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Sample records for oxidation processes based

  1. Process for preparing zinc oxide-based sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gangwal, Santosh Kumar; Turk, Brian Scott; Gupta, Raghubir Prasad

    2011-06-07

    The disclosure relates to zinc oxide-based sorbents, and processes for preparing and using them. The sorbents are preferably used to remove one or more reduced sulfur species from gas streams. The sorbents comprise an active zinc component, optionally in combination with one or more promoter components and/or one or more substantially inert components. The active zinc component is a two phase material, consisting essentially of a zinc oxide (ZnO) phase and a zinc aluminate (ZnAl.sub.2O.sub.4) phase. Each of the two phases is characterized by a relatively small crystallite size of typically less than about 500 Angstroms. Preferably the sorbents are prepared by converting a precursor mixture, comprising a precipitated zinc oxide precursor and a precipitated aluminum oxide precursor, to the two-phase, active zinc oxide containing component.

  2. Solution-Processed Indium Oxide Based Thin-Film Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wangying

    Oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) have attracted considerable attention over the past decade due to their high carrier mobility and excellent uniformity. However, most of these oxide TFTs are usually fabricated using costly vacuum-based techniques. Recently, the solution processes have been developed due to the possibility of low-cost and large-area fabrication. In this thesis, we have carried out a detailed and systematic study of solution-processed oxide thin films and TFTs. At first, we demonstrated a passivation method to overcome the water susceptibility of solution-processed InZnO TFTs by utilizing octadecylphosphonic acid (ODPA) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). The unpassivated InZnO TFTs exhibited large hysteresis in their electrical characteristics due to the adsorbed water at the semiconductor surface. Formation of a SAM of ODPA on the top of InZnO removed water molecules weakly absorbed at the back channel and prevented water diffusion from the surroundings. Therefore the passivated devices exhibited significantly reduced hysteretic characteristics. Secondly, we developed a simple spin-coating approach for high- k dielectrics (Al2O3, ZrO2, Y 2O3 and TiO2). These materials were used as gate dielectrics for solution-processed In2O3 or InZnO TFTs. Among the high-k dielectrics, the Al2O3-based devices showed the best performance, which is attributed to the smooth dielectric/semiconductor interface and the low interface trap density besides its good insulating property. Thirdly, the formation and properties of Al2O3 thin films under various annealing temperatures were intensively studied, revealing that the sol-gel-derived Al2O3 thin film undergoes the decomposition of organic residuals and nitrate groups, as well as conversion of aluminum hydroxides to form aluminum oxide. Besides, the Al2O 3 film was used as gate dielectric for solution-processed oxide TFTs, resulting in high mobility and low operating voltage. Finally, we proposed a green route for

  3. SULFATE RADICAL-BASED ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESSES- ACS MEETING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper will present an overview of sulfate radical-based advanced oxidation technologies for the destruction of environmentally toxic chemicals in wastewater, industrial water, groundwater and sources of water supply. The paper will include fundamental aspects of the generati...

  4. Modeling a granule-based anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (ANAMMOX) process.

    PubMed

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Chen, You-Peng; Liu, Shao-Yang; Fang, Fang; Xie, Wen-Ming; Yu, Han-Qing

    2009-06-15

    A mathematical model was developed to describe the anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX) process in a granular upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor. ANAMMOX granules were cultivated in the UASB reactor by seeding aerobic granules. The granule-based reactor had a great N-loading resistant capacity. The model simulation results on the 1-year reactor performance matched the experimental data well. The yield coefficient for the growth and the decay rate coefficient of the ANAMMOX granules were estimated to be 0.164 g COD g(-1) N and 0.00016 h(-1), respectively. With this model, the effects of process parameters on the reactor performance were evaluated. Results showed that the optimum granule diameter for the maximum N-removal should be between 1.0 and 1.3 mm and that the optimum N loading rate should be 0.8 kg N m(-3) d(-1). In addition, the substrate micro-profiles in the ANAMMOX granules were measured with a microelectrode to explore the diffusion dynamics within the granules, and the measured profiles matched the predicted results well. PMID:19280667

  5. Processing, characterization and properties of oxide based nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaduri, Sutapa

    The synthesis, characterization and mechanical properties of oxide based nanocomposites are reported in this dissertation. Two binary systems are studied: Alsb2Osb3-MgO and Alsb2Osb3-ZrOsb2. Alsb2Osb3-MgO was chosen because of its relatively large field of solid solubilities at a moderate temperature. On the other hand, Alsb2Osb3-ZrOsb2 was chosen because it shows minimal solid solubility of the constituents. A novel "Auto Ignition" process using suitable fuels and oxidizers was utilized in the synthesis of nanocomposites and solid solutions. Thermodynamic calculations were carried out in predicting end point adiabatic temperatures (Tsbad) for each composition in both systems. Combustion temperatures were experimentally measured by means of a data acquisition system. Characterizations of the powders were carried out by x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive analysis (EDAX) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). Heat treatment experiments were carried out to study the grain growth behavior. A hot isostatic pressing (HIP) model was developed for the present nanoceramics. Input parameters were carefully chosen for such nanomaterials. The as-synthesized nanocrystalline powders were consolidated to near theoretical density by hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) while retaining fine grain size. The experimental results were compared with the predictions of the model. Mechanical properties, such as room temperature toughness, low temperatures well as high temperature hardness, were determined for both systems. Room temperature hardness values were (2.89-7.79) GPa and fracture toughness was between 2.7 and 5.82 MPa.msp{1/2} for various compositions in the Alsb2Osb3-MgO system. Room temperature hardness values were between 5.33 and 8.71 GPa and fracture toughness values ranged from (5.3-9.62) MPa.msp{1/2} for various compositions in the Alsb2Osb3-ZrOsb2 system. Nanoindentation experiments were carried out to further explore the room

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF SULFATE RADICAL-BASED CHEMICAL OXIDATION PROCESSES FOR GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study investigates the development of novel sulfate radical-based chemical oxidation processes for treatment of groundwater contaminants. Environmentally friendly transition metal (Fe (II), Fe (III)) has been evaluated for the activation of common oxidants (peroxymonosulfat...

  7. TREATMENT OF PAHS AND PCBS USING SULFATE RADICAL-BASED OXIDATION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in aquatic systems pose serious threat to public health due to their toxicity and potential carcinogenicity [1]. Sulfate radical-based oxidation processes can be effectively used for degradation of these...

  8. The study of leachate treatment by using three advanced oxidation process based wet air oxidation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Wet air oxidation is regarded as appropriate options for wastewater treatment with average organic compounds. The general purpose of this research is to determine the efficiency of three wet air oxidation methods, wet oxidation with hydrogen peroxide and absorption with activated carbon in removing organic matter and nitrogenous compounds from Isfahan's urban leachate. A leachate sample with the volume of 1.5 liters entered into a steel reactor with the volume of three liters and was put under a 10-bar pressure, at temperatures of 100, 200, and 300° as well as three retention times of 30, 60, and 90 minutes. The sample was placed at 18 stages of leachate storage ponds in Isfahan Compost Plant with the volume of 20 liters, using three WPO, WAO methods and a combination of WAO/GAC for leachate pre-treatment. Thirty percent of pure oxygen and hydrogen peroxide were applied as oxidation agents. The COD removal efficiency in WAO method is 7.8-33.3%, in BOD is 14.7-50.6%, the maximum removal percentage (efficiency) for NH4-N is 53.3% and for NO3-N is 56.4-73.9%. The removal efficiency of COD and BOD5 is 4.6%-34 and 24%-50 respectively in WPO method. Adding GAC to the reactor, the removal efficiency of all parameters was improved. The maximum removal efficiency was increased 48% for COD, 31%-43.6 for BOD5 by a combinational method, and the ratio of BOD5/COD was also increased to 90%. In this paper, WAO and WPO process was used for Leachate pre-treatment and WAO/GAC combinational process was applied for improving the organic matter removal and leachate treatment; it was also determined that the recent process is much more efficient in removing resistant organic matter. PMID:23369258

  9. Advanced oxide powders processing based on cascade plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solonenko, O. P.; Smirnov, A. V.

    2014-11-01

    Analysis of the potential advantages offered to thermal spraying and powder processing by the implementation of plasma torches with inter-electrode insert (IEI) or, in other words, cascade plasma torches (CPTs) is presented. The paper provides evidence that the modular designed single cathode CPT helps eliminate the following major disadvantages of conventional plasma torches: plasma parameters drifting, 1-5 kHz pulsing of plasma flow, as well as excessive erosion of electrodes. More stable plasma results in higher quality, homogeneity and reproducibility of plasma sprayed coatings and powders treated. In addition, CPT offers an extremely wide operating window, which allows better control of plasma parameters, particle dwell time and, consequently, particle temperature and velocity within a wide range by generating high enthalpy quasi-laminar plasmas, medium enthalpy transient plasmas, as well as relatively low enthalpy turbulent plasmas. Stable operation, flexibility with plasma gases as well as wide operating window of CPT should help significantly improve the existing plasma spraying processes and coatings, and also help develop new advanced technologies.

  10. DESTRUCTION OF PAHS AND PCBS IN WATER USING SULFATE RADICAL-BASED CATALYTIC ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new class of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) based on sulfate radicals is being tested for the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in aqueous solution. These AOPs are based on the generation of sulfate radicals through...

  11. Zinc-oxide-based sorbents and processes for preparing and using same

    DOEpatents

    Gangwal, Santosh Kumar; Turk, Brian Scott; Gupta, Raghubir Prasael

    2010-03-23

    Zinc oxide-based sorbents, and processes for preparing and using them are provided. The sorbents are preferably used to remove one or more reduced sulfur species from gas streams. The sorbents comprise an active zinc component, optionally in combination with one or more promoter components and/or one or more substantially inert components. The active zinc component is a two phase material, consisting essentially of a zinc oxide (ZnO) phase and a zinc aluminate (ZnAl.sub.2O.sub.4) phase. Each of the two phases is characterized by a relatively small crystallite size of typically less than about 500 Angstroms. Preferably the sorbents are prepared by converting a precursor mixture, comprising a precipitated zinc oxide precursor and a precipitated aluminum oxide precursor, to the two-phase, active zinc oxide containing component.

  12. Zinc oxide-based sorbents and processes for preparing and using same

    DOEpatents

    Gangwal, Santosh Kumar; Turk, Brian Scott; Gupta, Raghubir Prasad

    2005-10-04

    Zinc oxide-based sorbents, and processes for preparing and using them are provided, wherein the sorbents are preferably used to remove one or more reduced sulfur species from gas streams. The sorbents contain an active zinc component, optionally in combination with one or more promoter components and/or one or more substantially inert components. The active zinc component is a two phase material, consisting essentially of a zinc oxide (ZnO) phase and a zinc aluminate (ZnAl.sub.2 O.sub.4) phase. Each of the two phases is characterized by a relatively small crystallite size of typically less than about 500 Angstroms. Preferably the sorbents are prepared by converting a precursor mixture, containing a precipitated zinc oxide precursor and a precipitated aluminum oxide precursor, to the two-phase, active zinc oxide containing component.

  13. High-Quality Solution-Processed Silicon Oxide Gate Dielectric Applied on Indium Oxide Based Thin-Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Jaehnike, Felix; Pham, Duy Vu; Anselmann, Ralf; Bock, Claudia; Kunze, Ulrich

    2015-07-01

    A silicon oxide gate dielectric was synthesized by a facile sol-gel reaction and applied to solution-processed indium oxide based thin-film transistors (TFTs). The SiOx sol-gel was spin-coated on highly doped silicon substrates and converted to a dense dielectric film with a smooth surface at a maximum processing temperature of T = 350 °C. The synthesis was systematically improved, so that the solution-processed silicon oxide finally achieved comparable break downfield strength (7 MV/cm) and leakage current densities (<10 nA/cm(2) at 1 MV/cm) to thermally grown silicon dioxide (SiO2). The good quality of the dielectric layer was successfully proven in bottom-gate, bottom-contact metal oxide TFTs and compared to reference TFTs with thermally grown SiO2. Both transistor types have field-effect mobility values as high as 28 cm(2)/(Vs) with an on/off current ratio of 10(8), subthreshold swings of 0.30 and 0.37 V/dec, respectively, and a threshold voltage close to zero. The good device performance could be attributed to the smooth dielectric/semiconductor interface and low interface trap density. Thus, the sol-gel-derived SiO2 is a promising candidate for a high-quality dielectric layer on many substrates and high-performance large-area applications. PMID:26039187

  14. Processing, Structure and High Temperature Oxidation Properties of Polymer-Derived and Hafnium Oxide Based Ceramic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terauds, Kalvis

    Demands for hypersonic aircraft are driving the development of ultra-high temperature structural materials. These aircraft, envisioned to sustain Mach 5+, are expected to experience continuous temperatures of 1200--1800°C on the aircraft surface and temperatures as high as 2800°C in combustion zones. Breakthroughs in the development of fiber based ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are opening the door to a new class of high-tech UHT structures for aerospace applications. One limitation with current carbon fiber or silicon carbide fiber based CMC technology is the inherent problem of material oxidation, requiring new approaches for protective environmental barrier coatings (EBC) in extreme environments. This thesis focuses on the development and characterization of SiCN-HfO2 based ceramic composite EBC systems to be used as a protective layer for silicon carbide fiber based CMCs. The presented work covers three main architectures for protection (i) multilayer films, (ii) polymer-derived HfSiCNO, and (iii) composite SiCN-HfO 2 infiltration. The scope of this thesis covers processing development, material characterization, and high temperature oxidation behavior of these three SiCN-HfO2 based systems. This work shows that the SiCN-HfO 2 composite materials react upon oxidation to form HfSiO4, offering a stable EBC in streaming air and water vapor at 1600°C.

  15. Research on filling process of fuel and oxidant during detonation based on absorption spectrum technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Xiao-Jing; Li, Ning; Weng, Chun-Sheng

    2014-12-01

    Research on detonation process is of great significance for the control optimization of pulse detonation engine. Based on absorption spectrum technology, the filling process of fresh fuel and oxidant during detonation is researched. As one of the most important products, H2O is selected as the target of detonation diagnosis. Fiber distributed detonation test system is designed to enable the detonation diagnosis under adverse conditions in detonation process. The test system is verified to be reliable. Laser signals at different working frequency (5Hz, 10Hz and 20Hz) are detected. Change of relative laser intensity in one detonation circle is analyzed. The duration of filling process is inferred from the change of laser intensity, which is about 100~110ms. The peak of absorption spectrum is used to present the concentration of H2O during the filling process of fresh fuel and oxidant. Absorption spectrum is calculated, and the change of absorption peak is analyzed. Duration of filling process calculated with absorption peak consisted with the result inferred from the change of relative laser intensity. The pulse detonation engine worked normally and obtained the maximum thrust at 10Hz under experiment conditions. The results are verified through H2O gas concentration monitoring during detonation.

  16. Excess processing of oxidative damaged bases causes hypersensitivity to oxidative stress and low dose rate irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Y; Yamasaki, A; Takatori, K; Suzuki, M; Kobayashi, J; Takao, M; Zhang-Akiyama, Q-M

    2015-10-01

    Ionizing radiations such as X-ray and γ-ray can directly or indirectly produce clustered or multiple damages in DNA. Previous studies have reported that overexpression of DNA glycosylases in Escherichia coli (E. coli) and human lymphoblast cells caused increased sensitivity to γ-ray and X-ray irradiation. However, the effects and the mechanisms of other radiation, such as low dose rate radiation, heavy-ion beams, or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), are still poorly understood. In the present study, we constructed a stable HeLaS3 cell line overexpressing human 8-oxoguanine DNA N-glycosylase 1 (hOGG1) protein. We determined the survival of HeLaS3 and HeLaS3/hOGG1 cells exposed to UV, heavy-ion beams, γ-rays, and H2O2. The results showed that HeLaS3 cells overexpressing hOGG1 were more sensitive to γ-rays, OH(•), and H2O2, but not to UV or heavy-ion beams, than control HeLaS3. We further determined the levels of 8-oxoG foci and of chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs) by detecting γ-H2AX foci formation in DNA. The results demonstrated that both γ-rays and H2O2 induced 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) foci formation in HeLaS3 cells. hOGG1-overexpressing cells had increased amounts of γ-H2AX foci and decreased amounts of 8-oxoG foci compared with HeLaS3 control cells. These results suggest that excess hOGG1 removes the oxidatively damaged 8-oxoG in DNA more efficiently and therefore generates more DSBs. Micronucleus formation also supported this conclusion. Low dose-rate γ-ray effects were also investigated. We first found that overexpression of hOGG1 also caused increased sensitivity to low dose rate γ-ray irradiation. The rate of micronucleus formation supported the notion that low dose rate irradiation increased genome instability. PMID:26059740

  17. Biological efficacy and toxic effect of emergency water disinfection process based on advanced oxidation technology.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yiping; Yuan, Xiaoli; Xu, Shujing; Li, Rihong; Zhou, Xinying; Zhang, Zhitao

    2015-12-01

    An innovative and removable water treatment system consisted of strong electric field discharge and hydrodynamic cavitation based on advanced oxidation technologies was developed for reactive free radicals producing and waterborne pathogens eliminating in the present study. The biological efficacy and toxic effects of this advanced oxidation system were evaluated during water disinfection treatments. Bench tests were carried out with synthetic microbial-contaminated water, as well as source water in rainy season from a reservoir of Dalian city (Liaoning Province, China). Results showed that high inactivation efficiency of Escherichia coli (>5 log) could be obtained for synthetic contaminated water at a low concentration (0.5-0.7 mg L(-1)) of total oxidants in 3-10 s. The numbers of wild total bacteria (108 × 10(3) CFU mL(-1)) and total coliforms (260 × 10(2) MPN 100 mL(-1)) in source water greatly reduced to 50 and 0 CFU mL(-1) respectively after treated by the advanced oxidation system, which meet the microbiological standards of drinking water, and especially that the inactivation efficiency of total coliforms could reach 100%. Meanwhile, source water qualities were greatly improved during the disinfection processes. The values of UV254 in particular were significantly reduced (60-80%) by reactive free radicals. Moreover, the concentrations of possible disinfection by-products (formaldehyde and bromide) in treated water were lower than detection limits, indicating that there was no harmful effect on water after the treatments. These investigations are helpful for the ecotoxicological studies of advanced oxidation system in the treatments of chemical polluted water or waste water. The findings of this work suggest that the developed water treatment system is ideal in the acute phases of emergencies, which also could offer additional advantages over a wide range of applications in water pollution control. PMID:26427371

  18. Processing of uranium oxide and silicon carbide based fuel using polymer infiltration and pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Abhishek K.; Zunjarrao, Suraj C.; Singh, Raman P.

    2008-09-01

    Ceramic composite pellets consisting of uranium oxide, UO 2, contained within a silicon carbide matrix, were fabricated using a novel processing technique based on polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP). In this process, particles of depleted uranium oxide, in the form of U 3O 8, were dispersed in liquid allylhydridopolycarbosilane (AHPCS), and subjected to pyrolysis up to 900 °C under a continuous flow of ultra high purity argon. The pyrolysis of AHPCS, at these temperatures, produced near-stoichiometric amorphous silicon carbide ( a-SiC). Multiple polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP) cycles were performed to minimize open porosity and densify the silicon carbide matrix. Analytical characterization was conducted to investigate chemical interaction between U 3O 8 and SiC. It was observed that U 3O 8 reacted with AHPCS during the very first pyrolysis cycle, and was converted to UO 2. As a result, final composition of the material consisted of UO 2 particles contained in an a-SiC matrix. The physical and mechanical properties were also quantified. It is shown that this processing scheme promotes uniform distribution of uranium fuel source along with a high ceramic yield of the parent matrix.

  19. NEPTUNIUM OXIDE PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, J; Watkins, R; Hensel, S

    2009-05-27

    The Savannah River Site's HB-Line Facility completed a campaign in which fifty nine cans of neptunium oxide were produced and shipped to the Idaho National Laboratory in the 9975 shipping container. The neptunium campaign was divided into two parts: Part 1 which consisted of oxide made from H-Canyon neptunium solution which did not require any processing prior to conversion into an oxide, and Part 2 which consisted of oxide made from additional H-Canyon neptunium solutions which required processing to purify the solution prior to conversion into an oxide. The neptunium was received as a nitrate solution and converted to oxide through ion-exchange column extraction, precipitation, and calcination. Numerous processing challenges were encountered in order make a final neptunium oxide product that could be shipped in a 9975 shipping container. Among the challenges overcome was the issue of scale: translating lab scale production into full facility production. The balance between processing efficiency and product quality assurance was addressed during this campaign. Lessons learned from these challenges are applicable to other processing projects.

  20. Gold coated ferric oxide nanoparticles based disposable magnetic genosensors for the detection of DNA hybridization processes.

    PubMed

    Loaiza, Óscar A; Jubete, Elena; Ochoteco, Estibalitz; Cabañero, German; Grande, Hans; Rodríguez, Javier

    2011-01-15

    In this article, a disposable magnetic DNA sensor using an enzymatic amplification strategy for the detection of specific hybridization processes, based on the coupling of streptavidin-peroxidase to biotinylated target sequences, has been developed. A thiolated 19-mer capture probe was attached to gold coated ferric oxide nanoparticles and hybridization with the biotinylated target was allowed to proceed. Then, a streptavidin-peroxide was attached to the biotinylated target and the resulting modified gold coated ferric oxide nanoparticles were captured by a magnetic field on the surface of a home-made carbon screen printed electrode (SPE). Using hydroquinone as a mediator, a square wave voltammetric procedure was chosen to detect the hybridization process after the addition of hydrogen peroxide. Different aspects concerning the assay protocol and nanoparticles fabrication were optimized in order to improve the sensitivity of the developed methodology. A low detection limit (31 pM) with good stability (RSD=7.04%, n=10) was obtained without the need of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. PMID:20951565

  1. An analytical method for 14C in environmental water based on a wet-oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan-Jun; Guo, Gui-Yin; Wu, Lian-Sheng; Zhang, Bing; Chen, Chao-Feng; Zhang, Hai-Ying; Qin, Hong-Juan; Shang-Guan, Zhi-Hong

    2015-04-01

    An analytical method for (14)C in environmental water based on a wet-oxidation process was developed. The method can be used to determine the activity concentrations of organic and inorganic (14)C in environmental water, or total (14)C, including in drinking water, surface water, rainwater and seawater. The wet-oxidation of the organic component allows the conversion of organic carbon to an inorganic form, and the extraction of the inorganic (14)C can be achieved by acidification and nitrogen purging. Environmental water with a volume of 20 L can be used for the wet-oxidation and extraction, and a detection limit of about 0.02 Bq/g(C) can be achieved for water with carbon content above 15 mg(C)/L, obviously lower than the natural level of (14)C in the environment. The collected carbon is sufficient for measurement with a low level liquid scintillation counter (LSC) for typical samples. Extraction or recovery experiments for inorganic carbon and organic carbon from typical materials, including analytical reagents of organic benzoquinone, sucrose, glutamic acid, nicotinic acid, humic acid, ethane diol, et cetera., were conducted with excellent results based on measurement on a total organic carbon analyzer and LSC. The recovery rate for inorganic carbon ranged tween 98.7%-99.0% with a mean of 98.9(± 0.1)%, for organic carbon recovery ranged between 93.8% and 100.0% with a mean of 97.1(± 2.6)%. Verification and an uncertainty budget of the method are also presented for a representative environmental water. The method is appropriate for (14)C analysis in environmental water, and can be applied also to the analysis of liquid effluent from nuclear facilities. PMID:25590997

  2. Oxidation resistant high temperature thermal cycling resistant coatings on silicon-based substrates and process for the production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sarin, V.K.

    1990-08-21

    An oxidation resistant, high temperature thermal cycling resistant coated ceramic article for ceramic heat engine applications is disclosed. The substrate is a silicon-based material, i.e. a silicon nitride- or silicon carbide-based monolithic or composite material. The coating is a graded coating of at least two layers: an intermediate AlN or Al[sub x]N[sub y]O[sub z] layer and an aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. The composition of the coating changes gradually from that of the substrate to that of the AlN or Al[sub x]N[sub y]O[sub z] layer and further to the composition of the aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. Other layers may be deposited over the aluminum oxide layer. A CVD process for depositing the graded coating on the substrate is also disclosed.

  3. Oxidation resistant high temperature thermal cycling resistant coatings on silicon-based substrates and process for the production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sarin, Vinod K.

    1990-01-01

    An oxidation resistant, high temperature thermal cycling resistant coated ceramic article for ceramic heat engine applications. The substrate is a silicon-based material, i.e. a silicon nitride- or silicon carbide-based monolithic or composite material. The coating is a graded coating of at least two layers: an intermediate AlN or Al.sub.x N.sub.y O.sub.z layer and an aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. The composition of the coating changes gradually from that of the substrate to that of the AlN or Al.sub.x N.sub.y O.sub.z layer and further to the composition of the aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. Other layers may be deposited over the aluminum oxide layer. A CVD process for depositing the graded coating on the substrate is also disclosed.

  4. Perovskite Solar Cells Based on Low-Temperature Processed Indium Oxide Electron Selective Layers.

    PubMed

    Qin, Minchao; Ma, Junjie; Ke, Weijun; Qin, Pingli; Lei, Hongwei; Tao, Hong; Zheng, Xiaolu; Xiong, Liangbin; Liu, Qin; Chen, Zhiliang; Lu, Junzheng; Yang, Guang; Fang, Guojia

    2016-04-01

    Indium oxide (In2O3) as a promising n-type semiconductor material has been widely employed in optoelectronic applications. In this work, we applied low-temperature solution-processed In2O3 nanocrystalline film as an electron selective layer (ESL) in perovskite solar cells (PSCs) for the first time. By taking advantages of good optical and electrical properties of In2O3 such as high mobility, wide band gap, and high transmittance, we obtained In2O3-based PSCs with a good efficiency exceeding 13% after optimizing the concentration of the precursor solution and the annealing temperature. Furthermore, to enhance the performance of the In2O3-based PSCs, a phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) layer was introduced to modify the surface of the In2O3 film. The PCBM film could fill up the pinholes or cracks along In2O3 grain boundaries to passivate the defects and make the ESL extremely compact and uniform, which is conducive to suppressing the charge recombination. As a result, the efficiency of the In2O3-based PSC was improved to 14.83% accompanied with VOC, JSC, and FF being 1.08 V, 20.06 mA cm(-2), and 0.685, respectively. PMID:26996215

  5. Simulation of the reduction process of solid oxide fuel cell composite anode based on phase field method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Zhenjun; Shikazono, Naoki

    2016-02-01

    It is known that the reduction process influences the initial performances and durability of nickel-yttria-stabilized zirconia composite anode of the solid oxide fuel cell. In the present study, the reduction process of nickel-yttria stabilized zirconia composite anode is simulated based on the phase field method. An three-dimensional reconstructed microstructure of nickel oxide-yttria stabilized zirconia composite obtained by focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy is used as the initial microstructure for the simulation. Both reduction of nickel oxide and nickel sintering mechanisms are considered in the model. The reduction rates of nickel oxide at different interfaces are defined based on the literature data. Simulation results are qualitatively compared to the experimental anode microstructures with different reduction temperatures.

  6. ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Colin P. Horwitz; Dr. Terrence J. Collins

    2003-11-04

    The removal of recalcitrant sulfur species, dibenzothiophene and its derivatives, from automotive fuels is an integral component in the development of cleaner burning and more efficient automobile engines. Oxidative desulfurization (ODS) wherein the dibenzothiophene derivative is converted to its corresponding sulfoxide and sulfone is an attractive approach to sulfur removal because the oxidized species are easily extracted or precipitated and filtered from the hydrocarbon phase. Fe-TAML{reg_sign} activators of hydrogen peroxide (TAML is Tetra-Amido-Macrocyclic-Ligand) catalytically convert dibenzothiophene and its derivatives rapidly and effectively at moderate temperatures (50-60 C) and ambient pressure to the corresponding sulfoxides and sulfones. The oxidation process can be performed in both aqueous systems containing alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, or t-butanol, and in a two-phase hydrocarbon/aqueous system containing tert-butanol or acetonitrile. In the biphasic system, essentially complete conversion of the DBT to its oxidized products can be achieved using slightly longer reaction times than in homogeneous solution. Among the key features of the technology are the mild reaction conditions, the very high selectivity where no over oxidation of the sulfur compounds occurs, the near stoichiometric use of hydrogen peroxide, the apparent lack of degradation of sensitive fuel components, and the ease of separation of oxidized products.

  7. Post-treatment of reclaimed waste water based on an electrochemical advanced oxidation process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verostko, Charles E.; Murphy, Oliver J.; Hitchens, G. D.; Salinas, Carlos E.; Rogers, Tom D.

    1992-01-01

    The purification of reclaimed water is essential to water reclamation technology life-support systems in lunar/Mars habitats. An electrochemical UV reactor is being developed which generates oxidants, operates at low temperatures, and requires no chemical expendables. The reactor is the basis for an advanced oxidation process in which electrochemically generated ozone and hydrogen peroxide are used in combination with ultraviolet light irradiation to produce hydroxyl radicals. Results from this process are presented which demonstrate concept feasibility for removal of organic impurities and disinfection of water for potable and hygiene reuse. Power, size requirements, Faradaic efficiency, and process reaction kinetics are discussed. At the completion of this development effort the reactor system will be installed in JSC's regenerative water recovery test facility for evaluation to compare this technique with other candidate processes.

  8. Hole mobility modulation of solution-processed nickel oxide thin-film transistor based on high-k dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ao; Liu, Guoxia; Zhu, Huihui; Shin, Byoungchul; Fortunato, Elvira; Martins, Rodrigo; Shan, Fukai

    2016-06-01

    Solution-processed p-type oxide semiconductors have recently attracted increasing interests for the applications in low-cost optoelectronic devices and low-power consumption complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor circuits. In this work, p-type nickel oxide (NiOx) thin films were prepared using low-temperature solution process and integrated as the channel layer in thin-film transistors (TFTs). The electrical properties of NiOx TFTs, together with the characteristics of NiOx thin films, were systematically investigated as a function of annealing temperature. By introducing aqueous high-k aluminum oxide (Al2O3) gate dielectric, the electrical performance of NiOx TFT was improved significantly compared with those based on SiO2 dielectric. Particularly, the hole mobility was found to be 60 times enhancement, quantitatively from 0.07 to 4.4 cm2/V s, which is mainly beneficial from the high areal capacitance of the Al2O3 dielectric and high-quality NiOx/Al2O3 interface. This simple solution-based method for producing p-type oxide TFTs is promising for next-generation oxide-based electronic applications.

  9. Kinetics and mechanisms of cylindrospermopsin destruction by sulfate radical-based advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    He, Xuexiang; de la Cruz, Armah A; O'Shea, Kevin E; Dionysiou, Dionysios D

    2014-10-15

    Cylindrospermopsin (CYN) is a potent cyanobacterial toxin frequently found in water bodies worldwide raising concerns over the safety of drinking and recreational waters. A number of technologies have been investigated to remove and/or degrade cyanotoxins with advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) being among the most promising and effective for water detoxification. In this study, the degradation of CYN by sulfate radical-based UV-254 nm-AOPs was evaluated. The UV/S2O8(2-) (UV/peroxydisulfate) was more efficient than UV/HSO5(-) (UV/peroxysulfate) and UV/H2O2 (UV/hydrogen peroxide) processes when natural water samples were used as reaction matrices. The observed UV fluence based pseudo-first-order rate constants followed the expected order of radical quantum yields. The presence of 200 μM natural organic matter (NOM) as carbon slightly inhibited the destruction of CYN; 1.24 mg L(-1)NO3(-) (nitrate) had no significant influence on the removal efficiency and 50 μg L(-1) Fe(2+) [iron (2+)] or Cu(2+) [copper (2+)] improved the performance of UV/S2O8(2-). The addition of tert-butyl alcohol (t-BuOH; hydroxyl radical scavenger) in the reaction yielded byproducts that indicated specific sites in CYN preferentially attacked by sulfate radicals (SRs). The predominant CYN degradation byproduct was P448 consistent with fragmentation of the C5C6 bond of the uracil ring. The subsequent formation of P420 and P392 through a stepwise loss of carbonyl group(s) further supported the fragmentation pathway at C5C6. The byproduct P432 was identified exclusively as mono-hydroxylation of CYN at tricyclic guanidine ring, whereas P414 was detected as dehydrogenation at the tricyclic ring. The elimination of sulfate group and the opening of tricyclic ring were also observed. The possible degradation pathways of CYN by SR-AOP were presented. PMID:25000199

  10. ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Colin P. Horwitz; Terrence J. Collins

    2003-10-22

    The design of new, high efficiency and cleaner burning engines is strongly coupled with the removal of recalcitrant sulfur species, dibenzothiophene and its derivatives, from fuels. Oxidative desulfurization (ODS) wherein these dibenzothiophene derivatives are oxidized to their corresponding sulfoxides and sulfones is an approach that has gained significant attention. Fe-TAML{reg_sign} activators of hydrogen peroxide (TAML is Tetra-Amido-Macrocyclic-Ligand) convert in a catalytic process dibenzothiophene and its derivatives to the corresponding sulfoxides and sulfones rapidly at moderate temperatures (60 C) and ambient pressure. The reaction can be performed in both an aqueous system containing an alcohol (methanol, ethanol, or t-butanol) to solubilize the DBT and in a two-phase hydrocarbon/aqueous system where the alcohol is present in both phases and facilitates the oxidation. Under a consistent set of conditions using the FeBF{sub 2} TAML activator, the degree of conversion was found to be t-butanol > methanol > ethanol. In the cases of methanol and ethanol, both the sulfoxide and sulfone were observed while for t-butanol only the sulfone was detected. In the two-phase system, the alcohol may function as an inverse phase transfer agent. The oxidation was carried out using two different TAML activators. In homogeneous solution, approximately 90% oxidation of the DBT could be achieved using the prototype TAML activator, FeB*, by sonicating the solution at near room temperature. In bi-phasic systems conversions as high as 50% were achieved using the FeB* TAML activator and hydrogen peroxide at 100 C. The sonication method yielded only {approx}6% conversion but this may have been due to mixing.

  11. Catalytic process for formaldehyde oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kielin, Erik J. (Inventor); Brown, Kenneth G. (Inventor); D'Ambrosia, Christine M. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Disclosed is a process for oxidizing formaldehyde to carbon dioxide and water without the addition of energy. A mixture of formaldehyde and an oxidizing agent (e.g., ambient air containing formaldehyde) is exposed to a catalyst which includes a noble metal dispersed on a metal oxide which possesses more than one oxidation state. Especially good results are obtained when the noble metal is platinum, and the metal oxide which possesses more than one oxidation state is tin oxide. A promoter (i.e., a small amount of an oxide of a transition series metal) may be used in association with the tin oxide to provide very beneficial results.

  12. Sono-bromination of aromatic compounds based on the ultrasonic advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Mitsue; Lévêque, Jean-Marc; Komatsu, Naoki; Kimura, Takahide

    2015-11-01

    A novel, mild "sono-halogenation" of various aromatic compounds with potassium halide was investigated under ultrasound in a biphasic carbon tetrachloride/water medium. The feasibility study was first undertaken with the potassium bromide and then extended to chloride and iodide analogues. This methodology could be considered as a new expansion of the ultrasonic advanced oxidation processes (UAOPs) into a synthetic aspect as the developed methodology is linked to the sonolytic disappearance of carbon tetrachloride. Advantages of the present method are not only that the manipulation of the bromination is simple and green, but also that the halogenating agents used are readily available, inexpensive, and easy-handling. PMID:26186842

  13. Processing and property evaluation of tungsten-based mixed oxides for photovoltaics and optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, Mirella

    Tungsten Oxide (WO3) films and low-dimensional structures have proven to be promising candidates in the fields of photonics and electronics. WO3 is a well-established n-type semiconductor characterized by unique electrochromic behavior, an ideal optical band gap that permits transparency over a wide spectral range, and high chemical integrity. The plethora of diverse properties endow WO3 to be highly effective in applications related to electrochromism, gas sensing, and deriving economical energy. Compared to the bulk films, a materials system involving WO3 and a related species (elements or metal oxides) offer the opportunity to tailor the electrochromic response, and an overall enhancement of the physio-chemical and optical properties. In the present case, WO3 and TiO2 composite films have been fabricated by reactive magnetron sputtering employing W/Ti alloy targets, and individual W and Ti targets for co-sputtering. Composite WO3-TiO2 films were fabricated with variable chemical composition and the effect of variable bulk chemistry on film structure, surface/interface chemistry and chemical valence state of the W and Ti cations was investigated in detail. The process-property relationships between composition and physical properties for the films deposited by using W/Ti alloy targets of variable Ti content are associated with decreases in the deposition rate of the WO3-TiO2 films due to the lower sputter yield of the strongly bonded TiO2 formed on the target surface. Additionally, for the co-sputtered films using variable tungsten power, the optical properties demonstrate unique optical modulation. The changes associated with the physical color of the films demonstrate the potential to tailor the optical behavior for the design and fabrication of multilayer photovoltaic and catalytic devices. The process-structure-property correlation derived in this work will provide a road-map to optimize and produce W-Ti-O thin films with desired properties for a given

  14. PROCESS OF OXIDIZING PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Coryell, C.D.

    1959-08-25

    The oxidation of plutonium to the plus six valence state is described. The oxidation is accomplished by treating the plutonium in aqueous solution with a solution above 0.01 molar in argentic ion, above 1.1 molar in nitric acid, and above 0.02 molar in argentous ion.

  15. An Environmentally Friendly Process Involving Refining and Membrane-Based Electrolysis for Magnesium Recovery from Partially Oxidized Scrap Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xiaofei; Pal, Uday B.; Powell, Adam C.

    2013-10-01

    Magnesium is recovered from partially oxidized scrap alloy by combining refining and solid oxide membrane (SOM) electrolysis. In this combined process, a molten salt eutectic flux (45 wt.% MgF2-55 wt.% CaF2) containing 10 wt.% MgO and 2 wt.% YF3 was used as the medium for magnesium recovery. During refining, magnesium and its oxide are dissolved from the scrap into the molten flux. Forming gas is bubbled through the flux and the dissolved magnesium is removed via the gas phase and condensed in a separate condenser at a lower temperature. The molten flux has a finite solubility for magnesium and acts as a selective medium for magnesium dissolution, but not aluminum or iron, and therefore the magnesium recovered has high purity. After refining, SOM electrolysis is performed in the same reactor to enable electrolysis of the dissolved magnesium oxide in the molten flux producing magnesium at the cathode and oxygen at the SOM anode. During SOM electrolysis, it is necessary to decrease the concentration of the dissolved magnesium in the flux to improve the faradaic current efficiency and prevent degradation of the SOM. Thus, for both refining and SOM electrolysis, it is very important to measure and control the magnesium solubility in the molten flux. High magnesium solubility facilitates refining whereas lower solubility benefits the SOM electrolysis process. Computational fluid dynamics modeling was employed to simulate the flow behavior of the flux stirred by the forming gas. Based on the modeling results, an optimized design of the stirring tubes and its placement in the flux are determined for efficiently removing the dissolved magnesium and also increasing the efficiency of the SOM electrolysis process.

  16. Advanced gas atomization production of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Ni-base superalloys through process and solidification control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, John Louis Lamb

    A novel gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) method was utilized to produce precursor Ni-Cr-Y-Ti powder with a surface oxide and an internal rare earth (RE)-containing intermetallic. Although Al is necessary for industrial superalloy production, the Ni-Cr base alloy system was selected as a simplified system more amenable to characterization. This was done in an effort to better study the effects of processing parameters. Consolidation and heat-treatment were performed to promote the exchange of oxygen from the surface oxide to the RE intermetallic to form nanometric oxide dispersoids. Alloy selection was aided by an internal oxidation and serial grinding experiment that found that Hf-containing alloys may form more stable dispersoids than Ti-containing alloys, but the Hf-containing system exhibited five different oxide phases and two different intermetallics compared to the two oxide phases and one intermetallic in the Ti-containing alloys. Since the simpler Ti-containing system was easier to characterize, and make observations on the effects of processing parameters, the Ti-containing system was used for experimental atomization trials. An internal oxidation model was used to predict the heat treatment times necessary for dispersoid formation as a function of powder size and temperature. A new high-pressure gas atomization (HPGA) nozzle was developed with the aim of promoting fine powder production at scales similar to that of the high gas-flow and melt-flow of industrial atomizers. The atomization nozzle was characterized using schlieren imaging and aspiration pressure testing to determine the optimum melt delivery tip geometry and atomization pressure to promote enhanced secondary atomization mechanisms. Six atomization trials were performed to investigate the effects of gas atomization pressure and reactive-gas concentration on the particle size distribution (PSD). Also, the effect on the rapidly solidified microstructure (as a function of powder size

  17. Graphene-Based Hybrids with Manganese Oxide Polymorphs as Tailored Interfaces for Electrochemical Energy Storage: Synthesis, Processing, and Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S.; van Meveren, M. M.; Jasinski, J.

    2015-01-01

    Technological progress is determined to a greater extent by developments of novel materials or new combinations of known materials with different dimensionality and diverse functionality. In this work, we report on the synthesis and characterization of graphene-based hybrid nanomaterials coupled with transition-metal oxide polymorphs (nano/micro-manganese oxides, i.e., β-MnO2 [Mn(IV)] and Mn3O4 [Mn(II, III)]). This lays the groundwork for high-performance electrochemical electrodes for alternative energy devices owing to their higher specific capacitance, wide operational potential window and stability through charge-discharge cycling, environmentally benignity, cost-effectiveness, easy processing, and reproducibility on a larger scale. To accomplish this, we strategically designed these hybrids by direct anchoring or physical adsorption of β-MnO2 and Mn3O4 on variants of graphene, namely graphene oxide and its reduced form, via mixing dispersions of the constituents under mild ultrasonication and drop-casting, resulting in four different combinations. This facile approach affords strong chemical/physical attachment and is expected to result in coupling between the pseudocapacitive transition-metal oxides and supercapacitive nanocarbons showing enhanced activity/reactivity and reasonable areal density of tailored interfaces. We used a range of complementary analytical characterization tools to determine the structure and physical properties, such as scanning electron microscopy combined with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, x-ray diffraction, resonance Raman spectroscopy combined with elemental Raman mapping, and transmission electron microscopy in conjunction with selected-area electron diffraction. All of these techniques reveal surface morphology, local (lattice dynamical) and average structure, and local charge transfer due to the physically (or chemically) adsorbed manganese oxide of synthesized hybrids that helps to establish

  18. Microgravity Processing of Oxide Superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olive, James R.; Hofmeister, William H.; Bayuzick, Robert J.; Vlasse, Marcus

    1999-01-01

    Considerable effort has been concentrated on the synthesis and characterization of high T(sub c) oxide superconducting materials. The YBaCuO system has received the most intense study, as this material has shown promise for the application of both thin film and bulk materials. There are many problems with the application of bulk materials- weak links, poor connectivity, small coherence length, oxygen content and control, environmental reactivity, phase stability, incongruent melting behavior, grain boundary contamination, brittle mechanical behavior, and flux creep. The extent to which these problems are intrinsic or associated with processing is the subject of controversy. This study seeks to understand solidification processing of these materials, and to use this knowledge for alternative processing strategies, which, at the very least, will improve the understanding of bulk material properties and deficiencies. In general, the phase diagram studies of the YBaCuO system have concentrated on solid state reactions and on the Y2BaCuO(x) + liquid yields YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) peritectic reaction. Little information is available on the complete melting relations, undercooling, and solidification behavior of these materials. In addition, rare earth substitutions such as Nd and Gd affect the liquidus and phase relations. These materials have promising applications, but lack of information on the high temperature phase relations has hampered research. In general, the understanding of undercooling and solidification of high temperature oxide systems lags behind the science of these phenomena in metallic systems. Therefore, this research investigates the fundamental melting relations, undercooling, and solidification behavior of oxide superconductors with an emphasis on improving ground based synthesis of these materials.

  19. Fabrication of Oxidation-Resistant Metal Wire Network-Based Transparent Electrodes by a Spray-Roll Coating Process.

    PubMed

    Kiruthika, S; Gupta, Ritu; Anand, Aman; Kumar, Ankush; Kulkarni, G U

    2015-12-16

    Roll and spray coating methods have been employed for the fabrication of highly oxidation resistant transparent and conducting electrodes (TCEs) by a simple solution process using crackle lithography technique. We have spray-coated a crackle paint-based precursor to produce highly interconnected crackle network on PET roll mounted on a roll coater with web speed of 0.6 m/min. Ag TCE with a transmittance of 78% and sheet resistance of ∼20 Ω/□ was derived by spraying Ag precursor ink over the crackle template followed by lift-off and annealing under ambient conditions. The Ag wire mesh was stable toward bending and sonication tests but prone to oxidation in air. When electrolessly coated with Pd, its robustness toward harsh oxidation conditions was enhanced. A low-cost transparent electrode has also been realized by using only small amounts of Ag as seed layer and growing Cu wire mesh by electroless method. Thus, made Ag/Cu meshes are found to be highly stable for more than a year even under ambient atmosphere. PMID:26580415

  20. Solution processed lanthanum aluminate gate dielectrics for use in metal oxide-based thin film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Esro, M.; Adamopoulos, G.; Mazzocco, R.; Kolosov, O.; Krier, A.; Vourlias, G.; Milne, W. I.

    2015-05-18

    We report on ZnO-based thin-film transistors (TFTs) employing lanthanum aluminate gate dielectrics (La{sub x}Al{sub 1−x}O{sub y}) grown by spray pyrolysis in ambient atmosphere at 440 °C. The structural, electronic, optical, morphological, and electrical properties of the La{sub x}Al{sub 1−x}O{sub y} films and devices as a function of the lanthanum to aluminium atomic ratio were investigated using a wide range of characterization techniques such as UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, impedance spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and field-effect measurements. As-deposited LaAlO{sub y} dielectrics exhibit a wide band gap (∼6.18 eV), high dielectric constant (k ∼ 16), low roughness (∼1.9 nm), and very low leakage currents (<3 nA/cm{sup 2}). TFTs employing solution processed LaAlO{sub y} gate dielectrics and ZnO semiconducting channels exhibit excellent electron transport characteristics with hysteresis-free operation, low operation voltages (∼10 V), high on/off current modulation ratio of >10{sup 6}, subthreshold swing of ∼650 mV dec{sup −1}, and electron mobility of ∼12 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}.

  1. Solution processed lanthanum aluminate gate dielectrics for use in metal oxide-based thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esro, M.; Mazzocco, R.; Vourlias, G.; Kolosov, O.; Krier, A.; Milne, W. I.; Adamopoulos, G.

    2015-05-01

    We report on ZnO-based thin-film transistors (TFTs) employing lanthanum aluminate gate dielectrics (LaxAl1-xOy) grown by spray pyrolysis in ambient atmosphere at 440 °C. The structural, electronic, optical, morphological, and electrical properties of the LaxAl1-xOy films and devices as a function of the lanthanum to aluminium atomic ratio were investigated using a wide range of characterization techniques such as UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, impedance spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and field-effect measurements. As-deposited LaAlOy dielectrics exhibit a wide band gap (˜6.18 eV), high dielectric constant (k ˜ 16), low roughness (˜1.9 nm), and very low leakage currents (<3 nA/cm2). TFTs employing solution processed LaAlOy gate dielectrics and ZnO semiconducting channels exhibit excellent electron transport characteristics with hysteresis-free operation, low operation voltages (˜10 V), high on/off current modulation ratio of >106, subthreshold swing of ˜650 mV dec-1, and electron mobility of ˜12 cm2 V-1 s-1.

  2. Process for the deposition of high temperature stress and oxidation resistant coatings on silicon-based substrates

    DOEpatents

    Sarin, Vinod K.

    1991-01-01

    A process for depositing a high temperature stress and oxidation resistant coating on a silicon nitride- or silicon carbide-based substrate body. A gas mixture is passed over the substrate at about 900.degree.-1500.degree. C. and about 1 torr to about ambient pressure. The gas mixture includes one or more halide vapors with other suitable reactant gases. The partial pressure ratios, flow rates, and process times are sufficient to deposit a continuous, fully dense, adherent coating. The halide and other reactant gases are gradually varied during deposition so that the coating is a graded coating of at least two layers. Each layer is a graded layer changing in composition from the material over which it is deposited to the material of the layer and further to the material, if any, deposited thereon, so that no clearly defined compositional interfaces exist. The gases and their partial pressures are varied according to a predetermined time schedule and the halide and other reactant gases are selected so that the layers include (a) an adherent, continuous intermediate layer about 0.5-20 microns thick of an aluminum nitride or an aluminum oxynitride material, over and chemically bonded to the substrate body, and (b) an adherent, continuous first outer layer about 0.5-900 microns thick including an oxide of aluminum or zirconium over and chemically bonded to the intermediate layer.

  3. Process for the deposition of high temperature stress and oxidation resistant coatings on silicon-based substrates

    DOEpatents

    Sarin, V.K.

    1991-07-30

    A process is disclosed for depositing a high temperature stress and oxidation resistant coating on a silicon nitride- or silicon carbide-based substrate body. A gas mixture is passed over the substrate at about 900--1500 C and about 1 torr to about ambient pressure. The gas mixture includes one or more halide vapors with other suitable reactant gases. The partial pressure ratios, flow rates, and process times are sufficient to deposit a continuous, fully dense, adherent coating. The halide and other reactant gases are gradually varied during deposition so that the coating is a graded coating of at least two layers. Each layer is a graded layer changing in composition from the material over which it is deposited to the material of the layer and further to the material, if any, deposited thereon, so that no clearly defined compositional interfaces exist. The gases and their partial pressures are varied according to a predetermined time schedule and the halide and other reactant gases are selected so that the layers include (a) an adherent, continuous intermediate layer about 0.5-20 microns thick of an aluminum nitride or an aluminum oxynitride material, over and chemically bonded to the substrate body, and (b) an adherent, continuous first outer layer about 0.5-900 microns thick including an oxide of aluminum or zirconium over and chemically bonded to the intermediate layer.

  4. Catalytic processes during preferential oxidation of CO in H 2-rich streams over catalysts based on copper-ceria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamarra, D.; Hornés, A.; Koppány, Zs.; Schay, Z.; Munuera, G.; Soria, J.; Martínez-Arias, A.

    Nanostructured catalysts based on combinations between oxidised copper and cerium entities prepared by two different methods (impregnation of ceria and coprecipitation of the two components within reverse microemulsions) have been examined with respect to their catalytic performance for preferential oxidation of CO in a H 2-rich stream (CO-PROX). Correlations between their catalytic and redox properties are established on the basis of parallel analyses of temperature programmed reduction results employing both H 2 and CO as reactants as well as by XPS. Although general catalytic trends can be directly correlated with the redox properties observed upon separate interactions with each of the two reductants (CO and H 2), the existence of interferences between both reductants must be considered to complete details for such activity/redox correlation. Differences in the nature of the active oxidised copper-cerium contacts present in each case determine the catalytic properties of these systems for the CO-PROX process.

  5. Catalytic oxidative dehydrogenation process

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Lanny D.; Huff, Marylin

    2002-01-01

    A process for the production of a mono-olefin from a gaseous paraffinic hydrocarbon having at least two carbon atoms or mixtures thereof comprising reacting said hydrocarbons and molecular oxygen in the presence of a platinum catalyst. The catalyst consist essentially of platinum supported on alumina or zirconia monolith, preferably zirconia and more preferably in the absence of palladium, rhodium and gold.

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF SULFATE RADICAL-BASED CHEMICAL OXIDATION PROCESSES FOR TREATMENT OF PCBS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study investigates transition metal based activation of peroxymonosulfate for generation of highly reactive sulfate radicals to degrade Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) in contaminated aqueous and sediment systems. Environmental friendly transition metal iron (Fe (II), Fe (I...

  7. UV-based advanced oxidation processes for the treatment of odour compounds: efficiency and by-product formation.

    PubMed

    Zoschke, Kristin; Dietrich, Norman; Börnick, Hilmar; Worch, Eckhard

    2012-10-15

    The occurrence of the taste and odour compounds geosmin and 2-methyl isoborneol (2-MIB) affects the organoleptic quality of raw waters from drinking water reservoirs worldwide. UV-based oxidation processes for the removal of these substances are an alternative to adsorption and biological processes, since they additionally provide disinfection of the raw water. We could show that the concentration of geosmin and 2-MIB could be reduced by VUV irradiation and the combination of UV irradiation with ozone and hydrogen peroxide in pure water and water from a drinking water reservoir. The figure of merit EE/O is an appropriate tool to compare the AOPs and showed that VUV and UV/O(3) yielded the lowest treatment costs for the odour compounds in pure and raw water, respectively. Additionally, VUV irradiation with addition of ozone, generated by the VUV lamp, was evaluated. The generation of ozone and the irradiation were performed in a single reactor system using the same low-pressure mercury lamp, thereby reducing the energy consumption of the treatment process. The formation of the undesired by-products nitrite and bromate was investigated. The combination of VUV irradiation with ozone produced by a VUV lamp avoided the formation of relevant concentrations of the by-products. The internal generation of ozone is capable to produce ozone concentrations sufficient to reduce EE/O below 1 kWh m(-3) and without the risk of the formation of nitrite or bromate above the maximum contaminant level. PMID:22858230

  8. Nanoscaled tin dioxide films processed from organotin-based hybrid materials: an organometallic route toward metal oxide gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Renard, Laetitia; Babot, Odile; Saadaoui, Hassan; Fuess, Hartmut; Brötz, Joachim; Gurlo, Aleksander; Arveux, Emmanuel; Klein, Andreas; Toupance, Thierry

    2012-11-01

    Nanocrystalline tin dioxide (SnO(2)) ultra-thin films were obtained employing a straightforward solution-based route that involves the calcination of bridged polystannoxane films processed by the sol-gel process from bis(triprop-1-ynylstannyl)alkylene and -arylene precursors. These films have been thoroughly characterized by FTIR, contact angle measurements, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force (AFM) and scanning electron (SEM) microscopies. Annealing at a high temperature gave 30-35 nm thick cassiterite SnO(2) films with a mean crystallite size ranging from 4 to 7 nm depending on the nature of the organic linker in the distannylated compound used as a precursor. In the presence of H(2) and CO gases, these layers led to highly sensitive, reversible and reproducible responses. The sensing properties were discussed in regard to the crystallinity and porosity of the sensing body that can be tuned by the nature of the precursor employed. Organometallic chemistry combined with the sol-gel process therefore offers new possibilities toward metal oxide nanostructures for the reproducible and sensitive detection of combustible and toxic gases. PMID:23011110

  9. Easily processable multimodal spectral converters based on metal oxide/organic—inorganic hybrid nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julián-López, Beatriz; Gonell, Francisco; Lima, Patricia P.; Freitas, Vânia T.; André, Paulo S.; Carlos, Luis D.; Ferreira, Rute A. S.

    2015-10-01

    This manuscript reports the synthesis and characterization of the first organic-inorganic hybrid material exhibiting efficient multimodal spectral converting properties. The nanocomposite, made of Er3+, Yb3+ codoped zirconia nanoparticles (NPs) entrapped in a di-ureasil d-U(600) hybrid matrix, is prepared by an easy two-step sol-gel synthesis leading to homogeneous and transparent materials that can be very easily processed as monolith or film. Extensive structural characterization reveals that zirconia nanocrystals of 10-20 nm in size are efficiently dispersed into the hybrid matrix and that the local structure of the di-ureasil is not affected by the presence of the NPs. A significant enhancement in the refractive index of the di-ureasil matrix with the incorporation of the ZrO2 nanocrystals is observed. The optical study demonstrates that luminescent properties of both constituents are perfectly preserved in the final hybrid. Thus, the material displays a white-light photoluminescence from the di-ureasil component upon excitation at UV/visible radiation and also intense green and red emissions from the Er3+- and Yb3+-doped NPs after NIR excitation. The dynamics of the optical processes were also studied as a function of the lanthanide content and the thickness of the films. Our results indicate that these luminescent hybrids represent a low-cost, environmentally friendly, size-controlled, easily processed and chemically stable alternative material to be used in light harvesting devices such as luminescent solar concentrators, optical fibres and sensors. Furthermore, this synthetic approach can be extended to a wide variety of luminescent NPs entrapped in hybrid matrices, thus leading to multifunctional and versatile materials for efficient tuneable nonlinear optical nanodevices.

  10. Easily processable multimodal spectral converters based on metal oxide/organic-inorganic hybrid nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Julián-López, Beatriz; Gonell, Francisco; Lima, Patricia P; Freitas, Vânia T; André, Paulo S; Carlos, Luis D; Ferreira, Rute A S

    2015-10-01

    This manuscript reports the synthesis and characterization of the first organic-inorganic hybrid material exhibiting efficient multimodal spectral converting properties. The nanocomposite, made of Er(3+), Yb(3+) codoped zirconia nanoparticles (NPs) entrapped in a di-ureasil d-U(600) hybrid matrix, is prepared by an easy two-step sol-gel synthesis leading to homogeneous and transparent materials that can be very easily processed as monolith or film. Extensive structural characterization reveals that zirconia nanocrystals of 10-20 nm in size are efficiently dispersed into the hybrid matrix and that the local structure of the di-ureasil is not affected by the presence of the NPs. A significant enhancement in the refractive index of the di-ureasil matrix with the incorporation of the ZrO2 nanocrystals is observed. The optical study demonstrates that luminescent properties of both constituents are perfectly preserved in the final hybrid. Thus, the material displays a white-light photoluminescence from the di-ureasil component upon excitation at UV/visible radiation and also intense green and red emissions from the Er(3+)- and Yb(3+)-doped NPs after NIR excitation. The dynamics of the optical processes were also studied as a function of the lanthanide content and the thickness of the films. Our results indicate that these luminescent hybrids represent a low-cost, environmentally friendly, size-controlled, easily processed and chemically stable alternative material to be used in light harvesting devices such as luminescent solar concentrators, optical fibres and sensors. Furthermore, this synthetic approach can be extended to a wide variety of luminescent NPs entrapped in hybrid matrices, thus leading to multifunctional and versatile materials for efficient tuneable nonlinear optical nanodevices. PMID:26374133

  11. A novel clean and effective syngas production system based on partial oxidation of methane assisted solid oxide co-electrolysis process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yao; Liu, Tong; Fang, Shumin; Xiao, Guoliang; Wang, Huanting; Chen, Fanglin

    2015-03-01

    Development of the syngas production from solid oxide H2O/CO2 co-electrolysis is limited by the intensive energy input and low efficiency. Here, we present a new concept to efficiently generate syngas in both sides of the solid oxide electrolyzer by synergistically combining co-electrolysis with partial oxidation of methane (POM). Thermodynamic calculation and electrochemical measurements for the POM assisted solid oxide co-electrolysis processes on the SFM-SDC/LSGM/SFM-SDC cells exhibited an reduced electric input, increased energy conversion efficiency and decreased cathodic co-electrolysis polarization resistance in comparison with the conventional co-electrolysis. This method will be crucial to establish a clean and effective energy conversion system to meet global sustainable energy needs.

  12. Joint Recovery of f-Elements Using Solvent Based on Carbamoyl-phosphine Oxides Heading Toward ORGA-Process

    SciTech Connect

    Ozawa, M.; Babain, V.; Shadrin, A.; Strelkov, S.; Kiseleva, R.; Murzin, A.

    2007-07-01

    Development of the recovery system which allows realizing joint recovery of all the actinides from the HLW is one of the relevant questions in radiochemistry. Carbamoyl-phosphine oxides (CMPO) were proposed and studied as extractant for rare-earth and transplutonium elements (RE and TPE) recovery from HLW with high acidity, for example TRUEX- and SETFICS-process. Organic system CMPO with TBP in kerosene is usually used as a solvent. However, low solubility of actinide adducts with CMPO results in third phase formation when the actinides concentration in organic phase is high. Application of fluorinated polar diluents increases the solubility of CMPO adducts with actinides in organic phase. It was shown that solvent based on carbamoyl-phosphonate in fluorinated polar diluents allows to recover both uranium and minor actinides concurrently, and there was no precipitation or third phase formation even at high uranium concentration in organic phase. The f-elements joint recovery process based on this solvent was proposed. Solvent containing octyl-phenyl-N,N-di-isobutyl-carbamoyl-methylene-phosphine oxide (O{phi}D[iB]CMPO) in polar diluent meta-nitro-benzo-trifluoride (fluoro-pole-732) was screened out for these studies. And, combined use of them with TBP modifier allows to provide uranium and europium (americium) high recovery characteristics concurrently with an opportunity of attainment of f-elements high concentration in organic phase. As it was indicated, precipitates or third phase was absent even when uranium content in organic phase was 100 g/l. Recovery efficiency to europium remained sufficiently high for its effective recovery. Organic phase saturation about 100% from theoretical attains in europium recovery with this system. Increasing of (O{phi}D[iB]CMPO) concentration in recovery system from 0.2 to 0.8 M results in europium content increasing in organic phase, but no third phase formation is observed. The highest possible europium content in organic phase

  13. Tunable Ultraviolet Photoresponse in Solution-Processed p-n Junction Photodiodes Based on Transition-Metal Oxides.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ting; Liu, Guannan; Wen, Baomei; Ha, Jong Y; Nguyen, Nhan V; Motayed, Abhishek; Debnath, Ratan

    2015-05-13

    Solution-processed p-n heterojunction photodiodes have been fabricated based on transition-metal oxides in which NiO and ternary Zn(1-x)Mg(x)O (x = 0-0.1) have been employed as p-type and n-type semiconductors, respectively. Composition-related structural, electrical, and optical properties are also investigated for all the films. It has been observed that the bandgap of Zn(1-x)Mg(x)O films can be tuned between 3.24 and 3.49 eV by increasing Mg content. The fabricated highly visible-blind p-n junction photodiodes show an excellent rectification ratio along with good photoresponse and quantum efficiency under ultraviolet (UV) illumination. With an applied reverse bias of 1 V and depending on the value of x, the maximum responsivity of the devices varies between 0.22 and 0.4 A/W and the detectivity varies between 0.17 × 10(12) and 2.2 × 10(12) cm (Hz)(1/2)/W. The photodetectors show an excellent UV-to-visible rejection ratio. Compositional nonuniformity has been observed locally in the alloyed films with x = 0.1, which is manifested in photoresponse and X-ray analysis data. This paper demonstrates simple solution-processed, low cost, band tunable photodiodes with excellent figures of merit operated under low bias. PMID:25898025

  14. Stabilized tin-oxide-based oxidation/reduction catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Davis, Patricia P. (Inventor); Leighty, Bradley D. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Schryer, Jacqueline L. (Inventor); Oglesby, Donald M. (Inventor); Gulati, Suresh T. (Inventor); Summers, Jerry C. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The invention described herein involves a novel approach to the production of oxidation/reduction catalytic systems. The present invention serves to stabilize the tin oxide reducible metal-oxide coating by co-incorporating at least another metal-oxide species, such as zirconium. In one embodiment, a third metal-oxide species is incorporated, selected from the group consisting of cerium, lanthanum, hafnium, and ruthenium. The incorporation of the additional metal oxide components serves to stabilize the active tin-oxide layer in the catalytic process during high-temperature operation in a reducing environment (e.g., automobile exhaust). Moreover, the additional metal oxides are active components due to their oxygen-retention capabilities. Together, these features provide a mechanism to extend the range of operation of the tin-oxide-based catalyst system for automotive applications, while maintaining the existing advantages.

  15. Valorization of GaN based metal-organic chemical vapor deposition dust a semiconductor power device industry waste through mechanochemical oxidation and leaching: A sustainable green process.

    PubMed

    Swain, Basudev; Mishra, Chinmayee; Lee, Chan Gi; Park, Kyung-Soo; Lee, Kun-Jae

    2015-07-01

    Dust generated during metal organic vapor deposition (MOCVD) process of GaN based semiconductor power device industry contains significant amounts of gallium and indium. These semiconductor power device industry wastes contain gallium as GaN and Ga0.97N0.9O0.09 is a concern for the environment which can add value through recycling. In the present study, this waste is recycled through mechanochemical oxidation and leaching. For quantitative recovery of gallium, two different mechanochemical oxidation leaching process flow sheets are proposed. In one process, first the Ga0.97N0.9O0.09 of the MOCVD dust is leached at the optimum condition. Subsequently, the leach residue is mechanochemically treated, followed by oxidative annealing and finally re-leached. In the second process, the MOCVD waste dust is mechanochemically treated, followed by oxidative annealing and finally leached. Both of these treatment processes are competitive with each other, appropriate for gallium leaching and treatment of the waste MOCVD dust. Without mechanochemical oxidation, 40.11 and 1.86 w/w% of gallium and Indium are leached using 4M HCl, 100°C and pulp density of 100 kg/m(3,) respectively. After mechanochemical oxidation, both these processes achieved 90 w/w% of gallium and 1.86 w/w% of indium leaching at their optimum condition. PMID:26094059

  16. A Three-Stage Inverter-Based Stacked Power Amplifier in 65 nm Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiumarsi, Hamid; Mizuochi, Yutaka; Ito, Hiroyuki; Ishihara, Noboru; Masu, Kazuya

    2012-02-01

    A three-stage inverter-based stacked power amplifier (PA) in complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process is proposed to overcome low breakdown voltage problem of scaled CMOS technologies. Unlike previous reported stacked PAs which radio frequency choke (RFC) was inevitable, we proposed stacked nMOS and pMOS transistors which effectively eliminates use of RFC. By properly setting self-biased circuits' and transistors' parameters, output impedance could reach up to 50 Ω which together with not employing the RFC makes this topology very appealing for the scalable PA realization. As a proof of concept, a three-stage PA using 65 nm CMOS technology is implemented. With a 6 V power supply for the third stage, the fabricated PA shows a small-signal gain of 36 dB, a saturated output power of 16 dBm and a maximum power added efficiency of 10% at 1 GHz. Using a 7.5 V of power supply, saturated output power reaches 18 dBm. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported inverter-based stacked PA.

  17. Efficient indium-tin-oxide free inverted organic solar cells based on aluminum-doped zinc oxide cathode and low-temperature aqueous solution processed zinc oxide electron extraction layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dazheng; Zhang, Chunfu; Wang, Zhizhe; Zhang, Jincheng; Tang, Shi; Wei, Wei; Sun, Li; Hao, Yue

    2014-06-01

    Indium-tin-oxide (ITO) free inverted organic solar cells (IOSCs) based on aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) cathode, low-temperature aqueous solution processed zinc oxide (ZnO) electron extraction layer, and poly(3-hexylthiophene-2, 5-diyl):[6, 6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester blend were realized in this work. The resulted IOSC with ZnO annealed at 150 °C shows the superior power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.01%, if decreasing the ZnO annealing temperature to 100 °C, the obtained IOSC also shows a PCE of 2.76%, and no light soaking issue is observed. It is found that this ZnO film not only acts as an effective buffer layer but also slightly improves the optical transmittance of AZO substrates. Further, despite the relatively inferior air-stability, these un-encapsulated AZO/ZnO IOSCs show comparable PCEs to the referenced ITO/ZnO IOSCs, which demonstrates that the AZO cathode is a potential alternative to ITO in IOSCs. Meanwhile, this simple ZnO process is compatible with large area deposition and plastic substrates, and is promising to be widely used in IOSCs and other relative fields.

  18. Efficient indium-tin-oxide free inverted organic solar cells based on aluminum-doped zinc oxide cathode and low-temperature aqueous solution processed zinc oxide electron extraction layer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Dazheng; Zhang, Chunfu Wang, Zhizhe; Zhang, Jincheng; Tang, Shi; Wei, Wei; Sun, Li; Hao, Yue

    2014-06-16

    Indium-tin-oxide (ITO) free inverted organic solar cells (IOSCs) based on aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) cathode, low-temperature aqueous solution processed zinc oxide (ZnO) electron extraction layer, and poly(3-hexylthiophene-2, 5-diyl):[6, 6]-phenyl C{sub 61} butyric acid methyl ester blend were realized in this work. The resulted IOSC with ZnO annealed at 150 °C shows the superior power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.01%, if decreasing the ZnO annealing temperature to 100 °C, the obtained IOSC also shows a PCE of 2.76%, and no light soaking issue is observed. It is found that this ZnO film not only acts as an effective buffer layer but also slightly improves the optical transmittance of AZO substrates. Further, despite the relatively inferior air-stability, these un-encapsulated AZO/ZnO IOSCs show comparable PCEs to the referenced ITO/ZnO IOSCs, which demonstrates that the AZO cathode is a potential alternative to ITO in IOSCs. Meanwhile, this simple ZnO process is compatible with large area deposition and plastic substrates, and is promising to be widely used in IOSCs and other relative fields.

  19. Erythromycin oxidation and ERY-resistant Escherichia coli inactivation in urban wastewater by sulfate radical-based oxidation process under UV-C irradiation.

    PubMed

    Michael-Kordatou, I; Iacovou, M; Frontistis, Z; Hapeshi, E; Dionysiou, D D; Fatta-Kassinos, D

    2015-11-15

    This study evaluates the feasibility of UV-C-driven advanced oxidation process induced by sulfate radicals SO4(.)- in degrading erythromycin (ERY) in secondary treated wastewater. The results revealed that 10 mg L(-1) of sodium persulfate (SPS) can result in rapid and complete antibiotic degradation within 90 min of irradiation, while ERY decay exhibited a pseudo-first-order kinetics pattern under the different experimental conditions applied. ERY degradation rate was strongly affected by the chemical composition of the aqueous matrix and it decreased in the order of: ultrapure water (kapp = 0.55 min(-1)) > bottled water (kapp = 0.26 min(-1)) > humic acid solution (kapp = 0.05 min(-1)) > wastewater effluents (kapp = 0.03 min(-1)). Inherent pH conditions (i.e. pH 8) yielded an increased ERY degradation rate, compared to that observed at pH 3 and 5. The contribution of hydroxyl and sulfate radicals (HO. and SO4(.)-) on ERY degradation was found to be ca. 37% and 63%, respectively. Seven transformation products (TPs) were tentatively elucidated during ERY oxidation, with the 14-membered lactone ring of the ERY molecule being intact in all cases. The observed phytotoxicity against the tested plant species can potentially be attributed to the dissolved effluent organic matter (dEfOM) present in wastewater effluents and its associated-oxidation products and not to the TPs generated from the oxidation of ERY. This study evidences the potential use of the UV-C/SPS process in producing a final treated effluent with lower phytotoxicity (<10%) compared to the untreated wastewater. Finally, under the optimum experimental conditions, the UV-C/SPS process resulted in total inactivation of ERY-resistant Escherichia coli within 90 min. PMID:26360228

  20. Control over variability in nonvolatile hafnium-oxide resistive-switching memory based on modeling of the switching processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butcher, Brian Jerad

    improve filament formation control and reduce variability. This method subsequently achieved low-power ReRAM switching, while maintaining a high on/off ratio. By drastically reducing time-to-FORMING, this hot FORMING method enabled filament-formation using low constant-voltage-biases, which was shown to increase resistance of the conductive filament, lower operational current, increase memory window and improve device-to-device uniformity. This novel hot-FORMING method underscored the importance of reducing the FORMING voltage (VF) as to create switchable, low-required-power, conductive-filaments (CFs). To enable further optimization of ReRAM performance from the standpoint of both device structural properties and operation conditions, a novel 3-dimensional physics-based simulation-model of the inherently stochastic and difficult-to-control ReRAM filament FORMING process was formulated using a statistical kinetic Monte-Carlo method. This simulation framework was constructed to elucidate the physical processes responsible for electrical (FORMING, RESET, and SET) characteristics by investigating the relationships between current, voltage, temperature, filament formation and variability. Specifically, this simulative investigation was carried out in terms of time-dependent-dielectric-breakdown: Hf-O bond-breakage i.e. defect generation, oxygen-ion diffusion, and vacancy-oxygen recombination. The simulation results well-reproduced the experimental trends observed for the conductivity of the post-FORMING low resistance state under different FORMING conditions. Simulation results also revealed that the distribution of the oxygen ions in the surrounding oxide during FORMING as well as local filament temperature and electrical field all affected the filament stability. This simulation model also provided, for the first time, a consistent explanation for all reported critical ReRAM features including the critical role of O-deficiency (sub-stoichiometry) needed for repeatable

  1. Process-based modeling of nitrous oxide emissions from wheat-cropped soils at the subregional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielle, B.; Laville, P.; Duval, O.; Nicoullaud, B.; Germon, J. C.; HéNault, C.

    2006-12-01

    Arable soils are a large source of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, making up half of the biogenic emissions worldwide. Estimating their source strength requires methods capable of capturing the spatial and temporal variability of N2O emissions, along with the effects of crop management. Here we applied a process-based model, Crop Environmental REsources Synthesis (CERES), with geo-referenced input data on soils, weather, and land use to map N2O emissions from wheat-cropped soils in three agriculturally intensive regions in France. Emissions were mostly controlled by soil type and local climate conditions, and only to a minor extent by the doses of fertilizer nitrogen applied. As a result, the direct emission factors calculated at the regional level were much smaller (ranging from 0.0007 to 0.0033 kg N2O-N kg-1 N) than the value of 0.0125 kg N2O-N kg-1 N currently recommended in the IPCC Tier 1 methodology. Regional emissions were far more sensitive to the soil microbial characteristics governing denitrification and its fraction evolved as N2O, soil bulk density, and soil initial inorganic N content. Mitigation measures should therefore target a reduction in the amount of soil inorganic N upon sowing of winter crops, and a decrease of the soil N2O production potential itself. From a general perspective, taking into account the spatial variability of soils and climate thereby appears necessary to improve the accuracy of national inventories, and to tailor mitigation strategies to regional characteristics.

  2. Microgravity Processing of Oxide Superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmeister, William H.; Bayuzick, Robert J.; Vlasse, Marcus; McCallum, William; Peters, Palmer (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The primary goal is to understand the microstructures which develop under the nonequilibrium solidification conditions achieved by melt processing in copper oxide superconductor systems. More specifically, to define the liquidus at the Y- 1:2:3 composition, the Nd-1:2:3 composition, and several intermediate partial substitution points between pure Y-1:2:3 and Nd-1:2:3. A secondary goal has been to understand resultant solidification morphologies and pathways under a variety of experimental conditions and to use this knowledge to better characterize solidification phenomena in these systems.

  3. Melatonin involvement in oxidative processes.

    PubMed

    Ianăş, O; Olinescu, R; Bădescu, I

    1991-01-01

    The fact that the pineal gland, by its melatonin (MT) production, responds to environmental light variations (the day-night cycle), being also a modulator of the body adaptation to these conditions, may lead to the assumption of its involvement in the body oxidative processes. The redox capacity of melatonin was followed-up in vitro by the chemiluminescence phenomenon. The system generating chemiluminescence as well as free radicals was made up of luminol and H2O2. Incubation of melatonin in doses of 0.08-0.5 microM/ml with the generating system showed that in doses under 0.25 microM/ml melatonin has a pro-oxidative effect while in doses above this value it has an antioxidative effect. The diagram of the results shows the answer specific to a modulator. The study of the correlation between the dose of melatonin with highest pro-oxidative properties and the various peroxide concentrations in the generating system showed that melatonin gets antioxidative properties with the increase in peroxide concentrations (less than 8 mM/ml). In the presence of a hypothalamic homogenate, which is a stimulant of the chemiluminescence-generating system (PXI = 16), melatonin has a dose-dependent antioxidative effect. Similar results were also obtained by adding tryptophan--a free radicals acceptor (PXI = 0.1) and the substrate in melatonin synthesis to the reaction medium. Melatonin in low concentrations (greater than 0.1 microM/ml) has an antioxidative effect while in higher doses it has a dose-dependent pro-oxidative effect.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1821072

  4. Processing of effluent salt from the direct oxide reduction process

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, B.; Olson, D.L. . Kroll Inst. for Extractive Metallurgy); Averill, W.A. )

    1992-01-01

    The production of reactive metals by Direct Oxide Reduction (DOR) process using calcium in a molten calcium salt system generates significant amount of contaminated waste as calcium oxide saturated calcium chloride salt mix with calcium oxide content of up to 15 wt. pct. Fused salt electrolysis of a simulated salt mix has been carried out to electrowin calcium, which can be recycled to the DOR reactor along with the calcium chloride salt or may be used in-situ in a combined DOR and electrowinning process. Many reactive metal oxides could thus be reduced in a one-step process without generating a significant amount of waste. The process has been optimized in terms of the calcium solubility, cell temperature, current density and the cell design to maximize the current efficiency. Based on the information available regarding the solubility of calcium in calcium chloride salt in the presence of calcium oxide, and the back reactions occurring in-situ between the electrowon calcium and other components present in the cell, e.g. carbon, oxygen, carbon dioxide and calcium oxide, it is difficult to recover elemental calcium within the system. However, a liquid cathode or a rising cathode has been used in the past to recover calcium. The solubility has also been found to depend on the use of graphite as the anode material as evidenced by the presence of calcium carbonate in the final salt. The rate of recovery for metallic calcium has to be enhanced to levels that overcome the back reactions in a system where quick removal of anodic gases is achieved. Calcium has been detected by the hydrogen evolution technique and the amount of calcia has been determined by titration. A porous ceramic sheath has been used in the cell to prevent the chemical reaction of electrowon calcium to produce oxide or carbonate and to prevent the contamination of salt by the anodic carbon.

  5. Processing of effluent salt from the direct oxide reduction process

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, B.; Olson, D.L.; Averill, W.A.

    1992-05-01

    The production of reactive metals by Direct Oxide Reduction (DOR) process using calcium in a molten calcium salt system generates significant amount of contaminated waste as calcium oxide saturated calcium chloride salt mix with calcium oxide content of up to 15 wt. pct. Fused salt electrolysis of a simulated salt mix has been carried out to electrowin calcium, which can be recycled to the DOR reactor along with the calcium chloride salt or may be used in-situ in a combined DOR and electrowinning process. Many reactive metal oxides could thus be reduced in a one-step process without generating a significant amount of waste. The process has been optimized in terms of the calcium solubility, cell temperature, current density and the cell design to maximize the current efficiency. Based on the information available regarding the solubility of calcium in calcium chloride salt in the presence of calcium oxide, and the back reactions occurring in-situ between the electrowon calcium and other components present in the cell, e.g. carbon, oxygen, carbon dioxide and calcium oxide, it is difficult to recover elemental calcium within the system. However, a liquid cathode or a rising cathode has been used in the past to recover calcium. The solubility has also been found to depend on the use of graphite as the anode material as evidenced by the presence of calcium carbonate in the final salt. The rate of recovery for metallic calcium has to be enhanced to levels that overcome the back reactions in a system where quick removal of anodic gases is achieved. Calcium has been detected by the hydrogen evolution technique and the amount of calcia has been determined by titration. A porous ceramic sheath has been used in the cell to prevent the chemical reaction of electrowon calcium to produce oxide or carbonate and to prevent the contamination of salt by the anodic carbon.

  6. Performance of combined sodium persulfate/H2O2 based advanced oxidation process in stabilized landfill leachate treatment.

    PubMed

    Hilles, Ahmed H; Abu Amr, Salem S; Hussein, Rim A; El-Sebaie, Olfat D; Arafa, Anwaar I

    2016-01-15

    A combination of persulfate and hydrogen peroxide (S2O8(2-)/H2O2) was used to oxidizelandfill leachate. The reaction was performed under varying S2O8(2-)/H2O2 ratio (g/g), S2O8(2-)/H2O2 dosages (g/g), pH, and reaction time (minutes), so as to determine the optimum operational conditions. Results indicated that under optimum operational conditions (i.e. 120 min of oxidation using a S2O8(2-)/H2O2 ratio of 1 g/1.47 g at a persulfate and hydrogen peroxide dosage of 5.88 g/50 ml and8.63 g/50 ml respectively, at pH 11) removal of 81% COD and 83% NH3-N was achieved. In addition, the biodegradability (BOD5/COD ratio) of the leachate was improved from 0.09 to 0.17. The results obtained from the combined use of (S2O8(2-)/H2O2) were compared with those obtained with sodium persulfate only, hydrogen peroxide only and sodium persulfate followed by hydrogen peroxide. The combined method (S2O8(2-)/H2O2) achieved higher removal efficiencies for COD and NH3-N compared with the other methods using a single oxidizing agent. Additionally, the study has proved that the combination of S2O8(2-)/H2O2 is more efficient than the sequential use of sodium persulfate followed by hydrogen peroxide in advanced oxidation processes aiming at treatingstabilizedlandfill leachate. PMID:26580899

  7. Valorization of GaN based metal-organic chemical vapor deposition dust a semiconductor power device industry waste through mechanochemical oxidation and leaching: A sustainable green process

    SciTech Connect

    Swain, Basudev; Mishra, Chinmayee; Lee, Chan Gi; Park, Kyung-Soo; Lee, Kun-Jae

    2015-07-15

    Dust generated during metal organic vapor deposition (MOCVD) process of GaN based semiconductor power device industry contains significant amounts of gallium and indium. These semiconductor power device industry wastes contain gallium as GaN and Ga{sub 0.97}N{sub 0.9}O{sub 0.09} is a concern for the environment which can add value through recycling. In the present study, this waste is recycled through mechanochemical oxidation and leaching. For quantitative recovery of gallium, two different mechanochemical oxidation leaching process flow sheets are proposed. In one process, first the Ga{sub 0.97}N{sub 0.9}O{sub 0.09} of the MOCVD dust is leached at the optimum condition. Subsequently, the leach residue is mechanochemically treated, followed by oxidative annealing and finally re-leached. In the second process, the MOCVD waste dust is mechanochemically treated, followed by oxidative annealing and finally leached. Both of these treatment processes are competitive with each other, appropriate for gallium leaching and treatment of the waste MOCVD dust. Without mechanochemical oxidation, 40.11 and 1.86 w/w% of gallium and Indium are leached using 4 M HCl, 100 °C and pulp density of 100 kg/m{sup 3,} respectively. After mechanochemical oxidation, both these processes achieved 90 w/w% of gallium and 1.86 w/w% of indium leaching at their optimum condition. - Highlights: • Waste MOCVD dust is treated through mechanochemical leaching. • GaN is hardly leached, and converted to NaGaO{sub 2} through ball milling and annealing. • Process for gallium recovery from waste MOCVD dust has been developed. • Thermal analysis and phase properties of GaN to Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} and GaN to NaGaO{sub 2} is revealed. • Solid-state chemistry involved in this process is reported.

  8. Post-treatment of biologically treated wastewater containing organic contaminants using a sequence of H2O2 based advanced oxidation processes: photolysis and catalytic wet oxidation.

    PubMed

    Rueda-Márquez, J J; Sillanpää, M; Pocostales, P; Acevedo, A; Manzano, M A

    2015-03-15

    In this paper the feasibility of a multi-barrier treatment (MBT) for the regeneration of synthetic industrial wastewater (SIWW) was evaluated. Industrial pollutants (orange II, phenol, 4-chlorophenol and phenanthrene) were added to the effluent of municipal wastewater treatment plant. The proposed MBT begins with a microfiltration membrane pretreatment (MF), followed by hydrogen peroxide photolysis (H2O2/UVC) and finishing, as a polishing step, with catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) using granular activated carbon (GAC) at ambient conditions. During the microfiltration step (0.7 μm) the decrease of suspended solids concentration, turbidity and Escherichia coli in treated water were 88, 94 and 99%, respectively. Also, the effluent's transmittance (254 nm) was increased by 14.7%. Removal of more than 99.9% of all added pollutants, mineralization of 63% of organic compounds and complete disinfection of total coliforms were reached during the H2O2/UVC treatment step (H2O2:TOC w/w ratio = 5 and an UVC average dose accumulated by wastewater 8.80 WUVC s cm(-2)). The power and efficiency of the lamp, the water transmittance and photoreactor geometry are taken into account and a new equation to estimate the accumulated dose in water is suggested. Remaining organic pollutants with a higher oxidation state of carbon atoms (+0.47) and toxic concentration of residual H2O2 were present in the effluent of the H2O2/UVC process. After 2.3 min of contact time with GAC at CWPO step, 90 and 100% of total organic carbon and residual H2O2 were removed, respectively. Also, the wastewater toxicity was studied using Vibrio fischeri and Sparus aurata larvae. The MBT operational and maintenance costs (O&M) was estimated to be 0.59 € m(-3). PMID:25600300

  9. Water based, solution-processable, transparent and flexible graphene oxide composite as electrodes in organic solar cell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, L. F.; Matos, C. F.; Gonçalves, L. C.; Salvatierra, R. V.; Cava, C. E.; Zarbin, A. J. G.; Roman, L. S.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we propose an easy method to achieve a conductive, transparent and flexible graphene oxide (GO)-based composite thin film from an aqueous dispersion. We investigated the blend ratio between GO and the conjugated polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) by comparing the thin film optical transmittance, sheet resistance, morphology and mechanical stability. It was found that reasonable values of transmittance and resistivity coupled with its excellent flexibility - the conductivity remains almost the same even after 1000 bends cycles - make this composite very attracting for flexible optoelectronic applications. Thus, these films were used as transparent electrodes in a bilayer structured organic solar cell and the device architecture PET/GO:PEDOT/F8T2/C60/Al could reach a power conversion efficiency around 1.10%. This result presents a better performance compared with pristine PEDOT produced with similar parameters.

  10. Reducible oxide based catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Levi T.; Kim, Chang Hwan; Bej, Shyamal K.

    2010-04-06

    A catalyst is disclosed herein. The catalyst includes a reducible oxide support and at least one noble metal fixed on the reducible oxide support. The noble metal(s) is loaded on the support at a substantially constant temperature and pH.

  11. Review of solution-processed oxide thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Si Joon; Yoon, Seokhyun; Kim, Hyun Jae

    2014-02-01

    In this review, we summarize solution-processed oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) researches based on our fulfillments. We describe the fundamental studies of precursor composition effects at the beginning in order to figure out the role of each component in oxide semiconductors, and then present low temperature process for the adoption of flexible devices. Moreover, channel engineering for high performance and reliability of solution-processed oxide TFTs and various coating methods: spin-coating, inkjet printing, and gravure printing are also presented. The last topic of this review is an overview of multi-functional solution-processed oxide TFTs for various applications such as photodetector, biosensor, and memory.

  12. Distributive Processing by the Iron(II)/α-Ketoglutarate-Dependent Catalytic Domains of the TET Enzymes Is Consistent with Epigenetic Roles for Oxidized 5-Methylcytosine Bases.

    PubMed

    Tamanaha, Esta; Guan, Shengxi; Marks, Katherine; Saleh, Lana

    2016-08-01

    The ten-eleven translocation (TET) proteins catalyze oxidation of 5-methylcytosine ((5m)C) residues in nucleic acids to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine ((5hm)C), 5-formylcytosine ((5f)C), and 5-carboxycytosine ((5ca)C). These nucleotide bases have been implicated as intermediates on the path to active demethylation, but recent reports have suggested that they might have specific regulatory roles in their own right. In this study, we present kinetic evidence showing that the catalytic domains (CDs) of TET2 and TET1 from mouse and their homologue from Naegleria gruberi, the full-length protein NgTET1, are distributive in both chemical and physical senses, as they carry out successive oxidations of a single (5m)C and multiple (5m)C residues along a polymethylated DNA substrate. We present data showing that the enzyme neither retains (5hm)C/(5f)C intermediates of preceding oxidations nor slides along a DNA substrate (without releasing it) to process an adjacent (5m)C residue. These findings contradict a recent report by Crawford et al. ( J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2016 , 138 , 730 ) claiming that oxidation of (5m)C by CD of mouse TET2 is chemically processive (iterative). We further elaborate that this distributive mechanism is maintained for TETs in two evolutionarily distant homologues and posit that this mode of function allows the introduction of (5m)C forms as epigenetic markers along the DNA. PMID:27362828

  13. Low Temperature Processed Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) Device by Oxidation Effect from Capping Layer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenwei; Al-Jawhari, Hala A.; Nayak, Pradipta K.; Caraveo-Frescas, J. A.; Wei, Nini; Hedhili, M. N.; Alshareef, H. N.

    2015-01-01

    In this report, both p- and n-type tin oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) were simultaneously achieved using single-step deposition of the tin oxide channel layer. The tuning of charge carrier polarity in the tin oxide channel is achieved by selectively depositing a copper oxide capping layer on top of tin oxide, which serves as an oxygen source, providing additional oxygen to form an n-type tin dioxide phase. The oxidation process can be realized by annealing at temperature as low as 190°C in air, which is significantly lower than the temperature generally required to form tin dioxide. Based on this approach, CMOS inverters based entirely on tin oxide TFTs were fabricated. Our method provides a solution to lower the process temperature for tin dioxide phase, which facilitates the application of this transparent oxide semiconductor in emerging electronic devices field. PMID:25892711

  14. Treatment of trichlorophenol by catalytic oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Chu, W; Law, C K

    2003-05-01

    The oxidation of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP) by ferrous-catalyzed hydrogen peroxide was quantified and modeled in the study. TCP was effectively degraded by hydroxyl radicals that were generated by Fe(II)/H(2)O(2) in the oxidation process. The oxidation capacity (OC) of the process depends on the concentrations of oxidant (hydrogen peroxide) and oxidative catalyst (ferrous ion). Up to 99.6% of TCP removal can be achieved in the process, provided the doses of Fe(II) and H(2)O(2) are selected correctly. The OC of the process was successfully predicted through a kinetic approach in a two-stage model with some simple and measurable parameters, which makes the model useful for predicting, controlling and optimizing the catalyzed oxidation process in the degradation of TCP. PMID:12727243

  15. Hybrid organotin and tin oxide-based thin films processed from alkynylorganotins: synthesis, characterization, and gas sensing properties.

    PubMed

    Renard, Laetitia; Brötz, Joachim; Fuess, Hartmut; Gurlo, Aleksander; Riedel, Ralf; Toupance, Thierry

    2014-10-01

    Hydrolysis-condensation of bis(triprop-1-ynylstannyl)butylene led to nanostructured bridged polystannoxane films yielding tin dioxide thin layers upon UV-treatment or annealing in air. According to Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, contact angle measurements, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) data, the films were composed of a network of aggregated "pseudo-particles", as calcination at 600 °C is required to form cassiterite nanocrystalline SnO2 particles. In the presence of reductive gases such as H2 and CO, these films gave rise to highly sensitive, reversible, and reproducible responses. The best selectivity toward H2 was reached at 150 °C with the hybrid thin films that do not show any response to CO at 20-200 °C. On the other hand, the SnO2 films prepared at 600 °C are more sensitive to H2 than to CO with best operating temperature in the 300-350 °C range. This organometallic approach provides an entirely new class of gas-sensing materials based on a class II organic-inorganic hybrid layer, along with a new way to include organic functionality in gas sensing metal oxides. PMID:25192546

  16. A process-based inventory model for landfill CH4 emissions inclusive of seasonal soil microclimate and CH4 oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spokas, K.; Bogner, J.; Chanton, J.

    2011-12-01

    We have developed and field-validated an annual inventory model for California landfill CH4 emissions that incorporates both site-specific soil properties and soil microclimate modeling coupled to 0.5° scale global climatic models. Based on 1-D diffusion, CALMIM (California Landfill Methane Inventory Model) is a freely available JAVA tool which models a typical annual cycle for CH4 emissions from site-specific daily, intermediate, and final landfill cover designs. Literature over the last decade has emphasized that the major factors controlling emissions in these highly managed soil systems are the presence or absence of engineered gas extraction, gaseous transport rates as affected by the thickness and physical properties of cover soils, and methanotrophic CH4 oxidation in cover materials as a function of seasonal soil microclimate. Moreover, current IPCC national inventory models for landfill CH4 emissions based on theoretical gas generation have high uncertainties and lack comprehensive field validation. This new approach, which is compliant with IPCC "Tier III" criteria, has been field-validated at two California sites (Monterey County; Los Angeles County), with limited field validation at three additional California sites. CALMIM accurately predicts soil temperature and moisture trends with emission predictions within the same order of magnitude as field measurements, indicating an acceptable initial model comparison in the context of published literature on measured CH4 emissions spanning 7 orders of magnitude. In addition to regional defaults for inventory purposes, CALMIM permits user-selectable parameters and boundary conditions for more rigorous site-specific applications where detailed CH4 emissions, meteorological, and soil microclimate data exist.

  17. PROCESSES OF CHLORINATION OF URANIUM OXIDES

    DOEpatents

    Rosenfeld, S.

    1958-09-16

    An improvement is described in the process fur making UCl/sub 4/ from uranium oxide and carbon tetrachloride. In that process, oxides of uranium are contacted with carbon tetrachloride vapor at an elevated temperature. It has been fuund that the reaction product and yield are improved if the uranlum oxide charge is disposed in flat trays in the reaction zone, to a depth of not more than 1/2 centimeter.

  18. Organic waste processing using molten salt oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, M. G., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) is a thermal means of oxidizing (destroying) the organic constituents of mixed wastes, hazardous wastes, and energetic materials while retaining inorganic and radioactive constituents in the salt. For this reason, MSO is considered a promising alternative to incineration for the treatment of a variety of organic wastes. The U. S. Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Management (DOE/EM) is currently funding research that will identify alternatives to incineration for the treatment of organic-based mixed wastes. (Mixed wastes are defined as waste streams which have both hazardous and radioactive properties.) One such project is Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s Expedited Technology Demonstration of Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO). The goal of this project is to conduct an integrated demonstration of MSO, including off-gas and spent salt treatment, and the preparation of robust solid final forms. Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has constructed an integrated pilot-scale MSO treatment system in which tests and demonstrations are presently being performed under carefully controlled (experimental) conditions. The system consists of a MSO process vessel with dedicated off-gas treatment, a salt recycle system, feed preparation equipment, and equipment for preparing ceramic final waste forms. In this paper we describe the integrated system and discuss its capabilities as well as preliminary process demonstration data. A primary purpose of these demonstrations is to identify the most suitable waste streams and waste types for MSO treatment.

  19. Accelerated oxidation processes is biodiesel

    SciTech Connect

    Canakci, M.; Monyem, A.; Van Gerpen, J.

    1999-12-01

    Biodiesel is an alternative fuel for diesel engines that can be produced from renewable feedstocks such as vegetable oil and animal fats. These feedstocks are reacted with an alcohol to produce alkyl monoesters that can be used in conventional diesel engines with little or no modification. Biodiesel, especially if produced from highly unsaturated oils, oxidizes more rapidly than diesel fuel. This article reports the results of experiments to track the chemical and physical changes that occur in biodiesel as it oxidizes. These results show the impact of time, oxygen flow rate, temperature, metals, and feedstock type on the rate of oxidation. Blending with diesel fuel and the addition of antioxidants are explored also. The data indicate that without antioxidants, biodiesel will oxidize very quickly at temperatures typical of diesel engines. This oxidation results in increases in peroxide value, acid value, and viscosity. While the peroxide value generally reaches a plateau of about 350 meq/kg ester, the acid value and viscosity increase monotonically as oxidation proceeds.

  20. Plutonium Oxide Process Capability Work Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, David E.; Tingey, Joel M.

    2014-02-28

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked to develop a Pilot-scale Plutonium-oxide Processing Unit (P3U) providing a flexible capability to produce 200g (Pu basis) samples of plutonium oxide using different chemical processes for use in identifying and validating nuclear forensics signatures associated with plutonium production. Materials produced can also be used as exercise and reference materials.

  1. Effectiveness of UV-based advanced oxidation processes for the remediation of hydrocarbon pollution in the groundwater: a laboratory investigation.

    PubMed

    Mascolo, Giuseppe; Ciannarella, Ruggero; Balest, Lydia; Lopez, Antonio

    2008-04-15

    The effectiveness of advanced oxidation processes in a batch and a flow reactor was investigated for the remediation of hydrocarbon pollution in the groundwater underlying a petrochemical industrial site. The main organic contaminants present in the groundwater were MTBE, benzene, alkyl-benzenes and alkyl-naphthalenes. Experimental results with a batch reactor showed that for all the organic contaminants the removal efficiency order is UV/TiO2 approximately UV/H2O2>UV (medium-pressure) in a synthetic aqueous solution, compared to UV/H2O2>UV (medium-pressure)>UV/TiO2 for the real polluted groundwater. The much lower performance of UV/TiO2 with respect to UV/H2O2 was inferred to the matrix of the groundwater, i.e. the salt content, as well as the organic and particulate matter. In fact, it is likely that the salts and dissolved organic matter quench the superoxide anion O2(-) and hydroxyl radicals just formed at the surface of the TiO2 catalyst. MTBE was the hardest compound to remove with each of the investigated treatments. UV and UV/TiO2 treatments were not able to reach a residual concentration of 10 microg/L (set by Italian legislation) even after 180 min. As for the UV/H2O2 process, only the MTBE degradation rate resulted affected by the initial H2O2 concentration, while for other compounds a complete removal was obtained within 20 min even with the lowest H2O2 concentration used (0.13 g/L). Only after 120 min of treatment, with an initial H2O2 concentration of 0.13 g/L, did the residual MTBE concentration fall below the above reported maximum admissible concentration. Instead, by using an initial concentration of 2g/L a residual concentration lower than 5 microg/L was obtained after just 30 min of reaction. The UV/H2O2 process was also investigated with a flow reactor. Results showed that it was more efficient than the batch reactor for removing MTBE, in terms of reaction time and initial H2O2 concentration required. This is consistent with the higher power of

  2. ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESSES (AOP'S FOR THE TREATMENT OF CCL CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research on treatment of Contaminant Candidate List (CCL) chemicals is being conducted. Specific groups of contaminants on the CCL will be evaluated using numerous advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). Initially, these CCL contaminants will be evaluated in groups based on chemical...

  3. Selective-oxidation catalyst improves Claus process

    SciTech Connect

    Lagas, J.A.; Borsboom, J. ); Berben, P.H. )

    1988-10-10

    Increased SO/sub 2/ emissions. On a worldwide scale, the exploitation and processing of crude oil and natural gas have increased significantly during the past 30 years. This expansion has caused severe pollution problems, especially from sulfur dioxide emissions to the atmosphere. A new development for the well-known Claus process improves production of elemental sulfur from H/sub 2/S. The ''SuperClaus'' process involves a modification of the process-control system and the use of a newly developed selective-oxidation catalyst in the third reactor with the objective of achieving a 99% or 99.5% overall sulfur recovery (two versions) without further tail-gas cleanup. The catalyst for the new process was developed and tested on laboratory bench scale for more than 3 years. Based on the results, it was decided to test the process directly in a commercial unit. A three-stage, 100-t/d Claus plant in a natural-gas plant in the Federal Republic of Germany has been retrofitted to SuperClause. Since Jan. 21, the process has been successfully operated.

  4. Light-emitting diodes based on solution-processed nontoxic quantum dots: oxides as carrier-transport layers and introducing molybdenum oxide nanoparticles as a hole-inject layer.

    PubMed

    Bhaumik, Saikat; Pal, Amlan J

    2014-07-23

    We report fabrication and characterization of solution-processed quantum dot light-emitting diodes (QDLEDs) based on a layer of nontoxic and Earth-abundant zinc-diffused silver indium disulfide (AIZS) nanoparticles as an emitting material. In the QDLEDs fabricated on indium tin oxide (ITO)-coated glass substrates, we use layers of oxides, such as graphene oxide (GO) and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles as a hole- and electron-transport layer, respectively. In addition, we introduce a layer of MoO3 nanoparticles as a hole-inject one. We report a comparison of the characteristics of different device architectures. We show that an inverted device architecture, ITO/ZnO/AIZS/GO/MoO3/Al, yields a higher electroluminescence (EL) emission, compared to direct ones, for three reasons: (1) the GO/MoO3 layers introduce barriers for electrons to reach the Al electrode, and, similarly, the ZnO layers acts as a barrier for holes to travel to the ITO electrode; (2) the introduction of a layer of MoO3 nanoparticles as a hole-inject layer reduces the barrier height for holes and thereby balances charge injection in the inverted structure; and (3) the wide-bandgap zinc oxide next to the ITO electrode does not absorb the EL emission during its exit from the device. In the QDLEDs with oxides as carrier inject and transport layers, the EL spectrum resembles the photoluminescence emission of the emitting material (AIZS), implying that excitons are formed in the quaternary nanocrystals and decay radiatively. PMID:24983915

  5. Charting oxidized methylcytosines at base resolution

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hao; Zhang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    DNA cytosine methylation (5-methylcytosines) represents a key epigenetic mark and is required for normal development. Iterative oxidation of 5mC by TET family of DNA dioxygenases generates three oxidized nucleotides, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC), and 5-carboxycytosine (5caC), in the mammalian genome. Recent advances in genomic mapping techniques for these oxidized bases suggest that 5hmC/5fC/5caC are not only functionally relevant to the process of active reversal of 5mC, but may also possess unique regulatory functions. This perspective highlights the potential gene regulatory functions of these oxidized cytosine bases in the mammalian genome, and discusses the principles and limitations of recently developed base-resolution mapping technologies. PMID:26333715

  6. Design and processing parameters of La2NiO4+δ-based cathode for anode-supported planar solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Changwoo; Lee, Jong-Heun; Park, Mansoo; Hong, Jongsup; Kim, Hyoungchul; Son, Ji-Won; Lee, Jong-Ho; Kim, Byung-Kook; Yoon, Kyung Joong

    2015-11-01

    The Ruddlesden-Popper phase lanthanum nickelate, La2NiO4+δ (LNO), is successfully implemented as a strontium- and cobalt-free cathode in anode-supported planar solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) through systematic optimization of materials, processing and structural parameters. Chemical interaction between LNO and gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC), which leads to phase decomposition of composite cathode and significant deterioration of the electrochemical performance, is prevented by lowering the processing temperature below 1000 °C. For low-temperature fabrication process, the thermo-mechanical stability at the interface is secured by modifying the powder characteristics and inserting the adhesive interlayer. The issues associated with the electrical contact and current distribution are resolved by incorporating the perovskite La0.6Sr0.4CoO3-δ (LSC) as a current collecting layer, and the thermal stresses at the interface are relieved by constructing a gradient electrode structure. Consequently, the optimized anode-supported planar cell with an LNO-based cathode exhibits superior performance compared to the reference cell with a conventional cathode in the intermediate-temperature range, which is attributed to the enhanced interfacial process and surface reaction kinetics based on impedance analysis.

  7. Hydrometallurgical process for the recovery of high value metals from spent lithium nickel cobalt aluminum oxide based lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joulié, M.; Laucournet, R.; Billy, E.

    2014-02-01

    A hydrometallurgical process is developed to recover valuable metals of the lithium nickel cobalt aluminum oxide (NCA) cathodes from spent lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). Effect of parameters such as type of acid (H2SO4, HNO3 and HCl), acid concentration (1-4 mol L-1), leaching time (3-18 h) and leaching temperature (25-90 °C) with a solid to liquid ratio fixed at 5% (w/v) are investigated to determine the most efficient conditions of dissolution. The preliminary results indicate that HCl provides higher leaching efficiency. In optimum conditions, a complete dissolution is performed for Li, Ni, Co and Al. In the nickel and cobalt recovery process, at first the Co(II) in the leaching liquor is selectively oxidized in Co(III) with NaClO reagent to recover Co2O3, 3H2O by a selective precipitation at pH = 3. Then, the nickel hydroxide is precipitated by a base addition at pH = 11. The recovery efficiency of cobalt and nickel are respectively 100% and 99.99%.

  8. Process for catalytically oxidizing cycloolefins, particularly cyclohexene

    DOEpatents

    Mizuno, Noritaka; Lyon, David K.; Finke, Richard G.

    1993-01-01

    This invention is a process for catalytically oxidizing cycloolefins, particularly cyclohexenes, to form a variety of oxygenates. The catalyst used in the process is a covalently bonded iridium-heteropolyanion species. The process uses the catalyst in conjunction with a gaseous oxygen containing gas to form 2-cyclohexen-1-ol and also 2-cyclohexen-1-one.

  9. Microwave processing of ceramic oxide filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, G.J.; Katz, J.D.

    1995-05-01

    The objective of the microwave filament processing project is to develop microwave techniques at 2.45 GHZ to manufacture continuous ceramic oxide filaments. Microwave processing uses the volumetric absorption of microwave power in oxide filament tows to drive off process solvents, to burn out organic binders, and to sinter the dried fibers to produce flexible, high-strength ceramic filaments. The technical goal is to advance filament processing technology by microwave heating more rapidly with less energy and at a lower cost than conventional processing, but with the same quality as conventional processing. The manufacturing goal is to collaborate with the 3M Company, a US manufacturer of ceramic oxide filaments, to evaluate the technology using a prototype filament system and to transfer the microwave technology to the 3M Company.

  10. Processes regulating nitric oxide emissions from soils.

    PubMed

    Pilegaard, Kim

    2013-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a reactive gas that plays an important role in atmospheric chemistry by influencing the production and destruction of ozone and thereby the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. NO also contributes by its oxidation products to the formation of acid rain. The major sources of NO in the atmosphere are anthropogenic emissions (from combustion of fossil fuels) and biogenic emission from soils. NO is both produced and consumed in soils as a result of biotic and abiotic processes. The main processes involved are microbial nitrification and denitrification, and chemodenitrification. Thus, the net result is complex and dependent on several factors such as nitrogen availability, organic matter content, oxygen status, soil moisture, pH and temperature. This paper reviews recent knowledge on processes forming NO in soils and the factors controlling its emission to the atmosphere. Schemes for simulating these processes are described, and the results are discussed with the purpose of scaling up to global emission. PMID:23713124

  11. Reduction of metal oxides through mechanochemical processing

    DOEpatents

    Froes, Francis H.; Eranezhuth, Baburaj G.; Senkov, Oleg N.

    2000-01-01

    The low temperature reduction of a metal oxide using mechanochemical processing techniques. The reduction reactions are induced mechanically by milling the reactants. In one embodiment of the invention, titanium oxide TiO.sub.2 is milled with CaH.sub.2 to produce TiH.sub.2. Low temperature heat treating, in the range of 400.degree. C. to 700.degree. C., can be used to remove the hydrogen in the titanium hydride.

  12. Process for etching mixed metal oxides

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Ginley, D.S.

    1994-10-18

    An etching process is described using dicarboxylic and tricarboxylic acids as chelating etchants for mixed metal oxide films such as high temperature superconductors and ferroelectric materials. Undesirable differential etching rates between different metal oxides are avoided by selection of the proper acid or combination of acids. Feature sizes below one micron, excellent quality vertical edges, and film thicknesses in the 100 Angstrom range may be achieved by this method. 1 fig.

  13. Process for etching mixed metal oxides

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.; Ginley, David S.

    1994-01-01

    An etching process using dicarboxylic and tricarboxylic acids as chelating etchants for mixed metal oxide films such as high temperature superconductors and ferroelectric materials. Undesirable differential etching rates between different metal oxides are avoided by selection of the proper acid or combination of acids. Feature sizes below one micron, excellent quality vertical edges, and film thicknesses in the 100 Angstom range may be achieved by this method.

  14. A process-based inventory model for landfill CH4 emissions inclusive of seasonal soil microclimate and CH4 oxidation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have developed and field-validated an annual inventory model for California landfill CH4 emissions that incorporates both site-specific soil properties and soil microclimate modeling coupled to 0.5o scale global climatic models. Based on 1-D diffusion, CALMIM (California Landfill Methane Inventor...

  15. Computer-based first-principles kinetic modeling of degradation pathways and byproduct fates in aqueous-phase advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xin; Minakata, Daisuke; Niu, Junfeng; Crittenden, John

    2014-05-20

    In this study, a computer-based first-principles kinetic model is developed to predict the degradation mechanisms and fates of intermediates and byproducts produced during aqueous-phase advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) for various organic compounds. The model contains a rule-based pathway generator to generate the reaction pathways, a reaction rate constant estimator to estimate the reaction rate constant for each reaction generated, a mechanistic reduction module to reduce the generated mechanisms, an ordinary differential equations generator and solver to solve the generated mechanisms and calculate the concentration profiles for all species, and a toxicity estimator to estimate the toxicity of major species and calculate time-dependent profiles of relative toxicity (i.e., concentration of species divided by toxicity value). We predict concentration profiles of acetone and trichloroethylene and their intermediates and byproducts in photolysis with hydrogen peroxide (i.e., UV/H2O2) and validate with experimental observations. The predicted concentration profiles for both parent compounds are consistent with experimental data. The calculated profiles of 96-h green algae chronic toxicity show that the overall toxicity decreases during the degradation process. These generated mechanisms also provide detailed and quantitative insights into the pathways for the formation and consumption of important intermediates and byproducts produced during AOPs. Our approach is sufficiently general to be applied to a wide range of contaminants. PMID:24749836

  16. Novel imazethapyr detoxification applying advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Stathis, Ioannis; Hela, Dimitra G; Scrano, Laura; Lelario, Filomena; Emanuele, Lucia; Bufo, Sabino A

    2011-01-01

    Different degradation methods have been applied to assess the suitability of advanced oxidation process (AOPs) to promote mineralization of imazethapyr [(RS)-5-ethyl-2-(4-isopropyl-4-methyl-5-oxo-2-imidazolin-2-yl)nicotinic acid], a widely used imidazolinone class herbicide, the persistence of which has been demonstrated in surface and ground waters destined to human uses. Independent of the oxidation process assessed, the decomposition of imazethapyr always followed a pseudo-first order kinetic. The direct UV-irradiation (UV) of the herbicide as well as its oxidation with ozone (O₃), and hydrogen peroxide tied to UV-irradiation (H₂O₂/UV) were sufficiently slow to permit the identification of intermediate products, the formation pathway of which has been proposed. Ozonation joined to UV-irradiation (O₃/UV), ozonation joined to titanium dioxide photo-catalysis (TiO₂/UV+O₃), sole photo-catalysis (TiO₂/UV), and photo-catalysis reinforced with hydrogen peroxide-oxidation (TiO₂/UV+H₂O₂) were characterized by a faster degradation and rapid formation of a lot of small molecules, which were quickly degraded to complete mineralization. The most effective oxidation methods were those using titanium dioxide photo-catalysis enhanced either by ozonation or hydrogen peroxide. Most of all, these last processes were useful to avoid the development of dangerous by-products. PMID:21726140

  17. HANDBOOK ON ADVANCED NONPHOTOCHEMICAL OXIDATION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this handbook is to summarize commercial-scale system performance and cost data for advanced nonphotochemical oxidation (ANPO) treatment of contaminated water, air, and soil. Similar information from pilot-and bench-scale evaluations of ANPO processes is also inclu...

  18. HANDBOOK ON ADVANCED PHOTOCHEMICAL OXIDATION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This handbook summarizes commercial-scale system performance and cost data for advanced photochemical oxidation (APO) treatment of contaminated water, air, and solids. Similar information from pilot- and bench-scale evaluations of APO processes is also included to supplement the...

  19. Process for preparing active oxide powders

    DOEpatents

    Berard, Michael F.; Hunter, Jr., Orville; Shiers, Loren E.; Dole, Stephen L.; Scheidecker, Ralph W.

    1979-02-20

    An improved process for preparing active oxide powders in which cation hydroxide gels, prepared in the conventional manner are chemically dried by alternately washing the gels with a liquid organic compound having polar characteristics and a liquid organic compound having nonpolar characteristics until the mechanical water is removed from the gel. The water-free cation hydroxide is then contacted with a final liquid organic wash to remove the previous organic wash and speed drying. The dried hydroxide treated in the conventional manner will form a highly sinterable active oxide powder.

  20. Removal of estrogens by electrochemical oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Cong, Vo Huu; Iwaya, Sota; Sakakibara, Yutaka

    2014-06-01

    Treatments of estrogens such as Estrone (E1), Estradiol (E2) and Ethinylestradiol (EE2) were conducted using an electrolytic reactor equipped with multi-packed granular glassy carbon electrodes. Experimental results showed that E1, E2 and EE2 were oxidized in the range of 0.45-0.85 V and were removed through electro-polymerization. Observed data from continuous experiments were in good agreement with calculated results by a mathematical model constructed based on mass transfer limitation. In continuous treatment of trace estrogens (1 μg/L), 98% of E1, E2 and EE2 were stably removed. At high loading rate (100 μg/L), removal efficiency of E1 was kept around 74%-88% for 21 days, but removal efficiency reduced due to passivation of electrodes. However, removal efficiency was recovered after electrochemical regeneration of electrodes in presence of ozone. Electric energy consumption was observed in the range of 1-2 Wh/m(3). From these results, we concluded that the present electrochemical process would be an alternative removal of estrogens. PMID:25079848

  1. Oxidation processes in magneto-optic and related materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Paul A.; Armstrong, Neal R.; Danzinger, James L.; England, Craig D.

    1992-01-01

    The surface oxidation processes of thin films of magneto-optic materials, such as the rare-earth transition metal alloys have been studied, starting in ultrahigh vacuum environments, using surface analysis techniques, as a way of modeling the oxidation processes which occur at the base of a defect in an overcoated material, at the instant of exposure to ambient environments. Materials examined have included FeTbCo alloys, as well as those same materials with low percentages of added elements, such a Ta, and their reactivities to both O2 and H2O compared with materials such as thin Fe films coated with ultrathin adlayers of Ti. The surface oxidation pathways for these materials is reviewed, and XPS data presented which indicates the type of oxides formed, and a critical region of Ta concentration which provides optimum protection.

  2. Methodology for the effective stabilization of tin-oxide-based oxidation/reduction catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Davis, Patricia P. (Inventor); Leighty, Bradley D. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony N. (Inventor); Schryer, Jacqueline L. (Inventor); Oglesby, Donald M. (Inventor); Gulati, Suresh T. (Inventor); Summers, Jerry C. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The invention described herein involves a novel approach to the production of oxidation/reduction catalytic systems. The present invention serves to stabilize the tin oxide reducible metal-oxide coating by co-incorporating at least another metal-oxide species, such as zirconium. In one embodiment, a third metal-oxide species is incorporated, selected from the group consisting of cerium, lanthanum, hafnium, and ruthenium. The incorporation of the additional metal oxide components serves to stabilize the active tin-oxide layer in the catalytic process during high-temperature operation in a reducing environment (e.g., automobile exhaust). Moreover, the additional metal oxides are active components due to their oxygen-retention capabilities. Together, these features provide a mechanism to extend the range of operation of the tin-oxide-based catalyst system for automotive applications, while maintaining the existing advantages.

  3. Induced effects of advanced oxidation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Li, Chaolin; Zhao, Zhuanjun; Lu, Gang; Cui, Haibo; Zhang, Wenfang

    2014-02-01

    Hazardous organic wastes from industrial, military, and commercial activities represent one of the greatest challenges to human beings. Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) are alternatives to the degradation of those organic wastes. However, the knowledge about the exact mechanisms of AOPs is still incomplete. Here we report a phenomenon in the AOPs: induced effects, which is a common property of combustion reaction. Through analysis EDTA oxidation processes by Fenton and UV-Fenton system, the results indicate that, just like combustion, AOPs are typical induction reactions. One most compelling example is that pre-feeding easily oxidizable organic matter can promote the oxidation of refractory organic compound when it was treated by AOPs. Connecting AOPs to combustion, it is possible to achieve some helpful enlightenment from combustion to analyze, predict and understand AOPs. In addition, we assume that maybe other oxidation reactions also have induced effects, such as corrosion, aging and passivation. Muchmore research is necessary to reveal the possibilities of induced effects in those fields.

  4. Induced effects of advanced oxidation processes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng; Li, Chaolin; Zhao, Zhuanjun; Lu, Gang; Cui, Haibo; Zhang, Wenfang

    2014-01-01

    Hazardous organic wastes from industrial, military, and commercial activities represent one of the greatest challenges to human beings. Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) are alternatives to the degradation of those organic wastes. However, the knowledge about the exact mechanisms of AOPs is still incomplete. Here we report a phenomenon in the AOPs: induced effects, which is a common property of combustion reaction. Through analysis EDTA oxidation processes by Fenton and UV-Fenton system, the results indicate that, just like combustion, AOPs are typical induction reactions. One most compelling example is that pre-feeding easily oxidizable organic matter can promote the oxidation of refractory organic compound when it was treated by AOPs. Connecting AOPs to combustion, it is possible to achieve some helpful enlightenment from combustion to analyze, predict and understand AOPs. In addition, we assume that maybe other oxidation reactions also have induced effects, such as corrosion, aging and passivation. Muchmore research is necessary to reveal the possibilities of induced effects in those fields. PMID:24503715

  5. Advanced oxidation process sanitization of eggshell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gottselig, Steven M; Dunn-Horrocks, Sadie L; Woodring, Kristy S; Coufal, Craig D; Duong, Tri

    2016-06-01

    The microbial quality of eggs entering the hatchery represents an important critical control point for biosecurity and pathogen reduction programs in integrated poultry production. The development of safe and effective interventions to reduce microbial contamination on the surface of eggs will be important to improve the overall productivity and microbial food safety of poultry and poultry products. The hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and ultraviolet (UV) light advanced oxidation process is a potentially important alternative to traditional sanitizers and disinfectants for egg sanitation. The H2O2/UV advanced oxidation process was demonstrated previously to be effective in reducing surface microbial contamination on eggs. In this study, we evaluated treatment conditions affecting the efficacy of H2O2/UV advanced oxidation in order to identify operational parameters for the practical application of this technology in egg sanitation. The effect of the number of application cycles, UV intensity, duration of UV exposure, and egg rotation on the recovery of total aerobic bacteria from the surface of eggs was evaluated. Of the conditions evaluated, we determined that reduction of total aerobic bacteria from naturally contaminated eggs was optimized when eggs were sanitized using 2 repeated application cycles with 5 s exposure to 14 mW cm(-2) UV light, and that rotation of the eggs between application cycles was unnecessary. Additionally, using these optimized conditions, the H2O2/UV process reduced Salmonella by greater than 5 log10 cfu egg(-1) on the surface of experimentally contaminated eggs. This study demonstrates the potential for practical application of the H2O2/UV advanced oxidation process in egg sanitation and its effectiveness in reducing Salmonella on eggshell surfaces. PMID:27030693

  6. Simulation of Triple Oxidation Ditch Wastewater Treatment Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yue; Zhang, Jinsong; Liu, Lixiang; Hu, Yongfeng; Xu, Ziming

    2010-11-01

    This paper presented the modeling mechanism and method of a sewage treatment system. A triple oxidation ditch process of a WWTP was simulated based on activated sludge model ASM2D with GPS-X software. In order to identify the adequate model structure to be implemented into the GPS-X environment, the oxidation ditch was divided into several completely stirred tank reactors depended on the distribution of aeration devices and dissolved oxygen concentration. The removal efficiency of COD, ammonia nitrogen, total nitrogen, total phosphorus and SS were simulated by GPS-X software with influent quality data of this WWTP from June to August 2009, to investigate the differences between the simulated results and the actual results. The results showed that, the simulated values could well reflect the actual condition of the triple oxidation ditch process. Mathematical modeling method was appropriate in effluent quality predicting and process optimizing.

  7. Indium oxide based fiber optic SPR sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Sarika; Sharma, Navneet K.

    2016-05-01

    Surface plasmon resonance based fiber optic sensor using indium oxide layer is presented and theoretically studied. It has been found that with increase in thickness of indium oxide layer beyond 170 nm, the sensitivity of SPR sensor decreases. 170 nm thick indium oxide layer based SPR sensor holds maximum sensitivity.

  8. Hybrid process for nitrogen oxides reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Epperly, W.R.; Sprague, B.N.

    1991-09-10

    This patent describes a process for reducing the nitrogen oxide concentration in the effluent from the combustion of a carbonaceous fuel. It comprises introducing into the effluent a first treatment agent comprising a nitrogenous composition selected from the group consisting of urea, ammonia, hexamethylenetetramine, ammonium salts of organic acids, 5- or 6-membered heterocyclic hydrocarbons having at least one cyclic nitrogen, hydroxy amino hydrocarbons, NH{sub 4}-lignosulfonate, fur-furylamine, tetrahydrofurylamine, hexamethylenediamine, barbituric acid, guanidine, guanidine carbonate, biguanidine, guanylurea sulfate, melamine, dicyandiamide, biuret, 1.1{prime}-azobisformamide, methylol urea, methylol urea-urea condensation product, dimethylol urea, methyl urea, dimethyl urea, calcium cyanamide, and mixtures thereof under conditions effective to reduce the nitrogen oxides concentration and ensure the presence of ammonia in the effluent; introducing into the effluent a second treatment agent comprising an oxygenated hydrocarbon at an effluent temperature of about 500{degrees} F. to about 1600{degrees} F. under conditions effective to oxidize nitric oxide in the effluent to nitrogen dioxide and ensure the presence of ammonia at a weight ratio of ammonia to nitrogen dioxide of about 1:5 to about 5:1; and contacting the effluent with an aqueous scrubbing solution having a pH of 12 or lower under conditions effective to cause nitrogen dioxide to be absorbed therein.

  9. DEAMOX--new biological nitrogen removal process based on anaerobic ammonia oxidation coupled to sulphide-driven conversion of nitrate into nitrite.

    PubMed

    Kalyuzhnyi, Sergey; Gladchenko, Marina; Mulder, Arnold; Versprille, Bram

    2006-11-01

    This paper reports about the successful laboratory testing of a new nitrogen removal process called DEAMOX (DEnitrifying AMmonium OXidation) for treatment of typical strong nitrogenous wastewater such as baker's yeast effluent. The concept of this process combines the recently discovered anammox (anaerobic ammonium oxidation) reaction with autotrophic denitrifying conditions using sulphide as an electron donor for the production of nitrite from nitrate within an anaerobic biofilm. To generate sulphide and ammonia, a Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Bed (UASB) reactor was used as a pre-treatment step. The UASB effluent was split and partially fed to a nitrifying reactor (to generate nitrate) and the remaining part was directly fed to the DEAMOX reactor where this stream was mixed with the nitrified effluent. Stable process performance and volumetric nitrogen loading rates of the DEAMOX reactor well above 1000 mgN/l/d with total nitrogen removal efficiencies of around 90% were obtained after long-term (410 days) optimisation of the process. Important prerequisites for this performance are appropriate influent ratios of the key species fed to the DEAMOX reactor, namely influent N-NO(x)/N-NH(4) ratios >1.2 (stoichiometry of the anammox reaction) and influent S-H(2)S/N-NO(3) ratios >0.57 mgS/mgN (stoichiometry of the sulphide-driven denitrification of nitrate to nitrite). The paper further describes some characteristics of the DEAMOX sludge as well as the preliminary results of its microbiological characterisation. PMID:16893559

  10. Direct reduction processes for titanium oxide in molten salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2007-02-01

    Molten salt electrolysis using CaCl2 is employed to produce pure titanium and its alloys directly from TiO2 and a mixture of elemental oxides, respectively, as an alternate to the Kroll process. This is because CaO, which is a reduction by-product, is highly soluble in CaCl2. Good-quality titanium containing only a small amount of residual oxygen has been successfully produced and scaled to industrial levels. Thermochemical and electrochemical bases are reviewed to optimize the process conditions. Several processes using molten salt are being examined for future progress in titanium processing.

  11. Wire-shaped ultraviolet photodetectors based on a nanostructured NiO/ZnO coaxial p-n heterojunction via thermal oxidation and hydrothermal growth processes.

    PubMed

    Ko, Yeong Hwan; Nagaraju, Goli; Yu, Jae Su

    2015-02-14

    We report the facile fabrication of wire-shaped ultraviolet photodetectors (WUPDs) by employing a nanostructured zinc oxide (ZnO)/nickel oxide (NiO) coaxial p-n heterojunction. The WUPD consists of a ZnO/NiO coaxial Ni wire and a twisted gold (Au) wire where the Ni and Au are used as the anode and cathode, respectively. For the coaxial p-n heterojunction, the NiO nanostructures (NSs) and the ZnO nanorods (NRs) are subsequently formed on the surface of Ni wire via thermal oxidation and hydrothermal growth processes. With an applied bias of -3.5 V, the WUPD exhibits good photoresponsivity of 7.37 A W(-1) and an external quantum efficiency of 28.1% at an incident light wavelength of 325 nm. Under the UV illumination at a wavelength of 365 nm, the dark current and photocurrent are -3.97 × 10(-7) and -8.47 × 10(-6) A, respectively. For enhancing the photocurrent, the WUPD is threaded through a silver (Ag) coated glass tube which acts as a waveguide to concentrate the UV light of 365 nm on the WUPD. As a result, the photocurrent is significantly improved up to -1.56 × 10(-5) A (i.e., 1.84 times) at the reverse bias of -3.5 V. PMID:25584497

  12. Process for combined control of mercury and nitric oxide.

    SciTech Connect

    Livengood, C. D.; Mendelsohn, M. H.

    1999-11-03

    Continuing concern about the effects of mercury in the environment may lead to requirements for the control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. If such controls are mandated, the use of existing flue-gas cleanup systems, such as wet scrubbers currently employed for flue-gas desulfurization, would be desirable, Such scrubbers have been shown to be effective for capturing oxidized forms of mercury, but cannot capture the very insoluble elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) that can form a significant fraction of the total emissions. At Argonne National Laboratory, we have proposed and tested a concept for enhancing removal of Hg{sup 0}, as well as nitric oxide, through introduction of an oxidizing agent into the flue gas upstream of a scrubber, which readily absorbs the soluble reaction products. Recently, we developed a new method for introducing the oxidizing agent into the flue-gas stream that dramatically improved reactant utilization. The oxidizing agent employed was NOXSORB{trademark}, which is a commercial product containing chloric acid and sodium chlorate. When a dilute solution of this agent was introduced into a gas stream containing Hg{sup 0} and other typical flue-gas species at 300 F, we found that about 100% of the mercury was removed from the gas phase and recovered in process liquids. At the same time, approximately 80% of the nitric oxide was removed. The effect of sulfur dioxide on this process was also investigated and the results showed that it slightly decreased the amount of Hg{sup 0} oxidized while appearing to increase the removal of nitric oxide from the gas phase. We are currently testing the effects of variations in NOXSORB{trademark} concentration, sulfur dioxide concentration, nitric oxide concentration, and reaction time (residence time). Preliminary economic projections based on the results to date indicate that the chemical cost for nitric oxide oxidation could be less than $5,000/ton removed, while for Hg{sup 0} oxidation it

  13. Effect of halide ions and carbonates on organic contaminant degradation by hydroxyl radical-based advanced oxidation processes in saline waters.

    PubMed

    Grebel, Janel E; Pignatello, Joseph J; Mitch, William A

    2010-09-01

    Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) generating nonselective hydroxyl radicals (HO*) provide a broad-spectrum contaminant destruction option for the decontamination of waters. Halide ions are scavengers of HO* during AOP treatment, such that treatment of saline waters would be anticipated to be ineffective. However, HO* scavenging by halides converts HO* to radical reactive halogen species (RHS) that participate in contaminant destruction but react more selectively with electron-rich organic compounds. The effects of Cl-, Br-, and carbonates (H2CO3+HCO3-+CO3(2-)) on the UV/H2O2 treatment of model compounds in saline waters were evaluated. For single target organic contaminants, the impact of these constituents on contaminant destruction rate suppression at circumneutral pH followed the order Br->carbonates>Cl-. Traces of Br- in the NaCl stock had a greater effect than Cl- itself. Kinetic modeling of phenol destruction demonstrated that RHS contributed significantly to phenol destruction, mitigating the impact of HO* scavenging. The extent of treatment efficiency reduction in the presence of halides varied dramatically among different target organic compounds. Destruction of contaminants containing electron-poor reaction centers in seawater was nearly halted, while 17beta-estradiol removal declined by only 3%. Treatment of mixtures of contaminants with each other and with natural organic matter (NOM) was evaluated. Although NOM served as an oxidant scavenger, conversion of nonselective HO* to selective radicals due to the presence of anions enhanced the efficiency of electron-rich contaminant removal in saline waters by focusing the oxidizing power of the system away from the NOM toward the target contaminant. Despite the importance of contaminant oxidation by halogen radicals, the formation of halogenated byproducts was minimal. PMID:20681567

  14. Stability of 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide as a spin-trap for quantification of hydroxyl radicals in processes based on Fenton reaction.

    PubMed

    Fontmorin, J M; Burgos Castillo, R C; Tang, W Z; Sillanpää, M

    2016-08-01

    Fenton reaction was used to produce hydroxyl radicals under conditions similar to AOPs with 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) as a spin trap agent in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analysis. A theoretical kinetics model was developed to determine conditions under which the spin-adduct DMPO-OH is not further oxidized by Fe(3+) and excessive radicals, so that hydroxyl radicals concentration could be accurately inferred. Experiments were designed based upon the model and H2O2 and Fe(2+) concentrations were varied from 1 to 100 mM and from 0.1 to 10 mM, respectively, with a constant H2O2: Fe(2+) ratio of 10:1. Results confirmed that DMPO concentration should be at least 20 times higher than the concentration of H2O2 and 200 times higher than iron concentration to produce stable DMPO-OH EPR signal. When DMPO: H2O2 ratio varied from 1 to 10, DMPO-OH could generate intermediates and be further oxidized leading to the apparition of an additional triplet. This signal was attributed to a paramagnetic dimer: its structure and a formation mechanism were proposed. Finally, the utilization of sodium sulfite and catalase to terminate Fenton reaction was discussed. Catalase appeared to be compatible with DMPO. However, sodium sulfite should be avoided since it reacted with DMPO-OH to form DMPO-SO3. PMID:27132196

  15. Butylated hydroxytoluene can reduce oxidative stress and improve quality of frozen-thawed bull semen processed in lecithin and egg yolk based extenders.

    PubMed

    Khumran, A M; Yimer, N; Rosnina, Y; Ariff, M O; Wahid, H; Kaka, Asmatullah; Ebrahimi, M; Sarsaifi, K

    2015-12-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of anti-oxidant butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), when added at different concentrations into lecithin-based Bioxcell(®) (BX) and two egg-yolk-based; Tris (TY) and citrate (CE) semen extenders, on post-thaw bull sperm quality and oxidative stress. A total of 30 ejaculates from three bulls were collected using an electro ejaculator. Ejaculates were extended with one of the BX, TY and CE extenders, which contained different concentrations (0.0 - control, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 3.0mM/ml) of BHT. The extended semen samples were chilled to 4 °C, and then frozen slowly to -196 °C in 0.25 ml straws before being stored in liquid nitrogen for 2 weeks. Results showed that supplementation of BHT improved (P<0.05) general motility, progressive motility, morphology, acrosome integrity, DNA integrity and malondialdehyde of sperm at 0.5mM/ml for BX and at 1-1.5mM/ml of BHT for TY and CE when compared with the control. However, greater concentrations of 2.0 and 3.0mM/ml of BHT had a detrimental (P<0.05) effect compared with the control with all extenders evaluated. In conclusion, BHT supplementation at lesser concentrations (0.5-1.5mM/ml) could improve frozen-thawed bull sperm quality by reducing oxidative stress produced during the freezing-thawing procedures in either lecithin or egg-yolk based extenders. PMID:26515370

  16. PROcess Based Diagnostics PROBE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clune, T.; Schmidt, G.; Kuo, K.; Bauer, M.; Oloso, H.

    2013-01-01

    Many of the aspects of the climate system that are of the greatest interest (e.g., the sensitivity of the system to external forcings) are emergent properties that arise via the complex interplay between disparate processes. This is also true for climate models most diagnostics are not a function of an isolated portion of source code, but rather are affected by multiple components and procedures. Thus any model-observation mismatch is hard to attribute to any specific piece of code or imperfection in a specific model assumption. An alternative approach is to identify diagnostics that are more closely tied to specific processes -- implying that if a mismatch is found, it should be much easier to identify and address specific algorithmic choices that will improve the simulation. However, this approach requires looking at model output and observational data in a more sophisticated way than the more traditional production of monthly or annual mean quantities. The data must instead be filtered in time and space for examples of the specific process being targeted.We are developing a data analysis environment called PROcess-Based Explorer (PROBE) that seeks to enable efficient and systematic computation of process-based diagnostics on very large sets of data. In this environment, investigators can define arbitrarily complex filters and then seamlessly perform computations in parallel on the filtered output from their model. The same analysis can be performed on additional related data sets (e.g., reanalyses) thereby enabling routine comparisons between model and observational data. PROBE also incorporates workflow technology to automatically update computed diagnostics for subsequent executions of a model. In this presentation, we will discuss the design and current status of PROBE as well as share results from some preliminary use cases.

  17. The oxidation of carbon monoxide using tin oxide based catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampson, Christopher F.; Jorgensen, Norman

    1990-01-01

    The preparation conditions for precious metal/tin oxide catalysts were optimized for maximum carbon monoxide/oxygen recombination efficiency. This was achieved by controlling the tin digestion, the peptization to form the sol, the calcination process and the method of adding the precious metals. Extensive studies of the tin oxide structure were carried out over the temperature range 20 to 500 C in air or hydrogen environments using Raman scattering and X ray diffraction. Adsorbed species on tin oxide, generated in an environment containing carbon monoxide, gave rise to a Raman band at about 1600 cm(exp -1) which was assigned to carbonaceous groups, possible carbonate.

  18. Process for fabrication of metal oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Tracy, C.E.; Benson, D.; Svensson, S.

    1990-07-17

    This invention is comprised of a method of fabricating metal oxide films from a plurality of reactants by inducing a reaction by plasma deposition among the reactants. The plasma reaction is effective for consolidating the reactants and producing thin films of metal oxides, e.g. electro-optically active transition metal oxides, at a high deposition rate. The presence of hydrogen during the plasma reaction enhances the deposition rate of the metal oxide. Various types of metal oxide films can be produced.

  19. Wire-shaped ultraviolet photodetectors based on a nanostructured NiO/ZnO coaxial p-n heterojunction via thermal oxidation and hydrothermal growth processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Yeong Hwan; Nagaraju, Goli; Yu, Jae Su

    2015-01-01

    We report the facile fabrication of wire-shaped ultraviolet photodetectors (WUPDs) by employing a nanostructured zinc oxide (ZnO)/nickel oxide (NiO) coaxial p-n heterojunction. The WUPD consists of a ZnO/NiO coaxial Ni wire and a twisted gold (Au) wire where the Ni and Au are used as the anode and cathode, respectively. For the coaxial p-n heterojunction, the NiO nanostructures (NSs) and the ZnO nanorods (NRs) are subsequently formed on the surface of Ni wire via thermal oxidation and hydrothermal growth processes. With an applied bias of -3.5 V, the WUPD exhibits good photoresponsivity of 7.37 A W-1 and an external quantum efficiency of 28.1% at an incident light wavelength of 325 nm. Under the UV illumination at a wavelength of 365 nm, the dark current and photocurrent are -3.97 × 10-7 and -8.47 × 10-6 A, respectively. For enhancing the photocurrent, the WUPD is threaded through a silver (Ag) coated glass tube which acts as a waveguide to concentrate the UV light of 365 nm on the WUPD. As a result, the photocurrent is significantly improved up to -1.56 × 10-5 A (i.e., 1.84 times) at the reverse bias of -3.5 V.We report the facile fabrication of wire-shaped ultraviolet photodetectors (WUPDs) by employing a nanostructured zinc oxide (ZnO)/nickel oxide (NiO) coaxial p-n heterojunction. The WUPD consists of a ZnO/NiO coaxial Ni wire and a twisted gold (Au) wire where the Ni and Au are used as the anode and cathode, respectively. For the coaxial p-n heterojunction, the NiO nanostructures (NSs) and the ZnO nanorods (NRs) are subsequently formed on the surface of Ni wire via thermal oxidation and hydrothermal growth processes. With an applied bias of -3.5 V, the WUPD exhibits good photoresponsivity of 7.37 A W-1 and an external quantum efficiency of 28.1% at an incident light wavelength of 325 nm. Under the UV illumination at a wavelength of 365 nm, the dark current and photocurrent are -3.97 × 10-7 and -8.47 × 10-6 A, respectively. For enhancing the photocurrent

  20. Oxidative Degradation and Stabilisation of Mineral Oil-Based Lubricants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, G.; Mazzamaro, G.; Rasberger, M.

    Thermally induced hydrocarbon oxidation is a self-accelerating autoxidation process and is divided into 'low'-, 30-120°C, and 'high'-, >120°C, temperature phases. The first has four stages - induction of radical chain reactions, propagation, branching and then termination. Mechanisms of these processes are described and discussed. Differences in hydrocarbon reactivity are related to molecular structure. For hydrocarbon oxidation >120°C, the first stage is the same as low-temperature oxidation but with reduced selectivity and increased reactivity; second, the oxidation phase becomes diffusion controlled as hydrocarbon viscosities increase from progressive polycondensation of higher molecular weight products, causing varnish and sludge formation. Base oil oxidation stabilities depend upon their derivation, whether solvent neutral, hydrocracked or synthetic, and their response to antioxidant treatment. Lubricant oxidation control focuses on radical scavengers and hydroperoxide decomposers and their synergistic mixtures.

  1. Process for strengthening silicon based ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Moorhead, A. J.

    1993-04-06

    A process for strengthening silicon based ceramic monolithic materials and omposite materials that contain silicon based ceramic reinforcing phases that requires that the ceramic be exposed to a wet hydrogen atmosphere at about 1400.degree. C. The process results in a dense, tightly adherent silicon containing oxide layer that heals, blunts , or otherwise negates the detrimental effect of strength limiting flaws on the surface of the ceramic body.

  2. Process for strengthening silicon based ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Moorhead, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    A process for strengthening silicon based ceramic monolithic materials and omposite materials that contain silicon based ceramic reinforcing phases that requires that the ceramic be exposed to a wet hydrogen atmosphere at about 1400.degree. C. The process results in a dense, tightly adherent silicon containing oxide layer that heals, blunts , or otherwise negates the detrimental effect of strength limiting flaws on the surface of the ceramic body.

  3. Partial oxidation process with extractant purification

    SciTech Connect

    Stellaccio, R.J.

    1983-09-06

    A partial oxidation process is disclosed with an extractant purifier for removing the particulate carbon entrained in a vaporized stream of normally liquid organic extractant-carbon-water dispersion from a decanter and producing a clean vaporized mixture of liquid organic extractant and water and a separate liquid stream of liquid hydrocarbonaceous fuel-carbon dispersion. The extractant purifier comprises a closed, vertical, cylindrical, thermally insulated vessel with an unobstructed central passage. Supported in the upper section of the vessel is a gas-solids separator for separating the particulate carbon from the vaporized dispersion flowing up the vessel and discharging the particulate carbon into atomized liquid hydrocarbon fuel located within the lower section of the purifier.

  4. Process for selected gas oxide removal by radiofrequency catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Cha, Chang Y.

    1993-01-01

    This process to remove gas oxides from flue gas utilizes adsorption on a char bed subsequently followed by radiofrequency catalysis enhancing such removal through selected reactions. Common gas oxides include SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x.

  5. Process for depositing an oxide epitaxially onto a silicon substrate and structures prepared with the process

    DOEpatents

    McKee, Rodney A.; Walker, Frederick J.

    1993-01-01

    A process and structure involving a silicon substrate utilizes an ultra high vacuum and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) methods to grow an epitaxial oxide film upon a surface of the substrate. As the film is grown, the lattice of the compound formed at the silicon interface becomes stabilized, and a base layer comprised of an oxide having a sodium chloride-type lattice structure grows epitaxially upon the compound so as to cover the substrate surface. A perovskite may then be grown epitaxially upon the base layer to render a product which incorporates silicon, with its electronic capabilities, with a perovskite having technologically-significant properties of its own.

  6. An AFM-based surface oxidation process for heavily carbon-doped p-type GaAs with a hole concentration of 1.5×1021 cm-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirakashi, J.-I.; Matsumoto, K.; Konagai, M.

    Under appropriate bias conditions in ambient humidity, AFM can be used to selectively oxidize the surface of electronic materials such as metals and semiconductors. Therefore, an AFM-based surface modification technique would be a powerful tool for fabricating nanometer-sized metal (M)/insulator (I) or semiconductor (S)/insulator (I) junction structures. Heavily carbon-doped p-type GaAs with a hole concentration of 1.5×1021 cm-3 is also of great interest for application to novel device structures, because the carrier concentration is comparable to that of normal metals. Selective surface oxidation of carbon-doped p-type GaAs was achieved using a negatively biased conductive tip. The oxidation shown here was carried out under 20-25% ambient humidity. By changing the applied bias voltage and the scanning speed of the cantilever, the size of the modified structure wires was precisely controlled, with a feature size of 10 nm. These results suggest that GaAs-based devices with ultra-small SIS junction systems could be realized using the AFM-based surface oxidation process.

  7. Nanowire-based All Oxide Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang*, Benjamin D. Yuhas and Peidong; Yang, Peidong

    2008-12-07

    We present an all-oxide solar cell fabricated from vertically oriented zinc oxide nanowires and cuprous oxide nanoparticles. Our solar cell consists of vertically oriented n-type zinc oxide nanowires, surrounded by a film constructed from p-type cuprous oxide nanoparticles. Our solution-based synthesis of inexpensive and environmentally benign oxide materials in a solar cell would allow for the facile production of large-scale photovoltaic devices. We found that the solar cell performance is enhanced with the addition of an intermediate oxide insulating layer between the nanowires and the nanoparticles. This observation of the important dependence of the shunt resistance on the photovoltaic performance is widely applicable to any nanowire solar cell constructed with the nanowire array in direct contact with one electrode.

  8. Development studies for a novel wet oxidation process

    SciTech Connect

    Dhooge, P.M.; Hakim, L.B.

    1994-01-01

    A catalytic wet oxidation process (DETOX), which uses an acidic iron solution to oxidize organic compounds to carbon dioxide, water, and other simple products, was investigated as a potential method for the treatment of multicomponent hazardous and mixed wastes. The organic compounds picric acid, poly(vinyl chloride), tetrachlorothiophene, pentachloropyridine, Aroclor 1260 (a polychlorinated biphenyl), and hexachlorobenzene were oxidized in 125 ml reaction vessels. The metals arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cerium (as a surrogate for plutonium), chromium, lead, mercury, neodymium (as a surrogate for uranium), nickel, and vanadium were tested in the DETOX solution. Barium, beryllium, cerium, chromium, mercury, neodymium, nickel, and vanadium were all found to be very soluble (>100 g/l) in the DETOX chloride-based solution. Arsenic, barium, cadmium, and lead solubilities were lower. Lead could be selectively precipitated from the DETOX solution. Chromium(VI) was reduced to relatively non-toxic chromium(III) by the solution. Six soils were contaminated with arsenic, barium, beryllium, chromium, lead, and neodymium oxides at approximately 0.1% by weight, and benzene, trichloroethene, mineral oil, and Aroclor 1260 at approximately 5% by weight total, and 5.g amounts treated with the DETOX solution in unstirred 125. ml reaction bombs. It is felt that soil treatment in a properly designed system is entirely possible despite incomplete oxidation of the less volatile organic materials in these unstirred tests.

  9. PROCESS OF PRODUCING REFRACTORY URANIUM OXIDE ARTICLES

    DOEpatents

    Hamilton, N.E.

    1957-12-01

    A method is presented for fabricating uranium oxide into a shaped refractory article by introducing a uranium halide fluxing reagent into the uranium oxide, and then mixing and compressing the materials into a shaped composite mass. The shaped mass of uranium oxide and uranium halide is then fired at an elevated temperature so as to form a refractory sintered article. It was found in the present invention that the introduction of a uraninm halide fluxing agent afforded a fluxing action with the uranium oxide particles and that excellent cohesion between these oxide particles was obtained. Approximately 90% of uranium dioxide and 10% of uranium tetrafluoride represent a preferred composition.

  10. Thick film oxidation of copper in an electroplated MEMS process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarus, N.; Meyer, C. D.; Bedair, S. S.; Song, X.; Boteler, L. M.; Kierzewski, I. M.

    2013-06-01

    Copper forms a porous oxide, allowing the formation of oxide layers up to tens of microns thick to be created at modest processing temperatures. In this work, the controlled oxidation of copper is employed within an all-metal electroplating process to create electrically insulating, structural posts and beams. This capability could eliminate the additional dielectric deposition and patterning steps that are often needed during the construction of sensors, waveguides, and other microfabricated devices. In this paper, copper oxidation rates for thermal and plasma-assisted growth methods are characterized. Time control of the oxide growth enables larger copper structures to remain conductive while smaller copper posts are fully oxidized. The concept is demonstrated using the controlled oxidation of a copper layer between two nickel layers to fabricate nickel inductors having both copper electrical vias and copper oxide support pillars. Nickel was utilized in this demonstration for its resistance against low temperature oxidation and interdiffusion with copper.

  11. Solid oxide membrane (SOM) process for ytterbium and silicon production from their oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yihong

    The Solid oxide membrane (SOM) electrolysis is an innovative green technology that produces technologically important metals directly from their respective oxides. A yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) tube, closed at one end is employed to separate the molten salt containing dissolved metal oxides from the anode inside the YSZ tube. When the applied electric potential between the cathode in the molten salt and the anode exceeds the dissociation potential of the desired metal oxides, oxygen ions in the molten salt migrate through the YSZ membrane and are oxidized at the anode while the dissolved metal cations in the flux are reduced to the desired metal at the cathode. Compared with existing metal production processes, the SOM process has many advantages such as one unit operation, less energy consumption, lower capital costs and zero carbon emission. Successful implementation of the SOM electrolysis process would provide a way to mitigate the negative environmental impact of the metal industry. Successful demonstration of producing ytterbium (Yb) and silicon (Si) directly from their respective oxides utilizing the SOM electrolysis process is presented in this dissertation. During the SOM electrolysis process, Yb2O3 was reduced to Yb metal on an inert cathode. The melting point of the supporting electrolyte (LiF-YbF3-Yb2O3) was determined by differential thermal analysis (DTA). Static stability testing confirmed that the YSZ tube was stable with the flux at operating temperature. Yb metal deposit on the cathode was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). During the SOM electrolysis process for silicon production, a fluoride based flux based on BaF2, MgF2, and YF3 was engineered to serve as the liquid electrolyte for dissolving silicon dioxide. YSZ tube was used to separate the molten salt from an anode current collector in the liquid silver. Liquid tin was chosen as cathode to dissolve the reduced silicon during

  12. Phenol oxidation kinetics in water solution using iron(3)-oxide-based nano-catalysts.

    PubMed

    Zelmanov, Grigory; Semiat, Raphael

    2008-08-01

    The influence of inorganic ions (HCO(3), PO(4)/HPO(4)/H(2)PO(4), Cl, SO(4), Ca, Na and Mg) on the advanced chemical oxidation process of organic compounds dissolved in water is reported here. The catalytic behavior of iron(3)-oxide-based nano-particles was investigated together with inorganic ions and hydrogen peroxide concentrations, and pH level. Phenol was chosen as a typical organic contaminant for this study as a simulating pollutant. The limiting concentrations of radical scavengers making the oxidation process inefficient were identified. The strong effect of concentration of radical scavengers HCO(3), PO(4)/HPO(4)/H(2)PO(4), the nano-catalyst and hydrogen peroxide concentrations, and pH on the phenol oxidation rate and lag time period before reaction starts was determined. It was shown that Cl, SO(4), Ca, Na and Mg ions had no significant effect on the kinetics of phenol oxidation. PMID:18657285

  13. Combining Advanced Oxidation Processes: Assessment Of Process Additivity, Synergism, And Antagonism

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Robert W.; Sharma, M.P.; Gbadebo Adewuyi, Yusuf

    2007-07-01

    This paper addresses the process interactions from combining integrated processes (such as advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), biological operations, air stripping, etc.). AOPs considered include: Fenton's reagent, ultraviolet light, titanium dioxide, ozone (O{sub 3}), hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), sonication/acoustic cavitation, among others. A critical review of the technical literature has been performed, and the data has been analyzed in terms of the processes being additive, synergistic, or antagonistic. Predictions based on the individual unit operations are made and compared against the behavior of the combined unit operations. The data reported in this paper focus primarily on treatment of petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents. (authors)

  14. Oxidation Ditches. Student Manual. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelsen, David

    The textual material for a two-lesson unit on oxidation ditches is presented in this student manual. Topics discussed in the first lesson (introduction, theory, and components) include: history of the oxidation ditch process; various designs of the oxidation ditch; multi-trench systems; carrousel system; advantages and disadvantages of the…

  15. One-Step Process for High-Performance, Adhesive, Flexible Transparent Conductive Films Based on p-Type Reduced Graphene Oxides and Silver Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yi-Ting; Tai, Nyan-Hwa

    2015-08-26

    This work demonstrates a one-step process to synthesize uniformly dispersed hybrid nanomaterial containing silver nanowires (AgNWs) and p-type reduced graphene (p-rGO). The hybrid nanomaterial was coated onto a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate for preparing high-performance flexible transparent conductive films (TCFs). The p-rGO plays the role of bridging discrete AgNWs, providing more electron holes and lowering the resistance of the contacted AgNWs; therefore, enhancing the electrical conductivity without sacrificing too much transparence of the TCFs. Additionally, the p-rGO also improves the adhesion between AgNWs and substrate by covering the AgNWs on the substrate tightly. The study shows that coating of the hybrid nanomaterials on the PET substrate demonstrates exceptional optoelectronic properties with a transmittance of 94.68% (at a wavelength of 550 nm) and a sheet resistance of 25.0 ± 0.8 Ω/sq. No significant variation in electric resistance can be detected even when the film was subjected to a bend loading with a radius of curvature of 5.0 mm or the film was loaded with a reciprocal tension or compression for 1000 cycles. Furthermore, both chemical corrosion resistance and haze effect were improved when p-rGO was introduced. The study shows that the fabricated flexible TCFs have the potential to replace indium tin oxide film in the optoelectronic industry. PMID:26247286

  16. Artifacts associated with the measurement of oxidized DNA bases.

    PubMed Central

    Cadet, J; Douki, T; Ravanat, J L

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we review recent aspects of the measurement of oxidized DNA bases, currently a matter of debate. There has long been an interest in the determination of the level of oxidized bases in cellular DNA under both normal and oxidative stress conditions. In this respect, the situation is confusing because variations that may be as large as two orders of magnitude have been reported for the yield of the formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoGua) in similar DNA samples. However, recent findings clearly show that application of several assays like gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and -32P--postlabeling may lead to a significant overestimation of the level of oxidized bases in cellular DNA. In particular, the silylation step, which is required to make the samples volatile for the GC-MS analysis, has been shown to induce oxidation of normal bases at the level of about one oxidized base per 10(4) normal bases. This has been found to be a general process that applies in particular to 8-oxoGua, 8-oxo-7, 8-dihydroadenine,5-hydroxycytosine, 5-(hydroxymethyl)uracil, and 5-formyluracil. Interestingly, prepurification of the oxidized bases from DNA hydrolysate prior to the derivatization reaction prevents artefactual oxidation. Under these conditions, the level of oxidized bases measured by GC-MS is similar to that obtained by HPLC associated with electrochemical detection (HPLC-EC). It should be added that the level of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2;-deoxyguanosine in control cellular DNA has been found to be about fivefold lower than in earlier HPLC-EC measurements by using appropriate conditions of extraction and enzymatic digestion of DNA. Similar conclusions were reached by measuring formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase sensitive sites as revealed by the single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay. Images Figure 1. PMID:9349826

  17. Process for depositing epitaxial alkaline earth oxide onto a substrate and structures prepared with the process

    DOEpatents

    McKee, Rodney A.; Walker, Frederick J.

    1996-01-01

    A process and structure involving a silicon substrate utilize molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and/or electron beam evaporation methods and an ultra-high vacuum facility to grow a layup of epitaxial alkaline earth oxide films upon the substrate surface. By selecting metal constituents for the oxides and in the appropriate proportions so that the lattice parameter of each oxide grown closely approximates that of the substrate or base layer upon which oxide is grown, lattice strain at the film/film or film/substrate interface of adjacent films is appreciably reduced or relieved. Moreover, by selecting constituents for the oxides so that the lattice parameters of the materials of adjacent oxide films either increase or decrease in size from one parameter to another parameter, a graded layup of films can be grown (with reduced strain levels therebetween) so that the outer film has a lattice parameter which closely approximates that of, and thus accomodates the epitaxial growth of, a pervoskite chosen to be grown upon the outer film.

  18. Synthesis and processing of monosized oxide powders

    DOEpatents

    Barringer, E.A.; Fegley, M.B. Jr.; Bowen, H.K.

    1985-09-24

    Uniform-size, high-purity, spherical oxide powders are formed by hydrolysis of alkoxide precursors in dilute alcoholic solutions. Under controlled conditions (concentrations of 0.03 to 0.2 M alkoxide and 0.2 to 1.5 M water, for example) oxide particles on the order of about 0.05 to 0.7 microns can be produced. Methods of doping such powders and forming sinterable compacts are also disclosed. 6 figs.

  19. Synthesis and processing of monosized oxide powders

    DOEpatents

    Barringer, Eric A.; Fegley, Jr., M. Bruce; Bowen, H. Kent

    1985-01-01

    Uniform-size, high-purity, spherical oxide powders are formed by hydrolysis of alkoxide precursors in dilute alcoholic solutions. Under controlled conditions (concentrations of 0.03 to 0.2 M alkoxide and 0.2 to 1.5 M water, for example) oxide particles on the order of about 0.05 to 0.7 micron can be produced. Methods of doping such powders and forming sinterable compacts are also disclosed.

  20. Cooperative processing data bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasta, Juzar

    1991-01-01

    Cooperative processing for the 1990's using client-server technology is addressed. The main theme is concepts of downsizing from mainframes and minicomputers to workstations on a local area network (LAN). This document is presented in view graph form.

  1. Active Oxidation of a UHTC-Based CMC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.; Splinter, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    The active oxidation of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) is a severe problem that must be avoided for multi-use hypersonic vehicles. Much work has been performed studying the active oxidation of silicon-based CMCs such as C/SiC and SiC-coated carbon/carbon (C/C). Ultra high temperature ceramics (UTHC) have been proposed as a possible material solution for high-temperature applications on hypersonic vehicles. However, little work has been performed studying the active oxidation of UHTCs. The intent of this paper is to present test data indicating an active oxidation process for a UHTC-based CMC similar to the active oxidation observed with Si-based CMCs. A UHTC-based CMC was tested in the HyMETS arc-jet facility (or plasma wind tunnel, PWT) at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA. The coupon was tested at a nominal surface temperature of 3000 F (1650 C), with a stagnation pressure of 0.026 atm. A sudden and large increase in surface temperature was noticed with negligible increase in the heat flux, indicative of the onset of active oxidation. It is shown that the surface conditions, both temperature and pressure, fall within the region for a passive to active transition (PAT) of the oxidation.

  2. Process for the separation of sulfur oxides from a gaseous mixture containing sulfur oxides and oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Derosset, A.J.; Ginger, E.A.

    1980-12-23

    An improved process for the separation of sulfur oxides from a gaseous mixture containing sulfur oxides and oxygen is disclosed. The gaseous mixture is contacted with a solid sulfur oxide acceptor comprising copper, copper oxide, or a mixture thereof dispersed on a carrier material in combination with a platinum group metal component and a component selected from the group consisting of rhenium, germanium and tin.

  3. Application of solution-processed V2O5 in inverted polymer solar cells based on fluorine-doped tin oxide substrate.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian; Zhang, Yupeng; He, Yeyuan; Liu, Chunyu; Guolt, Wenbin; Ruan, Shengping

    2014-06-01

    We used a hydrothermal method to synthesis the solution-processed V2O5 as anode buffer layer, which applied on inverted polymer solar cells based on FTO substrate. The structure of the device is glass/FTO/TiO2/P3HT:PCBM/V2O5/Ag. We discussed the dependence of device performance on the concentrations of V2O5 solution. It is found that when the concentration of V2O5 is 300 microg/ml, the power conversion efficiency (PCE of 2.38%) is the highest, which is much higher than that of the device without anode buffer layer (PCE of only 0.87%). Moreover, it can significantly reduce the energy consumption and make it more cost-effective. PMID:24738373

  4. Catalyst and process for oxidizing hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Hass, R.H.; Fullerton; Ward, J.W.; Yorba, L.

    1984-04-24

    Catalysts comprising bismuth and vanadium components are highly active and stable, especially in the presence of water vapor, for oxidizing hydrogen sulfide to sulfur or SO/sub 2/. Such catalysts have been found to be especially active for the conversion of hydrogen sulfide to sulfur by reaction with oxygen or SO/sub 2/.

  5. Conversion of Sulfur by Wet Oxidation in the Bayer Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhanwei; Li, Wangxing; Ma, Wenhui; Yin, Zhonglin; Wu, Guobao

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, the effects of temperature, oxidation time, and oxygen concentration on the conversion of sulfur by wet oxidation in the Bayer process were investigated at length. The results show that active sulfur S2- and S2O3 2- in sodium aluminate solution can be converted completely by wet oxidation during the digestion process, thus the effects of S2- and S2O3 2- on alumina product quality are eliminated; increased temperature, oxidation time, and oxygen concentration are conducive to conversion of S2- and S2O3 2-. At the same time, part of the organic carbon in the sodium aluminate solution is also oxidized by wet oxidation, and the color of the sodium aluminate solution noticeably fades.

  6. Nitric Oxide Regulation of Mitochondrial Processes: Commonality in Medical Disorders.

    PubMed

    Stefano, George B; Kream, Richard M

    2015-01-01

    The vital status of diverse classes of eukaryotic mitochondria is reflected by the high degree of evolutionary modification functionally linked to ongoing multifaceted organelle development. From this teleological perspective, a logistical enhancement of eukaryotic cellular energy requirements indicates a convergence of metabolic processes within the mitochondrial matrix for optimal synthesis of ATP from ADP and inorganic phosphate and necessitates an evolutionarily driven retrofit of the primordial endosymbiont bacterial plasma membrane into the inner mitochondrial membrane. The biochemical complexity of eukaryotic inner membrane electron transport complexes linked to temporally-defined, state-dependent, fluctuations in mitochondrial oxygen utilization is capable of generating deleterious reactive oxygen species. Within this functional context, an extensive neurochemical literature supports the role of the free radical gas nitric oxide (NO) as a key signaling molecule involved in the regulation of multiple aspects of mitochondrial respiration/oxidative phosphorylation. Importantly, the unique chemical properties of NO underlie its rapid metabolism in vivo within a mechanistic spectrum of small oxidative molecules, free and protein-bound thiol adducts, and reversible binding to ferrous heme iron centers. Recent compelling work has identified a medically relevant dual regulation pathway for mitochondrial NO expression mediated by traditionally characterized NO synthases (NOS) and by enzymatic reduction of available cellular nitrite pools by a diverse class of cytosolic and mitochondrial nitrite reductases. Accordingly, our short review presents selected medically-based discussion topics relating to multi-faceted NO regulation of mitochondrial functions in human health and disease states. PMID:26177568

  7. Process for Producing Metal Compounds From Graphite Oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A process for providing elemental metals or metal oxides distributed on a carbon substrate or self-supported utilizing graphite oxide as a precursor. The graphite oxide is exposed to one or more metal chlorides to form an intermediary product comprising carbon, metal, chloride, and oxygen. This intermediary product can be fiber processed by direct exposure to carbonate solutions to form a second intermediary product comprising carbon. metal carbonate. and oxygen. Either intermediary product may be further processed: a) in air to produce metal oxide b) in an inert environment to produce metal oxide on carbon substrate; c) in a reducing environment to produce elemental metal distributed on carbon substrate. The product generally takes the shape of the carbon precursor.

  8. Process for Producing Metal Compounds from Graphite Oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A process for providing elemental metals or metal oxides distributed on a carbon substrate or self-supported utilizing graphite oxide as a precursor. The graphite oxide is exposed to one or more metal chlorides to form an intermediary product comprising carbon. metal. chloride. and oxygen This intermediary product can be flier processed by direct exposure to carbonate solutions to form a second intermediary product comprising carbon. metal carbonate. and oxygen. Either intermediary product may be further processed: a) in air to produce metal oxide: b) in an inert environment to produce metal oxide on carbon substrate: c) in a reducing environment. to produce elemental metal distributed on carbon substrate. The product generally takes the shape of the carbon precursor.

  9. Process for producing metal compounds from graphite oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A process for providing elemental metals or metal oxides distributed on a carbon substrate or self-supported utilizing graphite oxide as a precursor. The graphite oxide is exposed to one or more metal chlorides to form an intermediary product comprising carbon, metal, chloride, and oxygen This intermediary product can be flier processed by direct exposure to carbonate solutions to form a second intermediary product comprising carbon, metal carbonate, and oxygen. Either intermediary product may be further processed: a) in air to produce metal oxide; b) in an inert environment to produce metal oxide on carbon substrate; c) in a reducing environment to produce elemental metal distributed on carbon substrate. The product generally takes the shape of the carbon precursor.

  10. Nitrous oxide emissions from wastewater treatment processes

    PubMed Central

    Law, Yingyu; Ye, Liu; Pan, Yuting; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2012-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from wastewater treatment plants vary substantially between plants, ranging from negligible to substantial (a few per cent of the total nitrogen load), probably because of different designs and operational conditions. In general, plants that achieve high levels of nitrogen removal emit less N2O, indicating that no compromise is required between high water quality and lower N2O emissions. N2O emissions primarily occur in aerated zones/compartments/periods owing to active stripping, and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, rather than heterotrophic denitrifiers, are the main contributors. However, the detailed mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated, despite strong evidence suggesting that both nitrifier denitrification and the chemical breakdown of intermediates of hydroxylamine oxidation are probably involved. With increased understanding of the fundamental reactions responsible for N2O production in wastewater treatment systems and the conditions that stimulate their occurrence, reduction of N2O emissions from wastewater treatment systems through improved plant design and operation will be achieved in the near future. PMID:22451112

  11. Process for selected gas oxide removal by radiofrequency catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Cha, C.Y.

    1993-09-21

    This process to remove gas oxides from flue gas utilizes adsorption on a char bed subsequently followed by radiofrequency catalysis enhancing such removal through selected reactions. Common gas oxides include SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x]. 1 figure.

  12. FENTON OXIDATION AND ADSORPTION/OXIDATION: PROCESS OPTIMIZATION AND APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The majority of the work proposed in the research will be in the laboratory. A pilot-scale treatability study will be conducted at an EPA Superfund site. The decision to conduct a pilot-scale study will be based on laboratory treatability study results. The following general su...

  13. Solid oxide electrochemical cell fabrication process

    DOEpatents

    Dollard, Walter J.; Folser, George R.; Pal, Uday B.; Singhal, Subhash C.

    1992-01-01

    A method to form an electrochemical cell (12) is characterized by the steps of thermal spraying stabilized zirconia over a doped lanthanum manganite air electrode tube (14) to provide an electrolyte layer (15), coating conductive particles over the electrolyte, pressurizing the outside of the electrolyte layer, feeding halide vapors of yttrium and zirconium to the outside of the electrolyte layer and feeding a source of oxygen to the inside of the electrolyte layer, heating to cause oxygen reaction with the halide vapors to close electrolyte pores if there are any and to form a metal oxide coating on and between the particles and provide a fuel electrode (16).

  14. Development studies for a novel wet oxidation process. Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    1994-07-01

    DETOX{sup SM} is a catalyzed wet oxidation process which destroys organic materials in an acidic water solution of iron at 373 to 473 K. The solution can be used repeatedly to destroy great amounts of organic materials. Since the process is conducted in a contained vessel, air emissions from the process can be well controlled. The solution is also capable of dissolving and concentrating many heavy and radioactive metals for eventual stabilization and disposal. The Phase 2 effort for this project is site selection and engineering design for a DETOX demonstration unit. Site selection was made using a set of site selection criteria and evaluation factors. A survey of mixed wastes at DOE sites was conducted using the Interim Mixed Waste Inventory Report. Sites with likely suitable waste types were identified. Potential demonstration sites were ranked based on waste types, interest, regulatory needs, scheduling, ability to provide support, and available facilities. Engineering design for the demonstration unit is in progress and is being performed by Jacobs Applied Technology. The engineering design proceeded through preliminary process flow diagrams (PFDs), calculation of mass and energy balances for representative waste types, process and instrumentation diagrams (P and IDs), preparation of component specifications, and a firm cost estimate for fabrication of the demonstration unit.

  15. Process for the reduction of nitrogen oxides in an effluent

    SciTech Connect

    Epperly, W.R.; Sullivan, J.C.; Sprague, B.N.

    1989-09-05

    This patent describes a process for the reduction of the concentration of nitrogen oxides in the effluent from the combustion of a carbonaceous fuel. The process comprises introducing a heterocyclic hydrocarbon selected from the group consisting of piperazine, piperidine, pyrazine, pyrazole, imidazole, oxazolidone, pyrrole and pyrrolidine into the effluent having an effluent temperature of greater than about 1200{sup 0}F. under conditions effective to reduce the concentration of nitrogen oxides in the effluent.

  16. Solid oxide fuel cell process and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, Matthew Ellis; Bayless, David J.; Trembly, Jason P.

    2011-11-15

    Conveying gas containing sulfur through a sulfur tolerant planar solid oxide fuel cell (PSOFC) stack for sulfur scrubbing, followed by conveying the gas through a non-sulfur tolerant PSOFC stack. The sulfur tolerant PSOFC stack utilizes anode materials, such as LSV, that selectively convert H.sub.2S present in the fuel stream to other non-poisoning sulfur compounds. The remaining balance of gases remaining in the completely or near H.sub.2S-free exhaust fuel stream is then used as the fuel for the conventional PSOFC stack that is downstream of the sulfur-tolerant PSOFC. A broad range of fuels such as gasified coal, natural gas and reformed hydrocarbons are used to produce electricity.

  17. The role of oxidative processes in emphysema

    SciTech Connect

    Janoff, A.; Carp, H.; Laurent, P.; Raju, L.

    1983-02-01

    Elastase/elastase inhibitor imbalance in the lung has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema. In light of this, it may be significant that the activity of two major elastase inhibitors, alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha 1-antitrypsin, alpha 1Pi) and bronchial mucous proteinase inhibitor, can be decreased by oxidizing agents. The effect can be observed with ozone, substances present in cigarette smoke, and oxygen metabolites generated by lung macrophages as well as peroxidative systems released by other phagocytic cells. Thus alpha 1Pi recovered from lung washings of cigarette smokers has only half the predicted normal activity per mg inhibitor and contains 4 moles of methionine sulfoxide (oxidized methionine) per mole of inactive inhibitor. By contrast, alpha 1Pi purified from nonsmokers' lung washings is fully active and contains only native methionine. At the same time, lung washes from some smokers show significantly greater hydrolytic activity against a specific synthetic elastase substrate than do lung washes of nonsmokers. These findings suggest that some smokers may develop an acquired imbalance between elastase and elastase inhibitor in their lungs, favoring activity of the enzyme. In addition to the potential effect of cigarette smoking on lung elastase/elastase inhibitor balance, smoking also may interfere with elastin repair mechanisms. Specifically, acidic water-soluble gas phase components of cigarette smoke prevent synthesis of desmosine cross-links during elastinogenesis in vitro. This report will attempt to correlate the foregoing information on biochemical changes in the lung induced by cigarette smoking with the development of emphysema in the smoker.

  18. CAVITATIONAL HYDROTHERMAL OXIDATION: A NEW REMEDIATION PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research will explore the emerging science of sonochemistry and its technological applications for organic waste remediation, particularly for water and soil purification. Ultrasound can induce unusual high-energy chemistry through the process of acoustic cavitation: the for...

  19. Surface photovoltage analysis of iron contamination in silicon processing and the relation to gate oxide integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henley, Worth B.

    1995-09-01

    Surface photovoltage (SPV), a contactless optical technique for measuring minority carrier lifetime, is used to quantify the relationship between silicon iron contamination level and thin gate oxide integrity. Iron concentration levels in the range of 1 X 1010 cm-3 to 5 X 1013 cm-3 are evaluated for oxide thicknesses of 8 to 20 nm. Ramp voltage electrical breakdown and time dependant dielectric breakdown measurement on the iron contaminated gate oxide capacitors are reported. Distinct iron contamination threshold limits based on defect density and gate oxide integrity evaluate cleaning efficiencies and metallic cross contamination effects during thermal processing contamination. Iron-silicide precipitation kinetics are investigated by the lifetime analysis procedure.

  20. Surface modification of nickel based alloys for improved oxidation resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Alman, David E.

    2005-02-01

    The present research is aimed at the evaluation of a surface modification treatment to enhance the high temperature stability of nickel-base superalloys. A low Coefficient Thermal Expansion (CTE ~12.5x10-6/°C) alloy based on the composition (in weight %) of Ni-22Mo-12.5Cr was produced by Vacuum Induction Melting and Vacuum Arc Melting and reduced to sheet by conventional thermal-mechanical processing. A surface treatment was devised to enhance the oxidation resistance of the alloys at high temperature. Oxidation tests (in dry and wet air; treated and untreated) were conducted 800°C to evaluate the oxidation resistance of the alloys. The results were compared to the behavior of Haynes 230 (Ni-22Cr) in the treated and untreated conditions. The treatment was not very effective for Haynes 230, as this alloy had similar oxidation behavior in both the treated and untreated conditions. However, the treatment had a significant effect on the behavior of the low CTE alloy. At 800°C, the untreated Ni-12.5Cr alloy was 5 times less oxidation resistant than Haynes 230. However, in the treated condition, the Ni-12.5Cr alloy had comparable oxidation resistance to the Haynes 230 alloy.

  1. Literature review for oxalate oxidation processes and plutonium oxalate solubility

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C. A.

    2015-10-01

    A literature review of oxalate oxidation processes finds that manganese(II)-catalyzed nitric acid oxidation of oxalate in precipitate filtrate is a viable and well-documented process. The process has been operated on the large scale at Savannah River in the past, including oxidation of 20 tons of oxalic acid in F-Canyon. Research data under a variety of conditions show the process to be robust. This process is recommended for oxalate destruction in H-Canyon in the upcoming program to produce feed for the MOX facility. Prevention of plutonium oxalate precipitation in filtrate can be achieved by concentrated nitric acid/ferric nitrate sequestration of oxalate. Organic complexants do not appear practical to sequester plutonium. Testing is proposed to confirm the literature and calculation findings of this review at projected operating conditions for the upcoming campaign.

  2. Manganese Oxide Nanoarray-Based Monolithic Catalysts: Tunable Morphology and High Efficiency for CO Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-Yu; Song, Wenqiao; Lin, Hui-Jan; Wang, Sibo; Biswas, Sourav; Mollahosseini, Mehdi; Kuo, Chung-Hao; Gao, Pu-Xian; Suib, Steven L

    2016-03-30

    A generic one-pot hydrothermal synthesis route has been successfully designed and utilized to in situ grow uniform manganese oxide nanorods and nanowires onto the cordierite honeycomb monolithic substrates, forming a series of nanoarray-based monolithic catalysts. During the synthesis process, three types of potassium salt oxidants have been used with different reduction potentials, i.e., K2Cr2O7, KClO3, and K2S2O8, denoted as HM-DCM, HM-PCR, and HM-PSF, respectively. The different reduction potentials of the manganese source (Mn(2+)) and oxidants induced the formation of manganese oxide nanoarrays with different morphology, surface area, and reactivity of carbon monoxide (CO) oxidation. K2Cr2O7 and KClO3 can induce sharp and long nanowires with slow growth rates due to their low reduction potentials. In comparison, the nanoarrays of HM-PSF presented shorter nanorods but displayed an efficient 90% CO oxidation conversion at 200 °C (T90) without noble-metal loading. Reducibility tests for the three monolithic catalysts by hydrogen temperature-programmed reduction revealed an activation energy order of HM-PSF > HM-DCM > HM-PCR for CO oxidation. The characterizations of oxygen temperature-programmed desorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated the abundant surface-adsorbed oxygen and lattice oxygen contributing to the superior reactivity of HM-PSF. The straightforward synthetic process showed a scalable, low-cost, and template-free method to fabricate manganese oxide nanoarray monolithic catalysts for exhaust treatment. PMID:26954301

  3. Laser Processing of Metal Oxides for Plasmonic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Heungsoo; Breckenfeld, Eric; Charipar, Nicholas; Pique, Alberto

    Noble metals such as Au and Ag have been used traditionally for plasmonic devices. However, conventional metals are not suitable for near infrared (IR) plasmonic applications due to their relatively large optical losses at these wavelengths. Metal oxides, on the other hand, have been considered for low loss metallic components in the near IR because they can provide a tunable carrier density by doping. The zero-cross-over permittivity values of these metal oxides, for example, can easily be tuned from 1.0 µm to 3 µm by adjusting doping levels. Optical losses in devices made from these metal oxide materials are generally found to be much lower than those obtained with conventional metals. We have investigated various laser processing techniques for synthesizing several types of metal oxides. First, pulsed laser deposition was used to grow metal oxide thin films such as, Al-doped ZnO, Sn-doped In2O3 and VO2. Second, a laser sintering technique was used to improve the properties of solution-processed VO2 coatings. Third, a laser printing technique was used to produce metal oxide films. We will present details on the use of laser processing techniques for synthesizing these metal oxides along with their electrical, optical, and structural properties. This work was funded by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) through the Naval Research Laboratory Basic Research Program.

  4. Lipid extraction from microalgae cell using persulfate-based oxidation.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yeong Hwan; Sung, Mina; Oh, You-Kwan; Han, Jong-In

    2016-01-01

    In this study, persulfate, a solid-type oxidant, was adopted as a substitute for hydrogen peroxide in extracting lipid from microalgae biomass. Microalgae cells were concentrated at pH 3 and with 200mg/L of ferric chloride, conditions which can activate oxidants such as hydrogen peroxide and persulfate. At a persulfate concentration of 2mM and a reaction temperature of 90°C, exceedingly high extraction efficiency over 95% was obtained, which was higher than with 0.5% hydrogen peroxide at the same temperature. This result showed that persulfate is sufficiently powerful and incomparably cheap enough to replace the potent yet expensive oxidant. It appears that combining iron-based coagulation and persulfate-based lipid extraction is indeed a competitive approach that can possibly lighten the process burden for the microalgae-derived biodiesel production. PMID:26614226

  5. Costs of the electrochemical oxidation of wastewaters: a comparison with ozonation and Fenton oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Cañizares, Pablo; Paz, Rubén; Sáez, Cristina; Rodrigo, Manuel A

    2009-01-01

    In the work described here the technical and economic feasibilities of three Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs) have been studied: Conductive-Diamond Electrochemical Oxidation (CDEO), Ozonation and Fenton oxidation. The comparison was made by assessing the three technologies with synthetic wastewaters polluted with different types of organic compounds and also with actual wastes (from olive oil mills and from a fine-chemical manufacturing plant). All three technologies were able to treat the wastes, but very different results were obtained in terms of efficiency and mineralization. Only CDEO could achieve complete mineralization of the pollutants for all the wastes. However, the efficiencies were found to depend on the concentration of pollutant (mass transfer control of the oxidation rate). Results obtained in the oxidation with ozone (at pH 12) or by Fenton's reagent were found to depend on the nature of the pollutants, and significant concentrations of oxidation-refractory compounds were usually accumulated during the treatment. Within the discharge limits that all of the technologies can reach, the economic analysis shows that the operating cost of Fenton oxidation is lower than either CDEO or ozonation, although CD\\EO can compete satisfactorily with the Fenton process in the treatment of several kinds of wastes. Likewise, the investment cost for the ozonation process seems to be higher than either CDEO or Fenton oxidation, regardless of the pollutant treated. PMID:18082930

  6. Catalytic oxidation of light alkanes in presence of a base

    DOEpatents

    Bhinde, Manoj V.; Bierl, Thomas W.

    1998-01-01

    The presence of a base in the reaction mixture in a metal-ligand catalyzed partial oxidation of alkanes results in sustained catalyst activity, and in greater percent conversion as compared with oxidation in the absence of base, while maintaining satisfactory selectivity for the desired oxidation, for example the oxidation of isobutane to isobutanol.

  7. Catalytic oxidation of light alkanes in presence of a base

    DOEpatents

    Bhinde, M.V.; Bierl, T.W.

    1998-03-03

    The presence of a base in the reaction mixture in a metal-ligand catalyzed partial oxidation of alkanes results in sustained catalyst activity, and in greater percent conversion as compared with oxidation in the absence of base, while maintaining satisfactory selectivity for the desired oxidation, for example the oxidation of isobutane to isobutanol. 1 fig.

  8. Enhancing ethylbenzene vapors degradation in a hybrid system based on photocatalytic oxidation UV/TiO2-In and a biofiltration process.

    PubMed

    Hinojosa-Reyes, M; Rodríguez-González, V; Arriaga, S

    2012-03-30

    The use of hybrid processes for the continuous degradation of ethylbenzene (EB) vapors has been evaluated. The hybrid system consists of an UV/TiO(2)-In photooxidation coupled with a biofiltration process. Both the photocatalytic system using P25-Degussa or indium-doped TiO(2) catalysts and the photolytic process were performed at UV-wavelengths of 254 nm and 365 nm. The experiments were carried out in an annular plug flow photoreactor packed with granular perlite previously impregnated with the catalysts, and in a glass biofilter packed with perlite and inoculated with a microbial consortium. Both reactors were operated at an inlet loading rate of 127 g m(-3)h(-1). The greatest degradation rate of EB (0.414 ng m(-2)min(-1)) was obtained with the TiO(2)-In 1%/365 nm photocatalytic system. The elimination capacity (EC) obtained in the control biofilter had values ≈ 60 g m(-3)h(-1). Consequently, the coupled system was operated for 15 days, and a maximal EC of 275 g m(-3)h(-1). Thus, the results indicate that the use of hybrid processes enhanced the EB vapor degradation and that this could be a promising technology for the abatement of recalcitrant volatile organic compounds. PMID:22296707

  9. Indium Tin Oxide Resistor-Based Nitric Oxide Microsensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Jennifer C.; Hunter, Gary W.; Gonzalez, Jose M., III; Liu, Chung-Chiun

    2012-01-01

    A sensitive resistor-based NO microsensor, with a wide detection range and a low detection limit, has been developed. Semiconductor microfabrication techniques were used to create a sensor that has a simple, robust structure with a sensing area of 1.10 0.99 mm. A Pt interdigitated structure was used for the electrodes to maximize the sensor signal output. N-type semiconductor indium tin oxide (ITO) thin film was sputter-deposited as a sensing material on the electrode surface, and between the electrode fingers. Alumina substrate (250 m in thickness) was sequentially used for sensor fabrication. The resulting sensor was tested by applying a voltage across the two electrodes and measuring the resulting current. The sensor was tested at different concentrations of NO-containing gas at a range of temperatures. Preliminary results showed that the sensor had a relatively high sensitivity to NO at 450 C and 1 V. NO concentrations from ppm to ppb ranges were detected with the low limit of near 159 ppb. Lower NO concentrations are being tested. Two sensing mechanisms were involved in the NO gas detection at ppm level: adsorption and oxidation reactions, whereas at ppb level of NO, only one sensing mechanism of adsorption was involved. The NO microsensor has the advantages of high sensitivity, small size, simple batch fabrication, high sensor yield, low cost, and low power consumption due to its microsize. The resistor-based thin-film sensor is meant for detection of low concentrations of NO gas, mainly in the ppb or lower range, and is being developed concurrently with other sensor technology for multispecies detection. This development demonstrates that ITO is a sensitive sensing material for NO detection. It also provides crucial information for future selection of nanostructured and nanosized NO sensing materials, which are expected to be more sensitive and to consume less power.

  10. Development studies of a novel wet oxidation process

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, T.W.; Dhooge, P.M.

    1995-10-01

    Many DOE waste streams and remediates contain complex and variable mixtures of organic compounds, toxic metals, and radionuclides. These materials are often dispersed in organic or inorganic matrices, such as personal protective equipment, various sludges, soils, and water. Incineration and similar combustive processes do not appear to be viable options for treatment of these waste streams due to various considerations. The objective of this project is to develop a novel catalytic wet oxidation process for the treatment of multi-component wastes. The DETOX process uses a unique combination of metal catalysts to increase the rate of oxidation of organic materials.

  11. Oxidation of diesel soot on binary oxide CuCr(Co)-based monoliths.

    PubMed

    Soloviev, Sergiy O; Kapran, Andriy Y; Kurylets, Yaroslava P

    2015-02-01

    Binary oxide systems (CuCr2O4, CuCo2O4), deposited onto cordierite monoliths of honeycomb structure with a second support (finely dispersed Al2O3), were prepared as filters for catalytic combustion of diesel soot using internal combustion engine's gas exhausts (O2, NOx, H2O, CO2) and O3 as oxidizing agents. It is shown that the second support increases soot capacity of aforementioned filters, and causes dispersion of the particles of spinel phases as active components enhancing thereby catalyst activity and selectivity of soot combustion to CO2. Oxidants used can be arranged with reference to decreasing their activity in a following series: O3≫NO2>H2O>NO>O2>CO2. Ozone proved to be the most efficient oxidizing agent: the diesel soot combustion by O3 occurs intensively (in the presence of copper chromite based catalyst) even at closing to ambient temperatures. Results obtained give a basis for the conclusion that using a catalytic coating on soot filters in the form of aforementioned binary oxide systems and ozone as the initiator of the oxidation processes is a promising approach in solving the problem of comprehensive purification of automotive exhaust gases at relatively low temperatures, known as the "cold start" problem. PMID:25662252

  12. Preparation and properties of electrically conducting ceramics based on indium oxide-rare earth oxides-hafnium oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Marchant, D.D.; Bates, J.L.

    1983-09-01

    Electrically conducting refractory oxides based on adding indium oxide to rare earth-stabilized hafnium oxide are being studied for use in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generators, fuel cells, and thermoelectric generators. The use of indium oxide generally increases the electrical conductivity. The results of measurements of the electrical conductivity and data on corrosion resistance in molten salts are presented.

  13. Chemical Sensors Based on Metal Oxide Nanostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Xu, Jennifer C.; Evans, Laura J.; VanderWal, Randy L.; Berger, Gordon M.; Kulis, Mike J.; Liu, Chung-Chiun

    2006-01-01

    This paper is an overview of sensor development based on metal oxide nanostructures. While nanostructures such as nanorods show significan t potential as enabling materials for chemical sensors, a number of s ignificant technical challenges remain. The major issues addressed in this work revolve around the ability to make workable sensors. This paper discusses efforts to address three technical barriers related t o the application of nanostructures into sensor systems: 1) Improving contact of the nanostructured materials with electrodes in a microse nsor structure; 2) Controling nanostructure crystallinity to allow co ntrol of the detection mechanism; and 3) Widening the range of gases that can be detected by using different nanostructured materials. It is concluded that while this work demonstrates useful tools for furt her development, these are just the beginning steps towards realizati on of repeatable, controlled sensor systems using oxide based nanostr uctures.

  14. Development of techniques for processing metal-metal oxide systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. C.

    1976-01-01

    Techniques for producing model metal-metal oxide systems for the purpose of evaluating the results of processing such systems in the low-gravity environment afforded by a drop tower facility are described. Because of the lack of success in producing suitable materials samples and techniques for processing in the 3.5 seconds available, the program was discontinued.

  15. Scientists set to destroy VOCs with thermal oxidation process

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, K.A

    1989-12-01

    This paper reports on a thermal oxidation process that boasts a 99.99 percent destruction removal efficiency (DRE) and minimal formation of products of incomplete combustion (PICs). Together with a high reliability, corrosion resistant,non-catalytic design, these attributes make the technology ideal for processing chlorinated compounds, say company officials.

  16. Advanced oxidation processes with coke plant wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Krzywicka, A; Kwarciak-Kozłowska, A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the most efficient method of coke wastewater treatment. This research examined two processes - advanced oxidation with Fenton and photo-Fenton reaction. It was observed that the use of ultraviolet radiation with Fenton process had a better result in removal of impurities. PMID:24804662

  17. Process of forming catalytic surfaces for wet oxidation reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagow, R. B. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A wet oxidation process was developed for oxidizing waste materials, comprising dissolved ruthenium salt in a reactant feed stream containing the waste materials. The feed stream is introduced into a reactor, and the reactor contents are then raised to an elevated temperature to effect deposition of a catalytic surface of ruthenium black on the interior walls of the reactor. The feed stream is then maintained in the reactor for a period of time sufficient to effect at least partial oxidation of the waste materials.

  18. COLUMBIC OXIDE ADSORPTION PROCESS FOR SEPARATING URANIUM AND PLUTONIUM IONS

    DOEpatents

    Beaton, R.H.

    1959-07-14

    A process is described for separating plutonium ions from a solution of neutron irradiated uranium in which columbic oxide is used as an adsorbert. According to the invention the plutonium ion is selectively adsorbed by Passing a solution containing the plutonium in a valence state not higher than 4 through a porous bed or column of granules of hydrated columbic oxide. The adsorbed plutonium is then desorbed by elution with 3 N nitric acid.

  19. Effect of Process Variables During the Head-End Treatment of Spent Oxide Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    K.J. Bateman; C.D. Morgan; J.F. Berg; D.J. Brough; P.J. Crane; D.G. Cummings; J.J. Giglio; M.W. Huntley; M.J. Rodriquez; J.D. Sommers; R.P. Lind; D.A. Sell

    2006-08-01

    The development of a head-end processing step for spent oxide fuel that applies to both aqueous and pyrometallurgical technologies is being performed by the Idaho National Laboratory, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute through a joint International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative. The processing step employs high temperatures and oxidative gases to promote the oxidation of UO2 to U3O8. Potential benefits of the head-end step include the removal or reduction of fission products as well as separation of the fuel from cladding. The effects of temperature, pressure, oxidative gas, and cladding have been studied with irradiated spent oxide fuel to determine the optimum conditions for process control. Experiments with temperatures ranging from 500oC to 1250oC have been performed on spent fuel using either air or oxygen gas for the oxidative reaction. Various flowrates and applications have been tested with the oxidative gases to discern the effects on the process. Tests have also been performed under vacuum conditions, following the oxidation cycle, at high temperatures to improve the removal of fission products. The effects of cladding on fission product removal have also been investigated with released fuel under vacuum and high temperature conditions. Results from these experiments will be presented as well as operating conditions based on particle size and decladding characteristics.

  20. [Oxidative stress, antioxydants and the ageing process].

    PubMed

    Pincemail, J; Ricour, C; Defraigne, J O; Petermans, J

    2014-01-01

    Antioxidant supplementation in the form of pills is thought to slow down the aging process through the "free radical" scavenger activity of these compounds. The idea arose from the "Free Radical Theory of Ageing" (FRTA), initially developed by Harman in 1956. In the present paper, we present some arguments against this theory. One of the most pertinent is that "free radicals", more properly renamed as reactive oxygen species (ROS), play important biological roles in defense mechanisms of the organism as illustrated, in particular, by the hormesis phenomenon. Surprisingly, a moderate production of ROS has been shown to extend the life span in animals. PMID:25065231

  1. Evaluating management effects on nitrous oxide emissions from grasslands using the process-based DeNitrification-DeComposition (DNDC) model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafique, Rashad; Peichl, Matthias; Hennessy, Deirdre; Kiely, Gerard

    2011-10-01

    The development of agricultural mitigation strategies to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is urgent in the context of climate change - land use interactions. In this study the DNDC biogeochemical model was used to study nitrous oxide (N 2O) emissions from grazed grasslands in southern Ireland. The objectives of this study were: (1) to evaluate the DNDC model using a two year (2008-2009) data set of chamber measured N 2O fluxes at eight grassland sites and (2) to investigate the impact of different management scenarios on N 2O emissions including changes in i) inorganic nitrogen (N) fertilizer application rates ii) slurry application rates; and iii) animal density (livestock unit per hectare LU ha -1). The comparison of modeled daily DNDC fluxes (using a combination of measured and default soil parameters) and measured fluxes resulted in an r (coefficient correlation) = 0.48. To improve the model performance, the fluxes for 2008 were used in a calibration exercise during which the soil properties were optimized to obtain the best fit of N 2O fluxes. This resulted in an improved model performance, with an r = 0.62. In a validation exercise using 2009 data, we used the model parameters set (e.g. soils) from the calibration exercise and this resulted in a model performance with an r = 0.57. The annual N 2O fluxes (measured and modeled) were appreciably higher than those estimated using the IPCC emissions factor of 1.25%. In scenario analysis, the modeled N 2O fluxes only increased/decreased on average ±6% and ±7% following a 50% increase/decrease of inorganic N and slurry N applications respectively. These modeled scenario % changes are much lower than the IPCC emission factor % changes of a 50% increase in N 2O emissions for a 50% increase in nitrogen applied. An absolute change scenario (±50 kg) in inorganic N and slurry N resulted in greater change in N 2O fluxes (±9% inorganic N and ±17% slurry N) as compared to the relative change scenario (above

  2. Comparison of halide impacts on the efficiency of contaminant degradation by sulfate and hydroxyl radical-based advanced oxidation processes (AOPs).

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Pignatello, Joseph J; Ma, Jun; Mitch, William A

    2014-02-18

    The effect of halides on organic contaminant destruction efficiency was compared for UV/H2O2 and UV/S2O8(2-) AOP treatments of saline waters; benzoic acid, 3-cyclohexene-1-carboxylic acid, and cyclohexanecarboxylic acid were used as models for aromatic, alkene, and alkane constituents of naphthenic acids in oil-field waters. In model freshwater, contaminant degradation was higher by UV/S2O8(2-) because of the higher quantum efficiency for S2O8(2-) than H2O2 photolysis. The conversion of (•)OH and SO4(•-) radicals to less reactive halogen radicals in the presence of seawater halides reduced the degradation efficiency of benzoic acid and cyclohexanecarboxylic acid. The UV/S2O8(2-) AOP was more affected by Cl(-) than the UV/H2O2 AOP because oxidation of Cl(-) is more favorable by SO4(•-) than (•)OH at pH 7. Degradation of 3-cyclohexene-1-carboxylic acid, was not affected by halides, likely because of the high reactivity of halogen radicals with alkenes. Despite its relatively low concentration in saline waters compared to Cl(-), Br(-) was particularly important. Br(-) promoted halogen radical formation for both AOPs resulting in ClBr(•-), Br2(•-), and CO3(•-) concentrations orders of magnitude higher than (•)OH and SO4(•-) concentrations and reducing differences in halide impacts between the two AOPs. Kinetic modeling of the UV/H2O2 AOP indicated a synergism between Br(-) and Cl(-), with Br(-) scavenging of (•)OH leading to BrOH(•-), and further reactions of Cl(-) with this and other brominated radicals promoting halogen radical concentrations. In contaminant mixtures, the conversion of (•)OH and SO4(•-) radicals to more selective CO3(•-) and halogen radicals favored attack on highly reactive reaction centers represented by the alkene group of 3-cyclohexene-1-carboxylic acid and the aromatic group of the model compound, 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, at the expense of less reactive reaction centers such as aromatic rings and alkane groups

  3. High Performance Oxides-Based Thermoelectric Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Guangkun; Lan, Jinle; Zeng, Chengcheng; Liu, Yaochun; Zhan, Bin; Butt, Sajid; Lin, Yuan-Hua; Nan, Ce-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Thermoelectric materials have attracted much attention due to their applications in waste-heat recovery, power generation, and solid state cooling. In comparison with thermoelectric alloys, oxide semiconductors, which are thermally and chemically stable in air at high temperature, are regarded as the candidates for high-temperature thermoelectric applications. However, their figure-of-merit ZT value has remained low, around 0.1-0.4 for more than 20 years. The poor performance in oxides is ascribed to the low electrical conductivity and high thermal conductivity. Since the electrical transport properties in these thermoelectric oxides are strongly correlated, it is difficult to improve both the thermoelectric power and electrical conductivity simultaneously by conventional methods. This review summarizes recent progresses on high-performance oxide-based thermoelectric bulk-materials including n-type ZnO, SrTiO3, and In2O3, and p-type Ca3Co4O9, BiCuSeO, and NiO, enhanced by heavy-element doping, band engineering and nanostructuring.

  4. Mechanical and tribological properties of oxide layers obtained on titanium in the thermal oxidation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aniołek, K.; Kupka, M.; Barylski, A.; Dercz, G.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the results of tests concerning a modification to the surface of titanium Grade 2 in the thermal oxidation process. It describes the oxidation kinetics of the tested material in the temperature range of 600-800 °C, with a duration from 20 min to 72 h. The greatest increase in mass was found in specimens oxidised at a temperature of 800 °C. The morphology of the obtained oxide layers was determined. The particles of oxides formed were noticeably larger after oxidation at a temperature of 600 °C. Raising temperature resulted in the formation of fine compact particles in the oxide layer. A phase analysis of oxidation products showed that TiO2 in the crystallographic form of rutile and Ti3O are the prevalent types of oxide at a temperature of 600 and 700 °C. On the other hand, only rutile formed at a temperature of 800 °C. Tribological tests showed that the presence of an oxide layer on the surface of titanium significantly improved resistance to abrasive wear. It was found that volumetric wear had decreased by 48% for a specimen oxidised at a temperature of 600 °C and by more than 60% for a specimen subjected to isothermal soaking at a temperature of 700 °C.

  5. Oxidation enhancement of submicron organic aerosols by fog processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Ge, X.; Collier, S.; Setyan, A.; Xu, J.; Sun, Y.

    2011-12-01

    During 2010 wintertime, a measurement study was carried out at Fresno, California, using an Aerodyne High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) combined with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). Four fog events occurred during the first week of the campaign. While ambient aerosol was sampled into the HR-ToF-AMS, fog water samples were collected, and were later aerosolized and analyzed via HR-TOF-AMS in the laboratory. We performed Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) on the AMS ambient organic mass spectra, and identified four OA factors: hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) likely from vehicle emissions, cooking influenced OA (COA), biomass burning OA (BBOA) representing residential wood combustion, and an oxygenated OA (OOA) that has an average O/C ratio of 0.42. The time series of the OOA factor correlates best with that of sulfate (R2 =0.54 ) during fog events, suggesting that aqueous phase processing may have strongly affected OOA production during wintertime in Fresno. We further investigate the OOA compositions and elemental ratios before, during, and after the fog events, as well as those of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in fog waters to study the influence of aqueous phase processing on OA compositions. Results of fog sample analysis shows an enhancement of oxidation of DOM in 11 separate fog samples. Further factor analysis of the fog DOM data will elucidate the possible mechanisms by which fog processing enhances oxidation of aerosol. In addition, in order to investigate the influence of aqueous processing on OA, we used the Extended Aerosol Inorganic Model (E-AIM) (http://www.aim.env.uea.ac.uk/aim/aim.php) to estimate aerosol phase water contents based on the AMS measured aerosol composition. The predicted water content has a good correlation with sulfate and OOA . We will further explore the correlations between particle phase water with organic aerosol characteristics to discuss the influence of aqueous phase processing on

  6. Destruction of microcystins (cyanotoxins) by UV-254 nm-based direct photolysis and advanced oxidation processes (AOPs): influence of variable amino acids on the degradation kinetics and reaction mechanisms.

    PubMed

    He, Xuexiang; de la Cruz, Armah A; Hiskia, Anastasia; Kaloudis, Triantafyllos; O'Shea, Kevin; Dionysiou, Dionysios D

    2015-05-01

    Hepatotoxic microcystins (MCs) are the most frequently detected group of cyanobacterial toxins. This study investigated the degradation of common MC variants in water, MC-LR, MC-RR, MC-YR and MC-LA, by UV-254 nm-based processes, UV only, UV/H2O2, UV/S2O8(2-) and UV/HSO5(-). Limited direct photolysis of MCs was observed, while the addition of an oxidant significantly improved the degradation efficiency with an order of UV/S2O8(2-) > UV/HSO5(-) > UV/H2O2 at the same initial molar concentration of the oxidant. The removal of MC-LR by UV/H2O2 appeared to be faster than another cyanotoxin, cylindrospermopsin, at either the same initial molar concentration or the same initial organic carbon concentration of the toxin. It suggested a faster reaction of MC-LR with hydroxyl radical, which was further supported by the determined second-order rate constant of MCs with hydroxyl radical. Both isomerization and photohydration byproducts were observed in UV only process for all four MCs; while in UV/H2O2, hydroxylation and diene-Adda double bond cleavage byproducts were detected. The presence of a tyrosine in the structure of MC-YR significantly promoted the formation of monohydroxylation byproduct m/z 1061; while the presence of a second arginine in MC-RR led to the elimination of a guanidine group and the absence of double bond cleavage byproducts. It was therefore demonstrated in this study that the variable amino acids in the structure of MCs influenced not only the degradation kinetics but also the preferable reaction mechanisms. PMID:25744186

  7. High-performance and environmentally stable planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells based on a solution-processed copper-doped nickel oxide hole-transporting layer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong H; Liang, Po-Wei; Williams, Spencer T; Cho, Namchul; Chueh, Chu-Chen; Glaz, Micah S; Ginger, David S; Jen, Alex K-Y

    2015-01-27

    An effective approach to significantly increase the electrical conductivity of a NiOx hole-transporting layer (HTL) to achieve high-efficiency planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells is demonstrated. Perovskite solar cells based on using Cu-doped NiOx HTL show a remarkably improved power conversion efficiency up to 15.40% due to the improved electrical conductivity and enhanced perovskite film quality. General applicability of Cu-doped NiOx to larger bandgap perovskites is also demonstrated in this study. PMID:25449020

  8. Solid oxide MEMS-based fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Jankowksi, Alan F.; Morse, Jeffrey D.

    2007-03-13

    A micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) based thin-film fuel cells for electrical power applications. The MEMS-based fuel cell may be of a solid oxide type (SOFC), a solid polymer type (SPFC), or a proton exchange membrane type (PEMFC), and each fuel cell basically consists of an anode and a cathode separated by an electrolyte layer. The electrolyte layer can consist of either a solid oxide or solid polymer material, or proton exchange membrane electrolyte materials may be used. Additionally catalyst layers can also separate the electrodes (cathode and anode) from the electrolyte. Gas manifolds are utilized to transport the fuel and oxidant to each cell and provide a path for exhaust gases. The electrical current generated from each cell is drawn away with an interconnect and support structure integrated with the gas manifold. The fuel cells utilize integrated resistive heaters for efficient heating of the materials. By combining MEMS technology with thin-film deposition technology, thin-film fuel cells having microflow channels and full-integrated circuitry can be produced that will lower the operating temperature an will yield an order of magnitude greater power density than the currently known fuel cells.

  9. Microwave processing of ceramic oxide filaments. Annual report, FY1997

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, G.J.

    1998-12-31

    The objective of the microwave filament processing project is to develop microwave techniques to manufacture continuous ceramic oxide filaments. Microwave processing uses the volumetric absorption of microwave power in oxide filament tows to drive off process solvents, to burn out organic binders, and to sinter the dried fibers to produce flexible, high-strength ceramic filaments. The technical goal is to advance filament processing technology by microwave heating more rapidly with less energy and at a lower cost than conventional processing, but with the same quality as conventional processing. The manufacturing goal is to collaborate with the 3M Company, a US manufacturer of ceramic oxide filaments, to evaluate the technology using a prototype filament system and to transfer the microwave technology to the 3M Company. Continuous ceramic filaments are a principal component in many advanced high temperature materials like continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) and woven ceramic textiles. The use of continuous ceramic filaments in CFCC radiant burners, gas turbines, waste incineration, and hot gas filters in U.S. industry and power generation is estimated to save at least 2.16 quad/yr by year 2010 with energy cost savings of at least $8.1 billion. By year 2010, continuous ceramic filaments and CFCC`s have the potential to abate pollution emissions by 917,000 tons annually of nitrous oxide and 118 million tons annually of carbon dioxide (DOE Report OR-2002, February, 1994).

  10. Optimization of leachate treatment using persulfate/H2O2 based advanced oxidation process: case study: Deir El-Balah Landfill Site, Gaza Strip, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Hilles, Ahmed H; Abu Amr, Salem S; Hussein, Rim A; Arafa, Anwar I; El-Sebaie, Olfat D

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the performance of employing H2O2 reagent in persulfate activation to treat stabilized landfill leachate. A central composite design (CCD) with response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to evaluate the relationships between operating variables, such as persulfate and H2O2 dosages, pH, and reaction time, to identify the optimum operating conditions. Quadratic models for the following two responses proved to be significant with very low probabilities (<0.0001): chemical oxygen demand (COD) and NH3-N removal. The obtained optimum conditions included a reaction time of 116 min, 4.97 g S2O8(2-), 7.29 g H2O2 dosage and pH 11. The experimental results were corresponding well with predicted models (COD and NH3-N removal rates of 81% and 83%, respectively). The results obtained in the stabilized leachate treatment were compared with those from other treatment processes, such as persulfate only and H2O2 only, to evaluate its effectiveness. The combined method (i.e., /S2O8(2-)/H2O2) achieved higher removal efficiencies for COD and NH3-N compared with other studied applications. PMID:26744940

  11. Effect of the ultrasound-Fenton oxidation process with the addition of a chelating agent on the removal of petroleum-based contaminants from soil.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Li, Fangmin; Li, Fanxiu; Yuan, Fuqian; Wei, Pingfang

    2015-12-01

    The effects of ultrasonic irradiation, the chelating agent modified Fenton reaction, and a combination of ultrasound and the Fenton method in removing petroleum contaminants from a soil were studied. The results showed that the contaminant removal rate of the Fenton treatment combined with an oxalic acid chelating agent was 55.6% higher than that without a chelating agent. The average removal rate of the contaminants using the ultrasound-Fenton treatment was 59.0% higher than that without ultrasonic treatment. A combination of ultrasound and an Fe(2+)/Fe(3+)-oxalate complex-modified Fenton reagent resulted in significantly higher removal rates of n-alkanes (C(n)H(2n+2), n < 28), isoprenoid hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, and saturated polycyclic terpenes compared with the ultrasound treatment alone or the Fenton method. The Fenton reaction and the ultrasound-Fenton treatment can unselectively remove multiple components of residual hydrocarbons and a number of benzene rings in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The chemistry of the heterocyclic compounds and the position and number of substituents can affect the degradation process. PMID:26268625

  12. Evaluation of pretreatment processes for supercritical water oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.M.

    1994-01-01

    This report evaluates processes to chemically treat US Department of Energy wastes to remove organic halogens, phosphorus, and sulfur. Chemical equilibrium calculations, process simulations, and responses from developers and licensors form the basis for comparisons. Gas-phase catalytic hydrogenation processes, strong base and base catalyzed processes, high pressure hydrolysis, and other emerging or commercial dehalogenation processes (both liquid and mixed phase) were considered. Cost estimates for full-scale processes and demonstration testing are given. Based on the evaluation, testing of a hydrogenation process and a strong base process are recommended.

  13. Biomaterial based sulphur di oxide gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, P. K.; Sarkar, A.

    2013-06-01

    Biomaterials are getting importance in the present research field of sensors. In this present paper performance of biomaterial based gas sensor made of gum Arabica and garlic extract had been studied. Extract of garlic clove with multiple medicinal and chemical utility can be proved to be useful in sensing Sulphur di Oxide gas. On exposure to Sulphur di Oxide gas the material under observation suffers some temporary structural change, which can be observed in form of amplified potentiometric change through simple electronic circuitry. Exploiting this very property a potentiometric gas sensor of faster response and recovery time can be designed. In this work sensing property of the said material has been studied through DC conductance, FTIR spectrum etc.

  14. LITERATURE REVIEW FOR OXALATE OXIDATION PROCESSES AND PLUTONIUM OXALATE SOLUBILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.

    2012-02-03

    A literature review of oxalate oxidation processes finds that manganese(II)-catalyzed nitric acid oxidation of oxalate in precipitate filtrate is a viable and well-documented process. The process has been operated on the large scale at Savannah River in the past, including oxidation of 20 tons of oxalic acid in F-Canyon. Research data under a variety of conditions show the process to be robust. This process is recommended for oxalate destruction in H-Canyon in the upcoming program to produce feed for the MOX facility. Prevention of plutonium oxalate precipitation in filtrate can be achieved by concentrated nitric acid/ferric nitrate sequestration of oxalate. Organic complexants do not appear practical to sequester plutonium. Testing is proposed to confirm the literature and calculation findings of this review at projected operating conditions for the upcoming campaign. H Canyon plans to commence conversion of plutonium metal to low-fired plutonium oxide in 2012 for eventual use in the Mixed Oxide Fuel (MOX) Facility. The flowsheet includes sequential operations of metal dissolution, ion exchange, elution, oxalate precipitation, filtration, and calcination. All processes beyond dissolution will occur in HB-Line. The filtration step produces an aqueous filtrate that may have as much as 4 M nitric acid and 0.15 M oxalate. The oxalate needs to be removed from the stream to prevent possible downstream precipitation of residual plutonium when the solution is processed in H Canyon. In addition, sending the oxalate to the waste tank farm is undesirable. This report addresses the processing options for destroying the oxalate in existing H Canyon equipment.

  15. Thermally stable yttrium-scandium oxide high-k dielectrics deposited by a solution process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wenbing; Frost, Bradley; Peterson, Rebecca L.

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the thermal stability of electrical properties in ternary alloy (Y x Sc1-x )2O3 high-k oxides as a function of yttrium fraction, x. The yttrium-scandium oxide dielectric films are deposited using a facile ink-based process. The oxides have a stoichiometry-dependent relative dielectric constant of 26.0 to 7.7 at 100 kHz, low leakage current density of 10-8 A·cm-2, high breakdown field of 4 MVṡcm-1, and interface trap density of 1012 cm-2·eV-1 with silicon. Compared with binary oxides, ternary alloys exhibit less frequency dispersion of the dielectric constant and a higher crystallization temperature. After crystallization is induced through a 900 °C anneal, ternary (Y0.6Sc0.4)2O3 films maintain their low leakage current and high breakdown field. In contrast, the electrical performance of the binary oxides significantly degrades following the same treatment. The solution-processed ternary oxide dielectrics demonstrated here may be used as high-k gate insulators in complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technologies, in novel electronic material systems and devices, and in printed, flexible thin film electronics, and as passivation layers for high power devices. These oxides may also be used as insulators in fabrication process flows that require a high thermal budget.

  16. Computer-based first-principles kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of polyethylene glycol degradation in aqueous phase UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xin; Minakata, Daisuke; Crittenden, John

    2014-09-16

    We have developed a computer-based first-principles kinetic Monte Carlo (CF-KMC) model to predict degradation mechanisms and fates of intermediates and byproducts produced from the degradation of polyethylene glycol (PEG) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (UV/H2O2). The CF-KMC model is composed of a reaction pathway generator, a reaction rate constant estimator, and a KMC solver. The KMC solver is able to solve the predicted pathways successfully without solving ordinary differential equations. The predicted time-dependent profiles of averaged molecular weight, and polydispersitivity index (i.e., the ratio of the weight-averaged molecular weight to the number-averaged molecular weight) for the PEG degradation were validated with experimental observations. These predictions are consistent with the experimental data. The model provided detailed and quantitative insights into the time evolutions of molecular weight distribution and concentration profiles of low molecular weight products and functional groups. Our approach may be useful to predict the fates of degradation products for a wide range of complicated organic contaminants. PMID:25158613

  17. Process Design for Preventing the Gate Oxide Thinning in the Integration of Dual Gate Oxide Transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong-Ho; Kim, Sung-Hoan; Kim, Sung-Eun; Kim, Myung-Soo; Park, Joo-Han; Kim, Eun-Soo; Kim, Jin-Tae

    2002-04-01

    In this study, a method is proposed to alleviate a gate oxide (GOX) thinning problem at the edge of shallow trench isolation (STI), when STI is adopted in the dual gate oxide process (DGOX). It is well known that the DGOX process is usually used for realizing both low and high voltage operating parts in one chip. However, it is found that severe GOX thinning occurs from 320 Å (in active area) to 79 Å (at STI top edge) and a dent profile exists at the top edge of STI, when conventional DGOX and STI processes are adopted. In order to solve these problems, a new DGOX process is used in this study. The GOX thinning is prevented mainly by a combination of a thick sidewall oxide with SiN pullback. Therefore, good subthreshold characteristics without a so-called double hump are obtained by the prevention of GOX thinning and a deep dent profile.

  18. Oxidation of Black Carbon by Biotic and Abiotic Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chih-hsin; Lehmann, Johannes C.; Thies, Janice E.; Burton, Sarah D.; Engelhard, Mark H.

    2006-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to quantify the relative importance of either biotic or abiotic oxidation of biomass-derived black carbon (BC) and to characterize the surface properties and charge characteristics of oxidized particulate BC. We incubated BC and BC-soil mixtures at two different temperatures (30 C and 70 C) with and without microbial inoculation, nutrient additions, or manure amendments for four months. Abiotic processes were more important for oxidation of BC than biotic processes during this short-term incubation, as inoculation with microorganisms did not change any of the measured parameters. Black C incubated at both 30 C and 70 C without microbial activity showed dramatic decreases in pH (in water) from 5.4 to 5.2 and 3.4, as well as increases in cation exchange capacity (CEC at pH 7) by 53% and 538% and in oxygen (O) contents by 4% and 38%, respectively. Boehm titration and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy suggested that the formation of carboxylic functional groups was the reason for the enhanced CEC during oxidation. The analyses of BC surface properties by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicated that the oxidation of BC particles initiated on the surface. Incubation at 30 C only enhanced oxidation on particle surfaces, while oxidation during incubation at 70 C penetrated into the interior of particles. Such short-term oxidation of BC has great significance for the stability of BC in soils as well as for its effects on soil fertility and biogeochemistry.

  19. Chemical oxidation of sulfadiazine by the Fenton process: kinetics, pathways, toxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji-Feng; Zhou, Shi-Biao; Xiao, An-Guo; Li, Wen-Jun; Ying, Guang-Guo

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigated sulfadiazine oxidation by the Fenton process under various reaction conditions. The reaction conditions tested in the experiments included the initial pH value of reaction solutions, and the dosages of ferrous ions and hydrogen peroxide. Under the reaction conditions with pH 3, 0.25 mM of ferrous ion and 2 mM of hydrogen peroxide, a removal efficiency of nearly 100% was achieved for sulfadiazine. A series of intermediate products including 4-OH-sulfadiazine/or 5-OH-sulfadiazine, 2-aminopyrimidine, sulfanilamide, formic acid, and oxalic acid were identified. Based on these products, the possible oxidation pathway of sulfadiazine by Fenton's reagent was proposed. The toxicity evaluation of reaction solutions showed increased antimicrobial effects following the Fenton oxidation process. The results from this study suggest that the Fenton oxidation process could remove sulfadiazine, but also increase solution toxicity due to the presence of more toxic products. PMID:25310806

  20. STEP wastewater treatment: a solar thermal electrochemical process for pollutant oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baohui; Wu, Hongjun; Zhang, Guoxue; Licht, Stuart

    2012-10-01

    A solar thermal electrochemical production (STEP) pathway was established to utilize solar energy to drive useful chemical processes. In this paper, we use experimental chemistry for efficient STEP wastewater treatment, and suggest a theory based on the decreasing stability of organic pollutants (hydrocarbon oxidation potentials) with increasing temperature. Exemplified by the solar thermal electrochemical oxidation of phenol, the fundamental model and experimental system components of this process outline a general method for the oxidation of environmentally stable organic pollutants into carbon dioxide, which is easily removed. Using thermodynamic calculations we show a sharply decreasing phenol oxidation potential with increasing temperature. The experimental results demonstrate that this increased temperature can be supplied by solar thermal heating. In combination this drives electrochemical phenol removal with enhanced oxidation efficiency through (i) a thermodynamically driven decrease in the energy needed to fuel the process and (ii) improved kinetics to sustain high rates of phenol oxidation at low electrochemical overpotential. The STEP wastewater treatment process is synergistic in that it is performed with higher efficiency than either electrochemical or photovoltaic conversion process acting alone. STEP is a green, efficient, safe, and sustainable process for organic wastewater treatment driven solely by solar energy. PMID:22965739

  1. Effect of processing on structural features of anodic aluminum oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdogan, Pembe; Birol, Yucel

    2012-09-01

    Morphological features of the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates fabricated by electrochemical oxidation under different processing conditions were investigated. The selection of the polishing parameters does not appear to be critical as long as the aluminum substrate is polished adequately prior to the anodization process. AAO layers with a highly ordered pore distribution are obtained after anodizing in 0.6 M oxalic acid at 20 °C under 40 V for 5 minutes suggesting that the desired pore features are attained once an oxide layer develops on the surface. While the pore features are not affected much, the thickness of the AAO template increases with increasing anodization treatment time. Pore features are better and the AAO growth rate is higher at 20 °C than at 5 °C; higher under 45 V than under 40 V; higher with 0.6 M than with 0.3 M oxalic acid.

  2. Certification-Based Process Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Russell L.

    2013-01-01

    Space mission architects are often challenged with knowing which investment in technology infusion will have the highest return. Certification-based analysis (CBA) gives architects and technologists a means to communicate the risks and advantages of infusing technologies at various points in a process. Various alternatives can be compared, and requirements based on supporting streamlining or automation can be derived and levied on candidate technologies. CBA is a technique for analyzing a process and identifying potential areas of improvement. The process and analysis products are used to communicate between technologists and architects. Process means any of the standard representations of a production flow; in this case, any individual steps leading to products, which feed into other steps, until the final product is produced at the end. This sort of process is common for space mission operations, where a set of goals is reduced eventually to a fully vetted command sequence to be sent to the spacecraft. Fully vetting a product is synonymous with certification. For some types of products, this is referred to as verification and validation, and for others it is referred to as checking. Fundamentally, certification is the step in the process where one insures that a product works as intended, and contains no flaws.

  3. Investigation of passive and active silica-tin oxide nanostructured optical fibers fabricated by "inverse dip-coating" and "powder in tube" method based on the chemical sol-gel process and laser emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granger, G.; Restoin, C.; Roy, P.; Jamier, R.; Rougier, S.; Duclere, J.-R.; Lecomte, A.; Dauliat, R.; Blondy, J.-M.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a study of original nanostructured optical fibers based on the SiO2-SnO2-(Yb3+) system. Two different processes have been developed and compared: the sol-gel chemical method associated to the "inverse dip-coating" (IDC) and the "powder in tube" (PIT). The microstructural and optical properties of the fibers are studied according to the concentration of SnO2. X-Ray Diffraction as well as Transmission Electron Microscopy studies show that the SnO2 crystallizes into the cassiterite phase as nanoparticles with a diameter ranging from 4 to 50 nm as a function of tin oxide concentration. A comparative study highlights a better conservation of SnO2 into the fiber core with the PIT approach according to the refractive index profile and energy dispersive X-Ray spectrometry measurement. The attenuation evaluated by the classic cut-back method gives respectively values higher than 3 dB/m and 0.2 dB/m in the visible (VIS) and infrared (IR) ranges for the PIT fibers whereas background losses reach 0.5 dB/m in the VIS range for IDC fibers. The introduction of ytterbium ions into the core of PIT fibers, directly in the first chemical step, leads to a laser emission (between 1050 and 1100 nm) according to the fiber length under 850 nm wavelength pumping. Luminescence studies have demonstrated the influence of the tin oxide on the rare earth optical properties especially by the modification of the absorption (850 to 1000 nm) and emission (950 to 1100 nm) by discretization of the bands, as well as on the IR emission lifetime evaluated to 10 μs.

  4. GREENING OF OXIDATION CATALYSIS THROUGH IMPROVED CATALYST AND PROCESS DESIGN

    EPA Science Inventory


    Greening of Oxidation Catalysis Through Improved Catalysts and Process Design
    Michael A. Gonzalez*, Thomas Becker, and Raymond Smith

    United State Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, 26 W...

  5. Better End-Cap Processing for Oxidation-Resistant Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Frimer, Aryeh A.

    2004-01-01

    A class of end-cap compounds that increase the thermo-oxidative stab ility of polyimides of the polymerization of monomeric reactants (PM R) type has been extended. In addition, an improved processing proto col for this class of end-cap compounds has been invented.

  6. FINAL REPORT. FUNDAMENTAL CHEMISTRY AND THERMODYNAMICS OF HYDROTHERMAL OXIDATION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this project was to address issues of fundamental chemistry and thermodynamic properties that currently limit the applicability of hydrothermal oxidation processes to the treatment of hazardous and radioactive DOE wastes. The primary issues are related to corrosion, i...

  7. Process and Equipment for Nitrogen Oxide Waste Conversion to Fertilizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueck, Dale E. (Inventor); Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention describes a process for converting vapor streams from sources containing at least one nitrogen-containing oxidizing agent therein to a liquid fertilizer composition comprising the steps of: (1) directing a vapor stream containing at least nitrogen-containing oxidizing agent to a first contact zone; (2) contacting said vapor stream with water to form nitrogen oxide(s) from said at least one nitrogen- containing oxidizing agent; (3) directing said acid(s) as a second stream to a second contact zone; (4) exposing said second stream to hydrogen peroxide which is present within said second contact zone in a relative amount of at least 0.1% by weight of said second stream within said second contact zone to convert at least some of any nitrogen oxide species or ions other than in the nitrite form present within said second stream to nitrate ion; (5) sampling said stream within said second contact zone to determine the relative amount of hydrogen peroxide within said second contact zone; (6) adding hydrogen peroxide to said second contact zone when a level on hydrogen peroxide less than 0.1% by weight in said second stream is determined by said sampling; (7) adding a solution comprising potassium hydroxide to said second stream to maintain a pH between 6.0 and 11.0 within said second stream within said second contact zone to form a solution of potassium nitrate; and (8) removing sais solution of potassium nitrate from said second contact zone.

  8. Evaluation of advanced oxidation process for the treatment of groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Garland, S.B. II ); Peyton, G.R. ); Rice, L.E. . Kansas City Div.)

    1990-01-01

    An advanced oxidation process utilizing ozone, ultraviolet radiation, and hydrogen peroxide was selected for the removal of chlorinated hydrocarbons, particularly trichlorethene and 1,2-dichlorethene, from groundwater underlying the US Department of Energy Kansas City Plant. Since the performance of this process for the removal of organics from groundwater is not well-documented, an evaluation was initiated to determine the performance of the treatment plant, document the operation and maintenance costs experience, and evaluate contaminant removal mechanisms. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Development studies of a novel wet oxidation process

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, T.W.; Dhooge, P.M.

    1995-12-01

    Many DOE waste streams and remediates contain complex and variable mixtures of organic compounds, toxic metals, and radionuclides. These materials are often dispersed in organic or inorganic matrices, such as personal protective equipment, various sludges, soils, and water. Incineration and similar combustive processes do not appear to be viable options for treatment of these waste streams due to various considerations. There is a need for non-combustion processes with a wide application range to treat the large majority of these waste forms. The non-combustion process should also be safe, effective, cost-competitive, permit-able, and preferrably mobile. This paper describes the DETOX process of organic waste oxidation.

  10. Oxidation resistant slurry coating for carbon-based materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, J. L.; Rybicki, G. C. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An oxidation resistant coating is produced on carbon-base materials, and the same processing step effects an infiltration of the substrate with silicon containing material. The process comprises making a slurry of nickel and silicon powders in a nitrocellulose lacquer, spraying onto the graphite or carbon-carbon substrate, and sintering in vacuum to form a fused coating that wets and covers the surface as well as penetrates into the pores of the substrate. Optimum wetting and infiltration occurs in the range of Ni-60 w/o Si to Ni-90 w/o Si with deposited thicknesses of 25-100 mg/sq. cm. Sintering temperatures of about 1200 C to about 1400 C are used, depending on the melting point of the specific coating composition. The sintered coating results in Ni-Si intermetallic phases and SiC, both of which are highly oxidation resistant.

  11. A solar-driven UV/Chlorine advanced oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Chan, Po Yee; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed; Bolton, James R

    2012-11-01

    An overlap of the absorption spectrum of the hypochlorite ion (OCl(-)) and the ultraviolet (UV) end of the solar emission spectrum implies that solar photons can probably initiate the UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process (AOP). The application of this solar process to water and wastewater treatment has been investigated in this study. At the bench-scale, the OCl(-) photolysis quantum yield at 303 nm (representative of the lower end of the solar UV region) and at concentrations from 0 to 4.23 mM was 0.87 ± 0.01. Also the hydroxyl radical yield factor (for an OCl(-) concentration of 1.13 mM) was 0.70 ± 0.02. Application of this process, at the bench-scale and under actual sunlight, led to methylene blue (MB) photobleaching and cyclohexanoic acid (CHA) photodegradation. For MB photobleaching, the OCl(-) concentration was the key factor causing an increase in the pseudo first-order rate constants. The MB photobleaching quantum yield was affected by the MB concentration, but not much by the OCl(-) concentration. For CHA photodegradation, an optimal OCl(-) concentration of 1.55 mM was obtained for a 0.23 mM CHA concentration, and a scavenger effect was observed when higher OCl(-) concentrations were applied. Quantum yields of 0.09 ± 0.01 and 0.89 ± 0.06 were found for CHA photodegradation and OCl(-) photolysis, respectively. In addition, based on the Air Mass 1.5 reference solar spectrum and experimental quantum yields, a theoretical calculation method was developed to estimate the initial rate for photoreactions under sunlight. The theoretical initial rates agreed well with the experimental rates for both MB photobleaching and CHA photodegradation. PMID:22939221

  12. Treatment of oxide spent fuel using the lithium reduction process

    SciTech Connect

    Karell, E.J.; Pierce, R.D.; Mulcahey, T.P.

    1996-05-01

    The wide variety in the composition of DOE spent nuclear fuel complicates its long-term disposition because of the potential requirement to individually qualify each type of fuel for repository disposal. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has developed the electrometallurgical treatment technique to convert all of these spent fuel types into a single set of disposal forms, simplifying the qualification process. While metallic fuels can be directly processed using the electrometallurgical treatment technique, oxide fuels must first be reduced to the metallic form. The lithium reduction process accomplishes this pretreatment. In the lithium process the oxide components of the fuel are reduced using lithium at 650 C in the presence of molten LiCl, yielding the corresponding metals and Li{sub 2}O. The reduced metal components are then separated from the LiCl salt phase and become the feed material for electrometallurgical treatment. A demonstration test of the lithium reduction process was successfully conducted using a 10-kg batch of simulated oxide spent fuel and engineering-scale equipment specifically constructed for that purpose. This paper describes the lithium process, the equipment used in the demonstration test, and the results of the demonstration test.

  13. Thermal Behavior Study of the MoVTeNb Oxide Catalyst for Selective Oxidation Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idris, R.; Hamid, S. B. Abd.

    2009-06-01

    Several parameters involved in preparing the multi metal oxide (MMO) catalysts (Mo1V0.3Te0.23Nb0.12Ox) for selective oxidation of propane to acrylic acid (AA) were investigated. These included the proper pre-calcined and calcinations atmosphere effect on the performance of the catalysts. It was found that each metal element plays a critical role to the performance of an effective catalyst and also the calcinations under a non-flow inert atmosphere. The characterization results from XRD, SEM, TG and DSC show the important differences depending on the activation procedures of the MoVTeNb oxide catalyst. The XRD analysis is used to identify the phase inventory of the MoVTeNb oxide catalysts. The structure of orthorhombic M1, M2, TeMo5O16, V0.95Mo0.97O5 and Mo5O14 phase was investigated. The orthorhombic M1 phase is the most active and selective phase and is responsible for the major of the efficiently of the best catalyst for selective oxidation process. TGA and DTG allow the identification of the number and types, of reactions involving evaporation of small molecules from removal of ligands and water to condensation or drying processes. From all these analyses it was proven that the activation procedures would affect the performance of the MoVTeNb oxide catalyst.

  14. Vanadium oxide based materials: Synthesis, characterization and gas sensing properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayesh, Samar I.

    In recent years, the demand for gas sensors based on safety and process control requirements has been expanding. The reason for such demand sterns from environmental and safety concerns since the toxic gases released from automobile exhausts and chemical plants can directly or indirectly pollute our environment and affect our health. Among the chemicals studied, nitrogen oxide (NOx) gases are among the most dangerous air pollutants. Transition metal oxide clusters (or polyoxometalates) provide an exciting opportunity for the design and synthesis of a new generation of materials for efficient NOx sensing. Polyoxometalates are an important and fast emerging class of compounds that exhibit many remarkable properties. Chapter 1 provides introduction and background of chemical sensors. It describes the need for gas sensors and the current status of research in the area of NOx gas sensors in particular. A description of polyoxmetalates and their relevance as potential novel gas sensor materials is also given. Chapter 2 describes the synthesis and characterization by FTIR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, manganometric titration, bond valence sum calculation, temperature dependent magnetic properties studies, electron paramagnetic resonance, and complete single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis of newly prepared vanadium oxide based-systems that have been discovered during the course of this work. First, the system containing arrays of decavanadates networked by extensive hydrogen bonding with cyclic nitrogen bases are described. This is followed by the mixed-valence vanadium oxide cluster, [VV 13VIV3O42(Cl)]-7, containing a hitherto unknown vanadium oxide framework structure. Finally the synthesis of 3D-framework materials is described. These compounds have highly symmetrical closely related three-dimensional framework structures consisting vanadium oxide shells {V18O42(XO4)} linked via heterometallic atoms {M' = Cd, Zn} into three

  15. Conceptual Design for the Pilot-Scale Plutonium Oxide Processing Unit in the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Meier, David E.; Tingey, Joel M.; Casella, Amanda J.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Jones, Susan A.; Rapko, Brian M.

    2014-08-05

    This report describes a conceptual design for a pilot-scale capability to produce plutonium oxide for use as exercise and reference materials, and for use in identifying and validating nuclear forensics signatures associated with plutonium production. This capability is referred to as the Pilot-scale Plutonium oxide Processing Unit (P3U), and it will be located in the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The key unit operations are described, including plutonium dioxide (PuO2) dissolution, purification of the Pu by ion exchange, precipitation, and conversion to oxide by calcination.

  16. A comparison of single oxidants versus advanced oxidation processes as chlorine-alternatives for wild blueberry processing (Vaccinium angustifolium).

    PubMed

    Crowe, Kristi M; Bushway, Alfred A; Bushway, Rodney J; Davis-Dentici, Katherine; Hazen, Russell A

    2007-05-01

    Advanced oxidation processes and single chemical oxidants were evaluated for their antimicrobial efficacy against common spoilage bacteria isolated from lowbush blueberries. Predominant bacterial flora were identified using biochemical testing with the assessment of relative abundance using non-selective and differential media. Single chemical oxidants evaluated for postharvest processing of lowbush blueberries included 1% hydrogen peroxide, 100 ppm chlorine, and 1 ppm aqueous ozone while advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) included combinations of 1% hydrogen peroxide/UV, 100 ppm chlorine/UV, and 1 ppm ozone/1% hydrogen peroxide/UV. Enterobacter agglomerans and Pseudomonas fluorescens were found to comprise 90-95% of the bacterial flora on lowbush blueberries. Results of inoculation studies reveal significant log reductions (p< or 5) in populations of E. agglomerans and P. fluorescens on all samples receiving treatment with 1% hydrogen peroxide, 1% hydrogen peroxide/UV, 1 ppm ozone, or a combined ozone/hydrogen peroxide/UV treatment as compared to chlorine treatments and unwashed control berries. Although population reductions approached 2.5 log CFU/g, microbial reductions among these treatments were not found to be significantly different (p< or 5) from each other despite the synergistic potential that should result from AOPs; furthermore, as a single oxidant, UV inactivation of inoculated bacteria was minimal and did not prove effective as a non-aqueous bactericidal process for fresh pack blueberries. Overall, results indicate that hydrogen peroxide and ozone, as single chemical oxidants, are as effective as AOPs and could be considered as chlorine-alternatives in improving the microbiological quality of lowbush blueberries. PMID:17350128

  17. Enzymatic oxidation of phenolic compounds in coffee processing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Torres, Juliana Arriel; Batista Chagas, Pricila Maria; Silva, Maria Cristina; dos Santos, Custódio Donizete; Duarte Corrêa, Angelita

    2016-01-01

    Peroxidases can be used in the treatment of wastewater containing phenolic compounds. The effluent from the wet processing of coffee fruits contains high content of these pollutants and although some studies propose treatments for this wastewater, none targets specifically the removal of these recalcitrant compounds. This study evaluates the potential use of different peroxidase sources in the oxidation of caffeic acid and of total phenolic compounds in coffee processing wastewater (CPW). The identification and quantification of phenolic compounds in CPW was performed and caffeic acid was found to be the major phenolic compound. Some factors, such as reaction time, pH, amount of H2O2 and enzyme were evaluated, in order to determine the optimum conditions for the enzyme performance for maximum oxidation of caffeic acid. The turnip peroxidase (TPE) proved efficient in the removal of caffeic acid, reaching an oxidation of 51.05% in just 15 minutes of reaction. However, in the bioremediation of the CPW, the horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was more efficient with 32.70%±0.16 of oxidation, followed by TPE with 18.25%±0.11. The treatment proposed in this work has potential as a complementary technology, since the efficiency of the existing process is intimately conditioned to the presence of these pollutants. PMID:26744933

  18. Mechanism-Based Design of Green Oxidation Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Rybak-Akimova, Elena

    2015-03-16

    In modern era of scarce resources, developing chemical processes that can eventually generate useful materials and fuels from readily available, simple, cheap, renewable starting materials is of paramount importance. Small molecules, such as dioxygen, dinitrogen, water, or carbon dioxide, can be viewed as ideal sources of oxygen, nitrogen, or carbon atoms in synthetic applications. Living organisms perfected the art of utilizing small molecules in biosynthesis and in generating energy; photosynthesis, which couples carbohydrate synthesis from carbon dioxide with photocatalytic water splitting, is but one impressive example of possible catalytic processes. Small molecule activation in synthetic systems remains challenging, and current efforts are focused on developing catalytic reactions that can convert small molecules into useful building blocks for generating more complicated organic molecules, including fuels. Modeling nature is attractive in many respects, including the possibility to use non-toxic, earth-abundant metals in catalysis. Specific systems investigated in our work include biomimetic catalytic oxidations with dioxygen, hydrogen peroxide, and related oxygen atom donors. More recently, a new direction was been also pursued in the group, fixation of carbon dioxide with transition metal complexes. Mechanistic understanding of biomimetic metal-catalyzed oxidations is critical for the design of functional models of metalloenzymes, and ultimately for the rational synthesis of useful, selective and efficient oxidation catalysts utilizing dioxygen and hydrogen peroxide as terminal oxidants. All iron oxidases and oxygenases (both mononuclear and dinuclear) utilize metal-centered intermediates as reactive species in selective substrate oxidation. In contrast, free radical pathways (Fenton chemistry) are common for traditional inorganic iron compounds, producing hydroxyl radicals as very active, non-selective oxidants. Recent developments, however, changed this

  19. Radiation-induced charge trapping in bipolar base oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Fleetwood, D.M.; Riewe, L.C.; Witczak, Schrimpf, R.D.

    1996-03-01

    Capacitance-voltage and thermally stimulated current methods are used to investigate radiation induced charge trapping in bipolar base oxides. Results are compared with models of oxide and interface trap charge buildup at low electric fields.

  20. Activation of Peroxymonosulfate by Benzoquinone: A Novel Nonradical Oxidation Process.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang; Jiang, Jin; Gao, Yuan; Ma, Jun; Pang, Su-Yan; Li, Juan; Lu, Xue-Ting; Yuan, Li-Peng

    2015-11-01

    The reactions between peroxymonosulfate (PMS) and quinones were investigated for the first time in this work, where benzoquinone (BQ) was selected as a model quinone. It was demonstrated that BQ could efficiently activate PMS for the degradation of sulfamethoxazole (SMX; a frequently detected antibiotic in the environments), and the degradation rate increased with solution pH from 7 to 10. Interestingly, quenching studies suggested that neither hydroxyl radical (•OH) nor sulfate radical (SO4•-) was produced therein. Instead, the generation of singlet oxygen (1O2) was proved by using two chemical probes (i.e., 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidinol and 9,10-diphenylanthracene) with the appearance of 1O2 indicative products detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometry and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, respectively. A catalytic mechanism was proposed involving the formation of a dioxirane intermediate between PMS and BQ and the subsequent decomposition of this intermediate into 1O2. Accordingly, a kinetic model was developed, and it well described the experimental observation that the pH-dependent decomposition rate of PMS was first-order with respect to BQ. These findings have important implications for the development of novel nonradical oxidation processes based on PMS, because 1O2 as a moderately reactive electrophile may suffer less interference from background organic matters compared with nonselective •OH and SO4•-. PMID:26452059

  1. Can sample treatments based on advanced oxidation processes assisted by high-intensity focused ultrasound be used for toxic arsenic determination in human urine by flow-injection hydride-generation atomic absorption spectrometry?

    PubMed

    Correia, A; Galesio, M; Santos, H; Rial-Otero, R; Lodeiro, C; Oehmen, A; Conceição, Antonio C L; Capelo, J L

    2007-05-15

    Two advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), based on high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), namely, KMnO(4)/HCl/HIFU and H(2)O(2)/HCl/HIFU are studied and compared for the determination of toxic arsenic in human urine [As(III)+As(V)+MMA+DMA] by flow-injection hydride-generation atomic absorption spectrometry (FI-HG-AAS). The KMnO(4)/HCl/HIFU procedure was found to be adequate for organic matter degradation in human urine. l-cysteine (letra minuscula) was used for As reduction to the trivalent state. The new procedure was assessed with seven urines certified in different As species. Results revealed that with KMnO(4)/HCl/HIFU plus l-cysteine the toxic arsenic can be accurately measured in human urine whilst the H(2)O(2)/HCl/HIFU procedure underestimates toxic As. DMA and MMA degradation in urine were observed, due to the effects of the ultrasonic field. Recoveries for As(III), As(V), MMA and DMA were within the certified ranges. Arsenobetaine was not degraded by the AOPs. The new procedure adheres well to the principles of analytical minimalism: (i) low reagent consumption, (ii) low reagent concentration, (iii) low waste production and (iv) low amount of time required for sample preparation and analysis. PMID:19071711

  2. Electrochemical oxide film formation at noble metals as a surface-chemical process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, B. E.

    1995-08-01

    The mechanisms of electrochemical oxide film formation at noble metals are described and exemplified by the cases of Pt and Au, especially in the light of recent experimentation by means of cyclic voltammetry, ellipsometry and vacuum surface-science studies using LEED and AES. Unlike the mechanisms of base-metal oxidation, e.g., in corrosion processes, anodic oxide film formation at noble metals proceeds by surface chemical processes involving, initially, sub-monolayer, through monolayer, formation of 2-dimensional {OH}/{O} arrays. During such 2-d processes, place-exchange between electrosorbed OH or O species on the surface, and Pt or Au atoms within the surface lattice, takes place leading to a quasi-2-d compact film which then grows ultimately to a multilayer hydrous oxide film, probably by continuing injection of ions of the substrate metal and their migration through the growing film under the influence of the field. The initial, sub-monolayer stage of electrosorption of OH involves competitive chemisorption by anions, e.g. HSO 4-, ClO 4-, Cl -, which inhibits onset of the first stage of surface oxidation. These processes are demonstrable in experiments on single-crystal surfaces. The combination of such anion effects with place-exchange during the extension of the film, leads to a general mechanism of noble metal oxide film formation. The formation of the oxide films can be examined in detail by recording the distinguishable stages in the film's electrochemical reduction in linear-sweep voltammetry which is sensitive down to {OH}/{O} fractional coverages as low as 0.5% and over time-scales down to 50μs in experiments on time-evolution and transformation of the states of the oxide films. By means of LEED, AES and STM or AFM experiments, the reconstructions and perturbations (e.g. generation of stepped terraces) which oxide films cause on singlecrystal surfaces can be followed.

  3. Vapor-gel processing and applications in oxide film depositions

    SciTech Connect

    Chour, K.W.; Xu, R.; Takada, T.

    1995-12-31

    The Vapor-gel processing of oxide films is discussed for the prototypic system of LiTa(OBut{sup n}){sub 6}-LiTaO{sub 3}. It is found that the hydrolysis-polycondensation reaction scheme, commonly used in Sol-gel processing, can be used in a vapor deposition environment. High quality films can be deposited at low temperatures. We present some initial results regarding this deposition method and discuss its advantages and disadvantages as compared with Sol-gel processing and typical MOCVD.

  4. Analysis of the laser oxidation kinetics process of In-In(2)O(3) MTMO photomasks by laser direct writing.

    PubMed

    Xia, Feng; Zhang, Xinzheng; Wang, Meng; Liu, Qian; Xu, Jingjun

    2015-11-01

    One kind of novel grayscale photomask based on Metal-transparent-metallic-oxides (MTMOs) system fabricated by laser direct writing was demonstrated recently. Here, a multilayer oxidation model of In-In(2)O(3) film with a glass substrate was proposed to study the pulsed laser-induced oxidation mechanism. The distribution of the electromagnetic field in the film is calculated by the transfer matrix method. Temperature fields of the model are simulated based on the heat transfer equations with the Finite-Difference Time-Domain method. The oxidation kinetics process is studied based on the laser-induced Cabrera-Mott theory. The simulated oxidation processes are consistent with the experimental results, which mean that our laser-induced oxidation model can successfully interpret the fabrication mechanism of MTMO grayscale photomasks. PMID:26561189

  5. Lewis acid catalysis and Green oxidations: sequential tandem oxidation processes induced by Mn-hyperaccumulating plants.

    PubMed

    Escande, Vincent; Renard, Brice-Loïc; Grison, Claude

    2015-04-01

    Among the phytotechnologies used for the reclamation of degraded mining sites, phytoextraction aims to diminish the concentration of polluting elements in contaminated soils. However, the biomass resulting from the phytoextraction processes (highly enriched in polluting elements) is too often considered as a problematic waste. The manganese-enriched biomass derived from native Mn-hyperaccumulating plants of New Caledonia was presented here as a valuable source of metallic elements of high interest in chemical catalysis. The preparation of the catalyst Eco-Mn1 and reagent Eco-Mn2 derived from Grevillea exul exul and Grevillea exul rubiginosa was investigated. Their unusual polymetallic compositions allowed to explore new reactivity of low oxidative state of manganese-Mn(II) for Eco-Mn1 and Mn(IV) for Eco-Mn2. Eco-Mn1 was used as a Lewis acid to catalyze the acetalization/elimination of aldehydes into enol ethers with high yields; a new green and stereoselective synthesis of (-)-isopulegol via the carbonyl-ene cyclization of (+)-citronellal was also performed with Eco-Mn1. Eco-Mn2 was used as a mild oxidative reagent and controlled the oxidation of aliphatic alcohols into aldehydes with quantitative yields. Oxidative cleavage was interestingly noticed when Eco-Mn2 was used in the presence of a polyol. Eco-Mn2 allowed direct oxidative iodination of ketones without using iodine, which is strongly discouraged by new environmental legislations. Finally, the combination of the properties in the Eco-Mn catalysts and reagents gave them an unprecedented potential to perform sequential tandem oxidation processes through new green syntheses of p-cymene from (-)-isopulegol and (+)-citronellal; and a new green synthesis of functionalized pyridines by in situ oxidation of 1,4-dihydropyridines. PMID:25263417

  6. Process for growing a film epitaxially upon an oxide surface and structures formed with the process

    DOEpatents

    McKee, Rodney Allen; Walker, Frederick Joseph

    1998-01-01

    A process and structure wherein a film comprised of a perovskite or a spinel is built epitaxially upon a surface, such as an alkaline earth oxide surface, involves the epitaxial build up of alternating constituent metal oxide planes of the perovskite or spinel. The first layer of metal oxide built upon the surface includes a metal element which provides a small cation in the crystalline structure of the perovskite or spinel, and the second layer of metal oxide built upon the surface includes a metal element which provides a large cation in the crystalline structure of the perovskite or spinel. The layering sequence involved in the film build up reduces problems which would otherwise result from the interfacial electrostatics at the first atomic layers, and these oxides can be stabilized as commensurate thin films at a unit cell thickness or grown with high crystal quality to thicknesses of 0.5-0.7 .mu.m for optical device applications.

  7. Process for growing a film epitaxially upon an oxide surface and structures formed with the process

    DOEpatents

    McKee, Rodney A.; Walker, Frederick J.

    1995-01-01

    A process and structure wherein a film comprised of a perovskite or a spinel is built epitaxially upon a surface, such as an alkaline earth oxide surface, involves the epitaxial build up of alternating constituent metal oxide planes of the perovskite or spinel. The first layer of metal oxide built upon the surface includes a metal element which provides a small cation in the crystalline structure of the perovskite or spinel, and the second layer of metal oxide built upon the surface includes a metal element which provides a large cation in the crystalline structure of the perovskite or spinel. The layering sequence involved in the film build up reduces problems which would otherwise result from the interfacial electrostatics at the first atomic layers, and these oxides can be stabilized as commensurate thin films at a unit cell thickness or grown with high crystal quality to thicknesses of 0.5-0.7 .mu.m for optical device applications.

  8. Oxidation of DNA bases, deoxyribonucleosides and homopolymers by peroxyl radicals.

    PubMed Central

    Simandan, T; Sun, J; Dix, T A

    1998-01-01

    DNA base oxidation is considered to be a key event associated with disease initiation and progression in humans. Peroxyl radicals (ROO. ) are important oxidants found in cells whose ability to react with the DNA bases has not been characterized extensively. In this paper, the products resulting from ROO. oxidation of the DNA bases are determined by gas chromatography/MS in comparison with authentic standards. ROO. radicals oxidize adenine and guanine to their 8-hydroxy derivatives, which are considered biomarkers of hydroxyl radical (HO.) oxidations in cells. ROO. radicals also oxidize adenine to its hydroxylamine, a previously unidentified product. ROO. radicals oxidize cytosine and thymine to the monohydroxy and dihydroxy derivatives that are formed by oxidative damage in cells. Identical ROO. oxidation profiles are observed for each base when exposed as deoxyribonucleosides, monohomopolymers and base-paired dihomopolymers. These results have significance for the development, utilization and interpretation of DNA base-derived biomarkers of oxidative damage associated with disease initiation and propagation, and support the idea that the mutagenic potential of N-oxidized bases, when generated in cellular DNA, will require careful evaluation. Adenine hydroxylamine is proposed as a specific molecular probe for the activity of ROO. in cellular systems. PMID:9761719

  9. Degradation of the commercial surfactant nonylphenol ethoxylate by advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Salatiel Wohlmuth; Klauck, Cláudia Regina; Siqueira, Marco Antônio; Bernardes, Andréa Moura

    2015-01-23

    Four different oxidation process, namely direct photolysis (DP) and three advanced oxidation processes (heterogeneous photocatalysis - HP, eletrochemical oxidation - EO and photo-assisted electrochemical oxidation - PEO) were applied in the treatment of wastewater containing nonylphenol ethoxylate (NPnEO). The objective of this work was to determine which treatment would be the best option in terms of degradation of NPnEO without the subsequent generation of toxic compounds. In order to investigate the degradation of the surfactant, the processes were compared in terms of UV/Vis spectrum, mineralization (total organic carbon), reaction kinetics, energy efficiency and phytotoxicity. A solution containing NPnEO was prepared as a surrogate of the degreasing wastewater, was used in the processes. The results showed that the photo-assisted processes degrade the surfactant, producing biodegradable intermediates in the reaction. On the other hand, the electrochemical process influences the mineralization of the surfactant. The process of PEO carried out with a 250W lamp and a current density of 10mA/cm(2) showed the best results in terms of degradation, mineralization, reaction kinetics and energy consumption, in addition to not presenting phytotoxicity. Based on this information, this process can be a viable alternative for treating wastewater containing NPnEO, avoiding the contamination of water resources. PMID:25262384

  10. Rheological Properties of Iron Oxide Based Ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, M.; Mohanta, D.

    2009-06-01

    In the present work, we report synthesis and magneto-viscous properties of cationic and anionic surfactant coated, iron oxide nanoparticles based ferrofluids. Structural and morphological aspects are revealed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies. We compare the rheological/magneto-viscous properties of different ferrofluids for various shear rates (2-450 sec-1) and applied magnetic fields (0-100 gauss). In the absence of a magnetic field, and under no shear case, the ferrofluid prepared with TMAH coated particle is found to be 12% more viscous compared to its counterpart. The rheological properties are governed by non-Newtonian features, and for a definite shear rate, viscosity of a given ferrofluid is found to be strongly dependent on the applied magnetic field as well as nature of the surfactant.

  11. ER Protein Processing Under Oxidative Stress: Implications and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Mahmoud F; Valenzuela, Carlos; Sisniega, Daniella; Skouta, Rachid; Narayan, Mahesh

    2016-06-01

    Elevated levels of mitochondrial nitrosative stress have been associated with the pathogenesis of both Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. The mechanism involves catalytic poisoning of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident oxidoreductase chaperone, protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), and the subsequent accumulation of ER-processed substrate proteins. Using a model system to mimic mitochondrial oxidative and nitrosative stress, we demonstrate a PDI-independent mechanism whereby reactive oxygen species (ROS) compromise regeneration rates of disulfide bond-containing ER-processed proteins. Under ROS-duress, the secretion-destined traffic adopts disulfide-exposed structures making the protein flux retrotranslocation biased. We also demonstrate that ROS-compromised protein maturation rates can be rescued by the polyphenol ellagic acid (EA). Our results are significant in that they reveal an additional mechanism which could promote neurodegenerative disorders. Furthermore, our data reveal that EA possesses therapeutic potential as a lead prophylactic agent against oxidative/nitrosative stress-related neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26983927

  12. Process for the reduction of nitrogen oxides in an effluent

    SciTech Connect

    Epperly, W.R.; Sullivan, J.C.

    1988-09-13

    A process is described for reducing the concentration of nitrogen oxides in an effluent from the combustion of a carbonaceous fuel, which process comprises injecting into the effluent ammonia and an enhancer selected from the group consisting of hexamethylenetetramine, a lower carbon alcohol, a hydroxyl amino hydrocarbon, sugar, furfural, furfural derivatives, an amino acid, a protein-containing composition, mixtures of ortho-, meta-, and para-methyl phenols, guanidine, guanidine carbonate, biguanidine, guanylurea sulfate, melamine, dicyandiamide, calcium cyanamide, biuret, 1,1'-azobisformamide, methylol urea, methylol urea-urea condensation product, dimethylol urea, methyl urea, dimethyl urea, and mixtures thereof, at an effluent temperature above about 1300/sup 0/F and a molar ratio of nitrogen in the ammonia and enhancer to the baseline nitrogen oxides level of about 1:5 to about 6:1 wherein the excess of oxygen in the effluent is no greater than about 6%.

  13. Wave-based signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClure, Mark Richard

    The efficacy of imbedding knowledge of wave-scattering phenomenology into the processing of remote-sensing data is examined. In particular, the processing of radar and sonar phase history and synthetic-aperture imagery is considered. Algorithms are developed for effecting signal denoising, feature extraction (for use in target identification/classification) and detection. Three classes of algorithms are presented: (1) superresolution, (2) adaptive-signal decomposition, and (3) template matching. A superresolution signal-processing algorithm is used for the identification of wavefronts from the fields scattered from several canonical targets. Particular wave objects that are examined are single and multiple edge diffraction, scattering from flat and curved surfaces, cone diffraction, and creeping waves. General properties of superresolution processing of such data--independent of the particular algorithm used--are assessed through examination of the Cramer-Rao bounds. The method of matching pursuits is used to effect data-adaptive signal decomposition. This algorithm utilizes a nonlinear iterative procedure to project a given waveform onto a particular dictionary. For scattering problems, the most appropriate dictionary is composed of waveobjects consistent with the underlying wave phenomenology. A signal scattered from most targets of interest can be decomposed in terms of wavefronts, resonances, and chirps--and each of these subclasses can be further subdivided based on characteristic wave physics. Here the efficacy of applying the method of matching pursuits with a wave-based dictionary is examined, for the processing of scattering data. Detection test statistics are derived based on matching-pursuits results from each dictionary separately as well as with the cumulative results from multiple dictionaries. Examples are presented using measured data, for wideband, time-domain acoustic scattering from a submerged elastic shell. Finally, a full-wave electromagnetic

  14. ELECTROCHEMICAL ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESS UTILIZING NB-DOPED TIO2 ELECTRODES

    EPA Science Inventory

    An electrochemical advanced oxidation process has been developed utilizing electrodes which generate hydroxyl free radical (HO) by oxidizing water. All substrates tested are oxidized, mostly with reaction rates proportional to the corresponding rate constants for reaction with hy...

  15. ELECTROCHEMICAL ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESS UTILIZING NB-DOPED TIO2 ELECTRODES

    EPA Science Inventory

    An electrochemical advanced oxidation process has been developed, utilizing electrodes which generate hydroxyl free radical (HO) by oxidizing water. All substrates tested are oxidized, mostly with reaction rates proportional to the corresponding rate constants for reaction with h...

  16. Metal-oxide-based energetic materials and synthesis thereof

    DOEpatents

    Tillotson, Thomas M. , Simpson; Randall L.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    2006-01-17

    A method of preparing energetic metal-oxide-based energetic materials using sol-gel chemistry has been invented. The wet chemical sol-gel processing provides an improvement in both safety and performance. Essentially, a metal-oxide oxidizer skeletal structure is prepared from hydrolyzable metals (metal salts or metal alkoxides) with fuel added to the sol prior to gelation or synthesized within the porosity metal-oxide gel matrix. With metal salt precursors a proton scavenger is used to destabilize the sol and induce gelation. With metal alkoxide precursors standard well-known sol-gel hydrolysis and condensation reactions are used. Drying is done by standard sol-gel practices, either by a slow evaporation of the liquid residing within the pores to produce a high density solid nanocomposite, or by supercritical extraction to produce a lower density, high porous nanocomposite. Other ingredients may be added to this basic nanostructure to change physical and chemical properties, which include organic constituents for binders or gas generators during reactions, burn rate modifiers, or spectral emitters.

  17. Facile Routes To Improve Performance of Solution-Processed Amorphous Metal Oxide Thin Film Transistors by Water Vapor Annealing.

    PubMed

    Park, Won-Tae; Son, Inyoung; Park, Hyun-Woo; Chung, Kwun-Bum; Xu, Yong; Lee, Taegweon; Noh, Yong-Young

    2015-06-24

    Here, we report on a simple and high-rate oxidization method for producing solution-based compound mixtures of indium zinc oxide (IZO) and indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) metal-oxide semiconductors (MOS) for thin-film transistor (TFT) applications. One of the issues for solution-based MOS fabrication is how to sufficiently oxidize the precursor in order to achieve high performance. As the oxidation rate of solution processing is lower than vacuum-based deposition such as sputtering, devices using solution-processed MOS exhibit relatively poorer performance. Therefore, we propose a method to prepare the metal-oxide precursor upon exposure to saturated water vapor in a closed volume for increasing the oxidization efficiency without requiring additional oxidizing agent. We found that the hydroxide rate of the MOS film exposed to water vapor is lower than when unexposed (≤18%). Hence, we successfully fabricated oxide TFTs with high electron mobility (27.9 cm(2)/V·s) and established a rapid process (annealing at 400 °C for 5 min) that is much shorter than the conventional as-deposited long-duration annealing (at 400 °C for 1 h) whose corresponding mobility is even lower (19.2 cm(2)/V·s). PMID:26043206

  18. Process for Nitrogen Oxide Waste Conversion to Fertilizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueck, Dale E. (Inventor); Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention describes a process for converting vapor streams from sources containing at least one nitrogen-containing oxidizing agent therein to a liquid fertilizer composition comprising the steps of: a) directing a vapor stream containing at least one nitrogen-containing oxidizing agent to a first contact zone; b) contacting said vapor stream with water to form nitrogen oxide(s) from said at least one nitrogen-containing oxidizing agent; c) directing said acid(s) as a second stream to a second contact zone; d) exposing said second stream to hydrogen peroxide which is present within said second contact zone in a relative amount of at least 0.1% by weight of said second stream within said second contact zone to convert at least some of any nitrogen oxide species or ions other than in the nitrate form present within said second stream to nitrate ion; e) sampling said stream within said second contact zone to determine the relative amount of hydrogen peroxide within said second contact zone; f) adding hydrogen peroxide to said second contact zone when a level of hydrogen peroxide less than 0.1 % by weight in said second stream is determined by said sampling; g) adding a solution comprising potassium hydroxide to said second stream to maintain a pH between 6.0 and 11.0 within said second stream within said second contact zone to form a solution of potassium nitrate; and h) removing said solution of potassium nitrate from said second contact zone.

  19. Lipid oxidation volatiles absent in milk after selected ultrasound processing.

    PubMed

    Juliano, Pablo; Torkamani, Amir Ehsan; Leong, Thomas; Kolb, Veronika; Watkins, Peter; Ajlouni, Said; Singh, Tanoj Kumar

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasonic processing can suit a number of potential applications in the dairy industry. However, the impact of ultrasound treatment on milk stability during storage has not been fully explored under wider ranges of frequencies, specific energies and temperature applications. The effect of ultrasonication on lipid oxidation was investigated in various types of milk. Four batches of raw milk (up to 2L) were sonicated at various frequencies (20, 400, 1000, 1600 and 2000kHz), using different temperatures (4, 20, 45 and 63°C), sonication times and ultrasound energy inputs up to 409kJ/kg. Pasteurized skim milk was also sonicated at low and high frequency for comparison. In selected experiments, non-sonicated and sonicated samples were stored at 4°C and were drawn periodically up to 14days for SPME-GCMS analysis. The cavitational yield, characterized in all systems in water, was highest between 400kHz and 1000kHz. Volatile compounds from milk lipid oxidation were detected and exceeded their odor threshold values at 400kHz and 1000kHz at specific energies greater than 271kJ/kg in raw milk. However, no oxidative volatile compounds were detected below 230kJ/kg in batch systems at the tested frequencies under refrigerated conditions. Skim milk showed a lower energy threshold for oxidative volatile formation. The same oxidative volatiles were detected after various passes of milk through a 0.3L flow cell enclosing a 20kHz horn and operating above 90kJ/kg. This study showed that lipid oxidation in milk can be controlled by decreasing the sonication time and the temperature in the system depending on the fat content in the sample among other factors. PMID:24704065

  20. Laccase oxidation and removal of toxicants released during combustion processes.

    PubMed

    Prasetyo, Endry Nugroho; Semlitsch, Stefan; Nyanhongo, Gibson S; Lemmouchi, Yahia; Guebitz, Georg M

    2016-02-01

    This study reports for the first time the ability of laccases adsorbed on cellulose acetate to eliminate toxicants released during combustion processes. Laccases directly oxidized and eliminated more than 40% w/v of 14 mM of 1,4-dihydroxybenzene (hydroquinone); 2-methyl-1,4-benzenediol (methylhydroquinone); 1,4-dihydroxy-2,3,5-trimethylbenzene (trimethylhydroquinone); 3-methylphenol (m-cresol); 4-methylphenol (p-cresol); 2-methylphenol (o-cresol); 1,3-benzenediol (resorcinol); 1,2-dihydroxybenzene (catechol); 3,4-dihydroxytoluene (4-methylcatechol) and 2-naphthylamine. Further, laccase oxidized 2-naphthylamine, hydroquinone, catechol, methylhydroquinone and methylcatechol were also able to in turn mediate the elimination of >90% w/v of toxicants which are per-se non-laccase substrates such as 3-aminobiphenyl; 4-aminobiphenyl; benz[a]anthracene; 3-(1-nitrosopyrrolidin-2-yl) pyridine (NNN); formaldehyde; 4-(methyl-nitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK); 2-butenal (crotonaldehyde); nitric oxide and vinyl cyanide (acrylonitrile). These studies demonstrate the potential of laccase immobilized on solid supports to remove many structurally different toxicants released during combustion processes. This system has great potential application for in situ removal of toxicants in the manufacturing, food processing and food service industries. PMID:26408262

  1. A comparison between conductive-diamond electrochemical oxidation and other advanced oxidation processes for the treatment of synthetic melanoidins.

    PubMed

    Cañizares, P; Hernández-Ortega, M; Rodrigo, M A; Barrera-Díaz, C E; Roa-Morales, G; Sáez, C

    2009-05-15

    In this study, three technologies classified as Advanced Oxidation Processes (Conductive-Diamond Electrochemical Oxidation (CDEO), ozonation and Fenton oxidation) have been compared to treat wastes produced in fermentation processes, and characterized by a significant color and a high organic load. Results of CDEO seem to strongly depend on the addition of an electrolyte salt, not only to decrease the energy cost but also to improve efficiency. The addition of sodium chloride as supporting electrolyte improves the removal percentages of organic load, indicating the important role of mediated oxidation processes carried out by the electrogenerated oxidants (hypochlorite). Fenton oxidation and ozonation seem to be less efficient, and mainly Fenton oxidation favors the accumulation of refractory compounds. The differences observed can be explained in terms of the contribution of hydroxyl radicals and other specific oxidation mechanisms involved in each technology. PMID:18789836

  2. Novel Carbon Dioxide Microsensor Based on Tin Oxide Nanomaterial Doped With Copper Oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Jennifer C.; Hunter, Gary W.; Lukco, Dorothy; Liu, Chung-Chiun; Ward, Benjamin J.

    2008-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is one of the major indicators of fire and therefore its measurement is very important for low-false-alarm fire detection and emissions monitoring. However, only a limited number of CO2 sensing materials exist due to the high chemical stability of CO2. In this work, a novel CO2 microsensor based on nanocrystalline tin oxide (SnO2) doped with copper oxide (CuO) has been successfully demonstrated. The CuO-SnO2 based CO2 microsensors are fabricated by means of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology and sol-gel nanomaterial-synthesis processes. At a doping level of CuO: SnO2 = 1:8 (molar ratio), the resistance of the sensor has a linear response to CO2 concentrations for the range of 1 to 4 percent CO2 in air at 450 C. This approach has demonstrated the use of SnO2, typically used for the detection of reducing gases, in the detection of an oxidizing gas.

  3. Process for the reduction of nitrogen oxides in an effluent

    SciTech Connect

    Epperly, W.R.; Sullivan, J.C.; Sprague, B.N.

    1989-07-04

    This patent describes a process for the reduction of the concentration of nitrogen oxides in the effluent from the combustion of a carbonaceous fuel. The process comprises introducing a treatment agent which comprises a composition selected from the group consisting of NH/sub 4/-lignosulfonate, calcium lignosulfonate, 2-furoic acid, 1,3 dioxolane, tetrahydrofuran, furfurylamine, furfurylalcohol, gluconic acid, citric acid, n-butyl acetate, 1,3 butylene glycol, methylal, tetrahydrofuryl alcohol, furan, fish oil, coumalic acid, furfuryl acetate, tetrahydrofuran 2,3,4,5-tetracarboxylic acid, tetrahydrofurylamine, furylacrylic acid, tetrahydropyran, 2,5-furandimethanol, mannitol, hexamethylenediamine, barbituric acid, acetic anhydride, oxalic acid, mucic acid and d-galactose.

  4. Oxidation-reduction catalyst and its process of use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Schryer, Jacqueline L. (Inventor); Oglesby, Donald M. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    This invention relates generally to a ruthenium stabilized oxidation-reduction catalyst useful for oxidizing carbon monoxide, and volatile organic compounds, and reducing nitrogen oxide species in oxidizing environments, substantially without the formation of toxic and volatile ruthenium oxide species upon said oxidizing environment being at high temperatures.

  5. Process for fabricating ZnO-based varistors

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.

    1985-01-01

    The invention is a process for producing ZnO-based varistors incorporating a metal oxide dopant. In one form, the invention comprises providing a varistor powder mix of colloidal particles of ZnO and metal-oxide dopants including Bi.sub.2 O.sub.3. The mix is hot-pressed to form a compact at temperatures below 850.degree. C. and under conditions effecting reduction of the ZnO to sub-stoichiometric oxide. This promotes densification while restricting liquid formation and grain growth. The compact then is heated under conditions restoring the zinc oxide to stoichiometric composition, thus improving the varistor properties of the compact. The process produces fine-grain varistors characterized by a high actual breakdown voltage and a high average breakdown voltage per individual grain boundary.

  6. Process for fabricating ZnO-based varistors

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, R.J.

    The invention is a process for producing ZnO-based varistors incorporating a metal oxide dopant. In one form, the invention comprises providing a varistor powder mix of colloidal particles of ZnO and metal-oxide dopants including Bi/sub 2/O/sub 3/. The mix is hot-pressed to form a compact at temperatures below 850/sup 0/C and under conditions effecting reduction of the ZnO to sub-stoichiometric oxide. This promotes densification while restricting liquid formation and grain growth. The compact then is heated under conditions restoring the zinc oxide to stoichiometric composition, thus improving the varistor properties of the compact. The process produces fine-grain varistors characterized by a high actual breakdown voltage and a high average breakdown voltage per individual grain boundary.

  7. A Monolithic Oxide-Based Transversal Thermoelectric Energy Harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teichert, S.; Bochmann, A.; Reimann, T.; Schulz, T.; Dreßler, C.; Udich, S.; Töpfer, J.

    2016-03-01

    We report the fabrication and properties of a monolithic transversal thermoelectric energy harvester based on the combination of a thermoelectric oxide and a metal. The fabrication of the device is done with a ceramic multilayer technology using printing and co-firing processes. Five transversal devices were combined to a meander-like thermoelectric generator. Electrical measurements and finite element calculations were performed to characterize the resulting thermoelectric generator. A maximum experimental electrical power output of 30.2 mW at a temperature difference of {Δ }T = 208 K was found. The prepared monolithic thermoelectric generator provides at {Δ }T = 35 K sufficient energy to drive a simple electronic sensor application.

  8. In situ analysis of repair processes for oxidative DNA damage in mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Li; Nakajima, Satoshi; Oohata, Yoshitsugu; Takao, Masashi; Okano, Satoshi; Masutani, Mitsuko; Wilson, Samuel H.; Yasui, Akira

    2004-09-01

    Oxidative DNA damage causes blocks and errors in transcription and replication, leading to cell death and genomic instability. Although repair mechanisms of the damage have been extensively analyzed in vitro, the actual in vivo repair processes remain largely unknown. Here, by irradiation with an UVA laser through a microscope lens, we have conditionally produced single-strand breaks and oxidative base damage at restricted nuclear regions of mammalian cells. We showed, in real time after irradiation by using antibodies and GFP-tagged proteins, rapid and ordered DNA repair processes of oxidative DNA damage in human cells. Furthermore, we characterized repair pathways by using repair-defective mammalian cells and found that DNA polymerase accumulated at single-strand breaks and oxidative base damage by means of its 31- and 8-kDa domains, respectively, and that XRCC1 is essential for both polymerase -dependent and proliferating cell nuclear antigen-dependent repair pathways of single-strand breaks. Thus, the repair of oxidative DNA damage is based on temporal and functional interactions among various proteins operating at the site of DNA damage in living cells.

  9. Oxidative degradation of dimethyl phthalate (DMP) by UV/H(2)O(2) process.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Gao, Nai-Yun; Cheng, Hefa; Xia, Sheng-Ji; Rui, Min; Zhao, Dan-Dan

    2009-03-15

    The photochemical degradation of dimethyl phthalate (DMP) in UV/H(2)O(2) advanced oxidation process was studied and a kinetic model based on the elementary reactions involved was developed in this paper. Relatively slow DMP degradation was observed during UV radiation, while DMP was not oxidized by H(2)O(2) alone. In contrast, the combined UV/H(2)O(2) process could effectively degraded DMP, which is attributed to the strong oxidation strength of hydroxyl radical produced. Results show that DMP degradation rate was affected by H(2)O(2) concentration, intensity of UV radiation, initial DMP concentration, and solution pH. A kinetic model without the pseudo-steady state assumption was established according to the generally accepted elementary reactions in UV/H(2)O(2) advanced oxidation process. The rate constant for the reaction between DMP and hydroxyl radical was found to be 4.0 x 10(9) M(-1)s(-1) through fitting the experimental data to this model. The kinetic model could adequately describe the influence of key factors on DMP degradation rate in UV/H(2)O(2) advanced oxidation process, and could serve as a guide in designing treatment systems for DMP removal. PMID:18639981

  10. Processing, Microstructure, and Oxidation Behavior of Iron Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyeji; Noh, Yoonsook; Choi, Hyelim; Hong, Kicheol; Kwon, Kyungjung; Choe, Heeman

    2016-09-01

    With its historically long popularity in major structural applications, the use of iron (Fe) has also recently begun to be explored as an advanced functional material. For this purpose, it is more advantageous to use Fe as a porous structure, simply because it can provide a greater surface area and a higher reaction rate. This study uses a freeze-casting method, which consists of simple and low-cost processing steps, to produce Fe foam with a mean pore size of 10 μm. We examine the influences of various parameters ( i.e., mold bottom temperature, powder content, and sintering time) on the processing of Fe foam, along with its oxidation kinetics at 823 K (550 °C) with various heat-treatment times. We confirm that Fe2O3 and Fe3O4 oxide layers are successfully formed on the surface of Fe foam. With the Fe oxide layers as an active anode material, the Fe foam can potentially be used as a three-dimensional anode current collector for an advanced lithium-ion battery.