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Sample records for oxidized calmodulin kinase

  1. Oxidative-stress-induced afterdepolarizations and calmodulin kinase II signaling.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lai-Hua; Chen, Fuhua; Karagueuzian, Hrayr S; Weiss, James N

    2009-01-01

    In the heart, oxidative stress caused by exogenous H(2)O(2) has been shown to induce early afterdepolarizations (EADs) and triggered activity by impairing Na current (I(Na)) inactivation. Because H(2)O(2) activates Ca(2+)/calmodulin kinase (CaMK)II, which also impairs I(Na) inactivation and promotes EADs, we hypothesized that CaMKII activation may be an important factor in EADs caused by oxidative stress. Using the patch-clamp and intracellular Ca (Ca(i)) imaging in Fluo-4 AM-loaded rabbit ventricular myocytes, we found that exposure to H(2)O(2) (0.2 to 1 mmol/L) for 5 to 15 minutes consistently induced EADs that were suppressed by the I(Na) blocker tetrodotoxin (10 micromol/L), as well as the I(Ca,L) blocker nifedipine. H(2)O(2) enhanced both peak and late I(Ca,L), consistent with CaMKII-mediated facilitation. By prolonging the action potential plateau and increasing Ca influx via I(Ca,L), H(2)O(2)-induced EADs were also frequently followed by DADs in response to spontaneous (ie, non-I(Ca,L)-gated) sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca release after repolarization. The CaMKII inhibitor KN-93 (1 micromol/L; n=4), but not its inactive analog KN-92 (1 micromol/L, n=5), prevented H(2)O(2)-induced EADs and DADs, and the selective CaMKII peptide inhibitor AIP (autocamtide-2-related inhibitory peptide) (2 micromol/L) significantly delayed their onset. In conclusion, H(2)O(2)-induced afterdepolarizations depend on both impaired I(Na) inactivation to reduce repolarization reserve and enhancement of I(Ca,L) to reverse repolarization, which are both facilitated by CaMKII activation. Our observations support a link between increased oxidative stress, CaMKII activation, and afterdepolarizations as triggers of lethal ventricular arrhythmias in diseased hearts. PMID:19038865

  2. Particulate air pollution induces arrhythmia via oxidative stress and calcium calmodulin kinase II activation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin-Bae; Kim, Changsoo; Choi, Eunmi; Park, Sanghoon; Park, Hyelim; Pak, Hui-Nam; Lee, Moon-Hyoung; Shin, Dong Chun; Hwang, Ki-Chul; Joung, Boyoung

    2012-02-15

    Ambient particulate matter (PM) can increase the incidence of arrhythmia. However, the arrhythmogenic mechanism of PM is poorly understood. This study investigated the arrhythmogenic mechanism of PM. In Sprague–Dawley rats, QT interval was increased from 115.0 ± 14.0 to 142.1 ± 18.4 ms (p = 0.02) after endotracheal exposure of DEP (200 μg/ml for 30 min, n = 5). Ventricular premature contractions were more frequently observed after DEP exposure (100%) than baseline (20%, p = 0.04). These effects were prevented by pretreatment of N-acetylcysteine (NAC, 5 mmol/L, n = 3). In 12 Langendorff-perfused rat hearts, DEP infusion of 12.5 μg/ml for 20 min prolonged action potential duration (APD) at only left ventricular base increasing apicobasal repolarization gradients. Spontaneous early afterdepolarization (EAD) and ventricular tachycardia (VT) were observed in 8 (67%) and 6 (50%) hearts, respectively, versus no spontaneous triggered activity or VT in any hearts before DEP infusion. DEP-induced APD prolongation, EAD and VT were successfully prevented with NAC (5 mmol/L, n = 5), nifedipine (10 μmol/L, n = 5), and active Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) blockade, KN 93 (1 μmol/L, n = 5), but not by thapsigargin (200 nmol/L) plus ryanodine (10 μmol/L, n = 5) and inactive CaMKII blockade, KN 92 (1 μmol/L, n = 5). In neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, DEP provoked ROS generation in dose dependant manner. DEP (12.5 μg/ml) induced apoptosis, and this effect was prevented by NAC and KN 93. Thus, this study shows that in vivo and vitro exposure of PM induced APD prolongation, EAD and ventricular arrhythmia. These effects might be caused by oxidative stress and CaMKII activation. -- Highlights: ► The ambient PM consistently prolonged repolarization. ► The ambient PM induced triggered activity and ventricular arrhythmia. ► These effects were prevented by antioxidants, I{sub CaL} blockade and CaMKII blockade. ► The ambient PM can induce

  3. Crocin Suppresses LPS-Stimulated Expression of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase by Upregulation of Heme Oxygenase-1 via Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase 4

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Hee; Park, Ga-Young; Bang, Soo Young; Park, Sun Young; Bae, Soo-Kyung; Kim, YoungHee

    2014-01-01

    Crocin is a water-soluble carotenoid pigment that is primarily used in various cuisines as a seasoning and coloring agent, as well as in traditional medicines for the treatment of edema, fever, and hepatic disorder. In this study, we demonstrated that crocin markedly induces the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) which leads to an anti-inflammatory response. Crocin inhibited inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and nitric oxide production via downregulation of nuclear factor kappa B activity in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. These effects were abrogated by blocking of HO-1 expression or activity. Crocin also induced Ca2+ mobilization from intracellular pools and phosphorylation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 4 (CAMK4). CAMK4 knockdown and kinase-dead mutant inhibited crocin-mediated HO-1 expression, Nrf2 activation, and phosphorylation of Akt, indicating that HO-1 expression is mediated by CAMK4 and that Akt is a downstream mediator of CAMK4 in crocin signaling. Moreover, crocin-mediated suppression of iNOS expression was blocked by CAMK4 inhibition. Overall, these results suggest that crocin suppresses LPS-stimulated expression of iNOS by inducing HO-1 expression via Ca2+/calmodulin-CAMK4-PI3K/Akt-Nrf2 signaling cascades. Our findings provide a novel molecular mechanism for the inhibitory effects of crocin against endotoxin-mediated inflammation. PMID:24839356

  4. Enzymatic assay for calmodulins based on plant NAD kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, A.C.; Jarrett, H.W.; Cormier, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    NAD kinase with increased sensitivity to calmodulin was purified from pea seedlings (Pisum sativum L., Willet Wonder). Assays for calmodulin based on the activities of NAD kinase, bovine brain cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase, and human erythrocyte Ca/sup 2 -/-ATPase were compared for their sensitivities to calmodulin and for their abilities to discriminate between calmodulins from different sources. The activities of the three enzymes were determined in the presence of various concentrations of calmodulins from human erythrocyte, bovine brain, sea pansy (Renilla reniformis), mung bean seed (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek), mushroom (Agaricus bisporus), and Tetrahymena pyriformis. The concentrations of calmodulin required for 50% activation of the NAD kinase (K/sub 0.5/) ranged from 0.520 ng/ml for Tetrahymena to 2.20 ng/ml for bovine brain. The A/sub 0.5/ s ranged from 19.6 ng/ml for bovine brain calmodulin to 73.5 ng/ml for mushroom calmodulin for phosphodiesterase activation. The K/sub 0.5/'s for the activation of Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase ranged from 36.3 ng/mol for erythrocyte calmodulin to 61.7 ng/ml for mushroom calmodulin. NAD kinase was not stimulated by phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, cardiolipin, or palmitoleic acid in the absence or presence of Ca/sup 2 +/. Palmitic acid had a slightly stimulatory effect in the presence of Ca/sup 2 +/ (10% of maximum), but no effect in the absence of Ca/sup 2 +/. Palmitoleic acid inhibited the calmodulin-stimulated activity by 50%. Both the NAD kinase assay and radioimmunoassay were able to detect calmodulin in extracts containing low concentrations of calmodulin. Estimates of calmodulin contents of crude homogenates determined by the NAD kinase assay were consistent with amounts obtained by various purification procedures. 30 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  5. Post-synaptic density-95 promotes calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-mediated Ser847 phosphorylation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Yasuo; Song, Tao; Sugimoto, Katsuyoshi; Horii, Mariko; Araki, Nobukazu; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi; Tezuka, Tohru; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Tokuda, Masaaki

    2003-01-01

    Post-synaptic density-95 (PSD-95) is a neuronal scaffolding protein that associates with N -methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and links them to intracellular signalling molecules. In neurons, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) binds selectively to the second PDZ domain (PDZ2) of PSD-95, thereby exhibiting physiological activation triggered via NMDA receptors. We have demonstrated previously that Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIalpha (CaM-K IIalpha) directly phosphorylates nNOS at residue Ser(847), and can attenuate the catalytic activity of the enzyme in neuronal cells [Komeima, Hayashi, Naito and Watanabe (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 28139-28143]. In the present study, we examined how CaM-K II participates in the phosphorylation by analysing the functional interaction between nNOS and PSD-95 in cells. The results showed that PSD-95 directly promotes the nNOS phosphorylation at Ser(847) induced by endogenous CaM-K II. In transfected cells, this effect of PSD-95 required its dual palmitoylation and the PDZ2 domain, but did not rely on its guanylate kinase domain. CaM-K Ialpha and CaM-K IV failed to phosphorylate nNOS at Ser(847) in transfected cells. Thus PSD-95 mediates cellular trafficking of nNOS, and may be required for the efficient phosphorylation of nNOS at Ser(847) by CaM-K II in neuronal cells. PMID:12630910

  6. Cross-Linking Proteins To Show Complex Formation: A Laboratory That Visually Demonstrates Calmodulin Binding to Calmodulin Kinase II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porta, Angela R.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a laboratory experiment demonstrating the binding of calcium/calmodulin to calmodulin kinase II, which is important in the metabolic and physiological activities of the cell. Uses SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). (YDS)

  7. Chronic hyperammonemia reduces the activity of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in cerebellum by altering its localization and increasing its phosphorylation by calcium-calmodulin kinase II.

    PubMed

    El-Mlili, Nisrin; Rodrigo, Regina; Naghizadeh, Bahareh; Cauli, Omar; Felipo, Vicente

    2008-08-01

    Impaired function of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway contributes to cognitive impairment in hyperammonemia and hepatic encephalopathy. The mechanisms by which hyperammonemia impairs this pathway remain unclear. Understanding these mechanisms would allow designing clinical treatments for cognitive deficits in hepatic encephalopathy. The aims of this work were: (i) to assess whether chronic hyperammonemia in vivo alters basal activity of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in cerebellum and/or its activation in response to NMDA receptor activation and (ii) to analyse the molecular mechanisms by which hyperammonemia induces these alterations. It is shown that hyperammonemia reduces both basal activity of nNOS and its activation following NMDA receptor activation. Reduced basal activity is because of increased phosphorylation in Ser847 (by 69%) which reduces basal activity of nNOS by about 40%. Increased phosphorylation of nNOS in Ser847 is because of increased activity of calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMKII) which in turn is because of increased phosphorylation at Thr286. Inhibiting CaMKII with KN-62 normalizes phosphorylation of Ser847 and basal NOS activity in hyperammonemic rats, returning to values similar to controls. Reduced activation of nNOS in response to NMDA receptor activation in hyperammonemia is because of altered subcellular localization of nNOS, with reduced amount in post-synaptic membranes and increased amount in the cytosol. PMID:18498443

  8. Calmodulin binds to and inhibits the activity of phosphoglycerate kinase.

    PubMed

    Myre, Michael A; O'Day, Danton H

    2004-09-17

    Phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) functions as a cytoplasmic ATP-generating glycolytic enzyme, a nuclear mediator in DNA replication and repair, a stimulator of Sendai virus transcription and an extracellular disulfide reductase in angiogenesis. Probing of a developmental expression library from Dictyostelium discoideum with radiolabelled calmodulin led to the isolation of a cDNA encoding a putative calmodulin-binding protein (DdPGK) with 68% sequence similarity to human PGK. Dictyostelium, rabbit and yeast PGKs bound to calmodulin-agarose in a calcium-dependent manner while DdPGK constructs lacking the calmodulin-binding domain (209KPFLAILGGAKVSDKIKLIE228) failed to bind. The calmodulin-binding domain shows 80% identity between diverse organisms and is situated beside the hinge and within the ATP binding domain adjacent to nine mutations associated with PGK deficiency. Calmodulin addition inhibits yeast PGK activity in vitro while the calmodulin antagonist W-7 abrogates this inhibition. Together, these data suggest that PGK activity may be negatively regulated by calcium and calmodulin signalling in eukaryotic cells. PMID:15363631

  9. Chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in tobacco: differential regulation by calmodulin isoforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Z.; Xia, M.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1998-01-01

    cDNA clones of chimeric Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) from tobacco (TCCaMK-1 and TCCaMK-2) were isolated and characterized. The polypeptides encoded by TCCaMK-1 and TCCaMK-2 have 15 different amino acid substitutions, yet they both contain a total of 517 amino acids. Northern analysis revealed that CCaMK is expressed in a stage-specific manner during anther development. Messenger RNA was detected when tobacco bud sizes were between 0.5 cm and 1.0 cm. The appearance of mRNA coincided with meiosis and became undetectable at later stages of anther development. The reverse polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification assay using isoform-specific primers showed that both of the CCaMK mRNAs were expressed in anther with similar expression patterns. The CCaMK protein expressed in Escherichia coli showed Ca2+-dependent autophosphorylation and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent substrate phosphorylation. Calmodulin isoforms (PCM1 and PCM6) had differential effects on the regulation of autophosphorylation and substrate phosphorylation of tobacco CCaMK, but not lily CCaMK. The evolutionary tree of plant serine/threonine protein kinases revealed that calmodulin-dependent kinases form one subgroup that is distinctly different from Ca2+-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) and other serine/threonine kinases in plants.

  10. Targeting of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    PubMed Central

    Colbran, Roger J

    2004-01-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) has diverse roles in virtually all cell types and it is regulated by a plethora of mechanisms. Local changes in Ca2+ concentration drive calmodulin binding and CaMKII activation. Activity is controlled further by autophosphorylation at multiple sites, which can generate an autonomously active form of the kinase (Thr286) or can block Ca2+/calmodulin binding (Thr305/306). The regulated actions of protein phosphatases at these sites also modulate downstream signalling from CaMKII. In addition, CaMKII targeting to specific subcellular microdomains appears to be necessary to account for the known signalling specificity, and targeting is regulated by Ca2+/calmodulin and autophosphorylation. The present review focuses on recent studies revealing the diversity of CaMKII interactions with proteins localized to neuronal dendrites. Interactions with various subunits of the NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) subtype of glutamate receptor have attracted the most attention, but binding of CaMKII to cytoskeletal and several other regulatory proteins has also been reported. Recent reports describing the molecular basis of each interaction and their potential role in the normal regulation of synaptic transmission and in pathological situations are discussed. These studies have revealed fundamental regulatory mechanisms that are probably important for controlling CaMKII functions in many cell types. PMID:14653781

  11. The chemosensitizing agent lubeluzole binds calmodulin and inhibits Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Claudio; Cavalluzzi, Maria Maddalena; Rusciano, Maria Rosaria; Lovece, Angelo; Carrieri, Antonio; Pracella, Riccardo; Giannuzzi, Giulia; Polimeno, Lorenzo; Viale, Maurizio; Illario, Maddalena; Franchini, Carlo; Lentini, Giovanni

    2016-06-30

    An affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE) method to estimate apparent dissociation constants between bovine brain calmodulin (CaM) and non-peptidic ligands was developed. The method was validated reproducing the dissociation constants of a number of well-known CaM ligands. In particular, the potent antagonist 125-C9 was ad hoc synthesized through an improved synthetic procedure. The ACE method was successfully applied to verify CaM affinity for lubeluzole, a well-known neuroprotective agent recently proved useful to potentiate the activity of anti-cancer drugs. Lubeluzole was slightly less potent than 125-C9 (Kd = 2.9 ± 0.7 and 0.47 ± 0.06 μM, respectively) and displayed Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibition (IC50 = 40 ± 1 μM). Possible binding modes of lubeluzole to CaM were explored by docking studies based on the X-ray crystal structures of several trifluoperazine-CaM complexes. An estimated dissociation constant in good agreement with the experimental one was found and the main aminoacidic residues and interactions contributing to complex formation were highlighted. The possibility that interference with Ca(2+) pathways may contribute to the previously observed chemosensitizing effects of lubeluzole on human ovarian adenocarcinoma and lung carcinoma cells are discussed. PMID:27043269

  12. Ca2+/Calmodulin and Apo-Calmodulin Both Bind to and Enhance the Tyrosine Kinase Activity of c-Src

    PubMed Central

    Anguita, Estefanía; Benaim, Gustavo; Villalobo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Src family non-receptor tyrosine kinases play a prominent role in multiple cellular processes, including: cell proliferation, differentiation, cell survival, stress response, and cell adhesion and migration, among others. And when deregulated by mutations, overexpression, and/or the arrival of faulty incoming signals, its hyperactivity contributes to the development of hematological and solid tumors. c-Src is a prototypical member of this family of kinases, which is highly regulated by a set of phosphorylation events. Other factor contributing to the regulation of Src activity appears to be mediated by the Ca2+ signal generated in cells by different effectors, where the Ca2+-receptor protein calmodulin (CaM) plays a key role. In this report we demonstrate that CaM directly interacts with Src in both Ca2+-dependent and Ca2+-independent manners in vitro and in living cells, and that the CaM antagonist N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide (W-7) inhibits the activation of this kinase induced by the upstream activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), in human carcinoma epidermoide A431 cells, and by hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress, in both A431 cells and human breast adenocarcinoma SK-BR-3 cells. Furthermore, we show that the Ca2+/CaM complex strongly activates the auto-phosphorylation and tyrosine kinase activity of c-Src toward exogenous substrates, but most relevantly and for the first time, we demonstrate that Ca2+-free CaM (apo-CaM) exerts a far higher activatory action on Src auto-phosphorylation and kinase activity toward exogenous substrates than the one exerted by the Ca2+/CaM complex. This suggests that a transient increase in the cytosolic concentration of free Ca2+ is not an absolute requirement for CaM-mediated activation of Src in living cells, and that a direct regulation of Src by apo-CaM could be inferred. PMID:26058065

  13. Cross Talk among Calcium, Hydrogen Peroxide, and Nitric Oxide and Activation of Gene Expression Involving Calmodulins and Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinases in Ulva compressa Exposed to Copper Excess1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    González, Alberto; Cabrera, M. de los Ángeles; Henríquez, M. Josefa; Contreras, Rodrigo A.; Morales, Bernardo; Moenne, Alejandra

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the copper-induced cross talk among calcium, nitric oxide (NO), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and the calcium-dependent activation of gene expression, the marine alga Ulva compressa was treated with the inhibitors of calcium channels, ned-19, ryanodine, and xestospongin C, of chloroplasts and mitochondrial electron transport chains, 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea and antimycin A, of pyruvate dehydrogenase, moniliformin, of calmodulins, N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphtalene sulfonamide, and of calcium-dependent protein kinases, staurosporine, as well as with the scavengers of NO, 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide, and of H2O2, ascorbate, and exposed to a sublethal concentration of copper (10 μm) for 24 h. The level of NO increased at 2 and 12 h. The first peak was inhibited by ned-19 and 3-(2,3-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea and the second peak by ned-19 and antimycin A, indicating that NO synthesis is dependent on calcium release and occurs in organelles. The level of H2O2 increased at 2, 3, and 12 h and was inhibited by ned-19, ryanodine, xestospongin C, and moniliformin, indicating that H2O2 accumulation is dependent on calcium release and Krebs cycle activity. In addition, pyruvate dehydrogenase, 2-oxoxglutarate dehydrogenase, and isocitrate dehydrogenase activities of the Krebs cycle increased at 2, 3, 12, and/or 14 h, and these increases were inhibited in vitro by EGTA, a calcium chelating agent. Calcium release at 2, 3, and 12 h was inhibited by 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide and ascorbate, indicating activation by NO and H2O2. In addition, the level of antioxidant protein gene transcripts decreased with N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphtalene sulfonamide and staurosporine. Thus, there is a copper-induced cross talk among calcium, H2O2, and NO and a calcium-dependent activation of gene expression involving calmodulins and calcium-dependent protein kinases. PMID:22234999

  14. Dual Regulation of a Chimeric Plant Serine/Threonine Kinase by Calcium and Calcium/Calmodulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takezawa, D.; Ramachandiran, S.; Paranjape, V.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1996-01-01

    A chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) gene characterized by a catalytic domain, a calmodulin-binding domain, and a neural visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain was recently cloned from plants. The Escherichia coli-expressed CCaMK phosphorylates various protein and peptide substrates in a Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent manner. The calmodulin-binding region of CCAMK has similarity to the calmodulin-binding region of the alpha-subunit of multifunctional Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII). CCaMK exhibits basal autophosphorylation at the threonine residue(s) (0.098 mol of P-32/mol) that is stimulated 3.4-fold by Ca(2+) (0.339 mol of P-32/mol), while calmodulin inhibits Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation to the basal level. A deletion mutant lacking the visinin-like domain did not show Ca(2+)-simulated autophosphorylation activity but retained Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase activity at a reduced level. Ca(2+)-dependent mobility shift assays using E.coli-expressed protein from residues 358-520 revealed that Ca(2+) binds to the visinin-like domain. Studies with site-directed mutants of the visinin-like domain indicated that EF-hands II and III are crucial for Ca(2+)-induced conformational changes in the visinin-like domain. Autophosphorylation of CCaMK increases Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase activity by about 5-fold, whereas it did not affect its C(2+)-independent activity. This report provides evidence for the existence of a protein kinase in plants that is modulated by Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin. The presence of a visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain in CCaMK adds an additional Ca(2+)-sensing mechanism not previously known to exist in the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-mediated signaling cascade in plants.

  15. Far-infrared radiation acutely increases nitric oxide production by increasing Ca{sup 2+} mobilization and Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-mediated phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase at serine 1179

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Sangmi; Cho, Du-Hyong; Park, Young Mi; Kang, Duk-Hee; Jo, Inho

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Far-infrared (FIR) radiation increases eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation and NO production in BAEC. •CaMKII and PKA mediate FIR-stimulated increases in eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation. •FIR increases intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels. •Thermo-sensitive TRPV Ca{sup 2+} channels are unlikely to be involved in the FIR-mediated eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation pathway. -- Abstract: Repeated thermal therapy manifested by far-infrared (FIR) radiation improves vascular function in both patients and mouse model with coronary heart disease, but its underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Using FIR as a thermal therapy agent, we investigate the molecular mechanism of its effect on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity and NO production. FIR increased the phosphorylation of eNOS at serine 1179 (eNOS-Ser{sup 1179}) in a time-dependent manner (up to 40 min of FIR radiation) in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) without alterations in eNOS expression. This increase was accompanied by increases in NO production and intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels. Treatment with KN-93, a selective inhibitor of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and H-89, a protein kinase A inhibitor, inhibited FIR radiation-stimulated eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation. FIR radiation itself also increased the temperature of culture medium. As transient receptors potential vanilloid (TRPV) ion channels are known to be temperature-sensitive calcium channels, we explore whether TRPV channels mediate these observed effects. Reverse transcription-PCR assay revealed two TRPV isoforms in BAEC, TRPV2 and TRPV4. Although ruthenium red, a pan-TRPV inhibitor, completely reversed the observed effect of FIR radiation, a partial attenuation (∼20%) was found in cells treated with Tranilast, TRPV2 inhibitor. However, ectopic expression of siRNA of TRPV2 showed no significant alteration in FIR radiation-stimulated eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation. This

  16. IMMUNOCYTOCHEMICAL LOCALIZATION OF CALCIUM/CALMODULIN-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE II IN RAT BRAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaM kinase II) is a prominent enzyme in mammalian brain capable of phosphorylating a variety of substrate proteins. In the present investigation, the subcellular and regional distribution of CaM kinase II has been studied by light a...

  17. ACQUISITION AND LOSS OF NEURONAL CA2+/CALMODULIN-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE DURING NEURONAL DIFFERENTIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurons display characteristic schedules by which they acquire and lose the neuron-specific Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein Kinase-Gr (CaM Kinase-Gr) during differentiation. uch schedules are exemplified by patterns of expression of this kinase in the developing cerebellum and ...

  18. Focal adhesion kinases and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases regulate protein tyrosine phosphorylation in stallion sperm.

    PubMed

    González-Fernández, Lauro; Macías-García, Beatriz; Loux, Shavahn C; Varner, Dickson D; Hinrichs, Katrin

    2013-06-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation (PY) is a hallmark of sperm capacitation. In stallion sperm, calcium inhibits PY at pH <7.8, mediated by calmodulin. To explore the mechanism of that inhibition, we incubated stallion sperm in media without added calcium, with calcium, or with calcium plus the calmodulin inhibitor W-7 (Ca/W-7 treatment). Treatment with inhibitors of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases, protein kinase A (PRKA), or Src family kinases suppressed the PY induced by the absence of added calcium, but not that induced by the Ca/W-7 treatment, indicating that PY in the absence of added calcium occurred via the canonical PRKA pathway, but that PY in the Ca/W-7 treatment did not. This suggested that when calmodulin was inhibited, calcium stimulated PY via a noncanonical pathway. Incubation with PF-431396, an inhibitor of focal adhesion kinases (FAKs), a family of calcium-induced protein tyrosine kinases, inhibited the PY induced both by the absence of added calcium and by the Ca/W-7 treatment. Western blotting demonstrated that both FAK family members, protein tyrosine kinases 2 and 2B, were phosphorylated in the absence of added calcium and in the Ca/W-7 treatment, but not in the presence of calcium without calmodulin inhibitors. Inhibition of FAK proteins inhibited PY in stallion sperm incubated under capacitating conditions (in the presence of calcium, bovine serum albumin, and bicarbonate at pH >7.8). These results show for the first time a role for calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases in PRKA-dependent sperm PY; a non-PRKA-dependent pathway regulating sperm PY; and the apparent involvement of the FAK family of protein tyrosine kinases downstream in both pathways. PMID:23595906

  19. Ca2+/calmodulin dependent protein kinase from Mycobacterium smegmatis ATCC 607.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S; Giri, S; Khuller, G K

    1998-06-01

    A soluble Ca2+/calmodulin dependent protein kinase has been partially purified (approximately 400 fold) from Mycobacterium smegmatis ATCC 607 using several purification steps like ammonium sulphate precipitation (30-60%), Sepharose CL-6B gel filtration, DEAE-cellulose and finally calmodulin-agarose affinity chromatography. On SDS-PAGE, this enzyme preparation showed a major protein band of molecular mass 35 kD and its activity was dependent on calcium, calmodulin and ATP when measured under saturating histone IIs (exogenous substrate) concentration. Phosphorylation of histone IIs was inhibited by W-7 (calmodulin inhibitor) and KN-62 (CaM-kinase inhibitor) with IC50 of 1.5 and 0.25 microm respectively, but was not affected by inhibitors of PKA (Sigma P5015) and PKC (H-7). All these results confirm that purified enzyme is Ca2+/calmodulin dependent protein kinase of M. smegmatis. The protein kinase of M. smegmatis demonstrated a narrow substrate specificity for both exogenous as well as endogenous substrates. These results suggest that purified CaM-kinase must be involved in regulating specific function(s) in this organism. PMID:9655195

  20. The Effect of Calcium on the Binding of Calmodulin to Calcium/Calmodulin Protein Kinase II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porta, Angela R.

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a follow-up laboratory experiment demonstrating the formation change when calcium binds to calmodulin. This conformation change allows this complex to bind to a target protein. Presents the necessary information to conduct the experiment and discusses the results. (YDS)

  1. Differential AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Recognition Mechanism of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase Kinase Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yuya; Kawaguchi, Yoshinori; Fujimoto, Tomohito; Kanayama, Naoki; Magari, Masaki; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi

    2016-06-24

    Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) is a known activating kinase for AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). In vitro, CaMKKβ phosphorylates Thr(172) in the AMPKα subunit more efficiently than CaMKKα, with a lower Km (∼2 μm) for AMPK, whereas the CaMKIα phosphorylation efficiencies by both CaMKKs are indistinguishable. Here we found that subdomain VIII of CaMKK is involved in the discrimination of AMPK as a native substrate by measuring the activities of various CaMKKα/CaMKKβ chimera mutants. Site-directed mutagenesis analysis revealed that Leu(358) in CaMKKβ/Ile(322) in CaMKKα confer, at least in part, a distinct recognition of AMPK but not of CaMKIα. PMID:27151216

  2. NAD kinase controls animal NADP biosynthesis and is modulated via evolutionarily divergent calmodulin-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Love, Nick R; Pollak, Nadine; Dölle, Christian; Niere, Marc; Chen, Yaoyao; Oliveri, Paola; Amaya, Enrique; Patel, Sandip; Ziegler, Mathias

    2015-02-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) is a critical cofactor during metabolism, calcium signaling, and oxidative defense, yet how animals regulate their NADP pools in vivo and how NADP-synthesizing enzymes are regulated have long remained unknown. Here we show that expression of Nadk, an NAD(+) kinase-encoding gene, governs NADP biosynthesis in vivo and is essential for development in Xenopus frog embryos. Unexpectedly, we found that embryonic Nadk expression is dynamic, showing cell type-specific up-regulation during both frog and sea urchin embryogenesis. We analyzed the NAD kinases (NADKs) of a variety of deuterostome animals, finding two conserved internal domains forming a catalytic core but a highly divergent N terminus. One type of N terminus (found in basal species such as the sea urchin) mediates direct catalytic activation of NADK by Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM), whereas the other (typical for vertebrates) is phosphorylated by a CaM kinase-dependent mechanism. This work indicates that animal NADKs govern NADP biosynthesis in vivo and are regulated by evolutionarily divergent and conserved CaM-dependent mechanisms. PMID:25605906

  3. NAD kinase controls animal NADP biosynthesis and is modulated via evolutionarily divergent calmodulin-dependent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Love, Nick R.; Pollak, Nadine; Dölle, Christian; Niere, Marc; Chen, Yaoyao; Oliveri, Paola; Amaya, Enrique; Patel, Sandip; Ziegler, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) is a critical cofactor during metabolism, calcium signaling, and oxidative defense, yet how animals regulate their NADP pools in vivo and how NADP-synthesizing enzymes are regulated have long remained unknown. Here we show that expression of Nadk, an NAD+ kinase-encoding gene, governs NADP biosynthesis in vivo and is essential for development in Xenopus frog embryos. Unexpectedly, we found that embryonic Nadk expression is dynamic, showing cell type-specific up-regulation during both frog and sea urchin embryogenesis. We analyzed the NAD kinases (NADKs) of a variety of deuterostome animals, finding two conserved internal domains forming a catalytic core but a highly divergent N terminus. One type of N terminus (found in basal species such as the sea urchin) mediates direct catalytic activation of NADK by Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM), whereas the other (typical for vertebrates) is phosphorylated by a CaM kinase-dependent mechanism. This work indicates that animal NADKs govern NADP biosynthesis in vivo and are regulated by evolutionarily divergent and conserved CaM-dependent mechanisms. PMID:25605906

  4. Calcium-stimulated autophosphorylation site of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Siems, W. F.; Jones, J. P.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2001-01-01

    The existence of two molecular switches regulating plant chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK), namely the C-terminal visinin-like domain acting as Ca(2+)-sensitive molecular switch and calmodulin binding domain acting as Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation-sensitive molecular switch, has been described (Sathyanarayanan, P. V., Cremo, C. R., and Poovaiah, B. W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 30417-30422). Here we report the identification of Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site of CCaMK by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight-mass spectrometry. Thr(267) was confirmed as the Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site by post-source decay experiments and by site-directed mutagenesis. The purified T267A mutant form of CCaMK did not show Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation, autophosphorylation-dependent variable calmodulin affinity, or Ca(2+)/calmodulin stimulation of kinase activity. Sequence comparison of CCaMK from monocotyledonous plant (lily) and dicotyledonous plant (tobacco) suggests that the autophosphorylation site is conserved. This is the first identification of a phosphorylation site specifically responding to activation by second messenger system (Ca(2+) messenger system) in plants. Homology modeling of the kinase and calmodulin binding domain of CCaMK with the crystal structure of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 1 suggests that the Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site is located on the surface of the kinase and far from the catalytic site. Analysis of Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation with increasing concentration of CCaMK indicates the possibility that the Ca(2+)-stimulated phosphorylation occurs by an intermolecular mechanism.

  5. Plant chimeric Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. Role of the neural visinin-like domain in regulating autophosphorylation and calmodulin affinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Cremo, C. R.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    Chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) is characterized by a serine-threonine kinase domain, an autoinhibitory domain, a calmodulin-binding domain and a neural visinin-like domain with three EF-hands. The neural visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain at the C-terminal end of the CaM-binding domain makes CCaMK unique among all the known calmodulin-dependent kinases. Biological functions of the plant visinin-like proteins or visinin-like domains in plant proteins are not well known. Using EF-hand deletions in the visinin-like domain, we found that the visinin-like domain regulated Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation of CCaMK. To investigate the effects of Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation on the interaction with calmodulin, the equilibrium binding constants of CCaMK were measured by fluorescence emission anisotropy using dansylated calmodulin. Binding was 8-fold tighter after Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation. This shift in affinity did not occur in CCaMK deletion mutants lacking Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation. A variable calmodulin affinity regulated by Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation mediated through the visinin-like domain is a new regulatory mechanism for CCaMK activation and calmodulin-dependent protein kinases. Our experiments demonstrate the existence of two functional molecular switches in a protein kinase regulating the kinase activity, namely a visinin-like domain acting as a Ca(2+)-triggered switch and a CaM-binding domain acting as an autophosphorylation-triggered molecular switch.

  6. Calcium calmodulin dependent kinase kinase 2 - a novel therapeutic target for gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Syed, Nazia; Barbhuiya, Mustafa A; Raja, Remya; Marimuthu, Arivusudar; Sahasrabuddhe, Nandini; Pinto, Sneha M; Manda, Srikanth Srinivas; Renuse, Santosh; Manju, HC; Zameer, Mohammed Abdul Lateef; Sharma, Jyoti; Brait, Mariana; Srikumar, Kotteazeth; Roa, Juan Carlos; Vijaya Kumar, M; Kumar, KV Veerendra; Prasad, TS Keshava; Ramaswamy, Girija; Kumar, Rekha Vijay; Pandey, Akhilesh; Gowda, Harsha; Chatterjee, Aditi

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common gastrointestinal malignancies and is associated with poor prognosis. Exploring alterations in the proteomic landscape of gastric cancer is likely to provide potential biomarkers for early detection and molecules for targeted therapeutic intervention. Using iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis, we identified 22 proteins that were overexpressed and 17 proteins that were downregulated in gastric tumor tissues as compared to the adjacent normal tissue. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase 2 (CAMKK2) was found to be 7-fold overexpressed in gastric tumor tissues. Immunohistochemical labeling of tumor tissue microarrays for validation of CAMKK2 overexpression revealed that it was indeed overexpressed in 94% (92 of 98) of gastric cancer cases. Silencing of CAMKK2 using siRNA significantly reduced cell proliferation, colony formation and invasion of gastric cancer cells. Our results demonstrate that CAMKK2 signals in gastric cancer through AMPK activation and suggest that CAMKK2 could be a novel therapeutic target in gastric cancer. PMID:25756516

  7. Calmodulin-dependent protein kinases mediate calcium-induced slow motility of mammalian outer hair cells.

    PubMed

    Puschner, B; Schacht, J

    1997-08-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells in vitro respond to elevation of intracellular calcium with slow shape changes over seconds to minutes ('slow motility'). This process is blocked by general calmodulin antagonists suggesting the participation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent enzymatic reactions. The present study proposes a mechanism for these reactions. Length changes of outer hair cells isolated from the guinea pig cochlea were induced by exposure to the calcium ionophore ionomycin. ATP levels remained unaffected by this treatment ruling out depletion of ATP (by activation of calcium-dependent ATPases) as a cause of the observed shape changes. Involvement of protein kinases was suggested by the inhibition of shape changes by K252a, a broad-spectrum inhibitor of protein kinase activity. Furthermore, the inhibitors ML-7 and ML-9 blocked the shape changes at concentrations compatible with inhibition of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). KN-62, an inhibitor of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), also attenuated the length changes. Inhibitors with selectivity for cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases (H-89, staurosporine) were tested to assess potential additional contributions by such enzymes. The dose dependence of their action supported the notion that the most likely mechanism of slow motility involves phosphorylation reactions catalyzed by MLCK or CaMKII or both. PMID:9282907

  8. Death-Associated Protein Kinase Activity Is Regulated by Coupled Calcium/Calmodulin Binding to Two Distinct Sites.

    PubMed

    Simon, Bertrand; Huart, Anne-Sophie; Temmerman, Koen; Vahokoski, Juha; Mertens, Haydyn D T; Komadina, Dana; Hoffmann, Jan-Erik; Yumerefendi, Hayretin; Svergun, Dmitri I; Kursula, Petri; Schultz, Carsten; McCarthy, Andrew A; Hart, Darren J; Wilmanns, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    The regulation of many protein kinases by binding to calcium/calmodulin connects two principal mechanisms in signaling processes: protein phosphorylation and responses to dose- and time-dependent calcium signals. We used the calcium/calmodulin-dependent members of the death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) family to investigate the role of a basic DAPK signature loop near the kinase active site. In DAPK2, this loop comprises a novel dimerization-regulated calcium/calmodulin-binding site, in addition to a well-established calcium/calmodulin site in the C-terminal autoregulatory domain. Unexpectedly, impairment of the basic loop interaction site completely abolishes calcium/calmodulin binding and DAPK2 activity is reduced to a residual level, indicative of coupled binding to the two sites. This contrasts with the generally accepted view that kinase calcium/calmodulin interactions are autonomous of the kinase catalytic domain. Our data establish an intricate model of multi-step kinase activation and expand our understanding of how calcium binding connects with other mechanisms involved in kinase activity regulation. PMID:27133022

  9. Genetic identification of an autoinhibitor in CDPK, a protein kinase with a calmodulin-like domain.

    PubMed

    Harper, J F; Huang, J F; Lloyd, S J

    1994-06-14

    CDPKs are a family of calcium (Ca2+)-dependent protein kinases which are defined by a carboxyl-terminal calmodulin-like domain. Mutational analysis indicates that the junction domain, which joins the kinase and calmodulin-like domains, contains an autoinhibitor. CDPK isoform AK1 from Arabidopsis was expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein sandwiched between glutathione S-transferase and six consecutive histidines at the N- and C-terminal ends, respectively. This fusion, called AK1-6H, was purified and displayed kinase activity which was stimulated up to 127-fold by Ca2+, with a typical specific activity of 2000 nmol min-1 mg-1, using syntide-2 as peptide substrate. A truncation which deletes the calmodulin-like domain, as in mutant delta C-6H, disrupts Ca2+ activation and leaves the enzyme with a basal level of activity. Delta C-6H could be activated 87-fold by preincubation with a purified polyclonal IgG which was raised against a junction domain fusion. A further deletion of the junction domain, as in mutant delta JC, results in a constitutively active enzyme. This indicates that the junction domain in delta C-6H can function as an autoinhibitor. Its function as an autoinhibitor in a full-length enzyme was confirmed by site-specific mutagenesis, as shown by mutant KJM23-6H, which had a six-residue substitution in the junction domain between A422 and A432. Both delta JC and KJM23-6H encoded Ca(2+)-independent enzymes which had specific activities greater than 70% that of a fully active AK1-6H and displayed equivalent Km values for ATP and syntide-2. Inhibition studies on delta JC, using peptides based on the autoinhibitory domains of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, are consistent with a model where the junction domain contains a similar pseudosubstrate-type autoinhibitor. PMID:8003490

  10. Inhibition of endogenous heat shock protein 70 attenuates inducible nitric oxide synthase induction via disruption of heat shock protein 70/Na(+) /H(+) exchanger 1-Ca(2+) -calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II/transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1-nuclear factor-κB signals in BV-2 microglia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao; Lu, Xu; Wang, Jia; Tong, Lijuan; Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) critically contributes to inflammation and host defense. The inhibition of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) prevents iNOS induction in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages. However, the role and mechanism of endogenous Hsp70 in iNOS induction in microglia remains unclear. This study addresses this issue in BV-2 microglia, showing that Hsp70 inhibition or knockdown prevents LPS-induced iNOS protein expression and nitric oxide production. Real-time PCR experiments showed that LPS-induced iNOS mRNA transcription was blocked by Hsp70 inhibition. Further studies revealed that the inhibition of Hsp70 attenuated LPS-stimulated nuclear translocation and phosphorylation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB as well as the degradation of inhibitor of κB (IκB)-α and phosphorylation of IκB kinase β (IKKβ). This prevention effect of Hsp70 inhibition on IKKβ-NF-κB activation was found to be dependent on the Ca(2+) /calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII)/transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) signals based on the following observations: 1) chelation of intracellular Ca(2+) or inhibition of CaMKII reduced LPS-induced increases in TAK1 phosphorylation and 2) Hsp70 inhibition reduced LPS-induced increases in CaMKII/TAK1 phosphorylation, intracellular pH value, [Ca(2+) ]i , and CaMKII/TAK1 association. Mechanistic studies showed that Hsp70 inhibition disrupted the association between Hsp70 and Na(+) /H(+) exchanger 1 (NHE1), which is an important exchanger responsible for Ca(2+) influx in LPS-stimulated cells. These studies demonstrate that the inhibition of endogenous Hsp70 attenuates the induction of iNOS, which likely occurs through the disruption of NHE1/Hsp70-Ca(2+) -CaMKII/TAK1-NF-κB signals in BV-2 microglia, providing further insight into the functions of Hsp70 in the CNS. PMID:25691123

  11. Autophosphorylation-dependent inactivation of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    Chimeric calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) is characterized by the presence of a visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain unlike other known calmodulin- dependent kinases. Ca(2+)-Binding to the visinin-like domain leads to autophosphorylation and changes in the affinity for calmodulin [Sathyanarayanan P.V., Cremo C.R. & Poovaiah B.W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 30417-30422]. Here, we report that the Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation of CCaMK results in time-dependent loss of enzyme activity. This time-dependent loss of activity or self-inactivation due to autophosphorylation is also dependent on reaction pH and ATP concentration. Inactivation of the enzyme resulted in the formation of a sedimentable enzyme due to self-association. Specifically, autophosphorylation in the presence of 200 microm ATP at pH 7.5 resulted in the formation of a sedimentable enzyme with a 33% loss in enzyme activity. Under similar conditions at pH 6.5, the enzyme lost 67% of its activity and at pH 8.5, 84% enzyme activity was lost. Furthermore, autophosphorylation at either acidic or alkaline reaction pH lead to the formation of a sedimentable enzyme. Transmission electron microscopic studies on autophosphorylated kinase revealed particles that clustered into branched complexes. The autophosphorylation of wild-type kinase in the presence of AMP-PNP (an unhydrolyzable ATP analog) or the autophosphorylation-site mutant, T267A, did not show formation of branched complexes under the electron microscope. Autophosphorylation- dependent self-inactivation may be a mechanism of modulating the signal transduction pathway mediated by CCaMK.

  12. NUCLEAR AND AXONAL LOCALIZATION OF CA2+/CALMODULIN-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE TYPE GR IN RAT CEREBELLAR CORTEX

    EPA Science Inventory

    The granule cell enriched Ca2+/calmodulin dependent protein kinase (Cam kinase-Gr) may serve as a calcium activated switch involved in neuronal communication. o investigate its potential sites of action we have characterized its subcellular distribution within the cerebellum by i...

  13. Functional domains of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase: regulation by autoinhibitory and visinin-like domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandiran, S.; Takezawa, D.; Wang, W.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1997-01-01

    A novel calcium-binding calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) with a catalytic domain, calmodulin-binding domain, and a neural visinin-like domain was cloned and characterized from plants [Patil et al., (1995) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92, 4797-4801; Takezawa et al. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 8126-8132]. The mechanisms of CCaMK activation by calcium and calcium/calmodulin were investigated using various deletion mutants. The use of deletion mutants of CCaMK lacking either one, two, or all three calcium-binding EF hands indicated that all three calcium-binding sites in the visinin-like domain were crucial for the full calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase activity. As each calcium-binding EF hand was deleted, there was a gradual reduction in calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase activity from 100 to 4%. Another mutant (amino acids 1-322) which lacks both the visinin-like domain containing three EF hands and the calmodulin-binding domain was constitutively active, indicating the presence of an autoinhibitory domain around the calmodulin-binding domain. By using various synthetic peptides and the constitutively active mutant, we have shown that CCaMK contains an autoinhibitory domain within the residues 322-340 which overlaps its calmodulin-binding domain. Kinetic studies with both ATP and the GS peptide substrate suggest that the autoinhibitory domain of CCaMK interacts only with the peptide substrate binding motif of the catalytic domain, but not with the ATP-binding motif.

  14. Ca2+-calmodulin promotes survival of pheromone-induced growth arrest by activation of calcineurin and Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Moser, M J; Geiser, J R; Davis, T N

    1996-01-01

    The cmd1-6 allele contains three mutations that block Ca2+ binding to calmodulin from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We find that strains containing cmd1-6 lose viability during cell cycle arrest induced by the mating pheromone alpha-factor. The 50% lethal dose (LD50) of alpha-factor for the calmodulin mutant is almost fivefold below the LD50 for a wild-type strain. The calmodulin mutants are not more sensitive to alpha-factor, as measured by activation of a pheromone-responsive reporter gene. Two observations indicate that activation of the Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin contributes to survival of pheromone-induced arrest. First, deletion of the gene encoding the calcineurin regulatory B subunit, CNB1, from a wild-type strain decreases the LD50 of alpha-factor but has no further effect on a cmd1-6 strain. Second, a dominant constitutive calcineurin mutant partially restores the ability of the cmd1-6 strain to survive exposure to alpha-factor. Activation of the Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) also contributes to survival, thus revealing a new function for this enzyme. Deletion of the CMK1 and CMK2 genes, which encode CaMK, decreases the LD50 of pheromone compared with that for a wild-type strain but again has no effect in a cmd1-6 strain. Furthermore, the LD50 of alpha-factor for a mutant in which the calcineurin and CaMK genes have been deleted is the same as that for the calmodulin mutant. Finally, the CaMK and calcineurin pathways appear to be independent since the ability of constitutive calcineurin to rescue a cmd1-6 strain is not blocked by deletion of the CaMK genes. PMID:8756641

  15. Pre-steady-state kinetics of the activation of rabbit skeletal muscle myosin light chain kinase by Ca2+/calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Bowman, B F; Peterson, J A; Stull, J T

    1992-03-15

    Myosin light chain kinase is activated by Ca2+/calmodulin. Insights into the kinetic mechanism of this activation by Ca2+/calmodulin have now been obtained using extrinsically labeled fluorescent calmodulin, a fluorescent peptide substrate, and a stopped-flow spectrophotofluorimeter. We employed spinach calmodulin labeled with the sulfhydryl-selective probe, 2-(4-maleimidoanilino)naphthalene-6-sulfonic acid, to measure changes in the fluorescence intensity of the 2-(4-maleimidoanilino)naphthalene-6-sulfonic acid-calmodulin upon binding to rabbit skeletal muscle myosin light chain kinase. The fluorescent peptide substrate KKRAARAC(sulfobenzo-furazan)SNVFS-amide was used to measure kinase activity. Our results showed that the binding interaction could be modeled as a two-step process: a bimolecular reaction with an association rate of 4.6 x 10(7) M-1 s-1 followed by an isomerization with a rate of 2.2 s-1. Phosphorylation of the peptide during stopped-flow experiments could be modeled by a two-step process with a catalytic association rate of 6.5 x 10(6) M-1 s-1 and a turnover rate of 10-20 s-1. Our results also indicated that kinase activity occurred too rapidly for the slower isomerization rate of 2.2 s-1 to be linked specifically to the activation process. PMID:1544916

  16. Alpha-isoform of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II autophosphorylation is required for memory consolidation-specific transcription.

    PubMed

    von Hertzen, Laura S J; Giese, K Peter

    2005-08-22

    Autophosphorylation of the alpha-isoform of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II switches the kinase into an autonomous activity mode. This molecular switch is important for hippocampal long-term memory formation, which requires de novo gene transcription and protein synthesis. Here, we have studied whether auto-phosphorylation of the alpha-isoform of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II is required for gene transcription induced in the hippocampus by contextual fear conditioning. We have shown that upregulation of a nonassociative transcript, the serum and glucocorticoid-induced kinase-1 messenger RNA, is normal in alpha-isoform of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II autophosphorylation-deficient mutant mice, whereas upregulation of an associative transcript, the nerve growth factor-inducible gene B messenger RNA, is impaired. Thus, we suggest that autophosphorylation of the alpha-isoform of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II is a biochemical switch that regulates association-specific consolidation processes. PMID:16056150

  17. Purification and sequencing of radish seed calmodulin antagonists phosphorylated by calcium-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Polya, G M; Chandra, S; Condron, R

    1993-01-01

    A family of radish (Raphanus sativus) calmodulin antagonists (RCAs) was purified from seeds by extraction, centrifugation, batch-wise elution from carboxymethyl-cellulose, and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on an SP5PW cation-exchange column. This RCA fraction was further resolved into three calmodulin antagonist polypeptides (RCA1, RCA2, and RCA3) by denaturation in the presence of guanidinium HCl and mercaptoethanol and subsequent reverse-phase HPLC on a C8 column eluted with an acetonitrile gradient in the presence of 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid. The RCA preparation, RCA1, RCA2, RCA3, and other radish seed proteins are phosphorylated by wheat embryo Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase (CDPK). The RCA preparation contains other CDPK substrates in addition to RCA1, RCA2, and RCA3. The RCA preparation, RCA1, RCA2, and RCA3 inhibit chicken gizzard calmodulin-dependent myosin light chain kinase assayed with a myosin-light chain-based synthetic peptide substrate (fifty percent inhibitory concentrations of RCA2 and RCA3 are about 7 and 2 microM, respectively). N-terminal sequencing by sequential Edman degradation of RCA1, RCA2, and RCA3 revealed sequences having a high homology with the small subunit of the storage protein napin from Brassica napus and with related proteins. The deduced amino acid sequences of RCA1, RCA2, RCA3, and RCA3' (a subform of RCA3) have agreement with average molecular masses from electrospray mass spectrometry of 4537, 4543, 4532, and 4560 kD, respectively. The only sites for serine phosphorylation are near or at the C termini and hence adjacent to the sites of proteolytic precursor cleavage. PMID:8278508

  18. Developmental regulation of the gene for chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in anthers.

    PubMed

    Poovaiah, B W; Xia, M; Liu, Z; Wang, W; Yang, T; Sathyanarayanan, P V; Franceschi, V R

    1999-08-01

    Chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) was cloned from developing anthers of lily (Lilium longiflorum Thumb. cv. Nellie White) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi). Previous biochemical characterization and structure/function studies had revealed that CCaMK has dual modes of regulation by Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin. The unique structural features of CCaMK include a catalytic domain, a calmodulin-binding domain, and a neural visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain. The existence of these three features in a single polypeptide distinguishes it from other kinases. Western analysis revealed that CCaMK is expressed in a stage-specific manner in developing anthers. Expression of CCaMK was first detected in pollen mother cells and continued to increase, reaching a peak around the tetrad stage of meiosis. Following microsporogenesis, CCaMK expression rapidly decreased and at later stages of microspore development, no expression was detected. A tobacco genomic clone of CCaMK was isolated and transgenic tobacco plants were produced carrying the CCaMK promoter fused to the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene. Both CCaMK mRNA and protein were detected in the pollen sac and their localizations were restricted to the pollen mother cells and tapetal cells. Consistent results showing a stage-specific expression pattern were obtained by beta-glucuronidase analysis, in-situ hybridization and immunolocalization. The stage- and tissue-specific appearance of CCaMK in anthers suggests that it could play a role in sensing transient changes in free Ca(2+) concentration in target cells, thereby controlling developmental events in the anther. PMID:10436217

  19. Developmental regulation of the gene for chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in anthers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poovaiah, B. W.; Xia, M.; Liu, Z.; Wang, W.; Yang, T.; Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Franceschi, V. R.

    1999-01-01

    Chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) was cloned from developing anthers of lily (Lilium longiflorum Thumb. cv. Nellie White) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi). Previous biochemical characterization and structure/function studies had revealed that CCaMK has dual modes of regulation by Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin. The unique structural features of CCaMK include a catalytic domain, a calmodulin-binding domain, and a neural visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain. The existence of these three features in a single polypeptide distinguishes it from other kinases. Western analysis revealed that CCaMK is expressed in a stage-specific manner in developing anthers. Expression of CCaMK was first detected in pollen mother cells and continued to increase, reaching a peak around the tetrad stage of meiosis. Following microsporogenesis, CCaMK expression rapidly decreased and at later stages of microspore development, no expression was detected. A tobacco genomic clone of CCaMK was isolated and transgenic tobacco plants were produced carrying the CCaMK promoter fused to the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene. Both CCaMK mRNA and protein were detected in the pollen sac and their localizations were restricted to the pollen mother cells and tapetal cells. Consistent results showing a stage-specific expression pattern were obtained by beta-glucuronidase analysis, in-situ hybridization and immunolocalization. The stage- and tissue-specific appearance of CCaMK in anthers suggests that it could play a role in sensing transient changes in free Ca(2+) concentration in target cells, thereby controlling developmental events in the anther.

  20. Impact of methionine oxidation on calmodulin structural dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, Megan R.; Thompson, Andrew R.; Nitu, Florentin; Moen, Rebecca J.; Olenek, Michael J.; Klein, Jennifer C.; Thomas, David D.

    2015-01-09

    Highlights: • We measured the distance distribution between two spin labels on calmodulin by DEER. • Two structural states, open and closed, were resolved at both low and high Ca. • Ca shifted the equilibrium toward the open state by a factor of 13. • Methionine oxidation, simulated by glutamine substitution, decreased the Ca effect. • These results have important implications for aging in muscle and other tissues. - Abstract: We have used electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to examine the structural impact of oxidizing specific methionine (M) side chains in calmodulin (CaM). It has been shown that oxidation of either M109 or M124 in CaM diminishes CaM regulation of the muscle calcium release channel, the ryanodine receptor (RyR), and that mutation of M to Q (glutamine) in either case produces functional effects identical to those of oxidation. Here we have used site-directed spin labeling and double electron–electron resonance (DEER), a pulsed EPR technique that measures distances between spin labels, to characterize the structural changes resulting from these mutations. Spin labels were attached to a pair of introduced cysteine residues, one in the C-lobe (T117C) and one in the N-lobe (T34C) of CaM, and DEER was used to determine the distribution of interspin distances. Ca binding induced a large increase in the mean distance, in concert with previous X-ray crystallography and NMR data, showing a closed structure in the absence of Ca and an open structure in the presence of Ca. DEER revealed additional information about CaM’s structural heterogeneity in solution: in both the presence and absence of Ca, CaM populates both structural states, one with probes separated by ∼4 nm (closed) and another at ∼6 nm (open). Ca shifts the structural equilibrium constant toward the open state by a factor of 13. DEER reveals the distribution of interprobe distances, showing that each of these states is itself partially disordered, with the width of each

  1. A novel calmodulin-β-PIX interaction and its implication in receptor tyrosine kinase regulation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vinay K; Munro, Kim; Jia, Zongchao

    2012-09-01

    Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein, regulates numerous cellular processes, primarily in response to calcium flux. We have identified and characterized a novel interaction between CaM and β-p21-activated kinase interacting exchange factor (β-PIX), a putative guanine exchange factor implicated in cell signaling, using affinity pull-down assays, co-immunoprecipitation, co-localization and circular dichroism studies. Fluorescence-based titration and isothermal titration calorimetry experiments revealed a Ca(2+)-dependent binding mechanism (K(D)≤10μM). Further, we show that CaM participates in a multi-protein complex involving β-PIX and E3 ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl (casitas B-cell lymphoma), which may play a critical role in receptor tyrosine kinase regulation and downstream signaling. PMID:22588125

  2. A mechanism for tunable autoinhibition in the structure of a human Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II holoenzyme

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Luke H.; Stratton, Margaret M.; Lee, Il-Hyung; Rosenberg, Oren S.; Levitz, Joshua; Mandell, Daniel J.; Kortemme, Tanja; Groves, Jay T.; Schulman, Howard; Kuriyan, John

    2011-01-01

    Summary Calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) forms a highly conserved dodecameric assembly that is sensitive to the frequency of calcium pulse trains. Neither the structure of the dodecameric assembly nor how it regulates CaMKII are known. We present the crystal structure of an autoinhibited full-length human CaMKII holoenzyme, revealing an unexpected compact arrangement of kinase domains docked against a central hub, with the calmodulin binding sites completely inaccessible. We show that this compact docking is important for the autoinhibition of the kinase domains and for setting the calcium response of the holoenzyme. Comparison of CaMKII isoforms, which differ in the length of the linker between the kinase domain and the hub, demonstrates that these interactions can be strengthened or weakened by changes in linker length. This equilibrium between autoinhibited states provides a simple mechanism for tuning the calcium response without changes in either the hub or the kinase domains. PMID:21884935

  3. 2,5-hexanedione (HD) treatment alters calmodulin, Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and protein kinase C in rats' nerve tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Qingshan Hou Liyan; Zhang Cuili; Zhao Xiulan; Yu Sufang; Xie, Ke-Qin

    2008-10-01

    Calcium-dependent mechanisms, particularly those mediated by Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), have been implicated in neurotoxicant-induced neuropathy. However, it is unknown whether similar mechanisms exist in 2,5-hexanedione (HD)-induced neuropathy. For that, we investigated the changes of CaM, CaMKII, protein kinase C (PKC) and polymerization ratios (PRs) of NF-L, NF-M and NF-H in cerebral cortex (CC, including total cortex and some gray), spinal cord (SC) and sciatic nerve (SN) of rats treated with HD at a dosage of 1.75 or 3.50 mmol/kg for 8 weeks (five times per week). The results showed that CaM contents in CC, SC and SN were significantly increased, which indicated elevation of Ca{sup 2+} concentrations in nerve tissues. CaMKII contents and activities were also increased in CC and were positively correlated with gait abnormality, but it could not be found in SC and SN. The increases of PKC contents and activities were also observed in SN and were positively correlated with gait abnormality. Except for that of NF-M in CC, the PRs of NF-L, NF-M and NF-H were also elevated in nerve tissues, which was consistent with the activation of protein kinases. The results suggested that CaMKII might be partly (in CC but not in SC and SN) involved in HD-induced neuropathy. CaMKII and PKC might mediate the HD neurotoxicity by altering the NF phosphorylation status and PRs.

  4. Chimeric Plant Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Gene with a Neural Visinin-Like Calcium-Binding Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patil, Shameekumar; Takezawa, D.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1995-01-01

    Calcium, a universal second messenger, regulates diverse cellular processes in eukaryotes. Ca-2(+) and Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-regulated protein phosphorylation play a pivotal role in amplifying and diversifying the action of Ca-2(+)- mediated signals. A chimeric Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) gene with a visinin-like Ca-2(+)- binding domain was cloned and characterized from lily. The cDNA clone contains an open reading frame coding for a protein of 520 amino acids. The predicted structure of CCaMK contains a catalytic domain followed by two regulatory domains, a calmodulin-binding domain and a visinin-like Ca-2(+)-binding domain. The amino-terminal region of CCaMK contains all 11 conserved subdomains characteristic of serine/threonine protein kinases. The calmodulin-binding region of CCaMK has high homology (79%) to alpha subunit of mammalian Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. The calmodulin-binding region is fused to a neural visinin-like domain that contains three Ca-2(+)-binding EF-hand motifs and a biotin-binding site. The Escherichia coli-expressed protein (approx. 56 kDa) binds calmodulin in a Ca-2(+)-dependent manner. Furthermore, Ca-45-binding assays revealed that CCaMK directly binds Ca-2(+). The CCaMK gene is preferentially expressed in developing anthers. Southern blot analysis revealed that CCaMK is encoded by a single gene. The structural features of the gene suggest that it has multiple regulatory controls and could play a unique role in Ca-2(+) signaling in plants.

  5. Light-regulated root gravitropism: a role for, and characterization of, a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase homolog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Y. T.; Feldman, L. J.

    1997-01-01

    Roots of many species grow downward (orthogravitropism) only when illuminated. Previous work suggests that this is a calcium-regulated response and that both calmodulin and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases participate in transducing gravity and light stimuli. A genomic sequence has been obtained for a calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase homolog (MCK1) expressed in root caps, the site of perception for both light and gravity. This homolog consists of 7265 base pairs and contains 11 exons and 10 introns. Since MCK1 is expressed constitutively in both light and dark, it is unlikely that the light directly affects MCK1 expression, though the activity of the protein may be affected by light. In cultivars showing light-regulated gravitropism, we hypothesize that MCK1, or a homolog, functions in establishing the auxin asymmetry necessary for orthogravitropism.

  6. Activation of chloride channels in normal and cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells by multifunctional calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, John A.; Cozens, Alison L.; Schulman, Howard; Gruenert, Dieter C.; Stryer, Lubert; Gardner, Phyllis

    1991-02-01

    CYSTIC fibrosis is associated with defective regulation of apical membrane chloride channels in airway epithelial cells. These channels in normal cells are activated by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase1,2 and protein kinase C3,4. In cystic fibrosis these kinases fail to activate otherwise normal Cl- channels1-4. But Cl- flux in cystic fibrosis cells, as in normal cells, can be activated by raising intracellular Ca2+ (refs 5-10). We report here whole-cell patch clamp studies of normal and cystic fibrosis-derived airway epithelial cells showing that Cl- channel activation by Ca2+ is mediated by multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. We find that intracellular application of activated kinase and ATP activates a Cl- current similar to that activated by a Ca2+ ionophore, that peptide inhibitors of either the kinase or calmodulin block Ca2+-dependent activation of Cl- channels, and that a peptide inhibitor of protein kinase C does not block Ca2+-dependent activation. Ca2+/calmodulin activation of Cl- channels presents a pathway with therapeutic potential for circumventing defective regulation of Cl- channels in cystic fibrosis.

  7. Calcium/calmodulin inhibition of the BRI1 receptor kinase provides a possible link between calcium- and brassinosteroid-signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The receptor kinase BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE 1 (BRI1) is a key component in brassinosteroid (BR) perception and signaling transduction, which has broad impacts on plant growth and development. In the present study, we demonstrate that Arabidopsis calmodulin (CaM) binds to the recombinant cytoplas...

  8. SPLICE VARIANT SPECIFIC UPREGULATIONOF CA+2/CALMODULIN DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE 1G BY PYRETHROID INSECTICIDES IN VIVO.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethroid insecticides induce neurotoxicity in mammals by interfering with ion channel function in excitable neuronal membranes. Previous work demonstrated dose-dependent increases in expression of Ca+2/calmodulin dependent protein kinase (Camk1g) mRNA following acute deltameth...

  9. A receptor-like kinase from Arabidopsis thaliana is a calmodulin-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Charpenteau, Martine; Jaworski, Krzysztof; Ramirez, Bertha C; Tretyn, Andrzej; Ranjeva, Raoul; Ranty, Benoît

    2004-01-01

    Screening a cDNA expression library with a radiolabelled calmodulin (CaM) probe led to the isolation of AtCaMRLK, a receptor-like kinase (RLK) of Arabidopsis thaliana. AtCaMRLK polypeptide sequence shows a modular organization consisting of the four distinctive domains characteristic of receptor kinases: an amino terminal signal sequence, a domain containing seven leucine-rich repeats, a single putative membrane-spanning segment and a protein kinase domain. Using truncated versions of the protein and a synthetic peptide, we demonstrated that a region of 23 amino acids, located near the kinase domain of AtCaMRLK, binds CaM in a calcium-dependent manner. Real-time binding experiments showed that AtCaMRLK interacted in vitro with AtCaM1, a canonical CaM, but not with AtCaM8, a divergent isoform of the Ca2+ sensor. The bacterially expressed kinase domain of the protein was able to autophosphorylate and to phosphorylate the myelin basic protein, using Mn2+ preferentially to Mg2+ as an ion activator. Site-directed mutagenesis of the conserved lysine residue (Lys423) to alanine, in the kinase subdomain II, resulted in a complete loss of kinase activity. CaM had no influence on the autophosphorylation activity of AtCaMRLK. AtCaMRLK was expressed in reproductive and vegetative tissues of A. thaliana, except in leaves. Disruption in the AtCaMRLK coding sequence by insertion of a DsG transposable element in an Arabidopsis mutant did not generate a discernible phenotype. The CaM-binding motif of AtCaMRLK was found to be conserved in several other members of the plant RLK family, suggesting a role for Ca2+/CaM in the regulation of RLK-mediated pathways. PMID:14720124

  10. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV: A multifunctional enzyme and potential therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Naz, Huma; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2016-05-01

    The calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CAMKIV) belongs to the serine/threonine protein kinase family, and is primarily involved in transcriptional regulation in lymphocytes, neurons and male germ cells. CAMKIV operates the signaling cascade and regulates activity of several transcription activators by phosphorylation, which in turn plays pivotal roles in immune response, inflammation and memory consolidation. In this review, we tried to focus on different aspects of CAMKIV to understand the significance of this protein in the biological system. This enzyme is associated with varieties of disorders such as cerebral hypoxia, azoospermia, endometrial and ovarian cancer, systemic lupus, etc., and hence it is considered as a potential therapeutic target. Structure of CAMKIV is comprised of five distinct domains in which kinase domain is responsible for enzyme activity. CAMKIV is involved in varieties of cellular functions such as regulation of gene expression, T-cell maturation, regulation of survival phase of dendritic cells, bone growth and metabolism, memory consolidation, sperm motility, regulation of microtubule dynamics, cell-cycle progression and apoptosis. In this review, we performed an extensive analysis on structure, function and regulation of CAMKIV and associated diseases. PMID:26773169

  11. Impact of methionine oxidation on calmodulin structural dynamics.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Megan R; Thompson, Andrew R; Nitu, Florentin; Moen, Rebecca J; Olenek, Michael J; Klein, Jennifer C; Thomas, David D

    2015-01-01

    We have used electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to examine the structural impact of oxidizing specific methionine (M) side chains in calmodulin (CaM). It has been shown that oxidation of either M109 or M124 in CaM diminishes CaM regulation of the muscle calcium release channel, the ryanodine receptor (RyR), and that mutation of M to Q (glutamine) in either case produces functional effects identical to those of oxidation. Here we have used site-directed spin labeling and double electron-electron resonance (DEER), a pulsed EPR technique that measures distances between spin labels, to characterize the structural changes resulting from these mutations. Spin labels were attached to a pair of introduced cysteine residues, one in the C-lobe (T117C) and one in the N-lobe (T34C) of CaM, and DEER was used to determine the distribution of interspin distances. Ca binding induced a large increase in the mean distance, in concert with previous X-ray crystallography and NMR data, showing a closed structure in the absence of Ca and an open structure in the presence of Ca. DEER revealed additional information about CaM's structural heterogeneity in solution: in both the presence and absence of Ca, CaM populates both structural states, one with probes separated by ∼4nm (closed) and another at ∼6nm (open). Ca shifts the structural equilibrium constant toward the open state by a factor of 13. DEER reveals the distribution of interprobe distances, showing that each of these states is itself partially disordered, with the width of each population ranging from 1 to 3nm. Both mutations (M109Q and M124Q) decrease the effect of Ca on the structure of CaM, primarily by decreasing the closed-to-open equilibrium constant in the presence of Ca. We propose that Met oxidation alters CaM's functional interaction with its target proteins by perturbing this Ca-dependent structural shift. PMID:25478640

  12. Intramolecular activation of a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase is disrupted by insertions in the tether that connects the calmodulin-like domain to the kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitart, V.; Christodoulou, J.; Huang, J. F.; Chazin, W. J.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases (CDPK) have a calmodulin-like domain (CaM-LD) tethered to the C-terminal end of the kinase. Activation is proposed to involve intramolecular binding of the CaM-LD to a junction sequence that connects the CaM-LD to the kinase domain. Consistent with this model, a truncated CDPK (DeltaNC) in which the CaM-LD has been deleted can be activated in a bimolecular interaction with an isolated CaM-LD or calmodulin, similar to the activation of a calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) by calmodulin. Here we provide genetic evidence that this bimolecular activation requires a nine-residue binding segment from F436 to I444 (numbers correspond to CPK-1 accession number L14771). Two mutations at either end of this core segment (F436/A and VI444/AA) severely disrupted bimolecular activation, whereas flanking mutations had only minor effects. Intramolecular activation of a full-length kinase was also disrupted by a VI444/AA mutation, but surprisingly not by a F436/A mutation (at the N-terminal end of the binding site). Interestingly, intramolecular but not bimolecular activation was disrupted by insertion mutations placed immediately downstream of I444. To show that mutant enzymes were not misfolded, latent kinase activity was stimulated through binding of an antijunction antibody. Results here support a model of intramolecular activation in which the tether (A445 to G455) that connects the CaM-LD to the kinase provides an important structural constraint and is not just a simple flexible connection.

  13. Interaction of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase with a homolog of eukaryotic elongation factor-1alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1999-01-01

    A chimeric Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) was previously cloned and characterized in this laboratory. To investigate the biological functions of CCaMK, the yeast two-hybrid system was used to isolate genes encoding proteins that interact with CCaMK. One of the cDNA clones obtained from the screening (LlEF-1alpha1) has high similarity with the eukaryotic elongation factor-1alpha (EF-1alpha). CCaMK phosphorylated LlEF-1alpha1 in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent manner. The phosphorylation site for CCaMK (Thr-257) was identified by site-directed mutagenesis. Interestingly, Thr-257 is located in the putative tRNA-binding region of LlEF-1alpha1. An isoform of Ca2+-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) phosphorylated multiple sites of LlEF-1alpha1 in a Ca2+-dependent but calmodulin-independent manner. Unlike CDPK, CCaMK phosphorylated only one site, and this site is different from CDPK phosphorylation sites. This suggests that the phosphorylation of EF-1alpha by these two kinases may have different functional significance. Although the phosphorylation of LlEF-1alpha1 by CCaMK is Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent, in vitro binding assays revealed that CCaMK binds to LlEF-1alpha1 in a Ca2+-independent manner. This was further substantiated by coimmunoprecipitation of CCaMK and EF-1alpha using the protein extract from lily anthers. Dissociation of CCaMK from EF-1alpha by Ca2+ and phosphorylation of EF-1alpha by CCaMK in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent manner suggests that these interactions may play a role in regulating the biological functions of EF-1alpha.

  14. Comprehensive Behavioral Analysis of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase IV Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Takao, Keizo; Tanda, Koichi; Nakamura, Kenji; Kasahara, Jiro; Nakao, Kazuki; Katsuki, Motoya; Nakanishi, Kazuo; Yamasaki, Nobuyuki; Toyama, Keiko; Adachi, Minami; Umeda, Masahiro; Araki, Tsutomu; Fukunaga, Kohji; Kondo, Hisatake; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV) is a protein kinase that activates the transcription factor CREB, the cyclic AMP-response element binding protein. CREB is a key transcription factor in synaptic plasticity and memory consolidation. To elucidate the behavioral effects of CaMKIV deficiency, we subjected CaMKIV knockout (CaMKIV KO) mice to a battery of behavioral tests. CaMKIV KO had no significant effects on locomotor activity, motor coordination, social interaction, pain sensitivity, prepulse inhibition, attention, or depression-like behavior. Consistent with previous reports, CaMKIV KO mice exhibited impaired retention in a fear conditioning test 28 days after training. In contrast, however, CaMKIV KO mice did not show any testing performance deficits in passive avoidance, one of the most commonly used fear memory paradigms, 28 days after training, suggesting that remote fear memory is intact. CaMKIV KO mice exhibited intact spatial reference memory learning in the Barnes circular maze, and normal spatial working memory in an eight-arm radial maze. CaMKIV KO mice also showed mildly decreased anxiety-like behavior, suggesting that CaMKIV is involved in regulating emotional behavior. These findings indicate that CaMKIV might not be essential for fear memory or spatial memory, although it is possible that the activities of other neural mechanisms or signaling pathways compensate for the CaMKIV deficiency. PMID:20209163

  15. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II regulates cardiac Na+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Stefan; Dybkova, Nataliya; Rasenack, Eva C.L.; Jacobshagen, Claudius; Fabritz, Larissa; Kirchhof, Paulus; Maier, Sebastian K.G.; Zhang, Tong; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Brown, Joan Heller; Bers, Donald M.; Maier, Lars S.

    2006-01-01

    In heart failure (HF), Ca2+/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII) expression is increased. Altered Na+ channel gating is linked to and may promote ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VTs) in HF. Calmodulin regulates Na+ channel gating, in part perhaps via CaMKII. We investigated effects of adenovirus-mediated (acute) and Tg (chronic) overexpression of cytosolic CaMKIIδC on Na+ current (INa) in rabbit and mouse ventricular myocytes, respectively (in whole-cell patch clamp). Both acute and chronic CaMKIIδC overexpression shifted voltage dependence of Na+ channel availability by –6 mV (P < 0.05), and the shift was Ca2+ dependent. CaMKII also enhanced intermediate inactivation and slowed recovery from inactivation (prevented by CaMKII inhibitors autocamtide 2–related inhibitory peptide [AIP] or KN93). CaMKIIδC markedly increased persistent (late) inward INa and intracellular Na+ concentration (as measured by the Na+ indicator sodium-binding benzofuran isophthalate [SBFI]), which was prevented by CaMKII inhibition in the case of acute CaMKIIδC overexpression. CaMKII coimmunoprecipitates with and phosphorylates Na+ channels. In vivo, transgenic CaMKIIδC overexpression prolonged QRS duration and repolarization (QT intervals), decreased effective refractory periods, and increased the propensity to develop VT. We conclude that CaMKII associates with and phosphorylates cardiac Na+ channels. This alters INa gating to reduce availability at high heart rate, while enhancing late INa (which could prolong action potential duration). In mice, enhanced CaMKIIδC activity predisposed to VT. Thus, CaMKII-dependent regulation of Na+ channel function may contribute to arrhythmogenesis in HF. PMID:17124532

  16. Structure-function of the multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    PubMed Central

    Hudmon, Andy; Schulman, Howard

    2002-01-01

    Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII) is a ubiquitous mediator of Ca2+-linked signalling that phosphorylates a wide range of substrates to co-ordinate and regulate Ca2+-mediated alterations in cellular function. The transmission of information by the kinase from extracellular stimuli and the intracellular Ca2+ rise is not passive. Rather, its multimeric structure and autoregulation enable this enzyme to participate actively in the sensitivity, timing and location of its action. CaMKII can: (i) be activated in a Ca2+-spike frequency-dependent manner; (ii) become independent of its initial Ca2+/CaM activators; and (iii) undergo a 'molecular switch-like' behaviour, which is crucial for certain forms of learning and memory. CaMKII is derived from a family of four homologous but distinct genes, with over 30 alternatively spliced isoforms described at present. These isoforms possess diverse developmental and anatomical expression patterns, as well as subcellular localization. Six independent catalytic/autoregulatory domains are connected by a narrow stalk-like appendage to each hexameric ring within the dodecameric structure. Ca2+/CaM binding activates the enzyme by disinhibiting the autoregulatory domain; this process initiates an intra-holoenzyme autophosphorylation reaction that induces complex changes in the enzyme's sensitivity to Ca2+/CaM, including the generation of Ca2+/CaM-independent (autonomous) activity and marked increase in affinity for CaM. The role of CaMKII in Ca2+ signal transduction is shaped by its autoregulation, isoenzymic type and subcellular localization. The molecular determinants and mechanisms producing these processes are discussed as they relate to the structure-function of this multifunctional protein kinase. PMID:11931644

  17. Cardiac myosin light chain is phosphorylated by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent and -independent kinase activities.

    PubMed

    Chang, Audrey N; Mahajan, Pravin; Knapp, Stefan; Barton, Hannah; Sweeney, H Lee; Kamm, Kristine E; Stull, James T

    2016-07-01

    The well-known, muscle-specific smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) (smMLCK) and skeletal muscle MLCK (skMLCK) are dedicated protein kinases regulated by an autoregulatory segment C terminus of the catalytic core that blocks myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) binding and phosphorylation in the absence of Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM). Although it is known that a more recently discovered cardiac MLCK (cMLCK) is necessary for normal RLC phosphorylation in vivo and physiological cardiac performance, information on cMLCK biochemical properties are limited. We find that a fourth uncharacterized MLCK, MLCK4, is also expressed in cardiac muscle with high catalytic domain sequence similarity with other MLCKs but lacking an autoinhibitory segment. Its crystal structure shows the catalytic domain in its active conformation with a short C-terminal "pseudoregulatory helix" that cannot inhibit catalysis as a result of missing linker regions. MLCK4 has only Ca(2+)/CaM-independent activity with comparable Vmax and Km values for different RLCs. In contrast, the Vmax value of cMLCK is orders of magnitude lower than those of the other three MLCK family members, whereas its Km (RLC and ATP) and KCaM values are similar. In contrast to smMLCK and skMLCK, which lack activity in the absence of Ca(2+)/CaM, cMLCK has constitutive activity that is stimulated by Ca(2+)/CaM. Potential contributions of autoregulatory segment to cMLCK activity were analyzed with chimeras of skMLCK and cMLCK. The constitutive, low activity of cMLCK appears to be intrinsic to its catalytic core structure rather than an autoinhibitory segment. Thus, RLC phosphorylation in cardiac muscle may be regulated by two different protein kinases with distinct biochemical regulatory properties. PMID:27325775

  18. Structure-function of the multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    PubMed

    Hudmon, Andy; Schulman, Howard

    2002-06-15

    Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII) is a ubiquitous mediator of Ca2+-linked signalling that phosphorylates a wide range of substrates to co-ordinate and regulate Ca2+-mediated alterations in cellular function. The transmission of information by the kinase from extracellular stimuli and the intracellular Ca2+ rise is not passive. Rather, its multimeric structure and autoregulation enable this enzyme to participate actively in the sensitivity, timing and location of its action. CaMKII can: (i) be activated in a Ca2+-spike frequency-dependent manner; (ii) become independent of its initial Ca2+/CaM activators; and (iii) undergo a 'molecular switch-like' behaviour, which is crucial for certain forms of learning and memory. CaMKII is derived from a family of four homologous but distinct genes, with over 30 alternatively spliced isoforms described at present. These isoforms possess diverse developmental and anatomical expression patterns, as well as subcellular localization. Six independent catalytic/autoregulatory domains are connected by a narrow stalk-like appendage to each hexameric ring within the dodecameric structure. Ca2+/CaM binding activates the enzyme by disinhibiting the autoregulatory domain; this process initiates an intra-holoenzyme autophosphorylation reaction that induces complex changes in the enzyme's sensitivity to Ca2+/CaM, including the generation of Ca2+/CaM-independent (autonomous) activity and marked increase in affinity for CaM. The role of CaMKII in Ca2+ signal transduction is shaped by its autoregulation, isoenzymic type and subcellular localization. The molecular determinants and mechanisms producing these processes are discussed as they relate to the structure-function of this multifunctional protein kinase. PMID:11931644

  19. Research Resource: Roles for Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Kinase 2 (CaMKK2) in Systems Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Marcelo, Kathrina L; Ribar, Thomas; Means, Christopher R; Tsimelzon, Anna; Stevens, Robert D; Ilkayeva, Olga; Bain, James R; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; Newgard, Christopher B; Means, Anthony R; York, Brian

    2016-05-01

    A number of epidemiological studies have implicated calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling as a major factor in obesity that contributes to aberrant systems metabolism. Somewhat paradoxically, obesity correlates with decreased circulating Ca(2+) levels, leading to increased release of intracellular Ca(2+) stores from the endoplasmic reticulum. These findings suggest that insulin resistance associated with the obese state is linked to activation of canonical Ca(2+) signaling pathways. Mechanistically, increased intracellular Ca(2+) binds calmodulin (CaM) to activate a set of Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent protein kinases. In this research resource, we explore the metabolic functions and implications of Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent protein kinase kinase 2 (CaMKK2) as a metabolic effector of Ca(2+)/CaM action. We reveal the importance of CaMKK2 for gating insulin release from pancreatic β-cells while concomitantly influencing the sensitivity of insulin-responsive tissues. To provide a better understanding of the metabolic impact of CaMKK2 loss, we performed targeted metabolomic analyses of key metabolic byproducts of glucose, fatty acid, and amino acid metabolism in mice null for CaMKK2. We quantified amino acids and acyl carnitines in 3 insulin-sensitive tissues (liver, skeletal muscle, plasma) isolated from CaMKK2(-/-) mice and their wild-type littermates under conditions of dietary stress (low-fat diet, normal chow, high-fat diet, and fasting), thereby unveiling unique metabolic functions of CaMKK2. Our findings highlight CaMKK2 as a molecular rheostat for insulin action and emphasize the importance of Ca(2+)/CaM/CaMKK2 in regulation of whole-body metabolism. These findings reveal that CaMKK2 may be an attractive therapeutic target for combatting comorbidities associated with perturbed insulin signaling. PMID:27003444

  20. Membrane translocation of TRPC6 channels and endothelial migration are regulated by calmodulin and PI3 kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Pinaki; Rosenbaum, Michael A; Sinharoy, Pritam; Damron, Derek S; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Graham, Linda M

    2016-02-23

    Lipid oxidation products, including lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC), activate canonical transient receptor potential 6 (TRPC6) channels leading to inhibition of endothelial cell (EC) migration in vitro and delayed EC healing of arterial injuries in vivo. The precise mechanism through which lysoPC activates TRPC6 channels is not known, but calmodulin (CaM) contributes to the regulation of TRPC channels. Using site-directed mutagenesis, cDNAs were generated in which Tyr(99) or Tyr(138) of CaM was replaced with Phe, generating mutant CaM, Phe(99)-CaM, or Phe(138)-CaM, respectively. In ECs transiently transfected with pcDNA3.1-myc-His-Phe(99)-CaM, but not in ECs transfected with pcDNA3.1-myc-His-Phe(138)-CaM, the lysoPC-induced TRPC6-CaM dissociation and TRPC6 externalization was disrupted. Also, the lysoPC-induced increase in intracellular calcium concentration was inhibited in ECs transiently transfected with pcDNA3.1-myc-His-Phe(99)-CaM. Blocking phosphorylation of CaM at Tyr(99) also reduced CaM association with the p85 subunit and subsequent activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). This prevented the increase in phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PIP3) and the translocation of TRPC6 to the cell membrane and reduced the inhibition of EC migration by lysoPC. These findings suggest that lysoPC induces CaM phosphorylation at Tyr(99) by a Src family kinase and that phosphorylated CaM activates PI3K to produce PIP3, which promotes TRPC6 translocation to the cell membrane. PMID:26858457

  1. Membrane translocation of TRPC6 channels and endothelial migration are regulated by calmodulin and PI3 kinase activation

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Pinaki; Rosenbaum, Michael A.; Sinharoy, Pritam; Damron, Derek S.; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Graham, Linda M.

    2016-01-01

    Lipid oxidation products, including lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC), activate canonical transient receptor potential 6 (TRPC6) channels leading to inhibition of endothelial cell (EC) migration in vitro and delayed EC healing of arterial injuries in vivo. The precise mechanism through which lysoPC activates TRPC6 channels is not known, but calmodulin (CaM) contributes to the regulation of TRPC channels. Using site-directed mutagenesis, cDNAs were generated in which Tyr99 or Tyr138 of CaM was replaced with Phe, generating mutant CaM, Phe99-CaM, or Phe138-CaM, respectively. In ECs transiently transfected with pcDNA3.1-myc-His-Phe99-CaM, but not in ECs transfected with pcDNA3.1-myc-His-Phe138-CaM, the lysoPC-induced TRPC6-CaM dissociation and TRPC6 externalization was disrupted. Also, the lysoPC-induced increase in intracellular calcium concentration was inhibited in ECs transiently transfected with pcDNA3.1-myc-His-Phe99-CaM. Blocking phosphorylation of CaM at Tyr99 also reduced CaM association with the p85 subunit and subsequent activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). This prevented the increase in phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PIP3) and the translocation of TRPC6 to the cell membrane and reduced the inhibition of EC migration by lysoPC. These findings suggest that lysoPC induces CaM phosphorylation at Tyr99 by a Src family kinase and that phosphorylated CaM activates PI3K to produce PIP3, which promotes TRPC6 translocation to the cell membrane. PMID:26858457

  2. Oxidation of Met(144) and Met(145) in Calmodulin Blocks Calmodulin Dependent Activation of the Plasma Membrane Ca-ATPase.

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, Ryan K.; Urbauer, Ramona J.; Anbanandam, A; Smallwood, Heather S.; Urbauer, Jeffrey L.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2003-04-15

    Methionine oxidation in calmodulin (CaM) isolated from senescent brain results in an inability to fully activate the plasma membrane (PM) Ca-ATPase which may contribute to observed increases in cytosolic calcium levels under conditions of oxidative stress and biological aging. To identify the functional importance of the oxidation of Met-144 and Met-145 near the carboxyl-terminus of CaM, we have used site-directed mutagenesis to substitute leucines for methionines at other positions in CaM, permitting the site-specific oxidation of Met-144 and Met-145. Prior to the oxidation, the CaM-dependent activation of the PM-CA-ATPase by these CaM mutants is similar to that of wild-type CaM. Likewise, oxidation of individual methionines has a minimal effect on the CaM concentration necessary for half-maximal activation of the PM-Ca-ATPase. These results are consistent with previous suggestions that no single methionine within CaM is essential for activation of the PM-CA-ATPase. Oxidation of either Met-144 or Met-145 or all nine methionines in CaM results in an equivalent inhibition of the PM-Ca-ATPase, resulting in a 50-60% reduction in the level of enzyme activation. Oxidation of Met-144 is largely responsible for the decreased extent of enzyme activation, suggesting that this site is critical in modulating the sensitivity of CaM to oxidant-induced loss-of-function. These results are discussed in terms of a possible functional role for Met-144 and Met-145 in CaM as redox sensors that function to modulate calcium homeostasis and energy metabolism in response to conditions of oxidative stress.

  3. Hunting Increases Phosphorylation of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Type II in Adult Barn Owls

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Grant S.; DeBello, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile barn owls readily adapt to prismatic spectacles, whereas adult owls living under standard aviary conditions do not. We previously demonstrated that phosphorylation of the cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) provides a readout of the instructive signals that guide plasticity in juveniles. Here we investigated phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (pCaMKII) in both juveniles and adults. In contrast to CREB, we found no differences in pCaMKII expression between prism-wearing and control juveniles within the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICX), the major site of plasticity. For prism-wearing adults that hunted live mice and are capable of adaptation, expression of pCaMKII was increased relative to prism-wearing adults that fed passively on dead mice and are not capable of adaptation. This effect did not bear the hallmarks of instructive information: it was not localized to rostral ICX and did not exhibit a patchy distribution reflecting discrete bimodal stimuli. These data are consistent with a role for CaMKII as a permissive rather than an instructive factor. In addition, the paucity of pCaMKII expression in passively fed adults suggests that the permissive default setting is “off” in adults. PMID:25789177

  4. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II links ER stress with Fas and mitochondrial apoptosis pathways

    PubMed Central

    Timmins, Jenelle M.; Ozcan, Lale; Seimon, Tracie A.; Li, Gang; Malagelada, Cristina; Backs, Johannes; Backs, Thea; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.; Anderson, Mark E.; Tabas, Ira

    2009-01-01

    ER stress–induced apoptosis is implicated in various pathological conditions, but the mechanisms linking ER stress–mediated signaling to downstream apoptotic pathways remain unclear. Using human and mouse cell culture and in vivo mouse models of ER stress–induced apoptosis, we have shown that cytosolic calcium resulting from ER stress induces expression of the Fas death receptor through a pathway involving calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIγ (CaMKIIγ) and JNK. Remarkably, CaMKIIγ was also responsible for processes involved in mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis, including release of mitochondrial cytochrome c and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. CaMKII-dependent apoptosis was also observed in a number of cultured human and mouse cells relevant to ER stress–induced pathology, including cultured macrophages, endothelial cells, and neuronal cells subjected to proapoptotic ER stress. Moreover, WT mice subjected to systemic ER stress showed evidence of macrophage mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis, renal epithelial cell apoptosis, and renal dysfunction, and these effects were markedly reduced in CaMKIIγ-deficient mice. These data support an integrated model in which CaMKII serves as a unifying link between ER stress and the Fas and mitochondrial apoptotic pathways. Our study also revealed what we believe to be a novel proapoptotic function for CaMKII, namely, promotion of mitochondrial calcium uptake. These findings raise the possibility that CaMKII inhibitors could be useful in preventing apoptosis in pathological settings involving ER stress–induced apoptosis. PMID:19741297

  5. Calmodulin kinase II regulates the maturation and antigen presentation of human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Tara L; Morita, Craig T; Lee, Kelvin; Kusner, David J

    2005-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen-presenting cells, which activate the adaptive immune system. Upon receiving a danger signal, they undergo a maturation process, which increases their antigen presentation capacity, but the responsible regulatory mechanisms remain incompletely understood. A Ca2+-calmodulin (Cam)-Cam kinase II (CamK II) pathway regulates phagosome maturation in macrophages, and this pathway is inhibited by pathogenic microbes. Our hypothesis is that signal transduction events which control phagosome maturation also regulate antigen presentation. Stimulation of primary human DC or the human DC line KG-1, with particulate antigen, resulted in the activation of CamK II and its localization to the phagosome and plasma membrane. Two mechanistically distinct inhibitors of CamK II significantly reduced DC maturation, as determined by up-regulation of surface costimulatory and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules and secretion of cytokines. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that the CamK II inhibitors blocked the antigen-induced increase in total cellular MHC class molecules as well as their trafficking to the plasma membrane. Inhibition of CamK II was associated with decreased presentation of particulate and soluble MHC class II-restricted antigen, with a greater effect on the former. These data support a model in which CamK II regulates critical stages of the maturation and antigen presentation capacity of human DC, particularly in response to stimulation via phagocytosis. PMID:16204647

  6. Calm down when the heart is stressed: Inhibiting calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II for antiarrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Dayue Darrel

    2015-01-01

    Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) plays a pivotal role in many regulatory processes of cellular functions ranging from membrane potentials and electric–contraction (E-C) coupling to mitochondrial integrity and survival of cardiomyocytes. The review article by Hund and Mohler in this issue of Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine highlights the importance of the elevated CaMKII signaling pathways under stressed conditions such as myocardial hypertrophy and ischemia in the detrimental remodeling of ion channels and in the genesis of cardiac arrhythmias. Down-regulation of the elevated CaMKII is now emerging as a powerful therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias and other forms of heart disease such as hypertrophic and ischemic heart failure. The development of new specific and effective CaMKII inhibitors as therapeutic agents for cardiac arrhythmias is challenged by the tremendous complexity of CaMKII expression and distribution of multi isoforms, as well as the multitude of downstream targets in the CaMKII signaling pathways and regulatory processes. A systematic understanding of the structure and regulation of the CaMKII signaling and functional network under the scope of genome and phenome may improve and extend our knowledge about the role of CaMKII in cardiac health and disease and accelerate the discovery of new CaMKII inhibitors that target not only the ATP-binding site but also the regulation sites in the CaMKII signaling and functional network. PMID:25910598

  7. Calm down when the heart is stressed: Inhibiting calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II for antiarrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Duan, Dayue Darrel

    2015-07-01

    Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) plays a pivotal role in many regulatory processes of cellular functions ranging from membrane potentials and electric-contraction (E-C) coupling to mitochondrial integrity and survival of cardiomyocytes. The review article by Hund and Mohler in this issue of Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine highlights the importance of the elevated CaMKII signaling pathways under stressed conditions such as myocardial hypertrophy and ischemia in the detrimental remodeling of ion channels and in the genesis of cardiac arrhythmias. Down-regulation of the elevated CaMKII is now emerging as a powerful therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias and other forms of heart disease such as hypertrophic and ischemic heart failure. The development of new specific and effective CaMKII inhibitors as therapeutic agents for cardiac arrhythmias is challenged by the tremendous complexity of CaMKII expression and distribution of multi isoforms, as well as the multitude of downstream targets in the CaMKII signaling pathways and regulatory processes. A systematic understanding of the structure and regulation of the CaMKII signaling and functional network under the scope of genome and phenome may improve and extend our knowledge about the role of CaMKII in cardiac health and disease and accelerate the discovery of new CaMKII inhibitors that target not only the ATP-binding site but also the regulation sites in the CaMKII signaling and functional network. PMID:25910598

  8. Hydrogen peroxide-mediated oxidative stress disrupts calcium binding on calmodulin: More evidence for oxidative stress in vitiligo

    SciTech Connect

    Schallreuter, K.U. . E-mail: k.schallreuter@bradford.ac.uk; Gibbons, N.C.J.; Zothner, C.; Abou Elloof, M.M.; Wood, J.M.

    2007-08-17

    Patients with acute vitiligo have low epidermal catalase expression/activities and accumulate 10{sup -3} M H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. One consequence of this severe oxidative stress is an altered calcium homeostasis in epidermal keratinocytes and melanocytes. Here, we show decreased epidermal calmodulin expression in acute vitiligo. Since 10{sup -3}M H{sub 2}O{sub 2} oxidises methionine and tryptophan residues in proteins, we examined calcium binding to calmodulin in the presence and absence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} utilising {sup 45}calcium. The results showed that all four calcium atoms exchanged per molecule of calmodulin. Since oxidised calmodulin looses its ability to activate calcium ATPase, enzyme activities were followed in full skin biopsies from lesional skin of patients with acute vitiligo (n = 6) and healthy controls (n = 6). The results yielded a 4-fold decrease of ATPase activities in the patients. Computer simulation of native and oxidised calmodulin confirmed the loss of all four calcium ions from their specific EF-hand domains. Taken together H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-mediated oxidation affects calcium binding in calmodulin leading to perturbed calcium homeostasis and perturbed L-phenylalanine-uptake in the epidermis of acute vitiligo.

  9. AKAP79 Selectively Enhances Protein Kinase C Regulation of GluR1 at a Ca2+-Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II/Protein Kinase C Site*

    PubMed Central

    Tavalin, Steven J.

    2008-01-01

    Enhancement of AMPA receptor activity in response to synaptic plasticity inducing stimuli may arise, in part, through phosphorylation of the GluR1 AMPA receptor subunit at Ser-831. This site is a substrate for both Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and protein kinase C (PKC). However, neuronal protein levels of CaMKII may exceed those of PKC by an order of magnitude. Thus, it is unclear how PKC could effectively regulate this common target site. The multivalent neuronal scaffold A-kinase-anchoring protein 79 (AKAP79) is known to bind PKC and is linked to GluR1 by synapse-associated protein 97 (SAP97). Here, biochemical studies demonstrate that AKAP79 localizes PKC activity near the receptor, thus accelerating Ser-831 phosphorylation. Complementary electrophysiological studies indicate that AKAP79 selectively shifts the dose-dependence for PKC modulation of GluR1 receptor currents ∼20-fold, such that low concentrations of PKC are as effective as much higher CaMKII concentrations. By boosting PKC activity near a target substrate, AKAP79 provides a mechanism to overcome limitations in kinase abundance thereby ensuring faithful signal propagation and efficient modification of AMPA receptor-mediated responses. PMID:18305116

  10. Molecular mechanism of activation-triggered subunit exchange in Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Moitrayee; Stratton, Margaret M; Going, Catherine C; McSpadden, Ethan D; Huang, Yongjian; Susa, Anna C; Elleman, Anna; Cao, Yumeng Melody; Pappireddi, Nishant; Burkhardt, Pawel; Gee, Christine L; Barros, Tiago; Schulman, Howard; Williams, Evan R; Kuriyan, John

    2016-01-01

    Activation triggers the exchange of subunits in Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), an oligomeric enzyme that is critical for learning, memory, and cardiac function. The mechanism by which subunit exchange occurs remains elusive. We show that the human CaMKII holoenzyme exists in dodecameric and tetradecameric forms, and that the calmodulin (CaM)-binding element of CaMKII can bind to the hub of the holoenzyme and destabilize it to release dimers. The structures of CaMKII from two distantly diverged organisms suggest that the CaM-binding element of activated CaMKII acts as a wedge by docking at intersubunit interfaces in the hub. This converts the hub into a spiral form that can release or gain CaMKII dimers. Our data reveal a three-way competition for the CaM-binding element, whereby phosphorylation biases it towards the hub interface, away from the kinase domain and calmodulin, thus unlocking the ability of activated CaMKII holoenzymes to exchange dimers with unactivated ones. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13405.001 PMID:26949248

  11. A brain-specific Ca sup 2+ /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaM kinase-Gr) is regulated by autophosphorylation. Relevance to neuronal Ca sup 2+ signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Frangakis, M.V.; Ohmstede, C.A.; Sahyoun, N. )

    1991-06-15

    A neuronal Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaM kinase-Gr) undergoes autophosphorylation on a serine residue(s) in response to Ca2+ and calmodulin. Phosphate incorporation leads to the formation of a Ca(2+)-independent (autonomous) activity state, as well as potentiation of the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent response. The autonomous enzyme activity of the phosphorylated enzyme {approximately} equals the Ca2+/calmodulin-stimulated activity of the unphosphorylated enzyme, but displays diminished affinity toward ATP and the synthetic substrate, syntide-2. The Km(app) for ATP and syntide-2 increased 4.3- and 1.7-fold, respectively. Further activation of the autonomous enzyme by Ca2+/calmodulin yields a marked increase in the affinity for ATP and peptide substrate such that the Km(app) for ATP and syntide-2 decreased by 14- and 8-fold, respectively. Both autophosphorylation and the addition of Ca2+/calmodulin are required to produce the maximum level of enzyme activation and to increase substrate affinity. Unlike Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type II that is dephosphorylated by the Mg(2+)-independent phosphoprotein phosphatases 1 and 2A, CaM kinase-Gr is dephosphorylated by a Mg(2+)-dependent phosphoprotein phosphatase that may be related to the type 2C enzyme. Dephosphorylation of CaM kinase-Gr reverses the effects of autophosphorylation on enzyme activity. A comparison between the autophosphorylation and dephosphorylation reactions of CaM kinase-Gr and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type II provides useful insights into the operation of Ca(2+)-sensitive molecular switches.

  12. Isolation and characterization of Dictyostelium thymidine kinase 1 as a calmodulin-binding protein.

    PubMed

    O'Day, Danton H; Chatterjee-Chakraborty, Munmun; Wagler, Stephanie; Myre, Michael A

    2005-06-17

    Probing of a cDNA expression library from multicellular development of Dictyostelium discoideum using a recombinant radiolabelled calmodulin probe (35S-VU1-CaM) led to the isolation of a cDNA encoding a putative CaM-binding protein (CaMBP). The cDNA contained an open reading frame of 951 bp encoding a 227aa polypeptide (25.5 kDa). Sequence comparisons led to highly significant matches with cytosolic thymidine kinases (TK1; EC 2.7.1.21) from a diverse number of species including humans (7e-56; 59% Identities; 75% Positives) indicating that the encoded protein is D. discoideum TK1 (DdTK1; ThyB). DdTK1 has not been previously characterized in this organism. In keeping with its sequence similarity with DdTK1, antibodies against humanTK1 recognize DdTK1, which is expressed during growth but decreases in amount after starvation. A CaM-binding domain (CaMBD; 20GKTTELIRRIKRFNFANKKC30) was identified and wild type DdTK1 plus two constructs (DdTK deltaC36, DdTK deltaC75) possessing the domain were shown to bind CaM in vitro but only in the presence of calcium while a construct (DdTK deltaN72) lacking the region failed to bind to CaM. Thus, DdTK1 is a Ca2+-dependent CaMBP. Sequence alignments against TK1 from vertebrates to viruses show that CaM-binding region is highly conserved. The identified CaMBD overlaps the ATP-binding (P-loop) domain suggesting CaM might affect the activity of this kinase. Recombinant DdTK is enzymatically active and showed stimulation by CaM (113+/-0.5%) an in vitro enhancement that was prevented by co-addition of the CaM antagonists W7 (91.2+/-0.8%) and W13 (96.6+/-0.6%). The discovery that TK1 from D. discoideum, and possibly other species including humans and a large number of human viruses, is a Ca2+-dependent CaMBP opens up new avenues for research on this medically relevant protein. PMID:15883042

  13. Interactions of calmodulin with death-associated protein kinase peptides: experimental and modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Kuczera, Krzysztof; Kursula, Petri

    2012-01-01

    We have studied the interactions between calmodulin (CaM) and three target peptides from the death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) protein family using both experimental and modeling methods, aimed at determining the details of the underlying biological regulation mechanisms. Experimentally, calorimetric binding free energies were determined for the complexes of CaM with peptides representing the DAPK2 wild-type and S308D mutant, as well as DAPK1. The observed affinity of CaM was very similar for all three studied peptides. The DAPK2 and DAPK1 peptides differ significantly in sequence and total charge, while the DAPK2 S308D mutant is designed to model the effects of DAPK2 Ser308 phosphorylation. The crystal structure of the CaM-DAPK2 S308D mutant peptide is also reported. The structures of CaM-DAPK peptide complexes present a mode of CaM-kinase interaction, in which bulky hydrophobic residues at positions 10 and 14 are both bound to the same hydrophobic cleft. To explain the microscopic effects underlying these interactions, we performed free energy calculations based on the approximate MM-PBSA approach. For these highly charged systems, standard MM-PBSA calculations did not yield satisfactory results. We proposed a rational modification of the approach which led to reasonable predictions of binding free energies. All three complexes are strongly stabilized by two effects: electrostatic interactions and buried surface area. The strong favorable interactions are to a large part compensated by unfavorable entropic terms, in which vibrational entropy is the largest contributor. The electrostatic component of the binding free energy followed the trend of the overall peptide charge, with strongest interactions for DAPK1 and weakest for the DAPK2 mutant. The electrostatics was dominated by interactions of the positively charged residues of the peptide with the negatively charged residues of CaM. The nonpolar binding free energy was comparable for all three peptides, the

  14. Negative regulation of multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases: physiological and pharmacological significance of protein phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, A; Sueyoshi, N; Shigeri, Y; Kameshita, I

    2008-01-01

    Multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMKs) play pivotal roles in intracellular Ca2+ signaling pathways. There is growing evidence that CaMKs are involved in the pathogenic mechanisms underlying various human diseases. In this review, we begin by briefly summarizing our knowledge of the involvement of CaMKs in the pathogenesis of various diseases suggested to be caused by the dysfunction/dysregulation or aberrant expression of CaMKs. It is widely known that the activities of CaMKs are strictly regulated by protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of specific phosphorylation sites. Since phosphorylation status is balanced by protein kinases and protein phosphatases, the mechanism of dephosphorylation/deactivation of CaMKs, corresponding to their ‘switching off', is extremely important, as is the mechanism of phosphorylation/activation corresponding to their ‘switching on'. Therefore, we focus on the regulation of multifunctional CaMKs by protein phosphatases. We summarize the current understanding of negative regulation of CaMKs by protein phosphatases. We also discuss the biochemical properties and physiological significance of a protein phosphatase that we designated as Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase (CaMKP), and those of its homologue CaMKP-N. Pharmacological applications of CaMKP inhibitors are also discussed. These compounds may be useful not only for exploring the physiological functions of CaMKP/CaMKP-N, but also as novel chemotherapies for various diseases. PMID:18454172

  15. Phosphorylation of a Ras-related GTP-binding protein, Rap-1b, by a neuronal Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase, CaM kinase Gr.

    PubMed Central

    Sahyoun, N; McDonald, O B; Farrell, F; Lapetina, E G

    1991-01-01

    A neuron-specific Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase, CaM kinase Gr, phosphorylates selectively a Ras-related GTP-binding protein (Rap-1b) that is enriched in brain tissue. The phosphorylation reaction achieves a stoichiometry of about 1 and involves a serine residue near the carboxyl terminus of the substrate. Both CaM kinase Gr and cAMP-dependent protein kinase, but not CaM kinase II, phosphorylate identical or contiguous serine residues in Rap-1b. The rate of phosphorylation of Rap-1b by CaM kinase Gr is enhanced following autophosphorylation of the protein kinase. Other low molecular weight GTP-binding proteins belonging to the Ras superfamily, including Rab-3A, Rap-2b, and c-Ha-ras p21, are not phosphorylated by CaM kinase Gr. The phosphorylation of Rap-1b itself can be reversed by an endogenous brain phosphoprotein phosphatase. These observations provide a potential connection between a neuronal Ca2(+)-signaling pathway and a specific low molecular weight GTP-binding protein that may regulate neuronal transmembrane signaling, vesicle transport, or neurotransmitter release. Images PMID:1901412

  16. Activation of a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase involves intramolecular binding of a calmodulin-like regulatory domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J. F.; Teyton, L.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are regulated by a C-terminal calmodulin-like domain (CaM-LD). The CaM-LD is connected to the kinase by a short junction sequence which contains a pseudosubstrate autoinhibitor. To understand how the CaM-LD regulates a CDPK, a recombinant CDPK (isoform CPK-1 from Arabidopsis, accession no. L14771) was made as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli. We show here that a truncated CDPK lacking a CaM-LD (e.g. mutant delta NC-26H) can be activated by exogenous calmodulin or an isolated CaM-LD (Kact approximately 2 microM). We propose that Ca2+ activation of a CDPK normally occurs through intramolecular binding of the CaM-LD to the junction. When the junction and CaM-LD are made as two separate polypeptides, the CaM-LD can bind the junction in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion with a dissociation constant (KD) of 6 x 10(-6) M, as determined by kinetic binding analyses. When the junction and CaM-LD are tethered in a single polypeptide (e.g. in protein JC-1), their ability to engage in bimolecular binding is suppressed (e.g. the tethered CaM-LD cannot bind a separate junction). A mutation which disrupts the putative CaM-LD binding sequence (e.g. substitution LRV-1444 to DLPG) appears to block intramolecular binding, as indicated by the restored ability of a tethered CaM-LD to engage in bimolecular binding. This mutation, in the context of a full-length enzyme (mutant KJM46H), appears to block Ca2+ activation. Thus, a disruption of intramolecular binding correlates with a disruption of the Ca2+ activation mechanism. CDPKs provide the first example of a member of the calmodulin superfamily where a target binding sequence is located within the same polypeptide.

  17. Molecular determinants for cardiovascular TRPC6 channel regulation by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Juan; Geshi, Naomi; Takahashi, Shinichi; Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Ichikawa, Jun; Hu, Yaopeng; Mori, Yasuo; Ito, Yushi; Inoue, Ryuji

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanism underlying Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent kinase II (CaMKII)-mediated regulation of the mouse transient receptor potential channel TRPC6 was explored by chimera, deletion and site-directed mutagenesis approaches. Induction of currents (ICCh) in TRPC6-expressing HEK293 cells by a muscarinic agonist carbachol (CCh; 100 μm) was strongly attenuated by a CaMKII-specific peptide, autocamtide-2-related inhibitory peptide (AIP; 10 μm). TRPC6/C7 chimera experiments showed that the TRPC6 C-terminal sequence is indispensable for ICCh to be sensitive to AIP-induced CaMKII inhibition. Further, deletion of a distal region (Gln855–Glu877) of the C-terminal CaM/inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor binding domain (CIRB) of TRPC6 was sufficient to abolish ICCh. Systematic alanine scanning for potential CaMKII phosphorylation sites revealed that Thr487 was solely responsible for the activation of the TRPC6 channel by receptor stimulation. The abrogating effect of the alanine mutation of Thr487 (T487A) was reproduced with other non-polar amino acids, namely glutamine or asparagine, while being partially rescued by phosphomimetic mutations with glutamate or aspartate. The cellular expression and distribution of TRPC6 channels did not significantly change with these mutations. Electrophysiological and immunocytochemical data with the Myc-tagged TRPC6 channel indicated that Thr487 is most likely located at the intracellular side of the cell membrane. Overexpression of T487A caused significant reduction of endogenous TRPC6-like current induced by Arg8-vasopressin in A7r5 aortic myocytes. Based on these results, we propose that the optimal spatial arrangement of a C-terminal domain (presumably the distal CIRB region) around a single CaMKII phosphorylation site Thr487 may be essential for CaMKII-mediated regulation of TRPC6 channels. This mechanism may be of physiological significance in a native environment such as in vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID

  18. Roles of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II in long-term memory formation in crickets.

    PubMed

    Mizunami, Makoto; Nemoto, Yuko; Terao, Kanta; Hamanaka, Yoshitaka; Matsumoto, Yukihisa

    2014-01-01

    Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a key molecule in many systems of learning and memory in vertebrates, but roles of CaMKII in invertebrates have not been characterized in detail. We have suggested that serial activation of NO/cGMP signaling, cyclic nucleotide-gated channel, Ca(2+)/CaM and cAMP signaling participates in long-term memory (LTM) formation in olfactory conditioning in crickets, and here we show participation of CaMKII in LTM formation and propose its site of action in the biochemical cascades. Crickets subjected to 3-trial conditioning to associate an odor with reward exhibited memory that lasts for a few days, which is characterized as protein synthesis-dependent LTM. In contrast, animals subjected to 1-trial conditioning exhibited memory that lasts for only several hours (mid-term memory, MTM). Injection of a CaMKII inhibitor prior to 3-trial conditioning impaired 1-day memory retention but not 1-hour memory retention, suggesting that CaMKII participates in LTM formation but not in MTM formation. Animals injected with a cGMP analogue, calcium ionophore or cAMP analogue prior to 1-trial conditioning exhibited 1-day retention, and co-injection of a CaMKII inhibitor impaired induction of LTM by the cGMP analogue or that by the calcium ionophore but not that by the cAMP analogue, suggesting that CaMKII is downstream of cGMP production and Ca(2+) influx and upstream of cAMP production in biochemical cascades for LTM formation. Animals injected with an adenylyl cyclase (AC) activator prior to 1-trial conditioning exhibited 1-day retention. Interestingly, a CaMKII inhibitor impaired LTM induction by the AC activator, although AC is expected to be a downstream target of CaMKII. The results suggest that CaMKII interacts with AC to facilitate cAMP production for LTM formation. We propose that CaMKII serves as a key molecule for interplay between Ca(2+) signaling and cAMP signaling for LTM formation, a new role of CaMKII in

  19. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV mediates acute nicotine-induced antinociception in acute thermal pain tests

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Kia J.; Damaj, M. Imad

    2014-01-01

    Calcium activated second messengers such as calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II have been implicated in drug-induced antinociception. The less abundant calcium activated second messenger, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV), mediates emotional responses to pain and tolerance to morphine analgesia; however its role in nicotine-mediated antinociception is currently unknown. The goal of this study was to evaluate the role of CaMKIV in the acute effects of nicotine, primarily acute nicotine- induced antinociception. CaMKIV knockout (−/−), heterozygote (+/−), and wild-type (+/+) mice were injected with various doses of nicotine and evaluated in a battery of tests, including the tail-flick and hot-plate tests for antinociception, body temperature, and locomotor activity. Our results show a genotype-dependent reduction in tail-flick and hot- plate latency in CaMKIV (+/−) and (−/−) mice after acute nicotine treatment, while no difference was observed between genotypes in the body temperature and locomotor activity assessments. The results of this study support a role for CaMKIV in acute nicotine-induced spinal and supraspinal pain mechanisms, and further implicate involvement of calcium-dependent mechanisms in drug-induced antinociception. PMID:24196027

  20. Muscarinic activation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in pancreatic islets. Temporal dissociation of kinase activation and insulin secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Babb, E L; Tarpley, J; Landt, M; Easom, R A

    1996-01-01

    We have demonstrated previously that glucose activates the multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaM kinase II) in isolated rat pancreatic islets in a manner consistent with a role of this enzyme in the regulation of insulin secretion [Wenham, Landt and Easom (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 4947-4952]. In the current study, the muscarinic agonist, carbachol, has been shown to induce the conversion of CaM kinase II into a Ca(2+)-independent, autonomous form indicative of its activation. Maximal activation (2-fold) was achieved by 15 s, followed by a rapid return to basal levels by 1 min. This response was primarily the result of the mobilization of Ca2+ from intracellular stores since it was not affected by a concentration (20 microM) of verapamil that completely prevented the activation of CaM kinase II by glucose. Surprisingly, carbachol added prior to, or simultaneously with, glucose attenuated nutrient activation of CaM kinase II. This effect was mimicked by cholecystokinin-8 (CCK-8) and thapsigargin, suggesting its mediation by phospholipase C and the mobilization of intracellular Ca2+. In contrast, carbachol, CCK-8 and thapsigargin markedly potentiated glucose (12 mM)-induced insulin secretion. These results suggest that CaM kinase II activation can be temporally dissociated from insulin secretion but do not exclude the potential dependence of insulin exocytosis on CaM kinase II-mediated protein phosphorylation. PMID:8694759

  1. IDENTIFICATION, ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF PKCAM-GR: A NOVEL NEURONAL CALMODULIN-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An increase in intracellular Ca levels via various mechanisms is a general response to many stimuli and has a pleiotropic effect on many intracellular systems. One family of enzymes which are activated by an increase in intracellular Ca levels are Ca/calmodulin-dependent protein ...

  2. Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Kinases (CaMKKs) Effects on AMP-Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Regulation of Chicken Sperm Functions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi Mong Diep; Combarnous, Yves; Praud, Christophe; Duittoz, Anne; Blesbois, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Sperm require high levels of energy to ensure motility and acrosome reaction (AR) accomplishment. The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been demonstrated to be strongly involved in the control of these properties. We address here the question of the potential role of calcium mobilization on AMPK activation and function in chicken sperm through the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinases (CaMKKs) mediated pathway. The presence of CaMKKs and their substrates CaMKI and CaMKIV was evaluated by western-blotting and indirect immunofluorescence. Sperm were incubated in presence or absence of extracellular Ca2+, or of CaMKKs inhibitor (STO-609). Phosphorylations of AMPK, CaMKI, and CaMKIV, as well as sperm functions were evaluated. We demonstrate the presence of both CaMKKs (α and β), CaMKI and CaMKIV in chicken sperm. CaMKKα and CaMKI were localized in the acrosome, the midpiece, and at much lower fluorescence in the flagellum, whereas CaMKKβ was mostly localized in the flagellum and much less in the midpiece and the acrosome. CaMKIV was only present in the flagellum. The presence of extracellular calcium induced an increase in kinases phosphorylation and sperm activity. STO-609 reduced AMPK phosphorylation in the presence of extracellular Ca2+ but not in its absence. STO-609 did not affect CaMKIV phosphorylation but decreased CaMKI phosphorylation and this inhibition was quicker in the presence of extracellular Ca2+ than in its absence. STO-609 efficiently inhibited sperm motility and AR, both in the presence and absence of extracellular Ca2+. Our results show for the first time the presence of CaMKKs (α and β) and one of its substrate, CaMKI in different subcellular compartments in germ cells, as well as the changes in the AMPK regulation pathway, sperm motility and AR related to Ca2+ entry in sperm through the Ca2+/CaM/CaMKKs/CaMKI pathway. The Ca2+/CaMKKs/AMPK pathway is activated only under conditions of extracellular Ca2+ entry in the cells

  3. Live imaging of endogenous Ca²⁺/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in neurons reveals that ischemia-related aggregation does not require kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Barcomb, Kelsey; Goodell, Dayton J; Arnold, Don B; Bayer, K Ulrich

    2015-11-01

    The Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) forms 12meric holoenzymes. These holoenzymes cluster into larger aggregates within neurons under ischemic conditions and in vitro when ischemic conditions are mimicked. This aggregation is thought to be mediated by interaction between the regulatory domain of one kinase subunit with the T-site of another kinase subunit in a different holoenzyme, an interaction that requires stimulation by Ca(2+) /CaM and nucleotide for its induction. This model makes several predictions that were verified here: Aggregation in vitro was reduced by the CaMKII inhibitors tatCN21 and tatCN19o (which block the T-site) as well as by KN93 (which is CaM-competitive). Notably, these and previously tested manipulations that block CaMKII activation all reduced aggregation, suggesting an alternative mechanism that instead requires kinase activity. However, experiments with the nucleotide-competitive broad-spectrum kinase inhibitors staurosporin and H7 showed that this is not the case. In vitro, staurosporine and H7 enabled CaMKII aggregation even in the absence of nucleotide. Within rat hippocampal neurons, an intra-body enabled live monitoring of endogenous CaMKII aggregation. This aggregation was blocked by tatCN21, but not by staurosporine, even though both effectively inhibit CaMKII activity. These results support the mechanistic model for CaMKII aggregation and show that kinase activity is not required. CaMKII aggregation is prevented by inhibiting kinase activity with mutations (red italics; shown previously) or inhibitors (red bold; shown here), indicating requirement of kinase activity. However, we show here that nucleotide-competitive inhibitors (green) allow CaMKII aggregation (including endogenous CaMKII within neurons), demonstrating that kinase activity is not required and supporting the current mechanistic model for CaMKII aggregation. PMID:26212614

  4. Characterization of a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase homolog from maize roots showing light-regulated gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Y. T.; Hidaka, H.; Feldman, L. J.

    1996-01-01

    Roots of many species respond to gravity (gravitropism) and grow downward only if illuminated. This light-regulated root gravitropism is phytochrome-dependent, mediated by calcium, and inhibited by KN-93, a specific inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II). A cDNA encoding MCK1, a maize homolog of mammalian CaMK, has been isolated from roots of maize (Zea mays L.). The MCK1 gene is expressed in root tips, the site of perception for both light and gravity. Using the [35S]CaM gel-overlay assay we showed that calmodulin-binding activity of the MCK1 is abolished by 50 microM KN-93, but binding is not affected by 5 microM KN-93, paralleling physiological findings that light-regulated root gravitropism is inhibited by 50 microM KN-93, but not by 5 microM KN-93. KN-93 inhibits light-regulated gravitropism by interrupting transduction of the light signal, not light perception, suggesting that MCK1 may play a role in transducing light. This is the first report suggesting a physiological function for a CaMK homolog in light signal transduction.

  5. Inactivation of calcium-activated chloride channels in smooth muscle by calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong-Xiao; Kotlikoff, Michael I.

    1997-01-01

    To determine the mechanisms responsible for the termination of Ca2+-activated Cl− currents (ICl(Ca)), simultaneous measurements of whole cell currents and intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) were made in equine tracheal myocytes. In nondialyzed cells, or cells dialyzed with 1 mM ATP, ICl(Ca) decayed before the [Ca2+]i decline, whereas the calcium-activated potassium current decayed at the same rate as [Ca2+]i. Substitution of AMP-PNP or ADP for ATP markedly prolonged the decay of ICl(Ca), resulting in a rate of current decay similar to that of the fall in [Ca2+]i. In the presence of ATP, dialysis of the calmodulin antagonist W7, the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibitor KN93, or a CaMKII-specific peptide inhibitor the rate of ICl(Ca) decay was slowed and matched the [Ca2+]i decline, whereas H7, a nonspecific kinase inhibitor with low affinity for CaMKII, was without effect. When a sustained increase in [Ca2+]i was produced in ATP dialyzed cells, the current decayed completely, whereas in cells loaded with 5′-adenylylimidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP), KN93, or the CaMKII inhibitory peptide, ICl(Ca) did not decay. Slowly decaying currents were repeatedly evoked in ADP- or AMP-PNP-loaded cells, but dialysis of adenosine 5′-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) or okadaic acid resulted in a smaller initial ICl(Ca), and little or no current (despite a normal [Ca2+]i transient) with a second stimulation. These data indicate that CaMKII phosphorylation results in the inactivation of calcium-activated chloride channels, and that transition from the inactivated state to the closed state requires protein dephosphorylation. PMID:9405714

  6. Phosphorylation of Alzheimer disease amyloid precursor peptide by protein kinase C and Ca sup 2+ /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II

    SciTech Connect

    Gandy, S.; Czernik, A.J.; Greengard, P. )

    1988-08-01

    The amino acid sequence of the Alzheimer disease amyloid precursor (ADAP) has been deduced from the corresponding cDNA, and hydropathy analysis of the sequence suggest a receptor-like structure with a single transmembrane domain. The putative cytoplasmic domain of ADAP contains potential sites for serine and threonine phosphorylation. In the present study, synthetic peptides derived from this domain were used as model substrates for various purified protein kinases. Protein kinase C rapidly catalyzed the phosphorylation of a peptide corresponding to amino acid residues 645-661 of ADAP. Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II phosphorylated ADAP peptide (645-661) on Thr-654 and Ser-655. Using rat cerebral cortex synaptosomes prelabeled with {sup 32}P{sub i}, a {sup 32}P-labeled phosphoprotein of {approx}135 kDa was immunoprecipitated by using antisera prepared against ADAP peptide(597-624), consistent with the possibility that the holoform of ADAP in rat brain is a phosphoprotein. Based on analogy with the effect of phosphorylation by protein kinase C of juxtamembrane residues in the cytoplasmic domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor and the interleukin 2 receptor, phosphorylation of ADAP may target it for internalization.

  7. Calspermin gene transcription is regulated by two cyclic AMP response elements contained in an alternative promoter in the calmodulin kinase IV gene.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Z; Sassone-Corsi, P; Means, A R

    1995-01-01

    The transcript for the high-affinity Ca2+/calmodulin-binding protein calspermin is generated from the gene encoding Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV only in postmeiotic germ cells during spermatogenesis. We demonstrate that this testis-specific calspermin transcript can be produced in heterologous cells by utilization of a promoter located in an intron of the calmodulin (CaM) kinase IV gene. Critical motifs within this promoter are two cyclic AMP response element (CRE)-like sequences located about -70 and -50 bp upstream of the transcriptional initiation site. Both CRE motifs are footprinted by the authentic testis-specific transcriptional activator CREM tau or by CREM tau present in adult testis nuclear extract. Whereas a 2.1-kb DNA fragment containing the calspermin promoter is inactive when transfected into NIH 3T3 cells, activity can be restored by cotransfection of CREM tau and protein kinase A or CaM kinase IV but not CaM kinase II alpha. Restoration of activity is greatly reduced by mutation of the two CRE motifs. Since CRE-like motifs have been identified in many genes uniquely expressed in postmeiotic germ cells, which contain abundant CREM tau protein, we suggest that CREM tau may function as one transcription factor responsible for the expression of postmeiotic germ cell-specific genes. PMID:7799965

  8. A calcium-dependent protein kinase can inhibit a calmodulin-stimulated Ca2+ pump (ACA2) located in the endoplasmic reticulum of Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, I.; Sze, H.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The magnitude and duration of a cytosolic Ca(2+) release can potentially be altered by changing the rate of Ca(2+) efflux. In plant cells, Ca(2+) efflux from the cytoplasm is mediated by H(+)/Ca(2+)-antiporters and two types of Ca(2+)-ATPases. ACA2 was recently identified as a calmodulin-regulated Ca(2+)-pump located in the endoplasmic reticulum. Here, we show that phosphorylation of its N-terminal regulatory domain by a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase (CDPK isoform CPK1), inhibits both basal activity ( approximately 10%) and calmodulin stimulation ( approximately 75%), as shown by Ca(2+)-transport assays with recombinant enzyme expressed in yeast. A CDPK phosphorylation site was mapped to Ser(45) near a calmodulin binding site, using a fusion protein containing the N-terminal domain as an in vitro substrate for a recombinant CPK1. In a full-length enzyme, an Ala substitution for Ser(45) (S45/A) completely blocked the observed CDPK inhibition of both basal and calmodulin-stimulated activities. An Asp substitution (S45/D) mimicked phosphoinhibition, indicating that a negative charge at this position is sufficient to account for phosphoinhibition. Interestingly, prior binding of calmodulin blocked phosphorylation. This suggests that, once ACA2 binds calmodulin, its activation state becomes resistant to phosphoinhibition. These results support the hypothesis that ACA2 activity is regulated as the balance between the initial kinetics of calmodulin stimulation and CDPK inhibition, providing an example in plants for a potential point of crosstalk between two different Ca(2+)-signaling pathways.

  9. Phosphorylation and activation of nuclear Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase (CaMKP-N/PPM1E) by Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase I (CaMKI)

    SciTech Connect

    Onouchi, Takashi; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki; Ishida, Atsuhiko; Kameshita, Isamu

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CaMKP-N/PPM1E underwent proteolytic processing and translocated to cytosol. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proteolysis was effectively inhibited by the proteasome inhibitors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ser-480 of zebrafish CaMKP-N was phosphorylated by cytosolic CaMKI. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphorylation-mimic mutants of CaMKP-N showed enhanced activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These results suggest that CaMKP-N is regulated by CaMKI. -- Abstract: Nuclear Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase (CaMKP-N/PPM1E) is an enzyme that dephosphorylates and downregulates multifunctional Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMKs) as well as AMP-dependent protein kinase. In our previous study, we found that zebrafish CaMKP-N (zCaMKP-N) underwent proteolytic processing and translocated to cytosol in a proteasome inhibitor-sensitive manner. In the present study, we found that zCaMKP-N is regulated by phosphorylation at Ser-480. When zCaMKP-N was incubated with the activated CaMKI, time-dependent phosphorylation of the enzyme was observed. This phosphorylation was significantly reduced when Ser-480 was replaced by Ala, suggesting that CaMKI phosphorylates Ser-480 of zCaMKP-N. Phosphorylation-mimic mutants, S480D and S480E, showed higher phosphatase activities than those of wild type and S480A mutant in solution-based phosphatase assay using various substrates. Furthermore, autophosphorylation of CaMKII after ionomycin treatment was more severely attenuated in Neuro2a cells when CaMKII was cotransfected with the phosphorylation-mimic mutant of zCaMKP-N than with the wild-type or non-phosphorylatable zCaMKP-N. These results strongly suggest that phosphorylation of zCaMKP-N at Ser-480 by CaMKI activates CaMKP-N catalytic activity and thereby downregulates multifunctional CaMKs in the cytosol.

  10. Intracellular translocation of calmodulin and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II during the development of hypertrophy in neonatal cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gangopadhyay, Jaya Pal; Ikemoto, Noriaki

    2010-01-01

    We have recently shown that stimulation of cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes with endothelin-1 (ET-1) first produces conformational disorder within the ryanodine receptor (RyR2) and diastolic Ca2+ leak from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), then develops hypertrophy (HT) in the cardiomyocytes [Hamada et al., 2009]. The present paper addresses the following question. By what mechanism does crosstalk between defective operation of RyR2 and activation of the HT gene program occur? Here we show that the immuno-stain of calmodulin (CaM) is localized chiefly in the cytoplasmic area in the control cells; whereas, in the ET-1-treated/hypertrophied cells, major immuno-staining is localized in the nuclear region. In addition, fluorescently labeled CaM that has been introduced into the cardiomyocytes using the BioPORTER system moves from the cytoplasm to the nucleus with the development of HT. The immuno-confocal imaging of Ca2+/CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) also shows cytoplasm-to-nucleus shift of the immuno-staining pattern in the hypertrophied cells. In an early phase of hypertrophic growth, the frequency of spontaneous Ca2+ transients increases, which accompanies with cytoplasm-to-nucleus translocation of CaM. In a later phase of hypertrophic growth, further increase in the frequency of spontaneous Ca2+ transients results in the appearance of trains of Ca2+ spikes, which accompanies with nuclear translocation of CaMKII. The cardio-protective reagent dantrolene (the reagent that corrects the de-stabilized inter-domain interaction within the RyR2 to a normal mode) ameliorates aberrant intracellular Ca2+ events and prevents nuclear translocation of both CaM and CaMKII, then prevents the development of HT. These results suggest that translocation of CaM and CaMKII from the cytoplasm to the nucleus serves as messengers to transmit the pathogenic signal elicited in the surface membrane and in the RyR2 to the nuclear transcriptional sites to activate HT program. PMID

  11. Intracellular translocation of calmodulin and Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II during the development of hypertrophy in neonatal cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Gangopadhyay, Jaya Pal; Ikemoto, Noriaki; Department of Neurology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115

    2010-05-28

    We have recently shown that stimulation of cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes with endothelin-1 (ET-1) first produces conformational disorder within the ryanodine receptor (RyR2) and diastolic Ca{sup 2+} leak from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), then develops hypertrophy (HT) in the cardiomyocytes (Hamada et al., 2009 ). The present paper addresses the following question. By what mechanism does crosstalk between defective operation of RyR2 and activation of the HT gene program occur? Here we show that the immuno-stain of calmodulin (CaM) is localized chiefly in the cytoplasmic area in the control cells; whereas, in the ET-1-treated/hypertrophied cells, major immuno-staining is localized in the nuclear region. In addition, fluorescently labeled CaM that has been introduced into the cardiomyocytes using the BioPORTER system moves from the cytoplasm to the nucleus with the development of HT. The immuno-confocal imaging of Ca{sup 2+}/CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) also shows cytoplasm-to-nucleus shift of the immuno-staining pattern in the hypertrophied cells. In an early phase of hypertrophic growth, the frequency of spontaneous Ca{sup 2+} transients increases, which accompanies with cytoplasm-to-nucleus translocation of CaM. In a later phase of hypertrophic growth, further increase in the frequency of spontaneous Ca{sup 2+} transients results in the appearance of trains of Ca{sup 2+} spikes, which accompanies with nuclear translocation of CaMKII. The cardio-protective reagent dantrolene (the reagent that corrects the de-stabilized inter-domain interaction within the RyR2 to a normal mode) ameliorates aberrant intracellular Ca{sup 2+} events and prevents nuclear translocation of both CaM and CaMKII, then prevents the development of HT. These results suggest that translocation of CaM and CaMKII from the cytoplasm to the nucleus serves as messengers to transmit the pathogenic signal elicited in the surface membrane and in the RyR2 to the nuclear transcriptional

  12. The Octopamine Receptor OAMB Mediates Ovulation via Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II in the Drosophila Oviduct Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Gwan; Rohila, Suman; Han, Kyung-An

    2009-01-01

    Ovulation is an essential physiological process in sexual reproduction; however, the underlying cellular mechanisms are poorly understood. We have previously shown that OAMB, a Drosophila G-protein-coupled receptor for octopamine (the insect counterpart of mammalian norepinephrine), is required for ovulation induced upon mating. OAMB is expressed in the nervous and reproductive systems and has two isoforms (OAMB-AS and OAMB-K3) with distinct capacities to increase intracellular Ca2+ or intracellular Ca2+ and cAMP in vitro. Here, we investigated tissue specificity and intracellular signals required for OAMB's function in ovulation. Restricted OAMB expression in the adult oviduct epithelium, but not the nervous system, reinstated ovulation in oamb mutant females, in which either OAMB isoform was sufficient for the rescue. Consistently, strong immunoreactivities for both isoforms were observed in the wild-type oviduct epithelium. To delineate the cellular mechanism by which OAMB regulates ovulation, we explored protein kinases functionally interacting with OAMB by employing a new GAL4 driver with restricted expression in the oviduct epithelium. Conditional inhibition of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), but not protein kinase A or C, in the oviduct epithelium inhibited ovulation. Moreover, constitutively active CaMKII, but not protein kinase A, expressed only in the adult oviduct epithelium fully rescued the oamb female's phenotype, demonstrating CaMKII as a major downstream molecule conveying the OAMB's ovulation signal. This is consistent with the ability of both OAMB isoforms, whose common intracellular signal in vitro is Ca2+, to reinstate ovulation in oamb females. These observations reveal the critical roles of the oviduct epithelium and its cellular components OAMB and CaMKII in ovulation. It is conceivable that the OAMB-mediated cellular activities stimulated upon mating are crucial for secretory activities suitable for egg transfer from

  13. Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II Is a Modulator of CARMA1-Mediated NF-κB Activation†

    PubMed Central

    Ishiguro, Kazuhiro; Green, Todd; Rapley, Joseph; Wachtel, Heather; Giallourakis, Cosmas; Landry, Aimee; Cao, Zhifang; Lu, Naifang; Takafumi, Ando; Goto, Hidemi; Daly, Mark J.; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2006-01-01

    CARMA1 is a central regulator of NF-κB activation in lymphocytes. CARMA1 and Bcl10 functionally interact and control NF-κB signaling downstream of the T-cell receptor (TCR). Computational analysis of expression neighborhoods of CARMA1-Bcl10MALT 1 for enrichment in kinases identified calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) as an important component of this pathway. Here we report that Ca2+/CaMKII is redistributed to the immune synapse following T-cell activation and that CaMKII is critical for NF-κB activation induced by TCR stimulation. Furthermore, CaMKII enhances CARMA1-induced NF-κB activation. Moreover, we have shown that CaMKII phosphorylates CARMA1 on Ser109 and that the phosphorylation facilitates the interaction between CARMA1 and Bcl10. These results provide a novel function for CaMKII in TCR signaling and CARMA1-induced NF-κB activation. PMID:16809782

  14. Kinetics of the inhibition of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II by pea protein-derived peptides.

    PubMed

    Li, Huan; Aluko, Rotimi E

    2005-11-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) catalyzes the phosphorylation of various cellular proteins and excessive activities have been implicated in the pathogenesis of various chronic diseases. We hypothesized that positively charged peptides can be produced through enzymatic hydrolysis of pea proteins; such peptides could then bind to negatively charged calmodulin (CaM) at a physiological pH level and inhibit CaMKII activity. Pea protein isolate was hydrolyzed with an alkaline protease (alcalase) and filtered through a 1000-mol wt cutoff membrane. The permeate, which contained low-molecular weight peptides, was used to isolate cationic peptides on an SP-Sepharose column by ion exchange chromatography. Separation of the permeate on the SP-Sepharose column yielded two fractions with net positive charges that were subsequently used for enzyme inhibition studies. Fraction I eluted earlier from the column and contained lower contents of lysine and arginine than Fraction II, which eluted later. Results show that both peptide fractions inhibited CaMKII activity mostly in a competitive manner, although kinetic data suggested that inhibition by Fraction II may be of the mixed type. Kinetic analysis (K(m) and K(i)) showed that affinity of peptides in Fraction II for CaM was more than that in Fraction I, which was directly correlated with the higher inhibitory properties of Fraction II against CaMKII. The results suggest that it may be possible to use pea protein-derived cationic peptides to modulate CaMKII activities. PMID:16111873

  15. Calcium/Calmodulin Dependent Kinase II Plays a Role in Persistent Central Neuropathic Pain Following Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Crown, Eric D; Gwak, Young S.; Ye, Zaiming; Tan, Huaiyu; Johnson, Kathia M; Xu, Guo-Ying; McAdoo, David J; Hulsebosch, Claire E

    2012-01-01

    Chronic central neuropathic pain following CNS injuries remains refractory to therapeutic interventions. A novel approach would be to target key intracellular signaling proteins that are known to contribute to continued activation by phosphorylation of kinases, transcription factors, and/or receptors that contribute to changes in membrane excitability. We demonstrate that one signaling kinase, calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), is critical in maintaining aberrant dorsal horn neuron hyperexcitability in the neuropathic pain condition following spinal cord injury (SCI). Following T10 contusion SCI, activated CaMKII (phosphorylated, pCAMKII) expression is significantly upregulated in the T7/8 spinal dorsal horn in neurons, but not glial cells, and in oligodendrocytes in the dorsal column in the same rats that displayed at-level mechanical allodynia. Furthermore, identified spinothalamic neurons demonstrated significant increases of pCaMKII after SCI compared to sham controls. However, neither astrocytes nor microglia showed pCaMKII expression in either sham or SCI rats. To demonstrate causality, treatment of SCI rats with KN-93, which prevents CaMKII activation, significantly attenuated at-level mechanical allodynia and aberrant WDR neuronal activity evoked by brush, pressure, pinch stimuli and a graded series of von Frey stimuli, respectively. This is the first evidence that persistent CaMKII activation contributes to chronic central neuropathic pain by mechanisms that involve maintained hyperexcitability of WDR dorsal horn neurons. Furthermore, targeting key signaling proteins is a novel, useful therapeutic strategy for treating chronic central neuropathic pain. PMID:22296735

  16. Alpha calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase II in learning-dependent plasticity of mouse somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Skibinska-Kijek, A; Radwanska, A; Kossut, M

    2008-02-01

    Calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), and more specifically its alpha subunit, is widely believed to be fundamental for hippocampal synaptic plasticity. In the cerebral cortex, deprivation-evoked plasticity was shown to depend on alphaCaMKII autophosphorylation abilities. Here we analyzed how learning-induced functional reorganization of cortical representations affected alphaCaMKII in adult Swiss mice. Mice were subjected to short-lasting sensory training in which stimulation of whiskers was paired with tail shock. The pairing results in enlargement of functional representation of vibrissae activated during the training. alphaCaMKII protein and its autophosphorylation level were determined by Western-blotting in somatosensory cortex crude synaptosomal fraction (P2) and postsynaptic protein-enriched, Triton X-100 insoluble fraction (TIF). The first training session resulted in an increase in alphaCaMKII autophosphorylation at autonomy site observed in TIF. A similar increase was also observed after the first session of just whiskers stimulation, which alone does not induce rearrangement of cortical representations. These data indicate that increased autophosphorylation of postsynaptic alphaCaMKII is not a correlate of induction phase of plasticity related reorganization of cortical representation of vibrissae. The increase observed in both experimental groups was transient and did not persist in the maintenance phase of the plastic change. Furthermore, we found that the training caused a delayed upregulation of alphaCaMKII protein level in crude synaptosomal fraction, but not in TIF, and the upregulation was not accompanied by an increase in autophosphorylation level of the kinase. The result indicates alphaCaMKII involvement in the late phase of plastic change and suggests the participation of a presynaptic pool of kinase rather than postsynaptic at this point. PMID:18164137

  17. Oxidation of the skeletal muscle Ca2+ release channel alters calmodulin binding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, J. Z.; Wu, Y.; Williams, B. Y.; Rodney, G.; Mandel, F.; Strasburg, G. M.; Hamilton, S. L.

    1999-01-01

    This study presents evidence for a close relationship between the oxidation state of the skeletal muscle Ca2+ release channel (RyR1) and its ability to bind calmodulin (CaM). CaM enhances the activity of RyR1 in low Ca2+ and inhibits its activity in high Ca2+. Oxidation, which activates the channel, blocks the binding of 125I-labeled CaM at both micromolar and nanomolar Ca2+ concentrations. Conversely, bound CaM slows oxidation-induced cross-linking between subunits of the RyR1 tetramer. Alkylation of hyperreactive sulfhydryls (<3% of the total sulfhydryls) on RyR1 with N-ethylmaleimide completely blocks oxidant-induced intersubunit cross-linking and inhibits Ca2+-free 125I-CaM but not Ca2+/125I-CaM binding. These studies suggest that 1) the sites on RyR1 for binding apocalmodulin have features distinct from those of the Ca2+/CaM site, 2) oxidation may alter the activity of RyR1 in part by altering its interaction with CaM, and 3) CaM may protect RyR1 from oxidative modifications during periods of oxidative stress.

  18. Identification of peptides in wheat germ hydrolysate that demonstrate calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Kumrungsee, Thanutchaporn; Akiyama, Sayaka; Guo, Jian; Tanaka, Mitsuru; Matsui, Toshiro

    2016-12-15

    Hydrolysis of wheat germ by proteases resulted in bioactive peptides that demonstrated an inhibitory effect against the vasoconstrictive Ca(2+)-calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II). The hydrolysate by thermolysin (1.0wt%, 5h) showed a particularly potent CaMK II inhibition. As a result of mixed mode high-performance liquid chromatography of thermolysin hydrolysate with pH elution gradient ranging between 4.8 and 8.9, the fraction eluted at pH 8.9 was the most potent CaMK II inhibitor. From this fraction, Trp-Val and Trp-Ile were identified as CaMK II inhibitors. In Sprague-Dawley rats, an enhanced aortic CaMK II activity by 1μM phenylephrine was significantly (p<0.05) suppressed by 15-min incubation with 300μM Trp-Val or Trp-Ile. On the basis of Ca(2+)-chelating fluorescence and CaMK II activity assays, it was concluded that Trp-Val and Trp-Ile competed with Ca(2+)-CaM complex to bind to CaMK II with Ki values of 5.4 and 3.6μM, respectively. PMID:27451188

  19. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIalpha in optic axons moves with slow axonal transport and undergoes posttranslational modification.

    PubMed

    Lund, L M; McQuarrie, I G

    2001-12-21

    In neurons, the mRNA for calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha (CKIIalpha) is known to be targeted to dendrites-where the enzyme is synthesized and supports postsynaptic functions. We are interested in knowing how neuronal proteins enter axons from the nerve cell body, and the mechanism for protein transport to terminals. Because CKIIalpha immunofluorescence can be demonstrated in over 80% of retinal ganglion cells, we asked whether this regulatory protein is being transported into optic axons. Using Sprague-Dawley rats, [(35)S] methionine was injected into the vitreous humor of the eye. Four days later, the optic nerves, tracts, lateral geniculate ganglia, and superior colliculi were removed and processed for 2D-PAGE and Western blotting. Radiolabeled CKIIalpha appears to move with slow component b (SCb) of axonal transport, as is the case in rodent sciatic motor neurons. In addition, the radiolabeled CKIIalpha isoform that enters the optic nerve is found to be 4 kDa heavier (in SDS-PAGE molecular mass) than the isoform in the optic tract, superior colliculus, and lateral geniculate nucleus. This reduction is likely the result of dephosphorylation, which is a mechanism used to regulate the enzyme's activity. PMID:11741313

  20. Adult cardiac fibroblast proliferation is modulated by calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in normal and hypertrophied hearts.

    PubMed

    Martin, Tamara P; Lawan, Ahmed; Robinson, Emma; Grieve, David J; Plevin, Robin; Paul, Andrew; Currie, Susan

    2014-02-01

    Increased adult cardiac fibroblast proliferation results in an increased collagen deposition responsible for the fibrosis accompanying pathological remodelling of the heart. The mechanisms regulating cardiac fibroblast proliferation remain poorly understood. Using a minimally invasive transverse aortic banding (MTAB) mouse model of cardiac hypertrophy, we have assessed fibrosis and cardiac fibroblast proliferation. We have investigated whether calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIδ (CaMKIIδ) regulates proliferation in fibroblasts isolated from normal and hypertrophied hearts. It is known that CaMKIIδ plays a central role in cardiac myocyte contractility, but nothing is known of its role in adult cardiac fibroblast function. The MTAB model used here produces extensive hypertrophy and fibrosis. CaMKIIδ protein expression and activity is upregulated in MTAB hearts and, specifically, in cardiac fibroblasts isolated from hypertrophied hearts. In response to angiotensin II, cardiac fibroblasts isolated from MTAB hearts show increased proliferation rates. Inhibition of CaMKII with autocamtide inhibitory peptide inhibits proliferation in cells isolated from both sham and MTAB hearts, with a significantly greater effect evident in MTAB cells. These results are the first to show selective upregulation of CaMKIIδ in adult cardiac fibroblasts following cardiac hypertrophy and to assign a previously unrecognised role to CaMKII in regulating adult cardiac fibroblast function in normal and diseased hearts. PMID:23881186

  1. Structural Properties of Human CaMKII Ca2+ /Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II using X-ray Crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yumeng Melody; McSpadden, Ethan; Kuriyan, John; Department of Molecular; Cell Biology; Department of Chemistry Team

    To this day, human memory storage remains a mystery as we can at most describe the process vaguely on a cellular level. Switch-like properties of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II make it a leading candidate in understanding the molecular basis of human memory. The protein crystal was placed in the beam of a synchrotron source and the x-ray crystallography data was collected as reflections on a diffraction pattern that undergo Fourier transform to obtain the electron density. We observed two drastic differences from our solved structure at 2.75Å to a similar construct of the mouse CaMKII association domain. Firstly, our structure is a 6-fold symmetric dodecamer, whereas the previously published construct was a 7-fold symmetric tetradecamer. This suggests the association domain of human CaMKII is a dynamic structure that is triggered subunit exchange process. Secondly, in our structure the N-terminal tag is docked as an additional beta-strand on an uncapped beta-sheet present in each association domain protomer. This is concrete evidence of the involvement of the polypeptide docking site in the molecular mechanism underlining subunit exchange. In the future, we would like to selectively inhibit the exchange process while not disrupting the other functionalities of CaMKII.

  2. Intrathecal inhibition of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in diabetic neuropathy adversely affects pain-related behavior.

    PubMed

    Jelicic Kadic, Antonia; Boric, Matija; Ferhatovic, Lejla; Banozic, Adriana; Sapunar, Damir; Puljak, Livia

    2013-10-25

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is considered an important enzyme contributing to the pathogenesis of persistent pain. The aim of this study was to test whether intrathecal injection of CaMKII inhibitors may reduce pain-related behavior in diabetic rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Diabetes was induced with intraperitoneal injection of 55mg/kg streptozotocin. Two weeks after diabetes induction, CaMKII inhibitor myristoil-AIP or KN-93 was injected intrathecally. Behavioral testing with mechanical and thermal stimuli was performed before induction of diabetes, the day preceding the injection, as well as 2h and 24h after the intrathecal injection. The expression of total CaMKII and its alpha isoform in dorsal horn was quantified using immunohistochemistry. Intrathecal injection of mAIP and KN-93 resulted in significant decrease in expression of total CaMKII and CaMKII alpha isoform activity. Also, mAIP and KN93 injection significantly increased sensitivity to a mechanical stimulus 24h after i.t. injection. Intrathecal inhibition of CaMKII reduced the expression of total CaMKII and its CaMKII alpha isoform activity in diabetic dorsal horn, which was accompanied with an increase in pain-related behavior. Further studies about the intrathecal inhibition of CaMKII should elucidate its role in nociceptive processes of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:24035897

  3. Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase mediates Hypergravity-Induced Changes in F-Actin Expression by Endothelial Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, Felisha D.; Melhado, Caroline; Bosah, Francis; Harris-Hooker, Sandra A.; Sanford, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    A number of basic cellular functions, e.g., electrolyte concentration cell growth rate, glucose utilization, bone formation, response to growth stimulation and exocytosis are modified by microgravity or during spaceflight. Studies with intact animal during spaceflights have found lipid accumulations within the lumen of the vasculature and degeneration of the vascular wall. Capillary alterations with extensive endothelial invaginations were also seen. Hemodynamic studies have shown that there is a redistribution of blood from the lower extremities to the upper part of the body; this will alter vascular permeability, resulting in leakage into surrounding tissues. These studies indicate that changes in gravity will affect a number of physiological systems, including the vasculature. However, few studies have addressed the effect of microgravity on vascular cell function and metabolism. A major problem with ground based studies is that achieving a true microgravity hand, environment for prolonged period is not possible. On the other increasing gravity (i.e., hypergravity) is easily achieved. Several researchers have shown that hypergravity will increase the proliferation of several different cell limes (e.g., chick embryo fibroblasts) while decreasing cell motility and slowing liver regeneration following partial hepatectomy. These studies suggest that hypergravity will alter the behavior of most cells. Several investigators have shown that hypergravity affects the expression of the early response genes (c-fos and c-myc) and the activation of several protein kinases (PK's) in cells (10,11). In this study we investigated whether hypergravity alters the expression of f-actin by aortic endothelial cells, and the possible role of protein kinases (calmodulin(II)-dependent and PKA) as mediators of these effects.

  4. Curcumin Attenuates Opioid Tolerance and Dependence by Inhibiting Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II α Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaoyu; Huang, Fang; Szymusiak, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Chronic use of opioid analgesics has been hindered by the development of opioid addiction and tolerance. We have reported that curcumin, a natural flavonoid from the rhizome of Curcuma longa, attenuated opioid tolerance, although the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that curcumin may inhibit Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II α (CaMKIIα), a protein kinase that has been previously proposed to be critical for opioid tolerance and dependence. In this study, we used state-of-the-art polymeric formulation technology to produce poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)-curcumin nanoparticles (nanocurcumin) to overcome the drug’s poor solubility and bioavailability, which has made it extremely difficult for studying in vivo pharmacological actions of curcumin. We found that PLGA-curcumin nanoparticles reduced the dose requirement by 11- to 33-fold. Pretreatment with PLGA-curcumin (by mouth) prevented the development of opioid tolerance and dependence in a dose-dependent manner, with ED50 values of 3.9 and 3.2 mg/kg, respectively. PLGA-curcumin dose-dependently attenuated already-established opioid tolerance (ED50 = 12.6 mg/kg p.o.) and dependence (ED50 = 3.1 mg/kg p.o.). Curcumin or PLGA-curcumin did not produce antinociception by itself or affect morphine (1–10 mg/kg) antinociception. Moreover, we found that the behavioral effects of curcumin on opioid tolerance and dependence correlated with its inhibition of morphine-induced CaMKIIα activation in the brain. These results suggest that curcumin may attenuate opioid tolerance and dependence by suppressing CaMKIIα activity. PMID:25515789

  5. Curcumin specifically binds to the human calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV: fluorescence and molecular dynamics simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Hoda, Nasimul; Naz, Huma; Jameel, Ehtesham; Shandilya, Ashutosh; Dey, Sharmistha; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Ahmad, Faizan; Jayaram, B

    2016-03-01

    Calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CAMK4) plays significant role in the regulation of calcium-dependent gene expression, and thus, it is involved in varieties of cellular functions such as cell signaling and neuronal survival. On the other hand, curcumin, a naturally occurring yellow bioactive component of turmeric possesses wide spectrum of biological actions, and it is widely used to treat atherosclerosis, diabetes, cancer, and inflammation. It also acts as an antioxidant. Here, we studied the interaction of curcumin with human CAMK4 at pH 7.4 using molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, fluorescence binding, and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) methods. We performed MD simulations for both neutral and anionic forms of CAMK4-curcumin complexes for a reasonably long time (150 ns) to see the overall stability of the protein-ligand complex. Molecular docking studies revealed that the curcumin binds in the large hydrophobic cavity of kinase domain of CAMK4 through several hydrophobic and hydrogen-bonded interactions. Additionally, MD simulations studies contributed in understanding the stability of protein-ligand complex system in aqueous solution and conformational changes in the CAMK4 upon binding of curcumin. A significant increase in the fluorescence intensity at 495 nm was observed (λexc = 425 nm), suggesting a strong interaction of curcumin to the CAMK4. A high binding affinity (KD = 3.7 × 10(-8) ± .03 M) of curcumin for the CAMK4 was measured by SPR further indicating curcumin as a potential ligand for the CAMK4. This study will provide insights into designing a new inspired curcumin derivatives as therapeutic agents against many life-threatening diseases. PMID:25929263

  6. Involvement of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in meiotic maturation and activation of pig oocytes.

    PubMed

    Fan, Heng-Yu; Huo, Li-Jun; Meng, Xiao-Qian; Zhong, Zhi-Sheng; Hou, Yi; Chen, Da-Yuan; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2003-11-01

    Calcium signal is important for the regulation of meiotic cell cycle in oocytes, but its downstream mechanism is not well known. The functional roles of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in meiotic maturation and activation of pig oocytes were studied by drug treatment, Western blot analysis, kinase activity assay, indirect immunostaining, and confocal microscopy. The results indicated that meiotic resumption of both cumulus-enclosed and denuded oocytes was prevented by CaMKII inhibitor KN-93, Ant-AIP-II, or CaM antagonist W7 in a dose-dependent manner, but only germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) of denuded oocytes was inhibited by membrane permeable Ca2+ chelator BAPTA-AM. When the oocytes were treated with KN-93, W7, or BAPTA-AM after GVBD, the first polar body emission was inhibited. A quick elevation of CaMKII activity was detected after electrical activation of mature pig oocytes, which could be prevented by the pretreatment of CaMKII inhibitors. Treatment of oocytes with KN-93 or W7 resulted in the inhibition of pronuclear formation. The possible regulation of CaMKII on maturation promoting factor (MPF), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and ribosome S6 protein kinase (p90rsk) during meiotic cell cycles of pig oocytes was also studied. KN-93 and W7 prevented the accumulation of cyclin B and the full phosphorylation of MAPK and p90rsk during meiotic maturation. When CaMKII activity was inhibited during parthenogenetic activation, cyclin B, the regulatory subunit of MPF, failed to be degraded, but MAPK and p90rsk were quickly dephosphorylated and degraded. Confocal microscopy revealed that CaM and CaMKII were localized to the nucleus and the periphery of the GV stage oocytes. Both proteins were concentrated to the condensed chromosomes after GVBD. In oocytes at the meiotic metaphase MI or MII stage, CaM distributed on the whole spindle, but CaMKII was localized only on the spindle poles. After transition into anaphase, both proteins

  7. Selective Nitration of Tyr(99) in Calmodulin as a Marker of Cellular Conditions of Oxidative Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Smallwood, Heather S. ); Galeva, Nadezhda A.; Bartlett, Ryan K.; Urbauer, Ramona J.; Williams, Todd D.; Urbauer, Jeffrey L.; Squier, Thomas C. )

    2003-01-01

    We examined the possible role of methionines as oxidant scavengers that prevent the peroxynitrite-induced nitration of tyrosines within calmodulin (CaM). We used mass spectrometry to investigate the reactivity of peroxynitrite with CaM at physiological pH. The possible role of methionines in scavenging peroxynitrite(ONOO-)was assessed in wild-type CaM and following substitution of all nine methionines in CaM with leucines. We find that peroxynitrite selectively nitrates Tyr-99 at physiological pH resulting in the formation of between 0.05 and 0.25 mol of nitrotyrosine/mol of CaM when the added molar ratio of peroxynitrite per CaM was varied between 2.5 and 15. In wild-type CaM there is a corresponding oxidation of between 0.8 and 2.8 mol of methionine to form methionine sulfoxide. However, following site-directed substitution of all nine methionines in wild-type CaM with leucines, the extent of nitration by peroxynitrite was unchanged. These results indicate that Tyr-99 is readily nitrated by perioxynitrite and that methionine side chains do not function as an antioxidant in scavenging perioxynitrite. Thus, separate reactive species are involved in the oxidation of

  8. Concentrated expression of Ca2+/ calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and protein kinase C in the mushroom bodies of the brain of the honeybee Apis mellifera L.

    PubMed

    Kamikouchi, A; Takeuchi, H; Sawata, M; Natori, S; Kubo, T

    2000-02-21

    We have previously used the differential display method to identify a gene that is expressed preferentially in the mushroom bodies of worker honeybees and to show that it encodes a putative inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) homologue (Kamikouchi et al. [1998] Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 242:181-186). In the present study, we examined whether the expression of some of the genes for proteins involved in the intracellular Ca2+ signal transduction is also concentrated in the mushroom bodies of the honeybee by isolating cDNA fragments that encode the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and protein kinase C (PKC) homologues of the honeybee. In situ hybridization analysis revealed that the expression of these genes was also concentrated in the mushroom bodies of the honeybee brain: The CaMKII gene was expressed preferentially in the large-type Kenyon cells of the mushroom bodies, whereas that for PKC was expressed in both the large and small types of Kenyon cells. The expression of the genes for IP3R and CaMKII was concentrated in the mushroom bodies of the queen and drone as well as in those of the worker bee. Furthermore, the enzymatic activities of CaMKII and PKC were found to be higher in the mushroom bodies/central bodies than in the optic and antennal lobes of the worker bee brain. These results suggest that the function of the intracellular Ca2+ signal transduction is enhanced in Kenyon cells in comparison to other neuronal cell types in the honeybee brain. PMID:10701869

  9. A Regulatory Feedback Loop Between Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase Kinase 2 (CaMKK2) and the Androgen Receptor in Prostate Cancer Progression*

    PubMed Central

    Karacosta, Loukia G.; Foster, Barbara A.; Azabdaftari, Gissou; Feliciano, David M.; Edelman, Arthur M.

    2012-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays a critical role in prostate cancer (PCa) progression, however, the molecular mechanisms by which the AR regulates cell proliferation in androgen-dependent and castration-resistant PCa are incompletely understood. We report that Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase 2 (CaMKK2) expression increases and becomes nuclear or perinuclear in advanced PCa. In the TRAMP (transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate) model of PCa, CaMKK2 expression increases with PCa progression with many cells exhibiting nuclear staining. CaMKK2 expression is higher in human castration-resistant tumor xenografts compared with androgen-responsive xenografts and is markedly higher in the AR-expressing, tumorigenic cell line LNCaP compared with cell lines that are AR-nonexpressing and/or nontumorigenic. In LNCaP cells, dihydrotestosterone induced CaMKK2 mRNA and protein expression and translocation of CaMKK2 to the nucleus. Conversely, androgen withdrawal suppressed CaMKK2 expression. Knockdown of CaMKK2 expression by RNAi reduced LNCaP cell proliferation and increased percentages of cells in G1 phase, whereas correspondingly reducing percentages in S phase, of the cell cycle. CaMKK2 knockdown reduced expression of the AR target gene prostate-specific antigen at both mRNA and protein levels, AR transcriptional activity driven by androgen responsive elements from the prostate-specific probasin gene promoter and levels of the AR-regulated cell cycle proteins, cyclin D1 and hyperphosphorylated Rb. Our results suggest that in PCa progression, CaMKK2 and the AR are in a feedback loop in which CaMKK2 is induced by the AR to maintain AR activity, AR-dependent cell cycle control, and continued cell proliferation. PMID:22654108

  10. A regulatory feedback loop between Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase 2 (CaMKK2) and the androgen receptor in prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Karacosta, Loukia G; Foster, Barbara A; Azabdaftari, Gissou; Feliciano, David M; Edelman, Arthur M

    2012-07-13

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays a critical role in prostate cancer (PCa) progression, however, the molecular mechanisms by which the AR regulates cell proliferation in androgen-dependent and castration-resistant PCa are incompletely understood. We report that Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase 2 (CaMKK2) expression increases and becomes nuclear or perinuclear in advanced PCa. In the TRAMP (transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate) model of PCa, CaMKK2 expression increases with PCa progression with many cells exhibiting nuclear staining. CaMKK2 expression is higher in human castration-resistant tumor xenografts compared with androgen-responsive xenografts and is markedly higher in the AR-expressing, tumorigenic cell line LNCaP compared with cell lines that are AR-nonexpressing and/or nontumorigenic. In LNCaP cells, dihydrotestosterone induced CaMKK2 mRNA and protein expression and translocation of CaMKK2 to the nucleus. Conversely, androgen withdrawal suppressed CaMKK2 expression. Knockdown of CaMKK2 expression by RNAi reduced LNCaP cell proliferation and increased percentages of cells in G(1) phase, whereas correspondingly reducing percentages in S phase, of the cell cycle. CaMKK2 knockdown reduced expression of the AR target gene prostate-specific antigen at both mRNA and protein levels, AR transcriptional activity driven by androgen responsive elements from the prostate-specific probasin gene promoter and levels of the AR-regulated cell cycle proteins, cyclin D1 and hyperphosphorylated Rb. Our results suggest that in PCa progression, CaMKK2 and the AR are in a feedback loop in which CaMKK2 is induced by the AR to maintain AR activity, AR-dependent cell cycle control, and continued cell proliferation. PMID:22654108

  11. Gene Expression Profile of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase IIα in Rat's Hippocampus during Morphine Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Shamseddin; Amiri, Shahin; Rafieenia, Fatemeh; Rostamzadeh, Jalal

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) which is highly expressed in the hippocampus is known to play a pivotal role in reward-related memories and morphine dependence. Methods In the present study, repeated morphine injections once daily for 7 days was done to induce morphine tolerance in male Wistar rats, after which gene expression profile of α-isoform of CaMKII (CaMKIIα) in the hippocampus was evaluated upon discontinuation of morphine injection over 21 days of morphine withdrawal. Control groups received saline for 7 consecutive days. For gene expression study, rats’ brains were removed and the hippocampus was dissected in separate groups on days 1, 3, 7, 14, and 21 since discontinuation of of morphine injection. A semi-quantitative RT-PCR method was used to evaluate the gene expression profile. Results Tolerance to morphine was verified by a significant decrease in morphine analgesia in a hotplate test on day 8 (one day after the final repeated morphine injections). Results showed that gene expression of CaMKIIα at mRNA level on day 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 of morphine withdrawal was significantly altered as compared to the saline control group. Post hoc Tukey's test revealed a significantly enhanced CaMKIIα gene expression on day 14. Discussion It can be concluded that CaMKIIα gene expression during repeated injections of morphine is increased and this increase continues up to 14 days of withdrawal then settles at a new set point. Therefore, the strong morphine reward-related memory in morphine abstinent animals may, at least partly be attributed to, the up-regulation of CaMKIIα in the hippocampus over 14 days of morphine withdrawal. PMID:25337341

  12. MicroRNA-30 inhibits neointimal hyperplasia by targeting Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIδ (CaMKIIδ)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong Feng; Spinelli, Amy; Sun, Li-Yan; Jiang, Miao; Singer, Diane V.; Ginnan, Roman; Saddouk, Fatima Z.; Van Riper, Dee; Singer, Harold A.

    2016-01-01

    The multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II δ-isoform (CaMKIIδ) promotes vascular smooth muscle (VSM) proliferation, migration, and injury-induced vascular wall neointima formation. The objective of this study was to test if microRNA-30 (miR-30) family members are endogenous regulators of CaMKIIδ expression following vascular injury and whether ectopic expression of miR-30 can inhibit CaMKIIδ-dependent VSM cell function and neointimal VSM hyperplasia induced by vascular injury. The CaMKIIδ 3′UTR contains a consensus miR-30 binding sequence that is highly conserved across species. A significant decrease in miR-30 family members and increase in CaMKIIδ2 protein expression, with no change in CaMKIIδ mRNA expression, was observed in medial layers of VSM 7 days post-injury. In vitro, overexpression of miR-30c or miR-30e inhibited CaMKIIδ2 protein expression by ~50% in cultured rat aortic VSM cells, and inhibited VSM cell proliferation and migration. In vivo, lenti-viral delivery of miR-30c into injured rat carotid arteries prevented the injury-induced increase in CaMKIIδ2. Furthermore, neointima formation was dramatically inhibited by lenti-viral delivery of miR-30c in the injured medial smooth muscle. These studies define a novel mechanism for regulating CaMKIIδ expression in VSM and provide a new potential therapeutic strategy to reduce progression of vascular proliferative diseases, including atherosclerosis and restenosis. PMID:27199283

  13. Regulation of Cardiac ATP-sensitive Potassium Channel Surface Expression by Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II*

    PubMed Central

    Sierra, Ana; Zhu, Zhiyong; Sapay, Nicolas; Sharotri, Vikas; Kline, Crystal F.; Luczak, Elizabeth D.; Subbotina, Ekaterina; Sivaprasadarao, Asipu; Snyder, Peter M.; Mohler, Peter J.; Anderson, Mark E.; Vivaudou, Michel; Zingman, Leonid V.; Hodgson-Zingman, Denice M.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels are key sensors and effectors of the metabolic status of cardiomyocytes. Alteration in their expression impacts their effectiveness in maintaining cellular energy homeostasis and resistance to injury. We sought to determine how activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), a central regulator of calcium signaling, translates into reduced membrane expression and current capacity of cardiac KATP channels. We used real-time monitoring of KATP channel current density, immunohistochemistry, and biotinylation studies in isolated hearts and cardiomyocytes from wild-type and transgenic mice as well as HEK cells expressing wild-type and mutant KATP channel subunits to track the dynamics of KATP channel surface expression. Results showed that activation of CaMKII triggered dynamin-dependent internalization of KATP channels. This process required phosphorylation of threonine at 180 and 224 and an intact 330YSKF333 endocytosis motif of the KATP channel Kir6.2 pore-forming subunit. A molecular model of the μ2 subunit of the endocytosis adaptor protein, AP2, complexed with Kir6.2 predicted that μ2 docks by interaction with 330YSKF333 and Thr-180 on one and Thr-224 on the adjacent Kir6.2 subunit. Phosphorylation of Thr-180 and Thr-224 would favor interactions with the corresponding arginine- and lysine-rich loops on μ2. We concluded that calcium-dependent activation of CaMKII results in phosphorylation of Kir6.2, which promotes endocytosis of cardiac KATP channel subunits. This mechanism couples the surface expression of cardiac KATP channels with calcium signaling and reveals new targets to improve cardiac energy efficiency and stress resistance. PMID:23223335

  14. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors regulate type 1 inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor expression via calmodulin kinase IV activation.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Koji; Kurokawa, Kazuhiro; Ohkuma, Seitaro

    2015-04-01

    Type 1 inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3 R-1) are among the important calcium channels regulating intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in the central nervous system. In a previous study, we showed that drugs of abuse, such as cocaine, methamphetamine, and ethanol, induced IP3 R-1 upregulation via the calcium signal transduction pathway in psychological dependence. Although nicotine, a major component in tobacco smoke, participates in psychological and/or physical dependence, it has not yet been clarified how nicotine alters IP3 R-1 expression. The present study, therefore, seeks to clarify the mechanism bgy which nicotine modifies IP3 R-1 expression by using mouse cerebral cortical neurons in primary culture. Nicotine induced dose- and time-dependent upregulation of IP3 R-1 protein following its mRNA increase, and the latter was significantly suppressed by a nonselective nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) antagonist, mecamylamine. Both cFos and phosphorylated-cJun (p-cJun) were immediately increased in the nucleus, together with an increase of calmodulin kinase (CaMK) IV but not CaMKII expression after nicotine exposure. A nonselective inhibitor of CaMKs, KN-93, and a calcium chelating regent, BAPTA-AM, completely suppressed the expression of cFos and p-cJun in the nucleus as well as the nicotine-induced IP3 R-1 upregulation. These results indicate that nAChR activation by nicotine upregulates IP3 R-1 via increase of activator protein-1, which is a cFos and cJun dimmer, in the nucleus, with activation of Ca(2+) signaling transduction processes. PMID:25430056

  15. Phosphorylation of a NAC Transcription Factor by a Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Regulates Abscisic Acid-Induced Antioxidant Defense in Maize.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuan; Yan, Jingwei; Liu, Weijuan; Liu, Lei; Sheng, Yu; Sun, Yue; Li, Yanyun; Scheller, Henrik Vibe; Jiang, Mingyi; Hou, Xilin; Ni, Lan; Zhang, Aying

    2016-07-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) has been shown to play an important role in abscisic acid (ABA)-induced antioxidant defense and enhance the tolerance of plants to drought stress. However, its downstream molecular events are poorly understood. Here, we identify a NAC transcription factor, ZmNAC84, in maize (Zea mays), which physically interacts with ZmCCaMK in vitro and in vivo. ZmNAC84 displays a partially overlapping expression pattern with ZmCCaMK after ABA treatment, and H2O2 is required for ABA-induced ZmNAC84 expression. Functional analysis reveals that ZmNAC84 is essential for ABA-induced antioxidant defense in a ZmCCaMK-dependent manner. Furthermore, ZmCCaMK directly phosphorylates Ser-113 of ZmNAC84 in vitro, and Ser-113 is essential for the ABA-induced stimulation of antioxidant defense by ZmCCaMK. Moreover, overexpression of ZmNAC84 in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) can improve drought tolerance and alleviate drought-induced oxidative damage of transgenic plants. These results define a mechanism for ZmCCaMK function in ABA-induced antioxidant defense, where ABA-produced H2O2 first induces expression of ZmCCaMK and ZmNAC84 and activates ZmCCaMK. Subsequently, the activated ZmCCaMK phosphorylates ZmNAC84 at Ser-113, thereby inducing antioxidant defense by activating downstream genes. PMID:27208250

  16. Phosphorylation of a NAC Transcription Factor by a Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Regulates Abscisic Acid-Induced Antioxidant Defense in Maize1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yuan; Yan, Jingwei; Liu, Weijuan; Liu, Lei; Sheng, Yu; Sun, Yue; Li, Yanyun; Hou, Xilin; Ni, Lan

    2016-01-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) has been shown to play an important role in abscisic acid (ABA)-induced antioxidant defense and enhance the tolerance of plants to drought stress. However, its downstream molecular events are poorly understood. Here, we identify a NAC transcription factor, ZmNAC84, in maize (Zea mays), which physically interacts with ZmCCaMK in vitro and in vivo. ZmNAC84 displays a partially overlapping expression pattern with ZmCCaMK after ABA treatment, and H2O2 is required for ABA-induced ZmNAC84 expression. Functional analysis reveals that ZmNAC84 is essential for ABA-induced antioxidant defense in a ZmCCaMK-dependent manner. Furthermore, ZmCCaMK directly phosphorylates Ser-113 of ZmNAC84 in vitro, and Ser-113 is essential for the ABA-induced stimulation of antioxidant defense by ZmCCaMK. Moreover, overexpression of ZmNAC84 in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) can improve drought tolerance and alleviate drought-induced oxidative damage of transgenic plants. These results define a mechanism for ZmCCaMK function in ABA-induced antioxidant defense, where ABA-produced H2O2 first induces expression of ZmCCaMK and ZmNAC84 and activates ZmCCaMK. Subsequently, the activated ZmCCaMK phosphorylates ZmNAC84 at Ser-113, thereby inducing antioxidant defense by activating downstream genes. PMID:27208250

  17. Rapid Method for Quantifying the Extent of Methionine Oxidation in Intact Calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Galeva, Nadezhda A.; Esch, S Wynn; Williams, Todd D.; Markillie, Lye MENG.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2005-09-01

    We have developed a method for rapidly quantifying the extent to which the functionally important Met144 and Met145 residues near the C-terminus of calmodulin (CaM) are converted to the corresponding sulfoxides, Met(O). The method utilizes a whole protein collision induced dissociation (CID) approach on an electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight (ESI-Q-TOF) mass spectrometer. Using standards of CaM oxidized by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or peroxynitrite (ONOO-), we demonstrated that CID fragmentation of the protein ions resulted in a series of C-terminal singly charged y1?y15 ions. Fragments larger than y4 exhibited mass shifts of +16 or +32 Da, corresponding to oxidation of one or two methionines, respectively. To assess the extent of oxidative modification for Met144 and Met145 to Met(O), we averaged the ratio of intensities for yn, yn +16, and yn +32 ions, where n = 6?9. By alternating MS and CID scans at low and high collision energies, this technique allowed us to rapidly determine both the distribution of intact CaM oxiforms and the extent of oxidative modification in the C-terminal region of the protein in a single run. We have applied the method to studies of the repair of fully oxidized CaM by methionine sulfoxide reductases (MsrA and MsrB), which normally function in concert to reduce the S and R stereoisomers of methionine sulfoxide. We found that repair of Met(O)144 and Met(O)145 did not go to completion, but was more efficient than average Met repair. Absence of complete repair is consistent with previous studies showing that accumulation of methionine sulfoxide in CaM can occur during aging.

  18. The toxic effects of Bisphenol A on the mouse spermatocyte GC-2 cell line: the role of the Ca2+-calmodulin-Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II axis.

    PubMed

    Qian, Wenyi; Wang, Yixin; Zhu, Jingying; Mao, Changfei; Wang, Qiang; Huan, Fei; Cheng, Jie; Liu, Yanqing; Wang, Jun; Xiao, Hang

    2015-11-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine-disrupting chemical (EDC), is known to induce male reproductive toxicity in rodents. However, its toxic effects on the germ cells are still poorly understood. It has been proposed that Ca(2+) homeostasis and Ca(2+) sensors, including calmodulin (CaM) and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), play critical roles in spermatogenesis. Therefore, in the present study, we aimed to investigate whether a perturbation in Ca(2+)-CaM-CaMKII signaling was involved in the BPA-induced injury to mouse spermatocyte GC-2spd (ts) (GC-2) cells. Our results showed that BPA (range from 0.2 to 20 μM) induced obvious GC-2 cell injury, including decreased cell viability, the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c and the activation of caspase-3. However, these processes could be partially abrogated by pretreatment with a Ca(2+) chelator (BAPTA/AM), a CaM antagonist (W7) or a CaMKII inhibitor (KN93). These results, taken together, indicate that BPA exposure contributes to male germ cell injury, which may be partially mediated through a perturbation in Ca(2+)/CaM/CaMKII signaling and the mitochondrial apoptotic process. PMID:26096086

  19. Cyclic nucleotide–gated channels, calmodulin, adenylyl cyclase, and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II are required for late, but not early, long-term memory formation in the honeybee

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Yukihisa; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe; Devaud, Jean-Marc; Lormant, Flore; Mizunami, Makoto; Giurfa, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Memory is a dynamic process that allows encoding, storage, and retrieval of information acquired through individual experience. In the honeybee Apis mellifera, olfactory conditioning of the proboscis extension response (PER) has shown that besides short-term memory (STM) and mid-term memory (MTM), two phases of long-term memory (LTM) are formed upon multiple-trial conditioning: an early phase (e-LTM) which depends on translation from already available mRNA, and a late phase (l-LTM) which requires de novo transcription and translation. Here we combined olfactory PER conditioning and neuropharmacological inhibition and studied the involvement of the NO–cGMP pathway, and of specific molecules, such as cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNG), calmodulin (CaM), adenylyl cyclase (AC), and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII), in the formation of olfactory LTM in bees. We show that in addition to NO–cGMP and cAMP–PKA, CNG channels, CaM, AC, and CaMKII also participate in the formation of a l-LTM (72-h post-conditioning) that is specific for the learned odor. Importantly, the same molecules are dispensable for olfactory learning and for the formation of both MTM (in the minute and hour range) and e-LTM (24-h post-conditioning), thus suggesting that the signaling pathways leading to l-LTM or e-LTM involve different molecular actors. PMID:24741108

  20. Involvement of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in the modulation of indolamines in diabetic and hyperglycemic rats.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, R; Prabhakaran, K; Jayakumar, A R; Gunasekaran, P; Sheeladevi, R; Suthanthirarajan, N

    2005-05-15

    Hyperglycemia and acidosis are the key factors in diabetic complications. It has been shown that acute or chronic diabetes alters serotonin levels in brain. However, the mechanism of hyperglycemia- or acidosis-induced changes in serotonin levels remains poorly understood. Because Ca2+-dependent protein kinases play a major role in the regulation of serotonin synthesis and release, we investigated the effect of diabetes, hyperglycemia, and acidosis on the level of indolamines [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and/or 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA)] and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) enzyme activity or protein expression in different brain regions. Alloxan-induced (45 mg/kg bw) diabetic rats (30 days) showed increased level of 5-HT in striatum (ST; 183%), midbrain (MB; 199%), pons medulla (PM; 151%), cerebellum (CB; 214%), and cerebral cortex (CCX; 162%) compared with control (P < 0.05), and these changes were reversed after insulin administration. Rats treated with glucose (500 mg/kg bw) for 30 days showed a 146%, 183%, 208%, and 177% (P < 0.05) increase in 5-HT levels in ST, PM, CB, and CCX, respectively. 5-HIAA level increased in hippocampus (HC; 172%) and in MB (145%; P < 0.05). In addition, rats treated with sodium acetoacetate (NaAcAc) for 30 days (60 mg/kg bw) showed significant increases (P < 0.05) of 5-HT level in ST (152%) and MB (174%). However, the levels of 5-HIAA increased only in MB (151%, P < 0.05). Rats treated with NH4Cl, which induced acidosis (150 mg/kg bw), showed an increased level of 5-HT only in HC (165%, P < 0.05). The increased activity and protein expression of CaMKII in ST, MB, PM, CB, and CCX under diabetic conditions were correlated with the levels of indolamines changes during diabetic, hyperglycemic, or acidotic conditions. These results suggest that CaMKII may be involved in the regulation of indolamines in diabetic animals. PMID:15846780

  1. Type III Transforming Growth Factor-β Receptor Drives Cardiac Hypertrophy Through β-Arrestin2-Dependent Activation of Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II.

    PubMed

    Lou, Jie; Zhao, Dan; Zhang, Ling-Ling; Song, Shu-Ying; Li, Yan-Chao; Sun, Fei; Ding, Xiao-Qing; Yu, Chang-Jiang; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Liu, Mei-Tong; Dong, Chang-Jiang; Ji, Yong; Li, Hongliang; Chu, Wenfeng; Zhang, Zhi-Ren

    2016-09-01

    The role of type III transforming growth factor-β receptor (TβRIII) in the pathogenesis of heart diseases remains largely unclear. Here, we investigated the functional role and molecular mechanisms of TβRIII in the development of myocardial hypertrophy. Western blot and quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that the expression of TβRIII was significantly elevated in human cardiac hypertrophic samples. Consistently, TβRIII expression was substantially increased in transverse aortic constriction (TAC)- and isoproterenol-induced mouse cardiac hypertrophy in vivo and in isoproterenol-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in vitro. Overexpression of TβRIII resulted in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, whereas isoproterenol-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy was greatly attenuated by knockdown of TβRIII in vitro. Cardiac-specific transgenic expression of TβRIII independently led to cardiac hypertrophy in mice, which was further aggravated by isoproterenol and TAC treatment. Cardiac contractile function of the mice was not altered in TβRIII transgenic mice; however, TAC led to significantly decreased cardiac contractile function in TβRIII transgenic mice compared with control mice. Conversely, isoproterenol- and TAC-induced cardiac hypertrophy and TAC-induced cardiac contractile function impairment were partially reversed by suppression of TβRIII in vivo. Our data suggest that TβRIII mediates stress-induced cardiac hypertrophy through activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, which requires a physical interaction of β-arrestin2 with both TβRIII and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. Our findings indicate that stress-induced increase in TβRIII expression results in cardiac hypertrophy through β-arrestin2-dependent activation of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and that transforming growth factor-β and β-adrenergic receptor signaling are not involved in spontaneous cardiac hypertrophy in cardiac

  2. Effect of pH on the structure, function, and stability of human calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV: combined spectroscopic and MD simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Naz, Huma; Shahbaaz, Mohd; Bisetty, Krishna; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2016-06-01

    Human calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CAMKIV) is a member of Ser/Thr protein kinase family. It is regulated by the calcium-calmodulin dependent signal through a secondary messenger, Ca(2+), which leads to the activation of its autoinhibited form. The over-expression and mutation in CAMKIV as well as change in Ca(2+) concentration is often associated with numerous neurodegenerative diseases and cancers. We have successfully cloned, expressed, and purified a functionally active kinase domain of human CAMKIV. To observe the effect of different pH conditions on the structural and functional properties of CAMKIV, we have used spectroscopic techniques such as circular diachroism (CD) absorbance and fluorescence. We have observed that within the pH range 5.0-11.5, CAMKIV maintained both its secondary and tertiary structures, along with its function, whereas significant aggregation was observed at acidic pH (2.0-4.5). We have also performed ATPase activity assays under different pH conditions and found a significant correlation between the structure and enzymatic activities of CAMKIV. In-silico validations were further carried out by modeling the 3-dimensional structure of CAMKIV and then subjecting it to molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to understand its conformational behavior in explicit water conditions. A strong correlation between spectroscopic observations and the output of molecular dynamics simulation was observed for CAMKIV. PMID:27032767

  3. Inhibitory effects of KN-93, an inhibitor of Ca2+ calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, on light-regulated root gravitropism in maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, L. J.; Hidaka, H.

    1993-01-01

    Light is essential for root gravitropism in Zea mays L., cultivar Merit. It is hypothesized that calcium mediates this light-regulated response. KN-93, an inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin kinase II (CaMK II), inhibits light-regulated root gravitropism but does not affect light perception. We hypothesize that CaMK II, or a homologue, operates late in the light/gravity signal transduction chain. Here we provide evidence suggesting a possible physiological involvement of CaMK II in root gravitropism in plants.

  4. Activation of cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Stimulates Cardiac ATP-Sensitive Potassium Channels via a ROS/Calmodulin/CaMKII Signaling Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Yongping; Zhang, Dai-Min; Lin, Yu-Fung

    2011-01-01

    Background Cyclic GMP (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKG) is recognized as an important signaling component in diverse cell types. PKG may influence the function of cardiac ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels, an ion channel critical for stress adaptation in the heart; however, the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. The present study was designed to address this issue. Methods and Findings Single-channel recordings of cardiac KATP channels were performed in both cell-attached and inside-out patch configurations using transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK)293 cells and rabbit ventricular cardiomyocytes. We found that Kir6.2/SUR2A (the cardiac-type KATP) channels were activated by cGMP-selective phosphodiesterase inhibitor zaprinast in a concentration-dependent manner in cell-attached patches obtained from HEK293 cells, an effect mimicked by the membrane-permeable cGMP analog 8-bromo-cGMP whereas abolished by selective PKG inhibitors. Intriguingly, direct application of PKG moderately reduced rather than augmented Kir6.2/SUR2A single-channel currents in excised, inside-out patches. Moreover, PKG stimulation of Kir6.2/SUR2A channels in intact cells was abrogated by ROS/H2O2 scavenging, antagonism of calmodulin, and blockade of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), respectively. Exogenous H2O2 also concentration-dependently stimulated Kir6.2/SUR2A channels in intact cells, and its effect was prevented by inhibition of calmodulin or CaMKII. PKG stimulation of KATP channels was confirmed in intact ventricular cardiomyocytes, which was ROS- and CaMKII-dependent. Kinetically, PKG appeared to stimulate these channels by destabilizing the longest closed state while stabilizing the long open state and facilitating opening transitions. Conclusion The present study provides novel evidence that PKG exerts dual regulation of cardiac KATP channels, including marked stimulation resulting from intracellular signaling mediated by ROS (H2O2 in

  5. Characterization of a Ca/sup 2 +/, calmodulin-dependent protein kinase which is able to phosphorylate native and protease cleaved purified hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Beg, Z.H.; Stonik, J.A.; Brewer, H.B. Jr.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have extensively purified a low molecular weight Ca/sup 2 +/, calmodulin-dependent protein kinase from rat brain cytosol. This kinase (M/sub r/ 120,000) is able to phosphorylate both native and soluble purified HMG-CoA reductase. The concomitant inactivation and phosphorylation of purified HMG-CoA reductase was completely dependent on Ca/sup 2 +/ and calmodulin. Incubation of phosphorylated /sup 32/P-HMG-CoA reductase was associated with the loss of /sup 32/P-radioactivity and reactivation of inactive enzyme. Maximal phosphorylation of purified HMG-CoA reductase involved the introduction of approximately 0.5 mol phosphate/53,000 enzyme fragment. The apparent Km for purified HMG-CoA reductase was .045 mg/ml. Microsomal native HMG-CoA reductase (M/sub r/ 100,000) was also phosphorylated and inactivated following incubation with calmodulin stimulated kinase, calmodulin, Ca/sup 2 +/ and Mg-ATP; dephosphorylation (reactivation) was catalyzed by the phosphoprotein phosphatase. The isolation and characterization of the M/sub r/ 120,000 calmodulin-binding enzyme complex provides additional insights into the mechanisms of the Ca/sup 2 +/ dependent regulation of HMG-CoA reductase phosphorylation. Based on these data and the authors previous in vitro and in vivo studies, they now propose that HMG-CoA reductase activity is modulated by three separate kinase systems.

  6. A surface plasmon resonance study of the interactions between the component subunits of protein kinase CK2 and two protein substrates, casein and calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Benítez, M J; Cochet, C; Jiménez, J S

    2001-11-01

    Surface plasmon resonance has been used to study the interaction between the subunits composing protein kinase CK2 (two catalytic, alpha-subunits, and two regulatory, beta-subunits), as well as the interaction of each subunit with two types of protein substrates, casein, the phosphorylation of which is activated by the regulatory subunit, and calmodulin, which belongs to the kind of substrates on which the catalytic subunit is downregulated by the regulatory subunit. The interaction of casein with the catalytic subunit differs from the interaction with the holoenzyme. Similarly to the interaction with the regulatory subunit, the catalytic subunit interacts with the protein substrate forming a very stable, irreversible complex. The reconstituted holoenzyme, however, binds casein reversibly, displaying a binding mode similar to that displayed by the regulatory subunit. The interaction of calmodulin with the catalytic subunit gives place, like in the case of casein, to an irreversible complex. The interactions with the regulatory subunit and with the holoenzyme were practically negligible, and the interaction with the regulatory subunit disappeared upon increasing the temperature value to close to 30 degrees C. The presence of polylysine induced a high increase in the extent of calmodulin binding to the holoenzyme. The results obtained suggest that CK2beta subunit and protein substrates share a common, or at least an overlapping, site of interaction on the catalytic subunit. The interaction between both subunits would prevent substrates from binding irreversibly to alpha subunit, and, at the same time, it would generate a new and milder site of interaction between the whole holoenzyme and the protein substrate. The main difference between casein and calmodulin would consist in the lower affinity display by the last for the new site generated upon the binding of the regulatory subunit, in the absence of polycations like polylysine. PMID:11827172

  7. Hsp90 Enhances Degradation of Oxidized Calmodulin by the 20S Proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Whittier, Jennifer E.; Xiong, Yijia; Rechsteiner, Martin C.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2004-10-29

    The 20S proteasome has been suggested to play a critical role in mediating the degradation of abnormal proteins under conditions of oxidative stress, and has been found in tight association with the molecular chaperone Hsp90. To elucidate the role of Hsp90 in promoting the degradation of oxidized calmodulin (CaMox), which accumulates in senescent brain during normal biological aging, we have purified the 20S proteasome free of Hsp90 from red blood cells and assessed its ability to recognize and degrade CaMox in the absence and presence of added Hsp90. The purified 20S proteasome does not degrade CaMox to any appreciable extent. However, following association with Hsp90, the 20S proteasome selectively degrades CaMox. This degradation is sensitive to both proteasome and Hsp90-specific inhibitors, and is further enhanced in the presence of 2 mM ATP. Irrespective of the presence of Hsp90 we find that unoxidized CaM is not significantly degraded. Furthermore, the ability of the proteasome to degrade commonly used fluorogenic peptides is not affected by Hsp90, indicating that there is no change in the accessibility of the catalytic core. Direct binding measurements demonstrate that Hsp90 selectively associates with CaMox; essentially no binding is observed between Hsp90 and unoxidized CaM. Since oxidation has previously been shown to induce both global conformational changes and a reduction in helical content of CaM, these results suggest that Hsp90 in association with the 20S proteasome selectively associates with partially unfolded proteins to promote their degradation by the proteasome.

  8. Selective nitration of Tyr99 in calmodulin as a marker of cellular conditions of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, Heather S; Galeva, Nadezhda A; Bartlett, Ryan K; Urbauer, Ramona J Bieber; Williams, Todd D; Urbauer, Jeffrey L; Squier, Thomas C

    2003-01-01

    We examined the possible role of methionines as oxidant scavengers that prevent the peroxynitrite-induced nitration of tyrosines within calmodulin (CaM). We used mass spectrometry to investigate the reactivity of peroxynitrite with CaM at physiological pH. The possible role of methionines in scavenging peroxynitrite (ONOO-) was assessed in wild-type CaM and following substitution of all nine methionines in CaM with leucines. We find that peroxynitrite selectively nitrates Tyr99 at physiological pH, resulting in the formation of between 0.05 and 0.25 mol of nitrotyrosine/mol of CaM when the added molar ratio of peroxynitrite per CaM was varied between 2.5 and 1.5. In wild-type CaM there is a corresponding oxidation of between 0.8 and 2.8 mol of methionine to form methionine sulfoxide. However, following site-directed substitution of all nine methionines in wild-type CaM with leucines, the extent of nitration by peroxynitrite was unchanged. These results indicate that Tyr99 is readily nitrated by peroxynitrite and that methionine side chains do not function as an antioxidant in scavenging peroxynitrite. Thus, separate reactive species are involved in the oxidation of methionine and nitration of Tyr99 whose relative concentrations are determined by solution conditions. The sensitivity of Tyr99 in CaM to nitration suggests that CaM-dependent signaling pathways are sensitive to peroxynitrite formation and that nitration of CaM represents a cellular marker of peroxynitrite-induced changes in cellular function. PMID:12693036

  9. Involvement of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in the activation of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I by okadaic acid in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Velasco, G; Guzmán, M; Zammit, V A; Geelen, M J

    1997-01-01

    The present work was undertaken to study the mechanism by which okadaic acid (OA), an inhibitor of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A, stimulates carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-I) in isolated rat hepatocytes [Guzmán, Kolodziej, Caldwell, Costorphine and Zammit (1994) Biochem. J. 300, 693-699]. The OA-induced stimulation of CPT-I was abolished by the general protein kinase inhibitor K-252a as well as by KN-62, a specific inhibitor of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (Ca2+/CM-PKII). However, neither the protein kinase C-specific inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide nor the protein kinase A/protein kinase C inhibitor H-7 was able to prevent the OA-induced stimulation of CPT-I. Hepatocyte-shrinkage-induced stimulation of CPT-I as well as OA-induced hepatocyte shrinkage was prevented by KN-62. KN-62 also antagonized the OA-enhanced release of lactate dehydrogenase from digitonin-permeabilized hepatocytes. Exposure of 32P-labelled hepatocytes to OA increased the degree of phosphorylation of Ca2+/CM-PKII, as immunoprecipitated by a monoclonal antibody raised against the alpha-subunit of rat brain kinase. This effect of OA was also antagonized by KN-62. The results thus indicate that the OA-dependent stimulation of CPT-I may be mediated (at least in part) by increased phosphorylation and subsequent activation of Ca2+/CM-PKII. PMID:9003421

  10. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent nitric oxide synthase activity in the human cervix carcinoma cell line ME-180.

    PubMed Central

    Werner-Felmayer, G; Werner, E R; Fuchs, D; Hausen, A; Mayer, B; Reibnegger, G; Weiss, G; Wachter, H

    1993-01-01

    We show here that the human cervix carcinoma cell line ME-180 expresses a constitutive nitric oxide (NO) synthase, as demonstrated by formation of [3H]citrulline and nitrite. The enzyme is dependent on tetrahydrobiopterin, NADPH, flavins and Ca2+/calmodulin. Enzyme activity is located in the cytosol rather than in the membrane fraction and can be inhibited by NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (NMMA). An antiserum to NO synthase purified from porcine cerebellum inhibited the enzyme activity. ME-180 cells released NO, as was shown by stimulation of guanylate cyclase (EC 4.6.1.2) in RFL-6 detector cells; this release was stimulated 8-fold by the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 and 2-fold by increasing the intracellular tetrahydrobiopterin levels with cytokines. This is the first characterization of a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent NO synthase activity in human epithelial-type tumour cells. PMID:7678733

  11. A Top-Down LC-FTICR MS-Based Strategy for Characterizing Oxidized Calmodulin in Activated Macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Lourette, Natacha M.; Smallwood, Heather S.; Wu, Si; Robinson, Errol W.; Squier, Thomas C.; Smith, Richard D.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2010-06-01

    Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) based approach for monitoring time dependent changes in the degree of nitration and oxidation of intact calmodulin (CaM) has been used to resolve approximately 500 CaM oxiforms. Tentative identifications of posttranslational modifications (PTMs) such as oxidation or nitration have been assigned by combining tryptic peptide information (generated from bottom-up analyses) with online collision induced dissociation (CID) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) at the intact protein level. The reduction in abundance and diversity of oxidatively modified CaM (i.e. nitrated tyrosines and oxidized methionines) induced by macrophage activation has been explored and semi-quantified for different oxidation degrees of CaM (i.e. no oxidation, moderate and high oxidation). This work demonstrates the power of top-down approach to identify hundreds of combinations of posttranslational modifications (PTMs) for single protein target such as CaM.

  12. Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II is a Ubiquitous Molecule in Human Long-term Memory Synaptic Plasticity: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ataei, Negar; Sabzghabaee, Ali Mohammad; Movahedian, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long-term memory is based on synaptic plasticity, a series of biochemical mechanisms include changes in structure and proteins of brain's neurons. In this article, we systematically reviewed the studies that indicate calcium/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII) is a ubiquitous molecule among different enzymes involved in human long-term memory and the main downstream signaling pathway of long-term memory. Methods: All of the observational, case–control and review studies were considered and evaluated by the search engines PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and ScienceDirect Scopus between 1990 and February 2015. We did not carry out meta-analysis. Results: At the first search, it was fined 1015 articles which included “synaptic plasticity” OR “neuronal plasticity” OR “synaptic density” AND memory AND “molecular mechanism” AND “calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II” OR CaMKII as the keywords. A total of 335 articles were duplicates in the databases and eliminated. A total of 680 title articles were evaluated. Finally, 40 articles were selected as reference. Conclusions: The studies have shown the most important intracellular signal of long-term memory is calcium-dependent signals. Calcium linked calmodulin can activate CaMKII. After receiving information for learning and memory, CaMKII is activated by Glutamate, the most important neurotransmitter for memory-related plasticity. Glutamate activates CaMKII and it plays some important roles in synaptic plasticity modification and long-term memory. PMID:26445635

  13. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and protein kinase C activities mediate extracellular glucose-regulated hippocampal synaptic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Shigeki; Oomura, Yutaka; Shioda, Norifumi; Han, Feng; Hori, Nobuaki; Aou, Shuji; Fukunaga, Kohji

    2011-01-01

    To define how extracellular glucose levels affect synaptic efficacy and long-term potentiation (LTP), we evaluated electrophysiological and neurochemical properties in hippocampal CA1 regions following alterations in glucose levels in the ACSF. In rat hippocampal slices prepared in ACSF with 3.5mM glucose, fEPSPs generated by Schaffer collateral/commissural stimulation markedly increased when ACSF glucose levels were increased from 3.5 to 7.0mM. The paired-pulse facilitation reflecting presynaptic transmitter release efficacy was significantly suppressed by elevation to 7.0mM glucose because of potentiation of the input-output relationship (I/O relationship) of fEPSPs by single pulse stimulation. Prolonged potentiation of fEPSPs by elevation to 7.0mM glucose coincided with increased autophosphorylation both of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and protein kinase Cα (PKCα). The increased I/O relationship of fEPSPs was also associated with markedly increased synapsin I phosphorylation by CaMKII. Transmitter-evoked postsynaptic currents were also measured in CA1 neurons by electrophoretical application of NMDA and AMPA to the apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons. NMDA- and AMPA-evoked currents were significantly augmented by elevation to 7.0mM. Notably, high frequency stimulation of the Schaffer collateral/commissural pathway failed to induce LTP in the CA1 region at 3.5mM glucose but LTP was restored dose-dependently by increasing glucose levels to 7.0 and 10.0mM. LTP induction in the presence of 7.0mM glucose was closely associated with further increases in CaMKII autophosphorylation without changes in PKCα autophosphorylation. Taken together, CaMKII and PKC activation likely mediate potentiation of fEPSPs by elevated glucose levels, and CaMKII activity is also associated with LTP induction in the hippocampal CA1 region. PMID:20807573

  14. Differential gene expression for glutamic acid decarboxylase and type II calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in basal ganglia, thalamus, and hypothalamus of the monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.L.; Isackson, P.J.; Hendry, S.H.; Jones, E.G. )

    1991-06-01

    In situ hybridization histochemistry, using cRNA probes, revealed a complementarity in the distributions of cells in the basal ganglia, basal nucleus of Meynert, thalamus, hypothalamus, and rostral part of the midbrain that showed gene expression for glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) or the alpha-subunit of type II calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CAM II kinase-alpha). Cells in certain nuclei such as the thalamic reticular nucleus, globus pallidus, and pars reticulata of the substantia nigra show GAD gene expression only; others in nuclei such as the basal nucleus of Meynert, medial mamillary nuclei, and ventromedial hypothalamic nuclei show CAM II kinase-alpha gene expression only. A few nuclei, for example, the pars compacta of the substantia nigra and the greater part of the subthalamic nucleus, display gene expression for neither GAD nor CAM II kinase-alpha. In other nuclei, notably those of the dorsal thalamus, and possibly in the striatum, GAD- and CAM II kinase-expressing cells appear to form two separate populations that, in most thalamic nuclei, together account for the total cell population. In situ hybridization reveals large amounts of CAM II kinase-alpha mRNA in the neuropil of most nuclei containing CAM II kinase-alpha-positive cells, suggesting its association with dendritic polyribosomes. The message may thus be translated at those sites, close to the synapses with which the protein is associated. The in situ hybridization results, coupled with those from immunocytochemical staining for CAM II kinase-alpha protein, indicate that CAM II kinase-alpha is commonly found in certain non-GABAergic afferent fiber systems but is not necessarily present in the postsynaptic cells on which they terminate. It appears to be absent from most GABAergic fiber systems but can be present in the cells on which they terminate.

  15. Inhibitors of the Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase family (CaMKP and CaMKP-N)

    SciTech Connect

    Sueyoshi, Noriyuki; Takao, Toshihiko; Nimura, Takaki; Sugiyama, Yasunori; Numano, Takamasa; Shigeri, Yasushi; Taniguchi, Takanobu; Kameshita, Isamu Ishida, Atsuhiko

    2007-11-23

    Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase (CaMKP) and its nuclear isoform CaMKP-N are unique Ser/Thr protein phosphatases that negatively regulate the Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) cascade by dephosphorylating multifunctional CaMKI, II, and IV. However, the lack of specific inhibitors of these phosphatases has hampered studies on these enzymes in vivo. In an attempt to obtain specific inhibitors, we searched inhibitory compounds and found that Evans Blue and Chicago Sky Blue 6B served as effective inhibitors for CaMKP. These compounds also inhibited CaMKP-N, but inhibited neither protein phosphatase 2C, another member of PPM family phosphatase, nor calcineurin, a typical PPP family phosphatase. The minimum structure required for the inhibition was 1-amino-8-naphthol-4-sulfonic acid. When Neuro2a cells cotransfected with CaMKIV and CaMKP-N were treated with these compounds, the dephosphorylation of CaMKIV was strongly suppressed, suggesting that these compounds could be used as potent inhibitors of CaMKP and CaMKP-N in vivo as well as in vitro.

  16. Regulation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase (CaMKP/PPM1F) by protocadherin-γC5 (Pcdh-γC5).

    PubMed

    Onouchi, Takashi; Kishino-Kaneko, Yoshimi; Kameshita, Isamu; Ishida, Atsuhiko; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki

    2015-11-01

    Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase (CaMKP/PPM1F) is a Ser/Thr protein phosphatase that belongs to the PPM family. It is important to identify an endogenous regulator of CaMKP. Using an Escherichia coli two-hybrid screening method, we identified the C-terminal cytoplasmic fragment of protocadherin γ subfamily C5 (Pcdh-γC5), which was generated by intracellular processing, as a CaMKP-binding protein. Dephosphorylation of phosphorylated Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase I (CaMKI) by CaMKP was significantly activated by the C-terminal cytoplasmic fragment, Pcdh-γC5(715-944), both in vitro and in cells, suggesting that the C-terminal fragment functions as an endogenous activator of CaMKP. The nuclear translocation of the fragment was blocked by its binding to cytoplasmic CaMKP to form a ternary complex with CaMKI. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that the C-terminal cytoplasmic fragment of Pcdh-γC5 acts as a scaffold for CaMKP and CaMKI to regulate CaMKP activity. These findings may provide new insights into the reversible regulation of CaMKP in cells. PMID:26386307

  17. Flow-dependent regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase: role of protein kinases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boo, Yong Chool; Jo, Hanjoong

    2003-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells are directly and continuously exposed to fluid shear stress generated by blood flow. Shear stress regulates endothelial structure and function by controlling expression of mechanosensitive genes and production of vasoactive factors such as nitric oxide (NO). Though it is well known that shear stress stimulates NO production from endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear and controversial. Shear-induced production of NO involves Ca2+/calmodulin-independent mechanisms, including phosphorylation of eNOS at several sites and its interaction with other proteins, including caveolin and heat shock protein-90. There have been conflicting results as to which protein kinases-protein kinase A, protein kinase B (Akt), other Ser/Thr protein kinases, or tyrosine kinases-are responsible for shear-dependent eNOS regulation. The functional significance of each phosphorylation site is still unclear. We have attempted to summarize the current status of understanding in shear-dependent eNOS regulation.

  18. Influence of a mutation in the ATP-binding region of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II on its interaction with peptide substrates.

    PubMed

    Praseeda, Mullasseril; Pradeep, Kurup K; Krupa, Ananth; Krishna, S Sri; Leena, Suseela; Kumar, R Rajeev; Cheriyan, John; Mayadevi, Madhavan; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Omkumar, Ramakrishnapillai V

    2004-03-01

    CaMKII (Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II) is expressed in high concentrations in the brain and is found enriched in the postsynaptic densities. The enzyme is activated by the binding of calmodulin to the autoregulatory domain in the presence of high levels of intracellular Ca2+, which causes removal of auto-inhibition from the N-terminal catalytic domain. Knowledge of the 3D (three-dimensional) structure of this enzyme at atomic resolution is restricted to the association domain, a region at the extreme C-terminus. The catalytic domain of CaMKII shares high sequence similarity with CaMKI. The 3D structure of the catalytic core of CaMKI comprises ATP- and substrate-binding regions in a cleft between two distinct lobes, similar to the structures of all protein kinases solved to date. Mutation of Glu-60, a residue in the ATP-binding region of CaMKII, to glycine exerts different effects on phosphorylation of two peptide substrates, syntide and NR2B ( N -methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 2B) 17-mer. Although the mutation caused increases in the Km values for phosphorylation for both the peptide substrates, the effect on the kcat values for each was different. The kcat value decreased in the case of syntide, whereas it increased in the case of the NR2B peptide as a result of the mutation. This resulted in a significant decrease in the apparent kcat/Km value for syntide, but the change was minimal for the NR2B peptide. These results indicate that different catalytic mechanisms are employed by the kinase for the two peptides. Molecular modelling suggests structural changes are likely to occur at the peptide-binding pocket in the active state of the enzyme as a consequence of the Glu-60-->Gly mutation. PMID:14558884

  19. Phylogeny of Plant Calcium and Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinases (CCaMKs) and Functional Analyses of Tomato CCaMK in Disease Resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ji-Peng; Munyampundu, Jean-Pierre; Xu, You-Ping; Cai, Xin-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) is a member of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase superfamily and is essential to microbe- plant symbiosis. To date, the distribution of CCaMK gene in plants has not yet been completely understood, and its function in plant disease resistance remains unclear. In this study, we systemically identified the CCaMK genes in genomes of 44 plant species in Phytozome and analyzed the function of tomato CCaMK (SlCCaMK) in resistance to various pathogens. CCaMKs in 18 additional plant species were identified, yet the absence of CCaMK gene in green algae and cruciferous species was confirmed. Sequence analysis of full-length CCaMK proteins from 44 plant species demonstrated that plant CCaMKs are highly conserved across all domains. Most of the important regulatory amino acids are conserved throughout all sequences, with the only notable exception being observed in N-terminal autophosphorylation site corresponding to Ser 9 in the Medicago truncatula CCaMK. CCaMK gene structures are similar, mostly containing six introns with a phase profile of 200200 and the exception was only noticed at the first exons. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that CCaMK lineage is likely to have diverged early from a calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) gene in the ancestor of all nonvascular plant species. The SlCCaMK gene was widely and differently responsive to diverse pathogenic stimuli. Furthermore, knock-down of SlCCaMK reduced tomato resistance to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 and decreased H2O2 accumulation in response to Pst DC3000 inoculation. Our results reveal that SlCCaMK positively regulates disease resistance in tomato via promoting H2O2 accumulation. SlCCaMK is the first CCaMK gene proved to function in plant disease resistance. PMID:26697034

  20. Phylogeny of Plant Calcium and Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinases (CCaMKs) and Functional Analyses of Tomato CCaMK in Disease Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ji-Peng; Munyampundu, Jean-Pierre; Xu, You-Ping; Cai, Xin-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) is a member of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase superfamily and is essential to microbe- plant symbiosis. To date, the distribution of CCaMK gene in plants has not yet been completely understood, and its function in plant disease resistance remains unclear. In this study, we systemically identified the CCaMK genes in genomes of 44 plant species in Phytozome and analyzed the function of tomato CCaMK (SlCCaMK) in resistance to various pathogens. CCaMKs in 18 additional plant species were identified, yet the absence of CCaMK gene in green algae and cruciferous species was confirmed. Sequence analysis of full-length CCaMK proteins from 44 plant species demonstrated that plant CCaMKs are highly conserved across all domains. Most of the important regulatory amino acids are conserved throughout all sequences, with the only notable exception being observed in N-terminal autophosphorylation site corresponding to Ser 9 in the Medicago truncatula CCaMK. CCaMK gene structures are similar, mostly containing six introns with a phase profile of 200200 and the exception was only noticed at the first exons. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that CCaMK lineage is likely to have diverged early from a calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) gene in the ancestor of all nonvascular plant species. The SlCCaMK gene was widely and differently responsive to diverse pathogenic stimuli. Furthermore, knock-down of SlCCaMK reduced tomato resistance to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 and decreased H2O2 accumulation in response to Pst DC3000 inoculation. Our results reveal that SlCCaMK positively regulates disease resistance in tomato via promoting H2O2 accumulation. SlCCaMK is the first CCaMK gene proved to function in plant disease resistance. PMID:26697034

  1. Calcium-binding sites of calmodulin and electron transfer by inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Gribovskaja, Irena; Brownlow, Kaleb C; Dennis, Sam J; Rosko, Andrew J; Marletta, Michael A; Stevens-Truss, Regina

    2005-05-24

    Like that of the neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), the binding of Ca(2+)-bound calmodulin (CaM) also regulates the activity of the inducible isoform (iNOS). However, the role of each of the four Ca(2+)-binding sites of CaM in the activity of iNOS is unclear. Using a series of single-point mutants of Drosophila melanogaster CaM, the effect that mutating each of the Ca(2+)-binding sites plays in the transfer of electrons within iNOS has been examined. The same Glu (E) to Gln (Q) mutant series of CaM used previously [Stevens-Truss, R., Beckingham, K., and Marletta, M. A. (1997) Biochemistry 36, 12337-12345] to study the role of the Ca(2+)-binding sites in the activity of nNOS was used for these studies. We demonstrate here that activity of iNOS is dependent on Ca(2+) being bound to sites II (B2Q) and III (B3Q) of CaM. Nitric oxide ((*)NO) producing activity (as measured using the hemoglobin assay) of iNOS bound to the B2Q and B3Q CaMs was found to be 41 and 43% of the wild-type activity, respectively. The site I (B1Q) and site IV (B4Q) CaM mutants only minimally affected (*)NO production (95 and 90% of wild-type activity, respectively). These results suggest that NOS isoforms, although all possessing a prototypical CaM binding sequence and requiring CaM for activity, interact with CaM differently. Moreover, iNOS activation by CaM, like nNOS, is not dependent on Ca(2+) being bound to all four Ca(2+)-binding sites, but has specific and distinct requirements. This novel information, in addition to helping us understand NOS, should aid in our understanding of CaM target activation. PMID:15896003

  2. The molecular, temporal and region-specific requirements of the beta isoform of Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type 2 (CAMK2B) in mouse locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Kool, Martijn J.; van de Bree, Jolet E.; Bodde, Hanna E.; Elgersma, Ype; van Woerden, Geeske M.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic approaches using temporal and brain region-specific restricted gene deletions have provided a wealth of insight in the brain regions and temporal aspects underlying spatial and associative learning. However, for locomotion such extensive studies are still scarce. Previous studies demonstrated that Camk2b–/– mice, which lack the β isoform of Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 2 (CAMK2B), show very severe locomotion deficits. However, where these locomotion deficits originate is unknown. Here we made use of novel Camk2b mutants (Camk2bf/f and Camk2bT287A), to explore the molecular, temporal and brain region-specific requirements of CAMK2B for locomotion. At the molecular level we found that normal locomotion requires Calcium/Calmodulin mediated activation of CAMK2B, but CAMK2B autonomous activity is largely dispensable. At a systems level, we found that global deletion of Camk2b in the adult mouse causes only mild locomotion deficits, suggesting that the severe locomotion deficits of Camk2b–/– mice are largely of developmental origin. However, early onset deletion of Camk2b in cerebellum, striatum or forebrain did not recapitulate the locomotion deficits, suggesting that these deficits cannot be attributed to a single brain area. Taken together, these results provide the first insights into the molecular, temporal and region-specific role of CAMK2B in locomotion. PMID:27244486

  3. The molecular, temporal and region-specific requirements of the beta isoform of Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type 2 (CAMK2B) in mouse locomotion.

    PubMed

    Kool, Martijn J; van de Bree, Jolet E; Bodde, Hanna E; Elgersma, Ype; van Woerden, Geeske M

    2016-01-01

    Genetic approaches using temporal and brain region-specific restricted gene deletions have provided a wealth of insight in the brain regions and temporal aspects underlying spatial and associative learning. However, for locomotion such extensive studies are still scarce. Previous studies demonstrated that Camk2b(-/-) mice, which lack the β isoform of Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 2 (CAMK2B), show very severe locomotion deficits. However, where these locomotion deficits originate is unknown. Here we made use of novel Camk2b mutants (Camk2b(f/f) and Camk2b(T287A)), to explore the molecular, temporal and brain region-specific requirements of CAMK2B for locomotion. At the molecular level we found that normal locomotion requires Calcium/Calmodulin mediated activation of CAMK2B, but CAMK2B autonomous activity is largely dispensable. At a systems level, we found that global deletion of Camk2b in the adult mouse causes only mild locomotion deficits, suggesting that the severe locomotion deficits of Camk2b(-/-) mice are largely of developmental origin. However, early onset deletion of Camk2b in cerebellum, striatum or forebrain did not recapitulate the locomotion deficits, suggesting that these deficits cannot be attributed to a single brain area. Taken together, these results provide the first insights into the molecular, temporal and region-specific role of CAMK2B in locomotion. PMID:27244486

  4. Multiplexed Dendritic Targeting of α Calcium Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II, Neurogranin, and Activity-regulated Cytoskeleton-associated Protein RNAs by the A2 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yuanzheng; Tatavarty, Vedakumar; Korza, George; Levin, Mikhail K.

    2008-01-01

    In neurons, many different RNAs are targeted to dendrites where local expression of the encoded proteins mediates synaptic plasticity during learning and memory. It is not known whether each RNA follows a separate trafficking pathway or whether multiple RNAs are targeted to dendrites by the same pathway. Here, we show that RNAs encoding α calcium calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, neurogranin, and activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein are coassembled into the same RNA granules and targeted to dendrites by the same cis/trans-determinants (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein [hnRNP] A2 response element and hnRNP A2) that mediate dendritic targeting of myelin basic protein RNA by the A2 pathway in oligodendrocytes. Multiplexed dendritic targeting of different RNAs by the same pathway represents a new organizing principle for coordinating gene expression at the synapse. PMID:18305102

  5. Digoxin and ouabain induce P-glycoprotein by activating calmodulin kinase II and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha in human colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Riganti, Chiara

    2009-11-01

    Digoxin and ouabain are cardioactive glycosides, which inhibit the Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase pump and in this way they increase the intracellular concentration of cytosolic calcium ([Ca{sup ++}]{sub i}). They are also strong inducers of the P-glycoprotein (Pgp), a transmembrane transporter which extrudes several drugs, including anticancer agents like doxorubicin. An increased amount of Pgp limits the absorption of drugs through epithelial cells, thus inducing resistance to chemotherapy. The mechanism by which cardioactive glycosides increase Pgp is not known and in this work we investigated whether digoxin and ouabain elicited the expression of Pgp with a calcium-driven mechanism. In human colon cancer HT29 cells both glycosides increased the [Ca{sup ++}]{sub i} and this event was dependent on the calcium influx via the Na{sup +}/Ca{sup ++} exchanger. The increased [Ca{sup ++}]{sub i} enhanced the activity of the calmodulin kinase II enzyme, which in turn activated the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha. This one was responsible for the increased expression of Pgp, which actively extruded doxorubicin from the cells and significantly reduced the pro-apoptotic effect of the drug. All the effects of glycosides were prevented by inhibiting the Na{sup +}/Ca{sup ++} exchanger or the calmodulin kinase II. This work clarified the molecular mechanisms by which digoxin and oubain induce Pgp and pointed out that the administration of cardioactive glycosides may widely affect the absorption of drugs in colon epithelia. Moreover, our results suggest that the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agent substrates of Pgp may be strongly reduced in patients taking digoxin.

  6. Dynamics of nitric oxide synthase-calmodulin interactions at physiological calcium concentrations.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Michael; Guillemette, J Guy; Dieckmann, Thorsten

    2015-03-24

    The intracellular Ca²⁺ concentration is an important regulator of many cellular functions. The small acidic protein calmodulin (CaM) serves as a Ca²⁺ sensor and control element for many enzymes. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) is one of the proteins that is activated by CaM and plays a major role in a number of key physiological and pathological processes. Previous studies have shown CaM to act like a switch that causes a conformational change in NOS to allow for the electron transfer between the reductase and oxygenase domains through a process that is thought to be highly dynamic. We have analyzed the structure and dynamics of complexes formed by peptides based on inducible NOS (iNOS) and endothelial NOS (eNOS) with CaM at Ca²⁺ concentrations that mimic the physiological basal (17 and 100 nM) and elevated levels (225 nM) found in mammalian cells using fluorescence techniques and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The results show the CaM-NOS complexes have similar structures at physiological and fully saturated Ca²⁺ levels; however, their dynamics are remarkably different. At 225 nM Ca²⁺, the CaM-NOS complexes show overall an increase in backbone dynamics, when compared to the dynamics of the complexes at saturating Ca²⁺ concentrations. Specifically, the N-lobe of CaM in the CaM-iNOS complex displays a lower internal mobility (higher S²) and higher exchange protection compared to those of the CaM-eNOS complex. In contrast, the C-lobe of CaM in the CaM-eNOS complex is less dynamic. These results illustrate that structures of CaM-NOS complexes determined at saturated Ca²⁺ concentrations cannot provide a complete picture because the differences in intramolecular dynamics become visible only at physiological Ca²⁺ levels. PMID:25751535

  7. 131I-MIBG targeting of neuroblastoma cells is acutely enhanced by KCl stimulation through the calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hyun Woo; Park, Jin Won; Lee, Eun Jeong; Jung, Kyung-Ho; Paik, Jin-Young; Lee, Kyung-Han

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of (131)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) therapy relies on norepinephrine transporter (NET) function. The ionic make-up of the extracellular fluid critically controls neuronal cell activity and can also affect substrate transport. In this study, we explored the effect of treatment with elevated KCl concentration on MIBG uptake in SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells. KCl stimulation caused a rapid increase of (131)I-MIBG uptake in a manner that was calcium-dependent and accompanied by activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK)II. The effect was completely abolished by KN93, an inhibitor of CaMKI, II, and IV. STO609, a selective inhibitor of CaMK kinase required for activation of CaMKI and IV, but not CaMKII, only modestly attenuated the response. The KCl effect was also completely abrogated by ML7, a selective inhibitor of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). This restricted form of CaMK activates myosin, which is required for vesicle trafficking. Saturation kinetic analysis revealed KCl stimulation to increase maximal transport velocity without affecting substrate affinity. In conclusion, KCl stimulation rapidly upregulates NET function through the CaMK pathway via activation of CaMKII and MLCK. These findings allow a better understanding of how NET function is acutely modulated by the ionic environment, which in turn may ultimately help improve the efficacy of (131)I-MIBG therapy. PMID:23763646

  8. Developmental differences in posttranslational calmodulin methylation in pea plants

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Sukheung; Roberts, D.M. )

    1990-05-01

    A calmodulin-N-methyltransferase was used to analyze the degree of lysine-115 methylation of pea calmodulin. Calmodulin was isolated from segments of developing roots of young etiolated and green pea plants and was tested for its ability to be methylated by the calmodulin methyltransferase in the presence of {sup 3}H-methyl-S-adenosylmethionine. Calmodulin methylation levels were lower in apical root segments and in the young lateral roots compared with the mature, differentiated root tissues. The methylation of these calmodulin samples occurs specifically at lysine 115 since site-directed mutants of calmodulin with substitutions at this position were not methylated and competitively inhibited methylation. The present findings, combined with previous data showing differences in NAD kinase activation by methylated and unmethylated calmodulins, raise the possibility that posttranslational methylation could affect calmodulin action.

  9. Phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase II at T286 enhances invasion and migration of human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chi, Mengna; Evans, Hamish; Gilchrist, Jackson; Mayhew, Jack; Hoffman, Alexander; Pearsall, Elizabeth Ann; Jankowski, Helen; Brzozowski, Joshua Stephen; Skelding, Kathryn Anne

    2016-01-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a multi-functional kinase that controls a range of cellular functions, including proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. The biological properties of CaMKII are regulated by multi-site phosphorylation. However, the role that CaMKII phosphorylation plays in cancer cell metastasis has not been examined. We demonstrate herein that CaMKII expression and phosphorylation at T286 is increased in breast cancer when compared to normal breast tissue, and that increased CAMK2 mRNA is associated with poor breast cancer patient prognosis (worse overall and distant metastasis free survival). Additionally, we show that overexpression of WT, T286D and T286V forms of CaMKII in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells increases invasion, migration and anchorage independent growth, and that overexpression of the T286D phosphomimic leads to a further increase in the invasive, migratory and anchorage independent growth capacity of these cells. Pharmacological inhibition of CaMKII decreases MDA-MB-231 migration and invasion. Furthermore, we demonstrate that overexpression of T286D, but not WT or T286V-CaMKII, leads to phosphorylation of FAK, STAT5a, and Akt. These results demonstrate a novel function for phosphorylation of CaMKII at T286 in the control of breast cancer metastasis, offering a promising target for the development of therapeutics to prevent breast cancer metastasis. PMID:27605043

  10. Phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase II at T286 enhances invasion and migration of human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Mengna; Evans, Hamish; Gilchrist, Jackson; Mayhew, Jack; Hoffman, Alexander; Pearsall, Elizabeth Ann; Jankowski, Helen; Brzozowski, Joshua Stephen; Skelding, Kathryn Anne

    2016-01-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a multi-functional kinase that controls a range of cellular functions, including proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. The biological properties of CaMKII are regulated by multi-site phosphorylation. However, the role that CaMKII phosphorylation plays in cancer cell metastasis has not been examined. We demonstrate herein that CaMKII expression and phosphorylation at T286 is increased in breast cancer when compared to normal breast tissue, and that increased CAMK2 mRNA is associated with poor breast cancer patient prognosis (worse overall and distant metastasis free survival). Additionally, we show that overexpression of WT, T286D and T286V forms of CaMKII in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells increases invasion, migration and anchorage independent growth, and that overexpression of the T286D phosphomimic leads to a further increase in the invasive, migratory and anchorage independent growth capacity of these cells. Pharmacological inhibition of CaMKII decreases MDA-MB-231 migration and invasion. Furthermore, we demonstrate that overexpression of T286D, but not WT or T286V-CaMKII, leads to phosphorylation of FAK, STAT5a, and Akt. These results demonstrate a novel function for phosphorylation of CaMKII at T286 in the control of breast cancer metastasis, offering a promising target for the development of therapeutics to prevent breast cancer metastasis. PMID:27605043

  11. Molecular basis for the modulation of native T-type Ca2+ channels in vivo by Ca2+ /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Junlan; Davies, Lucinda A.; Howard, Jason D.; Adney, Scott K.; Welsby, Philip J.; Howell, Nancy; Carey, Robert M.; Colbran, Roger J.; Barrett, Paula Q.

    2006-01-01

    Ang II receptor activation increases cytosolic Ca2+ levels to enhance the synthesis and secretion of aldosterone, a recently identified early pathogenic stimulus that adversely influences cardiovascular homeostasis. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a downstream effector of the Ang II–elicited signaling cascade that serves as a key intracellular Ca2+ sensor to feedback-regulate Ca2+ entry through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which CaMKII regulates these important physiological targets to increase Ca2+ entry remain unresolved. We show here that CaMKII forms a signaling complex with α1H T-type Ca2+ channels, directly interacting with the intracellular loop connecting domains II and III of the channel pore (II-III loop). Activation of the kinase mediated the phosphorylation of Ser1198 in the II-III loop and the positive feedback regulation of channel gating both in intact cells in situ and in cells of the native adrenal zona glomerulosa stimulated by Ang II in vivo. These data define the molecular basis for the in vivo modulation of native T-type Ca2+ channels by CaMKII and suggest that the disruption of this signaling complex in the zona glomerulosa may provide a new therapeutic approach to limit aldosterone production and cardiovascular disease progression. PMID:16917542

  12. Intra-nucleus accumbens administration of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitor AIP induced antinociception in rats with mononeuropathy.

    PubMed

    Bian, Hui; Yu, Long-Chuan

    2015-07-10

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a serine/threonine- dependent protein kinase, which has been implicated in pain modulation at different levels of the central nervous system. The present study was performed in rats with mononeuropathy induced by left common sciatic nerve ligation. Unilateral sciatic nerve loose ligation produced decreases in the hindpaw withdrawal latency (HWL) to noxious thermal and mechanical stimulation. Intra-nucleus accumbens (NAc) injection of 3 μg, 6 μg and 12 μg of myristoylated autocamtide-2-inhibitory peptide (AIP), the CaMKII inhibitor, dose-dependently increased the HWL to noxious thermal and mechanical stimulation in rats with mononeuropathy. Furthermore, intra-NAc administration of morphine, the HWL to noxious thermal and mechanical stimulation increased markedly, and there were no significant differences between morphine group and AIP group. Taken together, the results showed that intra-NAc injection of AIP induced significant antinociceptive effects in rats with mononeuropathy, indicating that CaMKII may play an important role in the transmission and/or modulation of nociceptive information in the NAc in rats with mononeuropathy. PMID:26022629

  13. The roles of calcium/calmodulin-dependent and Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinases in the development of psychostimulant-induced behavioral sensitization.

    PubMed

    Licata, Stephanie C; Pierce, R Christopher

    2003-04-01

    Although the development of behavioral sensitization to psychostimulants such as cocaine and amphetamine is confined mainly to one nucleus in the brain, the ventral tegmental area (VTA), this process is nonetheless complex, involving a complicated interplay between neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and trophic factors. In the present review we present the hypothesis that calcium-stimulated second messengers, including the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases and the Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinases, represent the major biochemical pathways whereby converging extracellular signals are integrated and amplified, resulting in the biochemical and molecular changes in dopaminergic neurons in the VTA that represent the critical neuronal correlates of the development of behavioral sensitization to psychostimulants. Moreover, given the important role of calcium-stimulated second messengers in the expression of behavioral sensitization, these signal transduction systems may represent the biochemical substrate through which the transient neurochemical changes associated with the development of behavioral sensitization are translated into the persistent neurochemical, biochemical and molecular alterations in neuronal function that underlie the long-term expression of psychostimulant-induced behavioral sensitization. PMID:12641723

  14. Calmodulin Binding Proteins and Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    O'Day, Danton H; Eshak, Kristeen; Myre, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    The small, calcium-sensor protein, calmodulin, is ubiquitously expressed and central to cell function in all cell types. Here the literature linking calmodulin to Alzheimer's disease is reviewed. Several experimentally-verified calmodulin-binding proteins are involved in the formation of amyloid-β plaques including amyloid-β protein precursor, β-secretase, presenilin-1, and ADAM10. Many others possess potential calmodulin-binding domains that remain to be verified. Three calmodulin binding proteins are associated with the formation of neurofibrillary tangles: two kinases (CaMKII, CDK5) and one protein phosphatase (PP2B or calcineurin). Many of the genes recently identified by genome wide association studies and other studies encode proteins that contain putative calmodulin-binding domains but only a couple (e.g., APOE, BIN1) have been experimentally confirmed as calmodulin binding proteins. At least two receptors involved in calcium metabolism and linked to Alzheimer's disease (mAchR; NMDAR) have also been identified as calmodulin-binding proteins. In addition to this, many proteins that are involved in other cellular events intimately associated with Alzheimer's disease including calcium channel function, cholesterol metabolism, neuroinflammation, endocytosis, cell cycle events, and apoptosis have been tentatively or experimentally verified as calmodulin binding proteins. The use of calmodulin as a potential biomarker and as a therapeutic target is discussed. PMID:25812852

  15. Gender-Specific Potential Inhibitory Role of Ca2+/Calmodulin Dependent Protein Kinase Phosphatase (CaMKP) in Pressure-Overloaded Mouse Heart

    PubMed Central

    Prévilon, Miresta; Pezet, Mylène; Vinet, Laurent; Mercadier, Jean-Jacques; Rouet-Benzineb, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Background Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase (CaMKP) has been proposed as a potent regulator of multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (i.e., CaMKII). The CaMKII-dependent activation of myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) disrupts interactions between MEF2-histone deacetylases (HDACs), thereby de-repressing downstream gene transcription. Whether CaMKP modulates the CaMKII- MEF2 pathway in the heart is unknown. Here, we investigated the molecular and functional consequences of left ventricular (LV) pressure overload in the mouse of both genders, and in particular we evaluated the expression levels and localization of CaMKP and its association with CaMKII-MEF2 signaling. Methodology and Principal Findings Five week-old B6D1/F1 mice of both genders underwent a sham-operation or thoracic aortic constriction (TAC). Thirty days later, TAC was associated with pathological LV hypertrophy characterized by systolic and diastolic dysfunction. Gene expression was assessed by real-time PCR. Fetal gene program re-expression comprised increased RNA levels of brain natriuretic peptide and alpha-skeletal actin. Mouse hearts of both genders expressed both CaMKP transcript and protein. Activation of signalling pathways was studied by Western blot in LV lysates or subcellular fractions (nuclear and cytoplasmic). TAC was associated with increased CaMKP expression in male LVs whereas it tended to be decreased in females. The DNA binding activity of MEF2 was determined by spectrophotometry. CaMKP compartmentalization differed according to gender. In male TAC mice, nuclear CaMKP was associated with inactive CaMKII resulting in less MEF2 activation. In female TAC mice, active CaMKII (phospho-CaMKII) detected in the nuclear fraction, was associated with a strong MEF2 transcription factor-binding activity. Conclusions/Significance Gender-specific CaMKP compartmentalization is associated with CaMKII-mediated MEF2 activation in pressure-overloaded hearts

  16. Calcium-Oxidant Signaling Network Regulates AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Activation upon Matrix Deprivation*

    PubMed Central

    Sundararaman, Ananthalakshmy; Amirtham, Usha; Rangarajan, Annapoorni

    2016-01-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has recently been implicated in anoikis resistance. However, the molecular mechanisms that activate AMPK upon matrix detachment remain unexplored. In this study, we show that AMPK activation is a rapid and sustained phenomenon upon matrix deprivation, whereas re-attachment to the matrix leads to its dephosphorylation and inactivation. Because matrix detachment leads to loss of integrin signaling, we investigated whether integrin signaling negatively regulates AMPK activation. However, modulation of focal adhesion kinase or Src, the major downstream components of integrin signaling, failed to cause a corresponding change in AMPK signaling. Further investigations revealed that the upstream AMPK kinases liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) contribute to AMPK activation upon detachment. In LKB1-deficient cells, we found AMPK activation to be predominantly dependent on CaMKKβ. We observed no change in ATP levels under detached conditions at early time points suggesting that rapid AMPK activation upon detachment was not triggered by energy stress. We demonstrate that matrix deprivation leads to a spike in intracellular calcium as well as oxidant signaling, and both these intracellular messengers contribute to rapid AMPK activation upon detachment. We further show that endoplasmic reticulum calcium release-induced store-operated calcium entry contributes to intracellular calcium increase, leading to reactive oxygen species production, and AMPK activation. We additionally show that the LKB1/CaMKK-AMPK axis and intracellular calcium levels play a critical role in anchorage-independent cancer sphere formation. Thus, the Ca2+/reactive oxygen species-triggered LKB1/CaMKK-AMPK signaling cascade may provide a quick, adaptable switch to promote survival of metastasizing cancer cells. PMID:27226623

  17. Involvement of the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II pathway in the Ca2+-mediated regulation of the capacitative Ca2+ entry in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Matifat, F; Fournier, F; Lorca, T; Capony, J P; Brûlé, G; Collin, T

    1997-01-01

    Activation of the phosphoinositide transduction pathway induces capacitative Ca2+ entry in Xenopus oocytes. This can also be evoked by intracellular injection of Ins(1,4.5)P3, external application of thapsigargin and/or incubation in a Ca2+-free medium. Readmission of Ca2+ to voltage-clamped, thapsigargin-treated Xenopus oocytes triggers Ca2+-dependent Cl- current variations that reflect capacitative Ca2+ entry. Inhibition of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) by specific peptides markedly increased the amplitude of the transients, suggesting an involvement of the CaMKII pathway in the regulation of capacitative Ca2+ entry. Biochemical studies provide evidence for the activation of CaMKII in response to the development of capacitative Ca2+ entry. In effect, a CaMKII assay in vivo allows us to postulate that readmission of Ca2+ to thapsigargin-treated oocytes can induce a burst of CaMKII activity. Finally, analysis of the Cl- transient kinetics at high resolution of time suggests that CaMKII inhibition blocks the onset of the inactivation process without affecting the activation rate. We therefore postulate that CaMKII might participate in a negative feedback regulation of store-depletion-evoked Ca2+ entry in Xenopus oocytes. PMID:9078272

  18. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIbeta isoform is expressed in motor neurons during axon outgrowth and is part of slow axonal transport.

    PubMed

    Lund, Linda M; McQuarrie, Irvine G

    2002-03-15

    Previously, we identified calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIbeta (CaMKIIbeta) mRNA in spinal motor neurons with 372 bp inserted in what corresponds to the "association" domain of the protein. This was interesting because known additions and deletions to CaMKIIbeta mRNA are usually less than 100 bp in size and found in the "variable" region. Changes in the association domain of CaMKIIbeta could influence substrate specificity, activity or intracellular targeting. We show that three variations of this insert are found in CNS neurons or sciatic motor neurons of Sprague-Dawley rats. We used PCR and nucleic acid sequencing to identify inserts of 114, 243, or 372 bases. We also show that addition of the 372 bases is associated with outgrowth of the axon (the standard CaMKIIbeta downregulates when axon outgrowth occurs). Radiolabeling, immunoblots, and 2D PAGE identified this larger CaMKIIbeta as part of the group of soluble proteins moving at the slowest rate of axonal transport (SCa) in sciatic motor neurons (similar1 mm/day). This group is composed mainly of structural proteins (e.g., tubulin) used to assemble the cytoskeleton of regrowing axons. PMID:11891785

  19. Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase (CaMKP/PPM1F) interacts with neurofilament L and inhibits its filament association.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Hana; Katoh, Tsuyoshi; Nakagawa, Ryoko; Ishihara, Yasuhiro; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki; Kameshita, Isamu; Taniguchi, Takanobu; Hirano, Tetsuo; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Ishida, Atsuhiko

    2016-09-01

    Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase (CaMKP/PPM1F) is a Ser/Thr phosphatase that belongs to the PPM family. Growing evidence suggests that PPM phosphatases including CaMKP act as a complex with other proteins to regulate cellular functions. In this study, using the two-dimensional far-western blotting technique with digoxigenin-labeled CaMKP as a probe, in conjunction with peptide mass fingerprinting analysis, we identified neurofilament L (NFL) as a CaMKP-binding protein in a Triton-insoluble fraction of rat brain. We confirmed binding of fluorescein-labeled CaMKP (F-CaMKP) to NFL in solution by fluorescence polarization. The analysis showed that the dissociation constant of F-CaMKP for NFL is 73 ± 17 nM (n = 3). Co-immunoprecipitation assay using a cytosolic fraction of NGF-differentiated PC12 cells showed that endogenous CaMKP and NFL form a complex in cells. Furthermore, the effect of CaMKP on self-assembly of NFL was examined. Electron microscopy revealed that CaMKP markedly prevented NFL from forming large filamentous aggregates, suggesting that CaMKP-binding to NFL inhibits its filament association. These findings may provide new insights into a novel mechanism for regulating network formation of neurofilaments during neuronal differentiation. PMID:27369073

  20. β-Amyloid Impairs AMPA Receptor Trafficking and Function by Reducing Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II Synaptic Distribution*

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Zhenglin; Liu, Wenhua; Yan, Zhen

    2009-01-01

    A fundamental feature of Alzheimer disease (AD) is the accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ), a peptide generated from the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Emerging evidence suggests that soluble Aβ oligomers adversely affect synaptic function, which leads to cognitive failure associated with AD. The Aβ-induced synaptic dysfunction has been attributed to the synaptic removal of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors (AMPARs); however, it is unclear how Aβ induces the loss of AMPARs at the synapses. In this study we have examined the potential involvement of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), a signaling molecule critical for AMPAR trafficking and function. We found that the synaptic pool of CaMKII was significantly decreased in cortical neurons from APP transgenic mice, and the density of CaMKII clusters at synapses was significantly reduced by Aβ oligomer treatment. In parallel, the surface expression of GluR1 subunit as well as AMPAR-mediated synaptic response and ionic current was selectively decreased in APP transgenic mice and Aβ-treated cultures. Moreover, the reducing effect of Aβ on AMPAR current density was mimicked and occluded by knockdown of CaMKII and blocked by overexpression of CaMKII. These results suggest that the Aβ-induced change in CaMKII subcellular distribution may underlie the removal of AMPARs from synaptic membrane by Aβ. PMID:19240035

  1. Effects of tiflucarbine as a dual protein kinase C/calmodulin antagonist on proliferation of human keratinocytes and release of reactive oxygen species from human leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Hegemann, L; Fruchtmann, R; Bonnekoh, B; Schmidt, B H; Traber, J; Mahrle, G; Müller-Peddinghaus, R; van Rooijen, L A

    1991-01-01

    Various studies have suggested that calmodulin (CaM) is involved in the pathophysiology of psoriasis. Protein kinase C (PKC) is also accepted as playing a regulatory role in cell proliferation as well as in inflammatory processes. Therefore, we investigated the effects of the known CaM antagonist tiflucarbine (BAY/TVX P 4495) on two cellular systems related to the major clinical symptoms of psoriasis: proliferation of cultured human keratinocytes (HaCa T cell line) and release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL). Tiflucarbine inhibited both cellular responses in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, tiflucarbine directly affected PKC, and may thus be considered to be a dual PKC/CaM antagonist with putative antipsoriatic activity. The effects of tiflucarbine on the different parameters were compared with those of the structurally unrelated dual PKC/CaM inhibitor W-7 and those of the potent PKC inhibitor staurosporine. The potencies of all three compounds were found to be in the same range as their PKC-inhibiting potency. Our data indicate that PKC, rather than CaM, may play a regulatory role in the release of ROS as well as in keratinocyte proliferation. Therefore, inhibition of PKC in general might have a therapeutic benefit in psoriasis. PMID:1801655

  2. The effects of intraganglionic injection of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitors on pain-related behavior in diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Jelicic Kadic, A; Boric, M; Kostic, S; Sapunar, D; Puljak, L

    2014-01-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) has been implicated in the transmission of nociceptive input in diabetic neuropathy. The aim of this study was to test whether intraganglionic (i.g.) injection of CaMKII inhibitors may alleviate pain-related behavior in diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats using 55 mg/kg streptozotocin intraperitoneally. Two weeks after diabetes induction, CaMKII inhibitors myristoil-AIP and KN93 were injected directly into the right L5 dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Behavioral testing with mechanical and thermal stimuli was performed before induction of diabetes, the day preceding the injection, as well as 2 and 24h after the i.g. injection. The expression of total CaMKII and its alpha isoform in DRG neurons was analyzed using immunohistochemistry. CaMKII inhibitors attenuated pain-related behavior in a modality-specific fashion. Attenuation of nociceptive behavior was accompanied with a corresponding decrease of CaMKII alpha expression in DRG neurons on the side of injection. A significant decrease of CaMKII alpha expression was seen in small- and medium-sized neurons. In conclusion, our study provides evidence that CaMKII inhibitors are potential pharmacological agents that should be further explored for treatment of diabetic neuropathy symptoms. PMID:24161721

  3. cAMP- and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases mediate inotropic, lusitropic and arrhythmogenic effects of urocortin 2 in mouse ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li-Zhen; Kockskämper, Jens; Khan, Shelina; Suarez, Jorge; Walther, Stefanie; Doleschal, Bernhard; Unterer, Gregor; Khafaga, Mounir; Mächler, Heinrich; Heinzel, Frank R; Dillmann, Wolfgang H; Pieske, Burkert; Spiess, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Urocortin 2 is beneficial in heart failure, but the underlying cellular mechanisms are not completely understood. Here we have characterized the functional effects of urocortin 2 on mouse cardiomyocytes and elucidated the underlying signalling pathways and mechanisms. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Mouse ventricular myocytes were field-stimulated at 0.5 Hz at room temperature. Fractional shortening and [Ca2+]i transients were measured by an edge detection and epifluorescence system respectively. Western blots were carried out on myocyte extracts with antibodies against total phospholamban (PLN) and PLN phosphorylated at serine-16. KEY RESULTS Urocortin 2 elicited time- and concentration-dependent positive inotropic and lusitropic effects (EC50: 19 nM) that were abolished by antisauvagine-30 (10 nM, n = 6), a specific antagonist of corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF) CRF2 receptors. Urocortin 2 (100 nM) increased the amplitude and decreased the time constant of decay of the underlying [Ca2+]i transients. Urocortin 2 also increased PLN phosphorylation at serine-16. H89 (2 µM) or KT5720 (1 µM), two inhibitors of protein kinase A (PKA), as well as KN93 (1 µM), an inhibitor of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), suppressed the urocortin 2 effects on shortening and [Ca2+]i transients. In addition, urocortin 2 also elicited arrhythmogenic events consisting of extra cell shortenings and extra [Ca2+]i increases in diastole. Urocortin 2-induced arrhythmogenic events were significantly reduced in cells pretreated with KT5720 or KN93. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Urocortin 2 enhanced contractility in mouse ventricular myocytes via activation of CRF2 receptors in a cAMP/PKA- and Ca2+/CaMKII-dependent manner. This enhancement was accompanied by Ca2+-dependent arrhythmogenic effects mediated by PKA and CaMKII. PMID:20942811

  4. Control of cortical axon elongation by a GABA-driven Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase cascade

    PubMed Central

    Ageta-Ishihara, Natsumi; Takemoto-Kimura, Sayaka; Nonaka, Mio; Adachi-Morishima, Aki; Suzuki, Kanzo; Kamijo, Satoshi; Fujii, Hajime; Mano, Tatsuo; Blaeser, Frank; Chatila, Talal A.; Mizuno, Hidenobu; Hirano, Tomoo; Tagawa, Yoshiaki; Okuno, Hiroyuki; Bito, Haruhiko

    2009-01-01

    Ca2+ signaling plays important roles during both axonal and dendritic growth. Yet, whether and how Ca2+ rises may trigger and contribute to the development of long range cortical connections remains largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that two separate limbs of CaMK kinase (CaMKK) - CaMKI cascades, CaMKK-CaMKIα and CaMKK-CaMKIγ, critically coordinate axonal and dendritic morphogenesis of cortical neurons, respectively. The axon-specific morphological phenotype required a diffuse cytoplasmic localization and a strikingly α-isoform-specific kinase activity of CaMKI. Unexpectedly, treatment with muscimol, a GABAA receptor agonist, selectively stimulated elongation of axons but not of dendrites, and the CaMKK-CaMKIα cascade critically mediated this axonogenic effect. Consistent with these findings, during early brain development, in vivo knockdown of CaMKIα significantly impaired the terminal axonal extension, and thereby perturbed the refinement of the interhemispheric callosal projections into the contralateral cortices. Our findings thus indicate a novel role for the GABA-driven CaMKK-CaMKIα cascade as a mechanism critical for accurate cortical axon pathfinding, an essential process which may contribute to fine-tuning the formation of interhemispheric connectivity during the perinatal development of the central nervous system. PMID:19864584

  5. Rice SPK, a Calmodulin-Like Domain Protein Kinase, Is Required for Storage Product Accumulation during Seed Development

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Takayuki; Kunieda, Noriko; Omura, Yuhi; Ibe, Hirokazu; Kawasaki, Tsutomu; Takano, Makoto; Sato, Miho; Furuhashi, Hideyuki; Mujin, Toshiyuki; Takaiwa, Fumio; Wu, Chuan-yin; Tada, Yuichi; Satozawa, Tomomi; Sakamoto, Masahiro; Shimada, Hiroaki

    2002-01-01

    Suc, an end product of photosynthesis, is metabolized by Suc synthase in sink organs as an initial step in the biosynthesis of storage products. Suc synthase activity is known to be regulated by reversible phosphorylation, but the details of this process are unclear at present. Rice SPK, a calcium-dependent protein kinase, is expressed uniquely in the endosperm of immature seed, and its involvement in the biosynthetic pathways of storage products was suggested. Antisense SPK transformants lacked the ability to accumulate storage products such as starch, but produced watery seed with a large amount of Suc instead, as the result of an inhibition of Suc degradation. Analysis of in vitro phosphorylation indicated that SPK phosphorylated specifically a Ser residue in Suc synthase that has been shown to be important for its activity in the degradation of Suc. This finding suggests that SPK is involved in the activation of Suc synthase. It appears that SPK is a Suc synthase kinase that may be important for supplying substrates for the biosynthesis of storage products. PMID:11910009

  6. Axodendritic contacts onto calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type II-expressing neurons in the barn owl auditory space map.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Contreras, Adrian; Liu, Xiao-Bo; DeBello, William M

    2005-06-01

    In the owl midbrain, a map of auditory space is synthesized in the inferior colliculus (IC) and conveyed to the optic tectum (OT). Ascending auditory information courses through these structures via topographic axonal projections. Little is known about the molecular composition of projection neurons or their postsynaptic targets. To visualize axodendritic contacts between identified cell types, we used double-label immunohistochemistry, in vivo retrograde tracing, in vitro anterograde tracing, high-resolution confocal microscopy, three-dimensional reconstruction and fly-through visualization. We discovered a major class of IC neurons that strongly expressed calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type II, alpha subunit (CaMKII). The distribution of these cells within the IC was mostly restricted to the external nucleus of the IC (ICX), in which the auditory space map is assembled. A large proportion of ICX-OT projection neurons were CaMKII positive. In addition to being the principal outputs, CaMKII cells were in direct contact with axonal boutons emanating from the main source of input to ICX, the lateral shell of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICCls). Numerous sites of putative synaptic contact were found on the somata, proximal dendrites, and distal dendrites. Double-label immunoelectron microscopy confirmed the existence of synapses between ICCls axons and the dendrites of CaMKII cells. Collectively, our data indicate that CaMKII ICX neurons are a cellular locus for the computation of auditory space-specific responses. Because the ICCls-ICX projection is physically altered during experience-dependent plasticity, these results lay the groundwork for probing microanatomical rearrangements that may underlie plasticity and learning. PMID:15944389

  7. The Anthocyanin Delphinidin 3-Rutinoside Stimulates Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Secretion in Murine GLUTag Cell Line via the Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Kinase II Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Masaki; Tani, Tsubasa; Terahara, Norihiko; Tsuda, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone secreted from enteroendocrine L-cells. Although several nutrients induce GLP-1 secretion, there is little evidence to suggest that non-nutritive compounds directly increase GLP-1 secretion. Here, we hypothesized that anthocyanins induce GLP-1 secretion and thereby significantly contribute to the prevention and treatment of diabetes. Delphinidin 3-rutinoside (D3R) was shown to increase GLP-1 secretion in GLUTag L cells. The results suggested that three hydroxyl or two methoxyl moieties on the aromatic ring are essential for the stimulation of GLP-1 secretion. Notably, the rutinose moiety was shown to be a potent enhancer of GLP-1 secretion, but only in conjunction with three hydroxyl moieties on the aromatic ring (D3R). Receptor antagonist studies revealed that D3R-stimulates GLP-1 secretion involving inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor-mediated intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. Treatment of GLUTag cells with a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinaseII (CaMKII) inhibitor (KN-93) abolished D3R-stimulated GLP-1 secretion. In addition, treatment of GLUTag cells with D3R resulted in activation of CaMKII. Pre-treatment of cells with a G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 40/120 antagonist (GW1100) also significantly decreased D3R-stimulated GLP-1 secretion. These observations suggest that D3R stimulates GLP-1 secretion in GLUTag cells, and that stimulation of GLP-1 secretion by D3R is mediated via Ca2+-CaMKII pathway, which may possibly be mediated by GPR40/120. These findings provide a possible molecular mechanism of GLP-1 secretion in intestinal L-cells mediated by foods or drugs and demonstrate a novel biological function of anthocyanins in regards to GLP-1 secretion. PMID:25962102

  8. Thyroid hormone regulation of gene expression in the developing rat fetal cerebral cortex: prominent role of the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV pathway.

    PubMed

    Morte, Beatriz; Díez, Diego; Ausó, Eva; Belinchón, Mónica M; Gil-Ibáñez, Pilar; Grijota-Martínez, Carmen; Navarro, Daniela; de Escobar, Gabriella Morreale; Berbel, Pere; Bernal, Juan

    2010-02-01

    Thyroid hormones influence brain development through regulation of gene expression mediated by nuclear receptors. Nuclear receptor concentration increases rapidly in the human fetus during the second trimester, a period of high sensitivity of the brain to thyroid hormones. In the rat, the equivalent period is the last quarter of pregnancy. However, little is known about thyroid hormone action in the fetal brain, and in rodents, most thyroid hormone-regulated genes have been identified during the postnatal period. To identify potential targets of thyroid hormone in the fetal brain, we induced maternal and fetal hypothyroidism by maternal thyroidectomy followed by antithyroid drug (2-mercapto-1-methylimidazole) treatment. Microarray analysis identified differentially expressed genes in the cerebral cortex of hypothyroid fetuses on d 21 after conception. Gene function analysis revealed genes involved in the biogenesis of the cytoskeleton, neuronal migration and growth, and branching of neurites. Twenty percent of the differentially expressed genes were related to each other centered on the Ca(2+) and calmodulin-activated kinase (Camk4) pathway. Camk4 was regulated directly by T(3) in primary cultured neurons from fetal cortex, and the Camk4 protein was also induced by thyroid hormone. No differentially expressed genes were recovered when euthyroid fetuses from hypothyroid mothers were compared with fetuses from normal mothers. Although the results do not rule out a specific contribution from the mother, especially at earlier stages of pregnancy, they indicate that the main regulators of thyroid hormone-dependent, fetal brain gene expression near term are the fetal thyroid hormones. PMID:20056827

  9. Transient Overexpression of α-Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II in the Nucleus Accumbens Shell Enhances Behavioral Responding to Amphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Loweth, Jessica A.; Singer, Bryan F.; Baker, Lorinda K.; Wilke, Georgia; Inamine, Hidetoshi; Bubula, Nancy; Alexander, John K.; Carlezon, William A.; Neve, Rachael L.; Vezina, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is known to contribute to the expression of psychostimulant sensitization by regulating dopamine (DA) overflow from DA neuron terminals in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). The present experiments explored the contribution of CaMKII in NAcc neurons postsynaptic to these terminals where it is known to participate in a number of signaling pathways that regulate responding to psychostimulant drugs. Exposure to amphetamine transiently increased αCaMKII levels in the shell but not the core of the NAcc. Thus, HSV (herpes simplex viral) vectors were used to transiently overexpress αCaMKII in NAcc neurons in drug-naive rats, and behavioral responding to amphetamine was assessed. Transiently overexpressing αCaMKII in the NAcc shell led to long-lasting enhancement of amphetamine-induced locomotion and self-administration manifested when αCaMKII levels were elevated and persisting long after they had returned to baseline. Enhanced locomotion was not observed after infection in the NAcc core or sites adjacent to the NAcc. Transient elevation of NAcc shell αCaMKII levels also enhanced locomotor responding to NAcc AMPA and increased phosphorylation levels of GluR1 (Ser831), a CaMKII site, both soon and long after infection. Similar increases in pGluR1 (Ser831) were observed both soon and long after exposure to amphetamine. These results indicate that the transient increase in αCaMKII observed in neurons of the NAcc shell after viral-mediated gene transfer and likely exposure to amphetamine leads to neuroadaptations in AMPA receptor signaling in this site that may contribute to the long-lasting maintenance of behavioral and incentive sensitization by psychostimulant drugs like amphetamine. PMID:20089902

  10. Atlas of transgenic Tet-Off Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and prion protein promoter activity in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Odeh, Francis; Leergaard, Trygve B; Boy, Jana; Schmidt, Thorsten; Riess, Olaf; Bjaalie, Jan G

    2011-02-14

    Conditional transgenic mouse models are important tools for investigations of neurodegenerative diseases and evaluation of potential therapeutic interventions. A popular conditional transgenic system is the binary tetracycline-responsive gene (Tet-Off) system, in which the expression of the gene of interest depends on a tetracycline-regulatable transactivator (tTA) under the control of a specific promoter construct. The most frequently used Tet-Off promoter mouse lines are the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CamKII) and prion protein (PrP) promoter lines, respectively. To target the regulated gene of interest to relevant brain regions, a priori knowledge about the spatial distribution of the regulated gene expression in the brain is important. Such distribution patterns can be investigated using double transgenic mice in which the promoter construct regulates a LacZ reporter gene encoding the marker β-galactosidase which can be histologically detected using its substrate X-gal. We have previously published an atlas showing the brain-wide expression mediated by the Tet-Off PrP promoter mouse line, but the distribution of activity in the Tet-Off CamKII promoter mouse line is less well known. To compare promoter activity distributions in these two Tet-Off mouse lines, we have developed an online digital atlas tailored for side-by-side comparison of histological section images. The atlas provides a comprehensive list of brain regions containing X-gal labeling and an interactive dual image viewer tool for panning and zooming of corresponding section images. Comparison of spatial expression patterns between the two lines show considerable regional and cellular differences, relevant in context of generation and analysis of inducible models based on these two tetracycline responsive promoter mouse lines. PMID:21093594

  11. Regulation of Voltage-Gated Ca2+ Currents by Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II in Resting Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kostic, Sandra; Pan, Bin; Guo, Yuan; Yu, Hongwei; Sapunar, Damir; Kwok, Wai-Meng; Hudmon, Andy; Wu, Hsiang-En; Hogan, Quinn H.

    2014-01-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is recognized as a key element in encoding depolarization activity of excitable cells into facilitated voltage-gated Ca2+ channel (VGCC) function. Less is known about the participation of CaMKII in regulating VGCCs in resting cells. We examined constitutive CaMKII control of Ca2+ currents in peripheral sensory neurons acutely isolated from dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) of adult rats. The small molecule CaMKII inhibitor KN-93 (1.0μM) reduced depolarization-induced ICa by 16 – 30% in excess of the effects produced by the inactive homolog KN-92. The specificity of CaMKII inhibition on VGCC function was shown by efficacy of the selective CaMKII blocking peptide autocamtide-2-related inhibitory peptide in a membrane-permeable myristoylated form, which also reduced VGCC current in resting neurons. Loss of VGCC currents is primarily due to reduced N-type current, as application of mAIP selectively reduced N-type current by approximately 30%, and prior N-type current inhibition eliminated the effect of mAIP on VGCCs, while prior block of L-type channels did not reduce the effect of mAIP on total ICa. T-type currents were not affected by mAIP in resting DRG neurons. Transduction of sensory neurons in vivo by DRG injection of an adeno-associated virus expressing AIP also resulted in a loss of N-type currents. Together, these findings reveal a novel molecular adaptation whereby sensory neurons retain CaMKII support of VGCCs despite remaining quiescent. PMID:25064143

  12. Regulation of voltage-gated Ca(2+) currents by Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in resting sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Kostic, Sandra; Pan, Bin; Guo, Yuan; Yu, Hongwei; Sapunar, Damir; Kwok, Wai-Meng; Hudmon, Andy; Wu, Hsiang-En; Hogan, Quinn H

    2014-09-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is recognized as a key element in encoding depolarization activity of excitable cells into facilitated voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel (VGCC) function. Less is known about the participation of CaMKII in regulating VGCCs in resting cells. We examined constitutive CaMKII control of Ca(2+) currents in peripheral sensory neurons acutely isolated from dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) of adult rats. The small molecule CaMKII inhibitor KN-93 (1.0μM) reduced depolarization-induced ICa by 16-30% in excess of the effects produced by the inactive homolog KN-92. The specificity of CaMKII inhibition on VGCC function was shown by the efficacy of the selective CaMKII blocking peptide autocamtide-2-related inhibitory peptide in a membrane-permeable myristoylated form, which also reduced VGCC current in resting neurons. Loss of VGCC currents is primarily due to reduced N-type current, as application of mAIP selectively reduced N-type current by approximately 30%, and prior N-type current inhibition eliminated the effect of mAIP on VGCCs, while prior block of L-type channels did not reduce the effect of mAIP on total ICa. T-type currents were not affected by mAIP in resting DRG neurons. Transduction of sensory neurons in vivo by DRG injection of an adeno-associated virus expressing AIP also resulted in a loss of N-type currents. Together, these findings reveal a novel molecular adaptation whereby sensory neurons retain CaMKII support of VGCCs despite remaining quiescent. PMID:25064143

  13. Holoenzyme structures of endothelial nitric oxide synthase - an allosteric role for calmodulin in pivoting the FMN domain for electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Volkmann, Niels; Martásek, Pavel; Roman, Linda J; Xu, Xiao-Ping; Page, Christopher; Swift, Mark; Hanein, Dorit; Masters, Bettie Sue

    2014-10-01

    While the three-dimensional structures of heme- and flavin-binding domains of the NOS isoforms have been determined, the structures of the holoenzymes remained elusive. Application of electron cryo-microscopy and structural modeling of the bovine endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) holoenzyme produced detailed models of the intact holoenzyme in the presence and absence of Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM). These models accommodate the cross-electron transfer from the reductase in one monomer to the heme in the opposite monomer. The heme domain acts as the anchoring dimeric structure for the entire enzyme molecule, while the FMN domain is activated by CaM to move flexibly to bridge the distance between the reductase and oxygenase domains. Our results indicate that the key regulatory role of CaM involves the stabilization of structural intermediates and precise positioning of the pivot for the FMN domain tethered shuttling motion to accommodate efficient and rapid electron transfer in the homodimer of eNOS. PMID:25175399

  14. High-affinity cholecystokinin type A receptor/cytosolic phospholipase A2 pathways mediate Ca2+ oscillations via a positive feedback regulation by calmodulin kinase in pancreatic acini.

    PubMed

    Lankisch, T O; Nozu, F; Owyang, C; Tsunoda, Y

    1999-09-01

    In rat pancreatic acini, we previously demonstrated that depending on the agonist used, activation of cholecystokinin type A (CCKA) receptor (CCK-AR) results in the differential involvement of the cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), phospholipase Cbeta1 (PLCbeta1) and Src/protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) pathways. The high-affinity CCK-AR appears to be coupled to the Gbeta/cPLA2/arachidonic acid (AA) cascade in mediating Ca2+ oscillations. The low-affinity CCK-AR is coupled to both the Galphaq/11/PLCbeta1/inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) to evoke intracellular Ca2+ release and the Src/PTK pathway to mediate extracellular Ca2+ influx. The objectives of this study were to provide evidence that cPLA2 is present in pancreatic acini and to evaluate the possibility that its activation results in Ca2+ oscillations and amylase secretion. Furthermore, we investigated the mechanism of Ca2+ oscillations mediated by the high-affinity CCK-AR. In rat pancreatic acini, immunoprecipitation studies using an anti-cPLA2 monoclonal antibody, demonstrated a cPLA2 band at the location of 110 kDa. A selective inhibitor of cPLA2, AACOCF3 (100 microM), inhibited production of AA metabolites, Ca2+ oscillations and amylase secretion elicited by the high-affinity CCK-AR agonist, CCK-OPE (10-1000 nM). In addition, through the repetitive release of intracellular Ca2+, CCK-OPE enhanced phosphotransferase activities of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type IV (CaMK IV), which were inhibited by AACOCF3. The CaMK inhibitor, K252-a (1-3 microM), also abolished basal and CCK-OPE-stimulated CaMK IV activities. The CaM inhibitor, W-7 (100 microM), and K252-a inhibited Ca2+ oscillations and amylase secretion evoked by CCK-OPE without affecting the AA formation. Therefore, it appears that Ca2+ oscillations elicited by the high-affinity CCK-AR/Gbeta/cPLA2/AA pathway activate CaMK IV. Activated CaMK, in turn, regulates Ca2+ oscillations through a positive feedback mechanism to mediate pancreatic

  15. Calcium/calmodulin-mediated signal network in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Tianbao; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2003-01-01

    Various extracellular stimuli elicit specific calcium signatures that can be recognized by different calcium sensors. Calmodulin, the predominant calcium receptor, is one of the best-characterized calcium sensors in eukaryotes. In recent years, completion of the Arabidopsis genome project and advances in functional genomics have helped to identify and characterize numerous calmodulin-binding proteins in plants. There are some similarities in Ca(2+)/calmodulin-mediated signaling in plants and animals. However, plants possess multiple calmodulin genes and many calmodulin target proteins, including unique protein kinases and transcription factors. Some of these proteins are likely to act as "hubs" during calcium signal transduction. Hence, a better understanding of the function of these calmodulin target proteins should help in deciphering the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-mediated signal network and its role in plant growth, development and response to environmental stimuli.

  16. Puerarin activates endothelial nitric oxide synthase through estrogen receptor-dependent PI3-kinase and calcium-dependent AMP-activated protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Hien, Tran Thi; Jeong, Myung Ho; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2011-11-15

    The cardioprotective properties of puerarin, a natural product, have been attributed to the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-mediated production of nitric oxide (NO) in EA.hy926 endothelial cells. However, the mechanism by which puerarin activates eNOS remains unclear. In this study, we sought to identify the intracellular pathways underlying eNOS activation by puerarin. Puerarin induced the activating phosphorylation of eNOS on Ser1177 and the production of NO in EA.hy926 cells. Puerarin-induced eNOS phosphorylation required estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling and was reversed by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibition. Importantly, puerarin inhibited the adhesion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}-stimulated monocytes to endothelial cells and suppressed the TNF-{alpha} induced expression of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1. Puerarin also inhibited the TNF-{alpha}-induced nuclear factor-{kappa}B activation, which was attenuated by pretreatment with N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a NOS inhibitor. These results indicate that puerarin stimulates eNOS phosphorylation and NO production via activation of an estrogen receptor-mediated PI3K/Akt- and CaMKII/AMPK-dependent pathway. Puerarin may be useful for the treatment or prevention of endothelial dysfunction associated with diabetes and cardiovascular disease. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin induced the phosphorylation of eNOS and the production of NO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin activated eNOS through ER-dependent PI3-kinase and Ca{sup 2+}-dependent AMPK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin-induced NO was involved in the inhibition of NF-kB activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin may help for prevention of vascular dysfunction and diabetes.

  17. Ca2+/calmodulin kinase II increases ryanodine binding and Ca2+-induced sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release kinetics during β-adrenergic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ferrero, Paola; Said, Matilde; Sánchez, Gina; Vittone, Leticia; Valverde, Carlos; Donoso, Paulina; Mattiazzi, Alicia; Mundiña-Weilenmann, Cecilia

    2007-01-01

    We aimed to define the relative contribution of both PKA and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) cascades to the phosphorylation of RyR2 and the activity of the channel during β-adrenergic receptor (βAR) stimulation. Rat hearts were perfused with increasing concentrations of the β-agonist isoproterenol in the absence and the presence of CaMKII inhibition. CaMKII was inhibited either by preventing the Ca2+ influx to the cell by low [Ca]o plus nifedipine or by the specific inhibitor KN-93. We immunodetected RyR2 phosphorylated at Ser2809 (PKA and putative CaMKII site) and at Ser2815 (CaMKII site) and measured [3H]-ryanodine binding and fast Ca2+ release kinetics in sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) vesicles. SR vesicles were isolated in conditions that preserved the phosphorylation levels achieved in the intact heart and were actively and equally loaded with Ca2+. Our results demonstrated that Ser2809 and Ser2815 of RyR2 were dose-dependently phosphorylated under βAR stimulation by PKA and CaMKII, respectively. The isoproterenol-induced increase in the phosphorylation of Ser2815 site was prevented by the PKA inhibitor H-89 and mimicked by forskolin. CaMKII-dependent phosphorylation of RyR2 (but not PKA-dependent phosphorylation) was responsible for the β-induced increase in the channel activity as indicated by the enhancement of the [3H]-ryanodine binding and the velocity of fast SR Ca2+ release. The present results show for the first time a dose-dependent increase in the phosphorylation of Ser2815 of RyR2 through the PKA-dependent activation of CaMKII and a predominant role of CaMKII-dependent phosphorylation of RyR2, over that of PKA-dependent phosphorylation, on SR-Ca2+ release during βAR stimulation. PMID:17643448

  18. Expression and phosphorylation of a MARCKS-like protein in gastric chief cells: further evidence for modulation of pepsinogen secretion by interaction of Ca2+/calmodulin with protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Raufman, J P; Malhotra, R; Xie, Q; Raffaniello, R D

    1997-03-01

    In gastric chief cells, agents that activate protein kinase C (PKC) stimulate pepsinogen secretion and phosphorylation of an acidic 72-kDa protein. The isoelectric point and molecular mass of this protein are similar to those for a common PKC substrate; the MARCKS (for Myristoylated Alanine-Rich C Kinase Substrate) protein. We examined expression and phosphorylation of the MARCKS-like protein in a nearly homogeneous suspension of chief cells from guinea pig stomach. Western blotting of fractions from chief cell lysates with a specific MARCKS antibody resulted in staining of a myristoylated 72-kDA protein (pp72), associated predominantly with the membrane fraction. Using permeabilized chief cells, we examined the effect of PKC activation (with the phorbol ester PMA), in the presence of basal (100 nM) or elevated cellular calcium (1 microM), on pepsinogen secretion and phosphorylation of the 72-KDa MARCKS-like protein. Secretion was increased 2.3-, 2.6-, and 4.5-fold by incubation with 100 nM PMA, 1 microM calcium, and PMA plus calcium, respectively. A PKC inhibitor (1 microM CGP 41 251) abolished PMA-induced secretion, but did not alter calcium-induced secretion. This indicates that calcium-induced secretion is independent of PKC activation. Chief cell proteins were labeled with 32P-orthophosphate and phosphorylation of pp72 was detected by autoradiography of 2-dimensional polyacrylamide gels. In the presence of basal calcium, PMA (100 nM) caused a > two-fold increase in phosphorylation of pp72. Without PMA, calcium did not alter phosphorylation of pp72. However, 1 microM calcium caused an approx. 50% attenuation of PMA-induced phosphorylation of pp72. Experiments with a MARCKS "phosphorylation/calmodulin binding domain peptide" indicated that calcium/calmodulin inhibits phosphorylation of pp72 by binding to the phosphorylation/calmodulin binding domain and not by inhibiting PKC activity. These observations support the hypothesis that, in gastric chief cells

  19. Calmodulin Binding Proteins and Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    O’Day, Danton H.; Eshak, Kristeen; Myre, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The small, calcium-sensor protein, calmodulin, is ubiquitously expressed and central to cell function in all cell types. Here the literature linking calmodulin to Alzheimer’s disease is reviewed. Several experimentally-verified calmodulin-binding proteins are involved in the formation of amyloid-β plaques including amyloid-β protein precursor, β-secretase, presenilin-1, and ADAM10. Many others possess potential calmodulin-binding domains that remain to be verified. Three calmodulin binding proteins are associated with the formation of neurofibrillary tangles: two kinases (CaMKII, CDK5) and one protein phosphatase (PP2B or calcineurin). Many of the genes recently identified by genome wide association studies and other studies encode proteins that contain putative calmodulin-binding domains but only a couple (e.g., APOE, BIN1) have been experimentally confirmed as calmodulin binding proteins. At least two receptors involved in calcium metabolism and linked to Alzheimer’s disease (mAchR; NMDAR) have also been identified as calmodulin-binding proteins. In addition to this, many proteins that are involved in other cellular events intimately associated with Alzheimer’s disease including calcium channel function, cholesterol metabolism, neuroinflammation, endocytosis, cell cycle events, and apoptosis have been tentatively or experimentally verified as calmodulin binding proteins. The use of calmodulin as a potential biomarker and as a therapeutic target is discussed. PMID:25812852

  20. Inhibition by calmodulin of calcium/phospholipid-dependent protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Albert, K A; Wu, W C; Nairn, A C; Greengard, P

    1984-01-01

    Calmodulin was previously found to inhibit the Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent phosphorylation of an endogenous substrate, called the 87-kilodalton protein, in a crude extract prepared from rat brain synaptosomal cytosol. We investigated the mechanism of this inhibition, using Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent protein kinase and the 87-kilodalton protein, both of which had been purified to homogeneity from bovine brain. Rabbit brain calmodulin and some other Ca2+-binding proteins inhibited the phosphorylation of the 87-kilodalton protein by this kinase in the purified system. Calmodulin also inhibited the Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent phosphorylation of H1 histone, synapsin I, and the delta subunit of the acetylcholine receptor, with use of purified components. These results suggest that calmodulin may be a physiological regulator of Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent protein kinase. Images PMID:6233611

  1. Diacylglycerol kinase regulation of protein kinase D during oxidative stress-induced intestinal cell injury

    SciTech Connect

    Song Jun; Li Jing; Mourot, Joshua M.; Mark Evers, B.; Chung, Dai H.

    2008-10-17

    We recently demonstrated that protein kinase D (PKD) exerts a protective function during oxidative stress-induced intestinal epithelial cell injury; however, the exact role of DAG kinase (DGK){zeta}, an isoform expressed in intestine, during this process is unknown. We sought to determine the role of DGK during oxidative stress-induced intestinal cell injury and whether DGK acts as an upstream regulator of PKD. Inhibition of DGK with R59022 compound or DGK{zeta} siRNA transfection decreased H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced RIE-1 cell apoptosis as measured by DNA fragmentation and increased PKD phosphorylation. Overexpression of kinase-dead DGK{zeta} also significantly increased PKD phosphorylation. Additionally, endogenous nuclear DGK{zeta} rapidly translocated to the cytoplasm following H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment. Our findings demonstrate that DGK is involved in the regulation of oxidative stress-induced intestinal cell injury. PKD activation is induced by DGK{zeta}, suggesting DGK is an upstream regulator of oxidative stress-induced activation of the PKD signaling pathway in intestinal epithelial cells.

  2. Phosphorylation of tyrosine residues of calmodulin in Rous sarcoma virus-transformed cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fukami, Y; Nakamura, T; Nakayama, A; Kanehisa, T

    1986-01-01

    Calmodulin, a wide-spread eukaryotic Ca2+-binding protein, was phosphorylated at its tyrosine residues in Rous sarcoma virus (RSV)-transformed chicken and rat cells but not in normal chicken embryo fibroblasts. In contrast, serine and threonine phosphorylation of calmodulin was found to occur in both normal and virus-transformed cells. In an in vitro system containing purified src kinase from RSV-transformed cells, tyrosine phosphorylation of calmodulin by the src kinase was inhibited by Ca2+. Furthermore, the tyrosine-phosphorylated calmodulin showed slower mobility than that of nonphosphorylated calmodulin in NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis when Ca2+ was present. These results suggest that the structure of calmodulin Ca2+ complex may be altered by tyrosine phosphorylation. It is thus inferred that Ca2+ may regulate the level of tyrosine phosphorylation of calmodulin in RSV-transformed cells, and phosphorylation in turn may attenuate the function of this protein in vivo. Images PMID:2424020

  3. Nitric oxide: a regulator of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 kinases.

    PubMed

    Tong, Lingying; Heim, Rachel A; Wu, Shiyong

    2011-06-15

    Generation of nitric oxide (NO(•)) can upstream induce and downstream mediate the kinases that phosphorylate the α subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2α), which plays a critical role in regulating gene expression. There are four known eIF2α kinases (EIF2AKs), and NO(•) affects each one uniquely. Whereas NO(•) directly activates EIF2AK1 (HRI), it indirectly activates EIF2AK3 (PERK). EIF2AK4 (GCN2) is activated by depletion of l-arginine, which is used by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) during the production of NO(•). Finally EIF2AK2 (PKR), which can mediate inducible NOS expression and therefore NO(•) production, can also be activated by NO(•). The production of NO(•) and activation of EIF2AKs coordinately regulate physiological and pathological events such as innate immune response and cell apoptosis. PMID:21463677

  4. Cell signaling through protein kinase C oxidation and activation.

    PubMed

    Cosentino-Gomes, Daniela; Rocco-Machado, Nathália; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Due to the growing importance of cellular signaling mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS), proteins that are reversibly modulated by these reactant molecules are of high interest. In this context, protein kinases and phosphatases, which act coordinately in the regulation of signal transduction through the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of target proteins, have been described to be key elements in ROS-mediated signaling events. The major mechanism by which these proteins may be modified by oxidation involves the presence of key redox-sensitive cysteine residues. Protein kinase C (PKC) is involved in a variety of cellular signaling pathways. These proteins have been shown to contain a unique structural feature that is susceptible to oxidative modification. A large number of scientific studies have highlighted the importance of ROS as a second messenger in numerous cellular processes, including cell proliferation, gene expression, adhesion, differentiation, senescence, and apoptosis. In this context, the goal of this review is to discuss the mechanisms by which PKCs are modulated by ROS and how these processes are involved in the cellular response. PMID:23109817

  5. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II regulates cyclooxygenase-2 expression and prostaglandin E2 production by activating cAMP-response element-binding protein in rat peritoneal macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xueyuan; Li, Junying; Yang, Wenxiu

    2014-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is an important inducer of inflammation, which is also closely linked to the progress of tumours. In macrophages, PGE2 production is regulated by arachidonic acid release and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression. In the present study, we found that COX-2 expression can be achieved by activating Ca2+/Calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) in rat peritoneal macrophages. Our results indicated that lipopolysaccharide and PMA could elicit the transient increase of the concentration of intracellular free calcium ions ([Ca2+]i), which induced activation of CaMKs with the presence of CaM. The subtype of CaMKs, CaMKII, then triggered the activation of CREB, which elevated COX-2 expression and PGE2 production in a chronological order. These results suggested that Ca2+/CaM-dependent CaMKII plays an important role in mediating COX-2 expression and PGE2 production by activating CREB in macrophages. The study also provides more useful information to clarify the mechanism of calcium regulation of PGE2 production, which plays an essential role in inflammation and cancers. PMID:24773364

  6. Metabolic Control of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II (CaMKII)-mediated Caspase-2 Suppression by the B55β/Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A)*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bofu; Yang, Chih-Sheng; Wojton, Jeffrey; Huang, Nai-Jia; Chen, Chen; Soderblom, Erik J.; Zhang, Liguo; Kornbluth, Sally

    2014-01-01

    High levels of metabolic activity confer resistance to apoptosis. Caspase-2, an apoptotic initiator, can be suppressed by high levels of nutrient flux through the pentose phosphate pathway. This metabolic control is exerted via inhibitory phosphorylation of the caspase-2 prodomain by activated Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). We show here that this activation of CaMKII depends, in part, on dephosphorylation of CaMKII at novel sites (Thr393/Ser395) and that this is mediated by metabolic activation of protein phosphatase 2A in complex with the B55β targeting subunit. This represents a novel locus of CaMKII control and also provides a mechanism contributing to metabolic control of apoptosis. These findings may have implications for metabolic control of the many CaMKII-controlled and protein phosphatase 2A-regulated physiological processes, because both enzymes appear to be responsive to alterations in glucose metabolized via the pentose phosphate pathway. PMID:25378403

  7. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Tagging Promotes Dendritic Branch Variability through the Capture of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II α (CaMKIIα) mRNAs by the RNA-binding Protein HuD.

    PubMed

    Sosanya, Natasha M; Cacheaux, Luisa P; Workman, Emily R; Niere, Farr; Perrone-Bizzozero, Nora I; Raab-Graham, Kimberly F

    2015-06-26

    The fate of a memory, whether stored or forgotten, is determined by the ability of an active or tagged synapse to undergo changes in synaptic efficacy requiring protein synthesis of plasticity-related proteins. A synapse can be tagged, but without the "capture" of plasticity-related proteins, it will not undergo long lasting forms of plasticity (synaptic tagging and capture hypothesis). What the "tag" is and how plasticity-related proteins are captured at tagged synapses are unknown. Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II α (CaMKIIα) is critical in learning and memory and is synthesized locally in neuronal dendrites. The mechanistic (mammalian) target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a protein kinase that increases CaMKIIα protein expression; however, the mechanism and site of dendritic expression are unknown. Herein, we show that mTOR activity mediates the branch-specific expression of CaMKIIα, favoring one secondary, daughter branch over the other in a single neuron. mTOR inhibition decreased the dendritic levels of CaMKIIα protein and mRNA by shortening its poly(A) tail. Overexpression of the RNA-stabilizing protein HuD increased CaMKIIα protein levels and preserved its selective expression in one daughter branch over the other when mTOR was inhibited. Unexpectedly, deleting the third RNA recognition motif of HuD, the domain that binds the poly(A) tail, eliminated the branch-specific expression of CaMKIIα when mTOR was active. These results provide a model for one molecular mechanism that may underlie the synaptic tagging and capture hypothesis where mTOR is the tag, preventing deadenylation of CaMKIIα mRNA, whereas HuD captures and promotes its expression in a branch-specific manner. PMID:25944900

  8. Calmodulin of the tropical sea cucumber: Gene structure, inducible expression and contribution to nitric oxide production and pathogen clearance during immune response.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Ren, Chunhua; Li, Wuhu; Jiang, Xiao; Xia, Jianjun; Wong, Nai-Kei; Hu, Chaoqun

    2015-08-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is an essential second messenger protein that transduces calcium signals by binding calcium ions (Ca(2+)) and modulating its interactions with various target proteins. In contrast to vertebrates, where CaM is well established as a cofactor for Ca(2+)-dependent physiological and cellular functions including host defense, there is a paucity of understanding on CaM in invertebrates (such as echinoderms) in response to immune challenge or microbial infections. In this study, we obtained and described the gene sequence of CaM from the tropical sea cucumber Stichopus monotuberculatus, a promising yet poorly characterized aquacultural species. mRNA expression of StmCaM could be detected in the intestine and coelomic fluid after Vibrio alginolyticus injection. Transcriptional and translational expression of StmCaM was inducible in nature, as evidenced by the expression patterns in primary coelomocytes following Vibrio challenge. This response could be mimicked by the Vibrio cells membrane components or lipopolysaccharides (LPS), and blocked by co-treatment of the LPS-neutralizing agent polymyxin B (PMB). Furthermore, inhibition of CaM activity by incubation with its inhibitor trifluoroperazine dihydrochloride (TFP) blunted the production of Vibrio-induced nitric oxide (NO) and augmented the survival of invading Vibrio in coelomocytes. Collectively, our study here supplied the first evidence for echinoderm CaM participation in innate immunity, and provided a functional link between CaM expression and antibacterial NO production in sea cucumber. PMID:25913576

  9. Functional coupling of a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent nitric oxide synthase and a soluble guanylyl cyclase in vertebrate photoreceptor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, K W; Lambrecht, H G; Haberecht, M; Redburn, D; Schmidt, H H

    1994-01-01

    Electrophysiological recordings on retinal rod cells, horizontal cells and on-bipolar cells indicate that exogenous nitric oxide (NO) has neuromodulatory effects in the vertebrate retina. We report here endogenous NO formation in mammalian photoreceptor cells. Photoreceptor NO synthase resembled the neuronal NOS type I from mammalian brain. NOS activity utilized the substrate L-arginine (Km = 4 microM) and the cofactors NADPH, FAD, FMN and tetrahydrobiopterin. The activity showed a complete dependence on the free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]) and was mediated by calmodulin. NO synthase activity was sufficient to activate an endogenous soluble guanylyl cyclase that copurified in photoreceptor preparations. This functional coupling was strictly controlled by the free [Ca2+] (EC50 = 0.84 microM). Activation of the soluble guanylyl cyclase by endogenous NO was up to 100% of the maximal activation of this enzyme observed with the exogenous NO donor compound sodium nitroprusside. This NO/cGMP pathway was predominantly localized in inner and not in outer segments of photoreceptors. Immunocytochemically, we localized NO synthase type I mainly in the ellipsoid region of the inner segments and a soluble guanylyl cyclase in cell bodies of cone photoreceptor cells. We conclude that in photoreceptors endogenous NO is functionally coupled to a soluble guanylyl cyclase and suggest that it has a neuromodulatory role in visual transduction and in synaptic transmission in the outer retina. Images PMID:7519146

  10. Dopamine binds calmodulin during autoregulation of dopaminergic D2 receptor signaling through CaMKIIα-calmodulin complex.

    PubMed

    Laoye, B J; Okurumeh, O A; Obagaye, O V; Olagunju, M O; Bankole, O O; Olubiyi, O O; Ogundele, O M

    2016-06-01

    The role of dopaminergic D2 receptor (D2R) autoregulation in dopamine (DA) neurotransmission cannot be overemphasized in cause and progression of disorders associated with complex behaviors. Although previous studies have shown that D2R is structurally and physiologically linked with calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKIIα), however, the role of calmodulin in the CaMKIIα complex in D2R regulation remains elusive. In this study, using structural biology modeling softwares (iGEMDOCK and CueMol), we have shown the interaction between D2R, CaMKIIα, calmodulin, and DA under varying conditions. The outcomes of this study suggest that CaMKIIα causes a change in DA binding affinity to the D2R receptive site while the detached DA binds to calmodulin to stop the activity of D2R in the D2R-dopaminergic D1 receptor (D1R) heteromer. Ultimately, we concluded that D2R autoregulates to stop its heteromeric combination with D1R. D2R interacts with D1R to facilitate calcium movement that activates calmodulin, then CaMKIIα. The CaMKIIα-calmodulin complex changes the affinity of DA-D2R causing DA to break free and bind with calmodulin. PMID:26446938

  11. Calcium/Calmodulin-Mediated Gravitropic Response in Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this project was to gain a fundamental understanding of how calcium/calmodulin-mediated signaling is involved in gravity signal transduction in plants. During the period of support, significant progress was made in elucidating the role of calmodulin and its target proteins in gravitropism. This laboratory has made breakthroughs by cloning and characterizing genes that are involved in calcium/calmodulin-mediated signaling. Some of these genes show altered expression under hypergravity and simulated microgravity conditions. A major advance was made in our attempts to understand gravity signal transduction by cloning and characterizing a catalase which requires calcium/calmodulin for its activation. Our results suggest that calcium/calmodulin have dual roles in regulating the level of hydrogen peroxide (H202), a signal molecule that plays a major role in gravitropism. It is well established that auxin plays a major role in gravitropism. Our results indicate that there is a 'cross-talk' between calcium/calmodulin-mediated signaling and auxin-mediated signal transduction. Auxin-regulated SAUR proteins that are involved in gravitropism bind to calmodulin in a calcium-dependent manner. A novel chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase was cloned and characterized and its role in gravity signal transduction was investigated. These studies have provided some answers to the fundamental questions about how signal molecules such as calcium, H202, and hormones such as auxin bring about the ultimate gravitropic response and the integral role of calmodulin in gravity signal transduction. This NASA-funded study has led to some spinoffs that have applications in solving agricultural problems. The Washington State University Research Foundation has obtained several patents related to this work.

  12. Analysis of the state of posttranslational calmodulin methylation in developing pea plants. [Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Sukheung; Roberts, D.M. )

    1990-07-01

    A specific calmodulin-N-methyltransferase was used in a radiometric assay to analyze the degree of methylation of lysine-115 in pea (Pisum sativum) plants. Calmodulin was isolated from dissected segments of developing roots of young etiolated and green pea plants and was tested for its ability to be methylated by incubation with the calmodulin methyltransferase in the presence of ({sup 3}H)methyl-S-adenosylmethionine. By this approach, the presence of unmethylated calmodulins were demonstrated in pea tissues, and the levels of methylation varied depending on the developmental state of the tissue tested. Calmodulin methylation levels were lower in apical root segments of both etiolated and green plants, and in the young lateral roots compared with the mature, differentiated root tissues. The incorporation of methyl groups into these calmodulin samples appears to be specific for position 115 since site-directed mutants of calmodulin with substitutions at this position competitively inhibited methyl group incorporation. The present findings, combined with previous data showing differences in the ability of methylated and unmethylated calmodulins to activate pea NAD kinase raise the possibility that posttranslational methylation of calmodulin could be another mechanism for regulating calmodulin activity.

  13. IL-1β induces GFAP expression in vitro and in vivo and protects neurons from traumatic injury-associated apoptosis in rat brain striatum via NFκB/Ca²⁺-calmodulin/ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Sticozzi, C; Belmonte, G; Meini, A; Carbotti, P; Grasso, G; Palmi, M

    2013-11-12

    Reactive astrogliosis, a feature of neuro-inflammation is induced by a number of endogenous mediators including cytokines. Despite interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) stands out as the major inducer of this process, the underlying mechanism and its role on neuronal viability remain elusive. We investigated in human astrocytoma cells and the rat brain striatum, the role of the nuclear factor-kB (NF-kB) intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) calmodulin (CaM) and extracellular regulated mitogen-activated protein kinases (ERK1/2) in IL-1β-induced expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and neuronal apoptosis associated to a brain trauma. Cell data showed that IL-1β (1 ng/ml) increased NF-kB, pERK1/2 and GFAP expression. Nevertheless, further increase in IL-1β levels reversed progressively these responses. Preventing ERK1/2 activation with 1,4-diamino-2,3-dicyano-1,4-bis[2-aminophenylthiol]-butadiene antagonized IL-1β-induced GFAP expression while inhibiting selectively nuclear translocation of NF-kB with caffeic-acid phenethyl-ester down-regulated both ERK1/2 and GFAP expression induced by IL-1β. The GFAP response was also prevented by antagonizing selectively increase in [Ca(2+)]i, CaM activity or inducible nitric oxide synthase expression with respectively ryanodine plus 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl-borate, N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalensulfonamide hydrochloride and N-[(3-(aminomethyl)-phenyl]methyl]-ethanimidamide dihydrochloride. Data in vivo supported these findings and showed that GFAP expression induced by IL-1β (50 ng/ml) correlated with attenuated glial scar formation and reduced neuronal apoptosis. Our data identified the NF-kB/Ca(2+)-CaM/ERK signaling pathway as a novel in vivo key regulator of IL-1β-induced astrogliosis which may represent a potential target in neurodegeneration. PMID:23928073

  14. A mechanism for the inactivation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II during prolonged seizure activity and its consequence after the recovery from seizure activity in rats in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Y; Imoto, K; Obata, K

    2006-07-01

    Seizure is a form of excessive neuronal excitation and seizure-induced neuronal damage has profound effects on the prognosis of epilepsy. In various seizure models, the inactivation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) occurs during seizure activity preceding neuronal cell death. CaMKII is a multifunctional protein kinase enriched in the brain and involved in various ways the regulation of neuronal activity. CaMKII inactivation during seizure activity may modify neuronal cell survival after seizure. However, the mechanism for CaMKII inactivation and its consequence after seizure recovery remain to be elucidated yet. In the present study, we employed a prolonged seizure model by systemic injection of kainic acid into rats and biochemically examined the activity state of CaMKII. In status epilepticus induced by kainic acid, not only the inactivation of CaMKII in brain homogenate, but also a shift in the distribution of CaMKII protein from the soluble to particulate fraction occurred in both hippocampus and parietal cortex. The particulate CaMKII showed a large decrease in the specific activity and a concurrent large increase in the autophosphorylation ratio at Thr-286 (alpha) and at Thr-287 (beta). In contrast, the soluble CaMKII showed normal or rather decreased specific activity and autophosphorylation ratio. After 24 h of recovery from kainic acid-induced status epilepticus, all such changes had disappeared. On the other hand, the total amount of CaMKII was decreased by 35% in hippocampus and 20% in parietal cortex, but the existing CaMKII was indistinguishable from those of controls in terms of the autonomous activity ratio, specific activity and autophosphorylation ratio. Thus, CaMKII inactivation in kainic acid-induced status epilepticus seems to be derived not from simple degradation of the enzyme, but from the formation of the autophosphorylated, inactivated and sedimentable CaMKII. Such a form of CaMKII may be important during pathological

  15. Glucose-independent inhibition of yeast plasma-membrane H+-ATPase by calmodulin antagonists.

    PubMed Central

    Romero, I; Maldonado, A M; Eraso, P

    1997-01-01

    Glucose metabolism causes activation of the yeast plasma-membrane H+-ATPase. The molecular mechanism of this regulation is not known, but it is probably mediated by phosphorylation of the enzyme. The involvement in this process of several kinases has been suggested but their actual role has not been proved. The physiological role of a calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in glucose-induced activation was investigated by studying the effect of specific calmodulin antagonists on the glucose-induced ATPase kinetic changes in wild-type and two mutant strains affected in the glucose regulation of the enzyme. Preincubation of the cells with calmidazolium or compound 48/80 impeded the increase in ATPase activity by reducing the Vmax of the enzyme without modifying the apparent affinity for ATP in the three strains. In one mutant, pma1-T912A, the putative calmodulin-dependent protein kinase-phosphorylatable Thr-912 was eliminated, and in the other, pma1-P536L, H+-ATPase was constitutively activated, suggesting that the antagonistic effect was not mediated by a calmodulin-dependent protein kinase and not related to glucose regulation. This was corroborated when the in vitro effect of the calmodulin antagonists on H+-ATPase activity was tested. Purified plasma membranes from glucose-starved or glucose-fermenting cells from both pma1-P890X, another constitutively activated ATPase mutant, and wild-type strains were preincubated with calmidazolium or melittin. In all cases, ATP hydrolysis was inhibited with an IC50 of approximately 1 microM. This inhibition was reversed by calmodulin. Analysis of the calmodulin-binding protein pattern in the plasma-membrane fraction eliminates ATPase as the calmodulin target protein. We conclude that H+-ATPase inhibition by calmodulin antagonists is mediated by an as yet unidentified calmodulin-dependent membrane protein. PMID:9148755

  16. Plant Calmodulins and Calmodulin-Related Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ranty, Benoît; Aldon, Didier

    2006-01-01

    The calmodulin (CaM) family is a major class of calcium sensor proteins which collectively play a crucial role in cellular signaling cascades through the regulation of numerous target proteins. Although CaM is one of the most conserved proteins in all eukaryotes, several features of CaM and its downstream effector proteins are unique to plants. The continuously growing repertoire of CaM-binding proteins includes several plant-specific proteins. Plants also possess a particular set of CaM isoforms and CaM-like proteins (CMLs) whose functions have just begun to be elucidated. This review summarizes recent insights that help to understand the role of this multigene family in plant development and adaptation to environmental stimuli. PMID:19521489

  17. Mechanism of Ca2+-influx and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV activity during in utero hypoxia in cerebral cortical neuronal nuclei of the guinea pig fetus at term.

    PubMed

    Vibert, Yanick M; Ashraf, Qazi M; Mishra, Om P; Delivoria-Papadopoulos, Maria

    2008-08-01

    Previously we showed that following hypoxia there is an increase in nuclear Ca(2+)-influx and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV activity (CaMK IV) in the cerebral cortex of term guinea pig fetus. The present study tests the hypothesis that clonidine administration will prevent hypoxia-induced increased neuronal nuclear Ca(2+)-influx and increased CaMK IV activity, by blocking high-affinity Ca(2+)-ATPase. Studies were conducted in 18 pregnant guinea pigs at term, normoxia (Nx, n=6), hypoxia (Hx, n=6) and clonidine with Hx (Hx+Clo, n=6). The pregnant guinea pig was exposed to a decreased FiO(2) of 0.07 for 60 min. Clonidine, an imidazoline inhibitor of high-affinity Ca(2+)-ATPase, was administered 12.5 microg/kg IP 30 min prior to hypoxia. Hypoxia was determined biochemically by ATP and phosphocreatine (PCr) levels. Nuclei were isolated and ATP-dependent (45)Ca(2+)-influx was determined. CaMK IV activity was determined by (33)P-incorporation into syntide 2 for 2 min at 37 degrees C in a medium containing 50mM HEPES (pH 7.5), 2mM DTT, 40muM syntide 2, 0.2mM (33)P-ATP, 10mM magnesium acetate, 5 microM PKI 5-24, 2 microM PKC 19-36 inhibitor peptides, 1 microM microcystine LR, 200 microM sodium orthovanadate and either 1mM EGTA (for CaMK IV-independent activity) or 0.8mM CaCl(2) and 1mM calmodulin (for total activity). ATP (mumoles/gbrain) values were significantly different in the Nx (4.62+/-0.2), Hx (1.65+/-0.2, p<0.05 vs. Nx), and Hx+Clo (1.92+/-0.6, p<0.05 vs. Nx). PCr (mumoles/g brain) values in the Nx (3.9+/-0.1), Hx (1.10+/-0.3, p<0.05 vs. Nx), and Hx+Clo (1.14+/-0.3, p<0.05 vs. Nx). There was a significant difference between nuclear Ca(2+)-influx (pmoles/mg protein/min) in Nx (3.98+/-0.4), Hx (10.38+/-0.7, p<0.05 vs. Nx), and Hx+Clo (7.35+/-0.9, p<0.05 vs. Nx, p<0.05 vs. Hx), and CaM KIV (pmoles/mg protein/min) in Nx (1314.00+/-195.4), Hx (2315.14+/-148.5, p<0.05 vs. Nx), and Hx+Clo (1686.75+/-154.3, p<0.05 vs. Nx, p<0.05 vs. Hx). We conclude that the

  18. Molecular mechanisms of calmodulin action on TRPV5 and modulation by parathyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Theun; Kovalevskaya, Nadezda V; Verkaart, Sjoerd; Schilderink, Nathalie; Felici, Marco; van der Hagen, Eline A E; Bindels, René J M; Vuister, Geerten W; Hoenderop, Joost G

    2011-07-01

    The epithelial Ca(2+) channel transient receptor potential vanilloid 5 (TRPV5) constitutes the apical entry gate for active Ca(2+) reabsorption in the kidney. Ca(2+) influx through TRPV5 induces rapid channel inactivation, preventing excessive Ca(2+) influx. This inactivation is mediated by the last ∼30 residues of the carboxy (C) terminus of the channel. Since the Ca(2+)-sensing protein calmodulin has been implicated in Ca(2+)-dependent regulation of several TRP channels, the potential role of calmodulin in TRPV5 function was investigated. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy revealed a Ca(2+)-dependent interaction between calmodulin and a C-terminal fragment of TRPV5 (residues 696 to 729) in which one calmodulin binds two TRPV5 C termini. The TRPV5 residues involved in calmodulin binding were mutated to study the functional consequence of releasing calmodulin from the C terminus. The point mutants TRPV5-W702A and TRPV5-R706E, lacking calmodulin binding, displayed a strongly diminished Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation compared to wild-type TRPV5, as demonstrated by patch clamp analysis. Finally, parathyroid hormone (PTH) induced protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent phosphorylation of residue T709, which diminished calmodulin binding to TRPV5 and thereby enhanced channel open probability. The TRPV5-W702A mutant exhibited a significantly increased channel open probability and was not further stimulated by PTH. Thus, calmodulin negatively modulates TRPV5 activity, which is reversed by PTH-mediated channel phosphorylation. PMID:21576356

  19. Molecular Mechanisms of Calmodulin Action on TRPV5 and Modulation by Parathyroid Hormone▿†

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, Theun; Kovalevskaya, Nadezda V.; Verkaart, Sjoerd; Schilderink, Nathalie; Felici, Marco; van der Hagen, Eline A. E.; Bindels, René J. M.; Vuister, Geerten W.; Hoenderop, Joost G.

    2011-01-01

    The epithelial Ca2+ channel transient receptor potential vanilloid 5 (TRPV5) constitutes the apical entry gate for active Ca2+ reabsorption in the kidney. Ca2+ influx through TRPV5 induces rapid channel inactivation, preventing excessive Ca2+ influx. This inactivation is mediated by the last ∼30 residues of the carboxy (C) terminus of the channel. Since the Ca2+-sensing protein calmodulin has been implicated in Ca2+-dependent regulation of several TRP channels, the potential role of calmodulin in TRPV5 function was investigated. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy revealed a Ca2+-dependent interaction between calmodulin and a C-terminal fragment of TRPV5 (residues 696 to 729) in which one calmodulin binds two TRPV5 C termini. The TRPV5 residues involved in calmodulin binding were mutated to study the functional consequence of releasing calmodulin from the C terminus. The point mutants TRPV5-W702A and TRPV5-R706E, lacking calmodulin binding, displayed a strongly diminished Ca2+-dependent inactivation compared to wild-type TRPV5, as demonstrated by patch clamp analysis. Finally, parathyroid hormone (PTH) induced protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent phosphorylation of residue T709, which diminished calmodulin binding to TRPV5 and thereby enhanced channel open probability. The TRPV5-W702A mutant exhibited a significantly increased channel open probability and was not further stimulated by PTH. Thus, calmodulin negatively modulates TRPV5 activity, which is reversed by PTH-mediated channel phosphorylation. PMID:21576356

  20. Modulation of phosphofructokinase action by macromolecular interactions. Quantitative analysis of the phosphofructokinase-aldolase-calmodulin system.

    PubMed

    Orosz, F; Christova, T Y; Ovádi, J

    1988-11-23

    The simultaneous effect of calmodulin and aldolase (D-fructose-1,6-bisphosphate D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-lyase, EC 4.1.2.13) on the concentration-dependent behaviour of muscle phosphofructokinase (ATP: D-fructose-6-phosphate 1-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.11) has been analysed by means of a covalently attached fluorescent probe, gel penetration experiments, and using a kinetic approach. We found that calmodulin-induced inactivation of phosphofructokinase is suspended by addition of an equimolar amount of aldolase. This effect was attributed to an apparent competition of calmodulin and aldolase for the dimeric forms of kinase. Moreover, the direct binding of aldolase to calmodulin has also been demonstrated, which resulted in a significant decrease in the kcat value of the enzyme. The quantitative analysis of these interactions in the system phosphofructokinase-calmodulin-aldolase is presented. A possible molecular model for the modulation of phosphofructokinase action by macromolecular interactions is envisaged. PMID:2973356

  1. Integrated Protein Array Screening and High Throughput Validation of 70 Novel Neural Calmodulin-binding Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, David J.; Bauer, Mikael C.; O'Brien, John; Johnson, Winifred M.; Divizio, Catherine A.; O'Kane, Sara L.; Berggård, Tord; Merino, Alejandro; Åkerfeldt, Karin S.; Linse, Sara; Cahill, Dolores J.

    2010-01-01

    Calmodulin is an essential regulator of intracellular processes in response to extracellular stimuli mediated by a rise in Ca2+ ion concentration. To profile protein-protein interactions of calmodulin in human brain, we probed a high content human protein array with fluorophore-labeled calmodulin in the presence of Ca2+. This protein array contains 37,200 redundant proteins, incorporating over 10,000 unique human neural proteins from a human brain cDNA library. We designed a screen to find high affinity (KD ≤ 1 μm) binding partners of calmodulin and identified 76 human proteins from all intracellular compartments of which 72 are novel. We measured the binding kinetics of 74 targets with calmodulin using a high throughput surface plasmon resonance assay. Most of the novel calmodulin-target complexes identified have low dissociation rates (koff ≤ 10−3 s−1) and high affinity (KD ≤ 1 μm), consistent with the design of the screen. Many of the identified proteins are known to assemble in neural tissue, forming assemblies such as the spectrin scaffold and the postsynaptic density. We developed a microarray of the identified target proteins with which we can characterize the biochemistry of calmodulin for all targets in parallel. Four novel targets were verified in neural cells by co-immunoprecipitation, and four were selected for exploration of the calmodulin-binding regions. Using synthetic peptides and isothermal titration calorimetry, calmodulin binding motifs were identified in the potassium voltage-gated channel Kv6.1 (residues 474–493), calmodulin kinase-like vesicle-associated protein (residues 302–316), EF-hand domain family member A2 (residues 202–216), and phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase, type I, γ (residues 400–415). PMID:20068228

  2. Correlation between calmodulin activity and gravitropic sensitivity in primary roots of maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stinemetz, C. L.; Kuzmanoff, K. M.; Evans, M. L.; Jarrett, H. W.

    1987-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates a role for calcium and calmodulin in the gravitropic response of primary roots of maize (Zea mays, L.). We examined this possibility by testing the relationship between calmodulin activity and gravitropic sensitivity in roots of the maize cultivars Merit and B73 x Missouri 17. Roots of the Merit cultivar require light to the gravitropically competent. The gravitropic response of the Missouri cultivar is independent of light. The occurrence of calmodulin in primary roots of these maize cultivars was tested by affinity gel chromatography followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with bovine brain calmodulin as standard. The distribution of calmodulin activity was measured using both the phosphodiesterase and NAD kinase assays for calmodulin. These assays were performed on whole tissue segments, crude extracts, and purified extracts. In light-grown seedlings of the Merit cultivar or in either dark- or light-grown seedlings of the Missouri cultivar, calmodulin activity per millimeter of root tissue was about 4-fold higher in the apical millimeter than in the subtending 3 millimeters. Calmodulin activity was very low in the apical millimeter of roots of dark-grown (gravitropically nonresponsive) seedlings of the Merit cultivar. Upon illumination, the calmodulin activity in the apical millimeter increased to a level comparable to that of light-grown seedlings and the roots became gravitropically competent. The time course of the development of gravitropic sensitivity following illumination paralleled the time course of the increase in calmodulin activity in the apical millimeter of the root. The results are consistent with the suggestion that calmodulin plays an important role in the gravitropic response of roots.

  3. Synthesis and Accumulation of Calmodulin in Suspension Cultures of Carrot (Daucus carota L.) 1

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Imara Y.; Zielinski, Raymond E.

    1992-01-01

    The expression of calmodulin mRNA and protein were measured during a growth cycle of carrot (Daucus carota L.) cells grown in suspension culture. A full-length carrot calmodulin cDNA clone isolated from a λgt10 library was used to measure steady-state calmodulin mRNA levels. During the exponential phase of culture growth when mitotic activity and oxidative respiration rates were maximal, calmodulin mRNA levels were 4- to 5-fold higher than they were during the later stages of culture growth, when respiration rates were lower and growth was primarily by cell expansion. Net calmodulin polypeptide synthesis, as measured by pulse-labeling in vivo with [35S]methionine, paralleled the changes in calmodulin steady-state mRNA level during culture growth. As a consequence, net calmodulin polypeptide synthesis declined 5- to 10-fold during the later stages of culture growth. The qualitative spectrum of polypeptides synthesized and accumulated by the carrot cells during the course of a culture cycle, however, remained largely unchanged. Calmodulin polypeptide levels, in contrast to its net synthesis, remained relatively constant during the exponential phases of the culture growth cycle and increased during the later stages of culture growth. Our data are consistent with increased calmodulin polypeptide turnover associated with periods of rapid cell proliferation and high levels of respiration. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:16653062

  4. Phosphorylation of rat liver heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins A2 and C can be modulated by calmodulin.

    PubMed Central

    Bosser, R; Faura, M; Serratosa, J; Renau-Piqueras, J; Pruschy, M; Bachs, O

    1995-01-01

    It was previously reported that the phosphorylation of three proteins of 36, 40 to 42, and 50 kDa by casein kinase 2 is inhibited by calmodulin in nuclear extracts from rat liver cells (R. Bosser, R. Aligué, D. Guerini, N. Agell, E. Carafoli, and O. Bachs, J. Biol. Chem. 268:15477-15483, 1993). By immunoblotting, peptide mapping, and endogenous phosphorylation experiments, the 36- and 40- to 42-kDa proteins have been identified as the A2 and C proteins, respectively, of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles. To better understand the mechanism by which calmodulin inhibits the phosphorylation of these proteins, they were purified by using single-stranded DNA chromatography, and the effect of calmodulin on their phosphorylation by casein kinase 2 was analyzed. Results revealed that whereas calmodulin inhibited the phosphorylation of purified A2 and C proteins in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner, it did not affect the casein kinase 2 phosphorylation of a different protein substrate, i.e., beta-casein. These results indicate that the effect of calmodulin was not on casein kinase 2 activity but on specific protein substrates. The finding that the A2 and C proteins can bind to a calmodulin-Sepharose column in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner suggests that this association could prevent the phosphorylation of the proteins by casein kinase 2. Immunoelectron microscopy studies have revealed that such interactions could also occur in vivo, since calmodulin and A2 and C proteins colocalize on the ribonucleoprotein particles in rat liver cell nuclei. PMID:7823935

  5. Role of Ca2+ and calmodulin in ehrlichial infection in macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Rikihisa, Y; Zhang, Y; Park, J

    1995-01-01

    Replication of Ehrlichia risticii was inhibited in P388D1 cells and murine peritoneal macrophages when a calmodulin antagonist (W-7, chlorpromazine, or trifluoperazine); a Ca2+ channel blocker (verapamil, diltiazem, nifedipine, or flunarizine); an extracellular Ca2+ chelator, EGTA [ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid]; an inhibitor of intracellular Ca2+ mobilization, TMB-8; or Ca2+ ionophore A23187 was added after internalization of the organism at 3 h postincubation. When intracellular ehrlichiae at their logarithmic stage of growth were treated with these reagents, not only was further proliferation prevented but also there was significant reduction in numbers of intracellular ehrlichiae. These reagents prevented spreading of E. risticii from P388D1 cells to THP-1 cells. None of these reagents prevented binding of [35S]methionine-labeled E. risticii to P388D1 cells, but all of these reagents prevented internalization of [35S]methionine-labeled E. risticii. Protein kinase C inhibitors, H-7 and staurosporin, had no effect. 14CO2 production from L-[14C]glutamine in Percoll-density-gradient-purified E. risticii was inhibited by A23187 but not by W-7 or verapamil, suggesting that Ca2+ but not calmodulin directly regulates ehrlichials glutamine oxidation. Pretreatment of E. risticii with W-7 or verapamil did not reduce its infectivity. These results indicate that calmodulin and Ca2+ are essential for ehrlichial internalization, replication, and spreading in macrophages but are not essential for binding. PMID:7768614

  6. SK channels and calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Adelman, John P

    2016-01-01

    Calcium ions are Nature's most widely used signaling mechanism, mediating communication between pathways at virtually every physiological level. Ion channels are no exception, as the activities of a wide range of ion channels are intricately shaped by fluctuations in intracellular Ca2+ levels. Mirroring the importance and the breadth of Ca2+ signaling, free Ca2+ levels are tightly controlled, and a myriad of Ca2+ binding proteins transduce Ca2+ signals, each with its own nuance, comprising a constantly changing symphony of metabolic activity. The founding member of Ca2+ binding proteins is calmodulin (CaM), a small, acidic, modular protein endowed with gymnastic-like flexibility and E-F hand motifs that chelate Ca2+ ions. In this review, I will trace the history that led to the realization that CaM serves as the Ca2+-gating cue for SK channels, the experiments that revealed that CaM is an intrinsic subunit of SK channels, and itself a target of regulation. PMID:25942650

  7. SK channels and calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Adelman, John P

    2016-01-01

    Calcium ions are Nature's most widely used signaling mechanism, mediating communication between pathways at virtually every physiological level. Ion channels are no exception, as the activities of a wide range of ion channels are intricately shaped by fluctuations in intracellular Ca(2+) levels. Mirroring the importance and the breadth of Ca(2+) signaling, free Ca(2+) levels are tightly controlled, and a myriad of Ca(2+) binding proteins transduce Ca(2+) signals, each with its own nuance, comprising a constantly changing symphony of metabolic activity. The founding member of Ca(2+) binding proteins is calmodulin (CaM), a small, acidic, modular protein endowed with gymnastic-like flexibility and E-F hand motifs that chelate Ca(2+) ions. In this review, I will trace the history that led to the realization that CaM serves as the Ca(2+)-gating cue for SK channels, the experiments that revealed that CaM is an intrinsic subunit of SK channels, and itself a target of regulation. PMID:25942650

  8. Role of Calmodulin in Cell Proliferation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chafouleas, J.

    1983-01-01

    Calmodulin levels were found to increase as cells enter plateau. The data suggest that the cells are exiting the cell cycle late in the G sub 1 phase, or that the calmodulin levels in plateau cells are uncoupled to progression into S phase in plateau cells. Upon release, calmodulin levels rapidly decrease. Following this decrease, there is a increase prior to S phase.

  9. Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent phosphorylation of islet secretory granule proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, D.T. )

    1991-08-01

    The effect of Ca2+ and calmodulin on phosphorylation of islet secretory granule proteins was studied. Secretory granules were incubated in a phosphorylation reaction mixture containing (32P)ATP and test reagents. The 32P-labeled proteins were resolved by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the 32P content was visualized by autoradiography, and the relative intensities of specific bands were quantitated. When the reaction mixture contained EGTA and no added Ca2+, 32P was incorporated into two proteins with molecular weights of 45,000 and 13,000. When 10(-4) M Ca2+ was added without EGTA, two additional proteins (58,000 and 48,000 Mr) were phosphorylated, and the 13,000-Mr protein was absent. The addition of 2.4 microM calmodulin markedly enhanced the phosphorylation of the 58,000- and 48,000-Mr proteins and resulted in the phosphorylation of a major protein whose molecular weight (64,000 Mr) is identical to that of one of the calmodulin binding proteins located on the granule surface. Calmodulin had no effect on phosphorylation in the absence of Ca2+ but was effective in the presence of calcium between 10 nM and 50 microM. Trifluoperazine and calmidazolium, calmodulin antagonists, produced a dose-dependent inhibition of the calmodulin effect. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate, a phorbol ester that activates protein kinase C, produced no increase in phosphorylation, and 1-(5-isoquinoline sulfonyl)-2-methyl piperazine dihydrochloride, an inhibitor of protein kinase C, had no effect. These results indicate that Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinases and endogenous substrates are present in islet secretory granules.

  10. Leveraging the Mechanism of Oxidative Decay for Adenylate Kinase to Design Structural and Functional Resistances

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Stanley C.; Richards, David H.; Mitch, William A.; Wilson, Corey J.

    2016-01-01

    Characterization of the mechanisms underlying hypohalous acid (i.e., hypochlorous acid or hypobromous acid) degradation of proteins is important for understanding how the immune system deactivates pathogens during infections, and damages human tissues during inflammatory diseases. Proteins are particularly important hypohalous acid reaction targets in pathogens and in host tissues, as evidenced by the detection of chlorinated and brominated oxidizable residues. While a significant amount of work has been conducted for reactions of hypohalous acids with a range of individual amino acids and small peptides, the assessment of oxidative decay in full-length proteins has lagged in comparison. The most rigorous test of our understanding of oxidative decay of proteins is the rational redesign of proteins with conferred resistances to the decay of structure and function. Toward this end, in this study we experimentally determined a putative mechanism of oxidative decay using adenylate kinase as the model system. In turn, we leveraged this mechanism to rationally design new proteins and experimentally test each system for oxidative resistance to loss of structure and function. From our extensive assessment of secondary-structure, protein hydrodynamics and enzyme activity upon hypochlorous acid or hypobromous acid challenge, we have identified two key strategies for conferring structural and functional resistance. Namely, the design of proteins (adenylate kinase enzymes) that are resistant to oxidation requires complementary consideration of protein stability and the modification (elimination) of certain oxidizable residues proximal to catalytic sites. PMID:26266833

  11. Leveraging the Mechanism of Oxidative Decay for Adenylate Kinase to Design Structural and Functional Resistances.

    PubMed

    Howell, Stanley C; Richards, David H; Mitch, William A; Wilson, Corey J

    2015-10-16

    Characterization of the mechanisms underlying hypohalous acid (i.e., hypochlorous acid or hypobromous acid) degradation of proteins is important for understanding how the immune system deactivates pathogens during infections and damages human tissues during inflammatory diseases. Proteins are particularly important hypohalous acid reaction targets in pathogens and in host tissues, as evidenced by the detection of chlorinated and brominated oxidizable residues. While a significant amount of work has been conducted for reactions of hypohalous acids with a range of individual amino acids and small peptides, the assessment of oxidative decay in full-length proteins has lagged in comparison. The most rigorous test of our understanding of oxidative decay of proteins is the rational redesign of proteins with conferred resistances to the decay of structure and function. Toward this end, in this study, we experimentally determined a putative mechanism of oxidative decay using adenylate kinase as the model system. In turn, we leveraged this mechanism to rationally design new proteins and experimentally test each system for oxidative resistance to loss of structure and function. From our extensive assessment of secondary structure, protein hydrodynamics, and enzyme activity upon hypochlorous acid or hypobromous acid challenge, we have identified two key strategies for conferring structural and functional resistance, namely, the design of proteins (adenylate kinase enzymes) that are resistant to oxidation requires complementary consideration of protein stability and the modification (elimination) of certain oxidizable residues proximal to catalytic sites. PMID:26266833

  12. Protein kinase C and tyrosine kinase pathways regulate lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide synthase activity in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Paul, A; Pendreigh, R H; Plevin, R

    1995-01-01

    1. In RAW 264.7 macrophages, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and gamma-interferon (IFN gamma) alone or in combination stimulated the induction of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity and increased the expression of the 130 kDa isoform of NOS. 2. LPS-induced NOS activity was reduced by incubation with CD14 neutralising antibodies and abolished in macrophages deprived of serum. 3. LPS stimulated a small increase in protein kinase C (PKC) activity in RAW 264.7 macrophages which was dependent on the presence of serum. However, IFN gamma did not potentiate LPS-stimulated PKC activity. 4. The protein kinase C inhibitor, Ro-318220, abolished both LPS- and IFN gamma-stimulated protein kinase C activity and the induction of NOS activity. 5. LPS- and IFN gamma-induced NOS activity was reduced by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genestein. Genestein also reduced LPS-stimulated protein kinase C activity but did not affect the response to the protein kinase C activator, tetradecanoylphorbol acetate (TPA). 6. Nicotinamide, an inhibitor of poly-ADP ribosylation, abolished LPS- and IFN gamma-induced NOS activity. 7. Brefeldin A, an inhibitor of a factor which stimulates nucleotide exchange activity on the 21 kDa ADP-ribosylation factor, ARF, reduced LPS- and IFN gamma-induced NOS activity by approximately 80%. 8. These results suggest the involvement of protein kinase C, tyrosine kinase and poly-ADP ribosylation pathways in the regulation of the induction of nitric oxide synthase in RAW 264.7 macrophages by LPS and IFN gamma. Images Figure 2 PMID:7533621

  13. Activation of AMP-kinase by Policosanol Requires Peroxisomal Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Subhashis; Ghoshal, Sarbani

    2011-01-01

    Policosanol, a well-defined mixture of very long chain primary alcohols that is available as a nutraceutical product, has been reported to lower blood cholesterol levels. The present studies demonstrate that policosanol promotes the phosphorylation of AMP-kinase and HMG-CoA reductase in hepatoma cells and in mouse liver after intragastric administration, providing a possible means by which policosanol might lower blood cholesterol levels. Treatment of hepatoma cells with policosanol produced a 2.5-fold or greater increase in the phosphorylation of AMP-kinase and HMG-CoA reductase, and increased the phosphorylation of Ca++/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase (CaMKK), an upstream AMP-kinase kinase. Intra-gastric administration of policosanol to mice similarly increased the phosphorylation of hepatic HMG-CoA reductase and AMP-kinase by greater than 2-fold. siRNA-mediated suppression of fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase, fatty acyl-CoA synthetase 4, and acyl-CoA acetyltransferase expression in hepatoma cells prevented the phosphorylation of AMP-kinase and HMG-CoA reductase by policosanol, indicating that metabolism of these very long chain alcohols to activated fatty acids is necessary for the suppression of cholesterol synthesis, presumably by increasing cellular AMP levels. Subsequent peroxisomal β-oxidation probably augments this effect. PMID:21359855

  14. Characterization of Phospho-(Tyrosine)-Mimetic Calmodulin Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Stateva, Silviya R.; Salas, Valentina; Benaim, Gustavo; Menéndez, Margarita; Solís, Dolores; Villalobo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) phosphorylated at different serine/threonine and tyrosine residues is known to exert differential regulatory effects on a variety of CaM-binding enzymes as compared to non-phosphorylated CaM. In this report we describe the preparation and characterization of a series of phospho-(Y)-mimetic CaM mutants in which either one or the two tyrosine residues present in CaM (Y99 and Y138) were substituted to aspartic acid or glutamic acid. It was expected that the negative charge of the respective carboxyl group of these amino acids mimics the negative charge of phosphate and reproduce the effects that distinct phospho-(Y)-CaM species may have on target proteins. We describe some physicochemical properties of these CaM mutants as compared to wild type CaM, after their expression in Escherichia coli and purification to homogeneity, including: i) changes in their electrophoretic mobility in the absence and presence of Ca2+; ii) ultraviolet (UV) light absorption spectra, far- and near-UV circular dichroism data; iii) thermal stability in the absence and presence of Ca2+; and iv) Tb3+-emitted fluorescence upon tyrosine excitation. We also describe some biochemical properties of these CaM mutants, such as their differential phosphorylation by the tyrosine kinase c-Src, and their action as compared to wild type CaM, on the activity of two CaM-dependent enzymes: cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 1 (PDE1) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) assayed in vitro. PMID:25830911

  15. Nitroglycerin drives endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Mao; Sudhahar, Varadarajan; Ansenberger-Fricano, Kristine; Fernandes, Denise C.; Tanaka, Leonardo Y.; Fukai, Tohru; Laurindo, Francisco R.M.; Mason, Ronald P.; Vasquez-Vivar, Jeannette; Minshall, Richard D.; Stadler, Krisztian; Bonini, Marcelo G.

    2012-01-01

    Nitroglycerin (GTN) has been clinically used to treat angina pectoris and acute heart episodes for over 100 years. The effects of GTN have long been recognized and active research has contributed to the unraveling of numerous metabolic routes capable of converting GTN to the potent vasoactive messenger nitric oxide. Recently, the mechanism by which minute doses of GTN elicit robust pharmacological responses was revisited and eNOS activation was implicated as an important route mediating vasodilation induced by low GTN doses (1–50 nM). Here, we demonstrate that at such concentrations the pharmacologic effects of nitroglycerin are largely dependent on the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, Akt/PKB, and phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) signal transduction axis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that nitroglycerin-dependent accumulation of 3,4,5-InsP3, probably because of inhibition of PTEN, is important for eNOS activation, conferring a mechanistic basis for GTN pharmacological action at pharmacologically relevant doses. PMID:22037515

  16. Nitroglycerin drives endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B pathway.

    PubMed

    Mao, Mao; Sudhahar, Varadarajan; Ansenberger-Fricano, Kristine; Fernandes, Denise C; Tanaka, Leonardo Y; Fukai, Tohru; Laurindo, Francisco R M; Mason, Ronald P; Vasquez-Vivar, Jeannette; Minshall, Richard D; Stadler, Krisztian; Bonini, Marcelo G

    2012-01-15

    Nitroglycerin (GTN) has been clinically used to treat angina pectoris and acute heart episodes for over 100 years. The effects of GTN have long been recognized and active research has contributed to the unraveling of numerous metabolic routes capable of converting GTN to the potent vasoactive messenger nitric oxide. Recently, the mechanism by which minute doses of GTN elicit robust pharmacological responses was revisited and eNOS activation was implicated as an important route mediating vasodilation induced by low GTN doses (1-50nM). Here, we demonstrate that at such concentrations the pharmacologic effects of nitroglycerin are largely dependent on the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, Akt/PKB, and phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) signal transduction axis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that nitroglycerin-dependent accumulation of 3,4,5-InsP(3), probably because of inhibition of PTEN, is important for eNOS activation, conferring a mechanistic basis for GTN pharmacological action at pharmacologically relevant doses. PMID:22037515

  17. Ginsenoside Rg3 increases nitric oxide production via increases in phosphorylation and expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase: Essential roles of estrogen receptor-dependent PI3-kinase and AMP-activated protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Hien, Tran Thi; Kim, Nak Doo; Pokharel, Yuba Raj; Oh, Seok Jeong; Lee, Moo Yeol; Kang, Keon Wook

    2010-08-01

    We previously showed that ginsenosides increase nitric oxide (NO) production in vascular endothelium and that ginsenoside Rg3 (Rg3) is the most active one among ginseng saponins. However, the mechanism for Rg3-mediated nitric oxide production is still uncertain. In this study, we determined whether Rg3 affects phosphorylation and expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in ECV 304 human endothelial cells. Rg3 increased both the phosphorylation and the expression of eNOS in a concentration-dependent manner and a maximal effect was found at 10 {mu}g/ml of Rg3. The enzyme activities of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 kinase were enhanced as were estrogen receptor (ER)- and glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-dependent reporter gene transcriptions in Rg3-treated endothelial cells. Rg3-induced eNOS phosphorylation required the ER-mediated PI3-kinase/Akt pathway. Moreover, Rg3 activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) through up-regulation of CaM kinase II and Rg3-stimulated eNOS phosphorylation was reversed by AMPK inhibition. The present results provide a mechanism for Rg3-stimulated endothelial NO production.

  18. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent transcriptional pathways: potential mediators of skeletal muscle growth and development.

    PubMed

    Al-Shanti, Nasser; Stewart, Claire E

    2009-11-01

    The loss of muscle mass with age and disuse has a significant impact on the physiological and social well-being of the aged; this is an increasingly important problem as the population becomes skewed towards older age. Exercise has psychological benefits but it also impacts on muscle protein synthesis and degradation, increasing muscle tissue volume in both young and older individuals. Skeletal muscle hypertrophy involves an increase in muscle mass and cross-sectional area and associated increased myofibrillar protein content. Attempts to understand the molecular mechanisms that underlie muscle growth, development and maintenance, have focused on characterising the molecular pathways that initiate, maintain and regenerate skeletal muscle. Such understanding may aid in improving targeted interventional therapies for age-related muscle loss and muscle wasting associated with diseases. Two major routes through which skeletal muscle development and growth are regulated are insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent transcriptional pathways. Many reviews have focused on understanding the signalling pathways of IGF-I and its receptor, which govern skeletal muscle hypertrophy. However, alternative molecular signalling pathways such as the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent transcriptional pathways should also be considered as potential mediators of muscle growth. These latter pathways have received relatively little attention and the purpose herein is to highlight the progress being made in the understanding of these pathways and associated molecules: calmodulin, calmodulin kinases (CaMKs), calcineurin and nuclear factor of activated T-cell (NFAT), which are involved in skeletal muscle regulation. We describe: (1) how conformational changes in the Ca(2+) sensor calmodulin result in the exposure of binding pockets for the target proteins (CaMKs and calcineurin). (2) How Calmodulin consequently activates either the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinases

  19. Calmodulin-stimulated phosphorylation of 17 beta-estradiol receptor on tyrosine.

    PubMed Central

    Migliaccio, A; Rotondi, A; Auricchio, F

    1984-01-01

    The calf uterine 17 beta-estradiol receptor is a phosphoprotein. Phosphorylation-dephosphorylation of the receptor is controlled by a cytosol receptor kinase that activates the hormone binding and by a nuclear phosphatase that inactivates this binding. This report concerns the nature of the 17 beta-estradiol receptor kinase. Highly purified calf uterus 17 beta-estradiol receptor preinactivated by the nuclear phosphatase was used as substrate of the purified receptor kinase. Ca2+ and calmodulin stimulate both the kinase-dependent activation of the hormone binding and 32P incorporation from [gamma-32P]-ATP into the receptor. Maximal stimulation of hormone binding activation requires 1 microM Ca2+ and 0.6 microM calmodulin. Fifteen micromolar trifluoperazine is the lowest concentration that will prevent completely Ca2+-calmodulin stimulation of the kinase. The receptor is phosphorylated by the receptor kinase exclusively on tyrosine. Phosphorylation of proteins on tyrosine is a rare event implicated in hormone-induced cell growth and cell transformation. Images PMID:6207535

  20. Single-molecule spectroscopy reveals how calmodulin activates NO synthase by controlling its conformational fluctuation dynamics

    PubMed Central

    He, Yufan; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Stuehr, Dennis J.; Lu, H. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms that regulate the nitric oxide synthase enzymes (NOS) are of interest in biology and medicine. Although NOS catalysis relies on domain motions, and is activated by calmodulin binding, the relationships are unclear. We used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy to elucidate the conformational states distribution and associated conformational fluctuation dynamics of the two electron transfer domains in a FRET dye-labeled neuronal NOS reductase domain, and to understand how calmodulin affects the dynamics to regulate catalysis. We found that calmodulin alters NOS conformational behaviors in several ways: It changes the distance distribution between the NOS domains, shortens the lifetimes of the individual conformational states, and instills conformational discipline by greatly narrowing the distributions of the conformational states and fluctuation rates. This information was specifically obtainable only by single-molecule spectroscopic measurements, and reveals how calmodulin promotes catalysis by shaping the physical and temporal conformational behaviors of NOS. PMID:26311846

  1. Single-molecule spectroscopy reveals how calmodulin activates NO synthase by controlling its conformational fluctuation dynamics.

    PubMed

    He, Yufan; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Stuehr, Dennis J; Lu, H Peter

    2015-09-22

    Mechanisms that regulate the nitric oxide synthase enzymes (NOS) are of interest in biology and medicine. Although NOS catalysis relies on domain motions, and is activated by calmodulin binding, the relationships are unclear. We used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy to elucidate the conformational states distribution and associated conformational fluctuation dynamics of the two electron transfer domains in a FRET dye-labeled neuronal NOS reductase domain, and to understand how calmodulin affects the dynamics to regulate catalysis. We found that calmodulin alters NOS conformational behaviors in several ways: It changes the distance distribution between the NOS domains, shortens the lifetimes of the individual conformational states, and instills conformational discipline by greatly narrowing the distributions of the conformational states and fluctuation rates. This information was specifically obtainable only by single-molecule spectroscopic measurements, and reveals how calmodulin promotes catalysis by shaping the physical and temporal conformational behaviors of NOS. PMID:26311846

  2. A role for cysteine 3635 of RYR1 in redox modulation and calmodulin binding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter Moore, C.; Zhang, J. Z.; Hamilton, S. L.

    1999-01-01

    Oxidation of the skeletal muscle Ca(2+) release channel (RYR1) increases its activity, produces intersubunit disulfide bonds, and blocks its interaction with calmodulin. Conversely, bound calmodulin protects RYR1 from the effects of oxidants (Zhang, J.-Z., Wu, Y., Williams, B. Y., Rodney, G., Mandel, F., Strasburg, G. M., and Hamilton, S. L. (1999) Am. J. Physiol. 276, Cell Physiol. C46-C53). In addition, calmodulin protects RYR1 from trypsin cleavage at amino acids 3630 and 3637 (Moore, C. P., Rodney, G., Zhang, J.-Z., Santacruz-Toloza, L., Strasburg, G. M., and Hamilton, S. L. (1999) Biochemistry 38, 8532-8537). The sequence between these two tryptic sites is AVVACFR. Alkylation of RYR1 with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) blocks both (35)S-apocalmodulin binding and oxidation-induced intersubunit cross-linking. In the current work, we demonstrate that both cysteines needed for the oxidation-induced intersubunit cross-link are protected from alkylation with N-ethylmaleimide by bound calmodulin. We also show, using N-terminal amino acid sequencing together with analysis of the distribution of [(3)H]NEM labeling with each sequencing cycle, that cysteine 3635 of RYR1 is rapidly labeled by NEM and that this labeling is blocked by bound calmodulin. We propose that cysteine 3635 is located at an intersubunit contact site that is close to or within a calmodulin binding site. These findings suggest that calmodulin and oxidation modulate RYR1 activity by regulating intersubunit interactions in a mutually exclusive manner and that these interactions involve cysteine 3635.

  3. Microfluidic free-flow electrophoresis for the discovery and characterisation of calmodulin binding partners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herling, Therese; Linse, Sara; Knowles, Tuomas

    2015-03-01

    Non-covalent and transient protein-ligand interactions are integral to cellular function and malfunction. Key steps in signalling and regulatory pathways rely on reversible non-covalent protein-protein binding or ion chelation. Here we present a microfluidic free-flow electrophoresis method for detecting and characterising protein-ligand interactions in solution. We apply this method to probe the binding equilibria of calmodulin, a central protein to calcium signalling pathways. In this study we characterise the specific binding of calmodulin to phosphorylase kinase, a known target, and creatine kinase, which we identify as a putative binding partner through a protein array screen and surface plasmon resonance experiments. We verify the interaction between calmodulin and creatine kinase in solution using free-flow electrophoresis and investigate the effect of calcium and sodium chloride on the calmodulin-ligand binding affinity in free solution without the presence of a potentially interfering surface. Our results demonstrate the general applicability of quantitative microfluidic electrophoresis to characterise binding equilibria between biomolecules in solution.

  4. Electrochemiluminescence resonance energy transfer between graphene quantum dots and graphene oxide for sensitive protein kinase activity and inhibitor sensing.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ru-Ping; Qiu, Wei-Bin; Zhao, Hui-Fang; Xiang, Cai-Yun; Qiu, Jian-Ding

    2016-01-21

    Herein, a novel electrochemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (ECL-RET) biosensor using graphene quantum dots (GQDs) as donor and graphene oxide (GO) as acceptor for monitoring the activity of protein kinase was presented for the first time. Anti-phosphoserine antibody conjugated graphene oxide (Ab-GO) nonocomposite could be captured onto the phosphorylated peptide/GQDs modified electrode surface through antibody-antigen interaction in the presence of casein kinase II (CK2) and adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), resulting in ECL from the GQDs quenching by closely contacting GO. This ECL quenching degree was positively correlated with CK2 activity. Therefore, on the basis of ECL-RET between GQDs and GO, the activity of protein kinase can be detected sensitively. This biosensor can also be used for quantitative analysis CK2 activity in serum samples and qualitative screening kinase inhibition, indicating the potential application of the developed method in biochemical fundamental research and clinical diagnosis. PMID:26724763

  5. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase negatively regulates hydrogen peroxide-stimulated AMP-activated protein kinase in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Benjamin Y.; Sartoretto, Juliano L.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Michel, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide and other reactive oxygen species are intimately involved in endothelial cell signaling. In many cell types, the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been implicated in the control of metabolic responses, but the role of endothelial cell redox signaling in the modulation of AMPK remains to be completely defined. We used RNA interference and pharmacological methods to establish that H2O2 is a critical activator of AMPK in cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). H2O2 treatment of BAECs rapidly and significantly increases the phosphorylation of AMPK. The EC50 for H2O2-promoted phosphorylation of AMPK is 65 ± 15 μM, within the physiological range of cellular H2O2 concentrations. The Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-β (CaMKKβ) inhibitor STO-609 abolishes H2O2-dependent AMPK activation, whereas eNOS inhibitors enhance AMPK activation. Similarly, siRNA-mediated knockdown of CaMKKβ abrogates AMPK activation, whereas siRNA-mediated knockdown of eNOS leads to a striking increase in AMPK phosphorylation. Cellular imaging studies using the H2O2 biosensor HyPer show that siRNA-mediated eNOS knockdown leads to a marked increase in intracellular H2O2 generation, which is blocked by PEG-catalase. eNOS−/− mice show a marked increase in AMPK phosphorylation in liver and lung compared to wild-type mice. Lung endothelial cells from eNOS−/− mice also show a significant increase in AMPK phosphorylation. Taken together, these results establish that CaMKKβ is critically involved in mediating the phosphorylation of AMPK promoted by H2O2 in endothelial cells, and document that eNOS is an important negative regulator of AMPK phosphorylation and intracellular H2O2 generation in endothelial cells. PMID:19805165

  6. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase negatively regulates hydrogen peroxide-stimulated AMP-activated protein kinase in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Benjamin Y; Sartoretto, Juliano L; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Michel, Thomas

    2009-10-13

    Hydrogen peroxide and other reactive oxygen species are intimately involved in endothelial cell signaling. In many cell types, the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been implicated in the control of metabolic responses, but the role of endothelial cell redox signaling in the modulation of AMPK remains to be completely defined. We used RNA interference and pharmacological methods to establish that H(2)O(2) is a critical activator of AMPK in cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). H(2)O(2) treatment of BAECs rapidly and significantly increases the phosphorylation of AMPK. The EC(50) for H(2)O(2)-promoted phosphorylation of AMPK is 65 + or - 15 microM, within the physiological range of cellular H(2)O(2) concentrations. The Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-beta (CaMKKbeta) inhibitor STO-609 abolishes H(2)O(2)-dependent AMPK activation, whereas eNOS inhibitors enhance AMPK activation. Similarly, siRNA-mediated knockdown of CaMKKbeta abrogates AMPK activation, whereas siRNA-mediated knockdown of eNOS leads to a striking increase in AMPK phosphorylation. Cellular imaging studies using the H(2)O(2) biosensor HyPer show that siRNA-mediated eNOS knockdown leads to a marked increase in intracellular H(2)O(2) generation, which is blocked by PEG-catalase. eNOS(-/-) mice show a marked increase in AMPK phosphorylation in liver and lung compared to wild-type mice. Lung endothelial cells from eNOS(-/-) mice also show a significant increase in AMPK phosphorylation. Taken together, these results establish that CaMKKbeta is critically involved in mediating the phosphorylation of AMPK promoted by H(2)O(2) in endothelial cells, and document that eNOS is an important negative regulator of AMPK phosphorylation and intracellular H(2)O(2) generation in endothelial cells. PMID:19805165

  7. Decoding the oxidative stress hypothesis in diabetic embryopathy through proapoptotic kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peixin; Reece, E Albert; Wang, Fang; Gabbay-Benziv, Rinat

    2015-05-01

    Maternal diabetes-induced birth defects occur in 6-10% of babies born to mothers with pregestational diabetes, representing a significant maternal-fetal health problem. Currently, these congenital malformations represent a significant maternal-fetal medicine issue, but are likely to create an even greater public health threat as 3 million women of reproductive age (19-44 years) have diabetes in the United States alone, and this number is expected to double by 2030. Neural tube defects (NTDs) and congenital heart defects are the most common types of birth defects associated with maternal diabetes. Animal studies have revealed that embryos under hyperglycemic conditions exhibit high levels of oxidative stress resulting from enhanced production of reactive oxygen species and impaired antioxidant capability. Oxidative stress activates a set of proapoptotic kinase signaling intermediates leading to abnormal cell death in the embryonic neural tube, which causes NTD formation. Work in animal models also has revealed that maternal diabetes triggers a series of signaling intermediates: protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms, PKCα, βII and δ; apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1; c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK)1/2; caspase; and apoptosis. Specifically, maternal diabetes in rodent models activates the proapoptotic unfolded protein response and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. A reciprocal causation between JNK1/2 activation and ER stress exists in diabetic embryopathy. Molecular studies further demonstrate that deletion of the genes for Prkc, Ask1, Jnk1, or Jnk2 abolishes maternal diabetes-induced neural progenitor apoptosis and ameliorates NTD formation. Similar preventive effects are also observed when apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1, JNK1/2, or ER stress is inhibited. Cell membrane stabilizers and antioxidant supplements are also effective in prevention of diabetes-induced birth defects. Mechanistic studies have revealed important insights into our understanding the cause

  8. Conformational heterogeneity of the calmodulin binding interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Diwakar; Peck, Ariana; Pande, Vijay S.

    2016-04-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous Ca2+ sensor and a crucial signalling hub in many pathways aberrantly activated in disease. However, the mechanistic basis of its ability to bind diverse signalling molecules including G-protein-coupled receptors, ion channels and kinases remains poorly understood. Here we harness the high resolution of molecular dynamics simulations and the analytical power of Markov state models to dissect the molecular underpinnings of CaM binding diversity. Our computational model indicates that in the absence of Ca2+, sub-states in the folded ensemble of CaM's C-terminal domain present chemically and sterically distinct topologies that may facilitate conformational selection. Furthermore, we find that local unfolding is off-pathway for the exchange process relevant for peptide binding, in contrast to prior hypotheses that unfolding might account for binding diversity. Finally, our model predicts a novel binding interface that is well-populated in the Ca2+-bound regime and, thus, a candidate for pharmacological intervention.

  9. Conformational heterogeneity of the calmodulin binding interface

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Diwakar; Peck, Ariana; Pande, Vijay S.

    2016-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous Ca2+ sensor and a crucial signalling hub in many pathways aberrantly activated in disease. However, the mechanistic basis of its ability to bind diverse signalling molecules including G-protein-coupled receptors, ion channels and kinases remains poorly understood. Here we harness the high resolution of molecular dynamics simulations and the analytical power of Markov state models to dissect the molecular underpinnings of CaM binding diversity. Our computational model indicates that in the absence of Ca2+, sub-states in the folded ensemble of CaM's C-terminal domain present chemically and sterically distinct topologies that may facilitate conformational selection. Furthermore, we find that local unfolding is off-pathway for the exchange process relevant for peptide binding, in contrast to prior hypotheses that unfolding might account for binding diversity. Finally, our model predicts a novel binding interface that is well-populated in the Ca2+-bound regime and, thus, a candidate for pharmacological intervention. PMID:27040077

  10. Conformational Frustration in Calmodulin-Target Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Swarnendu; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Pengzhi; Hoffman, Laurel; Waxham, M. Neal; Cheung, Margaret S.

    2015-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a primary calcium (Ca2+) signaling protein that specifically recognizes and activates highly diverse target proteins. We explored the molecular basis of target recognition of CaM with peptides representing the CaM-binding domains from two Ca2+-CaM dependent kinases, CaMKI and CaMKII, by employing experimentally-constrained molecular simulations. Detailed binding route analysis revealed that the two CaM target peptides, although similar in length and net charge, follow distinct routes that lead to a higher binding frustration in the CaM-CaMKII complex than the CaM-CaMKI complex. We discovered that the molecular origin of the binding frustration is caused by intermolecular contacts formed with the C-domain of CaM that need to be broken before the formation of intermolecular contacts with the N-domain of CaM. We argue that the binding frustration is important for determining the kinetics of the recognition process of proteins involving large structural fluctuations. PMID:25622562

  11. Endothelial NOS-dependent activation of c-Jun NH(2)- terminal kinase by oxidized low-density lipoprotein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Go, Y. M.; Levonen, A. L.; Moellering, D.; Ramachandran, A.; Patel, R. P.; Jo, H.; Darley-Usmar, V. M.

    2001-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is known to activate a number of signal transduction pathways in endothelial cells. Among these are the c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK), also known as stress-activated protein kinase, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). These mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAP kinase) determine cell survival in response to environmental stress. Interestingly, JNK signaling involves redox-sensitive mechanisms and is activated by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species derived from both NADPH oxidases, nitric oxide synthases (NOS), peroxides, and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL). The role of endothelial NOS (eNOS) in the activation of JNK in response to oxLDL has not been examined. Herein, we show that on exposure of endothelial cells to oxLDL, both ERK and JNK are activated through independent signal transduction pathways. A key role of eNOS activation through a phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-dependent mechanism leading to phosphorylation of eNOS is demonstrated for oxLDL-dependent activation of JNK. Moreover, we show that activation of ERK by oxLDL is critical in protection against the cytotoxicity of oxLDL.

  12. Mechanisms of cell signaling by nitric oxide and peroxynitrite: from mitochondria to MAP kinases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levonen, A. L.; Patel, R. P.; Brookes, P.; Go, Y. M.; Jo, H.; Parthasarathy, S.; Anderson, P. G.; Darley-Usmar, V. M.

    2001-01-01

    Many of the biological and pathological effects of nitric oxide (NO) are mediated through cell signaling pathways that are initiated by NO reacting with metalloproteins. More recently, it has been recognized that the reaction of NO with free radicals such as superoxide and the lipid peroxyl radical also has the potential to modulate redox signaling. Although it is clear that NO can exert both cytotoxic and cytoprotective actions, the focus of this overview are those reactions that could lead to protection of the cell against oxidative stress in the vasculature. This will include the induction of antioxidant defenses such as glutathione, activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in response to blood flow, and modulation of mitochondrial function and its impact on apoptosis. Models are presented that show the increased synthesis of glutathione in response to shear stress and inhibition of cytochrome c release from mitochondria. It appears that in the vasculature NO-dependent signaling pathways are of three types: (i) those involving NO itself, leading to modulation of mitochondrial respiration and soluble guanylate cyclase; (ii) those that involve S-nitrosation, including inhibition of caspases; and (iii) autocrine signaling that involves the intracellular formation of peroxynitrite and the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases. Taken together, NO plays a major role in the modulation of redox cell signaling through a number of distinct pathways in a cellular setting.

  13. Calmodulin Methionine Residues are Targets For One-Electron Oxidation by Hydroxyl Radicals: Formation of S therefore N three-electron bonded Radical Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Nauser, Thomas; Jacoby, Michael E.; Koppenol, Willem H.; Squier, Thomas C.; Schoneich, Christian

    2005-02-01

    The one-electron (1e) oxidation of organic sulfides and methionine (Met) constitutes an important reaction mechanism in vivo.1,2 Evidence for a Cu(II)-catalyzed oxidation of Met35 in the Alzheimer's disease -amyloid peptide was obtained,3 and, based on theoretical studies, Met radical cations were proposed as intermediates.4 In the structure of -amyloid peptide, the formation of Met radical cations appears to be facilitated by a preexisting close sulfur-oxygen (S-O) interaction between the Met35 sulfur and the carbonyl oxygen of the peptide bond C-terminal to Ile31.5 Substitution of Ile31 with Pro31 abolishes this S-O interaction,5 significantly reducing the ability of -amyloid to reduce Cu(II), and converts the neurotoxic wild-type -amyloid into a non-toxic peptide.6 The preexisting S-O bond characterized for wild-type -amyloid suggests that electron transfer from Met35 to Cu(II) is supported through stabilization of the Met radical cation by the electron-rich carbonyl oxygen, generating an SO-bonded7 sulfide radical cation (Scheme 1, reaction 1).5

  14. Decoding the oxidative stress hypothesis in diabetic embryopathy through pro-apoptotic kinase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Peixin; Reece, E. Albert; Wang, Fang; Gabbay-Benziv, Rinat

    2014-01-01

    Maternal diabetes-induced birth defects occur in 6-10% of babies born to mothers with pregestational diabetes, representing a significant maternal-fetal health problem. Currently, these congenital malformations represent a significant maternal-fetal medicine issue, but are likely to create an even greater public health threat as 3 million women of reproductive age (19-44 years) have diabetes in the United States alone, and this number is expected to double by 2030. Neural tube defects (NTDs) and congenital heart defects are the most common types of birth defects associated with maternal diabetes. Animal studies have revealed that embryos under hyperglycemic conditions exhibit high levels of oxidative stress resulting from enhanced production of reactive oxygen species and impaired antioxidant capability. Oxidative stress activates a set of pro-apoptotic kinase signaling intermediates leading to abnormal cell death in the embryonic neural tube, which causes NTD formation. Work in animal models also has revealed that maternal diabetes triggers a series of signaling intermediates: protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms, PKCα, βII and δ; apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1), c-Jun-N-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2), caspase and apoptosis. Specifically, maternal diabetes in rodent models activates the pro-apoptotic unfolded protein response and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. A reciprocal causation between JNK1/2 activation and ER stress exists in diabetic embryopathy. Molecular studies further demonstrate that deletion of the genes for PKCα, Ask1, Jnk1 or Jnk2 abolishes maternal diabetes-induced neural progenitor apoptosis and ameliorates NTD formation. Similar preventive effects are also observed when ASK1, JNK1/2 or ER stress is inhibited. Cell membrane stabilizers and antioxidant supplements are also effective in prevention of diabetes-induced birth defects. Mechanistic studies have revealed important insights into our understanding the cause of diabetic

  15. Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress Corrupts Coronary Collateral Growth by Activating Adenosine Monophosphate Activated Kinase-α Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Pung, Yuh Fen; Sam, Wai Johnn; Stevanov, Kelly; Enrick, Molly; Chen, Chwen-Lih; Kolz, Christopher; Thakker, Prashanth; Hardwick, James P.; Chen, Yeong-Renn; Dyck, Jason R.B.; Yin, Liya; Chilian, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Our goal was to determine the mechanism by which mitochondrial oxidative stress impairs collateral growth in the heart. Approach and Results Rats were treated with rotenone (mitochondrial complex I inhibitor that increases reactive oxygen species production) or sham-treated with vehicle and subjected to repetitive ischemia protocol for 10 days to induce coronary collateral growth. In control rats, repetitive ischemia increased flow to the collateral-dependent zone; however, rotenone treatment prevented this increase suggesting that mitochondrial oxidative stress compromises coronary collateral growth. In addition, rotenone also attenuated mitochondrial complex I activity and led to excessive mitochondrial aggregation. To further understand the mechanistic pathway(s) involved, human coronary artery endothelial cells were treated with 50 ng/ mL vascular endothelial growth factor, 1 µmol/L rotenone, and rotenone/vascular endothelial growth factor for 48 hours. Vascular endothelial growth factor induced robust tube formation; however, rotenone completely inhibited this effect (P<0.05 rotenone versus vascular endothelial growth factor treatment). Inhibition of tube formation by rotenone was also associated with significant increase in mitochondrial superoxide generation. Immunoblot analyses of human coronary artery endothelial cells with rotenone treatment showed significant activation of adenosine monophosphate activated kinase (AMPK)-α and inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin and p70 ribosomal S6 kinase. Activation of AMPK-α suggested impairments in energy production, which was reflected by decrease in O2 consumption and bioenergetic reserve capacity of cultured cells. Knockdown of AMPK-α (siRNA) also preserved tube formation during rotenone, suggesting the negative effects were mediated by the activation of AMPK-α. Conversely, expression of a constitutively active AMPK-α blocked tube formation. Conclusions We conclude that activation of AMPK

  16. Phosphodiesterase 5 Inhibition Limits Doxorubicin-induced Heart Failure by Attenuating Protein Kinase G Iα Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Prysyazhna, Oleksandra; Burgoyne, Joseph Robert; Scotcher, Jenna; Grover, Steven; Kass, David; Eaton, Philip

    2016-08-12

    Phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors limit myocardial injury caused by stresses, including doxorubicin chemotherapy. cGMP binding to PKG Iα attenuates oxidant-induced disulfide formation. Because PDE5 inhibition elevates cGMP and protects from doxorubicin-induced injury, we reasoned that this may be because it limits PKG Iα disulfide formation. To investigate the role of PKG Iα disulfide dimerization in the development of apoptosis, doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy was compared in male wild type (WT) or disulfide-resistant C42S PKG Iα knock-in (KI) mice. Echocardiography showed that doxorubicin treatment caused loss of myocardial tissue and depressed left ventricular function in WT mice. Doxorubicin also reduced pro-survival signaling and increased apoptosis in WT hearts. In contrast, KI mice were markedly resistant to the dysfunction induced by doxorubicin in WTs. In follow-on experiments the influence of the PDE5 inhibitor tadalafil on the development of doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy in WT and KI mice was investigated. In WT mice, co-administration of tadalafil with doxorubicin reduced PKG Iα oxidation caused by doxorubicin and also protected against cardiac injury and loss of function. KI mice were again innately resistant to doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity, and therefore tadalafil afforded no additional protection. Doxorubicin decreased phosphorylation of RhoA (Ser-188), stimulating its GTPase activity to activate Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) in WTs. These pro-apoptotic events were absent in KI mice and were attenuated in WTs co-administered tadalafil. PKG Iα disulfide formation triggers cardiac injury, and this initiation of maladaptive signaling can be blocked by pharmacological therapies that elevate cGMP, which binds kinase to limit its oxidation. PMID:27342776

  17. Correlating Calmodulin Landscapes with Chemical Catalysis in Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase using Time-Resolved FRET and a 5-Deazaflavin Thermodynamic Trap

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A major challenge in enzymology is the need to correlate the dynamic properties of enzymes with, and understand the impact on, their catalytic cycles. This is especially the case with large, multicenter enzymes such as the nitric oxide synthases (NOSs), where the importance of dynamics has been inferred from a variety of structural, single-molecule, and ensemble spectroscopic approaches but where motions have not been correlated experimentally with mechanistic steps in the reaction cycle. Here we take such an approach. Using time-resolved spectroscopy employing absorbance and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and exploiting the properties of a flavin analogue (5-deazaflavin mononucleotide (5-dFMN)) and isotopically labeled nicotinamide coenzymes, we correlate the timing of CaM structural changes when bound to neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) with the nNOS catalytic cycle. We show that remodeling of CaM occurs early in the electron transfer sequence (FAD reduction), not at later points in the reaction cycle (e.g., FMN reduction). Conformational changes are tightly correlated with FAD reduction kinetics and reflect a transient “opening” and then “closure” of the bound CaM molecule. We infer that displacement of the C-terminal tail on binding NADPH and subsequent FAD reduction are the likely triggers of conformational change. By combining the use of cofactor/coenzyme analogues and time-resolved FRET/absorbance spectrophotometry, we show how the reaction cycles of complex enzymes can be simplified, enabling a detailed study of the relationship between protein dynamics and reaction cycle chemistry—an approach that can also be used with other complex multicenter enzymes. PMID:27563493

  18. Oxidized LDL impair adipocyte response to insulin by activating serine/threonine kinases.

    PubMed

    Scazzocchio, Beatrice; Varì, Rosaria; D'Archivio, Massimo; Santangelo, Carmela; Filesi, Carmelina; Giovannini, Claudio; Masella, Roberta

    2009-05-01

    Oxidized LDL (oxLDL) increase in patients affected by type-2 diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome. Likewise, insulin resistance, an impaired responsiveness of target tissues to insulin, is associated with those pathological conditions. To investigate a possible causal relationship between oxLDL and the onset of insulin resistance, we evaluated the response to insulin of 3T3-L1 adipocytes treated with oxLDL. We observed that oxLDL inhibited glucose uptake (-40%) through reduced glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) recruitment to the plasma membrane (-70%), without affecting GLUT4 gene expression. These findings were associated to the impairment of insulin signaling. Specifically, in oxLDL-treated cells insulin receptor (IR) substrate-1 (IRS-1) was highly degraded likely because of the enhanced Ser(307)phosphorylation. This process was largely mediated by the activation of the inhibitor of kappaB-kinase beta (IKKbeta) and the c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK). Moreover, the activation of IKKbeta positively regulated the nuclear content of nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB), by inactivating the inhibitor of NF-kappaB (IkappaBalpha). The activated NF-kappaB further impaired per se GLUT4 functionality. Specific inhibitors of IKKbeta, JNK, and NF-kappaB restored insulin sensitivity in adipocytes treated with oxLDL. These data provide the first evidence that oxLDL, by activating serine/threonine kinases, impaired adipocyte response to insulin affecting pathways involved in the recruitment of GLUT4 to plasma membranes (PM). This suggests that oxLDL might participate in the development of insulin resistance. PMID:19136667

  19. Oxidized LDL impair adipocyte response to insulin by activating serine/threonine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Scazzocchio, Beatrice; Varì, Rosaria; D'Archivio, Massimo; Santangelo, Carmela; Filesi, Carmelina; Giovannini, Claudio; Masella, Roberta

    2009-01-01

    Oxidized LDL (oxLDL) increase in patients affected by type-2 diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome. Likewise, insulin resistance, an impaired responsiveness of target tissues to insulin, is associated with those pathological conditions. To investigate a possible causal relationship between oxLDL and the onset of insulin resistance, we evaluated the response to insulin of 3T3-L1 adipocytes treated with oxLDL. We observed that oxLDL inhibited glucose uptake (−40%) through reduced glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) recruitment to the plasma membrane (−70%), without affecting GLUT4 gene expression. These findings were associated to the impairment of insulin signaling. Specifically, in oxLDL-treated cells insulin receptor (IR) substrate-1 (IRS-1) was highly degraded likely because of the enhanced Ser307phosphorylation. This process was largely mediated by the activation of the inhibitor of κB-kinase β (IKKβ) and the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK). Moreover, the activation of IKKβ positively regulated the nuclear content of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), by inactivating the inhibitor of NF-κB (IκBα). The activated NF-κB further impaired per se GLUT4 functionality. Specific inhibitors of IKKβ, JNK, and NF-κB restored insulin sensitivity in adipocytes treated with oxLDL. These data provide the first evidence that oxLDL, by activating serine/threonine kinases, impaired adipocyte response to insulin affecting pathways involved in the recruitment of GLUT4 to plasma membranes (PM). This suggests that oxLDL might participate in the development of insulin resistance. PMID:19136667

  20. Tau regulates the subcellular localization of calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Barreda, Elena Gomez de

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} In this work we have tried to explain how a cytoplasmic protein could regulate a cell nuclear function. We have tested the role of a cytoplasmic protein (tau) in regulating the expression of calbindin gene. We found that calmodulin, a tau-binding protein with nuclear and cytoplasmic localization, increases its nuclear localization in the absence of tau. Since nuclear calmodulin regulates calbindin expression, a decrease in nuclear calmodulin, due to the presence of tau that retains it at the cytoplasm, results in a change in calbindin expression. -- Abstract: Lack of tau expression in neuronal cells results in a change in the expression of few genes. However, little is known about how tau regulates gene expression. Here we show that the presence of tau could alter the subcellular localization of calmodulin, a protein that could be located at the cytoplasm or in the nucleus. Nuclear calmodulin binds to co-transcription factors, regulating the expression of genes like calbindin. In this work, we have found that in neurons containing tau, a higher proportion of calmodulin is present in the cytoplasm compared with neurons lacking tau and that an increase in cytoplasmic calmodulin correlates with a higher expression of calbindin.

  1. Protein Kinase A Governs Oxidative Phosphorylation Kinetics and Oxidant Emitting Potential at Complex I

    PubMed Central

    Lark, Daniel S.; Reese, Lauren R.; Ryan, Terence E.; Torres, Maria J.; Smith, Cody D.; Lin, Chien-Te; Neufer, P. Darrell

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial electron transport system (ETS) is responsible for setting and maintaining both the energy and redox charges throughout the cell. Reversible phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins, particularly via the soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC)/cyclic AMP (cAMP)/Protein kinase A (PKA) axis, has recently been revealed as a potential mechanism regulating the ETS. However, the governance of cAMP/PKA signaling and its implications on ETS function are incompletely understood. In contrast to prior reports using exogenous bicarbonate, we provide evidence that endogenous CO2 produced by increased tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle flux is insufficient to increase mitochondrial cAMP levels, and that exogenous addition of membrane permeant 8Br-cAMP does not enhance mitochondrial respiratory capacity. We also report important non-specific effects of commonly used inhibitors of sAC which preclude their use in studies of mitochondrial function. In isolated liver mitochondria, inhibition of PKA reduced complex I-, but not complex II-supported respiratory capacity. In permeabilized myofibers, inhibition of PKA lowered both the Km and Vmax for complex I-supported respiration as well as succinate-supported H2O2 emitting potential. In summary, the data provided here improve our understanding of how mitochondrial cAMP production is regulated, illustrate a need for better tools to examine the impact of sAC activity on mitochondrial biology, and suggest that cAMP/PKA signaling contributes to the governance of electron flow through complex I of the ETS. PMID:26635618

  2. Imipramine protects retinal ganglion cells from oxidative stress through the tyrosine kinase receptor B signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ming-lei; Liu, Guo-hua; Guo, Jin; Yu, Shu-juan; Huang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration is irreversible in glaucoma and tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB)-associated signaling pathways have been implicated in the process. In this study, we attempted to examine whether imipramine, a tricyclic antidepressant, may protect hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced RGC degeneration through the activation of the TrkB pathway in RGC-5 cell lines. RGC-5 cell lines were pre-treated with imipramine 30 minutes before exposure to H2O2. Western blot assay showed that in H2O2 -damaged RGC-5 cells, imipramine activated TrkB pathways through extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase/TrkB phosphorylation. TUNEL staining assay also demonstrated that imipramine ameliorated H2O2 -induced apoptosis in RGC-5 cells. Finally, TrkB-IgG intervention was able to reverse the protective effect of imipramine on H2O2 -induced RGC-5 apoptosis. Imipramine therefore protects RGCs from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis through the TrkB signaling pathway. PMID:27127489

  3. Role of oxidative stress in methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic toxicity mediated by protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Xuan-Khanh Thi; Li, Zhengyi; Bing, Guoying; Bach, Jae-Hyung; Park, Dae Hun; Nakayama, Keiichi; Ali, Syed F.; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.; Cadet, Jean Lud; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Kim, Hyoung-Chun

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the role of protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes in methamphetamine (MA)-induced dopaminergic toxicity. Multiple-dose administration of MA did not significantly alter PKCα, PKCβI, PKCβII, or PKCζ expression in the striatum, but did significantly increase PKCδ expression. Gö6976 (a co-inhibitor of PKCα and -β), hispidin (PKCβ inhibitor), and PKCζ pseudosubstrate inhibitor (PKCζ inhibitor) did not significantly alter MA-induced behavioral impairments. However, rottlerin (PKCδ inhibitor) significantly attenuated behavioral impairments in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, MA-induced behavioral impairments were not apparent in PKCδ knockout (–/–) mice. MA-induced oxidative stress (i.e., lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation) was significantly attenuated in rottlerin-treated mice and was not apparent in PKCδ (–/–) mice. Consistent with this, MA-induced apoptosis (i.e., terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling-positive apoptotic cells) was significantly attenuated in rottlerin-treated mice. Furthermore, MA-induced increases in the dopamine (DA) turnover rate and decreases in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity and the expression of TH, dopamine transporter (DAT), and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) were not significantly observed in rottlerin-treated or PKCδ (–/–) mice. Our results suggest that PKCδ gene expression is a key mediator of oxidative stress and dopaminergic damage induced by MA. Thus, inhibition of PKCδ may be a useful target for protection against MA-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:22512859

  4. Stress Induced Expression of a Beta vulgaris L. Gene for a Chloroplast-Targeted Signal Calmodulin-Binding Protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In sugarbeet, Beta vulgaris L., Medicago truncatula Gaertn and Populus trichocarpa Torr & Gray, a cluster of orthologous genes includes NPR1, a disease resistance-controlling gene, CaMP, encoding a calmodulin-binding protein and CK1PK, determining a dual-specificity casein kinase 1-class protein kin...

  5. Protein Kinases and Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anna M.; Messing, Robert O.

    2011-01-01

    Although drugs of abuse have different chemical structures and interact with different protein targets, all appear to usurp common neuronal systems that regulate reward and motivation. Addiction is a complex disease that is thought to involve drug-induced changes in synaptic plasticity due to alterations in cell signaling, gene transcription, and protein synthesis. Recent evidence suggests that drugs of abuse interact with and change a common network of signaling pathways that include a subset of specific protein kinases. The best studied of these kinases are reviewed here and include extracellular signal-regulated kinase, cAMP-dependent protein kinase, cyclin-dependent protein kinase 5, protein kinase C, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and Fyn tyrosine kinase. These kinases have been implicated in various aspects of drug addiction including acute drug effects, drug self-administration, withdrawal, reinforcement, sensitization, and tolerance. Identifying protein kinase substrates and signaling pathways that contribute to the addicted state may provide novel approaches for new pharma-cotherapies to treat drug addiction. PMID:18991950

  6. Ligand-independent tyrosine kinase signalling in RTH 149 trout hepatoma cells: comparison among heavy metals and pro-oxidants.

    PubMed

    Burlando, Bruno; Magnelli, Valeria; Panfoli, Isabella; Berti, Elena; Viarengo, Aldo

    2003-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation depends on the activity of receptor and non-receptor tyrosine kinases and promote cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis. Different stressors are known to stimulate tyrosine kinase activities and this could explain a wide spectrum of effects that these agents produce on different organisms. We studied the effects of heavy metals and pro-oxidants on tyrosine kinase signalling in trout hepatoma cells (RTH 149) by Western immunoblotting. Use of antiphosphotyrosine showed that Hg(2+) and Cu(2+)in the microM range, and H(2)O(2) in the mM range, induced tyrosine phosphorylation. The effect of Cu(2+)was prevented by pre-incubation with genistein, while those of Hg(2+)and H(2)O(2) were only decreased, probably due to tyrosine kinase stimulation coupled to phosphatase inhibition. Phosphospecific antibodies against the three types of MAPKs showed that ERK is activated by heavy metals only, while p38 and SAPK/JNK are activated by H(2)O(2), Hg(2+), and Cu(2+) plus low H(2)O(2). Cell pre-incubation with p38 inhibitors indicated that ERK activation by H(2)O(2) is prevented by concomitant activation of p38. Phosphospecific STAT antibodies revealed activation by H(2)O(2) only. In conclusion, fish cell exposure to heavy metals and pro-oxidants produce specific tyrosine kinase responses, involving cross talk and redox modulatory effects. PMID:12876385

  7. Mechanical stretching of proteins: calmodulin and titin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marek

    2005-07-01

    Mechanical unfolding of several domains of calmodulin and titin is studied using a Go-like model with a realistic contact map and Lennard-Jones contact interactions. It is shown that this simple model captures the experimentally observed difference between the two proteins: titin is a spring that is tough and strong whereas calmodulin acts like a weak spring with featureless force-displacement curves. The difference is related to the dominance of the α secondary structures in the native structure of calmodulin. The tandem arrangements of calmodulin unwind simultaneously in each domain whereas the domains in titin unravel in a serial fashion. The sequences of contact events during unravelling are correlated with the contact order, i.e., with the separation between contact making amino acids along the backbone in the native state. Temperature is found to affect stretching in a profound way.

  8. Protein kinase Cδ regulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression via Akt activation and nitric oxide generation

    PubMed Central

    Sud, Neetu; Wedgwood, Stephen; Black, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we explore the roles of the delta isoform of PKC (PKCδ) in the regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity in pulmonary arterial endothelial cells isolated from fetal lambs (FPAECs). Pharmacological inhibition of PKCδ with either rottlerin or with the peptide, δV1-1, acutely attenuated NO production, and this was associated with a decrease in phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser1177 (S1177). The chronic effects of PKCδ inhibition using either rottlerin or the overexpression of a dominant negative PKCδ mutant included the downregulation of eNOS gene expression that was manifested by a decrease in both eNOS promoter activity and protein expression after 24 h of treatment. We also found that PKCδ inhibition blunted Akt activation as observed by a reduction in phosphorylated Akt at position Ser473. Thus, we conclude that PKCδ is actively involved in the activation of Akt. To determine the effect of Akt on eNOS signaling, we overexpressed a dominant negative mutant of Akt and determined its effect of NO generation, eNOS expression, and phosphorylation of eNOS at S1177. Our results demonstrated that Akt inhibition was associated with decreased NO production that correlated with reduced phosphorylation of eNOS at S1177, and decreased eNOS promoter activity. We next evaluated the effect of endogenously produced NO on eNOS expression by incubating FPAECs with the eNOS inhibitor 2-ethyl-2-thiopseudourea (ETU). ETU significantly inhibited NO production, eNOS promoter activity, and eNOS protein levels. Together, our data indicate involvement of PKCδ-mediated Akt activation and NO generation in maintaining eNOS expression. PMID:18192589

  9. Sustained cutaneous vasoconstriction during and following cyrotherapy treatment: Role of oxidative stress and Rho kinase.

    PubMed

    Christmas, Kevin M; Patik, Jordan C; Khoshnevis, Sepideh; Diller, Kenneth R; Brothers, R Matthew

    2016-07-01

    Cryotherapy is a therapeutic technique using ice or cold water applied to the skin to reduce bleeding, inflammation, pain, and swelling following soft tissue trauma and injury. While beneficial, there are some side effects such as pronounced vasoconstriction and tissue ischemia that are sustained for hours post-treatment. This study tested the hypothesis that this vasoconstriction is mediated by 1) the Rho-kinase pathway and/or 2) elevated oxidative stress. 9 subjects were fitted with a commercially available cryotherapy unit with a water perfused bladder on the lateral portion of the right calf. Participants were instrumented with three microdialysis probes underneath the bladder. One site received lactated ringers (control site), one received the Rho-Kinase inhibitor Fasudil, and one received Ascorbic Acid. Skin temperature (Tskin) and cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was measured at each site. Subjects had 1°C water perfused through the bladder for 30min, followed by passive rewarming for 90min. Tskin fell from ~34°C to ~18.0°C during active cooling across all sites and this response was similar for all sites (P>0.05 for all comparisons). During passive rewarming Tskin rose to a similar degree in all sites (P>0.05 relative to the end of cooling). %CVC was reduced during active cooling in all sites; however, the magnitude of this response was blunted in the Fasudil site relative to control (P<0.001 for all comparisons) and min 25 and 30 of cooling in the Ascorbic Acid site (P<0.05). During passive rewarming %CVC at the control and Ascorbic Acid sites did not change such that values were similar to the end of cooling (P>0.05 for each comparison). %CVC at the Fasudil site remained elevated during passive rewarming such that values were higher compared to the control and Ascorbic Acid sites throughout the 90min of passive rewarming (P<0.001 main effect of Fasudil). These findings indicate that the Rho-kinase pathway contributes to pronounced vasoconstriction

  10. Rho GTPase/Rho Kinase Negatively Regulates Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Phosphorylation through the Inhibition of Protein Kinase B/Akt in Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Xiu-Fen; Viswambharan, Hema; Barandier, Christine; Ruffieux, Jean; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Rusconi, Sandro; Yang, Zhihong

    2002-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is an important regulator of cardiovascular homeostasis by production of nitric oxide (NO) from vascular endothelial cells. It can be activated by protein kinase B (PKB)/Akt via phosphorylation at Ser-1177. We are interested in the role of Rho GTPase/Rho kinase (ROCK) pathway in regulation of eNOS expression and activation. Using adenovirus-mediated gene transfer in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), we show here that both active RhoA and ROCK not only downregulate eNOS gene expression as reported previously but also inhibit eNOS phosphorylation at Ser-1177 and cellular NO production with concomitant suppression of PKB activation. Moreover, coexpression of a constitutive active form of PKB restores the phosphorylation but not gene expression of eNOS in the presence of active RhoA. Furthermore, we show that thrombin inhibits eNOS phosphorylation, as well as expression via Rho/ROCK pathway. Expression of the active PKB reverses eNOS phosphorylation but has no effect on downregulation of eNOS expression induced by thrombin. Taken together, these data demonstrate that Rho/ROCK pathway negatively regulates eNOS phosphorylation through inhibition of PKB, whereas it downregulates eNOS expression independent of PKB. PMID:12446767