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Sample records for oxidative membrane damage

  1. Modification of radiation-induced oxidative damage in liposomal and microsomal membrane by eugenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, B. N.; Lathika, K. M.; Mishra, K. P.

    2006-03-01

    Radiation-induced membrane oxidative damage, and their modification by eugenol, a natural antioxidant, was investigated in liposomes and microsomes. Liposomes prepared with DPH showed decrease in fluorescence after γ-irradiation, which was prevented significantly by eugenol and correlated with magnitude of oxidation of phospholipids. Presence of eugenol resulted in substantial inhibition in MDA formation in irradiated liposomes/microsomes, which was less effective when added after irradiation. Similarly, the increase in phospholipase C activity observed after irradiation in microsomes was inhibited in samples pre-treated with eugenol. Results suggest association of radio- oxidative membrane damage with alterations in signaling molecules, and eugenol significantly prevented these membrane damaging events.

  2. Shape-dependent bactericidal activity of copper oxide nanoparticle mediated by DNA and membrane damage

    SciTech Connect

    Laha, Dipranjan; Pramanik, Arindam; Laskar, Aparna; Jana, Madhurya; Pramanik, Panchanan; Karmakar, Parimal

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Spherical and sheet shaped copper oxide nanoparticles were synthesized. • Physical characterizations of these nanoparticles were done by TEM, DLS, XRD, FTIR. • They showed shape dependent antibacterial activity on different bacterial strain. • They induced both membrane damage and ROS mediated DNA damage in bacteria. - Abstract: In this work, we synthesized spherical and sheet shaped copper oxide nanoparticles and their physical characterizations were done by the X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The antibacterial activity of these nanoparticles was determined on both gram positive and gram negative bacterial. Spherical shaped copper oxide nanoparticles showed more antibacterial property on gram positive bacteria where as sheet shaped copper oxide nanoparticles are more active on gram negative bacteria. We also demonstrated that copper oxide nanoparticles produced reactive oxygen species in both gram negative and gram positive bacteria. Furthermore, they induced membrane damage as determined by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Thus production of and membrane damage are major mechanisms of the bactericidal activity of these copper oxide nanoparticles. Finally it was concluded that antibacterial activity of nanoparticles depend on physicochemical properties of copper oxide nanoparticles and bacterial strain.

  3. Protective Effect of Sundakai (Solanum torvum) Seed Protein (SP) Against Oxidative Membrane Damage in Human Erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sivapriya, M; Gowda, S S Thammanna; Srinivas, Leela

    2015-12-01

    Lipid peroxidation by ROS at the membrane level disturbs the inherit integrity of components activating subsequent alterations in the function. In this study, the protective effect of purified Sundakai (Solanum torvum) seed protein (SP) was tested against oxidative membrane damage in erythrocyte membrane. SP prevented oxidative RBC lysis induced by pro-oxidants; Fe:As (2:20 μmol), periodate (0.4 mM), and t-BOOH (1 mM) up to 86, 81, and 86 %, respectively. Further, SP prevented the Fe:As-induced K(+) leakage up to the tune of 95 %. The inhibition offered by SP on K(+) leakage was comparable to inhibition offered by quinine sulfate, a known K(+) channel blocker. SP dose dependently restored Na(+)K(+) ATPase and Ca(2+)Mg(2+) ATPase activities in erythrocyte membrane. The restoration of ATPase activity by SP was two times more than standard antioxidants BHA and α-tocopherol. Besides, SP at 1.6 μmol restored the membrane proteins over Fe:As induction when analyzed by SDS-PAGE, which was comparable to protection offered by BHA. In conclusion, SP is an effective antioxidant in preventing oxidative membrane damage and associated functions mediated by ROS. As SP is non-toxic, it can be used as an effective bioprotective antioxidant agent to cellular components. PMID:26374653

  4. Effective protection of biological membranes against photo-oxidative damage: Polymeric antioxidant forming a protecting shield over the membrane.

    PubMed

    Mertins, Omar; Mathews, Patrick D; Gomide, Andreza B; Baptista, Mauricio S; Itri, Rosangela

    2015-10-01

    We have prepared a chitosan polymer modified with gallic acid in order to develop an efficient protection strategy biological membranes against photodamage. Lipid bilayers were challenged with photoinduced damage by photosensitization with methylene blue, which usually causes formation of hydroperoxides, increasing area per lipid, and afterwards allowing leakage of internal materials. The damage was delayed by a solution of gallic acid in a concentration dependent manner, but further suppressed by the polymer at very low concentrations. The membrane of giant unilamellar vesicles was covered with this modified macromolecule leading to a powerful shield against singlet oxygen and thus effectively protecting the lipid membrane from oxidative stress. The results have proven the discovery of a promising strategy for photo protection of biological membranes. PMID:26055894

  5. Erythrocyte Shape Abnormalities, Membrane Oxidative Damage, and β-Actin Alterations: An Unrecognized Triad in Classical Autism

    PubMed Central

    Ciccoli, Lucia; De Felice, Claudio; Pecorelli, Alessandra; Belmonte, Giuseppe; Guerranti, Roberto; Cortelazzo, Alessio; Durand, Thierry; Valacchi, Giuseppe; Rossi, Marcello; Hayek, Joussef

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a complex group of neurodevelopment disorders steadily rising in frequency and treatment refractory, where the search for biological markers is of paramount importance. Although red blood cells (RBCs) membrane lipidomics and rheological variables have been reported to be altered, with some suggestions indicating an increased lipid peroxidation in the erythrocyte membrane, to date no information exists on how the oxidative membrane damage may affect cytoskeletal membrane proteins and, ultimately, RBCs shape in autism. Here, we investigated RBC morphology by scanning electron microscopy in patients with classical autism, that is, the predominant ASDs phenotype (age range: 6–26 years), nonautistic neurodevelopmental disorders (i.e., “positive controls”), and healthy controls (i.e., “negative controls”). A high percentage of altered RBCs shapes, predominantly elliptocytes, was observed in autistic patients, but not in both control groups. The RBCs altered morphology in autistic subjects was related to increased erythrocyte membrane F2-isoprostanes and 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts. In addition, an oxidative damage of the erythrocyte membrane β-actin protein was evidenced. Therefore, the combination of erythrocyte shape abnormalities, erythrocyte membrane oxidative damage, and β-actin alterations constitutes a previously unrecognized triad in classical autism and provides new biological markers in the diagnostic workup of ASDs. PMID:24453417

  6. Acetone Extract of Almond Hulls Provides Protection against Oxidative Damage and Membrane Protein Degradation.

    PubMed

    Meshkini, Azadeh

    2016-06-01

    Several studies have revealed that among foods, the consumption of edible nuts has beneficial effects on health which are attributed to their high content of potent antioxidants. Among nuts, the whole seed of the almond (Prunus dulcis) has been demonstrated to possess potent free radical scavenging activity, which is related to the presence of phenolic compounds. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the polyphenol content and the antioxidant ability of almond hull, which is an agriculture solid waste. The present results revealed that among different extraction methods, the acetone extract of almond hulls has a high content of phenolic and flavonoid compounds and a high antioxidant ability, which were determined by using the phosphomolybdenum method and by measuring the potency of the antioxidant, respectively. Moreover, the experimental data disclosed that the acetone extract of almond hulls provides protection against the oxidative damage and the membrane protein degradation that are caused in human erythrocytes by hydrogen peroxide. These phenomena may likely be due to the recruitment of antioxidants by cell membranes and/or translocation to cytosol. Overall, almond hull extract could be considered as a natural source of antioxidants, and its consumption could have a positive effect on human health. PMID:27342887

  7. Supplementation of T3 Recovers Hypothyroid Rat Liver Cells from Oxidatively Damaged Inner Mitochondrial Membrane Leading to Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Sutapa; Samanta, Luna; Roy, Anita; Bhanja, Shravani; Chainy, Gagan B. N.

    2014-01-01

    Hypothyroidism is a growing medical concern. There are conflicting reports regarding the mechanism of oxidative stress in hypothyroidism. Mitochondrial oxidative stress is pivotal to thyroid dysfunction. The present study aimed to delineate the effects of hepatic inner mitochondrial membrane dysfunction as a consequence of 6-n-propyl-2-thiouracil-induced hypothyroidism in rats. Increased oxidative stress predominance in the submitochondrial particles (SMP) and altered antioxidant defenses in the mitochondrial matrix fraction correlated with hepatocyte apoptosis. In order to check whether the effects caused by hypothyroidism are reversed by T3, the above parameters were evaluated in a subset of T3-treated hypothyroid rats. Complex I activity was inhibited in hypothyroid SMP, whereas T3 supplementation upregulated electron transport chain complexes. Higher mitochondrial H2O2 levels in hypothyroidism due to reduced matrix GPx activity culminated in severe oxidative damage to membrane lipids. SMP and matrix proteins were stabilised in hypothyroidism but exhibited increased carbonylation after T3 administration. Glutathione content was higher in both. Hepatocyte apoptosis was evident in hypothyroid liver sections; T3 administration, on the other hand, exerted antiapoptotic and proproliferative effects. Hence, thyroid hormone level critically regulates functional integrity of hepatic mitochondria; hypothyroidism injures mitochondrial membrane lipids leading to hepatocyte apoptosis, which is substantially recovered upon T3 supplementation. PMID:24987693

  8. Iron-Mediated Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization in Ethanol-Induced Hepatic Oxidative Damage and Apoptosis: Protective Effects of Quercetin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanyan; Chen, Man; Xu, Yanyan; Yu, Xiao; Xiong, Ting; Du, Min; Sun, Jian; Liu, Liegang; Tang, Yuhan; Yao, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Iron, in its free ferrous states, can catalyze Fenton reaction to produce OH∙, which is recognized as a crucial role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver diseases (ALD). As a result of continuous decomposition of iron-containing compounds, lysosomes contain a pool of redox-active iron. To investigate the important role of intralysosomal iron in alcoholic liver injury and the potential protection of quercetin, male C57BL/6J mice fed by Lieber De Carli diets containing ethanol (30% of total calories) were cotreated by quercetin or deferoxamine (DFO) for 15 weeks and ethanol-incubated mice primary hepatocytes were pretreated with FeCl3, DFO, and bafilomycin A1 at their optimal concentrations and exposure times. Chronic ethanol consumption caused an evident increase in lysosomal redox-active iron accompanying sustained oxidative damage. Iron-mediated ROS could trigger lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and subsequent mitochondria apoptosis. The hepatotoxicity was attenuated by reducing lysosomal iron while being exacerbated by escalating lysosomal iron. Quercetin substantially alleviated the alcoholic liver oxidative damage and apoptosis by decreasing lysosome iron and ameliorating iron-mediated LMP, which provided a new prospective of the use of quercetin against ALD. PMID:27057276

  9. Graphene oxide induces plasma membrane damage, reactive oxygen species accumulation and fatty acid profiles change in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng; Yu, Qilin; Liang, Chen; Liu, Zhe; Zhang, Biao; Li, Mingchun

    2016-10-01

    During the past couple of years, graphene nanomaterials were extremely popular among the scientists due to the promising properties in many aspects. Before the materials being well applied, we should first focus on their biosafety and toxicity. In this study, we investigated the toxicity of synthesized graphene oxide (GO) against the model industrial organism Pichia pastoris. We found that the synthesized GO showed dose-dependent toxicity to P. pastoris, through cell membrane damage and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. In response to these cell stresses, cells had normal unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) levels but increased contents of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) with up-regulation of UFA synthesis-related genes on the transcriptional level, which made it overcome the stress under GO attack. Two UFA defective strains (spt23Δ and fad12Δ) were used to demonstrate the results above. Hence, this study suggested a close connection between PUFAs and cell survival against GO. PMID:27376352

  10. Benzoyl peroxide increases UVA-induced plasma membrane damage and lipid oxidation in murine leukemia L1210 cells.

    PubMed

    Ibbotson, S H; Lambert, C R; Moran, M N; Lynch, M C; Kochevar, I E

    1998-01-01

    Ultraviolet A radiation induces oxidative stress and cell damage. The purpose of this investigation was to examine whether ultraviolet A-induced cell injury was amplified by the presence of a non-ultraviolet A absorbing molecule capable of generating free radicals. Benzoyl peroxide was used as a lipid soluble potential radical-generating agent. Plasma membrane permeability assessed by trypan blue uptake was used to measure cell damage in murine leukemia L1210 cells. Cells were irradiated with a pulsed Nd/YAG laser at 355 nm using 0-160 J per cm2. The ratio of the fluence-response slope in the presence of 40 microM benzoyl peroxide to that of irradiated controls was 4.3 +/- 2.6. Benzoyl peroxide alone or benzoyl peroxide added after irradiation did not cause increased trypan blue uptake. The ratio of the fluence-response slopes in the presence of 40 microM benzoyl peroxide to that of irradiated controls was 4.7 +/- 1.4 when cells were irradiated (0-43 J per cm2) with a xenon lamp, filtered to remove wavelengths <320 nm. The increased trypan blue uptake in 355 nm-irradiated cells in the presence of benzoyl peroxide was inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by butylated hydroxytoluene, vitamin E, and trolox, a water-soluble vitamin E derivative. Lipid oxidation, assessed as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, was significantly increased in samples irradiated with ultraviolet A in the presence of benzoyl peroxide at fluences >34 J per cm2. The increased trypan blue uptake and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances were inhibited by butylated hydroxytoluene. These results suggest that agents not absorbing ultraviolet A radiation may enhance ultraviolet A-initiated oxidative stress in cells. PMID:9424093

  11. Toxicity of perfluorooctane sulfonate and perfluorooctanoic acid to Escherichia coli: Membrane disruption, oxidative stress, and DNA damage induced cell inactivation and/or death.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gesheng; Zhang, Shuai; Yang, Kun; Zhu, Lizhong; Lin, Daohui

    2016-07-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) are two widely used polyfluorinated compounds (PFCs) and are persistent in the environment. This study for the first time systematically investigated their toxicities and the underlying mechanisms to Escherichia coli. Much higher toxicity was observed for PFOA than PFOS, with the 3 h half growth inhibition concentrations (IC50) determined to be 10.6 ± 1.0 and 374 ± 3 mg L(-1), respectively, while the bacterial accumulation of PFOS was much greater than that of PFOA. The PFC exposures disrupted cell membranes as evidenced by the dose-dependent variations of cell structures (by transmission electron microscopy observations), surface properties (electronegativity, hydrophobicity, and membrane fluidity), and membrane compositions (by gas chromatogram and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses). The increases in the contents of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde and the activity of superoxide dismutase indicated the increment of oxidative stress induced by the PFCs in the bacterial cells. The fact that the cell growth inhibition was mitigated by the addition of ROS scavenger (N-acetyl cysteine) further evidenced the important role of oxidative damage in the toxicities of PFOS and PFOA. Eighteen genes involved in cell division, membrane instability, oxidative stress, and DNA damage of the exposed cells were up or down expressed, indicating the DNA damage by the PFCs. The toxicities of PFOS and PFOA to E. coli were therefore ascribed to the membrane disruption, oxidative stress, and DNA damage induced cell inactivation and/or death. The difference in the bactericidal effect between PFOS and PFOA was supposed to be related to their different dominating toxicity mechanisms, i.e., membrane disruption and oxidative damage, respectively. The outcomes will shed new light on the assessment of ecological effects of PFCs. PMID:27155098

  12. Melatonin reduces membrane rigidity and oxidative damage in the brain of SAMP8 mice.

    PubMed

    García, J J; Piñol-Ripoll, G; Martínez-Ballarín, E; Fuentes-Broto, L; Miana-Mena, F J; Venegas, C; Caballero, B; Escames, G; Coto-Montes, A; Acuña-Castroviejo, D

    2011-11-01

    We evaluated the autophagy-lysosomal pathway and membrane fluidity in brain cells and mitochondrial membranes obtained from senescence-accelerated (SAMP(8)) and senescence-resistant (SAMR(1)) mice at 5 and 10 months of age. Moreover, we studied whether chronic treatment from age 1 to 10 months with melatonin stabilizes membrane fluidity. Fluidity was measured by polarization changes of 1-(4-trimethylammoniumphenyl)-6-phenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene-p-toluene sulfonate. Results showed that in untreated animals at 5 months of age, synaptosomal and mitochondrial fluidity was decreased in SAMP(8) compared to SAMR(1), as was the cathepsin D/B ratio, indicating dysfunction of the autophagy-lysosomal pathway. Moreover, we detected synaptosomal rigidity and programmed cell death capability in both groups at 10 months of age. Mitochondrial fluidity, however, did not show a significant age-dependent change but was lower in SAMP(8) than in SAMR(1) at the 5- and 10-month time points. Melatonin administration prevented rigidity in the mitochondrial membrane and seemed to decrease age-related autophagy-lysosomal alterations. These data suggest that melatonin may act to slow down the aging process because of its ability to enhance membrane fluidity and maintain structural pathways. PMID:20096480

  13. Nav Channels in Damaged Membranes.

    PubMed

    Morris, C E; Joos, B

    2016-01-01

    Sick excitable cells (ie, Nav channel-expressing cells injured by trauma, ischemia, inflammatory, and other conditions) typically exhibit "acquired sodium channelopathies" which, we argue, reflect bleb-damaged membranes rendering their Nav channels "leaky." The situation is excitotoxic because untreated Nav leak exacerbates bleb damage. Fast Nav inactivation (a voltage-independent process) is so tightly coupled, kinetically speaking, to the inherently voltage-dependent process of fast activation that when bleb damage accelerates and thus left-shifts macroscopic fast activation, fast inactivation accelerates to the same extent. The coupled g(V) and availability(V) processes and their window conductance regions consequently left-shift by the same number of millivolts. These damage-induced hyperpolarizing shifts, whose magnitude increases with damage intensity, are called coupled left shift (CLS). Based on past work and modeling, we discuss how to test for Nav-CLS, emphasizing the virtue of sawtooth ramp clamp. We explain that it is the inherent mechanosensitivity of Nav activation that underlies Nav-CLS. Using modeling of excitability, we show the known process of Nav-CLS is sufficient to predict a wide variety of "sick excitable cell" phenomena, from hyperexcitability through to depolarizing block. When living cells are mimicked by inclusion of pumps, mild Nav-CLS produces a wide array of burst phenomena and subthreshold oscillations. Dynamical analysis of mild damage scenarios shows how these phenomena reflect changes in spike thresholds as the pumps try to counteract the leaky Nav channels. Smart Nav inhibitors designed for sick excitable cells would target bleb-damaged membrane, buying time for cell-mediated removal or repair of Nav-bearing membrane that has become bleb-damaged (ie, detached from the cytoskeleton). PMID:27586295

  14. Hemoglobin-sulfhydryls from tortoise (Geochelone carbonaria) can reduce oxidative damage induced by organic hydroperoxide in erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Torsoni, M A; Ogo, S H

    2000-08-01

    Sulfhydryl groups are important to avoid oxidative damage to the cell. In RBC, tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tert-BOOH) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are capable of oxidizing heme and promoting lipid peroxidation. H2O2 caused greater oxidation of heme than tert-BOOH, although the oxidation of sulfhydryl groups was similar. Geochelone carbonaria Hb, a rich sulfhydryl protein, inhibited the TBA-reactive substances formation of human erythrocytes exposed to tert-BOOH by about 30%; this decrease was smaller with Geochelone denticulata Hb. Sulfhydryl reagents diminished the number of reactive sulfhydryl groups in the G. carbonaria Hb resulting in a decrease of its antioxidant power, suggesting the involvement of sulfhydryls of Hb in the protection against lipid peroxidation. PMID:11026669

  15. Oxidative damage and mitochondrial decay in aging.

    PubMed Central

    Shigenaga, M K; Hagen, T M; Ames, B N

    1994-01-01

    We argue for the critical role of oxidative damage in causing the mitochondrial dysfunction of aging. Oxidants generated by mitochondria appear to be the major source of the oxidative lesions that accumulate with age. Several mitochondrial functions decline with age. The contributing factors include the intrinsic rate of proton leakage across the inner mitochondrial membrane (a correlate of oxidant formation), decreased membrane fluidity, and decreased levels and function of cardiolipin, which supports the function of many of the proteins of the inner mitochondrial membrane. Acetyl-L-carnitine, a high-energy mitochondrial substrate, appears to reverse many age-associated deficits in cellular function, in part by increasing cellular ATP production. Such evidence supports the suggestion that age-associated accumulation of mitochondrial deficits due to oxidative damage is likely to be a major contributor to cellular, tissue, and organismal aging. PMID:7971961

  16. Products of lipid peroxidation, but not membrane susceptibility to oxidative damage, are conserved in skeletal muscle following temperature acclimation.

    PubMed

    Grim, Jeffrey M; Semones, Molly C; Kuhn, Donald E; Kriska, Tamas; Keszler, Agnes; Crockett, Elizabeth L

    2015-03-01

    Changes in oxidative capacities and phospholipid remodeling accompany temperature acclimation in ectothermic animals. Both responses may alter redox status and membrane susceptibility to lipid peroxidation (LPO). We tested the hypothesis that phospholipid remodeling is sufficient to offset temperature-driven rates of LPO and, thus, membrane susceptibility to LPO is conserved. We also predicted that the content of LPO products is maintained over a range of physiological temperatures. To assess LPO susceptibility, rates of LPO were quantified with the fluorescent probe C11-BODIPY in mitochondria and sarcoplasmic reticulum from oxidative and glycolytic muscle of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) acclimated to 7°C and 25°C. We also measured phospholipid compositions, contents of LPO products [i.e., individual classes of phospholipid hydroperoxides (PLOOH)], and two membrane antioxidants. Despite phospholipid headgroup and acyl chain remodeling, these alterations do not counter the effect of temperature on LPO rates (i.e., LPO rates are generally not different among acclimation groups when normalized to phospholipid content and compared at a common temperature). Although absolute levels of PLOOH are higher in muscles from cold- than warm-acclimated fish, this difference is lost when PLOOH levels are normalized to total phospholipid. Contents of vitamin E and two homologs of ubiquinone are more than four times higher in mitochondria prepared from oxidative muscle of warm- than cold-acclimated fish. Collectively, our data demonstrate that although phospholipid remodeling does not provide a means for offsetting thermal effects on rates of LPO, differences in phospholipid quantity ensure a constant proportion of LPO products with temperature variation. PMID:25519739

  17. Antibiofilm and Membrane-Damaging Potential of Cuprous Oxide Nanoparticles against Staphylococcus aureus with Reduced Susceptibility to Vancomycin

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Avinash; Ahmed, Asar; Khanduja, Sonali; Singh, Satyendra K.; Srivastava, Janmejai K.; Gajbhiye, Namdeo S.

    2015-01-01

    The antimicrobial effects of copper ions and salts are well known, but the effects of cuprous oxide nanoparticles (Cu2O-NPs) on staphylococcal biofilms have not yet been clearly revealed. The present study evaluated Cu2O-NPs for their antibacterial and antibiofilm activities against heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (hVISA) and vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA). Nanoscaled Cu2O, generated by solution phase technology, contained Cu2O octahedral nanoparticles. Field emission electron microscopy demonstrated particles with sizes ranging from 100 to 150 nm. Cu2O-NPs inhibited the growth of S. aureus and showed antibiofilm activity. The MICs and minimum biofilm inhibitory concentrations ranged from 625 μg/ml to 5,000 μg/ml and from 2,500 μg/ml to 10,000 μg/ml, respectively. Exposure of S. aureus to Cu2O-NPs caused leakage of the cellular constituents and increased uptake of ethidium bromide and propidium iodide. Exposure also caused a significant reduction in the overall vancomycin-BODIPY (dipyrromethene boron difluoride [4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene] fluorescent dye) binding and a decrease in the viable cell count in the presence of 7.5% sodium chloride. Cu2O-NP toxicity assessment by hemolysis assay showed no cytotoxicity at 625 to 10,000 μg/ml concentrations. The results suggest that Cu2O-NPs exert their action by disruption of the bacterial cell membrane and can be used as effective antistaphylococcal and antibiofilm agents in diverse medical devices. PMID:26303796

  18. Synergistic combination of direct plasma membrane damage and oxidative stress as a cause of antifungal activity of polyol macrolide antibiotic niphimycin.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Keiji; Yamaguchi, Takafumi; Doi, Takeshi; Usuki, Yoshinosuke; Taniguchi, Makoto; Tanaka, Toshio

    2002-01-01

    The polyol macrolide niphimycin (NM) exhibited fungicidal activity against Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells accompanying the leakage of cytoplasmic components including nucleotide-like materials in addition to K+ at 10 microM or above. Such a dynamic change in the plasma membrane was observed upon treatment of cells with H2O2 but not with the polyene macrolide antibiotic amphotericin B (AmB). The NM-induced cell death could be prevented by the exogenous addition of phosphatidylcholine (PC) whereas such a protective effect was only weakly observed with ergosterol, the molecular target of AmB. NM-treated cells were further characterized with a dramatic loss of glutathione even at a dose of 5 microM or less, representing NM-triggered metabolic conversion of the antioxidant molecule. NM-treatment indeed accelerated the cellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as H2O2 detectable with a specific fluorescent probe in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggested a synergistic combination of direct plasma membrane damage and oxidative stress as a cause of antifungal activity of NM against S. cerevisiae. PMID:16233293

  19. Oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage and neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chunyan; Sun, Li; Chen, Xueping; Zhang, Danshen

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Oxidative stress is characterized by the overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which can induce mitochondrial DNA mutations, damage the mitochondrial respiratory chain, alter membrane permeability, and influence Ca2+ homeostasis and mitochondrial defense systems. All these changes are implicated in the development of these neurodegenerative diseases, mediating or amplifying neuronal dysfunction and triggering neurodegeneration. This paper summarizes the contribution of oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage to the onset of neurodegenerative eases and discusses strategies to modify mitochondrial dysfunction that may be attractive therapeutic interventions for the treatment of various neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25206509

  20. Staged membrane oxidation reactor system

    DOEpatents

    Repasky, John Michael; Carolan, Michael Francis; Stein, VanEric Edward; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

    2014-05-20

    Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising (a) two or more membrane oxidation stages, each stage comprising a reactant zone, an oxidant zone, one or more ion transport membranes separating the reactant zone from the oxidant zone, a reactant gas inlet region, a reactant gas outlet region, an oxidant gas inlet region, and an oxidant gas outlet region; (b) an interstage reactant gas flow path disposed between each pair of membrane oxidation stages and adapted to place the reactant gas outlet region of a first stage of the pair in flow communication with the reactant gas inlet region of a second stage of the pair; and (c) one or more reactant interstage feed gas lines, each line being in flow communication with any interstage reactant gas flow path or with the reactant zone of any membrane oxidation stage receiving interstage reactant gas.

  1. Staged membrane oxidation reactor system

    DOEpatents

    Repasky, John Michael; Carolan, Michael Francis; Stein, VanEric Edward; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

    2013-04-16

    Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising (a) two or more membrane oxidation stages, each stage comprising a reactant zone, an oxidant zone, one or more ion transport membranes separating the reactant zone from the oxidant zone, a reactant gas inlet region, a reactant gas outlet region, an oxidant gas inlet region, and an oxidant gas outlet region; (b) an interstage reactant gas flow path disposed between each pair of membrane oxidation stages and adapted to place the reactant gas outlet region of a first stage of the pair in flow communication with the reactant gas inlet region of a second stage of the pair; and (c) one or more reactant interstage feed gas lines, each line being in flow communication with any interstage reactant gas flow path or with the reactant zone of any membrane oxidation stage receiving interstage reactant gas.

  2. Staged membrane oxidation reactor system

    DOEpatents

    Repasky, John Michael; Carolan, Michael Francis; Stein, VanEric Edward; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

    2012-09-11

    Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising (a) two or more membrane oxidation stages, each stage comprising a reactant zone, an oxidant zone, one or more ion transport membranes separating the reactant zone from the oxidant zone, a reactant gas inlet region, a reactant gas outlet region, an oxidant gas inlet region, and an oxidant gas outlet region; (b) an interstage reactant gas flow path disposed between each pair of membrane oxidation stages and adapted to place the reactant gas outlet region of a first stage of the pair in flow communication with the reactant gas inlet region of a second stage of the pair; and (c) one or more reactant interstage feed gas lines, each line being in flow communication with any interstage reactant gas flow path or with the reactant zone of any membrane oxidation stage receiving interstage reactant gas.

  3. Operation of staged membrane oxidation reactor systems

    DOEpatents

    Repasky, John Michael

    2012-10-16

    A method of operating a multi-stage ion transport membrane oxidation system. The method comprises providing a multi-stage ion transport membrane oxidation system with at least a first membrane oxidation stage and a second membrane oxidation stage, operating the ion transport membrane oxidation system at operating conditions including a characteristic temperature of the first membrane oxidation stage and a characteristic temperature of the second membrane oxidation stage; and controlling the production capacity and/or the product quality by changing the characteristic temperature of the first membrane oxidation stage and/or changing the characteristic temperature of the second membrane oxidation stage.

  4. Oxidative damage in chemical teratogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wells, P G; Kim, P M; Laposa, R R; Nicol, C J; Parman, T; Winn, L M

    1997-12-12

    The teratogenicity of many xenobiotics is thought to depend at least in part upon their bioactivation by embryonic cytochromes P450, prostaglandin H synthase (PHS) and lipoxygenases (LPOs) to electrophilic and/or free radical reactive intermediates that covalently bind to or oxidize cellular macromolecules such as DNA, protein and lipid, resulting in in utero death or teratogenesis. Using as models the tobacco carcinogens benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), the anticonvulsant drug phenytoin, structurally related anticonvulsants (e.g. mephenytoin, nirvanol, trimethadione, dimethadione) and the sedative drug thalidomide, we have examined the potential teratologic relevance of free radical-initiated, reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated oxidative molecular target damage, genotoxicity (micronucleus formation) and DNA repair in mouse and rabbit models in vivo and in embryo culture, and in vitro using purified enzymes or cultured rat skin fibroblasts. These teratogens were bioactivated by PHS and LPOs to free radical reactive intermediary metabolites, characterized by electron spin resonance spectrometry, that initiated ROS formation, including hydroxyl radicals, which were characterized by salicylate hydroxylation. ROS-initiated oxidation of DNA (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine formation), protein (carbonyl formation), glutathione (GSH) and lipid (peroxidation), and embryotoxicity were shown for phenytoin, its major hydroxylated metabolite 5-(p-hydroxyphenyl)-5-phenylhydantoin [HPPH], thalidomide, B[a]P and NNK in vivo and/or in embryo culture, the latter indicating a teratologically critical role for embryonic, as distinct from maternal, processes. DNA oxidation and teratogenicity of phenytoin and thalidomide were reduced by PHS inhibitors. Oxidative macromolecular lesions and teratogenicity also were reduced by the free radical trapping agent phenylbutylnitrone (PBN), and the antioxidants caffeic acid and vitamin E. In embryo

  5. Oxidant damage during and after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.; Leskiw, M. J.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess oxidant damage during and after spaceflight and to compare the results against bed rest with 6 degrees head-down tilt. We measured the urinary excretion of the F(2) isoprostane, 8-iso-prostaglandin (PG) F(2alpha), and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2 deoxyguanosine (8-OH DG) before, during, and after long-duration spaceflight (4-9 mo) on the Russian space station MIR, short-duration spaceflight on the shuttle, and 17 days of bed rest. Sample collections on MIR were obtained between 88 and 186 days in orbit. 8-iso-PGF(2alpha) and 8-OH DG are markers for oxidative damage to membrane lipids and DNA, respectively. Data are mean +/- SE. On MIR, isoprostane levels were decreased inflight (96. 9 +/- 11.6 vs. 76.7 +/- 14.9 ng. kg(-1). day(-1), P < 0.05, n = 6) due to decreased dietary intake secondary to impaired thermoregulation. Isoprostane excretion was increased postflight (245.7 +/- 55.8 ng. kg(-1). day(-1), P < 0.01). 8-OH DG excretion was unchanged with spaceflight and increased postflight (269 +/- 84 vs 442 +/- 180 ng. kg(-1). day(-1), P < 0.05). On the shuttle, 8-OH DG excretion was unchanged in- and postflight, but 8-iso-PGF(2alpha) excretion was decreased inflight (15.6 +/- 4.3 vs 8.0 +/- 2.7 ng. kg(-1). day(-1), P < 0.05). No changes were found with bed rest, but 8-iso-PGF(2alpha) was increased during the recovery phase (48.9 +/- 23.0 vs 65.4 +/- 28.3 ng. kg(-1). day(-1), P < 0.05). The changes in isoprostane production were attributed to decreased production of oxygen radicals from the electron transport chain due to the reduced energy intake inflight. The postflight increases in the excretion of the products of oxidative damage were attributed to a combination of an increase in metabolic activity and the loss of some host antioxidant defenses inflight. We conclude that 1) oxidative damage was decreased inflight, and 2) oxidative damage was increased postflight.

  6. Reducing systems protecting the bacterial cell envelope from oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Arts, Isabelle S; Gennaris, Alexandra; Collet, Jean-François

    2015-06-22

    Exposure of cells to elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) damages DNA, membrane lipids and proteins, which can potentially lead to cell death. In proteins, the sulfur-containing residues cysteine and methionine are particularly sensitive to oxidation, forming sulfenic acids and methionine sulfoxides, respectively. The presence of protection mechanisms to scavenge ROS and repair damaged cellular components is therefore essential for cell survival. The bacterial cell envelope, which constitutes the first protection barrier from the extracellular environment, is particularly exposed to the oxidizing molecules generated by the host cells to kill invading microorganisms. Therefore, the presence of oxidative stress defense mechanisms in that compartment is crucial for cell survival. Here, we review recent findings that led to the identification of several reducing pathways protecting the cell envelope from oxidative damage. We focus in particular on the mechanisms that repair envelope proteins with oxidized cysteine and methionine residues and we discuss the major questions that remain to be solved. PMID:25957772

  7. Lung Oxidative Damage by Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Araneda, O. F.; Tuesta, M.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important functions of lungs is to maintain an adequate oxygenation in the organism. This organ can be affected by hypoxia facing both physiological and pathological situations. Exposure to this condition favors the increase of reactive oxygen species from mitochondria, as from NADPH oxidase, xanthine oxidase/reductase, and nitric oxide synthase enzymes, as well as establishing an inflammatory process. In lungs, hypoxia also modifies the levels of antioxidant substances causing pulmonary oxidative damage. Imbalance of redox state in lungs induced by hypoxia has been suggested as a participant in the changes observed in lung function in the hypoxic context, such as hypoxic vasoconstriction and pulmonary edema, in addition to vascular remodeling and chronic pulmonary hypertension. In this work, experimental evidence that shows the implied mechanisms in pulmonary redox state by hypoxia is reviewed. Herein, studies of cultures of different lung cells and complete isolated lung and tests conducted in vivo in the different forms of hypoxia, conducted in both animal models and humans, are described. PMID:22966417

  8. Tissue Damage and Oxidant/Antioxidant Balance

    PubMed Central

    Kisaoglu, Abdullah; Borekci, Bunyamin; Yapca, O. Erkan; Bilen, Habib; Suleyman, Halis

    2013-01-01

    The oxidant/antioxidant balance in healthy tissues is maintained with a predominance of antioxidants. Various factors that can lead to tissue damage disrupt the oxidant/antioxidant balance in favor of oxidants. In this study, disruptions of the oxidant/antioxidant balance in favor of oxidants were found to be a consequence of the over-consumption of antioxidants. For this reason, antioxidants are considered to be of importance in the prevention and treatment of various types of tissue damage that are aggravated by stress. PMID:25610248

  9. In vitro toxicity of iron oxide nanoparticle: oxidative damages on Hep G2 cells.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Leila; Tanwir, Farzeen; Yousefi Babadi, Vahid

    2015-02-01

    During the past years many studies have been done highlighting the great need for a more thorough understanding of cell-iron oxide nanoparticle interactions. To improve our knowledge in this field, there is a great need for standardized protocols that would allow to comparing the cytotoxic potential of any Fe2O3-NP type with previously studied particles. Several approaches are reported that several parameters which are of great importance for Fe2O3 nanoparticle induced toxicity. Nanoparticles because of their very small size can pass through the cell membrane and can make oxidative damage in all parts of the cells such as mitochondria, membrane, DNA due to high surface area. This study focuses on acute cytotoxicity of reactive oxygen species and DNA damaging effects of mentioned nanoparticles. Results showed increase of the oxidative damage leads cells to the apoptosis, therefore reduced cell viability. It is interesting that all of the results are concentration and time dependent. PMID:25497787

  10. The oxidative environment and protein damage.

    PubMed

    Davies, Michael J

    2005-01-17

    Proteins are a major target for oxidants as a result of their abundance in biological systems, and their high rate constants for reaction. Kinetic data for a number of radicals and non-radical oxidants (e.g. singlet oxygen and hypochlorous acid) are consistent with proteins consuming the majority of these species generated within cells. Oxidation can occur at both the protein backbone and on the amino acid side-chains, with the ratio of attack dependent on a number of factors. With some oxidants, damage is limited and specific to certain residues, whereas other species, such as the hydroxyl radical, give rise to widespread, relatively non-specific damage. Some of the major oxidation pathways, and products formed, are reviewed. The latter include reactive species, such as peroxides, which can induce further oxidation and chain reactions (within proteins, and via damage transfer to other molecules) and stable products. Particular emphasis is given to the oxidation of methionine residues, as this species is readily oxidised by a wide range of oxidants. Some side-chain oxidation products, including methionine sulfoxide, can be employed as sensitive, specific, markers of oxidative damage. The product profile can, in some cases, provide valuable information on the species involved; selected examples of this approach are discussed. Most protein damage is non-repairable, and has deleterious consequences on protein structure and function; methionine sulfoxide formation can however be reversed in some circumstances. The major fate of oxidised proteins is catabolism by proteosomal and lysosomal pathways, but some materials appear to be poorly degraded and accumulate within cells. The accumulation of such damaged material may contribute to a range of human pathologies. PMID:15680218

  11. Detection of damage in axial (membrane) systems

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, T.A.; Baker, W.E.; Farrar, C.R.; Rhee, W.H.

    1998-12-31

    In a recent paper, two methods of damage identification (Modified Damage Index and Change-in-Flexibility) were applied to detection of damage in an 8-DOF vibrating system. The goal of the work was to detect damage (reduction in stiffness of one or more of the elements) as well as to locate the particular damaged elements (S). However, the investigation was limited to numerical simulations only. In this paper, a physical, spring-mass model of a similar, degenerate 8-DOF system (7 normal modes plus a rigid-body mode) was constructed. Experiments were then performed and the modal properties of the system were determined in undamaged and damaged states. Excitation was provided either by an impact hammer or by an electromechanical shaker. Damage was induced by replacing one of the springs with a spring of lower stiffness. The Modified Damage Index method clearly isolated the location of damage for a variety of damage locations and levels of damage. The Change-in-Flexibility method, however, was found to be less reliable. The ability of the method to locate damage depended strongly on location and the level of damage as well as the number of modes included.

  12. Cardiovascular diseases: oxidative damage and antioxidant protection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, P-Y; Xu, X; Li, X-C

    2014-10-01

    Atherosclerosis, the hardening of arteries under oxidative stress is related to oxidative changes of low density lipoproteins (LDL). The antioxidants prevent the formation of oxidized LDL during atherogenesis. Perhaps more than one mechanism is involved in the atherosclerosis disease where LDL is oxidized in all the cells of arterial wall during the development of this disease. The oxidation of LDL produces lipid peroxidation products such as isoprostans from arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids, oxysterols from cholesterol, hydroxyl fatty acids, lipid peroxides and aldehydes. The lipid peroxidation bioassay can serve as a marker for the risk of cardiovascular. An in vivo test of levels of oxidative lipid damage is an early prediction of development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Serum paraoxonase (PON) activity is correlated to severity of the coronary artery disease. The antioxidants level in the serum and serum paraoxonase activity provides information for the risk of CVD. The antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase is responsible for dismutation of superoxide, a free radical chain initiator. The subcellular changes in the equilibrium in favor of free radicals can cause increase in the oxidative stress which leads to cardiomyopathy, heart attack or cardiac dysfunction. The oxidative damage and defense of heart disease has been reported where dietary antioxidants protect the free radical damage to DNA, proteins and lipids. The ascorbic acid, vitamin C is an effective antioxidant and high vitamin E intake can reduce the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) by inhibition of atherogenic forms of oxidized LDL. The vitamin A and beta-carotene protect lipid peroxidation and provitamin-A activity. It has been recently suggested that the protection of oxidative damage and related CVD is best served by antioxidants found in the fruits and vegetables. The oxidative damage and antioxidant protection of CVD have been described here. PMID:25392110

  13. Age associated oxidative damage in lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Nandeslu; Das, Subhasis; Mahapatra, Santanu Kar; Chakraborty, Subhankari Prasad; Kundu, Pratip Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Lymphocytes are an important immunological cell and have been played a significant role in acquired immune system; hence, may play in pivotal role in immunosenescence. Oxidative stress has been reported to increase in elderly subjects, possibly arising from an uncontrolled production of free radicals with aging and decreased antioxidant defenses. This study was aimed to evaluate the level of lipid-protein damage and antioxidant status in lymphocytes of healthy individuals to correlate between oxidative damage with the aging process. Twenty healthy individuals of each age group (11–20; 21–30; 31–40; 41–50; and 51–60 years) were selected randomly. Blood samples were drawn by medical practitioner and lymphocytes were isolated from blood samples. Malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyls (PC) level were evaluated to determine the lipid and protein damage in lymphocytes. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione and glutathione dependent enzymes were estimated to evaluate the antioxidant status in the lymphocytes. Increased MDA and PC levels strongly support the increased oxidative damage in elderly subject than young subjects. The results indicated that, balance of oxidant and antioxidant systems in lymphocytes shifts in favor of accelerated oxidative damage during aging. Thus oxidative stress in lymphocytes may particular interest in aging and may play important role in immunosenescence. PMID:20972374

  14. Oxidative stress and oxidative damage in chemical carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Klaunig, James E. Wang Zemin; Pu Xinzhu; Zhou Shaoyu

    2011-07-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are induced through a variety of endogenous and exogenous sources. Overwhelming of antioxidant and DNA repair mechanisms in the cell by ROS may result in oxidative stress and oxidative damage to the cell. This resulting oxidative stress can damage critical cellular macromolecules and/or modulate gene expression pathways. Cancer induction by chemical and physical agents involves a multi-step process. This process includes multiple molecular and cellular events to transform a normal cell to a malignant neoplastic cell. Oxidative damage resulting from ROS generation can participate in all stages of the cancer process. An association of ROS generation and human cancer induction has been shown. It appears that oxidative stress may both cause as well as modify the cancer process. Recently association between polymorphisms in oxidative DNA repair genes and antioxidant genes (single nucleotide polymorphisms) and human cancer susceptibility has been shown.

  15. Plasmalogen phospholipids protect internodal myelin from oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Luoma, Adrienne M; Kuo, Fonghsu; Cakici, Ozgur; Crowther, Michelle N; Denninger, Andrew R; Avila, Robin L; Brites, Pedro; Kirschner, Daniel A

    2015-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are implicated in a range of degenerative conditions, including aging, neurodegenerative diseases, and neurological disorders. Myelin is a lipid-rich multilamellar sheath that facilitates rapid nerve conduction in vertebrates. Given the high energetic demands and low antioxidant capacity of the cells that elaborate the sheaths, myelin is considered intrinsically vulnerable to oxidative damage, raising the question whether additional mechanisms prevent structural damage. We characterized the structural and biochemical basis of ROS-mediated myelin damage in murine tissues from both central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS). To determine whether ROS can cause structural damage to the internodal myelin, whole sciatic and optic nerves were incubated ex vivo with a hydroxyl radical-generating system consisting of copper (Cu), hydrogen peroxide (HP), and ortho-phenanthroline (OP). Quantitative assessment of unfixed tissue by X-ray diffraction revealed irreversible compaction of myelin membrane stacking in both sciatic and optic nerves. Incubation in the presence of the hydroxyl radical scavenger sodium formate prevented this damage, implicating hydroxyl radical species. Myelin membranes are particularly enriched in plasmalogens, a class of ether-linked phospholipids proposed to have antioxidant properties. Myelin in sciatic nerve from plasmalogen-deficient (Pex7 knockout) mice was significantly more vulnerable to Cu/OP/HP-mediated ROS-induced compaction than myelin from WT mice. Our results directly support the role of plasmalogens as endogenous antioxidants providing a defense that protects ROS-vulnerable myelin. PMID:25801291

  16. Thermal Damage to Chloroplast Envelope Membranes 1

    PubMed Central

    McCain, Douglas C.; Croxdale, Judith; Markley, John L.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance was used to detect thermal injury to chloroplasts in vivo. A lesion occurs in the chloroplast envelope membrane at temperatures between 53°C and 57°C, depending on species, leaf condition, and heating rate. The injury is associated with a sudden loss of water from the chloroplast. PMID:16666815

  17. Membrane damage by human islet amyloid polypeptide through fibril growth at the membrane.

    PubMed

    Engel, Maarten F M; Khemtémourian, Lucie; Kleijer, Cécile C; Meeldijk, Hans J D; Jacobs, Jet; Verkleij, Arie J; de Kruijff, Ben; Killian, J Antoinette; Höppener, Jo W M

    2008-04-22

    Fibrillar protein deposits (amyloid) in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans are thought to be involved in death of the insulin-producing islet beta cells in type 2 diabetes mellitus. It has been suggested that the mechanism of this beta cell death involves membrane disruption by human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), the major constituent of islet amyloid. However, the molecular mechanism of hIAPP-induced membrane disruption is not known. Here, we propose a hypothesis that growth of hIAPP fibrils at the membrane causes membrane damage. We studied the kinetics of hIAPP-induced membrane damage in relation to hIAPP fibril growth and found that the kinetic profile of hIAPP-induced membrane damage is characterized by a lag phase and a sigmoidal transition, which matches the kinetic profile of hIAPP fibril growth. The observation that seeding accelerates membrane damage supports the hypothesis. In addition, variables that are well known to affect hIAPP fibril formation, i.e., the presence of a fibril formation inhibitor, hIAPP concentration, and lipid composition, were found to have the same effect on hIAPP-induced membrane damage. Furthermore, electron microscopy analysis showed that hIAPP fibrils line the surface of distorted phospholipid vesicles, in agreement with the notion that hIAPP fibril growth at the membrane and membrane damage are physically connected. Together, these observations point toward a mechanism in which growth of hIAPP fibrils, rather than a particular hIAPP species, is responsible for the observed membrane damage. This hypothesis provides an additional mechanism next to the previously proposed role of oligomers as the main cytotoxic species of amyloidogenic proteins. PMID:18408164

  18. Membrane damage by human islet amyloid polypeptide through fibril growth at the membrane

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Maarten F. M.; Khemtémourian, Lucie; Kleijer, Cécile C.; Meeldijk, Hans J. D.; Jacobs, Jet; Verkleij, Arie J.; de Kruijff, Ben; Killian, J. Antoinette; Höppener, Jo W. M.

    2008-01-01

    Fibrillar protein deposits (amyloid) in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans are thought to be involved in death of the insulin-producing islet β cells in type 2 diabetes mellitus. It has been suggested that the mechanism of this β cell death involves membrane disruption by human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), the major constituent of islet amyloid. However, the molecular mechanism of hIAPP-induced membrane disruption is not known. Here, we propose a hypothesis that growth of hIAPP fibrils at the membrane causes membrane damage. We studied the kinetics of hIAPP-induced membrane damage in relation to hIAPP fibril growth and found that the kinetic profile of hIAPP-induced membrane damage is characterized by a lag phase and a sigmoidal transition, which matches the kinetic profile of hIAPP fibril growth. The observation that seeding accelerates membrane damage supports the hypothesis. In addition, variables that are well known to affect hIAPP fibril formation, i.e., the presence of a fibril formation inhibitor, hIAPP concentration, and lipid composition, were found to have the same effect on hIAPP-induced membrane damage. Furthermore, electron microscopy analysis showed that hIAPP fibrils line the surface of distorted phospholipid vesicles, in agreement with the notion that hIAPP fibril growth at the membrane and membrane damage are physically connected. Together, these observations point toward a mechanism in which growth of hIAPP fibrils, rather than a particular hIAPP species, is responsible for the observed membrane damage. This hypothesis provides an additional mechanism next to the previously proposed role of oligomers as the main cytotoxic species of amyloidogenic proteins. PMID:18408164

  19. The oxidative damage initiation hypothesis for meiosis.

    PubMed

    Hörandl, Elvira; Hadacek, Franz

    2013-12-01

    The maintenance of sexual reproduction in eukaryotes is still a major enigma in evolutionary biology. Meiosis represents the only common feature of sex in all eukaryotic kingdoms, and thus, we regard it a key issue for discussing its function. Almost all asexuality modes maintain meiosis either in a modified form or as an alternative pathway, and facultatively apomictic plants increase frequencies of sexuality relative to apomixis after abiotic stress. On the physiological level, abiotic stress causes oxidative stress. We hypothesize that repair of oxidative damage on nuclear DNA could be a major driving force in the evolution of meiosis. We present a hypothetical model for the possible redox chemistry that underlies the binding of the meiosis-specific protein Spo11 to DNA. During prophase of meiosis I, oxidized sites at the DNA molecule are being targeted by the catalytic tyrosine moieties of Spo11 protein, which acts like an antioxidant reducing the oxidized target. The oxidized tyrosine residues, tyrosyl radicals, attack the phosphodiester bonds of the DNA backbone causing DNA double strand breaks that can be repaired by various mechanisms. Polyploidy in apomictic plants could mitigate oxidative DNA damage and decrease Spo11 activation. Our hypothesis may contribute to explaining various enigmatic phenomena: first, DSB formation outnumbers crossovers and, thus, effective recombination events by far because the target of meiosis may be the removal of oxidative lesions; second, it offers an argument for why expression of sexuality is responsive to stress in many eukaryotes; and third, repair of oxidative DNA damage turns meiosis into an essential characteristic of eukaryotic reproduction. PMID:23995700

  20. Oxidative damage lipid peroxidation in the kidney of choline-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Ossani, Georgina; Dalghi, Marianela; Repetto, Marisa

    2007-01-01

    Phosphatidylcholine is the most abundant phospholipid constituent of cell membranes and choline is a quaternary amine required for phosphatidylcholine synthesis. The impairment of membrane functions is considered as an indication of oxidative damage. In order to kinetically analyze the time course of the pathogenesis of renal necrosis following to choline deficiency in weanling rats, we determined markers of membrane lipid peroxidation (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances; TBARS and hydroperoxide-induced chemiluminescence (BOOH-CL) ) and studied the histopathological damage. Plasma TBARS (t(1/2) = 2.5 days) was an early indicator of systemic oxidative stress, likely involving liver and kidney. The levels of TBARS an BOOH-CL increased by 80% and by 183%, respectively, in kidney homogenates with t(1/2) = 1.5 days and 4 days, respectively. The levels of BOOH-CL were statistically higher in rats fed a choline-deficient diet at day 6, in a mixture of membranes (from plasmatic, smooth and rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi), in mitochondrial membranes and in lysosomal membranes. The results indicate that choline deficiency produces oxidative damage in kidney subcellular membranes. Necrosis involved mainly convoluted tubules and appeared with a t(1/2) = 5.5 days. An increase in the production of reactive oxygen species, triggered by NADH overproduction in the mitochondrial dysfunction associated with choline deficiency appears as one of the pathogenic mechanism of mitochondrial and cellular oxidative damage in choline-deficiency. PMID:17127370

  1. Oxidative DNA Damage and Nucleotide Excision Repair

    PubMed Central

    Melis, Joost P.M.; Luijten, Mirjam

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Oxidative DNA damage is repaired by multiple, overlapping DNA repair pathways. Accumulating evidence supports the hypothesis that nucleotide excision repair (NER), besides base excision repair (BER), is also involved in neutralizing oxidative DNA damage. Recent Advances: NER includes two distinct sub-pathways: transcription-coupled NER (TC-NER) and global genome repair (GG-NER). The CSA and CSB proteins initiate the onset of TC-NER. Recent findings show that not only CSB, but also CSA is involved in the repair of oxidative DNA lesions, in the nucleus as well as in mitochondria. The XPG protein is also of importance for the removal of oxidative DNA lesions, as it may enhance the initial step of BER. Substantial evidence exists that support a role for XPC in NER and BER. XPC deficiency not only results in decreased repair of oxidative lesions, but has also been linked to disturbed redox homeostasis. Critical Issues: The role of NER proteins in the regulation of the cellular response to oxidative (mitochondrial and nuclear) DNA damage may be the underlying mechanism of the pathology of accelerated aging in Cockayne syndrome patients, a driving force for internal cancer development in XP-A and XP-C patients, and a contributor to the mixed exhibited phenotypes of XP-G patients. Future Directions: Accumulating evidence indicates that DNA repair factors can be involved in multiple DNA repair pathways. However, the distinct detailed mechanism and consequences of these additional functions remain to be elucidated and can possibly shine a light on clinically related issues. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 2409–2419. PMID:23216312

  2. Oxidative DNA damage accumulation in gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Farinati, F; Cardin, R; Degan, P; Rugge, M; Di, M; Bonvicini, P; Naccarato, R

    1998-01-01

    Background—Gastric carcinogenesis is a multifactorial, multistep process, in which chronic inflammation plays a major role. 
Aims—In order to ascertain whether free radical mediated oxidative DNA damage is involved in such a process, concentrations of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8OHdG), a mutagenic/carcinogenic adduct, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), as an indirect measure of free radical mediated damage, were determined in biopsy specimens from patients undergoing endoscopy. 
Patients—Eighty eight patients were divided into histological subgroups as follows: 27 with chronic non-atrophic gastritis, 41 with atrophic gastritis, six with gastric cancer, and 14 unaffected controls. 
Methods—Intestinal metaplasia, Helicobacter pylori infection, and disease activity were semiquantitatively scored. 8OHdG concentrations were assessed by HPLC with electrochemical detection, and TBARS concentrations were fluorimetrically assayed. 
Results—8OHdG concentrations (mean number of adducts/105 dG residues) were significantly higher in chronic atrophic gastritis (p=0.0009). Significantly higher concentrations were also detected in the presence of severe disease activity (p=0.02), intestinal metaplasia (p=0.035), and H pylori infection (p=0.001). TBARS concentrations were also higher in atrophic gastritis, though not significantly so. In a multiple logistic regression analysis, 8OHdG concentrations correlated best with the presence and severity of H pylori infection (r=0.53, p=0.002). 
Conclusions—Chronic gastritis is characterised by the accumulation of oxidative DNA damage with mutagenic and carcinogenic potential. H pylori infection is the major determinant for DNA adduct formation. 

 Keywords: free radicals; oxidative DNA damage; gastric carcinogenesis; precancerous changes; peroxidative damage PMID:9577340

  3. Membrane protein damage and repair: selective loss of a quinone-protein function in chloroplast membranes. [Chlamydomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Kyle, D.J.; Ohad, I.; Arntzen, C.J.

    1984-07-01

    A loss of electron transport capacity in chloroplast membranes was induced by high-light intensities (photoinhibition). The primary site of inhibition was at the reducing side of photosystem II (PSII) with little damage to the oxidizing side or to the reaction center core of PSII. Addition of herbicides (atrazine or diuron) partially protected the membrane from photoinhibition; these compounds displace the bound plastoquinone (designated as Q/sub B/), which functions as the secondary electron acceptor on the reducing side of PSII. Loss of function of the 32-kilodalton Q/sub B/ apoprotein was demonstrated by a loss of binding sites for (/sup 14/C)atraazine. We suggest that quinone anions, which may interact with molecular oxygen to produce an oxygen radical, selectively damage the apoprotein of the secondary acceptor of PSII, thus rendering it inactive and thereby blocking photosynthetic electron flow under conditions of high photon flux densities. 21 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  4. Phototoxicity mechanisms: chlorpromazine photosensitized damage to DNA and cell membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Kochevar, K.E.

    1981-07-01

    Photosensitized damage to biological molecules is the initial process in phototoxic responses. It is now recognized that many phototoxic compounds can photosensitize damage to more than one type of biological substrate. The in vitro light-initiated reactions of phototoxic compounds with DNA, soluble proteins and membrane components can be classified by their molecular mechanisms: (1) those in which an excited state of the phototoxic compound (or an unstable species derived from it) reacts directly with the biological substrate and (2) those in which a molecule derived from the phototoxic compound (a photoproduct or an activated oxygen species) reacts with the biological substrate. This paper describes the mechanisms by which chlorpromazine photosensitizes damage to membranes, protein and DNA and compares them to the mechanisms of photosensitization by psoralens, porphyrins, dyes, and other molecules.

  5. Reactor vessel using metal oxide ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Marc A.; Zeltner, Walter A.

    1992-08-11

    A reaction vessel for use in photoelectrochemical reactions includes as its reactive surface a metal oxide porous ceramic membrane of a catalytic metal such as titanium. The reaction vessel includes a light source and a counter electrode. A provision for applying an electrical bias between the membrane and the counter electrode permits the Fermi levels of potential reaction to be favored so that certain reactions may be favored in the vessel. The electrical biasing is also useful for the cleaning of the catalytic membrane.

  6. Membranes for corrosive oxidations. Final CRADA report.

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, S. W.; Energy Systems

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this project is to develop porous hydrophilic membranes that are highly resistant to oxidative and corrosive conditions and to deploy them for recovery and purification of high tonnage chemicals such as hydrogen peroxide and other oxychemicals. The research team patented a process for membrane-based separation of hydrogen peroxide (US Patent No. 5,662,878). The process is based on using a hydrophilic membrane to separate hydrogen peroxide from the organic working solution. To enable this process, a new method for producing hydrophilic membrane materials (Patent No.6,464,880) was reported. We investigated methods of producing these hydrophilic materials and evaluated separations performance in comparison to membrane stability. It was determined that at the required membrane flux, membrane stability was not sufficient to design a commercial process. This work was published (Hestekin et al., J. Membrane Science 2006). To meet the performance needs of the process, we developed a membrane contactor method to extract the hydrogen peroxide, then we surveyed several commercial and pre-commercial membrane materials. We identified pre-commercial hydrophilic membranes with the required selectivity, flux, and stability to meet the needs of the process. In addition, we invented a novel reaction/separations format that greatly increases the performance of the process. To test the performance of the membranes and the new formats we procured and integrated reactor/membrane separations unit that enables controlled mixing, flow, temperature control, pressure control, and sampling. The results were used to file a US non-provisional patent application (ANL-INV 03-12). Hydrogen peroxide is widely used in pulp and paper applications, environmental treatment, and other industries. Virtually all hydrogen peroxide production is now based on a process featuring catalytic hydrogenation followed by auto-oxidation of suitable organic carrier molecules. This process has several

  7. Microfluidic DNA extraction using a patterned aluminum oxide membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungkyu; Gale, Bruce K.

    2006-01-01

    A DNA extraction system was designed and fabricated using an AOM (aluminum oxide membrane) with 200 nm pores and PDMS microfluidic channels. The membrane was patterned using soft lithography techniques and SU-8 photolithography on the membrane. After making the pattern with SU-8, the AOM was observed using an SEM (scanning electro microscope) to verify the AOM structure was not damaged. From the SEM images, the AOM structure was not different after modification with SU-8. To complete the system, a PDMS mold for the microfluidic channels was made by soft lithography. Using the SU-8 mold, PDMS microchannels were cast using PDMS with a low polymer to curing agent ratio to provide adhesion between the patterned membrane and microfluidic channel. Then, the patterned membrane was sandwiched between PDMS microfluidic channels in a parallel format. The completed system was tested with 10ug of Lambda DNA mixed with the fluorescent dye SYBR Green I. Following DNA extraction, the surface of each well was examined with fluorescence microscopy while embedded in the microfluidic system. Extracted and immobilized DNA on the AOM was observed in almost every separation well. This microsystem, referred to as a membrane-on-a-chip, has potential applications in high-throughput DNA extraction and analysis, with the possibility of being integrated into polymer-based microfluidic systems.

  8. Oxidation of DNA: damage to nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Kanvah, Sriram; Joseph, Joshy; Schuster, Gary B; Barnett, Robert N; Cleveland, Charles L; Landman, Uzi

    2010-02-16

    All organisms store the information necessary to maintain life in their DNA. Any process that damages DNA, causing a loss or corruption of that information, jeopardizes the viability of the organism. One-electron oxidation is such a process. In this Account, we address three of the central features of one-electron oxidation of DNA: (i) the migration of the radical cation away from the site of its formation; (ii) the electronic and structural factors that determine the nucleobases at which irreversible reactions most readily occur; (iii) the mechanism of reaction for nucleobase radical cations. The loss of an electron (ionization) from DNA generates an electron "hole" (a radical cation), located most often on its nucleobases, that migrates reversibly through duplex DNA by hopping until it is trapped in an irreversible chemical reaction. The particular sequence of nucleobases in a DNA oligomer determines both the efficiency of hopping and the specific location and nature of the damaging chemical reaction. In aqueous solution, DNA is a polyanion because of the negative charge carried by its phosphate groups. Counterions to the phosphate groups (typically Na(+)) play an important role in facilitating both hopping and the eventual reaction of the radical cation with H(2)O. Irreversible reaction of a radical cation with H(2)O in duplex DNA occurs preferentially at the most reactive site. In normal DNA, comprising the four common DNA nucleobases G, C, A, and T, reaction occurs most commonly at a guanine, resulting in its conversion primarily to 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-OxoG). Both electronic and steric effects control the outcome of this process. If the DNA oligomer does not contain a suitable guanine, then reaction of the radical cation occurs at the thymine of a TT step, primarily by a tandem process. The oxidative damage of DNA is a complex process, influenced by charge transport and reactions that are controlled by a combination of enthalpic, entropic, steric, and

  9. Metallothionein blocks oxidative DNA damage in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Wei; Pi, Jingbo; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    The role of metallothionein (MT) in mitigation of oxidative DNA damage (ODD) induced either by cadmium (Cd) or the direct oxidant hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was systematically examined by using MT-I/II double knockout (MT-null) or MT-competent wild-type (WT) cells. Both toxicants were much more lethal to MT-null cells (Cd LC50 = 6.6 μM; H2O2 LC50 = 550 μM) than WT cells (Cd LC50 = 16.5 μM; H2O2 LC50 = 930 μM). Cd induced concentration-related MT increases in WT cells, while the basal levels were undetectable and not increased by Cd in MT-null cells. ODD, measured by the immuno-spin trapping method, was minimally induced by sub-toxic Cd levels (1 or 5 μM; 24 h) in WT cells, but markedly increased in MT-null cells (> 430%). Similarly, ODD was induced to higher levels by lower concentrations of H2O2 in MT-null cells than WT cells. Transfection of MT-I into MT-null cells reduced both Cd- and H2O2-induced cytolethality and ODD. Cd increased expression of the oxidant defense genes, HO-1 and GSTa2 to a much greater extent in MT-null cells than WT. Cd or H2O2 exposure increased expression of key transport genes, Mrp1 and Mrp2, in WT cells but not in MT-null cells. MT protects against Cd- and H2O2-induced ODD in MT competent cells possibly by multiple mechanisms, potentially including direct metal ion sequestration and sequestration of oxidant radicals by MT. MT-deficient cells appear to adapt to Cd primarily by turning on oxidant response systems, while MT-competent cells activate MT and transport systems. PMID:22914987

  10. Metal oxide membranes for gas separation

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Marc A.; Webster, Elizabeth T.; Xu, Qunyin

    1994-01-01

    A method for permformation of a microporous ceramic membrane onto a porous support includes placing a colloidal suspension of metal oxide particles on one side of the porous support and exposing the other side of the porous support to a drying stream of gas or a reactive gas stream so that the particles are deposited on the drying side of the support as a gel. The gel so deposited can be sintered to form a supported ceramic membrane having mean pore sizes less than 30 Angstroms and useful for ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, or gas separation.

  11. Metal oxide membranes for gas separation

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, M.A.; Webster, E.T.; Xu, Q.

    1994-08-30

    A method for formation of a microporous ceramic membrane onto a porous support includes placing a colloidal suspension of metal oxide particles on one side of the porous support and exposing the other side of the porous support to a drying stream of gas or a reactive gas stream so that the particles are deposited on the drying side of the support as a gel. The gel so deposited can be sintered to form a supported ceramic membrane having mean pore sizes less than 30 Angstroms and useful for ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, or gas separation. 4 figs.

  12. Eating increases oxidative damage in a reptile.

    PubMed

    Butler, Michael W; Lutz, Thomas J; Fokidis, H Bobby; Stahlschmidt, Zachary R

    2016-07-01

    While eating has substantial benefits in terms of both nutrient and energy acquisition, there are physiological costs associated with digesting and metabolizing a meal. Frequently, these costs have been documented in the context of energy expenditure while other physiological costs have been relatively unexplored. Here, we tested whether the seemingly innocuous act of eating affects either systemic pro-oxidant (reactive oxygen metabolite, ROM) levels or antioxidant capacity of corn snakes (Pantherophis guttatus) by collecting plasma during absorptive (peak increase in metabolic rate due to digestion of a meal) and non-absorptive (baseline) states. When individuals were digesting a meal, there was a minimal increase in antioxidant capacity relative to baseline (4%), but a substantial increase in ROMs (nearly 155%), even when controlling for circulating nutrient levels. We report an oxidative cost of eating that is much greater than that due to long distance flight or mounting an immune response in other taxa. This result demonstrates the importance of investigating non-energetic costs associated with meal processing, and it begs future work to identify the mechanism(s) driving this increase in ROM levels. Because energetic costs associated with eating are taxonomically widespread, identifying the taxonomic breadth of eating-induced ROM increases may provide insights into the interplay between oxidative damage and life history theory. PMID:27099366

  13. 20-Hydroxyecdysone prevents oxidative stress damage in adult Pyrrhocoris apterus.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Natraj; Vecera, Josef; Kodrík, Dalibor; Sehnal, Frantisek

    2007-07-01

    Injections of 38 pmol paraquat (1,1'-dimethyl-4,4'-bypyridilium) into adult Pyrrhocoris apterus (average body weight 29.6 mg in males and 36.9 mg in females) caused a significant elevation of lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation and a decline of membrane fluidity in the microsomal brain fraction. Another manifestation of oxidative stress was a depletion of the reduced glutathione pool and reduction of the gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase activity in the brain extracts. The damaging action of paraquat on the brain was counteracted by simultaneous injection of 1 pmol 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E). 20E restrained lipid peroxidation and the formation of protein carbonyls, ameliorated changes in microsomal membrane fluidity, enhanced the level of reduced glutathione, and upregulated the activity of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase. At the organismic level, 20E curtailed three detrimental effects caused by paraquat injection: the disappearance of a blood protein, the suppression of fecundity and egg hatchability, and the shortening of adult life span. The data showed that 20E provided a systemic antioxidant protection but the significance of endogenous ecdysteroids in the management of oxidative stress remains to be shown. PMID:17570141

  14. Liposomal Antioxidants for Protection against Oxidant-Induced Damage

    PubMed Central

    Suntres, Zacharias E.

    2011-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), including superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radical, can be formed as normal products of aerobic metabolism and can be produced at elevated rates under pathophysiological conditions. Overproduction and/or insufficient removal of ROS result in significant damage to cell structure and functions. In vitro studies showed that antioxidants, when applied directly and at relatively high concentrations to cellular systems, are effective in conferring protection against the damaging actions of ROS, but results from animal and human studies showed that several antioxidants provide only modest benefit and even possible harm. Antioxidants have yet to be rendered into reliable and safe therapies because of their poor solubility, inability to cross membrane barriers, extensive first-pass metabolism, and rapid clearance from cells. There is considerable interest towards the development of drug-delivery systems that would result in the selective delivery of antioxidants to tissues in sufficient concentrations to ameliorate oxidant-induced tissue injuries. Liposomes are biocompatible, biodegradable, and nontoxic artificial phospholipid vesicles that offer the possibility of carrying hydrophilic, hydrophobic, and amphiphilic molecules. This paper focus on the use of liposomes for the delivery of antioxidants in the prevention or treatment of pathological conditions related to oxidative stress. PMID:21876690

  15. Antimicrobial metallic copper surfaces kill Staphylococcus haemolyticus via membrane damage

    PubMed Central

    Santo, Christophe Espírito; Quaranta, Davide; Grass, Gregor

    2012-01-01

    Recently, copper (Cu) in its metallic form has regained interest for its antimicrobial properties. Use of metallic Cu surfaces in worldwide hospital trials resulted in remarkable reductions in surface contaminations. Yet, our understanding of why microbes are killed upon contact to the metal is still limited and different modes of action have been proposed. This knowledge, however, is crucial for sustained use of such surfaces in hospitals and other hygiene-sensitive areas. Here, we report on the molecular mechanisms by which the Gram-positive Staphylococcus haemolyticus is inactivated by metallic Cu. Staphylococcus haemolyticus was killed within minutes on Cu but not on stainless steel demonstrating the antimicrobial efficacy of metallic Cu. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) analysis and in vivo staining with Coppersensor-1 indicated that cells accumulated large amounts of Cu ions from metallic Cu surfaces contributing to lethal damage. Mutation rates of Cu- or steel-exposed cells were similarly low. Instead, live/dead staining indicated cell membrane damage in Cu- but not steel-exposed cells. These findings support a model of the cellular targets of metallic Cu toxicity in bacteria, which suggests that metallic Cu is not genotoxic and does not kill via DNA damage. In contrast, membranes constitute the likely Achilles’ heel of Cu surface-exposed cells. PMID:22950011

  16. Sperm DNA oxidative damage and DNA adducts.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Hueiwang Anna; Pan, Chih-Hong; Chao, Mu-Rong; Lin, Wen-Yi

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate DNA damage and adducts in sperm from coke oven workers who have been exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. A longitudinal study was conducted with repeated measurements during spermatogenesis. Coke-oven workers (n=112) from a coke-oven plant served the PAH-exposed group, while administrators and security personnel (n=67) served the control. Routine semen parameters (concentration, motility, vitality, and morphology) were analyzed simultaneously; the assessment of sperm DNA integrity endpoints included DNA fragmentation, bulky DNA adducts, and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dGuo). The degree of sperm DNA fragmentation was measured using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay and sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). The PAH-exposed group had a significant increase in bulky DNA adducts and 8-oxo-dGuo compared to the control subjects (Ps=0.002 and 0.045, respectively). Coke oven workers' percentages of DNA fragmentation and denaturation from the PAH-exposed group were not significantly different from those of the control subjects (Ps=0.232 and 0.245, respectively). Routine semen parameters and DNA integrity endpoints were not correlated. Concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo were positively correlated with percentages of DNA fragmentation measured by both TUNEL and SCSA (Ps=0.045 and 0.034, respectively). However, the concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo and percentages of DNA fragmentation did not correlate with concentrations of bulky DNA adducts. In summary, coke oven workers with chronic exposure to PAHs experienced decreased sperm DNA integrity. Oxidative stress could contribute to the degree of DNA fragmentation. Bulky DNA adducts may be independent of the formation of DNA fragmentation and oxidative adducts in sperm. Monitoring sperm DNA integrity is recommended as a part of the process of assessing the impact of occupational and environmental toxins on sperm

  17. Lipid oxidation induces structural changes in biomimetic membranes.

    PubMed

    Weber, Georges; Charitat, Thierry; Baptista, Maurício S; Uchoa, Adjaci F; Pavani, Christiane; Junqueira, Helena C; Guo, Yachong; Baulin, Vladimir A; Itri, Rosangela; Marques, Carlos M; Schroder, André P

    2014-06-28

    Oxidation can intimately influence and structurally compromise the levels of biological self-assembly embodied by intracellular and plasma membranes. Lipid peroxidation, a natural metabolic outcome of life with oxygen under light, is also a salient oxidation reaction in photomedicine treatments. However, the effect of peroxidation on the fate of lipid membranes remains elusive. Here we use a new photosensitizer that anchors and disperses in the membrane to achieve spatial control of the oxidizing species. We find, surprisingly, that the integrity of unsaturated unilamellar vesicles is preserved even for fully oxidized membranes. Membrane survival allows for the quantification of the transformations of the peroxidized bilayers, providing key physical and chemical information to understand the effect of lipid oxidation on protein insertion and on other mechanisms of cell function. We anticipate that spatially controlled oxidation will emerge as a new powerful strategy for tuning and evaluating lipid membranes in biomimetic media under oxidative stress. PMID:24871383

  18. Oxidative Stress and Plasma Membrane Repair in Single Myoblasts After Femtosecond Laser Photoporation.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xinxing; Chan, Kam Tai; Lee, Kenneth K H; Mak, Arthur F T

    2015-11-01

    Cell membranes are susceptible to biophysical damages. These biophysical damages often present themselves in challenging oxidative environments, such as in chronic inflammation. Here we report the damage evolution after single myoblasts were individually subjected to femtosecond (fs) laser photoporation on their plasma membranes under normal and oxidative conditions. A well-characterized tunable fs laser was coupled with a laser scanning confocal microscope. The post-damage wound evolution was documented by real-time imaging. The fs laser could generate a highly focused hole at a targeted site of the myoblast plasma membrane. The initial hole size depended on the laser dosage in terms of power and exposure duration. With the same laser power and irradiation duration, photoporation invoked bigger holes in the oxidative groups than in the control. Myoblasts showed difficulty in repairing holes with initial size beyond certain threshold. Within the threshold, holes could apparently be resealed within 100 s under the normal condition; while in oxidative condition, the resealing process could take 100-300 s. The hole-resealing capacity of myoblasts was compromised under oxidative stress particularly when the oxidative exposure was chronic. It is interesting to note that brief exposure to oxidative stress apparently could promote resealing in myoblasts after photoporation. PMID:26014361

  19. Vitellogenin Recognizes Cell Damage through Membrane Binding and Shields Living Cells from Reactive Oxygen Species*

    PubMed Central

    Havukainen, Heli; Münch, Daniel; Baumann, Anne; Zhong, Shi; Halskau, Øyvind; Krogsgaard, Michelle; Amdam, Gro V.

    2013-01-01

    Large lipid transfer proteins are involved in lipid transportation and diverse other molecular processes. These serum proteins include vitellogenins, which are egg yolk precursors and pathogen pattern recognition receptors, and apolipoprotein B, which is an anti-inflammatory cholesterol carrier. In the honey bee, vitellogenin acts as an antioxidant, and elevated vitellogenin titer is linked to prolonged life span in this animal. Here, we show that vitellogenin has cell and membrane binding activity and that it binds preferentially to dead and damaged cells. Vitellogenin binds directly to phosphatidylcholine liposomes and with higher affinity to liposomes containing phosphatidylserine, a lipid of the inner leaflet of cell membranes that is exposed in damaged cells. Vitellogenin binding to live cells, furthermore, improves cell oxidative stress tolerance. This study can shed more light on why large lipid transfer proteins have a well conserved α-helical domain, because we locate the lipid bilayer-binding ability of vitellogenin largely to this region. We suggest that recognition of cell damage and oxidation shield properties are two mechanisms that allow vitellogenin to extend honey bee life span. PMID:23897804

  20. Can graphene oxide cause damage to eyesight?

    PubMed

    Yan, Lu; Wang, Yaping; Xu, Xu; Zeng, Chao; Hou, Jiangping; Lin, Mimi; Xu, Jingzhou; Sun, Fei; Huang, Xiaojie; Dai, Liming; Lu, Fan; Liu, Yong

    2012-06-18

    As graphene becomes one of the most exciting candidates for multifunctional biomedical applications, contact between eyes and graphene-based materials is inevitable. On the other hand, eyes, as a special organ in the human body, have unique advantages to be used for testing new biomedical research and development, such as drug delivery. Intraocular biocompatible studies on graphene-related materials are thus essential. Here, we report our recent studies on intraocular biocompatibility and cytotoxicity of graphene oxide (GO) both in vitro and in vivo. The successful preparation of GO nanosheets was confirmed using atomic force microscopy, contact angle analyzer, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. The influence of GO on human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells in terms of the cell morphology, viability, membrane integrity, and apoptosis was investigated using various techniques, including optical micrography, cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay, and apoptosis assay. The addition of GO had little influence on cell morphology, but the change was visible after long-time culturing. RPE cells showed higher than 60% cell viability by CCK-8 assay in GO solutions and less than 8% LDH release, although a small amount of apoptosis (1.5%) was observed. In vitro results suggested good biocompatibility of GO to RPE cells with slight adverse influence, on the cell viability and morphology in long-time periods, along with aggregation of GO. Thus, some further studies are needed to clarify the cytotoxicity mechanism of GO. GO intravitreally injected eyes showed few changes in eyeball appearance, intraocular pressure (IOP), eyesight, and histological photos. Our results suggested that GO did not cause any significant toxicity to the cell growth and proliferation. Intravitreal injection of GO into rabbits' eyes did not lead to much change in the eyeball appearance, IOP, electroretinogram, and histological examination

  1. High-Temperature Oxide Regrowth on Mechanically-Damaged Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian; Lowe, Tracie M

    2008-01-01

    Here we report the effects of mechanical damage from a sharp stylus on the regrowth of oxide layers on a Ni-based superalloy known as Pyromet 80A . It was found that the oxide that reformed on the damaged portion of a pre-oxidized surface differed from that which formed on undamaged areas after the equal exposures to elevated temperature in air. These findings have broad implications for modeling the processes of material degradation in applications such as exhaust valves in internal combustion engines because they imply that static oxidation data for candidate materials may not adequately reflect their reaction to operating environments that involve both mechanical contact and oxidation.

  2. Membrane permeability during pressure ulcer formation: A computational model of dynamic competition between cytoskeletal damage and repair.

    PubMed

    Jagannathan, N Suhas; Tucker-Kellogg, Lisa

    2016-05-24

    Pressure ulcers are debilitating wounds that arise frequently in people who have lost mobility. Mechanical stress, oxidative stress and ischemia-reperfusion injury are potential sources of damage during pressure ulcer formation, but cross-talk between these sources has rarely been investigated. In vitro experiments with mechanically-induced cell damage previously demonstrated that non-lethal amounts of static cell deformation could induce myoblast membrane permeabilization. Permeabilization, in turn, has the potential to induce oxidative stress via leakage of calcium, myoglobin or alarmins. In this work, we constructed a hypothetical causal network of cellular-scale effects resulting from deformation and permeabilization, and we investigated the theoretical sensitivity of cell death toward various parameters and pathways of the model. Simulations showed that the survival/death outcome was particularly sensitive to the speed of membrane repair. The outcome was also sensitive to whether oxidative stress could decrease the speed of membrane repair. Finally, using the assumption that apoptosis and necrosis would have opposite effects on membrane leakage in dying cells, we showed that promoting apoptosis might under certain conditions have the paradoxical effect of decreasing, rather than increasing, total cell death. Our work illustrates that apoptosis may have hidden benefits at preventing spatial spread of death. More broadly, our work shows the importance of membrane repair dynamics and highlights the need for experiments to measure the effects of ischemia, apoptosis induction, and other co-occurring sources of cell stress toward the speed of membrane repair. PMID:26772800

  3. Oxidative damage to human plasma proteins by ozone.

    PubMed

    Cross, C E; Reznick, A Z; Packer, L; Davis, P A; Suzuki, Y J; Halliwell, B

    1992-01-01

    Exposure of human plasma to ozone produces oxidative protein damage, measured as protein carbonyl formation. Isolated human albumin or creatine phosphokinase are oxidized much faster than are total proteins. Consideration must be given to proteins as targets of oxidative injury by ozone in vivo. PMID:1568641

  4. Role of oxidative damage in toxicity of particulates.

    PubMed

    Møller, Peter; Jacobsen, Nicklas R; Folkmann, Janne K; Danielsen, Pernille H; Mikkelsen, Lone; Hemmingsen, Jette G; Vesterdal, Lise K; Forchhammer, Lykke; Wallin, Håkan; Loft, Steffen

    2010-01-01

    Particulates are small particles of solid or liquid suspended in liquid or air. In vitro studies show that particles generate reactive oxygen species, deplete endogenous antioxidants, alter mitochondrial function and produce oxidative damage to lipids and DNA. Surface area, reactivity and chemical composition play important roles in the oxidative potential of particulates. Studies in animal models indicate that particles from combustion processes (generated by combustion of wood or diesel oil), silicate, titanium dioxide and nanoparticles (C60 fullerenes and carbon nanotubes) produce elevated levels of lipid peroxidation products and oxidatively damaged DNA. Biomonitoring studies in humans have shown associations between exposure to air pollution and wood smoke particulates and oxidative damage to DNA, deoxynucleotides and lipids measured in leukocytes, plasma, urine and/or exhaled breath. The results indicate that oxidative stress and elevated levels of oxidatively altered biomolecules are important intermediate endpoints that may be useful markers in hazard characterization of particulates. PMID:19886744

  5. Retinal Damage Induced by Internal Limiting Membrane Removal

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Rachel; Stevenson, William; Prospero Ponce, Claudia; Agarwal, Daniel; Christoforidis, John Byron

    2015-01-01

    The internal limiting membrane (ILM), the basement membrane of the Müller cells, serves as the interface between the vitreous body and the retinal nerve fiber layer. It has a fundamental role in the development, structure, and function of the retina, although it also is a pathologic component in the various vitreoretinal disorders, most notably in macular holes. It was not until understanding of the evolution of idiopathic macular holes and the advent of idiopathic macular hole surgery that the idea of adjuvant ILM peeling in the treatment of tractional maculopathies was explored. Today intentional ILM peeling is a commonly applied surgical technique among vitreoretinal surgeons as it has been found to increase the rate of successful macular hole closure and improve surgical outcomes in other vitreoretinal diseases. Though ILM peeling has refined surgery for tractional maculopathies, like all surgical procedures it is not immune to perioperative risk. The essential role of the ILM to the integrity of the retina and risk of trauma to retinal tissue spurs suspicion with regard to its routine removal. Several authors have investigated the retinal damage induced by ILM peeling and these complications have been manifested across many different diagnostic studies. PMID:26425355

  6. Plasticity and ductility in graphene oxide through a mechanochemically induced damage tolerance mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoding; Mao, Lily; Soler-Crespo, Rafael A; Paci, Jeffrey T; Huang, Jiaxing; Nguyen, SonBinh T; Espinosa, Horacio D

    2015-01-01

    The ability to bias chemical reaction pathways is a fundamental goal for chemists and material scientists to produce innovative materials. Recently, two-dimensional materials have emerged as potential platforms for exploring novel mechanically activated chemical reactions. Here we report a mechanochemical phenomenon in graphene oxide membranes, covalent epoxide-to-ether functional group transformations that deviate from epoxide ring-opening reactions, discovered through nanomechanical experiments and density functional-based tight binding calculations. These mechanochemical transformations in a two-dimensional system are directionally dependent, and confer pronounced plasticity and damage tolerance to graphene oxide monolayers. Additional experiments on chemically modified graphene oxide membranes, with ring-opened epoxide groups, verify this unique deformation mechanism. These studies establish graphene oxide as a two-dimensional building block with highly tuneable mechanical properties for the design of high-performance nanocomposites, and stimulate the discovery of new bond-selective chemical transformations in two-dimensional materials. PMID:26289729

  7. Plasticity and ductility in graphene oxide through a mechanochemically induced damage tolerance mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaoding; Mao, Lily; Soler-Crespo, Rafael A.; Paci, Jeffrey T.; Huang, Jiaxing; Nguyen, Sonbinh T.; Espinosa, Horacio D.

    2015-08-01

    The ability to bias chemical reaction pathways is a fundamental goal for chemists and material scientists to produce innovative materials. Recently, two-dimensional materials have emerged as potential platforms for exploring novel mechanically activated chemical reactions. Here we report a mechanochemical phenomenon in graphene oxide membranes, covalent epoxide-to-ether functional group transformations that deviate from epoxide ring-opening reactions, discovered through nanomechanical experiments and density functional-based tight binding calculations. These mechanochemical transformations in a two-dimensional system are directionally dependent, and confer pronounced plasticity and damage tolerance to graphene oxide monolayers. Additional experiments on chemically modified graphene oxide membranes, with ring-opened epoxide groups, verify this unique deformation mechanism. These studies establish graphene oxide as a two-dimensional building block with highly tuneable mechanical properties for the design of high-performance nanocomposites, and stimulate the discovery of new bond-selective chemical transformations in two-dimensional materials.

  8. Plasticity and ductility in graphene oxide through a mechanochemically induced damage tolerance mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaoding; Mao, Lily; Soler-Crespo, Rafael A.; Paci, Jeffrey T.; Espinosa, Horacio D.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to bias chemical reaction pathways is a fundamental goal for chemists and material scientists to produce innovative materials. Recently, two-dimensional materials have emerged as potential platforms for exploring novel mechanically activated chemical reactions. Here we report a mechanochemical phenomenon in graphene oxide membranes, covalent epoxide-to-ether functional group transformations that deviate from epoxide ring-opening reactions, discovered through nanomechanical experiments and density functional-based tight binding calculations. These mechanochemical transformations in a two-dimensional system are directionally dependent, and confer pronounced plasticity and damage tolerance to graphene oxide monolayers. Additional experiments on chemically modified graphene oxide membranes, with ring-opened epoxide groups, verify this unique deformation mechanism. These studies establish graphene oxide as a two-dimensional building block with highly tuneable mechanical properties for the design of high-performance nanocomposites, and stimulate the discovery of new bond-selective chemical transformations in two-dimensional materials. PMID:26289729

  9. Increased methyl esterification of altered aspartyl residues in erythrocyte membrane proteins in response to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ingrosso, D; D'angelo, S; di Carlo, E; Perna, A F; Zappia, V; Galletti, P

    2000-07-01

    Protein-L-isoaspartate (D-aspartate) O-methyltransferase (PCMT; EC 2. 1.1.77) catalyses the methyl esterification of the free alpha-carboxyl group of abnormal L-isoaspartyl residues, which occur spontaneously in protein and peptide substrates as a consequence of molecular ageing. The biological function of this transmethylation reaction is related to the repair or degradation of age-damaged proteins. Methyl ester formation in erythrocyte membrane proteins has also been used as a marker reaction to tag these abnormal residues and to monitor their increase associated with erythrocyte ageing diseases, such as hereditary spherocytosis, or cell stress (thermal or osmotic) conditions. The study shows that levels of L-isoaspartyl residues rise in membrane proteins of human erythrocytes exposed to oxidative stress, induced by t-butyl hydroperoxide or H2O2. The increase in malondialdehyde content confirmed that the cell membrane is a primary target of oxidative alterations. A parallel rise in the methaemoglobin content indicates that proteins are heavily affected by the molecular alterations induced by oxidative treatments in erythrocytes. Antioxidants largely prevented the increase in membrane protein methylation, underscoring the specificity of the effect. Conversely, we found that PCMT activity, consistent with its repair function, remained remarkably stable under oxidative conditions, while damaged membrane protein substrates increased significantly. The latter include ankyrin, band 4.1 and 4.2, and the integral membrane protein band 3 (the anion exchanger). The main target was found to be particularly protein 4.1, a crucial element in the maintenance of membrane-cytoskeleton network stability. We conclude that the increased formation/exposure of L-isoaspartyl residues is one of the major structural alterations occurring in erythrocyte membrane proteins as a result of an oxidative stress event. In the light of these and previous findings, the occurrence of isoaspartyl

  10. Metabolic activation of carcinogenic ethylbenzene leads to oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Midorikawa, Kaoru; Uchida, Takafumi; Okamoto, Yoshinori; Toda, Chitose; Sakai, Yoshie; Ueda, Koji; Hiraku, Yusuke; Murata, Mariko; Kawanishi, Shosuke; Kojima, Nakao

    2004-12-01

    Ethylbenzene is carcinogenic to rats and mice, while it has no mutagenic activity. We have investigated whether ethylbenzene undergoes metabolic activation, leading to DNA damage. Ethylbenzene was metabolized to 1-phenylethanol, acetophenone, 2-ethylphenol and 4-ethylphenol by rat liver microsomes. Furthermore, 2-ethylphenol and 4-ethylphenol were metabolically transformed to ring-dihydroxylated metabolites such as ethylhydroquinone and 4-ethylcatechol, respectively. Experiment with 32P-labeled DNA fragment revealed that both ethylhydroquinone and 4-ethylcatechol caused DNA damage in the presence of Cu(II). These dihydroxylated compounds also induced the formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine in calf thymus DNA in the presence of Cu(II). Catalase, methional and Cu(I)-specific chelator, bathocuproine, significantly (P<0.05) inhibited oxidative DNA damage, whereas free hydroxyl radical scavenger and superoxide dismutase did not. These results suggest that Cu(I) and H2O2 produced via oxidation of ethylhydroquinone and 4-ethylcatechol are involved in oxidative DNA damage. Addition of an endogenous reductant NADH dramatically enhanced 4-ethylcatechol-induced oxidative DNA damage, whereas ethylhydroquinone-induced DNA damage was slightly enhanced. Enhancing effect of NADH on oxidative DNA damage by 4-ethylcatechol may be explained by assuming that reactive species are generated from the redox cycle. In conclusion, these active dihydroxylated metabolites would be involved in the mechanism of carcinogenesis by ethylbenzene. PMID:15560893

  11. Quercitrin protects skin from UVB-induced oxidative damage

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Yuanqin; Li, Wenqi; Son, Young-Ok; Sun, Lijuan; Lu, Jian; Kim, Donghern; Wang, Xin; Yao, Hua; Wang, Lei; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Hitron, Andrew J.; Luo, Jia; Gao, Ning; Shi, Xianglin; Zhang, Zhuo

    2013-06-01

    Exposure of the skin to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation causes oxidative damage to skin, resulting in sunburn, photoaging, and skin cancer. It is generally believed that the skin damage induced by UV irradiation is a consequence of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recently, there is an increased interest in the use of natural products as chemopreventive agents for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) due to their antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties. Quercitrin, glycosylated form of quercetin, is the most common flavonoid in nature with antioxidant properties. The present study investigated the possible beneficial effects of quercitrin to inhibit UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that quercitrin decreased ROS generation induced by UVB irradiation in JB6 cells. Quercitrin restored catalase expression and GSH/GSSG ratio reduced by UVB exposure, two major antioxidant enzymes, leading to reductions of oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis and protection of the skin from inflammation caused by UVB exposure. The present study demonstrated that quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage to skin. - Highlights: • Oxidative stress plays a key role in UV-induced cell and tissue injuries. • Quercitrin decreases ROS generation and restores antioxidants irradiated by UVB. • Quercitrin reduces UVB-irradiated oxidative DNA damage, apoptosis, and inflammation. • Quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB-induced skin injuries.

  12. Zinc protects HepG2 cells against the oxidative damage and DNA damage induced by ochratoxin A

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Juanjuan; Zhang, Yu; Xu, Wentao; Luo, YunBo; Hao, Junran; Shen, Xiao Li; Yang, Xuan; Li, Xiaohong; Huang, Kunlun

    2013-04-15

    Oxidative stress and DNA damage are the most studied mechanisms by which ochratoxin A (OTA) induces its toxic effects, which include nephrotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, immunotoxicity and genotoxicity. Zinc, which is an essential trace element, is considered a potential antioxidant. The aim of this paper was to investigate whether zinc supplement could inhibit OTA-induced oxidative damage and DNA damage in HepG2 cells and the mechanism of inhibition. The results indicated that that exposure of OTA decreased the intracellular zinc concentration; zinc supplement significantly reduced the OTA-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity but did not affect the OTA-induced decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ{sub m}). Meanwhile, the addition of the zinc chelator N,N,N′,N′-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN) strongly aggravated the OTA-induced oxidative damage. This study also demonstrated that zinc helped to maintain the integrity of DNA through the reduction of OTA-induced DNA strand breaks, 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) formation and DNA hypomethylation. OTA increased the mRNA expression of metallothionein1-A (MT1A), metallothionein2-A (MT2A) and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1). Zinc supplement further enhanced the mRNA expression of MT1A and MT2A, but it had no effect on the mRNA expression of SOD1 and catalase (CAT). Zinc was for the first time proven to reduce the cytotoxicity of OTA through inhibiting the oxidative damage and DNA damage, and regulating the expression of zinc-associated genes. Thus, the addition of zinc can potentially be used to reduce the OTA toxicity of contaminated feeds. - Highlights: ► OTA decreased the intracellular zinc concentration. ► OTA induced the formation of 8-OHdG in HepG2 cells. ► It was testified for the first time that OTA induced DNA hypomethylation. ► Zinc protects against the oxidative damage and DNA damage induced by

  13. Antioxidant Nutrients and Oxidative DNA Damage in Humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic diseases related to aging, such as cancer and cardiovascular disease. When the excessive amount of reactive oxygen species accumulates in vivo, it can cause oxidative damage to lipids, proteins and DNA. In particular DNA is one of...

  14. Gender differences in alcohol-induced oxidative stress and altered membrane properties in erythrocytes of rats.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Kindinti Rameshwar; Reddy, Vaddi Damodara; Padmavathi, Pannuru; Kavitha, Godugu; Saradamma, Bulle; Varadacharyulu, N C

    2013-02-01

    Alcohol-induced oxidative stress leads to imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the antioxidant defense system, resulting in oxidative damage to membrane components such as lipids and proteins, ultimately altering membrane properties. In this study, we assessed oxidative stress status and alterations in erythrocyte membrane properties in alcohol-administered rats with respect to gender difference. Alcohol (20% v/v) administered rats of both genders showed significant changes in plasma lipid profile with elevated nitrite/nitrate levels. Furthermore, alcohol-administration significantly decreased erythrocyte antioxidant enzymes and enhanced erythrocyte membrane lipid peroxidation, cholesterol/phospholipid (C/P) ratio and Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity in both males and females. Besides, anisotropic studies revealed that alcohol-administration significantly decreased erythrocyte membrane fluidity. In conclusion, alcohol-administration significantly increased oxidative stress by decreasing antioxidant status, and subsequent generation of ROS altered membrane properties by altering fluidity and Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity. Female rats were more vulnerable to alcohol-induced biochemical and biophysical changes in plasma and erythrocyte including oxidative stress than male rats. PMID:23617072

  15. OXIDATIVE DNA DAMAGE IN DIESEL BUS MECHANICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale:

    Diesel exposure has been associated with adverse health effects, including susceptibility to asthma, allergy and cancer. Previous epidemiological studies demonstrated increased cancer incidence among workers exposed to diesel. This is likely due to oxid...

  16. Strong, damage tolerant oxide-fiber/oxide matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Yahua

    cationic polyelectrolytes to have a positive surface charge and then dipped into diluted, negatively-charged AlPO4 colloidal suspension (0.05M) at pH 7.5. Amorphous AlPO4 (crystallizes to tridymite- and cristobalite-forms at 1080°C) nano particles were coated on fibers layer-by-layer using an electrostatic attraction protocol. A uniform and smooth coating was formed which allowed fiber pullout from the matrix of a Nextel 720/alumina mini-composite hot-pressed at 1250°C/20MPa. Reaction-bonded mullite (RBM), with low formation temperature and sintering shrinkage was synthesized by incorporation of mixed-rare-earth-oxide (MREO) and mullite seeds. Pure mullite formed with 7.5wt% MREO at 1300°C. Introduction of 5wt% mullite seeds gave RBM with less than 3% shrinkage and 20% porosity. AlPO4-coated Nextel 720/RBM composites were successful fabricated by EPID and pressureless sintering at 1300°C. Significant fiber pullout occurred and the 4-point bend strength was around 170MPa (with 25-30vol% fibers) at room temperature and 1100°C and a Work-of-Fracture 7KJ/m2. At 1200°C, the composite failed in shear due to the MREO-based glassy phase in the matrix. AlPO4-coated Nextel 720 fiber/aluminosilicate (no MREO) showed damage tolerance at 1200°C with a bend strength 170MPa.

  17. Oxidative damage and cell-programmed death induced in Zea mays L. by allelochemical stress.

    PubMed

    Ciniglia, Claudia; Mastrobuoni, Francesco; Scortichini, Marco; Petriccione, Milena

    2015-05-01

    The allelochemical stress on Zea mays was analyzed by using walnut husk washing waters (WHWW), a by-product of Juglans regia post-harvest process, which possesses strong allelopathic potential and phytotoxic effects. Oxidative damage and cell-programmed death were induced by WHWW in roots of maize seedlings. Treatment induced ROS burst, with excess of H2O2 content. Enzymatic activities of catalase were strongly increased during the first hours of exposure. The excess in malonildialdehyde following exposure to WHWW confirmed that oxidative stress severely damaged maize roots. Membrane alteration caused a decrease in NADPH oxidase activity along with DNA damage as confirmed by DNA laddering. The DNA instability was also assessed through sequence-related amplified polymorphism assay, thus suggesting the danger of walnut processing by-product and focusing the attention on the necessity of an efficient treatment of WHWW. PMID:25736610

  18. Superoxide and the production of oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed Central

    Keyer, K; Gort, A S; Imlay, J A

    1995-01-01

    The conventional model of oxidative DNA damage posits a role for superoxide (O2-) as a reductant for iron, which subsequently generates a hydroxyl radical by transferring the electron to H2O2. The hydroxyl radical then attacks DNA. Indeed, mutants of Escherichia coli that lack superoxide dismutase (SOD) were 10-fold more vulnerable to DNA oxidation by H2O2 than were wild-type cells. Even the pace of DNA damage by endogenous oxidants was great enough that the SOD mutants could not tolerate air if enzymes that repair oxidative DNA lesions were inactive. However, DNA oxidation proceeds in SOD-proficient cells without the involvement of O2-, as evidenced by the failure of SOD overproduction or anaerobiosis to suppress damage by H2O2. Furthermore, the mechanism by which excess O2- causes damage was called into question when the hypersensitivity of SOD mutants to DNA damage persisted for at least 20 min after O2- had been dispelled through the imposition of anaerobiosis. That behavior contradicted the standard model, which requires that O2- be present to rereduce cellular iron during the period of exposure to H2O2. Evidently, DNA oxidation is driven by a reductant other than O2-, which leaves the mechanism of damage promotion by O2- unsettled. One possibility is that, through its well-established ability to leach iron from iron-sulfur clusters, O2- increases the amount of free iron that is available to catalyze hydroxyl radical production. Experiments with iron transport mutants confirmed that increases in free-iron concentration have the effect of accelerating DNA oxidation. Thus, O2- may be genotoxic only in doses that exceed those found in SOD-proficient cells, and in those limited circumstances it may promote DNA damage by increasing the amount of DNA-bound iron. PMID:7592468

  19. Surface-Localized Spermidine Protects the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Outer Membrane from Antibiotic Treatment and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Lori; Mulcahy, Heidi; Kanevets, Uliana; Shi, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular DNA acts as a cation chelator and induces the expression of antibiotic resistance genes regulated by Mg2+ levels. Here we report the characterization of novel DNA-induced genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa that are annotated as homologs of the spermidine synthesis genes speD (PA4773) and speE (PA4774). The addition of sublethal concentrations of DNA and membrane-damaging antibiotics induced expression of the genes PA4773 to PA4775, as shown using transcriptional lux fusions and quantitative RT-PCR. Exogenous polyamine addition prevented DNA- and peptide-mediated gene induction. Mutation of PA4774 resulted in an increased outer membrane (OM) susceptibility phenotype upon polymyxin B, CP10A, and gentamicin treatment. When the membrane-localized fluorescent probe C11-BODIPY581/591 was used as an indicator of peroxidation of membrane lipids, the PA4774::lux mutant demonstrated an increased susceptibility to oxidative membrane damage from H2O2 treatment. Addition of exogenous polyamines protected the membranes of the PA4774::lux mutant from polymyxin B and H2O2 treatment. Polyamines from the outer surface were isolated and shown to contain putrescine and spermidine by using high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. The PA4774::lux mutant did not produce spermidine on the cell surface, but genetic complementation restored surface spermidine production as well as the antibiotic and oxidative stress resistance phenotypes of the membrane. We have identified new functions for spermidine on the cell surface and propose that polyamines are produced under Mg2+-limiting conditions as an organic polycation to bind lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and to stabilize and protect the outer membrane against antibiotic and oxidative damage. PMID:22155771

  20. Contribution of Membrane-Damaging Toxins to Bacillus Endophthalmitis Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Callegan, Michelle C.; Cochran, Daniel C.; Kane, Scott T.; Gilmore, Michael S.; Gominet, Myriam; Lereclus, Didier

    2002-01-01

    Membrane-damaging toxins are thought to be responsible for the explosive clinical course of Bacillus endophthalmitis. This study analyzed the contribution of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) and phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) to the pathogenesis of experimental Bacillus endophthalmitis. Isogenic mutants were constructed by insertion of lacZ into Bacillus thuringiensis genes encoding PI-PLC (plcA) and PC-PLC (plcB). Rabbit eyes were injected intravitreally with 2 log10 CFU of strain BT407 (wild type), the PI-PLC mutant (BTplcA::lacZ), or the PC-PLC mutant (BTplcB::lacZ). The rates of decrease in retinal responses of eyes infected with the isogenic mutants were similar to that of wild type, with all infections resulting in elimination of retinal function by 18 h. Strain BT407 caused a significant increase in the latency of retinal responses at 6 h, but strains BTplcA::lacZ and BTplcB::lacZ did not. All strains elicited significant inflammatory cell influx into the anterior chamber by 12 h. Histologically, eyes infected with each strain were indistinguishable throughout the infection course. In this model, neither PI-PLC nor PC-PLC had an effect on the course or severity of experimental Bacillus endophthalmitis. Alterations in retinal responses early in infection may mark the beginnings of specific photoreceptor or glial cell dysfunction. PMID:12228262

  1. Bacillus thuringiensis membrane-damaging toxins acting on mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Celandroni, Francesco; Salvetti, Sara; Senesi, Sonia; Ghelardi, Emilia

    2014-12-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is widely used as a biopesticide in forestry and agriculture, being able to produce potent species-specific insecticidal toxins and considered nonpathogenic to other animals. More recently, however, repeated observations are documenting the association of this microorganism with various infectious diseases in humans, such as food-poisoning-associated diarrheas, periodontitis, bacteremia, as well as ocular, burn, and wound infections. Similar to B. cereus, B. thuringiensis produces an array of virulence factors acting against mammalian cells, such as phosphatidylcholine- and phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC and PI-PLC), hemolysins, in particular hemolysin BL (HBL), and various enterotoxins. The contribution of some of these toxins to B. thuringiensis pathogenicity has been studied in animal models of infection, following intravitreous, intranasal, or intratracheal inoculation. These studies lead to the speculation that the activities of PC-PLC, PI-PLC, and HBL are responsible for most of the pathogenic properties of B. thuringiensis in nongastrointestinal infections in mammals. This review summarizes data regarding the biological activity, the genetic basis, and the structural features of these membrane-damaging toxins. PMID:25283838

  2. Mn oxide coated catalytic membranes for a hybrid ozonation-membrane filtration: comparison of Ti, Fe and Mn oxide coated membranes for water quality.

    PubMed

    Byun, S; Davies, S H; Alpatova, A L; Corneal, L M; Baumann, M J; Tarabara, V V; Masten, S J

    2011-01-01

    In this study the performance of catalytic membranes in a hybrid ozonation-ceramic membrane filtration system was investigated. The catalytic membranes were produced by coating commercial ceramic ultrafiltration membranes with manganese or iron oxide nanoparticles using a layer-by-layer self-assembly technique. A commercial membrane with a titanium oxide filtration layer was also evaluated. The performance of the coated and uncoated membranes was evaluated using water from a borderline eutrophic lake. The permeate flux and removal of the organic matter was found to depend on the type of the metal oxide present on the membrane surface. The performance of the manganese oxide coated membrane was superior to that of the other membranes tested, showing the fastest recovery in permeate flux when ozone was applied and the greatest reduction in the total organic carbon (TOC) in the permeate. The removal of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) precursors using the membrane coated 20 times with manganese oxide nanoparticles was significantly better than that for the membranes coated with 30 or 40 times with manganese oxide nanoparticles or 40 times with iron oxide nanoparticles. PMID:20822791

  3. Antioxidants, Oxidative Damage and Oxygen Deprivation Stress: a Review

    PubMed Central

    BLOKHINA, OLGA; VIROLAINEN, EIJA; FAGERSTEDT, KURT V.

    2003-01-01

    Oxidative stress is induced by a wide range of environmental factors including UV stress, pathogen invasion (hypersensitive reaction), herbicide action and oxygen shortage. Oxygen deprivation stress in plant cells is distinguished by three physiologically different states: transient hypoxia, anoxia and reoxygenation. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is characteristic for hypoxia and especially for reoxygenation. Of the ROS, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide (O2·–) are both produced in a number of cellular reactions, including the iron‐catalysed Fenton reaction, and by various enzymes such as lipoxygenases, peroxidases, NADPH oxidase and xanthine oxidase. The main cellular components susceptible to damage by free radicals are lipids (peroxidation of unsaturated fatty acids in membranes), proteins (denaturation), carbohydrates and nucleic acids. Consequences of hypoxia‐induced oxidative stress depend on tissue and/or species (i.e. their tolerance to anoxia), on membrane properties, on endogenous antioxidant content and on the ability to induce the response in the antioxidant system. Effective utilization of energy resources (starch, sugars) and the switch to anaerobic metabolism and the preservation of the redox status of the cell are vital for survival. The formation of ROS is prevented by an antioxidant system: low molecular mass antioxidants (ascorbic acid, glutathione, tocopherols), enzymes regenerating the reduced forms of antioxidants, and ROS‐interacting enzymes such as SOD, peroxidases and catalases. In plant tissues many phenolic compounds (in addition to tocopherols) are potential antioxidants: flavonoids, tannins and lignin precursors may work as ROS‐scavenging compounds. Antioxidants act as a cooperative network, employing a series of redox reactions. Interactions between ascorbic acid and glutathione, and ascorbic acid and phenolic compounds are well known. Under oxygen deprivation stress some contradictory results on the

  4. Are vacuum-filtrated reduced graphene oxide membranes symmetric?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Bo; Zhang, Lianbin; Li, Renyuan; Wu, Jinbo; Hedhili, Mohamed Neijib; Wang, Peng

    2015-12-01

    Graphene or reduced graphene oxide (rGO) membrane-based materials are promising for many advanced applications due to their exceptional properties. One of the most widely used synthesis methods for rGO membranes is vacuum filtration of graphene oxide (GO) on a filter membrane, followed by reduction, which shows great advantages such as operational convenience and good controllability. Despite vacuum-filtrated rGO membranes being widely used in many applications, a fundamental question is overlooked: are the top and bottom surfaces of the membranes formed at the interfaces with air and with the filter membrane respectively symmetric or asymmetric? This work, for the first time, reports the asymmetry of the vacuum-filtrated rGO membranes and discloses the filter membranes' physical imprint on the bottom surface of the rGO membrane, which takes place when the filter membrane surface pores have similar dimension to GO sheets. This result points out that the asymmetric surface properties should be cautiously taken into consideration while designing the surface-related applications for GO and rGO membranes.Graphene or reduced graphene oxide (rGO) membrane-based materials are promising for many advanced applications due to their exceptional properties. One of the most widely used synthesis methods for rGO membranes is vacuum filtration of graphene oxide (GO) on a filter membrane, followed by reduction, which shows great advantages such as operational convenience and good controllability. Despite vacuum-filtrated rGO membranes being widely used in many applications, a fundamental question is overlooked: are the top and bottom surfaces of the membranes formed at the interfaces with air and with the filter membrane respectively symmetric or asymmetric? This work, for the first time, reports the asymmetry of the vacuum-filtrated rGO membranes and discloses the filter membranes' physical imprint on the bottom surface of the rGO membrane, which takes place when the filter

  5. Potential role of punicalagin against oxidative stress induced testicular damage

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Faiza; Tian, Hui; Li, Wenqing; Hung, Helong; Sun, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Punicalagin is isolated from pomegranate and widely used for the treatment of different diseases in Chinese traditional medicine. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Punicalagin (purity ≥98%) on oxidative stress induced testicular damage and its effect on fertility. We detected the antioxidant potential of punicalagin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced oxidative stress damage in testes, also tried to uncover the boosting fertility effect of Punicalagin (PU) against oxidative stress-induced infertility. Results demonstrated that 9 mg kg−1 for 7 days treatment significantly decreases LPS induced oxidative damage in testes and nitric oxide production. The administration of oxidative stress resulted in a significant reduction in testes antioxidants GSH, T-SOD, and CAT raised LPO, but treatment with punicalagin for 7 days increased antioxidant defense GSH, T-SOD, and CAT by the end of the experiment and reduced LPO level as well. PU also significantly activates Nrf2, which is involved in regulation of antioxidant defense systems. Hence, the present research categorically elucidates the protective effect of punicalagin against LPS induced oxidative stress induced perturbation in the process of spermatogenesis and significantly increased sperm health and number. Moreover, fertility success significantly decreased in LPS-injected mice compared to controls. Mice injected with LPS had fertility indices of 12.5%, while others treated with a combination of PU + LPS exhibited 75% indices. By promoting fertility and eliminating oxidative stress and inflammation, PU may be a useful nutrient for the treatment of infertility. PMID:26763544

  6. Protective effect of Pterostilbene against free radical mediated oxidative damage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pterostilbene, a methoxylated analog of Resveratrol, is gradually gaining more importance as a therapeutic drug owing to its higher lipophilicity, bioavailability and biological activity than Resveratrol. This study was undertaken to characterize its ability to scavenge free radicals such as superoxide, hydroxyl and hydrogen peroxide and to protect bio-molecules within a cell against oxidative insult. Methods Anti-oxidant activity of Pterostilbene was evaluated extensively by employing several in vitro radical scavenging/inhibiting assays and pulse radiolysis study. In addition, its ability to protect rat liver mitochondria against tertiary-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) and hydroxyl radical generated oxidative damage was determined by measuring the damage markers such as protein carbonyls, protein sulphydryls, lipid hydroperoxides, lipid peroxides and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine. Pterostilbene was also evaluated for its ability to inhibit •OH radical induced single strand breaks in pBR322 DNA. Result Pterostilbene exhibited strong anti-oxidant activity against various free radicals such as DPPH, ABTS, hydroxyl, superoxide and hydrogen peroxide in a concentration dependent manner. Pterostilbene conferred protection to proteins, lipids and DNA in isolated mitochondrial fractions against TBHP and hydroxyl radical induced oxidative damage. It also protected pBR322 DNA against oxidative assault. Conclusions Thus, present study provides an evidence for the strong anti-oxidant property of Pterostilbene, methoxylated analog of Resveratrol, thereby potentiating its role as an anti-oxidant. PMID:24070177

  7. Potential role of punicalagin against oxidative stress induced testicular damage.

    PubMed

    Rao, Faiza; Tian, Hui; Li, Wenqing; Hung, Helong; Sun, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Punicalagin is isolated from pomegranate and widely used for the treatment of different diseases in Chinese traditional medicine. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Punicalagin (purity ≥98%) on oxidative stress induced testicular damage and its effect on fertility. We detected the antioxidant potential of punicalagin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced oxidative stress damage in testes, also tried to uncover the boosting fertility effect of Punicalagin (PU) against oxidative stress-induced infertility. Results demonstrated that 9 mg kg-1 for 7 days treatment significantly decreases LPS induced oxidative damage in testes and nitric oxide production. The administration of oxidative stress resulted in a significant reduction in testes antioxidants GSH, T-SOD, and CAT raised LPO, but treatment with punicalagin for 7 days increased antioxidant defense GSH, T-SOD, and CAT by the end of the experiment and reduced LPO level as well. PU also significantly activates Nrf2, which is involved in regulation of antioxidant defense systems. Hence, the present research categorically elucidates the protective effect of punicalagin against LPS induced oxidative stress induced perturbation in the process of spermatogenesis and significantly increased sperm health and number. Moreover, fertility success significantly decreased in LPS-injected mice compared to controls. Mice injected with LPS had fertility indices of 12.5%, while others treated with a combination of PU + LPS exhibited 75% indices. By promoting fertility and eliminating oxidative stress and inflammation, PU may be a useful nutrient for the treatment of infertility. PMID:26763544

  8. Metal oxide porous ceramic membranes with small pore sizes

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Marc A.; Xu, Qunyin

    1991-01-01

    A method is disclosed for the production of metal oxide ceramic membranes of very small pore size. The process is particularly useful in the creation of titanium and other transition metal oxide membranes. The method utilizes a sol-gel process in which the rate of particle formation is controlled by substituting a relatively large alcohol in the metal alkoxide and by limiting the available water. Stable, transparent metal oxide ceramic membranes are created having a narrow distribution of pore size, with the pore diameter being manipulable in the range of 5 to 40 Angstroms.

  9. Metal oxide porous ceramic membranes with small pore sizes

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Marc A.; Xu, Qunyin

    1992-01-01

    A method is disclosed for the production of metal oxide ceramic membranes of very small pore size. The process is particularly useful in the creation of titanium and other transition metal oxide membranes. The method utilizes a sol-gel process in which the rate of particle formation is controlled by substituting a relatively large alcohol in the metal alkoxide and by limiting the available water. Stable, transparent metal oxide ceramic membranes are created having a narrow distribution of pore size, with the pore diameter being manipulable in the range of 5 to 40 Angstroms.

  10. Antioxidant-mediated protective effect of potato peel extract in erythrocytes against oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nandita; Rajini, P S

    2008-05-28

    Potato peels are waste by-product of the potato processing industry. They are reportedly rich in polyphenols. Our earlier studies have shown that extracts derived from potato peel (PPE) possess strong antioxidant activity in chemical and biological model systems in vitro, attributable to its polyphenolic content. The main objective of this study was to investigate the ability of PPE to protect erythrocytes against oxidative damage, in vitro. The protection rendered by PPE in erythrocytes was studied in terms of resistance to oxidative damage, morphological alterations as well as membrane structural alterations. The total polyphenolic content in PPE was found to be 3.93 mg/g powder. The major phenolic acids present in PPE were predominantly: gallic acid, caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid and protocatechuic acid. We chose the experimental prooxidant system: FeSO(4) and ascorbic acid to induce lipid peroxidation in rat RBCs and human RBC membranes. PPE was found to inhibit lipid peroxidation with similar effectiveness in both the systems (about 80-85% inhibition by PPE at 2.5 mg/ml). While PPE per se did not cause any morphological alteration in the erythrocytes, under the experimental conditions, PPE significantly inhibited the H(2)O(2)-induced morphological alterations in rat RBCs as revealed by scanning electron microscopy. Further, PPE was found to offer significant protection to human erythrocyte membrane proteins from oxidative damage induced by ferrous-ascorbate. In conclusion, our results indicate that PPE is capable of protecting erythrocytes against oxidative damage probably by acting as a strong antioxidant. PMID:18452909

  11. GST activity and membrane lipid saturation prevents mesotrione-induced cellular damage in Pantoea ananatis.

    PubMed

    Prione, Lilian P; Olchanheski, Luiz R; Tullio, Leandro D; Santo, Bruno C E; Reche, Péricles M; Martins, Paula F; Carvalho, Giselle; Demiate, Ivo M; Pileggi, Sônia A V; Dourado, Manuella N; Prestes, Rosilene A; Sadowsky, Michael J; Azevedo, Ricardo A; Pileggi, Marcos

    2016-12-01

    Callisto(®), containing the active ingredient mesotrione (2-[4-methylsulfonyl-2-nitrobenzoyl]1,3-cyclohenanedione), is a selective herbicide that controls weeds in corn crops and is a potential environmental contaminant. The objective of this work was to evaluate enzymatic and structural changes in Pantoea ananatis, a strain isolated from water, in response to exposure to this herbicide. Despite degradation of mesotrione, probably due a glutathione-S-transferase (GST) pathway in Pantoea ananatis, this herbicide induced oxidative stress by increasing hydrogen peroxide production. Thiol fragments, eventually produced after mesotrione degradation, could be involved in increased GST activity. Nevertheless, there was no peroxidation damage related to this production, as malondialdehyde (MDA) synthesis, which is due to lipid peroxidation, was highest in the controls, followed by the mesotrione- and Callisto(®)-treated cultures at log growth phase. Therefore, P. ananatis can tolerate and grow in the presence of the herbicide, probably due an efficient control of oxidative stress by a polymorphic catalase system. MDA rates depend on lipid saturation due to a pattern change to a higher level of saturation. These changes are likely related to the formation of GST-mesotrione conjugates and mesotrione degradation-specific metabolites and to the presence of cytotoxic adjuvants. These features may shift lipid membrane saturation, possibly providing a protective effect to bacteria through an increase in membrane impermeability. This response system in P. ananatis provides a novel model for bacterial herbicide tolerance and adaptation in the environment. PMID:27620734

  12. Oxidative Stress Damage as a Detrimental Factor in Preterm Birth Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Ramkumar

    2014-01-01

    Normal term and spontaneous preterm births (PTB) are documented to be associated with oxidative stress (OS), and imbalances in the redox system (balance between pro- and antioxidant) have been reported in the maternal–fetal intrauterine compartments. The exact mechanism of labor initiation either at term or preterm by OS is still unclear, and this lack of understanding can partially be blamed for failure of antioxidant supplementation trials in PTB prevention. Based on recent findings from our laboratory, we postulate heterogeneity in host OS response. The physiologic (at term) and pathophysiologic (preterm) pathways of labor are not mediated by OS alone but by OS-induced damage to intrauterine tissues, especially fetal membranes of the placenta. OS damage affects all major cellular elements in the fetal cells, and this damage promotes fetal cell senescence (aging). The aging of the fetal cells is predominated by p38 mitogen activated kinase (p38MAPK) pathways. Senescing cells generate biomolecular signals that are uterotonic, triggering labor process. The aging of fetal cells is normal at term. However, aging is premature in PTB, especially in those PTBs complicated by preterm premature rupture of the membranes, where elements of redox imbalances and OS damage are more dominant. We postulate that fetal cell senescence signals generated by OS damage are likely triggers for labor. This review highlights the mechanisms involved in senescence development at term and preterm by OS damage and provides insight into novel fetal signals of labor initiation pathways. PMID:25429290

  13. Transformation of iron oxides on PI electrospun membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Penggang; Lv, Fengzhu; Liu, Leipeng; Ding, Ling; Zhang, Yihe

    2016-09-01

    Iron oxides/PI fiber membranes, especially magnetic PI membranes, are important flexible porous materials available application in the field of wave absorption, magnetic recording, membrane separation and catalysts. Therefore, α-Fe2O3 loaded PI composite fibers were prepared by electrospinning of poly(amic acid) PAA solution followed by loading Fe3+ on the PAA membrane by ion-exchange and then imidization. Then the α-Fe2O3 on PI membrane were reduced by H2 to give magnetic PI membranes. The content of α-Fe2O3 and Fe3O4 on PI can be controlled by adjustment the ion-exchange time. The saturation magnetization of the composite membranes can reach up to 4 emu/g and the final composite membranes have magnetic response ability.

  14. Inhibition of transcription by oxidative DNA damage products

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, S.; Reines, D.; Doetsch, P.W. )

    1991-03-11

    Thymine glycol is a major oxidative DNA base damage product that can be produced spontaneously in normal cells or by certain chemicals and ionizing radiation. This lesion as well as other oxidatively damaged bases are recognized and removed in eukaryotic cells by the DNA repair enzyme redoxyendonuclease which the authors have identified in a variety of cell types. Transcriptional regulation is a key element in the control of gene expression. Deficiencies in the various steps of transcription of an essential gene may have catastrophic effects for a cell. In terminally differentiated cells, the removal of RNA-polymerase blocking lesions could be viewed as a critical function for DNA repair systems in such cells. Very little information exists on the effects of oxidative base damage products on the process of transcription. The authors show here that thymine glycol containing DNA templates can inhibit transcriptional elongation when these lesions are chemically introduced into a DNA template. A DNA segment containing a region of the human H3.3 histone gene was utilized to determine the effects of oxidative DNA base damage on transcription by pure E. coli core RNA polymerase and rat liver RNA polymerase II. Both eukaryotic and prokaryotic RNA polymerases are blocked by the presence of thymine glycols appearing in certain clusters of thymines in the oxidatively damaged transcription template. To obtain quantitative efficiencies of transcriptional arrest, the authors are engineering a DNA template containing a single defined oxidatively damaged residue. The authors' results support the idea that an important function of DNA repair systems in terminally differentiated cells is to ensure the efficient transcription of genes necessary for normal cellular function.

  15. Evidence of neuronal oxidative damage in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Good, P. F.; Werner, P.; Hsu, A.; Olanow, C. W.; Perl, D. P.

    1996-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been proposed as a pathogenetic mechanism in Alzheimer's disease. One mechanism of oxidative damage is the nitration of tyrosine residues in proteins, mediated by peroxynitrite breakdown. Peroxynitrite, a reaction product of nitric oxide and superoxide radicals, has been implicated in N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated excitotoxic damage. Reported evidence of oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease includes increased iron, alterations in protective enzymes, and markers of oxidative damage to proteins and lipids. In this report, we demonstrate the presence of nitrotyrosine in neurofibrillary tangles of Alzheimer's disease. Nitrotyrosine was not detected in controls lacking neurofibrillary tangles. Immunolabeling was demonstrated to be specific nitrotyrosine in a series of control experiments. These observations link oxidative stress with a key pathological lesion of Alzheimer's disease, the neurofibrillary tangle, and demonstrate a pathogenetic mechanism in common with the other major neurodegenerative diseases of aging, Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. These findings further implicate nitric oxide expression and excitotoxicity in the pathogenesis of cell death in Alzheimer's disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8686745

  16. Quercitrin Protects Skin from UVB-induced Oxidative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yuanqin; Li, Wenqi; Son, Yong-Ok; Sun, Lijuan; Lu, Jian; Kim, Donghern; Wang, Xin; Yao, Hua; Wang, Lei; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Hitron, Andrew J; Luo, Jia; Gao, Ning; Shi, Xianglin; Zhang, Zhuo

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of the skin to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation causes oxidative damage to skin, resulting in sunburn, photoaging, and skin cancer. It is generally believed that the skin damage induced by UV irradiation is a consequence of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recently, there is an increased interest in the use of natural products as chemopreventive agents for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) due to their antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties. Quercitrin, glycosylated form of quercetin, is the most common flavonoid in nature with antioxidant properties. The present study investigated the possible beneficial effects of quercitrin to inhibit UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that quercitrin decreased ROS generation induced by UVB irradiation in JB6 cells. Quercitrin restored catalase expression and GSH/GSSG ratio reduced by UVB exposure, two major antioxidant enzymes, leading to reductions of oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis and protection of the skin from inflammation caused by UVB exposure. The present study demonstrated that quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage to skin. PMID:23545178

  17. Oxidative DNA damage stalls the human mitochondrial replisome

    PubMed Central

    Stojkovič, Gorazd; Makarova, Alena V.; Wanrooij, Paulina H.; Forslund, Josefin; Burgers, Peter M.; Wanrooij, Sjoerd

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is capable of causing damage to various cellular constituents, including DNA. There is however limited knowledge on how oxidative stress influences mitochondrial DNA and its replication. Here, we have used purified mtDNA replication proteins, i.e. DNA polymerase γ holoenzyme, the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA binding protein mtSSB, the replicative helicase Twinkle and the proposed mitochondrial translesion synthesis polymerase PrimPol to study lesion bypass synthesis on oxidative damage-containing DNA templates. Our studies were carried out at dNTP levels representative of those prevailing either in cycling or in non-dividing cells. At dNTP concentrations that mimic those in cycling cells, the replication machinery showed substantial stalling at sites of damage, and these problems were further exacerbated at the lower dNTP concentrations present in resting cells. PrimPol, the translesion synthesis polymerase identified inside mammalian mitochondria, did not promote mtDNA replication fork bypass of the damage. This argues against a conventional role for PrimPol as a mitochondrial translesion synthesis DNA polymerase for oxidative DNA damage; however, we show that Twinkle, the mtDNA replicative helicase, is able to stimulate PrimPol DNA synthesis in vitro, suggestive of an as yet unidentified role of PrimPol in mtDNA metabolism. PMID:27364318

  18. Are vacuum-filtrated reduced graphene oxide membranes symmetric?

    PubMed

    Tang, Bo; Zhang, Lianbin; Li, Renyuan; Wu, Jinbo; Hedhili, Mohamed Neijib; Wang, Peng

    2016-01-14

    Graphene or reduced graphene oxide (rGO) membrane-based materials are promising for many advanced applications due to their exceptional properties. One of the most widely used synthesis methods for rGO membranes is vacuum filtration of graphene oxide (GO) on a filter membrane, followed by reduction, which shows great advantages such as operational convenience and good controllability. Despite vacuum-filtrated rGO membranes being widely used in many applications, a fundamental question is overlooked: are the top and bottom surfaces of the membranes formed at the interfaces with air and with the filter membrane respectively symmetric or asymmetric? This work, for the first time, reports the asymmetry of the vacuum-filtrated rGO membranes and discloses the filter membranes' physical imprint on the bottom surface of the rGO membrane, which takes place when the filter membrane surface pores have similar dimension to GO sheets. This result points out that the asymmetric surface properties should be cautiously taken into consideration while designing the surface-related applications for GO and rGO membranes. PMID:26667828

  19. Graphene oxide membranes with tunable semipermeability in organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liang; Li, Yingru; Zhou, Qinqin; Yuan, Wenjing; Shi, Gaoquan

    2015-07-01

    Graphene oxide membranes (GOMs) are mechanically stable in various organic solvents, and their nanochannels can be narrowed by thermal annealing or widened by solvation. Therefore, the semipermeability of GOMs can be easily modulated, and they can be used as "multipurpose membranes" for molecular sieving in organic media. PMID:25994919

  20. Biomarkers of oxidative damage to DNA and repair.

    PubMed

    Loft, Steffen; Høgh Danielsen, Pernille; Mikkelsen, Lone; Risom, Lotte; Forchhammer, Lykke; Møller, Peter

    2008-10-01

    Oxidative-stress-induced damage to DNA includes a multitude of lesions, many of which are mutagenic and have multiple roles in cancer and aging. Many lesions have been characterized by MS-based methods after extraction and digestion of DNA. These preparation steps may cause spurious base oxidation, which is less likely to occur with methods such as the comet assay, which are based on nicking of the DNA strand at modified bases, but offer less specificity. The European Standards Committee on Oxidative DNA Damage has concluded that the true levels of the most widely studied lesion, 8-oxodG (8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine), in cellular DNA is between 0.5 and 5 lesions per 10(6) dG bases. Base excision repair of oxidative damage to DNA can be assessed by nicking assays based on oligonucleotides with lesions or the comet assay, by mRNA expression levels or, in the case of, e.g., OGG1 (8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1), responsible for repair of 8-oxodG, by genotyping. Products of repair in DNA or the nucleotide pool, such as 8-oxodG, excreted into the urine can be assessed by MS-based methods and generally reflects the rate of damage. Experimental and population-based studies indicate that many environmental factors, including particulate air pollution, cause oxidative damage to DNA, whereas diets rich in fruit and vegetables or antioxidant supplements may reduce the levels and enhance repair. Urinary excretion of 8-oxodG, genotype and expression of OGG1 have been associated with risk of cancer in cohort settings, whereas altered levels of damage, repair or urinary excretion in case-control settings may be a consequence rather than the cause of the disease. PMID:18793191

  1. XPD localizes in mitochondria and protects the mitochondrial genome from oxidative DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Fang, Hongbo; Chi, Zhenfen; Wu, Zan; Wei, Di; Mo, Dongliang; Niu, Kaifeng; Balajee, Adayabalam S.; Hei, Tom K.; Nie, Linghu; Zhao, Yongliang

    2015-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD/ERCC2) encodes an ATP-dependent helicase that plays essential roles in both transcription and nucleotide excision repair of nuclear DNA, however, whether or not XPD exerts similar functions in mitochondria remains elusive. In this study, we provide the first evidence that XPD is localized in the inner membrane of mitochondria, and cells under oxidative stress showed an enhanced recruitment of XPD into mitochondrial compartment. Furthermore, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and levels of oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) common deletion were significantly elevated, whereas capacity for oxidative damage repair of mtDNA was markedly reduced in both XPD-suppressed human osteosarcoma (U2OS) cells and XPD-deficient human fibroblasts. Immunoprecipitation-mass spectrometry analysis was used to identify interacting factor(s) with XPD and TUFM, a mitochondrial Tu translation elongation factor was detected to be physically interacted with XPD. Similar to the findings in XPD-deficient cells, mitochondrial common deletion and oxidative damage repair capacity in U2OS cells were found to be significantly altered after TUFM knock-down. Our findings clearly demonstrate that XPD plays crucial role(s) in protecting mitochondrial genome stability by facilitating an efficient repair of oxidative DNA damage in mitochondria. PMID:25969448

  2. Lipid and protein oxidation in hepatic homogenates and cell membranes exposed to bile acids.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Broto, Lorena; Martínez-Ballarín, Enrique; Miana-Mena, Javier; Berzosa, Cesar; Piedrafita, Eduardo; Cebrián, Igor; Reiter, Russel J; García, Joaquín J

    2009-01-01

    Cholestasis occurs in a variety of hepatic diseases and causes damage due to accumulation of bile acids in the liver. The aim was to investigate the effect of several bile acids, i.e. chenodeoxycholic, taurochenodeoxycholic, deoxycholic, taurodeoxycholic, ursodeoxycholic, lithocholic and taurolithocholic (TLC), in inducing oxidative damage. Hepatic tissue of male Sprague-Dawley rats was incubated with or without 1 mM of each bile acid, with or without 0.1 mM FeCl(3) and 0.1 mM ascorbic acid for the purpose of generating free radicals. Several bile acids increased lipid and protein oxidation, with TLC being the most pro-oxidative (657% and 175% in homogenates and 350% and 311% in membranes, respectively). TLC also enhanced iron-induced oxidative stress to lipids (21% in homogenates and 29% in membranes) and to proteins (74% in membranes). This enhancement was dose- and time-dependent and was reduced by melatonin. These results suggest that bile acids differentially mediate hepatic oxidative stress and may be involved in the physiopathology of cholestasis. PMID:19669996

  3. Eugenol-inhibited root growth in Avena fatua involves ROS-mediated oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Nitina; Singh, Harminder Pal; Batish, Daizy Rani; Kohli, Ravinder Kumar

    2015-02-01

    Plant essential oils and their constituent monoterpenes are widely known plant growth retardants but their mechanism of action is not well understood. We explored the mechanism of phytotoxicity of eugenol, a monoterpenoid alcohol, proposed as a natural herbicide. Eugenol (100-1000 µM) retarded the germination of Avena fatua and strongly inhibited its root growth compared to the coleoptile growth. We further investigated the underlying physiological and biochemical alterations leading to the root growth inhibition. Eugenol induced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to oxidative stress and membrane damage in the root tissue. ROS generation measured in terms of hydrogen peroxide, superoxide anion and hydroxyl radical content increased significantly in the range of 24 to 144, 21 to 91, 46 to 173% over the control at 100 to 1000 µM eugenol, respectively. The disruption in membrane integrity was indicated by 25 to 125% increase in malondialdehyde (lipid peroxidation byproduct), and decreased conjugated diene content (~10 to 41%). The electrolyte leakage suggesting membrane damage increased both under light as well as dark conditions measured over a period from 0 to 30 h. In defense to the oxidative damage due to eugenol, a significant upregulation in the ROS-scavenging antioxidant enzyme machinery was observed. The activities of superoxide dismutases, catalases, ascorbate peroxidases, guaiacol peroxidases and glutathione reductases were elevated by ~1.5 to 2.8, 2 to 4.3, 1.9 to 5.0, 1.4 to 3.9, 2.5 to 5.5 times, respectively, in response to 100 to 1000 µM eugenol. The study concludes that eugenol inhibits early root growth through ROS-mediated oxidative damage, despite an activation of the antioxidant enzyme machinery. PMID:25752432

  4. Role of Oxidative RNA Damage in Chronic-Degenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Normal cellular metabolism and exposure to ionizing and ultraviolet radiations and exogenous agents produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). Due to their reactivity, they can interact with many critical biomolecules and induce cell damage. The reaction of ROS with free nucleobases, nucleosides, nucleotides, or oligonucleotides can generate numerous distinct modifications in nucleic acids. Oxidative damage to DNA has been widely investigated and is strongly implicated in the development of many chronic-degenerative diseases. In contrast, RNA damage is a poorly examined field in biomedical research. In this review, I discuss the importance of RNA as a target of oxidative damage and the role of oxidative damage to RNA in the pathogenesis of some chronic-degenerative diseases, such as neurological disorders, atherosclerosis, and cancer. Furthermore, I review recent evidence suggesting that RNA may be the target for toxic agents and indicating RNA degradation as a powerful tool to treat any pathology in which there is an aberrant expression of mRNA and/or its gene products. PMID:26078805

  5. Effect of Pulsed Electric Field on Membrane Lipids and Oxidative Injury of Salmonella typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Ou; Zeng, Xin-An; Brennan, Charles S.; Han, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium cells were subjected to pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment at 25 kV/cm for 0–4 ms to investigate the effect of PEF on the cytoplasmic membrane lipids and oxidative injury of cells. Results indicated that PEF treatment induced a decrease of membrane fluidity of Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimuriumi), possibly due to the alterations of fatty acid biosynthesis-associated gene expressions (down-regulation of cfa and fabA gene expressions and the up-regulation of fabD gene expression), which, in turn, modified the composition of membrane lipid (decrease in the content ratio of unsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acids). In addition, oxidative injury induced by PEF treatment was associated with an increase in the content of malondialdehyde. The up-regulation of cytochrome bo oxidase gene expressions (cyoA, cyoB, and cyoC) indicated that membrane damage was induced by PEF treatment, which was related to the repairing mechanism of alleviating the oxidative injury caused by PEF treatment. Based on these results, we achieved better understanding of microbial injury induced by PEF, suggesting that micro-organisms tend to decrease membrane fluidity in response to PEF treatment and, thus, a greater membrane fluidity might improve the efficiency of PEF treatment to inactivate micro-organisms. PMID:27556460

  6. Effect of Pulsed Electric Field on Membrane Lipids and Oxidative Injury of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Yun, Ou; Zeng, Xin-An; Brennan, Charles S; Han, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium cells were subjected to pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment at 25 kV/cm for 0-4 ms to investigate the effect of PEF on the cytoplasmic membrane lipids and oxidative injury of cells. Results indicated that PEF treatment induced a decrease of membrane fluidity of Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimuriumi), possibly due to the alterations of fatty acid biosynthesis-associated gene expressions (down-regulation of cfa and fabA gene expressions and the up-regulation of fabD gene expression), which, in turn, modified the composition of membrane lipid (decrease in the content ratio of unsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acids). In addition, oxidative injury induced by PEF treatment was associated with an increase in the content of malondialdehyde. The up-regulation of cytochrome bo oxidase gene expressions (cyoA, cyoB, and cyoC) indicated that membrane damage was induced by PEF treatment, which was related to the repairing mechanism of alleviating the oxidative injury caused by PEF treatment. Based on these results, we achieved better understanding of microbial injury induced by PEF, suggesting that micro-organisms tend to decrease membrane fluidity in response to PEF treatment and, thus, a greater membrane fluidity might improve the efficiency of PEF treatment to inactivate micro-organisms. PMID:27556460

  7. Quality decline and oxidative damage in sperm of freshwater crab Sinopotamon henanense exposed to lead.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Hou, Yu-Hua; Jing, Wei-Xin; Dahms, Hans-Uwe; Wang, Lan

    2016-08-01

    Lead (Pb) induces male infertility in vertebrates. Whether lead is related to reproductive abnormalities in aquatic invertebrates remains uncertain. In this work, effects of Pb on the sperm quality and oxidative stress of the freshwater crab Sinopotamon henanense were investigated after 3, 5 and 7d exposure to different Pb concentrations (0, 3.675, 7.35, 14.7, 29.4 and 58.8mg/L). Sperm quality indices including sperm plasma-membrane integrity and acrosomal-membrane integrity were measured by flow cytometry. DNA integrity was measured by fluorescence microscopy. The results showed that Pb levels in sperm increased significantly upon Pb exposure in most treated groups, sperm plasma-membrane integrity, acrosomal-membrane integrity, and DNA integrity were reduced at higher concentrations after 5 d and 7d. Oxidative stress of sperm induced by Pb was reflected in significant up-regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels after 3, 5 and 7d. A significant reduction of the total antioxidant capacity levels occurred after exposure to 14.7mg/L Pb and above at 7d compared to the control. The results of oxidative damage to lipids, proteins and DNA of sperm showed that malondialdehyde, protein carbonylation and DNA-protein crosslinks were increased in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Our findings document that Pb can induce harmful effects on several reproductive endpoints in a freshwater crab. PMID:27123971

  8. Structure of graphene oxide membranes in solvents and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klechikov, Alexey; Yu, Junchun; Thomas, Diana; Sharifi, Tiva; Talyzin, Alexandr V.

    2015-09-01

    The change of distance between individual graphene oxide sheets due to swelling is the key parameter to explain and predict permeation of multilayered graphene oxide (GO) membranes by various solvents and solutions. In situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction study shows that swelling properties of GO membranes are distinctly different compared to precursor graphite oxide powder samples. Intercalation of liquid dioxolane, acetonitrile, acetone, and chloroform into the GO membrane structure occurs with maximum one monolayer insertion (Type I), in contrast with insertion of 2-3 layers of these solvents into the graphite oxide structure. However, the structure of GO membranes expands in liquid DMSO and DMF solvents similarly to precursor graphite oxide (Type II). It can be expected that Type II solvents will permeate GO membranes significantly faster compared to Type I solvents. The membranes are found to be stable in aqueous solutions of acidic and neutral salts, but dissolve slowly in some basic solutions of certain concentrations, e.g. in NaOH, NaHCO3 and LiF. Some larger organic molecules, alkylamines and alkylammonium cations are found to intercalate and expand the lattice of GO membranes significantly, e.g. up to ~35 Å in octadecylamine/methanol solution. Intercalation of solutes into the GO structure is one of the limiting factors for nano-filtration of certain molecules but it also allows modification of the inter-layer distance of GO membranes and tuning of their permeation properties. For example, GO membranes functionalized with alkylammonium cations are hydrophobized and they swell in non-polar solvents.The change of distance between individual graphene oxide sheets due to swelling is the key parameter to explain and predict permeation of multilayered graphene oxide (GO) membranes by various solvents and solutions. In situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction study shows that swelling properties of GO membranes are distinctly different compared to precursor graphite

  9. Fungicide prochloraz induces oxidative stress and DNA damage in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lundqvist, J; Hellman, B; Oskarsson, A

    2016-05-01

    Prochloraz is widely used in horticulture and agriculture, e.g. as a post-harvest anti-mold treatment. Prochloraz is a known endocrine disruptor causing developmental toxicity with multiple mechanisms of action. However, data are scarce concerning other toxic effects. Since oxidative stress response, with formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), is a common mechanism for different toxic endpoints, e.g. genotoxicity, carcinogenicity and teratogenicity, the aim of this study was to investigate if prochloraz can induce oxidative stress and/or DNA damage in human cells. A cell culture based in vitro model was used to study oxidative stress response by prochloraz, as measured by the activity of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a key molecule in oxidative defense mechanisms. It was observed that prochloraz induced oxidative stress in cultured human adrenocortical H295R and hepatoma HepG2 cells at non-toxic concentrations. Further, we used Comet assay to investigate the DNA damaging potential of prochloraz, and found that non-toxic concentrations of prochloraz induced DNA damage in HepG2 cells. These are novel findings, contradicting previous studies in the field of prochloraz and genotoxicity. This study reports a new mechanism by which prochloraz may exert toxicity. Our findings suggest that prochloraz might have genotoxic properties. PMID:26945613

  10. Melittin induced cytogenetic damage, oxidative stress and changes in gene expression in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Gajski, Goran; Domijan, Ana-Marija; Žegura, Bojana; Štern, Alja; Gerić, Marko; Novak Jovanović, Ivana; Vrhovac, Ivana; Madunić, Josip; Breljak, Davorka; Filipič, Metka; Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera

    2016-02-01

    Melittin (MEL) is the main constituent and principal toxin of bee venom. It is a small basic peptide, consisting of a known amino acid sequence, with powerful haemolytic activity. Since MEL is a nonspecific cytolytic peptide that attacks lipid membranes thus leading to toxicity, the presumption is that it could have significant therapeutic benefits. The aim was to evaluate the cyto/genotoxic effects of MEL in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBLs) and the molecular mechanisms involved using a multi-biomarker approach. We found that MEL was cytotoxic for HPBLs in a dose- and time-dependent manner. It also induced morphological changes in the cell membrane, granulation and lysis of exposed cells. After treating HPBLs with non-cytotoxic concentrations of MEL, we observed increased DNA damage including oxidative DNA damage as well as increased formation of micronuclei and nuclear buds, and decreased lymphocyte proliferation determined by comet and micronucleus assays. The observed genotoxicity coincided with increased formation of reactive oxygen species, reduction of glutathione level, increased lipid peroxidation and phospholipase C activity, showing the induction of oxidative stress. MEL also modulated the expression of selected genes involved in DNA damage response (TP53, CDKN1A, GADD45α, MDM), oxidative stress (CAT, SOD1, GPX1, GSR and GCLC) and apoptosis (BAX, BCL-2, CAS-3 and CAS-7). Results indicate that MEL is genotoxic to HPBLs and provide evidence that oxidative stress is involved in its DNA damaging effects. MEL toxicity towards normal cells has to be considered if used for potential therapeutic purposes. PMID:26704293

  11. The Lipopeptide Antibiotic Paenibacterin Binds to the Bacterial Outer Membrane and Exerts Bactericidal Activity through Cytoplasmic Membrane Damage

    PubMed Central

    Huang, En

    2014-01-01

    Paenibacterin is a broad-spectrum lipopeptide antimicrobial agent produced by Paenibacillus thiaminolyticus OSY-SE. The compound consists of a cyclic 13-residue peptide and an N-terminal C15 fatty acyl chain. The mechanism of action of paenibacterin against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus was investigated in this study. The cationic lipopeptide paenibacterin showed a strong affinity for the negatively charged lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Addition of LPS (100 μg/ml) completely eliminated the antimicrobial activity of paenibacterin against E. coli. The electrostatic interaction between paenibacterin and LPS may have displaced the divalent cations on the LPS network and thus facilitated the uptake of antibiotic into Gram-negative cells. Paenibacterin also damaged the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane, as evidenced by the depolarization of membrane potential and leakage of intracellular potassium ions from cells of E. coli and S. aureus. Therefore, the bactericidal activity of paenibacterin is attributed to disruption of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and damage of the cytoplasmic membrane of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Despite the evidence of membrane damage, this study does not rule out additional bactericidal mechanisms potentially exerted by paenibacterin. PMID:24561581

  12. OXIDATIVE COUPLING OF METHANE USING INORGANIC MEMBRANE REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Y.H. Ma; Dr. W.R. Moser; Dr. A.G. Dixon; Dr. A.M. Ramachandra; Dr. Y. Lu; C. Binkerd

    1998-04-01

    The objective of this research is to study the oxidative coupling of methane in catalytic inorganic membrane reactors. A specific target is to achieve conversion of methane to C{sub 2} hydrocarbons at very high selectivity and higher yields than in conventional non-porous, co-feed, fixed bed reactors by controlling the oxygen supply through the membrane. A membrane reactor has the advantage of precisely controlling the rate of delivery of oxygen to the catalyst. This facility permits balancing the rate of oxidation and reduction of the catalyst. In addition, membrane reactors minimize the concentration of gas phase oxygen thus reducing non selective gas phase reactions, which are believed to be a main route for the formation of CO{sub x} products. Such gas phase reactions are a cause of decreased selectivity in the oxidative coupling of methane in conventional flow reactors. Membrane reactors could also produce higher product yields by providing better distribution of the reactant gases over the catalyst than the conventional plug flow reactors. Membrane reactor technology also offers the potential for modifying the membranes both to improve catalytic properties as well as to regulate the rate of the permeation/diffusion of reactants through the membrane to minimize by-product generation. Other benefits also exist with membrane reactors, such as the mitigation of thermal hot-spots for highly exothermic reactions such as the oxidative coupling of methane. The application of catalytically active inorganic membranes has potential for drastically increasing the yield of reactions which are currently limited by either thermodynamic equilibria, product inhibition, or kinetic selectivity.

  13. Deficiency in the inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2-like (Immp21) gene increases ischemic brain damage and impairs mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi; Mehta, Suresh L.; Lu, Baisong; Andy Li, P.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays an important role in mediating ischemic brain damage. Immp2l is an inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase that processes mitochondrial proteins cytochrome c1 (Cyc1). Homozygous mutation of Immp2l (Immp2lTg(Tyr)979Ove or Immp2l−/−) elevates mitochondrial membrane potential, increases superoxide (•O2−) production in the brain and impairs fertility. The objectives of this study are to explore the effects of heterozygous mutation of lmmp2l (Immp2l+/−) on ischemic outcome and to determine the influence of Immp2l deficiency on brain mitochondria after stroke. Male Immp2l+/− and wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to 1-h focal cerebral ischemia. Their brains were harvested after 5 and 24-h of reperfusion. The results showed that infarct volume and DNA oxidative damage significantly increased in the Immp2l+/− mice. There were no obvious cerebral vasculature abnormalities between the two types of mice viewed by Indian ink perfusion. The increased damage in Immp2l+/− mice was associated with early increase in •O2− production. Mitochondrial respiratory rate, total mitochondrial respiratory capacity and mitochondrial respiratory complex activities were decreased at 5-h of recirculation in Immp2l+/− mice compared to WT mice. Our results suggest that lmmp2l deficiency increases ischemic brain damage by enhancing •O2− production and damaging mitochondrial functional performance. PMID:21824519

  14. Maternal diabetes triggers DNA damage and DNA damage response in neurulation stage embryos through oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Dong, Daoyin; Yu, Jingwen; Wu, Yanqing; Fu, Noah; Villela, Natalia Arias; Yang, Peixin

    2015-11-13

    DNA damage and DNA damage response (DDR) in neurulation stage embryos under maternal diabetes conditions are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether maternal diabetes and high glucose in vitro induce DNA damage and DDR in the developing embryo through oxidative stress. In vivo experiments were conducted by mating superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) transgenic male mice with wild-type (WT) female mice with or without diabetes. Embryonic day 8.75 (E8.75) embryos were tested for the DNA damage markers, phosphorylated histone H2A.X (p-H2A.X) and DDR signaling intermediates, including phosphorylated checkpoint 1 (p-Chk1), phosphorylated checkpoint 2 (p-Chk2), and p53. Levels of the same DNA damage markers and DDR signaling intermediates were also determined in the mouse C17.2 neural stem cell line. Maternal diabetes and high glucose in vitro significantly increased the levels of p-H2A.X. Levels of p-Chk1, p-Chk2, and p53, were elevated under both maternal diabetic and high glucose conditions. SOD1 overexpression blocked maternal diabetes-induced DNA damage and DDR in vivo. Tempol, a SOD1 mimetic, diminished high glucose-induced DNA damage and DDR in vitro. In conclusion, maternal diabetes and high glucose in vitro induce DNA damage and activates DDR through oxidative stress, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes-associated embryopathy. PMID:26427872

  15. Copper oxide nanoparticle mediated DNA damage in terrestrial plant models.

    PubMed

    Atha, Donald H; Wang, Huanhua; Petersen, Elijah J; Cleveland, Danielle; Holbrook, R David; Jaruga, Pawel; Dizdaroglu, Miral; Xing, Baoshan; Nelson, Bryant C

    2012-02-01

    Engineered nanoparticles, due to their unique electrical, mechanical, and catalytic properties, are presently found in many commercial products and will be intentionally or inadvertently released at increasing concentrations into the natural environment. Metal- and metal oxide-based nanomaterials have been shown to act as mediators of DNA damage in mammalian cells, organisms, and even in bacteria, but the molecular mechanisms through which this occurs are poorly understood. For the first time, we report that copper oxide nanoparticles induce DNA damage in agricultural and grassland plants. Significant accumulation of oxidatively modified, mutagenic DNA lesions (7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine; 2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine; 4,6-diamino-5-formamidopyrimidine) and strong plant growth inhibition were observed for radish (Raphanus sativus), perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne), and annual ryegrass (Lolium rigidum) under controlled laboratory conditions. Lesion accumulation levels mediated by copper ions and macroscale copper particles were measured in tandem to clarify the mechanisms of DNA damage. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of multiple DNA lesion formation and accumulation in plants. These findings provide impetus for future investigations on nanoparticle-mediated DNA damage and repair mechanisms in plants. PMID:22201446

  16. Bilirubin and its oxidation products damage brain white matter.

    PubMed

    Lakovic, Katarina; Ai, Jinglu; D'Abbondanza, Josephine; Tariq, Asma; Sabri, Mohammed; Alarfaj, Abdullah K; Vasdev, Punarjot; Macdonald, Robert Loch

    2014-11-01

    Brain injury after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) occurs in cortex and white matter and may be mediated by blood breakdown products, including hemoglobin and heme. Effects of blood breakdown products, bilirubin and bilirubin oxidation products, have not been widely investigated in adult brain. Here, we first determined the effect of bilirubin and its oxidation products on the structure and function of white matter in vitro using brain slices. Subsequently, we determined whether these compounds have an effect on the structure and function of white matter in vivo. In all, 0.5 mmol/L bilirubin treatment significantly damaged both the function and the structure of myelinated axons but not the unmyelinated axons in brain slices. Toxicity of bilirubin in vitro was prevented by dimethyl sulfoxide. Bilirubin oxidation products (BOXes) may be responsible for the toxicity of bilirubin. In in vivo experiments, unmyelinated axons were found more susceptible to damage from bilirubin injection. These results suggest that unmyelinated axons may have a major role in white-matter damage in vivo. Since bilirubin and BOXes appear in a delayed manner after ICH, preventing their toxic effects may be worth investigating therapeutically. Dimethyl sulfoxide or its structurally related derivatives may have a potential therapeutic value at antagonizing axonal damage after hemorrhagic stroke. PMID:25160671

  17. Bilirubin and its oxidation products damage brain white matter

    PubMed Central

    Lakovic, Katarina; Ai, Jinglu; D'Abbondanza, Josephine; Tariq, Asma; Sabri, Mohammed; Alarfaj, Abdullah K; Vasdev, Punarjot; Macdonald, Robert Loch

    2014-01-01

    Brain injury after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) occurs in cortex and white matter and may be mediated by blood breakdown products, including hemoglobin and heme. Effects of blood breakdown products, bilirubin and bilirubin oxidation products, have not been widely investigated in adult brain. Here, we first determined the effect of bilirubin and its oxidation products on the structure and function of white matter in vitro using brain slices. Subsequently, we determined whether these compounds have an effect on the structure and function of white matter in vivo. In all, 0.5 mmol/L bilirubin treatment significantly damaged both the function and the structure of myelinated axons but not the unmyelinated axons in brain slices. Toxicity of bilirubin in vitro was prevented by dimethyl sulfoxide. Bilirubin oxidation products (BOXes) may be responsible for the toxicity of bilirubin. In in vivo experiments, unmyelinated axons were found more susceptible to damage from bilirubin injection. These results suggest that unmyelinated axons may have a major role in white-matter damage in vivo. Since bilirubin and BOXes appear in a delayed manner after ICH, preventing their toxic effects may be worth investigating therapeutically. Dimethyl sulfoxide or its structurally related derivatives may have a potential therapeutic value at antagonizing axonal damage after hemorrhagic stroke. PMID:25160671

  18. NDE for Characterizing Oxidation Damage in Reinforced Carbon-Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Rauser, Richard W.; Jacobson, nathan S.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Walker, James L.; Cosgriff, Laura A.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, coated reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) samples of similar structure and composition as that from the NASA space shuttle orbiter s thermal protection system were fabricated with slots in their coating simulating craze cracks. These specimens were used to study oxidation damage detection and characterization using NDE methods. These specimens were heat treated in air at 1143 and 1200 C to create cavities in the carbon substrate underneath the coating as oxygen reacted with the carbon and resulted in its consumption. The cavities varied in diameter from approximately 1 to 3 mm. Single-sided NDE methods were used since they might be practical for on-wing inspection, while x-ray micro-computed tomography (CT) was used to measure cavity sizes in order to validate oxidation models under development for carbon-carbon materials. An RCC sample having a naturally-cracked coating and subsequent oxidation damage was also studied with x-ray micro-CT. This effort is a follow-on study to one that characterized NDE methods for assessing oxidation damage in an RCC sample with drilled holes in the coating. The results of that study are briefly reviewed in this article as well. Additionally, a short discussion on the future role of simulation to aid in these studies is provided.

  19. Bee Products Prevent Agrichemical-Induced Oxidative Damage in Fish

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Daiane; Rocha, Helio Carlos; Kreutz, Luiz Carlos; Loro, Vania Lucia; Marqueze, Alessandra; Koakoski, Gessi; Santos da Rosa, João Gabriel; Gusso, Darlan; Oliveira, Thiago Acosta; de Abreu, Murilo Sander; Barcellos, Leonardo José Gil

    2013-01-01

    In southern South America and other parts of the world, aquaculture is an activity that complements agriculture. Small amounts of agrichemicals can reach aquaculture ponds, which results in numerous problems caused by oxidative stress in non-target organisms. Substances that can prevent or reverse agrichemical-induced oxidative damage may be used to combat these effects. This study includes four experiments. In each experiment, 96 mixed-sex, 6-month-old Rhamdia quelen (118±15 g) were distributed into eight experimental groups: a control group that was not exposed to contaminated water, three groups that were exposed to various concentrations of bee products, three groups that were exposed to various concentrations of bee products plus tebuconazole (TEB; Folicur 200 CE™) and a group that was exposed to 0.88 mg L−1 of TEB alone (corresponding to 16.6% of the 96-h LC50). We show that waterborne bee products, including royal jelly (RJ), honey (H), bee pollen (BP) and propolis (P), reversed the oxidative damage caused by exposure to TEB. These effects were likely caused by the high polyphenol contents of these bee-derived compounds. The most likely mechanism of action for the protective effects of bee products against tissue oxidation and the resultant damage is that the enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) are increased. PMID:24098336

  20. Chemical and Biological Consequences of Oxidatively Damaged Guanine in DNA

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, Sarah; Jarem, Daniel A.; Volle, Catherine B.; Yennie, Craig J.

    2013-01-01

    Of the four native nucleosides, 2′-deoxyguanosine (dGuo) is most easily oxidized. Two lesions derived from dGuo are 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo) and 2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine (Fapy)·dGuo. Furthermore, while steady-state levels of 8-oxodGuo can be detected in genomic DNA, it is also known that 8-oxodGuo is more easily oxidized than dGuo. Thus, 8-oxodGuo is susceptible to further oxidation to form several hyperoxidized dGuo products. This review addresses the structural impact, the mutagenic and genotoxic potential, and biological implications of oxidatively damaged DNA, in particular 8-oxodGuo, Fapy·dGuo, and the hyperoxidized dGuo products. PMID:22239655

  1. Development of topologically structured membranes of aluminum oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bankova, A.; Videkov, V.; Tzaneva, B.

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, nanomembranes have become one of the most widely used construction material for ultrasensitive and ultrathin applications in micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) and other sensor structures due to their remarkable mechanical properties. Among these, the mechanical stability is of particular importance. We present an approach to the analysis of the stability of nanostructured anodic aluminum oxide free membranes subjected to mechanical bending. The membranes tested were with a thickness of 500 nm to 15 urn in various topological shapes; we describe the technological schemes of their preparation. Bends were applied to membranes prepared by using a selective process of etching and anodizing. The results of the preparation of the membranes are discussed, together with the influence of the angle of deflection, and the number of bendings. The results obtained can be used in designing MEMS structures and sensors which use nanostructured anodic aluminum oxide.

  2. Peroxiredoxin-2 expression is increased in β-thalassemic mouse red cells but is displaced from the membrane as a marker of oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Matte, Alessandro; Low, Philip S.; Turrini, Franco; Bertoldi, Mariarita; Campanella, Maria Estela; Spano, Daniela; Pantaleo, Antonella; Siciliano, Angela; De Franceschi, Lucia

    2012-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin 2 (Prx2), the third most abundant cytoplasmic protein in red blood cells (RBCs), is involved in the defense against oxidative stress. Although much is known about Prx2 in healthy RBCs, its role in pathological RBCs remains largely unexplored. Here, we show that the expression and net content of Prx2 are markedly increased in RBCs from two mouse models of β-thalassemia (β-thal; Hbbth/th and Hbbth3/+ strains). We also demonstrate that the increased expression of Prx2 correlates with the severity of the disease and that the amount of Prx2 bound to the membrane is markedly reduced in β-thal mouse RBCs. To explore the impact of oxidative stress on Prx2 membrane association, we examined Prx2 dimerization and membrane translocation in murine RBCs exposed to various oxidants (phenylhydrazine, PHZ; diamide; H2O2). PHZ-treated RBCs, which mimic the membrane damage in β-thal RBCs, exhibited a kinetic correlation among Prx2 membrane displacement, intracellular methemoglobin levels, and hemichrome membrane association, suggesting the possible masking of Prx2 docking sites by membrane-bound hemichromes, providing a possible mechanism for the accumulation of oxidized/dimerized Prx2 in the cytoplasm and the increased membrane damage in β-thal RBCs. Thus, reduced access of Prx2 to the membrane in β-thal RBCs represents a new factor that could contribute to the oxidative damage characterizing the pathology. PMID:20488244

  3. Oxidative DNA damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes of coal workers.

    PubMed

    Schins, R P; Schilderman, P A; Borm, P J

    1995-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species are important mediators of both mineral dust-induced (malignant) lung disease and in vitro DNA damage. Therefore, we studied in vivo oxidative DNA damage in coal workers who had been chronically exposed to silica-containing dust. In peripheral blood lymphocytes of 38 retired coal miners (eight with coal workers pneumoconiosis, 30 references) and 24 age-matched, non-dust-exposed controls 7-hydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) was determined by reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. The ratio of 8-oxodG residues to deoxyguanosine (dG) was related to individual cumulative dust exposure estimates and pneumoconiotic stage as established by chest radiography. The ratio of 8-oxodG to dG(x 10(-5)) in lymphocytes did not differ between miners with coal workers' pneumoconiosis (2.61 +/- 0.44) and miners without coal workers' pneumoconiosis (2.96 +/- 1.86). However, oxidative DNA damage in all miners was higher than in the non-dust-exposed controls (1.67 +/- 1.31). 8-oxodG/dG ratio was not related to individual cumulative coal dust exposure, age or smoking (pack years) when evaluated by multiple linear regression. We suggest that oxidative damage to the DNA of peripheral blood lymphocytes may be introduced by increased oxidative stress responses in subjects chronically exposed to mineral dusts. Whether this is an important pathway in the suggested carcinogenicity of silica is still an open question. PMID:7591172

  4. Reduction in oxidatively generated DNA damage following smoking cessation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoking is a known cause of cancer, and cancer may be in part due to effects of oxidative stress. However, whether smoking cessation reverses oxidatively induced DNA damage unclear. The current study sought to examine the extent to which three DNA lesions showed significant reductions after participants quit smoking. Methods Participants (n = 19) in this study were recruited from an ongoing 16-week smoking cessation clinical trial and provided blood samples from which leukocyte DNA was extracted and assessed for 3 DNA lesions (thymine glycol modification [d(TgpA)]; formamide breakdown of pyrimidine bases [d(TgpA)]; 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine [d(Gh)]) via liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Change in lesions over time was assessed using generalized estimating equations, controlling for gender, age, and treatment condition. Results Overall time effects for the d(TgpA) (χ2(3) = 8.068, p < 0.045), d(PfpA) (χ2(3) = 8.477, p < 0.037), and d(Gh) (χ2(3) = 37.599, p < 0.001) lesions were seen, indicating levels of each decreased significantly after CO-confirmed smoking cessation. The d(TgpA) and d(PfpA) lesions show relatively greater rebound at Week 16 compared to the d(Gh) lesion (88% of baseline for d(TgpA), 64% of baseline for d(PfpA), vs 46% of baseline for d(Gh)). Conclusions Overall, results from this analysis suggest that cigarette smoking contributes to oxidatively induced DNA damage, and that smoking cessation appears to reduce levels of specific damage markers between 30-50 percent in the short term. Future research may shed light on the broader array of oxidative damage influenced by smoking and over longer durations of abstinence, to provide further insights into mechanisms underlying carcinogenesis. PMID:21569419

  5. Scalable nanostructured membranes for solid-oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Masaru; Lai, Bo-Kuai; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2011-05-01

    The use of oxide fuel cells and other solid-state ionic devices in energy applications is limited by their requirement for elevated operating temperatures, typically above 800 °C (ref. 1). Thin-film membranes allow low-temperature operation by reducing the ohmic resistance of the electrolytes. However, although proof-of-concept thin-film devices have been demonstrated, scaling up remains a significant challenge because large-area membranes less than ~100 nm thick are susceptible to mechanical failure. Here, we report that nanoscale yttria-stabilized zirconia membranes with lateral dimensions on the scale of millimetres or centimetres can be made thermomechanically stable by depositing metallic grids on them to function as mechanical supports. We combine such a membrane with a nanostructured dense oxide cathode to make a thin-film solid-oxide fuel cell that can achieve a power density of 155 mW cm-2 at 510 °C. We also report a total power output of more than 20 mW from a single fuel-cell chip. Our large-area membranes could also be relevant to electrochemical energy applications such as gas separation, hydrogen production and permeation membranes.

  6. Oxidative coupling of methane using inorganic membrane reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Y.H.; Moser, W.R.; Dixon, A.G.

    1995-12-31

    The goal of this research is to improve the oxidative coupling of methane in a catalytic inorganic membrane reactor. A specific target is to achieve conversion of methane to C{sub 2} hydrocarbons at very high selectivity and relatively higher yields than in fixed bed reactors by controlling the oxygen supply through the membrane. A membrane reactor has the advantage of precisely controlling the rate of delivery of oxygen to the catalyst. This facility permits balancing the rate of oxidation and reduction of the catalyst. In addition, membrane reactors minimize the concentration of gas phase oxygen thus reducing non selective gas phase reactions, which are believed to be a main route for formation of CO{sub x} products. Such gas phase reactions are a cause for decreased selectivity in oxidative coupling of methane in conventional flow reactors. Membrane reactors could also produce higher product yields by providing better distribution of the reactant gases over the catalyst than the conventional plug flow reactors. Modeling work which aimed at predicting the observed experimental trends in porous membrane reactors was also undertaken in this research program.

  7. Dietary Nickel Chloride Induces Oxidative Intestinal Damage in Broilers

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bangyuan; Cui, Hengmin; Peng, Xi; Fang, Jing; Zuo, Zhicai; Deng, Junliang; Huang, Jianying

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the oxidative damage induced by dietary nickel chloride (NiCl2) in the intestinal mucosa of different parts of the intestine of broilers, including duodenum, jejunum and ileum. A total of 240 one-day-old broilers were divided into four groups and fed on a corn-soybean basal diet as control diet or the same basal diet supplemented with 300, 600 or 900 mg/kg NiCl2 during a 42-day experimental period. The results showed that the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and the ability to inhibit hydroxy radical and glutathione (GSH) content were significantly (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01) decreased in the 300, 600 and 900 mg/kg groups in comparison with those of the control group. In contrast, malondialdehyde (MDA) content was significantly (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01) higher in the 300, 600 and 900 mg/kg groups than that in the control group. It was concluded that dietary NiCl2 in excess of 300 mg/kg could cause oxidative damage in the intestinal mucosa in broilers, which finally impaired the intestinal functions including absorptive function and mucosal immune function. The oxidative damage might be a main mechanism on the effects of NiCl2 on the intestinal health of broilers. PMID:23702803

  8. Preparation of titanium oxide ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Marc A.; Xu, Qunyin

    1992-01-01

    A procedure is disclosed for the reliable production of either particulate or polymeric titanium ceramic membranes by a highly constrained sol-gel procedure. The critical constraints in the procedure include the choice of alkyl alcohol solvent, the amount of water and its rate of addition, the pH of the solution during hydrolysis, and the limit of sintering temperature applied to the resulting gels.

  9. Preparation of titanium oxide ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, M.A.; Xu, Q.

    1992-03-17

    A procedure is disclosed for the reliable production of either particulate or polymeric titanium ceramic membranes by a highly constrained sol-gel procedure. The critical constraints in the procedure include the choice of alkyl alcohol solvent, the amount of water and its rate of addition, the pH of the solution during hydrolysis, and the limit of sintering temperature applied to the resulting gels.

  10. The Effect of Acute Microgravity on Mechanically-Induced Membrane Damage and Membrane-Membrane Fusion Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Mark, S. F.; Vanderburg, Charles R.; Feedback, Daniel L.

    2001-01-01

    Although it is unclear how a living cell senses gravitational forces there is no doubt that perturbation of the gravitational environment results in profound alterations in cellular function. In the present study, we have focused our attention on how acute microgravity exposure during parabolic flight affects the skeletal muscle cell plasma membrane (i.e. sarcolemma), with specific reference to a mechanically-reactive signaling mechanism known as mechanically-induced membrane disruption or "wounding". This response is characterized by both membrane rupture and membrane resealing events mediated by membrane-membrane fusion. We here present experimental evidence that acute microgravity exposure can inhibit membrane-membrane fusion events essential for the resealing of sarcolemmal wounds in individual human myoblasts. Additional evidence to support this contention comes from experimental studies that demonstrate acute microgravity exposure also inhibits secretagogue-stimulated intracellular vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane in HL-60 cells. Based on our own observations and those of other investigators in a variety of ground-based models of membrane wounding and membrane-membrane fusion, we suggest that the disruption in the membrane resealing process observed during acute microgravity is consistent with a microgravity-induced decrease in membrane order.

  11. The effect of acute microgravity on mechanically-induced membrane damage and membrane-membrane fusion events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, M. S.; Vanderburg, C. R.; Feeback, D. L.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Although it is unclear how a living cell senses gravitational forces there is no doubt that perturbation of the gravitational environment results in profound alterations in cellular function. In the present study, we have focused our attention on how acute microgravity exposure during parabolic flight affects the skeletal muscle cell plasma membrane (i.e. sarcolemma), with specific reference to a mechanically-reactive signaling mechanism known as mechanically-induced membrane disruption or "wounding". Both membrane rupture and membrane resealing events mediated by membrane-membrane fusion characterize this response. We here present experimental evidence that acute microgravity exposure can inhibit membrane-membrane fusion events essential for the resealing of sarcolemmal wounds in individual human myoblasts. Additional evidence to support this contention comes from experimental studies that demonstrate acute microgravity exposure also inhibits secretagogue-stimulated intracellular vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane in HL-60 cells. Based on our own observations and those of other investigators in a variety of ground-based models of membrane wounding and membrane-membrane fusion, we suggest that the disruption in the membrane resealing process observed during acute microgravity is consistent with a microgravity-induced decrease in membrane order.

  12. Cell Adhesion and Growth on the Anodized Aluminum Oxide Membrane.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Su; Moon, Dalnim; Kim, Jin-Seok; Lee, Jin Seok

    2016-03-01

    Nanotopological cues are popular tools for in vivo investigation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and cellular microenvironments. The ECM is composed of multiple components and generates a complex microenvironment. The development of accurate in vivo methods for the investigation of ECM are important for disease diagnosis and therapy, as well as for studies on cell behavior. Here, we fabricated anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes using sulfuric and oxalic acid under controlled voltage and temperature. The membranes were designed to possess three different pore and interpore sizes, AAO-1, AAO-2, and AAO-3 membranes, respectively. These membranes were used as tools to investigate nanotopology-signal induced cell behavior. Cancerous cells, specifically, the OVCAR-8 cell-line, were cultured on porous AAO membranes and the effects of these membranes on cell shape, proliferation, and viability were studied. AAO-1 membranes bearing small sized pores were found to maintain the spreading shape of the cultured cells. Cells cultured on AAO-2 and AAO-3 membranes, bearing large pore-sized AAO membranes, changed shape from spreading to rounding. Furthermore, cellular area decreased when cells were cultured on all three AAO membranes that confirmed decreased levels of focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Additionally, OVCAR-8 cells exhibited increased proliferation on AAO membranes possessing various pore sizes, indicating the importance of the nanosurface structure in regulating cell behaviors, such as cell proliferation. Our results suggest that porous-AAO membranes induced nanosurface regulated cell behavior as focal adhesion altered the intracellular organization of the cytoskeleton. Our results may find potential applications as tools in in vivo cancer research studies. PMID:27280255

  13. Leaky lysosomes in lung transplant macrophages: azithromycin prevents oxidative damage

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Lung allografts contain large amounts of iron (Fe), which inside lung macrophages may promote oxidative lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP), cell death and inflammation. The macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM) accumulates 1000-fold inside the acidic lysosomes and may interfere with the lysosomal pool of Fe. Objective Oxidative lysosomal leakage was assessed in lung macrophages from lung transplant recipients without or with AZM treatment and from healthy subjects. The efficiency of AZM to protect lysosomes and cells against oxidants was further assessed employing murine J774 macrophages. Methods Macrophages harvested from 8 transplant recipients (5 without and 3 with ongoing AZM treatment) and 7 healthy subjects, and J774 cells pre-treated with AZM, a high-molecular-weight derivative of the Fe chelator desferrioxamine or ammonium chloride were oxidatively stressed. LMP, cell death, Fe, reduced glutathione (GSH) and H-ferritin were assessed. Results Oxidant challenged macrophages from transplants recipients without AZM exhibited significantly more LMP and cell death than macrophages from healthy subjects. Those macrophages contained significantly more Fe, while GSH and H-ferritin did not differ significantly. Although macrophages from transplant recipients treated with AZM contained both significantly more Fe and less GSH, which would sensitize cells to oxidants, these macrophages resisted oxidant challenge well. The preventive effect of AZM on oxidative LMP and J774 cell death was 60 to 300 times greater than the other drugs tested. Conclusions AZM makes lung transplant macrophages and their lysososomes more resistant to oxidant challenge. Possibly, prevention of obliterative bronchiolitis in lung transplants by AZM is partly due to this action. PMID:23006592

  14. Personal Exposure to Ultrafine Particles and Oxidative DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Vinzents, Peter S.; Møller, Peter; Sørensen, Mette; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Hertel, Ole; Jensen, Finn Palmgren; Schibye, Bente; Loft, Steffen

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to ultrafine particles (UFPs) from vehicle exhaust has been related to risk of cardiovascular and pulmonary disease and cancer, even though exposure assessment is difficult. We studied personal exposure in terms of number concentrations of UFPs in the breathing zone, using portable instruments in six 18-hr periods in 15 healthy nonsmoking subjects. Exposure contrasts of outdoor pollution were achieved by bicycling in traffic for 5 days and in the laboratory for 1 day. Oxidative DNA damage was assessed as strand breaks and oxidized purines in mononuclear cells isolated from venous blood the morning after exposure measurement. Cumulated outdoor and cumulated indoor exposures to UFPs each were independent significant predictors of the level of purine oxidation in DNA but not of strand breaks. Ambient air concentrations of particulate matter with an aero-dynamic diameter of ≤10 μm (PM10), nitrous oxide, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, and/or number concentration of UFPs at urban background or busy street monitoring stations was not a significant predictor of DNA damage, although personal UFP exposure was correlated with urban background concentrations of CO and NO2, particularly during bicycling in traffic. The results indicate that biologic effects of UFPs occur at modest exposure, such as that occurring in traffic, which supports the relationship of UFPs and the adverse health effects of air pollution. PMID:16263500

  15. Organic Fouling of Graphene Oxide Membranes and Its Implications for Membrane Fouling Control in Engineered Osmosis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Meng; Zheng, Sunxiang; Mi, Baoxia

    2016-01-19

    This study provides experimental evidence to mechanistically understand some contradicting effects of the characteristic properties of graphene oxide (GO), such as the high hydrophilicity, negative charge, strong adsorption capability, and large surface area, on the antifouling properties of GO membranes. Furthermore, this study demonstrates the effectiveness of forming a dense GO barrier layer on the back (i.e., porous) side of an asymmetric membrane for fouling control in pressure-retarded osmosis (PRO), an emerging engineered osmosis process whose advancement has been much hindered due to the severe irreversible fouling that occurs as foulants accumulate inside the porous membrane support. In the membrane fouling experiments, protein and alginate were used as model organic foulants. When operated in forward osmosis mode, the GO membrane exhibited fouling performance comparable with that of a polyamide (PA) membrane. Analysis of the membrane adsorption capacity showed that, likely due to the presence of hydrophobic regions in the GO basal plane, the GO membrane has an affinity toward organic foulants 4 to 5 times higher than the PA membrane. Such a high adsorption capacity along with a large surface area, however, did not noticeably aggravate the fouling problem. Our explanation for this phenomenon is that organic foulants are adsorbed mainly on the basal plane of GO nanosheets, and water enters the GO membrane primarily around the oxidized edges of GO, making foulant adsorption not create much hindrance to water flux. When operated in PRO mode, the GO membrane exhibited much better antifouling performance than the PA membrane. This is because unlike the PA membrane for which foulants can be easily trapped inside the porous support and hence cause severe irreversible fouling, the GO membrane allows the foulants to accumulate primarily on its surface due to the sealing effect of the GO layer assembled on the porous side of the asymmetric membrane support. Results

  16. Manganese oxide nanowires, films, and membranes and methods of making

    SciTech Connect

    Suib, Steven Lawrence; Yuan, Jikang

    2011-02-15

    Nanowires, films, and membranes comprising ordered porous manganese oxide-based octahedral molecular sieves and methods of making the same are disclosed. A method for forming nanowires includes hydrothermally treating a chemical precursor composition in a hydrothermal treating solvent to form the nanowires, wherein the chemical precursor composition comprises a source of manganese cations and a source of counter cations, and wherein the nanowires comprise ordered porous manganese oxide-based octahedral molecular sieves.

  17. Exposure to benzene metabolites causes oxidative damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Raj, Abhishek; Nachiappan, Vasanthi

    2016-06-01

    Hydroquinone (HQ) and benzoquinone (BQ) are known benzene metabolites that form reactive intermediates such as reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study attempts to understand the effect of benzene metabolites (HQ and BQ) on the antioxidant status, cell morphology, ROS levels and lipid alterations in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. There was a reduction in the growth pattern of wild-type cells exposed to HQ/BQ. Exposure of yeast cells to benzene metabolites increased the activity of the anti-oxidant enzymes catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase but lead to a decrease in ascorbic acid and reduced glutathione. Increased triglyceride level and decreased phospholipid levels were observed with exposure to HQ and BQ. These results suggest that the enzymatic antioxidants were increased and are involved in the protection against macromolecular damage during oxidative stress; presumptively, these enzymes are essential for scavenging the pro-oxidant effects of benzene metabolites. PMID:27016252

  18. A study of oxidative stress induced by non-thermal plasma-activated water for bacterial damage

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qian; Ma, Ruonan; Tian, Ying; Liang, Yongdong; Feng, Hongqing; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2013-05-20

    Ar/O{sub 2} (2%) cold plasma microjet was used to create plasma-activated water (PAW). The disinfection efficacy of PAW against Staphylococcus aureus showed that PAW can effectively disinfect bacteria. Optical emission spectra and oxidation reduction potential results demonstrated the inactivation is attributed to oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species in PAW. Moreover, the results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy suggested that the chemical state of cell surface, the integrity of cell membrane, as well as the cell internal components and structure were damaged by the oxidative stress.

  19. A study of oxidative stress induced by non-thermal plasma-activated water for bacterial damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qian; Liang, Yongdong; Feng, Hongqing; Ma, Ruonan; Tian, Ying; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2013-05-01

    Ar/O2 (2%) cold plasma microjet was used to create plasma-activated water (PAW). The disinfection efficacy of PAW against Staphylococcus aureus showed that PAW can effectively disinfect bacteria. Optical emission spectra and oxidation reduction potential results demonstrated the inactivation is attributed to oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species in PAW. Moreover, the results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy suggested that the chemical state of cell surface, the integrity of cell membrane, as well as the cell internal components and structure were damaged by the oxidative stress.

  20. Prevention of oxidative DNA damage in rats by brussels sprouts.

    PubMed

    Deng, X S; Tuo, J; Poulsen, H E; Loft, S

    1998-03-01

    The alleged cancer preventive effects of cruciferous vegetables could be related to protection from mutagenic oxidative DNA damage. We have studied the effects of Brussels sprouts, some non-cruciferous vegetables and isolated glucosinolates on spontaneous and induced oxidative DNA damage in terms of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) in groups of 6-8 male Wistar rats. Excess oxidative DNA damage was induced by 2-nitropropane (2-NP 100 mg/kg). Four days oral administration of 3 g of cooked Brussels sprouts homogenate reduced the spontaneous urinary 8-oxodG excretion by 31% (p<0.05) whereas raw sprouts, beans and endive (1:1), isolated indolyl glucosinolates and breakdown products had no significant effect. An aqueous extract of cooked Brussels sprouts (corresponding to 6.7 g vegetable per day for 4 days) decreased the spontaneous 8-oxodG excretion from 92 +/- 12 to 52 +/- 15 pmol/24 h (p<0.05). After 2-NP administration the 8-oxodG excretion was increased to 132 +/- 26 pmol/24 h (p<0.05) whereas pretreatment with the sprouts extract reduced this to 102 +/- 30 pmol/24 h (p<0.05). The spontaneous level of 8-oxodG in nuclear DNA from liver and bone marrow was not significantly affected by the sprouts extract whereas the level decreased by 27% in the kidney (p<0.05). In the liver 2-NP increased the 8-oxodG levels in nuclear DNA 8.7 and 3.8 times (p<0.05) 6 and 24 h after dose, respectively. The sprouts extract reduced this increase by 57% (p<0.05) at 6 h whereas there was no significant effect at 24 h. In the kidneys 2-NP increased the 8-oxodG levels 2.2 and 1.2 times (p<0.05) 6 and 24 h after dose, respectively. Pretreatment with the sprouts extract abolished these increases (p<0.05). Similarly, in the bone marrow the extract protected completely (p<0.05) against a 4.9-fold 2-NP induced increase (p<0.05) in the 8-oxodG level. These findings demonstrate that cooked Brussels sprouts contain bioactive substance(s) with a potential for reducing the physiological

  1. Porous reduced graphene oxide membrane with enhanced gauge factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jen-Chieh; Weng, Cheng-Hsi; Tsai, Fu-Cheng; Shih, Wen-Pin; Chang, Pei-Zen

    2016-01-01

    This paper shows that a porous structure for a reduced graphene oxide (rGO) membrane effectively enhances its gauge factor. A porous graphene-based membrane was synthesized in a liquid phase by combining a GO sheet with copper hydroxide nanostrands (CHNs). A chemical reduction treatment using L-ascorbic acid was utilized to simultaneously improve the conductivity of GO and remove the CHNs from each GO sheet. The intrinsic gauge factors of the porous rGO membrane with varying applied tensile strains were obtained and found to increase monotonically with the increased porosity of the rGO membrane. For a membrane porosity of 15.78%, the maximum gauge factor is 46.1 under an applied strain of less than 1%. The main mechanism behind the enhanced gauge factor is attributed to the structure of the porous rGO membrane. The relationships between the initial electrical resistance, tunneling distance, and gauge factor of the rGO membrane were found by adjusting the membrane porosity and the results completely confirmed the physical phenomena.

  2. Separation of tritiated water using graphene oxide membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Sevigny, Gary J.; Motkuri, Radha K.; Gotthold, David W.; Fifield, Leonard S.; Frost, Anthony P.; Bratton, Wesley

    2015-06-28

    In future nuclear fuel reprocessing plants and possibly for nuclear power plants, the cleanup of tritiated water will be needed for hundreds of thousands of gallons of water with low activities of tritium. This cleanup concept utilizes graphene oxide laminar membranes (GOx) for the separation of low-concentration (10-3-10 µCi/g) tritiated water to create water that can be released to the environment and a much smaller waste stream with higher tritium concentrations. Graphene oxide membranes consist of hierarchically stacked, overlapping molecular layers and represent a new class of materials. A permeation rate test was performed with a 2-µm-thick cast Asbury membrane using mixed gas permeability testing with zero air (highly purified atmosphere) and with air humidified with either H2O or D2O to a nominal 50% relative humidity. The membrane permeability for both H2O and D2O was high with N2 and O2 at the system measurement limit. The membrane water permeation rate was compared to a Nafion® membrane and the GOx permeation was approximately twice as high at room temperature. The H2O vapor permeation rate was 5.9 × 102 cc/m2/min (1.2 × 10-6 g/min-cm2), which is typical for graphene oxide membranes. To demonstrate the feasibility of such isotopic water separation through GOX laminar membranes, an experimental setup was constructed to use pressure-driven separation by heating the isotopic water mixture at one side of the membrane to create steam while cooling the other side. Several membranes were tested and were prepared using different starting materials and by different pretreatment methods. The average separation result was 0.8 for deuterium and 0.6 for tritium. Higher or lower temperatures may also improve separation efficiency but neither has been tested yet. A rough estimate of cost compared to current technology was also included as an indication of potential viability of the process. The relative process costs were based on the rough size of facility to

  3. Brain oxidative damage restored by Sesbania grandiflora in cigarette smoke-exposed rats.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Thiyagarajan; Sureka, Chandrabose; Bhuvana, Shanmugham; Begum, Vavamohaideen Hazeena

    2015-08-01

    Cigarette smoking has been associated with high risk of neurological diseases such as stroke, Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, etc., The present study was designed to evaluate the restorative effects of Sesbania grandiflora (S. grandiflora) on oxidative damage induced by cigarette smoke exposure in the brain of rats. Adult male Wistar-Kyoto rats were exposed to cigarette smoke for a period of 90 days and consecutively treated with S. grandiflora aqueous suspension (SGAS, 1000 mg/kg body weight per day by oral gavage) for a period of 3 weeks. The levels of protein carbonyl, nitric oxide, and activities of cytochrome P450, NADPH oxidase and xanthine oxidase were significantly increased, whereas the levels of total thiol, protein thiol, non-protein thiol, nucleic acids, tissue protein and the activities of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, Ca(2+)-ATPase and Mg(2+)-ATPase were significantly diminished in the brain of rats exposed to cigarette smoke as compared with control rats. Also cigarette smoke exposure resulted in a significant alteration in brain total lipid, total cholesterol, triglycerides and phospholipids content. Treatment of SGAS is regressed these alterations induced by cigarette smoke. The results of our study suggest that S. grandiflora restores the brain from cigarette smoke induced oxidative damage. S. grandiflora could have rendered protection to the brain by stabilizing their cell membranes and prevented the protein oxidation, probably through its free radical scavenging and anti-peroxidative effect. PMID:25620659

  4. Garlic supplementation prevents oxidative DNA damage in essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Veena; Jain, Sanjay

    2005-07-01

    Oxygen-free radicals and other oxygen/nitrogen species are constantly generated in the human body. Most are intercepted by antioxidant defences and perform useful metabolic roles, whereas others escape to damage biomolecules like DNA, lipids and proteins. Garlic has been shown to contain antioxidant phytochemicals that prevent oxidative damage. These include unique water-soluble organosulphur compounds, lipid-soluble organosulphur compounds and flavonoids. Therefore, in the present study, we have tried to explore the antioxidant effect of garlic supplementation on oxidative stress-induced DNA damage, nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide generation and on the total antioxidant status (TAS) in patients of essential hypertension (EH). Twenty patients of EH as diagnosed by JNC VI criteria (Group I) and 20 age and sex-matched normotensive controls (Group II) were enrolled in the study. Both groups were given garlic pearls (GP) in a dose of 250 mg per day for 2 months. Baseline samples were taken at the start of the study, i.e. 0 day, and thereafter 2 months follow-up. 8-Hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), lipids, lipid peroxidation (MDA), NO and antioxidant vitamins A, E and C were determined. A moderate decline in blood pressure (BP) and a significant reduction in 8-OHdG, NO levels and lipid peroxidation were observed in Group I subjects with GP supplementation. Further, a significant increase in vitamin levels and TAS was also observed in this group as compared to the control subjects. These findings point out the beneficial effects of garlic supplementation in reducing blood pressure and counteracting oxidative stress, and thereby, offering cardioprotection in essential hypertensives. PMID:16335787

  5. Transcription-coupled homologous recombination after oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Wei, Leizhen; Levine, Arthur Samuel; Lan, Li

    2016-08-01

    Oxidative DNA damage induces genomic instability and may lead to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. As severe blockades to RNA polymerase II (RNA POLII) during transcription, oxidative DNA damage and the associated DNA strand breaks have a profoundly deleterious impact on cell survival. To protect the integrity of coding regions, high fidelity DNA repair at a transcriptionally active site in non-dividing somatic cells, (i.e., terminally differentiated and quiescent/G0 cells) is necessary to maintain the sequence integrity of transcribed regions. Recent studies indicate that an RNA-templated, transcription-associated recombination mechanism is important to protect coding regions from DNA damage-induced genomic instability. Here, we describe the discovery that G1/G0 cells exhibit Cockayne syndrome (CS) B (CSB)-dependent assembly of homologous recombination (HR) factors at double strand break (DSB) sites within actively transcribed regions. This discovery is a challenge to the current dogma that HR occurs only in S/G2 cells where undamaged sister chromatids are available as donor templates. PMID:27233112

  6. The Flocculating Cationic Polypetide from Moringa oleifera Seeds Damages Bacterial Cell Membranes by Causing Membrane Fusion.

    PubMed

    Shebek, Kevin; Schantz, Allen B; Sines, Ian; Lauser, Kathleen; Velegol, Stephanie; Kumar, Manish

    2015-04-21

    A cationic protein isolated from the seeds of the Moringa oleifera tree has been extensively studied for use in water treatment in developing countries and has been proposed for use in antimicrobial and therapeutic applications. However, the molecular basis for the antimicrobial action of this peptide, Moringa oleifera cationic protein (MOCP), has not been previously elucidated. We demonstrate here that a dominant mechanism of MOCP antimicrobial activity is membrane fusion. We used a combination of cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and fluorescence assays to observe and study the kinetics of fusion of membranes in liposomes representing model microbial cells. We also conducted cryo-EM experiments on E. coli cells where MOCP was seen to fuse the inner and outer membranes. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of membrane vesicles with MOCP molecules were used to elucidate steps in peptide adsorption, stalk formation, and fusion between membranes. PMID:25845029

  7. Ultrafine particulate pollutants induce oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Sioutas, Constantinos; Cho, Arthur; Schmitz, Debra; Misra, Chandan; Sempf, Joan; Wang, Meiying; Oberley, Terry; Froines, John; Nel, Andre

    2003-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine whether differences in the size and composition of coarse (2.5-10 micro m), fine (< 2.5 microm), and ultrafine (< 0.1 microm) particulate matter (PM) are related to their uptake in macrophages and epithelial cells and their ability to induce oxidative stress. The premise for this study is the increasing awareness that various PM components induce pulmonary inflammation through the generation of oxidative stress. Coarse, fine, and ultrafine particles (UFPs) were collected by ambient particle concentrators in the Los Angeles basin in California and used to study their chemical composition in parallel with assays for generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ability to induce oxidative stress in macrophages and epithelial cells. UFPs were most potent toward inducing cellular heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression and depleting intracellular glutathione. HO-1 expression, a sensitive marker for oxidative stress, is directly correlated with the high organic carbon and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) content of UFPs. The dithiothreitol (DTT) assay, a quantitative measure of in vitro ROS formation, was correlated with PAH content and HO-1 expression. UFPs also had the highest ROS activity in the DTT assay. Because the small size of UFPs allows better tissue penetration, we used electron microscopy to study subcellular localization. UFPs and, to a lesser extent, fine particles, localize in mitochondria, where they induce major structural damage. This may contribute to oxidative stress. Our studies demonstrate that the increased biological potency of UFPs is related to the content of redox cycling organic chemicals and their ability to damage mitochondria. PMID:12676598

  8. Oxidative Damage in the Aging Heart: an Experimental Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Gustavo Lenci; Neto, Francisco Filipak; Ribeiro, Ciro Alberto de Oliveira; Liebel, Samuel; de Fraga, Rogério; Bueno, Ronaldo da Rocha Loures

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Several theories have been proposed to explain the cause of ‘aging’; however, the factors that affect this complex process are still poorly understood. Of these theories, the accumulation of oxidative damage over time is among the most accepted. Particularly, the heart is one of the most affected organs by oxidative stress. The current study, therefore, aimed to investigate oxidative stress markers in myocardial tissue of rats at different ages. Methods: Seventy-two rats were distributed into 6 groups of 12 animals each and maintained for 3, 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24 months. After euthanasia, the heart was removed and the levels of non-protein thiols, lipid peroxidation, and protein carbonylation, as well as superoxide dismutase and catalase activities were determined. Results: Superoxide dismutase, catalase activity and lipid peroxidation were reduced in the older groups of animals, when compared with the younger group. However, protein carbonylation showed an increase in the 12-month group followed by a decrease in the older groups. In addition, the levels of non-protein thiols were increased in the 12-month group and not detected in the older groups. Conclusion: Our data showed that oxidative stress is not associated with aging in the heart. However, an increase in non-protein thiols may be an important factor that compensates for the decrease of superoxide dismutase and catalase activity in the oldest rats, to maintain appropriate antioxidant defenses against oxidative insults. PMID:27006709

  9. Tunable water desalination across graphene oxide framework membranes.

    PubMed

    Nicolaï, Adrien; Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, Vincent

    2014-05-14

    The performance of graphene oxide framework (GOF) membranes for water desalination is assessed using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The coupling between water permeability and salt rejection of GOF membranes is studied as a function of linker concentration n, thickness h and applied pressure ΔP. The simulations reveal that water permeability in GOF-(n,h) membranes can be tuned from ∼5 (n = 32 and h = 6.5 nm) to 400 L cm(-2) day(-1) MPa(-1) (n = 64 and h = 2.5 nm) and follows a Cnh(-αn) law. For a given pore size (n = 16 or 32), water permeability of GOF membranes increases when the pore spacing decreases, whereas for a given pore spacing (n = 32 or 64), water permeability increases by up to two orders of magnitude when the pore size increases. Furthermore, for linker concentrations n ≤ 32, the high water permeability corresponds to a 100% salt rejection, elevating this type of GOF membrane as an ideal candidate for water desalination. Compared to experimental performance of reverse osmosis membranes, our calculations suggest that under the same conditions of applied pressure and characteristics of membranes (ΔP ∼ 10 MPa and h ∼ 100 nm), one can expect a perfect salt rejection coupled to a water permeability two orders of magnitude higher than existing technologies, i.e., from a few cL cm(-2) day(-1) MPa(-1) to a few L cm(-2) day(-1) MPa(-1). PMID:24675972

  10. Tunable water desalination across Graphene Oxide Framework membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolai, Adrien; Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, V.

    2014-01-01

    The performance of graphene oxide framework (GOF) membranes for water desalination is assessed using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The coupling between water permeability and salt rejection GOF membranes is studied as a function of linker concentration n, thickness h and applied pressure DP. The simulations reveal that water permeability in GOF-(n,h) membranes can be tuned from 5 (n = 32 and h = 6.5 nm) to 400 L/cm2/day/MPa (n = 64 and h = 2.5 nm) and follows the law Cnh an . For a given pore size (n = 16 or 32), water permeability of GOF membranes increases when the pore spacing decreases, whereas for a given pore spacing (n = 32 or 64), water permeability increases by up to two orders of magnitude when the pore size increases. Furthermore, for linker concentrations n 32, the high water permeability corresponds to a 100% salt rejection, elevating this type of GOF membrane as an ideal candidate for water desalination. Compared to experimental performance of reverse osmosis membranes, our calculations suggest that under the same conditions of applied pressure and characteristics of membranes (DP 10 MPa and h 100 nm), one can expect a perfect salt rejection coupled to a water permeability two orders of magnitude higher than existing technologies, i.e., from a few cL/cm2/day/MPa to a few L/cm2/day/MPa.

  11. Oxidative damage and neurodegeneration in manganese-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Milatovic, Dejan; Yu, Yingchun

    2009-10-15

    Exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) levels results in neurotoxicity to the extrapyramidal system and the development of Parkinson's disease (PD)-like movement disorder, referred to as manganism. Although the mechanisms by which Mn induces neuronal damage are not well defined, its neurotoxicity appears to be regulated by a number of factors, including oxidative injury, mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation. To investigate the mechanisms underlying Mn neurotoxicity, we studied the effects of Mn on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, changes in high-energy phosphates (HEP), neuroinflammation mediators and associated neuronal dysfunctions both in vitro and in vivo. Primary cortical neuronal cultures showed concentration-dependent alterations in biomarkers of oxidative damage, F{sub 2}-isoprostanes (F{sub 2}-IsoPs) and mitochondrial dysfunction (ATP), as early as 2 h following Mn exposure. Treatment of neurons with 500 {mu}M Mn also resulted in time-dependent increases in the levels of the inflammatory biomarker, prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}). In vivo analyses corroborated these findings, establishing that either a single or three (100 mg/kg, s.c.) Mn injections (days 1, 4 and 7) induced significant increases in F{sub 2}-IsoPs and PGE{sub 2} in adult mouse brain 24 h following the last injection. Quantitative morphometric analyses of Golgi-impregnated striatal sections from mice exposed to single or three Mn injections revealed progressive spine degeneration and dendritic damage of medium spiny neurons (MSNs). These findings suggest that oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation are underlying mechanisms in Mn-induced neurodegeneration.

  12. Non-thermal dielectric-barrier discharge plasma damages human keratinocytes by inducing oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    KIM, KI CHEON; PIAO, MEI JING; HEWAGE, SUSARA RUWAN KUMARA MADDUMA; HAN, XIA; KANG, KYOUNG AH; JO, JIN OH; MOK, YOUNG SUN; SHIN, JENNIFER H.; PARK, YEUNSOO; YOO, SUK JAE; HYUN, JIN WON

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the mechanisms through which dielectric-barrier discharge plasma damages human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) through the induction of oxidative stress. For this purpose, the cells were exposed to surface dielectric-barrier discharge plasma in 70% oxygen and 30% argon. We noted that cell viability was decreased following exposure of the cells to plasma in a time-dependent manner, as shown by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were determined using 2′,7′-dichlorodihydro-fluorescein diacetate and dihydroethidium was used to monitor superoxide anion production. Plasma induced the generation of ROS, including superoxide anions, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals. N-acetyl cysteine, which is an antioxidant, prevented the decrease in cell viability caused by exposure to plasma. ROS generated by exposure to plasma resulted in damage to various cellular components, including lipid membrane peroxidation, DNA breaks and protein carbonylation, which was detected by measuring the levels of 8-isoprostane and diphenyl-1-pyrenylphosphine assay, comet assay and protein carbonyl formation. These results suggest that plasma exerts cytotoxic effects by causing oxidative stress-induced damage to cellular components. PMID:26573561

  13. Non-thermal dielectric-barrier discharge plasma damages human keratinocytes by inducing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Cheon; Piao, Mei Jing; Madduma Hewage, Susara Ruwan Kumara; Han, Xia; Kang, Kyoung Ah; Jo, Jin Oh; Mok, Young Sun; Shin, Jennifer H; Park, Yeunsoo; Yoo, Suk Jae; Hyun, Jin Won

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the mechanisms through which dielectric-barrier discharge plasma damages human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) through the induction of oxidative stress. For this purpose, the cells were exposed to surface dielectric-barrier discharge plasma in 70% oxygen and 30% argon. We noted that cell viability was decreased following exposure of the cells to plasma in a time-dependent manner, as shown by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were determined using 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate and dihydroethidium was used to monitor superoxide anion production. Plasma induced the generation of ROS, including superoxide anions, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals. N-acetyl cysteine, which is an antioxidant, prevented the decrease in cell viability caused by exposure to plasma. ROS generated by exposure to plasma resulted in damage to various cellular components, including lipid membrane peroxidation, DNA breaks and protein carbonylation, which was detected by measuring the levels of 8-isoprostane and diphenyl-1-pyrenylphosphine assay, comet assay and protein carbonyl formation. These results suggest that plasma exerts cytotoxic effects by causing oxidative stress-induced damage to cellular components. PMID:26573561

  14. The thermomechanical stability of micro-solid oxide fuel cells fabricated on anodized aluminum oxide membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Chang-Woo; Lee, Jae-Il; Kim, Ki-Bum; Lee, Hae-Weon; Lee, Jong-Ho; Son, Ji-Won

    2012-07-01

    The thermomechanical stability of micro-solid oxide fuel cells (micro-SOFCs) fabricated on an anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane template is investigated. The full structure consists of the following layers: AAO membrane (600 nm)/Pt anode/YSZ electrolyte (900 nm)/porous Pt cathode. The utilization of a 600-nm-thick AAO membrane significantly improves the thermomechanical stability due to its well-known honeycomb-shaped nanopore structure. Moreover, the Pt anode layer deposited in between the AAO membrane and the YSZ electrolyte preserves its integrity in terms of maintaining the triple-phase boundary (TPB) and electrical conductivity during high-temperature operation. Both of these results guarantee thermomechanical stability of the micro-SOFC and extend the cell lifetime, which is one of the most critical issues in the fabrication of freestanding membrane-type micro-SOFCs.

  15. Textile industrial effluent induces mutagenicity and oxidative DNA damage and exploits oxidative stress biomarkers in rats.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Muhammad Furqan; Ashraf, Muhammad; Anjum, Aftab Ahmad; Javeed, Aqeel; Sharif, Ali; Saleem, Ammara; Akhtar, Bushra

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to complex mixtures like textile effluent poses risks to animal and human health such as mutations, genotoxicity and oxidative damage. Aim of the present study was to quantify metals in industrial effluent and to determine its mutagenic, genotoxic and cytotoxic potential and effects on oxidative stress biomarkers in effluent exposed rats. Metal analysis revealed presence of high amounts of zinc, copper, chromium, iron, arsenic and mercury in industrial effluent. Ames test with/without enzyme activation and MTT assay showed strong association of industrial effluent with mutagenicity and cytotoxicity respectively. In-vitro comet assay revealed evidence of high oxidative DNA damage. When Wistar rats were exposed to industrial effluent in different dilutions for 60 days, then activities of total superoxide dismutase and catalase and hydrogen peroxide concentration were found to be significantly lower in kidney, liver and blood/plasma of effluent exposed rats than control. Vitamin C in a dose of 50 mg/kg/day significantly reduced oxidative effects of effluent in rats. On the basis of this study it is concluded that industrial effluent may cause mutagenicity, in-vitro oxidative stress-related DNA damage and cytotoxicity and may be associated with oxidative stress in rats. Vitamin C may have ameliorating effect when exposed to effluent. PMID:26710178

  16. Oxidant conditioning protects cartilage from mechanically induced damage.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Prem; Hecht, Benjamin A; Pedersen, Douglas R; Lavery, Matthew R; Maynard, Jerry; Buckwalter, Joseph A; Martin, James A

    2010-07-01

    Articular cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritis has been linked to abnormal mechanical stresses that are known to cause chondrocyte apoptosis and metabolic derangement in in vitro models. Evidence implicating oxidative damage as the immediate cause of these harmful effects suggests that the antioxidant defenses of chondrocytes might influence their tolerance for mechanical injury. Based on evidence that antioxidant defenses in many cell types are stimulated by moderate oxidant exposure, we hypothesized that oxidant preconditioning would reduce acute chondrocyte death and proteoglycan depletion in cartilage explants after exposure to abnormal mechanical stresses. Porcine cartilage explants were treated every 48 h with tert-butyl hydrogen peroxide (tBHP) at nonlethal concentrations (25, 100, 250, and 500 microM) for a varying number of times (one, two, or four) prior to a bout of unconfined axial compression (5 MPa, 1 Hz, 1800 cycles). When compared with untreated controls, tBHP had significant positive effects on post-compression viability, lactate production, and proteoglycan losses. Overall, the most effective regime was 100 microM tBHP applied four times. RNA analysis revealed significant effects of 100 microM tBHP on gene expression. Catalase, hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha), and glyceraldehyde 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) were significantly increased relative to untreated controls in explants treated four times with 100 microM tBHP, a regime that also resulted in a significant decrease in matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) expression. These findings demonstrate that repeated exposure of cartilage to sublethal concentrations of peroxide can moderate the acute effects of mechanical stress, a conclusion supported by evidence of peroxide-induced changes in gene expression that could render chondrocytes more resistant to oxidative damage. PMID:20058262

  17. Spaceflight environment induces mitochondrial oxidative damage in ocular tissue.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiao W; Pecaut, Michael J; Stodieck, Louis S; Ferguson, Virginia L; Bateman, Ted A; Bouxsein, Mary; Jones, Tamako A; Moldovan, Maria; Cunningham, Christopher E; Chieu, Jenny; Gridley, Daila S

    2013-10-01

    A recent report shows that more than 30% of the astronauts returning from Space Shuttle missions or the International Space Station (ISS) were diagnosed with eye problems that can cause reduced visual acuity. We investigate here whether spaceflight environment-associated retinal damage might be related to oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial apoptosis. Female C57BL/6 mice were flown in the space shuttle Atlantis (STS-135), and within 3-5 h of landing, the spaceflight and ground-control mice, similarly housed in animal enclosure modules (AEMs) were euthanized and their eyes were removed for analysis. Changes in expression of genes involved in oxidative stress, mitochondrial and endothelial cell biology were examined. Apoptosis in the retina was analyzed by caspase-3 immunocytochemical analysis and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Levels of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) protein, an oxidative specific marker for lipid peroxidation were also measured. Evaluation of spaceflight mice and AEM ground-control mice showed that expression of several genes playing central roles in regulating the mitochondria-associated apoptotic pathway were significantly altered in mouse ocular tissue after spaceflight compared to AEM ground-control mice. In addition, the mRNA levels of several genes, which are responsible for regulating the production of reactive oxygen species were also significantly up-regulated in spaceflight samples compared to AEM ground-control mice. Further more, the level of HNE protein was significantly elevated in the retina after spaceflight compared to controls. Our results also revealed that spaceflight conditions induced significant apoptosis in the retina especially inner nuclear layer (INL) and ganglion cell layer (GCL) compared to AEM ground controls. The data provided the first evidence that spaceflight conditions induce oxidative damage that results in mitochondrial apoptosis in the retina. This data suggest

  18. Role of Oxidative Damage in Radiation-Induced Bone Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Alwood, Joshua S.; Limoli, Charles L.; Globus, Ruth K.

    2014-01-01

    During prolonged spaceflight, astronauts are exposed to both microgravity and space radiation, and are at risk for increased skeletal fragility due to bone loss. Evidence from rodent experiments demonstrates that both microgravity and ionizing radiation can cause bone loss due to increased bone-resorbing osteoclasts and decreased bone-forming osteoblasts, although the underlying molecular mechanisms for these changes are not fully understood. We hypothesized that excess reactive oxidative species (ROS), produced by conditions that simulate spaceflight, alter the tight balance between osteoclast and osteoblast activities, leading to accelerated skeletal remodeling and culminating in bone loss. To test this, we used the MCAT mouse model; these transgenic mice over-express the human catalase gene targeted to mitochondria, the major organelle contributing free radicals. Catalase is an anti-oxidant that converts reactive species, hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen. This animal model was selected as it displays extended lifespan, reduced cardiovascular disease and reduced central nervous system radio-sensitivity, consistent with elevated anti-oxidant activity conferred by the transgene. We reasoned that mice overexpressing catalase in mitochondria of osteoblast and osteoclast lineage cells would be protected from the bone loss caused by simulated spaceflight. Over-expression of human catalase localized to mitochondria caused various skeletal phenotypic changes compared to WT mice; this includes greater bone length, decreased cortical bone area and moment of inertia, and indications of altered microarchitecture. These findings indicate mitochondrial ROS are important for normal bone-remodeling and skeletal integrity. Catalase over-expression did not fully protect skeletal tissue from structural decrements caused by simulated spaceflight; however there was significant protection in terms of cellular oxidative damage (MDA levels) to the skeletal tissue. Furthermore, we

  19. Enabling graphene oxide nanosheets as water separation membranes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Meng; Mi, Baoxia

    2013-04-16

    We report a novel procedure to synthesize a new type of water separation membrane using graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets such that water can flow through the nanochannels between GO layers while unwanted solutes are rejected by size exclusion and charge effects. The GO membrane was made via layer-by-layer deposition of GO nanosheets, which were cross-linked by 1,3,5-benzenetricarbonyl trichloride, on a polydopamine-coated polysulfone support. The cross-linking not only provided the stacked GO nanosheets with the necessary stability to overcome their inherent dispensability in water environment but also fine-tuned the charges, functionality, and spacing of the GO nanosheets. We then tested the membranes synthesized with different numbers of GO layers to demonstrate their interesting water separation performance. It was found that the GO membrane flux ranged between 80 and 276 LMH/MPa, roughly 4-10 times higher than that of most commercial nanofiltration membranes. Although the GO membrane in the present development stage had a relatively low rejection (6-46%) of monovalent and divalent salts, it exhibited a moderate rejection (46-66%) of Methylene blue and a high rejection (93-95%) of Rhodamine-WT. We conclude the paper by emphasizing that the facile synthesis of a GO membrane exploiting the ideal properties of inexpensive GO materials offers a myriad of opportunities to modify its physicochemical properties, potentially making the GO membrane a next-generation, cost-effective, and sustainable alternative to the long-existing thin-film composite polyamide membranes for water separation applications. PMID:23488812

  20. Anodic Aluminum Oxide (AAO) Membranes for Cellular Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, Anthony P.

    Anodic Aluminum Oxide (AAO) membranes can be fabricated with a highly tunable pore structure making them a suitable candidate for cellular hybrid devices with single-molecule selectivity. The objective of this study was to characterize the cellular response of AAO membranes with varying pore sizes to serve as a proof-of-concept for an artificial material/cell synapse system. AAO membranes with pore diameters ranging from 34-117 nm were achieved via anodization at a temperature of -1°C in a 2.7% oxalic acid electrolyte. An operating window was established for this setup to create membranes with through-pore and disordered pore morphologies. C17.2 neural stem cells were seeded onto the membranes and differentiated via serum withdrawal. The data suggests a highly tunable correlation between AAO pore diameter and differentiated cell populations. Analysis of membranes before and after cell culture indicated no breakdown of the through-pore structure. Immunocytochemistry (ICC) showed that AAO membranes had increased neurite outgrowth when compared to tissue culture treated (TCT) glass, and neurite outgrowth varied with pore diameter. Additionally, lower neuronal percentages were found on AAO as compared to TCT glass; however, neuronal population was also found to vary with pore diameter. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and ICC images suggested the presence of a tissue-like layer with a mixed-phenotype population. AAO membranes appear to be an excellent candidate for cellular devices, but more work must be completed to understand the surface chemistry of the AAO membranes as it relates to cellular response.

  1. Lysosomal exocytosis in response to subtle membrane damage following nanosecond pulse exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalzell, Danielle R.; Roth, Caleb C.; Bernhard, Joshua A.; Payne, Jason A.; Wilmink, Gerald J.; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2011-03-01

    The cellular response to subtle membrane damage following exposure to nanosecond electric pulses (nsEP) is not well understood. Recent work has shown that when cells are exposed to nsEP, ion permeable nanopores (< 2nm) are created in the plasma membrane in contrast to larger diameter pores (> 2nm) created by longer micro and millisecond duration pulses. Macroscopic damage to a plasma membrane by a micropipette has been shown to cause internal vesicles (lysosomes) to undergo exocytosis to repair membrane damage, a calcium mediated process called lysosomal exocytosis. Formation of large pores in the plasma membrane by electrical pulses has been shown to elicit lysosomal exocytosis in a variety of cell types. Our research objective is to determine whether lysosomal exocytosis will occur in response to nanopores formed by exposure to nsEP. In this paper we used propidium iodide (PI) and Calcium Green-1 AM ester (CaGr) to differentiate between large and small pores formed in CHO-K1 cells following exposure to either 1 or 20, 600-ns duration electrical pulses at 16.2 kV/cm. This information was compared to changes in membrane organization observed by increases in FM1-43 fluorescence, both in the presence and absence of calcium ions in the outside buffer. In addition, we monitored the real time migration of lysosomes within the cell using Cellular Lights assay to tag LAMP-1, a lysosomal membrane protein. Both 1 and 20 pulses elicited a large influx of extracellular calcium, while little PI uptake was observed following a single pulse exposure. Statistically significant increases in FM1-43 fluorescence were seen in samples containing calcium suggesting that calcium-triggered membrane repair may be occurring. Lastly, density of lysosomes within cells, specifically around the nucleus, appeared to change rapidly upon nsEP stimulation suggesting lysosomal migration.

  2. Hyperoside protects human primary melanocytes against H2O2-induced oxidative damage

    PubMed Central

    YANG, BIN; YANG, QIN; YANG, XIN; YAN, HONG-BO; LU, QI-PING

    2016-01-01

    Cuscutae semen has been shown to have beneficial effects in the treatment of vitiligo, recorded in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia, whereas the effects of its constituent compounds remains to be elucidated. Using a tetrazolium bromide assay, the present study found that hyperoside (0.5–200 µg/ml) significantly increased the viability of human melanocytes in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The present study used a cell model of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative damage to examine the effect of hyperoside on human primary melanocytes. The results demonstrated that hyperoside pretreatment for 2 h decreased cell apoptosis from 54.03±9.11 to 17.46±3.10% in the H2O2-injured melanocytes. The levels of oxidative stress in the mitochondrial membrane potential of the melanocytes increased following hyperoside pretreatment. The mRNA and protein levels of B-cell lymphoma-2/Bcl-2-associated X protein and caspase 3 were regulated by hyperoside, and phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling were also mediated by hyperoside. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that hyperoside protected the human primary melanocytes against oxidative damage. PMID:27082158

  3. Ultrasonic assessment of interfacial oxidation damage in ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Y. C.; Rokhlin, S. I.; Baaklini, G. Y.

    1993-01-01

    A new approach to characterizing oxidation damage in ceramic matrix composites using ultrasonic techniques is proposed. In this approach, the elastic constants of the composite are determined nondestructively by measuring the angular dependence of both longitudinal and transverse wave velocities. A micromechanical model for composites with anisotropic constituents is used to find the anisotropic properties of an effective fiber, which is a combination of the fiber and the interface. Interfacial properties are extracted from the properties of this effective fiber by analyzing the difference between effective and actual fiber properties. Unidirectional /0/28 SiC/Si3N4 composites with 30 percent fiber volume fraction and 30 percent matrix porosity are used. The samples are exposed in a flowing oxygen environment at elevated temperatures, up to 1400 C, for 100 hours and then measured by ultrasonic methods at room temperature. The Young's modulus in the fiber direction of the sample oxidized at 600 C decreased significantly but it was unchanged for samples oxidized at temperatures above 1200 C. The transverse moduli obtained from ultrasonic measurements decrease continuously up to 1200 C. The shear stiffnesses show behavior similar to the transverse moduli. The effective elastic moduli of the interfacial carbon coating are determined from the experimental data, and their change due to thermal oxidation is discussed.

  4. Photoinduced Membrane Damage of E. coli and S. aureus by the Photosensitizer-Antimicrobial Peptide Conjugate Eosin-(KLAKLAK)2

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Gregory A.; Ellis, E. Ann; Kim, Hansoo; Muthukrishnan, Nandhini; Snavely, Thomas; Pellois, Jean-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives Upon irradiation with visible light, the photosensitizer-peptide conjugate eosin-(KLAKLAK)2 kills a broad spectrum of bacteria without damaging human cells. Eosin-(KLAKLAK)2 therefore represents an interesting lead compound for the treatment of local infection by photodynamic bacterial inactivation. The mechanisms of cellular killing by eosin-(KLAKLAK)2, however, remain unclear and this lack of knowledge hampers the development of optimized therapeutic agents. Herein, we investigate the localization of eosin-(KLAKLAK)2 in bacteria prior to light treatment and examine the molecular basis for the photodynamic activity of this conjugate. Methodology/Principal Findings By employing photooxidation of 3,3-diaminobenzidine (DAB), (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) methodologies, eosin-(KLAKLAK)2 is visualized at the surface of E. coli and S. aureus prior to photodynamic irradiation. Subsequent irradiation leads to severe membrane damage. Consistent with these observations, eosin-(KLAKLAK)2 binds to liposomes of bacterial lipid composition and causes liposomal leakage upon irradiation. The eosin moiety of the conjugate mediates bacterial killing and lipid bilayer leakage by generating the reactive oxygen species singlet oxygen and superoxide. In contrast, the (KLAKLAK)2 moiety targets the photosensitizer to bacterial lipid bilayers. In addition, while (KLAKLAK)2 does not disrupt intact liposomes, the peptide accelerates the leakage of photo-oxidized liposomes. Conclusions/Significance Together, our results suggest that (KLAKLAK)2 promotes the binding of eosin Y to bacteria cell walls and lipid bilayers. Subsequent light irradiation results in membrane damage from the production of both Type I & II photodynamic products. Membrane damage by oxidation is then further aggravated by the (KLAKLAK)2 moiety and membrane lysis is accelerated by the peptide. These results therefore establish how

  5. Fisetin Protects DNA Against Oxidative Damage and Its Possible Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tingting; Lin, Huajuan; Tu, Qian; Liu, Jingjing; Li, Xican

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The paper tries to assess the protective effect of fisetin against •OH-induced DNA damage, then to investigate the possible mechanism. Methods: The protective effect was evaluated based on the content of malondialdehyde (MDA). The possible mechanism was analyzed using various antioxidant methods in vitro, including •OH scavenging (deoxyribose degradation), •O2- scavenging (pyrogallol autoxidation), DPPH• scavenging, ABTS•+ scavenging, and Cu2+-reducing power assays. Results: Fisetin increased dose-dependently its protective percentages against •OH-induced DNA damage (IC50 value =1535.00±29.60 µM). It also increased its radical-scavenging percentages in a dose-dependent manner in various antioxidants assays. Its IC50 values in •OH scavenging, •O2- scavenging, DPPH• scavenging, ABTS•+ scavenging, and Cu2+-reducing power assays, were 47.41±4.50 µM, 34.05±0.87 µM, 9.69±0.53 µM, 2.43±0.14 µM, and 1.49±0.16 µM, respectively. Conclusion: Fisetin can effectively protect DNA against •OH-induced oxidative damage possibly via reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging approach, which is assumed to be hydrogen atom (H•) and/or single electron (e) donation (HAT/SET) pathways. In the HAT pathway, the 3’,4’-dihydroxyl moiety in B ring of fisetin is thought to play an important role, because it can be ultimately oxidized to a stable ortho-benzoquinone form. PMID:27478791

  6. Myelin Basic Protein Induces Neuron-Specific Toxicity by Directly Damaging the Neuronal Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Sixin; Liu, Xiao; Jin, Jinghua; Ren, Yi; Luo, Jianhong

    2014-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) insults may cause massive demyelination and lead to the release of myelin-associated proteins including its major component myelin basic protein (MBP). MBP is reported to induce glial activation but its effect on neurons is still little known. Here we found that MBP specifically bound to the extracellular surface of the neuronal plasma membrane and induced neurotoxicity in vitro. This effect of MBP on neurons was basicity-dependent because the binding was blocked by acidic lipids and competed by other basic proteins. Further studies revealed that MBP induced damage to neuronal membrane integrity and function by depolarizing the resting membrane potential, increasing the permeability to cations and other molecules, and decreasing the membrane fluidity. At last, artificial liposome vesicle assay showed that MBP directly disturbed acidic lipid bilayer and resulted in increased membrane permeability. These results revealed that MBP induces neurotoxicity through its direct interaction with acidic components on the extracellular surface of neuronal membrane, which may suggest a possible contribution of MBP to the pathogenesis in the CNS disorders with myelin damage. PMID:25255088

  7. Pathophysiology of Bronchoconstriction: Role of Oxidatively Damaged DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Bacsi, Attila; Pan, Lang; Ba, Xueqing; Boldogh, Istvan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review To provide an overview on the present understanding of roles of oxidative DNA damage repair in cell signaling underlying bronchoconstriction common to, but not restricted to various forms of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Recent findings Bronchoconstriction is a tightening of smooth muscle surrounding the bronchi and bronchioles with consequent wheezing and shortness of breath. Key stimuli include air pollutants, viral infections, allergens, thermal and osmotic changes, and shear stress of mucosal epithelium, triggering a wide range of cellular, vascular and neural events. Although activation of nerve fibers, the role of G-proteins, protein kinases and Ca++, and molecular interaction within contracting filaments of muscle are well defined, the overarching mechanisms by which a wide range of stimuli initiate these events are not fully understood. Many, if not all, stimuli increase levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are signaling and oxidatively modifying macromolecules, including DNA. The primary ROS target in DNA is guanine, and 8-oxoguanine is one of the most abundant base lesions. It is repaired by 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase1 (OGG1) during base excision repair processes. The product, free 8-oxoG base, is bound by OGG1 with high affinity, and the complex then functions as an activator of small GTPases, triggering pathways for inducing gene expression and contraction of intracellular filaments in mast and smooth muscle cells. Summary Oxidative DNA damage repair-mediated cell activation signaling result in gene expression that “primes” the mucosal epithelium and submucosal tissues to generate mediators of airway smooth muscle contractions. PMID:26694039

  8. Manganese oxide nanowires, films, and membranes and methods of making

    DOEpatents

    Suib, Steven Lawrence; Yuan, Jikang

    2008-10-21

    Nanowires, films, and membranes comprising ordered porous manganese oxide-based octahedral molecular sieves, and methods of making, are disclosed. A single crystal ultra-long nanowire includes an ordered porous manganese oxide-based octahedral molecular sieve, and has an average length greater than about 10 micrometers and an average diameter of about 5 nanometers to about 100 nanometers. A film comprises a microporous network comprising a plurality of single crystal nanowires in the form of a layer, wherein a plurality of layers is stacked on a surface of a substrate, wherein the nanowires of each layer are substantially axially aligned. A free standing membrane comprises a microporous network comprising a plurality of single crystal nanowires in the form of a layer, wherein a plurality of layers is aggregately stacked, and wherein the nanowires of each layer are substantially axially aligned.

  9. Protective Effect of Folic Acid on Oxidative DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaojuan; Cui, Huan; Zhang, Haiyang; Guan, Xiaoju; Zhang, Zheng; Jia, Chaonan; Wu, Jia; Yang, Hui; Qiu, Wenting; Zhang, Chuanwu; Yang, Zuopeng; Chen, Zhu; Mao, Guangyun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although previous reports have linked DNA damage with both transmissions across generations as well as our own survival, it is unknown how to reverse the lesion. Based on the data from a Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo Controlled Clinical Trial, this study aimed to assess the efficacy of folic acid supplementation (FAS) on DNA oxidative damage reversal. In this randomized clinical trial (RCT), a total of 450 participants were enrolled and randomly assigned to 3 groups to receive folic acid (FA) 0.4 mg/day (low-FA), 0.8 mg/day (high-FA), or placebo (control) for 8 weeks. The urinary 8-hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and creatinine (Cr) concentration at pre- and post-FAS were measured with modified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), respectively. A multivariate general linear model was applied to assess the individual effects of FAS and the joint effects between FAS and hypercholesterolemia on oxidative DNA damage improvement. This clinical trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02235948. Of the 438 subjects that received FA fortification or placebo, the median (first quartile, third quartile) of urinary 8-OHdG/Cr for placebo, low-FA, and high-FA groups were 58.19 (43.90, 82.26), 53.51 (38.97, 72.74), 54.73 (39.58, 76.63) ng/mg at baseline and 57.77 (44.35, 81.33), 51.73 (38.20, 71.30), and 50.65 (37.64, 76.17) ng/mg at the 56th day, respectively. A significant decrease of urinary 8-OHdG was observed after 56 days FA fortification (P < 0.001). Compared with the placebo, after adjusting for some potential confounding factors, including the baseline urinary 8-OHdG/Cr, the urinary 8-OHdG/Cr concentration significantly decreased after 56 days FAS [β (95% confidence interval) = −0.88 (−1.62, −0.14) and P = 0.020 for low-FA; and β (95% confidence interval) = −2.68 (−3.42, −1.94) and P < 0.001 for high-FA] in a dose-response fashion (Ptrend

  10. Evaluation of Oxidation Damage in Thermal Barrier Coating Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1996-01-01

    A method based on the technique of dilatometry has been established to quantitatively evaluate the interfacial damage due to the oxidation in a thermal barrier coating system. Strain isolation and adhesion coefficients have been proposed to characterize the thermal barrier coating (TBC) performance based on its thermal expansion behavior. It has been found that, for a thermal barrier coating system consisting of ZrO2-8%Y2O3/FeCrAlY/4140 steel substrate, the oxidation of the bond coat and substrate significantly reduced the ceramic coating adherence, as inferred from the dilatometry measurements. The in-situ thermal expansion measurements under 30 deg C to 700 deg C thermal cycling in air showed that the adhesion coefficient, A(sub i) decreased by 25% during the first 35 oxidation cycles. Metallography showed that delamination occurred at both the ceramic/bond coat and bond coat/substrate interfaces. In addition, the strain isolation effect has been improved by increasing the FeCrAlY bond coat thickness. The strain isolation coefficient, Si, increased from about 0.04 to 0.25, as the bond coat thickness changed from 0.1 mm to 1.0 mm. It may be possible to design optimum values of strain isolation and interface adhesion coefficients to achieve the best TBC performance.

  11. Melatonin protects the integrity of granulosa cells by reducing oxidative stress in nuclei, mitochondria, and plasma membranes in mice

    PubMed Central

    TANABE, Manabu; TAMURA, Hiroshi; TAKETANI, Toshiaki; OKADA, Maki; LEE, Lifa; TAMURA, Isao; MAEKAWA, Ryo; ASADA, Hiromi; YAMAGATA, Yoshiaki; SUGINO, Norihiro

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin protects luteinized granulosa cells (GCs) from oxidative stress in the follicle during ovulation. However, it is unclear in which cellular components (e.g., nuclei, mitochondria, or plasma membranes) melatonin works as an antioxidant. GCs from immature (3 wks) ICR mice were incubated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2; 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10 mM) in the presence or absence of melatonin (100 μg/ml) for 2 h. DNA damage was assessed by fluorescence-based immunocytochemistry using specific antibodies for 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), an indicator of oxidative guanine base damage in DNA, and for histone H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX), a marker of double-strand breaks of DNA. Mitochondrial function was assessed by the fluorescence intensity of MitoTracker Red probes, which diffuse across the membrane and accumulate in mitochondria with active membrane potentials. Lipid peroxidation of plasma membranes was analyzed by measuring hexanoyl-lysine (HEL), a oxidative stress marker for lipid peroxidation. Apoptosis of GCs was assessed by nuclear fragmentation using DAPI staining, and apoptotic activities were evaluated by caspase-3/7 activities. H2O2 treatment significantly increased the fluorescence intensities of 8-OHdG and γH2AX, reduced the intensity of MitoTracker Red in the mitochondria, increased HEL concentrations in GCs, and enhanced the number of apoptotic cells and caspase-3/7 activities. All these changes were significantly decreased by melatonin treatment. Melatonin reduced oxidative stress-induced DNA damage, mitochondrial dysfunction, lipid peroxidation, and apoptosis in GCs, suggesting that melatonin protects GCs by reducing oxidative stress of cellular components including nuclei, mitochondria, and plasma membranes. Melatonin helps to maintain the integrity of GCs as an antioxidant in the preovulatory follicle. PMID:25366368

  12. Ultra-thin Oxide Membranes: Synthesis and Carrier Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Jai Sung

    Self-supported freestanding membranes are films that are devoid of any underlying supporting layers. The key advantage of such structures is that, due to the lack of substrate effects - both mechanical and chemical, the true native properties of the material can be probed. This is crucial since many of the studies done on materials that are used as freestanding membranes are done as films clamped to substrates or in the bulk form. This thesis focuses on the synthesis and fabrication as well as electrical studies of free standing ultrathin < 40nm oxide membranes. It also is one of the first demonstrations for electrically probing nanoscale freestanding oxide membranes. Fabrication of such membranes is non-trivial as oxide materials are often brittle and difficult to handle. Therefore, it requires an understanding of thin plate mechanics coupled with controllable thin film deposition process. Taking things a step further, to electrically probe these membranes required design of complex device architecture and extensive optimization of nano-fabrication processes. The challenges and optimized fabrication method of such membranes are demonstrated. Three materials are probed in this study, VO2, TiO2, and CeO2. VO2 for understanding structural considerations for electronic phase change and nature of ionic liquid gating, TiO2 and CeO2 for understanding surface conduction properties and surface chemistry. The VO2 study shows shift in metal-insulator transition (MIT) temperature arising from stress relaxation and opening of the hysteresis. The ionic liquid gating studies showed reversible modulation of channel resistance and allowed distinguishing bulk process from the surface effects. Comparing the ionic liquid gating experiments to hydrogen doping experiments illustrated that ionic liquid gating can be a surface limited electrostatic effect, if the critical voltage threshold is not exceeded. TiO2 study shows creation of non-stoichiometric forms under ion milling. Utilizing

  13. Improvement of bovine semen quality by removal of membrane-damaged sperm cells with DNA aptamers and magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Farini, Veronica L; Camaño, Carla V; Ybarra, Gabriel; Viale, Diego L; Vichera, Gabriel; Yakisich, Juan S; Radrizzani, Martín

    2016-07-10

    In cattle, cryopreservation of semen and sex-sorting kill up to 50% of spermatozoa and decrease the success of assisted insemination (AI). Therefore, significant efforts are being carried out to improve the quality of semen prior to AI. In this work we used the Cell-SELEX technique to select single strand DNA aptamers able to recognize with high affinity and specificity damaged sperm cells generated by heat-treatment. We first isolated aptamers with a conserved two motifs of 6 nucleotides of length that bind to the membrane of heat-treated spermatozoa. Then, we used synthetic biotin-labeled aptamers containing the conserved motif to recognize membrane-damaged cells and separate them from viable cells by the use of avidin-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION). This procedure improved the quality of semen by significantly increasing the percentage of healthy sperm cells without affecting the rate of blastocyst cleavage. This technique was successfully applied to both unsorted and sex-sorted sperm suspension. PMID:27164256

  14. Growth inhibition and oxidative damage of Microcystis aeruginosa induced by crude extract of Sagittaria trifolia tubers.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang; Liu, Yunguo; Zhang, Pingyang; Zeng, Guangming; Cai, Xiaoxi; Liu, Shaobo; Yin, Yicheng; Hu, Xinjiang; Hu, Xi; Tan, Xiaofei

    2016-05-01

    Aquatic macrophytes are considered to be promising in controlling harmful cyanobacterial blooms. In this research, an aqueous extract of Sagittaria trifolia tubers was prepared to study its inhibitory effect on Microcystis aeruginosa in the laboratory. Several physiological indices of M. aeruginosa, in response to the environmental stress, were analyzed. Results showed that S. trifolia tuber aqueous extract significantly inhibited the growth of M. aeruginosa in a concentration-dependent way. The highest inhibition rate reached 90% after 6 day treatment. The Chlorophyll-a concentration of M. aeruginosa cells decreased from 343.1 to 314.2μg/L in the treatment group. The activities of superoxide dismutase and peroxidase and the content of reduced glutathione in M. aeruginosa cells initially increased as a response to the oxidative stress posed by S. trifolia tuber aqueous extract, but then decreased as time prolonged. The lipid peroxidation damage of the cyanobacterial cell membranes was reflected by the malondialdehyde level, which was notably higher in the treatment group compared with the controls. It was concluded that the oxidative damage of M. aeruginosa induced by S. trifolia tuber aqueous extract might be one of the mechanisms for the inhibitory effects. PMID:27155407

  15. Amelioration of Isoproterenol-Induced Oxidative Damage in Rat Myocardium by Withania somnifera Leaf Extract

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Md. Ibrahim; Ahmmed, Istiyak; Ahmed, Romana; Tanvir, E. M.; Afroz, Rizwana; Paul, Sudip; Gan, Siew Hua; Alam, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the protective role of Withania somnifera leaf extract (WSLEt) on isoproterenol- (ISO-) induced myocardial infarction (MI) in rats. Subcutaneous injection of ISO (85 mg/kg body weight (b.w.)) administered to rats for two consecutive days caused a significant increase in cardiac troponin I (cTnI) levels and serum lipid profiles, as well as the activities of some marker enzymes. In addition to these diagnostic markers, there were increased levels of lipid peroxidation (LPO) and decreased activities of enzymatic antioxidants (superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GRx), and glutathione-S-transferase (GST)) in the myocardium. However, oral pretreatment (100 mg/kg b.w.) with WSLEt for 4 weeks elicited a significant cardioprotective activity by lowering the levels of cTnI, lipid profiles, and marker enzymes. The levels of LPO products were also significantly decreased. Elevated activities of antioxidant enzymes were also observed in rats pretreated with WSLEt. As further confirmed histopathologically, our findings strongly suggest that the cardioprotective effect of WSLEt on myocardium experiencing ISO-induced oxidative damage may be due to an augmentation of the endogenous antioxidant system and an inhibition of LPO in the myocardial membrane. We conclude that WSLEt confers some protection against oxidative damage in ISO-induced MI in rats. PMID:26539517

  16. Amelioration of Isoproterenol-Induced Oxidative Damage in Rat Myocardium by Withania somnifera Leaf Extract.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Md Ibrahim; Ahmmed, Istiyak; Ahmed, Romana; Tanvir, E M; Afroz, Rizwana; Paul, Sudip; Gan, Siew Hua; Alam, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the protective role of Withania somnifera leaf extract (WSLEt) on isoproterenol- (ISO-) induced myocardial infarction (MI) in rats. Subcutaneous injection of ISO (85 mg/kg body weight (b.w.)) administered to rats for two consecutive days caused a significant increase in cardiac troponin I (cTnI) levels and serum lipid profiles, as well as the activities of some marker enzymes. In addition to these diagnostic markers, there were increased levels of lipid peroxidation (LPO) and decreased activities of enzymatic antioxidants (superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GRx), and glutathione-S-transferase (GST)) in the myocardium. However, oral pretreatment (100 mg/kg b.w.) with WSLEt for 4 weeks elicited a significant cardioprotective activity by lowering the levels of cTnI, lipid profiles, and marker enzymes. The levels of LPO products were also significantly decreased. Elevated activities of antioxidant enzymes were also observed in rats pretreated with WSLEt. As further confirmed histopathologically, our findings strongly suggest that the cardioprotective effect of WSLEt on myocardium experiencing ISO-induced oxidative damage may be due to an augmentation of the endogenous antioxidant system and an inhibition of LPO in the myocardial membrane. We conclude that WSLEt confers some protection against oxidative damage in ISO-induced MI in rats. PMID:26539517

  17. Coverage and disruption of phospholipid membranes by oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pera, Harke; Nolte, Tom M; Leermakers, Frans A M; Kleijn, J Mieke

    2014-12-01

    We studied the interactions of silica and titanium dioxide nanoparticles with phospholipid membranes and show how electrostatics plays an important role. For this, we systematically varied the charge density of both the membranes by changing their lipid composition and the oxide particles by changing the pH. For the silica nanoparticles, results from our recently presented fluorescence vesicle leakage assay are combined with data on particle adsorption onto supported lipid bilayers obtained by optical reflectometry. Because of the strong tendency of the TiO2 nanoparticles to aggregate, the interaction of these particles with the bilayer was studied only in the leakage assay. Self-consistent field (SCF) modeling was applied to interpret the results on a molecular level. At low charge densities of either the silica nanoparticles or the lipid bilayers, no electrostatic barrier to adsorption exists. However, the adsorption rate and adsorbed amounts drop with increasing (negative) charge densities on particles and membranes because of electric double-layer repulsion, which is confirmed by the effect of the ionic strength. SCF calculations show that charged particles change the structure of lipid bilayers by a reorientation of a fraction of the zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine (PC) headgroups. This explains the affinity of the silica particles for pure PC lipid layers, even at relatively high particle charge densities. Particle adsorption does not always lead to the disruption of the membrane integrity, as is clear from a comparison of the leakage and adsorption data for the silica particles. The attraction should be strong enough, and in line with this, we found that for positively charged TiO2 particles vesicle disruption increases with increasing negative charge density on the membranes. Our results may be extrapolated to a broader range of oxide nanoparticles and ultimately may be used for establishing more accurate nanoparticle toxicity assessments and drug

  18. Atmospheric Nonthermal Plasma-Treated PBS Inactivates Escherichia coli by Oxidative DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Yost, Adam D.; Joshi, Suresh G.

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported that phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) treated with nonthermal dielectric-barrier discharge plasma (plasma) acquires strong antimicrobial properties, but the mechanisms underlying bacterial inactivation were not known. The goal of this study is to understand the cellular responses of Escherichia coli and to investigate the properties of plasma-activated PBS. The plasma-activated PBS induces severe oxidative stress in E. coli cells and reactive-oxygen species scavengers, α-tocopherol and catalase, protect E. coli from cell death. Here we show that the response of E. coli to plasma-activated PBS is regulated by OxyR and SoxyRS regulons, and mediated predominantly through the expression of katG that deactivates plasma-generated oxidants. During compensation of E. coli in the absence of both katG and katE, sodA and sodB are significantly overexpressed in samples exposed to plasma-treated PBS. Microarray analysis found that up-regulation of genes involved in DNA repair, and E. coli expressing recA::lux fusion was extremely sensitive to the SOS response upon exposure to plasma-treated PBS. The cellular changes include rapid loss of E. coli membrane potential and membrane integrity, lipid peroxidation, accumulation of 8-hydroxy-deoxyguinosine (8OHdG), and severe oxidative DNA damage; reveal ultimate DNA disintegration, and cell death. Together, these data suggest that plasma-treated PBS contains hydrogen peroxide and superoxide like reactive species or/and their products which lead to oxidative changes to cell components, and are eventually responsible for cell death. PMID:26461113

  19. Atmospheric Nonthermal Plasma-Treated PBS Inactivates Escherichia coli by Oxidative DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Yost, Adam D; Joshi, Suresh G

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported that phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) treated with nonthermal dielectric-barrier discharge plasma (plasma) acquires strong antimicrobial properties, but the mechanisms underlying bacterial inactivation were not known. The goal of this study is to understand the cellular responses of Escherichia coli and to investigate the properties of plasma-activated PBS. The plasma-activated PBS induces severe oxidative stress in E. coli cells and reactive-oxygen species scavengers, α-tocopherol and catalase, protect E. coli from cell death. Here we show that the response of E. coli to plasma-activated PBS is regulated by OxyR and SoxyRS regulons, and mediated predominantly through the expression of katG that deactivates plasma-generated oxidants. During compensation of E. coli in the absence of both katG and katE, sodA and sodB are significantly overexpressed in samples exposed to plasma-treated PBS. Microarray analysis found that up-regulation of genes involved in DNA repair, and E. coli expressing recA::lux fusion was extremely sensitive to the SOS response upon exposure to plasma-treated PBS. The cellular changes include rapid loss of E. coli membrane potential and membrane integrity, lipid peroxidation, accumulation of 8-hydroxy-deoxyguinosine (8OHdG), and severe oxidative DNA damage; reveal ultimate DNA disintegration, and cell death. Together, these data suggest that plasma-treated PBS contains hydrogen peroxide and superoxide like reactive species or/and their products which lead to oxidative changes to cell components, and are eventually responsible for cell death. PMID:26461113

  20. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage: importance in non-SOD1 ALS

    PubMed Central

    Carrì, Maria Teresa; Valle, Cristiana; Bozzo, Francesca; Cozzolino, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that mitochondrial damage (MD) is both the major contributor to oxidative stress (OS) (the condition arising from unbalance between production and removal of reactive oxygen species) and one of the major consequences of OS, because of the high dependance of mitochondrial function on redox-sensitive targets such as intact membranes. Conditions in which neuronal cells are not able to cope with MD and OS seem to lead or contribute to several neurodegenerative diseases including Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), at least in the most studied superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1)-linked genetic variant. As summarized in this review, new evidence indicates that MD and OS play a role also in non-SOD1 ALS and thus they may represent a target for therapy despite previous failures in clinical trials. PMID:25741238

  1. Firpronil induced spermotoxicity is associated with oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis in male rats.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saleem; Jan, M H; Kumar, Dhirendra; Telang, A G

    2015-10-01

    The present study is the first to investigate and characterize the fipronil (FPN) induced spermotoxicity in male rats. Male rats were orally given FPN (2.5, 5.0 and 10 mg/kg/day) for 4 weeks. Epididymal sperms were collected and remaining testis was processed for histopathological evaluation. FPN treatment significantly reduced sperm density, motility, viability and per cent intact acrosome along with concomitant increase in spermatozoa abnormalities. Exposure of FPN caused excessive ROS generation, lipid peroxidation and alteration in mitochondrial membrane potential leading to apoptosis of spermatozoa in dose dependent manner. Higher FPN doses (5 and 10 mg/kg) markedly reduced the DNA integrity of spermatozoa. These data suggest that FPN causes male reproductive toxicity through oxidative stress induced DNA damage and apoptosis of spermatozoa. PMID:26453224

  2. Planar ceramic membrane assembly and oxidation reactor system

    DOEpatents

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Dyer, legal representative, Kathryn Beverly; Wilson, Merrill Anderson; Ohrn, Ted R.; Kneidel, Kurt E.; Peterson, David; Chen, Christopher M.; Rackers, Keith Gerard; Dyer, Paul Nigel

    2009-04-07

    Planar ceramic membrane assembly comprising a dense layer of mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material, wherein the dense layer has a first side and a second side, a porous layer of mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material in contact with the first side of the dense layer, and a ceramic channeled support layer in contact with the second side of the dense layer. The planar ceramic membrane assembly can be used in a ceramic wafer assembly comprising a planar ceramic channeled support layer having a first side and a second side; a first dense layer of mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material having an inner side and an outer side, wherein the inner side is in contact with the first side of the ceramic channeled support layer; a first outer support layer comprising porous mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material and having an inner side and an outer side, wherein the inner side is in contact with the outer side of the first dense layer; a second dense layer of mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material having an inner side and an outer side, wherein the inner side is in contact with the second side of the ceramic channeled layer; and a second outer support layer comprising porous mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material and having an inner side and an outer side, wherein the inner side is in contact with the outer side of the second dense layer.

  3. Planar ceramic membrane assembly and oxidation reactor system

    DOEpatents

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Dyer, legal representative, Kathryn Beverly; Wilson, Merrill Anderson; Ohm, Ted R.; Kneidel, Kurt E.; Peterson, David; Chen, Christopher M.; Rackers, Keith Gerard; Dyer, deceased, Paul Nigel

    2007-10-09

    Planar ceramic membrane assembly comprising a dense layer of mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material, wherein the dense layer has a first side and a second side, a porous layer of mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material in contact with the first side of the dense layer, and a ceramic channeled support layer in contact with the second side of the dense layer. The planar ceramic membrane assembly can be used in a ceramic wafer assembly comprising a planar ceramic channeled support layer having a first side and a second side; a first dense layer of mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material having an inner side and an outer side, wherein the inner side is in contact with the first side of the ceramic channeled support layer; a first outer support layer comprising porous mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material and having an inner side and an outer side, wherein the inner side is in contact with the outer side of the first dense layer; a second dense layer of mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material having an inner side and an outer side, wherein the inner side is in contact with the second side of the ceramic channeled layer; and a second outer support layer comprising porous mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material and having an inner side and an outer side, wherein the inner side is in contact with the outer side of the second dense layer.

  4. In vitro apoptotic and DNA damaging potential of nanobarium oxide

    PubMed Central

    Alarifi, Saud; Ali, Daoud; Al-Bishri, Widad

    2016-01-01

    Barium oxide nanoparticles (BaONPs) are an important industrial compound and are widely used in polymers and paints. In this study, apoptotic and genotoxic effects of BaONPs in mouse embryonic fibroblast (L929) cells were determined by using single-cell gel test. In vitro cytotoxicity assays were performed to assess BaONPs’ toxicity in L929 cells. Mild cytotoxicity was observed in L929 cells due to BaONPs. BaONPs increased lipid peroxidation, catalase, and superoxide dismutase levels and lowered glutathione levels in L929 cells. This was accompanied by concomitant generation of reactive oxygen species and activation of caspase-3 in BaONPs-treated L929 cells. On the other hand, when we exposed L929 cells to BaONPs for 24 and 48 hours (comet assay), there was a duration- and dose-dependent increase in DNA impairment detected in the single-cell gel test. Thus, BaONPs exhibit genotoxic and apoptotic effects in L929 cells, most likely due to initiation of oxidative damage. PMID:26834473

  5. Electrochemically Reduced Water Protects Neural Cells from Oxidative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Hamasaki, Takeki; Kinjo, Tomoya; Nakamichi, Noboru; Teruya, Kiichiro; Kabayama, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    Aging-related neurodegenerative disorders are closely associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stresses and their incidence tends to increase with aging. Brain is the most vulnerable to reactive species generated by a higher rate of oxygen consumption and glucose utilization compared to other organs. Electrochemically reduced water (ERW) was demonstrated to scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) in several cell types. In the present study, the protective effect of ERW against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitric oxide (NO) was investigated in several rodent neuronal cell lines and primary cells. ERW was found to significantly suppress H2O2 (50–200 μM) induced PC12 and SFME cell deaths. ERW scavenged intracellular ROS and exhibited a protective effect against neuronal network damage caused by 200 μM H2O2 in N1E-115 cells. ERW significantly suppressed NO-induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cells despite the fact that it did not have the ability to scavenge intracellular NO. ERW significantly suppressed both glutamate induced Ca2+ influx and the resulting cytotoxicity in primary cells. These results collectively demonstrated for the first time that ERW protects several types of neuronal cells by scavenging ROS because of the presence of hydrogen and platinum nanoparticles dissolved in ERW. PMID:25383141

  6. Electrochemically reduced water protects neural cells from oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Kashiwagi, Taichi; Yan, Hanxu; Hamasaki, Takeki; Kinjo, Tomoya; Nakamichi, Noboru; Teruya, Kiichiro; Kabayama, Shigeru; Shirahata, Sanetaka

    2014-01-01

    Aging-related neurodegenerative disorders are closely associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stresses and their incidence tends to increase with aging. Brain is the most vulnerable to reactive species generated by a higher rate of oxygen consumption and glucose utilization compared to other organs. Electrochemically reduced water (ERW) was demonstrated to scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) in several cell types. In the present study, the protective effect of ERW against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitric oxide (NO) was investigated in several rodent neuronal cell lines and primary cells. ERW was found to significantly suppress H2O2 (50-200 μM) induced PC12 and SFME cell deaths. ERW scavenged intracellular ROS and exhibited a protective effect against neuronal network damage caused by 200 μM H2O2 in N1E-115 cells. ERW significantly suppressed NO-induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cells despite the fact that it did not have the ability to scavenge intracellular NO. ERW significantly suppressed both glutamate induced Ca(2+) influx and the resulting cytotoxicity in primary cells. These results collectively demonstrated for the first time that ERW protects several types of neuronal cells by scavenging ROS because of the presence of hydrogen and platinum nanoparticles dissolved in ERW. PMID:25383141

  7. Mitochondrial ferritin suppresses MPTP-induced cell damage by regulating iron metabolism and attenuating oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    You, Lin-Hao; Li, Zhen; Duan, Xiang-Lin; Zhao, Bao-Lu; Chang, Yan-Zhong; Shi, Zhen-Hua

    2016-07-01

    Our previous work showed that mitochondrial ferritin (MtFt) played an important role in preventing neuronal damage in 6-OHDA-induced Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the role of MtFt in a PD model induced by MPTP is not clear. Here, we found that methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6-tetra-pyridine (MPTP) significantly upregulated MtFt in the mouse hippocampus, substantia nigra (SN) and striatum. To explore the effect of MtFt upregulation on the MPTP-mediated injury to neural cells, MtFt-/- mice and MtFt-overexpressing cells were used to construct models of PD induced by MPTP. Our results showed that MPTP dramatically downregulated expression of transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) and tyrosine hydroxylase and upregulated L-ferritin expression in the mouse striatum and SN. Interestingly, MPTP induced high levels of MtFt in these tissues, indicating that MtFt was involved in iron metabolism and influenced dopamine synthesis induced by MPTP. Meanwhile, the Bcl2/Bax ratio was decreased significantly by MPTP in the striatum and SN of MtFt knockout (MtFt-/-) mice compared with controls. Overexpression of MtFt increased TfR1 and decreased ferroportin 1 induced by 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ions (MPP+). MtFt strongly inhibited mitochondrial damage through maintaining the mitochondrial membrane potential and protecting the integrity of the mitochondrial membrane. It also suppressed the increase of the labile iron pool, decreased production of reactive oxygen species and dramatically rescued the apoptosis induced by MPP+. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that MtFt plays an important role in preventing neuronal damage in the MPTP-induced parkinsonian phenotype by inhibiting cellular iron accumulation and subsequent oxidative stress. PMID:27017962

  8. Cadmium-induced oxidative cellular damage in human fetal lung fibroblasts (MRC-5 cells).

    PubMed Central

    Yang, C F; Shen, H M; Shen, Y; Zhuang, Z X; Ong, C N

    1997-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that cadmium (Cd) exposure causes pulmonary damage such as emphysema and lung cancer. However, relatively little is known about the mechanisms involved in Cd pulmonary toxicity. In the present study, the effects of Cd exposure on human fetal lung fibroblasts (MRC-5 cells) were evaluated by determination of lipid peroxidation, intra-cellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and changes of mitochondrial membrane potential. A time- and dose-dependent increase of both lactate dehydrogenase leakage and malondialdehyde formation was observed in Cd-treated cells. A close correlation between these two events suggests that lipid peroxidation may be one of the main pathways causing its cytotoxicity. It was also noted that Cd-induced cell injury and lipid peroxidation were inhibited by catalase and superoxide dismutase, two antioxidant enzymes. By using the fluorescent probe 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate, a significant increase of ROS production in Cd-treated MRC-5 cells was detected. The inhibition of dichlorofluorescein fluorescence by catalase, not superoxide dismutase, suggests that hydrogen peroxide is the main ROS involved. Moreover, the significant dose-dependent changes of mitochondrial membrane potential in Cd-treated MRC-5 cells, demonstrated by increased fluorescence of rhodamine 123 examined using a laser-scanning confocal microscope, also indicate the involvement of mitochondrial damage in Cd cytotoxicity. These findings provide in vitro evidence that Cd causes oxidative cellular damage in human fetal lung fibroblasts, which may be closely associated with the pulmonary toxicity of Cd. Images Figure 1. A Figure 1. B Figure 2. A Figure 2. B Figure 3. A Figure 3. B Figure 4. A Figure 4. B Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. A Figure 7. B PMID:9294717

  9. Pomegranate from Oman Alleviates the Brain Oxidative Damage in Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Subash, Selvaraju; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed; Al-Asmi, Abdullah; Al-Adawi, Samir; Vaishnav, Ragini; Braidy, Nady; Manivasagam, Thamilarasan; Guillemin, Gilles J.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress may play a key role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology. Pomegranates (石榴 Shí Liú) contain very high levels of antioxidant polyphenolic substances, as compared to other fruits and vegetables. Polyphenols have been shown to be neuroprotective in different model systems. Here, the effects of the antioxidant-rich pomegranate fruit grown in Oman on brain oxidative stress status were tested in the AD transgenic mouse. The 4-month-old mice with double Swedish APP mutation (APPsw/Tg2576) were purchased from Taconic Farm, NY, USA. Four-month-old Tg2576 mice were fed with 4% pomegranate or control diet for 15 months and then assessed for the influence of diet on oxidative stress. Significant increase in oxidative stress was found in terms of enhanced levels of lipid peroxidation (LPO) and protein carbonyls. Concomitantly, decrease in the activities of antioxidant enzymes was observed in Tg2576 mice treated with control diet. Supplementation with 4% pomegranate attenuated oxidative damage, as evidenced by decreased LPO and protein carbonyl levels and restoration in the activities of the antioxidant enzymes [superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione (GSH), and Glutathione S transferase (GST)]. The activities of membrane-bound enzymes [Na+ K+-ATPase and acetylcholinesterase (AChE)] were altered in the brain regions of Tg2576 mouse treated with control diet, and 4% pomegranate supplementation was able to restore the activities of enzymes to comparable values observed in controls. The results suggest that the therapeutic potential of 4% pomegranate in the treatment of AD might be associated with counteracting the oxidative stress by the presence of active phytochemicals in it. PMID:25379464

  10. Methionine restriction decreases endogenous oxidative molecular damage and increases mitochondrial biogenesis and uncoupling protein 4 in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Naudí, Alba; Caro, Pilar; Jové, Mariona; Gómez, José; Boada, Jordi; Ayala, Victoria; Portero-Otín, Manuel; Barja, Gustavo; Pamplona, Reinald

    2007-12-01

    Aging plays a central role in the occurrence of neurodegenerative diseases. Caloric restriction (CR) mitigates oxidative stress by decreasing the rate of generation of endogenous damage, a mechanism that can contribute to the slowing of the aging rate induced by this intervention. Various reports have recently linked methionine to aging, and methionine restriction (MetR) without energy restriction also increases life span. We have thus hypothesized that MetR can be responsible, at least in part, for the decrease in endogenous oxidative damage in CR. In this investigation we subjected male rats to exactly the same dietary protocol of MetR that is known to increase their life span. We have found that MetR: (1) decreases the mitochondrial complex I content and activity, as well as complex III content, while the complex II and IV, the mitochondrial flavoprotein apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and ATP content are unchanged; (2) increases the mitochondrial biogenesis factor PGC-1alpha; (3) increases the resistance of brain to metabolic and oxidative stress by increasing mitochondrial uncoupling protein 4 uncoupling protein 4 (UCP4); and (4) decreases mitochondrial oxidative DNA damage and all five different markers of protein oxidation measured and lowers membrane unsaturation in rat brain. No changes were detected for protein amino acid composition. These beneficial MetR-induced changes likely derived from metabolic reprogramming at the cellular and tissue level can play a key role in the protection against aging-associated neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:17716000

  11. Transcriptomic Analysis of Carboxylic Acid Challenge in Escherichia coli: Beyond Membrane Damage

    PubMed Central

    Royce, Liam A.; Boggess, Erin; Fu, Yao; Liu, Ping; Shanks, Jacqueline V.; Dickerson, Julie; Jarboe, Laura R.

    2014-01-01

    Carboxylic acids are an attractive biorenewable chemical. Enormous progress has been made in engineering microbes for production of these compounds though titers remain lower than desired. Here we used transcriptome analysis of Escherichia coli during exogenous challenge with octanoic acid (C8) at pH 7.0 to probe mechanisms of toxicity. This analysis highlights the intracellular acidification and membrane damage caused by C8 challenge. Network component analysis identified transcription factors with altered activity including GadE, the activator of the glutamate-dependent acid resistance system (AR2) and Lrp, the amino acid biosynthesis regulator. The intracellular acidification was quantified during exogenous challenge, but was not observed in a carboxylic acid producing strain, though this may be due to lower titers than those used in our exogenous challenge studies. We developed a framework for predicting the proton motive force during adaptation to strong inorganic acids and carboxylic acids. This model predicts that inorganic acid challenge is mitigated by cation accumulation, but that carboxylic acid challenge inverts the proton motive force and requires anion accumulation. Utilization of native acid resistance systems was not useful in terms of supporting growth or alleviating intracellular acidification. AR2 was found to be non-functional, possibly due to membrane damage. We proposed that interaction of Lrp and C8 resulted in repression of amino acid biosynthesis. However, this hypothesis was not supported by perturbation of lrp expression or amino acid supplementation. E. coli strains were also engineered for altered cyclopropane fatty acid content in the membrane, which had a dramatic effect on membrane properties, though C8 tolerance was not increased. We conclude that achieving higher production titers requires circumventing the membrane damage. As higher titers are achieved, acidification may become problematic. PMID:24586888

  12. Ballet dancers cardiorespiratory, oxidative and muscle damage responses to classes and rehearsals.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues-Krause, Josianne; Krause, Mauricio; Cunha, Giovani Dos Santos; Perin, Diana; Martins, Jocelito B; Alberton, Cristine Lima; Schaun, Maximiliano I; De Bittencourt, Paulo Ivo Homem; Reischak-Oliveira, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to describe and compare ballet dancers' cardiorespiratory responses, muscle damage and oxidative stress levels during a ballet class (practice of isolated ballet exercises performed with barre/hand-rail support and across-the-floor movements to improve technical skills) and rehearsal (practice of ballet choreography involving technical-artistic skills to improve dancers' performance for shows). The 12 advanced female ballet dancers undertook three exercise sessions: maximum effort test, class and rehearsal. Heart rate (HR) and oxygen consumption (VO2) were continuously measured. Lactate was determined before 15 min and after class and rehearsal. Blood was sampled pre, post and 48 h after class and rehearsal for creatine kinase (CK), lipid peroxides (LPO) and glutathione analysis (GSSG/GSH). Class was of lower intensity than rehearsal as shown by VO2, HR and lactate values: VO2 (mL.kg(-1).min(-1)): 14.5±2.1 vs. 19.1±1.7 (p < 0.001); HR (bpm.min(-1)): 145.7±17.9 vs. 174.5±13.8 (p < 0.001); lactate (mmol.L(-1)): 4.2±1.1 vs. 5.5±2.7 (p = 0.049). CK (IU) increased following class and rehearsal, remaining high 48 h after: class (pre = 109.3±48.5; post = 144±60; 48 h = 117.2±64.6); rehearsal (pre = 78.6±52.1; post = 122±70.7; 48 h = 104.9±89.5). LPO (µM) increased from pre-class (1.27±0.19) to post-class (1.41±0.19) and went down after 48 h (1.20±0.22). No LPO time-course changes followed the rehearsal. GSSG/GSH decreased 48 h after class and rehearsal. Greater increases in LPO post-class suggest it promotes CK release by an oxidative membrane-damage mechanism. Physiological increases of LPO and CK in class indicate it prepares the dancers for exercise-induced oxidative stress and muscle damage during rehearsals. Ballet dancers' muscle damage and oxidative stress responses seem not to be dependent on exercise intensity based on VO2 responses. PMID:23679120

  13. Electron Beam Irradiation Dose Dependently Damages the Bacillus Spore Coat and Spore Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Fiester, S. E.; Helfinstine, S. L.; Redfearn, J. C.; Uribe, R. M.; Woolverton, C. J.

    2012-01-01

    Effective control of spore-forming bacilli begs suitable physical or chemical methods. While many spore inactivation techniques have been proven effective, electron beam (EB) irradiation has been frequently chosen to eradicate Bacillus spores. Despite its widespread use, there are limited data evaluating the effects of EB irradiation on Bacillus spores. To study this, B. atrophaeus spores were purified, suspended in sterile, distilled water, and irradiated with EB (up to 20 kGy). Irradiated spores were found (1) to contain structural damage as observed by electron microscopy, (2) to have spilled cytoplasmic contents as measured by spectroscopy, (3) to have reduced membrane integrity as determined by fluorescence cytometry, and (4) to have fragmented genomic DNA as measured by gel electrophoresis, all in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, cytometry data reveal decreased spore size, increased surface alterations, and increased uptake of propidium iodide, with increasing EB dose, suggesting spore coat alterations with membrane damage, prior to loss of spore viability. The present study suggests that EB irradiation of spores in water results in substantial structural damage of the spore coat and inner membrane, and that, along with DNA fragmentation, results in dose-dependent spore inactivation. PMID:22319535

  14. Respiratory epithelial cytotoxicity and membrane damage (holes) caused by amine-modified nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ruenraroengsak, Pakatip; Novak, Pavel; Berhanu, Deborah; Thorley, Andrew J; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Gorelik, Julia; Korchev, Yuri E; Tetley, Teresa D

    2012-02-01

    The respiratory epithelium is a significant target of inhaled, nano-sized particles, the biological reactivity of which will depend on its physicochemical properties. Surface-modified, 50 and 100 nm, polystyrene latex nanoparticles (NPs) were used as model particles to examine the effect of particle size and surface chemistry on transformed human alveolar epithelial type 1-like cells (TT1). Live images of TT1 exposed to amine-modified NPs taken by hopping probe ion conductance microscopy revealed severe damage and holes on cell membranes that were not observed with other types of NPs. This paralleled induction of cell detachment, cytotoxicity and apoptotic (caspase-3/7 and caspase-9) cell death, and increased release of CXCL8 (IL-8). In contrast, unmodified, carboxyl-modified 50 nm NPs and the 100 nm NPs did not cause membrane damage, and were less reactive. Thus, the susceptibility and membrane damage to respiratory epithelium following inhalation of NPs will depend on both surface chemistry (e.g., cationic) and nano-size. PMID:21352086

  15. Evaluation of the damage of cell wall and cell membrane for various extracellular polymeric substance extractions of activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuesong; Liu, Junxin; Xiao, Benyi

    2014-10-20

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) are susceptible to contamination by intracellular substances released during the extraction of EPS owing to the damage caused to microbial cell structures. The damage to cell walls and cell membranes in nine EPS extraction processes of activated sludge was evaluated in this study. The extraction of EPS (including proteins, carbohydrates and DNA) was the highest using the NaOH extraction method and the lowest using formaldehyde extraction. All nine EPS extraction methods in this study resulted in cell wall and membrane damage. The damage to cell walls, evaluated by 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate (KDO) and N-acetylglucosamine content changes in extracted EPS, was the most significant in the NaOH extraction process. Formaldehyde extraction showed a similar extent of damage to cell walls to those detected in the control method (centrifugation), while those in the formaldehyde-NaOH and cation exchange resin extractions were slightly higher than those detected in the control. N-acetylglucosamine was more suitable than KDO for the evaluation of cell wall damage in the EPS extraction of activated sludge. The damage to cell membranes was characterized by two fluorochromes (propidium iodide and FITC Annexin V) with flow cytometry (FCM) measurement. The highest proportion of membrane-damaged cells was detected in NaOH extraction (26.54% of total cells) while membrane-damaged cells comprised 8.19% of total cells in the control. PMID:25173614

  16. Ionizing radiation, antioxidant response and oxidative damage: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Einor, D; Bonisoli-Alquati, A; Costantini, D; Mousseau, T A; Møller, A P

    2016-04-01

    One mechanism proposed as a link between exposure to ionizing radiation and detrimental effects on organisms is oxidative damage. To test this hypothesis, we surveyed the scientific literature on the effects of chronic low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) on antioxidant responses and oxidative damage. We found 40 publications and 212 effect sizes for antioxidant responses and 288 effect sizes for effects of oxidative damage. We performed a meta-analysis of signed and unsigned effect sizes. We found large unsigned effects for both categories (0.918 for oxidative damage; 0.973 for antioxidant response). Mean signed effect size weighted by sample size was 0.276 for oxidative damage and -0.350 for antioxidant defenses, with significant heterogeneity among effects for both categories, implying that ionizing radiation caused small to intermediate increases in oxidative damage and small to intermediate decreases in antioxidant defenses. Our estimates are robust, as shown by very high fail-safe numbers. Species, biological matrix (tissue, blood, sperm) and age predicted the magnitude of effects for oxidative damage as well as antioxidant response. Meta-regression models showed that effect sizes for oxidative damage varied among species and age classes, while effect sizes for antioxidant responses varied among species and biological matrices. Our results are consistent with the description of mechanisms underlying pathological effects of chronic exposure to LDIR. Our results also highlight the importance of resistance to oxidative stress as one possible mechanism associated with variation in species responses to LDIR-contaminated areas. PMID:26851726

  17. Two-peptide bacteriocin PlnEF causes cell membrane damage to Lactobacillus plantarum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Wang, Yang; Liu, Lei; Wei, Yunlu; Shang, Nan; Zhang, Xiangmei; Li, Pinglan

    2016-02-01

    Biologically active, artificially synthesized two-peptide bacteriocin PlnEF was used to study its mode of action on sensitive bacteria Lactobacillus plantarum pl2. The data obtained showed that PlnEF induced membrane permeabilization, allowing for the efflux of electrolytes, which was evidenced by the increased extracellular conductivity, the dissipation of transmembrane electrical potential and pH gradient, and rapid intracellular ATP depletion after L. plantarum pl2 cells were treated with PlnEF for minutes. Laser confocal microscopy showed that PlnEF accumulated very quickly in L. plantarum pl2 cells and the accumulation of PlnEF caused damage to cell membrane. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy further showed that PlnEF induced morphological changes and structure disruption to L. plantarum pl2 cells, such as the formation of blebs, microspheres, membrane deformation and cell lysis. In summary, the data obtained show that PlnEF caused cell membrane damage to L. plantarum pl2 cells. Our study reveals the antimicrobial mechanism of two-peptide bacteriocin PlnEF against L. plantarum. PMID:26615918

  18. Diminution of Oxidative Damage to Human Erythrocytes and Lymphocytes by Creatine: Possible Role of Creatine in Blood

    PubMed Central

    Qasim, Neha; Mahmood, Riaz

    2015-01-01

    Creatine (Cr) is naturally produced in the body and stored in muscles where it is involved in energy generation. It is widely used, especially by athletes, as a staple supplement for improving physical performance. Recent reports have shown that Cr displays antioxidant activity which could explain its beneficial cellular effects. We have evaluated the ability of Cr to protect human erythrocytes and lymphocytes against oxidative damage. Erythrocytes were challenged with model oxidants, 2, 2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the presence and absence of Cr. Incubation of erythrocytes with oxidant alone increased hemolysis, methemoglobin levels, lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl content. This was accompanied by decrease in glutathione levels. Antioxidant enzymes and antioxidant power of the cell were compromised while the activity of membrane bound enzyme was lowered. This suggests induction of oxidative stress in erythrocytes by AAPH and H2O2. However, Cr protected the erythrocytes by ameliorating the AAPH and H2O2 induced changes in these parameters. This protective effect was confirmed by electron microscopic analysis which showed that oxidant-induced cell damage was attenuated by Cr. No cellular alterations were induced by Cr alone even at 20 mM, the highest concentration used. Creatinine, a by-product of Cr metabolism, was also shown to exert protective effects, although it was slightly less effective than Cr. Human lymphocytes were similarly treated with H2O2 in absence and presence of different concentrations of Cr. Lymphocytes incubated with oxidant alone had alterations in various biochemical and antioxidant parameters including decrease in cell viability and induction of DNA damage. The presence of Cr attenuated all these H2O2-induced changes in lymphocytes. Thus, Cr can function as a blood antioxidant, protecting cells from oxidative damage, genotoxicity and can potentially increase their lifespan. PMID

  19. Peptide translocation through the plasma membrane of human cells: Can oxidative stress be exploited to gain better intracellular access?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting-Yi; Pellois, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) enter cells primarily by escaping from endosomal compartments or by directly translocating across the plasma membrane. Due to their capability of permeating into the cytosolic space of the cell, CPPs are utilized for the delivery of cell-impermeable molecules. However, the fundamental mechanisms and parameters associated with the penetration of CPPs and their cargos through the lipid bilayer have not been fully determined. This in turn has hampered their usage in biotechnological or therapeutic applications. We have recently reported that the cell penetration activity of poly-arginine CPPs (PACPPs) is dependent on the oxidation status of the plasma membrane of cells. Our data support a model where the positively-charged PACPP binds negatively-charged lipids exposed on the cell surface as a result of oxidative damage. The PACPP then crosses the membrane via formation of inverted micelles with these anionic lipids. This model provides a plausible explanation for the high variability in the cell delivery efficiency of a PACPP often observed in different settings. Notably, taking into account the current literature describing the effects of lipid oxidation, our data point to a highly complex and underappreciated interplay between PACPPs and oxidized membrane species. Overall, a better understanding of oxidation-dependent cell penetration might provide a fundamental basis for development of optimal cell permeable peptides (including cyclic peptides, stapled peptides, peptoids, etc…) and of robust delivery protocols. PMID:27574543

  20. Peptide translocation through the plasma membrane of human cells: Can oxidative stress be exploited to gain better intracellular access?

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting-Yi; Pellois, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) enter cells primarily by escaping from endosomal compartments or by directly translocating across the plasma membrane. Due to their capability of permeating into the cytosolic space of the cell, CPPs are utilized for the delivery of cell-impermeable molecules. However, the fundamental mechanisms and parameters associated with the penetration of CPPs and their cargos through the lipid bilayer have not been fully determined. This in turn has hampered their usage in biotechnological or therapeutic applications. We have recently reported that the cell penetration activity of poly-arginine CPPs (PACPPs) is dependent on the oxidation status of the plasma membrane of cells. Our data support a model where the positively-charged PACPP binds negatively-charged lipids exposed on the cell surface as a result of oxidative damage. The PACPP then crosses the membrane via formation of inverted micelles with these anionic lipids. This model provides a plausible explanation for the high variability in the cell delivery efficiency of a PACPP often observed in different settings. Notably, taking into account the current literature describing the effects of lipid oxidation, our data point to a highly complex and underappreciated interplay between PACPPs and oxidized membrane species. Overall, a better understanding of oxidation-dependent cell penetration might provide a fundamental basis for development of optimal cell permeable peptides (including cyclic peptides, stapled peptides, peptoids, etc…) and of robust delivery protocols. PMID:27574543

  1. Aging-associated oxidized albumin promotes cellular senescence and endothelial damage

    PubMed Central

    Luna, Carlos; Alique, Matilde; Navalmoral, Estefanía; Noci, Maria-Victoria; Bohorquez-Magro, Lourdes; Carracedo, Julia; Ramírez, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Increased levels of oxidized proteins with aging have been considered a cardiovascular risk factor. However, it is unclear whether oxidized albumin, which is the most abundant serum protein, induces endothelial damage. The results of this study indicated that with aging processes, the levels of oxidized proteins as well as endothelial microparticles release increased, a novel marker of endothelial damage. Among these, oxidized albumin seems to play a principal role. Through in vitro studies, endothelial cells cultured with oxidized albumin exhibited an increment of endothelial damage markers such as adhesion molecules and apoptosis levels. In addition, albumin oxidation increased the amount of endothelial microparticles that were released. Moreover, endothelial cells with increased oxidative stress undergo senescence. In addition, endothelial cells cultured with oxidized albumin shown a reduction in endothelial cell migration measured by wound healing. As a result, we provide the first evidence that oxidized albumin induces endothelial injury which then contributes to the increase of cardiovascular disease in the elderly subjects. PMID:27042026

  2. Nonenzymatic Reactions above Phospholipid Surfaces of Biological Membranes: Reactivity of Phospholipids and Their Oxidation Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Solís-Calero, Christian; Ortega-Castro, Joaquín; Frau, Juan; Muñoz, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipids play multiple and essential roles in cells, as components of biological membranes. Although phospholipid bilayers provide the supporting matrix and surface for many enzymatic reactions, their inherent reactivity and possible catalytic role have not been highlighted. As other biomolecules, phospholipids are frequent targets of nonenzymatic modifications by reactive substances including oxidants and glycating agents which conduct to the formation of advanced lipoxidation end products (ALEs) and advanced glycation end products (AGEs). There are some theoretical studies about the mechanisms of reactions related to these processes on phosphatidylethanolamine surfaces, which hypothesize that cell membrane phospholipids surface environment could enhance some reactions through a catalyst effect. On the other hand, the phospholipid bilayers are susceptible to oxidative damage by oxidant agents as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Molecular dynamics simulations performed on phospholipid bilayers models, which include modified phospholipids by these reactions and subsequent reactions that conduct to formation of ALEs and AGEs, have revealed changes in the molecular interactions and biophysical properties of these bilayers as consequence of these reactions. Then, more studies are desirable which could correlate the biophysics of modified phospholipids with metabolism in processes such as aging and diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25977746

  3. Oxidative damage induced by herbicides is mediated by thiol oxidation and hydroperoxides production.

    PubMed

    Braconi, Daniela; Bernardini, Giulia; Fiorani, Mara; Azzolini, Catia; Marzocchi, Barbara; Proietti, Fabrizio; Collodel, Giulia; Santucci, Annalisa

    2010-08-01

    Toxicological and environmental issues are associated with the extensive use of agricultural pesticides, although the knowledge of their toxic effects as commercial formulations is still far from being complete. This work investigated the impact of three herbicides as commercial formulations on the oxidative status of a wild type Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain. With yeast being a well-established model of eukaryotic cells, especially as far as regards the stress response, these results may be indicative of potential damages on higher eukaryotes. It was found that herbicide-mediated toxicity towards yeast cells could be the result of an increased production of hydroperoxides (like in the case of the herbicides Pointer and Silglif) or advanced oxidation protein products and lipid peroxidation (especially in the case of the herbicide Proper Energy). Through a redox-proteomic approach it was found also that, besides a common signature, each herbicide showed a specific pattern for protein thiols oxidation. PMID:20528566

  4. Slow DNA Transport through Nanopores in Hafnium Oxide Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Bell, David C.; Cohen-Karni, Tzahi; Rosenstein, Jacob K.; Wanunu, Meni

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of double- and single-stranded DNA transport through nanopores fabricated in ultrathin (2–7 nm thick) free-standing hafnium oxide (HfO2) membranes. The high chemical stability of ultrathin HfO2 enables long-lived experiments with <2 nm diameter pores that last several hours, in which we observe >50 000 DNA translocations with no detectable pore expansion. Mean DNA velocities are slower than velocities through comparable silicon nitride pores, providing evidence that HfO2 nanopores have favorable physicochemical interactions with nucleic acids that can be leveraged to slow down DNA in a nanopore. PMID:24083444

  5. CONDITIONS INFLUENCING YIELD AND ANALYSIS OF 8-HYDROXY-2'-DEOXYGUANOSINE IN OXIDATIVELY DAMAGED DNA

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have conducted studies to obtain practical knowledge regarding the stability, digestion, and analytical determination of the content of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) in oxidatively damaged DNA. tilizing H2O2 plus uv light to form oxidatively damaged DNA, we found that st...

  6. Early membrane damage during coronary reperfusion in dogs. Detection by radiolabeled anticardiac myosin (Fab')2.

    PubMed Central

    Frame, L H; Lopez, J A; Khaw, B A; Fallon, J T; Haber, E; Powell, W J

    1983-01-01

    There is currently great interest in acute coronary reperfusion as a therapeutic modality for severe myocardial ischemia. While some studies have demonstrated a reduction in the overall extent of necrosis by early reperfusion, other studies have identified potentially deleterious effects produced by reflow. Because membrane disruption may be an important mechanism of irreversible cell injury, we measured changes in cell membrane integrity early during reperfusion using radiolabeled anticardiac myosin (Fab')2 antibody fragments in dogs. Our method involved brief periods of exposure to the (Fab')2 so that the levels of (Fab')2 binding indicated the degree of membrane disruption at discrete times during the progression of cell injury. In the first protocol (Fab')2 fragments labeled with either 125I and 131I were injected into the left circumflex coronary artery at the onset of reflow and at 45 min of reflow after a 1-h circumflex artery occlusion. Coronary sinus flow was diverted for 5 min following each injection to prevent recirculation. The (Fab')2 binding ratio (ischemic/control) increased during the first 45 min of reflow in each of eight experiments (mean increase 170%, P less than 0.01). No significant increase in (Fab')2 binding was observed in five additional experiments in which nonspecific (Fab')2 was injected. This indicates that the increase in binding seen with antimyosin-specific (Fab')2 was due to changes in specific binding rather than to alterations in (Fab')2 delivery produced by changes in blood flow distribution. The increase in membrane damage during reflow was confirmed by a second protocol in which each animal received only a single left atrial injection of (Fab')2 followed by rapid excision of the heart. The (Fab')2 binding ratio was 1.7 +/- 0.3 (SEM) in the group that received (Fab')2 at the onset of reflow and 3.7 +/- 0.6 (SEM) (P less than 0.05) in the group that received (Fab')2 after 45 min of reflow. In a third set of experiments in

  7. Flexible Proton-Gated Oxide Synaptic Transistors on Si Membrane.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li Qiang; Wan, Chang Jin; Gao, Ping Qi; Liu, Yang Hui; Xiao, Hui; Ye, Ji Chun; Wan, Qing

    2016-08-24

    Ion-conducting materials have received considerable attention for their applications in fuel cells, electrochemical devices, and sensors. Here, flexible indium zinc oxide (InZnO) synaptic transistors with multiple presynaptic inputs gated by proton-conducting phosphorosilicate glass-based electrolyte films are fabricated on ultrathin Si membranes. Transient characteristics of the proton gated InZnO synaptic transistors are investigated, indicating stable proton-gating behaviors. Short-term synaptic plasticities are mimicked on the proposed proton-gated synaptic transistors. Furthermore, synaptic integration regulations are mimicked on the proposed synaptic transistor networks. Spiking logic modulations are realized based on the transition between superlinear and sublinear synaptic integration. The multigates coupled flexible proton-gated oxide synaptic transistors may be interesting for neuroinspired platforms with sophisticated spatiotemporal information processing. PMID:27471861

  8. Cytoplasmic calcium mediates oxidative damage in an excitotoxic /energetic deficit synergic model in rats.

    PubMed

    Pérez-De La Cruz, Verónica; Konigsberg, Mina; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Herrera-Mundo, Nieves; Díaz-Muñoz, Mauricio; Morán, Julio; Fortoul-van der Goes, Teresa; Rondán-Zárate, Adrián; Maldonado, Perla D; Ali, Syed F; Santamaría, Abel

    2008-03-01

    Excessive calcium is responsible for triggering different potentially fatal metabolic pathways during neurodegeneration. In this study, we evaluated the role of calcium on the oxidative damage produced in an in vitro combined model of excitotoxicity/energy deficit produced by the co-administration of quinolinate and 3-nitropropionate to brain synaptosomal membranes. Synaptosomal fractions were incubated in the presence of subtoxic concentrations of these agents (21 and 166 microm, respectively). In order further to characterize possible toxic mechanisms involved in oxidative damage in this experimental paradigm, agents with different properties - dizocilpine, acetyl L-carnitine, iron porphyrinate and S-allylcysteine - were tested at increasing concentrations (10-1000 microm). Lipid peroxidation was assessed by the formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances. For confirmatory purposes, additional fractions were incubated in parallel in the presence of the intracellular calcium chelator 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid-acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA-AM). Under physiological conditions of extracellular calcium availability, synaptomes exposed to both toxins displayed an increased lipoperoxidation (76% above controls), and this effect was partially attenuated by the tested agents as follows: dizocilpine = iron porphyrinate > acetyl L-carnitine > S-allylcysteine. When the incubation medium was deprived of calcium, the lipoperoxidative effect achieved in this experimental paradigm was still high (49% above the control), and the order of attenuation was: iron porphyrinate > S-allylcysteine > acetyl L-carnitine > dizocilpine. BAPTA-AM was effective in preventing the pro-oxidant action of both toxins, promoting even lower peroxidative levels than those quantified under basal conditions. Our results suggest that the lipid peroxidation induced in synaptosomal fractions by quinolinate plus 3-nitropropionate is largely dependent on the cytoplasmic

  9. Protection against oxidative damage in human erythrocytes and preliminary photosafety assessment of Punica granatum seed oil nanoemulsions entrapping polyphenol-rich ethyl acetate fraction.

    PubMed

    Baccarin, Thaisa; Mitjans, Montserrat; Lemos-Senna, Elenara; Vinardell, Maria Pilar

    2015-12-25

    The main purpose of the present study is to evaluate the ability of nanoemulsion entrapping pomegranate peel polyphenol-rich ethyl acetate fraction (EAF) prepared from pomegranate seed oil and medium chain triglyceride to protect human erythrocyte membrane from oxidative damage and to assess preliminary in vitro photosafety. In order to evaluate the phototoxic effect of nanoemulsions, human red blood cells (RBCs) are used as a biological model and the rate of haemolysis and photohaemolysis (5 J cm(-2) UVA) is assessed in vitro. The level of protection against oxidative damage caused by the peroxyl radical generator AAPH in human RBCs as well as its effects on bilayer membrane characteristics such as fluidity, protein profile and RBCs morphology are determined. EAF-loaded nanoemulsions do not promote haemolysis or photohaemolysis. Anisotropy measurements show that nanoemulsions significantly retrain the increase in membrane fluidity caused by AAPH. SDS-PAGE analysis reveals that AAPH induced degradation of membrane proteins, but that nanoemulsions reduce the extension of degradation. Scanning electron microscopy examinations corroborate the interaction between AAPH, nanoemulsions and the RBC membrane bilayer. Our work demonstrates that Punica granatum nanoemulsions are photosafe and protect RBCs against oxidative damage and possible disturbance of the lipid bilayer of biomembranes. Moreover it suggests that these nanoemulsions could be promising new topical products to reduce the effects of sunlight on skin. PMID:26407526

  10. Effects of in vitro ozone exposure on peroxidative damage, membrane leakage, and taurine content of rat alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, M.A.; Porter, D.W.; Martin, W.G.; Castranova, V. )

    1990-08-01

    Rat alveolar macrophages (AM) were isolated by pulmonary lavage, allowed to adhere to a tissue culture flask, and then exposed to 0.45 +/- 0.05 ppm ozone. After exposures ranging from 0 to 60 min, the medium was decanted and cells were harvested. Cells were assayed for oxidant damage and media analyzed for leakage of intracellular components. Increasing length of exposure to ozone resulted in a decreased number of adherent AM and decreased cell viability. Resting and zymosan-stimulated chemiluminescence increased immediately after ozone exposure and reached a maximum at 15-30 min, then declined to initial levels after 60 min of ozone exposure. Lipid peroxidation and leakage of protein and K+ ions increased with increasing length of exposure to ozone, while leakage of reduced and oxidized glutathione increased through 30 min, then declined (reduced) or leveled off (oxidized). Activity of the Na+/K+ ATPase decreased with time while intracellular taurine concentration exhibited an initial rise, peaked at 30 min, and then returned to the untreated level. Leakage of taurine into the medium increased with time of exposure, suggesting that exposure of AM to ozone results in a shift from bound to free intracellular taurine. These data indicate that in vitro exposure of AM to ozone results in a time-dependent alteration of cell function, membrane integrity, and viability.

  11. Isoflavone supplementation reduces DNA oxidative damage and increases O-β-N-acetyl-D-glucosaminidase activity in healthy women.

    PubMed

    Erba, Daniela; Casiraghi, M Cristina; Martinez-Conesa, Cristina; Goi, Giancarlo; Massaccesi, Luca

    2012-04-01

    Phenolic compounds are believed to boost the human antioxidant defense system and health; therefore, the aim of this research was to investigate the hypothesis that soy isoflavones (IFs) provide antioxidant protection in healthy women by evaluating DNA resistance to oxidative damage and O-β-N-acetyl-D-glucosaminidase (OGA) activity. An IF supplement (80 mg/d) was given to 9 postmenopausal women and 13 young women for 6 months and then stopped up to the 14th month. The women were allowed to consume their normal diet. Blood samples were collected at the beginning of the study after 2, 4, and 6 months and then at the 8th and 14th months. Plasma concentrations of genistein and daidzein, total antioxidant capacity, plasma vitamin status, markers of oxidative stress (red blood cell membrane fluidity, activity of the red blood cell cytosolic enzyme OGA and lymphocyte DNA susceptibility to oxidative stress), and serum lipid profile were analyzed. Analysis of variance for repeated measures was used for statistical analysis. Plasma concentrations of IFs rose significantly during the supplementation period, and plasma total antioxidant capacity increased in young women; membrane fluidity and OGA activity increased, and DNA oxidative damage decreased (P < .05) at 4 months, then returned to the basal level. There was a significant inverse correlation between DNA damage and plasma IF concentrations (P < .01). The results indicated a positive effect of IF supplementation on oxidative stress in women, thus suggesting that the healthful action ascribed to soy consumption may be partially related to the antioxidant potential of IFs. PMID:22575035

  12. An Update on Oxidative Damage to Spermatozoa and Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Opuwari, Chinyerum S.; Henkel, Ralf R.

    2016-01-01

    On the one hand, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are mandatory mediators for essential cellular functions including the function of germ cells (oocytes and spermatozoa) and thereby the fertilization process. However, the exposure of these cells to excessive levels of oxidative stress by too high levels of ROS or too low levels of antioxidative protection will render these cells dysfunctional thereby failing the fertilization process and causing couples to be infertile. Numerous causes are responsible for the delicate bodily redox system being out of balance and causing disease and infertility. Many of these causes are modifiable such as lifestyle factors like obesity, poor nutrition, heat stress, smoking, or alcohol abuse. Possible correctable measures include foremost lifestyle changes, but also supplementation with antioxidants to scavenge excessive ROS. However, this should only be done after careful examination of the patient and establishment of the individual bodily antioxidant needs. In addition, other corrective measures include sperm separation for assisted reproductive techniques. However, these techniques have to be carried out very carefully as they, if applied wrongly, bear risks of generating ROS damaging the germ cells and preventing fertilization. PMID:26942204

  13. Modified hydroxyethyl starch protects cells from oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Filippov, Sergey K; Sergeeva, Olga Yu; Vlasov, Petr S; Zavyalova, Margarita S; Belostotskaya, Galina B; Garamus, Vasil M; Khrustaleva, Raisa S; Stepanek, Petr; Domnina, Nina S

    2015-12-10

    This article describes the synthesis of novel starch-antioxidant conjugates, which show great potential for biomedical applications to protect cells from oxidative damage. These conjugates were synthesized by the modification of a hydroxyethyl starch (molecular weight=200,000g/mol) with various sterically hindered phenols that differ in radical scavenging activity. They possess substantial radical scavenging activity toward a model free radical. It was found that the polymer conjugate conformation depends on the antioxidant structure and degree of substitution. We constructed the complete conformational phase behavior for the polymers with increasing degrees of substitution from small-angle neutron scattering data. It was observed that the conjugate conformation changes are the result of water shifting from a thermodynamically favorable solvent to an unfavorable one, a process that then leads to compaction of the conjugate. We selected the conjugates that possess high substitution degree but still exhibit coil conformation for biological studies. The high efficiency of the conjugates was confirmed by different in vitro (hypotonic hemolysis of erythrocytes/osmotic resistance of erythrocytes and the change of [Ca(2+)]i inside freshly isolated cardiomyocytes) and in vivo (acute hemorrhage/massive blood loss) methods. PMID:26428130

  14. Transgenic Mouse Model for Reducing Oxidative Damage in Bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreurs, A.-S.; Torres, S.; Truong, T.; Kumar, A.; Alwood, J. S.; Limoli, C. L.; Globus, R. K.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to musculoskeletal disuse and radiation result in bone loss; we hypothesized that these catabolic treatments cause excess reactive oxygen species (ROS), and thereby alter the tight balance between bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts, culminating in bone loss. To test this, we used transgenic mice which over-express the human gene for catalase, targeted to mitochondria (MCAT). Catalase is an anti-oxidant that converts the ROS hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen. MCAT mice were shown previously to display reduced mitochondrial oxidative stress and radiosensitivity of the CNS compared to wild type controls (WT). As expected, MCAT mice expressed the transgene in skeletal tissue, and in marrow-derived osteoblasts and osteoclast precursors cultured ex vivo, and also showed greater catalase activity compared to wildtype (WT) mice (3-6 fold). Colony expansion in marrow cells cultured under osteoblastogenic conditions was 2-fold greater in the MCAT mice compared to WT mice, while the extent of mineralization was unaffected. MCAT mice had slightly longer tibiae than WT mice (2%, P less than 0.01), although cortical bone area was slightly lower in MCAT mice than WT mice (10%, p=0.09). To challenge the skeletal system, mice were treated by exposure to combined disuse (2 wk Hindlimb Unloading) and total body irradiation Cs(137) (2 Gy, 0.8 Gy/min), then bone parameters were analyzed by 2-factor ANOVA to detect possible interaction effects. Treatment caused a 2-fold increase (p=0.015) in malondialdehyde levels of bone tissue (ELISA) in WT mice, but had no effect in MCAT mice. These findings indicate that the transgene conferred protection from oxidative damage caused by treatment. Unexpected differences between WT and MCAT mice emerged in skeletal responses to treatment.. In WT mice, treatment did not alter osteoblastogenesis, cortical bone area, moment of inertia, or bone perimeter, whereas in MCAT mice, treatment increased these

  15. Graphene oxide membrane for liquid phase organic molecular separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Renlong; Arabale, Girish; Kim, Jinseon; Sun, Ke; Lee, Yongwoon; Ryu, Changkook; Lee, Changgu

    2015-03-01

    The selective permeation of organic solvents and water through graphene oxide (GO) membranes has been demonstrated. Water was found to permeate through GO membranes faster than various alcohols. The permeation rates of propanol are about 80 times lower than that of water. Taking advantage of the differences in the permeation rates, we separated water from the alcohols and obtained alcohols with high purity. For ethanol and 1-propanol, binary solutions of the alcohol and water were filtered efficiently to produce alcohols with concentration of about 97%. However, the selectivity of the filtration of methanol is significantly lower than those of the other alcohols. To understand the mechanism we followed the structural changes in the GO membranes by X-Ray diffraction analysis. From the X-ray diffraction results we speculate that the selectivity of the permeation of water and alcohols is closely related to the molecular sizes of the solvents and their polarity. In order to demonstrate the potential applications of this process for the selective removal of water from aqueous organic mixtures, we performed the separation of water from a bio-oil containing 73% of water. The majority of the water was filtered out resulting in a higher purity bio-oil.

  16. Caryocar brasiliense camb protects against genomic and oxidative damage in urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, N.B.R.; Rangel, M.P.; Martins, V.; Hage, M.; Gelain, D.P.; Barbeiro, D.F.; Grisolia, C.K.; Parra, E.R.; Capelozzi, V.L.

    2015-01-01

    The antioxidant effects of Caryocar brasiliense Camb, commonly known as the pequi fruit, have not been evaluated to determine their protective effects against oxidative damage in lung carcinogenesis. In the present study, we evaluated the role of pequi fruit against urethane-induced DNA damage and oxidative stress in forty 8-12 week old male BALB/C mice. An in vivo comet assay was performed to assess DNA damage in lung tissues and changes in lipid peroxidation and redox cycle antioxidants were monitored for oxidative stress. Prior supplementation with pequi oil or its extract (15 µL, 60 days) significantly reduced urethane-induced oxidative stress. A protective effect against DNA damage was associated with the modulation of lipid peroxidation and low protein and gene expression of nitric oxide synthase. These findings suggest that the intake of pequi fruit might protect against in vivo genotoxicity and oxidative stress. PMID:26200231

  17. Permeability characteristics of complement-damaged membranes: evaluation of the membrane leak generated by the complement proteins C5b-9.

    PubMed

    Sims, P J

    1981-03-01

    Permeability characteristics of the membrane lesion generated by the terminal complement proteins are considered in light of recent observations that the measured diffusion of solute across complement-damaged membranes does not conform to the "doughnut hole" model of a discrete transmembrane pore formed by the inserted C5b-9 complex. By using the measured kinetics of steady-state tracer isotope diffusion of nonelectrolytes across resealed erythrocyte ghost membranes treated with C5b-9, a new transport model is developed. This model considers the apparent membrane lesion strictly in terms of the operational criteria of a functional conducting pathway for the observed diffusing solute, independent of a priori assumptions about the geometry or molecular properties of the membrane lesion. With this definition of the unit membrane lesion and the assumption that the exclusion size of the conducting pathway varies directly with the multiplicity of bound C5b-9 (as suggested by previous measurements under conditions of varying input of C5b-9), numerical estimates of te apparent permeability of the complement-damaged membrane to four diffusing nonelectrolytes are derived. These results suggest that the pathway for a particle diffusing across the complement lesion cannot be a pore and is functionally equivalent to an aqueous leak pathway, free of pore constraints. Implications of these results are discussed in terms of current molecular models for the mechanism of membrane damage by the complement proteins. PMID:6940192

  18. Method for forming H2-permselective oxide membranes

    DOEpatents

    Gavalas, George R.; Nam, Suk Woo; Tsapatsis, Michael; Kim, Soojin

    1995-01-01

    Methods of forming permselective oxide membranes that are highly selective to permeation of hydrogen by chemical deposition of reactants in the pore of porous tubes, such as Vycor.TM. glass or Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 tubes. The porous tubes have pores extending through the tube wall. The process involves forming a stream containing a first reactant of the formula RX.sub.n, wherein R is silicon, titanium, boron or aluminum, X is chlorine, bromine or iodine, and n is a number which is equal to the valence of R; and forming another stream containing water vapor as the second reactant. Both of the reactant streams are passed along either the outside or the inside surface of a porous tube and the streams react in the pores of the porous tube to form a nonporous layer of R-oxide in the pores. The membranes are formed by the hydrolysis of the respective halides. In another embodiment, the first reactant stream contains a first reactant having the formula SiH.sub.n Cl.sub.4-n where n is 1, 2 or 3; and the second reactant stream contains water vapor and oxygen. In still another embodiment the first reactant stream containing a first reactant selected from the group consisting of Cl.sub.3 SiOSiCl.sub.3, Cl.sub.3 SiOSiCl.sub.2 OSiCl.sub.3, and mixtures thereof and the second reactant stream contains water vapor. In still another embodiment, membrane formation is carried out by an alternating flow deposition method. This involves a sequence of cycles, each cycle comprising introduction of the halide-containing stream and allowance of a specific time for reaction followed by purge and flow of the water vapor containing stream for a specific length of time. In all embodiments the nonporous layers formed are selectively permeable to hydrogen.

  19. Method for forming H2-permselective oxide membranes

    DOEpatents

    Gavalas, G.R.; Nam, S.W.; Tsapatsis, M.; Kim, S.

    1995-09-26

    Methods are disclosed for forming permselective oxide membranes that are highly selective to permeation of hydrogen by chemical deposition of reactants in the pore of porous tubes, such as Vycor{trademark} glass or Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} tubes. The porous tubes have pores extending through the tube wall. The process involves forming a stream containing a first reactant of the formula RX{sub n}, wherein R is silicon, titanium, boron or aluminum, X is chlorine, bromine or iodine, and n is a number which is equal to the valence of R; and forming another stream containing water vapor as the second reactant. Both of the reactant streams are passed along either the outside or the inside surface of a porous tube and the streams react in the pores of the porous tube to form a nonporous layer of R-oxide in the pores. The membranes are formed by the hydrolysis of the respective halides. In another embodiment, the first reactant stream contains a first reactant having the formula SiH{sub n}Cl{sub 4{minus}n} where n is 1, 2 or 3; and the second reactant stream contains water vapor and oxygen. In still another embodiment the first reactant stream containing a first reactant selected from the group consisting of Cl{sub 3}SiOSiCl{sub 3}, Cl{sub 3}SiOSiCl{sub 2}OSiCl{sub 3}, and mixtures thereof and the second reactant stream contains water vapor. In still another embodiment, membrane formation is carried out by an alternating flow deposition method. This involves a sequence of cycles, each cycle comprising introduction of the halide-containing stream and allowance of a specific time for reaction followed by purge and flow of the water vapor containing stream for a specific length of time. In all embodiments the nonporous layers formed are selectively permeable to hydrogen. 11 figs.

  20. Monosodium glutamate-induced oxidative kidney damage and possible mechanisms: a mini-review.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Amod

    2015-01-01

    Animal studies suggest that chronic monosodium glutamate (MSG) intake induces kidney damage by oxidative stress. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear, despite the growing evidence and consensus that α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, glutamate receptors and cystine-glutamate antiporter play an important role in up-regulation of oxidative stress in MSG-induced renal toxicity. This review summaries evidence from studies into MSG-induced renal oxidative damage, possible mechanisms and their importance from a toxicological viewpoint. PMID:26493866

  1. Reproductive effects in hybrid sparrow from a polluted area in Tunisia: Oxidative damage and altered testicular histomorphology.

    PubMed

    Amri, Nahed; Hammouda, Abdessalem; Rahmouni, Fatma; Chokri, Med Ali; Chaabane, Rim; Selmi, Slaheddine; Rebai, Tarek; Badraoui, Riadh

    2016-07-01

    Air pollution is a threat for human health and wildlife. The aim of this study is to assess the pathophysiological changes and the oxidative-antioxidative status in testicular tissues of 40 Hybrid sparrows collected from four areas in Gabès city, one of the most polluted areas in Tunisia. The testis histopathological analysis revealed alterations in birds from Ghannouche, the polluted area. The thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) levels were higher in testis of birds from the contaminated site compared to less polluted areas indicating oxidative damage to membrane lipids. Antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase and catalase) were lower in testis sparrows from the polluted site compared with the reference site, suggesting deficiency of the antioxidant system to compensate for oxidative stress. Overall, our results suggest that the hybrid sparrow offers a suitable model for biomonitoring programs of atmosphere pollutants and the selected biomarkers could be useful tool to evaluate pollution impacts in living organisms. PMID:27039245

  2. Antibacterial Activity of Shikimic Acid from Pine Needles of Cedrus deodara against Staphylococcus aureus through Damage to Cell Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jinrong; Wu, Yanping; Liu, Xiaoyan; Zhong, Kai; Huang, Yina; Gao, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Shikimic acid (SA) has been reported to possess antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, whereas the mode of action of SA is still elusive. In this study, the antibacterial activity and mechanism of SA toward S. aureus by cell membrane damage was investigated. After SA treatment, massive K+ and nucleotide leakage from S. aureus, and a significant change in the membrane potential was observed, suggesting SA may act on the membrane by destroying the cell membrane permeability. Through transmission electron microscopic observations we further confirmed that SA can disrupt the cell membrane and membrane integrity. Meanwhile, SA was found to be capable of reducing the membrane fluidity of the S. aureus cell. Moreover, the fluorescence experiments indicated that SA could quench fluorescence of Phe residues of the membrane proteins, thus demonstrating that SA can bind to S. aureus membrane proteins. Therefore, these results showed the antibacterial activity of SA against S. aureus could be caused by the interactions of SA with S. aureus membrane proteins and lipids, resulting in causing cell membrane dysfunction and bacterial damage or even death. This study reveals the potential use of SA as an antibacterial agent. PMID:26580596

  3. DNA damage targets PKC{eta} to the nuclear membrane via its C1b domain

    SciTech Connect

    Tamarkin, Ana; Zurgil, Udi; Braiman, Alex; Hai, Naama; Krasnitsky, Ella; Maissel, Adva; Ben-Ari, Assaf; Yankelovich, Liat; Livneh, Etta

    2011-06-10

    Translocation to cellular membranes is one of the hallmarks of PKC activation, occurring as a result of the generation of lipid secondary messengers in target membrane compartments. The activation-induced translocation of PKCs and binding to membranes is largely directed by their regulatory domains. We have previously reported that PKC{eta}, a member of the novel subfamily and an epithelial specific isoform, is localized at the cytoplasm and ER/Golgi and is translocated to the plasma membrane and the nuclear envelope upon short-term activation by PMA. Here we show that PKC{eta} is shuttling between the cytoplasm and the nucleus and that upon etoposide induced DNA damage is tethered at the nuclear envelope. Although PKC{eta} expression and its phosphorylation on the hydrophobic motif (Ser675) are increased by etoposide, this phosphorylation is not required for its accumulation at the nuclear envelope. Moreover, we demonstrate that the C1b domain is sufficient for translocation to the nuclear envelope. We further show that, similar to full-length PKC{eta}, the C1b domain could also confer protection against etoposide-induced cell death. Our studies demonstrate translocation of PKC{eta} to the nuclear envelope, and suggest that its spatial regulation could be important for its cellular functions including effects on cell death.

  4. Damage of the outer membrane of enteric gram-negative bacteria by lactoferrin and transferrin.

    PubMed Central

    Ellison, R T; Giehl, T J; LaForce, F M

    1988-01-01

    Many studies have shown that lactoferrin and transferrin have antimicrobial activity against gram-negative bacteria, but a mechanism of action has not been defined. We hypothesized that the iron-binding proteins could affect the gram-negative outer membrane in a manner similar to that of the chelator EDTA. The ability of lactoferrin and transferrin to release radiolabeled lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from a UDP-galactose epimerase-deficient Escherichia coli mutant and from wild-type Salmonella typhimurium strains was tested. Initial studies in barbital-acetate buffer showed that EDTA and lactoferrin cause significant release of LPS from all three strains. Further studies found that LPS release was blocked by iron saturation of lactoferrin, occurred between pH 6 and 7.5, was comparable for bacterial concentrations from 10(4) to 10(7) CFU/ml, and increased with increasing lactoferrin concentrations. Studies using Hanks balanced salt solution lacking calcium and magnesium showed that transferrin also could cause LPS release. Additionally, both lactoferrin and transferrin increased the antibacterial effect of a subinhibitory concentration of rifampin, a drug excluded by the bacterial outer membrane. This work demonstrates that these iron-binding proteins damage the gram-negative outer membrane and alter bacterial outer membrane permeability. Images PMID:3169987

  5. Elimination of damaged mitochondria through mitophagy reduces mitochondrial oxidative stress and increases tolerance to trichothecenes.

    PubMed

    Bin-Umer, Mohamed Anwar; McLaughlin, John E; Butterly, Matthew S; McCormick, Susan; Tumer, Nilgun E

    2014-08-12

    Trichothecene mycotoxins are natural contaminants of small grain cereals and are encountered in the environment, posing a worldwide threat to human and animal health. Their mechanism of toxicity is poorly understood, and little is known about cellular protection mechanisms against trichothecenes. We previously identified inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis as a novel mechanism for trichothecene-induced cell death. To identify cellular functions involved in trichothecene resistance, we screened the Saccharomyces cerevisiae deletion library for increased sensitivity to nonlethal concentrations of trichothecin (Tcin) and identified 121 strains exhibiting higher sensitivity than the parental strain. The largest group of sensitive strains had significantly higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels relative to the parental strain. A dose-dependent increase in ROS levels was observed in the parental strain treated with different trichothecenes, but not in a petite version of the parental strain or in the presence of a mitochondrial membrane uncoupler, indicating that mitochondria are the main site of ROS production due to toxin exposure. Cytotoxicity of trichothecenes was alleviated after treatment of the parental strain and highly sensitive mutants with antioxidants, suggesting that oxidative stress contributes to trichothecene sensitivity. Cotreatment with rapamycin and trichothecenes reduced ROS levels and cytotoxicity in the parental strain relative to the trichothecene treatment alone, but not in mitophagy deficient mutants, suggesting that elimination of trichothecene-damaged mitochondria by mitophagy improves cell survival. These results reveal that increased mitophagy is a cellular protection mechanism against trichothecene-induced mitochondrial oxidative stress and a potential target for trichothecene resistance. PMID:25071194

  6. Elimination of damaged mitochondria through mitophagy reduces mitochondrial oxidative stress and increases tolerance to trichothecenes

    PubMed Central

    Bin-Umer, Mohamed Anwar; McLaughlin, John E.; Butterly, Matthew S.; McCormick, Susan; Tumer, Nilgun E.

    2014-01-01

    Trichothecene mycotoxins are natural contaminants of small grain cereals and are encountered in the environment, posing a worldwide threat to human and animal health. Their mechanism of toxicity is poorly understood, and little is known about cellular protection mechanisms against trichothecenes. We previously identified inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis as a novel mechanism for trichothecene-induced cell death. To identify cellular functions involved in trichothecene resistance, we screened the Saccharomyces cerevisiae deletion library for increased sensitivity to nonlethal concentrations of trichothecin (Tcin) and identified 121 strains exhibiting higher sensitivity than the parental strain. The largest group of sensitive strains had significantly higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels relative to the parental strain. A dose-dependent increase in ROS levels was observed in the parental strain treated with different trichothecenes, but not in a petite version of the parental strain or in the presence of a mitochondrial membrane uncoupler, indicating that mitochondria are the main site of ROS production due to toxin exposure. Cytotoxicity of trichothecenes was alleviated after treatment of the parental strain and highly sensitive mutants with antioxidants, suggesting that oxidative stress contributes to trichothecene sensitivity. Cotreatment with rapamycin and trichothecenes reduced ROS levels and cytotoxicity in the parental strain relative to the trichothecene treatment alone, but not in mitophagy deficient mutants, suggesting that elimination of trichothecene-damaged mitochondria by mitophagy improves cell survival. These results reveal that increased mitophagy is a cellular protection mechanism against trichothecene-induced mitochondrial oxidative stress and a potential target for trichothecene resistance. PMID:25071194

  7. Polymorphic trial in oxidative damage of arsenic exposed Vietnamese

    SciTech Connect

    Fujihara, Junko; Soejima, Mikiko; Yasuda, Toshihiro; Koda, Yoshiro; Kunito, Takashi; Iwata, Hisato; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Takeshita, Haruo

    2011-10-15

    Arsenic causes DNA damage and changes the cellular capacity for DNA repair. Genes in the base excision repair (BER) pathway influence the generation and repair of oxidative lesions. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1) Ser326Cys; apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE1) Asp148Glu; X-ray and repair and cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) Arg280His and Arg399Gln in the BER genes were analyzed, and the relationship between these 4 SNPs and the urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) concentrations of 100 Vietnamese population exposed to arsenic was investigated. Individuals with hOGG1 326Cys/Cys showed significantly higher urinary 8-OHdG concentrations than did those with 326 Ser/Cys and Ser/Ser. As for APE1 Asp148Glu, heterozygous subjects showed significantly higher urinary 8-OHdG concentrations than did those homozygous for Asp/Asp. Moreover, global ethnic comparison of the allelic frequencies of the 4SNPs was performed in 10 population and previous reported data. The mutant allele frequencies of hOGG1 Ser326Cys in the Asian populations were higher than those in the African and Caucasian populations. As for APE1 Asp148Glu, Caucasians showed higher mutant frequencies than those shown by African and Asian populations. Among Asian populations, the Bangladeshi population showed relatively higher mutant allele frequencies of the APE1 Asp148Glu polymorphism. This study is the first to demonstrate the existence of genetic heterogeneity in a worldwide distribution of SNPs (hOGG1 Ser326Cys, APE1 Asp148Glu, XRCC1 Arg280His, and XRCC1 Arg399Gln) in the BER genes. - Highlights: > We showed that hOGG1 and APE1 are associated with urinary 8-OHdG concentrations. > We showed the existence of inter-ethnic differences in hOGG1 and APE1 polymorphism. > These polymorphisms is a genetic marker of susceptibility to oxidative stress.

  8. Protective effect of Ugni molinae Turcz against oxidative damage of human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Orellana, P; Avello, M; Villena, F

    2007-01-01

    Ugni molinae Turcz, also known as "Murtilla", is a plant that grows in the south of Chile. Infusions of its leaves have long been used in traditional native herbal medicine. The chemical composition of the leaves indicates the presence of polyphenols, which have antioxidant properties. In the present work, the antioxidant properties of U. molinae were evaluated in human erythrocytes exposed in vitro to oxidative stress induced by HClO. The experiments were carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and hemolysis measurements. The SEM observations showed that HClO induced a morphological alteration in the red blood cells from a discoid to an echinocytic form. According to the bilayer couple hypothesis, the formation of echinocytes indicates that HClO was inserted in the outer leaflet of the erythrocyte membrane. However, a concentration as low as 10 microM gallic acid equivalents (GAE) U. molinae aqueous extract neutralized the shape change effect of HClO applied in a concentration as high as 0.25 mM. The significant protection of U. molinae aqueous extract was also shown in the hemolysis experiments. In fact, very low concentrations of the extract considerably reduced the deleterious capacity of HClO to induce hemolysis in red blood cells. It is concluded that the location of the extract components into the membrane bilayer and the resulting restriction on its fluidity might hinder the diffusion of HClO and its consequent damaging effects. This conclusion can also imply that this restriction could apply to the diffusion of free radicals into cell membranes and the subsequent decrease of the kinetics of free radical reactions. PMID:17030381

  9. Operation of mixed conducting metal oxide membrane systems under transient conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Carolan, Michael Francis

    2008-12-23

    Method of operating an oxygen-permeable mixed conducting membrane having an oxidant feed side, an oxidant feed surface, a permeate side, and a permeate surface, which method comprises controlling the differential strain between the permeate surface and the oxidant feed surface at a value below a selected maximum value by varying the oxygen partial pressure on either or both of the oxidant feed side and the permeate side of the membrane.

  10. Pinacidil protects osteoblastic cells against antimycin A-induced oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun Mi; Jung, Woon Won; Suh, Kwang Sik

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the protective effect of a non-selective mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium channel (mito-KATP) opener, pinacidil, on antimycin A-induced oxidative damage in osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells. Antimycin A inhibits mitochondrial electron transport by binding to complex III. Osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells were treated with antimycin A in the presence or absence of pinacidil and markers of mitochondrial function and oxidative stress were subsequently examined. The effects of pinacidil on the activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), Akt and cyclic adenosine monophosphate‑responsive element-binding protein (CREB) were also examined. In osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells exposed to antimycin A, pinacidil inhibited antimycin A-induced cell death. The protective effects of pinacidil on cell survival were prevented by the addition of LY294002 (a PI3K inhibitor), an Akt inhibitor or auranofin [a thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) inhibitor], but not by KATP channel inhibitor glibenclamide. Pinacidil inhibited antimycin A-induced inactivation of PI3K and Akt as well as phosphorylation of CREB and TrxR. Furthermore, pinacidil prevented antimycin A-induced mitochondrial superoxide release, mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation, reduced ATP synthesis and intracellular [Ca2+] elevation. In conclusion, these results suggested that pinacidil may rescue osteoblastic cells from antimycin A-induced cellular damage, potentially via antioxidant activity and restoration of mitochondrial function, which are mediated in part by the PI3K/Akt/CREB signaling pathway. PMID:25334089

  11. Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Protects Mouse Cortical Neurons From Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia-Mediated Oxidative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Xiaoyang; Chi, Liying; Ke, Yan; Luo, Chun; Qian, Steven; Gozal, David; Liu, Rugao

    2007-01-01

    Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) syndrome has been recognized as a highly prevalent public health problem and is associated with major neurobehavioral morbidity. Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), a major pathological component of OSA, increases oxidative damage to the brain cortex and decreases neurocognitive function in rodent models resembling human OSA. We employed in vitro and in vivo approaches to identify the specific phases and subcellular compartments in which enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated during CIH. In addition, we utilized the cell culture and animal models to analyze the consequences of enhanced production of ROS on cortical neuronal cell damage and neurocognitive dysfunction. In a primary cortical neuron culture system, we demonstrated that the transition phase from hypoxia to normoxia (NOX) during CIH generates more ROS than the transition phase from NOX to hypoxia or hypoxia alone, all of which generate more ROS than NOX. Using selective inhibitors of the major pathways underlying ROS generation in the cell membrane, cytosol, and mitochondria, we showed that the mitochondria are the predominant source of enhanced ROS generation during CIH in mouse cortical neuronal cells. Furthermore, in both cell culture and transgenic mice, we demonstrated that overexpression of MnSOD decreased CIH-mediated cortical neuronal apoptosis, and reduced spatial learning deficits measured with the Morris water maze assay. Together, the data from the in vitro and in vivo experiments indicate that CIH-mediated mitochondrial oxidative stress may play a major role in the neuronal cell loss and neurocognitive dysfunction in OSA. Thus, therapeutic strategies aiming at reducing ROS generation from mitochondria may improve the neurobehavioral morbidity in OSA. PMID:17719231

  12. The cytotoxic effects of titanium oxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles oh Human Cervical Adenocarcinoma cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironava, Tatsiana; Applebaum, Ariella; Applebaum, Eliana; Guterman, Shoshana; Applebaum, Kayla; Grossman, Daniel; Gordon, Chris; Brink, Peter; Wang, H. Z.; Rafailovich, Miriam

    2013-03-01

    The importance of titanium dioxide (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO), inorganic metal oxides nanoparticles (NPs) stems from their ubiquitous applications in personal care products, solar cells and food whitening agents. Hence, these NPs come in direct contact with the skin, digestive tracts and are absorbed into human tissues. Currently, TiO2 and ZnO are considered safe commercial ingredients by the material safety data sheets with no reported evidence of carcinogenicity or ecotoxicity, and do not classify either NP as a toxic substance. This study examined the direct effects of TiO2 and ZnO on HeLa cells, a human cervical adenocarcinonma cell line, and their membrane mechanics. The whole cell patch-clamp technique was used in addition to immunohistochemistry staining, TEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Additionally, we examined the effects of dexamethasone (DXM), a glucocorticoid steroid known to have an effect on cell membrane mechanics. Overall, TiO2 and ZnO seemed to have an adverse effect on cell membrane mechanics by effecting cell proliferation, altering cellular structure, decreasing cell-cell adhesion, activating existing ion channels, increasing membrane permeability, and possibly disrupting cell signaling.

  13. Interactions between Biliverdin, Oxidative Damage, and Spleen Morphology after Simulated Aggressive Encounters in Veiled Chameleons

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Michael W.; Ligon, Russell A.

    2015-01-01

    Stressors frequently increase oxidative damage–unless organisms simultaneously mount effective antioxidant responses. One putative mitigative mechanism is the use of biliverdin, an antioxidant produced in the spleen during erythrocyte degradation. We hypothesized that both wild and captive-bred male veiled chameleons (Chamaeleo calyptratus), which are highly aggressive to conspecifics, would respond to agonistic displays with increased levels of oxidative damage, but that increased levels of biliverdin would limit this increase. We found that even just visual exposure to a potential combatant resulted in decreased body mass during the subsequent 48-hour period, but that hematocrit, biliverdin concentration in the bile, relative spleen size, and oxidative damage in plasma, liver, and spleen were unaffected. Contrary to our predictions, we found that individuals with smaller spleens exhibited greater decreases in hematocrit and higher bile biliverdin concentrations, suggesting a revision to the idea of spleen-dependent erythrocyte processing. Interestingly, individuals with larger spleens had reduced oxidative damage in both the liver and spleen, demonstrating the spleen’s importance in modulating oxidative damage. We also uncovered differences in spleen size and oxidative damage between wild and captive-bred chameleons, highlighting environmentally dependent differences in oxidative physiology. Lastly, we found no relationship between oxidative damage and biliverdin concentration, calling into question biliverdin’s antioxidant role in this species. PMID:26368930

  14. Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles Induced Toxicity in Human Lung Cells: Role of ROS Mediated DNA Damage and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Alok K.

    2014-01-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs) have promising industrial and biomedical applications. In spite of their applications, the toxicity of these NPs in biological/physiological environment is a major concern. Present study aimed to understand the molecular mechanism underlying the toxicity of CeO2 NPs on lung adenocarcinoma (A549) cells. After internalization, CeO2 NPs caused significant cytotoxicity and morphological changes in A549 cells. Further, the cell death was found to be apoptotic as shown by loss in mitochondrial membrane potential and increase in annexin-V positive cells and confirmed by immunoblot analysis of BAX, BCl-2, Cyt C, AIF, caspase-3, and caspase-9. A significant increase in oxidative DNA damage was found which was confirmed by phosphorylation of p53 gene and presence of cleaved poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP). This damage could be attributed to increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with concomitant decrease in antioxidant “glutathione (GSH)” level. DNA damage and cell death were attenuated by the application of ROS and apoptosis inhibitors N-acetyl-L- cysteine (NAC) and Z-DEVD-fmk, respectively. Our study concludes that ROS mediated DNA damage and cell cycle arrest play a major role in CeO2 NPs induced apoptotic cell death in A549 cells. Apart from beneficial applications, these NPs also impart potential harmful effects which should be properly evaluated prior to their use. PMID:24987704

  15. Protein corona mitigates the cytotoxicity of graphene oxide by reducing its physical interaction with cell membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Guangxin; Kang, Seung-Gu; Tian, Xin; Garate, Jose Antonio; Zhao, Lin; Ge, Cuicui; Zhou, Ruhong

    2015-09-01

    Many recent studies have shown that the way nanoparticles interact with cells and biological molecules can vary greatly in the serum-containing or serum-free culture medium. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of how the so-called ``protein corona'' formed in serum medium affects nanoparticles' biological responses are still largely unresolved. Thus, it is critical to understand how absorbed proteins on the surfaces of nanoparticles alter their biological effects. In this work, we have demonstrated with both experimental and theoretical approaches that protein BSA coating can mitigate the cytotoxicity of graphene oxide (GO) by reducing its cell membrane penetration. Our cell viability and cellular uptake experiments showed that protein corona decreased cellular uptake of GO, thus significantly mitigating the potential cytotoxicity of GO. The electron microscopy images also confirmed that protein corona reduced the cellular morphological damage by limiting GO penetration into the cell membrane. Further molecular dynamics (MD) simulations validated the experimental results and revealed that the adsorbed BSA in effect weakened the interaction between the phospholipids and graphene surface due to a reduction of the available surface area plus an unfavorable steric effect, thus significantly reducing the graphene penetration and lipid bilayer damaging. These findings provide new insights into the underlying molecular mechanism of this important graphene protein corona interaction with cell membranes, and should have implications in future development of graphene-based biomedical applications.Many recent studies have shown that the way nanoparticles interact with cells and biological molecules can vary greatly in the serum-containing or serum-free culture medium. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of how the so-called ``protein corona'' formed in serum medium affects nanoparticles' biological responses are still largely unresolved. Thus, it is critical

  16. Antioxidant and micronutrient-rich milk formula reduces lead poisoning and related oxidative damage in lead-exposed mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Li, Qingqing; Liu, Xiaojie; Zhu, Hui; Song, Aihua; Jiao, Jingjing

    2013-07-01

    Lead poisoning is a global environmental disease that induces lifelong adverse health effects. The effect of a milk formula consisting of antioxidant of bamboo leaves (AOB), vitamin C (Vc), calcium lactate (CaLac), ferrous sulfate (FeSO₄) and zinc sulfate (ZnSO₄) on the reduction of lead and lead-induced oxidative damage in lead-exposed mice was studied. The lead-reducing effect of milk formula was investigated via a 7-week toxicokinetics study and a tissue distribution level examination. The ameliorating effect of milk formula on lead-induced oxidative damage was investigated. Results demonstrated current milk formula could effectively reduce blood lead levels (BLLs) and lead distribution levels of liver, kidneys, thighbones and brain in mice based on metal ion-mediated antagonism and chelation mechanisms. This milk formula could not only protect lead-susceptible tissues against lead poisoning, but also maintain normal absorption and distribution of essential elements in vivo. Meanwhile, current milk formula could prevent the reduction of δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (δ-ALAD) activity and enhancement of free erythrocyte protoporphyrins (FEP) levels in blood erythrocytes of mice. Also, this formula could indirectly protect blood cell membranes against lead-induced lipid peroxidation. We conclude that current optimized milk formula effectively reduces lead poisoning and lead-induced in vivo oxidative damage in lead-exposed mice. PMID:23537597

  17. [Lipid oxidation in bilayer lipid membranes linked with the reaction of oxidation of NAD.H by atmospheric oxygen].

    PubMed

    Shchipumov, Iu A; Sokolov, V S; Iaguzhinskiĭ, L S; Boguslavskiĭ, L I

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that along with NAD.H oxidation with air oxygen peroxide oxidation of lipids forming the membrane takes place in bilayer lipid membranes modified with ubiquinone. During nicotin amide oxidation proton absorption takes place. Peroxide oxidation of lipids results in the liberation of H+ ions, which in its turn brings about the formation of protone-deficient or enriched (against aqueous solution) layers adjacent to the membrane. The potential value on the membrane is shown to depend on nicotine amide and oxygen concentration, on ubiquinone presence and lipid composition of the membrane. It has been also indicated that the transmembrane potential difference is initiated with a sharp change of aqueous solution pH by 0.05--0.4 units. PMID:178383

  18. Nitric Oxide Suppresses β-Cell Apoptosis by Inhibiting the DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Oleson, Bryndon J; Broniowska, Katarzyna A; Naatz, Aaron; Hogg, Neil; Tarakanova, Vera L; Corbett, John A

    2016-08-01

    Nitric oxide, produced in pancreatic β cells in response to proinflammatory cytokines, plays a dual role in the regulation of β-cell fate. While nitric oxide induces cellular damage and impairs β-cell function, it also promotes β-cell survival through activation of protective pathways that promote β-cell recovery. In this study, we identify a novel mechanism in which nitric oxide prevents β-cell apoptosis by attenuating the DNA damage response (DDR). Nitric oxide suppresses activation of the DDR (as measured by γH2AX formation and the phosphorylation of KAP1 and p53) in response to multiple genotoxic agents, including camptothecin, H2O2, and nitric oxide itself, despite the presence of DNA damage. While camptothecin and H2O2 both induce DDR activation, nitric oxide suppresses only camptothecin-induced apoptosis and not H2O2-induced necrosis. The ability of nitric oxide to suppress the DDR appears to be selective for pancreatic β cells, as nitric oxide fails to inhibit DDR signaling in macrophages, hepatocytes, and fibroblasts, three additional cell types examined. While originally described as the damaging agent responsible for cytokine-induced β-cell death, these studies identify a novel role for nitric oxide as a protective molecule that promotes β-cell survival by suppressing DDR signaling and attenuating DNA damage-induced apoptosis. PMID:27185882

  19. The direct anti-MRSA effect of emodin via damaging cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming; Peng, Wei; Qin, Rongxin; Yan, Zifei; Cen, Yanyan; Zheng, Xinchuan; Pan, Xichun; Jiang, Weiwei; Li, Bin; Li, Xiaoli; Zhou, Hong

    2015-09-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has become an important bacterium for nosocomial infection. Only a few antibiotics can be effective against MRSA. Therefore, searching for new drugs against MRSA is important. Herein, anti-MRSA activities of emodin and its mechanisms were investigated. Firstly, in vitro antimicrobial activity was investigated by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC), and time-growth curve, and multipassage resistance testing was performed. Secondly, protection of emodin on mice survival and blood bacterial load in mice challenged with lethal or sublethal dose of MRSA were investigated. Subsequently, the influences of emodin on the bacterial morphology, messenger RNA (mRNA) expressions related to cell wall synthesis and lysis, β-lactamase activity, drug accumulation, membrane fluidity, and integrity were performed to investigate its mechanisms. Lastly, in vitro cytotoxicity assay were performed using the 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2, 5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) method. The results showed MICs and MBCs of emodin against MRSA252 and 36 clinical MRSA strains were among 2-8 and 4-32 μg/mL, respectively. There was no MIC increase for emodin during 20 passages. In vivo, emodin dose-dependently protected mice challenged with lethal dose of MRSA and decreased bacterial load in mice challenged with sublethal dose of MRSA. Morphology observation showed emodin might disrupt cell wall and membrane of MRSA. Although emodin had no influence on genes related to cell wall synthesis and lysis as well as β-lactamase activity and drug accumulation, emodin reduced membrane fluidity and disrupted membrane integrity. Based on the fact that emodin had no significant cytotoxicity against mammalian cells, it could be further investigated as a membrane-damage bactericide against MRSA in the future. PMID:25998658

  20. 3,6-O-[N-(2-Aminoethyl)-acetamide-yl]-chitosan exerts antibacterial activity by a membrane damage mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yan, Feilong; Dang, Qifeng; Liu, Chengsheng; Yan, Jingquan; Wang, Teng; Fan, Bing; Cha, Dongsu; Li, Xiaoli; Liang, Shengnan; Zhang, Zhenzhen

    2016-09-20

    A novel chitosan derivative, 3,6-O-[N-(2-aminoethyl)-acetamide-yl]-chitosan (AACS), was successfully prepared to improve water solubility and antibacterial activity of chitosan. AACS had good antibacterial activity, with minimum inhibitory concentrations of 0.25mg/mL, against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Cell membrane integrity, electric conductivity and NPN uptake tests showed that AACS caused quickly increasing the release of intracellular nucleic acids, the uptake of NPN, and the electric conductivity by damaging membrane integrity. On the other hand, hydrophobicity, cell viability and SDS-PAGE experiments indicated that AACS was able to reduce the surface hydrophobicity, the cell viability and the intracellular proteins through increasing membrane permeability. SEM observation further confirmed that AACS could kill bacteria via disrupting their membranes. All results above verified that AACS mainly exerted antibacterial activity by a membrane damage mechanism, and it was expected to be a new food preservative. PMID:27261735

  1. Oxidative damage of DNA by chromium(V) complexes: relative importance of base versus sugar oxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Bose, R N; Moghaddas, S; Mazzer, P A; Dudones, L P; Joudah, L; Stroup, D

    1999-01-01

    Chromium(V)-mediated oxidative damage of deoxy-ribonucleic acids was investigated at neutral pH in aqueous solution by utilizing bis(2-ethyl-2-hydroxy-butanato)oxochromate(V) (I) and bis(hydroxyethyl)-amino-tris(hydroxymethyl)methane)oxochromate(V) (II). Single-stranded and double-stranded (ds) calf thymus and human placenta DNA, as well as two oligomers, 5'-GATCTAGTAGGAGGACAAATAGTGTTTG-3' and 5'-GATCCAAGCAAACACTATTTGTCCTCCTACTA-3', were reacted with the chromium(V) complexes. Most products were separated and characterized by chroma-tographic and spectroscopic methods. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis experiments reveal more damage at G sites in comparison to other bases. Three primary oxidation products, 5-methylene-2-furanone (5-MF), furfural and 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine, were characterized. A minor product, which appears to be thymine propenal, was also observed. The dsDNA produces more furfural than furanone. The formation of these two products resulted from hydrogen ion or hydride transfer from C1' and C5' positions of the ribose to the oxo-chromium(V) center. Since no enhancements of these products (except propenal) were observed in the presence of oxygen, mechanisms pertaining to the participation of activated oxygen species may be ruled out. The oxidation of the G base is most likely associated with an oxygen atom transfer from the oxo-metallates to the double bond between C8 and N7 of the purine ring. The formation of the propenal may be associated with an oxygen-activated species, since a marginal enhancement of this product was observed in the presence of oxygen. The formation of furfural in higher abundance over 5-MF for dsDNA was attributed to the ease of hydrogen ion (or hydride transfer) from the C5' compared to C1' position of the ribose within a Cr(V)-DNA intermediate in which the metal center is bound to the phosphate diester moiety. PMID:10219096

  2. Oxidative damage of DNA by chromium(V) complexes: relative importance of base versus sugar oxidation.

    PubMed

    Bose, R N; Moghaddas, S; Mazzer, P A; Dudones, L P; Joudah, L; Stroup, D

    1999-05-15

    Chromium(V)-mediated oxidative damage of deoxy-ribonucleic acids was investigated at neutral pH in aqueous solution by utilizing bis(2-ethyl-2-hydroxy-butanato)oxochromate(V) (I) and bis(hydroxyethyl)-amino-tris(hydroxymethyl)methane)oxochromate(V) (II). Single-stranded and double-stranded (ds) calf thymus and human placenta DNA, as well as two oligomers, 5'-GATCTAGTAGGAGGACAAATAGTGTTTG-3' and 5'-GATCCAAGCAAACACTATTTGTCCTCCTACTA-3', were reacted with the chromium(V) complexes. Most products were separated and characterized by chroma-tographic and spectroscopic methods. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis experiments reveal more damage at G sites in comparison to other bases. Three primary oxidation products, 5-methylene-2-furanone (5-MF), furfural and 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine, were characterized. A minor product, which appears to be thymine propenal, was also observed. The dsDNA produces more furfural than furanone. The formation of these two products resulted from hydrogen ion or hydride transfer from C1' and C5' positions of the ribose to the oxo-chromium(V) center. Since no enhancements of these products (except propenal) were observed in the presence of oxygen, mechanisms pertaining to the participation of activated oxygen species may be ruled out. The oxidation of the G base is most likely associated with an oxygen atom transfer from the oxo-metallates to the double bond between C8 and N7 of the purine ring. The formation of the propenal may be associated with an oxygen-activated species, since a marginal enhancement of this product was observed in the presence of oxygen. The formation of furfural in higher abundance over 5-MF for dsDNA was attributed to the ease of hydrogen ion (or hydride transfer) from the C5' compared to C1' position of the ribose within a Cr(V)-DNA intermediate in which the metal center is bound to the phosphate diester moiety. PMID:10219096

  3. Biomarkers of oxidative stress and DNA damage in agricultural workers: A pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Muniz, Juan F. McCauley, Linda; Scherer, J.; Lasarev, M.; Koshy, M.; Kow, Y.W.; Nazar-Stewart, Valle; Kisby, G.E.

    2008-02-15

    Oxidative stress and DNA damage have been proposed as mechanisms linking pesticide exposure to health effects such as cancer and neurological diseases. A study of pesticide applicators and farmworkers was conducted to examine the relationship between organophosphate pesticide exposure and biomarkers of oxidative stress and DNA damage. Urine samples were analyzed for OP metabolites and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG). Lymphocytes were analyzed for oxidative DNA repair activity and DNA damage (Comet assay), and serum was analyzed for lipid peroxides (i.e., malondialdehyde, MDA). Cellular damage in agricultural workers was validated using lymphocyte cell cultures. Urinary OP metabolites were significantly higher in farmworkers and applicators (p < 0.001) when compared to controls. 8-OH-dG levels were 8.5 times and 2.3 times higher in farmworkers or applicators (respectively) than in controls. Serum MDA levels were 4.9 times and 24 times higher in farmworkers or applicators (respectively) than in controls. DNA damage (Comet assay) and oxidative DNA repair were significantly greater in lymphocytes from applicators and farmworkers when compared with controls. Markers of oxidative stress (i.e., increased reactive oxygen species and reduced glutathione levels) and DNA damage were also observed in lymphocyte cell cultures treated with an OP. The findings from these in vivo and in vitro studies indicate that organophosphate pesticides induce oxidative stress and DNA damage in agricultural workers. These biomarkers may be useful for increasing our understanding of the link between pesticides and a number of health effects.

  4. Protective effects of the compounds isolated from the seed of Psoralea corylifolia on oxidative stress-induced retinal damage

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyung-A; Shim, Sang Hee; Ahn, Hong Ryul; Jung, Sang Hoon

    2013-06-01

    The mechanism underlying glaucoma remains controversial, but apoptosis caused by increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is thought to play a role in its pathogenesis. We investigated the effects of compounds isolated from Psoralea corylifolia on oxidative stress-induced cell death in vitro and in vivo. Transformed retinal ganglion cells (RGC-5) were treated with L-buthione-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO) and glutamate in the presence or with pre-treatment with compound 6, bakuchiol isolated from P. corylifolia. We observed reduced cell death in cells pre-treated with bakuchiol. Moreover, bakuchiol inhibited the oxidative stress-induced decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, ΔΨm). Furthermore, while intracellular Ca{sup 2+} was high in RGC-5 cells after exposure to oxidative stress, bakuchiol reduced these levels. In an in vivo study, in which rat retinal damage was induced by intravitreal injection of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), bakuchiol markedly reduced translocation of AIF and release of cytochrome c, and inhibited up-regulation of cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-9, and cleaved PARP. The survival rate of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) 7 days after optic nerve crush (ONC) in mice was significantly decreased; however, bakuchiol attenuated the loss of RGCs. Moreover, bakuchiol attenuated ONC-induced up-regulation of apoptotic proteins, including cleaved PARP, cleaved caspase-3, and cleaved caspase-9. Bakuchiol also significantly inhibited translocation of mitochondrial AIF into the nuclear fraction and release of mitochondrial cytochrome c into the cytosol. These results demonstrate that bakuchiol isolated from P. corylifolia has protective effects against oxidative stress-induced retinal damage, and may be considered as an agent for treating or preventing retinal degeneration. - Highlights: • Psoralea corylifolia have neuroprotective effects in vitro and in vivo. • Bakuchiol attenuated the increase of apoptotic proteins induced by oxidative

  5. The Cell Membrane as a Major Site of Damage during Aerosolization of Escherichia coli▿

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Richard J.; Webber, Daniel; Hopkins, Rebecca; Frost, Andrew; Laws, Thomas; Jayasekera, Pramukh N.; Atkins, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to provide data on the survival and site of damage of Escherichia coli cells following aerosolization using two different techniques, nebulization and flow focusing. Four metabolic stains were assessed for their ability to detect respiratory activities and membrane homeostasis in aerosolized E. coli cells. The degree of sublethal injury increased significantly over the 10-min period of aerosolization in E. coli cells aerosolized by using the Collison nebulizer, reaching up to 99.9% of the population. In contrast, a significantly lower proportion of the population was sublethally damaged during aerosolization using the flow-focusing aerosol generator (FFAG). Concomitantly, loss of membrane homeostasis increased at a higher rate in nebulized cells (68 to 71%) than in those aerosolized by using the FFAG (32 to 34%). The activities of respiratory enzymes decreased at increased rates in nebulized cells (27 to 37%) compared to the rates of decrease in cells aerosolized by using the FFAG (59 to 61%). The results indicate that the physiology of an aerosolized bacterium is linked to the method of aerosol generation and may affect the interpretation of a range of aerobiological phenomenon. PMID:21148696

  6. [Exercise training in hypoxia prevents hypoxia induced mitochondrial DNA oxidative damage in skeletal muscle].

    PubMed

    Bo, Hai; Li, Ling; Duan, Fu-Qiang; Zhu, Jiang

    2014-10-25

    This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of exercise training on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) oxidative damage and 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase-1 (OGG1) expression in skeletal muscle of rats under continuous exposure to hypoxia. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 8): normoxia control group (NC), normoxia training group (NT), hypoxia control group (HC), and hypoxia training group (HT). The hypoxia-treated animals were housed in normobaric hypoxic tent containing 11.3% oxygen for consecutive 4 weeks. The exercise-trained animals were exercised on a motor-driven rodent treadmill at a speed of 15 m/min, 5% grade for 60 min/day, 5 days per week for 4 weeks. The results showed that, compared with NC group, hypoxia attenuated complex I, II, IV and ATP synthase activities of the electron transport chain, and the level of mitochondrial membrane potential in HC group (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). Moreover, hypoxia decreased mitochondrial OGG1, MnSOD, and GPx activities (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01), whereas elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and the level of 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) in mtDNA (P < 0.01). Furthermore, hypoxia attenuated muscle and mitochondrial [NAD⁺]/ [NADH] ratio, and SIRT3 protein expression (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). Compared with HC group, exercise training in hypoxia elevated complex I, II, IV and ATP synthase activities, and the level of mitochondrial membrane potential in HT group (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). Moreover, exercise training in hypoxia increased MnSOD and GPx activities and mitochondrial OGG1 level (P < 0.01), whereas decreased ROS generation and the level of 8-oxodG in mtDNA (P < 0.01). Furthermore, exercise training in hypoxia increased muscle and mitochondrial [NAD⁺]/[NADH] ratio, as well as SIRT3 protein expression (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). These findings suggest that exercise training in hypoxia can decrease hypoxia-induced mtDNA oxidative damage in the skeletal muscle through up

  7. Salmonella Rapidly Regulates Membrane Permeability To Survive Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    van der Heijden, Joris; Reynolds, Lisa A.; Deng, Wanyin; Mills, Allan; Scholz, Roland; Imami, Koshi; Foster, Leonard J.; Duong, Franck

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria provides protection against toxic molecules, including reactive oxygen species (ROS). Decreased OM permeability can promote bacterial survival under harsh circumstances and protects against antibiotics. To better understand the regulation of OM permeability, we studied the real-time influx of hydrogen peroxide in Salmonella bacteria and discovered two novel mechanisms by which they rapidly control OM permeability. We found that pores in two major OM proteins, OmpA and OmpC, could be rapidly opened or closed when oxidative stress is encountered and that the underlying mechanisms rely on the formation of disulfide bonds in the periplasmic domain of OmpA and TrxA, respectively. Additionally, we found that a Salmonella mutant showing increased OM permeability was killed more effectively by treatment with antibiotics. Together, these results demonstrate that Gram-negative bacteria regulate the influx of ROS for defense against oxidative stress and reveal novel targets that can be therapeutically targeted to increase bacterial killing by conventional antibiotics. PMID:27507830

  8. Oxidative Damage and Mitochondrial Injuries Are Induced by Various Irrigation Pressures in Rabbit Models of Mild and Severe Hydronephrosis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhixiu; Yu, Weimin; Li, Wei; Cheng, Fan; Rao, Ting; Yao, Xiaobing; Zhang, Xiaobin; Larré, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Objective We aimed to study whether tolerance to irrigation pressure could be modified by evaluating the oxidative damage of obstructed kidneys based on rabbit models experiencing different degrees of hydronephrosis. Methods A total of 66 rabbits were randomly divided into two experimental groups and a control group. In the experimental groups, the rabbits underwent a surgical procedure inducing mild (group M, n=24) or severe (group S, n=24) hydronephrosis. In each experimental group, the rabbits were then randomly divided into 4 subgroups (M0-M3 and S0-S3) consisting of 6 rabbits each. Group 0 received no perfusion. Groups 1 through 3 were perfused with 20, 60 and 100 mmHg fluid, respectively. For the control group, after a sham operation was performed, the rabbits were divided into 4 subgroups and were perfused with fluid at 0, 20, 60 or 100 mmHg of pressure. Kidney injuries was evaluated by neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin (NGAL). Oxidative damage was assessed by analyzing superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) activity, malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, glutathione reductase (GR), catalase (CAT) and peroxide (H2O2) levels, mitochondrial injuries was assessed by mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), the mitochondrial ultrastructure and tubular cell apoptosis. Results In the experimental groups, all results were similar for groups 0 and 1. In group 2, abnormalities were observed in the S group only, and the kidneys of rabbits in group 3 suffered oxidative damage and mitochondrial injuries with increased NGAL, decreased Mn-SOD, GR and CAT,increased MDA and H2O2, lower levels of MMP, mitochondrial vacuolization and an increased apoptotic index. Conclusion In rabbits, severely obstructed kidneys were more susceptible to oxidative damage and mitochondrial injury than mildly obstructed kidneys when subjected to higher degrees of kidney perfusion pressure. PMID:26090815

  9. Vertebrate POLQ and POLβ Cooperate in Base Excision Repair of Oxidative DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Michio; Kohzaki, Masaoki; Nakamura, Jun; Asagoshi, Kenjiro; Sonoda, Eiichiro; Hou, Esther; Prasad, Rajendra; Wilson, Samuel H.; Tano, Keizo; Yasui, Akira; Lan, Li; Seki, Mineaki; Wood, Richard D.; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Buerstedde, Jean-Marie; Hochegger, Helfrid; Okada, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Takeda, Shunichi

    2007-01-01

    Summary Base excision repair (BER) plays an essential role in protecting cells from mutagenic base damage caused by oxidative stress, hydrolysis, and environmental factors. POLQ is a DNA polymerase, which appears to be involved in translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) past base damage. We disrupted POLQ, and its homologs HEL308 and POLN in chicken DT40 cells, and also created polq/hel308 and polq/poln double mutants. We found that POLQ-deficient mutants exhibit hypersensitivity to oxidative base damage induced by H2O2, but not to UV or cisplatin. Surprisingly, this phenotype was synergistically increased by concomitant deletion of the major BER polymerase, POLβ. Moreover, extracts from a polq null mutant cell line show reduced BER activity, and POLQ, like POLβ, accumulated rapidly at sites of base damage. Accordingly, POLQ and POLβ share an overlapping function in the repair of oxidative base damage. Taken together, these results suggest a role for vertebrate POLQ in BER. PMID:17018297

  10. Arsenic trioxide induces oxidative stress, DNA damage, and mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis in human leukemia (HL-60) cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), which accounts for approximately 10% of all acute myloid leukemia cases. It is a blood cancer that is formed by chromosomal mutation. Each year in the United States, APL affects about 1,500 patients of all age groups and causes approximately 1.2% of cancer deaths. Arsenic trioxide (ATO) has been used successfully for treatment of APL patients, and both induction and consolidated therapy have resulted in complete remission. Recently published studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that ATO pharmacology as an anti-leukemic drug is associated with cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in leukemia cells. Methods In the present study, we further investigated the detailed molecular mechanism of ATO-mediated intrinsic pathway of apoptosis; using HL-60 cells as a test model. Oxidative stress was assessed by spectrophotometric measurements of MDA and GSH levels while genotoxicity was determined by single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet assay). Apoptosis pathway was analyzed by Western blot analysis of Bax, Bcl2 and caspase 3 expression, as well as immunocytochemistry and confocal imaging of Bax and Cyt c translocation and mitochondrial membrane potential depolarization. Results ATO significantly (p < 0.05) induces oxidative stress, DNA damage, and caspase 3 activityin HL-60 cells in a dose-dependent manner. It also activated the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis by significantly modulating (p < 0.05) the expression and translocation of apoptotic molecules and decreasing the mitochondrial membrane potential in leukemia cells. Conclusion Taken together, our research demonstrated that ATO induces mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis in HL-60 cells. This apoptotic signaling is modulated via oxidative stress, DNA damage, and change in mitochondrial membrane potential, translocation and upregulation of apoptotic proteins leading programmed cell death. PMID:24887205