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1

OXYGEN ENHANCED COMBUSTION FOR NOx CONTROL  

SciTech Connect

Conventional wisdom says adding oxygen to a combustion system enhances product throughput, system efficiency, and, unless special care is taken, increases NOx emissions. This increase in NOx emissions is typically due to elevated flame temperatures associated with oxygen use leading to added thermal NOx formation. Innovative low flame temperature oxy-fuel burner designs have been developed and commercialized to minimize both thermal and fuel NOx formation for gas and oil fired industrial furnaces. To be effective these systems require close to 100% oxy-fuel combustion and the cost of oxygen is paid for by fuel savings and other benefits. For applications to coal-fired utility boilers at the current cost of oxygen, however, it is not economically feasible to use 100% oxygen for NOx control. In spite of this conventional wisdom, Praxair and its team members, in partnership with the US Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory, have developed a novel way to use oxygen to reduce NOx emissions without resorting to complete oxy-fuel conversion. In this concept oxygen is added to the combustion process to enhance operation of a low NOx combustion system. Only a small fraction of combustion air is replaced with oxygen in the process. By selectively adding oxygen to a low NOx combustion system it is possible to reduce NOx emissions from nitrogen-containing fuels, including pulverized coal, while improving combustion characteristics such as unburned carbon. A combination of experimental work and modeling was used to define how well oxygen enhanced combustion could reduce NOx emissions. The results of this work suggest that small amounts of oxygen replacement can reduce the NOx emissions as compared to the air-alone system. NOx emissions significantly below 0.15 lbs/MMBtu were measured. Oxygen addition was also shown to reduce carbon in ash. Comparison of the costs of using oxygen for NOx control against competing technologies, such as SCR, show that this concept offers substantial savings over SCR and is an economically attractive alternative to purchasing NOx credits or installing other conventional technologies. In conjunction with the development of oxygen based low NOx technology, Praxair also worked on developing the economically enhancing oxygen transport membrane (OTM) technology which is ideally suited for integration with combustion systems to achieve further significant cost reductions and efficiency improvements. This OTM oxygen production technology is based on ceramic mixed conductor membranes that operate at high temperatures and can be operated in a pressure driven mode to separate oxygen with infinite selectivity and high flux. An OTM material was selected and characterized. OTM elements were successfully fabricated. A single tube OTM reactor was designed and assembled. Testing of dense OTM elements was conducted with promising oxygen flux results of 100% of target flux. However, based on current natural gas prices and stand-alone air separation processes, ceramic membranes do not offer an economic advantage for this application. Under a different DOE-NETL Cooperative Agreement, Praxair is continuing to develop oxygen transport membranes for the Advanced Boiler where the economics appear more attractive.

David R. Thompson; Lawrence E. Bool; Jack C. Chen

2004-04-01

2

OXYGEN ENHANCED COMBUSTION FOR NOx CONTROL  

SciTech Connect

Increased environmental regulations will require utility boilers to reduce NO{sub x} emissions to less than 0.15lb/MMBtu in the near term. Conventional technologies such as Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) and Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) are unable to achieve these lowered emission levels without substantially higher costs and major operating problems. Oxygen enhanced combustion is a novel technology that allows utilities to meet the NO{sub x} emission requirements without the operational problems that occur with SCR and SNCR. Furthermore, oxygen enhanced combustion can achieve these NO{sub x} limits at costs lower than conventional technologies. The objective of this program is to demonstrate the use of oxygen enhanced combustion as a technical and economical method of meeting the EPA State Implementation Plan for NO{sub x} reduction to less than 0.15lb/MMBtu for a wide range of boilers and coal. The oxygen enhanced coal combustion program (Task 1) focused this quarter on the specific objective of exploration of the impact of oxygen enrichment on NO{sub x} formation utilizing small-scale combustors for parametric testing. Research efforts toward understanding any limitations to the applicability of the technology to different burners and fuels such as different types of coal are underway. The objective of the oxygen transport membrane (OTM) materials development program (Task 2.1) is to ascertain a suitable material composition that can be fabricated into dense tubes capable of producing the target oxygen flux under the operating conditions. This requires that the material have sufficient oxygen permeation resulting from high oxygen ion conductivity, high electronic conductivity and high oxygen surface exchange rate. The OTM element development program (Task 2.2) objective is to develop, fabricate and characterize OTM elements for laboratory and pilot reactors utilizing quality control parameters to ensure reproducibility and superior performance. A specific goal is to achieve a material that will sinter to desired density without compromising other variables such as reaction to binder systems or phase purity. Oxygen-enhanced combustion requires a facility which is capable of supplying high purity oxygen (>99.5%) at low costs. This goal can be achieved through the thermal integration of high temperature air separation with ceramic OTM. The objective of the OTM process development program (Task 2.3) is to demonstrate successfully the program objectives on a lab-scale single OTM tube reactor under process conditions comparable to those of an optimum large-scale oxygen facility. This quarterly technical progress report will summarize work accomplished for the Program through the first quarter April--June 2000 in the following task areas: Task 1 Oxygen Enhanced Coal Combustion; Task 2 Oxygen Transport Membranes; and Task 4 Program Management.

Lawrence E. Bool; Jack C. Chen; David R. Thompson

2000-07-01

3

OXYGEN ENHANCED COMBUSTION FOR NOx CONTROL  

Microsoft Academic Search

Increased environmental regulations will require utility boilers to reduce NOâ emissions to less than 0.15lb\\/MMBtu in the near term. Conventional technologies such as Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) and Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) are unable to achieve these lowered emission levels without substantially higher costs and major operating problems. Oxygen enhanced combustion is a novel technology that allows utilities to meet

Lawrence E. Bool; Jack C. Chen; David R. Thompson

2000-01-01

4

Oxygen enhanced switching to combustion of lower rank fuels  

DOEpatents

A furnace that combusts fuel, such as coal, of a given minimum energy content to obtain a stated minimum amount of energy per unit of time is enabled to combust fuel having a lower energy content, while still obtaining at least the stated minimum energy generation rate, by replacing a small amount of the combustion air fed to the furnace by oxygen. The replacement of oxygen for combustion air also provides reduction in the generation of NOx.

Kobayashi, Hisashi; Bool III, Lawrence E.; Wu, Kuang Tsai

2004-03-02

5

Mult-Pollutant Control Through Novel Approaches to Oxygen Enhanced Combustion  

SciTech Connect

Growing concerns about global climate change have focused effortss on identifying approaches to stabilizing carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere. One approach utilizes oxy-fuel combustion to produce a concentrated flue gas that will enable economical CO{sub 2} capture by direct methods. Oxy-fuel combustion rewuires an Air Separation Unit (ASU) to provide a high-purity stream of oxygen as well as a Compression and Purification Unit (CPU) to clean and compress the CO{sub 2} for long term storage. Overall plant efficiency will suffer from the parasitic load of both the ASU and CPU and researchers are investigating techniques to enhance other aspects of the combustion and gas cleanup proceses to improve the benefit-to-cost ratio. This work examines the influence of oxy-fuel combustion and non-carbon based sorbents on the formation and fate of multiple combustion pollutants both numerically and experimentally.

Richard Axelbaum; Pratim Biswas

2009-02-28

6

High-Efficiency, High-Capacity, Low-NOx Aluminum Melting Using Oxygen-Enhanced Combustion  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the development and application of a novel oxygen enhanced combustion system with an integrated vacuum swing adsorption (VSA) oxygen supply providing efficient, low NOx melting in secondary aluminum furnaces. The mainstay of the combustion system is a novel air-oxy-natural gas burner that achieves high productivity and energy efficiency with low NOx emissions through advanced mixing concepts and the use of separate high- and low-purity oxidizer streams. The technology was installed on a reverberatory, secondary aluminum melting plant at the Wabash Aluminum Alloy's Syracuse, N.Y. plant, where it is currently in operation. Field testing gave evidence that the new burner technology meets the stringent NOx emissions target of 0.323 lb NO2/ton aluminum, thus complying with regulations promulgated by Southern California's South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD). Test results also indicated that the burner technology exceeded fuel efficiency and melting capacity goals. Economic modeling showed that the novel air-oxy-fuel (ADF) combustion technology provides a substantial increase in furnace profitability relative to air-fuel operation. Model results also suggest favorable economics for the air-oxy-fuel technology relative to a full oxy-fuel conversion of the furnace.

D'Agostini, M.D.

2000-06-02

7

Numerical study of the enhancement of combustion performance in a scramjet combustor due to injection of electric-discharge-activated oxygen molecules  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A comprehensive analysis of the efficiency of an approach based on the injection of a thin oxygen stream, subjected to a tailored electric discharge, into a supersonic H2-air flow to enhance the combustion performance in the mixing layer and in the scramjet combustor is conducted. It is shown that for such an approach there exist optimal values of reduced electric field E/N and transversal dimension d of the injected oxygen stream, which provide the minimal length of induction zone in the mixing layer. The optimal values of E/N and d depend on air flow parameters and the specific energy put into the oxygen. The injection of a thin oxygen stream (d = 1 mm) subjected to an electric discharge with E/N = 50-100 Td, which produces mostly singlet oxygen O2(a 1?g) and O_{2}(b\\,^{1}\\Sigma_{g}^{+} ) molecules and atomic oxygen, allows one to arrange stable combustion in a scramjet duct at an extremely low air temperature Tair = 900 K and pressure Pair = 0.3 bar even at a small specific energy put into the oxygen Es = 0.2 J ncm-3, and to provide rather high combustion completeness ? = 0.73. The advance in the energy released during combustion is much higher (hundred times), in this case, than the energy supplied to the oxygen stream in the electric discharge. This approach also makes it possible to ensure the rather high combustion completeness in the scramjet combustor with reduced length. The main reason for the combustion enhancement of the H2-air mixture in the scramjet duct is the intensification of chain-branching reactions due to the injection of a small amount of cold non-equilibrium oxygen plasma comprising highly reactive species, O2(a 1?g) and O_{2}(b\\,^{1}\\Sigma_{g}^{+} ) molecules and O atoms, into the H2-air supersonic flow.

Starik, A. M.; Bezgin, L. V.; Kopchenov, V. I.; Loukhovitski, B. I.; Sharipov, A. S.; Titova, N. S.

2013-12-01

8

Dilute Oxygen Combustion Phase 3 Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Dilute Oxygen Combustion (DOC) burners have been successfully installed and operated in the reheat furnace at Auburn Steel Co., Inc., Auburn, NY, under Phase 3 of the Dilute Oxygen Combustion project. Two new preheat zones were created employing a total of eight 6.5 MMBtu/hr capacity burners. The preheat zones provide a 30 percent increase in maximum furnace production rate, from 75 tph to 100 tph. The fuel rate is essentially unchanged, with the fuel savings expected from oxy-fuel combustion being offset by higher flue gas temperatures. When allowance is made for the high nitrogen level and high gas phase temperature in the furnace, measured NOx emissions are in line with laboratory data on DOC burners developed in Phase 1 of the project. Burner performance has been good and there have been no operating or maintenance problems. The DOC system continues to be used as part of Auburn Steel?s standard reheat furnace practice. High gas phase temperature is a result of the high firing density needed to achieve high production rates, and little opportunity exists for improvement in that area. However, fuel and NOx performance can be improved by further conversion of furnace zones to DOC burners, which will lower furnace nitrogen levels. Major obstacles are cost and concern about increased formation of oxide scale on the steel. Oxide scale formation may be enhanced by exposure of the steel to higher concentrations of oxidizing gas components (primarily products of combustion) in the higher temperature zones of the furnace. Phase 4 of the DOC project will examine the rate of oxide scale formation in these higher temperature zones and develop countermeasures that will allow DOC burners to be used successfully in these furnace zones.

Riley, M.F.; Ryan, H.M.

2000-05-31

9

Dilute Oxygen Combustion - Phase 3 Report  

SciTech Connect

Dilute Oxygen Combustion (DOC) burners have been successfully installed and operated in the reheat furnace at Auburn Steel Co., Inc., Auburn, NY, under Phase 3 of the Dilute Oxygen Combustion project. Two new preheat zones were created employing a total of eight 6.5 MMBtu/hr capacity burners. The preheat zones provide a 30 percent increase in maximum furnace production rate, from 75 tph to 100 tph. The fuel rate is essentially unchanged, with the fuel savings expected from oxy-fuel combustion being offset by higher flue gas temperatures. When allowance is made for the high nitrogen level and high gas phase temperature in the furnace, measured NOx emissions are in line with laboratory data on DOC burners developed in Phase 1 of the project. Burner performance has been good, and there have been no operating or maintenance problems. The DOC system continues to be used as part of Auburn Steel's standard reheat furnace practice. High gas phase temperature is a result of the high firing density needed to achieve high production rates, and little opportunity exists for improvement in that area. However, fuel and NOx performance can be improved by further conversion on furnace zones to DOC burners, which will lower furnace nitrogen levels. Major obstacles are cost and concern about increased formation of oxide scale on the steel. Oxide scale formation may be enhanced by exposure of the steel to higher concentrations of oxidizing gas components (primarily products of combustion) in the higher temperature zones of the furnace. Phase 4 of the DOC project will examine the rate of oxide scale formation in these higher temperature zones and develop countermeasures that will allow DOC burners to be used successfully in these furnace zones.

Riley, Michael F.

2000-05-31

10

Oxygen Compatibility Screening Tests in Oxygen-Rich Combustion Environment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The identification and characterization of oxygen-rich compatible materials enables full-flow, staged combustion designs. Although these oxygen-rich designs offer significant cost, performance, and reliability benefits over existing systems, they have never been used operationally by the United States. If these systems are to be realized, it is critical to understand the long-term oxidative stability in high-temperature, high-pressure, oxygen-rich combustion environments. A unique facility has been constructed at the NASA Lewis Research Center to conduct tests of small-scale rocket engine materials and subcomponents in an oxygen-rich combustion environment that closely approximates a full-scale rocket engine. Thus, a broad range of advanced materials and concepts can be screened in a timely manner and at a relatively low cost.

Eckel, Anerew J.

1997-01-01

11

Hydrogen-oxygen powered internal combustion engine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Hydrogen at 300 psi and oxygen at 800 psi are injected sequentially into the combustion chamber to form hydrogen-rich mixture. This mode of injection eliminates difficulties of preignition, detonation, etc., encountered with carburated, spark-ignited, hydrogen-air mixtures. Ignition at startup is by means of a palladium catalyst.

Cameron, H.; Morgan, N.

1970-01-01

12

ENHANCED COMBUSTION WOODSTOVE (ECW) TECHNOLOGY  

EPA Science Inventory

The paper discusses Enhanced Combustion Woodstove (ECW) technology, developed by EPA in response to the field observation that woodstoves certified by EPA as being clean burning were not achieving the level of emission control "seen" in laboratory tests. ts development was also i...

13

Quantitative measurement of oxygen in microgravity combustion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This research combines two innovations in an experimental system which should result in a new capability for quantitative, nonintrusive measurement of major combustion species. Using a newly available vertical cavity surface-emitting diode laser (VCSEL) and an improved spatial scanning method, we plan to measure the temporal and spatial profiles of the concentrations and temperatures of molecular oxygen in a candle flame and in a solid fuel (cellulose sheet) system. The required sensitivity for detecting oxygen is achieved by the use of high frequency wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS). Measurements will be performed in the NASA Lewis 2.2-second Drop Tower Facility. The objective of this research is twofold. First, we want to develop a better understanding of the relative roles of diffusion and reaction of oxygen in microgravity combustion. As the primary oxidizer species, oxygen plays a major role in controlling the observed properties of flames, including flame front speed (in solid or liquid flames), extinguishment characteristics, flame size, and flame temperature. The second objective is to develop better diagnostics based on diode laser absorption which can be of real value in microgravity combustion research. We will also demonstrate diode lasers' potential usefulness for compact, intrinsically-safe monitoring sensors aboard spacecraft. Such sensors could be used to monitor any of the major cabin gases as well as important pollutants.

Silver, Joel A.

1995-01-01

14

Bimetallic Fe-Ni Oxygen Carriers for Chemical Looping Combustion  

SciTech Connect

The relative abundance, low cost, and low toxicity of iron make Fe-based oxygen carriers of great interest for chemical looping combustion (CLC), an emerging technology for clean and efficient combustion of fossil and renewable fuels. However, Fe also shows much lower reactivity than other metals (such as Ni and Cu). Here, we demonstrate strong improvement of Fe-based carriers by alloying the metal phase with Ni. Through a combination of carrier synthesis and characterization with thermogravimetric and fixed-bed reactor studies, we demonstrate that the addition of Ni results in a significant enhancement in activity as well as an increase in selectivity for total oxidation. Furthermore, comparing alumina and ceria as support materials highlights the fact that reducible supports can result in a strong increase in oxygen carrier utilization.

Bhavsar, Saurabh; Veser, Goetz

2013-11-06

15

Dilute Oxygen Combustion Phase 2 Final Report  

SciTech Connect

A novel burner, in which fuel (natural gas) and oxidant (oxygen or air) are separately injected into a furnace, shows promise for achieving very low nitrogen oxide(s) (NOx) emissions for commercial furnace applications. The dilute oxygen combustion (DOC) burner achieves very low NOx through in-furnace dilution of the oxidant stream prior to combustion, resulting in low flame temperatures, thus inhibiting thermal NOx production. The results of a fundamental and applied research effort on the development of the DOC burner are presented. In addition, the results of a market survey detailing the potential commercial impact of the DOC system are disclosed. The fundamental aspects of the burner development project involved examining the flame characteristics of a natural gas turbulent jet in a high-temperature (~1366 K) oxidant (7-27% O2 vol. wet). Specifically, the mass entrainment rate, the flame lift-off height, the velocity field and major species field of the jet were evaluated as a function of surrounding-gas temperature and composition. The measured entrainment rate of the fuel jet decreased with increasing oxygen content in the surrounding high-temperature oxidant, and was well represented by the d+ scaling correlation found in the literature. The measured flame lift-off height decreased with increasing oxygen content and increasing temperature of the surrounding gas. An increase in surrounding-gas oxygen content and/or temperature inhibited the velocity decay within the jet periphery as a function of axial distance as compared to isothermal turbulent jets. However, the velocity measurements were only broadly represented by the d+ scaling correlation. Several DOC burner configurations were tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at a nominal firing rate of 185 kW (~0.63 MMBtu/h). The flue gas composition was recorded as a function of furnace nitrogen content, furnace temperature, burner geometric arrangement, firing rate, and fuel injection velocity. NOx emissions increased with increasing furnace nitrogen content and furnace temperature, but remained relatively insensitive to variations in fuel injection velocity and firing rate. NOx emissions below 5-10-3 g/MJ (10 ppm-air equivalent at 3% O2 dry) were obtained for furnace temperatures below 1533 K (2300?F) and furnace nitrogen levels between 1 and 40%. CO emissions were typically low (<35 ppm). Detailed in-furnace species measurements revealed the importance of the interior furnace circulation patterns, as influenced by fuel and oxidant injection schemes, on pollutant emissions. The combustion stability traits of several DOC burner arrangements were ascertained through furnace pressure measurements, wit6h increased stability occurring as furnace temperature increased and as the separation distance between fuel and oxidant inputs decreased. Based on current market conditions, oxy-fuel conversion of batch steel reheat furnaces with a DOC burner is justified on the basis of lower utility costs alone. However, conversion of continuous steel reheat furnaces, which are responsible for most steel production, required additional economic incentives, such as further fuel savings, increased furnace productivity, or emission credits.

Ryan, H.M.; Riley, M.F.; Kobayashi, H.

2005-09-30

16

Dilute Oxygen Combustion Phase I Final Report  

SciTech Connect

A novel burner, in which fuel (natural gas) and oxidant (oxygen or air) are separately injected into a furnace, shows promise for achieving very low nitrogen oxide(s) (NOx) emissions for commercial furnace applications. The dilute oxygen combustion (DOC) burner achieves very low NOx through in-furnace dilution of the oxidant stream prior to combustion, resulting in low flame temperatures, thus inhibiting thermal NOx production. The results of a fundamental and applied research effort on the development of the DOC burner are presented. In addition, the results of a market survey detailing the potential commercial impact of the DOC system are disclosed. The fundamental aspects of the burner development project involved examining the flame characteristics of a natural gas turbulent jet in a high-temperature (~1366 K) oxidant (7-27% O2 vol. wet). Specifically, the mass entrainment rate, the flame lift-off height, the velocity field and major species field of the jet were evaluated as a function of surrounding-gas temperature and composition. The measured entrainment rate of the fuel jet decreased with increasing oxygen content in the surrounding high-temperature oxidant, and was well represented by the d+ scaling correlation found in the literature. The measured flame lift-off height decreased with increasing oxygen content and increasing temperature of the surrounding gas. An increase in surrounding-gas oxygen content and/or temperature inhibited the velocity decay within the jet periphery as a function of axial distance as compared to isothermal turbulent jets. However, the velocity measurements were only broadly represented by the d+ scaling correlation. Several DOC burner configurations were tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at a nominal firing rate of 185 kW (~0.63 MMBtu/h). The flue gas composition was recorded as a function of furnace nitrogen content, furnace temperature, burner geometric arrangement, firing rate, and fuel injection velocity. NOx emissions increased with increasing furnace nitrogen content and furnace temperature, but remained relatively insensitive to variations in fuel injection velocity and firing rate. NOx emissions below 5-10-3 g/MJ (10 ppm-air equivalent at 3% O2 dry) were obtained for furnace temperatures below 1533 K (2300°F) and furnace nitrogen levels between 1 and 40%. CO emissions were typically low (<35 ppm). Detailed in-furnace species measurements revealed the importance of the interior furnace circulation patterns, as influenced by fuel and oxidant injection schemes, on pollutant emissions. The combustion stability traits of several DOC burner arrangements were ascertained through furnace pressure measurements, wit6h increased stability occurring as furnace temperature increased and as the separation distance between fuel and oxidant inputs decreased. Based on current market conditions, oxy-fuel conversion of batch steel reheat furnaces with a DOC burner is justified on the basis of lower utility costs alone. However, conversion of continuous steel reheat furnaces, which are responsible for most steel production, required additional economic incentives, such as further fuel savings, increased furnace productivity, or emission credits.

Ryan, H.M.; Riley, M.F.; Kobayashi, H.

1997-10-31

17

Dilute oxygen combustion. Phase I report  

SciTech Connect

A novel burner, in which fuel (natural gas) and oxidant (oxygen or air) are separately injected into a furnace, shows promise for achieving very low nitrogen oxide(s) (NO{sub x}) emissions for commercial furnace applications. The dilute oxygen combustion (DOC) burner achieves very low NO{sub x} through in-furnace dilution of the oxidant stream prior to combustion, resulting in low flame temperatures, thus inhibiting thermal NO{sub x} production. The results of a fundamental and applied research effort on the development of the DOC burner are presented. In addition, the results of a market survey detailing the potential commercial impact of the DOC system are disclosed. The fundamental aspects of the burner development project involved examining the flame characteristics of a natural gas turbulent jet in a high-temperature ({approximately}1366 K) oxidant (7-27% O{sub 2} vol. wet). Specifically, the mass entrainment rate, the flame lift-off height, the velocity field and major species field of the jet were evaluated as a function of surrounding-gas temperature and composition. The measured entrainment rate of the fuel jet decreased with increasing oxygen content in the surrounding high-temperature oxidant, and was well represented by the d{sup +} scaling correlation found in the literature. The measured flame lift-off height decreased with increasing oxygen content and increasing temperature of the surrounding gas. An increase in surrounding-gas oxygen content and/or temperature inhibited the velocity decay within the jet periphery as a function of axial distance as compared to isothermal turbulent jets. However, the velocity measurements were only broadly represented by the d{sup +} scaling correlation. Several DOC burner configurations were tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at a nominal firing rate of 185 kW ({approximately}0.63 MMBtu/h). The flue gas composition was recorded as a function of furnace nitrogen content, furnace temperature, burner geometric arrangement, firing rate, and fuel injection velocity. NO{sub x} emissions increased with increasing furnace nitrogen content and furnace temperature, but remained relatively insensitive to variations in fuel injection velocity and firing rate. NO{sub x} emissions below 5{times}10{sup -3} g/MJ (10 ppm-air equivalent at 3% O{sub 2} dry) were obtained for furnace temperatures below 1533 K (2300{degree}F) and furnace nitrogen levels between 1 and 40%. CO emissions were typically low (<35 ppm). Detailed in- furnace species measurements revealed the importance of the interior furnace circulation patterns, as influenced by fuel and oxidant injection schemes, on pollutant emissions. The combustion stability traits of several DOC burner arrangements were ascertained through furnace pressure measurements, with increased stability occurring as furnace temperature increased and as the separation distance between fuel and oxidant inputs decreased. Based on current market conditions, oxy-fuel conversion of batch steel reheat furnaces with a DOC burner is justified on the basis of utility costs alone. However, conversion of continuous steel reheat furnaces, which are responsible for most steel production, requires additional economic incentives, such as further fuel savings, increased furnace productivity, or emission credits.

NONE

1997-10-01

18

Detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms for combustion of oxygenated fuels  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thermodynamic properties and detailed chemical kinetic models have been developed for the combustion of two oxygenates: methyl butanoate, a model compound for biodiesel fuels, and methyl formate, a related simpler molecule. Bond additivity methods and rules for estimating kinetic parameters were adopted from hydrocarbon combustion and extended. The resulting mechanisms have been tested against the limited combustion data available in

E. M. Fisher; W. J. Pitz; H. J. Curran; C. K. Westbrook

2000-01-01

19

ENHANCED SO3 EMISSIONS FROM STAGED COMBUSTION  

EPA Science Inventory

The report gives results of an experimental study to determine if staged combustion can increase (enhance) the SO3 level in a combustion gas, relative to that observed in a similar single-stage process. Methane flames doped with H2S were used to examine the staging effects, emplo...

20

Engine Valve Actuation For Combustion Enhancement  

DOEpatents

A combustion chamber valve, such as an intake valve or an exhaust valve, is briefly opened during the compression and/or power strokes of a 4-stroke combustion cycle in an internal combustion engine (in particular, a diesel or CI engine). The brief opening may (1) enhance mixing withing the combustion chamber, allowing more complete oxidation of particulates to decrease engine emissions; and/or may (2) delay ignition until a more desirable time, potentially allowing a means of timing ignition in otherwise difficult-to-control conditions, e.g., in HCCI (Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition) conditions.

Reitz, Rolf Deneys (Madison, WI); Rutland, Christopher J. (Madison, WI); Jhavar, Rahul (Madison, WI)

2004-05-18

21

Engine valve actuation for combustion enhancement  

DOEpatents

A combustion chamber valve, such as an intake valve or an exhaust valve, is briefly opened during the compression and/or power strokes of a 4-strokes combustion cycle in an internal combustion engine (in particular, a diesel or CI engine). The brief opening may (1) enhance mixing withing the combustion chamber, allowing more complete oxidation of particulates to decrease engine emissions; and/or may (2) delay ignition until a more desirable time, potentially allowing a means of timing ignition in otherwise difficult-to-control conditions, e.g., in HCCI (Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition) conditions.

Reitz, Rolf Deneys (Madison, WI); Rutland, Christopher J. (Madison, WI); Jhavar, Rahul (Madison, WI)

2008-03-04

22

Oxyfuel coal combustion by efficient integration of oxygen transport membranes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oxyfuel combustion is considered to be an energy efficient process for carbon capture and storage in power plants. Compared to cryogenic air separation, oxygen supply by means of an oxygen transport membrane (OTM) is more energy efficient. This paper describes possible implementations of an OTM into an oxyfuel process, in particular that is three-end and four-end integration of the membrane

Hannes Stadler; Franz Beggel; Martin Habermehl; Bernhard Persigehl; Reinhold Kneer; Michael Modigell; Peter Jeschke

2011-01-01

23

Oxygen Enriched Combustion System Performance Study  

E-print Network

OXYGEN ENRICHED COr~USTION A. R. ABELE, Y. KWAN, S. L. CHEN Energy and Environmental Research Corporation Irvine, California ABSTRACT The objective of this study is to identify pot~ntial industri~l applications for which oxygen enr... burner designs have been conducted at scales of 1 x 10 6 Btu/hr and 10 x 10 6 Btu/hr. The burners represent both conven tional air fired designs and oxygen/fuel burners designed primarily for very high oxygen levels. The results of these tests...

Chen, S. L.; Kwan, Y.; Abele, A. R.; Silver, L. S.; Kobayashi, H.

24

Consider oxygen-based combustion for waste incineration  

SciTech Connect

Incineration using mobile or transportable equipment is often the preferred method of remediating hazardous-waste-contaminated sites. Such an incinerator usually consists of a rotary kiln and a secondary combustion chamber (SCC), along with related equipment. As with most on-site remediation projects, increasing processing capacity and on-stream time will help minimize the amount of time the incinerator is on-site, thus improving overall project economics. A proven method of increasing capacity without increasing equipment size is to use an oxygen-based combustion system. These systems help maximize incinerator throughput by reducing gas volume (compared to air-based combustion) while increasing heat transfer. At the same time, particulate carryover into the SCC, which can lead to slag formation and increased downtime, is also reduced. This article examines the basics of oxygen-based combustion and offers criteria for selecting an oxygen-based combustion system and oxygen supplier. It also briefly discusses the use of an oxygen-based combustion system for a large Superfund site that contained approximately 142,000 m.t. of waste material (mostly bayou sediment), plus some soils and miscellaneous wastes that were on the ground.

Acharya, P.; Schafer, L.L.

1995-03-01

25

Oxygen enriched combustion system performance study. Phase 2: 100 percent oxygen enriched combustion in regenerative glass melters, Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The field test project described in this report was conducted to evaluate the energy and environmental performance of 100% oxygen enriched combustion (100% OEC) in regenerative glass melters. Additional objectives were to determine other impacts of 100% OEC on melter operation and glass quality, and to verify on a commercial scale that an on-site Pressure Swing Adsorption oxygen plant can

G. B. Tuson; H. Kobayashi; M. J. Campbell

1994-01-01

26

Ignition and combustion of metals in oxygen  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Tests in which metals were rubbed against themselves in oxygen have revealed that increasing oxygen pressure does not always increase the potential for ignition. It is believed that there exists a specific pressure above which convective heat loss due to higher oxygen density will overcome the potential increase in the oxidation rate afforded by the increase in oxygen pressure. Test results have shown that, once a specific oxygen pressure is exceeded, greater rates of frictional energy were required for ignition of metals as pressure is increased. Other test results have indicated that as oxygen pressure is increased during the rubbing process, the bulk sample equilibrium temperatures decrease. These results support the belief that increases in convective heat loss as pressure is increased can raise the energy requirements for ignition of metals or lower their ignition potentials. Testing has also indicated that, when metals were exposed to a rubbing process and oxygen pressure was increased, metals such as carbon steel exhibited a decrease in their bulk ignition temperatures, whereas metals such as Monel showed bulk ignition temperatures independent of pressure.

Benz, Frank J.; Zhu, S.

1987-01-01

27

Natural Ores as Oxygen Carriers in Chemical Looping Combustion  

SciTech Connect

Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is a combustion technology that utilizes oxygen from oxygen carriers (OC), such as metal oxides, instead of air to combust fuels. The use of natural minerals as oxygen carriers has advantages, such as lower cost and availability. Eight materials, based on copper or iron oxides, were selected for screening tests of CLC processes using coal and methane as fuels. Thermogravimetric experiments and bench-scale fixed-bed reactor tests were conducted to investigate the oxygen transfer capacity, reaction kinetics, and stability during cyclic reduction/oxidation reaction. Most natural minerals showed lower combustion capacity than pure CuO/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} due to low-concentrations of active oxide species in minerals. In coal CLC, chryscolla (Cu-based), magnetite, and limonite (Fe-based) demonstrated better reaction performances than other materials. The addition of steam improved the coal CLC performance when using natural ores because of the steam gasification of coal and the subsequent reaction of gaseous fuels with active oxide species in the natural ores. In methane CLC, chryscolla, hematite, and limonite demonstrated excellent reactivity and stability in 50-cycle thermogravimetric analysis tests. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-based ores possess greater oxygen utilization but require an activation period before achieving full performance in methane CLC. Particle agglomeration issues associated with the application of natural ores in CLC processes were also studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

Tian, Hanjing; Siriwardane, Ranjani; Simonyi, Thomas; Poston, James

2013-08-01

28

Combustion Enhancement with a Silent Discharge Plasma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is well known that the application of an external electric field to a flame can affect its propagation speed, stability, and combustion chemistry (Lawton & Weinberg 1969). External electrodes, arc discharges, and plasma jets have been employed to allow combustible gas mixtures to operate outside their flammability limits by gas heating, injection of free radicals, and field-promoted flame stabilization (Yagodnikov & Voronetskii 1994). Other investigators have carried out experiments with silent electrical discharges applied to propagating flames (Inomata et al 1983, Kim et al 2003). These have demonstrated that the flame propagation velocity is actually decreased (combustion retarded) when a silent discharge is applied directly to the flame region, but that the flame propagation velocity is increased (combustion promoted) when a silent discharge is applied to the unburned gas mixture upstream of a flame. Two other recent works have considered the possibility of combustion enhancement in aircraft gas turbine engine combustor mixers by using a plasma-generating fuel nozzle, that employs an electric-arc or microwave plasma generator, to produce dissociated fuel or ionized fuel (Johnson et al 2001); and pulsed corona-enhanced detonation of fuel-air mixtures in jet engines (Wang et al 2003). In contrast to these prior works, we have employed a silent discharge plasma (SDP) reactor to break up large fuel molecules into smaller molecules and create free radicals or other active species in a gas stream before the fuel is mixed with an oxidizer and combusted. In experiments reported here, a cylindrical SDP reactor was used to 'activate' propane before mixing it with air and igniting the combustible gas mixture. With the plasma, the physical appearance of the flame changes and substantial changes in mass spectrometer fragmentation peaks are observed (e.g., propane fragments decrease and water and carbon dioxide increase). This indicates that the combustion process is enhanced with the application of the plasma. Results of changes in the degree of combustion will be discussed in terms of variations in the plasma specific energy.

Rosocha, Louis

2003-10-01

29

Research on ignition and combustion in oxygen systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The work on ignition and combustion research in oxygen systems under the sponsorship of NASA's Aerospace Safety Research and Data Institute is described. Preliminary results of ignition of nonmetallic materials by electric arc and mechanical impact are presented. Ignition by a resonant process involving repeated shock waves has been demonstrated and some of the results included. In addition, results of studies concerned with ignition due to the rapid rupture of metal films and diaphragms are reviewed. Burning rate studies of three nonmetallic materials in oxygen enriched environments were completed and the results presented. A brief description of these combustion studies under zero gravity is also included. These results are compared to combustion under one gravity.

Ordin, P. M.

1973-01-01

30

Powdered aluminum and oxygen rocket propellants: Subscale combustion experiments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Aluminum combined with oxygen has been proposed as a potential lunar in situ propellant for ascent/descent and return missions for future lunar exploration. Engine concepts proposed to use this propellant have not previously been demonstrated, and the impact on performance from combustion and two-phase flow losses could only be estimated. Therefore, combustion tests were performed for aluminum and aluminum/magnesium alloy powders with oxygen in subscale heat-sink rocket engine hardware. The metal powder was pneumatically injected, with a small amount of nitrogen, through the center orifice of a single element O-F-O triplet injector. Gaseous oxygen impinged on the fuel stream. Hot-fire tests of aluminum/oxygen were performed over a mixture ratio range of 0.5 to 3.0, and at a chamber pressure of approximately 480 kPa (70 psia). The theoretical performance of the propellants was analyzed over a mixture ratio range of 0.5 to 5.0. In the theoretical predictions the ideal one-dimensional equilibrium rocket performance was reduced by loss mechanisms including finite rate kinetics, two-dimensional divergence losses, and boundary layer losses. Lower than predicted characteristic velocity and specific impulse performance efficiencies were achieved in the hot-fire tests, and this was attributed to poor mixing of the propellants and two-phase flow effects. Several tests with aluminum/9.8 percent magnesium alloy powder did not indicate any advantage over the pure aluminum fuel.

Meyer, Mike L.

1993-01-01

31

REDUCTION OF NOx EMISSION FROM COAL COMBUSTION THROUGH OXYGEN ENRICHMENT  

SciTech Connect

BOC Process Gas Solutions and Western Research Institute (WRI) conducted a pilot-scale test program to evaluate the impact of oxygen enrichment on the emissions characteristics of pulverized coal. The combustion test facility (CTF) at WRI was used to assess the viability of the technique and determine the quantities of oxygen required for NOx reduction from coal fired boiler. In addition to the experimental work, a series of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were made of the CTF under comparable conditions. A series of oxygen enrichment test was performed using the CTF. In these tests, oxygen was injected into one of the following streams: (1) the primary air (PA), (2) the secondary air (SA), and (3) the combined primary and secondary air. Emission data were collected from all tests, and compared with the corresponding data from the baseline cases. A key test parameter was the burner stoichiometry ratio. A series of CFD simulation models were devised to mimic the initial experiments in which secondary air was enriched with oxygen. The results from these models were compared against the experimental data. Experimental evidence indicated that oxygen enrichment does appear to be able to reduce NOx levels from coal combustion, especially when operated at low over fire air (OFA) levels. The reductions observed however are significantly smaller than that reported by others (7-8% vs. 25-50%), questioning the economic viability of the technique. This technique may find favor with fuels that are difficult to burn or stabilize at high OFA and produce excessive LOI. While CFD simulation appears to predict NO amounts in the correct order of magnitude and the correct trend with staging, it is sensitive to thermal conditions and an accurate thermal prediction is essential. Furthermore, without development, Fluent's fuel-NO model cannot account for a solution sensitive fuel-N distribution between volatiles and char and thus cannot predict the trends seen in the experiment.

Western Research Institute

2006-07-01

32

Methanol Droplet Combustion in Oxygen-Inert Environments in Microgravity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Flame Extinguishment (FLEX) experiment that is currently underway in the Combustion Integrated Rack facility onboard the International Space Station is aimed at understanding the effects of inert diluents on the flammability of condensed phase fuels. To this end, droplets of various fuels, including alkanes and alcohols, are burned in a quiescent microgravity environment with varying amounts of oxygen and inert diluents to determine the limiting oxygen index (LOI) for these fuels. In this study we report experimental observations of methanol droplets burning in oxygen-nitrogen-carbon dioxide and oxygen-nitrogen-helium gas mixtures at 0.7 and 1 atmospheric pressures. The initial droplet size varied between approximately 1.5 mm and 4 mm to capture both diffusive extinction brought about by insufficient residence time at the flame and radiative extinction caused by excessive heat loss from the flame zone. The ambient oxygen concentration varied from a high value of 30% by volume to as low as 12%, approaching the limiting oxygen index for the fuel. The inert dilution by carbon dioxide and helium varied over a range of 0% to 70% by volume. In these experiments, both freely floated and tethered droplets were ignited using symmetrically opposed hot-wire igniters and the burning histories were recorded onboard using digital cameras, downlinked later to the ground for analysis. The digital images yielded droplet and flame diameters as functions of time and subsequently droplet burning rate, flame standoff ratio, and initial and extinction droplet diameters. Simplified theoretical models correlate the measured burning rate constant and the flame standoff ratio reasonably well. An activation energy asymptotic theory accounting for time-dependent water dissolution or evaporation from the droplet is shown to predict the measured diffusive extinction conditions well. The experiments also show that the limiting oxygen index for methanol in these diluent gases is around 12% to 13% oxygen by volume.

Nayagam, Vedha; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Hicks, Michael C.; Williams, Forman A.

2013-01-01

33

Enhanced Combustion Low NOx Pulverized Coal Burner  

SciTech Connect

For more than two decades, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) has developed a range of low cost, in-furnace technologies for NOx emissions control for the domestic U.S. pulverized coal fired boiler market. This includes ALSTOM's internally developed TFS 2000 firing system, and various enhancements to it developed in concert with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). As of 2004, more than 200 units representing approximately 75,000 MWe of domestic coal fired capacity have been retrofit with ALSTOM low NOx technology. Best of class emissions range from 0.18 lb/MMBtu for bituminous coals to 0.10 lb/MMBtu for subbituminous coals, with typical levels at 0.24 lb/MMBtu and 0.13 lb/MMBtu, respectively. Despite these gains, NOx emissions limits in the U.S. continue to ratchet down for new and existing (retrofit) boiler equipment. If enacted, proposed Clear Skies legislation will, by 2008, require an average, effective, domestic NOx emissions rate of 0.16 lb/MMBtu, which number will be reduced to 0.13 lb/MMBtu by 2018. Such levels represent a 60% and 67% reduction, respectively, from the effective 2000 level of 0.40 lb/MMBtu. Low cost solutions to meet such regulations, and in particular those that can avoid the need for a costly selective catalytic reduction system (SCR), provide a strong incentive to continue to improve low NOx firing system technology to meet current and anticipated NOx control regulations. In light of these needs, ALSTOM, in cooperation with the DOE, is developing an enhanced combustion, low NOx pulverized coal burner which, when integrated with ALSTOM's state-of-the-art, globally air staged low NOx firing systems, will provide a means to achieve less than 0.15 lb/MMBtu NOx at less than 3/4 the cost of an SCR with low to no impact on balance of plant issues when firing a high volatile bituminous coal. Such coals can be more economic to fire than subbituminous or Powder River Basin (PRB) coals, but are more problematic from a NOx control standpoint as existing firing system technologies do not provide a means to meet current or anticipated regulations absent the use of an SCR. The DOE/ALSTOM program performed large pilot scale combustion testing in ALSTOM's Industrial Scale Burner Facility (ISBF) at its U.S. Power Plant Laboratories facility in Windsor, Connecticut. During this work, the near-field combustion environment was optimized to maximize NOx reduction while minimizing the impact on unburned carbon in ash, slagging and fouling, corrosion, and flame stability/turn-down under globally reducing conditions. Initially, ALSTOM utilized computational fluid dynamic modeling to evaluate a series of burner and/or near field stoichiometry controls in order to screen promising design concepts in advance of the large pilot scale testing. The third and final test, to be executed, will utilize several variants of the best nozzle tip configuration and compare performance with 3 different coals. The fuels to be tested will cover a wide range of coals commonly fired at US utilities. The completion of this work will provide sufficient data to allow ALSTOM to design, construct, and demonstrate a commercial version of an enhanced combustion low NOx pulverized coal burner. A preliminary cost/performance analysis of the developed enhanced combustion low NOx burner applied to ALSTOM's state-of-the-art TFS 2000 firing system was performed to show that the burner enhancements is a cost effective means to reduce NOx.

Ray Chamberland; Aku Raino; David Towle

2006-09-30

34

Polymer-Oxygen Compatibility Testing: Effect of Oxygen Aging on Ignition and Combustion Properties  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The oxygen compatibility of six polymers used in oxygen service was evaluated after exposure for 48 hours to oxygen pressures ranging from 350 to 6200 kPa (50 to 900 psia), and temperatures ranging from 50 to 250 C (122 to 302 F). Three elastomers were tested: CR rubber (C873-70), FKM fluorocarbon rubber (Viton A), and MPQ silicone rubber (MIL-ZZ-765, Class 2); and three thermoplastics were tested: polyhexamethylene adipamide (Zytel 42), polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon TFE), and polychlorotrifluoroethylene (Neoflon CTFE M400H). Post-aging changes in mass, dimensions, tensile strength, elongation at break, and durometer hardness were determined. Also, the compression set was determined for the three elastomers. Results show that the properties under investigation were more sensitive to oxygen pressure at low to moderate temperatures, and more sensitive to temperature at low to moderate oxygen pressures. Inspection of the results also suggested that both chain scissioning and cross-linking processes were operative, consistent with heterogeneous oxidation. Attempts are underway to verify conclusively the occurrence of heterogeneous oxidation using a simple modulus profiling technique. Finally, the effect of aging at 620 kpa (90 psia) and 121 C (250 F) on ignition and combustion resistance was determined. As expected, aged polymers were less ignitable and combustible (had higher AlTs and lower heats of combustion). Special attention was given to Neoflon CTFE. More specifically, the effect of process history (compression versus extrusion molding) and percent crystallinity (quick- versus slow-quenched) on the AIT, heat of combustion, and impact sensitivity of Neoflon CTFE was investigated. Results show the AIT, heat of combustion, and impact sensitivity to be essentially independent of Neoflon CTFE process history and structure.

Waller, Jess M.; Haas, Jon P.; Wilson, D. Bruce; Fries, Joseph (Technical Monitor)

2000-01-01

35

Enhanced Combustion Low NOx Pulverized Coal Burner  

SciTech Connect

For more than two decades, Alstom Power Inc. (Alstom) has developed a range of low cost, infurnace technologies for NOx emissions control for the domestic U.S. pulverized coal fired boiler market. This includes Alstom's internally developed TFS 2000{trademark} firing system, and various enhancements to it developed in concert with the U.S. Department of Energy. As of the date of this report, more than 270 units representing approximately 80,000 MWe of domestic coal fired capacity have been retrofit with Alstom low NOx technology. Best of class emissions range from 0.18 lb/MMBtu for bituminous coal to 0.10 lb/MMBtu for subbituminous coal, with typical levels at 0.24 lb/MMBtu and 0.13 lb/MMBtu, respectively. Despite these gains, NOx emissions limits in the U.S. continue to ratchet down for new and existing boiler equipment. On March 10, 2005, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR). CAIR requires 25 Eastern states to reduce NOx emissions from the power generation sector by 1.7 million tons in 2009 and 2.0 million tons by 2015. Low cost solutions to meet such regulations, and in particular those that can avoid the need for a costly selective catalytic reduction system (SCR), provide a strong incentive to continue to improve low NOx firing system technology to meet current and anticipated NOx control regulations. The overall objective of the work is to develop an enhanced combustion, low NOx pulverized coal burner, which, when integrated with Alstom's state-of-the-art, globally air staged low NOx firing systems will provide a means to achieve: Less than 0.15 lb/MMBtu NOx emissions when firing a high volatile Eastern or Western bituminous coal, Less than 0.10 lb/MMBtu NOx emissions when firing a subbituminous coal, NOx reduction costs at least 25% lower than the costs of an SCR, Validation of the NOx control technology developed through large (15 MWt) pilot scale demonstration, and Documentation required for economic evaluation and commercial application. During the project performance period, Alstom performed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling and large pilot scale combustion testing in its Industrial Scale Burner Facility (ISBF) at its U.S. Power Plant Laboratories facility in Windsor, Connecticut in support of these objectives. The NOx reduction approach was to optimize near-field combustion to ensure that minimum NOx emissions are achieved with minimal impact on unburned carbon in ash, slagging and fouling, corrosion, and flame stability/turn-down. Several iterations of CFD and combustion testing on a Midwest coal led to an optimized design, which was extensively combustion tested on a range of coals. The data from these tests were then used to validate system costs and benefits versus SCR. Three coals were evaluated during the bench-scale and large pilot-scale testing tasks. The three coals ranged from a very reactive subbituminous coal to a moderately reactive Western bituminous coal to a much less reactive Midwest bituminous coal. Bench-scale testing was comprised of standard ASTM properties evaluation, plus more detailed characterization of fuel properties through drop tube furnace testing and thermogravimetric analysis. Bench-scale characterization of the three test coals showed that both NOx emissions and combustion performance are a strong function of coal properties. The more reactive coals evolved more of their fuel bound nitrogen in the substoichiometric main burner zone than less reactive coal, resulting in the potential for lower NOx emissions. From a combustion point of view, the more reactive coals also showed lower carbon in ash and CO values than the less reactive coal at any given main burner zone stoichiometry. According to bench-scale results, the subbituminous coal was found to be the most amenable to both low NOx, and acceptably low combustibles in the flue gas, in an air staged low NOx system. The Midwest bituminous coal, by contrast, was predicted to be the most challenging of the three coals, with the Western bituminous coal predicted to beh

David Towle; Richard Donais; Todd Hellewell; Robert Lewis; Robert Schrecengost

2007-06-30

36

Using oxygen-quenched pressure-sensitive paint for oxygen concentration measurements in low-temperature combustion environments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The feasibility of using pressure-sensitive paint for oxygen concentration measurements in low-temperature combustion environments has been investigated and applied to slow combustion processes. In addition, the temperature limitation for this application was studied. A Nd:YAG laser system, a PMT and fiber-optics were used for developing a compact probe for oxygen measurements. The lifetime sensitivity to oxygen concentration and temperature of a commercially available pressure-sensitive paint has been investigated with regard to possible abilities and limitations. After calibrations with regard to temperature, measurements in slow combustion environments showed that the technique is capable of accurately measuring oxygen concentration in environments up to 180 °C. The measurements indicate usability also in the combustion area despite issues of thermal quenching and quenching from NO. The compact design of the system makes it a useful tool for oxygen measurements in situations where suction probes and other oxygen measurement techniques are too intrusive.

Särner, Gustaf; Göransson, Ulf; Lindén, Johannes; Richter, Mattias; Aldén, Marcus

2008-08-01

37

Using oxygen-quenched pressure-sensitive paint for oxygen concentration measurements in low-temperature combustion environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

The feasibility of using pressure-sensitive paint for oxygen concentration measurements in low-temperature combustion environments has been investigated and applied to slow combustion processes. In addition, the temperature limitation for this application was studied. A Nd:YAG laser system, a PMT and fiber-optics were used for developing a compact probe for oxygen measurements. The lifetime sensitivity to oxygen concentration and temperature of

Gustaf Särner; Ulf Göransson; Johannes Lindén; Mattias Richter; Marcus Aldén

2008-01-01

38

RECENT ADVANCES IN CaSO4 OXYGEN CARRIER FOR CHEMICAL-LOOPING COMBUSTION (CLC) PROCESS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a novel combustion technology with inherent separation of the greenhouse gas CO2 and low NOx (NO, NO2, N2O) emissions. In CLC, the solid oxygen carrier supplies the stoichiometric oxygen needed for CO2 and water formation, resulting in a free nitrogen mixture. The performance of oxygen carrier is the key to CLC's application. A good oxygen carrier

Qingjie Guo; Jianshe Zhang; Hongjing Tian

2012-01-01

39

Combustion of hydrogen-oxygen mixture in electrochemically generated nanobubbles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ignition of exothermic chemical reactions in small volumes is considered as difficult or impossible due to the large surface-to-volume ratio. Here observation of the spontaneous reaction is reported between hydrogen and oxygen in bubbles whose diameter is smaller than a threshold value around 150 nm. The effect is attributed to high Laplace pressure and to fast dynamics in nanobubbles and is the first indication on combustion in the nanoscale. In this study the bubbles were produced by water electrolysis using successive generation of H2 and O2 above the same electrode with short voltage pulses in the microsecond range. The process was observed in a microsystem at current densities >1000 A/cm2 and relative supersaturations >1000.

Svetovoy, Vitaly B.; Sanders, Remko G. P.; Lammerink, Theo S. J.; Elwenspoek, Miko C.

2011-09-01

40

Thermodynamic, transport, and flow properties of gaseous products resulting from combustion of methane-air-oxygen  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results of calculations to determine thermodynamic, transport, and flow properties of combustion product gases are presented. The product gases are those resulting from combustion of methane-air-oxygen and methane-oxygen mixtures. The oxygen content of products resulting from the combustion of methane-air-oxygen mixtures was similiar to that of air; however, the oxygen contained in products of methane-oxygen combustion ranged from 20 percent by volume to zero for stoichiometric combustion. Calculations were made for products of reactant mixtures with fuel percentages, by mass, of 7.5 to 20. Results are presented for specific mixtures for a range of pressures varying from 0.0001 to 1,000 atm and for temperatures ranging from 200 to 3,800 K.

Klich, G. F.

1976-01-01

41

Synergetic effects of mixed copper-iron oxides oxygen carriers in chemical looping combustion  

SciTech Connect

Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is an emerging technology for clean energy production from fuels. CLC produces sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}-streams without a significant energy penalty. Development of efficient oxygen carriers is essential to successfully operate a CLC system. Copper and iron oxides are promising candidates for CLC. Copper oxide possesses high reactivity but it has issues with particle agglomeration due to its low melting point. Even though iron oxide is an inexpensive oxygen carrier it has a slower reactivity. In this study, mixed metal oxide carriers containing iron and copper oxides were evaluated for coal and methane CLC. The components of CuO and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were optimized to obtain good reactivity while maintaining physical and chemical stability during cyclic reactions for methane-CLC and solid-fuel CLC. Compared with single metal oxygen carriers, the optimized Cu–Fe mixed oxide oxygen carriers demonstrated high reaction rate, better combustion conversion, greater oxygen usage and improved physical stability. Thermodynamic calculations, XRD, TGA, flow reactor studies and TPR experiments suggested that there is a strong interaction between CuO and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} contributing to a synergistic effect during CLC reactions. The amount of oxygen release of the mixed oxide carrier in the absence of a fuel was similar to that of the single metal oxides. However, in the presence of fuels, the oxygen consumption and the reaction profiles of the mixed oxide carriers were significantly better than that of the single metal oxides. The nature of the fuel not only influenced the reactivity, but also the final reduction status of the oxygen carriers during chemical looping combustion. Cu oxide of the mixed oxide was fully reduced metallic copper with both coal and methane. Fe oxide of the mixed oxide was fully reduced Fe metal with methane but it was reduced to only FeO with coal. Possible mechanisms of how the presence of CuO enhances the reduction of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} are discussed.

Siriwardane, Ranjani; Tian, Hanjing; Simonyi, Thomas; Poston, James

2013-06-01

42

Metallized gelled propellants: Oxygen/RP-1/aluminum combustion experiments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A series of combustion experiments using metallized gelled liquid propellants were conducted. These experiments used a small 30- to 40-lb(sub f) thrust engine composed of a modular injector, igniter, chamber and nozzle. The fuels used were traditional liquid RP-1 and gelled RP-1 with 0-wt percent, 5-wt percent, and 44-wt percent loadings of aluminum and gaseous oxygen and the oxidizer. Ten different injectors were used during the testing: 6 were for the baseline O2/RP-1 tests and 4 for the gelled fuels. Relatively high C-star efficiencies were obtained with gelled RP-1 (0-wt% RP-1/Al) and metallized 5-wt% RP-1/Al over the O/F range tested: 90-98%. A peak of 98 percent efficiency was reached with ungelled O2/RP-1 and up to 95% efficiency was obtained with gelled RP-1/Al (55-wt% Al). Injector erosion was evident with the 55-wt% testing, while there was little or no erosion seen with the gelled RP-1 with 0 and 5-wt% Al. A protective layer of gelled fuel formed in the firings that minimized the damage to the rocket injector face. This effect may provide a useful technique for engine cooling.

Palaszewski, Bryan

1994-01-01

43

Carbon Deposition Model for Oxygen-Hydrocarbon Combustion, Volume 2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Presented are details of the design, fabrication, and testing of subscale hardware used in the evaluation of carbon deposition characteristics of liquid oxygen and three hydrocarbon fuels for both main chamber and preburner/gas generator operating conditions. In main chamber conditions, the deposition of carbon on the combustion chamber wall was investigated at mixture ratios of 2.0 to 4.0 and at chamber pressures of 1000 to 1500 psia. No carbon deposition on chamber walls was detected at these main chamber mixture ratios. In preburner/gas generator operating conditions, the deposition of carbon on the turbine simulator tubes was evaluated at mixture ratios of 0.20 to 0.60 and at chamber pressures of 720 to 1650 psia. The results of the tests showed carbon deposition rate to be a strong function of mixture ratio and a weak function of chamber pressure. Further analyses evaluated the operational concequences of carbon deposition on preburner/gas generator performance. This is Volume 2 of the report, which contains data plots of all the test programs.

Hernandez, R.; Ito, J. I.; Niiya, K. Y.

1987-01-01

44

Carbon deposition model for oxygen-hydrocarbon combustion, volume 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Presented are details of the design, fabrication, and testing of subscale hardware used in the evaluation of carbon deposition characteristics of liquid oxygen and three hydrocarbon fuels for both main chamber and preburner/gas generator operating conditions. In main chamber conditions, the deposition of carbon on the combustion chamber wall was investigated at mixture ratios of 2.0 to 4.0 and at pressures of 1000 to 1500 psia. No carbon deposition on the chamber walls was detected at these main chamber mixture ratios. In preburner/gas generator operating conditions, the deposition of carbon on the turbine simulator tubes was evaluated at mixture ratios of 0.20 to 0.60 and at chamber pressures of 720 to 1650 psia. The results of the tests showed carbon deposition rate to be a strong function of mixture ratio and a weak function of chamber pressure. Further analyses evaluated the operational consequences of carbon deposition on preburner/gas generator performance. The report is in two volumes, of which this is Volume 1 covering the main body of the report plus Appendixes A through D.

Hernandez, R.; Ito, J. I.; Niiya, K. Y.

1987-01-01

45

National Combustion Code Parallel Performance Enhancements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The National Combustion Code (NCC) is being developed by an industry-government team for the design and analysis of combustion systems. The unstructured grid, reacting flow code uses a distributed memory, message passing model for its parallel implementation. The focus of the present effort has been to improve the performance of the NCC code to meet combustor designer requirements for model accuracy and analysis turnaround time. Improving the performance of this code contributes significantly to the overall reduction in time and cost of the combustor design cycle. This report describes recent parallel processing modifications to NCC that have improved the parallel scalability of the code, enabling a two hour turnaround for a 1.3 million element fully reacting combustion simulation on an SGI Origin 2000.

Quealy, Angela; Benyo, Theresa (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

46

Problems with determining oxygen deficiencies for use in ratios used for assessing spontaneous combustion activity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several common ratios used for determining spontaneous combustion activity rely on comparing the amount of various products of oxidation with the amount of oxygen consumed to produce these products. As coal gets hotter, oxidation reactions become more efficient meaning more products produced for less oxygen consumed. There are many problems associated with accurately determining the true amount of oxygen used.

D. M. Brady

47

Combustion Enhancement Using a Silent Discharge Plasma Reactor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Electric fields affect flame propagation speed, stability, and combustion chemistry. External electrodes, arc discharges, and plasma jets have been used to combust gas mixtures outside their flammability limits. Experiments with silent electrical discharges (SEDs) and propagating flames have shown that flame propagation velocity is actually decreased (combustion retarded) when an SED is applied directly to the flame region, but velocity is increased (combustion promoted) when applied to the unburned gas mixture upstream of a flame. More recent work has proposed electric arc/microwave-driven plasma-generating fuel nozzles to produce dissociated fuel or ionized fuel for aircraft gas turbine engine combustor mixers. In contrast to prior works, we have used a silent discharge plasma (SDP) reactor to break up large fuel molecules into smaller molecules and create free radicals/active species in a gas stream before the fuel is mixed with an oxidizer and combusted. A cylindrical SDP reactor was used to 'activate' propane before mixing it with air and igniting the combustible gas mixture. With the plasma, the physical appearance of the flame changes and substantial changes in mass spectrometer fragmentation peaks for fuel and combustion products are observed (i.e., combustion is enhanced). Results of changes in the degree of combustion will be discussed in terms of variations in the plasma specific energy.

Rosocha, Louis; Platts, David; Coates, Don; Stange, Sy

2003-10-01

48

A zero emission combustion power plant for enhanced oil recovery  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have studied an internal combustion CO2 power plant to enhanced oil recovery. The plant has air separation of O2 for combustion and of N2 for injection, a combution chamber, a turbine, a compressors, a recuperator, and a cooling tower. The oil-derived gases are used to produce liquid CO2, highly compressed N2, process steam and, if necessary, power. No exhaust

Göran Wall; Eugene I. Yantovskii; Lars Lindquist; Joakim Tryggstad

1995-01-01

49

Algorithmic Enhancements for Unsteady Aerodynamics and Combustion Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Research in the FY01 focused on the analysis and development of enhanced algorithms for unsteady aerodynamics and chemically reacting flowfields. The research was performed in support of NASA Ames' efforts to improve the capabilities of the in-house computational fluid dynamics code, OVERFLOW. Specifically, the research was focused on the four areas: (1) investigation of stagnation region effects; (2) unsteady preconditioning dual-time procedures; (3) dissipation formulation for combustion; and (4) time-stepping methods for combustion.

Venkateswaran, Sankaran; Olsen, Michael (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

50

Comparison of iron-, nickel-, copper- and manganese-based oxygen carriers for chemical-looping combustion  

Microsoft Academic Search

For combustion with CO2 capture, chemical-looping combustion (CLC) with inherent separation of CO2 is a promising technology. Two interconnected fluidized beds are used as reactors. In the fuel reactor, a gaseous fuel is oxidized by an oxygen carrier, e.g. metal oxide particles, producing carbon dioxide and water. The reduced oxygen carrier is then transported to the air reactor, where it

Paul Cho; Tobias Mattisson; Anders Lyngfelt

2004-01-01

51

Mathematical simulation of hydrogen-oxygen combustion in rocket engines using LOGOS code  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hydrogen-oxygen fuels are very attractive now for rocket engines designers, because this pair is ecology friendly. Computer aided design of new effective and clean hydrogen engines needs mathematical tools for supercomputer modeling of hydrogen-oxygen components mixing and combustion in rocket engines. The paper presents the results of developing, verification and validation of mathematical model making it possible to simulate unsteady processes of ignition and combustion in rocket engines.

Betelin, V. B.; Shagaliev, R. M.; Aksenov, S. V.; Belyakov, I. M.; Deryuguin, Yu. N.; Korchazhkin, D. A.; Kozelkov, A. S.; Nikitin, V. F.; Sarazov, A. V.; Zelenskiy, D. K.

2014-03-01

52

Detailed chemical kinetic modeling of diesel combustion with oxygenated fuels  

Microsoft Academic Search

The influence of oxygenated hydrocarbons as additives to diesel fuels on ignition, NOx emissions and soot production has been examined using a detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism. N-heptane was used as a representative diesel fuel, and methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether and dimethoxymethane were used as oxygenated fuel additives. It was found that addition of oxygenated hydrocarbons reduced NOx levels and

W J Pitz; H J Curran; E Fisher; P A Glaude; N M Marinov; C K Westbrook

1999-01-01

53

Nanocrystalline perovskites for catalytic combustion and oxygen separation  

E-print Network

Nanocrystalline perovskites (Lal-xAMnl-yByO3) were successfully synthesized with higher surface area and smaller grain size by chemical co-precipitation compared to solid-state and complexation/combustion synthesis routes. ...

Sangar, Neeraj, 1974-

2002-01-01

54

BIOLOGICALLY ENHANCED OXYGEN TRANSFER IN THE ACTIVATED SLUDGE PROCESS (JOURNAL)  

EPA Science Inventory

Biologically enhanced oxgyen transfer has been a hypothesis to explain observed oxygen transfer rates in activated sludge systems that were well above that predicted from aerator clean-water testing. The enhanced oxygen transfer rates were based on tests using BOD bottle oxygen ...

55

Tubular amperometric high-temperature sensors: simultaneous determination of oxygen, nitrogen oxides and combustible components  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tubular amperometric sensors based on stabilized zirconia solid electrolyte with two working electrodes have been studied experimentally with respect to the simultaneous measurements of oxygen and nitrogen oxides, and of oxygen and combustible gas mixtures. Sensors with different types of working electrodes have been optimized for specific gas analytical problems. An almost complete separation of the sensor signals to defined

S. I Somov; G Reinhardt; U Guth; W Göpel

2000-01-01

56

Experimental Research of the Oxygen-Enriched Combustion of Sewage Sludge and Coal in CFB  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sewage sludge is the by-products of sewage treatment, and it is a fuel of high moisture, high ash and low caloric. Oxygen-enriched combustion technology is one of the new and clean coal combustion technologies that can control pollutant emission, which makes CO2 separation, SO2 treatment become easier, and NOx emission reduced. In this paper, we carried out the experimental research on the advantages of oxygen-enriched combustion and the characteristics of sewage sludge in a CFB incinerator that the diameter of the furnace is 100 mm, It is an important foundation for the industrialized application of the oxygen-enriched combustion of sewage sludge and coal in CFB. Experimental analyzed on the combustion characteristics of three conditions in the oxygen concentration of 21%˜35%, which were the weight ratio of coal and sludge were 1?1, 1?2 and also the coal was given. Furthermore, the change of gas composition along with the change of oxygen content and the temperature of dense phase region was analyzed. The results showed that the combustion characteristics differ from the different mixing rate between coal and sludge in different oxygen atmosphere, when the fluidized air velocity was 1.56 m/s˜1.88 m/s, the combustion stability; When the amount of the fuel was constant, as the increase of the oxygen contents in the experimental atmosphere, the total air volume decreased, the furnace temperature increased gradually, the concentration of SO2 and NOx showed increasing trend, which is beneficial to the removal of SO2; The concentration of NOx was increased gradually as temperature of the fluidized bed increased.

Xin, S. W.; Lu, X. F.; Liu, H. Z.

57

COMBUSTION ENHANCEMENT OF A GAS FLARE USING ACOUSTICAL EXCITATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of acoustical excitation on flame stability, trajectory, exhaust emissions, and gas temperatures from a gas flare stack in a crossflow was experimentally investigated. Circular, elliptical, and cup nozzle configurations were examined and compared with a sinusoidal wave excitation. It was found that increasing the pulsation amplitude enhances the combusting efficiency up to the quenching limit. Increasing the Strouhal

R. E. EL BEHERY; A. A. MOHAMAD; M. M. KAMAL

2005-01-01

58

OXYGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANE (OTM) AIDED  

E-print Network

OXYGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANE (OTM) AIDED OXYGEN ENHANCED COMBUSTION Prepared For: California Energy-2005-088 #12;#12;ENERGY INNOVATIONS SMALL GRANT (EISG) PROGRAM INDEPENDENT ASSESSMENT REPORT (IAR) OXYGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANE (OTM) AIDED OXYGEN ENHANCED COMBUSTION EISG AWARDEE University of Southern California

59

Pressurized chemical-looping combustion of coal with an iron ore-based oxygen carrier  

SciTech Connect

Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a new combustion technology with inherent separation of CO{sub 2}. Most of the previous investigations on CLC of solid fuels were conducted under atmospheric pressure. A pressurized CLC combined cycle (PCLC-CC) system is proposed as a promising coal combustion technology with potential higher system efficiency, higher fuel conversion, and lower cost for CO{sub 2} sequestration. In this study pressurized CLC of coal with Companhia Valedo Rio Doce (CVRD) iron ore was investigated in a laboratory fixed bed reactor. CVRD iron ore particles were exposed alternately to reduction by 0.4 g of Chinese Xuzhou bituminous coal gasified with 87.2% steam/N{sub 2} mixture and oxidation with 5% O{sub 2} in N{sub 2} at 970 C. The operating pressure was varied between 0.1 MPa and 0.6 MPa. First, control experiments of steam coal gasification over quartz sand were performed. H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} are the major components of the gasification products, and the operating pressure influences the gas composition. Higher concentrations of CO{sub 2} and lower fractions of CO, CH{sub 4}, and H{sub 2} during the reduction process with CVRD iron ore was achieved under higher pressures. The effects of pressure on the coal gasification rate in the presence of the oxygen carrier were different for pyrolysis and char gasification. The pressurized condition suppresses the initial coal pyrolysis process while it also enhances coal char gasification and reduction with iron ore in steam, and thus improves the overall reaction rate of CLC. The oxidation rates and variation of oxygen carrier conversion are higher at elevated pressures reflecting higher reduction level in the previous reduction period. Scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) analyses show that particles become porous after experiments but maintain structure and size after several cycles. Agglomeration was not observed in this study. An EDX analysis demonstrates that there is very little coal ash deposited on the oxygen carrier particles but no appreciable crystalline phases change as verified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Overall, the limited pressurized CLC experiments carried out in the present work suggest that PCLC of coal is promising and further investigations are necessary. (author)

Xiao, Rui; Song, Min; Zhang, Shuai; Shen, Laihong [School of Energy and Environment, Southeast University, Sipailou No. 2, Nanjing 210096 (China); Song, Qilei [School of Energy and Environment, Southeast University, Sipailou No. 2, Nanjing 210096 (China); Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3RA (United Kingdom); Lu, Zuoji [School of Energy and Environment, Southeast University, Sipailou No. 2, Nanjing 210096 (China); GCL Engineering Limited, Zhujiang No. 1, Nanjing 210008 (China)

2010-06-15

60

Combustion Enhancement in Scramjet-Operation of a RBCC Engine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Combination of a scramjet (supersonic combustion ramjet) flow-pass with embedded rocket engines (the combined system termed as Rocket Based Combined Cycle engine) are expected to be the most effective propulsion system for Booster stage of space launch vehicles. At hypersonic regime, it will be operated at rather high rocket engine output for final acceleration with some Isp gains due to air-breathing effects. In this regime, attaining thrust at this high-speed regime becomes very difficult, so that parallel injection of the fuel for scramjet combustion is favorable as the momentum of the injection can contribute to the thrust production. Thus, embedded rocket chamber was supposed to the operated as fuel rich gas generator at very high output. This configuration was tested at simulated flight Mach number of 7-11 at High Enthalpy Shock Tunnel (HIEST) with detonation tube as the source of the simulated rocket exhaust. However, combustion of the residual fuel in the rocket exhaust with airflow could not be attained. Direct-connect combustor tests were performed to evaluate effectiveness of a combustion enhancement technique termed auxiliary injection, i.e., a portion of fuel to be directly injected into airflow to provide ignition source for the residual fuel. Results of both the engine model tests at HIEST and the direct-connect tests are summarized and presented, and modification to the engine model for combustion enhancement was proposed.

Sadatake Tomioka, By; Ryohei Kobayashi; Murakami, Atsuo; Shuichi Ueda; Komuro, Tomoyuki; Katsuhiro Itoh, And

61

Combustion in a multiburner furnace with selective flow of oxygen  

DOEpatents

Improved operational characteristics such as improved fuel efficiency, reduction of NOx formation, reduction of the amount of unburned carbon in the ash, and lessened tendency to corrosion at the tube wall, in a multi-burner furnace are obtained by reducing the flow rate of combustion air to the burners and selectively individually feeding oxidant to only some of the burners.

Bool III, Lawrence E.; Kobayashi, Hisashi

2004-03-02

62

Enriched Oxygen Combustion Simulation for Rotary Kiln Application  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rotary kilns are important key equipment for the production of cement clinker in the cement manufacturing process. These kilns are fired with fossil fuels which release CO2, NOx and other gases into the atmosphere. Oxy-fuel combustion reduces emission of pollutants (CO2 and NOx) from the rotary kiln as well as it increases the efficiency of cement production due to higher

B. Manickam; F. Dinkelacker; T. Lobe; M. Tertychnyy

2009-01-01

63

NOx reduction in combustion with concentrated coal streams and oxygen injection  

DOEpatents

NOx formation in the combustion of solid hydrocarbonaceous fuel such as coal is reduced by obtaining, from the incoming feed stream of fuel solids and air, a stream having a ratio of fuel solids to air that is higher than that of the feed steam, and injecting the thus obtained stream and a small amount of oxygen to a burner where the fuel solids are combusted.

Kobayashi, Hisashi; Bool III, Lawrence E.; Snyder, William J.

2004-03-02

64

Identifying combustion intermediates in premixed MTBE\\/gasoline\\/oxygen flame probed via synchrotron radiation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Molecular-beam sampling mass spectrometry (MBMS) combined with tunable synchrotron radiation photoionization technique offers\\u000a obvious advantages for the study of flame chemistry over other techniques because of the precision measurement of the combustion\\u000a intermediates and products in flame. In this paper, the results to identify combustion intermediates in low-pressure premixed\\u000a gasoline\\/oxygen flame with the synchrotron radiation were reported. Based on the

Chunde Yao; Jing Li; Qi Li; Qing Ji; Chaoqun Huang; Lixia Wei; Jing Wang; Zhenyu Tian; LI Yuyang; Fei Qi

2007-01-01

65

Combustion Effects in Laser-oxygen Cutting: Basic Assumptions, Numerical Simulation and High Speed Visualization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Laser-oxygen cutting is very complicated for theoretical description technological process. Iron-oxygen combustion playing a leading role making it highly effective, able to cut thicker plates and, at the same time, producing special types of striations and other defects on the cut surface. In this paper results of numerical simulation based on elementary assumptions on iron-oxygen combustion are verified with high speed visualization of laser-oxygen cutting process. On a base of assumption that iron oxide lost its protective properties after melting simulation of striation formation due cycles of laser induced non self-sustained combustion is proposed. Assumption that reaction limiting factor is oxygen transport from the jet to cutting front allows to calculate reaction intensity by solving Navier - Stokes and diffusion system in gas phase. Influence of oxygen purity and pressure is studied theoretically. The results of numerical simulation are examined with high speed visualization of laser-oxygen cutting of 4-20 mm mild steel plates at cutting conditions close to industrial.

Zaitsev, Alexander V.; Ermolaev, Grigory V.

66

Investigation of spontaneous combustion of hydrogen-oxygen mixture using DSMC simulation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Combustion has been widely studied in the literature, but very little work was focused on the microscopic level. In this paper, the DSMC method is applied to simulate the microscopic behavior of the spontaneous combustion of hydrogen oxygen mixture. It is found that the ignition delay time of the mixture depends on many factors, such as the physical size, temperature, pressure, and dilution. Comparison between DSMC and CFD results shows that more atomic hydrogen is consumed through reaction HO2+ H ? H2+ O2 at temperature close to the extended second explosion limit due to localized distribution of reactants, which may indicate the importance of microscopic behavior on low temperature combustion.

Yang, Chao; Sun, Quanhua

2014-12-01

67

New type of microengine using internal combustion of hydrogen and oxygen.  

PubMed

Microsystems become part of everyday life but their application is restricted by lack of strong and fast motors (actuators) converting energy into motion. For example, widespread internal combustion engines cannot be scaled down because combustion reactions are quenched in a small space. Here we present an actuator with the dimensions 100 × 100 × 5??m(3) that is using internal combustion of hydrogen and oxygen as part of its working cycle. Water electrolysis driven by short voltage pulses creates an extra pressure of 0.5-4?bar for a time of 100-400??s in a chamber closed by a flexible membrane. When the pulses are switched off this pressure is released even faster allowing production of mechanical work in short cycles. We provide arguments that this unexpectedly fast pressure decrease is due to spontaneous combustion of the gases in the chamber. This actuator is the first step to truly microscopic combustion engines. PMID:24599052

Svetovoy, Vitaly B; Sanders, Remco G P; Ma, Kechun; Elwenspoek, Miko C

2014-01-01

68

New type of microengine using internal combustion of hydrogen and oxygen  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Microsystems become part of everyday life but their application is restricted by lack of strong and fast motors (actuators) converting energy into motion. For example, widespread internal combustion engines cannot be scaled down because combustion reactions are quenched in a small space. Here we present an actuator with the dimensions 100 × 100 × 5 ?m3 that is using internal combustion of hydrogen and oxygen as part of its working cycle. Water electrolysis driven by short voltage pulses creates an extra pressure of 0.5-4 bar for a time of 100-400 ?s in a chamber closed by a flexible membrane. When the pulses are switched off this pressure is released even faster allowing production of mechanical work in short cycles. We provide arguments that this unexpectedly fast pressure decrease is due to spontaneous combustion of the gases in the chamber. This actuator is the first step to truly microscopic combustion engines.

Svetovoy, Vitaly B.; Sanders, Remco G. P.; Ma, Kechun; Elwenspoek, Miko C.

2014-03-01

69

New type of microengine using internal combustion of hydrogen and oxygen  

PubMed Central

Microsystems become part of everyday life but their application is restricted by lack of strong and fast motors (actuators) converting energy into motion. For example, widespread internal combustion engines cannot be scaled down because combustion reactions are quenched in a small space. Here we present an actuator with the dimensions 100 × 100 × 5??m3 that is using internal combustion of hydrogen and oxygen as part of its working cycle. Water electrolysis driven by short voltage pulses creates an extra pressure of 0.5–4?bar for a time of 100–400??s in a chamber closed by a flexible membrane. When the pulses are switched off this pressure is released even faster allowing production of mechanical work in short cycles. We provide arguments that this unexpectedly fast pressure decrease is due to spontaneous combustion of the gases in the chamber. This actuator is the first step to truly microscopic combustion engines. PMID:24599052

Svetovoy, Vitaly B.; Sanders, Remco G. P.; Ma, Kechun; Elwenspoek, Miko C.

2014-01-01

70

Enhanced efficiency of internal combustion engines by employing spinning gas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The efficiency of the internal combustion engine might be enhanced by employing spinning gas. A gas spinning at near sonic velocities has an effectively higher heat capacity, which allows practical fuel cycles, which are far from the Carnot efficiency, to approach more closely the Carnot efficiency. A remarkable gain in fuel efficiency is shown to be theoretically possible for the Otto and Diesel cycles. The use of a flywheel, in principle, could produce even greater increases in efficiency.

Geyko, V. I.; Fisch, N. J.

2014-08-01

71

Combustion Dynamics of Plasma-Enhanced Premixed and Nonpremixed Flames  

Microsoft Academic Search

Combustion dynamics are investigated for plasma-enhanced methane-air flames in premixed and nonpremixed configurations using a transient arc dc plasmatron. Planar laser-induced fluorescence images of hydroxyl (OH) and carbon monoxide (CO) radicals are obtained over a range of equivalence ratios (? = 0.7 - 1.3), flow rates (6-18 LPM), and plasma powers (100-900 mA) to monitor radical propagation and in situ

Xing Rao; Steve Hammack; Tonghun Lee; Campbell Carter; Igor B. Matveev

2010-01-01

72

Enhanced efficiency of internal combustion engines by employing spinning gas.  

PubMed

The efficiency of the internal combustion engine might be enhanced by employing spinning gas. A gas spinning at near sonic velocities has an effectively higher heat capacity, which allows practical fuel cycles, which are far from the Carnot efficiency, to approach more closely the Carnot efficiency. A remarkable gain in fuel efficiency is shown to be theoretically possible for the Otto and Diesel cycles. The use of a flywheel, in principle, could produce even greater increases in efficiency. PMID:25215720

Geyko, V I; Fisch, N J

2014-08-01

73

Enhanced Efficiency of Internal Combustion Engines By Employing Spinning Gas  

SciTech Connect

The efficiency of the internal combustion engine might be enhanced by employing spinning gas. A gas spinning at near sonic velocities has an effectively higher heat capacity, which allows practical fuel cycles, which are far from the Carnot efficiency, to approach more closely the Carnot efficiency. A gain in fuel efficiency of several percent is shown to be theoretically possible for the Otto and Diesel cycles. The use of a flywheel, in principle, could produce even greater increases in the efficiency.

Geyko, Vasily; Fisch, Nathaniel

2014-02-27

74

High density adsorbed oxygen on Rh,,111... and enhanced routes to metallic oxidation using atomic oxygen  

E-print Network

High density adsorbed oxygen on Rh,,111... and enhanced routes to metallic oxidation using atomic oxygen K. D. Gibson, Mark Viste, Errol C. Sanchez, and S. J. Sibener The James Franck Institute; accepted 30 November 1998 Exposure of Rh 111 to atomic oxygen leads to the facile formation of a full

Sibener, Steven

75

Combustion and Performance Analyses of Coaxial Element Injectors with Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Methane Propellants  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Liquid rocket engines using oxygen and methane propellants are being considered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for in-space vehicles. This propellant combination has not been previously used in a flight-qualified engine system, so limited test data and analysis results are available at this stage of early development. NASA has funded several hardware-oriented activities with oxygen and methane propellants over the past several years with the Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project, under the Exploration Technology Development Program. As part of this effort, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has conducted combustion, performance, and combustion stability analyses of several of the configurations. This paper summarizes the analyses of combustion and performance as a follow-up to a paper published in the 2008 JANNAF/LPS meeting. Combustion stability analyses are presented in a separate paper. The current paper includes test and analysis results of coaxial element injectors using liquid oxygen and liquid methane or gaseous methane propellants. Several thrust chamber configurations have been modeled, including thrust chambers with multi-element swirl coax element injectors tested at the NASA MSFC, and a uni-element chamber with shear and swirl coax injectors tested at The Pennsylvania State University. Configurations were modeled with two one-dimensional liquid rocket combustion analysis codes, the Rocket Combustor Interaction Design and Analysis (ROCCID), and the Coaxial Injector Combustion Model (CICM). Significant effort was applied to show how these codes can be used to model combustion and performance with oxygen/methane propellants a priori, and what anchoring or calibrating features need to be applied or developed in the future. This paper describes the test hardware configurations, presents the results of all the analyses, and compares the results from the two analytical methods

Hulka, J. R.; Jones, G. W.

2010-01-01

76

Effect of fuel mixture on moderate and intense low oxygen dilution combustion  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of fuel mixture on the establishment of moderate and intense low oxygen dilution (MILD) combustion in a recuperative furnace were investigated. Experimental as well as computational results are presented in this paper. Data from exhaust sampling of NOx and thermocouple measurements of temperature are reported along with results from simultaneous measurement of temperature and OH using Rayleigh scattering

B. B. Dally; E. Riesmeier; N. Peters

2004-01-01

77

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF THE LINDE OXYGEN COMBUSTION SYSTEM ON THE EPA MOBILE INCINERATOR  

EPA Science Inventory

This paper summarizes the various system performance tests and the long-term operating experience of the LINDE(r) Oxygen Combustion System (OCS) installed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Mobile Incineration System (MIS) when it was in operation at the Denney F...

78

Application of oxygen-enriched combustion air in radiant tubes: feasibility study. Final report, April 1984-March 1985  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the program is to determine the effect of applying oxygen-enriched combustion air to radiant tubes. Specifically, the increases in heat-transfer rates and thermal efficiency are to be quantified as a function of the oxygen concentration in the combustion air.

Huebner, S.R.; Schmall, R.A.; Hersch, C.A.

1985-03-01

79

Numerical Simulation in Combustion Space of an Oxy-fuel Glass Furnace with Different Jet Angles of Auxiliary Oxygen  

Microsoft Academic Search

Numerical simulation in the combustion space of an oxy-fuel glass furnace was carried out. In order to obtain better combustion efficiency, the cases by adding auxiliary oxygen inlet with different jet angles of auxiliary oxygen from 0 degrees to 90 degrees were compared. The gas phase is expressed with two-equation model, while the combustion with non-premixed model and the radiation

Xinjie Fu; Hailiang Zhang; Junlin Xie; Shuxia Mei

2010-01-01

80

PHYSICAL REVIEW E 90, 022139 (2014) Enhanced efficiency of internal combustion engines by employing spinning gas  

E-print Network

PHYSICAL REVIEW E 90, 022139 (2014) Enhanced efficiency of internal combustion engines by employing; published 28 August 2014) The efficiency of the internal combustion engine might be enhanced by employing Optimizing the internal combustion engine to achieve the highest possible fuel efficiency can be approached

2014-01-01

81

Enhanced Glow Discharge Production of Oxygen  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Studies starting in late seventies have shown Mars atmosphere can be used as a feedstock for oxygen production using simple chemical processing systems during early phases of the Mars exploration program. This approach has been recognized as one of the most important in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) concepts for enabling future round trip Mars missions. It was determined a decade ago that separation of oxygen can be accomplished efficiently by permeation through a silver membrane at temperatures well below 1000 K. This process involves adsorption of atomic oxygen on the surface and its subsequent diffusion through a silver lattice via an oxygen concentration gradient. We have determined recently that glow discharge can be used to liberate atomic oxygen from Mars atmosphere and that the oxygen can be collected through a silver permeation membrane. Recently, we demonstrated a substantial increase in energy efficiency of the process by applying a radio frequency discharge in combination with a silver permeation membrane. The experiments were performed using pure carbon dioxide in the pressure range equal to Mars surface conditions. Energy efficiency was defined as the ratio of the energy required to dissociate a unit mass of oxygen from carbon dioxide to the (electrical) energy consumed by the overall system during the dissociation and collection process. The research effort, started at NASA Langley Research Center, continued with this project. Oxygen production apparatus, built and operated under the research grant NAG1-1140 was relocated to the Atomic Beams Laboratory at ODU in July 1996, being since then in fall operation.

Ash, Robert; Zhong, Shi

1998-01-01

82

Performance and Stability Analyses of Rocket Combustion Devices Using Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Methane Propellants  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Liquid rocket engines using oxygen and methane propellants are being considered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for in-space vehicles. This propellant combination has not been previously used in flight-qualified engine systems, so limited test data and analysis results are available at this stage of early development. NASA has funded several hardware-oriented programs with oxygen and methane propellants over the past several years with the Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project, under the Exploration Technology Development Program. As part of this effort, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has conducted combustion, performance, and combustion stability analyses of several of the configurations on these programs. This paper summarizes these analyses. Test and analysis results of impinging and coaxial element injectors using liquid oxygen and liquid methane propellants are included. Several cases with gaseous methane are included for reference. Several different thrust chamber configurations have been modeled, including thrust chambers with multi-element like-on-like and swirl coax element injectors tested at NASA MSFC, and a unielement chamber with shear and swirl coax injectors tested at The Pennsylvania State University. Configurations were modeled with two one-dimensional liquid rocket combustion analysis codes, the Rocket Combustor Interaction Design and Analysis (ROCCID), and the Coaxial Injector Combustion Model (CICM). Significant effort was applied to show how these codes can be used to model combustion and performance with oxygen/methane propellants a priori, and what anchoring or calibrating features need to be applied or developed in the future. This paper describes the test hardware configurations, presents the results of all the analyses, and compares the results from the two analytical methods.

Hulka, James R.; Jones, G. W.

2010-01-01

83

Carbon dioxide remediation via oxygen-enriched combustion using dense ceramic membranes  

DOEpatents

A method of combusting pulverized coal by mixing the pulverized coal and an oxidant gas to provide a pulverized coal-oxidant gas mixture and contacting the pulverized coal-oxidant gas mixture with a flame sufficiently hot to combust the mixture. An oxygen-containing gas is passed in contact with a dense ceramic membrane of metal oxide material having electron conductivity and oxygen ion conductivity that is gas-impervious until the oxygen concentration on one side of the membrane is not less than about 30% by volume. An oxidant gas with an oxygen concentration of not less than about 30% by volume and a CO.sub.2 concentration of not less than about 30% by volume and pulverized coal is contacted with a flame sufficiently hot to combust the mixture to produce heat and a flue gas. One dense ceramic membrane disclosed is selected from the group consisting of materials having formulae SrCo.sub.0.8 Fe.sub.0.2 O.sub.x, SrCo.sub.0.5 FeO.sub.x and La.sub.0.2 Sr.sub.0.8 Co.sub.0.4 Fe.sub.0.6 O.sub.x.

Balachandran, Uthamalingam (Hinsdale, IL); Bose, Arun C. (Pittsburgh, PA); McIlvried, Howard G. (Pittsburgh, PA)

2001-01-01

84

EFFECT OF OXYGEN - ENHANCEMENT ON HAZARDOUS WASTE INCINERATION  

EPA Science Inventory

How does the addition of oxygen improve the applicability of incineration? his paper addresses that question by evaluating the performance of oxygen enhanced hazardous waste incineration in three different applications. he cases studied include a laboratory study of the use of ox...

85

Study of using oxygen-enriched combustion air for locomotive diesel engines  

SciTech Connect

A thermodynamic simulation is used to study the effects of oxygen-enriched intake air on the performance and nitrogen oxide (NO) emissions of a locomotive diesel engine. The parasitic power of the air separation membrane required to supply the oxygen-enriched air is also estimated. For a given constraint on peak cylinder pressure, the gross and net power output of an engine operating under different levels of oxygen enrichment are compared with those obtained when a high-boost turbocharged engine is used. A 4% increase in peak cylinder pressure can result in an increase in net engine power of approximately 13% when intake air with an oxygen content of 28% by volume is used and fuel injection timing is retarded by 4 degrees. When the engine is turbocharged to a higher inlet boost, the same increase in peak cylinder pressure can improve power by only 4%. If part of the significantly higher exhaust enthalpies available as a result of oxygen enrichment are recovered, the power requirements of the air separator membrane can be met, resulting in substantial net power improvements. Oxygen enrichment with its attendant higher combustion temperatures, reduces emissions of particulates and visible smoke but increases NO emissions (by up to three times at 26% oxygen content). Therefore, exhaust gas after-treatment and heat recovery would be required if the full potential of oxygen enrichment for improving the performance of locomotive diesel engines is to be realized.

Poola, R.B.; Sekar, R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Assanis, D.N. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Cataldi, G.R. [Association of American Railroads, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-12-31

86

Comparison of Oxygen-Bomb Combustion with Standard Ignition Techniques for Determining Author(s): William A. Reiners and Norma M. Reiners  

E-print Network

Comparison of Oxygen-Bomb Combustion with Standard Ignition Techniques for Determining Total Ash. http://www.jstor.org #12;COMPARISON OF OXYGEN-BOMB COMBUSTION WITH STANDARD IGNITION TECHNIQUES samples by oxygen- bomb combustion and by a simple muffle-furnacetechnique. The influence of using

Minnesota, University of

87

Modeling of solid fuels combustion in oxygen-enriched atmosphere in circulating fluidized bed boiler  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper is focused on the idea of large-scale CFB boiler operation with oxygen\\/CO2-modified atmosphere inside combustion chamber. The following main advantages can be found for this technology: reduction of pollutant emissions, possibility of high efficiency separation of CO2 from the exhaust gases that results from increased CO2 concentration, lower chimney loss due to the reduction of flue gases in

Jaroslaw Krzywanski; Tomasz Czakiert; Waldemar Muskala; Robert Sekret; Wojciech Nowak

2010-01-01

88

Chemicl-looping combustion of coal with metal oxide oxygen carriers  

SciTech Connect

The combustion and reoxidation properties of direct coal chemical-looping combustion (CLC) over CuO, Fe2O3, Co3O4, NiO, and Mn2O3 were investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and bench-scale fixed-bed flow reactor studies. When coal is heated in either nitrogen or carbon dioxide (CO2), 50% of weight loss was observed because of partial pyrolysis, consistent with the proximate analysis. Among various metal oxides evaluated, CuO showed the best reaction properties: CuO can initiate the reduction reaction as low as 500 °C and complete the full combustion at 700 °C. In addition, the reduced copper can be fully reoxidized by air at 700 °C. The combustion products formed during the CLC reaction of the coal/metal oxide mixture are CO2 and water, while no carbon monoxide was observed. Multicycle TGA tests and bench-scale fixed-bed flow reactor tests strongly supported the feasibility of CLC of coal by using CuO as an oxygen carrier. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of solid reaction products indicated some changes in the surface morphology of a CuO-coal sample after reduction/oxidation reactions at 800 °C. However, significant surface sintering was not observed. The interactions of fly ash with metal oxides were investigated by X-ray diffraction and thermodynamic analysis. Overall, the results indicated that it is feasible to develop CLC with coal by metal oxides as oxygen carriers.

Siriwardane, R.; Tian, H.; Richards, G.; Simonyi, T.; Poston, J.

2009-01-01

89

A Preliminary Study on the Toxic Combustion Products Testing of Polymers Used in High-Pressure Oxygen Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One likely cause of polymer ignition in a high-pressure oxygen system is adiabatic-compression heating of polymers caused by pneumatic impact. Oxidative _ pyrolysis or combustion of polymers in a high-pressure oxygen system could generate toxic gases. This paper reports the preliminary results of toxic combustion product testing of selected polymers in a pneumatic-impact test system. Five polymers commonly used in high-pressure oxygen systems, Nylon 6/6, polychlorotrifluoroethylene (CTFE), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), fluoroelastomer (Viton(TradeMark) A), and nitrile rubber (Buna N), were tested in a pneumatic-impact test system at 2500- or 3500-psia oxygen pressure. The polymers were ignited and burned, then combustion products were collected in a stainless-steel sample bottle and analyzed by GC/MS/IRD, GC/FID, and GC/Methanizer/FID. The results of adiabatic-compression tests show that combustion of hydrocarbon polymers, nitrogen-containing polymers, and halogenated polymers in high-pressure oxygen systems are relatively complete. Toxicity of the combustion product gas is presumably much lower than the combustion product gas generated from ambient-pressure oxygen (or air) environments. The NASA-Lewis equilibrium code was used to determine the composition of combustion product gas generated from a simulated, adiabatic-compression test of nine polymers. The results are presented and discussed.

Hshieh, Fu-Yu; Beeson, Harold D.

2004-01-01

90

Alarming Oxygen Depletion Caused by Hydrogen Combustion and Fuel Cells and their Resolution by Magnegas$^{TM}$  

E-print Network

We recall that hydrogen combustion does resolve the environmental problems of fossil fuels due to excessive emission of carcinogenic substances and carbon dioxide. However, hydrogen combustion implies the permanent removal from our atmosphere of directly usable oxygen, a serious environmental problem called oxygen depletion, since the combustion turns oxygen into water whose separation to restore the original oxygen is prohibitive due to cost. We then show that a conceivable global use of hydrogen in complete replacement of fossil fuels would imply the permanent removal from our atmosphere of 2.8875x10^7 metric tons O_2/day. Fuel cells are briefly discussed to point out similarly serious environmental problems, again, for large uses. We propose the possibility of resolving these problems by upgrading hydrogen to the new combustible fuel called magnegas^TM, whose chemical structure is composed by the new chemical species of magnecules, whose energy content and other features are beyond the descriptive capaciti...

Santilli, R M

2000-01-01

91

COâ emission abatement in IGCC power plants by semiclosed cycles: Part A -- With oxygen-blown combustion  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper analyzes the fundamentals of IGCC power plants where carbon dioxide produced by syngas combustion can be removed, liquefied and eventually disposed, to limit the environmental problems due to the greenhouse effect. To achieve this goal, a semiclosed-loop gas turbine cycle using an highly-enriched COâ mixture as working fluid was adopted. As the oxidizer, the syngas combustion utilizes oxygen

P. Chiesa; G. Lozza

1999-01-01

92

Alarming Oxygen Depletion Caused by Hydrogen Combustion and Fuel Cells and their Resolution by Magnegas$^{TM}$  

E-print Network

We recall that hydrogen combustion does resolve the environmental problems of fossil fuels due to excessive emission of carcinogenic substances and carbon dioxide. However, hydrogen combustion implies the permanent removal from our atmosphere of directly usable oxygen, a serious environmental problem called oxygen depletion, since the combustion turns oxygen into water whose separation to restore the original oxygen is prohibitive due to cost. We then show that a conceivable global use of hydrogen in complete replacement of fossil fuels would imply the permanent removal from our atmosphere of 2.8875x10^7 metric tons O_2/day. Fuel cells are briefly discussed to point out similarly serious environmental problems, again, for large uses. We propose the possibility of resolving these problems by upgrading hydrogen to the new combustible fuel called magnegas^TM, whose chemical structure is composed by the new chemical species of magnecules, whose energy content and other features are beyond the descriptive capacities of quantum chemistry. In fact, magnegas contains up to 50% hydrogen, while having combustion exhaust with: 1) a positive oxygen balance (releasing more oxygen in the exhaust than that used in the combustion); 2) no appreciable carcinogenic or toxic substances; 3) considerably reduced carbon dioxide as compared to fossil fuels; 4) considerably reduced nitrogen oxides; and 5) general reduction of pollutants in the exhaust up to 96% of current EPA standards.

R. M. Santilli

2000-09-04

93

Exfoliation of layered double hydroxides for enhanced oxygen evolution catalysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The oxygen evolution reaction is a key reaction in water splitting. The common approach in the development of oxygen evolution catalysts is to search for catalytic materials with new and optimized chemical compositions and structures. Here we report an orthogonal approach to improve the activity of catalysts without alternating their compositions or structures. Specifically, liquid phase exfoliation is applied to enhance the oxygen evolution activity of layered double hydroxides. The exfoliated single-layer nanosheets exhibit significantly higher oxygen evolution activity than the corresponding bulk layered double hydroxides in alkaline conditions. The nanosheets from nickel iron and nickel cobalt layered double hydroxides outperform a commercial iridium dioxide catalyst in both activity and stability. The exfoliation creates more active sites and improves the electronic conductivity. This work demonstrates the promising catalytic activity of single-layered double hydroxides for the oxygen evolution reaction.

Song, Fang; Hu, Xile

2014-07-01

94

Exfoliation of layered double hydroxides for enhanced oxygen evolution catalysis.  

PubMed

The oxygen evolution reaction is a key reaction in water splitting. The common approach in the development of oxygen evolution catalysts is to search for catalytic materials with new and optimized chemical compositions and structures. Here we report an orthogonal approach to improve the activity of catalysts without alternating their compositions or structures. Specifically, liquid phase exfoliation is applied to enhance the oxygen evolution activity of layered double hydroxides. The exfoliated single-layer nanosheets exhibit significantly higher oxygen evolution activity than the corresponding bulk layered double hydroxides in alkaline conditions. The nanosheets from nickel iron and nickel cobalt layered double hydroxides outperform a commercial iridium dioxide catalyst in both activity and stability. The exfoliation creates more active sites and improves the electronic conductivity. This work demonstrates the promising catalytic activity of single-layered double hydroxides for the oxygen evolution reaction. PMID:25030209

Song, Fang; Hu, Xile

2014-01-01

95

Combustion Stability Analyses of Coaxial Element Injectors with Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Methane Propellants  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Liquid rocket engines using oxygen and methane propellants are being considered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for in-space vehicles. This propellant combination has not been previously used in a flight-qualified engine system, so limited test data and analysis results are available at this stage of early development. NASA has funded several hardware-oriented activities with oxygen and methane propellants over the past several years with the Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project, under the Exploration Technology Development Program. As part of this effort, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has conducted combustion stability analyses of several of the configurations. This paper presents test data and analyses of combustion stability from the recent PCAD-funded test programs at the NASA MSFC. These test programs used swirl coaxial element injectors with liquid oxygen and liquid methane propellants. Oxygen was injected conventionally in the center of the coaxial element, and swirl was provided by tangential entry slots. Injectors with 28-element and 40-element patterns were tested with several configurations of combustion chambers, including ablative and calorimeter spool sections, and several configurations of fuel injection design. Low frequency combustion instability (chug) occurred with both injectors, and high-frequency combustion instability occurred at the first tangential (1T) transverse mode with the 40-element injector. In most tests, a transition between high-amplitude chug with gaseous methane flow and low-amplitude chug with liquid methane flow was readily observed. Chug analyses of both conditions were conducted using techniques from Wenzel and Szuch and from the Rocket Combustor Interactive Design and Analysis (ROCCID) code. The 1T mode instability occurred in several tests and was apparent by high-frequency pressure measurements as well as dramatic increases in calorimeter-measured heat flux throughout the chamber. Analyses of the transverse mode were conducted with ROCCID and empirical methods such as Hewitt d/V. This paper describes the test hardware configurations, test data, analysis methods, and presents results of the various analyses.

Hulka, J. R.

2010-01-01

96

Variable oxygen/nitrogen enriched intake air system for internal combustion engine applications  

DOEpatents

An air supply control system for selectively supplying ambient air, oxygen enriched air and nitrogen enriched air to an intake of an internal combustion engine includes an air mixing chamber that is in fluid communication with the air intake. At least a portion of the ambient air flowing to the mixing chamber is selectively diverted through a secondary path that includes a selectively permeable air separating membrane device due a differential pressure established across the air separating membrane. The permeable membrane device separates a portion of the nitrogen in the ambient air so that oxygen enriched air (permeate) and nitrogen enriched air (retentate) are produced. The oxygen enriched air and the nitrogen enriched air can be selectively supplied to the mixing chamber or expelled to atmosphere. Alternatively, a portion of the nitrogen enriched air can be supplied through another control valve to a monatomic-nitrogen plasma generator device so that atomic nitrogen produced from the nitrogen enriched air can be then injected into the exhaust of the engine. The oxygen enriched air or the nitrogen enriched air becomes mixed with the ambient air in the mixing chamber and then the mixed air is supplied to the intake of the engine. As a result, the air being supplied to the intake of the engine can be regulated with respect to the concentration of oxygen and/or nitrogen.

Poola, Ramesh B. (Woodridge, IL); Sekar, Ramanujam R. (Naperville, IL); Cole, Roger L. (Elmhurst, IL)

1997-01-01

97

Oxygen bomb combustion of biological samples for inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A rapid sample preparation method is proposed for decomposition of milk powder, corn bran, bovine and fish tissues, containing certified contents of the analytes. The procedure involves sample combustion in a commercial stainless steel oxygen bomb operating at 25 bar. Most of the samples were decomposed within 5 min. Diluted nitric acid or water-soluble tertiary amines 10% v/v were used as absorption solutions. Calcium, Cu, K, Mg, Na, P, S and Zn were recovered with the bomb washings and determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Ethanol mixed with paraffin was used as a combustion aid to allow complete combustion. A cooling step prior releasing of the bomb valve was employed to increase the efficiency of sample combustion. Iodine was also determined in milk samples spiked with potassium iodide to evaluate the volatilization and collection of iodine in amine CFA-C medium and the feasibility of its determination by ICP-OES with axial view configuration. Most of the element recoveries in the samples were between 91 and 105% and the certified and found contents exhibited a fair agreement at a 95% confidence level.

Souza, Gilberto B.; Carrilho, Elma Neide V. M.; Oliveira, Camila V.; Nogueira, Ana Rita A.; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.

2002-12-01

98

Upgrading and enhanced recovery of Jobo heavy oil using hydrogen donor under in-situ combustion  

E-print Network

UPGRADING AND ENHANCED RECOVERY OF JOBO HEAVY OIL USING HYDROGEN DONOR UNDER IN-SITU COMBUSTION A... UPGRADING AND ENHANCED RECOVERY OF JOBO HEAVY OIL USING HYDROGEN DONOR UNDER IN-SITU COMBUSTION A Thesis by SAMIR HUSEYNZADE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

Huseynzade, Samir

2008-10-10

99

Temperature variations in the oxygen carrier particles during their reduction and oxidation in a chemical-looping combustion system  

Microsoft Academic Search

A particle reaction model including mass and heat transfer has been developed to know the temperature variations produced inside the oxygen carrier particles during the cyclic reduction and oxidation reactions taking place in a chemical-looping combustion (CLC) system. The reactions of the different oxygen carriers based on Cu, Co, Fe, Mn, and Ni during the reduction with fuel gas (CH4,

Francisco García-Labiano; Luis F. de Diego; Juan Adánez; Alberto Abad; Pilar Gayán

2005-01-01

100

On the triple oxygen isotope composition of carbon dioxide from some combustion processes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The triple oxygen isotope composition (?17O) of CO2 from different sources is gaining in importance as possible tracer of gross carbon exchanges between major reservoirs. Here we present the ?17O of CO2 from natural gas and propane-butane combustion, wood chips burning, car exhaust and human breath. All investigated CO2 samples had negative ?17O value compared to the CO2-water equilibration line (slope ? = 0.522; zero intercept), which was inherited from the oxidant air O2. However, for all combustion experiments, the ?17O value of CO2 was significantly higher than the ?17O value of air O2. The oxygen isotope composition of CO2 from natural gas (?18O = 21.6 ± 0.7‰; ?17O = -0.30 ± 0.02‰) and from propane-butane (?18O = 22.5 ± 0.8‰; ?17O = -0.32 ± 0.02‰) combustion is explained by kinetic fractionation of ambient air O2. In case of wood chips burning (?18O = 19.4 ± 1.0‰; ?17O = -0.21 ± 0.02‰) the wood inherent O also affected the triple oxygen isotope composition of the CO2. Car exhaust CO2 (?18O = 32.6 ± 3.0‰; ?17O = -0.32 ± 0.03‰) might have likely equilibrated with the condensed water in the exhaust line. The isotope composition of breath CO2 (?18O = 35 ± 1‰; ?17O = -0.03 ± 0.03‰) was controlled by equilibration with body water. We assess the ?17O value of CO2 as a potential tracer for anthropogenic CO2 emission.

Horváth, B.; Hofmann, M. E. G.; Pack, A.

2012-10-01

101

A Brief Study on Toxic Combustion Products of the Polymers Used in High-Pressure Oxygen Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One likely cause of polymer ignition in a high-pressure oxygen system is the adiabatic-compression heating of polymers caused by pneumatic impact. Oxidative pyrolysis or combustion of polymers in a high-pressure oxygen system could generate toxic gases. This paper investigates the feasibility of using the NASA pneumatic-impact system to conduct adiabatic-compression combustion tests and determines the toxic combustion products produced from the burning of five selected polymers. Five polymers commonly used in high-pressure oxygen systems, Zytel(Registered TradeMark) 42 (Nylon 6/6), Buna N (nitrile rubber), Witon(Registered TradeMark) A (copolymer of vinylidene fluoride and hexafluoropropylene), Neoflon(Registered TradeMark) (polychlorotrifluoroethylene), and Teflon(Registered TradeMark) (polytetrafluoroethylene), were tested in the NASA pneumatic-impact test system at 17.2-MPa oxygen pressure. The polymers were ignited and burned; combustion products were collected in a stainless-steel sample bottle and analyzed using various methods. The results show that the NASA pneumatic-impact system is an appropriate test system to conduct adiabatic-compression combustion tests and to collect combustion products for further chemical analysis. The composition of the combustion product gas generated from burning the five selected polymers are presented and discussed.

Hshieh, Fu-Yu; Beeson, Harold D.

2005-01-01

102

Corrosion prevention in copper combustion chamber liners of liquid oxygen/methane booster engines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The use of a protective gold coating for preventing the corrosion of copper combustion chamber liners in liquid oxygen/methane booster engines is discussed with reference to experimental results. Gold-plated and unplated copper alloy specimens were tested in a carbothermal test facility providing realistic simulations of booster engine cooling channel conditions, such as temperature, pressure, flow velocity, and heat flux. Metallographic examinations of the unplated specimens showed severe corrosion as a result of the reaction with the sulfur-containing contaminant in the fuel. In contrast, gold-plated specimens showed no corrosion under similar operating conditions.

Rosenberg, S. D.; Gage, M. L.

1990-01-01

103

CONTROL OF TRANSIENT INCINERATOR EMISSIONS WITH AN OXYGEN BASED COMBUSTION SYSTEM  

EPA Science Inventory

The subject of this paper is the experience with a novel and field-proven method for the enhanced control of transient emissions from rotary kiln incinerators using oxygen enrichment. hen high-BTU content wastes are fed into rotary kiln incinerators in an intermittent mode (typic...

104

Oxygen carrier development for chemical looping combustion of coal derived synthesis gas  

SciTech Connect

In the present work, NETL researchers have studied chemical looping combustion (CLC) with an oxygen carrier NiO/bentonite (60 wt.% NiO) for the IGCC systems utilizing simulated synthesis gas. Multi cycle CLC was conducted with NiO/Bentonite in TGA at atmospheric pressure and in a high pressure reactor in a temperature range between 700-900°C. Global reaction rates of reduction and oxidation as a function of conversion were calculated for all oxidation-reduction cycles utilizing the TGA data. The effect of particle size of the oxygen carrier on CLC was studied for the size between 20-200 mesh. The multi cycle CLC tests conducted in a high pressure packed bed flow reactor indicated constant total production of CO2 from fuel gas at 800°C and 900°C and full consumption of hydrogen during the reaction.

Siriwardane, R.V.; Chaudhari, K.; Zinn, A.N.; Simonyi, T.; Robinson, Clark; Poston, J.A.

2006-09-01

105

Emissions of Parent, Nitro, and Oxygenated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons from Residential Wood Combustion in Rural China  

PubMed Central

Residential wood combustion is one of the important sources of air pollution in developing countries. Among the pollutants emitted, parent polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (pPAHs) and their derivatives, including nitrated and oxygenated PAHs (nPAHs and oPAHs), are of concern because of their mutagenic and carcinogenic effects. In order to evaluate their impacts on regional air quality and human health, emission inventories, based on realistic emission factors (EFs), are needed. In this study, the EFs of 28 pPAHs (EFPAH28), 9 nPAHs (EFPAHn9) and 4 oPAHs (EFPAHo4) were measured for residential combustion of 27 wood fuels in rural China. The measured EFPAH28, EFPAHn9, and EFPAHo4 for brushwood were 86.7±67.6, 3.22±1.95×10?2, and 5.56±4.32 mg/kg, which were significantly higher than 12.7±7.0, 8.27±5.51×10?3, and 1.19±1.87 mg/kg for fuel wood combustion (p < 0.05). Sixteen U.S. EPA priority pPAHs contributed approximately 95% of the total of the 28 pPAHs measured. EFs of pPAHs, nPAHs, and oPAHs were positively correlated with one another. Measured EFs varied obviously depending on fuel properties and combustion conditions. The EFs of pPAHs, nPAHs, and oPAHs were significantly correlated with modified combustion efficiency and fuel moisture. Nitro-naphthalene and 9-fluorenone were the most abundant nPAHs and oPAHs identified. Both nPAHs and oPAHs showed relatively high tendencies to be present in the particulate phase than pPAHs due to their lower vapor pressures. The gas-particle partitioning of freshly emitted pPAHs, nPAHs and oPAHs was primarily controlled by organic carbon absorption. PMID:22765266

SHEN, Guofeng; TAO, Shu; WEI, Siye; ZHANG, Yanyan; WANG, Rong; WANG, Bin; LI, Wei; SHEN, Huizhong; HUANG, Ye; CHEN, Yuanchen; CHEN, Han; YANG, Yifeng; WANG, Wei; WANG, Xilong; LIU, Wenxin; SIMONICH, Staci L. M.

2012-01-01

106

Combustion Stability Characteristics of the Project Morpheus Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Methane Main Engine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Project Morpheus liquid oxygen (LOX) / liquid methane rocket engines demonstrated acousticcoupled combustion instabilities during sea-level ground-based testing at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) and Stennis Space Center (SSC). High-amplitude, 1T, 1R, 1T1R (and higher order) modes appear to be triggered by injector conditions. The instability occurred during the Morpheus-specific engine ignition/start sequence, and did demonstrate the capability to propagate into mainstage. However, the instability was never observed to initiate during mainstage, even at low power levels. The Morpheus main engine is a JSC-designed 5,000 lbf-thrust, 4:1 throttling, pressure-fed cryogenic engine using an impinging element injector design. Two different engine designs, named HD4 and HD5, and two different builds of the HD4 engine all demonstrated similar instability characteristics. Through the analysis of more than 200 hot fire tests on the Morpheus vehicle and SSC test stand, a relationship between ignition stability and injector/chamber pressure was developed. The instability has the distinct characteristic of initiating at high relative injection pressure drop (dP) at low chamber pressure (Pc); i.e., instabilities initiated at high dP/Pc at low Pc during the start sequence. The high dP/Pc during start results during the injector /chamber chill-in, and is enhanced by hydraulic flip in the injector orifice elements. Because of the fixed mixture ratio of the existing engine design (the main valves share a common actuator), it is not currently possible to determine if LOX or methane injector dP/Pc were individual contributors (i.e., LOX and methane dP/Pc typically trend in the same direction within a given test). The instability demonstrated initiation characteristic of starting at or shortly after methane injector chillin. Colder methane (e.g., sub-cooled) at the injector inlet prior to engine start was much more likely to result in an instability. A secondary effect of LOX sub-cooling was also possibly observed; greater LOX sub- cooling improved stability. Some tests demonstrated a low-amplitude 1L-1T instability prior to LOX injector chill-in. The Morpheus main engine also demonstrated chug instabilities during some engine shutdown sequences on the flight vehicle and SSC test stand. The chug instability was also infrequently observed during the startup sequence. The chug instabilities predictably initiated at low dP/Pc at low Pc. The chug instabilities were always self-limiting; startup chug instabilities terminated during throttle-up and shutdown chug instabilities decayed by shutdown termination.

Melcher, J. C.; Morehead, Robert L.

2014-01-01

107

Photographic Study of Combustion in a Rocket Engine I : Variation in Combustion of Liquid Oxygen and Gasoline with Seven Methods of Propellant Injection  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Motion pictures at camera speeds up to 3000 frames per second were taken of the combustion of liquid oxygen and gasoline in a 100-pound-thrust rocket engine. The engine consisted of thin contour and injection plates clamped between two clear plastic sheets forming a two-dimensional engine with a view of the entire combustion chamber and nozzle. A photographic investigation was made of the effect of seven methods of propellant injection on the uniformity of combustion. From the photographs, it was found that the flame front extended almost to the faces of the injectors with most of the injection methods, all the injection systems resulted in a considerable nonuniformity of combustion, and luminosity rapidly decreased in the divergent part of the nozzle. Pressure vibration records indicated combustion vibrations that approximately corresponded to the resonant frequencies of the length and the thickness of the chamber. The combustion temperature divided by the molecular weight of the combustion gases as determined from the combustion photographs was about 50 to 70 percent of the theoretical value.

Bellman, Donald R; Humphrey, Jack C

1948-01-01

108

Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for measurement of fuel/oxygen mixing in combustion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is applied for measurement of C-O equivalence ratios and mixing in a methane/oxygen flame. A nominal 10-nanosecond Q-switched Nd:YAG laser is used to effect a cascade-type optical breakdown in the flame, which is projected above a pre-mixed McKenna burner. Atomic and ionic carbon and oxygen spectra are used to verify the combustion equivalence ratios in the range of 0.5 to 2.0. Emission spectra are obtained separately from the near ultraviolet (vicinity of 250nm) and from the visible (vicinity of 430nm) using gated array detectors. Emission data are obtained over a range of sub-microsecond delay times following the laser pulse. The ultraviolet lines exhibit significantly larger signal-to-noise/background ratios, but the visible lines possess greater relative intensity. Implications of these results are discussed for local measurements of fuel-oxidizer ratios for both atmospheric pressure and high pressure combustion.

Dackman, Matthew; Lewis, J. W. L.; Chen, Ying-Ling; Shi, Lei

2007-11-01

109

Measurement and modelling of oxygenated organic compounds from smoldering combustion of biomass  

SciTech Connect

Biomass fires emit a myriad of compounds, some of which are toxic and/or globally significant as photochemically reactive, tropospheric trace gases, greenhouse gases and precursors to stratospheric ozone-destroying radicals. 35 oxygenated organic compounds in condensed (-45{degrees}C) smoke from 29 bench scale fires of ponderosa pine sapwood, needles, bark, litter, duff, and humus have been identified and quantified. These fires ranged from flaming to low intensity smoldering. In addition, five low intensity fires of intact ponderosa pine forest floor (litter, duff, and humus) were carried out on a larger scale in a combustion chamber. The condensates were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and the gas phase was analyzed by gas chromatography/flame ionization detection. Acetic acid, vinyl acetate and acetol were major condensable emissions. The dependence of oxygenated organic emissions on fuel chemistry and combustion efficiency has been investigated, along with correlations between emissions. Molar emission ratios of individual compounds to CO have been calculated and used to estimate possible exposure levels for wildland firefighters.

McKenzie, L.M.; Richards, G.N. [Univ. of Montana, Missoula, MT (United States)

1995-12-01

110

Emissions of parent, nitrated, and oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from indoor corn straw burning in normal and controlled combustion conditions  

PubMed Central

Emission factors (EFs) of parent polycyclic aromatic (pPAHs), nitrated PAHs (nPAHs), and oxygenated PAHs (oPAHs) were measured for indoor corn straw burned in a cooking brick stove in both normal and controlled burning conditions. EFs of total 28 pPAHs, 6 nPAHs and 4 oPAHs were 7.9±3.4, 6.5±1.6×10-3, and 6.1±1.4×10-1 mg/kg, respectively. By controlling the burning conditions, it was found that the influence of fuel charge size on EFs of the pPAHs and derivatives was insignificant. Measured EFs increased significantly in a fast burning mainly because of the oxygen deficient atmosphere formed in the stove chamber with a small volume. In both restricted and enhance air supply conditions, EFs of pPAHs, nPAHs and oPAHs were significantly higher than those measured in normal burning conditions. Though EFs varied in different burning conditions, the composition profiles and calculated isomer ratios were similar without significant differences. The results from the stepwise regression model showed that fuel burning rate, air supply amount, and modified combustion efficiency were three most significant influencing factors, explaining 72-85% of the total variations. PMID:24494494

Shen, Guofeng; Xue, Miao; Wei, Siye; Chen, Yuanchen; Wang, Bin; Wang, Rong; Lv, Yan; Shen, Huizhong; Li, Wei; Zhang, Yanyan; Huang, Ye; Chen, Han; Wei, Wen; Zhao, Qiuyue; Li, Bin; Wu, Haisuo; Tao, Shu

2014-01-01

111

Does oxygen enhance the radiation-induced inactivation of penicillinase  

SciTech Connect

The radiation-induced inactivation of penicillinase (..beta..-lactamase, EC 3.5.2.6) in dilute aqueous solutions buffered with phosphate was studied by examining enzyme radiosensitivity in the presence of various gases (He, O/sub 2/, H/sub 2/, N/sub 2/O and N/sub 2/O + O/sub 2/). The introduction of either N/sub 2/O or O/sub 2/ was found to reduce the radiodamage. On the other hand, H/sub 2/ or N/sub 2/O + O/sub 2/ gas mixture enhanced the radiosensitivity. In the presence of formate and oxygen no enzyme inactivation was detected. The results indicated that the specific damaging efficiency of H atoms is more than twofold higher than that of OH radicals; therefore, in 50 mM phosphate buffer, where more than half the free radicals are H atoms, the H radicals are responsible for the majority of the damage. The superoxide radicals appeared to be completely inactive and did not contribute to enzyme inactivation. Oxygen affected the radiosensitivity in two ways: (1) it protected by converting e/sub aq//sup -/ and H into harmless O/sub 2/-radicals; and (2) it increased inactivation by enhancing the damage brought about by OH radicals (OER = 2.6). In oxygenated buffer the protection effect of oxygen exceeded that of sensitization, thus giving rise to a moderate overall protection effect.

Samuni, A.; Kalkstein, A.; Czapski, G.

1980-04-01

112

Embryonic oxygen enhances learning ability in hatchling lizards  

PubMed Central

Introduction Producing smart offspring is an important fitness trait; individuals with enhanced cognitive ability should be more adept at responding to complex environmental demands. Cognitive ability can be influenced by conditions experienced during embryonic development. Although oxygen is necessary for embryonic development, availability can be limited within the nest environment because of substrate type, hydric conditions, and temperature. We do not yet understand, however, whether oxygen availability during embryonic development influences offspring fitness, especially cognitive ability. To address this question we incubated Mongolian Racerunner lizard (Eremias argus) eggs under hypoxic (12% O2), normoxic (21% O2), and hyperoxic conditions (30% O2). Results Hypoxia not only slowed hatching time, but also resulted in constrained cognitive ability relative to hatchlings experiencing normoxic or hyperoxic incubation conditions. Oxygen did not influence hatching success, body size or sprint speed of hatchlings. Conclusions Oxygen availability during embryonic development has important influences on incubation duration and cognitive ability of hatchling lizards. This study provides the first evidence that oxygen availability during embryonic development can modify cognitive ability of oviparous reptiles. PMID:24589451

2014-01-01

113

Oxygen carrying microbubbles for enhanced sonodynamic therapy of hypoxic tumours.  

PubMed

Tumour hypoxia represents a major challenge in the effective treatment of solid cancerous tumours using conventional approaches. As oxygen is a key substrate for Photo-/Sono-dynamic Therapy (PDT/SDT), hypoxia is also problematic for the treatment of solid tumours using these techniques. The ability to deliver oxygen to the vicinity of the tumour increases its local partial pressure improving the possibility of ROS generation in PDT/SDT. In this manuscript, we investigate the use of oxygen-loaded, lipid-stabilised microbubbles (MBs), decorated with a Rose Bengal sensitiser, for SDT-based treatment of a pancreatic cancer model (BxPc-3) in vitro and in vivo. We directly compare the effectiveness of the oxygen-loaded MBs with sulphur hexafluoride (SF6)-loaded MBs and reveal a significant improvement in therapeutic efficacy. The combination of oxygen-carrying, ultrasound-responsive MBs, with an ultrasound-responsive therapeutic sensitiser, offers the possibility of delivering and activating the MB-sensitiser conjugate at the tumour site in a non-invasive manner, providing enhanced sonodynamic activation at that site. PMID:25660073

McEwan, Conor; Owen, Joshua; Stride, Eleanor; Fowley, Colin; Nesbitt, Heather; Cochrane, David; Coussios, Constantin C; Borden, M; Nomikou, Nikolitsa; McHale, Anthony P; Callan, John F

2015-04-10

114

Kinetic mechanism for low-pressure oxygen/methane ignition and combustion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is known that during a launch of a rocket, the interaction of the exhaust gases of rocket engines with the atmosphere causes a local depletion of the ozone layer. In order to study these chemical processes in detail, a chemical reaction mechanism of the methane oxidation appropriate for high- and low-pressure conditions and a chemical reactor network to reproduce operating conditions in rocket engines and in the environment have been developed. An earlier developed detailed chemical kinetic model for the high-pressure CH4/O2 combustion has been improved for the low pressure and low temperature methane combustion and augmented with a submodel for NOx formation. The main model improvements are related to the pressure depending reactions. The model has been validated for operating conditions of 0.02 < p < 100 atm, 300 < T < 1800 K and 0.5 < ? < 3.0. The network of chemical reactors available in CHEMICAL WORKBENCH software has been successfully developed to simulate chemical processes in the convergent divergent rocket nozzle and in the exhaust-jet. Simulations performed have shown that the exhaust gases of a methane/oxygen propelled liquid rocket engine contain high amounts of active radicals, which can influence the formation of nitrogen compounds and consume ozone in the atmosphere.

Slavinskaya, N. A.; Wiegand, M.; Starcke, J. H.; Riedel, U.; Haidn, O. J.; Suslov, D.

2013-03-01

115

Combustion, Respiration and Intermittent Exercise: A Theoretical Perspective on Oxygen Uptake and Energy Expenditure  

PubMed Central

While no doubt thought about for thousands of years, it was Antoine Lavoisier in the late 18th century who is largely credited with the first “modern” investigations of biological energy exchanges. From Lavoisier’s work with combustion and respiration a scientific trend emerges that extends to the present day: the world gains a credible working hypothesis but validity goes missing, often for some time, until later confirmed using proper measures. This theme is applied to glucose/glycogen metabolism where energy exchanges are depicted as conversion from one form to another and, transfer from one place to another made by both the anaerobic and aerobic biochemical pathways within working skeletal muscle, and the hypothetical quantification of these components as part of an oxygen (O2) uptake measurement. The anaerobic and aerobic energy exchange components of metabolism are represented by two different interpretations of O2 uptake: one that contains a glycolytic component (1 L O2 = 21.1 kJ) and one that does not (1 L O2 = 19.6 kJ). When energy exchange transfer and oxygen-related expenditures are applied separately to exercise and recovery periods, an increased energy cost for intermittent as compared to continuous exercise is hypothesized to be a direct result. PMID:24833508

Scott, Christopher B.

2014-01-01

116

Combustion, respiration and intermittent exercise: a theoretical perspective on oxygen uptake and energy expenditure.  

PubMed

While no doubt thought about for thousands of years, it was Antoine Lavoisier in the late 18th century who is largely credited with the first "modern" investigations of biological energy exchanges. From Lavoisier's work with combustion and respiration a scientific trend emerges that extends to the present day: the world gains a credible working hypothesis but validity goes missing, often for some time, until later confirmed using proper measures. This theme is applied to glucose/glycogen metabolism where energy exchanges are depicted as conversion from one form to another and, transfer from one place to another made by both the anaerobic and aerobic biochemical pathways within working skeletal muscle, and the hypothetical quantification of these components as part of an oxygen (O2) uptake measurement. The anaerobic and aerobic energy exchange components of metabolism are represented by two different interpretations of O2 uptake: one that contains a glycolytic component (1 L O2 = 21.1 kJ) and one that does not (1 L O2 = 19.6 kJ). When energy exchange transfer and oxygen-related expenditures are applied separately to exercise and recovery periods, an increased energy cost for intermittent as compared to continuous exercise is hypothesized to be a direct result. PMID:24833508

Scott, Christopher B

2014-01-01

117

Effect of fuel gas composition in chemical-looping combustion with Ni-based oxygen carriers. 1. Fate of sulfur  

SciTech Connect

Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) has been suggested among the best alternatives to reduce the economic cost of CO{sub 2} capture using fuel gas because CO{sub 2} is inherently separated in the process. For gaseous fuels, natural gas, refinery gas, or syngas from coal gasification can be used. These fuels may contain different amounts of sulfur compounds, such as H{sub 2}S and COS. An experimental investigation of the fate of sulfur during CH{sub 4} combustion in a 500 W{sub th} CLC prototype using a Ni-based oxygen carrier has been carried out. The effect on the oxygen carrier behavior and combustion efficiency of several operating conditions such as temperature and H{sub 2}S concentration has been analyzed. Nickel sulfide, Ni3S{sub 2}, was formed at all operating conditions in the fuel reactor, which produced an oxygen carrier deactivation and lower combustion efficiencies. However, the oxygen carrier recovered their initial reactivity after certain time without sulfur addition. The sulfides were transported to the air reactor where SO{sub 2} was produced as final gas product. Agglomeration problems derived from the sulfides formation were never detected during continuous operation. Considering both operational and environmental aspects, fuels with sulfur contents below 100 vppm H{sub 2}S seem to be adequate to be used in an industrial CLC plant.

Garcia-Labiano, F.; de Diego, L.F.; Gayan, P.; Adanez, J.; Abad, A.; Dueso, C. [CSIC, Zaragoza (Spain)

2009-03-15

118

Burning of solids in oxygen-rich environments in normal and reduced gravity. [combustion of cellulose acetates  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An experimental program was conducted to investigate the combustion characteristics of solids burning in a weightless environment. The combustion characteristics of thin cellulose acetate material were obtained from specimens burned in supercritical as well as in low pressure oxygen atmospheres. Flame spread rates were measured and found to depend on material thickness and pressure in both normal gravity (1-g) and reduced gravity (0-g). A gravity effect on the burning process was also observed; the ratio of 1-g to 0-g flame spread rate becomes larger with increasing material thickness. Qualitative results on the combustion characteristics of metal screens (stainless steel, Inconel, copper, and aluminum) burning in supercritical oxygen and normal gravity are also presented. Stainless steel (300 sq mesh) was successfully ignited in reduced gravity; no apparent difference in the flame spread pattern was observed between 1-g and 0-g.

Andracchio, C. R.; Cochran, T. H.

1974-01-01

119

Clinical oxygen enhancement ratio of tumors in carbon ion radiotherapy: the influence of local oxygenation changes  

PubMed Central

The effect of carbon ion radiotherapy on hypoxic tumors has recently been questioned because of low linear energy transfer (LET) values in the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP). The aim of this study was to investigate the role of hypoxia and local oxygenation changes (LOCs) in fractionated carbon ion radiotherapy. Three-dimensional tumors with hypoxic subvolumes were simulated assuming interfraction LOCs. Different fractionations were applied using a clinically relevant treatment plan with a known LET distribution. The surviving fraction was calculated, taking oxygen tension, dose and LET into account, using the repairable–conditionally repairable (RCR) damage model with parameters for human salivary gland tumor cells. The clinical oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) was defined as the ratio of doses required for a tumor control probability of 50% for hypoxic and well-oxygenated tumors. The resulting OER was well above unity for all fractionations. For the hypoxic tumor, the tumor control probability was considerably higher if LOCs were assumed, rather than static oxygenation. The beneficial effect of LOCs increased with the number of fractions. However, for very low fraction doses, the improvement related to LOCs did not compensate for the increase in total dose required for tumor control. In conclusion, our results suggest that hypoxia can influence the outcome of carbon ion radiotherapy because of the non-negligible oxygen effect at the low LETs in the SOBP. However, if LOCs occur, a relatively high level of tumor control probability is achievable with a large range of fractionation schedules for tumors with hypoxic subvolumes, but both hyperfractionation and hypofractionation should be pursued with caution. PMID:24728013

Antonovic, Laura; Lindblom, Emely; Dasu, Alexandru; Bassler, Niels; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Toma-Dasu, Iuliana

2014-01-01

120

Combustion of solid fuel slabs with gaseous oxygen in a hybrid motor analog  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Using a high-pressure, two-dimensional hybrid motor, an experimental investigation was conducted on fundamental processes involved in hybrid rocket combustion. HTPB (Hydroxyl-terminated Polybutadiene) fuel cross-linked with diisocyanate was burned with gaseous oxygen (GOX) under various operating conditions. Large-amplitude pressure oscillations were encountered in earlier test runs. After identifying the source of instability and decoupling the GOX feed-line system and combustion chamber, the pressure oscillations were drastically reduced from plus or minus 20% of the localized mean pressure to an acceptable range of plus or minus 1.5%. Embedded fine--wire thermocouples indicated that the surface temperature of the burning fuel was around 1000 K depending upon axial locations and operating conditions. Also, except near the leading edge region, the subsurface thermal wave profiles in the upstream locations are thicker than those in the downstream locations since the solid-fuel regression rate, in general, increases with distance along the fuel slab. The recovered solid fuel slabs in the laminar portion of the boundary layer exhibited smooth surfaces, indicating the existence of a liquid melt layer on the burning fuel surface in the upstream region. After the transition section, which displayed distinct transverse striations, the surface roughness pattern became quite random and very pronounced in the downstream turbulent boundary-layer region. Both real-time X-ray radiography and ultrasonic pulse echo techniques were used to determine the instantaneous web thicknesses and instantaneous solid-fuel regression rates over certain portions of the fuel slabs. Globally averaged and axially dependent but time-averaged regression rates were also obtained and presented. Several tests were conducted using, simultaneously, one translucent fuel slab and one fuel slab processed with carbon black powder. The addition of carbon black did not affect the measured regression rates or surface temperatures in comparison to the translucent fuel slabs.

Chiaverini, Martin J.; Harting, George C.; Lu, Yeu-Cherng; Kuo, Kenneth K.; Serin, Nadir; Johnson, David K.

1995-01-01

121

Absorption spectroscopy of oxygen, carbon dioxide and water species for applications in combustion diagnostics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Laser absorption spectroscopy has been a useful tool applied in combustion diagnostics because of its capability to measure the species' concentration, particularly to measure concentration, temperature, and pressure simultaneously. These measurements provide the necessary information for dynamic combustion control. Due to its advantages such as fast response, non-intrusive nature and applicability under harsh environment like high temperature and high pressure, absorption laser spectroscopy makes it possible to monitor combustion system on-line and in situ. Since its development for more than thirty years, laser spectroscopy has matured, and the novel and advanced laser sensors have pushed it to be applied fast. On the other hand, industry still needs cheaper and more operable spectroscopy, which becomes an important consideration in the development and application of modern laser spectroscopy. This study presents an instrumental structure including the algorithm of the spectrum computation and the hardware configuration. The algorithm applied the central maximum value of the spectrum to simplify the computation. The whole calculation was done extensively using Beer-Lambert theory and HITRAN database which makes it efficient and applicable. This research conducted the simulations of high temperature species, such as CO2, H2O to carry out the algorithm, which were compared with published data. Also, this research designed and performed the experiments of measuring oxygen and its mixture with Helium by using a 760 nm diode laser and a 655 nm Helium/Neon laser sensor with fixed wavelength structures. The results of this research also conclude the following: (1) extensive literature survey, field research and laboratory work; (2) studying the significant theories and experimental methods of the laser spectroscopy; (3) developing efficient and simplified algorithm for spectrum calculation; (4) simulating high temperature species H2O and CO2; (5) designing and building experiments for measuring species O2; (6) Numerical model of Abel Transform and analytical model for spatial distribution of concentration using line of sight data. The work in this research for the spectroscopy of H2O, CO 2 and O2 will help to construct an economic, operable and robust instrument.

Mei, Anhua

122

THE USE OF CO 2 AND COMBUSTION GASES FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY IN RUSSIA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of carbon dioxide and combustion gases in EOR technologies is of interest from the point of view of CO2 geological sequestration. During the period of 1980-1990 large-scale pilot tests were carried out in Russia to utilize carbon dioxide and combustion gases, formed at different petrochemical production plants, to enhance oil recovery in different hydrocarbon fields. The analysis of

V. A. Kuvshinov

123

Steam-enhanced regime for liquid hydrocarbons combustion: velocity distribution in the burner flame  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The lab-scale burner device with proprietary design was used for combustion of diesel fuel in a steam-enhanced regime. This operation mode ensures drastic intensification of liquid hydrocarbon combustion due to supply of superheated steam jet to the combustion zone. The particle image velocimetry technique was used for study of velocity field in the burner flame. The method of seeding of flow zone with new kind of tracers (micro-sized silica particles produced from silicon oil added to liquid fuel) was tested.

Alekseenko, S. V.; Anufriev, I. S.; Vigriyanov, M. S.; Dulin, V. M.; Kopyev, E. P.; Sharypov, O. V.

2014-06-01

124

Mathematical analysis of potentiometric oxygen sensors for combustion-gas streams  

SciTech Connect

The mathematical tools necessary to describe quantitatively the chemical processes that dictate the performance of exhaust oxygen sensors are developed. Such sensor are used commonly to monitor exhaust streams generated by internal-combustion processes. Calculated results compared will with available experimental results, although several open questions are identified that require more experimental data. The mathematical formalism for describing the transport of gaseous species through the porous spinel structure protecting the platinum electrode on the exhaust side of the sensor is developed based on the Stefan-Maxwell equations. The kinetic processes occurring at the interface formed by the platinum electrode and the spinel structure, including the oxidation of hydrogen and carbon monoxide and various adsorption-desorption reactions, enter as boundary conditions for the transport equations. The analysis enables one to calculate the sensor's voltage response as a function of the air-to-fuel ratio [lambda] and to investigate phenomena such as the magnitude of the voltage jump in going from rich to lean gas mixtures and the [lambda] value at which the jump occurs.

Baker, D.R.; Verbrugge, M.W. (General Motors Research and Development Center, Warren, MI (United States))

1994-09-01

125

Reference concepts for a space-based hydrogen-oxygen combustion, turboalternator, burst power system  

SciTech Connect

This report describes reference concepts for a hydrogen-oxygen combustion, turboalternator power system that supplies power during battle engagement to a space-based, ballistic missile defense platform. All of the concepts are open''; that is, they exhaust hydrogen or a mixture of hydrogen and water vapor into space. We considered the situation where hydrogen is presumed to be free to the power system because it is also needed to cool the platform's weapon and the situation where hydrogen is not free and its mass must be added to that of the power system. We also considered the situation where water vapor is an acceptable exhaust and the situation where it is not. The combination of these two sets of situations required four different power generation systems, and this report describes each, suggests parameter values, and estimates masses for each of the four. These reference concepts are expected to serve as a baseline'' to which other types of power systems can be compared, and they are expected to help guide technology development efforts in that they suggest parameter value ranges that will lead to optimum system designs. 7 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

Edenburn, M.W.

1990-07-01

126

Chemical-looping combustion of coal-derived synthesis gas over copper oxide oxygen carriers  

SciTech Connect

CuO/bentonite and CuO-BHA nanocomposites were studied as oxygen carriers in chemical-looping combustion (CLC) of simulated synthesis gas. Global reaction rates of reduction and oxidation, as the function of reaction conversion, were calculated from 10-cycle oxidation/reduction tests utilizing thermogravimetric analysis at atmospheric pressure between 700 and 900 °C. It was found that the reduction reactions are always faster than oxidation reactions; reaction temperature and particle size do not significantly affect the reaction performance of CuO/bentonite. Multicycle CLC tests conducted in a high-pressure flow reactor showed stable reactivity for production of CO2 from fuel gas at 800 and 900 °C and full consumption of hydrogen during the reaction. Results of the tapered element oscillating microbalance showed a negative effect of pressure on the global rates of reduction-oxidation reactions at higher fractional conversions. X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed the presence of CuO in the bulk phase of the oxidized sample. Electron microanalysis showed significant morphology changes of reacted CuO/bentonite samples after the 10 oxidation-reduction cycles above 700 °C in an atmospheric thermogravimetric analyzer. The nanostructured CuO-BHA carrier also showed excellent stability and, in comparison to the CuO/bentonite system, slightly accelerated redox kinetics albeit at the expense of significantly increased complexity of manufacturing. Overall, both types of CuO carriers exhibited excellent reaction performance and thermal stability for the CLC process at 700-900 °C.

Tian, H.; Chaudhari, K.; Simonyi, T.; Poston, J.; Liu, T.; Sanders, T.; Veser, G.; Siriwardane, R.

2008-01-01

127

Chemical-looping combustion of coal-derived synthesis gas over copper oxide oxygen carriers  

SciTech Connect

CuO/bentonite and CuO?BHA nanocomposites were studied as oxygen carriers in chemical-looping combustion (CLC) of simulated synthesis gas. Global reaction rates of reduction and oxidation, as the function of reaction conversion, were calculated from 10-cycle oxidation/reduction tests utilizing thermogravimetric analysis at atmospheric pressure between 700 and 900 °C. It was found that the reduction reactions are always faster than oxidation reactions; reaction temperature and particle size do not significantly affect the reaction performance of CuO/bentonite. Multicycle CLC tests conducted in a high-pressure flow reactor showed stable reactivity for production of CO2 from fuel gas at 800 and 900 °C and full consumption of hydrogen during the reaction. Results of the tapered element oscillating microbalance showed a negative effect of pressure on the global rates of reduction?oxidation reactions at higher fractional conversions. X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed the presence of CuO in the bulk phase of the oxidized sample. Electron microanalysis showed significant morphology changes of reacted CuO/bentonite samples after the 10 oxidation?reduction cycles above 700 °C in an atmospheric thermogravimetric analyzer. The nanostructured CuO?BHA carrier also showed excellent stability and, in comparison to the CuO/bentonite system, slightly accelerated redox kinetics albeit at the expense of significantly increased complexity of manufacturing. Overall, both types of CuO carriers exhibited excellent reaction performance and thermal stability for the CLC process at 700?900 °C.

Tian, Hanjing; Chaudhari, K.P.; Simonyi, Thomas; Poston, J.A.; Liu, Tengfei; Sanders, Tom; Veser, Goetz; Siriwardane, R.V.

2008-11-01

128

Combustion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An overview of the emissions related research being conducted as part of the Fundamental Aeronautics Subsonics Fixed Wing Project is presented. The overview includes project metrics, milestones, and descriptions of major research areas. The overview also includes information on some of the emissions research being conducted under NASA Research Announcements. Objective: Development of comprehensive detailed and reduced kinetic mechanisms of jet fuels for chemically-reacting flow modeling. Scientific Challenges: 1) Developing experimental facilities capable of handling higher hydrocarbons and providing benchmark combustion data. 2) Determining and understanding ignition and combustion characteristics, such as laminar flame speeds, extinction stretch rates, and autoignition delays, of jet fuels and hydrocarbons relevant to jet surrogates. 3) Developing comprehensive kinetic models for jet fuels.

Bulzan, Dan

2007-01-01

129

Combustion  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this chemistry activity, learners discover that the weight of the product of combustion is greater than that of the starting material. Learners will compare the weight of steel wool before and after it is heated. Learners are asked to consider why the steel wool weighs more (oxidation) as well as write the balanced chemical equation for the burning of steel. This activity uses an open flame; adult supervision is recommended. The resource includes notes for educators and extension ideas.

2014-01-28

130

Preliminary Study of Oxygen-Enhanced Longitudinal Relaxation in MRI: A Potential Novel Biomarker of Oxygenation Changes in Solid Tumors  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: There is considerable interest in developing non-invasive methods of mapping tumor hypoxia. Changes in tissue oxygen concentration produce proportional changes in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) longitudinal relaxation rate (R{sub 1}). This technique has been used previously to evaluate oxygen delivery to healthy tissues and is distinct from blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) imaging. Here we report application of this method to detect alteration in tumor oxygenation status. Methods and materials: Ten patients with advanced cancer of the abdomen and pelvis underwent serial measurement of tumor R{sub 1} while breathing medical air (21% oxygen) followed by 100% oxygen (oxygen-enhanced MRI). Gadolinium-based dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI was then performed to compare the spatial distribution of perfusion with that of oxygen-induced DELTAR{sub 1}. Results: DELTAR{sub 1} showed significant increases of 0.021 to 0.058 s{sup -1} in eight patients with either locally recurrent tumor from cervical and hepatocellular carcinomas or metastases from ovarian and colorectal carcinomas. In general, there was congruency between perfusion and oxygen concentration. However, regional mismatch was observed in some tumor cores. Here, moderate gadolinium uptake (consistent with moderate perfusion) was associated with low area under the DELTAR{sub 1} curve (consistent with minimal increase in oxygen concentration). Conclusions: These results provide evidence that oxygen-enhanced longitudinal relaxation can monitor changes in tumor oxygen concentration. The technique shows promise in identifying hypoxic regions within tumors and may enable spatial mapping of change in tumor oxygen concentration.

O'Connor, James P.B. [Imaging Science and Biomedical Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom) and Cancer Research UK Department of Medical Oncology, Christie Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Naish, Josephine H.; Parker, Geoff J.M. [Imaging Science and Biomedical Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Waterton, John C. [Imaging Science and Biomedical Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); AstraZeneca, Cheshire (United Kingdom); Watson, Yvonne [Imaging Science and Biomedical Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Jayson, Gordon C. [Cancer Research UK Department of Medical Oncology, Christie Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Buonaccorsi, Giovanni A.; Cheung, Sue; Buckley, David L.; McGrath, Deirdre M. [Imaging Science and Biomedical Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); West, Catharine M.L. [Academic Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Davidson, Susan E. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Christie Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Roberts, Caleb; Mills, Samantha J. [Imaging Science and Biomedical Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Mitchell, Claire L.; Hope, Lynn; Ton, N. Chan [Cancer Research UK Department of Medical Oncology, Christie Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Jackson, Alan [Imaging Science and Biomedical Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom)

2009-11-15

131

Metallized Gelled Propellants: Oxygen/RP-1/Aluminum Rocket Heat Transfer and Combustion Measurements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A series of rocket engine heat transfer experiments using metallized gelled liquid propellants was conducted. These experiments used a small 20- to 40-lb/f thrust engine composed of a modular injector, igniter, chamber and nozzle. The fuels used were traditional liquid RP-1 and gelled RP-1 with 0-, 5-, and 55-percentage by weight loadings of aluminum particles. Gaseous oxygen was used as the oxidizer. Three different injectors were used during the testing: one for the baseline O(2)/RP-1 tests and two for the gelled and metallized gelled fuel firings. Heat transfer measurements were made with a rocket engine calorimeter chamber and nozzle with a total of 31 cooling channels. Each chamber used a water flow to carry heat away from the chamber and the attached thermocouples and flow meters allowed heat flux estimates at each of the 31 stations. The rocket engine Cstar efficiency for the RP-1 fuel was in the 65-69 percent range, while the gelled 0 percent by weight RP-1 and the 5-percent by weight RP-1 exhibited a Cstar efficiency range of 60 to 62% and 65 to 67%, respectively. The 55-percent by weight RP-1 fuel delivered a 42-47% Cstar efficiency. Comparisons of the heat flux and temperature profiles of the RP-1 and the metallized gelled RP-1/A1 fuels show that the peak nozzle heat fluxes with the metallized gelled O2/RP-1/A1 propellants are substantially higher than the baseline O2/RP-1: up to double the flux for the 55 percent by weight RP-1/A1 over the RP-1 fuel. Analyses showed that the heat transfer to the wall was significantly different for the RP-1/A1 at 55-percent by weight versus the RP-1 fuel. Also, a gellant and an aluminum combustion delay was inferred in the 0 percent and 5-percent by weight RP-1/A1 cases from the decrease in heat flux in the first part of the chamber. A large decrease in heat flux in the last half of the chamber was caused by fuel deposition in the chamber and nozzle. The engine combustion occurred well downstream of the injector face based on the heat flux estimates from the temperature measurements.

Palaszewski, Bryan; Zakany, James S.

1996-01-01

132

Metallized Gelled Propellants: Oxygen/RP-1/aluminum Rocket Combustion Experiments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A series of combustion experiments were conducted to measure the specific impulse, Cstar-, and specific-impulse efficiencies of a rocket engine using metallized gelled liquid propellants. These experiments used a small 20- to 40-1bf (89- to 178-N) thrust, modular engine consisting of an injector, igniter, chamber and nozzle. The fuels used were traditional liquid RP-1 and gelled RP-1 with 0-, 5-, and 55-wt% loadings of aluminum and gaseous oxygen was the oxidizer. Ten different injectors were used during the testing: 6 for the baseline 02/RP-1 tests and 4 for the gelled fuel tests which covered a wide range of mixture ratios. At the peak of the Isp versus oxidizer-to-fuel ratio (O/F) data, a range of 93 to 99% Cstar efficiency was reached with ungelled 02/RP-1. A Cstar efficiency range of 75 to 99% was obtained with gelled RP-l (0-wt% RP-1/Al) while the metallized 5-wt% RP-1/Al delivered a Cstar efficiency of 94 to 99% at the peak Isp in the O/F range tested. An 88 to 99% Cstar efficiency was obtained at the peak Isp of the gelled RP1/Al with 55-wt% Al. Specific impulse efficiencies for the 55-wt% RP-1/Al of 67%-83% were obtained at a 2.4:1 expansion ratio. Injector erosion was evident with the 55-wt% testing, while there was little or no erosion seen with the gelled RP-1 with 0- and 5-wt% Al. A protective layer of gelled fuel formed in the firings that minimized the damage to the rocket injector face. This effect may provide a useful technique for engine cooling. These experiments represent a first step in characterizing the performance of and operational issues with gelled RP-1 fuels.

Palaszewski, Bryan; Zakany, James S.

1995-01-01

133

Chemical-looping combustion of coal-derived synthesis gas over copper oxide oxygen carriers  

SciTech Connect

CuO/bentonite and CuO-BHA nanocomposites were studied as oxygen carriers in chemical-looping combustion (CLC) of simulated synthesis gas. Global reaction rates of reduction and oxidation, as the function of reaction conversion, were calculated from 10-cycle oxidation/reduction tests utilizing thermogravimetric analysis at atmospheric pressure between 700 and 900{degree}C. It was found that the reduction reactions are always faster than oxidation reactions; reaction temperature and particle size do not significantly affect the reaction performance of CuO/bentonite. Multicycle CLC tests conducted in a high-pressure flow reactor showed stable reactivity for production of CO{sub 2} from fuel gas at 800 and 900{degree}C and full consumption of hydrogen during the reaction. Results of the tapered element oscillating microbalance showed a negative effect of pressure on the global rates of reduction-oxidation reactions at higher fractional conversions. X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed the presence of CuO in the bulk phase of the oxidized sample. Electron microanalysis showed significant morphology changes of reacted CuO/bentonite samples after the 10 oxidation-reduction cycles above 700{degree}C in an atmospheric thermogravimetric analyzer. The nanostructured CuO-BHA carrier also showed excellent stability and, in comparison to the CuO/bentonite system, slightly accelerated redox kinetics albeit at the expense of significantly increased complexity of manufacturing. Overall, both types of CuO carriers exhibited excellent reaction performance and thermal stability for the CLC process at 700-900{degree}C. 48 refs., 12 figs., 8 tabs.

Hanjing Tian; Karuna Chaudhari; Thomas Simonyi; James Poston; Tengfei Liu; Tom Sanders; Goetz Veser; Ranjani Siriwardane [U.S. Department of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States). National Energy Technology Laboratory

2008-11-15

134

Combustion Stability Characteristics of the Project Morpheus Liquid Oxygen / Liquid Methane Main Engine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The project Morpheus liquid oxygen (LOX) / liquid methane (LCH4) main engine is a Johnson Space Center (JSC) designed 5,000 lbf-thrust, 4:1 throttling, pressure-fed cryogenic engine using an impinging element injector design. The engine met or exceeded all performance requirements without experiencing any in- ight failures, but the engine exhibited acoustic-coupled combustion instabilities during sea-level ground-based testing. First tangential (1T), rst radial (1R), 1T1R, and higher order modes were triggered by conditions during the Morpheus vehicle derived low chamber pressure startup sequence. The instability was never observed to initiate during mainstage, even at low power levels. Ground-interaction acoustics aggravated the instability in vehicle tests. Analysis of more than 200 hot re tests on the Morpheus vehicle and Stennis Space Center (SSC) test stand showed a relationship between ignition stability and injector/chamber pressure. The instability had the distinct characteristic of initiating at high relative injection pressure drop at low chamber pressure during the start sequence. Data analysis suggests that the two-phase density during engine start results in a high injection velocity, possibly triggering the instabilities predicted by the Hewitt stability curves. Engine ignition instability was successfully mitigated via a higher-chamber pressure start sequence (e.g., 50% power level vs 30%) and operational propellant start temperature limits that maintained \\cold LOX" and \\warm methane" at the engine inlet. The main engine successfully demonstrated 4:1 throttling without chugging during mainstage, but chug instabilities were observed during some engine shutdown sequences at low injector pressure drop, especially during vehicle landing.

Melcher, John C.; Morehead, Robert L.

2014-01-01

135

Plasma torch for ignition, flameholding and enhancement of combustion in high speed flows  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Preheating of fuel and injection into a plasma torch plume fro adjacent the plasma torch plume provides for only ignition with reduced delay but improved fuel-air mixing and fuel atomization as well as combustion reaction enhancement. Heat exchange also reduced erosion of the anode of the plasma torch. Fuel mixing atomization, fuel mixture distribution enhancement and combustion reaction enhancement are improved by unsteady plasma torch energization, integral formation of the heat exchanger, fuel injection nozzle and plasma torch anode in a more compact, low-profile arrangement which is not intrusive on a highspeed air flow with which the invention is particularly effective and further enhanced by use of nitrogen as a feedstock material and inclusion of high pressure gases in the fuel to cause effervescence during injection.

O'Brien, Walter F. (Inventor); Billingsley, Matthew C. (Inventor); Sanders, Darius D. (Inventor); Schetz, Joseph A. (Inventor)

2009-01-01

136

The Tapioca Bomb: A Demonstration to Enhance Learning about Combustion and Chemical Safety  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In any demonstration to students, producing light and sound usually ensures interest and can enhance understanding and retention of the concepts involved. A guided inquiry (Predict, Observe, Explain: POE) approach was used to involve the students actively in their learning about the explosive combustion of fine flour particles in air in the…

Keeratichamroen, Wasana; Dechsri, Precharn; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Ruenwongsa, Pintip

2010-01-01

137

Demonstration of oxygen-enriched combustion system on a light-duty vehicle to reduce cold-start emissions  

SciTech Connect

The oxygen content in the ambient air drawn by combustion engines can be increased by polymer membranes. The authors have previously demonstrated that 23 to 25% (concentration by volume) oxygen-enriched intake air can reduce hydrocarbons (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), air toxics, and ozone-forming potential (OFP) from flexible-fueled vehicles (FFVs) that use gasoline or M85. When oxygen-enriched air was used only during the initial start-up and warm-up periods, the emission levels of all three regulated pollutants [CO, nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHC), and NO{sub x}] were lower than the U.S. EPA Tier II (year 2004) standards (without adjusting for catalyst deterioration factors). In the present work, an air separation membrane module was installed on the intake of a 2.5-L FFV and tested at idle and free acceleration to demonstrate the oxygen-enrichment concept for initial start-up and warm-up periods. A bench-scale, test set-up was developed to evaluate the air separation membrane characteristics for engine applications. On the basis of prototype bench tests and from vehicle tests, the additional power requirements and module size for operation of the membrane during the initial period of the cold-phase, FTP-75 cycle were evaluated. A prototype membrane module (27 in. long, 3 in. in diameter) supplying about 23% oxygen-enriched air in the engine intake only during the initial start-up and warm-up periods of a 2.5-L FFV requires additional power (blower) of less than one horsepower. With advances in air separation membranes to develop compact modules, oxygen enrichment of combustion air has the potential of becoming a more practical technique for controlling exhaust emissions from light-duty vehicles.

Sekar, R.; Poola, R.B.

1997-08-01

138

Mathematical modeling of combustion in a grate-fired boiler burning straw and effect of operating conditions under air- and oxygen-enriched atmospheres  

Microsoft Academic Search

A three-dimensional mathematical model has been developed as a tool for furnace structure design and operation conditions optimization when the straw combustion is in oxygen-enriched or conventional air atmospheres. Mathematical methods have been used based on a combination of FLIC (A fluid Dynamic Incinerator Code) code for the in-bed incineration and commercial software FLUENT for the over-bed combustion. Oxygen-enriched atmospheres

Zhaosheng Yu; Xiaoqian Ma; Yanfen Liao

2010-01-01

139

Shock enhancement and control of hypersonic mixing and combustion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Experimental and computational analyses of the possibility that shock-enhanced mixing can substantially increase the rate of mixing between coflowing streams of hydrogen and air are discussed. Numerical computations indicate that the steady interaction between a weak shock in air with a coflowing hydrogen jet can be approximated by the two-dimensional time-dependent interaction between a weak shock and an initially circular region filled with hydrogen imbedded in air. Experimental results obtained in a shock tube and contoured wall injector are presented. It is shown that the shock impinging process causes the light gas cylinder to split into two parts; one of these mixes rapidly with air and the other forms a stably stratified vortex pair which mixes more slowly. The geometry of the flow field and the mixing process and scaling parameters are assessed.

Marble, Frank E.; Zukoski, Edward E.; Jacobs, Jeffrey; Hendricks, Gavin; Waitz, Ian

1990-01-01

140

Wiebke Breves Ru diger Heuermann Rainer Reuter Enhanced red fluorescence emission in the oxygen minimum zone  

E-print Network

weeks of sample storage in the dark and cannot be reproduced even after depletion of dissolved oxygen in the oxygen minimum zone of the Arabian Sea Received: 22 May 2002 / Accepted: 18 February 2003 Ó Springer, the profiles in the oxygen minimum region well below the euphotic zone show enhanced red fluorescence. Red

Oldenburg, Carl von Ossietzky Universität

141

Oxygen and Opacity Stack Emission Monitoring Systems To Optimize Combustion Efficiency and Meet EPA Requirements  

E-print Network

of the status of the products of combustion fuel - air - mixture ratios can be maintained at optimum levels resulting in improved combustion efficiency and reduced air pollution in compliance with EPA guidelines. The smoke going up your stack is to a large part...

Molloy, R. C.

1980-01-01

142

Detailed Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Diesel Spray Combustion with Oxygenated Fuels  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper confirms a structure for the soot formation process inside a burning diesel jet plume of oxygenated fuels. An explanation of how the soot formation process changes by the use of oxygenated fuel in comparison with that for using a conventional diesel fuel, and why oxygenated fuel drastically suppresses the soot forma- tion has been derived from the chemical

Takaaki Kitamura; Takayuki Ito; Jiro Senda; Hajime Fujimoto

2001-01-01

143

Enhanced performance of an electric oxygen-iodine laser D. L. Carrolla  

E-print Network

Enhanced performance of an electric oxygen-iodine laser D. L. Carrolla , G. F. Benavidesa,b , J. W and modeling have led to continued enhancements in the Electric Oxygen-Iodine Laser (ElectricOIL) system. This continuous wave (cw) laser operating on the 1315 nm transition of atomic iodine is pumped by the production

Carroll, David L.

144

Supplemental Oxygen (Oxygen Therapy)  

MedlinePLUS

... gas and is non-flammable, however, it supports combustion. Materials burn more readily in an oxygen-enriched ... avoid using lotions or creams containing petroleum. The combustion of flammable products containing petroleum can also be ...

145

Development of Nanofiller-Modulated Polymeric Oxygen Enrichment Membranes for Reduction of Nitrogen Oxides in Coal Combustion  

SciTech Connect

North Carolina A&T State University in Greensboro, North Carolina, has undertaken this project to develop the knowledge and the material to improve the oxygen-enrichment polymer membrane, in order to provide high-grade oxygen-enriched streams for coal combustion and gasification applications. Both experimental and theoretical approaches were used in this project. The membranes evaluated thus far include single-walled carbon nano-tube, nano-fumed silica polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and zeolite-modulated polyimide membranes. To document the nanofiller-modulated polymer, molecular dynamics simulations have been conducted to calculate the theoretical oxygen molecular diffusion coefficient and nitrogen molecular coefficient inside single-walled carbon nano-tube PDMS membranes, in order to predict the effect of the nano-tubes on the gas-separation permeability. The team has performed permeation and diffusion experiments using polymers with nano-silica particles, nano-tubes, and zeolites as fillers; studied the influence of nano-fillers on the self diffusion, free volume, glass transition, oxygen diffusion and solubility, and perm-selectivity of oxygen in polymer membranes; developed molecular models of single-walled carbon nano-tube and nano-fumed silica PDMS membranes, and zeolites-modulated polyimide membranes. This project partially supported three graduate students (two finished degrees and one transferred to other institution). This project has resulted in two journal publications and additional publications will be prepared in the near future.

Jianzhong Lou; Shamsuddin Ilias

2010-12-31

146

Determination of mercury in ash and soil samples by oxygen flask combustion method--cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CVAFS).  

PubMed

A simple method was developed for the determination of mercury (Hg) in coal fly ash (CFA), waste incineration ash (WIA), and soil by use of oxygen flask combustion (OFC) followed by cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CVAFS). A KMnO4 solution was used as an absorbent in the OFC method, and the sample containing a combustion agent and an ash or soil sample was combusted by the OFC method. By use of Hg-free graphite as the combustion agent, the determination of Hg in ash and soil was successfully carried out; the Hg-free graphite was prepared by use of a mild pyrolysis procedure at 500 degrees C. For six certified reference materials (three CFA samples and three soil samples), the values of Hg obtained by this method were in good agreement with the certified or reference values. In addition, real samples including nine CFAs collected from some coal-fired power plants, five WIAs collected from waste incineration plants, and two soils were analyzed by the present method, and the data were compared to those from microwave-acid digestion (MW-AD) method. PMID:18023528

Geng, Wenhua; Nakajima, Tsunenori; Takanashi, Hirokazu; Ohki, Akira

2008-06-15

147

Methane and propane combustion over lanthanum transition-metal perovskites: role of oxygen mobility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Catalytic hydrocarbon combustion is a technologically important, but still relatively poorly understood reaction. To shed more light on the role of various physical and chemical characteristics of the catalyst on its activity for hydrocarbon combustion, La1?xSrxM1?yMy?O3?? perovskites (M and M? represent transition metals) were used as a model system. Four representative compositions were prepared and fully characterized by different methods

M Alifanti; J Kirchnerova; B Delmon; D Klvana

2004-01-01

148

Vapor hydrogen and oxygen isotopes reflect water of combustion in the urban atmosphere  

PubMed Central

Anthropogenic modification of the water cycle involves a diversity of processes, many of which have been studied intensively using models and observations. Effective tools for measuring the contribution and fate of combustion-derived water vapor in the atmosphere are lacking, however, and this flux has received relatively little attention. We provide theoretical estimates and a first set of measurements demonstrating that water of combustion is characterized by a distinctive combination of H and O isotope ratios. We show that during periods of relatively low humidity and/or atmospheric stagnation, this isotopic signature can be used to quantify the concentration of water of combustion in the atmospheric boundary layer over Salt Lake City. Combustion-derived vapor concentrations vary between periods of atmospheric stratification and mixing, both on multiday and diurnal timescales, and respond over periods of hours to variations in surface emissions. Our estimates suggest that up to 13% of the boundary layer vapor during the period of study was derived from combustion sources, and both the temporal pattern and magnitude of this contribution were closely reproduced by an independent atmospheric model forced with a fossil fuel emissions data product. Our findings suggest potential for water vapor isotope ratio measurements to be used in conjunction with other tracers to refine the apportionment of urban emissions, and imply that water vapor emissions associated with combustion may be a significant component of the water budget of the urban boundary layer, with potential implications for urban climate, ecohydrology, and photochemistry. PMID:25733906

Gorski, Galen; Strong, Courtenay; Good, Stephen P.; Bares, Ryan; Ehleringer, James R.; Bowen, Gabriel J.

2015-01-01

149

Vapor hydrogen and oxygen isotopes reflect water of combustion in the urban atmosphere.  

PubMed

Anthropogenic modification of the water cycle involves a diversity of processes, many of which have been studied intensively using models and observations. Effective tools for measuring the contribution and fate of combustion-derived water vapor in the atmosphere are lacking, however, and this flux has received relatively little attention. We provide theoretical estimates and a first set of measurements demonstrating that water of combustion is characterized by a distinctive combination of H and O isotope ratios. We show that during periods of relatively low humidity and/or atmospheric stagnation, this isotopic signature can be used to quantify the concentration of water of combustion in the atmospheric boundary layer over Salt Lake City. Combustion-derived vapor concentrations vary between periods of atmospheric stratification and mixing, both on multiday and diurnal timescales, and respond over periods of hours to variations in surface emissions. Our estimates suggest that up to 13% of the boundary layer vapor during the period of study was derived from combustion sources, and both the temporal pattern and magnitude of this contribution were closely reproduced by an independent atmospheric model forced with a fossil fuel emissions data product. Our findings suggest potential for water vapor isotope ratio measurements to be used in conjunction with other tracers to refine the apportionment of urban emissions, and imply that water vapor emissions associated with combustion may be a significant component of the water budget of the urban boundary layer, with potential implications for urban climate, ecohydrology, and photochemistry. PMID:25733906

Gorski, Galen; Strong, Courtenay; Good, Stephen P; Bares, Ryan; Ehleringer, James R; Bowen, Gabriel J

2015-03-17

150

In Situ CO, Oxygen, and Opacity Measurement for Optimizing Combustion Control System Performance  

E-print Network

can cause exponential errors in oxygen readings. In that CO is a product of cumbustion, air infiltration leakage does not have a significant effect on CO readings even when operating at low oxygen levels. With multi-burner systems, problems arise...

Molloy, R. C.

1982-01-01

151

Oxygen-diffusion limited metal combustions in Zr, Ti, and Fe foils: Time- and angle-resolved x-ray diffraction studies  

SciTech Connect

The transient phase and chemical transformations of diffusion controlled metal combustions in bulk Zr, Ti, and Fe foils have been investigated, in situ, using novel time- and angle-resolved x-ray diffraction (TARXD). The TARXD employs monochromatic synchrotron x-rays and a fast-rotating diffracted beam chopper resolving the diffraction image temporally in time-resolution of {approx}45 {mu}s along the azimuth on a 2D pixel array detector. The metal foil strips (10-25 {mu}m in thickness) are ignited using a pulsed electrical heating with a typical heating rate of {approx}10{sup 6} K/s. The x-ray results indicate that the combustion occurs in molten metals, producing a wide range of stoichiometric solid oxides. It reflects an enhanced oxygen solubility and mobility of molten metals with respect to those of solid metals. However, the initial oxides formed are mainly oxygen-deficient metal oxides of ZrO, TiO, and FeO/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} - the lowest suboxides stable at these high temperatures. These transition metal monoxides further react with unreacted molten metals, yielding the secondary products of Zr{sub 3}O, Ti{sub 3}O, and Ti{sub 2}O - but not in FeO/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. On the other hand, the higher stoichiometric oxides of ZrO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2} are formed in the later time only on the metal surface. These results clearly indicate that the combustion process of metal strips is diffusion limited and strongly depends on the solubility and diffusivity of oxygen into molten metals. The time-resolved diffraction data reveals no evidence for metal oxidation in solids, but a series of temperature-induced polymorphic phase transitions. The dynamic thermal expansibility of Fe measured in the present fast heating experiments is similar to those in static conditions (3.3*10{sup -5}/K vs 3.5*10{sup -5}/K for {alpha}-Fe and 6.5*10{sup -5}/K versus 7.0*10{sup -5}/K for {gamma}-Fe).

Wei, Haoyan; Yoo, Choong-Shik; Chen, Jing-Yin; Shen, Guoyin (CIW); (WSU)

2012-04-30

152

High-pressure calorimeter chamber tests for liquid oxygen/kerosene (LOX/RP-1) rocket combustion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An experimental program was conducted to investigate the rocket combustion and heat transfer characteristics of liquid oxygen/kerosene (LOX/RP-1) mixtures at high chamber pressures. Two water-cooled calorimeter chambers of different combustion lengths were tested using 37- and 61-element oxidizer-fuel-oxidizer triplet injectors. The tests were conducted at nominal chamber pressures of 4.1, 8.3, and 13.8 MPa abs (600, 1200, and 2000 psia). Heat flux Q/A data were obtained for the entire calorimeter length for oxygen/fuel mixture ratios of 1.8 to 3.3. Test data at 4.1 MPa abs compared favorably with previous test data from another source. Using an injector with a fuel-rich outer zone reduced the throat heat flux by 47 percent with only a 4.5 percent reduction in the characteristic exhaust velocity efficiency C* sub eff. The throat heat transfer coefficient was reduced approximately 40 percent because of carbon deposits on the chamber wall.

Masters, Philip A.; Armstrong, Elizabeth S.; Price, Harold G.

1988-01-01

153

Application of oxygen-enriched combustion for locomotive diesel engines. Phase 1  

SciTech Connect

A thermodynamic simulation is used to study the effects of oxygen-enriched intake air on the performance and nitrogen oxide (NO) emissions of a locomotive diesel engine. The parasitic power of the air separation membrane required to supply the oxygen-enriched air is also estimated. For a given constraint on peak cylinder pressure, the gross and net power outputs of an engine operating under different levels of oxygen enrichment are compared with those obtained when a high-boost turbocharged engine is used. A 4% increase in peak cylinder pressure can result in an increase in net engine power of approximately 13% when intake air with an oxygen content of 28% by volume is used and fuel injection timing is retarded by 4 degrees. When the engine is turbocharged to a higher inlet boost, the same increase in peak cylinder pressure improves power by only 4%. If part of the significantly higher exhaust enthalpies available as a result of oxygen enrichment are recovered, the power requirements of the air separator membrane can be met, resulting in substantial net power improvements. Oxygen enrichment reduces particulate and visible smoke emissions but increases NO emissions. However, a combination of retarded fuel injection timing and post-treatment of exhaust gases may be adequate to meet the locomotive diesel engine NO{sub x} standards. Exhaust gas after-treatment and heat recovery would be required to realize the full potential of oxygen enrichment. Economic analysis shows that oxygen-enrichment technology is economically feasible and provides high returns on investment. The study also indicates the strong influence of membrane parasitic requirements and exhaust energy recovery on economic benefits. To obtain an economic advantage while using a membrane with higher parasitic power requirements, it is necessary to recover a part of the exhaust energy.

Poola, R.B.; Sekar, R.R.; Assanis, D.N.

1996-09-01

154

CO{sub 2} emission abatement in IGCC power plants by semiclosed cycles: Part A -- With oxygen-blown combustion  

SciTech Connect

This paper analyzes the fundamentals of IGCC power plants where carbon dioxide produced by syngas combustion can be removed, liquefied and eventually disposed, to limit the environmental problems due to the greenhouse effect. To achieve this goal, a semiclosed-loop gas turbine cycle using an highly-enriched CO{sub 2} mixture as working fluid was adopted. As the oxidizer, the syngas combustion utilizes oxygen produced by an air separation unit. Combustion gases mainly consist of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O: after expansion, heat recovery and water condensation, a part of the exhausts, highly concentrated in CO{sub 2}, can be easily extracted, compressed and liquefied for storage or disposal. A detailed discussion about the configuration and the thermodynamic performance of these plants is the aim of the paper. Proper attention was paid to: (i) the modelization of the gasification section and of its integration with the power cycle, (ii) the optimization of pressure ratio due the change of the cycle working fluid, (iii) the calculation of the power consumption of the auxiliary equipment, including the compression train of the separated CO{sub 2} and the air separation unit. The resulting overall efficiency is in the 38--39% range, with status-of-the-art gas turbine technology, but resorting to a substantially higher pressure ratio. The extent of modifications to the gas turbine engine, with respect to commercial units, was therefore discussed. Relevant modifications are needed, but not involving changes in the technology. A second plant scheme will be considered in the second part of the paper, using air for syngas combustion and a physical absorption process to separate CO{sub 2} from nitrogen-rich exhausts. A comparison between the two options will be addressed there.

Chiesa, P.; Lozza, G.

1999-10-01

155

Biologically enhanced cathode design for improved capacity and cycle life for lithium-oxygen batteries  

E-print Network

Lithium-oxygen batteries have a great potential to enhance the gravimetric energy density of fully packaged batteries by two to three times that of lithium ion cells. Recent studies have focused on finding stable electrolytes ...

Oh, Dahyun

156

Enhancement of electric oxygen-iodine laser performance using larger mode volume resonators  

E-print Network

Enhancement of electric oxygen-iodine laser performance using larger mode volume resonators Brian S iodine via a 100% increase in the resonator mode volume. O2 a1 is produced by a single rf.4130, 140.4780, 230.5750. The electrically driven oxygen-iodine laser (Electric- OIL) that was first

Carroll, David L.

157

Super-linear Enhancement of the Electric Oxygen-Iodine Laser David L. Carrolla  

E-print Network

Super-linear Enhancement of the Electric Oxygen-Iodine Laser David L. Carrolla , Brian S. Woodardb., Urbana, Illinois, 61801, United States ABSTRACT Continuing experiments with Electric Oxygen-Iodine Laser output on the 1315-nm transition of atomic iodine. The peak output power observed was 538 W. Keywords

Carroll, David L.

158

Discharge-driven electric oxygen-iodine laser superlinear enhancement via increasing g0L  

E-print Network

Discharge-driven electric oxygen-iodine laser superlinear enhancement via increasing g0L G. F the development of an electric oxygen-iodine laser with higher output using a larger product of gain and gain length, g0L. A factor of 4.4 increase in laser power output on the 1315 nm atomic iodine transition

Carroll, David L.

159

Electric Oxygen-Iodine Laser Performance Enhancement using Larger Discharge and Resonator Mode Volumes  

E-print Network

Electric Oxygen-Iodine Laser Performance Enhancement using Larger Discharge and Resonator Mode transition of atomic iodine for only a 50% increase in gain length (5.1 cm to 7.6 cm), flow rates that significantly higher power was available in the electric oxygen-iodine laser gas flow which could be extracted

Carroll, David L.

160

Enhancement of electric oxygen-iodine laser performance using a rectangular discharge and longer gain length  

E-print Network

Enhancement of electric oxygen-iodine laser performance using a rectangular discharge and longer transition of atomic iodine via a 50% increase in gain length, flow rates, and discharge power. O2 a 1 of Physics. doi:10.1063/1.3269811 The electrically driven oxygen-iodine laser Electri- cOIL that was first

Carroll, David L.

161

Regenerable MgO promoted metal oxide oxygen carriers for chemical looping combustion  

DOEpatents

The disclosure provides an oxygen carrier comprised of a plurality of metal oxide particles in contact with a plurality of MgO promoter particles. The MgO promoter particles increase the reaction rate and oxygen utilization of the metal oxide when contacting with a gaseous hydrocarbon at a temperature greater than about 725.degree. C. The promoted oxide solid is generally comprised of less than about 25 wt. % MgO, and may be prepared by physical mixing, incipient wetness impregnation, or other methods known in the art. The oxygen carrier exhibits a crystalline structure of the metal oxide and a crystalline structure of MgO under XRD crystallography, and retains these crystalline structures over subsequent redox cycles. In an embodiment, the metal oxide is Fe.sub.2O.sub.3, and the gaseous hydrocarbon is comprised of methane.

Siriwardane, Ranjani V.; Miller, Duane D.

2014-08-19

162

Evaluation of Advanced PSA and Oxygen Combustion System for Industrial Furnace Applications  

E-print Network

of use. In contrast, high purity (99.999% pure) oxygen is produced by the Y. Kwan Energy and Environmental Research Corp. Irvine, CA distillation of liquid air at a remote plant and usually transported to the point of use either as cryogenic liquid... expense items. Referring to Figure 3, the PSA system produces 90% product purity, whereas the membrane system produces 35%, and the cryogenic and liquid systems supply 99.9% oxygen. The cost curves show PSA supply to be particUlarly attractive...

Delano, M. A.; Lagree, D.; Kwan, Y.

163

Solid Fuel - Oxygen Fired Combustion for Production of Nodular Reduced Iron to Reduce CO2 Emissions and Improve Energy Efficiencies  

SciTech Connect

The current trend in the steel industry is an increase in iron and steel produced in electric arc furnaces (EAF) and a gradual decline in conventional steelmaking from taconite pellets in blast furnaces. In order to expand the opportunities for the existing iron ore mines beyond their blast furnace customer base, a new material is needed to satisfy the market demands of the emerging steel industry while utilizing the existing infrastructure and materials handling capabilities. This demand creates opportunity to convert iron ore or other iron bearing materials to Nodular Reduced Iron (NRI) in a recently designed Linear Hearth Furnace (LHF). NRI is a metallized iron product containing 98.5 to 96.0% iron and 2.5 to 4% C. It is essentially a scrap substitute with little impurity that can be utilized in a variety of steelmaking processes, especially the electric arc furnace. The objective of this project was to focus on reducing the greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) through reducing the energy intensity using specialized combustion systems, increasing production and the use of biomass derived carbon sources in this process. This research examined the use of a solid fuel-oxygen fired combustion system and compared the results from this system with both oxygen-fuel and air-fuel combustion systems. The solid pulverized fuels tested included various coals and a bio-coal produced from woody biomass in a specially constructed pilot scale torrefaction reactor at the Coleraine Minerals Research Laboratory (CMRL). In addition to combustion, the application of bio-coal was also tested as a means to produce a reducing atmosphere during key points in the fusion process, and as a reducing agent for ore conversion to metallic iron to capture the advantage of its inherent reduced carbon footprint. The results from this study indicate that the approaches taken can reduce both greenhouse gas emissions and the associated energy intensity with the Linear Hearth Furnace process for converting iron ore to metallic iron nodules. Various types of coals including a bio-coal produced though torrefaction can result in production of NRI at reduced GHG levels. The process results coupled with earlier already reported developments indicate that this process technique should be evaluated at the next level in order to develop parameter information for full scale process design. Implementation of the process to full commercialization will require a full cost production analysis and comparison to other reduction technologies and iron production alternatives. The technical results verify that high quality NRI can be produced under various operating conditions at the pilot level.

Donald R. Fosnacht; Richard F. Kiesel; David W. Hendrickson; David J. Englund; Iwao Iwasaki; Rodney L. Bleifuss; Mathew A. Mlinar

2011-12-22

164

Review of the PDWA Concept for Combustion Enhancement in a Supersonic Air-Breathing Combustor Environment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper reviews the design of the Pulsed Detonation Wave Augmentor (PDWA) concept and the preliminary computational fluid dynamics studies that supported it. The PDWA relies on the rapid generation of detonation waves in a small tube, which are then injected into the supersonic stream of the main combustor. The blast waves thus generated are used to stimulate the mixing and combustion inside the main combustor. The mixing enhancement relies on various forms of the baroclinic interaction, where misaligned pressure and density gradients combine to produce vortical flow. By using unsteady shock waves, the concept also uses the Richtmyer-Meshkov effect to further increase the rate of mixing. By carefully designing the respective configurations of the combustor and the detonation tubes, one can also increase the penetration of the fuel into the supersonic air stream. The unsteady shocks produce lower stagnation pressure losses than steady shocks. Combustion enhancement can also be obtained through the transient shock-heating of the fuel-air interface, and the lowering of the ignition delay in these regions. The numerical simulations identify these processes, and show which configurations give the best results. Engineering considerations are also presented, and discuss the feasibility of the concept. Of primary importance are the enhancements in performance, the design simplicity, the minimization of the power, cost, and weight, and the methods to achieve very rapid cycling.

Canbier, Jean-Luc; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

1995-01-01

165

Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents and other methods to enhance oxygen transport  

PubMed Central

Oxygen is essential for life, and the body has developed an exquisite method to collect oxygen in the lungs and transport it to the tissues. Hb contained within red blood cells (RBCs), is the key oxygen-carrying component in blood, and levels of RBCs are tightly controlled according to demand for oxygen. The availability of oxygen plays a critical role in athletic performance, and agents that enhance oxygen delivery to tissues increase aerobic power. Early methods to increase oxygen delivery included training at altitude, and later, transfusion of packed RBCs. A breakthrough in understanding how RBC formation is controlled included the discovery of erythropoietin (Epo) and cloning of the EPO gene. Cloning of the EPO gene was followed by commercial development of recombinant human Epo (rHuEpo). Legitimate use of this and other agents that affect oxygen delivery is important in the treatment of anaemia (low Hb levels) in patients with chronic kidney disease or in cancer patients with chemotherapy-induced anaemia. However, competitive sports was affected by illicit use of rHuEpo to enhance performance. Testing methods for these agents resulted in a cat-and-mouse game, with testing labs attempting to detect the use of a drug or blood product to improve athletic performance (doping) and certain athletes developing methods to use the agents without being detected. This article examines the current methods to enhance aerobic performance and the methods to detect illicit use. PMID:18362898

Elliott, S

2008-01-01

166

Reduction of NO{sub x} and particulate emissions by using oxygen-enriched combustion air in a locomotive diesel engine.  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses operational and emissions results obtained with a locomotive (two-cylinder, EMD 567B) research diesel engine when oxygen-enriched combustion air is used. An operating regime was identified in which particulates and NO{sub x} could be reduced simultaneously when the concentration of intake air oxygen, fueling rate, and injection timing were optimized. Using oxygen from an external source, particulates were reduced by approximately 60% and NO{sub x} emissions were reduced by 15--20% with the optimal operating strategy. Higher gross power, lower peak cylinder pressures, and lower brake-specific fuel consumption were also observed. Gross power was increased by about 15--20% at base peak combustion pressure, and gross brake-specific fuel consumption was decreased by 2--10% with load. The effect of achieving oxygen enrichment by means of an air separation membrane is beyond the scope of the current study.

Poola, R. B.; Sekar, R. R.; Energy Systems; Electro-Motive Div., General Motors Corp.

2003-04-01

167

Performance and Stability Characteristics of a Uni-Element Swirl Injector for Oxygen-Rich Stage Combustion Cycles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A uni-element liquid propellant combustion performance and instability study for liquid RP-1 and hot oxygen-rich pre-burner products was conducted, at a chamber pressure of about 1000 psi. using flush and recessed swirl injectors. High-frequency pressure transducer measurements were analyzed to yield the characteristic frequencies which were compared to expected frequencies of the chamber. Modes, which were discovered to be present within the main chamber included, the first longitudinal, detected at approximately 1950 Hz, and the second longitudinal mode at approximately 3800 Hz. An additional first longitudinal quarter wave mode was measured at a frequency of approximately 23000 Hz for the recessed swirl injector configuration. The characteristic instabilities resulting from these experiments were relatively weak averaging 0.2% to 0.3% of the chamber pressure.

Pal, S.; Kalitan, D.; Woodward, R. D.; Santoro, R. J.

2004-01-01

168

Carbon deposition model for oxygen-hydrocarbon combustion. Task 6: Data analysis and formulation of an empirical model  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The formation and deposition of carbon (soot) was studied in the Carbon Deposition Model for Oxygen-Hydrocarbon Combustion Program. An empirical, 1-D model for predicting soot formation and deposition in LO2/hydrocarbon gas generators/preburners was derived. The experimental data required to anchor the model were identified and a test program to obtain the data was defined. In support of the model development, cold flow mixing experiments using a high injection density injector were performed. The purpose of this investigation was to advance the state-of-the-art in LO2/hydrocarbon gas generator design by developing a reliable engineering model of gas generator operation. The model was formulated to account for the influences of fluid dynamics, chemical kinetics, and gas generator hardware design on soot formation and deposition.

Makel, Darby B.; Rosenberg, Sanders D.

1990-01-01

169

Output Power Enhancement of a Chemical Oxygen-Iodine Laser by Predissociated Iodine Injection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Output power enhancement of a chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) by an injection of predissociated iodine was studied. Iodine molecules were dissociated into atoms by the microwave discharge prior to injection. It was determined that predissociation caused a negative effect on the output power enhancement when this technique was applied to a conventional supersonic COIL@. Model calculations revealed that the existence

Masamori Endo; Daichi Sugimoto; Hideo Okamoto; Kenzo Nanri; Taro Uchiyama; Shuzaburo Takeda; Tomoo Fujioka

2000-01-01

170

Ignition delays, heats of combustion, and reaction rates of aluminum alkyl derivatives used as ignition and combustion enhancers for supersonic combustors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The work was based on adapting an apparatus and procedure developed at Southwest Research Institute for rating the ignition quality of fuels for diesel engines. Aluminum alkyls and various Lewis-base adducts of these materials, both neat and mixed 50/50 with pure JP-10 hydrocarbon, were injected into the combustion bomb using a high-pressure injection system. The bomb was pre-charged with air that was set at various initial temperatures and pressures for constant oxygen density. The ignition delay times were determined for the test materials at these different initial conditions. The data are presented in absolute terms as well as comparisons with the parent alkyls. The relative heats of reaction of the various test materials were estimated based on a computation of the heat release, using the pressure data recorded during combustion in the bomb. In addition, the global reaction rates for each material were compared at a selected tmperature and pressure.

Ryan, T. W., III; Harlowe, W. W.; Schwab, S.

1992-01-01

171

Enhancement of microalgal growth by using perfluorocarbon as oxygen carrier.  

PubMed

The contribution of green microalgae has been recognized in the production of useful products such as chemicals, fatty acids, proteins, carotenoids, pigments, polysaccharides, and pharmaceuticals. One of the challenges to the development of profitable bioproduct markets is the design, development, modeling, and evaluation of cost-effective production systems. The photobioreactors for microalgae can be either open or closed systems in large-scale production. In various situations, it has been reported that closed photobioreactors offer many advantages over open systems. These advantages include lower contamination, higher biomass densities, and better process control. Nevertheless, for the scale-up of enclosed tubular photobioreactors, the accumulation of oxygen as a photosynthetic byproduct has been a major limitation because it severely inhibits growth of microalgae. In this study, we use the distinctive feature of liquid perfluorocarbons (PFCs) as a carrier that efficiently removes the accumulated oxygen from algal medium phase in the spinner culture flasks. The results show the growth kinetics of microalgae cultivated by this approach is significantly improved. PMID:11280683

Wasanasathian, A; Peng, C A

2001-01-01

172

A laboratory model of a hydrogen/oxygen engine for combustion and nozzle studies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A small laboratory diagnostic thruster was developed in order to evaluate approaches for the use of temperature and pressure sensors for the investigation of low thrust rocket flowfields. Tests were performed at chamber pressures of about 255 kPa, 370 kPa, and 500 kPa with oxidizer/fuel mixture ratios between 4.0 and 8.0. Two gaseous hydrogen/gaseous oxygen injector designs were tested with 60 and 75 fuel film cooling. The results of hot-wire tests showed the thruster and instrumentation designs to be effective. Azimuthal temperature distributions were found to be a function of operating conditions and hardware configuration. Results indicated that small differences in injector design can result in dramatically different thruster performance and wall temperature behavior. However, the importance of these injector effects may be decreased by operating at a high fuel film cooling rate.

Morren, Sybil H.; Myers, Roger M.; Benko, Stephen E.; Arrington, Lynn A.; Reed, Brian D.

1993-01-01

173

Study of using oxygen-enriched combustion air for locomotive diesel engines  

SciTech Connect

A thermodynamic simulation is used to study effects of O2-enriched intake air on performance and NO emissions of a locomotive diesel engine. Parasitic power of the air separation membrane required to supply the O2-enriched air is also estimated. For a given constraint on peak cylinder pressure, gross and net power output of an engine operating under different levels of O2 enrichment are compared with those obtained when a high-boost turbocharged engine is used. A 4% increase in peak cylinder pressure can result in 13% increase in net engine power when intake air with 28 vol% O2 is used and fuel injection timing retarded by 4 degrees. When the engine is turbocharged to a higher inlet boost, the same increase in peak cylinder pressure can result in only 4% improvement in power. If part of the higher exhaust enthalpies from the O2 enrichment is recovered, the power requirements of the air separator membrane can be met. O2 enrichment with its higher combustion temperatures reduces emissions of particulates and visible smoke but increases NO emissions (by up to 3 times at 26% O2 content). Therefore, exhaust gas after-treatment and heat recovery would be required if the full potential of O2 enrichment for improving the performance of locomotive diesel engines is to be realized.

Poola, R.B.; Sekar, R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Assanis, D.N. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Cataldi, G.R. [Association of American Railroads, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-10-01

174

Saturated nucleate pool boiling of oxygen under magnetically-enhanced effective gravity  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigate the effect of enhancing gravity on saturated nucleate pool boiling of oxygen for effective gravities (geff) of 1g, 6g, and 16g (g=9.8;m s-2) at a saturation pressure of 760;torr and for heat fluxes of 10˜3000;W m-2. The effective gravity on the oxygen is increased by applying a magnetic body force generated by a superconducting solenoid. We measure the

T. A. Corcovilos; M. E. Turk; D. M. Strayer; N. N. Asplund; N.-C. Yeh

2008-01-01

175

Saturated nucleate pool boiling of oxygen under magnetically-enhanced effective gravity  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigate the effect of enhancing gravity on saturated nucleate pool boiling of oxygen for effective gravities of 1g, 6.0g, and 16g (g=9.8 m\\/s^2) at a saturation pressure of 760 torr and for heat fluxes of 10 ~ 3000 W\\/m^2. The effective gravity on the oxygen is increased by applying a magnetic body force generated by a superconducting solenoid. We

T. A. Corcovilos; M. E. Turk; D. M. Strayer; N. N. Asplund; N.-C. Yeh

2007-01-01

176

Conversion of Methane to Hydrogen in a Reversible Flow Reactor in the Process of Filtration Combustion of Fuel Mixtures Enriched with Oxygen  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper considers the process of partial oxidation of methane to syngas in a reversible flow reactor in the process of filtration combustion of fuel mixtures enriched with oxygen in an inert porous medium. Experimental studies have been made of the influence of the volume concentration of oxygen in the initial fuel mixture on the basic parameters of the conversion process — the maximum temperature in the combustion wave and the composition of reaction products. Investigations have been carried out for fuel mixtures having different calorific values under the same filtration conditions. It has been shown that the addition of oxygen to the initial methane-air mixture permits increasing considerably the efficiency of the conversion process.

Dmitrenko, Yu. M.; Klyovan, R. A.

2013-11-01

177

Light enhanced calcification in Stylophora pistillata: effects of glucose, glycerol and oxygen  

PubMed Central

Zooxanthellate corals have long been known to calcify faster in the light than in the dark, however the mechanism underlying this process has been uncertain. Here we tested the effects of oxygen under controlled pCO2 conditions and fixed carbon sources on calcification in zooxanthellate and bleached microcolonies of the branching coral Stylophora pistillata. In zooxanthellate microcolonies, oxygen increased dark calcification rates to levels comparable to those measured in the light. However in bleached microcolonies oxygen alone did not enhance calcification, but when combined with a fixed carbon source (glucose or glycerol), calcification increased. Respiration rates increased in response to oxygen with greater increases when oxygen is combined with fixed carbon. ATP content was largely unaffected by treatments, with the exception of glycerol which decreased ATP levels. PMID:24883242

Tambutté, Eric; Allemand, Denis; Tambutté, Sylvie

2014-01-01

178

Mathematical modeling of MSW combustion and SNCR in a full-scale municipal incinerator and effects of grate speed and oxygen-enriched atmospheres on operating conditions.  

PubMed

The rising popularity of incineration of municipal solid waste (MSW) calls for detailed mathematical modeling and accurate prediction of pollutant emissions. In this paper, mathematical modeling methods for both solid and gaseous phases were employed to simulate the operation of a 450 t/d MSW-burning incinerator to obtain detailed information on the flow and combustion characteristics in the furnace and to predict the amount of pollutant emissions. The predicted data were compared to on-site measurements of gas temperature, gas composition and SNCR de-NO(X) system. The major operating conditions considered in this paper were grate speed and oxygen concentration. A suitable grate speed ensures complete waste combustion. The predictions are as follows: volatile release increases with increasing grate speed, and the maximal value is within the range of 700-800 kg/m(2)h; slow grate speeds result in incomplete combustion of fixed carbon; the gas temperature at slow grate speeds is higher due to adequate oxygenation for fixed carbon combustion, and the deviation reaches 200K; NO(X) emission decreases, but CO emission and O(2) concentrations increase, and the deviation is 63%, 34% and 35%, respectively. Oxygen-enriched atmospheres promote the destruction of most pollutants due to the high oxygen partial pressure and temperature. The furnace temperature, NO production and CO emission increase as the oxygen concentration increases, and the deviation of furnace exit temperature, NO and CO concentration is 38.26%, 58.43% and 86.67%, respectively. Finally, oxygen concentration is limited to below 35% to prevent excessive CO and NO(X) emission without compromising plant performance. The current work greatly helps to understand the operating characteristics of large-scale MSW-burning plants. PMID:20627508

Liang, Zengying; Ma, Xiaoqian

2010-12-01

179

A Laboratory Model of a Hydrogen/Oxygen Engine for Combustion and Nozzle Studies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A small laboratory diagnostic thruster was developed to augment present low thrust chemical rocket optical and heat flux diagnostics at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The objective of this work was to evaluate approaches for the use of temperature and pressure sensors for the investigation of low thrust rocket flow fields. The nominal engine thrust was 110 N. Tests were performed at chamber pressures of about 255 kPa, 370 kPa, and 500 kPa with oxidizer to fuel mixture ratios between 4.0 and 8.0. Two gaseous hydrogen/gaseous oxygen injector designs were tested with 60 percent and 75 percent fuel film cooling. The thruster and instrumentation designs were proven to be effective via hot fire testing. The thruster diagnostics provided inner wall temperature and static pressure measurements which were compared to the thruster global performance data. For several operating conditions, the performance data exhibited unexpected trends which were correlated with changes in the axial wall temperature distribution. Azimuthal temperature distributions were found to be a function of operating conditions and hardware configuration. The static pressure profiles showed that no severe pressure gradients were present in the rocket. The results indicated that small differences in injector design can result in dramatically different thruster performance and wall temperature behavior, but that these injector effects may be overshadowed by operating at a high fuel film cooling rate.

Morren, Sybil Huang; Myers, Roger M.; Benko, Stephen E.; Arrington, Lynn A.; Reed, Brian D.

1993-01-01

180

Sulfur evolution in chemical looping combustion of coal with MnFe2O4 oxygen carrier.  

PubMed

Chemical looping combustion (CLC) of coal has gained increasing attention as a novel combustion technology for its advantages in CO2 capture. Sulfur evolution from coal causes great harm from either the CLC operational or environmental perspective. In this research, a combined MnFe2O4 oxygen carrier (OC) was synthesized and its reaction with a typical Chinese high sulfur coal, Liuzhi (LZ) bituminous coal, was performed in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA)-Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer. Evolution of sulfur species during reaction of LZ coal with MnFe2O4 OC was systematically investigated through experimental means combined with thermodynamic simulation. TGA-FTIR analysis of the LZ reaction with MnFe2O4 indicated MnFe2O4 exhibited the desired superior reactivity compared to the single reference oxides Mn3O4 or Fe2O3, and SO2 produced was mainly related to oxidization of H2S by MnFe2O4. Experimental analysis of the LZ coal reaction with MnFe2O4, including X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, verified that the main reduced counterparts of MnFe2O4 were Fe3O4 and MnO, in good agreement with the related thermodynamic simulation. The obtained MnO was beneficial to stabilize the reduced MnFe2O4 and avoid serious sintering, although the oxygen in MnO was not fully utilized. Meanwhile, most sulfur present in LZ coal was converted to solid MnS during LZ reaction with MnFe2O4, which was further oxidized to MnSO4. Finally, the formation of both MnS and such manganese silicates as Mn2SiO4 and MnSiO3 should be addressed to ensure the full regeneration of the reduced MnFe2O4. PMID:25079636

Wang, Baowen; Gao, Chuchang; Wang, Weishu; Zhao, Haibo; Zheng, Chuguang

2014-05-01

181

No effect of red light on oxygen uptake enhanced by blue light in chlorella.  

PubMed

In chlorophyll-free, mutated Chlorella cells the respiratory oxygen consumption is enhanced upon irradiation with blue light. Since for other blue light-dependent reactions in plants modifying effects of red light have been reported, we tested the blue light-enhanced oxygen uptake of Chlorella after preceding, or during simultaneous, application of red light of different wavelengths and intensities. There was no measurable alteration. Also prior exposure to blue light did not create any measurable sensitivity to red light compared with darkness. The data obtained give no indication of an involvement of a red light absorbing pigment (e.g. phytochrome) in the respiration of Chlorella. PMID:23195052

Dörge, U; Kowallik, W

1984-09-01

182

Oxygen-enhanced biodegradation of phenoxy acids in ground water at contaminated sites.  

PubMed

The effects of adding oxygen to anaerobic aquifer materials on biodegradation of phenoxy acid herbicides were studied by laboratory experiments with aquifer material from two contaminated sites (a former agricultural machinery service and an old landfill). At both sites, the primary pollutants were phenoxy acids and related chlorophenols. It was found that addition of oxygen enhanced degradation of the six original phenoxy acids and six original chlorophenols. Inverse modeling on 14C 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxypropanoic acid (MCPP) degradation curves revealed that increasing the oxygen concentrations from <0.3 mg/L up to 7 to 8 mg/L shortened the lag phases (from approximately 150 d to 5 to 25 d) and increased first-order degradation rate constants by 1 order of magnitude (from approximately 5 x 10(-2) d(-1) to up to 30 x 10(-2) d(-1)). Additionally, the degree of MCPP mineralization was increased (30% to 50% mineralized at low oxygen concentrations and 50% to 70% mineralized at high oxygen concentrations, based on 14CO2 recovery). These positive effects on degradation were observed even at relatively low oxygen concentrations (2 mg/L). Furthermore, effects related to the addition of oxygen on the general geochemistry were studied. An oxygen consumption of 2.2 to 2.6 mg O2/g dw was observed due to oxidation of solid organic matter and, to some extent (0.5% to 11% of the total oxygen consumption), water-soluble compounds such as Fe2+, dissolved Mn, nonvolatile organic carbon, and NH4+. Overall, the results suggest that stimulated biodegradation by addition of oxygen might be a feasible remediation technology at herbicide-contaminated sites, although oxygen consumption by the sediment could limit the applicability. PMID:16556207

Tuxen, Nina; Reitzel, Lotte A; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Bjerg, Poul L

2006-01-01

183

Experimental study of O{sub 2}-CO{sub 2} production for the oxyfuel combustion using a Co-based oxygen carrier  

SciTech Connect

Production of O{sub 2}-CO{sub 2} mixed gases for the oxyfuel combustion using a Co-based oxygen carrier packed in a fixed bed reactor was investigated. The reaction kinetics of CoO with O{sub 2} and the decomposition kinetics of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} in CO{sub 2} atmosphere at different temperatures were studied using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Both desorption and sorption processes exhibit a high reaction rate. Multiple sorption and desorption cycles indicated that Co-based oxygen carrier has high reactivity and cyclic stability. The results of X-ray diffraction indicated that Co-based oxygen carrier does not react with CO{sub 2} during the desorption stage, and this is especially important for oxyfuel combustion. The high temperature sorption process for production of O{sub 2}-CO{sub 2} gas mixtures in a fixed bed reactor packed with Co-based oxygen carrier particles through air separation with carbon dioxide as the purge gas is investigated. Oxygen is absorbed, and heat is stored by the Co-based oxygen carrier particles with air being fed. An O{sub 2}-CO{sub 2} stream can be obtained when the fixed bed is regenerated with carbon dioxide as the desorption gas. O{sub 2} fraction in the O{sub 2}-CO{sub 2} gas mixtures can be controlled by adjusting the flow rate of CO{sub 2} regeneration gas. This Co-based oxygen carrier offers potential for further study in the O{sub 2}-CO{sub 2} production for the oxyfuel coal combustion process.

Li, Z.S.; Zhang, T.; Cai, N.S. [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

2008-10-01

184

Oxygen-enhanced thermionic emission pattern of hemispherical single-crystal LaB6  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With the application of Martin's experimental arrangement for direct observation of thermionic emission patterns from a hemispherical single-crystal LaB6 cathode, it has been determined that oxygen-enhanced thermionic emission does occur for the (210) plane at the rather low partial pressure of oxygen, i.e., in the 10-9-Torr region, at sample temperatures of 1050 °C. For further quantitative assessment, work-function measurements by Richardson plots were done for different crystal planes of clean surface by attaching a photomultiplier. The result clearly shows that the values of the work function increases in order from (100), (210), (110), and (111). The measurements were also extended to the oxygen-enhanced surface of the (210) plane and it was found that the results follow, phenomenologically, the Richardson plot as well.

Shimizu, R.; Onoda, H.; Hashimoto, H.; Hagiwara, H.

1984-03-01

185

Reducible Supports for Ni-based Oxygen Carriers in Chemical Looping Combustion  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear spin relaxation, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) techniques are used to determine supramolecular arrangement of 3-methyl-1-octyl-4-phenyl-1H-triazol-1,2,3-ium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide [OMPhTz][Tf{sub 2}N], an example of a triazolium-based ionic liquid. The results obtained showed first-order thermodynamic dependence for nuclear spin relaxation of the anion. First-order relaxation dependence is interpreted as through-bond dipolar relaxation. Greater than first-order dependence was found in the aliphatic protons, aromatic carbons (including nearest neighbors), and carbons at the end of the aliphatic tail. Greater than first order thermodynamic dependence of spin relaxation rates is interpreted as relaxation resulting from at least one mechanism additional to through-bond dipolar relaxation. In rigid portions of the cation, an additional spin relaxation mechanism is attributed to anisotropic effects, while greater than first order thermodynamic dependence of the octyl side chain’s spin relaxation rates is attributed to cation–cation interactions. Little interaction between the anion and the cation was observed by spin relaxation studies or by ESI-MS. No extended supramolecular structure was observed in this study, which was further supported by MS and SAXS. nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) factors are used in conjunction with spin–lattice relaxation time (T{sub 1}) measurements to calculate rotational correlation times for C–H bonds (the time it takes for the vector represented by the bond between the two atoms to rotate by one radian). The rotational correlation times are used to represent segmental reorientation dynamics of the cation. A combination of techniques is used to determine the segmental interactions and dynamics of this example of a triazolium-based ionic liquid.

Bhavsar, Saurabh; Veser, Goetz

2013-04-01

186

Oxygen plasma assisted high performance solution-processed Al2Ox gate insulator for combustion-processed InGaZnOx thin film transistors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effects of oxygen-plasma treatment on solution-processed Al2Ox gate dielectrics for InGaZnOx (IGZO) thin film transistors (TFTs) are investigated in this paper. Thin films of amorphous Al2Ox are successfully fabricated by annealing temperature of 300 °C. Utilizing oxygen-plasma treated gate dielectrics, combustion-processed IGZO TFTs, which are annealed at a temperature of 300 °C, show a mobility of 7.3 cm2 V-1 s-1, a threshold voltage of -0.3 V, an on-off current ratio of 1 × 105, a subthreshold swing of 160 mV/decade, when operating with a voltage ranging from -2 V to +5 V. Our experimental results demonstrate that oxygen-plasma treatment can remarkably improve dielectric performance. This is presumably due to the passivation of interfacial and bulk traps, and the reduced concentration of oxygen vacancies.

Wang, Han; Xu, Wangying; Zhou, Shuang; Xie, Fangyan; Xiao, Yubin; Ye, Lei; Chen, Jian; Xu, Jianbin

2015-01-01

187

High-Index-Contrast Ridge Waveguide Lasers Fabricated Via Oxygen-Enhanced Wet Thermal Oxidation  

E-print Network

High-Index-Contrast Ridge Waveguide Lasers Fabricated Via Oxygen-Enhanced Wet Thermal Oxidation Di etch plus wet thermal oxidization process is demonstrated which enables high-index- contrast (HIC than the native-oxide devices for comparable bar lengths. The resulting high lateral optical

Bowers, John

188

Remote Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition of SiO 2 Films : Oxygen Plasma Diagnostic  

Microsoft Academic Search

Silicon oxide is deposited by remote microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (RMPECVD). The silica films are produced by exciting oxygen in a microwave discharge while a mixture of 5% of silane diluted in argon is introduced downstream. In the afterglow, double Langmuir probe measurements and rotational temperatures deduced from optical emission spectroscopy (OES), show that the electron energy is

C. Regnier; J. Desmaison; P. Tristant; D. Merle

1995-01-01

189

Enhanced formation of sulfate and nitrate associated with the use of oxygenated Fuels  

SciTech Connect

Oxygenated fuels are used in some western mountain valley communities to help in the control of CO during winter inversions. However, it is possible that oxygenated fuel use will increase PM{sub 2.5} concentrations. The oxygen in these fuels may lead to increased concentrations of oxidants. In turn, the concentrations of atmospheric oxidants involved in SO{sub 2} and NO{sub 2} chemistry may increase. This may lead to increased conversion of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} to particulate sulfate and nitrate. To explore the possible presence of this enhanced atmospheric chemistry, samples of gas and particulate sulfur and nitrogen oxides were collected in 5/day sample sets during four 3-day inversion episodes at two locations in the urban areas of Utah Valley. Two of the episodes occurred during December 1995 when oxygenated fuels were used in the valley. The last two episodes occurred in February 1996 after the end of oxygenated fuel use on January 15. Fogs were absent during all four episodes. The results indicate that the conversion of SO{sub 2} to sulfate and NO{sub 2} to nitrate are both increased about two-fold during the use of oxygenated fuels, as compared to the non-oxygenated fuel periods. The results, possible chemistry which may be related to the observed differences and implications for attainment of both the present and proposed new PM standard will be presented.

Du, Y.; Ren, Y.; Mangelson, N.F.; Eatough, D.J. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Cooper, J.A. [TRC Environmental Corp., Beaverton, OR (United States)

1997-12-31

190

An Aerosol Rapid Compression Machine for Studying Energetic-Nanoparticle-Enhanced Combustion of Liquid Fuels  

SciTech Connect

The use of energetic nanoparticles offers a promising means of adjusting the reactivity of liquid fuels for enhanced combustion stability in next generation propulsion systems. This work outlines the development of a novel aerosol rapid compression machine (RCM) for studying the impact of energetic nanoparticles on reducing the ignition delay of liquid fuels, and a proof-of-concept demonstration is presented using ethanol and JP-8. Fuel droplets are generated using an ultrasonic nozzle. The seeding of 50 nm aluminum nanoparticles in the liquid fuel is achieved by using a combination of chemical surfactants in addition to mixing in an ultrasonic bath. The autoignition delay is measured for neat and nanoparticle-enhanced mixtures at compressed conditions of 772–830 K and 12–28 bar in the RCM. The results show that significant changes in the ignition delay can be observed using a low concentration (2%-weight) of energetic nanoparticles. For ethanol and JP-8, ignition delays were reduced by 32% and 50%, respectively. Measurements to verify the uniformity of aerosol dispersion in the RCM, the reproducibility of the RCM data, and a method for approximating compressed temperature are also presented.

Allen, C.; Mittal, G.; Sung, C. J.; Toulson, E.; Lee, T.

2011-01-01

191

Saturated nucleate pool boiling of oxygen under magnetically-enhanced effective gravity  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigate the effect of enhancing gravity on saturated nucleate pool\\u000aboiling of oxygen for effective gravities of 1g, 6.0g, and 16g (g=9.8 m\\/s^2) at\\u000aa saturation pressure of 760 torr and for heat fluxes of 10 ~ 3000 W\\/m^2. The\\u000aeffective gravity on the oxygen is increased by applying a magnetic body force\\u000agenerated by a superconducting solenoid. We

T. A. Corcovilos; M. E. Turk; D. M. Strayer; N. N. Asplund; N.-C. Yeh

2007-01-01

192

Detection of Molecular Oxygen at Low Concentrations Using Quartz Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy  

PubMed Central

Molecular oxygen is detected at low concentrations using photoacoustic spectroscopy despite its unfavorable photoacoustic properties. The system consists of a seed laser diode, a tapered amplifier and a quartz tuning fork based spectrophone, thus employing quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS). With this system a detection limit of 13 ppm is reached with a compact and long term stable setup. Further improvement of the detection limit is possible by adding suitable gases to the sample gas that promote the radiationless de-excitation of the oxygen molecules. PMID:22163666

Pohlkötter, Andreas; Köhring, Michael; Willer, Ulrike; Schade, Wolfgang

2010-01-01

193

Saturated nucleate pool boiling of oxygen under magnetically-enhanced effective gravity  

E-print Network

We investigate the effect of enhancing gravity on saturated nucleate pool boiling of oxygen for effective gravities of 1g, 6.0g, and 16g (g=9.8 m/s^2) at a saturation pressure of 760 torr and for heat fluxes of 10 ~ 3000 W/m^2. The effective gravity on the oxygen is increased by applying a magnetic body force generated by a superconducting solenoid. We measure the heater temperature (expressed as a reduced superheat) as a function of heat flux and fit this data to a piecewise power-law/linear boiling curve. At low heat flux (boiling curve over our applied gravity range.

T. A. Corcovilos; M. E. Turk; D. M. Strayer; N. N. Asplund; N. -C. Yeh

2007-02-01

194

Diamagnetic levitation enhances growth of liquid bacterial cultures by increasing oxygen availability  

PubMed Central

Diamagnetic levitation is a technique that uses a strong, spatially varying magnetic field to reproduce aspects of weightlessness, on the Earth. We used a superconducting magnet to levitate growing bacterial cultures for up to 18 h, to determine the effect of diamagnetic levitation on all phases of the bacterial growth cycle. We find that diamagnetic levitation increases the rate of population growth in a liquid culture and reduces the sedimentation rate of the cells. Further experiments and microarray gene analysis show that the increase in growth rate is owing to enhanced oxygen availability. We also demonstrate that the magnetic field that levitates the cells also induces convective stirring in the liquid. We present a simple theoretical model, showing how the paramagnetic force on dissolved oxygen can cause convection during the aerobic phases of bacterial growth. We propose that this convection enhances oxygen availability by transporting oxygen around the liquid culture. Since this process results from the strong magnetic field, it is not present in other weightless environments, e.g. in Earth orbit. Hence, these results are of significance and timely to researchers considering the use of diamagnetic levitation to explore effects of weightlessness on living organisms and on physical phenomena. PMID:20667843

Dijkstra, Camelia E.; Larkin, Oliver J.; Anthony, Paul; Davey, Michael R.; Eaves, Laurence; Rees, Catherine E. D.; Hill, Richard J. A.

2011-01-01

195

Output Power Enhancement of a Chemical Oxygen-Iodine Laser by Predissociated Iodine Injection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Output power enhancement of a chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) by an injection of predissociated iodine was studied. Iodine molecules were dissociated into atoms by the microwave discharge prior to injection. It was determined that predissociation caused a negative effect on the output power enhancement when this technique was applied to a conventional supersonic COIL@. Model calculations revealed that the existence of atomic iodine at the plenum caused the dissipation of stored energy. It was demonstrated that decreasing the mixing point pressure was crucial to obtain output power enhancement by the predissociation technique. For this purpose, a low-pressure transonic mixing scheme with a grid nozzle array was developed. A 9% enhancement of output power was demonstrated.

Endo, Masamori; Sugimoto, Daichi; Okamoto, Hideo; Nanri, Kenzo; Uchiyama, Taro; Takeda, Shuzaburo; Fujioka, Tomoo

2000-02-01

196

Oxygen Microwave Plasma Density Enhancement by Surface Waves with a High-Permittivity Material Window  

Microsoft Academic Search

The oxygen microwave plasma properties caused by surface waves in high-permittivity materials of alumina and quartz windows were studied for large-diameter plasma generation. The electron density value for the alumina window at microwave powers above 450 W is significantly enhanced by surface waves and is considered to be in a surface-wave mode. The electron density value for the quartz window

Masakazu Furukawa; Takashi Koromogawa; Kouji Kamiyo; Keisuke Shinagawa; Katsufumi Kawamura; Haruo Shindo

1999-01-01

197

Enhanced red fluorescence emission in the oxygen minimum zone of the Arabian Sea  

Microsoft Academic Search

Depth profiles of fluorescence at several excitation and emission wavelengths were measured along with CTD data during the\\u000a cruise So119 of RV Sonne in the Arabian Sea from 12 May to 10 June 1997. In addition to chlorophyll fluorescence from phytoplankton in the near-surface\\u000a layer, the profiles in the oxygen minimum region well below the euphotic zone show enhanced red

Wiebke Breves; Rüdiger Heuermann; Rainer Reuter

2003-01-01

198

Icariin enhances neuronal survival after oxygen and glucose deprivation by increasing SIRT1  

Microsoft Academic Search

It has been reported that icariin protects neurons against ischemia\\/reperfusion injury. In this study, we found that icariin could enhance neuronal viability and suppress neuronal death after oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). Further study showed that neuroprotection by icariin was through the induction of Sirtuin type 1 (SIRT1), an effect that was reversed by SIRT1 inhibitor III and P38 inhibitor

Lin Wang; Ling Zhang; Zhi-Bin Chen; Jia-Yong Wu; Xin Zhang; Yun Xu

2009-01-01

199

Enhancement of oxidative vaporization of chromium (III) oxide and chromium by oxygen atoms  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Rates of oxidative vaporization of Cr2O3 were found to be markedly enhanced in the presence of O atoms. Investigations were conducted over the temperature range 470 to 1520 K. For Cr2O3 the enhancement was about 10 to the 9th power at 820 K in oxygen containing 2.5 percent atoms. Rapid oxidative vaporization of bare chromium was observed below 1070 K, the rate being about one-half that of Cr2O3. Results are interpreted in terms of thermochemical analysis.

Fryburg, G. C.; Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.

1974-01-01

200

Effects of Oxygenated Compounds on Combustion and Soot Evolution in a DI Diesel Engine: Broadband Natural Luminosity Imaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

The detailed mechanisms by which oxygenated diesel fuels reduce engine-out soot emissions are not well understood. The literature contains conflicting results as to whether a fuel's overall oxygen content is the only important parameter in determining its soot-reduction potential, or if oxygenate molecular structure or other variables also play significant roles. To begin to resolve this controversy, experiments were conducted

Charles J. Mueller; Glen C. Martin

2002-01-01

201

Ignition delays, heats of combustion, and reaction rates of aluminum alkyl derivatives used as ignition and combustion enhancers for supersonic combustion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The subject of this paper is the design of supersonic combustors which will be required in order to achieve the needed reaction rates in a reasonable sized combustor. A fuel additive approach, which is the focus of this research, is the use of pyrophorics to shorten the ignition delay time and to increase the energy density of the fuel. Pyrophoric organometallic compounds may also provide an ignition source and flame stabilization mechanism within the combustor, thus permitting use of hydrocarbon fuels in supersonic combustion systems. Triethylaluminum (TEA) and trimethylaluminum (TMA) were suggested for this application due to their high energy density and reactivity. The objective here is to provide comparative data for the ignition quality, the energy content, and the reaction rates of several different adducts of both TEA and TMA. The results of the experiments indicate the aluminum alkyls and their more stable derivatives reduce the ignition delay and total reaction time to JP-10 jet fuel. Furthermore, the temperature dependence of ignition delay and total reaction time of the blends of the adducts are significantly lower than in neat JP-10.

Ryan, Thomas W., III; Schwab, S. T.; Harlowe, W. W.

1992-01-01

202

Enhancement of reactive oxygen species and induction of apoptosis in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats under hyperbaric oxygen exposure  

PubMed Central

An important source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase, which on activation induces superoxide production via oxidation in the mitochondria, inflammation and stress; such ROS are implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications, including neuropathy. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatments are applied various diseases including diabetic patients with unhealing foot ulcers, however, and also increases the formation of ROS. In a previous study, we showed that a clinically recommended HBO treatment significantly enhanced oxidative stress of pancreatic tissue in the diabetic rats. However, no study has been undertaken with regard to the effects of HBO on the activity and gene expression of the NADPH oxidase complex and on apoptosis in the pancreas of diabetic animals. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of HBO exposure on gene expression of the NADPH complex, and pancreatic expression of genes related to apoptosis via the mitochondria, using the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin. The mRNA expression of genes related to NADPH oxidase complex and apoptosis increased significantly (P < 0.05) in the pancreas of diabetic rats under HBO exposure. Similarly, activities of NADPH oxidase and caspase-3 changed in parallel with mRNA levels. These results suggest that oxidative stress caused by HBO exposure in diabetic animals induces further ROS production and apoptosis, potentially through the up-regulation of NADPH oxidase complex. Thus, this study can contribute to development of a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of apoptosis via the mitochondria in diabetes, under HBO exposure. PMID:21487521

Matsunami, Tokio; Sato, Yukita; Hasegawa, Yuki; Ariga, Satomi; Kashimura, Haruka; Sato, Takuya; Yukawa, Masayoshi

2011-01-01

203

Efficiency evaluation of oxygen enrichment in energy conversion processes  

SciTech Connect

The extent to which energy conversion efficiencies can be increased by using oxygen or oxygen-enriched air for combustion was studied. Combustion of most fuels with oxygen instead of air was found to have five advantages: increases combustion temperature and efficiency, improves heat transfer at high temperatures, reduces nitrous oxide emissions, permits a high ration of exhaust gas recirculation and allows combustion of certain materials not combustible in air. The same advantages, although to a lesser degree, are apparent with oxygen-enriched air. The cost-effectiveness of the process must necessarily be improved by about 10% when using oxygen instead of air before such use could become justifiable on purely economic terms. Although such a modest increase appears to be attainable in real situations, this study ascertained that it is not possible to generally assess the economic gains. Rather, each case requires its own evaluation. For certain processes industry has already proven that the use of oxygen leads to more efficient plant operation. Several ideas for essentially new applications are described. Specifically, when oxygen is used with exhaust gas recirculation in external or internal combustion engines. It appears also that the advantages of pulse combustion can be amplified further if oxygen is used. When burning wet fuels with oxygen, direct steam generation becomes possible. Oxygen combustion could also improve processes for in situ gasification of coals, oil shales, peats, and other wet fuels. Enhanced oil recovery by fire flooding methods might also become more effective if oxygen is used. The cold energy contained in liquid oxygen can be substantially recovered in the low end of certain thermodynamic cycles. Further efforts to develop certain schemes for using oxygen for combustion appear to be justified from both the technical and economic viewpoints.

Bomelburg, H.J.

1983-12-01

204

Toward enhanced hydrogen generation from water using oxygen permeating LCF membranes.  

PubMed

Hydrogen production from water thermolysis can be enhanced by the use of perovskite-type mixed ionic and electronic conducting (MIEC) membranes, through which oxygen permeation is driven by a chemical potential gradient. In this work, water thermolysis experiments were performed using 0.9 mm thick La0.9Ca0.1FeO3-? (LCF-91) perovskite membranes at 990 °C in a lab-scale button-cell reactor. We examined the effects of the operating conditions such as the gas species concentrations and flow rates on the feed and sweep sides on the water thermolysis rate and oxygen flux. A single step reaction mechanism is proposed for surface reactions, and three-resistance permeation models are derived. Results show that water thermolysis is facilitated by the LCF-91 membrane especially when a fuel is added to the sweep gas. Increasing the gas flow rate and water concentration on the feed side or the hydrogen concentration on the sweep side enhances the hydrogen production rate. In this work, hydrogen is used as the fuel by construction, so that a single-step surface reaction mechanism can be developed and water thermolysis rate parameters can be derived. Both surface reaction rate parameters for oxygen incorporation/dissociation and hydrogen-oxygen reactions are fitted at 990 °C. We compare the oxygen fluxes in water thermolysis and air separation experiments, and identify different limiting steps in the processes involving various oxygen sources and sweep gases for this 0.9 mm thick LCF-91 membrane. In the air feed-inert sweep case, the bulk diffusion and sweep side surface reaction are the two limiting steps. In the water feed-inert sweep case, surface reaction on the feed side dominates the oxygen permeation process. Yet in the water feed-fuel sweep case, surface reactions on both the feed and sweep sides are rate determining when hydrogen concentration in the sweep side is in the range of 1-5 vol%. Furthermore, long term studies show that the surface morphology changes and silica impurities have little impact on the oxygen flux for either water thermolysis or air separation. PMID:25790173

Wu, Xiao-Yu; Chang, Le; Uddi, Mruthunjaya; Kirchen, Patrick; Ghoniem, Ahmed F

2015-04-01

205

Performance of sorption-enhanced water-gas shift as a pre-combustion CO 2 capture technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

The sorption-enhanced water-gas shift (SEWGS) process is a promising technology for pre-combustion decarbonisation. It is well suited for decarbonising syngas produced from natural-gas and coal based fuels in combined-cycle power production schemes. Higher capture rates could be obtained by SEWGS at lower efficiency penalties and at lower costs than by absorption. In the SEWGS process, multiple reactor vessels are packed

E. R. van Selow; P. D. Cobden; R. W. van den Brink; J. R. Hufton; A. Wright

2009-01-01

206

Comparative investigation on chemical looping combustion of coal-derived synthesis gas containing H2S over supported NiO oxygen carriers  

SciTech Connect

Chemical looping combustion (CLC) of simulated coal-derived synthesis gas was conducted with NiO oxygen carriers supported on SiO2, ZrO2, TiO2, and sepiolite. The effect of H2S on the performance of these samples for the CLC process was also evaluated. Five-cycle thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) tests at 800 #1;C indicated that all oxygen carriers had a stable performance at 800 #1;C, except NiO/SiO2. Full reduction/oxidation reactions of the oxygen carrier were obtained during the five-cycle test. It was found that support had a significant effect on reaction performance of NiO both in reduction and oxidation rates. The reduction reaction was significantly faster than the oxidation reaction for all oxygen carriers, while the oxidation reaction is fairly slow due to oxygen diffusion on NiO layers. The reaction profile was greatly affected by the presence of H2S, but there was no effect on the capacity due to the presence of H2S in synthesis gas. The presence of H2S decreased reduction reaction rates significantly, but oxidation rates of reduced samples increased. X-ray diffraction (XRD) data of the oxidized samples after a five-cycle test showed stable crystalline phases without any formation of sulfides or sulfites/sulfates. Increase in reaction temperature to 900 #1;C had a positive effect on the performance.

Ksepko, E.; Siriwardane, R.; Tian, H.; Simonyi, T.; Sciazko, M.

2010-01-01

207

Characteristics Evaluation of a CO2-Caputuring Power Generation System with Reheat Cycle Utilizing Regenerative Oxygen-Combustion Steam-Superheater  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new CO2-capturing power generation system is proposed that can be easily realized by applying conventional technologies. In the proposed system, the temperature of middle-pressure steam in a thermal power plant is raised by utilizing oxygen-combusting regenerative steam-superheater. The generated CO2 by combusting fuel in the superheater can be easily separated and captured from the exhaust gas at condenser outlet, and is liquefied. The superheated steam is used to drive a steam turbine power generation system. By adopting a high efficient combined cycle power generation system as an example, it has been shown that the proposed system can increase power output by 10.8%, decrease the CO2 emission amount of the total integrated system by 18.6% with power generation efficiency drop of 2.36% compared with the original power plant without CO2-capture, when superheated steam temperature is 750°C

Pak, Pyong Sik

208

Cathodic current enhancement via manganese and oxygen related reactions in marine biofilms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Corrosion is a threat that has economic, and environmental impacts worldwide. Many types of corrosive attack are the subject of ongoing research. One of these areas of research is microbiologically influenced corrosion, which is the enhancement and/or initiation of corrosion events caused by microorganisms. It is well known that colonies of microorganisms can enhance cathodic currents through biofilm formation. The aim of the present work was to elucidate the role of manganese in enhancing cathodic currents in the presence of biofilms. Repeated polarizations conducted in Delaware Bay waters, on biofilm coated Cr identified potentially sustainable reduction reactions. The reduction of MnO2 and the enhancement of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) were proven to be factors that influence cathodic current enhancement. The removal of ambient oxygen during polarizations resulted in a shutdown of cathodic current enhancement. These field data led to an exploration of the synergistic relationship between MnO2 and the ORR. Laboratory studies of the catalysis of peroxide disproportionation by MnO2 were monitored using a hanging mercury drop electrode. Experiments were run at an ambient sweater pH of 8 and pH 9, which simulated the near-surface conditions typical of cathodes immersed in seawater. Rapid reoxidation at the more basic pH was shown to allow manganese to behave as a persistent catalyst under the typical electrochemical surface conditions of a cathode. As a result a mechanism for ORR enhancement by manganese was proposed as a unique mechanism for cathodic current enhancement in biofilms. A separate field study of Delaware biofilms on stainless steel coupled to a sacrificial Al anode was carried out to identify the ORR enhancement mechanism and sustainable redox reactions at the cathode. Chemical treatments of glutaraldehyde and formaldoxime were applied to cathodes with biofilms to distinguish between enzymatic and MnO2 related ORR enhancement. The results ruled out the enzymatic catalysis of ORR and supported the catalysis by MnO2. Sustainable redox reactions at the cathode were evaluated by monitoring the cathodic current of biofilm coated stainless steel for a year under different polarization intensities. The results showed that sustainable cathodic reactions were present in marine biofilms but their influence on the cathodic current was negligible until a potential was reached where the ORR could take place. Additionally seasonal variability was observed in the enhanced cathodic current in Delaware Bay biofilms. This was attributed to the seasonal variability of manganese in the water column.

Strom, Matthew James

209

Design and implementation of Carbon Monoxide and Oxygen emissions measurement in swirl-stabilized oxy-fuel combustion  

E-print Network

Oxy-fuel combustion in natural gas power generation is a technology of growing interest as it provides the most efficient means of carbon capture. Since all the emissions from these power plants are sequestered, there are ...

Sommer, Andrew (Andrew Zhang)

2013-01-01

210

Communication: Enhanced oxygen reduction reaction and its underlying mechanism in Pd-Ir-Co trimetallic alloys  

SciTech Connect

Based on a combined density functional theory and experimental study, we present that the electrochemical activity of Pd{sub 3}Co alloy catalysts toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) can be enhanced by adding a small amount of Ir. While Ir tends to favorably exist in the subsurface layers, the underlying Ir atoms are found to cause a substantial modification in the surface electronic structure. As a consequence, we find that the activation barriers of O/OH hydrogenation reactions are noticeably lowered, which would be mainly responsible for the enhanced ORR activity. Furthermore, our study suggests that the presence of Ir in the near-surface region can suppress Co out-diffusion from the Pd{sub 3}Co substrate, thereby improving the durability of Pd-Ir-Co catalysts. We also discuss the relative roles played by Ir and Co in enhancing the ORR activity relative to monometallic Pd catalysts.

Ham, Hyung Chul; Hwang, Gyeong S., E-mail: gshwang@che.utexas.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Manogaran, Dhivya [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Lee, Kang Hee; Jin, Seon-ah; You, Dae Jong; Pak, Chanho [Energy Lab, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., Suwon (Korea, Republic of)] [Energy Lab, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Kyungjung [Department of Energy and Mineral Resources Engineering, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Energy and Mineral Resources Engineering, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-11-28

211

Superoxide dismutase deficiency enhances superoxide levels in brain tissues during oxygenation and hypoxia-reoxygenation.  

PubMed

To determine whether the mitochondria or cytoplasm produces superoxide during ischemia-reperfusion of the brain, we analyzed lucigenine-enhanced chemiluminescence emission in slices of brain tissue prepared from manganese-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD)-deficient (Sod2-deficient) and copper and zinc-superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn-SOD)-deficient (Sod1-deficient) mice during oxygenation and hypoxia-reoxygenation. The steady-state level of chemiluminescence under oxygenated conditions was significantly enhanced by a lack of either Sod. We hypothesize that the enhanced chemiluminescence produced by Sod2 and Sod1 deficiency reflects in situ superoxide generation in the mitochondria and cytoplasm, respectively. Based on this hypothesis, the major site of intracellular superoxide generation was assumed to be the cytoplasm. However, mitochondria occupy less cellular space than the cytoplasm. In terms of volume, the superoxide concentration is assumed to be higher in mitochondria than in the cytoplasm. Mn-SOD activity was 18% of the Cu,Zn-SOD activity observed in the wild-type mouse brain. However, when mitochondrial SOD activity was expressed as per volume, it was assumed to be equal to that observed in the cytoplasm. This imbalance between superoxide and SOD activity is expected to cause mitochondrial oxidative damage. The chemiluminescence intensity increased significantly during reoxygenation and was enhanced by Sod2 deficiency but was not significantly affected by Sod1 deficiency. The superoxide concentration in the reoxygenated brain would be higher in the mitochondria than in the cytoplasm. The present study indicated that the major site of intracellular superoxide generation in the brain during oxygenation is the cytoplasm, whereas it is the mitochondria during reoxygenation. PMID:21280062

Sasaki, Toru; Shimizu, Takahiko; Koyama, Tomoko; Sakai, Masanobu; Uchiyama, Satoshi; Kawakami, Satoru; Noda, Yoshihiro; Shirasawa, Takuji; Kojima, Shuji

2011-04-01

212

Gain and continuous-wave laser power enhancement with a multiple discharge electric oxygen-iodine laser  

E-print Network

Gain and continuous-wave laser power enhancement with a multiple discharge electric oxygen-iodine transition of atomic iodine via an increase in flow rates and pressure using multiple discharges in an electric oxygen-iodine laser. O2 a 1 is produced by two parallel radio-frequency-excited electric

Carroll, David L.

213

Enhanced in-situ biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons using passive addition of oxygen to groundwater  

SciTech Connect

A field trial incorporating the addition of oxygen to ground water through a passive interception system to ground water in a shallow sand aquifer beneath a former gasoline station in southwestern Ontario (Canada) has been initiated. The purpose of the trial is to evaluate the degree of remediation by oxygen-enhanced biodegradation. Based on the results of preliminary tests, the selected oxygen source is an oxygen-releasing compound (ORC), a proprietary metal peroxide powder. The ORC is mixed with sand, wrapped in a permeable filter sock and lowered down an unpumped well to the ground water zone in a retrievable plastic harness. In the design configuration adopted for the test, seven source wells constructed of 20 cm diameter PVC plastic were installed across a segment of a plume containing elevated concentrations of BTEX. The wells were screened (No. 8 slot) across the water table from 3 m below ground surface to their terminal depths at 6 m. The source wells were installed at 0.8 m centers in staggered fashion in two adjacent rows separated by 0.8 m. The experiment was designed with the intent of inducing convergent flow of ground water through the source wells to ensure interception of the plume across the trial segment by maintaining hydraulic conductivity of the ORC-filled chambers within the wells above that of the surrounding aquifer materials.

Smyth, D.J.A. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada); Wilson, R.D.; Byerley, B.T.; Chapman, S.W.; Mackay, D.M.

1995-09-01

214

Biologically enhanced cathode design for improved capacity and cycle life for lithium-oxygen batteries  

PubMed Central

Lithium-oxygen batteries have a great potential to enhance the gravimetric energy density of fully packaged batteries by 2–3 times that of lithium-ion cells. Recent studies have focused on finding stable electrolytes to address poor cycling capability and improve practical limitations of current lithium-oxygen batteries. In this study, the catalyst electrode, where discharge products are deposited and decomposed, was investigated since it plays a critical role in the operation of rechargeable lithium-oxygen batteries. Here we report the electrode design principle to improve specific capacity and cycling performance of lithium-oxygen batteries by utilizing high efficiency nanocatalysts assembled by M13 virus with earth abundant elements, such as manganese oxides. By incorporating only 3–5 wt % of palladium nanoparticles in the electrode, this hybrid nanocatalyst achieves 13,350 mAh g?1c (7,340 mAh g?1c+catalyst) of specific capacity at 0.4 A g?1c and a stable cycle life up to 50 cycles (4,000 mAh g?1c, 400 mAh g?1c+catalyst) at 1 A g?1c. PMID:24220635

Oh, Dahyun; Qi, Jifa; Lu, Yi-Chun; Zhang, Yong; Shao-Horn, Yang; Belcher, Angela M.

2014-01-01

215

Chemical kinetic modeling of oxy-fuel combustion of sour gas for enhanced oil recovery  

E-print Network

Oxy-fuel combustion of sour gas, a mixture of natural gas (primarily methane (CH 4 )), carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), and hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S), could enable the utilization of large natural gas resources, especially when ...

Bongartz, Dominik

2014-01-01

216

The impact of chlorine disinfection on biochemical oxygen demand levels in chemically enhanced primary treatment effluent.  

PubMed

The response trends of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and organic strength after the chlorination/dechlorination process were explored through a 2-year, 5-month chemically enhanced primary treatment (CEPT) effluent onsite monitoring program and a 2-month laboratory-scale study. The monitoring results showed that better instantaneous mixing at the chlorine injection point reduced the effect of chlorination/dechlorination on the 5-day BOD levels. The laboratory study results demonstrated that chlorination did not change the particle size distribution, dissolved organic carbon, or chemical oxygen demand of the organic content of the effluent. Nevertheless, chlorination/dechlorination strongly affected the BOD measurement when nitrification was inhibited by changing bioactivity/biodegradation rates. PMID:23863431

Dai, Ji; Jiang, Feng; Shang, Chii; Chau, Kwok-ming; Tse, Yuet-kar; Lee, Chi-fai; Chen, Guang-Hao; Fang, Jingyun; Zhai, Liming

2013-01-01

217

Combustion-derived flame generated ultrafine soot generates reactive oxygen species and activates Nrf2 antioxidants differently in neonatal and adult rat lungs  

PubMed Central

Background Urban particulate matter (PM) has been epidemiologically correlated with multiple cardiopulmonary morbidities and mortalities, in sensitive populations. Children exposed to PM are more likely to develop respiratory infections and asthma. Although PM originates from natural and anthropogenic sources, vehicle exhaust rich in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) can be a dominant contributor to the PM2.5 and PM0.1 fractions and has been implicated in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Objectives Current studies of ambient PM are confounded by the variable nature of PM, so we utilized a previously characterized ethylene-combusted premixed flame particles (PFP) with consistent and reproducible physiochemical properties and 1) measured the oxidative potential of PFP compared to ambient PM, 2) determined the ability of PFPs to generate oxidative stress and activate the transcription factor using in vitro and ex vivo models, and 3) we correlated these responses with antioxidant enzyme expression in vivo. Methods We compared oxidative stress response (HMOX1) and antioxidant enzyme (SOD1, SOD2, CAT, and PRDX6) expression in vivo by performing a time-course study in 7-day old neonatal and young adult rats exposed to a single 6-hour exposure to 22.4 ?g/m3 PFPs. Results We showed that PFP is a potent ROS generator that induces oxidative stress and activates Nrf2. Induction of the oxidative stress responsive enzyme HMOX1 in vitro was mediated through Nrf2 activation and was variably upregulated in both ages. Furthermore, antioxidant enzyme expression had age and lung compartment variations post exposure. Of particular interest was SOD1, which had mRNA and protein upregulation in adult parenchyma, but lacked a similar response in neonates. Conclusions We conclude that PFPs are effective ROS generators, comparable to urban ambient PM2.5, that induce oxidative stress in neonatal and adult rat lungs. PFPs upregulate a select set of antioxidant enzymes in young adult animals, that are unaffected in neonates. We conclude that the inability of neonatal animals to upregulate the antioxidant response may, in part, explain enhanced their susceptibility to ultrafine particles, such as PFP. PMID:23902943

2013-01-01

218

Enhanced Formation of Oxidants from Bimetallic Nickel-Iron Nanoparticles in the Presence of Oxygen  

PubMed Central

Nanoparticulate zero-valent iron (nZVI) rapidly reacts with oxygen to produce strong oxidants, capable of transforming organic contaminants in water. However, the low yield of oxidants with respect to the iron added normally limits the application of this system. Bimetallic nickel-iron nanoparticles (nNi-Fe; i.e., Ni-Fe alloy and Ni-coated Fe nanoparticles) exhibited enhanced yields of oxidants compared to nZVI. nNi-Fe (Ni-Fe alloy nanoparticles with [Ni]/[Fe] = 0.28 and Ni-coated Fe nanoparticles with [Ni]/[Fe] = 0.035) produced approximately 40% and 85% higher yields of formaldehyde from the oxidation of methanol relative to nZVI at pH 4 and 7, respectively. Ni-coated Fe nanoparticles showed a higher efficiency for oxidant production relative to Ni-Fe alloy nanoparticles based on Ni content. Addition of Ni did not enhance the oxidation of 2-propanol or benzoic acid, indicating that Ni addition did not enhance hydroxyl radical formation. The enhancement in oxidant yield was observed over a pH range of 4 – 9. The enhanced production of oxidant by nNi-Fe appears to be attributable to two factors. First, the nNi-Fe surface is less reactive toward hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) than the nZVI surface, which favors the reaction of H2O2 with dissolved Fe(II) (the Fenton reaction). Second, the nNi-Fe surface promotes oxidant production from the oxidation of ferrous ion by oxygen at neutral pH values. PMID:19068843

Lee, Changha; Sedlak, David L.

2009-01-01

219

Sensitivity enhancement of carbon nanotube based ammonium ion sensors through surface modification by using oxygen plasma treatment  

SciTech Connect

We have shown that the sensitivity of carbon nanotube (CNT) based sensors can be enhanced as high as 74 times through surface modification by using the inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition method with oxygen. The plasma treatment power was maintained as low as 10 W within 20 s, and the oxygen plasma was generated far away from the sensors to minimize the plasma damage. From X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, we found that the concentration of oxygen increased with the plasma treatment time, which implies that oxygen functional groups or defect sites were generated on the CNT surface.

Yeo, Sanghak; Woong Jang, Chi; Lee, Seok; Min Jhon, Young [Sensor System Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)] [Sensor System Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Changrok [Center for Nano-Bio Convergence, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-340, North Korea (Korea, Republic of)] [Center for Nano-Bio Convergence, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-340, North Korea (Korea, Republic of)

2013-02-18

220

Two-photon antenna-core oxygen probe with enhanced performance.  

PubMed

Recent development of two-photon phosphorescence lifetime microscopy (2PLM) of oxygen enabled first noninvasive high-resolution measurements of tissue oxygenation in vivo in 3D, providing valuable physiological information. The so far developed two-photon-enhanced phosphorescent probes comprise antenna-core constructs, in which two-photon absorbing chromophores (antenna) capture and channel excitation energy to a phosphorescent core (metalloporphyrin) via intramolecular excitation energy transfer (EET). These probes allowed demonstration of the methods' potential; however, they suffer from a number of limitations, such as partial loss of emissivity to competing triplet state deactivation pathways (e.g., electron transfer) and suboptimal sensitivity to oxygen, thereby limiting spatial and temporal resolution of the method. Here we present a new probe, PtTCHP-C307, designed to overcome these limitations. The key improvements include significant increase in the phosphorescence quantum yield, higher efficiency of the antenna-core energy transfer, minimized quenching of the phosphorescence by electron transfer and increased signal dynamic range. For the same excitation flux, the new probe is able to produce up to 6-fold higher signal output than previously reported molecules. Performance of PtTCHP-C307 was demonstrated in vivo in pO2 measurements through the intact mouse skull into the bone marrow, where all blood cells are made from hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:24848643

Roussakis, Emmanuel; Spencer, Joel A; Lin, Charles P; Vinogradov, Sergei A

2014-06-17

221

Simulation study of dose enhancement in a cell due to nearby carbon and oxygen in particle radiotherapy  

E-print Network

The aim of this study is to investigate the dose-deposition enhancement by alpha-particle irradiation in a cellular model using carbon and oxygen chemical compositions.A simulation study was performed to study dose enhancement due to carbon and oxygen for a human cell where Geant4 code used for the alpha-particle irradiation to the cellular phantom. The characteristic of dose enhancement in the nucleus and cytoplasm by the alpha-particle radiation was investigated based on concentrations of the carbon and oxygen compositions and was compared with those by gold and gadolinium.The results show that both the carbon and oxygen-induced dose enhancement was found to be more effective than those of gold and gadolinium. We found that the dose-enhancement effect was more dominant in the nucleus than in the cytoplasm if carbon or oxygen is uniformly distributed in a whole cell. In the condition that the added chemical composition was inserted only into the cytoplasm, the effect of the dose enhancement in nucleus become...

Shin, Jae Ik; Cho, Sungho; Kim, Eun Ho; Song, Yongkeun; Jung, Won-Gyun; Yoo, SeungHoon; Shin, Dongho; Lee, Se Byeong; Yoon, Myonggeun; Incerti, Sebastian; Geso, Moshi; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B

2015-01-01

222

FEASIBILITY STUDY OF ENHANCED COMBUSTION VIA IMPROVED WOOD STOVE FIREBOX DESIGN  

EPA Science Inventory

The paper gives results of an examination of materials that might be used within the firebox of a wood-burning stove to produce more uniform and complete combustion. Although many materials were initially considered, refractory materials appear to possess the qualities desired re...

223

Experimental and Modeling Studies of the Characteristics of Liquid Biofuels for Enhanced Combustion  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project have been to develop a comprehensive set of fundamental data regarding the combustion behavior of biodiesel fuels and appropriately associated model fuels that may represent biodiesels in automotive engineering simulation. Based on the fundamental study results, an auxiliary objective was to identify differentiating characteristics of molecular fuel components that can be used to explain different fuel behavior and that may ultimately be used in the planning and design of optimal fuel-production processes. The fuels studied in this project were BQ-9000 certified biodiesel fuels that are certified for use in automotive engine applications. Prior to this project, there were no systematic experimental flame data available for such fuels. One of the key goals has been to generate such data, and to use this data in developing and verifying effective kinetic models. The models have then been reduced through automated means to enable multi-dimensional simulation of the combustion characteristics of such fuels in reciprocating engines. Such reliable kinetics models, validated against fundamental data derived from laminar flames using idealized flow models, are key to the development and design of optimal engines, engine operation and fuels. The models provide direct information about the relative contribution of different molecular constituents to the fuel performance and can be used to assess both combustion and emissions characteristics. During this project, we completed a major and thorough validation of a set of biodiesel surrogate components, allowing us to begin to evaluate the fundamental combustion characteristics for B100 fuels.

E. Meeks; A. U. Modak; C.V. Naik; K. V. Puduppakkam; C. Westbrook; F. N. Egolfopoulos; T. Tsotsis; S. H. Roby

2009-07-01

224

Enhancement of hybrid rocket combustion performance using nano-sized energetic particles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Until now, the regression rate of classical hybrid rocket engines have typically been an order of magnitude lower than solid propellant motors; thus, hybrids require a relatively large fuel surface area for a given thrust level. In addition to low linear regression rates, relatively low combustion efficiency (87 to 92%), low mass burning rates, varying oxidizer-to-fuel ratio during operation, and

Grant Alexander Risha

2003-01-01

225

Upgrading and enhanced recovery of Jobo heavy oil using hydrogen donor under in-situ combustion  

E-print Network

In-situ upgrading of oil using hydrogen donors is a new process. In particular, very little research has been conducted with respect to in-situ oil upgrading using hydrogen donor under in-situ combustion. Several papers describe the use of metal...

Huseynzade, Samir

2009-05-15

226

Plasma-Enhanced Combustion of Hydrocarbon Fuels and Fuel Blends Using Nanosecond Pulsed Discharges  

SciTech Connect

This project had as its goals the study of fundamental physical and chemical processes relevant to the sustained premixed and non-premixed jet ignition/combustion of low grade fuels or fuels under adverse flow conditions using non-equilibrium pulsed nanosecond discharges.

Cappelli, Mark; Mungal, M Godfrey

2014-10-28

227

Effects of oxygen functional groups on the enhancement of the hydrogen spillover of Pd-doped activated carbon.  

PubMed

The hydrogen storage performance of Pd-doped oxidized activated carbon (Pd/AC-ox) with various oxygen contents or functional groups was investigated. The surface chemistry of the Pd/AC-ox sample was modified by treatment with hydrogen gas. Temperature-programmed desorption was performed to characterize the oxygen functional groups in each sample. In this study, low- and high-pressure hydrogen adsorption isotherm experiments were conducted using a static volumetric measurement at room temperature (RT) and pressures of up to 8 MPa. The results showed that increasing the oxygen content and functional groups on the surface of the Pd/AC-ox significantly improved the reversible RT hydrogen storage capacity due to the spillover effect. The hydrogen spillover enhancement factors at 0.12 MPa were greater than 100% for all samples. The hydrogen uptake of Pd/AC-ox1 at RT and 8 MPa with an oxygen content of 8.94 wt.% was 0.37 wt.%, which was 48% greater than that of Pd-free AC-ox (0.25 wt.%). In addition, the hydrogen uptake of Pd/AC-ox3 with lower oxygen contents demonstrates that the hydrogen spillover enhancement gradually disappears when the pressure is increased to more than 2 MPa (i.e., a transition from spillover to physisorption). The surface diffusion, or reversible adsorption, of the spiltover H atoms, which is enhanced by oxygen functional groups, was affected by a threshold amount of oxygen groups (such as hydroxyl groups). PMID:25490569

Chung, Tsui-Yun; Tsao, Cheng-Si; Tseng, Hui-Ping; Chen, Chien-Hung; Yu, Ming-Sheng

2015-03-01

228

Characterization of mercury-enriched coal combustion residues from electric utilities using enhanced sorbents for mercury control  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates changes that may occur to coal-fired power plant air pollution control residues from the use of activated carbon and other enhanced sorbents for reducing air emissions of mercury and evaluates the potential for captured pollutants leaching during the disposal or use of these residues. Leaching of mercury, arsenic, and selenium during land disposal or beneficial use of coal combustion residues (CCRs) is the environmental impact pathway evaluated in this report. Coal combustion residues refer collectively to fly ash and other air pollution control solid residues generated during the combustion of coal collected through the associated air pollution control system. This research is part of an on-going effort by US Environmental protection Agency (EPA) to use a holistic approach to account for the fate of mercury and other metals in coal throughout the life-cycle stages of CCR management. This report focuses on facilities that use injected sorbents for mercury control. It includes four facilities with activated carbon injection (ACI) and two facilities using brominated ACI. Fly ash has been obtained from each facility with and without operation of the sorbent injection technology for mercury control. Each fly ash sampled was evaluated in the laboratory for leaching as a function of pH and liquid-to-solid ratio. Mercury, arsenic and selenium were the primary constituent of interest; results for these elements are presented here. 30 refs., 30 figs., 14 tabs., 10 apps.

Sanchez, F.; Keeney, R.; Kosson, D.; Delapp, R. [Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

2006-02-15

229

Enhanced proliferation and dopaminergic differentiation of ventral mesencephalic precursor cells by synergistic effect of FGF2 and reduced oxygen tension  

SciTech Connect

Effective numerical expansion of dopaminergic precursors might overcome the limited availability of transplantable cells in replacement strategies for Parkinson's disease. Here we investigated the effect of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2) and FGF8 on expansion and dopaminergic differentiation of rat embryonic ventral mesencephalic neuroblasts cultured at high (20%) and low (3%) oxygen tension. More cells incorporated bromodeoxyuridine in cultures expanded at low as compared to high oxygen tension, and after 6 days of differentiation there were significantly more neuronal cells in low than in high oxygen cultures. Low oxygen during FGF2-mediated expansion resulted also in a significant increase in tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH-ir) dopaminergic neurons as compared to high oxygen tension, but no corresponding effect was observed for dopamine release into the culture medium. However, switching FGF2-expanded cultures from low to high oxygen tension during the last two days of differentiation significantly enhanced dopamine release and intracellular dopamine levels as compared to all other treatment groups. In addition, the short-term exposure to high oxygen enhanced in situ assessed TH enzyme activity, which may explain the elevated dopamine levels. Our findings demonstrate that modulation of oxygen tension is a recognizable factor for in vitro expansion and dopaminergic differentiation of rat embryonic midbrain precursor cells.

Jensen, Pia [Department of Neurobiology Research, Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Southern Denmark, Winslowparken 21, DK-5000 Odense C (Denmark) [Department of Neurobiology Research, Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Southern Denmark, Winslowparken 21, DK-5000 Odense C (Denmark); Department of Neurosurgery, University of Bern, CH-3010 Bern (Switzerland); Gramsbergen, Jan-Bert; Zimmer, Jens [Department of Neurobiology Research, Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Southern Denmark, Winslowparken 21, DK-5000 Odense C (Denmark)] [Department of Neurobiology Research, Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Southern Denmark, Winslowparken 21, DK-5000 Odense C (Denmark); Widmer, Hans R. [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Bern, CH-3010 Bern (Switzerland)] [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Bern, CH-3010 Bern (Switzerland); Meyer, Morten, E-mail: MMeyer@health.sdu.dk [Department of Neurobiology Research, Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Southern Denmark, Winslowparken 21, DK-5000 Odense C (Denmark)] [Department of Neurobiology Research, Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Southern Denmark, Winslowparken 21, DK-5000 Odense C (Denmark)

2011-07-15

230

Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents and other methods to enhance oxygen transport  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oxygen is essential for life, and the body has developed an exquisite method to collect oxygen in the lungs and transport it to the tissues. Hb contained within red blood cells (RBCs), is the key oxygen-carrying component in blood, and levels of RBCs are tightly controlled according to demand for oxygen. The availability of oxygen plays a critical role in

S Elliott

2008-01-01

231

Combustion synthesized TiO{sub 2} for enhanced photocatalytic activity under the direct sunlight-optimization of titanylnitrate synthesis  

SciTech Connect

Graphical abstract: Effect of oxidant on the combustion synthesis of TiO{sub 2} has been studied by preparing titanylnitrate in four different ways from Ti(IV) iso-propoxide. It is observed that oxidant preparation method has a significant effect on physico-chemical as well as photocatalytic properties of TiO{sub 2}. All the catalysts showed excellent photocatalytic activity than Degussa P-25 under direct sunlight for the degradation of a textile dye (methylene blue), without the need of external light sources, oxygen supply and reactor systems. Highlights: ? Optimized synthesis of titanylnitrate. ? Influence of titanylnitrate synthesis on the physico-chemical properties of TiO{sub 2} prepared by combustion synthesis. ? Development of highly efficient TiO{sub 2} photocatalysts those are active under the direct sunlight in open atmosphere. ? Degradation of the textile dye (methylene blue) under direct sunlight. -- Abstract: Optimized synthesis of Ti-precursor ‘titanylnitrate’ for one step combustion synthesis of N- and C-doped TiO{sub 2} catalysts were reported and characterized by using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), diffused reflectance UV–vis spectroscopy, N{sub 2} adsorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XRD confirmed the formation of TiO{sub 2} anatase and nano-crystallite size which was further confirmed by TEM. UV-DRS confirmed the decrease in the band gap to less than 3.0 eV, which was assigned due to the presence of C and N in the framework of TiO{sub 2} as confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Degradation of methylene blue in aqueous solution under the direct sunlight was carried out and typical results indicated the better performance of the synthesized catalysts than Degussa P-25.

Daya Mani, A. [Department of Chemistry, IIT Hyderabad, Yeddumailaram 502 205 (India)] [Department of Chemistry, IIT Hyderabad, Yeddumailaram 502 205 (India); Laporte, V. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Interdisciplinary Centre for Electron Microscopy – Surface Analysis Facility, CH-Lausanne (Switzerland)] [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Interdisciplinary Centre for Electron Microscopy – Surface Analysis Facility, CH-Lausanne (Switzerland); Ghosal, P. [Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory (DMRL), Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad 500 058 (India)] [Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory (DMRL), Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad 500 058 (India); Subrahmanyam, Ch., E-mail: csubbu@iith.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, IIT Hyderabad, Yeddumailaram 502 205 (India)

2012-09-15

232

Experimental and analytical study to model temperature profiles and stoichiometry in oxygen-enriched in-situ combustion  

E-print Network

in Venezuela. These runs were carried out with air containing three values of oxygen concentration, 21%, 30%, and 40%. The weight percentage of sand, clay, water, and oil in the sand mix was kept constant in all runs at 86.6%, 4.7%, 4.0%, and 4.7% respectively...

Rodriguez, Jose Ramon

2004-09-30

233

Effect of food deprivation on oxygen consumption and body composition of growth-enhanced transgenic Atlantic salmon ( Salmo salar)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The influence of food deprivation on the rate of oxygen consumption and the rate of mobilization\\/utilization of energy reserves in F2 generation growth-enhanced transgenic Atlantic salmon were compared relative to their non-transgenic counterparts, over a pre-smolt weight interval of 8 to 55 g.Throughout most of the 8 weeks of food deprivation, transgenic fish exhibited a greater rate of oxygen consumption

J. T Cook; A. M Sutterlin; M. A McNiven

2000-01-01

234

Role of Metal Coordination Structures in Enhancement of Electrocatalytic Activity of Ternary Nanoalloys for Oxygen Reduction Reaction  

SciTech Connect

The ability to harness the metal-metal and metal-oxygen coordination structures of nanoalloy catalysts is critical for catalyzing the oxygen reduction reaction because such a detailed atomic-scale structure dictates the surface binding site and strength for molecular oxygen and oxygenated intermediate species in the electrocatalytic process. This report describes the results of an investigation of the metal-metal and metal-oxygen coordination structures of ternary nanoalloys and their manipulation to enhance the electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction. The basic hypothesis is that such atomic-scale structure can be manipulated by oxidative-reductive thermal treatment to influence the binding site and strength of molecular oxygen and oxygenated species on the nanoalloy surface. The results have revealed remarkable increases in both mass activity and specific activity for the catalysts processed by the oxidative-reductive treatment over those treated under non-reactive or low-degree oxidative atmospheres before the reductive treatment. In comparison with non-reactive-reductive treatment, an increased degree of heteroatomic alloying among the three metal components in the ternary catalysts and a decreased percentage of oxides (NiO and CoO) have been revealed by X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy for the catalysts treated by the oxidative-reductive treatment. An enrichment of surface Pt has also been detected by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for such catalysts. A combination of the increase in the heteroatomic alloying, the decrease in metal oxides, and the enrichment of surface Pt by the oxidative-reductive thermal treatment has therefore been concluded to be responsible for the enhanced electrocatalytic activity. The demonstration of this new approach to manipulating the metal-metal and metal-oxygen coordination structures forms the basis for an effective strategy in engineering ternary nanoalloy catalysts, and has provided new insights into the role of such structures in the enhancement of the electrocatalytic activity.

Wanjala, Bridgid N.; Fang, Bin; Loukrakpam, Rameshwori; Chen, Yongsheng; Engelhard, Mark H.; Luo, Jin; Yin, Jun; Yang, Lefu; Shan, Shiyao; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

2012-04-04

235

Including oxygen enhancement ratio in ion beam treatment planning: model implementation and experimental verification.  

PubMed

We present a method for adapting a biologically optimized treatment planning for particle beams to a spatially inhomogeneous tumor sensitivity due to hypoxia, and detected e.g., by PET functional imaging. The TRiP98 code, established treatment planning system for particles, has been extended for including explicitly the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) in the biological effect calculation, providing the first set up of a dedicated ion beam treatment planning approach directed to hypoxic tumors, TRiP-OER, here reported together with experimental tests. A simple semi-empirical model for calculating the OER as a function of oxygen concentration and dose averaged linear energy transfer, generating input tables for the program is introduced. The code is then extended in order to import such tables coming from the present or alternative models, accordingly and to perform forward and inverse planning, i.e., predicting the survival response of differently oxygenated areas as well as optimizing the required dose for restoring a uniform survival effect in the whole irradiated target. The multiple field optimization results show how the program selects the best beam components for treating the hypoxic regions. The calculations performed for different ions, provide indications for the possible clinical advantages of a multi-ion treatment. Finally the predictivity of the code is tested through dedicated cell culture experiments on extended targets irradiation using specially designed hypoxic chambers, providing a qualitative agreement, despite some limits in full survival calculations arising from the RBE assessment. The comparison of the predictions resulting by using different model tables are also reported. PMID:23681217

Scifoni, E; Tinganelli, W; Weyrather, W K; Durante, M; Maier, A; Krämer, M

2013-06-01

236

Including oxygen enhancement ratio in ion beam treatment planning: model implementation and experimental verification  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a method for adapting a biologically optimized treatment planning for particle beams to a spatially inhomogeneous tumor sensitivity due to hypoxia, and detected e.g., by PET functional imaging. The TRiP98 code, established treatment planning system for particles, has been extended for including explicitly the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) in the biological effect calculation, providing the first set up of a dedicated ion beam treatment planning approach directed to hypoxic tumors, TRiP-OER, here reported together with experimental tests. A simple semi-empirical model for calculating the OER as a function of oxygen concentration and dose averaged linear energy transfer, generating input tables for the program is introduced. The code is then extended in order to import such tables coming from the present or alternative models, accordingly and to perform forward and inverse planning, i.e., predicting the survival response of differently oxygenated areas as well as optimizing the required dose for restoring a uniform survival effect in the whole irradiated target. The multiple field optimization results show how the program selects the best beam components for treating the hypoxic regions. The calculations performed for different ions, provide indications for the possible clinical advantages of a multi-ion treatment. Finally the predictivity of the code is tested through dedicated cell culture experiments on extended targets irradiation using specially designed hypoxic chambers, providing a qualitative agreement, despite some limits in full survival calculations arising from the RBE assessment. The comparison of the predictions resulting by using different model tables are also reported.

Scifoni, E.; Tinganelli, W.; Weyrather, W. K.; Durante, M.; Maier, A.; Krämer, M.

2013-06-01

237

Enhanced production of human serum albumin by fed-batch culture of Hansenula polymorpha with high-purity oxygen.  

PubMed

Fed-batch cultures of Hansenula polymorpha were studied to develop an efficient biosystem to produce recombinant human serum albumin (HSA). To comply with this purpose, we used high purity oxygen supplying strategy to increase viable cell density in a bioreactor and enhance the production of target protein. A mutant strain, H. polymorpha GOT7 was utilized in this study as a host strain in both 5-L and 30-L scale fermentors. To supply high purity oxygen into a bioreactor, nearly 100 % high purity oxygen from commercial bomb or higher than 93 % oxygen available in-situ from a pressure swing adsorption oxygen generator (PSA) was employed. Under the optimal fermentation of H. polymorpha with high purity oxygen, the final cell densities and produced HSA concentrations were 24.6 g/L and 5.1 g/L in the 5-L fermentor, and 24.8 g/L and 4.5 g/L in the 30-L fermentor, respectively. These were about 2-10 times higher than those obtained in air-based fed-batch fermentations. The discrepancies between the 5-L and 30-L fermentors with air supply were presumably due to the higher contribution of surface aeration over submerged aeration in the 5-L fermentor. This study, therefore, proved the positive effect of high purity oxygen to enhance viable cell density as well as target recombinant protein production in microbial fermentations. PMID:21124059

Youn, Jong Kyu; Shang, Longan; Kim, Moon Il; Jeong, Chang Moon; Chang, Ho Nam; Hahm, Moon Sun; Rhee, Sang Ki; Kang, Hyun Ah

2010-11-01

238

Identification of combustion intermediates in a low-pressure premixed laminar 2,5-dimethylfuran/oxygen/argon flame with tunable synchrotron photoionization  

SciTech Connect

Low-pressure (4.0 kPa) premixed laminar 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF)/oxygen/argon flame with an equivalence ratio of 2.0 was studied with tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation photoionization and molecular-beam mass spectrometry. Photoionization mass spectra of DMF/O{sub 2}/Ar flame were recorded and the photoionization efficiency curves of the combustion intermediates were measured. Flame species, including isomeric intermediates, are identified by comparing the measured ionization energies with those reported in literatures or those calculated with Gaussian-3 procedure. More than 70 species have been detected, including furan and its derivatives, aromatics, and free radicals. Possible reaction pathways of DMF, 2-methylfuran, and furan are proposed based on the intermediates identified. DMF can be consumed by H-abstraction and pyrolysis reactions. 2-Methylfuran and furan can be consumed by H-abstraction, H-addition and pyrolysis reactions. (author)

Wu, Xuesong; Huang, Zuohua; Wei, Lixia [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); Yuan, Tao; Zhang, Kuiwen [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029 (China)

2009-07-15

239

Oxygen-enhanced models for globular cluster stars. III - Horizontal-branch sequences  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A large grid of horizontal-branch (HB) evolutionary sequences which have been calculated with core expansion and semiconvection and with enhanced oxygen composition are presented and described. Tracks for 10 different metallicities are computed; they range from (Fe/H) = -0.47 to -2.26 and comprise a total of 115 sequences. The evolution is traced from the zero-age horizontal-branch (ZAHB) to the lower AGB at a point where log L/solar luminosity = 2.25. All of the sequences are illustrated on both the theoretical H-R diagram and on the B, V color-magnitude diagram. A complete set of tables for the ZAHB models and a representative sample of tabulations of the track parameters are provided. The phenomena which control HB evolution morphology, and existing certainties in theoretical HB models are discussed.

Dorman, Ben

1992-01-01

240

Enhanced oxygen reduction activity and solid oxide fuel cell performance with a nanoparticles-loaded cathode.  

PubMed

Reluctant oxygen-reduction-reaction (ORR) activity has been a long-standing challenge limiting cell performance for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) in both centralized and distributed power applications. We report here that this challenge has been tackled with coloading of (La,Sr)MnO3 (LSM) and Y2O3 stabilized zirconia (YSZ) nanoparticles within a porous YSZ framework. This design dramatically improves ORR activity, enhances fuel cell output (200-300% power improvement), and enables superior stability (no observed degradation within 500 h of operation) from 600 to 800 °C. The improved performance is attributed to the intimate contacts between nanoparticulate YSZ and LSM particles in the three-phase boundaries in the cathode. PMID:25686380

Zhang, Xiaomin; Liu, Li; Zhao, Zhe; Tu, Baofeng; Ou, Dingrong; Cui, Daan; Wei, Xuming; Chen, Xiaobo; Cheng, Mojie

2015-03-11

241

Enhancing Electrocatalytic Oxygen Reduction on Nitrogen-Doped Graphene by Active Sites Implantation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The shortage of nitrogen active sites and relatively low nitrogen content result in unsatisfying eletrocatalytic activity and durability of nitrogen-doped graphene (NG) for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Here we report a novel approach to substantially enhance electrocatalytic oxygen reduction on NG electrode by the implantation of nitrogen active sites with mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride (mpg-C3N4). Electrochemical characterization revealed that in neutral electrolyte the resulting NG (I-NG) exhibited super electrocatalytic activity (completely 100% of four-electron ORR pathway) and durability (nearly no activity change after 100000 potential cyclings). When I-NG was used as cathode catalyst in microbial fuel cells (MFCs), power density and its drop percentage were also much better than the NG and Pt/C ones, demonstrating that the current I-NG was a perfect alternative to Pt/C and offered a new potential for constructing high-performance and less expensive cathode which is crucial for large-scale application of MFC technology.

Feng, Leiyu; Yang, Lanqin; Huang, Zujing; Luo, Jingyang; Li, Mu; Wang, Dongbo; Chen, Yinguang

2013-11-01

242

Enhancing Electrocatalytic Oxygen Reduction on Nitrogen-Doped Graphene by Active Sites Implantation  

PubMed Central

The shortage of nitrogen active sites and relatively low nitrogen content result in unsatisfying eletrocatalytic activity and durability of nitrogen-doped graphene (NG) for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Here we report a novel approach to substantially enhance electrocatalytic oxygen reduction on NG electrode by the implantation of nitrogen active sites with mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride (mpg-C3N4). Electrochemical characterization revealed that in neutral electrolyte the resulting NG (I-NG) exhibited super electrocatalytic activity (completely 100% of four-electron ORR pathway) and durability (nearly no activity change after 100000 potential cyclings). When I-NG was used as cathode catalyst in microbial fuel cells (MFCs), power density and its drop percentage were also much better than the NG and Pt/C ones, demonstrating that the current I-NG was a perfect alternative to Pt/C and offered a new potential for constructing high-performance and less expensive cathode which is crucial for large-scale application of MFC technology. PMID:24264379

Feng, Leiyu; Yang, Lanqin; Huang, Zujing; Luo, Jingyang; Li, Mu; Wang, Dongbo; Chen, Yinguang

2013-01-01

243

Durability enhancement and degradation of oxygen evolution anodes in seawater electrolysis for hydrogen production  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For the anode composed of electrocatalyst oxide, intermediate layer and titanium substrate, the substitution of a certain amount of iridium with tin in the IrO 2 intermediate layer was remarkably effective in elongating the life of the anode in preventing oxidation of the substrate titanium during oxygen evolution. The longest life was realized by preparation of intermediate layer with uniform thickness by brush-coating of H 2IrCl 6-SnCl 4 butanol solution and subsequent calcination. The anode with the intermediate layer prepared from 0.04 M H 2IrCl 6-0.06 M SnCl 4 butanol solution showed the best performance, that is, the oxygen evolution efficiency higher than 99.8% for more than 4300 h in the electrolysis of 0.5 M NaCl solution of pH 1 at the current density of 1000 Am -2. An increase in SnCl 4 concentration decreased the viscosity of the coating solution with a consequent enhancement of uniformity of the intermediate layer but decreased the thickness of the intermediate layer acting as a barrier to prevent oxidation of titanium. Thus, the best performance was attained at an intermediate SnCl 4 concentration. The growth of an oxide layer on titanium during electrolysis occurred and was found by the potential increase.

Kato, Zenta; Bhattarai, Jagadeesh; Kumagai, Naokazu; Izumiya, Koichi; Hashimoto, Koji

2011-07-01

244

Lipopolysaccharide infusion enhances dynamic cerebral autoregulation without affecting cerebral oxygen vasoreactivity in healthy volunteers  

PubMed Central

Introduction Sepsis may be associated with disturbances in cerebral oxygen transport and cerebral haemodynamic function, thus rendering the brain particularly susceptible to hypoxia. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of isocapnic hypoxia and hyperoxia on dynamic cerebral autoregulation in a human-experimental model of the systemic inflammatory response during the early stages of sepsis. Methods A total of ten healthy volunteers were exposed to acute isocapnic inspiratory hyperoxia (FIO2?=?40%) and hypoxia (FIO2?=?12%) before and after a 4-hour lipopolysaccharide (LPS) infusion (2 ng kg-1). Middle cerebral artery blood follow velocity was assessed using transcranial Doppler ultrasound, and dynamic autoregulation was evaluated by transfer function analysis. Results Transfer function analysis revealed an increase in the phase difference between mean arterial blood pressure and middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity in the low frequency range (0.07–0.20 Hz) after LPS (P<0.01). In contrast, there were no effects of either isocapnic hyperoxia or hypoxia on dynamic autoregulation, and the cerebral oxygen vasoreactivity to both hyperoxia and hypoxia was unaffected by LPS. Conclusions The observed increase in phase suggests that dynamic cerebral autoregulation is enhanced after LPS infusion and resistant to any effects of acute hypoxia; this may protect the brain from ischaemia and/or blood–brain barrier damage during the early stages of sepsis. PMID:24131656

2013-01-01

245

Atomic Ordering Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity of Nanoalloys for Oxygen Reduction Reaction  

SciTech Connect

For oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) over alloy electrocatalysts, the understanding of how the atomic arrangement of the metal species in the nanocatalysts is responsible for the catalytic enhancement is challenging for achieving better design and tailoring of nanoalloy catalysts. This paper reports results of an investigation of the atomic structures and the electrocatalytic activities of ternary and binary nanoalloys, aiming at revealing a fundamental insight into the unique atomic-scale structure?electrocatalytic activity relationship. PtIrCo catalyst and its binary counterparts (PtCo and PtIr) are chosen as a model system for this study. The effect of thermochemical treatment temperature on the atomic-scale structure of the catalysts was examined as a useful probe to the structure?activity correlation. The structural characterization of the binary and ternary nanoalloy catalysts was performed by combining surface sensitive techniques such as XPS and 3D atomic ordering sensitive techniques such as high-energy X-ray diffraction (HE-XRD) coupled to atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis (HE-XRD/PDFs) and computer simulations. The results show that the thermal treatment temperature tunes the nanoalloy’s atomic and chemical ordering in a different way depending on the chemical composition, leading to differences in the nanoalloy’s mass and specific activities. A unique structural tunability of the atomic ordering in a platinum?iridium?cobalt nanoalloy has been revealed for enhancing greatly the electrocatalytic activity toward oxygen reduction reaction, which has significant implication for rational design and nanoengineering of advanced catalysts for electrochemical energy conversion and storage.

Loukrakpam, Rameshwori; Shan, Shiyao; Petkov, Valeri; Yang, Lefu; Luo, Jin; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

2013-10-01

246

The use of thermal analysis techniques to obtain information relevant to the in-situ combustion process for enhanced oil recovery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thein-situ combustion technique of enhanced oil recovery may be used for the recovery of heavy oil deposits. In order to predict when\\u000a this process may be used computer-based simulators are being developed. The data required by these simulators are currently\\u000a available from two sources: (i) combustion tubes; these are complex, expensive and time consuming to run; (ii) thermal analysis\\u000a techniques;

A. Millington; D. Price; R. Hughes

1993-01-01

247

Final report on the project entitled: Highly Preheated Combustion Air System with/without Oxygen Enrichment for Metal Processing Furnaces  

SciTech Connect

This work develops and demonstrates a laboratory-scale high temperature natural gas furnace that can operate with/without oxygen enrichment to significantly improve energy efficiency and reduce emissions. The laboratory-scale is 5ft in diameter & 8ft tall. This furnace was constructed and tested. This report demonstrates the efficiency and pollutant prevention capabilities of this test furnace. The project also developed optical detection technology to control the furnace output.

Arvind Atreya

2007-02-16

248

IGF-I enhances cellular senescence via the reactive oxygen species-p53 pathway  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cellular senescence plays an important role in tumorigenesis and aging process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrated IGF-I enhanced cellular senescence in primary confluent cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IGF-I enhanced cellular senescence in the ROS and p53-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These results may explain the underlying mechanisms of IGF-I involvement in tumorigenesis and in regulation of aging. -- Abstract: Cellular senescence is characterized by growth arrest, enlarged and flattened cell morphology, the expression of senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-gal), and by activation of tumor suppressor networks. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) plays a critical role in cellular growth, proliferation, tumorigenesis, and regulation of aging. In the present study, we show that IGF-I enhances cellular senescence in mouse, rat, and human primary cells in the confluent state. IGF-I induced expression of a DNA damage marker, {gamma}H2AX, the increased levels of p53 and p21 proteins, and activated SA-{beta}-gal. In the confluent state, an altered downstream signaling of IGF-I receptor was observed. Treatment with a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, N-acetylcystein (NAC) significantly suppressed induction of these markers, indicating that ROS are involved in the induction of cellular senescence by IGF-I. In p53-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts, the IGF-I-induced augmentation of SA-{beta}-gal and p21 was inhibited, demonstrating that p53 is required for cellular senescence induced by IGF-I. Thus, these data reveal a novel pathway whereby IGF-I enhances cellular senescence in the ROS and p53-dependent manner and may explain the underlying mechanisms of IGF-I involvement in tumorigenesis and in regulation of aging.

Handayaningsih, Anastasia-Evi; Takahashi, Michiko; Fukuoka, Hidenori; Iguchi, Genzo; Nishizawa, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Suda, Kentaro [Division of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan)] [Division of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Takahashi, Yutaka, E-mail: takahash@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan)] [Division of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan)

2012-08-24

249

Research Combustion Lab Facility Capabilities and Throughput Enhanced by New Test Stands  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The original test stand location has a small copper rocket engine mounted on the stand. The new stand, located about 4 feet to the left, has a long pulse detonation combustion engine mounted on it. To the rear of the two stands can be seen a bulkhead with feed line outlets that can be switched at common valves behind the bulkhead to supply either stand. A gauge panel is visible through a doorway in the bulkhead at which various purge pressures are set. A connection panel for instrumentation wiring can be seen above the stands.

2003-01-01

250

Multicolor tunability and upconversion enhancement of fluoride nanoparticles by oxygen dopant  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ability to manipulate the upconversion luminescence of lanthanide-ion doped fluoride upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) is particularly important and highly desired due to their wide applications in color displays, multiplexing bioassays and multicolor imaging. Here, we developed a strategy for simultaneously tuning color output and enhancing upconversion emission of Yb/Er doped fluoride UCNPs, based on adjusting the oxygen doping level. The synthesis of multicolored multifunctional NaGdF4:Yb,Er UCNPs was used as the model host system to demonstrate this protocol. Ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) was used as the oxygen source and added into the reaction system at the beginning stage of nucleation and growth process of fluoride UCNPs, which facilitates the formation of enough oxygen atoms and the diffusion of these into the fluoride host matrix. The results revealed that multicolour output and upconversion enhancement mainly resulted from the variation of phonon energy and crystal field symmetry of the host lattice, respectively. This strategy can be further expanded to other fluoride host matrices. As an example of an application, multicolored UCNPs were used as a color converter in light emitting diodes, which can effectively convert near-infrared light into visible light. It is expected that these multicolored UCNPs will be promising for applications in multiplexing biodetection, bioimaging (optical and magnetic resonance imaging) and other optical technologies, and the present method for the control of O2- doping may also be used in other functional nanomaterials.The ability to manipulate the upconversion luminescence of lanthanide-ion doped fluoride upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) is particularly important and highly desired due to their wide applications in color displays, multiplexing bioassays and multicolor imaging. Here, we developed a strategy for simultaneously tuning color output and enhancing upconversion emission of Yb/Er doped fluoride UCNPs, based on adjusting the oxygen doping level. The synthesis of multicolored multifunctional NaGdF4:Yb,Er UCNPs was used as the model host system to demonstrate this protocol. Ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) was used as the oxygen source and added into the reaction system at the beginning stage of nucleation and growth process of fluoride UCNPs, which facilitates the formation of enough oxygen atoms and the diffusion of these into the fluoride host matrix. The results revealed that multicolour output and upconversion enhancement mainly resulted from the variation of phonon energy and crystal field symmetry of the host lattice, respectively. This strategy can be further expanded to other fluoride host matrices. As an example of an application, multicolored UCNPs were used as a color converter in light emitting diodes, which can effectively convert near-infrared light into visible light. It is expected that these multicolored UCNPs will be promising for applications in multiplexing biodetection, bioimaging (optical and magnetic resonance imaging) and other optical technologies, and the present method for the control of O2- doping may also be used in other functional nanomaterials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Upconversion spectra of NaYF4:Yb,Er UCNPs prepared with various oxygen sources (trimethylamine N-oxide and ammonium carbonate, Fig. S1) and different addition temperatures of NH4NO3 (Fig. S2), enlarged XRD patterns (Fig. S3), the intensity ratios of green to red emissions of NaGdF4:Yb,Er UCNPs prepared with various amounts of NH4NO3 (Fig. S4), power dependence of upconversion spectra of NaGdF4:Yb,Er UCNPs prepared at 300 °C for 1 h (Fig. S5), upconversion spectra of the product after further reaction between as-prepared NaYF4:Yb,Er and 50 mg of NH4NO3 at 300 °C for 1 h (Fig. S6), XRD patterns of NaYF4:Yb,Er and NaLuF4:Yb,Er UCNPs prepared with various amounts of NH4NO3 (Fig. S7 and S8), the corresponding magnetization curves of NaGdF4:Yb,Er UCNPs (Fig. S9). See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr01612a

Niu, Wenbin; Wu, Suli; Zhang, Shufen; Su, Liap Tat; Tok, Alfred Iing Yoong

2013-08-01

251

Enhancement of yeast fermentation by addition of oxygen vectors in air-lift bioreactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of an oxygen vector on the oxygen transfer rate in air-lift bioreactor was evaluated using the ratio of the volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient to the volumetric fraction of the oxygen vector. When n-dodecane and perfluorocarbon were added at final concentrations of 3% and 2% (v\\/v), respectively, the oxygen transfer rate reached a maximum value. By addition of 3%

Shiru Jia; Mingxia Wang; Prihardi Kahar; Mitsuyasu Okabe

1997-01-01

252

Polyelectrolyte assisted synthesis and enhanced oxygen reduction activity of Pt nanocrystals with controllable shape and size.  

PubMed

The shape control of platinum nanocrystals is significant to the enhancement of their catalytic performance in terms of activity and selectivity. However, it still remains a major challenge to prepare Pt nanocrystals with tunable shape and clean surface in an eco-friendly way. This article develops a facile and green strategy to prepare well tuned platinum nanocrystals employing poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) as the capping agent, reductant, and stabilizer simultaneously in a facile hydrothermal process. It is identified that the variation of PDDA concentration is crucial to control the growth of crystalline facets, leading to the formation of cubic, truncated cubic, and octahedral Pt nanocrystals with sizes tunable from ca. 17 nm to ca. 50 nm. The resultant Pt nanocrystals exhibit excellent electrocatalytic activity and stability toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acidic media compared with those of commercial Pt black and the state-of-the-art Pt/C catalyst. It is proposed that the preferential Pt surface and the decoration of PDDA, which modulates the electronic structures and electrooxidation of Pt nanocrystals, synergistically contribute to the enhanced catalytic performance. PMID:25058739

Du, Lei; Zhang, Sheng; Chen, Guangyu; Yin, Geping; Du, Chunyu; Tan, Qiang; Sun, Yongrong; Qu, Yunteng; Gao, Yunzhi

2014-08-27

253

Promoted combustion of nine structural metals in high-pressure gaseous oxygen - A comparison of ranking methods  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The 316, 321, 440C, and 17-4 PH stainless steels, as well as Inconel 600, Inconel 718, Waspaloy, Monel 400, and Al 2219, have been evaluated for relative nonflammability in a high-pressure oxygen environment with a view to the comparative advantages of four different flammability-ranking methods. The effects of changes in test pressure, sample diameter, promoter type, and sample configuration on ranking method results are evaluated; ranking methods employing velocity as the primary ranking criterion are limited by diameter effects, while those which use extinguishing pressure are nonselective for metals with similar flammabilities.

Steinberg, Theodore A.; Rucker, Michelle A.; Beeson, Harold D.

1989-01-01

254

Effect of defect-enhanced molecular oxygen adsorption on the imbalance of hole versus electron mobility in conjugated polymers  

E-print Network

Effect of defect-enhanced molecular oxygen adsorption on the imbalance of hole versus electron mobility in conjugated polymers Chi-Ken Lu, Shu-Ting Pi, and Hsin-Fei Meng* Institute of Physics, National manuscript received 28 January 2007; published 9 May 2007 The generally observed higher hole mobility

255

BUFFER ADDITIVES FOR LIME/LIMESTONE SLURRY SCRUBBING: SULFITE OXIDATION WITH ENHANCED OXYGEN ABSORPTION CATALYZED BY TRANSITION METALS  

EPA Science Inventory

The report gives results of a study of sulfite oxidation, involving the measurement of the rate of enhanced oxygen absorption across an unbroken interface into solution containing sulfite (2-100 mM) and catalyst (0.01-100 mM) at pH 4-6 and 50 C. Fe, Mn, Co, Cu and Cr ions were po...

256

Reactive Oxygen Species Prevent Imiquimod-Induced Psoriatic Dermatitis through Enhancing Regulatory T Cell Function  

PubMed Central

Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease resulting from immune dysregulation. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are important in the prevention of psoriasis. Traditionally, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to be implicated in the progression of inflammatory diseases, including psoriasis, but many recent studies suggested the protective role of ROS in immune-mediated diseases. In particular, severe cases of psoriasis vulgaris have been reported to be successfully treated by hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT), which raises tissue level of ROS. Also it was reported that Treg function was closely associated with ROS level. However, it has been only investigated in lowered levels of ROS so far. Thus, in this study, to clarify the relationship between ROS level and Treg function, as well as their role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, we investigated imiquimod-induced psoriatic dermatitis (PD) in association with Treg function both in elevated and lowered levels of ROS by using knockout mice, such as glutathione peroxidase-1?/? and neutrophil cytosolic factor-1?/? mice, as well as by using HBOT or chemicals, such as 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone and N-acetylcysteine. The results consistently showed Tregs were hyperfunctional in elevated levels of ROS, whereas hypofunctional in lowered levels of ROS. In addition, imiquimod-induced PD was attenuated in elevated levels of ROS, whereas aggravated in lowered levels of ROS. For the molecular mechanism that may link ROS level and Treg function, we investigated the expression of an immunoregulatory enzyme, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) which is induced by ROS, in PD lesions. Taken together, it was implied that appropriately elevated levels of ROS might prevent psoriasis through enhancing IDO expression and Treg function. PMID:24608112

Choi, Eun-Jeong; Hong, Min-Pyo; Kie, Jeong-Hae; Lim, Woosung; Lee, Hyeon Kook; Moon, Byung-In; Seoh, Ju-Young

2014-01-01

257

Enhanced one dimensional mobility of oxygen on strained LaCoO3(001) Jeong Woo Han and Bilge Yildiz*  

E-print Network

Enhanced one dimensional mobility of oxygen on strained LaCoO3(001) surface Jeong Woo Han and Bilge mobility along the [110] direction. The increase of space around Co that the oxygen (vacancy) traverses, the mobility of the adsorbed oxygen atom is suppressed with increasing strain due to its stronger adsorption

Yildiz, Bilge

258

Supersonic Inlet with Pylons Set and Star-Shaped Forebody for Mixing, Combustion and Thrust Enhancement  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Two new approaches are discussed in this paper for application in the Scramjet inlet of an air-breathing propulsion system: 1) In the first approach, the pylon set is installed in the rectangular inlet near the cowl front edge. For a quasi-axisymmetric inlet, a similar set is installed along the Star-shaped forebody axis. This set contains 3 - 4 airfoil-shaped strips or cross-sectional rings depending on the type of inlet. The inlets: rectangular, axisymmetric or star-shaped, are located at different distances from the forebody. Fuel injection takes place through these pylons, which provides for uniform mixing downstream. The locations, sizes and angles of these pylons are very important for efficient application. Optimal values of geometrical parameters were determined from multi-parametric NSE-based numerical simulations of the laminar and turbulent external/internal flows. These simulations have shown significant benefits for mixing, combustion and thrust of the proposed approach by comparison with traditional well-known designs. Experimental tests will be conducted soon at the NASA LaRC and Institute of Mechanics at Moscow State University. Preliminary estimates are very promising.

Gilinsky, M.; Gonor, A. L.; Khaikine, V. A.; Blankson, I. M.

2003-01-01

259

Low oxygen tension enhances the generation of lung progenitor cells from mouse embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells  

PubMed Central

Abstract Whole?organ decellularization technology has emerged as a new alternative for the fabrication of bioartificial lungs. Embryonic stem cells (ESC) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) are potentially useful for recellularization since they can be directed to express phenotypic marker genes of lung epithelial cells. Normal pulmonary development takes place in a low oxygen environment ranging from 1 to 5%. By contrast, in vitro ESC and iPSC differentiation protocols are usually carried out at room?air oxygen tension. Here, we sought to determine the role played by oxygen tension on the derivation of Nkx2.1+ lung/thyroid progenitor cells from mouse ESC and iPSC. A step?wise differentiation protocol was used to generate Nkx2.1+ lung/thyroid progenitors under 20% and 5% oxygen tension. On day 12, gene expression analysis revealed that Nkx2.1 and Foxa2 (endodermal and early lung epithelial cell marker) were significantly upregulated at 5% oxygen tension in ESC and iPSC differentiated cultures compared to 20% oxygen conditions. In addition, quantification of Foxa2+Nkx2.1+Pax8? cells corresponding to the lung field, with exclusion of the potential thyroid fate identified by Pax8 expression, confirmed that the low physiologic oxygen tension exerted a significant positive effect on early pulmonary differentiation of ESC and iPSC. In conclusion, we found that 5% oxygen tension enhanced the derivation of lung progenitors from mouse ESC and iPSC compared to 20% room?air oxygen tension. PMID:25347858

Garreta, Elena; Melo, Esther; Navajas, Daniel; Farré, Ramon

2014-01-01

260

Enhancement of activity of RuSex electrocatalyst by modification with nanostructured iridium towards more efficient reduction of oxygen  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Electrocatalytic activity of carbon (Vulcan XC-72) supported selenium-modified ruthenium, RuSex/C, nanoparticles for reduction of oxygen was enhanced through intentional decoration with iridium nanostructures (dimensions, 2-3 nm). The catalytic materials were characterized in oxygenated 0.5 mol dm-3 H2SO4 using cyclic and rotating ring disk voltammetric techniques as well as using transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy equipped with X-ray dispersive analyzer. Experiments utilizing gas diffusion electrode aimed at mimicking conditions existing in the low-temperature fuel cell. Upon application of our composite catalytic system, the reduction of oxygen proceeded at more positive potentials, and higher current densities were observed when compared to the behavior of the simple iridium-free system (RuSex/C) investigated under the analogous conditions. The enhancement effect was more pronounced than that one would expect from simple superposition of voltammetric responses for the oxygen reduction at RuSex/C and iridium nanostructures studied separately. Nanostructured iridium acted here as an example of a powerful catalyst for the reduction of H2O2 (rather than O2) and, when combined with such a moderate catalyst as ruthenium-selenium (for O2 reduction), it produced an integrated system of increased electrocatalytic activity in the oxygen reduction process. The proposed system retained its activity in the presence of methanol that could appear in a cathode compartment of alcohol fuel cell.

Dembinska, Beata; Kiliszek, Malgorzata; Elzanowska, Hanna; Pisarek, Marcin; Kulesza, Pawel J.

2013-12-01

261

Hydroxyl radical-PLIF measurements and accuracy investigation in high pressure gaseous hydrogen/gaseous oxygen combustion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In-flow species concentration measurements in reacting flows at high pressures are needed both to improve the current understanding of the physical processes taking place and to validate predictive tools that are under development, for application to the design and optimization of a range of power plants from diesel to rocket engines. To date, non intrusive measurements have been based on calibrations determined from assumptions that were not sufficiently quantified to provide a clear understanding of the range of uncertainty associated with these measurements. The purpose of this work is to quantify the uncertainties associated with OH measurement in a oxygen-hydrogen system produced by a shear, coaxial injector typical of those used in rocket engines. Planar OH distributions are obtained providing instantaneous and averaged distribution that are required for both LES and RANS codes currently under development. This study has evaluated the uncertainties associated with OH measurement at 10, 27, 37 and 53 bar respectively. The total rms error for OH-PLIF measurements from eighteen different parameters was quantified and found as 21.9, 22.8, 22.5, and 22.9% at 10, 27, 37 and 53 bar respectively. These results are used by collaborators at Georgia Institute of Technology (LES), Pennsylvania State University (LES), University of Michigan (RANS) and NASA Marshall (RANS).

Vaidyanathan, Aravind

262

Platinum-Based Nanowire Networks with Enhanced Oxygen-Reduction Activity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Pt-Al and Pt-Y-Al thin-film electrodes on yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolytes were prepared by dealloying of cosputtered Pt-Al or Pt-Y-Al films. The selective dissolution of Al from the Pt-alloy compound causes the formation of a highly porous nanowire network with a mean branch thickness below 25 nm and a pore intercept length below 35 nm. The oxygen-reduction capability of the resulting electrodes is analyzed in a micro-solid-oxide fuel-cell setup at elevated temperatures (598-873 K). Here, we demonstrate that these nanoporous thin films excel "state-of-the-art" fuel-cell electrodes in terms of catalytic activity and thermal stability. The nanoporous Pt electrodes exhibit exchange-current densities that are up to 13 times higher than conventional Pt electrodes, measured at 648 K. It is shown that the enhanced intrinsic electrocatalytic activity of these Pt electrodes is achieved by the addition of yttrium as a ternary constituent, which allows for an engineering of the material's band structure.

Galinski, Henning; Ryll, Thomas; Lin, Yang; Scherrer, Barbara; Evans, Anna; Gauckler, Ludwig J.; Döbeli, Max

2014-11-01

263

Oxygen-plasma-modified biomimetic nanofibrous scaffolds for enhanced compatibility of cardiovascular implants  

PubMed Central

Summary Electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds have been extensively used in several biomedical applications for tissue engineering due to their morphological resemblance to the extracellular matrix (ECM). Especially, there is a need for the cardiovascular implants to exhibit a nanostructured surface that mimics the native endothelium in order to promote endothelialization and to reduce the complications of thrombosis and implant failure. Thus, we herein fabricated poly-?-caprolactone (PCL) electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds, to serve as coatings for cardiovascular implants and guide tissue regeneration. Oxygen plasma treatment was applied in order to modify the surface chemistry of the scaffold and its effect on cell attachment and growth was evaluated. The conditions of the surface modification were properly adjusted in order to define those conditions of the treatment that result in surfaces favorable for cell growth, while maintaining morphological integrity and mechanical behavior. Goniometry (contact angle measurements), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements were used to evaluate the morphological and chemical changes induced by the plasma treatment. Moreover, depth-sensing nanoindentation was performed to study the resistance of the plasma-treated scaffolds to plastic deformation. Lastly, the cell studies indicated that all scaffolds were cytocompatible, with the plasma-treated ones expressing a more pronounced cell viability and adhesion. All the above findings demonstrate the great potential of these biomimetic tissue-engineering constructs as efficient coatings for enhanced compatibility of cardiovascular implants. PMID:25671169

Pappa, Anna Maria; Krol, Silke; Kassavetis, Spyros; Konstantinou, Dimitris; Pitsalidis, Charalampos; Tzounis, Lazaros; Pliatsikas, Nikos; Logothetidis, Stergios

2015-01-01

264

Functional Lung MRI in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Comparison of T1 Mapping, Oxygen-Enhanced T1 Mapping and Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Perfusion  

PubMed Central

Purpose Monitoring of regional lung function in interventional COPD trials requires alternative endpoints beyond global parameters such as FEV1. T1 relaxation times of the lung might allow to draw conclusions on tissue composition, blood volume and oxygen fraction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential value of lung Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with native and oxygen-enhanced T1 mapping for the assessment of COPD patients in comparison with contrast enhanced perfusion MRI. Materials and Methods 20 COPD patients (GOLD I-IV) underwent a coronal 2-dimensional inversion recovery snapshot flash sequence (8 slices/lung) at room air and during inhalation of pure oxygen, as well as dynamic contrast-enhanced first-pass perfusion imaging. Regional distribution of T1 at room air (T1), oxygen-induced T1 shortening (?T1) and peak enhancement were rated by 2 chest radiologists in consensus using a semi-quantitative 3-point scale in a zone-based approach. Results Abnormal T1 and ?T1 were highly prevalent in the patient cohort. T1 and ?T1 correlated positively with perfusion abnormalities (r = 0.81 and r = 0.80; p&0.001), and with each other (r = 0.80; p<0.001). In GOLD stages I and II ?T1 was normal in 16/29 lung zones with mildly abnormal perfusion (15/16 with abnormal T1). The extent of T1 (r = 0.45; p<0.05), ?T1 (r = 0.52; p<0.05) and perfusion abnormalities (r = 0.52; p<0.05) showed a moderate correlation with GOLD stage. Conclusion Native and oxygen-enhanced T1 mapping correlated with lung perfusion deficits and severity of COPD. Under the assumption that T1 at room air correlates with the regional pulmonary blood pool and that oxygen-enhanced T1 reflects lung ventilation, both techniques in combination are principally suitable to characterize ventilation-perfusion imbalance. This appears valuable for the assessment of regional lung characteristics in COPD trials without administration of i.v. contrast. PMID:25822195

Jobst, Bertram J.; Triphan, Simon M. F.; Sedlaczek, Oliver; Anjorin, Angela; Kauczor, Hans Ulrich; Biederer, Jürgen; Ley-Zaporozhan, Julia; Ley, Sebastian; Wielpütz, Mark O.

2015-01-01

265

ANALYSIS OF HEXAMINE COMBUSTION  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hexamine was combusted under varying amounts of oxygen in a modified Parr combustion bomb. The products were collected and analyzed by gas chromatography, ion chromatography, ion-selective electrodes, and calorimetric tests. The primary products were nitrogen and carbon dioxide, with small amounts of nitrogen monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, and ammonia. Other possible products such as hydrogen cyanide, dinitrogen monoxide, and carbon monoxide

James R. Merritt; Lorie Herington; S. Bart Jones; Yousry Sayed

1991-01-01

266

The application of profluorescent nitroxides to detect reactive oxygen species derived from combustion-generated particulate matter: Cigarette smoke - A case study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and related free radicals are considered to be key factors underpinning the various adverse health effects associated with exposure to ambient particulate matter. Therefore, measurement of ROS is a crucial factor for assessing the potential toxicity of particles. In this work, a novel profluorescent nitroxide, BPEAnit, was investigated as a probe for detecting particle-derived ROS. BPEAnit has a very low fluorescence emission due to inherent quenching by the nitroxide group, but upon radical trapping or redox activity, a strong fluorescence is observed. BPEAnit was tested for detection of ROS present in mainstream and sidestream cigarette smoke. In the case of mainstream cigarette smoke, there was a linear increase in fluorescence intensity with an increasing number of cigarette puffs, equivalent to an average of 101 nmol ROS per cigarette based on the number of moles of the probe reacted. Sidestream cigarette smoke sampled from an environmental chamber exposed BPEAnit to much lower concentrations of particles, but still resulted in a clearly detectible increase in fluorescence intensity with sampling time. It was calculated that the amount of ROS was equivalent to 50 ± 2 nmol per mg of particulate matter; however, this value decreased with ageing of the particles in the chamber. Overall, BPEAnit was shown to provide a sensitive response related to the oxidative capacity of the particulate matter. These findings present a good basis for employing the new BPEAnit probe for the investigation of particle-related ROS generated from cigarette smoke as well as from other combustion sources.

Miljevic, B.; Fairfull-Smith, K. E.; Bottle, S. E.; Ristovski, Z. D.

2010-06-01

267

Enhanced Oxygen-Tolerance of the Full Heterotrimeric Membrane-Bound [NiFe]-Hydrogenase of Ralstonia eutropha  

PubMed Central

Hydrogenases are oxygen-sensitive enzymes that catalyze the conversion between protons and hydrogen. Water-soluble subcomplexes of membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenases (MBH) have been extensively studied for applications in hydrogen–oxygen fuel cells as they are relatively tolerant to oxygen, although even these catalysts are still inactivated in oxidative conditions. Here, the full heterotrimeric MBH of Ralstonia eutropha, including the membrane-integral cytochrome b subunit, was investigated electrochemically using electrodes modified with planar tethered bilayer lipid membranes (tBLM). Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry experiments show that MBH, in equilibrium with the quinone pool in the tBLM, does not anaerobically inactivate under oxidative redox conditions. In aerobic environments, the MBH is reversibly inactivated by O2, but reactivation was found to be fast even under oxidative redox conditions. This enhanced resistance to inactivation is ascribed to the oligomeric state of MBH in the lipid membrane. PMID:24866391

2014-01-01

268

Enhancement of singlet oxygen production based on FRET between Coumarin tri-compound and CdSe/ZnS QDs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The compatibility between coumarin-derived dendrimer (CdD)-captured silica particles (SiCdDs) and watersoluble CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) in the FRET process improved the excited state of QDs in the reaction of singlet oxygen production under LED irradiation. Sol-gel GA was successfully used to improve the binding between SiCdDs and QDs. Singlet oxygen production using QDs coated with SiCdDs through sol-gel GA was enhanced by about 80 % compared to that achieved using QDs only. The single oxygen produced by the QDs, the QDs/GA-SiCdDs complexes and the SiCdDs/GA-QDs complexes in this study could be used in the treatment of HeLa cells.

Duong, Hong Dinh; Lee, Jee Won; Rhee, Jong Il

2014-08-01

269

Enhanced oxygen-tolerance of the full heterotrimeric membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenase of Ralstonia eutropha.  

PubMed

Hydrogenases are oxygen-sensitive enzymes that catalyze the conversion between protons and hydrogen. Water-soluble subcomplexes of membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenases (MBH) have been extensively studied for applications in hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells as they are relatively tolerant to oxygen, although even these catalysts are still inactivated in oxidative conditions. Here, the full heterotrimeric MBH of Ralstonia eutropha, including the membrane-integral cytochrome b subunit, was investigated electrochemically using electrodes modified with planar tethered bilayer lipid membranes (tBLM). Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry experiments show that MBH, in equilibrium with the quinone pool in the tBLM, does not anaerobically inactivate under oxidative redox conditions. In aerobic environments, the MBH is reversibly inactivated by O2, but reactivation was found to be fast even under oxidative redox conditions. This enhanced resistance to inactivation is ascribed to the oligomeric state of MBH in the lipid membrane. PMID:24866391

Radu, Valentin; Frielingsdorf, Stefan; Evans, Stephen D; Lenz, Oliver; Jeuken, Lars J C

2014-06-18

270

Enhanced reactive oxygen species overexpression by CuO nanoparticles in poorly differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma cells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) are known to exhibit toxic effects on a variety of cell types and organs. To determine the oxidative impact of CuO NPs on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells, well-differentiated (HepG2) and poorly differentiated (SK-Hep-1) cells were exposed to CuO NPs. Cell viability assay showed that the median inhibition concentration (IC50) for SK-Hep-1 and HepG2 cells was 25 ?g ml-1 and 85 ?g ml-1, respectively. Cellular fluorescence intensity using DCFH-DA staining analysis revealed significant intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation of up to 242% in SK-Hep-1 cells, compared with 86% in HepG2 cells. HPLC analysis demonstrated that a CuO NP treatment caused cellular GSH depletion of 58% and a GSH/GSSG ratio decrease to ~0.1 in SK-Hep-1 cells. The oxidative stress caused by enhanced superoxide anion production was observed in both HepG2 (146%) and SK-Hep-1 (192%) cells. The Griess assay verified that CuO NPs induced NO production (170%) in SK-Hep-1 cells. Comet assay and western blot further demonstrated that CuO NPs induced severe DNA strand breakage (70%) in SK-Hep-1 cells and caused DNA damage via increased ?-H2AX levels. These results suggest that well-differentiated HepG2 cells possess a robust antioxidant defense system against CuO NP-induced ROS stress and exhibit more tolerance to oxidative stress. Conversely, poorly differentiated SK-Hep-1 cells exhibited a deregulated antioxidant defense system that allowed accumulation of CuO NP-induced ROS and resulted in severe cytotoxicity.Copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) are known to exhibit toxic effects on a variety of cell types and organs. To determine the oxidative impact of CuO NPs on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells, well-differentiated (HepG2) and poorly differentiated (SK-Hep-1) cells were exposed to CuO NPs. Cell viability assay showed that the median inhibition concentration (IC50) for SK-Hep-1 and HepG2 cells was 25 ?g ml-1 and 85 ?g ml-1, respectively. Cellular fluorescence intensity using DCFH-DA staining analysis revealed significant intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation of up to 242% in SK-Hep-1 cells, compared with 86% in HepG2 cells. HPLC analysis demonstrated that a CuO NP treatment caused cellular GSH depletion of 58% and a GSH/GSSG ratio decrease to ~0.1 in SK-Hep-1 cells. The oxidative stress caused by enhanced superoxide anion production was observed in both HepG2 (146%) and SK-Hep-1 (192%) cells. The Griess assay verified that CuO NPs induced NO production (170%) in SK-Hep-1 cells. Comet assay and western blot further demonstrated that CuO NPs induced severe DNA strand breakage (70%) in SK-Hep-1 cells and caused DNA damage via increased ?-H2AX levels. These results suggest that well-differentiated HepG2 cells possess a robust antioxidant defense system against CuO NP-induced ROS stress and exhibit more tolerance to oxidative stress. Conversely, poorly differentiated SK-Hep-1 cells exhibited a deregulated antioxidant defense system that allowed accumulation of CuO NP-induced ROS and resulted in severe cytotoxicity. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr05843g

Kung, Mei-Lang; Hsieh, Shu-Ling; Wu, Chih-Chung; Chu, Tian-Huei; Lin, Yu-Chun; Yeh, Bi-Wen; Hsieh, Shuchen

2015-01-01

271

Enhanced singlet oxygen production by photodynamic therapy and a novel method for its intracellular measurement.  

PubMed

The generation of singlet oxygen (SO) in the presence of specific photosensitizers (PSs) or semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and its application in photodynamic therapy (PDT) is of great interest to develop cancer therapies with no need of surgery, chemotherapy, and/or radiotherapy. This work was focused on the identification of the main factors leading to the enhancement of SO production using Rose Bengal (RB), and Methylene Blue (MB) as PS species in organic and aqueous mediums. Subsequently, the capacity of zinc oxide (ZnO), zinc sulfide (ZnS), and ZnO/ZnS core-shell QDs as well as manganese (Mn(+2)) doped ZnO and ZnS nanoparticles (NPs) as potential PS was also investigated. Many variable parameters such as type of quencher, PSs, NPs, as well as its different concentrations, light source, excitation wavelength, reaction time, distance from light source, and nature of solvent were used. The degradation kinetics of the quenchers generated by SO species and the corresponding quantum yields were determined by monitoring the photo-oxidation of the chemical quencher and measuring its disappearance by fluorometry and spectrophotometry in the presence of NPs. Small intracellular changes of SO induced by these metal Zn (zinc) NPs and PDT could execute and accelerate deadly programs in these leukemic cells, providing in this way an innovative modality of treatment. In order to perform further more specific in vitro cytotoxic studies on B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells exposed to Zn NPs and PDT, we needed first to measure and ascertain those possible intracellular SO variations generated by this type of treatment; for this purpose, we have also developed and tested a novel method first described by us. PMID:25490599

Pena Luengas, Sandra L; Marin, Gustavo Horacio; Aviles, Kevin; Cruz Acuña, Ricardo; Roque, Gustavo; Rodríguez Nieto, Felipe; Sanchez, Francisco; Tarditi, Adrián; Rivera, Luis; Mansilla, Eduardo

2014-12-01

272

Enhanced reactive oxygen species overexpression by CuO nanoparticles in poorly differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma cells.  

PubMed

Copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) are known to exhibit toxic effects on a variety of cell types and organs. To determine the oxidative impact of CuO NPs on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells, well-differentiated (HepG2) and poorly differentiated (SK-Hep-1) cells were exposed to CuO NPs. Cell viability assay showed that the median inhibition concentration (IC50) for SK-Hep-1 and HepG2 cells was 25 ?g ml(-1) and 85 ?g ml(-1), respectively. Cellular fluorescence intensity using DCFH-DA staining analysis revealed significant intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation of up to 242% in SK-Hep-1 cells, compared with 86% in HepG2 cells. HPLC analysis demonstrated that a CuO NP treatment caused cellular GSH depletion of 58% and a GSH/GSSG ratio decrease to ?0.1 in SK-Hep-1 cells. The oxidative stress caused by enhanced superoxide anion production was observed in both HepG2 (146%) and SK-Hep-1 (192%) cells. The Griess assay verified that CuO NPs induced NO production (170%) in SK-Hep-1 cells. Comet assay and western blot further demonstrated that CuO NPs induced severe DNA strand breakage (70%) in SK-Hep-1 cells and caused DNA damage via increased ?-H2AX levels. These results suggest that well-differentiated HepG2 cells possess a robust antioxidant defense system against CuO NP-induced ROS stress and exhibit more tolerance to oxidative stress. Conversely, poorly differentiated SK-Hep-1 cells exhibited a deregulated antioxidant defense system that allowed accumulation of CuO NP-induced ROS and resulted in severe cytotoxicity. PMID:25521936

Kung, Mei-Lang; Hsieh, Shu-Ling; Wu, Chih-Chung; Chu, Tian-Huei; Lin, Yu-Chun; Yeh, Bi-Wen; Hsieh, Shuchen

2015-02-01

273

Reversed flow fluidized-bed combustion apparatus  

DOEpatents

The present invention is directed to a fluidized-bed combustion apparatus provided with a U-shaped combustion zone. A cyclone is disposed in the combustion zone for recycling solid particulate material. The combustion zone configuration and the recycling feature provide relatively long residence times and low freeboard heights to maximize combustion of combustible material, reduce nitrogen oxides, and enhance sulfur oxide reduction.

Shang, Jer-Yu (Fairfax, VA); Mei, Joseph S. (Morgantown, WV); Wilson, John S. (Morgantown, WV)

1984-01-01

274

Effects of EGR, water/N2/CO2 injection and oxygen enrichment on the availability destroyed due to combustion for a range of conditions and fuels  

E-print Network

combustion of iso octane.................................................................................................... 24 3 Percentage availability destroyed for different ?Cooled? EGR fractions as a function of reactant temperature for constant... volume combustion of iso octane, reactant pressure of 500 kPa......................................................... 24 4 Product temperature for different ?Cooled? EGR fractions as a function of reactant temperature for constant pressure combustion...

Sivadas, Hari Shanker

2009-06-02

275

Responses to Oxygen Deprivation and Potential for Enhanced Flooding Tolerance in Maize  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Although plants release oxygen as a byproduct during the process of photosynthesis, they are obligatory aerobes requiring the gas for their survival, growth and productivity. Oxygen limitation, the predominant stress in flooded plants, dramatically affects the gene expression, development and produc...

276

Enhanced Spatial Localization of Neuronal Activation Using Simultaneous Apparent-Diffusion-Coefficient and Blood-Oxygenation  

E-print Network

-Diffusion-Coefficient and Blood-Oxygenation Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Allen W. Song, Marty G. Woldorff, StaceyMRI) can detect blood oxygen- ation level dependent (BOLD) hemodynamic re- sponses secondary to local based on the differences in the mobility of the blood within them, thereby revealing the contributions

277

Hyperbaric oxygenation enhances transplanted cell graft and functional recovery in the infarct heart  

Microsoft Academic Search

A major limitation to the application of stem-cell therapy to repair ischemic heart damage is the low survival of transplanted cells in the heart, possibly due to poor oxygenation. We hypothesized that hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO) can be used as an adjuvant treatment to augment stem-cell therapy. Therefore, the goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of HBO on

Mahmood Khan; Sarath Meduru; Iyyapu K. Mohan; M. Lakshmi Kuppusamy; Sheik Wisel; Aditi Kulkarni; Brian K. Rivera; Robert L. Hamlin; Periannan Kuppusamy

2009-01-01

278

Photogenerated charge carriers and reactive oxygen species in ZnO/Au hybrid nanostructures with enhanced photocatalytic and antibacterial activity.  

PubMed

Semiconductor nanostructures with photocatalytic activity have the potential for many applications including remediation of environmental pollutants and use in antibacterial products. An effective way for promoting photocatalytic activity is depositing noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) on a semiconductor. In this paper, we demonstrated the successful deposition of Au NPs, having sizes smaller than 3 nm, onto ZnO NPs. ZnO/Au hybrid nanostructures having different molar ratios of Au to ZnO were synthesized. It was found that Au nanocomponents even at a very low Au/ZnO molar ratio of 0.2% can greatly enhance the photocatalytic and antibacterial activity of ZnO. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy with spin trapping and spin labeling was used to investigate the enhancing effect of Au NPs on the generation of reactive oxygen species and photoinduced charge carriers. Deposition of Au NPs onto ZnO resulted in a dramatic increase in light-induced generation of hydroxyl radical, superoxide and singlet oxygen, and production of holes and electrons. The enhancing effect of Au was dependent on the molar ratio of Au present in the ZnO/Au nanostructures. Consistent with these results from ESR measurements, ZnO/Au nanostructures also exhibited enhanced photocatalytic and antibacterial activity. These results unveiled the enhanced mechanism of Au on ZnO and these materials have great potential for use in water purification and antibacterial products. PMID:24354568

He, Weiwei; Kim, Hyun-Kyung; Wamer, Wayne G; Melka, David; Callahan, John H; Yin, Jun-Jie

2014-01-15

279

Enhancement of aerobic biodegradation in an oxygen-limiting environment using a saponin-based microbubble suspension.  

PubMed

This study investigated the ability of a saponin-based microbubble suspension to enhance aerobic biodegradation of phenanthrene by subsurface delivery. As the microbubble suspension flowed through a sand column pressure buildup and release was repeatedly observed, which delivered oxygen to the less permeable regions. Burkholderia cepacia RPH1, a phenanthrene-degrading bacterium, was mainly transported in a suspended form in the microbubble suspension. When three pore volumes of the microbubble suspension containing B. cepacia RPH1 was introduced into a column contaminated with phenanthrene (100 mg/kg), the oxygen content declined to 5% from an initial value of 20% within 5 days and correspondingly, 34.4% of initial phenanthrene was removed in 8 days. The addition of two further three pore volumes enhanced the biodegradation efficiency by a factor of 2.2. Our data suggest that a saponin-based microbubble suspension could be a potential carrier for enhancing the aerobic biodegradation under an oxygen-limiting environment. PMID:19427721

Choi, Yong Ju; Kim, Young-Jin; Nam, Kyoungphile

2009-01-01

280

Prospects for Enhancing Carbon Sequestration and Reclamation of Degraded Lands with Fossil-fuel Combustion By-products.  

SciTech Connect

Concern for the potential global change consequences of increasing atmospheric CO2 has prompted interest in the development of mechanisms to reduce or stabilize atmospheric CO2 .During the next several decades, a program focused on terrestrial sequestration processes could make a significant contribution to abating CO2 increases.The reclamation of degraded lands, such as mine-spoil sites, highway rights-of-way, and poorly managed lands, represents an opportunity to couple C sequestration with the use of fossil-fuel and energy by-products and other waste material, such as biosolids and organic wastes from human and animal sewage treatment facilities, to improve soil quality. Degraded lands are often characterized by acidic pH, low levels of key nutrients, poor soil structure, and limited moisture-retention capacity.Much is known about the methods to improve these soils, but the cost of implementation is often a limiting factor.However, the additional financial and environmental benefit s of C sequestration may change the economics of land reclamation activities.The addition of energy-related by-products can address the adverse conditions of these degraded lands through a variety of mechanisms, such as enhancing plant growth and capturing of organic C in long-lived soil C pools.This review examines the use of fossil-fuel combustion by-products and organic amendments to enhance C sequestration and identifies the key gaps in information that still must be addressed before these methods can be implemented on an environmentally meaningful scale.

Palumbo, A V.; Mccarthy, John F.; Amonette, James E.; Fisher, L S.; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Daniels, William L.

2004-03-01

281

Hydrogen-Enhanced Lunar Oxygen Extraction and Storage Using Only Solar Power  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The innovation consists of a thermodynamic system for extracting in situ oxygen vapor from lunar regolith using a solar photovoltaic power source in a reactor, a method for thermally insulating the reactor, a method for protecting the reactor internal components from oxidation by the extracted oxygen, a method for removing unwanted chemical species produced in the reactor from the oxygen vapor, a method for passively storing the oxygen, and a method for releasing high-purity oxygen from storage for lunar use. Lunar oxygen exists in various types of minerals, mostly silicates. The energy required to extract the oxygen from the minerals is 30 to 60 MJ/kg O. Using simple heating, the extraction rate depends on temperature. The minimum temperature is approximately 2,500 K, which is at the upper end of available oven temperatures. The oxygen is released from storage in a purified state, as needed, especially if for human consumption. This method extracts oxygen from regolith by treating the problem as a closed batch cycle system. The innovation works equally well in Earth or Lunar gravity fields, at low partial pressure of oxygen, and makes use of in situ regolith for system insulation. The innovation extracts oxygen from lunar regolith using a method similar to vacuum pyrolysis, but with hydrogen cover gas added stoichiometrically to react with the oxygen as it is produced by radiatively heating regolith to 2,500 K. The hydrogen flows over and through the heating element (HE), protecting it from released oxygen. The H2 O2 heat of reaction is regeneratively recovered to assist the heating process. Lunar regolith is loaded into a large-diameter, low-height pancake reactor powered by photovoltaic cells. The reactor lid contains a 2,500 K HE that radiates downward onto the regolith to heat it and extract oxygen, and is shielded above by a multi-layer tungsten radiation shield. Hydrogen cover gas percolates through the perforated tungsten shielding and HE, preventing oxidation of the shielding and HE, and reacting with the oxygen to form water vapor. The water vapor is filtered through solid regolith to remove unwanted extraction byproducts, and then condensed to a liquid state and stored at 300 to 325 K. Conversion to usable oxygen is achieved by pumping liquid water into a high-pressure electrolyzer, storing the gaseous oxygen at high pressure for use, and diverting the hydrogen back to the reactor or to storage. The results from this design effort show that this oxygen-generating concept can be developed in an efficient system with low specific mass. Advantages include use of regolith as an oxygen source, filter, and thermal insulator. The system can be tested in Earth gravity and can be expected to operate similarly in lunar gravity. The system is scalable, either by increasing the power level and output of a standard module, or by employing multiple modules.

Burton, rodney; King, Darren

2013-01-01

282

Enhanced electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction based on pattering of platinum surfaces with cyanide.  

SciTech Connect

The slow rate of the oxygen reduction reaction in the phosphoric acid fuel cell is the main factor limiting its wide application. Here, we present an approach that can be used for the rational design of cathode catalysts with potential use in phosphoric acid fuel cells, or in any environments containing strongly adsorbing tetrahedral anions. This approach is based on molecular patterning of platinum surfaces with cyanide adsorbates that can efficiently block the sites for adsorption of spectator anions while the oxygen reduction reaction proceeds unhindered. We also demonstrate that, depending on the supporting electrolyte anions and cations, on the same CN-covered Pt(111) surface, the oxygen reduction reaction activities can range from a 25-fold increase to a 50-fold decrease. This behaviour is discussed in the light of the role of covalent and non-covalent interactions in controlling the ensemble of platinum active sites required for high turn over rates of the oxygen reduction reaction.

Strmcnik, D.; Escudero-Escribano, M.; Kodama, K.; Stamenkovic, V. R.; Cuesta, A.; Markovic, N. M.; Materials Science Division; Inst. de Quimica Fisica; Toyota Central R& D Labs., Inc.

2010-08-15

283

Enhanced electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction based on patterning of platinum surfaces with cyanide  

SciTech Connect

The slow rate of the oxygen reduction reaction in the phosphoric acid fuel cell is the main factor limiting its wide application. Here, we present an approach that can be used for the rational design of cathode catalysts with potential use in phosphoric acid fuel cells, or in any environments containing strongly adsorbing tetrahedral anions. This approach is based on molecular patterning of platinum surfaces with cyanide adsorbates that can efficiently block the sites for adsorption of spectator anions while the oxygen reduction reaction proceeds unhindered. We also demonstrate that, depending on the supporting electrolyte anions and cations, on the same CN-covered Pt(111) surface, the oxygen reduction reaction activities can range from a 25-fold increase to a 50-fold decrease. This behaviour is discussed in the light of the role of covalent and non-covalent interactions in controlling the ensemble of platinum active sites required for high turn over rates of the oxygen reduction reaction.

Strmcnik, D.; Escudero, M.; Kodama, K.; Stamenkovic, V. R.; Cuesta, A.; Markovic, N. M. (Materials Science Division); (Inst. de Quimica Fisica); (Toyota Central R& D Labs.)

2010-10-01

284

Enhanced electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction based on patterning of platinum surfaces with cyanide.  

PubMed

The slow rate of the oxygen reduction reaction in the phosphoric acid fuel cell is the main factor limiting its wide application. Here, we present an approach that can be used for the rational design of cathode catalysts with potential use in phosphoric acid fuel cells, or in any environments containing strongly adsorbing tetrahedral anions. This approach is based on molecular patterning of platinum surfaces with cyanide adsorbates that can efficiently block the sites for adsorption of spectator anions while the oxygen reduction reaction proceeds unhindered. We also demonstrate that, depending on the supporting electrolyte anions and cations, on the same CN-covered Pt(111) surface, the oxygen reduction reaction activities can range from a 25-fold increase to a 50-fold decrease. This behaviour is discussed in the light of the role of covalent and non-covalent interactions in controlling the ensemble of platinum active sites required for high turn over rates of the oxygen reduction reaction. PMID:20861905

Strmcnik, Dusan; Escudero-Escribano, María; Kodama, Kensaku; Stamenkovic, Vojislav R; Cuesta, Angel; Markovi?, Nenad M

2010-10-01

285

ENHANCED BIOREMEDIATION UTILIZING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE AS A SUPPLEMENTAL SOURCE OF OXYGEN: A LABORATORY AND FIELD STUDY  

EPA Science Inventory

Laboratory and field scale studies were conducted to investigate the feasibility of using hydrogen peroxide as a supplemental source of oxygen for bioremediation of an aviation gasoline fuel spill. Field samples of aviation gasoline contaminated aquifer material were artificially...

286

Turbulent combustion  

SciTech Connect

Turbulent combustion is the dominant process in heat and power generating systems. Its most significant aspect is to enhance the burning rate and volumetric power density. Turbulent mixing, however, also influences the chemical rates and has a direct effect on the formation of pollutants, flame ignition and extinction. Therefore, research and development of modern combustion systems for power generation, waste incineration and material synthesis must rely on a fundamental understanding of the physical effect of turbulence on combustion to develop theoretical models that can be used as design tools. The overall objective of this program is to investigate, primarily experimentally, the interaction and coupling between turbulence and combustion. These processes are complex and are characterized by scalar and velocity fluctuations with time and length scales spanning several orders of magnitude. They are also influenced by the so-called {open_quotes}field{close_quotes} effects associated with the characteristics of the flow and burner geometries. The authors` approach is to gain a fundamental understanding by investigating idealized laboratory flames. Laboratory flames are amenable to detailed interrogation by laser diagnostics and their flow geometries are chosen to simplify numerical modeling and simulations and to facilitate comparison between experiments and theory.

Talbot, L.; Cheng, R.K. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

1993-12-01

287

Giant enhancement of oxygen mobility in high-Tc superconductors by atomic substitution  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most high-Tc superconductors require loading or unloading of oxygen after synthesis, in order to maximise the transition temperature, Tc. The rate of oxygen diffusion in dense, bulk material, is so slow as to be prohibitive, or at best calls for a lengthy manufacturing process. We report here that by a variety of aliovalent atomic substitutions in YBa2Cu3O7-delta, the rate of

J. L. Tallon; D. M. Pooke; M. P. Staines; M. E. Bowden; N. E. Flower; R. G. Buckley; M. R. Presland; R. L. Davis

1990-01-01

288

Field-scale investigation of enhanced petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation in the vadose zone combining soil venting as an oxygen source with moisture and nutrient addition. Appendices. Doctoral thesis  

SciTech Connect

This document contains appendices regarding a reprint on a field scale investigation of enhanced petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation in the vadose zone combining soil venting as a oxygen source with moisture and nutrient addition.

Miller, R.N.

1990-01-01

289

Thermogravimetric studies of systems pertinent to the in-situ combustion process for enhanced oil recovery. Part 1. Development of a high-pressure thermobalance  

Microsoft Academic Search

A high-pressure (0–1000 psig) thermobalance experiment has been developed in order to obtain thermogravimetric (TG) and derivative thermogravimetry data (DTG) pertinent to the in-situ combustion process for enhanced oil recovery. Studies on the pressured thermo-oxidative behaviour of 20\\/80 (W\\/W) oil\\/sand and coked sand samples are reported.In the case of the oil\\/sand sample under a 100 psig non-oxidising atmosphere, distillation\\/evaporation occurred

S. Indrijarso; J. S. Oklany; A. Millington; D. Price; R. Hughes

1996-01-01

290

An analysis of combustion studies in shock expansion tunnels and reflected shock tunnels  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The effect of initial nonequilibrium dissociated air constituents on the combustion of hydrogen in high-speed flows for a simulated Mach 17 flight condition was investigated by analyzing the results of comparative combustion experiments performed in a reflected shock tunnel test gas and in a shock expansion tunnel test gas. The results were analyzed and interpreted with a one-dimensional quasi-three-stream combustor code that includes finite rate combustion chemistry. The results of this study indicate that the combustion process is kinetically controlled in the experiments in both tunnels and the presence of the nonequilibrium partially dissociated oxygen in the reflected shock tunnel enhances the combustion. Methods of compensating for the effect of dissociated oxygen are discussed.

Jachimowski, Casimir J.

1992-01-01

291

Using fluorochemical as oxygen carrier to enhance the growth of marine microalga Nannochloropsis oculata.  

PubMed

The commercial value of marine Nannochloropsis oculata has been recognized due to its high content of eicosapentaenoic acid (>50% w/w). To make it as a profitable bioresource, one of the most desirable goals is to develop a quality-controlled, cost-effective, and large-scale photobioreactor for N. oculata growth. Generally, closed culture system can offer many advantages over open system such as small space requirement, controllable process and low risk of contamination. However, oxygen accumulation is often a detrimental factor for enclosed microalgal culture that has seriously hampered the development of microalga-related industries. In this study, we proposed to use fluorochemical as oxygen carrier to overcome the challenge where four liquid fluorochemicals namely perfluorooctyl bromide, perfluorodecalin, methoxynonafluorobutane, and ethoxynonafluorobutane were investigated separately. Our results showed that the microalgal proliferation with different fluorinated liquids was similar and comparable to the culture without a fluorochemical. When cultured in the photobioreactor with 60% oxygen atmosphere, the N. oculata can grow up in all the fluorochemical photobioreactors, but completely inhibited in the chamber without a fluorochemical. Moreover, the perfluorooctyl bromide system exhibited the most robust efficacy of oxygen removal in the culture media (perfluorooctyl bromide > perfluorodecalin > methoxynonafluorobutane > ethoxynonafluorobutane), and yielded a >3-fold increase of biomass production after 5 days. In summary, the developed fluorochemical photobioreactors offer a feasible means for N. oculata growth in closed and large-scale setting without effect of oxygen inhibition. PMID:23178985

Lee, Yu-Hsiang; Yeh, Yu-Ling; Lin, Keng-Hsien; Hsu, Yu-Chih

2013-08-01

292

UNDERGROUNG PLACEMENT OF COAL PROCESSING WASTE AND COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS BASED PASTE BACKFILL FOR ENHANCED MINING ECONOMICS  

SciTech Connect

This project has successfully demonstrated that the extraction ratio in a room-and-pillar panel at an Illinois mine can be increased from the current value of approximately 56% to about 64%, with backfilling done from the surface upon completion of all mining activities. This was achieved without significant ground control problems due to the increased extraction ratio. The mined-out areas were backfilled from the surface with gob, coal combustion by-products (CCBs), and fine coal processing waste (FCPW)-based paste backfill containing 65%-70% solids to minimize short-term and long-term surface deformations risk. This concept has the potential to increase mine productivity, reduce mining costs, manage large volumes of CCBs beneficially, and improve the miner's health, safety, and environment. Two injection holes were drilled over the demonstration panel to inject the paste backfill. Backfilling was started on August 11, 1999 through the first borehole. About 9,293 tons of paste backfill were injected through this borehole with a maximum flow distance of 300-ft underground. On September 27, 2000, backfilling operation was resumed through the second borehole with a mixture of F ash and FBC ash. A high-speed auger mixer (new technology) was used to mix solids with water. About 6,000 tons of paste backfill were injected underground through this hole. Underground backfilling using the ''Groutnet'' flow model was simulated. Studies indicate that grout flow over 300-foot distance is possible. Approximately 13,000 tons of grout may be pumped through a single hole. The effect of backfilling on the stability of the mine workings was analyzed using SIUPANEL.3D computer program and further verified using finite element analysis techniques. Stiffness of the backfill mix is most critical for enhancing the stability of mine workings. Mine openings do not have to be completely backfilled to enhance their stability. Backfill height of about 50% of the seam height is adequate to minimize surface deformations. Freeman United Coal Company performed engineering economic evaluation studies for commercialization. They found that the costs for underground management at the Crown III mine would be slightly higher than surface management at this time. The developed technologies have commercial potential but each site must be analyzed on its merit. The Company maintains significant interest in commercializing the technology.

Y.P. Chugh; D. Biswas; D. Deb

2002-06-01

293

Oxygen plasma immersion ion implantation treatment to enhance data retention of tungsten nanocrystal nonvolatile memory  

SciTech Connect

Data retention characteristics of tungsten nanocrystal (W-NC) memory devices using an oxygen plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) treatment are investigated. With an increase of oxygen PIII bias voltage and treatment time, the capacitance–voltage hysteresis memory window is increased but the data retention characteristics become degraded. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy images show that this poor data retention is a result of plasma damage on the tunneling oxide layer, which can be prevented by lowering the bias voltage to 7?kV. In addition, by using the elevated temperature retention measurement technique, the effective charge trapping level of the WO{sub 3} film surrounding the W-NCs can be extracted. This measurement reveals that a higher oxygen PIII bias voltage and treatment time induces more shallow traps within the WO{sub 3} film, degrading the retention behavior of the W-NC memory.

Wang, Jer-Chyi, E-mail: jcwang@mail.cgu.edu.tw; Chang, Wei-Cheng; Lai, Chao-Sung, E-mail: cslai@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Electronic Engineering, Chang Gung University, Kweishan 333, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chang, Li-Chun [Department of Material Engineering and Center for Thin Film Technologies and Applications, Ming Chi University of Technology, Taishan 24301, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Ai, Chi-Fong; Tsai, Wen-Fa [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Atomic Energy Council, Longtan 325, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)

2014-03-15

294

Creatine supplementation enhances corticomotor excitability and cognitive performance during oxygen deprivation.  

PubMed

Impairment or interruption of oxygen supply compromises brain function and plays a role in neurological and neurodegenerative conditions. Creatine is a naturally occurring compound involved in the buffering, transport, and regulation of cellular energy, with the potential to replenish cellular adenosine triphosphate without oxygen. Creatine is also neuroprotective in vitro against anoxic/hypoxic damage. Dietary creatine supplementation has been associated with improved symptoms in neurological disorders defined by impaired neural energy provision. Here we investigate, for the first time in humans, the utility of creatine as a dietary supplement to protect against energetic insult. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of oral creatine supplementation on the neurophysiological and neuropsychological function of healthy young adults during acute oxygen deprivation. Fifteen healthy adults were supplemented with creatine and placebo treatments for 7 d, which increased brain creatine on average by 9.2%. A hypoxic gas mixture (10% oxygen) was administered for 90 min, causing global oxygen deficit and impairing a range of neuropsychological processes. Hypoxia-induced decrements in cognitive performance, specifically attentional capacity, were restored when participants were creatine supplemented, and corticomotor excitability increased. A neuromodulatory effect of creatine via increased energy availability is presumed to be a contributing factor of the restoration, perhaps by supporting the maintenance of appropriate neuronal membrane potentials. Dietary creatine monohydrate supplementation augments neural creatine, increases corticomotor excitability, and prevents the decline in attention that occurs during severe oxygen deficit. This is the first demonstration of creatine's utility as a neuroprotective supplement when cellular energy provision is compromised. PMID:25632150

Turner, Clare E; Byblow, Winston D; Gant, Nicholas

2015-01-28

295

Combustion of solid waste in a pulse incinerator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study investigated the effects of pulsations on the combustion of simulated solid waste at high Reynolds numbers in an incinerator fed with cold or preheated combustion air. Corrugated cardboard and charcoal were chosen as waste surrogates. Combustion times and emissions of CO2, CO and NOx were measured while the samples were burned under different experimental conditions. Pulsations significantly reduced flaming combustion times in tests with and without preheated. Most of this enhancement resulted from increased heat transfer rate due to a closer attachment of the gas flame to the solid sample. Pulsations also reduced smoldering combustion time. This was caused by faster transport of oxygen to and combustion products from the sample surface. Furthermore, the smoldering combustion rate increased with increasing Sound Pressure Levels. While this effect was the strongest in laminar flows, pulsations doubled combustion rates even in a highly turbulent flow where Re = 47,000. Higher combustion rates at elevated Reynolds numbers in steady tests were caused by larger turbulent velocity fluctuations. Combustion rates were further enhanced by the addition of acoustic velocity fluctuations, which dominated the process if they were much larger than the turbulent velocity fluctuations. Below this limit, acoustic modes with velocities normal to the main flow enhanced the combustion process more significantly than those parallel to the flow. Most of this enhancement by pulsations resulted from increased species transport due to faster removal of ash layers on the burning surface by acoustic shear. Acoustic streaming was not responsible for the observed, enhanced combustion rates. Instantaneous pollutant emissions were much higher with pulsations than without. However, pulsations did not affect total amount of carbon converted into gaseous products from the sample but favored more complete combustion, i.e., less total CO emission. This was caused by a larger fraction of the sample being burned by gas flame with pulsations. Total NOx emissions, on the other hand, were not affected by pulsations during smoldering but increased during flaming combustion. The later was caused by higher thermal NO x emission with pulsations.

Kan, Tie

296

Enhanced Adhesion of Campylobacter jejuni to Abiotic Surfaces Is Mediated by Membrane Proteins in Oxygen-Enriched Conditions  

PubMed Central

Campylobacter jejuni is responsible for the major foodborne bacterial enteritis in humans. In contradiction with its fastidious growth requirements, this microaerobic pathogen can survive in aerobic food environments, suggesting that it must employ a variety of protection mechanisms to resist oxidative stress. For the first time, C. jejuni 81–176 inner and outer membrane subproteomes were analyzed separately using two-dimensional protein electrophoresis (2-DE) of oxygen-acclimated cells and microaerobically grown cells. LC-MS/MS analyses successfully identified 42 and 25 spots which exhibited a significantly altered abundance in the IMP-enriched fraction and in the OMP-enriched fraction, respectively, in response to oxidative conditions. These spots corresponded to 38 membrane proteins that could be grouped into different functional classes: (i) transporters, (ii) chaperones, (iii) fatty acid metabolism, (iv) adhesion/virulence and (v) other metabolisms. Some of these proteins were up-regulated at the transcriptional level in oxygen-acclimated cells as confirmed by qRT-PCR. Downstream analyses revealed that adhesion of C. jejuni to inert surfaces and swarming motility were enhanced in oxygen-acclimated cells or paraquat-stressed cells, which could be explained by the higher abundance of membrane proteins involved in adhesion and biofilm formation. The virulence factor CadF, over-expressed in the outer membrane of oxygen-acclimated cells, contributes to the complex process of C. jejuni adhesion to inert surfaces as revealed by a reduction in the capability of C. jejuni 81–176 ?CadF cells compared to the isogenic strain. Taken together, these data demonstrate that oxygen-enriched conditions promote the over-expression of membrane proteins involved in both the biofilm initiation and virulence of C. jejuni. PMID:23029510

Sulaeman, Sheiam; Hernould, Mathieu; Schaumann, Annick; Coquet, Laurent; Bolla, Jean-Michel; Dé, Emmanuelle; Tresse, Odile

2012-01-01

297

Enhanced Oxygen Delivery Reverses Anaerobic Metabolic States in Prolonged Sandwich Rat Hepatocyte Culture  

Microsoft Academic Search

It must be assumed that current petri dish primary hepatocyte culture models do not supply sufficient amounts of oxygen and thus cause anaerobic metabolism of the cells. This is contrary to the physiologic state of the cells.In vivothe liver is a highly vascularized organ with a rather high blood flow rate of a mixture of arterial and venous blood. The

A. Bader; N. Frühauf; M. Tiedge; M. Drinkgern; L. De Bartolo; J. T. Borlak; G. Steinhoff; A. Haverich

1999-01-01

298

Structural features and enhanced high-temperature oxygen ion transport in SrFe{sub 1-x}Ta{sub x}O{sub 3-{delta}}  

SciTech Connect

Structural features, oxygen non-stoichiometry and transport properties are studied in the oxide series SrFe{sub 1-x}Ta{sub x}O{sub 3-{delta}}, where x=0.2, 0.3 and 0.4. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy data evidence formation of the inhomogeneous materials at x=0.3 and 0.4, which include phase constituents with a cubic perovskite and a double perovskite structure types. The composition, the amount and the typical grain size of the phase inhomogeneities are shown to depend both on doping and oxygen content. The increased oxygen-ion conductivity is observed in oxygen depleted materials, which is explained by the increase in the amount of cubic perovskite-like phase and development of interfacial pathways favorable for enhanced oxygen ion transport. - Graphical abstract: The structural studies, oxygen content and conductivity measurements suggest that oxygen depletion from the double perovskite phase constituent of SrFe{sub 1-x}Ta{sub x}O{sub 3-{delta}} for x>0.2 is accompanied by formation of pathways for fast ion transport. Black-Small-Square Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The double perovskite type regions are shown to exist in SrFe{sub 1-x}Ta{sub x}O{sub 3-{delta}}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The oxygen depletion is accompanied with phase separation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The phase separation favors formation of pathways for enhanced oxygen ion transport.

Markov, Alexey A.; Shalaeva, Elizaveta V.; Tyutyunnik, Alexander P.; Kuchin, Vasily V. [Institute of Solid State Chemistry of Ural Branch of RAS, 91 Pervomaiskaya Str., 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Patrakeev, Mikhail V., E-mail: patrakeev@ihim.uran.ru [Institute of Solid State Chemistry of Ural Branch of RAS, 91 Pervomaiskaya Str., 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Leonidov, Ilya A.; Kozhevnikov, Victor L. [Institute of Solid State Chemistry of Ural Branch of RAS, 91 Pervomaiskaya Str., 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

2013-01-15

299

Internal Combustion Engine Flows  

Microsoft Academic Search

An automobile engine's performance can be enhanced by a more complete combustion reaction which results in less fuel consumption and lower emissions. The combustion improvement can be accomplished through an increase in turbulence from tumble flow, a circulatory motion inside the cylinder. In previous research, this increase is created by changing the intake ports on the engine so the flow

Amy McCleney; Paul Puzinauskas; Kendrick Gibson

2009-01-01

300

Lipocalin-2 enhances angiogenesis in rat brain endothelial cells via reactive oxygen species and iron-dependent mechanisms.  

PubMed

Inflammation is a key part of central nervous system pathophysiology. However, inflammatory factors are now thought to have both beneficial and deleterious effects. Here, we examine the hypothesis that lipocalin-2 (LCN2), an inflammatory molecule that can be up-regulated in the distressed central nervous system, may enhance angiogenesis in brain endothelial cells. Adding LCN2 (0.5-2.0 ?g/mL) to RBE (Rat brain endothelial cells). 4 rat brain endothelial cells significantly increased matrigel tube formation and scratch migration, and also elevated levels of iron and reactive oxygen species. Co-treatment with a radical scavenger (U83836E), a Nox inhibitor (apocynin) and an iron chelating agent (deferiprone) significantly dampened the ability of LCN2 to enhance tube formation and scratch migration in brain endothelial cells. These findings provide in vitro proof of the concept that LCN2 can promote angiogenesis via iron- and reactive oxygen species-related pathways, and support the idea that LCN2 may contribute to the neurovascular recovery aspects of inflammation. Angiogenesis is an important part of stroke recovery. In the present study, we examined the hypothesis that lipocalin-2 (LCN2) may enhance angiogenesis in brain endothelial cells. LCN2 promoted tube formation and migration via iron and ROS-related pathways in rat brain endothelial cells. ROS scavengers, Nox inhibitors and iron chelators all dampened the ability of LCN2 to enhance in vitro angiogenesis. These findings support the idea that LCN2 that is released by damaged neurons may act as a 'help me' signal that promotes neurovascular recovery after stroke and brain injury. PMID:25557118

Wu, Limin; Du, Yang; Lok, Josephine; Lo, Eng H; Xing, Changhong

2015-03-01

301

The role of subsurface oxygen in the selectivity enhancement of ethylene epoxidation on Ag-Cu Catalysts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The role of subsurface oxygen on the Ag-Cu alloy catalysts for the ethylene epoxidation reaction has been studied by means of first principles Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. We find that in presence of oxygen and ethylene reactants, the subsurface oxygen adsorption is energetically favorable on fcc sites under the thin oxide-like CuO layer formed at the catalyst surface. On this substrate the reaction proceeds via the formation of a common oxametallacycle precursor. The calculated activation energies show favorable energetics for the pathway leading to the formation of the desired product, ethylene oxide, with respect to the one leading to the formation of the undesired product, acetaldehyde, while the opposite order is obtained on pure Ag catalyst. These findings provide an understanding, at the atomistic level, of the selectivity enhancement of Ag-Cu alloy with respect to pure Ag catalysts. Furthermore, we find that under temperature and partial pressure conditions close to the experimental ones, the ethylenedioxy intermediate is present on the phase diagram of Ag-Cu (111) surface. Our calculations indicate, however, that the formation of this structure could poison the catalyst surface.

Linh Nguyen, Ngoc; de Gironcoli, Stefano; Piccinin, Simone

2011-03-01

302

New functionalized graphene sheets for enhanced oxygen reduction as metal-free cathode electrocatalysts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tridodecylmethylammonium chloride (TDMAC) functionalized reduced graphene oxide (TDMAC-RGO) has synthesized by a simple physicochemical process. The resultant functionalized graphene imparts electrocatalytic activity as metal- free catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cells (FCs), with long-term operational stability, and tolerance to methanol and ethanol via a four-electron pathway in alkaline FCs. The ORR activities have systematically investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) techniques. The results show that the TDMAC-RGO demonstrates excellent catalytic activity for oxygen reduction. Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) measurements indicate charge transfer from the graphene sheets to the TDMAC via intermolecular charge-transfer. TDMAC-RGO catalysts are low-cost, free of metal and costly polymers, and are an efficient approach to FC applications.

Ahmed, Mohammad Shamsuddin; Jeon, Seungwon

2012-11-01

303

Reactive oxygen species and inflammatory mediators enhance muscle spindles mechanosensitivity in rats  

Microsoft Academic Search

We tested the hypothesis that reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inflammatory mediators affect transduction properties of muscle\\u000a spindles. In rats, muscle spindles response to high-frequency vibration (HFV) was recorded before and after (1) injection\\u000a of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in control rats and animals pre-treated with diclofenac (anti-inflammatory substance), (2) injection of bradykinin and (3)\\u000a fatigue induced by muscle stimulation (MS)

Stéphane Delliaux; Christelle Brerro-Saby; Jean Guillaume Steinberg; Yves Jammes

2009-01-01

304

Energy transfer enhancement by oxygen perturbation of spin-forbidden electronic transitions in aromatic systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Triplet-triplet energy transfer in multicomponent organic systems is usually entirely ascribed to a Dexter-type mechanism involving only short-range donor/acceptor interactions. We demonstrate that the presence of molecular oxygen introduces a perturbation to the electronic structure of one of the involved moieties which can induce a large increase in the spin-forbidden transition oscillator strength so that the otherwise negligible Förster contribution dominates the overall energy transfer rate.

Monguzzi, A.; Tubino, R.; Salamone, M. M.; Meinardi, F.

2010-09-01

305

Effects of Pin-up Oxygen on [60]Fullerene for Enhanced Antioxidant Activity  

PubMed Central

The introduction of pin-up oxygen on C60, such as in the oxidized fullerenes C60O and C60On, induced noticeable increase in the antioxidant activity as compared to pristine C60. The water-soluble inclusion complexes of fullerenes C60O and C60Onreacted with linoleic acid peroxyl radical 1.7 and 2.4 times faster, respectively.

2008-01-01

306

Strongly enhanced incorporation of oxygen into barium titanate based multilayer ceramic capacitors using water vapor  

SciTech Connect

The reoxidation of sintered BaTiO{sub 3}-based multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs) is currently an empirically determined, but poorly understood, procedure. In this work, the incorporation of oxygen into BaTiO{sub 3}-based MLCCs has been studied by means of isotope exchange annealing ({sup 18}O{sub 2}/{sup 16}O{sub 2}, {sup 1}H{sub 2}{sup 18}O/{sup 1}H{sub 2}{sup 16}O or {sup 2}H{sub 2}{sup 16}O/{sup 1}H{sub 2}{sup 16}O) and subsequent determination of the isotope profiles in the solid by secondary ion mass spectrometry. Oxygen isotope profiles in the barium titanate dielectric can be described by a bulk diffusion coefficient D* and a surface exchange coefficient k*. The values obtained for k* indicate that oxygen incorporation from H{sub 2}O is much faster than from dry O{sub 2}; it thus plays the key role in the reoxidation process.

Kessel, M.; De Souza, R. A.; Martin, M. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Yoo, H.-I. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

2010-07-12

307

Oxygen stabilization induced enhancement in J(sub c) and T(sub c) of superconducting oxides  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In an attempt to enhance the electrical and mechanical properties of the high temperature superconducting oxides, high T(sub c) composites were prepared composed of the 123 compounds and AgO. The presence of extra oxygen due to the decomposition of AgO at high temperature is found to stabilize the superconducting 123 phase. Ag is found to serve as clean flux for grain growth and precipitates as pinning center. Consequently, almost two orders of magnitude enhancement in critical current densities were also observed in these composites. In addition, these composites also show much improvement in workability and shape formation. On the other hand, proper oxygen treatment of Y5Ba6Cu11Oy was found to possibly stabilize superconducting phase with T(sub c) near 250 K. I-V, ac susceptibility, and electrical resistivity measurements indicate the existence of this ultra high T(sub c) phase in this compound. Detailed structure, microstructure, electrical, magnetic and thermal studies of the superconducting composites and the ultra high T(sub c) compound are presented and discussed.

Wu, M. K.; Chen, J. T.; Huang, C. Y.

1990-01-01

308

Flow enhances photosynthesis in marine benthic autotrophs by increasing the efflux of oxygen from the organism to the water.  

PubMed

Worldwide, many marine coastal habitats are facing rapid deterioration due in part to human-driven changes in habitat characteristics, including changes in flow patterns, a factor known to greatly affect primary production in corals, algae, and seagrasses. The effect of flow traditionally is attributed to enhanced influx of nutrients and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) across the benthic boundary layer from the water to the organism however, here we report that the organism's photosynthetic response to changes in the flow is nearly instantaneous, and that neither nutrients nor DIC limits this rapid response. Using microelectrodes, dual-pulse amplitude-modulated fluorometry, particle image velocimetry, and real time mass-spectrometry with the common scleractinian coral Favia veroni, the alga Gracilaria cornea, and the seagrass Halophila stipulacea, we show that this augmented photosynthesis is due to flow-driven enhancement of oxygen efflux from the organism to the water, which increases the affinity of the RuBisCO to CO(2). No augmentation of photosynthesis was found in the absence of flow or when flow occurred, but the ambient concentration of oxygen was artificially elevated. We suggest that water motion should be considered a fundamental factor, equivalent to light and nutrients, in determining photosynthesis rates in marine benthic autotrophs. PMID:20133799

Mass, Tali; Genin, Amatzia; Shavit, Uri; Grinstein, Mor; Tchernov, Dan

2010-02-01

309

Flow enhances photosynthesis in marine benthic autotrophs by increasing the efflux of oxygen from the organism to the water  

PubMed Central

Worldwide, many marine coastal habitats are facing rapid deterioration due in part to human-driven changes in habitat characteristics, including changes in flow patterns, a factor known to greatly affect primary production in corals, algae, and seagrasses. The effect of flow traditionally is attributed to enhanced influx of nutrients and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) across the benthic boundary layer from the water to the organism however, here we report that the organism’s photosynthetic response to changes in the flow is nearly instantaneous, and that neither nutrients nor DIC limits this rapid response. Using microelectrodes, dual-pulse amplitude-modulated fluorometry, particle image velocimetry, and real time mass-spectrometry with the common scleractinian coral Favia veroni, the alga Gracilaria cornea, and the seagrass Halophila stipulacea, we show that this augmented photosynthesis is due to flow-driven enhancement of oxygen efflux from the organism to the water, which increases the affinity of the RuBisCO to CO2. No augmentation of photosynthesis was found in the absence of flow or when flow occurred, but the ambient concentration of oxygen was artificially elevated. We suggest that water motion should be considered a fundamental factor, equivalent to light and nutrients, in determining photosynthesis rates in marine benthic autotrophs. PMID:20133799

Mass, Tali; Genin, Amatzia; Shavit, Uri; Grinstein, Mor; Tchernov, Dan

2010-01-01

310

TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION SUMMARY: THE AMERICAN COMBUSTION PYRETRON THERMAL DESTRUCTION SYSTEM AT THE U.S. EPA'S COMBUSTION FACILITY  

EPA Science Inventory

The American Combustion Pyretron Thermal Destruction System at the U.S. EPA's Combustion Research Facility. Under the auspices of the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation, or SITE, program, a critical assessment was made of the American Combustion Pyretron? oxygen enha...

311

Enhanced Cellular Responses and Distinct Gene Profiles in Human Fetoplacental Artery Endothelial Cells under Chronic Low Oxygen1  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Fetoplacental endothelial cells are exposed to oxygen levels ranging from 2% to 8% in vivo. However, little is known regarding endothelial function within this range of oxygen because most laboratories use ambient air (21% O2) as a standard culture condition (SCN). We asked whether human umbilical artery endothelial cells (HUAECs) that were steadily exposed to the physiological chronic normoxia (PCN, 3% O2) for ?20–25 days differed in their proliferative and migratory responses to FGF2 and VEGFA as well as in their global gene expression compared with those in the SCN. We observed that PCN enhanced FGF2- and VEGFA-stimulated cell proliferation and migration. In oxygen reversal experiments (i.e., when PCN cells were exposed to SCN for 24 h and vice versa), we found that preexposure to 21% O2 decreased the migratory ability, but not the proliferative ability, of the PCN-HUAECs in response to FGF2 and VEGFA. These PCN-enhanced cellular responses were associated with increased protein levels of HIF1A and NOS3, but not FGFR1, VEGFR1, and VEGFR2. Microarray analysis demonstrated that PCN up-regulated 74 genes and down-regulated 86, 14 of which were directly regulated by hypoxia-inducible factors as evaluated using in silico analysis. Gene function analysis further indicated that the PCN-regulated genes were highly related to cell proliferation and migration, consistent with the results from our functional assays. Given that PCN significantly alters cellular responses to FGF2 and VEGFA as well as transcription in HUAECs, it is likely that we may need to reexamine the current cellular and molecular mechanisms controlling fetoplacental endothelial functions, which were largely derived from endothelial models established under ambient O2. PMID:24152727

Jiang, Yi-Zhou; Wang, Kai; Li, Yan; Dai, Cai-Feng; Wang, Ping; Kendziorski, Christina; Chen, Dong-Bao; Zheng, Jing

2013-01-01

312

Droplet Combustion Experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Liquid fuel combustion provides a major portion of the world's energy supply. In most practical combustion devices, liquid burns after being separated into a droplet spray. Essential to the design of efficient combustion systems is a knowledge of droplet combustion behavior. The microgravity environment aboard spacecraft provides an opportunity to investigate the complex interactions between the physical and chemical combustion processes involved in droplet combustion without the complications of natural buoyancy. Launched on STS-83 and STS-94 (April 4 and July 1, 1997), the Droplet Combustion Experiment (DCE) investigated the fundamentals of droplet combustion under a range of pressures (0.25 to 1 atm), oxygen mole fractions (<0.5), and droplet sizes (1.5 to 5 mm). Principal DCE flight hardware features were a chamber to supply selected test environments, the use of crew-inserted bottles, and a vent system to remove unwanted gaseous combustion products. The internal apparatus contained the droplet deployment and ignition mechanisms to burn single, freely deployed droplets in microgravity. Diagnostics systems included a 35-mm high-speed motion picture camera (see the following sequence of photos) with a backlight to photograph burning droplets and a camcorder to monitor experiment operations. Additional diagnostics included an ultraviolet-light-sensitive CCD (charge couple discharge) camera to obtain flame radiation from hydroxyl radicals (see the final figure) and a 35-mm SLR (single-lens-reflex) camera to obtain color still photographs of the flames.

Nayagam, Vedha

1998-01-01

313

Evidence for enhanced phosphorus regeneration from marine sediments overlain by oxygen depleted waters  

SciTech Connect

Phosphorus regeneration and burial fluxes determined from in situ benthic flux chamber and solid phase measurements at sites on the Californian continental margin, Peruvian continental slope, North Carolina continental slope, and from the Santa Monica basin, California are reported. Comparison of these sites indicates that O{sub 2}-depleted bottomwaters enhance P regeneration from sediments, diminishing overall phosphorus burial efficiency. Based on these observations, a positive feedback, linking ocean anoxia, enhanced benthic phosphorus regeneration, and marine productivity is proposed. On shorter timescales, these results also suggest that O{sub 2} depletion in coastal regions caused by eutrophication may enhance P regeneration from sediments, thereby providing additional P necessary for increased biological productivity. 42 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Ingall, E.; Jahnki, R. [Skidaway Institute of Oceanography, Savannah, GA (United States)] [Skidaway Institute of Oceanography, Savannah, GA (United States)

1994-06-01

314

LOX/Hydrocarbon Combustion Instability Investigation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The LOX/Hydrocarbon Combustion Instability Investigation Program was structured to determine if the use of light hydrocarbon combustion fuels with liquid oxygen (LOX) produces combustion performance and stability behavior similar to the LOX/hydrogen propellant combination. In particular methane was investigated to determine if that fuel can be rated for combustion instability using the same techniques as previously used for LOX/hydrogen. These techniques included fuel temperature ramping and stability bomb tests. The hot fire program probed the combustion behavior of methane from ambient to subambient temperatures. Very interesting results were obtained from this program that have potential importance to future LOX/methane development programs. A very thorough and carefully reasoned documentation of the experimental data obtained is contained. The hot fire test logic and the associated tests are discussed. Subscale performance and stability rating testing was accomplished using 40,000 lb. thrust class hardware. Stability rating tests used both bombs and fuel temperature ramping techniques. The test program was successful in generating data for the evaluation of the methane stability characteristics relative to hydrogen and to anchor stability models. Data correlations, performance analysis, stability analyses, and key stability margin enhancement parameters are discussed.

Jensen, R. J.; Dodson, H. C.; Claflin, S. E.

1989-01-01

315

CHARACTERIZATION OF MERCURY-ENRICHED COAL COMBUSTION RESIDUES FROM ELECTRIC UTILITIES USING ENHANCED SORBENTS FOR MERCURY CONTROL  

EPA Science Inventory

Leaching of mercury and other constituents of potential concern during land disposal or beneficial use of coal combustion residues (CCRs) is the environmental impact pathway evaluated in this report. The specific objectives of the research was to: (1) evaluate mercury, arsenic an...

316

Rotating Non-Equilibrium Gliding Arc Plasma Disc for Enhancement in Ignition and Combustion of Hydrocarbon Fuels  

Microsoft Academic Search

The best plasma discharge system for combustion applications should generate non-equilibrium plasma with high concentration of active species and intermediate temperatures, high enough to support chain in propagation reaction. The non-equilibrium Gliding Arc (GA) aptly suits this application. A novel, non- equilibrium gliding arc plasma disc reactor has been developed to study possibility of flame speed increase, flammability limit extension

Shailesh Gangoli; Alexander Gutsol; Alexander Fridman

317

Engineering the oxygen sensing regulation results in an enhanced recombinant human hemoglobin production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.  

PubMed

Efficient production of appropriate oxygen carriers for transfusions (blood substitutes or artificial blood) has been pursued for many decades, and to date several strategies have been used, from synthetic polymers to cell-free hemoglobin carriers. The recent advances in the field of metabolic engineering also allowed the generation of different genetically modified organisms for the production of recombinant human hemoglobin. Several studies have showed very promising results using the bacterium Escherichia coli as a production platform, reporting hemoglobin titers above 5% of the total cell protein content. However, there are still certain limitations regarding the protein stability and functionality of the recombinant hemoglobin produced in bacterial systems. In order to overcome these limitations, yeast systems have been proposed as the eukaryal alternative. We recently reported the generation of a set of plasmids to produce functional human hemoglobin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with final titers of active hemoglobin exceeding 4% of the total cell protein. In this study, we propose a strategy for further engineering S. cerevisiae by altering the oxygen sensing pathway by deleting the transcription factor HAP1, which resulted in an increase of the final recombinant active hemoglobin titer exceeding 7% of the total cellular protein. PMID:25082441

Martínez, José L; Liu, Lifang; Petranovic, Dina; Nielsen, Jens

2015-01-01

318

Reduction of blood oxygen levels enhances postprandial cardiac hypertrophy in Burmese python (Python bivittatus).  

PubMed

Physiological cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by reversible enlargement of cardiomyocytes and changes in chamber architecture, which increase stroke volume and via augmented convective oxygen transport. Cardiac hypertrophy is known to occur in response to repeated elevations of O2 demand and/or reduced O2 supply in several species of vertebrate ectotherms, including postprandial Burmese pythons (Python bivittatus). Recent data suggest postprandial cardiac hypertrophy in P. bivittatus is a facultative rather than obligatory response to digestion, though the triggers of this response are unknown. Here, we hypothesized that an O2 supply-demand mismatch stimulates postprandial cardiac enlargement in Burmese pythons. To test this hypothesis, we rendered animals anemic prior to feeding, essentially halving blood oxygen content during the postprandial period. Fed anemic animals had heart rates 126% higher than those of fasted controls, which, coupled with a 71% increase in mean arterial pressure, suggests fed anemic animals were experiencing significantly elevated cardiac work. We found significant cardiac hypertrophy in fed anemic animals, which exhibited ventricles 39% larger than those of fasted controls and 28% larger than in fed controls. These findings support our hypothesis that those animals with a greater magnitude of O2 supply-demand mismatch exhibit the largest hearts. The 'low O2 signal' stimulating postprandial cardiac hypertrophy is likely mediated by elevated ventricular wall stress associated with postprandial hemodynamics. PMID:24311803

Slay, Christopher E; Enok, Sanne; Hicks, James W; Wang, Tobias

2014-05-15

319

Enhancing nitrogen use efficiency of cereal crops by optimizing temperature, moisture, balanced nutrients, and oxygen bioavailability  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Enhancement of nutrient use efficiency is imperative for increasing economic returns and reduction of environmental pollution caused by fertilization in crop production systems. In this paper, we have demonstrated at a given soil temperature and nitrogen (N) rate, N loss via ammonia (NH3) emission f...

320

Hydrothermal continuous flow synthesis and exfoliation of NiCo layered double hydroxide nanosheets for enhanced oxygen evolution catalysis.  

PubMed

We report the controlled synthesis of NiCo layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoplates using a newly developed high temperature high pressure hydrothermal continuous flow reactor (HCFR), which enables direct growth onto conductive substrates in high yield and, most importantly, better control of the precursor supersaturation and, thus, nanostructure morphology and size. The solution coordination chemistry of metal-ammonia complexes was utilized to synthesize well-defined NiCo LDH nanoplates directly in a single step without topochemical oxidation. The as-grown NiCo LDH nanoplates exhibit a high catalytic activity toward the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). By chemically exfoliating LDH nanoplates to thinner nanosheets, the catalytic activity can be further enhanced to yield an electrocatalytic current density of 10 mA cm(-2) at an overpotential of 367 mV and a Tafel slope of 40 mV dec(-1). Such enhancement could be due to the increased surface area and more exposed active sites. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) suggests the exfoliation also caused some changes in electronic structure. This work presents general strategies to controllably grow nanostructures of LDH and ternary oxide/hydroxides in general and to enhance the electrocatalytic performance of layered nanostructures by exfoliation. PMID:25633476

Liang, Hanfeng; Meng, Fei; Cabán-Acevedo, Miguel; Li, Linsen; Forticaux, Audrey; Xiu, Lichen; Wang, Zhoucheng; Jin, Song

2015-02-11

321

Unusual synergistic effects upon incorporation of Fe and/or Ni into mesoporous Co3O4 for enhanced oxygen evolution.  

PubMed

Fe and Ni doped mesoporous Co3O4 (mCo3O4) catalysts were prepared and investigated for electrochemical oxygen evolution. The incorporation of Fe into mCo3O4 (Fe-mCo3O4) results in unusual synergistic effects via destruction of the bulk mesoporous structure and formation of slit-like pores. The Fe-mCo3O4 composite displayed a significantly enhanced catalytic activity for oxygen evolution. PMID:25050969

Xiao, Changlong; Lu, Xunyu; Zhao, Chuan

2014-09-11

322

A review of the compatibility of structural materials with oxygen  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Consideration of the problem of ignition and combustion of structural materials, particularly metals, which may come in contact with oxygen during its production, transport, and use. Following a review of the historical development of compatibility problems and research, a detailed account is given of compatibility testing methods aimed at detecting probable ignition sources, such as mechanical impact, electric sparks or flashes, heat, sound waves, abrasion, and surface fractures. A summary is presented of the ignition and combustion research reported in the literature, dwelling particularly on papers concerning oxygen-related accidents and the compatibility of metals with high-pressure oxygen. The relative oxygen compatibility of a number of common materials is discussed, including that of nickel and copper alloys, stainless steels, aluminum alloys, and titanium alloys. Finally, an effort is made to pinpoint research areas which would enhance understanding of the compatibility of bulk materials.

Clark, A. F.; Hust, J. G.

1974-01-01

323

Enhanced oxygen evolution activity of IrO2 and RuO2 (100) surfaces  

SciTech Connect

The activities of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) on IrO2 and RuO2 catalysts are among the highest known to date. However, the intrinsic OER activities of surfaces with defined crystallographic orientations are not well established experimentally. Here we report that the (100) surface of IrO2 and RuO2 is more active than the (110) surface that has been traditionally explored by density functional theory studies. The relation between the OER activity and density of coordinatively undersaturated metal sites exposed on each rutile crystallographic facet is discussed. The surface-orientation dependent activities can guide the design of high-surface-area catalysts with increased activity for electrolyzers, metal-air batteries, and photoelectrochemical water splitting applications.

Stoerzinger, Kelsey [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)] [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Qiao, Liang [ORNL] [ORNL; Biegalski, Michael D [ORNL] [ORNL; Christen, Hans M [ORNL] [ORNL; Shao-Horn, Yang [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)] [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

2014-01-01

324

Covalent grafting of carbon nanotubes with a biomimetic heme model compound to enhance oxygen reduction reactions.  

PubMed

The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is one of the most important reactions in both life processes and energy conversion systems. The replacement of noble-metal Pt-based ORR electrocatalysts by nonprecious-metal catalysts is crucial for the large-scale commercialization of automotive fuel cells. Inspired by the mechanisms of dioxygen activation by metalloenzymes, herein we report a structurally well-defined, bio-inspired ORR catalyst that consists of a biomimetic model compound-an axial imidazole-coordinated porphyrin-covalently attached to multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Without pyrolysis, this bio-inspired electrocatalyst demonstrates superior ORR activity and stability compared to those of the state-of-the-art Pt/C catalyst in both acidic and alkaline solutions, thus making it a promising alternative as an ORR electrocatalyst for application in fuel-cell technology. PMID:24842193

Wei, Ping-Jie; Yu, Guo-Qiang; Naruta, Yoshinori; Liu, Jin-Gang

2014-06-23

325

Laboratory investigations of stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratio data enhance monitoring of CO2 underground  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stable carbon and oxygen isotope data play an important role in monitoring CO2 in the subsurface, for instance during carbon capture and storage (CCS). This includes monitoring of supercritical and gaseous CO2 movement and reactions under reservoir conditions and detection of potential CO2 leakage scenarios. However, in many cases isotope data from field campaigns are either limited due to complex sample retrieval or require verification under controlled boundary conditions. Moreover, experimentally verified isotope fractionation factors are also accurately known only for temperatures and pressures lower than commonly found in CO2 reservoirs (Myrttinen et al., 2012). For this reason, several experimental series were conducted in order to investigate effects of elevated pressures, temperatures and salinities on stable carbon and oxygen isotope changes of CO2 and water. These tests were conducted with a heateable pressure device and with glass or metal gas containers in which CO2 reacted with fluids for time periods of hours to several weeks. The obtained results revealed systematic differences in 13C/12C-distributions between CO2 and the most important dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) species under reservoir conditions (CO2(aq), H2CO3 and HCO3-). Since direct measurements of the pH, even immediately after sampling, were unreliable due to rapid CO2 de-gassing, one of the key results of this work is that carbon isotope fractionation data between DIC and CO2 may serve to reconstruct in situ pH values. pH values reconstructed with this approach ranged between 5.5 and 7.4 for experiments with 60 bars and up to 120 °C and were on average 1.4 pH units lower than those measured with standard pH electrodes directly after sampling. In addition, pressure and temperature experiments with H2O and CO2 revealed that differences between the oxygen isotope ratios of both phases depended on temperature, water-gas ratios as well as salt contents of the solutions involved. Such systematic knowledge of the extent of oxygen isotope fractionation between H2O and CO2 can help to reconstruct equilibration times, fluid-CO2 ratios as well as temperature and salinity conditions. Isotope results from systematic laboratory studies and the information they provide for assessing in situ reservoir conditions can be transferred to field applications concerning integrity of CO2 reservoirs. They can also apply to natural systems and other industrial uses that involve monitoring of gases in the subsurface under similar pressure and temperature conditions. Reference: Myrttinen, A., Becker, V., Barth, J.A.C., 2012. A review of methods used for equilibrium isotope fractionation investigations between dissolved inorganic carbon and CO2. Earth-Science Reviews, 115(3): 192-199.

Barth, Johannes A. C.; Myrttinen, Anssi; Becker, Veith; Nowak, Martin; Mayer, Bernhard

2014-05-01

326

Labor Contractions Enhance Oxygenation and Behavioral Activity of Newborn Rat Pups  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Labor contractions help instigate behavioral responses at birth (viz., breathing and suckling) that are vital for the newborn's adaptation to the extrauterine world (Ronca et al., 1996). In the present study, we analyzed the role of labor contractions in postpartum oxygenation and behavioral activity of newborn rat pups. Newborns were observed following either vaginal (V) or cesarean delivery. For cesarean delivery, day 21 pregnant dams' were administered a spinal transaction to eliminate lower body sensation, a laparotomy was performed and the uterus was maintained in a heated (37.5 C) bath. Four rat fetuses in one of the dams' paired uterine horn were compressed (C) to Simulate labor contractions (20 sec/min for 10 min) while four fetuses in the opposite horn were not compressed (NC). Fetuses were surgically removed from the uterus, stroked with a soft brush to mimic postnatal licking by the dam, the umbilical cord occluded. Pups were exposed to room temperature (22 C) for one hr, then nest temperature (33 C) for one hr. PO2, CO2, and O2, saturation were determined at 0, 30, 60, or 120 min post delivery using a blood gas analyzer. V and C delivered neonates showed comparable rates of PO2, CO2 and O2 saturation whereas NC neonates showed depressed levels at all time points (p<0.05). Respiratory rates of V, C and NC neonates increased significantly (p<0.05) over the first two postpartum hrs and did not differ across groups. Postpartum behavioral activity was significantly greater in V and C conditions and positively correlated with postnatal oxygenation. These findings provide further evidence for importance of labor contractions in early postpartum adaptation.

Mills, N. A.; Baer, L. A.; Ronca, A. E.; Balton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

327

A pilot test of passive oxygen release for enhancement of in situ bioremediation of BTEX-contaminated ground water  

SciTech Connect

A pilot-scale field demonstration of the use of Oxygen Release Compound{trademark} (ORC) was conducted at the site of a former gasoline service station. ORC was installed into a barrier consisting of a tight pattern of treatment wells located relatively near the apparent source of hydrocarbon contamination. The purpose of the barrier was to enhance in situ biodegradation of BTEX in ground water by the passive release of oxygen from the unpumped treatment wells placed across the migration path of the plume. Detailed monitoring was carried out using fencelines of multilevel monitoring wells located up- and downgradient of the barrier. Total BTEX concentrations influent to the barrier were found to be highly variable in space and time. Total influent BTEX concentrations averaged on a cross section transverse to flow were less variable over time, ranging from 10 to 16 mg/L. Significant decreases in BTEX mass flux through the zone impacted by the treatment wells were observed. For the entire portion of the plume impacted by the treatment wells, estimated BTEX treatment efficiency was approximately 70% on Day 51 of the test and declined thereafter.

Chapman, S.W.; Byerley, B.T.; Smyth, D.J.A.; Mackay, D.M.

1997-09-01

328

The role of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in enhancing the rate of wound healing with a focus on axon regeneration.  

PubMed

Wounds have always afflicted humanity causing pain, suffering and death, and for thousands of years humans have tested and developed various techniques for their ability to induce wound healing. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) refers to placing a patient or their extremity in a chamber in which the pressure is raised several fold above ambient air pressure and the ambient air is substituted with 100% oxygen. HBOT is effective in enhancing the rate and effectiveness of healing of a variety of wounds and injuries. The mechanisms by which HBOT acts are well understood. An important question about HBOT is whether it can heal another is type of wound, nerves after trauma? This review primarily discusses mechanisms by which HBOT induces the complex process of wound healing. It then examines how some of these mechanisms are also involved in promoting axon regeneration. Finally it presents anecdotal evidence suggesting that HBOT promotes axon regeneration, but notes that more extensive and thorough studies are required to determine whether HBOT induces axon regeneration. PMID:21449496

Kuffler, Damien P

2011-03-01

329

Improvement of islet function in a bioartificial pancreas by enhanced oxygen supply and growth hormone releasing hormone agonist  

PubMed Central

Islet transplantation is a feasible therapeutic alternative for metabolically labile patients with type 1 diabetes. The primary therapeutic target is stable glycemic control and prevention of complications associated with diabetes by reconstitution of endogenous insulin secretion. However, critical shortage of donor organs, gradual loss in graft function over time, and chronic need for immunosuppression limit the indication for islet transplantation to a small group of patients. Here we present a promising approach to address these limitations by utilization of a macrochamber specially engineered for islet transplantation. The s.c. implantable device allows for controlled and adequate oxygen supply and provides immunological protection of donor islets against the host immune system. The minimally invasive implantable chamber normalized blood glucose in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rodents for up to 3 mo. Sufficient graft function depended on oxygen supply. Pretreatment with the growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) agonist, JI-36, significantly enhanced graft function by improving glucose tolerance and increasing ?-cell insulin reserve in rats thereby allowing for a reduction of the islet mass required for metabolic control. As a result of hypervascularization of the tissue surrounding the device, no relevant delay in insulin response to glucose changes has been observed. Consequently, this system opens up a fundamental strategy for therapy of diabetes and may provide a promising avenue for future approaches to xenotransplantation. PMID:22393012

Ludwig, Barbara; Rotem, Avi; Schmid, Janine; Weir, Gordon C.; Colton, Clark K.; Brendel, Mathias D.; Neufeld, Tova; Block, Norman L.; Yavriyants, Karina; Steffen, Anja; Ludwig, Stefan; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Reichel, Andreas; Azarov, Dimitri; Zimermann, Baruch; Maimon, Shiri; Balyura, Mariya; Rozenshtein, Tania; Shabtay, Noa; Vardi, Pnina; Bloch, Konstantin; de Vos, Paul; Schally, Andrew V.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Barkai, Uriel

2012-01-01

330

Structurally ordered intermetallic platinum-cobalt core-shell nanoparticles with enhanced activity and stability as oxygen reduction electrocatalysts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To enhance and optimize nanocatalyst performance and durability for the oxygen reduction reaction in fuel-cell applications, we look beyond Pt-metal disordered alloys and describe a new class of Pt-Co nanocatalysts composed of ordered Pt3Co intermetallic cores with a 2-3 atomic-layer-thick platinum shell. These nanocatalysts exhibited over 200% increase in mass activity and over 300% increase in specific activity when compared with the disordered Pt3Co alloy nanoparticles as well as Pt/C. So far, this mass activity for the oxygen reduction reaction is the highest among the Pt-Co systems reported in the literature under similar testing conditions. Stability tests showed a minimal loss of activity after 5,000 potential cycles and the ordered core-shell structure was maintained virtually intact, as established by atomic-scale elemental mapping. The high activity and stability are attributed to the Pt-rich shell and the stable intermetallic Pt3Co core arrangement. These ordered nanoparticles provide a new direction for catalyst performance optimization for next-generation fuel cells.

Wang, Deli; Xin, Huolin L.; Hovden, Robert; Wang, Hongsen; Yu, Yingchao; Muller, David A.; Disalvo, Francis J.; Abruña, Héctor D.

2013-01-01

331

Structurally ordered intermetallic platinum-cobalt core-shell nanoparticles with enhanced activity and stability as oxygen reduction electrocatalysts.  

PubMed

To enhance and optimize nanocatalyst performance and durability for the oxygen reduction reaction in fuel-cell applications, we look beyond Pt-metal disordered alloys and describe a new class of Pt-Co nanocatalysts composed of ordered Pt(3)Co intermetallic cores with a 2-3 atomic-layer-thick platinum shell. These nanocatalysts exhibited over 200% increase in mass activity and over 300% increase in specific activity when compared with the disordered Pt(3)Co alloy nanoparticles as well as Pt/C. So far, this mass activity for the oxygen reduction reaction is the highest among the Pt-Co systems reported in the literature under similar testing conditions. Stability tests showed a minimal loss of activity after 5,000 potential cycles and the ordered core-shell structure was maintained virtually intact, as established by atomic-scale elemental mapping. The high activity and stability are attributed to the Pt-rich shell and the stable intermetallic Pt(3)Co core arrangement. These ordered nanoparticles provide a new direction for catalyst performance optimization for next-generation fuel cells. PMID:23104154

Wang, Deli; Xin, Huolin L; Hovden, Robert; Wang, Hongsen; Yu, Yingchao; Muller, David A; DiSalvo, Francis J; Abruña, Héctor D

2013-01-01

332

Coal Combustion Science  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this activity is to support the Office of Fossil Energy in executing research on coal combustion science. This activity consists of basic research on coal combustion that supports both the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center Direct Utilization Advanced Research and Technology Development Program, and the International Energy Agency Coal Combustion Science Project. Specific tasks for this activity include: (1) coal devolatilization - the objective of this risk is to characterize the physical and chemical processes that constitute the early devolatilization phase of coal combustion as a function of coal type, heating rate, particle size and temperature, and gas phase temperature and oxidizer concentration; (2) coal char combustion -the objective of this task is to characterize the physical and chemical processes involved during coal char combustion as a function of coal type, particle size and temperature, and gas phase temperature and oxygen concentration; (3) fate of mineral matter during coal combustion - the objective of this task is to establish a quantitative understanding of the mechanisms and rates of transformation, fragmentation, and deposition of mineral matter in coal combustion environments as a function of coal type, particle size and temperature, the initial forms and distribution of mineral species in the unreacted coal, and the local gas temperature and composition.

Hardesty, D.R. (ed.); Fletcher, T.H.; Hurt, R.H.; Baxter, L.L. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States))

1991-08-01

333

Green synthesis of silver nanoclusters supported on carbon nanodots: enhanced photoluminescence and high catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Metal nanoclusters exhibit unusual optical and catalytic properties due to their unique electronic structures. Here, surfactant-free silver nanoclusters supported on carbon nanodots were synthesized through a facile and green approach with only glucose and AgNO3 as precursors and without any other protecting ligands and reducing agents. The hybrid nanoclusters exhibited enhanced blue fluorescence compared to the carbon nanodots. More importantly, the ``surface-clean'' silver nanoclusters have remarkable electrocatalytic performance towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) with the most efficient four-electron transfer process. Moreover, compared with commercial Pt/C catalyst, the Pt-free hybrid clusters showed comparable catalytic performance for ORR but much higher tolerance to methanol crossover. Such silver nanoclusters will provide broad applications in fluorescence-related areas and in fuel cells as an efficient Pt-free catalyst with low cost and high catalytic performance.Metal nanoclusters exhibit unusual optical and catalytic properties due to their unique electronic structures. Here, surfactant-free silver nanoclusters supported on carbon nanodots were synthesized through a facile and green approach with only glucose and AgNO3 as precursors and without any other protecting ligands and reducing agents. The hybrid nanoclusters exhibited enhanced blue fluorescence compared to the carbon nanodots. More importantly, the ``surface-clean'' silver nanoclusters have remarkable electrocatalytic performance towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) with the most efficient four-electron transfer process. Moreover, compared with commercial Pt/C catalyst, the Pt-free hybrid clusters showed comparable catalytic performance for ORR but much higher tolerance to methanol crossover. Such silver nanoclusters will provide broad applications in fluorescence-related areas and in fuel cells as an efficient Pt-free catalyst with low cost and high catalytic performance. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: UV-Vis absorption spectra, XPS, additional fluorescence, CV and RDE data of the samples. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr04054b

Liu, Minmin; Chen, Wei

2013-11-01

334

Atomic Layer-by-Layer Deposition of Platinum on Palladium Octahedra for Enhanced Catalysts toward the Oxygen Reduction Reaction.  

PubMed

We systematically evaluated two different approaches to the syntheses of Pd@PtnL (n = 2-5) core-shell octahedra. We initially prepared the core-shell octahedra using a polyol-based route by titrating a Pt(IV) precursor into the growth solution containing Pd octahedral seeds at 200 °C through the use of a syringe pump. The number of Pt atomic layers could be precisely controlled from two to five by increasing the volume of the precursor solution while fixing the amount of seeds. We then demonstrated the synthesis of Pd@PtnL octahedra using a water-based route at 95 °C through the one-shot injection of a Pt(II) precursor. Due to the large difference in reaction temperature, the Pd@PtnL octahedra obtained via the water-based route showed sharper corners than their counterparts obtained through the polyol-based route. When compared to a commercial Pt/C catalyst based upon 3.2 nm Pt particles, the Pd@PtnL octahedra prepared using both methods showed similar remarkable enhancement in terms of activity (both specific and mass) and durability toward the oxygen reduction reaction. Calculations based upon periodic, self-consistent density functional theory suggested that the enhancement in specific activity for the Pd@PtnL octahedra could be attributed to the destabilization of OH on their PtnL*/Pd(111) surface relative to the {111} and {100} facets exposed on the surface of Pt/C. The destabilization of OH facilitates its hydrogenation, which was found to be the rate-limiting step of the oxygen reduction reaction on all these surfaces. PMID:25661922

Park, Jinho; Zhang, Lei; Choi, Sang-Il; Roling, Luke T; Lu, Ning; Herron, Jeffrey A; Xie, Shuifen; Wang, Jinguo; Kim, Moon J; Mavrikakis, Manos; Xia, Younan

2015-03-24

335

Study of electrostatic modulation of fuel sprays to enhance combustion performance in an aviation gas turbine. Master's thesis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The influence of electrostatic and electrohydrodynamic charging on hydrocarbon fuel-spray patterns and droplet atomization was investigated. Research was performed in a combustion environment with an Allison T-56 combustor liner and an unmodified pressure-jet atomizer fuel nozzle. High-voltage probes and a variable-geometry probe-insertion device were developed to assess the effectiveness of probe type and location on fuel-spray modification and modulation. Exhaust-gas

1987-01-01

336

Dichloroacetate Enhances Adriamycin-Induced Hepatoma Cell Toxicity In Vitro and In Vivo by Increasing Reactive Oxygen Species Levels  

PubMed Central

A unique bioenergetic feature of cancer, aerobic glycolysis is considered an attractive therapeutic target for cancer therapy. Recently, dichloroacetate (DCA), a small-molecule metabolic modulator, was shown to reverse the glycolytic phenotype, induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and trigger apoptosis in various tumor cells. In this work, the capacity of DCA to enhance Adriamycin (ADM) efficacy in hepatoma cells by modulating glucose metabolism and redox status was evaluated. Two human hepatoma (HCC-LM3 and SMMC-7721) and a normal liver (LO2) cell lines were treated with DCA or ADM alone, or in combination. Exposure of hepatoma cells to DCA/ADM combination resulted in significantly decreased cell viability and increased percentage of apoptotic cells as well as intracellular ROS levels, in comparison with treatment with DCA or ADM alone. However, simultaneous treatment with the thiol antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC, 10 mmol/L) reduced the elevated ROS levels and protected hepatoma cells from the cytotoxic effects of DCA/ADM combination. L-buthionine-[S,R]-sulfoximine, an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis, enhanced hepatoma cell sensitivity to DCA/ADM combination. Interestingly, treatment with DCA/ADM combination did not significantly increase cytotoxicity in normal hepatocytes in comparison with the drugs administered individually. Finally, DCA reduced tumor growth and enhanced ADM efficacy on HCC-LM3 hepatoma in mice. Overall, our data suggest that DCA enhances ADM cytotoxicity in hepatoma cells by increasing intracellular ROS levels and provide a strong biochemical rationale for the use of DCA in combination with ADM for treatment of hepatoma. PMID:24728083

Huang, Gang; Liu, Jianjun; Sheng, Shile; Wang, Hongjian; Qin, Wenxin

2014-01-01

337

High thermal sensitivity of blood enhances oxygen delivery in the high-flying bar-headed goose.  

PubMed

The bar-headed goose (Anser indicus) crosses the Himalaya twice a year at altitudes where oxygen (O2) levels are less than half those at sea level and temperatures are below -20°C. Although it has been known for over three decades that the major hemoglobin (Hb) component of bar-headed geese has an increased affinity for O2, enhancing O2 uptake, the effects of temperature and interactions between temperature and pH on bar-headed goose Hb-O2 affinity have not previously been determined. An increase in breathing of the hypoxic and extremely cold air experienced by a bar-headed goose at altitude (due to the enhanced hypoxic ventilatory response in this species) could result in both reduced temperature and reduced levels of CO2 at the blood-gas interface in the lungs, enhancing O2 loading. In addition, given the strenuous nature of flapping flight, particularly in thin air, blood leaving the exercising muscle should be warm and acidotic, facilitating O2 unloading. To explore the possibility that features of blood biochemistry in this species could further enhance O2 delivery, we determined the P50 (the partial pressure of O2 at which Hb is 50% saturated) of whole blood from bar-headed geese under conditions of varying temperature and [CO2]. We found that blood-O2 affinity was highly temperature sensitive in bar-headed geese compared with other birds and mammals. Based on our analysis, temperature and pH effects acting on blood-O2 affinity (cold alkalotic lungs and warm acidotic muscle) could increase O2 delivery by twofold during sustained flapping flight at high altitudes compared with what would be delivered by blood at constant temperature and pH. PMID:23470665

Meir, Jessica U; Milsom, William K

2013-06-15

338

Ames Hybrid Combustion Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The report summarizes the design, fabrication, safety features, environmental impact, and operation of the Ames Hybrid-Fuel Combustion Facility (HCF). The facility is used in conducting research into the scalability and combustion processes of advanced paraffin-based hybrid fuels for the purpose of assessing their applicability to practical rocket systems. The facility was designed to deliver gaseous oxygen at rates between 0.5 and 16.0 kg/sec to a combustion chamber operating at pressures ranging from 300 to 900. The required run times were of the order of 10 to 20 sec. The facility proved to be robust and reliable and has been used to generate a database of regression-rate measurements of paraffin at oxygen mass flux levels comparable to those of moderate-sized hybrid rocket motors.

Zilliac, Greg; Karabeyoglu, Mustafa A.; Cantwell, Brian; Hunt, Rusty; DeZilwa, Shane; Shoffstall, Mike; Soderman, Paul T.; Bencze, Daniel P. (Technical Monitor)

2003-01-01

339

Reduction and oxidation kinetics of Mn 3O 4\\/Mg–ZrO 2 oxygen carrier particles for chemical-looping combustion  

Microsoft Academic Search

The kinetics of reduction with methane and oxidation with oxygen of Mn3O4 supported on Mg–ZrO2 prepared by freeze granulation has been investigated. The reactivity experiments were performed in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) using different reacting gas concentrations and temperatures in the range of 1073–1223K. The oxygen carrier particles showed high reactivity during both reduction and oxidation at all investigated temperatures.

Qamar Zafar; Alberto Abad; Tobias Mattisson; Börje Gevert; Michael Strand

2007-01-01

340

Enhanced healing and cost-effectiveness of low-pressure oxygen therapy in healing necrotic wounds: a feasibility study of technology transfer.  

PubMed

Recent advances in topical hyperbaric oxygen technology identified the use of low-pressure topical hyperbaric oxygen therapy in enhancing wound healing. This study prospectively examined the feasibility of technology transfer from university to Health Maintenance Organization personnel, using topical hyperbaric oxygen therapy to heal necrotic wounds. Fifteen patients with 24 gangrenous and/or necrotic wounds that did not improve or worsened after at least 6 weeks of standard wound care were treated with topical hyperbaric oxygen therapy by trained HMO personnel. Four patients underwent digital amputation for osteomyelitis and/or gangrene followed by topical hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Assessment parameters included wound healing and cost of wound care before and after topical hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Six of the six Level 2 wounds healed within 2 to 4 weeks, nine of the ten Level 3 wounds healed within 4 to 10 weeks, and seven of the eight Level 4 wounds healed within 4 to 12 weeks. The ulcers improved by a mean of 0.829 cm2 per day. T test (SSPS 7.5) showed significant improvement per day after topical hyperbaric oxygen therapy, t = 5.217, df = 24, P < 0.0001 (95% CI = 1.13-0.49). Wound healing with topical hyperbaric oxygen therapy was associated with decreased costs. The results of this support the feasibility of transfer of new wound healing technology from research to HMO personnel. PMID:10788918

Heng, M C; Harker, J; Bardakjian, V B; Ayvazian, H

2000-03-01

341

The effect of hyperbaric oxygen in the enhancement of healing in selected problem wounds.  

PubMed

Problem wounds represent a significant and growing challenge to our healthcare system. The incidence and prevalence of these wounds are increasing in the population, resulting in growing utilization of healthcare resources and dollars expended. Venous leg ulcers represent the most common lower-extremity wound seen in ambulatory wound care centers, with recurrences frequent and outcomes often less than satisfactory. Pressure ulcers are common in patients in long-term institutional care settings adding significant increases in cost, disability and liability. Foot ulcers in patients with diabetes contribute to more than half of lower-extremity amputations in the United States in a group at risk, representing only 3 percent of the population. In response to this challenge, specialized programs have emerged designed to identify and manage these patients, using standardized protocols and a variety of new technologies to improve outcomes. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBO2T) has been increasingly utilized in an adjunctive role in the care of many of these patients, coinciding with optimized patient and local wound care. PMID:23045921

Warriner, Robert A; Hopf, Harriet W

2012-01-01

342

Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as radiosensitizer via enhanced reactive oxygen species formation  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ultrasmall citrate-coated SPIONs with {gamma}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} structure were prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SPIONs uptaken by MCF-7 cells increase the ROS production for about 240%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SPION induced ROS production is due to released iron ions and catalytically active surfaces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Released iron ions and SPION surfaces initiate the Fenton and Haber-Weiss reaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-ray irradiation of internalized SPIONs leads to an increase of catalytically active surfaces. -- Abstract: Internalization of citrate-coated and uncoated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by human breast cancer (MCF-7) cells was verified by transmission electron microscopy imaging. Cytotoxicity studies employing metabolic and trypan blue assays manifested their excellent biocompatibility. The production of reactive oxygen species in iron oxide nanoparticle loaded MCF-7 cells was explained to originate from both, the release of iron ions and their catalytically active surfaces. Both initiate the Fenton and Haber-Weiss reaction. Additional oxidative stress caused by X-ray irradiation of MCF-7 cells was attributed to the increase of catalytically active iron oxide nanoparticle surfaces.

Klein, Stefanie; Sommer, Anja [Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy, Physical Chemistry I and ICMM, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Egerlandstr. 3, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany)] [Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy, Physical Chemistry I and ICMM, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Egerlandstr. 3, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Distel, Luitpold V.R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Friedrich Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Universitaetsstrasse 27, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Friedrich Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Universitaetsstrasse 27, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany); Neuhuber, Winfried [Department of Anatomy, Chair of Anatomy I, Friedrich Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Krankenhausstr. 9, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany)] [Department of Anatomy, Chair of Anatomy I, Friedrich Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Krankenhausstr. 9, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany); Kryschi, Carola, E-mail: kryschi@chemie.uni-erlangen.de [Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy, Physical Chemistry I and ICMM, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Egerlandstr. 3, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany)] [Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy, Physical Chemistry I and ICMM, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Egerlandstr. 3, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany)

2012-08-24

343

Enhancement of oxygen vacancies and solar photocatalytic activity of zinc oxide by incorporation of nonmetal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

B-doped ZnO and N-doped ZnO powders have been synthesized by mechanochemical method and characterized by TG-DTA, XRD, SEM-EDX, XPS, UV-visible and photoluminescence (PL) spectra. X-ray diffraction data suggests the hexagonal wurtzite structure for modified ZnO crystallites and the incorporation of nonmetal expands the lattice constants of ZnO. The room temperature PL spectra suggest more number of oxygen vacancies exist in nonmetal-doped ZnO than that of undoped zinc oxide. XPS analysis shows the substitution of some of the O atoms of ZnO by nonmetal atoms. Solar photocatalytic activity of B-doped ZnO, N-doped ZnO and undoped ZnO was compared by means of oxidative photocatalytic degradation (PCD) of Bisphenol A (BPA). B-doped ZnO showed better solar PCD efficiency as compare to N-doped ZnO and undoped ZnO. The PCD of BPA follows first order reaction kinetics. The detail mechanism of PCD of Bisphenol A was proposed with the identification of intermediates such as hydroquinone, benzene-1,2,4-triol and 4-(2-hydroxypropan-2-yl) phenol.

Patil, Ashokrao B.; Patil, Kashinath R.; Pardeshi, Satish K.

2011-12-01

344

Enhanced nitrogen removal in constructed wetlands: effects of dissolved oxygen and step-feeding.  

PubMed

Four horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands (HSFCWs), named HSFCW1 (three-stage, without step-feeding), HSFCW2 (three-stage, with step-feeding), HSFCW3 (five-stage, without step-feeding) and HSFCW4 (five-stage, with step-feeding) were designed to investigate the effects of dissolved oxygen (DO) and step-feeding on nitrogen removal. High removal of 90.9% COD, 99.1% ammonium nitrogen and 88.1% total nitrogen (TN) were obtained simultaneously in HSFCW4 compared with HSFCW1-3. The excellent TN removal of HSFCW4 was due to artificial aeration provided sufficient DO for nitrification and the favorable anoxic environment created for denitrification. Step-feeding was a crucial factor because it provided sufficient carbon source (high COD: nitrate ratio of 14.3) for the denitrification process. Microbial activities and microbial abundance in HSFCW4 was found to be influenced by DO distribution and step-feeding, and thus improve TN removal. These results suggest that artificial aeration combined with step-feeding could achieve high nitrogen removal in HSFCWs. PMID:25069093

Li, Fengmin; Lu, Lun; Zheng, Xiang; Ngo, Huu Hao; Liang, Shuang; Guo, Wenshan; Zhang, Xiuwen

2014-10-01

345

Membrane-electrode assembly enhances performance of a microbial fuel cell type biological oxygen demand sensor.  

PubMed

A membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) was applied to a microbial fuel cell (MFC) type biological oxygen demand (BOD) sensor and the performance of the sensor was assessed. To establish the optimal conditions for MEA fabrication, platinum-catalysed carbon cloth cathodic electrodes were assembled with cation exchange membranes under various temperatures and pressures. By analysing coulombs from the MFCs, it could be determined that the optimal hot-pressing conditions were 120 degrees C and 150 kg cm(-2) for 30 s. When the MEA fabricated under optimal conditions and an air cathode were utilized for the construction of the MFC type BOD sensor, coulombs increased to 4.65 C from 0.52 C and power increased to 69,080 mW m(-3) from 880 mW m(-3) (at a BOD concentration of 200 mg L(-1)), respectively, compared with the conventional MFC lacking a MEA. The increased power improved the performance of the MFC type BOD sensor: sensitivity increased from 1.2 x 10(-3) to 1.8 x 10(-2) C per mg L(-1) of BOD, with good linearity (r2 = 0.97) and over 97% repeatability. We conclude that the MEA can be successfully applied to MFCs to make them highly sensitive BOD sensors. PMID:19492544

Kim, Mia; Hyun, Moon Sik; Gadd, Geoffrey M; Kim, Gwang Tae; Lee, Sang-Joon; Kim, Hyung Joo

2009-04-01

346

Construction of a reusable, high-fidelity model to enhance extracorporeal membrane oxygenation training through simulation.  

PubMed

Initiation of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is stressful, especially for inexperienced extracorporeal life support providers. The main objective of this study was to create a novel, reusable mannequin for high-fidelity simulation of ECMO initiation. We modified a Laerdal neonatal mannequin (SimNewB; Stavanger, Norway) so that it could be used to simulate an ECMO initiation. A simulation of a neonatal patient suffering from meconium aspiration was performed in the pediatric intensive care unit, and participants included new extracorporeal life support specialists in addition to the composition of the clinical ECMO team. A total of 17 individuals participated in the neonatal ECMO initiation simulation. Questionnaire results showed that 88% of participants felt better prepared to assist in an ECMO initiation after the simulation. All participants (100%) agreed that the modified mannequin and the environment were realistic and that this simulation helps teamwork and communication in future initiations of ECMO. Simulation can be used for the prevention, identification, and reduction of anxiety-related crisis situations that novice providers may infrequently encounter during routine clinical use of mechanical circulatory support. Use of a reusable, high-fidelity mannequin may be beneficial for effective team training of complex pediatric ECMO-related procedures. PMID:24675629

Thompson, Jess L; Grisham, Lisa M; Scott, Jeanne; Mogan, Chris; Prescher, Hannes; Biffar, David; Jarred, John; Meyer, Robyn J; Hamilton, Allan J

2014-04-01

347

Pyruvate Induces Transient Tumor Hypoxia by Enhancing Mitochondrial Oxygen Consumption and Potentiates the Anti-Tumor Effect of a Hypoxia-Activated Prodrug TH-302  

PubMed Central

Background TH-302 is a hypoxia-activated prodrug (HAP) of bromo isophosphoramide mustard that is selectively activated within hypoxic regions in solid tumors. Our recent study showed that intravenously administered bolus pyruvate can transiently induce hypoxia in tumors. We investigated the mechanism underlying the induction of transient hypoxia and the combination use of pyruvate to potentiate the anti-tumor effect of TH-302. Methodology/Results The hypoxia-dependent cytotoxicity of TH-302 was evaluated by a viability assay in murine SCCVII and human HT29 cells. Modulation in cellular oxygen consumption and in vivo tumor oxygenation by the pyruvate treatment was monitored by extracellular flux analysis and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oxygen imaging, respectively. The enhancement of the anti-tumor effect of TH-302 by pyruvate treatment was evaluated by monitoring the growth suppression of the tumor xenografts inoculated subcutaneously in mice. TH-302 preferentially inhibited the growth of both SCCVII and HT29 cells under hypoxic conditions (0.1% O2), with minimal effect under aerobic conditions (21% O2). Basal oxygen consumption rates increased after the pyruvate treatment in SCCVII cells in a concentration-dependent manner, suggesting that pyruvate enhances the mitochondrial respiration to consume excess cellular oxygen. In vivo EPR oxygen imaging showed that the intravenous administration of pyruvate globally induced the transient hypoxia 30 min after the injection in SCCVII and HT29 tumors at the size of 500–1500 mm3. Pretreatment of SCCVII tumor bearing mice with pyruvate 30 min prior to TH-302 administration, initiated with small tumors (?550 mm3), significantly delayed tumor growth. Conclusions/Significance Our in vitro and in vivo studies showed that pyruvate induces transient hypoxia by enhancing mitochondrial oxygen consumption in tumor cells. TH-302 therapy can be potentiated by pyruvate pretreatment if started at the appropriate tumor size and oxygen concentration. PMID:25254649

Takakusagi, Yoichi; Matsumoto, Shingo; Saito, Keita; Matsuo, Masayuki; Kishimoto, Shun; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W.; DeGraff, William; Kesarwala, Aparna H.; Choudhuri, Rajani; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Subramanian, Sankaran; Munasinghe, Jeeva P.; Gillies, Robert J.; Mitchell, James B.; Hart, Charles P.; Krishna, Murali C.

2014-01-01

348

Mechanism of Enhanced Superoxide Production in the Cytochrome b6f Complex of Oxygenic Photosynthesis  

PubMed Central

The specific rate of superoxide (O2?) production in purified active crystallizable cytochrome b6f complex, normalized to the rate of electron transport, has been found to be an order of magnitude greater than that measured in isolated yeast respiratory bc1 complex. The biochemical and structural basis for the enhanced production of O2? in the cytochrome b6f compared to the bc1 complex is discussed. The larger rate of superoxide production in the b6f complex could be a consequence of an increased residence time of plastosemiquinone/plastoquinol in its binding niche near the Rieske protein iron-sulfur cluster, resulting from (i) occlusion of the quinone portal by the phytyl chain of the unique bound chlorophyll, (ii) an altered environment of the proton-accepting glutamate believed to be a proton acceptor from semiquinone, or (iii) a more negative redox potential of the heme bp on the electrochemically positive side of the complex. The enhanced rate of superoxide production in the b6f complex is physiologically significant as chloroplast-generated ROS functions in the regulation of excess excitation energy, is a source of oxidative damage inflicted during photosynthetic reactions, and is a major source of ROS in plant cells. Altered levels of ROS production are believed to convey redox signaling from the organelle to the cytosol and nucleus. PMID:24298890

Baniulis, Danas; Hasan, S. Saif; Stofleth, Jason T.; Cramer, William A.

2014-01-01

349

Dynamic Quenching of Porphyrin Triplet States by Two-Photon Absorbing Dyes: Towards Two-Photon-Enhanced Oxygen Nanosensors  

PubMed Central

Two-photon-enhanced dendritic nanoprobes are being developed for two-photon (2P) laser scanning microscopy of oxygen [1]. In these molecular constructs, phosphorescence of metalloporphyrins is coupled to two-photon absorption (2PA) of electronically separate antenna dyes via intramolecular Förster-type resonance energy transfer (FRET). In the originally developed probes, competing electron transfer (ET) between the antennae and the long-lived triplet states of metalloporphyrins partially quenched the phosphorescence, reducing the probe's sensitivity and dynamic range. The rate of such ET can be reduced by tuning the redox potentials of the chromophores. In order to identify the optimal metalloporphyrin-2P antenna pairs, we performed screening of several phosphorescent Pt porphyrins (FRET acceptors) and 2P dyes (FRET donors) using dynamic quenching of phosphorescence. Phosphorescence lifetimes of Pt porphyrins were measured as a function of the dye concentration in organic solutions. The obtained Stern-Volmer quenching constants were correlated with the corresponding ET driving forces (?GET), calculated using the Rehm-Weller equation. FRET-pairs with minimal quenching rates were identified. The developed approach allows convenient screening of candidate-compounds for covalent assembly of 2P-enhanced triplet nanodevices. Systematic electrochemical measurements in a series of Pt porphyrins with varying peripheral substitution and conjugation pathways are presented. PMID:19030124

Finikova, Olga S.; Chen, Ping; Ou, Zhongping; Kadish, Karl M.; Vinogradov, Sergei A.

2008-01-01

350

An Increase in Reactive Oxygen Species by Deregulation of ARNT Enhances Chemotherapeutic Drug-Induced Cancer Cell Death  

PubMed Central

Background Unique characteristics of tumor microenvironments can be used as targets of cancer therapy. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) is an important mediator of tumor progression. However, the functional role of ARNT in chemotherapeutic drug-treated cancer remains unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we found that knockdown of ARNT in cancer cells reduced the proliferation rate and the transformation ability of those cells. Moreover, cisplatin-induced cell apoptosis was enhanced in ARNT-deficient cells. Expression of ARNT also decreased in the presence of cisplatin through proteasomal degradation pathway. However, ARNT level was maintained in cisplatin-treated drug-resistant cells, which prevented cell from apoptosis. Interestingly, reactive oxygen species (ROS) dramatically increased when ARNT was knocked down in cancer cells, enhancing cisplatin-induced apoptosis. ROS promoted cell death was inhibited in cells treated with the ROS scavenger, N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC). Conclusions/Significance These results suggested that the anticancer activity of cisplatin is attributable to its induction of the production of ROS by ARNT degradation. Targeting ARNT could be a potential strategy to eliminate drug resistance in cancer cells. PMID:24921657

Shieh, Jiunn-Min; Shen, Chih-Jie; Chang, Wei-Chiao; Cheng, Hung-Chi; Chan, Ya-Yi; Huang, Wan-Chen; Chang, Wen-Chang; Chen, Ben-Kuen

2014-01-01

351

Sensitive determination of reactive oxygen species in cigarette smoke using microchip electrophoresis-localized surface plasmon resonance enhanced fluorescence detection.  

PubMed

A sensitive approach to the determination of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in puffs of cigarette smoke (CS) has been developed. The experimental system consists of a microfluidic chip electrophoresis and a laser induced fluorescence (LIF) device enhanced by localized surface plasmon resonance. Core-shell Ag@SiO2 nanoparticles were prepared and then immobilized on the surface of the microchannel to increase the fluorescence intensity based on localized surface plasmon resonance-enhanced fluorescence (LSPREF) effect. The ROS in puffs of CS were trapped via the oxidation of 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein (DCHF) that had been loaded on polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers in a micro-column. Determination of ROS was based on the amount of 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF), which is the sole product from DCHF oxidation. With the optimization of the trapping efficiency, we detected about 8.0 pmol of ROS per puff in the mainstream CS. This microchip electrophoresis-SPREF system enables sensitive quantitation of ROS in CS with low consumption of reagent, material, and analysis time. PMID:24458305

Wang, Huai-Song; Xiao, Fang-Nan; Li, Zhong-Qiu; Ouyang, Jun; Wu, Zeng-Qiang; Xia, Xing-Hua; Zhou, Guo-Jun

2014-03-21

352

Laser irradiation of mouse spermatozoa enhances in-vitro fertilization and Ca2+ uptake via reactive oxygen species  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

630 nm He-Ne laser irradiation was found to have a profound influence on Ca2+ uptake in mouse spermatozoa and the fertilizing potential of these cells. Laser irradiation affected mainly the mitochondrial Ca2+ transport mechanisms. Furthermore, the effect of light was found to be Ca2+-dependent. We demonstrate that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in the cascade of biochemical events evoked by laser irradiation. A causal association between laser irradiation, ROS generation, and sperm function was indicated by studies with ROS scavengers, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, and exogenous hydrogen peroxide. SOD treatment resulted in increased Ca2+ uptake and in enhanced fertilization rate. Catalase treatment impaired the light-induced stimulation in Ca2+ uptake and fertilization rate. Exogenous hydrogen peroxide was found to enhance Ca2+ uptake in mouse spermatozoa and the fertilizing capability of these cells in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that the effect of 630 nm He-Ne laser irradiation is mediated through the generation of hydrogen peroxide by the spermatozoa and that this effect plays a significant role in the augmentation of the sperm cells' capability to fertilize metaphase II-arrested eggs in-vitro.

Cohen, Natalie; Lubart, Rachel; Rubinstein, Sara; Breitbart, Haim

1996-11-01

353

Simultaneous synthesis of gold nanoparticle/graphene nanocomposite for enhanced oxygen reduction reaction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report here on a novel and facile technique for the simultaneous synthesis of a highly active and stable gold (Au) nanoparticle/reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheet nanocomposite as an efficient electrocatalyst to facilitate the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and electrochemical methods were employed to characterize the Au and rGO nanocomposites formed on the electrode surface. The major advantage of the simultaneous synthetic method is the integration of the superb properties of both Au nanoparticles and graphene in a single-step with a 100% usage of the precursors. The Au/rGO nanocomposites exhibited pronounced electrocatalytic performance towards ORR with approximately three times higher than that of Au nanoparticles. The nanocomposites show the ORR onset peak potentials at 0.12 and -0.03 V (vs Ag/AgCl), with reduction peaks at -0.06 and -0.16 V (vs Ag/AgCl) in 0.1 M H2SO4 and KOH media, which is ?120-190 mV more positive than that of Au nanoparticles and a commercial Pt/C catalyst. Moreover, the nanocomposites exhibit excellent methanol tolerance and high durability in comparison with the commercial Pt/C. The new method demonstrated in this study provides an efficient route for the generation of ultrafine and highly dense Au nanoparticles that are homogeneously dispersed on rGO sheets for ORR.

Govindhan, Maduraiveeran; Chen, Aicheng

2015-01-01

354

Oxygen vacancies induced enhancement of photoconductivity of La0.5Sr0.5CoO3 - ? thin film  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Effects of light and electrical current on the electrical transport properties and photovoltaic properties of oxygen-stoichiometric La0.5Sr0.5CoO3 and oxygen-deficient La0.5Sr0.5CoO3 - ? films prepared by pulsed laser deposition have been investigated. Oxygen-deficient films annealed in a vacuum show an obvious increase of resistance and lattice parameter. Besides, a direct correlation between the magnitude of the photoconductivity and oxygen vacancies in La0.5Sr0.5CoO3 - ? films has been observed. The light illumination causes a resistance drop to show the photoconductivity effect. Moreover, the photoconductivity can be remarkably enhanced by increasing the electrical current, that is, it exhibits current-enhanced photoconductivity (CEPC) effect. Oxygen deficiency in the annealed film leads to the formation of a structural disorder in the Co-O-Co conduction channel due to the accumulated oxygen vacancies and hence is believed to be responsible for the increase in higher photoconductivity. These results may be important for practical applications in photoelectric devices.

Gao, R. L.; Fu, C. L.; Cai, W.; Chen, G.; Deng, X. L.; Yang, H. W.; Sun, J. R.; Zhao, Y. G.; Shen, B. G.

2014-09-01

355

Reactive oxygen species-mediated breast cell carcinogenesis enhanced by multiple carcinogens and intervened by dietary ergosterol and mimosine.  

PubMed

Most breast cancers occur sporadically due to long-term exposure to low-dose carcinogens in the diet and the environment. Specifically, smoke, polluted air, and high-temperature cooked meats comprise multiple carcinogens, such as 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), benzo[?]pyrene (B[?]P), and 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP). We sought to determine if these carcinogens act together to induce breast cell carcinogenesis, and if so, whether noncytotoxic dietary agents could intervene. We demonstrated that coexposure to physiologically achievable doses of NNK, B[?]P, and PhIP (NBP) holistically enhanced initiation and progression of breast cell carcinogenesis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of the ERK pathway were transiently induced by NBP in each exposure, and cross talk between reinforced ROS elevation and ERK activation played an essential role in increased DNA oxidation and damage. After cumulative exposures to NBP, this cross talk contributed to enhanced initiation of cellular carcinogenesis and led to enhanced acquisition of cancer-associated properties. Using NBP-induced transient changes, such as ROS elevation and ERK pathway activation, and cancer-associated properties as targeted endpoints, we revealed, for the first time, that two less-studied dietary compounds, ergosterol and mimosine, at physiologically achievable noncytotoxic levels, were highly effective in intervention of NBP-induced cellular carcinogenesis. Combined ergosterol and mimosine were more effective than individual agents in blocking NBP-induced transient endpoints, including ROS-mediated DNA oxidation, which accounted for their preventive ability to suppress progression of NBP-induced cellular carcinogenesis. Thus, dietary components, such as mushrooms containing ergosterol and legumes containing mimosine, should be considered for affordable prevention of sporadic breast cancer associated with long-term exposure to environmental and dietary carcinogens. PMID:25535943

Pluchino, Lenora Ann; Liu, Amethyst Kar-Yin; Wang, Hwa-Chain Robert

2015-03-01

356

Mathematical modeling of MSW combustion and SNCR in a full-scale municipal incinerator and effects of grate speed and oxygen-enriched atmospheres on operating conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The rising popularity of incineration of municipal solid waste (MSW) calls for detailed mathematical modeling and accurate prediction of pollutant emissions. In this paper, mathematical modeling methods for both solid and gaseous phases were employed to simulate the operation of a 450t\\/d MSW-burning incinerator to obtain detailed information on the flow and combustion characteristics in the furnace and to predict

Zengying Liang; Xiaoqian Ma

2010-01-01

357

Combustion joining of refractory materials: Carboncarbon composites  

E-print Network

Combustion joining of refractory materials: Carbon­carbon composites Jeremiah D.E. White Department­carbon composite is achieved by employing self-sustained, oxygen-free, high-temperature combustion reactions to a used "core" to produce a brake that meets the performance specifications. The combustion-joining (CJ

Mukasyan, Alexander

358

Enhanced Oxygen Diffusion Within the Internal Oxidation Zone of Alloy 617 in Controlled Impurity Helium Environments from 1023 K to 1123 K (750 °C to 850 °C)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Alloy 617 was exposed to He-CO-CO2 environments with P_{{CO}} /P_{{{{CO}}2 }} of either 9 or 1320 at temperatures from 1023 K to 1123 K (750 °C to 850 °C) to determine the oxygen diffusion coefficients within the internal oxidation zone of the alloy. The oxygen diffusion coefficients determined based on both intergranular and transgranular oxidation rates were several orders of magnitude greater than those reported in pure nickel and in nickel-based binary alloys, indicating that the rapid internal aluminum oxidation of Alloy 617 was primarily due to enhanced oxygen diffusion along the incoherent Al2O3-alloy interfaces. The range of activation energy values determined for oxygen diffusion associated with the intergranular aluminum oxidation was from 149.6 to 154.7 kJ/mol, and that associated with the transgranular aluminum oxidation was from 244.7 to 283.5 kJ/mol.

Gulsoy, Gokce; Was, Gary S.

2015-01-01

359

Enhanced Oxygen Diffusion Within the Internal Oxidation Zone of Alloy 617 in Controlled Impurity Helium Environments from 1023 K to 1123 K (750 °C to 850 °C)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Alloy 617 was exposed to He-CO-CO2 environments with of either 9 or 1320 at temperatures from 1023 K to 1123 K (750 °C to 850 °C) to determine the oxygen diffusion coefficients within the internal oxidation zone of the alloy. The oxygen diffusion coefficients determined based on both intergranular and transgranular oxidation rates were several orders of magnitude greater than those reported in pure nickel and in nickel-based binary alloys, indicating that the rapid internal aluminum oxidation of Alloy 617 was primarily due to enhanced oxygen diffusion along the incoherent Al2O3-alloy interfaces. The range of activation energy values determined for oxygen diffusion associated with the intergranular aluminum oxidation was from 149.6 to 154.7 kJ/mol, and that associated with the transgranular aluminum oxidation was from 244.7 to 283.5 kJ/mol.

Gulsoy, Gokce; Was, Gary S.

2015-04-01

360

A fluidized-bed combustion process with inherent CO 2 separation; application of chemical-looping combustion  

Microsoft Academic Search

For combustion with CO2 capture, chemical-looping combustion has the advantage that no energy is lost for the separation of CO2. In chemical-looping combustion oxygen is transferred from the combustion air to the gaseous fuel by means of an oxygen carrier. The fuel and the combustion air are never mixed, and the gases from the oxidation of the fuel, CO2 and

Anders Lyngfelt; Bo Leckner; Tobias Mattisson

2001-01-01

361

Combustion noise  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A review of the subject of combustion generated noise is presented. Combustion noise is an important noise source in industrial furnaces and process heaters, turbopropulsion and gas turbine systems, flaring operations, Diesel engines, and rocket engines. The state-of-the-art in combustion noise importance, understanding, prediction and scaling is presented for these systems. The fundamentals and available theories of combustion noise are given. Controversies in the field are discussed and recommendations for future research are made.

Strahle, W. C.

1977-01-01

362

Production of Oxygen  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this chemistry activity, learners use yeast and hydrogen peroxide to generate a gas (oxygen) and test some of its properties. This resource includes brief questions for learners to answer after the experiment. Use this activity to introduce learners to oxygen as well as combustion. Note: this activity involves an open flame.

The Science House

2014-01-28

363

Aging Enhances the Production of Reactive Oxygen Species and Bactericidal Activity in Peritoneal Macrophages by Upregulating Classical Activation Pathways  

SciTech Connect

Maintenance of macrophages in their basal state and their rapid activation in response to pathogen detection are central to the innate immune system, acting to limit nonspecific oxidative damage and promote pathogen killing following infection. To identify possible age-related alterations in macrophage function, we have assayed the function of peritoneal macrophages from young (3?4 months) and aged (14?15 months) Balb/c mice. In agreement with prior suggestions, we observe age-dependent increases in the extent of recruitment of macrophages into the peritoneum, as well as ex vivo functional changes involving enhanced nitric oxide production under resting conditions that contribute to a reduction in the time needed for full activation of senescent macrophages following exposure to lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Further, we observe enhanced bactericidal activity following Salmonella uptake by macrophages isolated from aged Balb/c mice in comparison with those isolated from young animals. Pathways responsible for observed phenotypic changes were interrogated using tandem mass spectrometry, which identified age-dependent increases in levels of proteins linked to immune cell pathways under basal conditions and following LPS activation. Immune pathways upregulated in macrophages isolated from aged mice include proteins critical to the formation of the immunoproteasome. Detection of these latter proteins is dramatically enhanced following LPS exposure for macrophages isolated from aged animals; in comparison, the identification of immunoproteasome subunits is insensitive to LPS exposure for macrophages isolated from young animals. Consistent with observed global changes in the proteome, quantitative proteomic measurements indicate that there are age-dependent abundance changes involving specific proteins linked to immune cell function under basal conditions. LPS exposure selectively increases the levels of many proteins involved in immune cell function in aged Balb/c mice. Collectively, these results indicate that macrophages isolated from old mice are in a preactivated state that enhances their sensitivities to LPS exposure. The hyper-responsive activation of macrophages in aged animals may act to minimize infection by general bacterial threats that arise due to age-dependent declines in adaptive immunity. However, this hypersensitivity and the associated increase in the level of formation of reactive oxygen species are likely to contribute to observed age-dependent increases in the level of oxidative damage that underlie many diseases of the elderly.

Smallwood, Heather S.; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Squier, Thomas C.

2011-10-07

364

One-step solution-combustion synthesis of complex spinel titanate flake particles with enhanced lithium-storage properties  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work, we report the formation of porous Li2MTi3O8 (M = Zn, Co) flakes (hereafter referred to as f-Li2MTi3O8) via a facile one-step solution-combustion in less than 10 min. As anodes for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries, the synthesized f-Li2MTi3O8 exhibits high reversible charge-discharge capacity, great cycling stability and high rate performance. These results can be attributed to the intrinsic characteristics of spinel Li2MTi3O8 flakes, in which a porous framework could provide a diffusion space for lithium ion insertion into and extraction from the anode material, resulting in excellent cycle performance, even cycling at high rate of 2000 mA g-1.

Li, Xue; Xiao, Qian; Liu, Bo; Lin, Huangchang; Zhao, Jinbao

2015-01-01

365

Hydrogen peroxide enhances the oxidation of oxygenated volatile organic compounds on mineral dust particles: a case study of methacrolein.  

PubMed

Heterogeneous oxidation of oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) serves as an important sink of OVOCs as well as a source of secondary organic material. However, the roles of gas phase oxidants in these reactions are poorly understood. In this work, we present the first laboratory study of the heterogeneous reactions of methacrolein (MACR) on various mineral dust particles in the presence of gaseous H2O2. It is found that the presence of gaseous H2O2 significantly promotes both the uptake and oxidation of MACR on kaolinite, ?-Al2O3, ?-Fe2O3, and TiO2, but not on CaCO3. The oxidation of MACR produces organic acids as its major low-molecular-weight product, whose yields are enhanced by a factor of 2-6 in the presence of H2O2. In addition, organic peroxides such as methyl hydroperoxide, peroxyformic acid, and peroxyacetic acid are only formed in the presence of H2O2, and the formation of methyl hydroperoxide indicates that MACR oxidation on the surface involves reaction with OH radicals. A probe reaction using salicylic acid verifies the production of OH radicals from H2O2 decomposition on kaolinite, ?-Al2O3, ?-Fe2O3, and TiO2, which rationalizes the enhanced MACR oxidation observed on these particles. The uptake coefficients of MACR on kaolinite, ?-Fe2O3, and TiO2 in the presence of H2O2 are on the order of 10(-5)-10(-4). Our results provide new insights into the formation and chemical evolution of organic species in the atmosphere. PMID:25111165

Zhao, Yue; Huang, Dao; Huang, Liubin; Chen, Zhongming

2014-09-16

366

Fuel-rich methane combustion: Role of the Pt dispersion and oxygen mobility in a fluorite-like complex oxide support  

Microsoft Academic Search

For catalysts comprised of Pt supported onto dispersed complex fluorite-like oxides (ceria doped by Pr, Gd, Sm, or CeO2–ZrO2 doped by La, Gd or Pr), the effects of the oxygen mobility in supports and Pt dispersion on the performance in methane selective oxidation into syngas at short contact times were elucidated using combination of kinetic and spectroscopic methods. While in

V. A. Sadykov; T. G. Kuznetsova; Yu. V. Frolova-Borchert; G. M. Alikina; A. I. Lukashevich; V. A. Rogov; V. S. Muzykantov; L. G. Pinaeva; E. M. Sadovskaya; Yu. A. Ivanova; E. A. Paukshtis; N. V. Mezentseva; L. Ch. Batuev; V. N. Parmon; S. Neophytides; E. Kemnitz; K. Scheurell; C. Mirodatos; A. C. van Veen

2006-01-01

367

Carbonization of self-assembled nanoporous hemin with a significantly enhanced activity for the oxygen reduction reaction.  

PubMed

The scarcity and high cost of Pt-based electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) hinder the practical application of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). It is critical to replace platinum with non-noble metal electrocatalysts (NNMEs). Carbonized metalloporphyrins represent an important class of NNMEs, but most metalloporphyrins are costly and the corresponding NNMEs do not possess a high ORR activity. Herein, we report that the self-assembly of inexpensive hemin leads to porous nanomaterials in water under ambient conditions and subsequent heat-treatment of the unprecedented nanoporous hemin results in a magnetic NNME with a much enhanced ORR activity compared with directly carbonized hemin without self-assembly. The improvement of the ORR activity likely originates from the exposure of more ORR active sites, caused by the surface area increase of the nanoporous hemin after carbonization over that of micro-scale pristine hemin crystals. Moreover, the ORR activity of heat-treated nanoporous hemin is actually comparable to that of commercial Pt/C in alkaline solution. Additionally, the carbonized nanoporous hemin is much better than commercial Pt/C in terms of durability and tolerance to methanol. This study opens up a new avenue to the production of inexpensive metalloporphyrin-based NNMEs with a high ORR performance by using a self-assembly method in combination with traditional pyrolysis. PMID:25406677

Xie, Yan; Tang, Chizhou; Hao, Zhiqiang; Lv, Yang; Yang, Ruixia; Wei, Xuming; Deng, Weiqiao; Wang, Anjie; Yi, Baolian; Song, Yujiang

2015-01-01

368

Docosahexaenoic acid prevents paraquat-induced reactive oxygen species production in dopaminergic neurons via enhancement of glutathione homeostasis.  

PubMed

Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid levels are reduced in the substantia nigra area in Parkinson's disease patients and animal models, implicating docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) as a potential treatment for preventing Parkinson's disease and suggesting the need for investigations into how DHA might protect against neurotoxin-induced dopaminergic neuron loss. The herbicide paraquat (PQ) induces dopaminergic neuron loss through the excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We found that treatment of dopaminergic SN4741 cells with PQ reduced cell viability in a dose-dependent manner, but pretreatment with DHA ameliorated the toxic effect of PQ. To determine the toxic mechanism of PQ, we measured intracellular ROS content in different organelles with specific dyes. As expected, all types of ROS were increased by PQ treatment, but DHA pretreatment selectively decreased cytosolic hydrogen peroxide content. Furthermore, DHA treatment-induced increases in glutathione reductase and glutamate cysteine ligase modifier subunit (GCLm) mRNA expression were positively correlated with glutathione (GSH) content. Consistent with this increase in GCLm mRNA levels, Western blot analysis revealed that DHA pretreatment increased nuclear factor-erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) protein levels. These findings indicate that DHA prevents PQ-induced neuronal cell loss by enhancing Nrf2-regulated GSH homeostasis. PMID:25545062

Lee, Hyoung Jun; Han, Jeongsu; Jang, Yunseon; Kim, Soo Jeong; Park, Ji Hoon; Seo, Kang Sik; Jeong, Soyeon; Shin, Soyeon; Lim, Kyu; Heo, Jun Young; Kweon, Gi Ryang

2015-01-30

369

Combustion monitoring  

SciTech Connect

This article describes application analysis system to lean-burn engines, engines that feature EGR, or other engines in which unfavorable combustion occurs, to control engine roughness, lower fuel consumption, and reduce NOx emission and combustion inconsistencies among cylinders. The idea of monitoring combustion of an internal combustion engine, and using the obtained data to control combustion, is not new. Two well-known methods have been developed: one involves combustion-pressure analysis, and the other measures ionic currents in combustion gas. Although highly precise analysis can be achieved by the former, there are problems in the installation of combustion pressure sensors, and their durability and cost. There are also problems in installing ionic-current sensors, and the reliability of data obtained from such sensors is questionable. Researchers at Honda R and D Co. and NGK Spark Plug Co. have developed a method which uses spark-plug-voltage analysis for monitoring combustion. Voltage is measured by noncontact sensors in the high-voltage zone near the spark plugs. Monitoring is done in real time by processing waveform data and measuring the ion density. This monitoring system can control combustion during fluctuations of the air/fuel ratio (A/F), exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), and ignition timing for lean-burn or other conventional engines. By controlling combustion near the lean, EGR, and timing limits, it is possible to reduce fuel consumption and exhaust emissions, while maintaining driveability.

Not Available

1993-07-01

370

Electronic resonance enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering technique for detection of combustion species and biological molecules  

E-print Network

The application of electronic-resonance enhanced (ERE) coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) for the detection of nitric oxide (NO) and acetylene (C2H2) is experimentally demonstrated and the effects of various parameters on the ERE CARS...

Hanna, Sherif Fayez

2006-10-30

371

Simple method to enhance positive bias stress stability of In-Ga-Zn-O thin-film transistors using a vertically graded oxygen-vacancy active layer.  

PubMed

We proposed a simple method to deposit a vertically graded oxygen-vacancy active layer (VGA) to enhance the positive bias stress (PBS) stability of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs). We deposited a-IGZO films by sputtering (target composition; In2O3:Ga2O3:ZnO = 1:1:1 mol %), and the oxygen partial pressure was varied during deposition so that the front channel of the TFTs was fabricated with low oxygen partial pressure and the back channel with high oxygen partial pressure. Using this method, we were able to control the oxygen vacancy concentration of the active layer so that it varied with depth. As a result, the turn-on voltage shift following a 10?000 s PBS of optimized VGA TFT was drastically improved from 12.0 to 5.6 V compared with a conventional a-IGZO TFT, without a significant decrease in the field effect mobility. These results came from the self-passivation effect and decrease in oxygen-vacancy-related trap sites of the VGA TFTs. PMID:25402628

Park, Ji Hoon; Kim, Yeong-Gyu; Yoon, Seokhyun; Hong, Seonghwan; Kim, Hyun Jae

2014-12-10

372

Breaking Up with Combustion  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity teaches combustion as the interaction of a fuel source and oxygen. A burning candle is observed, then extinguished—first by a glass cup placed over it to cut off the oxygen supply, then using carbon dioxide generated by vinegar and baking soda. Some background information is provided about how car engines use gasoline as fuel, and how humans use food as fuel— both are similar to how the candle uses wax as fuel. The activity is written for a kit that can be checked out of the library, but the kit is not required.

Maisie Shaw

2010-01-01

373

Droplet Combustion Experiment movie  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Droplet Combustion Experiment (DCE) was designed to investigate the fundamental combustion aspects of single, isolated droplets under different pressures and ambient oxygen concentrations for a range of droplet sizes varying between 2 and 5 mm. The DCE principal investigator was Forman Williams, University of California, San Diego. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 mission (STS-83, April 4-8 1997; the shortened mission was reflown as MSL-1R on STS-94). Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (1.1 MB, 12-second MPEG, screen 320 x 240 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available)A still JPG composite of this movie is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300164.html.

2003-01-01

374

Droplet Combustion Experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Droplet Combustion Experiment (DCE) was designed to investigate the fundamental combustion aspects of single, isolated droplets under different pressures and ambient oxygen concentrations for a range of droplet sizes varying between 2 and 5 mm. The DCE principal investigator was Forman Williams, University of California, San Diego. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 mission (STS-83, April 4-8 1997; the shortened mission was reflown as MSL-1R on STS-94). Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (199KB JPEG, 1311 x 1477 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) The MPG from which this composite was made is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300165.html.

2003-01-01

375

Droplet Combustion Experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Droplet Combustion Experiment (DCE) was designed to investigate the fundamental combustion aspects of single, isolated droplets under different pressures and ambient oxygen concentrations for a range of droplet sizes varying between 2 and 5 mm. The DCE principal investigator was Forman Williams, University of California, San Diego. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (120KB JPEG, 655 x 736 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) The MPG from which this composite was made is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300167.html.

2003-01-01

376

Low Oxygen Tension Enhances Osteogenic Potential of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Osteonecrosis-Related Functional Impairment  

PubMed Central

Objective. Glucocorticoids can affect the function of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) adversely and merit the requirement for a strategy to correct this anomaly; we assessed the effect of low oxygen (2%) on BMMSCs from rabbits with osteonecrosis. Methods. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells from normal rabbits and rabbits with osteonecrosis were divided into four groups: (1) normal-normoxia group, with normal BMMSCs cultured under 20% oxygen; (2) osteonecrosis-normoxia group, with BMMSCs from rabbits with osteonecrosis cultured under 20% oxygen; (3) osteonecrosis-low oxygen treated group, with BMMSCs from rabbits with osteonecrosis cultured under 2% oxygen; (4) normal-low oxygen treated group, with normal BMMSCs cultured under 2% oxygen. The proliferation, osteogenic, and adipogenic differentiation of MSCs and expression of stemness genes, osteogenic, and adipogenic differentiation markers were investigated. Results. Compared with BMMSCs from normal rabbits, those from osteonecrosis rabbits showed significantly reduced proliferation ability, repressed expression of stemness genes, decreased osteoblasts formation, and increased adipocytes formation, indicating an osteonecrosis-related impairment. Low oxygen (2%) treated BMMSCs from osteonecrosis rabbits showed not only increased proliferation and osteogenic potential but also decreased adipogenic potential. Conclusion. Low oxygen (2%) culture represents a novel strategy to augment BMMSC function affected by glucocorticoids and holds significance for future strategies to treat femoral head osteonecrosis. PMID:25691905

Fan, Lihong; Liu, Ruiyu; Shi, Zhibin; Dang, Xiaoqian; Wang, Kunzheng

2015-01-01

377

The oxycoal process with cryogenic oxygen supply  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Due to its large reserves, coal is expected to continue to play an important role in the future. However, specific and absolute CO2 emissions are among the highest when burning coal for power generation. Therefore, the capture of CO2 from power plants may contribute significantly in reducing global CO2 emissions. This review deals with the oxyfuel process, where pure oxygen is used for burning coal, resulting in a flue gas with high CO2 concentrations. After further conditioning, the highly concentrated CO2 is compressed and transported in the liquid state to, for example, geological storages. The enormous oxygen demand is generated in an air-separation unit by a cryogenic process, which is the only available state-of-the-art technology. The generation of oxygen and the purification and liquefaction of the CO2-enriched flue gas consumes significant auxiliary power. Therefore, the overall net efficiency is expected to be lowered by 8 to 12 percentage points, corresponding to a 21 to 36% increase in fuel consumption. Oxygen combustion is associated with higher temperatures compared with conventional air combustion. Both the fuel properties as well as limitations of steam and metal temperatures of the various heat exchanger sections of the steam generator require a moderation of the temperatures during combustion and in the subsequent heat-transfer sections. This is done by means of flue gas recirculation. The interdependencies among fuel properties, the amount and the temperature of the recycled flue gas, and the resulting oxygen concentration in the combustion atmosphere are investigated. Expected effects of the modified flue gas composition in comparison with the air-fired case are studied theoretically and experimentally. The different atmosphere resulting from oxygen-fired combustion gives rise to various questions related to firing, in particular, with regard to the combustion mechanism, pollutant reduction, the risk of corrosion, and the properties of the fly ash or the deposits that form. In particular, detailed nitrogen and sulphur chemistry was investigated by combustion tests in a laboratory-scale facility. Oxidant staging, in order to reduce NO formation, turned out to work with similar effectiveness as for conventional air combustion. With regard to sulphur, a considerable increase in the SO2 concentration was found, as expected. However, the H2S concentration in the combustion atmosphere increased as well. Further results were achieved with a pilot-scale test facility, where acid dew points were measured and deposition probes were exposed to the combustion environment. Besides CO2 and water vapour, the flue gas contains impurities like sulphur species, nitrogen oxides, argon, nitrogen, and oxygen. The CO2 liquefaction is strongly affected by these impurities in terms of the auxiliary power requirement and the CO2 capture rate. Furthermore, the impurity of the liquefied CO2 is affected as well. Since the requirements on the liquid CO2 with regard to geological storage or enhanced oil recovery are currently undefined, the effects of possible flue gas treatment and the design of the liquefaction plant are studied over a wide range.

Kather, Alfons; Scheffknecht, Günter

2009-09-01

378

The oxycoal process with cryogenic oxygen supply.  

PubMed

Due to its large reserves, coal is expected to continue to play an important role in the future. However, specific and absolute CO2 emissions are among the highest when burning coal for power generation. Therefore, the capture of CO2 from power plants may contribute significantly in reducing global CO2 emissions. This review deals with the oxyfuel process, where pure oxygen is used for burning coal, resulting in a flue gas with high CO2 concentrations. After further conditioning, the highly concentrated CO2 is compressed and transported in the liquid state to, for example, geological storages. The enormous oxygen demand is generated in an air-separation unit by a cryogenic process, which is the only available state-of-the-art technology. The generation of oxygen and the purification and liquefaction of the CO2-enriched flue gas consumes significant auxiliary power. Therefore, the overall net efficiency is expected to be lowered by 8 to 12 percentage points, corresponding to a 21 to 36% increase in fuel consumption. Oxygen combustion is associated with higher temperatures compared with conventional air combustion. Both the fuel properties as well as limitations of steam and metal temperatures of the various heat exchanger sections of the steam generator require a moderation of the temperatures during combustion and in the subsequent heat-transfer sections. This is done by means of flue gas recirculation. The interdependencies among fuel properties, the amount and the temperature of the recycled flue gas, and the resulting oxygen concentration in the combustion atmosphere are investigated. Expected effects of the modified flue gas composition in comparison with the air-fired case are studied theoretically and experimentally. The different atmosphere resulting from oxygen-fired combustion gives rise to various questions related to firing, in particular, with regard to the combustion mechanism, pollutant reduction, the risk of corrosion, and the properties of the fly ash or the deposits that form. In particular, detailed nitrogen and sulphur chemistry was investigated by combustion tests in a laboratory-scale facility. Oxidant staging, in order to reduce NO formation, turned out to work with similar effectiveness as for conventional air combustion. With regard to sulphur, a considerable increase in the SO2 concentration was found, as expected. However, the H2S concentration in the combustion atmosphere increased as well. Further results were achieved with a pilot-scale test facility, where acid dew points were measured and deposition probes were exposed to the combustion environment. Besides CO2 and water vapour, the flue gas contains impurities like sulphur species, nitrogen oxides, argon, nitrogen, and oxygen. The CO2 liquefaction is strongly affected by these impurities in terms of the auxiliary power requirement and the CO2 capture rate. Furthermore, the impurity of the liquefied CO2 is affected as well. Since the requirements on the liquid CO2 with regard to geological storage or enhanced oil recovery are currently undefined, the effects of possible flue gas treatment and the design of the liquefaction plant are studied over a wide range. PMID:19495717

Kather, Alfons; Scheffknecht, Günter

2009-09-01

379

Synergistically enhanced activity of graphene quantum dot/multi-walled carbon nanotube composites as metal-free catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction.  

PubMed

Graphene quantum dots (GQDs), as metal-free carbon nanomaterials, have potential applications in electrochemical fields due to their strong chemical inertness, oxygen-rich functional groups and remarkable quantum confinement and edge effects. Herein, we demonstrate that a novel metal-free electrode composed of GQDs and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) exhibits a significant synergistic effect on enhanced catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Compared to commercially available Pt/C catalysts, enhanced electrocatalytic activity, improved long-term stability and excellent resistance to crossover effect were observed for the novel composite electrode. Interestingly, the amount of GQDs introduced is found to have an apparent effect on the positions of the reduction peaks of the electrodes. PMID:24477654

Zhou, Xuemei; Tian, Zhimin; Li, Jing; Ruan, Hong; Ma, Yuanyuan; Yang, Zhi; Qu, Yongquan

2014-03-01

380

Pyrolysis reactor and fluidized bed combustion chamber  

DOEpatents

A solid carbonaceous material is pyrolyzed in a descending flow pyrolysis reactor in the presence of a particulate source of heat to yield a particulate carbon containing solid residue. The particulate source of heat is obtained by educting with a gaseous source of oxygen the particulate carbon containing solid residue from a fluidized bed into a first combustion zone coupled to a second combustion zone. A source of oxygen is introduced into the second combustion zone to oxidize carbon monoxide formed in the first combustion zone to heat the solid residue to the temperature of the particulate source of heat.

Green, Norman W. (Upland, CA)

1981-01-06

381

Unraveling the enhanced photocatalytic activity and phototoxicity of ZnO/metal hybrid nanostructures from generation of reactive oxygen species and charge carriers.  

PubMed

An effective way for promoting photocatalytic activity of a semiconductor is deposition of noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) onto it. In this paper, we deposited Ag and Pd onto ZnO NPs to form ZnO/Ag and ZnO/Pd hybrid nanostructures. It was found that both Ag and Pd nanocomponents can greatly enhance the photocatalytic activity and phototoxicity of ZnO toward human skin cells. Using electron spin resonance spectroscopy with spin trapping and spin labeling techniques, we observed that either deposition of Ag or Pd resulted in a significant increase in photogenerated electrons and holes and production of reactive oxygen species including hydroxyl radicals, superoxide, and singlet oxygen. We compared the enhancing effects of Ag and Pd and found that Pd is more effective than Ag in promoting the generation of hydroxyl radicals and holes and the photocatalytic activity of ZnO. Conversely, Ag is more effective than Pd in enhancing electron transfer and the generation of superoxide and singlet oxygen. The mechanism underlying the differences in the effects of Ag and Pd may be related to differences in Fermi levels for Ag and Pd and band bending accompanied by effects on Schottky barriers. The results of these studies provide information valuable for designing hybrid nanomaterials having photocatalytic and photobiological activities useful for applications such as water purification and formulation of antibacterial products. PMID:25116236

He, Weiwei; Wu, Haohao; Wamer, Wayne G; Kim, Hyun-Kyung; Zheng, Jiwen; Jia, Huimin; Zheng, Zhi; Yin, Jun-Jie

2014-09-10

382

Combustion processes for carbon capture  

Microsoft Academic Search

A review of the technologies for coal-based power generation closest to commercial application involving carbon capture is presented. Carbon capture and storage (CCS) developments are primarily adaptations of conventional combustion systems, with additional unit operations such as bulk oxygen supply, CO2 capture by sorbents, CO2 compression, and storage. They use pulverized coal combustion in entrained flow—the dominant current technology for

Terry F. Wall

2007-01-01

383

Summary of Simplified Two Time Step Method for Calculating Combustion Rates and Nitrogen Oxide Emissions for Hydrogen/Air and Hydrogen/Oxygen  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A simplified single rate expression for hydrogen combustion and nitrogen oxide production was developed. Detailed kinetics are predicted for the chemical kinetic times using the complete chemical mechanism over the entire operating space. These times are then correlated to the reactor conditions using an exponential fit. Simple first order reaction expressions are then used to find the conversion in the reactor. The method uses a two time step kinetic scheme. The first time averaged step is used at the initial times with smaller water concentrations. This gives the average chemical kinetic time as a function of initial overall fuel air ratio, temperature, and pressure. The second instantaneous step is used at higher water concentrations (greater than l x 10(exp -20)) moles per cc) in the mixture which gives the chemical kinetic time as a function of the instantaneous fuel and water mole concentrations, pressure and temperature (T(sub 4)). The simple correlations are then compared to the turbulent mixing times to determine the limiting properties of the reaction. The NASA Glenn GLSENS kinetics code calculates the reaction rates and rate constants for each species in a kinetic scheme for finite kinetic rates. These reaction rates are used to calculate the necessary chemical kinetic times. This time is regressed over the complete initial conditions using the Excel regression routine. Chemical kinetic time equations for H2 and NOx are obtained for H2/Air fuel and for H2/O2. A similar correlation is also developed using data from NASA's Chemical Equilibrium Applications (CEA) code to determine the equilibrium temperature (T(sub 4)) as a function of overall fuel/air ratio, pressure and initial temperature (T(sub 3)). High values of the regression coefficient R squared are obtained.

Marek, C. John; Molnar, Melissa

2005-01-01

384

Simplified Two-Time Step Method for Calculating Combustion Rates and Nitrogen Oxide Emissions for Hydrogen/Air and Hydorgen/Oxygen  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A simplified single rate expression for hydrogen combustion and nitrogen oxide production was developed. Detailed kinetics are predicted for the chemical kinetic times using the complete chemical mechanism over the entire operating space. These times are then correlated to the reactor conditions using an exponential fit. Simple first order reaction expressions are then used to find the conversion in the reactor. The method uses a two-time step kinetic scheme. The first time averaged step is used at the initial times with smaller water concentrations. This gives the average chemical kinetic time as a function of initial overall fuel air ratio, temperature, and pressure. The second instantaneous step is used at higher water concentrations (> 1 x 10(exp -20) moles/cc) in the mixture which gives the chemical kinetic time as a function of the instantaneous fuel and water mole concentrations, pressure and temperature (T4). The simple correlations are then compared to the turbulent mixing times to determine the limiting properties of the reaction. The NASA Glenn GLSENS kinetics code calculates the reaction rates and rate constants for each species in a kinetic scheme for finite kinetic rates. These reaction rates are used to calculate the necessary chemical kinetic times. This time is regressed over the complete initial conditions using the Excel regression routine. Chemical kinetic time equations for H2 and NOx are obtained for H2/air fuel and for the H2/O2. A similar correlation is also developed using data from NASA s Chemical Equilibrium Applications (CEA) code to determine the equilibrium temperature (T4) as a function of overall fuel/air ratio, pressure and initial temperature (T3). High values of the regression coefficient R2 are obtained.

Molnar, Melissa; Marek, C. John

2005-01-01

385

Effect of Hydrologic and Geochemical Conditions on Oxygen-Enhanced Bioremediation in a Gasoline-Contaminated Aquifer  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The effect of pre-existing factors, e.g., hydrologic, geochemical, and microbiological properties, on the results of oxygen addition to a reformulated gasoline-contaminated groundwater system was studied. Oxygen addition with an oxygen-release compound (a proprietary form of magnesium peroxide produced different results with respect to dissolved oxygen (DO) generation and contaminant decrease in the two locations. Oxygen-release compound injected at the former UST source area did not significantly change measured concentrations of DO, benzene, toluene, or MTBE. Conversely, oxygen-release compound injected 200 m downgradient of the former UST source area rapidly increased DO levels, and benzene, toluene, and MTBE concentrations decreased substantially. The different results could be related to differences in hydrologic and geochemical conditions that characterized the two locations prior to oxygen addition. The lack of recharge to ground water in the paved UST source area led to a much larger geochemical sink for DO compared to ground water in the unpaved area.

Landmeyer, J.E.; Bradley, P.M.

2003-01-01

386

Enhanced growth and recombinant protein production of Escherichia coli by a perfluorinated oxygen carrier in miniaturized fed-batch cultures  

PubMed Central

Background Liquid perfluorochemicals (PFCs) are interesting oxygen carriers in medicine and biotechnology with a high solubility for oxygen. They have been repeatedly used for improving oxygen transfer into prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell cultures, however their application is still limited. Here we show the great benefit of air/oxygen saturated perfluorodecalin (PFD) for high cell density cultivation of Escherichia coli in microwell plates and their positive effect on the soluble production of a correctly folded heterologously expressed alcohol dehydrogenase. Results In EnBase® cultivations the best effect was seen with PFD saturated with oxygen enriched air (appr. 10 ?M oxygen per ml) when PFD was added at the time of induction. In contrast the effect of PFD was negligible when it was added already at the time of inoculation. Optimisation of addition time and content of loaded oxygen into the PFD resulted in an increased the cell density by 40% compared to control cultures, and correspondingly also the product yield increased, demonstrated at the example of a recombinant alcohol dehydrogenase. Conclusions PFCs are a valuable additive in miniaturized cell culture formats. For production of recombinant proteins in low cell density shaken cultures the addition of oxygen-enriched PFD makes the process more robust, i.e. a high product yield is not any more limited to a very narrow cell density window during which the induction has to be done. The positive effect of PFD was even more obvious when it was added during high cell density cultures. The effect of the PFD phase depends on the amount of oxygen which is loaded into the PFD and which thus is a matter of optimisation. PMID:21708024

2011-01-01

387

Thermal Model of the Promoted Combustion Test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Flammability of metals in high pressure, pure oxygen environments, such as rocket engine turbopumps, is commonly evaluated using the Promoted Combustion Test (PCT). The PCT emphasizes the ability of an ignited material to sustain combustion, as opposed to evaluating the sample's propensity to ignite in the first place. A common arrangement is a rod of the sample material hanging in a chamber in which a high pressure, pure oxygen environment is maintained. An igniter of some energetically combusting material is fixed to the bottom of the rod and fired. This initiates combustion, and the sample burns and melts at its bottom tip. A ball of molten material forms, and this ball detaches when it grows too large to be supported by surface tension with the rod. In materials which do not sustain combustion, the combustion then extinguishes. In materials which do sustain combustion, combustion re-initiates from molten residue left on the bottom of the rod, and the melt ball burns and grows until it detaches again. The purpose of this work is development of a PCT thermal simulation model, detailing phase change, melt detachment, and the several heat transfer modes. Combustion is modeled by a summary rate equation, whose parameters are identified by comparison to PCT results. The sensitivity of PCT results to various physical and geometrical parameters is evaluated. The identified combustion parameters may be used in design of new PCT arrangements, as might be used for flammability assessment in flow-dominated environments. The Haynes 214 nickel-based superalloy, whose PCT results are applied here, burns heterogeneously (fuel and oxidizer are of different phases; combustion takes place on the fuel surface). Heterogeneous combustion is not well understood. (In homogeneous combustion, the metal vaporizes, and combustion takes place in an analytically treatable cloud above the surface). Thermal modeling in heterogeneous combustion settings provides a means for linking test results more directly to detailed combustion mechanics, leading to improved data analysis, and improved understanding of heterogeneous combustion phenomena.

Jones, Peter D.

1996-01-01

388

Coencapsulation of oxygen carriers and glucose oxidase in polyelectrolyte complex capsules for the enhancement of D-gluconic acid and delta-gluconolactone production.  

PubMed

A novel encapsulated oxidative biocatalyst comprising glucose oxidase (GOD) coencapsulated with oxygen carriers within polyelectrolyte complex capsules was developed for the production of D-gluconic acid and delta-gluconolactone. The capsules containing immobilized GOD were produced by polyelectrolyte complexation with sodium alginate (SA) and cellulose sulfate (CS) as polyanions, poly(methylene-co-guanidine) (PMCG) as the polycation, CaCl(2) as the gelling agent and NaCl as the antigelling agent (GOD-SA-CS/PMCG capsules). Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) and an emulsion of n-dodecane (DOD) or perfluorodecaline (PFD) with PDMS were used as the oxygen carriers and MnO(2) was used as a hydrogen peroxide decomposition catalyst. Water-soluble PDMS was found to act as both an oxygen carrier and an emulsifier of water-insoluble DOD and PFD. Stable microcapsules could be produced with concentrations of up to 4% (w/w) of PDMS, 10% (w/w) of DOD and PFD, and 25% (w/w) of MnO(2) in the polyanion solution of SA and CS. Roughly a two-fold increase in the GOD activity from 21.0+/-1.1 to 38.4+/-2.0 U*g(-1) and product space-time yields (STY) from 44.3+/-2.0 to 83.4+/-3.4 g*H*day(-1) could be achieved utilizing coencapsulated oxygen carriers compared to GOD encapsulated in the absence of oxygen carriers. This enhanced production does not significantly depend on the selected oxygen carrier under the conditions used in this study. PMID:20222845

Bucko, Marek; Gemeiner, Peter; Vikartovská, Alica; Mislovicová, Danica; Lacík, Igor; Tkác, Ján

2010-04-01

389

Modeling of Laser-Induced Metal Combustion  

SciTech Connect

Experiments involving the interaction of a high-power laser beam with metal targets demonstrate that combustion plays an important role. This process depends on reactions within an oxide layer, together with oxygenation and removal of this layer by the wind. We present an analytical model of laser-induced combustion. The model predicts the threshold for initiation of combustion, the growth of the combustion layer with time, and the threshold for self-supported combustion. Solutions are compared with detailed numerical modeling as benchmarked by laboratory experiments.

Boley, C D; Rubenchik, A M

2008-02-20

390

FORMATION AND CONTROL OF PRODUCTS OF INCOMPLETE COMBUSTION  

EPA Science Inventory

Oxygenated organic products of incomplete combustion, including oxygenated PAHs and phthalates, have been found in combustor emissions. Some have substantial health effects and significantly influence the risk assessment calculations. Others are found that may or may not be a...

391

Hybrid membrane--PSA system for separating oxygen from air  

DOEpatents

A portable, non-cryogenic, oxygen generation system capable of delivering oxygen gas at purities greater than 98% and flow rates of 15 L/min or more is described. The system consists of two major components. The first component is a high efficiency membrane capable of separating argon and a portion of the nitrogen content from air, yielding an oxygen-enriched permeate flow. This is then fed to the second component, a pressure swing adsorption (PSA) unit utilizing a commercially available, but specifically formulated zeolite compound to remove the remainder of the nitrogen from the flow. The system is a unique gas separation system that can operate at ambient temperatures, for producing high purity oxygen for various applications (medical, refining, chemical production, enhanced combustion, fuel cells, etc . . . ) and represents a significant advance compared to current technologies.

Staiger, Chad L. (Albuquerque, NM); Vaughn, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM); Miller, A. Keith (Albuquerque, NM); Cornelius, Christopher J. (Blackburg, VA)

2011-01-25

392

Polyoxometalate-Enhanced Oxidation of Organic Compounds by Nanoparticulate Zero-Valent Iron and Ferrous Ion in the Presence of Oxygen  

PubMed Central

In the presence of oxygen, organic compounds can be oxidized by zero-valent iron or dissolved Fe(II). However, this process is not a very effective means of degrading contaminants because the yields of oxidants are usually low (i.e., typically less than 5% of the iron added is converted into oxidants capable of transforming organic compounds). The addition of polyoxometalate (POM) greatly increases the yield of oxidants in both systems. The mechanism of POM enhancement depends on solution pH. Under acidic conditions, POM-mediates the electron transfer from nanoparticulate zero-valent iron (nZVI) or Fe(II) to oxygen, increasing the production of hydrogen peroxide, which is subsequently converted to hydroxyl radical through the Fenton reaction. At neutral pH values, iron forms a complex with POM, preventing iron precipitation on the nZVI surface and in bulk solution. At pH 7, the yield of oxidant approaches the theoretical maximum in the nZVI/O2 and the Fe(II)/O2 systems when POM is present, suggesting that coordination of iron by POM alters the mechanism of the Fenton reaction by converting the active oxidant from ferryl ion to hydroxyl radical. Comparable enhancements in oxidant yields are also observed when nZVI or Fe(II) are exposed to oxygen in the presence of silica-immobilized POM. PMID:18678027

Lee, Changha; Keenan, Christina R.; Sedlak, David L.

2008-01-01

393

The oxygen sensitivity/compatibility ranking of several materials by different test methods  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Eleven materials were evaluated for oxygen compatibility using the following test methods: heat of combustion (ASTM D 2015), liquid oxygen impact (ASTM D 2512), pneumatic impact (ASTM G 74), gaseous mechanical impact (ASTM G 86), autogenous ignition temperature by pressurized differential scanning calorimeter, and the determination of the 50 percent reaction level in liquid oxygen using silicon carbide as a reaction enhancer. The eleven materials evaluated were: Teflon TFE, Vespel SP-21, Krytox 240AC, Viton PLV5010B, Fluorel E2160, Kel F 81, Fluorogold, Fluorogreen E-600, Rulon A, Garlock 8573, nylon 6/6.

Lockhart, Billy J.; Bryan, Coleman J.; Hampton, Michael D.

1989-01-01

394

Low-temperature liquid phase reduced TiO2 nanotube arrays: synergy of morphology manipulation and oxygen vacancy doping for enhancement of field emission.  

PubMed

The partially reduced TiO2 nanotube arrays (TNAs) are prepared via an uncomplicated and low-cost liquid phase reduction strategy using NaBH4 as the reducing agent. By controlling and adjusting the reduction temperatures from 30 to 90 °C, the reduction treatment can not only change their surface morphology but also introduce oxygen vacancies into them, resulting in an optimized morphology, elevated Fermi-level, reduced effective work function and improved conductivity of the TNAs. Meanwhile, the thermal and long-term stability of oxygen vacancy are also investigated, indicating that the oxygen vacancies retain long-term stability from room temperature up to 150 °C. More interesting, partially reduced TNAs show drastically enhanced field emission (FE) performances including substantially decreased turn-on field from 18.86 to 1.53 V ?m(-1), a high current density of 4.00 mA cm(-2) at 4.52 V ?m(-1), and an excellent FE stability and repeatability. These very promising results are attributed to the combination of the optimized morphology and introduced oxygen vacancies, which can increase FE sites, reduce effective work function and increase conductivity. PMID:25850954

Zhang, Xu-Qiang; Chen, Jian-Biao; Wang, Cheng-Wei; Liao, Ai-Zhen; Su, Xiao-Feng

2015-05-01

395

Non-equilibrium Plasma-Assisted Combustion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As a promising method to enhance combustion, plasma-assisted combustion has drawn considerable attention. Due to the fast electron impact excitation and dissociation of molecules at low temperatures, plasma introduces new reaction pathways, changes fuel oxidation timescales, and can dramatically modify the combustion processes. In this dissertation, the radical generation from the plasma and its effect on flame extinction and ignition were investigated experimentally together with detailed numerical simulation on a counterflow CH4 diffusion flame. It was found that the atomic oxygen production played a dominant role in enhancing the chain-branching reaction pathways and accelerating fuel oxidation at near limit flame conditions. To understand the direct coupling effect between plasma and flame, a novel plasma-assisted combustion system with in situ discharge in a counterflow diffusion flame was developed. The ignition and extinction characteristics of CH4/O 2/He diffusion flames were investigated. For the first time, it was demonstrated that the strong plasma-flame coupling in in situ discharge could significantly modify the ignition/extinction characteristics and create a new fully stretched ignition S-curve. To understand low temperature kinetics of combustion, it is critical to measure the formation and decomposition of H2O2. A molecular beam mass spectrometry (MBMS) system was developed and integrated with a laminar flow reactor. H2O2 measurements were directly calibrated, and compared to kinetic models. The results confirmed that low and intermediate temperature DME oxidation produced significant amounts of H2O2. The experimental characterizations of important intermediate species including H2O2, CH2O and CH3OCHO provided new capabilities to investigate and improve the chemical kinetics especially at low temperatures. A numerical scheme for model reduction was developed to improve the computational efficiency in the simulation of combustion with detailed kinetics. A multi-generation Path Flux Analysis (PFA) method for kinetic mechanism reduction is proposed and validated. In this method, the formation and consumption fluxes of each species at multiple reaction path generations were analyzed and used to identify the important reaction pathways. The comparisons of the ignition delays, flame speeds, and flame structures showed that the PFA method presented a higher accuracy than that of current existing methods in a broad range of initial pressures and temperatures.

Sun, Wenting

396

Combustion Physics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses how physics is used to improve the efficiency of combustion, pointing out that the interdisciplinary topic has applications to problems of real industrial relevance and practical value. (JN)

Jones, A. R.

1985-01-01

397

Combustion & Health  

E-print Network

) ? Combustion of fossil fuels for ? Electricity ? Industrial processes ? Vehicle propulsion ? Cooking and heat ? Other ? Munitions ? Fireworks ? Light ? Cigarettes, hookahs? FFCOMBUSTION & HEALTH FFCOMBUSTION: THE THREAT ? SCALE (think health... for public health and strategies to reduce GHG ? Reduce CO2 emissions by 50% by 2030 ? Reduction in PM2.5 deaths greatly offset costs in all models FFCOMBUSTION & HEALTH FFCOMBUSTION: PM EXPOSURE ? Combustion is source of most concern ? Health...

Hamilton, W.

2012-01-01

398

Enhanced Kosterlitz-Thouless Transitions in Yttrium BARIUM(2) COPPER(3) OXYGEN(7-X)/PRASEODYMIUM BARIUM(2) COPPER(3) OXYGEN(7-X) Superlattices  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The superconducting properties of YBa _2Cu_3O_ {7-x}/PrBa_2Cu _3O_{7-x} superlattices with ultrathin YBa_2 Cu_3O_{7 -x} layers were studied. The superlattices were multilayered films grown epitaxially on (100) SrTiO_3 and LaAlO_3 substrates by pulsed-laser deposition. They were characterized by several methods and found to have good structural and electrical characteristics. Strongly enhanced Kosterlitz-Thouless transitions were observed in the multilayers composed of two and four unit cells of YBa_2Cu_3 O_{7-x}, separated by insulating PrBa_2Cu_3 O_{7-x}. The parameter tau_{KT} = (T_{co} - T_{KT})/ T_{co} was up to an order of magnitude larger than in single crystals or in thicker films of YBa_2Cu _3O_{7-x}, showing that two-dimensional behavior is more closely approached in the multilayers. Here T_{co} is the mean-field transition temperature and T_{KT} is the Kosterlitz-Thouless transition temperature. Our results confirm that the enhancement of two -dimensionality is accompanied by a lowering of T _{co} in the ultrathin layers of YBa_2Cu_3 O_{7-x}. We interpret this as direct evidence that interlayer coupling is essential for the higher transition temperature observed in the bulk.

Vadlamannati, Sharma S.

1991-02-01

399

Collect Oxygen Over Water  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners use a pneumatic trough (see related activity) to generate and collect pure oxygen. Learners will test to see if they've generated oxygen by observing the combustion of elemental sulfur, which yields a brilliant blue flame of sulfur oxidation. The manganese dioxide catalyst used in this process is easily recovered from a spent zinc-carbon battery (see related activity).

2014-10-03

400

Activation and enhancement of room-temperature ferromagnetism in Cu-doped anatase TiO? films by bound magnetic polaron and oxygen defects.  

PubMed

Cu-doped anatase TiO2 films grown by magnetron sputtering at room temperature showed the unexpected observation of room-temperature ferromagnetism, which was enhanced or destroyed corresponding to low or high impurity concentration via vacuum annealing. On the basis of the analysis of composition and structure, the most important factor for activating ferromagnetism can be identified as the creation of grain boundary defects. In addition, oxygen defects can be the dominating factor for increasing the saturation moment of the 0.19 at. % Cu-doped TiO2 film from 0.564 to 26.41 emu/cm(3). These results help elucidate the origin of ferromagnetism and emphasize the role of oxygen defects for the application of ferromagnetic films. PMID:25437752

Zheng, Jian-Yun; Bao, Shan-Hu; Lv, Yan-Hong; Jin, Ping

2014-12-24

401

Strategies to overcome oxygen transfer limitations during hairy root cultivation of Azadiracta indica for enhanced azadirachtin production.  

PubMed

The vast untapped potential of hairy root cultures as a stable source of biologically active chemicals has focused the attention of scientific community toward its commercial exploitation. However, the major bottleneck remains its successful scale-up. Due to branching, the roots form an interlocked matrix that exhibits resistance to oxygen transfer. Thus, present work was undertaken to develop cultivation strategies like optimization of inlet gas composition (in terms of % (v/v) O(2) in air), air-flow rate and addition of oxygen vectors in the medium, to curb the oxygen transfer limitations during hairy root cultivation of Azadirachta indica for in vitro azadirachtin (a biopesticide) production. It was found that increasing the oxygen fraction in the inlet air (in the range, 20-100% (v/v) O(2) in air) increased the azadirachtin productivity by approximately threefold, to a maximum of 4.42 mg/L per day (at 100% (v/v) O(2) in air) with respect to 1.68 mg/L per day in control (air with no oxygen supplementation). Similarly, increasing the air-flow rate (in the range, 0.3-2 vvm) also increased the azadirachtin productivity to a maximum of 1.84 mg/L per day at 0.8 vvm of air-flow rate. On the contrary, addition of oxygen vectors (in the range, 1-4% (v/v); hydrogen peroxide, toluene, Tween 80, kerosene, silicone oil, and n-hexadecane), decreased the azadirachtin productivity with respect to control (1.76 mg/L per day). PMID:22246729

Srivastava, Smita; Srivastava, Ashok Kumar

2012-07-01

402

Influence of oxygen content of room temperature TiO2-x deposited films for enhanced resistive switching memory performance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work, we demonstrate that TiO2-x based Resistive Random Access Memory devices can function without an initial electroforming process and a wide range of switching ratios could be achieved by controlling the oxygen content, the compliance current, the sweep bias amplitude, and the width of the voltage pulse applied on the memory cell. The influence of deposition ambient and more particularly of oxygen flux during thin film sputtering at room temperature to the resistive properties of titanium oxide will be discussed in detail. By controlling the density of oxygen vacancies into the dielectric matrix, we can also improve the repeatability and the operation of the device, in terms of distribution of the SET/RESET voltages. We propose that ultra high density of vacancies deteriorate the switching phenomenon, whereas high vacancy density results in better switching behavior. Moreover, we conclude that the oxygen vacancies density and distribution have a direct impact on the conducting filament diameter, in terms of sensitivity of the conducting paths (high OFF/ON ratio). By increasing the oxygen content, we reduce the size of vacancy based filaments, resulting in a more stable operation of our device. In addition, manipulation of population of oxygen ions into the Ti top electrode enables the creation of multilevel switching states. Switching speed, endurance, and retention performance reveals the excellent functionality of our device as a non-volatile memory element and conduction mechanism analysis demonstrates the manifestation of Poole-Frenkel emission in conjunction with trap-assisted tunneling, which is also deployed in order to interpret the gradual increase of current during SET process.

Bousoulas, P.; Michelakaki, I.; Tsoukalas, D.

2014-01-01

403

Oxy Coal Combustion at the US EPA  

EPA Science Inventory

Oxygen enriched coal (oxy-coal) combustion is a developing, and potentially a strategically key technology intended to accommodate direct CO2 recovery and sequestration. Oxy-coal combustion is also intended for retrofit application to existing power plants. During oxy-coal comb...

404

Apparatus for monitoring low level combustibles  

Microsoft Academic Search

An improved safety system for a coal pulverizing mill based on the detection of carbon monoxide and other combustible gases as an indication of fire in the mill in advance of an oxygen measurement for detecting such fires comprising: means for determining the level of carbon monoxide and other combustible gases in the coal pulverizing mill and establishing a signal

S. Y. Jewett; J. W. Jr. Robertson; G. D. Woolbert

1988-01-01

405