Soil Using Organic Acid Solutions.

    PubMed

    Ash, Christopher; Drábek, Ondřej; Tejnecký, Václav; Jehlička, Jan; Michon, Ninon; Borůvka, Luboš

    2016-01-01

    Shredded card (SC) was assessed for use as a sorbent of potentially toxic elements (PTE) carried from contaminated soil in various leachates (oxalic acid, formic acid, CaCl2, water). We further assessed SC for retention of PTE, using acidified water (pH 3.4). Vertical columns and a peristaltic pump were used to leach PTE from soils (O and A/B horizons) before passing through SC. Sorption onto SC was studied by comparing leachates, and by monitoring total PTE contents on SC before and after leaching. SC buffers against acidic soil conditions that promote metals solubility; considerable increases in solution pH (+4.49) were observed. Greatest differences in solution PTE content after leaching with/without SC occurred for Pb. In oxalic acid, As, Cd, Pb showed a high level of sorption (25, 15, and 58x more of the respective PTE in leachates without SC). In formic acid, Pb sorption was highly efficient (219x more Pb in leachate without SC). In water, only Pb showed high sorption (191x more Pb in leachate without SC). In desorption experiments, release of PTE from SC varied according to the source of PTE (organic/mineral soil), and type of solvent used. Arsenic was the PTE most readily leached in desorption experiments. Low As sorption from water was followed by fast release (70% As released from SC). A high rate of Cd sorption from organic acid solutions was followed by strong retention (~12% Cd desorption). SC also retained Pb after sorption from water, with subsequent losses of ≤8.5% of total bound Pb. The proposed use of this material is for the filtration of PTE from extract solution following soil washing. Low-molecular-mass organic acids offer a less destructive, biodegradable alternative to strong inorganic acids for soil washing. PMID:26900684

  20. Sustainable Soil Washing: Shredded Card Filtration of Potentially Toxic Elements after Leaching from Soil Using Organic Acid Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Ash, Christopher; Drábek, Ondřej; Tejnecký, Václav; Jehlička, Jan; Michon, Ninon; Borůvka, Luboš

    2016-01-01

    Shredded card (SC) was assessed for use as a sorbent of potentially toxic elements (PTE) carried from contaminated soil in various leachates (oxalic acid, formic acid, CaCl2, water). We further assessed SC for retention of PTE, using acidified water (pH 3.4). Vertical columns and a peristaltic pump were used to leach PTE from soils (O and A/B horizons) before passing through SC. Sorption onto SC was studied by comparing leachates, and by monitoring total PTE contents on SC before and after leaching. SC buffers against acidic soil conditions that promote metals solubility; considerable increases in solution pH (+4.49) were observed. Greatest differences in solution PTE content after leaching with/without SC occurred for Pb. In oxalic acid, As, Cd, Pb showed a high level of sorption (25, 15, and 58x more of the respective PTE in leachates without SC). In formic acid, Pb sorption was highly efficient (219x more Pb in leachate without SC). In water, only Pb showed high sorption (191x more Pb in leachate without SC). In desorption experiments, release of PTE from SC varied according to the source of PTE (organic/mineral soil), and type of solvent used. Arsenic was the PTE most readily leached in desorption experiments. Low As sorption from water was followed by fast release (70% As released from SC). A high rate of Cd sorption from organic acid solutions was followed by strong retention (~12% Cd desorption). SC also retained Pb after sorption from water, with subsequent losses of ≤8.5% of total bound Pb. The proposed use of this material is for the filtration of PTE from extract solution following soil washing. Low-molecular-mass organic acids offer a less destructive, biodegradable alternative to strong inorganic acids for soil washing. PMID:26900684

  1. Speciation in aqueous solutions of nitric acid.

    PubMed

    Hlushak, S; Simonin, J P; De Sio, S; Bernard, O; Ruas, A; Pochon, P; Jan, S; Moisy, P

    2013-02-28

    In this study, speciation in aqueous solutions of nitric acid at 25 °C was assessed in two independent ways. First, Raman experiments were carried out and interpreted in terms of free nitrate ions, ion pairs and neutral HNO(3) molecules. In parallel, a model was developed to account for the formation of these two kinds of pairs. It was based on an extension of the binding mean spherical approximation (BiMSA), or associative MSA (AMSA), in which the size and the charge of the ions in the chemical pair may differ from those of the free ions. A simultaneous fit of the osmotic coefficient and of the proportion of free ions (obtained from Raman spectroscopy experiments) led to an estimation of the speciation in nitric acid solutions. The result obtained using this procedure was compared with the estimation obtained from the Raman experiments. PMID:23258765

  2. Contribution of dietary oxalate to urinary oxalate excretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, R. P.; Goodman, H. O.; Assimos, D. G.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The amount of oxalate excreted in urine has a significant impact on calcium oxalate supersaturation and stone formation. Dietary oxalate is believed to make only a minor (10 to 20%) contribution to the amount of oxalate excreted in urine, but the validity of the experimental observations that support this conclusion can be questioned. An understanding of the actual contribution of dietary oxalate to urinary oxalate excretion is important, as it is potentially modifiable. METHODS: We varied the amount of dietary oxalate consumed by a group of adult individuals using formula diets and controlled, solid-food diets with a known oxalate content, determined by a recently developed analytical procedure. Controlled solid-food diets were consumed containing 10, 50, and 250 mg of oxalate/2500 kcal, as well as formula diets containing 0 and 180 mg oxalate/2500 kcal. Changes in the content of oxalate and other ions were assessed in 24-hour urine collections. RESULTS: Urinary oxalate excretion increased as dietary oxalate intake increased. With oxalate-containing diets, the mean contribution of dietary oxalate to urinary oxalate excretion ranged from 24.4 +/- 15.5% on the 10 mg/2500 kcal/day diet to 41.5 +/- 9.1% on the 250 mg/2500 kcal/day diet, much higher than previously estimated. When the calcium content of a diet containing 250 mg of oxalate was reduced from 1002 mg to 391 mg, urinary oxalate excretion increased by a mean of 28.2 +/- 4.8%, and the mean dietary contribution increased to 52.6 +/- 8.6%. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that dietary oxalate makes a much greater contribution to urinary oxalate excretion than previously recognized, that dietary calcium influences the bioavailability of ingested oxalate, and that the absorption of dietary oxalate may be an important factor in calcium oxalate stone formation.

  3. Alkaline earth cation extraction from acid solution

    DOEpatents

    Dietz, Mark; Horwitz, E. Philip

    2003-01-01

    An extractant medium for extracting alkaline earth cations from an aqueous acidic sample solution is described as are a method and apparatus for using the same. The separation medium is free of diluent, free-flowing and particulate, and comprises a Crown ether that is a 4,4'(5')[C.sub.4 -C.sub.8 -alkylcyclohexano]18-Crown-6 dispersed on an inert substrate material.

  4. An oxalyl-CoA dependent pathway of oxalate catabolism plays a role in regulating calcium oxalate crystal accumulation and defending against oxalate-secreting phytopathogens in Medicago truncatula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Considering the widespread occurrence of oxalate in nature and its broad impact on a host of organisms, it is surprising that so little is known about the turnover of this important acid. In plants, oxalate oxidase is the most well studied enzyme capable of degrading oxalate, but not all plants pos...

  5. Complexation of Am(III) by oxalate in NaClO{sub 4} media

    SciTech Connect

    Choppin, G.R.; Chen, J.F.

    1995-09-01

    The complexation of Am(III) by oxalate has been investigated in solutions of NaClO{sub 4} up to 9.0 M ionic strength at 25{degrees}C. The dissociation constants of oxalic acid were determined by potentiometric titration, while the stability constants of the Am(III)-oxalate complexation were measured by the solvent extraction technique. A thermodynamic model was constructed to predict the apparent equilibrium constants at different ionic strengths by applying the Pitzer equation using parameters for the Na{sup +}-HOx{sup -}, Na{sup +}-Ox{sup -}, AmOx{sup +}-ClO{sub 4}{sup -}, and Na{sup +}-Am(Ox){sub 2}{sup -} interactions obtained by fitting the data.

  6. Anaerobic Oxalate Degradation: Widespread Natural Occurrence in Aquatic Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Richard L.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    1983-01-01

    Significant concentrations of oxalate (dissolved plus particulate) were present in sediments taken from a diversity of aquatic environments, ranging from 0.1 to 0.7 mmol/liter of sediment. These included pelagic and littoral sediments from two freshwater lakes (Searsville Lake, Calif., and Lake Tahoe, Calif.), a hypersaline, meromictic, alkaline lake (Big Soda Lake, Nev.), and a South San Francisco Bay mud flat and salt marsh. The oxalate concentration of several plant species which are potential detrital inputs to these aquatic sediments ranged from 0.1 to 5.0% (wt/wt). In experiments with litter bags, the oxalate content of Myriophyllum sp. samples buried in freshwater littoral sediments decreased to 7% of the original value in 175 days. This suggests that plant detritus is a potential source of the oxalate within these sediments. [14C]oxalic acid was anaerobically degraded to 14CO2 in all sediment types tested, with higher rates evident in littoral sediments than in the pelagic sediments of the lakes studied. The turnover time of the added [14C]oxalate was less than 1 day in Searsville Lake littoral sediments. The total sediment oxalate concentration did not vary significantly between littoral and pelagic sediments and therefore did not appear to be controlling the rate of oxalate degradation. However, depth profiles of [14C]oxalate mineralization and dissolved oxalate concentration were closely correlated in freshwater littoral sediments; both were greatest in the surface sediments (0 to 5 cm) and decreased with depth. The dissolved oxalate concentration (9.1 μmol/liter of sediment) was only 3% of the total extractable oxalate (277 μmol/liter of sediment) at the sediment surface. These results suggest that anaerobic oxalate degradation is a widespread phenomenon in aquatic sediments and may be limited by the dissolved oxalate concentration within these sediments. PMID:16346332

  7. Evaluation of Oxalate Concentration in the U.S. Spinach Germplasm Collection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In addition to its high nutrient content, spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) is also known to have greater amount of oxalic acid than most crops. Oxalic acid may form crystals with minerals to reduce the bioavailability and absorption of calcium and iron in diets, and calcium oxalate may deposit in the...

  8. Seasonal and spatial variability of the OM/OC mass ratios and high regional correlation between oxalic acid and zinc in Chinese urban organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, L.; Fu, T.-M.; Cao, J. J.; Lee, S. C.; Wang, G. H.; Ho, K. F.; Cheng, M.-C.; You, C.-F.; Wang, T. J.

    2013-04-01

    We calculated the organic matter to organic carbon mass ratios (OM/OC mass ratios) in PM2.5 collected from 14 Chinese cities during summer and winter of 2003 and analyzed the causes for their seasonal and spatial variability. The OM/OC mass ratios were calculated two ways. Using a mass balance method, the calculated OM/OC mass ratios averaged 1.92 ± 0.39 year-round, with no significant seasonal or spatial variation. The second calculation was based on chemical species analyses of the organic compounds extracted from the PM2.5 samples using dichloromethane/methanol and water. The calculated OM/OC mass ratio in summer was relatively high (1.75 ± 0.13) and spatially-invariant due to vigorous photochemistry and secondary organic aerosol (OA) production throughout the country. The calculated OM/OC mass ratio in winter (1.59 ± 0.18) was significantly lower than that in summer, with lower values in northern cities (1.51 ± 0.07) than in southern cities (1.65 ± 0.15). This likely reflects the wider usage of coal for heating purposes in northern China in winter, in contrast to the larger contributions from biofuel and biomass burning in southern China in winter. On average, organic matter constituted 36% and 34% of Chinese urban PM2.5 mass in summer and winter, respectively. We report, for the first time, a high regional correlation between Zn and oxalic acid in Chinese urban aerosols in summer. This is consistent with the formation of stable Zn oxalate complex in the aerosol phase previously proposed by Furukawa and Takahashi (2011). We found that many other dicarboxylic acids were also highly correlated with Zn in the summer Chinese urban aerosol samples, suggesting that they may also form stable organic complexes with Zn. Such formation may have profound implications for the atmospheric abundance and hygroscopic properties of aerosol dicarboxylic acids.

  9. Acidities of Water and Methanol in Aqueous Solution and DMSO

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Daqing

    2009-01-01

    The relative acidities of water and methanol have been a nagging issue. In gas phase, methanol is more acidic than water by 36.0 kJ/mol; however, in aqueous solution, the acidities of methanol and water are almost identical. The acidity of an acid in solution is determined by both the intrinsic gas-phase ionization Gibbs energy and the solvent…

  10. ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING: EFFECTIVENESS OF THE UV LAMP TO DECOMPOSE OXALATES

    SciTech Connect

    Ketusky, E.; Huff, T.; Sudduth, C.

    2010-01-19

    Enhanced Chemical Cleaning is a new process scheduled to begin cleaning Savannah River Site High Level Waste Tanks in 2012. It is an improvement over the current chemical cleaning method, in that it minimizes downstream impacts on the High Level Waste System. It is based on a state of the art scale removal process used on the secondary side of nuclear power plants, with modifications to accommodate the unique constraints created by the tanks. Both Enhanced Chemical Cleaning and the scale removal process are founded on dissolving metal oxides/hydroxides using oxalic acid, with subsequent oxalate decomposition via hydroxylation using ozone or peroxide, and UV light as a catalyst. A divergence Enhanced Chemical Cleaning has from nuclear power scale removal is the significantly increased solids concentration during oxalate decomposition. These solids can limit the ability of the UV light to create hydroxyl radicals, either by limiting the ability of the light to penetrate through the solution, or by increasing the fouling rate on the UV light. Both will decrease the overall catalytic effectiveness, thereby decreasing the concentration of formed hydroxyl radicals. The hydroxyl radicals are the driving force behind the oxalate decomposition. To understand the impact of increased solids, testing was performed using a medium pressure UV light inside an ozone supplied Oxalate Decomposition Reactor. Using a dissolved metal sludge simulant with an initial oxalate concentration greater than 12,000 ppm, and an initial pH of about 2.0, the spent acid solution was recirculated through the reactor, while the UV light was allowed to foul. For the first few hours, the oxalate decomposition rate was about 1,300 ppm/hour. After about 3 hours, enough time for the UV lamp to foul, the oxalate decomposition rate decreased to about 500 ppm/hour. The decomposition rate then remained roughly constant for the next 16 hours. Overall, testing showed that the oxalate destruction rate decreased

  11. Pictorial Analogies XI: Concentrations and Acidity of Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortman, John J.

    1994-01-01

    Presents pictorial analogies of several concepts relating to solutions for chemistry students. These include concentration of solution, strength of solution, supersaturated solution, and conjugate acid-base pairs. Among the examples are comparison of acid strength to percentage of strong soldiers or making supersaturated solution analogous to a…

  12. Determination of uric acid in urine, saliva and calcium oxalate renal calculi by high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Perelló, Joan; Sanchis, Pilar; Grases, Félix

    2005-09-25

    A very simple and direct method for determination of uric acid, in various biological matrices, based on high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry is described. Chromatographic separations were performed with a stationary phase Zorbax Sax Column, an anion exchange resin, with 50% sodium citrate 1 mM at pH 6.5 and 50% acetonitrile as mobile phase delivered at a flow rate of 1 ml/min. The detector counted negative ions by monitoring m/z 167.1, which corresponds to the urate anion. The method does not use an internal standard but quality control samples were used. Intra-day precision ranged between 1.1 and 1.5%, whereas inter-day precision was between 1.3 and 2.8% (n=5) working with some selected standards. Recovery tests of added standard have been successfully performed in urine and saliva samples, thus showing an appropriate accuracy of the method. The limit of quantitation found was 70 microg/l. Different urine and saliva samples were analyzed using an alternative analytical methodology based on an enzymatic reaction and photometric detection at 520 nm, resulting both methods comparable at a 95% confidence level. The method has been also applied to the determination of trace amounts of uric acid in the core of some selected calcium oxalate renal calculi. PMID:16061429

  13. Arthritis associated with calcium oxalate crystals in an anephric patient treated with peritoneal dialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, A.; Ryan, L.M.; McCarty, D.J.

    1988-09-02

    The authors report a case of calcium oxalate arthropathy in a woman undergoing intermittent peritoneal dialysis who was not receiving pharmacologic doses of ascorbic acid. She developed acute arthritis, with calcium oxalate crystals in Heberden's and Bouchard's nodes, a phenomenon previously described in gout. Intermittent peritoneal dialysis may be less efficient than hemodialysis in clearing oxalate, and physicians should now consider calcium oxalate-associated arthritis in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis who are not receiving large doses of ascorbic acid.

  14. A one-pot gold seed-assisted synthesis of gold/platinum wire nanoassemblies and their enhanced electrocatalytic activity for the oxidation of oxalic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Juan; Fang, Chun-Long; Liu, Zong-Huai; Chen, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) noble metal nanoassemblies composed of one-dimensional (1D) nanowires have been attracting much interest due to the unique physical and chemical properties of 1D nanowires as well as the particular interconnected open-pore structure of 3D nanoassemblies. In this work, well-defined Au/Pt wire nanoassemblies were synthesized by using a facile NaBH4 reduction method in the presence of a branched form of polyethyleneimine (PEI). A study of the growth mechanism indicated the morphology of the final product to be highly related to the molecular structure of the polymeric amine. Also, the preferred Pt-on-Pt deposition contributed to the formation of the 1D Pt nanowires. The Au/Pt wire nanoassemblies were functionalized with PEI at the same time that these nanoassemblies were synthesized due to the strong N-Pt bond. The chemically functionalized Au/Pt wire nanoassemblies exhibited better electrocatalytic activity for the electro-oxidation of oxalic acid than did commercial Pt black.Three-dimensional (3D) noble metal nanoassemblies composed of one-dimensional (1D) nanowires have been attracting much interest due to the unique physical and chemical properties of 1D nanowires as well as the particular interconnected open-pore structure of 3D nanoassemblies. In this work, well-defined Au/Pt wire nanoassemblies were synthesized by using a facile NaBH4 reduction method in the presence of a branched form of polyethyleneimine (PEI). A study of the growth mechanism indicated the morphology of the final product to be highly related to the molecular structure of the polymeric amine. Also, the preferred Pt-on-Pt deposition contributed to the formation of the 1D Pt nanowires. The Au/Pt wire nanoassemblies were functionalized with PEI at the same time that these nanoassemblies were synthesized due to the strong N-Pt bond. The chemically functionalized Au/Pt wire nanoassemblies exhibited better electrocatalytic activity for the electro-oxidation of oxalic acid than

  15. Electrochemical synthesis and characterization of zinc oxalate nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Roushani, Mahmoud; Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Synthesis of zinc oxalate nanoparticles via electrolysis of a zinc plate anode in sodium oxalate solutions. ► Design of a Taguchi orthogonal array to identify the optimal experimental conditions. ► Controlling the size and shape of particles via applied voltage and oxalate concentration. ► Characterization of zinc oxalate nanoparticles by SEM, UV–vis, FT-IR and TG–DTA. - Abstract: A rapid, clean and simple electrodeposition method was designed for the synthesis of zinc oxalate nanoparticles. Zinc oxalate nanoparticles in different size and shapes were electrodeposited by electrolysis of a zinc plate anode in sodium oxalate aqueous solutions. It was found that the size and shape of the product could be tuned by electrolysis voltage, oxalate ion concentration, and stirring rate of electrolyte solution. A Taguchi orthogonal array design was designed to identify the optimal experimental conditions. The morphological characterization of the product was carried out by scanning electron microscopy. UV–vis and FT-IR spectroscopies were also used to characterize the electrodeposited nanoparticles. The TG–DTA studies of the nanoparticles indicated that the main thermal degradation occurs in two steps over a temperature range of 350–430 °C. In contrast to the existing methods, the present study describes a process which can be easily scaled up for the production of nano-sized zinc oxalate powder.

  16. Rapid analysis of acid in etching and pickling solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Tumbina, V.P.; Chinokalov, V.Ya.

    1995-02-01

    A computational method for determining sulfuric and hydrochloric acids in two-component etching solutions has been proposed. The method makes use of linear relationships, assuming that the sum of free and bound acid in solution remains constant.

  17. Reactive solute transport in acidic streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Broshears, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    Spatial and temporal profiles of Ph and concentrations of toxic metals in streams affected by acid mine drainage are the result of the interplay of physical and biogeochemical processes. This paper describes a reactive solute transport model that provides a physically and thermodynamically quantitative interpretation of these profiles. The model combines a transport module that includes advection-dispersion and transient storage with a geochemical speciation module based on MINTEQA2. Input to the model includes stream hydrologic properties derived from tracer-dilution experiments, headwater and lateral inflow concentrations analyzed in field samples, and a thermodynamic database. Simulations reproduced the general features of steady-state patterns of observed pH and concentrations of aluminum and sulfate in St. Kevin Gulch, an acid mine drainage stream near Leadville, Colorado. These patterns were altered temporarily by injection of sodium carbonate into the stream. A transient simulation reproduced the observed effects of the base injection.

  18. Oxalate in grain amaranth.

    PubMed

    Gélinas, Bruce; Seguin, Philippe

    2007-06-13

    Grain amaranth (Amaranthus spp.) is a widely adaptable C4 pseudo-cereal crop that has interesting nutritional characteristics including high protein and calcium concentrations and a lack of gluten. To date, no antinutrient has been found at problematic levels in grain amaranth; however, oxalate has not been thoroughly studied. Dietary oxalate is a potential risk factor for kidney stone development, and its presence in food lowers calcium and magnesium availability. Oxalate concentration and forms and calcium and magnesium concentrations were determined in 30 field-grown grain amaranth genotypes from the species A. cruentus, A. hybrid, and A. hypochondriacus. The effects of seeding date and fertilization with calcium ammonium nitrate were evaluated in field experiments conducted in multiple environments; the effects of cooking were also evaluated. Mean total oxalate concentration in the 30 genotypes analyzed was 229 mg/100 g, with values ranging between 178 and 278 mg/100 g, the greatest proportion being insoluble (average of 80%). Calcium concentration averaged 186 mg/100 g and ranged between 134 and 370 mg/100 g, whereas magnesium averaged 280 mg/100 g and ranged between 230 and 387 mg/100 g. Fertilization only marginally increased total oxalate concentration and had no effects on other variables. Seeding date had no effects on any of the variables studied. Boiling increased the proportion of soluble oxalate but did not affect total oxalate concentration. Grain amaranth can be considered a high oxalate source, however, as most is in insoluble form, and due to its high calcium and magnesium concentrations, oxalate absorbability could be low. This should be confirmed by bioavailability studies. PMID:17511467

  19. Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Dietz, Mark L.

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

  20. Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1993-01-01

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

  1. Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1994-09-06

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid. 4 figs.

  2. Reduction of Oxalate Levels in Tomato Fruit and Consequent Metabolic Remodeling Following Overexpression of a Fungal Oxalate Decarboxylase1[W

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Niranjan; Ghosh, Rajgourab; Ghosh, Sudip; Narula, Kanika; Tayal, Rajul; Datta, Asis; Chakraborty, Subhra

    2013-01-01

    The plant metabolite oxalic acid is increasingly recognized as a food toxin with negative effects on human nutrition. Decarboxylative degradation of oxalic acid is catalyzed, in a substrate-specific reaction, by oxalate decarboxylase (OXDC), forming formic acid and carbon dioxide. Attempts to date to reduce oxalic acid levels and to understand the biological significance of OXDC in crop plants have met with little success. To investigate the role of OXDC and the metabolic consequences of oxalate down-regulation in a heterotrophic, oxalic acid-accumulating fruit, we generated transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants expressing an OXDC (FvOXDC) from the fungus Flammulina velutipes specifically in the fruit. These E8.2-OXDC fruit showed up to a 90% reduction in oxalate content, which correlated with concomitant increases in calcium, iron, and citrate. Expression of OXDC affected neither carbon dioxide assimilation rates nor resulted in any detectable morphological differences in the transgenic plants. Comparative proteomic analysis suggested that metabolic remodeling was associated with the decrease in oxalate content in transgenic fruit. Examination of the E8.2-OXDC fruit proteome revealed that OXDC-responsive proteins involved in metabolism and stress responses represented the most substantially up- and down-regulated categories, respectively, in the transgenic fruit, compared with those of wild-type plants. Collectively, our study provides insights into OXDC-regulated metabolic networks and may provide a widely applicable strategy for enhancing crop nutritional value. PMID:23482874

  3. Containment of nitric acid solutions of Plutonium-238

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimus, M. A. H.; Silver, G. L.; Pansoy-Hjelvik, L.; Ramsey, K. B.

    1999-01-01

    The corrosion of various metals that could be used to contain nitric acid solutions of Pu-238 has been studied. Tantalum and tantalum/2.5% tungsten resisted the test solvent better than 304L stainless steel and several INCONEL alloys. The solvent used to imitate nitric acid solutions of Pu-238 contained 70% nitric acid, hydrofluoric acid, and ammonium hexanitratocerate.

  4. A one-pot gold seed-assisted synthesis of gold/platinum wire nanoassemblies and their enhanced electrocatalytic activity for the oxidation of oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Bai, Juan; Fang, Chun-Long; Liu, Zong-Huai; Chen, Yu

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) noble metal nanoassemblies composed of one-dimensional (1D) nanowires have been attracting much interest due to the unique physical and chemical properties of 1D nanowires as well as the particular interconnected open-pore structure of 3D nanoassemblies. In this work, well-defined Au/Pt wire nanoassemblies were synthesized by using a facile NaBH4 reduction method in the presence of a branched form of polyethyleneimine (PEI). A study of the growth mechanism indicated the morphology of the final product to be highly related to the molecular structure of the polymeric amine. Also, the preferred Pt-on-Pt deposition contributed to the formation of the 1D Pt nanowires. The Au/Pt wire nanoassemblies were functionalized with PEI at the same time that these nanoassemblies were synthesized due to the strong N-Pt bond. The chemically functionalized Au/Pt wire nanoassemblies exhibited better electrocatalytic activity for the electro-oxidation of oxalic acid than did commercial Pt black. PMID:26771075

  5. Analysis of nanopore arrangement and structural features of anodic alumina layers formed by two-step anodizing in oxalic acid using the dedicated executable software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaraska, Leszek; Stępniowski, Wojciech J.; Sulka, Grzegorz D.; Ciepiela, Eryk; Jaskuła, Marian

    2014-02-01

    Anodic porous alumina layers were fabricated by a two-step self-organized anodization in 0.3 M oxalic acid under various anodizing potentials ranging from 30 to 60 V at two different temperatures (10 and 17 ∘C). The effect of anodizing conditions on structural features and pore arrangement of AAO was investigated in detail by using the dedicated executable publication combined with ImageJ software. With increasing anodizing potential, a linear increase of the average pore diameter, interpore distance, wall thickness and barrier layer thickness, as well as a decrease of the pore density, were observed. In addition, the higher pore diameter and porosity values were obtained for samples anodized at the elevated temperature, independently of the anodizing potential. A degree of pore order was investigated on the basis of Delaunay triangulations (defect maps) and calculation of pair distribution or angle distribution functions (PDF or ADF), respectively. All methods confirmed that in order to obtain nanoporous alumina with the best, hexagonal pore arrangement, the potential of 40 V should be applied during anodization. It was confirmed that the dedicated executable publication can be used to a fast and complex analysis of nanopore arrangement and structural features of nanoporous oxide layers.

  6. Surface aggregation of urinary proteins and aspartic acid-rich peptides on the faces of calcium oxalate monohydrate investigated by in situ force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, M L; Qiu, S R; Hoyer, J R; Casey, W H; Nancollas, G H; De Yoreo, J J

    2008-05-28

    The growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate in the presence of Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP), osteopontin (OPN), and the 27-residue synthetic peptides (DDDS){sub 6}DDD and (DDDG){sub 6}DDD [where D = aspartic acid and X = S (serine) or G (glycine)] was investigated via in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that these three growth modulators create extensive deposits on the crystal faces. Depending on the modulator and crystal face, these deposits can occur as discrete aggregates, filamentary structures, or uniform coatings. These proteinaceous films can lead to either the inhibition or increase of the step speeds (with respect to the impurity-free system) depending on a range of factors that include peptide or protein concentration, supersaturation and ionic strength. While THP and the linear peptides act, respectively, to exclusively increase and inhibit growth on the (-101) face, both exhibit dual functionality on the (010) face, inhibiting growth at low supersaturation or high modulator concentration and accelerating growth at high supersaturation or low modulator concentration. Based on analyses of growth morphologies and dependencies of step speeds on supersaturation and protein or peptide concentration, we argue for a picture of growth modulation that accounts for the observations in terms of the strength of binding to the surfaces and steps and the interplay of electrostatic and solvent-induced forces at crystal surface.

  7. EPR Spin Trapping of an Oxalate-Derived Free Radical in the Oxalate Decarboxylase Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Imaram, Witcha; Saylor, Benjamin T.; Centonze, Christopher P.; Richards, Nigel G. J.; Angerhofer, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    EPR spin trapping experiments on bacterial oxalate decarboxylase from Bacillus subtilis under turn-over conditions are described. The use of doubly 13C-labeled oxalate leads to a characteristic splitting of the observed radical adducts using the spin trap N-tert-butyl-α-phenylnitrone linking them directly to the substrate. The radical was identified as the carbon dioxide radical anion which is a key intermediate in the hypothetical reaction mechanism of both decarboxylase and oxidase activities. X-ray crystallography had identified a flexible loop, SENS161-4, which acts as a lid to the putative active site. Site directed mutagenesis of the hinge amino acids, S161 and T165 was explored and showed increased radical trapping yields compared to the wild type. In particular, T165V shows approximately ten times higher radical yields while at the same time its decarboxylase activity was reduced by about a factor of ten. This mutant lacks a critical H-bond between T165 and R92 resulting in compromised control over its radical chemistry allowing the radical intermediate to leak into the surrounding solution. PMID:21277974

  8. ADVANCED OXIDATION: OXALATE DECOMPOSITION TESTING WITH OZONE

    SciTech Connect

    Ketusky, E.; Subramanian, K.

    2012-02-29

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), oxalic acid is currently considered the preferred agent for chemically cleaning the large underground Liquid Radioactive Waste Tanks. It is applied only in the final stages of emptying a tank when generally less than 5,000 kg of waste solids remain, and slurrying based removal methods are no-longer effective. The use of oxalic acid is preferred because of its combined dissolution and chelating properties, as well as the fact that corrosion to the carbon steel tank walls can be controlled. Although oxalic acid is the preferred agent, there are significant potential downstream impacts. Impacts include: (1) Degraded evaporator operation; (2) Resultant oxalate precipitates taking away critically needed operating volume; and (3) Eventual creation of significant volumes of additional feed to salt processing. As an alternative to dealing with the downstream impacts, oxalate decomposition using variations of ozone based Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) were investigated. In general AOPs use ozone or peroxide and a catalyst to create hydroxyl radicals. Hydroxyl radicals have among the highest oxidation potentials, and are commonly used to decompose organics. Although oxalate is considered among the most difficult organic to decompose, the ability of hydroxyl radicals to decompose oxalate is considered to be well demonstrated. In addition, as AOPs are considered to be 'green' their use enables any net chemical additions to the waste to be minimized. In order to test the ability to decompose the oxalate and determine the decomposition rates, a test rig was designed, where 10 vol% ozone would be educted into a spent oxalic acid decomposition loop, with the loop maintained at 70 C and recirculated at 40L/min. Each of the spent oxalic acid streams would be created from three oxalic acid strikes of an F-area simulant (i.e., Purex = high Fe/Al concentration) and H-area simulant (i.e., H area modified Purex = high Al/Fe concentration) after nearing

  9. Multiscale structural characterizations of mixed U(iv)-An(iii) oxalates (An(iii) = Pu or Am) combining XAS and XRD measurements.

    PubMed

    Arab-Chapelet, B; Martin, P M; Costenoble, S; Delahaye, T; Scheinost, A C; Grandjean, S; Abraham, F

    2016-04-28

    Mixed actinide(III,IV) oxalates of the general formula M2.2UAn(C2O4)5·nH2O (An = Pu or Am and M = H3O(+) and N2H5(+)) have been quantitatively precipitated by oxalic precipitation in nitric acid medium (yield >99%). Thorough multiscale structural characterization using XRD and XAS measurements confirmed the existence of mixed actinide oxalate solid solutions. The XANES analysis confirmed that the oxidation states of the metallic cations, tetravalent for uranium and trivalent for plutonium and americium, are maintained during the precipitation step. EXAFS measurements show that the local environments around U(+IV), Pu(+III) and Am(+III) are comparable, and the actinides are surrounded by ten oxygen atoms from five bidentate oxalate anions. The mean metal-oxygen distances obtained by XAS measurements are in agreement with those calculated from XRD lattice parameters. PMID:26979820

  10. Determination of nitric acid in highly radioactive solutions by the method of coulometric titration

    SciTech Connect

    Gromov, V.S.; Kuperman, A.Ya.; Smirnov, Yu.A.

    1988-11-01

    A procedure, a cell, and an electronic block have been developed for a long-distance determination of nitric acid in highly radioactive industrial solutions by coulometric titration under hot chamber conditions. A solution of a mixture of ammonium and potassium oxalates was used for the background and anoide electrolytes. This solution prevents the hydrolysis of the metal ions and appreciably decreases the rate of accumulation of the acid in the anode chamber of the cell. Titration with 0.1-0.5 A currents is carried out with internal generation of hydroxyl ions. The cell was prepared from a radiation-resistant and transparent material, poly(methyl methacrylate). The anode and cathode chambers were separated by a cellophane membrane, reinforced by a porous glass filter. By using the electronic coulometric block working together with a pH-meter (EV-74 or I-130) and with an automatic titration block (BAT-15), the titration can be carried out automatically, and the determination results can be obtained in a digital form.

  11. Ultra-structural mapping of sugarcane bagasse after oxalic acid fiber expansion (OAFEX) and ethanol production by Candida shehatae and Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Diminishing supplies of fossil fuels and oil spills are rousing to explore the alternative sources of energy that can be produced from non-food/feed-based substrates. Due to its abundance, sugarcane bagasse (SB) could be a model substrate for the second-generation biofuel cellulosic ethanol. However, the efficient bioconversion of SB remains a challenge for the commercial production of cellulosic ethanol. We hypothesized that oxalic-acid-mediated thermochemical pretreatment (OAFEX) would overcome the native recalcitrance of SB by enhancing the cellulase amenability toward the embedded cellulosic microfibrils. Results OAFEX treatment revealed the solubilization of hemicellulose releasing sugars (12.56 g/l xylose and 1.85 g/l glucose), leaving cellulignin in an accessible form for enzymatic hydrolysis. The highest hydrolytic efficiency (66.51%) of cellulignin was achieved by enzymatic hydrolysis (Celluclast 1.5 L and Novozym 188). The ultrastructure characterization of SB using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform–near infrared spectroscopy (FT-NIR), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed structural differences before and after OAFEX treatment with enzymatic hydrolysis. Furthermore, fermentation mediated by C. shehatae UFMG HM52.2 and S. cerevisiae 174 showed fuel ethanol production from detoxified acid (3.2 g/l, yield 0.353 g/g; 0.52 g/l, yield, 0.246 g/g) and enzymatic hydrolysates (4.83 g/l, yield, 0.28 g/g; 6.6 g/l, yield 0.46 g/g). Conclusions OAFEX treatment revealed marked hemicellulose degradation, improving the cellulases’ ability to access the cellulignin and release fermentable sugars from the pretreated substrate. The ultrastructure of SB after OAFEX and enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulignin established thorough insights at the molecular level. PMID:23324164

  12. Genomic evaluation of oxalate-degrading transgenic soybean in response to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxalate oxidases catalyze the degradation of oxalic acid (OA). Highly resistant transgenic soybean carrying an oxalate oxidase (OxO) gene and its susceptible parent soybean line, AC Colibri, were tested for genome-wide gene expression in response to the necrotrophic, OA producing pathogen Sclerotini...

  13. Nitric acid uptake by sulfuric acid solutions under stratospheric conditions - Determination of Henry's Law solubility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reihs, Christa M.; Golden, David M.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1990-01-01

    The uptake of nitric acid by sulfuric acid solutions representative of stratospheric particulate at low temperatures was measured to determine the solubility of nitric acid in sulfuric acid solutions as a function of H2SO4 concentration and solution temperature. Solubilities are reported for sulfuric acid solutions ranging from 58 to 87 wt pct H2SO4 over a temperature range from 188 to 240 K, showing that, in general, the solubility of nitric acid increases with decreasing sulfuric acid concentration and with decreasing temperature. The measured solubilities indicate that nitric acid in the global stratosphere will be found predominantly in the gas phase.

  14. Effects of EDTA and low molecular weight organic acids on soil solution properties of a heavy metal polluted soil.

    PubMed

    Wu, L H; Luo, Y M; Christie, P; Wong, M H

    2003-02-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the effects of EDTA and low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOA) on the pH, total organic carbon (TOC) and heavy metals in the soil solution in the rhizosphere of Brassica juncea grown in a paddy soil contaminated with Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd. The results show that EDTA and LMWOA have no effect on the soil solution pH. EDTA addition significantly increased the TOC concentrations in the soil solution. The TOC concentrations in treatments with EDTA were significantly higher than those in treatments with LMWOA. Adding 3 mmol kg(-1) EDTA to the soil markedly increased the total concentrations of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd in the soil solution. Compared to EDTA, LMWOA had a very small effect on the metal concentrations. Total concentrations in the soil solution followed the sequence: EDTA > citric acid (CA) approximately oxalic acid (OA) approximately malic acid (MA) for Cu and Pb; EDTA > MA > CA approximately OA for Zn; and EDTA > MA > CA > OA for Cd. The labile concentrations of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd showed similar trends to the total concentrations. PMID:12688497

  15. SEPARATION OF PLUTONIUM FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS BY ION-EXCHANGE

    DOEpatents

    Schubert, J.

    1958-06-01

    A process is described for the separation of plutonium from an aqueous solution of a plutonium salt, which comprises adding to the solution an acid of the group consisting of sulfuric acid, phosphoric acid, and oxalic acid, and mixtures thereof to provide an acid concentration between 0.0001 and 1 M, contacting the resultant solution with a synthetic organic anion exchange resin, and separating the aqueous phase and the resin which contains the plutonium.

  16. Removal of azo dye C.I. acid red 14 from contaminated water using Fenton, UV/H(2)O(2), UV/H(2)O(2)/Fe(II), UV/H(2)O(2)/Fe(III) and UV/H(2)O(2)/Fe(III)/oxalate processes: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Daneshvar, N; Khataee, A R

    2006-01-01

    The decolorization of the solution containing a common textile and leather dye, C.I. Acid Red 14 (AR14), at pH 3 by hydrogen peroxide photolysis, Fenton, Fenton-like and photo-Fenton processes was studied. The dark and light reactions were carried out in stirred batch photoreactor equipped with an UV-C lamp (30 W) as UV light source. The experiments showed that the dye was resistant to the UV illumination, but was oxidized when one of Fe(II), Fe(III) and H(2)O(2) compounds was present. It was also found that UV light irradiation can accelerate significantly the rate of AR14 decolorization in the presence of Fe(III)/H(2)O(2) or Fe(II)/H(2)O(2), comparing to that in the dark. The effect of different system variables like initial concentration of the azo dye, effect of UV light irradiation, initial concentration of Fe(II) or Fe(III) and added oxalate ion has been investigated. The results showed that the decolorization efficiency of AR14 at the reaction time of 2 min follows the decreasing order: UV/H(2)O(2)/Fe(III)/oxalate > UV/H(2)O(2)/Fe(III) > UV/H(2)O(2)/Fe(II) > UV/H(2)O(2). Our results also showed that the UV/H(2)O(2)/Fe(III)/oxalate process was appropriate as the effective treatment method for decolorization of a real dyeing and finishing. The mechanism for each process is also discussed and linked together for understanding the observed differences in reactivity. PMID:16484066

  17. Quasi-intrinsic colossal permittivity in Nb and In co-doped rutile TiO2 nanoceramics synthesized through a oxalate chemical-solution route combined with spark plasma sintering.

    PubMed

    Han, HyukSu; Dufour, Pascal; Mhin, Sungwook; Ryu, Jeong Ho; Tenailleau, Christophe; Guillemet-Fritsch, Sophie

    2015-07-14

    Nb and In co-doped rutile TiO2 nanoceramics (n-NITO) were successfully synthesized through a chemical-solution route combined with a low temperature spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique. The particle morphology and the microstructure of n-NITO compounds were nanometric in size. Various techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermogravimetric (TG)/differential thermal analysis (DTA), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and Raman spectroscopy were used for the structural and compositional characterization of the synthesized compound. The results indicated that the as-synthesized n-NITO oxalate as well as sintered ceramic have a co-doped single phase of titanyl oxalate and rutile TiO2, respectively. Broadband impedance spectroscopy revealed that novel colossal permittivity (CP) was achieved in n-NITO ceramics exhibiting excellent temperature-frequency stable CP (up to 10(4)) as well as low dielectric loss (∼5%). Most importantly, detailed impedance data analyses of n-NITO compared to microcrystalline NITO (μ-NITO) demonstrated that the origin of CP in NITO bulk nanoceramics might be related with the pinned electrons in defect clusters and not to extrinsic interfacial effects. PMID:26058428

  18. Process for the recovery of strontium from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Dietz, Mark L.

    1992-01-01

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium and technetium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant is a macrocyclic polyether in a diluent which is insoluble in water, but which will itself dissolve a small amount of water. The process will extract strontium and technetium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

  19. Process for the recovery of strontium from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1992-03-31

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium and technetium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant is a macrocyclic polyether in a diluent which is insoluble in water, but which will itself dissolve a small amount of water. The process will extract strontium and technetium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid. 5 figs.

  20. Process for the recovery of strontium from acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1990-12-31

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium and technetium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant is a macrocyclic polyether in a diluent which is insoluble in water, but which will itself dissolve a small amount of water. The process will extract strontium and technetium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

  1. Rapid oxidation and immobilization of arsenic by contact glow discharge plasma in acidic solution.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Hu, Ping; Zheng, Xing; Zheng, Jingtang; Tan, Minghui; Wu, Mingbo; Xue, Qinzhong

    2015-04-01

    Arsenic is a priority pollutant in aquatic ecosystem and therefore the remediation of arsenic-bearing wastewater is an important environmental issue. This study unprecedentedly reported simultaneous oxidation of As(III) and immobilization of arsenic can be achieved using contact glow discharge process (CGDP). CGDP with thinner anodic wire and higher energy input were beneficial for higher As(V) production efficiency. Adding Fe(II) in CGDP system significantly enhanced the oxidation rate of As(III) due to the generations of additional OH and Fe(IV) species, accompanied with which arsenic can be simultaneously immobilized in one process. Arsenic immobilization can be favorably obtained at solution pH in the range of 4.0-6.0 and Fe(II) concentration from 250 to 1000 μM. The presence of organics (i.e., oxalic acid, ethanol and phenol) retarded the arsenic immobilization by scavenging OH or complexing Fe(III) in aqueous solution. On the basis of these results, a mechanism was proposed that the formed ionic As(V) rapidly coprecipitated with Fe(III) ions or was adsorbed on the ferric oxyhydroxides with the formation of amorphous ferric arsenate-bearing ferric oxyhydroxides. This CGDP-Fenton system was of great interest for engineered systems concerned with the remediation of arsenic containing wastewater. PMID:25600320

  2. Selective adsorption in two porous triazolate–oxalate-bridged antiferromagnetic metal-azolate frameworks obtained via in situ decarboxylation of 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole-5-carboxylic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Juan-Juan; Xu, Xia; Jiang, Ning; Wu, Ya-Qin; Zhang, Xian-Ming

    2015-03-15

    Solvothermal reactions of metal salts, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole-5-carboxylic acid (H{sub 2}atzc) and ammonium oxalate in different temperature produced two metal azolate frameworks, namely, [Cu{sub 3}(atzc){sub 2}(atz)(ox)]·1.5H{sub 2}O (1) and [Co{sub 5}(atz){sub 4}(ox){sub 3}(HCOO){sub 2}]·DMF (2) (H{sub 2}atzc=3-amino-1,2,4-triazole-5-carboxylic acid, Hatz=3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, and ox=oxalate), in which the atzc precusor was in situ decarboxylated. Structural determination reveals that 1 contains [Cu{sub 3}(atzc){sub 2}(atz)]{sup 2−} layers of mixed μ{sub 4}-atzc and μ{sub 3}-atz ligands, which are pillared by ox{sup 2−} groups to form a 3D porous framework. Compound 2 contains 2D layers with basic spindle-shaped decanuclear units, which extended by ox{sup 2−} and formates to form 3D porous framework. Gas adsorption investigation revealed that two kinds of frameworks exhibited selective CO{sub 2} over N{sub 2} sorption. Moreover, activated 2 shows H{sub 2} storage capacity. Additionally, magnetic properties of both the compounds have been investigated. - Graphical abstract: Solvothermal reactions of metal salts, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole-5-carboxylate and oxalate produced two metal azolate frameworks, which could store gas molecules, especially H{sub 2} due to small pores. in situ decarboxylation of precursor was observed. - Highlights: • Two MAFs were synthesized via in situ decarboxylation of H{sub 2}atzc. • Both activated frameworks exhibited selective CO{sub 2} over N{sub 2} sorption. • Activated 2 could adsorb H{sub 2}, which makes it promising candidates for gas storage.

  3. REDUCTION OF ACIDITY OF NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS BY USE OF FORMALDEHYDE

    DOEpatents

    Healy, T.V.

    1958-05-20

    A continuous method is described of concentrating by evaporation and reducing the nitrate ion content of an aqueous solution of metallic salts containing nitric acid not in excess of 8N. It consists of heating the solution and then passing formaldehyde into the heated solution to bring about decomposition of the nitric acid. The evolved gases containing NO are contacted countercurrently with an aqueous metal salt solution containing nitric acid in excess of 8N so as to bring about decomposition of the nitric acid and lower the normality to at least 8N, whereupon it is passed into the body of heated solution.

  4. Acute oxalate nephropathy due to 'Averrhoa bilimbi' fruit juice ingestion.

    PubMed

    Bakul, G; Unni, V N; Seethaleksmy, N V; Mathew, A; Rajesh, R; Kurien, G; Rajesh, J; Jayaraj, P M; Kishore, D S; Jose, P P

    2013-07-01

    Irumban puli (Averrhoa bilimbi) is commonly used as a traditional remedy in the state of Kerala. Freshly made concentrated juice has a very high oxalic acid content and consumption carries a high risk of developing acute renal failure (ARF) by deposition of calcium oxalate crystals in renal tubules. Acute oxalate nephropathy (AON) due to secondary oxalosis after consumption of Irumban puli juice is uncommon. AON due to A. bilimbi has not been reported before. We present a series of ten patients from five hospitals in the State of Kerala who developed ARF after intake of I. puli fruit juice. Seven patients needed hemodialysis whereas the other three improved with conservative management. PMID:23960349

  5. An electrochemiluminescent biosensor for uric acid based on the electrochemiluminescence of bis-[3,4,6-trichloro-2-(pentyloxycarbonyl)-phenyl] oxalate on an ITO electrode modified by an electropolymerized nickel phthalocyanine film.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhenyu; Chen, Zhihuang; Liu, Yan; Wang, Jian; Chen, Guonan

    2008-06-01

    Nickel(ii) tetrasulfophthalo-cyanine (NiTSPc) could be electrodeposited onto an indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode to form an electropolymerization film of NiTSPc. The electrochemiluminescent (ECL) behavior of bis-[3,4,6-trichloro-2-(pentyloxy-carbonyl)-phenyl] oxalate (BTPPO) on this modified electrode was investigated in detail. The emission of ECL of BTPPO can be greatly enhanced by hydrogen peroxide at this modified electrode. Thus, a new ECL biosensor for uric acid was developed based on the enzymatic reaction of uric acid in the presence of uricase to produce H(2)O(2). The developed sensor has been used to detect uric acid in real serum samples, and the results compared well with those obtained by the routine method. PMID:18493682

  6. Heterogeneous nucleation of calcium oxalate on native oxide surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Song, L.; Pattillo, M.J.; Graff, G.L.; Campbell, A.A.; Bunker, B.C.

    1994-12-31

    The aqueous deposition of calcium oxalate onto colloidal oxides has been studied as a model system for understanding heterogeneous nucleation processes of importance in biomimetic synthesis of ceramic thin films. Calcium oxalate nucleation has been monitored by measuring induction times for nucleation using Constant Composition techniques and by measuring nucleation densities on extended oxide surfaces using an atomic force microscope. Results show that the dependence of calcium oxalate nucleation on solution supersaturation fits the functional form predicted by classical nucleation theories. Anionic surfaces appear to promote nucleation better than cationic surfaces, lowering the effective energy barrier to heterogeneous nucleation.

  7. Dissolution kinetics of kaolinite in acidic aqueous solutions at 25 C

    SciTech Connect

    Wieland, E.; Stumm, W. Swiss Federal Inst. of Tech., Zuerich )

    1992-09-01

    The dissolution of kaolinite is interpreted in terms of the surface complexation model. Acid/base properties of the terminal OH groups and ion exchange reactions occurring at the kaolinite surface have been investigated. A three-site model incorporating solid-solution equilibria at aluminol groups of the edge and gibbsite surfaces and at negatively charged XO groups of the siloxane surface account for the protonation of kaolinite platelets in acidic solutions. The dissolution kinetics of kaolinite at 25 C has been studied as a function of solution pH. The dissolution of kaolinite is nonstoichiometric in the pH range 2-6.5 with a preferential release of silicon. Stoichiometry of the dissolution reaction is achieved, however, in the presence of oxalate as Al-complexing ligand. The detachment of aluminium from the lattice structure of the kaolinite surface and its readsorption on distinct surface sites occur simultaneously during the dissolution process causing the experimentally observed nonstoichiometry. The proton-promoted dissolution of kaolinite occurs at the edge surface (pH < 6.5) and the gibbsite surface (pH < 4). The pH-dependence of the dissolution rate R[sub H](Si) reflects sequential protonation of terminal OH groups on both surfaces. The dissolution reaction can be interpreted as a coupled release of Al and Si with the detachment of the Al center from the surface lattice structure as the rate-limiting step. The aluminium:proton stoichiometry of the activated complex is 1:3 at the gibbsite surface and 1:1 at the edge surface.

  8. Method for liquid chromatographic extraction of strontium from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Dietz, Mark L.

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column is described. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water.

  9. Selective adsorption in two porous triazolate-oxalate-bridged antiferromagnetic metal-azolate frameworks obtained via in situ decarboxylation of 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole-5-carboxylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Juan-Juan; Xu, Xia; Jiang, Ning; Wu, Ya-Qin; Zhang, Xian-Ming

    2015-03-01

    Solvothermal reactions of metal salts, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole-5-carboxylic acid (H2atzc) and ammonium oxalate in different temperature produced two metal azolate frameworks, namely, [Cu3(atzc)2(atz)(ox)]·1.5H2O (1) and [Co5(atz)4(ox)3(HCOO)2]·DMF (2) (H2atzc=3-amino-1,2,4-triazole-5-carboxylic acid, Hatz=3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, and ox=oxalate), in which the atzc precusor was in situ decarboxylated. Structural determination reveals that 1 contains [Cu3(atzc)2(atz)]2- layers of mixed μ4-atzc and μ3-atz ligands, which are pillared by ox2- groups to form a 3D porous framework. Compound 2 contains 2D layers with basic spindle-shaped decanuclear units, which extended by ox2- and formates to form 3D porous framework. Gas adsorption investigation revealed that two kinds of frameworks exhibited selective CO2 over N2 sorption. Moreover, activated 2 shows H2 storage capacity. Additionally, magnetic properties of both the compounds have been investigated.

  10. Genetic evidence for differences in the pathways of druse and prismatic calcium oxalate crystal formation in Medicago truncatula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current evidence supports a single pathway utilizing ascorbic acid as the precursor in oxalate biosynthesis. In this study, we address the possibility that more than one pathway of oxalate biosynthesis and calcium oxalate formation occurs in Medicago truncatula. Like wildtype, developing leaves of...

  11. Genetic evidence for differences in the pathways of druse and prismatic calcium oxalate crystal formation in Medicago truncatula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current evidence supports a single pathway of oxalate biosynthesis utilising ascorbic acid as the precursor. In this study, we begin to address the possibility that more than one pathway of oxalate biosynthesis and calcium oxalate formation occurs in Medicago truncatula Gaertn. (cv. Jemalong genotyp...

  12. Postprandial hyperoxaluria and intestinal oxalate absorption in idiopathic renal stone disease

    SciTech Connect

    Schwille, P.O.; Hanisch, E.; Scholz, D.

    1984-10-01

    Calcium and oxalate were studied in daily, fasting and postprandial urine specimens from healthy subjects and patients with idiopathic renal calcium stones in response to a test meal free of oxalate, and supplemented with calcium and 14carbon-oxalic acid. The data showed that the amount of oxalate in fasting urine of patients with stones did not differ from that in controls. Generally, patients with stones had considerable postprandial hyperoxaluria in terms of excretion and concentration, associated with a significantly higher degree of supersaturation with regard to calcium oxalate compared to controls. These findings were paralleled by decreased intestinal absorption of 14carbon-oxalate and by unchanged 24-hour urinary oxalate. Although the source of increased p

  13. Biogeochemistry of oxalate in the antarctic cryptoendolithic lichen-dominated community.

    PubMed

    Johnston, C G; Vestal, J R

    1993-05-01

    Cryptoendolithic (hidden in rock) lichen-dominated microbial communities from the Ross Desert of Antarctica were shown to produce oxalate (oxalic acid). Oxalate increased mineral dissolution, which provides nutrients, creates characteristic weathering patterns, and may ultimately influence the biological residence time of the community. Oxalate was the only organic acid detectable by HPLC, and its presence was verified by GC/MS. Community photosynthetic metabolism was involved in oxalate production since rates of (14)C-oxalate production from (14)C02 were higher in light than in dark incubations. Flaking of the sandstone at the level of the lichen-dominated zone a few millimeters beneath the rock surface can be explained by dissolution of the sandstone cement, which was enhanced by Si, Fe, and Al oxalate complex formation. Added oxalate was observed to increase the solubility of Si, Fe, Al, P, and K. Oxalate's ability to form soluble trivalent metal-oxalate complexes correlated with the observed order of metal oxide depletion from the lichen-dominated zone (Mn > Fe > Al). Thermodynamic calculations predict that Fe oxalate complex formation mobilizes amorphous Fe oxides (ferrihydrite) in the lichen-dominated zone, and where oxalate is depleted, ferrihydrite should precipitate. Hematite, a more crystalline Fe oxide, should remain solid at in situ oxalate concentrations. Oxalate was not a carbon source for the indigenous heterotrophs, but the microbiota were involved in oxalate mineralization to CO2, since oxalate mineralization was reduced in poisoned incubations. Photooxidation of oxalate to C02 coupled with photoreduction of Fe(Ill) may be responsible for oxalate removal in situ, since rates of (14)C-oxalate mineralization in dark incubations were at least 50% lower than those in the light. Removal of oxalate from Si, Fe, and Al complexes should allow free dissolved Si, Fe, and Al to precipitate as amorphous silicates and metal oxides. This may explain increased

  14. Distribution of Components in Ion Exchange Materials Taken from the K East Basin and Leaching of Ion Exchange Materials by Nitric/Hydrofluoric Acid and Nitric/Oxalic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, C.H.; Rinehart, D.E.; Hoopes, F.V.

    1999-04-02

    Laboratory tests were performed to examine the efficacy of mixed nitric/hydrofluoric acid followed by mixed nitric/oxalic acid leach treatments to decontaminate ion exchange materials that have been found in a number of samples retrieved from K East (KE)Basin sludge. The ion exchange materials contain organic ion exchange resins and zeolite inorganic ion exchange material. Based on process records, the ion exchange resins found in the K Basins is a mixed-bed, strong acid/strong base material marketed as Purolite NRW-037. The zeolite material is Zeolon-900, a granular material composed of the mineral mordenite. Radionuclides sorbed or associated with the ion exchange material can restrict its disposal to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The need for testing to support development of a treatment process for K Basin sludge has been described in Section 4.2 of ''Testing Strategy to Support the Development of K Basins Sludge Treatment Process'' (Flament 1998). Elutriation and washing steps are designed to remove the organic resins from the K Basin sludge. To help understand the effects of the anticipated separation steps, tests were performed with well-rinsed ion exchange (IX) material from KE Basin floor sludge (sample H-08 BEAD G) and with well-rinsed IX having small quantities of added KE canister composite sludge (sample KECOMP). Tests also were performed to determine the relative quantities of organic and inorganic IX materials present in the H-08 K Basin sludge material. Based on chemical analyses of the separated fractions, the rinsed and dry IX material H-08 BEAD G was found to contain 36 weight percent inorganic material (primarily zeolite). The as-received (unrinsed) and dried H-08 material was estimated to contain 45 weight percent inorganic material.

  15. Decomposition Studies of Triphenylboron, Diphenylborinic Acid and Phenylboric Acid in Aqueous Alkaline Solutions Containing Copper

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.L.; Peterson, R. A.

    1997-02-11

    This report documents the copper-catalyzed chemical kinetics of triphenylboron, diphenylborinic acid and phenylboric acid (3PB, 2PB and PBA) in aqueous alkaline solution contained in carbon-steel vessels between 40 and 70 degrees C.

  16. Effects of organic acids and initial solution pH on photocatalytic degradation of bisphenol A (BPA) in a photo-Fenton-like process using goethite (α-FeOOH).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guangshan; Wang, Qiao; Zhang, Wen; Li, Tian; Yuan, Yixing; Wang, Peng

    2016-08-01

    This work investigated the effects of organic acids and initial solution pH on the photodegradation of BPA in a photo-Fenton-like process using α-FeOOH as a catalyst. The results showed that the addition of different organic acids affected the formation of the ferric-carboxylate complexes and free radicals, which in turn varied the photodegradation efficacy. Compared with the other acids, oxalic acid (OA) was found to be the most effective in enhancing the photodegradation of BPA, which strongly depends on the OA concentration. Particularly, the addition of OA could significantly extend the working pH from an acidic to a neutral range for the photocatalytic process and thus the acidification pretreatment may not be needed. A high photocatalytic degradation of BPA occurred at pH 6.0, due to the formation of ferric-oxalate complexes and ˙OH radicals in the synergistic interactions of OA and α-FeOOH. This finding highlights that the oxalate-promoted photo-Fenton-like process using the α-FeOOH catalyst may be used for wastewater treatment without pH adjustment. PMID:27436621

  17. Abortiporus biennis tolerance to insoluble metal oxides: oxalate secretion, oxalate oxidase activity, and mycelial morphology.

    PubMed

    Graz, Marcin; Jarosz-Wilkołazka, Anna; Pawlikowska-Pawlega, Bozena

    2009-06-01

    The ability of Abortiporus biennis to tolerate and solubilize toxic metal oxides (Cu(2)O, Al(2)O(3), ZnO, CuFe(2)O(4)Zn, CdO, and MnO(2)) incorporated into agar media was investigated and the growth rate, oxalic acid secretion, and mycelial morphology were monitored. Among the tested metal oxides, formation of clear zones underneath the mycelium growing on Cu(2)O- and ZnO-amended plates was observed. ZnO, CdO and Cu(2)O caused the highest rate of fungal growth inhibition. An increased level of oxalic acid concentration was detected as a response of A. biennis to the presence of Cu(2)O, MnO(2), ZnO and CuFe(2)O(4)Zn in growth medium. The oxalate oxidase (OXO) was found to be responsible for oxalic acid degradation in A. biennis cultivated in metal-amended media. An increased level of OXO was observed in media amended with Cu(2)O, ZnO and MnO(2). Confocal microscopy used in this study revealed changes in mycelial morphology which appeared as increased hyphal branching, increased septation and increased spore number. PMID:18985279

  18. The effects of oxalate-containing products on the exposed dentine surface: an SEM investigation.

    PubMed

    Gillam, D G; Mordan, N J; Sinodinou, A D; Tang, J Y; Knowles, J C; Gibson, I R

    2001-11-01

    In-office products containing oxalates have been claimed to be clinically effective in reducing dentine sensitivity, although there has been limited supporting clinical data. The rationale for their use appears to be based on their potential to act as occluding and/or nerve desensitizing agents. Four commercially available oxalate-containing products were applied to etched dentine discs and the extent of tubule occlusion was observed by scanning electron microscopy. Tenure Quick (aluminium oxalate), Sensodyne Sealant (ferric oxalate) and MS Coat (oxalic acid) covered the dentine surface and occluded the tubules. However, Butler Protect (potassium oxalate) did not cover the surface to any great extent but provided some occlusion. The presence of oxalates after application to glass slides and dentine discs was examined using thin film X-ray diffraction. From samples on glass, only potassium oxalate could be clearly identified (JCPDS 14-0845). No oxalate was detected on dentine discs in either thin film geometry or standard theta two theta mode. We have demonstrated that professionally applied in-office products containing oxalate are capable of covering the dentine surface and/or occluding the tubules to varying degrees. However, X-ray diffraction analysis was unable to confirm the oxalate profile for all products as described in the available commercial literature. PMID:11722720

  19. Nylon Dissolution in Nitric Acid Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    KESSINGER, GLENF.

    2004-06-16

    H Area Operations is planning to process Pu-contaminated uranium scrap in support of de-inventory efforts. Nylon bags will be used to hold materials to be dissolved in H-Canyon. Based on this set of twelve nylon dissolutions, it is concluded that (when other variables are held constant): increased acid concentration results in increased dissolution rates; increased acid concentration results in a lower dissolution onset temperature; little, if any, H plus is consumed during the depolymerization process; and 2.0-3.0 M HNO3, with 0.025 M KF and 2 g/L B, is satisfactory for the dissolution of nylon bag materials to be used during H-Canyon processing.

  20. Raman spectra of amino acids and their aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guangyong; Zhu, Xian; Fan, Qi; Wan, Xueliang

    2011-03-01

    Amino acids are the basic "building blocks" that combine to form proteins and play an important physiological role in all life-forms. Amino acids can be used as models for the examination of the importance of intermolecular bonding in life processes. Raman spectra serve to obtain information regarding molecular conformation, giving valuable insights into the topology of more complex molecules (peptides and proteins). In this paper, amino acids and their aqueous solution have been studied by Raman spectroscopy. Comparisons of certain values for these frequencies in amino acids and their aqueous solutions are given. Spectra of solids when compared to those of the solute in solution are invariably much more complex and almost always sharper. We present a collection of Raman spectra of 18 kinds of amino acids ( L-alanine, L-arginine, L-aspartic acid, cystine, L-glutamic acid, L-glycine, L-histidine, L-isoluecine, L-leucine, L-lysine, L-phenylalanine, L-methionone, L-proline, L-serine, L-threonine, L-tryptophan, L-tyrosine, L-valine) and their aqueous solutions that can serve as references for the interpretation of Raman spectra of proteins and biological materials.

  1. Polymerization of beta-amino acids in aqueous solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, R.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We have compared carbonyl diimidazole (CDI) and 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) as activating agents for the oligomerization of negatively-charged alpha- and beta-amino acids in homogeneous aqueous solution. alpha-Amino acids can be oligomerized efficiently using CDI, but not by EDAC. beta-Amino acids can be oligomerized efficiently using EDAC, but not by CDI. Aspartic acid, an alpha- and beta-dicarboxylic acid is oligomerized efficiently by both reagents. These results are explained in terms of the mechanisms of the reactions, and their relevance to prebiotic chemistry is discussed.

  2. Vacuum-jacketed hydrofluoric acid solution calorimeter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robie, R.A.

    1965-01-01

    A vacuum-jacketed metal calorimeter for determining heats of solution in aqueous HF was constructed. The reaction vessel was made of copper and was heavily gold plated. The calorimeter has a cooling constant of 0.6 cal-deg -1-min-1, approximately 1/4 that of the air-jacketed calorimeters most commonly used with HF. It reaches equilibrium within 10 min after turning off the heater current. Measurements of the heat of solution of reagent grade KCl(-100 mesh dried 2 h at 200??C) at a mole ratio of 1 KCl to 200 H2O gave ??H = 4198??11 cal at 25??C. ?? 1965 The American Institute of Physics.

  3. Effect of dietary oxalate and calcium on urinary oxalate and risk of formation of calcium oxalate kidney stones.

    PubMed

    Massey, L K; Roman-Smith, H; Sutton, R A

    1993-08-01

    Dietary restriction of oxalate intake has been used as therapy to reduce the risk of recurrence of calcium oxalate kidney stones. Although urinary oxalate is derived predominantly from endogenous synthesis, it may also be affected by dietary intake of oxalate and calcium. The risk of increasing urinary oxalate excretion by excessive consumption of dietary oxalate is greatest in individuals with a high rate of oxalate absorption, both with and without overt intestinal disease. Although oxalate-rich foods enhanced excretion of urinary oxalate in normal volunteers, the increase was not proportional to the oxalate content of the food. Only eight foods--spinach, rhubarb, beets, nuts, chocolate, tea, wheat bran, and strawberries--caused a significant increase in urinary oxalate excretion. Restriction of dietary calcium enhances oxalate absorption and excretion, whereas an increase in calcium intake may reduce urinary oxalate excretion by binding more oxalate in the gut. This review of the literature indicates that initial dietary therapy for stone-forming individuals can be limited to the restriction of foods definitely shown to increase urinary oxalate. The effects of oxalate-restricted diets on urinary oxalate should be evaluated by means of laboratory analyses of urine composition. Subsequent long-term therapy can be recommended if beneficial results are obtained from oxalate restriction at an appropriate calcium intake. PMID:8335871

  4. Method for incorporating radioactive phosphoric acid solutions in concrete

    DOEpatents

    Wolf, Gary A [Kennewick, WA; Smith, Jeffrey W [Lancaster, OH; Ihle, Nathan C [Walla Walla, WA

    1984-01-01

    A method for incorporating radioactive phosphoric acid solutions in concrete is described wherein the phosphoric acid is reacted with Ca(OH).sub.2 to form a precipitate of hydroxyapatite and the hydroxyapatite is mixed with portland cement to form concrete.

  5. Method for incorporating radioactive phosphoric acid solutions in concrete

    DOEpatents

    Wolf, G.A.; Smith, J.W.; Ihle, N.C.

    1982-07-08

    A method for incorporating radioactive phosphoric acid solutions in concrete is described wherein the phosphoric acid is reacted with Ca(OH)/sub 2/ to form a precipitate of hydroxyapatite and the hydroxyapatite is mixed with Portland cement to form concrete.

  6. Improved method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Kalina, D.G.; Kaplan, L.; Mason, G.W.

    1983-07-26

    A process for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous acidic solutions uses a new series of neutral bi-functional extractants, the alkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialkylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxides. The process is suitable for the separation of actinide and lanthanide values from fission product values found together in high-level nuclear reprocessing waste solutions.

  7. RECOVERY OF ACTINIDES FROM AQUEOUS NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Ader, M.

    1963-11-19

    A process of recovering actinides is presented. Tetravalent actinides are extracted from rare earths in an aqueous nitric acid solution with a ketone and back-extracted from the ketone into an aqueous medium. The aqueous actinide solution thus obtained, prior to concentration by boiling, is sparged with steam to reduce its ketone to a maximum content of 3 grams per liter. (AEC)

  8. Phosphorylation of Glyceric Acid in Aqueous Solution Using Trimetaphosphate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, Vera; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1996-01-01

    The phosphorylation of glyceric acid is an interesting prebiotic reaction because it converts a simple, potentially prebiotic organic molecule into phosphate derivatives that are central to carbohydrate metabolism. We find that 0.05 M glyceric acid in the presence of 0.5 M trimetaphosphate in alkaline solution gives a mixture of 2- and 3-phosphoglyceric acids in combined yields of up to 40%.

  9. Dealumination of zeolite {beta} via dicarboxylic acid treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Apelian, M.R.; Fung, A.S.; Kennedy, G.J.; Degnan, T.F.

    1996-10-10

    It is demonstrated that zeolite {beta} and zeolite {beta} containing catalysts can be dealuminated to very low acidity levels using a novel oxalic acid treatment without reducing zeolite integrity. The effect of the oxalic acid treatment has been studied over a wide range of treatment conditions for both silica-bound and unbound zeolite {beta} catalysts. Greater than 90% dealumination is observed with a concomitant reduction in n-hexane-cracking activity as measured by the alpha ({alpha}) test. Removal of framework aluminum occurs via a two-step hyrolysis/chelation mechanism, with the oxalic acid acting both as an acid and as a chelating agent. Framework aluminum removal is accompanied by the formation of internal silanol groups. Water soluble aluminum oxalates are present in the extracted solutions. Silanol groups are annealed with extended oxalic acid treatment. Oxalic acid treatment results in a unique contraction of the zeolite {beta} lattice structure not observed for mineral acid treated or steamed zeolite {beta} catalysts. 15 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Reduction of Plutonium in Acidic Solutions by Mesoporous Carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons-Moss, Tashi; Jones, Stephen; Wang, Jinxiu; Wu, Zhangxiong; Uribe, Eva; Zhao, Dongyuan; Nitsche, Heino

    2015-12-19

    Batch contact experiments with several porous carbon materials showed that carbon solids spontaneously reduce the oxidation state of plutonium in 1-1.5 M acid solutions, without significant adsorption. The final oxidation state and rate of Pu reduction varies with the solution matrix, and also depends on the surface chemistry and surface area of the carbon. It was demonstrated that acidic Pu(VI) solutions can be reduced to Pu(III) by passing through a column of porous carbon particles, offering an easy alternative to electrolysis with a potentiostat.

  11. Identification of calcium oxalate crystals using alizarin red S stain.

    PubMed

    Proia, A D; Brinn, N T

    1985-02-01

    Calcium oxalate crystals stain with alizarin red S at a pH of 7.0 but not at a pH of 4.2. In contrast, calcium phosphate and calcium carbonate stain at a pH of both 7.0 and 4.2. This difference allows presumptive identification of calcium oxalate deposits. The identity of calcium oxalate can then be confirmed by its insolubility in 2M acetic acid, since both calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate are soluble. We have applied this procedure for several years and have found it to be a rapid, reliable, and technically simple procedure for distinguishing calcium oxalate from other calcium deposits. PMID:2579619

  12. Evidence for a cytoplasmic pathway of oxalate biosynthesis in Aspergillus niger

    SciTech Connect

    Kubicek, C.P.; Schreferl-Kunar, G.; Woehrer, W.; Roehr, M.

    1988-03-01

    Oxalate accumulation of up to 8 g/liter was induced in Aspergillus niger by shifting the pH from 6 to 8. This required the presence of P/sub i/ and a nitrogen source and was inhibited by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Exogenously added /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ was not incorporated into oxalate, but was incorporated into acetate and malate, thus indicating the biosynthesis of oxalate by hydrolytic cleavage of oxaloacetate. Inhibition of mitochondrial citrate metabolism by fluorocitrate did not significantly decrease the oxalate yield. The putative enzyme that was responsible for this oxaloacetate hydrolase (EC 3.7.1.1), which was induced de novo during the pH shift. Subcellular fractionation of oxalic acid-forming mycelia of A. niger showed that this enzyme is located in the cytoplasm of A. niger. The results are consistent with a cytoplasmic pathway of oxalate formation which does not involve the tricarboxylic acid cycle.

  13. Heterogeneous photodegradation of pentachlorophenol with maghemite and oxalate under UV illumination.

    PubMed

    Lan, Qing; Li, Fangbai; Liu, Chengshuai; Li, Xiang-Zhong

    2008-11-01

    The degradation of pentachlorophenol (PCP) in a heterogeneous system with maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) and oxalate under UV illumination was investigated in this study. The results of adsorption experiments demonstrated competitive adsorption between PCP and oxalic acid on the surface of gamma-Fe2O3. The results of photodegradation experiments showed that the rate of PCP degradation strongly relied on the oxalic acid concentration and that an optimal tested initial concentration of oxalic acid (Cox(0)) of 0.8 mM was obtained under our experimental conditions. It was observed that a sufficient amount of oxalic acid can be adsorbed on the gamma-Fe2O3 to form various Fe(III)-oxalate complexes at Cox(o) = 0.8 mM. During the photoreaction, Fe(C2O4)2- and Fe(C2O4)3(3-) were found to be the dominant Fe(III)-oxalate complexes at different Cox(0), while Fe(C2O4)2(2-) was the dominant Fe(II)-oxalate complex at Cox(0) > or = 0.8 mM. The mechanism of H2O2 formation and consumption in the UV-irradiated gamma-Fe2O3/oxalate system was proposed and evaluated. Furthermore, six intermediates of PCP degradation were identified by GC/MS, HPLC, and IC analyses, respectively, and a possible pathway of PCP degradation in such a system was proposed. PMID:19031881

  14. REMOVAL OF CHLORIDE FROM ACIDIC SOLUTIONS USING NO2

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, A; Robert Pierce, R; James Laurinat, J

    2006-08-22

    Chloride (Cl{sup -}) salt processing in strong acids is used to recycle plutonium (Pu) from pyrochemical residues. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is studying the potential application of nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) gas to effectively convert dissolved pyrochemical salt solutions to chloride-free solutions and improve recovery operations. An NO{sub 2} sparge has been shown to effectively remove Cl{sup -} from solutions containing 6-8 M acid (H{sup +}) and up to 5 M Cl{sup -}. Chloride removal occurs as a result of the competition of at least two reactions, one which is acid-dependent. Below 4 M H+, NO2 reacts with Cl- to produce nitrosyl chloride (ClNO). Between 6 M and 8 M H{sup +}, the reaction of hydrochloric acid (HCl) with nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), facilitated by the presence of NO{sub 2}, strongly affects the rate of Cl{sup -} removal. The effect of heating the acidic Cl{sup -} salt solution without pre-heating the NO{sub 2} gas has minimal effect on Cl{sup -} removal rates when the contact times between NO{sub 2} and the salt solution are on the order of seconds.

  15. Putative Aspergillus niger-induced oxalate nephrosis in sheep.

    PubMed

    Botha, C J; Truter, M; Bredell, T; Lange, L; Mülders, M S G

    2009-03-01

    A sheep farmer provided a maize-based brewer's grain (mieliemaroek) and bales of Eragrostis curvula hay to ewes and their lambs, kept on zero-grazing in pens. The 'mieliemaroek' was visibly mouldy. After 14 days in the feedlot, clinical signs, including generalised weakness, ataxia of the hind limbs, tremors and recumbency, were noticed. Six ewes died within a period of 7 days. A post mortem examination was performed on 1 ewe. The carcass appeared to be cachectic with mild effusions into the body cavities; mild lung congestion and pallor of the kidneys were observed. Microscopical evaluation revealed nephrosis and birefringent oxalate crystals in the renal tubules when viewed under polarised light. A provisional diagnosis of oxalate nephrosis with subsequent kidney failure was made. Amongst other fungi, Aspergillus niger was isolated from 'mieliemaroek' samples submitted for fungal culture and identification. As A. niger is known to synthesise oxalates, a qualitative screen to detect oxalic acid in the mieliemaroek and purified A. niger isolates was performed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Oxalic acid was detected, which supported a diagnosis of soluble oxalate-induced nephropathy. PMID:19653520

  16. Evaluation of localized corrosion of zirconium in acidic chloride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Fahey, J.; Holmes, D.; Yau, T.L.

    1997-01-01

    Zirconium is prone to localized corrosion in acidic chloride (Cl{sup {minus}}) solutions contaminated by oxidizing ions, such as ferric or cupric ions. This tendency can be reduced by ensuring that the zirconium surface is clean and smooth. The effect of surface condition on localized corrosion of zirconium in acidic chloride solutions was predicted using potentiodynamic polarization scans. Predictions were confirmed by mass-loss tests on various combinations of surface finish and acid concentrations. A real-time indication of localized corrosion was derived by monitoring electrochemical noise produced between two similar electrodes immersed in an acidic chloride solution. Electrochemical noise monitoring correlated well with predictions from the potentiodynamic polarization and mass-loss experiments. Electrochemical noise results showed a more anodic potential caused by ferric ion (Fe{sup 3+}) contamination might be necessary for localized corrosion but that it was not a sufficient condition. A clean zirconium surface reduced localized corrosion of zirconium.

  17. OXALATE DEPOSITION ON ASBESTOS BODIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The clinical and histopathologic findings in three patients with a deposition of calcium oxalate crystals on ferruginous bodies after occupational exposure to asbestos are provided. In addition, we test the hypothesis that this oxalate can be generated through a nonenzymatic o...

  18. Seasonal and spatial variability of the organic matter-to-organic carbon mass ratios in Chinese urban organic aerosols and a first report of high correlations between aerosol oxalic acid and zinc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, L.; Fu, T.-M.; Cao, J. J.; Lee, S. C.; Wang, G. H.; Ho, K. F.; Cheng, M.-C.; You, C.-F.; Wang, T. J.

    2013-01-01

    We calculated the organic matter to organic carbon mass ratios (OM/OC mass ratios) in PM2.5 collected from 14 Chinese cities during summer and winter of 2003 and analyzed the causes for their seasonal and spatial variability. The OM/OC mass ratios were calculated two ways. Using a mass balance method, the calculated OM/OC mass ratios averaged 1.92 ± 0.39 yr-round, with no significant seasonal or spatial variation. The second calculation was based on chemical species analyses of the organic compounds extracted from the PM2.5 samples using dichloromethane/methanol and water. The calculated OM/OC mass ratio in summer was relatively high (1.75 ± 0.13) and spatially-invariant, due to vigorous photochemistry and secondary OA production throughout the country. The calculated OM/OC mass ratio in winter (1.59 ± 0.18) was significantly lower than that in summer, with lower values in northern cities (1.51 ± 0.07) than in southern cities (1.65 ± 0.15). This likely reflects the wider usage of coal for heating purposes in northern China in winter, in contrast to the larger contributions from biofuel and biomass burning in southern China in winter. On average, organic matters constituted 36% and 34% of Chinese urban PM2.5 mass in summer and winter, respectively. We reported, for the first time, high correlations between Zn and oxalic acid in Chinese urban aerosols in summer. This is consistent with the formation of stable Zn oxalate complex in the aerosol phase previously proposed by Furukawa and Takahashi (2011). We found that many other dicarboxylic acids were also highly correlated with Zn in the summer Chinese urban aerosol samples, suggesting that they may also form stable organic complexes with Zn. Such formation may have profound implications for the atmospheric abundance and hygroscopic property of aerosol dicarboxylic acids.

  19. An Oxalyl-CoA Dependent Pathway of Oxalate Catabolism Plays a Role in Regulating Calcium Oxalate Crystal Accumulation and Defending against Oxalate-Secreting Phytopathogens in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Justin; Luo, Bin; Nakata, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Considering the widespread occurrence of oxalate in nature and its broad impact on a host of organisms, it is surprising that so little is known about the turnover of this important acid. In plants, oxalate oxidase is the most well studied enzyme capable of degrading oxalate, but not all plants possess this activity. Recently, an Acyl Activating Enzyme 3 (AAE3), encoding an oxalyl-CoA synthetase, was identified in Arabidopsis. AAE3 has been proposed to catalyze the first step in an alternative pathway of oxalate degradation. Whether this enzyme and proposed pathway is important to other plants is unknown. Here, we identify the Medicago truncatula AAE3 (MtAAE3) and show that it encodes an oxalyl-CoA synthetase activity exhibiting high activity against oxalate with a Km = 81 ± 9 μM and Vmax = 19 ± 0.9 μmoles min-1mg protein-1. GFP-MtAAE3 localization suggested that this enzyme functions within the cytosol of the cell. Mtaae3 knock-down line showed a reduction in its ability to degrade oxalate into CO2. This reduction in the capacity to degrade oxalate resulted in the accumulation of druse crystals of calcium oxalate in the Mtaae3 knock-down line and an increased susceptibility to oxalate-secreting phytopathogens such as Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Taken together, these results suggest that AAE3 dependent turnover of oxalate is important to different plants and functions in the regulation of tissue calcium oxalate crystal accumulation and in defense against oxalate-secreting phytopathogens. PMID:26900946

  20. 137Cs desorption from lichen using acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čučulović, A. A.; Veselinović, D.; Miljanić, S. S.

    2009-09-01

    Desoprtion of 137Cs from samples of Cetraria islandica lichen using HCl ( A) and HNO3 ( B) acid solutions with pH values from 2.00 to 3.75 was investigated. After five consecutive desorptions lasting 24 h it was shown that between 52.2% (solution B pH 3.28) and 72.2% (solution A pH 2.00) of 137Cs was desorbed from the lichen and the initial desorptions were the most successful. Lichen desorbed with the stated solutions did not undergo structural changes. The amount of absorbed water from solutions A and B, used for desorption from lichen, in relation to the starting volume (expressed in %) showed that solution concentration did not take place. Lichen act as neutralizing agents because the pH of the lichen thallus is higher than the pH value of the solution used

  1. Recovery of Am-Cm from high-activity waste concentrate by in-canyon-tank precipitation as oxalates

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, L W; Burney, G A; Wilson, T W; McKibben, J M

    1980-01-01

    Savannah River Laboratory and Savannah River Plant have been separating actinides for more than 25 years. Work continues to upgrade processes and to initiate new processes. This report summarizes work on a precipitation process to separate kg amounts of Am and Cm from hundreds of kilograms of NaNO/sub 3/ and Al(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/. The developed process includes formic acid denitration of the Am-Cm bearing streams for acid adjustment; oxalate precipitation of the Am-Cm; and Mn/sup +2/ catalyzed oxidation of oxalate in both the decanted supernate and the precipitated actinides. The new process generates one fourth the radioactive waste as the solvent extraction process which it replaced, and produces a cleaner feed solution for downstream processing to separate the Am and Cm before conversion to their respective oxides.

  2. Photodegradation of Orange II using waste paper sludge-derived heterogeneous catalyst in the presence of oxalate under ultraviolet light emitting diode irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guoqiang; Guo, Jinyi; Zhou, Guowang; Wan, Xiankai; Shi, Huixiang

    2016-09-01

    A waste paper sludge-derived heterogeneous catalyst (WPS-Fe-350) was synthesized via a facile method and successfully applied for the degradation of Orange II in the presence of oxalic acid under the illumination of ultraviolet light emitting diode (UV-LED) Powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electronic microscopy and N2 sorption isotherm analysis indicated the formation of α-Fe2O3 in the mesoporous nanocomposite. The degradation test showed that WPS-Fe-350 exhibited rapid Orange II (OII) degradation and mineralization in the presence of oxalic acid under the illumination of UV-LED. The effects of pH, oxalic acid concentration and dosage of the catalyst on the degradation of OII were evaluated, respectively. Under the optimal conditions (1g/L catalyst dosage, 2mmol/L oxalic acid and pH3.0), the degradation percentage for a solution containing 30mg/L OII reached 83.4% under illumination by UV-LED for 80min. Moreover, five cyclic tests for OII degradation suggested that WPS-Fe-350 exhibited excellent stability of catalytic activity. Hence, this study provides an alternative environmentally friendly way to reuse waste paper sludge and an effective and economically viable method for degradation of azo dyes and other refractory organic pollutants in water. PMID:27593273

  3. Dephosphorization of Steelmaking Slag by Leaching with Acidic Aqueous Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Yong; Diao, Jiang; Liu, Xuan; Li, Xiaosa; Zhang, Tao; Xie, Bing

    2015-12-01

    In the present paper, dephosphorization of steelmaking slag by leaching with acidic aqueous solution composed of citric acid, sodium hydroxide, hydrochloric acid and ion-exchanged water was investigated. The buffer solution of C6H8O7-NaOH-HCl system prevented changes in the pH values. Kinetic parameters including leaching temperature, slag particle size and pH values of the solution were optimized. The results showed that temperature has no obvious effect on the dissolution ratio of phosphorus. However, it has a significant effect on the dissolution ratio of iron. The dephosphorization rate increases with the decrease of slag particle size and the pH value of the solution. Over 90% of the phosphorus can be dissolved in the solution while the corresponding leaching ratio of iron was only 30% below the optimal condition. Leaching kinetics of dephosphorization follow the unreacted shrinking core model with a rate controlled step by the solid diffusion layer, the corresponding apparent activation energy being 1.233 kJ mol-1. A semiempirical kinetic equation was established. After leaching, most of the nC2S-C3P solid solution in the steelmaking slag was selectively dissolved in the aqueous solution and the iron content in the solid residue was correspondingly enriched.

  4. Choice between autotrophy and heterotrophy in Pseudomonas oxalaticus. Utilization of oxalate by cells after adaptation from growth on formate to growth on oxalate

    PubMed Central

    Blackmore, Maureen A.; Quayle, J. R.; Walker, I. O.

    1968-01-01

    1. The labelling patterns of phosphoglycerate obtained from formate-grown or oxalate-grown Pseudomonas oxalaticus after exposure for 15sec. to [14C]formate or [14C]oxalate respectively were determined. 2. The phosphoglycerate obtained from the formate-grown cells contained 78% of the radioactivity in the carboxyl group. This is in accord with that predicted for operation of the ribulose diphosphate cycle of carbon dioxide fixation. 3. The labelling pattern of the phosphoglycerate obtained from the oxalate-grown cells approached uniformity, as predicted for the heterotrophic pathway of oxalate assimilation. The departure from complete uniformity may have been due to concurrent 14CO2 fixation into C4 dicarboxylic acids. 4. The labelling pattern of phosphoglycerate obtained from cells that had just started to grow on oxalate after adaptation from formate was determined after incubation of the cells for 15sec. with [14C]oxalate. This pattern approached uniformity. 5. The pathway of incorporation of 14CO2 into cells that had just started to grow on oxalate after adaptation from formate, in the presence of either formate or oxalate as energy source, was studied by chromatographic and radio-autographic analysis. 6. It is concluded from the isotopic data that a mixed heterotrophic–autotrophic metabolism, with the former mode predominating, operates in the initial stages of growth on oxalate after adaptation from growth on formate. PMID:16742592

  5. γ-Irradiation of malic acid in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negron-Mendoza, Alicia; Graff, Rebecca L.; Ponnamperuma, Cyril

    1980-12-01

    The γ-irradiation of malic acid in aqueous solutions was studied under initially oxygenated and oxygen-free conditions in an attempt to determine the possible interconversion of malic acid into other carboxylic acids, specifically those associated with Krebs cycle. The effect of dose on product formation of the system was investigated. Gas-liquid chromatography combined with mass spectrometry was used as the principal means of identification of the non-volatile products. Thin layer chromotography and direct probe mass spectroscopy were also employed. The findings show that a variety of carboxylic acids are formed, with malonic and succinic acids in greatest abundance. These products have all been identified as being formed in the γ-irradiation of acetic acid, suggesting a common intermediary. Since these molecules fit into a metabolic cycle, it is strongly suggestive that prebiotic pathways provided the basis for biological systems.

  6. Two-step oxalate approach for the preparation of high performance LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode material with high voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zushan; Jiang, Yangmei; Zeng, Xiaoyuan; Xiao, Guan; Song, Huiyu; Liao, Shijun

    2014-02-01

    A high voltage cathode material, LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4, is synthesized with a two-step approach, in which the nickel-manganese oxalate precipitate is firstly obtained by adding oxalic acid to the solution of nickel and manganese ions precursors, followed by calcining the oxalates to obtain spinel nickel-manganese oxide, incorporating lithium ions with ball milling and calcining at 900 °C for 15 h. The materials are characterized with TG, XRD, SEM, BET and FTIR; it is revealed that both nickel-manganese oxide and final LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 have well defined spinel structure. The LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinel materials exhibit high capacities and good cyclic stability, the capacity of the materials is in the range from 126 to 136 mAh -1, depending on the calcining temperatures. The sample calcined at an optimal temperature of 900 °C exhibits best performance, the capacity is high up to 136 mAh g-1 at tenth cycle and the capacity retention after 50 cycles is 93%. For the sample prepared by mixing and milling oxalate with lithium salt, the discharge capacity is only 115 mAh g-1. We suggest that the spinel oxide derived from oxalate may play an important role for the high performance and high stability of the final cathode materials.

  7. Update on Oxalate Crystal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Elizabeth C.; Michet, Claude J.; Milliner, Dawn S.; Lieske, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Oxalate arthropathy is a rare cause of arthritis characterized by deposition of calcium oxalate crystals within synovial fluid. This condition typically occurs in patients with underlying primary or secondary hyperoxaluria. Primary hyperoxaluria constitutes a group of genetic disorders resulting in endogenous overproduction of oxalate, whereas secondary hyperoxaluria results from gastrointestinal disorders associated with fat malabsorption and increased absorption of dietary oxalate. In both conditions oxalate crystals can deposit in the kidney leading to renal failure. Since oxalate is primarily renally eliminated, it accumulates throughout the body in renal failure, a state termed oxalosis. Affected organs can include bones, joints, heart, eyes and skin. Since patients can present with renal failure and oxalosis before the underlying diagnosis of hyperoxaluria has been made, it is important to consider hyperoxaluria in patients who present with unexplained soft tissue crystal deposition. The best treatment of oxalosis is prevention. If patients present with advanced disease, treatment of oxalate arthritis consists of symptom management and control of the underlying disease process. PMID:23666469

  8. Highly accurate boronimeter assay of concentrated boric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, R.M. )

    1992-01-01

    The Random-Walk Boronimeter has successfully been used as an on-line indicator of boric acid concentration in an operating commercial pressurized water reactor. The principle has been adapted for measurement of discrete samples to high accuracy and to concentrations up to 6000 ppm natural boron in light water. Boric acid concentration in an aqueous solution is a necessary measurement in many nuclear power plants, particularly those that use boric acid dissolved in the reactor coolant as a reactivity control system. Other nuclear plants use a high-concentration boric acid solution as a backup shutdown system. Such a shutdown system depends on rapid injection of the solution and frequent surveillance of the fluid to ensure the presence of the neutron absorber. The two methods typically used to measure boric acid are the chemical and the physical methods. The chemical method uses titration to determine the ionic concentration of the BO[sub 3] ions and infers the boron concentration. The physical method uses the attenuation of neutrons by the solution and infers the boron concentration from the neutron absorption properties. This paper describes the Random-Walk Boronimeter configured to measure discrete samples to high accuracy and high concentration.

  9. Polymerization of Pu(IV) in aqueous nitric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, L.M.; Friedman, H.A.; Osborne, M.M.

    1980-10-01

    The polymerization of Pu(IV) in aqueous nitric acid solutions has been studied spectrophotometrically both to establish the influence of large UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} concentrations on the polymerization rates and, more generally, to review the influence of the major parameters on the polymer reaction. Typically, experiments have been performed at 50{sup 0}C and with 0.05 M Pu in nitric acid solutions that vary in acidity from 0.07 to 0.4 M. An induction period usually precedes the polymer growth stage during which time nucleation of primary hydrolysis products occurs. Uranyl nitrate retards the polymerization reaction by approximately 35% in spite of the counteracting influence of the nitrate ions associated with this solute. The rate of polymer formation, expressed as d(percent polymer)/dt, has been shown to depend on the total plutonium concentration in reactions where the Pu(IV) concentration remained constant; and it is therefore suggested that the polymer reaction rate is not first order with respect to the concentration of plutonium as was previously thought. It has been shown further that accurate acid determinations on stock reagents are essential in order to obtain reliable polymerization experiments. Satisfactory procedures for these analyses did not exist, so appropriate modifications to the iodate precipitation methods were developed. The most ideal plutonium reagent material has been shown to be crystalline Pu(IV) nitrate because it can be added directly to acid solutions without the occurrence of unintentional hydrolysis reactions.

  10. Flow-driven pattern formation in the calcium-oxalate system.

    PubMed

    Bohner, Bíborka; Endrődi, Balázs; Horváth, Dezső; Tóth, Ágota

    2016-04-28

    The precipitation reaction of calcium oxalate is studied experimentally in the presence of spatial gradients by controlled flow of calcium into oxalate solution. The density difference between the reactants leads to strong convection in the form of a gravity current that drives the spatiotemporal pattern formation. The phase diagram of the system is constructed, the evolving precipitate patterns are analyzed and quantitatively characterized by their diameters and the average height of the gravity flow. The compact structures of calcium oxalate monohydrate produced at low flow rates are replaced by the thermodynamically unstable calcium oxalate dihydrate favored in the presence of a strong gravity current. PMID:27131554

  11. Flow-driven pattern formation in the calcium-oxalate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohner, Bíborka; Endrődi, Balázs; Horváth, Dezső; Tóth, Ágota

    2016-04-01

    The precipitation reaction of calcium oxalate is studied experimentally in the presence of spatial gradients by controlled flow of calcium into oxalate solution. The density difference between the reactants leads to strong convection in the form of a gravity current that drives the spatiotemporal pattern formation. The phase diagram of the system is constructed, the evolving precipitate patterns are analyzed and quantitatively characterized by their diameters and the average height of the gravity flow. The compact structures of calcium oxalate monohydrate produced at low flow rates are replaced by the thermodynamically unstable calcium oxalate dihydrate favored in the presence of a strong gravity current.

  12. Miniaturizing and automation of free acidity measurements for uranium (VI)-HNO3 solutions: Development of a new sequential injection analysis for a sustainable radio-analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Néri-Quiroz, José; Canto, Fabrice; Guillerme, Laurent; Couston, Laurent; Magnaldo, Alastair; Dugas, Vincent

    2016-10-01

    A miniaturized and automated approach for the determination of free acidity in solutions containing uranium (VI) is presented. The measurement technique is based on the concept of sequential injection analysis with on-line spectroscopic detection. The proposed methodology relies on the complexation and alkalimetric titration of nitric acid using a pH 5.6 sodium oxalate solution. The titration process is followed by UV/VIS detection at 650nm thanks to addition of Congo red as universal pH indicator. Mixing sequence as well as method validity was investigated by numerical simulation. This new analytical design allows fast (2.3min), reliable and accurate free acidity determination of low volume samples (10µL) containing uranium/[H(+)] moles ratio of 1:3 with relative standard deviation of <7.0% (n=11). The linearity range of the free nitric acid measurement is excellent up to 2.77molL(-1) with a correlation coefficient (R(2)) of 0.995. The method is specific, presence of actinide ions up to 0.54molL(-1) does not interfere on the determination of free nitric acid. In addition to automation, the developed sequential injection analysis method greatly improves the standard off-line oxalate complexation and alkalimetric titration method by reducing thousand fold the required sample volume, forty times the nuclear waste per analysis as well as the analysis time by eight fold. These analytical parameters are important especially in nuclear-related applications to improve laboratory safety, personnel exposure to radioactive samples and to drastically reduce environmental impacts or analytical radioactive waste. PMID:27474315

  13. An oxalyl-CoA synthetase is important for oxalate metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although oxalic acid is common in nature, our understanding of the mechanism(s) regulating its turnover remains incomplete. In this study we identify Saccharomyces cerevisiae acyl-activating enzyme 3 (ScAAE3) as an enzyme capable of catalyzing the conversion of oxalate to oxalyl-CoA. Based on our fi...

  14. ADVANCES IN OUR UNDERSTANDING OF CALCIUM OXALATE CRYSTAL FORMATION AND FUNCTION IN PLANTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium oxalate crystal formation in plants appears to play a central role in a variety of important functions, including tissue calcium regulation, protection from herbivory, and metal detoxification. Evidence is mounting to support ascorbic acid as the primary precursor to oxalate biosynthesis. ...

  15. Deep catalytic oxidative desulfurization (ODS) of dibenzothiophene (DBT) with oxalate-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs).

    PubMed

    Lü, Hongying; Li, Pengcheng; Deng, Changliang; Ren, Wanzhong; Wang, Shunan; Liu, Pan; Zhang, Han

    2015-07-01

    An oxalate-based DES with a tetrabutyl ammonium chloride and oxalate acid molar ratio of 1/2 (TBO1 : 2) exhibited high activity in oxidative desulfurization (ODS) of dibenzothiophene (DBT) under mild reaction conditions. It is potentially a promising and highly environmentally friendly approach for desulfurization of fuels. PMID:26051675

  16. Methanol Uptake by Low Temperature Aqueous Sulfuric Acid Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, L. T.; Essin, A. M.; Golden, D. M.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The global methanol budget is currently unbalanced, with source terms significantly larger than the sinks terms. To evaluate possible losses of gaseous methanol to sulfate aerosols, the solubility and reactivity of methanol in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions representative of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosols is under investigation. Methanol will partition into sulfate aerosols according to its Henry's law solubility. Using standard uptake techniques in a Knudsen cell reactor, we have measured the effective Henry's law coefficient, H*, for cold (196 - 220 K) solutions ranging between 45 and 70 wt % H2SO4. We have found that methanol solubility ranges from approx. 10(exp 5) - 10(exp 7) M/atm for UT/LS conditions. Solubility increases with decreasing temperature and with increasing sulfuric acid content. Although methanol is slightly more soluble than are acetone and formaldehyde, current data indicate that uptake by clean aqueous sulfuric acid particles will not be a significant sink for methanol in the UT/LS. These solubility measurements include uptake due to physical solvation and any rapid equilibria which are established in solution. Reaction between primary alcohols and sulfuric acid does occur, leading to the production of alkyl sulfates. Literature values for the rate of this reaction suggest that formation of CH3OSO3H is not significant over our experimental time scale for solutions below 80 wt % H2SO4. To confirm this directly, results obtained using a complementary equilibrium measurement technique will also be presented.

  17. [Investigation on mechanism of pyrite oxidation in acidic solutions].

    PubMed

    Wang, Nan; Yi, Xiao-Yun; Dang, Zhi; Liu, Yun

    2012-11-01

    The mechanism of pyrite oxidation in acidic solutions was investigated by electrochemical analysis methods, such as open-circuit potential, cyclic voltammetry, Tafel polarization curve and anodic polarization curve, using a pyrite-carbon paste electrode as working electrode. The results showed that the oxidation process of pyrite in acidic solutions was via a two-step reaction: the first step was the dissolution of iron moiety and formation of a passivation film composed of elemental sulphur, metal-deficient sulfide and polysulfide; the second step was the further oxidation of these intermediate products to SO4(2-). The final reaction products of pyrite oxidation were Fe3+ and SO4(2-) in acidic solutions. In addition, the open-circuit potential and corrosion potential were positively shifted, the peak current and the corrosion current were increased with the increase in concentration of H2SO4 solutions. This indicated that increased acidity of the system was advantageous to the oxidation of pyrite. PMID:23323425

  18. Medical therapy, calcium oxalate urolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruml, L. A.; Pearle, M. S.; Pak, C. Y.

    1997-01-01

    The development of diagnostic protocols that identify specific risk factors for calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis has led to the formulation of directed medical regimens that are aimed at correcting the underlying metabolic disturbances. Initiation of these treatment programs has reduced markedly the rate of stone formation in the majority of patients who form stones. This article discusses the rationale that underlies the choice of medical therapy for the various pathophysiologic causes of calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis and the appropriate use of available medications.

  19. Comparative biosorption of Mn(II) and Pb(II) ions on raw and oxalic acid modified maize husk: kinetic, thermodynamic and isothermal studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeogun, Abideen Idowu; Idowu, Mopelola Abidemi; Ofudje, Andrew Edwin; Kareem, Sarafadeen Olateju; Ahmed, Sikiru Akinyeye

    2013-03-01

    Maize husk, an abundant agricultural waste was used to prepare a biosorbent for the biosorption of Mn(II) and Pb(II) ions from aqueous solution in a batch process. Equilibrium and kinetics of biosorption of the metals ions were studied at 25 °C. The adsorbtion data were treated with common kinetic and isotherm models. The equilibrium data fitted well with Langmuir isotherm with maximum capacity of 8.52 and 7.38 mg g-1 for Mn(II) and Pb(II), respectively on raw biomass (UTCS). The capacity of 9.00 and 9.33 mg g-1 was observed for Mn(II) and Pb(II), respectively on acid modified biomass (ATCS). The study also revealed that the sorption process in both cases depend on biomass dosage, temperature, pH and initial metal ion concentration, respectively. The calculated thermodynamic parameters (∆ G o, ∆ H o and ∆ S o) showed that the biosorption of the metal ions onto maize husk is feasible, spontaneous and exothermic in nature.

  20. Reflectance spectroscopy of oxalate minerals and relevance to Solar System carbon inventories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applin, Daniel M.; Izawa, Matthew R. M.; Cloutis, Edward A.

    2016-11-01

    The diversity of oxalate formation mechanisms suggests that significant concentrations of oxalic acid and oxalate minerals could be widely distributed in the Solar System. We have carried out a systematic study of the reflectance spectra of oxalate minerals and oxalic acid, covering the 0.2-16 μm wavelength region. Our analyses show that oxalates exhibit unique spectral features that enable discrimination between oxalate phases and from other commonly occurring compounds, including carbonates, in all regions of the spectrum except for the visible. Using these spectral data, we consider the possible contribution of oxalate minerals to previously observed reflectance spectra of many objects throughout the Solar System, including satellites, comets, and asteroids. We find that polycarboxylic acid dimers and their salts may explain the reflectance spectra of many carbonaceous asteroids in the 3 μm spectral region. We suggest surface concentration of these compounds may be a type of space weathering from the photochemical and oxidative decomposition of the organic macromolecular material found in carbonaceous chondrites. The stability and ubiquity of these minerals on Earth, in extraterrestrial materials, and in association with biological processes make them useful for many applications in Earth and planetary sciences.

  1. Hydrolysis kinetics of lead silicate glass in acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Rafi Ali; Sadrnezhaad, Sayed Khatibuleslam; Raisali, Gholamreza; Hamidi, Amir

    2009-06-01

    Hydrolysis kinetics of the lead silicate glass (LSG) with 40 mol% PbO in 0.5 N HNO 3 aqueous acid solution was investigated. The surface morphology and the gel layer thickness were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICP) were used to determine the composition of the gel layer and the aqueous solution, respectively. The silicon content of the dissolution products was determined by using weight-loss data and compositions of the gel layer and the solution. The kinetic parameters were determined using the shrinking-core-model (SCM) for rate controlling step. The activation energy obtained for hydrolysis reaction was Qche = 56.07 kJ/mole. The diffusion coefficient of the Pb ions from the gel layer was determined by using its concentration in solution and in LSG. The shrinkage of the sample and the gel layer thickness during dissolution process were determined.

  2. A mechanistic study of copper electropolishing in phosphoric acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansson, Andrew

    The microelectronics industry is using copper as the interconnect material for microchips. A study of copper electropolishing is important for the process development of a new, low downforce approach, which is being developed to replace chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) of the copper overburden. A promising technology is a combination of electropolishing with conventional CMP. Electropolishing of copper in phosphoric acid has been studied for, more than 70 years. Previous work has shown that the polishing rate, as measured by current density is directly related to the viscosity of the electrolyte. Also, the limiting species is water. In this study, a multidimensional design of experiments was performed to develop an in-depth model of copper electropolishing. Phosphoric acid was mixed with alcohols of different molecular weight and related viscosity to investigate how the solvents' properties affected polishing. The alcohols used were methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, butanol, ethylene glycol, and glycerol. The limiting current densities and electrochemical behavior of each solution was measured by potentiodynamic and potentiostatic experiments. Also, the kinematic viscosity and density were measured to determine the dynamic viscosity to investigate the relationship of current density and viscosity. Water, methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol solutions were also examined at 20°C to 60°C. Next, the relative percentage of dissociated phosphoric acid was measured by Raman spectroscopy for each polishing solution. Raman spectroscopy was also used to measure the relative dissociation of phosphoric acid inside the polishing film. Additionally, wafers were electropolished and electrochemical mechanically polished to investigate the effects of the different solvents, fluid flow, current, and potential. The results of these experiments have shown that the molecular mass and the ability of the solvent to dissociate phosphoric acid are the primary electrolyte properties that

  3. Solution Preserves Nucleic Acids in Body-Fluid Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Stowe, Raymond P.

    2004-01-01

    A solution has been formulated to preserve deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) in specimens of blood, saliva, and other bodily fluids. Specimens of this type are collected for diagnostic molecular pathology, which is becoming the method of choice for diagnosis of many diseases. The solution makes it possible to store such specimens at room temperature, without risk of decomposition, for subsequent analysis in a laboratory that could be remote from the sampling location. Thus, the solution could be a means to bring the benefits of diagnostic molecular pathology to geographic regions where refrigeration equipment and diagnostic laboratories are not available. The table lists the ingredients of the solution. The functions of the ingredients are the following: EDTA chelates divalent cations that are necessary cofactors for nuclease activity. In so doing, it functionally removes these cations and thereby retards the action of nucleases. EDTA also stabilizes the DNA helix. Tris serves as a buffering agent, which is needed because minor contaminants in an unbuffered solution can exert pronounced effects on pH and thereby cause spontaneous degradation of DNA. SDS is an ionic detergent that inhibits ribonuclease activity. SDS has been used in some lysis buffers and as a storage buffer for RNA after purification. The use of the solution is straightforward. For example, a sample of saliva is collected by placing a cotton roll around in the subject's mouth until it becomes saturated, then the cotton is placed in a collection tube. Next, 1.5 mL of the solution are injected directly into the cotton and the tube is capped for storage at room temperature. The effectiveness of the solution has been demonstrated in tests on specimens of saliva containing herpes simplex virus. In the tests, the viral DNA, as amplified by polymerase chain reaction, was detected even after storage for 120 days.

  4. Importance of oxalate precursors for oxalate metabolism in rats.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Y; Miyazato, T; Hatano, T

    1999-11-01

    Three metabolic precursors of oxalate were compared after intravenous administration to rats by measuring the urinary excretion of oxalate and related substances using capillary electrophoresis. Urine specimens were collected hourly from eight male Wistar rats (approximately 200 g) in each group. Glyoxylate (2 mg), glycolate (10 mg), and hydroxypyruvate (100 mg) were almost equally oxalogenic based on urinary oxalate excretion, with 22.0, 6.1, and 0.4% of the respective doses being converted into oxalate, 3, 8.9, and 0.2% into glycolate, and 1, 0.1, and 0.003% into glyoxylate. The mean urinary excretion of oxalate peaked between 1 and 2 h, while that of glycolate peaked at 1 h. The baseline urinary excretion of glycolate and glyoxylate was 0.11 to 0.24 micromol/h and 0.0 to 8.3 nmol/h, respectively, and all three agents caused a significant increase of urinary glycolate excretion for 2 to 3 h. Only glyoxylate administration increased urinary glyoxylate excretion at 1 h. Hydroxypyruvate administration significantly increased urinary hydroxypyruvate, glycerate, and citrate excretion at 1 to 2 h. The increase of urinary citrate excretion remains to be explained. PMID:10541259

  5. Simultaneous treatment of chlorinated organics and removal of metals and radionuclides with bimetals and complexing acids - application to surfactant solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Korte, N.E.; Gu, B.

    1997-10-01

    Currently available methods for separation and treatment of radioactive mixed waste are typically energy-intensive, and often require high temperatures. Passive methods that operate at ambient temperatures are needed. The purpose of this task is to develop bimetallic substrates, using a base metal such as iron and a promoter metal such as palladium (Pd), to provide a passive, low-energy solution to a substantial portion of DOE`s mixed-waste problem. This technology consists of a porous medium that can simultaneously dechlorinate hazardous organics such as TCE and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) at the same time that it removes metallic and hazardous wastes from a solvent/surfactant solution. The porous medium consists of a bimetallic substrate such as palladized iron (Pd/Fe). Palladium is readily chemically plated on iron and preliminary studies suggest that only 0.05 to 0.1% Pd is needed for an efficient reaction. Thus, the cost of the material is reasonable especially is it is long-lived or can be regenerated. Field implementation would consist of the passage of a surfactant-laden, mixed waste through a column or bed of the bimetallic substrate. The organic component of this mixed waste may contain semivolatile compounds such as PCBs or pesticides and herbicides. The bimetal simultaneously removes radionuclides and metals and degrades halogenated hydrocarbons. Virtually any concentration can be treated. Following reaction of the bimetal with the waste stream, the resulting effluent will consist of an uncontaminated aqueous solution of surfactant or solvent that can be reused. The bimetal would then be rinsed with a dilute mineral acid or a mild complexing acid (e.g., oxalic or citric acid) to regenerate the surface and to remove sorbed metals and non-hazardous organic residue. The latter effluent would be low-level radioactive waste in some cases, but it would now be much easier to manage and be of a lower volume than the original mixed waste.

  6. Multiphase chemistry of ozone on fulvic acids solutions.

    PubMed

    Brigante, Marcello; D'Anna, Barbara; Conchon, Pierre; George, Christian

    2008-12-15

    By means of a wetted-wall flow tube, we studied the multiphase chemistry of ozone on aqueous solutions containing fulvic acids (FA), taken as proxies for atmospheric "humic like substances", so-called HULIS. In these experiments, the loss of gaseous O3 was monitored by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy at the reactor outlet (i.e., after contact between the gaseous and liquid phases). Measurements are reported in terms of dimensionless uptake coefficients (gamma) in the range from 1.6 x 10(-7) to 1.3 x 10(-5) depending on ozone gas phase concentration (in the range from 6.6 to 34.4 x 10(11) molecules cm(-3)) and fulvic acid aqueous concentration (in the range from 0.25 to 2.5 mg L(-1)) and pH (in the range from 2.5 to 9.2). The measured kinetics were observed to follow a Langmuir-Hinshelwood type mechanism, in which O3 first adsorbs on the liquid surface and then reacts with the Fulvic Acid molecules. The reported uptake coefficients are greatly increased over those measured on pure water, demonstrating that the presence in solution of fulvic acids does greatly enhance the uptake kinetics. Accordingly, the chemical interactions of fulvic acids (or HULIS) may be a driving force for the uptake of ozone on liquid organic aerosols and can also represent an important mechanism for the O3 deposition to the rivers and lakes. PMID:19174887

  7. Acid hydrolysis of cellulose in zinc chloride solution

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, N.J.; Xu, Q.; Chen, L.F.

    1995-12-31

    The efficient conversion of cellulosic materials to ethanol has been hindered by the low yield of sugars, the high energy consumption in pretreatment processes, and the difficulty of recycling the pre-treatment agents. Zinc chloride may provide an alternative for pre-treating biomass prior to the hydrolysis of cellulose. The formation of a zinc-cellulose complex during the pretreatment of cellulose improves the yield of glucose in both the enzymatic and acid hydrolysis of cellulose. Low-temperature acid hydrolysis of cellulose in zinc chloride solution is carried out in two stages, a liquefaction stage and a saccharification stage. Because of the formation of zinc-cellulose complex in the first stage, the required amount of acid in the second stage has been decreased significantly. In 67% zinc chloride solution, a 99.5% yield of soluble sugars has been obtained at 70{degrees}C and 0.5M acid concentration. The ratio of zinc chloride to cellulose has been reduced from 4.5 to 1.5, and the yield of soluble sugars is kept above 80%. The rate of hydrolysis is affected by the ratio of zinc chloride to cellulose, acid concentration, and temperature.

  8. Solution influence on biomolecular equilibria - Nucleic acid base associations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, A.; Pratt, L. R.; Burt, S. K.; Macelroy, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    Various attempts to construct an understanding of the influence of solution environment on biomolecular equilibria at the molecular level using computer simulation are discussed. First, the application of the formal statistical thermodynamic program for investigating biomolecular equilibria in solution is presented, addressing modeling and conceptual simplications such as perturbative methods, long-range interaction approximations, surface thermodynamics, and hydration shell. Then, Monte Carlo calculations on the associations of nucleic acid bases in both polar and nonpolar solvents such as water and carbon tetrachloride are carried out. The solvent contribution to the enthalpy of base association is positive (destabilizing) in both polar and nonpolar solvents while negative enthalpies for stacked complexes are obtained only when the solute-solute in vacuo energy is added to the total energy. The release upon association of solvent molecules from the first hydration layer around a solute to the bulk is accompanied by an increase in solute-solvent energy and decrease in solvent-solvent energy. The techniques presented are expectd to displace less molecular and more heuristic modeling of biomolecular equilibria in solution.

  9. Electrodialysis synthesis of concentrated solutions of perrhenic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palant, A. A.; Bryukvin, V. A.; Levin, A. M.; Reshetova, O. V.

    2011-03-01

    The presented results demonstrate the possibility of electrodialysis production of concentrated solutions of perrhenic acid (HReO4 concentration >400 g/l). KReO4 is used as a precursor. The investigations are performed in a three-chamber electrodialysis cell in a continuous mode. The optimal processing parameters are as follows: the current is 3-5 A, the voltage is 30-40 V, and the anode chamber temperature is 20-25°C. Grade AR-0 ammonium perrhenate is precipitated from the obtained HReO4 solution.

  10. Method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Kalina, Dale G.; Kaplan, Louis; Mason, George W.

    1985-01-01

    A process for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous acidic solutions with an organic extractant having the formula: ##STR1## where .phi. is phenyl, R.sup.1 is a straight or branched alkyl or alkoxyalkyl containing from 6 to 12 carbon atoms and R.sup.2 is an alkyl containing from 3 to 6 carbon atoms. The process is suitable for the separation of actinide and lanthanide values from fission product values found together in high level nuclear reprocessing waste solutions.

  11. Hydrogen bonded structures in organic amine oxalates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidhyanathan, R.; Natarajan, S.; Rao, C. N. R.

    2002-05-01

    Oxalates of n-propylamine, n-butylamine, ethylenediamine, 1,4-butanediamine, piperazine, guanidine and 1,4-diazabicyclo[2,2,2]octane (DABCO) have been synthesized and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction and other techniques. The amine oxalates show different types of hydrogen bonded networks, linear hydrogen bonded chains characterizing the oxalates of the first five amines. Guanidinium oxalate has a sheet like structure while DABCO oxalate has dimeric hydrogen bonded rings. Hydrogen bonded structures of these oxalates are discussed in detail, besides relating their thermal stability to the strengths of the networks.

  12. DC diaphragm discharge in water solutions of selected organic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyhnankova, Edita J.; Hammer, Malte U.; Reuter, Stephan; Krcma, Frantisek

    2015-07-01

    Effect of four simple organic acids water solution on a DC diaphragm discharge was studied. Efficiency of the discharge was quantified by the hydrogen peroxide production determined by UV-VIS spectrometry of a H2O2 complex formed with specific titanium reagent. Automatic titration was used to study the pH behaviour after the plasma treatment. Optical emission spectroscopy overview spectra were recorded and detailed spectra of OH band and Hβ line were used to calculate the rotational temperature and comparison of the line profile (reflecting electron concentration) in the acid solutions. Contribution to the topical issue "The 14th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XIV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ronny Brandenburg and Lars Stollenwark

  13. Interaction of Ethyl Alcohol Vapor with Sulfuric Acid Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leu, Ming-Taun

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the uptake of ethyl alcohol (ethanol) vapor by sulfuric acid solutions over the range approx.40 to approx.80 wt % H2SO4 and temperatures of 193-273 K. Laboratory studies used a fast flow-tube reactor coupled to an electron-impact ionization mass spectrometer for detection of ethanol and reaction products. The uptake coefficients ((gamma)) were measured and found to vary from 0.019 to 0.072, depending upon the acid composition and temperature. At concentrations greater than approx.70 wt % and in dilute solutions colder than 220 K, the values approached approx.0.07. We also determined the effective solubility constant of ethanol in approx.40 wt % H2SO4 in the temperature range 203-223 K. The potential implications to the budget of ethanol in the global troposphere are briefly discussed.

  14. Solubility of chlorine in aqueous hydrochloric acid solutions.

    PubMed

    Alkan, Mahir; Oktay, Münir; Kocakerim, M Muhtar; Copur, Mehmet

    2005-03-17

    The solubility of chlorine in aqueous hydrochloric acid solutions was studied. The effects of HCl concentration and temperature on the solubility were evaluated, and the thermodynamic parameters of the dissolution were calculated. It was found that the solubility isotherms had a minimum at about 0.5M HCl concentration at all the temperatures studied and that solubility decreased with the increase of temperature at all the HCl concentration range investigated. PMID:15752843

  15. Recovery of rhenium from sulfuric acid solutions with activated coals

    SciTech Connect

    Troshkina, I.D.; Naing, K.Z.; Ushanova, O.N.; P'o, V.; Abdusalomov, A.A.

    2006-09-15

    Equilibrium and kinetic characteristics of rhenium sorption from sulfuric acid solutions (pH 2) by activated coals produced from coal raw materials (China) were studied. Constants of the Henry equation describing isotherms of rhenium sorption by activated coals were calculated. The effective diffusion coefficients of rhenium in the coals were determined. The dynamic characteristics of rhenium sorption and desorption were determined for the activated coal with the best capacity and kinetic characteristics.

  16. Acid mine drainage: An economic total resource recovery solution

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, R.L.; Clarke, S.R.; Brackenbury, D.R.

    1995-12-31

    A common feature of abandoned hard rock mines and subterranean coal mines is the creation of toxic and acidic solution often containing iron, copper, zinc, lead, cadmium, manganese and alkaline earth and alkali metals. A process is described which sequentially removes heavy metals using electrochemical ion exchange and rotating cylinder electrodes. Studies summarized indicate recovery of copper, zinc, iron, and aluminum oxide; selective stripping of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, and lead; and recovery of water acceptable for drinking after removal of heavy metals.

  17. Experimental alkali feldspar dissolution at 100 degree C by carboxylic acids and their anions

    SciTech Connect

    Stoessell, R.K. ); Pittman, E.D. )

    1990-05-01

    Feldspar dissolution will enhance sandstone porosity if the released aluminum can be transported away in the subsurface waters. Carboxylic acids have been proposed to provide hydrogen ions to promote dissolution and anions to complex aqueous aluminum to keep it in solution. However, the hydrogen ions should react quickly following acid generation in source beds, leaving monocarboxylic anions with lesser amounts of dicarboxylic acids and their anions on feldspar dissolution and the apparent complexing of aluminum in solution. Two-week dissolution experiments of alkali feldspar were run at 100{degree}C and 300 bars in acetic acid, oxalic acid, and sodium salt solutions of chloride, acetate, propionate, oxalate, and malonate. Extrapolation of the results, to reservoir conditions during sandstone diagenesis, implies that concentrations of aluminum-organic complexes are not significant for acetate and propionate and are possibly significant for oxalate and malonate, depending upon fluid compositions. Propionate appeared to inhibit feldspar dissolution and hence might decrease secondary porosity formation. Increases in aluminum concentrations in the presence of oxalic and acetic acid solutions appear to be due to enhanced dissolution kinetics and greater aluminum solubility under low-pH conditions. Such low-pH fluids are generally absent in subsurface reservoirs, making this an unlikely mechanism for enhancing porosity. Furthermore, the observed thermal instability of oxalate and malonate anions explains their general low concentrations in subsurface fluids which limits their aluminum complexing potential in reservoirs during late diagenesis.

  18. Surface tensions of solutions containing dicarboxylic acid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Young; Hildemann, Lynn M.

    2014-06-01

    Organic solutes tend to lower the surface tension of cloud condensation nuclei, allowing them to more readily activate. The surface tension of various dicarboxylic acid aerosol mixtures was measured at 20 °C using the Wilhelmy plate method. At lower concentrations, the surface tension of a solution with equi-molar mixtures of dicarboxylic acids closely followed that of a solution with the most surface-active organic component alone. Measurements of surface tension for these mixtures were lower than predictions using Henning's model and the modified Szyszkowski equation, by ˜1-2%. The calculated maximum surface excess (Γmax) and inverse Langmuir adsorption coefficient (β) from the modified Szyszkowski equation were both larger than measured values for 6 of the 7 mixtures tested. Accounting for the reduction in surface tension in the Köhler equation reduced the critical saturation ratio for these multi-component mixtures - changes were negligible for dry diameters of 0.1 and 0.5 μm, but a reduction from 1.0068 to 1.0063 was seen for the 4-dicarboxylic acid mixture with a dry diameter of 0.05 μm.

  19. Dehydration and oxidation of cellulose hydrolysis products in acidic solution

    SciTech Connect

    Garves, K.

    1981-01-01

    The dehydration of cotton cellulose in aqueous solutions in the presence of Ac/sub 2/O, AcOH, HCl, H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ or HBr proceeded by hydrolysis to carbohydrates with acetate groups, followed by conversion to 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (I) and then, to levulinic acid (II) accompanied by humic acids. For the formation of I, HCl was a more efficient and selective catalyst than H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, and the formation of II was promoted by high acid and H/sub 2/O concentrations in the medium. The addition of FeCl/sub 3/ to the dehydration mixture with HCl and continuous distillation led to the isolation of furfural.

  20. The Application of Electrodialysis to Desalting an Amino Acid Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-García, Vicente; Montiel, Vicente; González-García, José; Expósito, Eduardo; Iniesta, Jesús; Bonete, Pedro; Inglés, Marina

    2000-11-01

    One of the main difficulties in preparing pharmaceutical products is isolating them from aqueous solutions of high salt concentration, as a high purity must be obtained. Several methods that employ organic solvents are normally used. In this paper, a novel method, electrodialysis, is presented together with its application to the desalting of an industrial effluent comprising an amino acid (p-hydroxyphenylglycine) with a high salt content (ammonium sulfate and sodium dihydrogenphosphate). It was possible to remove more than 70% of the initial salt content. From this solution with a low salt content, it is possible to isolate the amino acid with a higher purity. This experiment will enable the student to gain a useful knowledge of this technique and to work with typical figures of merit of electrodialysis such as current efficiency, electrical energy consumption, production of the process, removal of salt, and loss of amino acid. In addition the student learns the use of chromatographic techniques applied to the analysis of amino acids (HPLC) and salts (IC).

  1. Methanol Uptake By Low Temperature Aqueous Sulfuric Acid Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Essin, Andrew M.; Golden, David M.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the role of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosols in the global budget of methanol, the solubility and reactivity of CH3OH in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions are under investigation. Using standard uptake techniques in a Knudsen cell reactor, we have measured the effective Henry's law coefficient, H(*), for methanol dissolution into 45 to 70 percent by weight H2SO4. We find that methanol solubility ranges from 10(exp 5) to 10(exp 8) M/atm and increases with decreasing temperature and with increasing sulfuric acid content. These solubility measurements include uptake due to physical solvation and all rapid equilibria which are established in solution. Our data indicate that simple uptake by aqueous sulfuric acid particles will not be a significant sink for methanol in the UT/LS. These results differ from those recently reported in the literature, and an explanation of this disparity will be presented. In addition to solvation, reaction between primary alcohols and sulfuric acid does occur, leading to the production of alkyl sulfates. Literature values for the rate of this reaction suggest that formation of CH3OSO3H may proceed in the atmosphere but is not significant under our experimental conditions. Results obtained using a complementary equilibrium measurement technique confirm this directly. In addition, the extent of methanol sequestration via formation of mono- and dimethylsulfate will be evaluated under several atmospheric conditions.

  2. Experimental equilibrium between acid gases and ethanolamine solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Bhairi, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    The general subject area of this study is equilibrium solubility of carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide in solutions of some common ethanolamines. The amines studied are most widely used in the area of gas sweetening. They include monoethanolamine, diglycolamine, diethanolamine and methyldiethanolamine. Only limited data are available for some of these amines. The process involved developing simple apparatus and procedure for investigating the equilibrium solubility of carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide in aqueous alkanolamine solutions. The procedure uses a single equilibrium cell. No gas chromatograph nor liquid chemical analysis is required. Measurements of the solubility were made in different amine solution concentrations at acid gas partial pressures to 1000 psia and temperatures from 77 to 240{degree}F. The method used was found to be sound as indicated by the consistency and reproducibility of the data.

  3. Synthesis of titanium-vanadium oxide materials from aqueous solutions via co-deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyue, Jing-Jong

    Titania-supported vanadium oxide is an important heterogeneous catalyst in a variety of applications. Therefore, the synthesis of mixed titanium-vanadium oxide films may be of interest for potential catalysts. While most vanadium-based catalysts consist of a vanadium oxide phase deposited on the surface of an oxide support, mixed titanium-vanadium oxides were co-deposited from aqueous solutions in a single step. The chemical composition of the titanium-vanadium oxide thin films on organic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) was manipulated by chelating agents, including lactic acid and oxalic acid. Based on the dependence of Ti:V ratio in the films on the oxalic acid concentration, it is concluded that oxalic acid chelates both titanium and vanadium, but preferentially vanadium. Therefore, from solutions with [oxalate]:[vanadium] < 1:1, titanium-enriched films were formed. However, with [oxalate]: [vanadium] > 1:1, excess oxalic acid chelates titanium as well. Consequently, the Ti:V ratio dropped back to that of films deposited in the absence of chelating agents. At high concentrations of oxalic acid, both titanium and vanadium was chelated excessively. Therefore, no films formed. Lactic acid can be oxidized by pentavalent vanadium, so that it cannot chelate cations. Therefore, when [lactate]: [vanadium] < 1:2, V4+ was formed. These V4+ ions increased the deposition rate of vanadium, and vanadium-rich films were formed. For [lactate]:[vanadium] > 1:2, the remaining lactic acid preferentially chelate vanadium and showed effects comparable to those seen with oxalic acid. The vanadium content in the mixed oxide films affected the thickness of films formed on the alkylammonium SAMs but had little or no effect on the films formed on amine SAMs. This result is consistent with the presence of a Stern layer, previously reported to form on amine-terminated surfaces. In addition to forming thin films, titanium-vanadium oxide solid-solution powders were also prepared via co

  4. LAB-SCALE DEMONSTRATION OF PLUTONIUM PURIFICATION BY ANION EXCHANGE, PLUTONIUM (IV) OXALATE PRECIPITATION, AND CALCINATION TO PLUTONIUM OXIDE TO SUPPORT THE MOX FEED MISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Crowder, M.; Pierce, R.

    2012-08-22

    H-Canyon and HB-Line are tasked with the production of PuO{sub 2} from a feed of plutonium metal. The PuO{sub 2} will provide feed material for the MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility. After dissolution of the Pu metal in H-Canyon, the solution will be transferred to HB-Line for purification by anion exchange. Subsequent unit operations include Pu(IV) oxalate precipitation, filtration and calcination to form PuO{sub 2}. This report details the results from SRNL anion exchange, precipitation, filtration, calcination, and characterization tests, as requested by HB-Line1 and described in the task plan. This study involved an 80-g batch of Pu and employed test conditions prototypical of HB-Line conditions, wherever feasible. In addition, this study integrated lessons learned from earlier anion exchange and precipitation and calcination studies. H-Area Engineering selected direct strike Pu(IV) oxalate precipitation to produce a more dense PuO{sub 2} product than expected from Pu(III) oxalate precipitation. One benefit of the Pu(IV) approach is that it eliminates the need for reduction by ascorbic acid. The proposed HB-Line precipitation process involves a digestion time of 5 minutes after the time (44 min) required for oxalic acid addition. These were the conditions during HB-line production of neptunium oxide (NpO{sub 2}). In addition, a series of small Pu(IV) oxalate precipitation tests with different digestion times were conducted to better understand the effect of digestion time on particle size, filtration efficiency and other factors. To test the recommended process conditions, researchers performed two nearly-identical larger-scale precipitation and calcination tests. The calcined batches of PuO{sub 2} were characterized for density, specific surface area (SSA), particle size, moisture content, and impurities. Because the 3013 Standard requires that the calcination (or stabilization) process eliminate organics, characterization of PuO{sub 2} batches monitored the

  5. Distinct effects of oxalate versus malonate on the iron redox chemistry: Implications for the photo-Fenton reaction.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dongxue; Guo, Yaoguang; Lou, Xiaoyi; Fang, Changling; Wang, Zhaohui; Liu, Jianshe

    2014-05-01

    The dicarboxylic acids oxalate (Oxal) and malonate (Mal) are frequently detected as the final low-molecular-weight organic acids during oxidative degradation of aromatic compounds. Here a distinct effect of Oxal versus Mal on iron-based photocatalytic technologies was reported by testing the degradation efficiency of the dye rhodamine B. The rates of dye degradation in irradiated Fe(III) solutions depended on Fe(III/II) speciation, photoreactivities of Fe complexes and reactivities of Fe(II) complexes with H2O2. Photolysis of the Fe(III)-oxalato complex was favorable due to the formation of O2-, HO2 and OH for oxidizing the dye; however, an excess of H2O2 could quench the excited state of ferrioxalate, decreasing the degradation efficiency. In contrast, activities of UV/Fe(III) in the presence of Mal were significantly diminished because Fe(III)-Mal complexes, with much lower quantum yield of Fe(II) from photoreduction, dominated Fe(III) speciation. The results provide data for an understanding of the mechanism of iron redox (photo)chemistry mediated by diacids, which will aid in selecting appropriate Fe ligands, screening photo-Fenton conditions and designing UV/Fe(III) treatability. PMID:24359921

  6. Experimental studies of oxalate complexation at 80 °C: Gibbsite, amorphous silica, and quartz solubilities in oxalate-bearing fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fein, Jeremy B.; Hestrin, Jacqueline E.

    1994-11-01

    Experimental measurements of amorphous silica, quartz, and gibbsite solubilities in oxalatebearing solutions at 80°C over a wide pH range reveal that aqueous Si-oxalate complexation is of negligible importance in natural fluid-rock systems, but that Al-oxalate complexation can dramatically affect aqueous Al concentrations. The data indicate the presence of at least two Al-oxalate complexes, and the data place quantitative constraints on the stoichiometry and stability of the Al-oxalate aqueous species. However, the data do not uniquely define the stoichiometries of the important Al-oxalate complexes. The two most likely possibilities are (1) Al(Ox) 33- and Al(Ox) + as the important complexes or (2) Al(OH) 2Ox -1 and Al(OH)Ox 0. For the first speciation, the observed solubilities constrain the values for the log of the dissociation constants for Al(Ox) 33- and Al(Ox) + to be -18.1 ± 0.5 and -8.3 ± 0.7, respectively. If Al(OH) 2Ox - and Al(OH)Ox 0 are dominant, the data define the dissociation constants for these complexes to be -24.5 ± 0.2 and -15.8 ± 0.5, respectively. Thermodynamic modeling, using these results, indicates that Al-oxalate complexation can dominate the Al budget of formation waters. Calculations suggest that with Al(Ox) 33- and Al(Ox) + dominant, the presence of a significant concentration of Ca (on the order of 200-300 ppm) does not imply a sequestering of oxalate by a Ca-oxalate precipitate. However, if Al(OH)Ox 0 and Al(OH) 2Ox - are the dominant Al-oxalate complexes, Ca-oxalate precipitation will occur at much lower Ca concentrations.

  7. Oxalate Mass Balance During Chemical Cleaning in Tank 5F

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.; Fink, S.

    2011-07-08

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is preparing Tank 5F for closure. The first step in preparing the tank for closure is mechanical sludge removal. Following mechanical sludge removal, SRS performed chemical cleaning with oxalic acid to remove the sludge heel. Personnel are currently assessing the effectiveness of the chemical cleaning to determine whether the tank is ready for closure. SRS personnel collected liquid samples during chemical cleaning and submitted them to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for analysis. Following chemical cleaning, they collected a solid sample (also known as 'process sample') and submitted it to SRNL for analysis. The authors analyzed these samples to assess the effectiveness of the chemical cleaning process. Analysis of the anions showed the measured oxalate removed from Tank 5F to be approximately 50% of the amount added in the oxalic acid. To close the oxalate mass balance, the author collected solid samples, leached them with nitric acid, and measured the concentration of cations and anions in the leachate.

  8. Effect of phytic acid, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, and chitosan solutions on microhardness of the human radicular dentin

    PubMed Central

    Nikhil, Vineeta; Jaiswal, Shikha; Bansal, Parul; Arora, Rohit; Raj, Shalya; Malhotra, Pulkit

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of phytic acid, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and chitosan solutions on the microhardness of human radicular dentin. Materials and Methods: Thirty dentin specimens were randomly divided into three groups of 10 specimens each according to the irrigant used: G1 — 1% phytic acid, G2 — 17% EDTA, and G3 — 0.2% chitosan. A standardized volume of each chelating solution was used for 3 min. Dentin microhardness was measured before and after application at the cervical, middle, and apical levels with a Vickers indenter under a 200-g load and a 10-s dwell time. The results were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student's t test. Results: Microhardness of the radicular dentin varied at the cervical, middle, and apical levels. EDTA had the greatest overall effect, causing a sharp percentage reduction in dentin microhardness with a significant difference from phytic acid and chitosan (P = 0.002). However, phytic acid and chitosan differed insignificantly from each other (P = 0.887). Conclusion: All tested chelating solutions reduced microhardness of the radicular dentin layer at all the levels. However, reduction was least at the apical level. EDTA caused more reduction in dentin microhardness than chitosan while phytic acid reduced the least. PMID:27099428

  9. Protection of Metal Artifacts with the Formation of Metal–Oxalates Complexes by Beauveria bassiana

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Edith; Cario, Sylvie; Simon, Anaële; Wörle, Marie; Mazzeo, Rocco; Junier, Pilar; Job, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Several fungi present high tolerance to toxic metals and some are able to transform metals into metal–oxalate complexes. In this study, the ability of Beauveria bassiana to produce copper oxalates was evaluated. Growth performance was tested on various copper-containing media. B. bassiana proved highly resistant to copper, tolerating concentrations of up to 20 g L−1, and precipitating copper oxalates on all media tested. Chromatographic analyses showed that this species produced oxalic acid as sole metal chelator. The production of metal–oxalates can be used in the restoration and conservation of archeological and modern metal artifacts. The production of copper oxalates was confirmed directly using metallic pieces (both archeological and modern). The conversion of corrosion products into copper oxalates was demonstrated as well. In order to assess whether the capability of B. bassiana to produce metal–oxalates could be applied to other metals, iron and silver were tested as well. Iron appears to be directly sequestered in the wall of the fungal hyphae forming oxalates. However, the formation of a homogeneous layer on the object is not yet optimal. On silver, a co-precipitation of copper and silver oxalates occurred. As this greenish patina would not be acceptable on silver objects, silver reduction was explored as a tarnishing remediation. First experiments showed the transformation of silver nitrate into nanoparticles of elemental silver by an unknown extracellular mechanism. The production of copper oxalates is immediately applicable for the conservation of copper-based artifacts. For iron and silver this is not yet the case. However, the vast ability of B. bassiana to transform toxic metals using different immobilization mechanisms seems to offer considerable possibilities for industrial applications, such as the bioremediation of contaminated soils or the green synthesis of chemicals. PMID:22291684

  10. Toluene nitration in irradiated nitric acid and nitrite solution

    SciTech Connect

    Gracy Elias; Bruce J. Mincher; Stephen P. Mezyk; Jim Muller; Leigh R. Martin

    2011-04-01

    The kinetics, mechanisms, and stable products produced for the aryl alkyl mild ortho-para director - toluene, in irradiated nitric acid and neutral nitrite solutions were investigated using ?, and pulse radiolysis. Electron pulse radiolysis was used to determine the bimolecular rate constants for the reaction of toluene with different transient species produced by irradiation. HPLC with UV detection was primarily used to assess the stable reaction products. GC-MS and LC-MS were used to confirm the results from HPLC. Free-radical nitration reaction products were found in irradiated acidic and neutral media. In acidic medium, the ring substitution and side chain substitution and oxidation produced different nitro products. In ring substitution, nitrogen oxide radicals were added mainly to hydroxyl radical-produced cyclohexadienyl radical, and in side chain substitution they were added to the carbon-centered benzyl radical produced by H-atom abstraction. In neutral nitrite toluene solution, radiolytic ring nitration products approached a statistically random distribution, suggesting a free-radical reaction involving addition of the •NO2 radical.

  11. Oxalic acid supported Si-18F-radiofluorination: one-step radiosynthesis of N-succinimidyl 3-(di-tert-butyl[18F]fluorosilyl)benzoate ([18F]SiFB) for protein labeling.

    PubMed

    Kostikov, Alexey P; Chin, Joshua; Orchowski, Katy; Niedermoser, Sabrina; Kovacevic, Miriam M; Aliaga, Antonio; Jurkschat, Klaus; Wängler, Bjoern; Wängler, Carmen; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Schirrmacher, Ralf

    2012-01-18

    N-Succinimidyl 3-(di-tert-butyl[(18)F]fluorosilyl)benzoate ([(18)F]SiFB), a novel synthon for one-step labeling of proteins, was synthesized via a simple (18)F-(19)F isotopic exchange. A new labeling technique that circumvents the cleavage of the highly reactive active ester moiety under regular basic (18)F-labeling conditions was established. In order to synthesize high radioactivity amounts of [(18)F]SiFB, it was crucial to partially neutralize the potassium oxalate/hydroxide that was used to elute (18)F(-) from the QMA cartridge with oxalic acid to prevent decomposition of the active ester moiety. Purification of [(18)F]SiFB was performed by simple solid-phase extraction, which avoided time-consuming HPLC and yielded high specific activities of at least 525 Ci/mmol and radiochemical yields of 40-56%. In addition to conventional azeotropic drying of (18)F(-) in the presence of [K(+)⊂2.2.2.]C(2)O(4), a strong anion-exchange (SAX) cartridge was used to prepare anhydrous (18)F(-) for nucleophilic radio-fluorination omitting the vacuum assisted drying of (18)F(-). Using a lyophilized mixture of [K(+)⊂2.2.2.]OH resolubilized in acetonitrile, the (18)F(-) was eluted from the SAX cartridge and used directly for the [(18)F]SiFB synthesis. [(18)F]SiFB was applied to the labeling of various proteins in likeness to the most commonly used labeling synthon in protein labeling, N-succinimidyl-4-[(18)F]fluorobenzoate ([(18)F]SFB). Rat serum albumin (RSA), apo-transferrin, a β-cell-specific single chain antibody, and erythropoietin were successfully labeled with [(18)F]SiFB in good radiochemical yields between 19% and 36%. [(18)F]SiFB- and [(18)F]SFB-derivatized RSA were directly compared as blood pool imaging agents in healthy rats using small animal positron emission tomography. Both compounds demonstrated identical biodistributions in healthy rats, accurately visualizing the blood pool with PET. PMID:22148255

  12. Concentration-Purification of Uranium from an Acid Leaching Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guettaf, H.; Becis, A.; Ferhat, K.; Hanou, K.; Bouchiha, D.; Yakoubi, K.; Ferrad, F.

    2009-11-01

    Chemical processes for the elaboration of uranium concentrate from uranium ore have been studied. This process is composed of successive units operations: crushing, milling, acid conventional leaching, filtration-washing, purification-concentration by ion exchange resins and uranium precipitation. The acid leaching operating conditions allow us to obtain a recovery uranium rate of 93%. The uranium concentration of the pregnant solution is approximately of 1.2 g/l. This value justifies the use of ion exchange resins to the concentration-purification of our pregnant solution. We have noticed that the pregnant solution contains a relatively high phosphate concentration which causes a premature uranium precipitation at pH=1.8. This pH value is in general, considered optimal to obtain the highest amount of fixed uranium by the anionic resin. To avoid the precipitation of uranium, the pH=1.5 has been fixed. We have obtained at this condition a good adsorption capacity. A 75% uranium concentrate have been elaborated, but the filtration of this concentrate has been very difficult. We have also noticed an excessive sulphate concentration. In order to improve this process, we have tested nitrates as eluant at different operating conditions.

  13. Anodic dissolution of nickel in acidic chloride solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Aal, E. E. Abd; Zakria, W.; Diab, A.; El Haleem, S. M. Abd

    2003-04-01

    The anodic dissolution of nickel was studied galvanostatically in hydrochloric acid solutions of various concentrations. The reaction orders of chloride ion and hydrogen ion concentrations were found to be 0.5 and 1.0, respectively. An anodic Tafel slope equal to 120 ± 10 mV · decade-1 was obtained. The dissolution rate of nickel at constant acid concentration was increased with stirring of the solution and increasing temperature. The activation energy, ΔH, for the anodic dissolution process was found to be 12 kcal · mol-1. The presence of oxygen in solutions assisted the passivation process. The effect of addition of aniline and some of its derivatives (o-, m-, and p-anisidine) as inhibitors on the dissolution kinetics of Ni in 1 M HCl was also investigated. These compounds inhibited the anodic dissolution of nickel without affecting the Tafel slope, indicating that the adsorption of such inhibitors could not interfere with the mechanism of metal dissolution.

  14. A Raman spectroscopic study of nickel(II) oxalate dihydrate, NiC 2O 4·2H 2O and dipotassium bisoxalatonickel(II) hexahydrate, K 2Ni(C 2O 4) 2·6H 2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bickley, R. I.; Edwards, H. G. M.; Rose, S. J.

    1991-03-01

    A comprehensive Raman spectroscopic study of nickel (II) oxalate and potassium oxalate has been made. Vibrations characteristic of the nickel oxalato complex have been identified and assigned. Aqueous solutions of nickel oxalate containing potassium oxalate have been studied and the species dipotassium bisoxalatonickel (II), K 2Ni(C 2O 4) 2, has been identified and characterised for the first time.

  15. Nonaqueous solution synthesis process for preparing oxide powders of lead zirconate titanate and related materials

    DOEpatents

    Voigt, James A.; Sipola, Diana L.; Tuttle, Bruce A.; Anderson, Mark T.

    1999-01-01

    A process for producing powders of perovskite-type compounds which comprises mixing a metal alkoxide solution with a lead acetate solution to form a homogeneous, clear metal solution, adding an oxalic acid/n-propanol solution to this metal solution to form an easily filterable, free-flowing precursor powder and then calcining this powder. This process provides fine perovskite-phase powders with ferroelectric properties which are particularly useful in a variety of electronic applications.

  16. Nonaqueous solution synthesis process for preparing oxide powders of lead zirconate titanate and related materials

    DOEpatents

    Voigt, J.A.; Sipola, D.L.; Tuttle, B.A.; Anderson, M.T.

    1999-06-01

    A process is disclosed for producing powders of perovskite-type compounds which comprises mixing a metal alkoxide solution with a lead acetate solution to form a homogeneous, clear metal solution, adding an oxalic acid/n-propanol solution to this metal solution to form an easily filterable, free-flowing precursor powder and then calcining this powder. This process provides fine perovskite-phase powders with ferroelectric properties which are particularly useful in a variety of electronic applications. 4 figs.

  17. Systems solutions by lactic acid bacteria: from paradigms to practice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are among the powerhouses of the food industry, colonize the surfaces of plants and animals, and contribute to our health and well-being. The genomic characterization of LAB has rocketed and presently over 100 complete or nearly complete genomes are available, many of which serve as scientific paradigms. Moreover, functional and comparative metagenomic studies are taking off and provide a wealth of insight in the activity of lactic acid bacteria used in a variety of applications, ranging from starters in complex fermentations to their marketing as probiotics. In this new era of high throughput analysis, biology has become big science. Hence, there is a need to systematically store the generated information, apply this in an intelligent way, and provide modalities for constructing self-learning systems that can be used for future improvements. This review addresses these systems solutions with a state of the art overview of the present paradigms that relate to the use of lactic acid bacteria in industrial applications. Moreover, an outlook is presented of the future developments that include the transition into practice as well as the use of lactic acid bacteria in synthetic biology and other next generation applications. PMID:21995776

  18. Systems solutions by lactic acid bacteria: from paradigms to practice.

    PubMed

    de Vos, Willem M

    2011-08-30

    Lactic acid bacteria are among the powerhouses of the food industry, colonize the surfaces of plants and animals, and contribute to our health and well-being. The genomic characterization of LAB has rocketed and presently over 100 complete or nearly complete genomes are available, many of which serve as scientific paradigms. Moreover, functional and comparative metagenomic studies are taking off and provide a wealth of insight in the activity of lactic acid bacteria used in a variety of applications, ranging from starters in complex fermentations to their marketing as probiotics. In this new era of high throughput analysis, biology has become big science. Hence, there is a need to systematically store the generated information, apply this in an intelligent way, and provide modalities for constructing self-learning systems that can be used for future improvements. This review addresses these systems solutions with a state of the art overview of the present paradigms that relate to the use of lactic acid bacteria in industrial applications. Moreover, an outlook is presented of the future developments that include the transition into practice as well as the use of lactic acid bacteria in synthetic biology and other next generation applications. PMID:21995776

  19. Acid retardation method in analysis of strongly acidic solutions by inductively coupled plasma mass-spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Seregina, I F; Perevoznik, O A; Bolshov, M A

    2016-10-01

    Acid retardation on the sorbents as a technique for reduction of the acidity of the solutions prior to their analysis by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was proposed and investigated. The proposed scheme provides substantial separation of the analytes and nitric acid, which allows direct introduction of the eluates in plasma without dilution. Two sorbents were examined - AV-17 anion-exchange resin and the Stirosorb 584 sorbent. Sorption and desorption of 38 elements on these sorbents were investigated. The efficiencies of the REEs' sorption on the anion-exchange and neutral sorbents were compared. The higher efficiency of the REEs and HNO3 separation was revealed for the neutral Stirosorb 584 sorbent. It was also found that most elements come out quantitatively of the column filled with the AV-17 resin after pumping 2-4mL of the solution. Wherein, the concentration of nitric acid decreased by 20 times. The anomalous behaviour of Ag, Pb, Th and U on the AV-17 resin was found. These analytes were eluted only after pumping 4 column volumes of deionized water. Na, K, Fe, Al and Li in concentrations within (50-1000mgL(-1)) range did not affect the recovery of REEs. The potential of ARM technique was demonstrate by the analysis of puriss. HNO3 and silverware. ARM enables to avoid dilution of highly acidic solutions prior to their introduction in ICP-MS. PMID:27474322

  20. Effects of acidic solutions on sexual reproduction of Pteridium aquilinum

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, L.S.; Conway, C.A.

    1980-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the effects of acidic solutions on spermatozoid motility and fertilization of gametophytes of Pteridium aquilinum. Buffered solutions (approx 0.0025 m) were used to simulate exposures to acidic precipitation for up to a 3.5 hr exposure. Experimental results suggest that the spermatozoid population can be subdivided into several groups with respect to pH sensitivity: About 25% spermatozoids are immobile one min after exposure to pH 6.1 buffer while about an equal percentage remain motile after 30 min exposure to buffer of pH 5.1. Between these two response extremes are two other subpopulations. One is quite sensitive to pH but shows some recovery if pH is between 5.6 and 6.1, while the second subpopulation does not seem to exhibit any motility recovery at all but is more resistant to acidity than the first subpopulation. To complement experiments that evaluate spermatozoid responses, experiments were performed to view the process of fertilization under controlled environmental conditions as well as under the canopy of a forest. Fertilization of gametophytes in uncovered petri dishes under a forest canopy was similar to results in aseptic culture after gametophytes were exposed to various pH levels and 86.6 micrometers sulfate. Fertilization at pH 4.5 and 3.6 was about one-half that occurring at pH 6.1. Fertilization in gametophytes exposed to pH 3.0 was about 10-20% of that occurring at pH 6.1. Addition of 86.6 micrometers sulfate decreased fertilization under all culture conditions. These experimental results suggest that fertilization in p. Aquilinum may be used as a bioindicator of contaminants in rainwater. The results demonstrate that spermatozoid motility (and the process of fertilization) is more acid sensitive than gametophytic and sporophytic tissues.

  1. Heterogeneous nucleation of calcium oxalate crystals in the presence of membrane vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Saeed R.; Whalen, Patrick O.; Glenton, Patricia A.

    1993-12-01

    Membrane-assisted crystallization of calcium oxalate was studied in vitro, using constant composition methodology. Rat renal tubular brush border membrane vesicles were incubated in supersaturated solution of calcium oxalate. Calcium and oxalate depletion started much earlier in the presence of the vesicles than in their absence; within 8, 32, or 258 min of the incubation of vesicles in calcium oxalate solutions of relative supersaturation of 12, 10 or 6 respectively. Thin plate-like crystals with jagged edges formed in association with the membrane vesicles. Since crystal nucleation in the presence of membrane vesicles started within 8 min at a relative supersaturation as low as 12, it will start significantly earlier in the urine of stone formers which is known to have higher relative supersaturation with respect to calcium oxalate. These results demonstrate that cellular membranes can efficiently induce nucleation of calcium oxalate crystals from a metastable solution in an vitro system. Similar membrane induced heterogeneous nucleation of calcium oxalate in vivo within the renal tubules is a distinct possibility.

  2. GC/MS method for determining carbon isotope enrichment and concentration of underivatized short-chain fatty acids by direct aqueous solution injection of biogas digester samples.

    PubMed

    Mulat, Daniel Girma; Feilberg, Anders

    2015-10-01

    In anaerobic digestion of organic matter, several metabolic pathways are involved during the simultaneous production and consumption of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) in general and acetate in particular. Understanding the role of each pathway requires both the determination of the concentration and isotope enrichment of intermediates in conjunction with isotope labeled substrates. The objective of this study was to establish a rapid and simple GC/MS method for determining the isotope enrichment of acetate and concentration of underivatized short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) in biogas digester samples by direct liquid injection of acidified aqueous samples. Sample preparation involves only acidification, centrifugation and filtration of the aqueous solution followed by direct injection of the aqueous supernatant solution onto a polar column. With the sample preparation and GC/MS conditions employed, well-resolved and sharp peaks of underivatized SCFA were obtained in a reasonably short time. Good recovery (96.6-102.3%) as well as low detection (4-7 µmol/L) and quantification limits (14-22 µmol/L) were obtained for all the 6 SCFA studied. Good linearity was achieved for both concentration and isotope enrichment measurement with regression coefficients higher than 0.9978 and 0.9996, respectively. The method has a good intra- and inter-day precision with a relative standard deviation (RSD) below 6% for determining the tracer-to-tracee ratio (TTR) of both [2-(13)C]acetate and [U-(13)C]acetate. It has also a good intra- and inter-day precision with a RSD below 6% and 5% for determining the concentration of standard solution and biogas digester samples, respectively. Acidification of biogas digester samples with oxalic acid provided the low pH required for the protonation of SCFA and thus, allows the extraction of SCFA from the complex sample matrix. Moreover, oxalic acid was the source of formic acid which was produced in the injector set at high temperature. The produced

  3. Biomimetic growth of calcium oxalate crystals: synchrotron X-ray studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uysal, Ahmet; Stripe, Benjamin; Dutta, Pulak

    2010-03-01

    Oriented crystals of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) form one of the major constituents of kidney stones in humans, and these crystals are also found in many plants. It is widely accepted that an organic matrix of lipids and proteins is involved in the crystallization of COM, though their role is not well-understood [1]. Langmuir monolayers of lipids on supersaturated aqueous solutions can be used to mimic the lipid-crystal interface during mineralization. We have studied nucleation and growth of COM crystals under heneicosanoic acid monolayers at the air-water interface. We used synchrotron x-rays in the grazing incidence geometry to determine the structure of the organic monolayer and the orientation of COM crystals in-situ during crystallization. We see that the (-101) faces of COM crystals are parallel to the organic matrix. There is a commensurate relationship between the heneicosanoic acid monolayer and the (-101) crystal face that may be responsible from the oriented growth. Evolution of the monolayer structure with time will be described. [1]S. R. Khan, Calcium Oxalate in Biological Systems, CRC Press, Boca Raton, 1995

  4. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by ascorbic acid in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiang-Rong; Li, Hua-Bin; Li, Xiao-Yan; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2004-11-01

    Hexavalent chromium is a priority pollutant in the USA and many other countries. Reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) is environmentally favorable as the latter species is not toxic to most living organisms and also has a low mobility and bioavailability. Reduction of Cr(VI) by ascorbic acid (vitamin C) as a reductant was studied using potassium dichromate solution as the model pollutant. Effects of concentration of vitamin C, pH, temperature, irradiation and reaction time on the reduction of Cr(VI) were examined. Cr(VI) might be reduced by vitamin C not only in acidic conditions but also in weakly alkaline solutions. The reduction of Cr(VI) by vitamin C might occur not only under irradiation but also in the dark. Vitamin C is an important biological reductant in humans and animals, and not toxic. It is water-soluble and can easily permeate through various types of soils. The results indicate that vitamin C could be used in effective remediation of Cr(VI)-contaminated soils and groundwater in a wide range of pH, with or without sunlight. PMID:15488923

  5. Synthesis of calcium oxalate crystals in culture medium irradiated with non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurake, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Ishikawa, Kenji; Nakamura, Kae; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Mizuno, Masaaki; Yamanishi, Yoko; Hori, Masaru

    2016-09-01

    Octahedral particulates several tens of microns in size were synthesized in a culture medium irradiated through contact with a plume of non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasma (NEAPP). The particulates were identified in the crystalline phase as calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD). The original medium contained constituents such as NaCl, d-glucose, CaCl2, and NaHCO3 but not oxalate or oxalic acid. The oxalate was clearly synthesized and crystallized in the medium as thermodynamically unstable COD crystals after the NEAPP irradiation.

  6. Infrared optical constants of H2O ice, amorphous nitric acid solutions, and nitric acid hydrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Koehler, Birgit G.; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Tolbert, Margaret A.; Jordon, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    We determined the infrared optical constants of nitric acid trihydrate, nitric acid dihydrate, nitric acid monohydrate, and solid amorphous nitric acid solutions which crystallize to form these hydrates. We have also found the infrared optical constants of H2O ice. We measured the transmission of infrared light throught thin films of varying thickness over the frequency range from about 7000 to 500/cm at temperatures below 200 K. We developed a theory for the transmission of light through a substrate that has thin films on both sides. We used an iterative Kramers-Kronig technique to determine the optical constants which gave the best match between measured transmission spectra and those calculated for a variety of films of different thickness. These optical constants should be useful for calculations of the infrared spectrum of polar stratospheric clouds.

  7. Removal of arsenious acid from sulfuric acidic solution using ultrasound oxidation and goethite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okawa, Hirokazu; Yoshikawa, Tomohiro; Hosokawa, Ryota; Hangui, Shinji; Kawamura, Youhei; Sugawara, Katsuyasu

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the properties of synthetic goethite for the adsorption of As from strongly acidic solutions in ambient atmosphere under ultrasound irradiation. The goethite was successfully synthesized from iron-containing sulfuric acidic solution (1271 ppm) using an autoclave apparatus for 1 h at 0.12 MPa and 121 °C. The ratio of the iron eluted from the synthetic goethite to the acidic solution was only 0.58% at pH 2.1. Ultrasound irradiation (200 kHz, 200 W) was applied to oxidize 10 ppm of As(III) to As(V) at pH 2.2 for 60 min under various atmospheric conditions. Remarkably, the oxidation ratio of As(III) to As(V) is quite high (89.7%) at pH 2.2 in ambient atmosphere and is close to those obtained for Ar (95.3%) and O2 (95.9%) atmospheres. The As(III) removal ratio reached 94.5% after 60 min of irradiation. Therefore, goethite is a promising material for As adsorption using ultrasound oxidation in the acidic region in ambient atmosphere.

  8. Arsenic removal from acidic solutions with biogenic ferric precipitates.

    PubMed

    Ahoranta, Sarita H; Kokko, Marika E; Papirio, Stefano; Özkaya, Bestamin; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2016-04-01

    Treatment of acidic solution containing 5g/L of Fe(II) and 10mg/L of As(III) was studied in a system consisting of a biological fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) for iron oxidation, and a gravity settler for iron precipitation and separation of the ferric precipitates. At pH 3.0 and FBR retention time of 5.7h, 96-98% of the added Fe(II) precipitated (99.1% of which was jarosite). The highest iron oxidation and precipitation rates were 1070 and 28mg/L/h, respectively, and were achieved at pH 3.0. Subsequently, the effect of pH on arsenic removal through sorption and/or co-precipitation was examined by gradually decreasing solution pH from 3.0 to 1.6 (feed pH). At pH 3.0, 2.4 and 1.6, the highest arsenic removal efficiencies obtained were 99.5%, 80.1% and 7.1%, respectively. As the system had ferric precipitates in excess, decreased arsenic removal was likely due to reduced co-precipitation at pH<2.4. As(III) was partially oxidized to As(V) in the system. In shake flask experiments, As(V) sorbed onto jarosite better than As(III). Moreover, the sorption capacity of biogenic jarosite was significantly higher than that of synthetic jarosite. The developed bioprocess simultaneously and efficiently removes iron and arsenic from acidic solutions, indicating potential for mining wastewater treatment. PMID:26705889

  9. Hydrogen production by photoelectrochemically splitting solutions of formic acid.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Guo, Wenliang; Zhu, Yusong; Wu, Yuping

    2011-10-17

    A TiO₂/FTO (FTO=fluorine-doped tin oxide) electrode was prepared by dip-coating FTO in a suspension of TiO₂ prepared from a sol-gel method and was used as a photoanode to split an aqueous solution of formic acid to produce hydrogen. The surface of the TiO₂/FTO film was covered with assemblies of TiO₂ nanoparticles with a diameter of approximately 20 nm. Under irradiation by using a Xe lamp, splitting of formic acid was performed at different applied current densities. Compared to splitting water or utilizing FTO and Pt foil as the anode, the splitting voltage is much lower and can be as low as -0.27 V. The results show that the splitting voltage is related to the concentration of free formate groups. The evolution rate of hydrogen measured by using gas chromatography is 130 μmol h⁻¹ at a current density of 20 mA cm⁻² and the energy-conversion efficiency can be 1.79 %. Photoelectrolysis of formic acid has the potential to be an efficient way to produce hydrogen with a high energy-conversion efficiency. PMID:21994155

  10. Conformation of poly(γ-glutamic acid) in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Muroga, Yoshio; Nakaya, Asami; Inoue, Atsuki; Itoh, Daiki; Abiru, Masaya; Wada, Kaori; Takada, Masako; Ikake, Hiroki; Shimizu, Shigeru

    2016-04-01

    Local conformation and overall conformation of poly(γ-DL-glutamic acid) (PγDLGA) and poly(γ-L-glutamic acid) (PγLGA) in aqueous solution was studied as a function of degree of ionization ε by (1) H-NMR, circular dichroism, and potentiometric titration. It was clarified that their local conformation is represented by random coil over an entire ε range and their overall conformation is represented by expanded random-coil in a range of ε > ε(*) , where ε(*) is about 0.3, 0.35, 0.45, and 0.5 for added-salt concentration of 0.02M, 0.05M, 0.1M, and 0.2M, respectively. In a range of ε < ε(*) , however, ε dependence of their overall conformation is significantly differentiated from each other. PγDLGA tends to aggregate intramolecularly and/or intermolecularly with decreasing ε, but PγLGA still behaves as expanded random-coil. It is speculated that spatial arrangement of adjacent carboxyl groups along the backbone chain essentially affects the overall conformation of PγGA in acidic media. PMID:26574908

  11. INTERACTION OF AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS OF CHLORINE WITH MALIC ACID, TARTARIC ACID, AND VARIOUS FRUIT JUICES, A SOURCE OF MUTAGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interactions of aqueous solutions of chlorine with some fruit acids (citric acid, DL-malic acid, and L-tartaric acid) at different pH values were studied. iethyl ether extraction followed by GC/MS analysis indicated that a number of mutagens (certain chlorinated propanones an...

  12. Mobilization of soil-borne arsenic by three common organic acids: Dosage and time effects.

    PubMed

    Onireti, Olaronke O; Lin, Chuxia

    2016-03-01

    A batch experiment was conducted to investigate the mobilization of soil-borne arsenic by three common low-molecular-weight organic acids with a focus on dosage and time effects. The results show that oxalic acid behaved differently from citric acid and malic acid in terms of mobilizing As that was bound to iron compounds. At an equivalent molar concentration, reactions between oxalic acid and soil-borne Fe were kinetically more favourable, as compared to those between either citric acid or malic acid and the soil-borne Fe. It was found that reductive dissolution of soil-borne Fe played a more important role in liberating As, as compared to non-reductive reactions. Prior to the 7th day of the experiment, As mobility increased with increasing dose of oxalic acid while there was no significant difference (P > 0.05) in mobilized As among the treatments with different doses of citric acid or malic acid. The dosage effect on soil-borne As mobilization in the citric acid and malic acid treatments became clear only after the 7th day of the experiment. Soluble Ca present in the soils could cause re-immobilization of As by competing with solution-borne Fe for available organic ligands to form practically insoluble organic compounds of calcium (i.e. calcium oxalate). This resulted in transformation of highly soluble organic complexes of iron (i.e. iron oxalate complexes) into slightly soluble organic compounds of iron (i.e. iron oxalate) or free ferric ion, which then reacted with the solution-borne arsenate ions to form practically insoluble iron arsenates in the latter part of the experiment. PMID:26774299

  13. The extraction of actinides from nitric acid solutions with diamides of dipicolinic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapka, Joseph L.; Paulenova, Alena; Alyapyshev, Mikhail Yu; Babain, Vasiliy A.; Law, Jack D.; Herbst, R. Scott

    2010-03-01

    Diamides of dipicolinic acid (N,N'-diethyl-N,N'-ditolyl-dipicolinamide, EtTDPA) were synthesized and evaluated for their extraction capability for actinides. In this work the extractions of neptunium(V), protactinium(V), and thorium(IV) with EtTDPA in a polar fluorinated diluent from nitric acid were investigated. EtTDPA shows a high affinity for Th(IV) even at millimolar concentrations. Np(V) and Pa(V) are both reasonably extractable with EtTDPA; however, near saturated solutions are required to achieve appreciable distribution ratios. A comparison with previously published actinide extraction data is given.

  14. Acute oxalate nephropathy due to ‘Averrhoa bilimbi’ fruit juice ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Bakul, G.; Unni, V. N.; Seethaleksmy, N. V.; Mathew, A.; Rajesh, R.; Kurien, G.; Rajesh, J.; Jayaraj, P. M.; Kishore, D. S.; Jose, P. P.

    2013-01-01

    Irumban puli (Averrhoa bilimbi) is commonly used as a traditional remedy in the state of Kerala. Freshly made concentrated juice has a very high oxalic acid content and consumption carries a high risk of developing acute renal failure (ARF) by deposition of calcium oxalate crystals in renal tubules. Acute oxalate nephropathy (AON) due to secondary oxalosis after consumption of Irumban puli juice is uncommon. AON due to A. bilimbi has not been reported before. We present a series of ten patients from five hospitals in the State of Kerala who developed ARF after intake of I. puli fruit juice. Seven patients needed hemodialysis whereas the other three improved with conservative management. PMID:23960349

  15. Radiolysis gases from nitric acid solutions containing HSA and HAN

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.R.

    1994-10-28

    The concentration of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) in the radiolytically produced off-gas from 2.76-4.25M HNO{sub 3}/PU solutions has been found to be greatly reduced in the presence of sulfamic acid (HSA) and hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN). The H{sub 2} concentration ([H{sub 2}]) is reduced from 35 percent to about 4 percent by dilution caused from an increase in the production rates of nitrogen (N{sub 2}), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), and oxygen (O{sub 2}) gases. The generation rate of H{sub 2} was not affected by HSA or HAN giving a measured radiolytic yield, G(H{sub 2}), value of 0.201 molecules/100 eV for 2.765M NO{sub 3}{sup -} solution (a value of 0.213 is predicted from previous data). The G(H{sub 2}) values are dependent on the solution nitrate concentration ([NO{sub 3}{sup -}]). The generation rates of N{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, and O{sub 2} are not dependent on the [NO{sub 3}{sup -}] in this narrow range, but are dependent on the presence of HSA and the concentration of HAN. The percentage [H{sub 2}] for the 2.5 to 3.0M NO{sub 3}{sup -} range expected in the off- from the FB-Line Pu{sup +3} Hold Tanks is conservatively estimated to be about 3.5 to 4.5 % for Pu + 3 solutions initially containing 0.023M HAN/0.165M HSA. The upper limit [H{sub 2}] may actually be about 4.1 % (4.3 % at 90 % confidence limits) but more {open_quotes}initial{close_quotes} off-gas rate data is needed at about 2.9M [NO{sub 3}{sup -}] in Pu{sup +3} solution for verification. Addition of ascorbic acid had no effect on the off-gas rate of Pu{sup +3} solutions containing HSA and NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentrations higher than those expected in the hold tanks. The maximum {open_quotes}hold time{close_quotes} for 50 grams/liter Pu{sup +3}/0.165M HSA/0.023M HAN/2.5-3.0M HNO{sub 3} solution is 20.3{+-}2.1 days. After this time the HSA initially present will become exhausted and the [H{sub 2}] will increase to 35 %. This hold time may be longer in [NO{sub 3}{sup -}] < 3.0M, but again more study is needed.

  16. Optical properties of chitosan in aqueous solution of L- and D-ascorbic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinkina, Olga N.; Shipovskaya, Anna B.; Kazmicheva, Olga F.

    2016-04-01

    The optical properties of aqueous chitosan solutions in L- and D-ascorbic acids were studied by optical rotatory dispersion and spectrophotometry. The specific optical rotation [α] of all chitosan solutions tested was positive, in contrast to aqueous solutions of the ascorbic acid enantiomers, which exhibit an inverse relationship of [α] values. Significant differences in the absolute values of [α] of the chitosan solutions at polymer-acid ratios exceeding the equimolar one were found.

  17. Aluminum(III) speciation with acetate and oxalate. A potentiometric and sup 27 Al NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, F.; Rouiller, J.; Genevrier, F.; Boudot, D. ); Masion, A.; Bottero, J.Y. )

    1991-09-01

    Aluminum (III) hydrolysis and precipitation in the presence of acetic acid and oxalic acid have been studied by combining potentiometric titration and liquid-state {sup 27}Al NMR. The main aluminum species have thus been identified and quantified: unreacted hydrolyzed, complexed monomers, and the Al{sub 13} tridecamer. A solid species appeared when precipitation occurred and was quantified by difference with the other species. The quantitative evolution of these species was followed for pH values up to 5. Acetate forms weak complexes with aluminum. The precipitated phase was hypothesized to be aggregated Al{sub 13}. Oxalate forms strong multiligand complexes to form Al{sub 13} requires higher hydroxyl content. High oxalate contents (L/M > 1) inhibit tridecamer formation and precipitation occurs only at high pH values. With oxalate the precipitated phase seems to be devoid of Al{sub 13} and of a more condensed nature than it is with acetate.

  18. Crystal growth methods dedicated to low solubility actinide oxalates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamain, C.; Arab-Chapelet, B.; Rivenet, M.; Grandjean, S.; Abraham, F.

    2016-04-01

    Two novel crystal growth syntheses dedicated to low solubility actinide-oxalate systems and adapted to glove box handling are described. These methods based on the use of precursors of either actinide metal or oxalic acid have been optimized on lanthanide systems (analogue of actinides(III)) and then assessed on real actinide systems. They allow the synthesis of several actinide oxalate single crystals, Am2(C2O4)3(H2O)3·xH2O, Th(C2O4)2·6H2O, M2+x[PuIV2-xPuIIIx(C2O4)5]·nH2O and M1-x[PuIII1-xPuIVx(C2O4)2·H2O]·nH2O. It is the first time that these well-known compounds are formed by crystal growth methods, thus enabling direct structural studies on transuranic element systems and acquisition of basic data beyond deductions from isomorphic (or not) lanthanide compounds. Characterizations by X-ray diffraction, UV-visible solid spectroscopy, demonstrate the potentialities of these two crystal growth methods to obtain oxalate compounds.

  19. Desorption of Mercury(II) on Kaolinite in the Presence of Oxalate or Cysteine

    SciTech Connect

    Senevirathna, W. U.; Zhang, Hong; Gu, Baohua

    2011-01-01

    Sorption and desorption of Hg(II) on clay minerals can impact the biogeochemical cycle and bio- uptake of Hg in aquatic systems. We studied the desorption of Hg(II) on kaolinite in the presence of oxalate or cysteine, representing the ligands with carboxylic and thiol groups of different affinities for Hg(II). The effects of pH (3, 5, 7), ligand concentration (0.25, 1.0 mM), and temperature (15, 25, 35 C) on the Hg(II) desorption were investigated through desorption kinetics. Our study showed that the Hg(II) desorption was pH-dependant. In the absence of any organic ligand, >90% of the previously adsorbed Hg(II) desorbed at pH 3 within 2 h, compared to <10% at pH 7. Similar results were observed in the presence of oxalate, showing that it hardly affected the Hg(II) desorption. Cysteine inhibited the Hg(II) desorption significantly at all the pH tested, especially in the first 80 min with the desorption less than 20%, but it appeared to enhance the Hg(II) desorption afterwards. The effect of ligand concentration on the Hg(II) desorption was small, especially in the presence of oxalate. The effect of temperature on the desorption was nearly insignificant. The effect of the organic acids on the Hg(II) sorption and desorption is explained by the formation of the ternary surface complexes involving the mineral, ligand, and Hg(II). The competition for Hg(II) between the cysteine molecules adsorbed on the particles and in the solution probably can also affect the Hg(II) desorption.

  20. Interaction of trace elements in acid mine drainage solution with humic acid.

    PubMed

    Suteerapataranon, Siripat; Bouby, Muriel; Geckeis, Horst; Fanghänel, Thomas; Grudpan, Kate

    2006-06-01

    The release of metal ions from a coal mining tailing area, Lamphun, Northern Thailand, is studied by leaching tests. Considerable amounts of Mn, Fe, Al, Ni and Co are dissolved in both simulated rain water (pH 4) and 10 mg L(-1) humic acid (HA) solution (Aldrich humic acid, pH 7). Due to the presence of oxidizing pyrite and sulfide minerals, the pH in both leachates decreases down to approximately 3 combined with high sulfate concentrations typical to acid mine drainage (AMD) water composition. Interaction of the acidic leachates upon mixing with ground- and surface water containing natural organic matter is simulated by subsequent dilution (1:100; 1:200; 1:300; 1:500) with a 10 mg L(-1) HA solution (ionic strength: 10(-3) mol L(-1)). Combining asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AsFlFFF) with UV/Vis and ICP-MS detection allows for the investigation of metal ion interaction with HA colloid and colloid size evolution. Formation of colloid aggregates is observed by filtration and AsFlFFF depending on the degree of the dilution. While the average HA size is initially found to be 2 nm, metal-HA complexes are always found to be larger. Such observation is attributed to a metal induced HA agglomeration, which is found even at low coverage of HA functional groups with metal ions. Increasing the metal ion to HA ratio, the HA bound metal ions and the HA entities are growing in size from <3 to >450 nm. At high metal ion to HA ratios, precipitation of FeOOH phases and HA agglomeration due to colloid charge neutralization by complete saturation of HA complexing sites are responsible for the fact that most of Fe and Al precipitate and are found in a size fraction >450 nm. In the more diluted solutions, HA is more relevant as a carrier for metal ion mobilization. PMID:16631855

  1. The role of carboxylic acids in albite and quartz dissolution: An experimental study under diagenetic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin, S.P. ); Hajash, A. Jr.; Tieh, T.T. ); Dewers, T.A. )

    1994-10-01

    Simple water soluble organic acids may promote secondary porosity development in sandstones during diagenesis by increasing feldspar solubility and dissolution rate. To test this hypothesis, Amelia albite and Brazilian hydrothermal quartz were reacted with 0.07 m acetate and 0.07 m acetate-0.005 m oxalate solutions at selected pH values, and distilled water. Pore fluid chemistry was monitored through time at various flow rates to obtain both solubility and dissolution rate data. The experiments were conducted in large volume, semi-static, flow-through systems at 100[degrees]C and 347 bars. These systems simulate subsurface flow rates, low mass water/rock, and high surface area/fluid mass. Acetate and acetate + oxalate solutions significantly increase albite solubility at temperatures, pressures, and pH values typical of diagenetic environments. Albite solubilities increased in acetate and acetate + oxalate solutions by factors of 2 and 3.4, respectively, compared to distilled water. In these same solutions, Al concentrations were [approx] 140 and [approx] 480 times higher than that calculated for kaolinite solubility at the same conditions without organic species. These enhanced solubilities occur at pH values (4.6-4.8) that may overlap with formation waters. In contrast to albite, quartz solubility was essentially identical in all solutions investigated. Dissolution rates in the acid region decreased with increasing pH in the acetate and acetate + oxalate solutions. Slopes of log rate vs. pH curves were [approx] 0.6 for acetate and [approx] 0.3 for acetate + oxalate. Although the effects of acetate on the dissolution rate are small, the effects of oxalate are significant. A rate law valid for albite dissolution at 100[degrees]C, oxalate concentrations to 0.01 m, and pH values ranging from 3.4 to 5.5 is given.

  2. Genome-Wide Screen for Oxalate-Sensitive Mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, V.; Stotz, H. U.; Hippchen, K.; Bakalinsky, A. T.

    2007-01-01

    Oxalic acid is an important virulence factor produced by phytopathogenic filamentous fungi. In order to discover yeast genes whose orthologs in the pathogen may confer self-tolerance and whose plant orthologs may protect the host, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae deletion library consisting of 4,827 haploid mutants harboring deletions in nonessential genes was screened for growth inhibition and survival in a rich medium containing 30 mM oxalic acid at pH 3. A total of 31 mutants were identified that had significantly lower cell yields in oxalate medium than in an oxalate-free medium. About 35% of these mutants had not previously been detected in published screens for sensitivity to sorbic or citric acid. Mutants impaired in endosomal transport, the rgp1Δ, ric1Δ, snf7Δ, vps16Δ, vps20Δ, and vps51Δ mutants, were significantly overrepresented relative to their frequency among all verified yeast open reading frames. Oxalate exposure to a subset of five mutants, the drs2Δ, vps16Δ, vps51Δ, ric1Δ, and rib4Δ mutants, was lethal. With the exception of the rib4Δ mutant, all of these mutants are impaired in vesicle-mediated transport. Indirect evidence is provided suggesting that the sensitivity of the rib4Δ mutant, a riboflavin auxotroph, is due to oxalate-mediated interference with riboflavin uptake by the putative monocarboxylate transporter Mch5. PMID:17644632

  3. Recognition of oxalate by a copper(II) polyaza macrobicyclic complex.

    PubMed

    Mateus, Pedro; Delgado, Rita; Brandão, Paula; Félix, Vítor

    2011-06-14

    A new polyamine macrobicyclic compound was synthesised through a [1+1] "tripod-tripod coupling" strategy and using a Schiff base condensation reaction, followed by sodium borohydride reduction. The resulting compound is a heteroditopic cage (btpN(7)) in which one of the head units is appropriate for the coordination of copper(II), whereas the other head is available for additional hydrogen-bonding and electrostatic interactions with substrates. The acid-base behaviour of the new compound, the stability constants of its complex with the Cu(2+) ion and the association constants of the copper(II) cryptate with oxalate (oxa(2-)), malonate (mal(2-)), succinate (suc(2-)), maleate (male(2-)) and fumarate (fum(2-)) were determined by potentiometry at 298.2 K in aqueous solution and at an ionic strength of 0.10 mol dm(-3) in KNO(3). These studies revealed a clear preference of the receptor [CuH(h)btpN(7)H(2)O]((2+h)+) for oxa(2-) over the other dicarboxylate substrates. This arises from co-operativity between metal-anion coordination and electrostatic and hydrogen-bonding interactions, in accordance with the ideal size of this dicarboxylate, which allow it to take full advantage of the potential binding sites of the receptor. A qualitative indicator-displacement study, in agreement with the potentiometric studies, demonstrated that the copper cryptate receptor can be used as a selective visual sensor for oxalate. PMID:21557358

  4. Comparison of peak shape in hydrophilic interaction chromatography using acidic salt buffers and simple acid solutions.

    PubMed

    Heaton, James C; Russell, Joseph J; Underwood, Tim; Boughtflower, Robert; McCalley, David V

    2014-06-20

    The retention and peak shape of neutral, basic and acidic solutes was studied on hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) stationary phases that showed both strong and weak ionic retention characteristics, using aqueous-acetonitrile mobile phases containing either formic acid (FA), ammonium formate (AF) or phosphoric acid (PA). The effect of organic solvent concentration on the results was also studied. Peak shape was good for neutrals under most mobile phase conditions. However, peak shapes for ionised solutes, particularly for basic compounds, were considerably worse in FA than AF. Even neutral compounds showed deterioration in performance with FA when the mobile phase water concentration was reduced. The poor performance in FA cannot be entirely attributed to the negative impact of ionic retention on ionised silanols on the underlying silica base materials, as results using PA at lower pH (where their ionisation is suppressed) were inferior to those in AF. Besides the moderating influence of the salt cation on ionic retention, it is likely that salt buffers improve peak shape due to the increased ionic strength of the mobile phase and its impact on the formation of the water layer on the column surface. PMID:24813934

  5. Release of nitrous acid and nitrogen dioxide from nitrate photolysis in acidic aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Scharko, Nicole K; Berke, Andrew E; Raff, Jonathan D

    2014-10-21

    Nitrate (NO3(-)) is an abundant component of aerosols, boundary layer surface films, and surface water. Photolysis of NO3(-) leads to NO2 and HONO, both of which play important roles in tropospheric ozone and OH production. Field and laboratory studies suggest that NO3¯ photochemistry is a more important source of HONO than once thought, although a mechanistic understanding of the variables controlling this process is lacking. We present results of cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy measurements of NO2 and HONO emitted during photodegradation of aqueous NO3(-) under acidic conditions. Nitrous acid is formed in higher quantities at pH 2-4 than expected based on consideration of primary photochemical channels alone. Both experimental and modeled results indicate that the additional HONO is not due to enhanced NO3(-) absorption cross sections or effective quantum yields, but rather to secondary reactions of NO2 in solution. We find that NO2 is more efficiently hydrolyzed in solution when it is generated in situ during NO3(-) photolysis than for the heterogeneous system where mass transfer of gaseous NO2 into bulk solution is prohibitively slow. The presence of nonchromophoric OH scavengers that are naturally present in the environment increases HONO production 4-fold, and therefore play an important role in enhancing daytime HONO formation from NO3(-) photochemistry. PMID:25271384

  6. Experimental study of aluminum-oxalate complexing at 80 °C: Implications for the formation of secondary porosity within sedimentary reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fein, Jeremy B.

    1991-10-01

    An experimental study of aluminum-oxalate complexing at 80 °C indicates that the presence of oxalate in sedimentary basin fluids may play an important role in creating secondary porosity in reservoir rocks. The solubility of gibbsite was measured as a function of oxalate concentration. Geologically realistic oxalate concentrations were used in order to simulate the aluminum mobilities that occur in reservoir fluids. Although the stoichiometry of the important aluminum-oxalate species cannot be determined from these data, the results are used to quantify the minimum extent of aluminum-oxalate complexing that occurs in solution. Assuming that Al(Ox)33- is the only important aluminum-oxalate complex, the data limit the log of the dissociation constant of Al(Ox)33- to be ≤-16.5. Thermodynamic modeling of aluminum systems with fluids that contain NaCl, acetate, and oxalate illustrates that aluminum-oxalate complexing is much more important than aluminum-acetate complexing, even at relatively low oxalate concentrations and at very high acetate concentrations. In addition, these calculations show that aluminum-oxalate complexing can greatly increase aluminum mobility in formation waters and, therefore, may increase aluminosilicate mineral dissolution within sedimentary basin fluid-rock systems.

  7. Compatible solute influence on nucleic acids: Many questions but few answers

    PubMed Central

    Kurz, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Compatible solutes are small organic osmolytes including but not limited to sugars, polyols, amino acids, and their derivatives. They are compatible with cell metabolism even at molar concentrations. A variety of organisms synthesize or take up compatible solutes for adaptation to extreme environments. In addition to their protective action on whole cells, compatible solutes display significant effects on biomolecules in vitro. These include stabilization of native protein and nucleic acid structures. They are used as additives in polymerase chain reactions to increase product yield and specificity, but also in other nucleic acid and protein applications. Interactions of compatible solutes with nucleic acids and protein-nucleic acid complexes are much less understood than the corresponding interactions of compatible solutes with proteins. Although we may begin to understand solute/nucleic acid interactions there are only few answers to the many questions we have. I summarize here the current state of knowledge and discuss possible molecular mechanisms and thermodynamics. PMID:18522725

  8. Glyoxylate rather than ascorbate is an efficient precursor for oxalate biosynthesis in rice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Le; Jiang, Jingzhe; Zhang, Chan; Jiang, Linrong; Ye, Nenghui; Lu, Yusheng; Yang, Guozheng; Liu, Ee; Peng, Changlian; He, Zhenghui; Peng, Xinxiang

    2010-01-01

    Oxalate is widely distributed in the plant kingdom. While excess oxalate in food crops is detrimental to animal and human health, it may play various functional roles in plants, particularly for coping with environmental stresses. Understanding its biosynthetic mechanism in plants, therefore, becomes increasingly important both theoretically and practically. However, it is still a matter of debate as to what precursor and pathway are ultimately used for oxalate biosynthesis in plants. In this study, both physiological and molecular approaches were applied to address these questions. First, it was observed that when glycolate or glyoxylate was fed into detached leaves, both organic acids were equally effective in stimulating oxalate accumulation. In addition, the stimulation could be completely inhibited by cysteine, a glyoxylate scavenger that forms cysteine–glyoxylate adducts. To verify the role of glyoxylate further, various transgenic plants were generated, in which several genes involved in glyoxylate metabolism [i.e. SGAT (serine-glyoxylate aminotransferase), GGAT (glutamate-glyoxylate aminotransferase), HPR (hydroxypyruvate reductase), ICL (isocitrate lyase)], were transcriptionally regulated through RNAi or over-expression. Analyses on these transgenic plants consistently revealed that glyoxylate acted as an efficient precursor for oxalate biosynthesis in rice. Unexpectedly, it was found that oxalate accumulation was not correlated with photorespiration, even though this pathway is known to be a major source of glyoxylate. Further, when GLDH (L-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase), a key enzyme gene for ascorbate biosynthesis, was down-regulated, the oxalate abundance remained constant, despite ascorbate having been largely reduced as expected in these transgenic plants. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that glyoxylate rather than ascorbate is an efficient precursor for oxalate biosynthesis, and that oxalate accumulation and regulation do not

  9. EXAFS Study on the Reactions Between Iron And Fulvic Acid in Acid Aqueous Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Schaik, J.W.J.van; Persson, I.; Kleja, D.B.; Gustafsson, J.P.

    2009-05-26

    Iron(III) competes with trace metals for binding sites on organic ligands. We used X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy to determine the binding mode and oxidation state of iron in solutions initially containing only iron(III) and fulvic acid at pHs 2 and 4. EXAFS spectra were recorded at different times after sample preparation. Iron was octahedrally configured with inner-sphere Fe-O interactions at 1.98-2.10 {angstrom}, depending on the oxidation state of iron. Iron(III) formed complexes with fulvic acid within 15 min. Iron(III) was reduced to iron(II) with time at pH 2, whereas no significant reduction occurred at pH 4. No signs of dimeric/trimeric hydrolysis products were found in any of the solution samples (<0.45 {mu}m). However, the isolated precipitate of the pH 2 sample (>0.45 {mu}m) showed Fe{hor_ellipsis}Fe distances, indicating the presence of tightly packed iron(III) trimers and/or clusters of corner-sharing octahedra. It is suggested that the binding mode of iron(III) to fulvic acid at low pH may be phase-dependent: in solution mononuclear complexes predominate, whereas in the solid phase hydrolyzed polynuclear iron(III) complexes form, even at very low pH values. The observed pH dependence of iron(III) reduction was consistent with expected results based on thermodynamic calculations for model ligands.

  10. Large-scale production of anhydrous nitric acid and nitric acid solutions of dinitrogen pentoxide

    DOEpatents

    Harrar, Jackson E.; Quong, Roland; Rigdon, Lester P.; McGuire, Raymond R.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for a large scale, electrochemical production of anhydrous nitric acid and N.sub.2 O.sub.5. The method includes oxidizing a solution of N.sub.2 O.sub.4 /aqueous-HNO.sub.3 at the anode, while reducing aqueous HNO.sub.3 at the cathode, in a flow electrolyzer constructed of special materials. N.sub.2 O.sub.4 is produced at the cathode and may be separated and recycled as a feedstock for use in the anolyte. The process is controlled by regulating the electrolysis current until the desired products are obtained. The chemical compositions of the anolyte and catholyte are monitored by measurement of the solution density and the concentrations of N.sub.2 O.sub.4.

  11. Uptake of Hypobromous Acid (HOBr) by Aqueous Sulfuric Acid Solutions: Low-Temperature Solubility and Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Michelsen, Rebecca R.; Ashbourn, Samatha F. M.; Rammer, Thomas A.; Golden, David M.

    2005-01-01

    Hypobromous acid (HOBr) is a key species linking inorganic bromine to the chlorine and odd hydrogen chemical families. We have measured the solubility of HOBr in 45 - 70 wt% sulfuric acid solutions representative of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosol composition. Over the temperature range 201 - 252 K, HOBr is quite soluble in sulfuric acid, with an effective Henry's law coefficient, H* = 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 7) mol/L/atm. H* is inversely dependent on temperature, with Delta H = -46.2 kJ/mol and Delta S = -106.2 J/mol/K for 55 - 70 wt% H2SO4 solutions. Our study includes temperatures which overlap both previous measurements of HOBr solubility. For uptake into aqueous 45 wt% H2SO4, the solubility can be described by log H* = 3665/T - 10.63. For 55 - 70 wt% H2SO4, log H* = 2412/T - 5.55. At temperatures colder than approx. 213 K, the solubility of HOBr in 45 wt% H2SO4 is noticeably larger than in 70 wt% H2SO4. The solubility of HOBr is comparable to that of HBr, indicating that upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosols should contain equilibrium concentrations of HOBr which equal or exceed those of HBr. Our measurements indicate chemical reaction of HOBr upon uptake into aqueous sulfuric acid in the presence of other brominated gases followed by evolution of gaseous products including Br2O and Br2, particularly at 70 wt% H2SO4.

  12. pH dependency of sclerotial development and pathogenicity revealed by using genetically defined oxalate-minus mutants of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liangsheng; Xiang, Meichun; White, David; Chen, Weidong

    2015-08-01

    The devastating plant pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum produces copious (up to 50 mM) amounts of oxalic acid, which, for over a quarter century, has been claimed as the pathogenicity determinant based on UV-induced mutants that concomitantly lost oxalate production and pathogenicity. Such a claim was made without fulfilling the molecular Koch's postulates because the UV mutants are genetically undefined and harbour a developmental defect in sclerotial production. Here, we generated oxalate-minus mutants of S. sclerotiorum using two independent mutagenesis techniques, and tested the resulting mutants for growth at different pHs and for pathogenicity on four host plants. The oxalate-minus mutants accumulated fumaric acid, produced functional sclerotia and have reduced ability to acidify the environment. The oxalate-minus mutants retained pathogenicity on plants, but their virulence varied depending on the pH and buffering capacity of host tissue. Acidifying the host tissue enhanced virulence of the oxalate-minus mutants, whereas supplementing with oxalate did not. These results suggest that it is low pH, not oxalic acid itself, that establishes the optimum conditions for growth, reproduction, pathogenicity and virulence expression of S. sclerotiorum. Exonerating oxalic acid as the primary pathogenicity determinant will stimulate research into identifying additional candidates as pathogenicity factors towards better understanding and managing Sclerotinia diseases. PMID:25720941

  13. Effect of calcium oxalate on the photocatalytic degradation of Orange II on ZnO surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassaid, S.; Ziane, B.; Badaoui, M.; Chaib, M.; Robert, D.

    2013-06-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of aqueous solution of Orange II, has been investigated in the presence of ZnO catalyst with calcium oxalate as sacrificial agent. This study demonstrated that the performance of ZnO photocatalyst can be improved by addition of calcium oxalate. Results show that adsorption is an important parameter controlling the degradation phenomena. Indeed, the added oxalate causes a drop in the pH medium, what causes a better adsorption of Orange II on the ZnO surface. The effect of calcium oxalate is to increase the concentration of superoxides (O{2/·-}) and hydroperoxides (HO2·) radicals, which are key intermediaries in the mechanism of photodegradation because of their powerful force of oxidation.

  14. Association analysis for oxalate concentration in spinach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Screening and breeding low-oxalate germplasm is a major objective in spinach breeding. This research aims to conduct association analysis and identify SNP markers associated with oxalate concentration in spinach germplasm. A total of 310 spinach genotypes including 300 USDA germplasm accessions and ...

  15. Engineering calcium oxalate crystal formation in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many plants accumulate crystals of calcium oxalate. Just how these crystals form remains unknown. To gain insight into the mechanisms regulating calcium oxalate crystal formation, a crystal engineering approach was initiated utilizing the non-crystal accumulating plant, Arabidopsis. The success of t...

  16. Synthesis of labeled oxalic acid derivatives

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Alvarez, Marc A.

    2004-06-22

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, specifically ##STR1## where each C* is selected from the group consisting of a carbon-12, i.e., .sup.12 C, or a carbon-13, i.e., .sup.13 C and at least one C* is .sup.13 C, R.sup.1 is selected from the group of C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl and aryl, and X is selected from the group of --NR.sup.2 R.sup.3 where R.sup.2 and R.sup.3 are each independently selected from the group of C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl, alkoxy and aryl, --SR.sup.4 where R.sup.4 is selected from the group of C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl, alkoxy and aryl, and --OR.sup.5 where R.sup.5 is selected from the group of C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl, alkoxy and aryl with the proviso that when R.sup.1 is methyl then R.sup.5 is other than methyl, when R.sup.1 is ethyl then R.sup.5 is other than ethyl, and when R.sup.1 is benzyl then R.sup.5 is other than benzyl.

  17. The oxalate-carbonate pathway: at the interface between biology and geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junier, P.; Cailleau, G.; Martin, G.; Guggiari, M.; Bravo, D.; Clerc, M.; Aragno, M.; Job, D.; Verrecchia, E.

    2012-04-01

    The formation of calcite in otherwise carbonate-free acidic soils through the biological degradation of oxalate is a mechanism termed oxalate-carbonate pathway. This pathway lies at the interface between biological and geological systems and constitutes an important, although underestimated, soil mineral carbon sink. In this case, atmospheric CO2 is fixed by the photosynthetic activity of oxalogenic plants, which is partly destined to the production of oxalate used for the chelation of metals, and particularly, calcium. Fungi are also able to produce oxalate to cope with elevated concentrations of metals. In spite of its abundance as a substrate, oxalate is a very stable organic anion that can be metabolized only by a group of bacteria that use it as carbon and energy sources. These bacteria close the biological cycle by degrading calcium oxalate, releasing Ca2+ and inducing a change in local soil pH. If parameters are favourable, the geological part of the pathway begins, because this change in pH will indirectly lead to the precipitation of secondary calcium carbonate (calcite) in unexpected geological conditions. Due to the initial acidic soil conditions, and the absence of geological carbonate in the basement, it is unexpected to find C in the form of calcite. The activity of the oxalate-carbonate pathway has now been demonstrated in several places around the world, suggesting that its importance can be even greater than expected. In addition, new roles for each of the biological players of the pathway have been revealed recently forcing us to reconsider a global biogeochemical model for oxalate cycling.

  18. Isothermal heat measurements of TBP-nitric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.R.; Cavin, W.S.

    1994-12-16

    Net heats of reaction were measured in an isothermal calorimeter for both single phase (organic) and two phase (organic and aqueous) TBP/HNO{sub 3} reacting solutions at temperatures above 100 C. The oxidation rate constant was determined to be 5.4E-4 min{sup {minus}1} at 110 C for an open ``vented`` system as compared to 1.33 E-3 min{sup {minus}1} in the closed system. The heat released per unit material oxidized was also reduced. The oxidation in both phases was found to be first order in nitric acid and pseudo-zero order in butylnitrate and water. The hydrolysis (esterification) rate constant determined by Nichols` (1.33E-3 min{sup {minus}1}) fit the experimental data from this work well. Forced evaporation of the volatile components by the product gases from oxidation resulted in a cooling mechanism which more than balanced the heat from the oxidation reaction in the two-phased systems. Rate expressions were derived and rate constants determined for both the single and two phase systems. An approximating mathematical model was developed to fit the experimental data and to extrapolate beyond the experimental conditions. This model shows that one foot of ``reacting`` 14.3M HNO{sub 3} aqueous phase solution at 121 C will transport sufficient water to the organic phase to replace evaporative losses, maintaining endothermicity, for organic layers up to 12.2 + 6.0 feet deep. If the pressure in a reacting system is allowed to increase due to insufficient venting the temperature of the organic phase would increase in temperature to reach a new equilibrium. The rate of oxidation would increase not only due to the increase in temperature but also from the increased concentration of dissolved HNO{sub 3} reduction products. Another important factor is that the cooling system described in this work becomes less effective as the total pressure increases. These factors probably contributed to the explosion at Tomsk.

  19. Influence of hydrochlorothiazide on urinary calcium oxalate relative supersaturation in healthy young adult female domestic shorthaired cats.

    PubMed

    Hezel, Alisha; Bartges, Joseph W; Kirk, Claudia A; Cox, Sherry; Geyer, Nicole; Moyers, Tammy; Hayes, Jimmy

    2007-01-01

    Hydrochlorothiazide (1 mg/kg PO q12h) or placebo was administered to healthy cats for 2 weeks in a masked, placebo-controlled, crossover-design study, and 24-hour urine samples were collected. When cats received hydrochlorothiazide, 24-hour urine volume, ammonia, chloride, creatinine, magnesium, oxalic acid, phosphate, potassium, and sodium were significantly higher than when cats received placebo. Hydrochlorothiazide was associated with significantly lower urinary saturation for calcium oxalate, but no difference was found in 24-hour urine calcium and citrate, urinary saturation for struvite, or blood ionized calcium. Hydrochlorothiazide decreased urinary saturation for calcium oxalate and could be useful in managing cats with calcium oxalate uroliths. Results of this study, however, should not be extrapolated to cats that form calcium oxalate uroliths. PMID:18183543

  20. Ultrastructural and biochemical studies on formation of calcium oxalate in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelmottaleb, A.M.

    1989-01-01

    Plant calcium oxalate crystals occur within cells called crystal idioblasts. Important aspects of this calcification phenomenon have not been characterized. This dissertation examines some of the aspects of this ubiquitous type of calcification including (1) characterization of ultrastructural features of developing crystal idioblasts, (2) determination of the relationship of specialized ultrastructural features of the idioblasts to transport of compounds and mechanisms of crystal deposition, and (3) the biochemical relationship between ascorbic acid metabolism and production of oxalic acid used for crystal formation. Structural and cytochemical studies revealed that crystal idioblasts have dense cytoplasm, modified plastids, enlarged nuclei, extensive endoplasmic reticulum, numerous dictyosomes and vesicles, and a bundle of raphide crystals in their vacuoles. A mechanism for Ca transport and crystal precipitation is proposed, based on these results. There is a strong and dynamic relationship between Ca concentration and oxalic acid produced for crystal formation, where increasing Ca level in the growth medium lead to increased total and insoluble oxalate in the plant. Calmodulin antagonists reduced oxalic acid production.

  1. Acid Solutions for Etching Corrosion-Resistant Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    New study characterized solutions for etching austenitic stainless steels, nickel-base alloys, and titanium alloys (annealed). Solutions recommended for use remove at least 0.4 mil of metal from surface in less than an hour. Solutions do not cause intergranular attack on metals for which they are effective, when used under specified conditions.

  2. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When...

  3. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When...

  4. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When...

  5. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When...

  6. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When...

  7. A review of plutonium oxalate decomposition reactions and effects of decomposition temperature on the surface area of the plutonium dioxide product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, R. M.; Sims, H. E.; Taylor, R. J.

    2015-10-01

    Plutonium (IV) and (III) ions in nitric acid solution readily form insoluble precipitates with oxalic acid. The plutonium oxalates are then easily thermally decomposed to form plutonium dioxide powder. This simple process forms the basis of current industrial conversion or 'finishing' processes that are used in commercial scale reprocessing plants. It is also widely used in analytical or laboratory scale operations and for waste residues treatment. However, the mechanisms of the thermal decompositions in both air and inert atmospheres have been the subject of various studies over several decades. The nature of intermediate phases is of fundamental interest whilst understanding the evolution of gases at different temperatures is relevant to process control. The thermal decomposition is also used to control a number of powder properties of the PuO2 product that are important to either long term storage or mixed oxide fuel manufacturing. These properties are the surface area, residual carbon impurities and adsorbed volatile species whereas the morphology and particle size distribution are functions of the precipitation process. Available data and experience regarding the thermal and radiation-induced decompositions of plutonium oxalate to oxide are reviewed. The mechanisms of the thermal decompositions are considered with a particular focus on the likely redox chemistry involved. Also, whilst it is well known that the surface area is dependent on calcination temperature, there is a wide variation in the published data and so new correlations have been derived. Better understanding of plutonium (III) and (IV) oxalate decompositions will assist the development of more proliferation resistant actinide co-conversion processes that are needed for advanced reprocessing in future closed nuclear fuel cycles.

  8. Chemical evaluation of soil-solution in acid forest soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, G.B.; David, M.B.

    1996-01-01

    Soil-solution chemistry is commonly studied in forests through the use of soil lysimeters.This approach is impractical for regional survey studies, however, because lysimeter installation and operation is expensive and time consuming. To address these problems, a new technique was developed to compare soil-solution chemistry among red spruce stands in New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine. Soil solutions were expelled by positive air pressure from soil that had been placed in a sealed cylinder. Before the air pressure was applied, a solution chemically similar to throughfall was added to the soil to bring it to approximate field capacity. After the solution sample was expelled, the soil was removed from the cylinder and chemically analyzed. The method was tested with homogenized Oa and Bs horizon soils collected from a red spruce stand in the Adirondack Mountains of New York, a red spruce stand in east-central Vermont, and a mixed hardwood stand in the Catskill Mountains of New York. Reproducibility, effects of varying the reaction time between adding throughfall and expelling soil solution (5-65 minutes) and effects of varying the chemical composition of added throughfall, were evaluated. In general, results showed that (i) the method was reproducible (coefficients of variation were generally < 15%), (ii) variations in the length of reaction-time did not affect expelled solution concentrations, and (iii) adding and expelling solution did not cause detectable changes in soil exchange chemistry. Concentrations of expelled solutions varied with the concentrations of added throughfall; the lower the CEC, the more sensitive expelled solution concentrations were to the chemical concentrations of added throughfall. Addition of a tracer (NaBr) showed that the expelled solution was a mixture of added solution and solution that preexisted in the soil. Comparisons of expelled solution concentrations with concentrations of soil solutions collected by zero-tension and

  9. Effect of oxalate on the dissolution rates of oligoclase and tremolite (journal version)

    SciTech Connect

    Mast, M.A.; Drever, J.I.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of oxalate, a strong chelator for Al and other cations, on the dissolution rates of oligoclase feldspar and tremolite amphibole was investigated in a flow-through reactor at 22 deg C. Oxalate at concentrations of 0.5 and 1 mM has essentially no effect on the dissolution rate of tremolite, nor on the steady-state rate of release of Si from oligoclase. The fact that oxalate has no effect on dissolution rate suggests that detachment of Si rather than Al or Mg is the rate-limiting step. At pH 4 and 9, oxalate has no effect on the steady-state rate of release of Al, and dissolution is congruent. At pH 5 and 7, oligoclase dissolution is congruent in the presence of oxalate, but in the absence of oxalate Al is preferentially retained in the solid relative to Si. The rate of dissolution of tremolite is independent of pH over the pH range 2-5, and decreases at higher pH. The rate of dissolution of oligoclase was independent of pH over the pH range 4-9. Since the dissolution rate of these minerals is independent of pH and organic ligand concentration, the effect of acid deposition from the atmosphere on the rate of supply of cations from weathering of granitic rocks should be minor.

  10. Computational study on nitronium and nitrosonium oxalate: potential oxidizers for solid rocket propulsion?

    PubMed

    Gökçinar, Elif; Klapötke, Thomas M; Kramer, Michael P

    2010-08-26

    The enthalpies of formation for solid ionic nitrosonium oxalate, [NO](2)[O(2)C-CO(2)], nitronium oxalate, [NO(2)](2)[O(2)C-CO(2)], as well as covalent bis(nitroso)oxalic acid, ON-O(2)C-CO(2)-NO, and oxalic acid dinitrate ester, O(2)N-O(2)C-CO(2)-NO(2), were calculated using the complete basis set (CBS-4M) method of Petersson and coworkers to obtain very accurate energies. For the nitrosonium species, the ionic form ([NO](2)[O(2)C-CO(2)]) was identified as the more stable isomer, whereas for the nitrosonium compound, the covalently bound dinitrate ester (O(2)N-O(2)C-CO(2)-NO(2)) was found to be more stable. The combustion parameters with respect to possible use as ingredients in solid rocket motors for both stable species were calculated using the EXPLO5 and the ICT code. The performance of an aluminized formulation with covalently bound dinitrate ester (O(2)N-O(2)C-CO(2)-NO(2)) was shown to be comparable to that of ammonium perchlorate/aluminum. This makes oxalic acid dinitrate ester a potentially interesting perchlorate-free and environmentally benign oxidizer for solid rocket propulsion. PMID:20302312

  11. Delayed fracture of Ni-Ti superelastic alloys in acidic and neutral fluoride solutions.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Ken'ichi; Kaneko, Kazuyuki; Moriyama, Keiji; Asaoka, Kenzo; Sakai, Jun'ichi; Nagumo, Michihiko

    2004-04-01

    Hydrogen-related degradation of the mechanical properties of a Ni-Ti superelastic alloy has been examined by means of delayed fracture tests in acidic and neutral fluoride solutions and hydrogen thermal desorption analysis. Delayed fracture took place in both solutions; the time to fracture was shorter in the acidic solutions than in the neutral solutions with the same fluoride concentration. The time to fracture was reduced in both solutions when applied stress exceeded the critical stress for martensite transformation. In the acidic solutions, Ni-Ti superelastic alloy underwent general corrosion and absorbed substantial amounts of hydrogen. Fractographic features suggested that the delayed fracture in the acidic solutions was attributable to hydrogen embrittlement, whereas in the neutral solutions, a different fracture mode appeared associated with localized corrosion only in the vicinity of the fracture initiation area. In the neutral solutions, the amount of absorbed hydrogen was much less than that in the acidic solutions, and the delayed fracture was likely to be induced by active path corrosion accompanying hydrogen absorption. The results of the present study imply that the hydrogen-related degradation of performance of Ni-Ti superelastic alloys occurs in the presence of fluoride. PMID:14999757

  12. Artificial photosynthesis of oxalate and oxalate-based polymer by a photovoltaic reactor

    PubMed Central

    Nong, Guangzai; Chen, Shan; Xu, Yuanjin; Huang, Lijie; Zou, Qingsong; Li, Shiqiang; Mo, Haitao; Zhu, Pingchuan; Cen, Weijian; Wang, Shuangfei

    2014-01-01

    A photovoltaic reactor was designed for artificial photosynthesis, based on the reactions involved in high energy hydrogen atoms, which were produced from water electrolysis. Water and CO2, under the conditions studied, were converted to oxalate (H2C2O4) and a polymer. This was the first time that the oxalates and oxalate-based polymer were produced from the artificial photosynthesis process. PMID:24389750

  13. Artificial photosynthesis of oxalate and oxalate-based polymer by a photovoltaic reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nong, Guangzai; Chen, Shan; Xu, Yuanjin; Huang, Lijie; Zou, Qingsong; Li, Shiqiang; Mo, Haitao; Zhu, Pingchuan; Cen, Weijian; Wang, Shuangfei

    2014-01-01

    A photovoltaic reactor was designed for artificial photosynthesis, based on the reactions involved in high energy hydrogen atoms, which were produced from water electrolysis. Water and CO2, under the conditions studied, were converted to oxalate (H2C2O4) and a polymer. This was the first time that the oxalates and oxalate-based polymer were produced from the artificial photosynthesis process.

  14. Artificial photosynthesis of oxalate and oxalate-based polymer by a photovoltaic reactor.

    PubMed

    Nong, Guangzai; Chen, Shan; Xu, Yuanjin; Huang, Lijie; Zou, Qingsong; Li, Shiqiang; Mo, Haitao; Zhu, Pingchuan; Cen, Weijian; Wang, Shuangfei

    2014-01-01

    A photovoltaic reactor was designed for artificial photosynthesis, based on the reactions involved in high energy hydrogen atoms, which were produced from water electrolysis. Water and CO2, under the conditions studied, were converted to oxalate (H2C2O4) and a polymer. This was the first time that the oxalates and oxalate-based polymer were produced from the artificial photosynthesis process. PMID:24389750

  15. Solution properties and taste behavior of lactose monohydrate in aqueous ascorbic acid solutions at different temperatures: Volumetric and rheological approach.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Abhijit; Sinha, Biswajit

    2016-11-15

    The densities and viscosities of lactose monohydrate in aqueous ascorbic acid solutions with several molal concentrations m=(0.00-0.08)molkg(-1) of ascorbic acid were determined at T=(298.15-318.15)K and pressure p=101kPa. Using experimental data apparent molar volume (ϕV), standard partial molar volume (ϕV(0)), the slope (SV(∗)), apparent specific volumes (ϕVsp), standard isobaric partial molar expansibility (ϕE(0)) and its temperature dependence [Formula: see text] the viscosity B-coefficient and solvation number (Sn) were determined. Viscosity B-coefficients were further employed to obtain the free energies of activation of viscous flow per mole of the solvents (Δμ1(0≠)) and of the solute (Δμ2(0≠)). Effects of molality, solute structure and temperature and taste behavior were analyzed in terms of solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions; results revealed that the solutions are characterized predominantly by solute-solvent interactions and lactose monohydrate behaves as a long-range structure maker. PMID:27283672

  16. Oxalate oxidases and differentiating surface structure in wheat: germins.

    PubMed Central

    Lane, B G

    2000-01-01

    Oxalate oxidases (OXOs) have been found to be concentrated in the surface tissues of wheat embryos and grains: germin is concentrated in root and leaf sheaths that surround germinated embryos; pseudogermin (OXO-psi) is concentrated in the epidermis and bracts that 'encircle' mature grains. Most strikingly, the epidermal accumulation of OXO-psi was found to presage the transition of a delicate 'skin', similar to the fragile epidermis of human skin, into the tough shell (the miller's 'beeswing') that is typical of mature wheat grains. A narrow range of oxalate concentration (1--2 mM) in the hydrated tissues of major crop cereals (barley, maize, oat, rice, rye and wheat) contrasted with wide variations in their OXO expression, e.g. cold-tolerant and cold-sensitive varieties of maize have similar oxalate contents but the former was found to contain approx. 20-fold more germin than did the latter. Well-known OXOs in sorghum, a minor cereal, and beet, a dicotyledon, were found to have little antigenic relatedness to the germins, but the beet enzyme did share some of the unique stability properties that are peculiar to the germin-like OXOs that are found only in the major crop cereals. Their concentration in surface structures of domesticated wheat suggests a biochemical role for germin-like OXOs: programmed cell death in surface tissues might be a constitutive as well as an adaptive form of differentiation that helps to produce refractory barriers against tissue invasion by predators. Incidental to the principal investigation, and using an OXO assay (oxalate-dependent release of CO(2)) that did not rely on detecting H(2)O(2), which is often fully degraded in cell extracts, it was found that OXO activity in soluble extracts of wheat was manifested only in standard solution assays if the extract was pretreated in a variety of ways, which included preincubation with pepsin or highly substituted glucuronogalactoarabinoxylans (cell-wall polysaccharides). PMID:10861243

  17. Oxalate adsorption at a plagioclase (An47) surface and models for ligand-promoted dissolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stillings, L.L.; Drever, J.I.; Poulson, S.R.

    1998-01-01

    Previous work on adsorption of oxalate at aluminosilicate surfaces suggests that maximum adsorption occurs through a bidentate attachment of the organic ligand, at near-neutral pH. Rates of ligand-promoted dissolution are expected to be greatest at this pH as well. We tested this model by measuring oxalate adsorption on the surface of andesine (An47), in solutions of pH 3- 5 and total oxalate concentrations of 0-8 mM. Contrary to expectation, the greatest adsorption density of 24 ??mol m-2 total oxalate was observed at pH 3 and 8 mM total oxalate. Adsorption is dependent upon the activities of both oxalate (C2O42-) and bioxalate (HC2O4-) in solution and can be modeled with either a two-term Langmuir or a two-term Freundlich isotherm. A Freundlich adsorption model provided the best fit to rate data because it was not constrained to a finite number of adsorption sites, as was the Langmuir model. The two-term ligand adsorption model was incorporated into a rate model: R(tot) = k(H-)[H(ads)/+](L) + k(HOx-)[HOx(ads)/-] + k(Ox2- )[Ox2(ads)/-] where R(tot) is the net dissolution rate of the feldspar, [i(ads)] is the concentration of species i adsorbed to the surface, and k(i) is the rate constant for release of the surface complex. The model was fit to data for oxalate-promoted dissolution of andesine, resulting in estimates for the rate constants of k(HOx-) = 1.16 x 10-12, k(Ox2-) = 1.05 x 10-12, and k(H-) = 9.61 x 10-13 mol of feldspar (??mol of i) (??mol of i)-1 s-1.Previous work on adsorption of oxalate at aluminosilicate surfaces suggests that maximum adsorption occurs through a bidentate attachment of the organic ligand, at near-neutral pH. Rates of ligand-promoted dissolution are expected to be greatest at this pH as well. We tested this model by measuring oxalate adsorption on the surface of andesine (An47), in solutions of pH 3-5 and total oxalate concentrations of 0-8 mM. Contrary to expectation, the greatest adsorption density of 24 ??mol m-2 total oxalate was

  18. Ionothermal synthesis of two oxalate-bridged lanthanide(III) chains with slow magnetization relaxation by using a deep eutectic solvent.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yan; Liu, Jun-Liang; Zhang, Ze-Min; Lin, Wei-Quan; Lin, Zhuo-Jia; Tong, Ming-Liang

    2013-09-28

    Two novel isostructural oxalate-bridged lanthanide(III) chains, (choline)[Ln(ox)(H2O)3Cl]Cl·H2O (Ln = Dy/Er), were first obtained ionothermally by using a choline chloride-oxalic acid eutectic mixture as both solvent and structure-directing agent, both of which show field-induced slow relaxation of magnetization. PMID:23903323

  19. Understanding the Chemistry of the Actinides in HL Waste Tank Systems: Actinide Speciation in Oxalic Acid Solutions in the Presence of Significant Quantities of Aluminum, Iron, and Manganese

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Sue

    2006-07-30

    The overall goal of this research plan is to provide a thermodynamic basis for describing actinide speciation over a range of tank-like conditions, including elevated temperature, elevated OH- concentrations, and the presence of various organic ligands. With support from DOE�s EMSP program, we have made significant progress towards measuring thermodynamic parameters for actinide complexation as a function of temperature. We have used the needs of the ESP modelers to guide our work to date, and we have made important progress defining the effect of temperature for actinide complexation by organic, and for hydrolysis of the hexa- and pentvalent oxidation states.

  20. Process for the removal of radium from acidic solutions containing same

    DOEpatents

    Scheitlin, F.M.

    The invention is a process for the removal of radium from acidic aqueous solutions. In one aspect, the invention is a process for removing radium from an inorganic-acid solution. The process comprises contacting the solution with coal fly ash to effect adsorption of the radium on the ash. The radium-containing ash then is separated from the solution. The process is simple, comparatively inexpensive, and efficient. High radium-distribution coefficients are obtained even at room temperature. Coal fly ash is an inexpensive, acid-resistant, high-surface-area material which is available in large quantities throughout the United States. The invention is applicable, for example, to the recovery of /sup 226/Ra from nitric acid solutions which have been used to leach radium from uranium-mill tailings.

  1. Removal of radium from acidic solutions containing same by adsorption on coal fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Scheitlin, Frank M.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is a process for the removal of radium from acidic aqueous solutions. In one aspect, the invention is a process for removing radium from an inorganic-acid solution. The process comprises contacting the solution with coal fly ash to effect adsorption of the radium on the ash. The radium-containing ash then is separated from the solution. The process is simple, comparatively inexpensive, and efficient. High radium-distribution coefficients are obtained even at room temperature. Coal fly ash is an inexpensive, acid-resistant, high-surface-area material which is available in large quantities throughout the United States. The invention is applicable, for example, to the recovery of .sup.226 Ra from nitric acid solutions which have been used to leach radium from uranium-mill tailings.

  2. Chaga mushroom-induced oxalate nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Yuko; Seta, Koichi; Ogawa, Yayoi; Takayama, Tatsuya; Nagata, Masao; Taguchi, Takashi; Yahata, Kensei

    2014-06-01

    Chaga mushrooms have been used in folk and botanical medicine as a remedy for cancer, gastritis, ulcers, and tuberculosis of the bones. A 72-year-old Japanese female had been diagnosed with liver cancer 1 year prior to presenting at our department. She underwent hepatectomy of the left lobe 3 months later. Chaga mushroom powder (4 - 5 teaspoons per day) had been ingested for the past 6 months for liver cancer. Renal function decreased and hemodialysis was initiated. Renal biopsy specimens showed diffuse tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis. Oxalate crystals were detected in the tubular lumina and urinary sediment and oxalate nephropathy was diagnosed. Chaga mushrooms contain extremely high oxalate concentrations. This is the first report of a case of oxalate nephropathy associated with ingestion of Chaga mushrooms. PMID:23149251

  3. Separation of ions in acidic solution by capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, M.

    1997-10-08

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is an effective method for separating ionic species according to differences in their electrophoretic mobilities. CE separations of amino acids by direct detection are difficult due to their similar electrophoretic mobilities and low absorbances. However, native amino acids can be separated by CE as cations at a low pH by adding an alkanesulfonic acid to the electrolyte carrier which imparts selectivity to the system. Derivatization is unnecessary when direct UV detection is used at 185 nm. Simultaneous speciation of metal cations such as vanadium (IV) and vanadium (V) can easily be performed without complexation prior to analysis. An indirect UV detection scheme for acidic conditions was also developed using guanidine as the background carrier electrolyte (BCE) for the indirect detection of metal cations. Three chapters have been removed for separate processing. This report contains introductory material, references, and general conclusions. 80 refs.

  4. Reprocessing system with nuclide separation based on chromatography in hydrochloric acid solution

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Tatsuya; Tachibana, Yu; Koyama, Shi-ichi

    2013-07-01

    We have proposed the reprocessing system with nuclide separation processes based on the chromatographic technique in the hydrochloric acid solution system. Our proposed system consists of the dissolution process, the reprocessing process, the minor actinide separation process, and nuclide separation processes. In the reprocessing and separation processes, the pyridine resin is used as a main separation media. It was confirmed that the dissolution in the hydrochloric acid solution is easily achieved by the plasma voloxidation and by the addition of oxygen peroxide into the hydrochloric acid solution.

  5. PROCESS OF SECURING PLUTONIUM IN NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS IN ITS TRIVALENT OXIDATION STATE

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, J.R.

    1958-08-26

    >Various processes for the recovery of plutonium require that the plutonium be obtalned and maintained in the reduced or trivalent state in solution. Ferrous ions are commonly used as the reducing agent for this purpose, but it is difficult to maintain the plutonium in a reduced state in nitric acid solutions due to the oxidizing effects of the acid. It has been found that the addition of a stabilizing or holding reductant to such solution prevents reoxidation of the plutonium. Sulfamate ions have been found to be ideally suitable as such a stabilizer even in the presence of nitric acid.

  6. Modeling the Adsorption of Oxalate onto Montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Ramos, M Elena; Emiroglu, Caglayan; García, David; Sainz-Díaz, C Ignacio; Huertas, F Javier

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a multiscale modeling of the interaction of oxalate with clay mineral surfaces from macroscale thermodynamic equilibria simulations to atomistic calculations is presented. Previous results from macroscopic adsorption data of oxalate on montmorillonite in 0.01 M KNO3 media at 25 °C within the pH range from 2.5 to 9 have been used to develop a surface complexation model. The experimental adsorption edge data were fitted using the triple-layer model (TLM) with the aid of the FITEQL 4.0 computer program. Surface complexation of oxalate is described by two reactions: >AlOH + Ox(2-) + 2H(+) = >AlOxH + H2O (log K = 14.39) and >AlOH + Ox(2-) + H(+) = >AlOx(-) + H2O (log K = 10.39). The monodentate complex >AlOxH dominated adsorption below pH 4, and the bidentate complex >AlOx(-) was predominant at higher pH values. Both of the proposed inner-sphere oxalate species are qualitatively consistent with previously published diffuse reflectance FTIR spectroscopic results for oxalate on montmorillonite edge surface (Chem. Geol. 2014, 363, 283-292). Atomistic computational studies have been performed to understand the interactions at the molecular level between adsorbates and mineral surface, showing the atomic structures and IR frequency shifts of the adsorption complexes of oxalate with the edge surface of a periodic montmorillonite model. PMID:26444928

  7. Multiple-acid equilibria in adsorption of carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Husson, S.M.; King, C.J.

    1999-02-01

    Equilibria were measured for adsorption of carboxylic acids from aqueous, binary-acid mixtures of lactic and succinic acids and acetic and formic acids onto basic polymeric sorbents. The experimentally determined adsorption isotherms compared well with model predictions, confirming that simple extensions from adsorption of individual acids apply. Fixed-bed studies were carried out that establish the efficacy of chromatographic fractionation of lactic and succinic acids using basic polymeric sorbents. Finally, sequential thermal and solvent regeneration of lactic and acetic acid-laden sorbents was investigated as a method to fractionate among coadsorbed volatile and nonvolatile acids. Essentially complete removal of the acetic acid from the acid-laden sorbent was achieved by vaporization under the conditions used; a small amount of loss of lactic acid (about 11%) was observed.

  8. Therapeutic effect of Xue Niao An on glyoxylate-induced calcium oxalate crystal deposition based on urinary metabonomics approach

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhongjiang; Chen, Wei; Gao, Songyan; Su, Li; Li, Na; Wang, Li; Lou, Ziyang; Dong, Xin; Guo, Zhiyong

    2014-01-01

    The anti-nephrolithiasis effect of Xue Niao An (XNA) capsules is explored by analyzing urine metabolic profiles in mouse models, with ultra-high performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF/MS). An animal model of calcium oxalate crystal renal deposition was established in mice by intra-abdominal injection of glyoxylate. Then, treatment with XNA by intra-gastric administration was performed. At the end of the study, calcium deposition in kidney was measured by Von Kossa staining under light microscopy, and the Von Kossa staining changes showed that XNA significantly alleviated the calcium oxalate crystal deposition. Meanwhile, urine samples for fifteen metabolites, including amino acids and fatty acids, with significant differences were detected in the calcium oxalate group, while XNA treatment attenuated metabolic imbalances. Our study indicated that the metabonomic strategy provided comprehensive insight on the metabolic response to XNA treatment of rodent renal calcium oxalate deposition. PMID:25411524

  9. Chronic metabolic acidosis reduces urinary oxalate excretion and promotes intestinal oxalate secretion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Whittamore, Jonathan M; Hatch, Marguerite

    2015-11-01

    Urinary oxalate excretion is reduced in rats during a chronic metabolic acidosis, but how this is achieved is not clear. In this report, we re-examine our prior work on the effects of a metabolic acidosis on urinary oxalate handling [Green et al., Am J Physiol Ren Physiol 289(3):F536-F543, 2005], offering a more detailed analysis and interpretation of the data, together with new, previously unpublished observations revealing a marked impact on intestinal oxalate transport. Sprague-Dawley rats were provided with 0.28 M ammonium chloride in their drinking water for either 4 or 14 days followed by 24 h urine collections, blood-gas and serum ion analysis, and measurements of (14)C-oxalate fluxes across isolated segments of the distal colon. Urinary oxalate excretion was significantly reduced by 75% after just 4 days compared to control rats, and this was similarly sustained at 14 days. Oxalate:creatinine clearance ratios indicated enhanced net re-absorption of oxalate by the kidney during a metabolic acidosis, but this was not associated with any substantive changes to serum oxalate levels. In the distal colon, oxalate transport was dramatically altered from net absorption in controls (6.20 ± 0.63 pmol cm(-2) h(-1)), to net secretion in rats with a metabolic acidosis (-5.19 ± 1.18 and -2.07 ± 1.05 pmol cm(-2) h(-1) at 4 and 14 days, respectively). Although we cannot rule out modifications to bi-directional oxalate movements along the proximal tubule, these findings support a gut-kidney axis in the management of oxalate homeostasis, where this shift in renal handling during a metabolic acidosis is associated with compensatory adaptations by the intestine. PMID:26162424

  10. Effects of surface coordination on the temperature-programmed desorption of oxalate from goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Boily, Jean F.; Szanyi, Janos; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2007-11-15

    The temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of weakly-bound, hydrogen-bonded and metal-bonded oxalate complexes at the goethite surface was investigated in the 300-900 K range with concerted Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) measurements (TPD-FTIR). These reactions took place with the concomitant dehydroxylation reaction of goethite to hematite and decarbonation of bulk-occluded carbonate. The measurements revealed three important stages of desorption. Stage I (300-440 K) corresponds to the desorption of weakly-and/or un-bound oxalate molecules in the goethite powder with a thermal decomposition reaction pathway characteristic of oxalic acid. Stage II (440-520 K) corresponds to a thermally-driven dehydration of hydrogen-bonded surface complexes, leading to a partial desorption via oxalic acid thermal decomposition pathways and to a partial conversion to metal-bonded surface complexes. This latter mechanism led to the increase in FTIR bands characteristic of these complexes. Finally, Stage III (520-660 K) corresponds to the thermal decomposition of the metal-bonded oxalate complex, proceeding through a 2 electron reduction pathway.

  11. Isolation and characterization of mesophilic, oxalate-degrading Streptomyces from plant rhizosphere and forest soils.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Nurettin

    2004-10-01

    The present work was aimed at the isolation of additional new pure cultures of oxalate-degrading Streptomyces and its preliminary characterization for further work in the field of oxalate metabolism and taxonomic studies. Mesophilic, oxalate-degrading Streptomyces were enriched and isolated from plant rhizosphere and forest soil samples. Strains were examined for cultural, morphological (spore chain morphology, spore mass colour, diffusible and melanin pigment production), physiological (antibiosis, growth in the presence of inhibitory compounds, assimilation of organic acids and enzyme substrates) and chemotaxonomic characters (cellular lipid components and diagnostic cell-wall diamino acid). The taxonomic data obtained were analysed by using the simple matching (SSM) and Jaccard (Sj) coefficients, clustering was achieved using the UPGMA algorithm. All strains were able to utilize sodium-, potassium-, calcium- and ammonium-oxalate salts. Based on the results of numerical taxonomy, isolates were grouped into five cluster groups with a > or =70% S(SM) similarity level. Streptomyces rochei was the most common of the cluster groups, with a Willcox probability of P > 0.8. Streptomyces antibioticus, S. anulatus, S. fulvissimus, S. halstedii and S. violaceusniger are newly reported as oxalate-utilizing Streptomyces. PMID:15448922

  12. Temperature dependence of hydrogen-bond dynamics in acetic acid-water solutions.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Francesco; Bencivenga, Filippo; Gessini, Alessandro; Masciovecchio, Claudio

    2010-08-19

    An inelastic UV scattering experiment has been carried out on acetic acid-water solutions as a function of temperature and concentration. The analysis of experimental data indicates the presence of a crossover temperature (T(c) approximately 325 +/- 10 K). Above T(c), the energy of hydrogen bonds responsible for water-acetic acid and acetic acid-acetic acid interactions is strongly reduced. This leads to a reduction in the average number of water molecule interacting with acetic acid, as well as to a lower number of acetic acid clusters. The latter behavior can be mainly ascribed to a temperature change in the activation energy of carboxylic groups of acetic acid. These results may be also relevant to better understand the folding mechanism in protein-water solutions. PMID:20701390

  13. Mechanistic studies of nitrations and oxidations in solutions of dinitrogen pentaoxide in nitric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Willmer, R.F.

    1992-01-01

    Mechanisms of nitrations in solutions of dinitrogen pentaoxide in nitric acid of 1,2,4-trichloro-5-nitrobenzene and 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene have been proposed. The kinetics and products of the nitration, in the title medium, of substantially deactivated benzoic acids and benzaldehydes have been investigated. Kinetics of nitration of some substituted benzoic acids in nitric acid solutions containing dinitrogen pentaoxide or nitronium trifluoro-methanesulphonate (nitronium triflate) have been compared. Rate coefficients for reactions in dinitrogen pentaoxide solutions were generally similar to those from nitronium triflate solutions of the same estimated nitronium ion concentration. Yields of aromatic products of nitration of some benzoic acid derivatives in the nitric acid solutions have been determined. Nitrodecarboxylation of 4-fluorobenzoic acid occurs as a result of nitronium ion attach at C(1). The competition between oxidation to the corresponding benzoic acid and nitration in the aromatic ring of some substituted benzaldehydes has been probed by kinetic and product studies. 4-Carboxybenzaldehyde is nitrated but more deactivated substrates are predominantly oxidized. Rapid reversible gem-dinitrate formation occurs in concentrated dinitrogen pentaoxide solutions. The equilibrium extent of formation of [alpha]-deuterio-(4-nitropheny)-dinitratomethane from [alpha]-deuterio-4-nitrobenzaldehyde is reported. 4-nitrobenzaldehyde and the gem-dinitrate are oxidized in processes in which [alpha]-hydrogen loss is at least partially rate determining. The relative rates of oxidation in nitronium triflate solutions suggest that the [alpha]-hydrogen is removed as a hydride ion in that medium. There is evidence for the intrusion of a radical mechanism of nitration in concentrated solutions of dinitrogen pentaoxide. (4-Nitrophenyl)dinitratomethane was produced on the addition of 4-nitrobenzaldehyde to a solution of dinitrogen pentaoxide in dichloromethane.

  14. Two novel metal–organic coordination polymers based on diphosphonate and oxalate: Synthesis, structures and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Qing-Jun; Zheng, Yue-Qing Zhou, Lin-Xia; Zhu, Hong-Lin

    2015-07-15

    Two 2-(1-imidazole)-1-hydroxyl-1,1'-ethylidenediphosphonato and oxalic acid bridged coordination polymers (H{sub 2}en)[Co{sub 3}(H{sub 2}zdn){sub 2}(ox)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}] (1) and Cd{sub 2}(H{sub 2}zdn)(ox){sub 0.5}(H{sub 2}O) (2) (2-(1-imidazole)-1-hydroxyl-1,1'-ethylidenediphosphonic acid=H{sub 5}zdn; oxalic acid=H{sub 2}ox) were synthesized under hydrothermal conditions and characterized by the infrared (IR), thermogravimetric analyses (TGA), elemental analyses (EA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Compound 1 is bridged by phosphonate anions to 1D chain, and further linked by oxalate anions to 2D layer. Compound 2 is bridged by O–P–O units of H{sub 5}zdn to the layer, and then pillared by oxalate anions to generate 3D frameworks. Compound 1 shows anti-ferromagnetic behaviors analyzed with the temperature-dependent zero-field ac magnetic susceptibilities, while compound 2 exhibits an influence on the luminescent property. - Graphical abstract: Linked by oxalate, two zoledronate-based metal–organic frameworks are synthesized, which exhibits the different frameworks. Magnetism and luminescent properties have been studied. The weak antiferromagnetic coupling is conducted in 1. - Highlights: • Compound 1 and 2 are first linked by oxalate anion based on zoledronic acid. • Compound 1 generates a classic “dia Diamond” (6{sup 6}) topology. • Compound 2 exhibits a (4{sup 4}·6{sup 2})(4{sup 4}·6{sup 6}) topology. • Magnetism and luminescent properties of 1 and 2 have been studied, respectively.

  15. Effect of acidic solutions on the surface degradation of a micro-hybrid composite resin.

    PubMed

    Münchow, Eliseu A; Ferreira, Ana Cláudia A; Machado, Raissa M M; Ramos, Tatiana S; Rodrigues-Junior, Sinval A; Zanchi, Cesar H

    2014-01-01

    Composite resins may undergo wear by the action of chemical substances (e.g., saliva, alcohol, bacterial acids) of the oral environment, which may affect the material's structure and surface properties. This study evaluated the effect of acidic substances on the surface properties of a micro-hybrid composite resin (Filtek Z-250). Eighty specimens were prepared, and baseline hardness and surface roughness (KMN0 and Ra0, respectively) were measured. The specimens were subjected to sorption (SO) and solubility (SL) tests according to ISO 4049:2009, but using different storage solutions: deionized water; 75/25 vol% ethanol/water solution; lactic acid; propionic acid; and acetic acid. The acids were used in two concentrations: PA and 0.02 N. pH was measured for all solutions and final hardness (KMN1) and surface roughness (Ra1) were measured. Data were analyzed with paired t-tests and one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (a=5%). All solutions decreased hardness and increased the Ra values, except for the specimens stored in water and 0.02 N lactic acid, which maintained the hardness. All solutions produced similar SO and SL phenomena, except for the 0.02 N lactic acid, which caused lower solubility than the other solutions. Ethanol showed the highest pH (6.6) and the 0.02 N lactic acid the lowest one (2.5). The solutions affected negatively the surface properties of the composite resin; in addition, an acidic pH did not seem to be a significant factor that intensifies the surface degradation phenomena. PMID:25250496

  16. Reactivity of the cadmium ion in concentrated phosphoric acid solutions.

    PubMed

    De Gyves, J; Gonzales, J; Louis, C; Bessiere, J

    1989-07-01

    The solvation transfer coefficients which characterize the changes of ion reactivity with phosphoric acid concentration have been calculated for cadmium from the constants of the successive chloride complexes, and for silver and diethyldithiophosphate from potentiometric measurements. They evidence the strong desolvation of the cadmium species in concentrated phosphoric acid media, causing a remarkable increase of its reactivity. They allow the results of liquid-liquid extraction, precipitation and flotation reactions to be correctly interpreted and their changes to be foreseen when the reagents are modified. PMID:18964794

  17. Effect of carboxylic and thiol ligands (oxalate, cysteine) on the kinetics of desorption of Hg(II) from kaolinite

    SciTech Connect

    Senevirathna, W. U.; Zhang, Hong; Gu, Baohua

    2010-01-01

    Sorption and desorption of Hg(II) on clay minerals can impact the biogeochemical cycle and bio-uptake of Hg in the environment. We studied the kinetics of the desorption of Hg(II) from kaolinite as affected by oxalate and cysteine, representing the ligands with carboxylic and thiol groups of different affinities for Hg(II). The effects of pH (3, 5, and 7), ligand concentration (0.25 and 1.0 mM), and temperature (15 C, 25 C, and 35 C) on the Hg(II) desorption were investigated through desorption kinetics. Our study showed that the Hg(II) desorption was pH dependent. In the absence of any organic ligand, >90% of the previously adsorbed Hg(II) desorbed at pH 3 within 2 h, compared to <10% at pH 7. Similar results were observed in the presence of oxalate, showing that it hardly affected the Hg(II) desorption. Cysteine inhibited the Hg(II) desorption significantly at all the pH tested, especially in the first 80 min with the desorption less than 20%, but the inhibition of the desorption appeared to be less prominent afterwards. The effect of the ligand concentration on the Hg(II) desorption was small, especially in the presence of oxalate. The effect of temperature on the Hg(II) desorption was nearly insignificant. The effect of the organic acids on the Hg(II) sorption and desorption is explained by the formation of the ternary surface complexes involving the mineral, ligand, and Hg(II). The competition for Hg(II) between the cysteine molecules adsorbed on the particle surfaces and in the solution phase probably can also affect the Hg(II) desorption.

  18. Enhanced pitting corrosion resistance of aluminum alloy 7075 in the presence of oxalate anions

    SciTech Connect

    Kobotiatis, L.; Tsikrikas, C.; Koutsoukos, P.G.

    1995-01-01

    The presence of oxalate in chloride-containing corrosive aqueous media was found to protect aluminum alloy AA 7075 (UNS A95075). The effect of 0.05 M sodium oxalate on induction times for the initiation of pit formation was measured on AA 7075 specimens. The variance and the mean value of the induction times measured increased with the time of specimen immersion at the open circuit potential (OCP). Statistical analysis was done by potentiostatic measurement of several specimens using electrochemical instrumentation controlled by a personal computer. Pit generation rates were found to be inversely proportional to the duration of the immersion period at OCP. Therefore, it was concluded that prolonged exposure of the tested specimens to sodium oxalate solutions enhanced their resistance to corrosion. Impedance measurements confirmed this finding. The increased resistance was attributed to the retardation of the process by which the surface protective layer would have been destroyed. This retardation may have been ascribable to the formation of surface complexes between Al{sup 3+} and oxalates from the bulk solution. Polarization of the specimens at anodic potentials reduced the corrosion resistance of AA 7075, possibly because of the destabilization of the surface complexes formed between Al and the oxalate ions.

  19. The Solubility of Xenon in Simple Organic Solvents and in Aqueous Amino Acid Solutions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himm, Jeffrey Frank

    We have measured the Ostwald solubility (L) of ('133)Xe in a variety of liquids, including normal alkanes, normal alkanols, and aqueous solutions of amino acids, NaCl, and sucrose. For the alkanes and alkanols, measurements were made in the temperature range from 10-50(DEGREES)C. Values of L were found to decrease with increasing temperature, and also with increasing chain length, for both series of solvents. Thermodynamic properties of solution (enthalpy and entropy of solution) are calculated using both mole fraction and number density scales. Results are interpreted using Uhlig's model of the solvation process. Measurements of L in aqueous amino acid solutions were made at 25(DEGREES)C. Concentrations of amino acids in solution varied from near saturation for each of the amino acids studied to pure water. In all solutions, except those with NaCl, L decreases linearly with increasing solution molarity. Hydration numbers (H), the mean number of water molecules associated with each solute molecule, were determined for each amino acid, for NaCl, and for sucrose. Values of H obtained ranged from near zero (arginine, H = 0.2 (+OR-) 0.5) to about 16 (NaCl, H = 16.25 (+OR-) 0.3).

  20. Density of simulated americium/curium melter feed solution

    SciTech Connect

    Rudisill, T.S.

    1997-09-22

    Vitrification will be used to stabilize an americium/curium (Am/Cm) solution presently stored in F-Canyon for eventual transport to Oak Ridge National Laboratory and use in heavy isotope production programs. Prior to vitrification, a series of in-tank oxalate precipitation and nitric/oxalic acid washes will be used to separate these elements and lanthanide fission products from the bulk of the uranium and metal impurities present in the solution. Following nitric acid dissolution and oxalate destruction, the solution will be denitrated and evaporated to a dissolved solids concentration of approximately 100 g/l (on an oxide basis). During the Am/Cm vitrification, an airlift will be used to supply the concentrated feed solution to a constant head tank which drains through a filter and an in-line orifice to the melter. Since the delivery system is sensitive to the physical properties of the feed, a simulated solution was prepared and used to measure the density as a function of temperature between 20 to 70{degrees} C. The measured density decreased linearly at a rate of 0.0007 g/cm3/{degree} C from an average value of 1.2326 g/cm{sup 3} at 20{degrees} C to an average value of 1.1973g/cm{sup 3} at 70{degrees} C.

  1. Moving single bubble sonoluminescence in phosphoric acid and sulphuric acid solutions.

    PubMed

    Troia, A; Ripa, D Madonna; Spagnolo, R

    2006-04-01

    The phenomenon of sonoluminescence still presents some unsolved aspects. Recently [Y.T. Didenko, K. Suslick, Molecular Emission during Single Bubble Sonoluminescence, Nature 407 (2000) 877-879.], it was found that a single cavitating air bubble in polar aprotic liquids (including formamide and adiponitrile) can produce very strong sonoluminescence while undergoing macroscopic translation movements in the resonator, a condition known as moving single bubble sonoluminescing (MSBSL). Here we describe some experiments conducted in aqueous solutions of phosphoric and sulphuric acid. In these liquid media, it is possible to reproduce MSBSL and luminescence is emitted even if a trapped bubble is subjected to a strong shape instability, named in the literature "jittering phase". When a moving and luminescing bubble was present and the acoustic pressure gradually increased, we observed the generation of a discrete lattice of trapped bubbles. The bubbles in the lattice emit very intense light flashes and can change their position while maintaining the overall spatial distribution in time. Some preliminary results, obtained from Mie-scattering and measurements of relative light intensity, are reported. PMID:16309944

  2. Standard addition method for free acid determination in solutions with hydrolyzable ions

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, E.W.

    1981-01-01

    The free acid content of solutions containing hydrolyzable ions has been determined potentiometrically by a standard addition method. Two increments of acid are added to the sample in a 1M potassium thiocyanate solution. The sample concentration is calculated by solution of three simultaneous Nernst equations. The method has been demonstrated for solutions containing Al/sup 3 +/, Cr/sup 3 +/, Fe/sup 3 +/, Ni/sup 2 +/, Th/sup 4 +/, or UO/sub 2//sup 2 +/ with a metal-to-acid ratio of < 2.5. The method is suitable for determination of 10 ..mu..moles acid in 10 mL total volume. The accuracy is verifiable by reasonable agreement of the Nerst slopes found in the presence and absence of hydrolyzable ions. The relative standard deviation is < 2.5 percent.

  3. Thermodynamics of the complexation of arabinogalactan with salicylic and p-aminobenzoic acids in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudarisova, R. Kh.; Badykova, L. A.

    2016-03-01

    The thermodynamics of complexation of arabinogalactan with salicylic and p-aminobenzoic acids in aqueous solutions is studied by means spectroscopy. The standard thermodynamic characteristics (Δ H°; Δ G°; Δ S°) of complexation are calculated.

  4. Nanoscale observations of the effect of citrate on calcium oxalate precipitation on calcite surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgos-Cara, Alejandro; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion; Putnis, Christine V.

    2016-04-01

    Calcium oxalate (CaC2O4ṡxH2O) minerals are naturally occurring minerals found in fossils, plants, kidney stones and is a by-product in some processes such as paper, food and beverage production [1,2]. In particular, calcium oxalate monohydrate phase (COM) also known as whewellite (CaC2O4ṡH2O), is the most frequently reported mineral phase found in urinary and kidney stones together with phosphates. Organic additives are well known to play a key role in the formation of minerals in both biotic and abiotic systems, either facilitating their precipitation or hindering it. In this regard, recent studies have provided direct evidence demonstrating that citrate species could enhance dissolution of COM and inhibit their precipitation. [3,4] The present work aims at evauate the influence of pH, citrate and oxalic acid concentrations in calcium oxalate precipitation on calcite surfaces (Island Spar, Chihuahua, Mexico) through in-situ nanoscale observation using in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM, Multimode, Bruker) in flow-through experiments. Changes in calcium oxalate morphologies and precipitated phases were observed, as well as the inhibitory effect of citrate on calcium oxalate precipitation, which also lead to stabilization an the amorphous calcium oxalate phase. [1] K.D. Demadis, M. Öner, Inhibitory effects of "green"additives on the crystal growth of sparingly soluble salts, in: J.T. Pearlman (Ed.), Green Chemistry Research Trends, Nova Science Publishers Inc., New York, 2009, pp. 265-287. [2] M. Masár, M. Zuborová, D. Kaniansky, B. Stanislawski, Determination of oxalate in beer by zone electrophoresis on a chip with conductivity detection, J. Sep. Sci. 26 (2003) 647-652. [3] Chutipongtanate S, Chaiyarit S, Thongboonkerd V. Citrate, not phosphate, can dissolve calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals and detach these crystals from renal tubular cells. Eur J Pharmacol 2012;689:219-25. [4] Weaver ML, Qiu SR, Hoyer JR, Casey WH, Nancollas GH, De Yoreo JJ

  5. An Assessment of Engineered Calcium Oxalate Crystal Formation on Plant Growth and Development as a Step toward Evaluating Its Use to Enhance Plant Defense.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of new approaches to control chewing insects has been sought not only for direct use in reducing crop loss but also in managing resistance to the pesticides already in use. Engineered formation of calcium oxalate crystals is a potential strategy that could be developed to fulfill both these needs. As a step toward this development, this study investigates the effects of transforming a non-calcium oxalate crystal accumulating plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, into a crystal accumulating plant. Calcium oxalate crystal accumulating A. thaliana lines were generated by ectopic expression of a single bacterial gene encoding an oxalic acid biosynthetic enzyme. Biochemical and cellular studies suggested that the engineered A. thaliana lines formed crystals of calcium oxalate in a manner similar to naturally occurring crystal accumulating plants. The amount of calcium oxalate accumulated in leaves also reached levels similar to those measured in the leaves of Medicago truncatula in which the crystals are known to play a defensive role. Visual inspection of the different engineered lines, however, suggested a phenotypic consequence on plant growth and development with higher calcium oxalate concentrations. The restoration of a near wild-type plant phenotype through an enzymatic reduction of tissue oxalate supported this observation. Overall, this study is a first to provide initial insight into the potential consequences of engineering calcium oxalate crystal formation in non-crystal accumulating plants. PMID:26517544

  6. An Assessment of Engineered Calcium Oxalate Crystal Formation on Plant Growth and Development as a Step toward Evaluating Its Use to Enhance Plant Defense

    PubMed Central

    Nakata, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of new approaches to control chewing insects has been sought not only for direct use in reducing crop loss but also in managing resistance to the pesticides already in use. Engineered formation of calcium oxalate crystals is a potential strategy that could be developed to fulfill both these needs. As a step toward this development, this study investigates the effects of transforming a non-calcium oxalate crystal accumulating plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, into a crystal accumulating plant. Calcium oxalate crystal accumulating A. thaliana lines were generated by ectopic expression of a single bacterial gene encoding an oxalic acid biosynthetic enzyme. Biochemical and cellular studies suggested that the engineered A. thaliana lines formed crystals of calcium oxalate in a manner similar to naturally occurring crystal accumulating plants. The amount of calcium oxalate accumulated in leaves also reached levels similar to those measured in the leaves of Medicago truncatula in which the crystals are known to play a defensive role. Visual inspection of the different engineered lines, however, suggested a phenotypic consequence on plant growth and development with higher calcium oxalate concentrations. The restoration of a near wild-type plant phenotype through an enzymatic reduction of tissue oxalate supported this observation. Overall, this study is a first to provide initial insight into the potential consequences of engineering calcium oxalate crystal formation in non-crystal accumulating plants. PMID:26517544

  7. Process for recovering uranium using an alkyl pyrophosphoric acid and alkaline stripping solution

    SciTech Connect

    Worthington, R.E.; Magdics, A.

    1987-03-24

    A process is described for stripping uranium for a pregnant organic extractant comprising an alkyl pyrophosphoric acid dissolved in a substantially water-immiscible organic diluent. The organic extractant contains tetravalent uranium and an alcohol or phenol modifier in a quantity sufficient to retain substantially all the unhydrolyzed alkyl pyrophosphoric acid in solution in the diluent during stripping. The process comprises adding an oxidizing agent to the organic extractant and thereby oxidizing the tetravalent uranium to the +6 state in the organic extractant, and contacting the organic extractant containing the uranium in the +6 state with a stripping solution comprising an aqueous solution of an alkali metal or ammonium carbonate or hydroxide thereby stripping uranium from the organic extractant into the stripping solution. The resulting barren organic extractant containing substantially all of the unhydrolyzed alkyl pyrophosphoric acid dissolved in the diluent is separated from the stripping solution containing the stripped uranium, the barren extractant being suitable for recycle.

  8. Process for recovering uranium using an alkyl pyrophosphoric acid and alkaline stripping solution

    SciTech Connect

    Worthington, R.E.; Magdics, A.

    1987-03-24

    A process is described for stripping uranium from a pregnant organic extractant comprising an alkyl pyrophosphoric acid dissolved in a substantially water-immiscible organic diluent. The organic extractant contains tetravalent uranium and an alcohol or phenol modifier in a quantity sufficient to retain substantially all the unhydrolyzed alkyl pyrophosphoric acid in solution in the diluent during stripping. The process comprises adding an oxidizing agent to the organic extractant to and thereby oxidizing the tetravalent uranium to the +6 state in the organic extractant, and contacting the organic extractant containing the uranium in the +6 state with a stripping solution comprising an aqueous solution of an alkali metal or ammonium carbonate, nonsaturated in uranium. The uranium is stripped from, the organic extractant into the stripping solution, and the resulting barren organic extractant containing substantially all of the unhydrolyzed alkyl pyrophosphoric acid dissolved in the diluent is separated from the stripping solution containing the stripped uranium, the barren extractant being suitable for recycle.

  9. Behaviors of acrylamide/itaconic acid hydrogels in uptake of uranyl ions from aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Karadag, E.; Saraydin, D.; Gueven, O.

    1995-12-01

    In this study, adsorptions of uranyl ions from two different aqueous uranyl solutions by acrylamide-itaconic acid hydrogels were investigated by a spectroscopic method. The hydrogels were prepared by irradiating with {gamma}-radiation. In the experiment of uranyl ions adsorption, Type II adsorption was found. One gram of acrylamide-itaconic acid hydrogels sorbed 178-219 mg uranyl ions from the solutions of uranyl acetate, 42-76 mg uranyl ions from the aqueous solutions of uranyl nitrate, while acrylamide hydrogel did not sorb any uranyl ion. For the hydrogel containing 40 mg of itaconic acid and irradiated to 3.73 kGy, swelling of the hydrogels was observed in water (1660%), in the aqueous solution of uranyl acetate (730%), and in the aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate (580%). Diffusions of water onto hydrogels were a non-Fickian type of diffusion, whereas diffusions of uranyl ions were a Fickian type of diffusion.

  10. Effect of various alkaline metal ions on electrochemical behavior of lead electrode in sulfuric acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Nobumitsu; Yamamoto, Yui

    2015-10-01

    The effect of various alkaline metal ions on electrochemical behavior of lead electrode in sulfuric acid solution has been investigated. It was found that "the specific anodic oxidation peak" appears at the cathodic scan in cyclic voltammogram of lead electrode in sulfuric acid solution containing Li2SO4, K2SO4, Na2SO4, Rb2SO4, or Cs2SO4. The height of the specific anodic oxidation peak varies with the alkaline sulfate in the solution; K2SO4 >> Na2SO4 > Cs2SO4 > Rb2SO4 > Li2SO4. It should be note that alkaline ions exist in lead sulfate formed on lead electrode in sulfuric acid solution containing potassium sulfate when the electrode was immersed in the solution at the rest potential for more than 1 h.

  11. Thermodynamic and Ultrasonic Properties of Ascorbic Acid in Aqueous Protic Ionic Liquid Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vickramjeet; Sharma, Gyanendra; Gardas, Ramesh L.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we report the thermodynamic and ultrasonic properties of ascorbic acid (vitamin C) in water and in presence of newly synthesized ammonium based protic ionic liquid (diethylethanolammonium propionate) as a function of concentration and temperature. Apparent molar volume and apparent molar isentropic compression, which characterize the solvation state of ascorbic acid (AA) in presence of protic ionic liquid (PIL) has been determined from precise density and speed of sound measurements at temperatures (293.15 to 328.15) K with 5 K interval. The strength of molecular interactions prevailing in ternary solutions has been discussed on the basis of infinite dilution partial molar volume and partial molar isentropic compression, corresponding volume of transfer and interaction coefficients. Result has been discussed in terms of solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions occurring between ascorbic acid and PIL in ternary solutions (AA + water + PIL). PMID:26009887

  12. Environment and solute-solvent interaction effects on photo-physical behaviors of Folic acid and Folinic acid drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khadem Sadigh, M.; Zakerhamidi, M. S.; Seyed Ahmadian, S. M.; Johari-Ahar, M.; Zare Haghighi, L.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, spectral properties of Folic acid and Folinic acid as widely used drugs in the treatment of some diseases have been studied in various environments with different polarity. Our results show that the absorption, emission and stokes shifts of solute molecules depend strongly on molecular surrounding characteristics, solute-solvent interactions and, different active groups in their chemical structures. In order to investigate the contribution of specific and nonspecific interactions on various properties of drug samples, the linear solvation energy relationships concept is used. Moreover, the calculated dipole moments by means of solvatochromic method show that the high values of dipole moments in excited state are due to local intramolecular charge transfer. Furthermore, the obtained results about molecular interactions can be extended to biological systems and can indicate completely the behaviors of Folic acid and Folinic acid in polar solvents such as water in body system.

  13. Cadmium-induced oxalate secretion from root apex is associated with cadmium exclusion and resistance in Lycopersicon esulentum.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao Fang; Zheng, Cheng; Hu, Yi Ting; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Yu; Dong, Ning Yu; Yang, Jian Li; Zheng, Shao Jian

    2011-07-01

    The mechanisms of heavy metal resistance in plants can be classified into internal tolerance and exclusion mechanisms, but exclusion of heavy metals with the help of organic acids secretion has not been well documented. Here we demonstrated the contribution of oxalate secretion to cadmium (Cd) exclusion and resistance in tomato. Different Cd resistance between two tomato cultivars was evaluated by relative root elongation (RRE) and Cd accumulation. Cultivar 'Micro-Tom' showed better growth and lower Cd content in roots than 'Hezuo903' at different Cd concentrations not only in short-term hydroponic experiment but also in long-term hydroponic and soil experiments, indicating that the genotypic difference in Cd resistance is related to the exclusion of Cd from roots. 'Micro-Tom' had greater ability to secrete oxalate, suggesting that oxalate secretion might contribute to Cd resistance. Cd-induced secretion of oxalate was localized to root apex at which the majority of Cd accumulated. Phenylglyoxal, an anion-channel inhibitor, effectively blocked Cd-induced oxalate secretion and aggravated Cd toxicity while exogenous oxalate supply ameliorated Cd toxicity efficiently. These results indicated that the oxalate secreted from the root apex helps to exclude Cd from entering tomato roots, thus contributes to Cd resistance in the Cd-resistant tomato cultivar. PMID:21388421

  14. Vapor-liquid equilibria for nitric acid-water and plutonium nitrate-nitric acid-water solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Maimoni, A.

    1980-01-01

    The liquid-vapor equilibrium data for nitric acid and nitric acid-plutnonium nitrate-water solutions were examined to develop correlations covering the range of conditions encountered in nuclear fuel reprocessing. The scanty available data for plutonium nitrate solutions are of poor quality but allow an order of magnitude estimate to be made. A formal thermodynamic analysis was attempted initially but was not successful due to the poor quality of the data as well as the complex chemical equilibria involved in the nitric acid and in the plutonium nitrate solutions. Thus, while there was no difficulty in correlating activity coefficients for nitric acid solutions over relatively narrow temperature ranges, attempts to extend the correlations over the range 25/sup 0/C to the boiling point were not successful. The available data were then analyzed using empirical correlations from which normal boiling points and relative volatilities can be obtained over the concentration ranges 0 to 700 g/l Pu, 0 to 13 M nitric acid. Activity coefficients are required, however, if estimates of individual component vapor pressures are needed. The required ternary activity coefficients can be approximated from the correlations.

  15. Protecting cell walls from binding aluminum by organic acids contributes to aluminum resistance.

    PubMed

    Li, Ya-Ying; Zhang, Yue-Jiao; Zhou, Yuan; Yang, Jian-Li; Zheng, Shao-Jian

    2009-06-01

    Aluminum-induced secretion of organic acids from the root apex has been demonstrated to be one major Al resistance mechanism in plants. However, whether the organic acid concentration is high enough to detoxify Al in the growth medium is frequently questioned. The genotypes of Al-resistant wheat, Cassia tora L. and buckwheat secrete malate, citrate and oxalate, respectively. In the present study we found that at a 35% inhibition of root elongation, the Al activities in the solution were 10, 20, and 50 muM with the corresponding malate, citrate, and oxalate exudation at the rates of 15, 20 and 21 nmol/cm(2) per 12 h, respectively, for the above three plant species. When exogenous organic acids were added to ameliorate Al toxicity, twofold and eightfold higher oxalate and malate concentrations were required to produce the equal effect by citrate. After the root apical cell walls were isolated and preincubated in 1 mM malate, oxalate or citrate solution overnight, the total amount of Al adsorbed to the cell walls all decreased significantly to a similar level, implying that these organic acids own an equal ability to protect the cell walls from binding Al. These findings suggest that protection of cell walls from binding Al by organic acids may contribute significantly to Al resistance. PMID:19522816

  16. Antimicrobial and cytotoxic effects of phosphoric acid solution compared to other root canal irrigants

    PubMed Central

    PRADO, Maíra; da SILVA, Emmanuel João Nogueira Leal; DUQUE, Thais Mageste; ZAIA, Alexandre Augusto; FERRAZ, Caio Cezar Randi; de ALMEIDA, José Flávio Affonso; GOMES, Brenda Paula Figueiredo de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoric acid has been suggested as an irrigant due to its effectiveness in removing the smear layer. Objectives : The purpose of this study was to compare the antimicrobial and cytotoxic effects of a 37% phosphoric acid solution to other irrigants commonly used in endodontics. Material and Methods : The substances 37% phosphoric acid, 17% EDTA, 10% citric acid, 2% chlorhexidine (solution and gel), and 5.25% NaOCl were evaluated. The antimicrobial activity was tested against Candida albicans, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Actinomyces meyeri, Parvimonas micra, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Prevotella nigrescens according to the agar diffusion method. The cytotoxicity of the irrigants was determined by using the MTT assay. Results : Phosphoric acid presented higher antimicrobial activity compared to the other tested irrigants. With regard to the cell viability, this solution showed results similar to those with 5.25% NaOCl and 2% chlorhexidine (gel and solution), whereas 17% EDTA and 10% citric acid showed higher cell viability compared to other irrigants. Conclusion : Phosphoric acid demonstrated higher antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity similar to that of 5.25% NaOCl and 2% chlorhexidine (gel and solution). PMID:26018307

  17. [Effect of amino acid solutions on the blood ammonia level].

    PubMed

    Sanjo, K; Harihara, Y; Kawasaki, S; Umekita, N; Idezuki, Y

    1985-09-01

    We have carried out several basic experiments on artificial liver support and found that the plasma free amino acid balance was lost after treatment according to this procedure. Application of fluid therapy--Using conventional amino acid preparations available on the market--Is not adequate during and after the treatment with artificial liver. Fluid therapy using mainly special amino acid preparations should have been established; preparations, named Todai Hospital fluid (THF), are intended to correct the deranged aminogram, supply nutrition and promote the improvement in symptoms. Furthermore, experimental animals with acute hepatic insufficiency of diverse severity were prepared and basic experiments were performed which these animals to see how the efficacy of THF developed. In the basic experiments, psychoneurotic symptoms and the electroencephalogram were improved with the lowering of the blood ammonia level. Clinically, THF was not only used as a therapeutic agent after treatment by artificial liver support in patients with fulminant hepatitis, but is also served as a further indication in hepatic encephalopathy accompanying chronic liver diseases in late stages. Improvement in encephalopathy was observed immediately after the administration of THF and persisted while the aminogram pattern returned to the premedication representation. There was more improvement in patients in whom ammonemia was complicated, and the blood ammonia level was reduced markedly. PMID:4088243

  18. Effect of oxalate on the dissolution rates of oligoclase and tremolite

    SciTech Connect

    Mast, M.A.; Drever, J.I.

    1987-09-01

    The effect of oxalate, a strong chelator for Al and other cations, on the dissolution rates of oligoclase feldspar and tremolite amphibole was investigated in a flow-through reactor at 22/sup 0/C. Oxalate at concentrations of 0.5 and 1 mM has essentially no effect on the dissolution rate of tremolite, nor on the steady-state rate of release of Si from oligoclase. The fact that oxalate has no effect on dissolution rate suggests that detachment of Si rather than Al or Mg is the rate-limiting step. At pH 4 and 9, oxalate has no effect on the steady-state rate of release of Al, and dissolution is congruent. At pH 5 and 7, oligoclase dissolution is congruent in the presence of oxalate, but in the absence of oxalate Al is preferentially retained in the solid relative to Si. Large transient spikes of Al or Si are observed when oxalate is added to or removed from the system. The cause of the spikes is unknown; the authors suggest adsorption feldspar surfaces away from sites of active dissolution as a possibility. The rate of dissolution of tremolite is independent of pH over the pH range 2-5, and decreases at higher pH. The rate of dissolution of oligoclase in these experiments was independent of pH over the pH range 4-9. Since the dissolution rate of these minerals is independent of pH and organic ligand concentration, the effect of acid deposition from the atmosphere on the rate of supply of cations from weathering of granitic rocks should be minor.

  19. Interfacial structures of acidic and basic aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, C.; Ji, N.; Waychunas, G.; Shen, Y.R.

    2008-10-20

    Phase-sensitive sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy was used to study water/vapor interfaces of HCl, HI, and NaOH solutions. The measured imaginary part of the surface spectral responses provided direct characterization of OH stretch vibrations and information about net polar orientations of water species contributing to different regions of the spectrum. We found clear evidence that hydronium ions prefer to emerge at interfaces. Their OH stretches contribute to the 'ice-like' band in the spectrum. Their charges create a positive surface field that tends to reorient water molecules more loosely bonded to the topmost water layer with oxygen toward the interface, and thus enhances significantly the 'liquid-like' band in the spectrum. Iodine ions in solution also like to appear at the interface and alter the positive surface field by forming a narrow double-charge layer with hydronium ions. In NaOH solution, the observed weak change of the 'liquid-like' band and disappearance of the 'ice-like' band in the spectrum indicates that OH{sup -} ions must also have excess at the interface. How they are incorporated in the interfacial water structure is however not clear.

  20. Waste acid/metal solution reduction and recovery by vacuum distillation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, E.O.; Wilcox, W.A.; Johnson, N.T.; Bowdish, F.W.

    1995-07-01

    Processes involving distillation under reduced pressure were developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory several years ago to recover spent acid solutions generated during the manufacture of nuclear fuel for the N-Reactor at the Hanford site. Following construction and testing of a pilot-plant, the technology was licensed to Viatec Recovery Systems, Inc. for commercialization. The technology developed included specialized distillation and rectification of volatile acids, removal of water and/or volatile acid from sulfuric acid, and precipitation of salts. A key feature of the Waste Acid Detoxification and Reclamation (WADR) technology is the development and use of advanced thermoplastic and fluoropolymer materials of construction in all critical process equipment. The technology was then expanded to include crystallization to recover metal salts for possible reuse. Economic and environmental advantages of the procedures include recovery of acids for reuse, simplification or elimination of the disposal of waste solutions, and possible recovery of metals. Industries expected to benefit from such applications include galvanizing, electroplating, sand leaching and any where metals are cleaned in acid solutions. Currently a modular system has been assembled for recovery of several different spent acid solutions.

  1. Silver-Catalyzed Decarboxylative Allylation of Aliphatic Carboxylic Acids in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Cui, Lei; Chen, He; Liu, Chao; Li, Chaozhong

    2016-05-01

    Direct decarboxylative radical allylation of aliphatic carboxylic acids is described. With K2S2O8 as the oxidant and AgNO3 as the catalyst, the reactions of aliphatic carboxylic acids with allyl sulfones in aqueous CH3CN solution gave the corresponding alkenes in satisfactory yields under mild conditions. This site-specific allylation method is applicable to all primary, secondary, and tertiary alkyl acids and exhibits wide functional group compatibility. PMID:27065060

  2. Solution-phase secondary-ion mass spectrometry of protonated amino acids.

    PubMed

    Pettit, G R; Cragg, G M; Holzapfel, C W; Tuinman, A A; Gieschen, D P

    1987-04-01

    Although sulfolane proved unexpectedly to be a poor solvent for solution-phase secondary-ion mass spectrometry of underivatized amino acids in the presence of thallium(I) salts, glycerol was somewhat more effective. Also, the addition of trifluoromethanesulfonic acid proved more effective than addition of the metal in generating molecular ion complexes. A convenient and reliable method for rapidly determining amino acid molecular ions is based on these observations. PMID:3037939

  3. The solvent extraction of Americium(III) by 2,6-bis[(diphenylphosphino)-methyl]pyridine N,P,P` trioxide from nitric acid and hydrochloric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, E.M.; Engelhardt, U.; Deere, T.P.; Rapko, B.M.; Paine, R.T.

    1997-12-31

    The liquid/liquid extractions of Am(III) from nitric acid and hydrochloric acid solutions with chloroform solutions of 2,6-bis[(diphenylphosphino)methyl]pyridine N,P,P{prime} trioxide will be described. Americium(III) extracts well from high concentration nitric acid solutions (D>3000 at 6M nitric acid) and can be back extracted from the organic phase at 0.01M Nitric Acid. Americium(III) exhibits modest extraction from hydrochloric acid solutions (D=2.2 at 5M hydrochloric acid) and can be back extracted from the organic phase at 0.1M hydrochloric acid. The ligand dependency data suggest that two ligand molecules are coordinated to americium in the nitric acid system and three ligand molecules are coordinated to the americium in the hydrochloric acid system.

  4. Hydrazinium lanthanide oxalates: synthesis, structure and thermal reactivity of N2H5[Ln2(C2O4)4(N2H5)]·4H2O, Ln = Ce, Nd.

    PubMed

    De Almeida, Lucie; Grandjean, Stéphane; Rivenet, Murielle; Patisson, Fabrice; Abraham, Francis

    2014-03-28

    New hydrazinium lanthanide oxalates N2H5[Ln2(C2O4)4(N2H5)]·4H2O, Ln = Ce (Ce-HyOx) and Nd (Nd-HyOx), were synthesized by hydrothermal reaction at 150 °C between lanthanide nitrate, oxalic acid and hydrazine solutions. The structure of the Nd compound was determined from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data, space group P2₁/c with a = 16.315(4), b = 12.127(3), c = 11.430(2) Å, β = 116.638(4)°, V = 2021.4(7) Å(3), Z = 4, and R1 = 0.0313 for 4231 independent reflections. Two distinct neodymium polyhedra are formed, NdO9 and NdO8N, an oxygen of one monodentate oxalate in the former being replaced by a nitrogen atom of a coordinated hydrazinium ion in the latter. The infrared absorption band at 1005 cm(-1) confirms the coordination of N2H5(+) to the metal. These polyhedra are connected through μ2 and μ3 oxalate ions to form an anionic three-dimensional neodymium-oxalate arrangement. A non-coordinated charge-compensating hydrazinium ion occupies, with water molecules, the resulting tunnels. The N-N stretching frequencies of the infrared spectra demonstrate the existence of the two types of hydrazine ions. Thermal reactivity of these hydrazinium oxalates and of the mixed isotypic Ce/Nd (CeNd-HyOx) oxalate were studied by using thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses coupled with gas analyzers, and high temperature X-ray diffraction. Under air, fine particles of CeO2 and Ce(0.5)Nd(0.5)O(1.75) are formed at low temperature from Ce-HyOx and CeNd-HyOx, respectively, thanks to a decomposition/oxidation process. Under argon flow, dioxymonocyanamides Ln2O2CN2 are formed. PMID:24468910

  5. Method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions by modification of Purex solvent

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Kalina, D.G.

    1984-05-21

    A process has been developed for the extraction of multivalent lanthanide and actinide values from acidic waste solutions, and for the separation of these values from fission product and other values, which utilizes a new series of neutral bi-functional extractants, the alkyl(phenyl)-N, N-dialkylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxides, in combination with a phase modifier to form an extraction solution. The addition of the extractant to the Purex process extractant, tri-n-butylphosphate in normal paraffin hydrocarbon diluent, will permit the extraction of multivalent lanthanide and actinide values from 0.1 to 12.0 molar acid solutions.

  6. The amino acid's backup bone - storage solutions for proteomics facilities.

    PubMed

    Meckel, Hagen; Stephan, Christian; Bunse, Christian; Krafzik, Michael; Reher, Christopher; Kohl, Michael; Meyer, Helmut Erich; Eisenacher, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Proteomics methods, especially high-throughput mass spectrometry analysis have been continually developed and improved over the years. The analysis of complex biological samples produces large volumes of raw data. Data storage and recovery management pose substantial challenges to biomedical or proteomic facilities regarding backup and archiving concepts as well as hardware requirements. In this article we describe differences between the terms backup and archive with regard to manual and automatic approaches. We also introduce different storage concepts and technologies from transportable media to professional solutions such as redundant array of independent disks (RAID) systems, network attached storages (NAS) and storage area network (SAN). Moreover, we present a software solution, which we developed for the purpose of long-term preservation of large mass spectrometry raw data files on an object storage device (OSD) archiving system. Finally, advantages, disadvantages, and experiences from routine operations of the presented concepts and technologies are evaluated and discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Computational Proteomics in the Post-Identification Era. Guest Editors: Martin Eisenacher and Christian Stephan. PMID:23722089

  7. Heterogeneous freezing of single sulphuric acid solution droplets: laboratory experiments utilising an acoustic levitator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettner, M.; Mitra, S. K.; Borrmann, S.

    2004-03-01

    The heterogeneous freezing temperatures of single binary sulphuric acid solution droplets were measured in dependency of acid concentration down to temperatures as low as -70°C. In order to avoid influence of supporting substrates on the freezing characteristics, the droplets were suspended by means of an acoustic levitator. The droplets contained immersed particles of graphite, kaolin or montmorillonite in order to study the influence of the presence of such contamination on the freezing temperature. The radii of the suspended droplets spanned the range between 0,4 and 1,1 mm and the concentration of the sulphuric acid solution varied between 5 and 25 weight percent. The presence of the particles in the solution raises the freezing temperature with respect to homogeneous freezing of these solution droplets. The pure solution droplets can be supercooled up to 40° below the ice-acid solution thermodynamic equilibrium curve. Depending on the concentration of sulphuric acid and the nature of the impurity the polluted droplets froze between -11°C and -35°C. The experimental set-up, combining a deep freezer with a movable ultrasonic levitator and suitable optics, proved to be a useful approach for such investigations on individual droplets.

  8. Heterogeneous freezing of single sulfuric acid solution droplets: laboratory experiments utilizing an acoustic levitator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettner, M.; Mitra, S. K.; Borrmann, S.

    2004-09-01

    The heterogeneous freezing temperatures of single binary sulfuric acid solution droplets were measured in dependency of acid concentration down to temperatures as low as -50°C. In order to avoid influence of supporting substrates on the freezing characteristics, a new technique has been developed to suspend the droplet by means of an acoustic levitator. The droplets contained immersed particles of graphite, kaolin or montmorillonite in order to study the influence of the presence of such contamination on the freezing temperature. The radii of the suspended droplets spanned the range between 0.4 and 1.1mm and the concentration of the sulfuric acid solution varied between 5 and 14 weight percent. The presence of the particles in the solution raises the freezing temperature with respect to homogeneous freezing of these solution droplets. The pure solution droplets can be supercooled up to 40 degrees below the ice-acid solution thermodynamic equilibrium curve. Depending on the concentration of sulfuric acid and the nature of the impurity the polluted droplets froze between -11°C and -35°C. The new experimental set-up, combining a deep freezer with a movable ultrasonic levitator and suitable optics, proved to be a useful approach for such investigations on individual droplets.

  9. Hydrogen generation by tin corrosion in lactic acid solution promoted by sodium perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deyab, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    A method to produce high purity hydrogen using the corrosion of tin metal in lactic acid solutions is studied. The addition of sodium perchlorate has been also investigated for promoting the tin-lactic acid reaction. The data reveal that the rate of hydrogen production increases with increasing lactic acid concentration. The presence of perchlorate ions in lactic acid solution enhances the active dissolution of tin metal and tends to breakdown the passive film and promoting the hydrogen generation rate. Polarization measurements show that the breakdown potential (Epit) decreases with increase in sodium perchlorate concentration. An increase in temperature accelerates the rate of solubility of passive layer on the tin surface. Moreover, a synergistic effect of sodium perchlorate in combination with increasing the solution temperature is key in promoting the hydrogen generation rate. Results obtained from hydrogen and polarization measurements are in good agreement. These measurements are complemented with SEM, EDX and XRD examinations of the electrode surface.

  10. Control and monitoring of the localized corrosion of zirconium in acidic chloride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Fahey, J.; Holmes, D.; Yau, T.L.

    1995-09-01

    Zirconium in acidic chloride solutions which are contaminated with ferric or cupric cations is prone to localized corrosion. This tendency can be reduced by ensuring that the zirconium surface is clean and smooth. In this paper, the effect of surface condition on the localized corrosion of zirconium in acidic chloride solutions is predicted with potentiodynamic scans. These predictions are confirmed by weight loss tests on various combinations of surface finish and acid concentrations. A real time indication of localized corrosion is seen by monitoring the electrochemical noise produced between two similar electrodes immersed in an acidic chloride solutions. Electrochemical noise monitoring correlates well with the predictions from potentiodynamic and weight loss experiments. The electrochemical noise results show that while an elevated (more anodic) potential caused by ferric ion contamination may be a necessary condition for localized corrosion, it is not a sufficient condition: A smooth, clean zirconium surface reduces the localized corrosion of zirconium.

  11. Observation of superoxide production during catalysis of Bacillus subtilis oxalate decarboxylase at pH 4.

    PubMed

    Twahir, Umar T; Stedwell, Corey N; Lee, Cory T; Richards, Nigel G J; Polfer, Nicolas C; Angerhofer, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    This contribution describes the trapping of the hydroperoxyl radical at a pH of 4 during turnover of wild-type oxalate decarboxylase and its T165V mutant using the spin-trap BMPO. Radicals were detected and identified by a combination of EPR and mass spectrometry. Superoxide, or its conjugate acid, the hydroperoxyl radical, is expected as an intermediate in the decarboxylation and oxidation reactions of the oxalate monoanion, both of which are promoted by oxalate decarboxylase. Another intermediate, the carbon dioxide radical anion was also observed. The quantitative yields of superoxide trapping are similar in the wild type and the mutant while it is significantly different for the trapping of the carbon dioxide radical anion. This suggests that the two radicals are released from different sites of the protein. PMID:25526893

  12. Observation of Superoxide Production During Catalysis of Bacillus subtilis Oxalate Decarboxylase at pH4

    PubMed Central

    Twahir, Umar T.; Stedwell, Corey N.; Lee, Cory T.; Richards, Nigel G. J.; Polfer, Nicolas C.; Angerhofer, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    This contribution describes the trapping of the hydroperoxyl radical at a pH of 4 during turnover of wild-type oxalate decarboxylase and its T165V mutant using the spin trap BMPO. Radicals were detected and identified by a combination of EPR and mass spectrometry. Superoxide, or its conjugate acid, the hydroperoxyl radical, is expected as an intermediate in the decarboxylation and oxidation reactions of the oxalate monoanion both of which are promoted by oxalate decarboxylase. Another intermediate, the carbon dioxide radical anion was also observed. The quantitative yields of superoxide trapping is similar in the wild type and the mutant while it is significantly different for the trapping of the carbon dioxide radical anion. This suggests that the two radicals are released from different sites of the protein. PMID:25526893

  13. Growth behavior of anodic porous alumina formed in malic acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2013-11-01

    The growth behavior of anodic porous alumina formed on aluminum by anodizing in malic acid solutions was investigated. High-purity aluminum plates were electropolished in CH3COOH/HClO4 solutions and then anodized in 0.5 M malic acid solutions at 293 K and constant cell voltages of 200-350 V. The anodic porous alumina grew on the aluminum substrate at voltages of 200-250 V, and a black, burned oxide film was formed at higher voltages. The nanopores of the anodic oxide were only formed at grain boundaries of the aluminum substrate during the initial stage of anodizing, and then the growth region extended to the entire aluminum surface as the anodizing time increased. The anodic porous alumina with several defects was formed by anodizing in malic acid solution at 250 V, and oxide cells were approximately 300-800 nm in diameter.

  14. Time dependent inhibition of xanthine oxidase in irradiated solutions of folic acid, aminopterin and methotrexate

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, K.; Pilot, T.F.; Meany, J.E. )

    1990-01-01

    The xanthine oxidase catalyzed oxidation of hypoxanthine was followed by monitoring the formation of uric acid at 290 nm. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase occurs in aqueous solutions of folic acid methotrexate and aminopterin. These compounds are known to dissociate upon exposure to ultraviolet light resulting in the formation of their respective 6-formylpteridine derivatives. The relative rates of dissociation were monitored spectrophotometrically by determining the absorbance of their 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine derivatives at 500 nm. When aqueous solutions of folic acid, aminopterin and methotrexate were exposed to uv light, a direct correlation was observed between the concentrations of the 6-formylpteridine derivatives existing in solution and the ability of these solutions to inhibit xanthine oxidase. The relative potency of the respective photolysis products were estimated.

  15. Electrochemical protection of zirconium in oxidizing hydrochloric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Yuu, T-L.; Maguire, M.

    1984-06-01

    An electrochemical protection technique using cathodic polarization to maintain zirconium below its critical repassivation potential was used to avoid pitting and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in hydrochloric acid (HCI) containing ferric ions (Fe/sup +3/). Corrosion and pit penetration rates are reported for pickled, abraded, and as-received surface conditions in 10, 20, and 37% HCI containing 50, 100, or 500 ppm Fe/sup +3/ at temperatures to boiling. The pickled surface was the least susceptible to pitting in the 64 day tests. Electrochemical protection is then evaluated for total immersion, partial immersion, U-bend, and constant strain rate tensile tests. Protection is effective in eliminating pitting and SCC in 10 and 20% HCI containing Fe/sup +3/.

  16. Synthesis, thermal and nonlinear optical characterization of L-arginine semi-oxalate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, P.; Gokulraj, S.; Sankar, S.

    2012-06-01

    Optically good quality L-arginine semi-oxalate, an organic nonlinear optical crystal, has been synthesized from aqueous solution by slow evaporation method. Single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis reveals that the synthesized L-arginine semi-oxalate crystal possesses triclinic structure with unit cell dimensions as a=5.05Å, b=9.73Å, c=13.12Å, α=111.030, β=92.790 and γ=91.910. The Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy was analyzed and the presence of functional groups of L-arginine semi-oxalate was confirmed. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies show that the material is thermally stable up to 1460C and the melting point is 1500C. Kurtz and Perry powder technique confirms that the second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency is 0.32 times that of standard organic materials urea and KDP.

  17. [In vitro effect of Hordeum vulgare on the crystallization of calcium oxalate monohydrate (whewellite)].

    PubMed

    Djaroud, Samira; Harrache, Djamila; Amar, Amina

    2012-01-01

    The recommended conservative treatment of hyperoxaluria is mainly based on hyperhydration and ingestion of inhibitors of crystallization. In accordance with this context, the aim of this study was to determine the in vitro effect of Hordeum vulgare on calcium oxalate crystallization oxalo-dependent. The crystallization of calcium oxalate monohydrate in supersaturated aqueous solution at 37 °C, was followed in a model turbidimetric continuous in a closed system. The proposed model is very good reproducibility (CV < 10%), crystallization was monitored continuously in the presence of Hordeum vulgare at different concentrations (0.0625 to 1 g/L). The comparison of turbidimetric parameters, that characterize the growth stage of monohydrated oxalate calcium crystals and observation of the crystals obtained at the end of crystallization into scanning electron microscopy, have been able to demonstrate the inducing effect of Hordeum vulgare to 0.0625 g/L and a slight inhibitory effect at the others concentrations. PMID:23207820

  18. Acid gas absorption in aqueous solutions of mixed amines

    SciTech Connect

    Rinker, E.B.; Ashour, S.S.; Sandall, O.C.

    1996-12-31

    A mass transfer model has been developed to describe the rate of absorption (or desorption) of H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} in aqueous blends of a tertiary and a secondary or a primary amine. The model is based on penetration theory, and all significant chemical reactions are incorporated in the model. The reactions are taken to be reversible, with reactions involving only a proton transfer considered to be at equilibrium. The particular amines studied in this research were methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), a tertiary amine, and diethanolamine (DEA), a secondary amine. Key physicochemical data needed in the model, such as diffusion coefficients, kinetic rate constants, and gas solubilities, were measured. Experimental absorption rates of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S were measured in a model gas-liquid contacting device and were compared with model predictions. Experiments were carried out for single amine solutions (both MDEA and DEA) and for amine blends.

  19. Solute-enhanced production of gamma-valerolactone (GVL) from aqueous solutions of levulinic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Dumesic, James A; Wettstein, Stephanie G; Alonso, David Martin; Gurbuz, Elif Ispir

    2015-02-24

    A method to produce levulinic acid (LA) and gamma-valerolactone (GVL) from biomass-derived cellulose or lignocellulose by selective extraction of LA using GVL and optionally converting the LA so isolated into GVL, with no purifications steps required to yield the GVL.

  20. Metabolic engineering of yeast to produce fatty acid-derived biofuels: bottlenecks and solutions.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Jiayuan; Feng, Xueyang

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid-derived biofuels can be a better solution than bioethanol to replace petroleum fuel, since they have similar energy content and combustion properties as current transportation fuels. The environmentally friendly microbial fermentation process has been used to synthesize advanced biofuels from renewable feedstock. Due to their robustness as well as the high tolerance to fermentation inhibitors and phage contamination, yeast strains such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Yarrowia lipolytica have attracted tremendous attention in recent studies regarding the production of fatty acid-derived biofuels, including fatty acids, fatty acid ethyl esters, fatty alcohols, and fatty alkanes. However, the native yeast strains cannot produce fatty acids and fatty acid-derived biofuels in large quantities. To this end, we have summarized recent publications in this review on metabolic engineering of yeast strains to improve the production of fatty acid-derived biofuels, identified the bottlenecks that limit the productivity of biofuels, and categorized the appropriate approaches to overcome these obstacles. PMID:26106371