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Sample records for oxidative stress caused

  1. Oxidative stress causes coral bleaching during exposure to elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesser, M. P.

    1997-07-01

    Elevated temperatures and solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation have been implicated as recent causes for the loss of symbiotic algae (i.e., bleaching) in corals and other invertebrates with photoautotrophic symbionts. One hypothesized mechanism of coral bleaching involves the production of reduced oxygen intermediates, or toxic oxygen, in the dinoflagellate symbionts and host tissues that subsequently causes cellular damage and expulsion of symbionts. Measurements of photosynthesis in the Caribbean coral Agaricia tenuifolia, taken during temperature-induced stress and exposure to full solar radiation, showed a decrease in photosynthetic performance followed by bleaching. Exposure of corals to exogenous antioxidants that scavenge reactive oxygen species during temperature-induced stress improves maximum photosynthetic capacity to rates indistinguishable from corals measured at the ambient temperature of their site of collection. Additionally, these antioxidants prevent the coral from " bleaching " and affect the mechanism of symbiont loss from the coral host. These observations confirm a role for oxidative stress, whether caused by elevated temperatures or exposure to UV radiation, in the bleaching phenomenon.

  2. Senescence-Induced Oxidative Stress Causes Endothelial Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bhayadia, Raj; Schmidt, Bernhard M W; Melk, Anette; Hömme, Meike

    2016-02-01

    Age is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, suggesting a causal relationship between age-related changes and vascular damage. Endothelial dysfunction is an early pathophysiological hallmark in the development of cardiovascular disease. Senescence, the cellular equivalent of aging, was proposed to be involved in endothelial dysfunction, but functional data showing a causal relationship are missing.Endothelium-dependent vasodilation was measured in aortic rings ex vivo. We investigated aortas from aged C57Bl/6 mice (24-28 months), in which p16 (INK4a) and p19 (ARF) expression, markers of stress-induced senescence, were significantly induced compared to young controls (4-6 months). To reflect telomere shortening in human aging, we investigated aortas from telomerase deficient (Terc(-/-)) mice of generation 3 (G3). Endothelium-dependent vasodilation in aged wildtype and in Terc(-/-) G3 mice was impaired. A combination of the superoxide dismutase mimetic 1-Oxyl-2,2,6, 6-tetramethyl-4-hydroxypiperidine (TEMPOL) and the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase inhibitor apocynin significantly improved endothelium-dependent vasodilation in aged wildtype and Terc(-/-) G3 mice compared to untreated controls. We show that both, aging and senescence induced by telomere shortening, cause endothelial dysfunction that can be restored by antioxidants, indicating a role for oxidative stress. The observation that cellular senescence is a direct signalling event leading to endothelial dysfunction holds the potential to develop new targets for the prevention of cardiovascular disease. PMID:25735595

  3. Causes and consequences of oxidative stress in spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Robert John; Gibb, Zamira; Baker, Mark A; Drevet, Joel; Gharagozloo, Parviz

    2015-02-01

    Spermatozoa are highly vulnerable to oxidative attack because they lack significant antioxidant protection due to the limited volume and restricted distribution of cytoplasmic space in which to house an appropriate armoury of defensive enzymes. In particular, sperm membrane lipids are susceptible to oxidative stress because they abound in significant amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Susceptibility to oxidative attack is further exacerbated by the fact that these cells actively generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in order to drive the increase in tyrosine phosphorylation associated with sperm capacitation. However, this positive role for ROS is reversed when spermatozoa are stressed. Under these conditions, they default to an intrinsic apoptotic pathway characterised by mitochondrial ROS generation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, caspase activation, phosphatidylserine exposure and oxidative DNA damage. In responding to oxidative stress, spermatozoa only possess the first enzyme in the base excision repair pathway, 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase. This enzyme catalyses the formation of abasic sites, thereby destabilising the DNA backbone and generating strand breaks. Because oxidative damage to sperm DNA is associated with both miscarriage and developmental abnormalities in the offspring, strategies for the amelioration of such stress, including the development of effective antioxidant formulations, are becoming increasingly urgent. PMID:27062870

  4. Does aspirin-induced oxidative stress cause asthma exacerbation?

    PubMed Central

    Kacprzak, Dorota

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin-induced asthma (AIA) is a distinct clinical syndrome characterized by severe asthma exacerbations after ingestion of aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The exact pathomechanism of AIA remains unknown, though ongoing research has shed some light. Recently, more and more attention has been focused on the role of aspirin in the induction of oxidative stress, especially in cancer cell systems. However, it has not excluded the similar action of aspirin in other inflammatory disorders such as asthma. Moreover, increased levels of 8-isoprostanes, reliable biomarkers of oxidative stress in expired breath condensate in steroid-naïve patients with AIA compared to AIA patients treated with steroids and healthy volunteers, has been observed. This review is an attempt to cover aspirin-induced oxidative stress action in AIA and to suggest a possible related pathomechanism. PMID:26170841

  5. Impaired Mitochondrial Energy Production Causes Light-Induced Photoreceptor Degeneration Independent of Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Manish; Haelterman, Nele A; Sandoval, Hector; Xiong, Bo; Donti, Taraka; Kalsotra, Auinash; Yamamoto, Shinya; Cooper, Thomas A; Graham, Brett H; Bellen, Hugo J

    2015-07-01

    Two insults often underlie a variety of eye diseases including glaucoma, optic atrophy, and retinal degeneration--defects in mitochondrial function and aberrant Rhodopsin trafficking. Although mitochondrial defects are often associated with oxidative stress, they have not been linked to Rhodopsin trafficking. In an unbiased forward genetic screen designed to isolate mutations that cause photoreceptor degeneration, we identified mutations in a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial gene, ppr, a homolog of human LRPPRC. We found that ppr is required for protection against light-induced degeneration. Its function is essential to maintain membrane depolarization of the photoreceptors upon repetitive light exposure, and an impaired phototransduction cascade in ppr mutants results in excessive Rhodopsin1 endocytosis. Moreover, loss of ppr results in a reduction in mitochondrial RNAs, reduced electron transport chain activity, and reduced ATP levels. Oxidative stress, however, is not induced. We propose that the reduced ATP level in ppr mutants underlies the phototransduction defect, leading to increased Rhodopsin1 endocytosis during light exposure, causing photoreceptor degeneration independent of oxidative stress. This hypothesis is bolstered by characterization of two other genes isolated in the screen, pyruvate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase. Their loss also causes a light-induced degeneration, excessive Rhodopsin1 endocytosis and reduced ATP without concurrent oxidative stress, unlike many other mutations in mitochondrial genes that are associated with elevated oxidative stress and light-independent photoreceptor demise. PMID:26176594

  6. Impaired Mitochondrial Energy Production Causes Light-Induced Photoreceptor Degeneration Independent of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Manish; Haelterman, Nele A.; Sandoval, Hector; Xiong, Bo; Donti, Taraka; Kalsotra, Auinash; Yamamoto, Shinya; Cooper, Thomas A.; Graham, Brett H.; Bellen, Hugo J.

    2015-01-01

    Two insults often underlie a variety of eye diseases including glaucoma, optic atrophy, and retinal degeneration—defects in mitochondrial function and aberrant Rhodopsin trafficking. Although mitochondrial defects are often associated with oxidative stress, they have not been linked to Rhodopsin trafficking. In an unbiased forward genetic screen designed to isolate mutations that cause photoreceptor degeneration, we identified mutations in a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial gene, ppr, a homolog of human LRPPRC. We found that ppr is required for protection against light-induced degeneration. Its function is essential to maintain membrane depolarization of the photoreceptors upon repetitive light exposure, and an impaired phototransduction cascade in ppr mutants results in excessive Rhodopsin1 endocytosis. Moreover, loss of ppr results in a reduction in mitochondrial RNAs, reduced electron transport chain activity, and reduced ATP levels. Oxidative stress, however, is not induced. We propose that the reduced ATP level in ppr mutants underlies the phototransduction defect, leading to increased Rhodopsin1 endocytosis during light exposure, causing photoreceptor degeneration independent of oxidative stress. This hypothesis is bolstered by characterization of two other genes isolated in the screen, pyruvate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase. Their loss also causes a light-induced degeneration, excessive Rhodopsin1 endocytosis and reduced ATP without concurrent oxidative stress, unlike many other mutations in mitochondrial genes that are associated with elevated oxidative stress and light-independent photoreceptor demise. PMID:26176594

  7. Heat stress causes oxidative stress but not inflammatory signaling in porcine skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Montilla, Sandra I Rosado; Johnson, Theresa P; Pearce, Sarah C; Gardan-Salmon, Delphine; Gabler, Nicholas K; Ross, Jason W; Rhoads, Robert P; Baumgard, Lance H; Lonergan, Steven M; Selsby, Joshua T

    2014-01-01

    Heat stress is associated with death and other maladaptions including muscle dysfunction and impaired growth across species. Despite this common observation, the molecular effects leading to these pathologic changes remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which heat stress disrupted redox balance and initiated an inflammatory response in oxidative and glycolytic skeletal muscle. Female pigs (5–6/group) were subjected to thermoneutral (20 °C) or heat stress (35 °C) conditions for 1 or 3 days and the semitendinosus removed and dissected into red (STR) and white (STW) portions. After 1 day of heat stress, relative abundance of proteins modified by malondialdehyde, a measure of oxidative damage, was increased 2.5-fold (P < 0.05) compared with thermoneutral in the STR but not the STW, before returning to thermoneutral conditions following 3 days of heat stress. This corresponded with increased catalase and superoxide dismutase-1 gene expression (P < 0.05) and superoxide dismutase-1 protein abundance (P < 0.05) in the STR but not the STW. In the STR catalase and total superoxide dismutase activity were increased by ~30% and ~130%, respectively (P < 0.05), after 1 day of heat stress and returned to thermoneutral levels by day 3. One or 3 days of heat stress did not increase inflammatory signaling through the NF-κB pathway in the STR or STW. These data suggest that oxidative muscle is more susceptible to heat stress-mediated changes in redox balance than glycolytic muscle during chronic heat stress.

  8. Acute and sub-lethal exposure to copper oxide nanoparticles causes oxidative stress and teratogenicity in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Santhanamari; Anaimalai Thirumurthi, Naveenkumar; Raghunath, Azhwar; Vijayakumar, Savitha; Perumal, Ekambaram

    2016-04-01

    Nano-copper oxides are a versatile inorganic material. As a result of their versatility, the immense applications and usage end up in the environment causing a concern for the lifespan of various beings. The ambiguities surround globally on the toxic effects of copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO-NPs). Hence, the present study endeavored to study the sub-lethal acute exposure effects on the developing zebrafish embryos. The 48 hpf LC50 value was about 64 ppm. Therefore, we have chosen the sub-lethal dose of 40 and 60 ppm for the study. Accumulation of CuO-NPs was evidenced from the SEM-EDS and AAS analyzes. The alterations in the AChE and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activities disrupted the development process. An increment in the levels of oxidants with a concomitant decrease in the antioxidant enzymes confirmed the induction of oxidative stress. Oxidative stress triggered apoptosis in the exposed embryos. Developmental anomalies were observed with CuO-NPs exposure in addition to oxidative stress in the developing embryos. Decreased heart rate and hatching delay hindered the normal developmental processes. Our work has offered valuable data on the connection between oxidative stress and teratogenicity leading to lethality caused by CuO-NPs. A further molecular mechanism unraveling the uncharted connection between oxidative stress and teratogenicity will aid in the safe use of CuO-NPs. PMID:26493272

  9. Experimental 'jet lag' causes sympathoexcitation via oxidative stress through AT1 receptor in the brainstem.

    PubMed

    Kishi, T; Sunagawa, K

    2011-01-01

    Circadian disruptions through frequent transmeridian travel, rotating shift work, and poor sleep hygiene are associated with an array of physical and mental health maladies, including the abnormal autonomic nervous system. We have demonstrated that the oxidative stress through AT(1) receptor in the brain activates sympathetic nervous system. The aim of the present study was to determine whether experimental 'jet lag' causes sympathoexcitation via oxidative stress through AT(1) receptor in the cardiovascular center of the brainstem (rostral ventrolateral medulla; RVLM) or not. Experimental 'jet lag' was made to normotensive (Wister-Kyoto rat; WKY rat) and hypertensive rats (stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats; SHRSP) by the exposure to a 12 hour phase advance for 5 days. In WKY, 'jet lag' increases blood pressure and the activity of sympathetic nervous system via oxidative stress through angiotensin II type 1 receptor in the RVLM for 2 days only, and the changes are improved at 3 day after the initiation of 'jet lag'. In SHRSP, 'jet lag' also increases blood pressure and the activity of sympathetic nervous system via oxidative stress through angiotensin II type 1 receptor in the RVLM, and the changes are greater compared to those in WKY, and are maintained for the period of 'jet lag'. These results suggest that experimental 'jet lag' causes sympathoexcitation via oxidative stress through AT(1) receptor in the brain, especially in hypertension. PMID:22254719

  10. Glutathione depletion due to copper-induced phytochelatin synthesis causes oxidative stress in Silene cucubalus

    SciTech Connect

    Ric De Vos, C.H.; Vonk, M.J.; Vooijs, R.; Schat, H. )

    1992-03-01

    The relation between loss of glutathione due to metal-induced phytochelatin synthesis and oxidative stress was studied in the roots of copper-sensitive and tolerant Silene cucubalus (L.) Wib., resistant to 1 and 40 micromolar Cu, respectively. The amount of nonprotein sulfhydryl compounds other then glutathione was taken as a measure of phytochelatins. At a supply of 20 micromolar Cu, which is toxic for sensitive plants only, phytochelatin synthesis and loss of total glutathione were observed only in sensitive plants within 6 h of exposure. When the plants were exposed to a range of copper concentrations for 3 d, a marked production of phytochelatins in sensitive plants was already observed at 0.5 micromolar Cu, whereas the production in tolerant plants was negligible at 40 micromolar or lower. The highest production in tolerant plants was only 40% of that in sensitive plants. In both varieties, the synthesis of phytochelatins was coupled to a loss of glutathione. Copper at toxic concentrations caused oxidative stress, as was evidenced by both the accumulation of lipid peroxidation products and a shift in the glutathione redox couple to a more oxidized state. Depletion of glutathione by pretreatment with buthionine sulfoximine significantly increased the oxidative damage by copper. At a comparably low glutathione level, cadmium had no effect on either lipid peroxidation or the glutathione redox couple in buthionine sulfoximine-treated plants. These results indicate that copper may specifically cause oxidative stress by depletion of the antioxidant glutathione due to phytochelatin synthesis.

  11. Bacteriocin of Enterococcus from lactoserum able to cause oxidative stress in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Eraso, Alberto Jorge; Inés, Albesa

    2004-02-13

    The effect of a bacteriocin of Enterococcus on the oxidative metabolism of sensitive bacteria was investigated through the detection of oxidative stress by chemiluminescence (CL). The bacteriocin named EntB was purified to study the action on Staphylococcus aureus isolated from cosmetic. Chromatographic separation of EntB indicated different states of oligomerization with molecular weights multiple of 12,000Da monomeric form. The monomer purified by ion exchange was studied in its capacity to affect the oxidative metabolism of S. aureus, which showed increase of anion superoxide (O(2)(-)) when incubated with EntB. This effect was compared to the action of EntB on leukocytes as an assay of toxicity. EntB did not generate significant oxidative stress in leukocytes. Pyoverdin, a leukotoxic pigment of Pseudomonas fluorescens, was taken as reference, and it was found that this pigment caused similar oxidative stress to EntB in S. aureus; however, pyoverdin generated high production of anion superoxide (O(2)(-)) in leukocytes, while EntB did not increase the level of O(2)(-). PMID:14741721

  12. Smoke Exposure Causes Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Lipid Accumulation in Retinal Pigment Epithelium through Oxidative Stress and Complement Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Kunchithapautham, Kannan; Atkinson, Carl; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex disease caused by genetic and environmental factors, including genetic variants in complement components and smoking. Smoke exposure leads to oxidative stress, complement activation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and lipid dysregulation, which have all been proposed to be associated with AMD pathogenesis. Here we examine the effects of smoke exposure on the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Mice were exposed to cigarette smoke or filtered air for 6 months. RPE cells grown as stable monolayers were exposed to 5% cigarette smoke extract (CSE). Effects of smoke were determined by biochemical, molecular, and histological measures. Effects of the alternative pathway (AP) of complement and complement C3a anaphylatoxin receptor signaling were analyzed using knock-out mice or specific inhibitors. ER stress markers were elevated after smoke exposure in RPE of intact mice, which was eliminated in AP-deficient mice. To examine this relationship further, RPE monolayers were exposed to CSE. Short term smoke exposure resulted in production and release of complement C3, the generation of C3a, oxidative stress, complement activation on the cell membrane, and ER stress. Long term exposure to CSE resulted in lipid accumulation, and secretion. All measures were reversed by blocking C3a complement receptor (C3aR), alternative complement pathway signaling, and antioxidant therapy. Taken together, our results provide clear evidence that smoke exposure results in oxidative stress and complement activation via the AP, resulting in ER stress-mediated lipid accumulation, and further suggesting that oxidative stress and complement act synergistically in the pathogenesis of AMD. PMID:24711457

  13. Scrambled and fried: Cigarette smoke exposure causes antral follicle destruction and oocyte dysfunction through oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Sobinoff, A.P.; Beckett, E.L.; Jarnicki, A.G.; Sutherland, J.M.; McCluskey, A.; Hansbro, P.M.; McLaughlin, E.A.

    2013-09-01

    Cigarette smoke is a reproductive hazard associated with pre-mature reproductive senescence and reduced clinical pregnancy rates in female smokers. Despite an increased awareness of the adverse effects of cigarette smoke exposure on systemic health, many women remain unaware of the adverse effects of cigarette smoke on female fertility. This issue is compounded by our limited understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind cigarette smoke induced infertility. In this study we used a direct nasal exposure mouse model of cigarette smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to characterise mechanisms of cigarette-smoke induced ovotoxicity. Cigarette smoke exposure caused increased levels of primordial follicle depletion, antral follicle oocyte apoptosis and oxidative stress in exposed ovaries, resulting in fewer follicles available for ovulation. Evidence of oxidative stress also persisted in ovulated oocytes which escaped destruction, with increased levels of mitochondrial ROS and lipid peroxidation resulting in reduced fertilisation potential. Microarray analysis of ovarian tissue correlated these insults with a complex mechanism of ovotoxicity involving genes associated with detoxification, inflammation, follicular activation, immune cell mediated apoptosis and membrane organisation. In particular, the phase I detoxifying enzyme cyp2e1 was found to be significantly up-regulated in developing oocytes; an enzyme known to cause molecular bioactivation resulting in oxidative stress. Our results provide a preliminary model of cigarette smoke induced sub-fertility through cyp2e1 bioactivation and oxidative stress, resulting in developing follicle depletion and oocyte dysfunction. - Highlights: • Cigarette smoke exposure targets developing follicle oocytes. • The antral follicle oocyte is a primary site of ovarian cigarette smoke metabolism. • Cyp2e1 is a major enzyme involved in ameliorating smoke-induced ovotoxicity. • Cigarette smoke causes oocyte

  14. Obesity, Oxidative Stress, Adipose Tissue Dysfunction, and the Associated Health Risks: Causes and Therapeutic Strategies.

    PubMed

    Manna, Prasenjit; Jain, Sushil K

    2015-12-01

    Obesity is gaining acceptance as a serious primary health burden that impairs the quality of life because of its associated complications, including diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, asthma, sleep disorders, hepatic dysfunction, renal dysfunction, and infertility. It is a complex metabolic disorder with a multifactorial origin. Growing evidence suggests that oxidative stress plays a role as the critical factor linking obesity with its associated complications. Obesity per se can induce systemic oxidative stress through various biochemical mechanisms, such as superoxide generation from NADPH oxidases, oxidative phosphorylation, glyceraldehyde auto-oxidation, protein kinase C activation, and polyol and hexosamine pathways. Other factors that also contribute to oxidative stress in obesity include hyperleptinemia, low antioxidant defense, chronic inflammation, and postprandial reactive oxygen species generation. In addition, recent studies suggest that adipose tissue plays a critical role in regulating the pathophysiological mechanisms of obesity and its related co-morbidities. To establish an adequate platform for the prevention of obesity and its associated health risks, understanding the factors that contribute to the cause of obesity is necessary. The most current list of obesity determinants includes genetic factors, dietary intake, physical activity, environmental and socioeconomic factors, eating disorders, and societal influences. On the basis of the currently identified predominant determinants of obesity, a broad range of strategies have been recommended to reduce the prevalence of obesity, such as regular physical activity, ad libitum food intake limiting to certain micronutrients, increased dietary intake of fruits and vegetables, and meal replacements. This review aims to highlight recent findings regarding the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of obesity and its associated risk factors, the role of dysfunctional adipose tissue in

  15. Restoration of nuclear-import failure caused by triple A syndrome and oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Kiriyama, Takao; Hirano, Makito Asai, Hirohide; Ikeda, Masanori; Furiya, Yoshiko; Ueno, Satoshi

    2008-10-03

    Triple A syndrome is an autosomal recessive neurological disease, mimicking motor neuron disease, and is caused by mutant ALADIN, a nuclear-pore complex component. We recently discovered that the pathogenesis involved impaired nuclear import of DNA repair proteins, including DNA ligase I and the cerebellar ataxia causative protein aprataxin. Such impairment was overcome by fusing classical nuclear localization signal (NLS) and 137-aa downstream sequence of XRCC1, designated stretched NLS (stNLS). We report here that the minimum essential sequence of stNLS (mstNLS) is residues 239-276, downsized by more than 100 aa. mstNLS enabled efficient nuclear import of DNA repair proteins in patient fibroblasts, functioned under oxidative stress, and reduced oxidative-stress-induced cell death, more effectively than stNLS. The stress-tolerability of mstNLS was also exerted in control fibroblasts and neuroblastoma cells. These findings may help develop treatments for currently intractable triple A syndrome and other oxidative-stress-related neurological diseases, and contribute to nuclear compartmentalization study.

  16. The R439C mutation in LMNA causes lamin oligomerization and susceptibility to oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Verstraeten, Valerie LRM; Caputo, Sandrine; Van Steensel, Maurice AM; Duband-Goulet, Isabelle; Zinn-Justin, Sophie; Kamps, Miriam; Kuijpers, Helma JH; Östlund, Cecilia; Worman, Howard J; Briedé, Jacob J; Le Dour, Caroline; Marcelis, Carlo LM; Van Geel, Michel; Steijlen, Peter M; Van Den Wijngaard, Arthur; Ramaekers, Frans CS; Broers, Jos LV

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Dunnigan-type familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD) is a laminopathy characterized by an aberrant fat distribution and a metabolic syndrome for which oxidative stress has recently been suggested as one of the disease-causing mechanisms. In a family affected with FPLD, we identified a heterozygous missense mutation c.1315C>T in the LMNA gene leading to the p.R439C substitution. Cultured patient fibroblasts do not show any prelamin A accumulation and reveal honeycomb-like lamin A/C formations in a significant percentage of nuclei. The mutation affects a region in the C-terminal globular domain of lamins A and C, different from the FPLD-related hot spot. Here, the introduction of an extra cysteine allows for the formation of disulphide-mediated lamin A/C oligomers. This oligomerization affects the interaction properties of the C-terminal domain with DNA as shown by gel retardation assays and causes a DNA-interaction pattern that is distinct from the classical R482W FPLD mutant. Particularly, whereas the R482W mutation decreases the binding efficiency of the C-terminal domain to DNA, the R439C mutation increases it. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy studies show significantly higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon induction of oxidative stress in R439C patient fibroblasts compared to healthy controls. This increased sensitivity to oxidative stress seems independent of the oligomerization and enhanced DNA binding typical for R439C, as both the R439C and R482W mutants show a similar and significant increase in ROS upon induction of oxidative stress by H2O2. PMID:19220582

  17. Potassium bromate causes cell lysis and induces oxidative stress in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mir Kaisar; Amani, Samreen; Mahmood, Riaz

    2014-02-01

    In the present study, we have studied the effect of KBrO3 on human erythrocytes under in vitro conditions. Erythrocytes were isolated from the blood of healthy nonsmoking volunteers and incubated with different concentrations of KBrO3 at 37°C for 60 min. This resulted in marked hemolysis in a KBrO3 -concentration dependent manner. Lysates were prepared from KBrO3 -treated and control erythrocytes and assayed for various parameters. KBrO3 treatment caused significant increase in protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation, hydrogen peroxide levels, and decrease in total sulfhydryl content, which indicates induction of oxidative stress in human erythrocytes. Methemoglobin levels and methemoglobin reductase activity were significantly increased while the total antioxidant power of lysates was greatly reduced upon KBrO3 treatment. Intracellular production of reactive oxygen species increased in a dose dependent manner. Exposure of erythrocytes to KBrO3 also caused decrease in the activities of catalase, glutathione peroxidase, thioredoxin reductase, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutathione reductase whereas the activities of Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase and glutathione-S-transferase were increased. These results show that KBrO3 induces oxidative stress in human erythrocytes through the generation of reactive oxygen species and alters the cellular antioxidant defense system. PMID:22012894

  18. In vitro platelet aggregation and oxidative stress caused by amorphous silica nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Nemmar, Abderrahim; Yuvaraju, Priya; Beegam, Sumaya; Yasin, Javed; Dhaheri, Rauda Al; Fahim, Mohamed A; Ali, Badreldin H

    2015-01-01

    Amorphous silica nanoparticles (SiNP) are being investigated for their potential use in various industrial and medical fields. Therefore, the assessment of their possible pathophysiological effect on circulating cells such as platelets is essential. We recently showed that intraperitoneal administration of SiNP causes proinflammatory and prothrombotic responses in vivo. However, little is known about the interaction of amorphous SiNP with platelets in vitro. Presently, we investigated the in vitro effects of SiNP (1, 5 and 25 μg/ml) on platelet aggregation, oxidative stress and intracellular calcium in mouse platelets. Incubation of platelets with SiNP caused a significant and dose-dependent platelet aggregation. Similarly, the activity of lactate dehydrogenase (as a marker of cell membrane integrity) was significantly increased by SiNP. Total antioxidant activity and lipid platelets vulnerability to in vitro peroxidation (measured by malondialdehyde production) were significantly increased after SiNP exposure. Additionally, SiNP exposure significantly increased the cytosolic calcium concentration. In conclusion, our in vitro data show that incubation of platelets with SiNP caused platelet aggregation, oxidative stress and increased intracellular calcium. This finding provides evidence on the toxicity of SiNP on platelet physiology. PMID:26069526

  19. Excess processing of oxidative damaged bases causes hypersensitivity to oxidative stress and low dose rate irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Y; Yamasaki, A; Takatori, K; Suzuki, M; Kobayashi, J; Takao, M; Zhang-Akiyama, Q-M

    2015-10-01

    Ionizing radiations such as X-ray and γ-ray can directly or indirectly produce clustered or multiple damages in DNA. Previous studies have reported that overexpression of DNA glycosylases in Escherichia coli (E. coli) and human lymphoblast cells caused increased sensitivity to γ-ray and X-ray irradiation. However, the effects and the mechanisms of other radiation, such as low dose rate radiation, heavy-ion beams, or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), are still poorly understood. In the present study, we constructed a stable HeLaS3 cell line overexpressing human 8-oxoguanine DNA N-glycosylase 1 (hOGG1) protein. We determined the survival of HeLaS3 and HeLaS3/hOGG1 cells exposed to UV, heavy-ion beams, γ-rays, and H2O2. The results showed that HeLaS3 cells overexpressing hOGG1 were more sensitive to γ-rays, OH(•), and H2O2, but not to UV or heavy-ion beams, than control HeLaS3. We further determined the levels of 8-oxoG foci and of chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs) by detecting γ-H2AX foci formation in DNA. The results demonstrated that both γ-rays and H2O2 induced 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) foci formation in HeLaS3 cells. hOGG1-overexpressing cells had increased amounts of γ-H2AX foci and decreased amounts of 8-oxoG foci compared with HeLaS3 control cells. These results suggest that excess hOGG1 removes the oxidatively damaged 8-oxoG in DNA more efficiently and therefore generates more DSBs. Micronucleus formation also supported this conclusion. Low dose-rate γ-ray effects were also investigated. We first found that overexpression of hOGG1 also caused increased sensitivity to low dose rate γ-ray irradiation. The rate of micronucleus formation supported the notion that low dose rate irradiation increased genome instability. PMID:26059740

  20. Imbalanced Oxidative Stress Causes Chlamydial Persistence during Non-Productive Human Herpes Virus Co-Infection

    PubMed Central

    Prusty, Bhupesh K.; Böhme, Linda; Bergmann, Birgit; Siegl, Christine; Krause, Eva; Mehlitz, Adrian; Rudel, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Both human herpes viruses and Chlamydia are highly prevalent in the human population and are detected together in different human disorders. Here, we demonstrate that co-infection with human herpes virus 6 (HHV6) interferes with the developmental cycle of C. trachomatis and induces persistence. Induction of chlamydial persistence by HHV6 is independent of productive virus infection, but requires the interaction and uptake of the virus by the host cell. On the other hand, viral uptake is strongly promoted under co-infection conditions. Host cell glutathione reductase activity was suppressed by HHV6 causing NADPH accumulation, decreased formation of reduced glutathione and increased oxidative stress. Prevention of oxidative stress restored infectivity of Chlamydia after HHV6-induced persistence. We show that co-infection with Herpes simplex virus 1 or human Cytomegalovirus also induces chlamydial persistence by a similar mechanism suggesting that Chlamydia -human herpes virus co-infections are evolutionary shaped interactions with a thus far unrecognized broad significance. PMID:23077614

  1. Polysaccharides from Angelica sinensis alleviate neuronal cell injury caused by oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Tao; Li, Haifeng; Fang, Zhen; Lin, Junbin; Wang, Shanshan; Xiao, Lingyun; Yang, Fan; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Junjian; Huang, Zebo; Liao, Weijing

    2014-01-01

    Angelica sinensis has antioxidative and neuroprotective effects. In the present study, we aimed to determine the neuroprotective effect of polysaccharides isolated from Angelica sinensis. In a preliminary experiment, Angelica sinensis polysaccharides not only protected PC12 neuronal cells from H2O2-induced cytotoxicity, but also reduced apoptosis and intracellular reactive oxygen species levels, and increased the mitochondrial membrane potential induced by H2O2 treatment. In a rat model of local cerebral ischemia, we further demonstrated that Angelica sinensis polysaccharides enhanced the antioxidant activity in cerebral cortical neurons, increased the number of microvessels, and improved blood flow after ischemia. Our findings highlight the protective role of polysaccharides isolated from Angelica sinensis against nerve cell injury and impairment caused by oxidative stress. PMID:25206810

  2. Iodinated contrast media cause direct tubular cell damage, leading to oxidative stress, low nitric oxide, and impairment of tubuloglomerular feedback

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi Zhao; Schmerbach, Kristin; Lu, Yuan; Perlewitz, Andrea; Nikitina, Tatiana; Cantow, Kathleen; Seeliger, Erdmann; Persson, Pontus B.; Liu, Ruisheng; Sendeski, Mauricio M.

    2014-01-01

    Iodinated contrast media (CM) have adverse effects that may result in contrast-induced acute kidney injury. Oxidative stress is believed to play a role in CM-induced kidney injury. We test the hypothesis that oxidative stress and reduced nitric oxide in tubules are consequences of CM-induced direct cell damage and that increased local oxidative stress may increase tubuloglomerular feedback. Rat thick ascending limbs (TAL) were isolated and perfused. Superoxide and nitric oxide were quantified using fluorescence techniques. Cell death rate was estimated using propidium iodide and trypan blue. The function of macula densa and tubuloglomerular feedback responsiveness were measured in isolated, perfused juxtaglomerular apparatuses (JGA) of rabbits. The expression of genes related to oxidative stress and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) were investigated in the renal medulla of rats that received CM. CM increased superoxide concentration and reduced nitric oxide bioavailability in TAL. Propidium iodide fluorescence and trypan blue uptake increased more in CM-perfused TAL than in controls, indicating increased rate of cell death. There were no marked acute changes in the expression of genes related to oxidative stress in medullary segments of Henle's loop. SOD activity did not differ between CM and control groups. The tubuloglomerular feedback in isolated JGA was increased by CM. Tubular cell damage and accompanying oxidative stress in our model are consequences of CM-induced direct cell damage, which also modifies the tubulovascular interaction at the macula densa, and may therefore contribute to disturbances of renal perfusion and filtration. PMID:24431205

  3. Mechanism study on mitochondrial fragmentation under oxidative stress caused by high-fluence low-power laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shengnan; Zhou, Feifan; Xing, Da

    2012-03-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that undergo continual fusion and fission to maintain their morphology and functions, but the mechanism involved is still not clear. Here, we investigated the effect of mitochondrial oxidative stress triggered by high-fluence low-power laser irradiation (HF-LPLI) on mitochondrial dynamics in human lung adenocarcinoma cells (ASTC-a-1). Upon HF-LPLI-triggered oxidative stress, mitochondria displayed a fragmented structure, which was abolished by exposure to dehydroascorbic acid (DHA), a reactive oxygen species scavenger, indicating that oxidative stress can induce mitochondrial fragmentation. Mitochondrial translocation of the profission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) was observed following HF-LPLI, demonstrating apoptosis-related activation of Drp1. Notably, DHA pre-treatment prevented HF-LPLI-induced Drp1 activation. We conclude that mitochondrial oxidative stress through activation of Drp1 causes mitochondrial fragmentation.

  4. The Protective Effect of Lipoic Acid on Selected Cardiovascular Diseases Caused by Age-Related Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Goraca, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is considered to be the primary cause of many cardiovascular diseases, including endothelial dysfunction in atherosclerosis and ischemic heart disease, hypertension, and heart failure. Oxidative stress increases during the aging process, resulting in either increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production or decreased antioxidant defense. The increase in the incidence of cardiovascular disease is directly related to age. Aging is also associated with oxidative stress, which in turn leads to accelerated cellular senescence and organ dysfunction. Antioxidants may help lower the incidence of some pathologies of cardiovascular diseases and have antiaging properties. Lipoic acid (LA) is a natural antioxidant which is believed to have a beneficial effect on oxidative stress parameters in relation to diseases of the cardiovascular system. PMID:25949771

  5. A review of adaptive mechanisms in cell responses towards oxidative stress caused by dental resin monomers.

    PubMed

    Krifka, Stephanie; Spagnuolo, Gianrico; Schmalz, Gottfried; Schweikl, Helmut

    2013-06-01

    Dental composite resins are biomaterials commonly used to aesthetically restore the structure and function of teeth impaired by caries, erosion, or fracture. Residual monomers released from resin restorations as a result of incomplete polymerization processes interact with living oral tissues. Monomers like triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) or 2-hydroxylethyl methacrylate (HEMA) are cytotoxic via apoptosis, induce genotoxic effects, and delay the cell cycle. Monomers also influence the response of cells of the innate immune system, inhibit specific odontoblast cell functions, or delay the odontogenic differentiation and mineralization processes in pulp-derived cells including stem cells. These observations indicate that resin monomers act as environmental stressors which inevitably disturb regulatory cellular networks through interference with signal transduction pathways. We hypothesize that an understanding of the cellular mechanisms underlying these phenomena will provide a better estimation of the consequences associated with dental therapy using composite materials, and lead to innovative therapeutic strategies and improved materials being used at tissue interfaces within the oral cavity. Current findings strongly suggest that monomers enhance the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is most likely the cause of biological reactions activated by dental composites and resin monomers. The aim of the present review manuscript is to discuss adaptive cell responses to oxidative stress caused by monomers. The particular significance of a tightly controlled network of non-enzymatic as well as enzymatic antioxidants for the regulation of cellular redox homeostasis and antioxidant defense in monomer-exposed cells will be addressed. The expression of ROS-metabolizing antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase (SOD1), glutathione peroxidase (GPx1/2), and catalase in cells exposed to monomers will be discussed with particular emphasis on the role

  6. p38α deficiency and oxidative stress cause cytokinesis failure in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Tormos Ana, M; Taléns-Visconti, Raquel; Jorques, María; Pérez-Garrido, Salvador; Bonora-Centelles, Ana; Nebreda Ángel, R; Sastre, Juan

    2014-10-01

    Cytokinesis is the last step in mitosis and it implies re-organization of the actin cytoskeleton. Its failure is one of the major mechanisms of polyploidy and binucleation in mammals. Our aims were 1) to assess the role of redox-sensitive p38α MAPK in cytokinesis by studying the liver of wild type mice or liver-specific p38α knock-out mice; 2) to assess the role of oxidative stress associated with hepatocyte isolation on cytokinesis. When p38α was down-regulated in hepatocytes, MK2 phosphorylation on threonine 334 was completely abrogated. Activation of MNK-1, required for abscission of the intercellular bridge, was diminished. Key proteins of the RhoA pathway (phospho-PRK2, nuclear phosphorylated cofilin, and cytosolic p27) were assessed confirming the impairment of this pathway. The absence of p38α in aging liver also led to a decrease in HSP27 phosphorylation, which is required for actin polymerization. Indeed, a severe impairment in the F-actin filamentous structure was found in the liver of old mice upon p38α deficiency. Consequently, long-term p38α MAPK down-regulation markedly affects the RhoA pathway and actin cytoskeleton dynamics inducing actin disassembly and cytokinesis failure upon aging. On the other hand, hepatocyte isolation caused marked glutathione depletion, increased generation of reactive oxygen species, and activated cell cycle entry. Addition of N-acetyl cysteine to isolation media prevented glutathione depletion, restrained the cell cycle entry, and abrogated defective cytokinesis and the formation of binucleated hepatocytes during isolation. Our results show that hepatocytes do enter into S phase but they do not complete cell division with age upon p38α deficiency or upon oxidative stress associated with isolation leading in both cases to cytokinesis failure and binucleation. PMID:26461300

  7. Deficiency of glutathione transferase zeta causes oxidative stress and activation of antioxidant response pathways.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Anneke C; Matthaei, Klaus I; Lim, Cindy; Taylor, Matthew C; Cappello, Jean Y; Hayes, John D; Anders, M W; Board, Philip G

    2006-02-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) zeta (GSTZ1-1) plays a significant role in the catabolism of phenylalanine and tyrosine, and a deficiency of GSTZ1-1 results in the accumulation of maleylacetoacetate and its derivatives maleylacetone (MA) and succinylacetone. Induction of GST subunits was detected in the liver of Gstz1(-/-) mice by Western blotting with specific antisera and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of glutathione affinity column-purified proteins. The greatest induction was observed in members of the mu class. Induction of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 and the catalytic and modifier subunits of glutamate-cysteine ligase was also observed. Many of the enzymes that are induced in Gstz1(-/-) mice are regulated by antioxidant response elements that respond to oxidative stress via the Keap1/Nrf2 pathway. It is significant that diminished glutathione concentrations were also observed in the liver of Gstz1(-/-) mice, which supports the conclusion that under normal dietary conditions, the accumulation of electrophilic intermediates such as maleylacetoacetate and MA results in a high level of oxidative stress. Elevated GST activities in the livers of Gstz1(-/-) mice suggest that GSTZ1-1 deficiency may alter the metabolism of some drugs and xenobiotics. Gstz1(-/-) mice given acetaminophen demonstrated increased hepatotoxicity compared with wild-type mice. This toxicity may be attributed to the increased GST activity or the decreased hepatic concentrations of glutathione, or both. Patients with acquired deficiency of GSTZ1-1 caused by therapeutic exposure to dichloroacetic acid for the clinical treatment of lactic acidosis may be at increased risk of drug- and chemical-induced toxicity. PMID:16278372

  8. Hepatic Oxidative Stress in Fructose-Induced Fatty Liver Is Not Caused by Sulfur Amino Acid Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kunde, Sachin S.; Roede, James R.; Vos, Miriam B.; Orr, Michael L.; Go, Young-Mi; Park, Youngja; Ziegler, Thomas R.; Jones, Dean P.

    2011-01-01

    Fructose-sweetened liquid consumption is associated with fatty liver and oxidative stress. In rodent models of fructose-mediated fatty liver, protein consumption is decreased. Additionally, decreased sulfur amino acid intake is known to cause oxidative stress. Studies were designed to test whether oxidative stress in fructose-sweetened liquid-induced fatty liver is caused by decreased ad libitum solid food intake with associated inadequate sulfur amino acid intake. C57BL6 mice were grouped as: control (ad libitum water), fructose (ad libitum 30% fructose-sweetened liquid), glucose (ad libitum 30% glucose-sweetened water) and pair-fed (ad libitum water and sulfur amino acid intake same as the fructose group). Hepatic and plasma thiol-disulfide antioxidant status were analyzed after five weeks. Fructose- and glucose-fed mice developed fatty liver. The mitochondrial antioxidant protein, thioredoxin-2, displayed decreased abundance in the liver of fructose and glucose-fed mice compared to controls. Glutathione/glutathione disulfide redox potential (EhGSSG) and abundance of the cytoplasmic antioxidant protein, peroxiredoxin-2, were similar among groups. We conclude that both fructose and glucose-sweetened liquid consumption results in fatty liver and upregulated thioredoxin-2 expression, consistent with mitochondrial oxidative stress; however, inadequate sulfur amino acid intake was not the cause of this oxidative stress. PMID:22254090

  9. A review on the cause-effect relationship between oxidative stress and toxic proteins in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Borza, Liana Rada

    2014-01-01

    Protein aggregates are the defining pathological feature of human neurodegenerative diseases. Studies have revealed that mutant huntingtin, polyglutamine-expanded ataxin-1 and ataxin-3 can cause elevated levels of reactive oxygen species in neuronal cells. It has also been indicated that the normal host prion protein behaves as an antioxidant, while the neurotoxic peptide based on the sequence of the scrapie isoform increases hydrogen peroxide toxicity in neuronal cultures. Additionally, not only can oxidative stress contribute to the aggregation of beta-amyloid and alpha-synuclein, but both beta-amyloid and alpha-synuclein can induce oxidative damage. Furthermore, oxidative stressors have been shown to play a critical role in neurofibrillary pathology leading to tau hyperphosphorylation. In conclusion, the present review supports a cause-effect relationship between oxidative stress and toxic proteins in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24741770

  10. Genetically induced oxidative stress in mice causes thrombocytosis, splenomegaly and placental angiodysplasia that leads to recurrent abortion

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Takamasa; Miyazawa, Masaki; Takanashi, Yumi; Tanigawa, Maya; Yasuda, Kayo; Onouchi, Hiromi; Kawabe, Noboru; Mitsushita, Junji; Hartman, Phil S.; Ishii, Naoaki

    2014-01-01

    Historical data in the 1950s suggests that 7%, 11%, 33%, and 87% of couples were infertile by ages 30, 35, 40 and 45, respectively. Up to 22.3% of infertile couples have unexplained infertility. Oxidative stress is associated with male and female infertility. However, there is insufficient evidence relating to the influence of oxidative stress on the maintenance of a viable pregnancy, including pregnancy complications and fetal development. Recently, we have established Tet-mev-1 conditional transgenic mice, which can express the doxycycline-induced mutant SDHCV69E transgene and experience mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction leading to intracellular oxidative stress. In this report, we demonstrate that this kind of abnormal mitochondrial respiratory chain-induced chronic oxidative stress affects fertility, pregnancy and delivery rates as well as causes recurrent abortions, occasionally resulting in maternal death. Despite this, spermatogenesis and early embryogenesis are completely normal, indicating the mutation's effects to be rather subtle. Female Tet-mev-1 mice exhibit thrombocytosis and splenomegaly in both non-pregnant and pregnant mice as well as placental angiodysplasia with reduced Flt-1 protein leading to hypoxic conditions, which could contribute to placental inflammation and fetal abnormal angiogenesis. Collectively these data strongly suggest that chronic oxidative stress caused by mitochondrial mutations provokes spontaneous abortions and recurrent miscarriage resulting in age-related female infertility. PMID:24936442

  11. Vitamin D3 Reduces Tissue Damage and Oxidative Stress Caused by Exhaustive Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Chun-Yen; Yang, Fwu-Lin; Wu, Wen-Tien; Chung, Chen-Han; Lee, Ru-Ping; Yang, Wan-Ting; Subeq, Yi-Maun; Liao, Kuang-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Exhaustive exercise results in inflammation and oxidative stress, which can damage tissue. Previous studies have shown that vitamin D has both anti-inflammatory and antiperoxidative activity. Therefore, we aimed to test if vitamin D could reduce the damage caused by exhaustive exercise. Rats were randomized to one of four groups: control, vitamin D, exercise, and vitamin D+exercise. Exercised rats received an intravenous injection of vitamin D (1 ng/mL) or normal saline after exhaustive exercise. Blood pressure, heart rate, and blood samples were collected for biochemical testing. Histological examination and immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses were performed on lungs and kidneys after the animals were sacrificed. In comparison to the exercise group, blood markers of skeletal muscle damage, creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase, were significantly (P < 0.05) lower in the vitamin D+exercise group. The exercise group also had more severe tissue injury scores in the lungs (average of 2.4 ± 0.71) and kidneys (average of 3.3 ± 0.6) than the vitamin D-treated exercise group did (1.08 ± 0.57 and 1.16 ± 0.55). IHC staining showed that vitamin D reduced the oxidative product 4-Hydroxynonenal in exercised animals from 20.6% to 13.8% in the lungs and from 29.4% to 16.7% in the kidneys. In summary, postexercise intravenous injection of vitamin D can reduce the peroxidation induced by exhaustive exercise and ameliorate tissue damage, particularly in the kidneys and lungs. PMID:26941574

  12. Vitamin D3 Reduces Tissue Damage and Oxidative Stress Caused by Exhaustive Exercise.

    PubMed

    Ke, Chun-Yen; Yang, Fwu-Lin; Wu, Wen-Tien; Chung, Chen-Han; Lee, Ru-Ping; Yang, Wan-Ting; Subeq, Yi-Maun; Liao, Kuang-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Exhaustive exercise results in inflammation and oxidative stress, which can damage tissue. Previous studies have shown that vitamin D has both anti-inflammatory and antiperoxidative activity. Therefore, we aimed to test if vitamin D could reduce the damage caused by exhaustive exercise. Rats were randomized to one of four groups: control, vitamin D, exercise, and vitamin D+exercise. Exercised rats received an intravenous injection of vitamin D (1 ng/mL) or normal saline after exhaustive exercise. Blood pressure, heart rate, and blood samples were collected for biochemical testing. Histological examination and immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses were performed on lungs and kidneys after the animals were sacrificed. In comparison to the exercise group, blood markers of skeletal muscle damage, creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase, were significantly (P < 0.05) lower in the vitamin D+exercise group. The exercise group also had more severe tissue injury scores in the lungs (average of 2.4 ± 0.71) and kidneys (average of 3.3 ± 0.6) than the vitamin D-treated exercise group did (1.08 ± 0.57 and 1.16 ± 0.55). IHC staining showed that vitamin D reduced the oxidative product 4-Hydroxynonenal in exercised animals from 20.6% to 13.8% in the lungs and from 29.4% to 16.7% in the kidneys. In summary, postexercise intravenous injection of vitamin D can reduce the peroxidation induced by exhaustive exercise and ameliorate tissue damage, particularly in the kidneys and lungs. PMID:26941574

  13. Immune Response in a Wild Bird Is Predicted by Oxidative Status, but Does Not Cause Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Cram, Dominic L.; Blount, Jonathan D.; York, Jennifer E.; Young, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    The immune system provides vital protection against pathogens, but extensive evidence suggests that mounting immune responses can entail survival and fecundity costs. The physiological mechanisms that underpin these costs remain poorly understood, despite their potentially important role in shaping life-histories. Recent studies involving laboratory models highlight the possibility that oxidative stress could mediate these costs, as immune-activation can increase the production of reactive oxygen species leading to oxidative stress. However, this hypothesis has rarely been tested in free-ranging wild populations, where natural oxidative statuses and compensatory strategies may moderate immune responses and their impacts on oxidative status. Furthermore, the possibility that individuals scale their immune responses according to their oxidative status, conceivably to mitigate such costs, remains virtually unexplored. Here, we experimentally investigate the effects of a phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) immune-challenge on oxidative status in wild male and female white-browed sparrow weavers, Plocepasser mahali. We also establish whether baseline oxidative status prior to challenge predicts the scale of the immune responses. Contrary to previous work on captive animals, our findings suggest that PHA-induced immune-activation does not elicit oxidative stress. Compared with controls (n = 25 birds), PHA-injected birds (n = 27 birds) showed no evidence of a differential change in markers of oxidative damage or enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant protection 24 hours after challenge. We did, however, find that the activity of a key antioxidant enzyme (superoxide dismutase, SOD) prior to immune-activation predicted the scale of the resulting swelling: birds with stronger initial SOD activity subsequently produced smaller swellings. Our findings (i) suggest that wild birds can mount immune responses without suffering from systemic oxidative stress, and (ii) lend support to

  14. Oxidative Stress Predicts All-Cause Mortality in HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Masiá, Mar; Padilla, Sergio; Fernández, Marta; Rodríguez, Carmen; Moreno, Ana; Oteo, Jose A.; Antela, Antonio; Moreno, Santiago; del Amo, Julia; Gutiérrez, Félix

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to assess whether oxidative stress is a predictor of mortality in HIV-infected patients. Methods We conducted a nested case-control study in CoRIS, a contemporary, multicentre cohort of HIV-infected patients, antiretroviral-naïve at entry, launched in 2004. Cases were patients who died with available stored plasma samples collected. Two age and sex-matched controls for each case were selected. We measured F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs) and malondialdehyde (MDA) plasma levels in the first blood sample obtained after cohort engagement. Results 54 cases and 93 controls were included. Median F2-IsoPs and MDA levels were significantly higher in cases than in controls. When adjustment was performed for age, HIV-transmission category, CD4 cell count and HIV viral load at cohort entry, and subclinical inflammation measured with highly-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP), the association of F2-IsoPs with mortality remained significant (adjusted OR per 1 log10 increase, 2.34 [1.23–4.47], P = 0.009). The association of MDA with mortality was attenuated after adjustment: adjusted OR (95% CI) per 1 log10 increase, 2.05 [0.91–4.59], P = 0.080. Median hsCRP was also higher in cases, and it also proved to be an independent predictor of mortality in the adjusted analysis: OR (95% CI) per 1 log10 increase, 1.39 (1.01–1.91), P = 0.043; and OR (95% CI) per 1 log10 increase, 1.46 (1.07–1.99), P = 0.014, respectively, when adjustment included F2-IsoPs and MDA. Conclusion Oxidative stress is a predictor of all-cause mortality in HIV-infected patients. For plasma F2-IsoPs, this association is independent of HIV-related factors and subclinical inflammation. PMID:27111769

  15. Genetic damage caused by methyl-parathion in mouse spermatozoa is related to oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Pina-Guzman, B.; Solis-Heredia, M.J.; Rojas-Garcia, A.E.; Uriostegui-Acosta, M.; Quintanilla-Vega, B. . E-mail: mquintan@cinvestav.mx

    2006-10-15

    Organophosphorous (OP) pesticides are considered genotoxic mainly to somatic cells, but results are not conclusive. Few studies have reported OP alterations on sperm chromatin and DNA, and oxidative stress has been related to their toxicity. Sperm cells are very sensitive to oxidative damage which has been associated with reproductive dysfunctions. We evaluated the effects of methyl-parathion (Me-Pa; a widely used OP) on sperm DNA, exploring the sensitive stage(s) of spermatogenesis and the relationship with oxidative stress. Male mice (10-12-weeks old) were administered Me-Pa (3-20 mg/kg bw/i.p.) and euthanized at 7- or 28-days post-treatment. Mature spermatozoa were obtained and evaluated for chromatin structure through SCSA (Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay; DNA Fragmentation Index parameters: Mean DFI and DFI%) and chromomycin-A{sub 3} (CMA{sub 3})-staining, for DNA damage through in situ-nick translation (NT-positive) and for oxidative stress through lipid peroxidation (LPO; malondialdehyde production). At 7-days post-treatment (mature spermatozoa when Me-Pa exposure), dose-dependent alterations in chromatin structure (Mean DFI and CMA{sub 3}-staining) were observed, as well as increased DNA damage, from 2-5-fold in DFI% and NT-positive cells. Chromatin alterations and DNA damage were also observed at 28-days post-treatment (cells at meiosis at the time of exposure); suggesting that the damage induced in spermatocytes was not repaired. Positive correlations were observed between LPO and sperm DNA-related parameters. These data suggest that oxidative stress is related to Me-Pa alterations on sperm DNA integrity and cells at meiosis (28-days post-treatment) and epididymal maturation (7-days post-treatment) are Me-Pa targets. These findings suggest a potential risk of Me-Pa to the offspring after transmission.

  16. Staphylococcal response to oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Gaupp, Rosmarie; Ledala, Nagender; Somerville, Greg A.

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococci are a versatile genus of bacteria that are capable of causing acute and chronic infections in diverse host species. The success of staphylococci as pathogens is due in part to their ability to mitigate endogenous and exogenous oxidative and nitrosative stress. Endogenous oxidative stress is a consequence of life in an aerobic environment; whereas, exogenous oxidative and nitrosative stress are often due to the bacteria's interaction with host immune systems. To overcome the deleterious effects of oxidative and nitrosative stress, staphylococci have evolved protection, detoxification, and repair mechanisms that are controlled by a network of regulators. In this review, we summarize the cellular targets of oxidative stress, the mechanisms by which staphylococci sense oxidative stress and damage, oxidative stress protection and repair mechanisms, and regulation of the oxidative stress response. When possible, special attention is given to how the oxidative stress defense mechanisms help staphylococci control oxidative stress in the host. PMID:22919625

  17. Role of calreticulin in the sensitivity of myocardiac H9c2 cells to oxidative stress caused by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Yoshito; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Kondo, Takahito

    2006-01-01

    Calreticulin (CRT), a Ca2+-binding molecular chaperone in the endoplasmic reticulum, plays a vital role in cardiac physiology and pathology. Oxidative stress is a main cause of myocardiac apoptosis in the ischemic heart, but the function of CRT under oxidative stress is not fully understood. In the present study, the effect of overexpression of CRT on susceptibility to apoptosis under oxidative stress was examined using myocardiac H9c2 cells transfected with the CRT gene. Under oxidative stress due to H2O2, the CRT-overexpressing cells were highly susceptible to apoptosis compared with controls. In the overexpressing cells, the levels of cytoplasmic free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) were significantly increased by H2O2, whereas in controls, only a slight increase was observed. The H2O2-induced apoptosis was enhanced by the increase in [Ca2+]i caused by thapsigargin in control cells but was suppressed by BAPTA-AM, a cell-permeable Ca2+ chelator in the CRT-overexpressing cells, indicating the importance of the level of [Ca2+]i in the sensitivity to H2O2-induced apoptosis. Suppression of CRT by the introduction of the antisense cDNA of CRT enhanced cytoprotection against oxidative stress compared with controls. Furthermore, we found that the levels of activity of calpain and caspase-12 were elevated through the regulation of [Ca2+]i in the CRT-overexpressing cells treated with H2O2 compared with controls. Thus we conclude that the level of CRT regulates the sensitivity to apoptosis under oxidative stress due to H2O2 through a change in Ca2+ homeostasis and the regulation of the Ca2+-calpain-caspase-12 pathway in myocardiac cells. PMID:16135540

  18. Induction of oxidative stress causes functional alterations in mouse urothelium via a TRPM8-mediated mechanism: implications for aging

    PubMed Central

    Nocchi, Linda; Daly, Donna M; Chapple, Christopher; Grundy, David

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of bladder conditions such as overactive bladder syndrome and its associated urinary incontinence is highly prevalent in the elderly. However, the mechanisms underlying these disorders are unclear. Studies suggest that the urothelium forms a ‘sensory network’ with the underlying innervation, alterations in which, could compromise bladder function. As the accumulation of reactive oxygen species can cause functional alterations with age, the aim of this study was to investigate whether oxidative stress alters urothelial sensory signalling and whether the mechanism underlying the effect of oxidative stress on the urothelium plays a role in aging. Five-month-old(young) and 24-month-old (aged) mice were used. H2O2, used to induce oxidative stress, resulted in an increase in bladder afferent nerve activity and urothelial intracellular calcium in preparations from young mice. These functional changes were concurrent with upregulation of TRPM8 in the urothelium. Moreover, application of a TRPM8 antagonist significantly attenuated the H2O2-induced calcium responses. Interestingly, an upregulation of TRPM8 was also found in the urothelium from aged mice, where high oxidative stress levels were observed, together with a greater calcium response to the TRPM8 agonist WS12. Furthermore, these calcium responses were attenuated by pretreatment with the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine. This study shows that oxidative stress affects urothelial function involving a TRPM8-mediated mechanism and these effects may have important implications for aging. These data provide an insight into the possible mechanisms by which oxidative stress causes physiological alterations in the bladder, which may also occur in other organs susceptible to aging. PMID:24593692

  19. Rosiglitazone causes cardiotoxicity via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ-independent mitochondrial oxidative stress in mouse hearts.

    PubMed

    He, Huamei; Tao, Hai; Xiong, Hui; Duan, Sheng Zhong; McGowan, Francis X; Mortensen, Richard M; Balschi, James A

    2014-04-01

    This study aims to test the hypothesis that thiazolidinedione rosiglitazone (RSG), a selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonist, causes cardiotoxicity independently of PPARγ. Energy metabolism and mitochondrial function were measured in perfused hearts isolated from C57BL/6, cardiomyocyte-specific PPARγ-deficient mice, and their littermates. Cardiac function and mitochondrial oxidative stress were measured in both in vitro and in vivo settings. Treatment of isolated hearts with RSG at the supratherapeutic concentrations of 10 and 30 μM caused myocardial energy deficiency as evidenced by the decreases in [PCr], [ATP], ATP/ADP ratio, energy charge with a concomitant cardiac dysfunction as indicated by the decreases in left ventricular systolic pressure, rates of tension development and relaxation, and by an increase in end-diastolic pressure. When incubated with tissue homogenate or isolated mitochondria at these same concentrations, RSG caused mitochondrial dysfunction as evidenced by the decreases in respiration rate, substrate oxidation rates, and activities of complexes I and IV. RSG also increased complexes I- and III-dependent O₂⁻ production, decreased glutathione content, inhibited superoxide dismutase, and increased the levels of malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl, and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine in mitochondria, consistent with oxidative stress. N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) 20 mM prevented RSG-induced above toxicity at those in vitro settings. Cardiomyocyte-specific PPARγ deletion and PPARγ antagonist GW9662 did not prevent the observed cardiotoxicity. Intravenous injection of 10 mg/kg RSG also caused cardiac dysfunction and oxidative stress, 600 mg/kg NAC antagonized these adverse effects. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that RSG at supratherapeutic concentrations causes cardiotoxicity via a PPARγ-independent mechanism involving oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in mouse hearts. PMID:24449420

  20. High efficiency versus maximal performance--the cause of oxidative stress in eukaryotes: a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Kadenbach, Bernhard; Ramzan, Rabia; Vogt, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Degenerative diseases are in part based on elevated production of ROS (reactive oxygen species) in mitochondria, mainly during stress and excessive work under stress (strenuous exercise). The production of ROS increases with increasing mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ(m)). A mechanism is described which is suggested to keep ΔΨ(m) at low values under normal conditions thus preventing ROS formation, but is switched off under stress and excessive work to maximize the rate of ATP synthesis, accompanied by decreased efficiency. Low ΔΨ(m) and low ROS production are suggested to occur by inhibition of respiration at high [ATP]/[ADP] ratios. The nucleotides interact with phosphorylated cytochrome c oxidase (COX), representing the step with the highest flux-control coefficient of mitochondrial respiration. At stress and excessive work neural signals are suggested to dephosphorylate the enzyme and abolish the control of COX activity (respiration) by the [ATP]/[ADP] ratio with consequent increase of ΔΨ(m) and ROS production. The control of COX by the [ATP]/[ADP] ratio, in addition, is proposed to increase the efficiency of ATP production via a third proton pumping pathway, identified in eukaryotic but not in prokaryotic COX. We conclude that 'oxidative stress' occurs when the control of COX activity by the [ATP]/[ADP] ratio is switched off via neural signals. PMID:23178790

  1. Regulation of influenza virus-caused oxidative stress by Kegan Liyan oral prescription, as monitored by ascorbyl radical ESR signals.

    PubMed

    Duan, Shaojin; Gu, Lizhen; Wang, Yanyun; Zheng, Rongbo; Lu, Jingfen; Yin, Junjie; Guli, Laowa; Ball, Michele

    2009-01-01

    To study the oxidative stress level of the influenza virus A FM1 subset-infected mouse in intranasal inhalation as a model, we employ an ascorbyl radical's ESR (electron spin resonance) spectrum as an oxidative stress biomarker. These infected mice were pretreated with Ribavirin, ascorbic acid, superoxide dismutase (SOD) or Kegan Liyan oral prescription (KGLY, proprietary Chinese medicine for influenza and common cold) in the stomach tube for 3 days, and then followed by the virus-infecting for 4 days. On the 4th day, samples were collected. It is recognized the strength of ascorbyl radical's ESR signal (A(-.)) (a(H4 = 0.177) Gauss, g = 2.00517) denotes oxidative stress level in vivo and in vitro. The magnitude of ESR spectrum (28.65 +/- 10.71 AU) in mice infected with influenza virus was significantly higher than those of healthy control mice (19.10 +/- 3.61 AU). Serum A(-.) in mice treated with Ribavirin, ascorbic acid, SOD and KGLY declined to 19.70 +/- 6.05, 18.50 +/- 2.93 and 16.25 +/- 3.59, 18.40 +/- 2.14 AU respectively. It is close to A(-.) signal height in healthy controls via down-regulation of the influenza virus-caused oxidative stress level getting decline in the lung index of pneumonia as compare to those of untreated healthy and the influenza virus infected mice pneumonia. It is well known that SOD can prevent the influenza virus pneumonia enhancing mouse survival rate; Ribavirin can treat viral diseases. Data from this study suggested that KGLY may indirectly relieve influenza virus-infected pneumonia via down- regulation of virus caused oxidative stress coupled with a redox reaction cascade as ribavirin, ascorbic acid and SOD. PMID:19938224

  2. Promoted megakaryocytic differentiation of K562 cells through oxidative stress caused by near ultraviolet irradiation.

    PubMed

    Nurhayati, Retno Wahyu; Ojima, Yoshihiro; Nomura, Naoki; Taya, Masahito

    2014-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been proven to be important activators for various cellular activities, including cell differentiation. Several reports showed the necessity of ROS during cell differentiation of the megakaryocytic (MK) lineage. In this study, we employed near ultraviolet (near-UV) irradiation to generate endogenous oxidative stress in an MK differentiation process of K562 cells with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) induction. A significant increase in the intracellular ROS level was detected on day 1 after near-UV irradiation. In the initial stage of differentiation, a shifted fraction of G1 and G2 phase cells was obtained using near-UV irradiation, giving an increased percentage of G2 phase cells (up from 31.1 to 68.7%). The near-UV irradiation-induced upregulation of the p21 gene, which is a cell cycle inhibitor, suggested that the G2 phase cells were prevented from undergoing cell division. It was found that the percentage of high ploidy (8N and 16N) cells was enhanced significantly at the later stage of the K562 cell culture with near-UV irradiation. Moreover, time-lapse analysis showed that near-UV irradiation encouraged the expression of CD41, a specific surface marker of megakaryocytes. This is the first report that the elevated oxidative stress through the near-UV irradiation promoted the MK differentiation of PMA-induced K562 cells. PMID:25338769

  3. Azoxystrobin causes oxidative stress and DNA damage in the aquatic macrophyte Myriophyllum quitense.

    PubMed

    Garanzini, Daniela S; Menone, Mirta L

    2015-02-01

    Among the search for new types of pesticides, the fungicide azoxystrobin (AZX) was the first patent of the strobilurin compounds, entering in the market in 1996. Its use worldwide is growing, mainly linked to soybean production, although its effects in non-target organisms are almost unknown. The goal of the present work was to evaluate effects of short-term AZX exposure to the aquatic macrophyte Myriophyllum quitense, focusing on oxidative stress parameters and DNA fragmentation. Significant inhibition of the antioxidant enzyme systems were observed at 50 μg/L AZX for catalase and peroxidase (p < 0.05). Lipid and DNA damage were significant at 50 and 100 μg/L AZX. These biomarkers were sensitive to AZX and can be used in a battery to evaluate the occurrence of AZX in freshwater ecosystems. PMID:25416866

  4. Diluted bitumen causes deformities and molecular responses indicative of oxidative stress in Japanese medaka embryos.

    PubMed

    Madison, Barry N; Hodson, P V; Langlois, V S

    2015-08-01

    This study characterized the toxicity and physiological effects of unweathered diluted bitumen (Access Western Blend dilbit; AWB) to fish. Embryos of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) were exposed for 17 days to dilutions of physically-dispersed (water accommodated fraction; WAF) and chemically-dispersed (chemically-enhanced WAF; CEWAF) dilbit. AWB dilbit exposure was not lethal to medaka, but resulted in a high prevalence of blue sac disease (BSD), impaired development, and abnormal or un-inflated swim bladders at hatch. Physiological effects were indicated by the relative mRNA levels of key genes associated with, among others, cell cycling and the response to mutations (p53), xenobiotic metabolism (ahr, arnt2), phase I (cyp1a) and II processes associated with oxidative stress (cat, g6pdh, hsp70, gst, gpx, gsr, nfe2, and sod). AWB dilbit treatment increased p53 and cyp1a transcript levels (1.5-fold and >15-fold, respectively), with significant, but less pronounced changes in indicators of oxidative stress and metabolism. The exposure-related changes in embryotoxicity and mRNA synthesis were consistent with metabolism of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to reactive and toxic metabolites. Medaka embryos responded similarly to WAF and CEWAF treatments, but CEWAF was about 100 times more efficient in delivering toxic concentrations of PAHs. The toxicity of chemically-dispersed nujol, a non-toxic mineral oil used as an experimental control, suggested that a portion of the observed effects of AWB could be attributed to excess dispersant in solution. This first study of the physiological effects of dilbit toxicity to fish embryos provides a baseline to compare toxicity between dilbit and conventional crude oils, and the groundwork for the development of molecular biomarkers of the sensitivity and level of risk of native Canadian fish species to dilbit exposure. PMID:26118968

  5. [Enhanced Resistance of Pea Plants to Oxidative: Stress Caused by Paraquat during Colonization by Aerobic Methylobacteria].

    PubMed

    Agafonova, N V; Doronina, N Y; Trotsenko, Yu A

    2016-01-01

    The influence of colonization of the pea (Pisum sativum L.) by aerobic methylobacteria of five different species (Methylophilus flavus Ship, Methylobacterium extorquens G10, Methylobacillus arboreus Iva, Methylopila musalis MUSA, Methylopila turkiensis Sidel) on plant resistance to paraquat-induced stresses has been studied. The normal conditions of pea colonization by methylobacteria were characterized by a decrease in the activity of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and peroxidases) and in the concentrations of endogenous H2O2, proline, and malonic dialdehyde, which is a product of lipid peroxidation and indicator of damage to plant cell membranes, and an increase in the activity of the photosynthetic apparatus (the content of chlorophylls a, b and carotenoids). In the presence of paraquat, the colonized plants had higher activities of antioxidant enzymes, stable photosynthetic indices, and a less intensive accumulation of the products of lipid peroxidation as compared to noncolonized plants. Thus, colonization by methylobacteria considerably increased the adaptive protection of pea plants to the paraquat-induced oxidative stress. PMID:27266250

  6. A Molecular Rotor that Measures Dynamic Changes of Lipid Bilayer Viscosity Caused by Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Vyšniauskas, Aurimas; Qurashi, Maryam; Kuimova, Marina K

    2016-09-01

    Oxidation of cellular structures is typically an undesirable process that can be a hallmark of certain diseases. On the other hand, photooxidation is a necessary step of photodynamic therapy (PDT), a cancer treatment causing cell death upon light irradiation. Here, the effect of photooxidation on the microscopic viscosity of model lipid bilayers constructed of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine has been studied. A molecular rotor has been employed that displays a viscosity-dependent fluorescence lifetime as a quantitative probe of the bilayer's viscosity. Thus, spatially-resolved viscosity maps of lipid photooxidation in giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) were obtained, testing the effect of the positioning of the oxidant relative to the rotor in the bilayer. It was found that PDT has a strong impact on viscoelastic properties of lipid bilayers, which 'travels' through the bilayer to areas that have not been irradiated directly. A dramatic difference in viscoelastic properties of oxidized GUVs by Type I (electron transfer) and Type II (singlet oxygen-based) photosensitisers was also detected. PMID:27487026

  7. Auranofin-induced oxidative stress causes redistribution of the glutathione pool in Taenia crassiceps cysticerci.

    PubMed

    Martínez-González, J J; Guevara-Flores, A; Rendón, J L; del Arenal, I P

    2015-05-01

    Previously, we have studied the effect of the gold-compound auranofin (AF) on both thioredoxin-glutathione reductasa (TGR) activity and viability of Taenia crassiceps cysticerci. It was demonstrated that micromolar concentrations of AF were high enough to fully inhibit TGR and kill the parasites. In this work, the dynamics of changes in the glutathione pool of T. crassiceps cysticerci following the addition of AF, was analyzed. A dose-dependent decrease in the internal glutathione concentration, concomitant with an increase in ROS production was observed. These changes were simultaneous with the formation of glutathione-protein complexes and the export of glutathione disulfide (GSSG) to the culture medium. Incubation of cysticerci in the presence of both AF and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) prevents all the above changes, maintaining cysticerci viability. By contrast, the presence of both AF and buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) resulted in a potentiation of the effects of the gold compound, jeopardizing cysticerci viability. These results suggest the lethal effect of AF on T. crassiceps cysticerci, observed at micromolar concentrations, can be explained as a consequence of major changes in the glutathione status, which results in a significant increase in the oxidative stress of the parasites. PMID:26024834

  8. Ongoing Oxidative Stress Causes Subclinical Neuronal Dysfunction in the Recovery Phase of EAE

    PubMed Central

    Radbruch, Helena; Bremer, Daniel; Guenther, Robert; Cseresnyes, Zoltan; Lindquist, Randall; Hauser, Anja E.; Niesner, Raluca

    2016-01-01

    Most multiple sclerosis (MS) patients develop over time a secondary progressive disease course, characterized histologically by axonal loss and atrophy. In early phases of the disease, focal inflammatory demyelination leads to functional impairment, but the mechanism of chronic progression in MS is still under debate. Reactive oxygen species generated by invading and resident central nervous system (CNS) macrophages have been implicated in mediating demyelination and axonal damage, but demyelination and neurodegeneration proceed even in the absence of obvious immune cell infiltration, during clinical recovery in chronic MS. Here, we employ intravital NAD(P)H fluorescence lifetime imaging to detect functional NADPH oxidases (NOX1–4, DUOX1, 2) and, thus, to identify the cellular source of oxidative stress in the CNS of mice affected by experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in the remission phase of the disease. This directly affects neuronal function in vivo, as monitored by cellular calcium levels using intravital FRET–FLIM, providing a possible mechanism of disease progression in MS. PMID:27014271

  9. Sustainable inflammation transforms hepatic cells by causing oxidative stress injury and potential epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kun; Liu, Guoyan; Yang, Ling; Liu, Fan; Gao, Libin; Shi, Jingxian; Deng, Xiaoling; Li, Qifu; Xu, Donghui; Shi, Songlin

    2016-09-01

    The inflammatory microenvironment promotes tumorigenesis. However, the mechanism through which inflammation transforms hepatic cells in precancerous lesions remains unclear. Hepatic cells undergo significant changes in metabolism before carcinogenesis, but the specific alterations in gene expression and cellular functions in response to precancerous inflammation have not been elucidated. In this study, a hepatitis-hepatoma mouse model was successfully established. Label-free quantitative (LFQ) proteomics coupled with bioinformatics analysis was then performed to identify differentially expressed proteins and their functions in hepatic cells with precancerous inflammation. We found that different chemical treatments induced several common changes in the model. Hepatic cells underwent serious oxidative stress injury. Canonical pathway analysis using IPA revealed the activation of signaling pathways, such as integrin signaling, signaling by Rho family GTPases, IL-8 signaling, and ILK signaling, as well as the inhibition of RhoGDI signaling. Analysis of the KEGG pathway indicated alteration in the pathways for focal adhesion and regulation of actin cytoskeleton. Results from western blot analysis demonstrated the upregulation of proteins, including p-STAT3, TWIST, SNAIL, Vimentin, and MMP-9, which are involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). These results indicated that hepatic cells were likely to undergo EMT. Interestingly, the expression of E-cadherin was upregulated, but this observation must be further investigated. In conclusion, the results revealed that notable functional and pathway changes occurred during the precancerous inflammation stage in the liver. Our study contributes to understanding of the roles of inflammation in tumorigenesis and provides a molecular basis for further studies on the tumorigenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:27315196

  10. The brominated flame retardant BDE-47 causes oxidative stress and apoptotic cell death in vitro and in vivo in mice

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Lucio G.; Pellacani, Claudia; Dao, Khoi; Kavanagh, Terrance J.; Roque, Pamela J.

    2015-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), used for decades as flame retardants, have become widespread environmental contaminants. Exposure is believed to occur primarily through diet and dust, and infants and toddlers have the highest body burden, raising concern for potential developmental neurotoxicity. The exact mechanisms of PBDE neurotoxicity have not been elucidated, but two relevant modes of action relate to impairment of thyroid hormone homeostasis and to direct effects on brain cells causing alterations in signal transduction, oxidative stress and apoptotic cell death. The present study shows that BDE-47 (2,2′,4,4′-tetrabromodiphenyl ether) induces oxidative stress and ensuing apoptotic cell death in mouse cerebellar granule neurons in vitro. Similarly, in vivo administration of BDE-47, according to an exposure protocol shown to induce behavioral and biochemical alterations (10 mg/kg, per os on post-natal day 10), induces oxidative stress and apoptosis, without altering serum levels of thyroid hormones. The effects of BDE-47 both in vitro and in vivo were more pronounced in a mouse model lacking the modifier subunit of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCLM) which results in reduced anti-oxidant capability due to low levels of GSH. Concentrations of BDE-47 in brain were in the mid-nanomolar range. These findings indicate that effects observed with BDE-47 in vitro are also present after in vivo administration, suggesting that in addition to potential endocrine effects, which were not seen here, direct interactions with brain cells should be considered as a potential mechanism of BDE-47 neurotoxicity. PMID:25797475

  11. Mechanism Profiling of Hepatotoxicity Caused by Oxidative Stress Using Antioxidant Response Element Reporter Gene Assay Models and Big Data

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Marlene Thai; Huang, Ruili; Sedykh, Alexander; Wang, Wenyi; Xia, Menghang; Zhu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hepatotoxicity accounts for a substantial number of drugs being withdrawn from the market. Using traditional animal models to detect hepatotoxicity is expensive and time-consuming. Alternative in vitro methods, in particular cell-based high-throughput screening (HTS) studies, have provided the research community with a large amount of data from toxicity assays. Among the various assays used to screen potential toxicants is the antioxidant response element beta lactamase reporter gene assay (ARE-bla), which identifies chemicals that have the potential to induce oxidative stress and was used to test > 10,000 compounds from the Tox21 program. Objective: The ARE-bla computational model and HTS data from a big data source (PubChem) were used to profile environmental and pharmaceutical compounds with hepatotoxicity data. Methods: Quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) models were developed based on ARE-bla data. The models predicted the potential oxidative stress response for known liver toxicants when no ARE-bla data were available. Liver toxicants were used as probe compounds to search PubChem Bioassay and generate a response profile, which contained thousands of bioassays (> 10 million data points). By ranking the in vitro–in vivo correlations (IVIVCs), the most relevant bioassay(s) related to hepatotoxicity were identified. Results: The liver toxicants profile contained the ARE-bla and relevant PubChem assays. Potential toxicophores for well-known toxicants were created by identifying chemical features that existed only in compounds with high IVIVCs. Conclusion: Profiling chemical IVIVCs created an opportunity to fully explore the source-to-outcome continuum of modern experimental toxicology using cheminformatics approaches and big data sources. Citation: Kim MT, Huang R, Sedykh A, Wang W, Xia M, Zhu H. 2016. Mechanism profiling of hepatotoxicity caused by oxidative stress using antioxidant response element reporter gene assay models and

  12. Cysteine Depletion Causes Oxidative Stress and Triggers Outer Membrane Vesicle Release by Neisseria meningitidis; Implications for Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    van de Waterbeemd, Bas; Zomer, Gijsbert; van den IJssel, Jan; van Keulen, Lonneke; Eppink, Michel H.; van der Ley, Peter; van der Pol, Leo A.

    2013-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMV) contain immunogenic proteins and contribute to in vivo survival and virulence of bacterial pathogens. The first OMV vaccines successfully stopped Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B outbreaks but required detergent-extraction for endotoxin removal. Current vaccines use attenuated endotoxin, to preserve immunological properties and allow a detergent-free process. The preferred process is based on spontaneously released OMV (sOMV), which are most similar to in vivo vesicles and easier to purify. The release mechanism however is poorly understood resulting in low yield. This study with N. meningitidis demonstrates that an external stimulus, cysteine depletion, can trigger growth arrest and sOMV release in sufficient quantities for vaccine production (±1500 human doses per liter cultivation). Transcriptome analysis suggests that cysteine depletion impairs iron-sulfur protein assembly and causes oxidative stress. Involvement of oxidative stress is confirmed by showing that addition of reactive oxygen species during cysteine-rich growth also triggers vesiculation. The sOMV in this study are similar to vesicles from natural infection, therefore cysteine-dependent vesiculation is likely to be relevant for the in vivo pathogenesis of N. meningitidis. PMID:23372704

  13. Oxidative Stress in Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Percário, Sandro; Moreira, Danilo R.; Gomes, Bruno A. Q.; Ferreira, Michelli E. S.; Gonçalves, Ana Carolina M.; Laurindo, Paula S. O. C.; Vilhena, Thyago C.; Dolabela, Maria F.; Green, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Malaria is a significant public health problem in more than 100 countries and causes an estimated 200 million new infections every year. Despite the significant effort to eradicate this dangerous disease, lack of complete knowledge of its physiopathology compromises the success in this enterprise. In this paper we review oxidative stress mechanisms involved in the disease and discuss the potential benefits of antioxidant supplementation as an adjuvant antimalarial strategy. PMID:23208374

  14. [Cyclosporin A causes oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in renal tubular cells].

    PubMed

    Pérez de Hornedo, J; de Arriba, G; Calvino, M; Benito, S; Parra, T

    2007-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in cyclosporin A (CsA) nephrotoxicity. As mitochondria are one of the main sources of ROS in cells, we evaluated the role of CsA in mitochondrial structure and function in LLC-PK1 cells. We incubated cells with CsA 1 microM for 24 hours and studies were performed with flow citometry and confocal microscopy. We studied mitochondrial NAD(P)H content, superoxide anion (O2.-) production (MitoSOX Red), oxidation of cardiolipin of inner mitochondrial membrane (NAO) and mitochondrial membrane potential (DIOC2(3)). Also we analyzed the intracellular ROS synthesis (H2DCF-DA) and reduced glutation (GSH) of cells. Our results showed that CsA decreased NAD(P)H and membrane potential, and increased O2.- in mitochondria. CsA also provoked oxidation of cardiolipin. Furthermore, CsA increased intracellular ROS production and decreased GSH content. These results suggest that CsA has crucial effects in mitochondria. CsA modified mitochondrial physiology through the decrease of antioxidant mitochondrial compounds as NAD(P)H and the dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential and increase of oxidants as O2.-. Also, CsA alters lipidic structure of inner mitochondrial membrane through the oxidation of cardiolipin. These effects trigger a chain of events that favour intracellular synthesis of ROS and depletion of GSH that can compromise cellular viability. Nephrotoxic cellular effects of CsA can be explained, at least in part, through its influence on mitochondrial functionalism. PMID:18045032

  15. [Proteinase-proteinase inhibitor complex in rats under oxidative stress caused by administration of cobalt chloride].

    PubMed

    Kaliman, P A; Samokhin, A A; Samokhina, L M

    2000-01-01

    Mechanisms of proteinase-inhibitor proteinase system response was estimated following of cobalt chloride injection. The increase proteinase activity, which led to significant decrease of alpha-2-macroglobulin (alpha-2-MG) level was established that indicated to the removal of the proteinase in complex with alpha-2-MG from the organism. Increase of alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha-1-PI) trypsin-inhibitory activity in the kidneys testify about removal of oxidative alpha-1-PI. PMID:10979565

  16. Oxidative stress by inorganic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tee, Jie Kai; Ong, Choon Nam; Bay, Boon Huat; Ho, Han Kiat; Leong, David Tai

    2016-05-01

    Metallic and metallic oxide nanoparticles (NPs) have been increasingly used for various bio-applications owing to their unique physiochemical properties in terms of conductivity, optical sensitivity, and reactivity. With the extensive usage of NPs, increased human exposure may cause oxidative stress and lead to undesirable health consequences. To date, various endogenous and exogenous sources of oxidants contributing to oxidative stress have been widely reported. Oxidative stress is generally defined as an imbalance between the production of oxidants and the activity of antioxidants, but it is often misrepresented as a single type of cellular stress. At the biological level, NPs can initiate oxidative stress directly or indirectly through various mechanisms, leading to profound effects ranging from the molecular to the disease level. Such effects of oxidative stress have been implicated owing to their small size and high biopersistence. On the other hand, cellular antioxidants help to counteract oxidative stress and protect the cells from further damage. While oxidative stress is commonly known to exert negative biological effects, measured and intentional use of NPs to induce oxidative stress may provide desirable effects to either stimulate cell growth or promote cell death. Hence, NP-induced oxidative stress can be viewed from a wide paradigm. Because oxidative stress is comprised of a wide array of factors, it is also important to use appropriate assays and methods to detect different pro-oxidant and antioxidant species at molecular and disease levels. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:414-438. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1374 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26359790

  17. Assessment at the Single-Cell Level Identifies Neuronal Glutathione Depletion As Both a Cause and Effect of Ischemia-Reperfusion Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Eun; Cittolin-Santos, Giordano Fabricio; Swanson, Raymond A.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to neuronal death in brain ischemia-reperfusion. Tissue levels of the endogenous antioxidant glutathione (GSH) are depleted during ischemia-reperfusion, but it is unknown whether this depletion is a cause or an effect of oxidative stress, and whether it occurs in neurons or other cell types. We used immunohistochemical methods to evaluate glutathione, superoxide, and oxidative stress in mouse hippocampal neurons after transient forebrain ischemia. GSH levels in CA1 pyramidal neurons were normally high relative to surrounding neuropil, and exhibited a time-dependent decrease during the first few hours of reperfusion. Colabeling for superoxide in the neurons showed a concurrent increase in detectable superoxide over this interval. To identify cause–effect relationships between these changes, we independently manipulated superoxide production and GSH metabolism during reperfusion. Mice in which NADPH oxidase activity was blocked to prevent superoxide production showed preservation of neuronal GSH content, thus demonstrating that neuronal GSH depletion is result of oxidative stress. Conversely, mice in which neuronal GSH levels were maintained by N-acetyl cysteine treatment during reperfusion showed less neuronal superoxide signal, oxidative stress, and neuronal death. At 3 d following ischemia, GSH content in reactive astrocytes and microglia was increased in the hippocampal CA1 relative to surviving neurons. Results of these studies demonstrate that neuronal GSH depletion is both a result and a cause of neuronal oxidative stress after ischemia-reperfusion, and that postischemic restoration of neuronal GSH levels can be neuroprotective. PMID:25948264

  18. The p53/HSP70 inhibitor, 2-phenylethynesulfonamide, causes oxidative stress, unfolded protein response and apoptosis in rainbow trout cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Fanxing; Tee, Catherine; Liu, Michelle; Sherry, James P; Dixon, Brian; Duncker, Bernard P; Bols, Niels C

    2014-01-01

    The effect of 2-phenylethynesulfonamide (PES), which is a p53 and HSP70 inhibitor in mammalian cells, was studied on the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) gill epithelial cell line, RTgill-W1, in order to evaluate PES as a tool for understanding the cellular survival pathways operating in fish. As judged by three viability assays, fish cells were killed by 24h exposures to PES, but cell death was blocked by the anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Cell death had several hallmarks of apoptosis: DNA laddering, nuclear fragmentation, Annexin V staining, mitochondrial membrane potential decline, and caspases activation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production peaked in several hours after the addition of PES and before cell death. HSP70 and BiP levels were higher in cultures treated with PES for 24h, but this was blocked by NAC. As well, PES treatment caused HSP70, BiP and p53 to accumulate in the detergent-insoluble fraction, and this too was prevented by NAC. Of several possible scenarios to explain the results, the following one is the simplest. PES enhances the generation of ROS, possibly by inhibiting the anti-oxidant actions of p53 and HSP70. ER stress arises from the ROS and from PES inhibiting the chaperone activities of HSP70. The ER stress in turn initiates the unfolded protein response (UPR), but this fails to restore ER homeostasis so proteins aggregate and cells die. Despite these multiple actions, PES should be useful for studying fish cellular survival pathways. PMID:24270669

  19. Women are more susceptible than men to oxidative stress and chromosome damage caused by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons exposure.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huan; Huang, Kun; Zhang, Xiao; Zhang, Wangzhen; Guan, Lei; Kuang, Dan; Deng, Qifei; Deng, Huaxin; Zhang, Xiaomin; He, Meian; Christiani, David; Wu, Tangchun

    2014-07-01

    Exposure to environmental polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has been associated with increased risk of cancer, but evidence for gender differences in this association is limited. The aim of this study was to examine the gender differences in PAHs caused early genotoxic effects such as oxidative stress and chromosome damage, which are potential carcinogenic etiology of PAHs. A total of 478 nonsmoking workers (272 men and 206 women) from a coke oven plant were recruited. We determined 16 environmental PAHs in their workplaces, and measured concentrations of 12 urinary PAH metabolites (OH-PAHs), plasma benzo[a]pyrene-r-7,t-8,t-9,c-10-tetrahydotetrol-albumin (BPDE-Alb) adducts, urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and 8-iso-prostaglandin-F2α (8-iso-PGF2α), and micronucleus frequencies in lymphocytes in all subjects. It showed that, women working at the office, adjacent to the coke oven, and on the bottom or side of the coke oven displayed significantly higher levels of urinary 8-OHdG and 8-iso-PGF2α, and lymphocytic micronucleus frequencies compared with men working at above areas, respectively (all P < 0.05). These gender differences remain significant after adjusted for potential confounders and urinary ΣOH-PAHs or plasma BPDE-Alb adducts. A significant interaction existed between gender and BPDE-Alb adducts on increasing micronucleus frequencies (Pinteraction  < 0.001). We further stratified all workers by the tertiles of urinary ΣOH-PAHs or plasma BPDE-Alb adducts, and the above gender differences were more evident in the median- and high-exposure groups (all P < 0.05). In conclusion, women were more susceptible than men to oxidative stress and chromosome damage induced by PAHs, which may add potential evidence underlying gender differences in PAH exposure-related lung cacinogenesis. PMID:24668722

  20. Oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Durany, Nuria

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a progressive dementia affecting a large proportion of the aging population. The histopathological changes in AD include neuronal cell death, formation of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. There is also evidence that brain tissue in patients with AD is exposed to oxidative stress (e.g., protein oxidation, lipid oxidation, DNA oxidation and glycoxidation) during the course of the disease. Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) are present in amyloid plaques in AD, and its extracellular accumulation may be caused by an accelerated oxidation of glycated proteins. AGEs participate in neuronal death causing direct (chemical) and indirect (cellular) free radical production and consequently increase oxidative stress. The development of drugs for the treatment of AD that breaks the vicious cycles of oxidative stress and neurodegeneration offer new opportunities. These approaches include AGE-inhibitors, antioxidants and anti-inflammatory substances, which prevent free radical production. PMID:19372765

  1. Oxidative DNA damage caused by inflammation may link to stress-induced non-targeted effects

    PubMed Central

    Sprung, Carl N.; Ivashkevich, Alesia; Forrester, Helen B.; Redon, Christophe E.; Georgakilas, Alexandros; Martin, Olga A.

    2013-01-01

    A spectrum of radiation-induced non-targeted effects has been reported during the last two decades since Nagasawa and Little first described a phenomenon in cultured cells that was later called the “bystander effect”. These non-targeted effects include radiotherapy-related abscopal effects, where changes in organs or tissues occur distant from the irradiated region. The spectrum of non-targeted effects continue to broaden over time and now embrace many types of exogenous and endogenous stressors that induce a systemic genotoxic response including a widely studied tumor microenvironment. Here we discuss processes and factors leading to DNA damage induction in non-targeted cells and tissues and highlight similarities in the regulation of systemic effects caused by different stressors. PMID:24041866

  2. Deficiency of methionine sulfoxide reductase A causes cellular dysfunction and mitochondrial damage in cardiac myocytes under physical and oxidative stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Nan, Changlong; Li, Yuejin; Jean-Charles, Pierre-Yves; Chen, Guozhen; Kreymerman, Alexander; Prentice, Howard; Weissbach, Herbert; Huang, Xupei

    2010-11-26

    Research highlights: {yields} Deficiency of MsrA in the heart renders myocardial cells more sensitive to oxidative stress. {yields} Mitochondrial damage happens in the heart lacking MsrA. {yields} More protein oxidation in myocardial cells lacking MsrA. {yields} MsrA protects the heart against oxidative stress. -- Abstract: Methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MsrA) is an enzyme that reverses oxidation of methionine in proteins. Using a MsrA gene knockout (MsrA{sup -/-}) mouse model, we have investigated the role of MsrA in the heart. Our data indicate that cellular contractility and cardiac function are not significantly changed in MsrA{sup -/-} mice if the hearts are not stressed. However, the cellular contractility, when stressed using a higher stimulation frequency (2 Hz), is significantly reduced in MsrA{sup -/-} cardiac myocytes. MsrA{sup -/-} cardiac myocytes also show a significant decrease in contractility after oxidative stress using H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Corresponding changes in Ca{sup 2+} transients are observed in MsrA{sup -/-} cardiomyocytes treated with 2 Hz stimulation or with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Electron microscope analyses reveal a dramatic morphological change of mitochondria in MsrA{sup -/-} mouse hearts. Further biochemical measurements indicate that protein oxidation levels in MsrA{sup -/-} mouse hearts are significantly higher than those in wild type controls. Our study demonstrates that the lack of MsrA in cardiac myocytes reduces myocardial cell's capability against stress stimulations resulting in a cellular dysfunction in the heart.

  3. BRCA1 and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Yong Weon; Kang, Hyo Jin; Bae, Insoo

    2014-01-01

    The breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) has been well established as a tumor suppressor and functions primarily by maintaining genome integrity. Genome stability is compromised when cells are exposed to oxidative stress. Increasing evidence suggests that BRCA1 regulates oxidative stress and this may be another mechanism in preventing carcinogenesis in normal cells. Oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) is implicated in carcinogenesis and is used strategically to treat human cancer. Thus, it is essential to understand the function of BRCA1 in oxidative stress regulation. In this review, we briefly summarize BRCA1’s many binding partners and mechanisms, and discuss data supporting the function of BRCA1 in oxidative stress regulation. Finally, we consider its significance in prevention and/or treatment of BRCA1-related cancers. PMID:24704793

  4. Oxidative Stress in Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, Bosch-Morell; Salvador, Mérida; Amparo, Navea

    2015-01-01

    Myopia affected approximately 1.6 billion people worldwide in 2000, and it is expected to increase to 2.5 billion by 2020. Although optical problems can be corrected by optics or surgical procedures, normal myopia and high myopia are still an unsolved medical problem. They frequently predispose people who have them to suffer from other eye pathologies: retinal detachment, glaucoma, macular hemorrhage, cataracts, and so on being one of the main causes of visual deterioration and blindness. Genetic and environmental factors have been associated with myopia. Nevertheless, lack of knowledge in the underlying physiopathological molecular mechanisms has not permitted an adequate diagnosis, prevention, or treatment to be found. Nowadays several pieces of evidence indicate that oxidative stress may help explain the altered regulatory pathways in myopia and the appearance of associated eye diseases. On the one hand, oxidative damage associated with hypoxia myopic can alter the neuromodulation that nitric oxide and dopamine have in eye growth. On the other hand, radical superoxide or peroxynitrite production damage retina, vitreous, lens, and so on contributing to the appearance of retinopathies, retinal detachment, cataracts and so on. The objective of this review is to suggest that oxidative stress is one of the key pieces that can help solve this complex eye problem. PMID:25922643

  5. Inorganic mercury causes pancreatic beta-cell death via the oxidative stress-induced apoptotic and necrotic pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yawen; Huang Chunfa; Yang Chingyao; Yen Chengchieh; Tsai Kehsung; Liu Shinghwa

    2010-03-15

    Mercury is a well-known highly toxic metal. In this study, we characterize and investigate the cytotoxicity and its possible mechanisms of inorganic mercury in pancreatic beta-cells. Mercury chloride (HgCl{sub 2}) dose-dependently decreased the function of insulin secretion and cell viability in pancreatic beta-cell-derived HIT-T15 cells and isolated mouse pancreatic islets. HgCl{sub 2} significantly increased ROS formation in HIT-T15 cells. Antioxidant N-acetylcysteine effectively reversed HgCl{sub 2}-induced insulin secretion dysfunction in HIT-T15 cells and isolated mouse pancreatic islets. Moreover, HgCl{sub 2} increased sub-G1 hypodiploids and annexin-V binding in HIT-T15 cells, indicating that HgCl{sub 2} possessed ability in apoptosis induction. HgCl{sub 2} also displayed several features of mitochondria-dependent apoptotic signals including disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential, increase of mitochondrial cytochrome c release and activations of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and caspase 3. Exposure of HIT-T15 cells to HgCl{sub 2} could significantly increase both apoptotic and necrotic cell populations by acridine orange/ethidium bromide dual staining. Meanwhile, HgCl{sub 2} could also trigger the depletion of intracellular ATP levels and increase the LDH release from HIT-T15 cells. These HgCl{sub 2}-induced cell death-related signals could be significantly reversed by N-acetylcysteine. The intracellular mercury levels were markedly elevated in HgCl{sub 2}-treated HIT-T15 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that HgCl{sub 2}-induced oxidative stress causes pancreatic beta-cell dysfunction and cytotoxicity involved the co-existence of apoptotic and necrotic cell death.

  6. Mutations and environmental factors affecting regulation of riboflavin synthesis and iron assimilation also cause oxidative stress in the yeast Pichia guilliermondii.

    PubMed

    Boretsky, Yuriy R; Protchenko, Olga V; Prokopiv, Tetiana M; Mukalov, Igor O; Fedorovych, Daria V; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2007-10-01

    Iron deficiency causes oversynthesis of riboflavin in several yeast species, known as flavinogenic yeasts. However, the mechanisms of such regulation are not known. We found that mutations causing riboflavin overproduction and iron hyperaccumulation (rib80, rib81 and hit1), as well as cobalt excess or iron deficiency all provoke oxidative stress in the Pichia guilliermondii yeast. Iron content in the cells, production both of riboflavin and malondialdehyde by P. guilliermondii wild type and hit1 mutant strains depend on a type of carbon source used in cultivation media. The data suggest that the regulation of riboflavin biosynthesis and iron assimilation in P. guilliermondii are linked with cellular oxidative state. PMID:17910100

  7. Evidence for induction of oxidative stress caused by chronic exposure of Chinese residents to arsenic contained in drinking water.

    PubMed Central

    Pi, Jingbo; Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Kumagai, Yoshito; Sun, Guifan; Yoshida, Takahiko; Aikawa, Hiroyuki; Hopenhayn-Rich, Claudia; Shimojo, Nobuhiro

    2002-01-01

    Exposure of experimental animals or cultured cells to arsenic induces oxidative stress, but, to date, no examination of this phenomenon in humans has been reported. In this study we conducted a cross-sectional study in Wuyuan, Inner Mongolia, China, to explore the relationship between chronic arsenic exposure from drinking water and oxidative stress in humans. Thirty-three inhabitants who had been drinking tube-well water with high concentrations of inorganic arsenic (mean value = 0.41 mg/L) for about 18 years constituted the high-exposure group, and 10 residents who lived nearby but were exposed to much lower concentrations of arsenic in their drinking water (mean value = 0.02 mg/L) were selected as the low-exposure comparison group. Results of the present study indicated that although the activity for superoxide dismutase (SOD) in blood did not differ significantly between the two groups, the mean serum level of lipid peroxides (LPO) was significantly higher among the high-exposed compared with the low-exposed group. Elevated serum LPO concentrations were correlated with blood levels of inorganic arsenic and its methylated metabolites. In addition, they showed an inverse correlation with nonprotein sulfhydryl (NPSH) levels in whole blood. The subjects in the high-arsenic-exposure group had mean blood NPSH levels 57.6% lower than those in the low-exposure group. Blood NPSH levels were inversely correlated with the concentrations of inorganic arsenic and its methylated metabolites in blood and with the ratio of monomethylarsenic to inorganic arsenic. These results provide evidence that chronic exposure to arsenic from drinking water in humans results in induction of oxidative stress, as indicated by the reduction in NPSH and the increase in LPO. Some possible mechanisms for the arsenic-induced oxidative stress are discussed. PMID:11940449

  8. The administration of food supplemented with cocoa powder during nutritional recovery reduces damage caused by oxidative stress in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Barragán Mejía, Gerardo; Calderón Guzmán, David; Juárez Olguín, Hugo; Hernández Martínez, Nancy; García Cruz, Edna; Morales Ramírez, Aline; Labra Ruiz, Norma; Esquivel Jiménez, Gabriela; Osnaya Brizuela, Norma; García Álvarez, Raquel; Ontiveros Mendoza, Esperanza

    2011-12-01

    Malnutrition contributes to the development of oxidative damage in the central nervous system. The selective administration of nutrients tends to show positive results in individuals who have suffered from malnutrition. To determine the effect of the administration of cocoa powder on the peroxidation of lipids and glutathione level during the nutritional recovery in brain, rats of 21 days old were subjected to a protocol that resembles malnutrition (MN) by feeding them with 60% of the daily food consumption of the control group (WN) and later to nutritional recovery with regular rodent feed (RFR) or added with cocoa (10 g of cocoa powder/kg of regular rodent feed) (CCR). Animals fed with regular rodent food showed significant reduction in brain glutathione: RFR (84.18 ± 6.38 ng/mg protein) vs. CCR (210.61 ± 50.10 ng/mg protein) and WN (186.55 ± 33.18 ng/mg protein), but with similar level to that of MN (92.12 ± 15.60 ng/mg protein). On the contrary, lipid peroxidation in RFR-fed animals increased RFR (1.32 ± 0.2 μM malondialdehyde/g of tissue), CCR (0.86 ± 0.07 μM malondialdehyde/g of tissue), WN (0.89 ± 0.09 μM malondialdehyde/g of tissue), but their thiobarbituric acid reactive substances concentration is similar to that of MN group (1.50 ± 0.2 μM malondialdehyde/g of tissue). Consumption of cocoa powder as a source of antioxidants favors the restoration of the concentration of glutathione and reduces the damage caused by oxidative stress during nutritional recovery in rat brain. PMID:21826449

  9. Early, But Not Late Onset Estrogen Replacement Therapy Prevents Oxidative Stress and Metabolic Alterations Caused by Ovariectomy

    PubMed Central

    López-Grueso, Raúl; Gambini, Juan; Abdelaziz, Kheira M.; Monleón, Daniel; Díaz, Ana; El Alami, Marya; Bonet-Costa, Vicent; Borrás, Consuelo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The usefulness of estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) in preventing oxidative stress associated with menopause is controversial. We aimed to study if there is a critical time window for effective treatment of the effects of ovariectomy with estrogens at the molecular, metabolic, and cellular level. Results: Our main finding is that early, but not late onset of ERT prevents an ovariectomy-associated increase in mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide levels, oxidative damage to lipids and proteins, and a decrease in glutathione peroxidase and catalase activity in rats. This may be due to a change in the estrogen receptor (ER) expression profile: ovariectomy increases the ER α/β ratio and immediate estrogen replacement prevents it. Positron emission tomography analysis shows that ovariectomy decreases the brain glucose uptake in vivo and that estrogen administration is beneficial, but only if administered immediately after deprivation. Ovariectomy decreases GLUT-1 and 3 glucose transporters in the brain, and only early onset estrogen administration prevents it. Plasma from rats treated with estrogens immediately after ovariectomy show similar metabolomics profiles as controls. Innovation: We provide molecular basis for the recommendation of early onset ERT and explain its lack of effectiveness if a significant time period elapses after ovariectomy and probably after the onset of menopause. Conclusion: Only early, but not late onset administration of estrogens after ovariectomy has beneficial effects at molecular levels on oxidative stress, brain glucose uptake, and metabolomic profiles. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 236–246. PMID:23725100

  10. Apoptosis in vascular endothelial cells caused by serum deprivation, oxidative stress and transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed

    Hogg, N; Browning, J; Howard, T; Winterford, C; Fitzpatrick, D; Gobé, G

    1999-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cell apoptosis has previously been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of hypertension-induced vessel deletion and damage. In the present in vitro study we analyse several possible relevant causative factors of vascular endothelial cell apoptosis, namely, serum deprivation and nutrient depletion, oxidative stress in the forms of hypoxia, hyperoxia or free radical damage, and altered levels of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) protein. An established cell line, bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC), was maintained in complete growth medium (RPMI-1640 plus 15% fetal calf serum and antibiotics, abbreviated as RPMI) in 25cm2 flasks or in 12-well plates on glass coverslips. Confluent but actively-growing cultures were treated with either hypoxia (PO2 of RPMI = 50mmHg), serum-free media (SFM), SFM plus hypoxia, hyperoxia (PO2 of RPMI = 450mmHg), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 1mM) in SFM, or TGF-beta1 protein (10ng/mL) in SFM. Appropriate control cultures were used. BAEC were collected 48h or 72h after all treatments except for TGF-beta1 and H2O2 treatments that were collected at 16-18h. Cell death was assessed using morphological characteristics or in situ end labeling (ISEL), cell proliferation assessed using proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and TGF-beta1 expression assessed using transcript levels or immunohistochemistry. All treatments significantly increased levels of apoptosis over control cultures (P<0.05), and decreased levels of cell proliferation. Treatment with TGF-beta1 protein or SFM plus hypoxia induced greatest levels of apoptosis. TGF-beta1 protein and transcript levels were decreased in treated cultures, results suggesting that a paracrine source of TGF-beta1 protein would be needed as a cause of endothelial cell apoptosis in viva. Future therapies against inappropriate vessel deletion in disease states may use the known gene-driven nature of apoptosis to modify this sort of cell death in endothelial cells. PMID

  11. Does short-term exposure to elevated levels of natural gamma radiation in Ramsar cause oxidative stress?

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, SMJ; Niroomand-Rad, A; Roshan-Shomal, P; Razavi-Toosi, SMT; Mossayeb-Zadeh, M; Moghadam, M

    2014-01-01

    Background: Ramsar, a city in northern Iran, has areas with some of the highest recorded levels of natural radiation among inhabited areas measured on the earth. Aims: To determine whether short-term exposure to extremely high levels of natural radiation induce oxidative stress. Materials and Methods: In this study, 53 Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups of 10-12 animals. Animals in the 1st group were kept for 7 days in an outdoor area with normal background radiation while the 2nd , 3rd , 4th and 5th groups were kept in four different outdoor areas with naturally elevated levels of gamma radiation in Ramsar. A calibrated RDS-110 survey meter, mounted on a tripod approximately 1 m above the ground, was used to measure exposure rate at each location. On days 7 and 9 blood sampling was performed to assess the serum levels of catalase (CAT) and malondialdehyde (MDA). On day 8, all animals were exposed to a lethal dose of 8 Gy gamma radiations emitted by a Theratron Phoenix (Theratronics, Canada) Cobalt-60 (55 cGy/min) at Radiotherapy Department of Razi Hospital in Rasht, Iran. Results: Findings obtained in this study indicate that high levels of natural radiation cannot induce oxidative stress. CAT and MDA levels in almost all groups were not significantly different (P = 0.69 and P = 0.05, respectively). After exposure to the lethal dose, CAT and MDA levels in all groups were not significantly different (P = 0.054 and P = 0.163, respectively). Conclusions: These findings indicate that short-term exposure to extremely high levels of natural radiation (up to 196 times higher than the normal background) does not induce oxidative stress. PMID:25143879

  12. The protective effect of N-acetylcysteine on oxidative stress in the brain caused by the long-term intake of aspartame by rats.

    PubMed

    Finamor, Isabela A; Ourique, Giovana M; Pês, Tanise S; Saccol, Etiane M H; Bressan, Caroline A; Scheid, Taína; Baldisserotto, Bernardo; Llesuy, Susana F; Partata, Wânia A; Pavanato, Maria A

    2014-09-01

    Long-term intake of aspartame at the acceptable daily dose causes oxidative stress in rodent brain mainly due to the dysregulation of glutathione (GSH) homeostasis. N-Acetylcysteine provides the cysteine that is required for the production of GSH, being effective in treating disorders associated with oxidative stress. We investigated the effects of N-acetylcysteine treatment (150 mg kg(-1), i.p.) on oxidative stress biomarkers in rat brain after chronic aspartame administration by gavage (40 mg kg(-1)). N-Acetylcysteine led to a reduction in the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, lipid hydroperoxides, and carbonyl protein levels, which were increased due to aspartame administration. N-Acetylcysteine also resulted in an elevation of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase activities, as well as non-protein thiols, and total reactive antioxidant potential levels, which were decreased after aspartame exposure. However, N-acetylcysteine was unable to reduce serum glucose levels, which were increased as a result of aspartame administration. Furthermore, catalase and glutathione S-transferase, whose activities were reduced due to aspartame treatment, remained decreased even after N-acetylcysteine exposure. In conclusion, N-acetylcysteine treatment may exert a protective effect against the oxidative damage in the brain, which was caused by the long-term consumption of the acceptable daily dose of aspartame by rats. PMID:24970110

  13. [Heme metabolism and oxidative stress].

    PubMed

    Kaliman, P A; Barannik, T B

    2001-01-01

    The role of heme metabolism in oxidative stress development and defense reactions formation in mammals under different stress factors are discussed in the article. Heme metabolism is considered as the totality of synthesis, degradation, transport and exchange processes of exogenous heme and heme liberated from erythrocyte hemoglobin under erythrocyte aging and hemolysis. The literature data presented display normal heme metabolism including mammals heme-binding proteins and intracellular free heme pool and heme metabolism alterations under oxidative stress development. The main attention is focused to the prooxidant action of heme, the interaction of heme transport and lipid exchange, and to the heme metabolism key enzymes (delta-aminolevulinate synthase and heme oxygenase), serum heme-binding protein hemopexin and intracellular heme-binding proteins participating in metabolism adaptation under the action of factors, which cause oxidative stress. PMID:11599427

  14. Comparison of the Pulmonary Oxidative Stress Caused by Intratracheal Instillation and Inhalation of NiO Nanoparticles when Equivalent Amounts of NiO Are Retained in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Horie, Masanori; Yoshiura, Yukiko; Izumi, Hiroto; Oyabu, Takako; Tomonaga, Taisuke; Okada, Takami; Lee, Byeong-Woo; Myojo, Toshihiko; Kubo, Masaru; Shimada, Manabu; Morimoto, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    NiO nanoparticles were administered to rat lungs via intratracheal instillation or inhalation. During pulmonary toxicity caused by NiO nanoparticles, the induction of oxidative stress is a major factor. Both intratracheal instillation and inhalation of NiO nanoparticles induced pulmonary oxidative stress. The oxidative stress response protein, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), was induced by the administration of NiO nanoparticles at both the protein and gene expression level. Additionally, certain oxidative-stress markers in the lung, such as 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α, thioredoxin, and inducible nitric oxide synthase were increased. Furthermore, the concentration of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the lung was also increased by the administration of NiO nanoparticles. When the amount of NiO in the lung is similar, the responses against pulmonary oxidative stress of intratracheal instillation and inhalation are also similar. However, the state of pulmonary oxidative stress in the early phase was different between intratracheal instillation and inhalation, even if the amount of NiO in the lung was similar. Inhalation causes milder oxidative stress than that caused by intratracheal instillation. On evaluation of the nanoparticle-induced pulmonary oxidative stress in the early phase, we should understand the different states of oxidative stress induced by intratracheal instillation and inhalation. PMID:26797643

  15. Energy Drink Administration in Combination with Alcohol Causes an Inflammatory Response and Oxidative Stress in the Hippocampus and Temporal Cortex of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Alfonso; Treviño, Samuel; Guevara, Jorge; Muñoz-Arenas, Guadalupe; Brambila, Eduardo; Espinosa, Blanca; Moreno-Rodríguez, Albino; Lopez-Lopez, Gustavo; Peña-Rosas, Ulises; Venegas, Berenice; Handal-Silva, Anabella; Morán-Perales, José Luis; Flores, Gonzalo; Aguilar-Alonso, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Energy drinks (EDs) are often consumed in combination with alcohol because they reduce the depressant effects of alcohol. However, different researches suggest that chronic use of these psychoactive substances in combination with alcohol can trigger an oxidative and inflammatory response. These processes are regulated by both a reactive astrogliosis and an increase of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, TNF-α, and iNOS, causing cell death (apoptosis) at the central and peripheral nervous systems. Currently, mechanisms of toxicity caused by mixing alcohol and ED in the brain are not well known. In this study, we evaluated the effect of chronic alcohol consumption in combination with ED on inflammatory response and oxidative stress in the temporal cortex (TCx) and hippocampus (Hp) of adult rats (90 days old). Our results demonstrated that consuming a mixture of alcohol and ED for 60 days induced an increase in reactive gliosis, IL-1β, TNF-α, iNOS, reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation, and nitric oxide, in the TCx and Hp. We also found immunoreactivity to caspase-3 and a decrease of synaptophysin in the same brain regions. The results suggested that chronic consumption of alcohol in combination with ED causes an inflammatory response and oxidative stress, which induced cell death via apoptosis in the TCx and Hp of the adult rats. PMID:27069534

  16. Energy Drink Administration in Combination with Alcohol Causes an Inflammatory Response and Oxidative Stress in the Hippocampus and Temporal Cortex of Rats.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Alfonso; Treviño, Samuel; Guevara, Jorge; Muñoz-Arenas, Guadalupe; Brambila, Eduardo; Espinosa, Blanca; Moreno-Rodríguez, Albino; Lopez-Lopez, Gustavo; Peña-Rosas, Ulises; Venegas, Berenice; Handal-Silva, Anabella; Morán-Perales, José Luis; Flores, Gonzalo; Aguilar-Alonso, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Energy drinks (EDs) are often consumed in combination with alcohol because they reduce the depressant effects of alcohol. However, different researches suggest that chronic use of these psychoactive substances in combination with alcohol can trigger an oxidative and inflammatory response. These processes are regulated by both a reactive astrogliosis and an increase of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, TNF-α, and iNOS, causing cell death (apoptosis) at the central and peripheral nervous systems. Currently, mechanisms of toxicity caused by mixing alcohol and ED in the brain are not well known. In this study, we evaluated the effect of chronic alcohol consumption in combination with ED on inflammatory response and oxidative stress in the temporal cortex (TCx) and hippocampus (Hp) of adult rats (90 days old). Our results demonstrated that consuming a mixture of alcohol and ED for 60 days induced an increase in reactive gliosis, IL-1β, TNF-α, iNOS, reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation, and nitric oxide, in the TCx and Hp. We also found immunoreactivity to caspase-3 and a decrease of synaptophysin in the same brain regions. The results suggested that chronic consumption of alcohol in combination with ED causes an inflammatory response and oxidative stress, which induced cell death via apoptosis in the TCx and Hp of the adult rats. PMID:27069534

  17. Vitamin B6s inhibit oxidative stress caused by Alzheimer's disease-related Cu(II)-β-amyloid complexes-cooperative action of phospho-moiety.

    PubMed

    Hashim, Alaa; Wang, Le; Juneja, Kashmir; Ye, Yong; Zhao, Yufen; Ming, Li-June

    2011-11-01

    Cu(II) complexes of Alzheimer's disease-related β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides exhibit metal-centered oxidation chemistry. The metallo-Aβ complexes are the hallmark of the disease and have been attributed to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), causing oxidative stress. In this communication, the inhibitions of the oxidative activity of Cu(II)-Aβ by vitamin B6 compounds pyridoxamine (PM), pyridoxine (PN), pyridoxal (PL), and pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP) are presented. These B6's are competitive inhibitors toward dopamine oxidation by Cu(II)-Aβ(1-20), with K(i) values of 1.4, 8.3, 1.2, and 0.2mM, respectively. The phospho-moiety in PLP seems to exhibit cooperative inhibition, affording a clue for future design of inhibitors. PMID:21944860

  18. Chronic exposure to emissions from photocopiers in copy shops causes oxidative stress and systematic inflammation among photocopier operators in India

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We assessed indoor air quality in photocopier centers and investigated whether occupational exposure to emissions from photocopiers is associated with decline in lung function or changes in haematological parameters, oxidative stress and inflammatory status. Methods Indoor air quality was monitored in five photocopier centers. Pulmonary function was assessed by spirometry in 81 photocopier operators (64 male and 17 female) and 43 healthy control (31 male and 12 female) subjects. Hematological status, serum thio-barbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), total ferric reducing antioxidant capacity (FRAC), leukotriene B4 (LTB4), 8-isoprostane, C reactive protein (CRP), interleukin 8 (IL-8), clara cell protein (CC-16), intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and eosinophilic cationic protein (ECP) were analyzed. Relationships between cumulative exposure, lung function and inflammatory markers were assessed. Results PM10 and PM2.5 were above the permissible levels in all the photocopier centers, whereas the levels of carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, ozone, sulphur dioxide, lead, arsenic, nickel, ammonia, benzene and benzo(a)pyrene were within Indian ambient air quality standards. Lung function was similar in the photocopier operators and control subjects. Serum TBARS was significantly higher and FRAC was lower among photocopier operators when compared to healthy controls. Plasma IL-8, LTB4, ICAM-1 and ECP were significantly higher in the photocopier exposed group. Conclusions Photocopiers emit high levels of particulate matter. Long term exposure to emissions from photocopiers was not associated with decreased lung function, but resulted in high oxidative stress and systemic inflammation leading to high risk of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24025094

  19. Analysis of Oxidative Stress in Zebrafish Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Mugoni, Vera; Camporeale, Annalisa; Santoro, Massimo M.

    2014-01-01

    High levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) may cause a change of cellular redox state towards oxidative stress condition. This situation causes oxidation of molecules (lipid, DNA, protein) and leads to cell death. Oxidative stress also impacts the progression of several pathological conditions such as diabetes, retinopathies, neurodegeneration, and cancer. Thus, it is important to define tools to investigate oxidative stress conditions not only at the level of single cells but also in the context of whole organisms. Here, we consider the zebrafish embryo as a useful in vivo system to perform such studies and present a protocol to measure in vivo oxidative stress. Taking advantage of fluorescent ROS probes and zebrafish transgenic fluorescent lines, we develop two different methods to measure oxidative stress in vivo: i) a “whole embryo ROS-detection method” for qualitative measurement of oxidative stress and ii) a “single-cell ROS detection method” for quantitative measurements of oxidative stress. Herein, we demonstrate the efficacy of these procedures by increasing oxidative stress in tissues by oxidant agents and physiological or genetic methods. This protocol is amenable for forward genetic screens and it will help address cause-effect relationships of ROS in animal models of oxidative stress-related pathologies such as neurological disorders and cancer. PMID:25046434

  20. Oxidative Stress in Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hongxiu; Li, Xiao-Kang

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic pruritic skin disorder affecting many people especially young children. It is a disease caused by the combination of genetic predisposition, immune dysregulation, and skin barrier defect. In recent years, emerging evidence suggests oxidative stress may play an important role in many skin diseases and skin aging, possibly including AD. In this review, we give an update on scientific progress linking oxidative stress to AD and discuss future treatment strategies for better disease control and improved quality of life for AD patients. PMID:27006746

  1. Metals from mine waste as potential cause of oxidative stress in burrowing crab Neohelice granulata from San Antonio bay.

    PubMed

    Giarratano, Erica; Gil, Mónica N; Marinho, Carmen H; Malanga, Gabriela

    2016-10-01

    The Natural Protected Area San Antonio bay is of particular importance for its congregation of migratory shorebirds and it has been declared one of the Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network International site (WHSRN). Present study represents the first assessment of variation on oxidative stress biomarkers in male crab Neohelice granulata from San Antonio bay (Río Negro, Argentina) under field conditions, associated mainly to metal contamination coming from passive mining wastes. Three sites were sampled once every three months from November 2012 to August 2013 within this sea inlet (Pile, Fishery and Port) and a control site at the southeast of the bay (Punta Perdices). Accumulation of Ni, Zn, Cr and Al varied only with seasons although without a constant trend, meanwhile Cd, Cu and Pb also varied among sites being highest in Pile and Port. Biochemical results indicated that variations in catalase activity was only site specific being maximum in Pile; meanwhile lipid radical, α-tocopherol and metallothioneins were only seasonal specific being higher in autumn and winter. Seasonal variation was also found for total thioles, being the content higher in summer and autumn than in winter. Correlation analysis revealed that malondialdehyde and α-tocopherol have a positive association with Al and negative with Ni, meanwhile GST has a positive association with Fe. Crabs from the closest area to the waste pile did not exhibit a differentiated oxidative pressure despite the higher accumulation of metals. It is possible that crabs from contaminated areas have developed a tolerance to metals, indicating a strong ecotoxicological selective pressure. More studies are needed to assess whether there is a transfer of metals through the food chain. PMID:27266655

  2. Effect of Oxidative Stress Induced by Brevibacterium sp. BS01 on a HAB Causing Species-Alexandrium tamarense

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yanyan; Zhang, Bangzhou; Zhang, Su; Li, Dong; Chen, Zhangran; Li, Yi; Bai, Shijie; Lv, Jinglin; Zheng, Wei; Tian, Yun; Zheng, Tianling

    2013-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms occur all over the world, destroying aquatic ecosystems and threatening other organisms. The culture supernatant of the marine algicidal actinomycete BS01 was able to lysis dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense ATGD98-006. Physiological and biochemical responses to oxidative stress in A. tamarense were investigated to elucidate the mechanism involved in BS01 inhibition of algal growth. Transmission electron microscope analysis revealed that there were some chloroplast abnormalities in response to BS01 supernatant. The decrease in cellular-soluble protein content suggested that cell growth was greatly inhibited at high concentration of BS01 supernatant. The increase in the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde contents following exposure to BS01 supernatant indicated that algal cells suffered from oxidative damage. The content of pigment was significantly decreased after 12 h treatment, which indicated that the accumulation of ROS destroyed pigment synthesis. Moreover, the decrease of Fv/Fm ratio suggested that in the photosynthetic system, the dominant sites producing ROS were destroyed by the supernatant of the BS01 culture. The activities of the antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase and peroxidase increased in a short time and decreased slightly with increasing exposure time. A real-time PCR assay showed changes in the transcript abundances of two photosynthetic genes, psbA and psbD. The results showed that BS01 supernatant reduced the expression of the psbA gene after 2 h exposure, but the expression of the psbD gene was increased at concentrations of 1.0 and 1.5%. Our results demonstrated that the expression of the psbA gene was inhibited by the BS01 supernatant, which might block the electron transport chain, significantly enhancing ROS level and excess activity of the antioxidant system. The accumulation of ROS destoryed pigment synthesis and membrane integrity, and inhibited or ultimately killed the

  3. Aberrant Rab11-Dependent Trafficking of the Neuronal Glutamate Transporter EAAC1 Causes Oxidative Stress and Cell Death in Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Valencia, Antonio; Sapp, Ellen; Masso, Nicholas; Alexander, Jonathan; Reeves, Patrick; Kegel, Kimberly B.; Aronin, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to neurodegeneration in Huntington's disease (HD). However, the origins of oxidative stress in HD remain unclear. Studies in HD transgenic models suggest involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction, which would lead to overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Impaired mitochondria complexes occur in late stages of HD but not in presymptomatic or early-stage HD patients. Thus, other mechanisms may account for the earliest source of oxidative stress caused by endogenous mutant huntingtin. Here, we report that decreased levels of a major intracellular antioxidant glutathione coincide with accumulation of ROS in primary HD neurons prepared from embryos of HD knock-in mice (HD140Q/140Q), which have human huntingtin exon 1 with 140 CAG repeats inserted into the endogenous mouse huntingtin gene. Uptake of extracellular cysteine through the glutamate/cysteine transporter EAAC1 is required for de novo synthesis of glutathione in neurons. We found that, compared with wild-type neurons, HD neurons had lower cell surface levels of EAAC1 and were deficient in taking up cysteine. Constitutive trafficking of EAAC1 from recycling endosomes relies on Rab11 activity, which is defective in the brain of HD140Q/140Q mice. Enhancement of Rab11 activity by expression of a dominant-active Rab11 mutant in primary HD neurons ameliorated the deficit in cysteine uptake, increased levels of intracellular glutathione, normalized clearance of ROS, and improved neuronal survival. Our data support a novel mechanism for oxidative stress in HD: Rab11 dysfunction slows trafficking of EAAC1 to the cell surface and impairs cysteine uptake, thereby leading to deficient synthesis of glutathione. PMID:20357106

  4. Exposure of breast cancer cells to a subcytotoxic dose of apigenin causes growth inhibition, oxidative stress, and hypophosphorylation of Akt.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Megan E; Power Coombs, Melanie R; Delaney, Leanne M; Hoskin, David W

    2014-10-01

    Epidemiological studies show that fruit- and vegetable-rich diets are associated with a reduced risk of developing certain forms of cancer, including breast cancer. In this study we demonstrate that a subcytotoxic concentration of apigenin, which is a flavone found at high concentrations in parsley, onions, grapefruit, oranges, and chamomile tea, inhibited DNA synthesis in a panel of human breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231, MBA-MB-468, MCF-7, SK-BR-3). Decreased proliferation of MDA-MB-468 cells in the presence of apigenin was associated with G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and the production of reactive oxygen species. Apigenin-treated MDA-MB-468 cells also showed reduced phosphorylation of Akt (protein kinase B), which is an essential effector serine/threonine kinase in the phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase pathway that promotes tumor growth and progression. However, exposure to the antioxidant reduced glutathione failed to reverse apigenin-mediated inhibition of Akt phosphorylation and cell proliferation, indicating that these effects were not due to oxidative stress. Taken together, these findings suggest that low-dose apigenin has the potential to slow or prevent breast cancer progression. PMID:25019465

  5. Inflammation and oxidative stress caused by nitric oxide synthase uncoupling might lead to left ventricular diastolic and systolic dysfunction in patients with hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Szelényi, Zsuzsanna; Fazakas, Ádám; Szénási, Gábor; Kiss, Melinda; Tegze, Narcis; Fekete, Bertalan Csaba; Nagy, Eszter; Bodó, Imre; Nagy, Bálint; Molvarec, Attila; Patócs, Attila; Pepó, Lilla; Prohászka, Zoltán; Vereckei, András

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of oxidative stress, inflammation, hypercoagulability and neuroendocrine activation in the transition of hypertensive heart disease to heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF). Methods We performed echocardiography for 112 patients (≥ 60 years old) with normal EF (18 controls and 94 with hypertension), and determined protein carbonylation (PC), and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), fibrinogen, plasminogen activator inhibitor type-I (PAI-I), von Willebrand factor, chromogranin A (cGA) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels from their blood samples. Results We found that 40% (38/94) of the patients with hypertension (HT) had no diastolic dysfunction (HTDD−), and 60% (56/94) had diastolic dysfunction (HTDD+). Compared to the controls, both patient groups had increased PC and BH4, TNF-α, PAI-I and BNP levels, while the HTDD+ group had elevated cGA and CRP levels. Decreased atrial and longitudinal left ventricular (LV) systolic and diastolic myocardial deformation (strain and strain rate) was demonstrated in both patient groups versus the control. Patients whose LV diastolic function deteriorated during the follow-up had elevated PC and IL-6 level compared to their own baseline values, and to the respective values of patients whose LV diastolic function remained unchanged. Oxidative stress, inflammation, BNP and PAI-I levels inversely correlated with LV systolic, diastolic and atrial function. Conclusions In patients with HT and normal EF, the most common HFPEF precursor condition, oxidative stress and inflammation may be responsible for LV systolic, diastolic and atrial dysfunction, which are important determinants of the transition of HT to HFPEF. PMID:25678898

  6. Oxidative stress in autism.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Abha; Chauhan, Ved

    2006-08-01

    Autism is a severe developmental disorder with poorly understood etiology. Oxidative stress in autism has been studied at the membrane level and also by measuring products of lipid peroxidation, detoxifying agents (such as glutathione), and antioxidants involved in the defense system against reactive oxygen species (ROS). Lipid peroxidation markers are elevated in autism, indicating that oxidative stress is increased in this disease. Levels of major antioxidant serum proteins, namely transferrin (iron-binding protein) and ceruloplasmin (copper-binding protein), are decreased in children with autism. There is a positive correlation between reduced levels of these proteins and loss of previously acquired language skills in children with autism. The alterations in ceruloplasmin and transferrin levels may lead to abnormal iron and copper metabolism in autism. The membrane phospholipids, the prime target of ROS, are also altered in autism. The levels of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) are decreased, and phosphatidylserine (PS) levels are increased in the erythrocyte membrane of children with autism as compared to their unaffected siblings. Several studies have suggested alterations in the activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase in autism. Additionally, altered glutathione levels and homocysteine/methionine metabolism, increased inflammation, excitotoxicity, as well as mitochondrial and immune dysfunction have been suggested in autism. Furthermore, environmental and genetic factors may increase vulnerability to oxidative stress in autism. Taken together, these studies suggest increased oxidative stress in autism that may contribute to the development of this disease. A mechanism linking oxidative stress with membrane lipid abnormalities, inflammation, aberrant immune response, impaired energy metabolism and excitotoxicity, leading to clinical symptoms and pathogenesis of autism is proposed. PMID:16766163

  7. Oxidative stress caused by ozone exposure induces β-amyloid 1-42 overproduction and mitochondrial accumulation by activating the amyloidogenic pathway.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Zimbrón, L F; Rivas-Arancibia, S

    2015-09-24

    Oxidative stress is a major risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD) that has been suggested to be the trigger of AD pathology. However, whether oxidative damage precedes and contributes directly to the intracellular accumulation of beta amyloid 1-42 (βA42) peptide remains a matter of debate. Chronic exposure to low doses of ozone similar to the levels during a day of high pollution in México City causes a state of oxidative stress that elicits progressive neurodegeneration in the hippocampi of rats. Several reports have demonstrated that the mitochondria are among the first organelles to be affected by oxidative stress and βA42 toxicity and act as sites of the accumulation of βA42, which affects energy metabolism. However, the mechanisms related to the neurodegeneration process and organelle damage that occur in conditions of chronic exposure to low doses of ozone have not been demonstrated. To analyze the effect of chronic ozone chronic exposure on changes in the production and accumulation of the βA42 and βA40 peptides in the mitochondria of hippocampal neurons of rats exposed to ozone, we examined the mitochondrial expression levels of Presenilins 1 and 2 and ADAM10 to detect changes related to the oxidative stress caused by low doses of ozone (0.25ppm). The results revealed significant accumulations of βA42 peptide in the mitochondrial fractions on days 60 and 90 of ozone exposure along with reductions in beta amyloid 1-40 accumulation, significant overexpressions of Pres2 and significant reductions in ADAM10 expression. Beta amyloid immunodetection revealed that there were some intracellular deposits of βA42 and that βA42 and the mitochondrial markers OPA1 and COX1 colocalized. These results indicate that the time of exposure to ozone and the accumulation of βA42 in the mitochondria of the hippocampal cells of rats were correlated. Our results suggest that the accumulation of the βA42 peptide may promote mitochondrial dysfunction due to its

  8. Hypoxia, Oxidative Stress and Fat.

    PubMed

    Netzer, Nikolaus; Gatterer, Hannes; Faulhaber, Martin; Burtscher, Martin; Pramsohler, Stephan; Pesta, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic disturbances in white adipose tissue in obese individuals contribute to the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Impaired insulin action in adipocytes is associated with elevated lipolysis and increased free fatty acids leading to ectopic fat deposition in liver and skeletal muscle. Chronic adipose tissue hypoxia has been suggested to be part of pathomechanisms causing dysfunction of adipocytes. Hypoxia can provoke oxidative stress in human and animal adipocytes and reduce the production of beneficial adipokines, such as adiponectin. However, time-dose responses to hypoxia relativize the effects of hypoxic stress. Long-term exposure of fat cells to hypoxia can lead to the production of beneficial substances such as leptin. Knowledge of time-dose responses of hypoxia on white adipose tissue and the time course of generation of oxidative stress in adipocytes is still scarce. This paper reviews the potential links between adipose tissue hypoxia, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and low-grade inflammation caused by adipocyte hypertrophy, macrophage infiltration and production of inflammatory mediators. PMID:26061760

  9. Oxidative Stress and Psychological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Salim, Samina

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is an imbalance between cellular production of reactive oxygen species and the counteracting antioxidant mechanisms. The brain with its high oxygen consumption and a lipid-rich environment is considered highly susceptible to oxidative stress or redox imbalances. Therefore, the fact that oxidative stress is implicated in several mental disorders including depression, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, is not surprising. Although several elegant studies have established a link between oxidative stress and psychiatric disorders, the causal relationship between oxidative stress and psychiatric diseases is not fully determined. Another critical aspect that needs much attention and effort is our understanding of the association between cellular oxidative stress and emotional stress. This review examines some of the recent discoveries that link oxidative status with anxiety, depression, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. A discussion of published results and questions that currently exist in the field regarding a causal relationship between oxidative and emotional stress is also provided. PMID:24669208

  10. Primary and secondary oxidative stress in Bacillus.

    PubMed

    Mols, Maarten; Abee, Tjakko

    2011-06-01

    Coping with oxidative stress originating from oxidizing compounds or reactive oxygen species (ROS), associated with the exposure to agents that cause environmental stresses, is one of the prerequisites for an aerobic lifestyle of Bacillus spp. such as B. subtilis, B. cereus and B. anthracis. This minireview highlights novel insights in the primary oxidative stress response caused by oxidizing compounds including hydrogen peroxide and the secondary oxidative stress responses apparent upon exposure to a range of agents and conditions leading to environmental stresses such as antibiotics, heat and acid. Insights in the pathways and damaging radicals involved have been compiled based among others on transcriptome studies, network analyses and fluorescence techniques for detection of ROS at single cell level. Exploitation of the current knowledge for the control of spoilage and pathogenic bacteria is discussed. PMID:21352461

  11. Cutaneous oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Polefka, Thomas G; Meyer, Thomas A; Agin, Patricia P; Bianchini, Robert J

    2012-03-01

    The earliest known microfossil records suggest that microorganisms existed on the earth approximately 3.8 billion years ago. Not only did sunlight drive this evolutionary process, but it also allowed photosynthetic organisms to elaborate oxygen and fundamentally change the earth's atmosphere and subsequent evolution. Paradoxically, however, an atmosphere of 20% oxygen offers aerobic organisms both benefits and some key challenges, particularly, to the external integument. This mini-review summarizes almost 40 years of research and provides a "60 000-foot" perspective on cutaneous oxidative stress. Topics reviewed include the following: What are free radicals and reactive oxygen species? Where do they come from? What is their chemistry? What are their roles and/or impact on the skin? What antioxidant defenses are available to mitigate oxidative stress. PMID:22360336

  12. Malfunctioning of the Iron–Sulfur Cluster Assembly Machinery in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Produces Oxidative Stress via an Iron-Dependent Mechanism, Causing Dysfunction in Respiratory Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Mauricio; Pérez-Gallardo, Rocío V.; Sánchez, Luis A.; Díaz-Pérez, Alma L.; Cortés-Rojo, Christian; Meza Carmen, Victor; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo; Lara-Romero, Javier; Jiménez-Sandoval, Sergio; Rodríguez, Francisco; Rodríguez-Zavala, José S.; Campos-García, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Biogenesis and recycling of iron–sulfur (Fe–S) clusters play important roles in the iron homeostasis mechanisms involved in mitochondrial function. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Fe–S clusters are assembled into apoproteins by the iron–sulfur cluster machinery (ISC). The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of ISC gene deletion and consequent iron release under oxidative stress conditions on mitochondrial functionality in S. cerevisiae. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, caused by H2O2, menadione, or ethanol, was associated with a loss of iron homeostasis and exacerbated by ISC system dysfunction. ISC mutants showed increased free Fe2+ content, exacerbated by ROS-inducers, causing an increase in ROS, which was decreased by the addition of an iron chelator. Our study suggests that the increment in free Fe2+ associated with ROS generation may have originated from mitochondria, probably Fe–S cluster proteins, under both normal and oxidative stress conditions, suggesting that Fe–S cluster anabolism is affected. Raman spectroscopy analysis and immunoblotting indicated that in mitochondria from SSQ1 and ISA1 mutants, the content of [Fe–S] centers was decreased, as was formation of Rieske protein-dependent supercomplex III2IV2, but this was not observed in the iron-deficient ATX1 and MRS4 mutants. In addition, the activity of complexes II and IV from the electron transport chain (ETC) was impaired or totally abolished in SSQ1 and ISA1 mutants. These results confirm that the ISC system plays important roles in iron homeostasis, ROS stress, and in assembly of supercomplexes III2IV2 and III2IV1, thus affecting the functionality of the respiratory chain. PMID:25356756

  13. Prenatal methylmercury exposure hampers glutathione antioxidant system ontogenesis and causes long-lasting oxidative stress in the mouse brain

    SciTech Connect

    Stringari, James; Nunes, Adriana K.C.; Franco, Jeferson L.; Bohrer, Denise; Garcia, Solange C.; Dafre, Alcir L.; Milatovic, Dejan; Souza, Diogo O.; Rocha, Joao B.T.; Aschner, Michael; Farina, Marcelo

    2008-02-15

    During the perinatal period, the central nervous system (CNS) is extremely sensitive to metals, including methylmercury (MeHg). Although the mechanism(s) associated with MeHg-induced developmental neurotoxicity remains obscure, several studies point to the glutathione (GSH) antioxidant system as an important molecular target for this toxicant. To extend our recent findings of MeHg-induced GSH dyshomeostasis, the present study was designed to assess the developmental profile of the GSH antioxidant system in the mouse brain during the early postnatal period after in utero exposure to MeHg. Pregnant mice were exposed to different doses of MeHg (1, 3 and 10 mg/l, diluted in drinking water, ad libitum) during the gestational period. After delivery, pups were killed at different time points - postnatal days (PND) 1, 11 and 21 - and the whole brain was used for determining biochemical parameters related to the antioxidant GSH system, as well as mercury content and the levels of F{sub 2}-isoprostane. In control animals, cerebral GSH levels significantly increased over time during the early postnatal period; gestational exposure to MeHg caused a dose-dependent inhibition of this developmental event. Cerebral glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR) activities significantly increased over time during the early postnatal period in control animals; gestational MeHg exposure induced a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on both developmental phenomena. These adverse effects of prenatal MeHg exposure were corroborated by marked increases in cerebral F{sub 2}-isoprostanes levels at all time points. Significant negative correlations were found between F{sub 2}-isoprostanes and GSH, as well as between F{sub 2}-isoprostanes and GPx activity, suggesting that MeHg-induced disruption of the GSH system maturation is related to MeHg-induced increased lipid peroxidation in the pup brain. In utero MeHg exposure also caused a dose-dependent increase in the cerebral levels of

  14. Oxidative stress in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Khandrika, Lakshmipathi; Kumar, Binod; Koul, Sweaty; Maroni, Paul; Koul, Hari K

    2009-09-18

    As prostate cancer and aberrant changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS) become more common with aging, ROS signaling may play an important role in the development and progression of this malignancy. Increased ROS, otherwise known as oxidative stress, is a result of either increased ROS generation or a loss of antioxidant defense mechanisms. Oxidative stress is associated with several pathological conditions including inflammation and infection. ROS are products of normal cellular metabolism and play vital roles in stimulation of signaling pathways in response to changing intra- and extracellular environmental conditions. Chronic increases in ROS over time are known to induce somatic mutations and neoplastic transformation. In this review we summarize the causes for increased ROS generation and its potential role in etiology and progression of prostate cancer. PMID:19185987

  15. Neonatal Benzo[a]pyrene Exposure Induces Oxidative Stress and DNA Damage Causing Neurobehavioural Changes during the Early Adolescence Period in Rats.

    PubMed

    Patel, Bhupesh; Das, Saroj Kumar; Patri, Manorama

    2016-01-01

    Humans are exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by ingestion of contaminated food and water. Prenatal exposure to benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) like PAHs through the placental barrier and neonatal exposure by breast milk and the environment may affect early brain development. In the present study, single intracisternal administration of B[a]P (0.2 and 2.0 µg/kg body weight) to male Wistar rat pups at postnatal day 5 (PND5) was carried out to study its specific effect on neonatal brain development and its consequences at PND30. B[a]P administration showed a significant increase in exploratory and anxiolytic-like behaviour with elevated hippocampal lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation at PND30. Further, DNA damage was estimated in vitro (Neuro2a and C6 cell lines) by the comet assay, and oxidative DNA damage of hippocampal sections was measured in vivo following exposure to B[a]P. DNA strand breaks (single and double) significantly increased due to B[a]P at PND30 in hippocampal neurons and increased the nuclear tail moment in Neuro2a cells. Hippocampal 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine production was significantly elevated showing expression of more TUNEL-positive cells in both doses of B[a]P. Histological studies also revealed a significant reduction in mean area and perimeter of hippocampal neurons in rats treated with B[a]P 2.0 μg/kg, when compared to naïve and control rats. B[a]P significantly increased anxiolytic-like behaviour and oxidative DNA damage in the hippocampus causing apoptosis that may lead to neurodegeneration in adolescence. The findings of the present study address the potential role of B[a]P in inducing oxidative stress-mediated neurodegeneration in the hippocampus through oxidative DNA damage in the early adolescence period of rats. PMID:27271523

  16. Airway oxidative stress causes vascular and hepatic inflammation via upregulation of IL-17A in a murine model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Al-Harbi, Naif O; Nadeem, Ahmed; Al-Harbi, Mohammed M; Ansari, Mushtaq A; AlSharari, Shakir D; Bahashwan, Saleh A; Attia, Sabry M; Al-Hosaini, Khaled A; Al Hoshani, Ali R; Ahmad, Sheikh F

    2016-05-01

    Oxidants are generated in asthmatic airways due to infiltration of inflammatory leukocytes and resident cells in the lung. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide and superoxide radical may leak into systemic circulation when generated in uncontrolled manner and may impact vasculature. Our previous studies have shown an association between airway inflammation and systemic inflammation; however so far none has investigated the impact of airway oxidative inflammation on hepatic oxidative stress and Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokine markers in liver/vasculature in a murine model of asthma. Therefore, this study investigated the contribution of oxidative stress encountered in asthmatic airways in modulation of systemic/hepatic Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines balance and hepatic oxidative stress. Mice were sensitized intraperitoneally with cockroach extract (CE) in the presence of aluminum hydroxide followed by several intranasal (i.n.) challenges with CE. Mice were then assessed for systemic/hepatic inflammation through assessment of Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines and oxidative stress (iNOS, protein nitrotyrosine, lipid peroxides and myeloperoxidase activity). Challenge with CE led to increased Th2/Th17 cytokines in blood/liver and hepatic oxidative stress. However, only Th17 related pro-inflammatory markers were upregulated by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) inhalation in vasculature and liver, whereas antioxidant treatment, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) downregulated them. Hepatic oxidative stress was also upregulated by H2O2 inhalation, whereas NAC attenuated it. Therefore, our study shows that airway oxidative inflammation may contribute to systemic inflammation through upregulation of Th17 immune responses in blood/liver and hepatic oxidative stress. This might predispose these patients to increased risk for the development of cardiovascular disorders. PMID:26953647

  17. Nongenomic effects of estrogen mediate the dose-related myocardial oxidative stress and dysfunction caused by acute ethanol in female rats

    PubMed Central

    El-Mas, Mahmoud M.

    2013-01-01

    Acute ethanol lowers blood pressure (BP) and cardiac output in proestrus and after chronic estrogen (E2) replacement in ovariectomized (OVX) female rats. However, whether rapid nongenomic effects of estrogen mediate these hemodynamic effects of ethanol remains unanswered. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of ethanol (0.5 or 1.5 g/kg iv) on left ventricular (LV) function and oxidative markers in OVX rats pretreated 30 min earlier with 1 μg/kg E2 (OVXE2) or vehicle (OVX) and in proestrus sham-operated (SO) rats. In SO rats, ethanol caused significant and dose-related reductions in BP, rate of rise in LV pressure (LV dP/dtmax), and LV developed pressure (LVDP). These effects of ethanol disappeared in OVX rats and were restored in OVXE2 rats, suggesting rapid estrogen receptor signaling mediates the detrimental effects of ethanol on LV function. Ex vivo studies revealed that the estrogen-dependent myocardial dysfunction caused by ethanol was coupled with higher LV 1) generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), 2) expression of malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts, 3) phosphorylation of protein kinase B (Akt) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2), and 4) catalase activity. ERK1/2 inhibition by PD-98059 (1 mg/kg iv) abrogated the myocardial dysfunction, hypotension, and the elevation in myocardial ROS generation caused by ethanol. We conclude that rapid estrogen receptor signaling is implicated in cellular events that lead to the generation of aldehyde protein adducts and Akt/ERK1/2 phosphorylation, which ultimately mediate the estrogen-dependent LV oxidative stress and dysfunction caused by ethanol in female rats. PMID:24368668

  18. Inhibition of NAPDH Oxidase 2 (NOX2) Prevents Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Abnormalities Caused by Saturated Fat in Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Leroy C.; Barca, Emanuele; Subramanyam, Prakash; Komrowski, Michael; Pajvani, Utpal; Colecraft, Henry M.; Hirano, Michio; Morrow, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and high saturated fat intake increase the risk of heart failure and arrhythmias. The molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. We hypothesized that physiologic levels of saturated fat could increase mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cardiomyocytes, leading to abnormalities of calcium homeostasis and mitochondrial function. We investigated the effect of saturated fat on mitochondrial function and calcium homeostasis in isolated ventricular myocytes. The saturated fatty acid palmitate causes a decrease in mitochondrial respiration in cardiomyocytes. Palmitate, but not the monounsaturated fatty acid oleate, causes an increase in both total cellular ROS and mitochondrial ROS. Palmitate depolarizes the mitochondrial inner membrane and causes mitochondrial calcium overload by increasing sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium leak. Inhibitors of PKC or NOX2 prevent mitochondrial dysfunction and the increase in ROS, demonstrating that PKC-NOX2 activation is also required for amplification of palmitate induced-ROS. Cardiomyocytes from mice with genetic deletion of NOX2 do not have palmitate-induced ROS or mitochondrial dysfunction. We conclude that palmitate induces mitochondrial ROS that is amplified by NOX2, causing greater mitochondrial ROS generation and partial depolarization of the mitochondrial inner membrane. The abnormal sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium leak caused by palmitate could promote arrhythmia and heart failure. NOX2 inhibition is a potential therapy for heart disease caused by diabetes or obesity. PMID:26756466

  19. Jumping the gun: Smoking constituent BaP causes premature primordial follicle activation and impairs oocyte fusibility through oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Sobinoff, A.P.; Pye, V.; Nixon, B.; Roman, S.D.; McLaughlin, E.A.

    2012-04-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) is an ovotoxic constituent of cigarette smoke associated with pre-mature ovarian failure and decreased rates of conception in IVF patients. Although the overall effect of BaP on female fertility has been documented, the exact molecular mechanisms behind its ovotoxicity remain elusive. In this study we examined the effects of BaP exposure on the ovarian transcriptome, and observed the effects of in vivo exposure on oocyte dysfunction. Microarray analysis of BaP cultured neonatal ovaries revealed a complex mechanism of ovotoxicity involving a small cohort of genes associated with follicular growth, cell cycle progression, and cell death. Histomorphological and immunohistochemical analysis supported these results, with BaP exposure causing increased primordial follicle activation and developing follicle atresia in vitro and in vivo. Functional analysis of oocytes obtained from adult Swiss mice treated neonatally revealed significantly increased levels of mitochondrial ROS/lipid peroxidation, and severely reduced sperm-egg binding and fusion in both low (1.5 mg/kg/daily) and high (3 mg/kg/daily) dose treatments. Our results reveal a complex mechanism of BaP induced ovotoxicity involving developing follicle atresia and accelerated primordial follicle activation, and suggest short term neonatal BaP exposure causes mitochondrial leakage resulting in reduced oolemma fluidity and impaired fertilisation in adulthood. This study highlights BaP as a key compound which may be partially responsible for the documented effects of cigarette smoke on follicular development and sub-fertility. -- Highlights: ► BaP exposure up-regulates canonical pathways linked with follicular growth/atresia. ► BaP causes primordial follicle activation and developing follicle atresia. ► BaP causes oocyte mitochondrial ROS and lipid peroxidation, impairing fertilisation. ► Short term neonatal BaP exposure compromises adult oocyte quality.

  20. Effects of Mikania glomerata Spreng. and Mikania laevigata Schultz Bip. ex Baker (Asteraceae) extracts on pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress caused by acute coal dust exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, T.P.; Silveira, P.C.; Rocha, L.G.; Rezin, G.T.; Rocha, J.; Citadini-Zanette, V.; Romao, P.T.; Dal-Pizzol, F.; Pinho, R.A.; Andrade, V.M.; Streck, E.L.

    2008-12-15

    Several studies have reported biological effects of Mikania glomerata and Mikania laevigata, used in Brazilian folk medicine for respiratory diseases. Pneumoconiosis is characterized by pulmonary inflammation caused by coal dust exposure. In this work, we evaluated the effect of pretreatment with M. glomerata and M. laevigata extracts (MGE and MLE, respectively) (100 mg/kg, s.c.) on inflammatory and oxidative stress parameters in lung of rats subjected to a single coal dust intratracheal instillation. Rats were pretreated for 2 weeks with saline solution, MGE, or MLE. On day 15, the animals were anesthetized, and gross mineral coal dust or saline solutions were administered directly in the lung by intratracheal instillation. Fifteen days after coal dust instillation, the animals were killed. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was obtained; total cell count and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity were determined. In the lung, myeloperoxidase activity, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) level, and protein carbonyl and sulfhydryl contents were evaluated. In BAL of treated animals, we verified an increased total cell count and LDH activity. MGE and MLE prevented the increase in cell count, but only MLE prevented the increase in LDH. Myeloperoxidase and TBARS levels were not affected, protein carbonylation was increased, and the protein thiol levels were decreased by acute coal dust intratracheal administration. The findings also suggest that both extracts present an important protective effect on the oxidation of thiol groups. Moreover, pretreatment with MGE and MLE also diminished lung inflammatory infiltration induced by coal dust, as assessed by histopathologic analyses.

  1. New Synthetic Triterpenoids: Potent Agents for Prevention and Treatment of Tissue Injury Caused by Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We review the original rationale for the development and the chemistry of a series of new synthetic oleanane triterpenoids (SO), based on oleanolic acid (1) as a starting material. Many of the new compounds that have been made, such as 2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9(11)-dien-28-oic acid (“CDDO”, 8), are highly potent (activities found at levels below 1 nM) anti-inflammatory agents, as measured by their ability to block the cellular synthesis of the enzyme inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in activated macrophages. Details of the organic synthesis of new SO and their chemical mechanisms of biological activity are reviewed, as is formation of biotin conjugates for investigation of protein targets. Finally, we give a brief summary of important biological activities of SO in many organ systems in numerous animal models. Clinical investigation of a new SO (methyl 2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9(11)dien-28-oate, “CDDO-Me”, bardoxolone methyl, 13) is currently in progress. PMID:21309592

  2. Oxidative Stress Related Diseases in Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Aykac, Kubra

    2016-01-01

    We review oxidative stress-related newborn disease and the mechanism of oxidative damage. In addition, we outline diagnostic and therapeutic strategies and future directions. Many reports have defined oxidative stress as an imbalance between an enhanced reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and the lack of protective ability of antioxidants. From that point of view, free radical-induced damage caused by oxidative stress seems to be a probable contributing factor to the pathogenesis of many newborn diseases, such as respiratory distress syndrome, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, periventricular leukomalacia, necrotizing enterocolitis, patent ductus arteriosus, and retinopathy of prematurity. We share the hope that the new understanding of the concept of oxidative stress and its relation to newborn diseases that has been made possible by new diagnostic techniques will throw light on the treatment of those diseases. PMID:27403229

  3. Oxidative Stress Related Diseases in Newborns.

    PubMed

    Ozsurekci, Yasemin; Aykac, Kubra

    2016-01-01

    We review oxidative stress-related newborn disease and the mechanism of oxidative damage. In addition, we outline diagnostic and therapeutic strategies and future directions. Many reports have defined oxidative stress as an imbalance between an enhanced reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and the lack of protective ability of antioxidants. From that point of view, free radical-induced damage caused by oxidative stress seems to be a probable contributing factor to the pathogenesis of many newborn diseases, such as respiratory distress syndrome, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, periventricular leukomalacia, necrotizing enterocolitis, patent ductus arteriosus, and retinopathy of prematurity. We share the hope that the new understanding of the concept of oxidative stress and its relation to newborn diseases that has been made possible by new diagnostic techniques will throw light on the treatment of those diseases. PMID:27403229

  4. Deletion of a single allele of the Pex11β gene is sufficient to cause oxidative stress, delayed differentiation and neuronal death in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Ahlemeyer, Barbara; Gottwald, Magdalena; Baumgart-Vogt, Eveline

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Impaired neuronal migration and cell death are commonly observed in patients with peroxisomal biogenesis disorders (PBDs), and in mouse models of this diseases. In Pex11β-deficient mice, we observed that the deletion of a single allele of the Pex11β gene (Pex11β+/− heterozygous mice) caused cell death in primary neuronal cultures prepared from the neocortex and cerebellum, although to a lesser extent as compared with the homozygous-null animals (Pex11β−/− mice). In corresponding brain sections, cell death was rare, but differences between the genotypes were similar to those found in vitro. Because PEX11β has been implicated in peroxisomal proliferation, we searched for alterations in peroxisomal abundance in the brain of heterozygous and homozygous Pex11β-null mice compared with wild-type animals. Deletion of one allele of the Pex11β gene slightly increased the abundance of peroxisomes, whereas the deletion of both alleles caused a 30% reduction in peroxisome number. The size of the peroxisomal compartment did not correlate with neuronal death. Similar to cell death, neuronal development was delayed in Pex11β+/− mice, and to a further extent in Pex11β−/− mice, as measured by a reduced mRNA and protein level of synaptophysin and a reduced protein level of the mature isoform of MAP2. Moreover, a gradual increase in oxidative stress was found in brain sections and primary neuronal cultures from wild-type to heterozygous to homozygous Pex11β-deficient mice. SOD2 was upregulated in neurons from Pex11β+/− mice, but not from Pex11β−/− animals, whereas the level of catalase remained unchanged in neurons from Pex11β+/− mice and was reduced in those from Pex11β−/− mice, suggesting a partial compensation of oxidative stress in the heterozygotes, but a failure thereof in the homozygous Pex11β−/− brain. In conclusion, we report the alterations in the brain caused by the deletion of a single allele of the Pex11β gene. Our data

  5. Photosynthetic inhibition and oxidative stress to the toxic Phaeocystis globosa caused by a diketopiperazine isolated from products of algicidal bacterium metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shuo; Hu, Xiaoli; Yin, Pinghe; Zhao, Ling

    2016-05-01

    Algicidal bacteria have been turned out to be available for inhibiting Phaeocystis globosa which frequently caused harmful algal blooms and threatened to economic development and ecological balance. A marine bacterium Bacillus sp. Ts-12 exhibited significant algicidal activity against P. globosa by indirect attack. In present study, an algicidal compound was isolated by silica gel column, Sephadex G-15 column and HPLC, further identified as hexahydropyrrolo[1,2-a]pyrazine-1,4-dione, cyclo-(Pro-Gly), by GC-MS and (1)H-NMR. Cyclo-(Pro-Gly) significantly increased the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) within P. globosa cells, further activating the enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant systems, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione (GSH) and ascorbic acid (AsA). The increase in methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA) content showed that the surplus ROS induced lipid peroxidation on membrane system. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and flow cytometry (FCM) analysis revealed that cyclo-(Pro-Gly) caused reduction of Chl-a content, destruction of cell membrane integrity, chloroplasts and nuclear structure. Real-time PCR assay showed that the transcriptions of photosynthesis related genes (psbA, psbD, rbcL) were significantly inhibited. This study indicated that cyclo-(Pro-Gly) from marine Bacillus sp. Ts-12 exerted photosynthetic inhibition and oxidative stress to P. globosa and eventually led to the algal cells lysis. This algicidal compound might be potential bio-agent for controlling P. globosa red tide. PMID:27095455

  6. Cadmium telluride quantum dots cause oxidative stress leading to extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Kathy C; Willmore, William G; Tayabali, Azam F

    2013-04-01

    The mechanisms of toxicity related to human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cell exposures to cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe-QDs) were investigated. CdTe-QDs caused cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Treated cells showed an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). Altered antioxidant levels were demonstrated by depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH), a decreased ratio of reduced glutathione to oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) and an increased NF-E2-related Factor 2 (Nrf2) activation. Enzyme assays showed that superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was elevated whereas catalase (CAT) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activities were depressed. Further analyses revealed that CdTe-QD exposure resulted in apoptosis, indicated by changes in levels of caspase-3 activity, poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage and phosphatidylserine externalization. Extrinsic apoptotic pathway markers such as Fas levels and caspase-8 activity increased as a result of CdTe-QD exposure. Involvement of the intrinsic/mitochondrial apoptotic pathway was indicated by decreased levels of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl2) protein and mitochondrial cytochrome c, and by increased levels of mitochondrial Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) and cytosolic cytochrome c. Further, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) such as c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (Erk1/2), and p38 were all activated. Our findings reveal that CdTe-QDs cause oxidative stress, interfere with antioxidant defenses and activate protein kinases, leading to apoptosis via both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways. Since the effects of CdTe-QDs on selected biomarkers were similar or greater compared to those of CdCl2 at equivalent concentrations of cadmium, the study suggests that the toxicity of CdTe-QDs arises from a combination of the effects of cadmium and ROS generated from the NPs. PMID:23485651

  7. Cocaine causes memory and learning impairments in rats: involvement of nuclear factor kappa B and oxidative stress, and prevention by topiramate.

    PubMed

    Muriach, María; López-Pedrajas, Rosa; Barcia, Jorge M; Sanchez-Villarejo, María V; Almansa, Inmaculada; Romero, Francisco J

    2010-08-01

    Different mechanisms have been suggested for cocaine toxicity including an increase in oxidative stress but the association between oxidative status in the brain and cocaine induced-behaviour is poorly understood. Nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB) is a sensor of oxidative stress and participates in memory formation that could be involved in drug toxicity and addiction mechanisms. Therefore NFkappaB activity, oxidative stress, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) activity, spatial learning and memory as well as the effect of topiramate, a previously proposed therapy for cocaine addiction, were evaluated in an experimental model of cocaine administration in rats. NFkappaB activity was decreased in the frontal cortex of cocaine treated rats, as well as GSH concentration and glutathione peroxidase activity in the hippocampus, whereas nNOS activity in the hippocampus was increased. Memory retrieval of experiences acquired prior to cocaine administration was impaired and negatively correlated with NFkappaB activity in the frontal cortex. In contrast, learning of new tasks was enhanced and correlated with the increase of nNOS activity and the decrease of glutathione peroxidase. These results provide evidence for a possible mechanistic role of oxidative and nitrosative stress and NFkappaB in the alterations induced by cocaine. Topiramate prevented all the alterations observed, showing novel neuroprotective properties. PMID:20477932

  8. Oxidative stress and oxidative damage in chemical carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Klaunig, James E. Wang Zemin; Pu Xinzhu; Zhou Shaoyu

    2011-07-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are induced through a variety of endogenous and exogenous sources. Overwhelming of antioxidant and DNA repair mechanisms in the cell by ROS may result in oxidative stress and oxidative damage to the cell. This resulting oxidative stress can damage critical cellular macromolecules and/or modulate gene expression pathways. Cancer induction by chemical and physical agents involves a multi-step process. This process includes multiple molecular and cellular events to transform a normal cell to a malignant neoplastic cell. Oxidative damage resulting from ROS generation can participate in all stages of the cancer process. An association of ROS generation and human cancer induction has been shown. It appears that oxidative stress may both cause as well as modify the cancer process. Recently association between polymorphisms in oxidative DNA repair genes and antioxidant genes (single nucleotide polymorphisms) and human cancer susceptibility has been shown.

  9. Diphenyl diselenide supplementation in infected mice by Toxoplasma gondii: Protective effect on behavior, neuromodulation and oxidative stress caused by disease.

    PubMed

    Machado, Vanessa Schopf; Bottari, Nathieli B; Baldissera, Matheus D; Rech, Virginia C; Ianiski, Francine R; Signor, Cristiane; Rubin, Maribel A; Waczuk, Emily P; Schwertz, Claiton I; Mendes, Ricardo E; Camillo, Giovana; Vogel, Fernanda F; de la Rue, Mario L; Morsch, Vera M; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Frühauf, Pâmella K S; Da Silva, Aleksandro S

    2016-10-01

    untreated animals (group C). It was concluded that (PhSe)2 showed antioxidant activity, but the dose used had no anti-inflammatory effect and failed to reverse the behavioral changes caused by the parasite. PMID:27472985

  10. Stress in College Athletics: Causes, Consequences, Coping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphrey, James H.; Yow, Deborah A.; Bowden, William W.

    This book addresses the causes and consequences of stress in college sports and offers effective coping mechanisms to help individuals understand and control stressors and emotions in their environment. The chapters are: (1) "Understanding Stress"; (2) "Perceptions of Stress in College Athletics"; (3) "Stress among College Athletes"; (4) "Stress…

  11. Sustained accumulation of prelamin A and depletion of lamin A/C both cause oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction but induce different cell fates

    PubMed Central

    Sieprath, Tom; Corne, Tobias DJ; Nooteboom, Marco; Grootaert, Charlotte; Rajkovic, Andreja; Buysschaert, Benjamin; Robijns, Joke; Broers, Jos LV; Ramaekers, Frans CS; Koopman, Werner JH; Willems, Peter HGM; De Vos, Winnok H

    2015-01-01

    The cell nucleus is structurally and functionally organized by lamins, intermediate filament proteins that form the nuclear lamina. Point mutations in genes that encode a specific subset of lamins, the A-type lamins, cause a spectrum of diseases termed laminopathies. Recent evidence points to a role for A-type lamins in intracellular redox homeostasis. To determine whether lamin A/C depletion and prelamin A accumulation differentially induce oxidative stress, we have performed a quantitative microscopy-based analysis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) in human fibroblasts subjected to sustained siRNA-mediated knockdown of LMNA and ZMPSTE24, respectively. We measured a highly significant increase in basal ROS levels and an even more prominent rise of induced ROS levels in lamin A/C depleted cells, eventually resulting in Δψm hyperpolarization and apoptosis. Depletion of ZMPSTE24 on the other hand, triggered a senescence pathway that was associated with moderately increased ROS levels and a transient Δψm depolarization. Both knockdowns were accompanied by an upregulation of several ROS detoxifying enzymes. Taken together, our data suggest that both persistent prelamin A accumulation and lamin A/C depletion elevate ROS levels, but to a different extent and with different effects on cell fate. This may contribute to the variety of disease phenotypes witnessed in laminopathies. PMID:25996284

  12. Synergistic combination of direct plasma membrane damage and oxidative stress as a cause of antifungal activity of polyol macrolide antibiotic niphimycin.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Keiji; Yamaguchi, Takafumi; Doi, Takeshi; Usuki, Yoshinosuke; Taniguchi, Makoto; Tanaka, Toshio

    2002-01-01

    The polyol macrolide niphimycin (NM) exhibited fungicidal activity against Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells accompanying the leakage of cytoplasmic components including nucleotide-like materials in addition to K+ at 10 microM or above. Such a dynamic change in the plasma membrane was observed upon treatment of cells with H2O2 but not with the polyene macrolide antibiotic amphotericin B (AmB). The NM-induced cell death could be prevented by the exogenous addition of phosphatidylcholine (PC) whereas such a protective effect was only weakly observed with ergosterol, the molecular target of AmB. NM-treated cells were further characterized with a dramatic loss of glutathione even at a dose of 5 microM or less, representing NM-triggered metabolic conversion of the antioxidant molecule. NM-treatment indeed accelerated the cellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as H2O2 detectable with a specific fluorescent probe in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggested a synergistic combination of direct plasma membrane damage and oxidative stress as a cause of antifungal activity of NM against S. cerevisiae. PMID:16233293

  13. Exposure to O-16 particle irradiation causes age-like decrements in rats through increased oxidative stress, inflammation and loss of autophagy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exposing young rats to particles of high energy and charge (HZE particles) enhances indices of oxidative stress and inflammation, disrupts the functioning of neuronal communication, and alters cognitive behaviors. Even though exposure to these highly charged particles occurs at low fluence rates, p...

  14. Oxidant stress in the vasculature.

    PubMed

    Maytin, M; Leopold, J; Loscalzo, J

    1999-09-01

    Vascular disease and vasomotor responses are largely influenced by oxidant stress. Superoxide is generated via the cellular oxidase systems, xanthine oxidase, and NADH/NADPH oxidases. Once formed, superoxides participate in a number of reactions, yielding various free radicals such as hydrogen peroxide, peroxynitrite, oxidized low-density lipoprotein, or hypochlorous acid. Numerous cellular antioxidant systems exist to defend against oxidant stress; glutathione and the enzymes superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase are critical for maintaining the redox balance of the cell. However, the redox state is disrupted by certain vascular diseases. It appears that oxidant stress both promotes and is induced by diseases such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, and restenosis as well as by certain risk factors for coronary artery disease including hyperlipidemia, diabetes, and cigarette smoking. Once oxidant stress is invoked, characteristic pathophysiologic features ensue, namely adverse vessel reactivity, vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, macrophage adhesion, platelet activation, and lipid peroxidation. PMID:11122705

  15. Etiologies of sperm oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Sabeti, Parvin; Pourmasumi, Soheila; Rahiminia, Tahereh; Akyash, Fatemeh; Talebi, Ali Reza

    2016-01-01

    Sperm is particularly susceptible to reactive oxygen species (ROS) during critical phases of spermiogenesis. However, the level of seminal ROS is restricted by seminal antioxidants which have beneficial effects on sperm parameters and developmental potentials. Mitochondria and sperm plasma membrane are two major sites of ROS generation in sperm cells. Besides, leukocytes including polymer phonuclear (PMN) leukocytes and macrophages produce broad category of molecules including oxygen free radicals, non-radical species and reactive nitrogen species. Physiological role of ROS increase the intracellular cAMP which then activate protein kinase in male reproductive system. This indicates that spermatozoa need small amounts of ROS to acquire the ability of nuclear maturation regulation and condensation to fertilize the oocyte. There is a long list of intrinsic and extrinsic factors which can induce oxidative stress to interact with lipids, proteins and DNA molecules. As a result, we have lipid peroxidation, DNA fragmentation, axonemal damage, denaturation of the enzymes, over generation of superoxide in the mitochondria, lower antioxidant activity and finally abnormal spermatogenesis. If oxidative stress is considered as one of the main cause of DNA damage in the germ cells, then there should be good reason for antioxidant therapy in these conditions. PMID:27351024

  16. Etiologies of sperm oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sabeti, Parvin; Pourmasumi, Soheila; Rahiminia, Tahereh; Akyash, Fatemeh; Talebi, Ali Reza

    2016-04-01

    Sperm is particularly susceptible to reactive oxygen species (ROS) during critical phases of spermiogenesis. However, the level of seminal ROS is restricted by seminal antioxidants which have beneficial effects on sperm parameters and developmental potentials. Mitochondria and sperm plasma membrane are two major sites of ROS generation in sperm cells. Besides, leukocytes including polymer phonuclear (PMN) leukocytes and macrophages produce broad category of molecules including oxygen free radicals, non-radical species and reactive nitrogen species. Physiological role of ROS increase the intracellular cAMP which then activate protein kinase in male reproductive system. This indicates that spermatozoa need small amounts of ROS to acquire the ability of nuclear maturation regulation and condensation to fertilize the oocyte. There is a long list of intrinsic and extrinsic factors which can induce oxidative stress to interact with lipids, proteins and DNA molecules. As a result, we have lipid peroxidation, DNA fragmentation, axonemal damage, denaturation of the enzymes, over generation of superoxide in the mitochondria, lower antioxidant activity and finally abnormal spermatogenesis. If oxidative stress is considered as one of the main cause of DNA damage in the germ cells, then there should be good reason for antioxidant therapy in these conditions. PMID:27351024

  17. Oxidative Stress in Aging Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Rinnerthaler, Mark; Bischof, Johannes; Streubel, Maria Karolin; Trost, Andrea; Richter, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress in skin plays a major role in the aging process. This is true for intrinsic aging and even more for extrinsic aging. Although the results are quite different in dermis and epidermis, extrinsic aging is driven to a large extent by oxidative stress caused by UV irradiation. In this review the overall effects of oxidative stress are discussed as well as the sources of ROS including the mitochondrial ETC, peroxisomal and ER localized proteins, the Fenton reaction, and such enzymes as cyclooxygenases, lipoxygenases, xanthine oxidases, and NADPH oxidases. Furthermore, the defense mechanisms against oxidative stress ranging from enzymes like superoxide dismutases, catalases, peroxiredoxins, and GSH peroxidases to organic compounds such as L-ascorbate, α-tocopherol, beta-carotene, uric acid, CoQ10, and glutathione are described in more detail. In addition the oxidative stress induced modifications caused to proteins, lipids and DNA are discussed. Finally age-related changes of the skin are also a topic of this review. They include a disruption of the epidermal calcium gradient in old skin with an accompanying change in the composition of the cornified envelope. This modified cornified envelope also leads to an altered anti-oxidative capacity and a reduced barrier function of the epidermis. PMID:25906193

  18. Oxidative Stress and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyong; Gross, Myron; Lee, Duk-Hee; Holvoet, Paul; Himes, John H.; Shikany, James M.; Jacobs, David R.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Although cumulative evidence suggests that increased oxidative stress may lead to insulin resistance in vivo or in vitro, community-based studies are scarce. This study examined the longitudinal relationships of oxidative stress biomarkers with the development of insulin resistance and whether these relationships were independent of obesity in nondiabetic young adults. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Biomarkers of oxidative stress (F2-isoprostanes [F2Isop] and oxidized LDL [oxLDL]), insulin resistance (the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance [HOMA-IR]), and various fatness measures (BMI, waist circumference, and estimated percent fat) were obtained in a population-based observational study (Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults) and its ancillary study (Young Adult Longitudinal Trends in Antioxidants) during 2000–2006. RESULTS There were substantial increases in estimated mean HOMA-IR over time. OxLDL and F2Isop showed little association with each other. Mean evolving HOMA-IR increased with increasing levels of oxidative stress markers (P < 0.001 for oxLDL and P = 0.06 for F2Isop), measured in 2000–2001. After additional adjustment for adiposity, a positive association between oxLDL and HOMA-IR was strongly evident, whereas the association between F2Isop and HOMA-IR was not. CONCLUSIONS We observed positive associations between each of two oxidative stress markers and insulin resistance. The association with oxidized LDL was independent of obesity, but that with F2Isop was not. PMID:19389821

  19. Diabetic Cardiovascular Disease Induced by Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kayama, Yosuke; Raaz, Uwe; Jagger, Ann; Adam, Matti; Schellinger, Isabel N.; Sakamoto, Masaya; Suzuki, Hirofumi; Toyama, Kensuke; Spin, Joshua M.; Tsao, Philip S.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). DM can lead to multiple cardiovascular complications, including coronary artery disease (CAD), cardiac hypertrophy, and heart failure (HF). HF represents one of the most common causes of death in patients with DM and results from DM-induced CAD and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Oxidative stress is closely associated with the pathogenesis of DM and results from overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS overproduction is associated with hyperglycemia and metabolic disorders, such as impaired antioxidant function in conjunction with impaired antioxidant activity. Long-term exposure to oxidative stress in DM induces chronic inflammation and fibrosis in a range of tissues, leading to formation and progression of disease states in these tissues. Indeed, markers for oxidative stress are overexpressed in patients with DM, suggesting that increased ROS may be primarily responsible for the development of diabetic complications. Therefore, an understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms mediated by oxidative stress is crucial to the prevention and treatment of diabetes-induced CVD. The current review focuses on the relationship between diabetes-induced CVD and oxidative stress, while highlighting the latest insights into this relationship from findings on diabetic heart and vascular disease. PMID:26512646

  20. Interpreting Causes of Personal Stress with "Cheese"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Karl L.

    2008-01-01

    Attempts to identify the root causes of individual stress have been made for centuries. The result has been the development of a myriad of approaches and explanations as to the cause of stress by psychologists, educators, researchers, and self-help authors. Each approach carries a degree of validity in the context that individuals experience…

  1. Oxidative stress induction as a cause of Ba2+-dependent fungicidal action of UMP-derivative on the yeast Shizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toshio; Usuki, Yoshinosuke

    2003-01-01

    A UMP-derivative, uridine 5'-hexadecylphosphate (UMPC16), exhibited a fungicidal action against various yeast strains including the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe in combination with Ba2+ ion. UMPC16 accelerated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in medium with Ba2+ ion in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Additional supplementation of Ca2+ ion into medium could suppress such a combined fungicidal action due to oxidative stress induction. PMID:16233563

  2. Heat waves imposed during early pod development in soybean (Glycine max) cause significant yield loss despite a rapid recovery from oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Siebers, Matthew H; Yendrek, Craig R; Drag, David; Locke, Anna M; Rios Acosta, Lorena; Leakey, Andrew D B; Ainsworth, Elizabeth A; Bernacchi, Carl J; Ort, Donald R

    2015-08-01

    Heat waves already have a large impact on crops and are predicted to become more intense and more frequent in the future. In this study, heat waves were imposed on soybean using infrared heating technology in a fully open-air field experiment. Five separate heat waves were applied to field-grown soybean (Glycine max) in central Illinois, three in 2010 and two in 2011. Thirty years of historical weather data from Illinois were analyzed to determine the length and intensity of a regionally realistic heat wave resulting in experimental heat wave treatments during which day and night canopy temperatures were elevated 6 °C above ambient for 3 days. Heat waves were applied during early or late reproductive stages to determine whether and when heat waves had an impact on carbon metabolism and seed yield. By the third day of each heat wave, net photosynthesis (A), specific leaf weight (SLW), and leaf total nonstructural carbohydrate concentration (TNC) were decreased, while leaf oxidative stress was increased. However, A, SLW, TNC, and measures of oxidative stress were no different than the control ca. 12 h after the heat waves ended, indicating rapid physiological recovery from the high-temperature stress. That end of season seed yield was reduced (~10%) only when heat waves were applied during early pod developmental stages indicates the yield loss had more to do with direct impacts of the heat waves on reproductive process than on photosynthesis. Soybean was unable to mitigate yield loss after heat waves given during late reproductive stages. This study shows that short high-temperature stress events that reduce photosynthesis and increase oxidative stress resulted in significant losses to soybean production in the Midwest, U.S. The study also suggests that to mitigate heat wave-induced yield loss, soybean needs improved reproductive and photosynthetic tolerance to high but increasingly common temperatures. PMID:25845935

  3. Distinct Phenotypes Caused by Mutation of MSH2 in Trypanosome Insect and Mammalian Life Cycle Forms Are Associated with Parasite Adaptation to Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Bolderson, Jason; Campos, Priscila C.; Miranda, Julia B.; Alves, Ceres L.; Machado, Carlos R.; McCulloch, Richard; Teixeira, Santuza M. R.

    2015-01-01

    Background DNA repair mechanisms are crucial for maintenance of the genome in all organisms, including parasites where successful infection is dependent both on genomic stability and sequence variation. MSH2 is an early acting, central component of the Mismatch Repair (MMR) pathway, which is responsible for the recognition and correction of base mismatches that occur during DNA replication and recombination. In addition, recent evidence suggests that MSH2 might also play an important, but poorly understood, role in responding to oxidative damage in both African and American trypanosomes. Methodology/Principal Findings To investigate the involvement of MMR in the oxidative stress response, null mutants of MSH2 were generated in Trypanosoma brucei procyclic forms and in Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigote forms. Unexpectedly, the MSH2 null mutants showed increased resistance to H2O2 exposure when compared with wild type cells, a phenotype distinct from the previously observed increased sensitivity of T. brucei bloodstream forms MSH2 mutants. Complementation studies indicated that the increased oxidative resistance of procyclic T. brucei was due to adaptation to MSH2 loss. In both parasites, loss of MSH2 was shown to result in increased tolerance to alkylation by MNNG and increased accumulation of 8-oxo-guanine in the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, indicating impaired MMR. In T. cruzi, loss of MSH2 also increases the parasite capacity to survive within host macrophages. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, these results indicate MSH2 displays conserved, dual roles in MMR and in the response to oxidative stress. Loss of the latter function results in life cycle dependent differences in phenotypic outcomes in T. brucei MSH2 mutants, most likely because of the greater burden of oxidative stress in the insect stage of the parasite. PMID:26083967

  4. Oxidative Stress Control by Apicomplexan Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Izui, Natália M.; Schettert, Isolmar; Liebau, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites cause infectious diseases that are either a severe public health problem or an economic burden. In this paper we will shed light on how oxidative stress can influence the host-pathogen relationship by focusing on three major diseases: babesiosis, coccidiosis, and toxoplasmosis. PMID:25722976

  5. Oxidative stress in developmental brain disorders.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masaharu; Miyata, Rie; Tanuma, Naoyuki

    2012-01-01

    In order to examine the involvement of oxidative stress in developmental brain disorders, we have performed immunohistochemistry in autopsy brains and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in the cerebrospinal fluid and urines of patients. Here, we review our data on the hereditary DNA repair disorders, congenital metabolic errors and childhood-onset neurodegenerative disorders. First, in our studies on hereditary DNA repair disorders, increased oxidative DNA damage and lipid peroxidation were carried out in the degeneration of basal ganglia, intracerebral calcification and cerebellar degeneration in patients with xeroderma pigmentosum, Cockayne syndrome and ataxia-telangiectasia-like disorder, respectively. Next, congenital metabolic errors, apoptosis due to lipid peroxidation seemed to cause neuronal damage in neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis. Oxidative stress of DNA combined with reduced expression of antioxidant enzymes occurred in the lesion of the cerebral cortex in mucopolysaccharidoses and mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes. In childhood-onset neurodegenerative disorders, increased oxidative DNA damage and lipid peroxidation may lead to motor neuron death in spinal muscular atrophy like in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In patients with dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy, a triplet repeat disease, deposition of oxidative products of nucleosides and reduced expression of antioxidant enzymes were found in the lenticular nucleus. In contrast, the involvement of oxidative stress is not definite in patients with Lafora disease. Rett syndrome patients showed changes of oxidative stress markers and antioxidant power in urines, although the changes may be related to systemic complications. PMID:22411250

  6. Enhanced nitric oxide generation from nitric oxide synthases as the cause of increased peroxynitrite formation during acute restraint stress: Effects on carotid responsiveness to angiotensinergic stimuli in type-1 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Josimar D; Pernomian, Larissa; Gomes, Mayara S; Moreira, Rafael P; do Prado, Alejandro F; da Silva, Carlos H T P; de Oliveira, Ana M

    2016-07-15

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with reactive oxygen and nitrogen species accumulation. Behavioral stress increases nitric oxide production, which may trigger a massive impact on vascular cells and accelerate cardiovascular complications under oxidative stress conditions such as Diabetes. For this study, type-1 Diabetes mellitus was induced in Wistar rats by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. After 28 days, cumulative concentration-response curves for angiotensin II were obtained in endothelium-intact carotid rings from diabetic rats that underwent to acute restraint stress for 3h. The contractile response evoked by angiotensin II was increased in carotid arteries from diabetic rats. Acute restraint stress did not alter angiotensin II-induced contraction in carotid arteries from normoglycaemic rats. However acute stress combined with Diabetes increased angiotensin II-induced contraction in carotid rings. Western blot experiments and the inhibition of nitric oxide synthases in functional assays showed that neuronal, endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase isoforms contribute to the increased formation of peroxynitrite and contractile hyperreactivity to angiotensin II in carotid rings from stressed diabetic rats. In summary, these findings suggest that the increased superoxide anion generation in carotid arteries from diabetic rats associated to the increased local nitric oxide synthases expression and activity induced by acute restrain stress were responsible for exacerbating the local formation of peroxynitrite and the contraction induced by angiotensin II. PMID:27118175

  7. Stress causing psychosomatic illness among nurses

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Pratibha P.

    2009-01-01

    Stress in nurses is an endemic problem. It contributes to health problems in nurses and decreases their efficiency. Documenting the causes and extent of stress in any healthcare unit is essential for successful interventions Aim: Establishing the existence and extent of work stress in nurses in a hospital setting, identifying the major sources of stress, and finding the incidence of psychosomatic illness related to stress. Materials and Methods: This study used a questionnaire relating to stressors and a list of psychosomatic ailments. One hundred and six nurses responded and they were all included in the study. Stressors were based on four main factors: work related, work interactions, job satisfaction, and home stress. The factors relating to stress were given weights according to the severity. The total score of 50 was divided into mild, moderate, severe, and burnout. Results: Most important causes of stress were jobs not finishing in time because of shortage of staff, conflict with patient relatives, overtime, and insufficient pay. Psychosomatic disorders like acidity, back pain, stiffness in neck and shoulders, forgetfulness, anger, and worry significantly increased in nurses having higher stress scores. Increase in age or seniority did not significantly decrease stress. Conclusion: Moderate levels of stress are seen in a majority of the nurses. Incidence of psychosomatic illness increases with the level of stress. Healthcare organizations need to urgently take preemptive steps to counter this problem. PMID:20165610

  8. Drug-Induced Oxidative Stress and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Deavall, Damian G.; Martin, Elizabeth A.; Horner, Judith M.; Roberts, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are a byproduct of normal metabolism and have roles in cell signaling and homeostasis. Species include oxygen radicals and reactive nonradicals. Mechanisms exist that regulate cellular levels of ROS, as their reactive nature may otherwise cause damage to key cellular components including DNA, protein, and lipid. When the cellular antioxidant capacity is exceeded, oxidative stress can result. Pleiotropic deleterious effects of oxidative stress are observed in numerous disease states and are also implicated in a variety of drug-induced toxicities. In this paper, we examine the nature of ROS-induced damage on key cellular targets of oxidative stress. We also review evidence implicating ROS in clinically relevant, drug-related side effects including doxorubicin-induced cardiac damage, azidothymidine-induced myopathy, and cisplatin-induced ototoxicity. PMID:22919381

  9. Oxidative Stress Resistance in Deinococcus radiodurans†

    PubMed Central

    Slade, Dea; Radman, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Deinococcus radiodurans is a robust bacterium best known for its capacity to repair massive DNA damage efficiently and accurately. It is extremely resistant to many DNA-damaging agents, including ionizing radiation and UV radiation (100 to 295 nm), desiccation, and mitomycin C, which induce oxidative damage not only to DNA but also to all cellular macromolecules via the production of reactive oxygen species. The extreme resilience of D. radiodurans to oxidative stress is imparted synergistically by an efficient protection of proteins against oxidative stress and an efficient DNA repair mechanism, enhanced by functional redundancies in both systems. D. radiodurans assets for the prevention of and recovery from oxidative stress are extensively reviewed here. Radiation- and desiccation-resistant bacteria such as D. radiodurans have substantially lower protein oxidation levels than do sensitive bacteria but have similar yields of DNA double-strand breaks. These findings challenge the concept of DNA as the primary target of radiation toxicity while advancing protein damage, and the protection of proteins against oxidative damage, as a new paradigm of radiation toxicity and survival. The protection of DNA repair and other proteins against oxidative damage is imparted by enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidant defense systems dominated by divalent manganese complexes. Given that oxidative stress caused by the accumulation of reactive oxygen species is associated with aging and cancer, a comprehensive outlook on D. radiodurans strategies of combating oxidative stress may open new avenues for antiaging and anticancer treatments. The study of the antioxidation protection in D. radiodurans is therefore of considerable potential interest for medicine and public health. PMID:21372322

  10. Oxidative Stress Markers in Sputum

    PubMed Central

    Antus, Balazs

    2016-01-01

    Although oxidative stress is thought to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory airway diseases, its assessment in clinical practice remains elusive. In recent years, it has been conceptualized that oxidative stress markers in sputum should be employed to monitor oxidative processes in patients with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), or cystic fibrosis (CF). In this review, the use of sputum-based oxidative markers was explored and potential clinical applications were considered. Among lipid peroxidation-derived products, 8-isoprostane and malondialdehyde have been the most frequently investigated, while nitrosothiols and nitrotyrosine may serve as markers of nitrosative stress. Several studies have showed higher levels of these products in patients with asthma, COPD, or CF compared to healthy subjects. Marker concentrations could be further increased during exacerbations and decreased along with recovery of these diseases. Measurement of oxidized guanine species and antioxidant enzymes in the sputum could be other approaches for assessing oxidative stress in pulmonary patients. Collectively, even though there are promising findings in this field, further clinical studies using more established detection techniques are needed to clearly show the benefit of these measurements in the follow-up of patients with inflammatory airway diseases. PMID:26885248

  11. Phagocytes and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Babior, B M

    2000-07-01

    Neutrophils and other phagocytes manufacture O(2)(-) (superoxide) by the one-electron reduction of oxygen at the expense of NADPH. Most of the O(2)(-) reacts with itself to form H(2)O(2) (hydrogen peroxide). From these agents a large number of highly reactive microbicidal oxidants are formed, including HOCl (hypochlorous acid), which is produced by the myeloperoxidase-catalyzed oxidation of Cl(-) by H(2)O(2); OH(*) (hydroxyl radical), produced by the reduction of H(2)O(2) by Fe(++) or Cu(+); ONOO(-) (peroxynitrite), formed by the reaction between O(2)(-) and NO(*); and many others. These reactive oxidants are manufactured for the purpose of killing invading microorganisms, but they also inflict damage on nearby tissues, and are thought to be of pathogenic significance in a large number of diseases. Included among these are emphysema, acute respiratory distress syndrome, atherosclerosis, reperfusion injury, malignancy and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:10936476

  12. Control of oxidative stress in hepatocellular carcinoma: Helpful or harmful?

    PubMed Central

    Takaki, Akinobu; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is becoming recognized as a key factor in the progression of chronic liver disease (CLD) and hepatocarcinogenesis. The metabolically important liver is a major reservoir of mitochondria that serve as sources of reactive oxygen species, which are apparently responsible for the initiation of necroinflammation. As a result, CLD could be a major inducer of oxidative stress. Chronic hepatitis C is a powerful generator of oxidative stress, causing a high rate of hepatocarcinogenesis among patients with cirrhosis. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis is also associated with oxidative stress although its hepatocarcinogenic potential is lower than that of chronic hepatitis C. Analyses of serum markers and histological findings have shown that hepatocellular carcinoma correlates with oxidative stress and experimental data indicate that oxidative stress increases the likelihood of developing hepatocarcinogenesis. However, the results of antioxidant therapy have not been favorable. Physiological oxidative stress is a necessary biological response, and thus adequate control of oxidative stress and a balance between oxidative and anti-oxidative responses is important. Several agents including metformin and L-carnitine can reportedly control mechanistic oxidative stress. This study reviews the importance of oxidative stress in hepatocarcinogenesis and of control strategies for the optimal survival of patients with CLD and hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:25954479

  13. Role of the yeast acetyltransferase Mpr1 in oxidative stress: regulation of oxygen reactive species caused by a toxic proline catabolism intermediate.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Michiyo; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2004-08-24

    The MPR1 gene, which is found in the Sigma1278b strain but is not present in the sequenced laboratory strain S288C, of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a previously uncharacterized N-acetyltransferase that detoxifies the proline analogue azetidine-2-carboxylate (AZC). However, it is unlikely that AZC is a natural substrate of Mpr1 because AZC is found only in some plant species. In our search for the physiological function of Mpr1, we found that mpr1-disrupted cells were hypersensitive to oxidative stresses and contained increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In contrast, overexpression of MPR1 leads to an increase in cell viability and a decrease in ROS level after oxidative treatments. These results indicate that Mpr1 can reduce intracellular oxidation levels. Because put2-disrupted yeast cells lacking Delta(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) dehydrogenase have increased ROS, we examined the role of Mpr1 in put2-disrupted strains. When grown on media containing urea and proline as the nitrogen source, put2-disrupted cells did not grow as well as WT cells and accumulated intracellular levels of P5C that were first detected in yeast cells and ROS. On the other hand, put2-disrupted cells that overexpressed MPR1 had considerably lower ROS levels. In vitro studies with bacterially expressed Mpr1 demonstrated that Mpr1 can acetylate P5C, or, more likely, its equilibrium compound glutamate-gamma-semialdehyde, at neutral pH. These results suggest that the proline catabolism intermediate P5C is toxic to yeast cells because of the formation of ROS, and Mpr1 regulates the ROS level under P5C-induced oxidative stress. PMID:15308773

  14. Levels and Causes of Stress Among Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Allan J.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Medical and dental residents at the University of Rochester Medical Center were surveyed with a brief symptom inventory to measure stress and its causes. Significantly elevated stress showed for rotations in the emergency room, greater frequency of being on call, and reduced sleep. (Author/MLW)

  15. Ethanol and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sun, A Y; Ingelman-Sundberg, M; Neve, E; Matsumoto, H; Nishitani, Y; Minowa, Y; Fukui, Y; Bailey, S M; Patel, V B; Cunningham, C C; Zima, T; Fialova, L; Mikulikova, L; Popov, P; Malbohan, I; Janebova, M; Nespor, K; Sun, G Y

    2001-05-01

    This article represents the proceedings of a workshop at the 2000 ISBRA Meeting in Yokohama, Japan. The chair was Albert Y. Sun. The presentations were (1) Ethanol-inducible cytochrome P-4502E1 in alcoholic liver disease, by Magnus Ingelman-Sundberg and Etienne Neve; (2) Regulation of NF-kappaB by ethanol, by H. Matsumoto, Y. Nishitani, Y. Minowa, and Y. Fukui; (3) Chronic ethanol consumption increases concentration of oxidized proteins in rat liver, by Shannon M. Bailey, Vinood B. Patel, and Carol C. Cunningham; (4) Antiphospholipids antibodies and oxidized modified low-density lipoprotein in chronic alcoholic patients, by Tomas Zima, Lenka Fialova, Ludmila Mikulikova, Ptr Popov, Ivan Malbohan, Marta Janebova, and Karel Nespor; and (5) Amelioration of ethanol-induced damage by polyphenols, by Albert Y. Sun and Grace Y. Sun. PMID:11391077

  16. Hemoglobin oxidative stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croci, S.; Ortalli, I.; Pedrazzi, G.; Passeri, G.; Piccolo, P.

    2000-07-01

    Venous blood obtained from healthy donors and from patients suffering from breast cancer have been treated with acetylphenylhydrazine (APH) for different time. Mössbauer spectra of the packed red cells have been recorded and compared. The largest difference occurs after 50 min of treatment with APH where the patient samples show a broad spectral pattern indicating an advanced hemoglobin oxidation. These results may have some relevance in early cancer diagnosis.

  17. Oxidative Stress Mechanisms Caused by Ag Nanoparticles (NM300K) are Different from Those of AgNO3: Effects in the Soil Invertebrate Enchytraeus crypticus

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Maria J.; Maria, Vera L.; Scott-Fordsmand, Janeck J.; Amorim, Mónica J. B.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of toxicity of Ag nanoparticles (NPs) are unclear, in particular in the terrestrial environment. In this study the effects of AgNP (AgNM300K) were assessed in terms of oxidative stress in the soil worm Enchytraeus crypticus, using a range of biochemical markers [catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GR), total glutathione (TG), metallothionein (MT), lipid peroxidation (LPO)]. E. crypticus were exposed during 3 and 7 days (d) to the reproduction EC20, EC50 and EC80 levels of both AgNP and AgNO3. AgNO3 induced oxidative stress earlier (3 d) than AgNP (7 d), both leading to LPO despite the activation of the anti-redox system. MT increased only for AgNP. The Correspondence Analysis showed a clear separation between AgNO3 and AgNP, with e.g., CAT being the main descriptor for AgNP for 7 d. LPO, GST and GPx were for both 3 and 7 d associated with AgNO3, whereas MT and TG were associated with AgNP. These results may reflect a delay in the effects of AgNP compared to AgNO3 due to the slower release of Ag+ ions from the AgNP, although this does not fully explain the observed differences, i.e., we can conclude that there is a nanoparticle effect. PMID:26287225

  18. Critical Role of FoxO1 in Granulosa Cell Apoptosis Caused by Oxidative Stress and Protective Effects of Grape Seed Procyanidin B2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia-Qing; Gao, Bin-Wen; Wang, Jing; Ren, Qiao-Ling; Chen, Jun-Feng; Ma, Qiang; Zhang, Zi-Jing; Xing, Bao-Song

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are closely related to the follicular granulosa cell apoptosis. Grape seed procyanidin B2 (GSPB2) has been reported to possess potent antioxidant activity. However, the GSPB2-mediated protective effects and the underlying molecular mechanisms in granulosa cell apoptosis process remain unknown. In this study, we showed for the first time that GSPB2 treatment decreased FoxO1 protein level, improved granulosa cell viability, upregulated LC3-II protein level, and reduced granulosa cell apoptosis rate. Under a condition of oxidative stress, GSPB2 reversed FoxO1 nuclear localization and increased its level in cytoplasm. In addition, FoxO1 knockdown inhibited the protective effects of GSPB2 induced. Our findings suggest that FoxO1 plays a pivotal role in regulating autophagy in granulosa cells, GSPB2 exerts a potent and beneficial role in reducing granulosa cell apoptosis and inducing autophagy process, and targeting FoxO1 could be significant in fighting against oxidative stress-reduced female reproductive system diseases. PMID:27057282

  19. Critical Role of FoxO1 in Granulosa Cell Apoptosis Caused by Oxidative Stress and Protective Effects of Grape Seed Procyanidin B2

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jia-Qing; Gao, Bin-Wen; Wang, Jing; Ren, Qiao-Ling; Chen, Jun-Feng; Ma, Qiang; Zhang, Zi-Jing; Xing, Bao-Song

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are closely related to the follicular granulosa cell apoptosis. Grape seed procyanidin B2 (GSPB2) has been reported to possess potent antioxidant activity. However, the GSPB2-mediated protective effects and the underlying molecular mechanisms in granulosa cell apoptosis process remain unknown. In this study, we showed for the first time that GSPB2 treatment decreased FoxO1 protein level, improved granulosa cell viability, upregulated LC3-II protein level, and reduced granulosa cell apoptosis rate. Under a condition of oxidative stress, GSPB2 reversed FoxO1 nuclear localization and increased its level in cytoplasm. In addition, FoxO1 knockdown inhibited the protective effects of GSPB2 induced. Our findings suggest that FoxO1 plays a pivotal role in regulating autophagy in granulosa cells, GSPB2 exerts a potent and beneficial role in reducing granulosa cell apoptosis and inducing autophagy process, and targeting FoxO1 could be significant in fighting against oxidative stress-reduced female reproductive system diseases. PMID:27057282

  20. Inheritance of the Bantu/Benin haplotype causes less severe hemolytic and oxidative stress in sickle cell anemia patients treated with hydroxycarbamide.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Jéssika V; Silva, Danilo G H; Torres, Lidiane S; Belini-Junior, Edis; Barberino, Willian M; Oliveira, Renan G; Carrocini, Gisele C S; Gelaleti, Gabriela B; Lobo, Clarisse L C; Bonini-Domingos, Claudia R

    2016-07-01

    Beta S-globin gene cluster haplotypes (β(S)-haplotypes) can modulate the response to hydroxycarbamide (HC) treatment in sickle cell anemia (SCA) patients. In Brazil, the most common haplotypes are Bantu and Benin, and both confer a poor prognosis for patients when untreated with HC. We evaluated oxidative and hemolytic biomarkers in 48 SCA patients undergoing HC treatment separated in three subgroups: Bantu/Bantu, Bantu/Benin and Benin/Benin haplotype. On the basis of reduced haptoglobin (HP) levels, patients with Bantu/Bantu haplotypes had 3.0% higher hemolysis degree when compared with those with Bantu/Benin haplotypes (P=0.01). The Benin/Benin patients had 53.6% greater lipid peroxidation index than the Bantu/Bantu patients (P=0.01) because of evaluated thiobarbituric acid reactive species levels. The Bantu/Benin subgroup had intermediate levels of hemolytic and oxidative stress markers compared with the homozygous subgroups. Through strict inclusion criteria adopted, as well as consolidated and well-described hemolytic and the oxidative parameters evaluated, we suggest a haplotype-interaction response to HC treatment mediated by a 'balance' between the genetic factors of each haplotype studied. PMID:26961071

  1. Oxidative Stress and Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; O, Wuliji; Li, Wei; Jiang, Zhi-Gang; Ghanbari, Hossein A.

    2013-01-01

    Living cells continually generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) through the respiratory chain during energetic metabolism. ROS at low or moderate concentration can play important physiological roles. However, an excessive amount of ROS under oxidative stress would be extremely deleterious. The central nervous system (CNS) is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress due to its high oxygen consumption, weakly antioxidative systems and the terminal-differentiation characteristic of neurons. Thus, oxidative stress elicits various neurodegenerative diseases. In addition, chemotherapy could result in severe side effects on the CNS and peripheral nervous system (PNS) of cancer patients, and a growing body of evidence demonstrates the involvement of ROS in drug-induced neurotoxicities as well. Therefore, development of antioxidants as neuroprotective drugs is a potentially beneficial strategy for clinical therapy. In this review, we summarize the source, balance maintenance and physiologic functions of ROS, oxidative stress and its toxic mechanisms underlying a number of neurodegenerative diseases, and the possible involvement of ROS in chemotherapy-induced toxicity to the CNS and PNS. We ultimately assess the value for antioxidants as neuroprotective drugs and provide our comments on the unmet needs. PMID:24351827

  2. Mitochondrial oxidative stress promotes atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wenjun; Santulli, Gaetano; Reiken, Steven R.; Yuan, Qi; Osborne, Brent W.; Chen, Bi-Xing; Marks, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation (AF). Indeed, the prevalence of AF increases with age as does oxidative stress. However, the mechanisms linking redox state to AF are not well understood. In this study we identify a link between oxidative stress and aberrant intracellular Ca2+ release via the type 2 ryanodine receptor (RyR2) that promotes AF. We show that RyR2 are oxidized in the atria of patients with chronic AF compared with individuals in sinus rhythm. To dissect the molecular mechanism linking RyR2 oxidation to AF we used two murine models harboring RyR2 mutations that cause intracellular Ca2+ leak. Mice with intracellular Ca2+ leak exhibited increased atrial RyR2 oxidation, mitochondrial dysfunction, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and AF susceptibility. Both genetic inhibition of mitochondrial ROS production and pharmacological treatment of RyR2 leakage prevented AF. Collectively, our results indicate that alterations of RyR2 and mitochondrial ROS generation form a vicious cycle in the development of AF. Targeting this previously unrecognized mechanism could be useful in developing effective interventions to prevent and treat AF. PMID:26169582

  3. Space flight and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Stein, T P

    2002-10-01

    Space flight is associated with an increase in oxidative stress after return to 1g. The effect is more pronounced after long-duration space flight. The effects lasts for several weeks after landing. In humans there is increased lipid peroxidation in erythrocyte membranes, reduction in some blood antioxidants, and increased urinary excretion of 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2alpha) and 8-oxo-7,8 dihydro-2 deoxyguanosine. Isoprostane 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2alpha) and 8-oxo-7,8 dihydro-2 deoxyguanosine are markers for oxidative damage to lipids and DNA, respectively. The changes have been attributed to a combination of the energy deficiency that occurs during flight and substrate competition for amino acids occurring between repleting muscle and other tissues during the recovery phase. The observations in humans have been complemented by rodent studies. Most rodent studies showed increased production of lipid peroxidation products postflight and decreased antioxidant enzyme activity postflight. The rodent observations were attributed to the stress associated with reentry into Earth's gravity. Decreasing the imbalance between the production of endogenous oxidant defenses and oxidant production by increasing the supply of dietary antioxidants may lessen the severity of the postflight increase in oxidative stress. PMID:12361781

  4. Space flight and oxidative stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.

    2002-01-01

    Space flight is associated with an increase in oxidative stress after return to 1g. The effect is more pronounced after long-duration space flight. The effects lasts for several weeks after landing. In humans there is increased lipid peroxidation in erythrocyte membranes, reduction in some blood antioxidants, and increased urinary excretion of 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2alpha) and 8-oxo-7,8 dihydro-2 deoxyguanosine. Isoprostane 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2alpha) and 8-oxo-7,8 dihydro-2 deoxyguanosine are markers for oxidative damage to lipids and DNA, respectively. The changes have been attributed to a combination of the energy deficiency that occurs during flight and substrate competition for amino acids occurring between repleting muscle and other tissues during the recovery phase. The observations in humans have been complemented by rodent studies. Most rodent studies showed increased production of lipid peroxidation products postflight and decreased antioxidant enzyme activity postflight. The rodent observations were attributed to the stress associated with reentry into Earth's gravity. Decreasing the imbalance between the production of endogenous oxidant defenses and oxidant production by increasing the supply of dietary antioxidants may lessen the severity of the postflight increase in oxidative stress.

  5. Oxidative stress and alopecia areata

    PubMed Central

    Prie, BE; Voiculescu, VM; Ionescu-Bozdog, OB; Petrutescu, B; Iosif, L; Gaman, LE; Clatici, VG; Stoian, I; Giurcaneanu, C

    2015-01-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) is an inflammatory and autoimmune disease presenting with non-scarring hair loss. The aethiopathogenesis of alopecia areata is unclear and many factors including autoimmunity, genetic predisposition, emotional and environmental stress are thought to play important roles in its development. Antioxidant/ oxidant balance perturbation is a common feature in autoimmune, emotional and environmental stress. Therefore, our paper discusses the implications of oxidative stress in alopecia areata. Abbreviations: AA = alopecia areata, ROS = reactive oxygen species, H2O2 = hydrogen peroxide, TBARS = thiobarbituric acid rective substances, MDA = malondialdehyde, TBARS = thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, SOD = superoxide dismutase, CAT = catalase, GSH-Px = glutathione peroxidase, PON1 = paraoxonase 1, HO-1 = hemoxigenase 1, TrxR = thioredoxin reductase, GSH = glutathione PMID:26361510

  6. Marine carotenoids and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Riccioni, Graziano

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species plays an important role in the etiology of many diseases. Dietary phytochemical products, such as bioactive food components and marine carotenoids (asthaxantin, lutein, β-carotene, fucoxanthin), have shown an antioxidant effect in reducing oxidative markers stress. Scientific evidence supports the beneficial role of phytochemicals in the prevention of some chronic diseases. Many carotenoids with high antioxidant properties have shown a reduction in disease risk both in epidemiological studies and supplementation human trials. However, controlled clinical trials and dietary intervention studies using well-defined subjects population have not provided clear evidence of these substances in the prevention of diseases. The most important aspects of this special issue will cover the synthesis, biological activities, and clinical applications of marine carotenoids, with particular attention to recent evidence regarding anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties in the prevention of cardiovascular disease. PMID:22363224

  7. Marine Carotenoids and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Riccioni, Graziano

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species plays an important role in the etiology of many diseases. Dietary phytochemical products, such as bioactive food components and marine carotenoids (asthaxantin, lutein, β-carotene, fucoxanthin), have shown an antioxidant effect in reducing oxidative markers stress. Scientific evidence supports the beneficial role of phytochemicals in the prevention of some chronic diseases. Many carotenoids with high antioxidant properties have shown a reduction in disease risk both in epidemiological studies and supplementation human trials. However, controlled clinical trials and dietary intervention studies using well-defined subjects population have not provided clear evidence of these substances in the prevention of diseases. The most important aspects of this special issue will cover the synthesis, biological activities, and clinical applications of marine carotenoids, with particular attention to recent evidence regarding anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties in the prevention of cardiovascular disease. PMID:22363224

  8. Geophysical pertubations as the main cause of northern human stress.

    PubMed

    Hasnulin, V I

    2007-01-01

    It was shown that frequent geomagnetic perturbations and also meteorological, climatic, photoperiodic, and gravitational changes in high latitudes are the main cause for human chronic stress in the North Free-radical damage of cellar and subcellar membranes (oxidative stress), disturbance of ferments' functions and changes in metabolism, connected with it; decrease in functional, detoxical, secretory and other functions of liver and other barrier organs; tension of endocrine adaptive functions; decrease in immune protection; psychoemotional strain are the main elements of geophysically conditioned northern stress. The slow wave regularity of stress reaction course has been found. Dependence of pathological reacting to meteo-geophysical factors of northern stress manifestation has been found out. The data of mechanisms providing stability to geophysically conditioned stress have been presented. PMID:17929640

  9. Chronic stress causes amygdala hyperexcitability in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Rosenkranz, J. Amiel; Venheim, Emily R.; Padival, Mallika

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic stress is a major health concern, often leading to depression, anxiety or when severe enough, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). While many studies demonstrate that the amygdala is hyper-responsive in patients with these disorders, the cellular neurophysiological effects of chronic stress on the systems that underlie psychiatric disorders, such as the amygdala, are relatively unknown. Methods In this study, we examined the effects of chronic stress on the activity and excitability of amygdala neurons in vivo in rats. We used in vivo intracellular recordings from single neurons of the lateral amygdala (LAT) to measure neuronal properties, and determine the cellular mechanism for the effects of chronic stress on LAT neurons. Results We found a mechanism for the effects of chronic stress on amygdala activity, specifically that chronic stress increased excitability of LAT pyramidal neurons recorded in vivo. This hyperexcitability was caused by a reduction of a regulatory influence during action potential firing, facilitating LAT neuronal activity. The effects of stress on excitability were occluded by agents that block KCa channels, and reversed by pharmacological enhancement of KCa channels. Conclusions These data demonstrate a specific channelopathy that occurs in the amygdala after chronic stress. This enhanced excitability of amygdala neurons after chronic stress may explain the observed hyper-responsiveness of the amygdala in patients with PTSD, and may facilitate the emergence of depression or anxiety in other patients. PMID:20378100

  10. Chasing great paths of Helmut Sies "Oxidative Stress".

    PubMed

    Majima, Hideyuki J; Indo, Hiroko P; Nakanishi, Ikuo; Suenaga, Shigeaki; Matsumoto, Ken-Ichiro; Matsui, Hirofumi; Minamiyama, Yukiko; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Yen, Hsiu-Chuan; Hawkins, Clare L; Davies, Michael J; Ozawa, Toshihiko; St Clair, Daret K

    2016-04-01

    Prof. Dr. Helmut Sies is a pioneer of "Oxidative Stress", and has published over 18 papers with the name of "Oxidative Stress" in the title. He has been Editor-in-Chief of the journal "Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics" for many years, and is a former Editor-in-Chief of the journal "Free Radical Research". He has clarified our understanding of the causes of chronic developing diseases, and has studied antioxidant factors. In this article, importance of "Oxidative Stress" and our mitochondrial oxidative stress studies; roles of mitochondrial ROS, effects of vitamin E and its homologues in oxidative stress-related diseases, effects of antioxidants in vivo and in vitro, and a mitochondrial superoxide theory for oxidative stress diseases and aging are introduced, and some of our interactions with Helmut are described, congratulating and appreciating his great path. PMID:27095216

  11. [Statins and oxidative stress].

    PubMed

    Filip-Ciubotaru, Florina; Foia, Liliana; Manciuc, Carmen

    2009-01-01

    Statins, as inhibitors of the first regulatory enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis --HMG-CoA reductase--have a special impact in medical practice. Given their therapeutic efficacy, statins are believed to be the strongest class of agents in the treatment of cardiovascular disorders. Moreover, besides decreasing total cholesterol and C-LDL levels, numerous fundamental and clinical researches suggest that statins also have an antiinflammatory effect. Inflammation is closely related to the production of oxygen-derived reactive species (ROS). The antioxidant effects of statins associated with their ability to block the formation and/or action of ROS may add up their therapeutic efficacy. Within this context, the present paper presents data in literature related to the effect of statins on the expression and activity of NAD(P)H oxidase, activity of the enzymes involved in the antioxidative defence (SOD, GPx, catalase, paraoxonase), and their ability to act as free radical scavengers and oxidized-LDL inhibitors. By their antioxidant properties statins may decrease the atherogenic potential of lipoproteins. PMID:21495335

  12. Diabetes and the Brain: Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Muriach, María; Flores-Bellver, Miguel; Romero, Francisco J.; Barcia, Jorge M.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common metabolic disorder associated with chronic complications including a state of mild to moderate cognitive impairment, in particular psychomotor slowing and reduced mental flexibility, not attributable to other causes, and shares many symptoms that are best described as accelerated brain ageing. A common theory for aging and for the pathogenesis of this cerebral dysfunctioning in diabetes relates cell death to oxidative stress in strong association to inflammation, and in fact nuclear factor κB (NFκB), a master regulator of inflammation and also a sensor of oxidative stress, has a strategic position at the crossroad between oxidative stress and inflammation. Moreover, metabolic inflammation is, in turn, related to the induction of various intracellular stresses such as mitochondrial oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and autophagy defect. In parallel, blockade of autophagy can relate to proinflammatory signaling via oxidative stress pathway and NFκB-mediated inflammation. PMID:25215171

  13. Oxidative stress, NADPH oxidases, and arteries.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qi-An; Runge, Marschall S; Madamanchi, Nageswara R

    2016-05-10

    Atherosclerosis and its major complications - myocardial infarction and stroke - remain major causes of death and disability in the United States and world-wide. Indeed, with dramatic increases in obesity and diabetes mellitus, the prevalence and public health impact of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) will likely remain high. Major advances have been made in development of new therapies to reduce the incidence of atherosclerosis and CVD, in particular for treatment of hypercholesterolemia and hypertension. Oxidative stress is the common mechanistic link for many CVD risk factors. However, only recently have the tools existed to study the interface between oxidative stress and CVD in animal models. The most important source of reactive oxygen species (and hence oxidative stress) in vascular cells are the multiple forms of enzymes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NADPH oxidase). Recently published and emerging studies now clearly establish that: 1) NADPH oxidases are of critical importance in atherosclerosis and hypertension in animal models; 2) given the tissue-specific expression of key components of NADPH oxidase, it may be possible to target vascular oxidative stress for prevention of CVD. PMID:25649240

  14. Neonatal exposure to benzo[a]pyrene induces oxidative stress causing altered hippocampal cytomorphometry and behavior during early adolescence period of male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Patel, Bhupesh; Das, Saroj Kumar; Das, Swagatika; Das, Lipsa; Patri, Manorama

    2016-05-01

    Environmental neurotoxicants like benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) have been well documented regarding their potential to induce oxidative stress. However, neonatal exposure to B[a]P and its subsequent effect on anti-oxidant defence system and hippocampal cytomorphometry leading to behavioral changes have not been fully elucidated. We investigated the effect of acute exposure of B[a]P on five days old male Wistar pups administered with single dose of B[a]P (0.2 μg/kg BW) through intracisternal mode. Control group was administered with vehicle i.e., DMSO and a separate group of rats without any treatment was taken as naive group. Behavioral analysis showed anxiolytic-like behavior with significant increase in time spent in open arm in elevated plus maze. Further, significant reduction in fall off time during rotarod test showing B[a]P induced locomotor hyperactivity and impaired motor co-ordination in adolescent rats. B[a]P induced behavioral changes were further associated with altered anti-oxidant defence system involving significant reduction in the total ATPase, Na(+) K(+) ATPase, Mg(2+) ATPase, GR and GPx activity with a significant elevation in the activity of catalase and GST as compared to naive and control groups. Cytomorphometry of hippocampus showed that the number of neurons and glia in B[a]P treated group were significantly reduced as compared to naive and control. Subsequent observation showed that the area and perimeter of hippocampus, hippocampal neurons and neuronal nucleus were significantly reduced in B[a]P treated group as compared to naive and control. The findings of the present study suggest that the alteration in hippocampal cytomorphometry and neuronal population associated with impaired antioxidant signaling and mood in B[a]P treated group could be an outcome of neuromorphological alteration leading to pyknotic cell death or impaired differential migration of neurons during early postnatal brain development. PMID:26946409

  15. Causes and Consequences of Replication Stress

    PubMed Central

    Zeman, Michelle K.; Cimprich, Karlene A.

    2015-01-01

    Replication stress is a complex phenomenon which has serious implications for genome stability, cell survival, and human disease. Generation of aberrant replication fork structures containing single-stranded DNA activates the replication stress response, primarily mediated by the kinase ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR). ATR and its downstream effectors stabilize and help to restart stalled replication forks, avoiding the generation of DNA damage and genome instability. Understanding these pathways may be key to diagnosis and treatment of human diseases caused by defective responses to replication stress. PMID:24366029

  16. Inflammatory and oxidative stress in rotavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Carlos A; Acosta, Orlando

    2016-01-01

    Rotaviruses are the single leading cause of life-threatening diarrhea affecting children under 5 years of age. Rotavirus entry into the host cell seems to occur by sequential interactions between virion proteins and various cell surface molecules. The entry mechanisms seem to involve the contribution of cellular molecules having binding, chaperoning and oxido-reducing activities. It appears to be that the receptor usage and tropism of rotaviruses is determined by the species, cell line and rotavirus strain. Rotaviruses have evolved functions which can antagonize the host innate immune response, whereas are able to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, oxidative stress and inflammatory signaling. A networking between ER stress, inflammation and oxidative stress is suggested, in which release of calcium from the ER increases the generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to toxic accumulation of ROS within ER and mitochondria. Sustained ER stress potentially stimulates inflammatory response through unfolded protein response pathways. However, the detailed characterization of the molecular mechanisms underpinning these rotavirus-induced stressful conditions is still lacking. The signaling events triggered by host recognition of virus-associated molecular patterns offers an opportunity for the development of novel therapeutic strategies aimed at interfering with rotavirus infection. The use of N-acetylcysteine, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and PPARγ agonists to inhibit rotavirus infection opens a new way for treating the rotavirus-induced diarrhea and complementing vaccines. PMID:27175349

  17. Inflammatory and oxidative stress in rotavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Carlos A; Acosta, Orlando

    2016-05-12

    Rotaviruses are the single leading cause of life-threatening diarrhea affecting children under 5 years of age. Rotavirus entry into the host cell seems to occur by sequential interactions between virion proteins and various cell surface molecules. The entry mechanisms seem to involve the contribution of cellular molecules having binding, chaperoning and oxido-reducing activities. It appears to be that the receptor usage and tropism of rotaviruses is determined by the species, cell line and rotavirus strain. Rotaviruses have evolved functions which can antagonize the host innate immune response, whereas are able to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, oxidative stress and inflammatory signaling. A networking between ER stress, inflammation and oxidative stress is suggested, in which release of calcium from the ER increases the generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to toxic accumulation of ROS within ER and mitochondria. Sustained ER stress potentially stimulates inflammatory response through unfolded protein response pathways. However, the detailed characterization of the molecular mechanisms underpinning these rotavirus-induced stressful conditions is still lacking. The signaling events triggered by host recognition of virus-associated molecular patterns offers an opportunity for the development of novel therapeutic strategies aimed at interfering with rotavirus infection. The use of N-acetylcysteine, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and PPARγ agonists to inhibit rotavirus infection opens a new way for treating the rotavirus-induced diarrhea and complementing vaccines. PMID:27175349

  18. Oxidative stress and adrenocortical insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, R; Kowalczyk, J C; Meimaridou, E; Storr, H L; Metherell, L A

    2014-01-01

    Maintenance of redox balance is essential for normal cellular functions. Any perturbation in this balance due to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) leads to oxidative stress and may lead to cell dysfunction/damage/death. Mitochondria are responsible for the majority of cellular ROS production secondary to electron leakage as a consequence of respiration. Furthermore, electron leakage by the cytochrome P450 enzymes may render steroidogenic tissues acutely vulnerable to redox imbalance. The adrenal cortex, in particular, is well supplied with both enzymatic (glutathione peroxidases and peroxiredoxins) and non-enzymatic (vitamins A, C and E) antioxidants to cope with this increased production of ROS due to steroidogenesis. Nonetheless oxidative stress is implicated in several potentially lethal adrenal disorders including X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, triple A syndrome and most recently familial glucocorticoid deficiency. The finding of mutations in antioxidant defence genes in the latter two conditions highlights how disturbances in redox homeostasis may have an effect on adrenal steroidogenesis. PMID:24623797

  19. Oxidative Stress and Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Akhilesh Kumar; Srivastava, Mona; Srivastava, Ragini

    2014-01-01

    Background: Major causative factor for major depression is inflammation, autoimmune tissue damage and prolonged psychological stress, which leads to oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to know the association of free radicals and antioxidant status in subjects suffering from major depression. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients diagnosed as a case of unipolar depression as per DSM IV, fulfilling the inclusion and exclusion criteria were compared with 40 healthy age and sex matched controls. The sera of both the groups were collected taking aseptic precautions and were evaluated for the markers of oxidative stress and for the antioxidants. The age group of the sample and the controls was between 18-60 y, both males and females were equally represented in the groups. Results: A significantly high level of malondialdehyde (MDA) was found in the patients with major depression (1.95 ± 1.04 mmol/L) as compared to healthy controls (0.366 ± 0.175 mmol/L) (p < 0.0001). The serum level of nitrite was found to be lower in cases (23.18 ± 12.08 μmol/L) in comparison to controls (26.18 ± 8.68 μmol/L) (p = 0.1789). Similarly the serum level of ascorbic acid and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were significantly below as compared to healthy controls (all p < 0.0001). Ceruloplasmin levels were also depressed in cases (p = 0.3943). Conclusion: The study concluded that in the absence of known oxidative injury causative agents, the lowered levels of antioxidants and higher levels of MDA implicate the high degree of oxidative stress in unipolar depression. PMID:25653939

  20. Chronic sublethal stress causes bee colony failure

    PubMed Central

    Bryden, John; Gill, Richard J; Mitton, Robert A A; Raine, Nigel E; Jansen, Vincent A A; Hodgson, David

    2013-01-01

    Current bee population declines and colony failures are well documented yet poorly understood and no single factor has been identified as a leading cause. The evidence is equivocal and puzzling: for instance, many pathogens and parasites can be found in both failing and surviving colonies and field pesticide exposure is typically sublethal. Here, we investigate how these results can be due to sublethal stress impairing colony function. We mathematically modelled stress on individual bees which impairs colony function and found how positive density dependence can cause multiple dynamic outcomes: some colonies fail while others thrive. We then exposed bumblebee colonies to sublethal levels of a neonicotinoid pesticide. The dynamics of colony failure, which we observed, were most accurately described by our model. We argue that our model can explain the enigmatic aspects of bee colony failures, highlighting an important role for sublethal stress in colony declines. PMID:24112478

  1. Cofactor binding protects flavodoxin against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Lindhoud, Simon; van den Berg, Willy A M; van den Heuvel, Robert H H; Heck, Albert J R; van Mierlo, Carlo P M; van Berkel, Willem J H

    2012-01-01

    In organisms, various protective mechanisms against oxidative damaging of proteins exist. Here, we show that cofactor binding is among these mechanisms, because flavin mononucleotide (FMN) protects Azotobacter vinelandii flavodoxin against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidation. We identify an oxidation sensitive cysteine residue in a functionally important loop close to the cofactor, i.e., Cys69. Oxidative stress causes dimerization of apoflavodoxin (i.e., flavodoxin without cofactor), and leads to consecutive formation of sulfinate and sulfonate states of Cys69. Use of 7-chloro-4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBD-Cl) reveals that Cys69 modification to a sulfenic acid is a transient intermediate during oxidation. Dithiothreitol converts sulfenic acid and disulfide into thiols, whereas the sulfinate and sulfonate forms of Cys69 are irreversible with respect to this reagent. A variable fraction of Cys69 in freshly isolated flavodoxin is in the sulfenic acid state, but neither oxidation to sulfinic and sulfonic acid nor formation of intermolecular disulfides is observed under oxidising conditions. Furthermore, flavodoxin does not react appreciably with NBD-Cl. Besides its primary role as redox-active moiety, binding of flavin leads to considerably improved stability against protein unfolding and to strong protection against irreversible oxidation and other covalent thiol modifications. Thus, cofactors can protect proteins against oxidation and modification. PMID:22829943

  2. Triclosan (TCS) and Triclocarban (TCC) cause lifespan reduction and reproductive impairment through oxidative stress-mediated expression of the defensome in the monogonont rotifer (Brachionus koreanus).

    PubMed

    Han, Jeonghoon; Won, Eun-Ji; Hwang, Un-Ki; Kim, Il-Chan; Yim, Joung Han; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2016-01-01

    Triclosan (TCS) and Triclocarban (TCC) are used as antimicrobial agents and have been widely dispersed and detected in the marine environment. However, the toxicities of TCS and TCC have been poorly investigated in marine invertebrates. In this study, the effects of TCS and TCC on mortality, population growth, lifespan, and fecundity were examined in the monogonont rotifer (Brachionus koreanus) using cellular ROS levels, GST enzymatic activity, and gene expression of defensomes. The median lethal concentration (LC50) of TCS (393.1μg/L) and TCC (388.1μg/L) was also determined in the same species. In TCS- and TCC-exposed B. koreanus, growth retardation and reduced fecundity were observed and were shown to have a potentially deleterious effect on the life cycle of B. koreanus. In addition, time-dependent increases in ROS content (%) and GST enzymatic activity were shown in response to TCS and TCC exposure. Additionally, transcript levels of detoxification proteins (e.g., CYPs), antioxidant proteins (e.g., GST-sigma, Cu/ZnSOD, CAT), and heat shock proteins (Hsps) were modulated in response to TCS and TCC exposure over a 24h period. Our results indicate that TCS and TCC induce oxidative stress and transcriptional regulation of detoxification, antioxidant, and heat shock proteins, resulting in changes in lifespan and fecundity. PMID:27067728

  3. Protective effect of Mn(III)-desferrioxamine B upon oxidative stress caused by ozone and acid rain in the Brazilian soybean cultivar Glycine max "Sambaiba".

    PubMed

    Esposito, Jéssica Bordotti Nobre; Esposito, Breno Pannia; Azevedo, Ricardo Antunes; Cruz, Luciano Soares; da Silva, Luzimar Campos; de Souza, Silvia Ribeiro

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of the Mn complex (Mn(III)-desferrioxamine B (MnDFB)) on oxidative stress in the Brazilian soybean cultivar Glycine max "Sambaiba" following exposure to ozone and acid rain. We determined the suitable dose of MnDFB to apply to G. max seedlings using a dose-response curve. The highest superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and Mn content in leaves were found upon the application of 8 μM MnDFB. Thus, G. max seedlings pretreated with 8 μM MnDFB were individually exposed to ozone and acid rain simulated. Pretreatment with MnDFB reduced lipid peroxidation upon ozone exposure and increased SOD activity in leaves; it did not alter the metal content in any part of the plant. Conversely, following acid rain exposure, neither the metal content in leaves nor SOD enzyme activity were directly affected by MnDFB, unlike pH. Our findings demonstrated that exogenous MnDFB application before ozone exposure may modulate the MnSOD, Cu/ZnSOD, and FeSOD activities to combat the ROS excess in the cell. Here, we demonstrated that the applied dose of MnDFB enhances antioxidative defenses in soybean following exposure to acid rain and especially to ozone. PMID:25510614

  4. Aging causes decreased resistance to multiple stresses and a failure to activate specific stress response pathways.

    PubMed

    Dues, Dylan J; Andrews, Emily K; Schaar, Claire E; Bergsma, Alexis L; Senchuk, Megan M; Van Raamsdonk, Jeremy M

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we examine the relationship between stress resistance and aging. We find that resistance to multiple types of stress peaks during early adulthood and then declines with age. To dissect the underlying mechanisms, we use C. elegans transcriptional reporter strains that measure the activation of different stress responses including: the heat shock response, mitochondrial unfolded protein response, endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response, hypoxia response, SKN-1-mediated oxidative stress response, and the DAF-16-mediated stress response. We find that the decline in stress resistance with age is at least partially due to a decreased ability to activate protective mechanisms in response to stress. In contrast, we find that any baseline increase in stress caused by the advancing age is too mild to detectably upregulate any of the stress response pathways. Further exploration of how worms respond to stress with increasing age revealed that the ability to mount a hormetic response to heat stress is also lost with increasing age. Overall, this work demonstrates that resistance to all types of stress declines with age. Based on our data, we speculate that the decrease in stress resistance with advancing age results from a genetically-programmed inactivation of stress response pathways, not accumulation of damage. PMID:27053445

  5. Aging causes decreased resistance to multiple stresses and a failure to activate specific stress response pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bergsma, Alexis L.; Senchuk, Megan M.; Van Raamsdonk, Jeremy M.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we examine the relationship between stress resistance and aging. We find that resistance to multiple types of stress peaks during early adulthood and then declines with age. To dissect the underlying mechanisms, we use C. elegans transcriptional reporter strains that measure the activation of different stress responses including: the heat shock response, mitochondrial unfolded protein response, endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response, hypoxia response, SKN-1-mediated oxidative stress response, and the DAF-16-mediated stress response. We find that the decline in stress resistance with age is at least partially due to a decreased ability to activate protective mechanisms in response to stress. In contrast, we find that any baseline increase in stress caused by the advancing age is too mild to detectably upregulate any of the stress response pathways. Further exploration of how worms respond to stress with increasing age revealed that the ability to mount a hormetic response to heat stress is also lost with increasing age. Overall, this work demonstrates that resistance to all types of stress declines with age. Based on our data, we speculate that the decrease in stress resistance with advancing age results from a genetically-programmed inactivation of stress response pathways, not accumulation of damage. PMID:27053445

  6. Electromagnetic Fields, Oxidative Stress, and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Consales, Claudia; Merla, Caterina; Marino, Carmela; Benassi, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Electromagnetic fields (EMFs) originating both from both natural and manmade sources permeate our environment. As people are continuously exposed to EMFs in everyday life, it is a matter of great debate whether they can be harmful to human health. On the basis of two decades of epidemiological studies, an increased risk for childhood leukemia associated with Extremely Low Frequency fields has been consistently assessed, inducing the International Agency for Research on Cancer to insert them in the 2B section of carcinogens in 2001. EMFs interaction with biological systems may cause oxidative stress under certain circumstances. Since free radicals are essential for brain physiological processes and pathological degeneration, research focusing on the possible influence of the EMFs-driven oxidative stress is still in progress, especially in the light of recent studies suggesting that EMFs may contribute to the etiology of neurodegenerative disorders. This review synthesizes the emerging evidences about this topic, highlighting the wide data uncertainty that still characterizes the EMFs effect on oxidative stress modulation, as both pro-oxidant and neuroprotective effects have been documented. Care should be taken to avoid methodological limitations and to determine the patho-physiological relevance of any alteration found in EMFs-exposed biological system. PMID:22991514

  7. Oxidative stress and immunotoxicity induced by graphene oxide in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Chen, Minjie; Yin, Junfa; Liang, Yong; Yuan, Shaopeng; Wang, Fengbang; Song, Maoyong; Wang, Hailin

    2016-05-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) has been extensively explored as a promising nanomaterial for applications in biology because of its unique properties. Therefore, systematic investigation of GO toxicity is essential to determine its fate in the environment and potential adverse effects. In this study, acute toxicity, oxidative stress and immunotoxicity of GO were investigated in zebrafish. No obvious acute toxicity was observed when zebrafish were exposed to 1, 5, 10 or 50mg/L GO for 14 days. However, a number of cellular alterations were detected by histological analysis of the liver and intestine, including vacuolation, loose arrangement of cells, histolysis and disintegration of cell boundaries. As evidence for oxidative stress, malondialdehyde levels and superoxide dismutase and catalase activities were increased and glutathione content was decreased in the liver after treatment with GO. GO treatment induced an immune response in zebrafish, as demonstrated by increased expression of tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-1 β, and interleukin-6 in the spleen. Our findings demonstrated that GO administration in an aquatic system can cause oxidative stress and immune toxicity in adult zebrafish. To our knowledge, this is the first report of immune toxicity of GO in zebrafish. PMID:26921726

  8. Assessment of Workplace Stress: Occupational Stress, Its Consequences, and Common Causes of Teacher Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Jo-Ida; Sullivan, Brandon A.

    This chapter introduces teachers and other education professionals to the assessment of occupational stress. It begins with a brief discussion of what occupational stress is, and overview of the consequences of prolonged stress, and a review of the common causes of teacher stress. Next, it presents methods for reducing occupational stress through…

  9. Honey bee (Apis mellifera) drones survive oxidative stress due to increased tolerance instead of avoidance or repair of oxidative damage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxidative stress can lead to premature aging symptoms and cause acute mortality at higher doses in a range of organisms. Oxidative stress resistance and longevity are mechanistically and phenotypically linked: considerable variation in oxidative stress resistance exists among and within species and ...

  10. Interaction of aflatoxin B1 and fumonisin B1 in mice causes immunotoxicity and oxidative stress: Possible protective role using lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Abbès, Samir; Ben Salah-Abbès, Jalila; Jebali, Rania; Younes, Ridha Ben; Oueslati, Ridha

    2016-01-01

    Aflatoxins (AF) are important foodborne mycotoxins implicated in human health and have immunocytotoxic effects. The aims of this study were to evaluate a new aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and fumonisin B1 (FB1)-binding/degrading micro-organism for biological detoxification, to examine its ability to degrade AFB1 and FB1 in liquid medium, and to evaluate its potential in vivo protective role against any combined effects from AFB1 and FB1 on host splenocyte caspase-3 activity (reflecting DNA damage/cell death) and mRNA levels of select inflammation-regulating cytokines. Balb/c mice were divided into groups (10/group) and treated daily for 2 weeks by oral gavage with AFB1 (80 µg/kg BW), FB1 (100 µg/kg), AFB1 + FB1, or lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus paracasei BEJ01, 2 × 10(9) CFU/L, ∼2 mg/kg) - alone or in combination with the AFB1 and/or FB1. After the exposures, spleens were collected for measures of caspase-3 activity, lipid peroxidation (LP), and glutathione (GSH) content, expression of anti-oxidation protective enzymes (GPx and SOD), and mRNA levels of inflammation-regulating cytokines (e.g. IL-10, IL-4, IFNγ, TNFα). Thymii were also removed for analysis of apoptosis. The results indicated that, in the spleen, exposure to the mycotoxins led to increased caspase-3 activity, LP, and IL-10 and IL-4 mRNA levels, but decreased GSH content and down-regulated expression of GPx and SOD, and of IFNγ and TNFα mRNA. Co-treatment using Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) with AFB1 or FB1 suppressed levels of DNA fragmentation, normalized splenic LP and increased GSH levels, up-regulated expression of GPx and SOD, and normalized mRNA levels of the analyzed cytokines. It is concluded that AFB1 and FB1 might have combinational (synergistic moreso than additive) toxic effects in situ. Further, it can be seen that use of LAB induced protective effects against the oxidative stress and (immuno)toxicity of these agents in part through adhesion (and so likely diminished

  11. TIA1 oxidation inhibits stress granule assembly and sensitizes cells to stress-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Arimoto-Matsuzaki, Kyoko; Saito, Haruo; Takekawa, Mutsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Cytoplasmic stress granules (SGs) are multimolecular aggregates of stalled translation pre-initiation complexes that prevent the accumulation of misfolded proteins, and that are formed in response to certain types of stress including ER stress. SG formation contributes to cell survival not only by suppressing translation but also by sequestering some apoptosis regulatory factors. Because cells can be exposed to various stresses simultaneously in vivo, the regulation of SG assembly under multiple stress conditions is important but unknown. Here we report that reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as H2O2 oxidize the SG-nucleating protein TIA1, thereby inhibiting SG assembly. Thus, when cells are confronted with a SG-inducing stress such as ER stress caused by protein misfolding, together with ROS-induced oxidative stress, they cannot form SGs, resulting in the promotion of apoptosis. We demonstrate that the suppression of SG formation by oxidative stress may underlie the neuronal cell death seen in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26738979

  12. The Role of Oxidative Stress and Antioxidants in Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sha; Tan, Hor-Yue; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Zhang-Jin; Lao, Lixing; Wong, Chi-Woon; Feng, Yibin

    2015-01-01

    A complex antioxidant system has been developed in mammals to relieve oxidative stress. However, excessive reactive species derived from oxygen and nitrogen may still lead to oxidative damage to tissue and organs. Oxidative stress has been considered as a conjoint pathological mechanism, and it contributes to initiation and progression of liver injury. A lot of risk factors, including alcohol, drugs, environmental pollutants and irradiation, may induce oxidative stress in liver, which in turn results in severe liver diseases, such as alcoholic liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Application of antioxidants signifies a rational curative strategy to prevent and cure liver diseases involving oxidative stress. Although conclusions drawn from clinical studies remain uncertain, animal studies have revealed the promising in vivo therapeutic effect of antioxidants on liver diseases. Natural antioxidants contained in edible or medicinal plants often possess strong antioxidant and free radical scavenging abilities as well as anti-inflammatory action, which are also supposed to be the basis of other bioactivities and health benefits. In this review, PubMed was extensively searched for literature research. The keywords for searching oxidative stress were free radicals, reactive oxygen, nitrogen species, anti-oxidative therapy, Chinese medicines, natural products, antioxidants and liver diseases. The literature, including ours, with studies on oxidative stress and anti-oxidative therapy in liver diseases were the focus. Various factors that cause oxidative stress in liver and effects of antioxidants in the prevention and treatment of liver diseases were summarized, questioned, and discussed. PMID:26540040

  13. Mutational activation of a Galphai causes uncontrolled proliferation of aerial hyphae and increased sensitivity to heat and oxidative stress in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Q; Borkovich, K A

    1999-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins, consisting of alpha, beta, and gamma subunits, transduce environmental signals through coupling to plasma membrane-localized receptors. We previously reported that the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa possesses a Galpha protein, GNA-1, that is a member of the Galphai superfamily. Deletion of gna-1 leads to defects in apical extension, differentiation of asexual spores, sensitivity to hyperosmotic media, and female fertility. In addition, Deltagna-1 strains have lower intracellular cAMP levels under conditions that promote morphological abnormalities. To further define the function of GNA-1 in signal transduction in N. crassa, we examined properties of strains with mutationally activated gna-1 alleles (R178C or Q204L) as the only source of GNA-1 protein. These mutations are predicted to inhibit the GTPase activity of GNA-1 and lead to constitutive signaling. In the sexual cycle, gna-1(R178C) and gna-1(Q204L) strains are female-fertile, but produce fewer and larger perithecia than wild type. During asexual development, gna-1(R178C) and gna-1(Q204L) strains elaborate abundant, long aerial hyphae, produce less conidia, and possess lower levels of carotenoid pigments in comparison to wild-type controls. Furthermore, gna-1(R178C) and gna-1(Q204L) strains are more sensitive to heat shock and exposure to hydrogen peroxide than wild-type strains, while Deltagna-1 mutants are more resistant. In contrast to Deltagna-1 mutants, gna-1(R178C) and gna-1(Q204L) strains have higher steady-state levels of cAMP than wild type. The results suggest that GNA-1 possesses several Gbetagamma-independent functions in N. crassa. We propose that GNA-1 mediates signal transduction pathway(s) that regulate aerial hyphae development and sensitivity to heat and oxidative stresses, possibly through modulation of cAMP levels. PMID:9872952

  14. ROS Function in Redox Signaling and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Schieber, Michael; Chandel, Navdeep S.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress refers to elevated intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that cause damage to lipids, proteins and DNA. Oxidative stress has been linked to a myriad of pathologies. However, elevated ROS are also signaling molecules i.e. redox biology that maintain physiological functions. In this review we discuss the two faces of ROS, redox signaling and oxidative stress, and their contribution to both physiological and pathological conditions. Redox biology refers to low levels of ROS that activate signaling pathways to initiate biological processes while oxidative stress denotes high levels of ROS that incur damage to DNA, protein or lipids. Thus, the response to ROS displays hormesis. The In this review, we argue that redox biology, rather than oxidative stress, underlies physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:24845678

  15. Stress Field Caused by Polygonal Inclusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozaki, Hideaki; Horibe, Tadashi; Taya, Minoru

    In this paper, we analyze the elastic field caused by an arbitrary polygonal inclusion (with uniform eigenstrain prescribed) in an infinite elastic solid. Closed-form solutions are obtained using Green’s function technique. Numerical calculations are performed for the strain and stress distributions in and around a regular polygonal inclusion. It is shown that logarithmic-type stress singularity at each corner of the inclusion may vanish only for a square inclusion of a specific orientation. Unique properties of the Eshelby tensor of a regular polygonal inclusion found by Nozaki and Taya [ASME J. Appl. Mech., Vol. 64, 1997, pp. 495-502] are also investigated in detail and the terms that cause the properties are specified.

  16. Oxidative Stress in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Niedzielska, Ewa; Smaga, Irena; Gawlik, Maciej; Moniczewski, Andrzej; Stankowicz, Piotr; Pera, Joanna; Filip, Małgorzata

    2016-08-01

    The pathophysiologies of neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Alzheimer's disease (AD), are far from being fully explained. Oxidative stress (OS) has been proposed as one factor that plays a potential role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. Clinical and preclinical studies indicate that neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by higher levels of OS biomarkers and by lower levels of antioxidant defense biomarkers in the brain and peripheral tissues. In this article, we review the current knowledge regarding the involvement of OS in neurodegenerative diseases, based on clinical trials and animal studies. In addition, we analyze the effects of the drug-induced modulation of oxidative balance, and we explore pharmacotherapeutic strategies for OS reduction. PMID:26198567

  17. Oxidative Stress in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Csányi, Gábor; Miller, Francis J.

    2014-01-01

    In the special issue “Oxidative Stress in Cardiovascular Disease” authors were invited to submit papers that investigate key questions in the field of cardiovascular free radical biology. The original research articles included in this issue provide important information regarding novel aspects of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated signaling, which have important implications in physiological and pathophysiological cardiovascular processes. The issue also included a number of review articles that highlight areas of intense research in the fields of free radical biology and cardiovascular medicine. PMID:24722571

  18. Oxidative stress in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Csányi, Gábor; Miller, Francis J

    2014-01-01

    In the special issue "Oxidative Stress in Cardiovascular Disease" authors were invited to submit papers that investigate key questions in the field of cardiovascular free radical biology. The original research articles included in this issue provide important information regarding novel aspects of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated signaling, which have important implications in physiological and pathophysiological cardiovascular processes. The issue also included a number of review articles that highlight areas of intense research in the fields of free radical biology and cardiovascular medicine. PMID:24722571

  19. Oxidative stress in inherited mitochondrial diseases.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Genki; Cortopassi, Gino

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondria are a source of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mitochondrial diseases are the result of inherited defects in mitochondrially expressed genes. One potential pathomechanism for mitochondrial disease is oxidative stress. Oxidative stress can occur as the result of increased ROS production or decreased ROS protection. The role of oxidative stress in the five most common inherited mitochondrial diseases, Friedreich ataxia, LHON, MELAS, MERRF, and Leigh syndrome (LS), is discussed. Published reports of oxidative stress involvement in the pathomechanisms of these five mitochondrial diseases are reviewed. The strongest evidence for an oxidative stress pathomechanism among the five diseases was for Friedreich ataxia. In addition, a meta-analysis was carried out to provide an unbiased evaluation of the role of oxidative stress in the five diseases, by searching for "oxidative stress" citation count frequency for each disease. Of the five most common mitochondrial diseases, the strongest support for oxidative stress is for Friedreich ataxia (6.42%), followed by LHON (2.45%), MELAS (2.18%), MERRF (1.71%), and LS (1.03%). The increased frequency of oxidative stress citations was significant relative to the mean of the total pool of five diseases (p<0.01) and the mean of the four non-Friedreich diseases (p<0.0001). Thus there is support for oxidative stress in all five most common mitochondrial diseases, but the strongest, significant support is for Friedreich ataxia. PMID:26073122

  20. Oxidative stress in oral diseases.

    PubMed

    Kesarwala, A H; Krishna, M C; Mitchell, J B

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative species, including reactive oxygen species (ROS), are components of normal cellular metabolism and are required for intracellular processes as varied as proliferation, signal transduction, and apoptosis. In the situation of chronic oxidative stress, however, ROS contribute to various pathophysiologies and are involved in multiple stages of carcinogenesis. In head and neck cancers specifically, many common risk factors contribute to carcinogenesis via ROS-based mechanisms, including tobacco, areca quid, alcohol, and viruses. Given their widespread influence on the process of carcinogenesis, ROS and their related pathways are attractive targets for intervention. The effects of radiation therapy, a central component of treatment for nearly all head and neck cancers, can also be altered via interfering with oxidative pathways. These pathways are also relevant to the development of many benign oral diseases. In this review, we outline how ROS contribute to pathophysiology with a focus toward head and neck cancers and benign oral diseases, describing potential targets and pathways for intervention that exploit the role of oxidative species in these pathologic processes. PMID:25417961

  1. Renal oxidative stress, oxygenation, and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Palm, Fredrik; Nordquist, Lina

    2011-11-01

    Hypertension is closely associated with progressive kidney dysfunction, manifested as glomerulosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis, proteinuria, and eventually declining glomerular filtration. The postulated mechanism for development of glomerulosclerosis is barotrauma caused by increased capillary pressure, but the reason for development of interstitial fibrosis and the subsequently reduced kidney function is less clear. However, it has been hypothesized that tissue hypoxia induces fibrogenesis and progressive renal failure. This is very interesting, since recent reports highlight several different mechanisms resulting in altered oxygen handling and availability in the hypertensive kidney. Such mechanisms include decreased renal blood flow due to increased vascular tone induced by ANG II that limits oxygen delivery and increases oxidative stress, resulting in increased mitochondrial oxygen usage, increased oxygen usage for tubular electrolyte transport, and shunting of oxygen from arterial to venous blood in preglomerular vessels. It has been shown in several studies that interventions to prevent oxidative stress and to restore kidney tissue oxygenation prevent progression of kidney dysfunction. Furthermore, inhibition of ANG II activity, by either blocking ANG II type 1 receptors or angiotensin-converting enzyme, or by preventing oxidative stress by administration of antioxidants also results in improved blood pressure control. Therefore, it seems likely that tissue hypoxia in the hypertensive kidney contributes to progression of kidney damage, and perhaps also persistence the high blood pressure. PMID:21832206

  2. Severe Life Stress and Oxidative Stress in the Brain: From Animal Models to Human Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Jaquet, Vincent; Trabace, Luigia; Krause, Karl-Heinz

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Severe life stress (SLS), as opposed to trivial everyday stress, is defined as a serious psychosocial event with the potential of causing an impacting psychological traumatism. Recent Advances: Numerous studies have attempted to understand how the central nervous system (CNS) responds to SLS. This response includes a variety of morphological and neurochemical modifications; among them, oxidative stress is almost invariably observed. Oxidative stress is defined as disequilibrium between oxidant generation and the antioxidant response. Critical Issues: In this review, we discuss how SLS leads to oxidative stress in the CNS, and how the latter impacts pathophysiological outcomes. We also critically discuss experimental methods that measure oxidative stress in the CNS. The review covers animal models and human observations. Animal models of SLS include sleep deprivation, maternal separation, and social isolation in rodents, and the establishment of hierarchy in non-human primates. In humans, SLS, which is caused by traumatic events such as child abuse, war, and divorce, is also accompanied by oxidative stress in the CNS. Future Directions: The outcome of SLS in humans ranges from resilience, over post-traumatic stress disorder, to development of chronic mental disorders. Defining the sources of oxidative stress in SLS might in the long run provide new therapeutic avenues. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1475–1490. PMID:22746161

  3. Peroxisomal metabolism and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Nordgren, Marcus; Fransen, Marc

    2014-03-01

    Peroxisomes are ubiquitous and multifunctional organelles that are primarily known for their role in cellular lipid metabolism. As many peroxisomal enzymes catalyze redox reactions as part of their normal function, these organelles are also increasingly recognized as potential regulators of oxidative stress-related signaling pathways. This in turn suggests that peroxisome dysfunction is not only associated with rare inborn errors of peroxisomal metabolism, but also with more common age-related diseases such as neurodegeneration, type 2 diabetes, and cancer. This review intends to provide a comprehensive picture of the complex role of mammalian peroxisomes in cellular redox metabolism. We highlight how peroxisomal metabolism may contribute to the bioavailability of important mediators of oxidative stress, with particular emphasis on reactive oxygen species. In addition, we review the biological properties of peroxisome-derived signaling messengers and discuss how these molecules may mediate various biological responses. Furthermore, we explore the emerging concepts that peroxisomes and mitochondria share an intricate redox-sensitive relationship and cooperate in cell fate decisions. This is particularly relevant to the observed demise of peroxisome function which accompanies cellular senescence, organismal aging, and age-related diseases. PMID:23933092

  4. Role of oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, WEN-JUAN; ZHANG, XIA; CHEN, WEI-WEI

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of disability in individuals aged >65 years worldwide. AD is characterized by the abnormal deposition of amyloid β (Aβ) peptide, and intracellular accumulation of neurofibrillary tangles of hyperphosphorylated τ protein and dementia. The neurotoxic oligomer Aβ peptide, which is the neuropathological diagnostic criterion of the disease, together with τ protein, are mediators of the neurodegeneration that is among the main causative factors. However, these phenomena are mainly initiated and enhanced by oxidative stress, a process referring to an imbalance between antioxidants and oxidants in favour of oxidants. This imbalance can occur as a result of increased free radicals or a decrease in antioxidant defense, free radicals being a species that contains one or more unpaired electrons in its outer shell. The major source of potent free radicals is the reduction of molecular oxygen in water, that initially yields the superoxide radical, which produces hydrogen peroxide by the addition of an electron. The reduction of hydrogen peroxide produces highly reactive hydroxyl radicals, termed reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can react with lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, and other molecules and may also alter their structures and functions. Thus, tissues and organs, particularly the brain, a vulnerable organ, are affected by ROS due to its composition. The brain is largely composed of easily oxidizable lipids while featuring a high oxygen consumption rate. The current review examined the role of oxidative stress in AD. PMID:27123241

  5. Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Sánchez, Alba; Madrigal-Santillán, Eduardo; Bautista, Mirandeli; Esquivel-Soto, Jaime; Morales-González, Ángel; Esquivel-Chirino, Cesar; Durante-Montiel, Irene; Sánchez-Rivera, Graciela; Valadez-Vega, Carmen; Morales-González, José A.

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease of multifactorial origin and can be defined as an increase in the accumulation of body fat. Adipose tissue is not only a triglyceride storage organ, but studies have shown the role of white adipose tissue as a producer of certain bioactive substances called adipokines. Among adipokines, we find some inflammatory functions, such as Interleukin-6 (IL-6); other adipokines entail the functions of regulating food intake, therefore exerting a direct effect on weight control. This is the case of leptin, which acts on the limbic system by stimulating dopamine uptake, creating a feeling of fullness. However, these adipokines induce the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), generating a process known as oxidative stress (OS). Because adipose tissue is the organ that secretes adipokines and these in turn generate ROS, adipose tissue is considered an independent factor for the generation of systemic OS. There are several mechanisms by which obesity produces OS. The first of these is the mitochondrial and peroxisomal oxidation of fatty acids, which can produce ROS in oxidation reactions, while another mechanism is over-consumption of oxygen, which generates free radicals in the mitochondrial respiratory chain that is found coupled with oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria. Lipid-rich diets are also capable of generating ROS because they can alter oxygen metabolism. Upon the increase of adipose tissue, the activity of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), was found to be significantly diminished. Finally, high ROS production and the decrease in antioxidant capacity leads to various abnormalities, among which we find endothelial dysfunction, which is characterized by a reduction in the bioavailability of vasodilators, particularly nitric oxide (NO), and an increase in endothelium-derived contractile factors, favoring atherosclerotic disease. PMID:21686173

  6. Oxidative Stress in Cystinosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vaisbich, Maria Helena; Pache de Faria Guimaraes, Luciana; Shimizu, Maria Heloisa Mazzola; Seguro, Antonio Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims Nephropathic cystinosis (NC) is a severe systemic disease and cysteamine improves its prognosis. Lysosomal cystine accumulation is the hallmark of cystinosis and is regarded as the primary defect due to mutations in the CTNS gene. However, there is great evidence that cystine accumulation itself is not responsible for all abnormalities observed in NC. Studies have demonstrated altered ATP metabolism, increased apoptosis, and cell oxidation. An increased number of autophagosomes and autophagic vacuoles have been observed in cystinotic fibroblasts and renal epithelial cells, suggesting that altered autophagy plays a role in NC, leading to increased production of reactive oxygen species. Therefore, cystinosis patients can be more susceptible to oxidative stress (OS) and it can contribute to the progression of the renal disease. Our goal was to evaluate a marker of OS (serum TBARS) in NC children, and to compare the results with those observed in healthy controls and correlated with renal function parameters. Methods The study included patients aged under 18 years, with good adherence to the treatment and out of renal replacement therapy. The following parameters were evaluated: serum creatinine, BUN, creatinine clearance estimated by stature and serum TBARS levels. Results We selected 20 patients aged 8.0 ±3.6 years and observed serum TBARS levels of 4.03 ±1.02 nmol/ml. Serum TBARS levels in the 43 healthy controls, aged 7.4 ±1.1 years, were 1.60 ±0.04 nmol/ml. There was a significant difference between the plasma TBARS levels among the 2 groups (p < 0.0001). We detected no significant correlation between plasma TBARS levels and renal function. Conclusion An increased level of serum TBARS in patients with NC was observed and this abnormality was not correlated with the renal function status degree. This is the first report that shows increased oxidative stress in serum of NC patients. PMID:22470381

  7. Aircraft crash caused by stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Kolkman, H.J.; Kool, G.A.; Wanhill, R.J.H.

    1996-01-01

    An aircraft crash in the Netherlands was caused by disintegration of a jet engine. Fractography showed that the chain of events started with stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of a pin attached to a lever arm of the compressor variable vane system. Such a lever arm-pin assembly costs only a few dollars. Investigation of hundreds of pins from the accident and a number of identical engines revealed that this was not an isolated case. Many pins exhibited various amounts of SCC. The failed pin in the accident engine happened to be the first fractured one. SCC requires the simultaneous presence of tensile stress, a corrosive environment, and a susceptible material. In this case the stress was a residual stress arising from the production method. There was a clear correlation between the presence of salt deposits on the levers and SCC of the pins. It was shown that these deposits were able to reach the internal space between the pin and lever arm, thereby initiating SCC in this space. The corrosive environment in Western Europe explains why the problem manifested itself in the Netherlands at a relatively early stage in engine life. The main point is, however, that the manufacturer selected an SCC-prone material in the design stage. The solution has been to change the pin material.

  8. Intracerebral Hemorrhage, Oxidative Stress, and Antioxidant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xiaochun; Wen, Zunjia; Shen, Haitao; Shen, Meifen

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke is a common and severe neurological disorder and is associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity, especially for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Increasing evidence demonstrates that oxidative stress responses participate in the pathophysiological processes of secondary brain injury (SBI) following ICH. The mechanisms involved in interoperable systems include endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, neuronal apoptosis and necrosis, inflammation, and autophagy. In this review, we summarized some promising advances in the field of oxidative stress and ICH, including contained animal and human investigations. We also discussed the role of oxidative stress, systemic oxidative stress responses, and some research of potential therapeutic options aimed at reducing oxidative stress to protect the neuronal function after ICH, focusing on the challenges of translation between preclinical and clinical studies, and potential post-ICH antioxidative therapeutic approaches. PMID:27190572

  9. Intracerebral Hemorrhage, Oxidative Stress, and Antioxidant Therapy.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaochun; Wen, Zunjia; Shen, Haitao; Shen, Meifen; Chen, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke is a common and severe neurological disorder and is associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity, especially for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Increasing evidence demonstrates that oxidative stress responses participate in the pathophysiological processes of secondary brain injury (SBI) following ICH. The mechanisms involved in interoperable systems include endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, neuronal apoptosis and necrosis, inflammation, and autophagy. In this review, we summarized some promising advances in the field of oxidative stress and ICH, including contained animal and human investigations. We also discussed the role of oxidative stress, systemic oxidative stress responses, and some research of potential therapeutic options aimed at reducing oxidative stress to protect the neuronal function after ICH, focusing on the challenges of translation between preclinical and clinical studies, and potential post-ICH antioxidative therapeutic approaches. PMID:27190572

  10. Nitric Oxide, Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Crosswhite, Patrick; Sun, Zhongjie

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and progressive disease characterized by a persistent elevation of pulmonary artery pressure accompanied by right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH). The current treatment for pulmonary hypertension is limited and only provides symptomatic relief due to unknown etiology and pathogenesis of the disease. Both vasoconstriction and structural remodeling (enhanced proliferation of VSMC) of the pulmonary arteries contribute to the progressive course of PAH, irrespective of different underlying causes. The exact molecular mechanism of PAH, however, is not fully understood. The purpose of this review is to provide recent advances in the mechanistic investigation of PAH. Specifically, this review focuses on nitric oxide (NO), oxidative stress and inflammation and how these factors contribute to the development and progression of PAH. This review also discusses recent and potential therapeutic advancements for the treatment of PAH. PMID:20051913

  11. Phenazine derivatives cause proteotoxicity and stress in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Arpita; Rentas, Courtney; Caldwell, Guy A.; Caldwell, Kim A.

    2014-01-01

    It is widely recognized that bacterial metabolites have toxic effects in animal systems. Phenazines are a common bacterial metabolite within the redox-active exotoxin class. These compounds have been shown to be toxic to the soil invertebrate Caenorhabditis elegans with the capability of causing oxidative stress and lethality. Here we report that chronic, low-level exposure to three separate phenazine molecules (phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, pyocyanin and 1-hydroxyphenazine) upregulated ER stress response and enhanced expression of a superoxide dismutase reporter in vivo. Exposure to these molecules also increased of polyglutamine and α-synuclein in the bodywall muscle cells of C. elegans. Exposure of worms to these phenazines caused additional sensitivity in dopamine neurons expressing wild-type α-synuclein, indicating a possible defect in protein homeostasis. The addition of an anti-oxidant failed to rescue the neurotoxic and protein aggregation phenotypes caused by these compounds. Thus, increased production of superoxide radicals that occurs in whole animals in response to these phenazines appears independent from the toxicity phenotype observed. Collectively, these data provide cause for further consideration of the neurodegenerative impact of phenazines. PMID:25304539

  12. Oxidative stress, thyroid dysfunction & Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Carlos; Casado, Ángela

    2015-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is one of the most common chromosomal disorders, occurring in one out of 700-1000 live births, and the most common cause of mental retardation. Thyroid dysfunction is the most typical endocrine abnormality in patients with DS. It is well known that thyroid dysfunction is highly prevalent in children and adults with DS and that both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism are more common in patients with DS than in the general population. Increasing evidence has shown that DS individuals are under unusual increased oxidative stress, which may be involved in the higher prevalence and severity of a number of pathologies associated with the syndrome, as well as the accelerated ageing observed in these individuals. The gene for Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is coded on chromosome 21 and it is overexpressed (~50%) resulting in an increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) due to overproduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). ROS leads to oxidative damage of DNA, proteins and lipids, therefore, oxidative stress may play an important role in the pathogenesis of DS. PMID:26354208

  13. Oxidative stress and metabolic disorders: Pathogenesis and therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Rani, Vibha; Deep, Gagan; Singh, Rakesh K; Palle, Komaraiah; Yadav, Umesh C S

    2016-03-01

    Increased body weight and metabolic disorder including insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular complications together constitute metabolic syndrome. The pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome involves multitude of factors. A number of studies however indicate, with some conformity, that oxidative stress along with chronic inflammatory condition pave the way for the development of metabolic diseases. Oxidative stress, a state of lost balance between the oxidative and anti-oxidative systems of the cells and tissues, results in the over production of oxidative free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Excessive ROS generated could attack the cellular proteins, lipids and nucleic acids leading to cellular dysfunction including loss of energy metabolism, altered cell signalling and cell cycle control, genetic mutations, altered cellular transport mechanisms and overall decreased biological activity, immune activation and inflammation. In addition, nutritional stress such as that caused by high fat high carbohydrate diet also promotes oxidative stress as evident by increased lipid peroxidation products, protein carbonylation, and decreased antioxidant system and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels. These changes lead to initiation of pathogenic milieu and development of several chronic diseases. Studies suggest that in obese person oxidative stress and chronic inflammation are the important underlying factors that lead to development of pathologies such as carcinogenesis, obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases through altered cellular and nuclear mechanisms, including impaired DNA damage repair and cell cycle regulation. Here we discuss the aspects of metabolic disorders-induced oxidative stress in major pathological conditions and strategies for their prevention and therapy. PMID:26851532

  14. Current concepts in the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia: the potential role of oxidative stress and nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Ozgocmen, Salih; Ozyurt, Huseyin; Sogut, Sadik; Akyol, Omer

    2006-05-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a common chronic pain syndrome with an unknown etiology. Recent years added new information to our understanding of FM pathophysiology. Researches on genetics, biogenic amines, neurotransmitters, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis hormones, oxidative stress, and mechanisms of pain modulation, central sensitization, and autonomic functions in FM revealed various abnormalities indicating that multiple factors and mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of FM. Oxidative stress and nitric oxide may play an important role in FM pathophysiology, however it is still not clear whether oxidative stress abnormalities documented in FM are the cause or the effect. This should encourage further researches evaluating the potential role of oxidative stress and nitric oxide in the pathophysiology of FM and the efficacy of antioxidant treatments (omega-3 and -6 fatty acids, vitamins and others) in double blind and placebo controlled trials. These future researches will enhance our understanding of the complex pathophysiology of this disorder. PMID:16328420

  15. Induction of Oxidative Stress in Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Ozbek, Emin

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress has a critical role in the pathophysiology of several kidney diseases, and many complications of these diseases are mediated by oxidative stress, oxidative stress-related mediators, and inflammation. Several systemic diseases such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and hypercholesterolemia; infection; antibiotics, chemotherapeutics, and radiocontrast agents; and environmental toxins, occupational chemicals, radiation, smoking, as well as alcohol consumption induce oxidative stress in kidney. We searched the literature using PubMed, MEDLINE, and Google scholar with “oxidative stress, reactive oxygen species, oxygen free radicals, kidney, renal injury, nephropathy, nephrotoxicity, and induction”. The literature search included only articles written in English language. Letters or case reports were excluded. Scientific relevance, for clinical studies target populations, and study design, for basic science studies full coverage of main topics, are eligibility criteria for articles used in this paper. PMID:22577546

  16. Role of oxidative stress and nitric oxide in atherothrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Lubos, Edith; Handy, Diane E.; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    During the last decade basic and clinical research has highlighted the central role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cardiovascular disease. Enhanced production or attenuated degradation of ROS leads to oxidative stress, a process that affects endothelial and vascular function, and contributes to vascular disease. Nitric oxide (NO), a product of the normal endothelium, is a principal determinant of normal endothelial and vascular function. In states of inflammation, NO production by the vasculature increases considerably and, in conjunction with other ROS, contributes to oxidative stress. This review examines the role of oxidative stress and NO in mechanisms of endothelial and vascular dysfunction with an emphasis on atherothrombosis. PMID:18508590

  17. Lung Injury and Lung Cancer Caused by Cigarette Smoke-Induced Oxidative Stress: Molecular Mechanisms and Therapeutic Opportunities Involving the Ceramide-Generating Machinery and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Filosto, Simone; Chung, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer are frequently caused by tobacco smoking. However, these diseases present opposite phenotypes involving redox signaling at the cellular level. While COPD is characterized by excessive airway epithelial cell death and lung injury, lung cancer is caused by uncontrolled epithelial cell proliferation. Notably, epidemiological studies have demonstrated that lung cancer incidence is significantly higher in patients who have preexisting emphysema/lung injury. However, the molecular link and common cell signaling events underlying lung injury diseases and lung cancer are poorly understood. This review focuses on studies of molecular mechanism(s) underlying smoking-related lung injury (COPD) and lung cancer. Specifically, the role of the ceramide-generating machinery during cigarette smoke-induced oxidative stress leading to both apoptosis and proliferation of lung epithelial cells is emphasized. Over recent years, it has been established that ceramide is a sphingolipid playing a major role in lung epithelia structure/function leading to lung injury in chronic pulmonary diseases. However, new and unexpected findings draw attention to its potential role in lung development, cell proliferation, and tumorigenesis. To address this dichotomy in detail, evidence is presented regarding several protein targets, including Src, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and neutral sphingomyelinase 2, the major sphingomyelinase that controls ceramide generation during oxidative stress. Furthermore, their roles are presented not only in apoptosis and lung injury but also in enhancing cell proliferation, lung cancer development, and resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted therapy for treating lung cancer. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 2149–2174. PMID:24684526

  18. Clinical Relevance of Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Frijhoff, Jeroen; Winyard, Paul G.; Zarkovic, Neven; Davies, Sean S.; Stocker, Roland; Cheng, David; Knight, Annie R.; Taylor, Emma Louise; Oettrich, Jeannette; Ruskovska, Tatjana; Gasparovic, Ana Cipak; Cuadrado, Antonio; Weber, Daniela; Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen; Grune, Tilman; Schmidt, Harald H.H.W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Oxidative stress is considered to be an important component of various diseases. A vast number of methods have been developed and used in virtually all diseases to measure the extent and nature of oxidative stress, ranging from oxidation of DNA to proteins, lipids, and free amino acids. Recent Advances: An increased understanding of the biology behind diseases and redox biology has led to more specific and sensitive tools to measure oxidative stress markers, which are very diverse and sometimes very low in abundance. Critical Issues: The literature is very heterogeneous. It is often difficult to draw general conclusions on the significance of oxidative stress biomarkers, as only in a limited proportion of diseases have a range of different biomarkers been used, and different biomarkers have been used to study different diseases. In addition, biomarkers are often measured using nonspecific methods, while specific methodologies are often too sophisticated or laborious for routine clinical use. Future Directions: Several markers of oxidative stress still represent a viable biomarker opportunity for clinical use. However, positive findings with currently used biomarkers still need to be validated in larger sample sizes and compared with current clinical standards to establish them as clinical diagnostics. It is important to realize that oxidative stress is a nuanced phenomenon that is difficult to characterize, and one biomarker is not necessarily better than others. The vast diversity in oxidative stress between diseases and conditions has to be taken into account when selecting the most appropriate biomarker. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 1144–1170. PMID:26415143

  19. Increased oxidative stress in foam cells obtained from hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Marlene S B; Fabris, Bruno A; Brinholi, Francis F; Bortolasci, Chiara C; Watanabe, Maria A E; Oliveira, Karen B; Delfino, Vinícius D A; Lavado, Edson L; Barbosa, Décio S

    2013-04-01

    Premature atherosclerosis represents the main cause of mortality among end-stage renal disease patients (ESRD). Increased inflammation and oxidative stress are involved in initiation and progression of the atherosclerotic plaque. As foam cells are capable of producing significant amounts of inflammatory mediators and free radicals, we hypothesized that foam cells from uremic patients could produce more inflammation and oxidative stress than foam cells from normal people and be, somehow, involved in the accelerated atherosclerosis of uremia. To test this hypothesis, the levels of a few markers of inflammation and oxidative stress: Tumor necrosis factor-α, inducible nitric oxide synthase, malondialdehyde, nitric oxide by-products were measured in the supernatants of macrophage-derived foam cells cultures from 18 hemodialysis patients and 18 apparently healthy individuals controls. Malondialdehyde levels in the supernatant of cell cultures (macrophages stimulated or not with native and oxidized lipoprotein) were significantly increased in uremic patients; no statistically significant difference was found between the supernatant concentrations of nitric oxide by-products, inducible nitric oxide synthase activity, and tumor necrosis factor-α between patients and controls. Our results, obtained with human macrophages and macrophage-derived foam cells, are compatible with the theory that increased cellular oxidative stress and inflammatory activity in ESRD patients could accelerate the atherosclerotic process. The present culture protocol showed it is possible to use human mononuclear cells to evaluate the oxidative metabolism of foam cells, which are considered to be the initial step of atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:22928784

  20. Mitochondrial metabolism mediates oxidative stress and inflammation in fatty liver

    PubMed Central

    Satapati, Santhosh; Kucejova, Blanka; Duarte, Joao A.G.; Fletcher, Justin A.; Reynolds, Lacy; Sunny, Nishanth E.; He, Tianteng; Nair, L. Arya; Livingston, Kenneth; Fu, Xiaorong; Merritt, Matthew E.; Sherry, A. Dean; Malloy, Craig R.; Shelton, John M.; Lambert, Jennifer; Parks, Elizabeth J.; Corbin, Ian; Magnuson, Mark A.; Browning, Jeffrey D.; Burgess, Shawn C.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are critical for respiration in all tissues; however, in liver, these organelles also accommodate high-capacity anaplerotic/cataplerotic pathways that are essential to gluconeogenesis and other biosynthetic activities. During nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), mitochondria also produce ROS that damage hepatocytes, trigger inflammation, and contribute to insulin resistance. Here, we provide several lines of evidence indicating that induction of biosynthesis through hepatic anaplerotic/cataplerotic pathways is energetically backed by elevated oxidative metabolism and hence contributes to oxidative stress and inflammation during NAFLD. First, in murine livers, elevation of fatty acid delivery not only induced oxidative metabolism, but also amplified anaplerosis/cataplerosis and caused a proportional rise in oxidative stress and inflammation. Second, loss of anaplerosis/cataplerosis via genetic knockdown of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (Pck1) prevented fatty acid–induced rise in oxidative flux, oxidative stress, and inflammation. Flux appeared to be regulated by redox state, energy charge, and metabolite concentration, which may also amplify antioxidant pathways. Third, preventing elevated oxidative metabolism with metformin also normalized hepatic anaplerosis/cataplerosis and reduced markers of inflammation. Finally, independent histological grades in human NAFLD biopsies were proportional to oxidative flux. Thus, hepatic oxidative stress and inflammation are associated with elevated oxidative metabolism during an obesogenic diet, and this link may be provoked by increased work through anabolic pathways. PMID:26571396

  1. Gliotoxin causes apoptosis and necrosis of rat Kupffer cells in vitro and in vivo in the absence of oxidative stress: Exacerbation by caspase and serine protease inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Anselmi, Kristin; Stolz, Donna B.; Nalesnik, Michael; Watkins, Simon C.; Kamath, Ravindra; Gandhi, Chandrashekhar R.

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aims A potential application of gliotoxin therapy for liver fibrosis was suggested by its apoptotic effect on fibrogenic activated stellate cells. We investigated if gliotoxin exerts similar effects on hepatic macrophages Kupffer cells. Methods Effects of gliotoxin on Kupffer cells isolated from the normal liver and in vivo following its administration to CCl4–induced cirrhotic rats were studied. Results Gliotoxin caused apoptosis of cultured Kupffer cells, the effect being apparent at 0.3 μM concentration within 1 hour; longer incubation caused necrosis. This effect was associated with mitochondroial cytochrome c release, caspase-3 activation and ATP depletion. Interestingly, inhibition of caspase-3 and serine proteases accelerated and augmented gliotoxin-induced cell death via necrosis. Gliotoxin stimulated nuclear translocation of NFκB, and phosphorylation of p38, ERK1/2 and JNK MAP kinases, but these signaling molecules were not involved in gliotoxin-induced death of Kupffer cells. In vivo administration of gliotoxin to cirrhotic rats caused apoptosis of Kupffer cells, stellate cells and hepatocytes. In control rats, the effect was minimal on the nonparenchymal cells and not apparent on hepatocytes. Conclusions In the fibrotic liver, gliotoxin nonspecifically causes death of hepatic cell types. Modification of gliotoxin molecule may be necessary for selective targeting and elimination of activated stellate cells. PMID:17466404

  2. Oxidative Stress, Lens Gap Junctions, and Cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, Eric C.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The eye lens is constantly subjected to oxidative stress from radiation and other sources. The lens has several mechanisms to protect its components from oxidative stress and to maintain its redox state, including enzymatic pathways and high concentrations of ascorbate and reduced glutathione. With aging, accumulation of oxidized lens components and decreased efficiency of repair mechanisms can contribute to the development of lens opacities or cataracts. Maintenance of transparency and homeostasis of the avascular lens depend on an extensive network of gap junctions. Communication through gap junction channels allows intercellular passage of molecules (up to 1 kDa) including antioxidants. Lens gap junctions and their constituent proteins, connexins (Cx43, Cx46, and Cx50), are also subject to the effects of oxidative stress. These observations suggest that oxidative stress-induced damage to connexins (and consequent altered intercellular communication) may contribute to cataract formation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11, 339–353. PMID:18831679

  3. Melamine Induces Oxidative Stress in Mouse Ovary

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xiao-Xin; Duan, Xing; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Xiong, Bo; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Melamine is a nitrogen heterocyclic triazine compound which is widely used as an industrial chemical. Although melamine is not considered to be acutely toxic with a high LD50 in animals, food contaminated with melamine expose risks to the human health. Melamine has been reported to be responsible for the renal impairment in mammals, its toxicity on the reproductive system, however, has not been adequately assessed. In the present study, we examined the effect of melamine on the follicle development and ovary formation. The data showed that melamine increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, and induced granulosa cell apoptosis as well as follicle atresia. To further analyze the mechanism by which melamine induces oxidative stress, the expression and activities of two key antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathi-one peroxidase (GPX) were analyzed, and the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA) were compared between control and melamine-treated ovaries. The result revealed that melamine changed the expression and activities of SOD and GPX in the melamine-treated mice. Therefore, we demonstrate that melamine causes damage to the ovaries via oxidative stress pathway. PMID:26545251

  4. Chloroplastic NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase in Tobacco Leaves Functions in Alleviation of Oxidative Damage Caused by Temperature Stress1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Duan, Wei; Takabayashi, Atsushi; Endo, Tsuyoshi; Shikanai, Toshiharu; Ye, Ji-Yu; Mi, Hualing

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the function of the NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (NDH)-dependent pathway in suppressing the accumulation of reactive oxygen species in chloroplasts was investigated. Hydrogen peroxide accumulated in the leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) defective in ndhC-ndhK-ndhJ (ΔndhCKJ) at 42°C and 4°C, and in that of wild-type leaves at 4°C. The maximum quantum efficiency of PSII decreased to a similar extent in both strains at 42°C, while it decreased more evidently in ΔndhCKJ at 4°C. The parameters linked to CO2 assimilation, such as the photochemical efficiency of PSII, the decrease of nonphotochemical quenching following the initial rise, and the photosynthetic O2 evolution, were inhibited more significantly in ΔndhCKJ than in wild type at 42°C and were seriously inhibited in both strains at 4°C. While cyclic electron flow around PSI mediated by NDH was remarkably enhanced at 42°C and suppressed at 4°C. The proton gradient across the thylakoid membranes and light-dependent ATP synthesis were higher in wild type than in ΔndhCKJ at either 25°C or 42°C, but were barely formed at 4°C. Based on these results, we suggest that cyclic photophosphorylation via the NDH pathway might play an important role in regulation of CO2 assimilation under heat-stressed condition but is less important under chilling-stressed condition, thus optimizing the photosynthetic electron transport and reducing the generation of reactive oxygen species. PMID:16428601

  5. State Transition of a Defect Causing Random-Telegraph-Noise Fluctuation in Stress-Induced Leakage Current of Thin SiO2 Films in a Metal-Oxide-Silicon Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Takeshi; Tega, Naoki; Mori, Yuki; Miki, Hiroshi; Mine, Toshiyuki; Kume, Hitoshi; Torii, Kazuyoshi; Yamada, Ren-ichi; Shiraishi, Kenji

    2013-11-01

    Dynamic fluctuation in stress-induced leakage current - called “variable stress-induced leakage current” - in a gate oxide of a metal-oxide-semiconductor structure was investigated. Variable stress-induced leakage current is attributed to random telegraph noise, which is associated with the state-transition of a single defect. To analyze the mechanism of the state-transition, dependence of state-transition probabilities on gate current and on temperature were investigated. These dependences indicate that the state-transition mechanism is a defect-structure transition by charge collision.

  6. Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Waldbaum, Simon; Patel, Manisha

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative stress and dysfunction are contributing factors to various neurological disorders. Recently, there has been increasing evidence supporting the association between mitochondrial oxidative stress and epilepsy. Although certain inherited epilepsies are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, little is known about its role in acquired epilepsies such as temporal lobe epilepsy. Mitochondrial oxidative stress and dysfunction are emerging as key factors that not only result from seizures, but may also contribute to epileptogenesis. The occurrence of epilepsy increases with age, and mitochondrial oxidative stress is a leading mechanism of aging and age-related degenerative disease, suggesting a further involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in seizure generation. Mitochondria have critical cellular functions that effect neuronal excitability including production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), fatty acid oxidation, control of apoptosis and necrosis, regulation of amino acid cycling, neurotransmitter biosynthesis, and regulation of cytosolic Ca2+ homeostasis. Mitochondria are the primary site of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production making them uniquely vulnerable to oxidative stress and damage which can further affect cellular macromolecule function, the ability of the electron transport chain to produce ATP, antioxidant defenses, mitochondrial DNA stability, and synaptic glutamate homeostasis. Oxidative damage to one or more of these cellular targets may affect neuronal excitability and increase seizure susceptibility. The specific targeting of mitochondrial oxidative stress, dysfunction, and bioenergetics with pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments may be a novel avenue for attenuating epileptogenesis and seizure initiation. PMID:19850449

  7. Oxidative stress in juvenile chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welker, T.L.; Congleton, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    Juvenile chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), were held in 8-11??C freshwater, starved for 3 days and subjected to a low-water stressor to determine the relationship between the general stress response and oxidative stress. Lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels (lipid hydroperoxides) were measured in kidney, liver and brain samples taken at the beginning of the experiment (0-h unstressed controls) and at 6, 24 and 48 h after application of a continuous low-water stressor. Tissue samples were also taken at 48 h from fish that had not been exposed to the stressor (48-h unstressed controls). Exposure to the low-water stressor affected LPO in kidney and brain tissues. In kidney, LPO decreased 6 h after imposition of the stressor; similar but less pronounced decreases also occurred in the liver and brain. At 48 h, LPO increased (in comparison with 6-h stressed tissues) in the kidney and brain. In comparison with 48-h unstressed controls, LPO levels were higher in the kidney and brain of stressed fish. Although preliminary, results suggest that stress can cause oxidative tissue damage in juvenile chinook salmon. Measures of oxidative stress have shown similar responses to stress in mammals; however, further research is needed to determine the extent of the stress-oxidative stress relationship and the underlying physiological mechanisms in fish.

  8. The effects of anesthetic agents on oxidative stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakan, Selvinaz; Düzgüner, Vesile

    2016-04-01

    Oxidative stress can be defined as the instability between antioxidant defense of the body and the production of free radical that causes peroxydation on the lipid layer. Free radicals are reactive oxygen species that are produced in the course of normal metabolisms of aerobe organisms and they may cause disorders in cell structure and organelles by interacting macromolecules, like lipid, protein, nucleic acids. Therefore, they may cause cardiovascular, immune system, liver, kidney illnesses and many other illnesses like cancer, aging, cataract, diabetes. It is known that many drugs used for the purpose of anesthetizing may cause lipid peroxidation in organism. For these reasons, determining the Oxidative stress index of anaesthetic stress chosen in the ones that are exposed to long term anaesthetic agents and anaesthesia appliccations, is so substantial.

  9. Oxidative stress contributes to autophagy induction in response to endoplasmic reticulum stress in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martín, Marta; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Lemaire, Stéphane D; Crespo, José L

    2014-10-01

    The accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) results in the activation of stress responses, such as the unfolded protein response or the catabolic process of autophagy to ultimately recover cellular homeostasis. ER stress also promotes the production of reactive oxygen species, which play an important role in autophagy regulation. However, it remains unknown whether reactive oxygen species are involved in ER stress-induced autophagy. In this study, we provide evidence connecting redox imbalance caused by ER stress and autophagy activation in the model unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Treatment of C. reinhardtii cells with the ER stressors tunicamycin or dithiothreitol resulted in up-regulation of the expression of genes encoding ER resident endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin1 oxidoreductase and protein disulfide isomerases. ER stress also triggered autophagy in C. reinhardtii based on the protein abundance, lipidation, cellular distribution, and mRNA levels of the autophagy marker ATG8. Moreover, increases in the oxidation of the glutathione pool and the expression of oxidative stress-related genes were detected in tunicamycin-treated cells. Our results revealed that the antioxidant glutathione partially suppressed ER stress-induced autophagy and decreased the toxicity of tunicamycin, suggesting that oxidative stress participates in the control of autophagy in response to ER stress in C. reinhardtii In close agreement, we also found that autophagy activation by tunicamycin was more pronounced in the C. reinhardtii sor1 mutant, which shows increased expression of oxidative stress-related genes. PMID:25143584

  10. Retinopathy of prematurity: an oxidative stress neonatal disease.

    PubMed

    Stone, William L; Shah, Darshan; Hollinger, Shawn M

    2016-01-01

    Proteomics is the global study of proteins in an organism or a tissue/fluid and is clinically relevant since most disease states are accompanied by specific alterations in an organism's proteome. This review focuses on the application of proteomics to neonatology with particular emphasis on retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), which is a disease in which oxidative stress plays a key pathophysiological role. Oxidative stress is a physiologically relevant redox imbalance caused by an excess of reactive oxygen (ROS) or reactive nitrogen oxide species (RNOS). A major conclusion of this review is that proteomics may be the optimal technology for studying neonatal diseases such as ROP, particularly in the setting of a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Proteomics has already identified a number of ROP serum biomarkers. This review will also suggest novel therapeutic approaches to ROP and other neonatal oxidative stress diseases (NOSDs) based on a systems medicine approach. PMID:26709767

  11. p66Shc, oxidative stress and aging

    PubMed Central

    Pinton, Paolo; Rizzuto, Rosario

    2009-01-01

    The 66 KDa isoform of Shc and its signalling properties have attracted in the past years major interest in aging research. Here, we summarize p66Shc functions and outline a specific signalling route leading to mitochondrial import, that accounts for its pro-apoptotic activity upon oxidative stress. This model, that could explain the alterations of mitochondrial Ca2+ homeostasis observed after oxidative stress, highlights novel pharmacological targets in age-related disorders. PMID:18235239

  12. Perturbations Caused by Lateral Stress Gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, R. E.; Harris, E. J.

    2007-12-01

    In principle, stress gauges mounted to measure lateral stresses in a shocked matrix allow the shear strength of the material to be determined. Interpreting the records from lateral stress gauges is hindered by the fact that the stress field in the insulating layer in which the gauges are mounted can differ signifcantly from the stress field that would be generated in the sample if no gauge were present. A series of high resolution Eulerian code calculations have been run which suggest that the stresses in the insulating layer vary with distance and time in a way that depends on the thickness of the layer, the shock strength, and the elastic and plastic properties of both the layer and the matrix. In particular, if the shock velocity in the matrix material is high the stress at a typical gauge position initially rises to a sharp peak then falls with time, but when the shock velocity in the matrix is low the stress rises relatively gradually throughout the time of interest. The shapes of the stress-time profiles predicted by the hydrocode compare well with the results of lateral gauge experiments on several different materials.

  13. Perturbations Caused by Lateral Stress Gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Ron; Harris, Ernie

    2007-06-01

    In principle, stress gauges mounted to measure lateral stresses in a shocked matrix allow the shear strength of the material to be determined. Interpreting the records from lateral stress gauges is hindered by the fact that the stress field in the insulating layer in which the gauges are mounted can differ significantly from the stress field that would be generated in the sample if no gauge were present. A series of high resolution Eulerian code calculations have been run which suggest that the stresses in the insulating layer vary with distance and time in a way that depends on the thickness of the layer, the shock strength, and the elastic and plastic properties of both the layer and the matrix. In particular, if the shock velocity in the matrix material is high the stress at a typical gauge position initially rises to a sharp peak then falls with time, but when the shock velocity in the matrix is low the stress rises relatively gradually throughout the time of interest. The shapes of the stress-time profiles predicted by the hydrocode compare well with the results of lateral gauge experiments on several different materials.

  14. Oxidative-stress-induced epigenetic changes in chronic diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Feng, Biao; Ruiz, Michael Anthony; Chakrabarti, Subrata

    2013-03-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the development and progression of chronic diabetic complications. Diabetes causes mitochondrial superoxide overproduction in the endothelial cells of both large and small vessels. This increased superoxide production causes the activation of several signal pathways involved in the pathogenesis of chronic complications. In particular, endothelial cells are major targets of glucose-induced oxidative damage in the target organs. Oxidative stress activates cellular signaling pathways and transcription factors in endothelial cells including protein kinase C (PKC), c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), forkhead box O (FOXO), and nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB). Oxidative stress also causes DNA damage and activates DNA nucleotide excision repair enzymes including the excision repair cross complimenting 1(ERCC1), ERCC4, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Augmented production of histone acetyltransferase p300, and alterations of histone deacetylases, including class III deacetylases sirtuins, are also involved in this process. Recent research has found that small noncoding RNAs, like microRNA, are a new kind of regulator associated with chronic diabetic complications. There are extensive and complicated interactions and among these molecules. The purpose of this review is to demonstrate the role of oxidative stress in the development of diabetic complications in relation to epigenetic changes such as acetylation and microRNA alterations. PMID:23537434

  15. Protective effects of pulmonary epithelial lining fluid on oxidative stress and DNA single-strand breaks caused by ultrafine carbon black, ferrous sulphate and organic extract of diesel exhaust particles.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Cheng, Yi-Ling; Lei, Yu-Chen; Chang, Hui-Hsien; Cheng, Tsun-Jen

    2013-02-01

    Pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (ELF) is the first substance to make contact with inhaled particulate matter (PM) and interacts chemically with PM components. The objective of this study was to determine the role of ELF in oxidative stress, DNA damage and the production of proinflammatory cytokines following physicochemical exposure to PM. Ultrafine carbon black (ufCB, 15 nm; a model carbonaceous core), ferrous sulphate (FeSO(4); a model transition metal) and a diesel exhaust particle (DEP) extract (a model organic compound) were used to examine the acellular oxidative potential of synthetic ELF and non-ELF systems. We compared the effects of exposure to ufCB, FeSO(4) and DEP extract on human alveolar epithelial Type II (A549) cells to determine the levels of oxidative stress, DNA single-strand breaks and interleukin-8 (IL-8) production in ELF and non-ELF systems. The effects of ufCB and FeSO(4) on the acellular oxidative potential, cellular oxidative stress and DNA single-strand breakage were mitigated significantly by the addition of ELF, whereas there was no decrease following treatment with the DEP extract. There was no significant effect on IL-8 production following exposure to samples that were suspended in ELF/non-ELF systems. The results of the present study indicate that ELF plays an important role in the initial defence against PM in the pulmonary environment. Experimental components, such as ufCB and FeSO(4), induced the production of oxidative stress and led to DNA single-strand breaks, which were moderately prevented by the addition of ELF. These findings suggest that ELF plays a protective role against PM-driven oxidative stress and DNA damage. PMID:23261976

  16. Oxidative stress and autophagy: Crucial modulators of kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Sureshbabu, Angara; Ryter, Stefan W.; Choi, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    Both acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) that lead to diminished kidney function are interdependent risk factors for increased mortality. If untreated over time, end stage renal disease (ESRD) is an inevitable outcome. Acute and chronic kidney diseases occur partly due to imbalance between the molecular mechanisms that govern oxidative stress, inflammation, autophagy and cell death. Oxidative stress refers to the cumulative effects of highly reactive oxidizing molecules that cause cellular damage. Autophagy removes damaged organelles, protein aggregates and pathogens by recruiting these substrates into double membrane vesicles called autophagosomes which subsequently fuse with lysosomes. Mounting evidence suggests that both oxidative stress and autophagy are significantly involved in kidney health and disease. However, very little is known about the signaling processes that link them. This review is focused on understanding the role of oxidative stress and autophagy in kidney diseases. In this review, we also discuss the potential relationships between oxidative stress and autophagy that may enable the development of better therapeutic intervention to halt the progression of kidney disease and promote its repair and resolution. PMID:25613291

  17. Salivary markers of oxidative stress in oral diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tóthová, L'ubomíra; Kamodyová, Natália; Červenka, Tomáš; Celec, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Saliva is an interesting alternative diagnostic body fluid with several specific advantages over blood. These include non-invasive and easy collection and related possibility to do repeated sampling. One of the obstacles that hinders the wider use of saliva for diagnosis and monitoring of systemic diseases is its composition, which is affected by local oral status. However, this issue makes saliva very interesting for clinical biochemistry of oral diseases. Periodontitis, caries, oral precancerosis, and other local oral pathologies are associated with oxidative stress. Several markers of lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and DNA damage induced by reactive oxygen species can be measured in saliva. Clinical studies have shown an association with oral pathologies at least for some of the established salivary markers of oxidative stress. This association is currently limited to the population level and none of the widely used markers can be applied for individual diagnostics. Oxidative stress seems to be of local oral origin, but it is currently unclear whether it is caused by an overproduction of reactive oxygen species due to inflammation or by the lack of antioxidants. Interventional studies, both, in experimental animals as well as humans indicate that antioxidant treatment could prevent or slow-down the progress of periodontitis. This makes the potential clinical use of salivary markers of oxidative stress even more attractive. This review summarizes basic information on the most commonly used salivary markers of oxidative damage, antioxidant status, and carbonyl stress and the studies analyzing these markers in patients with caries or periodontitis. PMID:26539412

  18. A Molecular Web: Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Inflammation, and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhari, Namrata; Talwar, Priti; Parimisetty, Avinash; Lefebvre d’Hellencourt, Christian; Ravanan, Palaniyandi

    2014-01-01

    Execution of fundamental cellular functions demands regulated protein folding homeostasis. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an active organelle existing to implement this function by folding and modifying secretory and membrane proteins. Loss of protein folding homeostasis is central to various diseases and budding evidences suggest ER stress as being a major contributor in the development or pathology of a diseased state besides other cellular stresses. The trigger for diseases may be diverse but, inflammation and/or ER stress may be basic mechanisms increasing the severity or complicating the condition of the disease. Chronic ER stress and activation of the unfolded-protein response (UPR) through endogenous or exogenous insults may result in impaired calcium and redox homeostasis, oxidative stress via protein overload thereby also influencing vital mitochondrial functions. Calcium released from the ER augments the production of mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS). Toxic accumulation of ROS within ER and mitochondria disturbs fundamental organelle functions. Sustained ER stress is known to potentially elicit inflammatory responses via UPR pathways. Additionally, ROS generated through inflammation or mitochondrial dysfunction could accelerate ER malfunction. Dysfunctional UPR pathways have been associated with a wide range of diseases including several neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, metabolic disorders, cancer, inflammatory disease, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and others. In this review, we have discussed the UPR signaling pathways, and networking between ER stress-induced inflammatory pathways, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial signaling events, which further induce or exacerbate ER stress. PMID:25120434

  19. Oxidative Stress, Prooxidants, and Antioxidants: The Interplay

    PubMed Central

    Rahal, Anu; Kumar, Amit; Singh, Vivek; Yadav, Brijesh

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a normal phenomenon in the body. Under normal conditions, the physiologically important intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are maintained at low levels by various enzyme systems participating in the in vivo redox homeostasis. Therefore, oxidative stress can also be viewed as an imbalance between the prooxidants and antioxidants in the body. For the last two decades, oxidative stress has been one of the most burning topics among the biological researchers all over the world. Several reasons can be assigned to justify its importance: knowledge about reactive oxygen and nitrogen species production and metabolism; identification of biomarkers for oxidative damage; evidence relating manifestation of chronic and some acute health problems to oxidative stress; identification of various dietary antioxidants present in plant foods as bioactive molecules; and so on. This review discusses the importance of oxidative stress in the body growth and development as well as proteomic and genomic evidences of its relationship with disease development, incidence of malignancies and autoimmune disorders, increased susceptibility to bacterial, viral, and parasitic diseases, and an interplay with prooxidants and antioxidants for maintaining a sound health, which would be helpful in enhancing the knowledge of any biochemist, pathophysiologist, or medical personnel regarding this important issue. PMID:24587990

  20. Oxidative Stress in Placenta: Health and Diseases.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fan; Tian, Fu-Ju; Lin, Yi

    2015-01-01

    During pregnancy, development of the placenta is interrelated with the oxygen concentration. Embryo development takes place in a low oxygen environment until the beginning of the second trimester when large amounts of oxygen are conveyed to meet the growth requirements. High metabolism and oxidative stress are common in the placenta. Reactive oxidative species sometimes harm placental development, but they are also reported to regulate gene transcription and downstream activities such as trophoblast proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis. Autophagy and apoptosis are two crucial, interconnected processes in the placenta that are often influenced by oxidative stress. The proper interactions between them play an important role in placental homeostasis. However, an imbalance between the protective and destructive mechanisms of autophagy and apoptosis seems to be linked with pregnancy-related disorders such as miscarriage, preeclampsia, and intrauterine growth restriction. Thus, potential therapies to hold oxidative stress in leash, promote placentation, and avoid unwanted apoptosis are discussed. PMID:26693479

  1. Oxidative Stress in Placenta: Health and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fan; Tian, Fu-Ju; Lin, Yi

    2015-01-01

    During pregnancy, development of the placenta is interrelated with the oxygen concentration. Embryo development takes place in a low oxygen environment until the beginning of the second trimester when large amounts of oxygen are conveyed to meet the growth requirements. High metabolism and oxidative stress are common in the placenta. Reactive oxidative species sometimes harm placental development, but they are also reported to regulate gene transcription and downstream activities such as trophoblast proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis. Autophagy and apoptosis are two crucial, interconnected processes in the placenta that are often influenced by oxidative stress. The proper interactions between them play an important role in placental homeostasis. However, an imbalance between the protective and destructive mechanisms of autophagy and apoptosis seems to be linked with pregnancy-related disorders such as miscarriage, preeclampsia, and intrauterine growth restriction. Thus, potential therapies to hold oxidative stress in leash, promote placentation, and avoid unwanted apoptosis are discussed. PMID:26693479

  2. Influence of Oxidative Stress on Stored Platelets

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Platelet storage and its availability for transfusion are limited to 5-6 days. Oxidative stress (OS) is one of the causes for reduced efficacy and shelf-life of platelets. The studies on platelet storage have focused on improving the storage conditions by altering platelet storage solutions, temperature, and materials. Nevertheless, the role of OS on platelet survival during storage is still unclear. Hence, this study was conducted to investigate the influence of storage on platelets. Platelets were stored for 12 days at 22°C. OS markers such as aggregation, superoxides, reactive oxygen species, glucose, pH, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, and antioxidant enzymes were assessed. OS increased during storage as indicated by increments in aggregation, superoxides, pH, conjugate dienes, and superoxide dismutase and decrements in glucose and catalase. Thus, platelets could endure OS till 6 days during storage, due to the antioxidant defense system. An evident increase in OS was observed from day 8 of storage, which can diminish the platelet efficacy. The present study provides an insight into the gradual changes occurring during platelet storage. This lays the foundation towards new possibilities of employing various antioxidants as additives in storage solutions. PMID:26949396

  3. Periodontal Disease-Induced Atherosclerosis and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko; Jia, Ru; Cai, Yu; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a highly prevalent disorder affecting up to 80% of the global population. Recent epidemiological studies have shown an association between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease, as oxidative stress plays an important role in chronic inflammatory diseases such as periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease. In this review, we focus on the mechanisms by which periodontopathic bacteria cause chronic inflammation through the enhancement of oxidative stress and accelerate cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, we comment on the antioxidative activity of catechin in atherosclerosis accelerated by periodontitis. PMID:26783845

  4. What Causes Stress? | Smokefree.gov

    Cancer.gov

    Stress is what we have when life gives us challenges. There are many ways that we may be challenged. Perhaps we have to change the way we live. Perhaps we have to solve a problem. Perhaps we have to get a task done in a short amount of time. Or maybe we have to make a hard choice. When the challenges of life (big or small) stack up, we have stress.

  5. Iron homeostatis and oxidative stress in idiopathic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: a case-control study

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Lung injury caused by both inhaled dusts and infectious agents depends on increased availability of iron and metal-catalyzed oxidative stress. Because inhaled particles, such as silica, and certain infections can cause secondary pulmonary alveolar proteinosi...

  6. Role of Nrf2 in Oxidative Stress and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Organismal life encounters reactive oxidants from internal metabolism and environmental toxicant exposure. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species cause oxidative stress and are traditionally viewed as being harmful. On the other hand, controlled production of oxidants in normal cells serves useful purposes to regulate signaling pathways. Reactive oxidants are counterbalanced by complex antioxidant defense systems regulated by a web of pathways to ensure that the response to oxidants is adequate for the body’s needs. A recurrent theme in oxidant signaling and antioxidant defense is reactive cysteine thiol–based redox signaling. The nuclear factor erythroid 2–related factor 2 (Nrf2) is an emerging regulator of cellular resistance to oxidants. Nrf2 controls the basal and induced expression of an array of antioxidant response element–dependent genes to regulate the physiological and pathophysiological outcomes of oxidant exposure. This review discusses the impact of Nrf2 on oxidative stress and toxicity and how Nrf2 senses oxidants and regulates antioxidant defense. PMID:23294312

  7. Sustained stress response after oxidative stress in trabecular meshwork cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guorong; Luna, Coralia; Liton, Paloma B.; Navarro, Iris; Epstein, David L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the mechanisms by which chronic oxidative stress may lead to a sustained stress response similar to that previously observed in the trabecular meshwork (TM) of glaucoma donors. Methods Porcine TM cells were treated with 200 μM H2O2 twice a day for four days and were allowed to recover for three additional days. After the treatment, TM cells were analyzed for generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (iROS), mitochondrial potential, activation of NF-κB, and the expression of inflammatory markers IL-1α, IL-6, IL-8, and ELAM-1. Potential sources of iROS were evaluated using inhibitors for nitric oxide, nitric oxide synthetase, cyclooxygenase, xanthine oxidase, NADPH oxidase, mitochondrial ROS, and PKC. The role of NF-κB activation in the induction of inflammatory markers was evaluated using the inhibitors Lactacystin and BAY11–7082. Results Chronic oxidative stress simulated by H2O2 exposure of porcine TM cells resulted in the sustained production of iROS by the mitochondria. Inhibition of mitochondrial iROS had a significant inhibitory effect on the activation of NF-κB and the induction of IL-1α, IL-6, IL-8, and ELAM-1 triggered by chronic oxidative stress. Inhibition of NF-κB partially prevented the induction of IL-1α, IL-8, and ELAM-1, but not IL-6. Conclusions Chronic oxidative stress in TM cells induced iROS production in mitochondria. This increase in iROS may contribute to the pathogenesis of the TM in glaucoma by inducing the expression of inflammatory mediators previously observed in glaucoma donors as well as the levels of oxidative damage in the tissue. PMID:18199969

  8. Protective effects of pulmonary epithelial lining fluid on oxidative stress and DNA single-strand breaks caused by ultrafine carbon black, ferrous sulphate and organic extract of diesel exhaust particles

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Cheng, Yi-Ling; Lei, Yu-Chen; Chang, Hui-Hsien; Cheng, Tsun-Jen

    2013-02-01

    Pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (ELF) is the first substance to make contact with inhaled particulate matter (PM) and interacts chemically with PM components. The objective of this study was to determine the role of ELF in oxidative stress, DNA damage and the production of proinflammatory cytokines following physicochemical exposure to PM. Ultrafine carbon black (ufCB, 15 nm; a model carbonaceous core), ferrous sulphate (FeSO{sub 4}; a model transition metal) and a diesel exhaust particle (DEP) extract (a model organic compound) were used to examine the acellular oxidative potential of synthetic ELF and non-ELF systems. We compared the effects of exposure to ufCB, FeSO{sub 4} and DEP extract on human alveolar epithelial Type II (A549) cells to determine the levels of oxidative stress, DNA single-strand breaks and interleukin-8 (IL-8) production in ELF and non-ELF systems. The effects of ufCB and FeSO{sub 4} on the acellular oxidative potential, cellular oxidative stress and DNA single-strand breakage were mitigated significantly by the addition of ELF, whereas there was no decrease following treatment with the DEP extract. There was no significant effect on IL-8 production following exposure to samples that were suspended in ELF/non-ELF systems. The results of the present study indicate that ELF plays an important role in the initial defence against PM in the pulmonary environment. Experimental components, such as ufCB and FeSO{sub 4}, induced the production of oxidative stress and led to DNA single-strand breaks, which were moderately prevented by the addition of ELF. These findings suggest that ELF plays a protective role against PM-driven oxidative stress and DNA damage. -- Highlights: ► To determine the role of ELF in ROS, DNA damage and IL-8 after exposure to PM. ► ufCB, FeSO{sub 4} and DEP extract were used to examine the protective effects of ELF. ► PM-driven oxidative stress and DNA single-strand breakage were mitigated by ELF. ► The findings

  9. Effect of Oxidative Stress on Male Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Gurpriya; Ong, Chloe; du Plessis, Stefan S

    2014-01-01

    Infertility affects approximately 15% of couples trying to conceive, and a male factor contributes to roughly half of these cases. Oxidative stress (OS) has been identified as one of the many mediators of male infertility by causing sperm dysfunction. OS is a state related to increased cellular damage triggered by oxygen and oxygen-derived free radicals known as reactive oxygen species (ROS). During this process, augmented production of ROS overwhelms the body's antioxidant defenses. While small amounts of ROS are required for normal sperm functioning, disproportionate levels can negatively impact the quality of spermatozoa and impair their overall fertilizing capacity. OS has been identified as an area of great attention because ROS and their metabolites can attack DNA, lipids, and proteins; alter enzymatic systems; produce irreparable alterations; cause cell death; and ultimately, lead to a decline in the semen parameters associated with male infertility. This review highlights the mechanisms of ROS production, the physiological and pathophysiological roles of ROS in relation to the male reproductive system, and recent advances in diagnostic methods; it also explores the benefits of using antioxidants in a clinical setting. PMID:24872947

  10. Diabetic Neuropathy and Oxidative Stress: Therapeutic Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Asieh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is a widespread disabling disorder comprising peripheral nerves' damage. DN develops on a background of hyperglycemia and an entangled metabolic imbalance, mainly oxidative stress. The majority of related pathways like polyol, advanced glycation end products, poly-ADP-ribose polymerase, hexosamine, and protein kinase c all originated from initial oxidative stress. To date, no absolute cure for DN has been defined; although some drugs are conventionally used, much more can be found if all pathophysiological links with oxidative stress would be taken into account. In this paper, although current therapies for DN have been reviewed, we have mainly focused on the links between DN and oxidative stress and therapies on the horizon, such as inhibitors of protein kinase C, aldose reductase, and advanced glycation. With reference to oxidative stress and the related pathways, the following new drugs are under study such as taurine, acetyl-L-carnitine, alpha lipoic acid, protein kinase C inhibitor (ruboxistaurin), aldose reductase inhibitors (fidarestat, epalrestat, ranirestat), advanced glycation end product inhibitors (benfotiamine, aspirin, aminoguanidine), the hexosamine pathway inhibitor (benfotiamine), inhibitor of poly ADP-ribose polymerase (nicotinamide), and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (trandolapril). The development of modern drugs to treat DN is a real challenge and needs intensive long-term comparative trials. PMID:23738033

  11. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress are involved in ZnO nanoparticle-induced hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xia; Shao, Huali; Liu, Weirong; Gu, Weizhong; Shu, Xiaoli; Mo, Yiqun; Chen, Xuejun; Zhang, Qunwei; Jiang, Mizu

    2015-01-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (Nano-ZnO) are widely used in sunscreens, clothes, medicine and electronic devices. However, the potential risks of human exposure and the potential for adverse health impacts are not well understood. Previous studies have demonstrated that exposure to Nano-ZnO caused liver damage and hepatocyte apoptosis through oxidative stress, but the molecular mechanisms that are involved in Nano-ZnO-induced hepatotoxicity are still unclear. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is sensitive to oxidative stress, and also plays a crucial role in oxidative stress-induced damage. Previous studies showed that ER stress was involved in many chemical-induced liver injuries. We hypothesized that exposure to Nano-ZnO caused oxidative stress and ER stress that were involved in Nano-ZnO-induced liver injury. To test our hypothesis, mice were gavaged with 200 mg/kg or 400 mg/kg of Nano-ZnO once a day for a period of 90 days, and blood and liver tissues were obtained for study. Our results showed that exposure to Nano-ZnO caused liver injury that was reflected by focal hepatocellular necrosis, congestive dilation of central veins, and significantly increased alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) levels. Exposure to Nano-ZnO also caused depletion of glutathione (GSH) the liver tissues. In addition, our electron microscope results showed that ER swelling and ribosomal degranulation were observed in the liver tissues from mice treated with Nano-ZnO. The mRNA expression levels of ER stress-associated genes (grp78, grp94, pdi-3, xbp-1) were also up-regulated in Nano-ZnO-treated mice. Nano-ZnO caused increased phosphorylation of RNA-dependent protein kinase-like ER kinase (PERK) and eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α). Finally, we found that exposure to Nano-ZnO caused increased ER stress-associated apoptotic protein levels, such as caspase-3, caspase-9, caspase-12, phosphorylation of JNK, and CHOP/GADD153, and up-regulation of pro-apoptotic genes (chop

  12. Oxidative stress in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Passali, D; Corallo, G; Yaremchuk, S; Longini, M; Proietti, F; Passali, G C; Bellussi, L

    2015-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is a disorder that leads to metabolic abnormalities and increased cardiovascular risk. The aim of this study was to identify early laboratory markers of cardiovascular disease through analysis of oxidative stress in normal subjects and patients with OSAS. A prospective study was designed to compare outcomes of oxidative stress laboratory tests in 20 adult patients with OSAS and a control group of 20 normal subjects. Laboratory techniques for detecting and quantifying free radical damage must be targeted to assess the pro-oxidant component and the antioxidant in order to obtain an overall picture of oxidative balance. No statistical differences in age, sex distribution, or BMI were found between the two groups (p>0.05). There were significant differences in the apnoea/hypopnoea index (AHI) between OSAS patients and the control group (p<0.05). Statistically significant differences in isoprostane, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and non-protein bound iron (NPBI) levels were found between the study and control groups. No significant difference in the levels of thiol biomarkers was found between the two groups. The main finding of the present study was increased production of oxidative stress biomarkers in OSAS patients. The major difference between thiols and other oxidative stress biomarkers is that thiols are antioxidants, while the others are expressions of oxidative damage. The findings of the present study indicate that biomarkers of oxidative stress in OSAS may be used as a marker of upper airway obstructive episodes due to mechanical trauma, as well as a marker of hypoxaemia causing local oropharyngeal inflammation. PMID:26900248

  13. The impact of oxidative stress on hair.

    PubMed

    Trüeb, R M

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative stress reflects an imbalance between the systemic manifestation of reactive oxygen species and a biological system's ability to detoxify the reactive intermediates or to repair the resulting damage. Reactive oxygen species or free radicals are highly reactive molecules that can directly damage lipids, proteins, and DNA. They are generated by a multitude of endogenous and environmental challenges, while the body possesses endogenous defense mechanisms. With age, production of free radicals increases, while the endogenous defense mechanisms decrease. This imbalance leads to progressive damage of cellular structures, presumably resulting in the aging phenotype. While the role of oxidative stress has been widely discussed in skin aging, little focus has been placed on its impact on hair condition. Moreover, most literature on age-related hair changes focuses on alopecia, but it is equally important that the hair fibers that emerge from the scalp exhibit significant age-related changes that have equal impact on the overall cosmetic properties of hair. Sources of oxidative stress with impact on the pre-emerging fiber include: oxidative metabolism, smoking, UVR, and inflammation from microbial, pollutant, or irritant origins. Sources of oxidative stress with impact on the post-emerging fiber include: UVR (enhanced by copper), chemical insults, and oxidized scalp lipids. The role of the dermatologist is recognition and treatment of pre- and post-emerging factors for lifetime scalp and hair health. PMID:26574302

  14. Cellular Mechanisms of Oxidative Stress and Action in Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Venza, Mario; Visalli, Maria; Beninati, Concetta; De Gaetano, Giuseppe Valerio; Teti, Diana; Venza, Isabella

    2015-01-01

    Most melanomas occur on the skin, but a small percentage of these life-threatening cancers affect other parts of the body, such as the eye and mucous membranes, including the mouth. Given that most melanomas are caused by ultraviolet radiation (UV) exposure, close attention has been paid to the impact of oxidative stress on these tumors. The possibility that key epigenetic enzymes cannot act on a DNA altered by oxidative stress has opened new perspectives. Therefore, much attention has been paid to the alteration of DNA methylation by oxidative stress. We review the current evidence about (i) the role of oxidative stress in melanoma initiation and progression; (ii) the mechanisms by which ROS influence the DNA methylation pattern of transformed melanocytes; (iii) the transformative potential of oxidative stress-induced changes in global and/or local gene methylation and expression; (iv) the employment of this epimutation as a biomarker for melanoma diagnosis, prognosis, and drug resistance evaluation; (v) the impact of this new knowledge in clinical practice for melanoma treatment. PMID:26064422

  15. Role of oxidative stress in Deoxynivalenol induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sakshi; Dwivedi, Premendra D; Pandey, Haushila P; Das, Mukul

    2014-10-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a Fusarium toxin that causes a variety of toxic effects with symptoms such as diarrhoea and low weight gain. To date, no review has addressed the toxicity of DON in relation to oxidative stress. The focus of this article is primarily intended to summarize the information associated with oxidative stress as a plausible mechanism for DON-induced toxicity. The present review shows that over the past two decades, several investigators have documented the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in oxidative stress as a result of DON treatment and have correlated them with various types of toxicity. The evidence for induction of an oxidative stress response resulting from DON exposure has been more focused on in vitro models and is relatively lacking in in vivo studies. Hence, more emphasis should be laid on in vivo investigations with doses that are commonly encountered in food products. Since DON is commonly found in food and feed, the cellular effects of this toxin in relation to oxidative stress, as well as effective measures to combat its toxicity, are important aspects to be considered for future studies. PMID:25010452

  16. Oxidative stress induces mitochondrial fragmentation in frataxin-deficient cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lefevre, Sophie; Sliwa, Dominika; Rustin, Pierre; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Santos, Renata

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Yeast frataxin-deficiency leads to increased proportion of fragmented mitochondria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress induces complete mitochondrial fragmentation in {Delta}yfh1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress increases mitochondrial fragmentation in patient fibroblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of mitochondrial fission in {Delta}yfh1 induces oxidative stress resistance. -- Abstract: Friedreich ataxia (FA) is the most common recessive neurodegenerative disease. It is caused by deficiency in mitochondrial frataxin, which participates in iron-sulfur cluster assembly. Yeast cells lacking frataxin ({Delta}yfh1 mutant) showed an increased proportion of fragmented mitochondria compared to wild-type. In addition, oxidative stress induced complete fragmentation of mitochondria in {Delta}yfh1 cells. Genetically controlled inhibition of mitochondrial fission in these cells led to increased resistance to oxidative stress. Here we present evidence that in yeast frataxin-deficiency interferes with mitochondrial dynamics, which might therefore be relevant for the pathophysiology of FA.

  17. Cellular Mechanisms of Oxidative Stress and Action in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Venza, Mario; Visalli, Maria; Beninati, Concetta; De Gaetano, Giuseppe Valerio; Teti, Diana; Venza, Isabella

    2015-01-01

    Most melanomas occur on the skin, but a small percentage of these life-threatening cancers affect other parts of the body, such as the eye and mucous membranes, including the mouth. Given that most melanomas are caused by ultraviolet radiation (UV) exposure, close attention has been paid to the impact of oxidative stress on these tumors. The possibility that key epigenetic enzymes cannot act on a DNA altered by oxidative stress has opened new perspectives. Therefore, much attention has been paid to the alteration of DNA methylation by oxidative stress. We review the current evidence about (i) the role of oxidative stress in melanoma initiation and progression; (ii) the mechanisms by which ROS influence the DNA methylation pattern of transformed melanocytes; (iii) the transformative potential of oxidative stress-induced changes in global and/or local gene methylation and expression; (iv) the employment of this epimutation as a biomarker for melanoma diagnosis, prognosis, and drug resistance evaluation; (v) the impact of this new knowledge in clinical practice for melanoma treatment. PMID:26064422

  18. Plasma levels of oxidative stress-responsive apoptosis inducing protein (ORAIP) in rats subjected to physicochemical oxidative stresses.

    PubMed

    Yao, Takako; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Murayama, Kimie; Seko, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is known to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of various disorders including atherosclerosis, aging and especially ischaemia/reperfusion injury. It causes cell damage that leads to apoptosis. However, the precise mechanism has been uncertain. Recently, we identified an apoptosis-inducing humoral factor in a hypoxia/reoxygenated medium of cardiac myocytes. We named this novel post-translationally modified secreted form of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) as oxidative stress-responsive apoptosis inducing protein (ORAIP). We developed a sandwich ELISA and confirmed that myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion markedly increased plasma levels of ORAIP. To investigate whether the role of ORAIP is common to various types of oxidative stress, we measured plasma ORAIP levels in rats subjected to three physicochemical models of oxidative stress including N2/O2 inhalation, cold/warm-stress (heat shock) and blood acidification. In all three models, plasma ORAIP levels significantly increased and reached a peak level at 10-30 min after stimulation, then decreased within 60 min. The (mean±S.E.M.) plasma ORAIP levels before and after (peak) stimulation were (16.4±9.6) and (55.2±34.2) ng/ml in N2/O2 inhalation, (14.1±12.4) and (34.3±14.6) ng/ml in cold/warm-stress, and (18.9±14.3) and (134.0±67.2) ng/ml in blood acidification study. These data strongly suggest that secretion of ORAIP in response to oxidative stress is universal mechanism and plays an essential role. ORAIP will be an important novel biomarker as well as a specific therapeutic target of these oxidative stress-induced cell injuries. PMID:26934977

  19. EFL Foreign Teacher Stress in Korea: Causes and Coping Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brundage, Gregory C.

    2007-01-01

    Survey study of 53 foreign EFL teachers in Jeonju City, South Korea looks at causes of teacher stress and coping mechanisms between the years of 2004 and 2006. Results show foreign EFL teachers report moderate levels of stress and attribute stresses in roughly equal measures to student misbehavior and school director/administrative sources. Survey…

  20. Oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage and neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chunyan; Sun, Li; Chen, Xueping; Zhang, Danshen

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Oxidative stress is characterized by the overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which can induce mitochondrial DNA mutations, damage the mitochondrial respiratory chain, alter membrane permeability, and influence Ca2+ homeostasis and mitochondrial defense systems. All these changes are implicated in the development of these neurodegenerative diseases, mediating or amplifying neuronal dysfunction and triggering neurodegeneration. This paper summarizes the contribution of oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage to the onset of neurodegenerative eases and discusses strategies to modify mitochondrial dysfunction that may be attractive therapeutic interventions for the treatment of various neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25206509

  1. Molecular and biochemical responses of Volvox carteri to oxidative stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingappa, U.; Rankin-Gee, E. K.; Lera, M.; Bebour, B.; Marcu, O.

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the intracellular response to environmental stresses is a key aspect to understanding the limits of habitability for life as we know it. A wide range of relevant stressors, from heat shock to radiation, result in the intracellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS are used physiologically as signaling molecules to cause changes in gene expression and metabolism. However, ROS, including superoxide (O2-) and peroxides, are also highly reactive molecules that cause oxidative damage to proteins, lipids and DNA. Here we studied stress response in the multicellular, eukaryotic green alga Volvox carteri, after exposure to heat shock conditions. We show that the ROS response to heat stress is paralleled by changes in photosynthetic metabolism, antioxidant enzyme activity and gene expression, and fluctuations in the elemental composition of cells. Metabolism, as measured by pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometry over two hours of heat stress, showed a linear decrease in the photosynthetic efficiency of Volvox. ROS quantification uncovered an increase in ROS in the culture medium, paralleled by a decrease in ROS within the Volvox colonies, suggesting an export mechanism is utilized to mitigate stress. Enzyme kinetics indicated an increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity over the heat stress timecourse. Using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, we show that these changes coincide with cell-specific import/export and intracellular redistribution of transition elements and halides, suggesting that the cellular metallome is also engaged in mediating oxidative stress in Volvox.

  2. Oxidative stress and antioxidant strategies in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jinok; Lee, Min-Geol

    2016-07-01

    Oxidative stress results from a prooxidant-antioxidant imbalance, leading to cellular damage. It is mediated by free radicals, such as reactive oxygen species or reactive nitrogen species, that are generated during physiological aerobic metabolism and pathological inflammatory processes. Skin serves as a protective organ that plays an important role in defending both external and internal toxic stimuli and maintaining homeostasis. It is becoming increasingly evident that oxidative stress is involved in numerous skin diseases and that antioxidative strategies can serve as effective and easy methods for improving these conditions. Herein, we review dysregulated antioxidant systems and antioxidative therapeutic strategies in dermatology. PMID:26020527

  3. Oxidative Stress in Schizophrenia: An Integrated Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bitanihirwe, Byron K.Y.; Woo, Tsung-Ung W.

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been suggested to contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. In particular, oxidative damage to lipids, proteins, and DNA as observed in schizophrenia is known to impair cell viability and function, which may subsequently account for the deteriorating course of the illness. Currently available evidence points towards an alteration in the activities of enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidant systems in schizophrenia. In fact, experimental models have demonstrated that oxidative stress induces behavioural and molecular anomalies strikingly similar to those observed in schizophrenia. These findings suggest that oxidative stress is intimately linked to a variety of pathophysiological processes, such as inflammation, oligodendrocyte abnormalities, mitochondrial dysfunction, hypoactive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and the impairment of fast-spiking gamma-aminobutyric acid interneurons.[bkyb1] Such self-sustaining mechanisms may progressively worsen producing the functional and structural consequences associated with schizophrenia. Recent clinical studies have shown antioxidant treatment to be effective in ameliorating schizophrenic symptoms. Hence, identifying viable therapeutic strategies to tackle oxidative stress and the resulting physiological disturbances provide an exciting opportunity for the treatment and ultimately prevention of schizophrenia. PMID:20974172

  4. Mild oxidative stress is beneficial for sperm telomere length maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Swetasmita; Kumar, Rajeev; Malhotra, Neena; Singh, Neeta; Dada, Rima

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate telomere length in sperm DNA and its correlation with oxidative stress (normal, mild, severe). METHODS: The study included infertile men (n = 112) and age matched fertile controls (n = 102). The average telomere length from the sperm DNA was measured using a quantitative real time PCR based assay. Seminal reactive oxygen species (ROS) and 8-Isoprostane (8-IP) levels were measured by chemiluminescence assay and ELISA respectively. RESULTS: Average sperm telomere length in infertile men and controls was 0.609 ± 0.15 and 0.789 ± 0.060, respectively (P < 0.0001). Seminal ROS levels in infertile was higher [66.61 ± 28.32 relative light units (RLU)/s/million sperm] than in controls (14.04 ± 10.67 RLU/s/million sperm) (P < 0.0001). The 8-IP level in infertile men was significantly higher (421.55 ± 131.29 pg/mL) than in controls (275.94 ± 48.13 pg/mL) (P < 0.001). When correlated to oxidative stress, in normal range of oxidative stress (ROS, 0-21.3 RLU/s/million sperm) the average telomere length in cases was 0.663 ± 0.14, in mild oxidative stress (ROS, 21.3-35 RLU/s/million sperm) it was elevated (0.684 ± 0.12) and in severe oxidative stress (ROS > 35 RLU/s/million sperm) average telomere length was decreased to 0.595 ± 0.15. CONCLUSION: Mild oxidative stress results in lengthening of telomere length, but severe oxidative stress results in shorter telomeres. Although telomere maintenance is a complex trait, the study shows that mild oxidative stress is beneficial in telomere length maintenance and thus a delicate balance needs to be established to maximize the beneficial effects of free radicals and prevent harmful effects of supra physiological levels. Detailed molecular evaluation of telomere structure, its correlation with oxidative stress would aid in elucidating the cause of accelerated telomere length attrition. PMID:27376021

  5. Potential Modulation of Sirtuins by Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Leonardo; Escande, Carlos; Denicola, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuins are a conserved family of NAD-dependent protein deacylases. Initially proposed as histone deacetylases, it is now known that they act on a variety of proteins including transcription factors and metabolic enzymes, having a key role in the regulation of cellular homeostasis. Seven isoforms are identified in mammals (SIRT1–7), all of them sharing a conserved catalytic core and showing differential subcellular localization and activities. Oxidative stress can affect the activity of sirtuins at different levels: expression, posttranslational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and NAD levels. Mild oxidative stress induces the expression of sirtuins as a compensatory mechanism, while harsh or prolonged oxidant conditions result in dysfunctional modified sirtuins more prone to degradation by the proteasome. Oxidative posttranslational modifications have been identified in vitro and in vivo, in particular cysteine oxidation and tyrosine nitration. In addition, oxidative stress can alter the interaction with other proteins, like SIRT1 with its protein inhibitor DBC1 resulting in a net increase of deacetylase activity. In the same way, manipulation of cellular NAD levels by pharmacological inhibition of other NAD-consuming enzymes results in activation of SIRT1 and protection against obesity-related pathologies. Nevertheless, further research is needed to establish the molecular mechanisms of redox regulation of sirtuins to further design adequate pharmacological interventions. PMID:26788256

  6. Potential Modulation of Sirtuins by Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Santos, Leonardo; Escande, Carlos; Denicola, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuins are a conserved family of NAD-dependent protein deacylases. Initially proposed as histone deacetylases, it is now known that they act on a variety of proteins including transcription factors and metabolic enzymes, having a key role in the regulation of cellular homeostasis. Seven isoforms are identified in mammals (SIRT1-7), all of them sharing a conserved catalytic core and showing differential subcellular localization and activities. Oxidative stress can affect the activity of sirtuins at different levels: expression, posttranslational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and NAD levels. Mild oxidative stress induces the expression of sirtuins as a compensatory mechanism, while harsh or prolonged oxidant conditions result in dysfunctional modified sirtuins more prone to degradation by the proteasome. Oxidative posttranslational modifications have been identified in vitro and in vivo, in particular cysteine oxidation and tyrosine nitration. In addition, oxidative stress can alter the interaction with other proteins, like SIRT1 with its protein inhibitor DBC1 resulting in a net increase of deacetylase activity. In the same way, manipulation of cellular NAD levels by pharmacological inhibition of other NAD-consuming enzymes results in activation of SIRT1 and protection against obesity-related pathologies. Nevertheless, further research is needed to establish the molecular mechanisms of redox regulation of sirtuins to further design adequate pharmacological interventions. PMID:26788256

  7. Autophagy Alleviates Neurodegeneration Caused by Mild Impairment of Oxidative Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Ya; Yong, Yue; Yang, Guang; Ding, Hanqing; Fan, Zhiqin; Tang, Yifen; Luo, Jia; Ke, Zun-Ji

    2013-01-01

    Thiamine deficiency (TD) causes mild impairment of oxidative metabolism and region-selective neuronal loss in the brain, which may be mediated by neuronal oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and neuroinflammation. TD-induced brain damage is used to model neurodegenerative disorders, and the mechanism for the neuronal death is still unclear. We hypothesized that autophagy might be activated in the TD brain and play a protective role in TD induced neuronal death. Our results demonstrated that TD induced the accumulation of autophagosomes in neurons of the thalamus measured by transmission electron microscopy, and the upregulation of autophagic markers: LC3-II, Atg5 and Beclin1 as measured with western blotting. TD also increased the expression of autophagic markers and induced LC3 puncta in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. TD-induced expression of autophagic markers was reversed once thiamine was re-administered. Both inhibition of autophagy by wortmannin and Beclin1 siRNA potentiated TD-induced death of SH-SY5Y cells. In contrast, activation of autophagy by rapamycin alleviated cell death induced by TD. Intraperitoneal injection of rapamycin stimulated neuronal autophagy and attenuated TD-induced neuronal death and microglia activation in the submedial thalamus nucleus (SmTN). TD inhibited the phosphorylation of p70S6 kinase, suggesting mTOR/p70S6 kinase pathway was involved the TD-induced autophagy. These results suggest that autophagy is neuroprotective in response to TD-induced neuronal death in the central nervous system. This opens a potential therapeutic avenue for neurodegenerative diseases caused by mild impairment of oxidative metabolism. PMID:23586593

  8. The plant Apolipoprotein D ortholog protects Arabidopsis against oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Charron, Jean-Benoit F; Ouellet, Francois; Houde, Mario; Sarhan, Fathey

    2008-01-01

    Background Lipocalins are a large and diverse family of small, mostly extracellular proteins implicated in many important functions. This family has been studied in bacteria, invertebrate and vertebrate animals but little is known about these proteins in plants. We recently reported the identification and molecular characterization of the first true lipocalins from plants, including the Apolipoprotein D ortholog AtTIL identified in the plant model Arabidopsis thaliana. This study aimed to determine its physiological role in planta. Results Our results demonstrate that the AtTIL lipocalin is involved in modulating tolerance to oxidative stress. AtTIL knock-out plants are very sensitive to sudden drops in temperature and paraquat treatment, and dark-grown plants die shortly after transfer to light. These plants accumulate a high level of hydrogen peroxide and other ROS, which causes an oxidative stress that is associated with a reduction in hypocotyl growth and sensitivity to light. Complementation of the knock-out plants with the AtTIL cDNA restores the normal phenotype. On the other hand, overexpression enhances tolerance to stress caused by freezing, paraquat and light. Moreover, this overexpression delays flowering and maintains leaf greenness. Microarray analyses identified several differentially-regulated genes encoding components of oxidative stress and energy balance. Conclusion This study provides the first functional evidence that a plant lipocalin is involved in modulating tolerance to oxidative stress. These findings are in agreement with recently published data showing that overexpression of ApoD enhances tolerance to oxidative stress and increases life span in mice and Drosophila. Together, the three papers strongly support a similar function of lipocalins in these evolutionary-distant species. PMID:18671872

  9. Haptoglobin Is Required to Prevent Oxidative Stress and Muscle Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lo Verso, Francesca; Santini, Ferruccio; Vitti, Paolo; Chisari, Carmelo; Sandri, Marco; Maffei, Margherita

    2014-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress (OS) plays a major role on tissue function. Several catabolic or stress conditions exacerbate OS, inducing organ deterioration. Haptoglobin (Hp) is a circulating acute phase protein, produced by liver and adipose tissue, and has an important anti-oxidant function. Hp is induced in pro-oxidative conditions such as systemic inflammation or obesity. The role of systemic factors that modulate oxidative stress inside muscle cells is still poorly investigated. Results We used Hp knockout mice (Hp-/-) to determine the role of this protein and therefore, of systemic OS in maintenance of muscle mass and function. Absence of Hp caused muscle atrophy and weakness due to activation of an atrophy program. When animals were stressed by acute exercise or by high fat diet (HFD), OS, muscle atrophy and force drop were exacerbated in Hp-/-. Depending from the stress condition, autophagy-lysosome and ubiquitin-proteasome systems were differently induced. Conclusions Hp is required to prevent OS and the activation of pathways leading to muscle atrophy and weakness in normal condition and upon metabolic challenges. PMID:24959824

  10. Overexpression of calreticulin sensitizes SERCA2a to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Yoshito; Kageyama, Kan; Kondo, Takahito

    2005-04-22

    Calreticulin (CRT), a Ca(2+)-binding molecular chaperone in the endoplasmic reticulum, plays a vital role in cardiac physiology and pathology. Oxidative stress is a main cause of myocardiac disorder in the ischemic heart, but the function of CRT under oxidative stress is not fully understood. In this study, the effect of overexpression of CRT on sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) 2a under oxidative stress was examined using myocardiac H9c2 cells transfected with the CRT gene. The in vitro activity of SERCA2a and uptake of (45)Ca(2+) into isolated microsomes were suppressed by H(2)O(2) in CRT-overexpressing cells compared with controls. Moreover, SERCA2a protein was degraded via a proteasome-dependent pathway following the formation of a complex with CRT under the stress with H(2)O(2). Thus, we conclude that overexpression of CRT enhances the inactivation and degradation of SERCA2a in the cells under oxidative stress, suggesting some pathophysiological functions of CRT in Ca(2+) homeostasis of myocardiac disease. PMID:15766574