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Sample records for oxidative kinetic resolution

  1. Efficiency in nonenzymatic kinetic resolution.

    PubMed

    Vedejs, Edwin; Jure, Mara

    2005-06-27

    The Walden memorial at the Technical University in Riga is pictured in the frontispiece to mark the recent centennial of the Walden inversion. This is a rare public monument to key events from the first era of exploration in stereocontrolled synthesis, and may be the only such monument to use the language of organic chemistry expressed at the molecular level. The reaction of racemic substrates with chiral nucleophiles is one of many methods currently known to achieve kinetic resolution, a phenomenon that ranks as the oldest and most general approach for the synthesis of highly enantioenriched substances. The first nonenzymatic kinetic resolutions as well as the original forms of the Walden inversion were studied in the 1890s. All of these investigations were conducted within the first generation following the demonstration that carbon is tetrahedral, and provided abundant evidence that the principles and importance of enantiocontrolled syntheses were understood. However, a reliable, rapid technique to quantify results and guide the optimization process was still lacking. Many decades passed before this problem was solved by the advent of HPLC and GLPC assays on chiral supports, which stimulated explosive growth in the synthesis of nonracemic substances by kinetic resolution. The Walden monument is accessible to passers-by for hands-on inspection as well as for contemplation and learning. In a similar way, kinetic resolution is experimentally accessible and can be thought-provoking at several levels. We follow the story of kinetic resolution from the early discoveries through fascinating historical milestones and conceptual developments, and close with a focus on modern techniques that maximize efficiency. PMID:15942973

  2. Oxidation kinetics of aluminum diboride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, Michael L.; Sohn, H. Y.; Cutler, Raymond A.

    2013-11-01

    The oxidation characteristics of aluminum diboride (AlB2) and a physical mixture of its constituent elements (Al+2B) were studied in dry air and pure oxygen using thermal gravimetric analysis to obtain non-mechanistic kinetic parameters. Heating in air at a constant linear heating rate of 10 °C/min showed a marked difference between Al+2B and AlB2 in the onset of oxidation and final conversion fraction, with AlB2 beginning to oxidize at higher temperatures but reaching nearly complete conversion by 1500 °C. Kinetic parameters were obtained in both air and oxygen using a model-free isothermal method at temperatures between 500 and 1000 °C. Activation energies were found to decrease, in general, with increasing conversion for AlB2 and Al+2B in both air and oxygen. AlB2 exhibited O2-pressure-independent oxidation behavior at low conversions, while the activation energies of Al+2B were higher in O2 than in air. Differences in the composition and morphology between oxidized Al+2B and AlB2 suggested that Al2O3-B2O3 interactions slowed Al+2B oxidation by converting Al2O3 on aluminum particles into a Al4B2O9 shell, while the same Al4B2O9 developed a needle-like morphology in AlB2 that reduced oxygen diffusion distances and increased conversion. The model-free kinetic analysis was critical for interpreting the complex, multistep oxidation behavior for which a single mechanism could not be assigned. At low temperatures, moisture increased the oxidation rate of Al+2B and AlB2, but both appear to be resistant to oxidation in cool, dry environments.

  3. Oxidation kinetics of aluminum diboride

    SciTech Connect

    Whittaker, Michael L.; Sohn, H.Y.; Cutler, Raymond A.

    2013-11-15

    The oxidation characteristics of aluminum diboride (AlB{sub 2}) and a physical mixture of its constituent elements (Al+2B) were studied in dry air and pure oxygen using thermal gravimetric analysis to obtain non-mechanistic kinetic parameters. Heating in air at a constant linear heating rate of 10 °C/min showed a marked difference between Al+2B and AlB{sub 2} in the onset of oxidation and final conversion fraction, with AlB{sub 2} beginning to oxidize at higher temperatures but reaching nearly complete conversion by 1500 °C. Kinetic parameters were obtained in both air and oxygen using a model-free isothermal method at temperatures between 500 and 1000 °C. Activation energies were found to decrease, in general, with increasing conversion for AlB{sub 2} and Al+2B in both air and oxygen. AlB{sub 2} exhibited O{sub 2}-pressure-independent oxidation behavior at low conversions, while the activation energies of Al+2B were higher in O{sub 2} than in air. Differences in the composition and morphology between oxidized Al+2B and AlB{sub 2} suggested that Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–B{sub 2}O{sub 3} interactions slowed Al+2B oxidation by converting Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on aluminum particles into a Al{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 9} shell, while the same Al{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 9} developed a needle-like morphology in AlB{sub 2} that reduced oxygen diffusion distances and increased conversion. The model-free kinetic analysis was critical for interpreting the complex, multistep oxidation behavior for which a single mechanism could not be assigned. At low temperatures, moisture increased the oxidation rate of Al+2B and AlB{sub 2}, but both appear to be resistant to oxidation in cool, dry environments. - Graphical abstract: Isothermal kinetic data for AlB{sub 2} in air, showing a constantly decreasing activation energy with increasing conversion. Model-free analysis allowed for the calculation of global kinetic parameters despite many simultaneous mechanisms occurring concurrently. (a) Time

  4. Chemoenzymatic dynamic kinetic resolution of acyloins.

    PubMed

    Odman, Peter; Wessjohann, Ludger A; Bornscheuer, Uwe T

    2005-11-11

    [Reaction: see text]. Acyloins (alpha-hydroxy ketones) are important building blocks in organic synthesis, e.g., for the total synthesis of epothilones. Optically pure acyloins can be obtained by lipase-catalyzed kinetic resolution (KR) of the racemate with, for example, Burkholderia cepacia lipase, but this process suffers from a yield limitation of 50%. To devise a dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR), we studied the racemization of two different acyloins and corresponding esters with various amine bases and ion exchangers. No combination of base and solvent was found that could selectively racemize the acyloin or corresponding ester under the conditions needed for a DKR. In contrast to bases, acidic resins (ARs) were found to racemize the acyloins selectively in n-hexane and in water. Unfortunately, the AR deactivated the lipase, preventing a one-pot DKR. Minor side reactions involving the AR, the substrate acyloin, and the vinyl ester acyl donor were also observed. However, an efficient DKR was made possible by the spatial separation of lipase and ion exchanger, with enzymatic transesterification and AR-catalyzed racemization taking place simultaneously in two compartments connected by a pump loop. The conversion of substrate alcohol was 91%, the selectivity toward the product butyrate ester 90%, and the enantiomeric excess of the (S)-product 93% ee. PMID:16268632

  5. Ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet absorbance detection-high-resolution-mass spectrometry combined with automated data processing for studying the kinetics of oxidative thermal degradation of thyroxine in the solid state.

    PubMed

    Neu, Volker; Bielow, Chris; Reinert, Knut; Huber, Christian G

    2014-12-01

    Levothyroxine as active pharmaceutical ingredient of formulations used for the treatment of hypothyroidism is distributed worldwide and taken by millions of people. An important issue in terms of compound stability is its capability to react with ambient oxygen, especially in case of long term compound storage at elevated temperature. In this study we demonstrate that ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography coupled to UV spectrometry and high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-UV-HRMS) represent very useful approaches to investigate the influence of ambient oxygen on the degradation kinetics of levothyroxine in the solid state at enhanced degradation conditions. Moreover, the impurity pattern of oxidative degradation of levothyroxine is elucidated and classified with respect to degradation kinetics at different oxygen levels. Kinetic analysis of thyroxine bulk material at 100 °C reveals bi-phasic degradation kinetics with a distinct change in degradation phases dependent on the availability of oxygen. The results clearly show that contact of the bulk material to ambient oxygen is a key factor for fast compound degradation. Furthermore, the combination of time-resolved HRMS data and automated data processing is shown to allow insights into the kinetics and mechanism of impurity formation on individual compound basis. By comparing degradation profiles, four main classes of profiles linked to reaction pathways of thyroxine degradation were identifiable. Finally, we show the capability of automated data processing for the matching of different stressing conditions, in order to extract information about mechanistic similarities. As a result, degradation kinetics is influenced by factors like availability of oxygen, stressing time, or stressing temperature, while the degradation mechanisms appear to be conserved. PMID:25456598

  6. Kinetics of soot oxidation by NO2

    SciTech Connect

    Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Nguyen, Anh; Zheng, Zhongqing; Wu, Hao-Wei; Jung, Hee-Jung

    2010-06-15

    Modern technologies use NO2 to promote low temperature soot oxidation for diesel particulate filter regeneration. Most previous methods studied soot oxidation with NO2 using offline methods such as thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). In this study, the online aerosol-technique of high-temperature oxidation tandem differential mobility analysis (HTO-TDMA) is used to study kinetics of soot oxidation with NO2 under N2 environment. This method has significant advantages over previous offline methods in reducing heat and mass transfer diffusion limitations to the soot surface. Soot particles are exposed to varying temperature and NO2 concentration inside the furnace resulting from thermal decomposition of NO2 to NO. This causes soot oxidation rates to vary throughout the furnace. In this study, variations in temperatures, NO2 concentrations and particle residence times are thoroughly accounted for the first time, and soot oxidation rates are derived. Soot oxidation rate is calculated as a function of Arrhenius rate constant Asoot, activation energy Esoot, and partial pressure of NO2 PNO2 within the furnace at temperatures ranging 500- 950 C. Results suggest Asoot and Esoot values for soot oxidation with NO2 of 1.68 nm K-0.5 s-1 (Nm-2)-n and 46.5 kJ mol-1 respectively. The activation energy for soot oxidation with NO2 is significantly lower than oxidation with air. However, ppm levels of NO2 cause soot oxidation at low temperatures suggesting NO2 is a stronger oxidant than O2. This study also shows that a semi-empirical approach with just a few kinetic parameters could represent varying soot oxidation rates in a diesel engine cylinder or on a diesel particulate filter. Further studies should be directed towards understanding synergistic effects of other oxidants as O2 and H2O in addition to NO2 using the HTO-TDMA method.

  7. Kinetic Resolution in Asymmetric Epoxidation using Iminium Salt Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The first reported examples of kinetic resolution in epoxidation reactions using iminium salt catalysis are described, providing up to 99% ee in the epoxidation of racemic cis-chromenes. PMID:23862687

  8. Oxidation kinetics and soot formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, I.; Brezinsky, K.

    1983-01-01

    The research objective is to clarify the role of aromaticity in the soot nucleation process by determining the relative importance of phenyl radical/molecular oxygen and benzene/atomic oxygen reactions in the complex combustion of aromatic compounds. Three sets of chemical flow reactor experiments have been designed to determine the relative importance of the phenyl radical/molecular oxygen and benzene/atomic oxygen reactions. The essential elements of these experiments are 1) the use of cresols and anisole formed during the high temperature oxidation of toluene as chemical reaction indicators; 2) the in situ photolysis of molecular oxygen to provide an oxygen atom perturbation in the reacting aromatic system; and 3) the high temperature pyrolysis of phenol, the cresols and possibly anisole.

  9. Oxidation and hydrolysis kinetic studies on UN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, G. A. Rama; Mukerjee, S. K.; Vaidya, V. N.; Venugopal, V.; Sood, D. D.

    1991-11-01

    The reaction of oxygen and water vapour with UN microspheres containing 0.78 and 10.9 mol% UO 2 as impurity was studied under non-isothermal heating conditions in a thermobalance under different partial pressures of oxygen, a fixed pressure of water vapour in argon, and in air. Uranium mononitride was ultimately converted to U 3O 8, with the formation of UO 2 and U 2N 3 as intermediates. The end product of pyrohydrolysis was UO 2. The kinetic parameters were evaluated and the mechanism of the reaction was suggested. Different kinetic models were used to explain the oxidation behaviour of UN.

  10. Chemical kinetic modeling of exhaust hydrocarbon oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, K.C.; Hochgreb, S.; Norris, M.B. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1995-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the oxidation of unburned hydrocarbons from spark ignition engines were made based on full-chemistry, zero-dimensional models and compared with experiments for engine-out hydrocarbons and exhaust port oxidation. Simple correlations can be drawn between calculated results for hydrocarbon oxidation half-lives in plug or stirred reactors and measured hydrocarbon emissions. the extent of reaction through the exhaust port was simulated using calculated temperature histories for each burned gas mass element leaving the cylinder, coupled to detailed chemical kinetic rate equations. The results show that, for the fuels considered, the extent of oxidation of the remaining unburned fuel measured through the exhaust can be bracketed by the calculated results for the well-mixed (average) and core (adiabatically expanded) temperatures in the exhaust. Most of the oxidation is shown to occur at the very early exhaust times. For the paraffins considered, comparisons of simulations and experiments suggest that fuel oxidation is partially controlled by the mixing of cold gases at the initial stages of exhaust, where temperatures are high and the cold unburned mixture emerges from the wall layers into the exhaust jet. These conclusions are supported by the relatively small measured dependence on fuel type of the extent of oxidation in the exhaust, and by the resulting ratio of fuel to nonfuel hydrocarbons in the exhaust port exit.

  11. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Cyclohexane Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Silke, E J; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Ribaucour, M

    2006-11-10

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of cyclohexane at both low and high temperatures. Reaction rate constant rules are developed for the low temperature combustion of cyclohexane. These rules can be used for in chemical kinetic mechanisms for other cycloalkanes. Since cyclohexane produces only one type of cyclohexyl radical, much of the low temperature chemistry of cyclohexane is described in terms of one potential energy diagram showing the reaction of cyclohexyl radical + O{sub 2} through five, six and seven membered ring transition states. The direct elimination of cyclohexene and HO{sub 2} from RO{sub 2} is included in the treatment using a modified rate constant of Cavallotti et al. Published and unpublished data from the Lille rapid compression machine, as well as jet-stirred reactor data are used to validate the mechanism. The effect of heat loss is included in the simulations, an improvement on previous studies on cyclohexane. Calculations indicated that the production of 1,2-epoxycyclohexane observed in the experiments can not be simulated based on the current understanding of low temperature chemistry. Possible 'alternative' H-atom isomerizations leading to different products from the parent O{sub 2}QOOH radical were included in the low temperature chemical kinetic mechanism and were found to play a significant role.

  12. Kinetic Modelling of Macroscopic Properties Changes during Crosslinked Polybutadiene Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audouin, Ludmila; Coquillat, Marie; Colin, Xavier; Verdu, Jacques; Nevière, Robert

    2008-08-01

    The thermal oxidation of additive free hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) isocyanate crosslinked rubber bulk samples has been studied at 80, 100 and 120 °C in air. The oxidation kinetics has been monitored by gravimetry and thickness distribution of oxidation products was determined by FTIR mapping. Changes of elastic shear modulus G' during oxidation were followed during oxidation at the same temperatures. The kinetic model established previously for HTPB has been adapted for bulk sample oxidation using previously determined set of kinetic parameters. Oxygen diffusion control of oxidation has been introduced into the model. The mass changes kinetic curves and oxidation products profiles were simulated and adequate fit was obtained. Using the rubber elasticity theory the elastic modulus changes were simulated taking into account the elastically active chains concentration changes due to chain scission and crosslinking reactions. The reasonable fit of G' as a function of oxidation time experimental curves was obtained.

  13. Copper-catalyzed divergent kinetic resolution of racemic allylic substrates.

    PubMed

    Pineschi, Mauro; Di Bussolo, Valeria; Crotti, Paolo

    2011-10-01

    When a racemic mixture is fully consumed the products may still be enantiomerically enriched. In particular, the regiodivergent kinetic resolution is a process in which a single chiral catalyst or reagent reacts with a racemic substrate to form regioisomers possessing an opposite configuration on the newly-formed stereogenic centers. This review reports the major advances in the field of the copper-catalyzed regiodivergent and stereodivergent kinetic resolution of allylic substrates with organometallic reagents. The chiral recognition matching phenomena found with particular allylic substrates with the absolute configuration of the chiral catalyst allows in some cases an excellent control of the regio- and stereoselectivity, sheding some light on the so-called "black-box" mechanism of a copper-catalyzed asymmetric allylic alkylation. PMID:21837639

  14. KINETICS AND MECHANISMS FOR TCE OXIDATION BY PERMANGANATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The oxidation of trichloroethylene (TCE) by permanganate was studied via a series of kinetic experiments. The goal in product identificationa dn parameterization of the oxidation kinetics was to assess the utility of this reaction as the basis for the in-situ remediation of grou...

  15. Charting oxidized methylcytosines at base resolution

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hao; Zhang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    DNA cytosine methylation (5-methylcytosines) represents a key epigenetic mark and is required for normal development. Iterative oxidation of 5mC by TET family of DNA dioxygenases generates three oxidized nucleotides, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC), and 5-carboxycytosine (5caC), in the mammalian genome. Recent advances in genomic mapping techniques for these oxidized bases suggest that 5hmC/5fC/5caC are not only functionally relevant to the process of active reversal of 5mC, but may also possess unique regulatory functions. This perspective highlights the potential gene regulatory functions of these oxidized cytosine bases in the mammalian genome, and discusses the principles and limitations of recently developed base-resolution mapping technologies. PMID:26333715

  16. Enzymatic kinetic resolution of racemic ibuprofen: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    José, Carla; Toledo, María Victoria; Briand, Laura E

    2016-10-01

    This review is a journey concerning the investigations of the kinetic resolution of racemic ibuprofen for the last 20 years. The relevancy of the pharmacological uses of the S( + ) enantiomer along with its higher cost compared with racemic profen are the driving forces of a variety of scientific research studies addressing the enzymatic resolution of ibuprofen through enantiomeric esterification using lipases as biocatalysts. Lipases of fungal sources such as Candida rugosa, Rhizomucor miehei and the lipase B of Candida antarctica have been extensively studied both in homogeneous and heterogeneous (immobilized on solid supports) processes. In this context, the various alcohols and organic co-solvents frequently used in the esterification of racemic ibuprofen are summarized and discussed in this review. Moreover, recent investigations using membranes as reactors coupled with the separation of the desired product and microfluidic devices are presented. Finally, some guidelines about future perspectives regarding the technology of the kinetic resolution of profens and research niches are given. PMID:26121932

  17. Exploiting Enzymatic Dynamic Reductive Kinetic Resolution (DYRKR) in Stereocontrolled Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Applegate, Gregory A.; Berkowitz, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, the domains of both frontline synthetic organic chemistry and process chemistry and have seen an increase in crosstalk between asymmetric organic/organometallic approaches and enzymatic approaches to stereocontrolled synthesis. This review highlights the particularly auspicious role for dehydrogenase enzymes in this endeavor, with a focus on dynamic reductive kinetic resolutions (DYRKR) to “deracemize” building blocks, often setting two stereocenters in so doing. The scope and limitations of such dehydrogenase-mediated processes are overviewed, as are future possibilities for the evolution of enzymatic DYRKR. PMID:26622223

  18. Asymmetric synthesis of QUINAP via dynamic kinetic resolution.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Vikram; Wang, Su; Stoltz, Brian M; Virgil, Scott C

    2013-11-13

    A palladium-catalyzed, atroposelective C-P coupling process has been developed for the asymmetric synthesis of QUINAP and its derivatives in high enantiomeric excess. Bromide, triflate (OTf) and 4-methanesulfonylbenzenesulfonate (OSs) precursors were studied, leading in the case of the triflate to a novel dynamic kinetic resolution involving isomerization of an arylpalladium intermediate. The operationally simple methods described in this communication afford these important ligands in good to high yields and selectivity using low catalyst loading (≤3 mol % Pd). PMID:24152221

  19. IMPACT OF OXYGEN MEDIATED OXIDATIVE COUPLING ON ADSORPTION KINETICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presence of molecular oxygen in the test environment promotes oxidative coupling (polymer formation) of phenolic compounds on the surface of granular activated carbon (GAC). Both adsorption equilibria and adsorption kinetics are affected by these chemical reactions. Lack of...

  20. Recent Results in Quantum Chemical Kinetics from High Resolution Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Quack, Martin

    2007-12-26

    We outline the approach of our group to derive intramolecular kinetic primary processes from high resolution spectroscopy. We then review recent results on intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) and on tunneling processes. Examples are the quantum dynamics of the C-H-chromophore in organic molecules, hydrogen bond dynamics in (HF){sub 2} and stereomutation dynamics in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and related chiral molecules. We finally discuss the time scales for these and further processes which range from 10 fs to more than seconds in terms of successive symmetry breakings, leading to the question of nuclear spin symmetry and parity violation as well as the question of CPT symmetry.

  1. The kinetics of sulfation of calcium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Sarofim, A.F.; Longwell, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    The rate of sulfation of a CaO surface is rapid at first, limited by the intrinsic kinetics, but slows down with increasing conversion as a consequence of the increased resistance to diffusion through the product layer. The objectives of this study are to determine the intrinsic kinetics and the product layer diffusion pate by minimizing the resistances to gas-phase pore diffusion, and eliminating complications due to pore filling. This is achieved by the use of nonporous CaO. A wide range of particle sizes are used to change the relative importance of the regimes in which the intrinsic kinetics and product layer diffusion control. The assumption of constant product layer diffusivity can then be tested and the variables that determine this diffusivity independently studied. Information on product layer diffusion can also be obtained from studies of porous particles after the pore mouths are all plugged and a uniform surface coating is obtained. This information on diffusion rate and intrinsic reactivity can then be combined with a geometrical model to describe the rate of reaction over the entire range of conversions and is particularly useful in treating the effect of particle size on conversion history.

  2. First principles Tafel kinetics of methanol oxidation on Pt(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ya-Hui; Liu, Zhi-Pan

    2015-01-01

    Electrocatalytic methanol oxidation is of fundamental importance in electrochemistry and also a key reaction in direct methanol fuel cell. To resolve the kinetics at the atomic level, this work investigates the potential-dependent reaction kinetics of methanol oxidation on Pt(111) using the first principles periodic continuum solvation model based on modified-Poisson-Boltzmann equation (CM-MPB), focusing on the initial dehydrogenation elementary steps. A theoretical model to predict Tafel kinetics (current vs potential) is established by considering that the rate-determining step of methanol oxidation (to CO) is the first Csbnd H bond breaking (CH3OH(aq) → CH2OH* + H*) according to the computed free energy profile. The first Csbnd H bond breaking reaction needs to overcome a large entropy loss during methanol approaching to the surface and replacing the adsorbed water molecules. While no apparent charge transfer is involved in this elementary step, the charge transfer coefficient of the reaction is calculated to be 0.36, an unconventional value for charge transfer reactions, and the Tafel slope is deduced to be 166 mV. The results show that the metal/adsorbate interaction and the solvation environment play important roles on influencing the Tafel kinetics. The knowledge learned from the potential-dependent kinetics of methanol oxidation can be applied in general for understanding the electrocatalytic reactions of organic molecules at the solid-liquid interface.

  3. High temperature heterogeneous reaction kinetics and mechanisms of tungsten oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabourin, Justin L.

    Tungsten, which is a material used in many high temperature applications, is limited by its susceptibility to oxidation at elevated temperatures. Although tungsten has the highest melting temperature of any metal, at much lower temperatures volatile oxides are formed during oxidation with oxygen containing species. This differs from many heterogeneous oxidation reactions involving metals since most reactions form very stable oxides that have higher melting or boiling points than the pure metal (e.g., aluminum, iron). Understanding heterogeneous oxidation and vaporization processes may allow for the expansion and improvement of high temperature tungsten applications. In order to increase understanding of the oxidation processes of tungsten, there is a need to develop reaction mechanisms and kinetics for oxidation processes involving oxidizers and environmental conditions of interest. Tungsten oxidation was thoroughly studied in the past, and today there is a good phenomenological understanding of these processes. However, as the design of large scale systems increasingly relies on computer modeling there becomes a need for improved descriptions of chemical reactions. With the increase in computing power over the last several decades, and the development of quantum chemistry and physics theories, heterogeneous systems can be modeled in detail at the molecular level. Thermochemical parameters that may not be measured experimentally may now be determined theoretically, a tool that was previously unavailable to scientists and engineers. Additionally, chemical kinetic modeling software is now available for both homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions. This study takes advantage of these new theoretical tools, as well as a thermogravimetric (TG) flow reactor developed as part of this study to learn about mechanisms and kinetics of tungsten oxidation. Oxidizers of interest are oxygen (O2), carbon dioxide (CO 2), water (H2O), and other oxidizers present in combustion and

  4. Dissolution kinetics of high-resolution novolac resists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Katsuyuki; Yamanaka, Koji; Nozue, Hiroshi; Kasama, Kunihiko

    1991-06-01

    Dissolution kinetics, as well as the formation mechanism of a surface insoluble layer produced by dipping into TMAH (tetramethylammonium hydroxide) developer, have been investigated. In the previous paper, we mentioned that dissolution rate characteristics of high resolution novolac resist are clearly divided into three regions. To investigate this dissolution mechanism, we evaluated the temperature dependence of R (Dissolution rate) by changing the exposure dose, PAC (photoactive compound equals dissolution inhibitor) and the TMAH concentration. From Arrhenius Plots of these resist systems, it is considered that R is determined by two competitive reactions in the presence of TMAH; i.e., (a) the complex formation between PAC and novolac resin which produces dissolution inhibition effect, (b) TMAH induced deprotonation of phenolic hydroxy groups in novolac resin which accelerates the dissolution of the resist. Furthermore, we also describe the formation mechanism of a surface insoluble layer produced by dipping into a TMAH developer followed by water rinse, on the basis of the dissolution time of this layer (ts). The resist surface was also analyzed by using FT-IR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic measurement) and XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy). As a result, it was found that (a) water rinse is essential for the surface insoluble layer formation, (b) the ts value is not directly correlated with PAC accumulation in the resist surface and (c) the ts value becomes longer when the amount of penetrated TMAH into the resist increases. These results suggest that the surface insoluble layer is produced via water rinse of PAC-novolac complex described above.

  5. Arsenate Adsorption On Ruthenium Oxides: A Spectroscopic And Kinetic Investigation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenate adsorption on amorphous (RuO2•1.1H2O) and crystalline (RuO2) ruthenium oxides was evaluated using spectroscopic and kinetic methods to elucidate the adsorption mechanism. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) was ...

  6. EFFECTS OF PHOTOCHEMICAL KINETIC MECHANISMS ON OXIDANT MODEL PREDICTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The comparative effects of kinetic mechanisms on oxidant model predictions have been tested using two different mechanisms (the Carbon-Bond Mechanism II (CBM-II) and the Demerjian Photochemical Box Model (DPBM) mechanism) in three air quality models (the OZIPM/EKMA, the Urban Air...

  7. Determination of oxygen diffusion kinetics during thin film ruthenium oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Coloma Ribera, R. Kruijs, R. W. E. van de; Yakshin, A. E.; Bijkerk, F.

    2015-08-07

    In situ X-ray reflectivity was used to reveal oxygen diffusion kinetics for thermal oxidation of polycrystalline ruthenium thin films and accurate determination of activation energies for this process. Diffusion rates in nanometer thin RuO{sub 2} films were found to show Arrhenius behaviour. However, a gradual decrease in diffusion rates was observed with oxide growth, with the activation energy increasing from about 2.1 to 2.4 eV. Further exploration of the Arrhenius pre-exponential factor for diffusion process revealed that oxidation of polycrystalline ruthenium joins the class of materials that obey the Meyer-Neldel rule.

  8. Chemical kinetics of homogeneous atmospheric oxidation of sulfur dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sander, S. P.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    A systematic evaluation of known homogeneous SO2 reactions which might be important in air pollution chemistry is carried out. A mechanism is developed to represent the chemistry of NOx/hydrocarbon/SO2 systems, and the mechanism is used to analyze available experimental data appropriate for quantitative analysis of SO2 oxidation kinetics. Detailed comparisons of observed and predicted concentration behavior are presented. In all cases, observed SO2 oxidation rates cannot be explained solely on the basis of those SO2 reactions for which rate constants have been measured. The role of ozone-olefin reactions in SO2 oxidation is elucidated.

  9. Enzymatic kinetic resolution and chemoenzymatic dynamic kinetic resolution of delta-hydroxy esters. An efficient route to chiral delta-lactones.

    PubMed

    Pàmies, Oscar; Bäckvall, Jan-E

    2002-02-22

    A successful kinetic resolution of a racemic mixture of delta-hydroxy esters 1 was obtained via lipase-catalyzed transesterification (E value up to 360). The combination of the enzymatic kinetic resolution with a ruthenium-catalyzed alcohol racemization led to an efficient dynamic kinetic resolution (ee up to 99% and conversion up to 92%). The synthetic utility of this procedure was illustrated by the practical syntheses of delta-lactones (R)-6-methyl- and (R)-6-ethyl-tetrahydropyran-2-one and (S)-5-(tert-butyldimethylsiloxy)heptanal. The former are important building blocks in the synthesis of natural products and biologically active compounds, and the latter is a key intermediate in the synthesis of widely used commercial insecticide Spinosyn A. PMID:11846671

  10. Kinetics of methane oxidation in selected mineral soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walkiewicz, A.; Bulak, P.; Brzeziñska, M.; Włodarczyk, T.; Polakowski, C.

    2012-10-01

    The kinetic parameters of methane oxidation in three mineral soils were measured under laboratory conditions. Incubationswere preceded by a 24-day preincubationwith 10%vol. of methane. All soils showed potential to the consumption of added methane. None of the soils, however, consumed atmospheric CH4. Methane oxidation followed the Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with relatively low values of parameters for Eutric Cambisol, while high values for Haplic Podzol, and especially for Mollic Gleysol which showed the highest methanotrophic activity and much lower affinity to methane. The high values of parameters for methane oxidation are typical for organic soils and mineral soils from landfill cover. The possibility of the involvement of nitrifying microorganisms, which inhabit the ammonia-fertilized agricultural soils should be verified.

  11. Oxidation kinetics of pentachlorophenol by manganese dioxide.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ling; Yu, Zhiqiang; Peng, Pingán; Huang, Weilin; Feng, Shunqing; Zhou, Haiyan

    2006-11-01

    This study examined the abiotic transformation kinetics of pentachlorophenol (PCP) by manganese dioxide (MnO2) at different solution chemistry and initial concentrations of PCP and MnO2. The measured PCP transformation rates were found to be on the order of 1.07 with respect to [PCP] and 0.91 and 0.87 with respect to [MnO2] and [H+], respectively. Dissolved Mn2+ and Ca2+ as background electrolytes considerably decreased the reaction rate because of their adsorption and hence blocking of active sites on MnO2 surfaces. The dechlorination number, 0.59 chloride ions per transformed PCP after a 1-h reaction, suggests that a fraction of the transformed PCP was not dechlorinated and may be coupled directly to dimeric products. Gas chromatography/ mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry techniques were used to identify two isomeric nonachlorohydroxybiphenylethers as major products and 2,3,5,6-tetrachloro-1,4-hydroquinone and tetrachlorocatechol as minor products. Product identification suggested that the reaction may include two parallel reactions to form either dimers or 2,3,5,6-tetrachloro-1,4-hydroquinone and tetrachlorocatechol via simultaneous dehydrochlorination and hydroxylation. PMID:17089714

  12. Neptunium_Oxide_Precipitation_Kinetics_AJohnsen

    SciTech Connect

    Johnsen, A M; Roberts, K E; Prussin, S G

    2012-06-08

    We evaluate the proposed NpO{sub 2}{sup +}(aq)-NpO{sub 2}(cr) reduction-precipitation system at elevated temperatures to obtain primary information on the effects of temperature, ionic strength, O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}. Experiments conducted on unfiltered solutions at 10{sup -4} M NpO{sub 2}{sup +}(aq), neutral pH, and 200 C indicated that solution colloids strongly affect precipitation kinetics. Subsequent experiments on filtered solutions at 200, 212, and 225 C showed consistent and distinctive temperature-dependent behavior at reaction times {le} 800 hours. At longer times, the 200 C experiments showed unexpected dissolution of neptunium solids, but experiments at 212 C and 225 C demonstrated quasi steady-state neptunium concentrations of 3 x 10{sup -6} M and 6 x 10{sup -6} M, respectively. Solids from a representative experiment analyzed by X-ray diffraction were consistent with NpO{sub 2}(cr). A 200 C experiment with a NaCl concentration of 0.05 M showed a dramatic increase in the rate of neptunium loss. A 200 C experiment in an argon atmosphere resulted in nearly complete loss of aqueous neptunium. Previously proposed NpO{sub 2}{sup +}(aq)-NpO{sub 2}(cr) reduction-precipitation mechanisms in the literature specified a 1:1 ratio of neptunium loss and H{sup +} production in solution over time. However, all experiments demonstrated ratios of approximately 0.4 to 0.5. Carbonate equilibria can account for only about 40% of this discrepancy, leaving an unexpected deficit in H+ production that suggests that additional chemical processes are occurring.

  13. Detailed chemical kinetic oxidation mechanism for a biodiesel surrogate

    SciTech Connect

    Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2007-09-17

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of methyl decanoate, a surrogate for biodiesel fuels. This model has been built by following the rules established by Curran et al. for the oxidation of n-heptane and it includes all the reactions known to be pertinent to both low and high temperatures. Computed results have been compared with methyl decanoate experiments in an engine and oxidation of rapeseed oil methyl esters in a jet stirred reactor. An important feature of this mechanism is its ability to reproduce the early formation of carbon dioxide that is unique to biofuels and due to the presence of the ester group in the reactant. The model also predicts ignition delay times and OH profiles very close to observed values in shock tube experiments fueled by n-decane. These model capabilities indicate that large n-alkanes can be good surrogates for large methyl esters and biodiesel fuels to predict overall reactivity, but some kinetic details, including early CO2 production from biodiesel fuels, can be predicted only by a detailed kinetic mechanism for a true methyl ester fuel. The present methyl decanoate mechanism provides a realistic kinetic tool for simulation of biodiesel fuels.

  14. Detailed chemical kinetic oxidation mechanism for a biodiesel surrogate

    SciTech Connect

    Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2007-09-20

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of methyl decanoate, a surrogate for biodiesel fuels. This model has been built by following the rules established by Curran et al. for the oxidation of n-heptane and it includes all the reactions known to be pertinent to both low and high temperatures. Computed results have been compared with methyl decanoate experiments in an engine and oxidation of rapeseed oil methyl esters in a jet stirred reactor. An important feature of this mechanism is its ability to reproduce the early formation of carbon dioxide that is unique to biofuels and due to the presence of the ester group in the reactant. The model also predicts ignition delay times and OH profiles very close to observed values in shock tube experiments fueled by n-decane. These model capabilities indicate that large n-alkanes can be good surrogates for large methyl esters and biodiesel fuels to predict overall reactivity, but some kinetic details, including early CO{sub 2} production from biodiesel fuels, can be predicted only by a detailed kinetic mechanism for a true methyl ester fuel. The present methyl decanoate mechanism provides a realistic kinetic tool for simulation of biodiesel fuels.

  15. Kinetics of ethylene oxide desorption from sterilized materials.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Gisela C; Brandão, Teresa R S; Silva, Cristina L M

    2013-01-01

    Ethylene oxide gas is commonly used to sterilize medical devices, and concerns about using this agent on biological systems are well-established. Medical devices sterilized by ethylene oxide must be properly aerated to remove residual gas and by-products. In this work, kinetics of ethylene oxide desorption from different sterilized materials were studied in a range of aeration temperatures. The experimental data were well-described by a Fickian diffusion mass transfer behavior, and diffusivities were estimated for two textile and two polymeric materials within the temperature range of 1.5 to 59.0 degrees C. The results will allow predictions of ethylene oxide desorption, which is a key step for the design of sterilization/aeration processes, contributing to an efficient removal of residual ethylene oxide content. PMID:23513954

  16. Oxidation Kinetics of K Basin Fuel (OCRWM)

    SciTech Connect

    TRIMBLE, D.J.

    2000-09-25

    Oxidation testing of K Basin-stored N Reactor fuel in dry air, moist air, and moist helium provided reaction rate data for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. The tests were performed on small samples from two spent nuclear fuel elements retrieved from the closed canisters of the K West Basin. The spent nuclear fuel samples were tested using a thermogravimetric analysis system modified for moist-gas operation to allow testing in moist environments. The tests were run at constant temperature and water vapor pressure. The moist helium tests used 6.5 H a water vapor, producing seventeen data between 75 C and 210 C. Eight of these data were excluded from primary consideration due to testing anomalies and balance drift issues. Regression analysis of the nine acceptable data provided good assurance that the moist-helium results are consistent with literature data within the temperature range of 25 C to 210 C. Concerns about possible oxygen poisoning from air in-leakage and mass transfer limitations on the test data were reviewed. If oxygen poisoning occurred it was not likely to have biased the data sufficiently to change the basic conclusions of comparability to the literature data. Mass transfer limitations did not appear to have had significant effect on the moist-helium data.

  17. Catalytic Kinetic Resolution of Disubstituted Piperidines by Enantioselective Acylation: Synthetic Utility and Mechanistic Insights.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Benedikt; Kreituss, Imants; Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Kozlowski, Marisa C; Bode, Jeffrey W

    2015-09-01

    The catalytic kinetic resolution of cyclic amines with achiral N-heterocyclic carbenes and chiral hydroxamic acids has emerged as a promising method to obtain enantio-enriched amines with high selectivity factors. In this report, we describe the catalytic kinetic resolution of disubstituted piperdines with practical selectivity factors (s, up to 52) in which we uncovered an unexpected and pronounced conformational effect resulting in disparate reactivity and selectivity between the cis- and trans-substituted piperidine isomers. Detailed experimental and computational studies of the kinetic resolution of various disubstituted piperidines revealed a strong preference for the acylation of conformers in which the α-substituent occupies the axial position. This work provides further experimental and computational support for the concerted 7-member transition state model for acyl transfer reagents and expands the scope and functional group tolerance of the secondary amine kinetic resolution. PMID:26308097

  18. Kinetics and spectroscopic observations of atrazine dealkylation on manganese oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Malengreau, N.; Sposito, G.; Cheney, M.A.; Crowley, D.E.

    1997-12-31

    Abiotic transformations of organic pollutants are often neglected in remediation scenarios but nonetheless can contribute significantly to detoxification. Mn oxide minerals are capable of degrading organic pollutants adsorbed to their surfaces by both redox and proton-promoted mechanisms. Concurrently with calorimetric, gas-pressure, chromatographic, and ESR methods, we used ICP, DRS, DRIFT, and FTIR spectroscopies to investigate atrazine degradation on three Mn oxides. We found that N-dealkylation can occur abiotically, leading to the formation of deethylatrazine and deisopropylatrazine. The Mn extractability after degradation of atrazine was highly dependent on the Mn oxide. Extractable Mn increased with time for cryptomelane, was constant for pyrolusite, and remained very low for birnessite. The extractable Mn is Mn(II). UV signatures of atrazine by-products were different from one another and were used to trace degradation products at the Mn oxide surface. Mechanistic interpretation of the in situ reaction kinetics and thermodynamics will be discussed.

  19. Reduction Kinetics of Graphene Oxide Determined by Temperature Programmed Desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventrice, Carl; Clark, Nicholas; Field, Daniel; Geisler, Heike; Jung, Inhwa; Yang, Dongxing; Piner, Richard; Ruoff, Rodney

    2009-10-01

    Graphene oxide, which is an electrical insulator, shows promise for use in several technological applications such as dielectric layers in nanoscale electronic devices or as the active region of chemical sensors. In principle, graphene oxide films could also be used as a precursor for the formation of large-scale graphene films by either thermal or chemical reduction of the graphene oxide. In order to determine the thermal stability and reduction kinetics of graphene oxide, temperature program desorption (TPD) measurements have been performed on multilayer films of graphene oxide deposited on SiO2/Si(100) substrates. The graphene oxide was exfoliated from the graphite oxide source material by slow-stirring in aqueous solution, which produces single-layer platelets with an average lateral size of ˜10 μm. From the TPD measurements, it was determined that the decomposition process begins at ˜80 ^oC. The primary desorption products of the graphene oxide films for temperatures up to 300 ^oC are H2O, CO2, and CO, with only trace amounts of O2 being detected. An activation energy of 1.4 eV/molecule was determined by assuming an Arrhenius dependence for the decomposition process.

  20. Expanded substrate scope and catalyst optimization for the catalytic kinetic resolution of N-heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Sheng-Ying; Binanzer, Michael; Kreituss, Imants; Bode, Jeffrey W

    2012-09-14

    The scope, reactivity, and selectivity of the chiral hydroxamic acid-catalyzed kinetic resolution of chiral amines are improved by a new catalyst structure and a more environmentally friendly reaction protocol. In addition to increasing selectivity across all substrates, these conditions make possible the resolution of N-heterocycles containing lactams or other basic functional groups that can inhibit the catalyst. PMID:22842709

  1. The kinetic of photoreactions in zinc oxide microrods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedot, M.; Rac, O.; Suchorska-Woźniak, P.; Nawrot, W.; Teterycz, H.

    2016-01-01

    Zinc oxide is the oldest sensing material used in the chemical resistive gas sensors which allow to detect many gases, such as carbon oxide, nitrogen oxides and other. This material is also widely used in medicine and daily life as antibacterial agent. For this reason this semiconductor is often synthesized on the polymer substrates such as foils and textiles. In presented results zinc oxide was deposited on the surface of poly(ethylene terephthalate) foil to obtain antibacterial material. As synthesis method chemical bath deposition was chosen. The growth of zinc oxide structures was carried out in water solution of zinc nitrate (V) and hexamethylenetetramine in 90°C during 9 h. Because antibacterial properties of ZnO are strongly depended on photocatalytic and electric properties of this semiconductor impedance spectroscopy measurements were carried out. During the measurements material was tested with and without UV light to determinate the kinetic of photoreactions in zinc oxide. Moreover the composite was analyzed by XRD diffraction and scanning electron microscope. The X-ray analysis indicated that obtained material has the structure of wurtzite which is typical of zinc oxide. SEM images showed that on the PET foil microrods of ZnO were formed. The impedance spectroscopy measurements of ZnO layer showed that in UV light significant changes in the conductivity of the material are observed.

  2. Oxidation kinetics of antibiotics during water treatment with potassium permanganate.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lanhua; Martin, Heather M; Strathmann, Timothy J

    2010-08-15

    The ubiquitous occurrence of antibiotics in aquatic environments raises concerns about potential adverse effects on aquatic ecology and human health, including the promotion of increased antibiotic resistance. This study examined the oxidation of three widely detected antibiotics (ciprofloxacin, lincomycin, and trimethoprim) by potassium permanganate [KMnO(4); Mn(VII)]. Reaction kinetics were described by second-order rate laws, with apparent second-order rate constants (k(2)) at pH 7 and 25 degrees C in the order of 0.61 +/- 0.02 M(-1) s(-1) (ciprofloxacin) < 1.6 +/- 0.1 M(-1) s(-1) (trimethoprim) < 3.6 +/- 0.1 M(-1) s(-1) (lincomycin). Arrhenius temperature dependence was observed with apparent activation energies (E(a)) ranging from 49 kJ mol(-1) (trimethoprim) to 68 kJ mol(-1) (lincomycin). Rates of lincomycin and trimethoprim oxidation exhibited marked pH dependences, whereas pH had only a small effect on rates of ciprofloxacin oxidation. The effects of pH were quantitatively described by considering parallel reactions between KMnO(4) and individual acid-base species of the target antibiotics. Predictions from a kinetic model that included temperature, KMnO(4) dosage, pH, and source water oxidant demand as input parameters agreed reasonably well with measurements of trimethoprim and lincomycin oxidation in six drinking water utility sources. Although Mn(VII) reactivity with the antibiotics was lower than that reported for ozone and free chlorine, its high selectivity and stability suggests a promising oxidant for treating sensitive micropollutants in organic-rich matrices (e.g., wastewater). PMID:20704243

  3. Kinetic Modeling of Oxidative Coagulation for Arsenic Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin-Wook; Kramer, Timothy A.

    2004-03-31

    A model of oxidative coagulation consisting of Fenton's reagent (Fe(II)/H2O2 at pH 7.0) was established. The optimum condition was found when the mole ratio of As(III):H2O2:Fe(II)=1:15:20. In this optimum condition, all of Fe(II) was converted to HFO (am-Fe(OH)3) and precipitated to be used as the oxidized arsenic(V) adsorbent and particle coagulant. Two sorption models consisting of a surface complexation model and a kinetic model were developed and coupled. Using the coupled sorption model, the kinetics of HFO surface charge/potential during As(V) sorption was calculated. Further, during arsenic sorption, the colloid stability kinetics resulting from the perikinetic coagulation mechanism was calculated by considering interparticle forces. Colloid surface potential was decreased from 60 mv to 12 mv in proportion to the amount of arsenic adsorbed onto HFO and this surface potential directly affected the colloid stability (collision efficiency).

  4. Hydrogen pickup measurements in zirconium alloys: Relation to oxidation kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couet, Adrien; Motta, Arthur T.; Comstock, Robert J.

    2014-08-01

    The optimization of zirconium-based alloys used for nuclear fuel cladding aims to reduce hydrogen pickup during operation, and the associated cladding degradation. The present study focuses on precisely and accurately measuring hydrogen pickup fraction for a set of alloys to specifically investigate the effects of alloying elements, microstructure and corrosion kinetics on hydrogen uptake. To measure hydrogen concentrations in zirconium alloys two techniques have been used: a destructive technique, Vacuum Hot Extraction, and a non-destructive one, Cold Neutron Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis. The results of both techniques show that hydrogen pickup fraction varies significantly with exposure time and between alloys. A possible interpretation of the results is that hydrogen pickup results from the need to balance charge. That is, the pickup of hydrogen shows an inverse relationship to oxidation kinetics, indicating that, if transport of charged species is rate limiting, oxide transport properties such as oxide electronic conductivity play a key role in the hydrogen pickup mechanism. Alloying elements (either in solid solution or in precipitates) would therefore impact the hydrogen pickup fraction by affecting charge transport.

  5. On the kinetics of phenol oxidation in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Krajnc, M.; Levec, J.

    1996-07-01

    Phenol oxidation in supercritical water was carried out in a tubular laboratory-scale reactor operated at a temperature range of 380 C to 450 C and pressures between 230 and 265 bar. The phenol feed concentrations were between 500 and 1,000 mg/L, while oxygen was fed into the reactor at 50 to 1,000% of the stoichiometric amount needed to oxidize phenol completely to carbon dioxide. Phenol conversions from 16 to 96% were attained as the reactor residence times varied from 15 to 203 s. The oxidation obeys a parallel-consecutive reaction scheme that involves multi-ring, intermediate products such as phenoxyl-phenol, biphenol, dibenzo-dioxin, maleic acid, and succinic acid. Experimental results showed that the phenol disappearance rate is represented well by a power-law kinetic model in which the rate is proportional to the 0.4 power of the oxygen mole fraction and roughly linearly proportional to the phenol mole fraction. The pressure effect on the disappearance rate was appropriately accounted for by introducing the molar volume of the reaction mixture, which was readily calculated by an equation of state. Total organic carbon reduction can be estimated by a lumped kinetic equation. In the P-T region the activation energy of the phenol disappearance was 124.7 kJ/mol.

  6. Kinetics of phyllosemiquinone oxidation in the Photosystem I reaction centre of Acaryochloris marina.

    PubMed

    Santabarbara, Stefano; Bailleul, Benjamin; Redding, Kevin; Barber, James; Rappaport, Fabrice; Telfer, Alison

    2012-02-01

    Light-induced electron transfer reactions in the chlorophyll a/d-binding Photosystem I reaction centre of Acaryochloris marina were investigated in whole cells by pump-probe optical spectroscopy with a temporal resolution of ~5ns at room temperature. It is shown that phyllosemiquinone, the secondary electron transfer acceptor anion, is oxidised with bi-phasic kinetics characterised by lifetimes of 88±6ns and 345±10ns. These lifetimes, particularly the former, are significantly slower than those reported for chlorophyll a-binding Photosystem I, which typically range in the 5-30ns and 200-300ns intervals. The possible mechanism of electron transfer reactions in the chlorophyll a/d-binding Photosystem I and the slower oxidation kinetics of the secondary acceptors are discussed. PMID:22037394

  7. Differential scanning calorimetry in determining kinetics parameter of Si oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faruque, Sk. Abdul Kader Md.; Chakraborty, Supratic

    2016-05-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) technique is employed here to study the oxidation of silicon by solid-gas reaction at a constant heating rate. The diffusion coefficient of oxygen into silicon at 900 °C is estimated from the kinetic equation of 1-dimensional diffusion controlled growth. The diffusion coefficient, D estimated as 4.5 × 10-5 exp (1.01ev/κBT) m2/s, as is in well agreement with the standard value available in literature.

  8. Kinetic Parameters of Binary Iron/Oxidant Pyrolants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Mahdi Pourmortazavi, Seied; Fathollahi, Manochehr

    2012-04-01

    The thermal properties of pyrotechnic mixtures containing iron powder as fuel and KNO3, KClO3, and KClO4 as oxidants are reported. The thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis results for pure components and corresponding pyrotechnic mixtures revealed that the melting point, decomposition temperature, and rate of oxygen releasing of the oxidants have dominant effects on ignition reaction of the pyrotechnic mixtures. The apparent activation energy and activation parameters for the combustion processes were evaluated from the differential scanning calorimetry experiments. Based on the ignition temperatures obtained and the resulting kinetic data, the thermal reactivity of the pyrotechnic mixtures was found to decrease as in the order Fe + KClO3 > Fe + KNO3 > Fe + KClO4.

  9. Interaction of Nitric Oxide with Catalase: Structural and Kinetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We present the structures of bovine catalase in its native form and complexed with ammonia and nitric oxide, obtained by X-ray crystallography. Using the NO generator 1-(N,N-diethylamino)diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate, we were able to generate sufficiently high NO concentrations within the catalase crystals that substantial occupation was observed despite a high dissociation rate. Nitric oxide seems to be slightly bent from the heme normal that may indicate some iron(II) character in the formally ferric catalase. Microspectrophotometric investigations inline with the synchrotron X-ray beam reveal photoreduction of the central heme iron. In the cases of the native and ammonia-complexed catalase, reduction is accompanied by a relaxation phase. This is likely not the case for the catalase NO complex. The kinetics of binding of NO to catalase were investigated using NO photolyzed from N,N′-bis(carboxymethyl)-N,N′-dinitroso-p-phenylenediamine using an assay that combines catalase with myoglobin binding kinetics. The off rate is 1.5 s–1. Implications for catalase function are discussed. PMID:21524057

  10. Phenol oxidation kinetics in water solution using iron(3)-oxide-based nano-catalysts.

    PubMed

    Zelmanov, Grigory; Semiat, Raphael

    2008-08-01

    The influence of inorganic ions (HCO(3), PO(4)/HPO(4)/H(2)PO(4), Cl, SO(4), Ca, Na and Mg) on the advanced chemical oxidation process of organic compounds dissolved in water is reported here. The catalytic behavior of iron(3)-oxide-based nano-particles was investigated together with inorganic ions and hydrogen peroxide concentrations, and pH level. Phenol was chosen as a typical organic contaminant for this study as a simulating pollutant. The limiting concentrations of radical scavengers making the oxidation process inefficient were identified. The strong effect of concentration of radical scavengers HCO(3), PO(4)/HPO(4)/H(2)PO(4), the nano-catalyst and hydrogen peroxide concentrations, and pH on the phenol oxidation rate and lag time period before reaction starts was determined. It was shown that Cl, SO(4), Ca, Na and Mg ions had no significant effect on the kinetics of phenol oxidation. PMID:18657285

  11. Stereochemically Rich Polycyclic Amines from the Kinetic Resolution of Indolines through Intramolecular Povarov Reactions.

    PubMed

    Min, Chang; Seidel, Daniel

    2016-07-25

    Under control of a chiral Brønsted acid catalyst, racemic indolines undergo intramolecular Povarov reactions with achiral aromatic aldehydes bearing a pendent dienophile. One enantiomer of the indoline reacts preferentially, resulting in the highly enantio- and diastereoselective formation of polycyclic heterocycles with four stereogenic centers. This kinetic resolution approach exploits the differential formation/reactivity of diastereomeric ion pairs. PMID:27346876

  12. Enantioselective Selenocyclization via Dynamic Kinetic Resolution of Seleniranium Ions by Hydrogen-Bond Donor Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Highly enantioselective selenocyclization reactions are promoted by the combination of a new chiral squaramide catalyst, a mineral acid, and an achiral Lewis base. Mechanistic studies reveal that the enantioselectivity originates from the dynamic kinetic resolution of seleniranium ions through anion-binding catalysis. PMID:25380129

  13. Oxidative dehydrogenation dimerization of propylene over bismuth oxide: kinetic and mechanistic studies

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.G.; Hightower, J.W.

    1983-07-01

    Classical kinetic experiments together with pulse microreactor studies involving deuterium and carbon-13-labeled isotopic tracers were used to investigate the oxidative dehydrogenation dimerization (OXDD) of propylene to 1,5-hexadiene and benzene over bismuth oxide between 748 and 898/sup 0/K. The kinetic data, which indicated that the OXDD reaction is of variable order with respect to oxygen and propylene concentrations, could be fit to rate equations based on either the Langmuir-Hinshelwood model or the Mars-van Krevelen model, although the former gave more linear Arrhenius plots. A significant kinetic isotope effect (k/sub H//k/sub D/ = 1.7 at 873/sup 0/K) shows that the rate-limiting step for the OXDD reaction involves C-H cleavage, and there is only a small amount of H/D scrambling among reactant and product molecules. Analysis of liquid products by infrared spectroscopy indicated that both 1,5-hexadiene and 1,3-cyclohexadiene are stable reaction intermediates; microreactor results involving unlabeled propylene, 1,5-hexadiene, 1,3-cyclohexadiene, and 1,4-cyclohexadiene as reactants confirmed the infrared findings. Pulse microreactor experiments with /sup 13/C-labeled propylene clearly showed that deep oxidation (complete combustion) occurs via a consecutive-parallel network involving the partially oxidized intermediates as well as the starting propylene. Changes in the particle size do not alter the overall activity, although larger particles have lower selectivities for C/sub 6/ products than do smaller particles.

  14. Kinetically driven instabilities and selectivities in methane oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y.K.; Vlachos, D.G.

    1997-08-01

    Ignitions, extinctions, and Hopf bifurcations in methane oxidation were studied as a function of pressure and inlet fuel composition. A continuous stirred-tank reactor was modeled with numerical bifurcation techniques, using the 177 reaction/31 species mechanism. Sensitivity and reaction pathway analyses were performed at turning points to identify the most important reactions and reactive species. Then, simulations were compared with experimental data. Multiple ignitions and extinctions as well as oscillations that are purely kinetically driven were found. Ignition to a partially ignited state with considerable reactivity of methane indicates possible narrow operation windows with high selectivities to partial oxidation products. At 0.1 atm, the authors found a selectivity of up to 80% to CO at 70% CH{sub 4} conversion. The ignition to a fully ignited branch is associated with high selectivity to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The C2 chemistry inhibits the ignition of methane to the partially ignited branch. The methane ignition temperature exhibits two branches with respect to pressure, with only the low-pressure branch being dominant. Reaction path analysis at ignition conditions shows that the preferred pathway of CH{sub 4} oxidation is to form CO and CO{sub 2} though CH{sub 2}O and CH{sub 2}(s) intermediates. However, at intermediate to high pressures, the recombination of CH{sub 3} to C{sub 2}H{sub 6} also becomes quite significant.

  15. Kinetic modeling of antimony(III) oxidation and sorption in soils.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yongbing; Mi, Yuting; Zhang, Hua

    2016-10-01

    Kinetic batch and saturated column experiments were performed to study the oxidation, adsorption and transport of Sb(III) in two soils with contrasting properties. Kinetic and column experiment results clearly demonstrated the extensive oxidation of Sb(III) in soils, and this can in return influence the adsorption and transport of Sb. Both sorption capacity and kinetic oxidation rate were much higher in calcareous Huanjiang soil than in acid red Yingtan soil. The results indicate that soil serve as a catalyst in promoting oxidation of Sb(III) even under anaerobic conditions. A PHREEQC model with kinetic formulations was developed to simulate the oxidation, sorption and transport of Sb(III) in soils. The model successfully described Sb(III) oxidation and sorption data in kinetic batch experiment. It was less successful in simulating the reactive transport of Sb(III) in soil columns. Additional processes such as colloid facilitated transport need to be quantified and considered in the model. PMID:27214003

  16. The role of layer structure in tin oxidation kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duhalde, S.; Arcondo, B.; Sirkin, H.

    1991-11-01

    Tin exhibits different oxidation kinetics which are composition dependent, when it forms intermetallic compounds with the chalcogenides S and Se. This phenomenon is related to the layer compounds SnS2 and SnSe2 crystalline structure. These minerals have anisotropic bonding characteristics, due to Van der Waals bonds presence between chalcogenides adjoining planes. The mentioned weak bonds allow the oxygen diffusion to the bulk, favouring the reaction with the inner tin atoms. In this work we study samples of Sn-S alloy with different thermal treatment by XRD and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Results are discussed and compared with those obtained for Sn-Se alloy in an early work [1].

  17. Kinetics of the reaction of nitric oxide with hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, W. L.; Hanson, R. K.; Kruger, C. H.

    1974-01-01

    Mixtures of NO and H2 diluted in argon or krypton were heated by incident shock waves, and the infrared emission from the fundamental vibration-rotation band of NO at 5.3 microns was used to monitor the time-varying NO concentration. The reaction kinetics were studied in the temperature range 2400-4500 K using a shock-tube technique. The decomposition of nitric oxide behind the shock was found to be modeled well by a fifteen-reaction system. A principle result of the study was the determination of the rate constant for the reaction H + NO yields N + OH, which may be the rate-limiting step for NO removal in some combustion systems. Experimental values of k sub 1 were obtained for each test through comparisons of measured and numerically predicted NO profiles.

  18. Kinetics of Uranium Extraction from Uranium Tailings by Oxidative Leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Biao; Li, Mi; Zhang, Xiaowen; Huang, Jing

    2016-05-01

    Extraction of uranium from uranium tailings by oxidative leaching with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was studied. The effects of various extraction factors were investigated to optimize the dissolution conditions, as well as to determine the leaching kinetic parameters. The behavior of H2O2 in the leaching process was determined through scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) and x-ray diffraction analysis of leaching residues. Results suggest that H2O2 can significantly improve uranium extraction by decomposing the complex gangue structures in uranium tailings and by enhancing the reaction rate between uranium phases and the leaching agent. The extraction kinetics expression was changed from 1 - 3(1 - α)2/3 + 2(1 - α) = K 0(H2SO4)-0.14903(S/L)-1.80435(R o)0.20023 e -1670.93/T t (t ≥ 5) to 1 - 3(1 - α)2/3 + 2(1 - α) = K 0(H2SO4)0.01382(S/L)-1.83275(R o)0.25763 e -1654.59/T t (t ≥ 5) by the addition of H2O2 in the leaching process. The use of H2O2 in uranium leaching may help in extracting uranium more efficiently and rapidly from low-uranium-containing ores or tailings.

  19. Kinetic spectrophotometric determination of certain cephalosporins using oxidized quercetin reagent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Gamal A.; El-Shaboury, Salwa R.; Mohamed, Fardous A.; Rageh, Azza H.

    2009-09-01

    A simple, precise and accurate kinetic spectrophotometric method for determination of cefoperazone sodium, cefazolin sodium and ceftriaxone sodium in bulk and in pharmaceutical formulations has been developed. The method is based upon a kinetic investigation of the reaction of the drug with oxidized quercetin reagent at room temperature for a fixed time of 30 min. The decrease in absorbance after the addition of the drug was measured at 510 nm. The absorbance concentration plot was rectilinear over the range 80-400 μg mL -1 for all studied drugs. The concentration of the studied drugs was calculated using the corresponding calibration equation for the fixed time method. The determination of the studied drugs by initial rate, variable time and rate-constant methods was feasible with the calibration equations obtained but the fixed time method has been found to be more applicable. The analytical performance of the method, in terms of accuracy and precision, was statistically validated; the results were satisfactory. The method has been successfully applied to the determination of the studied drugs in commercial pharmaceutical formulations. Statistical comparison of the results with a well established reported method showed excellent agreement and proved that there is no significant difference in the accuracy and precision.

  20. Kinetics of Uranium Extraction from Uranium Tailings by Oxidative Leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Biao; Li, Mi; Zhang, Xiaowen; Huang, Jing

    2016-07-01

    Extraction of uranium from uranium tailings by oxidative leaching with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was studied. The effects of various extraction factors were investigated to optimize the dissolution conditions, as well as to determine the leaching kinetic parameters. The behavior of H2O2 in the leaching process was determined through scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) and x-ray diffraction analysis of leaching residues. Results suggest that H2O2 can significantly improve uranium extraction by decomposing the complex gangue structures in uranium tailings and by enhancing the reaction rate between uranium phases and the leaching agent. The extraction kinetics expression was changed from 1 - 3(1 - α)2/3 + 2(1 - α) = K 0(H2SO4)-0.14903(S/L)-1.80435( R o)0.20023 e -1670.93/T t ( t ≥ 5) to 1 - 3(1 - α)2/3 + 2(1 - α) = K 0(H2SO4)0.01382(S/L)-1.83275( R o)0.25763 e -1654.59/T t ( t ≥ 5) by the addition of H2O2 in the leaching process. The use of H2O2 in uranium leaching may help in extracting uranium more efficiently and rapidly from low-uranium-containing ores or tailings.

  1. Kinetic-dependent Killing of Oral Pathogens with Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Backlund, C.J.; Worley, B.V.; Sergesketter, A.R.

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO)–releasing silica nanoparticles were synthesized via the co-condensation of tetramethyl orthosilicate with aminosilanes and subsequent conversion of secondary amines to N-diazeniumdiolate NO donors. A series of ~150 nm NO-releasing particles with different NO totals and release kinetics (i.e., half-lives) were achieved by altering both the identity and mol% composition of the aminosilane precursors. Independent of identical 2 h NO-release totals, enhanced antibacterial action was observed against the periodontopathogens Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis with extended NO-release kinetics at pH 7.4. Negligible bactericidal effect was observed against cariogenic Streptococcus mutans at pH 7.4, even when using NO-releasing silica particles with greater NO-release totals. However, antibacterial activity was observed against S. mutans at lower pH (6.4). This result was attributed to more rapid proton-initiated decomposition of the N-diazeniumdiolate NO donors and greater NO-release payloads. The data suggest a differential sensitivity to NO between cariogenic and periodontopathogenic bacteria with implications for the future development of NO-releasing oral care therapeutics. PMID:26078424

  2. Kinetics of the catalytic oxidation of phenol over manganese oxide in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Oshima, Yoshito; Tomita, Kengo; Koda, Seiichiro

    1999-11-01

    A kinetic analysis was made for the phenol disappearance rate in catalytic oxidation of phenol over MnO{sub 2} in supercritical water at a fixed temperature of 425 C and pressures between 22.7 and 27.2 MPa. The nonsupported MnO{sub 2} catalyst possessed a strong activity for promoting phenol oxidation, though the overall reaction rate was appreciably influenced by internal mass-transfer resistance. From the kinetic analysis on the reaction rate of the phenol disappearance, the global rate expression of the surface reaction was obtained, where the reaction orders with respect to phenol, oxygen, and water were almost unity, 0.7, and {minus}2.0, respectively. A Langmuir-type mechanism, in which phenol and oxygen adsorbed on the catalytic sites and water adsorbed on the same site to inhibit the phenol and oxygen adsorption, was proposed to explain the reaction orders for phenol, oxygen, and water.

  3. High resolution and comprehensive techniques to analyze aerobic methane oxidation in mesocosm experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, E. W.; Kessler, J. D.; Redmond, M. C.; Shiller, A. M.; Arrington, E. C.; Valentine, D. L.; Colombo, F.

    2015-12-01

    Many studies of microbially mediated aerobic methane oxidation in oceanic environments have examined the many different factors that control the rates of oxidation. However, there is debate on how quickly methane is oxidized once a microbial population is established and what factor(s) are limiting in these types of environments. These factors include the availability of CH4, O2, trace metals, nutrients, and the density of cell population. Limits to these factors can also control the temporal aspects of a methane oxidation event. In order to look at this process in its entirety and with higher temporal resolution, a mesocosm incubation system was developed with a Dissolved Gas Analyzer System (DGAS) coupled with a set of analytical tools to monitor aerobic methane oxidation in real time. With the addition of newer laser spectroscopy techniques (cavity ringdown spectroscopy), stable isotope fractionation caused by microbial processes can also be examined on a real time and automated basis. Cell counting, trace metal, nutrient, and DNA community analyses have also been carried out in conjunction with these mesocosm samples to provide a clear understanding of the biology in methane oxidation dynamics. This poster will detail the techniques involved to provide insights into the chemical and isotopic kinetics controlling aerobic methane oxidation. Proof of concept applications will be presented from seep sites in the Hudson Canyon and the Sleeping Dragon seep field, Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC 118). This system was used to conduct mesocosm experiments to examine methane consumption, O2 consumption, nutrient consumption, and biomass production.

  4. Oxidation kinetics and chemostat growth kinetics of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans on tetrathionate and thiosulfate.

    PubMed

    Eccleston, M; Kelly, D P

    1978-06-01

    Growth of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans in batch culture on 10 mM potassium tetrathionate was optimal at pH 2.5 (specific growth rate, 0.092 h-1). Oxygen electrode studies on resting cell suspensions showed that the apparent Km for tetrathionate oxidation (0.13 to 8.33 mM) was pH dependent, suggesting higher substrate affinity at higher pH. Conversely, oxidation rates were greatest at low pH. High substrate concentrations (7.7 to 77 mM) did not affect maximum oxidation rates at pH 3.0, but produced substrate inhibition at other pH values. Tetrathionate-grown cell suspensions also oxidized thiosulfate at pH 2.0 to 4.0. Apparent Km values (1.2 to 25 mM) were of the same order as for tetrathionate, but kinetics were complex. Continuous culture on growth-limiting tetrathionate at pH 2.5, followed by continuous culture on growth-limiting thiosulfate at pH 2.5, indicated true growth yield values (grams [dry weight] per gram-molecule of substrate) of 12.2 and 7.5, and maintenance coefficient values (millimoles of substrate per gram [dry weight) of organisms per hour) of 1.01 and 0.97 for tetrathionate and thiosulfate, respectively. Yield was increased on both media at low dilution rates by increase in CO2 supply. The apparent maintenance coefficient was lowered without affecting YG, suggesting better energy coupling in CO2-rich environments. Prolonged continuous cultivation on tetrathionate or thiosulfate did not affect the ability of the organism to grow subsequently in ferrous iron medium. PMID:26665

  5. Kinetic Modeling of Toluene Oxidation for Surrogate Fuel Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Frassoldati, A; Mehl, M; Fietzek, R; Faravelli, T; Pitz, W J; Ranzi, E

    2009-04-21

    New environmental issues, like the effect of combustion-generated greenhouse gases, provide motivation to better characterize oxidation of hydrocarbons. Transportation, in particular, significantly contributes to energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions. Kinetic studies about the combustion of fuels under conditions typical of internal combustion engines provides important support to improve mechanism formulation and to eventually provide better computational tools that can be used to increase the engine performance. It is foreseeable that at least in the next 30 years the main transportation fuels will be either gasoline or diesel. Unfortunately, these fuels are very complex mixtures of many components. Moreover, their specifications and performance requirements significantly change the composition of these fuels: gasoline and diesel mixtures are different if coming from different refineries or they are different from winter to summer. At the same time a fuel with a well defined and reproducible composition is needed for both experimental and modeling work. In response to these issues, surrogate fuels are proposed. Surrogate fuels are defined as mixtures of a small number of hydrocarbons whose relative concentrations is adjusted in order to approximate the chemical and physical properties of a real fuel. Surrogate fuels are then very useful both for the design of reproducible experimental tests and also for the development of reliable kinetic models. The primary reference fuels (PRF) are a typical and old example of surrogate fuel: n-heptane and iso-octane mixtures are used to reproduce antiknock propensity of complex mixtures contained in a gasoline. PRFs are not able to surrogate gasoline in operating conditions different from standard ones and new surrogates have been recently proposed. Toluene is included in all of them as a species able to represent the behavior of aromatic compounds. On the other side, the toluene oxidation chemistry is not so well

  6. Kinetics and fixed-bed reactor modeling of butane oxidation to maleic anhydride

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R.K.; Cresswell, D.L. ); Newson, E.J. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on selective oxidation kinetics of n-butane to maleic anhydride in air studied over a commercial, fixed-bed vanadium-phosphor oxide catalyst. The temperature range was 573-653 K with butane concentrations up to 3 mol % in the feed, which is within flammability limits but below ignition temperatures. The rate data were modeled using power law kinetics with product inhibition and included total oxidation and decomposition reactions. Kinetic parameters were estimated using a multiresponse, nonlinear regression algorithm showing intercorrelation effects. The kinetics were combined with independent measurements of catalyst diffusivity and reactor heat transfer using a one- dimensional heterogeneous reactor model.

  7. Effect of temperature on Candida antartica lipase B activity in the kinetic resolution of acebutolol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajin, Mariani; Kamaruddin, A. H.

    2016-06-01

    Thermodynamic studies of free Candida antartica lipase B in kinetic resolution of acebutolol have been carried out to characterize the temperature effects towards enzyme stability and activity. A decreased in reaction rate was observed in temperature above 40oC. Thermodynamic studies on lipase deactivation exhibited a first-order kinetic pattern. The activation and deactivation energies were 39.63 kJ/mol and 54.90 kJ/mol, respectively. The enthalpy and entropy of the lipase deactivation were found to be 52.12 kJ/mol and -0.18 kJ/mol, respectively.

  8. Fenton Oxidation Kinetics and Intermediates of Nonylphenol Ethoxylates

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Kai; Yi, Hao; Zhou, Zi-jian; Zhuo, Qiong-fang; Bing, Yong-xin; Guo, Qing-wei; Xu, Zhen-cheng

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Removal of nonylphenol ethoxylates (NPEOs) in aqueous solution by Fenton oxidation process was studied in a laboratory-scale batch reactor. Operating parameters, including initial pH temperature, hydrogen peroxide, and ferrous ion dosage, were thoroughly investigated. Maximum NPEOs reduction of 84% was achieved within 6 min, under an initial pH of 3.0, 25°C, an H2O2 dosage of 9.74×10−3 M, and a molar ratio of [H2O2]/[Fe2+] of 3. A modified pseudo-first-order kinetic model was found to well represent experimental results. Correlations of reaction rate constants and operational parameters were established based on experimental data. Results indicated that the Fenton oxidation rate and removal efficiency were more dependent on the dosage of H2O2 than Fe2+, and the apparent activation energy (ΔE) was 17.5 kJ/mol. High-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatograph mass spectrometer analytical results indicated degradation of NPEOs obtained within the first 2 min stepwise occurred by ethoxyl (EO) unit shortening. Long-chain NPEOs mixture demonstrated a higher degradation rate than shorter-chain ones. Nonylphenol (NP), short-chain NPEOs, and NP carboxyethoxylates were identified as the primary intermediates, which were mostly further degraded. PMID:24868141

  9. High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) of nanophase ferric oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Iron oxide minerals are the prime candidates for Fe(III) signatures in remotely sensed Martian surface spectra. Magnetic, Mossbauer, and reflectance spectroscopy have been carried out in the laboratory in order to understand the mineralogical nature of Martian analog ferric oxide minerals of submicron or nanometer size range. Out of the iron oxide minerals studied, nanometer sized ferric oxides are promising candidates for possible Martian spectral analogs. 'Nanophase ferric oxide (np-Ox)' is a generic term for ferric oxide/oxihydroxide particles having nanoscale (less than 10 nm) particle dimensions. Ferrihydrite, superparamagnetic particles of hematite, maghemite and goethite, and nanometer sized particles of inherently paramagnetic lepidocrocite are all examples of nanophase ferric oxides. np-Ox particles in general do not give X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns with well defined peaks and would often be classified as X-ray amorphous. Therefore, different np-Oxs preparations should be characterized using a more sensitive technique e.g., high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The purpose of this study is to report the particle size, morphology and crystalline order, of five np-Ox samples by HRTEM imaging and electron diffraction (ED).

  10. Kinetics of pyrite oxidation in sodium carbonate solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Ciminelli, V.S.T.; Osseo-Asare, K.

    1995-04-01

    The kinetics of pyrite oxidation in sodium carbonate solutions were investigated in a stirred vessel, under temperatures ranging from 50 C to 85 C, oxygen partial pressures from 0 to 1 atm, particle size fractions from {minus}150 + 106 to {minus}38 + 10 {mu}m ({minus}100 + 150 Mesh to {minus}400 Mesh + 10 {mu}m) and pH values of up to 12.5. The rate of the oxidation reaction is described by the following expression: {minus}dN/dt = SbkpO{sup 0.5}{sub 2} [OH{sup {minus}}]{sup 0.1} where N represents moles of pyrite, S is the surface area of the solid particles, b is a stoichiometric factor, k is an apparent rate constant, pO{sub 2} is the oxygen partial pressure, and [OH{sup {minus}}] is the hydroxyl ion concentration. The experimental data were fitted by a stochastic model for chemically controlled reactions, represented by the following fractional conversion (X) vs time (t) equation: (1 {minus} X){sup {minus}2/3} {minus} 1 = k{sub ST}t. The assumption behind this model, i.e., surface heterogeneity leading to preferential dissolution, is supported by the micrographs of reacted pyrite particles, showing pits created by localized dissolution beneath an oxide layer. In addition to the surface texture, the magnitude of the activation energy (60.0 kJ/mol or 14.6 {+-} 2.7 kcal/mol), the independence of rate on the stirring speed, the inverse relationship between the rate constant and the initial particle diameter, and the fractional reaction orders are also in agreement with a mechanism controlled by chemical reaction.

  11. Kinetics of pyrite oxidation in sodium hydroxide solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciminelli, V. S. T.; Osseo-Asare, K.

    1995-08-01

    The kinetics of pyrite oxidation in sodium hydroxide solution were investigated in a stirred reactor, under temperatures ranging from 50 °C to 85 °C, oxygen partial pressures of up to 1 atm, particle size fractions from -150 + 106 to -38 + 10µm (-100 + 150 mesh to -400 mesh + 10 µ), and pH values of up to 12.5. The surface reaction is represented by the rate equation:- dN/dt = Sbk″pO0.5 2[oH- 0.25/(1 + k‴ pO2 0.5) where N represents moles of pyrite, S is the surface area of the solid particles, k″ and k″ are constants, b is a stoichiometric factor, pO2 is the oxygen partial pressure, and [OH-] is the hydroxyl ion concentration. The corresponding fractional conversion ( X) vs time behavior follows the shrinking particle model for chemical reaction control: 1 - (1 - X)1/3 = k ct The rate increases with the reciprocal of particle size and has an activation energy of 55.6 kJ/mol (13.6 kcal/mol). The relationship between reaction rate and oxygen partial pressure resembles a Langmuir-type equation and thus suggests that the reaction involves adsorption or desorption of oxygen at the interface. The square-root rate law may be due to the adsorption of a dissociated oxygen molecule. The observed apparent reaction order with respect to the hydroxyl ion concentration is a result of a complex combination of processes involving the oxidation and nydrolysis of iron, oxidation and hydrolysis of sulfur, and the oxygen reduction.

  12. Kinetics of pyrite oxidation in sodium carbonate solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciminelli, V. S. T.; Osseo-Asare, K.

    1995-04-01

    The kinetics of pyrite oxidation in sodium carbonate solutions were investigated in a stirred vessel, under temperatures ranging from 50 °C to 85 °C, oxygen partial pressures from 0 to 1 atm, particle size fractions from -150 + 106 to -38 + 10 µm (-100 + 150 Mesh to -400 Mesh + 10 µm) and pH values of up to 12.5. The rate of the oxidation reaction is described by the following expression: -dN/dt = SbkpO{2/0.5} [OH-]0.1 where N represents moles of pyrite, S is the surface area of the solid particles, b is a stoichiometric factor, k is an apparent rate constant, pO```2`` is the oxygen partial pressure, and [OH-] is the hydroxyl ion concentration. The experimental data were fitted by a stochastic model for chemically controlled reactions, represented by the following fractional conversion (X) vs time ( t) equation: (1-X)-2/3-1 = k STt The assumption behind this model, i.e., surface heterogeneity leading to preferential dissolution, is supported by the micrographs of reacted pyrite particles, showing pits created by localized dissolution beneath an oxide layer. In addition to the surface texture, the magnitude of the activation energy (60.9 kJ/mol or 14.6 ± 2.7 kcal/mol), the independence of rate on the stirring speed, the inverse relationship between the rate constant and the initial particle diameter, and the fractional reaction orders are also in agreement with a mechanism controlled by chemical reaction.

  13. Origin of enantioselectivity in benzotetramisole-catalyzed dynamic kinetic resolution of azlactones.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Yang, Xing; Birman, Vladimir B; Houk, K N

    2012-07-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to investigate the origins of enantioselectivity in benzotetramisole (BTM)-catalyzed dynamic kinetic resolution of azlactones. The transition states of the fast-reacting enantiomer are stabilized by electrostatic interactions between the amide carbonyl group and the acetate anion bound to the nucleophile. The chiral BTM catalyst confines the conformation of the α-carbon and the facial selectivity of the nucleophilic attack to promote such electrostatic attractions. PMID:22686505

  14. Lipase-catalyzed highly enantioselective kinetic resolution of boron-containing chiral alcohols.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Leandro H; Barcellos, Thiago

    2009-07-16

    The first application of enzymes as catalysts to obtain optically pure boron compounds is described. The kinetic resolution of boron-containing chiral alcohols via enantioselective transesterification catalyzed by lipases was studied. Aromatic, allylic, and aliphatic secondary alcohols containing a boronate ester or boronic acid group were resolved by lipase from Candida antartica (CALB), and excellent E values (E > 200) and high enantiomeric excesses (up to >99%) of both remaining substrates and acetylated product were obtained. PMID:19552446

  15. Synergistic Kinetic Resolution and Asymmetric Propargyl Claisen Rearrangement for the Synthesis of Chiral Allenes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yangbin; Liu, Xiaohua; Hu, Haipeng; Guo, Jing; Xia, Yong; Lin, Lili; Feng, Xiaoming

    2016-03-14

    The asymmetric propargyl Claisen rearrangement provides a convenient entry to chiral allene motifs. Herein, we describe the development of a kinetic resolution and asymmetric rearrangement of racemic propargyl vinyl ethers. This transformation afforded chiral allene products along with the enantiomerically enriched substrate in good yields with excellent diastereo- and enantioselectivity. The complete chirality transfer and facially selective rearrangement enabled the simultaneous construction of an axially chiral allenic unit and a quaternary carbon stereocenter. PMID:26889758

  16. Kinetic Modeling of a Heterogeneous Fenton Oxidative Treatment of Petroleum Refining Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Basheer Hasan, Diya'uddeen; Abdul Raman, Abdul Aziz; Wan Daud, Wan Mohd Ashri

    2014-01-01

    The mineralisation kinetics of petroleum refinery effluent (PRE) by Fenton oxidation were evaluated. Within the ambit of the experimental data generated, first-order kinetic model (FKM), generalised lumped kinetic model (GLKM), and generalized kinetic model (GKM) were tested. The obtained apparent kinetic rate constants for the initial oxidation step (k2′), their final oxidation step (k1′), and the direct conversion to endproducts step (k3′) were 10.12, 3.78, and 0.24 min−1 for GKM; 0.98, 0.98, and nil min−1 for GLKM; and nil, nil, and >0.005 min−1 for FKM. The findings showed that GKM is superior in estimating the mineralization kinetics. PMID:24592152

  17. Kinetics and dynamics of oxidation reactions involving an adsorbed CO species on bulk and supported platinum and copper-oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Harold, M.P.

    1991-07-01

    The proposed research is an integrated experimental and modeling study of oxidation reactions involving CO as a key player -- be it a reactant, adsorbed intermediate, and/or partial oxidation product -- in the catalytic sequence and chemistry. The reaction systems of interest in the project include CO, formaldehyde, and methanol oxidation by O{sub 2} and CO oxidation by NO, on both Pt and copper oxide catalysts. These reactions are of importance in automobile exhaust catalysis. There is a paucity of rate data in the literature for these important environmental control reactions. The goal of this research is to better understand the catalytic chemistry and kinetics of oxidations reactions involving CO as an adsorbed intermediate. Successfully meeting this goal requires an integration of basic kinetic measurements, in situ catalyst surface monitoring, kinetic modeling, and nonlinear mathematical tools.

  18. Oxidative degradation and kinetics of chlorinated ethylenes by potassium permanganate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Y. Eugene; Schwartz, Frank W.

    1999-04-01

    The oxidative treatment of chlorinated ethylenes in ground water using permanganate was investigated in a series of batch kinetic tests. Five chlorinated ethylenes including tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), and three isomers of dichloroethylenes (DCEs) were examined. The degradation process was rapid with pseudo-first-order rate constants ranging from 4.5×10 -5 to 0.03 s -1 at MnO 4-=1 mM. The rate increased with a decreasing number of chlorine substituents on the ethylene. The higher reactivity of trans-DCE ( kobs=30×10 -3 s -1 at MnO 4-=1 mM) as compared to cis-DCE ( kobs=0.9×10 -3 s -1 at MnO 4-=1 mM) is thought to be caused by a significant steric effect due to the formation of a large cyclic activated complex. TCE oxidation as a second-order reaction was confirmed and the rate constant, k=0.67±0.03 M -1 s -1, is independent of pH over the range of 4-8. The activity of both Cl - and hydrogen ions was monitored over time and suggests essentially complete dechlorination, making the degradation products less harmful than the parent compounds. Competition for MnO 4- from other organic compounds in ground water or highly contaminated ground water was also evaluated in experiments. A simple and quick approach was demonstrated to estimate permanganate consumption by other organic compounds for field applications and to predict the TCE degradation rate in a system involving multiple contaminants. The modeling results suggest that the effect of autocatalysis by MnO 2 on TCE degradation is significant when the system contains high concentration levels of MnO 4- and TOC.

  19. Kinetics of photocatalytic oxidation of organic solutes over titanium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, R.W.

    1988-06-01

    The kinetics of photooxidation to CO/sub 2/ of 22 organic solutes over a UV illuminated film of Degussa P25 titanium dioxide have been studied over a 100-fold concentration range for each solute, generally from about 1 to 100 mg/liter. The dependence of the photooxidation rate on concentration obeyed a simple two-coefficient Langmuir expression for each solute. The coefficients reflecting the degree of adsorption on the TiO/sub 2/ and the limiting rate at high concentrations enable the prediction of photocatalytic rates in any TiO/sub 2/-based photoreactor of a similar type once a reference rate has been determined for one of the solutes. A reaction mechanism is proposed for the oxidation of aromatic compounds involving peroxyhydroxycyclohexadienyl- and mucondialdehyde-type compounds as important intermediates. The solutes studied were benzoic acid, salicylic acid, phenol, biphthalate, 2-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol, monochlorobenzene, nitrobenzene, methanol, ethanol, n-propanol, 2-propanol, acetone, ethyl acetate, acetic acid, formic acid, sucrose, 2-naphthol, umbelliferone, chloroform, trichloroethylene, and dichloroethane.

  20. The kinetics of iodide oxidation by the manganese oxide mineral birnessite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fox, P.M.; Davis, J.A.; Luther, G. W., III

    2009-01-01

    The kinetics of iodide (I-) and molecular iodine (I2) oxidation by the manganese oxide mineral birnessite (??-MnO2) was investigated over the pH range 4.5-6.25. I- oxidation to iodate (IO3-) proceeded as a two-step reaction through an I2 intermediate. The rate of the reaction varied with both pH and birnessite concentration, with faster oxidation occurring at lower pH and higher birnessite concentration. The disappearance of I- from solution was first order with respect to I- concentration, pH, and birnessite concentration, such that -d[I-]/dt = k[I-][H+][MnO2], where k, the third order rate constant, is equal to 1.08 ?? 0.06 ?? 107 M-2 h-1. The data are consistent with the formation of an inner sphere I- surface complex as the first step of the reaction, and the adsorption of I- exhibited significant pH dependence. Both I2, and to a lesser extent, IO3- sorbed to birnessite. The results indicate that iodine transport in mildly acidic groundwater systems may not be conservative. Because of the higher adsorption of the oxidized I species I2 and IO3-, as well as the biophilic nature of I2, redox transformations of iodine must be taken into account when predicting I transport in aquifers and watersheds.

  1. Lipase-catalyzed kinetic resolution of (±)-1-(2-furyl) ethanol in nonaqueous media.

    PubMed

    Devendran, Saravanan; Yadav, Ganapati D

    2014-06-01

    S-1-(2-Furyl) ethanol serves as an important chiral building block for the preparation of various natural products, fine chemicals, and is widely used in the chemical and pharmaceutical industries. In this work, lipase-catalyzed kinetic resolution of (R/S)-1-(2-furyl) ethanol using different acyl donors was investigated. Vinyl esters are good acyl donors vis-à-vis alkyl esters for kinetic resolution. Among them, vinyl acetate was found to be the best acyl donor. Different immobilized lipases such as Rhizomucor miehei lipase, Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase, and Candida antarctica lipase B were evaluated for this reaction, among which C. antarctica lipase B, immobilized on acrylic resin (Novozym 435), was found to be the best catalyst in n-heptane as solvent. The effect of various parameters was studied in a systematic manner. Maximum conversion of 47% and enantiomeric excess of the substrate (ees ) of 89% were obtained in 2 h using 5 mg of enzyme loading with an equimolar ratio of alcohol to vinyl acetate at 60 °C at a speed of 300 rpm in a batch reactor. From the analysis of progress curve and initial rate data, it was concluded that the reaction followed the ordered bi-bi mechanism with dead-end ester inhibition. Kinetic parameters were obtained by using nonlinear regression. This process is more economical, green, and easily scalable than the chemical processes. PMID:24733779

  2. Microwave assisted enzymatic kinetic resolution of (±)-1-phenyl-2-propyn-1-ol in nonaqueous media.

    PubMed

    Devendran, Saravanan; Yadav, Ganapati D

    2014-01-01

    Kinetic resolution of 1-phenyl-2-propyn-1-ol, an important chiral synthon, was studied through trans-esterification with acyl acetate to investigate synergism between microwave irradiation and enzyme catalysis. Lipases from different microbial origins were employed for the kinetic resolution of (R/S)-1-phenyl-2-propyn-1-ol, among which Candida antarctica lipase B, immobilized on acrylic resin (Novozym 435), was found to be the best catalyst in n-hexane as solvent. Vinyl acetate was the most effective among different acyl esters studied. The effect of various parameters was studied in a systematic manner. Definite synergism between microwave and enzyme was observed. The initial rate was improved around 1.28 times under microwave irradiation than conventional heating. Under optimum conditions, maximum conversion (48.78%) and high enantiomeric excess (93.25%) were obtained in 2 h. From modeling studies, it is concluded that the reaction follows the Ping-Pong bi-bi mechanism with dead end alcohol inhibition. Kinetic parameters were obtained by using nonlinear regression. This process is green, clean, and easily scalable as compared to the chemical process. PMID:24707487

  3. Microwave Assisted Enzymatic Kinetic Resolution of (±)-1-Phenyl-2-propyn-1-ol in Nonaqueous Media

    PubMed Central

    Devendran, Saravanan; Yadav, Ganapati D.

    2014-01-01

    Kinetic resolution of 1-phenyl-2-propyn-1-ol, an important chiral synthon, was studied through trans-esterification with acyl acetate to investigate synergism between microwave irradiation and enzyme catalysis. Lipases from different microbial origins were employed for the kinetic resolution of (R/S)-1-phenyl-2-propyn-1-ol, among which Candida antarctica lipase B, immobilized on acrylic resin (Novozym 435), was found to be the best catalyst in n-hexane as solvent. Vinyl acetate was the most effective among different acyl esters studied. The effect of various parameters was studied in a systematic manner. Definite synergism between microwave and enzyme was observed. The initial rate was improved around 1.28 times under microwave irradiation than conventional heating. Under optimum conditions, maximum conversion (48.78%) and high enantiomeric excess (93.25%) were obtained in 2 h. From modeling studies, it is concluded that the reaction follows the Ping-Pong bi-bi mechanism with dead end alcohol inhibition. Kinetic parameters were obtained by using nonlinear regression. This process is green, clean, and easily scalable as compared to the chemical process. PMID:24707487

  4. Oxidation Kinetics of Chemically Vapor-Deposited Silicon Carbide in Wet Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.

    1994-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of chemically vapor-deposited SiC in dry oxygen and wet oxygen (P(sub H2O) = 0.1 atm) at temperatures between 1200 C and 1400 C were monitored using thermogravimetric analysis. It was found that in a clean environment, 10% water vapor enhanced the oxidation kinetics of SiC only very slightly compared to rates found in dry oxygen. Oxidation kinetics were examined in terms of the Deal and Grove model for oxidation of silicon. It was found that in an environment containing even small amounts of impurities, such as high-purity Al2O3 reaction tubes containing 200 ppm Na, water vapor enhanced the transport of these impurities to the oxidation sample. Oxidation rates increased under these conditions presumably because of the formation of less protective sodium alumino-silicate scales.

  5. Crystalline Grain Interior Configuration Affects Lithium Migration Kinetics in Li-Rich Layered Oxide.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haijun; So, Yeong-Gi; Kuwabara, Akihide; Tochigi, Eita; Shibata, Naoya; Kudo, Tetsuichi; Zhou, Haoshen; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2016-05-11

    The electrode kinetics of Li-ion batteries, which are important for battery utilization in electric vehicles, are affected by the grain size, crystal orientation, and surface structure of electrode materials. However, the kinetic influences of the grain interior structure and element segregation are poorly understood, especially for Li-rich layered oxides with complex crystalline structures and unclear electrochemical phenomena. In this work, cross-sectional thin transmission electron microscopy specimens are "anatomized" from pristine Li1.2Mn0.567Ni0.167Co0.067O2 powders using a new argon ion slicer technique. Utilizing advanced microscopy techniques, the interior configuration of a single grain, multiple monocrystal-like domains, and nickel-segregated domain boundaries are clearly revealed; furthermore, a randomly distributed atomic-resolution Li2MnO3-like with an intergrown LiTMO2 (TM = transitional metals) "twin domain" is demonstrated to exist in each domain. Further theoretical calculations based on the Li2MnO3-like crystal domain boundary model reveal that Li(+) migration in the Li2MnO3-like structure with domain boundaries is sluggish, especially when the nickel is segregated in domain boundaries. Our work uncovers the complex configuration of the crystalline grain interior and provides a conceptual advance in our understanding of the electrochemical performance of several compounds for Li-ion batteries. PMID:27088669

  6. Carotenoid Excited State Kinetics in Bacterial RCs with the Primary Electron Donor Oxidized

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Su; Katilius, Evaldas; Woodbury, Neal W.

    Carotenoid singlet excited state kinetics in wild type reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides was investigated using ultrafast laser spectroscopy under conditions where the primary electron donor is either neutral or oxidized.

  7. Composition effects on the early-stage oxidation kinetics of (001) Cu-Au alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, G.-W.; Eastman, J. A.; Birtcher, R. C.; Baldo, P. M.; Pearson, J. E.; Thompson, L. J.; Wang, L.; Yang, J. C.

    2007-02-01

    An in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy study of the nucleation and growth of oxide islands during the early-stage oxidation of (001) Cu1-xAux alloys (x⩽38at.%) was undertaken in order to investigate the effects of alloying on oxide island nucleation behavior and growth kinetics. The kinetic data reveal that Au enhances the nucleation density of oxide islands and suppresses their growth rate. Our results provide insight into reasons for the decreased passivation properties of Cu when alloyed with Au.

  8. Kinetic isotopic effects in oxidative dehydrogenation of propane on vanadium oxide catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.; Iglesia, E.; Bell, A.T.

    2000-05-15

    Kinetic isotopic effects (KIEs) for oxidative dehydrogenation of propane were measured on 10 wt% V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/ZrO{sub 2}. Normal KIEs were obtained using CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 3} and CD{sub 3}CD{sub 2}CD{sub 3} as reactants for primary dehydrogenation (2.8) and combustion (1.9) of propane and for secondary combustion of propene (2.6), suggesting that in all cases C-H bond dissociation is a kinetically relevant step. CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 3} and CH{sub 3}CD{sub 2}CH{sub 3} reactants led to normal KIEs for dehydrogenation (2.7) and combustion (1.8) of propane, but to a very small KIE (1.1) for propene combustion. These results show that the methylene C-H bond is activated in the rate-determining steps for propane dehydrogenation and combustion reactions. The rate-determining step in secondary propene combustion involves the allylic C-H bond. In each reaction, the weakest C-H bond in the reactant is cleaved in the initial C-H bond activation step. The measured propane oxidative dehydrogenation KIEs are in agreement with theoretical estimates using a sequence of elementary steps, reaction rate expression, and transition state theory. The much smaller KIE for propane oxidative dehydrogenation (2.8) than the maximum KIE (6) expected for propane thermal dehydrogenation indicates the participation of lattice oxygen. The different KIE values for propane primary dehydrogenation and combustion suggest that these two reactions involve different lattice oxygen sites.

  9. Asymmetric Synthesis of Diverse Glycolic Acid Scaffolds via Dynamic Kinetic Resolution of α-Keto Esters

    PubMed Central

    Steward, Kimberly M.; Corbett, Michael T.; Goodman, C. Guy; Johnson, Jeffrey S.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamic kinetic resolution of α-keto esters via asymmetric transfer hydrogenation has been developed as a technique for the highly stereoselective construction of structurally diverse β-substituted-α-hydroxy carboxylic acid derivatives. Through the development of a privileged m-terphenylsulfonamide for (arene)RuCl(monosulfonamide) complexes with a high affinity for selective α-keto ester reduction, excellent levels of chemo-, diastereo-, and enantiocontrol can be realized in the reduction of β-aryl- and β-chloro-α-keto esters. PMID:23186551

  10. Regio- and Enantioselective Synthesis of Azole Hemiaminal Esters by Lewis Base Catalyzed Dynamic Kinetic Resolution.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, David W; Kamlet, Adam S; Dechert-Schmitt, Anne-Marie R; Yan, Jiangli; Brandt, Thomas A; Xiao, Jun; Wei, Liuqing; Barrila, Mark T

    2016-04-13

    We report a modular three-component dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) that affords enantiomerically enriched hemiaminal esters derived from azoles and aldehydes. The novel and scalable reaction can be used to synthesize valuable substituted azoles in a regioselective manner by capping (e.g., acylation) of the equilibrating azole-aldehyde adduct. With the use of a prolinol-derived DMAP catalyst as the chiral Lewis base, the products can be obtained in high chemical yield and with high enantiomeric excess. The DKR was performed on a multikilogram scale to produce a tetrazole prodrug fragment for a leading clinical candidate that posed formidable synthesis challenges. PMID:27003237

  11. Chiral Phosphoric Acid Catalyzed Asymmetric Ugi Reaction by Dynamic Kinetic Resolution of the Primary Multicomponent Adduct.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun; Ao, Yu-Fei; Huang, Zhi-Tang; Wang, De-Xian; Wang, Mei-Xiang; Zhu, Jieping

    2016-04-18

    Reaction of isonitriles with 3-(arylamino)isobenzofuran-1(3H)-ones in the presence of a catalytic amount of an octahydro (R)-binol-derived chiral phosphoric acid afforded 3-oxo-2-arylisoindoline-1-carboxamides in high yields with good to high enantioselectivities. An enantioselective Ugi four-center three-component reaction of 2-formylbenzoic acids, anilines, and isonitriles was subsequently developed for the synthesis of the same heterocycle. Mechanistic studies indicate that the enantioselectivity results from the dynamic kinetic resolution of the primary Ugi adduct, rather than from the C-C bond-forming process. The resulting heterocycle products are of significant medicinal importance. PMID:26997306

  12. Recyclable Ligands for the Non-Enzymatic Dynamic Kinetic Resolution of Challenging α-Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Nian, Yong; Wang, Jiang; Zhou, Shengbin; Wang, Shuni; Moriwaki, Hiroki; Kawashima, Aki; Soloshonok, Vadim A; Liu, Hong

    2015-10-26

    Structurally simple and inexpensive chiral tridentate ligands were employed for substantially advancing the purely chemical dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) of unprotected racemic tailor-made α-amino acids (TM-α-AAs), enabling the first DKR of TM-α-AAs bearing tertiary alkyl chains as well as multiple unprotected functional groups. Owing to the operationally convenient conditions, virtually complete stereoselectivity, and full recyclability of the source of chirality, this method should find wide applications for the preparation of TM-α-AAs, especially on large scale. PMID:26367134

  13. Rhodium-Catalyzed Asymmetric Cycloisomerization and Parallel Kinetic Resolution of Racemic Oxabicycles.

    PubMed

    Loh, Charles C J; Schmid, Matthias; Webster, Robert; Yen, Andy; Yazdi, Shabnam K; Franke, Patrick T; Lautens, Mark

    2016-08-16

    While desymmetrizations by intermolecular asymmetric ring-opening reactions of oxabicyclic alkenes with various nucleophiles have been reported over the past two decades, the demonstration of an intramolecular variant is unknown. Reported herein is the first rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric cycloisomerization of meso-oxabicyclic alkenes tethered to bridgehead nucleophiles, thus providing access to tricyclic scaffolds through a myriad of enantioselective C-O, C-N, and C-C bond formations. Moreover, we also demonstrate a unique parallel kinetic resolution, whereby racemic oxabicycles bearing two different bridgehead nucleophiles can be resolved enantioselectively. PMID:27416818

  14. Origin of Kinetic Resolution of Hydroxy Esters through Catalytic Enantioselective Lactonization by Chiral Phosphoric Acids.

    PubMed

    Changotra, Avtar; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2016-08-01

    Kinetic resolution is a widely used strategy for separation and enrichment of enantiomers. Using density functional theory computations, the origin of how a chiral BINOL-phosphoric acid catalyzes the selective lactonization of one of the enantiomers of α-methyl γ-hydroxy ester is identified. In a stepwise mechanism, the stereocontrolling transition state for the addition of the hydroxyl group to the si face of the ester carbonyl in the case of the S isomer exhibits a network of more effective noncovalent interactions between the substrate and the chiral catalyst. PMID:27463593

  15. Kinetic Resolution of 2H-Azirines by Asymmetric Imine Amidation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Haipeng; Liu, Yangbin; Lin, Lili; Zhang, Yuheng; Liu, Xiaohua; Feng, Xiaoming

    2016-08-16

    Highly efficient kinetic resolution of 2H-azirines by an asymmetric imine amidation was achieved in the presence of a chiral N,N'-dioxide/Sc(III) complex, thus providing a promising method to obtain the enantioenriched 2H-azirine derivatives and protecting-group free aziridines at the same time. It is rare to find an example of N1 of an oxindole participating in a reaction over C3. Moreover, chiral 2H-azirines were stereospecifically transformed into an unprotected aziridine and α-amino ketone. PMID:27384910

  16. Oxidation of Refractory Benzothiazoles with PMS/CuFe2O4: Kinetics and Transformation Intermediates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Chen, Yin; Leiknes, TorOve

    2016-06-01

    Benzothiazole (BTH) and its derivatives 2-(methylthio)bezothiazole (MTBT), 2-benzothiazolsulfonate (BTSA), and 2-hydroxybenzothiazole (OHBT) are refractory pollutants ubiquitously existing in urban runoff at relatively high concentrations. Here, we report their oxidation by CuFe2O4-activated peroxomonosulfate (PMS/CuFe2O4), focusing on kinetics and transformation intermediates. These benzothiazoles can be efficiently degraded by this oxidation process, which is confirmed to generate mainly sulfate radicals (with negligible hydroxyl-radical formation) under slightly acidic to neutral pH conditions. The molar exposure ratio of sulfate radical to residual PMS (i.e., Rct) for this process is a constant that is related to the reaction condition and can be easily determined. The reaction rate constants of these benzothiazoles toward sulfate radical are (3.3 ± 0.3) × 10(9), (1.4 ± 0.3) × 10(9), (1.5 ± 0.1) × 10(9), and (4.7 ± 0.5) × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1), respectively (pH 7 and 20 °C). On the basis of Rct and these rate constants, their degradation in the presence of organic matter can be well-predicted. A number of transformation products were detected and tentatively identified using triple-quadruple/linear ion trap MS/MS and high-resolution MS. It appears that sulfate radicals attack BTH, MTBT, and BTSA on their benzo ring via electron transfer, generating multiple hydroxylated intermediates that are reactive toward common oxidants. For OHBT oxidation, the thiazole ring is preferentially broken down. Due to competitions of the transformation intermediates, a minimum PMS/pollutant molar ratio of 10-20 is required for effective degradation. The flexible PMS/CuFe2O4 could be a useful process to remove the benzothiazoles from low dissolved organic carbon waters like urban runoff or polluted groundwater. PMID:27144396

  17. Energy resolution and efficiency of phonon-mediated kinetic inductance detectors for light detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardani, L.; Colantoni, I.; Cruciani, A.; Di Domizio, S.; Vignati, M.; Bellini, F.; Casali, N.; Castellano, M. G.; Coppolecchia, A.; Cosmelli, C.; Tomei, C.

    2015-08-01

    The development of sensitive cryogenic light detectors is of primary interest for bolometric experiments searching for rare events like dark matter interactions or neutrino-less double beta decay. Thanks to their good energy resolution and the natural multiplexed read-out, Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) are particularly suitable for this purpose. To efficiently couple KIDs-based light detectors to the large crystals used by the most advanced bolometric detectors, active surfaces of several cm2 are needed. For this reason, we are developing phonon-mediated detectors. In this paper, we present the results obtained with a prototype consisting of four 40 nm thick aluminum resonators patterned on a 2 × 2 cm2 silicon chip, and calibrated with optical pulses and X-rays. The detector features a noise resolution σE = 154 ± 7 eV and an (18 ± 2)% efficiency.

  18. Size control, quantum confinement, and oxidation kinetics of silicon nanocrystals synthesized at a high rate by expanding thermal plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Lihao E-mail: A.H.M.Smets@tudelft.nl; Zeman, Miro; Smets, Arno H. M. E-mail: A.H.M.Smets@tudelft.nl

    2015-05-25

    The growth mechanism of silicon nanocrystals (Si NCs) synthesized at a high rate by means of expanding thermal plasma chemical vapor deposition technique are studied in this letter. A bimodal Gaussian size distribution is revealed from the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images, and routes to reduce the unwanted large Si NCs are discussed. Photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopies are employed to study the size-dependent quantum confinement effect, from which the average diameters of the small Si NCs are determined. The surface oxidation kinetics of Si NCs are studied using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and the importance of post-deposition passivation treatments of hydrogenated crystalline silicon surfaces are demonstrated.

  19. Thermodynamic controls on the kinetics of microbial low-pH Fe(II) oxidation.

    PubMed

    Larson, Lance N; Sánchez-España, Javier; Kaley, Bradley; Sheng, Yizhi; Bibby, Kyle; Burgos, William D

    2014-08-19

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a major worldwide environmental threat to surface and groundwater quality. Microbial low-pH Fe(II) oxidation could be exploited for cost-effective AMD treatment; however, its use is limited because of uncertainties associated with its rate and ability to remove Fe from solution. We developed a thermodynamic-based framework to evaluate the kinetics of low-pH Fe(II) oxidation. We measured the kinetics of low-pH Fe(II) oxidation at five sites in the Appalachian Coal Basin in the US and three sites in the Iberian Pyrite Belt in Spain and found that the fastest rates of Fe(II) oxidation occurred at the sites with the lowest pH values. Thermodynamic calculations showed that the Gibbs free energy of Fe(II) oxidation (ΔG(oxidation)) was also most negative at the sites with the lowest pH values. We then conducted two series of microbial Fe(II) oxidation experiments in laboratory-scale chemostatic bioreactors operated through a series of pH values (2.1-4.2) and found the same relationships between Fe(II) oxidation kinetics, ΔG(oxidation), and pH. Conditions that favored the fastest rates of Fe(II) oxidation coincided with higher Fe(III) solubility. The solubility of Fe(III) minerals, thus plays an important role on Fe(II) oxidation kinetics. Methods to incorporate microbial low-pH Fe(II) oxidation into active and passive AMD treatment systems are discussed in the context of these findings. This study presents a simplified model that describes the relationship between free energy and microbial kinetics and should be broadly applicable to many biogeochemical systems. PMID:25072394

  20. Oxidation Kinetics and Strength Degradation of Carbon Fibers in a Cracked Ceramic Matrix Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.

    2003-01-01

    Experimental results and oxidation modeling will be presented to discuss carbon fiber susceptibility to oxidation, the oxidation kinetics regimes and composite strength degradation and failure due to oxidation. Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) was used to study the oxidation rates of carbon fiber and of a pyro-carbon interphase. The analysis was used to separately obtain activation energies for the carbon constituents within a C/SiC composite. TGA was also conducted on C/SiC composite material to study carbon oxidation and crack closure as a function of temperature. In order to more closely match applications conditions C/SiC tensile coupons were also tested under stressed oxidation conditions. The stressed oxidation tests show that C/SiC is much more susceptible to oxidation when the material is under an applied load where the cracks are open and allow for oxygen ingress. The results help correlate carbon oxidation with composite strength reduction and failure.

  1. [Changes in Kinetics of Chemiluminescence of Plasma as a Measure of Systemic Oxidative Stress in Humans].

    PubMed

    Sozarukova, M M; Polimova, A M; Proskurnina, E V; Vladimirov, Yu A

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a pathogenetic factor of many diseases. The control of its level is important for early diagnosis and therapy adjustment. In this work, antioxidant status was estimated in blood plasma. In the system of 2,2'-azo-bis(2-amidinopropane)dihydrochloride-luminol a set of chemiluminescence kinetic curve parameters is proposed for oxidative stress level estimation (the latent period τ(lat) and the increasing of analytical signal ΔI(CL)). Uric acid and albumin were shown as the main components that responsible for changes in chemiluminescence kinetic curve of plasma. Serum albumin undergoes oxidative modification in dose-depend manner under the action of UV irradiation, it causes the enhancement of antioxidant properties. Changes in plasma chemiluminescence kinetics are proposed as a measure of oxidative stress in human body. PMID:27192837

  2. High-temperature steam oxidation kinetics of the E110G cladding alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Király, Márton; Kulacsy, Katalin; Hózer, Zoltán; Perez-Feró, Erzsébet; Novotny, Tamás

    2016-07-01

    In the course of recent years, several experiments were performed at MTA EK (Centre for Energy Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences) on the isothermal high-temperature oxidation of the improved Russian cladding alloy E110G in steam/argon atmosphere. Using these data and designing additional supporting experiments, the oxidation kinetics of the E110G alloy was investigated in a wide temperature range, between 600 °C and 1200 °C. For short durations (below 500 s) or high temperatures (above 1065 °C) the oxidation kinetics was found to follow a square-root-of-time dependence, while for longer durations and in the intermediate temperature range (800-1000 °C) it was found to approach a cube-root-of-time dependence rather than a square-root one. Based on the results a new best-estimate and a conservative oxidation kinetics model were created.

  3. Chemical kinetic modeling of propane oxidation behind shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclain, A. G.; Jachimowski, C. J.

    1977-01-01

    The stoichiometric combustion of propane behind incident shock waves was studied experimentally and analytically over a temperature range from 1700 K to 2600 K and a pressure range from 1.2 to 1.9 atm. Measurements of the concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) and the product of the oxygen atom and carbon dioxide concentrations (O)(CO) were made after passage of the incident shock wave. A kinetic mechanism was developed which, when used in a computer program for a flowing, reacting gas behind an incident shock wave predicted experimentally measured results quite well. Ignition delay times from the literature were also predicted quite well. The kinetic mechanism consisted of 59 individual kinetic steps.

  4. [Oxidation behavior and kinetics of representative VOCs emitted from petrochemical industry over CuCeOx composite oxides].

    PubMed

    Chen, Chang-Wei; Yu, Yan-Ke; Chen, Jin-Sheng; He, Chi

    2013-12-01

    CuCeOx composite catalysts were synthesized via coprecipitation (COP-CuCeO,) and incipient impregnation (IMP-CuCeOx) methods, respectively. The physicochemical properties of the samples were characterized by XRD, low-temperature N2 sorption, H2-TPR and O2-TPD. The influences of reactant composition and concentration, reaction space velocity, O2 content, H2O concentration, and catalyst type on the oxidation behaviors of benzene, toluene, and n-hexane emitted from petrochemical industry were systematically investigated. In addition, the related kinetic parameters were model fitted. Compared with IMP-CuCeOx, COP-CuCeOx had well-dispersed active phase, better low-temperature reducibility, and more active surface oxygen species. The increase of reactant concentration was unfavorable for toluene oxidation, while the opposite phenomenon could be observed in n-hexane oxidation. The inlet concentration of benzene was irrelevant to its conversion under high oxidation rate. The introduction of benzene obviously inhibited the oxidation of toluene and n-hexane, while the presence of toluene had a positive effect on beuzene conversion. The presence of n-hexane could promote the oxidation of toluene, while toluene had a negative influence on e-hexane oxidation. Both low space velocity and high oxygen concentration were beneficial for the oxidation process, and the variation of oxygen content had negligible effect on n-hexane and henzene oxidation. The presence of H2O noticeably inhibited the oxidation of toluene, while significantly accelerated the oxidation procedure of henzene and n-hexane. COP-CuCeOx had superior catalytic performance for toluene and benzene oxidation, while IMP-CuCeOx showed higher n-hexane oxidation activity under dry condition. The oxidation behaviors under different conditions could be well fitted and predicted by the pseudo first-order kinetic model. PMID:24640915

  5. Origin of the chemical and kinetic stability of graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Si; Bongiorno, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    At moderate temperatures (≤ 70°C), thermal reduction of graphene oxide is inefficient and after its synthesis the material enters in a metastable state. Here, first-principles and statistical calculations are used to investigate both the low-temperature processes leading to decomposition of graphene oxide and the role of ageing on the structure and stability of this material. Our study shows that the key factor underlying the stability of graphene oxide is the tendency of the oxygen functionalities to agglomerate and form highly oxidized domains surrounded by areas of pristine graphene. Within the agglomerates of functional groups, the primary decomposition reactions are hindered by both geometrical and energetic factors. The number of reacting sites is reduced by the occurrence of local order in the oxidized domains, and due to the close packing of the oxygen functionalities, the decomposition reactions become - on average - endothermic by more than 0.6 eV. PMID:23963517

  6. Evaluation of a new protocol for enzymatic dynamic kinetic resolution of 3-hydroxy-3-(aryl)propanoic acids.

    PubMed

    Koszelewski, Dominik; Zysk, Małgorzata; Brodzka, Anna; Żądło, Anna; Paprocki, Daniel; Ostaszewski, Ryszard

    2015-12-01

    The application of tandem metal-enzyme dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) is a powerful tool for the manufacture of high-value chemical commodities. A new protocol of kinetic resolution based on irreversible enzymatic esterification of carboxylic acids with orthoesters was introduced to obtain optically active β-hydroxy esters. This procedure was combined with metal catalyzed racemization of the target substrate providing both (R) and (S) enantiomers of ethyl 3-hydroxy-3-(4-nitrophenyl)propanoate with a high yield of 89% at 40 °C. A substantial influence of the enzyme type, organic co-solvent, and metal catalyst on the conversion and enantioselectivity of the enzymatic dynamic kinetic resolution was noted. PMID:26383530

  7. On the oxidation of (U, Pu)C fuel: Experimental and kinetic aspects, practical issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazaudier, F.; Tamani, C.; Galerie, A.; Marc, Y.

    2010-11-01

    The oxidation of mixed (U, Pu) carbide fuel was studied to meet some of the general requirements applicable to the back- and front-end of the nuclear fuel cycle. Data are unfortunately scarce in this field. Based on an experimental study and a kinetic treatment, it was proved that the oxidation of solid or powdered mixed carbide fuel does not involve any unwanted kinetic transition and does not have the intrinsic ability to self-sustain. We never observed the formation of a protective oxide layer on the samples. The oxidation products were always low-density, finely-divided oxide powder expanding and tending to slow down the process. The low thermal activation observed demonstrates the key role of gas transport when using powders. Practical solutions have been derived from this work.

  8. Chemoenzymatic dynamic kinetic resolution of primary amines using a recyclable palladium nanoparticle catalyst together with lipases.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, Karl P J; Lihammar, Richard; Verho, Oscar; Engström, Karin; Bäckvall, Jan-E

    2014-05-01

    A catalyst consisting of palladium nanoparticles supported on amino-functionalized siliceous mesocellular foam (Pd-AmP-MCF) was used in chemoenzymatic dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) to convert primary amines to amides in high yields and excellent ee's. The efficiency of the nanocatalyst at temperatures below 70 °C enables reaction conditions that are more suitable for enzymes. In the present study, this is exemplified by subjecting 1-phenylethylamine (1a) and analogous benzylic amines to DKR reactions using two commercially available lipases, Novozyme-435 (Candida antartica Lipase B) and Amano Lipase PS-C1 (lipase from Burkholderia cepacia) as biocatalysts. The latter enzyme has not previously been used in the DKR of amines because of its low stability at temperatures over 60 °C. The viability of the heterogeneous Pd-AmP-MCF was further demonstrated in a recycling study, which shows that the catalyst can be reused up to five times. PMID:24724828

  9. Development of dynamic kinetic resolution on large scale for (±)-1-phenylethylamine.

    PubMed

    Thalén, Lisa K; Bäckvall, Jan-E

    2010-01-01

    Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) and racemization catalyst 4 were combined in the dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) of (±)-1-phenylethylamine (1). Several reaction parameters have been investigated to modify the method for application on multigram scale. A comparison of isopropyl acetate and alkyl methoxyacetates as acyl donors was carried out. It was found that lower catalyst loadings could be used to obtain (R)-2-methoxy-N-(1-phenylethyl)acetamide (3) in good yield and high ee when alkyl methoxyacetates were used as acyl donors compared to when isopropyl acetate was used as the acyl donor. The catalyst loading could be decreased to 1.25 mol % Ru-catalyst 4 and 10 mg CALB per mmol 1 when alkyl methoxyacetates were used as the acyl donor. PMID:20978623

  10. Lipase-Catalyzed Kinetic Resolution of Novel Antifungal N-Substituted Benzimidazole Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Łukowska-Chojnacka, Edyta; Staniszewska, Monika; Bondaryk, Małgorzata; Maurin, Jan K; Bretner, Maria

    2016-04-01

    A series of new N-substituted benzimidazole derivatives was synthesized and their antifungal activity against Candida albicans was evaluated. The chemical step included synthesis of appropriate ketones containing benzimidazole ring, reduction of ketones to the racemic alcohols, and acetylation of alcohols to the esters. All benzimidazole derivatives were obtained with satisfactory yields and in relatively short times. All synthesized compounds exhibit significant antifungal activity against Candida albicans 900028 ATCC (% cell inhibition at 0.25 μg concentration > 98%). Additionally, racemic mixtures of alcohols were separated by lipase-catalyzed kinetic resolution. In the enzymatic step a transesterification reaction was applied and the influence of a lipase type and solvent on the enantioselectivity of the reaction was studied. The most selective enzymes were Novozyme SP 435 and lipase Amano AK from Pseudomonas fluorescens (E > 100). PMID:26922853

  11. Development of a Diastereoselective Phosphorylation of a Complex Nucleoside via Dynamic Kinetic Resolution.

    PubMed

    Tran, Kristy; Beutner, Gregory L; Schmidt, Michael; Janey, Jacob; Chen, Ke; Rosso, Victor; Eastgate, Martin D

    2015-05-15

    The development of a diastereoselective nucleoside phosphorylation is described, which produces a single isomer of a complex nucleoside monophosphate pro-drug. A stable phosphoramidic acid derivative is coupled to the nucleoside, in a process mediated by HATU and quinine, to deliver the coupled product in high chemical yield and good diastereoselectivity. This unusual process was shown to proceed through a dynamic kinetic resolution of a 1:1 mixture of activated phosphonate ester diastereoisomers. The optimized conditions afforded the product with a combined [S,S(P)] and [S,R(P)] in-process yield of 89% and a ∼7:1 [S,S(P):S,R(P)] diastereomeric ratio. Isolation of the major isomer was facilitated by single crystallization from anisole, where the product was obtained in 57% isolated yield, excellent purity (>95%), and a high diastereomeric ratio (>50:1). PMID:25840459

  12. Kinetic resolution of 2-hydroxybutanoate racemic mixtures by NAD-independent L-lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chao; Zhang, Wen; Ma, Cuiqing; Liu, Peng; Xu, Ping

    2011-04-01

    Optically active D-2-hydroxybutanoate is an important building block intermediate for medicines and biodegradable poly(2-hydroxybutanoate). Kinetic resolution of racemic 2-hydroxybutanoate may be a green and desirable alternative for D-2-hydroxybutanoate production. In this work, D-2-hydroxybutanoate at a high concentration (0.197 M) and a high enantiomeric excess (99.1%) was produced by an NAD-independent L-lactate dehydrogenase (L-iLDH) containing biocatalyst. 2-Oxobutanoate, another important intermediate, was co-produced at a high concentration (0.193 M). Using a simple ion exchange process with the macroporous anion exchange resin D301, D-2-hydroxybutanoate was separated from the biotransformation system with a high recovery of 84.7%. PMID:21295977

  13. In situ investigation of mesoporous silicon oxidation kinetics using infrared emittance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bardet, Benjamin; De Sousa Meneses, Domingos; Defforge, Thomas; Billoué, Jérôme; Gautier, Gaël

    2016-07-21

    In this paper, we study the thermal oxidation kinetics of mesoporous silicon layers, synthesized by electrochemical anodization, from 260 °C up to 1100 °C. A specific apparatus is employed to heat the mesoporous samples in air and to record at the same time their infrared emittance. Based on Bruggeman effective medium approximation, an optical model is set up to realistically approximate the dielectric function of the porous material with an emphasis on the surface chemistry and oxide content. A transition temperature of 600 °C is evidenced from data processing which gives evidence of two oxidation mechanisms with distinct kinetics. Between 260-600 °C, the oxidation is surface-limited with kinetics dependent on the hydrogen desorption rate. However, above 600 °C, the oxide growth is limited by oxygen diffusion through the existing oxide layer. A parabolic law is employed to fit the oxidation rate and to extract the high-temperature activation energy (EA = 1.5 eV). A precise control of the oxide growth can thus be achieved. PMID:27333267

  14. Natural realgar and amorphous AsS oxidation kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengke, Maggy F.; Tempel, Regina N.

    2003-03-01

    The oxidation rates of natural realgar and amorphous synthetic AsS by dissolved oxygen were evaluated using mixed flow reactors at pH 7.2 to 8.8 and dissolved oxygen contents of 5.9 to 16.5 ppm over a temperature range of 25 to 40°C. The ratios of As/S are stoichiometric for all amorphous AsS oxidation experiments except for two experiments conducted at pH ˜8.8. In these experiments, stoichiometric ratios of As/S were only observed in the early stages of AsS (am) oxidation whereas lower As/S ratios were observed during steady state. For realgar oxidation experiments, the As/S ratio is less than the stoichiometric ratio of realgar, ranging between 0.61 and 0.71. This nonstoichiometric release of As and S to solution indicates that realgar oxidation is more selective for S after the rates of oxidation become constant. All measured oxidation rates at 25°C can be described within experimental uncertainties as follows: Table 1

  15. Synthesis of a Racemic Ester and Its Lipase Catalyzed Kinetic Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetca, Delia; Arends, Isabel W. C. E.; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2002-11-01

    A first-year organic chemistry laboratory experiment is described in which an enzyme is utilized for the kinetic resolution of a racemic ester. In the first step, the racemic ester is synthesized from racemic 1-phenylethanol and acetic anhydride in the presence of pyridine. In the second step, only one of the two enantiomers of the racemic ester is selectively hydrolyzed. This reaction is enzyme-catalyzed and it clearly demonstrates the great ease with which enzymes can be used for the synthesis of enantiomerically-enriched compounds. The two enantiomerically-enriched compounds formed are isolated and analyzed for their optical purity. In these experiments the students are exposed to enzyme chemistry in combination with standard organic methods. Indeed, all the products are purified by techniques that are applied in the research laboratory (column chromatography and distillation), ensuring that these experiments come as close to the research environment as possible. By means of these experiments, topics such as enantioselective synthesis, enzymes in synthesis, enzyme kinetics, and analytical techniques such as IR, TLC, and optical rotation can be introduced to the students.

  16. High-resolution Hybrid Simulations of Kinetic Plasma Turbulence at Proton Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franci, Luca; Landi, Simone; Matteini, Lorenzo; Verdini, Andrea; Hellinger, Petr

    2015-10-01

    We investigate properties of plasma turbulence from magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) to sub-ion scales by means of two-dimensional, high-resolution hybrid particle-in-cell simulations. We impose an initial ambient magnetic field perpendicular to the simulation box, and we add a spectrum of large-scale magnetic and kinetic fluctuations with energy equipartition and vanishing correlation. Once the turbulence is fully developed, we observe an MHD inertial range, where the spectra of the perpendicular magnetic field and the perpendicular proton bulk velocity fluctuations exhibit power-law scaling with spectral indices of -5/3 and -3/2, respectively. This behavior is extended over a full decade in wavevectors and is very stable in time. A transition is observed around proton scales. At sub-ion scales, both spectra steepen, with the former still following a power law with a spectral index of ∼ -3. A -2.8 slope is observed in the density and parallel magnetic fluctuations, highlighting the presence of compressive effects at kinetic scales. The spectrum of the perpendicular electric fluctuations follows that of the proton bulk velocity at MHD scales, and flattens at small scales. All these features, which we carefully tested against variations of many parameters, are in good agreement with solar wind observations. The turbulent cascade leads to on overall proton energization with similar heating rates in the parallel and perpendicular directions. While the parallel proton heating is found to be independent on the resistivity, the number of particles per cell, and the resolution employed, the perpendicular proton temperature strongly depends on these parameters.

  17. Kinetic Resolution of Racemic Allylic Alcohols by Catalytic Asymmetric Substitution of the OH Group with Monosubstituted Hydrazines.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liang; Xu, Jing-Kun; Huang, Chao-Fan; He, Zeng-Yang; Xu, Ya-Nan; Tian, Shi-Kai

    2016-09-01

    A new strategy has been established for the kinetic resolution of racemic allylic alcohols through a palladium/sulfonyl-hydrazide-catalyzed asymmetric OH-substitution under mild conditions. In the presence of 1 mol % [Pd(allyl)Cl]2 , 4 mol % (S)-SegPhos, and 10 mol % 2,5-dichlorobenzenesulfonyl hydrazide, a range of racemic allylic alcohols were smoothly resolved with selectivity factors of more than 400 through an asymmetric allylic alkylation of monosubstituted hydrazines under air at room temperature. Importantly, this kinetic resolution process provided various allylic alcohols and allylic hydrazine derivatives with high enantiopurity. PMID:27339655

  18. Biomimetic Kinetic Resolution: Highly Enantio- and Diastereoselective Transfer Hydrogenation of Aglain Ketones To Access Flavagline Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We have previously reported asymmetric syntheses and absolute configuration assignments of the aglains (+)-ponapensin and (+)-elliptifoline and proposed a biosynthetic kinetic resolution process to produce enantiomeric rocaglamides and aglains. Herein, we report a biomimetic approach for the synthesis of enantiomerically enriched aglains and rocaglamides via kinetic resolution of a bridged ketone utilizing enantioselective transfer hydrogenation. The methodology has been employed to synthesize and confirm the absolute stereochemistries of the pyrimidone rocaglamides (+)-aglaiastatin and (−)-aglaroxin C. Additionally, the enantiomers and racemate of each metabolite were assayed for inhibition of the heat-shock response, cytotoxicity, and translation inhibition. PMID:25514979

  19. Kinetic of benzotriazole oxidation by ozone and hydroxyl radical.

    PubMed

    Vel Leitner, Nathalie Karpel; Roshani, Babak

    2010-03-01

    Ozonation experiments were performed in batch reactors in order to determine the rate constants for the reaction of molecular ozone and OH radicals with benzotriazole (BT) at different pHs. The first group of ozonation experiments was carried out for the determination of the rate constant for the direct reactions between ozone and BT. Two different kinetic models were used for the determination of kinetic rate constants: (i) the log-reduction of BT with ozone in excess, (ii) the competition kinetic model. The second-order rate constants for BT with molecular ozone were determined to be 36.4+/-3.8M(-1) s(-1) and 18.4+/-0.8M(-1) s(-1) at pH 2 from the two methods respectively. With the competition method, the value at pH 5 was found to be 22.0+/-2.0M(-1) s(-1). In a following stage, the reaction of BT with OH radicals was investigated at pH values ranging from 2 to 10.2. Using a method involving two probe compounds during the ozonation, the second-order rate constants of the BT reaction with hydroxyl radicals were determined. The rate constants were found to vary from 6.2x10(9)M(-1) s(-1) at pH 10.2 to 1.7x10(10)M(-1) s(-1) at pH 2. PMID:20097402

  20. Fundamental kinetics and mechanistic pathways for oxidation reactions in supercritical water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webley, Paul A.; Tester, Jefferson W.

    1988-01-01

    Oxidation of the products of human metabolism in supercritical water has been shown to be an efficient way to accomplish the on-board water/waste recycling in future long-term space flights. Studies of the oxidation kinetics of methane to carbon dioxide in supercritical water are presented in this paper in order to enhance the fundamental understanding of the oxidation of human waste compounds in supercritical water. It is concluded that, although the elementary reaction models remain the best hope for simulating oxidation in supercritical water, several modifications to existing mechanisms need to be made to account for the role of water in the reaction mechanism.

  1. Oxidation kinetics of a continuous carbon phase in a nonreactive matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckel, Andrew J.; Cawley, James D.; Parthasarathy, Triplicane A.

    1995-01-01

    Analytical solutions of and experimental results on the oxidation kinetics of carbon in a pore are presented. Reaction rate, reaction sequence, oxidant partial pressure, total system pressure, pore/crack dimensions, and temperature are analyzed with respect to the influence of each on an overall linear-parabolic rate relationship. Direct measurement of carbon recession is performed using two microcomposite model systems oxidized in the temperature range of 700 to 1200 C, and for times to 35 h. Experimental results are evaluated using the derived analytical solutions. Implications on the oxidation resistance of continuous-fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites containing a carbon constituent are discussed.

  2. Energy resolution and efficiency of phonon-mediated kinetic inductance detectors for light detection

    SciTech Connect

    Cardani, L.; Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A.; Cruciani, A.; Vignati, M.; Bellini, F.; Casali, N.; Cosmelli, C.; Di Domizio, S.; Castellano, M. G.; Tomei, C.

    2015-08-31

    The development of sensitive cryogenic light detectors is of primary interest for bolometric experiments searching for rare events like dark matter interactions or neutrino-less double beta decay. Thanks to their good energy resolution and the natural multiplexed read-out, Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) are particularly suitable for this purpose. To efficiently couple KIDs-based light detectors to the large crystals used by the most advanced bolometric detectors, active surfaces of several cm{sup 2} are needed. For this reason, we are developing phonon-mediated detectors. In this paper, we present the results obtained with a prototype consisting of four 40 nm thick aluminum resonators patterned on a 2 × 2 cm{sup 2} silicon chip, and calibrated with optical pulses and X-rays. The detector features a noise resolution σ{sub E} = 154 ± 7 eV and an (18 ± 2)% efficiency.

  3. Probing Protein Folding Kinetics with High-resolution, Stabilized Optical Tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Wesley; Halvorsen, Ken

    2009-03-01

    Single-molecule techniques provide a powerful means of exploring molecular transitions such as the unfolding and refolding of a protein. However, the quantification of bi-directional transitions and near-equilibrium phenomena poses unique challenges, and is often limited by the detection resolution and long-term stability of the instrument. We have developed unique optical tweezers methods that address these problems, including an interference-based method for high-resolution 3D bead tracking (˜1 nm laterally, ˜0.3 nm vertically, at > 100 Hz), and a continuous autofocus system that stabilizes the trap height to within 1-2 nm longterm [1,2]. We have used our instruments to quantify the force-dependent unfolding and refolding kinetics of single protein domains (e.g. spectrin in collaboration with E. Evans). These single-molecule studies are presented, together with the accompanying probabilistic analysis that we have developed. References: 1. W.P. Wong, V. Heinrich, E. Evans, Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc., 790, P5.1-P5.10 (2004). 2. V. Heinrich, W.P. Wong, K. Halvorsen, E. Evans, Langmuir, 24, 1194-1203 (2008).

  4. Kinetic study of the hydrogen oxidation reaction on sub-stoichiometric titanium oxide-supported platinum electrocatalyst in acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babić, B.; Gulicovski, J.; Gajić-Krstajić, Lj.; Elezović, N.; Radmilović, V. R.; Krstajić, N. V.; Vračar, Lj. M.

    The kinetics and mechanism of the hydrogen oxidation reaction were studied in 0.5 mol dm -3 HClO 4 solution on an electrode based on titanium oxide with Magneli phase structure-supported platinum electrocatalyst applied on rotation Au disk electrode. Pt catalyst was prepared by impregnation method from 2-propanol solution of Pt(NH 3) 2(NO 2) 2 and sub-stoichiometric titanium oxide powder. Sub-stiochiometric titanium oxide support was characterized by X-ray diffraction and BET techniques. The synthesized catalyst was analyzed by TEM technique. Based on Tafel-Heyrovsky-Volmer mechanism the corresponding kinetic equations were derived to describe the hydrogen oxidation current-potential behavior on RDE over the entire potential region. The polarization RDE curves were fitted with derived polarization equations according to proposed model. The fitting shows that the HOR on Pt proceeds most likely via the Tafel-Volmer (TV) pathway in the lower potential region, while the Heyrovsky-Volmer (HV) pathway is operative in the higher potential region. It is pointed out that Tafel equation that has been frequently used for the kinetics analysis in the HOR, can not reproduce the polarization curves measured with high mass-transport rates. Polarization measurements on RDE revealed that the Pt catalyst deposited on titanium suboxide support showed equal specific activity for the HOR compared to conventional carbon-supported Pt fuel cell catalyst.

  5. A kinetic model of municipal sludge degradation during non-catalytic wet oxidation.

    PubMed

    Prince-Pike, Arrian; Wilson, David I; Baroutian, Saeid; Andrews, John; Gapes, Daniel J

    2015-12-15

    Wet oxidation is a successful process for the treatment of municipal sludge. In addition, the resulting effluent from wet oxidation is a useful carbon source for subsequent biological nutrient removal processes in wastewater treatment. Owing to limitations with current kinetic models, this study produced a kinetic model which predicts the concentrations of key intermediate components during wet oxidation. The model was regressed from lab-scale experiments and then subsequently validated using data from a wet oxidation pilot plant. The model was shown to be accurate in predicting the concentrations of each component, and produced good results when applied to a plant 500 times larger in size. A statistical study was undertaken to investigate the validity of the regressed model parameters. Finally the usefulness of the model was demonstrated by suggesting optimum operating conditions such that volatile fatty acids were maximised. PMID:26426294

  6. Surface oxidation energetics and kinetics on MoS2 monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KC, Santosh; Longo, Roberto C.; Wallace, Robert M.; Cho, Kyeongjae

    2015-04-01

    In this work, surface oxidation of monolayer MoS2 (one of the representative semiconductors in transition-metal dichalcogenides) has been investigated using density functional theory method. Oxygen interaction with MoS2 shows that, thermodynamically, the surface tends to be oxidized. However, the dissociative absorption of molecular oxygen on the MoS2 surface is kinetically limited due to the large energy barrier at low temperature. This finding elucidates the air stability of MoS2 surface in the atmosphere. Furthermore, the presence of defects significantly alters the surface stability and adsorption mechanisms. The electronic properties of the oxidized surface have been examined as a function of oxygen adsorption and coverage as well as substitutional impurities. Our results on energetics and kinetics of oxygen interaction with the MoS2 monolayer are useful for the understanding of surface oxidation, air stability, and electronic properties of transition-metal dichalcogenides at the atomic scale.

  7. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation process of two-component Fe-Al alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przewlocka, H.; Siedlecka, J.

    1982-01-01

    The oxidation process of two-component Fe-Al alloys containing up to 7.2% Al and from 18 to 30% Al was studied. Kinetic measurements were conducted using the isothermal gravimetric method in the range of 1073-1223 K and 1073-1373 K for 50 hours. The methods used in studies of the mechanism of oxidation included: X-ray microanalysis, X-ray structural analysis, metallographic analysis and marker tests.

  8. Electro-oxidation of the dye azure B: kinetics, mechanism, and by-products.

    PubMed

    Olvera-Vargas, Hugo; Oturan, Nihal; Aravindakumar, C T; Paul, M M Sunil; Sharma, Virender K; Oturan, Mehmet A

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the electrochemical degradation of the dye azure B in aqueous solutions was studied by electrochemical advanced oxidation processes (EAOPs), electro-Fenton, and anodic oxidation processes, using Pt/carbon-felt and boron-doped diamond (BDD)/carbon-felt cells with H₂O₂ electrogeneration. The higher oxidation power of the electro-Fenton (EF) process using BDD anode was demonstrated. The oxidative degradation of azure B by the electrochemically generated hydroxyl radicals ((•)OH) follows a pseudo-first-order kinetics. The apparent rate constants of the oxidation of azure B by (•)OH were measured according to pseudo-first-order kinetic model. The absolute rate constant of azure B hydroxylation reaction was determined by competition kinetics method and found to be 1.19 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). It was found that the electrochemical degradation of the dye leads to the formation of aromatic by-products which are then oxidized to aliphatic carboxylic acids before their almost mineralization to CO₂ and inorganic ions (sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium). The evolution of the TOC removal and time course of short-chain carboxylic acids during treatment were also investigated. PMID:24682678

  9. Kinetic resolution of axially chiral 2,2'-dihydroxy-1,1'-biaryls by palladium-catalyzed alcoholysis.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Hiroshi; Tokunaga, Makoto; Kiyosu, Junya; Iwasawa, Tetsuo; Obora, Yasushi; Tsuji, Yasushi

    2005-08-01

    Palladium-diamine complexes catalyzed kinetic resolution of axially chiral 2,2'-dihydroxy-1,1'-biaryls by alcoholysis of vinyl ethers. The reaction proceeded with high selectivity for various kinds of biaryls. This process is applicable to not only binaphthols but also biphenols, which have been considered to be difficult for the enantioselective synthesis by known catalytic methods. PMID:16045319

  10. Enzymatic kinetic resolution of primary allenic alcohols. Application to the total synthesis and stereochemical assignment of striatisporolide A.

    PubMed

    Deska, Jan; Bäckvall, Jan-E

    2009-09-01

    Crude Porcine pancreatic lipase was successfully used for the kinetic resolution of axially chiral primary allenic alcohols providing very high enantioselectivities with E values above 200. This simple access to optically active allenes was applied to the total synthesis of the fungal metabolite (-)-striatisporolide A, allowing its unambiguous stereochemical assignment. PMID:19675888

  11. Exploring crystallization kinetics in natural rhyolitic melts using high resolution CT imagery of spherulites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clow, T. W.; Befus, K. S.; Gardner, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Little of our understanding of crystallization kinetics has been directly derived from studies of natural samples. We examine crystallization of rhyolitic melts by quantifying spherulite sizes and number densities in obsidian collected from Yellowstone caldera using high-resolution x-ray computed tomography (CT) imagery. Spherulites are spherical to ellipsoidal masses of intergrown alkali feldspar and quartz in a radiating, fibrous structure. They are thought to form in response to relatively rapid crystallization of melt in response to large amounts of undercooling. Recent research using compositional gradients that form outside of spherulites has suggested that they nucleate at 700 to 500 ˚C and their growth slows exponentially until it eventually ceases at ~400 ˚C. By quantifying spherulite textures, and using those temperature constraints, we derive new kinetic information regarding crystallization in natural rhyolitic systems. We find that spherulites range from 0.2 to 12.3 mm in diameter, and are 0.004 to 49.5 mm3 in volume. Such values generate number densities of 70 to 185 spherulites cm-3. Histograms of size display positively skewed distributions indicating small spherulites are far more abundant than larger ones. Those distributions imply nucleation rates change as a function of temperature. At higher temperatures where the melt is undercooled by 400-500 ˚C, nucleation is rare and growth is favored. With decreasing temperature, nucleation rates increase rapidly until cold enough temperatures are reached that diffusion limits crystallization and causes it to cease (undercoolings of ~650 ˚C). Assuming a cooling rate for the host obsidian of 10-5 ˚C s-1, then overall spherulite nucleation rates are 0.01 to 0.03 spherulites cm-3 hour-1.

  12. Effects of alloy heat treatment on oxidation kinetics and scale morphology for Crofer 22 APU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdefrau, Neal J.; Chen, Lei; Sun, Ellen Y.; Aindow, Mark

    2013-11-01

    The effect of alloy heat treatment on the oxidation kinetics and oxide scale microstructure of Crofer 22 APU has been studied. Parabolic oxidation rate constants were measured for the as-received alloy and after pre-oxidation heat treatment in argon at 1050 °C for 1 and 4 h. The oxide scale microstructure was investigated using scanning electron microscopy, focused ion beam milling and transmission electron microscopy. It was found that the alloy forms a two-layer scale with a continuous chromia layer and a discontinuous MnCr2O4 overlayer. Two forms of internal oxides were also formed: subscale pockets of spinel and isolated TiOx precipitates in the underlying alloy. The pre-oxidation heat treatment had a profound effect on the grain size and morphology of the Cr2O3 and MnCr2O4 layers in the scale. The heat-treated samples exhibit a 3.5× lower parabolic oxidation rate constant than the as-received Crofer 22 APU. This improvement in oxidation resistance is attributed to the dramatic differences in the morphology of the oxide scale that forms during the earliest stages of oxidation (<5 h). The implications of these findings for oxidation mechanisms and long-term SOFC performance are discussed.

  13. Dissolution kinetics of spent petroleum catalyst using sulfur oxidizing acidophilic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Debaraj; Ahn, Jong G; Kim, Dong J; Roychaudhury, G; Ralph, David E

    2009-08-15

    Bioleaching studies of spent petroleum catalyst were carried out using sulfur oxidizing, Acidithiobacillus species. Leaching studies were carried out in two-stage, in the first stage bacteria were grown and culture filtrate was used in the second stage for leaching purpose. XRD analysis of spent petroleum catalyst showed oxides of V, Fe and Al and sulfides of Mo and Ni. The leaching kinetics followed dual rate, initial faster followed by slower rate and equilibrium could be achieved within 7 days. The leaching rate of Ni and V were high compared to Mo. The low Mo leaching rate may be either due to formation of impervious sulfur layer or refractoriness of sulfides or both. The leaching kinetics followed 1st order rate. Using leaching kinetics, rate equations for dissolution process for different metal ions were evaluated. The rate determining step observed to be pore diffusion controlled. PMID:19286311

  14. Thermodynamics and kinetics of extracting zinc from zinc oxide ore by the ammonium sulfate roasting method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yi; Shen, Xiao-yi; Zhai, Yu-chun

    2015-05-01

    Thermodynamic analyses and kinetic studies were performed on zinc oxide ore treatment by (NH4)2SO4 roasting technology. The results show that it is theoretically feasible to realize a roasting reaction between the zinc oxide ore and (NH4)2SO4 in a temperature range of 573-723 K. The effects of reaction temperature and particle size on the extraction rate of zinc were also examined. It is found that a surface chemical reaction is the rate-controlling step in roasting kinetics. The calculated activation energy of this process is about 45.57 kJ/mol, and the kinetic model can be expressed as follows: 1 - (1 - α)1/3 = 30.85 exp(-45.57/ RT)· t. An extraction ratio of zinc as high as 92% could be achieved under the optimum conditions.

  15. Oxidation kinetics of crystal violet by potassium permanganate in acidic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Sameera Razi; Ashfaq, Maria; Mubashir; Masood, Summyia

    2016-05-01

    The oxidation kinetics of crystal violet (a triphenylmethane dye) by potassium permanganate was focused in an acidic medium by the spectrophotometric method at 584 nm. The oxidation reaction of crystal violet by potassium permanganate is carried out in an acidic medium at different temperatures ranging within 298-318 K. The kinetic study was carried out to investigate the effect of the concentration, ionic strength and temperature. The reaction followed first order kinetics with respect to potassium permanganate and crystal violet and the overall rate of the reaction was found to be second order. Thermodynamic activation parameters like the activation energy ( E a), enthalpy change (Δ H*), free energy change (Δ G*), and entropy change (Δ S*) have also been evaluated.

  16. Atypical kinetic behavior of chloroperoxidase-mediated oxidative halogenation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Aburto, Jorge; Correa-Basurto, Jose; Torres, Eduardo

    2008-12-01

    We have identified an atypical kinetic behavior for the oxidative halogenation of several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by chloroperoxidase (CPO) from Caldariomyces fumago. This behavior resembles the capacity of some members of the P450 family to simultaneously recognize several substrate molecules at their active sites. Indeed, fluorometric studies showed that PAHs exist in solution as monomers and pi-pi dimers that interact to different extents with CPO. The dissociation constants of dimerization were evaluated for every single PAH by spectrofluorometry. Furthermore, docking studies also suggest that CPO might recognize either one or two substrate molecules in its active site. The atypical sigmoidal kinetic behavior of CPO in the oxidative halogenation of PAHs is explained in terms of different kinetic models for non-heteroatomic PAHs (naphthalene, anthracene and pyrene). The results suggest that the actual substrate for CPO in this study was the pi-pi dimer for all evaluated PAHs. PMID:18823932

  17. Self-limited kinetics of electron doping in correlated oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jikun Zhou, You; Jiang, Jun; Shi, Jian; Ramanathan, Shriram; Middey, Srimanta; Chakhalian, Jak; Chen, Nuofu; Chen, Lidong; Shi, Xun; Döbeli, Max

    2015-07-20

    Electron doping by hydrogenation can reversibly modify the electrical properties of complex oxides. We show that in order to realize large, fast, and reversible response to hydrogen, it is important to consider both the electron configuration on the transition metal 3d orbitals, as well as the thermodynamic stability in nickelates. Specifically, large doping-induced resistivity modulations ranging several orders of magnitude change are only observed for rare earth nickelates with small ionic radii on the A-site, in which case both electron correlation effects and the meta-stability of Ni{sup 3+} are important considerations. Charge doping via metastable incorporation of ionic dopants is of relevance to correlated oxide-based devices where advancing approaches to modify the ground state electronic properties is an important problem.

  18. Nitrite-driven nitrous oxide production under aerobic soil conditions: Kinetics and biochemical controls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrite (NO2-) can accumulate during nitrification in soil following fertilizer application. While the role of NO2- as a substrate regulating nitrous oxide (N2O) production is recognized, kinetic data are not available that allow for estimating N2O production or soil-to-atmosphere fluxes as a functi...

  19. Kinetics and Mechanism of Iodide Oxidation by Iron(III): A Clock Reaction Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Jurica; Tomisic, Vladislav; Vrkljan, Petar B. A.

    2008-01-01

    A simple method for studying the kinetics of a chemical reaction is described and the significance of reaction orders in deducing reaction mechanisms is demonstrated. In this student laboratory experiment, oxidation of iodide by iron(III) ions in an acidic medium is transformed into a clock reaction. By means of the initial rates method, it is…

  20. Nitrite-Driven Nitrous Oxide Production Under Aerobic Soil Conditions: Kinetics and Biochemical Controls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrite (NO2-) can accumulate during nitrification in soil following fertilizer application. While the role of NO2- as a substrate regulating nitrous oxide (N2O) production is recognized, kinetic data are not available that allow for estimating N2O production or soil-to-atmosphere fluxes as a functi...

  1. Ferrate promoted oxidative cleavage of sulfonamides: Kinetics and product formation under acidic conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sulfonamide-based antibiotics are often detected in surface waters and secondary wastewater effluents and pose an eminent threat for the development of antibiotic resistance bacteria and genes in aquatic environment. This paper presents the kinetics and stoichiometry of the oxid...

  2. Reaction Mechanism and Kinetics of Enargite Oxidation at Roasting Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, Rafael; Aracena, Alvaro; Ruiz, Maria C.

    2012-10-01

    Roasting of enargite (Cu3AsS4) in the temperature range of 648 K to 898 K (375 °C to 625 °C) in atmospheres containing variable amounts of oxygen has been studied by thermogravimetric methods. From the experimental results of weight loss/gain data and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of partially reacted samples, the reaction mechanism of the enargite oxidation was determined, which occurred in three sequential stages:

  3. Oxidation kinetic analysis of a mixed uranium dicarbide and graphite compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, M.; Fiquet, O.; Brothier, M.

    2013-06-01

    The oxidation of a mixed uranium dicarbide and graphite powder has been investigated by simultaneous thermal gravimetric (TGA) and differential thermal (DTA) analyses coupled with gas phase chromatography. For isothermal oxidation conditions with temperatures below 330 °C, only the UC2 chemical phase is progressively oxidised into U3O8 oxides. Parabolic weight gain curves as a function of oxidation over time were obtained. A detailed kinetic study is proposed to establish a pseudo-steady-state during the oxidation process. Using an experimental method based on the sudden temperature increases, a single rate-limiting step has been validated and then modelled by a 3D diffusion law. An apparent activation energy calculated from the Arrhenius representation has been evaluated at -35 kJ/mol, thus describing the diffusion of oxygen through the oxide layer.

  4. Study of oxide and α-Zr(O) growth kinetics from high temperature steam oxidation of Zircaloy-4 cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawarn, Tapan K.; Banerjee, Suparna; Samanta, Akanksha; Rath, B. N.; Kumar, Sunil

    2015-12-01

    Oxidation kinetics of Zircaloy-4 cladding of fuel pins of Indian pressurized heavy water reactors (IPHWRs) under a simulated loss of coolant accident (LOCA) condition was investigated. The kinetic rate constants for the oxide and oxygen stabilized α-Zr phase growth were established from the isothermal metal-steam reaction at high temperatures (900-1200 °C) with soaking periods in the range of 60-900 s. Oxide and α-Zr(O) layer thickness were measured to derive the respective growth rates. The observed rates obeyed a parabolic law and Arrhenius expressions of rate constants were established. Percentage equivalent clad reacted (%ECR) was calculated using Baker-Just equation. Hydrogen estimation was carried out on the oxidized samples using inert gas fusion technique. The hydrogen pick up was found to be in the range 10-30 ppm. The measured values of oxide and α-Zr(O) layer thickness were compared with the results obtained using OXYCON, an indigenously developed model. The model predicts the oxide growth reasonably well but under predicts the α-Zr(O) growth significantly at thickness values higher than 80 μm.

  5. The kinetics of the oxidation of pyrite by ferric ions and dissolved oxygen: An electrochemical study

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, P.R.; Crundwell, F.K.

    2000-01-01

    The dissolution of pyrite is important in the geochemical cycling of iron and sulphur, in the formation of acid mine drainage, and in the extraction of metals by bacterial leaching. Many researchers have studied the kinetics of dissolution, and the rate of dissolution has often been found to be half-order in ferric ions or oxygen. Previous work has not adequately explained the kinetics of dissolution of pyrite. The dissolution of pyrite is an oxidation-reduction reaction. The kinetics of the oxidation and reduction half-reactions was studied independently using electrochemical techniques of voltammetry. The kinetics of the overall reaction was studied by the electrochemical technique of potentiometry, which consisted of measuring the mixed potential of a sample of corroding pyrite in solutions of different compositions. The kinetics of the half reactions are related to the kinetics of the overall dissolution reaction by the condition that there is no accumulation of charge. This principle is used to derive expressions for the mixed potential and the rate of dissolution, which successfully describe the mixed potential measurements and the kinetics of dissolution reported in the literature. It is shown that the observations of half-order kinetics and that the oxygen in the sulphate product arises from water are both a direct consequence of the electrochemical mechanism. Thus it is concluded that the electrochemical reaction steps occurring at the mineral-solution interface control the rate of dissolution. Raman spectroscopy was used to analyze reaction products formed on the pyrite surface. The results indicated that small amounts of polysulphides form on the surface of the pyrite. However, it was also found that the mixed (corrosion) potential does not change over a 14-day leaching period. This indicates that even though polysulphide material is present on the surface, it does not influence the rate of the reactions occurring at the surface. Measurement of the

  6. The influence of transition metal oxides on the kinetics of Li2O2 oxidation in Li-O2 batteries: high activity of chromium oxides.

    PubMed

    Yao, Koffi P C; Lu, Yi-Chun; Amanchukwu, Chibueze V; Kwabi, David G; Risch, Marcel; Zhou, Jigang; Grimaud, Alexis; Hammond, Paula T; Bardé, Fanny; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2014-02-14

    Reducing the energy loss associated with Li2O2 electrochemical oxidation is paramount to the development of efficient rechargeable lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) batteries for practical use. The influence of a series of perovskites with different eg filling on the kinetics of Li2O2 oxidation was examined using Li2O2-prefilled electrodes. While LaCrO3 is inactive for oxygen evolution upon water oxidation in alkaline solution, it was found to provide the highest specific current towards Li2O2 oxidation among all the perovskites examined. Further exploration of Cr-based catalysts showed that Cr nanoparticles (Cr NP) with an average particle size of 40 nm, having oxidized surfaces, had comparable surface area activities to LaCrO3 but much greater mass activities. Unlike Pt/C and Ru/C that promote electrolyte oxidation in addition to Li2O2 oxidation, no evidence of enhanced electrolyte oxidation was found for Cr NP relative to Vulcan carbon. X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the O K and Cr L edge revealed a redox process of Cr(3+) ↔ Cr(6+) on the surface of Cr NP upon Li2O2 oxidation, which might be responsible for the enhanced oxidation kinetics of Li2O2 and the reduced charging voltages of Li-O2 batteries. PMID:24352578

  7. Iron oxidation kinetics for H-2 and CO production via chemical looping

    SciTech Connect

    Stehle, RC; Bobek, MM; Hahn, DW

    2015-01-30

    Solar driven production of fuels by means of an intermediate reactive metal for species splitting has provided a practical and potentially efficient pathway for disassociating molecules at significantly lower thermal energies. The fuels of interest are of or derive from the separation of oxygen from H2O and CO2 to form hydrogen and carbon monoxide, respectively. The following study focuses on iron oxidation through water and CO2 splitting to explore the fundamental reaction kinetics and kinetic rates that are relevant to these processes. In order to properly characterize the reactive metal potential and to optimize a scaled-up solar reactor system, a monolith-based laboratory reactor was implemented to investigate reaction temperatures over a range from 990 to 1400 K. The presence of a single, solid monolith as a reacting surface allowed for a limitation in mass transport effects in order to monitor kinetically driven reaction steps. The formation of oxide layers on the iron monoliths followed Cabrera-Mott models for oxidation of metals with kinetic rates being measured using real-time mass spectrometry to calculate kinetic constants and estimate oxide layer thicknesses. Activation energies of 47.3 kJ/mol and 32.8 kJ/mol were found for water-splitting and CO2 splitting, respectively, and the conclusions of the independent oxidation reactions where applied to experimental results for syngas (H-2-CO) production to explore ideal process characteristics. Copyright (C) 2014, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Kinetic analysis for ammonia decomposition in supercritical water oxidation of sewage sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, Motonobu; Shiramizu, Daisuke; Kodama, Akio; Hirose, Tsutomu

    1999-11-01

    Supercritical water oxidation was applied to the destruction of municipal excess sewage sludge. The reaction was carried out in a batch reactor with hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant in the temperature range of 723--823 K. Ammonia and acetic acid are found to be refractory intermediates in supercritical water oxidation of organic wastes. Ammonia concentration produced during the reaction was measured as a function of reaction time. The dynamic data were analyzed by a first-order kinetics. The reaction rate constant coincides with those reported in the literature.

  9. Ruthenium(III) catalyzed oxidation of sugar alcohols by dichloroisocyanuric acid—A kinetic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshman Kumar, Y.; Venkata Nadh, R.; Radhakrishnamurti, P. S.

    2016-02-01

    Kinetics of ruthenium(III) catalyzed oxidation of biologically important sugar alcohols (myo-inositol, D-sorbitol, and D-mannitol) by dichloroisocyanuric acid was carried out in aqueous acetic acid—perchloric medium. The reactions were found to be first order in case of oxidant and ruthenium(III). Zero order was observed with the concentrations of sorbitol and mannitol whereas, a positive fractional order was found in the case of inositol concentration. An inverse fractional order was observed with perchloric acid in oxidation of three substrates. Arrhenius parameters were calculated and a plausible mechanism was proposed.

  10. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Ciprofloxacin Oxidation on Hematite Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Martin, Sébastien; Shchukarev, Andrey; Hanna, Khalil; Boily, Jean-François

    2015-10-20

    Adsorption of antibiotics at mineral surfaces has been extensively studied over the past 20 years, yet much remains to be learned on their interfacial properties and transformation mechanisms. In this study, interactions of Ciprofloxacin (CIP), a fluoroquinolone antibiotic with two sets of synthetic nanosized hematite particles, with relatively smooth (H10, 10-20 nm in diameter) and roughened (H80, 80-90 nm in diameter) surfaces, were studied by means of liquid chromatography (LC), mass spectrometry (MS), and spectroscopy (vibration and X-ray photoelectron). Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy provides evidence for inner-sphere bidentate complex formation of CIP at hematite surfaces in 0.01 M NaCl, irrespective of pH and particle size. ATR-FTIR spectroscopy also revealed that the sorbed mother CIP molecule decayed to other surface species over a period of at least 65 h. This was supported by the detection of three daughter products in the aqueous phase by LC/MS. The appearance of NH3(+) groups during the course of these experiments, revealed by cryogenic XPS, provides further evidence that CIP oxidation proceeds through an opening of piperazine ring via N-dealkylation. Additional in vacuo FTIR experiments under temperature-programmed desorption also showed that oxidation of sorbed byproducts were effectively degraded beyond 450 °C, a result denoting considerably strong (inter)molecular bonds of both mother and daughter products. This work also showed that rougher, possibly multidomainic particles (H80) generated slower rates of CIP decomposition but occurring through more complex schemes than at smoother particle surfaces (H10). This work thus uncovered key aspects of the binding of an important antibiotic at iron oxide surfaces, and therefore provided additional constraints to our growing understanding of the fate of emerging contaminants in the environment. PMID:26419340

  11. Influence of hydrogen oxidation kinetics on hydrogen environment embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, R. J.; Kendig, M. W.; Meisels, A. P.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented from experiments performed to determine the roles of hydrogen absorption and hydrogen electron transfer on the susceptibility of Fe- and Ni-base alloys to ambient-temperature hydroen embrittlement. An apparent independence is noted between hydrogen environment embrittlement and internal hydrogen embrittlement. The experiments were performed on Inconel 718, Incoloy 903, and A286. The electrochemical results obtained indicate that Inconel 718 either adsorbs hydrogen more rapidly and/or the electrochemical oxidation of the adsorbed hydrogen occurred more rapidly than in the other two materials.

  12. Kinetics of Chronic Oxidation of NBG-17 Nuclear Graphite by Water Vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; Burchell, Timothy D; Mee, Robert

    2015-05-01

    This report presents the results of kinetic measurements during accelerated oxidation tests of NBG-17 nuclear graphite by low concentration of water vapor and hydrogen in ultra-high purity helium. The objective is to determine the parameters in the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) equation describing the oxidation kinetics of nuclear graphite in the helium coolant of high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR). Although the helium coolant chemistry is strictly controlled during normal operating conditions, trace amounts of moisture (predictably < 0.2 ppm) cannot be avoided. Prolonged exposure of graphite components to water vapor at high temperature will cause very slow (chronic) oxidation over the lifetime of graphite components. This behavior must be understood and predicted for the design and safe operation of gas-cooled nuclear reactors. The results reported here show that, in general, oxidation by water of graphite NBG-17 obeys the L-H mechanism, previously documented for other graphite grades. However, the characteristic kinetic parameters that best describe oxidation rates measured for graphite NBG-17 are different than those reported previously for grades H-451 (General Atomics, 1978) and PCEA (ORNL, 2013). In some specific conditions, certain deviations from the generally accepted L-H model were observed for graphite NBG-17. This graphite is manufactured in Germany by SGL Carbon Group and is a possible candidate for the fuel elements and reflector blocks of HTGR.

  13. Dynamic Kinetic Resolution Enabled by Intramolecular Benzoin Reaction: Synthetic Applications and Mechanistic Insights.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoxiang; Yang, Shuang; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Lin, Qiqiao; Das, Deb K; Liu, Jian; Fang, Xinqiang

    2016-06-29

    The highly enantio-, diastereo-, and regioselective dynamic kinetic resolution of β-ketoesters and 1,3-diketones was achieved via a chiral N-heterocyclic carbene catalyzed intramolecular cross-benzoin reaction. A variety of tetralone derivatives bearing two contiguous stereocenters and multiple functionalities were liberated in moderate to excellent yields and with high levels of stereoselectivity (>95% ee and >20:1 dr in most cases). In addition, the excellent regioselectivity control for aryl/alkyl 1,3-diketones, and the superior electronic differentiation of 1,3-diarylketones were highlighted. Moreover, a set of new mechanistic rationale that differs with the currently widely accepted understanding of intramolecular benzoin reactions was established to demonstrate the superior preference of benzoin over aldol transformation: (1) A coexistence of competitive aldol and benzoin reactions was detected, but a retro-aldol-irreversible benzoin process performs a vital role in the generation of predominant benzoin products. (2) The most essential role of an N-electron-withdrawing substituent in triazolium catalysts was revealed to be accelerating the rate of the benzoin transformation, rather than suppressing the aldol process through reducing the inherent basicity of the catalyst. PMID:27270409

  14. Dynamic kinetic resolution of secondary alcohols combining enzyme-catalyzed transesterification and zeolite-catalyzed racemization.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yongzhong; Fow, Kam-Loon; Chuah, Gaik-Khuan; Jaenicke, Stephan

    2007-01-01

    Hydrophobic zeolite beta containing low concentrations of Zr or Al was found to be a good catalyst for the racemization of 1-phenylethanol. The formation of styrene as a side product could be minimized by reducing the metal concentration in the zeolite beta. Combined with an immobilized lipase from Candida antarctica, the dynamic kinetic resolution of 1-phenylethanol to the (R)-phenylethylester can be achieved with high yield and selectivity. The reaction was best conducted in toluene as solvent at 60 degrees C, with higher temperatures leading to a loss in the enantioselectivity of the formed ester. By using high-molecular-weight acyl-transfer reagents, such as vinyl butyrate or vinyl octanoate, a high enantiomeric excess of the product esters of 92 and 98 %, respectively, could be achieved. This is attributed to a steric effect: the bulky ester is less able to enter the pore space of the zeolite catalyst where the active sites for racemization are localized. Close to 100 % conversion of the alcohol was achieved within 2 h. If the more common acyl donor, isopropenyl acetate, was used, the enantiomeric excess (ee) of the formed ester was only 67 %, and the reaction was considerably slower. PMID:17004277

  15. Chemoenzymatic Dynamic Kinetic Resolution: A Powerful Tool for the Preparation of Enantiomerically Pure Alcohols and Amines

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chemoenzymatic dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) constitutes a convenient and efficient method to access enantiomerically pure alcohol and amine derivatives. This Perspective highlights the work carried out within this field during the past two decades and pinpoints important avenues for future research. First, the Perspective will summarize the more developed area of alcohol DKR, by delineating the way from the earliest proof-of-concept protocols to the current state-of-the-art systems that allows for the highly efficient and selective preparation of a wide range of enantiomerically pure alcohol derivatives. Thereafter, the Perspective will focus on the more challenging DKR of amines, by presenting the currently available homogeneous and heterogeneous methods and their respective limitations. In these two parts, significant attention will be dedicated to the design of efficient racemization methods as an important means of developing milder DKR protocols. In the final part of the Perspective, a brief overview of the research that has been devoted toward improving enzymes as biocatalysts is presented. PMID:25730714

  16. Chemoenzymatic dynamic kinetic resolution: a powerful tool for the preparation of enantiomerically pure alcohols and amines.

    PubMed

    Verho, Oscar; Bäckvall, Jan-E

    2015-04-01

    Chemoenzymatic dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) constitutes a convenient and efficient method to access enantiomerically pure alcohol and amine derivatives. This Perspective highlights the work carried out within this field during the past two decades and pinpoints important avenues for future research. First, the Perspective will summarize the more developed area of alcohol DKR, by delineating the way from the earliest proof-of-concept protocols to the current state-of-the-art systems that allows for the highly efficient and selective preparation of a wide range of enantiomerically pure alcohol derivatives. Thereafter, the Perspective will focus on the more challenging DKR of amines, by presenting the currently available homogeneous and heterogeneous methods and their respective limitations. In these two parts, significant attention will be dedicated to the design of efficient racemization methods as an important means of developing milder DKR protocols. In the final part of the Perspective, a brief overview of the research that has been devoted toward improving enzymes as biocatalysts is presented. PMID:25730714

  17. Oxidation kinetics of coated silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (SiC/SiC)

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, D.S.

    1994-12-31

    Silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (SiC/SiC) was exposed for 100 hours to dry, flowing oxygen. Oxidation kinetics were determined via thermogravimetric analysis at 981{degrees}, 1204{degrees} and 1316{degrees}C (1800{degrees}, 2200{degrees} and 2400{degrees}F). The effectiveness of three external coating systems applied for oxidation protection is discussed. In all cases, weight gains were observed, and the pyrolytic carbon interface layer remained intact. A CVD SiC external coating is the most promising due to low oxidation kinetics resulting from solid silica formation. A borosilicate glass was observed on the surface of two of the materials that have boron-containing coatings.

  18. Detailed kinetic modeling study of n-pentanol oxidation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Heufer, K. Alexander; Sarathy, S. Mani; Curran, Henry J.; Davis, Alexander C.; Westbrook, Charles K.; Pitz, William J.

    2012-09-28

    To help overcome the world’s dependence upon fossil fuels, suitable biofuels are promising alternatives that can be used in the transportation sector. Recent research on internal combustion engines shows that short alcoholic fuels (e.g., ethanol or n-butanol) have reduced pollutant emissions and increased knock resistance compared to fossil fuels. Although higher molecular weight alcohols (e.g., n-pentanol and n-hexanol) exhibit higher reactivity that lowers their knock resistance, they are suitable for diesel engines or advanced engine concepts, such as homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI), where higher reactivity at lower temperatures is necessary for engine operation. The present study presents a detailedmore » kinetic model for n-pentanol based on modeling rules previously presented for n-butanol. This approach was initially validated using quantum chemistry calculations to verify the most stable n-pentanol conformation and to obtain C–H and C–C bond dissociation energies. In addition, the proposed model has been validated against ignition delay time data, speciation data from a jet-stirred reactor, and laminar flame velocity measurements. Overall, the model shows good agreement with the experiments and permits a detailed discussion of the differences between alcohols and alkanes.« less

  19. Kinetics of the reaction of nitric oxide with hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, W. L.; Hanson, R. K.; Kruger, C. H.

    1975-01-01

    The reaction of nitric oxide with hydrogen has been studied in the temperature range 2400-4500 K using a shock-tube technique. Mixtures of NO and H2 diluted in argon or krypton were heated by incident shock waves, and the infrared emission from the fundamental vibration-rotation band of NO at 5.3 microns was used to monitor the time-varying NO concentration. The decomposition of nitric oxide behind the shock was found to be modeled well by a fifteen-reaction system. A principal result of the study was the determination of the rate constant k1 for the reaction H + NO yields N + OH, which may be the rate-limiting step for NO removal in some combustion systems. Experimental values of k1 were obtained for each test through comparisons of measured and numerically predicted NO profiles. The data are fit closely by the expression k1 = 1.34 times 10 to the fourteenth power exp(-49 200/RT) cu cm/mole-sec. These data appear to be the first available for this rate constant.

  20. OH- Initiated Heterogeneous Oxidation of Saturated Organic Aerosols in the Presence of SO2: Uptake Kinetics and Product Identification.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards-Henderson, N. K.; Ward, M.; Goldstein, A. H.; Wilson, K. R.

    2014-12-01

    Gas-phase oxidation mechanisms for organic gases are often used as a starting point to understand heterogeneous oxidation. The reaction of a simple alkane hydrocarbon by OH proceeds through hydrogen abstraction and under ambient conditions leads to peroxy radical (RO2) formation. RO2 can further react to form: (1) smaller molecular weight products (i.e. fragmentation) via alkoxy radical formation and dissociation and/or (2) higher molecular weight products with oxygenated functional groups (i.e. functionalization). The ability to perturb these two pathways (functionalization vs. fragmentation) is critical for understanding the detailed reaction mechanism that control atmospheric aging chemistry of particles. At high temperatures the presence of sulfur dioxide (SO2) during organic-OH gas-phase oxidation enhances the fragmentation pathway leading to increased alkoxy formation. It is unknown if a comparative affect occurs at room temperature during a heterogeneous reaction. We used the heterogeneous reaction of OH radicals with sub-micron squalane particles in the presence and absence of SO2 as a model system to explore changes in individual mechanistic pathways. Detailed kinetic measurements were made in a flow tube reactor using a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization aerosol mass spectrometer and oxidation products are identified from samples collected on quartz filters using thermal desorption two-dimensional chromatographic separation and ionization by either VUV (10.5 eV) or electron impact (70 eV), with detection by high resolution time of flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-VUV/EI-HRTOFMS). In the presence of SO2 the yields of alcohols were enhanced compared to without SO2, suggesting that the alkoxy formation pathway was dominant. The results from this work will provide an experimentally-confirmed kinetic framework that could be used to model atmospheric aging mechanisms.

  1. Study of the oxidation of W(110) by full-solid-angle photoelectron diffraction with chemical state and time resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Ynzunza, R. X.; Palomares, F. J.; Tober, E. D.; Wang, Z.; Morais, J.; Denecke, R.; Daimon, H.; Chen, Y.; Hussain, Z; Liesengang, J.; Van Hove, M. A.; Fadley, C. S.

    1997-04-01

    The brightness of third-generation synchrotron radiation from beamline 9.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source has been combined with the high-intensities and energy resolutions possible with its advanced photoelectron spectrometer/diffractometer experimental station in order to study the time dependence of the oxidation of the W(110) surface. This has been done via chemical-state-resolved core-level photoelectron spectroscopy and diffraction. This system has been studied previously by other methods such as LEED and STM, but several questions remain as to the basic kinetics of oxidation and the precise adsorption structures involved. By studying the decay and growth with time of various peaks in the W 4f{sub 7/2} photoelectron spectra, it should be possible to draw quantitative conclusions concerning the reaction kinetics involved. The authors have also measured full-solid-angle photoelectron diffraction patterns for the two oxygen-induced W states, and these should permit fully defining the different structures involved in this oxidation process.

  2. Impact of Biodiesel on the Oxidation Kinetics and Morphology of Diesel Particulate

    SciTech Connect

    Strzelec, Andrea; Toops, Todd J; Daw, C Stuart

    2011-01-01

    We compare the oxidation characteristics of four different diesel particulates generated with a modern light-duty engine. The four particulates represent engine fueling with conventional ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD), biodiesel, and two intermediate blends of these fuels. The comparisons discussed here are based on complementary measurements implemented in a laboratory micro-reactor, including temperature programmed desorption and oxidation, pulsed isothermal oxidation, and BET surface area. From these measurements we have derived models that are consistent with the observed oxidation reactivity differences. When accessible surface area effects are properly accounted for, the oxidation kinetics of the fixed carbon components were found to consistently exhibit an Arrhenius activation energy of 113 6 kJ/mol. Release of volatile carbon from the as-collected particulate appears to follow a temperaturedependent rate law.

  3. The impact of the initial state on the kinetics of oxidation ion- modified fuel cladding alloy E110

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalin, B. A.; Volkov, N. V.; Valikov, R. A.; Yashin, A. S.; Yakutkina, T. V.

    2016-04-01

    The paper examines the impact of the initial state (the presence of impurities, surface preparation), and surface alloying on the kinetics of the oxidation of fuel cladding alloy E110. The studies concluded that the use of ionic polishing instead of traditional chemical polishing helps to reduce the rate of oxidation of zirconium alloys. Also studied the effect of alloying elements introduced in the surface layers of claddings by ion mixing on the kinetics of the oxidation of the alloy E110.

  4. Iron-Mediated Oxidation of Methoxyhydroquinone under Dark Conditions: Kinetic and Mechanistic Insights.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiu; Davis, James A; Nico, Peter S

    2016-02-16

    Despite the biogeochemical significance of the interactions between natural organic matter (NOM) and iron species, considerable uncertainty still remains as to the exact processes contributing to the rates and extents of complexation and redox reactions between these important and complex environmental components. Investigations on the reactivity of low-molecular-weight quinones, which are believed to be key redox active compounds within NOM, toward iron species, could provide considerable insight into the kinetics and mechanisms of reactions involving NOM and iron. In this study, the oxidation of 2-methoxyhydroquinone (MH2Q) by ferric iron (Fe(III)) under dark conditions in the absence and presence of oxygen was investigated within a pH range of 4-6. Although Fe(III) was capable of stoichiometrically oxidizing MH2Q under anaerobic conditions, catalytic oxidation of MH2Q was observed in the presence of O2 due to further cycling between oxygen, semiquinone radicals, and iron species. A detailed kinetic model was developed to describe the predominant mechanisms, which indicated that both the undissociated and monodissociated anions of MH2Q were kinetically active species toward Fe(III) reduction, with the monodissociated anion being the key species accounting for the pH dependence of the oxidation. The generated radical intermediates, namely semiquinone and superoxide, are of great importance in reaction-chain propagation. The kinetic model may provide critical insight into the underlying mechanisms of the thermodynamic and kinetic characteristics of metal-organic interactions and assist in understanding and predicting the factors controlling iron and organic matter transformation and bioavailability in aquatic systems. PMID:26789138

  5. Chemical kinetic mechanism for the oxidation of paraffinic hydrocarbons needed for primary reference fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J.

    1993-03-01

    A detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism is described which simulates the oxidation of the primary reference fuels n-heptane and iso-octane. The high temperature subset of these mechanisms is identified, and the extensions to deal with low temperature conditions are also explained. The algorithms used to assign reaction rates to elementary steps in the reaction mechanism are described, and the means of identifying the different chemical species and the relevant reactions are outlined. Finally, we show how interested kinetic modeling researchers can obtain copies of this reaction mechanism.

  6. Influence of recrystallization on phase separation kinetics of oxide dispersion strengthened Fe Cr Al alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Capdevila, C.; Miller, Michael K; Pimentel, G.; Chao, J.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of different starting microstructures on the kinetics of Fe-rich ({alpha}) and Cr-rich ({alpha}') phase separation during aging of Fe-Cr-Al oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys has been analyzed with a combination of atom probe tomography and thermoelectric power measurements. The results revealed that the high recrystallization temperature necessary to produce a coarse grained microstructure in Fe-base ODS alloys affects the randomness of Cr-atom distributions and defect density, which consequently affect the phase separation kinetics at low annealing temperatures.

  7. Effect of a 1-hour single bout of moderate-intensity exercise on fat oxidation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Chenevière, Xavier; Borrani, Fabio; Ebenegger, Vincent; Gojanovic, Boris; Malatesta, Davide

    2009-12-01

    The present study aimed to examine the effects of a prior 1-hour continuous exercise bout (CONT) at an intensity (Fat(max)) that elicits the maximal fat oxidation (MFO) on the fat oxidation kinetics during a subsequent submaximal incremental test (IncrC). Twenty moderately trained subjects (9 men and 11 women) performed a graded test on a treadmill (Incr), with 3-minute stages and 1-km.h(-1) increments. Fat oxidation was measured using indirect calorimetry and plotted as a function of exercise intensity. A mathematical model (SIN) including 3 independent variables (dilatation, symmetry, and translation) was used to characterize the shape of fat oxidation kinetics and to determine Fat(max) and MFO. On a second visit, the subjects performed CONT at Fat(max) followed by IncrC. After CONT performed at 57% +/- 3% (means +/- SE) maximal oxygen uptake (Vo(2max)), the respiratory exchange ratio during IncrC was lower at every stage compared with Incr (P < .05). Fat(max) (56.4% +/- 2.3% vs 51.5% +/- 2.4% Vo(2max), P = .013), MFO (0.50 +/- 0.03 vs 0.40 +/- 0.03 g.min(-1), P < .001), and fat oxidation rates from 35% to 70% Vo(2max) (P < .05) were significantly greater during IncrC compared with Incr. However, dilatation and translation were not significantly different (P > .05), whereas symmetry tended to be greater in IncrC (P = .096). This study showed that the prior 1-hour continuous moderate-intensity exercise bout increased Fat(max), MFO, and fat oxidation rates over a wide range of intensities during the postexercise incremental test. Moreover, the shape of the postexercise fat oxidation kinetics tended to have a rightward asymmetry. PMID:19632694

  8. Kinetics of low-temperature CO oxidation on Au(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuening, Theodore; Walker, Joshua; Adams, Heather; Furlong, Octavio; Tysoe, Wilfred T.

    2016-06-01

    The oxidation of carbon monoxide on oxygen-modified Au(111) surfaces is studied using a combination of reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). TPD reveals that CO desorbs in two states with the low-temperature state have a peak temperature between ~ 130 and 150 K, and the higher-temperature state having a peak temperature that varies from ~ 175 to ~ 220 K depending on the initial oxygen and CO coverages. Infrared spectroscopy indicates that the low-temperature CO desorption state is predominantly associated with CO adsorbed on Auδ + sites, while the higher-temperature states are due to CO on Au0 sites. No additional vibrational features are detected indicating that CO reacts directly with adsorbed atomic oxygen on gold to form CO2. Estimates of the activation energy for CO2 formation suggest that they are in the same range and found for supported gold catalysts at reaction temperature below ~ 300 K.

  9. Denitrifying kinetics and nitrous oxide emission under different copper concentrations.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guangxue; Zhai, Xiaofeng; Jiang, Chengai; Guan, Yuntao

    2014-01-01

    Denitrifying activities and nitrous oxide (N2O) emission during denitrification can be affected by copper concentrations. Different denitrifiers were acclimated in sequencing batch reactors with acetate or methanol as the electron donor and nitrate as the electron acceptor. The effect of copper concentrations on the denitrifying activity and N2O emission for the acclimated denitrifiers was examined in batch experiments. Denitrifying activities of the acclimated denitrifiers declined with increasing copper concentrations, and the copper concentration exhibited a higher effect on denitrifiers acclimated with acetate than those acclimated with methanol. Compared with the control without the addition of copper, at the copper concentration of 1 mg/L, the acetate utilization rate reduced by 89% for acetate-acclimated denitrifiers, while the methanol utilization rate only reduced by 15% for methanol-acclimated denitrifiers. Copper also had different effects on N2O emission during denitrification carried out by various types of denitrifiers. For the acetate-acclimated denitrifiers, N2O emission initially increased and then decreased with increasing copper concentrations, while for the methanol-acclimated denitrifiers, N2O emission decreased with increasing copper concentrations. PMID:24569272

  10. Estimation of Sintering Kinetics of Oxidized Magnetite Pellet Using Optical Dilatometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandeep Kumar, T. K.; Viswanathan, Neelakantan Nurni; Ahmed, Hesham M.; Andersson, Charlotte; Björkman, Bo

    2015-04-01

    The quality of magnetite pellet is primarily determined by the physico-chemical changes the pellet undergoes as it makes excursion through the gaseous and thermal environment in the induration furnace. Among these physico-chemical processes, the oxidation of magnetite phase and the sintering of oxidized magnetite (hematite) and magnetite (non-oxidized) phases are vital. Rates of these processes not only depend on the thermal and gaseous environment the pellet gets exposed in the induration reactor but also interdependent on each other. Therefore, a systematic study should involve understanding these processes in isolation to the extent possible and quantify them seeking the physics. With this motivation, the present paper focusses on investigating the sintering kinetics of oxidized magnetite pellet. For the current investigation, sintering experiments were carried out on pellets containing more than 95 pct magnetite concentrate from LKAB's mine, dried and oxidized to completion at sufficiently low temperature to avoid sintering. The sintering behavior of this oxidized pellet is quantified through shrinkage captured by Optical Dilatometer. The extent of sintering characterized by sintering ratio found to follow a power law with time i.e., Kt n . The rate constant K for sintering was determined for different temperatures from isothermal experiments. The rate constant, K, varies with temperature as and the activation energy ( Q) and reaction rate constant ( K') are estimated. Further, the sintering kinetic equation was also extended to a non-isothermal environment and validated using laboratory experiments.

  11. Kinetics, Mechanism, and Secondary Organic Aerosol Yield of Aqueous Phase Photo-oxidation of α-Pinene Oxidation Products.

    PubMed

    Aljawhary, Dana; Zhao, Ran; Lee, Alex K Y; Wang, Chen; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2016-03-10

    Formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) involves atmospheric oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), the majority of which are emitted from biogenic sources. Oxidation can occur not only in the gas-phase but also in atmospheric aqueous phases such as cloudwater and aerosol liquid water. This study explores for the first time the aqueous-phase OH oxidation chemistry of oxidation products of α-pinene, a major biogenic VOC species emitted to the atmosphere. The kinetics, reaction mechanisms, and formation of SOA compounds in the aqueous phase of two model compounds, cis-pinonic acid (PIN) and tricarballylic acid (TCA), were investigated in the laboratory; TCA was used as a surrogate for 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid (MBTCA), a known α-pinene oxidation product. Aerosol time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (Aerosol-ToF-CIMS) was used to follow the kinetics and reaction mechanisms at the molecular level. Room-temperature second-order rate constants of PIN and TCA were determined to be 3.3 (±0.5) × 10(9) and 3.1 (±0.2) × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1), respectively, from which were estimated their condensed-phase atmospheric lifetimes. Aerosol-ToF-CIMS detected a large number of products leading to detailed reaction mechanisms for PIN and MBTCA. By monitoring the particle size distribution after drying, the amount of SOA material remaining in the particle phase was determined. An aqueous SOA yield of 40 to 60% was determined for PIN OH oxidation. Although recent laboratory studies have focused primarily on aqueous-phase processing of isoprene-related compounds, we demonstrate that aqueous formation of SOA materials also occurs from monoterpene oxidation products, thus representing an additional source of biogenically driven aerosol formation. PMID:26299576

  12. Phototrophic sulfide oxidation: environmental insights and a method for kinetic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Thomas E.; Luther, George W.; Findlay, Alyssa J.; MacDonald, Daniel J.; Hess, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we presented data that indicated microbial sulfide oxidation would out-compete strictly chemical, abiotic sulfide oxidation reactions under nearly all conditions relevant to extant ecosystems (Luther et al., 2011). In particular, we showed how anaerobic microbial sulfide oxidation rates were several orders of magnitude higher than even metal catalyzed aerobic sulfide oxidation processes. The fact that biotic anaerobic sulfide oxidation is kinetically superior to abiotic reactions implies that nearly all anaerobic and sulfidic environments should host microbial populations that oxidize sulfide at appreciable rates. This was likely an important biogeochemical process during long stretches of euxinia in the oceans suggested by the geologic record. In particular, phototrophic sulfide oxidation allows the utilization of carbon dioxide as the electron acceptor suggesting that this process should be particularly widespread rather than relying on the presence of other chemical oxidants. Using the Chesapeake Bay as an example, we argue that phototrophic sulfide oxidation may be more important in many environments than is currently appreciated. Finally, we present methodological considerations to assist other groups that wish to study this process. PMID:24391629

  13. Insights into the Mechanism and Kinetics of Thermo-Oxidative Degradation of HFPE High Performance Polymer.

    PubMed

    Kunnikuruvan, Sooraj; Parandekar, Priya V; Prakash, Om; Tsotsis, Thomas K; Nair, Nisanth N

    2016-06-01

    The growing requisite for materials having high thermo-oxidative stability makes the design and development of high performance materials an active area of research. Fluorination of the polymer backbone is a widely applied strategy to improve various properties of the polymer, most importantly the thermo-oxidative stability. Many of these fluorinated polymers are known to have thermo-oxidative stability up to 700 K. However, for space and aerospace applications, it is important to improve its thermo-oxidative stability beyond 700 K. Molecular-level details of the thermo-oxidative degradation of such polymers can provide vital information to improve the polymer. In this spirit, we have applied quantum mechanical and microkinetic analysis to scrutinize the mechanism and kinetics of the thermo-oxidative degradation of a fluorinated polymer with phenylethenyl end-cap, HFPE. This study gives an insight into the thermo-oxidative degradation of HFPE and explains most of the experimental observations on the thermo-oxidative degradation of this polymer. Thermolysis of C-CF3 bond in the dianhydride component (6FDA) of HFPE is found to be the rate-determining step of the degradation. Reaction pathways that are responsible for the experimentally observed weight loss of the polymer is also scrutinized. On the basis of these results, we propose a modification of HFPE polymer to improve its thermo-oxidative stability. PMID:27187246

  14. High resolution mapping of oxygen reduction reaction kinetics at polycrystalline platinum electrodes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chang-Hui; Meadows, Katherine E; Cuharuc, Anatolii; Lai, Stanley C S; Unwin, Patrick R

    2014-09-14

    The scanning droplet-based technique, scanning electrochemical cell microscopy (SECCM), combined with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), is demonstrated as a powerful approach for visualizing surface structure effects on the rate of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at polycrystalline platinum electrodes. Elucidating the effect of electrode structure on the ORR is of major interest in connection to electrocatalysis for energy-related applications. The attributes of the approach herein stem from: (i) the ease with which the polycrystalline substrate electrode can be prepared; (ii) the wide range of surface character open to study; (iii) the possibility of mapping reactivity within a particular facet (or grain), in a pseudo-single-crystal approach, and acquiring a high volume of data as a consequence; (iv) the ready ability to measure the activity at grain boundaries; and (v) an experimental arrangement (SECCM) that mimics the three-phase boundary in low temperature fuel cells. The kinetics of the ORR was analyzed and a finite element method model was developed to explore the effect of the three-phase boundary, in particular to examine pH variations in the droplet and the differential transport rates of the reactants and products. We have found a significant variation of activity across the platinum substrate, inherently linked to the crystallographic orientation, but do not detect any enhanced activity at grain boundaries. Grains with (111) and (100) contributions exhibit considerably higher activity than those with (110) and (100) contributions. These results, which can be explained by reference to previous single-crystal measurements, enhance our understanding of ORR structure-activity relationships on complex high-index platinum surfaces, and further demonstrate the power of high resolution flux imaging techniques to visualize and understand complex electrocatalyst materials. PMID:25072300

  15. Kinetics of the Oxidation of Bismuthinite in Oxygen-Nitrogen Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, Rafael; Villa, Ricardo; Ruiz, Maria C.; Reddy, Ramana G.

    2011-10-01

    Bismuth is present in copper concentrates mainly as the mineral bismuthinite (Bi2S3). In some cases of smelting of concentrates, a substantial amount of bismuth can lead to contaminated copper cathodes. Thus, understanding the behavior of Bi2S3 at high temperatures is crucial to assessing the potential of bismuth removal in the pyrometallurgical process. Therefore, the oxidation of bismuthinite in mixtures of oxygen-nitrogen atmospheres was investigated using a thermogravimetric analysis technique. The results indicate that the oxidation process occurs through the following consecutive reactions: {{First stage: }}{{Bi}}_{ 2} {{S}}_{ 3} ( {{s,l}} ) + 3{{O}}2 ( {{g}} ) = 2{{Bi}}( {{l}} ) + 3{{SO}}_{ 2} ( {{g}} ) {{Second stage: }}2{{Bi}}( {{l}} ) + 3/2{{O}}2 ( {{g}} ) = {{Bi}}2 {{O}}3 ( {{s,l}} ) The kinetics of the oxidation of bismuthinite (first stage) was studied, and the model ln(1 - X) = -kapp t describes the kinetics of this reaction well. The bismuthinite oxidation dependence on oxygen partial pressure was of 0.9 order, and the intrinsic kinetic constants were obtained in the temperature range of 873 K to 1273 K (600 °C to 1000 °C), which were used to determine the activation energy of 91 kJ/mol. The results indicate that the oxidation of bismuthinite is a process controlled by chemical reactions. From this study, it can be concluded that the removal of bismuth from the Bi2S3-containing concentrates through a mechanism involving gaseous bismuth compounds is not feasible during an oxidizing roasting and/or smelting of concentrates containing Bi2S3.

  16. Dynamic Kinetic Resolution of Biaryl Lactones via a Chiral Bifunctional Amine Thiourea-Catalyzed Highly Atropo-enantioselective Transesterification.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chenguang; Huang, He; Li, Xiangmin; Zhang, Yueteng; Wang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    A solution to the unmet synthetic challenge of achieving highly atropo-enantioselective transesterification of Bringmann's lactones has been realized, employing a chiral bifunctional amine thiourea as promoter. The synergistic activation of the lactones and alcohols/phenols by the respective thiourea and amine groups is crucial for achieving the highly enantioselective, high-yielding dynamic kinetic resolution process. This protocol gives highly optically pure, axially chiral biaryl compounds with a broad substrate scope under mild reaction conditions. PMID:27218264

  17. Kinetic Resolution of Racemic and Branched Monosubstituted Allylic Acetates by a Ruthenium-Catalyzed Regioselective Allylic Etherification.

    PubMed

    Shinozawa, Toru; Terasaki, Shou; Mizuno, Shota; Kawatsura, Motoi

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrated the kinetic resolution of racemic and branched monosubstituted allylic acetates by a ruthenium-catalyzed regioselective allylic etherification. The reaction was effectively catalyzed by the chiral ruthenium catalyst, which was generated by [RuCl2(p-cymene)]2 and (S,S)-iPr-pybox and a catalytic amount of TFA, and both the allylic etherification product and recovered allylic acetate were obtained as an enantiomerically enriched form with up to a 103 s value. PMID:27276556

  18. Detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for the oxidation of biodiesel fuels blend surrogate

    SciTech Connect

    Herbinet, Olivier; Pitz, William J.; Westbrook, Charles K.

    2010-05-15

    Detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms were developed and used to study the oxidation of two large unsaturated esters: methyl-5-decenoate and methyl-9-decenoate. These models were built from a previous methyl decanoate mechanism and were compared with rapeseed oil methyl esters oxidation experiments in a jet-stirred reactor. A comparative study of the reactivity of these three oxygenated compounds was performed and the differences in the distribution of the products of the reaction were highlighted showing the influence of the presence and the position of a double bond in the chain. Blend surrogates, containing methyl decanoate, methyl-5-decenoate, methyl-9-decenoate and n-alkanes, were tested against rapeseed oil methyl esters and methyl palmitate/n-decane experiments. These surrogate models are realistic kinetic tools allowing the study of the combustion of biodiesel fuels in diesel and homogeneous charge compression ignition engines. (author)

  19. Detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for the oxidation of biodiesel fuels blend surrogate.

    SciTech Connect

    Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2009-07-21

    Detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms were developed and used to study the oxidation of two large unsaturated esters: methyl-5-decenoate and methyl-9-decenoate. These models were built from a previous methyl decanoate mechanism and were compared with rapeseed oil methyl esters oxidation experiments in a jet stirred reactor. A comparative study of the reactivity of these three oxygenated compounds was performed and the differences in the distribution of the products of the reaction were highlighted showing the influence of the presence and the position of a double bond in the chain. Blend surrogates, containing methyl decanoate, methyl-5-decenoate, methyl-9-decenoate and n-alkanes, were tested against rapeseed oil methyl esters and methyl palmitate/n-decane experiments. These surrogate models are realistic kinetic tools allowing the study of the combustion of biodiesel fuels in diesel and homogeneous charge compression ignition engines.

  20. Oxidation kinetics of common Kilka (Clupeonella cultiventris caspia) oil in presence of bene oils' unsaponifiable matter.

    PubMed

    Pazhouhanmehr, Samaneh; Farhoosh, Reza; Sharif, Ali; Esmaeilzadeh Kenari, Reza

    2016-01-01

    The oxidation mechanisms and kinetics of the purified common Kilka (Clupeonella cultiventris caspia) triacylglycerols (PKO) as affected by 1-1.5% (w/w) of unsaponifiable matters of bene kernel (UKO) and hull (UHO) oils were studied and compared with that of 100 mg/kg of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and α-tocopherol in the Rancimat test at 50-70 °C. There were good correlations between the oxidative stability index (OSI) and time required to reach a 50%-increase in PV (t50). The frequency factor (A) and activation energy (Ea) were correlated well with the values of entropy and enthalpy, respectively. The values of free energy of activation (ΔG(++)) could describe the values of t50 or OSI well. Kinetic data indicated that the UKO with higher contents of tocopherols and tocotrienols, and terpenoid compounds was more effective than the UHO on the PKO stability. PMID:26213034

  1. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidative bromination of o-xylene in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Dorfman, Ya.A.; Emel'yanova, V.S.; Efremenko, I.G.; Doroshkevich, D.M.; Korolev, A.V.

    1988-07-01

    The kinetics of oxidative bromination of aromatic compounds have been studied in HNO/sub 3/-HBr-H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/-H/sub 2/O-O/sub 2/ solution. A kinetic equation which describes the results was derived for P/sub O/sub 2// > 5 /times/ 10/sup 4/ Pa. The equation parameters were determined at a temperature of 323 K. Quantum mechanical CNDO calculations were carried out in order to study the nature of the reactive intermediates involved: NO/sub 2/ NO(OH)/sup +/, N(OH)/sub 2//sup 2 +/, NO(OH)Br, and N(OH)/sub 2/Br/sup +/. A mechanism has been proposed to account for the oxidative bromination of aromatic compounds in HNO/sub 3/-H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/-HBr-O/sub 2/-H/sub 2/ solution.

  2. [Degradation kinetics of ozone oxidation on landfill leachate rejected by RO treatment].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ke; Zhou, Shao-Qi; Sha, Shuang; Yang, Mei-Mei

    2011-10-01

    This study kinetically investigated landfill leachate rejected by reverse osmosis (RO) oxidation degradation by ozonation. Initial pH, ozone dosage, temperature and initial COD had significant impact on the oxidation rate. The results demonstrated that for the removal efficiencies of COD 67.6% under the conditions of 8.0 pH, 5.02 g/h ozone dosage, 303K temperature. The empirical kinetic equation of ozonation degradation for landfill leachate under the conditions of 2.0-8.0 pH, 2.53-6.90 g/h ozone dosage, 934-4 037 mg/L initial COD, 283-323 K temperature fitted well with the experimental data(R2 0.969-0.996), with low activation energy E(a) = 1.43 x1094) J x mol(-1). PMID:22279910

  3. Oxidation rate of graphitic matrix material in the kinetic regime for VHTR air ingress accident scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jo Jo; Ghosh, Tushar K.; Loyalka, Sudarshan K.

    2014-08-01

    Data on oxidation rates of matrix-grade graphite in the kinetically-controlled temperature regime of graphite oxidation are needed for safety analysis of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors and Very High Temperature Reactors. In this work, the oxidation rate of graphitic matrix material GKrS was measured thermogravimetrically for various oxygen concentrations and with temperatures from 873 to 1873 K. A semi-empirical Arrhenius rate equation was also developed for this temperature range. The activation energy of the graphitic material is found to be about 111.5 kJ/mol. The order of reaction was found to be about 0.89. The surface of oxidized GKrS was characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy.

  4. One- and two-electron oxidation of thiols: mechanisms, kinetics and biological fates.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, Madia; Alvarez, Beatriz; Radi, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    The oxidation of biothiols participates not only in the defense against oxidative damage but also in enzymatic catalytic mechanisms and signal transduction processes. Thiols are versatile reductants that react with oxidizing species by one- and two-electron mechanisms, leading to thiyl radicals and sulfenic acids, respectively. These intermediates, depending on the conditions, participate in further reactions that converge on different stable products. Through this review, we will describe the biologically relevant species that are able to perform these oxidations and we will analyze the mechanisms and kinetics of the one- and two-electron reactions. The processes undergone by typical low-molecular-weight thiols as well as the particularities of specific thiol proteins will be described, including the molecular determinants proposed to account for the extraordinary reactivities of peroxidatic thiols. Finally, the main fates of the thiyl radical and sulfenic acid intermediates will be summarized. PMID:26329537

  5. Oxidation kinetics of model compounds of metabolic waste in supercritical water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webley, Paul A.; Holgate, Henry R.; Stevenson, David M.; Tester, Jefferson W.

    1990-01-01

    In this NASA-funded study, the oxidation kinetics of methanol and ammonia in supercritical water have been experimentally determined in an isothermal plug flow reactor. Theoretical studies have also been carried out to characterize key reaction pathways. Methanol oxidation rates were found to be proportional to the first power of methanol concentration and independent of oxygen concentration and were highly activated with an activation energy of approximately 98 kcal/mole over the temperature range 480 to 540 C at 246 bar. The oxidation of ammonia was found to be catalytic with an activation energy of 38 kcal/mole over temperatures ranging from 640 to 700 C. An elementary reaction model for methanol oxidation was applied after correction for the effect of high pressure on the rate constants. The conversion of methanol predicted by the model was in good agreement with experimental data.

  6. Concentration-dependent photodegradation kinetics and hydroxyl-radical oxidation of phenicol antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Zhang, Peng; Ge, Linke; Ren, Honglei; Yu, Chunyan; Chen, Xiaoyang; Zhao, Yuanfeng

    2014-09-01

    Thiamphenicol and florfenicol are two phenicol antibiotics widely used in aquaculture and are ubiquitous as micropollutants in surface waters. The present study investigated their photodegradation kinetics, hydroxyl-radical (OH) oxidation reactivities and products. Firstly, the photolytic kinetics of the phenicols in pure water was studied as a function of initial concentrations (C0) under UV-vis irradiation (λ>200nm). It was found that the kinetics was influenced by C0. A linear plot of the pseudo-first-order rate constant vs C0 was observed with a negative slope. Secondly, the reaction between the phenicol antibiotics and OH was examined with a competition kinetic method under simulated solar irradiation (λ>290nm), which quantified their bimolecular reaction rate constants of (2.13±0.02)×10(9)M(-1)s(-1) and (1.82±0.10)×10(9)M(-1)s(-1) for thiamphenicol and florfenicol, respectively. Then the corresponding OH oxidated half-lives in sunlit surface waters were calculated to be 90.5-106.1h. Some main intermediates were formed from the reaction, which suggested that the two phenicols underwent hydroxylation, oxygenation and dehydrogenation when OH existed. These results are of importance to assess the phenicol persistence in wastewater treatment and sunlit surface waters. PMID:24997929

  7. A Study of the Kinetics of the Electrochemical Deposition of Ce3+/Ce4+ Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valov, I.; Guergova, Desislava; Stoychev, D.

    The kinetics of cathodic electrodeposition of Ce3+ and/or Ce4+ oxides from alcoholic electrolytes on gold substrates has been studied. It was found that, depending on the oxygen content in the CeCl3-based electrolyte, Ce2O3 (in oxygen atmosphere) or CeO2 (in an inert atmosphere), respectively, were obtained. XPS studies clearly separated the two valence states of Ce ions in the oxide layers. The microstructure of the coatings was analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM).

  8. Kinetics of the oxidation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) by potassium permanganate.

    PubMed

    Damm, Jochen H; Hardacre, Christopher; Kalin, Robert M; Walsh, Kayleen P

    2002-08-01

    The occurrence of the fuel oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in the environment has received considerable scientific attention. The pollutant is frequently found in the groundwater due to leaking of underground storage tanks or pipelines. Concentrations of more than several mg/L MTBE were detected in groundwater at several places in the US and Germany in the last few years. In situ chemical oxidation is a promising treatment method for MTBE-contaminated plumes. This research investigated the reaction kinetics for the oxidation of MTBE by permanganate. Batch tests demonstrated that the oxidation of MTBE by permanganate is second order overall and first order individually with respect to permanganate and MTBE. The second-order rate constant was 1.426 x 10(-6) L/mg/h. The influence of pH on the reaction rate was demonstrated to have no significant effect. However, the rate of MTBE oxidation by potassium permanganate is 2-3 orders of magnitude lower than of other advanced oxidation processes. The slower rates of MTBE oxidation by permanganate limit the applicability of this process for rapid MTBE cleanup strategies. However, permanganate oxidation of MTBE has potential for passive oxidation risk management strategies. PMID:12230210

  9. High-temperature oxidation kinetics of Zircaloy-4 in oxygen/argon mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uetsuka, H.; Hofmann, P.

    1989-11-01

    The reaction kinetics of Zircaloy-4 in a gas mixture of oxygen and argon was determined by isothermal oxidation tests of cladding tube specimens at temperatures from 1173 to 1773 K for times between 120 and 3600 s. The reaction obeyed a cubic rate law at 1173 K, but a parabolic rate law at temperatures above 1273 K. A discontinuity in the temperature dependence of the parabolic rate constants was observed between 1273 and 1373 K, which may be attributed to an allotropic phase transformation of the ZrO 2 reaction layer. The equations describing the parabolic rate law constants for the mass increase, the ZrO 2 oxide layer growth and the growth of the combined layer of ZrO 2 and oxygen-stabilized alpha-Zr(O) were determined. No significant difference was found between the oxidation rates obtained in the present study and those obtained in Zircaloy-4/steam oxidation experiments. Changing the oxygen concentration in the gas mixture from 10 to 100 vol% did not affect the oxidation kinetics of Zircaloy-4.

  10. Kinetics of the oxidative degradation of formaldehyde with electrogenerated hypochlorite ion

    SciTech Connect

    Do, J.S.; Yeh, W.C.; Chao, I.Y.

    1997-02-01

    Aldehydes pose a potential problem in waste waters coming from a variety of process industry sources and must be treated before industrial waste waters can be discharged. The mechanisms and kinetics of the anodic oxidation of chloride ion on SnO{sub 2}-PdO-RuO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2}/Ti (SPR) anode and the oxidation of formaldehyde with hypochlorite ion were studied, and the new kinetic data based on theoretical analysis were evaluated in this investigation. The reaction order of the anodic oxidation of chloride ion on SPR was unity. Also, the oxidation of formaldehyde with hypochlorite ion was second order in formaldehyde and first order in hypochlorite ion. Furthermore, the activation energy was evaluated as 37.9 kJ/mol. Formaldehyde was degraded from 3,000 to 279 ppm, and the degradation fraction was 90.7% when the electrolysis time was 111 min. A model calculation of the in situ oxidative degradation of formaldehyde with electrogenerated hypochlorite ion correlated well with experimental results.

  11. Kinetic modeling of the oxidative degradation of additive free PE in bleach disinfected water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikdam, Aïcha; Colin, Xavier; Billon, Noëlle; Minard, Gaëlle

    2016-05-01

    The chemical interactions between PE and bleach were studied at 60°C in immersion in bleach solutions kept at a free chlorine concentration of 100 ppm and a pH of 5 or 7.2. It was found that the polymer undergoes a severe oxidation from the earliest weeks of exposure, in a superficial layer whose thickness (of about 50-70 µm) is almost independent of the pH value, although the superficial oxidation rate is faster in acidic than in neutral medium. Oxidation leads to the formation and accumulation of a large variety of carbonyl products (mostly ketones and carboxylic acids) and, after a few weeks, to a decrease in the average molar mass due to the large predominance of chain scissions over crosslinking. A scenario was elaborated for explaining such unexpected results. According to this scenario, the non-ionic molecules (Cl2 and ClOH) formed from the disinfectant in the water phase, would migrate deeply into PE and dissociate into highly reactive radicals (Cl• and HO•) in order to initiate a radical chain oxidation. A kinetic model was derived from this scenario for predicting the general trends of the oxidation kinetics and its dependence on environmental factors such as temperature, free chlorine concentration and pH. The validity of this model was successfully checked by comparing the numerical simulations with experimental data.

  12. Mass-transfer limitations for immobilized enzyme-catalyzed kinetic resolution of racemate in a fixed-bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Xiu, G H; Jiang, L; Li, P

    2001-07-01

    A mathematical model has been developed for immobilized enzyme-catalyzed kinetic resolution of racemate in a fixed-bed reactor in which the enzyme-catalyzed reaction (the irreversible uni-uni competitive Michaelis-Menten kinetics is chosen as an example) was coupled with intraparticle diffusion, external mass transfer, and axial dispersion. The effects of mass-transfer limitations, competitive inhibition of substrates, deactivation on the enzyme effective enantioselectivity, and the optical purity and yield of the desired product are examined quantitatively over a wide range of parameters using the orthogonal collocation method. For a first-order reaction, an analytical solution is derived from the mathematical model for slab-, cylindrical-, and spherical-enzyme supports. Based on the analytical solution for the steady-state resolution process, a new concise formulation is presented to predict quantitatively the mass-transfer limitations on enzyme effective enantioselectivity and optical purity and yield of the desired product for a continuous steady-state kinetic resolution process in a fixed-bed reactor. PMID:11353408

  13. Kinetics of the electrochemical oxidation of 1,1-bis-hydroperoxy-4-methylcyclohexane on platinum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedenyapina, M. D.; Simakova, A. P.; Platonov, M. M.; Terent'ev, A. O.; Skundin, A. M.; Vedenyapin, A. A.

    2013-03-01

    The electrochemical synthesis of 3,12-dimethyl-7,8,15,16-tetraoxadispiro[5.2.5.2]hexadecane (1,2,4,5-tetraoxane) from 1,1-bis-hydroperoxy-4-methylcyclohexane on platinum electrode in a cell with separated and unseparated cathode and anode space in an aprotic solvent is conducted. The kinetics of electrochemical oxidation of 1,1-bis(hydroperoxy)-4-methylcyclohexane is studied. The current yield of the reaction is determined.

  14. Comparison of the Isothermal Oxidation Behavior of As-Cast Cu-17%Cr and Cu-17%Cr-5%Al. Part 1; Oxidation Kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj. Sai V.

    2008-01-01

    The isothermal oxidation kinetics of as-cast Cu-17%Cr and Cu-17%Cr-5%Al in air were studied between 773 and 1173 K under atmospheric pressure. These observations reveal that Cu- 17%Cr-5%Al oxidizes at significantly slower rates than Cu-17%Cr. The rate constants for the alloys were determined from generalized analyses of the data without an a priori assumption of the nature of the oxidation kinetics. Detailed analyses of the isothermal thermogravimetric weight change data revealed that Cu-17%Cr exhibited parabolic oxidation kinetics with an activation energy of 165.9 9.5 kJ mol-1. In contrast, the oxidation kinetics for the Cu-17%Cr- 5%Al alloy exhibited a parabolic oxidation kinetics during the initial stages followed by a quartic relationship in the later stages of oxidation. Alternatively, the oxidation behavior of Cu-17%CR- 5%Al could be better represented by a logarithmic relationship. The parabolic rate constants and activation energy data for the two alloys are compared with literature data to gain insights on the nature of the oxidation mechanisms dominant in these alloys.

  15. Comparison of the Isothermal Oxidation Behavior of As-Cast Cu-17 Percent Cr and Cu-17 Percent Cr-5 Percent Al. Part 1; Oxidation Kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.

    2008-01-01

    The isothermal oxidation kinetics of as-cast Cu-17%Cr and Cu-17%Cr-5%Al in air were studied between 773 and 1173 K under atmospheric pressure. These observations reveal that Cu-17%Cr-5%Al oxidizes at significantly slower rates than Cu-17%Cr. The rate constants for the alloys were determined from generalized analyses of the data without an a priori assumption of the nature of the oxidation kinetics. Detailed analyses of the isothermal thermogravimetric weight change data revealed that Cu-17%Cr exhibited parabolic oxidation kinetics with an activation energy of 165.9+/-9.5 kJ/mol. In contrast, the oxidation kinetics for the Cu-17%Cr-5%Al alloy exhibited a parabolic oxidation kinetics during the initial stages followed by a quartic relationship in the later stages of oxidation. Alternatively, the oxidation behavior of Cu-17%CR-5%Al could be better represented by a logarithmic relationship. The parabolic rate constants and activation energy data for the two alloys are compared with literature data to gain insights on the nature of the oxidation mechanisms dominant in these alloys.

  16. Comparison of the Isothermal Oxidation Behavior of As-Cast Cu-17%Cr and Cu-17%Cr-5%Al. Part 1; Oxidation Kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj. Sai V.

    2008-01-01

    The isothermal oxidation kinetics of as-cast Cu-17%Cr and Cu-17%Cr-5%Al in air were studied between 773 and 1173 K under atmospheric pressure. These observations reveal that Cu- 17%Cr-5%Al oxidizes at significantly slower rates than Cu-17%Cr. The rate constants for the alloys were determined from generalized analyses of the data without an a priori assumption of the nature of the oxidation kinetics. Detailed analyses of the isothermal thermogravimetric weight change data revealed that Cu-17%Cr exhibited parabolic oxidation kinetics with an activation energy of 165.9 +/- 9.5 kJ/mol. In contrast, the oxidation kinetics for the Cu-17%Cr- 5%Al alloy exhibited a parabolic oxidation kinetics during the initial stages followed by a quartic relationship in the later stages of oxidation. Alternatively, the oxidation behavior of Cu-17%CR- 5%Al could be better represented by a logarithmic relationship. The parabolic rate constants and activation energy data for the two alloys are compared with literature data to gain insights on the nature of the oxidation mechanisms dominant in these alloys.

  17. Z-Selective Hydrothiolation of Racemic 1,3-Disubstituted Allenes: An Atom-Economic Rhodium-Catalyzed Dynamic Kinetic Resolution.

    PubMed

    Pritzius, Adrian B; Breit, Bernhard

    2015-12-21

    A Z-selective rhodium-catalyzed hydrothiolation of 1,3-disubstituted allenes and subsequent oxidation towards the corresponding allylic sulfones is described. Using the bidentate 1,4-bis(diphenylphosphino)butane (dppb) ligand, Z/E-selectivities up to >99:1 were obtained. The highly atom-economic desymmetrization reaction tolerates functionalized aromatic and aliphatic thiols. Additionally, a variety of symmetric internal allenes, as well as unsymmetrically disubstituted substrates were well tolerated, thus resulting in high regioselectivities. Starting from chiral but racemic 1,3-disubstituted allenes a dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) could be achieved by applying (S,S)-Me-DuPhos as the chiral ligand. The desired Z-allylic sulfones were obtained in high yields and enantioselectivities up to 96 % ee. PMID:26418035

  18. Development and validation of a model for the chemical kinetics of graphite oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Tournier, Jean-Michel P.

    2011-04-01

    A model of the chemical kinetics and primary reactions of graphite oxidation is developed and successfully validated for pyrolytic carbon thin films. The model uses Gaussian distributions of the activation energies for adsorption and desorption and the measured active surface area (ASA) as a function of burn-off. The activation energies distributions and the pre-exponential rate coefficients for the four elementary oxidation kinetics reactions in the model are obtained from the reported measurements of the gases yields and adsorbed oxygen using a multi-parameter optimization algorithm. The model calculates the production rates of CO and CO 2 and the gasification rate as functions of temperature and oxygen partial pressure, and its predictions are in excellent agreement with reported experimental measurements. Results for pyrolytic carbon thin films show that when the oxygen pressure is kept constant, the gasification rate depends on both temperature and ASA until a full burn-off is reached. By contrast, in a depleting oxygen environment, only partial burn-off is possible; gasification ceases following the consumption of the free oxygen in the enclosure. This model represents the first phase in an ongoing effort to develop a model for predicting the oxidation kinetics of nuclear graphite following a massive air ingress in high temperature reactors.

  19. Adsorption kinetics of plasma proteins on ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jansch, M; Stumpf, P; Graf, C; Rühl, E; Müller, R H

    2012-05-30

    In this study the kinetics of plasma protein adsorption onto ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particles have been analyzed and compared to previously published kinetic studies on polystyrene particles (PS particles), oil-in-water nanoemulsions and solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs). SPIO and USPIO nanoparticles are commonly used as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enhancers for tumor imaging as well as in drug delivery applications. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) has been used to determine the plasma protein adsorption onto the citrate/triethylene glycol-stabilized iron oxide surface. The results indicate that the existence of a Vroman effect, a displacement of previously adsorbed abundant proteins, such as albumin or fibrinogen, respectively, on USPIO particles has to be denied. Previously, identical findings have been reported for oil-in-water nanoemulsions. Furthermore, the protein adsorption kinetics differs dramatically from that of other solid drug delivery systems (PS, SLN). More relevant for the in vivo fate of long circulating particles is the protein corona after several minutes or even hours. Interestingly, the patterns received after an incubation time of 0.5 min to 240 min are found to be qualitatively and quantitatively similar. This leads to the assumption of a long-lived ("hard") protein corona around the iron oxide nanoparticles. PMID:22342465

  20. Total organic carbon disappearance kinetics for the supercritical water oxidation of monosubstituted phenols

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, C.J.; Savage, P.E.

    1999-06-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is a process technology for destroying organic compounds present in aqueous waste streams. The authors oxidized phenols bearing single -CH{sub 3}, -C{sub 2}H{sub 5}, -COCH{sub 3}, -CHO, -OH, -OCH{sub 3}, and -NO{sub 2} substituents in supercritical water at 460 C and 25.3 MPa. The observed effects of the concentrations of total organic carbon (TOC) and oxygen on the global disappearance rates for TOC were correlated by using power-law rate expressions. This kinetics study revealed that the rate of TOC disappearance is more sensitive to the oxygen concentration than is the rate of reactant disappearance. Additionally, the rate of TOC disappearance is always slower than the rate of reactant disappearance, with the ratio of these rates ranging from 0.10 to 0.65 for the different phenols at the conditions studied. The rates of TOC disappearance during SCWO of these substituted phenols varied by nearly 2 orders of magnitude, showing significant effects from both the identity and location of the substituent. These substituent effects are greater for TOC disappearance kinetics than for reactant disappearance kinetics. Additionally, all of the substituted phenols exhibit faster TOC disappearance rates than does phenol. Accordingly, phenol is a good worst case model compound for SCWO studies. The pronounced substituent effects for TOC disappearance rates indicate that the oxidation of a common refractory intermediate is not an important feature of the SCWO networks for these phenols at the conditions studied.

  1. Chemistry of Al in Oxidizer Medium: From Shock Initiation to Post Detonation Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Santanu; Losada, Martin; Fotovati, Shahryar

    2013-06-01

    Reactive materials, propellants, and thermites are often constructed from Al/oxidizer composites. Al/oxidizer composites are also considered for self-sustaining reactions for deep space applications to reduce the need for carrying oxygen. In particular, Al/Teflon, Al/I2O5 and Al/RDX composites will be discussed as representative Al in oxidizer systems. Results of post-detonation kinetics using transition state theory and master equation based RRKM theory will be compared including discussion on some unresolved theoretical issues in collision theories and basis set effects in predicting the temperature/pressure-dependent kinetics. For Al/Teflon system, the RRKM theory calculated fall-off curves show a significant pressure dependence of rate constant in wide range of 0-1 MPa pressures at elevated temperatures. For Al/I2O5 systems, incorporation of spin-orbit coupling in DFT with various standard and augmented basis sets is important. A mechanism for generation of I2 and O2 during the reaction will be proposed. Finally, describing shock initiation reactions inside a condensed phase Al/RDX composites for a combustion reaction or detonation is currently a challenge for theoretical chemistry and chemical dynamics community. Especially, exact theoretical treatment for kinetics of reactants in confined hot-spots under high-pressure/temperature conditions is lacking. A new collision theoretical approach and reactive embedding possiblityies will be discussed as alternative to reactive force field based simulations of hot-spot growth.

  2. Oxidation kinetics of cyclophosphamide and methotrexate by ozone in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ac, Araceli; Broséus, Romain; Vincent, Simon; Barbeau, Benoit; Prévost, Michèle; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2010-05-01

    This study investigates the aqueous degradation by ozone of two target cytostatic drugs, cyclophosphamide and methotrexate. A column switching technique for on-line solid phase extraction (SPE) coupled to electro-spray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) was used for the simultaneous detection of the trace contaminants. The second-order kinetic rate constants for the reaction of cyclophosphamide with molecular ozone and hydroxyl radicals were determined in bench-scale experiments at pH 8.10. The molecular ozone oxidation kinetics was studied in buffered ultrapure water and compared to the oxidation kinetics in natural water from a municipal drinking water treatment plant in the province of Quebec (Canada). For cyclophosphamide, the degradation rate constant with molecular ozone in ultrapure water was low (k(O3)=3.3+/-0.2M(-1)s(-1)) and the extent of oxidation was linearly correlated to the ozone exposure. The impact of water quality matrix on oxidation efficacy was not significant during direct ozone reaction (k(O3) =2.9+/-0.3M(-1)s(-1)). The rate constant with hydroxyl radicals was higher at 2.0 x 10(9) M(-1)s(-1). Methotrexate reacted quickly with molecular ozone at dosages typically applied in drinking water treatment (k(O3)>3.6 x 10(3)M(-1)s(-1)). Overall, the results confirmed that organic compounds reactivity with ozone was dependent of their chemical structure. Ozone was very effective against methotrexate but high oxidant concentration x contact time (CT) values were required to completely remove cyclophosphamide from drinking water. Further studies should be conducted in order to identify the ozonation by-products and explore the impact of ozone on their degradation and toxicity. PMID:20403630

  3. Kinetics of plastoquinol oxidation by the Q-cycle in leaves.

    PubMed

    Laisk, Agu; Oja, Vello; Eichelmann, Hillar

    2016-06-01

    Electrochromic shift measurements confirmed that the Q-cycle operated in sunflower leaves. The slow temporarily increasing post-pulse phase was recorded, when ATP synthase was inactivated in the dark and plastoquinol (PQH(2)) oxidation was initiated by a short pulse of far-red light (FRL). During illumination by red light, the Q-cycle-supported proton arrival at the lumen and departure via ATP synthase were simultaneous, precluding extreme build-up of the membrane potential. To investigate the kinetics of the Q-cycle, less than one PQH(2) per cytochrome b(6)f (Cyt b(6)f) were reduced by illuminating the leaf with strong light pulses or single-turnover Xe flashes. The post-pulse rate of oxidation of these PQH2 molecules was recorded via the rate of reduction of plastocyanin (PC(+)) and P700(+), monitored at 810 and 950 nm. The PSII-reduced PQH(2) molecules were oxidized with multi-phase overall kinetics, τ(d)=1, τ(p)=5.6 and τ(s)=16 ms (22 °C). We conclude that τ(d) characterizes PSII processes and diffusion, τ(p) is the bifurcated oxidation of the primary quinol and τ(s) is the Q-cycle-involving reduction of the secondary quinol at the n-site, its transport to the p-site, and bifurcated oxidation there. The extraordinary slow kinetics of the Q-cycle may be related to the still unsolved mechanism of the "photosynthetic control." PMID:27056771

  4. Oxidation kinetics of some nickel-based superalloy foils and electronic resistance of the oxide scale formed in air. Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    England, D.M.; Virkar, A.V.

    1999-09-01

    Haynes 230, Inconel 625, Inconel 718, and Hastelloy X foil specimens were oxidized in air for several thousand hours in the temperature range of 800--1,100 C. The oxidation kinetics of alloys studied obeyed the parabolic rate law. Haynes 230 exhibited the slowest oxidation kinetics of the alloys studied. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) were the principal characterization tools employed. Chromium oxide, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, was the predominant oxide phase in the oxide scale of all alloys studied. Manganese chromate was also detected in the oxide scales of Haynes 230, Hastelloy X, and Inconel 625. EPMA showed that the concentration of Mn in the oxide scale was much higher than in the alloy, indicating selective oxidation of Mn. The electronic resistance of the oxide scale was measured in air at temperatures up to 800 C on samples oxidized in air for up to several thousand hours. The oxide scale on Haynes 230 exhibited the lowest area-specific resistance, consistent with its slower oxidation kinetics.

  5. High temperature X-ray diffraction study of the oxidation products and kinetics of uranium-plutonium mixed oxides.

    PubMed

    Strach, Michal; Belin, Renaud C; Richaud, Jean-Christophe; Rogez, Jacques

    2014-12-15

    The oxidation products and kinetics of two sets of mixed uranium-plutonium dioxides containing 14%, 24%, 35%, 46%, 54%, and 62% plutonium treated in air were studied by means of in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) from 300 to 1773 K every 100 K. The first set consisted of samples annealed 2 weeks before performing the experiments. The second one consisted of powdered samples that sustained self-irradiation damage. Results were compared with chosen literature data and kinetic models established for UO2. The obtained diffraction patterns were used to determine the temperature of the hexagonal M3O8 (M for metal) phase formation, which was found to increase with Pu content. The maximum observed amount of the hexagonal phase in wt % was found to decrease with Pu addition. We conclude that plutonium stabilizes the cubic phases during oxidation, but the hexagonal phase was observed even for the compositions with 62 mol % Pu. The results indicate that self-irradiation defects have a slight impact on the kinetics of oxidation and the lattice parameter even after the phase transformation. It was concluded that the lattice constant of the high oxygen phase was unaffected by the changes in the overall O/M when it was in equilibrium with small quantities of M3O8. We propose that the observed changes in the high oxygen cubic phase lattice parameter are a result of either cation migration or an increase in the miscibility of oxygen in this phase. The solubility of Pu in the hexagonal phase was estimated to be below 14 mol % even at elevated temperatures. PMID:25412433

  6. Statistical model for grain boundary and grain volume oxidation kinetics in UO{sub 2} spent fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, R.B.; Shaw, H.F.; Einziger, R.E.

    1989-09-01

    This paper addresses statistical characteristics for the simplest case of grain boundary/grain volume oxidation kinetics of UO{sub 2} to U{sub 3}O{sub 7} for a fragment of a spent fuel pellet. It also presents a limited discussion of future extensions to this simple case to represent the more complex cases of oxidation kinetics in spent fuels. 17 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Surface oxidation energetics and kinetics on MoS{sub 2} monolayer

    SciTech Connect

    KC, Santosh; Longo, Roberto C.; Wallace, Robert M.; Cho, Kyeongjae

    2015-04-07

    In this work, surface oxidation of monolayer MoS{sub 2} (one of the representative semiconductors in transition-metal dichalcogenides) has been investigated using density functional theory method. Oxygen interaction with MoS{sub 2} shows that, thermodynamically, the surface tends to be oxidized. However, the dissociative absorption of molecular oxygen on the MoS{sub 2} surface is kinetically limited due to the large energy barrier at low temperature. This finding elucidates the air stability of MoS{sub 2} surface in the atmosphere. Furthermore, the presence of defects significantly alters the surface stability and adsorption mechanisms. The electronic properties of the oxidized surface have been examined as a function of oxygen adsorption and coverage as well as substitutional impurities. Our results on energetics and kinetics of oxygen interaction with the MoS{sub 2} monolayer are useful for the understanding of surface oxidation, air stability, and electronic properties of transition-metal dichalcogenides at the atomic scale.

  8. Kinetics of the Oxidation of Reduced Cu,Zn-Superoxide Dismutase by Peroxymonocarbonate

    PubMed Central

    Ranguelova, Kalina; Ganini, Douglas; Bonini, Marcelo G.; London, Robert E.; Mason, Ronald P.

    2012-01-01

    Kinetic evidence is reported for the role of the peroxymonocarbonate, HOOCO2−, as an oxidant for reduced Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase-Cu(I) (SOD1) during the peroxidase activity of the enzyme. The formation of this reactive oxygen species results from the equilibrium between hydrogen peroxide and bicarbonate. Recently, peroxymonocarbonate has been proposed to be a key substrate for reduced SOD1 and has been shown to oxidize SOD1-Cu(I) to SOD1-Cu(II) much faster than H2O2. We have reinvestigated the kinetics of the reaction between SOD1-Cu(I) and HOOCO2− by using conventional stopped-flow spectrophotometry and obtained a second-order rate constant of k = 1600 ± 100 M−1s−1 for SOD1-Cu(I) oxidation by HOOCO2−. Our results demonstrate that peroxymonocarbonate oxidizes SOD1-Cu(I) to SOD1-Cu(II) and is in turn reduced to the carbonate anion radical. It is proposed that the dissociation of His61 from the active site Cu(I) in SOD-Cu(I) contributes to this chemistry by facilitating the binding of larger anions, such as peroxymonocarbonate. PMID:22569304

  9. Oxidation of chlorinated ethenes by heat-activated persulfate: kinetics and products.

    PubMed

    Waldemer, Rachel H; Tratnyek, Paul G; Johnson, Richard L; Nurmi, James T

    2007-02-01

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) and in situ thermal remediation (ISTR) are applicable to treatment of groundwater contaminated with chlorinated ethenes. ISCO with persulfate (S2O8(2-)) requires activation, and this can be achieved with the heat from ISTR, so there may be advantages to combining these technologies. To explore this possibility, we determined the kinetics and products of chlorinated ethene oxidation with heat-activated persulfate and compared them to the temperature dependence of other degradation pathways. The kinetics of chlorinated ethene disappearance were pseudo-first-order for 1-2 half-lives, and the resulting rate constants-measured from 30 to 70 degrees C--fit the Arrhenius equation, yielding apparent activation energies of 101 +/- 4 kJ mol(-1) for tetrachloroethene (PCE), 108 +/- 3 kJ mol(-1) for trichloroethene (TCE), 144 +/- 5 kJ mol(-1) for cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE), and 141 +/- 2 kJ mol(-1) for trans-1,2-dichloroethene (trans-DCE). Chlorinated byproducts were observed, but most of the parent material was completely dechlorinated. Arrhenius parameters for hydrolysis and oxidation by persulfate or permanganate were used to calculate rates of chlorinated ethene degradation by these processes over the range of temperatures relevant to ISTR and the range of oxidant concentrations and pH relevant to ISCO. PMID:17328217

  10. Influence of Dihydrogen and Water Vapor on the Kinetics of CO Oxidation over Au/Alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Calla,J.; Davis, R.

    2005-01-01

    Alumina-supported Au nanoparticles were prepared by a deposition-precipitation method using HAuCl{sub 4} and a thermal treatment in He. X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Au L{sub III} edge revealed that the Au particles were predominantly metallic with an average size of 1.2 nm. The kinetics of CO oxidation were measured with various amounts of co-fed H2O in the presence and absence of H2. Co-feeding H2O significantly increased the rate of CO oxidation, with rates similar to that observed during selective CO oxidation in H2. The order of reaction with respect to CO decreased from 0.32 to 0.18 by the addition of water vapor. In contrast, the O2 order increased from 0.36 to 0.48 in the presence of H2O. The temperature dependence of the rate changes with water concentration. Although values of the kinetic parameters determined in the presence of H2 were different from those in the presence of co-fed H{sub 2}O, the general trends were similar. These results suggest that the presence of H{sub 2}O or H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} have similar promotional effects during CO oxidation on Au/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  11. Sequential reduction-oxidation for photocatalytic degradation of tetrabromobisphenol A: kinetics and intermediates.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yaoguang; Lou, Xiaoyi; Xiao, Dongxue; Xu, Lei; Wang, Zhaohui; Liu, Jianshe

    2012-11-30

    C-Br bond cleavage is considered as a key step to reduce their toxicities and increase degradation rates for most brominated organic pollutants. Here a sequential reduction/oxidation strategy (i.e. debromination followed by photocatalytic oxidation) for photocatalytic degradation of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), one of the most frequently used brominated flame retardants, was proposed on the basis of kinetic analysis and intermediates identification. The results demonstrated that the rates of debromination and even photodegradation of TBBPA strongly depended on the atmospheres, initial TBBPA concentrations, pH of the reaction solution, hydrogen donors, and electron acceptors. These kinetic data and byproducts identification obtained by GC-MS measurement indicated that reductive debromination reaction by photo-induced electrons dominated under N(2)-saturated condition, while oxidation reaction by photoexcited holes or hydroxyl radicals played a leading role when air was saturated. It also suggested that the reaction might be further optimized for pretreatment of TBBPA-contaminated wastewater by a two-stage reductive debromination/subsequent oxidative decomposition process in the UV-TiO(2) system by changing the reaction atmospheres. PMID:23046696

  12. Kinetics of Mn(II) oxidation by Leptothrix discophora SS1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinghao; Lion, Leonard W.; Nelson, Yarrow M.; Shuler, Michael L.; Ghiorse, William C.

    2002-03-01

    The kinetics of Mn(II) oxidation by the bacterium Leptothrix discophora SS1 was investigated in this research. Cells were grown in a minimal mineral salts medium in which chemical speciation was well defined. Mn(II) oxidation was observed in a bioreactor under controlled conditions with pH, O 2, and temperature regulation. Mn(II) oxidation experiments were performed at cell concentrations between 24 mg/L and 35 mg/L, over a pH range from 6 to 8.5, between temperatures of 10°C and 40°C, over a dissolved oxygen range of 0 to 8.05 mg/L, and with L. discophora SS1 cells that were grown in the presence of Cu concentrations ranging from zero to 0.1 μM. Mn(II) oxidation rates were determined when the cultures grew to stationary phase and were found to be directly proportional to O 2 and cell concentrations over the ranges investigated. The optimum pH for Mn(II) oxidation was approximately 7.5, and the optimum temperature was 30°C. A Cu level as low as 0.02 μM was found to inhibit the growth rate and yield of L. discophora SS1 observed in shake flasks, while Cu levels between 0.02 and 0.1 μM stimulated the Mn(II) oxidation rate observed in bioreactors. An overall rate law for Mn(II) oxidation by L. discophora as a function of pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen concentration (D.O.), and Cu concentration is proposed. At circumneutral pH, the rate of biologically mediated Mn(II) oxidation is likely to exceed homogeneous abiotic Mn(II) oxidation at relatively low (≈μg/L) concentrations of Mn oxidizing bacteria.

  13. Zinc adsorption effects on arsenite oxidation kinetics at the birnessite-water interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Power, L.E.; Arai, Y.; Sparks, D.L.

    2005-01-01

    Arsenite is more toxic and mobile than As(V) in soil and sediment environments, and thus it is advantageous to explore factors that enhance oxidation of As(III) to As(V). Previous studies showed that manganese oxides, such as birnessite (??-MnO2), directly oxidized As(III). However, these studies did not explore the role that cation adsorption has on As(III) oxidation. Accordingly, the effects of adsorbed and nonadsorbed Zn on arsenite (As(III)) oxidation kinetics at the birnessite-water interface were investigated using batch adsorption experiments (0.1 g L-1; pH 4.5 and 6.0; I = 0.01 M NaCl). Divalent Zn adsorption on synthetic ??-MnO 2 in the absence of As(III) increased with increasing pH and caused positive shifts in electrophoretic mobility values at pH 4-6, indirectly suggesting inner-sphere Zn adsorption mechanisms. Arsenite was readily oxidized on birnessite in the absence of Zn. The initial As(III) oxidation rate constant decreased with increasing pH from 4.5 to 6.0 and initial As(III) concentrations from 100 to 300 ??M. Similar pH and initial As(III) concentration effects were observed in systems when Zn was present (i.e., presorbed Zn prior to As(III) addition and simultaneously added Zn-As(III) systems), but As(III) oxidation reactions were suppressed compared to the respective control systems. The suppression was more pronounced when Zn was presorbed on the ??-MnO 2 surfaces as opposed to added simultaneously with As(III). This study provides further understanding of As(III) oxidation reactions on manganese oxide surfaces under environmentally applicable conditions where metals compete for reactive sites.

  14. Oxide Transformation in Cr-Mn-Prealloyed Sintered Steels: Thermodynamic and Kinetic Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hryha, Eduard; Nyborg, Lars

    2014-04-01

    The main obstacle for utilization of Cr and Mn as alloying elements in powder metallurgy is their high oxygen affinity leading to oxidation risk during powder manufacturing, handling, and especially during further consolidation. Despite the high purity of the commercially available Cr- and Mn-prealloyed iron powder grades, the risk of stable oxide formation during the sintering process remains. Thermodynamic and kinetic simulation of the oxide formation/transformation on the former powder surface during heating and sintering stages using thermodynamic modeling tools (Thermo-Calc and HSC Chemistry) was performed. Simulation is based on the results from the analysis of amount, morphology, and composition of the oxide phases inside the inter-particle necks in the specimens from interrupted sintering trials utilizing advanced analysis tools (HRSEM + EDX and XPS). The effect of the processing parameters, such as sintering atmosphere composition, temperature profile as well as graphite addition on the possible scenarios of oxide reduction/formation/transformation for Fe-Cr-Mn-C powder systems, was evaluated. Results indicate that oxide transformation occurs in accordance with the thermodynamic stability of oxides as follows: Fe2O3 → FeO → Fe2MnO4 → Cr2FeO4 → Cr2O3 → MnCr2O4 → MnO/MnSiO x → SiO2. Spinel MnCr2O4 was identified as the most stable oxide phase at applied sintering conditions up to 1393 K (1120 °C). Controlled conditions during the heating stage minimize the formation of stable oxide products and produce oxide-free sintered parts.

  15. Kinetics of sorption and abiotic oxidation of arsenic(III) by aquifer materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amirbahman, A.; Kent, D.B.; Curtis, G.P.; Davis, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    The fate of arsenic in groundwater depends largely on its interaction with mineral surfaces. We investigated the kinetics of As(III) oxidation by aquifer materials collected from the USGS research site at Cape Cod, MA, USA, by conducting laboratory experiments. Five different solid samples with similar specific surface areas (0.6-0.9 m2 g-1) and reductively extractable iron contents (18-26 ??mol m-2), but with varying total manganese contents (0.5-3.5 ??mol m-2) were used. Both dissolved and adsorbed As(III) and As(V) concentrations were measured with time up to 250 h. The As(III) removal rate from solution increased with increasing solid manganese content, suggesting that manganese oxide is responsible for the oxidation of As(III). Under all conditions, dissolved As(V) concentrations were very low. A quantitative model was developed to simulate the extent and kinetics of arsenic transformation by aquifer materials. The model included: (1) reversible rate-limited adsorption of As(III) onto both oxidative and non-oxidative (adsorptive) sites, (2) irreversible rate-limited oxidation of As(III), and (3) equilibrium adsorption of As(V) onto adsorptive sites. Rate constants for these processes, as well as the total oxidative site densities were used as the fitting parameters. The total adsorptive site densities were estimated based on the measured specific surface area of each material. The best fit was provided by considering one fast and one slow site for each adsorptive and oxidative site. The fitting parameters were obtained using the kinetic data for the most reactive aquifer material at different initial As(III) concentrations. Using the same parameters to simulate As(III) and As(V) surface reactions, the model predictions were compared to observations for aquifer materials with different manganese contents. The model simulated the experimental data very well for all materials at all initial As(III) concentrations. The As(V) production rate was related to the

  16. Kinetics of sorption and abiotic oxidation of arsenic(III) by aquifer materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirbahman, Aria; Kent, Douglas B.; Curtis, Gary P.; Davis, James A.

    2006-02-01

    The fate of arsenic in groundwater depends largely on its interaction with mineral surfaces. We investigated the kinetics of As(III) oxidation by aquifer materials collected from the USGS research site at Cape Cod, MA, USA, by conducting laboratory experiments. Five different solid samples with similar specific surface areas (0.6-0.9 m 2 g -1) and reductively extractable iron contents (18-26 μmol m -2), but with varying total manganese contents (0.5-3.5 μmol m -2) were used. Both dissolved and adsorbed As(III) and As(V) concentrations were measured with time up to 250 h. The As(III) removal rate from solution increased with increasing solid manganese content, suggesting that manganese oxide is responsible for the oxidation of As(III). Under all conditions, dissolved As(V) concentrations were very low. A quantitative model was developed to simulate the extent and kinetics of arsenic transformation by aquifer materials. The model included: (1) reversible rate-limited adsorption of As(III) onto both oxidative and non-oxidative (adsorptive) sites, (2) irreversible rate-limited oxidation of As(III), and (3) equilibrium adsorption of As(V) onto adsorptive sites. Rate constants for these processes, as well as the total oxidative site densities were used as the fitting parameters. The total adsorptive site densities were estimated based on the measured specific surface area of each material. The best fit was provided by considering one fast and one slow site for each adsorptive and oxidative site. The fitting parameters were obtained using the kinetic data for the most reactive aquifer material at different initial As(III) concentrations. Using the same parameters to simulate As(III) and As(V) surface reactions, the model predictions were compared to observations for aquifer materials with different manganese contents. The model simulated the experimental data very well for all materials at all initial As(III) concentrations. The As(V) production rate was related to the

  17. Kinetically induced irreversibility in electro-oxidation and reduction of Pt surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinnouchi, Ryosuke; Kodama, Kensaku; Suzuki, Takahisa; Morimoto, Yu

    2015-05-01

    A mean field kinetic model was developed for electrochemical oxidations and reductions of Pt(111) on the basis of density functional theory calculations, and the reaction mechanisms were analyzed. The model reasonably describes asymmetric shapes of cyclic voltammograms and small Tafel slopes of relevant redox reactions observed in experiments without assuming any unphysical forms of rate equations. Simulations using the model indicate that the oxidation of Pt(111) proceeds via an electrochemical oxidation from Pt to PtOH and a disproportionation reaction from PtOH to PtO and Pt, while its reduction proceeds via two electrochemical reductions from PtO to PtOH and from PtOH to Pt.

  18. Thermal oxidation of single-crystal silicon carbide - Kinetic, electrical, and chemical studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petit, J. B.; Neudeck, P. G.; Matus, L. G.; Powell, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents kinetic data from oxidation studies of the polar faces for 3C and 6H SiC in wet and dry oxidizing ambients. Values for the linear and parabolic rate constants were obtained, as well as preliminary results for the activation energies of the rate constants. Examples are presented describing how thermal oxidation can be used to map polytypes and characterize defects in epitaxial layers grown on low tilt angle 6H SiC substrates. Interface widths were measured using Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) with Ar ion beam depth profiling and variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE) with effective medium approximation (EMA) models. Preliminary electrical measurements of MOS capacitors are also presented.

  19. Analyzing the kinetic response of tin oxide-carbon and tin oxide-CNT composites gas sensors for alcohols detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamble, Vinayak; Umarji, Arun

    2015-03-01

    Tin oxide nanoparticles are synthesized using solution combustion technique and tin oxide - carbon composite thick films are fabricated with amorphous carbon as well as carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and porosity measurements show that the as-synthesized nanoparticles are having rutile phase with average crystallite size ˜7 nm and ˜95 m2/g surface area. The difference between morphologies of the carbon doped and CNT doped SnO2 thick films, are characterized using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The adsorption-desorption kinetics and transient response curves are analyzed using Langmuir isotherm curve fittings and modeled using power law of semiconductor gas sensors.

  20. Analyzing the kinetic response of tin oxide-carbon and tin oxide-CNT composites gas sensors for alcohols detection

    SciTech Connect

    Kamble, Vinayak Umarji, Arun

    2015-03-15

    Tin oxide nanoparticles are synthesized using solution combustion technique and tin oxide – carbon composite thick films are fabricated with amorphous carbon as well as carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and porosity measurements show that the as-synthesized nanoparticles are having rutile phase with average crystallite size ∼7 nm and ∼95 m{sup 2}/g surface area. The difference between morphologies of the carbon doped and CNT doped SnO{sub 2} thick films, are characterized using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The adsorption-desorption kinetics and transient response curves are analyzed using Langmuir isotherm curve fittings and modeled using power law of semiconductor gas sensors.

  1. Kinetics of switch grass pellet thermal decomposition under inert and oxidizing atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Sriraam R; Hopke, Philip K

    2012-12-01

    Grass pellets are a renewable resource that have energy content similar to that of wood. However, the higher ash and chlorine content affects combustion. Thermal degradation analysis of a fuel is useful in developing effective combustion. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of the thermal degradation of grass pellets under inert (nitrogen) and oxidizing (air) atmospheres was conducted. Non-isothermal conditions were employed with 4 different heating rates. Kinetic parameters (activation energy and pre-exponential factors) were estimated using the iso-conversional method. Both pyrolysis and oxidative atmospheric thermal degradation exhibited two major loss process: volatilization of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin and burning or slow oxidation of the residual char. The activation energy and pre-exponential factors were high for the oxidizing environment. During pyrolysis, major decomposition occurred with 40% to 75% conversion of the mass to gas with an activation energy of 314 kJ/mol. In air the decomposition occurred with 30% to 55% conversion with an activation energy of 556 kJ/mol. There was a substantial effect of heating rate on mass loss and mass loss rate. The TG shifted to higher temperature ranges on increasing the heating rate. In both pyrolyzing and oxidizing conditions, average combustion and devolatilization rates increased. Enhanced combustion takes place with higher activation energy in oxidizing atmosphere compared to the inert atmosphere due to presence of air. PMID:23026316

  2. Oxidation Kinetics and Textures for Natural and Synthetic MORB Glasses and Subliquidus Melts: RBS Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, K.; Cooper, R. F.; Cherniak, D. J.

    2007-12-01

    Fe and ionic Mg effects oxidation at higher temperatures, giving way to kinetic domination of ionic Ca at lower temperatures. Specific results will be presented. We are initiating transmission electron microscopy studies to characterize the compositions and distributions of internally-nucleated ferrites. Cook, G.B. and R.F. Cooper, Amer. Mineral. 85, 397-406 (2000).

  3. Application of Electrode Methods in Studies of Nitric Oxide Metabolism and Diffusion Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoping; Zweier, Jay L.

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has many important physiological roles in the body. Since NO electrodes can directly measure NO concentration in the nM range and in real time, NO electrode methods have been generally used in laboratories for measuring NO concentration in vivo and in vitro. This review focuses on the application of electrode methods in studies of NO diffusion and metabolic kinetics. We have described the physical and chemical properties that need to be considered in the preparation of NO stock solution, discussed the effect of several interfering factors on the measured curves of NO concentration that need to be eliminated in the experimental setup for NO measurements, and provided an overview of the application of NO electrode methods in measuring NO diffusion and metabolic kinetics in solution and in biological systems. This overview covers NO metabolism by oxygen (O2), superoxide, heme proteins, cells and tissues. Important conclusions and physiological implication of these studies are discussed. PMID:23730264

  4. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of vanadium(2+) by molecular oxygen and hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Rush, J.D.; Bielski, B.H.J.

    1985-12-04

    The reaction between hexaaquovanadium (II) and molecular oxygen has been studied by the stopped-flow method in 0.12M perchloric acid and in solutions containing 0.1M sulfate ion. The kinetics and stoichiometry of the reactions are consistent with a general oxidation mechanism for divalent transition-metal ions proposed by Ochiai. The reaction was found to proceed by parallel pathways resulting in a V(II)-dependent stoichiometry. At concentrations < 0.005 M V(II), one molecule of VO2 was produced per molecule of O2 consumed. At V(II) concentrations greater than 0.1 M, no free peroxide was formed and two vanadyl ions, VOS , are the intermediate reaction products. A mechanism involving a V(II)-dependent equilibrium between a mononuclear vanadium(III) peroxide and a dinuclear vanadium(III) peroxide intermediate explain the reported results. The kinetic parameters of the reaction have been determined and are reported.

  5. Solving the master equation without kinetic Monte Carlo: Tensor train approximations for a CO oxidation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelß, Patrick; Matera, Sebastian; Schütte, Christof

    2016-06-01

    In multiscale modeling of heterogeneous catalytic processes, one crucial point is the solution of a Markovian master equation describing the stochastic reaction kinetics. Usually, this is too high-dimensional to be solved with standard numerical techniques and one has to rely on sampling approaches based on the kinetic Monte Carlo method. In this study we break the curse of dimensionality for the direct solution of the Markovian master equation by exploiting the Tensor Train Format for this purpose. The performance of the approach is demonstrated on a first principles based, reduced model for the CO oxidation on the RuO2(110) surface. We investigate the complexity for increasing system size and for various reaction conditions. The advantage over the stochastic simulation approach is illustrated by a problem with increased stiffness.

  6. Transient Kinetic Analysis of Hydrogen Sulfide Oxidation Catalyzed by Human Sulfide Quinone Oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Mishanina, Tatiana V; Yadav, Pramod K; Ballou, David P; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-10-01

    The first step in the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway is catalyzed by sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR), which belongs to the family of flavoprotein disulfide oxidoreductases. During the catalytic cycle, the flavin cofactor is intermittently reduced by sulfide and oxidized by ubiquinone, linking H2S oxidation to the electron transfer chain and to energy metabolism. Human SQR can use multiple thiophilic acceptors, including sulfide, sulfite, and glutathione, to form as products, hydrodisulfide, thiosulfate, and glutathione persulfide, respectively. In this study, we have used transient kinetics to examine the mechanism of the flavin reductive half-reaction and have determined the redox potential of the bound flavin to be -123 ± 7 mV. We observe formation of an unusually intense charge-transfer (CT) complex when the enzyme is exposed to sulfide and unexpectedly, when it is exposed to sulfite. In the canonical reaction, sulfide serves as the sulfur donor and sulfite serves as the acceptor, forming thiosulfate. We show that thiosulfate is also formed when sulfide is added to the sulfite-induced CT intermediate, representing a new mechanism for thiosulfate formation. The CT complex is formed at a kinetically competent rate by reaction with sulfide but not with sulfite. Our study indicates that sulfide addition to the active site disulfide is preferred under normal turnover conditions. However, under pathological conditions when sulfite concentrations are high, sulfite could compete with sulfide for addition to the active site disulfide, leading to attenuation of SQR activity and to an alternate route for thiosulfate formation. PMID:26318450

  7. Gas-Phase Oxidation Kinetics and Organic Aerosol Products of Ethanolamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borduas, N.; Abbatt, J.; Murphy, J. G.

    2012-12-01

    Ethanolamine is currently the solvent of choice in carbon capture and storage technology (CCS) which aims to reduce CO2 emissions to the atmosphere in coal powered pilot plants. CCS technology represents an unprecedented large scale application of ethanolamine and little is known of its fate if it was unintentionally released into the atmosphere. Relative kinetic experiments were conducted in a 1m3 smog chamber using online proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry. The kinetics of oxidation with hydroxyl radicals from light and dark sources converge to a value of (7.6 ± 1.1) x 10-11 cm3 molec-1 s-1. The reaction of ethanolamine with ozone was determined to be (1.05 ± 0.08) x 10-18 cm3 molec-1 s-1. We find that ethanolamine has a short lifetime in the atmosphere and readily deposits onto wall and particle surfaces, as observed by considerable formation of organonitrogen aerosol products. An investigation into the oxidation product formation using a combination of reagent ions with online chemical ionization mass spectrometry approaches lead to the detection of higher order products. The formation of these high molecular weight products is simultaneous with the oxidation of ethanolamine and implies substantial organic aerosol chemistry.

  8. Oxidation and combustion of the n-hexene isomers: a wide range kinetic modeling study

    SciTech Connect

    Mehl, M; Vanhove, G; Pitz, W J; Ranzi, E

    2008-03-12

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed to study the oxidation of the straight-chain isomers of hexene over a wide range of operating conditions. The main features of this detailed kinetic mechanism, which includes both high and low temperature reaction pathways, are presented and discussed with special emphasis on the main classes of reactions involved in alkene oxidation. Simulation results have been compared with experimental data over a wide range of operating conditions including shock tube, jet stirred reactor and rapid compression machine. The different reactivities of the three isomers have been successfully predicted by the model. Isomerization reactions of the hexenyl radicals were found to play a significant role in the chemistry and interactions of the three n-hexene isomers. A comparative reaction flux analysis is used to verify and discuss the fundamental role of the double bond position in the isomerization reactions of alkenyl radicals, as well as the impact of the allylic site in the low and high temperature mechanism of fuel oxidation.

  9. The kinetic isotopic effect, bridge ligand, and mechanisms of oxidation of alkanes in solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Rudakov, E.S

    1982-10-01

    The purpose of this article was to call attention to a new and striking fact: the kinetic isotopic effect of hydrogen (KIE) in oxidative homolysis, in a first approximation, is independent of the central atom-oxidizing agent M/sup n/ and is determined exclusively by the bridge ligand, which is a quantitative criterion for the selection of the bridge. Most of the data were obtained recently in a study of the first step of the oxidation of alkanes in sulfuric acid and aqueous media by reagents which, as has been suggested, include sulfate (OSO/sub 2/O-) or oxo (O=) bridges. The structures of the reagents were selected considering data on the kinetics, selectivity, and KIE. For the reactions of RH with CF/sub 3/-COOH, HOCl(Cl/sub 2/ + H/sub 2/O), H/sub 2/SO/sub 5/ (H/sub 2/O/sub 2/-90% H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/) and HNO/sub 3/-Pt/sup IV/-Cl/sup -/-H/sub 2/O, structures with OH bridges were assumed. The values of the KIE are the same for tert- and sec-C-H bonds; the reproducibility is usually within +/- 15%.

  10. Size Resolved High Temperature Oxidation Kinetics of Nano-Sized Titanium and Zirconium Particles.

    PubMed

    Zong, Yichen; Jacob, Rohit J; Li, Shuiqing; Zachariah, Michael R

    2015-06-18

    While ultrafine metal particles offer the possibility of very high energy density fuels, there is considerable uncertainty in the mechanism by which metal nanoparticles burn, and few studies that have examined the size dependence to their kinetics at the nanoscale. In this work we quantify the size dependence to the burning rate of titanium and zirconium nanoparticles. Nanoparticles in the range of 20-150 nm were produced via pulsed laser ablation, and then in-flight size-selected using differential electrical mobility. The size-selected oxide free metal particles were directly injected into the post flame region of a laminar flame to create a high temperature (1700-2500 K) oxidizing environment. The reaction was monitored using high-speed videography by tracking the emission from individual nanoparticles. We find that sintering occurs prior to significant reaction, and that once sintering is accounted for, the rate of combustion follows a near nearly (diameter)(1) power-law dependence. Additionally, Arrhenius parameters for the combustion of these nanoparticles were evaluated by measuring the burn times at different ambient temperatures. The optical emission from combustion was also used to model the oxidation process, which we find can be reasonably described with a kinetically controlled shrinking core model. PMID:25914926

  11. Kinetics that govern the release of tritium from neutron-irradiated lithium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Bertone, P.C.

    1986-01-01

    The Lithium Blanket Module (LBM) program being conducted at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory requires that tritium concentrations as low as 0.1 nCi/g, bred in both LBM lithium oxide pellets and gram-size lithium samples, be measured with an uncertainty not exceeding +/-6%. This thesis reports two satisfactory methods of assaying LBM pellets and one satisfactory method of assaying lithium samples. Results of a fundamental kinetic investigation are also reported. The thermally driven release of tritium from neutron-irradiated lithium oxide pellets is studied between the temperatures of 300 and 400/sup 0/C. The observed release clearly obeys first-order kinetics, and the governing activation energy appears to be 28.4 kcal/mole. Finally, a model is presented that may explain the thermally driven release of tritium from a lithium oxide crystal and assemblies thereof. It predicts that under most circumstances the release is controlled by either the diffusion of a tritiated species through the crystal, or by the desorption of tritiated water from it.

  12. Oxidative vaporization kinetics of chromium (III) oxide in oxygen from 1270 to 1570 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, C. A.; Kohl, F. J.; Fryburg, G. C.

    1974-01-01

    Rates of oxidative vaporization of Cr2O3 on preoxidized resistively heated chromium were determined in flowing oxygen at 0.115 torr for temperatures from 1270 to 1570 K. Reaction controlled rates were obtained from experimental rates by a gold calibration technique. These rates were shown to agree with those predicted by thermochemical analysis. The activation energy obtained for the oxidative vaporation reaction corresponded numerically with the thermochemical enthalpy of the reaction. A theoretical equation is given for calculating the rate from thermodynamic data by using boundary layer theory.

  13. Effect of Dunaliella tertiolecta organic exudates on the Fe(II) oxidation kinetics in seawater.

    PubMed

    González, A G; Santana-Casiano, J M; González-Dávila, M; Pérez-Almeida, N; Suárez de Tangil, M

    2014-07-15

    The role played by the natural organic ligands excreted by the green algae Dunaliella tertiolecta on the Fe(II) oxidation rate constants was studied at different stages of growth. The concentration of dissolved organic carbon increased from 2.1 to 7.1 mg L(-1) over time of culture. The oxidation kinetics of Fe(II) was studied at nanomolar levels and under different physicochemical conditions of pH (7.2-8.2), temperature (5-35 °C), salinity (10-37), and dissolved organic carbon produced by cells (2.1-7.1 mg L(-1)). The experimental rate always decreased in the presence of organic exudates with respect to that in the control seawater. The Fe(II) oxidation rate constant was also studied in the context of Marcus theory, where ΔG° was 39.31-51.48 kJ mol(-1). A kinetic modeling approach was applied for computing the equilibrium and rate constants for Fe(II) and exudates present in solution, the Fe(II) speciation, and the contribution of each Fe(II) species to the overall oxidation rate constant. The best fit model took into account two acidity equilibrium constants for the Fe(II) complexing ligands with pKa,1=9.45 and pKa,2=4.9. The Fe(II) complexing constants were KFe(II)-LH=3×10(10) and KFe(II)-L=10(7), and the corresponding computed oxidation rates were 68±2 and 36±8 M(-1) min(-1), respectively. PMID:24941285

  14. Zinc oxide nanowire gamma ray detector with high spatiotemporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, Daniel C.; Nolen, J. Ryan; Cook, Andrew; Mu, Richard R.; Haglund, Richard F.

    2016-03-01

    Conventional scintillation detectors are typically single crystals of heavy-metal oxides or halides doped with rare-earth ions that record the recombination of electron-hole pairs by photon emission in the visible to ultraviolet. However, the light yields are typically low enough to require photomultiplier detection with the attendant instrumental complications. Here we report initial studies of gamma ray detection by zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires, grown by vapor-solid deposition. The nanowires grow along the c-axis in a wurtzite structure; they are typically 80 nm in diameter and have lengths of 1- 2 μm. The nanowires are single crystals of high quality, with a photoluminescence (PL) yield from band-edge exciton emission in the ultraviolet that is typically one hundred times larger than the PL yield from defect centers in the visible. Nanowire ensembles were irradiated by 662 keV gamma rays from a Cs-137 source for periods of up to ten hours; gamma rays in this energy range interact by Compton scattering, which in ZnO creates F+ centers that relax to form singly-charged positive oxygen vacancies. Following irradiation, we fit the PL spectra of the visible emission with a sum of Gaussians at the energies of the known defects. We find highly efficient PL from the irradiated area, with a figure of merit approaching 106 photons/s/MeV of deposited energy. Over a period of days, the singly charged O+ vacancies relax to the more stable doubly charged O++ vacancies. However, the overall defect PL returns to pre-irradiation values after about a week, as the vacancies diffuse to the surface of these very thin nanowires, indicating that a self-healing process restores the nanowires to their original state.

  15. PHOTOCATALYTIC OXIDATION FOR NOx ABATEMENT: DEVELOPMENT OF A KINETIC EXPRESSION AND DESIGN TOOLS

    SciTech Connect

    Rajiv Srivastava; M. A. Ebadian

    2000-09-15

    The ''Nitrogen Oxides Emission Reduction Program'' and ''Ozone Non-Attainment Program'' in the 1990 Clean Air Act provide guidelines for controlling NOx (NO and NO{sub 2}) emissions in new and existing stationary sources. NOx emissions have local (air quality), regional (acid rain), and global (ozone production) consequences. This study aids in developing the photocatalyst technology that has potential for use in abatement of NOx. The objective of the proposed project is to apply the principles of chemical engineering fundamentals--reaction kinetics, transport phenomena and thermodynamics--in the process design for a system that will utilize a photocatalytic reactor to oxidize NOx to nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}). HNO{sub 3} can be more easily trapped than NOx on adsorbent surfaces or in water. The project dealt with the engineering aspect of the gas-solid heterogeneous oxidation of NOx. The experiments were conducted in a photocatalyst wash-coated glass flow tube reactor. A mathematical model was developed based on a rigorous description of the physical and chemical processes occurring in the reactor. The mathematical model took into account (1) intrinsic reaction kinetics (i.e., true reaction rates), (2) transport phenomena that deal with the mass transfer effects in the reactor, and (3) the geometry of the reactor. The experimental results were used for validation of the mathematical model that provides the basis for a versatile and reliable method for the purpose of design, scale-up and process control. The NOx abatement was successfully carried out in a flow tube reactor surrounded by black lights under the exploratory grant. Due to lack of funds, a comprehensive kinetic analysis for the photocatalytic reaction scheme could not be carried out. The initial experiments look very promising for use of photocatalysis for NOx abatement.

  16. Dynamic Kinetic Resolution Approach for the Asymmetric Synthesis of Tetrahydrobenzodiazepines Using Transfer Hydrogenation by Chiral Phosphoric Acid.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Kosaku; Yamamoto, Eri; Saito, Kodai; Yamanaka, Masahiro; Akiyama, Takahiko

    2016-06-01

    Asymmetric synthesis of tetrahydrobenzodiazepines was achieved by transfer hydrogenation of dihydrobenzodiazepines with benzothiazoline having a hydrogen-bonding donor substituent by means of a newly synthesized chiral phosphoric acid. This method was applicable to various racemic dihydrobenzodiazepines to give the corresponding products in good yields with excellent diastereoselectivities and enantioselectivities taking advantage of the dynamic kinetic resolution. Furthermore, the effect of bulky substituent at 3,3'-position on the catalyst and hydrogen-bonding donor substituent on benzothiazoline was fully elucidated by the theoretical study. PMID:27150449

  17. Chemical Kinetic Study of Toluene Oxidation Under Premixed and Nonpremixed Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, I D; Bozzelli, J W; Seiser, R; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Chen, C -; Fournet, R; Seshadri, K; Battin-Leclerc, F; Billaud, F

    2003-12-10

    A study was performed to elucidate the chemical-kinetic mechanism of combustion of toluene. A detailed chemical-kinetic mechanism for toluene was improved by adding a more accurate description of the phenyl + O{sub 2} reaction channels, toluene decomposition reactions and the benzyl + O reaction. Results of the chemical kinetic mechanism are compared with experimental data obtained from premixed and non-premixed systems. Under premixed conditions, predicted ignition delay times are compared with new experimental data obtained in shock tube. Also, calculated species concentration histories are compared to experimental flow reactor data from the literature. Under non-premixed conditions, critical conditions of extinction and autoignition were measured in strained laminar flows in the counterflow configuration. Numerical calculations are performed using the chemical-kinetic mechanism at conditions corresponding to those in the experiments. Critical conditions of extinction and autoignition are predicted and compared with the experimental data. Comparisons between the model predictions and experimental results of ignition delay times in shock tube, and extinction and autoignition in non-premixed systems show that the chemical-kinetic mechanism predicts that toluene/air is overall less reactive than observed in the experiments. For both premixed and non-premixed systems, sensitivity analysis was used to identify the reaction rate constants that control the overall rate of oxidation in each of the systems considered. Under shock tube conditions, the reactions that influence ignition delay time are H + O{sub 2} chain branching, the toluene decomposition reaction to give an H atom, and the toluene + H abstraction reaction. The reactions that influence autoignition in non-premixed systems involve the benzyl + HO{sub 2} reaction and the phenyl + O{sub 2} reaction.

  18. Thermodynamic and kinetic study of phenol degradation by a non-catalytic wet air oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Sébastien; Boutin, Olivier; Ferrasse, Jean-Henry; Malleret, Laure; Faucherand, Rémy; Viand, Alain

    2011-08-01

    This work is dedicated to an accurate evaluation of thermodynamic and kinetics aspects of phenol degradation using wet air oxidation process. Phenol is a well known polluting molecule and therefore it is important having data of its behaviour during this process. A view cell is used for the experimental study, with an internal volume of 150 mL, able to reach pressures up to 30 MPa and temperatures up to 350°C. Concerning the thermodynamic phase equilibria, experimental and modelling results are obtained for different binary systems (water/nitrogen, water/air) and ternary system (water/nitrogen/phenol). The best model is the Predictive Soave Redlich Kwong one. This information is necessary to predict the composition of the gas phase during the process. It is also important for an implementation in a process simulation. The second part is dedicated to kinetics evaluation of the degradation of phenol. Different compounds have been detected using GC coupled with a MS. A kinetic scheme is deduced, taking into account the evolution of phenol, hydroquinones, catechol, resorcinol and acetic acid. The kinetic parameters are calculated for this scheme. These data are important to evaluate the evolution of the concentration of the different polluting molecules during the process. A simplified kinetic scheme, which can be easily implemented in a process simulation, is also determined for the direct degradation of phenol into H(2)O and CO(2). The Arrhenius law data obtained for the phenol disappearance are the following: k=1.8×10(6)±3.9×10(5)M(-1)s(-1) (pre-exponential factor) and E(a)=77±8 kJ mol(-1) (activation energy). PMID:21700312

  19. Effects of preconditioning the rhizosphere of different plant species on biotic methane oxidation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Ndanga, Éliane M; Lopera, Carolina B; Bradley, Robert L; Cabral, Alexandre R

    2016-09-01

    The rhizosphere is known as the most active biogeochemical layer of the soil. Therefore, it could be a beneficial environment for biotic methane oxidation. The aim of this study was to document - by means of batch incubation tests - the kinetics of CH4 oxidation in rhizosphere soils that were previously exposed to methane. Soils from three pre-exposure to CH4 zones were sampled: the never-before pre-exposed (NEX), the moderately pre-exposed (MEX) and the very pre-exposed (VEX). For each pre-exposure zone, the rhizosphere of several plant species was collected, pre-incubated, placed in glass vials and submitted to CH4 concentrations varying from 0.5% to 10%. The time to the beginning of CH4 consumption and the CH4 oxidation rate were recorded. The results showed that the fastest CH4 consumption occurred for the very pre-exposed rhizosphere. Specifically, a statistically significant difference in CH4 oxidation half-life was found between the rhizosphere of the VEX vegetated with a mixture of different plants and the NEX vegetated with ryegrass. This difference was attributed to the combined effect of the preconditioning level and plant species as well as to the organic matter content. Regardless of the preconditioning level, the oxidation rate values obtained in this study were comparable to those reported in the reviewed literature for mature compost. PMID:27177464

  20. Rate Equations and Kinetic Parameters of the Reactions Involved in Pyrite Oxidation by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Lizama, H M; Suzuki, I

    1989-11-01

    Rate equations and kinetic parameters were obtained for various reactions involved in the bacterial oxidation of pyrite. The rate constants were 3.5 muM Fe per min per FeS(2) percent pulp density for the spontaneous pyrite dissolution, 10 muM Fe per min per mM Fe for the indirect leaching with Fe, 90 muM O(2) per min per mg of wet cells per ml for the Thiobacillus ferrooxidans oxidation of washed pyrite, and 250 muM O(2) per min per mg of wet cells per ml for the T. ferrooxidans oxidation of unwashed pyrite. The K(m) values for pyrite concentration were similar and were 1.9, 2.5, and 2.75% pulp density for indirect leaching, washed pyrite oxidation by T. ferrooxidans, and unwashed pyrite oxidation by T. ferrooxidans, respectively. The last reaction was competitively inhibited by increasing concentrations of cells, with a K(i) value of 0.13 mg of wet cells per ml. T. ferrooxidans cells also increased the rate of Fe production from Fe plus pyrite. PMID:16348054

  1. Palladium nanoparticles anchored on graphene nanosheets: Methanol, ethanol oxidation reactions and their kinetic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaraju, D.H.; Devaraj, S.; Balaya, P.

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Palladium nanoparticles decorated graphene is synthesized in a single step. • Electro-catalytic activity of Gra/Pd toward alcohol oxidation is evaluated. • 1:1 Gra/Pd exhibits good electro-catalytic activity and efficient electron transfer. - Abstract: Palladium nanoparticles decorated graphene (Gra/Pd nanocomposite) was synthesized by simultaneous chemical reduction of graphene oxide and palladium salt in a single step. The negatively charged graphene oxide (GO) facilitates uniform distribution of Pd{sup 2+} ions onto its surface. The subsequent reduction by hydrazine hydrate provides well dispersed Pd nanoparticles decorated graphene. Different amount of Pd nanoparticles on graphene was synthesized by changing the volume to weight ratio of GO to PdCl{sub 2}. X-ray diffraction studies showed FCC lattice of Pd with predominant (1 1 1) plane. SEM and TEM studies revealed that thin graphene nanosheets are decorated by Pd nanoparticles. Raman spectroscopic studies revealed the presence of graphene nanosheets. The electro-catalytic activity of Gra/Pd nanocomposites toward methanol and ethanol oxidation in alkaline medium was evaluated by cyclic voltammetric studies. 1:1 Gra/Pd nanocomposite exhibited good electro-catalytic activity and efficient electron transfer. The kinetics of electron transfer was studied using chronoamperometry. Improved electro-catalytic activity of 1:1 Gra/Pd nanocomposite toward alcohol oxidation makes it as a potential anode for the alcohol fuel cells.

  2. Heterogeneous oxidation of folpet and dimethomorph by OH radicals: A kinetic and mechanistic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Rashidi, M.; Chakir, A.; Roth, E.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the heterogeneous OH oxidation of folpet and dimethomorph, two fungicides identified in the atmosphere of the Champagne-Ardenne region. Kinetic experiments were conducted in the relative mode, using terbuthylazine as a reference compound. The experimental method employed makes use of a simulation chamber coupled to a GC/MS analytical system. Meanwhile, the identification of (4-chlorophenyl)(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)methanone (CPMPM), a degradation product of the OH oxidation of dimethomorph, is achieved using SPME/GC/MS. Moreover, a degradation mechanism of dimethomorph is proposed, and the heterogeneous OH reactivity of CPMPM is evaluated. The obtained OH reaction rate constants (cm3 molecule-1 s-1) are: kZ-dimethomorph = (2.0 ± 1.2) 10-14, kE-dimethomorph = (1.7 ± 1.2) 10-14, kFolpet = (1.6 ± 0.9) 10-13 and kCPMPM = (1.9 ± 1.0) 10-12. The implicated tropospheric life-times are up to 2 months, which shows that the investigated pesticides are relatively persistent towards oxidation removal processes. CPMPM, the identified product of OH oxidation of dimethomorph, is less persistent with a life time of only 6 days relative to heterogeneous oxidation by OH radicals.

  3. Kinetic control by limiting glutaredoxin amounts enables thiol oxidation in the reducing mitochondrial intermembrane space

    PubMed Central

    Kojer, Kerstin; Peleh, Valentina; Calabrese, Gaetano; Herrmann, Johannes M.; Riemer, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial intermembrane space (IMS) harbors an oxidizing machinery that drives import and folding of small cysteine-containing proteins without targeting signals. The main component of this pathway is the oxidoreductase Mia40, which introduces disulfides into its substrates. We recently showed that the IMS glutathione pool is maintained as reducing as that of the cytosol. It thus remained unclear how equilibration of protein disulfides with the IMS glutathione pool is prevented in order to allow oxidation-driven protein import. Here we demonstrate the presence of glutaredoxins in the IMS and show that limiting amounts of these glutaredoxins provide a kinetic barrier to prevent the thermodynamically feasible reduction of Mia40 substrates by the IMS glutathione pool. Moreover, they allow Mia40 to exist in a predominantly oxidized state. Consequently, overexpression of glutaredoxin 2 in the IMS results in a more reduced Mia40 redox state and a delay in oxidative folding and mitochondrial import of different Mia40 substrates. Our findings thus indicate that carefully balanced glutaredoxin amounts in the IMS ensure efficient oxidative folding in the reducing environment of this compartment. PMID:25392302

  4. Kinetic and mechanistic investigations of the degradation of sulfamethazine in heat-activated persulfate oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yan; Ji, Yuefei; Kong, Deyang; Lu, Junhe; Zhou, Quansuo

    2015-12-30

    Sulfamethazine (SMZ) is widely used in livestock feeding and aquaculture as an antibiotic agent and growth promoter. Widespread occurrence of SMZ in surface water, groundwater, soil and sediment has been reported. In this study, degradation of SMZ by heat-activated persulfate (PS) oxidation was investigated in aqueous solution. Experimental results demonstrated that SMZ degradation followed pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics. The pseudo-first-order rate constant (kobs) was increased markedly with increasing concentration of PS and temperature. Radical scavenging tests revealed that the predominant oxidizing species was SO4·(-) with HO playing a less important role. Aniline moiety in SMZ molecule was confirmed to be the reactive site for SO4·(-) attack by comparison with substructural analogs. Nontarget natural water constituents affected SMZ removal significantly, e.g., Cl(-) and HCO3(-) improved the degradation while fulvic acid reduced it. Reaction products were enriched by solid phase extraction (SPE) and analyzed by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). 6 products derived from sulfonamide S--N bond cleavage, aniline moiety oxidation and Smiles-type rearrangement were identified, and transformation pathways of SMZ oxidation were proposed. Results reveal that heat-activated PS oxidation could be an efficient approach for remediation of water contaminated by SMZ and related sulfonamides. PMID:26151383

  5. Kinetics and Mechanism of Oxidation of Methimazole by Chlorite in Slightly Acidic Media.

    PubMed

    Chipiso, Kudzanai; Simoyi, Reuben H

    2016-06-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of methimazole (1-methyl-3H-imidazole), MMI, by chlorite in mildly acidic environments were studied. It is a complex reaction that gives oligo-oscillations in chlorine dioxide concentrations in excess chlorite conditions. The stoichiometry is strictly 2:1, with the sulfur center being oxidized to sulfate and the organic moiety being hydrolyzed to several indeterminate species. In excess MMI conditions over chlorite, the sulfinic acid and sulfonic acid were observed as major intermediates. The sulfenic acid, which was observed in the electrochemical oxidation of MMI, was not observed with chlorite oxidations. Initial reduction of chlorite produced HOCl, an autocatalytic species in chlorite oxidations. HOCl rapidly reacts with chlorite to produce chlorine dioxide, which, in turn, reacts rapidly with MMI to produce more chlorite. The reaction of chlorine dioxide with MMI is competitive, in rate, with the chlorite-MMI and HOCl-ClO2(-) reactions. This explains the oligo-oscillations in ClO2 concentrations. PMID:27126471

  6. Wet oxidation of an azo dye: Lumped kinetics in batch and mixed flow reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Donlagic, J.; Levec, J.

    1999-12-01

    Oxidation of a dilute aqueous solution of a model azo dye pollutant (Orange II) was studied in batch and continuous well-mixed (CSTR) reactors. Both reactors operate at 200--250 C, and total pressures up to 50 bar and at oxygen partial pressure from 10 to 30 bar. The model pollutant concentrations were in a range between 100 and 1,000 mg/L, which may be found in industrial wastewaters. The dye oxidation undergoes parallel-consecutive reaction pathways, in which it first decomposes thermally and oxidatively to aromatic intermediates and via organic acids to the final product carbon dioxide. To develop a kinetic equation capable of predicting organic carbon reduction, all organic species present in solution were lumped by total organic carbon (TOC). The lumped oxidation rate in batch reactor exhibited second-order behavior, whereas in the CSTR is was found linearly proportional to its TOC concentration. The lump behavior in batch reactor was dominated by the refractory low molecular mass aliphatic acids formed during the oxidation.

  7. A kinetic approach to the catalytic oxidation of mercury in flue gas

    SciTech Connect

    Albert A. Presto; Evan J. Granite; Andrew Karash; Richard A. Hargis; William J. O'Dowd; Henry W. Pennline

    2006-10-15

    Four mercury oxidation catalysts were tested in a packed bed reactor in the presence of flue gas generated by the NETL 500 lb/h coal combustor. The four catalysts tested were Ir, Ir/HCl, Darco FGD activated carbon, and Thief/HCl. The Thief/HCl and Darco converted the highest percentage of the inlet mercury; however, the high conversion in these experiments was aided by larger catalyst loadings than in the Ir and Ir/HCl experiments. We propose a method for analyzing mercury oxidation catalyst results in a kinetic framework using the bulk reaction rate for oxidized mercury formation normalized by either the catalyst mass or surface area. Results reported for fractional mercury oxidation are strongly influenced by the specific experimental conditions and are therefore difficult to translate from experiment to experiment. The catalyst-normalized results allow for more quantitative analysis of mercury oxidation catalyst data and are the first step in creating a predictive model that will allow for efficient scaling up from laboratory-scale to larger-scale studies. 34 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  8. Kinetic spectrophotometric method for the determination of silymarin in pharmaceutical formulations using potassium permanganate as oxidant.

    PubMed

    Rahman, N; Khan, N A; Azmi, S N H

    2004-02-01

    A new simple and sensitive kinetic spectrophotometric method for the determination of silymarin in pure form and in pharmaceutical formulations is described. The method is based on the oxidation of the drug with potassium permanganate at pH 7.0 +/- 0.2. The reaction is followed spectrophotometrically by measuring the decrease in the absorbance at 530 nm. The calibration graph is linear in the range of 18-50 microg x m(-1). The method has been successfully applied to the determination of silymarin in pharmaceutical formulations. Statistical comparison of the results with the reference method shows excellent agreement and indicates no significant difference in accuracy and precision. PMID:15025178

  9. Carbon kinetic isotope effect accompanying microbial oxidation of methane in boreal forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeburgh, W. S.; Hirsch, A. I.; Sansone, F. J.; Popp, B. N.; Rust, T. M.

    1997-11-01

    Atmospheric methane (CH 4) oxidation occurs in soils at sites in the Bonanza Creek L.T.E.R. near Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, at rates ⩽2 mg CH 4 m -2 d -1; the maximum CH 4 oxidizing activity is located in loess at a depth of ˜15 cm. Methane, carbon dioxide, and stable isotope (δ 13C-CH 4, δ 13C-CO 2) depth distributions were measured at two sites: South facing Aspen (AS2) and North facing Black Spruce (BS2). The combined effects of diffusion and oxidation are similar at both sites and result in a CH 4 concentration decrease (1.8-0.1 ppm) and a δ 13C-CH 4 increase (-48% to -43%) from the soil surface to 60-80 cm depth. Isotope flux ratio and diffusion-consumption models were used to estimate the kinetic isotope effect (KIE); these results agree with the observed top-to-bottom difference in δ 13C-CH 4, which is the integrated result of isotope fractionation due to diffusion and oxidation. The KIE for CH 4 oxidation determined from these measurements is 1.022-1.025, which agrees with previous KIE determinations based on changes in headspace CH 4 concentration and δ 13C-CH 4 over time. A much lower soil respiration rate in the North facing Black Spruce soils is indicated by fivefold lower Soil CO 2 concentrations. The similarity in CH 4 oxidation at the two sites and the differences in inferred soil respiration at the two sites suggest that soil CH 4 oxidation and soil respiration are independent processes. The soil organic matter responsible for the CO 2 flux has a δ 13C estimated to be -27 to -28%.

  10. Kinetics of Mn(II) oxidation by spores of the marine Bacillus sp. SG-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2016-09-01

    The kinetics of Mn(II) oxidation by spores of the marine Bacillus sp. SG-1 was measured under controlled conditions of the initial Mn(II) concentration, spore concentration, chemical speciation, pH, O2, and temperature. Mn(II) oxidation experiments were performed with spore concentrations ranging from 0.7 to 11 × 109 spores/L, a pH range from 5.8 to 8.1, temperatures between 4 and 58 °C, a range of dissolved oxygen from 2 to 270 μM, and initial Mn(II) concentrations from 1 to 200 μM. The Mn(II) oxidation rates were directly proportional to the spore concentrations over these ranges of concentration. The Mn(II) oxidation rate increased with increasing initial Mn(II) concentration to a critical concentration, as described by the Michaelis-Menten model (Km = ca. 3 μM). Whereas with starting Mn(II) concentrations above the critical concentration, the rate was almost constant in low ionic solution (I = 0.05, 0.08). At high ionic solution (I = 0.53, 0.68), the rate was inversely correlated with Mn(II) concentration. Increase in the Mn(II) oxidation rate with the dissolved oxygen concentration followed the Michaelis-Menten model (Km = 12-19 μM DO) in both a HEPES-buffered commercial drinking (soft) water and in artificial and natural seawater. Overall, our results suggest that the mass transport limitations of Mn(II) ions due to secondary Mn oxide products accumulating on the spores cause a significant decrease of the oxidation rate at higher initial Mn(II) concentration on a spore basis, as well as in more concentrated ionic solutions. The optimum pH for Mn(II) oxidation was approximately 7.0 in low ionic solutions (I = 0.08). The high rates at the alkaline side (pH > 7.5) may suggest a contribution by heterogeneous reactions on manganese bio-oxides. The effect of temperature on the Mn(II) oxidation rate was studied in three solutions (500 mM NaCl, ASW, NSW solutions). Thermal denaturation occurred at 58 °C and spore germination was evident at 40 °C in all three

  11. Morphological impact on the reaction kinetics of size-selected cobalt oxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Bartling, Stephan Meiwes-Broer, Karl-Heinz; Barke, Ingo; Pohl, Marga-Martina

    2015-09-21

    Apart from large surface areas, low activation energies are essential for efficient reactions, particularly in heterogeneous catalysis. Here, we show that not only the size of nanoparticles but also their detailed morphology can crucially affect reaction kinetics, as demonstrated for mass-selected, soft-landed, and oxidized cobalt clusters in a 6 nm to 18 nm size range. The method of reflection high-energy electron diffraction is extended to the quantitative determination of particle activation energies which is applied for repeated oxidation and reduction cycles at the same particles. We find unexpectedly small activation barriers for the reduction reaction of the largest particles studied, despite generally increasing barriers for growing sizes. We attribute these observations to the interplay of reaction-specific material transport with a size-dependent inner particle morphology.

  12. Kinetics simulation of luminol chemiluminescence based on quantitative analysis of photons generated in electrochemical oxidation.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Yozo; Nosaka, Yoshio

    2013-08-22

    The kinetics of electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) of luminol at a gold electrode in alkaline solution was investigated by measuring the absolute number of photons emitted in an integrating sphere. The ECL efficiency as the ratio of photon to electric charge was 0.0004 in cyclic voltammography and 0.0005 in chronoamperometry. By numerically solving the rate equations based on a diffusion layer model, the observed time profile of the luminescence intensity could be successfully simulated from the oxidation current of luminol in the chronoamperometry. In the simulation, the rate constant for the oxidation of luminol by superoxide radicals in alkaline solution was determined to be 6 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1). The present methodology and the achievement could be widely applicable to various analytical techniques using chemiluminescence. PMID:23879304

  13. Kinetics of oxidation of pentavalent neptunium by pentavalent vanadium in solutions of nitric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Precek, Martin; Paulenova, Alena

    2010-03-01

    Management of the oxidation state of neptunium in the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel by solvent extraction is very important. The kinetics of the oxidation of neptunium(V) by vanadium(V) in solutions of nitrate acid was investigated at constant ionic strength 4M. The reaction rate is first order with respect to Np(V) and V(V). The effects of proton concentration on the apparent second order rate constant k1" was determined for temperature 25°C as k1" = (0.99±0.03)·[H+]1.21M-1s-1. Activation parameters associated with the overall reaction have been calculated; the standard reaction enthalpy and entropy were 52.6±0.9 kJ/mol and -55.8±0.9 J/K/mol respectively.

  14. Relevance of Chemical Kinetics for Medicine: The Case of Nitric Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaban, Alexandru T.; Seitz, William

    2003-06-01

    Nitric oxide, NO, is central to many physiological processes including regulation of blood pressure and nerve signal transmission. Enzymes in endothelial cells and in the brain of mammals continuously synthesize it—generally in low and carefully regulated concentrations. The well known reaction of NO with oxygen to produce toxic nitrogen dioxide, NO2, has a rate which is bimolecular in NO. High concentrations of NO, as are found often in industrial plants or cigarettes, react rapidly with oxygen to produce toxic NO2. However, the half-life of NO at low NO concentrations as found in solutions and gases occurring in blood vessels, brains, and lungs is sufficiently long for biochemical purposes. Kinetics, then, determines the harmful versus helpful aspects of nitric oxide. At concentrations below 80 ppm NO is used in hospitals for lung vasodilation of preterm newborns and patients with pulmonary distress.

  15. Hydrogenation kinetics in oxidized boron-doped silicon irradiated by keV electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wallace Wan-Li; Sah, Chih-Tang

    1988-08-01

    Hydrogenation kinetics of boron acceptors in oxidized silicon during and after repeated 8-keV electron irradiation (225-2700-μC/cm2 stresses and 10-168-h interirradiation anneals) at room temperature are reported. Hydrogenation proceeds rapidly during irradiation but continues for many hours after the 8-keV electron beam is removed. Postoxidation process dependencies show that postoxidation and postmetallization annealing processes reduce the hydrogenation effect during the 8-keV electron irradiation, while exposure of the oxide to water prior to aluminum electrode deposition enhances it. The data can be interpreted by our two-reaction model consisting of the hydrogen capture reaction by the boron acceptor and the hydrogen recombination reaction to form hydrogen molecule.

  16. Extracting copper from copper oxide ore by a zwitterionic reagent and dissolution kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jiu-shuai; Wen, Shu-ming; Deng, Jian-ying; Wu, Dan-dan

    2015-03-01

    Sulfamic acid (SA), which possesses a zwitterionic structure, was applied as a leaching reagent for the first time for extracting copper from copper oxide ore. The effects of reaction time, temperature, particle size, reagent concentration, and stirring speed on this leaching were studied. The dissolution kinetics of malachite was illustrated with a three-dimensional diffusion model. A novel leaching effect of SA on malachite was eventually demonstrated. The leaching rate increased with decreasing particle size and increasing concentration, reaction temperature and stirring speed. The activation energy for SA leaching malachite was 33.23 kJ/mol. Furthermore, the effectiveness of SA as a new reagent for extracting copper from copper oxide ore was confirmed by experiment. This approach may provide a solution suitable for subsequent electrowinning. In addition, results reported herein may provide basic data that enable the leaching of other carbonate minerals of copper, zinc, cobalt and so on in an SA system.

  17. Ruthenium(salen)-catalyzed aerobic oxidative desymmetrization of meso-diols and its kinetics.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hideki; Onitsuka, Satoaki; Egami, Hiromichi; Katsuki, Tsutomu

    2005-04-20

    Chiral (nitrosyl)ruthenium(salen) complexes were found to be efficient catalysts for aerobic oxidative desymmetrization of meso-diols under photoirradiation to give optically active lactols. The scope of the applicability of this reaction ranges widely from acyclic diols to mono-cyclic diols, although fine ligand-tuning of the ruthenium(salen) complexes was required to attain high enantioselectivity (up to 93% ee). In particular, the nature of the apical ligand was found to affect not only enantioselectivity but also kinetics of the desymmetrization reaction. Spectroscopic analysis of the oxidation disclosed that irradiation of visible light is indispensable not only for dissociation of the nitrosyl ligand but also for single electron transfer from the alcohol-bound ruthenium ion to dioxygen. PMID:15826178

  18. Oxidative folding of peptides with cystine-knot architectures: kinetic studies and optimization of folding conditions.

    PubMed

    Reinwarth, Michael; Glotzbach, Bernhard; Tomaszowski, Michael; Fabritz, Sebastian; Avrutina, Olga; Kolmar, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Bioactive peptides often contain several disulfide bonds that provide the main contribution to conformational rigidity and structural, thermal, or biological stability. Among them, cystine-knot peptides-commonly named "knottins"-make up a subclass with several thousand natural members. Hence, they are considered promising frameworks for peptide-based pharmaceuticals. Although cystine-knot peptides are available through chemical and recombinant synthetic routes, oxidative folding to afford the bioactive isomers still remains a crucial step. We therefore investigated the oxidative folding of ten protease-inhibiting peptides from two knottin families, as well as that of an HIV entry inhibitor and of aprotinin, under two conventional sets of folding conditions and by a newly developed procedure. Kinetic studies identified folding conditions that resulted in correctly folded miniproteins with high rates of conversion even for highly hydrophobic and aggregation-prone peptides in concentrated solutions. PMID:23229141

  19. Use of the point defect model to interpret the iron oxidation kinetics under proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lapuerta, S.; Moncoffre, N.; Jaffrezic, H.; Millard-Pinard, N.; Bererd, N.; Esnouf, C.; Crusset, D.

    2007-03-15

    This article concerns the study of iron corrosion in wet air under mega-electron-volt proton irradiation for different fluxes at room temperature and with a relative humidity fixed to 45%. Oxidized iron sample surfaces are characterized by ion beam analysis (Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and elastic recoil detection analysis), for the elemental analysis. The structural and physicochemical characterization is performed using the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques. We have also measured the iron oxidation kinetics. Radiation enhanced diffusion and transport processes have been evidenced. The modeling of the experimental data shows that the apparent oxygen diffusion coefficient increases whereas the oxygen transport velocity decreases as function of flux. Finally, the point defect model has been used to determine the electric field value in the samples. Results have shown that the transport process can be attributed to the presence of an electrical potential gradient.

  20. Oxidation kinetics of the combustible fraction of construction and demolition wastes.

    PubMed

    Chang, N B; Lin, K S; Sun, Y P; Wang, H P

    2001-01-01

    Proper disposal of construction and demolition wastes (CDW) has received wide attention recently due to significantly large quantities of waste streams collected from razed or retrofitted buildings in many metropolitan regions. Burning the combustible fractions of CDW (CCDW) and possibly recovering part of the heat content for economic uses could be valuable for energy conservation. This paper explores the oxidation kinetics of CCDW associated with its ash characterization. Kinetic parameters for the oxidation of CCDW were numerically calculated using thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and the resultant rate equations were therefore developed for illustrating the oxidation processes of CCDW simultaneously. Based on three designated heating rates, each of the oxidation processes can be featured distinctively with five different stages according to the rate of weight change at the temperature between 300 K and 923 K. In addition, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was employed, associated with a lab-scale fixed-bed incinerator for monitoring the composition of flue gas. Carbon dioxide (CO2) was found as a major component in the flue gas. The fuel analysis also included an ash composition analysis via the use of X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), atomic absorption (AA) spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDX). The ash streams were identified as nonhazardous materials based on the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP). Overall, the scientific findings gained in this study will be helpful for supporting a sound engineering design of real-world CCDW incineration systems. PMID:11476518

  1. Kinetic resolution of (R,S)-sec-butylamine using omega-transaminase from Vibrio fluvialis JS17 under reduced pressure.

    PubMed

    Yun, Hyungdon; Cho, Byung-Kwan; Kim, Byung-Gee

    2004-09-20

    The kinetic resolution of (R,S) sec-butylamine with the omega-transaminase (TA) from Vibrio fluvialis JS17 was performed under reduced pressure (e.g., 150 torr) to selectively remove an inhibitory product (2-butanone). The evaporation kinetics of 2-butanone at 150 torr in the buffer solution followed the first-order rate law, and the evaporation rate constant was 2.19 1/h, and independent of pH, while the evaporation kinetics of sec-butylamine is dependent on pH. A simple mathematical model of the evaporation of sec-butylamine allowing the estimation of its concentration in the reaction media was developed. The evaporation rate constant of its free amine form and the protonated amine form were 1.00 1/h, and nearly zero, respectively. Although the optimum pH of the omega-TA activity for sec-butylamine is 9.0, the optimal pH of the enzyme reaction under reduced pressure was pH 7.0, due to the higher evaporation rate of sec-butylamine at higher pH above 7.0. Using the recombinant Escherichia coli BL21 overexpressing omega-TA, 400 mM racemic sec-butylamine was resolved successfully to 98% ee of (R)-sec-butylamine with 53% conversion at 150 torr and pH 7.0. PMID:15329935

  2. Thermal oxidation kinetics and mechanism of sludge from a wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Tettamanti, M; Lasagni, M; Collina, E; Sancassani, M; Pitea, D; Fermo, P; Cariati, F

    2001-10-01

    The organic fraction of a sludge from a wastewater biological treatment plant is characterized by the total organic carbon, TOC, content, cyclohexane and toluene extractions, and thermal desorptions in nitrogen and air flow at different temperatures. The inorganic fraction is characterized by water extraction, FT-IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersion X-ray analysis. The thermal degradation rate of organic carbon is studied in batch experiments in air, in the 250-500 degrees C temperature range. The sample TOC is used to measure the decrease of reagent concentration with time. The TOC vs time data are well fitted by a generalized kinetic model, previously proposed for the MSWIs fly ash thermal degradation. The rate constants of the immediate carbon gasification, k2, and of the dissociative oxygen chemisorption, k1, followed by C(O) intermediate gasification, k3, together with activation and thermodynamic parameters are calculated. The rate determining step is the C(O) oxidation. The influence of desorbed or extracted organic compounds on kinetics and the role of the C(O) formation in explaining the reaction mechanism as well as the comparison with fly ash kinetics are discussed. PMID:11642466

  3. Chemical kinetic study of the oxidation of toluene and related cyclic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Mehl, M; Frassoldati, A; Fietzek, R; Faravelli, T; Pitz, W; Ranzi, E

    2009-10-01

    Chemical kinetic models of hydrocarbons found in transportation fuels are needed to simulate combustion in engines and to improve engine performance. The study of the combustion of practical fuels, however, has to deal with their complex compositions, which generally involve hundreds of compounds. To provide a simplified approach for practical fuels, surrogate fuels including few relevant components are used instead of including all components. Among those components, toluene, the simplest of the alkyl benzenes, is one of the most prevalent aromatic compounds in gasoline in the U.S. (up to 30%) and is a promising candidate for formulating gasoline surrogates. Unfortunately, even though the combustion of aromatics been studied for a long time, the oxidation processes relevant to this class of compounds are still matter of discussion. In this work, the combustion of toluene is systematically approached through the analysis of the kinetics of some important intermediates contained in its kinetic submechanism. After discussing the combustion chemistry of cyclopentadiene, benzene, phenol and, finally, of toluene, the model is validated against literature experimental data over a wide range of operating conditions.

  4. [CoCuMnOx Photocatalyzed Oxidation of Multi-component VOCs and Kinetic Analysis].

    PubMed

    Meng, Hai-long; Bo, Long-li; Liu, Jia-dong; Gao, Bo; Feng, Qi-qi; Tan, Na; Xie, Shuai

    2016-05-15

    Solar energy absorption coating CoCuMnOx was prepared by co-precipitation method and applied to photodegrade multi- component VOCs including toluene, ethyl acetate and acetone under visible light irradiation. The photocatalytic oxidation performance of toluene, ethyl acetate and acetone was analyzed and reaction kinetics of VOCs were investigated synchronously. The research indicated that removal rates of single-component toluene, ethyl acetate and acetone were 57%, 62% and 58% respectively under conditions of 400 mg · m⁻³ initial concentration, 120 mm illumination distance, 1 g/350 cm² dosage of CoCuMnOx and 6 h of irradiation time by 100 W tungsten halogen lamp. Due to the competition among different VOCs, removal efficiencies in three-component mixture were reduced by 5%-26% as compared with single VOC. Degradation processes of single-component VOC and three-component VOCs both fitted pseudo first order reaction kinetics, and kinetic constants of toluene, ethyl acetate and acetone were 0.002, 0.002 8 and 0.002 33 min⁻¹ respectively under single-component condition. Reaction rates of VOCs in three-component mixture were 0.49-0.88 times of single components. PMID:27506018

  5. Energetics, kinetics and dynamics of decaying metastable ions studied with a high-resolution three-sector field mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matt-Leubner, S.; Feil, S.; Gluch, K.; Fedor, J.; Stamatovic, A.; Echt, O.; Scheier, P.; Becker, K.; Märk, T. D.

    2005-05-01

    Mass spectrometric analysis of metastable decay reactions is devoted to the measurements of the kinetic energy release distribution (KERD) for the decay of singly charged rare gas dimer ions Xe_{2}^{ + } and Kr_{2}^{ + } , the doubly charged acetylene parent ion C_{2}H_{2^{ 2+ }} and the singly and doubly charged SF6 fragment ions, like for example SF_{3}^{ + } , SF_{3}^{ 2 + } and SF_{4}^{ 2 + } . The KERDs are obtained either from high-resolution mass analysed ion kinetic energy spectra or the measurement of ion beam profiles using a specially improved mass spectrometric system. Due to the high energy resolution measurements and theoretical studies based on ab initio calculations of potential energy curves it is possible to assign the reaction products of the rare gas dimer decays to electronic transitions in the excited parent ion. The C_{2}H_{2^{ 2 + }} and also the SF_{4}^{ 2 + } ions are investigated because of obscurities in the production of their fragment ions. The unusual shape of the SF_{3}^{ + } ionization cross section indicates that at sufficiently high electron energies the fragmentation channel of doubly charged SF_{4}^{ 2 + } contributes significantly to the ion yield. Additional measurements of the corresponding appearance energies confirm the existence of this second production channel.

  6. Kinetic resolution of (R/S)-propranolol (1-isopropylamino-3-(1-naphtoxy)-2-propanolol) catalyzed by immobilized preparations of Candida antarctica lipase B (CAL-B).

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Oveimar; Ariza, Cesar; Ortiz, Claudia; Torres, Rodrigo

    2010-12-31

    Enzyme preparations of Candida antarctica B lipase (CAL-B) - immobilized on Eupergit C and partially modified Eupergit C supports - were tested for kinetic resolution of (R/S)-propranolol, using vinyl acetate as acyl donor, and toluene as organic solvent. The effects of (R/S)-propranolol concentration, vinyl acetate concentration and biocatalyst loading on the esterification and resolution of propranolol were studied. Additionally, different types of immobilized lipase derivatives were also evaluated in terms of its selectivity on kinetic resolution of (R,S)-propranolol. These derivatives showed different enantiomeric ratios (E), with high enantiomeric ratios (E=57) with CAL-B immobilized on Eupergit C supports. PMID:20667519

  7. Coal desulfurization in oxidative acid media using hydrogen peroxide and ozone: a kinetic and statistical approach

    SciTech Connect

    F.R. Carrillo-Pedroza; A. Davalos Sanchez; M. Soria-Aguilar; E.T. Pecina Trevino

    2009-07-15

    The removal of pyritic sulfur from a Mexican sub-bituminous coal in nitric, sulfuric, and hydrochloric acid solutions was investigated. The effect of the type and concentration of acid, in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and ozone as oxidants, in a temperature range of 20-60{sup o}C, was studied. The relevant factors in pyrite dissolution were determined by means of the statistical analysis of variance and optimized by the response surface method. Kinetic models were also evaluated, showing that the dissolution of pyritic sulfur follows the kinetic model of the shrinking core model, with diffusion through the solid product of the reaction as the controlling stage. The results of statistical analysis indicate that the use of ozone as an oxidant improves the pyrite dissolution because, at 0.25 M HNO{sub 3} or H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} at 20{sup o}C and 0.33 g/h O{sub 3}, the obtained dissolution is similar to that of 1 M H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and 1 M HNO{sub 3} or H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} at 40{sup o}C. 42 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Kinetic study of the oxide-assisted catalyst-free synthesis of silicon nitride nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farjas, J.; Pinyol, A.; Rath, Chandana; Roura, P.; Bertran, E.

    2006-05-01

    The synthesis of Si3N4 nanowires from the reaction of silicon nanoparticles with N2 in the 1200-1440 °C temperature range is reported. The nitridation conditions are such that the reaction with nitrogen is favoured by the presence of silicon oxide in the particles and by the active oxidation of silicon without a catalyst. It is shown that the Si to Si3N4 conversion rate depends on the amount of silicon particles used in the experiments and that, in general, the reaction slows down for greater amounts. This trend is explained by particle stacking, which restricts the exchange of gases between the furnace atmosphere and the atmosphere around the inner particles. In a first stage, local oxygen partial pressure increases around the inner particles and inhibits nitridation locally. If the amount of reactant Si nanoparticles is small enough, this extrinsic effect is avoided and the intrinsic nitridation kinetics can be measured. Experiments show that intrinsic kinetics does not depend on temperature.

  9. Crystallization kinetics of a solid oxide fuel cell seal glass by differential thermal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Gamble, Eleanor A.

    Crystallization kinetics of a barium-calcium aluminosilicate glass (BCAS), a sealant material for planar solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), have been investigated by differential thermal analysis (DTA). From variation of DTA peak maximum temperature with heating rate, the activation energy for glass crystallization was calculated to be 259 kJ/mol using a kinetic model. Development of crystalline phases on thermal treatments of the glass at various temperatures has been followed by powder X-ray diffraction. Microstructure and chemical composition of the crystalline phases were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopic (EDS) analysis. BaSiO 3 and hexacelsian (BaAl 2Si 2O 8) were the primary crystalline phases whereas monoclinic celsian (BaAl 2Si 2O 8) and (Ba xCa y)SiO 4 were also detected as minor phases. Needle-shaped BaSiO 3 crystals are formed first, followed by the formation of other phases at longer times of heat treatments. The glass does not fully crystallize even after long-term heat treatments at 750-900 °C. Devitrification of the glass seal over a long period of time during operation of the SOFC would generate thermal stresses in the seal and may have adverse effects on its mechanical performance. This may lead to cracking of the seal, resulting in mixing of the fuel and the oxidant gases.

  10. A kinetic model for bacterial Fe(III) oxide reduction in batch cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacherl, Eric L.; Kosson, David S.; Cowan, Robert M.

    2003-04-01

    A model has been developed describing the microbial reduction of solid-phase electron acceptors (Fe(III) oxides) as well as dissolved electron acceptors (chelated Fe(III) or organic electron shuttles) in Shewanella alga BrY. The model utilized a multiple-substrate, Monod kinetics formulation. The Monod description of solid Fe(III) reduction requires a normalization of surface Fe concentration to biomass concentration in order to describe the "bioavailable" Fe(III) concentration. The model also contains provisions for irreversible sorption of Fe(II) to Fe(III) oxide surfaces and for the precipitation of Fe(III) carbonates. The loss of bioavailable Fe(III) due to sorption of Fe(II) was found to be minor, even for highly sorptive amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxides. However, the final extent of microbial reduction is very sensitive to the rate of siderite precipitation, assuming that siderite precipitation could partially occlude Fe(III) surface sites. The use of a multisubstrate Monod kinetics model enabled an evaluation of the effects of electron shuttles on solid Fe(III) reduction. Because the electron shuttle is recycled, very small additions can greatly increase the overall rate of solid Fe(III) reduction.

  11. Features of the kinetics of the liquid-phase oxidation of cyclohexanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchkov, S. V.; Moskvitina, E. G.; Nepomnyashchikh, Yu. V.; Perkel', A. L.

    2013-05-01

    The kinetics of oxygen uptake in the cumyl peroxide-initiated oxidation of cyclohexanol (373 K, o-dichlorobenzene) is studied. The parameters of the oxidizability of k p (2 k t )-0.5 (which depend on [RH]) and the rate constants of the bi- and trimolecular reactions of chain initiation ( k 0 = 1.25 × 10-8 L/(mol s) and k'0 = 2.5 × 10-9 L2/(mol2 s), respectively) are determined by solving the inverse kinetic problem. It is demonstrated that the quadratic-law recombination of peroxyl radicals during cyclohexanol oxidation also occurs without chain termination. The recombination rates of peroxyl radicals with and without chain termination ( k'/ k t ) are found to grow with increasing [RH], reaching their maxima at [RH] = 1.0 mol/L, and to diminish subsequently. We conclude that this can be attributed to changes in the ratio between the propagating peroxyl radicals (hydroperoxyl and 1-hydroxycyclohexylperoxyl) in the reaction medium.

  12. A Shock Tube and Chemical Kinetic Modeling Study of the Oxidation of 2,5-Dimethylfuran

    PubMed Central

    Sirjean, Baptiste; Fournet, René; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Wang, Weijing; Oehlschlaeger, Matthew A.

    2013-01-01

    A detailed kinetic model describing the oxidation of 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF), a potential second-generation biofuel, is proposed. The kinetic model is based upon quantum chemical calculations for the initial DMF consumption reactions and important reactions of intermediates. The model is validated by comparison to new DMF shock tube ignition delay time measurements (over the temperature range 1300 – 1831 K and at nominal pressures of 1 and 4 bar) and the DMF pyrolysis speciation measurements of Lifshitz et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 102 (52) (1998) 10655-10670] Globally, modeling predictions are in good agreement with the considered experimental targets. In particular, ignition delay times are predicted well by the new model, with model experiment deviations of at most a factor of two, and DMF pyrolysis conversion is predicted well, to within experimental scatter of the Lifshitz et al. data. Additionally, comparisons of measured and model predicted pyrolysis speciation provides validation of theoretically calculated channels for the oxidation of DMF. Sensitivity and reaction flux analyses highlight important reactions as well as the primary reaction pathways responsible for the decomposition of DMF and formation and destruction of key intermediate and product species. PMID:23327724

  13. Kinetics and mechanism of arsenate removal by nanosized iron oxide-coated perlite.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, M G; Chen, Yen-Hua; Jean, Jiin-Shuh; Liu, Chia-Chuan; Lee, Yao-Chang

    2011-03-15

    This study discussed the adsorption kinetics of As(V) onto nanosized iron oxide-coated perlite. The effects of pH, initial concentration of As(V) and common anions on the adsorption efficiency were also investigated. It was observed that a 100% As(V) adsorption was achieved at pH value of 4-8 from the initial concentration containing 1.0 mg-As(V)L(-1) and the adsorption percentage depended on the initial concentration; the phosphate and silicate ions would not interfere with the adsorption efficiency. Furthermore, nanosized iron oxide-coated perlite (IOCP) has been shown to be an effective adsorbent for the removal of arsenate from water. The adsorption kinetics were studied using pseudo-first- and pseudo-second-order models, and the experimental data fitted well with the pseudo-second-order model. Moreover, it suggests that the Langmuir isotherm is more adequate than the Freundlich isotherm in simulating the adsorption isotherm of As(V). The adsorption rate constant is 44.84 L mg(-1) and the maximum adsorption capacity is 0.39 mg g(-1). These findings indicate that the adsorption property of IOCP gives the compound a great potential for applications in environmental remediation. PMID:21282000

  14. [Influence of pH on Kinetics of Anilines Oxidation by Permanganate].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Sun, Bo; Guan, Xiao-hong

    2016-02-15

    To investigate the effect of pH on the oxidation of anilines by potassium permanganate, aniline and p-Chloroaniline were taken as the target contaminants, and the experiments were conducted under the condition with potassium permanganate in excess over a wide pH range. The reaction displayed remarkable autocatalysis, which was presumably ascribed to the formation of complexes by the in situ generated MnOx and the target contaminants on its surface, and thereby improved the oxidation rate of the target contaminants by permanganate. The reaction kinetics was fitted with the pseudo-first-order kinetics at different pH to obtain the pseudo-first-order reaction constants (k(obs)). The second-order rate constants calculated from permanganate concentration and k,b, increased with the increase of pH and reached the maximum near their respective pKa, after which they decreased gradually. This tendency is called parabola-like shaped pH-rate profile. The second-order rate constants between permanganate and anilines were well fitted by the proton transfer model proposed by us in previous work. PMID:27363148

  15. Low-temperature oxidation of alkali overlayers: Ionic species and reaction kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krix, David; Nienhaus, Hermann

    2013-04-01

    Clean and oxidized alkali metal films have been studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Thin films, typically 10 nm thick, of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium have been deposited on silicon substrates and oxidized at 120 K. Plasmon losses were found to dress the primary photo emission structures of the metals’ core lines which confirms the metallic, bulk like nature of the films. The emission from the O 1s core levels was used to determine the chemical composition and the reaction kinetics during the exposure to molecular oxygen at low pressures. Molecular oxide ions O2- and O22- as well as atomic oxygen ions O2- were detected in varying amounts depending on the alkali metal used. Diffusive transport of material in the film is shown to greatly determine the composition of the oxides. Especially, the growth of potassium superoxide is explained by the diffusion of potassium atoms to the surface and growth at the surface in a Deal-Grove like model.

  16. Kinetics, simulation and insights for CO selective oxidation in fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yongtaek; Stenger, Harvey G.

    The kinetics of CO preferential oxidation (PROX) was studied to evaluate various rate expressions and to simulate the performance the CO oxidation step of a methanol fuel processor for fuel cell applications. The reaction was carried out in a micro reactor testing unit using a commercial Engelhard Selectoxo (Pt-Fe/γ-alumina) catalyst and three self-prepared catalysts. Temperature was varied between 100 and 300 °C, and a of range feed rates and compositions were tested. A reaction model in which three reactions (CO oxidation, H 2 oxidation and the water gas shift reaction) occur simultaneously was chosen to predict the reactor performance. Using non-linear least squares, empirical power-law type rate expressions were found to fit the experimental data. It was critical to include all three reactions to determine good fitting results. In particular, the reverse water gas shift reaction had an important role when fitting the experimental data precisely and explained the selectivity decrease at higher reaction temperatures. Using this three reaction model, several simulation studies for a commercial PROX reactor were performed. In these simulations, the effect of O 2/CO ratio, the effect of water addition, and various non-isothermal modes of operation were evaluated. The results of the simulation were compared with corresponding experimental data and shows good agreement.

  17. Kinetic studies on the oxidation of semiquinone and hydroquinone forms of Arabidopsis cryptochrome by molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    van Wilderen, Luuk J G W; Silkstone, Gary; Mason, Maria; van Thor, Jasper J; Wilson, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    Cryptochromes (crys) are flavoprotein photoreceptors present throughout the biological kingdom that play important roles in plant development and entrainment of the circadian clock in several organisms. Crys non-covalently bind flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) which undergoes photoreduction from the oxidised state to a radical form suggested to be active in signalling in vivo. Although the photoreduction reactions have been well characterised by a number of approaches, little is known of the oxidation reactions of crys and their mechanisms. In this work, a stopped-flow kinetics approach is used to investigate the mechanism of cry oxidation in the presence and absence of an external electron donor. This in vitro study extends earlier investigations of the oxidation of Arabidopsis cryptochrome1 by molecular oxygen and demonstrates that, under some conditions, a more complex model for oxidation of the flavin than was previously proposed is required to accommodate the spectral evidence (see P. Müller and M. Ahmad (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 21033-21040 [1]). In the absence of an electron donor, photoreduction leads predominantly to the formation of the radical FADH(•). Dark recovery most likely forms flavin hydroperoxide (FADHOOH) requiring superoxide. In the presence of reductant (DTT), illumination yields the fully reduced flavin species (FADH(-)). Reaction of this with dioxygen leads to transient radical (FADH(•)) and simultaneous accumulation of oxidised species (FAD), possibly governed by interplay between different cryptochrome molecules or cooperativity effects within the cry homodimer. PMID:26649273

  18. Modeling the kinetics of UV/hydrogen peroxide oxidation of some mono-, di-, and trichlorophenols.

    PubMed

    Hugül, M; Apak, R; Demirci, S

    2000-10-01

    The decomposition of a number of chlorophenols (CPs), namely 2-CP, 2, 4-dichlorophenol and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, has been studied in aqueous solution by UV-catalyzed oxidation with H(2)O(2) under UV radiation emitted by a 125-W medium pressure Hg lamp in an immersion well-type quartz photoreactor, and the organic-bound chlorine has been converted into the environmentally harmless inorganic chloride. For oxidant/CP mole ratios between 1:1 and 16:1, the reaction kinetics were modeled and the corresponding rate constants found by periodically measuring the remaining CP, hydrogen peroxide and converted chloride in solution. A theoretical model for the degradation pathway is proposed expressing the rate as a linear function of the concentrations of CP and oxidant. The rate constants for the pseudo-first order approximation of the CP degradation were compared. H(2)O(2), when combined with UV, is an effective photoactivated oxidant. The photodegradation order in terms of the initial rate of CPs destruction was: Cl(3).Ph>/=Cl(2).Ph>Cl.Ph. PMID:10946128

  19. Kinetic studies on the oxidation of semiquinone and hydroquinone forms of Arabidopsis cryptochrome by molecular oxygen

    PubMed Central

    van Wilderen, Luuk J.G.W.; Silkstone, Gary; Mason, Maria; van Thor, Jasper J.; Wilson, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Cryptochromes (crys) are flavoprotein photoreceptors present throughout the biological kingdom that play important roles in plant development and entrainment of the circadian clock in several organisms. Crys non-covalently bind flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) which undergoes photoreduction from the oxidised state to a radical form suggested to be active in signalling in vivo. Although the photoreduction reactions have been well characterised by a number of approaches, little is known of the oxidation reactions of crys and their mechanisms. In this work, a stopped-flow kinetics approach is used to investigate the mechanism of cry oxidation in the presence and absence of an external electron donor. This in vitro study extends earlier investigations of the oxidation of Arabidopsis cryptochrome1 by molecular oxygen and demonstrates that, under some conditions, a more complex model for oxidation of the flavin than was previously proposed is required to accommodate the spectral evidence (see P. Müller and M. Ahmad (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 21033–21040 [1]). In the absence of an electron donor, photoreduction leads predominantly to the formation of the radical FADH•. Dark recovery most likely forms flavin hydroperoxide (FADHOOH) requiring superoxide. In the presence of reductant (DTT), illumination yields the fully reduced flavin species (FADH−). Reaction of this with dioxygen leads to transient radical (FADH•) and simultaneous accumulation of oxidised species (FAD), possibly governed by interplay between different cryptochrome molecules or cooperativity effects within the cry homodimer. PMID:26649273

  20. Influence of organic substrates on the kinetics of bacterial As(III) oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lescure, T.; Joulian, C.; Bauda, P.; Hénault, C.; Battaglia-Brunet, F.

    2012-04-01

    Soil microflora plays a major role on the behavior of metals and metalloids. Arsenic speciation, in particular, is related to the activity of bacteria able to oxidize, reduce or methylate this element, and determines mobility, bioavailability and toxicity of As. Arsenite (AsIII) is more toxic and more mobile than arsenate (AsV). Bacterial As(III)-oxidation tends to reduce the toxicity of arsenic in soils and the risk of transfer toward underlying aquifers, that would affect the quality of water resources. Previous results suggest that organic matter may affect kinetics or efficiency of bacterial As(III)-oxidation in presence of oxygen, thus in conventional physico-chemical conditions of a surface soil. Different hypothesis can be proposed to explain the influence of organic matter on As(III) oxidation. Arsenic is a potential energy source for bacteria. The presence of easily biodegradable organic matter may inhibit the As(III) oxidation process because bacteria would first metabolize these more energetic substrates. A second hypothesis would be that, in presence of organic matter, the Ars system involved in bacterial resistance to arsenic would be more active and would compete with the Aio system of arsenite oxidation, decreasing the global As(III) oxidation rate. In addition, organic matter influences the solubility of iron oxides which often act as the main pitfalls of arsenic in soils. The concentration and nature of organic matter could therefore have a significant influence on the bioavailability of arsenic and hence on its environmental impact. The influence of organic matter on biological As(III) oxidation has not yet been determined in natural soils. In this context, soil amendment with organic matter during operations of phytostabilization or, considering diffuse pollutions, through agricultural practices, may affect the mobility and bio-availability of the toxic metalloid. The objective of the present project is to quantify the influence of organic matter

  1. Degradation kinetics of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons by methane oxidizers naturally-associated with wetland plant roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, C. L.; Goltz, M. N.; Agrawal, A.

    2014-12-01

    Chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) are common groundwater contaminants that can be removed from the environment by natural attenuation processes. CAH biodegradation can occur in wetland environments by reductive dechlorination as well as oxidation pathways. In particular, CAH oxidation may occur in vegetated wetlands, by microorganisms that are naturally associated with the roots of wetland plants. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the cometabolic degradation kinetics of the CAHs, cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cisDCE), trichloroethene (TCE), and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1TCA), by methane-oxidizing bacteria associated with the roots of a typical wetland plant in soil-free system. Laboratory microcosms with washed live roots investigated aerobic, cometabolic degradation of CAHs by the root-associated methane-oxidizing bacteria at initial aqueous [CH4] ~ 1.9 mg L- 1, and initial aqueous [CAH] ~ 150 μg L- 1; cisDCE and TCE (in the presence of 1,1,1TCA) degraded significantly, with a removal efficiency of approximately 90% and 46%, respectively. 1,1,1TCA degradation was not observed in the presence of active methane oxidizers. The pseudo first-order degradation rate-constants of TCE and cisDCE were 0.12 ± 0.01 and 0.59 ± 0.07 d- 1, respectively, which are comparable to published values. However, their biomass-normalized degradation rate constants obtained in this study were significantly smaller than pure-culture studies, yet they were comparable to values reported for biofilm systems. The study suggests that CAH removal in wetland plant roots may be comparable to processes within biofilms. This has led us to speculate that the active biomass may be on the root surface as a biofilm. The cisDCE and TCE mass losses due to methane oxidizers in this study offer insight into the role of shallow, vegetated wetlands as an environmental sink for such xenobiotic compounds.

  2. Destruction kinetic of PCDDs/Fs in MSWI fly ash using microwave peroxide oxidation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Min; Fang, Wen-Bin; Tsai, Kuo-Sheng; Kao, Jimmy C M; Lin, Kae-Long; Chen, Ching-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Microwave peroxide oxidation is a less greenhouse gas emission and energy-efficient technology to destroy toxic organic compounds in hazardous waste. The research novelty is to adopt the innovative microwave peroxide oxidation in H2SO4/HNO3 solution to efficiently destroy the polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs)/Fs in municipal solid waste incineration fly ash. The major objective of this paper is to study dynamic destruction of PCDDs/Fs using the microwave peroxide oxidation. Almost all PCDDs/Fs in the raw fly ash can be destructed in 120 min at a temperature of 423 K using the microwave peroxide oxidation treatment. It was found that the microwave peroxide oxidation provides the potential to destruct the PCDDs/Fs content in municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash to a low level as a function of treatment time. A useful kinetic correlation between destruction efficiency and treatment conditions is proposed on the basis of the experimental data obtained in this study. The significance of this work in terms of practical engineering applications is that the necessary minimum treatment time can be solved using a proposed graphic illustration method, by which the minimum treatment time is obtained if the desired destruction efficiency and treatment temperature are known. Because of inorganic salt dissolution, the temperature would be a critical factor facilitating the parts of fly ash dissolution. Material loss problem caused by the microwave peroxide oxidation and the effects of treatment time and temperature are also discussed in this paper. PMID:25176128

  3. Capture of gas-phase arsenic oxide by lime: kinetic and mechanistic studies.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, R A; Fan, L S

    2001-02-15

    Trace metal emission from coal combustion is a major concern for coal-burning utilities. Toxic compounds such as arsenic species are difficult to control because of their high volatility. Mineral sorbents such as lime and hydrated lime have been shown to be effective in capturing arsenic from the gas phase over a wide temperature range. In this study, the mechanism of interaction between arsenic oxide (As2O3) and lime (CaO) is studied over the range of 300-1000 degrees C. The interaction between these two components is found to depend on the temperature; tricalcium orthoarsenate (Ca3As2O8) is found to be the product of the reaction below 600 degrees C, whereas dicalcium pyroarsenate (Ca2As2O7) is found to be the reaction product in the range of 700-900 degrees C. Maximum capture of arsenic oxide is found to occur in the range of 500-600 degrees C. At 500 degrees C, a high reactivity calcium carbonate is found to capture arsenic oxide by a combination of physical and chemical adsorption. Intrinsic kinetics of the reaction between calcium oxide and arsenic oxide in the medium-temperature range of 300-500 degrees C is studied in a differential bed flow-through reactor. Using the shrinking core model, the order of reaction with respect to arsenic oxide concentration is found to be about 1, and the activation energy is calculated to be 5.1 kcal/mol. The effect of initial surface area of CaO sorbent is studied over a range of 2.7-45 m2/g using the grain model. The effect of other major acidic flue gas species (SO2 and HCl) on arsenic capture is found to be minimal under the conditions of the experiment. PMID:11349294

  4. Methane and methanol oxidation in supercritical water: Chemical kinetics and hydrothermal flame studies

    SciTech Connect

    Steeper, R.R.

    1996-01-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is an emerging technology for the treatment of wastes in the presence of a large concentration of water at conditions above water`s thermodynamic critical point. A high-pressure, optically accessible reaction cell was constructed to investigate the oxidation of methane and methanol in this environment. Experiments were conducted to examine both flame and non-flame oxidation regimes. Optical access enabled the use of normal and shadowgraphy video systems for visualization, and Raman spectroscopy for in situ measurement of species concentrations. Flame experiments were performed by steadily injecting pure oxygen into supercritical mixtures of water and methane or methanol at 270 bar and at temperatures from 390 to 510{degrees}C. The experiments mapped conditions leading to the spontaneous ignition of diffusion flames in supercritical water. Above 470{degrees}C, flames spontaneously ignite in mixtures containing only 6 mole% methane or methanol. This data is relevant to the design and operation of commercial SCWO processes that may be susceptible to inadvertent flame formation. Non-flame oxidation kinetics experiments measured rates of methane oxidation in supercritical water at 270 bar and at temperatures from 390 to 442{degrees}C. The initial methane concentration was nominally 0.15 gmol/L, a level representative of commercial SCWO processes. The observed methane concentration histories were fit to a one-step reaction rate expression indicating a reaction order close to two for methane and zero for oxygen. Experiments were also conducted with varying water concentrations (0 to 8 gmol/L) while temperature and initial reactant concentrations were held constant. The rate of methane oxidation rises steadily with water concentration up to about 5 gmol/L and then abruptly falls off at higher concentrations.

  5. Time-Resolved O3 Chemical Chain Reaction Kinetics Via High-Resolution IR Laser Absorption Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulcke, Axel; Blackmon, Brad; Chapman, William B.; Kim, In Koo; Nesbitt, David J.

    1998-01-01

    Excimer laser photolysis in combination with time-resolved IR laser absorption detection of OH radicals has been used to study O3/OH(v = 0)/HO2 chain reaction kinetics at 298 K, (i.e.,(k(sub 1) is OH + 03 yields H02 + 02 and (k(sub 2) is H02 + 03 yields OH + 202). From time-resolved detection of OH radicals with high-resolution near IR laser absorption methods, the chain induction kinetics have been measured at up to an order of magnitude higher ozone concentrations ([03] less than or equal to 10(exp 17) molecules/cu cm) than accessible in previous studies. This greater dynamic range permits the full evolution of the chain induction, propagation, and termination process to be temporally isolated and measured in real time. An exact solution for time-dependent OH evolution under pseudo- first-order chain reaction conditions is presented, which correctly predicts new kinetic signatures not included in previous OH + 03 kinetic analyses. Specifically, the solutions predict an initial exponential loss (chain "induction") of the OH radical to a steady-state level ([OH](sub ss)), with this fast initial decay determined by the sum of both chain rate constants, k(sub ind) = k(sub 1) + k(sub 2). By monitoring the chain induction feature, this sum of the rate constants is determined to be k(sub ind) = 8.4(8) x 10(exp -14) cu cm/molecule/s for room temperature reagents. This is significantly higher than the values currently recommended for use in atmospheric models, but in excellent agreement with previous results from Ravishankara et al.

  6. KINETICS OF DIRECT OXIDATION OF H2S IN COAL GAS TO ELEMENTAL SULFUR

    SciTech Connect

    K.C. Kwon

    2002-02-01

    Removal of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gasifier gas and sulfur recovery are key steps in the development of Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced Vision 21 plants that employ coal and natural gas and produce electric power and clean transportation fuels. These Vision 21 plants will require highly clean coal gas with H{sub 2}S below 1 ppm and negligible amounts of trace contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, ammonia, alkali, heavy metals, and particulate. The conventional method of sulfur removal and recovery employing amine, Claus, and tail-gas treatment is very expensive. A second generation approach developed under DOE's sponsorship employs hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). However, this process sequence does not remove trace contaminants and is targeted primarily towards the development of advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants that produce electricity (not both electricity and transportation fuels). There is an immediate as well as long-term need for the development of cleanup processes that produce highly clean coal gas for next generation Vision 21 plants. To this end, a novel process is now under development at Research Triangle Institute (RTI) in which the H{sub 2}S in coal gas is directly oxidized to elemental sulfur over a selective catalyst. Such a process is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The objective of this research is to support the near- and long-term DOE efforts to commercialize this direct oxidation technology. Specifically, we aim to: Measure the kinetics of direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur over selective catalysts in the presence of major

  7. KINETICS OF DIRECT OXIDATION OF H2S IN COAL GAS TO ELEMENTAL SULFUR

    SciTech Connect

    K.C. Kwon

    2004-01-01

    The direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and the hot-gas desulfurization using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process. The objective of this research is to support the near- and long-term process development efforts to commercialize this direct oxidation technology. The objectives of this research are to measure kinetics of direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and moisture, using 160-{micro}m C-500-04 alumina catalyst particles and a micro bubble reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. To achieve the above-mentioned objectives, experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into liquid elemental sulfur were carried out for the space time range of 1-6 milliseconds at 125-155 C to evaluate effects of reaction temperature, moisture concentration, reaction pressure on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into liquid elemental sulfur. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 70 v% hydrogen, 2,500-7,500-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,250-3,750 ppmv sulfur dioxide, and 0-15 vol% moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of a simulated coal gas mixture to a micro bubble reactor are 100 cm{sup 3}/min at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an oven at 125-155 C. The

  8. KINETICS OF DIRECT OXIDATION OF H2S IN COAL GAS TO ELEMENTAL SULFUR

    SciTech Connect

    K.C. Kwon

    2005-01-01

    The direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and the hot-gas desulfurization using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process. The objective of this research is to support the near- and long-term process development efforts to commercialize this direct oxidation technology. The objectives of this research are to measure kinetics of direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and moisture, using 160-{micro}m C-500-04 alumina catalyst particles and a micro bubble reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. To achieve the above-mentioned objectives, experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into liquid elemental sulfur were carried out for the space time range of 0.059-0.87 seconds at 125-155 C to evaluate effects of reaction temperature, H{sub 2}S concentration, reaction pressure, and catalyst loading on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into liquid elemental sulfur. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 62-78 v% hydrogen, 3,000-7,000-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,500-3,500 ppmv sulfur dioxide, and 10 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of a simulated coal gas mixture to a micro bubble reactor are 50 cm{sup 3}/min at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an

  9. Mincle-mediated translational regulation is required for strong nitric oxide production and inflammation resolution

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wook-Bin; Kang, Ji-Seon; Choi, Won Young; Zhang, Quanri; Kim, Chul Han; Choi, Un Yung; Kim-Ha, Jeongsil; Kim, Young-Joon

    2016-01-01

    In response to persistent mycobacteria infection, the host induces a granuloma, which often fails to eradicate bacteria and results in tissue damage. Diverse host receptors are required to control the formation and resolution of granuloma, but little is known concerning their regulatory interactions. Here we show that Mincle, the inducible receptor for mycobacterial cord factor, is the key switch for the transition of macrophages from cytokine expression to high nitric oxide production. In addition to its stimulatory role on TLR-mediated transcription, Mincle enhanced the translation of key genes required for nitric oxide synthesis through p38 and eIF5A hypusination, leading to granuloma resolution. Thus, Mincle has dual functions in the promotion and subsequent resolution of inflammation during anti-mycobacterial defence using both transcriptional and translational controls. PMID:27089465

  10. Volumetric analysis of syringomyelia following hindbrain decompression for Chiari malformation Type I: syringomyelia resolution follows exponential kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Coumans, Jean-Valery; Walcott, Brian P.; Butler, William E.; Nahed, Brian V.; Kahle, Kristopher T.

    2013-01-01

    Object Resolution of syringomyelia is common following hindbrain decompression for Chiari malformation, yet little is known about the kinetics governing this process. The authors sought to establish the volumetric rate of syringomyelia resolution. Methods A retrospective cohort of patients undergoing hindbrain decompression for a Chiari malformation Type I with preoperative cervical or thoracic syringomyelia was identified. Patients were included in the study if they had at least 3 neuroimaging studies that detailed the entirety of their preoperative syringomyelia over a minimum of 6 months postoperatively. The authors reconstructed the MR images in 3 dimensions and calculated the volume of the syringomyelia. They plotted the syringomyelia volume over time and constructed regression models using the method of least squares. The Akaike information criterion and Bayesian information criterion were used to calculate the relative goodness of fit. The coefficients of determination R2 (unadjusted and adjusted) were calculated to describe the proportion of variability in each individual data set accounted for by the statistical model. Results Two patients were identified as meeting inclusion criteria. Plots of the least-squares best fit were identified as 4.01459e−0.0180804x and 13.2556e−0.00615859x. Decay of the syringomyelia followed an exponential model in both patients (R2 = 0.989582 and 0.948864). Conclusions Three-dimensional analysis of syringomyelia resolution over time enables the kinetics to be estimated. This technique is yet to be validated in a large cohort. Because syringomyelia is the final common pathway for a number of different pathological processes, it is possible that this exponential only applies to syringomyelia related to treatment of Chiari malformation Type I. PMID:21882909

  11. THERMAL EFFECTS ON MASS AND SPATIAL RESOLUTION DURING LASER PULSE ATOM PROBE TOMOGRAPHY OF CERIUM OXIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Rita Kirchhofer; Melissa C. Teague; Brian P. Gorman

    2013-05-01

    Cerium oxide (CeO2) is an ideal surrogate material for trans-uranic elements and fission products found in nuclear fuels due to similarities in their thermal properties; therefore, cerium oxide was used to determine the best run condition for atom probe tomography (APT). Laser pulse APT is a technique that allows for spatial resolution in the nm scale and isotopic/elemental chemical identification. A systematic study of the impact of laser pulse energy and specimen base temperature on the mass resolution, measurement of stoichiometry, multiples, and evaporation mechanisms are reported in this paper. It was demonstrated that using laser pulse APT stoichiometric field evaporation of cerium oxide was achieved at 1 pJ laser pulse energy and 20 K specimen base temperature.

  12. Effect of the particle size of a heterogeneous catalyst on the kinetics of liquid-phase oxidation of tetralin

    SciTech Connect

    Artemov, A.V.; Vainshtein, E.F.

    1988-01-10

    The dependence of the initial rate of oxidation of tetralin on the particle size of the Co/sup 2 +//SiO/sub 2/ catalyst is shown. The method proposed permitted explanation of the dependence of the kinetics of liquid-phase processes in the absence of extra- and intradiffusion hindrances on the particle size of a heterogeneous catalyst and estimation of the values of the kinetic constants from this dependence.

  13. Kinetic resolution of acids in acylation reactions in the presence of chiral tertiary amines

    SciTech Connect

    Potapov, V.M.; Dem'yanovich, V.M.; Khlebnikov, V.A.

    1988-07-10

    Asymmetric synthesis has now become an important method for the production of optically active compounds, and its most attractive form is asymmetric catalysis. This work was devoted to an investigation into asymmetric catalysis with chiral tertiary amines in acylation reactions. During the acylation of alcohols and amines by the action of racemic 2-phenylpropionic and 2-methyl-3-phenylpropionic acids in the presence of S-nicotine the initial acids are resolved kinetically. The (R)-2-phenylpropionic acid obtained in this way had an optical purity of 0.5-1.5%.

  14. Kinetics of aqueous ozone-induced oxidation of some endocrine disruptors.

    PubMed

    Deborde, Marie; Rabouan, Sylvie; Duguet, Jean-Pierre; Legube, Bernard

    2005-08-15

    This study investigated aqueous ozone-induced oxidation of six endocrine disruptors (EDs: 4-n-nonylphenol, bisphenol A, 17alpha-ethinylestradiol, 17beta-estradiol, estrone, and estriol). In the first part, ED ozonation kinetics were studied over a pH range of 2.5-10.5 at 20 +/- 2 degrees C and in the presence of tert-butyl alcohol. Under these conditions, for each studied compound, the apparent ozone rates presented minima at acidic pH (pH < 5) and maxima at basic pH (pH > 10). In the second part, to explain this pH dependence, elementary reactions, i.e., reactions of ozone with neutral and ionized ED species, were proposed, and the intrinsic constants of each of them were calculated. The reactivity of ozone with ionized EDs (i.e. 1.06 x 10(9)-6.83 x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1)) was found to be 10(4)-10(5) times higher than with neutral EDs (i.e. 1.68 x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1)-2.21 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1)). At pH > 5, ozone reacted to the greatest extent with dissociated ED forms. Finally, to assess the potential of ozone for inducing ED oxidation in water treatment conditions, the expected removal rates for each of the studied EDs were determined on the basis of the kinetic study at pH = 7 and 20 +/- 2 degrees C. For all EDs considered, O3 exposures of only approximately 2 x 10(-3) mg min L(-1) were calculated to achieve > or = 95% removal efficiency. The ozonation process could thus highly oxidize the studied EDs under water treatment conditions. PMID:16173567

  15. Kinetics and products from o-cresol oxidation in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, C.J.; Savage, P.E.; Kasiborski, J.

    1995-06-01

    Dilute aqueous solutions of o-cresol (2-methylphenol) were oxidized in a tubular flow reactor at near-critical and supercritical conditions. The power-law rate expression that best correlates the kinetics of o-cresol disappearance is rate = 10{sup 5.7} exp({minus}29,700/RT)[o-cresol]{sup 0.57}[O{sub 2}]{sup 0.22}[H{sub 2}O]{sup 1.44}. The power-law rate expression that best correlates the experimental results for the conversion of organic carbon to CO{sub 2} is rate = 10{sup 6.8} exp({minus}34,000/RT)[TOC]{sup 0.34}[O{sub 2}]{sup 0.73}[H{sub 2}O]{sup 1.18}. All concentrations are in moles per liter, the activation energy is in calories per mole, and the rate is in moles per liter per second. The most abundant products from o-cresol oxidation were typically phenol, 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde, 1,3-benzodioxole, indanone, CO, and CO{sub 2}. 2-Hydroxybenzaldehyde was the major primary product. A reanalysis of published kinetics data for the oxidation of two other ring-containing compounds (pyridine and 4-chlorophenol) in supercritical water revealed that the rate laws previously reported for these two compounds do not provide the best correlation of the experimental data. The authors report the new rate laws, which are similar to those for o-cresol, 2-chlorophenol, and phenol in that the global reaction orders are between 0.55 and 0.9 for the organic compounds and between 0.2 and 0.5 for oxygen.

  16. ABTS as an Electron Shuttle to Enhance the Oxidation Kinetics of Substituted Phenols by Aqueous Permanganate.

    PubMed

    Song, Yang; Jiang, Jin; Ma, Jun; Pang, Su-Yan; Liu, Yong-Ze; Yang, Yi; Luo, Cong-Wei; Zhang, Jian-Qiao; Gu, Jia; Qin, Wen

    2015-10-01

    In this study, it was, interestingly, found that 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline)-6-sulfonate (ABTS), a widely used electron shuttle, could greatly accelerate the oxidation of substituted phenols by potassium permanganate (Mn(VII)) in aqueous solutions at pH 5-9. This was attributed to the fact that these substituted phenols could be readily oxidized by the stable radical cation (ABTS(•+)), which was quickly produced from the oxidation of ABTS by Mn(VII). The reaction of Mn(VII) with ABTS exhibited second-order kinetics, with stoichiometries of ∼5:1 at pH 5-6 and ∼3:1 at pH 7-9, and the rate constants varied negligibly from pH 5 to 9 (k = (9.44 ± 0.21) × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1)). Comparatively, the reaction of ABTS(•+) with phenol showed biphasic kinetics. The second-order rate constants for the reactions of ABTS(•+) with substituted phenols obtained in the initial phase were strongly affected by pH, and they were several orders of magnitude higher than those for the reactions of Mn(VII) with substituted phenols at each pH. Good Hammett-type correlations were found for the reactions of ABTS(•+) with undissociated (log(k) = 2.82-4.31σ) and dissociated phenols (log(k) = 7.29-5.90σ). The stoichiometries of (2.2 ± 0.06):1 (ABTS(•+) in excess) and (1.38 ± 0.18):1 (phenol in excess) were achieved in the reaction of ABTS(•+) with phenol, but they exhibited no pH dependency. PMID:26378975

  17. Kinetics of solid-gas reactions characterized by scanning AC nano-calorimetry with application to Zr oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Kechao; Lee, Dongwoo; Vlassak, Joost J.

    2014-10-27

    Scanning AC nano-calorimetry is a recently developed experimental technique capable of measuring the heat capacity of thin-film samples of a material over a wide range of temperatures and heating rates. Here, we describe how this technique can be used to study solid-gas phase reactions by measuring the change in heat capacity of a sample during reaction. We apply this approach to evaluate the oxidation kinetics of thin-film samples of zirconium in air. The results confirm parabolic oxidation kinetics with an activation energy of 0.59 ± 0.03 eV. The nano-calorimetry measurements were performed using a device that contains an array of micromachined nano-calorimeter sensors in an architecture designed for combinatorial studies. We demonstrate that the oxidation kinetics can be quantified using a single sample, thus enabling high-throughput mapping of the composition-dependence of the reaction rate.

  18. Diastereo- and enantioselective synthesis of (E)-2-Methyl-1,2-syn- and (E)-2-Methyl-1,2-anti-3-pentenediols via allenylboronate kinetic resolution with ((d)Ipc)2BH and aldehyde allylboration.

    PubMed

    Han, Jeng-Liang; Chen, Ming; Roush, William R

    2012-06-15

    Enantioselective hydroboration of racemic allenylboronate (±)-1 with 0.48 equiv of ((d)Ipc)(2)BH at -25 °C proceeds with efficient kinetic resolution and provides allylborane (R)-Z-4. When heated to 95 °C, allylborane (R)-Z-4 isomerizes to the thermodynamically more stable allylborane isomer (S)-E-7. Subsequent allylboration of aldehydes with (R)-Z-4 or (S)-E-7 at -78 °C followed by oxidative workup provides 1,2-syn- or 1,2-anti-diols, 2 or 3, respectively, in 87-94% ee. PMID:22646839

  19. Geochemical modeling of arsenic sulfide oxidation kinetics in a mining environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengke, Maggy F.; Tempel, Regina N.

    2005-01-01

    Arsenic sulfide (AsS (am), As 2S 3 (am), orpiment, and realgar) oxidation rates increase with increasing pH values. The rates of arsenic sulfide oxidation at higher pH values relative to those at pH˜2 are in the range of 26-4478, 3-17, 8-182, and 4-10 times for As 2S 3 (am), orpiment, AsS (am), and realgar, respectively. Numerical simulations of orpiment and realgar oxidation kinetics were conducted using the geochemical reaction path code EQ3/6 to evaluate the effects of variable DO concentrations and mineral reactivity factors on water chemistry evolution during orpiment and realgar oxidation. The results show that total As concentrations increase by ˜1.14 to 13 times and that pH values decrease by ˜0.6 to 4.2 U over a range of mineral reactivity factors from 1% to 50% after 2000 days (5.5 yr). The As release from orpiment and realgar oxidation exceeds the current U.S. National Drinking Water Standard (0.05 ppm) approximately in 200-300 days at the lowest initial dissolved oxygen concentration (3 ppm) and a reactivity factor of 1%. The results of simulations of orpiment oxidation in the presence of albite and calcite show that calcite can act as an effective buffer to the acid water produced from orpiment oxidation within relatively short periods (days/months), but the release of As continues to increase. Pyrite oxidation rates are faster than orpiment and realgar from pH 2.3 to 8; however, pyrite oxidation rates are slower than As 2S 3 (am) and AsS (am) at pH 8. The activation energies of arsenic sulfide oxidation range from 16 to 124 kJ/mol at pH˜8 and temperature 25 to 40°C, and pyrite activation energies are ˜52 to 88 kJ/mol, depending on pH and temperature range. The magnitude of activation energies for both pyrite and arsenic sulfide solids indicates that the oxidation of these minerals is dominated by surface reactions, except for As 2S 3 (am). Low activation energies of As 2S 3 (am) indicate that diffusion may be rate controlling. Limestone is

  20. Catalytic and non-catalytic wet air oxidation of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate: kinetics and biodegradability enhancement.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Ojeda, María Eugenia; Kim, Jungkwon; Carrera, Julián; Metcalfe, Ian S; Font, Josep

    2007-06-18

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) and catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) were investigated as suitable precursors for the biological treatment of industrial wastewater containing sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (DBS). Two hours WAO semi-batch experiments were conducted at 15 bar of oxygen partial pressure (P(O2)) and at 180, 200 and 220 degrees C. It was found that the highest temperature provides appreciable total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) abatement of about 42 and 47%, correspondingly. Based on the main identified intermediates (acetic acid and sulfobenzoic acid) a reaction pathway for DBS and a kinetic model in WAO were proposed. In the case of CWAO experiments, seventy-two hours tests were done in a fixed bed reactor in continuous trickle flow regime, using a commercial activated carbon (AC) as catalyst. The temperature and P(O2) were 140-160 degrees C and 2-9 bar, respectively. The influence of the operating conditions on the DBS oxidation, the occurrence of oxidative coupling reactions over the AC, and the catalytic activity (in terms of substrate removal) were established. The results show that the AC without any supported active metal behaves bi-functional as adsorbent and catalyst, giving TOC conversions up to 52% at 160 degrees C and 2 bar of P(O2), which were comparable to those obtained in WAO experiments. Respirometric tests were completed before and after CWAO and to the main intermediates identified through the WAO and CWAO oxidation route. Then, the readily biodegradable COD (COD(RB)) of the CWAO and WAO effluents were found. Taking into account these results it was possible to compare whether or not the CWAO or WAO effluents were suitable for a conventional activated sludge plant inoculated with non adapted culture. PMID:17363148

  1. Iron oxidation kinetics and phosphorus immobilization at the groundwater-surface water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Grift, Bas; Rozemeijer, Joachim; Griffioen, Jasper; van der Velde, Ype

    2014-05-01

    Eutrophication of freshwater environments following diffuse nutrient loads is a widely recognized water quality problem in catchments. Fluxes of non-point P sources to surface waters originate from surface runoff and flow from soil water and groundwater into surface water. The availability of P in surface waters is controlled strongly by biogeochemical nutrient cycling processes at the soil-water interface. The mechanisms and rates of the iron oxidation process with associated binding of phosphate during exfiltration of anaerobic Fe(II) bearing groundwater are among the key unknowns in P retention processes in surface waters in delta areas where the shallow groundwater is typically pH-neutral to slightly acid, anoxic, iron-rich. We developed an experimental field set-up to study the dynamics in Fe(II) oxidation and mechanisms of P immobilization at the groundwater-surface water interface in an agricultural experimental catchment of a small lowland river. We physically separated tube drain effluent from groundwater discharge before it entered a ditch in an agricultural field. The exfiltrating groundwater was captured in in-stream reservoirs constructed in the ditch. Through continuous discharge measurements and weekly water quality sampling of groundwater, tube drain water, exfiltrated groundwater, and ditch water, we quantified Fe(II) oxidation kinetics and P immobilization processes across the seasons. This study showed that seasonal changes in climatic conditions affect the Fe(II) oxidation process. In winter time the dissolved iron concentrations in the in-stream reservoirs reached the levels of the anaerobic groundwater. In summer time, the dissolved iron concentrations of the water in the reservoirs are low, indicating that dissolved Fe(II) is completely oxidized prior to inflow into the reservoirs. Higher discharges, lower temperatures and lower pH of the exfiltrated groundwater in winter compared to summer shifts the location of the redox transition zone

  2. Oxidation of flavonoids by hypochlorous acid: reaction kinetics and antioxidant activity studies.

    PubMed

    Krych-Madej, Justyna; Stawowska, Katarzyna; Gebicka, Lidia

    2016-08-01

    Flavonoids, plant polyphenols, ubiquitous components of human diet, are excellent antioxidants. Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), produced by activated neutrophils, is highly reactive chlorinating and oxidizing species. It has been reported earlier that flavonoids are chlorinated by HOCl. Here we show that flavonoids from flavonol subclass are also oxidized by HOCl, but only if the latter is in a large molar excess (≥ 10). The kinetics of this reaction was studied by stopped-flow spectrophotometry, at different pH. We found that flavonols were oxidized by HOCl with the rate constants of the order of 10(4)-10(5) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 7.5. Antioxidant activity of HOCl-modified flavonoids was measured by 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) method. Slightly higher antioxidant activity, compared to parent compounds, was observed for flavonols after their reaction with equimolar or moderate excess of HOCl whereas flavonols treated with high molar excess of HOCl exhibited decrease in antioxidant activity. The mechanism of flavonoid reaction with HOCl at physiological pH is proposed, and biological consequences of this reaction are discussed. PMID:27225705

  3. Kinetics of 1-hexene oxidation in a JSR and a shock tube: Experimental and modeling study

    SciTech Connect

    Yahyaoui, M.; Djebaili-Chaumeix, N.; Dagaut, P.; Paillard, C.-E.; Gail, S.

    2006-10-15

    1-Hexene ignition delay times were measured behind reflected shock waves for 0.1% fuel diluted in Ar between 1270 and 1700 K, at pressures between 0.2 and 1 MPa. 1-C{sub 6}H{sub 12} ignition delay times were measured by following OH chemiluminescence emission. 1-Hexene oxidation has been investigated in the jet-stirred reactor (JSR) between 750 and 1200 K, at a pressure of 1 MPa, and 0.1% of fuel diluted in N{sub 2}. In both experimental studies, three equivalence ratios, 0.5, 1, and 1.5, were investigated. Molecular species concentration profiles were obtained by sonic probe sampling and GC analyses during 1-hexene oxidation in JSR. H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 2}O, CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, C{sub 3}H{sub 6}, 1-C{sub 4}H{sub 8}, and 1,3-C{sub 4}H{sub 6} were the major products of 1-C{sub 6}H{sub 12} oxidation. All the experimental data have been compared to those calculated using a detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism. (author)

  4. New insights into atrazine degradation by cobalt catalyzed peroxymonosulfate oxidation: kinetics, reaction products and transformation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yuefei; Dong, Changxun; Kong, Deyang; Lu, Junhe

    2015-03-21

    The widespread occurrence of atrazine in waters poses potential risk to ecosystem and human health. In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanisms and transformation pathways of atrazine degradation by cobalt catalyzed peroxymonosulfate (Co(II)/PMS). Co(II)/PMS was found to be more efficient for ATZ elimination in aqueous solution than Fe(II)/PMS process. ATZ oxidation by Co(II)/PMS followed pseudo-first-order kinetics, and the reaction rate constant (k(obs)) increased appreciably with increasing Co(II) concentration. Increasing initial PMS concentration favored the decomposition of ATZ, however, no linear relationship between k(obs) and PMS concentration was observed. Higher efficiency of ATZ oxidation was observed around neutral pH, implying the possibility of applying Co(II)/PMS process under environmental realistic conditions. Natural organic matter (NOM), chloride (Cl(-)) and bicarbonate (HCO3(-)) showed detrimental effects on ATZ degradation, particularly at higher concentrations. Eleven products were identified by applying solid phase extraction-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPE-LC/MS) techniques. Major transformation pathways of ATZ included dealkylation, dechlorination-hydroxylation, and alkyl chain oxidation. Detailed mechanisms responsible for these transformation pathways were discussed. Our results reveal that Co(II)/PMS process might be an efficient technique for remediation of groundwater contaminated by ATZ and structurally related s-triazine herbicides. PMID:25544494

  5. Fischer-Tropsch kinetic studies with cobalt-manganese oxide catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Keyser, M.J.; Everson, R.C.; Espinoza, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to establish the reaction mechanism for the Fischer-Tropsch reaction, in the presence of the water-gas shift reaction, over a cobalt-manganese oxide catalyst under conditions favoring the formation of gaseous, liquid, and solid (waxes) hydrocarbons (210--250 C and 6--26 bar). A micro-fixed-bed reactor was used with a cobalt-manganese oxide catalyst prepared by a coprecipitation method. An integral reactor model involving both Fischer-Tropsch and water-gas shift reaction kinetics was used to describe the overall performance. Reaction rate equations based on Langmuir-Hinshelwood-Hougen-Watson models for the Fischer-Tropsch reaction (hydrocarbon forming) and empirical reaction rate equations for the water-gas shift reaction from the literature were tested. Different combinations of the reaction rate equation were evaluated with the aid of a nonlinear regression procedure. It was found that a reaction rate equation for the Fischer-Tropsch reaction based on the enolic theory performed slightly better than a reaction rate equation based on the carbide theory. Reaction rate constants for the cobalt-manganese oxide catalyst are reported, and it is concluded that this catalyst also behaves very much like iron-based catalysts.

  6. Kinetics and mechanisms of reactions between H2O2 and copper and copper oxides.

    PubMed

    Björkbacka, Åsa; Yang, Miao; Gasparrini, Claudia; Leygraf, Christofer; Jonsson, Mats

    2015-09-28

    One of the main challenges for the nuclear power industry today is the disposal of spent nuclear fuel. One of the most developed methods for its long term storage is the Swedish KBS-3 concept where the spent fuel is sealed inside copper canisters and placed 500 meters down in the bedrock. Gamma radiation will penetrate the canisters and be absorbed by groundwater thereby creating oxidative radiolysis products such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hydroxyl radicals (HO˙). Both H2O2 and HO˙ are able to initiate corrosion of the copper canisters. In this work the kinetics and mechanism of reactions between the stable radiolysis product, H2O2, and copper and copper oxides were studied. Also the dissolution of copper into solution after reaction with H2O2 was monitored by ICP-OES. The experiments show that both H2O2 and HO˙ are present in the systems with copper and copper oxides. Nevertheless, these species do not appear to influence the dissolution of copper to the same extent as observed in recent studies in irradiated systems. This strongly suggests that aqueous radiolysis can only account for a very minor part of the observed radiation induced corrosion of copper. PMID:26287519

  7. [Depth Profiles of Methane Oxidation Kinetics and the Related Methanotrophic Community in a Simulated Landfill Cover].

    PubMed

    Xing, Zhi-lin; Zhao, Tian-tao; Gao, Yan-hui; He, Zhi; Yang, Xu; Peng, Xu-ya

    2015-11-01

    Simulated landfill cover with real time online monitoring system was developed using cover soils. Then the system started and the concentrations of bio-gas in various depths were continuously monitored, and it was found that the system ran continually and stably after 2-3 h when methane flux changed. After that, the relationship between regularity of methane oxidation and methane flux in landfill cover was analyzed. The results indicated that concentration of oxygen decreased with increasing methane flux when the depth was deeper than 20 cm, and no obvious correlation between oxygen concentration in landfill cover surface and methane flux, however, methane oxidation rate showed positive correlation with methane flux in various depths (range of R2 was 0.851-0.999). Kinetics of CH4 oxidation in landfill cover was fitted by CH4 -O2 dual-substrate model (range of R2 was 0.902-0.955), the half-saturation constant K(m) increasing with depth was 0.157-0.729 in dynamic condition. Finally, methanotrophs community structure in original cover soil sample and that in simulated landfill cover were investigated by high-throughout sequencing technology, and the statistics indicated that the abundance and species of methanotrophs in simulated landfill cover significantly increased compared with those in original cover soil sample, and type I methanotrophs including Methylobacter and Methylophilaceae and type II methanotrophs Methylocystis were dominant species. PMID:26911022

  8. In situ oxidation remediation technologies: kinetic of hydrogen peroxide decomposition on soil organic matter.

    PubMed

    Romero, Arturo; Santos, Aurora; Vicente, Fernando; Rodriguez, Sergio; Lafuente, A Lopez

    2009-10-30

    Rates of hydrogen peroxide decomposition were investigated in soils slurries. The interaction soil-hydrogen peroxide was studied using a slurry system at 20 degrees C and pH 7. To determine the role of soil organic matter (SOM) in the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, several experiments were carried out with two soils with different SOM content (S1=15.1%, S2=10%). The influence of the oxidant dosage ([H2O2](o) from 10 to 30 g L(-1) and soil weight to liquid phase volume ratio=500 g L(-1)) was investigated using the two calcareous loamy sand soil samples. The results showed a rate dependency on both SOM and hydrogen peroxide concentration being the H2O2 decomposition rate over soil surface described by a second-order kinetic expression r(H2O2) = -dn(H2O2) / W(SOM) dt = kC(H2O2) C(SOM). Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to evaluate the effect caused by the application of this oxidant on the SOM content. It was found a slightly increase of SOM content after treatment with hydrogen peroxide, probably due to the incorporation of oxygen from the oxidant (hydrogen peroxide). PMID:19520509

  9. Kinetic analysis of high-temperature oxidation of metals accompanied by scale volatilization

    SciTech Connect

    Taimatsu, Hitoshi

    1999-10-01

    An equation suitable for analyzing the high-temperature oxidation kinetics of metals in the case where scale volatilization is inevitable is presented. The equation derived {Delta}m = k'{sub p}{sup 1/2}t{sup 1/2} - (2/3 + f{sub Me}/3) k{prime}{sub v}t, where k{prime}{sub p} is the parabolic rate constant, f{sub Me} the mass fraction of the metal Me in the scale oxide Me{sub {nu}}O, and k'{sub v} the volatilization rate constant of the oxide, has such a simple form as to be used for easily separating the mass gain into the scale growth due to diffusion and its volatilization by curve-fitting the equation for mass gain data. The limitations of the application of this equation are discussed, and its validity is verified by its application to experimental data reported for Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-forming alloys.

  10. Oxidation Kinetics of a NiPtTi High Temperature Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.; Humphrey, Donald L.; Noebe, Ronald D.

    2007-01-01

    A high temperature shape memory alloy (HTSMA), Ni30Pt50Ti, with an M(sub s) near 600 C, was isothermally oxidized in air for 100 hr over the temperature range of 500 to 900 C. Parabolic kinetics were confirmed by log-log and parabolic plots and showed no indication of fast transient oxidation. The overall behavior could be best described by the Arrhenius relationship: k(sub p) = 1.64 x 10(exp 12)[(-250 kJ/mole)/RT] mg(sup 2)/cm(sup 4)hr. This is about a factor of 4 reduction compared to values measured here for a binary Ni47Ti commercial SMA. The activation energy agreed with most literature values for TiO2 scale growth measured for elemental Ti and other NiTi alloys. Assuming uniform alloy depletion of a 20 mil (0.5 mm) dia. HTSMA wire, approx. 1 percent Ti reduction is predicted after 20,000 hr oxidation at 500 C, but becomes much more serious at higher temperatures.

  11. Removal of zinc(II) ion by graphene oxide (GO) and functionalized graphene oxide-glycine (GO-G) as adsorbents from aqueous solution: kinetics studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafi, F.

    2015-05-01

    The main purpose of this study is to explain the absorption of zinc from aqueous solution by grapheme oxide and functionalized grapheme oxide with glycine as the adsorbent surface. For confirmed functionalized graphene oxide, the glycine amino group was added to the surface of graphene oxide. The effects of the initial concentration of Zn(II) ions and contact time were studied. Results showed that with increasing initial concentration of Zn(II) ions, the adsorption capacity increased. The adsorption capacity did not show a large change after 50 min; therefore, for the study of kinetic parameters, the optimal time of 50 min was selected. The chemical structure of graphene oxide was confirmed by using FT-IR analysis. The adsorption process of Zn(II) ions graphene oxide and functionalized graphene oxide-glycine surfaces was fixed at 298 K and pH 6. The pseudo-first-order and the pseudo-second-order (types I, II, III and IV) kinetic models were tested for the adsorption process and the results showed that the kinetic parameters best fit type (I) of the pseudo-second-order model. A high R 2 was used to be the best match.

  12. Incipient oxidation kinetics of alloy 617 and residual stress of the oxide scale formed in air at temperatures between 850 and 1000 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Hsiao-Ming; Stubbins, James F.

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate incipient oxidation of alloy 617 in air in the temperature range of 850-1000 °C. Alloy 617 exhibited a two-stage oxidation kinetics and followed Wagner's parabolic law. The activation energy for the first stage and the second stage are 271.2 and 318 kJ/mol, respectively. The transition time between the two stages decreased as the oxidation temperature increased. X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed that the oxide phase is chromium oxide, Cr2O3, over the entire temperature range. The results of residual stress measurements showed that the grown-in stresses of the scale are tensile in nature. This may be due to the crystallite coalescence during the growth of the oxide. The measured residual stress of the substrate decreases with increasing oxidation temperature which may be attributed to the formation of pores or voids within the substrate after exposure to high temperatures.

  13. Reaction network and kinetics for the catalytic oxidation of toluene over V sub 2 O sub 5

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, J.; Andersson, L.T. )

    1990-11-01

    The oxidation of three methyl-diphenylmethane isomers and of bibenzyl, benzyl alcohol, and benzaldehyde, which are intermediates in the catalytic oxidation of toluene over V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, has been studied to elucidate the reaction network and relative importance of various reactions. Selectivity dependences reveal that the network is composed mainly of three parallel reaction routes: (1) side-chain oxidation with consecutive reactions, (2) oxidative coupling with both parallel and consecutive reactions, and (3) carbon oxide formation. Coupling products are not negligible, with an initial selectivity of 29% (400{degree}C). Anthraquinone is produced mainly from o-methyl-diphenylmethane conditions and catalyst used. Selectivity dependences suggested product lumping and a simplified network. Kinetic analysis of this reaction network indicates that higher temperatures favor route 2 over route 1. The same initial intermediates for route 1 of side-chain oxidation and for route 2 of oxidative coupling are suggested.

  14. Kinetic studies of the stability of Pt for No oxidation: effect of sulfur and long-term aging.

    SciTech Connect

    Pazmino, J. H.; Miller, J. T.; Mulla, S. S.; Delgass, W. N.; Ribeiro, F. H.

    2011-01-01

    The stability of Pt catalysts for NO oxidation was analyzed by observing the effect of pre-adsorbed sulfur on the reaction kinetics using a series of Pt/SBA-15 catalysts with varying Pt particle sizes (ca 2-9 nm). Our results indicate that sulfur addition did not influence catalyst deactivation of any of the Pt catalysts, resulting in unchanged turnover rates (TOR) and reaction kinetics. The presence of sulfur on Pt was confirmed by X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) under reducing environments. However, exposure of the catalyst to NO oxidation conditions displaced sulfur from the first coordination shell of Pt, yielding Pt-O bonds instead. Re-reduction fully recovered the Pt-S backscattering, implying that sulfur remained near the Pt under oxidizing conditions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and chemisorption measurements confirmed the presence of sulfur near platinum. The invariance of the NO oxidation reaction to sulfur poisoning is explained by sulfur displacement to interfacial sites and/or sulfur binding on kinetically irrelevant sites. Formation of Pt oxides remains as the main source of catalyst deactivation as observed by kinetic and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements.

  15. Kinetic and Spectral Resolution of Multiple Nonphotochemical Quenching Components in Arabidopsis Leaves1[C

    PubMed Central

    Lambrev, Petar H.; Nilkens, Manuela; Miloslavina, Yuliya; Jahns, Peter; Holzwarth, Alfred R.

    2010-01-01

    Using novel specially designed instrumentation, fluorescence emission spectra were recorded from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves during the induction period of dark to high-light adaptation in order to follow the spectral changes associated with the formation of nonphotochemical quenching. In addition to an overall decrease of photosystem II fluorescence (quenching) across the entire spectrum, high light induced two specific relative changes in the spectra: (1) a decrease of the main emission band at 682 nm relative to the far-red (750–760 nm) part of the spectrum (Δ F682); and (2) an increase at 720 to 730 nm (Δ F720) relative to 750 to 760 nm. The kinetics of the two relative spectral changes and their dependence on various mutants revealed that they do not originate from the same process but rather from at least two independent processes. The Δ F720 change is specifically associated with the rapidly reversible energy-dependent quenching. Comparison of the wild-type Arabidopsis with mutants unable to produce or overexpressing the PsbS subunit of photosystem II showed that PsbS was a necessary component for Δ F720. The spectral change Δ F682 is induced both by energy-dependent quenching and by PsbS-independent mechanism(s). A third novel quenching process, independent from both PsbS and zeaxanthin, is activated by a high turnover rate of photosystem II. Its induction and relaxation occur on a time scale of a few minutes. Analysis of the spectral inhomogeneity of nonphotochemical quenching allows extraction of mechanistically valuable information from the fluorescence induction kinetics when registered in a spectrally resolved fashion. PMID:20032080

  16. Carbon kinetic isotope effect accompanying microbial oxidation of methane in boreal forest soils

    SciTech Connect

    Reeburgh, W.S.; Hirsch, A.I.; Sansone, F.J.; Popp, B.N.

    1997-11-01

    Atmospheric methane (CH{sub 4}) oxidation occurs in soils at sites in the Bonanza Creek L.T.E.R. near Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, at rates {le}2 mg CH{sub 4} m{sup -2} d{sup -1}; the maximum CH{sub 4} oxidizing activity is located in loess at a depth of {approximately}15 cm. Methane, carbon dioxide, and stable isotope ({delta}{sup 13}C-CH{sub 4}, {delta}{sup 13}C-CO{sub 2}) depth distributions were measured at two sites: South facing Aspen (AS2) and North facing Black Spruce (BS2). The combined effects of diffusion and oxidation are similar at both sites and result in a CH{sub 4} concentration decrease (1.8-0.1 ppm) and a {delta}{sup 13}C-CH{sub 4} increase (-48{per_thousand} to -43{per_thousand}) from the soil surface to 60-80 cm depth. Isotope flux ratio and diffusion-consumption models were used to estimate the kinetic isotope effect (KIE); these results agree with the observed top-to-bottom difference in {delta}{sup 13}C-CH{sub 4}, which is the integrated result of isotope fractionation due to diffusion and oxidation. The KIE for CH{sub 4} oxidation determined from these measurements is 1.022-1.025, which agrees with previous KIE determinations based on changes in headspace CH{sub 4} concentration and {delta}{sup 13}C-CH{sub 4} over time. A much lower soil respiration rate in the North facing Black Spruce soils is indicated by fivefold lower soil CO{sub 2} concentrations. The similarity in CH{sub 4} oxidation at the two sites and the differences in inferred soil respiration at the two sites suggest that soil CH{sub 4} oxidation and soil respiration are independent processes. The soil organic matter responsible for the CO{sub 2} flux has a {delta}{sup 13}C estimated to be -27 to -28 {per_thousand}. 23 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Modeling Photo-Bleaching Kinetics to Create High Resolution Maps of Rod Rhodopsin in the Human Retina.

    PubMed

    Ehler, Martin; Dobrosotskaya, Julia; Cunningham, Denise; Wong, Wai T; Chew, Emily Y; Czaja, Wojtek; Bonner, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    We introduce and describe a novel non-invasive in-vivo method for mapping local rod rhodopsin distribution in the human retina over a 30-degree field. Our approach is based on analyzing the brightening of detected lipofuscin autofluorescence within small pixel clusters in registered imaging sequences taken with a commercial 488nm confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (cSLO) over a 1 minute period. We modeled the kinetics of rhodopsin bleaching by applying variational optimization techniques from applied mathematics. The physical model and the numerical analysis with its implementation are outlined in detail. This new technique enables the creation of spatial maps of the retinal rhodopsin and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) bisretinoid distribution with an ≈ 50μm resolution. PMID:26196397

  18. Enantiodivergent Atroposelective Synthesis of Chiral Biaryls by Asymmetric Transfer Hydrogenation: Chiral Phosphoric Acid Catalyzed Dynamic Kinetic Resolution.

    PubMed

    Mori, Keiji; Itakura, Tsubasa; Akiyama, Takahiko

    2016-09-12

    Reported herein is an enantiodivergent synthesis of chiral biaryls by a chiral phosphoric acid catalyzed asymmetric transfer hydrogenation reaction. Upon treatment of biaryl lactols with aromatic amines and a Hantzsch ester in the presence of chiral phosphoric acid, dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) involving a reductive amination reaction proceeded smoothly to furnish both R and S isomers of chiral biaryls with excellent enantioselectivities by proper choice of hydroxyaniline derivative. This trend was observed in wide variety of substrates, and various chiral biphenyl and phenyl naphthyl adducts were synthesized with satisfactory enantioselectivities in enantiodivergent fashion. The enantiodivergent synthesis of synthetically challenging, chiral o-tetrasubstituted biaryls were also accomplished, and suggests high synthetic potential of the present method. PMID:27491630

  19. Efficient access to enantiomerically pure cyclic α-amino esters through a lipase-catalyzed kinetic resolution

    PubMed Central

    Alatorre-Santamaría, Sergio; Rodriguez-Mata, María; Gotor-Fernández, Vicente; de Mattos, Marcos Carlos; Sayago, Francisco J.; Jiménez, Ana I.

    2008-01-01

    A series of α-amino acid derivatives containing the 2,3-dihydroindole or octahydroindole core have been chemoenzymatically synthesized in good overall yields and high enantiomeric purity under mild reaction conditions using lipases for the introduction of chirality. Candida antarctica lipase type A has shown excellent activity and high enantiodiscrimination ability towards the two cyclic amino esters used as substrates. The selectivity of the process proved to be greatly dependent on the alkoxycarbonylating agent. Thus, the enzymatic kinetic resolution of methyl indoline-2-carboxylate has been successfully achieved using 3-methoxyphenyl allyl carbonate, whereas (2R,3aR,7aR)-benzyl octahydroindole-2-carboxylate required the less reactive diallyl carbonate. PMID:20104250

  20. Modeling Photo-Bleaching Kinetics to Create High Resolution Maps of Rod Rhodopsin in the Human Retina

    PubMed Central

    Ehler, Martin; Dobrosotskaya, Julia; Cunningham, Denise; Wong, Wai T.; Chew, Emily Y.; Czaja, Wojtek; Bonner, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce and describe a novel non-invasive in-vivo method for mapping local rod rhodopsin distribution in the human retina over a 30-degree field. Our approach is based on analyzing the brightening of detected lipofuscin autofluorescence within small pixel clusters in registered imaging sequences taken with a commercial 488nm confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (cSLO) over a 1 minute period. We modeled the kinetics of rhodopsin bleaching by applying variational optimization techniques from applied mathematics. The physical model and the numerical analysis with its implementation are outlined in detail. This new technique enables the creation of spatial maps of the retinal rhodopsin and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) bisretinoid distribution with an ≈ 50μm resolution. PMID:26196397

  1. Reaction progress kinetic analysis of a copper-catalyzed aerobic oxidative coupling reaction with N-phenyl tetrahydroisoquinoline.

    PubMed

    Scott, Martin; Sud, Abhishek; Boess, Esther; Klussmann, Martin

    2014-12-19

    The results from a kinetic investigation of a Cu-catalyzed oxidative coupling reaction between N-phenyl tetrahydroisoquinoline and a silyl enol ether using elemental oxygen as oxidant are presented. By using reaction progress kinetic analysis as an evaluation method for the obtained data, we discovered information regarding the reaction order of the substrates and catalysts. Based on this information and some additional experiments, a refined model for the initial oxidative activation of the amine substrate and the activation of the nucleophile by the catalyst was developed. The mechanistic information also helped to understand why silyl nucleophiles have previously failed in a related Cu-catalyzed reaction using tert-butyl hydroperoxide as oxidant and how to overcome this limitation. PMID:25203932

  2. High temperature materials synthesis without heat: Oxide layer growth on electronic materials using high-kinetic-energy atomic oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffbauer, M.A.; Cross, J.B.; Archuleta, F.A.

    1996-04-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors examined thin-film materials-synthesis processes in which chemical reactions are initiated using high-kinetic-energy neutral atomic species instead of high temperatures. The research is aimed at producing device-quality insulating oxide layers on semiconductor materials. Thick, uniform, and fully oxidized insulating layers of unprecedented quality are formed on gallium arsenide by exposure of wafer substrates to a high kinetic-energy ({approximately}3eV) neutral atomic-oxygen beam. The nonthermal oxidation process does not disrupt the crystalline order of the substrate and no detectable elemental arsenic is produced at the oxide/gallium arsenide interface.

  3. Deuterium oxide dilution kinetics to predict body composition in dairy goats

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.L.; Taylor, S.J.

    1986-04-01

    Body composition and D2O dilution kinetics were studied in 15 female goats ranging from 38.0 to 70.1 kg live weight. Infrared spectrophotometric analyses of blood samples drawn during the 4 d following D2O injections were used to estimate D2O space. All does were slaughtered without shrinking and analyzed for dry matter, fat, nitrogen, and ash content. Estimates of D2O space from the late slope of the dilution curve, together with live weight, were used to predict body composition. Conclusions were 1) deuterium oxide space with live body weight accounts for about 90% of the variation in dairy goat empty body fat, empty body nitrogen, and empty body dry matter; 2) less than half the variation in empty body ash is related to live weight and D2O space; and 3) D2O space estimates would be biased by accelerations in water turnover.

  4. Kinetic Analysis of Spontaneous Whisker Growth on Pre-treated Surfaces with Weak Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Chien-Hao; Chen, Hao; Lee, Hsin-Yi; Liu, Cheng Yi; Ku, Ching-Shun; Wu, Albert T.

    2014-09-01

    This study sought to clarify the relationship between cracks in surface oxide layers and the growth behavior of tin whiskers. The number, length, and total volume of extrusions were precisely calculated and residual stress was measured using synchrotron radiation x-ray diffractometry. The aim was to elucidate the influence of stress on the driving force and flux involved in atomic diffusion. The distance between weak spots was shown to be the most significant factor involved in the growth of whiskers. The results could explain why increasing the density of the surface weak spots could reduce the number of long whiskers. Measuring the dimensions of whiskers yielded a precise kinetic model capable of describing the migration of atoms to the root of whiskers, resulting in their spontaneous growth.

  5. A kinetic investigation of high-temperature mercury oxidation by chlorine

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, J.

    2009-06-15

    First-stage mercury oxidation reactions typical of coal combustion flue gases were investigated. The present study is a determination of the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the bimolecular reactions, Hg + Cl{sub 2}{leftrightarrow} HgCl + Cl, Hg + HCl {leftrightarrow} HgCl + H, and Hg + HOCl {leftrightarrow} HgCl + OH, at the B3LYP/RCEP60 VDZ level of theory over a temperature range of 298.15 to 2000 K at atmospheric pressure. Conventional transition state theory was used to predict the forward and reverse rate constants for each reaction and ab initio based equilibrium constant expressions were calculated as a function of temperature. Reasonable agreement was achieved between the calculated equilibrium constants and the available experimental values.

  6. Kinetic patterns in the formation of nanosized manganese-manganese oxide systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surovoi, E. P.; Bugerko, L. N.; Surovaya, V. E.; Zaikonnikova, T. M.

    2016-03-01

    Transformations in nanosized manganese films are studied by means of optical spectroscopy, microscopy, and gravimetry at different film thicknesses ( d = 4-108 nm) and temperatures of heat treatment ( T = 373-673 K). It is found that the kinetic curves of conversion are satisfactorily described in the terms of linear, inverse logarithmic, cubic, and logarithmic laws. The contact potential difference is measured for Mn and MnO films, and photo EMF is measured for Mn-MnO systems. An energy band diagram is constructed for Mn-MnO systems. A model for the thermal transformation of Mn films is proposed that includes stages of oxygen adsorption, the redistribution of charge carriers in the contact field of Mn-MnO, and manganese(II) oxide formation.

  7. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of nitrous acid by chlorite ion

    SciTech Connect

    Lengyel, I.; Gaspar, V.; Beck, M.T.

    1988-01-14

    Although the oxidation of nitrite by chlorite both stoichiometrically and kinetically is a fairly simple reaction when nitrite is in excess and the pH is above 4, it becomes exceedingly complex in acidic solution containing chlorite in excess. Cl/sub 2/O/sub 2/ appears to be a key intermediate, the transitory formation of which explains both the formation of ClO/sub 2/ and peculiar three-extrema E versus time curve. Assuming that the electrode process on the bright Pt electrode is HOCl + e/sup -/ + H/sup +/ = Cl/sub 2/ + H/sub 2/O, the reaction is an oligooscillatory one in which the concentration of HOCl exhibits three extrema at most.

  8. Adsorption kinetics and thermodynamics of acid Bordeaux B from aqueous solution by graphene oxide/PAMAMs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; He, Shengfu; Zhang, Chen; Peng, Zhiyuan

    2015-01-01

    Graphene oxide/polyamidoamines dendrimers (GO/PAMAMs) composites were synthesized via modifying GO with 2.0 G PAMAM. The adsorption behavior of the GO/PAMAMs for acid Bordeaux B (ABB) was studied and the effects of media pH, adsorption time and initial ABB concentration on adsorption capacity of the adsorbent were investigated. The optimum pH value of the adsorption of ABB onto GO/PAMAMs was 2.5. The maximum adsorption capacity increased from 325.78 to 520.83 mg/g with the increase in temperature from 298 to 328 K. The equilibrium data followed the Langmuir isotherm model better than the Freundlich model. The kinetic study illustrated that the adsorption of ABB onto GO/PAMAMs fit the pseudo-second-order model. The thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption process was physisorption, and also an endothermic and spontaneous process. PMID:26398038

  9. Kinetic investigation of sulfidizing annealing of scorodite in processing of refractory oxidized gold-containing ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boboev, I. R.; Strizhko, L. S.; Bobozoda, Sh.; Gorbunov, E. P.

    2016-03-01

    The results of kinetic studies on the removal of arsenic from scorodite using sulfidizing annealing are presented. The reaction order with respect to the reactant and the activation energy are established from the experimental data. The rate-determining step of the sulfidizing annealing process is determined. The main reactions that occur during the sulfidizing of arsenic in scorodite are proposed on the basis of the obtained results and confirmed by thermodynamic calculations and chemical analyses. The major results of testing this technology, as applied to the refractory oxidized ores in which arsenic is mainly concentrated in scorodite, are presented. Arsenic removal from this ore is confirmed by chemical and quantitative X-ray diffraction analyses and by qualitative phase analysis. Industrial use of this technology provides safe and efficient processing of refractory gold-containing ores, where arsenic is mainly concentrated in scorodite.

  10. Study of the Reaction Stages and Kinetics of the Europium Oxide Carbochlorination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomiro, Federico J.; Fouga, Gastón G.; Gaviría, Juan P.; Bohé, Ana E.

    2015-02-01

    The europium oxide (Eu2O3(s)) chlorination reaction with sucrose carbon was studied by thermogravimetry between room temperature and 1223 K (950 °C). The nonisothermal thermogravimetry showed that the reaction consists of three stages, and their stoichiometries were studied. The product of the first stage was europium oxychloride, and it showed independence of the reaction kinetics with the carbon content. Subsequently, in the second stage, the EuOCl(s) was carbochlorinated with formation of EuCl3(l) and its evaporation is observed in the third stage. The analysis by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of gaseous species showed that the reaction at second stage occurs with the formation of CO2(g) and CO(g). Both reactants and products were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. The influence of carbon content, total flow rate, sample initial mass, chlorine partial pressure, and temperature were evaluated. The second stage kinetics was analyzed, which showed an anomalous behavior caused by generation of chlorine radicals during interaction of Cl2(g) and carbon. It was found that the reaction rate at 933 K (660 °C) was proportional to a potential function of the chlorine partial pressure whose exponent is 0.56. The conversion curves were analyzed with the Avrami-Erofeev model and it was obtained an activation energy of 154 ± 5 kJ mol-1.

  11. Kinetics of O{sub 3} decomposition and heterogeneous chemistry on aluminum oxide particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hanning-Lee, M.A.; Brady, B.B.; Syage, J.A.

    1996-10-01

    Measurements of chemistry on aluminum oxide particles pertinent to solid rocket motor plume/stratosphere interactions are reported. A new method for measuring heterogeneous chemistry is described based on real-time studies of the kinetics by absorption spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. These measurements complement similar measurements in a flow tube reactor, but have certain advantages in disentangling adsorption/desorption kinetics from equilibrium properties. Catalytic decay of ozone has been expressed as a reaction probability {eta} on different grades of alumina. {eta} ranges from 10{sup -5} to 10{sup -3} over the temperature range 20 to 200{degrees}C, respectively. At stratospheric temperatures (-60{degrees}C), the reaction probability increases to about 10{sup -4} possibly reflecting an increased surface residence time for ozone with decreasing temperature. Adsorption and desorption rate coefficients are presented for plume species of high activity such as ozone, water, and HCl. These measurements enable an assessment of the impact of SRM plumes on stratospheric ozone depletion.

  12. Hydrous ferric oxide doped alginate beads for fluoride removal: Adsorption kinetics and equilibrium studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sujana, M. G.; Mishra, A.; Acharya, B. C.

    2013-04-01

    A new biopolymer beads, composite of hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) and alginate were synthesised, characterised and studied for its fluoride efficiency from water. The beads were characterised by chemical analysis, BET surface area, pHPZC and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The optimum conditions for fluoride removal were determined by studying operational variables viz. pH, contact time, initial F- concentration, bead dose and temperature. Presence of other anions like SO42-, PO43-, NO3-, Cl- and HCO3- effect on fluoride removal efficiency of prepared beads was also tested. The beads were 0.8-0.9 mm in size and contain 32-33% Fe (III) and showed specific surface area of 25.80 m2 g-1 and pHPZC of 5.15. Modified beads demonstrated Langmuir F- adsorption capacity of 8.90 mg g-1 at pH 7.0. The adsorption kinetics were best described by the pseudo-second order kinetic model followed by intra-particle diffusion as the rate determining step. It was found that about 80% of the adsorbed fluoride could be desorbed by using 0.05 M HCl. The FTIR, Raman and SEM-EDAX analysis were used to study the fluoride adsorption mechanisms on beads. Studies were also conducted to test the potential application of beads for F- removal from drinking water and the treated water quality.

  13. Reaction kinetics of selected micropollutants in ozonation and advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaohui; Peldszus, Sigrid; Huck, Peter M

    2012-12-01

    Second-order reaction rate constants of micropollutants with ozone (k(O3)) and hydroxyl radicals (k(OH)) are essential for evaluating their removal efficiencies from water during ozonation and advanced oxidation processes. Kinetic data are unavailable for many of the emerging micropollutants. Twenty-four micropollutants with very diverse structures and applications including endocrine disrupting compounds, pharmaceuticals, and personal care products were selected, and their k(O3) and k(OH) values were determined using bench-scale reactors (at pH 7 and T = 20 °C). Reactions with molecular ozone are highly selective as indicated by their k(O3) values ranging from 10(-2)-10(7) M(-1) s(-1). The general trend of ozone reactivity can be explained by micropollutant structures in conjunction with the electrophilic nature of ozone reactions. All of the studied compounds are highly reactive with hydroxyl radicals as shown by their high k(OH) values (10(8)-10(10) M(-1) s(-1)) even though they are structurally very diverse. For compounds with a low reactivity toward ozone, hydroxyl radical based treatment such as O(3)/H(2)O(2) or UV/H(2)O(2) is a viable alternative. This study contributed to filling the data gap pertaining kinetic data of organic micropollutants while confirming results reported in the literature where available. PMID:23079129

  14. [Effect of trace NO2 and kinetic characteristics for anaerobic ammonium oxidation of granular sludge].

    PubMed

    Zu, Bo; Zhang, Dai-Jun; Yan, Qing

    2008-03-01

    The effect of trace NO2 and kinetic characteristics for anaerobic ammonium oxidation of granular sludge was investigated by batch experiment. The sludge anammox rates could be described by the Haldane model. The kinetic parameters were determined, where the maximum anammox rate was 6.65 x 10(-3) mg (mg h)(-1). The half saturate coefficient and inhibition coefficient for ammonium nitrogen were 87.1 mg L(-1) and 1,123 mg L(-1) respectively, and the half saturate coefficient and inhibition coefficient for nitrite nitrogen were 15.39 mg L(-1) and 159.5 mg L(-1) respectively. Trace NO2 apparently enhanced anammox under trace NO2 atmosphere conditions. The function for NO2 to enhance anammox was suggested by the Haldane based model. The parameters in the function were estimated, where the maximum enhancing anammox coefficient was 48.79, and the half saturate coefficient and inhibition coefficient for NO2 were 2480 mg m(-3) and 4.22 mg m(-3) respectively, and the basic rate coefficient was 0.0182. The most of NOx in the experiment was lost. PMID:18649528

  15. Nitric oxide reduction in BioDeNOx reactors: kinetics and mechanism.

    PubMed

    van der Maas, Peter; Manconi, Isabella; Klapwijk, Bram; Lens, Piet

    2008-08-15

    Biological reduction of nitric oxide (NO) to di-nitrogen (N(2)) gas in aqueous Fe(II)EDTA(2-) solutions is a key reaction in BioDeNOx, a novel process for NOx removal from flue gases. The mechanism and kinetics of the first step of NO reduction, that is, the conversion of NO to N(2)O, was determined in batch experiments using various types of inocula. Experiments were performed in Fe(II)EDTA(2-) medium (5-25 mM) under BioDeNOx reactor conditions (55 degrees C, pH 7.2 +/- 0.2) with ethanol as external electron donor. BioDeNOx reactor mixed liquor gave the highest NO reduction rates (+/-0.34 nmol s(-1) mg(prot)(-1)) with an estimated K(m) value for NO lower than 10 nM. The specific NO (to N(2)O) reduction rate depended on the NO (aq) and Fe(II)EDTA(2-) concentration as well as the temperature. The experimental results, complemented with kinetic and thermodynamic considerations, show that Fe(II)EDTA(2-), and not ethanol, is the primary electron donor for NO reduction, that is, the BioDeNOx reactor medium (the redox system Fe(II)EDTA(2-)/Fe(III)EDTA(-)) interferes with the NO reduction electron transfer chain and thus enhances the NO denitrification rate. PMID:18553393

  16. Degradation of oxcarbazepine by UV-activated persulfate oxidation: kinetics, mechanisms, and pathways.

    PubMed

    Bu, Lingjun; Zhou, Shiqing; Shi, Zhou; Deng, Lin; Li, Guangchao; Yi, Qihang; Gao, Naiyun

    2016-02-01

    The degradation kinetics and mechanism of the antiepileptic drug oxcarbazepine (OXC) by UV-activated persulfate oxidation were investigated in this study. Results showed that UV/persulfate (UV/PS) process appeared to be more effective in degrading OXC than UV or PS alone. The OXC degradation exhibited a pseudo-first order kinetics pattern and the degradation rate constants (k obs) were affected by initial OXC concentration, PS dosage, initial pH, and humic acid concentration to different degrees. It was found that low initial OXC concentration, high persulfate dosage, and initial pH enhanced the OXC degradation. Additionally, the presence of humic acid in the solution could greatly inhibit the degradation of OXC. Moreover, hydroxyl radical (OH•) and sulfate radical (SO4 (-)••) were identified to be responsible for OXC degradation and SO4 (-)• made the predominant contribution in this study. Finally, major intermediate products were identified and a preliminary degradation pathway was proposed. Results demonstrated that UV/PS system is a potential technology to control the water pollution caused by emerging contaminants such as OXC. PMID:26452660

  17. Dissolution kinetics of macronutrient fertilizers coated with manufactured zinc oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Milani, Narges; McLaughlin, Mike J; Stacey, Samuel P; Kirby, Jason K; Hettiarachchi, Ganga M; Beak, Douglas G; Cornelis, Geert

    2012-04-25

    The solubility of Zn in Zn fertilizers plays an important role in the agronomic effectiveness of the fertilizer. On the basis of thermodynamics, zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) should dissolve faster and to a greater extent than bulk ZnO particles (equivalent spherical diameter >100 nm). These novel solubility features of ZnO NPs might be exploited to improve the efficiency of Zn fertilizers. In this study, we compared the Zn solubility and dissolution kinetics of ZnO nanoparticles and bulk ZnO particles coated onto two selected granular macronutrient fertilizers, urea and monoammonium phosphate (MAP). The main Zn species on coated MAP and urea granules were zinc ammonium phosphate and ZnO, respectively. Coated MAP granules showed greater Zn solubility and faster dissolution rates in sand columns compared to coated urea granules, which may be related to pH differences in the solution surrounding the fertilizer granules. The kinetics of Zn dissolution was not affected by the size of the ZnO particles applied for coating of either fertilizer type, possibly because solubility was controlled by formation of the same compounds irrespective of the size of the original ZnO particles used for coating. PMID:22480134

  18. Enzymatic Kinetic Resolution of 2-Piperidineethanol for the Enantioselective Targeted and Diversity Oriented Synthesis †

    PubMed Central

    Perdicchia, Dario; Christodoulou, Michael S.; Fumagalli, Gaia; Calogero, Francesco; Marucci, Cristina; Passarella, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    2-Piperidineethanol (1) and its corresponding N-protected aldehyde (2) were used for the synthesis of several natural and synthetic compounds. The existence of a stereocenter at position 2 of the piperidine skeleton and the presence of an easily-functionalized group, such as the alcohol, set 1 as a valuable starting material for enantioselective synthesis. Herein, are presented both synthetic and enzymatic methods for the resolution of the racemic 1, as well as an overview of synthesized natural products starting from the enantiopure 1. PMID:26712740

  19. Kinetics of a Criegee intermediate that would survive high humidity and may oxidize atmospheric SO2.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hao-Li; Chao, Wen; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2015-09-01

    Criegee intermediates are thought to play a role in atmospheric chemistry, in particular, the oxidation of SO2, which produces SO3 and subsequently H2SO4, an important constituent of aerosols and acid rain. However, the impact of such oxidation reactions is affected by the reactions of Criegee intermediates with water vapor, because of high water concentrations in the troposphere. In this work, the kinetics of the reactions of dimethyl substituted Criegee intermediate (CH3)2COO with water vapor and with SO2 were directly measured via UV absorption of (CH3)2COO under near-atmospheric conditions. The results indicate that (i) the water reaction with (CH3)2COO is not fast enough (kH2O < 1.5 × 10(-16) cm(3) s(-1)) to consume atmospheric (CH3)2COO significantly and (ii) (CH3)2COO reacts with SO2 at a near-gas-kinetic-limit rate (kSO2 = 1.3 × 10(-10) cm(3) s(-1)). These observations imply a significant fraction of atmospheric (CH3)2COO may survive under humid conditions and react with SO2, very different from the case of the simplest Criegee intermediate CH2OO, in which the reaction with water dimer predominates in the CH2OO decay under typical tropospheric conditions. In addition, a significant pressure dependence was observed for the reaction of (CH3)2COO with SO2, suggesting the use of low pressure rate may underestimate the impact of this reaction. This work demonstrates that the reactivity of a Criegee intermediate toward water vapor strongly depends on its structure, which will influence the main decay pathways and steady-state concentrations for various Criegee intermediates in the atmosphere. PMID:26283390

  20. Oxidation of microcystin-LR by ferrate(VI): kinetics, degradation pathways, and toxicity assessments.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wenjun; Chen, Long; Batchu, Sudha Rani; Gardinali, Piero R; Jasa, Libor; Marsalek, Blahoslav; Zboril, Radek; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; O'Shea, Kevin E; Sharma, Virender K

    2014-10-21

    The presence of the potent cyanotoxin, microcystin-LR (MC-LR), in drinking water sources poses a serious risk to public health. The kinetics of the reactivity of ferrate(VI) (Fe(VI)O4(2-), Fe(VI)) with MC-LR and model compounds (sorbic acid, sorbic alcohol, and glycine anhydride) are reported over a range of solution pH. The degradation of MC-LR followed second-order kinetics with the bimolecular rate constant (kMCLR+Fe(VI)) decreasing from 1.3 ± 0.1 × 10(2) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 7.5 to 8.1 ± 0.08 M(-1) s(-1) at pH 10.0. The specific rate constants for the individual ferrate species were determined and compared with a number of common chemical oxidants employed for water treatment. Detailed product studies using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) indicated the oxidized products (OPs) were primarily the result of hydroxylation of the aromatic ring, double bond of the methyldehydroalanine (Mdha) amino acid residue, and diene functionality. Products studies also indicate fragmentation of the cyclic MC-LR structure occurs under the reaction conditions. The analysis of protein phosphatase (PP1) activity suggested that the degradation byproducts of MC-LR did not possess significant biological toxicity. Fe(VI) was effective for the degradation MC-LR in water containing carbonate ions and fulvic acid (FA) and in lake water samples, but higher Fe(VI) dosages would be needed to completely remove MC-LR in lake water compared to deionized water. PMID:25215438

  1. Kinetics of a Criegee intermediate that would survive high humidity and may oxidize atmospheric SO2

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hao-Li; Chao, Wen; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2015-01-01

    Criegee intermediates are thought to play a role in atmospheric chemistry, in particular, the oxidation of SO2, which produces SO3 and subsequently H2SO4, an important constituent of aerosols and acid rain. However, the impact of such oxidation reactions is affected by the reactions of Criegee intermediates with water vapor, because of high water concentrations in the troposphere. In this work, the kinetics of the reactions of dimethyl substituted Criegee intermediate (CH3)2COO with water vapor and with SO2 were directly measured via UV absorption of (CH3)2COO under near-atmospheric conditions. The results indicate that (i) the water reaction with (CH3)2COO is not fast enough (kH2O < 1.5 × 10−16 cm3s−1) to consume atmospheric (CH3)2COO significantly and (ii) (CH3)2COO reacts with SO2 at a near–gas-kinetic-limit rate (kSO2 = 1.3 × 10−10 cm3s−1). These observations imply a significant fraction of atmospheric (CH3)2COO may survive under humid conditions and react with SO2, very different from the case of the simplest Criegee intermediate CH2OO, in which the reaction with water dimer predominates in the CH2OO decay under typical tropospheric conditions. In addition, a significant pressure dependence was observed for the reaction of (CH3)2COO with SO2, suggesting the use of low pressure rate may underestimate the impact of this reaction. This work demonstrates that the reactivity of a Criegee intermediate toward water vapor strongly depends on its structure, which will influence the main decay pathways and steady-state concentrations for various Criegee intermediates in the atmosphere. PMID:26283390

  2. Reaction kinetics and oxidation product formation in the degradation of acetaminophen by ferrate (VI).

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongyu; Liu, Yibing; Jiang, Jia-Qian

    2016-07-01

    This paper investigates the degradation of acetaminophen (AAP) in aqueous solutions by ferrate (VI), aiming to propose the kinetics, pathways and the oxidation products' formation in the AAP degradation. A series of jar tests were undertaken over ferrate (VI) dosages (molar ratios of ferrate (VI):AAP, 5:1 to 25:1) and pH values (4-11). The effects of co-existing ions (0.2-5 mM) and humic acid (10-50 mg l(-1)) on the AAP removal were investigated. Ferrate (VI) can remove 99.6% AAP (from 1000 μg l(-1)) in 60 min under study conditions when majority of the AAP reduction occurred in the first 5 min. The treatment performance depended on the ferrate(VI) dosage, pH and the type and strength of co-existing ions and humic acid. Raising ferrate (VI) dosage with optimal pH 7 improved the AAP degradation. In the presence of humic acid, the AAP degradation by ferrate (VI) was promoted in a short period (<30 min) but then inhibited with increasing in humic acid contents. The presence of Al(3+), CO3(2-) and PO4(3-) ions declined but the existence of K(+), Na(+), Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) ions can improve the AAP removal. The catalytic function of Al(3+) on the decomposition of ferrate (VI) in aqueous solution was found. The kinetics of the reaction between ferrate (VI) and AAP was pseudo first-order for ferrete (VI) and pseudo second-order for AAP. The pseudo rate constant of ferrate (VI) with AAP was 1.4 × 10(-5) L(2) mg(-2) min(-1). Three oxidation products (OPs) were identified and the AAP degradation pathways were proposed. PMID:27155474

  3. Thermodynamic and kinetic characterization using process dynamics: acidophilic ferrous iron oxidation by Leptospirillum ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Kleerebezem, Robbert; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2008-05-01

    Kinetic and stoichiometric properties of acidophilic aerobic ferrous iron oxidation by growing and non-growing Leptospirillum ferrooxidans cultures were investigated. The use of a continuous stirred tank reactor operated at a variable dilution rate and equipped with on-line measurement of the electron donor, acceptor and anabolic substrate uptake rate enabled detailed kinetic characterization from a single experiment. It was demonstrated that substrate conversion and microbial growth are tightly coupled processes in L. ferrooxidans, and uncoupling occurs only due to the minor impact of substrate conversion for growth-independent maintenance purposes. The tight stoichiometric coupling implies bioenergetic uncoupling of the catabolism and anabolism because the Gibbs energy change for ferrous iron oxidation as a function of the actual growth rate of the culture ranges from -45 to -25 kJ mol-FeII(-1). Bioenergetic description of the process could only be achieved by introduction of a growth rate dependent Gibbs energy dissipation term. Removal of carbon dioxide from the influent gas stopped biomass growth, but the biomass specific respiration rate was unaffected or slightly stimulated. The uncoupling of the catabolism and anabolism is suggested to induce instantaneously an energy dissipation pathway. Also dosage of a low concentration propionic acid resulted in complete inhibition of the anabolism. Propionic acid served as an uncoupler of the membrane potential and all catabolic energy is required for the increased maintenance requirements. Recovery of the anabolism after reestablishment of the normal cultivation conditions was obtained only after 1-2 days. The results obtained provide additional constraints on cultivation of L. ferrooxidans for biotechnological application. PMID:18080344

  4. Oxidation of triclosan by ferrate: reaction kinetics, products identification and toxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Ying, Guang-Guo; Zhao, Jian-Liang; Zhang, Li-Juan; Fang, Yi-Xiang; Nghiem, Long Duc

    2011-02-15

    The oxidation of triclosan by commercial grade aqueous ferrate (Fe(VI)) was investigated and the reaction kinetics as a function of pH (7.0-10.0) were experimentally determined. Intermediate products of the oxidation process were characterized using both GC-MS and RRLC-MS/MS techniques. Changes in toxicity during the oxidation process of triclosan using Fe(VI) were investigated using Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata growth inhibition tests. The results show that triclosan reacted rapidly with Fe(VI), with the apparent second-order rate constant, k(app), being 754.7 M(-1) s(-1) at pH 7. At a stoichiometric ratio of 10:1 (Fe(VI):triclosan), complete removal of triclosan was achieved. Species-specific rate constants, k, were determined for reaction of Fe(VI) with both the protonated and deprotonated triclosan species. The value of k determined for neutral triclosan was 6.7(±1.9)×10(2) M(-1) s(-1), while that measured for anionic triclosan was 7.6(±0.6)×10(3) M(-1) s(-1). The proposed mechanism for the oxidation of triclosan by the Fe(VI) involves the scission of ether bond and phenoxy radical addition reaction. Coupling reaction may also occur during Fe(VI) degradation of triclosan. Overall, the degradation processes of triclosan resulted in a significant decrease in algal toxicity. The toxicity tests showed that Fe(VI) itself dosed in the reaction did not inhibit green algae growth. PMID:21093982

  5. Kinetics and mechanism of the deep electrochemical oxidation of sodium diclofenac on a boron-doped diamond electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedenyapina, M. D.; Borisova, D. A.; Rosenwinkel, K.-H.; Weichgrebe, D.; Stopp, P.; Vedenyapin, A. A.

    2013-08-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of the deep oxidation of sodium diclofenac on a boron-doped diamond electrode are studied to develop a technique for purifying wastewater from pharmaceutical products. The products of sodium diclofenac electrolysis are analyzed using cyclic voltammetry and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. It is shown that the toxicity of the drug and products of its electrolysis decreases upon its deep oxidation.

  6. High-Resolution p-Type Metal Oxide Semiconductor Nanowire Array as an Ultrasensitive Sensor for Volatile Organic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Cho, Soo-Yeon; Yoo, Hae-Wook; Kim, Ju Ye; Jung, Woo-Bin; Jin, Ming Liang; Kim, Jong-Seon; Jeon, Hwan-Jin; Jung, Hee-Tae

    2016-07-13

    The development of high-performance volatile organic compound (VOC) sensor based on a p-type metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) is one of the important topics in gas sensor research because of its unique sensing characteristics, namely, rapid recovery kinetics, low temperature dependence, high humidity or thermal stability, and high potential for p-n junction applications. Despite intensive efforts made in this area, the applications of such sensors are hindered because of drawbacks related to the low sensitivity and slow response or long recovery time of p-type MOSs. In this study, the VOC sensing performance of a p-type MOS was significantly enhanced by forming a patterned p-type polycrystalline MOS with an ultrathin, high-aspect-ratio (∼25) structure (∼14 nm thickness) composed of ultrasmall grains (∼5 nm size). A high-resolution polycrystalline p-type MOS nanowire array with a grain size of ∼5 nm was fabricated by secondary sputtering via Ar(+) bombardment. Various p-type nanowire arrays of CuO, NiO, and Cr2O3 were easily fabricated by simply changing the sputtering material. The VOC sensor thus fabricated exhibited higher sensitivity (ΔR/Ra = 30 at 1 ppm hexane using NiO channels), as well as faster response or shorter recovery time (∼30 s) than that of previously reported p-type MOS sensors. This result is attributed to the high resolution and small grain size of p-type MOSs, which lead to overlap of fully charged zones; as a result, electrical properties are predominantly determined by surface states. Our new approach may be used as a route for producing high-resolution MOSs with particle sizes of ∼5 nm within a highly ordered, tall nanowire array structure. PMID:27304752

  7. The compound piston: resolution of a thermodynamic controversy by means of kinetic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sands, David; Dunning-Davies, Jeremy

    2010-07-01

    A numerical model of a hard-sphere fluid on either side of a compound piston shows that damping occurs naturally without invoking extraneous mechanisms such as friction. Inter-particle collisions are identified as being responsible. Whereas only the component of particle momentum in the direction of the piston motion is affected by the collisions with the piston, inter-particle collisions affect the other components of momentum and effectively dissipate the energy of the piston. These ideas are then incorporated into a simpler, one-dimensional numerical model based on kinetic theory in which all the particles have the same initial energy and inter-particle collisions are simulated by randomly adjusting the energy distribution. Varying the rate of energy redistribution alters the rate of decay of the piston motion, but we find the net work done to be dependent only on the starting conditions and quite independent of the detailed motion. This allows the consequences for thermodynamics of this intrinsic dissipation process to be investigated. We find that the adiabatic compound piston is irreversible, with the net work done being given by the product of the final pressure and the volume change. This finding is supported mathematically and we propose a simple method for determining the final piston position.

  8. Colloidal chemical synthesis and formation kinetics of uniformly sized nanocrystals of metals, oxides, and chalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soon Gu; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2008-12-01

    Nanocrystals exhibit interesting electrical, optical, magnetic, and chemical properties not achieved by their bulk counterparts. Consequently, to fully exploit the potential of nanocrystals, the synthesis of nanocrystals must focus on producing materials with uniform size and shape. Top-down physical processes can produce large quantities of nanocrystals, but controlling the size is difficult with these methods. On the other hand, colloidal chemical synthetic methods can produce uniform nanocrystals with a controlled particle size. In this Account, we present our synthesis of uniform nanocrystals of various shapes and materials, and we discuss the kinetics of nanocrystal formation. We employed four different synthetic approaches including thermal decomposition, nonhydrolytic sol-gel reactions, thermal reduction, and use of reactive chalcogen reagents. We synthesized uniform oxide nanocrystals via heat-up methods. This method involved slowly heat-up reaction mixtures composed of metal precursors, surfactants, and solvents from room temperature to high temperature. We then held reaction mixtures at an aging temperature for a few minutes to a few hours. Kinetics studies revealed a three-step mechanism for the synthesis of nanocrystals through the heat-up method with size distribution control. First, as metal precursors thermally decompose, monomers accumulate. At the aging temperature, burst nucleation occurs rapidly; at the end of this second phase, nucleation stops, but continued diffusion-controlled growth leads to size focusing to produce uniform nanocrystals. We used nonhydrolytic sol-gel reactions to synthesize various transition metal oxide nanocrystals. We employed ester elimination reactions for the synthesis of ZnO and TiO(2) nanocrystals. Uniform Pd nanoparticles were synthesized via a thermal reduction reaction induced by heating up a mixture of Pd(acac)(2), tri-n-octylphosphine, and oleylamine to the aging temperature. Similarly, we synthesized

  9. Degradation kinetics of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons by methane oxidizers naturally-associated with wetland plant roots.

    PubMed

    Powell, C L; Goltz, M N; Agrawal, A

    2014-12-01

    Chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) are common groundwater contaminants that can be removed from the environment by natural attenuation processes. CAH biodegradation can occur in wetland environments by reductive dechlorination as well as oxidation pathways. In particular, CAH oxidation may occur in vegetated wetlands, by microorganisms that are naturally associated with the roots of wetland plants. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the cometabolic degradation kinetics of the CAHs, cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cisDCE), trichloroethene (TCE), and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1TCA), by methane-oxidizing bacteria associated with the roots of a typical wetland plant in soil-free system. Laboratory microcosms with washed live roots investigated aerobic, cometabolic degradation of CAHs by the root-associated methane-oxidizing bacteria at initial aqueous [CH4] ~1.9mgL(-1), and initial aqueous [CAH] ~150μgL(-1); cisDCE and TCE (in the presence of 1,1,1TCA) degraded significantly, with a removal efficiency of approximately 90% and 46%, respectively. 1,1,1TCA degradation was not observed in the presence of active methane oxidizers. The pseudo first-order degradation rate-constants of TCE and cisDCE were 0.12±0.01 and 0.59±0.07d(-1), respectively, which are comparable to published values. However, their biomass-normalized degradation rate constants obtained in this study were significantly smaller than pure-culture studies, yet they were comparable to values reported for biofilm systems. The study suggests that CAH removal in wetland plant roots may be comparable to processes within biofilms. This has led us to speculate that the active biomass may be on the root surface as a biofilm. The cisDCE and TCE mass losses due to methane oxidizers in this study offer insight into the role of shallow, vegetated wetlands as an environmental sink for such xenobiotic compounds. PMID:25444117

  10. Report on Ultra-high Resolution Gamma- / X-ray Analysis of Uranium Skull Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S; Velazquez, M; Drury, O; Salaymeh, S

    2009-11-02

    We have utilized the high energy resolution and high peak-to-background ratio of superconducting TES {gamma}-detectors at very low energies for non-destructive analysis of a skull oxide derived from reprocessed nuclear fuel. Specifically, we demonstrate that superconducting detectors can separate and analyze the strong actinide emission lines in the spectral region below 60 keV that are often obscured in {gamma}-measurements with conventional Ge detectors.

  11. The kinetic to potential energy ratio and spectral separability from high-resolution balloon soundings near the Andes Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Torre, A.; Alexander, P.; Giraldez, A.

    The ratio R between the spectral kinetic and potential energies as a function of vertical wavenumber has been calculated from high-resolution data obtained with open stratospheric balloons near the Andes Mountains. Two segments of altitude in the troposphere and stratosphere respectively were analyzed. The ratio values are larger in both the troposphere and stratosphere than those predicted from the separability of wavenumber and frequency spectra. A comparison was made with previous statistical results from soundings over flat terrain extending up to log m (cy/m) = -2.0. Our calculations prolong this interval to -2.0 ≤ log m ≤ -0.7. In the stratosphere, a remarkable similarity between that earlier work and ours is observed. This also happens in the troposphere, but only up to log m = -1.4. As suggested by the other authors, the enhanced R values might be explained by the propagation of inertial gravity waves generated in the mountain relief (this is supported by rotational spectra calculated here). Previous evidence in favor of spectral separability obtained by other authors has been extended here for larger wavenumbers by the observed constancy of the ratio between the temperature and vertical velocity spectra. In both the troposphere and the stratosphere, this ratio appears to be fairly uniform and similar to previous results obtained by other authors at lower resolution.

  12. Kinetic approach for the enzymatic determination of levodopa and carbidopa assisted by multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares.

    PubMed

    Grünhut, Marcos; Garrido, Mariano; Centurión, Maria E; Fernández Band, Beatriz S

    2010-07-12

    A combination of kinetic spectroscopic monitoring and multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) was proposed for the enzymatic determination of levodopa (LVD) and carbidopa (CBD) in pharmaceuticals. The enzymatic reaction process was carried out in a reverse stopped-flow injection system and monitored by UV-vis spectroscopy. The spectra (292-600 nm) were recorded throughout the reaction and were analyzed by multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares. A small calibration matrix containing nine mixtures was used in the model construction. Additionally, to evaluate the prediction ability of the model, a set with six validation mixtures was used. The lack of fit obtained was 4.3%, the explained variance 99.8% and the overall prediction error 5.5%. Tablets of commercial samples were analyzed and the results were validated by pharmacopeia method (high performance liquid chromatography). No significant differences were found (alpha=0.05) between the reference values and the ones obtained with the proposed method. It is important to note that a unique chemometric model made it possible to determine both analytes simultaneously. PMID:20630175

  13. Oxidation kinetics of Haynes 230 alloy in air at temperatures between 650 and 850 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Li; Jian, Pu; Bing, Hua; Xie, Guangyuan

    Haynes 230 alloy was oxidized in air at temperatures between 650 and 850 °C. Thermogravimetry was used to measure the kinetics of oxidation. The formed oxides were identified by the thin film (small angle) X-ray diffraction technique. Cr 2O 3 and MnCr 2O 4 were found in the oxide scale. Multi-stage oxidation kinetics was observed, and each stage follows Wagner's parabolic law. The first slow oxidation stage corresponded to the growth of an Cr 2O 3 layer, controlled by Cr ions diffusion through the dense Cr 2O 3 scale. The faster second stage was a result of rapid diffusion of Mn ions passing through the established Cr 2O 3 scale to form MnCr 2O 4 on top of the Cr 2O 3 layer. A duplex oxide scale is expected. The third stage, with a rate close to that of the first stage, only appeared for oxidation in the intermediate temperature range, i.e., 750-800 °C, which can be explained by the interruption of the Mn flux that forms MnCr 2O 4.

  14. Analysis of the laser oxidation kinetics process of In-In(2)O(3) MTMO photomasks by laser direct writing.

    PubMed

    Xia, Feng; Zhang, Xinzheng; Wang, Meng; Liu, Qian; Xu, Jingjun

    2015-11-01

    One kind of novel grayscale photomask based on Metal-transparent-metallic-oxides (MTMOs) system fabricated by laser direct writing was demonstrated recently. Here, a multilayer oxidation model of In-In(2)O(3) film with a glass substrate was proposed to study the pulsed laser-induced oxidation mechanism. The distribution of the electromagnetic field in the film is calculated by the transfer matrix method. Temperature fields of the model are simulated based on the heat transfer equations with the Finite-Difference Time-Domain method. The oxidation kinetics process is studied based on the laser-induced Cabrera-Mott theory. The simulated oxidation processes are consistent with the experimental results, which mean that our laser-induced oxidation model can successfully interpret the fabrication mechanism of MTMO grayscale photomasks. PMID:26561189

  15. Oxidative degradation of N-Nitrosopyrrolidine by the ozone/UV process: Kinetics and pathways.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi; Fang, Jingyun; Fan, Chihhao; Shang, Chii

    2016-05-01

    N-Nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYR) is an emerging contaminant in drinking water and wastewater. The degradation kinetics and mechanisms of NPYR degradation by the O3/UV process were investigated and compared with those of UV direct photolysis and ozonation. A synergistic effect of ozone and UV was observed in the degradation of NPYR due to the accelerated production of OH• by ozone photolysis. This effect was more pronounced at higher ozone dosages. The second-order rate constants of NPYR reacting with OH• and ozone was determined to be 1.38 (± 0.05) × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) and 0.31 (± 0.02) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. The quantum yield by direct UV photolysis was 0.3 (± 0.01). An empirical model using Rct (the ratio of the exposure of OH• to that of ozone) was established for NPYR degradation in treated drinking water and showed that the contributions of direct UV photolysis and OH• oxidation on NPYR degradation were both significant. As the reaction proceeded, the contribution by OH• became less important due to the exhausting of ozone. Nitrate was the major product in the O3/UV process by two possible pathways. One is through the cleavage of nitroso group to form NO• followed by hydrolysis, and the other is the oxidation of the intermediates of amines by ozonation. PMID:26733013

  16. Wavefront Kinetics of Plamsa Oxidation of Polydimethylsiloxane: Implications for Micropatterning Size Limits by Wrinkling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayley, Angus; Cabral, Joao; Lingling Liao, Joanne; Chiche, Arnaud; Stavrinou, Paul

    2013-03-01

    We investigate spontaneous wrinkling of bilayers under compressive strain as a means of producing highly ordered micropatterns that span macroscopic areas. Our focus is a fast track wrinkling method, involving plasma oxidation of pre-stretched elastomeric polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), which when subsequently relaxed forms one-dimensionally aligned sinusoidal surface undulations. For the first time, we evaluate this micropatterning method in terms of the range of geometries of 1D wrinkles it can produce. Our investigation reveals the presence of an apparent minimum wrinkling wavelength for a given value of prestrain (approximately 600nm for a prestrain of 10%), offering clues regarding the kinetics of glassy film formation on the surface of PDMS during plasma oxidation, which is subsequently investigated. X-ray reflectometry and analysis of wrinkling behavior for a selection of PDMS samples exposed to a range of plasma doses yields evidence that this transient film growth process is not dissimilar to the process of frontal photopolymerization. With the benefit of this finding, a route to further minimization of wrinkle periodicity - increasing processing pre-strain - is identified and subsequently implemented, allowing us to access periodicities as low as 140nm. We acknowledge the EPSRC for their funding of this work.

  17. Kinetics of Direct Oxidation of H2S in Coal Gas to Elemental Sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    K.C. Kwon

    2005-11-01

    Removal of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gasifier gas and sulfur recovery are key steps in the development of Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced Vision 21 plants that produce electric power and clean transportation fuels with coal and natural gas. These Vision 21 plants will require highly clean coal gas with H{sub 2}S below 1 ppm and negligible amounts of trace contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, ammonia, alkali, heavy metals, and particulate. The conventional method of sulfur removal and recovery employing amine, Claus, and tail-gas treatment is very expensive. A second generation approach developed under DOE's sponsorship employs hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). However, this process sequence does not remove trace contaminants and is targeted primarily towards the development of advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants that produce electricity (not both electricity and transportation fuels). There is an immediate as well as long-term need for the development of cleanup processes that produce highly clean coal gas for next generation Vision 21 plants. To this end, a novel process is now under development at several research organizations in which the H{sub 2}S in coal gas is directly oxidized to elemental sulfur over a selective catalyst. Such a process is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. The direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The objectives of this research are to measure kinetics of direct

  18. Kinetic modeling of pH-dependent antimony (V) sorption and transport in iron oxide-coated sand.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yongbing; Li, Lulu; Zhang, Hua

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the mechanisms and kinetics controlling the retention and transport of antimony (Sb) is prerequisite for evaluating the risk of groundwater contamination by the toxic element. In this study, kinetic batch and saturated miscible displacement experiments were performed to investigate effects of protonation-deprotonation reactions on sorption-desorption and transport of Sb(V) in iron oxide-coated sand (IOCS). Results clearly demonstrated that Sb(V) sorption was highly nonlinear and time dependent, where both sorption capacity and kinetic rates decreased with increasing solution pH. Breakthrough curves (BTCs) obtained at different solution pH exhibited that mobility of Sb(V) were higher under neutral to alkaline condition than under acidic condition. Because of the nonlinear and non-equilibrium nature of Sb(V) retention and transport, multi-reaction models (MRM) with equilibrium and kinetic sorption expressions were utilized successfully to simulate the experiment data. Equilibrium distribution coefficient (Ke) and reversible kinetic retention parameters (k1 and k2) of both kinetic sorption and transport experiment showed marked decrease as pH increased from 4.0 to 7.5. Surface complexation is suggested as the dominant mechanism for the observed pH-dependent phenomena, which need to be incorporated into the kinetic models to accurately simulate the reactive transport of Sb(V) in vadose zone and aquifers. PMID:26291756

  19. Oxidative degradation of triclosan by potassium permanganate: Kinetics, degradation products, reaction mechanism, and toxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Qu, Ruijuan; Pan, Xiaoxue; Wang, Zunyao

    2016-10-15

    In this study, we systematically investigated the potential applicability of potassium permanganate for removal of triclosan (TCS) in water treatment. A series of kinetic experiments were carried out to study the influence of various factors, including the pH, oxidant doses, temperature, and presence of typical anions (Cl(-), SO4(2-), NO3(-)), humic acid (HA), and fulvic acid (FA) on triclosan removal. The optimal reaction conditions were: pH = 8.0, [TCS]0:[KMnO4]0 = 1:2.5, and T = 25 °C, where 20 mg/L of TCS could be completely degraded in 120 s. However, the rate of TCS (20 μg/L) oxidation by KMnO4 ([TCS]0:[KMnO4]0 = 1:2.5) was 1.64 × 10(-3) mg L(-1)·h(-1), lower than that at an initial concentration of 20 mg/L (2.24 × 10(3) mg L(-1)·h(-1)). A total of eleven products were detected by liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (LC-Q-TOF-MS) analysis, including phenol and its derivatives, benzoquinone, an organic acid, and aldehyde. Two main reaction pathways involving CO bond cleavage (-C(8)O(7)-) and benzene ring opening (in the less chlorinated benzene ring) were proposed, and were further confirmed based on frontier electron density calculations and point charges. Furthermore, the changes in the toxicity of the reaction solution during TCS oxidation by KMnO4 were evaluated by using both the luminescent bacteria Photobacterium phosphoreum and the water flea Daphnia magna. The toxicity of 20 mg/L triclosan to D. magna and P. phosphoreum after 60 min was reduced by 95.2% and 43.0%, respectively. Phenol and 1,4-benzoquinone, the two representative degradation products formed during permanganate oxidation, would yield low concentrations of DBPs (STHMFP, 20.99-278.97 μg/mg; SHAAFP, 7.86 × 10(-4)-45.77 μg/mg) after chlorination and chloramination. Overall, KMnO4 can be used as an effective oxidizing agent for TCS removal in water and wastewater treatment. PMID:27459151

  20. Multiple apolipoprotein kinetics measured in human HDL by high-resolution/accurate mass parallel reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sasha A; Andraski, Allison B; Pieper, Brett; Goh, Wilson; Mendivil, Carlos O; Sacks, Frank M; Aikawa, Masanori

    2016-04-01

    Endogenous labeling with stable isotopes is used to study the metabolism of proteins in vivo. However, traditional detection methods such as GC/MS cannot measure tracer enrichment in multiple proteins simultaneously, and multiple reaction monitoring MS cannot measure precisely the low tracer enrichment in slowly turning-over proteins as in HDL. We exploited the versatility of the high-resolution/accurate mass (HR/AM) quadrupole Orbitrap for proteomic analysis of five HDL sizes. We identified 58 proteins in HDL that were shared among three humans and that were organized into five subproteomes according to HDL size. For seven of these proteins, apoA-I, apoA-II, apoA-IV, apoC-III, apoD, apoE, and apoM, we performed parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) to measure trideuterated leucine tracer enrichment between 0.03 to 1.0% in vivo, as required to study their metabolism. The results were suitable for multicompartmental modeling in all except apoD. These apolipoproteins in each HDL size mainly originated directly from the source compartment, presumably the liver and intestine. Flux of apolipoproteins from smaller to larger HDL or the reverse contributed only slightly to apolipoprotein metabolism. These novel findings on HDL apolipoprotein metabolism demonstrate the analytical breadth and scope of the HR/AM-PRM technology to perform metabolic research. PMID:26862155

  1. Effect of oxidation kinetics on the near threshold fatigue crack growth behavior of a nickel base superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Yuen, J.L.; Roy, P.; Nix, W.D.

    1984-09-01

    The influence of oxidation kinetics on the near threshold fatigue crack growth behavior of a nickel base precipitation hardened superalloy was studied in air from 427 to 649 C. The tests were conducted at 100 Hz and at load ratios of 0.1 and 0.5. The threshold values of the alternating stress intensity factor were found to increase with temperature. This behavior is attributed to oxide deposits that form on the freshly created fracture surfaces which enhance crack closure. As determined from secondary ion mass spectrometry, the oxide thickness was uniform over the crack length and was of the order of the maximum crack tip opening displacement at threshold. Oxidation kinetics were important in thickening the oxide on the fracture surfaces at elevated temperatures, whereas at room temperature, the oxide deposits at near threshold fatigue crack growth rates and at low load ratios were thickened by an oxide fretting mechanism. The effect of fracture surface roughness-induced crack closure on the near threshold fatigue crack growth behavior is also discussed. 27 references.

  2. Effect of oxidation kinetics on the near threshold fatigue crack growth behavior of a nickel base superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, J. L.; Roy, P.; Nix, W. D.

    1984-09-01

    The influence of oxidation kinetics on the near threshold fatigue crack growth behavior of a nickel base precipitation hardened superalloy was studied in air from 427° to 649 °C. The tests were conducted at 100 Hz and at load ratios of 0.1 and 0.5. The threshold ΔK values were found to increase with temperature. This behavior is attributed to oxide deposits that form on the freshly created fracture surfaces which enhance crack closure. As determined from secondary ion mass spectrometry, the oxide thickness was uniform over the crack length and was of the order of the maximum crack tip opening displacement at threshold. Oxidation kinetics were important in thickening the oxide on the fracture surfaces at elevated temperatures, whereas at room temperature, the oxide deposits at near threshold fatigue crack growth rates and at low load ratios were thickened by an oxide fretting mechanism. The effect of fracture surface roughness-induced crack closure on the near threshold fatigue crack growth behavior is also discussed.

  3. KINETICS OF DIRECT OXIDATION OF H2S IN COAL GAS TO ELEMENTAL SULFUR

    SciTech Connect

    K.C. Kwon

    2003-01-01

    The direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The objective of this research is to support the near- and long-term DOE efforts to commercialize this direct oxidation technology. The objectives of this research are to measure kinetics of direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and moisture, using 60-{micro}m C-500-04 alumina catalyst particles and a PFA differential fixed-bed micro reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. To achieve the above-mentioned objectives, experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur were carried out for the space time range of 0.01-0.047 seconds at 125-155 C to evaluate effects of reaction temperatures, moisture concentrations, reaction pressures on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 61-89 v% hydrogen, 2,300-9,200-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,600-4,900 ppmv sulfur dioxide, and 2.6-13.7 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of a simulated coal gas mixture to the reactor are 100-110 cm{sup 3}/min at room temperature and atmospheric pressure (SCCM). The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an oven at 125-155 C. The pressure of the reactor is maintained at 28-127 psia. The following results were obtained based on experimental data generated from the differential reactor system, and their interpretations, (1) Concentration of moisture and concentrations of both H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2} appear to affect slightly reaction

  4. Development of a combined model of tissue kinetics and radiation response of human bronchiolar epithelium with single cell resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrovskaya, Natela Grigoryevna

    2005-07-01

    Lack of accurate data for epidemiological studies of low dose radiation effects necessitates development of dosimetric models allowing prediction of cancer risks for different organs. The objective of this work is to develop a model of the radiation response of human bronchiolar tissue with single cell resolution. The computer model describes epithelial tissue as an ensemble of individual cells, with the geometry of a human bronchiole and the properties of different cell types are taken into account. The model simulates the tissue kinetics and radiation exposure in four dimensions: three spatial dimensions and a temporal dimension. The bronchiole is modeled as a regular hollow cylinder with the epithelial cells of three different types (basal, secretory, and ciliated) lining its interior. For the purposes of assessment of radiation damage to the cells only the nuclei of the cells have been modeled. Subroutines describing cellular kinetics have been developed to simulate cell turnover in a normal epithelial tissue. Monte Carlo subroutines have been developed to simulate exposure to alpha particles; the GEANT4 toolkit has been used to simulate exposure to low LET radiation. Each hit cell is provided with a record of energy deposition, and this record is passed to the progeny if the cell survives. The model output provides data on the number of basal progenitor cells in different phases of a cell life-cycle and secretory to ciliated cell ratio after several generations of cell proliferation. The model calculates labeling and mitotic indices and estimates the average cell turnover time for the bronchiolar tissue. Microdosimetric calculations are performed for cells traversed by ionizing particles. The model will be used to assess the accumulation of damage in cells due to protracted low level radiation exposure. The model output may provide directions for the future experimental design.

  5. Effect of pH and temperature on the kinetics of odor oxidation using chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Kastner, James R; Das, Keshav C; Hu, Cheng; McClendon, Ron

    2003-10-01

    Increasing public concerns over odors and air regulations in nonattainment zones necessitate the remediation of a wide range of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) generated in the poultry-rendering industry. Currently, wet scrubbers using oxidizing chemicals such as chlorine dioxide (ClO2) are utilized to treat VOCs. However, little information is available on the kinetics of ClO2 reaction with rendering air pollutants, limiting wet scrubber design and optimization. Kinetic analysis indicated that ClO2 does not react with hexanal and 2-methylbutanal regardless of pH and temperature and implied that aldehyde removal occurs primarily via mass transfer. Contrary to the aldehydes, ethanethiol or ethyl mercaptan (a model compound for methanethiol or methyl mercaptan) and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) rapidly reacted with ClO2. The overall reaction was found to be second and third order for ethanethiol and DMDS, respectively. Moreover, an increase in pH from 3.6 to 5.1 exponentially increased the reaction rate of ethanethiol (e.g., k2 = 25-4200 L/mol/sec from pH 3.6 to 5.1) and significantly increased the reaction rate of DMDS if increased to pH 9 (k3 = 1.4 x 10(6) L2/mol2/sec). Thus, a small increase in pH could significantly improve wet scrubber operations for removal of odor-causing compounds. However, an increase in pH did not improve aldehyde removal. The results explain why aldehyde removal efficiencies are much lower than methanethiol and DMDS in wet scrubbers using ClO2. PMID:14604331

  6. Aging is associated with altered vasodilator kinetics in dynamically contracting muscle: role of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Casey, Darren P; Ranadive, Sushant M; Joyner, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis that aging would be associated with slowed vasodilator kinetics in contracting muscle in part due to a reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Young (n = 10; 24 ± 2 yr) and older (n = 10; 67 ± 2 yr) adults performed rhythmic forearm exercise (4 min each) at 10, 20, and 30% of max during saline infusion (control) and NO synthase (NOS) inhibition. Brachial artery diameter and velocities were measured using Doppler ultrasound. Forearm vascular conductance (FVC) was calculated for each duty cycle (1 s contraction/2 s relaxation) from forearm blood flow (FBF; ml/min) and blood pressure (mmHg) and fit with a monoexponential model. The main parameters derived from the model were the amplitude of the FBF and FVC response and the number of duty cycles for FBF and FVC to change 63% of the steady-state amplitude (τFBF and τFVC). Under control conditions 1) the amplitude of the FVC response at 30% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) was lower in older compared with young adults (319 ± 33 vs. 462 ± 52 ml·min(-1)·100 mmHg(-1); P < 0.05) and 2) τFVC was slower in older (10 ± 1, 13 ± 1, and 15 ± 1 duty cycles) compared with young (6 ± 1, 9 ± 1, and 11 ± 1 duty cycles) adults at all intensities (P < 0.05). In young adults, NOS inhibition blunted the amplitude of the FVC response at 30% MVC and prolonged the τFVC at all intensities (10 ± 2, 12 ± 1, and 16 ± 2 duty cycles; P < 0.05), whereas it did not change in older adults. Our data indicate that the blood flow and vasodilator kinetics in exercising muscle are altered with aging possibly due to blunted NO signaling. PMID:26023230

  7. Kinetic modelling for the assay of nortriptyline hydrochloride using potassium permanganate as oxidant.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Nafisur; Khan, Sumaiya

    2015-06-01

    Kinetic methods for accurate determination of nortriptyline hydrochloride have been described. The methods are based on the oxidation of nortriptyline hydrochloride with KMnO4 in acidic and basic media. In acidic medium, the decrease in absorbance at 525.5 nm and in basic medium, the increase in absorbance at 608.5 nm were measured as a function of time. The variables affecting the reactions were carefully investigated and optimised. Kinetic models such as initial rate, rate constant, variable time and fixed time were employed to construct the calibration curves. The initial rate and fixed time methods were selected for quantification of nortriptyline hydrochloride. In acidic medium, the calibration curves showed a linear response over the concentration range 10-50 μg mL(-1) for initial rate and 10-60 μg mL(-1) for fixed time method (2 min). In basic medium, the calibration graphs were linear over the concentration range 10-100 μg mL(-1) for initial rate and fixed time methods (4 min). In acidic medium, the limits of detection for initial rate and fixed time methods (2 min) were 1.02 and 3.26 μg mL(-1), respectively. In basic medium, the limits of detection were found to be 1.67 and 1.55 μg mL(-1) for initial rate and fixed time methods (4 min), respectively. The initial rate and fixed time methods have been successfully applied to the determination of nortriptyline hydrochloride in commercial dosage form. Statistical comparison of the results of the proposed methods with those of reference method exhibited excellent agreement and there is no significant difference between the compared methods in terms of accuracy and precision. PMID:25380790

  8. Radiation re-solution of fission gas in non-oxide nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Christopher; Schwen, Daniel; Klein, Andrew C.

    2015-02-01

    Renewed interest in fast nuclear reactors is creating a need for better understanding of fission gas bubble behavior in non-oxide fuels to support very long fuel lifetimes. Collisions between fission fragments and their subsequent cascades can knock fission gas atoms out of bubbles and back into the fuel lattice. We showed that these collisions can be treated as using the so-called ‘‘homogenous’’ atom-by-atom re-solution theory and calculated using the Binary Collision Approximation code 3DOT. The calculations showed that there is a decrease in the re-solution parameter as bubble radius increases until about 50 nm, at which the re-solution parameter stays nearly constant. Furthermore, our model shows ion cascades created in the fuel result in many more implanted fission gas atoms than collisions directly with fission fragments. This calculated re-solution parameter can be used to find a re-solution rate for future bubble simulations.

  9. A Model of Reduced Kinetics for Alkane Oxidation Using Constituents and Species for N-Heptane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, Kenneth G.; Bellan, Josette

    2011-01-01

    The reduction of elementary or skeletal oxidation kinetics to a subgroup of tractable reactions for inclusion in turbulent combustion codes has been the subject of numerous studies. The skeletal mechanism is obtained from the elementary mechanism by removing from it reactions that are considered negligible for the intent of the specific study considered. As of now, there are many chemical reduction methodologies. A methodology for deriving a reduced kinetic mechanism for alkane oxidation is described and applied to n-heptane. The model is based on partitioning the species of the skeletal kinetic mechanism into lights, defined as those having a carbon number smaller than 3, and heavies, which are the complement of the species ensemble. For modeling purposes, the heavy species are mathematically decomposed into constituents, which are similar but not identical to groups in the group additivity theory. From analysis of the LLNL (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) skeletal mechanism in conjunction with CHEMKIN II, it is shown that a similarity variable can be formed such that the appropriately non-dimensionalized global constituent molar density exhibits a self-similar behavior over a very wide range of equivalence ratios, initial pressures and initial temperatures that is of interest for predicting n-heptane oxidation. Furthermore, the oxygen and water molar densities are shown to display a quasi-linear behavior with respect to the similarity variable. The light species ensemble is partitioned into quasi-steady and unsteady species. The reduced model is based on concepts consistent with those of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) in which functional forms are used to replace the small scales eliminated through filtering of the governing equations; in LES, these small scales are unimportant as far as the overwhelming part of dynamic energy is concerned. Here, the scales thought unimportant for recovering the thermodynamic energy are removed. The concept is tested by

  10. Nitrate denitrification with nitrite or nitrous oxide as intermediate products: Stoichiometry, kinetics and dynamics of stable isotope signatures.

    PubMed

    Vavilin, V A; Rytov, S V

    2015-09-01

    A kinetic analysis of nitrate denitrification by a single or two species of denitrifying bacteria with glucose or ethanol as a carbon source and nitrite or nitrous oxide as intermediate products was performed using experimental data published earlier (Menyailo and Hungate, 2006; Vidal-Gavilan et al., 2013). Modified Monod kinetics was used in the dynamic biological model. The special equations were added to the common dynamic biological model to describe how isotopic fractionation between N species changes. In contrast to the generally assumed first-order kinetics, in this paper, the traditional Rayleigh equation describing stable nitrogen and oxygen isotope fractionation in nitrate was derived from the dynamic isotopic equations for any type of kinetics. In accordance with the model, in Vidal-Gavilan's experiments, the maximum specific rate of nitrate reduction was proved to be less for ethanol compared to glucose. Conversely, the maximum specific rate of nitrite reduction was proved to be much less for glucose compared to ethanol. Thus, the intermediate nitrite concentration was negligible for the ethanol experiment, while it was significant for the glucose experiment. In Menyailo's and Hungate's experiments, the low value of maximum specific rate of nitrous oxide reduction gives high intermediate value of nitrous oxide concentration. The model showed that the dynamics of nitrogen and oxygen isotope signatures are responding to the biological dynamics. Two microbial species instead of single denitrifying bacteria are proved to be more adequate to describe the total process of nitrate denitrification to dinitrogen. PMID:25989520

  11. A high-resolution study of surfactant partitioning and kinetic limitations for two-component internally mixed aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, S. R.; Petters, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), altering cloud properties and ultimately affecting climate through their effect on the radiative balance. Aerosol CCN activity depends in part on aerosol composition and surfactant compounds are of particular interest because surfactants are enriched at the water/air interface, resulting in a radial concentration gradient within the aqueous droplet. Accurate treatment of the surfactant concentration gradient complicates the otherwise straightforward predictions of CCN activity for aerosols of known composition. To accurately evaluate predictions made by theory, laboratory studies investigating the relationship between critical supersaturation and dry diameter of particles that include surfactants require significant reduction in measurement uncertainty for both water-uptake and CCN measurements. Furthermore, uncertainties remain regarding kinetic limitations to surfactant partitioning that could result in deviation from predictions based on equilibrium thermodynamics. This study attempts to address some of these issues through high-resolution analysis of CCN activity of two-component mixed surfactant/non-surfactant aerosols at different internal mixing ratios performed with and without a water-uptake time delay to ascertain whether or not the observed effects are kinetically limited. We present new data for the aerosols consisting of 1) the ionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) with ammonium sulfate, 2) SDS with sodium chloride and 3) the strong non-ionic fluorosurfactant Zonyl with an organic proxy glucose. As a point of reference we also evaluated the mixture of ammonium sulfate with glucose. Aerosol activation diameters were determined using CCN analysis in conjunction with scanning mobility size classification and high sheath-to-aerosol flow ratios. This resulted in CCN-derived kappa values that could be determined within +/-5% relative error. To test whether dynamic surfactant partitioning

  12. Kinetic isotope effects implicate the iron-oxene as the sole oxidant in P450-catalyzed N-dealkylation.

    PubMed

    Dowers, Tamara S; Rock, Dan A; Rock, Denise A; Jones, Jeffrey P

    2004-07-28

    Multiple oxidants have been implicated as playing a role in cytochrome P450-mediated oxidations. Herein, we report results on N-dealkylation, one of the most facile reactions mediated by P450 enzymes. We have employed the N-oxides of a series of para-substituted 13C2H2-labeled N,N-dimethylanilines to function as both substrates and surrogate oxygen atom donors for P450cam and P4502E1. Kinetic isotope effect profiles obtained using the N-oxide system were found to closely match the profiles produced using the complete NAD(P)H/NAD(P)-P450 reductase/O2 system. The results are consistent with oxidation occurring solely through an iron-oxene species. PMID:15264797

  13. Thermodynamics and Kinetics for the Free Radical Oxygen Protein Oxidation Pathway in a Model for β-Structured Peptides.

    PubMed

    Green, Mandy C; Dubnicka, Laura J; Davis, Alex C; Rypkema, Heather A; Francisco, Joseph S; Slipchenko, Lyudmila V

    2016-04-28

    Oxidative stress plays a role in many biological phenomena, but involved mechanisms and individual reactions are not well understood. Correlated electronic structure calculations with the MP2, MP4, and CCSD(T) methods detail thermodynamic and kinetic information for the free radical oxygen protein oxidation pathway studied in a trialanine model system. The pathway includes aerobic, anaerobic and termination reactions. The course of the oxidation process depends on local conditions and availability of specific reactive oxygen species (ROS). A chemical mechanism is proposed for how oxidative stress promotes β-structure formation in the amyloid diseases. The work can be used to aid experimentalists as they explore individual reactions and mechanisms involving oxygen free radicals and oxidative stress in β-structured proteins. PMID:27055125

  14. Nanoporous activated carbon fluidized bed catalytic oxidations of aqueous o, p and m-cresols: kinetic and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, S; Sekaran, G; Gupta, V K

    2013-07-01

    Nanoporous activated carbon prepared from rice husk through precarbonisation at 400 °C and phosphoric acid activation at 800 °C was used as fluidized bed in Fenton oxidation of the o, p and m-cresols in aqueous solution. The efficiencies of homogeneous Fenton oxidation, fluidized Fenton oxidation and aerobic biological oxidation systems for the removal of o, p and m-cresols in aqueous solution have been compared. The kinetic constants and the thermodynamic parameters for the homogeneous Fenton, heterogeneous Fenton and aerobic biological oxidations of o, p and m-cresols in synthetic wastewater were determined. The degradation of cresols in synthetic wastewater was confirmed using FT-IR, (1)H-NMR and UV-visible spectroscopy. PMID:23292221

  15. Final Report: Molecular mechanisms and kinetics of microbial anaerobic nitrate-dependent U(IV) and Fe(II) oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    O'Day, Peggy A.; Asta, Maria P.; Kanematsu, Masakazu; Beller, Harry; Zhou, Peng; Steefel, Carl

    2015-02-27

    In this project, we combined molecular genetic, spectroscopic, and microscopic techniques with kinetic and reactive transport studies to describe and quantify biotic and abiotic mechanisms underlying anaerobic, nitrate-dependent U(IV) and Fe(II) oxidation, which influences the long-term efficacy of in situ reductive immobilization of uranium at DOE sites. In these studies, Thiobacillus denitrificans, an autotrophic bacterium that catalyzes anaerobic U(IV) and Fe(II) oxidation, was used to examine coupled oxidation-reduction processes under either biotic (enzymatic) or abiotic conditions in batch and column experiments with biogenically produced UIVO2(s). Synthesis and quantitative analysis of coupled chemical and transport processes were done with the reactive transport modeling code Crunchflow. Research focused on identifying the primary redox proteins that catalyze metal oxidation, environmental factors that influence protein expression, and molecular-scale geochemical factors that control the rates of biotic and abiotic oxidation.

  16. Mechanism and kinetics of the atmospheric oxidative degradation of dimethylphenol isomers initiated by OH radical.

    PubMed

    Sandhiya, L; Kolandaivel, P; Senthilkumar, K

    2013-06-01

    Dimethylphenols are highly reactive in the atmosphere, and their oxidation plays a vital role in the autoignition and combustion processes. The dominant oxidation process for dimethylphenols is by gas-phase reaction with OH radical. In the present study, the reaction of OH radical with dimethylphenol isomers is studied using density functional theory methods, B3LYP, M06-2X, and MPW1K, and also at the MP2 level of theory using 6-31G(d,p) and 6-31+G(d,p) basis sets. The activation energy values have also been calculated using the CCSD(T) method with 6-31G(d,p) and 6-311+G(d,p) basis sets using the geometries optimized at the M06-2X/6-31G(d,p) level of theory. The reactions subsequent to the principal oxidation steps are studied, and the different reaction pathways are modeled. The positions of the OH and CH3 substituents in the aromatic ring have a great influence on the reactivity of dimethylphenol toward OH radical. Accordingly, the reaction is initiated in four different ways: H-atom abstraction from the phenol group, H-atom abstraction from a methyl group, H-atom abstraction from the aromatic ring by OH radical, or electrophilic addition of OH radical to the aromatic ring. Aromatic peroxy radicals arising from initial H-atom abstraction and subsequent O2 addition lead to the formation of hydroperoxide adducts and alkoxy radicals. The O2 additions to dimethylphenol-OH adduct results in the formation of epoxide and bicyclic radicals. The rate constants for the most favorable reaction pathways are calculated using canonical variational transition state theory with small curvature tunneling corrections. This study provides thermochemical and kinetic data for the oxidation of dimethylphenol in the atmosphere and demonstrates the mechanism for the conversion of peroxy radical into aldehydes, hydroperoxides, epoxides, and bicyclic radicals, and their lifetimes in the atmosphere. PMID:23656398

  17. Kinetics of Indigenous Nitrate Reducing Sulfide Oxidizing Activity in Microaerophilic Wastewater Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Villahermosa, Desirée; Corzo, Alfonso; Garcia-Robledo, Emilio; González, Juan M.; Papaspyrou, Sokratis

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate decreases sulfide release in wastewater treatment plants (WWTP), but little is known on how it affects the microzonation and kinetics of related microbial processes within the biofilm. The effect of nitrate addition on these properties for sulfate reduction, sulfide oxidation, and oxygen respiration were studied with the use of microelectrodes in microaerophilic wastewater biofilms. Mass balance calaculations and community composition analysis were also performed. At basal WWTP conditions, the biofilm presented a double-layer system. The upper microaerophilic layer (~300 μm) showed low sulfide production (0.31 μmol cm-3 h-1) and oxygen consumption rates (0.01 μmol cm-3 h-1). The anoxic lower layer showed high sulfide production (2.7 μmol cm-3 h-1). Nitrate addition decreased net sulfide production rates, caused by an increase in sulfide oxidation rates (SOR) in the upper layer, rather than an inhibition of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). This suggests that the indigenous nitrate reducing-sulfide oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB) were immediately activated by nitrate. The functional vertical structure of the biofilm changed to a triple-layer system, where the previously upper sulfide-producing layer in the absence of nitrate split into two new layers: 1) an upper sulfide-consuming layer, whose thickness is probably determined by the nitrate penetration depth within the biofilm, and 2) a middle layer producing sulfide at an even higher rate than in the absence of nitrate in some cases. Below these layers, the lower net sulfide-producing layer remained unaffected. Net SOR varied from 0.05 to 0.72 μmol cm-3 h-1 depending on nitrate and sulfate availability. Addition of low nitrate concentrations likely increased sulfate availability within the biofilm and resulted in an increase of both net sulfate reduction and net sulfide oxidation by overcoming sulfate diffusional limitation from the water phase and the strong coupling between SRB and NR-SOB syntrophic

  18. Comparative Dissolution Kinetics of Biogenic and Chemogenic Uraninite Under Oxidizing Conditions in the Presence of Carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, Kai-Uwe; Ilton, Eugene S.; Veeramani, Harish; Sharp, Jonathan O.; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan; Schofield, Eleanor J.; Bargar, John; Giammar, Daniel E.

    2009-10-15

    The long-term stability of biogenic uraninite with respect to oxidation is pivotal to the success of in situ bioreduction strategies for the subsurface remediation of uranium legacies. Given the structural homology between biogenic uraninite nanoparticles obtained from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and chemogenic UO2.00, similar surface free energy and reactivity is expected. Batch and flow-through dissolution experiments were conducted along with spectroscopic analyses to compare both materials with respect to their equilibrium solubility, dissolution mechanisms, and dissolution kinetics in water of varied oxygen and carbonate concentrations. Both uraninite materials exhibited a similar intrinsic solubility of ~10-8 M under reducing conditions. The observation of comparable dissolution rates under anoxic as well as oxidizing conditions is consistent with the structural bulk homology of biogenic and stoichiometric uraninite. Carbonate, a ubiquitous groundwater component and strong complexant of U(VI), reversibly promoted the uraninite dissolution not only under moderately oxidizing, but also under reducing conditions, where the biogenic material yielded higher dissolution rates than the chemogenic. This difference is in accordance with the higher proportion of U(V) detected on the biogenic uraninite surface by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Reasonable sources of the intermediate U(V) are discussed. The observed increase of the dissolution rates can be explained by carbonate complexation of U(V) facilitating the detachment of U(V) from the uraninite surface. The fraction of surface U(VI) increased with increasing oxygen concentration; this result is consistent with x-ray absorption near-edge spectra showing evidence of higher-valent U in the form of UO2+x (0 < x ≤ 0.20). In equilibrium with air, combined spectroscopic results support the formation of a near-surface layer of U4O9 (UO2.25) coated by an outer layer of U(VI) corresponding to a metaschoepite

  19. Atomic resolution imaging and spectroscopy of barium atoms and functional groups on graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Boothroyd, C B; Moreno, M S; Duchamp, M; Kovács, A; Monge, N; Morales, G M; Barbero, C A; Dunin-Borkowski, R E

    2014-10-01

    We present an atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning TEM (STEM) study of the local structure and composition of graphene oxide modified with Ba(2+). In our experiments, which are carried out at 80kV, the acquisition of contamination-free high-resolution STEM images is only possible while heating the sample above 400°C using a highly stable heating holder. Ba atoms are identified spectroscopically in electron energy-loss spectrum images taken at 800°C and are associated with bright contrast in high-angle annular dark-field STEM images. The spectrum images also show that Ca and O occur together and that Ba is not associated with a significant concentration of O. The electron dose used for spectrum imaging results in beam damage to the specimen, even at elevated temperature. It is also possible to identify Ba atoms in high-resolution TEM images acquired using shorter exposure times at room temperature, thereby allowing the structure of graphene oxide to be studied using complementary TEM and STEM techniques over a wide range of temperatures. PMID:24726278

  20. Catalytic Mechanism of Perosamine N-Acetyltransferase Revealed by High-Resolution X-ray Crystallographic Studies and Kinetic Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Thoden, James B.; Reinhardt, Laurie A.; Cook, Paul D.; Menden, Patrick; Cleland, W.W.; Holden, Hazel M.

    2012-09-17

    N-Acetylperosamine is an unusual dideoxysugar found in the O-antigens of some Gram-negative bacteria, including the pathogenic Escherichia coli strain O157:H7. The last step in its biosynthesis is catalyzed by PerB, an N-acetyltransferase belonging to the left-handed {beta}-helix superfamily of proteins. Here we describe a combined structural and functional investigation of PerB from Caulobacter crescentus. For this study, three structures were determined to 1.0 {angstrom} resolution or better: the enzyme in complex with CoA and GDP-perosamine, the protein with bound CoA and GDP-N-acetylperosamine, and the enzyme containing a tetrahedral transition state mimic bound in the active site. Each subunit of the trimeric enzyme folds into two distinct regions. The N-terminal domain is globular and dominated by a six-stranded mainly parallel {beta}-sheet. It provides most of the interactions between the protein and GDP-perosamine. The C-terminal domain consists of a left-handed {beta}-helix, which has nearly seven turns. This region provides the scaffold for CoA binding. On the basis of these high-resolution structures, site-directed mutant proteins were constructed to test the roles of His 141 and Asp 142 in the catalytic mechanism. Kinetic data and pH-rate profiles are indicative of His 141 serving as a general base. In addition, the backbone amide group of Gly 159 provides an oxyanion hole for stabilization of the tetrahedral transition state. The pH-rate profiles are also consistent with the GDP-linked amino sugar substrate entering the active site in its unprotonated form. Finally, for this investigation, we show that PerB can accept GDP-3-deoxyperosamine as an alternative substrate, thus representing the production of a novel trideoxysugar.

  1. Kinetic folding mechanism of an integral membrane protein examined by pulsed oxidative labeling and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yan; Brown, Leonid; Konermann, Lars

    2011-07-01

    We report the application of pulsed oxidative labeling for deciphering the folding mechanism of a membrane protein. SDS-denatured bacteriorhodopsin (BR) was refolded by mixing with bicelles in the presence of free retinal. At various time points (20 ms to 1 day), the protein was exposed to a microsecond ·OH pulse that induces oxidative modifications at solvent-accessible methionine side chains. The extent of labeling was determined by mass spectrometry. These measurements were complemented by stopped-flow spectroscopy. Major time-dependent changes in solvent accessibility were detected for M20 (helix A) and M118 (helix D). Our kinetic data indicate a sequential folding mechanism, consistent with models previously suggested by others on the basis of optical data. Yet, ·OH labeling provides additional structural insights. An initial folding intermediate I(1) gets populated within 20 ms, concomitantly with formation of helix A. Subsequent structural consolidation leads to a transient species I(2). Noncovalent retinal binding to I(2) induces folding of helix D, thereby generating an intermediate I(R). In the absence of retinal, the latter transition does not take place. Hence, formation of helix D depends on retinal binding, whereas this is not the case for helix A. As the cofactor settles deeper into its binding pocket, a final transient species I(R) is generated. This intermediate converts into native BR within minutes by formation of the retinal-K216 Schiff base linkage. The combination of pulsed covalent labeling and optical spectroscopy employed here should also be suitable for exploring the folding mechanisms of other membrane proteins. PMID:21570983

  2. Modeling arsenic(III) adsorption and heterogeneous oxidation kinetics in soils

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, B.A.; Suarez, D.L.

    2000-02-01

    Arsenite [As(III)] is a soluble and toxic species of arsenic that can be introduced into soil by geothermal waters, mining activities, irrigation practices, and disposal of industrial wastes. The authors determined the rates of As(III) adsorption, and subsequent oxidation to arsenate [As(V)] in aerobic soil-water suspensions using four California soils. The rate of As(III) adsorption on the soils was closely dependent on soil properties that reflect the reactivity of mineral surfaces including citrate-dithionite (CD) extractable metals, soil texture, specific surface area, and pH. Heterogeneous oxidation of As(III) to As(V) was observed in all soils studied. The recovery of As(V) from As(III)-treated soils was dependent on levels of oxalate-extractable Mn and soil texture. After derivation of rate equations to describe the changes in soluble and recoverable As(III) and As(V) in soil suspensions, soil property measurements were used to normalize the empirically derived rate constants for three soils. The fourth soil, which had substantially different soil properties from the other three soils, was used to independently test the derived soil property-normalized model. The soil property-normalized consecutive reaction model gave a satisfactory description of the trends seen in the experimental data for all four soils. Understanding the effects of soil properties on the kinetics of chemical reactions of As(III) and As(V) in soils will be essential to development of quantitative models for predicting the mobility of As in the field.

  3. Mechanism and Kinetics of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Auto-S-Nitrosation and Inactivation†

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Brian C.; Fernhoff, Nathaniel B.; Marletta, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), the product of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) reaction, was previously shown to result in S-nitrosation of the NOS Zn2+-tetrathiolate and inactivation of the enzyme. To probe the potential physiological significance of NOS S-nitrosation, the inactivation timescale of the inducible NOS isoform (iNOS) was determined and found to directly correlate with an increase in iNOS S-nitrosation. A kinetic model of NOS inactivation in which arginine is treated as a suicide substrate was developed. In this model, NO synthesized at the heme cofactor is partitioned between release into solution (NO release pathway) and NOS S-nitrosation followed by NOS inactivation (inactivation pathway). Experimentally determined progress curves of NO formation were fit to the model. The NO release pathway was perturbed through addition of the NO traps oxymyoglobin (MbO2) and β2 H-NOX, which yielded partition ratios between NO release and inactivation of ~100 at 4 μM MbO2 and ~22,000 at saturating trap concentrations. The results suggest that a portion of the NO synthesized at the heme cofactor reacts with the Zn2+-tetrathiolate without being released into solution. Perturbation of the inactivation pathway through addition of the reducing agents GSH or TCEP resulted in a concentration-dependent decrease in iNOS S-nitrosation that directly correlated with protection from iNOS inactivation. iNOS inactivation was most responsive to physiological concentrations of GSH with an apparent Km value of 13 mM. NOS turnover that leads to NOS S-nitrosation might be a mechanism to control NOS activity, and NOS S-nitrosation could play a role in the physiological generation of nitrosothiols. PMID:22242685

  4. Kinetics of Cyclic Oxidation and Cracking and Finite Element Analysis of MA956 and Sapphire/MA956 Composite System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kang N.; Arya, Vinod K.; Halford, Gary R.; Barrett, Charles A.

    1996-01-01

    Sapphire fiber-reinforced MA956 composites hold promise for significant weight savings and increased high-temperature structural capability, as compared to unreinforced MA956. As part of an overall assessment of the high-temperature characteristics of this material system, cyclic oxidation behavior was studied at 1093 C and 1204 C. Initially, both sets of coupons exhibited parabolic oxidation kinetics. Later, monolithic MA956 exhibited spallation and a linear weight loss, whereas the composite showed a linear weight gain without spallation. Weight loss of the monolithic MA956 resulted from the linking of a multiplicity of randomly oriented and closely spaced surface cracks that facilitated ready spallation. By contrast, cracking of the composite's oxide layer was nonintersecting and aligned nominally parallel with the orientation of the subsurface reinforcing fibers. Oxidative lifetime of monolithic MA956 was projected from the observed oxidation kinetics. Linear elastic, finite element continuum, and micromechanics analyses were performed on coupons of the monolithic and composite materials. Results of the analyses qualitatively agreed well with the observed oxide cracking and spallation behavior of both the MA956 and the Sapphire/MA956 composite coupons.

  5. Structural and silver/vanadium ratio effects on silver vanadium phosphorous oxide solution formation kinetics: impact on battery electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Bock, David C; Takeuchi, Kenneth J; Marschilok, Amy C; Takeuchi, Esther S

    2015-01-21

    The detailed understanding of non-faradaic parasitic reactions which diminish battery calendar life is essential to the development of effective batteries for use in long life applications. The dissolution of cathode materials including manganese, cobalt and vanadium oxides in battery systems has been identified as a battery failure mechanism, yet detailed dissolution studies including kinetic analysis are absent from the literature. The results presented here provide a framework for the quantitative and kinetic analyses of the dissolution of cathode materials which will aid the broader community in more fully understanding this battery failure mechanism. In this study, the dissolution of silver vanadium oxide, representing the primary battery powering implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD), is compared with the dissolution of silver vanadium phosphorous oxide (Ag(w)VxPyOz) materials which were targeted as alternatives to minimize solubility. This study contains the first kinetic analyses of silver and vanadium solution formation from Ag0.48VOPO4·1.9H2O and Ag2VP2O8, in a non-aqueous battery electrolyte. The kinetic results are compared with those of Ag2VO2PO4 and Ag2V4O11 to probe the relationships among crystal structure, stoichiometry, and solubility. For vanadium, significant dissolution was observed for Ag2V4O11 as well as for the phosphate oxide Ag0.49VOPO4·1.9H2O, which may involve structural water or the existence of multiple vanadium oxidation states. Notably, the materials from the SVPO family with the lowest vanadium solubility are Ag2VO2PO4 and Ag2VP2O8. The low concentrations and solution rates coupled with their electrochemical performance make these materials interesting alternatives to Ag2V4O11 for the ICD application. PMID:25478865

  6. Mechanistic Basis for High Stereoselectivity and Broad Substrate Scope in the (salen)Co(III)-Catalyzed Hydrolytic Kinetic Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Ford, David D.; Nielsen, Lars P. C.; Zuend, Stephan J.; Jacobsen, Eric N.

    2013-01-01

    In the (salen)Co(III)-catalyzed hydrolytic kinetic resolution (HKR) of terminal epoxides, the rate- and stereoselectivity-determining epoxide ring-opening step occurs by a cooperative bimetallic mechanism with one Co(III) complex acting as a Lewis acid and another serving to deliver the hydroxide nucleophile. In this paper, we analyze the basis for the extraordinarily high stereoselectivity and broad substrate scope observed in the HKR. We demonstrate that the stereochemistry of each of the two (salen)Co(III) complexes in the rate-determining transition structure is important for productive catalysis: a measurable rate of hydrolysis occurs only if the absolute stereochemistry of each of these (salen)Co(III) complexes is the same. Experimental and computational studies provide strong evidence that stereochemical communication in the HKR is mediated by the stepped conformation of the salen ligand, and not the shape of the chiral diamine backbone of the ligand. A detailed computational analysis reveals that the epoxide binds the Lewis acidic Co(III) complex in a well-defined geometry imposed by stereoelectronic, rather than steric effects. This insight serves as the basis of a complete stereochemical and transition structure model that sheds light on the reasons for the broad substrate generality of the HKR. PMID:24041239

  7. Modeling aerosol surface chemistry and gas-particle interaction kinetics with K2-SURF: PAH oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraiwa, M.; Garland, R.; Pöschl, U.

    2009-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are ubiquitous in the atmosphere. They have the ability to impact cloud properties, radiative balance and provide surfaces for heterogeneous reactions. The uptake of gaseous species on aerosol surfaces impacts both the aerosol particles and the atmospheric budget of trace gases. These subsequent changes to the aerosol can in turn impact the aerosol chemical and physical properties. However, this uptake, as well as the impact on the aerosol, is not fully understood. This uncertainty is due not only to limited measurement data, but also a dearth of comprehensive and applicable modeling formalizations used for the analysis, interpretation and description of these heterogeneous processes. Without a common model framework, comparing and extrapolating experimental data is difficult. In this study, a novel kinetic surface model (K2-SURF) [Ammann & Pöschl, 2007; Pöschl et al., 2007] was used to describe the oxidation of a variety of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Integrated into this consistent and universally applicable kinetic and thermodynamic process model are the concepts, terminologies and mathematical formalizations essential to the description of atmospherically relevant physicochemical processes involving organic and mixed organic-inorganic aerosols. Within this process model framework, a detailed master mechanism, simplified mechanism and parameterizations of atmospheric aerosol chemistry are being developed and integrated in analogy to existing mechanisms and parameterizations of atmospheric gas-phase chemistry. One of the key aspects to this model is the defining of a clear distinction between various layers of the particle and surrounding gas phase. The processes occurring at each layer can be fully described using known fluxes and kinetic parameters. Using this system there is a clear separation of gas phase, gas-surface and surface bulk transport and reactions. The partitioning of compounds can be calculated using the flux

  8. Kinetic and Product Yields of the Gas-Phase Reactions of Isoprene Hydroperoxides with Atmospheric Oxidants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, V.; Lozano, E. I.; Maitra, S.; Manning, D. M.; Cervantes, R.; Hasson, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    Isoprene is a volatile organic compound (VOC) that is emitted into the atmosphere by plants and trees. It has the largest emission rate of any non-methane VOC and is very reactive, and therefore has a major impact on the chemical composition of the atmosphere. Isoprene Hydroperoxides (IHP) are formed in the atmosphere from the chemical degradation of isoprene. These compounds can then potentially react in the atmosphere with atmospheric oxidants (ozone, OH, NO3) to produce secondary products. This chemistry is potentially important as it may contribute to particle growth and to mediation of ozone concentrations. In this work, the kinetics and mechanisms of the reactions of two IHPs with ozone were investigated. IHPs were synthesized and purified, and were characterized by NMR and HPLC. The gas phase chemistry of these compounds was then studied in chamber experiments using PTRMS as the primary analytical tool. The rate coefficients for reaction with ozone were measured at room temperature and 1 atmosphere using the relative rate technique, and yields of major gas phase reaction products were measured. Implications of these results will be discussed.

  9. Kinetic and morphological development of oxide-sulfide scales on manganese at 1,073 K

    SciTech Connect

    McAdam, G.; Yound, D.J. )

    1992-04-01

    The corrosion behavior of manganese in controlled gas atmospheres of SO{sub 2}-CO{sub 2}-CO-N{sub 2} at 1073 K was studied. Under all conditions, the gas phase was slow to equilibrate, and catalysis of the gas affected the corrosion mechanism and resulting scale morphologies. Product scales invariably became detached from the metal during reaction, but the high manganese vapor pressure meant that no slowing of reaction resulted. Corrosion under conditions where MnS was the equilibrium reaction product led to the formation of a sulfide scale. At low p{sub s{sub 2}} values, this scale grew by reaction with either COS or SO{sub 2} according to parabolic kinetics. Gases with equilibrium compositions calculated to produce MnO, in fact corroded manganese to produce an inner layer of oxide plus sulfide, and an outer layer of MnO. The tendency to form sulfide was more marked at lower SO{sub 2} partial pressure and higher sulfur activities, the latter resulting from gas catalysis. These effects are due to the fact that SO{sub 2} is the principal reactant species.

  10. A detailed kinetic modeling study of toluene oxidation in a premixed laminar flame

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Zhenyu; Pitz, William J.; Fournet, René; Glaude, Pierre-Alexander; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique

    2013-01-01

    An improved chemical kinetic model for the toluene oxidation based on experimental data obtained in a premixed laminar low-pressure flame with vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization and molecular beam mass spectrometry (MBMS) techniques has been proposed. The present mechanism consists of 273 species up to chrysene and 1740 reactions. The rate constants of reactions of toluene decomposition, reaction with oxygen, ipso-additions and metatheses with abstraction of phenylic H-atom are updated; new pathways of C4 + C2 species giving benzene and fulvene are added. Based on the experimental observations, combustion intermediates such as fulvenallene, naphtol, methylnaphthalene, acenaphthylene, 2-ethynylnaphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene, 1-methylphenanthrene, pyrene and chrysene are involved in the present mechanism. The final toluene model leads to an overall satisfactory agreement between the experimentally observed and predicted mole fraction profiles for the major products and most combustion intermediates. The toluene depletion is governed by metathese giving benzyl radicals, ipso-addition forming benzene and metatheses leading to C6H4CH3 radicals. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the unimolecular decomposition via the cleavage of a methyl C-H bond has a strong inhibiting effect, while decomposition via C-C bond breaking, ipso-addition of H-atom to toluene, decomposition of benzyl radicals and reactions related to C6H4CH3 radicals have promoting effect for the consumption of toluene. Moreover, flow rate analysis is performed to illustrate the formation pathways of mono- and polycyclic aromatics. PMID:23762016

  11. UV spectra and OH-oxidation kinetics of gaseous phase morpholinic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Rashidi, M.; El Masri, A.; Roth, E.; Chakir, A.

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of the UV spectra as well as the kinetics of gaseous phase OH-oxidation of morpholine, N-formylmorpholine (NFM) and N-acetlymorpholine (NAM). The spectra recorded using a UV spectrometer in the spectral range 200-280 nm show that the analytes mainly absorb at wavelengths less than 280 nm. This indicates that their photolysis potential in the troposphere is insignificant. Meanwhile, the OH-reactivity of these analytes was studied using a triple-jacket 2 m long reactor equipped with a multi-reflection system and coupled to an FTIR spectrometer. The experiments were carried out at 295 and 313 K for the amine and amides, respectively. The study was conducted in the relative mode using isoprene and benzaldehyde as reference compounds. The rate constants obtained are 14.0 ± 1.9, 4.0 ± 1.1 and 3.8 ± 1.0 (in units of 10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1) for morpholine, NFM and NAM respectively. These results are discussed in terms of reactivity and compared to those obtained for other oxy-nitrogenated species. In addition, the determined rate constants are used to estimate effective atmospheric lifetimes of the investigated morpholinic compounds with respect to reaction with OH radicals.

  12. Crystallization Kinetics of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Seal Glass by Differential Thermal Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Gamble, Eleanor A.

    2005-01-01

    Crystallization kinetics of a barium calcium aluminosilicate glass (BCAS), a sealant material for planar solid oxide fuel cells, have been investigated by differential thermal analysis (DTA). From variation of DTA peak maximum temperature with heating rate, the activation energy for glass crystallization was calculated to be 259 kJ/mol. Development of crystalline phases on thermal treatments of the glass at various temperatures has been followed by powder x-ray diffraction. Microstructure and chemical composition of the crystalline phases were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopic (EDS) analysis. BaSiO3 and hexacelsian (BaAl2Si2O8) were the primary crystalline phases whereas monoclinic celsian (BaAl2Si2O8) and (Ba(x), Ca(y))SiO4 were also detected as minor phases. Needle-shaped BaSiO3 crystals are formed first, followed by the formation of other phases at longer times of heat treatments. The glass does not fully crystallize even after long term heat treatments at 750 to 900 C.

  13. Kinetics and thermodynamics of anaerobic ammonium oxidation process using Brocadia spp. dominated mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Puyol, D; Carvajal-Arroyo, J M; Garcia, B; Sierra-Alvarez, R; Field, J A

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) is a recently discovered microbial process commonly applied to treat ammonium pollution in effluents with low organic carbon content. Modeling anammox processes is important for simulating and controlling full-scale plants. In this study, the anammox process was simulated using three models, and substrate and growth parameters obtained by different research groups. Two Brocadia spp.-dominated mixed cultures, one granular and the other flocculent, were used for this purpose. A very good correlation between experimental data using both sludges and model predictions was achieved by one of the models, obtaining correlation coefficients higher than 0.997. Other models and stoichiometric equations tested were unable to predict the anammox kinetics and stoichiometry. Furthermore, the thermodynamic behavior of the two mixed cultures was compared through the determination of the energy of activation of the anammox conversion at temperatures ranging from 9 to 40 °C. Optimum temperature for anammox activity was established at 30-35 °C in both cases. The energy of activation values calculated for granular sludge and flocculent sludge were 64 and 124 kJ mol(-1), respectively. PMID:24759529

  14. A kinetic approach to assess oxidative metabolism related features in the bivalve Mya arenaria.

    PubMed

    González, Paula Mariela; Abele, Doris; Puntarulo, Susana

    2012-12-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance uses the resonant microwave radiation absorption of paramagnetic substances to detect highly reactive and, therefore, short-lived oxygen and nitrogen centered radicals. Previously, steady state concentrations of nitric oxide, ascorbyl radical (A·) and the labile iron pool (LIP) were determined in digestive gland of freshly collected animals from the North Sea bivalve Mya arenaria. The application of a simple kinetic analysis of these data based on elemental reactions allowed us to estimate the steady state concentrations of superoxide anion, the rate of A· disappearance and the content of unsaturated lipids. This analysis applied to a marine invertebrate opens the possibility of a mechanistic understanding of the complexity of free radical and LIP interactions in a metabolically slow, cold water organism under unstressed conditions. This data can be further used as a basis to assess the cellular response to stress in a simple system as the bivalve M. arenaria that can then be compared to cells of higher organisms. PMID:22829190

  15. Kinetic and isotopic studies of the oxidative half-reaction of phenol hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M G; Massey, V

    1991-05-01

    Phenol hydroxylase, an FAD-containing monooxygenase, catalyzes the conversion of substituted phenols to the corresponding catechol. Use of metapyrocatechase, capable of dioxygenation of several catechols to give highly absorbing products, permitted determination of the time course of product release from phenol hydroxylase. Product dissociated prior to complete reoxidation of the enzyme, most likely concomitant with formation of the 4a-hydroxyflavin species (intermediate III). Deuterated phenol and thiophenol exhibited no kinetic isotope effect during the oxidative half-reaction. Isotope effects of 1.7 to 3.7 were found with resorcinol for the conversion of the second intermediate to intermediate III. These effects limited the possible models for phenol hydroxylation. An attempt was made to distinguish whether the spectrum of intermediate II is due entirely to that of the flavin moiety of phenol hydroxylase or whether some radical intermediate form involved in the formation of catechol makes a significant visible contribution. Reduced native and 6-hydroxy-FAD phenol hydroxylase were reacted with oxygen and resorcinol in order to provide evidence for the identity of intermediate II. PMID:2022646

  16. Effects of Natural Organic Matter Properties on the Dissolution Kinetics of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chuanjia; Aiken, George R; Hsu-Kim, Heileen

    2015-10-01

    The dissolution of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) is a key step of controlling their environmental fate, bioavailability, and toxicity. Rates of dissolution often depend upon factors such as interactions of NPs with natural organic matter (NOM). We examined the effects of 16 different NOM isolates on the dissolution kinetics of ZnO NPs in buffered potassium chloride solution using anodic stripping voltammetry to directly measure dissolved zinc concentrations. The observed dissolution rate constants (kobs) and dissolved zinc concentrations at equilibrium increased linearly with NOM concentration (from 0 to 40 mg C L(-1)) for Suwannee River humic and fulvic acids and Pony Lake fulvic acid. When dissolution rates were compared for the 16 NOM isolates, kobs was positively correlated with certain properties of NOM, including specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA), aromatic and carbonyl carbon contents, and molecular weight. Dissolution rate constants were negatively correlated to hydrogen/carbon ratio and aliphatic carbon content. The observed correlations indicate that aromatic carbon content is a key factor in determining the rate of NOM-promoted dissolution of ZnO NPs. The findings of this study facilitate a better understanding of the fate of ZnO NPs in organic-rich aquatic environments and highlight SUVA as a facile and useful indicator of NOM interactions with metal-based nanoparticles. PMID:26355264

  17. Curing kinetics and morphology of a nanovesicular epoxy/stearyl-block-poly(ethylene oxide) surfactant system.

    PubMed

    Bogaerts, K; Lavrenova, A; Spoelstra, A B; Boyard, N; Goderis, B

    2015-08-21

    Brittle epoxy based thermosets can be made tougher by introducing structural inhomogeneities at the micro- or nanoscale. In that respect, nano vesicles and worm-like micelles from self-assembling blockcopolymers have been shown to be very effective. This paper describes the curing kinetics and morphology of an epoxy composed of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) and 4,4'-methylenedianiline (MDA), modified by 20% of the surfactant stearyl-block-poly(ethylene oxide). Time resolved, synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering demonstrates that at any time during the epoxy curing process, the surfactant predominantly adopts a bilayer vesicular nano-morphology. Transmission electron microscopy on fully cured systems reveals the coexistence of spherical and worm-like micelles. Differential scanning calorimetry experiments prove that the presence of surfactant reduces the epoxy curing rate but that ultimately full curing is accomplished. The material glass transition temperature falls below that of the pure resin due to plasticization. It is suggested that favorable secondary interactions between the PEO segments and the epoxy resin are responsible for the observed phenomena. PMID:26144526

  18. Kinetic Spectrofluorometric Determination of Certain Calcium Channel Blockers via Oxidation with Cerium (IV) in Pharmaceutical Preparations.

    PubMed

    Walash, M I; Belal, F; El-Enany, N; Abdelal, A A

    2009-06-01

    A simple and sensitive kinetic spectrofluorometric method was developed for the determination of some calcium channel blockers namely, verapamil hydrochloride, diltiazem hydrochloride, nicardipine hydrochloride and flunarizine. The method is based upon oxidation of the studied drugs with cerium (IV) ammonium sulphate in acidic medium. The fluorescence of the produced Ce (III) was measured at 365 nm after excitation at 255 nm. The different experimental parameters affecting the development and stability of the reaction product were carefully studied and optimized. The fluorescence-concentration plots were rectilinear for all the studied compounds over the concentration range of 0.01 to 0.12 μg mL(-1). The limits of detections for the studied compounds ranged from 2.93 × 10(-3) to 0.012 μg mL(-1) and limits of quantification from 9.76 × 10(-3) to 0.04 μg mL(-1) were obtained. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of commercial tablets. The results obtained were in good agreement with those obtained with reference methods. PMID:23675129

  19. Kinetic Spectrofluorometric Determination of Certain Calcium Channel Blockers via Oxidation with Cerium (IV) in Pharmaceutical Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Walash, M. I.; Belal, F.; El-Enany, N.; Abdelal, A. A.

    2009-01-01

    A simple and sensitive kinetic spectrofluorometric method was developed for the determination of some calcium channel blockers namely, verapamil hydrochloride, diltiazem hydrochloride, nicardipine hydrochloride and flunarizine. The method is based upon oxidation of the studied drugs with cerium (IV) ammonium sulphate in acidic medium. The fluorescence of the produced Ce (III) was measured at 365 nm after excitation at 255 nm. The different experimental parameters affecting the development and stability of the reaction product were carefully studied and optimized. The fluorescence-concentration plots were rectilinear for all the studied compounds over the concentration range of 0.01 to 0.12 μg mL-1. The limits of detections for the studied compounds ranged from 2.93 × 10-3 to 0.012 μg mL-1 and limits of quantification from 9.76 × 10-3 to 0.04 μg mL-1 were obtained. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of commercial tablets. The results obtained were in good agreement with those obtained with reference methods. PMID:23675129

  20. Reductive Reactivity of Iron(III) Oxides in the East China Sea Sediments: Characterization by Selective Extraction and Kinetic Dissolution

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang-Jin; Zhu, Mao-Xu; Yang, Gui-Peng; Huang, Xiang-Li

    2013-01-01

    Reactive Fe(III) oxides in gravity-core sediments collected from the East China Sea inner shelf were quantified by using three selective extractions (acidic hydroxylamine, acidic oxalate, bicarbonate-citrate buffered sodium dithionite). Also the reactivity of Fe(III) oxides in the sediments was characterized by kinetic dissolution using ascorbic acid as reductant at pH 3.0 and 7.5 in combination with the reactive continuum model. Three parameters derived from the kinetic method: m0 (theoretical initial amount of ascorbate-reducible Fe(III) oxides), k′ (rate constant) and γ (heterogeneity of reactivity), enable a quantitative characterization of Fe(III) oxide reactivity in a standardized way. Amorphous Fe(III) oxides quantified by acidic hydroxylamine extraction were quickly consumed in the uppermost layer during early diagenesis but were not depleted over the upper 100 cm depth. The total amounts of amorphous and poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxides are highly available for efficient buffering of dissolved sulfide. As indicated by the m0, k′ and γ, the surface sediments always have the maximum content, reactivity and heterogeneity of reactive Fe(III) oxides, while the three parameters simultaneously downcore decrease, much more quickly in the upper layer than at depth. Albeit being within a small range (within one order of magnitude) of the initial rates among sediments at different depths, incongruent dissolution could result in huge discrepancies of the later dissolution rates due to differentiating heterogeneity, which cannot be revealed by selective extraction. A strong linear correlation of the m0 at pH 3.0 with the dithionite-extractable Fe(III) suggests that the m0 may represent Fe(III) oxide assemblages spanning amorphous and crystalline Fe(III) oxides. Maximum microbially available Fe(III) predicted by the m0 at pH 7.5 may include both amorphous and a fraction of other less reactive Fe(III) phases. PMID:24260377

  1. Reductive reactivity of iron(III) oxides in the east china sea sediments: characterization by selective extraction and kinetic dissolution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang-Jin; Zhu, Mao-Xu; Yang, Gui-Peng; Huang, Xiang-Li

    2013-01-01

    Reactive Fe(III) oxides in gravity-core sediments collected from the East China Sea inner shelf were quantified by using three selective extractions (acidic hydroxylamine, acidic oxalate, bicarbonate-citrate buffered sodium dithionite). Also the reactivity of Fe(III) oxides in the sediments was characterized by kinetic dissolution using ascorbic acid as reductant at pH 3.0 and 7.5 in combination with the reactive continuum model. Three parameters derived from the kinetic method: m 0 (theoretical initial amount of ascorbate-reducible Fe(III) oxides), k' (rate constant) and γ (heterogeneity of reactivity), enable a quantitative characterization of Fe(III) oxide reactivity in a standardized way. Amorphous Fe(III) oxides quantified by acidic hydroxylamine extraction were quickly consumed in the uppermost layer during early diagenesis but were not depleted over the upper 100 cm depth. The total amounts of amorphous and poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxides are highly available for efficient buffering of dissolved sulfide. As indicated by the m 0, k' and γ, the surface sediments always have the maximum content, reactivity and heterogeneity of reactive Fe(III) oxides, while the three parameters simultaneously downcore decrease, much more quickly in the upper layer than at depth. Albeit being within a small range (within one order of magnitude) of the initial rates among sediments at different depths, incongruent dissolution could result in huge discrepancies of the later dissolution rates due to differentiating heterogeneity, which cannot be revealed by selective extraction. A strong linear correlation of the m 0 at pH 3.0 with the dithionite-extractable Fe(III) suggests that the m 0 may represent Fe(III) oxide assemblages spanning amorphous and crystalline Fe(III) oxides. Maximum microbially available Fe(III) predicted by the m 0 at pH 7.5 may include both amorphous and a fraction of other less reactive Fe(III) phases. PMID:24260377

  2. Effects of pH, Chloride, and Bicarbonate on Cu(I) Oxidation Kinetics at Circumneutral pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, X.; Pham, A.; Waite, T.; Xing, G.; Rose, A.

    2012-12-01

    The redox chemistry of copper species in the upper water column plays a significant role in its speciation, transport and bioavailability. Most previous studies have focused primarily on Cu(II), principally because Cu(I) is easily oxidized to Cu(II) by oxygen or other oxidants. However, a growing body of evidence indicates that a number of potentially important reactions may lead to Cu(I) formation and result in a significant steady-state concentration of Cu(I) in natural waters. Redox reactions of Cu(I) could result in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide and hydroxyl radical, that may subsequently induce a cascade of radical-promoted reactions with other constituents in natural waters. As such, a better understanding of copper-catalysed processes that produce and consume O2- is important in furthering our insight into factors contributing to global biogeochemical cycles. In this study, the oxidation kinetics of nanomolar concentrations of Cu(I) in NaCl solutions have been investigated over the pH range 6.5-8.0.The overall apparent oxidation rate constant was strongly affected by chloride, moderately by bicarbonate and, and to a lesser extent, by pH. In the absence of bicarbonate, an equilibrium-based speciation model indicated that Cu+ and CuClOH- were the most kinetically reactive species, while the contribution of other Cu(I) species to the overall oxidation rate was minor. A kinetic model based on recognized key redox reactions for these two species further indicated that oxidation of Cu(I) by oxygen and superoxide were important reactions at all pH values and [Cl-] considered, but back reduction of Cu(II) by superoxide only became important at relatively low chloride concentrations. Bicarbonate concentrations from 2-5 mM substantially accelerated Cu(I) oxidation. Kinetic analysis over a range of bicarbonate concentrations revealed that this was due to the formation of CuCO3-, which reacts relatively rapidly with oxygen, and not

  3. Kinetics of cytochrome P450 2E1-catalyzed oxidation of ethanol to acetic acid via acetaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Bell-Parikh, L C; Guengerich, F P

    1999-08-20

    The P450 2E1-catalyzed oxidation of ethanol to acetaldehyde is characterized by a kinetic deuterium isotope effect that increases K(m) with no effect on k(cat), and rate-limiting product release has been proposed to account for the lack of an isotope effect on k(cat) (Bell, L. C., and Guengerich, F. P. (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 29643-29651). Acetaldehyde is also a substrate for P450 2E1 oxidation to acetic acid, and k(cat)/K(m) for this reaction is at least 1 order of magnitude greater than that for ethanol oxidation to acetaldehyde. Acetic acid accounts for 90% of the products generated from ethanol in a 10-min reaction, and the contribution of this second oxidation has been overlooked in many previous studies. The noncompetitive intermolecular kinetic hydrogen isotope effects on acetaldehyde oxidation to acetic acid ((H)(k(cat)/K(m))/(D)(k(cat)/K(m)) = 4.5, and (D)k(cat) = 1.5) are comparable with the isotope effects typically observed for ethanol oxidation to acetaldehyde, and k(cat) is similar for both reactions, suggesting a possible common catalytic mechanism. Rapid quench kinetic experiments indicate that acetic acid is formed rapidly from added acetaldehyde (approximately 450 min(-1)) with burst kinetics. Pulse-chase experiments reveal that, at a subsaturating concentration of ethanol, approximately 90% of the acetaldehyde intermediate is directly converted to acetic acid without dissociation from the enzyme active site. Competition experiments suggest that P450 2E1 binds acetic acid and acetaldehyde with relatively high K(d) values, which preclude simple tight binding as an explanation for rate-limiting product release. The existence of a rate-determining step between product formation and release is postulated. Also proposed is a conformational change in P450 2E1 occurring during the course of oxidation and the discrimination of P450 2E1 between acetaldehyde and its hydrated form, the gem-diol. This multistep P450 reaction is characterized by kinetic

  4. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Sulfide Oxidation by Oxygen: A Look at Inorganically Controlled Reactions and Biologically Mediated Processes in the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Luther, George W.; Findlay, Alyssa J.; MacDonald, Daniel J.; Owings, Shannon M.; Hanson, Thomas E.; Beinart, Roxanne A.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2011-01-01

    The thermodynamics for the first electron transfer step for sulfide and oxygen indicates that the reaction is unfavorable as unstable superoxide and bisulfide radical ions would need to be produced. However, a two-electron transfer is favorable as stable S(0) and peroxide would be formed, but the partially filled orbitals in oxygen that accept electrons prevent rapid kinetics. Abiotic sulfide oxidation kinetics improve when reduced iron and/or manganese are oxidized by oxygen to form oxidized metals which in turn oxidize sulfide. Biological sulfur oxidation relies on enzymes that have evolved to overcome these kinetic constraints to affect rapid sulfide oxidation. Here we review the available thermodynamic and kinetic data for H2S and HS• as well as O2, reactive oxygen species, nitrate, nitrite, and NOx species. We also present new kinetic data for abiotic sulfide oxidation with oxygen in trace metal clean solutions that constrain abiotic rates of sulfide oxidation in metal free solution and agree with the kinetic and thermodynamic calculations. Moreover, we present experimental data that give insight on rates of chemolithotrophic and photolithotrophic sulfide oxidation in the environment. We demonstrate that both anaerobic photolithotrophic and aerobic chemolithotrophic sulfide oxidation rates are three or more orders of magnitude higher than abiotic rates suggesting that in most environments biotic sulfide oxidation rates will far exceed abiotic rates due to the thermodynamic and kinetic constraints discussed in the first section of the paper. Such data reshape our thinking about the biotic and abiotic contributions to sulfide oxidation in the environment. PMID:21833317

  5. Study of Iron oxide nanoparticles using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshtrakh, M. I.; Ushakov, M. V.; Šepelák, V.; Semionkin, V. A.; Morais, P. C.

    2016-01-01

    Iron oxide (magnetite and maghemite) nanoparticles developed for magnetic fluids were studied using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution at 295 and 90 K. The recorded Mössbauer spectra have demonstrated that usual physical models based on octahedral and tetrahedral sites were not suitable for fitting. Alternatively, the Mössbauer spectra were nicely fitted using a large number of magnetic sextets. The obtained results showed that the Mössbauer spectra and the assessed parameters were different for nanoparticles as-prepared and dispersed in the dispersing fluid at 295 K. We claim that this finding is mainly due to the interaction of polar molecules with Iron cations at nanoparticle's surface or due to the surface coating using carboxylic-terminated molecules. It is assumed that the large number of spectral components may be related to complexity of the nanoparticle's characteristics and deviations from stoichiometry, including in the latter the influence of the oxidation of magnetite towards maghemite.

  6. Oxidation of diamond films by atomic oxygen: High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shpilman, Z.; Gouzman, I.; Grossman, E.; Akhvlediani, R.; Hoffman, A.

    2007-12-01

    Diamond surface oxidation by atomic oxygen, annealing up to ˜700°C, and in situ exposure to thermally activated hydrogen were studied by high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS). After atomic oxygen (AO) exposure, HREELS revealed peaks associated with CHx groups, carbonyl, ether, and peroxide-type species and strong quenching of the diamond optical phonon and its overtones. Upon annealing of the oxidized surfaces, the diamond optical phonon overtones at 300 and 450meV emerge and carbonyl and peroxide species gradually desorb. The diamond surface was not completely regenerated after annealing to ˜700°C and in situ exposure to thermally activated hydrogen, probably due to the irreversible deterioration of the surface by AO.

  7. The Role of Defects in the Local Reaction Kinetics of CO Oxidation on Low-Index Pd Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The role of artificially created defects and steps in the local reaction kinetics of CO oxidation on the individual domains of a polycrystalline Pd foil was studied by photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM), mass spectroscopy (MS), and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The defects and steps were created by STM-controlled Ar+ sputtering and the novel PEEM-based approach allowed the simultaneous determination of local kinetic phase transitions on differently oriented μm-sized grains of a polycrystalline sample. The independent (single-crystal-like) reaction behavior of the individual Pd(hkl) domains in the 10–5 mbar pressure range changes upon Ar+ sputtering to a correlated reaction behavior, and the reaction fronts propagate unhindered across the grain boundaries. The defect-rich surface shows also a significantly higher CO tolerance as reflected by the shift of both the global (MS-measured) and the local (PEEM-measured) kinetic diagrams toward higher CO pressure. PMID:23785524

  8. Resolution of Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress Rescues Coronary Collateral Growth in Zucker Obese Fatty Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pung, Yuh Fen; Rocic, Petra; Murphy, Michael P; Smith, Robin A J; Hafemeister, Jennifer; Ohanyan, Vahagn; Guarini, Giacinta; Yin, Liya; Chilian, William M

    2014-01-01

    Objective We have previously found abrogated ischemia-induced coronary collateral growth in Zucker obese fatty rats (ZOF) compared to Zucker lean rats (ZLN). Because ZOF have structural abnormalities in their mitochondria suggesting dysfunction, and also show increased production of O2ׄ−, we hypothesized that mitochondrial dysfunction, caused by oxidative stress impairs coronary collateral growth in ZOF. Methods and Results Increased levels of ROS were observed in aortic endothelium and smooth muscle cells in ZOF compared to ZLN. ROS levels were decreased by the mitochondria-targeted antioxidants MitoQuinone (MQ) and MitoTempol (MT) as assessed by MitoSox Red and DHE staining. Lipid peroxides (a marker of oxidized lipids) were increased in ZOF by ∼47 % compared to ZLN. The elevation in oxidative stress was accompanied by increased antioxidant enzymes, except GPx-1, and by increased uncoupling protein-2 in ZOF vs ZLN. In addition, elevated respiration rates were also observed in the obese compared to leans. Administration of MQ significantly normalized the metabolic profiles and reduced lipid peroxides in ZOF to the same level observed in leans. The protective effect of MQ also suppressed the induction of UCP-2 in the obese rats. Resolution of mitochondrial oxidative stress by MQ or MT restored coronary collateral growth to the same magnitude observed in ZLN in response to repetitive ischemia. Conclusions We conclude that mitochondrial oxidative stress and dysfunction play a key role in disrupting coronary collateral growth in obesity and the metabolic syndrome, and elimination of the mitochondrial oxidative stress with MQ or MT rescues collateral growth. PMID:22155454

  9. Atmospheric Oxidation of Squalene: Molecular Study Using COBRA Modeling and High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Fooshee, David R.; Aiona, Paige K.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey; Baldi, Pierre

    2015-10-22

    Squalene is a major component of skin and plant surface lipids, and is known to be present at high concentrations in indoor dust. Its high reactivity toward ozone makes it an important ozone sink and a natural protectant against atmospheric oxidizing agents. While the volatile products of squalene ozonolysis are known, the condensed-phase products have not been characterized. We present an analysis of condensed-phase products resulting from an extensive oxidation of squalene by ozone probed by electrospray ionization (ESI) high-resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS). A complex distribution of nearly 1,300 peaks assignable to molecular formulas is observed in direct infusion positive ion mode ESI mass spectra. The distribution of peaks in the mass spectra suggests that there are extensive cross-coupling reactions between hydroxy-carbonyl products of squalene ozonolysis. To get additional insights into the mechanism, we apply a Computational Brewing Application (COBRA) to simulate the oxidation of squalene in the presence of ozone, and compare predicted results with those observed by the HR-MS experiments. The system predicts over one billion molecular structures between 0-1450 Da, which correspond to about 27,000 distinct elemental formulas. Over 83% of the squalene oxidation products inferred from the mass spectrometry data are matched by the simulation. Simulation indicates a prevalence of peroxy groups, with hydroxyl and ether groups being the second-most important O-containing functional groups formed during squalene oxidation. These highly oxidized products of squalene ozonolysis may accumulate on indoor dust and surfaces, and contribute to their redox capacity.

  10. Atmospheric Oxidation of Squalene: Molecular Study Using COBRA Modeling and High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fooshee, David R; Aiona, Paige K; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A; Baldi, Pierre F

    2015-11-17

    Squalene is a major component of skin and plant surface lipids and is known to be present at high concentrations in indoor dust. Its high reactivity toward ozone makes it an important ozone sink and a natural protectant against atmospheric oxidizing agents. While the volatile products of squalene ozonolysis are known, the condensed-phase products have not been characterized. We present an analysis of condensed-phase products resulting from an extensive oxidation of squalene by ozone probed by electrospray ionization (ESI) high-resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS). A complex distribution of nearly 1300 peaks assignable to molecular formulas is observed in direct infusion positive ion mode ESI mass spectra. The distribution of peaks in the mass spectra suggests that there are extensive cross-coupling reactions between hydroxy-carbonyl products of squalene ozonolysis. To get additional insights into the mechanism, we apply a Computational Brewing Application (COBRA) to simulate the oxidation of squalene in the presence of ozone, and compare predicted results with those observed by the HR-MS experiments. The system predicts over one billion molecular structures between 0 and 1450 Da, which correspond to about 27 000 distinct elemental formulas. Over 83% of the squalene oxidation products inferred from the mass spectrometry data are matched by the simulation. The simulation indicates a prevalence of peroxy groups, with hydroxyl and ether groups being the second-most important O-containing functional groups formed during squalene oxidation. These highly oxidized products of squalene ozonolysis may accumulate on indoor dust and surfaces and contribute to their redox capacity. PMID:26492333

  11. Oxidation process of MoO xC y to MoO 3: kinetics and mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleman-Vázquez, L. O.; Torres-García, E.; Rodríguez-Gattorno, G.; Ocotlán-Flores, J.; Camacho-López, M. A.; Cano, J. L.

    2004-10-01

    A non-isothermal kinetic study of the oxidation of "carbon-modified MoO3" in the temperature range of 150-550°C by simultaneous TGA-DTA was investigated. During the oxidation process, two thermal events were detected, which are associated with the oxidation of carbon in MoOxCy and MoO2 to MoO3. The model-free and model-fitting kinetic approaches have been applied to TGA experimental data. The solid state-kinetics of the oxidation of MoOxCy to MoO3 is governed by F1 (unimolecular decay), which suggests that the reaction is of the first order with respect to oxygen concentration. The constant (Ea)α value (about 115±5 kJ/mol) for this first stage can be related to the nature of the reaction site in the MoO3 matrix. This indicates that oxidation occurs in well-defined lattice position sites (energetically equivalent). On the other hand, for the second stage of oxidation, MoO2 to MoO3, the isoconversional analysis shows a complex (Ea)α dependence on (α) and reveals a typical behavior for competitive reaction. A D2 (two-dimensional diffusion) mechanism with a variable activation energy value in the range 110-200 kJ/mol was obtained. This can be interpreted as an inter-layer oxygen diffusion in the solid bulk, which does not exclude other simultaneous mechanism reactions.

  12. Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulation of the oscillatory catalytic CO oxidation using a modified Ziff-Gulari-Barshad model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Indrajit; Mukherjee, Ashim K.

    2014-03-01

    The oxidation of CO on Pt-group metal surfaces has attracted widespread attention since a long time due to its interesting oscillatory kinetics and spatiotemporal behavior. The use of STM in conjunction with other experimental data has confirmed the validity of the surface reconstruction (SR) model under low pressure and the more recent surface oxide (SO) model which is possible under sub-atmospheric pressure conditions [1]. In the SR model the surface is periodically reconstructed below a certain low critical CO-coverage and this reconstruction is lifted above a second, higher critical CO-coverage. Alternatively the SO model proposes periodic switching between a low-reactivity metallic surface and a high-reactivity oxide surface. Here we present an overview of our recent kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulation studies on the oscillatory kinetics of surface catalyzed CO oxidation. Different modifications of the lattice gas Ziff-Gulari-Barshad (ZGB) model have been utilized or proposed for this purpose. First we present the effect of desorption on the ZGB reactive to poisoned irreversible phase transition in the SR model. Next we discuss our recent research on KMC simulation of the SO model. The ZGB framework is utilized to propose a new model incorporating not only the standard Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) mechanism, but also introducing the Mars-van Krevelen (MvK) mechanism for the surface oxide phase [5]. Phase diagrams, which are plots between long time averages of various oscillating quantities against the normalized CO pressure, show two or three transitions depending on the CO coverage critical threshold (CT) value beyond which all adsorbed oxygen atoms are converted to surface oxide.

  13. Extraction/oxidation kinetics of low molecular weight compounds in wine brandy resulting from different ageing technologies.

    PubMed

    Canas, Sara; Caldeira, Ilda; Belchior, A Pedro

    2013-06-15

    This study provides innovative information on the influence of new technologies of ageing (stainless steel tanks with wood staves or wood tablets of chestnut or Limousin oak), in comparison with traditional technology (oak wooden barrels), on the extraction/oxidation kinetics of low molecular weight compounds of wine brandy. The brandy was sampled and analysed by HPLC during the first year of ageing. The results show that most of the compounds tend to increase over the time, but their extraction/oxidation kinetics depend on the ageing technology. The wooden barrels promote greater enrichment in the majority of the compounds. However, gallic acid, ellagic acid and syringaldehyde, and vanillin and 5-methylfurfural, which are strong antioxidants and key-odourant compounds, respectively, present higher contents in the brandy aged with the alternative technologies. Chestnut proves to be a suitable alternative to Limousin oak for the ageing of brandy in all the studied technologies, inducing faster evolution and high quality. PMID:23497909

  14. Oxidation rate of nuclear-grade graphite IG-110 in the kinetic regime for VHTR air ingress accident scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jo Jo; Ghosh, Tushar K.; Loyalka, Sudarshan K.

    2014-03-01

    The oxidation rates of nuclear-grade graphite IG-110 in the kinetically-controlled temperature regime of graphite oxidation were predicted and compared in Very High Temperature Reactor air ingress accident scenarios. The oxidative mass loss of graphite was measured thermogravimetrically from 873 to 1873 K in 100% air (21 mol%). The activation energy was found to be 222.07 kJ/mol, and the order of reaction with respect to oxygen concentration is 0.76. The surfaces of the samples were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy before and after oxidation. These results are compared with those available in the literature, and our recently reported results for NBG-18 nuclear-grade graphite using the same technique.

  15. kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of uranium(iv) by persulfate ions in perchloric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Ermakov, V.A.

    1986-07-01

    The kinetics of the oxidation of uranium(IV) by persulfate ions in perchloric acid solutions was studied by a spectrophotometric method. It was established that the oxidation of uranium(IV) ions occurs along three pathways: directly by S/sub 2/O /SUP 2/8/ /sup -/ ions, by products of their thermal decomposition, and intramolecularly in a persulfate complex. It was shown that the contribution of each of the three pathways to the overall rate of oxidation of uranium(IV) depends on the initial reagent concentrations, the hydrogen ion concentration, and the temperature. The activation energies of the oxidation of uranium(IV) directly by persulfate ions, by products of their thermal decomposition, as well as in a persulfate complex, were determined.

  16. Dependence of Heterogeneous OH Kinetics with Biomass Burning Aerosol Proxies on Oxidant Concentration and Relative Humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slade, J. H.; Knopf, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    Chemical transformations of aerosol particles by heterogeneous reactions with trace gases such as OH radicals can influence particle physicochemical properties and lifetime, affect cloud formation, light scattering, and human health. Furthermore, OH oxidation can result in degradation of particle mass by volatilization reactions, altering the budget of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). However, the reactive uptake coefficient (γ) and particle oxidation degree can vary depending on several factors including oxidant concentration and relative humidity (RH). While RH can influence the extent of dissociation/ionization, it can also affect particle phase and thus oxidant diffusivity. Only one study so far has investigated the effect of RH on the rate of OH uptake to organic surfaces; however, the underlying processes affecting OH reactivity with organic aerosol under humidified conditions still remains elusive. Here, we determine the effect of RH on OH reactivity with laboratory-generated biomass burning aerosol (BBA) surrogate particles: levoglucosan and 4-methyl-5-nitrocatechol. The effect of OH concentration on γ for three common BBA molecular markers (levoglucosan, abietic acid, and nitroguaiacol) under dry conditions was investigated from [OH]≈107-1011 molecule cm-3, covering both [OH] in biomass burning plumes and [OH] commonly used in particle aging studies. Furthermore, key VOC reaction products and their production pathways resulting from BBA volatilization by OH were identified. OH radicals are produced using a microwave induced plasma (MIP) of H2 in He or Ar followed by reaction with O2, or by photolysis of O3 in the presence of H2O. A cylindrical rotating wall flow-tube reactor and fast-flow aerosol flow reactor are used for conducting kinetic studies. OH is detected using a Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) and a Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS) is employed for VOC analysis. γ decreases from 0.2-0.5 at

  17. Effect of Humic Acid on As Redox Transformation and Kinetic Adsorption onto Iron Oxide Based Adsorbent (IBA)

    PubMed Central

    Fakour, Hoda; Lin, Tsair-Fuh

    2014-01-01

    Due to the importance of adsorption kinetics and redox transformation of arsenic (As) during the adsorption process, the present study elucidated natural organic matter (NOM) effects on As adsorption-desorption kinetics and speciation transformation. The experimental procedures were conducted by examining interactions of arsenate and arsenite with different concentrations of humic acid (HA) as a model representative of NOM, in the presence of iron oxide based adsorbent (IBA), as a model solid surface in three environmentally relevant conditions, including the simultaneous adsorption of both As and HA onto IBA, HA adsorption onto As-presorbed IBA, and As adsorption onto HA-presorbed IBA. Experimental adsorption-desorption data were all fitted by original and modified Lagergren pseudo-first and -second order adsorption kinetic models, respectively. Weber’s intraparticle diffusion was also used to gain insight into the mechanisms and rate controlling steps, which the results suggested that intraparticle diffusion of As species onto IBA is the main rate-controlling step. Different concentrations of HA mediated the redox transformation of As species, with a higher oxidation ability than reduction. The overall results indicated the significant effect of organic matter on the adsorption kinetics and redox transformation of As species, and consequently, the fate, transport and mobility of As in different environmentally relevant conditions. PMID:25325357

  18. Oxidation of tricyclic antidepressant drugs with chloramine-T in acidic solutions: kinetic, mechanistic and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Sukhdev, Anu; Puttaswamy, Puttaswamy

    2013-12-01

    The kinetics of the oxidation of two tricyclic antidepressants (TCA) namely, imipramine (IMP) and clomipramine (CLM) with sodium N-chloro-p-toluenesulfonamide or chloramine-T (CAT) in HClO4 medium was studied at 300 K. The two reactions followed identical kinetics with a first-order dependence of rate on [CAT]o and fractional order dependence on [TCA]o. The reaction is catalyzed by H(+) ions with a fractional order dependence. The reaction was studied at different temperatures and activation parameters were evaluated. The reaction constants involved in the mechanism were computed. The solvent isotope effect was studied using D2O. Addition of p-toluenesulfonamide retards the reaction rate. The rate increased with decreasing dielectric constant of the medium. Variation of ionic strength of the medium and addition of halide ions (Cl(-) or Br(-)) showed no effect on the rate. The stoichiometry of the reaction was found to be 1:1 and the oxidation products were identified as imipramine-5-N-oxide and clomipramine-5-N-oxide. The rate of oxidation of IMP is faster than CLM. The observed results have been explained in terms of a mechanism and a relevant rate law has been deduced. PMID:23543721

  19. Period-four modulation of photosystem II primary quinone acceptor (Q(A)) reduction/oxidation kinetics in thylakoid membranes.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Alain; Joly, David; Boisvert, Steve; Carpentier, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII), a multiprotein complex mainly coded by the chloroplast genome in higher plants and algae, contains the oxygen-evolving complex with four manganese atoms responsible for the oxidation of water. After each absorption of a light quantum by pigment molecules in the light harvesting complexes of PSII, the Mn cluster advances in its oxidation states denoted from S(0) to S(4) . The S(4) state decays to S(0) in the dark with the concurrent release of molecular oxygen. Therefore, the oxygen production in PSII exposed to successive single turnover excitations follows a period-four oscillation pattern. The intensity of chlorophyll a fluorescence of PSII is also known to be influenced by the oxidation state of the Mn cluster. In the present work, fluorescence induction kinetics was measured in isolated thylakoids with various initial S-state populations settled by preflashes. The shape of the fluorescence induction traces was strongly affected by preflashes. O-J and J-I phases of the induction followed a period-four oscillation pattern. The results indicate that these changes reflect the influence of the oxidation rate of the Mn cluster on the reduction/oxidation kinetics of the primary quinone acceptor (Q(A) ) of PSII. PMID:20553414

  20. Kinetics and pathways of ibuprofen degradation by the UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yingying; Fang, Jingyun; Shang, Chii

    2016-03-01

    The UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process (AOP), which forms reactive species such as hydroxyl radicals (HO) and reactive chlorine species (RCS) such as chlorine atoms (Cl) and Cl2(-), is being considered as an alternative to the UV/H2O2 AOP for the degradation of emerging contaminants. This study investigated the kinetics and pathways of the degradation of a recalcitrant pharmaceutical and personal care product (PPCP)-ibuprofen (IBP)-by the UV/chlorine AOP. The degradation of IBP followed the pseudo first-order kinetics. The first-order rate constant was 3.3 times higher in the UV/chlorine AOP than in the UV/H2O2 AOP for a given chemical molar dosage at pH 6. The first-order rate constant decreased from 3.1 × 10(-3) s(-1) to 5.5 × 10(-4) s(-1) with increasing pH from 6 to 9. Both HO and RCS contributed to the degradation, and the contribution of RCS increased from 22% to 30% with increasing pH from 6 to 9. The degradation was initiated by HO-induced hydroxylation and Cl-induced chlorine substitution, and sustained through decarboxylation, demethylation, chlorination and ring cleavage to form more stable products. Significant amounts of chlorinated intermediates/byproducts were formed from the UV/chlorine AOP, and four chlorinated products were newly identified. The yield of total organic chlorine (TOCl) was 31.6 μM after 90% degradation of 50 μM IBP under the experimental conditions. The known disinfection by-products (DBPs) comprised 17.4% of the TOCl. The effects of water matrix in filtered drinking water on the degradation were not significant, demonstrating the practicality of the UV/chlorine AOP for the control of some refractory PPCPs. However, the toxicity of the chlorinated products should be further assessed. PMID:26748208

  1. Characterization and kinetics of sulfide-oxidizing autotrophic denitrification in batch reactors containing suspended and immobilized cells.

    PubMed

    Moraes, B S; Souza, T S O; Foresti, E

    2011-01-01

    Sulfide-oxidizing autotrophic denitrification is an advantageous alternative over heterotrophic denitrification, and may have potential for nitrogen removal of low-strength wastewaters, such as anaerobically pre-treated domestic sewage. This study evaluated the fundamentals and kinetics of this process in batch reactors containing suspended and immobilized cells. Batch tests were performed for different NOx-/S2- ratios and using nitrate and nitrite as electron acceptors. Autotrophic denitrification was observed for both electron acceptors, and NOx-/S2- ratios defined whether sulfide oxidation was complete or not. Kinetic parameter values obtained for nitrate were higher than for nitrite as electron acceptor. Zero-order models were better adjusted to profiles obtained for suspended cell reactors, whereas first-order models were more adequate for immobilized cell reactors. However, in the latter, mass transfer physical phenomena had a significant effect on kinetics based on biochemical reactions. Results showed that sulfide-oxidizing autotrophic denitrification can be successfully established for low-strength wastewaters and have potential for nitrogen removal from anaerobically pre-treated domestic sewage. PMID:22097054

  2. Kinetically stabilized aliovalent europium-doped magnesium oxide as a UV sensitized phosphor.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Chandresh Kumar; Saha, Sulay; Sivakumar, Sri; Pala, Raj Ganesh S; Kumar, Jitendra

    2015-02-14

    Doping of size mismatched aliovalent ions is challenging due to the associated elastic and electronic stress making the thermodynamics unfavorable. Despite such features, its utilization may be viable if such systems can be made metastable by suppressing the kinetics of phase segregation. In light of such a possibility, we utilize sol-gel synthesis for preparing a size mismatched trivalent europium doped MgO (Mg(1-x)Eu(x)O:(x/2)V"(Mg)) system, which can be potentially used in optical applications. It is found that such a doped system can be metastabilized and the extent of metastability can be correlated with critical temperature (Tc) required for phase segregation which decreases with the dopant concentration. For x = 0.005, 0.01, and 0.02, Tc is above 1200 °C, 500-800 °C and less than 500 °C, respectively. As the synthesis temperature is 500 °C, these trends in critical temperatures make it impossible to metastabilize europium in MgO with x > 0.01. Doping is evident from X-ray diffraction data, excitation spectra, high resolution emission spectra, and luminescence lifetimes. A characteristic strong red emission of Eu(3+) has been observed via energy transfer from the MgO matrix to Eu(3+). Density functional theory based simulations suggest stabilization of Eu(3+) in MgO at lower doping concentration through the formation of cation vacancies which is also evident from optical studies. Furthermore, thin films deposited using the e-beam evaporation technique from the Mg(1-x)Eu(x)O:(x/2)V"(Mg) (x = 0.005) system show UV sensitized emission with CIE coordinates (0.26, 0.21). PMID:25584434

  3. High-resolution experiments on chemical oxidation of DNAPL in variable-aperture fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshadi, Masoud; Rajaram, Harihar; Detwiler, Russell L.; Jones, Trevor

    2015-04-01

    Chemical oxidation of dense nonaqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs) by permanganate has emerged as an effective remediation strategy in fractured rock. We present high-resolution experimental investigations in transparent analog variable-aperture fractures to improve understanding of chemical oxidation of residual entrapped trichloroethylene (TCE) in fractures. Four experiments were performed with different permanganate concentrations, flow rates, and initial TCE phase geometry. The initial aperture field and evolving entrapped-phase geometry were quantified for each experiment. The integrated mass transfer rate from the TCE phase for all experiments exhibited three time regimes: an early-time regime with slower mass transfer rates limited by low specific interfacial area; an intermediate-time regime with higher mass transfer rates resulting from breakup of large TCE blobs, which greatly increases specific interfacial area; and a late-time regime with low mass transfer rates due to the deposition of MnO2 precipitates. In two experiments, mass balance analyses suggested that TCE mass removal rates exceeded the maximum upper bound mass removal rates derived by assuming that oxidation and dissolution are the only mechanisms for TCE mass removal. We propose incomplete oxidation by permanganate and TCE solubility enhancement by intermediate reaction products as potential mechanisms to explain this behavior. We also speculate that some intermediate reaction products with surfactant-like properties may play a role in lowering the TCE-water interfacial tension, thus causing breakup of large TCE blobs. Our quantitative experimental measurements will be useful in the context of developing accurate computational models for chemical oxidation of TCE in fractures.

  4. Kinetics of the superoxide radical oxidation of(cobalt sepulchrate)(2+). A flash photolytic study

    SciTech Connect

    Bakac, A.; Espenson, J.H.; kCreaser, I.I.; Sargeson, A.M.

    1983-12-28

    The postulated formation of the superoxide radical anion, O/sub 2//sup -/-, as an intermediate in the reaction of Co(sep)/sup 2 +/ (sep = sepulchrate) with molecular oxygen has now been confirmed by a trapping reaction with Cu/sup 2 +/. In the absence of Cu/sup 2 +/, O/sub 2//sup -/-oxidizes a second Co(sep)/sup 2 +/ to Co(sep)/sup 3 +/. The latter reaction, studied directly by use of the flash photolytic technique, has at 25/sup 0/C a rate constant of (4.6+/-1.1) x 10/sup 7/M/sup -1/s/sup -1/, independent of pH in the range 11.3-12.6. Nitrogen perdeuteration yields d(N)/sup 6 -/Co(sep)/sup 2 +/, which reacts with O/sub 2/ at the same rate but with O/sub 2//sup -/ 2.1 times more slowly. The proposed mechanism of the O/sub 2//sup -/ reaction consists of the hydrogen atom abstraction from a N-H bond of Co(sep)/sup 2 +/ by O/sub 2//sup -/, followed by the rapid protonation of the products, Co/sup III/(sep-H)/sup 2 +/ and HO/sub 2/, to form Co(sep)/sup 3 +/ and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. In contrast, the reaction between Co(sep)/sup 2 +/ and O/sub 2/, which shows no kinetic isotope effect, occurs by outer-sphere electron transfer.

  5. Adsorption Properties of Tetracycline onto Graphene Oxide: Equilibrium, Kinetic and Thermodynamic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ghadim, Ehsan Ezzatpour; Manouchehri, Firouzeh; Soleimani, Gholamreza; Hosseini, Hadi; Kimiagar, Salimeh; Nafisi, Shohreh

    2013-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) nanoparticle is a high potential effective absorbent. Tetracycline (TC) is a broad-spectrum antibiotic produced, indicated for use against many bacterial infections. In the present research, a systematic study of the adsorption and release process of tetracycline on GO was performed by varying pH, sorption time and temperature. The results of our studies showed that tetracycline strongly loads on the GO surface via π–π interaction and cation–π bonding. Investigation of TC adsorption kinetics showed that the equilibrium was reached within 15 min following the pseudo-second-order model with observed rate constants of k2 = 0.2742–0.5362 g/mg min (at different temperatures). The sorption data has interpreted by the Langmuir model with the maximum adsorption of 323 mg/g (298 K). The mean energy of adsorption was determined 1.83 kJ/mol (298 K) based on the Dubinin–Radushkevich (D–R) adsorption isotherm. Moreover, the thermodynamic parameters such as ΔH°, ΔS° and ΔG° values for the adsorption were estimated which indicated the endothermic and spontaneous nature of the sorption process. The electrochemistry approved an ideal reaction for the adsorption under electrodic process. Simulation of GO and TC was done by LAMMPS. Force studies in z direction showed that tetracycline comes close to GO sheet by C8 direction. Then it goes far and turns and again comes close from amine group to the GO sheet. PMID:24302989

  6. Kinetic and morphological development of oxide-sulfide scales on iron at 1,073 K

    SciTech Connect

    McAdam, G.; Young, D.J. )

    1992-04-01

    The corrosion behavior of pure iron has been investigated at 1,073 K in controlled gas atmospheres of SO{sub 2}-CO{sub 2}-CO-N{sub 2}. The equilibrium gas compositions were such that: (1) FeS was stable with respect to FeO, (2) FeO was stable with respect to FeS, and (3) only one of the solids was stable with respect to the gas sulfur and oxygen activities. The resultant scale morphologies are discussed along with the observed parabolic corrosion kinetics. It was shown that duplex (oxide plus sulfide) scales could be produced under all three reaction conditions. Careful adjustment of gas compositions permitted comparisons to be made among sets of experiments having (1) the same p{sub s{sub 2}} value but different p{sub so{sub 2}} and p{sub o{sub 2}}values, (2) the same p{sub o{sub 2}} value but different p{sub so{sub 2}} and p{sub s{sub 2}} values, and (3) the same p{sub so{sub 2}}value but different p{sub s{sub 2}} and p{sub o{sub 2}}values. In this way it was confirmed that the reactant species was SO{sub 2} over a wide range of gas compositions, and under conditions in which solid-state diffusion was rate-controlling. The exception was found at very high p{sub s{sub 2}} values, where elemental sulfur was the reactant. Catalysis of the reactant gas demonstrated that the results could be affected by the slow approach to equilibrium of the gas phase.

  7. A detailed kinetic modeling study of toluene oxidation in a premixed laminar flame

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Z; Pitz, W J; Fournet, R; Glaude, P; Battin-Leclerc, F

    2009-12-18

    An improved chemical kinetic model for the toluene oxidation based on experimental data obtained in a premixed laminar low-pressure flame with vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization and molecular beam mass spectrometry (MBMS) techniques has been proposed. The present mechanism consists of 273 species up to chrysene and 1740 reactions. The rate constants of reactions of toluene, decomposition, reaction with oxygen, ipso-additions and metatheses with abstraction of phenylic H-atom are updated; new pathways of C{sub 4} + C{sub 2} species giving benzene and fulvene are added. Based on the experimental observations, combustion intermediates such as fulvenallene, naphtol, methylnaphthalene, acenaphthylene, 2-ethynylnaphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene, 1-methylphenanthrene, pyrene and chrysene are involved in the present mechanism. The final toluene model leads to an overall satisfactory agreement between the experimentally observed and predicted mole fraction profiles for the major products and most combustion intermediates. The toluene depletion is governed by metathese giving benzyl radicals, ipso-addition forming benzene and metatheses leading to C{sub 6}H{sub 4}CH{sub 3} radicals. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the unimolecular decomposition via the cleavage of a C-H bond has a strong inhibiting effect, while decomposition via C-C bond breaking, ipso-addition of H-atom to toluene, decomposition of benzyl radicals and reactions related to C{sub 6}H{sub 4}CH{sub 3} radicals have promoting effect for the consumption of toluene. Moreover, flow rate analysis is performed to illustrate the formation pathways of mono- and polycyclic aromatics.

  8. Nonlinear effects in infrared action spectroscopy of silicon and vanadium oxide clusters: experiment and kinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Florent; Li, Yejun; Kiawi, Denis M; Bakker, Joost M; Parneix, Pascal; Janssens, Ewald

    2015-10-21

    For structural assignment of gas phase compounds, infrared action spectra are usually compared to computed linear absorption spectra. However, action spectroscopy is highly nonlinear owing to the necessary transfer of the excitation energy and its subsequent redistribution leading to statistical ionization or dissociation. Here, we examine by joint experiment and dedicated modeling how such nonlinear effects affect the spectroscopic features in the case of selected inorganic clusters. Vibrational spectra of neutral silicon clusters are recorded by tunable IR-UV two-color ionization while IR spectra for cationic vanadium oxide clusters are obtained by IR multiphoton absorption followed by dissociation of the bare cluster or of its complex with Xe. Our kinetic modeling accounts for vibrational anharmonicities, for the laser interaction through photon absorption and stimulated emission rates, as well as for the relevant ionization or dissociation rates, all based on input parameters from quantum chemical calculations. Comparison of the measured and calculated spectra indicates an overall agreement as far as trends are concerned, except for the photodissociation of the V3O7(+)-Xe messenger complex, for which anharmonicities are too large and poorly captured by the perturbative anharmonic model. In all systems studied, nonlinear effects are essentially manifested by variations in the intensities as well as spectral broadenings. Differences in some band positions originate from inaccuracies of the quantum chemical data rather than specific nonlinear effects. The simulations further yield information on the average number of photons absorbed, which is otherwise unaccessible information: several to several tens of photons need to be absorbed to observe a band through dissociation, while three to five photons can be sufficient for detection of a band via IR-UV ionization. PMID:26208251

  9. Mutual sensitization of the oxidation of nitric oxide and a natural gas blend in a JSR at elevated pressure: experimental and detailed kinetic modeling study.

    PubMed

    Dagaut, Philippe; Dayma, Guillaume

    2006-06-01

    The mutual sensitization of the oxidation of NO and a natural gas blend (methane-ethane 10:1) was studied experimentally in a fused silica jet-stirred reactor operating at 10 atm, over the temperature range 800-1160 K, from fuel-lean to fuel-rich conditions. Sonic quartz probe sampling followed by on-line FTIR analyses and off-line GC-TCD/FID analyses were used to measure the concentration profiles of the reactants, the stable intermediates, and the final products. A detailed chemical kinetic modeling of the present experiments was performed yielding an overall good agreement between the present data and this modeling. According to the proposed kinetic scheme, the mutual sensitization of the oxidation of this natural gas blend and NO proceeds through the NO to NO2 conversion by HO2, CH3O2, and C2H5O2. The detailed kinetic modeling showed that the conversion of NO to NO2 by CH3O2 and C2H5O2 is more important at low temperatures (ca. 820 K) than at higher temperatures where the reaction of NO with HO2 controls the NO to NO2 conversion. The production of OH resulting from the oxidation of NO by HO2, and the production of alkoxy radicals via RO2 + NO reactions promotes the oxidation of the fuel. A simplified reaction scheme was delineated: NO + HO2 --> NO2 + OH followed by OH + CH4 --> CH3 + H2O and OH + C2H6 --> C2H5 + H2O. At low-temperature, the reaction also proceeds via CH3 + O2 (+ M) --> CH3O2 (+ M); CH3O2 + NO --> CH3O + NO2 and C2H5 + O2 --> C2H5O2; C2H5O2 + NO --> C2H5O + NO2. At higher temperature, methoxy radicals are produced via the following mechanism: CH3 + NO2 --> CH3O + NO. The further reactions CH3O --> CH2O + H; CH2O + OH --> HCO + H2O; HCO + O2 --> HO2 + CO; and H + O2 + M --> HO2 + M complete the sequence. The proposed model indicates that the well-recognized difference of reactivity between methane and a natural gas blend is significantly reduced by addition of NO. The kinetic analyses indicate that in the NO-seeded conditions, the main production

  10. Elucidating molecular iridium water oxidation catalysts using metal-organic frameworks: a comprehensive structural, catalytic, spectroscopic, and kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng; Wang, Jin-Liang; Lin, Wenbin

    2012-12-01

    As a new class of porous, crystalline, molecular materials, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have shown great promise as recyclable and reusable single-site solid catalysts. Periodic order and site isolation of the catalytic struts in MOFs facilitate the studies of their activities and reaction mechanisms. Herein we report the construction of two highly stable MOFs (1 and 2) using elongated dicarboxylate bridging ligands derived from Cp*Ir(L)Cl complexes (L = dibenzoate-substituted 2,2'-bipyridine, bpy-dc, or dibenzoate-substituted 2-phenylpyridine, ppy-dc) and Zr(6)O(4)(OH)(4)(carboxylate)(12) cuboctahedral secondary building units (SBUs) and the elucidation of water oxidation pathways of the Cp*Ir(L)Cl catalysts using these MOFs. We carried out detailed kinetic studies of Ce(4+)-driven water oxidation reactions (WORs) catalyzed by the MOFs using UV-vis spectroscopy, phosphorescent oxygen detection, and gas chromatographic analysis. These results confirmed not only water oxidation activity of the MOFs but also indicated oxidative degradation of the Cp* rings during the WOR. The (bpy-dc)Ir(H(2)O)(2)XCl (X is likely a formate or acetate group) complex resulted from the oxidative degradation process was identified as a competent catalyst responsible for the water oxidation activity of 1. Further characterization of the MOFs recovered from WORs using X-ray photoelectron, diffuse-reflectance UV-vis absorption, luminescence, and infrared spectroscopies supported the identity of (bpy-dc)Ir(H(2)O)(2)XCl as an active water oxidation catalyst. Kinetics of MOF-catalyzed WORs were monitored by Ce(4+) consumptions and fitted with a reaction-diffusion model, revealing an intricate relationship between reaction and diffusion rates. Our work underscores the opportunity in using MOFs as well-defined single-site solid catalytic systems to reveal mechanistic details that are difficult to obtain for their homogeneous counterparts. PMID:23136923

  11. First-principles-based investigation of kinetic mechanism of SiC(0001) dry oxidation including defect generation and passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrikov, Alexey; Knizhnik, Andrey; Safonov, Andrey; Scherbinin, Andrey; Bagatur'yants, Alexander; Potapkin, Boris; Chatterjee, Aveek; Matocha, Kevin

    2008-11-01

    The key stages of the dry oxidation of the SiC(0001) surface are analyzed based on first-principles calculations. It is found that an abrupt SiC/SiO2 interface model results in a large activation barrier of oxygen penetration to the silicon carbide, and thus the penetration is probably the rate-limiting step for the entire dry-oxidation process. The subsequent reactions of SiC oxidation after oxygen penetration are investigated, and it is found that CO release is competing with carbon dimer formation. These dimers probably are responsible for near-interface traps in the silica layer generated during SiC oxidation. The possible passivation reactions of a carbon dimer defect by active species, such as O2, NO, and H2 are investigated. It is found that an oxygen molecule can break a Si-C bond via dissociation in the triplet state and finally can produce two CO molecules from the carbon dimer defect. The NO molecule can easily break a Si-C bond of a carbon dimer defect and form cyano groups -CN, which can finally recombine to form a C2N2 molecule. This molecule can hardly diffuse in silica matrix, and it is suggested that it is further oxidized by an NO molecule to CO and N2 molecules. It is suggested that the process of passivation by O2 and NO molecules is restricted by the incorporation of these molecules in small voids near the carbon defect. Based on the calculated results, a simple kinetic mechanism of dry SiC oxidation is proposed and kinetic modeling of the oxidation process is performed. It is found that in the framework of this mechanism, the carbon defect density should weakly depend on temperature.

  12. High-resolution Z-contrast imaging and EELS study of functional oxide materials.

    PubMed

    Klie, Robert F; Zhao, Yuan; Yang, Guang; Zhu, Yimei

    2008-08-01

    Functional complex-oxide materials show a wide variety of properties and behaviors that cannot be found in any other class of materials, including high-temperature superconductivity and colossal magneto resistance. Consequently, this group of oxide materials has become the focus of many experimental as well as theoretical studies, aiming at understanding the fundamental mechanisms and properties that govern these complex structures. Here, we will review our high-resolution Z-contrast imaging and electron energy-loss studies of two complex-oxide materials systems, more specifically low-angle tilt grain-boundaries in YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7) (YBCO), and the spin-state transition in LaCoO(3). It will be shown that the O K-edge pre-peak can be used to quantify the hole-concentration in the vicinity of the dislocation core in YBCO, as well as to determine the Co(3+) spin-state in LaCoO(3). PMID:18082411

  13. Oxidation of cetirizine, fexofenadine and hydrochlorothiazide during ozonation: Kinetics and formation of transformation products.

    PubMed

    Borowska, Ewa; Bourgin, Marc; Hollender, Juliane; Kienle, Cornelia; McArdell, Christa S; von Gunten, Urs

    2016-05-01

    The efficiency of wastewater ozonation for the abatement of three nitrogen-containing pharmaceuticals, two antihistamine drugs, cetirizine (CTR) and fexofenadine (FXF), and the diuretic drug, hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ), was investigated. Species-specific second-order rate constants for the reactions of the molecular, protonated (CTR, FXF) or deprotonated (HCTZ) forms of these compounds with ozone were determined. All three compounds are very reactive with ozone (apparent second order rate constants at pH 7: kO3,pH7 = 1.7·10(5) M(-1)s(-1), 8.5·10(4) M(-1)s(-1) and 9.0·10(3) M(-1)s(-1) for CTR, HCTZ and FXF, respectively). Transformation product (TP) structures were elucidated using liquid chromatography coupled with high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry, including isotope-labeled standards. For cetirizine and hydrochlorothiazide 8 TPs each and for fexofenadine 7 TPs were identified. The main TPs of cetirizine and fexofenadine are their respective N-oxides, whereas chlorothiazide forms to almost 100% from hydrochlorothiazide. In the bacteria bioluminescence assay the toxicity was slightly increased only during the ozonation of cetirizine at very high cetirizine concentrations. The main TPs detected in bench-scale experiments were also detected in full-scale ozonation of a municipal wastewater, for >90% elimination of the parent compounds. PMID:26971810

  14. High-Resolution Electron Energy Loss Studies of Oxygen, Hydrogen, Nitrogen, Nitric Oxide, and Nitrous Oxide Adsorption on Germanium Surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entringer, Anthony G.

    The first high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) studies of the oxidation and nitridation of germanium surfaces are reported. Both single crystal Ge(111) and disordered surfaces were studied. Surfaces were exposed to H, O_2, NO, N _2O, and N, after cleaning in ultra-high vacuum. The Ge surfaces were found to be non-reactive to molecular hydrogen (H_2) at room temperature. Exposure to atomic hydrogen (H) resulted hydrogen adsorption as demonstrated by the presence of Ge-H vibrational modes. The HREEL spectrum of the native oxide of Ge characteristic of nu -GeO_2 was obtained by heating the oxide to 200^circC. Three peaks were observed at 33, 62, and 106 meV for molecular oxygen (O_2) adsorbed on clean Ge(111) at room temperature. These peaks are indicative of dissociative bonding and a dominant Ge-O-Ge bridge structure. Subsequent hydrogen exposure resulted in a shift of the Ge-H stretch from its isolated value of 247 meV to 267 meV, indicative of a dominant +3 oxidation state. A high density of dangling bonds and defects and deeper oxygen penetration at the amorphous Ge surface result in a dilute bridge structure with a predominant +1 oxidation state for similar exposures. Molecules of N_2O decompose at the surfaces to desorbed N_2 molecules and chemisorbed oxygen atoms. In contrast, both oxygen and nitrogen are detected at the surfaces following exposure to NO molecules. Both NO and N_2O appear to dissociate and bond at the top surface layer. Molecular nitrogen (N_2) does not react with the Ge surfaces, however, a precursor Ge nitride is observed at room temperature following exposure to nitrogen atoms and ions. Removal of oxygen by heating of the NO-exposed surface to 550^circC enabled the identification of the Ge-N vibrational modes. These modes show a structure similar to that of germanium nitride. This spectrum is also identical to that of the N-exposed surface heated to 550^circC. Surface phonon modes of the narrow-gap semiconducting

  15. Transient kinetic modeling of the ethylene and carbon monoxide oxidation over a commercial automotive exhaust gas catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Harmsen, J.M.A.; Hoebink, J.H.B.J.; Schouten, J.C.

    2000-03-01

    The transient kinetics of ethylene oxidation by oxygen over a commercial Pt/Rh/CeO{sub 2}/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} three-way catalyst were modeled. Experiments were carried out in a fixed-bed microreactor with two separate inlets, enabling alternate feeding of ethylene and oxygen with frequencies up to {1/4} Hz. The experimental conditions resemble the cold-start period of an Otto engine in a car. Two types of adsorbed ethylene species seem to exist. A selective catalyst deactivation for oxygen adsorption, due to deposition of carbonaceous species, was found. A kinetic model was developed, based on elementary reaction steps, that allows one to describe the experiments quantitatively. Furthermore, this model was combined with the published model for transient carbon monoxide oxidation over the same catalyst, which enables one to predict the results of simultaneous ethylene and carbon monoxide oxidation. Both components react in rather distinct zones, with ethylene being converted only when carbon monoxide oxidation is almost complete.

  16. Pyrite as a sustainable catalyst in electro-Fenton process for improving oxidation of sulfamethazine. Kinetics, mechanism and toxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Barhoumi, Natija; Oturan, Nihal; Olvera-Vargas, Hugo; Brillas, Enric; Gadri, Abdellatif; Ammar, Salah; Oturan, Mehmet A

    2016-05-01

    The degradation of 0.20 mM sulfamethazine (SMT) solutions was investigated by heterogeneous electro-Fenton (EF) process using pyrite as source of Fe(2+) (catalyst) and pH regulator in an undivided electrochemical cell equipped either with a Pt or a BDD anode and carbon-felt as cathode. Effect of pyrite concentration and applied current on the oxidative degradation kinetics and mineralization efficiency has been studied. The higher oxidation power of the process, named "Pyrite-EF″ using BDD anode was demonstrated. Pyrite-EF showed a better performance for the oxidation/mineralization of the drug SMT in comparison to the classic EF process: 95% and 87% TOC removal by Pyrite-EF with BDD and Pt anodes, respectively, versus 90% and 83% by classical EF with BDD and Pt anodes, respectively. The rate constant of the oxidation of SMT by OH was determined by the competition kinetics method and found to be 1.87 × 10(9) mol(-1) L s(-1). Based on the identified reaction intermediates by HPLC and GS-MS, as well as released SO4(2-), NH4(+) and NO3(-) ions, a plausible reaction pathway was proposed for the mineralization of SMT during Pyrite-EF process. Toxicity assessment by means of Microtox method revealed the formation of some toxic intermediates during the treatment. However, toxicity of the solution was removed at the end of treatment. PMID:26938493

  17. Kinetic resolution of 2-substituted 2,3-dihydro-4-pyridones by palladium-catalyzed asymmetric allylic alkylation: catalytic asymmetric total synthesis of indolizidine (-)-209I.

    PubMed

    Lei, Bai-Lin; Zhang, Qing-Song; Yu, Wei-Hua; Ding, Qiu-Ping; Ding, Chang-Hua; Hou, Xue-Long

    2014-04-01

    The kinetic resolution of 2-substituted-2,3-dihydro-4-pyridones was realized via a Pd-catalyzed allylic substitution reaction using a commercially available (S)-P-Phos as a ligand, affording optically active dihydropyridones and C-allylated dihydropyridones in high yields and good enantioselectivities with the S-factor up to 43. With this protocol, a catalytic asymmetric total synthesis of indolizidine (-)-209I was realized for the first time. PMID:24661080

  18. Inactivation kinetics and photoreactivation of vegetable oxidative enzymes after combined UV-C processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The inactivation kinetics of lipoxygenase (LOX), peroxidase (POD) and polyphenoloxidase (PPO) in phosphate buffer (pH 4.0 and 7.0) treated by combined thermal (25-65 C) and UV-C (1-10 min) processes were fitted using a traditional first-order kinetics model and the Weibull distribution function. For...

  19. Effects of surface chemistry and microstructure of electrolyte on oxygen reduction kinetics of solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joong Sun; An, Jihwan; Lee, Min Hwan; Prinz, Fritz B.; Lee, Wonyoung

    2015-11-01

    We report systematic investigation of the surface properties of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolytes with the control of the grain boundary (GB) density at the surface, and its effects on electrochemical activities. The GB density of thin surface layers deposited on single crystal YSZ substrates is controlled by changing the annealing temperature (750-1450 °C). Higher oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) kinetics is observed in samples annealed at lower temperatures. The higher ORR activity is ascribed to the higher GB density at the YSZ surface where 'mobile' oxide ion vacancies are more populated. Meanwhile, oxide ion vacancies concurrently created with yttrium segregation at the surface at the higher annealing temperature are considered inactive to oxygen incorporation reactions. Our results provide additional insight into the interplay between the surface chemistry, microstructures, and electrochemical activity. They potentially provide important guidelines for engineering the electrolyte-electrode interfaces of solid oxide fuel cells for higher electrochemical performance.

  20. Effects of surface chemistry and microstructure of electrolyte on oxygen reduction kinetics of solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Joong Sun; An, Jihwan; Lee, Min Hwan; Prinz, Friedrich B.; Lee, Wonyoung

    2015-07-10

    In this study, we report systematic investigation of the surface properties of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolytes with the control of the grain boundary (GB) density at the surface, and its effects on electrochemical activities. The GB density of thin surface layers deposited on single crystal YSZ substrates is controlled by changing the annealing temperature (750-1450 °C). Higher oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) kinetics is observed in samples annealed at lower temperatures. The higher ORR activity is ascribed to the higher GB density at the YSZ surface where 'mobile' oxide ion vacancies are more populated. Meanwhile, oxide ion vacancies concurrently created with yttrium segregation at the surface at the higher annealing temperature are considered inactive to oxygen incorporation reactions. Our results provide additional insight into the interplay between the surface chemistry, microstructures, and electrochemical activity. They potentially provide important guidelines for engineering the electrolyte electrode interfaces of solid oxide fuel cells for higher electrochemical performance.

  1. Heterogeneous oxidation of saturated organic aerosols by hydroxyl radicals: uptake kinetics, condensed-phase products, and particle size change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, I. J.; Vlasenko, A.; Slowik, J. G.; Broekhuizen, K.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2007-08-01

    The kinetics and reaction mechanism for the heterogeneous oxidation of saturated organic aerosols by gas-phase OH radicals were investigated under NOx-free conditions. The reaction of 150 nm diameter Bis(2-ethylhexyl) sebacate (BES) particles with OH was studied as a proxy for chemical aging of atmospheric aerosols containing saturated organic matter. An aerosol reactor flow tube combined with an Aerodyne time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (ToF-AMS) and scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) was used to study this system. Hydroxyl radicals were produced by 254 nm photolysis of O3 in the presence of water vapour. The kinetics of the heterogeneous oxidation of the BES particles was studied by monitoring the loss of a mass fragment of BES with the ToF-AMS as a function of OH exposure. We measured an initial OH uptake coefficient of γ0=1.3 (±0.4), confirming that this reaction is highly efficient. The density of BES particles increased by up to 20% of the original BES particle density at the highest OH exposure studied, consistent with the particle becoming more oxidized. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis showed that the major particle-phase reaction products are multifunctional carbonyls and alcohols with higher molecular weights than the starting material. Volatilization of oxidation products accounted for a maximum of 17% decrease of the particle volume at the highest OH exposure studied. Tropospheric organic aerosols will become more oxidized from heterogeneous photochemical oxidation, which may affect not only their physical and chemical properties, but also their hygroscopicity and cloud nucleation activity.

  2. AMS+ALS: Kinetic and Product Studies of the Heterogeneous Oxidation of Organic Aerosol at the Advanced Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, J. H.; Wilson, K. R.; Kessler, S. H.; Browne, E. C.; Nah, T.; Smith, J.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    The atmospheric oxidation of condensed-phase organic species can have a major influence on the composition, properties, and impacts of organic aerosol (OA); however the rates and products of such "aging" reactions are poorly constrained. Here we describe a series of laboratory experiments aimed at better understanding one class of aging reactions, the heterogeneous oxidation of OA by gas-phase oxidants. Central to these experiments is the availability of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline of the Advanced Light Source at LBNL, which enables the implementation of VUV photoionization aerosol mass spectrometry. This technique allows for the real-time, speciated measurement of OA composition, yielding molecular information that is highly complementary to ensemble data from electron-impact ionization. OA composition is measured with both ionization schemes as a function of oxidant exposure within a flow reactor, providing detailed information on the kinetics and products of heterogeneous oxidation over multiple generations of oxidation. Specific topics investigated include the branching between functionalization and fragmentation of OA components, the formation of secondary organic aerosol from photolytically-generated radical species, and the heterogeneous aging of soot-associated organic species.

  3. Kinetics and dynamics of oxidation reactions involving an adsorbed CO species on bulk and supported platinum and copper-oxide. First year annual report, January 1, 1991--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Harold, M.P.

    1991-07-01

    The proposed research is an integrated experimental and modeling study of oxidation reactions involving CO as a key player -- be it a reactant, adsorbed intermediate, and/or partial oxidation product -- in the catalytic sequence and chemistry. The reaction systems of interest in the project include CO, formaldehyde, and methanol oxidation by O{sub 2} and CO oxidation by NO, on both Pt and copper oxide catalysts. These reactions are of importance in automobile exhaust catalysis. There is a paucity of rate data in the literature for these important environmental control reactions. The goal of this research is to better understand the catalytic chemistry and kinetics of oxidations reactions involving CO as an adsorbed intermediate. Successfully meeting this goal requires an integration of basic kinetic measurements, in situ catalyst surface monitoring, kinetic modeling, and nonlinear mathematical tools.

  4. Kinetics of the sulfur oxidation on palladium: A combined in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and density-functional study

    SciTech Connect

    Gotterbarm, Karin; Hoefert, Oliver; Lorenz, Michael P. A.; Streber, Regine; Papp, Christian; Luckas, Nicola; Vines, Francesc; Steinrueck, Hans-Peter; Goerling, Andreas

    2012-03-07

    We studied the reaction kinetics of sulfur oxidation on the Pd(100) surface by in situ high resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio density functional calculations. Isothermal oxidation experiments were performed between 400 and 500 K for small amounts ({approx}0.02 ML) of preadsorbed sulfur, with oxygen in large excess. The main stable reaction intermediate found on the surface is SO{sub 4}, with SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} being only present in minor amounts. Density-functional calculations depict a reaction energy profile, which explains the sequential formation of SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, and eventually SO{sub 4}, also highlighting that the in-plane formation of SO from S and O adatoms is the rate limiting step. From the experiments we determined the activation energy of the rate limiting step to be 85 {+-} 6 kJ mol{sup -1} by Arrhenius analysis, matching the calculated endothermicity of the SO formation.

  5. Kinetics of Several Oxygen-Containing Carbon-Centered Free Radical Reactions with Nitric Oxide.

    PubMed

    Rissanen, Matti P; Ihlenborg, Marvin; Pekkanen, Timo T; Timonen, Raimo S

    2015-07-16

    Kinetics of four carbon-centered, oxygen-containing free radical reactions with nitric oxide (NO) were investigated as a function of temperature at a few Torr pressure of helium, employing flow tube reactors coupled to a laser-photolysis/resonance-gas-discharge-lamp photoionization mass spectrometer (LP-RPIMS). Rate coefficients were directly determined from radical (R) decay signals under pseudo-first-order conditions ([R]0 ≪ [NO]). The obtained rate coefficients showed negative temperature dependences, typical for a radical-radical association process, and can be represented by the following parametrizations (all in units of cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)): k(CH2OH + NO) = (4.76 × 10(-21)) × (T/300 K)(15.92) × exp[50700/(RT)] (T = 266-363 K, p = 0.79-3.44 Torr); k(CH3CHOH + NO) = (1.27 × 10(-16)) × (T/300 K)(6.81) × exp[28700/(RT)] (T = 241-363 K, p = 0.52-3.43 Torr); k(CH3OCH2 + NO) = (3.58 ± 0.12) × 10(-12) × (T/300 K)(-3.17±0.14) (T = 221-363 K, p = 0.50-0.80 Torr); k(T)3 = 9.62 × 10(-11) × (T/300 K)(-5.99) × exp[-7100/(RT)] (T = 221-473 K, p = 1.41-2.95 Torr), with the uncertainties given as standard errors of the fits and the overall uncertainties estimated as ±20%. The rate of CH3OCH2 + NO reaction was measured in two density ranges due to its observed considerable pressure dependence, which was not found in the studied hydroxyalkyl reactions. In addition, the CH3CO + NO rate coefficient was determined at two temperatures resulting in k298K(CH3CO + NO) = (5.6 ± 2.8) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). No products were found during these experiments, reasons for which are briefly discussed. PMID:26000890

  6. Stabilization and oxidation kinetics of iron in hydrothermal plumes above the East Scotia Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkes, J.; Connelly, D.; Achterberg, E. P.

    2011-12-01

    Two hydrothermal vent fields were recently discovered along the East Scotia Ridge (a back arc basin spreading centre) in the Southern Ocean. These are the most southerly high-temperature vents discovered to date. End-member fluids and the associated hydrothermal plumes were sampled for total, dissolved and 'soluble' (<0.02μm) iron, manganese and copper. This study evaluates the speciation and size fractionation of iron in the plume samples, and considers the implications of iron stabilization in the Southern Ocean, and other ocean settings. Iron is an important micronutrient and in the formation of oxyhydroxide particles is involved in the scavenging of many elements including phosphorous and the rare earth elements. The study of the fate of hydrothermally sourced, unstable Fe(II) is therefore crucial to the understanding of the biogeochemical cycling of iron and other elements in the ocean. We present the first combined results of both size fractionation and natural ligand complexation of Fe(III) in the plume samples, using a combination of ICP-MS analysis and competitive ligand exchange cathodic stripping voltammetry (CLE-CSV) experiments. In doing so, we present a first evaluation of the relationship between ligand and colloid stabilization mechanisms in hydrothermal plume settings. Plume samples are discussed in relation to the end-member fluid chemistry of the vent fields, which have relatively low dissolved metal concentrations (~1 mM Fe) and very high H2S:Fe ratios (~8) compared with typical mid-ocean ridge settings. The bottom water oxygen concentration is 175 μM (c.f. North Atlantic: 250 μM, North Pacific: 104 μM), and background dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations are ~43 μM. Ambient seawater temperature at plume depth (~2200m) is close to 0°C. All of these features may play a part in the observed Fe(II) oxidation kinetics and Fe(III) stabilization and therefore the impact of hydrothermal Fe input on Southern Ocean biogeochemistry. The

  7. Investigation of the electrode kinetics in a solid oxide fuel cell and an oxygen sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, Rajesh

    This dissertation investigates the electrode kinetics in a solid oxide fuel cell and an oxygen sensor. The first chapter describes the basics of fuel cell and motivation behind the studies. The second chapter investigates the dependence of cathodic charge transfer reaction resistance (Rct), on three-phase boundary length (lTPB) at various temperatures and oxygen partial pressures ( pO2 ). Impedance spectra were obtained using three-electrode configuration on discs having cathodes with definite lTPB to investigate the La0.8Sr0.2MnO3 (LSM)-Y 0.16Zr0.84O2 (YSZ), platinum (Pt)-YSZ and La 0.8Sr0.2CoO3 (LSC)-Ce0.8Sm0.2 O2 (SDC) half cell reactions at temperatures between 650--800°C and pO2 between 10-3 to 1 atm. For LSM-YSZ and Pt-YSZ, 1/Rct varies linearly with lTPB. LSC-SDC system did not show any specific dependence between R ct and lTPB. The third chapter examines the use of an electrolyte supported cell with externally applied voltage to determine the single electrode overpotential and extending the parameters derived to that of an anode supported fuel cell having thin film electrolyte operating under a chemical potential gradient. Spatial distributions of the electrochemical potential of electrons (ϕ) and oxygen ions ( m˜O-2 ), and chemical potential of oxygen ( mO2 ) for these two cases were obtained. Under fuel cell operating conditions, ϕ, m˜O-2 and mO2 , decreases monotonically from higher value to lower value. For electrolyte supported cell under externally applied voltage mO2 does not vary monotonically; it reaches values above or below that of the boundary values, leading to development of internal electromotive forces (EMFs), which can in turn affect the activity of the interface. The fourth chapter describes design microfabrication and characterization of a series connected potentiometric oxygen sensor. A drawback of potentiometric sensors in general is that the output signal is low when the ratio of the partial pressures at the two electrodes is low

  8. The Kinetic Sunyaev–Zel’dovich Effect from Reionization: Simulated Full-sky Maps at Arcminute Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Marcelo A.

    2016-06-01

    The kinetic Sunyaev–Zel’dovich (kSZ) effect results from Thomson scattering by coherent flows in the reionized intergalactic medium. We present new results based on ray-tracing an 8 Gpc/h realization of reionization with resolution elements 2 Mpc/h (subtending ˜ 1‧ at z = 6) on a side to create a full-sky kSZ map. The realization includes, self-consistently, the effects of reionization on scales corresponding to multipoles 10≲ {\\ell }≲ 5000. We separate the kSZ map into Doppler ({\\boldsymbol{v}}), Ostriker–Vishniac (δ {\\boldsymbol{v}}), patchy (x{\\boldsymbol{v}}), and third-order (xδ {\\boldsymbol{v}}) components, and compute explicitly all the auto- and cross-correlations (e.g., < {\\boldsymbol{vv}}> , < δ {\\boldsymbol{v}}x{\\boldsymbol{v}}> , etc.) that contribute to the total power. We find a complex and nonmonotonic dependence on the duration of reionization at {\\ell }˜ 300 and evidence for a non-negligible (10%–30%) contribution from connected four-point correlations, < x{\\boldsymbol{v}}x{\\boldsymbol{v}}{> }c, usually neglected in analytical models. We also investigate the cross-correlation of linear matter and large-scale kSZ temperature fluctuations, focusing on (1) cross-power spectra with biased tracers of the matter density and (2) cold spots from infall onto large, rare H ii regions centered on peaks in the matter distribution at redshifts z\\gt 10 that are a generic non-Gaussian feature of patchy reionization. Finally, we show that the reionization history can be reconstructed at 5σ–10σ significance by correlating full-sky 21 cm maps stacked in bins with {{Δ }}ν = 10 {{MHz}} with existing cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature maps at {\\ell }\\lt 500, raising the prospects for probing reionization by correlating CMB and LSS measurements. The resulting kSZ maps have been made publicly available at www.cita.utoronto.ca/~malvarez/research/ksz-data/.

  9. The Kinetic Sunyaev–Zel’dovich Effect from Reionization: Simulated Full-sky Maps at Arcminute Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Marcelo A.

    2016-06-01

    The kinetic Sunyaev–Zel’dovich (kSZ) effect results from Thomson scattering by coherent flows in the reionized intergalactic medium. We present new results based on ray-tracing an 8 Gpc/h realization of reionization with resolution elements 2 Mpc/h (subtending ∼ 1‧ at z = 6) on a side to create a full-sky kSZ map. The realization includes, self-consistently, the effects of reionization on scales corresponding to multipoles 10≲ {\\ell }≲ 5000. We separate the kSZ map into Doppler ({\\boldsymbol{v}}), Ostriker–Vishniac (δ {\\boldsymbol{v}}), patchy (x{\\boldsymbol{v}}), and third-order (xδ {\\boldsymbol{v}}) components, and compute explicitly all the auto- and cross-correlations (e.g., < {\\boldsymbol{vv}}> , < δ {\\boldsymbol{v}}x{\\boldsymbol{v}}> , etc.) that contribute to the total power. We find a complex and nonmonotonic dependence on the duration of reionization at {\\ell }∼ 300 and evidence for a non-negligible (10%–30%) contribution from connected four-point correlations, < x{\\boldsymbol{v}}x{\\boldsymbol{v}}{> }c, usually neglected in analytical models. We also investigate the cross-correlation of linear matter and large-scale kSZ temperature fluctuations, focusing on (1) cross-power spectra with biased tracers of the matter density and (2) cold spots from infall onto large, rare H ii regions centered on peaks in the matter distribution at redshifts z\\gt 10 that are a generic non-Gaussian feature of patchy reionization. Finally, we show that the reionization history can be reconstructed at 5σ–10σ significance by correlating full-sky 21 cm maps stacked in bins with {{Δ }}ν = 10 {{MHz}} with existing cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature maps at {\\ell }\\lt 500, raising the prospects for probing reionization by correlating CMB and LSS measurements. The resulting kSZ maps have been made publicly available at www.cita.utoronto.ca/~malvarez/research/ksz-data/.

  10. Investigation of oxidation and tautomerization of a recently synthesized Schiff base in micellar media using multivariate curve resolution alternative least squares and rank annihilation factor analysis methods.

    PubMed

    Afkhami, Abbas; Khajavi, Farzad; Khanmohammadi, Hamid

    2009-08-11

    The oxidation of the recently synthesized Schiff base 3,6-bis((2-aminoethyl-5-Br-salicyliden)thio)pyridazine (PABST) with hydrogen peroxide was investigated using spectrophotometric studies. The reaction rate order and observed rate constant of the oxidation reaction was obtained in the mixture of N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF):water (30:70, v/v) at pH 10 using multivariate cure resolution alternative least squares (MCR-ALS) method and rank annihilation factor analysis (RAFA). The effective parameters on the oxidation rate constant such as percents of DMF, the effect of transition metals like Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Mn(2+) and Hg(2+) and the presence of surfactants were investigated. The keto-enol equilibria in DMF:water (30:70, v/v) solution at pH 7.6 was also investigated in the presence of surfactants. At concentrations above critical micelle concentration (cmc) of cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), the keto form was the predominant species, while at concentrations above cmc of anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), the enol form was the predominant species. The kinetic reaction order and the rate constant of tautomerization in micellar medium were obtained using MCR-ALS and RAFA. The results obtained by both the methods were in a good agreement with each other. Also the effect of different volume percents of DMF on the rate constant of tautomerization was investigated. The neutral surfactant (Triton X-100) had no effect on tautomerization equilibrium. PMID:19591704

  11. [Kinetics of Ca2+, NADH, and oxidized flavoproteins in the frog olfactory lining under the effect of odorants].

    PubMed

    Rudenko, Ia N; Bigdaĭ, E V; Samoĭlov, V O

    2007-01-01

    The kinetics of fluorescence of Ca(2+) - chlortertacyclin-cell membrane complex as well as of NADH and oxidized flavoproteins in receptor cells of the frog olfactory lining under the effect of odorants has been studied. Changes in the fluorescence of the olfactory lining upon stimulation by cineole and vanillin occurred more rapidly than under the effect of camphor and amyl alcohol. Differences in the kinetics of reactions of NADH and the Ca(2+)-CTC-CM complex to different odorants are apparently due to heterogeneity of molecular mechanisms associated with the involvement of different intracellular signal systems in the transduction of these odorants in the olfactory lining. In contrast to them, ammonia and beta3-mercaptoethanol penetrate into olfactory cells and inhibit the mitochondrial respiratory chain without the participation of second messengers. At the same time, the motor activity of olfactory cilia is depressed. PMID:17348402

  12. Comparisons of kinetics, thermodynamics and regeneration of tetramethylammonium hydroxide adsorption in aqueous solution with graphene oxide, zeolite and activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shenteng; Lu, Chungsying; Lin, Kun-Yi Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO), sodium Y-type zeolite (NaY) and granular activated carbon (GAC) are selected as adsorbents to study their kinetics, thermodynamics and regeneration of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) adsorption from water. The adsorption kinetics follows the pseudo-second-order rate law while the adsorption thermodynamics shows an exothermic reaction with GO and GAC but displays an endothermic reaction with NaY. The adsorbed TMAH can be readily desorbed from the surface of GO and NaY by 0.05 M NaCl solution. A comparative study on the cyclic TMAH adsorption with GO, NaY and GAC is also conducted and the results reveal that GO exhibits the greatest TMAH adsorption capacity as well as superior reversibility of TMAH adsorption over 10 cycles of adsorption and desorption process. These features indicate that GO is a promising and efficient adsorbent for TMAH removal in wastewater treatment.

  13. Kinetic and stoichiometric characterization of anoxic sulfide oxidation by SO-NR mixed cultures from anoxic biotrickling filters.

    PubMed

    Mora, Mabel; Fernández, Maikel; Gómez, José Manuel; Cantero, Domingo; Lafuente, Javier; Gamisans, Xavier; Gabriel, David

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring the biological activity in biotrickling filters is difficult since it implies estimating biomass concentration and its growth yield, which can hardly be measured in immobilized biomass systems. In this study, the characterization of a sulfide-oxidizing nitrate-reducing biomass obtained from an anoxic biotrickling filter was performed through the application of respirometric and titrimetric techniques. Previously, the biomass was maintained in a continuous stirred tank reactor under steady-state conditions resulting in a growth yield of 0.328 ± 0.045 g VSS/g S. To properly assess biological activity in respirometric tests, abiotic assays were conducted to characterize the stripping of CO2 and sulfide. The global mass transfer coefficient for both processes was estimated. Subsequently, different respirometric tests were performed: (1) to solve the stoichiometry related to the autotrophic denitrification of sulfide using either nitrate or nitrite as electron acceptors, (2) to evaluate the inhibition caused by nitrite and sulfide on sulfide oxidation, and (3) to propose, calibrate, and validate a kinetic model considering both electron acceptors in the overall anoxic biodesulfurization process. The kinetic model considered a Haldane-type equation to describe sulfide and nitrite inhibitions, a non-competitive inhibition to reflect the effect of sulfide on the elemental sulfur oxidation besides single-step denitrification since no nitrite was produced during the biological assays. PMID:24705508

  14. Mechanism and kinetics of low-temperature oxidation of a biodiesel surrogate: methyl propanoate radicals with oxygen molecule.

    PubMed

    Le, Xuan T; Mai, Tam V T; Ratkiewicz, Artur; Huynh, Lam K

    2015-04-23

    This paper presents a computational study on the low-temperature mechanism and kinetics of the reaction between molecular oxygen and alkyl radicals of methyl propanoate (MP), which plays an important role in low-temperature oxidation and/or autoignition processes of the title fuel. Their multiple reaction pathways either accelerate the oxidation process via chain branching or inhibit it by forming relatively stable products. The potential energy surfaces of the reactions between three primary MP radicals and molecular oxygen, namely, C(•)H2CH2COOCH3 + O2, CH3C(•)HCOOCH3 + O2, and CH3CH2COOC(•)H2 + O2, were constructed using the accurate composite CBS-QB3 method. Thermodynamic properties of all species as well as high-pressure rate constants of all reaction channels were derived with explicit corrections for tunneling and hindered internal rotations. Our calculation results are in good agreement with a limited number of scattered data in the literature. Furthermore, pressure- and temperature-dependent rate constants for all reaction channels on the multiwell-multichannel potential energy surfaces were computed with the quantum Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel (QRRK) and the modified strong collision (MSC) theories. This procedure resulted in a thermodynamically consistent detailed kinetic submechanism for low-temperature oxidation governed by the title process. A simplified mechanism, which consists of important reactions, is also suggested for low-temperature combustion at engine-like conditions. PMID:25822662

  15. Electron-beam-enhanced oxidation processes in II-VI compound semiconductors observed by high-resolution electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Thangaraj, N.; Wessels, B.W.

    1990-02-01

    Enhanced oxidation of ZnS and ZnSe semiconductor surfaces has been observed in situ during electron irradiation in a high-resolution electron microscope. The phase present at the surface region has been identified as ZnO by optical diffractogram and selected area electron diffraction techniques. For ZnS oxidation, both hexagonal ZnO having a random orientation and cubic ZnO in perfect epitaxial relationship with the bulk ZnS were observed. Enhanced oxidation of ZnSe to ZnO has also been observed under electron beam irradiation. However, only the hexagonal form was observed. The oxidation rates for both ZnS and ZnSe depended on electron flux but was independent of orientation. A model in which the oxidation process is limited by diffusion through the oxide film is proposed. By electron irradiation the diffusion rate is enhanced presumably by a nonthermal process.

  16. Study of Iron oxide nanoparticles using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution.

    PubMed

    Oshtrakh, M I; Ushakov, M V; Šepelák, V; Semionkin, V A; Morais, P C

    2016-01-01

    Iron oxide (magnetite and maghemite) nanoparticles developed for magnetic fluids were studied using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution at 295 and 90K. The recorded Mössbauer spectra have demonstrated that usual physical models based on octahedral and tetrahedral sites were not suitable for fitting. Alternatively, the Mössbauer spectra were nicely fitted using a large number of magnetic sextets. The obtained results showed that the Mössbauer spectra and the assessed parameters were different for nanoparticles as-prepared and dispersed in the dispersing fluid at 295K. We claim that this finding is mainly due to the interaction of polar molecules with Iron cations at nanoparticle's surface or due to the surface coating using carboxylic-terminated molecules. It is assumed that the large number of spectral components may be related to complexity of the nanoparticle's characteristics and deviations from stoichiometry, including in the latter the influence of the oxidation of magnetite towards maghemite. PMID:26105556

  17. Implementation of steady state approximation for modelling of reaction kinetic of UV catalysed hydrogen peroxide oxidation of starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumoro, Andri Cahyo; Retnowati, Diah Susetyo; Ratnawati, Budiyati, Catarina Sri

    2015-12-01

    With regard to its low viscosity, high stability, clarity, film forming and binding properties, oxidised starch has been widely used in various applications specifically in the food, paper, textile, laundry finishing and binding materials industries. A number of methods have been used to produce oxidised starch through reactions with various oxidizing agents, such as hydrogen peroxide, air oxygen, ozone, bromine, chromic acid, permanganate, nitrogen dioxide and hypochlorite. Unfortunately, most of previous works reported in the literatures were focused on the study of reaction mechanism and physicochemical properties characterization of the oxidised starches produced without investigation of the reaction kinetics of the oxidation process. This work aimed to develop a simple kinetic model for UV catalysed hydrogen peroxide oxidation of starch through implementation of steady state approximation for the radical reaction rates. The model was then verified using experimental data available in the literature. The model verification revealed that the proposed model shows its good agreement with the experimental data as indicated by an average absolute relative error of only 2.45%. The model also confirmed that carboxyl groups are oxidised further by hydroxyl radical. The carbonyl production rate was found to follow first order reaction with respect to carbonyl concentration. Similarly, carboxyl production rate also followed first order reaction with respect to carbonyl concentration. The apparent reaction rate constant for carbonyl formation and oxidation were 6.24 × 104 s-1 and 1.01 × 104 M-1.s-1, respectively. While apparent reaction rate constant for carboxyl oxidation was 4.86 × 104 M-1.s-1.

  18. Kinetic dissolution of carbonates and Mn oxides in acidic water: Measurement of in situ field rates and reactive transport modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, J.G.; Glynn, P.D.

    2003-01-01

    The kinetics of carbonate and Mn oxide dissolution under acidic conditions were examined through the in situ exposure of pure phase samples to acidic ground water in Pinal Creek Basin, Arizona. The average long-term calculated in situ dissolution rates for calcite and dolomite were 1.65??10-7 and 3.64??10-10 mmol/(cm2 s), respectively, which were about 3 orders of magnitude slower than rates derived in laboratory experiments by other investigators. Application of both in situ and lab-derived calcite and dolomite dissolution rates to equilibrium reactive transport simulations of a column experiment did not improve the fit to measured outflow chemistry: at the spatial and temporal scales of the column experiment, the use of an equilibrium model adequately simulated carbonate dissolution in the column. Pyrolusite (MnO2) exposed to acidic ground water for 595 days increased slightly in weight despite thermodynamic conditions that favored dissolution. This result might be related to a recent finding by another investigator that the reductive dissolution of pyrolusite is accompanied by the precipitation of a mixed Mn-Fe oxide species. In PHREEQC reactive transport simulations, the incorporation of Mn kinetics improved the fit between observed and simulated behavior at the column and field scales, although the column-fitted rate for Mn-oxide dissolution was about 4 orders of magnitude greater than the field-fitted rate. Remaining differences between observed and simulated contaminant transport trends at the Pinal Creek site were likely related to factors other than the Mn oxide dissolution rate, such as the concentration of Fe oxide surface sites available for adsorption, the effects of competition among dissolved species for available surface sites, or reactions not included in the model.

  19. Electron energy-loss near-edge structures of 3d transition metal oxides recorded at high-energy resolution.

    PubMed

    Mitterbauer, C; Kothleitner, G; Grogger, W; Zandbergen, H; Freitag, B; Tiemeijer, P; Hofer, F

    2003-09-01

    Near-edge fine structures of the metal L(2,3) and O K-edges in transition metal-oxides have been studied with a transmission electron microscope equipped with a monochromator and a high-resolution imaging filter. This system enables the recording of EELS spectra with an energy resolution of 0.1eV thus providing new near-edge fine structure details which could not be observed previously by EELS in conventional TEM instruments. EELS-spectra from well-defined oxides like titanium oxide (TiO(2)), vanadium oxide (V(2)O(5)), chromium oxide (Cr(2)O(3)), iron oxide (Fe(2)O(3)), cobalt oxide (CoO) and nickel oxide (NiO) have been measured with the new system. These spectra are compared with EELS data obtained from a conventional microscope and the main spectral features are interpreted. Additionally, the use of monochromised TEMs is discussed in view of the natural line widths of K and L(2,3) edges. PMID:12871809

  20. Kinetic features of the oxide formation on {111} polar planes upon anode treatment of n-GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, A. M.; Yavtushenko, I. O.; Makhmud-Akhunov, M. Yu.

    2016-04-01

    The mechanism and kinetics of anode destruction of {111} polar planes of n-GaAs and morphological features of forming oxide films in the potentiostatic mode of polarization in weakly acid solutions of electrolytes have been studied. It has been found that anode polarization of the gallium plane (111) Ga provides the formation of a porous structure of both the single-crystal matrix and oxide film, which has a planar topology. In this case, the pore density is always commensurable with the surface dope concentration. In contrast to the gallium plane, the anode polarization of the arsenic plane overline {( {111} )} As provides the tangential mechanism of destruction of the semiconductor matrix and the island-type morphology of the oxide. Equal crystallographic orientation of islands is determined by the directive action of the family of oxidized planes { {1overline {11} } } GaAs. However, regardless of the crystallographic orientation of the polar plane, the forming oxide is represented by polycrystalline As2O3 and amorphous Ga2O3.

  1. Unravelling the dependence of hydrogen oxidation kinetics on the size of Pt nanoparticles by in operando nanoplasmonic temperature sensing.

    PubMed

    Wettergren, Kristina; Hellman, Anders; Cavalca, Filippo; Zhdanov, Vladimir P; Langhammer, Christoph

    2015-01-14

    We use a noninvasive nanoscale optical-temperature measurement method based on localized surface plasmon resonance to investigate the particle size-dependence of the hydrogen oxidation reaction kinetics on model supported Pt nanocatalysts at atmospheric pressure in operando. With decreasing average nanoparticle size from 11 down to 3 nm, the apparent reaction activation energy is found to increase from 0.5 up to 0.8 eV. This effect is attributed to an increase of the fraction of (100)-facet and edge and corner sites and their increasingly important role in the reaction with decreasing particle size. PMID:25479190

  2. Kinetic and spectroscopic study of catalysts for water-gas shift and nitrogen oxide removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kispersky, Vincent Frederick

    adsorbed CO2 proved less competitive for NOx sorption sites, explaining the weak reduction of NSC by CO2 on low Ba loadings. Contrary to CO2, H2O exhibited both beneficial and inhibitory effects on the NSC. Over long periods of time, and at high Ba loadings, the addition of H2O in the feed increased the NSC, attributed to enhanced O2 spillover on the hydroxylated Ba surface allowing greater access to available NOx storage sites. When the Ba loading was reduced, the interaction sphere of Pt particles with the Ba storage component required for O2 to spillover to assist in NOx storage was reduced. Thus, despite the enhanced spillover capacity of oxygen on the hydroxylated storage component other NSC decreasing effects of H2O addition, such as Ba agglomeration, became more dominant and reduced the NSC. Recent developments in selective catalytic reduction have shown Cu and Fe/chabazite (CHA) based zeolites to be particularly well suited to sustaining high catalytic rates without degradation in the harsh environment of diesel engine exhaust. Little has been published about these catalysts as the academic community has just recently learned about the materials and their commercial implementation. Using operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy, combined with first-principles thermodynamics simulations and kinetic analysis, we have studied the nature of the Cu active site on Cu/SSZ-13, Cu/SAPO-34 and Cu/ZSM-5. Examining the catalysts under operando standard SCR conditions (300 ppm NO, 300 ppm NH3, 5% O2, 5% H2O and 5% CO2) showed the catalyst to be in a mixed Cu(I)-Cu(II) oxidation state. Neither the amount of Cu(I) nor Cu(II) individually correlated with the different rates measured on the various zeolite catalysts, and so we proposed that the SCR reaction progresses via a redox mechanism requiring both Cu(I) and Cu(II). First principles thermodynamic calculations found that the redox couple of Cu(I)H2O and Cu(II)(OH)2 were the most thermodynamically stable species of any of the Ox

  3. Surface Area, and Oxidation Effects on Nitridation Kinetics of Silicon Powder Compacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Palczer, A. R.

    1998-01-01

    Commercially available silicon powders were wet-attrition-milled from 2 to 48 hr to achieve surface areas (SA's) ranging from 1.3 to 70 sq m/g. The surface area effects on the nitridation kinetics of silicon powder compacts were determined at 1250 or 1350 C for 4 hr. In addition, the influence of nitridation environment, and preoxidation on nitridation kinetics of a silicon powder of high surface area (approximately equals 63 sq m/g) was investigated. As the surface area increased, so did the percentage nitridation after 4 hr in N2 at 1250 or 1350 C. Silicon powders of high surface area (greater than 40 sq m/g) can be nitrided to greater than 70% at 1250 C in 4 hr. The nitridation kinetics of the high-surface-area powder compacts were significantly delayed by preoxidation treatment. Conversely, the nitridation environment had no significant influence on the nitridation kinetics of the same powder. Impurities present in the starting powder, and those accumulated during attrition milling, appeared to react with the silica layer on the surface of silicon particles to form a molten silicate layer, which provided a path for rapid diffusion of nitrogen and enhanced the nitridation kinetics of high surface area silicon powder.

  4. Structure sensitivity in oxide catalysis: First-principles kinetic Monte Carlo simulations for CO oxidation at RuO2(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tongyu; Reuter, Karsten

    2015-11-24

    We present a density-functional theory based kinetic Monte Carlo study of CO oxidation at the (111) facet of RuO2. We compare the detailed insight into elementary processes, steady-state surface coverages, and catalytic activity to equivalent published simulation data for the frequently studied RuO2(110) facet. Qualitative differences are identified in virtually every aspect ranging from binding energetics over lateral interactions to the interplay of elementary processes at the different active sites. Nevertheless, particularly at technologically relevant elevated temperatures, near-ambient pressures and near-stoichiometric feeds both facets exhibit almost identical catalytic activity. As a result, these findings challenge the traditional definition of structure sensitivity based on macroscopically observable turnover frequencies and prompt scrutiny of the applicability of structure sensitivity classifications developed for metals to oxide catalysis.

  5. Structure sensitivity in oxide catalysis: First-principles kinetic Monte Carlo simulations for CO oxidation at RuO2(111)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Tongyu; Reuter, Karsten

    2015-11-24

    We present a density-functional theory based kinetic Monte Carlo study of CO oxidation at the (111) facet of RuO2. We compare the detailed insight into elementary processes, steady-state surface coverages, and catalytic activity to equivalent published simulation data for the frequently studied RuO2(110) facet. Qualitative differences are identified in virtually every aspect ranging from binding energetics over lateral interactions to the interplay of elementary processes at the different active sites. Nevertheless, particularly at technologically relevant elevated temperatures, near-ambient pressures and near-stoichiometric feeds both facets exhibit almost identical catalytic activity. As a result, these findings challenge the traditional definition of structuremore » sensitivity based on macroscopically observable turnover frequencies and prompt scrutiny of the applicability of structure sensitivity classifications developed for metals to oxide catalysis.« less

  6. Structure sensitivity in oxide catalysis: First-principles kinetic Monte Carlo simulations for CO oxidation at RuO{sub 2}(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tongyu; Reuter, Karsten

    2015-11-28

    We present a density-functional theory based kinetic Monte Carlo study of CO oxidation at the (111) facet of RuO{sub 2}. We compare the detailed insight into elementary processes, steady-state surface coverages, and catalytic activity to equivalent published simulation data for the frequently studied RuO{sub 2}(110) facet. Qualitative differences are identified in virtually every aspect ranging from binding energetics over lateral interactions to the interplay of elementary processes at the different active sites. Nevertheless, particularly at technologically relevant elevated temperatures, near-ambient pressures and near-stoichiometric feeds both facets exhibit almost identical catalytic activity. These findings challenge the traditional definition of structure sensitivity based on macroscopically observable turnover frequencies and prompt scrutiny of the applicability of structure sensitivity classifications developed for metals to oxide catalysis.

  7. Kinetic and spectroscopic study of catalysts for water-gas shift and nitrogen oxide removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kispersky, Vincent Frederick

    adsorbed CO2 proved less competitive for NOx sorption sites, explaining the weak reduction of NSC by CO2 on low Ba loadings. Contrary to CO2, H2O exhibited both beneficial and inhibitory effects on the NSC. Over long periods of time, and at high Ba loadings, the addition of H2O in the feed increased the NSC, attributed to enhanced O2 spillover on the hydroxylated Ba surface allowing greater access to available NOx storage sites. When the Ba loading was reduced, the interaction sphere of Pt particles with the Ba storage component required for O2 to spillover to assist in NOx storage was reduced. Thus, despite the enhanced spillover capacity of oxygen on the hydroxylated storage component other NSC decreasing effects of H2O addition, such as Ba agglomeration, became more dominant and reduced the NSC. Recent developments in selective catalytic reduction have shown Cu and Fe/chabazite (CHA) based zeolites to be particularly well suited to sustaining high catalytic rates without degradation in the harsh environment of diesel engine exhaust. Little has been published about these catalysts as the academic community has just recently learned about the materials and their commercial implementation. Using operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy, combined with first-principles thermodynamics simulations and kinetic analysis, we have studied the nature of the Cu active site on Cu/SSZ-13, Cu/SAPO-34 and Cu/ZSM-5. Examining the catalysts under operando standard SCR conditions (300 ppm NO, 300 ppm NH3, 5% O2, 5% H2O and 5% CO2) showed the catalyst to be in a mixed Cu(I)-Cu(II) oxidation state. Neither the amount of Cu(I) nor Cu(II) individually correlated with the different rates measured on the various zeolite catalysts, and so we proposed that the SCR reaction progresses via a redox mechanism requiring both Cu(I) and Cu(II). First principles thermodynamic calculations found that the redox couple of Cu(I)H2O and Cu(II)(OH)2 were the most thermodynamically stable species of any of the Ox

  8. Use of Mg-Al oxide for boron removal from an aqueous solution in rotation: Kinetics and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Kameda, Tomohito; Oba, Jumpei; Yoshioka, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Mg-Al oxide prepared through the thermal treatment of [Formula: see text] intercalated Mg-Al layered double hydroxides (CO3·Mg-Al LDH) was found to remove boron (B) from an aqueous solution. B was removed by the rehydration of Mg-Al oxide accompanied by combination with [Formula: see text] . When using twice the stoichiometric quantity of Mg-Al oxide for Mg/Al = 4, the residual concentration of B dropped from 100 to 2.8 mg/L in 480 min, and for Mg/Al = 2, it decreased from 100 to 2.5 mg/L in 240 min. In both cases, the residual concentration of B was highlighted to be lower than the current Japanese effluent standards (10 mg/L). The removal of B can be explained by way of pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics. The apparent activation energy of 63.5 kJ mol(-1), calculated from the Arrhenius plot indicating that a chemical reaction dominates the removal of B by Mg-Al oxide (Mg/Al = 2). The adsorption of B acts upon a Langmuir-type phenomena. The maximum adsorption (qm) and equilibrium adsorption constants (KL) were 7.4 mmol g(-1) and 1.9 × 10(3), respectively, for Mg-Al oxide (Mg/Al = 2). [Formula: see text] in B(OH)4·Mg-Al LDH produced by the removal of B was observed to undergo anion exchange with [Formula: see text] in solution. Following regeneration, the Mg-Al oxide maintained the ability to remove B from an aqueous solution. This study has clarified the possibility of recycling Mg-Al oxide for B removal. PMID:26454072

  9. Kinetic studies of natural uranium minerals for the long-term evolution of spent nuclear fuel under oxidizing conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Casas, I.; Cera, E.; Bruno, J.

    1993-12-31

    The time scale of spent fuel dissolution studies is of the order of magnitude of 2 to 10 years, while the performance of a spent fuel repository should be assessed for much longer times (10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} years). These time scales can be bridged using appropriate natural analogues. Among other important information, the study of natural systems can give insight of which can be the oxidative alteration of spent fuel in granite environments. However, in studying such systems, thermodynamic and kinetic data of relevant natural solid phases are needed. In this work we present preliminary results of dissolution experiments carried out under oxidizing conditions with selected and well characterized natural samples of the alteration chain of uraninite (i.e., uraninite, schoepite, uranophane). The experiments have been performed using a synthetic granitic groundwater as a leachant, in contact with air and at 25{degrees}C.

  10. Absorption of calcium ions on oxidized graphene sheets and study its dynamic behavior by kinetic and isothermal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathy, Mahmoud; Abdel Moghny, Th.; Mousa, Mahmoud Ahmed; El-Bellihi, Abdel-Hameed A.-A.; Awadallah, Ahmed E.

    2016-07-01

    Sorption of calcium ion from the hard underground water using novel oxidized graphene (GO) sheets was studied in this paper. Physicochemical properties and microstructure of graphene sheets were investigated using Raman spectrometer, thermogravimetry analyzer, transmission electron microscope, scanning electron microscope. The kinetics adsorption of calcium on graphene oxide sheets was examined using Lagergren first and second orders. The results show that the Lagergren second-order was the best-fit model that suggests the conception process of calcium ion adsorption on the Go sheets. For isothermal studies, the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were used at temperatures ranging between 283 and 313 K. Thermodynamic parameters resolved at 283, 298 and 313 K indicating that the GO adsorption was exothermic spontaneous process. Finally, the graphene sheets show high partiality toward calcium particles and it will be useful in softening and treatment of hard water.

  11. Effect of heat treatments on oxidation kinetics in AZ91 and AM60 magnesium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Barrena, M.I. Gomez de Salazar, J.M.; Matesanz, L.; Soria, A.

    2011-10-15

    The effect of heat treatments on a non protective atmosphere (air) on the morphology and composition of the oxide in AM60 and AZ91 alloys has been evaluated. With the aim of evaluating the loss of alloying elements during heat treatment, a study of these alloys has been carried out using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). In order to determine the nature of the oxides the reaction products generated were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Results show that the nature and morphology of the oxides generated are related to the temperature and the time of the heating conditions applied. - Highlights: {yields} The effect of heat treatments on the oxide growth in Mg-Al alloys has been evaluated. {yields} The nature and morphology of the oxides have been characterized. {yields} These oxides are associated to the time and the temperature conditions.

  12. A high temperature and atmospheric pressure experimental and detailed chemical kinetic modelling study of 2-methyl furan oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Somers, Kieran P.; Simmie, John M.; Gillespie, Fiona; Burke, Ultan; Connolly, Jessica; Metcalfe, Wayne K.; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Dirrenberger, Patricia; Herbinet, Olivier; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Curran, Henry J.

    2013-01-01

    An experimental ignition delay time study for the promising biofuel 2-methyl furan (2MF) was performed at equivalence ratios of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 for mixtures of 1% fuel in argon in the temperature range 1200–1800 K at atmospheric pressure. Laminar burning velocities were determined using the heat-flux method for mixtures of 2MF in air at equivalence ratios of 0.55–1.65, initial temperatures of 298–398 K and atmospheric pressure. A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism consisting of 2059 reactions and 391 species has been constructed to describe the oxidation of 2MF and is used to simulate experiment. Accurate reproduction of the experimental data has been obtained over all conditions with the developed mechanism. Rate of production and sensitivity analyses have been carried out to identify important consumption pathways of the fuel and key kinetic parameters under these conditions. The reactions of hydrogen atom with the fuel are highlighted as important under all experimental conditions studied, with abstraction by the hydrogen atom promoting reactivity and hydrogen atom addition to the furan ring inhibiting reactivity. This work, to the authors knowledge, is the first to combine theoretical and experimental work to describe the oxidation of any of the alkylated furans. The mechanism developed herein to describe 2MF combustion should also function as a sub-mechanism to describe the oxidation of 2,5-dimethyl furan whilst also providing key insights into the oxidation of this similar biofuel candidate. PMID:23814505

  13. Thermodynamic and kinetic controls on cotransport of Pantoea agglomerans cells and Zn through clean and iron oxide coated sand columns.

    PubMed

    Kapetas, Leon; Ngwenya, Bryne T; Macdonald, Alan M; Elphick, Stephen C

    2012-12-18

    Recent observations that subsurface bacteria quickly adsorb metal contaminants raise concerns that they may enhance metal transport, given the high mobility of bacteria themselves. However, metal adsorption to bacteria is also reversible, suggesting that mobility within porous medium will depend on the interplay between adsorption-desorption kinetics and thermodynamic driving forces for adsorption. Till now there has been no systematic investigation of these important interactions. This study investigates the thermodynamic and kinetic controls of cotransport of Pantoea agglomerans cells and Zn in quartz and iron-oxide coated sand (IOCS) packed columns. Batch kinetic studies show that significant Zn sorption on IOCS takes place within two hours. Adsorption onto P. agglomerans surfaces reaches equilibrium within 30 min. Experiments in flow through quartz sand systems demonstrate that bacteria have negligible effect on zinc mobility, regardless of ionic strength and pH conditions. Zinc transport exhibits significant retardation in IOCS columns at high pH in the absence of cells. Yet, when mobile bacteria (non attached) are passed through simultaneously with zinc, no facilitated transport is observed. Adsorption onto cells becomes significant and plays a role in mobile metal speciation only once the IOCS is saturated with zinc. This suggests that IOCS exhibits stronger affinity for Zn than cell surfaces. However, when bacteria and Zn are preassociated on entering the column, zinc transport is initially facilitated. Subsequently, zinc partly desorbs from the cells and redistributes onto the IOCS as a result of the higher thermodynamic affinity for IOCS. PMID:23153272

  14. Steady-state kinetics with nitric oxide reductase (NOR): new considerations on substrate inhibition profile and catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Américo G; Cordas, Cristina M; Moura, José J G; Moura, Isabel

    2014-03-01

    Nitric oxide reductase (NOR) from denitrifying bacteria is an integral membrane protein that catalyses the two electron reduction of NO to N2O, as part of the denitrification process, being responsible for an exclusive reaction, the NN bond formation, the key step of this metabolic pathway. Additionally, this class of enzymes also presents residual oxidoreductase activity, reducing O2 to H2O in a four electron/proton reaction. In this work we report, for the first time, steady-state kinetics with the Pseudomonas nautica NOR, either in the presence of its physiological electron donor (cyt. c552) or immobilised on a graphite electrode surface, in the presence of its known substrates, namely NO or O2. The obtained results show that the enzyme has high affinity for its natural substrate, NO, and different kinetic profiles according to the electron donor used. The kinetic data, as shown by the pH dependence, is modelled by ionisable amino acid residues nearby the di-nuclear catalytic site. The catalytic mechanism is revised and a mononitrosyl-non-heme Fe complex (FeB(II)-NO) species is favoured as the first catalytic intermediate involved on the NO reduction. PMID:24412239

  15. Origin of two time-scale regimes in potentiometric titration of metal oxides. A replica kinetic Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Zarzycki, Piotr P.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2009-06-16

    Replica Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations were used to study the characteristic time scales of potentiometric titration of the metal oxides and (oxy)hydroxides. The effect of surface heterogeneity and surface transformation on the titration kinetics were also examined. Two characteristic relaxation times are often observed experimentally, with the trailing slower part attributed to surface non-uniformity, porosity, polymerization, amorphization, and other dynamic surface processes induced by unbalanced surface charge. However, our simulations show that these two characteristic relaxation times are intrinsic to the proton binding reaction for energetically homogeneous surfaces, and therefore surface heterogeneity or transformation do not necessarily need to be invoked. However, all such second-order surface processes are found to intensify the separation and distinction of the two kinetic regimes. The effect of surface energetic-topographic non-uniformity, as well dynamic surface transformation, interface roughening/smoothing were described in a statistical fashion. Furthermore, our simulations show that a shift in the point-of-zero charge is expected from increased titration speed and the pH-dependence of the titration measurement error is in excellent agreement with experimental studies.

  16. Effect of oxidizing environment on the strength and oxidation kinetics of HTGR graphites. Part I. Reactivity and strength loss of H451, PGX and IG-11 graphites

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, M.; Growcock, F.B.

    1981-09-01

    The effects of oxidizing atmosphere and temperature on the reactivities and strengths of PGX, H451, and IG-11 were examined. Preliminary measurements of the oxidation kinetics of these graphites in H/sub 2/O-, CO/sub 2/- and O/sub 2/-containing atmospheres indicated that the reactivities of H451 graphite toward O/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/O are quite similar to those of IG-11 graphite. The apparent activation energy for oxidation of these in O/sub 2/ were estimated to be approx. 175 kJ/mol while that in H/sub 2/O is probably approx. 200 kJ/mol. The apparent activation energy of IG-11 graphite oxidized in CO/sub 2/ is 255 +- 18 kJ/mol. PGX graphite was found to be quite variable in its reactivity toward H/sub 2/O. A linear dependence with (Fe) was determined, but other intrinsic properties were found to affect its absolute reactivity by as much as a factor of X50.

  17. Kinetic and spectroscopic analysis of the inactivating effects of nitric oxide on the individual components of Azotobacter vinelandii nitrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hyman, M.R.; Arp, D.J. ); Seefeldt, L.C.; Morgan, T.V.; Mortenson, L.E. )

    1992-03-24

    The effect of nitric oxide (NO) on the individual components of Azotobacter vinelandii nitrogenase have been examined by kinetic and spectroscopic methods. Incubation of the Fe protein (Av2) for 1 h with stoichiometries of 4- and 8-fold molar excesses of NO to Av2 dimer resulted in a complete loss of activity of Av2 in C{sub 2}H{sub 2}-reduction assays. The kinetics of inactivation indicated that the minimum stoichiometry of NO to Av2 required to fully inactive Av2 lies between 1 and 2. The rate of inactivation of Av2 activity by NO was stimulated up to 2-fold by the presence of MgATP and MgADP but was unaffected by the presence of sodium dithionite. Unexpectedly, complete inactivation of Av2 by low ratios of NO to Av2 also resulted in a complete loss of its ability to bind MgATP and MgADP. UV-visible spectroscopy indicate that the effect of NO on Av2 involves oxidation of the (4Re-4S) center. EPR spectroscopy revealed that the loss of activity during inactivation of Av2 by NO correlated with the loss of the S = 1/2 and S = 3/2 signals. A correlation between UV-visible and EPR spectra features and the extent of NO inactivation has been established. The effects of NO on both nitrogenase components are interpreted in terms of the known reactivity of NO with Fe-S centers.

  18. Kinetics and mechanism of the heterogeneous catalyzed oxidative decolorization of Acid-Blue 92 using bimetallic metal-organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-sharkawy, Rehab G.; El-din, Ahmed S. Badr; Etaiw, Safaa El-din H.

    2011-09-01

    The kinetics study of the oxidative decolorization of Acid-Blue 92 has been investigated by hydrogen peroxide catalyzed with bimetallic metal-organic frameworks. The used metal-organic frameworks (MOF) are [Ph 3SnCu(CN) 2·L] where L = pyrazine (pyz) 1, methylpyrazine (mepyz) 2, 4,4'-bipyridine (bpy) 3, trans-1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethene (tbpe) 4 or 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethane (bpe) 5. The reaction was followed by conventional UV-Vis spectrophotometer at λmax = 571 nm. The reaction exhibited first-order kinetics with respect to [dye] and [H 2O 2]. The reactivity of the catalysts depends on the type of the medium and thereafter decreases in strong alkaline media. Addition of NaCl enhances the reaction rate. Also, the irradiation of the reaction with UV-light enhanced the rate of AB-92 mineralization by about 86.9%. The reaction was entropy-controlled as confirmed by the isokinetic relationship. A reaction mechanism was proposed with the formation of free radicals as an oxidant.

  19. Mathematical Modeling of the Kinetics of Carbothermic Reduction of Iron Oxides in Ore-Coal Composite Pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Kang; Lu, W.-K.

    2009-02-01

    The kinetics of the carbothermic reduction of iron oxides in a composite pellet made of taconite concentrate and high-volatility coal has been studied by means of mathematical modeling that simultaneously takes into account the transfer rates of both the mass and the heat, and the rates of chemical reactions. The computational results, which have been validated with experimental data in the literature, confirm that the overall rate of the carbothermic reduction, which is strongly endothermic, is limited by heat-transfer steps. From a kinetics viewpoint, the optimum composition of the composite pellet is approximately in accordance with the stoichiometry, when CO is assumed to be the sole oxide of carbon in the gas. To raise the temperature of the pellet from its ambient value to furnace temperature, the heat required is greater than that needed for sustaining all chemical reactions, including the Boudouard reaction. The gaseous product consists mainly of CO and H2, except in the very initial stage. The overall observable reaction rate, in terms of the volumetric rate of the generation of gases, peaks at approximately 30 seconds of reaction time.

  20. Mathematical modeling of the kinetics of carbothermic reduction of iron oxides in ore-coal composite pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, K.; Lu, W.K.

    2009-02-15

    The kinetics of the carbothermic reduction of iron oxides in a composite pellet made of taconite concentrate and high-volatility coal has been studied by means of mathematical modeling that simultaneously takes into account the transfer rates of both the mass and the heat, and the rates of chemical reactions. The computational results, which have been validated with experimental data in the literature, confirm that the overall rate of the carbothermic reduction, which is strongly endothermic, is limited by heat-transfer steps. From a kinetics viewpoint, the optimum composition of the composite pellet is approximately in accordance with the stoichiometry, when CO is assumed to be the sole oxide of carbon in the gas. To raise the temperature of the pellet from its ambient value to furnace temperature, the heat required is greater than that needed for sustaining all chemical reactions, including the Boudouard reaction. The gaseous product consists mainly of CO and H{sub 2}, except in the very initial stage. The overall observable reaction rate, in terms of the volumetric rate of the generation of gases, peaks at approximately 30 seconds of reaction time.

  1. Kinetic study of the reaction of vanadium and vanadium-titanium oxide cluster anions with SO2.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Ewald; Lang, Sandra M; Brümmer, Mathias; Niedziela, Andrzej; Santambrogio, Gabriele; Asmis, Knut R; Sauer, Joachim

    2012-11-01

    The reactivity of mass-selected V(4)O(10)(-) cluster anions towards sulphur dioxide is investigated in an ion trap under multi-collision conditions. Gas phase reaction kinetics are studied as a function of temperature (T(R) = 150-275 K). The binding energy of SO(2) to V(4)O(10)(-) is obtained by analyzing the experimental low pressure rate constants, employing the Lindemann energy transfer model for association reactions in conjunction with statistical RRKM theory. In addition, infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy is used in conjunction with density functional theory for the structural assignment of the [V(4)O(10)(-), SO(2)] complex, revealing a square pyramidal structure with the SO(2) molecule incorporated in the vanadium oxide framework. Energy profiles are calculated for the reaction between V(4)O(10)(-) and V(6)O(15)(-) with SO(2). Whereas the transition structures along the reaction pathway of V(4)O(10)(-) with SO(2) have energies below those of the separated partners, the reaction of V(6)O(15)(-) with SO(2) proceeds via a transition structure with energy higher than the educts. The role of cluster size and composition is investigated by studying the reaction kinetics of larger (V(6)O(15)(-) and V(8)O(20)(-)) and titanium doped (V(3)TiO(10)(-) and V(2)Ti(2)O(10)(-)) vanadium oxide clusters with SO(2). The observed cluster size and composition dependencies are discussed. PMID:23008835

  2. Mapping the local reaction kinetics by PEEM: CO oxidation on individual (100)-type grains of Pt foil

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, D.; Spiel, C.; Suchorski, Y.; Urich, A.; Schlögl, R.; Rupprechter, G.

    2011-01-01

    The locally-resolved reaction kinetics of CO oxidation on individual (100)-type grains of a polycrystalline Pt foil was monitored in situ using photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM). Reaction-induced surface morphology changes were studied by optical differential interference contrast microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Regions of high catalytic activity, low activity and bistability in a (p,T)-parameter space were determined, allowing to establish a local kinetic phase diagram for CO oxidation on (100) facets of Pt foil. PEEM observations of the reaction front propagation on Pt(100) domains reveal a high degree of propagation anisotropy both for oxygen and CO fronts on the apparently isotropic Pt(100) surface. The anisotropy vanishes for oxygen fronts at temperatures above 465 K, but is maintained for CO fronts at all temperatures studied, i.e. in the range of 417 to 513 K. A change in the front propagation mechanism is proposed to explain the observed effects. PMID:22140277

  3. Cobalt catalyzed peroxymonosulfate oxidation of tetrabromobisphenol A: Kinetics, reaction pathways, and formation of brominated by-products.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yuefei; Kong, Deyang; Lu, Junhe; Jin, Hao; Kang, Fuxing; Yin, Xiaoming; Zhou, Quansuo

    2016-08-01

    Degradation of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), a flame retardant widely spread in the environment, in Co(II) catalyzed peroxymonosulfate (PMS) oxidation process was systematically explored. The second-order-rate constant for reaction of sulfate radical (SO4(-)) with TBBPA was determined to be 5.27×10(10)M(-1)s(-1). Apparently, degradation of TBBPA showed first-order kinetics to the concentrations of both Co(II) and PMS. The presence of humic acid (HA) and bicarbonate inhibited TBBPA degradation, most likely due to their competition for SO4(-). Degradation of TBBPA was initiated by an electron abstraction from one of the phenolic rings. Detailed transformation pathways were proposed, including β-scission of isopropyl bridge, phenolic ring oxidation, debromination and coupling reactions. Further oxidative degradation of intermediates in Co(II)/PMS process yielded brominated disinfection by-products (Br-DBPs) such as bromoform and brominated acetic acids. Evolution profile of Br-DBPs showed an initially increasing and then decreasing pattern with maximum concentrations occurring around 6-10h. The presence of HA enhanced the formation of Br-DBPs significantly. These findings reveal potentially important, but previously unrecognized, formation of Br-DBPs during sulfate radical-based oxidation of bromide-containing organic compounds that may pose toxicological risks to human health. PMID:27107323

  4. Kinetics of OH-initiated oxidation of some oxygenated organic compounds in the aqueous phase under tropospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulain, L.; Grubert, S.; François, S.; Monod, A.; Wortham, H.

    2003-04-01

    The interest for multiphase interactions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in the troposphere has increased for a few years. Inside the clouds water droplets, soluble VOCs can be oxidized by free radicals thus modifying the droplet composition. This reactivity has an impact on the tropospheric oxidizing capacity as well as the aerosols' properties. In the present work, we measured aqueous phase OH-initiated oxidation rate constants of several oxygenated organic compounds relevant to the atmosphere or chosen as test compounds (ethanol, t-butanol, 1-butanol, iso-propanol, 1-propanol, acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde, butyraldehyde, valeraldehyde, phenol, ethyl ter-butyl ether (ETBE), n-propyl acetate, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), methyl iso-butyl ketone (MIBK), ethyl formate). Experiments took place in an aqueous phase photoreactor. The rate constants were determinated using the relative kinetic method. Different OH-radical sources were tested, as well as different reference compounds in order to detect any artifact. The results have shown validation of the experimental protocol on test compounds. The overall results allowed to propose a structure reactivity method in order to predict OH-oxidation rate constant of new compounds. Finally, tropospheric life times of the studied compounds were compared inside and outside a cloud.

  5. Kinetics of catalytic oxidation of benzene, n-hexane, and emission gas from a refinery oil/water separator over a chromium oxide catalyst.

    PubMed

    Wang, J B; Chou, M S

    2000-02-01

    With the advances made in the past decade, catalytic incineration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) has become the technology of choice in a wide range of pollution abatement strategies. In this study, a test was undertaken for the catalytic incineration, over a chromium oxide (Cr2O3) catalyst, of n-hexane, benzene, and an emission air/vapor mixture collected from an oil/water separator of a refinery. Reactions were carried out by controlling the feed stream to constant VOC concentrations and temperatures, in the ranges of 1300-14,700 mg/m3 and 240-400 degrees C, respectively. The destruction efficiency for each of the three VOCs as a function of influent gas temperature and empty bed gas residence time was obtained. Results indicate that n-hexane and the oil vapor with a composition of straight- and branch-chain aliphatic hydrocarbons exhibited similar catalytic incineration effects, while benzene required a higher incineration temperature or longer gas retention time to achieve comparable results. In the range of the VOC concentrations studied, at a given gas residence time, increasing the operating temperature of the catalyst bed increased the destruction efficiency. However, the much higher temperatures required for a destruction efficiency of over 99% may be not cost-effective and are not suggested. A first-order kinetics with respect to VOC concentration and an Arrhenius temperature dependence of the kinetic constant appeared to be an adequate representation for the catalytic oxidation of these volatile organics. Activation energy and kinetic constants were estimated for each of the VOCs. Low-temperature destruction of the target volatile organics could be achieved by using the Cr2O3 catalyst. PMID:10680352

  6. Kinetics of Alcohol Dehydrogenase-Catalyzed Oxidation of Ethanol Followed by Visible Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bendinskas, Kestutis; DiJiacomo, Christopher; Krill, Allison; Vitz, Ed

    2005-01-01

    The effect of substrate concentration on the rate of enzymatic reaction was investigated and typical Michaelis-Mentin kinetics was observed during the first week. The first order reaction at relatively low concentrations of ethanol and the pseudo zero-order reaction at high concentrations of ethanol were emphasized.

  7. Dissociation against oxidation kinetics for the conversion of VOCs in non-thermal plasmas of atmospheric gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquiers, Stéphane; Blin-Simiand, Nicole; Magne, Lionel

    2016-08-01

    The kinetics of four volatile organic compounds (VOCs) (propene, propane, acetaldehyde, acetone) were studied in plasmas of atmospheric gases using a photo-triggered discharge (homogeneous plasma) or a dielectric barrier discharge (filamentary plasma). It was shown for the homogeneous plasma that quenchings of nitrogen metastable states, A3Ʃ+u and the group of singlets a' 1Ʃ-u, a 1Πg and w 1∆u, are important processes for the decomposition of such molecules. Recent measurements of the H2 concentration produced in the N2/C3H6 mixture emphasize that the hydrogen molecule can be an exit route for propene dissociation. It is also found that H2 and CO molecules are efficiently produced following the dissociation of CH3COCH3 and the subsequent chemical reactivity induced by radicals coming from acetone. Addition of oxygen to a N2/VOC mixture can change drastically the kinetics. However, the quenching processes of N2 metastables by the VOC are always present and compete with oxidation reactions for the conversion of the pollutant. At low temperature, oxidations by O or by OH are not always sufficiently effective to induce an increase of the molecule decomposition when oxygen is added to the mixture. In particular, the presence of O2 has a detrimental effect on the acetone removal. Also, as evidenced for acetaldehyde and propane, some kinetic analogies appear between filamentary and homogeneous plasmas. Contribution to the topical issue "6th Central European Symposium on Plasma Chemistry (CESPC-6)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ester Marotta and Cristina Paradisi

  8. Determination of a kinetic region in catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sultanov, M. Y.; Sadykhova, K. A.

    1981-01-01

    The catalytic activity of cupric oxide activated with ceric oxide in a braod interval of volumetric velocities was investigated. It was determined that for practical catalysts used in the diffuse region, dilution of the active substance by an inert diluent increases the effectiveness of the catalysts.

  9. Trichloroethylene oxidation by purified toluene 2-monooxygenase: products, kinetics, and turnover-dependent inactivation.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, L M; Wackett, L P

    1997-01-01

    Trichloroethylene is oxidized by several types of nonspecific bacterial oxygenases. Toluene 2-monooxygenase from Burkholderia cepacia G4 is implicated in trichloroethylene oxidation and is uniquely suggested to be resistant to turnover-dependent inactivation in vivo. In this work, the oxidation of trichloroethylene was studied with purified toluene 2-monooxygenase. All three purified toluene 2-monooxygenase protein components and NADH were required to reconstitute full trichloroethylene oxidation activity in vitro. The apparent Km and Vmax were 12 microM and 37 nmol per min per mg of hydroxylase component, respectively. Ten percent of the full activity was obtained when the small-molecular-weight enzyme component was omitted. The stable oxidation products, accounting for 84% of the trichloroethylene oxidized, were carbon monoxide, formic acid, glyoxylic acid, and covalently modified oxygenase proteins that constituted 12% of the reacted [14C]trichloroethylene. The stable oxidation products may all derive from the unstable intermediate trichloroethylene epoxide that was trapped by reaction with 4-(p-nitrobenzyl)pyridine. Chloral hydrate and dichloroacetic acid were not detected. This finding differs from that with soluble methane monooxygenase and cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase, which produce chloral hydrate. Trichloroethylene-dependent inactivation of toluene 2-monooxygenase activity was observed. All of the protein components were covalently modified during the oxidation of trichloroethylene. The addition of cysteine to reaction mixtures partially protected the enzyme system against inactivation, most notably protecting the NADH-oxidoreductase component. This suggested the participation of diffusible intermediates in the inactivation of the oxidoreductase. PMID:8981984

  10. KINETICS AND SELECTIVITY OF DEEP CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF N-HEXANE AND BENZENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Deep (complete) catalytic combustion (oxidation) of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is emerging as an important emission control technique. A fundamental study was carried out for low-temperature deep oxidation of n-hexane and benzene over a 0.1% Pt, 3% Ni/gamma-Al2O3 catalyst....

  11. Millisecond time resolution electron cryo-microscopy of the M-ATP transient kinetic state of the acto-myosin ATPase.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, M; Trinick, J; White, H

    1995-01-01

    The structure of the AM-ATP transient kinetic state of the acto-myosin ATPase cycle has been examined by electron microscopy using frozen-hydrated specimens prepared in low ionic strength. By spraying grids layered with the acto-S1 complex with ATP immediately before freezing, it was possible to examine the structure of the ternary complex with a time resolution of 10 ms. Disordered binding of the S1 was observed, suggesting more than one attachment geometry. This could be due to the presence of more than one biochemical intermediate, or to a single intermediate binding in more than one conformation. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:7787114

  12. Influence of the partial volume correction method on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose brain kinetic modelling from dynamic PET images reconstructed with resolution model based OSEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, Spencer L.; Byars, Larry G.; Michel, Christian J.; Chonde, Daniel B.; Catana, Ciprian

    2013-10-01

    Kinetic parameters estimated from dynamic 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET acquisitions have been used frequently to assess brain function in humans. Neglecting partial volume correction (PVC) for a dynamic series has been shown to produce significant bias in model estimates. Accurate PVC requires a space-variant model describing the reconstructed image spatial point spread function (PSF) that accounts for resolution limitations, including non-uniformities across the field of view due to the parallax effect. For ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM), image resolution convergence is local and influenced significantly by the number of iterations, the count density, and background-to-target ratio. As both count density and background-to-target values for a brain structure can change during a dynamic scan, the local image resolution may also concurrently vary. When PVC is applied post-reconstruction the kinetic parameter estimates may be biased when neglecting the frame-dependent resolution. We explored the influence of the PVC method and implementation on kinetic parameters estimated by fitting 18F-FDG dynamic data acquired on a dedicated brain PET scanner and reconstructed with and without PSF modelling in the OSEM algorithm. The performance of several PVC algorithms was quantified with a phantom experiment, an anthropomorphic Monte Carlo simulation, and a patient scan. Using the last frame reconstructed image only for regional spread function (RSF) generation, as opposed to computing RSFs for each frame independently, and applying perturbation geometric transfer matrix PVC with PSF based OSEM produced the lowest magnitude bias kinetic parameter estimates in most instances, although at the cost of increased noise compared to the PVC methods utilizing conventional OSEM. Use of the last frame RSFs for PVC with no PSF modelling in the OSEM algorithm produced the lowest bias in cerebral metabolic rate of glucose estimates, although by less than 5% in most

  13. Kinetic and Mechanistic Aspects of the Reactions of Iodide and Hypoiodous Acid with Permanganate: Oxidation and Disproportionation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaodan; Salhi, Elisabeth; Liu, Huiling; Ma, Jun; von Gunten, Urs

    2016-04-19

    Oxidation kinetics of iodide and HOI/OI(-) by permanganate were studied in the pH range of 5.0-10.0. Iodide oxidation and iodate formation were faster at lower pH. The apparent second-order rate constants (kobs) for iodide oxidation by permanganate decrease with increasing pH from 29 M(-1) s(-1) at pH 5.0 and 6.9 M(-1) s(-1) at pH 7.0 to 2.7 M(-1) s(-1) at pH 10.0. kobs for HOI abatement are 56 M(-1) s(-1) at pH 5.0, 2.5 M(-1) s(-1) at pH 7.0, and 173 M(-1) s(-1) at pH 10.0. Iodate yields over HOI abatement decrease from 98% at pH 6.0 to 33% for pH ≥ 9.5, demonstrating that HOI disproportionation dominates HOI transformation by permanganate at pH ≥ 8.0. MnO2 formed as a product from permanganate reduction, oxidizes HOI to iodate for pH < 8.0, and promotes HOI disproportionation for pH ≥ 8.0. The rate of HOI oxidation or disproportionation induced by MnO2 is much lower than for permanganate. During treatment of iodide-containing waters, the potential for iodinated disinfection byproducts (I-DBPs) formation is highest at pH 7.0-8.0 due to the long lifetime of HOI. For pH < 6.0, HOI/I2 is quickly oxidized by permanganate to iodate, whereas for pH ≥ 8.0, HOI/OI(-) undergoes a fast permanganate-mediated disproportionation. PMID:27003721

  14. A kinetics study of the atmospheric pressure CVD reaction of silane and nitrous oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Chapple-Sokol, J.D.; Giunta, C.J.; Gordon, R.G. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1989-10-01

    A mechanistic study of oxide deposition from silane and nitrous oxide between 495{sup 0}C and 690{sup 0}C was performed in a laminar flow, cool wall reactor. Results indicate the existence of two distinct chemical pathways. At high nitrous oxide concentrations, the deposition reaction is dominated by radical chain chemistry initiated by the decomposition of N/sub 2/O. At lower N/sub 2/O concentrations, the decomposition of silane to form silylene (SiH/sub 2/) initiates the deposition. Studies of the reaction of disilane and nitrous oxide confirmed the role of SiH/sub 2/ in the deposition. Reactions involving SiH/sub 2/ are used to explain the observed growth of sub-stoichiometric oxides under low N/sub 2/O conditions.

  15. Kinetic description of metal nanocrystal oxidation: a combined theoretical and experimental approach for determining morphology and diffusion parameters in hollow nanoparticles by the nanoscale Kirkendall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yoshiki; Mowbray, Ryan W.; Rice, Katherine P.; Stoykovich, Mark P.

    2014-10-01

    The oxidation of colloidal metal nanocrystals to form hollow shells via the nanoscale Kirkendall effect has been investigated using a combined theoretical and experimental approach. A generalized kinetic model for the formation of hollow nanoparticles describes the phenomenon and, unlike prior models, is applicable to any material system and accounts for the effect of surface energies. Phase diagrams of the ultimate oxidized nanoparticle morphology and the time to achieve complete oxidation are calculated, and are found to depend significantly upon consideration of surface energy effects that destabilize the initial formation of small voids. For the oxidation of Cu nanocrystals to Cu2O nanoparticles, we find that the diffusion coefficients dictate the morphological outcomes: the ratio of ? to ? controls the void size, ? determines the time of oxidation and ? is largely irrelevant in the kinetics of oxidation. The kinetic model was used to fit experimental measurements of 11 nm diameter Cu nanocrystals oxidized in air from which temperature-dependent diffusivities of ? and ? for 100 ≤ T ≤ 200 °C were determined. In contrast to previous interpretations of the nanoscale Kirkendall effect in the Cu/Cu2O system, these results are obtained without any a priori assumptions about the relative magnitudes of ? and ?. The theoretical and experimental approaches presented here are broadly applicable to any nanoparticle system undergoing oxidation, and can be used to precisely control the final nanoparticle morphology for applications in catalysis or optical materials.

  16. Differences in nitrite-oxidizing communities and kinetics in a brackish environment after enrichment at low and high nitrite concentrations.

    PubMed

    Tangkitjawisut, Wipasanee; Limpiyakorn, Tawan; Powtongsook, Sorawit; Pornkulwat, Preeyaporn; Suwannasilp, Benjaporn Boonchayaanant

    2016-04-01

    Nitrite accumulation in shrimp ponds can pose serious adverse effects to shrimp production and the environment. This study aims to develop an effective process for the enrichment of ready-to-use nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) inocula that would be appropriate for nitrite removal in brackish shrimp ponds. To achieve this objective, the effects of nitrite concentrations on NOB communities and nitrite oxidation kinetics in a brackish environment were investigated. Moving-bed biofilm sequencing batch reactors and continuous moving-bed biofilm reactors were used for the enrichment of NOB at various nitrite concentrations, using sediment from brackish shrimp ponds as seed inoculum. The results from NOB population analysis with quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) show that only Nitrospira were detected in the sediment from the shrimp ponds. After the enrichment, both Nitrospira and Nitrobacter coexisted in the reactors controlling effluent nitrite at 0.1 and 0.5 mg-NO2(-)-N/L. On the other hand, in the reactors controlling effluent nitrite at 3, 20, and 100 mg-NO2(-)-N/L, Nitrobacter outcompeted Nitrospira in many orders of magnitude. The half saturation coefficients (Ks) for nitrite oxidation of the enrichments at low nitrite concentrations (0.1 and 0.5 mg-NO2(-)-N/L) were in the range of 0.71-0.98 mg-NO2(-)-N/L. In contrast, the K(s) values of NOB enriched at high nitrite concentrations (3, 20, and 100 mg-NO2(-)-N/L) were much higher (8.36-12.20 mg-NO2(-)-N/L). The results suggest that the selection of nitrite concentrations for the enrichment of NOB inocula can significantly influence NOB populations and kinetics, which could affect the effectiveness of their applications in brackish shrimp ponds. PMID:27090693

  17. Kinetic and morphological studies of palladium oxidation in oxygen-methane mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jinyi

    The oxidation of Pd single crystals: Pd(111), Pd(100) and Pd(110) was studied using Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), Low Electron Energy Diffraction (LEED) and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) as they were subjected to O2 in the pressure range between 1 and 150 Torr at temperatures 600-900 K. The oxygen species formed during oxidation, the oxygen uptake dependence on the sample history, the Pd single crystal surface morphology transformations, and the catalytic methane combustion over Pd single crystals were investigated in detail. The Pd single crystal oxidation proceeded through a three-step mechanism. Namely, (1) oxygen dissociatively adsorbed on Pd surface, forming chemisorbed oxygen and surface oxide; (2) atomic oxygen diffused through a thin surface oxide layer into Pd metal, forming near surface and bulk oxygen; (3) bulk PdO formed when a critical oxygen concentration was reached in the near surface region. The diffusion of oxygen through thin surface oxide layer into Pd metal decreased in the order: Pd(110)>Pd(100)>Pd(111). The oxygen diffusion coefficient was estimated to be around 10-16 cm2 s -1 at 600 K, with an activation energy of 80 kJ mol-1. Once bulk PdO was formed, the diffusion of oxygen through the bulk oxide layer was the rate-determining step for the palladium oxidation. The diffusion coefficient was equal to 10-18 cm2 s-1 at 600 K and the activation energy was approximately 120 kJ mol-1. The oxygen diffusion through thin surface oxide layer and bulk PdO followed the Mott-Cabrera parabolic diffusion law. The oxygen uptake on Pd single crystals depended on the sample history. The uptake amount increased with the population of the bulk oxygen species, which was achieved by high oxygen exposure at elevated temperatures, for example in 1 Torr O2 at above 820 K. Ar+ sputtering or annealing in vacuum at 1300 K depleted the bulk oxygen. The Pd single crystal surface

  18. The kinetics of iodide oxidation by hydrogen peroxide in acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milenković, M. C.; Stanisavljev, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    The kinetics of the complex reaction between I- and H2O2 in acid media was investigated. The particular attention was focused on the determination of the rate constant of the reaction between HIO and H2O2 involved in the investigated complex process. The examination of the whole kinetics was performed by simultaneously monitoring the evolution of O2 pressure, I{3/-} and I- concentrations. We modeled the behavior of experimentally followed components based on Liebhafsky's research. Our preliminary results suggest a significantly higher rate constant (3.5 × 107 M-1 s-1) of the reaction between HIO and H2O2 as those proposed in the literature.

  19. Chemical oxidation of sulfadiazine by the Fenton process: kinetics, pathways, toxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji-Feng; Zhou, Shi-Biao; Xiao, An-Guo; Li, Wen-Jun; Ying, Guang-Guo

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigated sulfadiazine oxidation by the Fenton process under various reaction conditions. The reaction conditions tested in the experiments included the initial pH value of reaction solutions, and the dosages of ferrous ions and hydrogen peroxide. Under the reaction conditions with pH 3, 0.25 mM of ferrous ion and 2 mM of hydrogen peroxide, a removal efficiency of nearly 100% was achieved for sulfadiazine. A series of intermediate products including 4-OH-sulfadiazine/or 5-OH-sulfadiazine, 2-aminopyrimidine, sulfanilamide, formic acid, and oxalic acid were identified. Based on these products, the possible oxidation pathway of sulfadiazine by Fenton's reagent was proposed. The toxicity evaluation of reaction solutions showed increased antimicrobial effects following the Fenton oxidation process. The results from this study suggest that the Fenton oxidation process could remove sulfadiazine, but also increase solution toxicity due to the presence of more toxic products. PMID:25310806

  20. Hot water extraction with in situ wet oxidation: kinetics of PAHs removal from soil.

    PubMed

    Dadkhah, Ali A; Akgerman, Aydin

    2006-09-01

    Finding environmentally friendly and cost-effective methods to remediate soils contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is currently a major concern of researchers. In this study, a series of small-scale semi-continuous extractions--with and without in situ wet oxidation--were performed on soils polluted with PAHs, using subcritical water (i.e. liquid water at high temperatures and pressures, but below the critical point) as the removal agent. Experiments were performed in a 300 mL reactor using an aged soil sample. To find the desorption isotherms and oxidation reaction rates, semi-continuous experiments with residence times of 1 and 2 h were performed using aged soil at 250 degrees C and hydrogen peroxide as oxidizing agent. In all combined extraction and oxidation flow experiments, PAHs in the remaining soil after the experiments were almost undetectable. In combined extraction and oxidation no PAHs could be detected in the liquid phase after the first 30 min of the experiments. Based on these results, extraction with hot water, if combined with oxidation, should reduce the cost of remediation and can be used as a feasible alternative technique for remediating contaminated soils and sediments. PMID:16621253